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Sample records for early repressor icer

  1. Regulatory T cells facilitate the nuclear accumulation of inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) and suppress nuclear factor of activated T cell c1 (NFATc1)

    PubMed Central

    Vaeth, Martin; Gogishvili, Tea; Bopp, Tobias; Klein, Matthias; Berberich-Siebelt, Friederike; Gattenloehner, Stefan; Avots, Andris; Sparwasser, Tim; Grebe, Nadine; Schmitt, Edgar; Hünig, Thomas; Serfling, Edgar; Bodor, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) is a transcriptional repressor, which, because of alternate promoter use, is generated from the 3′ region of the cAMP response modulator (Crem) gene. Its expression and nuclear occurrence are elevated by high cAMP levels in naturally occurring regulatory T cells (nTregs). Using two mouse models, we demonstrate that nTregs control the cellular localization of ICER/CREM, and thereby inhibit IL-2 synthesis in conventional CD4+ T cells. Ablation of nTregs in depletion of regulatory T-cell (DEREG) mice resulted in cytosolic localization of ICER/CREM and increased IL-2 synthesis upon stimulation. Direct contacts between nTregs and conventional CD4+ T cells led to nuclear accumulation of ICER/CREM and suppression of IL-2 synthesis on administration of CD28 superagonistic (CD28SA) Ab. In a similar way, nTregs communicated with B cells and induced the cAMP-driven nuclear localization of ICER/CREM. High levels of ICER suppressed the induction of nuclear factor of activated T cell c1 (Nfatc1) gene in T cells whose inducible Nfatc1 P1 promoter bears two highly conserved cAMP-responsive elements to which ICER/CREM can bind. These findings suggest that nTregs suppress T-cell responses by the cAMP-dependent nuclear accumulation of ICER/CREM and inhibition of NFATc1 and IL-2 induction. PMID:21262800

  2. Mechanism of repression of the inhibin alpha-subunit gene by inducible 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate early repressor.

    PubMed

    Burkart, Anna D; Mukherjee, Abir; Mayo, Kelly E

    2006-03-01

    The rodent ovary is regulated throughout the reproductive cycle to maintain normal cyclicity. Ovarian follicular development is controlled by changes in gene expression in response to the gonadotropins FSH and LH. The inhibin alpha-subunit gene belongs to a group of genes that is positively regulated by FSH and negatively regulated by LH. Previous studies established an important role for inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) in repression of alpha-inhibin. These current studies investigate the mechanisms of repression by ICER. It is not clear whether all four ICER isoforms expressed in the ovary can act as repressors of the inhibin alpha-subunit gene. EMSAs demonstrate binding of all isoforms to the inhibin alpha-subunit CRE (cAMP response element), and transfection studies demonstrate that all isoforms can repress the inhibin alpha-subunit gene. Repression by ICER is dependent on its binding to DNA as demonstrated by mutations to ICER's DNA-binding domain. These mutational studies also demonstrate that repression by ICER is not dependent on heterodimerization with CREB (CRE-binding protein). Competitive EMSAs show that ICER effectively competes with CREB for binding to the inhibin alpha CRE in vitro. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrate a replacement of CREB dimers bound to the inhibin alpha CRE by ICER dimers in ovarian granulosa cells in response to LH signaling. Thus, there is a temporal association of transcription factors bound to the inhibin alpha-CRE controlling inhibin alpha-subunit gene expression.

  3. Establishment of inducible cAMP early repressor transgenic fibroblasts in a porcine model of human type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eui-Man; Kim, Yu-Kyung; Lee, Geun-Shik; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Hwang, Woo-Suk; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2012-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease caused by impaired insulin secretion from the pancreatic β cells and increased insulin resistance in peripheral tissues. Recently, the overexpression of inducible cyclic AMP (cAMP) early repressor (ICER) Iγ in rodent pancreatic β cells was found to induce insulin deficiency and glucagon overproduction similar to that found in human diabetes mellitus. ICER Iγ with only a DNA binding domain interrupts the transcriptional regulation of the cAMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB) target genes. Based on this information, we hypothesized that the overexpression of ICER Iγ, the most powerful competitor to CREB, could be useful for generating a pig model of diabetes. First, we evaluated the promoter activities of the human insulin gene for the β cell-specific overexpression of ICER Iγ in the pig pancreas. The maximum promoter activity region [-1,431 nucleotides (nt) to +1 nt, +1 = the transcriptional start site] of the insulin gene presented an activity level 3-fold higher than a promoterless construct. Second, ICER Iγ overexpression controlled by this promoter region significantly blocked the glucose-mediated insulin transcription, such as that regulated by the viral promoter in the pancreatic β cell line, MIN6. This suggests that the human insulin promoter may facilitate the overexpression of ICER Iγ in porcine pancreatic β cells. In addition, the overexpression of ICER Iγ in porcine β cells may induce human-like type 1 diabetes mellitus in pigs. In the present study, we generated transgenic fibroblasts containing ICER Iγ cDNA controlled by the human insulin promoter, as well as two screening markers, the green fluorescence protein and the neomycin resistance gene. These fibroblasts may provide a source for somatic cell nuclear transfer to generate a pig model that mimics human diabetes mellitus.

  4. Expression and regulation of Icer mRNA in the Syrian hamster pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Elena; Garidou, Marie-Laure; Dardente, Hugues; Salingre, Anthony; Pévet, Paul; Simonneaux, Valérie

    2003-04-10

    Inducible-cAMP early repressor (ICER) is a potent inhibitor of CRE (cAMP-related element)-driven gene transcription. In the rat pineal gland, it has been proposed to be part of the mechanisms involved in the shutting down of the transcription of the gene coding for arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT, the melatonin rhythm-generating enzyme). In this study, we report that ICER is expressed in the pineal gland of the photoperiodic rodent Syrian hamster although with some difference compared to the rat. In the Syrian hamster pineal, Icer mRNA levels, low at daytime, displayed a 20-fold increase during the night. Nighttime administration of a beta-adrenergic antagonist, propranolol, significantly reduced Icer mRNA levels although daytime administration of a beta-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol, was unable to raise the low amount of Icer mRNA. These observations indicate that Icer mRNA expression is induced by the clock-driven norepinephrine release and further suggest that this stimulation is restricted to nighttime, as already observed for Aa-nat gene transcription. Furthermore, we found that the daily profile of Icer mRNA displayed photoperiodic variation with a lengthening of the nocturnal peak in short versus long photoperiod. These data indicate that ICER may be involved in both daily and seasonal regulation of melatonin synthesis in the Syrian hamster.

  5. ICER-3D Hyperspectral Image Compression Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Hua; Kiely, Aaron; Klimesh, matthew; Aranki, Nazeeh

    2010-01-01

    Software has been developed to implement the ICER-3D algorithm. ICER-3D effects progressive, three-dimensional (3D), wavelet-based compression of hyperspectral images. If a compressed data stream is truncated, the progressive nature of the algorithm enables reconstruction of hyperspectral data at fidelity commensurate with the given data volume. The ICER-3D software is capable of providing either lossless or lossy compression, and incorporates an error-containment scheme to limit the effects of data loss during transmission. The compression algorithm, which was derived from the ICER image compression algorithm, includes wavelet-transform, context-modeling, and entropy coding subalgorithms. The 3D wavelet decomposition structure used by ICER-3D exploits correlations in all three dimensions of sets of hyperspectral image data, while facilitating elimination of spectral ringing artifacts, using a technique summarized in "Improving 3D Wavelet-Based Compression of Spectral Images" (NPO-41381), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 33, No. 3 (March 2009), page 7a. Correlation is further exploited by a context-modeling subalgorithm, which exploits spectral dependencies in the wavelet-transformed hyperspectral data, using an algorithm that is summarized in "Context Modeler for Wavelet Compression of Hyperspectral Images" (NPO-43239), which follows this article. An important feature of ICER-3D is a scheme for limiting the adverse effects of loss of data during transmission. In this scheme, as in the similar scheme used by ICER, the spatial-frequency domain is partitioned into rectangular error-containment regions. In ICER-3D, the partitions extend through all the wavelength bands. The data in each partition are compressed independently of those in the other partitions, so that loss or corruption of data from any partition does not affect the other partitions. Furthermore, because compression is progressive within each partition, when data are lost, any data from that partition received

  6. 7 CFR 3201.37 - General purpose de-icers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) that are designed to aid in the removal of snow and/or ice, and/or in the prevention of the buildup of snow and/or ice, in general use applications by lowering the freezing point of water. Specialized de-icer products, such as those used to de-ice aircraft and airport runways, are not included. (b) Minimum...

  7. 7 CFR 3201.37 - General purpose de-icers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) that are designed to aid in the removal of snow and/or ice, and/or in the prevention of the buildup of snow and/or ice, in general use applications by lowering the freezing point of water. Specialized de-icer products, such as those used to de-ice aircraft and airport runways, are not included. (b) Minimum...

  8. 7 CFR 3201.37 - General purpose de-icers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) that are designed to aid in the removal of snow and/or ice, and/or in the prevention of the buildup of snow and/or ice, in general use applications by lowering the freezing point of water. Specialized de-icer products, such as those used to de-ice aircraft and airport runways, are not included. (b) Minimum...

  9. 7 CFR 2902.37 - General purpose de-icers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... are designed to aid in the removal of snow and/or ice, and/or in the prevention of the buildup of snow and/or ice, in general use applications by lowering the freezing point of water. Specialized de-icer products, such as those used to de-ice aircraft and airport runways, are not included. (b) Minimum biobased...

  10. 7 CFR 2902.37 - General purpose de-icers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... are designed to aid in the removal of snow and/or ice, and/or in the prevention of the buildup of snow and/or ice, in general use applications by lowering the freezing point of water. Specialized de-icer products, such as those used to de-ice aircraft and airport runways, are not included. (b) Minimum biobased...

  11. 14 CFR 23.1416 - Pneumatic de-icer boot system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Safety Equipment § 23.1416 Pneumatic de-icer boot system. If certification with ice protection provisions is desired and a pneumatic de-icer boot system is installed— (a) The system must meet the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pneumatic de-icer boot system. 23.1416...

  12. 14 CFR 23.1416 - Pneumatic de-icer boot system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Safety Equipment § 23.1416 Pneumatic de-icer boot system. If certification with ice protection provisions is desired and a pneumatic de-icer boot system is installed— (a) The system must meet the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pneumatic de-icer boot system. 23.1416...

  13. 14 CFR 23.1416 - Pneumatic de-icer boot system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Safety Equipment § 23.1416 Pneumatic de-icer boot system. If certification with ice protection provisions is desired and a pneumatic de-icer boot system is installed— (a) The system must meet the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pneumatic de-icer boot system. 23.1416...

  14. 14 CFR 23.1416 - Pneumatic de-icer boot system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pneumatic de-icer boot system. 23.1416... Safety Equipment § 23.1416 Pneumatic de-icer boot system. If certification with ice protection provisions is desired and a pneumatic de-icer boot system is installed— (a) The system must meet the...

  15. 14 CFR 23.1416 - Pneumatic de-icer boot system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pneumatic de-icer boot system. 23.1416... Safety Equipment § 23.1416 Pneumatic de-icer boot system. If certification with ice protection provisions is desired and a pneumatic de-icer boot system is installed— (a) The system must meet the...

  16. Repressing a Repressor

    PubMed Central

    Silverstone, Aron L.; Jung, Hou-Sung; Dill, Alyssa; Kawaide, Hiroshi; Kamiya, Yuji; Sun, Tai-ping

    2001-01-01

    RGA (for repressor of ga1-3) and SPINDLY (SPY) are likely repressors of gibberellin (GA) signaling in Arabidopsis because the recessive rga and spy mutations partially suppressed the phenotype of the GA-deficient mutant ga1-3. We found that neither rga nor spy altered the GA levels in the wild-type or the ga1-3 background. However, expression of the GA biosynthetic gene GA4 was reduced 26% by the rga mutation, suggesting that partial derepression of the GA response pathway by rga resulted in the feedback inhibition of GA4 expression. The green fluorescent protein (GFP)–RGA fusion protein was localized to nuclei in transgenic Arabidopsis. This result supports the predicted function of RGA as a transcriptional regulator based on sequence analysis. Confocal microscopy and immunoblot analyses demonstrated that the levels of both the GFP-RGA fusion protein and endogenous RGA were reduced rapidly by GA treatment. Therefore, the GA signal appears to derepress the GA signaling pathway by degrading the repressor protein RGA. The effect of rga on GA4 gene expression and the effect of GA on RGA protein level allow us to identify part of the mechanism by which GA homeostasis is achieved. PMID:11449051

  17. ICER-3D: A Progressive Wavelet-Based Compressor for Hyperspectral Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiely, A.; Klimesh, M.; Xie, H.; Aranki, N.

    2005-01-01

    ICER-3D is a progressive, wavelet-based compressor for hyperspectral images. ICER-3D is derived from the ICER image compressor. ICER-3D can provide lossless and lossy compression, and incorporates an error-containment scheme to limit the effects of data loss during transmission. The three-dimensional wavelet decomposition structure used by ICER-3D exploits correlations in all three dimensions of hyperspectral data sets, while facilitating elimination of spectral ringing artifacts. Correlation is further exploited by a context modeler that effectively exploits spectral dependencies in the wavelet-transformed hyperspectral data. Performance results illustrating the benefits of these features are presented.

  18. Efficient numerical simulation of an electrothermal de-icer pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, R. J.; Keith, T. G., Jr.; De Witt, K. J.; Wright, W. B.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, a new approach to calculate the transient thermal behavior of an iced electrothermal de-icer pad was developed. The method of splines was used to obtain the temperature distribution within the layered pad. Splines were used in order to create a tridiagonal system of equations that could be directly solved by Gauss elimination. The Stefan problem was solved using the enthalpy method along with a recent implicit technique. Only one to three iterations were needed to locate the melt front during any time step. Computational times were shown to be greatly reduced over those of an existing one dimensional procedure without any reduction in accuracy; the curent technique was more than 10 times faster.

  19. Effects of transgenic sterilization constructs and their repressor compounds on hatch, developmental rate and early survival of electroporated channel catfish embryos and fry.

    PubMed

    Su, Baofeng; Shang, Mei; Li, Chao; Perera, Dayan A; Pinkert, Carl A; Irwin, Michael H; Peatman, Eric; Grewe, Peter; Patil, Jawahar G; Dunham, Rex A

    2015-04-01

    Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) embryos were electroporated with sterilization constructs targeting primordial germ cell proteins or with buffer. Some embryos then were treated with repressor compounds, cadmium chloride, copper sulfate, sodium chloride or doxycycline, to prevent expression of the transgene constructs. Promoters included channel catfish nanos and vasa, salmon transferrin (TF), modified yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae copper transport protein (MCTR) and zebrafish racemase (RM). Knock-down systems were the Tet-off (nanos and vasa constructs), MCTR, RM and TF systems. Knock-down genes included shRNAi targeting 5' nanos (N1), 3' nanos (N2) or dead end (DND), or double-stranded nanos RNA (dsRNA) for overexpression of nanos mRNA. These constructs previously were demonstrated to knock down nanos, vasa and dead end, with the repressors having variable success. Exogenous DNA affected percentage hatch (% hatch), as all 14 constructs, except for the TF dsRNA, TF N1 (T), RM DND (C), vasa DND (C), vasa N1 (C) and vasa N2 (C), had lower % hatch than the control electroporated with buffer. The MCTR and RM DND (T) constructs resulted in delayed hatch, and the vasa and nanos constructs had minimal effects on time of hatch (P < 0.05). Cadmium chloride appeared to counteract the slow development caused by the TF constructs in two TF treatments (P < 0.05). The 4 ppt sodium chloride treatment for the RM system decreased % hatch (P < 0.05) and slowed development. In the case of nanos constructs, doxycycline greatly delayed hatch (P < 0.05). Adverse effects of the transgenes and repressors continued for several treatments for the first 6 days after hatch, but only in a few treatments during the next 10 days. Repressors and gene expression impacted the yield of putative transgenic channel catfish fry, and need to be considered and accounted for in the hatchery phase of producing transgenically sterilized catfish fry and their fertile counterparts. This fry output

  20. Migration of alternative de-icers in unsaturated zone of aquifers--in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Hellstén, P; Nystén, T

    2003-01-01

    The migration of organic de-icers in the shallow aquifers typical in Finland is not well known and we need to find solutions to minimise the negative impacts of de-icing on groundwater quality. The objective of the MIDAS project is to find de-icers which have the least harmful impacts on groundwater quality. Migration of sodium chloride as a tracer and five alternative de-icers in aquifers was studied. The alternative de-icers were calcium chloride, magnesium chloride, calcium-magnesium-acetate, potassium acetate and potassium formate. The research consists of leaching of heavy metals from roadsides in the area of Highway 1 in southern Finland; an in vitro study, which represented the full length of winter at low temperatures; and the subsequent on-going field research in south-eastern Finland. So far, in our studies potassium formate caused fewer changes to the quality of the infiltrated water than the chlorides and acetates. After finishing the on-going research the results will be used to choose a preferred de-icer from the existing chemicals and for the development of new less harmful de-icers. The information will be used mainly in Scandinavia and North America where the hydrogeological conditions are similar to those in Finland.

  1. Aircraft de-icer: Recycling can cut carbon emissions in half

    SciT

    Johnson, Eric P., E-mail: ejohnson@ecosite.co.uk

    Flight-safety regulations in most countries require aircraft to be ice-free upon takeoff. In icy weather, this means that the aircraft usually must be de-iced (existing ice is removed) and sometimes anti-iced (to protect against ice-reformation). For both processes, aircraft typically are sprayed with an 'antifreeze' solution, consisting mainly of glycol diluted with water. This de/anti-icing creates an impact on the environment, of which environmental regulators have grown increasingly conscious. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), for example, recently introduced stricter rules that require airports above minimum size to collect de-icing effluents and send them to wastewater treatment. De-icer collection andmore » treatment is already done at most major airports, but a few have gone one step further: rather than putting the effluent to wastewater, they recycle it. This study examines the carbon savings that can be achieved by recycling de-icer. There are two key findings. One, recycling, as opposed to not recycling, cuts the footprint of aircraft de-icing by 40-50% - and even more, in regions where electricity-generation is cleaner. Two, recycling petrochemical-based de-icer generates a 15-30% lower footprint than using 'bio' de-icer without recycling. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon footprint of aircraft de-icing can be measured. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling aircraft de-icer cuts the footprint of aircraft de-icing by 40-50%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling 'fossil' de-icer is lower carbon than not recycling 'bio' de-icer.« less

  2. Purification of bacteriophage lambda repressor

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ning; Shearwin, Keith; Mack, John; Finzi, Laura; Dunlap, David

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophage lambda repressor controls the lysogeny/lytic growth switch after infection of E. coli by lambda phage. In order to study in detail the looping of DNA mediated by the protein, tag-free repressor and a loss-of-cooperativity mutant were expressed in E.coli and purified by (1) ammonium sulfate fractionation, (2) anion-exchange chromatography and (3) heparin affinity chromatography. This method employs more recently developed and readily available chromatography resins to produce highly pure protein in good yield. In tethered particle motion looping assays and atomic force microscopy “footprinting” assays, both the wild-type protein and a C-terminal His-tagged variant, purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography, bound specifically to high affinity sites to mediate loop formation. In contrast the G147D loss-of-cooperativity mutant bound specifically but did not secure loops. PMID:23831434

  3. Potential toxic effects of aircraft de-icers and wastewater samples containing these compounds.

    PubMed

    Mohiley, A; Franzaring, J; Calvo, O C; Fangmeier, A

    2015-09-01

    One of the major problems of airport operation is the impact of pollution caused by runoff waters. Runoff waters at an airport may contain high concentrations of different contaminants resulting from various activities of its operation. High quantities of aircraft de-icing/anti-icing fluids are used annually at airports worldwide. Aircraft de-icers and anti-icers may have negative environmental impacts, but their effects on aquatic organisms are virtually unknown. In order to address this issue, aircraft de-icers, pavement de-icers and wastewater samples were obtained from a regional airport. To evaluate the toxicity of wastewater samples and aircraft de-icing/anti-icing fluids (ADAFs), two bio-tests were performed: the Lemna growth inhibition test according to OECD guideline 221 and the luminescent bacteria test according to ISO guideline 11348-2. In the Lemna growth inhibition test, phytotoxicity was assessed using the endpoints frond number and frond area. The luminescent bacteria test involved the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. The estimates of effective concentrations (EC50) values were determined using the free software R and the "drc" library. Aquatic plants and marine bacteria showed a higher sensitivity towards ADAFs than to wastewater samples. Experiments showed that aircraft de-icing/anti-icing fluids and wastewater samples were relatively more toxic towards Lemna gibba L. in comparison to V. fischeri.

  4. A numerical simulation of the full two-dimensional electrothermal de-icer pad. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masiulaniec, Konstanty C.

    1988-01-01

    The ability to predict the time-temperature history of electrothermal de-icer pads is important in the subsequent design of improved and more efficient versions. These de-icer pads are installed near the surface of aircraft components, for the specific purpose of removing accreted ice. The proposed numerical model can incorporate the full 2-D geometry through a section of a region (i.e., section of an airfoil), that current 1-D numerical codes are unable to do. Thus, the effects of irregular layers, curvature, etc., can now be accounted for in the thermal transients. Each layer in the actual geometry is mapped via a body-fitted coordinate transformation into uniform, rectangular computational grids. The relevant heat transfer equations are transformed and discretized. To model the phase change that might occur in any accreted ice, in an enthalpy formulation the phase change equations are likewise transformed and discretized. The code developed was tested against numerous classical numerical solutions, as well as against experimental de-icing data on a UH1H rotor blade obtained from the NASA Lewis Research Center. The excellent comparisons obtained show that this code can be a useful tool in predicting the performance of current de-icer models, as well as in the designing of future models.

  5. Loss of floral repressor function adapts rice to higher latitudes in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Ariza, Jorge; Galbiati, Francesca; Goretti, Daniela; Brambilla, Vittoria; Shrestha, Roshi; Pappolla, Andrea; Courtois, Brigitte; Fornara, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The capacity to discriminate variations in day length allows plants to align flowering with the most favourable season of the year. This capacity has been altered by artificial selection when cultivated varieties became adapted to environments different from those of initial domestication. Rice flowering is promoted by short days when HEADING DATE 1 (Hd1) and EARLY HEADING DATE 1 (Ehd1) induce the expression of florigenic proteins encoded by HEADING DATE 3a (Hd3a) and RICE FLOWERING LOCUS T 1 (RFT1). Repressors of flowering antagonize such induction under long days, maintaining vegetative growth and delaying flowering. To what extent artificial selection of long day repressor loci has contributed to expand rice cultivation to Europe is currently unclear. This study demonstrates that European varieties activate both Hd3a and RFT1 expression regardless of day length and their induction is caused by loss-of-function mutations at major long day floral repressors. However, their contribution to flowering time control varies between locations. Pyramiding of mutations is frequently observed in European germplasm, but single mutations are sufficient to adapt rice to flower at higher latitudes. Expression of Ehd1 is increased in varieties showing reduced or null Hd1 expression under natural long days, as well as in single hd1 mutants in isogenic backgrounds. These data indicate that loss of repressor genes has been a key strategy to expand rice cultivation to Europe, and that Ehd1 is a central node integrating floral repressive signals. PMID:25732533

  6. Cdyl: a new transcriptional co-repressor

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Cécile; Pivot-Pajot, Christophe; van Grunsven, Leo A.; Col, Edwige; Lestrat, Cécile; Rousseaux, Sophie; Khochbin, Saadi

    2003-01-01

    Cdyl (chromodomain-Y-like) is a chromodomain-containing protein that is predominantly expressed during mouse spermiogenesis. In its carboxy-terminal portion, there is a domain with homology to the coenzyme A (CoA) pocket of the enoyl-CoA hydratase/isomerase, which is shown here to be able to bind CoA and histone deacetylases (HDACs). It also efficiently represses transcription. Moreover, the binding of Hdac1 represses the ability of Cdyl to bind CoA, and a Cdyl–CoA interaction only occurs in the absence of HDACs. These data suggest that Cdyl is primarily a transcriptional co-repressor. However, the degradation of cellular Hdac1 and Hdac2, as observed here in the elongating spermatids, may provide an HDAC-free environment in which Cdyl could bind CoA and participate in the global chromatin remodelling that occurs in these cells. PMID:12947414

  7. Possible Impact of Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Ratio (ICER) on Decision Making for Cancer Screening in Hong Kong: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Wong, Carlos K H; Lang, Brian H H; Guo, Vivian Y W; Lam, Cindy L K

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this paper was to critically review the literature on the cost effectiveness of cancer screening interventions, and examine the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) that may influence government recommendations on cancer screening strategies and funding for mass implementation in the Hong Kong healthcare system. We conducted a literature review of cost-effectiveness studies in the Hong Kong population related to cancer screening published up to 2015, through a hand search and database search of PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, and OVID Medline. Binary data on the government's decisions were obtained from the Cancer Expert Working Group, Department of Health. Mixed-effect logistic regression analysis was used to examine the impact of ICERs on decision making. Using Youden's index, an optimal ICER threshold value for positive decisions was examined by area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Eight studies reporting 30 cost-effectiveness pairwise comparisons of population-based cancer screening were identified. Most studies reported an ICER for a cancer screening strategy versus a comparator with outcomes in terms of cost per life-years (55.6 %), or cost per quality-adjusted life-years (55.6 %). Among comparisons with a mean ICER of US$102,931 (range 800-715,137), the increase in ICER value by 1000 was associated with decreased odds (odds ratio 0.990, 0.981-0.999; p = 0.033) of a positive recommendation. An optimal ICER value of US$61,600 per effectiveness unit yielded a high sensitivity of 90 % and specificity of 85 % for a positive recommendation. A lower ICER threshold value of below US$8044 per effectiveness unit was detected for a positive funding decision. Linking published evidence to Government recommendations and practice on cancer screening, ICERs influence decisions on the adoption of health technologies in Hong Kong. The potential ICER threshold for recommendation in Hong Kong may be higher than those of developed

  8. Identification of the gene transcription repressor domain of Gli3.

    PubMed

    Tsanev, Robert; Tiigimägi, Piret; Michelson, Piret; Metsis, Madis; Østerlund, Torben; Kogerman, Priit

    2009-01-05

    Gli transcription factors are downstream targets of the Hedgehog signaling pathway. Two of the three Gli proteins harbor gene transcription repressor function in the N-terminal half. We have analyzed the sequences and identified a potential repressor domain in Gli2 and Gli3 and have tested this experimentally. Overexpression studies confirm that the N-terminal parts harbor gene repression activity and we mapped the minimal repressor to residues 106 till 236 in Gli3. Unlike other mechanisms that inhibit Gli induced gene transcription, the repressor domain identified here does not utilize Histone deacetylases (HDACs) to achieve repression, as confirmed by HDAC inhibition studies and pull-down assays. This distinguishes the identified domain from other regulatory parts with negative influence on transcription.

