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Sample records for early radiation-induced hypoplasia

  1. Effect of ozone oxidative preconditioning in preventing early radiation-induced lung injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Bakkal, B.H.; Gultekin, F.A.; Guven, B.; Turkcu, U.O.; Bektas, S.; Can, M.

    2013-01-01

    Ionizing radiation causes its biological effects mainly through oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species. Previous studies showed that ozone oxidative preconditioning attenuated pathophysiological events mediated by reactive oxygen species. As inhalation of ozone induces lung injury, the aim of this study was to examine whether ozone oxidative preconditioning potentiates or attenuates the effects of irradiation on the lung. Rats were subjected to total body irradiation, with or without treatment with ozone oxidative preconditioning (0.72 mg/kg). Serum proinflammatory cytokine levels, oxidative damage markers, and histopathological analysis were compared at 6 and 72 h after total body irradiation. Irradiation significantly increased lung malondialdehyde levels as an end-product of lipoperoxidation. Irradiation also significantly decreased lung superoxide dismutase activity, which is an indicator of the generation of oxidative stress and an early protective response to oxidative damage. Ozone oxidative preconditioning plus irradiation significantly decreased malondialdehyde levels and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, which might indicate protection of the lung from radiation-induced lung injury. Serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta levels, which increased significantly following total body irradiation, were decreased with ozone oxidative preconditioning. Moreover, ozone oxidative preconditioning was able to ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury assessed by histopathological evaluation. In conclusion, ozone oxidative preconditioning, repeated low-dose intraperitoneal administration of ozone, did not exacerbate radiation-induced lung injury, and, on the contrary, it provided protection against radiation-induced lung damage. PMID:23969972

  2. Hypoplasia-associated Severe Early Childhood Caries – A Proposed Definition

    PubMed Central

    Caufield, P.W.; Li, Y.; Bromage, T.G.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new classification of severe early childhood caries (S-ECC): hypoplasia-associated severe early childhood caries (HAS-ECC). This form of caries affects mostly young children living at or below poverty, characterized by structurally damaged primary teeth that are particularly vulnerable to dental caries. These predisposing developmental dental defects are mainly permutations of enamel hypoplasia (EHP). Anthropologists and dental researchers consider EHP an indicator for infant and maternal stresses including malnutrition, a variety of illnesses, and adverse birthing conditions. Differentiation of HAS-ECC from other forms of early childhood caries is warranted because of its distinct etiology, clinical presentation, and eventual management. Defining HAS-ECC has important clinical implications: Therapies that control or prevent other types of caries are likely to be less effective with HAS-ECC because the structural integrity of the teeth is compromised prior to their emergence into the oral cavity. By the time these children present to the dentist, the treatment options often become limited to surgical management under general anesthesia. To prevent HAS-ECC, dentists must partner with other health providers to develop interventions that begin with pregnant mothers, with the aim of eliminating or ameliorating the covariates accompanying poverty, including better pre- and post-natal care and nutrition. PMID:22529242

  3. Serum microRNAs are early indicators of survival after radiation-induced hematopoietic injury

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Sanket S.; Fendler, Wojciech; Watson, Jacqueline; Hamilton, Abigail; Pan, Yunfeng; Gaudiano, Emily; Moskwa, Patryk; Bhanja, Payel; Saha, Subhrajit; Guha, Chandan; Parmar, Kalindi; Chowdhury, Dipanjan

    2015-01-01

    Accidental radiation exposure is a threat to human health that necessitates effective clinical planning and diagnosis. Minimally invasive biomarkers that can predict long-term radiation injury are urgently needed for optimal management after a radiation accident. We have identified serum microRNA (miRNA) signatures that indicate long-term impact of total body irradiation (TBI) in mice when measured within 24 hours of exposure. Impact of TBI on the hematopoietic system was systematically assessed to determine a correlation of residual hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with increasing doses of radiation. Serum miRNA signatures distinguished untreated mice from animals exposed to radiation and correlated with the impact of radiation on HSCs. Mice exposed to sublethal (6.5 Gy) and lethal (8 Gy) doses of radiation were indistinguishable for 3 to 4 weeks after exposure. A serum miRNA signature detectable 24 hours after radiation exposure consistently segregated these two cohorts. Furthermore, using either a radioprotective agent before, or radiation mitigation after, lethal radiation, we determined that the serum miRNA signature correlated with the impact of radiation on animal health rather than the radiation dose. Last, using humanized mice that had been engrafted with human CD34+ HSCs, we determined that the serum miRNA signature indicated radiation-induced injury to the human bone marrow cells. Our data suggest that serum miRNAs can serve as functional dosimeters of radiation, representing a potential breakthrough in early assessment of radiation-induced hematopoietic damage and timely use of medical countermeasures to mitigate the long-term impact of radiation. PMID:25972001

  4. Risedronate Prevents Early Radiation-Induced Osteoporosis in Mice at Multiple Skeletal Locations

    PubMed Central

    Willey, Jeffrey S.; Livingston, Eric W.; Robbins, Michael E.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Tirado-Lee, Leidamarie; Smith-Sielicki, Hope; Bateman, Ted A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Irradiation of normal, non-malignant bone during cancer therapy can lead to atrophy and increased risk of fracture at several skeletal sites, particularly the hip. This bone loss has been largely attributed to damaged osteoblasts. Little attention has been given to increased bone resorption as a contributor to radiation-induced osteoporosis. Our aims were to identify if radiation increases bone resorption resulting in acute bone loss, and if bone loss could be prevented by administering risedronate. Methods Twenty-week old female C57BL/6 mice were either: not irradiated and treated with placebo (NR+PL); whole-body irradiated with 2 Gy X-rays and treated with placebo (IR+PL); or irradiated and treated with risedronate (IR+RIS; 30μg/kg every other day). Calcein injections were administered 7 and 2 days before sacrifice. Bones were collected 1, 2, and 3 weeks after exposure. MicroCT analysis was performed at 3 sites: proximal tibial metaphysis; distal femoral metaphysis; and the body of the 5th lumbar vertebra (L5). Osteoclasts were identified from TRAP-stained histological sections. Dynamic histomorphometry of cortical and trabecular bone was performed. Circulating TRAP5b and osteocalcin concentrations were quantified. Results In animals receiving IR+PL, significant (P < 0.05) reduction in trabecular volume fraction relative to non-irradiated controls was observed at all three skeletal sites and time points. Likewise, radiation-induced loss of connectivity and trabecular number relative to NR+PL were observed at all skeletal sites throughout the study. Bone loss primarily occurred during the first week post-exposure. Trabecular and endocortical bone formation was not reduced until Week 2. Loss of bone volume was absent in animals receiving IR+RIS. Histology indicated greater osteoclast numbers at Week 1 within IR+PL mice. Serum TRAP5b concentration was increased in IR+PL mice only at Week 1 compared to NR+PL (P = 0.05). Risedronate treatment prevented

  5. Expression of Iroquois genes is up-regulated during early lung development in the nitrofen-induced pulmonary hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Doi, Takashi; Lukošiūtė, Aušra; Ruttenstock, Elke; Dingemann, Jens; Puri, Prem

    2011-01-01

    Iroquois homeobox (Irx) genes have been implicated in the early lung morphogenesis of vertebrates. Irx1-3 and Irx5 gene expression is seen in fetal lung in rodents up to day (D) 18.5 of gestation. Fetal lung in Irx knockdown mice shows loss of mesenchyme and dilated airspaces, whereas nitrofen-induced hypoplastic lung displays thickened mesenchyme and diminished airspaces. We hypothesized that the Irx genes are up-regulated during early lung morphogenesis in the nitrofen-induced hypoplastic lung. Pregnant rats were exposed either to olive oil or nitrofen on D9. Fetal lungs harvested on D15 were divided into control and nitrofen groups; and the lungs harvested on D18 were divided into control, nitrofen without congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH[-]), and nitrofen with CDH (CDH[+]). Irx gene expression levels were analyzed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate protein expression of Irx family. Pulmonary Irx1-3 and Irx5 messenger RNA expression levels were significantly up-regulated in nitrofen group compared with controls at D15. On D15, Irx immunoreactivity was increased in nitrofen-induced hypoplastic lung compared with controls. Overexpression of Irx genes in the early lung development may cause pulmonary hypoplasia in the nitrofen CDH model by inducing lung dysmorphogenesis with thickened mesenchyme and diminished airspaces. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Antenatal vitamin A administration attenuates lung hypoplasia by interfering with early instead of late determinants of lung underdevelopment in congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Maria J; Melo-Rocha, Gustavo; Pedrosa, Carla; Gonzaga, Sílvia; Teles, Antónia; Estevão-Costa, José; Areias, José C; Flake, Alan W; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F; Correia-Pinto, Jorge

    2005-04-01

    Early and late lung underdevelopment in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is likely caused by nonmechanical (directly mediated by nitrofen) and mechanical (mediated by thoracic herniation) factors, respectively. The authors investigated if vitamin A enhances lung growth because of effects on both early and late determinants of lung hypoplasia. Twenty-seven pregnant Wistar rats were exposed on embryonic day (E)9.5 to 100 mg of nitrofen or just olive oil. From nitrofen-exposed pregnant rats, 12 were treated at day 9.5 or 18.5 with 15,000 IU of vitamin A. Lungs were harvested at E18, E20, and E22, weighed, and analyzed for DNA and protein contents. Left and/or right lung hypoplasia was estimated by assessment of the ratios of lung to body weight and left to right lung weight. Fetuses were assigned to 5 experimental groups: baseline (exposed neither to nitrofen nor vitamin A), nitrofen (exposed to nitrofen without CDH), CDH (exposed to nitrofen with CDH), nitr+vitA (exposed to nitrofen without CDH and treated with vitamin A), and CDH+vitA (exposed to nitrofen with CDH and treated with vitamin A). Incidence of hernia was significantly reduced in fetuses treated with vitamin A. When vitamin A was administered at E9.5, the authors observed similar effect on lung hypoplasia measured through ratio of lung to body weight at E18 in the nitrofen and CDH groups (nitrofen 1.92% +/- 0.05%, CDH 1.92% +/- 0.04%), whereas lung hypoplasia was attenuated relative to baseline (2.45% +/- 0.05%) in 5% and 4% in nitrofen (nitr+vitA 2.05% +/- 0.03%) and CDH (CDH+vitA 2.08% +/- 0.04%) groups, respectively. At E20, lung hypoplasia was increased in CDH compared with nitrofen groups (nitrofen 2.52% +/- 0.1%, CDH 2.39% +/- 0.05%), whereas vitamin A attenuated lung hypoplasia, in relation to baseline (3.20% +/- 0.07%), 14% in both nitrofen-exposed groups (nitr+vitA 2.96% +/- 0.03%, CDH+vitA 2.83% +/- 0.03%). At E22, lung hypoplasia was significantly higher in CDH group than nitrofen group

  7. Spectrum of PORCN mutations in Focal Dermal Hypoplasia

    Focal Dermal Hypoplasia (FDH), also known as Goltz syndrome (OMIM 305600), is a genetic disorder that affects multiple organ systems early in development. Features of FDH include skin abnormalities, (hypoplasia, atrophy, linear pigmentation, and herniation of fat through dermal defects); papillomas...

  8. DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage

    SciT

    Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    Exposure to ionizing radiation and other environmental agents can affect the genomic integrity of germ cells and induce adverse health effects in the progeny. Efficient DNA repair during gametogenesis and the early embryonic cycles after fertilization is critical for preventing transmission of DNA damage to the progeny and relies on maternal factors stored in the egg before fertilization. The ability of the maternal repair machinery to repair DNA damage in both parental genomes in the fertilizing egg is especially crucial for the fertilizing male genome that has not experienced a DNA repair-competent cellular environment for several weeks prior to fertilization.more » During the DNA repair-deficient period of spermatogenesis, DNA lesions may accumulate in sperm and be carried into the egg where, if not properly repaired, could result in the formation of heritable chromosomal aberrations or mutations and associated birth defects. Studies with female mice deficient in specific DNA repair genes have shown that: (i) cell cycle checkpoints are activated in the fertilized egg by DNA damage carried by the sperm; and (ii) the maternal genotype plays a major role in determining the efficiency of repairing genomic lesions in the fertilizing sperm and directly affect the risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes. There is also growing evidence that implicates DNA damage carried by the fertilizing gamete as a mediator of postfertilization processes that contribute to genomic instability in subsequent generations. Transgenerational genomic instability most likely involves epigenetic mechanisms or error-prone DNA repair processes in the early embryo. Maternal and embryonic DNA repair processes during the early phases of mammalian embryonic development can have far reaching consequences for the genomic integrity and health of subsequent generations.« less

  9. Early and late skin reactions to radiotherapy for breast cancer and their correlation with radiation-induced DNA damage in lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    López, Escarlata; Guerrero, Rosario; Núñez, Maria Isabel; del Moral, Rosario; Villalobos, Mercedes; Martínez-Galán, Joaquina; Valenzuela, Maria Teresa; Muñoz-Gámez, José Antonio; Oliver, Francisco Javier; Martín-Oliva, David; Ruiz de Almodóvar, José Mariano

    2005-01-01

    Radiotherapy outcomes might be further improved by a greater understanding of the individual variations in normal tissue reactions that determine tolerance. Most published studies on radiation toxicity have been performed retrospectively. Our prospective study was launched in 1996 to measure the in vitro radiosensitivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes before treatment with radical radiotherapy in patients with breast cancer, and to assess the early and the late radiation skin side effects in the same group of patients. We prospectively recruited consecutive breast cancer patients receiving radiation therapy after breast surgery. To evaluate whether early and late side effects of radiotherapy can be predicted by the assay, a study was conducted of the association between the results of in vitro radiosensitivity tests and acute and late adverse radiation effects. Intrinsic molecular radiosensitivity was measured by using an initial radiation-induced DNA damage assay on lymphocytes obtained from breast cancer patients before radiotherapy. Acute reactions were assessed in 108 of these patients on the last treatment day. Late morbidity was assessed after 7 years of follow-up in some of these patients. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) morbidity score system was used for both assessments. Radiosensitivity values obtained using the in vitro test showed no relation with the acute or late adverse skin reactions observed. There was no evidence of a relation between acute and late normal tissue reactions assessed in the same patients. A positive relation was found between the treatment volume and both early and late side effects. After radiation treatment, a number of cells containing major changes can have a long survival and disappear very slowly, becoming a chronic focus of immunological system stimulation. This stimulation can produce, in a stochastic manner, late radiation-related adverse effects of varying severity. Further research is warranted to identify

  10. Early detection of radiation-induced heart disease using (99m)Tc-MIBI SPECT gated myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with oesophageal cancer during radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Hu, Xudong; Yue, Jinbo; Meng, Xue; Han, Dali; Sun, Xindong; Yang, Guoren; Wang, Shijiang; Wang, Xiaohui; Yu, Jinming

    2015-05-01

    The primary aim of this prospective study was to investigate the value of (99m)Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) gated myocardial perfusion imaging (GMPI) in the detection of radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) as early as during radiotherapy (RT) for oesophageal cancer (EC). The second aim was to analyse the correlation between cardiac toxicity and the dose-volume factors. The (99m)Tc-MIBI SPECT GMPI was performed both pre-RT and during RT (40Gray). The results of the SPECT were quantitatively analysed with QGS/QPS software and read by two experienced nuclear medicine physicians. The correlation between the changes in the SPECT parameters and the RT dosimetric data was analysed. Eighteen patients with locally advanced EC were enrolled in the study. Compared with the baseline, the imaging during RT showed not only significant decreases in the wall motion (WM) (1/20 segments), wall thickening (WT) (2/20 segments), end-diastolic perfusion (EDP) (5/20 segments) and end-systolic perfusion (ESP) (8/20 segments) (p<0.05) but also a significant increase in the heart rate (74.63±7.79 vs 81.49±9.90, p=0.036). New myocardial perfusion defects were observed in 8 of the 18 patients. The V37-V40 was significantly higher (p<0.05) in the patients with the new perfusion defects during RT than in the patients who did not exhibit these defects. Radiotherapy for EC induces cardiac damage from an early stage. (99m)Tc-MIBI SPECT GMPI can detect the occurrence of cardiac impairment during RT. The WM, WT, EDP and ESP may be valuable as early indicators of RIHD. The percentage of the heart volume that receives a high dose is an important factor that is correlated with RIHD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Early and late skin reactions to radiotherapy for breast cancer and their correlation with radiation-induced DNA damage in lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    López, Escarlata; Guerrero, Rosario; Núñez, Maria Isabel; del Moral, Rosario; Villalobos, Mercedes; Martínez-Galán, Joaquina; Valenzuela, Maria Teresa; Muñoz-Gámez, José Antonio; Oliver, Francisco Javier; Martín-Oliva, David; de Almodóvar, José Mariano Ruiz

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Radiotherapy outcomes might be further improved by a greater understanding of the individual variations in normal tissue reactions that determine tolerance. Most published studies on radiation toxicity have been performed retrospectively. Our prospective study was launched in 1996 to measure the in vitro radiosensitivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes before treatment with radical radiotherapy in patients with breast cancer, and to assess the early and the late radiation skin side effects in the same group of patients. We prospectively recruited consecutive breast cancer patients receiving radiation therapy after breast surgery. To evaluate whether early and late side effects of radiotherapy can be predicted by the assay, a study was conducted of the association between the results of in vitro radiosensitivity tests and acute and late adverse radiation effects. Methods Intrinsic molecular radiosensitivity was measured by using an initial radiation-induced DNA damage assay on lymphocytes obtained from breast cancer patients before radiotherapy. Acute reactions were assessed in 108 of these patients on the last treatment day. Late morbidity was assessed after 7 years of follow-up in some of these patients. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) morbidity score system was used for both assessments. Results Radiosensitivity values obtained using the in vitro test showed no relation with the acute or late adverse skin reactions observed. There was no evidence of a relation between acute and late normal tissue reactions assessed in the same patients. A positive relation was found between the treatment volume and both early and late side effects. Conclusion After radiation treatment, a number of cells containing major changes can have a long survival and disappear very slowly, becoming a chronic focus of immunological system stimulation. This stimulation can produce, in a stochastic manner, late radiation-related adverse effects of varying severity

  12. Early evaluation of radiation-induced parotid damage in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma by T2 mapping and mDIXON Quant imaging: initial findings.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nan; Chu, Chen; Dou, Xin; Chen, Weibo; He, Jian; Yan, Jing; Zhou, Zhengyang; Yang, Xiaofeng

    2018-02-08

    Radiation-induced parotid damage is a common complication in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with radiotherapy to head and neck region, which severely reduce the life quality of those patients. The aim of this study was to early evaluate the changes of irradiated parotid glands with T2 mapping and mDIXON Quant imaging. Forty-one patients with NPC underwent conventional magnetic resonance imaging for nasopharynx and neck, and T2 mapping and mDIXON Quant imaging for bilateral parotid glands within 2 weeks before radiotherapy (pre-RT), 5 weeks after the beginning of radiotherapy (mid-RT), and 4 weeks after radiotherapy (post-RT). Parotid volume, T2 values, fat fraction (FF) values, and mean radiation dose were recorded and analyzed. From pre-RT to mid-RT, parotid volume decreased (atrophy rate, 27.0 ± 11.5%), while parotid T2 and FF values increased (change rate, 6.0 ± 6.2% for T2 value and 9.1 ± 9.9% for FF value) significantly. From mid-RT to post-RT, parotid T2 value continuously increased (change rate, 4.6 ± 7.7%), but parotid FF value decreased (change rate, - 9.9 ± 18.2%) significantly. Change rate of parotid T2 value significantly correlated with parotid atrophy rate from pre-RT to post-RT (r = 0.313, P = 0.027). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that parotid T2 value (standardized coefficient [SC] = - 0.259, P = 0.001) and FF value (SC = - 0.320, P = 0.014) negatively correlated with parotid volume, while parotid T2 value positively correlated with MR scan time point (SC = 0.476, P = 0.001) significantly. Parotid T2 and FF values showed excellent reproducibility (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.935-0.992). T2 mapping and mDIXON Quant imaging is useful for noninvasive evaluation of radiation-induced parotid damage.

  13. Predicted Risk of Radiation-Induced Cancers After Involved Field and Involved Node Radiotherapy With or Without Intensity Modulation for Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma in Female Patients

    SciT

    Weber, Damien C., E-mail: damien.weber@unige.ch; Johanson, Safora; Peguret, Nicolas

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the excess relative risk (ERR) of radiation-induced cancers (RIC) in female patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) female patients treated with conformal (3DCRT), intensity modulated (IMRT), or volumetric modulated arc (RA) radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Plans for 10 early-stage HL female patients were computed for 3DCRT, IMRT, and RA with involved field RT (IFRT) and involvednode RT (INRT) radiation fields. Organs at risk dose--volume histograms were computed and inter-compared for IFRT vs. INRT and 3DCRT vs. IMRT/RA, respectively. The ERR for cancer induction in breasts, lungs, and thyroid was estimated using both linear and nonlinear models. Results:more » The mean estimated ERR for breast, lung, and thyroid were significantly lower (p < 0.01) with INRT than with IFRT planning, regardless of the radiation delivery technique used, assuming a linear dose-risk relationship. We found that using the nonlinear model, the mean ERR values were significantly (p < 0.01) increased with IMRT or RA compared to those with 3DCRT planning for the breast, lung, and thyroid, using an IFRT paradigm. After INRT planning, IMRT or RA increased the risk of RIC for lung and thyroid only. Conclusions: In this comparative planning study, using a nonlinear dose--risk model, IMRT or RA increased the estimated risk of RIC for breast, lung, and thyroid for HL female patients. This study also suggests that INRT planning, compared to IFRT planning, may reduce the ERR of RIC when risk is predicted using a linear model. Observing the opposite effect, with a nonlinear model, however, questions the validity of these biologically parameterized models.« less

  14. TH-E-BRF-03: A Multivariate Interaction Model for Assessment of Hippocampal Vascular Dose-Response and Early Prediction of Radiation-Induced Neurocognitive Dysfunction

    SciT

    Farjam, R; Pramanik, P; Srinivasan, A

    Purpose: Vascular injury could be a cause of hippocampal dysfunction leading to late neurocognitive decline in patients receiving brain radiotherapy (RT). Hence, our aim was to develop a multivariate interaction model for characterization of hippocampal vascular dose-response and early prediction of radiation-induced late neurocognitive impairments. Methods: 27 patients (17 males and 10 females, age 31–80 years) were enrolled in an IRB-approved prospective longitudinal study. All patients were diagnosed with a low-grade glioma or benign tumor and treated by 3-D conformal or intensity-modulated RT with a median dose of 54 Gy (50.4–59.4 Gy in 1.8− Gy fractions). Six DCE-MRI scans weremore » performed from pre-RT to 18 months post-RT. DCE data were fitted to the modified Toft model to obtain the transfer constant of gadolinium influx from the intravascular space into the extravascular extracellular space, Ktrans, and the fraction of blood plasma volume, Vp. The hippocampus vascular property alterations after starting RT were characterized by changes in the hippocampal mean values of, μh(Ktrans)τ and μh(Vp)τ. The dose-response, Δμh(Ktrans/Vp)pre->τ, was modeled using a multivariate linear regression considering integrations of doses with age, sex, hippocampal laterality and presence of tumor/edema near a hippocampus. Finally, the early vascular dose-response in hippocampus was correlated with neurocognitive decline 6 and 18 months post-RT. Results: The μh(Ktrans) increased significantly from pre-RT to 1 month post-RT (p<0.0004). The multivariate model showed that the dose effect on Δμh(Ktrans)pre->1M post-RT was interacted with sex (p<0.0007) and age (p<0.00004), with the dose-response more pronounced in older females. Also, the vascular dose-response in the left hippocampus of females was significantly correlated with memory function decline at 6 (r = − 0.95, p<0.0006) and 18 (r = −0.88, p<0.02) months post-RT. Conclusion: The hippocampal

  15. Quantification of regional early stage gas exchange changes using hyperpolarized (129)Xe MRI in a rat model of radiation-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Doganay, Ozkan; Stirrat, Elaine; McKenzie, Charles; Schulte, Rolf F; Santyr, Giles E

    2016-05-01

    To assess the feasibility of hyperpolarized (HP) (129)Xe MRI for detection of early stage radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) in a rat model involving unilateral irradiation by assessing differences in gas exchange dynamics between irradiated and unirradiated lungs. The dynamics of gas exchange between alveolar air space and pulmonary tissue (PT), PT and red blood cells (RBCs) was measured using single-shot spiral iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation images of the right and left lungs of two age-matched cohorts of Sprague Dawley rats. The first cohort (n = 5) received 18 Gy irradiation to the right lung using a (60)Co source and the second cohort (n = 5) was not irradiated and served as the healthy control. Both groups were imaged two weeks following irradiation when radiation pneumonitis (RP) was expected to be present. The gas exchange data were fit to a theoretical gas exchange model to extract measurements of pulmonary tissue thickness (LPT) and relative blood volume (VRBC) from each of the right and left lungs of both cohorts. Following imaging, lung specimens were retrieved and percent tissue area (PTA) was assessed histologically to confirm RP and correlate with MRI measurements. Statistically significant differences in LPT and VRBC were observed between the irradiated and non-irradiated cohorts. In particular, LPT of the right and left lungs was increased approximately 8.2% and 5.0% respectively in the irradiated cohort. Additionally, VRBC of the right and left lungs was decreased approximately 36.1% and 11.7% respectively for the irradiated cohort compared to the non-irradiated cohort. PTA measurements in both right and left lungs were increased in the irradiated group compared to the non-irradiated cohort for both the left (P < 0.05) and right lungs (P < 0.01) confirming the presence of RP. PTA measurements also correlated with the MRI measurements for both the non-irradiated (r = 0.79, P < 0.01) and

  16. Genetics Home Reference: cartilage-hair hypoplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions Cartilage-hair hypoplasia Cartilage-hair hypoplasia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Cartilage-hair hypoplasia is a disorder of bone growth characterized ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Leydig cell hypoplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions Leydig cell hypoplasia Leydig cell hypoplasia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR-Cas9? What is precision medicine? What is newborn ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: focal dermal hypoplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... in people with focal dermal hypoplasia is an omphalocele , which is an opening in the wall of ... Dermal Hypoplasia MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Ectodermal dysplasia MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Omphalocele General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests ...

  19. Radiation-induced cerebrovascular disease in children

    SciT

    Wright, T.L.; Bresnan, M.J.

    1976-06-01

    Radiation-induced internal carotid artery occlusion has not been well recognized previously as a cause of childhood cerebrovascular disease. A child who had received radiation as a neonate for a hemangioma involving the left orbit at the age of 6 years experienced a recurrent right-sided paresis, vascular headaches, and speech difficulties. Angiography showed a hypoplastic left carotid artery with occlusion of both the anterior and middle cerebral arteries. Collateral vessels bypassed the occluded-stenotic segments. Review of the literature showed two additional cases of large vessel occlusion in childhood associated with anastomatic telangiectatic vessel development following early radiation therapy of facial hemangioma.

  20. Pulmonary hypoplasia in Jarcho-Levin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Luis M; García-García, Inés; Correa-Rivas, María S; García-Fragoso, Lourdes

    2004-03-01

    Jarcho-Levin syndrome, also known as spondylothoracic dysplasia and characterized by short trunk dwarfism, "crab-like" rib cage, with ribs and vertebral defects; it is not uncommon in Puerto Ricans. Many patients die in early infancy due to respiratory compromise associated to lung restriction and the reported cases emphasize mostly the skeletal malformations associated to the syndrome. We report the autopsy findings in a newborn with isolated Jarcho-Levin syndrome emphasizing pulmonary pathology. He was a pre-term male who died of respiratory failure at three hours old and, autopsy findings confirmed the clinical diagnosis. Internal examination showed hypoplastic lungs with normal lobation. The histological structure appeared normal and relatively mature; the diaphragm showed eventration and unilateral absence of musculature. This case shows the worst spectum of the Jarcho-Levin syndrome: pulmonary hypoplasia not compatible with extrauterine life. Since thoracic restriction is present during the fetal period, the degree of pulmonary hypoplasia probably defines survival beyond the neonatal period.

  1. Radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the heritable somatic effects of ionizing radiation exposures has relied upon the assumption that radiation-induced lesions were 'fixed' in the DNA prior to the first postirradiation mitosis. Lesion conversion was thought to occur during the initial round of DNA replication or as a consequence of error-prone enzymatic processing of lesions. The standard experimental protocols for the assessment of a variety of radiation-induced endpoints (cell death, specific locus mutations, neoplastic transformation and chromosome aberrations) evaluate these various endpoints at a single snapshot in time. In contrast with the aforementioned approaches, some studies have specifically assessed radiation effects as a function of time following exposure. Evidence has accumulated in support of the hypothesis that radiation exposure induces a persistent destabilization of the genome. This instability has been observed as a delayed expression of lethal mutations, as an enhanced rate of accumulation of non-lethal heritable alterations, and as a progressive intraclonal chromosomal heterogeneity. The genetic controls and biochemical mechanisms underlying radiation-induced genomic instability have not yet been delineated. The aim is to integrate the accumulated evidence that suggests that radiation exposure has a persistent effect on the stability of the mammalian genome.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita Printable PDF Open All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita is a disorder that ...

  3. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  4. RADIATION INDUCED AGING IN MICE

    SciT

    Curtis, H.J.; Gebhard, K.L.

    1958-10-31

    . Experiments were undertaken in an effort to determine the degree of similarity between natural and radiation induced aging, and to determine the causes for the latter. Several severe non-specific stresses were applied to mice either as single massive doses or as smaller doses administered over a large fraction of the life span of the animals. Stresses used included typhoid vaccine, tetanus toxin and tetanus toxoid and turpentine. None of these produced any premature aging comparable to that produced by radiation. The somatic mutation theory of aging and expecially radiationinduced aging has been tested by applying the chemical mutatgen, nitrogenmore » mustard, either as a massive single dose or as smaller single doses repeated over long periods of time. No shortening of the life span has been observed and it is concluded that the somatic mutation theory is untenable. Experiments designed to determine the organ system responsible for radiation induced aging have demonstrated that the hematopoietic system is not primarily involved in this phenomenon. (auth)« less

  5. Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Maria, Osama Muhammad; Eliopoulos, Nicoletta; Muanza, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced oral mucositis (RIOM) is a major dose-limiting toxicity in head and neck cancer patients. It is a normal tissue injury caused by radiation/radiotherapy (RT), which has marked adverse effects on patient quality of life and cancer therapy continuity. It is a challenge for radiation oncologists since it leads to cancer therapy interruption, poor local tumor control, and changes in dose fractionation. RIOM occurs in 100% of altered fractionation radiotherapy head and neck cancer patients. In the United Sates, its economic cost was estimated to reach 17,000.00 USD per patient with head and neck cancers. This review will discuss RIOM definition, epidemiology, impact and side effects, pathogenesis, scoring scales, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. PMID:28589080

  6. Radiation-induced instability and its relation to radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullrich, R. L.; Ponnaiya, B.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: A model that identifies radiation-induced genetic instability as the earliest cellular event in the multi-step sequence leading to radiation-induced cancer was previously proposed. In this paper ongoing experiments are discussed which are designed to test this model and its predictions in mouse mammary epithelial cells. RESULTS: Several lines of evidence are presented that appear to support this model: first, the development of delayed mutations in p53 following irradiation in altered growth variants; secondly, the high frequencies for the induction of both instability and transformation following irradiation in mammary epithelial cells; and finally, the demonstration that susceptibility to the induction of cytogenetic instability is a heritable trait that correlates with susceptibility to transformation and radiation-induced mammary cancer. Mice resistant to transformation and mammary cancer development are also resistant to the development of instability after irradiation. In contrast, mice sensitive to transformation and cancer are also sensitive to the development of cytogenetic instability. CONCLUSIONS: Data from this laboratory and from the studies cited above suggest a specific, and perhaps unique, role for radiation-induced instability as a critical early event associated with initiation of the carcinogenic process.

  7. Radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid

    SciT

    Griem, K.L.; Robb, P.K.; Caldarelli, D.D.

    1989-08-01

    A 23-year-old white man presented with a thyroid mass 12 years after receiving high-dose radiotherapy for a T2 and N1 lymphoepithelioma of the nasopharynx. Following subtotal thyroidectomy, a histopathologic examination revealed liposarcoma of the thyroid gland. The relationship between sarcomas and irradiation is described and Cahan and colleagues' criteria for radiation-induced sarcomas are reviewed. To our knowledge, we are presenting the first such case of a radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid gland.

  8. Radiation-induced moyamoya syndrome

    SciT

    Desai, Snehal S.; Paulino, Arnold C.; Mai, Wei Y.

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: The moyamoya syndrome is an uncommon late complication after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A PubMed search of English-language articles, with radiation, radiotherapy, and moyamoya syndrome used as search key words, yielded 33 articles from 1967 to 2002. Results: The series included 54 patients with a median age at initial RT of 3.8 years (range, 0.4 to 47). Age at RT was less than 5 years in 56.3%, 5 to 10 years in 22.9%, 11 to 20 years in 8.3%, 21 to 30 years in 6.3%, 31 to 40 years in 2.1%, and 41 to 50 years in 4.2%.more » Fourteen of 54 patients (25.9%) were diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1). The most common tumor treated with RT was low-grade glioma in 37 tumors (68.5%) of which 29 were optic-pathway glioma. The average RT dose was 46.5 Gy (range, 22-120 Gy). For NF-1-positive patients, the average RT dose was 46.5 Gy, and for NF-1-negative patients, it was 58.1 Gy. The median latent period for development of moyamoya syndrome was 40 months after RT (range, 4-240). Radiation-induced moyamoya syndrome occurred in 27.7% of patients by 2 years, 53.2% of patients by 4 years, 74.5% of patients by 6 years, and 95.7% of patients by 12 years after RT. Conclusions: Patients who received RT to the parasellar region at a young age (<5 years) are the most susceptible to moyamoya syndrome. The incidence for moyamoya syndrome continues to increase with time, with half of cases occurring within 4 years of RT and 95% of cases occurring within 12 years. Patients with NF-1 have a lower radiation-dose threshold for development of moyamoya syndrome.« less

  9. Radiation-Induced Breast Cancer Incidence and Mortality From Digital Mammography Screening: A Modeling Study.

    PubMed

    Miglioretti, Diana L; Lange, Jane; van den Broek, Jeroen J; Lee, Christoph I; van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T; Ritley, Dominique; Kerlikowske, Karla; Fenton, Joshua J; Melnikow, Joy; de Koning, Harry J; Hubbard, Rebecca A

    2016-02-16

    Estimates of risk for radiation-induced breast cancer from mammography screening have not considered variation in dose exposure or diagnostic work-up after abnormal screening results. To estimate distributions of radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality from digital mammography screening while considering exposure from screening and diagnostic mammography and dose variation among women. 2 simulation-modeling approaches. U.S. population. Women aged 40 to 74 years. Annual or biennial digital mammography screening from age 40, 45, or 50 years until age 74 years. Lifetime breast cancer deaths averted (benefits) and radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality (harms) per 100,000 women screened. Annual screening of 100,000 women aged 40 to 74 years was projected to induce 125 breast cancer cases (95% CI, 88 to 178) leading to 16 deaths (CI, 11 to 23), relative to 968 breast cancer deaths averted by early detection from screening. Women exposed at the 95th percentile were projected to develop 246 cases of radiation-induced breast cancer leading to 32 deaths per 100,000 women. Women with large breasts requiring extra views for complete examination (8% of population) were projected to have greater radiation-induced breast cancer risk (266 cancer cases and 35 deaths per 100,000 women) than other women (113 cancer cases and 15 deaths per 100,000 women). Biennial screening starting at age 50 years reduced risk for radiation-induced cancer 5-fold. Life-years lost from radiation-induced breast cancer could not be estimated. Radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality from digital mammography screening are affected by dose variability from screening, resultant diagnostic work-up, initiation age, and screening frequency. Women with large breasts may have a greater risk for radiation-induced breast cancer. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, National Cancer Institute.

  10. Phase 2 results from Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Study 0537: a phase 2/3 study comparing acupuncture-like transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation versus pilocarpine in treating early radiation-induced xerostomia.

    PubMed

    Wong, Raimond K W; James, Jennifer L; Sagar, Stephen; Wyatt, Gwen; Nguyen-Tân, Phuc Felix; Singh, Anurag K; Lukaszczyk, Barbara; Cardinale, Francis; Yeh, Alexander M; Berk, Lawrence

    2012-09-01

    In this phase 2 component of a multi-institutional, phase 2/3, randomized trial, the authors assessed the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of acupuncture-like transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (ALTENS) in reducing radiation-induced xerostomia. Patients with cancer of the head and neck who were 3 to 24 months from completing radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy (RT ± C) and who were experiencing xerostomia symptoms with basal whole saliva production ≥0.1 mL per minute and were without recurrence were eligible. Patients received twice weekly ALTENS sessions (24 sessions over 12 weeks) using a proprietary electrical stimulation unit. The primary study objective was to assess the feasibility of ALTENS treatment. Patients were considered compliant if 19 of 24 ALTENS sessions were delivered, and the targeted compliance rate was 85%. Secondary objectives measured treatment-related toxicities and the effect of ALTENS on overall radiation-induced xerostomia burden using the University of Michigan Xerostomia-Related Quality of Life Scale (XeQOLS). Of 48 accrued patients, 47 were evaluable. The median age was 60 years, 84% of patients were men, 70% completed RT ± C for >12 months, and 21% had previously received pilocarpine. Thirty-four patients completed all 24 ALTENS sessions, 9 patients completed 20 to 23 sessions, and 1 patient completed 19 sessions, representing a 94% total compliance rate. Six-month XeQOLS scores were available for 35 patients and indicated that 30 patients (86%) achieved a positive treatment response with a mean ± standard deviation reduction of 35.9% ± 36.1%. Five patients developed grade 1 or 2 gastrointestinal toxicity, and 1 had a grade 1 pain event. The current results indicated that ALTENS treatment for radiation-induced xerostomia can be delivered uniformly in a cooperative, multicenter setting and produces possible beneficial treatment response. Given these results, the phase 3 component of this study was initiated

  11. Phase II Results of RTOG 0537: A Phase II/III Study Comparing Acupuncture-like Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Versus Pilocarpine in Treating Early Radiation-Induced Xerostomia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Raimond K. W.; James, Jennifer L.; Sagar, Stephen; Wyatt, Gwen; Nguyen-Tân, Phuc Felix; Singh, Anurag K.; Lukaszczyk, Barbara; Cardinale, Francis; Yeh, Alexander M.; Berk, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This phase II component of a multi-institutional phase II/III randomized trial assessed the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of acupuncture-like transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (ALTENS) in reducing radiation-induced xerostomia. Methods Head and neck cancer patients who were 3–24 months from completing radiotherapy ± chemotherapy (RT±C) and experiencing xerostomia symptoms with basal whole saliva production ≥0.1 ml/min and without recurrence were eligible. Patients received twice weekly ALTENS sessions (24 over 12 weeks) using a Codetron™ unit. The primary objective assessed the feasibility of ALTENS treatment. A patient was considered compliant if 19/24 ALTENS were delivered, with a targeted 85% compliance rate. Secondary objectives measured treatment-related toxicities and ALTENS effect on overall radiation-induced xerostomia burden using the University of Michigan Xerostomia-Related Quality of Life Scale (XeQOLS). Results Of 48 accrued patients, 47 were evaluable. Median age was 60 years; 84% were male, 70% completed RT±C for > 12 months and 21% had received prior pilocarpine. All ALTENS sessions were completed in 34 patients, but 9 and 1 completed 20–23 and 19 sessions respectively, representing a 94% total compliance rate. 6-month XeQOLS scores were available for 35 patients; 30 (86%) achieved a positive treatment response with a mean reduction of 35.9% (SD 36.1). Five patients developed grade 1–2 gastrointestinal toxicity and one had grade 1 pain event. Conclusions ALTENS treatment for radiation-induced xerostomia can be uniformly delivered in a cooperative multicenter setting and has possible beneficial treatment response. Given these results, the phase III component of this study was initiated. PMID:22252927

  12. Radiation-induced second primary cancer risks from modern external beam radiotherapy for early prostate cancer: impact of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and flattening filter free (FFF) radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Louise J.; Thompson, Christopher M.; Lilley, John; Cosgrove, Vivian; Franks, Kevin; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Henry, Ann M.

    2015-02-01

    Risks of radiation-induced second primary cancer following prostate radiotherapy using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), flattening filter free (FFF) and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) were evaluated. Prostate plans were created using 10 MV 3D-CRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions) and 6 MV 5-field IMRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions), VMAT (78 Gy in 39 fractions, with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams) and SABR (42.7 Gy in 7 fractions with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams). Dose-volume histograms from pelvic planning CT scans of three prostate patients, each planned using all 6 techniques, were used to calculate organ equivalent doses (OED) and excess absolute risks (EAR) of second rectal and bladder cancers, and pelvic bone and soft tissue sarcomas, using mechanistic, bell-shaped and plateau models. For organs distant to the treatment field, chamber measurements recorded in an anthropomorphic phantom were used to calculate OEDs and EARs using a linear model. Ratios of OED give relative radiation-induced second cancer risks. SABR resulted in lower second cancer risks at all sites relative to 3D-CRT. FFF resulted in lower second cancer risks in out-of-field tissues relative to equivalent flattened techniques, with increasing impact in organs at greater distances from the field. For example, FFF reduced second cancer risk by up to 20% in the stomach and up to 56% in the brain, relative to the equivalent flattened technique. Relative to 10 MV 3D-CRT, 6 MV IMRT or VMAT with flattening filter increased second cancer risks in several out-of-field organs, by up to 26% and 55%, respectively. For all techniques, EARs were consistently low. The observed large relative differences between techniques, in absolute terms, were very low, highlighting the importance of considering absolute risks alongside the corresponding relative risks, since when absolute

  13. [The occupational radiation-induced cataract in five industrial radiographers].

    PubMed

    Benzarti Mezni, A; Loukil, I; Hriz, N; Kallel, K; Mlaiki, N; Ben Jemaâ, A

    2012-04-01

    The industrial uses of ionizing radiation in Tunisia are expanding, especially in industry and most particularly in the nondestructive testing of welds. Thus workers operating in the non-destructive testing of welds may develop a radiation-induced cataract varying in time to onset depending on the dose. To describe the characteristics of the radiation-induced cataract in patients exposed to ionizing radiation, determine the risk factors of radiation-induced cataracts. This was an anamnestic, clinical, and environmental study of five cases of radiation-induced cataract in workers employed in non-destructive testing of welds. This series of five cases had a mean age of 30.2 years and 5.53 years of work experience, ranging from 14 months to 15 years. All the patients were male and industrial radiographers specialized in nondestructive testing of welds. The average duration of exposure to ionizing radiation was 5.53 years. None of the patients had worn protective gear such as eye goggles. The ophthalmic check-up for the five special industrial radiographers showed punctuate opacities in three cases, punctiform opacities in one eye in one case, and phacosclerosis with bilateral lens multiple crystalline stromal opacities in a case of micro-lens opacities in both eyes with opalescence of both eyes in one case. These cataracts had been declared as occupational diseases. The value of a specialized ophthalmologic surveillance among these workers and the early diagnosis of lens opacities must be emphasized. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Intertooth patterns of hypoplasia expression: implications for childhood health in the classic Maya collapse.

    PubMed

    Wright, L E

    1997-02-01

    Enamel hypoplasias, which record interacting stresses of nutrition and illness during the period of tooth formation, are a key tool in the study of childhood health in prehistory. But interpretation of the age of peak morbidity is complicated by differences in susceptibility to stress both between tooth positions and within a single tooth. Here, hypoplasias are used to evaluate the prevailing ecological model for the collapse of Classic Period Lowland Maya civilization, circa AD 900. Hypoplasias were recorded in the full dentition of 160 adult skeletons from six archaeological sites in the Pasion River region of Guatemala. Instead of constructing a composite scale of stress experience, teeth are considered separately by position in the analysis. No statistical differences are found in the proportion of teeth affected by hypoplasia between "Early," Late Classic, and Terminal Classic Periods for anterior teeth considered to be most susceptible to stress, indicating stability in the overall stress loads affecting children of the three chronological periods. However, hypoplasia trends in posterior teeth may imply a change in the ontogenetic-timing of more severe stress episodes during the final occupation and perhaps herald a shift in child-care practices. These results provide little support for the ecological model of collapse but do call to attention the potential of posterior teeth to reveal subtle changes in childhood morbidity when consideredindividually.

  15. Turner's hypoplasia and non-vitality: A case report of sequelae in permanent tooth

    PubMed Central

    Geetha Priya, P. R.; John, John B.; Elango, Indumathi

    2010-01-01

    Hypoplasia is the result of disruption in the process of enamel matrix formation, which in turn causes defect in quality and thickness of enamel. Four cases of Turner's hypoplastic teeth with a previous history of trauma/infection in their primary predecessors at the age of 2-3 years have been reported. These hypoplastic teeth had turned non-vital without any carious insult, cavitation or further trauma. This article thereby stresses the importance of early detection of enamel hypoplasia and proper management at the earliest possible stage to enable an efficient prevention from clinically non-evident microbial invasion in the dentinal tubules and concomitant pulp pathosis. PMID:22114432

  16. Radiation-induced vaginal stenosis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Lucinda; Do, Viet; Chard, Jennifer; Brand, Alison H

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of gynecological cancer commonly involves pelvic radiation therapy (RT) and/or brachytherapy. A commonly observed side effect of such treatment is radiation-induced vaginal stenosis (VS). This review analyzed the incidence, pathogenesis, clinical manifestation(s) and assessment and grading of radiation-induced VS. In addition, risk factors, prevention and treatment options and follow-up schedules are also discussed. The limited available literature on many of these aspects suggests that additional studies are required to more precisely determine the best management strategy of this prevalent group after RT. PMID:28496367

  17. Circulatory CNP Rescues Craniofacial Hypoplasia in Achondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, S; Nakao, Kazumasa; Koyama, N; Isobe, Y; Ueda, Y; Kanai, Y; Kondo, E; Fujii, T; Miura, M; Yasoda, A; Nakao, Kazuwa; Bessho, K

    2017-12-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common genetic form of human dwarfism, characterized by midfacial hypoplasia resulting in occlusal abnormality and foramen magnum stenosis, leading to serious neurologic complications and hydrocephalus. Currently, surgery is the only way to manage jaw deformity, neurologic complications, and hydrocephalus in patients with achondroplasia. We previously showed that C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is a potent stimulator of endochondral bone growth of long bones and vertebrae and is also a potent stimulator in the craniofacial region, which is crucial for midfacial skeletogenesis. In this study, we analyzed craniofacial morphology in a mouse model of achondroplasia, in which fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is specifically activated in cartilage ( Fgfr3 ach mice), and investigated the mechanisms of jaw deformities caused by this mutation. Furthermore, we analyzed the effect of CNP on the maxillofacial area in these animals. Fgfr3 ach mice exhibited midfacial hypoplasia, especially in the sagittal direction, caused by impaired endochondral ossification in craniofacial cartilage and by premature closure of the spheno-occipital synchondrosis, an important growth center in craniomaxillofacial skeletogenesis. We crossed Fgfr3 ach mice with transgenic mice in which CNP is expressed in the liver under the control of the human serum amyloid-P component promoter, resulting in elevated levels of circulatory CNP ( Fgfr3 ach /SAP-Nppc-Tg mice). In the progeny, midfacial hypoplasia in the sagittal direction observed in Fgfr3 ach mice was improved significantly by restoring the thickness of synchondrosis and promoting proliferation of chondrocytes in the craniofacial cartilage. In addition, the foramen magnum stenosis observed in Fgfr3 ach mice was significantly ameliorated in Fgfr3 ach /SAP-Nppc-Tg mice due to enhanced endochondral bone growth of the anterior intraoccipital synchondrosis. These results clearly demonstrate the therapeutic

  18. Use of repeat anterior maxillary distraction to correct residual midface hypoplasia in cleft patients

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of performing a second, repeat anterior maxillary distraction (AMD) to treat residual cleft maxillary hypoplasia. Materials and Methods Five patients between the ages of 12 to 15 years with a history of AMD and with residual cleft maxillary hypoplasia were included in the study. Inclusion was irrespective of gender, type of cleft lip and palate, and the amount of advancement needed. Repeat AMD was executed in these patients 4 to 5 years after the primary AMD procedure to correct the cleft maxillary hypoplasia that had developed since the initial procedure. Orthopantomogram (OPG) and lateral cephalograms were taken for evaluation preoperatively, immediately after distraction, after consolidation, and one year postoperatively. The data obtained was tabulated and a Mann Whitney U-test was used for statistical comparisons. Results At the time of presentation, a residual maxillary hypoplasia was observed with a well maintained distraction gap on the OPG which ruled out the occurrence of a relapse. Favorable movement of the segments without any resistance was seen in all patients. Mean maxillary advancement of 10.56 mm was achieved at repeat AMD. Statistically significant increases in midfacial length, SNA angle, and nasion perpendicular to point A distance was achieved (P=0.012, P=0.011, and P=0.012, respectively). Good profile was achieved for all patients. Minimal transient complications, for example anterior open bite and bleeding episodes, were managed. Conclusion Addressing the problem of cleft maxillary hypoplasia at an early age (12–15 years) is beneficial for the child. Residual hypoplasia may develop in some patients, which may require additional corrective procedures. The results of our study show that AMD can be repeated when residual deformity develops with the previous procedure having no negative impact on the results of the repeat procedure. PMID:29333371

  19. Use of repeat anterior maxillary distraction to correct residual midface hypoplasia in cleft patients.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Sunil; Krishna, Shreya; Bansal, Avi

    2017-12-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of performing a second, repeat anterior maxillary distraction (AMD) to treat residual cleft maxillary hypoplasia. Five patients between the ages of 12 to 15 years with a history of AMD and with residual cleft maxillary hypoplasia were included in the study. Inclusion was irrespective of gender, type of cleft lip and palate, and the amount of advancement needed. Repeat AMD was executed in these patients 4 to 5 years after the primary AMD procedure to correct the cleft maxillary hypoplasia that had developed since the initial procedure. Orthopantomogram (OPG) and lateral cephalograms were taken for evaluation preoperatively, immediately after distraction, after consolidation, and one year postoperatively. The data obtained was tabulated and a Mann Whitney U-test was used for statistical comparisons. At the time of presentation, a residual maxillary hypoplasia was observed with a well maintained distraction gap on the OPG which ruled out the occurrence of a relapse. Favorable movement of the segments without any resistance was seen in all patients. Mean maxillary advancement of 10.56 mm was achieved at repeat AMD. Statistically significant increases in midfacial length, SNA angle, and nasion perpendicular to point A distance was achieved ( P =0.012, P =0.011, and P =0.012, respectively). Good profile was achieved for all patients. Minimal transient complications, for example anterior open bite and bleeding episodes, were managed. Addressing the problem of cleft maxillary hypoplasia at an early age (12-15 years) is beneficial for the child. Residual hypoplasia may develop in some patients, which may require additional corrective procedures. The results of our study show that AMD can be repeated when residual deformity develops with the previous procedure having no negative impact on the results of the repeat procedure.

  20. Novel Radiomitigator for Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, A-S; Shirazi-fard, Y.; Terada, M.; Alwood, J. S.; Steczina, S.; Medina, C.; Tahimic, C. G. T.; Globus, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced bone loss can occur with radiotherapy patients, accidental radiation exposure and during long-term spaceflight. Bone loss due to radiation is due to an early increase in oxidative stress, inflammation and bone resorption, resulting in an imbalance in bone remodeling. Furthermore, exposure to high-Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation will impair the bone forming progenitors and reduce bone formation. Radiation can be classified as high-LET or low-LET based on the amount of energy released. Dried Plum (DP) diet prevents bone loss in mice exposed to total body irradiation with both low-LET and high-LET radiation. DP prevents the early radiation-induced bone resorption, but furthermore, we show that DP protects the bone forming osteoblast progenitors from high-LET radiation. These results provide insight that DP re-balances the bone remodeling by preventing resorption and protecting the bone formation capacity. This data is important considering that most of the current osteoporosis treatments only block the bone resorption but do not protect bone formation. In addition, DP seems to act on both the oxidative stress and inflammation pathways. Finally, we have preliminary data showing the potential of DP to be radio-protective at a systemic effect and could possible protect other tissues at risk of total body-irradiation such as skin, brain and heart.

  1. Radiation-induced leukemia: lessons from history.

    PubMed

    Finch, Stuart C

    2007-03-01

    Beginning in 1895, with the discovery of x-rays, alpha and beta radiation, uranium, radium, thorium, and polonium, the fascinating story of the beginning of knowledge concerning the existence of ionizing radiation unfolds. This brief history of radiation and leukemia is divided into two main parts: the first 50 years, which deals with the confusion regarding radiation effects and the failure to clearly recognize that exposure to ionizing radiation may induce leukemia. The second part focuses on the last 60 years, when the radiation induction of leukemia was accepted and some progress achieved in understanding the clinical and pathophysiological characteristics of radiation-induced leukemia. Particular attention in this is paid to the effects of radiation on the survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The discussion in this section also covers some concepts of radiation-induced cell damage and ruminations on unanswered questions.

  2. Radiation induced fracture of the scapula

    SciT

    Riggs, J.H. III; Schultz, G.D.; Hanes, S.A.

    A case of radiation induced osteonecrosis resulting in a fracture of the scapula in a 76-yr-old female patient with a history of breast carcinoma is presented. Diagnostic imaging, laboratory recommendations and clinical findings are discussed along with an algorithm for the safe management of patients with a history of cancer and musculoskeletal complaints. This case demonstrates the necessity of a thorough investigation of musculoskeletal complaints in patients with previous bone-seeking carcinomas.

  3. Radiation-induced skin carcinomas of the head and neck

    SciT

    Ron, E.; Modan, B.; Preston, D.

    1991-03-01

    Radiation exposures to the scalp during childhood for tinea capitis were associated with a fourfold increase in skin cancer, primarily basal cell carcinomas, and a threefold increase in benign skin tumors. Malignant melanoma, however, was not significantly elevated. Overall, 80 neoplasms were identified from an extensive search of the pathology logs of all major hospitals in Israel and computer linkage with the national cancer registry. Radiation dose to the scalp was computed for over 10,000 persons irradiated for ringworm (mean 7 Gy), and incidence rates were contrasted with those observed in 16,000 matched comparison subjects. The relative risk of radiogenicmore » skin cancer did not differ significantly between men or women or by time since exposure; however, risk was greatest following exposures in early childhood. After adjusting for sex, ethnic origin, and attained age, the estimated excess relative risk was 0.7 per Gy and the average excess risk over the current follow-up was 0.31/10(4) PY-Gy. The risk per Gy of radiation-induced skin cancer was intermediate between the high risk found among whites and no risk found among blacks in a similar study conducted in New York City. This finding suggests the role that subsequent exposure to uv radiation likely plays in the expression of a potential radiation-induced skin malignancy.« less

  4. Radiation-induced leukemia: Comparative studies in mouse and man

    SciT

    Haas, M.

    1991-01-01

    We now have a clear understanding of the mechanism by which radiation-induced (T-cell) leukemia occurs. In irradiated mice (radiation-induced thymic leukemia) and in man (acute lymphoblastic T-cell leukemia, T-ALL) the mechanism of leukemogenesis is surprisingly similar. Expressed in the most elementary terms, T-cell leukemia occurs when T-cell differentiation is inhibited by a mutation, and pre-T cells attempt but fail to differentiate in the thymus. Instead of leaving the thymus for the periphery as functional T-cells they continue to proliferate in the thymus. The proliferating pre- (pro-) T-cells constitute the (early) acute T-cell leukemia (A-TCL). This model for the mechanism ofmore » T-cell leukemogenesis accounts for all the properties of both murine and human A-TCL. Important support for the model has recently come from work by Ilan Kirsch and others, who have shown that mutations/deletions in the genes SCL (TAL), SIL, and LCK constitute primary events in the development of T-ALL, by inhibiting differentiation of thymic pre- (pro-) T-cells. This mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis brings several specific questions into focus: How do early A-TCL cells progress to become potently tumorigenic and poorly treatable Is it feasible to genetically suppress early and/or progressed A-TCL cells What is the mechanism by which the differentiation-inhibited (leukemic) pre-T cells proliferate During the first grant year we have worked on aspects of all three questions.« less

  5. A report on radiation-induced gliomas

    SciT

    Salvati, M.; Artico, M.; Caruso, R.

    1991-01-15

    Radiation-induced gliomas are uncommon, with only 73 cases on record to date. The disease that most frequently occasioned radiation therapy has been acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Three more cases are added here, two after irradiation for ALL and one after irradiation for tinea capitis. In a review of the relevant literature, the authors stress the possibility that the ALL-glioma and the retinoblastoma-glioma links point to syndromes in their own right that may occur without radiation therapy.56 references.

  6. Radiation induced detwinning in nanotwinned Cu

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Youxing; Wang, Haiyan; Kirk, Mark A.; ...

    2016-11-15

    Superior radiation tolerance has been experimentally examined in nanotwinned metals. The stability of nanotwinned structure under radiation is the key factor for advancing the application of nanotwinned metals for nuclear reactors. We thus performed in situ radiation tests for nanotwinned Cu with various twin thicknesses inside a transmission electron microscope. We found that there is a critical twin thickness (10 nm), below which, radiation induced detwinning is primarily accomplished through migration of incoherent twin boundaries. Lastly, detwinning is faster for thinner twins in this range, while thicker twins are more stable.

  7. Radiation-Induced Breast Cancer Incidence and Mortality from Digital Mammography Screening: A Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Miglioretti, Diana L.; Lange, Jane; van den Broek, Jeroen J.; Lee, Christoph I.; van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T.; Ritley, Dominique; Kerlikowske, Karla; Fenton, Joshua J.; Melnikow, Joy; de Koning, Harry J.; Hubbard, Rebecca A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Estimates of radiation-induced breast cancer risk from mammography screening have not previously considered dose exposure variation or diagnostic work-up after abnormal screening. Objective To estimate distributions of radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality from digital mammography screening, considering exposure from screening and diagnostic mammography and dose variation across women. Design Two simulation-modeling approaches using common data on screening mammography from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium and radiation dose from mammography from the Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial. Setting U.S. population. Patients Women aged 40–74 years. Interventions Annual or biennial digital mammography screening from age 40, 45, or 50 until 74. Measurements Lifetime breast cancer deaths averted (benefits) and radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality per 100,000 women screened (harms). Results On average, annual screening of 100,000 women aged 40 to 74 years was projected to induce 125 breast cancers (95% confidence interval [CI]=88–178) leading to 16 deaths (95% CI=11–23) relative to 968 breast cancer deaths averted by early detection from screening. Women exposed at the 95th percentile were projected to develop 246 radiation-induced breast cancers leading to 32 deaths per 100,000 women. Women with large breasts requiring extra views for complete breast examination (8% of population) were projected to have higher radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality (266 cancers, 35 deaths per 100,000 women), compared to women with small or average breasts (113 cancers, 15 deaths per 100,000 women). Biennial screening starting at age 50 reduced risk of radiation-induced cancers 5-fold. Limitations We were unable to estimate years of life lost from radiation-induced breast cancer. Conclusions Radiation-induced breast cancer incidence and mortality from digital mammography screening are impacted by dose

  8. Dual-Hit Hypothesis Explains Pulmonary Hypoplasia in the Nitrofen Model of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Keijzer, Richard; Liu, Jason; Deimling, Julie; Tibboel, Dick; Post, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Pulmonary hypoplasia associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) remains a major therapeutic problem. Moreover, the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypoplasia in case of CDH is controversial. In particular, little is known about early lung development in this anomaly. To investigate lung development separate from diaphragm development we used an in vitro modification of the 2,4-dichlorophenyl-p-nitrophenylether (Nitrofen) animal model for CDH. This enabled us to investigate the direct effects of Nitrofen on early lung development and branching morphogenesis in an organotypic explant system without the influence of impaired diaphragm development. Epithelial cell differentiation of the lung explants was assessed using surfactant protein-C and Clara cell secretory protein-10 mRNA expression as markers. Furthermore, cell proliferation and apoptosis were investigated. Our results indicate that Nitrofen negatively influences branching morphogenesis of the lung. Initial lung anlage formation is not affected. In addition, epithelial cell differentiation and cell proliferation are attenuated in lungs exposed to Nitrofen. These data indicate that Nitrofen interferes with early lung development before and separate from (aberrant) diaphragm development. Therefore, we postulate the dual-hit hypothesis, which explains pulmonary hypoplasia in CDH by two insults, one affecting both lungs before diaphragm development and one affecting the ipsilateral lung after defective diaphragm development. PMID:10751355

  9. A previously undescribed syndrome combining fibular agenesis/hypoplasia, oligodactylous clubfeet, anonychia/ungual hypoplasia, and other defects.

    PubMed

    Santos, Silvana C; Pardono, Eliete; Ferreira da Costa, Maria Ione; de Melo, Aurea Nogueira; Graciani, Zodja; de Albuquerque e Souza, Alessandra Cavalcanti; Lezirovitz, Karina; Thiele-Aguiar, Renata Soares; Mingroni-Netto, Regina Célia; Opitz, John M; Kok, Fernando; Otto, Paulo A

    2008-12-15

    We describe an apparently new genetic syndrome in six members of a family living in a remote area in Northeastern Brazil. This syndrome comprises: short stature due to a marked decrease in the length of the lower limbs (predominantly mesomelic with fibular agenesis/marked hypoplasia), grossly malformed/deformed clubfeet with severe oligodactyly, upper limbs with acromial dimples and variable motion limitation of the forearms and/or hands, severe nail hypoplasia/anonychia sometimes associated with mild brachydactyly and occasionally with pre-axial polydactyly. This syndrome is apparently distinct from the syndrome of brachydactyly-ectrodactyly with fibular aplasia or hypoplasia (OMIM 113310), the syndrome of fibular aplasia or hypoplasia, femoral bowing and poly-, syn-, and oligodactyly (OMIM 228930), and from other previously described conditions exhibiting fibular agenesis/hypoplasia. Copyright (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia in rats

    SciT

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.; Harris, A.H.

    1991-05-01

    The role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia was examined. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of neurotensin produced dose-dependent hypothermia. Histamine appears to mediate neurotensin-induced hypothermia because the mast cell stabilizer disodium cromoglycate and antihistamines blocked the hypothermic effects of neurotensin. An ICV pretreatment with neurotensin antibody attenuated neurotensin-induced hypothermia, but did not attenuate radiation-induced hypothermia, suggesting that radiation-induced hypothermia was not mediated by neurotensin.

  11. Evidence for Radiation-Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation as a Major Cause of Radiation-Induced Death in Ferrets

    SciT

    Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Savage, Alexandria R.; Billings, Paul C.

    Purpose: The studies reported here were performed as part of a program in space radiation biology in which proton radiation like that present in solar particle events, as well as conventional gamma radiation, were being evaluated in terms of the ability to affect hemostasis. Methods and Materials: Ferrets were exposed to 0 to 2 Gy of whole-body proton or gamma radiation and monitored for 30 days. Blood was analyzed for blood cell counts, platelet clumping, thromboelastometry, and fibrin clot formation. Results: The lethal dose of radiation to 50% of the population (LD{sub 50}) of the ferrets was established at ∼1.5 Gy, with 100%more » mortality at 2 Gy. Hypocoagulability was present as early as day 7 postirradiation, with animals unable to generate a stable clot and exhibiting signs of platelet aggregation, thrombocytopenia, and fibrin clots in blood vessels of organs. Platelet counts were at normal levels during the early time points postirradiation when coagulopathies were present and becoming progressively more severe; platelet counts were greatly reduced at the time of the white blood cell nadir of 13 days. Conclusions: Data presented here provide evidence that death at the LD{sub 50} in ferrets is most likely due to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). These data question the current hypothesis that death at relatively low doses of radiation is due solely to the cell-killing effects of hematopoietic cells. The recognition that radiation-induced DIC is the most likely mechanism of death in ferrets raises the question of whether DIC is a contributing mechanism to radiation-induced death at relatively low doses in large mammals.« less

  12. Evidence for radiation-induced disseminated intravascular coagulation as a major cause of radiation-induced death in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Krigsfeld, Gabriel S; Savage, Alexandria R; Billings, Paul C; Lin, Liyong; Kennedy, Ann R

    2014-03-15

    The studies reported here were performed as part of a program in space radiation biology in which proton radiation like that present in solar particle events, as well as conventional gamma radiation, were being evaluated in terms of the ability to affect hemostasis. Ferrets were exposed to 0 to 2 Gy of whole-body proton or gamma radiation and monitored for 30 days. Blood was analyzed for blood cell counts, platelet clumping, thromboelastometry, and fibrin clot formation. The lethal dose of radiation to 50% of the population (LD50) of the ferrets was established at ∼ 1.5 Gy, with 100% mortality at 2 Gy. Hypocoagulability was present as early as day 7 postirradiation, with animals unable to generate a stable clot and exhibiting signs of platelet aggregation, thrombocytopenia, and fibrin clots in blood vessels of organs. Platelet counts were at normal levels during the early time points postirradiation when coagulopathies were present and becoming progressively more severe; platelet counts were greatly reduced at the time of the white blood cell nadir of 13 days. Data presented here provide evidence that death at the LD50 in ferrets is most likely due to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). These data question the current hypothesis that death at relatively low doses of radiation is due solely to the cell-killing effects of hematopoietic cells. The recognition that radiation-induced DIC is the most likely mechanism of death in ferrets raises the question of whether DIC is a contributing mechanism to radiation-induced death at relatively low doses in large mammals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Risk factors for teeth aplasia and hypoplasia in cleft lip and palate children].

    PubMed

    Korolenkova, M V; Starikova, N V; Ageeva, L V

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the significance of environmental risk factors for teeth aplasia and hypoplasia in cleft lip and palate children. Two hundred and forty-seven cleft lip and palate (CLP) children were enrolled in the study including 105 (42.5%) with bilateral CLP and 57.5% with unilateral CLP. The mean age was 11.2±4.9 years. Teeth condition was assessed clinically and radiologically. The impact of risk factors for teeth anomalies was analyzed by retrospective data obtained from computer database (absence of preoperative orthopedic treatment, palatal defects after primary palatoplasty and type of primary procedures). Surgical trauma by early periosteoplasty (at the age of 3-4 months), excessive scarring and tissue traction due to absence of early orthopedic treatment and palatal defect were associated with significantly higher incidence of incisors hypoplasia (both developmental enamel defects and microdentia) and aplasia of central incisors not seen in the other study subgroups. Incisors aplasia and hypoplasia in CLP patients do not always have disembryogenic origin but may depend on external environmental factors, including surgical trauma.

  14. Radiation induced genome instability: multiscale modelling and data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Sergey; Eidelman, Yuri

    2012-07-01

    Genome instability (GI) is thought to be an important step in cancer induction and progression. Radiation induced GI is usually defined as genome alterations in the progeny of irradiated cells. The aim of this report is to demonstrate an opportunity for integrative analysis of radiation induced GI on the basis of multiscale modelling. Integrative, systems level modelling is necessary to assess different pathways resulting in GI in which a variety of genetic and epigenetic processes are involved. The multilevel modelling includes the Monte Carlo based simulation of several key processes involved in GI: DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) generation in cells initially irradiated as well as in descendants of irradiated cells, damage transmission through mitosis. Taking the cell-cycle-dependent generation of DNA/chromosome breakage into account ensures an advantage in estimating the contribution of different DNA damage response pathways to GI, as to nonhomologous vs homologous recombination repair mechanisms, the role of DSBs at telomeres or interstitial chromosomal sites, etc. The preliminary estimates show that both telomeric and non-telomeric DSB interactions are involved in delayed effects of radiation although differentially for different cell types. The computational experiments provide the data on the wide spectrum of GI endpoints (dicentrics, micronuclei, nonclonal translocations, chromatid exchanges, chromosome fragments) similar to those obtained experimentally for various cell lines under various experimental conditions. The modelling based analysis of experimental data demonstrates that radiation induced GI may be viewed as processes of delayed DSB induction/interaction/transmission being a key for quantification of GI. On the other hand, this conclusion is not sufficient to understand GI as a whole because factors of DNA non-damaging origin can also induce GI. Additionally, new data on induced pluripotent stem cells reveal that GI is acquired in normal mature

  15. Brain stem hypoplasia associated with Cri-du-Chat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jin Ho; Lee, Ha Young; Lim, Myung Kwan; Kim, Mi Young; Kang, Young Hye; Lee, Kyung Hee; Cho, Soon Gu

    2013-01-01

    Cri-du-Chat syndrome, also called the 5p-syndrome, is a rare genetic abnormality, and only few cases have been reported on its brain MRI findings. We describe the magnetic resonance imaging findings of a 1-year-old girl with Cri-du-Chat syndrome who showed brain stem hypoplasia, particularly in the pons, with normal cerebellum and diffuse hypoplasia of the cerebral hemispheres. We suggest that Cri-du-Chat syndrome chould be suspected in children with brain stem hypoplasia, particularly for those with high-pitched cries.

  16. Orthognathic Surgery and Rhinoplasty to Address Nasomaxillary Hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Veeramani, Anamika; Sawh, Raj; Steinbacher, Derek M

    2017-11-01

    The treatment of nasomaxillary hypoplasia is challenging. The phenotype of Binder "syndrome" includes the following: midfacial hypoplasia, class III malocclusion, small or absent anterior nasal spine, flattened nose, horizontal nostrils, short columella, acute nasolabial angle, and a flat frontonasal angle. A staged approach is used, with orthognathic surgery to achieve vertical maxillary length and sagittal advancement, followed by rhinoplasty aimed to increase nasal tip projection, rotation, and columellar length. This article details the diagnosis and treatment of nasomaxillary hypoplasia, demonstrating the senior author's (D.M.S.) preferred approach and technical steps. Therapeutic, V.

  17. Radiation-induced segregation in model alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezawa, T.; Wakai, E.; Oshima, R.

    2000-12-01

    The dependence of the size factor of solutes on radiation-induced segregation (RIS) was studied. Ni-Si, Ni-Co, Ni-Cu, Ni-Mn, Ni-Pd, and Ni-Nb binary solid solution alloys were irradiated with electrons in a high voltage electron microscope at the same irradiation conditions. A focused beam and a grain boundary were utilized to generate a flow of point defects to cause RIS. From the concentration profile obtained by an energy dispersive X-ray analysis, the amount of RIS was calculated. The amount of RIS decreased as the size of the solute increased up to about 10%. However, as the size increased further, the amount of RIS increased. This result shows that RIS is not simply determined by the size effect rule.

  18. Enamel hypoplasia in the middle pleistocene hominids from Atapuerca (Spain).

    PubMed

    Bermúdez de Castro, J M; Pérez, P J

    1995-03-01

    The prevalence and chronology of enamel hypoplasias were studied in a hominid dental sample from the Sima de los Huesos (SH) Middle Pleistocene site at the Sierra de Atapuerca (Burgos, northern Spain). A total of 89 permanent maxillary teeth, 143 permanent mandibular teeth, and one deciduous lower canine, belonging to a minimum of 29 individuals, were examined. Excluding the antimeres (16 maxillary and 37 mandibular cases) from the sample, the prevalence of hypoplasias in the permanent dentition is 12.8% (23/179), whereas the deciduous tooth also showed an enamel defect. No statistically significant differences were found between both arcades and between the anterior and postcanine teeth for the prevalence of hypoplasias. In both the maxilla and the mandible the highest frequency of enamel hypoplasias was recorded in the canines. Only one tooth (a permanent upper canine) showed two different enamel defects, and most of the hypoplasias were expressed as faint linear horizontal defects. Taking into account the limitations that the incompleteness of virtually all permanent dentitions imposes, we have estimated that the frequency by individual in the SH hominid sample was not greater than 40%. Most of the hypoplasias occurred between birth and 7 years (N = 18, X = 3.5, SD = 1.3). Both the prevalence and severity of the hypoplasias of the SH hominid sample are significantly less than those of a large Neandertal sample. Furthermore, prehistoric hunter-gatherers and historic agricultural and industrial populations exhibit a prevalence of hypoplasias generally higher than that of the SH hominids. Implications for the survival strategies and life quality of the SH hominids are also discussed.

  19. A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury

    SciT

    Yannam, Govardhana Rao; Han, Bing; Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi

    Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ≥40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevatedmore » alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury.« less

  20. Pathophysiological Responses in Rat and Mouse Models of Radiation-Induced Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lianhong; Yang, Jianhua; Li, Guoqian; Li, Yi; Wu, Rong; Cheng, Jinping; Tang, Yamei

    2017-03-01

    The brain is the major dose-limiting organ in patients undergoing radiotherapy for assorted conditions. Radiation-induced brain injury is common and mainly occurs in patients receiving radiotherapy for malignant head and neck tumors, arteriovenous malformations, or lung cancer-derived brain metastases. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms of radiation-induced brain injury are largely unknown. Although many treatment strategies are employed for affected individuals, the effects remain suboptimal. Accordingly, animal models are extremely important for elucidating pathogenic radiation-associated mechanisms and for developing more efficacious therapies. So far, models employing various animal species with different radiation dosages and fractions have been introduced to investigate the prevention, mechanisms, early detection, and management of radiation-induced brain injury. However, these models all have limitations, and none are widely accepted. This review summarizes the animal models currently set forth for studies of radiation-induced brain injury, especially rat and mouse, as well as radiation dosages, dose fractionation, and secondary pathophysiological responses.