  9. Label-free assay based on immobilized capillary enzyme reactor of Leishmania infantum nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (LicNTPDase-2-ICER-LC/UV).

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Luana; de Oliveira, Arthur Henrique Cavalcante; de Souza Vasconcellos, Raphael; Mariotini-Moura, Christiane; de Cássia Firmino, Rafaela; Fietto, Juliana Lopes Rangel; Cardoso, Carmen Lúcia

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase) is an enzyme belonging to the apyrase family that participates in the hydrolysis of the nucleosides di- and triphosphate to the corresponding nucleoside monophosphate. This enzyme underlies the virulence of parasites such as Leishmania. Recently, an NTPDase from Leishmania infantum (LicNTPDase-2) was cloned and expressed and has been considered as a new drug target for the treatment of leishmaniasis. With the intent of developing label-free online screening methodologies, LicNTPDase-2 was covalently immobilized onto a fused silica capillary tube in the present study to create an immobilized capillary enzyme reactor (ICER) based on LicNTPDase-2 (LicNTPDase-2-ICER). To perform the activity assays, a multidimensional chromatographic method was developed employing the LicNTPDase-2-ICER in the first dimension, and an analytical Ascentis C8 column was used in the second dimension to provide analytical separation of the substrates and products. The validated LicNTPDase-2-ICER method provided the following kinetic parameters of the immobilized enzyme: KM of 2.2 and 1.8mmolL(-1) for the ADP and ATP substrates, respectively. Suramin (1mmolL(-1)) was also shown to inhibit 32.9% of the enzymatic activity. The developed method is applicable to kinetic studies and enables the recognition of the ligands. Furthermore, a comparison of the values of LicNTPDase-2-ICER with those obtained with an LC method using free enzyme in solution showed that LicNTPDase-2-ICER-LC/UV was an accurate and reproducible method that enabled automated measurements for the rapid screening of ligands. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Repressor-mediated tissue-specific gene expression in plants

    DOEpatents

    Meagher, Richard B [Athens, GA; Balish, Rebecca S [Oxford, OH; Tehryung, Kim [Athens, GA; McKinney, Elizabeth C [Athens, GA

    2009-02-17

    Plant tissue specific gene expression by way of repressor-operator complexes, has enabled outcomes including, without limitation, male sterility and engineered plants having root-specific gene expression of relevant proteins to clean environmental pollutants from soil and water. A mercury hyperaccumulation strategy requires that mercuric ion reductase coding sequence is strongly expressed. The actin promoter vector, A2pot, engineered to contain bacterial lac operator sequences, directed strong expression in all plant vegetative organs and tissues. In contrast, the expression from the A2pot construct was restricted primarily to root tissues when a modified bacterial repressor (LacIn) was coexpressed from the light-regulated rubisco small subunit promoter in above-ground tissues. Also provided are analogous repressor operator complexes for selective expression in other plant tissues, for example, to produce male sterile plants.

  11. Solution structure of dimeric Mnt repressor (1-76).

    PubMed

    Burgering, M J; Boelens, R; Gilbert, D E; Breg, J N; Knight, K L; Sauer, R T; Kaptein, R

    1994-12-20

    Wild-type Mnt repressor of Salmonella bacteriophage P22 is a tetrameric protein of 82 residues per monomer. A C-terminal deletion mutant of the repressor denoted Mnt (1-76) is a dimer in solution. The structure of this dimer has been determined using NMR. The NMR assignments of the majority of the 1H, 15N, and 13C resonances were obtained using 2D and triple-resonance 3D techniques. Elements of secondary structure were identified on the basis of characteristic sequential and medium range NOEs. For the structure determination more than 1000 NOEs per monomer were obtained, and structures were generated using distance geometry and restrained simulated annealing calculations. The discrimination of intra- vs intermonomer NOEs was based upon the observation of intersubunit NOEs in [15N,13C] double half-filtered NOESY experiments. The N-terminal part of Mnt (residues 1-44), which shows a 40% sequence homology with the Arc repressor, has a similar secondary and tertiary structure. Mnt (1-76) continues with a loop region of irregular structure, a third alpha-helix, and a random coil C-terminal peptide. Analysis of the secondary structure NOEs, the exchange rates, and the backbone chemical shifts suggests that the carboxy-terminal third helix is less stable than the remainder of the protein, but the observation of intersubunit NOEs for this part of the protein enables the positioning of this helix. The rsmd's between the backbone atoms of the N-terminal part of the Mnt repressor (residues 5-43, 5'-43') and the Arc repressor is 1.58 A, and between this region and the corresponding part of the MetJ repressor 1.43 A.

  12. Oligomeric properties and DNA binding specificities of repressor isoforms from the Streptomyces bacteriophage phiC31.

    PubMed

    Wilson, S E; Smith, M C

    1998-05-15

    Three protein isoforms (74, 54 and 42 kDa) are expressed from repressor gene c in the Streptomyces temperate bacteriophage phiC31. Because expression of the two smaller isoforms, 54 and 42 kDa, is sufficient for superinfection immunity, the interaction between these isoforms was studied. The native 42 kDa repressor (Nat42) and an N-terminally 6x histidine-tagged 54 kDa isoform (His54) were shown by co-purification on a Ni-NTA column to interact in Streptomyces lividans . In vitro three repressor preparations, containing Nat42, His54 and the native 54 and 42 kDa isoforms expressed together (Nat54&42), were subjected to chemical crosslinking and gel filtration analysis. Homo- and hetero-tetramers were observed. Previous work showed that the smallest isoform bound to 17 bp operators containing aconservedinvertedrepeat (CIR) and that the CIRs were located at 16 loci throughout the phiC31 genome. One of the CIRs (CIR6) is believed to be critical for regulating the lytic pathway. The DNA binding activities of the three repressor preparations were studied using fragments containing CIRs (CIR3-CIR6) from the essential early region as templates for DNase I footprinting. Whereas Nat42 bound to CIR6, poorly to CIR5 but undetectably to CIR3 or CIR4, the Nat54&42 preparation could bind to all CIRs tested, albeit poorly to CIR3 and CIR4. The His54 isoform bound all CIRs tested. Isoforms expressed from the phiC31 repressor gene, like those which are expressed from many eukaryotic transcription factor genes, apparently have different binding specificities.

  13. Transcriptional co-repressor SIN3A silencing rescues decline in memory consolidation during scopolamine-induced amnesia.

    PubMed

    Srivas, Sweta; Thakur, Mahendra K

    2018-05-01

    Epigenetic modifications through methylation of DNA and acetylation of histones modulate neuronal gene expression and regulate long-term memory. Earlier we demonstrated that scopolamine-induced decrease in memory consolidation is correlated with enhanced expression of hippocampal DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) in mice. DNMT1 and HDAC2 act together by recruiting a co-repressor complex and deacetylating the chromatin. The catalytic activity of HDACs is mainly dependent on its incorporation into multiprotein co-repressor complexes, among which SIN3A-HDAC2 co-repressor is widely studied to regulate synaptic plasticity. However, the involvement of co-repressor complex in regulating memory loss or amnesia is unexplored. This study examines the role of co-repressor SIN3A in scopolamine-induced amnesia through epigenetic changes in the hippocampus. Scopolamine treatment remarkably enhanced hippocampal SIN3A expression in mice. To prevent such increase in SIN3A expression, we used hippocampal infusion of SIN3A-siRNA and assessed the effect of SIN3A silencing on scopolamine-induced amnesia. Silencing of SIN3A in amnesic mice reduced the binding of HDAC2 at neuronal immediate early genes (IEGs) promoter, but did not change the expression of HDAC2. Furthermore, it increased acetylation of H3K9 and H3K14 at neuronal IEGs (Arc, Egr1, Homer1 and Narp) promoter, prevented scopolamine-induced down-regulation of IEGs and improved consolidation of memory during novel object recognition task. These findings together suggest that SIN3A has a critical role in regulation of synaptic plasticity and might act as a potential therapeutic target to rescue memory decline during amnesia and other neuropsychiatric pathologies. © 2018 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  14. Upregulation of CREM/ICER suppresses wound endothelial CRE-HIF-1α-VEGF-dependent signaling and impairs angiogenesis in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Milad S.; Al-Mulla, Fahd

    2015-01-01

    Impaired angiogenesis and endothelial dysfunction in type 2 diabetes constitute dominant risk factors for non-healing wounds and most forms of cardiovascular disease. We propose that diabetes shifts the ‘angiogenic balance’ in favor of an excessive anti-angiogenic phenotype. Herein, we report that diabetes impairs in vivo sponge angiogenic capacity by decreasing VEGF expression and fibrovascular invasion, and reciprocally enhances the formation of angiostatic molecules, such as thrombospondins, NFκB and FasL. Defective in vivo angiogenesis prompted cellular studies in cultured endothelial cells derived from subcutaneous sponge implants (SIECs) of control and Goto-Kakizaki rats. Ensuing data from diabetic SIECs demonstrated a marked upregulation in cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling, possibly stemming from increased expression of adenylyl cyclase isoforms 3 and 8, and decreased expression of PDE3. Mechanistically, we found that oxidative stress and PKA activation in diabetes enhanced CREM/ICER expression. This reduces IRS2 cellular content by inhibiting cAMP response element (CRE) transcriptional activity. Consequently, a decrease in the activity of Akt-mTOR ensued with a concomitant reduction in the total and nuclear protein levels of HIF-1α. Limiting HIF-1α availability for the specific hypoxia response elements in diabetic SIECs elicited a marked reduction in VEGF expression, both at the mRNA and protein levels. These molecular abnormalities were illustrated functionally by a defect in various pro-angiogenic properties, including cell proliferation, migration and tube formation. A genetic-based strategy in diabetic SIECs using siRNAs against CREM/ICER significantly augmented the PKA-dependent VEGF expression. To this end, the current data identify the importance of CREM/ICER as a negative regulator of endothelial function and establish a link between CREM/ICER overexpression and impaired angiogenesis during the course of diabetes. Moreover, it could also point to

  15. The biotin repressor: modulation of allostery by corepressor analogs.

    PubMed

    Brown, Patrick H; Cronan, John E; Grøtli, Morten; Beckett, Dorothy

    2004-04-02

    The Escherichia coli biotin repressor functions in biotin retention and regulation of biotin biosynthesis. Biotin retention is accomplished via the two-step biotinylation of the biotin-dependent enzyme, acetyl-CoA carboxylase. In the first step of this reaction the substrates biotin and ATP are utilized in synthesis of the activated biotin, biotinyl-5'-AMP, while in the second step this activated biotin is transferred to a unique lysine residue of the biotin carboxyl carrier protein subunit of the carboxylase. Regulation of biotin biosynthesis is accomplished through binding of the repressor to the transcription control region of the biotin biosynthetic operon. The adenylated or activated biotin functions as the corepressor in this DNA binding process. The activated biotin is a mixed anhydride and thus labile. In efforts to develop tools for structural and thermodynamic studies of the biotin regulatory interactions, two analogs of the adenylate, a sulfamoyl derivative and an ester derivative, have been synthesized and functionally characterized. Results of fluorescence measurements indicate that both analogs bind with high affinity to the repressor and that both are inactive in biotin transfer to the acceptor protein. Functional studies of their corepressor properties indicate that while the sulfamoyl is a weak allosteric activator, the ester closely mimics the physiological corepressor in activation of assembly of the transcription repression complex. Results of these studies also provide further insight into the allosteric mechanism of the biotin repressor.

  16. Modeling the Lac repressor-operator assembly: The influence of DNA looping on Lac repressor conformation

    PubMed Central

    Swigon, David; Coleman, Bernard D.; Olson, Wilma K.

    2006-01-01

    Repression of transcription of the Escherichia coli Lac operon by the Lac repressor (LacR) is accompanied by the simultaneous binding of LacR to two operators and the formation of a DNA loop. A recently developed theory of sequence-dependent DNA elasticity enables one to relate the fine structure of the LacR–DNA complex to a wide range of heretofore-unconnected experimental observations. Here, that theory is used to calculate the configuration and free energy of the DNA loop as a function of its length and base-pair sequence, its linking number, and the end conditions imposed by the LacR tetramer. The tetramer can assume two types of conformations. Whereas a rigid V-shaped structure is observed in the crystal, EM images show extended forms in which two dimer subunits are flexibly joined. Upon comparing our computed loop configurations with published experimental observations of permanganate sensitivities, DNase I cutting patterns, and loop stabilities, we conclude that linear DNA segments of short-to-medium chain length (50–180 bp) give rise to loops with the extended form of LacR and that loops formed within negatively supercoiled plasmids induce the V-shaped structure. PMID:16785444

  17. Characterization of aircraft deicer and anti-icer components and toxicity in airport snowbanks and snowmelt runoff.

    PubMed

    Corsi, Steven R; Geis, Steven W; Loyo-Rosales, Jorge E; Rice, Clifford P; Sheesley, Rebecca I; Failey, Greg G; Cancilla, Devon A

    2006-05-15

    Snowbank samples were collected from snowbanks within a medium-sized airport for four years to characterize aircraft deicer and anti-icer (ADAF) components and toxicity. Concentrations of ADAF components varied with median glycol concentrations from individual sampling periods ranging from 65 to 5940 mg/L. Glycol content in snowbanks ranged from 0.17 to 11.4% of that applied to aircraft. Glycol, a freezing point depressant, was selectively removed during melt periods before snow and ice resulting in lower glycol concentrations after melt periods. Concentrations of ADAF components in airport runoff were similar during periods of snowmelt as compared to active ADAF application periods; however, due to the long duration of snowmelt events, greater masses of glycol were transported during snowmelt events. Alkylphenol ethoxylates (APEO), selected APEO degradation products, and 4- and 5-methyl-1H-benzotriazole were detected in snowbank samples and airport snowmelt. Concentrations of APEO parent products were greater in snowbank samples than in runoff samples. Relative abundance of APEO degradation products increased in the downstream direction from the snowbank to the outfalls and the receiving stream with respect to APEO parent compounds and glycol. Toxicity in Microtox assays remained in snowbanks after most glycol had been removed during melt periods. Increased toxicity in airport snowbanks as compared to other urban snowbanks was not explained by additional combustion or fuel contribution in airport snow. Organic markers suggest ADAF additives as a possible explanation for this increased toxicity. Results indicate that glycol cannot be used as a surrogate for fate and transport of other ADAF components.

  18. Characterization of aircraft deicer and anti-icer components and toxicity in airport snowbanks and snowmelt runoff

    Corsi, S.R.; Geis, S.W.; Loyo-Rosales, J. E.; Rice, C.P.; Sheesley, R.J.; Failey, G.G.; Cancilla, Devon A.

    2006-01-01

    Snowbank samples were collected from snowbanks within a medium-sized airport for four years to characterize aircraft deicer and anti-icer (ADAF) components and toxicity. Concentrations of ADAF components varied with median glycol concentrations from individual sampling periods ranging from 65 to 5940 mg/L. Glycol content in snowbanks ranged from 0.17 to 11.4% of that applied to aircraft. Glycol, a freezing point depressant, was selectively removed during melt periods before snow and ice resulting in lower glycol concentrations after melt periods. Concentrations of ADAF components in airport runoff were similar during periods of snowmelt as compared to active ADAF application periods; however, due to the long duration of snowmelt events, greater masses of glycol were transported during snowmelt events. Alkylphenol ethoxylates (APEO), selected APEO degradation products, and 4- and 5-methyl-1H-benzotriazole were detected in snowbank samples and airport snowmelt. Concentrations of APEO parent products were greater in snowbank samples than in runoff samples. Relative abundance of APEO degradation products increased in the downstream direction from the snowbank to the outfalls and the receiving stream with respect to APEO parent compounds and glycol. Toxicity in Microtox assays remained in snowbanks after most glycol had been removed during melt periods. Increased toxicity in airport snowbanks as compared to other urban snowbanks was not explained by additional combustion or fuel contribution in airport snow. Organic markers suggest ADAF additives as a possible explanation for this increased toxicity. Results indicate that glycol cannot be used as a surrogate for fate and transport of other ADAF components. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  19. Transcriptional repressor foxl1 regulates central nervous system development by suppressing shh expression in zebra fish.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Chisako; Satoh, Shinya; Tabata, Yoko; Arai, Ken-ichi; Watanabe, Sumiko

    2006-10-01

    We identified zebra fish forkhead transcription factor l1 (zfoxl1) as a gene strongly expressed in neural tissues such as midbrain, hindbrain, and the otic vesicle at the early embryonic stage. Loss of the function of zfoxl1 effected by morpholino antisense oligonucleotide resulted in defects in midbrain and eye development, and in that of formation of the pectoral fins. Interestingly, ectopic expression of shh in the midbrain and elevated pax2a expression in the optic stalk were observed in foxl1 MO-injected embryos. In contrast, expression of pax6a, which is negatively regulated by shh, was suppressed in the thalamus and pretectum regions, supporting the idea of augmentation of the shh signaling pathway by suppression of foxl1. Expression of zfoxl1-EnR (repressing) rather than zfoxl1-VP16 (activating) resulted in a phenotype similar to that induced by foxl1-mRNA, suggesting that foxl1 may act as a transcriptional repressor of shh in zebra fish embryos. Supporting this notion, foxl1 suppressed isolated 2.7-kb shh promoter activity in PC12 cells, and the minimal region of foxl1 required for its transcriptional repressor activity showed strong homology with the groucho binding motif, which is found in genes encoding various homeodomain proteins. In view of all of our data taken together, we propose zfoxl1 to be a novel regulator of neural development that acts by suppressing shh expression.

  20. Transcriptional Repressor foxl1 Regulates Central Nervous System Development by Suppressing shh Expression in Zebra Fish†

    PubMed Central

    Nakada, Chisako; Satoh, Shinya; Tabata, Yoko; Arai, Ken-ichi; Watanabe, Sumiko

    2006-01-01

    We identified zebra fish forkhead transcription factor l1 (zfoxl1) as a gene strongly expressed in neural tissues such as midbrain, hindbrain, and the otic vesicle at the early embryonic stage. Loss of the function of zfoxl1 effected by morpholino antisense oligonucleotide resulted in defects in midbrain and eye development, and in that of formation of the pectoral fins. Interestingly, ectopic expression of shh in the midbrain and elevated pax2a expression in the optic stalk were observed in foxl1 MO-injected embryos. In contrast, expression of pax6a, which is negatively regulated by shh, was suppressed in the thalamus and pretectum regions, supporting the idea of augmentation of the shh signaling pathway by suppression of foxl1. Expression of zfoxl1-EnR (repressing) rather than zfoxl1-VP16 (activating) resulted in a phenotype similar to that induced by foxl1-mRNA, suggesting that foxl1 may act as a transcriptional repressor of shh in zebra fish embryos. Supporting this notion, foxl1 suppressed isolated 2.7-kb shh promoter activity in PC12 cells, and the minimal region of foxl1 required for its transcriptional repressor activity showed strong homology with the groucho binding motif, which is found in genes encoding various homeodomain proteins. In view of all of our data taken together, we propose zfoxl1 to be a novel regulator of neural development that acts by suppressing shh expression. PMID:16980626

  1. Directed evolution of a synthetic phylogeny of programmable Trp repressors.

    PubMed

    Ellefson, Jared W; Ledbetter, Michael P; Ellington, Andrew D

    2018-04-01

    As synthetic regulatory programs expand in sophistication, an ever increasing number of biological components with predictable phenotypes is required. Regulators are often 'part mined' from a diverse, but uncharacterized, array of genomic sequences, often leading to idiosyncratic behavior. Here, we generate an entire synthetic phylogeny from the canonical allosteric transcription factor TrpR. Iterative rounds of positive and negative compartmentalized partnered replication (CPR) led to the exponential amplification of variants that responded with high affinity and specificity to halogenated tryptophan analogs and novel operator sites. Fourteen repressor variants were evolved with unique regulatory profiles across five operators and three ligands. The logic of individual repressors can be modularly programmed by creating heterodimeric fusions, resulting in single proteins that display logic functions, such as 'NAND'. Despite the evolutionarily limited regulatory role of TrpR, vast functional spaces exist around this highly conserved protein scaffold and can be harnessed to create synthetic regulatory programs.

  2. Genomic Mining of Prokaryotic Repressors for Orthogonal Logic Gates

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Brynne C.; Nielsen, Alec A.K.; Tamsir, Alvin; Clancy, Kevin; Peterson, Todd; Voigt, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic circuits perform computational operations based on interactions between freely diffusing molecules within a cell. When transcription factors are combined to build a circuit, unintended interactions can disrupt its function. Here, we apply “part mining” to build a library of 73 TetR-family repressors gleaned from prokaryotic genomes. The operators of a subset were determined using an in vitro method and this information was used to build synthetic promoters. The promoters and repressors were screened for cross-reactions. Of these, 16 were identified that both strongly repress their cognate promoter (5- to 207-fold) and do not interact with other promoters. Each repressor:promoter pair was converted to a NOT gate and characterized. Used as a set of 16 NOR gates, there are >1054 circuits that could be built by changing the pattern of input and output promoters. This represents a large set of compatible gates that can be used to construct user-defined circuits. PMID:24316737

  3. Impacts of aircraft deicer and anti-icer runoff on receiving waters from Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, Texas, USA

    Corsi, S.R.; Harwell, G.R.; Geis, S.W.; Bergman, D.

    2006-01-01

    From October 2002 to April 2004, data were collected from Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW) International Airport (TX, USA) outfalls and receiving waters (Trigg Lake and Big Bear Creek) to document the magnitude and potential effects of aircraft deicer and anti-icer fluid (ADAF) runoff on water quality. Glycol concentrations at outfalls ranged from less than 18 to 23,800 mg/L, whereas concentrations in Big Bear Creek were less because of dilution, dispersion, and degradation, ranging from less than 18 to 230 mg/L. Annual loading results indicate that 10 and 35% of what was applied to aircraft was discharged to Big Bear Creek in 2003 and 2004, respectively. Glycol that entered Trigg Lake was diluted and degraded before reaching the lake outlet. Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations at airport outfalls sometimes were low (5.0 mg/L). Results of toxicity tests indicate that effects on Ceriodaphnia dubia, Pimephales promelas, and Selanastrum capricornutum are influenced by type IV ADAF (anti-icer), not just type I ADAF (deicer) as is more commonly assumed. ?? 2006 SETAC.