  1. Inactivation of kupffer cells by gadolinium chloride protects murine liver from radiation-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Du, Shi-Suo; Qiang, Min; Zeng, Zhao-Chong; Ke, Ai-Wu; Ji, Yuan; Zhang, Zheng-Yu; Zeng, Hai-Ying; Liu, Zhongshan

    2010-03-15

    To determine whether the inhibition of Kupffer cells before radiotherapy (RT) would protect hepatocytes from radiation-induced apoptosis. A single 30-Gy fraction was administered to the upper abdomen of Sprague-Dawley rats. The Kupffer cell inhibitor gadolinium chloride (GdCl3; 10 mg/kg body weight) was intravenously injected 24 h before RT. The rats were divided into four groups: group 1, sham RT plus saline (control group); group 2, sham RT plus GdCl3; group 3, RT plus saline; and group 4, RT plus GdCl3. Liver tissue was collected for measurement of apoptotic cytokine expression and evaluation of radiation-induced liver toxicity by analysis of liver enzyme activities, hepatocyte micronucleus formation, apoptosis, and histologic staining. The expression of interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha was significantly attenuated in group 4 compared with group 3 at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h after injection (p <0.05). At early points after RT, the rats in group 4 exhibited significantly lower levels of liver enzyme activity, apoptotic response, and hepatocyte micronucleus formation compared with those in group 3. Selective inactivation of Kupffer cells with GdCl3 reduced radiation-induced cytokine production and protected the liver against acute radiation-induced damage. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Pulmonary hypoplasia: An analysis of cases over a 20-year period].

    PubMed

    Delgado-Peña, Yanny Paola; Torrent-Vernetta, Alba; Sacoto, Gabriela; de Mir-Messa, Inés; Rovira-Amigo, Sandra; Gartner, Silvia; Moreno-Galdó, Antonio; Molino-Gahete, José Andrés; Castillo-Salinas, Felíx

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary hypoplasia is the most frequent congenital anomaly associated with perinatal mortality. A retrospective and descriptive review was conducted on cases of patients diagnosed with pulmonary hypoplasia between 1995 and 2014 in a tertiary university hospital. An analysis was made of the prenatal imaging, clinical manifestations, post-natal diagnostic tests, treatment and management, long-term follow up, and survival data. A total of 60 cases were identified, all of them with prenatal imaging. Sixteen patients required foetal surgery. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia was the most frequent diagnosis. Main clinical presentation was respiratory distress with severe hypoxemia and high requirements of mechanical ventilation. Mortality rate was 47% within first 60 days of life, and 75% for the first day of life. Pneumonia and recurrent bronchitis episodes were observed during follow-up. They had a lung function obstructive pattern, and their quality of life and exercise tolerance was good. High neonatal mortality and significant long-term morbidity associated with pulmonary hypoplasia requires an early diagnosis and a specialised multidisciplinary team management. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. A preclinical murine model for the early detection of radiation-induced brain injury using magnetic resonance imaging and behavioral tests for learning and memory: with applications for the evaluation of possible stem cell imaging agents and therapies.

    PubMed

    Ngen, Ethel J; Wang, Lee; Gandhi, Nishant; Kato, Yoshinori; Armour, Michael; Zhu, Wenlian; Wong, John; Gabrielson, Kathleen L; Artemov, Dmitri

    2016-06-01

    Stem cell therapies are being developed for radiotherapy-induced brain injuries (RIBI). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers advantages for imaging transplanted stem cells. However, most MRI cell-tracking techniques employ superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIOs), which are difficult to distinguish from hemorrhage. In current preclinical RIBI models, hemorrhage occurs concurrently with other injury markers. This makes the evaluation of the recruitment of transplanted SPIO-labeled stem cells to injury sites difficult. Here, we developed a RIBI model, with early injury markers reflective of hippocampal dysfunction, which can be detected noninvasively with MRI and behavioral tests. Lesions were generated by sub-hemispheric irradiation of mouse hippocampi with single X-ray beams of 80 Gy. Lesion formation was monitored with anatomical and contrast-enhanced MRI and changes in memory and learning were assessed with fear-conditioning tests. Early injury markers were detected 2 weeks after irradiation. These included an increase in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier, demonstrated by a 92 ± 20 % contrast enhancement of the irradiated versus the non-irradiated brain hemispheres, within 15 min of the administration of an MRI contrast agent. A change in short-term memory was also detected, as demonstrated by a 40.88 ± 5.03 % decrease in the freezing time measured during the short-term memory context test at this time point, compared to that before irradiation. SPIO-labeled stem cells transplanted contralateral to the lesion migrated toward the lesion at this time point. No hemorrhage was detected up to 10 weeks after irradiation. This model can be used to evaluate SPIO-based stem cell-tracking agents, short-term.

  4. Epidemiology of radiation-induced cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Radford, E P

    1983-01-01

    The epidemiology of radiation-induced cancer is important for theoretical and practical insights that these studies give to human cancer in general and because we have more evidence from radiation-exposed populations than for any other environmental carcinogen. On theoretical and experimental grounds, the linear no-threshold dose-response relationship is a reasonable basis for extrapolating effects to low doses. Leukemia is frequently the earliest observed radiogenic cancer but is now considered to be of minor importance, because the radiation effect dies out after 25 or 30 years, whereas solid tumors induced by radiation develop later and the increased cancer risk evidently persists for the remaining lifetime. Current estimates of the risk of particular cancers from radiation exposure cannot be fully evaluated until the population under study have been followed at least 40 or 50 years after exposure. Recent evidence indicates that for lung cancer induction, combination of cigarette smoking and radiation exposure leads to risks that are not multiplicative but rather nearly additive. PMID:6653538

  5. Radiation-induced valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Gujral, Dorothy M; Lloyd, Guy; Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev

    2016-02-15

    Radiation to the mediastinum is a key component of treatment with curative intent for a range of cancers including Hodgkin's lymphoma and breast cancer. Exposure to radiation is associated with a risk of radiation-induced heart valve damage characterised by valve fibrosis and calcification. There is a latent interval of 10-20 years between radiation exposure and development of clinically significant heart valve disease. Risk is related to radiation dose received, interval from exposure and use of concomitant chemotherapy. Long-term outlook and the risk of valve surgery are related to the effects of radiation on mediastinal structures including pulmonary fibrosis and pericardial constriction. Dose prediction models to predict the risk of heart valve disease in the future and newer radiation techniques to reduce the radiation dose to the heart are being developed. Surveillance strategies for this cohort of cancer survivors at risk of developing significant heart valve complications are required. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Radiation-Induced Amorphization of Crystalline Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fama, M.; Loeffler, M. J.; Raut, U.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    We study radiation-induced amorphization of crystalline ice, ana lyzing the resu lts of three decades of experiments with a variety of projectiles, irradiation energy, and ice temperature, finding a similar trend of increasing resistance of amorphization with temperature and inconsistencies in results from different laboratories. We discuss the temperature dependence of amorphization in terms of the 'thermal spike' model. We then discuss the common use of the 1.65 micrometer infrared absorption band of water as a measure of degree of crystallinity, an increasingly common procedure to analyze remote sensing data of astronomical icy bodies. The discussion is based on new, high quality near-infrared refl ectance absorption spectra measured between 1.4 and 2.2 micrometers for amorphous and crystalline ices irradiated with 225 keV protons at 80 K. We found that, after irradiation with 10(exp 15) protons per square centimeter, crystalline ice films thinner than the ion range become fully amorphous, and that the infrared absorption spectra show no significant changes upon further irradiation. The complete amorphization suggests that crystalline ice observed in the outer Solar System, including trans-neptunian objects, may results from heat from internal sources or from the impact of icy meteorites or comets.

  7. Dermatologic findings of focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz syndrome).

    PubMed

    Bree, Alanna F; Grange, Dorothy K; Hicks, M John; Goltz, Robert W

    2016-03-01

    Goltz syndrome, caused by mutations in PORCN, is an X-linked dominant ectodermal dysplasia which is also known as focal dermal hypoplasia. This name is derived from the predominant pathologic skin findings of the syndrome. Nineteen Goltz-affected participants attended a multidisciplinary scientific and clinical conference convened by the National Foundation for Ectodermal Dysplasia which allowed further characterization of the features of this very rare condition. At birth, the affected areas of skin are typically erythematous and fragile. The hallmark cutaneous features, which vary widely due to mosacism and X-inactivation, include the previously described skin changes of asymmetric Blaschko-linear and reticulated atrophy, pigmentary changes, and telangectasias. Lipomatous changes and papillomas as characteristically defined were reported in the majority of patients. A newly recognized skin finding was progressive hyperpigmented freckling that occurred within the hypopigmented areas which were noted to be photosensitive. Many patients also had a pebbly texture to the central face, dorsal hands and feet. Punctate erosions within the atrophic areas and hypohidrosis were also common. Most had patchy alopecia and many had diffusely thin hair. Scanning electron microscopy of the hair shafts revealed abnormalities in the majority of participants with several different features identified, including atrophic hairs with reduced diameters, markedly flattened hairs as noted in cross-sectional views, trichorrhexis nodosa, pili torti, and pili trianguli et canaliculi. Nail changes included V-nicking and longitudinal ridging of the nail plate, in addition to micronychia. Early recognition of the dermatologic features, in addition to the variable but universal limb anomalies, of Goltz syndrome will allow early and accurate diagnosis without the need for extensive diagnostic studies, while also allowing for accurate prognosis and appropriate genetic counseling. © 2016 Wiley

  8. Glycyrrhetinic acid alleviates radiation-induced lung injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinmei; Zhang, Weijian; Zhang, Lurong; Zhang, Jiemin; Chen, Xiuying; Yang, Meichun; Chen, Ting; Hong, Jinsheng

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common complication of thoracic radiotherapy, but efficacious therapy for RILI is lacking. This study ascertained whether glycyrrhetinic acid (GA; a functional hydrolyzed product of glycyrrhizic acid, which is extracted from herb licorice) can protect against RILI and investigated its relationship to the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1/Smads signaling pathway. C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: a control group, a GA group and two irradiation (IR) groups. IR groups were exposed to a single fraction of X-rays (12 Gy) to the thorax and administered normal saline (IR + NS group) or GA (IR + GA group). Two days and 17 days after irradiation, histologic analyses were performed to assess the degree of lung injury, and the expression of TGF-β1, Smad2, Smad3 and Smad7 was recorded. GA administration mitigated the histologic changes of lung injury 2 days and 17 days after irradiation. Protein and mRNA expression of TGF-β1, Smad2 and Smad3, and the mRNA level of Smad7, in lung tissue were significantly elevated after irradiation. GA decreased expression of TGF-β1, Smad2 and Smad3 in lung tissue, but did not increase Smad7 expression. GA can protect against early-stage RILI. This protective effect may be associated with inhibition of the TGF-β1/Smads signaling pathway. PMID:27672101

  9. Radar detection of radiation-induced ionization in air

    DOEpatents

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Heifetz, Alexander; Chien, Hual-Te; Liao, Shaolin; Koehl, Eugene R.; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    2015-07-21

    A millimeter wave measurement system has been developed for remote detection of airborne nuclear radiation, based on electromagnetic scattering from radiation-induced ionization in air. Specifically, methods of monitoring radiation-induced ionization of air have been investigated, and the ionized air has been identified as a source of millimeter wave radar reflection, which can be utilized to determine the size and strength of a radiation source.

  10. Treatment of radiation-induced cystitis with hyperbaric oxygen

    SciT

    Weiss, J.P.; Boland, F.P.; Mori, H.

    The effects of hyperbaric oxygen on radiation cystitis have been documented in 3 patients with radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis refractory to conventional therapy. Cessation of gross hematuria and reversal of cystoscopic bladder changes were seen in response to a series of hyperbaric oxygen treatments of 2 atmosphere absolute pressure for 2 hours. To our knowledge this is the first report of cystoscopically documented healing of radiation-induced bladder injury.

  11. Radiation-Induced Second Cancer Risk Estimates From Radionuclide Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarz, Bryan; Besemer, Abigail

    2017-09-01

    The use of radionuclide therapy in the clinical setting is expected to increase significantly over the next decade. There is an important need to understand the radiation-induced second cancer risk associated with these procedures. In this study the radiation-induced cancer risk in five radionuclide therapy patients was investigated. These patients underwent serial SPECT imaging scans following injection as part of a clinical trial testing the efficacy of a 131Iodine-labeled radiopharmaceutical. Using these datasets the committed absorbed doses to multiple sensitive structures were calculated using RAPID, which is a novel Monte Carlo-based 3D dosimetry platform developed for personalized dosimetry. The excess relative risk (ERR) for radiation-induced cancer in these structures was then derived from these dose estimates following the recommendations set forth in the BEIR VII report. The radiation-induced leukemia ERR was highest among all sites considered reaching a maximum value of approximately 4.5. The radiation-induced cancer risk in the kidneys, liver and spleen ranged between 0.3 and 1.3. The lifetime attributable risks (LARs) were also calculated, which ranged from 30 to 1700 cancers per 100,000 persons and were highest for leukemia and the liver for both males and females followed by radiation-induced spleen and kidney cancer. The risks associated with radionuclide therapy are similar to the risk associated with external beam radiation therapy.

  12. Radiation induced abnormalities in early in vitro mouse embryos

    SciT

    Kirkpatrick, J.F.

    1973-08-01

    Female mice were superovulated and mated, and the two-cell embryos were collected and cultured in vitro. The embryos were exposed to x-irradiation (0 to 491 rads) during the two-cell stage before the appearance of the next cleavage plate, placed in new unirradiated culture medium and observed during subsequent development. Morphological abnormalities, which occurred as a result of irradiation, included fragmentation, disintegration, granlation, incomplete cleavage, cleavage cessation, nuclear degeneration and pycnosis and cytoplasmic vacuolization. There was no damage to the zona pellucida. The types of abnormalities indicate an agreement with the results of previous in vivo studies. A distinct correlation existedmore » between morphological abnormalities and embryo death. The greatest number of abnormalities resulted within five hours following irradiation, but increased through 20 hours post-exposure. At doses above 300 rads, the magnitude of damage was greater in the in vitro embryos than that shown in previous in vivo studies. (auth)« less

  13. Familial intra-areolar polythelia with mammary hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Rintala, A; Norio, R

    1982-01-01

    Dysplastic divided nipples (intra-areolar polythelia) have been found bilaterally in a mother, her two daughters and one son. Two of the patients had mammary hypoplasia, one had unilateral hypoplasia of the pectoral muscle and duplication of the renal pelvis and ureter. The mammary findings are consistent with autosomal dominant inheritance. Whether they represent a new mammo-renal syndrome is uncertain. Reconstructive surgery was performed on two patients. Due to the deformity the mother was unable to nurse her children; following reconstructive surgery the daughter was able to feed her baby normally.

  14. Lissencephaly with brainstem and cerebellar hypoplasia and congenital cataracts.

    PubMed

    Abumansour, Iman S; Wrogemann, Jens; Chudley, Albert E; Chodirker, Bernard N; Salman, Michael S

    2014-06-01

    Classical lissencephaly may be associated with cerebellar hypoplasia and when significant cerebellar abnormalities occur, defects in proteins encoded by TUBA1A, RELN, and very-low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) genes have been reported. We present a neonate with a severe neurologic phenotype associated with hypotonia, oropharyngeal incoordination that required a gastric tube for feeding, intractable epilepsy, and congenital cataracts. Her brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed classical lissencephaly, ventriculomegaly, absent corpus callosum, globular and vertical hippocampi, and severe cerebellar and brainstem hypoplasia. She died at 6 weeks of age. No specific molecular diagnosis was made. This likely represents a previously undescribed genetic lissencephaly syndrome. © The Author(s) 2013.

  15. Effects of Pharmacological Inhibition and Genetic Deficiency of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury

    SciT

    Abderrahmani, Rym; Francois, Agnes; Buard, Valerie

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate effects of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) genetic deficiency and pharmacological PAI-1 inhibition with PAI-039 in a mouse model of radiation-induced enteropathy. Methods and Materials: Wild-type (Wt) and PAI-1{sup -/-} knockout mice received a single dose of 19 Gy to an exteriorized localized intestinal segment. Sham and irradiated Wt mice were treated orally with 1 mg/g of PAI-039. Histological modifications were quantified using a radiation injury score. Moreover, intestinal gene expression was monitored by real-time PCR. Results: At 3 days after irradiation, PAI-039 abolished the radiation-induced increase in the plasma active form of PAI-1 and limited themore » radiation-induced gene expression of transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1), CTGF, PAI-1, and COL1A2. Moreover, PAI-039 conferred temporary protection against early lethality. PAI-039 treatment limited the radiation-induced increase of CTGF and PAI-1 at 2 weeks after irradiation but had no effect at 6 weeks. Radiation injuries were less severe in PAI-1{sup -/-} mice than in Wt mice, and despite the beneficial effect, 3 days after irradiation, PAI-039 had no effects on microscopic radiation injuries compared to untreated Wt mice. Conclusions: A genetic deficiency of PAI-1 is associated with amelioration of late radiation enteropathy. Pharmacological inhibition of PAI-1 by PAI-039 positively impacts the early, acute phase increase in plasma PAI-1 and the associated radiation-induced gene expression of inflammatory/extracellular matrix proteins. Since PAI-039 has been shown to inhibit the active form of PAI-1, as opposed to the complete loss of PAI-1 in the knockout animals, these data suggest that a PAI-1 inhibitor could be beneficial in treating radiation-induced tissue injury in acute settings where PAI-1 is elevated.« less

  16. Clinical and dosimetric factors of radiation-induced esophageal injury: radiation-induced esophageal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Wen-Bo; Zhao, Yan-Hui; Zhao, Yan-Bin; Wang, Rui-Zhi

    2005-05-07

    To analyze the clinical and dosimetric predictive factors for radiation-induced esophageal injury in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). We retrospectively analyzed 208 consecutive patients (146 men and 62 women) with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT. The median age of the patients was 64 years (range 35-87 years). The clinical and treatment parameters including gender, age, performance status, sequential chemotherapy, concurrent chemotherapy, presence of carinal or subcarinal lymph nodes, pretreatment weight loss, mean dose to the entire esophagus, maximal point dose to the esophagus, and percentage of volume of esophagus receiving >55 Gy were studied. Clinical and dosimetric factors for radiation-induced acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury were analyzed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. Twenty-five (12%) of the two hundred and eight patients developed acute or late grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Among them, nine patients had both acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury, two died of late esophageal perforation. Concurrent chemotherapy and maximal point dose to the esophagus > or =60 Gy were significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Fifty-four (26%) of the two hundred and eight patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Among them, 25 (46%) developed grade 3-5 esophageal injury (P = 0.0001<0.01). However, no grade 3-5 esophageal injury occurred in patients who received a maximal point dose to the esophagus <60 Gy (P = 0.0001<0.01). Concurrent chemotherapy and the maximal esophageal point dose > or =60 Gy are significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury in patients with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT.

  17. Ionizing radiation-induced acoustics for radiotherapy and diagnostic radiology applications.

    PubMed

    Hickling, Susannah; Xiang, Liangzhong; Jones, Kevin C; Parodi, Katia; Assmann, Walter; Avery, Stephen; Hobson, Maritza; El Naqa, Issam

    2018-04-21

    Acoustic waves are induced via the thermoacoustic effect in objects exposed to a pulsed beam of ionizing radiation. This phenomenon has interesting potential applications in both radiotherapy dosimetry and treatment guidance as well as low dose radiological imaging. After initial work in the field in the 1980s and early 1990s, little research was done until 2013 when interest was rejuvenated, spurred on by technological advances in ultrasound transducers and the increasing complexity of radiotherapy delivery systems. Since then, many studies have been conducted and published applying ionizing radiation-induced acoustic principles into three primary research areas: Linear accelerator photon beam dosimetry, proton therapy range verification, and radiological imaging. This review article introduces the theoretical background behind ionizing radiation-induced acoustic waves, summarizes recent advances in the field, and provides an outlook on how the detection of ionizing radiation-induced acoustic waves can be used for relative and in vivo dosimetry in photon therapy, localization of the Bragg peak in proton therapy, and as a low-dose medical imaging modality. Future prospects and challenges for clinical implementation of these techniques are discussed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Patients with Testicular Cancer Undergoing CT Surveillance Demonstrate a Pitfall of Radiation-induced Cancer Risk Estimates: The Timing Paradox

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Jonathan D.; Lee, Richard J.; Gilmore, Michael E.; Turan, Ekin A.; Singh, Sarabjeet; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Liu, Bob; Kong, Chung Yin; Gazelle, G. Scott

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate a limitation of lifetime radiation-induced cancer risk metrics in the setting of testicular cancer surveillance—in particular, their failure to capture the delayed timing of radiation-induced cancers over the course of a patient’s lifetime. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained for the use of computed tomographic (CT) dosimetry data in this study. Informed consent was waived. This study was HIPAA compliant. A Markov model was developed to project outcomes in patients with testicular cancer who were undergoing CT surveillance in the decade after orchiectomy. To quantify effects of early versus delayed risks, life expectancy losses and lifetime mortality risks due to testicular cancer were compared with life expectancy losses and lifetime mortality risks due to radiation-induced cancers from CT. Projections of life expectancy loss, unlike lifetime risk estimates, account for the timing of risks over the course of a lifetime, which enabled evaluation of the described limitation of lifetime risk estimates. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods were used to estimate the uncertainty of the results. Results: As an example of evidence yielded, 33-year-old men with stage I seminoma who were undergoing CT surveillance were projected to incur a slightly higher lifetime mortality risk from testicular cancer (598 per 100 000; 95% uncertainty interval [UI]: 302, 894) than from radiation-induced cancers (505 per 100 000; 95% UI: 280, 730). However, life expectancy loss attributable to testicular cancer (83 days; 95% UI: 42, 124) was more than three times greater than life expectancy loss attributable to radiation-induced cancers (24 days; 95% UI: 13, 35). Trends were consistent across modeled scenarios. Conclusion: Lifetime radiation risk estimates, when used for decision making, may overemphasize radiation-induced cancer risks relative to short-term health risks. © RSNA, 2012 Supplemental material: http

  19. Glycyrrhetinic acid alleviates radiation-induced lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinmei; Zhang, Weijian; Zhang, Lurong; Zhang, Jiemin; Chen, Xiuying; Yang, Meichun; Chen, Ting; Hong, Jinsheng

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common complication of thoracic radiotherapy, but efficacious therapy for RILI is lacking. This study ascertained whether glycyrrhetinic acid (GA; a functional hydrolyzed product of glycyrrhizic acid, which is extracted from herb licorice) can protect against RILI and investigated its relationship to the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1/Smads signaling pathway. C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: a control group, a GA group and two irradiation (IR) groups. IR groups were exposed to a single fraction of X-rays (12 Gy) to the thorax and administered normal saline (IR + NS group) or GA (IR + GA group). Two days and 17 days after irradiation, histologic analyses were performed to assess the degree of lung injury, and the expression of TGF-β1, Smad2, Smad3 and Smad7 was recorded. GA administration mitigated the histologic changes of lung injury 2 days and 17 days after irradiation. Protein and mRNA expression of TGF-β1, Smad2 and Smad3, and the mRNA level of Smad7, in lung tissue were significantly elevated after irradiation. GA decreased expression of TGF-β1, Smad2 and Smad3 in lung tissue, but did not increase Smad7 expression. GA can protect against early-stage RILI. This protective effect may be associated with inhibition of the TGF-β1/Smads signaling pathway. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  20. Hyperbaric oxygen: Primary treatment of radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis

    SciT

    Weiss, J.P.; Neville, E.C.

    Of 8 patients with symptoms of advanced cystitis due to pelvic radiation treated with hyperbaric oxygen 7 are persistently improved during followup. All 6 patients treated for gross hematuria requiring hospitalization have been free of symptoms for an average of 24 months (range 6 to 43 months). One patient treated for stress incontinence currently is dry despite little change in bladder capacity, implying salutary effect from hyperbaric oxygen on the sphincter mechanism. One patient with radiation-induced prostatitis failed to respond. This experience suggests that hyperbaric oxygen should be considered the primary treatment for patients with symptomatic radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis.

  1. Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Conditioned Taste Aversion Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    to Walter A. Hunt. 86 4 21 144 . J Jr -.W U *’ = 7 . 7 .: M: W. ,WLW;i , .-, -’ .’P. %k T .- - ’ .: ’W ; .a --,.-" -. t .:-. , 56 RABIN AND HUNT can...8217. 7m. U RADIATION-INDUCED TASTE AVERSIONS 57 induced CTA 11021. Alternatively, when the antihistamine is [ 21 . A radiation-induced CTA can be...in rats. Pharmmad psychioactive drugs. J (omp Phvsiod Pvchld .;’: 21 -26. 1972. Biochem Behav 17: 305-311. 1982. 4. Berger. B. D.. C. D. Wise and L

  2. OSTEOLYSIS FOLLOWING RADIATION INDUCED FRACTURE OF THE CLAVICLE (in German)

    SciT

    Kolar, J.

    1961-04-01

    A case is described in which osteolysis of the lateral half of the clavicle was observed following a radiation induced fracture. No previous observation of a similar complication following irradiation of bone has been described. The phenomenon may be compared with the spontaneous absorption of bone following fractures in this region. (auth)

  3. Apatinib in refractory radiation-induced brain edema

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei Guo; Weng, Yi Ming; Dong, Yi; Li, Xiang Pan; Song, Qi-Bin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Apatinib is a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, which has observed to be effective and safe in refractory radiation-induced brain edema, like Avastin did. Till now, there is no case report after apatinib came in the market. Patient concerns: Two patients who received brain radiotherapy developed clinical manifestations of brain edema, including dizziness, headache, limb activity disorder, and so on. Diagnoses: Two patients were both diagnosed as refractory radiation-induced brain edema. Interventions: Two patients received apatinib (500 mg/day) for 2 and 4 weeks. Outcomes: Two patients got symptomatic improvements from apatinib in different degrees. Magnetic resonance imaging after apatinib treatments showed that compared with pre-treatment imaging, the perilesional edema reduced dramatically. However, the toxicity of apatinib was controllable and tolerable. Lessons: Apatinib can obviously relieve the symptoms of refractory radiation-induced brain edema and improve the quality of life, which offers a new method for refractory radiation-induced brain edema in clinical practices. But that still warrants further investigation in the prospective study. PMID:29145238

  4. Bilateral renal dysplasia with nephron hypoplasia in a foal.

    PubMed

    Zicker, S C; Marty, G D; Carlson, G P; Madigan, J E; Smith, J M; Goetzman, B W

    1990-06-15

    Bilateral renal dysplasia and nephron hypoplasia was diagnosed in a Quarter Horse foal with clinical signs of lethargy, convulsions, and diarrhea. Laboratory evaluation revealed anemia, hypoproteinemia, leukopenia, hyponatremia, hypochloremia, and hyposmolality. The foal also had high concentrations of serum creatinine, BUN, and phosphorus. Evaluation of urinary indices revealed a high ratio of urinary gamma-glutamyl-transferase activity to concentration of creatinine, as well as a high fractional clearance ratio of sodium and potassium. Intravenous treatment with saline solution (0.9% NaCl) and antimicrobials provided only temporary resolution of some of the abnormalities. Diagnosis was partly established by histologic evaluation of renal tissue obtained via an ultrasonographically guided biopsy and was confirmed at necropsy. Pathologic changes in the kidney were unique in that the size of the kidneys, along with the appearance and number of glomeruli, were essentially normal despite marked hypoplasia of nephron tubules in the medulla.

  5. Treatment of enamel hypoplasia in a patient with Usher syndrome.

    PubMed

    de la Peña, Victor Alonso; Valea, Martín Caserío

    2011-08-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is a group of autosomal recessive diseases characterized by the association of retinitis pigmentosa with sensorineural hearing loss. There are three types of USH. In addition, in people with USH and hypoplasia, the thickness of the enamel is reduced. The authors describe a case of a patient with USH type II associated with severe enamel hypoplasia and multiple unerupted teeth. The authors placed direct composite crowns and extracted severely affected and impacted molars. There is little information available on the oral pathologies of USH. Because the authors did not know how the patient's condition would progress and the patient still was growing, the authors treated the patient conservatively by placing direct composite crowns. The treatment has met both esthetic and functional expectations for 10 years. Copyright © 2011 American Dental Association. All rights reserved.

  6. A non-human primate model of human radiation-induced venocclusive liver disease and hepatocyte injury

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M.; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Galambos, Csaba; Fong, Jason V.; Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A.; Yamanouchi, Kosho; Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Roy-Chowdhury, Jayanta; Locker, Joseph; Abe, Michio; Enke, Charles A.; Baranowska-Kortylewicz, Janina; Solberg, Timothy D.; Guha, Chandan; Fox, Ira J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Since the characteristic venocclusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic venocclusive disease. Methods We performed a dose escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results At doses ≥40Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses where radiation-induced liver disease was mild or non-existent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human venocclusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury. PMID:24315566

  7. First-trimester sonographic findings associated with a Dandy-Walker malformation and inferior vermian hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Bornstein, Eran; Goncalves Rodríguez, José Luis; Álvarez Pavón, Erika Carolina; Quiroga, Héctor; Or, Drorit; Divon, Michael Y

    2013-10-01

    We report 2 cases in which first-trimester measurements of the intracranial translucency and the brain stem-to-occipital bone diameter were markedly enlarged. This finding was thought to represent an abnormal fourth ventricle-cisterna magna complex. Subsequently, the diagnoses of a Dandy-Walker malformation with partial vermian agenesis in 1 case and inferior vermian hypoplasia in the other were established and confirmed by either postmortem autopsy or postnatal magnetic resonance imaging. These cases suggest that evaluation of the fourth ventricle-cisterna magna complex, by measuring the intracranial translucency or brain stem-to-occipital bone diameter may identify some cases with structural malformations of the cerebellum as early as the first trimester.

  8. Using Imaging Methods to Interrogate Radiation-Induced Cell Signaling

    SciT

    Shankaran, Harish; Weber, Thomas J.; Freiin von Neubeck, Claere H.

    2012-04-01

    There is increasing emphasis on the use of systems biology approaches to define radiation induced responses in cells and tissues. Such approaches frequently rely on global screening using various high throughput 'omics' platforms. Although these methods are ideal for obtaining an unbiased overview of cellular responses, they often cannot reflect the inherent heterogeneity of the system or provide detailed spatial information. Additionally, performing such studies with multiple sampling time points can be prohibitively expensive. Imaging provides a complementary method with high spatial and temporal resolution capable of following the dynamics of signaling processes. In this review, we utilize specific examplesmore » to illustrate how imaging approaches have furthered our understanding of radiation induced cellular signaling. Particular emphasis is placed on protein co-localization, and oscillatory and transient signaling dynamics.« less

  9. Modulation of Radiation-Induced Apoptosis by Thiolamines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warters, R. L.; Roberts, J. C.; Wilmore, B. H.; Kelley, L. L.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to the thiolamine radioprotector N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-propanediamine (WR-1065) induced apoptosis in the mouse TB8-3 hybridoma after 60-minute (LD(sub50) = 4.5mM) or during a 20-hour (LD(sub50) = 0.15 mM) exposure. In contrast, a 20-hour exposure to 17 mM L-cysteine or 10 mM cysteamine was required to induce 50 percent apoptosis within 20 hours. Apoptosis was not induced by either a 60-minute or 20-hour exposure to 10 mM of the thiazolidime prodrugs ribose-cysteine (RibCys) or ribose-cysteamine (RibCyst). Thiolamine-induced apoptosis appeared to be a p53-independent process since it was induced by WR-1065 exposure in human HL60 cells. Exposure to WR-1065 (4mM for 15 minutes) or cysteine (10mM for 60 minutes) before and during irradiation protected cells against the induction of both DNA double-strand breaks and apoptosis, while exposure to RibCys (10 mM for 3 hours) did not. Treatment with either WR-1065, cysteine, RibCys or RibCyst for 60 minutes beginning 60 minutes after irradiation did not affect the level of radiation-induced apoptosis. In contrast, treatment with either cysteine, cysteamine or RibCys for 20 hours beginning 60 minutes after irradiation enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis. Similar experiments could not be conducted with WR-1065 because of its extreme toxicity. Our results indicate that thiolamine enhancement of radiation-induced apoptosis is not involved in their previously reported capacity to reduce radiation-induced mutations.

  10. Occupational therapy intervention with radiation-induced brachial plexopathy.

    PubMed

    Cooper, J

    1998-06-01

    Occupational therapy intervention minimizes disability and facilitates optimum functional independence. The range of dysfunction experienced by patients with radiation-induced brachial plexopathy includes physical, psychological, emotional and social difficulties. The occupational therapist works as part of the multiprofessional team to use a client-centred, problem-solving approach to address the problems and enable the patient to adapt to the altered body image and disabilities.

  11. Radiation-Induced Immune Modulation in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    cancers. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Radiation, Dendritic Cells , Cytokines, PSA 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18...radiation is more than a cytotoxic agent. Our recent study has shown that radiation modulates the immune system by affecting dendritic cell (DC...translate radiation-induced tumor cell death into generation of tumor immunity in the hope of optimizing therapy for localized and disseminated prostate

  12. Ossification of the posterior atlantoaxial membrane associated with atlas hypoplasia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yichen; Zhou, Dongxiao; Gao, Rui; Ma, Jun; Wang, Ce; Zhou, Xuhui

    2016-11-01

    Hypoplasia with an intact posterior arch of the atlas and ossification of the posterior atlantoaxial membrane (PAAM) are individually rare. The patient presented with a 6-month history of progressive weakness and paresthesia of his lower extremities. Cervical myelopathy resulting from atlas hypoplasia and ossification of the posterior atlantoaxial membrane. Laminectomy of the atlas with duroplasty. Preoperative symptoms were alleviated. In most reported cases, either atlas hypoplasia or ossification of the PAAM is responsible for patients' myelopathy. The case illustrated here, to the best of our knowledge, is the first one with coexistent atlas hypoplasia and ossification of the PAAM. And laminectomy of the atlas with duroplasty provided satisfied outcome.

  13. Protection from radiation-induced pneumonitis using cerium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Colon, Jimmie; Herrera, Luis; Smith, Joshua; Patil, Swanand; Komanski, Chris; Kupelian, Patrick; Seal, Sudipta; Jenkins, D Wayne; Baker, Cheryl H

    2009-06-01

    In an effort to combat the harmful effects of radiation exposure, we propose that rare-earth cerium oxide (CeO(2)) nanoparticles (free-radical scavengers) protect normal tissue from radiation-induced damage. Preliminary studies suggest that these nanoparticles may be a therapeutic regenerative nanomedicine that will scavenge reactive oxygen species, which are responsible for radiation-induced cell damage. The effectiveness of CeO(2) nanoparticles in radiation protection in murine models during high-dose radiation exposure is investigated, with the ultimate goal of offering a new approach to radiation protection, using nanotechnology. We show that CeO(2) nanoparticles are well tolerated by live animals, and they prevent the onset of radiation-induced pneumonitis when delivered to live animals exposed to high doses of radiation. In the end, these studies provide a tremendous potential for radioprotection and can lead to significant benefits for the preservation of human health and the quality of life for humans receiving radiation therapy.

  14. Modeling radiation induced segregation in Iron-Chromium alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Senninger, Oriane; Soisson, Frederic; Martinez Saez, Enrique; ...

    2015-10-16

    Radiation induced segregation in ferritic Fe-Cr alloys is studied by Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations that include di usion of chemical species by vacancy and interstitial migration, recombination, and elimination at sinks. The parameters of the di usion model are tted to DFT calculations. Transport coe cients that control the coupling between di usion of defects and chemical species are measured in dilute and concentrated alloys. Radiation induced segregation near grain boundaries is directly simulated with this model. We nd that the di usion of vacancies toward sinks leads to a Cr depletion. Meanwhile, the di usion of self-interstitials causesmore » an enrichment of Cr in the vicinity of sinks. For concentrations lower than 15%Cr, we predict that sinks will be enriched with Cr for temperatures lower than a threshold. When the temperature is above this threshold value, the sinks will be depleted in Cr. These results are compared to previous experimental studies and models. Cases of radiation induced precipitation and radiation accelerated precipitation are considered.« less

  15. Thyroid Hypoplasia in Congenital Hypothyroidism Associated with Thyroid Peroxidase Mutations.

    PubMed

    Stoupa, Athanasia; Chaabane, Rim; Guériouz, Manelle; Raynaud-Ravni, Catherine; Nitschke, Patrick; Bole-Feyset, Christine; Mnif, Mouna; Ammar Keskes, Leila; Hachicha, Mongia; Belguith, Neila; Polak, Michel; Carré, Aurore

    2018-05-23

    Primary congenital hypothyroidism (CH) affects about 1:3000 newborns worldwide and is mainly caused by defects in thyroid gland development (thyroid dysgenesis, TD) or hormone synthesis. A genetic cause is identified in less than 10% of TD patients. Our aim was to identify novel candidate genes in patients with TD using next-generation sequencing tools. We used whole exome sequencing (WES) to study two families, a consanguineous Tunisian family (one child with severe thyroid hypoplasia) and a French family (two newborn siblings, with a thyroid in situ that was not enlarged on ultrasound at diagnosis). Variants in candidate genes were filtered according to type of variation, frequency in public and in-house databases, in silico prediction tools, and inheritance mode. We unexpectedly identified three different variants of the thyroid peroxidase (TPO) gene. A homozygous missense mutation (c.875C>T, p.S292F) was found in the Tunisian patient with severe thyroid hypoplasia. The two French siblings were compound heterozygotes (c.387delC/c.2578G>A, p.N129Kfs*80/p.G860R) for TPO mutations. All three mutations have been previously described in patients with goitrous CH. In our patients treatment was initiated immediately after diagnosis and the effect, if any, of TSH stimulation of these thyroids remains unclear. We report the first cases of thyroid hypoplasia at diagnosis during neonatal period in patients with CH and TPO mutations. These cases highlight the importance of screening for TPO mutations not only in goitrous CH, but also in thyroids of normal or small size, and they broaden the clinical spectrum of described phenotypes.

  16. Hyberbaric oxygen as sole treatment for severe radiation - induced haemorrhagic cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Dellis, Athanasios; Papatsoris, Athanasios; Kalentzos, Vasileios; Deliveliotis, Charalambos; Skolarikos, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To examine the safety and efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen as the primary and sole treatment for severe radiation-induced haemorrhagic cystitis. Materials and methods Hyperbaric oxygen was prospectively applied as primary treatment in 38 patients with severe radiation cystitis. Our primary endpoint was the incidence of complete and partial response to treatment, while the secondary endpoints included the duration of response, the correlation of treatment success-rate to the interval between the onset of haematuria and initiation of therapy, blood transfusion need and total radiation dose, the number of sessions to success, the avoidance of surgery and the overall survival. Results All patients completed therapy without complications with a mean follow-up of 29.33 months. Median number of sessions needed was 33. Complete and partial response rate was 86.8% and 13.2%, respectively. All 33 patients with complete response received therapy within 6 months of the haematuria onset. One patient needed cystectomy, while 33 patients were alive at the end of follow-up. Conclusions Our study suggests the early primary use of hyperbaric oxygen for radiation-induced severe cystitis as an effective and safe treatment option. PMID:28338304

  17. Congenital hypoplasia of the cerebellum: developmental causes and behavioral consequences

    PubMed Central

    Basson, M. Albert; Wingate, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last 60 years, the spotlight of research has periodically returned to the cerebellum as new techniques and insights have emerged. Because of its simple homogeneous structure, limited diversity of cell types and characteristic behavioral pathologies, the cerebellum is a natural home for studies of cell specification, patterning, and neuronal migration. However, recent evidence has extended the traditional range of perceived cerebellar function to include modulation of cognitive processes and implicated cerebellar hypoplasia and Purkinje neuron hypo-cellularity with autistic spectrum disorder. In the light of this emerging frontier, we review the key stages and genetic mechanisms behind cerebellum development. In particular, we discuss the role of the midbrain hindbrain isthmic organizer in the development of the cerebellar vermis and the specification and differentiation of Purkinje cells and granule neurons. These developmental processes are then considered in relation to recent insights into selected human developmental cerebellar defects: Joubert syndrome, Dandy–Walker malformation, and pontocerebellar hypoplasia. Finally, we review current research that opens up the possibility of using the mouse as a genetic model to study the role of the cerebellum in cognitive function. PMID:24027500

  18. Image-based modeling of radiation-induced foci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costes, Sylvain; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ponomarev, Artem; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Chen, James; Chou, William; Gascard, Philippe

    Several proteins involved in the response to DNA double strand breaks (DSB) form microscopically visible nuclear domains, or foci, after exposure to ionizing radiation. Radiation-induced foci (RIF) are believed to be located where DNA damage occurs. To test this assumption, we used Monte Carlo simulations to predict the spatial distribution of DSB in human nuclei exposed to high or low-LET radiation. We then compared these predictions to the distribution patterns of three DNA damage sensing proteins, i.e. 53BP1, phosphorylated ATM and γH2AX in human mammary epithelial. The probability to induce DSB can be derived from DNA fragment data measured experimentally by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. We first used this probability in Monte Carlo simulations to predict DSB locations in synthetic nuclei geometrically described by a complete set of human chromosomes, taking into account microscope optics from real experiments. Simulations showed a very good agreement for high-LET, predicting 0.7 foci/µm along the path of a 1 GeV/amu Fe particle against measurement of 0.69 to 0.82 foci/µm for various RIF 5 min following exposure (LET 150 keV/µm). On the other hand, discrepancies were shown in foci frequency for low-LET, with measurements 20One drawback using a theoretical model for the nucleus is that it assumes a simplistic and static pattern for DNA densities. However DNA damage pattern is highly correlated to DNA density pattern (i.e. the more DNA, the more likely to have a break). Therefore, we generalized our Monte Carlo approach to real microscope images, assuming pixel intensity of DAPI in the nucleus was directly proportional to the amount of DNA in that pixel. With such approach we could predict DNA damage pattern in real images on a per nucleus basis. Since energy is randomly deposited along high-LET particle paths, RIF along these paths should also be randomly distributed. As expected, simulations produced DNA-weighted random (Poisson) distributions. In

  19. Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity in Teflon (PTFE).

    SciT

    Hartman, E. Frederick; Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.

    2013-05-01

    We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity (RIC) in thin samples of Teflon (PTFE) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil (76.2 microns) samples were irradiated with a 0.5 %CE%BCs pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E11 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Details of the experimental apparatus and analysis are reported in this report on prompt RIC in Teflon.

  20. Facial reconstruction for radiation-induced skin cancer

    SciT

    Panje, W.R.; Dobleman, T.J.

    1990-04-01

    Radiation-induced skin cancers can be difficult to diagnose and treat. Typically, a patient who has received orthovoltage radiotherapy for disorders such as acne, eczema, tinea capitis, skin tuberculosis, and skin cancer can expect that aggressive skin cancers and chronic radiodermatitis may develop subsequently. Cryptic facial cancers can lead to metastases and death. Prophylactic widefield excision of previously irradiated facial skin that has been subject to multiple recurrent skin cancers is suggested as a method of deterring future cutaneous malignancy and metastases. The use of tissue expanders and full-thickness skin grafts offers an expedient and successful method of subsequent reconstruction.

  1. The effect of topical application of pure honey on radiation-induced mucositis: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Motallebnejad, M; Akram, S; Moghadamnia, A; Moulana, Z; Omidi, S

    2008-03-01

    Radiation-induced mucositis is an early effect of head and neck radiotherapy. Mucositis can cause ulcers, and patients may experience pain and dysphasia which need treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of pure natural honey on radiation induced mucositis. In this randomized single blind (examiner blind) clinical trial 40 patients with head and neck cancer requiring radiation to the oropharyngeal mucosa were randomly assigned to two groups. Twenty patients assigned to the study group received honey, while both the study and control groups received standard head and neck radiation therapy based on a standard protocol. In the study group patients were instructed to take 20 ml of honey 15 minutes before radiation therapy, then again at intervals of 15 minutes and six hours after radiation. In the control group patients were instructed to rinse with 20 ml of saline before and after radiation. Patients were evaluated weekly for progression of mucositis using the Oral Mucositis Assessing Scale (OMAS). Data were analyzed using the independent t-test, Mann-Whitney, and Friedman tests. A significant reduction in mucositis among honey-received patients compared with controls (p=0.000) occurred. Within the limits of this study the results showed the application of natural honey is effective in managing radiation induced mucositis. Natural honey is a product with rich nutritional qualities that could be a pleasant, simple, and economic modality for the management of radiation mucositis.

  2. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    DOE PAGES

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesismore » that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.« less

  3. Radiation induces an antitumour immune response to mouse melanoma.

    PubMed

    Perez, Carmen A; Fu, Allie; Onishko, Halina; Hallahan, Dennis E; Geng, Ling

    2009-12-01

    Irradiation of cancer cells can cause immunogenic death. We used mouse models to determine whether irradiation of melanoma can enhance the host antitumour immune response and function as an effective vaccination strategy, and investigated the molecular mechanisms involved in this radiation-induced response. For in vivo studies, C57BL6/J mice and the B16F0 melanoma cell line were used in a lung metastasis model, intratumoural host immune activation assays, and tumour growth delay studies. In vitro studies included a dendritic cell (DC) phagocytosis assay, detection of cell surface exposure of the protein calreticulin (CRT), and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated depletion of CRT cellular levels. Irradiation of cutaneous melanomas prior to their resection resulted in more than 20-fold reduction in lung metastases after systemic challenge with untreated melanoma cells. A syngeneic vaccine derived from irradiated melanoma cells also induced adaptive immune response markers in irradiated melanoma implants. Our data indicate a trend for radiation-induced increase in melanoma cell surface exposure of CRT, which is involved in the enhanced phagocytic activity of DC against irradiated melanoma cells (VIACUC). The present study suggests that neoadjuvant irradiation of cutaneous melanoma tumours prior to surgical resection can stimulate an endogenous anti-melanoma host immune response.

  4. [Radiation-induced genomic instability: phenomenon, molecular mechanisms, pathogenetic significance].

    PubMed

    Mazurik, V K; Mikhaĭlov, V F

    2001-01-01

    The recent data on the radiation-induced genome instability as a special state of progeny of cells irradiated in vitro as well as after a whole body exposure to ionizing radiation, that make these cells considerably different from normal, unirradiated cells, were considered. This state presents a number of cytogenetical, molecular-biological, cytological and biochemical manifestations untypical for normal cells. The state is controlled by the mechanisms of regulation of checkpoints of cell cycle, and apoptosis, that is under gene p53 control. The proof has been found that this state transfers from irradiated maternal cells to their surviving progeny by the epigenetical mechanisms and would exist until the cells restore the original state of response on the DNA damage. From the point of view of the genome instability conception, that considers the chromatine rearrangement as the adaptive-evolution mechanism of adaptation of the species to changeable environmental conditions, the radiation-induced genome instability may be considered as transition of irradiated progeny to the state of read these to adaptation changes with two alternative pathways. The first leads to adaptation to enviromental conditions and restoring of normal cell functions. The second presents the cell transition into the transformed state with remain genome instability and with increase of tumour growth probability.

  5. Radiation induced corrosion of copper for spent nuclear fuel storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björkbacka, Åsa; Hosseinpour, Saman; Johnson, Magnus; Leygraf, Christofer; Jonsson, Mats

    2013-11-01

    The long term safety of repositories for radioactive waste is one of the main concerns for countries utilizing nuclear power. The integrity of engineered and natural barriers in such repositories must be carefully evaluated in order to minimize the release of radionuclides to the biosphere. One of the most developed concepts of long term storage of spent nuclear fuel is the Swedish KBS-3 method. According to this method, the spent fuel will be sealed inside copper canisters surrounded by bentonite clay and placed 500 m down in stable bedrock. Despite the importance of the process of radiation induced corrosion of copper, relatively few studies have been reported. In this work the effect of the total gamma dose on radiation induced corrosion of copper in anoxic pure water has been studied experimentally. Copper samples submerged in water were exposed to a series of total doses using three different dose rates. Unirradiated samples were used as reference samples throughout. The copper surfaces were examined qualitatively using IRAS and XPS and quantitatively using cathodic reduction. The concentration of copper in solution after irradiation was measured using ICP-AES. The influence of aqueous radiation chemistry on the corrosion process was evaluated based on numerical simulations. The experiments show that the dissolution as well as the oxide layer thickness increase upon radiation. Interestingly, the evaluation using numerical simulations indicates that aqueous radiation chemistry is not the only process driving the corrosion of copper in these systems.

  6. [Biomarkers of radiation-induced DNA repair processes].

    PubMed

    Vallard, Alexis; Rancoule, Chloé; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Espenel, Sophie; Sauvaigo, Sylvie; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire; Magné, Nicolas

    2017-11-01

    The identification of DNA repair biomarkers is of paramount importance. Indeed, it is the first step in the process of modulating radiosensitivity and radioresistance. Unlike tools of detection and measurement of DNA damage, DNA repair biomarkers highlight the variations of DNA damage responses, depending on the dose and the dose rate. The aim of the present review is to describe the main biomarkers of radiation-induced DNA repair. We will focus on double strand breaks (DSB), because of their major role in radiation-induced cell death. The most important DNA repair biomarkers are DNA damage signaling proteins, with ATM, DNA-PKcs, 53BP1 and γ-H2AX. They can be analyzed either using immunostaining, or using lived cell imaging. However, to date, these techniques are still time and money consuming. The development of "omics" technologies should lead the way to new (and usable in daily routine) DNA repair biomarkers. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Radiation-induced transmissable chromosomal instability in haemopoietic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadhim, M. A.; Wright, E. G.

    Heritable radiation-induced genetic alterations have long been assumed to be ``fixed'' within the first cell division. However, there is a growing body of evidence that a considerable fraction of cells surviving radiation exposure appear normal, but a variety of mutational changes arise in their progeny due to a transmissible genomic instability. In our investigations of G-banded metaphases, non-clonal cytogenetic aberrations, predominantly chromatid-type aberrations, have been observed in the clonal descendants of murine and human haemopoietic stem cells surviving low doses (~1 track per cell) of alpha-particle irradiations. The data are consistent with a transmissible genetic instability induced in a stem cell resulting in a diversity of chromosomal aberrations in its clonal progeny many cell divisions later. Recent studies have demonstrated that the instability phenotype persists in vivo and that the expression of chromosomal instability has a strong dependence on the genetic characteristics of the irradiated cell. At the time when cytogenetic aberrations are detected, an increased incidence of hprt mutations and apoptotic cells have been observed in the clonal descendants of alpha-irradiated murine haemopoietic stem cells. Thus, delayed chromosomal abnormalities, delayed cell death by apoptosis and late-arising specific gene mutations may reflect diverse consequences of radiation-induced genomic instability. The relationship, if any, between these effects is not established. Current studies suggest that expression of these delayed heritable effects is determined by the type of radiation exposure, type of cell and a variety of genetic factors.

  8. Characterization of radiation-induced emesis in the ferret

    SciT

    King, G.L.

    1988-06-01

    Forty-eight ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) were individually head-shielded and radiated with bilateral /sup 60/Co gamma radiation at 100 cGy min-1 at doses ranging between 49 and 601 cGy. The emetic threshold was observed at 69 cGy, the ED50 was calculated at 77 cGy, and 100% incidence of emesis occurred at 201 cGy. With increasing doses of radiation, the latency to first emesis after radiation decreased dramatically, whereas the duration of the prodromal period increased. Two other sets of experiments suggest that dopaminergic mechanisms play a minor role in radiation-induced emesis in the ferret. Twenty-two animals were injected either intravenously ormore » subcutaneously with 30 to 300 micrograms/kg of apomorphine. Fewer than 50% of the animals vomited to 300 micrograms/kg apomorphine; central dopaminergic receptor activation was apparent at all doses. Another eight animals received 1 mg/kg domperidone prior to either 201 (n = 4) or 401 (n = 4) cGy radiation and their emetic responses were compared with NaCl-injected-irradiated controls (n = 8). At 201 cGy, domperidone significantly reduced only the total time in emetic behavior. At 401 cGy, domperidone had no salutary effect on radiation-induced emesis. The emetic responses of the ferret to radiation and apomorphine are compared with these responses in other vomiting species.« less

  9. Characterization of radiation-induced emesis in the ferret

    SciT

    King, G.L.

    1988-01-01

    Forty-eight ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) were individually head-shielded and radiated with bilateral cobalt 60 gamma radiation at 100 cGy min at doses ranging between 49 and 601 cGy. The emetic threshold was observed at 69 cGy, the ED 50 was calculated as 77 cGy, and 100% incidence of emesis occurred at 201 cGy. With increasing doses of radiation, the latency to first emesis after radiation decreased dramatically, whereas the duration of the prodromal period increased. Two other sets of experiments suggest that dopaminergic mechanisms play a minor role in radiation-induced emesis in the ferret. Twenty-two animals were injected either intravenouslymore » or subcutaneously with 30 to 300 micrograms /kg of apomorphine. Fewer than 50% of the animals vomited to 300 micrograms/kg apomorphine; central dopaminergic receptor activation was apparent at all doses. Another eight animals received 1 mg/kg domperidone prior to either 201 (n=4) or 401 (n=4) cGy radiation and their emetic responses were compared with NaCi-injected-irradiated controls (n=8). At 201 cGy, domperidone significantly reduced only the total time in emetic behavior. At 401 cGy, domperidone had no salutary effect on radiation-induced emesis. The emetic responses of the ferret to radiation and apomorphine are compared with these responses in other vomiting species.« less

  10. Radiation-induced defect centers in glass ceramics

    SciT

    Tsai, T.E.; Friebele, E.J.; Griscom, D.L.

    1989-01-15

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) was used to characterize the radiation-induced defect centers in low-thermal-expansion glass ceramics, including two types of Zerodur and Astrositall. The observed ESR spectra can be associated with different types of defect centers: a Zn/sup +/ center, several types of oxygen hole centers (OHCs), an aluminum-oxygen hole center (Al-OHC), an Fe/sup 3 +/ center, Ti/sup 3 +/ and Zr/sup 3 +/ centers, and three types of As centers. An Sb/sup 4 +/ center, which is not observed in Zerodur, is tentatively identified in Astrositall. From the effect of crystallization on the observed defect concentrations in Zerodur andmore » computer simulation of the spectral lines of some of the centers, we infer that among the nine defect centers observed in the Zerodurs, the As-associated centers are located in the glassy phase and/or at the interface between the glassy and crystalline phases, Zn/sup +/ and Al-OHC are in the crystalline phase, and the rest (including most of the OHCs) are in the glassy phase. Radiation-induced compaction in these materials appears to be related to the generation of OHCs in the glass phase.« less

  11. Bone marrow hypoplasia associated with fenbendazole administration in a dog.

    PubMed

    Gary, Anthony T; Kerl, Marie E; Wiedmeyer, Charles E; Turnquist, Susan E; Cohn, Leah A

    2004-01-01

    A 1.5-year-old Doberman pinscher was presented with sudden-onset of fever and malaise. Twelve days prior to presentation, fenbendazole therapy was initiated for a suspected lungworm infection. Results of a complete blood count on presentation showed pancytopenia, while histopathological evaluation of a bone marrow core sample revealed bone marrow hypoplasia of undetermined etiology. Bactericidal antibiotics and fluid therapy, as well as discontinuation of fenbendazole administration, led to a complete resolution of clinical and hematological abnormalities within 15 days. An idiosyncratic reaction to fenbendazole was suspected based on the absence of infectious, neoplastic, autoimmune, and toxic etiologies, as well as resolution of clinical signs and pancytopenia upon drug withdrawal.

  12. Maxillary Hypoplasia With Congenital Oligodontia Treated by Maxillary Distraction Osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Sayaka; Yamaguchi, Takako; Watanabe, Takuma; Komatani, Toru; Nakao, Kazumasa; Takahashi, Katsu; Bessho, Kazuhisa

    2018-02-27

    It is known that congenitally missing teeth can often cause differences in craniofacial morphology; however, there are few reported cases of orthognathic surgical treatment for these patients. Herein, the authors report a rare case of maxillary hypoplasia with congenital oligodontia treated by maxillary distraction osteogenesis with internal device. A 17-year-old male presenting with multiple tooth agenesis and maxillary recession was referred to our hospital for orthognathic surgical treatment. Preoperative simulation surgery was performed using Full-Color 3-dimensional salt model. After surgery, improvement in maxillary recession and occlusal stability was observed. This report demonstrates the advantages of the method used herein, which includes reduction in operating time with increase in the safety of the procedure.

  13. ATM Mutations and the Development of Severe Radiation-Induced Morbidity Following Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    repair of radiation-induced damage. Furthermore, cells possessing a mutated copy of this gene are more radiosensitive than cells from individuals with...AD Award Number: DAMD17-02-1-0503 TITLE: ATM Mutations and the Development of Severe Radiation-Induced Morbidity Following Radiotherapy for Breast...2005 Annual 1 Jul 2004 - 30 Jun 2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER ATM Mutations and the Development of Severe Radiation-Induced Morbidity

  14. Polarized light and scanning electron microscopic investigation of enamel hypoplasia in primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Sabel, Nina; Klingberg, Gunilla; Dietz, Wolfram; Nietzsche, Sandor; Norén, Jörgen G

    2010-01-01

    Enamel hypoplasia is a developmental disturbance during enamel formation, defined as a macroscopic defect in the enamel, with a reduction of the enamel thickness with rounded, smooth borders. Information on the microstructural level is still limited, therefore further studies are of importance to better understand the mechanisms behind enamel hypoplasia. To study enamel hypoplasia in primary teeth by means of polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Nineteen primary teeth with enamel hypoplasia were examined in a polarized light microscope and in a scanning electron microscope. The cervical and incisal borders of the enamel hypoplasia had a rounded appearance, as the prisms in the rounded cervical area of the hypoplasia were bent. The rounded borders had a normal surface structure whereas the base of the defects appeared rough and porous. Morphological findings in this study indicate that the aetiological factor has a short duration and affects only certain ameloblasts. The bottom of the enamel hypoplasia is porous and constitutes possible pathways for bacteria into the dentin.

  15. Effectiveness of the herbal medicine daikenchuto for radiation-induced enteritis.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Takashi; Kamiura, Shouji; Kimura, Tadashi

    2008-07-01

    Radiation-induced enteritis is a serious clinical problem for which there is currently no recommended standard management. Daikenchuto (DKT) is a Japanese herbal medicine that has been used to treat adhesive bowel obstruction in Japan. This report describes a patient with radiation-induced enteritis whose clinical symptoms were much improved by treatment with DKT. The patient was administered DKT, a traditional Japanese herbal formula, orally (2.5 g 3 times daily). Abdominal distention was evaluated objectively with computed tomography. Gastrointestinal symptoms associated with radiation-induced enteritis were controlled successfully with DKT treatment. DKT treatment may be useful for the management of radiation-induced enteritis.

  16. Radiation-induced lichen sclerosus of the vulva : First report in the medical literature.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Lisa R; Privette, Emily D; Patterson, James W; Tchernev, Georgi; Chokoeva, Anastasiya Atanasova; Wollina, Uwe; Lotti, Torello; Wilson, Barbara B

    2017-03-01

    A 67-year-old woman presented with a firm plaque in the perineal region, 16 months after diagnosis of a high-grade basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the vagina and treatment by external beam radiation therapy and vaginal cuff brachytherapy. The differential diagnosis included radiation-induced morphea, radiation dermatitis, or, possibly, radiation-induced lichen sclerosus. Biopsy findings, including special staining, confirmed the diagnosis of radiation-induced lichen sclerosus. To our knowledge, this is the first report of radiation-induced lichen sclerosus of the vulvar region.

  17. Solar radiation induced rotational bursting of interplanetary particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, J. G.

    1975-01-01

    It is suggested that the magnitudes of the two radiation-induced rotational bursting mechanisms (Radzieskii effect and windmill effect) have been overestimated and that they do not work significantly faster than the Poynting-Robertson effect in removing interplanetary particles. These two mechanisms are described, and serious doubts are raised regarding the derivation of their radiation pressure-torque proportionality constants, which are required for calculating their magnitudes. It is shown that both mechanisms will cause the alignment of elongated particles and, consequently, the polarization of zodiacal light. Since no positive polarization has been measured at the antisolar point, it is concluded that the magnitudes of the rotational bursting mechanisms are smaller than that of the Poynting-Robertson effect.

  18. Radiation-induced cerebral meningioma: a recognizable entity

    SciT

    Rubinstein, A.B.; Shalit, M.N.; Cohen, M.L.

    1984-11-01

    The authors retrospectively analyzed the clinical and histopathological findings in 201 patients with intracranial meningiomas operated on in the period 1978 to 1982. Forty-three of the patients (21.4%) had at some previous time received radiation treatment to their scalp, the majority for tinea capitis. The findings in these 43 irradiated patients were compared with those in the 158 non-irradiated patients. Several distinctive clinical and histological features were identified in the irradiated group, which suggest that radiation-induced meningiomas can be defined as a separate nosological subgroup. The use of irradiation in large numbers of children with tinea capitis in the eramore » prior to the availability of griseofulvin may be responsible for a significantly increased incidence of intracranial meningiomas.« less

  19. Promotion of initiated cells by radiation-induced cell inactivation.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, W F; Paretzke, H G

    2008-11-01

    Cells on the way to carcinogenesis can have a growth advantage relative to normal cells. It has been hypothesized that a radiation-induced growth advantage of these initiated cells might be induced by an increased cell replacement probability of initiated cells after inactivation of neighboring cells by radiation. Here Monte Carlo simulations extend this hypothesis for larger clones: The effective clonal expansion rate decreases with clone size. This effect is stronger for the two-dimensional than for the three-dimensional situation. The clones are irregular, far from a circular shape. An exposure-rate dependence of the effective clonal expansion rate could come in part from a minimal recovery time of the initiated cells for symmetric cell division.

  20. Radiation Induced Incorporation of CO in Pure and Aqueous Methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hak-Jin; Getoff, Nikola; Lorbeer, Eberhard

    1994-05-01

    Pure and aqueous methanol were used for radiation induced incorporation of CO at elevated pressure (up to 15 bar). The initial yields (Gi) of the main products in pure methanol under 15 bar CO and 1 bar N2O were found to be: Gi(formaldehyde) = 3.80 and Gi(glycolic aldehyde) = 2.0. For aqueous (10-2 mol · dm-3) methanol under 15 bar CO (dose: 0.557 kGy, pH = 2): the yields were G(formaldehyde) = 5.44, G(glycolic aldehyde) = 4.0 and G(oxalic acid) = 7.7. At pH = 7 the yields were essentially lower, namely: G(formaldehyde) = 3.2, G(glycolic aldehyde) = 2.0, G(formate) = 3.8 and G(oxalate) = 5.0. Probable reaction-mechanisms for the product formation are discussed.

  1. A review of radiation-induced demagnetization of permanent magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samin, Adib J.

    2018-05-01

    Radiation-induced demagnetization of permanent magnets is important for a number of applications including space missions, particle accelerators and robots designed to carry out rescue missions at nuclear accidents where magnet failure can lead to serious consequences. This topic has been studied by several investigators over the past three decades and in this work, a review of the available literature is conducted and some general conclusions and trends are presented. In short, it can be gleaned that magnetism loss is dependent on the type of radiation, the energy of the incoming particle and the overall dose or fluence. Furthermore, magnetism loss also shows a dependence on the type of the irradiated magnet, the coercivity of the magnet, the demagnetizing field and the temperature of irradiation.

  2. Non-radiation induced signals in TL dosimetry.

    PubMed

    German, U; Weinstein, M

    2002-01-01

    One source of background signals, which are non-radiation related, is the reader system and it includes dark current, external contaminants and electronic spikes. These factors can induce signals equivalent to several hundredths of mSv. Mostly, the effects are minimised by proper design of the TLD reader, but some effects are dependent on proper operation of the system. The other main group of background signals originates in the TL crystal and is due to tribothermoluminescence, dirt, chemical reactions and stimulation by visible or UV light. These factors can have a significant contribution, equivalent to over several mSv, depending on whether the crystal is bare or protected by PTFE. Working in clean environments, monitoring continuously the glow curves and performing glow curve deconvolution are suggested to minimise non-radiation induced spurious signals.

  3. Kinetics of radiation-induced precipitation at the alloy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, N. Q.; Nguyen, T.; Leaf, G. K.; Yip, S.

    1988-05-01

    Radiation-induced precipitation of a new phase at the surface of an alloy during irradiation at elevated temperatures was studied with the aid of a kinetic model of segregation. The preferential coupling of solute atoms with the defect fluxes gives rise to a strong solute enrichment at the surface, which, if surpassing the solute solubility limit, leads to the formation of a precipitate layer. The moving precipitate/matrix interface was accommodated by means of a mathematical scheme that transforms spatial coordinates into a reference frame in which the boundaries are immobile. Sample calculations were performed for precipitation of the γ'-Ni 3Si layer on Ni-Si alloys undergoing electron irradiation. The dependences of the precipitation kinetics on the defect-production rate, irradiation temperature, internal defect sink concentration and alloy composition were investigated systematically.

  4. Invertase immobilization onto radiation-induced graft copolymerized polyethylene pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Queiroz, Alvaro Antonio Alencar; Vitolo, Michele; de Oliveira, Rômulo Cesar; Higa, Olga Zazuco

    1996-06-01

    The graft copolymer poly(ethylene-g-acrylic acid) (LDPE-g-AA) was prepared by radiation-induced graft copolymerization of acrylic acid onto low density polyethylene (LDPE) pellets, and characterized by infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The presence of the grafted poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was established. Invertase was immobilized onto the graft polymer and the thermodynamic parameters of the soluble and immobilized enzyme were determined. The Michaelis constant, Km, and the maximum reaction velocity, Vmax, were determined for the free and the immobilized invertase. The Michaelis constant, Km was larger for the immobilized invertase than for the free enzyme, whereas Vmax was smaller for the immobilized invertase. The thermal stability of the immobilized invertase was higher than that of the free enzyme.

  5. Radiation-induced polymerization for the immobilization of penicillin acylase

    SciT

    Boccu, E.; Carenza, M.; Lora, S.

    The immobilization of Escherichia coli penicillin acylase was investigated by radiation-induced polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate at low temperature. A leak-proof composite that does not swell in water was obtained by adding the cross-linking agent trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate to the monomer-aqueous enzyme mixture. Penicillin acylase, which was immobilized with greater than 70% yield, possessed a higher Km value toward the substrate 6-nitro-3-phenylacetamidobenzoic acid than the free enzyme form (Km = 1.7 X 10(-5) and 1 X 10(-5) M, respectively). The structural stability of immobilized penicillin acylase, as assessed by heat, guanidinium chloride, and pH denaturation profiles, was very similar to that ofmore » the free-enzyme form, thus suggesting that penicillin acylase was entrapped in its native state into aqueous free spaces of the polymer matrix.« less

  6. Role of Oxidative Damage in Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Alwood, Joshua S.; Limoli, Charles L.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2014-01-01

    used an array of countermeasures (Antioxidant diets and injections) to prevent the radiation-induced bone loss, although these did not prevent bone loss, analysis is ongoing to determine if these countermeasure protected radiation-induced damage to other tissues.

  7. Simulating Space Radiation-Induced Breast Tumor Incidence Using Automata.

    PubMed

    Heuskin, A C; Osseiran, A I; Tang, J; Costes, S V

    2016-07-01

    Estimating cancer risk from space radiation has been an ongoing challenge for decades primarily because most of the reported epidemiological data on radiation-induced risks are derived from studies of atomic bomb survivors who were exposed to an acute dose of gamma rays instead of chronic high-LET cosmic radiation. In this study, we introduce a formalism using cellular automata to model the long-term effects of ionizing radiation in human breast for different radiation qualities. We first validated and tuned parameters for an automata-based two-stage clonal expansion model simulating the age dependence of spontaneous breast cancer incidence in an unexposed U.S. We then tested the impact of radiation perturbation in the model by modifying parameters to reflect both targeted and nontargeted radiation effects. Targeted effects (TE) reflect the immediate impact of radiation on a cell's DNA with classic end points being gene mutations and cell death. They are well known and are directly derived from experimental data. In contrast, nontargeted effects (NTE) are persistent and affect both damaged and undamaged cells, are nonlinear with dose and are not well characterized in the literature. In this study, we introduced TE in our model and compared predictions against epidemiologic data of the atomic bomb survivor cohort. TE alone are not sufficient for inducing enough cancer. NTE independent of dose and lasting ∼100 days postirradiation need to be added to accurately predict dose dependence of breast cancer induced by gamma rays. Finally, by integrating experimental relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for TE and keeping NTE (i.e., radiation-induced genomic instability) constant with dose and LET, the model predicts that RBE for breast cancer induced by cosmic radiation would be maximum at 220 keV/μm. This approach lays the groundwork for further investigation into the impact of chronic low-dose exposure, inter-individual variation and more complex space radiation

  8. Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 Knockout Abrogates Radiation Induced Pulmonary Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallahan, Dennis E.; Virudachalam, Subbulakshmi

    1997-06-01

    Increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1; CD54) is induced by exposure to ionizing radiation. The lung was used as a model to study the role of ICAM-1 in the pathogenesis of the radiation-induced inflammation-like response. ICAM-1 expression increased in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium and not in the endothelium of larger pulmonary vessels following treatment of mice with thoracic irradiation. To quantify radiation-induced ICAM-1 expression, we utilized fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of anti-ICAM-1 antibody labeling of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells from human cadaver donors (HMVEC-L cells). Fluorochrome conjugates and UV microscopy were used to quantify the fluorescence intensity of ICAM in the irradiated lung. These studies showed a dose- and time-dependent increase in ICAM-1 expression in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium. Peak expression occurred at 24 h, while threshold dose was as low as 2 Gy. To determine whether ICAM-1 is required for inflammatory cell infiltration into the irradiated lung, the anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibody was administered by tail vein injection to mice following thoracic irradiation. Inflammatory cells were quantified by immunofluorescence for leukocyte common antigen (CD45). Mice treated with the anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibody showed attenuation of inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung in response to ionizing radiation exposure. To verify the requirement of ICAM-1 in the inflammation-like radiation response, we utilized the ICAM-1 knockout mouse. ICAM-1 was not expressed in the lungs of ICAM-1-deficient mice following treatment with thoracic irradiation. ICAM-1 knockout mice had no increase in the inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung in response to thoracic irradiation. These studies demonstrate a radiation dose-dependent increase in ICAM-1 expression in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium, and show that ICAM-1 is required for inflammatory cell infiltration

  9. Modulation of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) by radiation- induced biophotons.

    PubMed

    Le, Michelle; McNeill, Fiona E; Seymour, Colin B; Rusin, Andrej; Diamond, Kevin; Rainbow, Andrew J; Murphy, James; Mothersill, Carmel E

    2018-05-01

    Radiation-induced biophotons are an electromagnetic form of bystander signalling. In human cells, biophoton signalling is capable of eliciting effects in non-irradiated bystander cells. However, the mechanisms by which the biophotons interact and act upon the bystander cells are not clearly understood. Mitochondrial energy production and ROS are known to be involved but the precise interactions are not known. To address this question, we have investigated the effect of biophoton emission upon the function of the complexes of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). The exposure of bystander HCT116 p53 +/+ cells to biophoton signals emitted from β-irradiated HCT116 p53 +/+ cells induced significant modifications in the activity of Complex I (NADH dehydrogenase or NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) such that the activity was severely diminished compared to non-irradiated controls. The enzymatic assay showed that the efficiency of NADH oxidation to NAD+ was severely compromised. It is suspected that this impairment may be linked to the photoabsorption of biophotons in the blue wavelength range (492-455 nm). The photobiomodulation to Complex I was suspected to contribute greatly to the inefficiency of ATP synthase function since it resulted in a lower quantity of H + ions to be available for use in the process of chemiosmosis. Other reactions of the ETC were not significantly impacted. Overall, these results provide evidence for a link between biophoton emission and biomodulation of the mitochondrial ATP synthesis process. However, there are many aspects of biological modulation by radiation-induced biophotons which will require further elucidation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.; Hartmann, Andreas; Limoli, Charles L.; Nagar, Shruti; Ponnaiya, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of GM10115 hamster-human hybrid cells to X-rays can result in the induction of chromosomal instability in the progeny of surviving cells. This instability manifests as the dynamic production of novel sub-populations of cells with unique cytogenetic rearrangements involving the "marker" human chromosome. We have used the comet assay to investigate whether there was an elevated level of endogenous DNA breaks in chromosomally unstable clones that could provide a source for the chromosomal rearrangements and thus account for the persistent instability observed. Our results indicate no significant difference in comet tail measurement between non-irradiated and radiation-induced chromosomally unstable clones. Using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization we also investigated whether recombinational events involving the interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences in GM10115 cells were involved at frequencies higher than random processes would otherwise predict. Nine of 11 clones demonstrated a significantly higher than expected involvement of these interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences at the recombination junction between the human and hamster chromosomes. Since elevated levels of endogenous breaks were not detected in unstable clones we propose that epigenetic or bystander effects (BSEs) lead to the activation of recombinational pathways that perpetuate the unstable phenotype. Specifically, we expand upon the hypothesis that radiation induces conditions and/or factors that stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These reactive intermediates then contribute to a chronic pro-oxidant environment that cycles over multiple generations, promoting chromosomal recombination and other phenotypes associated with genomic instability.

  11. Spatiotemporal characterization of ionizing radiation induced DNA damage foci and their relation to chromatin organization

    SciT

    Costes, Sylvain V; Chiolo, Irene; Pluth, Janice M.

    2009-09-15

    DNA damage sensing proteins have been shown to localize to the sites of DSB within seconds to minutes following ionizing radiation (IR) exposure, resulting in the formation of microscopically visible nuclear domains referred to as radiation-induced foci (RIF). This review characterizes the spatio-temporal properties of RIF at physiological doses, minutes to hours following exposure to ionizing radiation, and it proposes a model describing RIF formation and resolution as a function of radiation quality and nuclear densities. Discussion is limited to RIF formed by three interrelated proteins ATM (Ataxia telangiectasia mutated), 53BP1 (p53 binding protein 1) and ?H2AX (phosphorylated variant histonemore » H2AX). Early post-IR, we propose that RIF mark chromatin reorganization, leading to a local nuclear scaffold rigid enough to keep broken DNA from diffusing away, but open enough to allow the repair machinery. We review data indicating clear kinetic and physical differences between RIF emerging from dense and uncondensed regions of the nucleus. At later time post-IR, we propose that persistent RIF observed days following exposure to ionizing radiation are nuclear ?scars? marking permanent disruption of the chromatin architecture. When DNA damage is resolved, such chromatin modifications should not necessarily lead to growth arrest and it has been shown that persistent RIF can replicate during mitosis. Thus, heritable persistent RIF spanning over tens of Mbp may affect the transcriptome of a large progeny of cells. This opens the door for a non DNA mutation-based mechanism of radiation-induced phenotypes.« less

  12. Purkinje cell heterotopy with cerebellar hypoplasia in two free-living American kestrels (Falco sparverius)

    Two wild fledgling kestrels exhibited lack of motor coordination, postural reaction deficits, and abnormal propioception. At necropsy, the cerebellum and brainstem were markedly underdeveloped. Microscopically, there was Purkinje cells heterotopy, abnormal circuitry, and hypoplasia with defective fo...

  13. Genetics of renal hypoplasia: insights into the mechanisms controlling nephron endowment.

    PubMed

    Cain, Jason E; Di Giovanni, Valeria; Smeeton, Joanna; Rosenblum, Norman D

    2010-08-01

    Renal hypoplasia, defined as abnormally small kidneys with normal morphology and reduced nephron number, is a common cause of pediatric renal failure and adult-onset disease. Genetic studies performed in humans and mutant mice have implicated a number of critical genes, in utero environmental factors and molecular mechanisms that regulate nephron endowment and kidney size. Here, we review current knowledge regarding the genetic contributions to renal hypoplasia with particular emphasis on the mechanisms that control nephron endowment in humans and mice.

  14. Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Malignancies and Acute Biological Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The hypothesis being evaluated in this research program is that control of radiation induced oxidative stress will reduce the risk of radiation induced adverse biological effects occurring as a result of exposure to the types of radiation encountered during space travel. As part of this grant work, we have evaluated the protective effects of several antioxidants and dietary supplements and observed that a mixture of antioxidants (AOX), containing L-selenomethionine, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid, vitamin E succinate, and alpha-lipoic acid, is highly effective at reducing space radiation induced oxidative stress in both in vivo and in vitro systems, space radiation induced cytotoxicity and malignant transformation in vitro [1-7]. In studies designed to determine whether the AOX formulation could affect radiation induced mortality [8], it was observed that the AOX dietary supplement increased the 30-day survival of ICR male mice following exposure to a potentially lethal dose (8 Gy) of X-rays when given prior to or after animal irradiation. Pretreatment of animals with antioxidants resulted in significantly higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts in peripheral blood at 4 and 24 hours following exposure to doses of 1 Gy and 8 Gy. Antioxidant treatment also resulted in increased bone marrow cell counts following irradiation, and prevented peripheral lymphopenia following 1 Gy irradiation. Supplementation with antioxidants in irradiated animals resulted in several gene expression changes: the antioxidant treatment was associated with increased Bcl-2, and decreased Bax, caspase-9 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression in the bone marrow following irradiation. These results suggest that modulation of apoptosis may be mechanistically involved in hematopoietic system radioprotection by antioxidants. Maintenance of the antioxidant diet was associated with improved recovery of the bone marrow following sub-lethal or potentially lethal irradiation. Taken together

  15. Cerebellar Hypoplasia and Dysmorphia in Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    PubMed

    Toelle, Sandra P; Poretti, Andrea; Weber, Peter; Seute, Tatjana; Bromberg, Jacoline E C; Scheer, Ianina; Boltshauser, Eugen

    2015-12-01

    Unidentified bright objects (UBO) and tumors are well-known cerebellar abnormalities in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Literature reports on malformative cerebellar anomalies in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), however, are scant. We retrospectively studied the clinical and neuroimaging findings of 5 patients with NF1 (4 females, age 6 to 29 years at last follow-up) and cerebellar anomalies. Cerebellar symptoms on neurological examination were mild or even not evident whereas learning disabilities were more or less pronounced in four patients. Two patients had cerebellar hypoplasia (diffusely enlarged cerebellar interfoliar spaces) and three cerebellar dysmorphias involving mainly one cerebellar hemisphere. In NF1, malformative cerebellar anomalies are rare (estimated prevalence of about 1%), but most likely underestimated and easily overlooked, because physicians tend to focus on more prevalent, obvious, and well-known findings such as optic pathway gliomas, other tumors, and UBO. This kind of cerebellar anomaly in NF1 has most likely a malformative origin, but the exact pathogenesis is unknown. The individual clinical significance is difficult to determine. We suggest that cerebellar anomalies should be systematically evaluated in neuroimaging studies of NF1 patients.

  16. Treatment alternatives of congenital hand differences with thumb hypoplasia involvement.

    PubMed

    Papadogeorgou, Ellada V; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2008-01-01

    Congenital thumb hypoplasia is a complex and heterogeneous congenital difference that is detrimental to hand function. Apart from its' classic form, which is now considered to be part of radial dysplasia, it can occur as part of other congenital anomalies including, syndactyly, symbrachydactyly, atypical cleft hand, bifid thumb, triphalangeal thumb, mirror hand, constriction band syndrome, as well as generalized anomalies and syndromes. Management is aimed primarily at restoring basic hand function, specifically, power grasp and precision pinch, and secondarily to improve cosmoses, which inevitably is going to be impaired. Several treatment alternatives have been proposed to manage the specific disabling condition and include, 1st web space reconstruction and opponensplasty, pollicization, toe-to-hand transfer, distraction lengthening, free toe phalangeal transfer or the use of allograft, stabilization of the metacarpophalangeal joint, and surgery of "spare parts." The purpose of this study is to evaluate the various alternatives available today and propose an algorithm applicable for the appropriate management of thumb deficiency, based on their specific characteristics. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Microsurgery, 2008.

  17. Radiation-induced chondrosarcoma of the maxilla 7-year after combined chemoradiation for tonsillar lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mohammadianpanah, M; Gramizadeh, B; Omidvari, Sh; Mosalaei, A

    2004-01-01

    Radiation-induced sarcoma is a rare complication of radiation therapy. We report a case of radiation-induced chondrosarcoma of the maxilla. An 80-year-old Persian woman developed radiation-induced chondrosarcoma of the left maxilla 7 years after combined chemotherapy and external beam radiation therapy for the Ann Arbor stage IE malignant lymphoma of the right tonsil. She underwent suboptimal tumour resection and died due to extensive locoregional disease 8 months later. An English language literature search of Medline using the terms chondrosarcoma, radiation-induced sarcoma and maxilla revealed only one earlier reported case. We describe the clinical and pathological features of this case and review the literature on radiation-induced sarcomas.

  18. Serum prolactin concentrations in relation to hypopituitarism and obesity in children with optic nerve hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Vedin, Amy M; Garcia-Filion, Pamela; Fink, Cassandra; Borchert, Mark; Geffner, Mitchell E

    2012-01-01

    The majority of children with optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) develop hypopituitarism and many also become obese. These associated conditions are a major cause of morbidity and are possibly due to hypothalamic dysfunction. Because mild hyperprolactinemia often occurs in subjects with disorders of the hypothalamus, we examined whether hyperprolactinemia was present in children with ONH during the first 3 years of life and whether it was a marker for hypopituitarism and/or obesity. Data were retrospectively analyzed from a registry study of children with ONH. The initial serum prolactin was obtained prior to age 36 months (n = 125) and compared with pituitary function and body mass index at age 5. 72% of subjects had an elevated initial serum prolactin and 60% had hypopituitarism. An elevated initial prolactin was associated with hypopituitarism (OR 2.58; 95% CI 1.16, 5.73), specifically with growth hormone deficiency (OR 2.77; 95% CI 1.21, 6.34). 31% of subjects had a body mass index ≥ 85th percentile, but this did not correlate with initial hyperprolactinemia. Early hyperprolactinemia correlates with the presence of hypopituitarism in children with ONH, but it is not a reliable prognosticator of hypopituitarism. Additionally, hyperprolactinemia does not predict future weight excess. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Serum Prolactin Concentrations in Relation to Hypopituitarism and Obesity in Children with Optic Nerve Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Vedin, Amy M.; Garcia-Filion, Pamela; Fink, Cassandra; Borchert, Mark; Geffner, Mitchell E.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims The majority of children with optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) develop hypopituitarism and many also become obese. These associated conditions are a major cause of morbidity and are possibly due to hypothalamic dysfunction. Because mild hyperprolactinemia often occurs in subjects with disorders of the hypothalamus, we examined whether hyperprolactinemia was present in children with ONH during the first three years of life and whether it was a marker for hypopituitarism and/or obesity. Methods Data were retrospectively analyzed from a registry study of children with ONH. The initial serum prolactin was obtained prior to age 36 months (n=125) and compared with pituitary function and body mass index (BMI) at age 5. Results Seventy-two percent of subjects had an elevated initial serum prolactin and 60% had hypopituitarism. An elevated initial prolactin was associated with hypopituitarism (OR 2.58; 95% CI 1.16, 5.73), specifically with growth hormone deficiency (OR 2.77; 95% CI 1.21, 6.34). Thirty-one percent of subjects had a BMI ≥85th %ile, but this did not correlate with initial hyperprolactinemia. Conclusions Early hyperprolactinemia correlates with the presence of hypopituitarism in children with ONH, but it is not a reliable prognosticator of hypopituitarism. Additionally, hyperprolactinemia does not predict future weight excess. PMID:22572701

  20. Clinical and immunologic outcome of patients with cartilage hair hypoplasia after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bordon, Victoria; Gennery, Andrew R; Slatter, Mary A; Vandecruys, Els; Laureys, Genevieve; Veys, Paul; Qasim, Waseem; Waseem, Qasim; Friedrich, Wilhelm; Wulfraat, Nico M; Scherer, Franziska; Cant, Andrew J; Fischer, Alain; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Cavazanna-Calvo, Marina; Bredius, Robbert G M; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Mazzolari, Evelina; Neven, Benedicte; Güngör, Tayfun; Tayfun, Güngör

    2010-07-08

    Cartilage-hair hypoplasia (CHH) is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the RMRP gene. Beside dwarfism, CHH has a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations including variable grades of combined immunodeficiency, autoimmune complications, and malignancies. Previous reports in single CHH patients with significant immunodeficiencies have demonstrated that allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an effective treatment for the severe immunodeficiency, while growth failure remains unaffected. Because long-term experience in larger cohorts of CHH patients after HSCT is currently unreported, we performed a European collaborative survey reporting on 16 patients with CHH and immunodeficiency who underwent HSCT. Immune dysregulation, lymphoid malignancy, and autoimmunity were important features in this cohort. Thirteen patients were transplanted in early childhood ( approximately 2.5 years). The other 3 patients were transplanted at adolescent age. Of 16 patients, 10 (62.5%) were long-term survivors, with a median follow-up of 7 years. T-lymphocyte numbers and function have normalized, and autoimmunity has resolved in all survivors. HSCT should be considered in CHH patients with severe immunodeficiency/autoimmunity, before the development of severe infections, major organ damage, or malignancy might jeopardize the outcome of HSCT and the quality of life in these patients.

  1. Hydranencephaly and cerebellar hypoplasia in two kittens attributed to intrauterine parvovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Sharp, N J; Davis, B J; Guy, J S; Cullen, J M; Steingold, S F; Kornegay, J N

    1999-07-01

    Six weeks after vaccination with modified live feline parvovirus vaccine, a cat gave birth to five kittens, three of which died soon afterwards. The remaining two kittens (A and B) survived, but at 8 weeks of age were unable to walk and showed abnormal behaviour, with lack of menace and oculovestibular responses, and severe dysmetria. These signs suggested multifocal disease associated with the cerebrum and cerebellum. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated severe bilateral (kitten A) or unilateral (kitten B) hydrocephalus or hydranencephaly, combined with cerebellar agenesis (kitten A) or severe hypoplasia (kitten B). Hydranencephaly was confirmed histopathologically in both kittens. Parvovirus was isolated from the kidney of one kitten. Parvoviral DNA was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from paraffin wax-embedded brain of both kittens. The severe malformations observed in these kittens presumably resulted from an in-utero parvovirus infection, possibly due to vaccination, that occurred late in the first, or early in the second, trimester of pregnancy. Copyright 1999 W.B. Saunders Company Ltd.

  2. Growth, nutritional, and gastrointestinal aspects of focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz-Gorlin syndrome).

    PubMed

    Motil, Kathleen J; Fete, Mary; Fete, Timothy J

    2016-03-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH) is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutations in the PORCN gene located on the X-chromosome. In the present study, we characterized the pattern of growth, body composition, and the nutritional and gastrointestinal aspects of children and adults (n = 19) affected with this disorder using clinical anthropometry and a survey questionnaire. The mean birth length (P < 0.06) and weight (P < 0.001) z-scores of the participants were lower than the reference population. The mean head circumference (P < 0.001), height (length) (P < 0.001), weight (P < 0.01), and BMI (P < 0.05) for age z-scores of the participants were lower than the reference population. The height-for-age and weight-for-age z-scores of the participants did not differ significantly between birth and current measurements. Three-fourths of the group reported having one or more nutritional or gastrointestinal problems including short stature (65%), underweight (77%), oral motor dysfunction (41%), gastroesophageal reflux (24%), gastroparesis (35%), and constipation (35%). These observations provide novel clinical information about growth, body composition, and nutritional and gastrointestinal aspects of children and adults with FDH and underscore the importance of careful observation and early clinical intervention in the care of individuals affected with this disorder. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Germline recessive mutations in PI4KA are associated with perisylvian polymicrogyria, cerebellar hypoplasia and arthrogryposis

    PubMed Central

    Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; Howard, Malcolm F.; Wisniewski, Eva; Popitsch, Niko; Knight, Samantha J.L.; Keays, David A.; Quaghebeur, Gerardine; Cox, Helen; Cox, Phillip; Balla, Tamas; Taylor, Jenny C.; Kini, Usha

    2015-01-01

    Polymicrogyria (PMG) is a structural brain abnormality involving the cerebral cortex that results from impaired neuronal migration and although several genes have been implicated, many cases remain unsolved. In this study, exome sequencing in a family where three fetuses had all been diagnosed with PMG and cerebellar hypoplasia allowed us to identify regions of the genome for which both chromosomes were shared identical-by-descent, reducing the search space for causative variants to 8.6% of the genome. In these regions, the only plausibly pathogenic mutations were compound heterozygous variants in PI4KA, which Sanger sequencing confirmed segregated consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. The paternally transmitted variant predicted a premature stop mutation (c.2386C>T; p.R796X), whereas the maternally transmitted variant predicted a missense substitution (c.5560G>A; p.D1854N) at a conserved residue within the catalytic domain. Functional studies using expressed wild-type or mutant PI4KA enzyme confirmed the importance of p.D1854 for kinase activity. Our results emphasize the importance of phosphoinositide signalling in early brain development. PMID:25855803

  4. Prenatal determinants of optic nerve hypoplasia: Review of suggested correlates and future focus

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Filion, Pamela; Borchert, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH), a congenital malformation characterized by an underdeveloped optic nerve, is a seemingly epidemic cause of childhood blindness and visual impairment with associated lifelong morbidity. While the prenatal determinants of ONH are unknown, early case reports have led to a longstanding speculation that risky health behaviors (e.g. recreational drugs, alcohol) are a likely culprit. There has yet to be a systematic review of the epidemiology of ONH to assess the common prenatal features that may help focus research efforts in the identification of likely prenatal correlates. A review of the past 50 years of epidemiologic research was conducted to examine the prenatal features linked with ONH and provide direction for future research. There are select prominent prenatal features associated with ONH: young maternal age and primiparity. Commonly implicated prenatal exposures (e.g., recreational or pharmaceutical drugs, viral infection, etc.) were rare or uncommon in large cohort studies of ONH and therefore unlikely to be major contributors to ONH. Familial cases and gene mutations are rare. The preponderance of young mothers and primiparity among cases of ONH is striking, although the significance is unclear. Recent research suggests a potential role for prenatal nutrition, weight gain, and factors of deprivation. With the rapidly increasing prevalence of ONH, future research should focus on investigating the relevance of young maternal age and primiparity and exploring the recently suggested etiologic correlates in epidemic clusters of ONH. PMID:24160732

  5. Radiation-induced alternative transcripts as detected in total and polysome-bound mRNA.

    PubMed

    Wahba, Amy; Ryan, Michael C; Shankavaram, Uma T; Camphausen, Kevin; Tofilon, Philip J

    2018-01-02

    Alternative splicing is a critical event in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. To investigate whether this process influences radiation-induced gene expression we defined the effects of ionizing radiation on the generation of alternative transcripts in total cellular mRNA (the transcriptome) and polysome-bound mRNA (the translatome) of the human glioblastoma stem-like cell line NSC11. For these studies, RNA-Seq profiles from control and irradiated cells were compared using the program SpliceSeq to identify transcripts and splice variations induced by radiation. As compared to the transcriptome (total RNA) of untreated cells, the radiation-induced transcriptome contained 92 splice events suggesting that radiation induced alternative splicing. As compared to the translatome (polysome-bound RNA) of untreated cells, the radiation-induced translatome contained 280 splice events of which only 24 were overlapping with the radiation-induced transcriptome. These results suggest that radiation not only modifies alternative splicing of precursor mRNA, but also results in the selective association of existing mRNA isoforms with polysomes. Comparison of radiation-induced alternative transcripts to radiation-induced gene expression in total RNA revealed little overlap (about 3%). In contrast, in the radiation-induced translatome, about 38% of the induced alternative transcripts corresponded to genes whose expression level was affected in the translatome. This study suggests that whereas radiation induces alternate splicing, the alternative transcripts present at the time of irradiation may play a role in the radiation-induced translational control of gene expression and thus cellular radioresponse.

  6. Prenatal microRNA miR-200b Therapy Improves Nitrofen-induced Pulmonary Hypoplasia Associated With Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia.

    PubMed

    Khoshgoo, Naghmeh; Kholdebarin, Ramin; Pereira-Terra, Patricia; Mahood, Thomas H; Falk, Landon; Day, Chelsea A; Iwasiow, Barbara M; Zhu, Fuqin; Mulhall, Drew; Fraser, Carly; Correia-Pinto, Jorge; Keijzer, Richard

    2017-11-13

    We aimed to evaluate the use of miR-200b as a prenatal transplacental therapy in the nitrofen rat model of abnormal lung development and congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Pulmonary hypoplasia (PH) and pulmonary hypertension determine mortality and morbidity in CDH babies. There is no safe medical prenatal treatment available. We previously discovered that higher miR-200b is associated with better survival in CDH babies. Here, we investigate the role of miR-200b in the nitrofen rat model of PH and CDH and evaluate its use as an in vivo prenatal therapy. We profiled miR-200b expression during nitrofen-induced PH using RT-qPCR and in situ hybridization in the nitrofen rat model of PH and CDH. The effects of nitrofen on downstream miR-200b targets were studied in bronchial lung epithelial cells using a SMAD luciferase assay, Western blotting and Immunohistochemistry. We evaluated miR-200b as a lung growth promoting therapy ex vivo and in vivo using lung explant culture and transplacental prenatal therapy in the nitrofen rat model. We show that late lung hypoplasia in CDH is associated with (compensatory) upregulation of miR-200b in less hypoplastic lungs. Increasing miR-200b abundance with mimics early after nitrofen treatment decreases SMAD-driven TGF-β signaling and rescues lung hypoplasia both in vitro and in vivo. Also, prenatal miR-200b therapy decreases the observed incidence of CDH. Our data indicate that miR-200b improves PH and decreases the incidence of CDH. Future studies will further exploit this newly discovered prenatal therapy for lung hypoplasia and CDH.

  7. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Radiation-Induced Cystitis and Proctitis

    SciT

    Oliai, Caspian; Fisher, Brandon; Jani, Ashish

    Purpose: To provide a retrospective analysis of the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) for treating hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) and proctitis secondary to pelvic- and prostate-only radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients were treated with HBOT for radiation-induced HC and proctitis. The median age at treatment was 66 years (range, 15-84 years). The range of external-beam radiation delivered was 50.0-75.6 Gy. Bleeding must have been refractory to other therapies. Patients received 100% oxygen at 2.0 atmospheres absolute pressure for 90-120 min per treatment in a monoplace chamber. Symptoms were retrospectively scored according to the Late Effects of Normal Tissues-Subjective, Objective,more » Management, Analytic (LENT-SOMA) scale to evaluate short-term efficacy. Recurrence of hematuria/hematochezia was used to assess long-term efficacy. Results: Four of the 19 patients were lost to follow-up. Fifteen patients were evaluated and received a mean of 29.8 dives: 11 developed HC and 4 proctitis. All patients experienced a reduction in their LENT-SOMA score. After completion of HBOT, the mean LENT-SOMA score was reduced from 0.78 to 0.20 in patients with HC and from 0.66 to 0.26 in patients with proctitis. Median follow-up was 39 months (range, 7-70 months). No cases of hematuria were refractory to HBOT. Complete resolution of hematuria was seen in 81% (n = 9) and partial response in 18% (n = 2). Recurrence of hematuria occurred in 36% (n = 4) after a median of 10 months. Complete resolution of hematochezia was seen in 50% (n = 2), partial response in 25% (n = 1), and refractory bleeding in 25% (n = 1). Conclusions: Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is appropriate for radiation-induced HC once less time-consuming therapies have failed to resolve the bleeding. In these conditions, HBOT is efficacious in the short and long term, with minimal side effects.« less

  8. Radiation-induced changes in mouse duodenal papilla.

    PubMed

    Indran, M; Carr, K E; Boyle, F C

    1988-11-01

    Radiation-induced changes in duodenal mucosal morphology as seen by scanning electron microscopy have been widely reported in the literature. However, no comment has previously been made on any post-irradiation alteration in the duodenal papilla. This paper describes the preliminary results of an investigation into the effects of X rays on the papilla. The duodenal papilla was difficult to find in untreated and sham irradiated mice. It was identified in only two of six mice examined and was located 5.37 and 4.43 mm from the gastroduodenal junction. Eighteen hours after irradiation with 15 Gy X rays, there was little change in position or prominence of the papilla. However, 3 days after treatment, the papilla was only 2.19-3.83 mm from the pylorus. It was also more prominent, being found in all three animals studied and having a widely dilated orifice in contrast to the closed structure seen in the unirradiated specimens. It is concluded that treatment with X rays alters the structure of the duodenal papilla. There may be implications for duodenal function in this marked change in the papilla, which controls the flow of pancreatic and biliary secretions.

  9. Long term radiological features of radiation-induced lung damage.

    PubMed

    Veiga, Catarina; Landau, David; McClelland, Jamie R; Ledermann, Jonathan A; Hawkes, David; Janes, Sam M; Devaraj, Anand

    2018-02-01

    To describe the radiological findings of radiation-induced lung damage (RILD) present on CT imaging of lung cancer patients 12 months after radical chemoradiation. Baseline and 12-month CT scans of 33 patients were reviewed from a phase I/II clinical trial of isotoxic chemoradiation (IDEAL CRT). CT findings were scored in three categories derived from eleven sub-categories: (1) parenchymal change, defined as the presence of consolidation, ground-glass opacities (GGOs), traction bronchiectasis and/or reticulation; (2) lung volume reduction, identified through reduction in lung height and/or distortions in fissures, diaphragm, anterior junction line and major airways anatomy, and (3) pleural changes, either thickening and/or effusion. Six patients were excluded from the analysis due to anatomical changes caused by partial lung collapse and abscess. All remaining 27 patients had radiological evidence of lung damage. The three categories, parenchymal change, shrinkage and pleural change were present in 100%, 96% and 82% respectively. All patients had at least two categories of change present and 72% all three. GGOs, reticulation and traction bronchiectasis were present in 44%, 52% and 37% of patients. Parenchymal change, lung shrinkage and pleural change are present in a high proportion of patients and are frequently identified in RILD. GGOs, reticulation and traction bronchiectasis are common at 12 months but not diagnostic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Chromatin Structure and Radiation-Induced Intrachromosome Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangala; Zhang, Ye; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    We have recently investigated the location of breaks involved in intrachromosomal type exchange events, using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique for human chromosome 3. In human epithelial cells exposed to both low- and high-LET radiations in vitro, intrachromosome exchanges were found to occur preferentially between a break in the 3p21 and one in the 3q11. Exchanges were also observed between a break in 3p21 and one in 3q26, but few exchanges were observed between breaks in 3q11 and 3q26, even though the two regions were on the same arm of the chromosome. To explore the relationships between intrachromosome exchanges and chromatin structure, we used probes that hybridize the three regions of 3p21, 3q11 and 3q26, and measured the distance between two of the three regions in interphase cells. We further analyzed fragile sites on the chromosome that have been identified in various types of cancers. Our results demonstrated that the distribution of breaks involved in radiation-induced intrachromosome aberrations depends upon both the location of fragile sites and the folding of chromatins

  11. Space-radiation-induced Photon Luminescence of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas; Lee, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    We report on the results of a study of the photon luminescence of the Moon induced by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and space radiation from the Sun, using the Monte Carlo program FLUKA. The model of the lunar surface is taken to be the chemical composition of soils found at various landing sites during the Apollo and Luna programs, averaged over all such sites to define a generic regolith for the present analysis. This then becomes the target that is bombarded by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) above 1 keV in FLUKA to determine the photon fluence albedo produced by the Moon's surface when there is no sunlight and Earthshine. This is to be distinguished from the gamma-ray spectrum produced by the radioactive decay of radiogenic constituents lying in the surface and interior of the Moon. From the photon fluence we derive the spectrum which can be utilized to examine existing lunar spectral data and to design orbiting instrumentation for measuring various components of the space-radiation-induced photon luminescence present on the Moon.

  12. Epigenetic determinants of space radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Munjal M.; Baddour, Al Anoud D.; Kawashita, Takumi; Allen, Barrett D.; Syage, Amber R.; Nguyen, Thuan H.; Yoon, Nicole; Giedzinski, Erich; Yu, Liping; Parihar, Vipan K.; Baulch, Janet E.

    2017-01-01

    Among the dangers to astronauts engaging in deep space missions such as a Mars expedition is exposure to radiations that put them at risk for severe cognitive dysfunction. These radiation-induced cognitive impairments are accompanied by functional and structural changes including oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and degradation of neuronal architecture. The molecular mechanisms that dictate CNS function are multifaceted and it is unclear how irradiation induces persistent alterations in the brain. Among those determinants of cognitive function are neuroepigenetic mechanisms that translate radiation responses into altered gene expression and cellular phenotype. In this study, we have demonstrated a correlation between epigenetic aberrations and adverse effects of space relevant irradiation on cognition. In cognitively impaired irradiated mice we observed increased 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine levels in the hippocampus that coincided with increased levels of the DNA methylating enzymes DNMT3a, TET1 and TET3. By inhibiting methylation using 5-iodotubercidin, we demonstrated amelioration of the epigenetic effects of irradiation. In addition to protecting against those molecular effects of irradiation, 5-iodotubercidin restored behavioral performance to that of unirradiated animals. The findings of this study establish the possibility that neuroepigenetic mechanisms significantly contribute to the functional and structural changes that affect the irradiated brain and cognition. PMID:28220892

  13. Relaxation model of radiation-induced conductivity in polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhutayeva, Yu. R.; Khatipov, S. A.

    1999-05-01

    The paper suggests a relaxation model of radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) in polymers. According to the model, the transfer of charges generated in the polymer volume by ionizing radiation takes place with the participation of molecular relaxation processes. The mechanism of electron transport consists in the transfer of the charge directly between traps when they draw close to one another due to the rotation of macromolecule segments. The numerical solutions of the corresponding kinetic equations for different distribution functions Q( τ) of the times of molecular relaxation and for different functions of the probability P( τ, τ') of charge transfer in the `overlapping' regions of the diffusion spheres of the segments are analyzed. The relaxation model provides an explanation of the non-Arrhenius behavior of the RIC temperature dependence, the power dependence of RIC on the dose rate with a power index in the interval 0.5-1.0, the appearance of maxima in the curves of the RIC temporal dependence and their irreversible character in the region of large dose rates (more than 1 Gy/s). The model can be used for interpreting polymer RIC in conditions of kinetic mobility of macromolecules.

  14. Pravastatin reduces radiation-induced damage in normal tissues.

    PubMed

    Doi, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Seiji; Odawara, Soichi; Shikata, Toshiyuki; Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Tanooka, Masao; Takada, Yasuhiro; Tsujimura, Tohru; Kamikonya, Norihiko; Hirota, Shozo

    2017-05-01

    Pravastatin is an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl- glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase that has been reported to have therapeutic applications in a range of inflammatory conditions. The aim of the present study was to assess the radioprotective effects of pravastatin in an experimental animal model. Mice were divided into two groups: The control group received ionizing radiation with no prior medication, while the pravastatin group received pravastatin prior to ionizing radiation. Pravastatin was administered orally at 30 mg/kg body weight in drinking water at 24 and 4 h before irradiation. Intestinal crypt epithelial cell survival and the incidence of apoptosis in the intestine and lung were measured post-irradiation. The effect of pravastatin on intestinal DNA damage was determined by immunohistochemistry. Finally, the effect of pravastatin on tumor response to radiotherapy was examined in a mouse mesothelioma xenograft model. Pravastatin increased the number of viable intestinal crypts and this effect was statistically significant in the ileum (P<0.0001). The pravastatin group showed significantly lower apoptotic indices in all examined parts of the intestine (P<0.0001) and tended to show reduced apoptosis in the lung. Pravastatin reduced the intestinal expression of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated and gamma-H2AX after irradiation. No apparent pravastatin-related differences were observed in the response of xenograft tumors to irradiation. In conclusion, pravastatin had radioprotective effects on the intestine and lung and reduced radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Pravastatin may increase the therapeutic index of radiotherapy.

  15. Radiation-induced optic neuropathy: A magnetic resonance imaging study

    SciT

    Guy, J.; Mancuso, A.; Beck, R.

    1991-03-01

    Optic neuropathy induced by radiation is an infrequent cause of delayed visual loss that may at times be difficult to differentiate from compression of the visual pathways by recurrent neoplasm. The authors describe six patients with this disorder who experienced loss of vision 6 to 36 months after neurological surgery and radiation therapy. Of the six patients in the series, two had a pituitary adenoma and one each had a metastatic melanoma, multiple myeloma, craniopharyngioma, and lymphoepithelioma. Visual acuity in the affected eyes ranged from 20/25 to no light perception. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed sellar and parasellar recurrence ofmore » both pituitary adenomas, but the intrinsic lesions of the optic nerves and optic chiasm induced by radiation were enhanced after gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA) administration and were clearly distinguishable from the suprasellar compression of tumor. Repeated MR imaging showed spontaneous resolution of gadolinium-DTPA enhancement of the optic nerve in a patient who was initially suspected of harboring recurrence of a metastatic malignant melanoma as the cause of visual loss. The authors found the presumptive diagnosis of radiation-induced optic neuropathy facilitated by MR imaging with gadolinium-DTPA. This neuro-imaging procedure may help avert exploratory surgery in some patients with recurrent neoplasm in whom the etiology of visual loss is uncertain.« less

  16. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability in human mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Yang, T. C.

    1996-01-01

    Karyotypes of human cells surviving X- and alpha-irradiation have been studied. Human mammary epithelial cells of the immortal, non-tumorigenic cell line H184B5 F5-1 M/10 were irradiated and surviving clones isolated and expanded in culture. Cytogenetic analysis was performed using dedicated software with an image analyzer. We have found that both high- and low-LET radiation induced chromosomal instability in long-term cultures, but with different characteristics. Complex chromosomal rearrangements were observed after X-rays, while chromosome loss predominated after alpha-particles. Deletions were observed in both cases. In clones derived from cells exposed to alpha-particles, some cells showed extensive chromosome breaking and double minutes. Genomic instability was correlated to delayed reproductive death and neoplastic transformation. These results indicate that chromosomal instability is a radiation-quality-dependent effect which could determine late genetic effects, and should therefore be carefully considered in the evaluation of risk for space missions.

  17. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability in human mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Yang, T. C.

    Karyotypes of human cells surviving X- and alpha-irradiation have been studied. Human mammary epithelial cells of the immortal, non-tumorigenic cell line H184B5 F5-1 M/10 were irradiated and surviving clones isolated and expanded in culture. Cytogenetic analysis was performed using dedicated software with an image analyzer. We have found that both high- and low-LET radiation induced chromosomal instability in long-term cultures, but with different characteristics. Complex chromosomal rearrangements were observed after X-rays, while chromosome loss predominated after alpha-particles. Deletions were observed in both cases. In clones derived from cells exposed to alpha-particles, some cells showed extensive chromosome breaking and double minutes. Genomic instability was correlated to delayed reproductive death and neoplastic transformation. These results indicate that chromosomal instability is a radiation-quality-dependent effect which could determine late genetic effects, and should therefore be carefully considered in the evaluation of risk for space missions.

  18. Radiation-induced heart disease in lung cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Xin; Feng, Yuanming; Yang, Chengwen; Wang, Wei; Wang, Ping; Deng, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD), which affects the patients’ prognosis with both acute and late side effects, has been published extensively in the radiotherapy of breast cancer, lymphoma and other benign diseases. Studies on RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy, however, are less extensive and clear even though the patients with lung cancer are delivered with higher doses to the heart during radiation treatment. Methods: In this article, after extensive literature search and analysis, we reviewed the current evidence on RIHD in lung cancer patients after their radiation treatments and investigated the potential risk factors for RIHD as compared to other types of cancers. Result: Cardiac toxicity has been found highly relevant in lung cancer radiotherapy. So far, the crude incidence of cardiac complications in the lung cancer patients after radiotherapy has been up to 33%. Conclusion: The dose to the heart, the lobar location of tumor, the treatment modality, the history of heart and pulmonary disease and smoking were considered as potential risk factors for RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy. As treatment techniques improve over the time with better prognosis for lung cancer survivors, an improved prediction model can be established to further reduce the cardiac toxicity in lung cancer radiotherapy. PMID:27741117

  19. Mechanism of Hydrophilicity by Radiation-Induced Surface Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honjo, Yoshio; Furuya, Masahiro; Takamasa, Tomoji; Okamoto, Koji

    When a metal oxide is irradiated by gamma rays, the irradiated surface becomes hydrophilic. This surface phenomenon is called as radiation-induced surface activation (RISA) hydrophilicity. In order to investigate gamma ray-induced and photoinduced hydrophilicity, the contact angles of water droplets on a titanium dioxide surface were measured in terms of irradiation intensity and time for gamma rays of cobalt-60 and for ultraviolet rays. Reciprocals of the contact angles increased in proportion to the irradiation time before the contact angles reached its super-hydrophilic state. The irradiation time dependency is equal to each other qualitatively. In addition, an effect of ambient gas was investigated. In pure argon gas, the contact angle remains the same against the irradiation time. This clearly indicates that certain humidity is required in ambient gas to take place of RISA hydrophilicity. A single crystal titanium dioxide (100) surface was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). After irradiation with gamma rays, a peak was found in the O1s spectrum, which indicates the adsorption of dissociative water to a surface 5-fold coordinate titanium site, and the formation of a surface hydroxyl group. We conclude that the RISA hydrophilicity is caused by chemisorption of the hydroxyl group on the surface.

  20. Countermeasures for space radiation induced adverse biologic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, A. R.; Wan, X. S.

    2011-11-01

    Radiation exposure in space is expected to increase the risk of cancer and other adverse biological effects in astronauts. The types of space radiation of particular concern for astronaut health are protons and heavy ions known as high atomic number and high energy (HZE) particles. Recent studies have indicated that carcinogenesis induced by protons and HZE particles may be modifiable. We have been evaluating the effects of proton and HZE particle radiation in cultured human cells and animals for nearly a decade. Our results indicate that exposure to proton and HZE particle radiation increases oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, cataract development and malignant transformation in in vivo and/or in vitro experimental systems. We have also shown that these adverse biological effects can be prevented, at least partially, by treatment with antioxidants and some dietary supplements that are readily available and have favorable safety profiles. Some of the antioxidants and dietary supplements are effective in preventing radiation induced malignant transformation in vitro even when applied several days after the radiation exposure. Our recent progress is reviewed and discussed in the context of the relevant literature.

  1. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousada, Cláudio M.; Soroka, Inna L.; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V.; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A.; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-04-01

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories.

  2. Temperature Dependence of Radiation Induced Conductivity in Insulators

    SciT

    Dennison, J. R.; Gillespie, Jodie; Hodges, Joshua

    2009-03-10

    This study measures Radiation Induced Conductivity (RIC) of Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) over temperatures ranging from {approx}110 K to {approx}350 K. RIC occurs when incident ionizing radiation deposits energy and excites electrons into the conduction band of insulators. Conductivity was measured when a voltage was applied across vacuum-baked, thin film LDPE polymer samples in a parallel plate geometry. RIC was calculated as the difference in sample conductivity under no incident radiation and under an incident {approx}4 MeV electron beam at low incident fluxes of 10{sup -4}-10{sup -1} Gr/sec. The steady-state RIC was found to agree well with the standard powermore » law relation, {sigma}{sub RIC} = k{sub RIC}{center_dot}D ring {sup {delta}} between conductivity, {sigma} and adsorbed dose rate, D ring . Both the proportionality constant, k{sub RIC}, and the power, {delta}, were found to be temperature dependant above {approx}250 K, with behavior consistent with photoconductivity models developed for localized trap states in disordered semiconductors. Below {approx}250 K, kRIC and {delta} exhibited little change. The observed difference in temperature dependence might be related to a structural phase transition seen at T{sub {beta}}{approx}256 K in prior studies of mechanical and thermodynamic properties of LDPE.« less

  3. Antioxidant Supplementation: A Linchpin in Radiation-Induced Enteritis

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Mumtaz; Ahmad, Shabeer; Akhtar, Reyhan; Mahmood, Akhtar

    2017-01-01

    Radiation enteritis is one of the most feared complications of abdominal and pelvic regions. Thus, radiation to abdominal or pelvic malignancies unavoidably injures the intestine. Because of rapid cell turnover, the intestine is highly sensitive to radiation injury, which is the limiting factor in the permissible dosage of irradiation. Bowel injuries such as fistulas, strictures, and chronic malabsorption are potentially life-threatening complications and have an impact on patient quality of life. The incidence of radiation enteritis is increasing because of the current trend of combined chemotherapy and radiation. The consequences of radiation damage to the intestine may result in considerable morbidity and even mortality. The observed effects of ionizing radiation are mediated mainly by oxygen-free radicals that are generated by its action on water and are involved in several steps of signal transduction cascade, leading to apoptosis. The oxyradicals also induce DNA strand breaks and protein oxidation. An important line of defense against free radical damage is the presence of antioxidants. Therefore, administration of antioxidants may ameliorate the radiation-induced damage to the intestine. PMID:28532242

  4. Outcome of Carotid Artery Stenting for Radiation-Induced Stenosis

    SciT

    Dorresteijn, Lucille, E-mail: L.Dorresteijn@mst.n; Vogels, Oscar; Leeuw, Frank-Erik de

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Patients who have been irradiated at the neck have an increased risk of symptomatic stenosis of the carotid artery during follow-up. Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) can be a preferable alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy, which is associated with increased operative risks in these patients. Methods and Materials: We performed a prospective cohort study of 24 previously irradiated patients who underwent CAS for symptomatic carotid stenosis. We assessed periprocedural and nonprocedural events including transient ischemic attack (TIA), nondisabling stroke, disabling stoke, and death. Patency rates were evaluated on duplex ultrasound scans. Restenosis was defined as a stenosis of >50%more » at the stent location. Results: Periprocedural TIA rate was 8%, and periprocedural stroke (nondisabling) occurred in 4% of patients. After a mean follow-up of 3.3 years (range, 0.3-11.0 years), only one ipsilateral incident event (TIA) had occurred (4%). In 12% of patients, a contralateral incident event was present: one TIA (4%) and two strokes (12%, two disabling strokes). Restenosis was apparent in 17%, 33%, and 42% at 3, 12, and 24 months, respectively, although none of the patients with restenosed vessels became symptomatic. The length of the irradiation to CAS interval proved the only significant risk factor for restenosis. Conclusions: The results of CAS for radiation-induced carotid stenosis are favorable in terms of recurrence of cerebrovascular events at the CAS site.« less

  5. Effect of radiation-induced amorphization on smectite dissolution.

    PubMed

    Fourdrin, C; Allard, T; Monnet, I; Menguy, N; Benedetti, M; Calas, G

    2010-04-01

    Effects of radiation-induced amorphization of smectite were investigated using artificial irradiation. Beams of 925 MeV Xenon ions with radiation dose reaching 73 MGy were used to simulate the effects generated by alpha recoil nuclei or fission products in the context of high level nuclear waste repository. Amorphization was controlled by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. An important coalescence of the smectite sheets was observed which lead to a loss of interparticle porosity. The amorphization is revealed by a loss of long-range structure and accompanied by dehydroxylation. The dissolution rate far-from-equilibrium shows that the amount of silica in solution is two times larger in the amorphous sample than in the reference clay, a value which may be enhanced by orders of magnitude when considering the relative surface area of the samples. Irradiation-induced amorphization thus facilitates dissolution of the clay-derived material. This has to be taken into account for the safety assessment of high level nuclear waste repository, particularly in a scenario of leakage of the waste package which would deliver alpha emitters able to amorphize smectite after a limited period of time.

  6. Ionizing radiation induced degradation of salicylic acid in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarrán, Guadalupe; Mendoza, Edith

    2018-06-01

    The radiation-induced degradation of salicylic acid (SA-) in aqueous solutions (1.0 and 0.1 mmol dm-3) saturated with N2O or air or without oxygen were studied. Irradiation was carried out using a cobalt-60 source. With a 1 mmol dm-3 solution saturated with N2O a seemingly total degradation occurred at about 18 kGy, although small quantities of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, catechol and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid were present at that dose at concentrations of 67, 22 and 6 μmol dm-3 respectively. Under air and when free oxygen, the three radiolytic products were present at 18.54 kGy while SA- was destroyed only to 90% and 62%, respectively. In the case of 0.1 mmol dm-3 SA- solutions, the acid was degraded at 3.5 kGy if the solution contained N2O, at 5.8 kGy in air and at 7 kGy without oxygen. The concentration of the radiolytic products increased with increasing dose and after a maximum they decreased. The oxidation was followed by measuring the chemical oxygen demand; the slopes were 0.48 and 0.11, 0.21 and 0.07, 0.15 and 0.03 mmol dm-3 kGy-1 for 1.0 and 0.10 mmol dm-3 solutions saturated with N2O or air or without oxygen, respectively.

  7. Gamma radiation induced changes in nuclear waste glass containing Eu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, M.; Kadam, R. M.; Mishra, R. K.; Kaushik, C. P.; Tomar, B. S.; Godbole, S. V.

    2011-10-01

    Gamma radiation induced changes were investigated in sodium-barium borosilicate glasses containing Eu. The glass composition was similar to that of nuclear waste glasses used for vitrifying Trombay research reactor nuclear waste at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India. Photoluminescence (PL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques were used to study the speciation of the rare earth (RE) ion in the matrix before and after gamma irradiation. Judd-Ofelt ( J- O) analyses of the emission spectra were done before and after irradiation. The spin counting technique was employed to quantify the number of defect centres formed in the glass at the highest gamma dose studied. PL data suggested the stabilisation of the trivalent RE ion in the borosilicate glass matrix both before and after irradiation. It was also observed that, the RE ion distributes itself in two different environments in the irradiated glass. From the EPR data it was observed that, boron oxygen hole centre based radicals are the predominant defect centres produced in the glass after irradiation along with small amount of E’ centres. From the spin counting studies the concentration of defect centres in the glass was calculated to be 350 ppm at 900 kGy. This indicated the fact that bulk of the glass remained unaffected after gamma irradiation up to 900 kGy.

  8. Internal Carotid Artery Hypoplasia: Role of Color-Coded Carotid Duplex Sonography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Ya; Liu, Hung-Yu; Lim, Kun-Eng; Lin, Shinn-Kuang

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the role of color-coded carotid duplex sonography for diagnosis of internal carotid artery hypoplasia. We retrospectively reviewed 25,000 color-coded carotid duplex sonograms in our neurosonographic database to establish more diagnostic criteria for internal carotid artery hypoplasia. A definitive diagnosis of internal carotid artery hypoplasia was made in 9 patients. Diagnostic findings on color-coded carotid duplex imaging include a long segmental small-caliber lumen (52% diameter) with markedly decreased flow (13% flow volume) in the affected internal carotid artery relative to the contralateral side but without intraluminal lesions. Indirect findings included markedly increased total flow volume (an increase of 133%) in both vertebral arteries, antegrade ipsilateral ophthalmic arterial flow, and a reduced vessel diameter with increased flow resistance in the ipsilateral common carotid artery. Ten patients with distal internal carotid artery dissection showed a similar color-coded duplex pattern, but the reductions in the internal and common carotid artery diameters and increase in collateral flow from the vertebral artery were less prominent than those in hypoplasia. The ipsilateral ophthalmic arterial flow was retrograde in 40% of patients with distal internal carotid artery dissection. In addition, thin-section axial and sagittal computed tomograms of the skull base could show the small diameter of the carotid canal in internal carotid artery hypoplasia and help distinguish hypoplasia from distal internal carotid artery dissection. Color-coded carotid duplex sonography provides important clues for establishing a diagnosis of internal carotid artery hypoplasia. A hypoplastic carotid canal can be shown by thin-section axial and sagittal skull base computed tomography to confirm the final diagnosis. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  9. Linkage analysis excludes the glaucoma locus on 1q from involvement in autosomal dominant glaucoma with iris hypoplasia

    SciT

    Heon, E.; Sheth, B.P.; Kalenak, J.W.

    1994-09-01

    Genetic factors have been implicated in a variety of types of glaucoma including primary open-angle glaucoma, infantile glaucoma, pigmentary glaucoma, and juvenile open-angle glaucoma. We previously mapped the disease-causing gene for one type of juvenile open angle glaucoma to chromosome 1q21-31. Weatherill and Hart (1969) and Pearce (1983) each noted the association of iris hypoplasia and early-onset autosomal dominant glaucoma. We recently had the opportunity to study a large family (12 affected members) with this phenotype. Affected individuals developed glaucoma at an average age of 30 years. These patients also have a strikingly underdeveloped iris stroma which causes a peculiarmore » eye color. Linkage analysis was able to completely exclude the 1q glaucoma locus from involvement in the disorder that affects this family. A complete clinical description of the family and linkage results at additional candidate loci will be presented.« less

  10. Chronic radiation-induced dermatitis: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Spałek, Mateusz

    2016-01-01

    Chronic radiation dermatitis is a late side effect of skin irradiation, which may deteriorate patients' quality of life. There is a lack of precise data about its incidence; however, several risk factors may predispose to the development of this condition. It includes radiotherapy dose, fractionation, technique, concurrent systemic therapy, comorbidities, and personal and genetic factors. Chronic radiation dermatitis is mostly caused by the imbalance of proinflammatory and profibrotic cytokines. Clinical manifestation includes changes in skin appearance, wounds, ulcerations, necrosis, fibrosis, and secondary cancers. The most severe complication of irradiation is extensive radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF). RIF can manifest in many ways, such as skin induration and retraction, lymphedema or restriction of joint motion. Diagnosis of chronic radiation dermatitis is usually made by clinical examination. In case of unclear clinical manifestation, a biopsy and histopathological examination are recommended to exclude secondary malignancy. The most effective prophylaxis of chronic radiation dermatitis is the use of proper radiation therapy techniques to avoid unnecessary irradiation of healthy skin. Treatment of chronic radiation dermatitis is demanding. The majority of the interventions are based only on clinical practice. Telangiectasia may be treated with pulse dye laser therapy. Chronic postirradiation wounds need special dressings. In case of necrosis or severe ulceration, surgical intervention may be considered. Management of RIF should be complex. Available methods are rehabilitative care, pharmacotherapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and laser therapy. Future challenges include the assessment of late skin toxicity in modern irradiation techniques. Special attention should be paid on genomics and radiomics that allow scientists and clinicians to select patients who are at risk of the development of chronic radiation dermatitis. Novel treatment methods and clinical

  11. Dosimetric Analysis of Radiation-induced Gastric Bleeding

    SciT

    Feng, Mary, E-mail: maryfeng@umich.edu; Normolle, Daniel; Pan, Charlie C.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced gastric bleeding has been poorly understood. In this study, we described dosimetric predictors for gastric bleeding after fractionated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The records of 139 sequential patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for intrahepatic malignancies were reviewed. Median follow-up was 7.4 months. The parameters of a Lyman normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for the occurrence of {>=}grade 3 gastric bleed, adjusted for cirrhosis, were fitted to the data. The principle of maximum likelihood was used to estimate parameters for NTCP models. Results: Sixteen of 116 evaluable patients (14%) developed gastric bleeds at amore » median time of 4.0 months (mean, 6.5 months; range, 2.1-28.3 months) following completion of RT. The median and mean maximum doses to the stomach were 61 and 63 Gy (range, 46-86 Gy), respectively, after biocorrection of each part of the 3D dose distributions to equivalent 2-Gy daily fractions. The Lyman NTCP model with parameters adjusted for cirrhosis predicted gastric bleed. Best-fit Lyman NTCP model parameters were n=0.10 and m=0.21 and with TD{sub 50} (normal) = 56 Gy and TD{sub 50} (cirrhosis) = 22 Gy. The low n value is consistent with the importance of maximum dose; a lower TD{sub 50} value for the cirrhosis patients points out their greater sensitivity. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the Lyman NTCP model has utility for predicting gastric bleeding and that the presence of cirrhosis greatly increases this risk. These findings should facilitate the design of future clinical trials involving high-dose upper abdominal radiation.« less

  12. Radiation-induced impairment in lung lymphatic vasculature.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ye; Wilder, Julie; Rietz, Cecilia; Gigliotti, Andrew; Tang, Xiaomeng; Shi, Yuanyuan; Guilmette, Raymond; Wang, Hao; George, Gautam; Nilo de Magaldi, Eduarda; Chu, Sarah G; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; McDonald, Jacob D; Rosas, Ivan O; El-Chemaly, Souheil

    2014-12-01

    The lymphatic vasculature has been shown to play important roles in lung injury and repair, particularly in lung fibrosis. The effects of ionizing radiation on lung lymphatic vasculature have not been previously reported. C57Bl/6 mice were immobilized in a lead shield exposing only the thoracic cavity, and were irradiated with a single dose of 14 Gy. Animals were sacrificed and lungs collected at different time points (1, 4, 8, and 16 weeks) following radiation. To identify lymphatic vessels in lung tissue sections, we used antibodies that are specific for lymphatic vessel endothelial receptor 1 (LYVE-1), a marker of lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC). To evaluate LEC cell death and oxidative damage, lung tissue sections were stained for LYVE-1 and with TUNEL staining, or 8-oxo-dG respectively. Images were imported into ImageJ v1.36b and analyzed. Compared to a non-irradiated control group, we observed a durable and progressive decrease in the density, perimeter, and area of lymphatic vessels over the study period. The decline in the density of lymphatic vessels was observed in both subpleural and interstitial lymphatics. Histopathologically discernible pulmonary fibrosis was not apparent until 16 weeks after irradiation. Furthermore, there was significantly increased LEC apoptosis and oxidative damage at one week post-irradiation that persisted at 16 weeks. There is impairment of lymphatic vasculature after a single dose of ionizing radiation that precedes architectural distortion and fibrosis, suggesting important roles for the lymphatic circulation in the pathogenesis of the radiation-induced lung injury.

  13. Novel concepts in radiation-induced cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Cuomo, Jason R; Sharma, Gyanendra K; Conger, Preston D; Weintraub, Neal L

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced cardiovascular disease (RICVD) is the most common nonmalignant cause of morbidity and mortality among cancer survivors who have undergone mediastinal radiation therapy (RT). Cardiovascular complications include effusive or constrictive pericarditis, cardiomyopathy, valvular heart disease, and coronary/vascular disease. These are pathophysiologically distinct disease entities whose prevalence varies depending on the timing and extent of radiation exposure to the heart and great vessels. Although refinements in RT dosimetry and shielding will inevitably limit future cases of RICVD, the increasing number of long-term cancer survivors, including those treated with older higher-dose RT regimens, will ensure a steady flow of afflicted patients for the foreseeable future. Thus, there is a pressing need for enhanced understanding of the disease mechanisms, and improved detection methods and treatment strategies. Newly characterized mechanisms responsible for the establishment of chronic fibrosis, such as oxidative stress, inflammation and epigenetic modifications, are discussed and linked to potential treatments currently under study. Novel imaging modalities may serve as powerful screening tools in RICVD, and recent research and expert opinion advocating their use is introduced. Data arguing for the aggressive use of percutaneous interventions, such as transcutaneous valve replacement and drug-eluting stents, are examined and considered in the context of prior therapeutic approaches. RICVD and its treatment options are the subject of a rich and dynamic body of research, and patients who are at risk or suffering from this disease will benefit from the care of physicians with specialty expertise in the emerging field of cardio-oncology. PMID:27721934

  14. Linear enamel hypoplasia in the great apes: analysis by genus and locality.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Darcy Lee; Guatelli-Steinberg, Debbie

    2005-05-01

    Most studies report a high prevalence of linear enamel hypoplasia (LEH) in the great apes relative to other nonhuman primates and some human populations. It is unclear if this difference is a direct result of poor health status for the great apes, or if it represents differential incidence due to a lower threshold (sensu Goodman and Rose, 1990 Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. [suppl.] 33:59-110) for the occurrence of enamel hypoplasia among great apes. This study uses the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History's great ape collection to examine the prevalence of LEH, the most common type of hypoplasia observed. Frequencies of LEH are reported, as well as analyses by taxa and provenience. The study sample consists of 136 specimens and includes 41 gorillas, 25 chimpanzees, and 70 orangutans. Analyses of frequencies are presented for both individuals and teeth by taxonomic category and locality. Among the individuals in this study, 63.97% are affected by LEH. Overall, gorillas (29.27%) exhibit lower frequencies of LEH than chimpanzees (68.00%) and orangutans (82.86%). There is a marked difference in LEH frequencies between mountain and lowland gorillas. There is no difference in LEH frequencies between Sumatran and Bornean orangutans. A range of variation for the great apes in enamel hypoplasia frequencies is found when taxon and locality are considered. It is likely that both biological and environmental factors influence the high frequencies of enamel hypoplasia exhibited in the great apes. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Localised enamel hypoplasia of human deciduous canines: genotype or environment?

    PubMed

    Taji, S; Hughes, T; Rogers, J; Townsend, G

    2000-06-01

    A discrete area of defective enamel formation that appears on the labial surface of the crowns of deciduous canine teeth has been described in both recent and prehistoric human populations, with reported frequencies varying from 1 to 45 per cent. Suggestions about the aetiology of this localized hypoplasia range from genotypic factors to environmental conditions and systemic effects. The major aims of this study were to describe the frequency of occurrence and pattern of expression of the lesion in Australian Aboriginal and Caucasian ethnic groups, and to clarify the role of genetic factors by examining a sample of twins. The study sample consisted of dental casts of 181 pairs of Australian Caucasian twins, 215 Aborigines and 122 Caucasian singletons, together with 253 extracted deciduous canines. Examination of dental casts and extracted teeth was undertaken under 2x magnification with emphasis being placed upon location and expression of the lesion. The defect was observed in 49 per cent of twins and 44 per cent of Aborigines, but only 36 per cent of singletons. The percentages of affected teeth in each group were: 18 per cent in twins, 17 per cent in Aborigines and 13 per cent in Caucasians. A significant proportion of the defects occurred on the mesial aspect of the labial surface, in the middle area incisocervically, with the majority in the lower jaw. A number of significant differences in frequency were observed between groups, sexes, arches and sides. The results confirm some of the findings of previous studies, but also suggest that none of environmental, genetic or systemic factors can be ruled out as being involved in aetiology of the defect. The higher incidence of the lesion occurring on the mesial aspect of the labial surface is suggestive of physical trauma. Also, the vulnerability of the prominent developing mandibular canine, with its thin or missing labial covering of bone, would be expected to lead to higher prevalence of the lesion in the lower

  16. Radiation-Induced Chromosomal Aberrations and Immunotherapy: Micronuclei, Cytosolic DNA, and Interferon-Production Pathway.

    PubMed

    Durante, Marco; Formenti, Silvia C

    2018-01-01

    Radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations represent an early marker of late effects, including cell killing and transformation. The measurement of cytogenetic damage in tissues, generally in blood lymphocytes, from patients treated with radiotherapy has been studied for many years to predict individual sensitivity and late morbidity. Acentric fragments are lost during mitosis and create micronuclei (MN), which are well correlated to cell killing. Immunotherapy is rapidly becoming a most promising new strategy for metastatic tumors, and combination with radiotherapy is explored in several pre-clinical studies and clinical trials. Recent evidence has shown that the presence of cytosolic DNA activates immune response via the cyclic GMP-AMP synthase/stimulator of interferon genes pathway, which induces type I interferon transcription. Cytosolic DNA can be found after exposure to ionizing radiation either as MN or as small fragments leaking through nuclear envelope ruptures. The study of the dependence of cytosolic DNA and MN on dose and radiation quality can guide the optimal combination of radiotherapy and immunotherapy. The role of densely ionizing charged particles is under active investigation to define their impact on the activation of the interferon pathway.

  17. Ghrelin may reduce radiation-induced mucositis and anorexia in head-neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Guney, Yildiz; Ozel Turkcu, Ummuhani; Hicsonmez, Ayse; Nalca Andrieu, Meltem; Kurtman, Cengiz

    2007-01-01

    Body weight loss is common in cancer patients, and is often associated with poor prognosis, it greatly impairs quality of life (QOL). Radiation therapy (RT) is used in head and neck cancers (HNC) either as a primary treatment or as an adjuvant therapy to surgery. Patients with HNC are most susceptible to malnutrition especially due to anorexia, which is aggravated by RT. Multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), interferon (IFN)-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha(TNF-alpha), have been all associated with the development of both anorexia and oral mucositis. Radiation-induced mucositis occurs in almost all patients, who are treated for HNC, it could also cause weight loss. Ghrelin is a novel 28-amino acid peptide, which up-regulates body weight through appetite control, increase food intake, down-regulate energy expenditure and induces adiposity. Furthermore, ghrelin inhibits pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, TNF-alpha which may cause oral mucositis and aneroxia, which are the results of weight loss. Thus weight loss during RT is an early indicator of nutritional decline, we propose that recombinant ghrelin used prophylactically could be useful as an appetite stimulant; and preventive of mucositis because of its anti-inflammatory effect, it might help patients maintain weight over the course of curative RT of the HNC and can improve specific aspects of QOL. This issue warrants further studies.

  18. Radiation-Induced Skin Injuries to Patients: What the Interventional Radiologist Needs to Know.

    PubMed

    Jaschke, Werner; Schmuth, Matthias; Trianni, Annalisa; Bartal, Gabriel

    2017-08-01

    For a long time, radiation-induced skin injuries were only encountered in patients undergoing radiation therapy. In diagnostic radiology, radiation exposures of patients causing skin injuries were extremely rare. The introduction of fast multislice CT scanners and fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI) changed the situation. Both methods carry the risk of excessive high doses to the skin of patients resulting in skin injuries. In the early nineties, several reports of epilation and skin injuries following CT brain perfusion studies were published. During the same time, several papers reported skin injuries following FGI, especially after percutaneous coronary interventions and neuroembolisations. Thus, CT and FGI are of major concern regarding radiation safety since both methods can apply doses to patients exceeding 5 Gy (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements threshold for substantial radiation dose level). This paper reviews the problem of skin injuries observed after FGI. Also, some practical advices are given how to effectively avoid skin injuries. In addition, guidelines are discussed how to deal with patients who were exposed to a potentially dangerous radiation skin dose during medically justified interventional procedures.

  19. Radiation-Induced Salivary Gland Dysfunction Results From p53-Dependent Apoptosis

    SciT

    Avila, Jennifer L.; Grundmann, Oliver; Burd, Randy

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer causes adverse secondary side effects in the salivary glands and results in diminished quality of life for the patient. A previous in vivo study in parotid salivary glands demonstrated that targeted head-and-neck irradiation resulted in marked increases in phosphorylated p53 (serine{sup 18}) and apoptosis, which was suppressed in transgenic mice expressing a constitutively active mutant of Akt1 (myr-Akt1). Methods and Materials: Transgenic and knockout mouse models were exposed to irradiation, and p53-mediated transcription, apoptosis, and salivary gland dysfunction were analyzed. Results: The proapoptotic p53 target genes PUMA and Bax were induced in parotid salivary glandsmore » of mice at early time points after therapeutic radiation. This dose-dependent induction requires expression of p53 because no radiation-induced expression of PUMA and Bax was observed in p53-/- mice. Radiation also induced apoptosis in the parotid gland in a dose-dependent manner, which was p53 dependent. Furthermore, expression of p53 was required for the acute and chronic loss of salivary function after irradiation. In contrast, apoptosis was not induced in p53-/- mice, and their salivary function was preserved after radiation exposure. Conclusions: Apoptosis in the salivary glands after therapeutic head-and-neck irradiation is mediated by p53 and corresponds to salivary gland dysfunction in vivo.« less

  20. Analysis of the enamel hypoplasia using micro-CT scanner versus classical method.

    PubMed

    Marchewka, Justyna; Skrzat, Janusz; Wróbel, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    This article demonstrates the use of micro-CT scanning of the teeth surface for recognizing and evaluating severity of the enamel hypoplasia. To test capabilities of the microtomography versus classical method of evaluation hypoplastic defects of the enamel we selected two human teeth (C, M(2)) showing different types of enamel hypoplasia: linear, pits, and groove. Examined samples derive from archeological material dated on XVII-XVIII AD and excavated in Poland. In the current study we proved that micro-CT scanning is a powerful technique not only for imaging all kinds of the enamel hypoplasia but also allows to perform accurate measurements of the enamel defects. We figure out that contrary to the classical method of scoring enamel defects, the micro-computed tomography yields adequate data which serve for estimating the length of stress episode and length of interval between them.

  1. Rebamipide alleviates radiation-induced colitis through improvement of goblet cell differentiation in mice.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyosun; Park, Sunhoo; Lee, Janet; Myung, Jae Kyung; Jang, Won-Suk; Lee, Sun-Joo; Myung, Hyunwook; Lee, Changsun; Kim, Hyewon; Lee, Seung-Sook; Jin, Young-Woo; Shim, Sehwan

    2018-04-01

    Radiation-induced colitis is a common clinical problem associated with radiotherapy and accidental exposure to ionizing radiation. Goblet cells play a pivotal role in the intestinal barrier against pathogenic bacteria. Rebamipide, an anti-gastric ulcer drug, has the effects to promote goblet cell proliferation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether radiation-induced colonic injury could be alleviated by rebamipide. This study orally administered rebamipide for 6 days to mice, which were subjected to 13 Gy abdominal irradiation, to evaluate the therapeutic effects of rebamipide against radiation-induced colitis. To confirm the effects of rebamipide on irradiated colonic epithelial cells, this study used the HT29 cell line. Rebamipide clearly alleviated the acute radiation-induced colitis, as reflected by the histopathological data, and significantly increased the number of goblet cells. The drug also inhibited intestinal inflammation and protected from bacterial translocation during acute radiation-induced colitis. Furthermore, rebamipide significantly increased mucin 2 expression in both the irradiated mouse colon and human colonic epithelial cells. Additionally, rebamipide accelerated not only the recovery of defective tight junctions but also the differentiation of impaired goblet cells in an irradiated colonic epithelium, which indicates that rebamipide has beneficial effects on the colon. Rebamipide is a therapeutic candidate for radiation-induced colitis, owing to its ability to inhibit inflammation and protect the colonic epithelial barrier. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology published by Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Pyruvate metabolism: A therapeutic opportunity in radiation-induced skin injury

    SciT

    Yoo, Hyun; Kang, Jeong Wook; Lee, Dong Won

    Ionizing radiation is used to treat a range of cancers. Despite recent technological progress, radiation therapy can damage the skin at the administration site. The specific molecular mechanisms involved in this effect have not been fully characterized. In this study, the effects of pyruvate, on radiation-induced skin injury were investigated, including the role of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 (PDK2) signaling pathway. Next generation sequencing (NGS) identified a wide range of gene expression differences between the control and irradiated mice, including reduced expression of PDK2. This was confirmed using Q-PCR. Cell culture studies demonstrated that PDK2 overexpression and a highmore » cellular pyruvate concentration inhibited radiation-induced cytokine expression. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated radiation-induced skin thickening and gene expression changes. Oral pyruvate treatment markedly downregulated radiation-induced changes in skin thickness and inflammatory cytokine expression. These findings indicated that regulation of the pyruvate metabolic pathway could provide an effective approach to the control of radiation-induced skin damage. - Highlights: • The effects of radiation on skin thickness in mice. • Next generation sequencing revealed that radiation inhibited pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 expression. • PDK2 inhibited irradiation-induced cytokine gene expression. • Oral pyruvate treatment markedly downregulated radiation-induced changes in skin thickness.« less

  3. Radiation-induced changes affecting polyester based polyurethane binder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierpoint, Sujita Basi

    The application of thermoplastic polyurethane elastomers as binders in the high energy explosives particularly when used in weapons presents a significantly complex and challenging problem due to the impact of the aging of this polymer on the useful service life of the explosive. In this work, the effects of radiation on the aging of the polyester based polyurethane were investigated using both electron beam and gamma irradiation at various dose rates in the presence and absence of oxygen. It was found by means of GPC that, in the presence and absence of oxygen, the poly (ester urethane) primarily undergoes cross-linking, by means of a carbon-centered secondary alkyl radical. It was also concluded that the polymer partially undergoes scission of the backbone of the main chain at C-O, N-C, and C-C bonds. Substantial changes in the conditions of irradiation and in dose levels did not affect the cross-linking and scission yields. Experiments were also performed with EPR spectroscopy for the purpose of identifying the initial carbon-centered free radicals and for studying the decay mechanisms of these radicals. It was found that the carbon-centered radical which is produced via C-C scission (primary alkyl radical) is rapidly converted to a long-lived allylic species at higher temperatures; more than 80% radicals are converted to allyl species in 2.5 hours. In the presence of oxygen, the allyl radical undergoes a fast reaction to produce a peroxyl radical; this radical decays with a 1.7 hour half-life by pseudo first-order kinetics to negligible levels in 13 hours. FTIR measurements were conducted to identify the radiation-induced changes to the functional groups in the polyester polyurethane. These measurements show an increase in carbonyl, amine and carboxylic groups as a result of reaction of H atoms with R-C-O·, ·NH-R and R-COO·. The FTIR results also demonstrate the production of the unsaturation resulting from hydrogen atom transfer during intrachain conversion

  4. Radiation-induced osteosarcomas in the pediatric population

    SciT

    Koshy, Matthew; Paulino, Arnold C.; Mai, Wei Y.

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: Radiation-induced osteosarcomas (R-OS) have historically been high-grade, locally invasive tumors with a poor prognosis. The purpose of this study was to perform a comprehensive literature review and analysis of reported cases dealing with R-OS in the pediatric population to identify the characteristics, prognostic factors, optimal treatment modalities, and overall survival of these patients. Methods and Materials: A MEDLINE/PubMed search of articles written in the English language dealing with OSs occurring after radiotherapy (RT) in the pediatric population yielded 30 studies from 1981 to 2004. Eligibility criteria included patients <21 years of age at the diagnosis of the primary cancer,more » cases satisfying the modified Cahan criteria, and information on treatment outcome. Factors analyzed included the type of primary cancer treated with RT, the radiation dose and beam energy, the latency period between RT and the development of R-OS, and the treatment, follow-up, and final outcome of R-OS. Results: The series included 109 patients with a median age at the diagnosis of primary cancer of 6 years (range, 0.08-21 years). The most common tumors treated with RT were Ewing's sarcoma (23.9%), rhabdomyosarcoma (17.4%), retinoblastoma (12.8%), Hodgkin's disease (9.2%), brain tumor (8.3%), and Wilms' tumor (6.4%). The median radiation dose was 47 Gy (range, 15-145 Gy). The median latency period from RT to the development of R-OS was 100 months (range, 36-636 months). The median follow-up after diagnosis of R-OS was 18 months (1-172 months). The 3- and 5-year cause-specific survival rate was 43.6% and 42.2%, respectively, and the 3- and 5-year overall survival rate was 41.7% and 40.2%, respectively. Variables, including age at RT, primary site, type of tumor treated with RT, total radiation dose, and latency period did not have a significant effect on survival. The 5-year cause-specific and overall survival rate for patients who received treatment for R

  5. Radiation-Induced Damage to Nucleic Acid Constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Heasook

    The objective of this research was to identify the primary free radical species produced by ionizing radiation in DNA. The ultimate goal would be to use these data obtained from model compounds to analyze radiation-induced damage in DNA itself. The different single crystals were studied in detail. The first was the sodium salt of guanosine-3 ^':5^' -cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP). The results of studies on crystals irradiated at 4.2^ circK distinguished two species. One of these species exhibited a non-exchangeable proton coupling that was characterized by ENDOR spectroscopy and shown to be sigma proton. The spin density on C8 was deduced from the ENDOR hyperfine coupling tensor and found to be 0.15. The second species also exhibited a non-exchangeable sigma proton coupling and a beta proton coupling. The spin densities on C8 and N9 were deduced from ENDOR measurements to be 0.09 and 0.36. The former is attributed to the oxidation product and the latter to the primary reduction product. These products are respectively the guanine cation and anion. The second single crystal studied was a sodium salt of 2^'-deoxyguanosine -5^'-monophosphate tetrahydrate. The ESR and ENDOR spectra obtained from this crystal after x-irradiation at 4.2^circK were complex and the paramagnetic species were tentatively identified as ionic species. The third DNA model compound studied was thymidine. Single crystal of thymidine were irradiated at 1.6^ circK and at 4.2^circ K. The lower temperature preserved a more primitive stage of the radiation damage process. ENDOR measurements distinguished three paramagnetic species. The most interesting component of the paramagnetic absorption in crystals irradiated at 1.6^circK is attributed to trapped electron. These electrons are stabilized by the electrostatic fields generated by hydroxy dipoles. The hyperfine couplings between the trapped electron and the proton of these polar groups were deduced from ENDOR measurements. The ESR and ENDOR

  6. Hepatic arteriovenous fistulae and portal vein hypoplasia in a Labrador retriever.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, I G; Kirpensteijn, J; Wolvekamp, W T; Van den Ingh, T S; Rothuizen, J

    2001-03-01

    An 18-month-old male Labrador retriever was referred for investigation of chronic intermittent diarrhoea and vomiting of two months duration. A diagnosis of hepatic arteriovenous fistulae was made. These are extremely rare hepatic vascular anomalies which confer arterial pressure to the portal vein. Liver atrophy, portal vein hypoplasia, portal hypertension and multiple acquired portosystemic collateral vessels are the main complications. Surgical excision is a challenge as resection of large lesions may be associated with significant blood loss. In this dog, persistence of portal vein hypoplasia and extensive collateral pathways following surgery led to a reserved prognosis.

  7. Radiation-induced leukemia: Comparative studies in mouse and man. Annual performance report, June 1, 1991--October 31, 1991

    SciT

    Haas, M.

    1991-12-31

    We now have a clear understanding of the mechanism by which radiation-induced (T-cell) leukemia occurs. In irradiated mice (radiation-induced thymic leukemia) and in man (acute lymphoblastic T-cell leukemia, T-ALL) the mechanism of leukemogenesis is surprisingly similar. Expressed in the most elementary terms, T-cell leukemia occurs when T-cell differentiation is inhibited by a mutation, and pre-T cells attempt but fail to differentiate in the thymus. Instead of leaving the thymus for the periphery as functional T-cells they continue to proliferate in the thymus. The proliferating pre- (pro-) T-cells constitute the (early) acute T-cell leukemia (A-TCL). This model for the mechanism ofmore » T-cell leukemogenesis accounts for all the properties of both murine and human A-TCL. Important support for the model has recently come from work by Ilan Kirsch and others, who have shown that mutations/deletions in the genes SCL (TAL), SIL, and LCK constitute primary events in the development of T-ALL, by inhibiting differentiation of thymic pre- (pro-) T-cells. This mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis brings several specific questions into focus: How do early A-TCL cells progress to become potently tumorigenic and poorly treatable? Is it feasible to genetically suppress early and/or progressed A-TCL cells? What is the mechanism by which the differentiation-inhibited (leukemic) pre-T cells proliferate? During the first grant year we have worked on aspects of all three questions.« less

  8. Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects: related inflammatory-type responses to radiation-induced stress and injury? A review.