  4. Impacts of aircraft deicer and anti-icer runoff on receiving waters from Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, Texas, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Corsi, Steven R; Harwell, Glenn R; Geis, Steven W; Bergman, Daniel

    2006-11-01

    From October 2002 to April 2004, data were collected from Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW) International Airport (TX, U.S.A.) outfalls and receiving waters (Trigg Lake and Big Bear Creek) to document the magnitude and potential effects of aircraft deicer and anti-icer fluid (ADAF) runoff on water quality. Glycol concentrations at outfalls ranged from less than 18 to 23,800 mg/L, whereas concentrations in Big Bear Creek were less because of dilution, dispersion, and degradation, ranging from less than 18 to 230 mg/L. Annual loading results indicate that 10 and 35% of what was applied to aircraft was discharged to Big Bear Creek in 2003 and 2004, respectively. Glycol that entered Trigg Lake was diluted and degraded before reaching the lake outlet. Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations at airport outfalls sometimes were low (<2.0 mg/L) but typical of what was measured in an urban reference stream. In comparison, the DO concentration at Trigg Lake monitoring sites was consistently greater than 5.5 mg/L during the monitoring period, probably because of the installation of aerators in the lake by DFW personnel. The DO concentration in Big Bear Creek was very similar at sites upstream and downstream of airport influence (>5.0 mg/L). Results of toxicity tests indicate that effects on Ceriodaphnia dubia, Pimephales promelas, and Selanastrum capricornutum are influenced by type IV ADAF (anti-icer), not just type I ADAF (deicer) as is more commonly assumed.

  5. DND protein functions as a translation repressor during zebrafish embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Manami; Tani-Matsuhana, Saori; Ohkawa, Yasuka; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Inoue, Kunio

    2017-03-04

    Germline and somatic cell distinction is regulated through a combination of microRNA and germ cell-specific RNA-binding proteins in zebrafish. An RNA-binding protein, DND, has been reported to relieve the miR-430-mediated repression of some germ plasm mRNAs such as nanos3 and tdrd7 in primordial germ cells (PGCs). Here, we showed that miR-430-mediated repression is not counteracted by the overexpression of DND protein in somatic cells. Using a λN-box B tethering assay in the embryo, we found that tethering of DND to reporter mRNA results in translation repression without affecting mRNA stability. Translation repression by DND was not dependent on another germline-specific translation repressor, Nanos3, in zebrafish embryos. Moreover, our data suggested that DND represses translation of nanog and dnd mRNAs, whereas an RNA-binding protein DAZ-like (DAZL) promotes dnd mRNA translation. Thus, our study showed that DND protein functions as a translation repressor of specific mRNAs to control PGC development in zebrafish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Viral Ubiquitin Ligase Stimulates Selective Host MicroRNA Expression by Targeting ZEB Transcriptional Repressors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju Youn; Leader, Andrew; Stoller, Michelle L.; Coen, Donald M.; Wilson, Angus C.

    2017-01-01

    Infection with herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) brings numerous changes in cellular gene expression. Levels of most host mRNAs are reduced, limiting synthesis of host proteins, especially those involved in antiviral defenses. The impact of HSV-1 on host microRNAs (miRNAs), an extensive network of short non-coding RNAs that regulate mRNA stability/translation, remains largely unexplored. Here we show that transcription of the miR-183 cluster (miR-183, miR-96, and miR-182) is selectively induced by HSV-1 during productive infection of primary fibroblasts and neurons. ICP0, a viral E3 ubiquitin ligase expressed as an immediate-early protein, is both necessary and sufficient for this induction. Nuclear exclusion of ICP0 or removal of the RING (really interesting new gene) finger domain that is required for E3 ligase activity prevents induction. ICP0 promotes the degradation of numerous host proteins and for the most part, the downstream consequences are unknown. Induction of the miR-183 cluster can be mimicked by depletion of host transcriptional repressors zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1)/δ-crystallin enhancer binding factor 1 (δEF1) and zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2 (ZEB2)/Smad-interacting protein 1 (SIP1), which we establish as new substrates for ICP0-mediated degradation. Thus, HSV-1 selectively stimulates expression of the miR-183 cluster by ICP0-mediated degradation of ZEB transcriptional repressors. PMID:28783105

  7. A homozygous mutation in HESX1 is associated with evolving hypopituitarism due to impaired repressor-corepressor interaction

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Luciani R.; Woods, Kathryn S.; Mendonca, Berenice B.; Marcal, Nathalie; Zamparini, Andrea L.; Stifani, Stefano; Brickman, Joshua M.; Arnhold, Ivo J.P.; Dattani, Mehul T.

    2003-01-01

    The paired-like homeobox gene expressed in embryonic stem cells Hesx1/HESX1 encodes a developmental repressor and is expressed in early development in a region fated to form the forebrain, with subsequent localization to Rathke’s pouch, the primordium of the anterior pituitary gland. Mutations within the gene have been associated with septo-optic dysplasia, a constellation of phenotypes including eye, forebrain, and pituitary abnormalities, or milder degrees of hypopituitarism. We identified a novel homozygous nonconservative missense mutation (I26T) in the critical Engrailed homology repressor domain (eh1) of HESX1, the first, to our knowledge, to be described in humans, in a girl with evolving combined pituitary hormone deficiency born to consanguineous parents. Neuroimaging revealed a thin pituitary stalk with anterior pituitary hypoplasia and an ectopic posterior pituitary, but no midline or optic nerve abnormalities. This I26T mutation did not affect the DNA-binding ability of HESX1 but led to an impaired ability to recruit the mammalian Groucho homolog/Transducin-like enhancer of split-1 (Gro/TLE1), a crucial corepressor for HESX1, thereby leading to partial loss of repression. Thus, the novel pituitary phenotype highlighted here appears to be a specific consequence of the inability of HESX1 to recruit Groucho-related corepressors, suggesting that other molecular mechanisms govern HESX1 function in the forebrain. PMID:14561704

  8. Radiation-induced tetramer-to-dimer transition of Escherichia coli lactose repressor

    SciT

    Goffinont, S.; Davidkova, M.; Spotheim-Maurizot, M., E-mail: spotheim@cnrs-orleans.fr

    2009-08-21

    The wild type lactose repressor of Escherichia coli is a tetrameric protein formed by two identical dimers. They are associated via a C-terminal 4-helix bundle (called tetramerization domain) whose stability is ensured by the interaction of leucine zipper motifs. Upon in vitro {gamma}-irradiation the repressor losses its ability to bind the operator DNA sequence due to damage of its DNA-binding domains. Using an engineered dimeric repressor for comparison, we show here that irradiation induces also the change of repressor oligomerisation state from tetramer to dimer. The splitting of the tetramer into dimers can result from the oxidation of the leucinemore » residues of the tetramerization domain.« less

  9. Repressor logic modules assembled by rolling circle amplification platform to construct a set of logic gates

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hua; Hu, Bo; Tang, Suming; Zhao, Guojie; Guan, Yifu

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule metabolites and their allosterically regulated repressors play an important role in many gene expression and metabolic disorder processes. These natural sensors, though valuable as good logic switches, have rarely been employed without transcription machinery in cells. Here, two pairs of repressors, which function in opposite ways, were cloned, purified and used to control DNA replication in rolling circle amplification (RCA) in vitro. By using metabolites and repressors as inputs, RCA signals as outputs, four basic logic modules were constructed successfully. To achieve various logic computations based on these basic modules, we designed series and parallel strategies of circular templates, which can further assemble these repressor modules in an RCA platform to realize twelve two-input Boolean logic gates and a three-input logic gate. The RCA-output and RCA-assembled platform was proved to be easy and flexible for complex logic processes and might have application potential in molecular computing and synthetic biology. PMID:27869177

  10. Heat-induced fibrillation of BclXL apoptotic repressor.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Vikas; Olenick, Max B; Schuchardt, Brett J; Mikles, David C; Deegan, Brian J; McDonald, Caleb B; Seldeen, Kenneth L; Kurouski, Dmitry; Faridi, Mohd Hafeez; Shareef, Mohammed M; Gupta, Vineet; Lednev, Igor K; Farooq, Amjad

    2013-09-01

    The BclXL apoptotic repressor bears the propensity to associate into megadalton oligomers in solution, particularly under acidic pH. Herein, using various biophysical methods, we analyze the effect of temperature on the oligomerization of BclXL. Our data show that BclXL undergoes irreversible aggregation and assembles into highly-ordered rope-like homogeneous fibrils with length in the order of mm and a diameter in the μm-range under elevated temperatures. Remarkably, the formation of such fibrils correlates with the decay of a largely α-helical fold into a predominantly β-sheet architecture of BclXL in a manner akin to the formation of amyloid fibrils. Further interrogation reveals that while BclXL fibrils formed under elevated temperatures show no observable affinity toward BH3 ligands, they appear to be optimally primed for insertion into cardiolipin bicelles. This salient observation strongly argues that BclXL fibrils likely represent an on-pathway intermediate for insertion into mitochondrial outer membrane during the onset of apoptosis. Collectively, our study sheds light on the propensity of BclXL to form amyloid-like fibrils with important consequences on its mechanism of action in gauging the apoptotic fate of cells in health and disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. CaAP2 transcription factor is a candidate gene for a flowering repressor and a candidate for controlling natural variation of flowering time in Capsicum annuum.

    PubMed

    Borovsky, Yelena; Sharma, Vinod K; Verbakel, Henk; Paran, Ilan

    2015-06-01

    The APETALA2 transcription factor homolog CaAP2 is a candidate gene for a flowering repressor in pepper, as revealed by induced-mutation phenotype, and a candidate underlying a major QTL controlling natural variation in flowering time. To decipher the genetic control of transition to flowering in pepper (Capsicum spp.) and determine the extent of gene function conservation compared to model species, we isolated and characterized several ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-induced mutants that vary in their flowering time compared to the wild type. In the present study, we report on the isolation of an early-flowering mutant that flowers after four leaves on the primary stem compared to nine leaves in the wild-type 'Maor'. By genetic mapping and sequencing of putative candidate genes linked to the mutant phenotype, we identified a member of the APETALA2 (AP2) transcription factor family, CaAP2, which was disrupted in the early-flowering mutant. CaAP2 is a likely ortholog of AP2 that functions as a repressor of flowering in Arabidopsis. To test whether CaAP2 has an effect on controlling natural variation in the transition to flowering in pepper, we performed QTL mapping for flowering time in a cross between early and late-flowering C. annuum accessions. We identified a major QTL in a region of chromosome 2 in which CaAP2 was the most significant marker, explaining 52 % of the phenotypic variation of the trait. Sequence comparison of the CaAP2 open reading frames in the two parents used for QTL mapping did not reveal significant variation. In contrast, significant differences in expression level of CaAP2 were detected between near-isogenic lines that differ for the flowering time QTL, supporting the putative function of CaAP2 as a major repressor of flowering in pepper.

  12. BiFCROS: A Low-Background Fluorescence Repressor Operator System for Labeling of Genomic Loci.

    PubMed

    Milbredt, Sarah; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2017-06-07

    Fluorescence-based methods are widely used to analyze elementary cell processes such as DNA replication or chromosomal folding and segregation. Labeling DNA with a fluorescent protein allows the visualization of its temporal and spatial organization. One popular approach is FROS (fluorescence repressor operator system). This method specifically labels DNA in vivo through binding of a fusion of a fluorescent protein and a repressor protein to an operator array, which contains numerous copies of the repressor binding site integrated into the genomic site of interest. Bound fluorescent proteins are then visible as foci in microscopic analyses and can be distinguished from the background fluorescence caused by unbound fusion proteins. Even though this method is widely used, no attempt has been made so far to decrease the background fluorescence to facilitate analysis of the actual signal of interest. Here, we present a new method that greatly reduces the background signal of FROS. BiFCROS (Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation and Repressor Operator System) is based on fusions of repressor proteins to halves of a split fluorescent protein. Binding to a hybrid FROS array results in fluorescence signals due to bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Only proteins bound to the hybrid FROS array fluoresce, greatly improving the signal to noise ratio compared to conventional FROS. We present the development of BiFCROS and discuss its potential to be used as a fast and single-cell readout for copy numbers of genetic loci. Copyright © 2017 Milbredt and Waldminghaus.

  13. BiFCROS: A Low-Background Fluorescence Repressor Operator System for Labeling of Genomic Loci

    PubMed Central

    Milbredt, Sarah; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence-based methods are widely used to analyze elementary cell processes such as DNA replication or chromosomal folding and segregation. Labeling DNA with a fluorescent protein allows the visualization of its temporal and spatial organization. One popular approach is FROS (fluorescence repressor operator system). This method specifically labels DNA in vivo through binding of a fusion of a fluorescent protein and a repressor protein to an operator array, which contains numerous copies of the repressor binding site integrated into the genomic site of interest. Bound fluorescent proteins are then visible as foci in microscopic analyses and can be distinguished from the background fluorescence caused by unbound fusion proteins. Even though this method is widely used, no attempt has been made so far to decrease the background fluorescence to facilitate analysis of the actual signal of interest. Here, we present a new method that greatly reduces the background signal of FROS. BiFCROS (Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation and Repressor Operator System) is based on fusions of repressor proteins to halves of a split fluorescent protein. Binding to a hybrid FROS array results in fluorescence signals due to bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Only proteins bound to the hybrid FROS array fluoresce, greatly improving the signal to noise ratio compared to conventional FROS. We present the development of BiFCROS and discuss its potential to be used as a fast and single-cell readout for copy numbers of genetic loci. PMID:28450375

  14. Evidence that the Dictyostelium Dd-STATa protein is a repressor that regulates commitment to stalk cell differentiation and is also required for efficient chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, S; Jermyn, K A; Early, A; Kawata, T; Aubry, L; Ceccarelli, A; Schaap, P; Williams, J G; Firtel, R A

    1999-08-01

    Dd-STATa is a structural and functional homologue of the metazoan STAT (Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription) proteins. We show that Dd-STATa null cells exhibit several distinct developmental phenotypes. The aggregation of Dd-STATa null cells is delayed and they chemotax slowly to a cyclic AMP source, suggesting a role for Dd-STATa in these early processes. In Dd-STATa null strains, slug-like structures are formed but they have an aberrant pattern of gene expression. In such slugs, ecmB/lacZ, a marker that is normally specific for cells on the stalk cell differentiation pathway, is expressed throughout the prestalk region. Stalk cell differentiation in Dictyostelium has been proposed to be under negative control, mediated by repressor elements present in the promoters of stalk cell-specific genes. Dd-STATa binds these repressor elements in vitro and the ectopic expression of ecmB/lacZ in the null strain provides in vivo evidence that Dd-STATa is the repressor protein that regulates commitment to stalk cell differentiation. Dd-STATa null cells display aberrant behavior in a monolayer assay wherein stalk cell differentiation is induced using the stalk cell morphogen DIF. The ecmB gene, a general marker for stalk cell differentiation, is greatly overinduced by DIF in Dd-STATa null cells. Also, Dd-STATa null cells are hypersensitive to DIF for expression of ST/lacZ, a marker for the earliest stages in the differentiation of one of the stalk cell sub-types. We suggest that both these manifestations of DIF hypersensitivity in the null strain result from the balance between activation and repression of the promoter elements being tipped in favor of activation when the repressor is absent. Paradoxically, although Dd-STATa null cells are hypersensitive to the inducing effects of DIF and readily form stalk cells in monolayer assay, the Dd-STATa null cells show little or no terminal stalk cell differentiation within the slug. Dd-STATa null slugs remain

  15. Deregulation of polycomb repressor complex 1 modifier AUTS2 in T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Stefan; Pommerenke, Claudia; Meyer, Corinna; Kaufmann, Maren; Drexler, Hans G; MacLeod, Roderick A F

    2016-07-19

    Recently, we identified deregulated expression of the B-cell specific transcription factor MEF2C in T-cell acute lymphoid leukemia (T-ALL). Here, we performed sequence analysis of a regulatory upstream section of MEF2C in T-ALL cell lines which, however, proved devoid of mutations. Unexpectedly, we found strong conservation between the regulatory upstream region of MEF2C (located at chromosomal band 5q14) and an intergenic stretch at 7q11 located between STAG3L4 and AUTS2, covering nearly 20 kb. While the non-coding gene STAG3L4 was inconspicuously expressed, AUTS2 was aberrantly upregulated in 6% of T-ALL patients (public dataset GSE42038) and in 3/24 T-ALL cell lines, two of which represented very immature differentiation stages. AUTS2 expression was higher in normal B-cells than in T-cells, indicating lineage-specific activity in lymphopoiesis. While excluding chromosomal aberrations, examinations of AUTS2 transcriptional regulation in T-ALL cells revealed activation by IL7-IL7R-STAT5-signalling and MEF2C. AUTS2 protein has been shown to interact with polycomb repressor complex 1 subtype 5 (PRC1.5), transforming this particular complex into an activator. Accordingly, expression profiling and functional analyses demonstrated that AUTS2 activated while PCGF5 repressed transcription of NKL homeobox gene MSX1 in T-ALL cells. Forced expression and pharmacological inhibition of EZH2 in addition to H3K27me3 analysis indicated that PRC2 repressed MSX1 as well. Taken together, we found that AUTS2 and MEF2C, despite lying on different chromosomes, share strikingly similar regulatory upstream regions and aberrant expression in T-ALL subsets. Our data implicate chromatin complexes PRC1/AUTS2 and PRC2 in a gene network in T-ALL regulating early lymphoid differentiation.

  16. Non-equilibrium repressor binding kinetics link DNA damage dose to transcriptional timing within the SOS gene network.

    PubMed

    Culyba, Matthew J; Kubiak, Jeffrey M; Mo, Charlie Y; Goulian, Mark; Kohli, Rahul M

    2018-06-01

    Biochemical pathways are often genetically encoded as simple transcription regulation networks, where one transcription factor regulates the expression of multiple genes in a pathway. The relative timing of each promoter's activation and shut-off within the network can impact physiology. In the DNA damage repair pathway (known as the SOS response) of Escherichia coli, approximately 40 genes are regulated by the LexA repressor. After a DNA damaging event, LexA degradation triggers SOS gene transcription, which is temporally separated into subsets of 'early', 'middle', and 'late' genes. Although this feature plays an important role in regulating the SOS response, both the range of this separation and its underlying mechanism are not experimentally defined. Here we show that, at low doses of DNA damage, the timing of promoter activities is not separated. Instead, timing differences only emerge at higher levels of DNA damage and increase as a function of DNA damage dose. To understand mechanism, we derived a series of synthetic SOS gene promoters which vary in LexA-operator binding kinetics, but are otherwise identical, and then studied their activity over a large dose-range of DNA damage. In distinction to established models based on rapid equilibrium assumptions, the data best fit a kinetic model of repressor occupancy at promoters, where the drop in cellular LexA levels associated with higher doses of DNA damage leads to non-equilibrium binding kinetics of LexA at operators. Operators with slow LexA binding kinetics achieve their minimal occupancy state at later times than operators with fast binding kinetics, resulting in a time separation of peak promoter activity between genes. These data provide insight into this remarkable feature of the SOS pathway by demonstrating how a single transcription factor can be employed to control the relative timing of each gene's transcription as a function of stimulus dose.

  17. Multiple binding sites for transcriptional repressors can produce regular bursting and enhance noise suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengyel, Iván M.; Morelli, Luis G.

    2017-04-01

    Cells may control fluctuations in protein levels by means of negative autoregulation, where transcription factors bind DNA sites to repress their own production. Theoretical studies have assumed a single binding site for the repressor, while in most species it is found that multiple binding sites are arranged in clusters. We study a stochastic description of negative autoregulation with multiple binding sites for the repressor. We find that increasing the number of binding sites induces regular bursting of gene products. By tuning the threshold for repression, we show that multiple binding sites can also suppress fluctuations. Our results highlight possible roles for the presence of multiple binding sites of negative autoregulators.

  18. Mechanism of Metal Ion Activation of the Diphtheria Toxin Repressor DtxR

    SciT

    D'Aquino,J.; Tetenbaum-Novatt, J.; White, A.

    2005-01-01

    The diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR) is a metal ion-activated transcriptional regulator that has been linked to the virulence of Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Structure determination has shown that there are two metal ion binding sites per repressor monomer, and site-directed mutagenesis has demonstrated that binding site 2 (primary) is essential for recognition of the target DNA repressor, leaving the role of binding site 1 (ancillary) unclear. Calorimetric techniques have demonstrated that although binding site 1 (ancillary) has high affinity for metal ion with a binding constant of 2 x 10{sup -7}, binding site 2 (primary) is a low-affinity binding site with amore » binding constant of 6.3 x 10{sup -4}. These two binding sites act in an independent fashion, and their contribution can be easily dissected by traditional mutational analysis. Our results clearly demonstrate that binding site 1 (ancillary) is the first one to be occupied during metal ion activation, playing a critical role in stabilization of the repressor. In addition, structural data obtained for the mutants Ni-DtxR(H79A, C102D), reported here, and the previously reported DtxR(H79A) have allowed us to propose a mechanism of metal activation for DtxR.« less

  19. The role of repressor kinetics in relief of transcriptional interference between convergent promoters

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Nan; Palmer, Adam C.; Ahlgren-Berg, Alexandra; Shearwin, Keith E.; Dodd, Ian B.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional interference (TI), where transcription from a promoter is inhibited by the activity of other promoters in its vicinity on the same DNA, enables transcription factors to regulate a target promoter indirectly, inducing or relieving TI by controlling the interfering promoter. For convergent promoters, stochastic simulations indicate that relief of TI can be inhibited if the repressor at the interfering promoter has slow binding kinetics, making it either sensitive to frequent dislodgement by elongating RNA polymerases (RNAPs) from the target promoter, or able to be a strong roadblock to these RNAPs. In vivo measurements of relief of TI by CI or Cro repressors in the bacteriophage λ PR–PRE system show strong relief of TI and a lack of dislodgement and roadblocking effects, indicative of rapid CI and Cro binding kinetics. However, repression of the same λ promoter by a catalytically dead CRISPR Cas9 protein gave either compromised or no relief of TI depending on the orientation at which it binds DNA, consistent with dCas9 being a slow kinetics repressor. This analysis shows how the intrinsic properties of a repressor can be evolutionarily tuned to set the magnitude of relief of TI. PMID:27378773

  20. Effects of Task Familiarity on Stress Responses of Repressors and Sensitizers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagano, Don F.

    1973-01-01

    R.S. Lazarus's theory of coping was used to investigate appraisal and reappraisal of threat in repressors and sensitizers. Two indexes of stress, self-report ratings of affect and palmar skin conductance, were measured prior to performance on a reaction time task, after one-third of the task was completed and after two-thirds of the task was…

  1. Mechanism of Metal Ion Activation of the Diphtheria Toxin Repressor DtxR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Aquino, J. Alejandro; Ringe, Dagmar

    2006-08-01

    The diphtheria toxin repressor, DtxR, is a metal ion-activated transcriptional regulator that has been linked to the virulence of Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Structure determination has shown that there are two metal ion binding sites per repressor monomer, and site-directed mutagenesis has demonstrated that binding site 2 (primary) is essential for recognition of the target DNA repressor, leaving the role of binding site 1 (ancillary) unclear (1 - 3). Calorimetric techniques have demonstrated that while binding site 1 (ancillary) has high affinity for metal ion with a binding constant of 2 × 10-7, binding site 2 (primary) is a low affinity binding site with a binding constant of 6.3 × 10-4. These two binding sites act independently and their contribution can be easily dissected by traditional mutational analysis. Our results clearly demonstrate that binding site 1 (ancillary) is the first one to be occupied during metal ion activation, playing a critical role in stabilization of the repressor. In addition, structural data obtained for the mutants Ni-DtxR(H79A,C102D), reported here and the previously reported DtxR(H79A) (4) has allowed us to propose a mechanism of metal ion activation for DtxR.

  2. Radiation-induced oxidative damage to the DNA-binding domain of the lactose repressor

    PubMed Central

    Gillard, Nathalie; Goffinont, Stephane; Buré, Corinne; Davidkova, Marie; Maurizot, Jean-Claude; Cadene, Martine; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the cellular effects of radiation-induced oxidation requires the unravelling of key molecular events, particularly damage to proteins with important cellular functions. The Escherichia coli lactose operon is a classical model of gene regulation systems. Its functional mechanism involves the specific binding of a protein, the repressor, to a specific DNA sequence, the operator. We have shown previously that upon irradiation with γ-rays in solution, the repressor loses its ability to bind the operator. Water radiolysis generates hydroxyl radicals (OH· radicals) which attack the protein. Damage of the repressor DNA-binding domain, called the headpiece, is most likely to be responsible of this loss of function. Using CD, fluorescence spectroscopy and a combination of proteolytic cleavage with MS, we have examined the state of the irradiated headpiece. CD measurements revealed a dose-dependent conformational change involving metastable intermediate states. Fluorescence measurements showed a gradual degradation of tyrosine residues. MS was used to count the number of oxidations in different regions of the headpiece and to narrow down the parts of the sequence bearing oxidized residues. By calculating the relative probabilities of reaction of each amino acid with OH· radicals, we can predict the most probable oxidation targets. By comparing the experimental results with the predictions we conclude that Tyr7, Tyr12, Tyr17, Met42 and Tyr47 are the most likely hotspots of oxidation. The loss of repressor function is thus correlated with chemical modifications and conformational changes of the headpiece. PMID:17263689

  3. The TIE1 Transcriptional Repressor Links TCP Transcription Factors with TOPLESS/TOPLESS-RELATED Corepressors and Modulates Leaf Development in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Qing; Guo, Dongshu; Wei, Baoye; Zhang, Fan; Pang, Changxu; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Jinzhe; Wei, Tong; Gu, Hongya; Qu, Li-Jia; Qin, Genji

    2013-01-01

    Leaf size and shape are mainly determined by coordinated cell division and differentiation in lamina. The CINCINNATA (CIN)-like TEOSINTE BRANCHED1/CYCLOIDEA/PCF (TCP) transcription factors are key regulators of leaf development. However, the mechanisms that control TCP activities during leaf development are largely unknown. We identified the TCP Interactor containing EAR motif protein1 (TIE1), a novel transcriptional repressor, as a major modulator of TCP activities during leaf development. Overexpression of TIE1 leads to hyponastic and serrated leaves, whereas disruption of TIE1 causes epinastic leaves. TIE1 is expressed in young leaves and encodes a transcriptional repressor containing a C-terminal EAR motif, which mediates interactions with the TOPLESS (TPL)/TOPLESS-RELATED (TPR) corepressors. In addition, TIE1 physically interacts with CIN-like TCPs. We propose that TIE1 regulates leaf size and morphology by inhibiting the activities of TCPs through recruiting the TPL/TPR corepressors to form a tertiary complex at early stages of leaf development. PMID:23444332

  4. Situational Discrimination in Repressor-type and Sensitizer-type Approval Seekers and the Birth Order by Subject Sex Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Gilbert

    1970-01-01

    Five experiments are reported. One conclusion in that repressor-type high need-for-approval subjects made the discrimination and permitted less favorable self-description, but sensitizer-type high need-for-approval subjects did not. (DB)

  5. Cu(I)-mediated Allosteric Switching in a Copper-sensing Operon Repressor (CsoR)*

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Feng-Ming James; Coyne, H. Jerome; Cubillas, Ciro; Vinuesa, Pablo; Fang, Xianyang; Ma, Zhen; Ma, Dejian; Helmann, John D.; García-de los Santos, Alejandro; Wang, Yun-Xing; Dann, Charles E.; Giedroc, David P.

    2014-01-01

    The copper-sensing operon repressor (CsoR) is representative of a major Cu(I)-sensing family of bacterial metalloregulatory proteins that has evolved to prevent cytoplasmic copper toxicity. It is unknown how Cu(I) binding to tetrameric CsoRs mediates transcriptional derepression of copper resistance genes. A phylogenetic analysis of 227 DUF156 protein members, including biochemically or structurally characterized CsoR/RcnR repressors, reveals that Geobacillus thermodenitrificans (Gt) CsoR characterized here is representative of CsoRs from pathogenic bacilli Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus anthracis. The 2.56 Å structure of Cu(I)-bound Gt CsoR reveals that Cu(I) binding induces a kink in the α2-helix between two conserved copper-ligating residues and folds an N-terminal tail (residues 12–19) over the Cu(I) binding site. NMR studies of Gt CsoR reveal that this tail is flexible in the apo-state with these dynamics quenched upon Cu(I) binding. Small angle x-ray scattering experiments on an N-terminally truncated Gt CsoR (Δ2–10) reveal that the Cu(I)-bound tetramer is hydrodynamically more compact than is the apo-state. The implications of these findings for the allosteric mechanisms of other CsoR/RcnR repressors are discussed. PMID:24831014

  6. Structures of ω repressors bound to direct and inverted DNA repeats explain modulation of transcription

    PubMed Central

    Weihofen, Wilhelm Andreas; Cicek, Aslan; Pratto, Florencia; Alonso, Juan Carlos; Saenger, Wolfram

    2006-01-01

    Repressor ω regulates transcription of genes required for copy number control, accurate segregation and stable maintenance of inc18 plasmids hosted by Gram-positive bacteria. ω belongs to homodimeric ribbon-helix-helix (RHH2) repressors typified by a central, antiparallel β-sheet for DNA major groove binding. Homodimeric ω2 binds cooperatively to promotors with 7 to 10 consecutive non-palindromic DNA heptad repeats (5′-A/TATCACA/T-3′, symbolized by →) in palindromic inverted, converging (→←) or diverging (←→) orientation and also, unique to ω2 and contrasting other RHH2 repressors, to non-palindromic direct (→→) repeats. Here we investigate with crystal structures how ω2 binds specifically to heptads in minimal operators with (→→) and (→←) repeats. Since the pseudo-2-fold axis relating the monomers in ω2 passes the central C–G base pair of each heptad with ∼0.3 Å downstream offset, the separation between the pseudo-2-fold axes is exactly 7 bp in (→→), ∼0.6 Å shorter in (→←) but would be ∼0.6 Å longer in (←→). These variations grade interactions between adjacent ω2 and explain modulations in cooperative binding affinity of ω2 to operators with different heptad orientations. PMID:16528102

  7. Control of developmentally primed erythroid genes by combinatorial co-repressor actions

    PubMed Central

    Stadhouders, Ralph; Cico, Alba; Stephen, Tharshana; Thongjuea, Supat; Kolovos, Petros; Baymaz, H. Irem; Yu, Xiao; Demmers, Jeroen; Bezstarosti, Karel; Maas, Alex; Barroca, Vilma; Kockx, Christel; Ozgur, Zeliha; van Ijcken, Wilfred; Arcangeli, Marie-Laure; Andrieu-Soler, Charlotte; Lenhard, Boris; Grosveld, Frank; Soler, Eric

    2015-01-01

    How transcription factors (TFs) cooperate within large protein complexes to allow rapid modulation of gene expression during development is still largely unknown. Here we show that the key haematopoietic LIM-domain-binding protein-1 (LDB1) TF complex contains several activator and repressor components that together maintain an erythroid-specific gene expression programme primed for rapid activation until differentiation is induced. A combination of proteomics, functional genomics and in vivo studies presented here identifies known and novel co-repressors, most notably the ETO2 and IRF2BP2 proteins, involved in maintaining this primed state. The ETO2–IRF2BP2 axis, interacting with the NCOR1/SMRT co-repressor complex, suppresses the expression of the vast majority of archetypical erythroid genes and pathways until its decommissioning at the onset of terminal erythroid differentiation. Our experiments demonstrate that multimeric regulatory complexes feature a dynamic interplay between activating and repressing components that determines lineage-specific gene expression and cellular differentiation. PMID:26593974

  8. DWARF 53 acts as a repressor of strigolactone signalling in rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liang; Liu, Xue; Xiong, Guosheng; Liu, Huihui; Chen, Fulu; Wang, Lei; Meng, Xiangbing; Liu, Guifu; Yu, Hong; Yuan, Yundong; Yi, Wei; Zhao, Lihua; Ma, Honglei; He, Yuanzheng; Wu, Zhongshan; Melcher, Karsten; Qian, Qian; Xu, H. Eric; Wang, Yonghong; Li, Jiayang

    2013-12-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are a group of newly identified plant hormones that control plant shoot branching. SL signalling requires the hormone-dependent interaction of DWARF 14 (D14), a probable candidate SL receptor, with DWARF 3 (D3), an F-box component of the Skp-Cullin-F-box (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Here we report the characterization of a dominant SL-insensitive rice (Oryza sativa) mutant dwarf 53 (d53) and the cloning of D53, which encodes a substrate of the SCFD3 ubiquitination complex and functions as a repressor of SL signalling. Treatments with GR24, a synthetic SL analogue, cause D53 degradation via the proteasome in a manner that requires D14 and the SCFD3 ubiquitin ligase, whereas the dominant form of D53 is resistant to SL-mediated degradation. Moreover, D53 can interact with transcriptional co-repressors known as TOPLESS-RELATED PROTEINS. Our results suggest a model of SL signalling that involves SL-dependent degradation of the D53 repressor mediated by the D14-D3 complex.

  9. Regulation of gene expression by manipulating transcriptional repressor activity using a novel CoSRI technology.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yue; Li, Song Feng; Parish, Roger W

    2017-07-01

    Targeted gene manipulation is a central strategy for studying gene function and identifying related biological processes. However, a methodology for manipulating the regulatory motifs of transcription factors is lacking as these factors commonly possess multiple motifs (e.g. repression and activation motifs) which collaborate with each other to regulate multiple biological processes. We describe a novel approach designated conserved sequence-guided repressor inhibition (CoSRI) that can specifically reduce or abolish the repressive activities of transcription factors in vivo. The technology was evaluated using the chimeric MYB80-EAR transcription factor and subsequently the endogenous WUS transcription factor. The technology was employed to develop a reversible male sterility system applicable to hybrid seed production. In order to determine the capacity of the technology to regulate the activity of endogenous transcription factors, the WUS repressor was chosen. The WUS repression motif could be inhibited in vivo and the transformed plants exhibited the wus-1 phenotype. Consequently, the technology can be used to manipulate the activities of transcriptional repressor motifs regulating beneficial traits in crop plants and other eukaryotic organisms. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Structural and functional analysis of the repressor complex in the Notch signaling pathway of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Dieter; Kurth, Patricia; Schulz, Adriana; Russell, Andrew; Yuan, Zhenyu; Gruber, Kim; Kovall, Rhett A.; Preiss, Anette

    2011-01-01

    In metazoans, the highly conserved Notch pathway drives cellular specification. On receptor activation, the intracellular domain of Notch assembles a transcriptional activator complex that includes the DNA-binding protein CSL, a composite of human C-promoter binding factor 1, Suppressor of Hairless of Drosophila melanogaster [Su(H)], and lin-12 and Glp-1 phenotype of Caenorhabditis elegans. In the absence of ligand, CSL represses Notch target genes. However, despite the structural similarity of CSL orthologues, repression appears largely diverse between organisms. Here we analyze the Notch repressor complex in Drosophila, consisting of the fly CSL protein, Su(H), and the corepressor Hairless, which recruits general repressor proteins. We show that the C-terminal domain of Su(H) is necessary and sufficient for forming a high-affinity complex with Hairless. Mutations in Su(H) that affect interactions with Notch and Mastermind have no effect on Hairless binding. Nonetheless, we demonstrate that Notch and Hairless compete for CSL in vitro and in cell culture. In addition, we identify a site in Hairless that is crucial for binding Su(H) and subsequently show that this Hairless mutant is strongly impaired, failing to properly assemble the repressor complex in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate Hairless-mediated inhibition of Notch signaling in a cell culture assay, which hints at a potentially similar repression mechanism in mammals that might be exploited for therapeutic purposes. PMID:21737682

  11. Phosphorylation of Trihelix Transcriptional Repressor ASR3 by MAP KINASE4 Negatively Regulates Arabidopsis Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Jiang, Shan; Yu, Xiao; Cheng, Cheng; Chen, Sixue; Cheng, Yanbing; Yuan, Joshua S.; Jiang, Daohong; He, Ping; Shan, Libo

    2015-01-01

    Proper control of immune-related gene expression is crucial for the host to launch an effective defense response. Perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) induces rapid and profound transcriptional reprogramming via unclear mechanisms. Here, we show that ASR3 (ARABIDOPSIS SH4-RELATED3) functions as a transcriptional repressor and plays a negative role in regulating pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) in Arabidopsis thaliana. ASR3 belongs to a plant-specific trihelix transcription factor family for which functional studies are lacking. MAMP treatments induce rapid phosphorylation of ASR3 at threonine 189 via MPK4, a mitogen-activated protein kinase that negatively regulates PTI responses downstream of multiple MAMP receptors. ASR3 possesses transcriptional repressor activity via its ERF-associated amphiphilic repression motifs and negatively regulates a large subset of flg22-induced genes. Phosphorylation of ASR3 by MPK4 enhances its DNA binding activity to suppress gene expression. Importantly, the asr3 mutant shows enhanced disease resistance to virulent bacterial pathogen infection, whereas transgenic plants overexpressing the wild-type or phospho-mimetic form of ASR3 exhibit compromised PTI responses. Our studies reveal a function of the trihelix transcription factors in plant innate immunity and provide evidence that ASR3 functions as a transcriptional repressor regulated by MAMP-activated MPK4 to fine-tune plant immune gene expression. PMID:25770109

  12. Evaluation of novel inducible promoter/repressor systems for recombinant protein expression in Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Heiss, Silvia; Hörmann, Angelika; Tauer, Christopher; Sonnleitner, Margot; Egger, Esther; Grabherr, Reingard; Heinl, Stefan

    2016-03-10

    Engineering lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is of growing importance for food and feed industry as well as for in vivo vaccination or the production of recombinant proteins in food grade organisms. Often, expression of a transgene is only desired at a certain time point or period, e.g. to minimize the metabolic burden for the host cell or to control the expression time span. For this purpose, inducible expression systems are preferred, though cost and availability of the inducing agent must be feasible. We selected the plasmid free strain Lactobacillus plantarum 3NSH for testing and characterization of novel inducible promoters/repressor systems. Their feasibility in recombinant protein production was evaluated. Expression of the reporter protein mCherry was monitored with the BioLector(®) micro-fermentation system. Reporter gene mCherry expression was compared under the control of different promoter/repressor systems: PlacA (an endogenous promoter/repressor system derived from L. plantarum 3NSH), PxylA (a promoter/repressor system derived from Bacillus megaterium DSMZ 319) and PlacSynth (synthetic promoter and codon-optimized repressor gene based on the Escherichia coli lac operon). We observed that PlacA was inducible solely by lactose, but not by non-metabolizable allolactose analoga. PxylA was inducible by xylose, yet showed basal expression under non-induced conditions. Growth on galactose (as compared to exponential growth phase on glucose) reduced basal mCherry expression at non-induced conditions. PlacSynth was inducible with TMG (methyl β-D-thiogalactopyranoside) and IPTG (isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside), but also showed basal expression without inducer. The promoter PlacSynth was used for establishment of a dual plasmid expression system, based on T7 RNA polymerase driven expression in L. plantarum. Comparative Western blot supported BioLector(®) micro-fermentation measurements. Conclusively, overall expression levels were moderate (compared to a

  13. Structure of the C-terminal domain of the arginine repressor protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciT

    Cherney, Leonid T.; Cherney, Maia M.; Garen, Craig R.

    2008-09-01

    The structure of the core domain of the arginine repressor protein from M. tuberculosis has been determined with (1.85 Å resolution) and without (2.15 Å resolution) the arginine corepressor bound. Three additional arginine molecules have been found to bind to the core domain hexamer at high (0.2 M) arginine concentration. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) gene product encoded by open reading frame Rv1657 is an arginine repressor (ArgR). All genes involved in the l-arginine (hereafter arginine) biosynthetic pathway are essential for optimal growth of the Mtb pathogen, thus making MtbArgR a potential target for drug design. The C-terminal domains of argininemore » repressors (CArgR) participate in oligomerization and arginine binding. Several crystal forms of CArgR from Mtb (MtbCArgR) have been obtained. The X-ray crystal structures of MtbCArgR were determined at 1.85 Å resolution with bound arginine and at 2.15 Å resolution in the unliganded form. These structures show that six molecules of MtbCArgR are arranged into a hexamer having approximate 32 point symmetry that is formed from two trimers. The trimers rotate relative to each other by about 11° upon binding arginine. All residues in MtbCArgR deemed to be important for hexamer formation and for arginine binding have been identified from the experimentally determined structures presented. The hexamer contains six regular sites in which the arginine molecules have one common binding mode and three sites in which the arginine molecules have two overlapping binding modes. The latter sites only bind the ligand at high (200 mM) arginine concentrations.« less

  14. SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE Up-Regulates TEMPRANILLO2 Floral Repressor at Low Ambient Temperatures1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Marín-González, Esther; Matías-Hernández, Luis; Aguilar-Jaramillo, Andrea E.; Lee, Jeong Hwan; Ahn, Ji Hoon; Suárez-López, Paula; Pelaz, Soraya

    2015-01-01

    Plants integrate day length and ambient temperature to determine the optimal timing for developmental transitions. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the floral integrator FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) and its closest homolog TWIN SISTER OF FT promote flowering in response to their activator CONSTANS under long-day inductive conditions. Low ambient temperature (16°C) delays flowering, even under inductive photoperiods, through repression of FT, revealing the importance of floral repressors acting at low temperatures. Previously, we have reported that the floral repressors TEMPRANILLO (TEM; TEM1 and TEM2) control flowering time through direct regulation of FT at 22°C. Here, we show that tem mutants are less sensitive than the wild type to changes in ambient growth temperature, indicating that TEM genes may play a role in floral repression at 16°C. Moreover, we have found that TEM2 directly represses the expression of FT and TWIN SISTER OF FT at 16°C. In addition, the floral repressor SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP) directly regulates TEM2 but not TEM1 expression at 16°C. Flowering time analyses of svp tem mutants indicate that TEM may act in the same genetic pathway as SVP to repress flowering at 22°C but that SVP and TEM are partially independent at 16°C. Thus, TEM2 partially mediates the temperature-dependent function of SVP at low temperatures. Taken together, our results indicate that TEM genes are also able to repress flowering at low ambient temperatures under inductive long-day conditions. PMID:26243615

  15. Aquatic toxicity of nine aircraft deicer and anti-icer formulations and relative toxicity of additive package ingredients alkylphenol ethoxylates and 4,5-methyl-1H-henzotriazoles.

    PubMed

    Corsi, Steven R; Geis, Steven W; Loyo-Rosales, Jorge E; Rice, Clifford P

    2006-12-01

    Characterization of the effects of aircraft deicer and anti-icer fluid (ADAF) runoff on aquatic organisms in receiving streams is a complex issue because the identities of numerous toxic additives are proprietary and not publicly available. Most potentially toxic and endocrine disrupting effects caused by ADAF are due to the numerous additive package ingredients which vary among manufacturers and types of ADAF formulation. Toxicity investigations of nine ADAF formulations indicate that endpoint concentrations for formulations of different manufacturers are widely variable. Type IV ADAF (anti-icers) are more toxic than Type I (deicers) for the four organisms tested (Vibrio fischeri, Pimephales promelas, Ceriodaphnia dubia, and Selenastrum capricornutum). Acute toxicity endpoint concentrations ranged from 347 to 7700 mg/L as ADAF for Type IV and from 1550 to 45,100 mg/L for Type I formulations. Chronic endpoint concentrations ranged from 70 to 1300 mg/L for Type IV and from 37 to 18,400 mg/L for Type I formulations. Alkylphenol ethoxylates and tolyltriazoles are two known classes of additives. Nonylphenol, nonylphenol ethoxylates, octylphenol, octylphenol ethoxylates, and 4,5-methyl-1H-benzotriazoles were quantified in the nine ADAF formulations, and toxicity tests were conducted with nonylphenol ethoxylates and 4,5-methyl-1H-benzotriazoles. Toxicity units computed for glycol and these additives, with respect to toxicity of the ADAF formulations, indicate that a portion of ADAF toxicity can be explained by the known additives and glycols, but much of the toxicity is due to unidentified additives.

  16. SatR Is a Repressor of Fluoroquinolone Efflux Pump SatAB

    PubMed Central

    Escudero, Jose Antonio; San Millan, Alvaro; Montero, Natalia; Gutierrez, Belen; Ovejero, Cristina Martinez; Carrilero, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is an emerging zoonotic agent responsible for high-mortality outbreaks among the human population in China. In this species, the ABC transporter SatAB mediates fluoroquinolone resistance when overexpressed. Here, we describe and characterize satR, an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a MarR superfamily regulator that acts as a repressor of satAB. satR is cotranscribed with satAB, and its interruption entails the overexpression of the pump, leading to a clinically relevant increase in resistance to fluoroquinolones. PMID:23650171

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the arginine repressor of the hyperthermophile Thermotoga neapolitana

    SciT

    Massant, Jan, E-mail: jan.massant@vub.ac.be; Peeters, Eveline; Charlier, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    The arginine repressor of the hyperthermophile T. neapolitana was crystallized with and without its corepressor arginine. Both crystals diffracted to high resolution and belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with similar unit-cell parameters. The arginine repressor of Thermotoga neapolitana (ArgRTnp) is a member of the family of multifunctional bacterial arginine repressors involved in the regulation of arginine metabolism. This hyperthermophilic repressor shows unique DNA-binding features that distinguish it from its homologues. ArgRTnp exists as a homotrimeric protein that assembles into hexamers at higher protein concentrations and/or in the presence of arginine. ArgRTnp was crystallized with andmore » without its corepressor arginine using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Crystals of the aporepressor diffracted to a resolution of 2.1 Å and belong to the orthorhombic P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} space group, with unit-cell parameters a = 117.73, b = 134.15, c = 139.31 Å. Crystals of the repressor in the presence of its corepressor arginine diffracted to a resolution of 2.4 Å and belong to the same space group, with similar unit-cell parameters.« less

  18. Sulfide-responsive transcriptional repressor SqrR functions as a master regulator of sulfide-dependent photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takayuki; Shen, Jiangchuan; Fang, Mingxu; Zhang, Yixiang; Hori, Koichi; Trinidad, Jonathan C; Bauer, Carl E; Giedroc, David P; Masuda, Shinji

    2017-02-28

    Sulfide was used as an electron donor early in the evolution of photosynthesis, with many extant photosynthetic bacteria still capable of using sulfur compounds such as hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) as a photosynthetic electron donor. Although enzymes involved in H 2 S oxidation have been characterized, mechanisms of regulation of sulfide-dependent photosynthesis have not been elucidated. In this study, we have identified a sulfide-responsive transcriptional repressor, SqrR, that functions as a master regulator of sulfide-dependent gene expression in the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus SqrR has three cysteine residues, two of which, C41 and C107, are conserved in SqrR homologs from other bacteria. Analysis with liquid chromatography coupled with an electrospray-interface tandem-mass spectrometer reveals that SqrR forms an intramolecular tetrasulfide bond between C41 and C107 when incubated with the sulfur donor glutathione persulfide. SqrR is oxidized in sulfide-stressed cells, and tetrasulfide-cross-linked SqrR binds more weakly to a target promoter relative to unmodified SqrR. C41S and C107S R. capsulatus SqrRs lack the ability to respond to sulfide, and constitutively repress target gene expression in cells. These results establish that SqrR is a sensor of H 2 S-derived reactive sulfur species that maintain sulfide homeostasis in this photosynthetic bacterium and reveal the mechanism of sulfide-dependent transcriptional derepression of genes involved in sulfide metabolism.

  19. Animal-specific C-terminal domain links myeloblastosis oncoprotein (Myb) to an ancient repressor complex

    PubMed Central

    Andrejka, Laura; Wen, Hong; Ashton, Jonathan; Grant, Megan; Iori, Kevin; Wang, Amy; Manak, J. Robert; Lipsick, Joseph S.

    2011-01-01

    Members of the Myb oncoprotein and E2F-Rb tumor suppressor protein families are present within the same highly conserved multiprotein transcriptional repressor complex, named either as Myb and synthetic multivuval class B (Myb-MuvB) or as Drosophila Rb E2F and Myb-interacting proteins (dREAM). We now report that the animal-specific C terminus of Drosophila Myb but not the more highly conserved N-terminal DNA-binding domain is necessary and sufficient for (i) adult viability, (ii) proper localization to chromosomes in vivo, (iii) regulation of gene expression in vivo, and (iv) interaction with the highly conserved core of the MuvB/dREAM transcriptional repressor complex. In addition, we have identified a conserved peptide motif that is required for this interaction. Our results imply that an ancient function of Myb in regulating G2/M genes in both plants and animals appears to have been transferred from the DNA-binding domain to the animal-specific C-terminal domain. Increased expression of B-MYB/MYBL2, the human ortholog of Drosophila Myb, correlates with poor prognosis in human patients with breast cancer. Therefore, our results imply that the specific interaction of the C terminus of Myb with the MuvB/dREAM core complex may provide an attractive target for the development of cancer therapeutics. PMID:21969598

  20. Solution NMR investigation of the response of the lactose repressor core domain dimer to hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Fuglestad, Brian; Stetz, Matthew A; Belnavis, Zachary; Wand, A Joshua

    2017-12-01

    Previous investigations of the sensitivity of the lac repressor to high-hydrostatic pressure have led to varying conclusions. Here high-pressure solution NMR spectroscopy is used to provide an atomic level view of the pressure induced structural transition of the lactose repressor regulatory domain (LacI* RD) bound to the ligand IPTG. As the pressure is raised from ambient to 3kbar the native state of the protein is converted to a partially unfolded form. Estimates of rotational correlation times using transverse optimized relaxation indicates that a monomeric state is never reached and that the predominate form of the LacI* RD is dimeric throughout this pressure change. Spectral analysis suggests that the pressure-induced transition is localized and is associated with a volume change of approximately -115mlmol -1 and an average pressure dependent change in compressibility of approximately 30mlmol -1 kbar -1 . In addition, a subset of resonances emerge at high-pressures indicating the presence of a non-native but folded alternate state. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Structural dynamics of the lac repressor-DNA complex revealed by a multiscale simulation.