    PubMed

    Lorimore, S A; Wright, E G

    2003-01-01

    To review studies of radiation responses in the haemopoietic system in the context of radiation-induced genomic instability, bystander effects and inflammatory-type processes. There is considerable evidence that cells that themselves are not exposed to ionizing radiation but are the progeny of cells irradiated many cell divisions previously may express a high frequency of gene mutations, chromosomal aberrations and cell death. These effects are collectively known as radiation-induced genomic instability. A second untargeted effect results in non-irradiated cells exhibiting responses typically associated with direct radiation exposure but occurs as a consequence of contact with irradiated cells or by receiving soluble signals from irradiated cells. These effects are collectively known as radiation-induced bystander effects. Reported effects include increases or decreases in damage-inducible and stress-related proteins; increases or decreases in reactive oxygen species, cell death or cell proliferation, and induction of mutations and chromosome aberrations. This array of responses is reminiscent of effects mediated by cytokines and other similar regulatory factors that may involve, but do not necessarily require, gap junction-mediated transfer, have multiple inducers and a variety of context-dependent consequences in different cell systems. That chromosomal instability in haemopoietic cells can be induced by an indirect bystander-type mechanism both in vitro and in vivo provides a potential link between these two untargeted effects and there are radiation responses in vivo consistent with the microenvironment contributing secondary cell damage as a consequence of an inflammatory-type response to radiation-induced injury. Intercellular signalling, production of cytokines and free radicals are features of inflammatory responses that have the potential for both bystander-mediated and persisting damage as well as for conferring a predisposition to malignancy. The

  9. Radiation-Induced Liver Damage: Correlation of Histopathology with Hepatobiliary Magnetic Resonance Imaging, a Feasibility Study

    SciT

    Seidensticker, Max, E-mail: max.seidensticker@med.ovgu.de; Burak, Miroslaw; Kalinski, Thomas

    PurposeRadiotherapy of liver malignancies shows promising results (radioembolization, stereotactic irradiation, interstitial brachytherapy). Regardless of the route of application, a certain amount of nontumorous liver parenchyma will be collaterally damaged by radiation. The functional reserve may be significantly reduced with an impact on further treatment planning. Monitoring of radiation-induced liver damage by imaging is neither established nor validated. We performed an analysis to correlate the histopathological presence of radiation-induced liver damage with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) utilizing hepatobiliary contrast media (Gd-BOPTA).MethodsPatients undergoing local high-dose-rate brachytherapy for whom a follow-up hepatobiliary MRI within 120 days after radiotherapy as well as an evaluablemore » liver biopsy from radiation-exposed liver tissue within 7 days before MRI were retrospectively identified. Planning computed tomography (CT)/dosimetry was merged to the CT-documentation of the liver biopsy and to the MRI. Presence/absence of radiation-induced liver damage (histopathology) and Gd-BOPTA uptake (MRI) as well as the dose applied during brachytherapy at the site of tissue sampling was determined.ResultsFourteen biopsies from eight patients were evaluated. In all cases with histopathological evidence of radiation-induced liver damage (n = 11), no uptake of Gd-BOPTA was seen. In the remaining three, cases no radiation-induced liver damage but Gd-BOPTA uptake was seen. Presence of radiation-induced liver damage and absence of Gd-BOPTA uptake was correlated with a former high-dose exposition.ConclusionsAbsence of hepatobiliary MRI contrast media uptake in radiation-exposed liver parenchyma may indicate radiation-induced liver damage. Confirmatory studies are warranted.« less

  10. Lipoxin A4 inhibits UV radiation-induced skin inflammation and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Martinez, R M; Fattori, V; Saito, P; Melo, C B P; Borghi, S M; Pinto, I C; Bussmann, A J C; Baracat, M M; Georgetti, S R; Verri, W A; Casagrande, R

    2018-04-27

    Lipoxin A4 (LXA 4 ) is a metabolic product of arachidonic acid. Despite potent anti-inflammatory and pro-resolution activities, it remains to be determined if LXA 4 has effect on ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced skin inflammation. To investigate the effects of systemic administration with LXA 4 on UV radiation-induced inflammation and oxidative damage in the skin of mice. Varied parameters of inflammation and oxidative stress in the skin of mice were evaluated after UV radiation (4.14 J/cm 2 ). Pretreatment with LXA 4 significantly inhibited UV radiation-induced skin edema and myeloperoxidase activity. LXA 4 efficacy was enhanced by increasing the time of pre-treatment to up to 72 h. LXA 4 reduced UV radiation-induced skin edema, neutrophil recruitment (myeloperoxidase activity and LysM-eGFP + cells), MMP-9 activity, deposition of collagen fibers, epidermal thickness, sunburn cell counts, and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-33). Depending on the time point, LXA 4 increased the levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines (TGF-β and IL-10). LXA 4 significantly attenuated UV radiation-induced oxidative damage returning the oxidative status to baseline levels in parameters such as ferric reducing ability, scavenging of free radicals, GSH levels, catalase activity and superoxide anion production. LXA 4 also reduced UV radiation-induced gp91 phox [nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase 2 (NOX2) subunit] mRNA expression and enhanced nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its downstream target enzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) quinone oxidoreductase (Nqo1) mRNA expression. LXA 4 inhibited UV radiation-induced skin inflammation by diminishing pro-inflammatory cytokine production and oxidative stress as well as inducing anti-inflammatory cytokines and Nrf2. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Trichostatin A inhibits radiation-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in the alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Devipriya; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Weiling; Han, Xiaochen

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced pneumonitis and fibrosis are major complications following thoracic radiotherapy. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays an important role in tissue injury leading to organ fibrosis, including lung. Our previous studies have reported that radiation can induce EMT in the type II alveolar epithelial cells in both in vitro and in vivo. HDAC inhibitors are a new family of anti-cancer agents currently being used in several clinical trials. In addition to their intrinsic anti-tumor properties, HDAC inhibition is also important in other human diseases, including fibrosis and radiation-induced damage. In this study, we evaluated the effect of Trichostatin A (TSA), a HDAC inhibitor, on radiation-induced EMT in type II alveolar epithelial cells (RLE-6TN). Pre-treatment of RLE-6TN cells with TSA inhibited radiation-induced EMT-like morphological alterations including elevated protein level of α-SMA and Snail, reduction of E-cadherin expression, enhanced phosphorylation of GSK3β and ERK1/2, increased generation of ROS. Radiation enhanced the protein level of TGF-β1, which was blocked by N-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant. Treating cells with SB-431542, TGF-β1 type I receptor inhibitor, diminished radiation-induced alterations in the protein levels of p-GSK-3β, Snail-1 and α-SMA, suggesting a regulatory role of TGF-β1 in EMT. Pre-incubation of cells with TSA showed significant decrease in the level of TGF-β1 compared to radiation control. Collectively, these results demonstrate that i] radiation-induced EMT in RLE-6TN cells is mediated by ROS/MEK/ERK and ROS/TGF-β1 signaling pathways and ii] the inhibitory role of TSA in radiation-induced EMT appears to be due, at least in part, to its action of blocking ROS and TGF-β1 signaling. PMID:29254201

  12. Parvovirus associated cerebellar hypoplasia and hydrocephalus in day-old broiler chickens

    Cerebellar hypoplasia and hydrocephalus were detected in day-old broiler chickens. Brains of chickens evaluated at necropsy appeared to be abnormal; some were disfigured and cerebellae appeared to be smaller than normal. Histopathologic examination of brains revealed cerebellar folia that were sho...

  13. WDR73 missense mutation causes infantile onset intellectual disability and cerebellar hypoplasia in a consanguineous family.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chen; Gai, Nan; Zou, Yongyi; Zheng, Yu; Ma, Ruiyu; Wei, Xianda; Liang, Desheng; Wu, Lingqian

    2017-01-01

    Galloway-Mowat syndrome (GMS) is a very rare autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by nephrotic syndrome associated with microcephaly, and various central nervous system abnormalities, mostly cerebral hypoplasia or cerebellar atrophy, intellectual disability and neural-migration defects. WDR73 is the only gene known to cause GMS, and has never been implicated in other disease. Here we present a Chinese consanguineous family with infantile onset intellectual disability and cerebellar hypoplasia but no microcephaly. Whole exome sequencing identified a WDR73 p.W371G missense mutation. The mutation is confirmed to be segregated in this family by Sanger sequencing according to a recessive inheritance pattern. It is predicted to be deleterious by multiple algorithms and affect highly conserved site. Structural modeling revealed conformational differences between the wild type protein and the p.W371G protein. Real-time PCR and Western blotting revealed altered mRNA and protein levels in mutated samples. Our study indicates the novel WDR73 p.W371G missense mutation causes infantile onset intellectual disability and cerebellar hypoplasia in recessive mode of inheritance. Our findings imply that microcephaly is a variable phenotype in WDR73-related disease, suggest WDR73 to be a candidate gene of severe intellectual disability and cerebellar hypoplasia, and expand the molecular spectrum of WDR73-related disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Mutations in X-linked PORCN, a putative regulator of Wnt signaling, cause focal dermal hypoplasia

    Focal dermal hypoplasia is an X-linked dominant disorder characterized by patchy hypoplastic skin and digital, ocular, and dental malformations. We used array comparative genomic hybridization to identify a 219-kb deletion in Xp11.23 in two affected females. We sequenced genes in this region and fou...

  15. A Case of Fatal Pulmonary Hypoplasia with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia, Thoracic Myelomeningocele, and Thoracic Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Ito, Ai; Fujinaga, Hideshi; Matsui, Sachiko; Tago, Kumiko; Iwasaki, Yuka; Fujino, Shuhei; Nagasawa, Junko; Amari, Shoichiro; Kaneshige, Masao; Wada, Yuka; Takahashi, Shigehiro; Tsukamoto, Keiko; Miyazaki, Osamu; Yoshioka, Takako; Ishiguro, Akira; Ito, Yushi

    2017-10-01

    Background  Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is fatal in severe cases of pulmonary hypoplasia. We experienced a fatal case of pulmonary hypoplasia due to CDH, thoracic myelomeningocele (MMC), and thoracic dysplasia. This constellation of anomalies has not been previously reported. Case Report  A male infant with a prenatal diagnosis of thoracic MMC with severe hydrocephalus and scoliosis was born at 36 weeks of gestation. CDH was found after birth and the patient died of respiratory failure due to pulmonary hypoplasia and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn at 30 hours of age despite neonatal intensive care. An autopsy revealed a left CDH without herniation of the liver or stomach into the thoracic cavity, severe hydrocephalus, Chiari malformation type II, MMC with spina bifida from Th4 to Th12, hemivertebrae, fused ribs, deformities of the thoracic cage and legs, short trunk, and agenesis of the left kidney. Conclusion  We speculate that two factors may be associated with the severe pulmonary hypoplasia: decreased thoracic space due to the herniation of visceral organs caused by CDH and thoracic dysplasia due to skeletal deformity and severe scoliosis.

  16. Growth, nutritional, and gastrointestinal aspects of focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz-Gorlin syndrome)

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH) is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutations in the PORCN gene located on the X-chromosome. In the present study, we characterized the pattern of growth, body composition, and the nutritional and gastrointestinal aspects of children and adults (n'='19) affected with t...

  17. Prenatal evaluation of the middle ear and diagnosis of middle ear hypoplasia using MRI.

    PubMed

    Katorza, Eldad; Nahama-Allouche, Catherine; Castaigne, Vanina; Gonzales, Marie; Galliani, Eva; Marlin, Sandrine; Jouannic, Jean-Marie; Rosenblatt, Jonathan; le Pointe, Hubert Ducou; Garel, Catherine

    2011-05-01

    Analysis of the middle ear with fetal MRI has not been previously reported. To show the contribution of fetal MRI to middle ear imaging. The tympanic cavity was evaluated in 108 fetal cerebral MRI examinations (facial and/or cerebral malformation excluded) and in two cases, one of Treacher Collins syndrome (case 1) and the other of oculo-auriculo-vertebral (OUV) spectrum (case 2) with middle ear hypoplasia identified by MRI at 27 and 36 weeks' gestation, respectively. In all 108 fetuses (mean gestational age 32.5 weeks), the tympanic cavity and T2 hypointensity related to the ossicles were well visualised on both sides. Case 1 had micro/retrognathia and bilateral external ear deformity and case 2 had retrognathism with a left low-set and deformed ear. MRI made it possible to recognize the marked hypoplasia of the tympanic cavity, which was bilateral in case 1 and unilateral in case 2. Both syndromes are characterized by craniofacial abnormalities including middle ear hypoplasia, which cannot be diagnosed with US. The middle ear cavity can be visualized with fetal MRI. We emphasize the use of this imaging modality in the diagnosis of middle ear hypoplasia.

  18. A Unique Way of Learning: Teaching Young Children with Optic Nerve Hypoplasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendiola, Rosalinda; Bahar, Cheryl; Brody, Jill; Slott, Gayle L.

    2005-01-01

    This booklet was inspired by the need of educators and therapists of preschool students who are blind and visually impaired to share their observations of children with Optic Nerve Hypoplasia (ONH) and the therapies found to be helpful when working with these children. The work done at the Blind Childrens Center is very rewarding, and these…

  19. Genes on chromosomes 1 and 4 in the mouse are associated with repair of radiation-induced chromatin damage.

    PubMed

    Potter, M; Sanford, K K; Parshad, R; Tarone, R E; Price, F M; Mock, B; Huppi, K

    1988-04-01

    Early-passage skin fibroblasts from different inbred and congenic strains of mice were X-irradiated (1 Gy), and the number of chromatid breaks was determined at 2.0 h after irradiation. The cells from DBA/2N, C3H/HeN, STS/A, C57BL/6N, BALB/cJ, and AKR/N had 25 to 42 chromatid breaks per 100 metaphase cells (efficient repair phenotype). NZB/NJ had greater than 78 and BALB/cAn had 87 to 110 chromatid breaks per 100 cells (inefficient repair phenotype). Differences between BALB/cAn and BALB/c. DBA/2 congenic strains which carry less than 1% of the DBA/2 genome indicate that two genes, one on chromosome 1 linked to bcl-2-Pep-3 and the other on chromosome 4 closely linked to Fv-1, affect the efficiency with which the cells repair radiation-induced chromatin damage.

  20. Radiation induces premature chromatid separation via the miR-142-3p/Bod1 pathway in carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Dong; Du, Yarong; Ren, Zhenxin; Chen, Yaxiong; Li, Xiaoman; Wang, Jufang; Hu, Burong

    2016-09-13

    Radiation-induced genomic instability plays a vital role in carcinogenesis. Bod1 is required for proper chromosome biorientation, and Bod1 depletion increases premature chromatid separation. MiR-142-3p influences cell cycle progression and inhibits proliferation and invasion in cervical carcinoma cells. We found that radiation induced premature chromatid separation and altered miR-142-3p and Bod1 expression in 786-O and A549 cells. Overexpression of miR-142-3p increased premature chromatid separation and G2/M cell cycle arrest in 786-O cells by suppressing Bod1 expression. We also found that either overexpression of miR-142-3p or knockdown of Bod1 sensitized 786-O and A549 cells to X-ray radiation. Overexpression of Bod1 inhibited radiation- and miR-142-3p-induced premature chromatid separation and increased resistance to radiation in 786-O and A549 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that radiation alters miR-142-3p and Bod1 expression in carcinoma cells, and thus contributes to early stages of radiation-induced genomic instability. Combining ionizing radiation with epigenetic regulation may help improve cancer therapies.

  1. Real-space analysis of radiation-induced specific changes with independent component analysis

    SciT

    Borek, Dominika; Bromberg, Raquel; Hattne, Johan

    A method of analysis is presented that allows for the separation of specific radiation-induced changes into distinct components in real space. The method relies on independent component analysis (ICA) and can be effectively applied to electron density maps and other types of maps, provided that they can be represented as sets of numbers on a grid. Here, for glucose isomerase crystals, ICA was used in a proof-of-concept analysis to separate temperature-dependent and temperature-independent components of specific radiation-induced changes for data sets acquired from multiple crystals across multiple temperatures. ICA identified two components, with the temperature-independent component being responsible for themore » majority of specific radiation-induced changes at temperatures below 130 K. The patterns of specific temperature-independent radiation-induced changes suggest a contribution from the tunnelling of electron holes as a possible explanation. In the second case, where a group of 22 data sets was collected on a single thaumatin crystal, ICA was used in another type of analysis to separate specific radiation-induced effects happening on different exposure-level scales. Here, ICA identified two components of specific radiation-induced changes that likely result from radiation-induced chemical reactions progressing with different rates at different locations in the structure. In addition, ICA unexpectedly identified the radiation-damage state corresponding to reduced disulfide bridges rather than the zero-dose extrapolated state as the highest contrast structure. The application of ICA to the analysis of specific radiation-induced changes in real space and the data pre-processing for ICA that relies on singular value decomposition, which was used previously in data space to validate a two-component physical model of X-ray radiation-induced changes, are discussed in detail. This work lays a foundation for a better understanding of protein-specific radiation

  2. Apparent diffusion coefficient histogram analysis can evaluate radiation-induced parotid damage and predict late xerostomia degree in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Nan; Guo, Tingting; Zheng, Huanhuan; Pan, Xia; Chu, Chen; Dou, Xin; Li, Ming; Liu, Song; Zhu, Lijing; Liu, Baorui; Chen, Weibo; He, Jian; Yan, Jing; Zhou, Zhengyang; Yang, Xiaofeng

    2017-01-01

    We investigated apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram analysis to evaluate radiation-induced parotid damage and predict xerostomia degrees in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients receiving radiotherapy. The imaging of bilateral parotid glands in NPC patients was conducted 2 weeks before radiotherapy (time point 1), one month after radiotherapy (time point 2), and four months after radiotherapy (time point 3). From time point 1 to 2, parotid volume, skewness, and kurtosis decreased (P < 0.001, = 0.001, and < 0.001, respectively), but all other ADC histogram parameters increased (all P < 0.001, except P = 0.006 for standard deviation [SD]). From time point 2 to 3, parotid volume continued to decrease (P = 0.022), and SD, 75th and 90th percentiles continued to increase (P = 0.024, 0.010, and 0.006, respectively). Early change rates of parotid ADCmean, ADCmin, kurtosis, and 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th percentiles (from time point 1 to 2) correlated with late parotid atrophy rate (from time point 1 to 3) (all P < 0.05). Multiple linear regression analysis revealed correlations among parotid volume, time point, and ADC histogram parameters. Early mean change rates for bilateral parotid SD and ADCmax could predict late xerostomia degrees at seven months after radiotherapy (three months after time point 3) with AUC of 0.781 and 0.818 (P = 0.014, 0.005, respectively). ADC histogram parameters were reproducible (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.830 - 0.999). ADC histogram analysis could be used to evaluate radiation-induced parotid damage noninvasively, and predict late xerostomia degrees of NPC patients treated with radiotherapy. PMID:29050274

  3. Apparent diffusion coefficient histogram analysis can evaluate radiation-induced parotid damage and predict late xerostomia degree in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nan; Guo, Tingting; Zheng, Huanhuan; Pan, Xia; Chu, Chen; Dou, Xin; Li, Ming; Liu, Song; Zhu, Lijing; Liu, Baorui; Chen, Weibo; He, Jian; Yan, Jing; Zhou, Zhengyang; Yang, Xiaofeng

    2017-09-19

    We investigated apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram analysis to evaluate radiation-induced parotid damage and predict xerostomia degrees in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients receiving radiotherapy. The imaging of bilateral parotid glands in NPC patients was conducted 2 weeks before radiotherapy (time point 1), one month after radiotherapy (time point 2), and four months after radiotherapy (time point 3). From time point 1 to 2, parotid volume, skewness, and kurtosis decreased ( P < 0.001, = 0.001, and < 0.001, respectively), but all other ADC histogram parameters increased (all P < 0.001, except P = 0.006 for standard deviation [SD]). From time point 2 to 3, parotid volume continued to decrease ( P = 0.022), and SD, 75 th and 90 th percentiles continued to increase ( P = 0.024, 0.010, and 0.006, respectively). Early change rates of parotid ADC mean , ADC min , kurtosis, and 25 th , 50 th , 75 th , 90 th percentiles (from time point 1 to 2) correlated with late parotid atrophy rate (from time point 1 to 3) (all P < 0.05). Multiple linear regression analysis revealed correlations among parotid volume, time point, and ADC histogram parameters. Early mean change rates for bilateral parotid SD and ADC max could predict late xerostomia degrees at seven months after radiotherapy (three months after time point 3) with AUC of 0.781 and 0.818 ( P = 0.014, 0.005, respectively). ADC histogram parameters were reproducible (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.830 - 0.999). ADC histogram analysis could be used to evaluate radiation-induced parotid damage noninvasively, and predict late xerostomia degrees of NPC patients treated with radiotherapy.

  4. Activating PTEN by COX-2 inhibitors antagonizes radiation-induced AKT activation contributing to radiosensitization

    SciT

    Meng, Zhen; Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 22 Zhongguancun Avenue South, Haidian District, Beijing 100081; Gan, Ye-Hua, E-mail: kqyehuagan@bjmu.edu.cn

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is still one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for many tumors. However, radioresistance remains a major impediment to radiotherapy. Although COX-2 inhibitors can induce radiosensitization, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib enhanced the radiation-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in HeLa and SACC-83 cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone dephosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), promoted PTEN membrane translocation or activation, and correspondingly dephosphorylated or inactivated protein kinase B (AKT). By contrast, treatment with radiation alone increased PTEN phosphorylation, inhibited PTEN membrane translocationmore » and correspondingly activated AKT in the two cell lines. However, treatment with celecoxib or another COX-2 selective inhibitor (valdecoxib) completely blocked radiation-induced increase of PTEN phosphorylation, rescued radiation-induced decrease in PTEN membrane translocation, and correspondingly inactivated AKT. Moreover, celecoxib could also upregulate PTEN protein expression by downregulating Sp1 expression, thereby leading to the activation of PTEN transcription. Our results suggested that COX-2 inhibitors could enhance radiosensitization at least partially by activating PTEN to antagonize radiation-induced AKT activation. - Highlights: • COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, could enhance radiosensitization. • Radiation induced PTEN inactivation (phosphorylation) and AKT activation. • COX-2 inhibitor induced PTEN expression and activation, and inactivated AKT. • COX-2 inhibitor enhanced radiosensitization through activating PTEN.« less

  5. Irradiated esophageal cells are protected from radiation-induced recombination by MnSOD gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yunyun; Wang, Hong; Wiktor-Brown, Dominika; Rugo, Rebecca; Shen, Hongmei; Huq, M Saiful; Engelward, Bevin; Epperly, Michael; Greenberger, Joel S

    2010-04-01

    Radiation-induced DNA damage is a precursor to mutagenesis and cytotoxicity. During radiotherapy, exposure of healthy tissues can lead to severe side effects. We explored the potential of mitochondrial SOD (MnSOD) gene therapy to protect esophageal, pancreatic and bone marrow cells from radiation-induced genomic instability. Specifically, we measured the frequency of homologous recombination (HR) at an integrated transgene in the Fluorescent Yellow Direct Repeat (FYDR) mice, in which an HR event can give rise to a fluorescent signal. Mitochondrial SOD plasmid/liposome complex (MnSOD-PL) was administered to esophageal cells 24 h prior to 29 Gy upper-body irradiation. Single cell suspensions from FYDR, positive control FYDR-REC, and negative control C57BL/6NHsd (wild-type) mouse esophagus, pancreas and bone marrow were evaluated by flow cytometry. Radiation induced a statistically significant increase in HR 7 days after irradiation compared to unirradiated FYDR mice. MnSOD-PL significantly reduced the induction of HR by radiation at day 7 and also reduced the level of HR in the pancreas. Irradiation of the femur and tibial marrow with 8 Gy also induced a significant increase in HR at 7 days. Radioprotection by intraesophageal administration of MnSOD-PL was correlated with a reduced level of radiation-induced HR in esophageal cells. These results demonstrate the efficacy of MnSOD-PL for suppressing radiation-induced HR in vivo.

  6. Reducing radiation-induced gastrointestinal toxicity — the role of the PHD/HIF axis

    PubMed Central

    Olcina, Monica M.; Giaccia, Amato J.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an effective treatment strategy for cancer, but a significant proportion of patients experience radiation-induced toxicity due to damage to normal tissue in the irradiation field. The use of chemical or biological approaches aimed at reducing or preventing normal tissue toxicity induced by radiotherapy is a long-held goal. Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) regulate the production of factors that may protect several cellular compartments affected by radiation-induced toxicity. Pharmacological inhibitors of prolyl hydroxylase domain–containing enzymes (PHDs), which result in stabilization of HIFs, have recently been proposed as a new class of radioprotectors. In this review, radiation-induced toxicity in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and the main cellular compartments studied in this context will be discussed. The effects of PHD inhibition on GI radioprotection will be described in detail. PMID:27548524

  7. Radiation-induced genomic instability and its implications for radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Lei; Snyder, Andrew R.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation-induced genomic instability is characterized by an increased rate of genetic alterations including cytogenetic rearrangements, mutations, gene amplifications, transformation and cell death in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after the initial insult. Chromosomal rearrangements are the best-characterized end point of radiation-induced genomic instability, and many of the rearrangements described are similar to those found in human cancers. Chromosome breakage syndromes are defined by chromosome instability, and individuals with these diseases are cancer prone. Consequently, chromosomal instability as a phenotype may underlie some fraction of those changes leading to cancer. Here we attempt to relate current knowledge regarding radiation-induced chromosome instability with the emerging molecular information on the chromosome breakage syndromes. The goal is to understand how genetic and epigenetic factors might influence the onset of chromosome instability and the role of chromosomal instability in carcinogenesis.

  8. Dried Plum Protects From Radiation-Induced Bone Loss by Attenuating Pro-Osteoclastic and Oxidative Stress Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Future space explorations beyond the earths magnetosphere will increase human exposure to space radiation and associated risks to skeletal health. We hypothesize that oxidative stress resulting from radiation exposure plays a major role in progressive bone loss and dysfunction in associated tissue. In animal studies, increased free radical formation is associated with pathological changes in bone structure, enhanced bone resorption, reduced bone formation and decreased bone mineral density, which can lead to skeletal fragility. Our long-term goals are to define the mechanisms and risk of bone loss in the spaceflight environment and to facilitate the development of effective countermeasures. We had previously reported that exposure to low or high-LET radiation correlates with an acute increase in the expression of pro-osteoclastic and oxidative stress genes in bone during the early response to radiation followed by pathological changes in skeletal structure. We then conducted systematic screening for potential countermeasures against bone loss where we tested the ability of various antioxidants to mitigate the radiation-induced increase in expression of these markers. For the screen, 16-week old C57Bl6J mice were treated with a dietary antioxidant cocktail, injectable DHLA or a dried plum-enriched diet (DP). Mice were then exposed to 2Gy 137Cs radiation and one day later, marrow cells were collected and the relevant genes analyzed for expression levels. Among the candidate countermeasures tested, DP was most effective in reducing the expression of genes associated with bone loss. Furthermore, analysis of skeletal structure by microcomputed tomography (microCT) revealed that DP also prevents the radiation-induced deterioration in skeletal microarchitecture as indicated by parameters such as percent bone volume (BVTV), trabecular spacing and trabecular number. We also found that DP has similar protective effects on skeletal structure in a follow-up study using 1 Gy of

  9. [Evaluation of the diagnostic usefulness for ultrasonographic and echocardiographic lethal markers in fetal pulmonary hypoplasia. Analysis of 11 cases].

    PubMed

    Kieszek, S; Kaczmarek, P; Czichos, E; Respondek, M

    1996-07-01

    Results of ultrasonographic and echocardiographic studies of 11 fetuses were analysed retrospectively in relation to their pulmonary hypoplasia. Congenital malformations, quality of hydramnios and echocardiographical measurements of fetal chest were estimated. The best symptoms of pulmonary hypoplasia were: oligo/ahydramnios, absence of fetal breathing movements and malformations in fetal chest cavity (diaphragmatic hernia, cardiomegaly, hydrothorax). Systemic malformations were present in each case. The measurements such as CC, CA, HA, (CA-HA) x 100/CA were not accurate enough and we did not find any statistical differences between the control and the studied group. Finding several factors predisposing to lung hypoplasia means that its lethal form may be present in fetus.

  10. Amelioration of Radiation-Induced Hematopoietic and Gastrointestinal Damage by Ex-RAD (trademark) in Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-06

    recovery from radiation-induced neutropenia Figure 3 shows the protective effects of Ex-RAD prophy- laxis on acute radiation-induced cytopenia. We used a... neutropenia on Day 4 post-TBI. For platelets, the nadir was observed between Days 7 to 17 post-TBI in the vehicle-treated group (Fig. 3d). Peripheral blood cell...recovery from neutropenia and restored blood Fig. 7. TUNEL staining in the jejunum sections from Ex-RAD-treated and vehicle-treated groups 24 h post

  11. Antimicrobial fabric adsorbed iodine produced by radiation-induced graft polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Shoji; Fujiwara, Kunio; Sugo, Takanobu; Suzuki, Koichi

    2013-03-01

    Antimicrobial fabric was synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of N-vinyl pyrrolidone onto polyolefine nonwoven fabric and subsequent adsorption of iodine. In response of the huge request for the antimicrobial material applied to face masks for swine flu in 2009, operation procedure of continuous radiation-induced graft polymerization apparatus was improved. The improved grafting production per week increased 3.8 times compared to the production by former operation procedure. Shipped antimicrobial fabric had reached 130,000 m2 from June until December, 2009.

  12. Pathophysiology of Radiation-Induced Dysphagia in Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    King, Suzanne N.; Dunlap, Neal E.; Tennant, Paul A.; Pitts, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Oncologic treatments, such as curative radiotherapy and chemoradiation, for head and neck cancer can cause long-term swallowing impairments (dysphagia) that negatively impact quality of life. Radiation-induced dysphagia is comprised of a broad spectrum of structural, mechanical, and neurologic deficits. An understanding of the biomolecular effects of radiation on the time course of wound healing and underlying morphological tissue responses that precede radiation damage will improve options available for dysphagia treatment. The goal of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology of radiation-induced injury and elucidate areas that need further exploration. PMID:27098922

  13. Gamma radiation-induced blue shift of resonance peaks of Bragg gratings in pure silica fibres

    SciT

    Faustov, A V; Mégret, P; Wuilpart, M

    2016-02-28

    We report the first observation of a significant gamma radiation-induced blue shift of the reflection/transmission peak of fibre Bragg gratings inscribed into pure-silica core fibres via multiphoton absorption of femtosecond pulses. At a total dose of ∼100 kGy, the shift is ∼20 pm. The observed effect is attributable to the ionising radiation-induced decrease in the density of the silica glass when the rate of colour centre formation is slow. We present results of experimental measurements that provide the key parameters of the dynamics of the gratings for remote dosimetry and temperature sensing. (laser crystals and braggg ratings)

  14. Detection of radiation-induced hydrocarbons in baked sponged cake prepared with irradiated liquid egg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulzki, G.; Spiegelberg, A.; Bögl, K. W.; Schreiber, G. A.

    1995-02-01

    For identification of irradiated food, radiation-induced volatile hydrocarbons (HC) are determined by gas chromatography in the non-polar fraction of fat. However, in complex food matrices the detection is often disturbed by fat-associated compounds. On-line coupling of high performance liquid chromatography (LC) and gas chromatography (GC) is very efficient to remove such compounds from the HC fraction. The high sensitivity of this fast and efficient technique is demonstrated by the example of detection of radiation-induced HC in fat isolated from baked sponge cake which had been prepared with irradiated liquid egg.

  15. Growth hormone used to control intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Xia, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Zheng-Sen; Lu, Xin-Liang

    2015-08-21

    Intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis is rare. We describe a 69-year-old man with intractable hemorrhagic gastritis induced by postoperative radiotherapy for the treatment of esophageal carcinoma. Although anti-secretory therapy with or without octreotide was initiated for hemostasis over three months, melena still occurred off and on, and the patient required blood transfusions to maintain stable hemoglobin. Finally growth hormone was used in the treatment of hemorrhage for two weeks, and hemostasis was successfully achieved. This is the first report that growth hormone has been used to control intractable bleeding caused by radiation-induced gastritis.

  16. Pathophysiology of Radiation-Induced Dysphagia in Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    King, Suzanne N; Dunlap, Neal E; Tennant, Paul A; Pitts, Teresa

    2016-06-01

    Oncologic treatments, such as curative radiotherapy and chemoradiation, for head and neck cancer can cause long-term swallowing impairments (dysphagia) that negatively impact quality of life. Radiation-induced dysphagia comprised a broad spectrum of structural, mechanical, and neurologic deficits. An understanding of the biomolecular effects of radiation on the time course of wound healing and underlying morphological tissue responses that precede radiation damage will improve options available for dysphagia treatment. The goal of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology of radiation-induced injury and elucidate areas that need further exploration.

  17. Monte Carlo Simulation of Nonlinear Radiation Induced Plasmas. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, B. S.

    1972-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation model for radiation induced plasmas with nonlinear properties due to recombination was, employing a piecewise linearized predict-correct iterative technique. Several important variance reduction techniques were developed and incorporated into the model, including an antithetic variates technique. This approach is especially efficient for plasma systems with inhomogeneous media, multidimensions, and irregular boundaries. The Monte Carlo code developed has been applied to the determination of the electron energy distribution function and related parameters for a noble gas plasma created by alpha-particle irradiation. The characteristics of the radiation induced plasma involved are given.

  18. Radiation-induced radioresistance of mammals and risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, O.; Yonezawa, M.

    It is shown experimentally that a preliminary low dose exposure can induce radioresistance in mice in two (early and late) periods after preirradiation. The manifestation of such effects is reduced mortality of pre-exposed specimens after challenge acute irradiation, the reason of the animal death being the hematopoietic subsyndrome of the acute radiation syndrome. Therefore, proceeding from the radiobiological concept of the critical system, the theoretical investigation of the influence of preirradiation on mammalian radiosensitivity is conducted by making use of mathematical models of the vital body system, hematopoiesis. Modeling results make it possible to elucidate the mechanisms of the radioprotection effect of low level priming irradiation on mammals. Specifically, the state of acquired radioresistance in mice is caused by reduced radiosensitivity of lymphopoietic and thrombocytopoietic systems in the early period and by reduced radiosensitivity of granulocytopoietic system in the late period after preirradiation. It is important to emphasize that the evaluations of the duration of the early and late periods of postirradiation radioresistance in mice, carried out on the basis of the modeling and experimental investigations, practically coincide. All this demonstrates the effectiveness of joint modeling and experimental methods in studies and predictions of modification effects of preirradiation on mammalian radiosensitivity. The results obtained show the importance of accounting such effects in radiation risk assessments for cosmonauts and astronauts on long-term missions.

  19. Three-dimensional quantitative evaluation of midfacial skeletal changes after trans-sutural distraction osteogenesis for midfacial hypoplasia in growing patients with cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Tong, Haizhou; Gao, Feng; Yin, Jiapeng; Shi, Zehong; Song, Tao; Li, Haidong; Sun, Xiaomei; Wang, Yongqian; Yin, Ningbei; Zhao, Zhenmin

    2015-11-01

    Trans-sutural distraction osteogenesis (TSDO) is an alternative method for the early treatment of midfacial hypoplasia in growing patients with cleft lip and palate (CLP). The purpose of this study was to analyze three-dimensional (3D) midfacial skeletal changes after TSDO and to explore the mechanism in this process. All patients with nonsyndromic CLP who underwent bone-borne TSDO for midfacial hypoplasia from 2005 to 2014 were reviewed in this retrospective study. 3D morphological and quantitative measurement analyses were performed to evaluate midfacial skeletal changes by superimposition of preoperative and postoperative computed tomographic images. Twenty-six patients with mean age of 11.5 years met the inclusion criteria. The 3D morphological findings exhibited the most significant suture stress changes at the pterygomaxillary suture area, with obvious bone generation in all patients. The whole midfacial skeleton had progressively increased advancement in a craniocaudal direction along the midface segment, associated with morphological changes in skeleton itself. The 3D quantitative measurement findings showed differential advancement of each landmark at the maxillary alveolar, zygomatic bone, orbital rim, and nasal bone, which was consistent with morphological findings. TSDO allows rotation advancement of the midfacial skeleton to achieve occlusal correction and facial harmony through the mechanism of both suture remodeling and bone remodeling. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Unilateral hypoplasia with contralateral hypertrophy of anterior belly of digastric muscle: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Escudero, Martin; Juliano, Amy F

    2016-10-01

    Anomalies of the anterior belly of the digastric muscle (DM) are uncommon. We present a case of hypoplasia of the anterior belly of the left DM with hypertrophy of the anterior belly of the contralateral DM. The importance of recognizing this finding is to differentiate hypoplasia of the anterior belly of the DM from denervation atrophy, and not to confuse contralateral hypertrophy with a submental mass or lymphadenopathy. In denervation atrophy of the anterior belly of the DM, associated atrophy of the ipsilateral mylohyoid muscle is present. Hypertrophy of the anterior belly of the contralateral DM can be differentiated from a submental mass or lymphadenopathy by recognizing its isodensity on computed tomography and isointensity on magnetic resonance imaging to other muscles, without abnormal contrast enhancement.

  1. Successful conservative treatment outcomes and clinical characteristics of congenital hypoplasia of the extensor tendon central slip.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, N; Uemura, T; Nakamura, H

    2017-03-01

    Congenital hypoplasia of the extensor tendon central slip is a rare entity. This article describes the clinical characteristics in a series of 22 fingers in 16 patients (mean age: 10 months), and the outcomes of conservative treatment. Nine of 22 fingers were classified as slender or hypoplastic. Treatment with bracing was successful in 21 digits, resulting in full active extension of the proximal interphalangeal joint at a mean of 8.5 months after treatment. Bracing was unsuccessful in one digit, in which operative treatment resulted in a successful outcome. Some residual deformity was observed in ten fingers after a mean follow-up period of 2 years and 1 month. Congenital hypoplasia of the central slip can be treated successfully by the conservative hand bracing when worn with full compliance. Treatment time is extended by the infrequent application of the hand brace or in the case of hypoplastic slender fingers. IV.

  2. A prospective cohort study on radiation-induced hypothyroidism: development of an NTCP model.

    PubMed

    Boomsma, Marjolein J; Bijl, Hendrik P; Christianen, Miranda E M C; Beetz, Ivo; Chouvalova, Olga; Steenbakkers, Roel J H M; van der Laan, Bernard F A M; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Oosting, Sjoukje F; Schilstra, Cornelis; Langendijk, Johannes A

    2012-11-01

    To establish a multivariate normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. The thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level of 105 patients treated with (chemo-) radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer was prospectively measured during a median follow-up of 2.5 years. Hypothyroidism was defined as elevated serum TSH with decreased or normal free thyroxin (T4). A multivariate logistic regression model with bootstrapping was used to determine the most important prognostic variables for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. Thirty-five patients (33%) developed primary hypothyroidism within 2 years after radiation therapy. An NTCP model based on 2 variables, including the mean thyroid gland dose and the thyroid gland volume, was most predictive for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. NTCP values increased with higher mean thyroid gland dose (odds ratio [OR]: 1.064/Gy) and decreased with higher thyroid gland volume (OR: 0.826/cm(3)). Model performance was good with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.85. This is the first prospective study resulting in an NTCP model for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. The probability of hypothyroidism rises with increasing dose to the thyroid gland, whereas it reduces with increasing thyroid gland volume. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. 3D ultrasound Nakagami imaging for radiation-induced vaginal fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter; Shelton, Joseph; Bruner, Debrorah; Tridandapani, Srini; Liu, Tian

    2014-03-01

    Radiation-induced vaginal fibrosis is a debilitating side-effect affecting up to 80% of women receiving radiotherapy for their gynecological (GYN) malignancies. Despite the significant incidence and severity, little research has been conducted to identify the pathophysiologic changes of vaginal toxicity. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that ultrasound Nakagami shape and PDF parameters can be used to quantify radiation-induced vaginal toxicity. These Nakagami parameters are derived from the statistics of ultrasound backscattered signals to capture the physical properties (e.g., arrangement and distribution) of the biological tissues. In this paper, we propose to expand this Nakagami imaging concept from 2D to 3D to fully characterize radiation-induced changes to the vaginal wall within the radiation treatment field. A pilot study with 5 post-radiotherapy GYN patients was conducted using a clinical ultrasound scanner (6 MHz) with a mechanical stepper. A serial of 2D ultrasound images, with radio-frequency (RF) signals, were acquired at 1 mm step size. The 2D Nakagami shape and PDF parameters were calculated from the RF signal envelope with a sliding window, and then 3D Nakagami parameter images were generated from the parallel 2D images. This imaging method may be useful as we try to monitor radiation-induced vaginal injury, and address vaginal toxicities and sexual dysfunction in women after radiotherapy for GYN malignancies.

  4. Radiation induces genomic instability and mammary ductal dysplasia in Atm heterozygous mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weil, M. M.; Kittrell, F. S.; Yu, Y.; McCarthy, M.; Zabriskie, R. C.; Ullrich, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is a genetic syndrome resulting from the inheritance of two defective copies of the ATM gene that includes among its stigmata radiosensitivity and cancer susceptibility. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that although women with a single defective copy of ATM (AT heterozygotes) appear clinically normal, they may never the less have an increased relative risk of developing breast cancer. Whether they are at increased risk for radiation-induced breast cancer from medical exposures to ionizing radiation is unknown. We have used a murine model of AT to investigate the effect of a single defective Atm allele, the murine homologue of ATM, on the susceptibility of mammary epithelial cells to radiation-induced transformation. Here we report that mammary epithelial cells from irradiated mice with one copy of Atm truncated in the PI-3 kinase domain were susceptible to radiation-induced genomic instability and generated a 10% incidence of dysplastic mammary ducts when transplanted into syngenic recipients, whereas cells from Atm(+/+) mice were stable and formed only normal ducts. Since radiation-induced ductal dysplasia is a precursor to mammary cancer, the results indicate that AT heterozygosity increases susceptibility to radiogenic breast cancer in this murine model system.

  5. Rebamipide ameliorates radiation-induced intestinal injury in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Shim, Sehwan; Jang, Hyo-Sun; Myung, Hyun-Wook; Myung, Jae Kyung; Kang, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Min-Jung; Lee, Seung Bum; Jang, Won-Suk; Lee, Sun-Joo; Jin, Young-Woo; Lee, Seung-Sook; Park, Sunhoo

    2017-08-15

    Radiation-induced enteritis is a major side effect in cancer patients undergoing abdominopelvic radiotherapy. Radiation exposure produces an uncontrolled inflammatory cascade and epithelial cell loss leading to impaired epithelial barrier function. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of rebamipide on regeneration of the intestinal epithelia after radiation injury. The abdomens of C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 13Gy of irradiation (IR) and then the mice were treated with rebamipide. Upon IR, intestinal epithelia were destroyed structurally at the microscopic level and bacterial translocation was increased. The intestinal damage reached a maximum level on day 6 post-IR and intestinal regeneration occurred thereafter. We found that rebamipide significantly ameliorated radiation-induced intestinal injury. In mice treated with rebamipide after IR, intestinal barrier function recovered and expression of the tight junction components of the intestinal barrier were upregulated. Rebamipide administration reduced radiation-induced intestinal mucosal injury. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) were significantly reduced upon rebamipide administration. Intestinal cell proliferation and β-catenin expression also increased upon rebamipide administration. These data demonstrate that rebamipide reverses impairment of the intestinal barrier by increasing intestinal cell proliferation and attenuating the inflammatory response by inhibiting MMP9 and proinflammatory cytokine expression in a murine model of radiation-induced enteritis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. In vivo evidence for an endothelium-dependent mechanism in radiation-induced normal tissue injury

    PubMed Central

    Rannou, Emilie; François, Agnès; Toullec, Aurore; Guipaud, Olivier; Buard, Valérie; Tarlet, Georges; Mintet, Elodie; Jaillet, Cyprien; Iruela-Arispe, Maria Luisa; Benderitter, Marc; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Milliat, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanism involved in side effects of radiation therapy, and especially the role of the endothelium remains unclear. Previous results showed that plasminogen activator inhibitor-type 1 (PAI-1) contributes to radiation-induced intestinal injury and suggested that this role could be driven by an endothelium-dependent mechanism. We investigated whether endothelial-specific PAI-1 deletion could affect radiation-induced intestinal injury. We created a mouse model with a specific deletion of PAI-1 in the endothelium (PAI-1KOendo) by a Cre-LoxP system. In a model of radiation enteropathy, survival and intestinal radiation injury were followed as well as intestinal gene transcriptional profile and inflammatory cells intestinal infiltration. Irradiated PAI-1KOendo mice exhibited increased survival, reduced acute enteritis severity and attenuated late fibrosis compared with irradiated PAI-1flx/flx mice. Double E-cadherin/TUNEL labeling confirmed a reduced epithelial cell apoptosis in irradiated PAI-1KOendo. High-throughput gene expression combined with bioinformatic analyses revealed a putative involvement of macrophages. We observed a decrease in CD68+cells in irradiated intestinal tissues from PAI-1KOendo mice as well as modifications associated with M1/M2 polarization. This work shows that PAI-1 plays a role in radiation-induced intestinal injury by an endothelium-dependent mechanism and demonstrates in vivo that the endothelium is directly involved in the progression of radiation-induced enteritis. PMID:26510580

  7. Three case reports of radiation-induced glioblastoma after complete remission of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kajitani, Takumi; Kanamori, Masayuki; Saito, Ryuta; Watanabe, Yuko; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Watanabe, Mika; Kure, Shigeo; Tominaga, Teiji

    2018-04-01

    Radiation therapy is sometimes performed to control intracranial acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), but may lead to radiation-induced malignant glioma. The clinical, radiological, histological, and molecular findings are described of three cases of radiation-induced glioblastoma after the treatment for ALL. They received radiation therapy at age 6-8 years. The latency from radiation therapy to the onset of radiation-induced glioblastoma was 5-10 years. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated diffuse lesions with multiple small enhanced lesions in all cases. Histological examination showed that the tumors consisted of mainly small round astrocytic atypical cells in one case, and astrocytic atypical cells with elongated cytoplasm and nuclear pleomorphism with small cell component in two cases. Microvascular proliferation was present in all cases. Immunohistochemical analysis for B-Raf V600E, and mutational analysis for the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1, IDH2, and H3F3A gene revealed the wild-type alleles in all three cases. The integrated diagnoses were IDH wild-type glioblastoma, and local irradiation and concomitant temozolomide were performed. After the initial treatment, significant shrinkage of the diffuse lesion and enhanced lesion was found in all cases. Radiation-induced glioblastoma occurring after the treatment for ALL had unique clinical, radiological, histological, and molecular characteristics in our three cases.

  8. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENTIAL FLUORESCENCE ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposur...

  9. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENNTIAL FLUORESENCE ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposures...

  10. γ-radiation induced corrosion of copper in bentonite-water systems under anaerobic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karin Norrfors, K.; Björkbacka, Åsa; Kessler, Amanda; Wold, Susanna; Jonsson, Mats

    2018-03-01

    In this work we have experimentally studied the impact of bentonite clay on the process of radiation-induced copper corrosion in anoxic water. The motivation for this is to further develop our understanding of radiation-driven processes occurring in deep geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel where copper canisters containing the spent nuclear fuel will be embedded in compacted bentonite. Experiments on radiation-induced corrosion in the presence and absence of bentonite were performed along with experiments elucidating the impact irradiation on the Cu2+ adsorption capacity of bentonite. The experiments presented in this work show that the presence of bentonite clay has no or very little effect on the magnitude of radiation-induced corrosion of copper in anoxic aqueous systems. The absence of a protective effect similar to that observed for radiation-induced dissolution of UO2 is attributed to differences in the corrosion mechanism. This provides further support for the previously proposed mechanism where the hydroxyl radical is the key radiolytic oxidant responsible for the corrosion of copper. The radiation effect on the bentonite sorption capacity of Cu2+ (reduced capacity) is in line with what has previously been reported for other cations. The reduced cation sorption capacity is partly attributed to a loss of Al-OH sites upon irradiation.

  11. Using Rouse-Fowler model to describe radiation-induced electrical conductivity of nanocomposite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyuryagina, N. S.; Yalovets, A. P.

    2017-05-01

    Using the Rouse-Fowler (RF) model this work studies the radiation-induced electrical conductivity of a polymer nanocomposite material with spherical nanoparticles against the intensity and exposure time of gamma-ray, concentration and size of nanoparticles. The research has found the energy distribution of localized statesinduced by nanoparticles. The studies were conducted on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) with CdS nanoparticles.

  12. Radiation-induced autophagy promotes esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell survival via the LKB1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chi; Xie, Conghua

    2016-06-01

    Radiotherapy is an important treatment modality for esophageal cancer; however, the clinical efficacy of radiotherapy is limited by tumor radioresistance. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that radiation induces tumor cell autophagy as a cytoprotective adaptive response, which depends on liver kinase B1 (LKB1) also known as serine/threonine kinase 11 (STK11). Radiation-induced Eca-109 cell autophagy was found to be dependent on signaling through the LKB1 pathway, and autophagy inhibitors that disrupted radiation-induced Eca-109 cell autophagy increased cell cycle arrest and cell death in vitro. Inhibition of autophagy also reduced the clonogenic survival of the Eca-109 cells. When treated with radiation alone, human esophageal carcinoma xenografts showed increased LC3B and p-LKB1 expression, which was decreased by the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine. In vivo inhibition of autophagy disrupted tumor growth and increased tumor apoptosis when combined with 6 Gy of ionizing radiation. In summary, our findings elucidate a novel mechanism of resistance to radiotherapy in which radiation-induced autophagy, via the LKB1 pathway, promotes tumor cell survival. This indicates that inhibition of autophagy can serve as an adjuvant treatment to improve the curative effect of radiotherapy.

  13. Molecular, Cellular and Functional Effects of Radiation-Induced Brain Injury: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Balentova, Sona; Adamkov, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy is the most effective non-surgical treatment of primary brain tumors and metastases. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into pathogenesis of radiation-induced injury to the central nervous system. Radiation-induced brain injury can damage neuronal, glial and vascular compartments of the brain and may lead to molecular, cellular and functional changes. Given its central role in memory and adult neurogenesis, the majority of studies have focused on the hippocampus. These findings suggested that hippocampal avoidance in cranial radiotherapy prevents radiation-induced cognitive impairment of patients. However, multiple rodent studies have shown that this problem is more complex. As the radiation-induced cognitive impairment reflects hippocampal and non-hippocampal compartments, it is of critical importance to investigate molecular, cellular and functional modifications in various brain regions as well as their integration at clinically relevant doses and schedules. We here provide a literature overview, including our previously published results, in order to support the translation of preclinical findings to clinical practice, and improve the physical and mental status of patients with brain tumors. PMID:26610477

  14. A Prospective Cohort Study on Radiation-induced Hypothyroidism: Development of an NTCP Model

    SciT

    Boomsma, Marjolein J.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Christianen, Miranda E.M.C.

    Purpose: To establish a multivariate normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. Methods and Materials: The thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level of 105 patients treated with (chemo-) radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer was prospectively measured during a median follow-up of 2.5 years. Hypothyroidism was defined as elevated serum TSH with decreased or normal free thyroxin (T4). A multivariate logistic regression model with bootstrapping was used to determine the most important prognostic variables for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. Results: Thirty-five patients (33%) developed primary hypothyroidism within 2 years after radiation therapy. An NTCP model based on 2 variables, including the mean thyroidmore » gland dose and the thyroid gland volume, was most predictive for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. NTCP values increased with higher mean thyroid gland dose (odds ratio [OR]: 1.064/Gy) and decreased with higher thyroid gland volume (OR: 0.826/cm{sup 3}). Model performance was good with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.85. Conclusions: This is the first prospective study resulting in an NTCP model for radiation-induced hypothyroidism. The probability of hypothyroidism rises with increasing dose to the thyroid gland, whereas it reduces with increasing thyroid gland volume.« less

  15. Apatinib in refractory radiation-induced brain edema: A case report.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei Guo; Weng, Yi Ming; Dong, Yi; Li, Xiang Pan; Song, Qi-Bin

    2017-11-01

    Apatinib is a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, which has observed to be effective and safe in refractory radiation-induced brain edema, like Avastin did. Till now, there is no case report after apatinib came in the market. Two patients who received brain radiotherapy developed clinical manifestations of brain edema, including dizziness, headache, limb activity disorder, and so on. Two patients were both diagnosed as refractory radiation-induced brain edema. Two patients received apatinib (500 mg/day) for 2 and 4 weeks. Two patients got symptomatic improvements from apatinib in different degrees. Magnetic resonance imaging after apatinib treatments showed that compared with pre-treatment imaging, the perilesional edema reduced dramatically. However, the toxicity of apatinib was controllable and tolerable. Apatinib can obviously relieve the symptoms of refractory radiation-induced brain edema and improve the quality of life, which offers a new method for refractory radiation-induced brain edema in clinical practices. But that still warrants further investigation in the prospective study.

  16. Autosomal-dominant nystagmus, foveal hypoplasia and presenile cataract associated with a novel PAX6 mutation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Shery; Thomas, Mervyn G; Andrews, Caroline; Chan, Wai-Man; Proudlock, Frank A; McLean, Rebecca J; Pradeep, Archana; Engle, Elizabeth C; Gottlob, Irene

    2014-03-01

    Autosomal-dominant idiopathic infantile nystagmus has been linked to 6p12 (OMIM 164100), 7p11.2 (OMIM 608345) and 13q31-q33 (OMIM 193003). PAX6 (11p13, OMIM 607108) mutations can also cause autosomal-dominant nystagmus, typically in association with aniridia or iris hypoplasia. We studied a large multigenerational white British family with autosomal-dominant nystagmus, normal irides and presenile cataracts. An SNP-based genome-wide analysis revealed a linkage to a 13.4-MB region on chromosome 11p13 with a maximum lod score of 2.93. A mutation analysis of the entire coding region and splice junctions of the PAX6 gene revealed a novel heterozygous missense mutation (c.227C>G) that segregated with the phenotype and is predicted to result in the amino-acid substitution of proline by arginine at codon 76 p.(P76R). The amino-acid variation p.(P76R) within the paired box domain is likely to destabilise the protein due to steric hindrance as a result of the introduction of a polar and larger amino acid. Eye movement recordings showed a significant intrafamilial variability of horizontal, vertical and torsional nystagmus. High-resolution in vivo imaging of the retina using optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed features of foveal hypoplasia, including rudimentary foveal pit, incursion of inner retinal layers, short photoreceptor outer segments and optic nerve hypoplasia. Thus, this study presents a family that segregates a PAX6 mutation with nystagmus and foveal hypoplasia in the absence of iris abnormalities. Moreover, it is the first study showing detailed characteristics using eye movement recordings of autosomal-dominant nystagmus in a multigenerational family with a novel PAX6 mutation.

  17. Correction of axial deformity during lengthening in fibular hypoplasia: Hexapodal versus monorail external fixation.

    PubMed

    Chalopin, A; Geffroy, L; Pesenti, S; Hamel, A; Launay, F

    2017-09-01

    Childhood fibular hypoplasia is a rare pathology which may or may not involve limb-length discrepancy and axial deformity in one or more dimensions. The objective of the present study was to compare the quality of the axial correction achieved in lengthening procedures by hexapodal versus monorail external fixators. The hypothesis was that the hexapodal fixator provides more precise correction. A retrospective multicenter study included 52 children with fibular hypoplasia. Seventy-two tibias were analyzed, in 2 groups: 52 using a hexapodal fixator, and 20 using a monorail fixator. Mean age was 10.2 years. Mean lengthening was 5.7cm. Deformities were analyzed and measured in 3 dimensions and classified in 4 preoperative types and 4 post-lengthening types according to residual deformity. Complete correction was achieved in 26 tibias in the hexapodal group (50%) and 2 tibias in the monorail group (10%). Mean post-correction mechanical axis deviation was smaller in the hexapodal group: 12.83mm, versus 14.29mm in the monorail group. Mean post-correction mechanical lateral distal femoral angle was 87.5° in the hexapodal group, versus 84.3° in the monorail group (P=0.002), and mean mechanical medial proximal tibial angle 86.9° versus 89.5°, respectively (P=0.015). No previous studies focused on this congenital pathology in lengthening and axial correction programs for childhood lower-limb deformity. The present study found the hexapodal fixator to be more effective in conserving or restoring mechanical axes during progressive bone lengthening for fibular hypoplasia. The hexapodal fixator met the requirements of limb-length equalization in childhood congenital lower-limb hypoplasia, providing better axial correction than the monorail fixator. IV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Short limbed dwarfism, genital hypoplasia, sparse hair, and vertebral anomalies: a variant of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Fryns, J P; Moerman, P

    1993-01-01

    A male newborn with acromesomelic short limbed dwarfism, genital hypoplasia, and vertebral anomalies is reported. As the child had an important number of clinical and radiological symptoms seen in patients with Ellis-van Creveld syndrome, we raise the question of whether he may represent a variant example of this syndrome despite the absence of cardinal symptoms such as postaxial polydactyly and ectodermal changes (nail hypoplasia). Images PMID:8487282

  19. Inherited neuroaxonal dystrophy in dogs causing lethal, fetal-onset motor system dysfunction and cerebellar hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Fyfe, John C.; Al-Tamimi, Raba' A.; Castellani, Rudy J.; Rosenstein, Diana; Goldowitz, Daniel; Henthorn, Paula S.

    2010-01-01

    Neuroaxonal dystrophy in brainstem, spinal cord tracts, and spinal nerves accompanied by cerebellar hypoplasia was observed in a colony of laboratory dogs. Fetal akinesia was documented by ultrasonographic examination. At birth, affected puppies exhibited stereotypical positioning of limbs, scoliosis, arthrogryposis, pulmonary hypoplasia, and respiratory failure. Regional hypoplasia in the central nervous system was apparent grossly, most strikingly as underdeveloped cerebellum and spinal cord. Histopathologic abnormalities included swollen axons and spheroids in brainstem and spinal cord tracts; reduced cerebellar foliation, patchy loss of Purkinje cells, multifocal thinning of the external granular cell layer, and loss of neurons in the deep cerebellar nuclei; spheroids and loss of myelinated axons in spinal roots and peripheral nerves; increased myocyte apoptosis in skeletal muscle; and fibrofatty connective tissue proliferation around joints. Breeding studies demonstrated that the canine disorder is a fully penetrant, simple autosomal recessive trait. The disorder demonstrated a type and distribution of lesions homologous to that of human infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (INAD), most commonly caused by mutations of PLA2G6, but alleles of informative markers flanking the canine PLA2G6 locus did not associate with the canine disorder. Thus, fetal-onset neuroaxonal dystrophy in dogs, a species with well-developed genome mapping resources, provides a unique opportunity for additional disease gene discovery and understanding of this pathology. PMID:20653033

  20. The transcriptome of nitrofen-induced pulmonary hypoplasia in the rat model of congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Mahood, Thomas H; Johar, Dina R; Iwasiow, Barbara M; Xu, Wayne; Keijzer, Richard

    2016-05-01

    We currently do not know how the herbicide nitrofen induces lung hypoplasia and congenital diaphragmatic hernia in rats. Our aim was to compare the differentially expressed transcriptome of nitrofen-induced hypoplastic lungs to control lungs in embryonic day 13 rat embryos before the development of embryonic diaphragmatic defects. Using next-generation sequencing technology, we identified the expression profile of microRNA (miRNA) and mRNA genes. Once the dataset was validated by both RT-qPCR and digital-PCR, we conducted gene ontology, miRNA target analysis, and orthologous miRNA sequence matching for the deregulated miRNAs in silico. Our study identified 186 known mRNA and 100 miRNAs which were differentially expressed in nitrofen-induced hypoplastic lungs. Sixty-four rat miRNAs homologous to known human miRNAs were identified. A subset of these genes may promote lung hypoplasia in rat and/or human, and we discuss their associations. Potential miRNA pathways relevant to nitrofen-induced lung hypoplasia include PI3K, TGF-β, and cell cycle kinases. Nitrofen-induced hypoplastic lungs have an abnormal transcriptome that may lead to impaired development.

  1. Mechanisms of cadmium-caused eye hypoplasia and hypopigmentation in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Zhou, Xin-Ying; Ma, Xu-Fa; Liu, Jing-Xia

    2015-10-01

    Cadmium-caused head and eye hypoplasia and hypopigmentation has been recognized for a long time, but knowledge of the underlying mechanisms is limited. In this study, we found that high mortality occurred in exposed embryos after 24 hpf, when cadmium (Cd) dosage was above 17.8 μM. Using high-throughput in situ hybridization screening, we found that genes labelling the neural crest and its derivative pigment cells exhibited obviously reduced expression in Cd-exposed embryos from 24 hpf, 2 days earlier than head and eye hypoplasia and hypopigmentation occurred. Moreover, based on expression of crestin, a neural crest marker, we found that embryos before the gastrula stage were more sensitive to cadmium toxicity and that damage caused by Cd on embryogenesis was dosage dependent. In addition, by phenotype observation and detection of neural crest and pigment cell markers, we found that BIO and retinoic acid (RA) could neutralize the toxic effects of Cd on zebrafish embryogenesis. In this study, we first determined that Cd blocked the formation of the neural crest and inhibited specification of pigment cells, which might contribute to the molecular mechanisms underlying the phenotype defects of head and eye hypoplasia and hypopigmentation in Cd-exposed embryos. Moreover, we found that compounds BIO or RA could neutralize the toxic effects of Cd. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Occult spinal canal stenosis due to C-1 hypoplasia in children with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Shunji; Imakiire, Takanori; Koga, Hiroaki; Ishidou, Yasuhiro; Sasaki, Hiromi; Taketomi, Eiji; Higo, Masaru; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Komiya, Setsuro

    2007-12-01

    Little has been published about subclinical spinal canal stenosis due to C-1 hypoplasia in patients with Down syndrome. In this paper the authors performed a matched comparison study with cross-sectional survey to investigate occult spinal canal stenosis due to C-1 hypoplasia in children with Down syndrome. A total of 102 children with Down syndrome ranging in age from 10 to 15 years were matched according to age and physique with 176 normal children. In all participants, the anteroposterior (AP) diameter of C-1 and the atlas-dens interval (ADI) were measured on plain lateral x-ray images of the cervical spine. The cross-sectional area of the atlas was also measured from a cross-sectional computed tomography image of C-1. Eight children (6.7%) with Down syndrome developed atlantoaxial subluxation associated with myelopathy. The difference in the ADI between the patients and controls was not statistically significant. The average AP diameter of the atlas and the spinal canal area along the cross-section of the atlas were significantly smaller in children with Down syndrome than those in the control group. Atlantoaxial instability and occult spinal canal stenosis due to C-1 hypoplasia in patients with Down syndrome may significantly increase the risk of myelopathy.

  3. Foveal hemorrhage in an eye with foveal hypoplasia associated with albinism.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Naonori; Hasegawa, Taiji; Yamashita, Mariko; Ogata, Nahoko

    2014-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism is a group of congenital disorders caused by alterations of melanin biosynthesis. We report our findings in a patient with oculocutaneous albinism who presented with foveal hypoplasia and a foveal hemorrhage. A 48-year-old man noted a dark spot in the middle of the visual field of his right eye. He had depigmented skin, white hair, white eyebrows, and white cilia. He also had horizontal nystagmus and depigmented irides. His best-corrected visual acuity was 2/100 with -14.0 diopters in the right eye and 3/100 with -5.0 diopters in the left eye. Ophthalmoscopy showed diffuse depigmentation in both eyes and a foveal hemorrhage in the right eye. Optical coherence tomography showed the absence of a foveal pit in both eyes and a subretinal hyperreflective lesion corresponding to the foveal hemorrhage in the right eye. Fluorescein angiography showed that the retinal and choroidal vessels were relatively hypofluorescent because of the lack of a blocking effect of the pigments in the retinal pigment epithelium. Fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green angiography did not show any evidence of choroidal neovascularization in either eye. The foveal hemorrhage in the right eye spontaneously regressed and finally resolved at 3 months after onset. At the final examination, the patient reported that his vision had recovered. A foveal hemorrhage is a rare condition in an eye with foveal hypoplasia associated with albinism. The hemorrhage may be related to high myopia and also to the hypoplasia of the fovea associated with albinism.

  4. Urethral hydrodistension for management of urethral hypoplasia in prune belly syndrome: long-term results.

    PubMed

    Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Rasouli, Mohammad Reza; Dianat, SeyedSaeid; Nezami, Behtash G; Mahboubi, Amir Hassan; Sina, Alireza

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of urethral hydrodistension for management of urethral hypoplasia in prune belly syndrome (PBS). During a 10-year period, 7 infants with PBS and urethral hypoplasia presented either with open urachus or surgically created urinary diversion referred to our hospital. Five milliliters of normal saline was pushed via a 22-gauge plastic angiocatheter into the urethra with simultaneous finger pressure on the perineum to occlude the proximal urethra that was repeated with higher volumes of the solution (up to 20 mL). The procedure was continued until a 6F or 8F feeding tube catheter confirmed the urethral patency. Hydrodistension was repeated in 3-month intervals till complete patency was confirmed by imaging. Median age of the infants was 6 (1-8) months. All urethral hydrodistension were successful after 1 to 3 sessions. Follow-up imaging studies showed significant improvement in all patients except one. Natural and surgically created urinary diversions were closed in 6 infants. The hydrodistension create an equal and constant pressure into the urethral wall without any urethral damage. This technique can be considered along with the other available methods for management of urethral hypoplasia in selected cases of PBS. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Exploring the relationship between hypoplasia and odontometric asymmetry in Isola Sacra, an imperial Roman necropolis.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Kara C; Corruccini, Robert S; Bondioli, Luca; Macchiarelli, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    Anthropological studies reporting odontometric asymmetry values or dental enamel hypoplasia frequencies use these markers as a record of physiological perturbations occurring during dental development. While both markers indirectly suggest the amount of relative stress a population might have experienced, a relationship between the two has been explored only recently in the literature. In this study, we address the possibility of such a relationship in two ways. First, Kendall's tau B correlations test the degree of relationship on the level of the individual between hypoplasia presence/absence (P/A) and severity of hypoplasia appearance (PS) data for the anterior dentition and directional (DA) and fluctuating asymmetry (FA) data for concurrently developing molars pairs. Second, an F-test explores between-group (ranked hypoplastic individuals and non-hypoplastic individuals) variance about the mean, expecting the hypoplastic individuals to be more variable. The sample consists of 72 individuals from the Isola Sacra necropolis, which is associated with Portus, the port city of ancient Rome. Results indicated only a very weak predictive relationship between some variables and few significant differences in variation. However, variance follows trends in published literature. Possible explanations for the lack of interaction on the level of the individual include both etiological and genetic susceptibility factors that are significant in and of themselves as they suggest a more complex reading of the hard tissue evidence for stress in archaeological populations. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  6. Adenosine Kinase Inhibition Protects against Cranial Radiation-Induced Cognitive Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Munjal M.; Baulch, Janet E.; Lusardi, Theresa A.; Allen, Barrett. D.; Chmielewski, Nicole N.; Baddour, Al Anoud D.; Limoli, Charles L.; Boison, Detlev

    2016-01-01

    Clinical radiation therapy for the treatment of CNS cancers leads to unintended and debilitating impairments in cognition. Radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction is long lasting; however, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms are still not well established. Since ionizing radiation causes microglial and astroglial activation, we hypothesized that maladaptive changes in astrocyte function might be implicated in radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction. Among other gliotransmitters, astrocytes control the availability of adenosine, an endogenous neuroprotectant and modulator of cognition, via metabolic clearance through adenosine kinase (ADK). Adult rats exposed to cranial irradiation (10 Gy) showed significant declines in performance of hippocampal-dependent cognitive function tasks [novel place recognition, novel object recognition (NOR), and contextual fear conditioning (FC)] 1 month after exposure to ionizing radiation using a clinically relevant regimen. Irradiated rats spent less time exploring a novel place or object. Cranial irradiation also led to reduction in freezing behavior compared to controls in the FC task. Importantly, immunohistochemical analyses of irradiated brains showed significant elevation of ADK immunoreactivity in the hippocampus that was related to astrogliosis and increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Conversely, rats treated with the ADK inhibitor 5-iodotubercidin (5-ITU, 3.1 mg/kg, i.p., for 6 days) prior to cranial irradiation showed significantly improved behavioral performance in all cognitive tasks 1 month post exposure. Treatment with 5-ITU attenuated radiation-induced astrogliosis and elevated ADK immunoreactivity in the hippocampus. These results confirm an astrocyte-mediated mechanism where preservation of extracellular adenosine can exert neuroprotection against radiation-induced pathology. These innovative findings link radiation-induced changes in cognition and CNS functionality to altered

  7. Feasibility of OCT to detect radiation-induced esophageal damage in small animal models (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelvehgaran, Pouya; Alderliesten, Tanja; Salguero, Javier; Borst, Gerben; Song, Ji-Ying; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; de Boer, Johannes F.; de Bruin, Daniel M.; van Herk, Marcel B.

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer survival is poor and radiotherapy patients often suffer serious treatment side effects. The esophagus is particularly sensitive leading to reduced food intake or even fistula formation. Only few direct techniques exist to measure radiation-induced esophageal damage, for which knowledge is needed to improve the balance between risk of tumor recurrence and complications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a minimally-invasive imaging technique that obtains cross-sectional, high-resolution (1-10µm) images and is capable of scanning the esophageal wall up to 2-3mm depth. In this study we investigated the feasibility of OCT to detect esophageal radiation damage in mice. In total 30 mice were included in 4 study groups (1 main and 3 control groups). Mice underwent cone-beam CT imaging for initial setup assessment and dose planning followed by single-fraction dose delivery of 4, 10, 16, and 20Gy on 5mm spots, spaced 10mm apart. Mice were repeatedly imaged using OCT: pre-irradiation and up to 3 months post-irradiation. The control groups received either OCT only, irradiation only, or were sham-operated. We used histopathology as gold standard for radiation-induced damage diagnosis. The study showed edema in both the main and OCT-only groups. Furthermore, radiation-induced damage was primarily found in the highest dose region (distal esophagus). Based on the histopathology reports we were able to identify the radiation-induced damage in the OCT images as a change in tissue scattering related to the type of induced damage. This finding indicates the feasibility and thereby the potentially promising role of OCT in radiation-induced esophageal damage assessment.

  8. Chronic intermittent hypobaric hypoxia attenuates radiation induced heart damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Wu, Yajing; Yuan, Fang; Liu, Yixian; Wang, Xuefeng; Cao, Feng; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Radiation-induced heart damage (RIHD) is becoming an increasing concern for patients and clinicians due to the use of radiotherapy for thoracic tumor. Chronic intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (CIHH) preconditioning has been documented to exert a cardioprotective effect. Here we hypothesized that CIHH was capable of attenuating functional and structural damage in a rat model of RIHD. Male adult Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: control, radiation, CIHH and CIHH plus radiation. Cardiac function was measured using Langendorff perfusion in in vitro rat hearts. Cardiac fibrosis, oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) was assessed by quantitative analysis of protein expression. No significant difference between any two groups was observed in baseline cardiac function as assessed by left ventricular end diastolic pressure (LVEDP), left ventricular developing pressure (LVDP) and the derivative of left ventricular pressure (±LVdp/dt). When challenged by ischemia/reperfusion, LVEDP was increased but LVDP and ±LVdp/dt was decreased significantly in radiation group compared with controls, accompanied by an enlarged infarct size and decreased coronary flow. Importantly, CIHH dramatically improved radiation-induced damage of cardiac function and blunted radiation-induced cardiac fibrosis in the perivascular and interstitial area. Furthermore, CIHH abrogated radiation-induced increase in malondialdehyde and enhanced total superoxide dismutase activity, as well as downregulated expression levels of ERS markers like GRP78 and CHOP. CIHH pretreatment alleviated radiation-induced damage of cardiac function and fibrosis. Such a protective effect was closely associated with suppression of oxidative stress and ERS responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Loss of Gq/11 Family G Proteins in the Nervous System Causes Pituitary Somatotroph Hypoplasia and Dwarfism in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wettschureck, N.; Moers, A.; Wallenwein, B.; Parlow, A. F.; Maser-Gluth, C.; Offermanns, S.

    2005-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins of the Gq/11 family transduce signals from a variety of neurotransmitter and hormone receptors and have therefore been implicated in various functions of the nervous system. Using the Cre/loxP system, we generated mice which lack the genes coding for the α subunits of the two main members of the Gq/11 family, gnaq and gna11, selectively in neuronal and glial precursor cells. Mice with defective gnaq and gna11 genes were morphologically normal, but they died shortly after birth. Mice carrying a single gna11 allele survived the early postnatal period but died within 3 to 6 weeks as anorectic dwarfs. In these mice, postnatal proliferation of pituitary somatotroph cells was strongly impaired, and plasma growth hormone (GH) levels were reduced to 15%. Hypothalamic levels of GH-releasing hormone (GHRH), an important stimulator of somatotroph proliferation, were strongly decreased, and exogenous administration of GHRH restored normal proliferation. The hypothalamic effects of ghrelin, a regulator of GHRH production and food intake, were reduced in these mice, suggesting that an impairment of ghrelin receptor signaling might contribute to GHRH deficiency and abnormal eating behavior. Taken together, our findings show that Gq/11 signaling is required for normal hypothalamic function and that impairment of this signaling pathway causes somatotroph hypoplasia, dwarfism, and anorexia. PMID:15713647

  10. TBX15 mutations cause craniofacial dysmorphism, hypoplasia of scapula and pelvis, and short stature in Cousin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lausch, Ekkehart; Hermanns, Pia; Farin, Henner F; Alanay, Yasemin; Unger, Sheila; Nikkel, Sarah; Steinwender, Christoph; Scherer, Gerd; Spranger, Jürgen; Zabel, Bernhard; Kispert, Andreas; Superti-Furga, Andrea

    2008-11-01

    Members of the evolutionarily conserved T-box family of transcription factors are important players in developmental processes that include mesoderm formation and patterning and organogenesis both in vertebrates and invertebrates. The importance of T-box genes for human development is illustrated by the association between mutations in several of the 17 human family members and congenital errors of morphogenesis that include cardiac, craniofacial, and limb malformations. We identified two unrelated individuals with a complex cranial, cervical, auricular, and skeletal malformation syndrome with scapular and pelvic hypoplasia (Cousin syndrome) that recapitulates the dysmorphic phenotype seen in the Tbx15-deficient mice, droopy ear. Both affected individuals were homozygous for genomic TBX15 mutations that resulted in truncation of the protein and addition of a stretch of missense amino acids. Although the mutant proteins had an intact T-box and were able to bind to their target DNA sequence in vitro, the missense amino acid sequence directed them to early degradation, and cellular levels were markedly reduced. We conclude that Cousin syndrome is caused by TBX15 insufficiency and is thus the human counterpart of the droopy ear mouse.

  11. Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 6 caused by mutations in RARS2: definition of the clinical spectrum and molecular findings in five patients.

    PubMed

    Cassandrini, Denise; Cilio, Maria Roberta; Bianchi, Marzia; Doimo, Mara; Balestri, Martina; Tessa, Alessandra; Rizza, Teresa; Sartori, Geppo; Meschini, Maria Chiara; Nesti, Claudia; Tozzi, Giulia; Petruzzella, Vittoria; Piemonte, Fiorella; Bisceglia, Luigi; Bruno, Claudio; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; D'Amico, Adele; Fattori, Fabiana; Carrozzo, Rosalba; Salviati, Leonardo; Santorelli, Filippo M; Bertini, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Recessive mutations in the mitochondrial arginyl-transfer RNA synthetase (RARS2) gene have been associated with early onset encephalopathy with signs of oxidative phosphorylation defects classified as pontocerebellar hypoplasia 6. We describe clinical, neuroimaging and molecular features on five patients from three unrelated families who displayed mutations in RARS2. All patients rapidly developed a neonatal or early-infantile epileptic encephalopathy with intractable seizures. The long-term follow-up revealed a virtual absence of psychomotor development, progressive microcephaly, and feeding difficulties. Mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes in muscle and fibroblasts were normal in two. Blood and CSF lactate was abnormally elevated in all five patients at early stages while appearing only occasionally abnormal with the progression of the disease. Cerebellar vermis hypoplasia with normal aspect of the cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres appeared within the first months of life at brain MRI. In three patients follow-up neuroimaging revealed a progressive pontocerebellar and cerebral cortical atrophy. Molecular investigations of RARS2 disclosed the c.25A>G/p.I9V and the c.1586+3A>T in family A, the c.734G>A/p.R245Q and the c.1406G>A/p.R469H in family B, and the c.721T>A/p.W241R and c.35A>G/p.Q12R in family C. Functional complementation studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that mutation MSR1-R531H (equivalent to human p.R469H) abolished respiration whereas the MSR1-R306Q strain (corresponding to p.R245Q) displayed a reduced growth on non-fermentable YPG medium. Although mutations functionally disrupted yeast we found a relatively well preserved arginine aminoacylation of mitochondrial tRNA. Clinical and neuroimaging findings are important clues to raise suspicion and to reach diagnostic accuracy for RARS2 mutations considering that biochemical abnormalities may be absent in muscle biopsy.

  12. Influence of radiation quality on mouse chromosome 2 deletions in radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Brown, Natalie; Finnon, Rosemary; Manning, Grainne; Bouffler, Simon; Badie, Christophe

    2015-11-01

    Leukaemia is the prevailing neoplastic disorder of the hematopoietic system. Epidemiological analyses of the survivors of the Japanese atomic bombings show that exposure to ionising radiation (IR) can cause leukaemia. Although a clear association between radiation exposure and leukaemia development is acknowledged, the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. A hemizygous deletion on mouse chromosome 2 (del2) is a common feature in several mouse strains susceptible to radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (rAML). The deletion is an early event detectable 24h after exposure in bone marrow cells. Ultimately, 15-25% of exposed animals develop AML with 80-90% of cases carrying del2. Molecular mapping of leukaemic cell genomes identified a minimal deleted region (MDR) on chromosome 2 (chr2) in which a tumour suppressor gene, Sfpi1 is located, encoding the transcription factor PU.1, essential in haematopoiesis. The remaining copy of Sfpi1 has a point mutation in the coding sequence for the DNA-binding domain of the protein in 70% of rAML, which alters a single CpG sequence in the codon for arginine residue R235. In order to identify chr2 deletions and Sfpi.1/PU.1 loss, we performed array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) on a unique panel of 79rAMLs. Using a custom made CGH array specifically designed for mouse chr2, we analysed at unprecedentedly high resolution (1.4M array- 148bp resolution) the size of the MDR in low LET and high-LET induced rAMLs (32 X-ray- and 47 neutron-induced). Sequencing of Sfpi1/PU.1DNA binding domain identified the presence of R235 point mutations, showing no influence of radiation quality on R235 type or frequency. We identified for the first time rAML cases with complex del2 in a subset of neutron-induced AMLs. This study allowed us to re-define the MDR to a much smaller 5.5Mb region (still including Sfpi1/PU.1), identical regardless of radiation quality. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  13. Radiation-induced myocardial perfusion abnormalities in breast cancer patients following external beam radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Eftekhari, Mohammad; Anbiaei, Robabeh; Zamani, Hanie; Fallahi, Babak; Beiki, Davood; Ameri, Ahmad; Emami-Ardekani, Alireza; Fard-Esfahani, Armaghan; Gholamrezanezhad, Ali; Seid Ratki, Kazem Razavi; Roknabadi, Alireza Momen

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy for breast cancer can induce myocardial capillary injury and increase cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. A prospective cohort was conducted to study the prevalence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities following radiation therapy of left-sided breast cancer patients as compared to those with right-sided cancer. To minimize potential confounding factors, only those patients with low 10-year risk of coronary artery disease (based on Framingham risk scoring) were included. All patients were initially treated by modified radical mastectomy and then were managed by postoperative 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy (CRT) to the surgical bed with an additional 1-cm margin, delivered by 46-50 Gy (in 2 Gy daily fractions) over a 5-week course. The same dose-adjusted chemotherapy regimen (including anthracyclines, cyclophosphamide and taxol) was given to all patients. Six months after radiation therapy, all patients underwent cardiac SPECT for the evaluation of myocardial perfusion. A total of 71 patients with a mean age of 45.3±7.2 years [35 patients with leftsided breast cancer (exposed) and 36 patients with right-sided cancer (controls)] were enrolled. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) [showing the percentage of the heart exposed to >50% of radiation] was significantly higher in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Visual interpretation detected perfusion abnormalities in 42.9% of cases and 16.7% of controls (P=0.02, Odds ratio=1.46). In semiquantitative segmental analysis, only apical (28.6% versus 8.3%, P=0.03) and anterolateral (17.1% versus 2.8%, P=0.049) walls showed significantly reduced myocardial perfusion in the exposed group. Summed Stress Score (SSS) of>3 was observed in twelve cases (34.3%), while in five of the controls (13.9%),(Odds ratio=1.3). There was no significant difference between the groups regarding left ventricular ejection fraction. The risk of radiation induced myocardial perfusion abnormality in patients treated with CRT on the

  14. Protective effect of α-lipoic acid against radiation-induced fibrosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Seung-Hee; Park, Eun-Young; Kwak, Sungmin; Heo, Seung-Ho; Ryu, Je-Won; Park, Jin-hong

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) is one of the most common late complications of radiation therapy. We found that α-lipoic acid (α-LA) effectively prevents RIF. In RIF a mouse model, leg contracture assay was used to test the in vivo efficacy of α-LA. α-LA suppressed the expression of pro-fibrotic genes after irradiation, both in vivo and in vitro, and inhibited the up-regulation of TGF-β1-mediated p300/CBP activity. Thus, α-LA prevents radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) by inhibiting the transcriptional activity of NF-κB through inhibition of histone acetyltransferase activity. α-LA is a new therapeutic methods that can be used in the prevention-treatment of RIF. PMID:26799284

  15. The potential influence of radiation-induced microenvironments in neoplastic progression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a complete carcinogen, able both to initiate and promote neoplastic progression and is a known carcinogen of human and murine mammary gland. Tissue response to radiation is a composite of genetic damage, cell death and induction of new gene expression patterns. Although DNA damage is believed to initiate carcinogenesis, the contribution of these other aspects of radiation response are beginning to be explored. Our studies demonstrate that radiation elicits rapid and persistent global alterations in the mammary gland microenvironment. We postulate that radiation-induced microenvironments may affect epithelial cells neoplastic transformation by altering their number or susceptibility. Alternatively, radiation induced microenvironments may exert a selective force on initiated cells and/or be conducive to progression. A key impetus for these studies is the possibility that blocking these events could be a strategy to interrupt neoplastic progression.

  16. EPR spectral investigation of radiation-induced radicals of gallic acid.

    PubMed

    Tuner, Hasan

    2017-11-01

    In the present work, spectroscopic features of the radiation-induced radicals of gallic acid compounds were investigated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. While un-irradiated samples presented no EPR signal, irradiated samples exhibited an EPR spectrum consisting of an intense resonance line at the center and weak lines on both sides. Detailed microwave saturation investigations were carried out to determine the origin of the experimental EPR lines. It is concluded that the two side lines of the triplet satellite originate from forbidden "spin-flip" transitions. The spectroscopic and structural features of the radiation-induced radicals were determined using EPR spectrum fittings. The experimental EPR spectra of the two gallic acid compounds were consistent with the calculated EPR spectroscopic features of the proposed radicals. It is concluded that the most probable radicals are the cyclohexadienyl-type, [Formula: see text] radicals for both compounds.

  17. Effects of hydroxylated benzaldehyde derivatives on radiation-induced reactions involving various organic radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksendzova, G. A.; Samovich, S. N.; Sorokin, V. L.; Shadyro, O. I.

    2018-05-01

    In the present paper, the effects of hydroxylated benzaldehyde derivatives and gossypol - the known natural occurring compound - on formation of decomposition products resulting from radiolysis of ethanol and hexane in deaerated and oxygenated solutions were studied. The obtained data enabled the authors to make conclusions about the effects produced by the structure of the compounds under study on their reactivity towards oxygen- and carbon-centered radicals. It has been found that 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, 4,6-di-tert-butyl-2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde and 4,6-di-tert-butyl-3-(1,3-dioxane-2-yl)-1,2-dihydroxybenzene are not inferior in efficiency to butylated hydroxytoluene - the industrial antioxidant - as regards suppression of the radiation-induced oxidation processes occurring in hexane. The derivatives of hydroxylated benzaldehydes were shown to have a significant influence on radiation-induced reactions involving α-hydroxyalkyl radicals.

  18. Radiation-induced segregation and precipitation behaviours around cascade clusters under electron irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sueishi, Yuichiro; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Shibayama, Tamaki; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Heishichiro

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the formation of cascade clusters and structural changes in them by means of electron irradiation following ion irradiation in an austenitic stainless steel. Almost all of the cascade clusters, which were introduced by the ion irradiation, grew to form interstitial-type dislocation loops or vacancy-type stacking fault tetrahedra after electron irradiation at 623 K, whereas a few of the dot-type clusters remained in the matrix. It was possible to recognize the concentration of Ni and Si by radiation-induced segregation around the dot-type clusters. After electron irradiation at 773 K, we found that some cascade clusters became precipitates (delta-Ni2Si) due to radiation-induced precipitation. This suggests that the cascade clusters could directly become precipitation sites during irradiation.

  19. Atomistic observation and simulation analysis of spatio-temporal fluctuations during radiation-induced amorphization.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Seiichi; Hoshino, Misaki; Koike, Takuto; Suda, Takanori; Ohnuki, Soumei; Takahashi, Heishichirou; Lam, Nighi Q

    2003-01-01

    We performed a dynamical-atomistic study of radiation-induced amorphization in the NiTi intermetallic compound using in situ high-resolution high-voltage electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations in connection with image simulation. Spatio-temporal fluctuations as non-equilibrium fluctuations in an energy-dissipative system, due to transient atom-cluster formation during amorphization, were revealed by the present spatial autocorrelation analysis.

  20. Impact of p53 status on heavy-ion radiation-induced micronuclei in circulating erythrocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, P. Y.; Torous, D.; Lutze-Mann, L.; Winegar, R.

    2000-01-01

    Transgenic mice that differed in their p53 genetic status were exposed to an acute dose of highly charged and energetic (HZE) iron particle radiation. Micronuclei (MN) in two distinct populations of circulating peripheral blood erythrocytes, the immature reticulocytes (RETs) and the mature normochromatic erythrocytes (NCEs), were measured using a simple and efficient flow cytometric procedure. Our results show significant elevation in the frequency of micronucleated RETs (%MN-RETs) at 2 and 3 days post-radiation. At 3 days post-irradiation, the magnitude of the radiation-induced MN-RET was 2.3-fold higher in the irradiated p53 wild-type animals compared to the unirradiated controls, 2.5-fold higher in the p53 hemizygotes and 4.3-fold higher in the p53 nullizygotes. The persistence of this radiation-induced elevation of MN-RETs is dependent on the p53 genetic background of the animal. In the p53 wild-type and p53 hemizygotes, %MN-RETs returned to control levels by 9 days post-radiation. However, elevated levels of %MN-RETs in p53 nullizygous mice persisted beyond 56 days post-radiation. We also observed elevated MN-NCEs in the peripheral circulation after radiation, but the changes in radiation-induced levels of MN-NCEs appear dampened compared to those of the MN-RETs for all three strains of animals. These results suggest that the lack of p53 gene function may play a role in the iron particle radiation-induced genomic instability in stem cell populations in the hematopoietic system.

  1. The standardization of acupuncture treatment for radiation-induced xerostomia: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling-Xin; Tian, Guang; He, Jing

    2016-07-01

    To assess the relative standardization of acupuncture protocols for radiation-induced xerostomia. A literature search was carried out up to November 10, 2012 in the databases PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE and China National Knowledge Infrastruction with the terms: radiation-induced xerostomia, acupuncture, acupuncture treatment, and acupuncture therapy. Five ancient Chinese classic acupuncture works were also reviewed with the keywords "dry mouth, thirst, dry tongue, dry eyes and dry lips" to search the effective acupuncture points for dry mouth-associated symptoms in ancient China. Twenty-two full-text articles relevant to acupuncture treatment for radiation-induced xerostomia were included and a total of 48 acupuncture points were searched in the 5 ancient Chinese classic acupuncture works, in which the most commonly used points were Chengjiang (CV24), Shuigou (GV 26), Duiduan (GV 27), Jinjin (EX-HN 12), and Yuye (EX-HN 13) on head and neck, Sanjian (LI 3), Shangyang (LI 1), Shaoshang (LU 11), Shaoze (SI 1), Xialian (LI 8) on hand, Fuliu (KI 7), Dazhong (KI 4), Zuqiaoyin (GB 44), Taichong (LR 3), Zhaohai (KI 6) on foot, Burong (ST 19), Zhangmen (LR 13), Tiantu (CV 22), Qimen (LR 14) on abdomen, Feishu (BL 13), Danshu (BL 19), Xiaochaogshu (BL 27), Ganshu (BL 18) on back, Shenmen (TF 4), Shen (CO10, Kidney), Yidan (CO11, Pancreas) and Pi (CO13, Spleen) on ear. There were considerable heterogeneities in the current acupuncture treatment protocols for radiation-induced xerostomia. Based on the results of the review and the personal perspectives, the authors provide a recommendation for manual acupuncture protocols in treating radiationinduced xerostomia patients with head and neck cancer.

  2. Effect of sodium meclofenamate on radiation-induced esophagitis and cystitis

    SciT

    Ambrus, J.L.; Ambrus, C.M.; Lillie, D.B.

    Stumptailed monkeys (Macaca arctoides) received 2000 rad irradiation to the upper half of the esophagus and to the bladder by a 6-MeV linear accelerator. Endoscopy and biopsy was obtained from these organs weekly for 3 weeks. At the end of this period, the animals were autopsied and histopathologic examination undertaken. Sodium meclofenamate in doses of 5-20 mg/kg/day p.os was found effective in reducing or preventing radiation-induced esophagitis and cystitis.

  3. C/EBPδ deficiency sensitizes mice to ionizing radiation-induced hematopoietic and intestinal injury.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Snehalata A; Shao, Lijian; Chang, Jianhui; Wang, Wenze; Pathak, Rupak; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Junru; Hendrickson, Howard; Boerma, Marjan; Sterneck, Esta; Zhou, Daohong; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the mechanisms involved in the radiation response is critical for developing interventions to mitigate radiation-induced injury to normal tissues. Exposure to radiation leads to increased oxidative stress, DNA-damage, genomic instability and inflammation. The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein delta (Cebpd; C/EBPδ is implicated in regulation of these same processes, but its role in radiation response is not known. We investigated the role of C/EBPδ in radiation-induced hematopoietic and intestinal injury using a Cebpd knockout mouse model. Cebpd-/- mice showed increased lethality at 7.4 and 8.5 Gy total-body irradiation (TBI), compared to Cebpd+/+ mice. Two weeks after a 6 Gy dose of TBI, Cebpd-/- mice showed decreased recovery of white blood cells, neutrophils, platelets, myeloid cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells, decreased colony-forming ability of bone marrow progenitor cells, and increased apoptosis of hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells compared to Cebpd+/+ controls. Cebpd-/- mice exhibited a significant dose-dependent decrease in intestinal crypt survival and in plasma citrulline levels compared to Cebpd+/+ mice after exposure to radiation. This was accompanied by significantly decreased expression of γ-H2AX in Cebpd-/- intestinal crypts and villi at 1 h post-TBI, increased mitotic index at 24 h post-TBI, and increase in apoptosis in intestinal crypts and stromal cells of Cebpd-/- compared to Cebpd+/+ mice at 4 h post-irradiation. This study uncovers a novel biological function for C/EBPδ in promoting the response to radiation-induced DNA-damage and in protecting hematopoietic and intestinal tissues from radiation-induced injury.

  4. Surgical techniques in radiation induced temporal lobe necrosis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Alfotih, Gobran Taha Ahmed; Zheng, Mei Guang; Cai, Wang Qing; Xu, Xin Ke; Hu, Zhen; Li, Fang Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Radiation induced brain injury ranges from acute reversible edema to late, irreversible radiation necrosis. Radiation induced temporal lobe necrosis is associated with permanent neurological deficits and occasionally progresses to death. We present our experience with surgery on radiation induced temporal lobe necrosis (RTLN) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients with special consideration of clinical presentation, surgical technique, and outcomes. This retrospective study includes 12 patients with RTLN treated by the senior author between January 2010 and December 2014. Patients initially sought medical treatment due to headache; other symptoms were hearing loss, visual deterioration, seizure, hemiparesis, vertigo, memory loss and agnosia. A temporal approach through a linear incision was performed for all cases. RTLN was found in one side in 7 patients, and bilaterally in 5. 4 patients underwent resection of necrotic tissue bilaterally and 8 patients on one side. No death occurred in this series of cases. There were no post-operative complications, except 1 patient who developed aseptic meningitis. All 12 patients were free from headache. No seizure occurred in patients with preoperative epilepsy. Other symptoms such as hemiparesis and vertigo improved in all patients. Memory loss, agnosia and hearing loss did not change post-operatively in all cases. The follow-up MR images demonstrated no recurrence of necrotic lesions in all 12 patients. Neurosurgical intervention through a temporal approach with linear incision is warranted in patients with radiation induced temporal lobe necrosis with significant symptoms and signs of increased intracranial pressure, minimum space occupying effect on imaging, or neurological deterioration despite conservative management. Copyright © 2016 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  5. Amelioration of radiation-induced hematopoietic and gastrointestinal damage by Ex-RAD® in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sanchita P.; Kulkarni, Shilpa; Perkins, Michael W.; Hieber, Kevin; Pessu, Roli L.; Gambles, Kristen; Maniar, Manoj; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Seed, Thomas M.; Kumar, K. Sree

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess recovery from hematopoietic and gastrointestinal damage by Ex-RAD®, also known as ON01210.Na (4-carboxystyryl-4-chlorobenzylsulfone, sodium salt), after total body radiation. In our previous study, we reported that Ex-RAD, a small-molecule radioprotectant, enhances survival of mice exposed to gamma radiation, and prevents radiation-induced apoptosis as measured by the inhibition of radiation-induced protein 53 (p53) expression in cultured cells. We have expanded this study to determine best effective dose, dose-reduction factor (DRF), hematological and gastrointestinal protection, and in vivo inhibition of p53 signaling. A total of 500 mg/kg of Ex-RAD administered at 24 h and 15 min before radiation resulted in a DRF of 1.16. Ex-RAD ameliorated radiation-induced hematopoietic damage as monitored by the accelerated recovery of peripheral blood cells, and protection of granulocyte macrophage colony-forming units (GM-CFU) in bone marrow. Western blot analysis on spleen indicated that Ex-RAD treatment inhibited p53 phosphorylation. Ex-RAD treatment reduces terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay (TUNEL)-positive cells in jejunum compared with vehicle-treated mice after radiation injury. Finally, Ex-RAD preserved intestinal crypt cells compared with the vehicle control at 13 and 14 Gy. The results demonstrated that Ex-RAD ameliorates radiation-induced peripheral blood cell depletion, promotes bone marrow recovery, reduces p53 signaling in spleen and protects intestine from radiation injury. PMID:22843617

  6. Protection from radiation-induced apoptosis by the radioprotector amifostine (WR-2721) is radiation dose dependent.

    PubMed

    Ormsby, Rebecca J; Lawrence, Mark D; Blyth, Benjamin J; Bexis, Katrina; Bezak, Eva; Murley, Jeffrey S; Grdina, David J; Sykes, Pamela J

    2014-02-01

    The radioprotective agent amifostine is a free radical scavenger that can protect cells from the damaging effects of ionising radiation when administered prior to radiation exposure. However, amifostine has also been shown to protect cells from chromosomal mutations when administered after radiation exposure. As apoptosis is a common mechanism by which cells with mutations are removed from the cell population, we investigated whether amifostine stimulates apoptosis when administered after radiation exposure. We chose to study a relatively low dose which is the maximum radiation dose for radiation emergency workers (0.25 Gy) and a high dose relevant to radiotherapy exposures (6 Gy). Mice were administered 400 mg/kg amifostine 30 min before, or 3 h after, whole-body irradiation with 0.25 or 6 Gy X-rays and apoptosis was analysed 3 or 7 h later in spleen and bone marrow. We observed a significant increase in radiation-induced apoptosis in the spleen of mice when amifostine was administered before or after 0.25 Gy X-rays. In contrast, when a high dose of radiation was used (6 Gy), amifostine caused a reduction in radiation-induced apoptosis 3 h post-irradiation in spleen and bone marrow similar to previously published studies. This is the first study to investigate the effect of amifostine on radiation-induced apoptosis at a relatively low radiation dose and the first to demonstrate that while amifostine can reduce apoptosis from high doses of radiation, it does not mediate the same effect in response to low-dose exposures. These results suggest that there may be a dose threshold at which amifostine protects from radiation-induced apoptosis and highlight the importance of examining a range of radiation doses and timepoints.

  7. An Overview of Radiation-Induced Interface Traps in MOS (Metal-Oxide Semiconductor) Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    to be Controlled by hole transport to the Si/S1 02 interface and by neutral hydrogen diffusion, respectively. ’We also discuss several models which...trivalent Si which is undergo a dispersive hopping transport which not mobile and a mobile nonbridging oxygen. controls the rate of interface state... control the buildup of ping event itself seems to be a phonon-assisted radiation-induced interface states are subjects tunneling transition between

  8. Vitamin D Deficiency Is Associated With the Severity of Radiation-Induced Proctitis in Cancer Patients

    SciT

    Ghorbanzadeh-Moghaddam, Amir; Gholamrezaei, Ali, E-mail: Gholamrezaei@med.mui.ac.ir; Poursina Hakim Research Institution, Isfahan

    Purpose: Radiation-induced injury to normal tissues is a common complication of radiation therapy in cancer patients. Considering the role of vitamin D in mucosal barrier hemostasis and inflammatory responses, we investigated whether vitamin D deficiency is associated with the severity of radiation-induced acute proctitis in cancer patients. Methods and Materials: This prospective observational study was conducted in cancer patients referred for pelvic radiation therapy. Serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D was measured before radiation therapy. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations of <35 nmol/L and <40 nmol/L in male and female patients, respectively, based on available normative data.more » Acute proctitis was assessed after 5 weeks of radiation therapy (total received radiation dose of 50 Gy) and graded from 0 to 4 using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. Results: Ninety-eight patients (57.1% male) with a mean age of 62.8 ± 9.1 years were studied. Vitamin D deficiency was found in 57 patients (58.1%). Symptoms of acute proctitis occurred in 72 patients (73.4%) after radiation therapy. RTOG grade was significantly higher in patients with vitamin D deficiency than in normal cases (median [interquartile range] of 2 [0.5-3] vs 1 [0-2], P=.037). Vitamin D deficiency was associated with RTOG grade of ≥2, independent of possible confounding factors; odds ratio (95% confidence interval) = 3.07 (1.27-7.50), P=.013. Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased severity of radiation-induced acute proctitis. Investigating the underlying mechanisms of this association and evaluating the effectiveness of vitamin D therapy in preventing radiation-induced acute proctitis is warranted.« less

  9. Radiation-induced transmethylation and transsulfuration in the system DNA-methionine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhnlein, W.; Merwitz, O.; Ohneseit, P.

    Evidence is presented for the radiation-induced transmethylation and transsulfuration in a DNA-methionine model system. The extent of such alkylation of DNA is found to be comparable with that of alkylating agents. Therefore, both processes could be initial steps in radiation carcinogenesis. The protective effect of methionine on DNA strand breaks, due to scavenging of OH radicals, causes the formation of methyl and thiyl radicals.

  10. Energy Distribution of Electrons in Radiation Induced-Helium Plasmas. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Energy distribution of high energy electrons as they slow down and thermalize in a gaseous medium is studied. The energy distribution in the entire energy range from source energies down is studied analytically. A helium medium in which primary electrons are created by the passage of heavy-charged particles from nuclear reactions is emphasized. A radiation-induced plasma is of interest in a variety of applications, such as radiation pumped lasers and gaseous core nuclear reactors.

  11. Selenoprotein P Inhibits Radiation-Induced Late Reactive Oxygen Species Accumulation and Normal Cell Injury

    SciT

    Eckers, Jaimee C.; Kalen, Amanda L.; Xiao, Wusheng

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation is a common mode of cancer therapy whose outcome is often limited because of normal tissue toxicity. We have shown previously that the accumulation of radiation-induced late reactive oxygen species (ROS) precedes cell death, suggesting that metabolic oxidative stress could regulate cellular radiation response. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether selenoprotein P (SEPP1), a major supplier of selenium to tissues and an antioxidant, regulates late ROS accumulation and toxicity in irradiated normal human fibroblasts (NHFs). Methods and Materials: Flow cytometry analysis of cell viability, cell cycle phase distribution, and dihydroethidium oxidation, along with clonogenic assays,more » were used to measure oxidative stress and toxicity. Human antioxidant mechanisms array and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays were used to measure gene expression during late ROS accumulation in irradiated NHFs. Sodium selenite addition and SEPP1 overexpression were used to determine the causality of SEPP1 regulating late ROS accumulation and toxicity in irradiated NHFs. Results: Irradiated NHFs showed late ROS accumulation (4.5-fold increase from control; P<.05) that occurs after activation of the cell cycle checkpoint pathways and precedes cell death. The mRNA levels of CuZn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxiredoxin 3, and thioredoxin reductase 1 increased approximately 2- to 3-fold, whereas mRNA levels of cold shock domain containing E1 and SEPP1 increased more than 6-fold (P<.05). The addition of sodium selenite before the radiation treatment suppressed toxicity (45%; P<.05). SEPP1 overexpression suppressed radiation-induced late ROS accumulation (35%; P<.05) and protected NHFs from radiation-induced toxicity (58%; P<.05). Conclusion: SEPP1 mitigates radiation-induced late ROS accumulation and normal cell injury.« less

  12. Radiation induced leakage due to stochastic charge trapping in isolation layers of nanoscale MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zebrev, G. I.; Gorbunov, M. S.; Pershenkov, V. S.

    2008-03-01

    The sensitivity of sub-100 nm devices to microdose effects, which can be considered as intermediate case between cumulative total dose and single event errors, is investigated. A detailed study of radiation-induced leakage due to stochastic charge trapping in irradiated planar and nonplanar devices is developed. The influence of High-K insulators on nanoscale ICs reliability is discussed. Low critical values of trapped charge demonstrate a high sensitivity to single event effect.

  13. Interstitial telomeric repeats are not preferentially involved in radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human cells.

    PubMed

    Desmaze, C; Pirzio, L M; Blaise, R; Mondello, C; Giulotto, E; Murnane, J P; Sabatier, L

    2004-01-01

    Telomeric repeat sequences, located at the end of eukaryotic chromosomes, have been detected at intrachromosomal locations in many species. Large blocks of telomeric sequences are located near the centromeres in hamster cells, and have been reported to break spontaneously or after exposure to ionizing radiation, leading to chromosome aberrations. In human cells, interstitial telomeric sequences (ITS) can be composed of short tracts of telomeric repeats (less than twenty), or of longer stretches of exact and degenerated hexanucleotides, mainly localized at subtelomeres. In this paper, we analyzed the radiation sensitivity of a naturally occurring short ITS localized in 2q31 and we found that this region is not a hot spot of radiation-induced chromosome breaks. We then selected a human cell line in which approximately 800 bp of telomeric DNA had been introduced by transfection into an internal euchromatic chromosomal region in chromosome 4q. In parallel, a cell line containing the plasmid without telomeric sequences was also analyzed. Both regions containing the transfected plasmids showed a higher frequency of radiation-induced breaks than expected, indicating that the instability of the regions containing the transfected sequences is not due to the presence of telomeric sequences. Taken together, our data show that ITS themselves do not enhance the formation of radiation-induced chromosome rearrangements in these human cell lines. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  14. Salivary gland transfer to prevent radiation-induced xerostomia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sood, Amit J; Fox, Nyssa F; O'Connell, Brendan P; Lovelace, Tiffany L; Nguyen, Shaun A; Sharma, Anand K; Hornig, Joshua D; Day, Terry A

    2014-02-01

    Salivary gland transfer (SGT) has the potential to prevent radiation-induced xerostomia. We attempt to analyze the efficacy of SGT in prevention of xerostomia and maintenance of salivary flow rates after radiation treatment (XRT). Systematic review and meta-analysis. Primary endpoint was efficacy of SGT in prevention of radiation-induced xerostomia. Secondary endpoint was change from baseline of unstimulated and stimulated salivary flow rates after XRT. Seven articles, accruing data from 12 institutions, met inclusion criteria. In a total of 177 patients at mean follow-up of 22.7months, SGT prevented radiation-induced xerostomia in 82.7% (95% CI, 76.6-87.7%) of patients. Twelve months after XRT, unstimulated and stimulated salivary flow rates rose to 88% and 76% of baseline values, respectively. In comparison to control subjects twelve months after XRT, SGT subjects' unstimulated (75% vs. 11%) and stimulated (86% vs. 8%) salivary flow rates were drastically higher in SGT patients. Salivary gland transfer appears to be highly effective in preventing the incidence of xerostomia in patients receiving definitive head and neck radiation therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the treatment of radiation-induced xerostomia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fox, Nyssa F; Xiao, Christopher; Sood, Amit J; Lovelace, Tiffany L; Nguyen, Shaun A; Sharma, Anand; Day, Terry A

    2015-07-01

    Radiation-induced xerostomia is one of the most common morbidities of radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancer. However, in spite of its high rate of occurrence, there are few effective therapies available for its management. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen on the treatment of radiation-induced xerostomia and xerostomia-related quality of life. PubMed, Google Scholar, and the Cochrane Library were searched for retrospective or prospective trials assessing subjective xerostomia, objective xerostomia, or xerostomia-related quality of life. To be included, patients had to have received radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, but not hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT). The systematic review initially identified 293 potential articles. Seven studies, comprising 246 patients, qualified for inclusion. Of the included studies, 6 of 7 were prospective in nature, and 1 was a retrospective study; and 2 of the 7 were controlled studies. HBOT may have utility for treating radiation-induced xerostomia refractory to other therapies. Additionally, HBOT may induce long-term improvement in subjective assessments of xerostomia, whereas other therapies currently available only provide short-term relief. The strength of these conclusions is limited by the lack of randomized controlled clinical trials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. L-N-Acetylcysteine protects against radiation-induced apoptosis in a cochlear cell line.

    PubMed

    Low, Wong-Kein; Sun, Li; Tan, Michelle G K; Chua, Alvin W C; Wang, De-Yun

    2008-04-01

    L-N-Acetylcysteine (L-NAC) significantly reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and cochlear cell apoptosis after irradiation. The safe and effective use of L-NAC in reducing radiation-induced sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) should be verified by further in vivo studies. Radiation-induced SNHL is a common complication after radiotherapy of head and neck tumours. There is growing evidence to suggest that ROS play an important role in apoptotic cochlear cell death from ototoxicity, resulting in SNHL. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of L-NAC, an antioxidant, on radiation-induced apoptosis in cochlear cells. The OC-k3 cochlear cell line was studied after 0 and 20 Gy of gamma-irradiation. Cell viability assay was performed using 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide. Flow cytometry and TUNEL assay were done with and without the addition of 10 mmol/L of L-NAC. Intracellular generation of ROS was detected by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate, with comparisons made using fluorescence intensity. L-NAC increased the viability of cells after irradiation. Generation of ROS was demonstrated at 1 h post-irradiation and was significantly reduced by L-NAC (p<0.0001). Flow cytometry and TUNEL assay showed cell apoptosis at 72 h post-irradiation, which was diminished by the addition of L-NAC.

  17. Radiation-induced meningiomas: Experience at the Mount Sinai Hospital and review of the literature

    SciT

    Harrison, M.J.; Wolfe, D.E.; Lau, T.S.

    1991-10-01

    From the records of The Mount Sinai Hospital, seven cases which met established criteria for radiation-induced meningiomas were identified. This represents the largest series of radiogenic meningiomas documented in North America and includes both intracranial and intraspinal tumors. The records and pathological specimens were reviewed and these data analyzed with other cases retrieved from the world literature. This study reveals that radiation-induced meningiomas can be categorized into three groups based on the amount of radiation administered: (1) low dose; (2) moderate dose and miscellaneous; and (3) high dose. The overwhelming majority of cases had received low-dose irradiation (800 rad) tomore » the scalp for tinea capitis and the second largest group resulted from high-dose irradiation for primary brain tumors (greater than 2000 rad). The unique features distinguishing radiation-induced meningiomas from other meningiomas are reviewed. Although histologically atypical tumors were common in this series, overt malignancy was not encountered. The preoperative management of these lesions should include angiography to evaluate for large-vessel occlusive vasculopathy, a known association of meningiomas induced by high-dose irradiation. Given the propensity these tumors possess for recurrence, a wide bony and dural margin is recommended at surgical resection. 102 references.« less

  18. Neuroprotective effects of Quercetin on radiation-induced brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Kale, Aydemir; Piskin, Özcan; Bas, Yilmaz; Aydin, Bengü Gülhan; Can, Murat; Elmas, Özlem; Büyükuysal, Çagatay

    2018-04-24

    Extensive research has been focused on radiation-induced brain injury. Animal and human studies have shown that flavonoids have remarkable toxicological profiles. This study aims to investigate the neuroprotective effects of quercetin in an experimental radiation-induced brain injury. A total of 32 adult male Wistar-Albino rats were randomly divided into four groups (control, quercetin, radiation, and radiation+quercetin groups, with eight rats in each group). Doses (50 mg/kg) of quercetin were administered to the animals in the quercetin and radiation+quercetin groups; radiation and radiation+quercetin groups were exposed to a dose of 20 Gy to the cranium region. Tissue samples, and biochemical levels of tissue injury markers in the four groups were compared. In all measured parameters of oxidative stress, administration of quercetin significantly demonstrated favorable effects. Both plasma and tissue levels of malondialdehyde and total antioxidant status significantly changed in favor of antioxidant activity. Histopathological evaluation of the tissues also demonstrated a significant decrease in cellular degeneration and infiltration parameters after quercetin administration. Quercetin demonstrated significant neuroprotection after radiation-induced brain injury. Further studies of neurological outcomes under different experimental settings are required in order to achieve conclusive results.

  19. UV-B Radiation Induces Root Bending Through the Flavonoid-Mediated Auxin Pathway in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Jinpeng; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Ruling; Sun, Liangliang; Wang, Wenying; Zhou, Huakun; Xu, Jin

    2018-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-B radiation-induced root bending has been reported; however, the underlying mechanisms largely remain unclear. Here, we investigate whether and how auxin and flavonoids are involved in UV-B radiation-induced root bending in Arabidopsis using physiological, pharmacological, and genetic approaches. UV-B radiation modulated the direction of root growth by decreasing IAA biosynthesis and affecting auxin distribution in the root tips, where reduced auxin accumulation and asymmetric auxin distribution were observed. UV-B radiation increased the distribution of auxin on the nonradiated side of the root tips, promoting growth and causing root bending. Further analysis indicated that UV-B induced an asymmetric accumulation of flavonoids; this pathway is involved in modulating the accumulation and asymmetric distribution of auxin in root tips and the subsequent redirection of root growth by altering the distribution of auxin carriers in response to UV-B radiation. Taken together, our results indicate that UV-B radiation-induced root bending occurred through a flavonoid-mediated phototropic response to UV-B radiation. PMID:29868074

  20. UV-B Radiation Induces Root Bending Through the Flavonoid-Mediated Auxin Pathway in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jinpeng; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Ruling; Sun, Liangliang; Wang, Wenying; Zhou, Huakun; Xu, Jin

    2018-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-B radiation-induced root bending has been reported; however, the underlying mechanisms largely remain unclear. Here, we investigate whether and how auxin and flavonoids are involved in UV-B radiation-induced root bending in Arabidopsis using physiological, pharmacological, and genetic approaches. UV-B radiation modulated the direction of root growth by decreasing IAA biosynthesis and affecting auxin distribution in the root tips, where reduced auxin accumulation and asymmetric auxin distribution were observed. UV-B radiation increased the distribution of auxin on the nonradiated side of the root tips, promoting growth and causing root bending. Further analysis indicated that UV-B induced an asymmetric accumulation of flavonoids; this pathway is involved in modulating the accumulation and asymmetric distribution of auxin in root tips and the subsequent redirection of root growth by altering the distribution of auxin carriers in response to UV-B radiation. Taken together, our results indicate that UV-B radiation-induced root bending occurred through a flavonoid-mediated phototropic response to UV-B radiation.

  1. Systematic review of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the treatment of radiation-induced skin necrosis.

    PubMed

    Borab, Zachary; Mirmanesh, Michael D; Gantz, Madeleine; Cusano, Alessandro; Pu, Lee L Q

    2017-04-01

    Every year, 1.2 million cancer patients receive radiation therapy in the United States. Late radiation tissue injury occurs in an estimated 5-15% of these patients. Tissue injury can include skin necrosis, which can lead to chronic nonhealing wounds. Despite many treatments available to help heal skin necrosis such as hyperbaric oxygen therapy, no clinical guidelines exist and evidence is lacking. The purpose of this review is to identify and comprehensively summarize studies published to date to evaluate the effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the treatment of radiation-induced skin necrosis. Adhering to PRISMA guidelines, a systematic review of currently published articles was performed, evaluating the use of hyperbaric oxygen to treat skin necrosis. Eight articles were identified, including one observational cohort, five case series, and two case reports. The articles describe changes in symptoms and alteration in wound healing of radiation-induced skin necrosis after treatment with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a safe intervention with promising outcomes; however, additional evidence is needed to endorse its application as a relevant therapy in the treatment of radiation-induced skin necrosis. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B.; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk.

  3. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk. Copyright © 2016 The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. NLRP3 inflammasome activation mediates radiation-induced pyroptosis in bone marrow-derived macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan-gang; Chen, Ji-kuai; Zhang, Zi-teng; Ma, Xiu-juan; Chen, Yong-chun; Du, Xiu-ming; Liu, Hong; Zong, Ying; Lu, Guo-cai

    2017-01-01

    A limit to the clinical benefit of radiotherapy is not an incapacity to eliminate tumor cells but rather a limit on its capacity to do so without destroying normal tissue and inducing inflammation. Recent evidence reveals that the inflammasome is essential for mediating radiation-induced cell and tissue damage. In this study, using primary cultured bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) and a mouse radiation model, we explored the role of NLRP3 inflammasome activation and the secondary pyroptosis underlying radiation-induced immune cell death. We observed an increasing proportion of pyroptosis and elevating Caspase-1 activation in 10 and 20 Gy radiation groups. Nlrp3 knock out significantly diminished the quantity of cleaved-Caspase-1 (p10) and IL-1β as well as the proportion of pyroptosis. Additionally, in vivo research shows that 9.5 Gy of radiation promotes Caspase-1 activation in marginal zone cells and induces death in mice, both of which can be significantly inhibited by knocking out Nlrp3. Thus, based on these findings, we conclude that the NLRP3 inflammasome activation mediates radiation-induced pyroptosis in BMDMs. Targeting NLRP3 inflammasome and pyroptosis may serve as effective strategies to diminish injury caused by radiation. PMID:28151471

  5. Intraperitoneal administration of chitosan/DsiRNA nanoparticles targeting TNFα prevents radiation-induced fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nawroth, Isabel; Alsner, Jan; Behlke, Mark A; Besenbacher, Flemming; Overgaard, Jens; Howard, Kenneth A; Kjems, Jørgen

    2010-10-01

    One of the most common and dose-limiting long-term adverse effects of radiation therapy is radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF), which is characterized by restricted tissue flexibility, reduced compliance or strictures, pain and in severe cases, ulceration and necrosis. Several strategies have been proposed to ameliorate RIF but presently no effective one is available. Recent studies have reported that tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) plays a role in fibrogenesis. Male CDF1 mice were radiated with a single dose of 45 Gy. Chitosan/DsiRNA nanoparticles targeting TNFα were intraperitoneal injected and late radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) was assessed using a modification of the leg contracture model. Additionally, the effect of these nanoparticles on tumor growth and tumor control probability in the absence of radiation was examined in a C3H mammary carcinoma model. We show in this work, that targeting TNFα in macrophages by intraperitoneal administration of chitosan/DsiRNA nanoparticles completely prevented radiation-induced fibrosis in CDF1 mice without revealing any cytotoxic side-effects after a long-term administration. Furthermore, such TNFα targeting was selective without any significant influence on tumor growth or irradiation-related tumor control probability. This nanoparticle-based RNAi approach represents a novel approach to prevent RIF with potential application to improve clinical radiation therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mechanisms of radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity and implications for future clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Jenrow, Kenneth A.; Brown, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    To summarize current knowledge regarding mechanisms of radiation-induced normal tissue injury and medical countermeasures available to reduce its severity. Advances in radiation delivery using megavoltage and intensity-modulated radiation therapy have permitted delivery of higher doses of radiation to well-defined tumor target tissues. Injury to critical normal tissues and organs, however, poses substantial risks in the curative treatment of cancers, especially when radiation is administered in combination with chemotherapy. The principal pathogenesis is initiated by depletion of tissue stem cells and progenitor cells and damage to vascular endothelial microvessels. Emerging concepts of radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity suggest that the recovery and repopulation of stromal stem cells remain chronically impaired by long-lived free radicals, reactive oxygen species, and pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines resulting in progressive damage after radiation exposure. Better understanding the mechanisms mediating interactions among excessive generation of reactive oxygen species, production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and activated macrophages, and role of bone marrow-derived progenitor and stem cells may provide novel insight on the pathogenesis of radiation-induced injury of tissues. Further understanding the molecular signaling pathways of cytokines and chemokines would reveal novel targets for protecting or mitigating radiation injury of tissues and organs. PMID:25324981

  7. The Efficacy of Nardostachys Jatamansi Against The Radiation Induced Haematological Damage In Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, Damodara K M; Shetty, Lathika; A P, Krishna; Kumari, Suchetha N; Sanjeev, Ganesh; P, Naveen

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Radiation is increasingly being used for medical purposes and it is an established weapon in the diagnosis and the therapy of cancer. An exposure to 1-2 Gys causes the NVD (Nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea) syndrome, whereas an exposure to 2-6 Gys causes the haematopoietic syndrome. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of the Nardostachys jatamansi root extract (NJE) on the radiation induced haematological damage in rats. Materials and Methods: EBR was performed at the Microtron Centre, Mangalore University, India. Rats were treated with NJE once daily for 15 days before and after the irradiation. After the irradiation, blood was collected for determining the peripheral blood counts (RBC and WBC), haemoglobin, the platelet count and the packed cell volume (PCV) at 6 hours, 12 hours, 24 hours, 48 hours and 5, 10 and 15 days post irradiation. The data was analyzed by one way ANOVA, followed by the Tukey’s test for multiple comparisons. Result: NJE provided protection against the radiation induced haematological disorders. The rats treated with NJE exhibited a time dependent significant elevation in all the haematological parameters which were studied and its modulation upto the near normal level was recorded. Conclusion: From this study, we concluded that, NJE provides protection by modulating the radiation induced damage on the haematopoietic system. PMID:23905085

  8. Role of the area postrema in radiation-induced taste aversion learning and emesis in cats

    SciT

    Rabin, B.M.; Hunt, W.A.; Chedester, A.L.

    1986-01-01

    The role of the area postrema in radiation-induced emesis and taste aversion learning and the relationship between these behaviors were studied in cats. The potential involvement of neural factors which might be independent of the area postrema was minimized by using low levels of ionizing radiation (100 rads at a dose rate of 40 rads/min) to elicit a taste aversion, and by using body-only exposures (4500 and 6000 rads at 450 rads/min) to produce emesis. Lesions of the area postrema disrupted both taste aversion learning and emesis following irradiation. These results, which indicate that the area postrema is involved inmore » the mediation of both radiation-induced emesis and taste aversion learning in cats under these experimental conditions, are interpreted as being consistent with the hypotheses that similar mechanisms mediate both responses to exposure to ionizing radiation, and that the taste aversion learning paradigm can therefore serve as a model system for studying radiation-induced emesis.« less

  9. Arginine glutamate improves healing of radiation-induced skin ulcers in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Khalin, Igor; Kocherga, Ganna

    2013-12-01

    The increase in the incidence of the radiation-induced skin injury cases and the absence of standard treatments escalate the interest in finding new and effective drugs for these lesions. We studied the effect of a 40% solution of arginine glutamate on the healing of radiation-induced skin ulcers in guinea pigs. Radiation skin injury was produced on the thigh of guinea pigs by 60 Gy local X-ray irradiation. Treatment was started 6 weeks after the irradiation when ulcers had been formed. Arginine glutamate was administered by subcutaneous injections around the wound edge. Methyluracil was chosen as the comparison drug. The animals were sacrificed on day 21 after the start of treatment and the irradiated skin tissues were subjected to histological evaluation, cytokines analysis, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes analysis. We have shown that arginine glutamate significantly (p < 0.05) decreased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the wound, restored the balance between lipid peroxidation formation and antioxidant enzymes activity and promoted cell proliferation as well as collagen synthesis. These results demonstrate that arginine glutamate successfully improves the healing of radiation-induced skin ulcers. In all probability, the curative effect is associated with the interaction of arginine with nitric oxide synthase II and arginase I, but further investigations are needed to validate this.

  10. Dynamics of wound healing signaling as a potential therapeutic target for radiation-induced tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yih-Lin; Pui, Newman N M

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized the histone deacetylase inhibitor phenylbutyrate (PB) has beneficial effects on radiation-induced injury by modulating the expression of DNA repair and wound healing genes. Hamsters received a radiosurgical dose of radiation (40 Gy) to the cheek and were treated with varying PB dosing regimens. Gross alteration of the irradiated cheeks, eating function, histological changes, and gene expression during the course of wound healing were compared between treatment groups. Pathological analysis showed decreased radiation-induced mucositis, facilitated epithelial cell growth, and preventing ulcerative wound formation, after short-term PB treatment, but not after vehicle or sustained PB. The radiation-induced wound healing gene expression profile exhibited a sequential transition from the inflammatory and DNA repair phases to the tissue remodeling phase in the vehicle group. Sustained PB treatment resulted in a prolonged wound healing gene expression profile and delayed the wound healing process. Short-term PB shortened the duration of inflammatory cytokine expression, triggered repeated pulsed expression of cell cycle and DNA repair-regulating genes, and promoted earlier oscillatory expression of tissue remodeling genes. Distinct gene expression patterns between sustained and short-term treatment suggest dynamic profiling of wound healing gene expression can be an important part of a biological therapeutic strategy to mitigate radiation-related tissue injury. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  11. Inhaled Nitric Oxide for Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes, Oligohydramnios, and Pulmonary Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Chock, Valerie Y.; Van Meurs, Krisa P.; Hintz, Susan R.; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Lemons, James A.; Kendrick, Douglas E.; Stevenson, David K.

    2008-01-01

    We sought to determine if inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) administered to preterm infants with premature rupture of membranes (PPROM), oligohydramnios, and pulmonary hypoplasia improved oxygenation, survival, or other clinical outcomes. Data were analyzed from infants with suspected pulmonary hypoplasia, oligohydramnios, and PPROM enrolled in the National Institute of Child Health and Development Neonatal Research Network Preemie Inhaled Nitric Oxide (PiNO) trial, where patients were randomized to receive placebo (oxygen) or iNO at 5 to 10 ppm. Outcome variables assessed were PaO2 response, mortality, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), and severe intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) or periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). Twelve of 449 infants in the PiNO trial met criteria. Six infants received iNO and six received placebo. The iNO group had a mean increase in PaO2 of 39±50 mm Hg versus a mean decrease of 11±15 mm Hg in the control group. Mortality was 33% versus 67%, BPD (2/5) 40% versus (2/2) 100%, and severe IVH or PVL (1/5) 20% versus (1/2) 50% in the iNO and control groups, respectively. None of these changes were statistically significant. Review of a limited number of cases from a large multicenter trial suggests that iNO use in the setting of PPROM, oligohydramnios, and suspected pulmonary hypoplasia improves oxygenation and may decrease the rate of BPD and death without increasing severe IVH or PVL. However, the small sample size precludes definitive conclusions. Further studies are required to determine if iNO is of benefit in this specific patient population. PMID:19067285

  12. Maxillary hypoplasia in the cleft patient: contribution of orthodontic dental space closure to orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Justine C; Slack, Ginger C; Walker, Ryann; Graves, Lindsay; Yen, Sandra; Woo, Jessica; Ambaram, Rishal; Martz, Martin G; Kawamoto, Henry K; Bradley, James P

    2014-02-01

    Cleft lip and palate surgery in the developing child is known to be associated with maxillary hypoplasia. However, the effects of nonsurgical manipulations on maxillary growth have not been well investigated. The authors present the contribution of orthodontic dental space closure with canine substitution to maxillary hypoplasia and the need for orthognathic surgery. Cleft lip/palate and cleft palate patients older than 15 years of age were reviewed for dental anomalies, orthodontic canine substitution, and Le Fort I advancement. Skeletal relationships of the maxilla to the skull base (SNA), mandible (ANB), and facial height were determined on lateral cephalograms. Logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate odds ratios. Ninety-five patients were reviewed (mean age, 18.1 years). In 65 patients with congenitally missing teeth, 55 percent with patent dental spaces required Le Fort I advancement. In contrast, 89 percent who underwent canine substitution required Le Fort I advancement (p = 0.004). Canine substitution is associated with a statistically significant increase in maxillary retrognathia when compared with dental space preservation on lateral cephalograms (mean SNA, 75.2 and 79.0, respectively; p = 0.006). Adjusting for missing dentition, logistic regression analyses demonstrated that canine substitution is an independent predictor for orthognathic surgery (OR, 6.47) and maxillary retrusion defined by SNA < 78 (OR, 8.100). The coordination of orthodontia and surgery is essential to cleft care. The authors report a strong association between orthodontic cleft closure using canine substitution with maxillary hypoplasia and subsequent Le Fort I advancement, and suggest systematic criteria for management of cleft-related dental agenesis. Therapeutic, III.

  13. The use of internal maxillary distraction for maxillary hypoplasia: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Van Sickels, Joseph E; Madsen, Mathew J; Cunningham, Larry L; Bird, Douglas

    2006-12-01

    Distraction osteogenesis is a useful alternative to advance the maxilla in complicated cases of maxillary hypoplasia. The purpose of this article is to review the workup, experience, and preliminary results with the use of internal distraction osteogenesis for maxillary hypoplasia at one teaching institution. Over a 5-year period, more than 300 patients with craniofacial and dentofacial defects have undergone oral and maxillofacial surgery at our center to correct their skeletal discrepancies. Of these, 10 have had maxillary distraction osteogenesis done with internal distractors. Follow-up of 6 months or more was available for 8 patients. Stereolithographic models were used to bend distractors prior to surgery in 6 patients. Latency prior to the start of distraction was 3 to 7 days and varied with the age of the patient. Distraction occurred at approximately 1 mm per day with an average distraction length of 8.5 mm (range, 6-10 mm). Excellent occlusal results were obtained in 5 patients. Major complications including nonunion and failure to achieve acceptable occlusal results were observed in 3 patients. Minor complications including pain and loosening of the distracter devices were observed in 2 patients, but did not appear to affect the esthetic and functional results. Distraction osteogenesis is a useful alternative to traditional orthognathic surgery to treat maxillary hypoplasia. Internal distractions are attractive to patients, but are more difficult to place and can cause discomfort to patients when trying to achieve an ideal primary vector of distraction. Stereolithographic models can help with placement of the device. Changes in design of distractors may help with patient discomfort.

  14. Posterior communicating artery hypoplasia as a risk factor for acute ischemic stroke in the absence of carotid artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yu-Ming; Liu, Chih-Yang; Pan, Po-Jung; Lin, Ching-Po

    2008-12-01

    Posterior communicating artery (PCoA) hypoplasia is a fetal variant of the Circle of Willis. According to angiograms and autopsy reports, this congenital variation is found in 6-21% of the general population. PCoA hypoplasia only becomes a risk factor for ischemic stroke in the presence of ipsilateral internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion. The aim of our study was to determine the role of PCoA hypoplasia in acute ischemic stroke in the absence of ICA occlusion. We examined 310 acute ischemic stroke patients (mean age+/-standard deviation; 68.9+/-15.6 years). Cerebral magnetic resonance angiography was performed within 72 hours of ischemic stroke onset. For comparison, a risk factor-matched control group was recruited. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to estimate the independent effect of potential risk factors. The overall incidence of PCoA hypoplasia in our experimental group was 19.35% (n=60), which was significantly higher than in the control group (8.20%, n=22, p=0.036, OR, 3.21; 95% CI, 1.43-9.62). The most common ischemic event was ipsilateral thalamic lacunar infarctions with or without occipital lobe involvement. Based on our results, PCoA hypoplasia appears to be a contributor to the risk of ischemic stroke, even in the absence of ICA occlusion. This risk is especially pronounced for strokes involving arteries that penetrate the thalamus.

  15. Clinical and molecular diagnosis of a cartilage-hair hypoplasia with IGF-1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Castilla-Cortázar, Inma; Rodríguez De Ita, Julieta; Martín-Estal, Irene; Castorena, Fabiola; Aguirre, Gabriel A; García de la Garza, Rocío; Elizondo, Martha I

    2017-02-01

    Cartilage-hair hypoplasia syndrome (CHH) is a rare autosomal recessive condition characterized by metaphyseal chondrodysplasia and characteristic hair, together with a myriad of other symptoms, being most common immunodeficiency and gastrointestinal complications. A 15-year-old Mexican male initially diagnosed with Hirschsprung disease and posterior immunodeficiency, presents to our department for genetic and complementary evaluation for suspected CHH. Physical, biochemical, and genetic studies confirmed CHH together with IGF-1 deficiency. For this reason, we propose IGF-1 replacement therapy for its well-known actions on hematopoiesis, immune function and maturation, and metabolism. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Multiple cerebral arteriovenous malformations associated to rostral hypoplasia of the superior sagittal sinus: case report.

    PubMed

    TORNè, Ramon; Molina Jaque, Felipe A; Rodriguez-Hernandez, Ana; Arikan, Fuat; Lopez-Bermeo, Diego; Tomasello, Alejandro

    2016-06-07

    Multiple cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are a rare occurrence usually associated with defined genetic disorders or a family history of cerebrovascular disease. The remaining cases cannot be associated to a genetic pathogenesis and are considered idiopathic. We report an extremely unusual case nor genetic neither idiopathic, but linked to an anatomical intracranial venous variation. The patient presented two independent frontal AVMs associated with rostral hypoplasia of the superior sagittal sinus. This anatomical variation may have induced frontal venous hypertension (VHT) triggering the development of the two AVMs. Throughout this intriguing case, we discuss the role of VHT in AVM development.

  17. Management of Cleft Maxillary Hypoplasia with Anterior Maxillary Distraction: Our Experience.

    PubMed

    Chacko, Tojan; Vinod, Sankar; Mani, Varghese; George, Arun; Sivaprasad, K K

    2014-12-01

    Maxillary hypoplasia is a common developmental problem in cleft lip and palate deformities. Since 1970s these deformities have traditionally been corrected by means of orthognathic surgery. Management of skeletal deformities in the maxillofacial region has been an important challenge for maxillofacial surgeons and orthodontists. Distraction osteogenesis is a surgical technique that uses body's own repairing mechanisms for optimal reconstruction of the tissues. We present four cases of anterior maxillary distraction osteogenesis with tooth borne distraction device-Hyrax, which were analyzed retrospectively for the efficacy of the tooth borne device-Hyrax and skeletal stability of distracted anterior maxillary segment.

  18. Familial syndrome with panhypopituitarism, hypoplasia of the hypophysis, and poorly developed sella turcica.

    PubMed Central

    Sipponen, P; Similä, S; Collan, Y; Autere, T; Herva, R

    1978-01-01

    Two sisters who died at the age of 2.5 years and 5 weeks are described. Both showed signs of panhypopituitarism. At necropsy, no hypophysis could be found in the first child and a rudimentary and partly ectopic hypophysis was found in the other. Both children had a flat, poorly developed sella turcica, and the sellar anomaly could be seen in skull x-rays. These patients represent a hereditary syndrome characterised by neonatal panhypopituitarism, hypoplasia of the pituitary gland, and flat sella turcica. Images Figure PMID:708104

  19. Epigenetic Analysis of Heavy-ion Radiation Induced Bystander Effects in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Cui, Changna; Xue, Bei

    Abstract: Radiation-induced bystander effect was defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic and proteomics plays significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male Balb/c and C57BL mice were exposed head-only to 40, 200, 2000mGy dose of (12) C heavy-ion radiation, while the rest of the animal body was shielded. Directly radiation organ ear and the distant organ liver were detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. Methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) was used to monitor the level of polymorphic genomic DNA methylation changed with dose and time effects. The results show that heavy-ion irradiated mouse head could induce genomic DNA methylation changes significantly in both the directly radiation organ ear and the distant organ liver. The percent of DNA methylation changes were time-dependent and tissue-specific. Demethylation polymorphism rate was highest separately at 1 h in 200 mGy and 6 h in 2000 mGy after irradiation. The global DNA methylation changes tended to occur in the CG sites. The results illustrated that genomic methylation changes of heavy ion radiation-induced bystander effect in liver could be obvious 1 h after radiation and achieved the maximum at 6 h, while the changes could recover gradually at 12 h. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in both directly radiation organ ear and distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of

  20. Crosstalk between telomere maintenance and radiation effects: A key player in the process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Grace; Ricoul, Michelle; Hempel, William M.; Azzam, Edouard I.; Sabatier, Laure

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that ionizing radiation induces chromosomal damage, both following direct radiation exposure and via non-targeted (bystander) effects, activating DNA damage repair pathways, of which the proteins are closely linked to telomeric proteins and telomere maintenance. Long-term propagation of this radiation-induced chromosomal damage during cell proliferation results in chromosomal instability. Many studies have shown the link between radiation exposure and radiation-induced changes in oxidative stress and DNA damage repair in both targeted and non-targeted cells. However, the effect of these factors on telomeres, long established as guardians of the genome, still remains to be clarified. In this review, we will focus on what is known about how telomeres are affected by exposure to low- and high-LET ionizing radiation and during proliferation, and will discuss how telomeres may be a key player in the process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:24486376

  1. Cerebellar Hypoplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center for Children with Disabilities U.S. Dept. of Education, Office of Special Education Programs 1825 Connecticut Avenue NW, Suite 700 ... Center for Children with Disabilities U.S. Dept. of Education, Office of Special Education Programs 1825 Connecticut Avenue NW, Suite 700 ...

  2. Genes on chromosomes 1 and 4 in the mouse are associated with repair of radiation-induced chromatin damage

    SciT

    Potter, M.; Sanford, K.K.; Parshad, R.

    Early-passage skin fibroblasts from different inbred and congenic strains of mice were X-irradiated (1 Gy), and the number of chromatid breaks was determined at 2.0 h after irradiation. The cells from DBA/2N, C3H/HeN, STS/A, C57BL/6N, BALB/cJ, and AKR/N had 25 to 42 chromatid breaks per 100 metaphase cells (efficient repair phenotype). NZB/NJ had greater than 78 and BALB/cAn had 87 to 110 chromatid breaks per 100 cells (inefficient repair phenotype). Differences between BALB/cAn and BALB/c. DBA/2 congenic strains which carry less than 1% of the DBA/2 genome indicate that two genes, one on chromosome 1 linked to bcl-2-Pep-3 and themore » other on chromosome 4 closely linked to Fv-1, affect the efficiency with which the cells repair radiation-induced chromatin damage.« less

  3. Radiation-induced temporo-mandibular joint disorder in post-radiotherapy nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients: assessment and treatment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Vincent W C; Lam, Ying-Na

    2016-06-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is endemic in southern China, and its incidence in Hong Kong is relatively high. Radiotherapy is the mainstay treatment for NPC due to its relatively high radiosensitivity and deep-seated anatomical position, which is not readily accessible by surgery. Although the technique of radiotherapy in NPC has been advancing and offers promising treatment outcome, complications around the irradiation areas are inevitable and the quality of life of the post-radiotherapy patients is often compromised. Trismus, which is defined as the restricted mouth opening or jaw movement due to the disorder of temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ), is one of the possible late complications for radiotherapy of NPC and is found in 5-17% of the post-radiotherapy (post-RT) patients. Trismus at early stage may only affect the speech, but in severe cases nutritional intake and oral hygiene condition may deteriorate seriously. This article reviewed the possible causes of radiation-induced TMJ damage, the various assessments including imaging modalities and possible treatments. The conclusion is that the availability of simple, yet effective examinations for trismus is essential for delaying the progression and restoring TMJ functions. Although there is no absolutely effective treatment for trismus, many supportive, restorative and palliative management are possible under different clinical situations.

  4. Severe hypoplasia of the omasal laminae in a Japanese Black steer with chronic bloat--a case report.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Mitsuhiro; Mukai, Shuhei; Fushimi, Yasuo; Matsushita, Kouhei; Miyoshi, Nobuaki; Yasuda, Nobuhiro; Kitajima, Hideo; Takamure, Senro; Matsushita, Toshihiko; Kitamura, Nobuo; Deguchi, Eisaburo

    2007-12-01

    An 11-month-old Japanese Black steer with chronic bloat underwent clinical and histological analyses. During the observation period, it showed normal appetite and fecal volume but persistent chronic bloat symptoms. Compared to controls, the steer's feces contained undigested large straws. Necropsy revealed normal rumen, reticulum, and abomasum but a small omasum. The rumen, reticulum, and abomasum mucosa was normal, with well-developed ruminal papillae. However, severe hypoplasia of the omasal laminae was observed along with hypoplasia reticular groove and ruminoreticular fold. The contents of the reticulum, omasum, and abomasums comprised undigested large sized hay particles. The omasum papillae showed no pathological abnormalities. This is a rare case of a steer with chronic bloat probably caused by severe hypoplasia of the omasal laminae.

  5. Protective effects of Korean red ginseng against radiation-induced apoptosis in human HaCaT keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jae Won; Park, Keun Hyung; HWANG, Hye Sook; Shin, Yoo Seob; Oh, Young-Taek; Kim, Chul-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced oral mucositis is a dose-limiting toxic side effect for patients with head and neck cancer. Numerous attempts at improving radiation-induced oral mucositis have not produced a qualified treatment. Ginseng polysaccharide has multiple immunoprotective effects. Our aim was to investigate the effectiveness of Korean red ginseng (KRG) on radiation-induced damage in the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT and in an in vivo zebrafish model. Radiation inhibited HaCaT cell proliferation and migration in a cell viability assay and wound healing assay, respectively. KRG protected against these effects. KRG attenuated the radiation-induced embryotoxicity in the zebrafish model. Irradiation of HaCaT cells caused apoptosis and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). KRG inhibited the radiation-induced apoptosis and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and stabilized the radiation-induced loss of MMP. Western blots revealed KRG-mediated reduced expression of ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein (ATM), p53, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 and cleaved caspase-3, compared with their significant increase after radiation treatment. The collective results suggest that KRG protects HaCaT cells by blocking ROS generation, inhibiting changes in MMP, and inhibiting the caspase, ATM, p38 and JNK pathways. PMID:24078877

  6. Protective effects of Korean red ginseng against radiation-induced apoptosis in human HaCaT keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jae Won; Park, Keun Hyung; Hwang, Hye Sook; Shin, Yoo Seob; Oh, Young-Taek; Kim, Chul-Ho

    2014-03-01

    Radiation-induced oral mucositis is a dose-limiting toxic side effect for patients with head and neck cancer. Numerous attempts at improving radiation-induced oral mucositis have not produced a qualified treatment. Ginseng polysaccharide has multiple immunoprotective effects. Our aim was to investigate the effectiveness of Korean red ginseng (KRG) on radiation-induced damage in the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT and in an in vivo zebrafish model. Radiation inhibited HaCaT cell proliferation and migration in a cell viability assay and wound healing assay, respectively. KRG protected against these effects. KRG attenuated the radiation-induced embryotoxicity in the zebrafish model. Irradiation of HaCaT cells caused apoptosis and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). KRG inhibited the radiation-induced apoptosis and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and stabilized the radiation-induced loss of MMP. Western blots revealed KRG-mediated reduced expression of ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein (ATM), p53, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 and cleaved caspase-3, compared with their significant increase after radiation treatment. The collective results suggest that KRG protects HaCaT cells by blocking ROS generation, inhibiting changes in MMP, and inhibiting the caspase, ATM, p38 and JNK pathways.

  7. The Infant with Aortic Arch Hypoplasia and Small Left Heart Structures: Echocardiographic Indices of Mitral and Aortic Hypoplasia Predicting Successful Biventricular Repair.

    PubMed

    Plymale, Jennifer M; Frommelt, Peter C; Nugent, Melodee; Simpson, Pippa; Tweddell, James S; Shillingford, Amanda J

    2017-08-01

    In infants with aortic arch hypoplasia and small left-sided cardiac structures, successful biventricular repair is dependent on the adequacy of the left-sided structures. Defining accurate thresholds of echocardiographic indices predictive of successful biventricular repair is paramount to achieving optimal outcomes. We sought to identify pre-operative echocardiographic indices of left heart size that predict intervention-free survival in infants with small left heart structures undergoing primary aortic arch repair to establish biventricular circulation (BVC). Infants ≤2 months undergoing aortic arch repair from 1999 to 2010 with aortic and/or mitral valve hypoplasia, (Z-score ≤-2) were included. Pre-operative and follow-up echocardiograms were reviewed. Primary outcome was successful biventricular circulation (BVC), defined as freedom from death, transplant, or single ventricular conversion at 1 year. Need for catheter based or surgical re-intervention (RI), valve annular growth, and significant late aortic or mitral valve obstruction were additional outcomes. Fifty one of 73 subjects (79%) had successful BVC and were free of RI at 1 year. Seven subjects failed BVC; four of those died. The overall 1 year survival for the cohort was 95%. Fifteen subjects underwent a RI but maintained BVC. In univariate analysis, larger transverse aorta (p = 0.006) and aortic valve (p = 0.02) predicted successful BVC without RI. In CART analysis, the combination of mitral valve (MV) to tricuspid valve (TV) ratio ≤0.66 with an aortic valve (AV) annulus Z-score ≤-3 had the greatest power to predict BVC failure (sensitivity 71%, specificity 94%). In those with successful BVC, the combination of both AV and MV Z-score ≤-2.5 increased the odds of RI (OR 3.8; CI 1.3-11.4). Follow-up of non-RI subjects revealed improvement in AV and MV Z-score (median AV annulus changed over time from -2.34 to 0.04 (p < 0.001) and MV changed from -2.88 to -1.41 (p < 0.001), but

  8. Association of diethylstilbestrol exposure in utero with cryptorchidism, testicular hypoplasia and semen abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gill, W B; Schumacher, G F; Bibbo, M; Straus, F H; Schoenberg, H W

    1979-07-01

    Epididymal cysts and/or hypoplastic testes have been found in 31.5 per cent of 308 men exposed to diethylstilbestrol in utero, compared to 7.8 per cent of 307 placebo-exposed controls. Analyses of the spermatozoa have revealed severe pathological changes (Eliasson score greater than 10) in 134 diethylstilbestrol-exposed men (18 per cent) and 87 placebo-exposed men (8 per cent). Further investigation of the 26 diethylstilbestrol-exposed men with testicular hypoplasia has revealed that 65 per cent had a history of cryptorchidism. Only 1 of the 6 placebo-exposed controls with testicular hypoplasia had a history of testicular maldescent. Although none of our Diekmann's lying-in study group has had carcinoma to date one must keep in mind the reported increased risk of testicular carcinoma in testes that are or were cryptorchid. A 25-year-old man who was not part of the study group was treated recently by us for a testicular carcinoma ( mixed anaplastic seminoma plus embryonal cell carcinoma) and he had a history of diethylstilbestrol exposure in utero and cryptorchidism.

  9. Liver segment IV hypoplasia as a risk factor for bile duct injury.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Miguel Angel; Franssen, Bernardo; Arriola, Juan Carlos; Garcia-Badiola, Artemio; Arámburo, Rigoberto; Elnecavé, Alejandro; Cortés-González, Rubén

    2011-09-01

    Bile duct injury remains constant in the era of laparoscopic cholecystectomy and misidentification of structures remains one of the most common causes of such injuries. Abnormalities in liver segment IV, which is fully visible during laparoscopic cholecystectomy, may contribute to misidentification as proposed herein. We describe the case of a 36-year-old female who had a bile duct injury during a laparoscopic cholecystectomy where the surgeon noticed an unusually small distance between the gallbladder and the round ligament. We define hypoplasia of liver segment IV as well as describe the variation of the biliary anatomy in the case. We also intend to fit it in a broader spectrum of developmental anomalies that have both hyopoplasia of some portion of the liver and variations in gallbladder and bile duct anatomy that may contribute to bile duct injury. To our knowledge, hypoplasia of liver segment IV has not been suggested in the literature as a risk factor for bile duct injury except in the extreme case of a left-sided gallbladder. Surgeons should be vigilant during laparoscopic cholecystectomy when they become aware of an unusually small distance between the gallbladder bed and the round ligament prior to beginning their dissection, variations in the common bile duct and cystic duct should be expected.

  10. [Diagnosis and surgical treatment of cystic pulmonary hypoplasia with aortic blood supply].

    PubMed

    Opanasenko, N S; Klimenko, V I; Kshanovskiĭ, A É; Tereshkovich, A V; Kalenichenko, M I; Konik, B N; Demus, R S; Obremskaia, O K; Levanda, L I; Kononenko, V A; Mikitenko, I Iu

    2013-12-01

    Cystic pulmonary hypoplasia with aortic blood supply--it is a rare inborn failure, in which the part of pulmonary tissue is developing separately from tracheo-bronchial tree and takes blood supply from systemic blood circulation. Diagnosis of the disease is a complicated, and it is necessary to apply modern radiological methods of visualization. The results of treatment of 27 patients, suffering cystic pulmonary hypoplasia with aortic blood supply, in the clinic through 50 yrs, were analyzed. All the patients were operated on.In 17 (63%) patients lobectomy was performed, in 4 (14.8%)--the left-sided lower lobe pyramid was excised, in 1 (3.7%)--the left-sided wedge resection of C(X), in 1 (3.7%)--the left-sided pulmonectomy, in 1 (3.7%)--left-sided resection of C(VIII) - C(IX). The rate of intraoperative complications--14.8%, and postoperative--7.4%. Efficacy of surgical treatment for this period constitutes 100%.

  11. Treatment of Severe Maxillary Hypoplasia With Combined Orthodontics and Distraction Osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lucchese, Alessandra; Albertini, Paolo; Asperio, Paolo; Manuelli, Maurizio; Gastaldi, Giorgio

    2018-01-05

    Distraction osteogenesis (DO) is a technique that allows the generation of new bone in a gap between 2 vascularized bone surfaces in response to the application of graduated tensile stress across the bone gap.Distraction osteogenesis has become a routine treatment of choice to correct skeletal deformities and severe bone defects in the craniofacial complex over the past decade. Distraction osteogenesis has been successfully chosen in lengthening the maxilla and the mandible; in the maxilla and recently in the mandible, the jawbones have been distracted and widened transversely to relieve severe anterior dental crowding and transverse discrepancies between the dental arches.Distraction osteogenesis for maxillary advancement started in 1993 and is now widely used, especially in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion caused by maxillary hypoplasia.The aim of this study was to present the efficiency of combined orthodontic and DO in the severe maxillary hypoplasia.A 35-year-old Italian man presented to our clinical practice with the chief complaint of esthetic and functionally problems because of skeletal Class III malocclusion with anterior crossbite.Considering that the severity of the skeletal discrepancy is remarkable but compensated by the DO potential, the combined orthodontic and DO treatment was considered adequate, like less invasive and equally effective.It was obtained a good alignment with the upper and lower arch dental alveolar maxillary advancement that allowed to correct the sagittal relationships.The patient was satisfied for the treatment results and had considerable improvement in his self-esteem.

  12. Trans-sinusal maxillary distraction for correction of midfacial hypoplasia: long-term clinical results.

    PubMed

    Nadjmi, N; Schutyser, F; Van Erum, R

    2006-10-01

    Maxillary distraction osteogenesis is indicated in severe angle class III malocclusions, and severe maxillary hypoplasia among some cleft patients and other craniofacial deformities. Twenty patients, aged 8-48 years (mean 17.8+/-10.5 SD) with maxillary and midfacial hypoplasia were treated. The follow-up period was 13-65 months (mean 35+/-16.3 SD). A trans-sinusal maxillary distractor was placed intraorally at each side of the maxilla. The distraction vector was predicted using specialist software, and was transferred to the patients using stereolithographic models and individual templates. A (high) Le Fort I type osteotomy was performed. The amount of activation varied from 8 to 17.5 mm (mean 13.1+/-2.9 SD). Soft and hard tissue formation resulted in complete healing across the distraction gaps. The distractors are almost completely submerged, and can be left in place as long as necessary to avoid relapse. Wit's appraisal was used to measure the stability of the long-term distraction results. Results up to 5 years after distraction showed considerable maxillary advancement with long-term stability. Ongoing growth of the facial skeleton must be considered when distraction osteogenesis is chosen in growing patients.