    PubMed

    Villa, Elizabeth; Balaeff, Alexander; Schulten, Klaus

    2005-05-10

    A multiscale simulation of a complex between the lac repressor protein (LacI) and a 107-bp-long DNA segment is reported. The complex between the repressor and two operator DNA segments is described by all-atom molecular dynamics; the size of the simulated system comprises either 226,000 or 314,000 atoms. The DNA loop connecting the operators is modeled as a continuous elastic ribbon, described mathematically by the nonlinear Kirchhoff differential equations with boundary conditions obtained from the coordinates of the terminal base pairs of each operator. The forces stemming from the looped DNA are included in the molecular dynamics simulations; the loop structure and the forces are continuously recomputed because the protein motions during the simulations shift the operators and the presumed termini of the loop. The simulations reveal the structural dynamics of the LacI-DNA complex in unprecedented detail. The multiple domains of LacI exhibit remarkable structural stability during the simulation, moving much like rigid bodies. LacI is shown to absorb the strain from the looped DNA mainly through its mobile DNA-binding head groups. Even with large fluctuating forces applied, the head groups tilt strongly and keep their grip on the operator DNA, while the remainder of the protein retains its V-shaped structure. A simulated opening of the cleft of LacI by 500-pN forces revealed the interactions responsible for locking LacI in the V-conformation.

  2. CCN5, a Novel Transcriptional Repressor of the Transforming Growth Factor β Signaling Pathway ▿

    PubMed Central

    Sabbah, Michèle; Prunier, Céline; Ferrand, Nathalie; Megalophonos, Virginie; Lambein, Kathleen; De Wever, Olivier; Nazaret, Nicolas; Lachuer, Joël; Dumont, Sylvie; Redeuilh, Gérard

    2011-01-01

    CCN5 is a member of the CCN (connective tissue growth factor/cysteine-rich 61/nephroblastoma overexpressed) family and was identified as an estrogen-inducible gene in estrogen receptor-positive cell lines. However, the role of CCN5 in breast carcinogenesis remains unclear. We report here that the CCN5 protein is localized mostly in the cytoplasm and in part in the nucleus of human tumor breast tissue. Using a heterologous transcription assay, we demonstrate that CCN5 can act as a transcriptional repressor presumably through association with histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1). Microarray gene expression analysis showed that CCN5 represses expression of genes associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) as well as expression of key components of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling pathway, prominent among them TGF-βRII receptor. We show that CCN5 is recruited to the TGF-βRII promoter, thereby providing a mechanism by which CCN5 restricts transcription of the TGF-βRII gene. Consistent with this finding, CCN5, we found, functions to suppress TGF-β-induced transcriptional responses and invasion that is concomitant with EMT. Thus, our data uncovered CCN5 as a novel transcriptional repressor that plays an important role in regulating tumor progression functioning, at least in part, by inhibiting the expression of genes involved in the TGF-β signaling cascade that is known to promote EMT. PMID:21262769

  3. SnoN co-repressor binds and represses smad7 gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Briones-Orta, Marco A; Sosa-Garrocho, Marcela; Moreno-Alvarez, Paola; Fonseca-Sánchez, Miguel A; Macías-Silva, Marina

    2006-03-17

    SnoN and Ski oncoproteins are co-repressors for Smad proteins and repress TGF-beta-responsive gene expression. The smad7 gene is a TGF-beta target induced by Smad signaling, and its promoter contains the Smad-binding element (SBE) required for a positive regulation by the TGF-beta/Smad pathway. SnoN and Ski co-repressors also bind SBE but regulate negatively smad7 gene. Ski along with Smad4 binds and represses the smad7 promoter, whereas the repression mechanism by SnoN is not clear. Ski and SnoN overexpression inhibits smad7 reporter expression induced through TGF-beta signaling. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we found that SnoN binds smad7 promoter at the basal condition, whereas after a short TGF-beta treatment for 15-30 min SnoN is downregulated and no longer bound smad7 promoter. Interestingly, after a prolonged TGF-beta treatment SnoN is upregulated and returns to its position on the smad7 promoter, functioning probably as a negative feedback control. Thus, SnoN also seems to regulate negatively the TGF-beta-responsive smad7 gene by binding and repressing its promoter in a similar way to Ski.

  4. Regulated expression of a repressor protein: FadR activates iclR.

    PubMed Central

    Gui, L; Sunnarborg, A; LaPorte, D C

    1996-01-01

    The control of the glyoxylate bypass operon (aceBAK) of Escherichia coli is mediated by two regulatory proteins, IclMR and FadR. IclMR is a repressor protein which has previously been shown to bind to a site which overlaps the aceBAK promoter. FAR is a repressor/activator protein which participates in control of the genes of fatty acid metabolism. A sequence just upstream of the iclR promoter bears a striking resemblance to FadR binding sites found in the fatty acid metabolic genes. The in vitro binding specificity of FadR, determined by oligonucleotide selection, was in good agreement with the sequences of these sites. The ability of FadR to bind to the site associated with iclR was demonstrated by gel shift and DNase I footprint analyses. Disruption of FadR or inactivation of the FadR binding site of iclR decreased the expression of an iclR::lacZ operon fusion, indicating that FadR activates the expression of iclR. It has been reported that disruption of fadR increases the expression of aceBAK. We observed a similar increase when we inactivated the FadR binding site of an iclR+ allele. This result suggests that FadR regulates aceBAK indirectly by altering the expression of IclR. PMID:8755903

  5. Crystal Structure of the CLOCK Transactivation Domain Exon19 in Complex with a Repressor

    SciT

    Hou, Zhiqiang; Su, Lijing; Pei, Jimin

    In the canonical clock model, CLOCK:BMAL1-mediated transcriptional activation is feedback regulated by its repressors CRY and PER and, in association with other coregulators, ultimately generates oscillatory gene expression patterns. How CLOCK:BMAL1 interacts with coregulator(s) is not well understood. Here we report the crystal structures of the mouse CLOCK transactivating domain Exon19 in complex with CIPC, a potent circadian repressor that functions independently of CRY and PER. The Exon19:CIPC complex adopts a three-helical coiled-coil bundle conformation containing two Exon19 helices and one CIPC. Unique to Exon19:CIPC, three highly conserved polar residues, Asn341 of CIPC and Gln544 of the two Exon19 helices,more » are located at the mid-section of the coiled-coil bundle interior and form hydrogen bonds with each other. Combining results from protein database search, sequence analysis, and mutagenesis studies, we discovered for the first time that CLOCK Exon19:CIPC interaction is a conserved transcription regulatory mechanism among mammals, fish, flies, and other invertebrates.« less

  6. Imprinting regulator DNMT3L is a transcriptional repressor associated with histone deacetylase activity.

    PubMed

    Aapola, Ulla; Liiv, Ingrid; Peterson, Pärt

    2002-08-15

    DNMT3L is a regulator of imprint establishment of normally methylated maternal genomic sequences. DNMT3L shows high similarity to the de novo DNA methyltransferases, DNMT3A and DNMT3B, however, the amino acid residues needed for DNA cytosine methyltransferase activity have been lost from the DNMT3L protein sequence. Apart from methyltransferase activity, Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b serve as transcriptional repressors associating with histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity. Here we show that DNMT3L can also repress transcription by binding directly to HDAC1 protein. We have identified the PHD-like zinc finger of the ATRX domain as a main repression motif of DNMT3L, through which DNMT3L recruits the HDAC activity needed for transcriptional silencing. Furthermore, we show that DNMT3L protein contains an active nuclear localisation signal at amino acids 156-159. These results describe DNMT3L as a co-repressor protein and suggest that a transcriptionally repressed chromatin organisation through HDAC activity is needed for establishment of genomic imprints.

  7. Crystal Structure of the Arginine Repressor Protein in Complex With the DNA Operator From Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    SciT

    Cherney, L.T.; Cherney, M.M.; Garen, C.R.

    2009-05-12

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) gene product encoded by open reading frame Rv1657 is an arginine repressor (ArgR). All genes involved in the L-arginine (hereafter arginine) biosynthetic pathway are essential for optimal growth of the Mtb pathogen, thus making MtbArgR a potential target for drug design. The C-terminal domains of arginine repressors (CArgR) participate in oligomerization and arginine binding. Several crystal forms of CArgR from Mtb (MtbCArgR) have been obtained. The X-ray crystal structures of MtbCArgR were determined at 1.85 {angstrom} resolution with bound arginine and at 2.15 {angstrom} resolution in the unliganded form. These structures show that six molecules ofmore » MtbCArgR are arranged into a hexamer having approximate 32 point symmetry that is formed from two trimers. The trimers rotate relative to each other by about 11{sup o} upon binding arginine. All residues in MtbCArgR deemed to be important for hexamer formation and for arginine binding have been identified from the experimentally determined structures presented. The hexamer contains six regular sites in which the arginine molecules have one common binding mode and three sites in which the arginine molecules have two overlapping binding modes. The latter sites only bind the ligand at high (200 mM) arginine concentrations.« less

  8. Safety mechanism assisted by the repressor of tetracycline (SMART) vaccinia virus vectors for vaccines and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Grigg, Patricia; Titong, Allison; Jones, Leslie A; Yilma, Tilahun D; Verardi, Paulo H

    2013-09-17

    Replication-competent viruses, such as Vaccinia virus (VACV), are powerful tools for the development of oncolytic viral therapies and elicit superior immune responses when used as vaccine and immunotherapeutic vectors. However, severe complications from uncontrolled viral replication can occur, particularly in immunocompromised individuals or in those with other predisposing conditions. VACVs constitutively expressing interferon-γ (IFN-γ) replicate in cell culture indistinguishably from control viruses; however, they replicate in vivo to low or undetectable levels, and are rapidly cleared even in immunodeficient animals. In an effort to develop safe and highly effective replication-competent VACV vectors, we established a system to inducibly express IFN-γ. Our SMART (safety mechanism assisted by the repressor of tetracycline) vectors are designed to express the tetracycline repressor under a constitutive VACV promoter and IFN-γ under engineered tetracycline-inducible promoters. Immunodeficient SCID mice inoculated with VACVs not expressing IFN-γ demonstrated severe weight loss, whereas those given VACVs expressing IFN-γ under constitutive VACV promoters showed no signs of infection. Most importantly, mice inoculated with a VACV expressing the IFN-γ gene under an inducible promoter remained healthy in the presence of doxycycline, but exhibited severe weight loss in the absence of doxycycline. In this study, we developed a safety mechanism for VACV based on the conditional expression of IFN-γ under a tightly controlled tetracycline-inducible VACV promoter for use in vaccines and oncolytic cancer therapies.

  9. Distinctive Roles for Amygdalar CREB in Reconsolidation and Extinction of Fear Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tronson, Natalie C.; Wiseman, Shari L.; Neve, Rachael L.; Nestler, Eric J.; Olausson, Peter; Taylor, Jane R.

    2012-01-01

    Cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) plays a critical role in fear memory formation. Here we determined the role of CREB selectively within the amygdala in reconsolidation and extinction of auditory fear. Viral overexpression of the inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) or the dominant-negative mCREB, specifically within the lateral…

  10. The myogenic repressor gene Holes in muscles is a direct transcriptional target of Twist and Tinman in the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Elwell, Jennifer A; Lovato, TyAnna L; Adams, Melanie M; Baca, Erica M; Lee, Thai; Cripps, Richard M

    2015-04-15

    Understanding the regulatory circuitry controlling myogenesis is critical to understanding developmental mechanisms and developmentally-derived diseases. We analyzed the transcriptional regulation of a Drosophila myogenic repressor gene, Holes in muscles (Him). Previously, Him was shown to inhibit Myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) activity, and is expressed in myoblasts but not differentiating myotubes. We demonstrate that different phases of Him embryonic expression arises through the actions of different enhancers, and we characterize the enhancer required for its early mesoderm expression. This Him early mesoderm enhancer contains two conserved binding sites for the basic helix-loop-helix regulator Twist, and one binding site for the NK homeodomain protein Tinman. The sites for both proteins are required for enhancer activity in early embryos. Twist and Tinman activate the enhancer in tissue culture assays, and ectopic expression of either factor is sufficient to direct ectopic expression of a Him-lacZ reporter, or of the endogenous Him gene. Moreover, sustained expression of twist in the mesoderm up-regulates mesodermal Him expression in late embryos. Our findings provide a model to define mechanistically how Twist can both promotes myogenesis through direct activation of Mef2, and can place a brake on myogenesis, through direct activation of Him. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The myogenic repressor gene Holes in muscles is a direct transcriptional target of Twist and Tinman in the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm

    PubMed Central

    Elwell, Jennifer A.; Lovato, TyAnna L.; Adams, Melanie M.; Baca, Erica M.; Lee, Thai; Cripps, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the regulatory circuitry controlling myogenesis is critical to understanding developmental mechanisms and developmentally-derived diseases. We analyzed the transcriptional regulation of a Drosophila myogenic repressor gene, Holes in muscles (Him). Previously, Him was shown to inhibit Myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) activity, and is expressed in myoblasts but not differentiating myotubes. We demonstrate that different phases of Him embryonic expression arise through the actions of different enhancers, and we characterize the enhancer required for its early mesoderm expression. This Him early mesoderm enhancer contains two conserved binding sites for the basic helix-loop-helix regulator Twist, and one binding site for the NK homeodomain protein Tinman. The sites for both proteins are required for enhancer activity in early embryos. Twist and Tinman activate the enhancer in tissue culture assays, and ectopic expression of either factor is sufficient to direct ectopic expression of a Him-lacZ reporter, or of the endogenous Him gene. Moreover, sustained expression of twist expression in the mesoderm up-regulates mesodermal Him expression in late embryos. Our findings provide a model to define mechanistically how Twist can both promotes myogenesis through direct activation of Mef2, and can place a brake on myogenesis, through direct activation of Him. PMID:25704510

  12. Water-mediated contacts in the trp-repressor operator complex recognition process.

    PubMed

    Wibowo, Fajar R; Rauch, Christine; Trieb, Michael; Wellenzohn, Bernd; Liedl, Klaus R

    2004-04-15

    Water-mediated contacts are known as an important recognition tool in trp-repressor operator systems. One of these contacts involves two conserved base pairs (G(6).C(-6) and A(5). T(-5)) and three amino acids (Lys 72, Ile 79, and Ala 80). To investigate the nature of these contacts, we analyzed the X-ray structure (PDB code: 1TRO) of the trp-repressor operator complex by means of molecular dynamics simulations. This X-ray structure contains two dimers that exhibit structural differences. From these two different starting structures, two 10 ns molecular dynamics simulations have been performed. Both of our simulations show an increase of water molecules in the major groove at one side of the dimer, while the other side remains unchanged compared to the X-ray structure. Though the maximum residence time of the concerned water molecules decreases with an increase of solvent at the interface, these water molecules continue to play an important role in mediating DNA-protein contacts. This is shown by new stable amino acids-DNA distances and a long water residence time compared to free DNA simulation. To maintain stability of the new contacts, the preferential water binding site on O6(G6) is extended. This extension agrees with mutation experiment data on A5 and G6, which shows different relative affinity due to mutation on these bases [A. Joachimiak, T. E. Haran, P. B. Sigler, EMBO Journal 1994, Vol. 13, No. (2) pp. 367-372]. Due to the rearrangements in the system, the phosphate of the base G6 is able to interconvert to the B(II) substate, which is not observed on the other half side of the complex. The decrease of the number of hydrogen bonds between protein and DNA backbone could be the initial step of the dissociation process of the complex, or in other words an intermediate complex conformation of the association process. Thus, we surmise that these features show the importance of water-mediated contacts in the trp-repressor operator recognition process. Copyright

  13. SPOROCYTELESS is a novel embryophyte-specific transcription repressor that interacts with TPL and TCP proteins in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang-Hui; Sun, Jia-Ying; Liu, Man; Liu, Jie; Yang, Wei-Cai

    2014-12-20

    Germlines in plants are formed de novo during post-embryonic development, while little is known about the mechanism that controls this process. In Arabidopsis, the earliest gene controlling this process is SPOROCYTELESS (SPL). A decade ago, we showed that loss of SPL function abolished sporogenesis in both male and female organs of Arabidopsis. However, its function is unclear up to now. In this study, we showed that SPL belongs to a novel transcription repressor family specific in embryophyte, which consists of 173 members in the land plants so far. All of them contain a conserved SPL-motif in their N-terminal and an ethylene-responsive element binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif in the C-terminal, therefore designated as SPL-like, EAR-containing proteins (SPEARs). Consistently, SPL acts as a transcriptional repressor in yeast and tobacco cells, and SPEAR proteins are able to form homodimer and/or heterodimer with each other in vitro. Furthermore, SPEARs interact with the TOPLESS (TPL) co-repressors via the EAR motif and TCP family transcription factors in yeast cells. Together, we propose that SPL and SPEARs most likely belong to a novel transcription repressor family in land plants which may play a variety of developmental roles in plants. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Genetics Society of China. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Structure of the Mecl Repressor from Staphylococcus aureus in Complex with the Cognate DNA Operator of mec

    SciT

    Safo,M.; Ko, T.; Musayev, F.

    The dimeric repressor MecI regulates the mecA gene that encodes the penicillin-binding protein PBP-2a in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MecI is similar to BlaI, the repressor for the blaZ gene of {beta}-lactamase. MecI and BlaI can bind to both operator DNA sequences. The crystal structure of MecI in complex with the 32 base-pair cognate DNA of mec was determined to 3.8 Angstroms resolution. MecI is a homodimer and each monomer consists of a compact N-terminal winged-helix domain, which binds to DNA, and a loosely packed C-terminal helical domain, which intertwines with its counter-monomer. The crystal contains horizontal layers of virtualmore » DNA double helices extending in three directions, which are separated by perpendicular DNA segments. Each DNA segment is bound to two MecI dimers. Similar to the BlaI-mec complex, but unlike the MecI-bla complex, the MecI repressors bind to both sides of the mec DNA dyad that contains four conserved sequences of TACA/TGTA. The results confirm the up-and-down binding to the mec operator, which may account for cooperative effect of the repressor.« less

  15. DNA replication checkpoint promotes G1-S transcription by inactivating the MBF repressor Nrm1

    PubMed Central

    de Bruin, R. A. M.; Kalashnikova, T. I.; Aslanian, A.; Wohlschlegel, J.; Chahwan, C.; Yates, J. R.; Russell, P.; Wittenberg, C.

    2008-01-01

    The cell cycle transcriptional program imposes order on events of the cell-cycle and is a target for signals that regulate cell-cycle progression, including checkpoints required to maintain genome integrity. Neither the mechanism nor functional significance of checkpoint regulation of the cell-cycle transcription program are established. We show that Nrm1, an MBF-specific transcriptional repressor acting at the transition from G1 to S phase of the cell cycle, is at the nexus between the cell cycle transcriptional program and the DNA replication checkpoint in fission yeast. Phosphorylation of Nrm1 by the Cds1 (Chk2) checkpoint protein kinase, which is activated in response to DNA replication stress, promotes its dissociation from the MBF transcription factor. This leads to the expression of genes encoding components that function in DNA replication and repair pathways important for cell survival in response to arrested DNA replication. PMID:18682565

  16. Comprehensive Interrogation of Natural TALE DNA Binding Modules and Transcriptional Repressor Domains

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Le; Zhou, Ruhong; Kuo, Yu-chi; Cunniff, Margaret; Zhang, Feng

    2012-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALE) are sequence-specific DNA binding proteins that harbor modular, repetitive DNA binding domains. TALEs have enabled the creation of customizable designer transcriptional factors and sequence-specific nucleases for genome engineering. Here we report two improvements of the TALE toolbox for achieving efficient activation and repression of endogenous gene expression in mammalian cells. We show that the naturally occurring repeat variable diresidue (RVD) Asn-His (NH) has high biological activity and specificity for guanine, a highly prevalent base in mammalian genomes. We also report an effective TALE transcriptional repressor architecture for targeted inhibition of transcription in mammalian cells. These findings will improve the precision and effectiveness of genome engineering that can be achieved using TALEs. PMID:22828628

  17. Beta-Lactamase Repressor BlaI Modulates Staphylococcus aureus Cathelicidin Antimicrobial Peptide Resistance and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Pence, Morgan A; Haste, Nina M; Meharena, Hiruy S; Olson, Joshua; Gallo, Richard L; Nizet, Victor; Kristian, Sascha A

    2015-01-01

    BlaI is a repressor of BlaZ, the beta-lactamase responsible for penicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. Through screening a transposon library in S. aureus Newman for susceptibility to cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide, we discovered BlaI as a novel cathelicidin resistance factor. Additionally, through integrational mutagenesis in S. aureus Newman and MRSA Sanger 252 strains, we confirmed the role of BlaI in resistance to human and murine cathelidicin and showed that it contributes to virulence in human whole blood and murine infection models. We further demonstrated that BlaI could be a target for innate immune-based antimicrobial therapies; by removing BlaI through subinhibitory concentrations of 6-aminopenicillanic acid, we were able to sensitize S. aureus to LL-37 killing.

  18. FBI-1 functions as a novel AR co-repressor in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jiajun; Yang, Yutao; Zhang, Chuanfu; Hu, Pinliang; Kan, Wei; Bai, Xianhong; Liu, Xuelin; Song, Hongbin

    2011-03-01

    The pro-oncogene FBI-1, encoded by Zbtb7a, is a transcriptional repressor that belongs to the POK (POZ/BTB and Krüppel) protein family. In this study, we investigated a potential interaction between androgen receptor (AR) signaling and FBI-1 and demonstrated that overexpression of FBI-1 inhibited ligand-dependent AR activation. A protein-protein interaction was identified between FBI-1 and AR in a ligand-dependent manner. Furthermore, FBI-1, AR and SMRT formed a ternary complex and FBI-1 enhanced the recruitment of NCoR and SMRT to endogenous PSA upstream sequences. Our data also indicated that the FBI-1-mediated inhibition of AR transcriptional activity is partially dependent on HDAC. Interestingly, FBI-1 plays distinct roles in regulating LNCaP (androgen-dependent) and PC-3 cell (androgen-independent) proliferation.