  13. Partial Agenesis and Hypoplasia of the Corpus Callosum in Idiopathic Autism

    PubMed Central

    Wegiel, Jarek; Flory, Michael; Kaczmarski, Wojciech; Brown, W. Ted; Chadman, Kathryn; Wisniewski, Thomas; Nowicki, Krzysztof; Kuchna, Izabela; Ma, Shuang Yong; Wegiel, Jerzy

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To test the hypothesis that developmental anomalies of the corpus callosum (CC), contribute to the pathogenesis of autism, we characterized the type, topography, and severity of CC pathology corresponding to reduced CC areas that are detected by magnetic resonance imaging in the brains of 11 individuals with autism and 11 controls. In the brains of 3 autistic subjects, partial CC agenesis resulted in complete or partial lack of interhemispheric axonal connections in CC segments III–V. In these cases, a combination of focal agenesis and uniform axonal deficit caused reduction of CC areas by 37%, of axon numbers by 62%, and of the numerical density of axons by 39%. In the CC of 8 autistic subjects without agenesis, there was an 18% deficit of the midsagittal CC area, 48.4% deficit of axon numbers, and 37% reduction of the numerical density of axons. The significantly thinner CC, reduced CC area, and uniform axonal deficit in all autistic subjects were classified as CC hypoplasia. Thus, the byproduct of partial CC agenesis and hypoplasia is reduction of axonal connections between cortical areas known to be involved in behavioral alterations observed in people with autism. PMID:28395085

  14. Abnormal platelet-derived growth factor signaling accounting for lung hypoplasia in experimental congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Dingemann, Jens; Doi, Takashi; Ruttenstock, Elke; Puri, Prem

    2010-10-01

    The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypoplasia in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is not fully understood. Platelet-derived growth factor A (PDGFA) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα) play a crucial role in lung development. It has been reported that PDGF induces H(2)O(2)-production and that oxidative stress may be an important mechanism for the impaired lung development in the nitrofen rat model. We hypothesized that pulmonary expression of PDGFA and PDGFRα is altered in the nitrofen induced CDH model. Pregnant rats received 100 mg nitrofen or vehicle on gestational day 9 (D9) and were sacrificed on D15, D18 or D21. RNA was extracted from fetal left lungs and mRNA levels of PDGFA and PDGFRα were determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemistry for protein expression of PDGFA and PDGFRα was performed. Pulmonary H(2)O(2) was measured colorimetrically. mRNA levels of PDGFRα at D15 (4.50 ± 0.87) and PDGFA at D18 (2.90 ± 1.38) were increased in the nitrofen group (P < .05). Immunohistochemistry revealed increased pulmonary expression of PDGFRα and PDGFA. H(2)O(2) content was significantly higher in the nitrofen group. Increased expression of PDGFA and PDGFRα suggests that pulmonary hypoplasia in the nitrofen CDH model may be owing to PDGF-induced oxidative stress during lung development. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Fetoscopic Therapy for Severe Pulmonary Hypoplasia in Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia: A First in Prenatal Regenerative Medicine at Mayo Clinic.

    PubMed

    Ruano, Rodrigo; Klinkner, Denise B; Balakrishnan, Karthik; Novoa Y Novoa, Victoria A; Davies, Norman; Potter, Dean D; Carey, William A; Colby, Christopher E; Kolbe, Amy B; Arendt, Katherine W; Segura, Leal; Sviggum, Hans P; Lemens, Maureen A; Famuyide, Abimbola; Terzic, Andre

    2018-05-15

    To introduce the prenatal regenerative medicine service at Mayo Clinic for fetal endoscopic tracheal occlusion (FETO) care for severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Two cases of prenatal management of severe CDH with FETO between January and August 2017 are reported. Per protocol, FETO was offered for life-threatening severe CDH at between 26 and 29 weeks' gestation. Regenerative outcome end point was fetal lung growth. Gestational age at procedure and maternal and perinatal outcomes were additional monitored parameters. Diagnosis by ultrasonography of severe CDH was based on extremely reduced lung size (observed-to-expected lung area to head circumference ratio [o/e-LHR], eg, o/e-LHR of 20.3% for fetus 1 and 23.0% for fetus 2) along with greater than one-third of the liver herniated into the chest in both fetuses. Both patients underwent successful FETO at 28 weeks. At the time of intervention, no maternal or fetal complications were observed. Postintervention, fetal lung growth was observed in both fetuses, reaching an o/e-LHR of 62.7% at 36 weeks in fetus 1 and 52.4% at 32 weeks in fetus 2. The balloons were removed successfully at 35 weeks and 4 days by ultrasound-guided puncture in the first patient and at 32 weeks and 3 days by ex utero intrapartum therapy-to-airway procedure in the second patient. Postnatal management followed standard of care with patch CDH therapy. At discharge, one patient was breathing normally, whereas the other required minimal nasal cannula oxygen support. The successful launch of the first fetoscopic therapy for CDH at Mayo Clinic reveals its feasibility and safety, with early signs of benefit documented by fetal lung growth and reversal of severe pulmonary hypoplasia. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: G170062. Copyright © 2018 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Is serum level of CC chemokine ligand 18 a biomarker for the prediction of radiation induced lung toxicity (RILT)?

    PubMed

    Gkika, Eleni; Vach, Werner; Adebahr, Sonja; Schimek-Jasch, Tanja; Brenner, Anton; Brunner, Thomas Baptist; Kaier, Klaus; Prasse, Antje; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Zissel, Gernot; Nestle, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    The CC chemokine ligand 18 (CCL18) is produced by alveolar macrophages in patients with fibrosing lung disease and its concentration is increased in various fibrotic lung diseases. Furthermore CCL18 is elevated in several malignancies as it is produced by tumor associated macrophages. In this study we aimed to analyze the role of CCL18 as a prognostic biomarker for the development of early radiation induced lung toxicity (RILT), i.e. radiation pneumonitis after thoracic irradiation and its significance in the course of the disease. Sixty seven patients were enrolled prospectively in the study. Patients were treated with irradiation for several thoracic malignancies (lung cancer, esophageal cancer, thymoma), either with conventionally fractionated or hypo-fractionated radiotherapy. The CCL18 serum levels were quantified with ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) at predefined time points: before, during and at the end of treatment as well as in the first and second follow-up. Treatment parameters and functional tests were also correlated with the development of RILT.Fifty three patients were evaluable for this study. Twenty one patients (39%) developed radiologic signs of RILT Grade >1 but only three of them (5.6%) developed clinical symptoms (Grade 2). We could not find any association between the different CCL18 concentrations and a higher incidence of RILT. Statistical significant factors were the planning target volume (odds ratio OR: 1.003, p = 0.010), the volume of the lung receiving > 20 Gy (OR: 1.132 p = 0.004) and age (OR: 0.917, p = 0.008). There was no association between serial CCL18 concentrations with tumor response and overall survival.In our study the dosimetric parameters remained the most potent predictors of RILT. Further studies are needed in order to estimate the role of CCL18 in the development of early RILT.

  17. Is serum level of CC chemokine ligand 18 a biomarker for the prediction of radiation induced lung toxicity (RILT)?

    PubMed Central

    Vach, Werner; Adebahr, Sonja; Schimeck-Jasch, Tanja; Brenner, Anton; Brunner, Thomas Baptist; Kaier, Klaus; Prasse, Antje; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Zissel, Gernot; Nestle, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    The CC chemokine ligand 18 (CCL18) is produced by alveolar macrophages in patients with fibrosing lung disease and its concentration is increased in various fibrotic lung diseases. Furthermore CCL18 is elevated in several malignancies as it is produced by tumor associated macrophages. In this study we aimed to analyze the role of CCL18 as a prognostic biomarker for the development of early radiation induced lung toxicity (RILT), i.e. radiation pneumonitis after thoracic irradiation and its significance in the course of the disease. Sixty seven patients were enrolled prospectively in the study. Patients were treated with irradiation for several thoracic malignancies (lung cancer, esophageal cancer, thymoma), either with conventionally fractionated or hypo-fractionated radiotherapy. The CCL18 serum levels were quantified with ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) at predefined time points: before, during and at the end of treatment as well as in the first and second follow-up. Treatment parameters and functional tests were also correlated with the development of RILT.Fifty three patients were evaluable for this study. Twenty one patients (39%) developed radiologic signs of RILT Grade >1 but only three of them (5.6%) developed clinical symptoms (Grade 2). We could not find any association between the different CCL18 concentrations and a higher incidence of RILT. Statistical significant factors were the planning target volume (odds ratio OR: 1.003, p = 0.010), the volume of the lung receiving > 20 Gy (OR: 1.132 p = 0.004) and age (OR: 0.917, p = 0.008). There was no association between serial CCL18 concentrations with tumor response and overall survival.In our study the dosimetric parameters remained the most potent predictors of RILT. Further studies are needed in order to estimate the role of CCL18 in the development of early RILT. PMID:28957436

  18. Radiation-induced DNA-protein cross-links: Mechanisms and biological significance.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Toshiaki; Xu, Xu; Salem, Amir M H; Shoulkamy, Mahmoud I; Ide, Hiroshi

    2017-06-01

    Ionizing radiation produces various DNA lesions such as base damage, DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs), DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs). Of these, the biological significance of DPCs remains elusive. In this article, we focus on radiation-induced DPCs and review the current understanding of their induction, properties, repair, and biological consequences. When cells are irradiated, the formation of base damage, SSBs, and DSBs are promoted in the presence of oxygen. Conversely, that of DPCs is promoted in the absence of oxygen, suggesting their importance in hypoxic cells, such as those present in tumors. DNA and protein radicals generated by hydroxyl radicals (i.e., indirect effect) are responsible for DPC formation. In addition, DPCs can also be formed from guanine radical cations generated by the direct effect. Actin, histones, and other proteins have been identified as cross-linked proteins. Also, covalent linkages between DNA and protein constituents such as thymine-lysine and guanine-lysine have been identified and their structures are proposed. In irradiated cells and tissues, DPCs are repaired in a biphasic manner, consisting of fast and slow components. The half-time for the fast component is 20min-2h and that for the slow component is 2-70h. Notably, radiation-induced DPCs are repaired more slowly than DSBs. Homologous recombination plays a pivotal role in the repair of radiation-induced DPCs as well as DSBs. Recently, a novel mechanism of DPC repair mediated by a DPC protease was reported, wherein the resulting DNA-peptide cross-links were bypassed by translesion synthesis. The replication and transcription of DPC-bearing reporter plasmids are inhibited in cells, suggesting that DPCs are potentially lethal lesions. However, whether DPCs are mutagenic and induce gross chromosomal alterations remains to be determined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Proteomic overview and perspectives of the radiation-induced bystander effects.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, François; Hamdi, Dounia Houria; Saintigny, Yannick; Lefaix, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Radiation proteomics is a recent, promising and powerful tool to identify protein markers of direct and indirect consequences of ionizing radiation. The main challenges of modern radiobiology is to predict radio-sensitivity of patients and radio-resistance of tumor to be treated, but considerable evidences are now available regarding the significance of a bystander effect at low and high doses. This "radiation-induced bystander effect" (RIBE) is defined as the biological responses of non-irradiated cells that received signals from neighboring irradiated cells. Such intercellular signal is no more considered as a minor side-effect of radiotherapy in surrounding healthy tissue and its occurrence should be considered in adapting radiotherapy protocols, to limit the risk for radiation-induced secondary cancer. There is no consensus on a precise designation of RIBE, which involves a number of distinct signal-mediated effects within or outside the irradiated volume. Indeed, several cellular mechanisms were proposed, including the secretion of soluble factors by irradiated cells in the extracellular matrix, or the direct communication between irradiated and neighboring non-irradiated cells via gap junctions. This phenomenon is observed in a context of major local inflammation, linked with a global imbalance of oxidative metabolism which makes its analysis challenging using in vitro model systems. In this review article, the authors first define the radiation-induced bystander effect as a function of radiation type, in vitro analysis protocols, and cell type. In a second time, the authors present the current status of protein biomarkers and proteomic-based findings and discuss the capacities, limits and perspectives of such global approaches to explore these complex intercellular mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Targeted Overexpression of Mitochondrial Catalase Prevents Radiation-Induced Cognitive Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Parihar, Vipan K.; Allen, Barrett D.; Tran, Katherine K.; Chmielewski, Nicole N.; Craver, Brianna M.; Martirosian, Vahan; Morganti, Josh M.; Rosi, Susanna; Vlkolinsky, Roman; Acharya, Munjal M.; Nelson, Gregory A.; Allen, Antiño R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Radiation-induced disruption of mitochondrial function can elevate oxidative stress and contribute to the metabolic perturbations believed to compromise the functionality of the central nervous system. To clarify the role of mitochondrial oxidative stress in mediating the adverse effects of radiation in the brain, we analyzed transgenic (mitochondrial catalase [MCAT]) mice that overexpress human catalase localized to the mitochondria. Results: Compared with wild-type (WT) controls, overexpression of the MCAT transgene significantly decreased cognitive dysfunction after proton irradiation. Significant improvements in behavioral performance found on novel object recognition and object recognition in place tasks were associated with a preservation of neuronal morphology. While the architecture of hippocampal CA1 neurons was significantly compromised in irradiated WT mice, the same neurons in MCAT mice did not exhibit extensive and significant radiation-induced reductions in dendritic complexity. Irradiated neurons from MCAT mice maintained dendritic branching and length compared with WT mice. Protected neuronal morphology in irradiated MCAT mice was also associated with a stabilization of radiation-induced variations in long-term potentiation. Stabilized synaptic activity in MCAT mice coincided with an altered composition of the synaptic AMPA receptor subunits GluR1/2. Innovation: Our findings provide the first evidence that neurocognitive sequelae associated with radiation exposure can be reduced by overexpression of MCAT, operating through a mechanism involving the preservation of neuronal morphology. Conclusion: Our article documents the neuroprotective properties of reducing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species through the targeted overexpression of catalase and how this ameliorates the adverse effects of proton irradiation in the brain. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 78–91. PMID:24949841

  1. Targeted overexpression of mitochondrial catalase prevents radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Parihar, Vipan K; Allen, Barrett D; Tran, Katherine K; Chmielewski, Nicole N; Craver, Brianna M; Martirosian, Vahan; Morganti, Josh M; Rosi, Susanna; Vlkolinsky, Roman; Acharya, Munjal M; Nelson, Gregory A; Allen, Antiño R; Limoli, Charles L

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced disruption of mitochondrial function can elevate oxidative stress and contribute to the metabolic perturbations believed to compromise the functionality of the central nervous system. To clarify the role of mitochondrial oxidative stress in mediating the adverse effects of radiation in the brain, we analyzed transgenic (mitochondrial catalase [MCAT]) mice that overexpress human catalase localized to the mitochondria. Compared with wild-type (WT) controls, overexpression of the MCAT transgene significantly decreased cognitive dysfunction after proton irradiation. Significant improvements in behavioral performance found on novel object recognition and object recognition in place tasks were associated with a preservation of neuronal morphology. While the architecture of hippocampal CA1 neurons was significantly compromised in irradiated WT mice, the same neurons in MCAT mice did not exhibit extensive and significant radiation-induced reductions in dendritic complexity. Irradiated neurons from MCAT mice maintained dendritic branching and length compared with WT mice. Protected neuronal morphology in irradiated MCAT mice was also associated with a stabilization of radiation-induced variations in long-term potentiation. Stabilized synaptic activity in MCAT mice coincided with an altered composition of the synaptic AMPA receptor subunits GluR1/2. Our findings provide the first evidence that neurocognitive sequelae associated with radiation exposure can be reduced by overexpression of MCAT, operating through a mechanism involving the preservation of neuronal morphology. Our article documents the neuroprotective properties of reducing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species through the targeted overexpression of catalase and how this ameliorates the adverse effects of proton irradiation in the brain.

  2. Effects of Berberine Against Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury in Mice

    SciT

    Li Guanghui; Zhang Yaping; Tang Jinliang

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced intestinal injury is a significant clinical problem in patients undergoing abdominal radiotherapy (RT). Berberine has been used as an antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antimotility agent. The present study investigated the protective effect of berberine against radiation-induced intestinal injury. Methods and Materials: The mice were administrated berberine or distilled water. A total of 144 mice underwent 0, 3, 6, 12, or 16 Gy single session whole-abdominal RT and 16 mice underwent 3 Gy/fraction/d for four fractions of fractionated abdominal RT. Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, interleukin-10, diamine oxidase, intestinal fatty acid-binding protein, malonaldehyde, and apoptosis were assayed in the mice after RT.more » The body weight and food intake of the mice receiving fractionated RT were recorded. Another 72 mice who had undergone 12, 16, or 20 Gy abdominal RT were monitored for mortality every 12 h. Results: The body weight and food intake of the mice administered with distilled water decreased significantly compared with before RT. After the same dose of abdominal RT, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, diamine oxidase, intestinal fatty acid-binding protein in plasma and malonalhehyde and apoptosis of the intestine were significantly greater in the control group than in the mice administered berberine (p < .05-.01). In contrast, interleukin-10 in the mice with berberine treatment was significantly greater than in the control group (p < .01). A similar result was found in the fractionated RT experiment and at different points after 16 Gy abdominal RT (p < .05-.01). Berberine treatment significantly delayed the point of death after 20 Gy, but not 16 Gy, abdominal RT (p < .01). Conclusion: Treatment with berberine can delay mortality and attenuated intestinal injury in mice undergoing whole abdominal RT. These findings could provide a useful therapeutic strategy for radiation-induced intestinal injury.« less

  3. Loss of Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 Attenuates Murine Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis

    SciT

    Flechsig, Paul; Hartenstein, Bettina; Teurich, Sybille

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Pulmonary fibrosis is a disorder of the lungs with limited treatment options. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) constitute a family of proteases that degrade extracellular matrix with roles in fibrosis. Here we studied the role of MMP13 in a radiation-induced lung fibrosis model using a MMP13 knockout mouse. Methods and Materials: We investigated the role of MMP13 in lung fibrosis by investigating the effects of MMP13 deficiency in C57Bl/6 mice after 20-Gy thoracic irradiation (6-MV Linac). The morphologic results in histology were correlated with qualitative and quantitative results of volume computed tomography (VCT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and clinical outcome. Results:more » We found that MMP13 deficient mice developed less pulmonary fibrosis than their wildtype counterparts, showed attenuated acute pulmonary inflammation (days after irradiation), and a reduction of inflammation during the later fibrogenic phase (5-6 months after irradiation). The reduced fibrosis in MMP13 deficient mice was evident in histology with reduced thickening of alveolar septi and reduced remodeling of the lung architecture in good correlation with reduced features of lung fibrosis in qualitative and quantitative VCT and MRI studies. The partial resistance of MMP13-deficient mice to fibrosis was associated with a tendency towards a prolonged mouse survival. Conclusions: Our data indicate that MMP13 has a role in the development of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Further, our findings suggest that MMP13 constitutes a potential drug target to attenuate radiation-induced lung fibrosis.« less

  4. Simulated microgravity increases heavy ion radiation-induced apoptosis in human B lymphoblasts.

    PubMed

    Dang, Bingrong; Yang, Yuping; Zhang, Erdong; Li, Wenjian; Mi, Xiangquan; Meng, Yue; Yan, Siqi; Wang, Zhuanzi; Wei, Wei; Shao, Chunlin; Xing, Rui; Lin, Changjun

    2014-03-03

    Microgravity and radiation, common in space, are the main factors influencing astronauts' health in space flight, but their combined effects on immune cells are extremely limited. Therefore, the effect of simulated microgravity on heavy ion radiation-induced apoptosis, and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-sensitive apoptosis signaling were investigated in human B lymphoblast HMy2.CIR cells. Simulated microgravity was achieved using a Rotating Wall Vessel Bioreactor at 37°C for 30 min. Heavy carbon-ion irradiation was carried out at 300 MeV/u, with a linear energy transfer (LET) value of 30 keV/μm and a dose rate of 1Gy/min. Cell survival was evaluated using the Trypan blue exclusion assay. Apoptosis was indicated by Annexin V/propidium iodide staining. ROS production was assessed by cytometry with a fluorescent probe dichlorofluorescein. Malondialdehyde was detected using a kit. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) and caspase-3 activation were measured by immunoblotting. Simulated microgravity decreased heavy ion radiation-induced cell survival and increased apoptosis in HMy2.CIR cells. It also amplified heavy ion radiation-elicited intracellular ROS generation, which induced ROS-sensitive ERK/MKP-1/caspase-3 activation in HMy2.CIR cells. The above phenomena could be reversed by the antioxidants N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and quercetin. These results illustrated that simulated microgravity increased heavy ion radiation-induced cell apoptosis, mediated by a ROS-sensitive signal pathway in human B lymphoblasts. Further, the antioxidants NAC and quercetin, especially NAC, might be good candidate drugs for protecting astronauts' and space travelers' health and safety. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Smad, but not MAPK, pathway mediates the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis

    SciT

    Yano, Hiroyuki; Division of Radioisotope Research, Department of Research Support, Research Promotion Project, Oita University, 1-1 Idaigaoka Hasama-machi, Yufu, Oita 879-5593; Hamanaka, Ryoji

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine how radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of collagen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta}1 mRNA is elevated earlier than those of collagen genes after irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smad pathway mediates the expression of collagen in radiation induced fibrosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAPK pathways are not affected in the expression of collagen after irradiation. -- Abstract: Radiation induced fibrosis occurs following a therapeutic or accidental radiation exposure in normal tissues. Tissue fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of collagen and other extracellular matrix components. This study investigated how ionizing radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of type I collagen. Realmore » time RT-RCR showed that both {alpha}1and {alpha}2 chain of type I collagen mRNA were elevated from 48 h after irradiation with 10 Gy in NIH3T3 cells. The relative luciferase activities of both genes and type I collagen marker were elevated at 72 h. TGF-{beta}1 mRNA was elevated earlier than those of type I collagen genes. A Western blot analysis showed the elevation of Smad phosphorylation at 72 h. Conversely, treatment with TGF-{beta} receptor inhibitor inhibited the mRNA and relative luciferase activity of type I collagen. The phosphorylation of Smad was repressed with the inhibitor, and the luciferase activity was cancelled using a mutant construct of Smad binding site of {alpha}2(I) collagen gene. However, the MAPK pathways, p38, ERK1/2 and JNK, were not affected with specific inhibitors or siRNA. The data showed that the Smad pathway mediated the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis.« less

  6. GUCY2C Signaling Opposes the Acute Radiation-Induced GI Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Wuthrick, Evan; Rappaport, Jeff A; Kraft, Crystal; Lin, Jieru E; Marszalowicz, Glen; Snook, Adam E; Zhan, Tingting; Hyslop, Terry M; Waldman, Scott A

    2017-09-15

    High doses of ionizing radiation induce acute damage to epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, mediating toxicities restricting the therapeutic efficacy of radiation in cancer and morbidity and mortality in nuclear disasters. No approved prophylaxis or therapy exists for these toxicities, in part reflecting an incomplete understanding of mechanisms contributing to the acute radiation-induced GI syndrome (RIGS). Guanylate cyclase C (GUCY2C) and its hormones guanylin and uroguanylin have recently emerged as one paracrine axis defending intestinal mucosal integrity against mutational, chemical, and inflammatory injury. Here, we reveal a role for the GUCY2C paracrine axis in compensatory mechanisms opposing RIGS. Eliminating GUCY2C signaling exacerbated RIGS, amplifying radiation-induced mortality, weight loss, mucosal bleeding, debilitation, and intestinal dysfunction. Durable expression of GUCY2C, guanylin, and uroguanylin mRNA and protein by intestinal epithelial cells was preserved following lethal irradiation inducing RIGS. Oral delivery of the heat-stable enterotoxin (ST), an exogenous GUCY2C ligand, opposed RIGS, a process requiring p53 activation mediated by dissociation from MDM2. In turn, p53 activation prevented cell death by selectively limiting mitotic catastrophe, but not apoptosis. These studies reveal a role for the GUCY2C paracrine hormone axis as a novel compensatory mechanism opposing RIGS, and they highlight the potential of oral GUCY2C agonists (Linzess; Trulance) to prevent and treat RIGS in cancer therapy and nuclear disasters. Cancer Res; 77(18); 5095-106. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. A case of radiation-induced generalized morphea with prominent mucin deposition and tenderness.

    PubMed

    Yanaba, Koichi; Umezawa, Yoshinori; Nakagawa, Hidemi

    2015-05-10

    Radiation-induced morphea is a rare complication of radiation therapy. The affected areas are generally restricted to the radiation field or to the nearby surrounding area. A 67-year-old Japanese woman with a history of right breast cancer followed by adjuvant radiotherapy was referred our hospital because of 7-year history of symmetrical indurated erythematous plaques on her trunk. Three months after completion of irradiation, erythematous plaques developed on her right chest and gradually spread accompanied tenderness. She did not have a history of trauma to her right chest. Laboratory testing was positive for antinuclear antibody test at 1: 640 but negative for anti-SS-A/B, anti-U1-RNP, anti-DNA, anti-Sm, anticentromere, anti-topoisomerase I antibodies, and Borrelia and cytomegalovirus infection. She had no Raynaud's phenomenon, sclerodactyly, or nail-fold bleeding. She did not have interstitial lung disease or other internal organ involvement. A biopsy specimen revealed reticular dermal fibrosis with thickened collagen bundles with superficial and deep perivascular infiltration of mononuclear cells. These findings were consistent with morphea. Furthermore, mucin deposition was present in the papillary dermis upon Alcian blue staining, which has been reported to be observed in generalized morphea. Consequently, a diagnosis of generalized morphea induced by radiotherapy was made. She had been treated with oral hydroxychloroquine sulfate, resulting in the resolution of tenderness but the erythematous plaques remained. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of radiation-induced generalized morphea with prominent mucin deposition. Hydroxychloroquine sulfate may be efficacious for radiation-induced morphea-associated tenderness.

  8. Role of Ferulic Acid in the Amelioration of Ionizing Radiation Induced Inflammation: A Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Das, Ujjal; Manna, Krishnendu; Sinha, Mahuya; Datta, Sanjukta; Das, Dipesh Kr; Chakraborty, Anindita; Ghosh, Mahua; Saha, Krishna Das; Dey, Sanjit

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is responsible for oxidative stress by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), which alters the cellular redox potential. This change activates several redox sensitive enzymes which are crucial in activating signaling pathways at molecular level and can lead to oxidative stress induced inflammation. Therefore, the present study was intended to assess the anti-inflammatory role of ferulic acid (FA), a plant flavonoid, against radiation-induced oxidative stress with a novel mechanistic viewpoint. FA was administered (50 mg/kg body wt) to Swiss albino mice for five consecutive days prior to exposing them to a single dose of 10 Gy 60Co γ-irradiation. The dose of FA was optimized from the survival experiment and 50 mg/kg body wt dose showed optimum effect. FA significantly ameliorated the radiation induced inflammatory response such as phosphorylation of IKKα/β and IκBα and consequent nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). FA also prevented the increase of cycloxygenase-2 (Cox-2) protein, inducible nitric oxide synthase-2 (iNOS-2) gene expression, lipid peroxidation in liver and the increase of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in serum. It was observed that exposure to radiation results in decreased activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and the pool of reduced glutathione (GSH) content. However, FA treatment prior to irradiation increased the activities of the same endogenous antioxidants. Thus, pretreatment with FA offers protection against gamma radiation induced inflammation. PMID:24854039

  9. Critical Review of Selected Components of RIPD (Radiation-Induced Performance Decrement)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    e in UG dis n Table 3. of the NAS of the NAS tive toxin A stem. This al vomiting leared at a ra ted by the e s for B and β rate const s of...protracted and fractionated doses. From data for acute doses ( King 1988), severity curves were constructed for the ferret. Model parameters were fit to...cytokine concentrations and bacterial infection,” Radiat. Res, 173(3):319– 332. King G.L., 1988. “Characterization of radiation-induced emesis in

  10. Protective effects of L-selenomethionine on space radiation induced changes in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Stewart, J; Ko, Y-H; Kennedy, A R

    2007-06-01

    Ionizing radiation can produce adverse biological effects in astronauts during space travel. Of particular concern are the types of radiation from highly energetic, heavy, charged particles known as HZE particles. The aims of our studies are to characterize HZE particle radiation induced biological effects and evaluate the effects of L-selenomethionine (SeM) on these adverse biological effects. In this study, microarray technology was used to measure HZE radiation induced changes in gene expression, as well as to evaluate modulation of these changes by SeM. Human thyroid epithelial cells (HTori-3) were irradiated (1 GeV/n iron ions) in the presence or in the absence of 5 microM SeM. At 6 h post-irradiation, all cells were harvested for RNA isolation. Gene Chip U133Av2 from Affymetrix was used for the analysis of gene expression, and ANOVA and EASE were used for a determination of the genes and biological processes whose differential expression is statistically significant. Results of this microarray study indicate that exposure to small doses of radiation from HZE particles, 10 and 20 cGy from iron ions, induces statistically significant differential expression of 196 and 610 genes, respectively. In the presence of SeM, differential expression of 77 out of 196 genes (exposure to 10 cGy) and 336 out of 610 genes (exposure to 20 cGy) is abolished. In the presence or in the absence of SeM, radiation from HZE particles induces differential expression of genes whose products have roles in the induction of G1/S arrest during the mitotic cell cycle, as well as heat shock proteins. Some of the genes, whose expressions were affected by radiation from HZE particles and were unchanged in irradiated cells treated with SeM, have been shown to have altered expression levels in cancer cells. The conclusions of this report are that radiation from HZE particles can induce differential expression of many genes, some of which are known to play roles in the same processes that have

  11. Radiation induced dechlorination of some chlorinated hydrocarbons in aqueous suspensions of various solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Múčka, V.; Buňata, M.; Čuba, V.; Silber, R.; Juha, L.

    2015-07-01

    Radiation induced dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in aqueous solutions containing the active carbon (AC) or cupric oxide (CuO) as the modifiers was studied. The obtained results were compared to the previously studied dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Both modifiers were found to decrease the efficiency of dechlorination. The AC modifier acts mainly via adsorption of the aliphatic (unlike the aromatic) hydrocarbons and the CuO oxide mainly inhibits the mineralization of the perchloroethylene. The results presented in this paper will be also helpful for the studies of the impact of chlorinated hydrocarbons on the membrane permeability of living cells.

  12. [The distribution of radiation-induced breaks in the chromosomes of irradiated subjects].

    PubMed

    Shemetun, O V; Pidlins'ka, M A; Shemetun, H M

    2000-01-01

    Distribution of radiation-induced breakpoints in chromosomes and its bands in persons recovered from acute radiation sickness and personnel from Chernobyl NPP were investigated using G-banding staining. The frequency of damaged bands and breakpoints in groups exposed to radiation was significantly higher as compared with the control group. It was shown that in exposed to radiation persons damage depends on its length. Most frequently damaged bands in the observed groups were determined. The G-negative bands and telomeres of chromosomes were more sensitive to radiation.

  13. Role of oxidative stress in a rat model of radiation-induced erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masaki; Rabbani, Zahid N; Zodda, Andrew R; Yan, Hui; Jackson, Isabel L; Polascik, Thomas J; Donatucci, Craig F; Moul, Judd W; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Koontz, Bridget F

    2012-06-01

    Chronic oxidative stress is one of the major factors playing an important role in radiation-induced normal tissue injury. However, the role of oxidative stress in radiation-induced erectile dysfunction (ED) has not been fully investigated. Aims.  To investigate role of oxidative stress after prostate-confined irradiation in a rat model of radiation-induced ED. Fifty-four young adult male rats (10-12 weeks of age) were divided into age-matched sham radiotherapy (RT) and RT groups. Irradiated animals received prostate-confined radiation in a single 20 Gy fraction. Intracavernous pressure (ICP) measurements with cavernous nerve electrical stimulation were conducted at 2, 4, and 9 weeks following RT. The protein expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase subunits (Nox4 and gp91(phox)), markers of oxidative DNA damage (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine [8-OHdG]), lipid peroxidation (4-hydroxynonenal [4HNE]), and inflammatory response including inducible nitric oxide synthase, macrophage activation (ED-1), and nitrotyrosine, and endogenous antioxidant defense by nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) were evaluated in irradiated prostate tissue and corpora cavernosa (CC). In addition, we investigated the relationships between results of ICP/mean arterial pressure (MAP) ratios and expression level of oxidative stress markers. In the RT group, hemodynamic functional studies demonstrated a significant time-dependent decrease in ICP. Increased expression of Nox4, gp91(phox), 8-OHdG, and 4HNE were observed in the prostate and CC after RT. Similarly, expressions of inflammatory markers were significantly increased. There was a trend for increased Nrf2 after 4 weeks. ICP/MAP ratio negatively correlated with higher expression level of oxidative markers. NADPH oxidase activation and chronic oxidative stress were observed in irradiated prostate tissue and CC, which correlated with lower ICP/MAP ratio. Persistent inflammatory responses were also

  14. Remote sensor response study in the regime of the microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations

    SciT

    Ye, Tianyu; Mani, R. G.; Wegscheider, W.

    2013-11-04

    A concurrent remote sensing and magneto-transport study of the microwave excited two dimensional electron system (2DES) at liquid helium temperatures has been carried out using a carbon detector to remotely sense the microwave activity of the 2D electron system in the GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure during conventional magneto-transport measurements. Various correlations are observed and reported between the oscillatory magnetotransport and the remotely sensed reflection. In addition, the oscillatory remotely sensed signal is shown to exhibit a power law type variation in its amplitude, similar to the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations.

  15. Observation of linear-polarization-sensitivity in the microwave-radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations

    SciT

    Mani, R. G.; Ramanayaka, A. N.; Wegscheider, W.

    2013-12-04

    We examine the linear polarization sensitivity of the radiation- induced magneto-resistance oscillations by investigating the effect of rotating in-situ the electric field of linearly polarized microwaves relative to the current, in the GaAs/AlGaAs system. We find that the frequency and the phase of the photo-excited magneto-resistance oscillations are insensitive to the polarization. On the other hand, the amplitude of the resistance oscillations are strongly sensitive to the relative orientation between the microwave antenna and the current-axis in the specimen.

  16. Dosimetric Predictors of Radiation-induced Acute Nausea and Vomiting in IMRT for Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    SciT

    Lee, Victor H.F., E-mail: vhflee@hku.hk; Ng, Sherry C.Y.; Leung, T.W.

    Purpose: We wanted to investigate dosimetric parameters that would predict radiation-induced acute nausea and vomiting in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for undifferentiated carcinoma of the nasopharynx (NPC). Methods and Materials: Forty-nine consecutive patients with newly diagnosed NPC were treated with IMRT alone in this prospective study. Patients receiving any form of chemotherapy were excluded. The dorsal vagal complex (DVC) as well as the left and right vestibules (VB-L and VB-R, respectively) were contoured on planning computed tomography images. A structure combining both the VB-L and the VB-R, named VB-T, was also generated. All structures were labeled organs at risk (OAR).more » A 3-mm three-dimensional margin was added to these structures and labeled DVC+3 mm, VB-L+3 mm, VB-R+3 mm, and VB-T+3 mm to account for physiological body motion and setup error. No weightings were given to these structures during optimization in treatment planning. Dosimetric parameters were recorded from dose-volume histograms. Statistical analysis of parameters' association with nausea and vomiting was performed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results: Six patients (12.2%) reported Grade 1 nausea, and 8 patients (16.3%) reported Grade 2 nausea. Also, 4 patients (8.2%) complained of Grade 1 vomiting, and 4 patients (8.2%) experienced Grade 2 vomiting. No patients developed protracted nausea and vomiting after completion of IMRT. For radiation-induced acute nausea, V40 (percentage volume receiving at least 40Gy) to the VB-T and V40>=80% to the VB-T were predictors, using univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, V40>=80% to the VB-T was the only predictor. There were no predictors of radiation-induced acute vomiting, as the number of events was too small for analysis. Conclusions: This is the first study demonstrating that a V40 to the VB-T is predictive of radiation-induced acute nausea. The vestibules should be labeled as sensitive

  17. Radiological manifestations of radiation-induced injury to the normal upper gastrointestinal tract

    SciT

    Goldstein, H.M.; Rogers, L.F.; Fletcher, G.H.

    1975-10-01

    Radiation-induced injury to the normal esophagus, stomach, and duodenum in patients with advanced cervical carcinoma who received high para-aortic lymph- node irradiation to an average tumor dose of 5,000 rads is discussed. Radiation esophagitis is usually the result of mediastinal irradiation for bronchogenic carcinoma. The most consistent radiological finding is abnormal motility, with esophageal stricture and/or ulceration occurring less frequently. Radiation gastritis is usually present as pyloric ulceration or irregular contractions of the antrum, simulating gastric carcinoma. Postbulbar duodenal mucosal thickening, ulceration, and strictures may occur. Pertinent clinical features, pathogenesis, and pathological correlations are discussed. (auth)

  18. Suppression of radiation-induced point defects by rhenium and osmium interstitials in tungsten

    PubMed Central

    Suzudo, Tomoaki; Hasegawa, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Modeling the evolution of radiation-induced defects is important for finding radiation-resistant materials, which would be greatly appreciated in nuclear applications. We apply the density functional theory combined with comprehensive analyses of massive experimental database to indicate a mechanism to mitigate the effect of radiation on W crystals by adding particular solute elements that change the migration property of interstitials. The resultant mechanism is applicable to any body-centered-cubic (BCC) metals whose self-interstitial atoms become a stable crowdion and is expected to provide a general guideline for computational design of radiation-resistant alloys in the field of nuclear applications. PMID:27824134

  19. High-Resolution Imaging of the Optic Nerve and Retina in Optic Nerve Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pilat, Anastasia; Sibley, Daniel; McLean, Rebecca J.; Proudlock, Frank A.; Gottlob, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the optic nerve and macular morphology in patients with optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT). Design Prospective, cross-sectional, observational study. Subjects A total of 16 participants with ONH (10 female and 6 male; mean age, 17.2 years; 6 bilateral involvement) and 32 gender-, age-, ethnicity-, and refraction-matched healthy controls. Methods High-resolution SD OCT (Copernicus [Optopol Technology S.A., Zawiercie, Poland], 3 μm resolution) and handheld SD OCT (Bioptigen Inc [Research Triangle Park, NC], 2.6 μm resolution) devices were used to acquire horizontal scans through the center of the optic disc and macula. Main Outcome Measures Horizontal optic disc/cup and rim diameters, cup depth, peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), and thickness of individual retinal layers in participants with ONH and in controls. Results Patients with ONH had significantly smaller discs (P < 0.03 and P < 0.001 compared with unaffected eye and healthy controls, respectively), horizontal cup diameter (P < 0.02 for both), and cup depth (P < 0.02 and P < 0.01, respectively). In the macula, significantly thinner RNFL (nasally), ganglion cell layer (GCL) (nasally and temporally), inner plexiform layer (IPL) (nasally), outer nuclear layer (ONL) (nasally), and inner segment (centrally and temporally) were found in patients with ONH compared with the control group (P < 0.05 for all comparisons). Continuation of significantly thicker GCL, IPL, and outer plexiform layer in the central retinal area (i.e., foveal hypoplasia) was found in more than 80% of patients with ONH. Clinically unaffected fellow eyes of patients with ONH showed mild features of underdevelopment. Visual acuity and presence of septo-optic dysplasia were associated with changes in GCL and IPL. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of ONH based on disc and retinal optical coherence tomography (OCT) parameters were >80

  20. Sinus hypoplasia in the cystic fibrosis rat resolves in the absence of chronic infection.

    PubMed

    Grayson, Jessica; Tipirneni, Kiranya E; Skinner, Daniel F; Fort, Matthew; Cho, Do-Yeon; Zhang, Shaoyan; Prince, Andrew C; Lim, Dong-Jin; Mackey, Calvin; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2017-09-01

    Sinus hypoplasia is a hallmark characteristic in cystic fibrosis (CF). Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is nearly universal from a young age, impaired sinus development could be secondary to loss of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) or consequences of chronic infection during maturation. The objective of this study was to assess sinus development relative to overall growth in a novel CF animal model. Sinus development was evaluated in CFTR -/- and CFTR +/+ rats at 3 stages of development: newborn; 3 weeks; and 16 weeks. Microcomputed tomography (microCT) scanning, cultures, and histology were performed. Three-dimensional sinus and skull volumes were quantified. At birth, sinus volumes were decreased in CFTR -/- rats compared with wild-type rats (mean ± SEM: 11.3 ± 0.85 mm 3 vs 14.5 ± 0.73 mm 3 ; p < 0.05), despite similar weights (8.4 ± 0.46 gm vs 8.3 ± 0.51 gm; p = 0.86). CF rat weights declined by 16 weeks (378.4 ± 10.6 gm vs 447.4 ± 15.9 gm; p < 0.05), sinus volume increased similar to wild-type rats (201.1 ± 3.77 gm vs 203.4 ± 7.13 gm; p = 0.8). The ratio of sinus volume to body weight indicates hypoplasia present at birth (1.37 ± 0.12 vs 1.78 ± 0.11; p < 0.05) and showed an increase compared with CFTR +/+ animals by 16 weeks (0.53 ± 0.02 vs 0.46 ± 0.02; p < 0.05). Rats did not develop histologic evidence of chronic infection. CF rat sinuses are smaller at birth, but develop volumes similar to wild-type rats with maturation. This suggests that loss of CFTR may confer sinus hypoplasia at birth, but normal development ensues without chronic sinus infection. © 2017 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  1. A Multidisciplinary Approach to Educating Preschool Children with Optic Nerve Hypoplasia and Septo-Optic Nerve Dysplasia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahar, Cheryl; Brody, Jill; McCann, Mary Ellen; Mendiola, Rosalinda; Slott, Gayle

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the observations and experiences of a multidisciplinary team at the Blind Childrens Center in Los Angeles, which works specifically with children from birth to 5 years of age who have been diagnosed with optic nerve hypoplasia and may have septo-optic displasia. Strategies for educational interventions are explained.…

  2. [Asphyxiating thoracic dysplasia associated with hepatic ductal hypoplasia, agenesis of the corpus callosum and Dandy-Walker syndrome].

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, M; Hammou-Jeddi, A; Kammoun, A; Bennaceur, B; Gharbi, H A

    1990-01-01

    The authors report on a case of a newborn with asphyxiating thoracic dysplasia who died 36 h after birth. This chondrodysplasia was associated with hepatic ductular hypoplasia, agenesis of the corpus callosum and Dandy-Walker malformation. To our knowledge, such an association has not previously been reported in the literature.

  3. Cerenkov radiation-induced phototherapy for depth-independent cancer treatment (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akers, Walter J.; Achilefu, Samuel; Kotagiri, Nalinikanth

    2017-02-01

    Light emitted as the result of high-energy particle transport through biological tissues (Cerenkov radiation) can be exploited for noninvasive diagnostic imaging using high sensitivity scientific cameras. We have investigated the energy transfer potential of Cerenkov radiation, discovering a new phototherapeutic technique for treatment of localized and disseminated cancers. This technique, Cerenkov radiation-induced phototherapy (CRIT), like photodynamic therapy, requires the presence of both light and photosensitive agent together to induce cytotoxicity and effective cancer treatment. But unlike conventional phototherapy strategies in which tissue ablation or activation of photoactive molecules is limited to superficial structures, radiation-induced phototherapy enables phototherapy delivery to the tumor sites throughout the body. Titanium oxide nanoparticles, which produce cytotoxic reactive oxygen species upon irradiation with UV light, were targeted to tumor tissue by surface decoration with transferrin. Subsequent administration of tumor-avid radiotracer, 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG) provided localized UV light source via Cerenkov radiation. Treatment of tumor-bearing mice with the combination of Titanium nanoparticles and 18FDG resulted in effective reduction in tumor growth, while individual agents were not therapeutic. This new strategy in cancer therapy extends the reach of phototherapy beyond what was previously possible, with potential for treatment of cancer metastases and rescue from treatment resistance.

  4. Effect of cooking on radiation-induced chemical markers in beef and pork during storage.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Joong-Ho; Kwon, Youngju; Kausar, Tusneem; Nam, Ki-Chang; Rok Min, Byong; Joo Lee, Eun; Ahn, Dong U

    2012-02-01

    Raw and cooked beef and pork loins were irradiated at 0 or 5 kGy. The radiation-induced marker compounds, such as hydrocarbons, 2-alkylcyclobutanones (2-ACBs), and sulfur volatiles, were determined after 0 and 6 mo of frozen storage. Two hydrocarbons (8-heptadecene [C(17:1)] and 6,9-heptadecadiene [C(17:2)]) and two 2-ACBs (2-dodecylcyclobutanone [2-DCB] and 2-tetradecylcyclobutanone [2-TCB]) were detected only in irradiated raw and cooked meats. Although precooked irradiated meats produced more hydrocarbons and 2-ACBs than the irradiated cooked ones, the amounts of individual hydrocarbons and 2-ACBs, such as 8-heptadecene, 6,9-heptadecadiene, 2-DCB, and 2-TCB, were sufficient enough to detect whether the meat was irradiated or not. Dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide were also determined only in irradiated meats but dimethyl trisulfide disappeared after 6 mo of frozen storage under oxygen-permeable packaging conditions. The results indicated that 8-heptadecene, 6,9-heptadecadiene, 2-DCB, 2-TCB, and dimethyl disulfide, even though they were decreased with storage, could be used as marker compounds for the detection of irradiated beef and pork regardless of cooking under the frozen conditions for 6 mo. Radiation-induced chemical changes such as specific hydrocarbons, 2-ACBs, and sulfur volatiles may be used as potential identification markers by regulatory authorities to confirm irradiation history of frozen stored raw or cooked beef and pork. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  5. Is Pilocarpine Effective in Preventing Radiation-Induced Xerostomia? A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei-fa; Liao, Gui-qing; Hakim, Samer G; Ouyang, Dai-qiao; Ringash, Jolie; Su, Yu-xiong

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of concomitant administration of pilocarpine on radiation-induced xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancers. The PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials were searched to identify randomized, controlled trials studying the effect of concomitant administration of pilocarpine for radiation-induced xerostomia. Included trials were systematically reviewed, and quantifiable outcomes were pooled for meta-analysis. Outcomes of interest included salivary flow, clinician-rated xerostomia grade, patient-reported xerostomia scoring, quality of life, and adverse effects. Six prospective, randomized, controlled trials in 8 articles were included in this systematic review. The total number of patients was 369 in the pilocarpine group and 367 in the control group. Concomitant administration of pilocarpine during radiation could increase the unstimulated salivary flow rate in a period of 3 to 6 months after treatment, and also reduce the clinician-rated xerostomia grade. Patient-reported xerostomia was not significantly impacted by pilocarpine in the initial 3 months but was superior at 6 months. No significant difference of stimulated salivary flow rate could be confirmed between the 2 arms. Adverse effects of pilocarpine were mild and tolerable. The concomitant administration of pilocarpine during radiation increases unstimulated salivary flow rate and reduces clinician-rated xerostomia grade after radiation. It also relieves patients' xerostomia at 6 months and possibly at 12 months. However, pilocarpine has no effect on stimulated salivary flow rate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiation induced vertebral osteosarcoma following treatment of an intradural extramedullary spinal cord tumor in a dog.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, P J; McEntee, M C; Lipsitz, D; Keel, K; LeCouteur, R A

    2001-01-01

    A 2-year-old neutered female Rottweiler diagnosed with an intradural extramedullary spinal cord tumor at T12-T13 was successfully treated with cytoreductive surgery followed by Cobalt 60 teletherapy. The dog was euthanised 5-and-a-half years later following diagnosis of an osteosarcoma involving the L1 and L2 vertebrae. Evidence of the initial tumor was not present at necropsy. The vertebral neoplasm fulfilled all of the accepted criteria for a radiation induced tumor. It was concluded that adjunctive irradiation should be considered for treatment of intradural extramedullary tumors of young dogs when total surgical resection is not possible. Although tumor induction is a rare late effect of radiation therapy, the risk of this occurrence should be considered when irradiating young animals. Radiation induced tumors in dogs have been associated with coarse fractionation schemes, or when large intraoperative doses have been administered. A lower dose per fraction, e.g., 3 Gy/fraction or less, is advisable when irradiating young dogs or any dog in which the life expectancy is 3-5 or more years after irradiation.

  7. Radiation-induced damage to cellular DNA: Chemical nature and mechanisms of lesion formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadet, Jean; Wagner, J. Richard

    2016-11-01

    This mini-review focuses on the recent identification of several novel radiation-induced single and tandem modifications in cellular DNA. For this purpose accurate high-performance electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) was applied allowing their quantitative measurement and unambiguous characterization. Exposure of human cells to gamma rays led to the formation of several modified bases arising from the rearrangement of the pyrimidine ring of thymine, cytosine and 5-methylcytosine subsequent to initial addition of an hydroxyl radical (•OH) to the 5,6-ethylenic bond. In addition, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, an novel epigenetic mark, and 5-formylcytosine, were found to be generated consecutively to •OH-mediated hydrogen abstraction from the methyl group of 5-methylcytosine. Relevant mechanistic information on one-oxidation reactions of cellular DNA was also gained from the detection of 5-hydroxycytosine and guanine-thymine intra-strand adducts whose formation is rationalized by the generation of related base radical cation. Attempts to search for the radiation-induced formation of purine 5‧,8-cyclo-2‧-deoxyribonucleosides were unsuccessful with the exception of trace amounts of (5‧S)-5‧,8-cyclo-2‧-deoxyadenosine.

  8. Andrographis paniculata Diterpenoids Protect against Radiation-Induced Transformation in BALB/3T3 Cells.

    PubMed

    Nantajit, Danupon; Jetawattana, Suwimol; Suriyo, Tawit; Grdina, David J; Satayavivad, Jutamaad

    2017-07-01

    One of the most concerning side effects of exposure to radiation are the carcinogenic risks. To reduce the negative effects of radiation, both cytoprotective and radioprotective agents have been developed. However, little is known regarding their potential for suppressing carcinogenesis. Andrographis paniculata , a plant, with multiple medicinal uses that is commonly used in traditional medicine, has three major constituents known to have cellular antioxidant activity: andrographolide (AP1); 14-deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide (AP3); and neoandrographolide (AP4). In our study, we tested these elements for their radioprotective properties as well as their anti-neoplastic effects on transformation using the BALB/3T3 cell model. All three compounds were able to reduce radiation-induced DNA damage. However, AP4 appeared to have superior radioprotective properties compared to the other two compounds, presumably by protecting mitochondrial function. The compound was able to suppress radiation-induced cellular transformation through inhibition of STAT3. Treatment with AP4 also reduced expressions of MMP-2 and MMP-9. These results suggest that AP4 could be further studied and developed into an anti-transformation/carcinogenic drug as well as a radioprotective agent.

  9. Ionizing radiation-induced bystander mutagenesis and adaptation: Quantitative and temporal aspects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Zhou, Junqing; Baldwin, Joseph; Held, Kathryn D; Prise, Kevin M; Redmond, Robert W.; Liber, Howard L.

    2009-01-01

    This work explores several quantitative aspects of radiation-induced bystander mutagenesis in WTK1 human lymphoblast cells. Gamma-irradiation of cells was used to generate conditioned medium containing bystander signals, and that medium was transferred onto naïve recipient cells. Kinetic studies revealed that it required up to one hour to generate sufficient signal to induce the maximal level of mutations at the thymidine kinase locus in the bystander cells receiving the conditioned medium. Furthermore, it required at least one hour of exposure to the signal in the bystander cells to induce mutations. Bystander signal was fairly stable in the medium, requiring 12–24 hours to diminish. Medium that contained bystander signal was rendered ineffective by a 4-fold dilution; in contrast a greater than 20-fold decrease in the cell number irradiated to generate a bystander signal was needed to eliminate bystander-induced mutagenesis. This suggested some sort of feedback inhibition by bystander signal that prevented the signaling cells from releasing more signal. Finally, an ionizing radiation-induced adaptive response was shown to be effective in reducing bystander mutagenesis; in addition, low levels of exposure to bystander signal in the transferred medium induced adaptation that was effective in reducing mutations induced by subsequent γ-ray exposures. PMID:19695271

  10. Investigation of radiation-induced free radicals and luminescence properties in fresh pomegranate fruits.

    PubMed

    Shahbaz, Hafiz M; Akram, Kashif; Ahn, Jae-Jun; Kwon, Joong-Ho

    2013-05-01

    Radiation-induced free radicals and luminescence properties were investigated in γ-irradiated (0-3 kGy) pomegranate ( Punica granatum L.) fruits. Photostimulated luminescence (PSL) analysis showed limited applicability, and only 3 kGy-irradiated pomegranates showed positive PSL values (>5000 PCs). Thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve features, such as intensity and the presence of maximum glow peak in radiation-specific temperature range (150-250 °C), provided definite proof of irradiation, and the TL ratios (TL1/TL2) also confirmed the reliability of TL results. Scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX) analysis of the separated minerals showed that feldspar and quartz minerals were responsible for the luminescence properties. Radiation-induced cellulose radicals were detected in the seeds and rinds by ESR analysis. The ESR results were better in freeze-dried samples than in alcohol-extracted ones. A positive correlation was found between the ESR and TL signal intensities and irradiation doses; however, the most promising detection of the irradiation status was possible through TL analysis.

  11. The nucleus is the target for radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, M. I.; Morgan, W. F.

    1998-01-01

    We have previously described chromosomal instability in cells of a human-hamster hybrid cell line after exposure to X rays. Chromosomal instability in these cells is characterized by the appearance of novel chromosomal rearrangements multiple generations after exposure to ionizing radiation. To identify the cellular target(s) for radiation-induced chromosomal instability, cells were treated with 125I-labeled compounds and frozen. Radioactive decays from 125I cause damage to the cell primarily at the site of their decay, and freezing the cells allows damage to accumulate in the absence of other cellular processes. We found that the decay of 125I-iododeoxyuridine, which is incorporated into the DNA, caused chromosomal instability. While cell killing and first-division chromosomal rearrangements increased with increasing numbers of 125I decays, the frequency of chromosomal instability was independent of dose. Chromosomal instability could also be induced from incorporation of 125I-iododeoxyuridine without freezing the cells for accumulation of decays. This indicates that DNA double-strand breaks in frozen cells resulting from 125I decays failed to lead to instability. Incorporation of an 125I-labeled protein (125I-succinyl-concanavalin A), which was internalized into the cell and/or bound to the plasma membrane, neither caused chromosomal instability nor potentiated chromosomal instability induced by 125I-iododeoxyuridine. These results show that the target for radiation-induced chromosomal instability in these cells is the nucleus.

  12. Blockade of TLR3 protects mice from lethal radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Takemura, Naoki; Kawasaki, Takumi; Kunisawa, Jun; Sato, Shintaro; Lamichhane, Aayam; Kobiyama, Kouji; Aoshi, Taiki; Ito, Junichi; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Karuppuchamy, Thangaraj; Matsunaga, Kouta; Miyatake, Shoichiro; Mori, Nobuko; Tsujimura, Tohru; Satoh, Takashi; Kumagai, Yutaro; Kawai, Taro; Standley, Daron M.; Ishii, Ken J.; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Akira, Shizuo; Uematsu, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    High-dose ionizing radiation induces severe DNA damage in the epithelial stem cells in small intestinal crypts and causes gastrointestinal syndrome (GIS). Although the tumour suppressor p53 is a primary factor inducing death of crypt cells with DNA damage, its essential role in maintaining genome stability means inhibiting p53 to prevent GIS is not a viable strategy. Here we show that the innate immune receptor Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) is critical for the pathogenesis of GIS. Tlr3−/− mice show substantial resistance to GIS owing to significantly reduced radiation-induced crypt cell death. Despite showing reduced crypt cell death, p53-dependent crypt cell death is not impaired in Tlr3−/− mice. p53-dependent crypt cell death causes leakage of cellular RNA, which induces extensive cell death via TLR3. An inhibitor of TLR3–RNA binding ameliorates GIS by reducing crypt cell death. Thus, we propose blocking TLR3 activation as a novel approach to treat GIS. PMID:24637670

  13. Rejoining and misrejoining of radiation-induced chromatin breaks. III. Hypertonic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; George, K.; Wu, H. L.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that treatment in anisotonic medium modifies rejoining of radiation-induced breaks in interphase chromosomes. In previous work, we have demonstrated that formation of exchanges in human lymphocytes has a slow component (half-time of 1-2 h), but a fraction of exchanges are also observed in samples assayed soon after exposure. In this paper we studied the effect of hypertonic treatment on rejoining and misrejoining of radiation-induced breaks using fluorescence in situ hybridization of prematurely condensed chromosomes in human lymphocytes. Isolated lymphocytes were irradiated with 7 Gy gamma rays, fused to mitotic hamster cells and incubated in hypertonic solution (0.5 M NaCl) for the period normally allowed for interphase chromosome condensation to occur. The data from hypertonic treatment experiments indicate the presence of a class of interphase chromosome breaks that rejoin and misrejoin very quickly (half-time of 5-6 min). The fast misrejoining of these lesions is considered to be responsible for the initial level of exchanges which we reported previously. No significant effect of hypertonic treatment on the yield of chromosome aberrations scored at the first postirradiation mitosis was detected.

  14. Role of drugs in the prevention and amelioration of radiation induced toxic effects.

    PubMed

    Patyar, Rakesh Raman; Patyar, Sazal

    2018-01-15

    As the use of radiation technology for nuclear warfare or for the benefits of mankind (e.g. in radiotherapy or radio-diagnosis) is increasing tremendously, the risk of associated side effects is becoming a cause of concern. These effects, ranging from nausea/vomiting to death, may result from accidental or deliberate exposure and begin in seconds. Through this review paper, efforts have been done to critically review different compounds which have been investigated as radioprotectors and radiation mitigators. Radioprotectors are compounds which are administered just before or at the time of irradiation so as to minimize the radiation induced damage to normal tissues. And radiation mitigators are the compounds which can even minimize or ameliorate post irradiaion-toxicity provided they are administered before the onset of toxic symptoms. A variety of agents have been investigated for their preventive and ameliorative potential against radiation induced toxic effects. This review article has focused on various aspects of the promising representative agents belonging to different classes of radioprotectors and mitigators. Many compounds have shown promising results, but till date only amifostine and palifermin are clinically approved by FDA. To fill this void in pharmacological armamentarium, focus should be shifted towards novel approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Role of Alveolar Epithelium in Radiation-Induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Celine; Nagarajan, Devipriya; Tian, Jian; Leal, Sofia Walder; Wheeler, Kenneth; Munley, Michael; Blackstock, William; Zhao, Weiling

    2013-01-01

    Pneumonitis and fibrosis are major lung complications of irradiating thoracic malignancies. In the current study, we determined the effect of thoracic irradiation on the lungs of FVB/N mice. Survival data showed a dose-dependent increase in morbidity following thoracic irradiation with single (11–13 Gy) and fractionated doses (24–36 Gy) of 137Cs γ-rays. Histological examination showed a thickening of vessel walls, accumulation of inflammatory cells, collagen deposition, and regional fibrosis in the lungs 14 weeks after a single 12 Gy dose and a fractionated 30 Gy dose; this damage was also seen 5 months after a fractionated 24 Gy dose. After both single and fractionated doses, i] aquaporin-5 was markedly decreased, ii] E-cadherin was reduced and iii] prosurfactant Protein C (pro-SP-c), the number of pro-SP-c+ cells and vimentin expression were increased in the lungs. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed co-localization of pro-SP-c and α-smooth muscle actin in the alveoli after a single dose of 12 Gy. These data suggest that, i] the FVB/N mouse strain is sensitive to thoracic radiation ii] aquaporin-5, E-cadherin, and pro-SP-c may serve as sensitive indicators of radiation-induced lung injury; and iii] the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition may play an important role in the development of radiation-induced lung fibrosis. PMID:23326473

  16. Are there mechanistic differences between ultraviolet and visible radiation induced skin pigmentation?

    PubMed

    Ramasubramaniam, Rajagopal; Roy, Arindam; Sharma, Bharati; Nagalakshmi, Surendra

    2011-12-01

    Most of the studies on sunlight-induced pigmentation of skin are mainly focused on ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced pigmentation and ways to prevent it. Recent studies have shown that the visible component of sunlight can also cause significant skin pigmentation. In the current study, the extent of pigmentation induced by UV and visible regions of sunlight in subjects with Fitzpatrick skin type IV-V was measured and compared with pigmentation induced by total sunlight. The immediate pigment darkening (IPD) induced by the visible fraction of sunlight is not significantly different from that induced by the UV fraction. However, the persistent pigment darkening (PPD) induced by visible fraction of sunlight in significantly lower than that induced by the UV fraction. The dose responses of IPD induced by UV, visible light and total sunlight suggest that both UV and visible light interact with the same precursor although UV is 25 times more efficient in inducing pigmentation per J cm(-2) of irradiation compared to visible radiation. The measured diffused reflection spectra and decay kinetics of UV and visible radiation-induced pigmentation are very similar, indicating that the nature of the transient and persistent species involved in both the processes are also likely to be same.

  17. Modulating factors in the expression of radiation-induced oncogenic transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, E J; Hei, T K

    1990-01-01

    Many assays for oncogenic transformation have been developed ranging from those in established rodent cell lines where morphological alteration is scored, to those in human cells growing in nude mice where tumor invasiveness is scored. In general, systems that are most quantitative are also the least relevant in terms of human carcinogenesis and human risk estimation. The development of cell culture systems has made it possible to assess at the cellular level the oncogenic potential of a variety of chemical, physical and viral agents. Cell culture systems afford the opportunity to identify factors and conditions that may prevent or enhance cellular transformation by radiation and chemicals. Permissive and protective factors in radiation-induced transformation include thyroid hormone and the tumor promoter TPA that increase the transformation incidence for a given dose of radiation, and retinoids, selenium, vitamin E, and 5-aminobenzamide that inhibit the expression of transformation. Densely ionizing alpha-particles, similar to those emitted by radon daughters, are highly effective in inducing transformations and appear to interact in a supra-additive fashion with asbestos fibers. The activation of a known dominant oncogene has not yet been demonstrated in radiation-induced oncogenic transformation. The most likely mechanism for radiation activation of an oncogene would be via the production of a chromosomal translocation. Radiation also efficiently induces deletions and may thus lead to the loss of a suppressor gene. Images FIGURE 4. PMID:2272310

  18. Ionizing Radiation-Induced Immune and Inflammatory Reactions in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lumniczky, Katalin; Szatmári, Tünde; Sáfrány, Géza

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced late brain injury consisting of vascular abnormalities, demyelination, white matter necrosis, and cognitive impairment has been described in patients subjected to cranial radiotherapy for brain tumors. Accumulating evidence suggests that various degrees of cognitive deficit can develop after much lower doses of ionizing radiation, as well. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these alterations are not elucidated so far. A permanent deficit in neurogenesis, chronic microvascular alterations, and blood–brain barrier dysfunctionality are considered among the main causative factors. Chronic neuroinflammation and altered immune reactions in the brain, which are inherent complications of brain irradiation, have also been directly implicated in the development of cognitive decline after radiation. This review aims to give a comprehensive overview on radiation-induced immune alterations and inflammatory reactions in the brain and summarizes how these processes can influence cognitive performance. The available data on the risk of low-dose radiation exposure in the development of cognitive impairment and the underlying mechanisms are also discussed. PMID:28529513

  19. The Development of Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Adverse Health Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The Development of Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Adverse Health Effects Ann R. Kennedy Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 195 John Morgan Building, 3620 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, PA, United States 19104-6072 The development of countermeasures for radiation induced adverse health effects is a lengthy process, particularly when the countermeasure/drug has not yet been evaluated in human trials. One example of a drug developed from the bench to the clinic is the soybean-derived Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI), which has been developed as a countermeasure for radiation induced cancer. It was originally identified as a compound/drug that could prevent the radiation induced carcinogenic process in an in vitro assay system in 1975. The first observation that BBI could inhibit carcinogenesis in animals was in 1985. BBI received Investigational New Drug (IND) Status with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1992 (after several years of negotiation with the FDA about the potential IND status of the drug), and human trials began at that time. Phase I, II and III human trials utilizing BBI have been performed under several INDs with the FDA, and an ongoing Phase III trial will be ending in the very near future. Thus, the drug has been in development for 35 years at this point, and it is still not a prescription drug on the market which is available for human use. A somewhat less time-consuming process is to evaluate compounds that are on the GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) list. These compounds would include some over-the-counter medications, such as antioxidant vitamins utilized in human trials at the levels for which Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) have been established. To determine whether GRAS substances are able to have beneficial effects on radiation induced adverse health effects, it is still likely to be a lengthy process involving many years to potentially decades of human trial work. The

  20. A non-human primate model of radiation-induced cachexia.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wanchang; Bennett, Alexander W; Zhang, Pei; Barrow, Kory R; Kearney, Sean R; Hankey, Kim G; Taylor-Howell, Cheryl; Gibbs, Allison M; Smith, Cassandra P; MacVittie, Thomas J

    2016-03-31

    Cachexia, or muscle wasting, is a serious health threat to victims of radiological accidents or patients receiving radiotherapy. Here, we propose a non-human primate (NHP) radiation-induced cachexia model based on clinical and molecular pathology findings. NHP exposed to potentially lethal partial-body irradiation developed symptoms of cachexia such as body weight loss in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Severe body weight loss as high as 20-25% was observed which was refractory to nutritional intervention. Radiographic imaging indicated that cachectic NHP lost as much as 50% of skeletal muscle. Histological analysis of muscle tissues showed abnormalities such as presence of central nuclei, inflammation, fatty replacement of skeletal muscle, and muscle fiber degeneration. Biochemical parameters such as hemoglobin and albumin levels decreased after radiation exposure. Levels of FBXO32 (Atrogin-1), ActRIIB and myostatin were significantly changed in the irradiated cachectic NHP compared to the non-irradiated NHP. Our data suggest NHP that have been exposed to high dose radiation manifest cachexia-like symptoms in a time- and dose-dependent manner. This model provides a unique opportunity to study the mechanism of radiation-induced cachexia and will aid in efficacy studies of mitigators of this disease.

  1. Radiation-induced injury of the exocrine pancreas after chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Wydmanski, Jerzy; Polanowski, Pawel; Tukiendorf, Andrzej; Maslyk, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    The pancreas is located almost entirely within the treatment area for radiotherapy of gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to analyze radiation-induced injury of the exocrine pancreas. The study included 127 gastric cancer patients, who underwent preoperative or postoperative chemoradiotherapy. A total dose of 45 Gy was given in 25 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil-based. Lipase and α-amylase were assayed before, during and after treatment. Lipase and α-amylase deficiencies were found in 48.2% and 19.7% of patients, respectively. In the univariant analysis, age and pretreatment α-amylase and lipase activities influenced on risk of injury of the exocrine pancreas (p<0.05). Younger patients (<65 years) had a lower risk of hypoamylasemia than older patients. The probability of insufficiency was lower than 0.2 for patients with pretreatment α-amylase and lipase activities above 50 U/L and 55 U/L, respectively. The multivariate analyses of the time to hypolipasemia showed that only pretreatment lipase activity was significant. Gastric cancer patients have an increased risk of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency after chemoradiotherapy. Thus, the pancreas should be regarded as an OAR. Measuring lipase activity should be the standard for assessing radiation-induced pancreatic injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Ionizing radiation induces senescence and differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Havelek, R; Soukup, T; Ćmielová, J; Seifrtová, M; Suchánek, J; Vávrová, J; Mokrý, J; Muthná, D; Řezáčová, M

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is one of the most common cancers in Europe. Many current anti-cancer treatments, including ionizing radiation, induce apoptosis via DNA damage. Unfortunately, such treatments are non-selective to cancer cells and produce similar toxicity in normal cells, including adult stem cells. One of the fundamental properties of an adult stem cell is that it does not have any tissue-specific structures that allow it to perform specialized functions. However, under certain stimuli, unspecialized adult stem cells can give rise to specialized cells to generate replacements for cells that are lost during one's life or due to injury or disease. Nevertheless, specialization of stem cells must be controlled by specific milieu and also initiated at the proper time, making the entire process beneficial for tissue recovery and maintaining it for a long time. In this paper we assess whether irradiated dental pulp stem cells have maintained open their options to mature into specialized cells, or whether they have lost their unspecialized (immature) state following irradiation. Our findings showed radiation-induced premature differentiation of dental pulp stem cells towards odonto-/osteoblast lineages in vitro. Matrix calcification was visualized from Day 6 or Day 9 following irradiation of cells expressing low or high levels of CD146, respectively.

  3. Molecular Cytogenetics Guides Massively Parallel Sequencing of a Radiation-Induced Chromosome Translocation in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Cornforth, Michael N; Anur, Pavana; Wang, Nicholas; Robinson, Erin; Ray, F Andrew; Bedford, Joel S; Loucas, Bradford D; Williams, Eli S; Peto, Myron; Spellman, Paul; Kollipara, Rahul; Kittler, Ralf; Gray, Joe W; Bailey, Susan M

    2018-05-11

    Chromosome rearrangements are large-scale structural variants that are recognized drivers of oncogenic events in cancers of all types. Cytogenetics allows for their rapid, genome-wide detection, but does not provide gene-level resolution. Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) promises DNA sequence-level characterization of the specific breakpoints involved, but is strongly influenced by bioinformatics filters that affect detection efficiency. We sought to characterize the breakpoint junctions of chromosomal translocations and inversions in the clonal derivatives of human cells exposed to ionizing radiation. Here, we describe the first successful use of DNA paired-end analysis to locate and sequence across the breakpoint junctions of a radiation-induced reciprocal translocation. The analyses employed, with varying degrees of success, several well-known bioinformatics algorithms, a task made difficult by the involvement of repetitive DNA sequences. As for underlying mechanisms, the results of Sanger sequencing suggested that the translocation in question was likely formed via microhomology-mediated non-homologous end joining (mmNHEJ). To our knowledge, this represents the first use of MPS to characterize the breakpoint junctions of a radiation-induced chromosomal translocation in human cells. Curiously, these same approaches were unsuccessful when applied to the analysis of inversions previously identified by directional genomic hybridization (dGH). We conclude that molecular cytogenetics continues to provide critical guidance for structural variant discovery, validation and in "tuning" analysis filters to enable robust breakpoint identification at the base pair level.

  4. Lithium delays the radiation-induced apoptotic process in external granule cells of mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Inouye, M; Yamamura, H; Nakano, A

    1995-09-01

    Proliferating cells of the external granular layer (EGL) in the developing cerebellum are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation. We examined the effect of lithium, an inhibitor of intracellular signaling, on the manifestation of radiation-induced apoptosis. Newborn mice were exposed to 0.5 Gy gamma-irradiation alone, or first were treated with lithium (10 mumol/g, SC) then given 0.5 Gy irradiation 2 hr later. The EGL was examined histologically for apoptosis at various times after treatment. Apoptotic cells increased rapidly, peaked (about 14%) 6 hr after irradiation, then decreased gradually to the control level by 24 hr. Prior treatment with lithium delayed the manifestation of apoptosis, the peak appearing at 12 hr. The disappearance of dead cells was delayed for about one day. The lithium concentration in the whole brain increased rapidly, being 30 micrograms/g at the time of irradiation and remaining at more than 40 micrograms/g for 40 hr. Lithium is reported to inhibit guanine-nucleotide binding to G proteins as well as phosphoinositide turnover. Of the variety of lesions induced by radiation, DNA double strand breaks are the most important source of cell lethality. The present findings, however, suggest that cyclic AMP-mediated and/or phosphoinositidemediated signaling systems regulate radiation-induced apoptosis.

  5. Does altered fractionation influence the risk of radiation-induced optic neuropathy?

    SciT

    Bhandare, Niranjan; Monroe, Alan T.; Morris, Christopher G.

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the parameters that influence the risk of radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) after radiotherapy for head-and-neck tumors. Methods and Materials: Between 1964 and 2000, 273 patients with tumors of the nasopharynx, paranasal sinuses, nasal cavity, and hard palate adenoid cystic carcinomas were treated with curative intent and had radiation fields that included the optic nerves and/or chiasm. Patients were followed for at least 1 year after radiotherapy. Results: Radiation-induced optic neuropathy developed in 32 eyes of 24 patients (9%). The 5-year rates of freedom from RION according to the total dose and once- vs. twice-daily fractionation were asmore » follows: {<=}63 Gy once daily, 95%; {<=}63 Gy twice daily, 98%; >63 Gy once daily, 78%; and >63 Gy twice daily, 91%. Multivariate analysis revealed that the total dose affected the risk of RION (p = 0.0047), with patient age (p = 0.0909), once-daily vs. twice-daily fractionation (p = 0.0684), and overall treatment time (p = 0.0972) were marginally significant. The use of adjuvant chemotherapy did not significantly influence the likelihood of developing RION. Conclusion: The likelihood of developing RION is primarily influenced by the total dose. Hyperfractionation may reduce the risk of experiencing this complication.« less

  6. Radiation-induced grain subdivision and bubble formation in U3Si2 at LWR temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Tiankai; Gong, Bowen; He, Lingfeng; Harp, Jason; Tonks, Michael; Lian, Jie

    2018-01-01

    U3Si2, an advanced fuel form proposed for light water reactors (LWRs), has excellent thermal conductivity and a high fissile element density. However, limited understanding of the radiation performance and fission gas behavior of U3Si2 is available at LWR conditions. This study explores the irradiation behavior of U3Si2 by 300 keV Xe+ ion beam bombardment combining with in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation. The crystal structure of U3Si2 is stable against radiation-induced amorphization at 350 °C even up to a very high dose of 64 displacements per atom (dpa). Grain subdivision of U3Si2 occurs at a relatively low dose of 0.8 dpa and continues to above 48 dpa, leading to the formation of high-density nanoparticles. Nano-sized Xe gas bubbles prevail at a dose of 24 dpa, and Xe bubble coalescence was identified with the increase of irradiation dose. The volumetric swelling resulting from Xe gas bubble formation and coalescence was estimated with respect to radiation dose, and a 2.2% volumetric swelling was observed for U3Si2 irradiated at 64 dpa. Due to extremely high susceptibility to oxidation, the nano-sized U3Si2 grains upon radiation-induced grain subdivision were oxidized to nanocrystalline UO2 in a high vacuum chamber for TEM observation, eventually leading to the formation of UO2 nanocrystallites stable up to 80 dpa.

  7. Radiation-induced complications in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuddin, A. Yusof; Rahman, I. Abdul; Siah, N. J.; Mohamed, F.; Saadc, M.; Ismail, F.

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine the relationship between radiation-induced complications with dosimetric and radiobiological parameters for prostate cancer patients that underwent the conformal radiotherapy treatment. 17 prostate cancer patients that have been treated with conformal radiotherapy were retrospectively analysed. The dosimetric data was retrieved in the form of dose-volume histogram (DVH) from Radiotherapy Treatment Planning System. The DVH was utilised to derived Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) in radiobiological data. Follow-up data from medical records were used to grade the occurrence of acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scoring system. The chi-square test was used to determine the relationship between radiation-induced complication with dosimetric and radiobiological parameters. 8 (47%) and 7 (41%) patients were having acute GI and GU complications respectively. The acute GI complication can be associated with V60rectum, rectal mean dose and NTCPrectum with p-value of 0.016, 0.038 and 0.049 respectively. There are no significant relationships of acute GU complication with dosimetric and radiobiological variables. Further study can be done by increase the sample size and follow up duration for deeper understanding of the factors that effecting the GU and GI complication in prostate cancer radiotherapy.