  19. Regulation of sugar transport and metabolism by the Candida albicans Rgt1 transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Jessica A; Brown, Victoria; Johnston, Mark

    2007-10-01

    The ability of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans to cause systemic infections depends in part on the function of Hgt4, a cell surface sugar sensor. The orthologues of Hgt4 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Snf3 and Rgt2, initiate a signalling cascade that inactivates Rgt1, a transcriptional repressor of genes encoding hexose transporters. To determine whether Hgt4 functions similarly through the C. albicans orthologue of Rgt1, we analysed Cargt1 deletion mutants. We found that Cargt1 mutants are sensitive to the glucose analogue 2-deoxyglucose, a phenotype probably due to uncontrolled expression of genes encoding glucose transporters. Indeed, transcriptional profiling revealed that expression of about two dozen genes, including multiple HGT genes encoding hexose transporters, is increased in the Cargt1 mutant in the absence of sugars, suggesting that CaRgt1 represses expression of several HGT genes under this condition. Some of the HGT genes (probably encoding high-affinity transporters) are also repressed by high levels of glucose, and we show that this repression is mediated by CaMig1, the orthologue of the major glucose-activated repressor in S. cerevisiae, but not by its paralogue CaMig2. Therefore, CaRgt1 and CaMig1 collaborate to control expression of C. albicans hexose transporters in response to different levels of sugars. We were surprised to find that CaRgt1 also regulates expression of GAL1, suggesting that regulation of galactose metabolism in C. albicans is unconventional. Finally, Cargt1 mutations cause cells to hyperfilament, and suppress the hypofilamented phenotype of an hgt4 mutant, indicating that the Hgt4 glucose sensor may affect filamentation by modulating sugar import and metabolism via CaRgt1. Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Regulation of neural macroRNAs by the transcriptional repressor REST

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Rory; Teh, Christina Hui-Leng; Jia, Hui; Vanisri, Ravi Raj; Pandey, Tridansh; Lu, Zhong-Hao; Buckley, Noel J.; Stanton, Lawrence W.; Lipovich, Leonard

    2009-01-01

    The essential transcriptional repressor REST (repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor) plays central roles in development and human disease by regulating a large cohort of neural genes. These have conventionally fallen into the class of known, protein-coding genes; recently, however, several noncoding microRNA genes were identified as REST targets. Given the widespread transcription of messenger RNA-like, noncoding RNAs (“macroRNAs”), some of which are functional and implicated in disease in mammalian genomes, we sought to determine whether this class of noncoding RNAs can also be regulated by REST. By applying a new, unbiased target gene annotation pipeline to computationally discovered REST binding sites, we find that 23% of mammalian REST genomic binding sites are within 10 kb of a macroRNA gene. These putative target genes were overlooked by previous studies. Focusing on a set of 18 candidate macroRNA targets from mouse, we experimentally demonstrate that two are regulated by REST in neural stem cells. Flanking protein-coding genes are, at most, weakly repressed, suggesting specific targeting of the macroRNAs by REST. Similar to the majority of known REST target genes, both of these macroRNAs are induced during nervous system development and have neurally restricted expression profiles in adult mouse. We observe a similar phenomenon in human: the DiGeorge syndrome-associated noncoding RNA, DGCR5, is repressed by REST through a proximal upstream binding site. Therefore neural macroRNAs represent an additional component of the REST regulatory network. These macroRNAs are new candidates for understanding the role of REST in neuronal development, neurodegeneration, and cancer. PMID:19050060

  1. Regulation of neural macroRNAs by the transcriptional repressor REST.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rory; Teh, Christina Hui-Leng; Jia, Hui; Vanisri, Ravi Raj; Pandey, Tridansh; Lu, Zhong-Hao; Buckley, Noel J; Stanton, Lawrence W; Lipovich, Leonard

    2009-01-01

    The essential transcriptional repressor REST (repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor) plays central roles in development and human disease by regulating a large cohort of neural genes. These have conventionally fallen into the class of known, protein-coding genes; recently, however, several noncoding microRNA genes were identified as REST targets. Given the widespread transcription of messenger RNA-like, noncoding RNAs ("macroRNAs"), some of which are functional and implicated in disease in mammalian genomes, we sought to determine whether this class of noncoding RNAs can also be regulated by REST. By applying a new, unbiased target gene annotation pipeline to computationally discovered REST binding sites, we find that 23% of mammalian REST genomic binding sites are within 10 kb of a macroRNA gene. These putative target genes were overlooked by previous studies. Focusing on a set of 18 candidate macroRNA targets from mouse, we experimentally demonstrate that two are regulated by REST in neural stem cells. Flanking protein-coding genes are, at most, weakly repressed, suggesting specific targeting of the macroRNAs by REST. Similar to the majority of known REST target genes, both of these macroRNAs are induced during nervous system development and have neurally restricted expression profiles in adult mouse. We observe a similar phenomenon in human: the DiGeorge syndrome-associated noncoding RNA, DGCR5, is repressed by REST through a proximal upstream binding site. Therefore neural macroRNAs represent an additional component of the REST regulatory network. These macroRNAs are new candidates for understanding the role of REST in neuronal development, neurodegeneration, and cancer.

  2. DAX1 suppresses FXR transactivity as a novel co-repressor

    SciT

    Li, Jin; Lu, Yan; Liu, Ruya

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} DAX1 is co-localized with FXR and interacts with FXR. {yields} DAX1 acts as a negative regulator of FXR. {yields} Three LXXLL motifs in the N-terminus of DAX1 were required. {yields} DAX1 suppresses FXR transactivation by competing with co-activators. -- Abstract: Bile acid receptor FXR (farnesoid X receptor) is a key regulator of hepatic bile acid, glucose and lipid homeostasis through regulation of numerous genes involved in the process of bile acid, triglyceride and glucose metabolism. DAX1 (dosage-sensitive sex reversal adrenal hypoplasia congenital critical region on X chromosome, gene 1) is an atypical member of the nuclear receptor familymore » due to lack of classical DNA-binding domains and acts primarily as a co-repressor of many nuclear receptors. Here, we demonstrated that DAX1 is co-localized with FXR in the nucleus and acted as a negative regulator of FXR through a physical interaction with FXR. Our study showed that over-expression of DAX1 down-regulated the expression of FXR target genes, whereas knockdown of DAX1 led to their up-regulation. Furthermore, three LXXLL motifs in the N-terminus of DAX1 were required for the full repression of FXR transactivation. In addition, our study characterized that DAX1 suppresses FXR transactivation via competing with co-activators such as SRC-1 and PGC-1{alpha}. In conclusion, DAX1 acts as a co-repressor to negatively modulate FXR transactivity.« less

  3. DeSUMOylation switches Kaiso from activator to repressor upon hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Zhenilo, Svetlana; Deyev, Igor; Litvinova, Ekaterina; Zhigalova, Nadezhda; Kaplun, Daria; Sokolov, Alexey; Mazur, Alexander; Prokhortchouk, Egor

    2018-02-22

    Kaiso is a member of the BTB/POZ zinc finger family, which is involved in cancer progression, cell cycle control, apoptosis, and WNT signaling. Depending on promoter context, it may function as either a transcriptional repressor or activator. Previous studies found that Kaiso might be SUMOylated due to heat shock, but the biological significance of Kaiso SUMOylation is unclear. Here, we find that K42 is the only amino acid within Kaiso that is modified with SUMO. Kaiso is monoSUMOylated at lysine 42 in cell lines of kidney origin under normal physiological conditions. SUMOylated Kaiso can activate transcription from exogenous methylated promoters, wherein the deSUMOylated form of the protein kept the ability to be a repressor. Rapid Kaiso deSUMOylation occurs in response to hyperosmotic stress and is reversible upon return to an isotonic environment. DeSUMOylation occurs within minutes in HEK293 cells treated with 100 mM NaCl and relaxes in 3 h even in a salt-containing medium. Genomic editing of Kaiso by conversion of K42 into R42 (K42R) in HEK293 cells that resulted in fully deSUMOylated endogenous protein led to misregulation of genes associated with ion transport, blood pressure, and the immune response. TRIM25 was significantly repressed in two K42R HEK293 clones. By a series of rescue experiments with K42R and KO HEK293 cells, we show that TRIM25 is a direct transcriptional target for Kaiso. In the absence of Kaiso, the level of TRIM25 is insensitive to hyperosmotic stress. Extending our observations to animal models, we show that in response to a high salt diet, Kaiso knockout mice are characterized by significantly higher blood pressure increases when compared to wild-type animals. Thus, we propose a novel biological role for Kaiso in the regulation of homeostasis.

  4. Rough energy landscapes in protein folding: dimeric E. coli Trp repressor folds through three parallel channels.

    PubMed

    Gloss, L M; Simler, B R; Matthews, C R

    2001-10-05

    The folding mechanism of the dimeric Escherichia coli Trp repressor (TR) is a kinetically complex process that involves three distinguishable stages of development. Following the formation of a partially folded, monomeric ensemble of species, within 5 ms, folding to the native dimer is controlled by three kinetic phases. The rate-limiting step in each phase is either a non-proline isomerization reaction or a dimerization reaction, depending on the final denaturant concentration. Two approaches have been employed to test the previously proposed folding mechanism of TR through three parallel channels: (1) unfolding double-jump experiments demonstrate that all three folding channels lead directly to native dimer; and (2) the differential stabilization of the transition state for the final step in folding and the native dimer, by the addition of salt, shows that all three channels involve isomerization of a dimeric species. A refined model for the folding of Trp repressor is presented, in which all three channels involve a rapid dimerization reaction between partially folded monomers followed by the isomerization of the dimeric intermediates to yield native dimer. The ensemble of partially folded monomers can be captured at equilibrium by low pH; one-dimensional proton NMR spectra at pH 2.5 demonstrate that monomers exist in two distinct, slowly interconverting conformations. These data provide a potential structural explanation for the three-channel folding mechanism of TR: random association of two different monomeric forms, which are distinguished by alternative packing modes of the core dimerization domain and the DNA-binding, helix-turn-helix, domain. One, perhaps both, of these packing modes contains non-native contacts. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  5. R1, a novel repressor of the human monoamine oxidase A.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kevin; Ou, Xiao-Ming; Chen, Gao; Choi, Si Ho; Shih, Jean C

    2005-03-25

    Monoamine oxidase catalyzes the oxidative deamination of a number of neurotransmitters. A deficiency in monoamine oxidase A results in aggressive behavior in both humans and mice. Studies on the regulation of monoamine oxidase A gene expression have shown that the Sp1 family is important for monoamine oxidase A expression. To search for novel transcription factors, the sequences of three Sp1 sites in the monoamine oxidase A core promoter were used in the yeast one-hybrid system to screen a human cDNA library. A novel repressor, R1 (RAM2), has been cloned. The R1 cDNA encodes a protein with 454 amino acids and an open reading frame at the 5'-end. The transfection of R1 in a human neuroblastoma cell line, SK-N-BE (2)-C, inhibited the monoamine oxidase A promoter and enzymatic activity. The degree of inhibition of monoamine oxidase A by R1 correlated with the level of R1 protein expression. R1 was also found to repress monoamine oxidase A promoter activity within a natural chromatin environment. A gel-shift assay indicated that the endogenous R1 protein in SK-N-BE (2)-C cells interacted with the R1 binding sequence. R1 also bound directly to the natural monoamine oxidase A promoter in vivo as shown by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Immunocytochemical analysis showed that R1 was expressed in both cytosol and nucleus, which suggested a role for R1 in transcriptional regulation. Northern blot analysis revealed the presence of endogenous R1 mRNA in human brain and peripheral tissues. Taken together, this study shows that R1 is a novel repressor that inhibits monoamine oxidase A gene expression.

  6. The transcription repressor NmrA is subject to proteolysis by three Aspergillus nidulans proteases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiao; Hume, Samantha L; Johnson, Christopher; Thompson, Paul; Huang, Junyong; Gray, Joe; Lamb, Heather K; Hawkins, Alastair R

    2010-01-01

    The role of specific cleavage of transcription repressor proteins by proteases and how this may be related to the emerging theme of dinucleotides as cellular signaling molecules is poorly characterized. The transcription repressor NmrA of Aspergillus nidulans discriminates between oxidized and reduced dinucleotides, however, dinucleotide binding has no effect on its interaction with the zinc finger in the transcription activator AreA. Protease activity in A. nidulans was assayed using NmrA as the substrate, and was absent in mycelium grown under nitrogen sufficient conditions but abundant in mycelium starved of nitrogen. One of the proteases was purified and identified as the protein Q5BAR4 encoded by the gene AN2366.2. Fluorescence confocal microscopy showed that the nuclear levels of NmrA were reduced approximately 38% when mycelium was grown on nitrate compared to ammonium and absent when starved of nitrogen. Proteolysis of NmrA occurred in an ordered manner by preferential digestion within a C-terminal surface exposed loop and subsequent digestion at other sites. NmrA digested at the C-terminal site was unable to bind to the AreA zinc finger. These data reveal a potential new layer of control of nitrogen metabolite repression by the ordered proteolytic cleavage of NmrA. NmrA digested at the C-terminal site retained the ability to bind NAD+ and showed a resistance to further digestion that was enhanced by the presence of NAD+. This is the first time that an effect of dinucleotide binding to NmrA has been demonstrated. PMID:20506376

  7. Structure of the MecI repressor from Staphylococcus aureus in complex with the cognate DNA operator of mec

    SciT

    Safo, Martin K., E-mail: msafo@vcu.edu; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Musayev, Faik N.

    The up-and-down binding of dimeric MecI to mecA dyad DNA may account for the cooperative effect of the repressor. The dimeric repressor MecI regulates the mecA gene that encodes the penicillin-binding protein PBP-2a in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MecI is similar to BlaI, the repressor for the blaZ gene of β-lactamase. MecI and BlaI can bind to both operator DNA sequences. The crystal structure of MecI in complex with the 32 base-pair cognate DNA of mec was determined to 3.8 Å resolution. MecI is a homodimer and each monomer consists of a compact N-terminal winged-helix domain, which binds to DNA,more » and a loosely packed C-terminal helical domain, which intertwines with its counter-monomer. The crystal contains horizontal layers of virtual DNA double helices extending in three directions, which are separated by perpendicular DNA segments. Each DNA segment is bound to two MecI dimers. Similar to the BlaI–mec complex, but unlike the MecI–bla complex, the MecI repressors bind to both sides of the mec DNA dyad that contains four conserved sequences of TACA/TGTA. The results confirm the up-and-down binding to the mec operator, which may account for cooperative effect of the repressor.« less

  8. Genome-wide characterization of JASMONATE-ZIM DOMAIN transcription repressors in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yukun; Qiao, Linyi; Bai, Jianfang; Wang, Peng; Duan, Wenjing; Yuan, Shaohua; Yuan, Guoliang; Zhang, Fengting; Zhang, Liping; Zhao, Changping

    2017-02-13

    The JASMONATE-ZIM DOMAIN (JAZ) repressor family proteins are jasmonate co-receptors and transcriptional repressor in jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway, and they play important roles in regulating the growth and development of plants. Recently, more and more researches on JAZ gene family are reported in many plants. Although the genome sequencing of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and its relatives is complete, our knowledge about this gene family remains vacant. Fourteen JAZ genes were identified in the wheat genome. Structural analysis revealed that the TaJAZ proteins in wheat were as conserved as those in other plants, but had structural characteristics. By phylogenetic analysis, all JAZ proteins from wheat and other plants were clustered into 11 sub-groups (G1-G11), and TaJAZ proteins shared a high degree of similarity with some JAZ proteins from Aegliops tauschii, Brachypodium distachyon and Oryza sativa. The Ka/Ks ratios of TaJAZ genes ranged from 0.0016 to 0.6973, suggesting that the TaJAZ family had undergone purifying selection in wheat. Gene expression patterns obtained by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed differential temporal and spatial regulation of TaJAZ genes under multifarious abiotic stress treatments of high salinity, drought, cold and phytohormone. Among these, TaJAZ7, 8 and 12 were specifically expressed in the anther tissues of the thermosensitive genic male sterile (TGMS) wheat line BS366 and normal control wheat line Jing411. Compared with the gene expression patterns in the normal wheat line Jing411, TaJAZ7, 8 and 12 had different expression patterns in abnormally dehiscent anthers of BS366 at the heading stage 6, suggesting that specific up- or down-regulation of these genes might be associated with the abnormal anther dehiscence in TGMS wheat line. This study analyzed the size and composition of the JAZ gene family in wheat, and investigated stress responsive and differential tissue-specific expression profiles of each

  9. Multi‐layered inhibition of Streptomyces development: BldO is a dedicated repressor of whiB

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Govind; Findlay, Kim C.; Buttner, Mark J.

    2017-01-01

    Summary BldD‐(c‐di‐GMP) sits on top of the regulatory network that controls differentiation in Streptomyces, repressing a large regulon of developmental genes when the bacteria are growing vegetatively. In this way, BldD functions as an inhibitor that blocks the initiation of sporulation. Here, we report the identification and characterisation of BldO, an additional developmental repressor that acts to sustain vegetative growth and prevent entry into sporulation. However, unlike the pleiotropic regulator BldD, we show that BldO functions as the dedicated repressor of a single key target gene, whiB, and that deletion of bldO or constitutive expression of whiB is sufficient to induce precocious hypersporulation. PMID:28271577

  10. Effect of mutation at the interface of Trp-repressor dimeric protein: a steered molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Miño, German; Baez, Mauricio; Gutierrez, Gonzalo

    2013-09-01

    The strength of key interfacial contacts that stabilize protein-protein interactions have been studied by computer simulation. Experimentally, changes in the interface are evaluated by generating specific mutations at one or more points of the protein structure. Here, such an evaluation is performed by means of steered molecular dynamics and use of a dimeric model of tryptophan repressor and in-silico mutants as a test case. Analysis of four particular cases shows that, in principle, it is possible to distinguish between wild-type and mutant forms by examination of the total energy and force-extension profiles. In particular, detailed atomic level structural analysis indicates that specific mutations at the interface of the dimeric model (positions 19 and 39) alter interactions that appear in the wild-type form of tryptophan repressor, reducing the energy and force required to separate both subunits.

  11. Human Freud-2/CC2D1B: a novel repressor of postsynaptic serotonin-1A receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Hadjighassem, Mahmoud R; Austin, Mark C; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Daigle, Mireille; Stockmeier, Craig A; Albert, Paul R

    2009-08-01

    Altered expression of serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) receptors, both presynaptic in the raphe nuclei and post-synaptic in limbic and cortical target areas, has been implicated in mood disorders such as major depression and anxiety. Within the 5-HT1A receptor gene, a powerful dual repressor element (DRE) is regulated by two protein complexes: Freud-1/CC2D1A and a second, unknown repressor. Here we identify human Freud-2/CC2D1B, a Freud-1 homologue, as the second repressor. Freud-2 distribution was examined with Northern and Western blot, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry/immunofluorescence; Freud-2 function was examined by electrophoretic mobility shift, reporter assay, and Western blot. Freud-2 RNA was widely distributed in brain and peripheral tissues. Freud-2 protein was enriched in the nuclear fraction of human prefrontal cortex and hippocampus but was weakly expressed in the dorsal raphe nucleus. Freud-2 immunostaining was co-localized with 5-HT1A receptors, neuronal and glial markers. In prefrontal cortex, Freud-2 was expressed at similar levels in control and depressed male subjects. Recombinant hFreud-2 protein bound specifically to 5' or 3' human DRE adjacent to the Freud-1 site. Human Freud-2 showed strong repressor activity at the human 5-HT1A or heterologous promoter in human HEK-293 5-HT1A-negative cells and neuronal SK-N-SH cells, a model of postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptor-positive cells. Furthermore, small interfering RNA knockdown of endogenous hFreud-2 expression de-repressed 5-HT1A promoter activity and increased levels of 5-HT1A receptor protein in SK-N-SH cells. Human Freud-2 binds to the 5-HT1A DRE and represses the human 5-HT1A receptor gene to regulate its expression in non-serotonergic cells and neurons.

  12. Multiple conformations of the cytidine repressor DNA-binding domain coalesce to one upon recognition of a specific DNA surface.

    PubMed

    Moody, Colleen L; Tretyachenko-Ladokhina, Vira; Laue, Thomas M; Senear, Donald F; Cocco, Melanie J

    2011-08-09

    The cytidine repressor (CytR) is a member of the LacR family of bacterial repressors with distinct functional features. The Escherichia coli CytR regulon comprises nine operons whose palindromic operators vary in both sequence and, most significantly, spacing between the recognition half-sites. This suggests a strong likelihood that protein folding would be coupled to DNA binding as a mechanism to accommodate the variety of different operator architectures to which CytR is targeted. Such coupling is a common feature of sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins, including the LacR family repressors; however, there are no significant structural rearrangements upon DNA binding within the three-helix DNA-binding domains (DBDs) studied to date. We used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to characterize the CytR DBD free in solution and to determine the high-resolution structure of a CytR DBD monomer bound specifically to one DNA half-site of the uridine phosphorylase (udp) operator. We find that the free DBD populates multiple distinct conformations distinguished by up to four sets of NMR peaks per residue. This structural heterogeneity is previously unknown in the LacR family. These stable structures coalesce into a single, more stable udp-bound form that features a three-helix bundle containing a canonical helix-turn-helix motif. However, this structure differs from all other LacR family members whose structures are known with regard to the packing of the helices and consequently their relative orientations. Aspects of CytR activity are unique among repressors; we identify here structural properties that are also distinct and that might underlie the different functional properties. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  13. Zn(II) stimulation of Fe(II)-activated repression in the iron-dependent repressor from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Brian; Walker, Lawrence R; Logan, Timothy M

    2013-03-19

    Thermodynamic measurements of Fe(II) binding and activation of repressor function in the iron-dependent repressor from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (IdeR) are reported. IdeR, a member of the diphtheria toxin repressor family of proteins, regulates iron homeostasis and contributes to the virulence response in M. tuberculosis. Although iron is the physiological ligand, this is the first detailed analysis of iron binding and activation in this protein. The results showed that IdeR binds 2 equiv of Fe(II) with dissociation constants that differ by a factor of 25. The high- and low-affinity iron binding sites were assigned to physical binding sites I and II, respectively, using metal binding site mutants. IdeR was also found to contain a high-affinity Zn(II) binding site that was assigned to physical metal binding site II through the use of binding site mutants and metal competition assays. Fe(II) binding was modestly weaker in the presence of Zn(II), but the coupled metal binding-DNA binding affinity was significantly stronger, requiring 30-fold less Fe(II) to activate DNA binding compared to Fe(II) alone. Together, these results suggest that IdeR is a mixed-metal repressor, where Zn(II) acts as a structural metal and Fe(II) acts to trigger the physiologically relevant promoter binding. This new model for IdeR activation provides a better understanding of IdeR and the biology of iron homeostasis in M. tuberculosis.

  14. Recognition of AT-Rich DNA Binding Sites by the MogR Repressor

    SciT

    Shen, Aimee; Higgins, Darren E.; Panne, Daniel

    2009-07-22

    The MogR transcriptional repressor of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes recognizes AT-rich binding sites in promoters of flagellar genes to downregulate flagellar gene expression during infection. We describe here the 1.8 A resolution crystal structure of MogR bound to the recognition sequence 5' ATTTTTTAAAAAAAT 3' present within the flaA promoter region. Our structure shows that MogR binds as a dimer. Each half-site is recognized in the major groove by a helix-turn-helix motif and in the minor groove by a loop from the symmetry-related molecule, resulting in a 'crossover' binding mode. This oversampling through minor groove interactions is important for specificity.more » The MogR binding site has structural features of A-tract DNA and is bent by approximately 52 degrees away from the dimer. The structure explains how MogR achieves binding specificity in the AT-rich genome of L. monocytogenes and explains the evolutionary conservation of A-tract sequence elements within promoter regions of MogR-regulated flagellar genes.« less

  15. A GntR-type transcriptional repressor controls sialic acid utilization in Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003.

    PubMed

    Egan, Muireann; O'Connell Motherway, Mary; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2015-02-01

    Bifidobacterium breve strains are numerically prevalent among the gut microbiota of healthy, breast-fed infants. The metabolism of sialic acid, a ubiquitous monosaccharide in the infant and adult gut, by B. breve UCC2003 is dependent on a large gene cluster, designated the nan/nag cluster. This study describes the transcriptional regulation of the nan/nag cluster and thus sialic acid metabolism in B. breve UCC2003. Insertion mutagenesis and transcriptome analysis revealed that the nan/nag cluster is regulated by a GntR family transcriptional repressor, designated NanR. Crude cell extract of Escherichia coli EC101 in which the nanR gene had been cloned and overexpressed was shown to bind to two promoter regions within this cluster, each of which containing an imperfect inverted repeat that is believed to act as the NanR operator sequence. Formation of the DNA-NanR complex is prevented in the presence of sialic acid, which we had previously shown to induce transcription of this gene cluster. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. A calorimetric investigation of the interaction of the lac repressor with inducer.

    PubMed

    Donnér, J; Caruthers, M H; Gill, S J

    1982-12-25

    A calorimetric study has been made of the interaction between the lac repressor and isopropyl-1-thio-beta-D-galactopyranoside (IPTG). The buffer-corrected enthalpy of reaction at 25 degrees C was found to be -15.6, -24.7, -4.6 kJ/mol of bound IPTG at pH 7.0, pH 8.1, and pH 9.0, respectively. This large range of enthalpy values is in contrast to a maximum difference in the free energy of the reaction of only 1.5 kJ/mol of bound IPTG between these pH values. The reaction was found by calorimetric measurements in different buffers to be accompanied by an uptake of 0.29 mol of protons/mol of bound IPTG at pH 8.1. The pH dependency of the reaction enthalpy suggests differences in the extent of protonation of the binding site and the involvement of H bonding with IPTG. The lack of strong hydrophobic contributions in the IPTG binding process is revealed by the absence of any determinable heat capacity change for the reaction at pH 7.0. The presence of phosphate buffer significantly alters the enthalpy of IPTG binding at higher pH values, but has little effect upon the binding constant. This implies that highly negative phosphate species change the nature of the IPTG binding site without any displacement of phosphate upon IPTG binding.

  17. Loss of the RNA polymerase III repressor MAF1 confers obesity resistance.

    PubMed

    Bonhoure, Nicolas; Byrnes, Ashlee; Moir, Robyn D; Hodroj, Wassim; Preitner, Frédéric; Praz, Viviane; Marcelin, Genevieve; Chua, Streamson C; Martinez-Lopez, Nuria; Singh, Rajat; Moullan, Norman; Auwerx, Johan; Willemin, Gilles; Shah, Hardik; Hartil, Kirsten; Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya; Kurland, Irwin; Hernandez, Nouria; Willis, Ian M

    2015-05-01

    MAF1 is a global repressor of RNA polymerase III transcription that regulates the expression of highly abundant noncoding RNAs in response to nutrient availability and cellular stress. Thus, MAF1 function is thought to be important for metabolic economy. Here we show that a whole-body knockout of Maf1 in mice confers resistance to diet-induced obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by reducing food intake and increasing metabolic inefficiency. Energy expenditure in Maf1(-/-) mice is increased by several mechanisms. Precursor tRNA synthesis was increased in multiple tissues without significant effects on mature tRNA levels, implying increased turnover in a futile tRNA cycle. Elevated futile cycling of hepatic lipids was also observed. Metabolite profiling of the liver and skeletal muscle revealed elevated levels of many amino acids and spermidine, which links the induction of autophagy in Maf1(-/-) mice with their extended life span. The increase in spermidine was accompanied by reduced levels of nicotinamide N-methyltransferase, which promotes polyamine synthesis, enables nicotinamide salvage to regenerate NAD(+), and is associated with obesity resistance. Consistent with this, NAD(+) levels were increased in muscle. The importance of MAF1 for metabolic economy reveals the potential for MAF1 modulators to protect against obesity and its harmful consequences. © 2015 Bonhoure et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  18. Loss of the RNA polymerase III repressor MAF1 confers obesity resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bonhoure, Nicolas; Byrnes, Ashlee; Moir, Robyn D.; Hodroj, Wassim; Preitner, Frédéric; Praz, Viviane; Marcelin, Genevieve; Chua, Streamson C.; Martinez-Lopez, Nuria; Singh, Rajat; Moullan, Norman; Auwerx, Johan; Willemin, Gilles; Shah, Hardik; Hartil, Kirsten; Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya; Kurland, Irwin

    2015-01-01

    MAF1 is a global repressor of RNA polymerase III transcription that regulates the expression of highly abundant noncoding RNAs in response to nutrient availability and cellular stress. Thus, MAF1 function is thought to be important for metabolic economy. Here we show that a whole-body knockout of Maf1 in mice confers resistance to diet-induced obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by reducing food intake and increasing metabolic inefficiency. Energy expenditure in Maf1−/− mice is increased by several mechanisms. Precursor tRNA synthesis was increased in multiple tissues without significant effects on mature tRNA levels, implying increased turnover in a futile tRNA cycle. Elevated futile cycling of hepatic lipids was also observed. Metabolite profiling of the liver and skeletal muscle revealed elevated levels of many amino acids and spermidine, which links the induction of autophagy in Maf1−/− mice with their extended life span. The increase in spermidine was accompanied by reduced levels of nicotinamide N-methyltransferase, which promotes polyamine synthesis, enables nicotinamide salvage to regenerate NAD+, and is associated with obesity resistance. Consistent with this, NAD+ levels were increased in muscle. The importance of MAF1 for metabolic economy reveals the potential for MAF1 modulators to protect against obesity and its harmful consequences. PMID:25934505

  19. Investigation of arc repressor DNA-binding specificity by comparative molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Guo, Jun-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors regulate gene expression through binding to specific DNA sequences. How transcription factors achieve high binding specificity is still not well understood. In this paper, we investigated the role of protein flexibility in protein-DNA-binding specificity by comparative molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Protein flexibility has been considered as a key factor in molecular recognition, which is intrinsically a dynamic process involving fine structural fitting between binding components. In this study, we performed comparative MD simulations on wild-type and F10V mutant P22 Arc repressor in both free and complex conformations. The F10V mutant has lower DNA-binding specificity though both the bound and unbound main-chain structures between the wild-type and F10V mutant Arc are highly similar. We found that the DNA-binding motif of wild-type Arc is structurally more flexible than the F10V mutant in the unbound state, especially for the six DNA base-contacting residues in each dimer. We demonstrated that the flexible side chains of wild-type Arc lead to a higher DNA-binding specificity through forming more hydrogen bonds with DNA bases upon binding. Our simulations also showed a possible conformational selection mechanism for Arc-DNA binding. These results indicate the important roles of protein flexibility and dynamic properties in protein-DNA-binding specificity.

  20. The co-existence of transcriptional activator and transcriptional repressor MEF2 complexes influences tumor aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Di Giorgio, Eros; Franforte, Elisa; Cefalù, Sebastiano; Rossi, Sabrina; Dei Tos, Angelo Paolo; Polano, Maurizio; Maestro, Roberta; Paluvai, Harikrishnareddy

    2017-01-01

    The contribution of MEF2 TFs to the tumorigenic process is still mysterious. Here we clarify that MEF2 can support both pro-oncogenic or tumor suppressive activities depending on the interaction with co-activators or co-repressors partners. Through these interactions MEF2 supervise histone modifications associated with gene activation/repression, such as H3K4 methylation and H3K27 acetylation. Critical switches for the generation of a MEF2 repressive environment are class IIa HDACs. In leiomyosarcomas (LMS), this two-faced trait of MEF2 is relevant for tumor aggressiveness. Class IIa HDACs are overexpressed in 22% of LMS, where high levels of MEF2, HDAC4 and HDAC9 inversely correlate with overall survival. The knock out of HDAC9 suppresses the transformed phenotype of LMS cells, by restoring the transcriptional proficiency of some MEF2-target loci. HDAC9 coordinates also the demethylation of H3K4me3 at the promoters of MEF2-target genes. Moreover, we show that class IIa HDACs do not bind all the regulative elements bound by MEF2. Hence, in a cell MEF2-target genes actively transcribed and strongly repressed can coexist. However, these repressed MEF2-targets are poised in terms of chromatin signature. Overall our results candidate class IIa HDACs and HDAC9 in particular, as druggable targets for a therapeutic intervention in LMS. PMID:28419090

  1. DNA sequence-dependent mechanics and protein-assisted bending in repressor-mediated loop formation

    PubMed Central

    Boedicker, James Q.; Garcia, Hernan G.; Johnson, Stephanie; Phillips, Rob

    2014-01-01

    As the chief informational molecule of life, DNA is subject to extensive physical manipulations. The energy required to deform double-helical DNA depends on sequence, and this mechanical code of DNA influences gene regulation, such as through nucleosome positioning. Here we examine the sequence-dependent flexibility of DNA in bacterial transcription factor-mediated looping, a context for which the role of sequence remains poorly understood. Using a suite of synthetic constructs repressed by the Lac repressor and two well-known sequences that show large flexibility differences in vitro, we make precise statistical mechanical predictions as to how DNA sequence influences loop formation and test these predictions using in vivo transcription and in vitro single-molecule assays. Surprisingly, sequence-dependent flexibility does not affect in vivo gene regulation. By theoretically and experimentally quantifying the relative contributions of sequence and the DNA-bending protein HU to DNA mechanical properties, we reveal that bending by HU dominates DNA mechanics and masks intrinsic sequence-dependent flexibility. Such a quantitative understanding of how mechanical regulatory information is encoded in the genome will be a key step towards a predictive understanding of gene regulation at single-base pair resolution. PMID:24231252

  2. Single-molecule manipulation reveals supercoiling-dependent modulation of lac repressor-mediated DNA looping

    PubMed Central

    Normanno, Davide; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2008-01-01

    Gene expression regulation is a fundamental biological process which deploys specific sets of genomic information depending on physiological or environmental conditions. Several transcription factors (including lac repressor, LacI) are present in the cell at very low copy number and increase their local concentration by binding to multiple sites on DNA and looping the intervening sequence. In this work, we employ single-molecule manipulation to experimentally address the role of DNA supercoiling in the dynamics and stability of LacI-mediated DNA looping. We performed measurements over a range of degrees of supercoiling between −0.026 and +0.026, in the absence of axial stretching forces. A supercoiling-dependent modulation of the lifetimes of both the looped and unlooped states was observed. Our experiments also provide evidence for multiple structural conformations of the LacI–DNA complex, depending on torsional constraints. The supercoiling-dependent modulation demonstrated here adds an important element to the model of the lac operon. In fact, the complex network of proteins acting on the DNA in a living cell constantly modifies its topological and mechanical properties: our observations demonstrate the possibility of establishing a signaling pathway from factors affecting DNA supercoiling to transcription factors responsible for the regulation of specific sets of genes. PMID:18310101

  3. Implication of intracellular localization of transcriptional repressor PLZF in thyroid neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, Kazuhiko; Izawa, Shoichiro; Ohkura, Tsuyoshi; Ohkura, Hiroko; Ishiguro, Kiyosuke; Yoshida, Akio; Takiyama, Yumi; Haneda, Masakazu; Shigemasa, Chiaki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Taniguchi, Shin-ichi

    2014-07-03

    Promyelocytic leukaemia zinc finger (PLZF) is a transcriptional repressor that was originally isolated from a patient with promyelocytic leukaemia. PLZF also affects key elements for cell cycle progression, such as cyclin A, and can affect the tumourigenicity of various cancers. Thus far, the behaviour of PLZF in thyroid carcinoma remains unclear. We analysed the expression profile of PLZF in different types of benign and malignant thyroid lesions as well as in normal thyroid tissue. Specifically, we examined PLZF expression in normal thyroid (N; n = 4), adenomatous lesion (AL; n = 5), follicular adenoma (FA; n = 2), papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC; n = 20), and anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC; n = 3) samples. PLZF expression was estimated by western blotting and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. PLZF was expressed in all samples of thyroid lesions examined. In N, AL, and FA, PLZF was mainly localized in the nucleus. In contrast, in PTC and ATC, PLZF was mainly expressed in the cytosol with high intensity. In more detail, the cytoplasmic IHC scores in PTC with capsular invasion (CI) and lymph node (LN) metastasis were higher than those in PTC without CI and LN metastasis. PLZF shows different subcellular localizations among PTC, ATC, and other thyroid lesions. Furthermore, high cytoplasmic expression of PLZF may be correlated with CI and LN metastasis in thyroid carcinoma. The present report is the first to describe the implications of intracellular PLZF expression in thyroid carcinomas.

  4. Mutations in the TGF-β Repressor SKI Cause Shprintzen-Goldberg Syndrome with Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Alexander J.; Doyle, Jefferson J.; Bessling, Seneca L.; Maragh, Samantha; Lindsay, Mark E.; Schepers, Dorien; Gillis, Elisabeth; Mortier, Geert; Homfray, Tessa; Sauls, Kimberly; Norris, Russell A.; Huso, Nicholas D.; Leahy, Dan; Mohr, David W.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Scott, Alan F.; Destrée, Anne; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Arn, Pamela H.; Curry, Cynthia J.; Van Laer, Lut; McCallion, Andrew S.; Loeys, Bart L.; Dietz, Harry C.

    2012-01-01

    Increased transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of syndromic presentations of aortic aneurysm, including Marfan syndrome (MFS) and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS)1-4. However, the location and character of many of the causal mutations in LDS would intuitively infer diminished TGF-β signaling5. Taken together, these data have engendered controversy regarding the specific role of TGF-β in disease pathogenesis. Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome (SGS) has considerable phenotypic overlap with MFS and LDS, including aortic aneurysm6-8. We identified causative variation in 10 patients with SGS in the proto-oncogene SKI, a known repressor of TGF-β activity9,10. Cultured patient dermal fibroblasts showed enhanced activation of TGF-β signaling cascades and increased expression of TGF-β responsive genes. Morpholino-induced silencing of SKI paralogs in zebrafish recapitulated abnormalities seen in SGS patients. These data support the conclusion that increased TGF-β signaling is the mechanism underlying SGS and contributes to multiple syndromic presentations of aortic aneurysm. PMID:23023332

  5. The Mannitol Operon Repressor MTIR belongs to a new class of transcription regulators in bacteria.

    SciT

    Tan, K.; Borovilos, M.; Zhou, M

    2009-12-25

    Many bacteria express phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase systems (PTS). The mannitol-specific PTS catalyze the uptake and phosphorylation of d-mannitol. The uptake system comprises several genes encoded in the single operon. The expression of the mannitol operon is regulated by a proposed transcriptional factor, mannitol operon repressor (MtlR) that was first studied in Escherichia coli. Here we report the first crystal structures of MtlR from Vibrio parahemeolyticus (Vp-MtlR) and its homolog YggD protein from Shigella flexneri (Sf-YggD). MtlR and YggD belong to the same protein family (Pfam05068). Although Vp-MtlR and Sf-YggD share low sequence identity (22%), their overall structures are very similar, representingmore » a novel all {alpha}-helical fold, and indicate similar function. However, their lack of any known DNA-binding structural motifs and their unfavorable electrostatic properties imply that MtlR/YggD are unlikely to bind a specific DNA operator directly as proposed earlier. This structural observation is further corroborated by in vitro DNA-binding studies of E. coli MtlR (Ec-MtlR), which detected no interaction of Ec-MtlR with the well characterized mannitol operator/promoter region. Therefore, MtlR/YggD belongs to a new class of transcription factors in bacteria that may regulate gene expression indirectly as a part of a larger transcriptional complex.« less

  6. Zic-Proteins Are Repressors of Dopaminergic Forebrain Fate in Mice and C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Tiveron, Marie-Catherine; Beclin, Christophe; Murgan, Sabrina; Wild, Stefan; Angelova, Alexandra; Marc, Julie; Coré, Nathalie; de Chevigny, Antoine; Herrera, Eloisa; Bosio, Andreas; Bertrand, Vincent; Cremer, Harold

    2017-11-01

    In the postnatal forebrain regionalized neural stem cells along the ventricular walls produce olfactory bulb (OB) interneurons with varying neurotransmitter phenotypes and positions. To understand the molecular basis of this region-specific variability we analyzed gene expression in the postnatal dorsal and lateral lineages in mice of both sexes from stem cells to neurons. We show that both lineages maintain transcription factor signatures of their embryonic site of origin, the pallium and subpallium. However, additional factors, including Zic1 and Zic2, are postnatally expressed in the dorsal stem cell compartment and maintained in the lineage that generates calretinin-positive GABAergic neurons for the OB. Functionally, we show that Zic1 and Zic2 induce the generation of calretinin-positive neurons while suppressing dopaminergic fate in the postnatal dorsal lineage. We investigated the evolutionary conservation of the dopaminergic repressor function of Zic proteins and show that it is already present in C. elegans SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The vertebrate brain generates thousands of different neuron types. In this work we investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying this variability. Using a genomics approach we identify the transcription factor signatures of defined neural stem cells and neuron populations. Based thereon we show that two related transcription factors, Zic1 and Zic2, are essential to control the balance between two defined neuron types in the postnatal brain. We show that this mechanism is conserved in evolutionary very distant species. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/3710611-13$15.00/0.

  7. Drosophila arginine methyltransferase 1 (DART1) is an ecdysone receptor co-repressor

    SciT

    Kimura, Shuhei; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8574; Sawatsubashi, Shun

    2008-07-11

    Histone arginine methylation is an epigenetic marker that regulates gene expression by defining the chromatin state. Arginine methyltransferases, therefore, serve as transcriptional co-regulators. However, unlike other transcriptional co-regulators, the physiological roles of arginine methyltransferases are poorly understood. Drosophila arginine methyltransferase 1 (DART1), the mammalian PRMT1 homologue, methylates the arginine residue of histone H4 (H4R3me2). Disruption of DART1 in Drosophila by imprecise P-element excision resulted in low viability during metamorphosis in the pupal stages. In the pupal stage, an ecdysone hormone signal is critical for developmental progression. DART1 interacted with the nuclear ecdysone receptor (EcR) in a ligand-dependent manner, and co-repressedmore » EcR in intact flies. These findings suggest that DART1, a histone arginine methyltransferase, is a co-repressor of EcR that is indispensable for normal pupal development in the intact fly.« less

  8. NF-kappaB binds to a polymorphic repressor element in the MMP-3 promoter.

    PubMed

    Borghaei, Ruth C; Rawlings, P Lyle; Javadi, Masoud; Woloshin, Joanna

    2004-03-26

    A 5T/6T polymorphic site in the matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) promoter has been identified as a repressor element involved in inhibiting induction of MMP-3 transcription by interleukin 1; and the 6T allele has been associated with decreased expression of MMP-3 as compared to the 5T allele. Zinc-binding protein-89 (ZBP-89) was cloned from a yeast one-hybrid assay via its ability to interact with this site, but when the protein was over-expressed, it resulted in activation of the MMP-3 promoter rather than repression. Here we show that in nuclear extracts isolated from human gingival fibroblasts stimulated with IL-1, this site is bound by p50 and p65 components of NF-kappaB in addition to ZBP-89, and that recombinant p50 binds preferentially to the 6T binding site. These results are consistent with a role for NF-kappaB in limiting the cytokine induced expression of MMP-3.

  9. Endoribonuclease-Based Two-Component Repressor Systems for Tight Gene Expression Control in Plants

    DOE PAGES

    Liang, Yan; Richardson, Sarah; Yan, Jingwei; ...

    2017-01-17

    Tight control and multifactorial regulation of gene expression are important challenges in genetic engineering and are critical for the development of regulatory circuits. In meeting these challenges we will facilitate transgene expression regulation and support the fine-tuning of metabolic pathways to avoid the accumulation of undesired intermediates. By employing the endoribonuclease Csy4 and its recognition sequence from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and manipulating 5'UTR of mRNA, we developed a two-component expression–repression system to tightly control synthesis of transgene products. We demonstrated that this regulatory device was functional in monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plant species, and showed that it can be used to repressmore » transgene expression by >400-fold and to synchronize transgene repression. In addition to tissue-specific transgene repression, this system offers stimuli-dependent expression control. Here, we identified 54 orthologous systems from various bacteria, using a bioinformatics approach and then validated in planta the activity for a few of those systems, demonstrating the potential diversity of such a two-component repressor system.« less

  10. Crystal Structure and Regulation of the Citrus Pol III Repressor MAF1 by Auxin and Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Soprano, Adriana Santos; Giuseppe, Priscila Oliveira de; Shimo, Hugo Massayoshi; Lima, Tatiani Brenelli; Batista, Fernanda Aparecida Heleno; Righetto, Germanna Lima; Pereira, José Geraldo de Carvalho; Granato, Daniela Campos; Nascimento, Andrey Fabricio Ziem; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; de Oliveira, Paulo Sérgio Lopes; Figueira, Ana Carolina Migliorini; Smetana, Juliana Helena Costa; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Murakami, Mario Tyago; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2017-09-05

    MAF1 is the main RNA polymerase (Pol) III repressor that controls cell growth in eukaryotes. The Citrus ortholog, CsMAF1, was shown to restrict cell growth in citrus canker disease but its role in plant development and disease is still unclear. We solved the crystal structure of the globular core of CsMAF1, which reveals additional structural elements compared with the previously available structure of hMAF1, and explored the dynamics of its flexible regions not present in the structure. CsMAF1 accumulated in the nucleolus upon leaf excision, and this translocation was inhibited by auxin and by mutation of the PKA phosphorylation site, S45, to aspartate. Additionally, mTOR phosphorylated recombinant CsMAF1 and the mTOR inhibitor AZD8055 blocked canker formation in normal but not CsMAF1-silenced plants. These results indicate that the role of TOR on cell growth induced by Xanthomonas citri depends on CsMAF1 and that auxin controls CsMAF1 interaction with Pol III in citrus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis transcriptional repressor EthR is negatively regulated by Serine/Threonine phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Leiba, Jade; Carrère-Kremer, Séverine; Blondiaux, Nicolas; Dimala, Martin Moune; Wohlkönig, Alexandre; Baulard, Alain; Kremer, Laurent; Molle, Virginie

    2014-04-18

    Recent efforts have underlined the role of Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases (STPKs) in growth, pathogenesis and cell wall metabolism in mycobacteria. Herein, we demonstrated that the Mycobacterium tuberculosis EthR, a transcriptional repressor that regulates the activation process of the antitubercular drug ethionamide (ETH) is a specific substrate of the mycobacterial kinase PknF. ETH is a prodrug that must undergo bioactivation by the monooxygenease EthA to exert its antimycobacterial activity and previous studies reported that EthR represses transcription of ethA by binding to the ethA-ethR intergenic region. Mass spectrometry analyses and site-directed mutagenesis identified a set of four phosphoacceptors, namely Thr2, Thr3, Ser4 and Ser7. This was further supported by the complete loss of PknF-dependent phosphorylation of a phosphoablative EthR mutant protein. Importantly, a phosphomimetic version of EthR, in which all phosphosites were replaced by Asp residues, exhibited markedly decreased DNA-binding activity compared with the wild-type protein. Together, these findings are the first demonstration of EthR phosphorylation and indicate that phosphorylation negatively affects its DNA-binding activity, which may impact ETH resistance levels in M. tb. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mxi1 is a repressor of the c-Myc promoter and reverses activation by USF.

    PubMed

    Lee, T C; Ziff, E B

    1999-01-08

    The basic region/helix-loop-helix/leucine zipper (B-HLH-LZ) oncoprotein c-Myc is abundant in proliferating cells and forms heterodimers with Max protein that bind to E-box sites in DNA and stimulate genes required for proliferation. A second B-HLH-LZ protein, Mxi1, is induced during terminal differentiation, and forms heterodimers with Max that also bind E-boxes but tether the mSin3 transcriptional repressor protein along with histone deacetylase thereby antagonizing Myc-dependent activation. We show that Mxi1 also antagonizes Myc by a second pathway, repression of transcription from the major c-myc promoter, P2. Repression was independent of Mxi1 binding to mSin3 but dependent on the Mxi1 LZ and COOH-terminal sequences, including putative casein kinase II phosphorylation sites. Repression targeted elements of the myc P2 promoter core (-35/+10), where it reversed transactivation by the constitutive transcription factor, USF. We show that Zn2+ induction of a stably transfected, metallothionein promoter-regulated mxi1 gene blocked the ability of serum to induce transcription of the endogenous c-myc gene and cell entry into S phase. Thus, induction of Mxi1 in terminally differentiating cells may block Myc function by repressing the c-myc gene P2 promoter, as well as by antagonizing Myc-dependent transactivation through E-boxes.

  13. RING1 is associated with the polycomb group protein complex and acts as a transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Satijn, D P; Gunster, M J; van der Vlag, J; Hamer, K M; Schul, W; Alkema, M J; Saurin, A J; Freemont, P S; van Driel, R; Otte, A P

    1997-07-01

    The Polycomb (Pc) protein is a component of a multimeric, chromatin-associated Polycomb group (PcG) protein complex, which is involved in stable repression of gene activity. The identities of components of the PcG protein complex are largely unknown. In a two-hybrid screen with a vertebrate Pc homolog as a target, we identify the human RING1 protein as interacting with Pc. RING1 is a protein that contains the RING finger motif, a specific zinc-binding domain, which is found in many regulatory proteins. So far, the function of the RING1 protein has remained enigmatic. Here, we show that RING1 coimmunoprecipitates with a human Pc homolog, the vertebrate PcG protein BMI1, and HPH1, a human homolog of the PcG protein Polyhomeotic (Ph). Also, RING1 colocalizes with these vertebrate PcG proteins in nuclear domains of SW480 human colorectal adenocarcinoma and Saos-2 human osteosarcoma cells. Finally, we show that RING1, like Pc, is able to repress gene activity when targeted to a reporter gene. Our findings indicate that RING1 is associated with the human PcG protein complex and that RING1, like PcG proteins, can act as a transcriptional repressor.