  8. Proximity within interphase chromosome contributes to the breakpoint distribution in radiation-induced intrachromosomal exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ye; Uhlemeyer, Jimmy; Hada, Megumi; Asaithamby, A.; Chen, David J.; Wu, Honglu

    2014-07-01

    Previously, we reported that breaks involved in chromosome aberrations were clustered in several regions of chromosome 3 in human mammary epithelial cells after exposures to either low- or high-LET radiation. In particular, breaks in certain regions of the chromosome tended to rejoin with each other to form an intrachromosome exchange event. This study tests the hypothesis that proximity within a single chromosome in interphase cell nuclei contributes to the distribution of radiation-induced chromosome breaks. Chromosome 3 in G1 human mammary epithelial cells was hybridized with the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) probes that distinguish the chromosome in six differently colored regions, and the location of these regions was measured with a laser confocal microscope. Results of the study indicated that, on a multi-mega base pair scale of the DNA, the arrangement of chromatin was non-random. Both telomere regions tended to be located towards the exterior of the chromosome domain, whereas the centromere region towards the interior. In addition, the interior of the chromosome domain was preferentially occupied by the p-arm of the chromatin, which is consistent with our previous finding of intrachromosome exchanges involving breaks on the p-arm and in the centromere region of chromosome 3. Other factors, such as the fragile sites in the 3p21 band and gene regulation, may also contribute to the breakpoint distribution in radiation-induced chromosome aberrations.

  9. Role of refractory inclusions in the radiation-induced microstructure of APMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dalong; Briggs, Samuel A.; Field, Kevin G.

    2018-07-01

    Kanthal APMT is a promising FeCrAl-based alloy for accident-tolerant fuel cladding because of its excellent high-temperature oxidation resistance. In this study, powder metallurgy Kanthal APMT alloy, neutron irradiated to 1.8 dpa at nominally 382 °C, was characterized. On-zone STEM imaging revealed that radiation-induced dislocation loops with Burgers vectors of a/2<111> or a < 100 > and black dots tended to agglomerate in the vicinity of refractory inclusions. The densities and sizes of these loops decreased with distance from the inclusion-matrix interfaces. In addition, high-resolution energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy mapping was used to determine the inclusions to be either yttrium- or silicon-rich, as well as to detect the radial distribution of radiation-enhanced α‧ phase near these inclusions. A high density of randomly distributed Cr-rich α‧ phase was found, regardless of the presence of inclusions. Results from this study provide insights into how microstructural features can locally tailor the radiation-induced defects in FeCrAl-based alloys.

  10. Soluble Dietary Fiber Ameliorates Radiation-Induced Intestinal Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianbo; Ding, Chao; Dai, Xujie; Lv, Tengfei; Xie, Tingbing; Zhang, Tenghui; Gao, Wen; Gong, Jianfeng; Zhu, Weiming; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2017-11-01

    Intestinal fibrosis is a late complication of pelvic radiotherapy. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays an important role in tissue fibrosis. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of soluble dietary fiber on radiation-induced intestinal EMT and fibrosis in a mouse model. Apple pectin (4% wt/wt in drinking water) was administered to wild-type and pVillin-Cre-EGFP transgenic mice with intestinal fibrosis induced by a single dose of abdominal irradiation of 10 Gy. The effects of pectin on intestinal EMT and fibrosis, gut microbiota, and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentration were evaluated. Intestinal fibrosis in late radiation enteropathy showed increased submucosal thickness and subepithelial collagen deposition. Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) + /vimentin + and EGFP + /α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) + coexpressing cells were most clearly observed at 2 weeks after irradiation and gradually decreased at 4 and 12 weeks. Pectin significantly attenuated the thickness of submucosa and collagen deposition at 12 weeks (24.3 vs 27.6 µm in the pectin + radiation-treated group compared with radiation-alone group, respectively, P < .05; 69.0% vs 57.1%, P < .001) and ameliorated EMT at 2 and 4 weeks. Pectin also modulated the intestinal microbiota composition and increased the luminal SCFA concentration. The soluble dietary fiber pectin protected the terminal ileum against radiation-induced fibrosis. This effect might be mediated by altered SCFA concentration in the intestinal lumen and reduced EMT in the ileal epithelium.

  11. Low dose or low dose rate ionizing radiation-induced health effect in the human.

    PubMed

    Tang, Feng Ru; Loganovsky, Konstantin

    2018-06-05

    The extensive literature review on human epidemiological studies suggests that low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) (≤100 mSv) or low dose rate ionizing radiation (LDRIR) (<6mSv/H) exposure could induce either negative or positive health effects. These changes may depend on genetic background, age (prenatal day for embryo), sex, nature of radiation exposure, i.e., acute or chronic irradiation, radiation sources (such as atomic bomb attack, fallout from nuclear weapon test, nuclear power plant accidents, 60 Co-contaminated building, space radiation, high background radiation, medical examinations or procedures) and radionuclide components and human epidemiological experimental designs. Epidemiological and clinical studies show that LDIR or LDRIR exposure may induce cancer, congenital abnormalities, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, cognitive and other neuropsychiatric disorders, cataracts and other eye and somatic pathology (endocrine, bronchopulmonary, digestive, etc). LDIR or LDRIR exposure may also reduce mutation and cancer mortality rates. So far, the mechanisms of LDIR- or LDRIR -induced health effect are poorly understood. Further extensive studies are still needed to clarify under what circumstances, LDIR or LDRIR exposure may induce positive or negative effects, which may facilitate development of new therapeutic approaches to prevent or treat the radiation-induced human diseases or enhance radiation-induced positive health effect. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Unusual congenital pulmonary anomaly with presumed left lung hypoplasia in a young dog.

    PubMed

    Lee, C M; Kim, J H; Kang, M H; Eom, K D; Park, H M

    2014-05-01

    A seven-month-old, entire, male miniature schnauzer dog was referred with acute vomiting, inappetence and depression primarily as a result of a gastric foreign body (pine cones). During investigations, thoracic radiographs revealed increased volume of the right lung lobes, deviated cardiomediastinal structures and elevation of the heart from the sternum. Thoracic computed tomography revealed left cranial lung lobe hypoplasia and extension of the right cranial lung parenchyma across the midline to the left hemithorax. Branches of the right pulmonary vessels and bronchi also crossed the midline and extended to the left caudal lung lobe. These findings suggested that the right and left lungs were fused. In humans this finding is consistent with horseshoe lung, which is an uncommon congenital malformation. To the authors' knowledge, this case represents the first report of such a pulmonary anomaly in a dog. © 2014 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  13. Diversity of Pubertal Development in Cartilage-Hair Hypoplasia; Two Illustrative Cases.

    PubMed

    Holopainen, Elina; Vakkilainen, Svetlana; Mäkitie, Outi

    2018-08-01

    Cartilage-hair hypoplasia (CHH) is a rare chondrodysplasia, including disproportionate short stature, hypoplastic hair, immunodeficiency, and increased risk of malignancies. Absent pubertal growth spurt and absent pubic hair complicate monitoring of pubertal development in these patients. Two CHH patients with delayed puberty and excessive growth failure are described. One of the girls had hypogonadotropic hypogonadism whereas the other had hyponormogonadotropic hypogonadism with no spontaneous pubertal development and slow response to estrogen therapy, both requiring permanent replacement therapy. Careful follow-up of pubertal development in individuals with CHH and other growth-restricting bone diseases is needed. In delayed pubertal development timely hormone therapy is essential to ensure maximal growth and well developed secondary sex characteristics. Copyright © 2018 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Multiple acquired portosystemic shunts secondary to primary hypoplasia of the portal vein in a cat.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Satoko; Maeda, Shingo; Tsuboi, Masaya; Saeki, Kohei; Chambers, James K; Yonezawa, Tomohiro; Fukushima, Kenjiro; Fujiwara, Reina; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Matsuki, Naoaki; Ohno, Koichi

    2018-06-06

    A 6-year 5-month-old spayed female Scottish Fold cat presented with a one-month history of gait abnormalities, increased salivation, and decreased activity. A blood test showed hyperammonemia and increased serum bile acids. Imaging tests revealed multiple shunt vessels indicating acquired portosystemic shunt. Histopathologic analysis of liver biopsy showed features consistent with liver hypoperfusion, such as a barely recognizable portal vein, increased numbers of small arterioles, and diffuse vacuolar degeneration of hepatocytes. These findings supported the diagnosis of primary hypoplasia of the portal vein/microvascular dysplasia, (PHPV/MVD). To our knowledge, this is the first case of feline PHPV/MVD that developed multiple acquired portosystemic shunts and presented with hepatic encephalopathy.

  15. Alport syndrome, mental retardation, midface hypoplasia, and elliptocytosis: a new X linked contiguous gene deletion syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, J J; Renieri, A; Gallagher, P G; Kashtan, C E; Cherniske, E M; Bruttini, M; Piccini, M; Vitelli, F; Ballabio, A; Pober, B R

    1998-01-01

    We describe a family with four members, a mother, two sons, and a daughter, who show clinical features consistent with X linked Alport syndrome. The two males presented with additional features including mental retardation, dysmorphic facies with marked midface hypoplasia, and elliptocytosis. The elliptocytosis was not associated with any detectable abnormalities in red cell membrane proteins; red cell membrane stability and rigidity was normal on ektacytometry. Molecular characterisation suggests a submicroscopic X chromosome deletion encompassing the entire COL4A5 gene. We propose that the additional abnormalities found in the affected males of this family are attributable to deletion or disruption of X linked recessive genes adjacent to the COL4A5 gene and that this constellation of findings may represent a new X linked contiguous gene deletion syndrome. Images PMID:9598718

  16. Reliability of magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of hypopituitarism in children with optic nerve hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnaiah, Raghu H; Shelton, Julie B; Glasier, Charles M; Phillips, Paul H

    2014-01-01

    It is essential to identify hypopituitarism in children with optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) because they are at risk for developmental delay, seizures, or death. The purpose of this study is to determine the reliability of neurohypophyseal abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the detection of hypopituitarism in children with ONH. Cross-sectional study. One hundred one children with clinical ONH who underwent MRI of the brain and orbits and a detailed pediatric endocrinologic evaluation. Magnetic resonance imaging studies were performed on 1.5-Tesla scanners. The imaging protocol included sagittal T1-weighted images, axial fast fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery/T2-weighted images, and diffusion-weighted images of the brain. Orbital imaging included fat-saturated axial and coronal images and high-resolution axial T2-weighted images. The MRI studies were reviewed by 2 pediatric neuroradiologists for optic nerve hypoplasia, absent or ectopic posterior pituitary, absent pituitary infundibulum, absent septum pellucidum, migration anomalies, and hemispheric injury. Medical records were reviewed for clinical examination findings and endocrinologic status. All patients underwent a clinical evaluation by a pediatric endocrinologist and a standardized panel of serologic testing that included serum insulin-like growth factor-1, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3, prolactin, cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and free thyroxine levels. Radiologists were masked to patients' endocrinologic status and funduscopic findings. Sensitivity and specificity of MRI findings for the detection of hypopituitarism. Neurohypophyseal abnormalities, including absent pituitary infundibulum, ectopic posterior pituitary bright spot, and absent posterior pituitary bright spot, occurred in 33 children. Magnetic resonance imaging disclosed neurohypophyseal abnormalities in 27 of the 28 children with hypopituitarism (sensitivity, 96%). A

  17. Optic Nerve Hypoplasia Syndrome: A Review of the Epidemiology and Clinical Associations

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Filion, Pamela; Borchert, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Opinion statement Background Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) has developed into a leading cause of congenital blindness. The frequently associated features of hypopituitarism and absent septum pellucidum were felt to have embryonic linkage as “septo-optic dysplasia” or “de Morsier’s syndrome.” More recent studies have suggested these associations are independent of one another. This review provides an assessment of the historical and recent evidence linking neuroradiologic, endocrinologic and developmental morbidity in patients with ONH. The prenatal risk factors, heritability, and genetic mutations associated with ONH are described. Results Recognition of the critical association of ONH with hypopituitarism should be attributed to William Hoyt, not Georges de Morsier. De Morsier never described a case of ONH or recognized its association with hypopituitarism or missing septum pellucidum. Hypopituitarism is caused by hypothalamic dysfunction. This, and other more recently identified associations with ONH, such as developmental delay and autism, are independent of septum pellucidum development. Other common neuroradiographic associations such as corpus callosum hypoplasia, gyrus dysplasia, and cortical heterotopia may have prognostic significance. The predominant prenatal risk factors for ONH are primiparity and young maternal age. Presumed risk factors such as prenatal exposure to drugs and alcohol are not supported by scrutiny of the literature. Heritability and identified gene mutations in cases of ONH are rare. Conclusion Children with ONH require monitoring for many systemic, developmental, and even life-threatening problems independent of the severity of ONH and presence of brain malformations including abnormalities of the septum pellucidum. “Septo-optic dysplasia” and “de Morsier’s syndrome” are historically inaccurate and clinically misleading terms. PMID:23233151

  18. Staged Transcatheter Treatment of Portal Hypoplasia and Congenital Portosystemic Shunts in Children

    SciT

    Bruckheimer, Elchanan, E-mail: elchananb@bezeqint.net; Dagan, Tamir; Atar, Eli

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Congenital portosystemic shunts (CPSS) with portal venous hypoplasia cause hyperammonemia. Acute shunt closure results in portal hypertension. A transcatheter method of staged shunt reduction to afford growth of portal vessels followed by shunt closure is reported. Methods: Pressure measurements and angiography in the CPSS or superior mesenteric artery (SMA) during temporary occlusion of the shunt were performed. If vessels were diminutive and the pressure was above 18 mmHg, a staged approach was performed, which included implantation of a tailored reducing stent to reduce shunt diameter by {approx}50 %. Recatheterization was performed approximately 3 months later. If the portal pressuremore » was below 18 mmHg and vessels had developed, the shunt was closed with a device. Results: Six patients (5 boys, 1 girl) with a median age of 3.3 (range 0.5-13) years had CPSS portal venous hypoplasia and hyperammonemia. Five patients underwent staged closure. One patient tolerated acute closure. One patient required surgical shunt banding because a reducing stent could not be positioned. At median follow-up of 3.8 (range 2.2-8.4) years, a total of 21 procedures (20 transcatheter, 1 surgical) were performed. In all patients, the shunt was closed with a significant reduction in portal pressure (27.7 {+-} 11.3 to 10.8 {+-} 1.8 mmHg; p = 0.016), significant growth of the portal vessels (0.8 {+-} 0.5 to 4.0 {+-} 2.4 mm; p = 0.037), and normalization of ammonia levels (202.1 {+-} 53.6 to 65.7 {+-} 9.6 {mu}mol/L; p = 0.002) with no complications. Conclusion: Staged CPSS closure is effective in causing portal vessel growth and treating hyperammonemia.« less

  19. Staged transcatheter treatment of portal hypoplasia and congenital portosystemic shunts in children.

    PubMed

    Bruckheimer, Elchanan; Dagan, Tamir; Atar, Eli; Schwartz, Michael; Kachko, Ludmila; Superina, Riccardo; Amir, Gabriel; Shapiro, Rivka; Birk, Einat

    2013-12-01

    Congenital portosystemic shunts (CPSS) with portal venous hypoplasia cause hyperammonemia. Acute shunt closure results in portal hypertension. A transcatheter method of staged shunt reduction to afford growth of portal vessels followed by shunt closure is reported. Pressure measurements and angiography in the CPSS or superior mesenteric artery (SMA) during temporary occlusion of the shunt were performed. If vessels were diminutive and the pressure was above 18 mmHg, a staged approach was performed, which included implantation of a tailored reducing stent to reduce shunt diameter by ~50 %. Recatheterization was performed approximately 3 months later. If the portal pressure was below 18 mmHg and vessels had developed, the shunt was closed with a device. Six patients (5 boys, 1 girl) with a median age of 3.3 (range 0.5-13) years had CPSS portal venous hypoplasia and hyperammonemia. Five patients underwent staged closure. One patient tolerated acute closure. One patient required surgical shunt banding because a reducing stent could not be positioned. At median follow-up of 3.8 (range 2.2-8.4) years, a total of 21 procedures (20 transcatheter, 1 surgical) were performed. In all patients, the shunt was closed with a significant reduction in portal pressure (27.7 ± 11.3 to 10.8 ± 1.8 mmHg; p = 0.016), significant growth of the portal vessels (0.8 ± 0.5 to 4.0 ± 2.4 mm; p = 0.037), and normalization of ammonia levels (202.1 ± 53.6 to 65.7 ± 9.6 μmol/L; p = 0.002) with no complications. Staged CPSS closure is effective in causing portal vessel growth and treating hyperammonemia.

  20. Perceptual Speech Assessment After Anterior Maxillary Distraction in Patients With Cleft Maxillary Hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Sunil; Seelan, Nikkie S; Selvaraj, Dhivakar; Khandeparker, Rakshit V; Gnanamony, Sangeetha

    2016-06-01

    To assess speech outcomes after anterior maxillary distraction (AMD) in patients with cleft-related maxillary hypoplasia. Fifty-eight patients at least 10 years old with cleft-related maxillary hypoplasia were included in this study irrespective of gender, type of cleft lip and palate, and amount of required advancement. AMD was carried out in all patients using a tooth-borne palatal distractor by a single oral and maxillofacial surgeon. Perceptual speech assessment was performed by 2 speech language pathologists preoperatively, before placement of the distractor device, and 6 months postoperatively using the scoring system of Perkins et al (Plast Reconstr Surg 116:72, 2005); the system evaluates velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI), resonance, nasal air emission, articulation errors, and intelligibility. The data obtained were tabulated and subjected to statistical analysis using Wilcoxon signed rank test. A P value less than .05 was considered significant. Eight patients were lost to follow-up. At 6-month follow-up, improvements of 62% (n = 31), 64% (n = 32), 50% (n = 25), 68% (n = 34), and 70% (n = 35) in VPI, resonance, nasal air emission, articulation, and intelligibility, respectively, were observed, with worsening of all parameters in 1 patient (2%). The results for all tested parameters were highly significant (P ≤ .001). AMD offers a substantial improvement in speech for all 5 parameters of perceptual speech assessment. Copyright © 2016 The American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The suppression of radiation-induced NF-{kappa}B activity by dexamethasone correlates with increased cell death in vivo

    SciT

    Nam, Seon Young; Chung, Hee-Yong

    2005-10-21

    In this study, we show that dexamethasone treatment increases ionizing radiation-induced cell death by inducing the inhibitory {kappa}B{alpha} (I{kappa}B{alpha}) pathway in mice. The effect of dexamethasone on radiation-induced cell death was assessed by changes in total spleen cellularity and bone marrow colony-forming unit-granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) contents after total body irradiation. While in vivo treatment of mice with dexamethasone alone (1 mg/kg/day, for 2 days) failed to elicit cell death in spleen cells, the combined treatment with dexamethasone (1 mg/kg/day, for 2 days) and {gamma}-rays (1 or 5 Gy) caused a 50-80% reduction in total cellularity in spleen and CFU-GM contents inmore » bone marrow. These results demonstrate that dexamethasone has a synergistic effect on radiation-induced cellular damages in vivo. Immunoblot analysis showed that dexamethasone treatment significantly increases I{kappa}B{alpha} expression in the spleens of irradiated mice. In addition, the dexamethasone treatment significantly reduced radiation-induced nuclear translocation of the nucleus factor-{kappa}B in the spleens of irradiated mice. These results indicate that dexamethasone treatment in vivo may increase radiation-induced cell damages by increasing I{kappa}B{alpha} expression in hematopoietic organs such as spleen and bone marrow.« less

  2. Inactivation of NADPH oxidases NOX4 and NOX5 protects human primary fibroblasts from ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Weyemi, Urbain; Redon, Christophe E; Aziz, Towqir; Choudhuri, Rohini; Maeda, Daisuke; Parekh, Palak R; Bonner, Michael Y; Arbiser, Jack L; Bonner, William M

    2015-03-01

    Human exposure to ionizing radiation from medical procedures has increased sharply in the last three decades. Recent epidemiological studies suggest a direct relationship between exposure to ionizing radiation and health problems, including cancer incidence. Therefore, minimizing the impact of radiation exposure in patients has become a priority in the development of future clinical practices. Crucial players in radiation-induced DNA damage include reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the sources of these have remained elusive. To the best of our knowledge, we show here for the first time that two members of the ROS-generating NADPH oxidase family (NOXs), NOX4 and NOX5, are involved in radiation-induced DNA damage. Depleting these two NOXs in human primary fibroblasts resulted in reduced levels of DNA damage as measured by levels of radiation-induced foci, a marker of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and the comet assay coupled with increased cell survival. NOX involvement was substantiated with fulvene-5, a NOXs-specific inhibitor. Moreover, fulvene-5 mitigated radiation-induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells ex vivo. Our results provide evidence that the inactivation of NOXs protects cells from radiation-induced DNA damage and cell death. These findings suggest that NOXs inhibition may be considered as a future pharmacological target to help minimize the negative effects of radiation exposure for millions of patients each year.

  3. Inactivation of NADPH Oxidases NOX4 and NOX5 Protects Human Primary Fibroblasts from Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Weyemi, Urbain; Redon, Christophe E.; Aziz, Towqir; Choudhuri, Rohini; Maeda, Daisuke; Parekh, Palak R.; Bonner, Michael Y.; Arbiser, Jack L.; Bonner, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Human exposure to ionizing radiation from medical procedures has increased sharply in the last three decades. Recent epidemiological studies suggest a direct relationship between exposure to ionizing radiation and health problems, including cancer incidence. Therefore, minimizing the impact of radiation exposure in patients has become a priority in the development of future clinical practices. Crucial players in radiation-induced DNA damage include reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the sources of these have remained elusive. To the best of our knowledge, we show here for the first time that two members of the ROS-generating NADPH oxidase family (NOXs), NOX4 and NOX5, are involved in radiation-induced DNA damage. Depleting these two NOXs in human primary fibroblasts resulted in reduced levels of DNA damage as measured by levels of radiation-induced foci, a marker of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and the comet assay coupled with increased cell survival. NOX involvement was substantiated with fulvene-5, a NOXs-specific inhibitor. Moreover, fulvene-5 mitigated radiation-induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells ex vivo. Our results provide evidence that the inactivation of NOXs protects cells from radiation-induced DNA damage and cell death. These findings suggest that NOXs inhibition may be considered as a future pharmacological target to help minimize the negative effects of radiation exposure for millions of patients each year. PMID:25706776

  4. The pulmonary mesenchymal tissue layer is defective in an in vitro recombinant model of nitrofen-induced lung hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    van Loenhout, Rhiannon B; Tseu, Irene; Fox, Emily K; Huang, Zhen; Tibboel, Dick; Post, Martin; Keijzer, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Despite modern treatments, congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) remains associated with variable survival and significant morbidity. The associated pulmonary hypoplasia is a major determinant of outcome. To develop better treatments, improved comprehension of the pathogenesis of lung hypoplasia is warranted. We developed an in vitro cell recombinant model to mimic pulmonary hypoplasia and specifically to investigate epithelial-mesenchymal interactions and to decipher which tissue layer is primarily defective in nitrofen-induced CDH-associated lung hypoplasia. Epithelial cells (E) and fibroblasts (F) were isolated from E19 control ((C)) and nitrofen-induced hypoplastic rat lungs ((N)). Cells were recombined and cultured as either homotypic [(F(C))(E(C)) and (F(N))(E(N))] or heterotypic [(F(C))(E(N)) and (F(N))(E(C))] recombinants. Recombinants containing F(N) fibroblasts had a thickened fibroblast tissue layer and there were fewer organized alveolar-like epithelial structures compared with those in control (F(C))(E(C)) recombinants. These F(N) recombinants exhibited a decrease in terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling and cleaved caspase-3 positive cells. Cell proliferation was arrested in recombinants containing F(N) fibroblasts, which also exhibited increased p27(Kip1) and p57(Kip2) expression. In conclusion, fibroblasts, and not epithelial cells, appear to be the defective cell type in nitrofen-induced hypoplastic lungs due to a decreased ability to undergo apoptosis and maintain overall proliferation. This may explain the characteristic pulmonary interstitial thickening and hypoplasia observed in both nitrofen-induced hypoplastic lungs as well as human hypoplastic CDH lungs. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Protection of radiation induced DNA and membrane damages by total triterpenes isolated from Ganoderma lucidum (Fr.) P. Karst.

    PubMed

    Smina, T P; Maurya, D K; Devasagayam, T P A; Janardhanan, K K

    2015-05-25

    The total triterpenes isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma lucidum was examined for its potential to prevent γ-radiation induced membrane damage in rat liver mitochondria and microsomes. The effects of total triterpenes on γ-radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in pBR 322 plasmid DNA in vitro and human peripheral blood lymphocytes ex vivo were evaluated. The protective effect of total triterpenes against γ-radiation-induced micronuclei formations in mice bone marrow cells in vivo were also evaluated. The results indicated the significant effectiveness of Ganoderma triterpenes in protecting the DNA and membrane damages consequent to the hazardous effects of radiation. The findings suggest the potential use of Ganoderma triterpenes in radio therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiation-induced inflammatory markers of brain injury are modulated by PPARdelta activation in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnegg, Caroline Isabel

    As a result of improvements in cancer therapy and health care, the population of long-term cancer survivors is growing. For these approximately 12 million long-term cancer survivors, brain metastases are a significant risk. Fractionated partial or whole-brain irradiation (fWBI) is often required to treat both primary and metastatic brain cancer. Radiation-induced normal tissue injury, including progressive cognitive impairment, however, can significantly affect the well-being of the approximately 200,000 patients who receive these treatments each year. Recent reports indicate that radiation-induced brain injury is associated with chronic inflammatory and oxidative stress responses, as well as increased microglial activation in the brain. Anti-inflammatory drugs may, therefore, be a beneficial therapy to mitigate radiation-induced brain injury. We hypothesized that activation of peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor delta (PPARō) would prevent or ameliorate radiation-induced brain injury, including cognitive impairment, in part, by alleviating inflammatory responses in microglia. For our in vitro studies, we hypothesized that PPARō activation would prevent the radiation-induced inflammatory response in microglia following irradiation. Incubating BV-2 murine microglial cells with the (PPAR)ō agonist, L-165041, prevented the radiation-induced increase in: i) intracellular ROS generation, ii) Cox-2 and MCP-1 expression, and iii) IL-1β and TNF-α message levels. This occured, in part, through PPARō-mediated modulation of stress activated kinases and proinflammatory transcription factors. PPARō inhibited NF-κB via transrepression by physically interacting with the p65 subunit, and prevented activation of the PKCα/MEK1/2/ERK1/2/AP-1 pathway by inhibiting the radiation-induced increase in intracellular ROS generation. These data support the hypothesis that PPARō activation can modulate the radiation-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory

  7. The flavonolignan-silymarin protects enzymatic, hematological, and immune system against γ-radiation-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Manish; Arora, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    The main focus of this study is evaluation of radioprotective efficacy of silymarin, a flavonolignan, against γ-radiation-induced damage to hematological, vital organs (liver and intestine), and immune system. Survival studies revealed that silymarin (administered orally for 3 days) provided maximum protection (67%) at 70 mg/kg body weight (b.wt.) against lethal 9 Gy γ-irradiation (dose reduction factor = 1.27). The study revealed significant (p < 0.05) changes in levels of catalase (12.57 ± 2.58 to 30.24 ± 4.89 units), glutathione peroxidase (6.23 ± 2.95 to 13.26 ± 1.36 µg of reduced glutathione consumed/min/mg protein), glutathione reductase (0.25 ± 5.6 to 11.65 ± 2.83 pM NADPH consumed/min/mg protein), and superoxide dismutase (11.74 ± 0.2 to 16.09 ± 3.47 SOD U/mg of protein) activity at 30th day. Silymarin pretreated irradiated group exhibited increased proliferation in erythrocyte count (1.76 ± 0.41 × 10(6) to 9.25 ± 0.24 × 10(6) ), hemoglobin (2.15 ± 0.48g/dL to 14.77 ± 0.25g/dL), hematocrit (4.55 ± 0.24% to 37.22 ± 0.21%), and total leucocyte count (1.4 ± 0.15 × 10(6) to 8.31 ± 0.47 × 10(6) ) as compared with radiation control group on 15th day. An increase in CD4:CD8 ratio was witnessed (0.2-1%) at 30th day time interval using flow cytometry. Silymarin also countered radiation-induced decrease (p < 0.05) in regulatory T-cells (Tregs ) (11.23% in radiation group at 7th day versus 0.1% in pretreated silymarin irradiated group at 15th day). The results of this study indicate that flavonolignan-silymarin protects enzymatic, hematological, and immune system against γ-radiation-induced toxicity and might prove useful in management of nuclear and radiological emergencies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 641-654, 2016. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The use of radiation-induced graft polymerization for modification of polymer track membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtanko, N. I.; Kabanov, V. Ya.; Apel, P. Yu.; Yoshida, M.

    1999-05-01

    Track membranes (TM) made of poly(ethylene terephtalate) (PET) and polypropylene (PP) films have a number of peculiarities as compared with other ones. They have high mechanical strength at a low thickness, narrow pore size distribution, low content of extractables. However, TM have some disadvantages such as low chemical resistance in alkaline media (PET TM), the low water flow rate due to the hydrophobic nature of their surface. The use of radiation-induced graft polymerization makes it possible to improve the basic characteristics of TM. In this communication our results on the modification of PET and PP TM are presented. The modified membranes were prepared by radiation-induced graft polymerization from the liquid phase. Three methods of grafting were used: (a) the direct method in argon atmosphere; (b) the pre-irradiation of TM in air followed by grafting in argon atmosphere; (c) pre-irradiation in vacuum followed by grafting in vacuum without contacting oxygen. The aim of the work was to investigate some properties of TM modified by grafted poly(methylvinyl pyridine) (PMVP) and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAM). It was shown that the modification of TM with hydrophilic polymer results in the growth of the water flow rate. In the past few years many works have been devoted to the synthesis of new polymers - the so-called "intelligent" materials - such as PNIPAAM. However, it is very difficult to make thin membranes of this polymer. Recently, it has been proposed to manufacture composite membranes by grafting stimulus-responsive polymers onto TM. Following this principle, we prepared thermosensitive membranes by the radiation-induced graft polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAM) onto PET TM. PET TM with the pore size of about 1 μm and pore density of 10 6 cm -2 were first inserted into a solution of NIPAAM containing inhibitor of homopolymerization (CuCl 2) and then exposed to the γ-rays from a 60Co source. The transport properties of the grafted

  9. The Role of DNA Methylation Changes in Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects in cranial irradiated Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Xue, Bei; Wang, Xinwen; Wang, Jiawen

    2016-07-01

    Heavy-ion radiation could lead to bystander effect in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. The exact mechanisms of radiation-induced bystander effect in distant organ remain obscure, yet accumulating evidence points to the role of DNA methylation changes in bystander effect. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male Balb/c and C57BL mice were cranial exposed to 40, 200, 2000mGy dose of carbon heavy-ion radiation, while the rest of the animal body was shielded. The γH2AX foci as the DNA damage biomarker in directly irradiation organ ear and the distant organ liver were detected on 0, 1, 2, 6, 12 and 24h after radiation, respectively. Methylation-sensitive amplifcation polymorphism (MSAP) was used to monitor the level of polymorphic genomic DNA methylation changed with dose and time effects. The results show that cranial irradiated mice could induce the γH2AX foci and genomic DNA methylation changes significantly in both the directly irradiation organ ear and the distant organ liver. The percent of DNA methylation changes were time-dependent and tissue-specific. Demethylation polymorphism rate were highest separately at 1 h in 200 mGy and 6 h in 2000 mGy after irradiation in ear. The global DNA methylation changes tended to occur in the CG sites. We also found that the numbers of γH2AX foci and the genomic methylation changes of heavy-ion radiation-induced bystander effect in liver could be obvious 1 h after radiation and achieved the maximum at 6 h, while the changes could recover gradually at 12 h. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in both directly radiation organ ear and distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo. Keywords: Heavy-ion radiation; Bystander effect; DNA methylation; γH2

  10. Dietary Supplement Attenuates Radiation-Induced Osteoclastogenic and Oxidative Stress-Related Responses and Protects Adult Mice from Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Ruth; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Tahimic, Candice; Shirazi-Fard, Yasaman; Alwood, Joshua; Shahnazari, Mohammed; Halloran, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Our central hypothesis is that oxidative stress plays a key role in cell dysfunction and progressive bone loss caused by radiation exposure during spaceflight. In animal studies, excess free radical formation is associated with pathological changes in bone structure, enhanced bone resorption, reduced bone formation and decreased bone mineral density, which can lead to skeletal fragility. We previously reported that exposure to low or high-LET radiation rapidly increases expression levels of pro-osteoclastogenic and oxidative stress-related genes in bone and marrow, followed by pathological changes in skeletal structure. To screen various antioxidants for radioprotective effects on bone, 4 month old, male C57Bl6/J mice were treated with a dietary antioxidant cocktail, injectable alpha-lipoic acid, or a dried plum-enriched diet (DP). Mice were then exposed to 2Gy 137Cs total body radiation and one day later marrow cells were collected and the relevant genes analyzed for expression levels. Of the candidates tested, DP was most effective in reducing bone resorption-related gene expression. Microcomputed tomography revealed that DP also prevented the radiation-induced deterioration of skeletal microarchitecture, as indicated by percent bone volume, trabecular spacing and trabecular number. DP had similar protective effects on skeletal structure after sequential exposure to protons (0.5 Gy, 150MeV/n) and 56Fe 0.5Gy, 600 MeV/n). When cultured ex vivo under osteogenic conditions, bone marrow-derived cells from DP-fed animals exhibited increased colony numbers compared to control diet-fed animals. These findings suggest that DP exerted pro-osteogenic effects apart from previously identified anti-resorptive actions, which may contribute to radioprotection of skeletal tissue. In conclusion, a diet enriched in certain types of antioxidants and polyphenols such as DP may be useful as an intervention to protect tissues from degenerative effects of ionizing radiation.

  11. Comparative study of microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistive oscillations induced by circularly- and linearly- polarized photo-excitation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Tianyu; Liu, Han-Chun; Wang, Zhuo; Wegscheider, W.; Mani, Ramesh G.

    2015-01-01

    A comparative study of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure two dimensional electron system (2DES) under linearly- and circularly- polarized microwave excitation indicates a profound difference in the response observed upon rotating the microwave launcher for the two cases, although circularly polarized microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed at low magnetic fields are similar to the oscillations observed with linearly polarized radiation. For the linearly polarized radiation, the magnetoresistive response is a strong sinusoidal function of the launcher rotation (or linear polarization) angle, θ. For circularly polarized radiation, the oscillatory magnetoresistive response is hardly sensitive to θ. PMID:26450679

  12. Comparative study of microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistive oscillations induced by circularly- and linearly- polarized photo-excitation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Tianyu; Liu, Han-Chun; Wang, Zhuo; Wegscheider, W; Mani, Ramesh G

    2015-10-09

    A comparative study of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure two dimensional electron system (2DES) under linearly- and circularly- polarized microwave excitation indicates a profound difference in the response observed upon rotating the microwave launcher for the two cases, although circularly polarized microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed at low magnetic fields are similar to the oscillations observed with linearly polarized radiation. For the linearly polarized radiation, the magnetoresistive response is a strong sinusoidal function of the launcher rotation (or linear polarization) angle, θ. For circularly polarized radiation, the oscillatory magnetoresistive response is hardly sensitive to θ.

  13. Reduction of radiation-induced cell cycle blocks by caffeine does not necessarily lead to increased cell killing

    SciT

    Musk, S.R.

    1991-03-01

    The effect of caffeine upon the radiosensitivities of three human tumor lines was examined and correlated with its action upon the radiation-induced S-phase and G2-phase blocks. Caffeine was found to reduce at least partially the S-phase and G2-phase blocks in all the cell lines examined but potentiated cytotoxicity in only one of the three tumor lines. That reductions have been demonstrated to occur in the absence of increased cell killing provides supporting evidence for the hypothesis that reductions may not be causal in those cases when potentiation of radiation-induced cytotoxicity is observed in the presence of caffeine.

  14. Functional properties of nisin-carbohydrate conjugates formed by radiation induced Maillard reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muppalla, Shobita R.; Sonavale, Rahul; Chawla, Surinder P.; Sharma, Arun

    2012-12-01

    Nisin-carbohydrate conjugates were prepared by irradiating nisin either with glucose or dextran. Increase in browning and formation of intermediate products was observed with a concomitant decrease in free amino and reducing sugar groups indicating occurrence of the Maillard reaction catalyzed by irradiation. Nisin-carbohydrate conjugates showed a broad spectrum antibacterial activity against Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescence) as well as Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus). Results of antioxidant assays, including that of DPPH radical-scavenging activity and reducing power, showed that the nisin-dextran conjugates possessed better antioxidant potential than nisin-glucose conjugate. These results suggested that it was possible to enhance the functional properties of nisin by preparing radiation induced conjugates suitable for application in food industry.

  15. Expression of Angiotensin II and Aldosterone in Radiation-induced Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shuo; Wu, Rong

    2012-12-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is the most common, dose-limiting complication in thoracic malignancy radiotherapy. Considering its negative impact on patients and restrictions to efficacy, the mechanism of RILI was studied. Wistar rats were locally irradiated with a single dose of 0, 16, and 20 Gy to the right half of the lung to establish a lung injury model. Two and six months after irradiation, the right half of the rat lung tissue was removed, and the concentrations of TGF-β1, angiotensin II, and aldosterone were determined via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Statistical differences were observed in the expression levels of angiotensin II and aldosterone between the non-irradiation and irradiation groups. Moreover, the expression level of the angiotensin II-aldosterone system increased with increasing doses, and the difference was still observed as time progressed. Angiotensin II-aldosterone system has an important pathophysiological function in the progression of RILI.

  16. Marked reduction of radiation-induced micronuclei in human blood lymphocytes pretreated with melatonin

    SciT

    Vijayalaxmi; Reiter, R.J.; Leal, B.Z.

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes which were pretreated in vitro with melatonin, and endogenously synthesized pineal hormone, for 20 min at 37 {plus_minus} 1{degrees}C exhibited a significant and concentration-dependent reduction in the frequency of {gamma}radiation-induced micronuclei compared with irradiated cells which did not receive the pretreatment. The extent of the reduction observed with 2.0 mM melatonin was similar to that found in lymphocytes pretreated for 20 min with 1.0 M dimethylsulfoxide, a known free radical scavenger. These observations indicate that melatonin may have an active role in protection of humans against genetic damage due to endogenously produced free radicals, and alsomore » may be of use in reducing damage due to exposure to physical and chemical mutagens and carcinogens which generate free radicals. 25 refs., 2 tabs.« less

  17. Gamma radiation-induced thermoluminescence emission of minerals adhered to Mexican sesame seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Lazcano, Y.; Correcher, V.; Garcia-Guinea, J.; Cruz-Zaragoza, E.

    2013-02-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) emission of minerals isolated from Mexican sesame seeds appear as a good tool to discern between irradiated and non-irradiated samples. According to the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) data, the adhered dust in both samples is mainly composed of different amounts of quartz and feldspars. These mineral phases exhibit (i) enough sensitivity to ionizing radiation inducing good TL intensity, (ii) high stability of the TL signal during the storage of the material, i.e. low fading, and (iii) are thermally and chemically stable. Blind tests were performed under laboratory conditions, but simulating industrial preservation processes, allow us to distinguish between 1 kGy gamma-irradiated and non-irradiated samples even 15 months after irradiation processing followed the EN 1788 European Standard protocol in sesame samples.

  18. A computational approach to the relationship between radiation induced double strand breaks and translocations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holley, W. R.; Chatterjee, A.

    1994-01-01

    A theoretical framework is presented which provides a quantitative analysis of radiation induced translocations between the ab1 oncogene on CH9q34 and a breakpoint cluster region, bcr, on CH 22q11. Such translocations are associated frequently with chronic myelogenous leukemia. The theory is based on the assumption that incorrect or unfaithful rejoining of initial double strand breaks produced concurrently within the 200 kbp intron region upstream of the second abl exon, and the 16.5 kbp region between bcr exon 2 and exon 6 interact with each other, resulting in a fusion gene. for an x-ray dose of 100 Gy, there is good agreement between the theoretical estimate and the one available experimental result. The theory has been extended to provide dose response curves for these types of translocations. These curves are quadratic at low doses and become linear at high doses.

  19. LHC signals of radiatively-induced neutrino masses and implications for the Zee-Babu model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaide, Julien; Chala, Mikael; Santamaria, Arcadi

    2018-04-01

    Contrary to the see-saw models, extended Higgs sectors leading to radiatively-induced neutrino masses do require the extra particles to be at the TeV scale. However, these new states have often exotic decays, to which experimental LHC searches performed so far, focused on scalars decaying into pairs of same-sign leptons, are not sensitive. In this paper we show that their experimental signatures can start to be tested with current LHC data if dedicated multi-region analyses correlating different observables are used. We also provide high-accuracy estimations of the complicated Standard Model backgrounds involved. For the case of the Zee-Babu model, we show that regions not yet constrained by neutrino data and low-energy experiments can be already probed, while most of the parameter space could be excluded at the 95% C.L. in a high-luminosity phase of the LHC.

  20. Rb1 haploinsufficiency promotes telomere attrition and radiation-induced genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Vasconcellos, Iria; Anastasov, Natasa; Sanli-Bonazzi, Bahar; Klymenko, Olena; Atkinson, Michael J; Rosemann, Michael

    2013-07-15

    Germline mutations of the retinoblastoma gene (RB1) predispose to both sporadic and radiation-induced osteosarcoma, tumors characterized by high levels of genomic instability, and activation of alternative lengthening of telomeres. Mice with haploinsufficiency of the Rb1 gene in the osteoblastic lineage reiterate the radiation susceptibility to osteosarcoma seen in patients with germline RB1 mutations. We show that the susceptibility is accompanied by an increase in genomic instability, resulting from Rb1-dependent telomere erosion. Radiation exposure did not accelerate the rate of telomere loss but amplified the genomic instability resulting from the dysfunctional telomeres. These findings suggest that telomere maintenance is a noncanonical caretaker function of the retinoblastoma protein, such that its deficiency in cancer may potentiate DNA damage-induced carcinogenesis by promoting formation of chromosomal aberrations, rather than simply by affecting cell-cycle control. ©2013 AACR.

  1. Radiation-Induced Organizing Pneumonia: A Characteristic Disease that Requires Symptom-Oriented Management

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Keisuke; Seo, Yuji; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced organizing pneumonia (RIOP) is an inflammatory lung disease that is occasionally observed after irradiation to the breast. It is a type of secondary organizing pneumonia that is characterized by infiltrates outside the irradiated volume that are sometimes migratory. Corticosteroids work acutely, but relapse of pneumonia is often experienced. Management of RIOP should simply be symptom-oriented, and the use of corticosteroids should be limited to severe symptoms from the perspective not only of cost-effectiveness but also of cancer treatment. Once steroid therapy is started, it takes a long time to stop it due to frequent relapses. We review RIOP from the perspective of its diagnosis, epidemiology, molecular pathogenesis, and patient management. PMID:28134830

  2. Resolution of radiation-induced acneform eruption following treatment with tretinoin and minocycline: a case report.

    PubMed

    Parr, Karina; Mahmoudizad, Rod; Grimwood, Ronald

    2013-07-01

    Postradiation comedogenesis is an uncommon side effect of radiation therapy, with few cases reported in the medical literature. The proposed etiology of this reaction is alteration of pilosebaceous unit secretions and retention of proliferating ductal keratinocytes due to stricture and scarring. We report a case of a 48-year-old woman who had been treated for infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the right breast with lumpectomy and radiation therapy. She subsequently developed open and closed comedones as well as tender inflammatory papules and papulopustules in the irradiated area. Our patient was treated with tretinoin cream and oral minocycline, with rapid improvement in symptoms and complete resolution of lesions after 2 months of therapy. We review the literature on the pathogenesis, clinical features, and treatment of postradiation acne, and discuss rapid resolution of a radiation-induced acneform eruption after combination treatment with tretinoin and minocycline.

  3. Radiation-induced desulfurization of Arabian crude oil and straight-run diesel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basfar, A. A.; Mohamed, K. A.

    2011-11-01

    Radiation-induced desulfurization of four types of Arabian crude oils (heavy, medium, light and extra light) and straight-run diesel (SRD) was investigated over the range of 10-200 kGy. Results show that gamma radiation processing at absorbed doses up to 200 kGy without further treatment is not sufficient for desulfurization. However, the combination of gamma-irradiation with other physical/chemical processes (i.e. L/L extraction, adsorption and oxidation) may be capable of removing considerable levels of sulfur compounds in the investigated products. Currently, this approach of combined radiation/physical/chemical processes is under investigation. The findings of these attempts will be reported in the future.

  4. Hydrogen therapy may reduce the risks related to radiation-induced oxidative stress in space flight.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Michael P; Ansari, Rafat R; Zakrajsek, June F; Billiar, Timothy R; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Wink, David A; Nakao, Atsunori

    2011-01-01

    Cosmic radiation is known to induce DNA and lipid damage associated with increased oxidative stress and remains a major concern in space travel. Hydrogen, recently discovered as a novel therapeutic medical gas in a variety of biomedical fields, has potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. It is expected that space mission activities will increase in coming years both in numbers and duration. It is therefore important to estimate and prevent the risks encountered by astronauts due to oxidative stress prior to developing clinical symptoms of disease. We hypothesize that hydrogen administration to the astronauts by either inhalation or drinking hydrogen-rich water may potentially yield a novel and feasible preventative/therapeutic strategy to prevent radiation-induced adverse events. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Radiation-induced changes in the dielectric response of poly(vinylidene fluoride) type polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilczer, B.; Smogor, H.; Goslar, J.; Warchol, S.

    2003-01-01

    High and dispersive dielectric response, characteristic of the relaxor state, was observed in ferroelectric P(VDF/TrFE)(50/50) copolymers irradiated with 1.0 MeV and 1.5 MeV electrons. Relaxor-like behaviour of the copolymer is a result of overlapping of the dielectric anomaly characteristic of the glass transition and that related to the Curie point, which is shifted downwards by electron irradiation. The results of ESR, IR and NIR Raman spectroscopy studies of the radiation damage to P(VDF/TrFE)(50/50) show that radiation-induced irreversible transformation of the ferroelectric copolymer to the relaxor state is related to the existence of polar clusters, consisting of a variety of short range coherence of trans-conformation, stabilized by random fields of C=C and conjugated C=C bonds.

  6. Radiation-Induced Organizing Pneumonia: A Characteristic Disease that Requires Symptom-Oriented Management.

    PubMed

    Otani, Keisuke; Seo, Yuji; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-27

    Radiation-induced organizing pneumonia (RIOP) is an inflammatory lung disease that is occasionally observed after irradiation to the breast. It is a type of secondary organizing pneumonia that is characterized by infiltrates outside the irradiated volume that are sometimes migratory. Corticosteroids work acutely, but relapse of pneumonia is often experienced. Management of RIOP should simply be symptom-oriented, and the use of corticosteroids should be limited to severe symptoms from the perspective not only of cost-effectiveness but also of cancer treatment. Once steroid therapy is started, it takes a long time to stop it due to frequent relapses. We review RIOP from the perspective of its diagnosis, epidemiology, molecular pathogenesis, and patient management.

  7. A review on radiation-induced nucleation and growth of colloidal metallic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This review presents an introduction to the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles by radiation-induced method, especially gamma irradiation. This method offers some benefits over the conventional methods because it provides fully reduced and highly pure nanoparticles free from by-products or chemical reducing agents, and is capable of controlling the particle size and structure. The nucleation and growth mechanism of metallic nanoparticles are also discussed. The competition between nucleation and growth process in the formation of nanoparticles can determine the size of nanoparticles which is influenced by certain parameters such as the choice of solvents and stabilizer, the precursor to stabilizer ratio, pH during synthesis, and absorbed dose. PMID:24225302

  8. Nuclear dynamics of radiation-induced foci in euchromatin and heterochromatin

    SciT

    Chiolo, Irene; Tang, Jonathan; Georgescu, Walter

    2013-10-01

    Repair of double strand breaks (DSBs) is essential for cell survival and genome integrity. While much is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in DSB repair and checkpoint activation, the roles of nuclear dynamics of radiation-induced foci (RIF) in DNA repair are just beginning to emerge. Here, we summarize results from recent studies that point to distinct features of these dynamics in two different chromatin environments: heterochromatin and euchromatin. We also discuss how nuclear architecture and chromatin components might control these dynamics, and the need of novel quantification methods for a better description and interpretation of these phenomena. These studiesmore » are expected to provide new biomarkers for radiation risk and new strategies for cancer detection and treatment.« less

  9. Analytical model of radiation-induced precipitation at the surface of dilute binary alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechenkin, V. A.; Stepanov, I. A.; Konobeev, Yu. V.

    2002-12-01

    Growth of precipitate layer at the foil surface of an undersaturated binary alloy under uniform irradiation is treated analytically. Analytical expressions for the layer growth rate, layer thickness limit and final component concentrations in the matrix are derived for coherent and incoherent precipitate-matrix interfaces. It is shown that the high temperature limit of radiation-induced precipitation is the same for both types of interfaces, whereas layer thickness limits are different. A parabolic law of the layer growth predicted for both types of interfaces is in agreement with experimental data on γ '-phase precipitation at the surface of Ni-Si dilute alloys under ion irradiation. Effect of sputtering on the precipitation rate and on the low temperature limit of precipitation under ion irradiation is discussed.

  10. Cinnamon extract ameliorates ionizing radiation-induced cellular injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Azab, Khaled Sh; Mostafa, Abdel-Halem A; Ali, Ehab M M; Abdel-Aziz, Mohamed A S

    2011-11-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the protective role of cinnamon extract against inflammatory and oxidative injuries in gamma irradiated rats. Rats were subjected to fractionated doses of gamma radiation. Cinnamon extract were daily administrated before starting irradiation and continued after radiation exposure. The results obtained revealed that the administration of cinnamon extract to irradiated rats significantly ameliorated the changes induced in liver antioxidant system; catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities as well as reduced glutathione concentration. The liver's lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation indices were significantly decreased when compared with their equivalent values in irradiated rats. Furthermore, the changes induces in xanthine oxidoreductase system were significantly diminished. In addition, the changes in liver nitric oxide contents, serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and C-reactive protein levels were markedly improved. In conclusion, the administration of cinnamon extract might provide substantial protection against radiation-induced oxidative and inflammatory damages. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Modeling and optimization aspects of radiation induced grafting of 4-vinylpyridene onto partially fluorinated films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasef, Mohamed Mahmoud; Ahmad Ali, Amgad; Saidi, Hamdani; Ahmad, Arshad

    2014-01-01

    Modeling and optimization aspects of radiation induced grafting (RIG) of 4-vinylpyridine (4-VP) onto partially fluorinated polymers such as poly(ethylene-co-tetrafluoroethene) (ETFE) and poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) films were comparatively investigated using response surface method (RSM). The effects of independent parameters: absorbed dose, monomer concentration, grafting time and reaction temperature on the response, grafting yield (GY) were correlated through two quadratic models. The results of this work confirm that RSM is a reliable tool not only for optimization of the reaction parameters and prediction of GY in RIG processes, but also for the reduction of the number of the experiments, monomer consumption and absorbed dose leading to an improvement of the overall reaction cost.

  12. A Human Espophageal Epithelial Cell Model for Study of Radiation Induced Cancer and DNA Damage Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Janice L.; Patel, Zarana S.; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2008-01-01

    For cancer risk assessment in astronauts and for countermeasure development, it is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis and how these mechanisms are influenced by exposure to the types of radiation found in space. We are developing an in vitro model system for the study of radiation-induced initiation and progression of esophageal carcinoma, a type of cancer found to have a significant enhancement in incidence in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. Here we present the results of our preliminary characterization of both normal and hTERT immortalized esophageal epithelial cells grown in 2-dimensional culture. We analyzed DNA repair capacity by measuring the kinetics of formation and loss of - H2AX foci following radiation exposure. Additionally, we analyzed induction of chromosomal aberrations using 3-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Data were generated using both low LET (gamma rays) and high LET ions (1000 MeV/nucleon iron).

  13. Challenges in Clinical Management of Radiation-Induced Illnesses in Exploration Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, Rebecca; Chancellor, Jeffery; Suresh, Rahul; Carnell, Lisa; Reyes, David; Nowadly, Craig; Antonsen, Erik

    2018-01-01

    Historical solar particle events (SPEs) provide context for some understanding of acute radiation exposure risk to astronauts traveling outside of low Earth orbit. Modeling of potential doses delivered to exploration crewmembers anticipates limited radiation-induced health impacts, including prodromal symptoms of nausea, emesis, and fatigue, but suggests that more severe clinical manifestations are unlikely. Recent large animal-model research in space-analogs closely mimicking SPEs has identified coagulopathic events independent of the hematopoietic sequelae of higher radiation doses, similar in manifestation to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). We explored the challenges of clinical management of radiation-related clinical manifestations, using currently accepted modeling techniques and anticipated physiological sequelae, to identify medical capabilities needed to successfully manage SPE-induced radiation illnesses during exploration spaceflight.

  14. New era of radiotherapy: an update in radiation-induced lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Benveniste, M. F. K.; Welsh, J.; Godoy, M. C. B.; Betancourt, S. L.; Mawlawi, O. R; Munden, R. F.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few decades, advances in radiotherapy (RT) technology have improved delivery of radiation therapy dramatically. Advances in treatment planning with the development of image-guided radiotherapy and in techniques such as proton therapy, allows the radiation therapist to direct high doses of radiation to the tumour. These advancements result in improved local regional control while reducing potentially damaging dosage to surrounding normal tissues. It is important for radiologists to be aware of the radiological findings from these advances in order to differentiate expected radiation-induced lung injury (RILD) from recurrence, infection, and other lung diseases. In order to understand these changes and correlate them with imaging, the radiologist should have access to the radiation therapy treatment plans. PMID:23473474

  15. Luminescence Properties of Surface Radiation-Induced Defects in Lithium Fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitovich, A. P.; Kalinov, V. S.; Martynovich, E. F.; Novikov, A. N.; Runets, L. P.; Stupak, A. P.

    2013-11-01

    Luminescence and luminescence excitation spectra are recorded for surface radiation-induced defects in lithium fluoride at temperatures of 77 and 293 K. The presence of three bands with relatively small intensity differences is a distinctive feature of the excitation spectrum. These bands are found to belong to the same type of defects. The positions of the peaks and the widths of the absorption and luminescence bands for these defects are determined. The luminescence decay time is measured. All the measured characteristics of these surface defects differ from those of previously known defects induced by radiation in the bulk of the crystals. It is found that the luminescence of surface defects in an ensemble of nanocrystals with different orientations is not polarized. The number of anion vacancies in the surface defects is estimated using the polarization measurements. It is shown that radiative scattering distorts the intensity ratios of the luminescence excitation bands located in different spectral regions.

  16. Radiation induced failures of complementary metal oxide semiconductor containing pacemakers: a potentially lethal complication

    SciT

    Lewin, A.A.; Serago, C.F.; Schwade, J.G.

    1984-10-01

    New multi-programmable pacemakers frequently employ complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS). This circuitry appears more sensitive to the effects of ionizing radiation when compared to the semiconductor circuits used in older pacemakers. A case of radiation induced runaway pacemaker in a CMOS device is described. Because of this and other recent reports of radiation therapy-induced CMOS type pacemaker failure, these pacemakers should not be irradiated. If necessary, the pacemaker can be shielded or moved to a site which can be shielded before institution of radiation therapy. This is done to prevent damage to the CMOS circuit and the life threatening arrythmiasmore » which may result from such damage.« less

  17. Low-dose radiation induces Drosophila innate immunity through Toll pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Seong, Ki Moon; Kim, Cha Soon; Lee, Byung-Sub; Nam, Seon Young; Yang, Kwang Hee; Kim, Ji-Young; Park, Joong-Jean; Min, Kyung-Jin; Jin, Young-Woo

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies report that exposing certain organisms to low-dose radiation induces beneficial effects on lifespan, tumorigenesis, and immunity. By analyzing survival after bacterial infection and antimicrobial peptide gene expression in irradiated flies, we demonstrate that low-dose irradiation of Drosophila enhances innate immunity. Low-dose irradiation of flies significantly increased resistance against gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial infections, as well as expression of several antimicrobial peptide genes. Additionally, low-dose irradiation also resulted in a specific increase in expression of key proteins of the Toll signaling pathway and phosphorylated forms of p38 and JNK. These results indicate that innate immunity is activated after low-dose irradiation through Toll signaling pathway in Drosophila.

  18. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia: antenatal prognostic factors. Does cardiac ventricular disproportion in utero predict outcome and pulmonary hypoplasia?

    PubMed

    Thébaud, B; Azancot, A; de Lagausie, P; Vuillard, E; Ferkadji, L; Benali, K; Beaufils, F

    1997-10-01

    Despite regular progress in neonatal intensive care, congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) diagnosed antenatally is still associated with up to 80% mortality. It is impossible to predict which fetus with CDH will survive or not. To identify reliable antenatal predictors of outcome and of pulmonary hypoplasia (PH) in fetuses with CDH. Retrospective study. Paediatric intensive care unit of a university children's hospital. Antenatal parameters and presence of left ventricular hypoplasia in utero were compared retrospectively to outcome and to presence of PH in 32 consecutive newborn infants with antenatally diagnosed CDH. Antenatal parameters included: gestational age at diagnosis, herniated organs, associated malformations and presence of polyhydramnios. Size of the cardiac ventricles, the aorta (Ao) and the pulmonary artery (PA) were obtained by fetal echocardiography, from which we calculated a cardioventricular index (left ventricle/right ventricle, LV/RV) and a cardiovascular index (Ao/PA). Delivery was planned in order to provide ventilatory and hemodynamic management. In case of death, PH was assessed according to the following criteria: the lung weight/body weight index and the radial alveolar count. For statistical comparisons, patients were separated into two groups: the hypoplasia group (H) and the non-hypoplasia group (NH). Thirty-two pregnancies were delivered. Twenty-six newborns died (81%), 6 survived (19%). When comparing non-survivors to survivors, predictors of poor outcome were: mean gestational age at diagnosis (23 vs 28 weeks, p = 0.002), intrathoracic stomach (20 vs 1 s, p = 0.01) and associated malformations (6 vs 0). Cardiac ventricular disproportion, expressed by the LV/RV ratio, appeared to correlate well with a poor outcome (0.63 in non-survivors vs 0.93 in survivors, p = 0.03) and with PH (0.63 in the H group vs 0.95 in the NH group, p = 0.03). Our study confirmed the factors for a poor prognosis associated with CDH previously described in

  19. Epigenetic dysregulation of key developmental genes in radiation-induced rat mammary carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Daino, Kazuhiro; Nishimura, Mayumi; Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Takabatake, Masaru; Morioka, Takamitsu; Nishimura, Yukiko; Shimada, Yoshiya; Kakinuma, Shizuko

    2018-02-13

    With the increase in the number of long-term cancer survivors worldwide, there is a growing concern about the risk of secondary cancers induced by radiotherapy. Epigenetic modifications of genes associated with carcinogenesis are attractive targets for the prevention of cancer owing to their reversible nature. To identify genes with possible changes in functionally relevant DNA methylation patterns in mammary carcinomas induced by radiation exposure, we performed microarray-based global DNA methylation and expression profiling in γ-ray-induced rat mammary carcinomas and normal mammary glands. The gene expression profiling identified dysregulation of developmentally related genes, including the downstream targets of polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and overexpression of enhancer of zeste homolog 2, a component of PRC2, in the carcinomas. By integrating expression and DNA methylation profiles, we identified ten hypermethylated and three hypomethylated genes that possibly act as tumor-suppressor genes and oncogenes dysregulated by aberrant DNA methylation; half of these genes encode developmental transcription factors. Bisulfite sequencing and quantitative PCR confirmed the dysregulation of the polycomb-regulated developmentally related transcription-factor genes Dmrt2, Hoxa7, Foxb1, Sox17, Lhx8, Gata3 and Runx1. Silencing of Hoxa7 was further verified by immunohistochemistry. These results suggest that, in radiation-induced mammary gland carcinomas, PRC2-mediated aberrant DNA methylation leads to dysregulation of developmentally related transcription-factor genes. Our findings provide clues to molecular mechanisms linking epigenetic regulation and radiation-induced breast carcinogenesis and underscore the potential of such epigenetic mechanisms as targets for cancer prevention. © 2018 UICC.

  20. Protective effect of hydrogen-rich saline against radiation-induced immune dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Sanhu; Yang, Yanyong; Liu, Wen; Xuan, Zhiqiang; Wu, Shouming; Yu, Shunfei; Mei, Ke; Huang, Yijuan; Zhang, Pei; Cai, Jianming; Ni, Jin; Zhao, Yaoxian

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies showed that hydrogen can be used as an effective radioprotective agent through scavenging free radicals. This study was undertaken to evaluate the radioprotective effects of hydrogen on immune system in mice. H2 was dissolved in physiological saline using an apparatus produced by our department. Spleen index and histological analysis were used to evaluate the splenic structural damage. Spleen superoxide dismutase, GSH, MDA were measured to appraise the antioxidant capacity and a DCF assay for the measurement of radical oxygen species. Cell apoptosis was evaluated by an Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide staining method as well as the apoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3 and c-caspase-3. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells subtypes were detected by flow cytometry with FITC-labelled antimouse CD4 and PE antimouse CD8 staining. Real-time PCR was utilized to determine the CD4+ T cell subtypes and related cytokines. Our study demonstrated that pre-treatment with H2 could increase the spleen index and attenuate the radiation damage on splenic structure. Radical oxygen species level was also reduced by H2 treatment. H2 also inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis in splenocytes and down-regulated pro-apoptotic proteins in living mice. Radiation-induced imbalance of T cells was attenuated by H2. Finally, we found that H2 could regulate the polarization of CD4+ T cells and the level of related cytokines. This study suggests H2 as an effective radioprotective agent on immune system by scavenging reactive oxygen species. PMID:24618260

  1. Effects of ozone oxidative preconditioning on radiation-induced organ damage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gultekin, Fatma Ayca; Bakkal, Bekir Hakan; Guven, Berrak; Tasdoven, Ilhan; Bektas, Sibel; Can, Murat; Comert, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Because radiation-induced cellular damage is attributed primarily to harmful effects of free radicals, molecules with direct free radical scavenging properties are particularly promising as radioprotectors. It has been demonstrated that controlled ozone administration may promote an adaptation to oxidative stress, preventing the damage induced by reactive oxygen species. Thus, we hypothesized that ozone would ameliorate oxidative damage caused by total body irradiation (TBI) with a single dose of 6 Gy in rat liver and ileum tissues. Rats were randomly divided into groups as follows: control group; saline-treated and irradiated (IR) groups; and ozone oxidative preconditioning (OOP) and IR groups. Animals were exposed to TBI after a 5-day intraperitoneal pretreatment with either saline or ozone (1 mg/kg/day). They were decapitated at either 6 h or 72 h after TBI. Plasma, liver and ileum samples were obtained. Serum AST, ALT and TNF-α levels were elevated in the IR groups compared with the control group and were decreased after treatment with OOP. TBI resulted in a significant increase in the levels of MDA in the liver and ileal tissues and a decrease of SOD activities. The results demonstrated that the levels of MDA liver and ileal tissues in irradiated rats that were pretreated with ozone were significantly decreased, while SOD activities were significantly increased. OOP reversed all histopathological alterations induced by irradiation. In conclusion, data obtained from this study indicated that ozone could increase the endogenous antioxidant defense mechanism in rats and there by protect the animals from radiation-induced organ toxicity. PMID:22915786

  2. p21 is Responsible for Ionizing Radiation-induced Bypass of Mitosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu Rui; Liu, Yong Ai; Sun, Fang; Li, He; Lei, Su Wen; Wang, Ju Fang

    2016-07-01

    To explore the role of p21 in ionizing radiation-induced changes in protein levels during the G2/M transition and long-term G2 arrest. Protein expression levels were assessed by western blot in the human uveal melanoma 92-1 cells after treatment with ionizing radiation. Depletion of p21 was carried out by employing the siRNA technique. Cell cycle distribution was determined by flow cytometry combined with histone H3 phosphorylation at Ser28, an M-phase marker. Senescence was assessed by senescence- associated-β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) staining combined with Ki67 staining, a cell proliferation marker. Accompanying increased p21, the protein levels of G2/M transition genes declined significantly in 92-1 cells irradiated with 5 Gy of X-rays. Furthermore, these irradiated cells were blocked at the G2 phase followed by cellular senescence. Depletion of p21 rescued radiation-induced G2 arrest as demonstrated by the upregulation of G2/M transition kinases, as well as the high expression of histone H3 phosphorylated at Ser28. Knockdown of p21 resulted in entry into mitosis of irradiated 92-1 cells. However, cells with serious DNA damage failed to undergo cytokinesis, leading to the accumulation of multinucleated cells. Our results indicated that p21 was responsible for the downregulation of G2/M transition regulatory proteins and the bypass of mitosis induced by irradiation. Downregulation of p21 by siRNA resulted in G2-arrested cells entering into mitosis with serious DNA damage. This is the first report on elucidating the role of p21 in the bypass of mitosis. Copyright © 2016 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  3. Modulation of ionizing radiation induced oxidative imbalance by semi-fractionated extract of Piper betle

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Savita; Dutta, Ajaswrata; Sankhwar, Sanghmitra; Shukla, Sandeep Kumar

    2010-01-01

    The study was planned to evaluate modulatory effect of aqueous extract of Piper betle leaf (PBL) on ionizing radiation mediated oxidative stress leading to normal tissues damage during radiotherapy and other radiation exposures. The total polyphenols and flavonoids known as free radical scavenger (chelators) were measured in the extract. To ascertain antioxidant potential of PBL extract, we studied free radical scavenging, metal chelation, reducing power, lipid peroxidation inhibition and ferric reducing antioxidant properties (FRAP ) using in vitro assays. Mice were exposed to varied radiation doses administered with the same extract prior to irradiation to confirm its oxidative stress minimizing efficacy by evaluating ferric reducing ability of plasma, reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation and micro-nuclei frequency. PBL extract was effective in scavenging DPPH (up to 92% at 100 µg/ml) and superoxide radicals (up to 95% at 80 µg/ml), chelated metal ions (up to 83% at 50 µg/ml) and inhibited lipid peroxidation (up to 45.65% at 500 µg/ml) in a dose dependant manner using in vitro model. Oral administration of PBL extract (225 mg/kg body weight) 1 hr before irradiation in mice significantly enhanced (p < 0.01) radiation abated antioxidant potential of plasma and GSH level in all the observed organs. The treatment with extract effectively lowered the radiation induced lipid peroxidation at 24 hrs in all the selected organs with maximum inhibition in thymus (p < 0.01). After 48 hrs, lipid peroxidation was maximally inhibited in the group treated with the extract. Frequency of radiation induced micronucleated cells declined significantly (34.78%, p < 0.01) at 24 hrs post-irradiation interval by PBL extract administration. The results suggest that PBL extract has high antioxidant potential and relatively non-toxic and thus could be assertively used to mitigate radiotherapy inflicted normal tissues damage and also injuries caused by moderate doses of radiation

  4. Is Pilocarpine Effective in Preventing Radiation-Induced Xerostomia? A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    SciT

    Yang, Wei-fa; Liao, Gui-qing; Hakim, Samer G.

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of concomitant administration of pilocarpine on radiation-induced xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancers. Methods and Materials: The PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials were searched to identify randomized, controlled trials studying the effect of concomitant administration of pilocarpine for radiation-induced xerostomia. Included trials were systematically reviewed, and quantifiable outcomes were pooled for meta-analysis. Outcomes of interest included salivary flow, clinician-rated xerostomia grade, patient-reported xerostomia scoring, quality of life, and adverse effects. Results: Six prospective, randomized, controlled trials in 8 articles were included in this systematic review. The total number of patientsmore » was 369 in the pilocarpine group and 367 in the control group. Concomitant administration of pilocarpine during radiation could increase the unstimulated salivary flow rate in a period of 3 to 6 months after treatment, and also reduce the clinician-rated xerostomia grade. Patient-reported xerostomia was not significantly impacted by pilocarpine in the initial 3 months but was superior at 6 months. No significant difference of stimulated salivary flow rate could be confirmed between the 2 arms. Adverse effects of pilocarpine were mild and tolerable. Conclusions: The concomitant administration of pilocarpine during radiation increases unstimulated salivary flow rate and reduces clinician-rated xerostomia grade after radiation. It also relieves patients' xerostomia at 6 months and possibly at 12 months. However, pilocarpine has no effect on stimulated salivary flow rate.« less

  5. RIP1 and RIP3 complex regulates radiation-induced programmed necrosis in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Das, Arabinda; McDonald, Daniel G; Dixon-Mah, Yaenette N; Jacqmin, Dustin J; Samant, Vikram N; Vandergrift, William A; Lindhorst, Scott M; Cachia, David; Varma, Abhay K; Vanek, Kenneth N; Banik, Naren L; Jenrette, Joseph M; Raizer, Jeffery J; Giglio, Pierre; Patel, Sunil J

    2016-06-01

    Radiation-induced necrosis (RN) is a relatively common side effect of radiation therapy for glioblastoma. However, the molecular mechanisms involved and the ways RN mechanisms differ from regulated cell death (apoptosis) are not well understood. Here, we compare the molecular mechanism of cell death (apoptosis or necrosis) of C6 glioma cells in both in vitro and in vivo (C6 othotopically allograft) models in response to low and high doses of X-ray radiation. Lower radiation doses were used to induce apoptosis, while high-dose levels were chosen to induce radiation necrosis. Our results demonstrate that active caspase-8 in this complex I induces apoptosis in response to low-dose radiation and inhibits necrosis by cleaving RIP1 and RI. When activation of caspase-8 was reduced at high doses of X-ray radiation, the RIP1/RIP3 necrosome complex II is formed. These complexes induce necrosis through the caspase-3-independent pathway mediated by calpain, cathepsin B/D, and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). AIF has a dual role in apoptosis and necrosis. At high doses, AIF promotes chromatinolysis and necrosis by interacting with histone H2AX. In addition, NF-κB, STAT-3, and HIF-1 play a crucial role in radiation-induced inflammatory responses embedded in a complex inflammatory network. Analysis of inflammatory markers in matched plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) isolated from in vivo specimens demonstrated the upregulation of chemokines and cytokines during the necrosis phase. Using RIP1/RIP3 kinase specific inhibitors (Nec-1, GSK'872), we also establish that the RIP1-RIP3 complex regulates programmed necrosis after either high-dose radiation or TNF-α-induced necrosis requires RIP1 and RIP3 kinases. Overall, our data shed new light on the relationship between RIP1/RIP3-mediated programmed necrosis and AIF-mediated caspase-independent programmed necrosis in glioblastoma.

  6. Radiation-induced diamond crystallization: Origin of carbonados and its implications on meteorite nano-diamonds

    Ozima, M.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1997-01-01

    Ten carbonados from Central Africa were studied for U-Th-Pb systematics. To extract U, Th, and Pb from the samples, we developed a cold combustion technique wherein diamond was burnt in liquid oxygen. The technique gave low blanks; 25-50 pg for Pb, 3 pg for U, and 5 pg for Th. After very thorough acid treatments of the carbonados with hot HNO3, HF, and HCl over one week, most of U, Th, and Pb were removed from the samples. Lead in the acid-leached diamonds was highly radiogenic (206Pb/204Pb up to 470). However, the amounts of U and Th in the acid-leached diamonds are too low to account for the radiogenic Pb even if we assume 4.5 Ga for the age of the diamonds. Therefore, we conclude that the radiogenic Pb was implanted into the diamonds from surroundings by means of recoil energy of radioactive decays of U and Th. From the radiogenic lead isotopic composition, we estimate a minimum age of 2.6 Ga and a maximum age of 3.8 Ga for the formation of the carbonados. The above findings of the implantation of recoiled radiogenic Pb into carbonados is consistent with the process of radiation-induced crystallization which was proposed for carbonado by Kaminsky (1987). We show from some theoretical considerations that when highly energetic particles, such as those emitted from radioactive decay of U and Th, interact with carbonaceous materials, they give rise to cascades of atomic disturbance (over regions of about a few nanometer), and the disturbed atoms are likely to recrystallize to form micro-diamonds because of increasing surface energy due to small size. The radiation-induced diamond formation mechanism may be relevant to the origin of nano-diamonds in primitive meteorites. Copyright ?? 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  7. A PPAR-gamma agonist protects from radiation-induced intestinal toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sottili, Mariangela; Gerini, Chiara; Desideri, Isacco; Bastida, Cinzia; Pallotta, Stefania; Castiglione, Francesca; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Meattini, Icro; Greto, Daniela; Cappelli, Sabrina; Di Brina, Lucia; Loi, Mauro; Biti, Giampaolo; Livi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Because of its anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic, anti-apoptotic and anti-neoplastic properties, the PPAR-γ agonist rosiglitazone is an interesting drug for investigating for use in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced intestinal damage. We aimed to evaluate the radioprotective effect of rosiglitazone in a murine model of acute intestinal damage, assessing whether radioprotection is selective for normal tissues or also occurs in tumour cells. Methods Mice were total-body irradiated (12 Gy), with or without rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg/day). After 24 and 72 hours, mice were sacrificed and the jejunum was collected. HT-29 human colon cancer cells were irradiated with a single dose of 2 (1000 cells), 4 (1500 cells) or 6 (2000 cells) Gy, with or without adding rosiglitazone (20 µM) 1 hour before irradiation. HT-29-xenografted CD1 mice were irradiated (16 Gy) with or without rosiglitazone; tumour volumes were measured for 33 days. Results Rosiglitazone markedly reduced histological signs of altered bowel structures, that is, villi shortening, submucosal thickening, necrotic changes in crypts, oedema, apoptosis, and inflammatory infiltrate induced by irradiation. Rosiglitazone significantly decreased p-NF-kB p65 phosphorylation and TGFβ protein expression at 24 and 72 hours post-irradiation and significantly decreased gene expression of Collagen1, Mmp13, Tnfα and Bax at 24 hours and p53 at 72 hours post-irradiation. Rosiglitazone reduced HT-29 clonogenic survival, but only produced a slight reduction of xenograft tumour growth. Conclusion Rosiglitazone exerts a protective effect on normal tissues and reduces alterations in bowel structures and inflammation in a radiation-induced bowel toxicity model, without interfering with the radiation effect on HT-29 cancer cells. PPAR-γ agonists should be further investigated for their application in abdominal and pelvic irradiation. PMID:28344789

  8. Persistence of Space Radiation Induced Cytogenetic Damage in the Blood Lymphocytes of Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2008-01-01

    Cytogenetic damage in astronaut's peripheral blood lymphocytes is a useful in vivo marker of space radiation induced damage. Moreover, if radiation induced chromosome translocations persist in peripheral blood lymphocytes for many years, as has been assumed, they could potentially be used to measure retrospective doses or prolonged low dose rate exposures. However, as more data becomes available, evidence suggests that the yield of translocations may decline with time after exposure, at least in the case of space radiation exposures. We present our latest follow-up measurements of chromosome aberrations in astronauts blood lymphocytes assessed by FISH painting and collected a various times beginning directly after return from space to several years after flight. For most individuals the analysis of individual time-courses for translocations revealed a temporal decline of yields with different half-lives. Since the level of stable aberrations depends on the interplay between natural loss of circulating T-lymphocytes and replenishment from the stem or progenitor cells, the differences in the rates of decay could be explained by inter-individual variation in lymphocyte turn over. Biodosimetry estimates derived from cytogenetic analysis of samples collected a few days after return to earth lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry. However, a temporal decline in yields may indicate complications with the use of stable aberrations for retrospective dose reconstruction, and the differences in the decay time may reflect individual variability in risk from space radiation exposure. In addition, limited data on multiple flights show a lack of correlation between time in space and translocation yields. Data from one crewmember who has participated in two separate long-duration space missions and has been followed up for over 10 years provides limited information on the effect of repeat flights and show a possible adaptive response to space radiation exposure.

  9. Protective effects of seabuckthorn pulp and seed oils against radiation-induced acute intestinal injury.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Wang, Lan; Lu, Yan; Ji, Yue; Wang, Yaqing; Dong, Ke; Kong, Xiangqing; Sun, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome, including nausea, diarrhea and dehydration, contributes to morbidity and mortality after medical or industrial radiation exposure. No safe and effective radiation countermeasure has been approved for clinical therapy. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential protective effects of seabuckthorn pulp and seed oils against radiation-induced acute intestinal injury. C57/BL6 mice were orally administered seabuckthorn pulp oil, seed oil and control olive oil once per day for 7 days before exposure to total-body X-ray irradiation of 7.5 Gy. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used for the measurement of apoptotic cells and proteins, inflammation factors and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. Seabuckthorn oil pretreatment increased the post-radiation survival rate and reduced the damage area of the small intestine villi. Both the pulp and seed oil treatment significantly decreased the apoptotic cell numbers and cleaved caspase 3 expression. Seabuckthorn oil downregulated the mRNA level of inflammatory factors, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. Both the pulp and seed oils elevated the level of phosphorylated extracellular-signal-regulated kinase and reduced the levels of phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38. Palmitoleic acid (PLA) and alpha linolenic acid (ALA) are the predominant components of pulp oil and seed oil, respectively. Pretreatment with PLA and ALA increased the post-radiation survival time. In conclusion, seabuckthorn pulp and seed oils protect against mouse intestinal injury from high-dose radiation by reducing cell apoptosis and inflammation. ALA and PLA are promising natural radiation countermeasure candidates. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation

  10. Radiation-induced erectile dysfunction using prostate-confined modern radiotherapy in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masaki; Yan, Hui; Rabbani, Zahid; Satoh, Takefumi; Baba, Shiro; Yin, Fang-fang; Polascik, Thomas J; Donatucci, Craig F; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Koontz, Bridget F

    2011-08-01

    The mechanisms of radiation-induced erectile dysfunction (ED) are unclear, as clinical studies are limited, and previous animal models were based on wide-field irradiation, which does not model current radiotherapy (RT) techniques. To perform functional and morphological analyses of erectile function (EF) utilizing image-guided stereotactic prostate-confined RT in a rat model. Sixty young adult male rats aged 10-12 weeks old were divided into age-matched sham and RT groups. A single 20-Gy fraction to the prostate was delivered to RT animals. Penile bulb, shaft, and testes were excluded from treatment fields. Bioassay and intracavernous pressure (ICP) measurements were conducted at 2, 4, and 9 weeks following RT. Perfusion analysis of the corpora cavernosa (CC) was conducted using Hoechst injected prior to sacrifice. Penile shaft and cavernous nerve (CN) were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Plasma testosterone level was analyzed using a testosterone enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) assay kit. Irradiated animals demonstrated statistically significant time-dependent functional impairment of EF by bioassay and ICP measurement from 4 weeks. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression was decreased in CN by 4 weeks. In CC, expression levels of anti-alpha smooth muscle actin and endothelial NOS were significantly decreased at 9 weeks. In penile dorsal vessels, smooth muscle/collagen ratio was significantly decreased at 4 and 9 weeks. Additionally, Hoechst perfusion showed time-dependent decrease in CC of RT animals, whereas CD31 expression was not affected. No toxicities were noted; testosterone levels were similar in both groups. We demonstrated time-dependent ED following image-guided stereotactic RT. Our results imply that reduction of neuronal NOS expression in cavernous nerve could trigger consecutive reduction of smooth muscle content as well as blood perfusion in CC that resulted in corporal veno-occlusive dysfunction. Present study could be a

  11. Radiation-induced functional connectivity alterations in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients with radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiongmin; Wu, Donglin; Zeng, Ling-Li; Shen, Hui; Hu, Dewen; Qiu, Shijun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The study aims to investigate the radiation-induced brain functional alterations in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients who received radiotherapy (RT) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and statistic scale. The fMRI data of 35 NPC patients with RT and 24 demographically matched untreated NPC patients were acquired. Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) was also measured to evaluate their global cognition performance. Multivariate pattern analysis was performed to find the significantly altered functional connections between these 2 groups, while the linear correlation level was detected between the altered functional connections and the MoCA scores. Forty-five notably altered functional connections were found, which were mainly located between 3 brain networks, the cerebellum, sensorimotor, and cingulo-opercular. With strictly false discovery rate correction, 5 altered functional connections were shown to have significant linear correlations with the MoCA scores, that is, the connections between the vermis and hippocampus, cerebellum lobule VI and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, precuneus and dorsal frontal cortex, cuneus and middle occipital lobe, and insula and cuneus. Besides, the connectivity between the vermis and hippocampus was also significantly correlated with the attention score, 1 of the 7 subscores of the MoCA. The present study provides new insights into the radiation-induced functional connectivity impairments in NPC patients. The results showed that the RT may induce the cognitive impairments, especially the attention alterations. The 45 altered functional connections, especially the 5 altered functional connections that were significantly correlated to the MoCA scores, may serve as the potential biomarkers of the RT-induced brain functional impairments and provide valuable targets for further functional recovery treatment. PMID:27442663

  12. Radiation-induced functional connectivity alterations in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients with radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiongmin; Wu, Donglin; Zeng, Ling-Li; Shen, Hui; Hu, Dewen; Qiu, Shijun

    2016-07-01

    The study aims to investigate the radiation-induced brain functional alterations in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients who received radiotherapy (RT) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and statistic scale.The fMRI data of 35 NPC patients with RT and 24 demographically matched untreated NPC patients were acquired. Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) was also measured to evaluate their global cognition performance. Multivariate pattern analysis was performed to find the significantly altered functional connections between these 2 groups, while the linear correlation level was detected between the altered functional connections and the MoCA scores.Forty-five notably altered functional connections were found, which were mainly located between 3 brain networks, the cerebellum, sensorimotor, and cingulo-opercular. With strictly false discovery rate correction, 5 altered functional connections were shown to have significant linear correlations with the MoCA scores, that is, the connections between the vermis and hippocampus, cerebellum lobule VI and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, precuneus and dorsal frontal cortex, cuneus and middle occipital lobe, and insula and cuneus. Besides, the connectivity between the vermis and hippocampus was also significantly correlated with the attention score, 1 of the 7 subscores of the MoCA.The present study provides new insights into the radiation-induced functional connectivity impairments in NPC patients. The results showed that the RT may induce the cognitive impairments, especially the attention alterations. The 45 altered functional connections, especially the 5 altered functional connections that were significantly correlated to the MoCA scores, may serve as the potential biomarkers of the RT-induced brain functional impairments and provide valuable targets for further functional recovery treatment.

  13. HGF Gene Modification in Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduces Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury by Modulating Immunity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Sun, Rui-Ting; Li, Yang; Yang, Yue-Feng; Xiao, Feng-Jun; Zhang, Yi-Kun; Wang, Shao-Xia; Sun, Hui-Yan; Zhang, Qun-Wei; Wu, Chu-Tse; Wang, Li-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Effective therapeutic strategies to address intestinal complications after radiation exposure are currently lacking. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which display the ability to repair the injured intestine, have been considered as delivery vehicles for repair genes. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-gene-modified MSCs on radiation-induced intestinal injury (RIII). Female 6- to 8-week-old mice were radiated locally at the abdomen with a single 13-Gy dose of radiation and then treated with saline control, Ad-HGF or Ad-Null-modified MSCs therapy. The transient engraftment of human MSCs was detected via real-time PCR and immunostaining. The therapeutic effects of non- and HGF-modified MSCs were evaluated via FACS to determine the lymphocyte immunophenotypes; via ELISA to measure cytokine expression; via immunostaining to determine tight junction protein expression; via PCNA staining to examine intestinal epithelial cell proliferation; and via TUNEL staining to detect intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis. The histopathological recovery of the radiation-injured intestine was significantly enhanced following non- or HGF-modified MSCs treatment. Importantly, the radiation-induced immunophenotypic disorders of the mesenteric lymph nodes and Peyer's patches were attenuated in both MSCs-treated groups. Treatment with HGF-modified MSCs reduced the expression and secretion of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), increased the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the tight junction protein ZO-1, and promoted the proliferation and reduced the apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells. Treatment of RIII with HGF-gene-modified MSCs reduces local inflammation and promotes the recovery of small intestinal histopathology in a mouse model. These findings might provide an effective therapeutic strategy for RIII.

  14. Safety and otoprotection of metformin in radiation-induced sensorineural hearing loss in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Mujica-Mota, Mario A; Salehi, Pezhman; Devic, Slobodan; Daniel, Sam J

    2014-05-01

    There is currently no treatment available to prevent radiation-induced sensorineural hearing loss. Metformin has antineoplastic effects and is able to regulate the mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species after cellular stress, which is one of the mechanisms involved in apoptosis after radiation damage. The objective of this study was to determine the safety and radioprotective properties of metformin against radiation-induced cochlear damage both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro and prospective animal study. Animal Care Facilities of the Montreal Children's Hospital Research Institute. Cultured auditory hair cells (HEI-OC1) were exposed to different concentrations of metformin to determine its safety. Cells were incubated with different metformin concentrations and subjected to radiation. Cell viability after experiments was determined with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay. Sixteen guinea pigs were divided in 2 groups: drinking tap water (n = 8) and drinking water containing metformin (n = 8). The animals were unilaterally irradiated for 20 days (total dose 70 Gy), and the ears were divided in 4 groups: control (n = 8), irradiated (n = 8), metformin (n = 8), and experimental (n = 8). Auditory brainstem responses were assessed before and 1, 6, and 16 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. Metformin was not cytotoxic or radioprotective in cultured auditory hair cells. Experimental ears had less hearing loss than radiated ones; however, differences were not statistically significant (P > .05). Metformin is not ototoxic or radioprotective in vitro or in vivo. Ears solely subjected to metformin had better hearing thresholds than the rest of the groups.

  15. The radiation-induced fibroatrophic process: therapeutic perspective via the antioxidant pathway.

    PubMed

    Delanian, Sylvie; Lefaix, Jean-Louis

    2004-11-01

    The radiation-induced fibroatrophic process (RIF) constitutes a late, local and unavoidable sequela to high-dose radiotherapy, traditionally considered irreversible. Today, this process is partly reversible, thanks to recent progress in understanding the physiopathology of the lesions it causes and the results of recent clinical trials using antioxidant therapy. This review includes a synthetic description of the static and dynamic features of the RIF process, as reflected by its clinical, instrumental and histopathological characteristics, and by its cellular and molecular regulation. Schematically, three successive clinical and histopathological phases can be distinguished: a pre-fibrotic aspecific inflammatory phase, a constitutive fibrotic cellular phase, and a matrix densification and remodelling phase, possibly ending in terminal tissular necrosis. The respective roles of the chief actors in the RIF process are defined, as well as their development with time. A fibroblastic stromal hypothesis is suggested revolving around a 'gravitational effect' exerted by the couple ROS (reactive oxygen species)--fibroblasts, and partly mediated by TGF-beta1. A variety of strategies have been tested for the management of RIF. In the light of the mechanisms described, a curative procedure has been proposed via the antioxidant pathway. In particular, it was showed that superoxide dismutase and combined pentoxifylline-tocopherol treatment enables the process of established radiation-induced fibroatrophy to be greatly reduced or even reversed, both in clinical practice and animal experiments. The efficacy of combined pentoxifylline-tocopherol treatment in superficial RIF was confirmed in a randomised clinical trial, and then in successful phase II trials especially in uterine fibroatrophy and osteoradionecrosis. It is of critical importance to evaluate these new management approaches in larger clinical trials and to improve the recording of results for better outcome analysis

  16. PD-1 Modulates Radiation-Induced Cardiac Toxicity through Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Du, Shisuo; Zhou, Lin; Alexander, Gregory S; Park, Kyewon; Yang, Lifeng; Wang, Nadan; Zaorsky, Nicholas G; Ma, Xinliang; Wang, Yajing; Dicker, Adam P; Lu, Bo

    2018-04-01

    Combined immune checkpoint blockade has led to rare autoimmune complications, such as fatal myocarditis. Recent approvals of several anti-programmed death 1 (anti-PD-1) drugs for lung cancer treatment prompted ongoing clinical trials that directly combine PD-1 inhibitors with thoracic radiotherapy for locally advanced lung cancer. Overlapping toxicities from either modality have the potential to increase the risk for radiation-induced cardiotoxicity (RICT), which is well documented among patients with Hodgkin's disease and breast cancer. To investigate cardiotoxicity without the compounding pulmonary toxicity from thoracic radiotherapy, we developed a technique to deliver cardiac irradiation (CIR) in a mouse model concurrently with PD-1 blockade to determine the presence of cardiac toxicity by using physiological testing and mortality as end points along with histological analysis. We observed an acute mortality of 30% within 2 weeks after CIR plus anti-PD-1 antibody compared with 0% from CIR plus immunoglobulin G (p = 0.023). Physiological testing demonstrated a reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (p < 0.01) by echocardiogram. Tissue analyses revealed increased immune cell infiltrates within cardiac tissue. Depletion of CD8-positive lymphocytes with anti-CD8 antibody reversed the acute mortality, suggesting that the toxicity is CD8-positive cell-mediated. To validate these findings using a clinically relevant fractionated radiotherapy regimen, we repeated the study by delivering five daily fractions of 6 Gy. Similar mortality, cardiac dysfunction, and histological changes were observed in mice receiving fractionated radiotherapy with concurrent anti-PD-1 therapy. This study provides strong preclinical evidence that radiation-induced cardiotoxicity is modulated by the PD-1 axis and that PD-1 blockade should be administered with careful radiotherapy planning with an effort of reducing cardiac dose. Copyright © 2017 International Association for the Study of

  17. Exposure to Heavy Ion Radiation Induces Persistent Oxidative Stress in Mouse Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Kamal; Suman, Shubhankar; Kallakury, Bhaskar V. S.; Fornace, Albert J.

    2012-01-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress is attributed to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) due to radiolysis of water molecules and is short lived. Persistent oxidative stress has also been observed after radiation exposure and is implicated in the late effects of radiation. The goal of this study was to determine if long-term oxidative stress in freshly isolated mouse intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) is dependent on radiation quality at a dose relevant to fractionated radiotherapy. Mice (C57BL/6J; 6 to 8 weeks; female) were irradiated with 2 Gy of γ-rays, a low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, and intestinal tissues and IEC were collected 1 year after radiation exposure. Intracellular ROS, mitochondrial function, and antioxidant activity in IEC were studied by flow cytometry and biochemical assays. Oxidative DNA damage, cell death, and mitogenic activity in IEC were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Effects of γ radiation were compared to 56Fe radiation (iso-toxic dose: 1.6 Gy; energy: 1000 MeV/nucleon; LET: 148 keV/µm), we used as representative of high-LET radiation, since it's one of the important sources of high Z and high energy (HZE) radiation in cosmic rays. Radiation quality affected the level of persistent oxidative stress with higher elevation of intracellular ROS and mitochondrial superoxide in high-LET 56Fe radiation compared to unirradiated controls and γ radiation. NADPH oxidase activity, mitochondrial membrane damage, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential were greater in 56Fe-irradiated mice. Compared to γ radiation oxidative DNA damage was higher, cell death ratio was unchanged, and mitotic activity was increased after 56Fe radiation. Taken together our results indicate that long-term functional dysregulation of mitochondria and increased NADPH oxidase activity are major contributing factors towards heavy ion radiation-induced persistent oxidative stress in IEC with potential for neoplastic transformation. PMID

  18. Proximity Within Interphase Chromosome Contributes to the Breakpoint Distribution in Radiation-Induced Intrachromosomal Exchanges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Uhlemeyer, Jimmy; Hada, Megumi; Asaithamby, A.; Chen, David J.; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we reported that breaks involved in chromosome aberrations were clustered in several regions of chromosome3 in human mammary epithelial cells after exposures to either low-or high-LET radiation. In particular, breaks in certain regions of the chromosome tended to rejoin with each other to form an intrachromosome exchange event. This study tests the hypothesis that proximity within a single chromosome in interphase cell nuclei contributes to the distribution of radiation-induced chromosome breaks. Chromosome 3 in G1 human mammary epithelial cells was hybridized with the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) probes that distinguish the chromosome in six differently colored regions, and the location of these regions was measured with a laser confocal microscope. Results of the study indicated that, on a multi-mega base pair scale of the DNA, the arrangement of chromatin was non-random. Both telomere regions tended to be located towards the exterior of the chromosome domain, whereas the centromere region towards the interior. In addition, the interior of the chromosome domain was preferentially occupied by the p-arm of the chromatin, which is consistent with our previous finding of intrachromosome exchanges involving breaks on the p-arm and in the centromere region of chromosome3. Other factors, such as the fragile sites in the 3p21 band and gene regulation, may also contribute to the breakpoint distribution in radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. Further investigations suggest that the 3D chromosome folding is cell type and culture condition dependent.

  19. Extracorporeal shock wave markedly alleviates radiation-induced chronic cystitis in rat

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Ta; Chen, Kuan-Hung; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Yang, Chih-Chao; Cheng, Ben-Chung; Chen, Chih-Hung; Chang, Chia-Lo; Sheu, Jiunn-Jye; Lee, Fan-Yen; Shao, Pei-Lin; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2018-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that extracorporeal shock wave (ECSW) treatment can effectively inhibit radiation-induced chronic cystitis (CC). Adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats (n = 24) were randomly divided into group 1 (normal control), group 2 (CC induced by radiation with 300 cGy twice with a four-hour interval to the urinary bladder), group 3 [CC with ECSW treatment (0.2 mJ/mm2/120 impulses/at days 1, 7, and 14 after radiation)]. Bladder specimens were harvested by day 28 after radiation. By day 28 after radiation, the degree of detrusor contraction impairment was significantly higher in group 2 than that in groups 1 and 3, and significantly higher in group 3 than that in group 1 (P<0.0001). The urine albumin concentration expressed an opposite pattern compared to that of detrusor function among the three groups (P<0.0001). The bladder protein expressions of inflammatory (TLR-2/TLR-4/IL-6/IL-12/MMP-9/TNF-α/NF-κB/RANTES/iNOS) and oxidative-stress (NOX-1/NOX-2/oxidized protein) biomarkers exhibited a pattern identical to that of urine albumin in all groups (all P<0.0001). The cellular expressions of inflammatory (CD14+/CD68+/CD74+/COX-2/MIF+/substance P+) and cytokeratin (CK13+/HMW CK+/CK+17/CK+18/CK+19) biomarkers, and collagen-deposition/fibrotic areas as well as epithelial-damaged score displayed an identical pattern compared to that of urine albumin among the three groups (all P<0.0001). In conclusion, ECSW treatment effectively protected urinary bladder from radiation-induced CC. PMID:29636892

  20. Tooth-Borne Anterior Maxillary Distraction for Cleft Maxillary Hypoplasia: Our Experience With 147 Patients.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Sunil; Selvaraj, Dhivakar; Khandeparker, Rakshit V; Seelan, Nikkie S; Richardson, Shweta

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the results of anterior maxillary distraction for its efficacy and long-term stability in the management of cleft maxillary hypoplasia in a large series of patients with a long-term follow-up extending to 4 years. One hundred sixty-four patients at least 10 years old with cleft maxillary hypoplasia who presented to the authors' unit from January 2009 through October 2014 were evaluated retrospectively, irrespective of gender, type of cleft lip and palate, and amount of advancement needed. Anterior maxillary distraction using a tooth-borne distractor appliance was carried out in all patients and all patients were followed up to 4 years (range, 1 to 4 yr) to evaluate the stability of the procedure and to document any relapse using digitalized lateral cephalograms taken before distraction, immediately after distraction (T2), and at the last follow-up visit (T3; range, 1 to 4 yr). Seventeen patients were subsequently lost to follow-up; therefore, a complete set of records was available for 147 patients. In a subset of 50 patients, perceptual speech assessment was carried out preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively by 2 speech pathologists using the Perkins scoring system that allowed the evaluation of 5 parameters (velopharyngeal insufficiency, resonance, nasal air emission, articulation, and intelligibility). None of these patients underwent speech therapy during the course of evaluation. The development of complications intra- or postoperatively was noted. The data were tabulated and analyzed. An advancement ranging from 4.0 to 13.1 mm (mean, 9.42 mm) was achieved in all patients. One hundred forty patients (95.23%) showed stable results on lateral cephalograms and when T2 values were compared with T3 values. Seven patients (4.76%) exhibited skeletal relapse in various linear and angular measurements assessed on lateral cephalograms. At 6-month follow-up, improvements of 62% (n = 31), 64% (n = 32), 50% (n = 25), 68% (n = 34), and 70% (n

  1. SU-F-R-50: Radiation-Induced Changes in CT Number Histogram During Chemoradiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciT

    Chen, X; Schott, D; Song, Y

    Purpose: In an effort of early assessment of treatment response, we investigate radiation induced changes in CT number histogram of GTV during the delivery of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for pancreatic cancer. Methods: Diagnostic-quality CT data acquired daily during routine CT-guided CRT using a CT-on-rails for 20 pancreatic head cancer patients were analyzed. All patients were treated with a radiation dose of 50.4 in 28 fractions. On each daily CT set, the contours of the pancreatic head and the spinal cord were delineated. The Hounsfiled Units (HU) histogram in these contourswere extracted and processed using MATLAB. Eight parameters of the histogrammore » including the mean HU over all the voxels, peak position, volume, standard deviation (SD), skewness, kurtosis, energy, and entropy were calculated for each fraction. The significances were inspected using paired two-tailed t-test and the correlations were analyzed using Spearman rank correlation tests. Results: In general, HU histogram in pancreatic head (but not in spinal cord) changed during the CRT delivery. Changes from the first to the last fraction in mean HU in pancreatic head ranged from −13.4 to 3.7 HU with an average of −4.4 HU, which was significant (P<0.001). Among other quantities, the volume decreased, the skewness increased (less skewed), and the kurtosis decreased (less sharp) during the CRT delivery. The changes of mean HU, volume, skewness, and kurtosis became significant after two weeks of treatment. Patient pathological response status is associated with the changes of SD (ΔSD), i.e., ΔSD= 1.85 (average of 7 patients) for good reponse, −0.08 (average of 6 patients) for moderate and poor response. Conclusion: Significant changes in HU histogram and the histogram-based metrics (e.g., meam HU, skewness, and kurtosis) in tumor were observed during the course of chemoradiation therapy for pancreas cancer. These changes may be potentially used for early assessment of treatment response.« less

  2. Radiation-induced equilibrium is a balance between tumor cell proliferation and T cell-mediated killing

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hua; Deng, Liufu; Chmura, Steven; Burnette, Byron; Liadis, Nicole; Darga, Thomas; Beckett, Michael A.; Lingen, Mark W.; Witt, MaryEllyn; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2013-01-01

    Local failures following radiation therapy are multifactorial and the contributions of the tumor and the host are complex. Current models of tumor equilibrium suggest that a balance exists between cell birth and cell death due to insufficient angiogenesis, immune effects, or intrinsic cellular factors. We investigated whether host immune responses contribute to radiation induced tumor equilibrium in animal models. We report an essential role for immune cells and their cytokines in suppressing tumor cell regrowth in two experimental animal model systems. Depletion of T cells or neutralization of interferon-gamma reversed radiation-induced equilibrium leading to tumor regrowth. We also demonstrate that PD-L1 blockade augments T cell responses leading to rejection of tumors in radiation induced equilibrium. We identify an active interplay between tumor cells and immune cells that occurs in radiation-induced tumor equilibrium and suggest a potential role for disruption of the PD-L1/PD-1 axis in increasing local tumor control. PMID:23630355

  3. Extracellular adenosine production by ecto-5′-nucleotidase (CD73) enhances radiation-induced lung fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wirsdörfer, Florian; de Leve, Simone; Cappuccini, Federica; Eldh, Therese; Meyer, Alina V.; Gau, Eva; Thompson, Linda F.; Chen, Ning-Yuan; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Fischer, Ute; Kasper, Michael; Klein, Diana; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Westendorf, Astrid M.; Stuschke, Martin; Jendrossek, Verena

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis is a severe side effect of thoracic irradiation, but its pathogenesis remains poorly understood and no effective treatment is available. In this study, we investigated the role of the extracellular adenosine as generated by the ecto-5'-nucleotidase CD73 in fibrosis development after thoracic irradiation. Exposure of wild-type C57BL/6 mice to a single dose (15 Gray) of whole thorax irradiation triggered a progressive increase in CD73 activity in the lung between 3 and 30 weeks post-irradiation. In parallel, adenosine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were increased by approximately three-fold. Histological evidence of lung fibrosis was observed by 25 weeks after irradiation. Conversely, CD73-deficient mice failed to accumulate adenosine in BALF and exhibited significantly less radiation-induced lung fibrosis (P<0.010). Furthermore, treatment of wild-type mice with pegylated adenosine deaminase (PEG-ADA) or CD73 antibodies also significantly reduced radiation-induced lung fibrosis. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that CD73 potentiates radiation-induced lung fibrosis, suggesting that existing pharmacological strategies for modulating adenosine may be effective in limiting lung toxicities associated with the treatment of thoracic malignancies. PMID:26921334

  4. Longitudinal diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging study of radiation-induced white matter damage in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Silun; Wu, Ed X; Qiu, Deqiang; Leung, Lucullus H T; Lau, Ho-Fai; Khong, Pek-Lan

    2009-02-01

    Radiation-induced white matter (WM) damage is a major side effect of whole brain irradiation among childhood cancer survivors. We evaluate longitudinally the diffusion characteristics of the late radiation-induced WM damage in a rat model after 25 and 30 Gy irradiation to the hemibrain at 8 time points from 2 to 48 weeks postradiation. We hypothesize that diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) indices including fractional anisotropy (FA), trace, axial diffusivity (lambda(//)), and radial diffusivity (lambda( perpendicular)) can accurately detect and monitor the histopathologic changes of radiation-induced WM damage, measured at the EC, and that these changes are dose and time dependent. Results showed a progressive reduction of FA, which was driven by reduction in lambda(//) from 4 to 40 weeks postradiation, and an increase in lambda( perpendicular) with return to baseline in lambda(//) at 48 weeks postradiation. Histologic evaluation of irradiated WM showed reactive astrogliosis from 4 weeks postradiation with reversal at 36 weeks, and demyelination, axonal degeneration, and necrosis at 48 weeks postradiation. Moreover, changes in lambda(//) correlated with reactive astrogliosis (P < 0.01) and lambda( perpendicular) correlated with demyelination (P < 0.01). Higher radiation dose (30 Gy) induced earlier and more severe histologic changes than lower radiation dose (25 Gy), and these differences were reflected by the magnitude of changes in lambda(//) and lambda( perpendicular). DTI indices reflected the histopathologic changes of WM damage and our results support the use of DTI as a biomarker to noninvasively monitor radiation-induced WM damage.

  5. Protective effects of Korean red ginseng on radiation-induced oral mucositis in a preclinical rat model.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jae Won; Choi, Jae Won; Lee, Bum Hei; Park, Ju Kyeong; Shin, Yoo Seob; Oh, Young-Taek; Noh, O Kyu; Kim, Chul-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies' attempts to improve radiation-induced oral mucositis have not produced a qualified treatment yet. Our aim was to investigate the effectiveness of Korean red ginseng (KRG) on radiation-induced damage in an in vivo rat model. After 20 Gy of irradiation, rats were divided randomly into the following 4 groups: control, KRG only, radiotherapy (RT) only, and RT + KRG group. The rats were monitored in terms of survival rate, activity, mucositis grade, oral intake, and body weight. The tongue, buccal mucosa, and submandibular gland (SMG) were harvested, and the weight of the SMG was analyzed. The samples then underwent hematoxylin and eosin, TUNEL, and immunohistochemical staining. Radiation-induced severe oral mucositis and SMG injury led to poor oral intake and delayed healing, resulting in the death of some rats. We found that survival rate, oral intake, and body weight increased. Moreover, rats treated with KRG showed less severe mucositis and decreased histologic changes of the oral mucosa and SMG. Furthermore, we showed that the protective effects of KRG were caused by inhibition of the apoptotic signal transduction pathway linked to caspase-3. In conclusion, KRG protects the oral mucosa and SMG from radiation-induced damage by inhibiting caspase-mediated apoptosis in rats.

  6. RADIOFREQUENCY RADIATION-INDUCED CALCIUM-ION-EFFLUX ENHANCEMENT FROM HUMAN AND OTHER NEUROBLASTOMA CELLS IN CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to test the generality of radiofrequency-radiation-induced change in alteration 45Ca2+ efflux from avian and feline brain tissues, human neuroblastoma cells were exposed to electromagnetic radiation at 147 MHz, amplitude modulated (AM) at 16 Hz, at specific absorption ra...

  7. Prophylaxis and management of acute radiation-induced skin toxicity: a survey of practice across Europe and the USA.

    PubMed

    O'Donovan, A; Coleman, M; Harris, R; Herst, P

    2015-05-01

    Radiation-induced toxicity is a common adverse side effect of radiation therapy. Previous studies have demonstrated a lack of evidence to support common skincare advice for radiotherapy patients. The aim of the current study was to investigate the management of radiation-induced skin toxicity across Europe and the USA. Where previous surveys have focused on national practice or treatment of specific sites, the current study aimed to gain a broader representation of skincare practice. An anonymous online survey investigating various aspects of radiotherapy skincare management was distributed to departments across Europe and the USA (n = 181/737 responded i.e. 25%). The UK was excluded as a similar survey was carried out in 2011. The results highlight the lack of consistency in both the prevention and management of radiation-induced skin toxicity. Recommended products are often not based on evidence-based practice. Examples include the continued use of aqueous cream and gentian violet, as well as the recommendations on washing restrictions during treatment. To our knowledge, this is the most extensive survey to date on the current management of radiation-induced skin toxicity. This study highlights significant disparities between clinical practice and research-based evidence published in recent systematic reviews and guidelines. Ongoing large prospective randomised trials are urgently needed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Radiation-induced immunogenic modulation of tumor enhances antigen processing and calreticulin exposure, resulting in enhanced T-cell killing

    PubMed Central

    Gameiro, Sofia R.; Jammed, Momodou L.; Wattenberg, Max M.; Tsang, Kwong Y.; Ferrone, Soldano; Hodge, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is used for local tumor control through direct killing of tumor cells. Radiation-induced cell death can trigger tumor antigen-specific immune responses, but these are often noncurative. Radiation has been demonstrated to induce immunogenic modulation (IM) in various tumor types by altering the biology of surviving cells to render them more susceptible to T cell-mediated killing. Little is known about the mechanism(s) underlying IM elicited by sub-lethal radiation dosing. We have examined the molecular and immunogenic consequences of radiation exposure in breast, lung, and prostate human carcinoma cells. Radiation induced secretion of ATP and HMGB1 in both dying and surviving tumor cells. In vitro and in vivo tumor irradiation induced significant upregulation of multiple components of the antigen-processing machinery and calreticulin cell-surface expression. Augmented CTL lysis specific for several tumor-associated antigens was largely dictated by the presence of calreticulin on the surface of tumor cells and constituted an adaptive response to endoplasmic reticulum stress, mediated by activation of the unfolded protein response. This study provides evidence that radiation induces a continuum of immunogenic alterations in tumor biology, from immunogenic modulation to immunogenic cell death. We also expand the concept of immunogenic modulation, where surviving tumor cells recovering from radiation-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress become more sensitive to CTL killing. These observations offer a rationale for the combined use of radiation with immunotherapy, including for patients failing RT alone. PMID:24480782

  9. Protection against radiation-induced oxidative stress in cultured human epithelial cells by treatment with antioxidant agents

    SciT

    Wan, X. Steven; Ware, Jeffrey H.; Zhou, Zhaozong

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the protective effects of antioxidant agents against space radiation-induced oxidative stress in cultured human epithelial cells. Methods and Materials: The effects of selected concentrations of N-acetylcysteine, ascorbic acid, sodium ascorbate, co-enzyme Q10, {alpha}-lipoic acid, L-selenomethionine, and vitamin E succinate on radiation-induced oxidative stress were evaluated in MCF10 human breast epithelial cells exposed to radiation with X-rays, {gamma}-rays, protons, or high mass, high atomic number, and high energy particles using a dichlorofluorescein assay. Results: The results demonstrated that these antioxidants are effective in protecting against radiation-induced oxidative stress and complete or nearly complete protection was achieved by treatingmore » the cells with a combination of these agents before and during the radiation exposure. Conclusion: The combination of antioxidants evaluated in this study is likely be a promising countermeasure for protection against space radiation-induced adverse biologic effects.« less

  10. Mitigation of radiation-induced hematopoietic injury by the polyphenolic acetate 7, 8-diacetoxy-4-methylthiocoumarin in mice

    PubMed Central

    Venkateswaran, Kavya; Shrivastava, Anju; Agrawala, Paban K.; Prasad, Ashok; Kalra, Namita; Pandey, Parvat R.; Manda, Kailash; Raj, Hanumantharao G.; Parmar, Virinder S.; Dwarakanath, Bilikere S.

    2016-01-01

    Protection of the hematopoietic system from radiation damage, and/or mitigation of hematopoietic injury are the two major strategies for developing medical countermeasure agents (MCM) to combat radiation-induced lethality. In the present study, we investigated the potential of 7, 8-diacetoxy-4-methylthiocoumarin (DAMTC) to ameliorate radiation-induced hematopoietic damage and the associated mortality following total body irradiation (TBI) in C57BL/6 mice. Administration of DAMTC 24 hours post TBI alleviated TBI-induced myelo-suppression and pancytopenia, by augmenting lymphocytes and WBCs in the peripheral blood of mice, while bone marrow (BM) cellularity was restored through enhanced proliferation of the stem cells. It stimulated multi-lineage expansion and differentiation of myeloid progenitors in the BM and induced proliferation of splenic progenitors thereby, facilitating hematopoietic re-population. DAMTC reduced the radiation-induced apoptotic and mitotic death in the hematopoietic compartment. Recruitment of pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages in spleen contributed to the immune-protection linked to the mitigation of hematopoietic injury. Recovery of the hematopoietic compartment correlated well with mitigation of mortality at a lethal dose of 9 Gy, leading to 80% animal survival. Present study establishes the potential of DAMTC to mitigate radiation-induced injury to the hematopoietic system by stimulating the re-population of stem cells from multiple lineages. PMID:27849061

  11. Potential prevention: Aloe vera mouthwash may reduce radiation-induced oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Amirhossein

    2012-08-01

    In recent years, more head and neck cancer patients have been treated with radiotherapy. Radiation-induced mucositis is a common and dose limiting toxicity of radiotherapy among patients with head and neck cancers. Patients undergoing radiation therapy for head and neck cancer are also at increased risk of developing oral candidiasis. A number of new agents applied locally or systemically to prevent or treat radiation-induced mucositis have been investigated, but there is no widely accepted prophylactic or effective treatment for mucositis. Topical Aloe vera is widely used for mild sunburn, frostbites, and scalding burns. Studies have reported the beneficial effects of Aloe gel for wound healing, mucous membrane protection, and treatment of oral ulcers, in addition to antiinflammatory, immunomudulation, antifungal, scavenging free radicals, increasing collagen formation and inhibiting collagenase. Herein the author postulates that oral Aloe vera mouthwash may not only prevent radiation-induced mucositis by its wound healing and antiinflammatory mechanism, but also may reduce oral candidiasis of patients undergoing head and neck radiotherapy due to its antifungal and immunomodulatory properties. Hence, Aloe vera mouthwash may provide an alternative agent for treating radiation-induced oral mucositis and candidiasis in patients with head and neck cancers.

  12. A Novel Approach for the Treatment of Radiation-Induced Hemorrhagic Cystitis with the GreenLight™ XPS Laser

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Daniel Roberto; Ercole, Cesar E; Lopez, Juan Gabriel; Parker, Justin; Hall, Mary K

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The treatment of pelvic malignancies with radiotherapy can develop severe sequelae, especially radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis. It is a progressive disease that can lead to the need for blood transfusion, hospitalizations, and surgical interventions. This tends to affect the quality of life of these patients, and management can at times be difficult. We have evaluated the GreenLight Xcelerated Performance System (XPS) with TruCoag, although primarily used for management of benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH), for the treatment of radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis. Materials and Methods: After International Review Board (IRB) approval, a retrospective chart review was performed in addition to a literature search. A series of four male patients, mean age of 81 years, with radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis secondary to radiotherapy for pelvic malignancies (3 prostate cancer, 1 rectal cancer) were successfully treated with the GreenLight laser after unsuccessful treatment with current therapies described in the literature. Results: All four patients treated with the GreenLight laser had resolution of their hematuria after one treatment and were discharge from the hospital with clear urine. Conclusion: The GreenLight XPS laser shows promising results for the treatment of patients with radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis, and deserves further evaluation and validation, especially since there is limited data available in the literature regarding the use of this technology for the treatment of this devastating condition. PMID:26200555

  13. [Bilateral hypoplasia of the internal carotid arteries associated with aneurysm of the right posterior communicating artery. Apropos of a case].

    PubMed

    el Khamlichi, A; Amrani, F; el Azzusi, M; el Oufir, M; Khamlichi, A M

    1989-01-01

    The authors report a case of bilateral hypoplasia of the internal carotid arteries associated with aneurysm of the right posterior communicating artery in a 17 year old female patient. This anomaly was discovered following a meningeal haemorrhage, which recurred 18 months later, causing the patient's death. Surgical operation was refused by the patient and her family. Bilateral hypoplasia of the internal carotid arteries is a rare congenital malformation (16 cases have been reported in the literature, our case constitutes the 17th). It is distinguished from aplasia by the presence of a patent but very reduced vascular lumen, while aplasia is associated with vestiges of non-patent vessels. The mechanism of development of such a malformation is unclear: some authors have suggested secondary regression of the internal carotid artery following a phase of normal development, while others consider it to represent arrest of the development of the internal carotid artery, at a given moment in time. The frequency of associated aneurysm would be due to the haemodynamic disruption induced by the malformation, especially as parietal defects are more frequent in a malformed vasculature. Bilateral hypoplasia of the internal carotid arteries may be compatible with normal life for an indefinite period of time due to the development of a large number of collateral vessels. However, the new vasculature is threatened by rupture with meningeal haemorrhage and by acute ischaemia, which would probably involve another aetiological factor.

  14. Anterior maxillary segmental distraction in the treatment of severe maxillary hypoplasia secondary to cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongliang; Dai, Jiewen; Si, Jiawen; Zhang, Jianfei; Wang, Minjiao; Shen, Steve Guofang; Yu, Hongbo

    2015-01-01

    Anterior maxillary segmental distraction (AMSD) is an effective surgical procedure in the treatment of maxillary hypoplasia secondary to cleft lip and palate. Its unique advantage of preserving velopharyngeal function makes this procedure widely applied. In this study, the application of AMSD was described and its long-term stability was explored. Eight patients with severe maxillary hypoplasia secondary to CLP were included in this study. They were treated with AMSD using rigid external distraction (RED) device. Cephalometric analysis was performed twice at three time points for evaluation: before surgery (T1), after distraction (T2), and 2 years after treatment (T3). One-way analysis of variance was used to assess the differences statistically. All the distractions completed smoothly, and maxilla was distracted efficiently. The value of SNA, NA-FH, Ptm-A, U1-PP, overjet and PP (ANS-PNS) increased significantly after the AMSD procedure (P < 0.05), with the mean overjet increased by 14.28 mm. However, comparison of cephalometric analysis between T2 and T3 showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). Changes of palatopharyngeal depth and soft palatal length were insignificant. AMSD with RED device provided an effective way to correct maxillary hypoplasia secondary to CLP, extended the palatal and arch length, avoided damage on velopharyngeal closure function and reduced the relapse rate. It is a promising and valuable technique in this potentially complicated procedure. PMID:26629107

  15. Anterior maxillary segmental distraction in the treatment of severe maxillary hypoplasia secondary to cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongliang; Dai, Jiewen; Si, Jiawen; Zhang, Jianfei; Wang, Minjiao; Shen, Steve Guofang; Yu, Hongbo

    2015-01-01

    Anterior maxillary segmental distraction (AMSD) is an effective surgical procedure in the treatment of maxillary hypoplasia secondary to cleft lip and palate. Its unique advantage of preserving velopharyngeal function makes this procedure widely applied. In this study, the application of AMSD was described and its long-term stability was explored. Eight patients with severe maxillary hypoplasia secondary to CLP were included in this study. They were treated with AMSD using rigid external distraction (RED) device. Cephalometric analysis was performed twice at three time points for evaluation: before surgery (T1), after distraction (T2), and 2 years after treatment (T3). One-way analysis of variance was used to assess the differences statistically. All the distractions completed smoothly, and maxilla was distracted efficiently. The value of SNA, NA-FH, Ptm-A, U1-PP, overjet and PP (ANS-PNS) increased significantly after the AMSD procedure (P < 0.05), with the mean overjet increased by 14.28 mm. However, comparison of cephalometric analysis between T2 and T3 showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). Changes of palatopharyngeal depth and soft palatal length were insignificant. AMSD with RED device provided an effective way to correct maxillary hypoplasia secondary to CLP, extended the palatal and arch length, avoided damage on velopharyngeal closure function and reduced the relapse rate. It is a promising and valuable technique in this potentially complicated procedure.

  16. New mutations of DAX-1 genes in two Japanese patients with X-linked congenital adrenal hypoplasia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism

    SciT

    Yanase, Toshihiko; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Oba, Koichi

    Congenital adrenal hypoplasia, an X-linked disorder, is characterized by primary adrenal insufficiency and frequent association with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The X-chromosome gene DAX-1 has been most recently identified and shown to be responsible for this disorder. We analyzed the DAX-1 genes of two unrelated Japanese patients with congenital adrenal hypoplasia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism by using PCR amplification of genomic DNA and its complete exonic sequencing. In a family containing several affected individuals, the proband male patient had a stop codon (TGA) in place of tryptophan (TGG) at amino acid position 171. As expected, his mother was a heterozygous carrier for themore » mutation, whereas his father and unaffected brother did not carry this mutation. In another male patient with noncontributory family history, sequencing revealed a 1-bp (T) deletion at amino acid position 280, leading to a frame shift and, subsequently a premature stop codon at amino acid position 371. The presence of this mutation in the patients` genome was further confirmed by digestion of genomic PCR product with MspI created by this mutation. Family studies using MspI digestion of genomic PCR products revealed that neither parent of this individual carried the mutation. These results clearly indicate that congenital adrenal hypoplasia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism result from not only inherited but also de novo mutation in the DAX-1 gene. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.« less

  17. Compliance between clinical and genetic diagnosis of choroidal hypoplasia in 103 Norwegian Border Collie puppies.

    PubMed

    Grosås, Siv; Lingaas, Frode; Prestrud, Kristin Wear; Ropstad, Ernst-Otto

    2017-11-07

    To describe the frequency of the nonhomologous end-joining factor 1 (NHEJ1) mutation and the compliance between clinical and genetic diagnosis of choroidal hypoplasia (CH) in a group of Norwegian Border Collies. Border collie puppies in the age from 5 to 8 weeks. Puppies included in the study had a complete ophthalmological examination. All findings were recorded, and an ECVO scheme form was issued for each puppy. DNA samples were achieved from buccal swabs. Genetic typing was performed for the 7.8-kb deletion in the gene encoding NHEJ1. Dogs with none, one, or two copies of the mutated allele were classified as free, carriers, and affected, respectively. 103 Border Collie puppies from 16 litters, 52 females and 51 males, were included in the study. Ages ranged from 5.1 to 8.9 weeks. One puppy had clinical findings consistent with CH and optic nerve coloboma compatible with the diagnosis Collie Eye Anomaly (CEA). Findings on ophthalmological examination of the remaining puppies were within normal limits. On genetic testing, 85 puppies were clear of the mutation in the NHEJ1 gene, 17 puppies were carriers, and one puppy was genetically affected. A good compliance between the clinical diagnosis and the genetic test results was found in all of the puppies examined. The allele frequency of the mutation was 6.3%. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  18. Applying standard perikymata profiles to Pongo pygmaeus canines to estimate perikymata counts between linear enamel hypoplasias.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Mackie

    2017-05-01

    Recently, studies have interpreted regular spacing and average number of perikymata between dental enamel defects in orangutans to reflect seasonal episodes of physiological stress. To estimate the amount of time between developmental defects (enamel hypoplasia), studies have relied on perikymata counts. Unfortunately, perikymata are frequently not continuously visible between defects, significantly reducing data sets. A method is presented here for estimating the number of perikymata between defects using standard perikymata profiles (SPP) that allow the number of perikymata between all pairs of defects across a tooth to be analyzed. The SPP method should allow the entire complement of defects to be analyzed within the context of an individual's crown formation time. The average number of perikymata were established per decile and charted to create male and female Pongo pygmaeus SPPs. The position of the beginning of each defect was recorded for lower canines from males (n = 6) and females (n = 17). The number of perikymata between defects estimated by the SPP was compared to the actual count (where perikymata were continuously visible). The number of perikymata between defects estimated by the SPPs was accurate within three perikymata and highly correlated with the actual counts, significantly increasing the number of analyzable defect pairs. SPPs allow all defect pairs to be included in studies of defect timing, not just those with continuously visible perikymata. Establishing an individual's entire complement of dental defects makes it possible to calculate the regularity (and potential seasonality) of defects. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Limb/pelvis hypoplasia/aplasia with skull defect (Schinzel phocomelia): distinctive features and prenatal detection.

    PubMed

    Olney, R S; Hoyme, H E; Roche, F; Ferguson, K; Hintz, S; Madan, A

    2001-11-01

    Schinzel phocomelia syndrome is characterized by limb/pelvis hypoplasia/aplasia: specifically, intercalary limb deficiencies and absent or hypoplastic pelvic bones. The phenotype is similar to that described in a related multiple malformation syndrome known as Al-Awadi/Raas-Rothschild syndrome. The additional important feature of large parietooccipital skull defects without meningocele, encephalocele, or other brain malformation has thus far been reported only in children with Schinzel phocomelia syndrome. We recently evaluated a boy affected with Schinzel phocomelia born to nonconsanguineous healthy parents of Mexican origin. A third-trimester fetal ultrasound scan showed severe limb deficiencies and an absent pelvis. The infant died shortly after birth. Dysmorphology examination, radiographs, and autopsy revealed quadrilateral intercalary limb deficiencies with preaxial toe polydactyly; an absent pelvis and a 7 x 3-cm skull defect; and extraskeletal anomalies including microtia, telecanthus, micropenis with cryptorchidism, renal cysts, stenosis of the colon, and a cleft alveolar ridge. A normal 46,XY karyotype was demonstrated, and autosomal recessive inheritance was presumed on the basis of previously reported families. This case report emphasizes the importance of recognizing severe pelvic and skull deficiencies (either post- or prenatally) in differentiating infants with Schinzel phocomelia from other multiple malformation syndromes that feature intercalary limb defects, including thalidomide embryopathy and Roberts-SC phocomelia. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Enamel hypoplasias and physiological stress in the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene hominins.

    PubMed

    Cunha, E; Rozzi, F Ramirez; Bermúdez de Castro, J M; Martinón-Torres, M; Wasterlain, S N; Sarmiento, S

    2004-11-01

    This study presents an analysis of linear enamel hypoplasias (LEH) and plane-form defects (PFD) in the hominine dental sample from the Sima de los Huesos (SH) Middle Pleistocene site in Atapuerca (Spain). The SH sample comprises 475 teeth, 467 permanent and 8 deciduous, belonging to a minimum of 28 individuals. The method for recording PFD and LEH is discussed, as well as the definition of LEH. The prevalence of LEH and PFD in SH permanent dentition (unilateral total count) is 4.6% (13/280). Only one deciduous tooth (lower dc) showed an enamel disruption. Prevalence by individual ranges from 18.7-30%. The most likely explanation for the relatively low LEH and PFD prevalence in the SH sample suggests that the SH population exhibited a low level of developmental stress. The age at occurrence of LEH and PFD was determined by counting the number of perikymata between each lesion and the cervix of the tooth. Assuming a periodicity of nine days for the incremental lines, the majority of LEH in the SH sample occurred during the third year of life and may be related to the metabolic stress associated with weaning.

  1. Missing defects? A comparison of microscopic and macroscopic approaches to identifying linear enamel hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Hassett, Brenna R

    2014-03-01

    Linear enamel hypoplasia (LEH), the presence of linear defects of dental enamel formed during periods of growth disruption, is frequently analyzed in physical anthropology as evidence for childhood health in the past. However, a wide variety of methods for identifying and interpreting these defects in archaeological remains exists, preventing easy cross-comparison of results from disparate studies. This article compares a standard approach to identifying LEH using the naked eye to the evidence of growth disruption observed microscopically from the enamel surface. This comparison demonstrates that what is interpreted as evidence of growth disruption microscopically is not uniformly identified with the naked eye, and provides a reference for the level of consistency between the number and timing of defects identified using microscopic versus macroscopic approaches. This is done for different tooth types using a large sample of unworn permanent teeth drawn from several post-medieval London burial assemblages. The resulting schematic diagrams showing where macroscopic methods achieve more or less similar results to microscopic methods are presented here and clearly demonstrate that "naked-eye" methods of identifying growth disruptions do not identify LEH as often as microscopic methods in areas where perikymata are more densely packed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Basilar artery hypoplasia associated with changes of brainstem potential, transcranial Doppler and perfusion-weighted imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dao Pei; Yin, Suo; Zhang, Shu Ling; Zhang, Jie Wen; Ma, Qian Kun; Lu, Gui Feng

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to observe brainstem hemodynamic alterations associated with basilar artery hypoplasia (BAH). Nine hundred and fifty-two consecutive patients received emergency multimodal computed tomography; magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiogram during the period of January 2011 to December 2014 were included. The vascular risk factors, brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP), blink reflex (BR), transcranial Doppler (TCD) and dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion-weighted imaging were completed. There was significant difference in the abnormal rates of TCD and BAEP between BAH and non-BAH patients. A positive correlation between basilar artery diameter and systolic velocity among BAH patients was suggested. V-wave value was used to predict posterior circulation infarction (PCI) with the sensitivity of 0.933 and specificity of 0.50 with the cutoff value of 5.97 s. Abnormal BR rate was also significantly different in BAH and non-BAH patients. The latency of R2 was used to predict PCI with the sensitivity of 0.933 and specificity of 0.50 with the cutoff value of 46.4 ms. The incidence of hypoperfusion was higher in BAH than non-BAH group and it was significant difference. BAH is closely associated with hemodynamic alterations within the pons, which might contribute to vascular vertigo due to regional hypoperfusion.

  3. Constitutive Activation of Smoothened in the Renal Collecting Ducts Leads to Renal Hypoplasia, Hydronephrosis, and Hydroureter.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepak Prasad; Hwang, Jae-Won; Cho, Eui-Sic; Kim, Won; Song, Chang Ho; Chai, Ok Hee

    2017-01-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling plays a major role in and is essential for regulation, patterning, and proliferation during renal development. Smoothened (Smo) plays a pivot role in transducing the Shh-glioma-associated oncogene Kruppel family member. However, the cellular and molecular mechanism underlying the role of sustained Smo activation in postnatal kidney development is still not clearly understood. Using a conditional knockin mouse model that expresses a constitutively activated form of Smo (SmoM2) upon Homeobox-B7-mediated recombination (Hoxb7-Cre), the effects of Shh signaling were determined in postnatal kidney development. SmoM2;Hoxb7-Cre mutant mice showed growth retardation with a reduction of body weight. Constitutive activation of Smo in the renal collecting ducts caused renal hypoplasia, hydronephrosis, and hydroureter. The parenchymal area and glomerular numbers were reduced, but the glomerular density was increased in SmoM2;Hoxb7-Cre mutant mice. The expression of Patched 1, the receptor of Shh and a downstream target gene of the Shh signaling pathway, was highly restricted and it was upregulated in the inner medullary collecting ducts of the kidney. The proliferative cells in the mesenchyme and collecting ducts were decreased in SmoM2;Hoxb7-Cre mutant mice. This study showed for the first time that sustained Smo inhibits postnatal kidney development by suppressing the proliferation of the mesenchyme and medullary collecting ducts in mice. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Children with optic nerve hypoplasia face a high risk of neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Sara; Wickström, Ronny; Ek, Ulla; Teär Fahnehjelm, Kristina

    2018-03-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is a congenital ocular malformation that has been associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, but the prevalence in unilateral disease and less severe visual impairment is unknown. We studied intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in patients with ONH. This was a population-based cross-sectional cohort study of 65 patients (33 female) with ONH below 20 years of age, living in Stockholm in December 2009, with data analysed in January 2016. Of these 35 were bilateral and 30 were unilateral. Neurodevelopmental disorders were diagnosed or confirmed by neurological assessments, the Five to Fifteen parent questionnaire and reviewing previous neuropsychological investigations or conducting neuropsychological tests. Bilateral ONH patients had lower mean full scale intelligence quotient scores than unilateral patients (84.4 and 99.4, respectively, p = 0.049). We assessed intellectual disability in 55 eligible patients, and it was more common in patients with bilateral ONH (18 of 32, 56%) than unilateral ONH (two of 23, 9%, p < 0.001). ASDs were diagnosed in seven of 42 (17%) patients. Children with bilateral ONH had a high risk of neurodevelopmental disorders, especially intellectual disability. The risk was lower in unilateral ONH, but the levels of neurodevelopmental disorders warrant screening of both groups. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Internal jugular vein thrombosis associated with venous hypoplasia and protein S deficiency revealed by ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Lim, Byung Gun; Kim, Young Min; Kim, Heezoo; Lim, Sang Ho; Lee, Mi Kyoung

    2011-12-01

    A 41-year-old woman, who had no thrombotic risk factors and past history except congenital scoliosis, underwent central venous catheterization (CVC) before correction of the scoliosis. When internal jugular vein (IJV) catheterization using the anatomical landmark technique failed, CVC under ultrasound guidance was tried. As a consequence, thrombosis and hypoplasia of the right IJV were incidentally detected by ultrasonography. Central venous catheters were then successfully placed in other veins under ultrasound guidance. Also, after examinations to rule out the possibility of pulmonary embolism and to clarify the causes of the IJV thrombosis, the patient was found to have protein S deficiency. CVC under ultrasound guidance should be recommended to prevent the failure of cannulation and complications such as thromboembolism in patients who could possibly have anomalies of vessels as a result of anatomical deformities caused by severe scoliosis, even if patients do not have thrombotic risk factors such as a history of central catheter insertion or intravenous drug abuse, cancer, advanced age, cerebral infarction, and left ventricular dysfunction. Also, if venous thrombosis is found in patients without predisposing risk factors, one should ascertain the cause of the hypercoagulable state, for example protein S deficiency, and perform appropriate treatment and prevention of venous thromboembolism.

  6. Testicular Fibrous Hypoplasia in Cynomolgus Monkeys ( Macaca fascicularis): An Incidental, Congenital Lesion.

    PubMed

    Pereira Bacares, Marcia E; Vemireddi, Vimala; Creasy, Dianne

    2017-06-01

    Testicular fibrous hypoplasia is an incidental lesion characterized by replacement of the testicular parenchyma by mature collagen. A retrospective survey of hematoxylin and eosin-stained testicular sections from 722 purpose-bred Asian and 90 Mauritian cynomolgus monkeys from 56 safety assessment studies conducted between 1999 and 2011 was performed. The incidence of the lesion increased markedly over time. No cases occurred between 1999 and 2004. Between 2005 and 2009, the incidence ranged between 8.1% and 11.0% of the monkeys examined and then rose to 26.1% in 2010 and 30.9% in 2011. Overall, the lesion was identified in 10.94% of Asian monkeys with the highest incidence in animals originating from China and Vietnam; severity ranged from minimal to severe and it occurred unilaterally (38.5%) and bilaterally (61.5%). In Mauritian monkeys, the lesion was predominantly minimal in severity, bilateral in distribution, and affected 6.6% of the animals examined. The lesion occurred regardless of sexual maturation status but when present in mature monkeys was often associated with cystic tubular atrophy of the seminiferous epithelium. Based on the morphological characteristics of the lesion and the unilateral/bilateral distribution, the lesion is considered to be a congenital or developmental abnormality.

  7. Cartilage-hair hypoplasia with normal height in childhood-4 patients with a unique genotype.

    PubMed

    Klemetti, P; Valta, H; Kostjukovits, S; Taskinen, M; Toiviainen-Salo, S; Mäkitie, O

    2017-08-01

    The manifestations of cartilage-hair hypoplasia (CHH), a metaphyseal chondrodysplasia caused by RMRP mutations, include short stature, hypoplastic hair, immunodeficiency and increased risk of malignancies. Clinical features show significant variability. We report a patient with normal height until age 12.5 years (-1.6 SDS at 11 years) who was diagnosed with CHH at 14 years. RMRP sequencing revealed compound heterozygosity for g.70A>G mutation and a 10-nucleotide duplication at position -13 (TACTCTGTGA). Through the Finnish Skeletal Dysplasia Register, we identified 3 additional patients with identical genotype. Two of them also showed unusually mild growth failure (height SDS -1.6 at 14 years and -3.0 at 12 years, respectively). Three of the 4 patients suffered from recurrent infections; 1 developed progressive bronchiectasis and another died from aggressive lymphoma. Our findings expand the phenotypic variability in CHH to include normal childhood height. The milder growth retardation related to this particular genotype was not associated with less severe extra-skeletal manifestations, emphasizing the need for careful follow-up also in CHH patients with mild-skeletal manifestations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Gallbladder volvulus with segmental right liver lobe hypoplasia/atrophy: a preoperative diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Musthafa, Shameel; Aftab, Zia; Ali, Syed Muhammad; Khanna, Maneesh

    2018-06-08

    Gallbladder volvulus (GBV) due to rotation of the gall bladder (GB) around its own mesentery is a rare surgical emergency and often identified intraoperatively. Typically, cholecystitis is the initial clinical diagnosis, but a high index of suspicion on imaging can alert the physician for the possibility of GBV requiring urgent surgical intervention. We describe a case of a young female patient with hypoplasia/atrophy of the posterior segment of the right liver lobe and a GB with no hepatic attachments but only mesenteric pedicle. She presented with first episode of sudden-onset, severe right subcostal pain. The ultrasonogram and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatogram findings were suggestive of GBV. She underwent laparoscopic exploration that confirmed GBV of a free-floating GB with a thrombosed cystic artery. The GB was detorted, and cholecystectomy was performed. She had an uneventful postoperative course and was discharged with no complications. Histopathological examination showed intramural haematoma of the GB with wall necrosis. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Interactions between TGF-β1, canonical WNT/β-catenin pathway and PPAR γ in radiation-induced fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Vallée, Alexandre; Lecarpentier, Yves; Guillevin, Rémy; Vallée, Jean-Noël

    2017-01-01

    Radiation therapy induces DNA damage and inflammation leading to fibrosis. Fibrosis can occur 4 to 12 months after radiation therapy. This process worsens with time and years. Radiation-induced fibrosis is characterized by fibroblasts proliferation, myofibroblast differentiation, and synthesis of collagen, proteoglycans and extracellular matrix. Myofibroblasts are non-muscle cells that can contract and relax. Myofibroblasts evolve towards irreversible retraction during fibrosis process. In this review, we discussed the interplays between transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), canonical WNT/β-catenin pathway and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR γ) in regulating the molecular mechanisms underlying the radiation-induced fibrosis, and the potential role of PPAR γ agonists. Overexpression of TGF-β and canonical WNT/β-catenin pathway stimulate fibroblasts accumulation and myofibroblast differentiation whereas PPAR γ expression decreases due to the opposite interplay of canonical WNT/β-catenin pathway. Both TGF-β1 and canonical WNT/β-catenin pathway stimulate each other through the Smad pathway and non-Smad pathways such as phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/serine/threonine kinase (PI3K/Akt) signaling. WNT/β-catenin pathway and PPAR γ interact in an opposite manner. PPAR γ agonists decrease β-catenin levels through activation of inhibitors of the WNT pathway such as Smad7, glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3 β) and dickkopf-related protein 1 (DKK1). PPAR γ agonists also stimulate phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression, which decreases both TGF-β1 and PI3K/Akt pathways. PPAR γ agonists by activating Smad7 decrease Smads pathway and then TGF-β signaling leading to decrease radiation-induced fibrosis. TGF-β1 and canonical WNT/β-catenin pathway promote radiation-induced fibrosis whereas PPAR γ agonists can prevent radiation-induced fibrosis. PMID:29163854

  10. Silymarin Protects Epidermal Keratinocytes from Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Apoptosis and DNA Damage by Nucleotide Excision Repair Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Katiyar, Santosh K.; Mantena, Sudheer K.; Meeran, Syed M.

    2011-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a well recognized epidemiologic risk factor for melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. This observation has been linked to the accumulation of UVB radiation-induced DNA lesions in cells, and that finally lead to the development of skin cancers. Earlier, we have shown that topical treatment of skin with silymarin, a plant flavanoid from milk thistle (Silybum marianum), inhibits photocarcinogenesis in mice; however it is less understood whether chemopreventive effect of silymarin is mediated through the repair of DNA lesions in skin cells and that protect the cells from apoptosis. Here, we show that treatment of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) with silymarin blocks UVB-induced apoptosis of NHEK in vitro. Silymarin reduces the amount of UVB radiation-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by reduced amounts of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and as measured by comet assay, and that ultimately may lead to reduced apoptosis of NHEK. The reduction of UV radiation-induced DNA damage by silymarin appears to be related with induction of nucleotide excision repair (NER) genes, because UV radiation-induced apoptosis was not blocked by silymarin in NER-deficient human fibroblasts. Cytostaining and dot-blot analysis revealed that silymarin repaired UV-induced CPDs in NER-proficient fibroblasts from a healthy individual but did not repair UV-induced CPD-positive cells in NER-deficient fibroblasts from patients suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation-A disease. Similarly, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that silymarin did not reduce the number of UVB-induced sunburn/apoptotic cells in the skin of NER-deficient mice, but reduced the number of sunburn cells in their wild-type counterparts. Together, these results suggest that silymarin exert the capacity to reduce UV radiation-induced DNA damage and, thus, prevent the harmful effects of UV radiation on the genomic stability of epidermal cells. PMID:21731736

  11. Exome sequencing reveals a de novo POLD1 mutation causing phenotypic variability in mandibular hypoplasia, deafness, progeroid features, and lipodystrophy syndrome (MDPL).

    PubMed

    Elouej, Sahar; Beleza-Meireles, Ana; Caswell, Richard; Colclough, Kevin; Ellard, Sian; Desvignes, Jean Pierre; Béroud, Christophe; Lévy, Nicolas; Mohammed, Shehla; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara

    2017-06-01

    Mandibular hypoplasia, deafness, progeroid features, and lipodystrophy syndrome (MDPL) is an autosomal dominant systemic disorder characterized by prominent loss of subcutaneous fat, a characteristic facial appearance and metabolic abnormalities. This syndrome is caused by heterozygous de novo mutations in the POLD1 gene. To date, 19 patients with MDPL have been reported in the literature and among them 14 patients have been characterized at the molecular level. Twelve unrelated patients carried a recurrent in-frame deletion of a single codon (p.Ser605del) and two other patients carried a novel heterozygous mutation in exon 13 (p.Arg507Cys). Additionally and interestingly, germline mutations of the same gene have been involved in familial polyposis and colorectal cancer (CRC) predisposition. We describe a male and a female patient with MDPL respectively affected with mild and severe phenotypes. Both of them showed mandibular hypoplasia, a beaked nose with bird-like facies, prominent eyes, a small mouth, growth retardation, muscle and skin atrophy, but the female patient showed such a severe and early phenotype that a first working diagnosis of Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria was made. The exploration was performed by direct sequencing of POLD1 gene exon 15 in the male patient with a classical MDPL phenotype and by whole exome sequencing in the female patient and her unaffected parents. Exome sequencing identified in the latter patient a de novo heterozygous undescribed mutation in the POLD1 gene (NM_002691.3: c.3209T>A), predicted to cause the missense change p.Ile1070Asn in the ZnF2 (Zinc Finger 2) domain of the protein. This mutation was not reported in the 1000 Genome Project, dbSNP and Exome sequencing databases. Furthermore, the Isoleucine1070 residue of POLD1 is highly conserved among various species, suggesting that this substitution may cause a major impairment of POLD1 activity. For the second patient, affected with a typical MDPL phenotype, direct sequencing

  12. Radiation-induced refraction artifacts in the optical CT readout of polymer gel dosimeters

    SciT

    Campbell, Warren G.; Jirasek, Andrew, E-mail: jirasek@uvic.ca; Wells, Derek M.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to demonstrate imaging artifacts that can occur during the optical computed tomography (CT) scanning of polymer gel dosimeters due to radiation-induced refractive index (RI) changes in polyacrylamide gels. Methods: A 1 L cylindrical polyacrylamide gel dosimeter was irradiated with 3 × 3 cm{sup 2} square beams of 6 MV photons. A prototype fan-beam optical CT scanner was used to image the dosimeter. Investigative optical CT scans were performed to examine two types of rayline bending: (i) bending within the plane of the fan-beam and (ii) bending out the plane of the fan-beam. Tomore » address structured errors, an iterative Savitzky–Golay (ISG) filtering routine was designed to filter 2D projections in sinogram space. For comparison, 2D projections were alternatively filtered using an adaptive-mean (AM) filter. Results: In-plane rayline bending was most notably observed in optical CT projections where rays of the fan-beam confronted a sustained dose gradient that was perpendicular to their trajectory but within the fan-beam plane. These errors caused distinct streaking artifacts in image reconstructions due to the refraction of higher intensity rays toward more opaque regions of the dosimeter. Out-of-plane rayline bending was observed in slices of the dosimeter that featured dose gradients perpendicular to the plane of the fan-beam. These errors caused widespread, severe overestimations of dose in image reconstructions due to the higher-than-actual opacity that is perceived by the scanner when light is bent off of the detector array. The ISG filtering routine outperformed AM filtering for both in-plane and out-of-plane rayline errors caused by radiation-induced RI changes. For in-plane rayline errors, streaks in an irradiated region (>7 Gy) were as high as 49% for unfiltered data, 14% for AM, and 6% for ISG. For out-of-plane rayline errors, overestimations of dose in a low-dose region (∼50 cGy) were as high as 13 Gy for

  13. Radiation-induced refraction artifacts in the optical CT readout of polymer gel dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Warren G; Wells, Derek M; Jirasek, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate imaging artifacts that can occur during the optical computed tomography (CT) scanning of polymer gel dosimeters due to radiation-induced refractive index (RI) changes in polyacrylamide gels. A 1 L cylindrical polyacrylamide gel dosimeter was irradiated with 3 × 3 cm(2) square beams of 6 MV photons. A prototype fan-beam optical CT scanner was used to image the dosimeter. Investigative optical CT scans were performed to examine two types of rayline bending: (i) bending within the plane of the fan-beam and (ii) bending out the plane of the fan-beam. To address structured errors, an iterative Savitzky-Golay (ISG) filtering routine was designed to filter 2D projections in sinogram space. For comparison, 2D projections were alternatively filtered using an adaptive-mean (AM) filter. In-plane rayline bending was most notably observed in optical CT projections where rays of the fan-beam confronted a sustained dose gradient that was perpendicular to their trajectory but within the fan-beam plane. These errors caused distinct streaking artifacts in image reconstructions due to the refraction of higher intensity rays toward more opaque regions of the dosimeter. Out-of-plane rayline bending was observed in slices of the dosimeter that featured dose gradients perpendicular to the plane of the fan-beam. These errors caused widespread, severe overestimations of dose in image reconstructions due to the higher-than-actual opacity that is perceived by the scanner when light is bent off of the detector array. The ISG filtering routine outperformed AM filtering for both in-plane and out-of-plane rayline errors caused by radiation-induced RI changes. For in-plane rayline errors, streaks in an irradiated region (>7 Gy) were as high as 49% for unfiltered data, 14% for AM, and 6% for ISG. For out-of-plane rayline errors, overestimations of dose in a low-dose region (∼50 cGy) were as high as 13 Gy for unfiltered data, 10 Gy for AM, and 3.1 Gy

  14. Radiation-Induced Leukemia at Doses Relevant to Radiation Therapy: Modeling Mechanisms and Estimating Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuryak, Igor; Sachs, Rainer K.; Hlatky, Lynn; Mark P. Little; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Brenner, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Because many cancer patients are diagnosed earlier and live longer than in the past, second cancers induced by radiation therapy have become a clinically significant issue. An earlier biologically based model that was designed to estimate risks of high-dose radiation induced solid cancers included initiation of stem cells to a premalignant state, inactivation of stem cells at high radiation doses, and proliferation of stem cells during cellular repopulation after inactivation. This earlier model predicted the risks of solid tumors induced by radiation therapy but overestimated the corresponding leukemia risks. Methods: To extend the model to radiation-induced leukemias, we analyzed in addition to cellular initiation, inactivation, and proliferation a repopulation mechanism specific to the hematopoietic system: long-range migration through the blood stream of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from distant locations. Parameters for the model were derived from HSC biologic data in the literature and from leukemia risks among atomic bomb survivors v^ ho were subjected to much lower radiation doses. Results: Proliferating HSCs that migrate from sites distant from the high-dose region include few preleukemic HSCs, thus decreasing the high-dose leukemia risk. The extended model for leukemia provides risk estimates that are consistent with epidemiologic data for leukemia risk associated with radiation therapy over a wide dose range. For example, when applied to an earlier case-control study of 110000 women undergoing radiotherapy for uterine cancer, the model predicted an excess relative risk (ERR) of 1.9 for leukemia among women who received a large inhomogeneous fractionated external beam dose to the bone marrow (mean = 14.9 Gy), consistent with the measured ERR (2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.2 to 6.4; from 3.6 cases expected and 11 cases observed). As a corresponding example for brachytherapy, the predicted ERR of 0.80 among women who received an inhomogeneous low

  15. Radiation-induced second cancers: the impact of 3D-CRT and IMRT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Eric J.; Wuu, Cheng-Shie

    2003-01-01

    Information concerning radiation-induced malignancies comes from the A-bomb survivors and from medically exposed individuals, including second cancers in radiation therapy patients. The A-bomb survivors show an excess incidence of carcinomas in tissues such as the gastrointestinal tract, breast, thyroid, and bladder, which is linear with dose up to about 2.5 Sv. There is great uncertainty concerning the dose-response relationship for radiation-induced carcinogenesis at higher doses. Some animal and human data suggest a decrease at higher doses, usually attributed to cell killing; other data suggest a plateau in dose. Radiotherapy patients also show an excess incidence of carcinomas, often in sites remote from the treatment fields; in addition there is an excess incidence of sarcomas in the heavily irradiated in-field tissues. The transition from conventional radiotherapy to three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) involves a reduction in the volume of normal tissues receiving a high dose, with an increase in dose to the target volume that includes the tumor and a limited amount of normal tissue. One might expect a decrease in the number of sarcomas induced and also (less certain) a small decrease in the number of carcinomas. All around, a good thing. By contrast, the move from 3D-CRT to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) involves more fields, and the dose-volume histograms show that, as a consequence, a larger volume of normal tissue is exposed to lower doses. In addition, the number of monitor units is increased by a factor of 2 to 3, increasing the total body exposure, due to leakage radiation. Both factors will tend to increase the risk of second cancers. Altogether, IMRT is likely to almost double the incidence of second malignancies compared with conventional radiotherapy from about 1% to 1.75% for patients surviving 10 years. The numbers may be larger for longer survival (or for younger patients), but the ratio should remain the same.

  16. A randomized placebo-controlled trial of manuka honey for radiation-induced oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Hawley, Philippa; Hovan, Allan; McGahan, Colleen E; Saunders, Deborah

    2014-03-01

    Few treatments have the potential to reduce the severity of radiation-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients. Some small studies ha