  14. Yin Yang 1 Is a Critical Repressor of Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Expression in Brain Neurons*

    PubMed Central

    Rylski, Marcin; Amborska, Renata; Zybura, Katarzyna; Mioduszewska, Barbara; Michaluk, Piotr; Jaworski, Jacek; Kaczmarek, Leszek

    2008-01-01

    Membrane depolarization controls long lasting adaptive neuronal changes in brain physiology and pathology. Such responses are believed to be gene expression-dependent. Notably, however, only a couple of gene repressors active in nondepolarized neurons have been described. In this study, we show that in the unstimulated rat hippocampus in vivo, as well as in the nondepolarized brain neurons in primary culture, the transcriptional regulator Yin Yang 1 (YY1) is bound to the proximal Mmp-9 promoter and strongly represses Mmp-9 transcription. Furthermore, we demonstrate that monoubiquitinated and CtBP1 (C-terminal binding protein 1)-bound YY1 regulates Mmp-9 mRNA synthesis in rat brain neurons controlling its transcription apparently via HDAC3-dependent histone deacetylation. In conclusion, our data suggest that YY1 exerts, via epigenetic mechanisms, a control over neuronal expression of MMP-9. Because MMP-9 has recently been shown to play a pivotal role in physiological and pathological neuronal plasticity, YY1 may be implicated in these phenomena as well. PMID:18940814

  15. Endoribonuclease-Based Two-Component Repressor Systems for Tight Gene Expression Control in Plants

    SciT

    Liang, Yan; Richardson, Sarah; Yan, Jingwei

    Tight control and multifactorial regulation of gene expression are important challenges in genetic engineering and are critical for the development of regulatory circuits. In meeting these challenges we will facilitate transgene expression regulation and support the fine-tuning of metabolic pathways to avoid the accumulation of undesired intermediates. By employing the endoribonuclease Csy4 and its recognition sequence from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and manipulating 5'UTR of mRNA, we developed a two-component expression–repression system to tightly control synthesis of transgene products. We demonstrated that this regulatory device was functional in monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plant species, and showed that it can be used to repressmore » transgene expression by >400-fold and to synchronize transgene repression. In addition to tissue-specific transgene repression, this system offers stimuli-dependent expression control. Here, we identified 54 orthologous systems from various bacteria, using a bioinformatics approach and then validated in planta the activity for a few of those systems, demonstrating the potential diversity of such a two-component repressor system.« less

  16. The transcription factor p53: Not a repressor, solely an activator

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Martin; Steiner, Lydia; Engeland, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    The predominant function of the tumor suppressor p53 is transcriptional regulation. It is generally accepted that p53-dependent transcriptional activation occurs by binding to a specific recognition site in promoters of target genes. Additionally, several models for p53-dependent transcriptional repression have been postulated. Here, we evaluate these models based on a computational meta-analysis of genome-wide data. Surprisingly, several major models of p53-dependent gene regulation are implausible. Meta-analysis of large-scale data is unable to confirm reports on directly repressed p53 target genes and falsifies models of direct repression. This notion is supported by experimental re-analysis of representative genes reported as directly repressed by p53. Therefore, p53 is not a direct repressor of transcription, but solely activates its target genes. Moreover, models based on interference of p53 with activating transcription factors as well as models based on the function of ncRNAs are also not supported by the meta-analysis. As an alternative to models of direct repression, the meta-analysis leads to the conclusion that p53 represses transcription indirectly by activation of the p53-p21-DREAM/RB pathway. PMID:25486564

  17. A Conserved Network of Transcriptional Activators and Repressors Regulates Anthocyanin Pigmentation in Eudicots[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Nick W.; Davies, Kevin M.; Lewis, David H.; Zhang, Huaibi; Montefiori, Mirco; Brendolise, Cyril; Boase, Murray R.; Ngo, Hanh; Jameson, Paula E.; Schwinn, Kathy E.

    2014-01-01

    Plants require sophisticated regulatory mechanisms to ensure the degree of anthocyanin pigmentation is appropriate to myriad developmental and environmental signals. Central to this process are the activity of MYB-bHLH-WD repeat (MBW) complexes that regulate the transcription of anthocyanin genes. In this study, the gene regulatory network that regulates anthocyanin synthesis in petunia (Petunia hybrida) has been characterized. Genetic and molecular evidence show that the R2R3-MYB, MYB27, is an anthocyanin repressor that functions as part of the MBW complex and represses transcription through its C-terminal EAR motif. MYB27 targets both the anthocyanin pathway genes and basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) ANTHOCYANIN1 (AN1), itself an essential component of the MBW activation complex for pigmentation. Other features of the regulatory network identified include inhibition of AN1 activity by the competitive R3-MYB repressor MYBx and the activation of AN1, MYB27, and MYBx by the MBW activation complex, providing for both reinforcement and feedback regulation. We also demonstrate the intercellular movement of the WDR protein (AN11) and R3-repressor (MYBx), which may facilitate anthocyanin pigment pattern formation. The fundamental features of this regulatory network in the Asterid model of petunia are similar to those in the Rosid model of Arabidopsis thaliana and are thus likely to be widespread in the Eudicots. PMID:24642943

  18. Determination of the DNA-binding kinetics of three related but heteroimmune bacteriophage repressors using EMSA and SPR analysis

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson-Peltola, Petri; Sehlén, Wilhelmina; Haggård-Ljungquist, Elisabeth

    2007-01-01

    Bacteriophages P2, P2 Hy dis and WΦ are very similar but heteroimmune Escherichia coli phages. The structural genes show over 96% identity, but the repressors show between 43 and 63% identities. Furthermore, the operators, which contain two directly repeated sequences, vary in sequence, length, location relative to the promoter and spacing between the direct repeats. We have compared the in vivo effects of the wild type and mutated operators on gene expression with the complexes formed between the repressors and their wild type or mutated operators using electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), and real-time kinetics of the protein–DNA interactions using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis. Using EMSA, the repressors formed different protein–DNA complexes, and only WΦ was significantly affected by point mutations. However, SPR analysis showed a reduced association rate constant and an increased dissociation rate constant for P2 and WΦ operator mutants. The association rate constants of P2 Hy dis was too fast to be determined. The P2 Hy dis dissociation response curves were shown to be triphasic, while both P2 and WΦ C were biphasic. Thus, the kinetics of complex formation and the nature of the complexes formed differ extensively between these very closely related phages. PMID:17412705

  19. The FRIGIDA Complex Activates Transcription of FLC, a Strong Flowering Repressor in Arabidopsis, by Recruiting Chromatin Modification Factors[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyuha; Kim, Juhyun; Hwang, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Sanghee; Park, Chulmin; Kim, Sang Yeol; Lee, Ilha

    2011-01-01

    The flowering of Arabidopsis thaliana winter annuals is delayed until the subsequent spring by the strong floral repressor FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). FRIGIDA (FRI) activates the transcription of FLC, but the molecular mechanism remains elusive. The fri mutation causes early flowering with reduced FLC expression similar to frl1, fes1, suf4, and flx, which are mutants of FLC-specific regulators. Here, we report that FRI acts as a scaffold protein interacting with FRL1, FES1, SUF4, and FLX to form a transcription activator complex (FRI-C). Each component of FRI-C has a specialized function. SUF4 binds to a cis-element of the FLC promoter, FLX and FES1 have transcriptional activation potential, and FRL1 and FES1 stabilize the complex. FRI-C recruits a general transcription factor, a TAF14 homolog, and chromatin modification factors, the SWR1 complex and SET2 homolog. Complex formation was confirmed by the immunoprecipitation of FRI-associated proteins followed by mass spectrometric analysis. Our results provide insight into how a specific transcription activator recruits chromatin modifiers to regulate a key flowering gene. PMID:21282526

  20. Toxoplasma gondii TgIST co-opts host chromatin repressors dampening STAT1-dependent gene regulation and IFN-γ–mediated host defenses

    PubMed Central

    Brenier-Pinchart, Marie-Pierre; Bertini, Rose-Laurence; Varesano, Aurélie; De Bock, Pieter-Jan

    2016-01-01

    An early hallmark of Toxoplasma gondii infection is the rapid control of the parasite population by a potent multifaceted innate immune response that engages resident and homing immune cells along with pro- and counter-inflammatory cytokines. In this context, IFN-γ activates a variety of T. gondii–targeting activities in immune and nonimmune cells but can also contribute to host immune pathology. T. gondii has evolved mechanisms to timely counteract the host IFN-γ defenses by interfering with the transcription of IFN-γ–stimulated genes. We now have identified TgIST (T. gondii inhibitor of STAT1 transcriptional activity) as a critical molecular switch that is secreted by intracellular parasites and traffics to the host cell nucleus where it inhibits STAT1-dependent proinflammatory gene expression. We show that TgIST not only sequesters STAT1 on dedicated loci but also promotes shaping of a nonpermissive chromatin through its capacity to recruit the nucleosome remodeling deacetylase (NuRD) transcriptional repressor. We found that during mice acute infection, TgIST-deficient parasites are rapidly eliminated by the homing Gr1+ inflammatory monocytes, thus highlighting the protective role of TgIST against IFN-γ–mediated killing. By uncovering TgIST functions, this study brings novel evidence on how T. gondii has devised a molecular weapon of choice to take control over a ubiquitous immune gene expression mechanism in metazoans, as a way to promote long-term parasitism. PMID:27503074

  1. Kif3a Controls Murine Nephron Number Via GLI3 Repressor, Cell Survival, and Gene Expression in a Lineage-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Lijun; Galtseva, Alevtina; Chen, Lin; Mo, Rong; Hui, Chi-chung; Rosenblum, Norman D.

    2013-01-01

    The primary cilium is required during early embryo patterning, epithelial tubulogenesis, and growth factor-dependent signal transduction. The requirement for primary cilia during renal epithelial-mesenchymal tissue interactions that give rise to nephrons is undefined. Here, we used Cre-mediated recombination to generate mice with Kif3a deficiency targeted to the ureteric and/or metanephric mesenchyme cell lineages in the embryonic kidney. Gradual loss of primary cilia in either lineage leads to a phenotype of reduced nephron number. Remarkably, in addition to cyst formation, loss of primary cilia in the ureteric epithelial cell leads to decreased expression of Wnt11 and Ret and reduced ureteric branching. Constitutive expression of GLI3 repressor (Gli3Δ699/+) rescues these abnormalities. In embryonic metanephric mesenchyme cells, Kif3a deficiency limits survival of nephrogenic progenitor cells and expression of genes required for nephron formation. Together, our data demonstrate that Kif3a controls nephron number via distinct cell lineage-specific mechanisms. PMID:23762375

  2. Nuclear Translocation of MEK1 Triggers a Complex T cell Response through the Co-repressor Silencing Mediator of Retinoid and Thyroid Hormone Receptor (SMRT)

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lei; Chen, Chaoyu; Liang, Qiaoling; Karim, Md. Zunayet; Gorska, Magdalena M.; Alam, Rafeul

    2012-01-01

    MEK1 phosphorylates ERK1/2 and regulates T cell generation, differentiation and function. MEK1 has recently been shown to translocate to the nucleus. Its nuclear function is largely unknown. By studying human CD4 T cells we demonstrate that a low level of MEK1 is present in the nucleus of CD4 T cells under basal conditions. T cell activation further increases the nuclear translocation of MEK1. MEK1 interacts with the nuclear receptor co-repressor SMRT. MEK1 reduces the nuclear level of SMRT in an activation-dependent manner. MEK1 is recruited to the promoter of c-Fos upon TCR stimulation. Conversely, SMRT is bound to the c-Fos promoter under basal conditions and is removed upon TCR stimulation. We examined the role of SMRT in regulation of T cell function. siRNA-mediated knockdown of SMRT results in a biphasic effect on cytokine production. The production of the cytokines—IL2, IL4, IL10 and IFNγ increases in the early phase (8 hr) and then decreases in the late phase (48 hr). The late phase decrease is associated with inhibition of T cell proliferation. The late phase inhibition of T cell activation is, in part, mediated by IL10 that is produced in the early phase, and in part, by β-catenin signaling. Thus, we have identified a novel nuclear function of MEK1. MEK1 triggers a complex pattern of early T cell activation followed by a late inhibition through its interaction with SMRT. This biphasic dual effect likely reflects a homeostatic regulation of T cell function by MEK1. PMID:23225884

  3. DNA Methylation of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Repressor Associations with Cigarette Smoking and Subclinical Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Lindsay M.; Wan, Ma; Ding, Jingzhong; Taylor, Jackson R.; Mstat, Kurt Lohman; Su, Dan; Bennett, Brian D.; Porter, Devin K.; Gimple, Ryan; Pittman, Gary S.; Wang, Xuting; Howard, Timothy D.; Siscovick, David; Psaty, Bruce M.; Shea, Steven; Burke, Gregory L.; Jacobs, David R.; Rich, Stephen S.; Hixson, James E.; Stein, James H.; Stunnenberg, Hendrik; Barr, R. Graham; Kaufman, Joel D.; Post, Wendy S.; Hoeschele, Ina; Herrington, David M.; Bell, Douglas A.; Liu, Yongmei

    2015-01-01

    Background Tobacco smoke contains numerous agonists of the aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway, and activation of the AhR pathway was shown to promote atherosclerosis in mice. Intriguingly, cigarette smoking is most strongly and robustly associated with DNA modifications to an AhR pathway gene, the aryl-hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AHRR). We hypothesized that altered AHRR methylation in monocytes, a cell type sensitive to cigarette smoking and involved in atherogenesis, may be a part of the biological link between cigarette smoking and atherosclerosis. Methods and Results DNA methylation profiles of AHRR in monocytes (542 CpG sites ± 150kb of AHRR, using Illumina 450K array) were integrated with smoking habits and ultrasound-measured carotid plaque scores from 1,256 participants of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Methylation of cg05575921 significantly associated (p = 6.1×10−134) with smoking status (current vs. never). Novel associations between cg05575921 methylation and carotid plaque scores (p = 3.1×10−10) were identified, which remained significant in current and former smokers even after adjusting for self-reported smoking habits, urinary cotinine, and well-known CVD risk factors. This association replicated in an independent cohort using hepatic DNA (n = 141). Functionally, cg05575921 was located in a predicted gene expression regulatory element (enhancer), and had methylation correlated with AHRR mRNA profiles (p = 1.4×10−17) obtained from RNA sequencing conducted on a subset (n = 373) of the samples. Conclusions These findings suggest AHRR methylation may be functionally related to AHRR expression in monocytes, and represents a potential biomarker of subclinical atherosclerosis in smokers. PMID:26307030

  4. p21 as a Transcriptional Co-Repressor of S-Phase and Mitotic Control Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ferrándiz, Nuria; Caraballo, Juan M.; García-Gutierrez, Lucía; Devgan, Vikram; Rodriguez-Paredes, Manuel; Lafita, M. Carmen; Bretones, Gabriel; Quintanilla, Andrea; Muñoz-Alonso, M. Jose; Blanco, Rosa; Reyes, Jose C.; Agell, Neus; Delgado, M. Dolores; Dotto, G. Paolo; León, Javier

    2012-01-01

    It has been previously described that p21 functions not only as a CDK inhibitor but also as a transcriptional co-repressor in some systems. To investigate the roles of p21 in transcriptional control, we studied the gene expression changes in two human cell systems. Using a human leukemia cell line (K562) with inducible p21 expression and human primary keratinocytes with adenoviral-mediated p21 expression, we carried out microarray-based gene expression profiling. We found that p21 rapidly and strongly repressed the mRNA levels of a number of genes involved in cell cycle and mitosis. One of the most strongly down-regulated genes was CCNE2 (cyclin E2 gene). Mutational analysis in K562 cells showed that the N-terminal region of p21 is required for repression of gene expression of CCNE2 and other genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that p21 was bound to human CCNE2 and other p21-repressed genes gene in the vicinity of the transcription start site. Moreover, p21 repressed human CCNE2 promoter-luciferase constructs in K562 cells. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the CDE motif is present in most of the promoters of the p21-regulated genes. Altogether, the results suggest that p21 exerts a repressive effect on a relevant number of genes controlling S phase and mitosis. Thus, p21 activity as inhibitor of cell cycle progression would be mediated not only by the inhibition of CDKs but also by the transcriptional down-regulation of key genes. PMID:22662213

  5. TcNPR3 from Theobroma cacao functions as a repressor of the pathogen defense response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) NON-EXPRESSOR OF PR1 (NPR1) is a transcription coactivator that plays a central role in regulating the transcriptional response to plant pathogens. Developing flowers of homozygous npr3 mutants are dramatically more resistant to infection by the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae, suggesting a role of NPR3 as a repressor of NPR1-mediated defense response with a novel role in flower development. Results We report here the characterization of a putative NPR3 gene from the tropical tree species Theobroma cacao (TcNPR3). Like in Arabidopsis, TcNPR3 was constitutively expressed across a wide range of tissue types and developmental stages but with some differences in relative levels compared to Arabidopsis. To test the function of TcNPR3, we performed transgenic complementation analysis by introducing a constitutively expressing putative TcNPR3 transgene into an Arabidopsis npr3 mutant. TcNPR3 expressing Arabidopsis plants were partially restored to the WT pathogen phenotype (immature flowers susceptible to bacterial infection). To test TcNPR3 function directly in cacao tissues, a synthetic microRNA targeting TcNPR3 mRNA was transiently expressed in cacao leaves using an Agrobacterium-infiltration method. TcNPR3 knock down leaf tissues were dramatically more resistance to infection with Phytophthora capsici in a leaf bioassay, showing smaller lesion sizes and reduced pathogen replication. Conclusions We conclude that TcNPR3 functions similar to the Arabidopsis NPR3 gene in the regulation of the cacao defense response. Since TcNPR3 did not show a perfect complementation of the Arabidopsis NPR3 mutation, the possibility remains that other functions of TcNPR3 remain to be found. This novel knowledge can contribute to the breeding of resistant cacao varieties against pathogens through molecular markers based approaches or biotechnological strategies. PMID:24314063

  6. TcNPR3 from Theobroma cacao functions as a repressor of the pathogen defense response.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zi; Zhang, Yufan; Maximova, Siela N; Guiltinan, Mark J

    2013-12-06

    Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) NON-EXPRESSOR OF PR1 (NPR1) is a transcription coactivator that plays a central role in regulating the transcriptional response to plant pathogens. Developing flowers of homozygous npr3 mutants are dramatically more resistant to infection by the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae, suggesting a role of NPR3 as a repressor of NPR1-mediated defense response with a novel role in flower development. We report here the characterization of a putative NPR3 gene from the tropical tree species Theobroma cacao (TcNPR3). Like in Arabidopsis, TcNPR3 was constitutively expressed across a wide range of tissue types and developmental stages but with some differences in relative levels compared to Arabidopsis. To test the function of TcNPR3, we performed transgenic complementation analysis by introducing a constitutively expressing putative TcNPR3 transgene into an Arabidopsis npr3 mutant. TcNPR3 expressing Arabidopsis plants were partially restored to the WT pathogen phenotype (immature flowers susceptible to bacterial infection). To test TcNPR3 function directly in cacao tissues, a synthetic microRNA targeting TcNPR3 mRNA was transiently expressed in cacao leaves using an Agrobacterium-infiltration method. TcNPR3 knock down leaf tissues were dramatically more resistance to infection with Phytophthora capsici in a leaf bioassay, showing smaller lesion sizes and reduced pathogen replication. We conclude that TcNPR3 functions similar to the Arabidopsis NPR3 gene in the regulation of the cacao defense response. Since TcNPR3 did not show a perfect complementation of the Arabidopsis NPR3 mutation, the possibility remains that other functions of TcNPR3 remain to be found. This novel knowledge can contribute to the breeding of resistant cacao varieties against pathogens through molecular markers based approaches or biotechnological strategies.

  7. Monoamine oxidase A and repressor R1 are involved in apoptotic signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ou, Xiao-Ming; Chen, Kevin; Shih, Jean C

    2006-07-18

    Monoamine oxidase A (MAO A) degrades serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine and produces reactive oxygen that may cause neuronal cell death. We have previously reported that a novel transcription factor R1 (RAM2/CDCA7L/JPO2) inhibits the MAO A promoter and enzymatic activities. This study reports the roles of MAO A and R1 in apoptosis and proliferation. We have found that in serum starvation-induced apoptosis, p38 kinase, MAO A, and caspase-3 were increased, whereas Bcl-2 and R1 were reduced. Using a p38 kinase inhibitor, R1 overexpression, and MAO A inhibitor, we have shown that MAO A and R1 are downstream of p38 kinase and Bcl-2, but upstream of caspase-3. Inhibition of MAO A prevents cell apoptosis. This notion was further supported by the finding that serum starvation-induced apoptosis is reduced in cortical brain cells from MAO A-deficient mice compared with WT. In addition, we found that MAO A and R1 are involved in the c-Myc-induced proliferative signaling pathway in the presence of serum. Immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry experiments indicate that the oncogene c-Myc colocalizes with R1 and induces R1 gene expression. Using R1 overexpression, R1 small interfering RNA, and a MAO A inhibitor, we found that R1 and MAO A act upstream of cyclin D1 and E2F1. In summary, this study demonstrates the functions of MAO A and its repressor R1 in apoptotic signaling pathways.

  8. Backbone dynamics in an intramolecular prolylpeptide-SH3 complex from the diphtheria toxin repressor, DtxR

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Nilakshee; Yi, Myunggi; Zhou, Huan-Xiang; Logan, Timothy M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The diphtheria toxin repressor contains an SH3-like domain that forms an intramolecular complex with a proline-rich (Pr) peptide segment and stabilizes the inactive state of the repressor. Upon activation of DtxR by transition metals, this intramolecular complex must dissociate as the SH3 domain and Pr segment form different interactions in the active repressor. In this study we investigate the dynamics of this intramolecular complex using backbone amide nuclear spin relaxation rates determined using NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics trajectories. The SH3 domain in the unbound and bound states showed typical dynamics in that the secondary structures were fairly ordered with high generalized order parameters and low effective correlation times while residues in the loops connecting β-strands exhibited reduced generalized order parameters and required additional motional terms to adequately model the relaxation rates. Residues forming the Pr segment exhibited low order parameters with internal rotational correlation times on the order of 0.6 – 1 ns. Further analysis showed that the SH3 domain was rich in millisecond timescale motions while the Pr segment was rich in motions on the 100s μs timescale. Molecular dynamics simultations indicated structural rearrangements that may contribute to the observed relaxation rates and, together with the observed relaxation rate data, suggested that the Pr segment exhibits a binding ↔ unbinding equilibrium. The results of this study provide new insights into the nature of the intramolecular complex and provide a better understanding of the biological role of the SH3 domain in regulating DtxR activity. PMID:17976643

  9. Combination of Cyclamen persicum Mill. floral gene promoters and chimeric repressors for the modification of ornamental traits in Torenia fournieri Lind.

    PubMed Central

    Kasajima, Ichiro; Ohtsubo, Norihiro; Sasaki, Katsutomo

    2017-01-01

    Although chimeric repressors such as the Arabidopsis TCP3 repressor are known to have significant effects on flower morphology and color, their cellular-level effects on flower petals are not understood. The promoter sequences of the genes expressed in the flowers of cyclamen, a representative potted flower grown during the winter season, are also unknown. Here, we isolated eight promoters from cyclamen genes that are reportedly expressed in the petals. These promoters were then fused to four chimeric repressors and introduced into the model flower torenia to screen for effective combinations of promoters and repressors for flower breeding. As expected, some of the constructs altered flower phenotypes upon transformation. We further analyzed the effects of chimeric repressors at the cellular level. We observed that complicated petal and leaf serrations were accompanied by excessive vascular branching. Dichromatism in purple anthocyanin was inferred to result in bluish flowers, and imbalanced cell proliferation appeared to result in epinastic flowers. Thus, the genetic constructs and phenotypic changes described in this report will benefit the future breeding and characterization of ornamental flowers. PMID:28446955

  10. Elk-3 is a transcriptional repressor of nitric-oxide synthase 2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Hsu; Layne, Matthew D; Chung, Su Wol; Ejima, Kuniaki; Baron, Rebecca M; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Perrella, Mark A

    2003-10-10

    The inducible isoform of nitric-oxide synthase (NOS2), a key enzyme catalyzing the dramatic increase in nitric oxide by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), plays an important role in the pathophysiology of endotoxemia and sepsis. Recent evidence suggests that Ets transcription factors may contribute to NOS2 induction by inflammatory stimuli. In this study, we investigated the role of Ets transcription factors in the regulation of NOS2 by LPS and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1. Transient transfection assays in macrophages showed that Ets-2 produced an increase in NOS2 promoter activity, whereas the induction by Ets-1 was modest and NERF2 had no effect. Elk-3 (Net/Erp/Sap-2a) markedly repressed NOS2 promoter activity in a dose-dependent fashion, and overexpression of Elk-3 blunted the induction of endogenous NOS2 message. Mutation of the Net inhibitory domain of Elk-3, but not the C-terminal-binding protein interaction domain, partially alleviated this repressive effect. We also found that deletion of the Ets domain of Elk-3 completely abolished its repressive effect on the NOS2 promoter. LPS administration to macrophages led to a dose-dependent decrease in endogenous Elk-3 mRNA levels, and this decrease in Elk-3 preceded the induction of NOS2 mRNA. In a mouse model of endotoxemia, the expression of Elk-3 in kidney, lung, and heart was significantly down-regulated after systemic administration of LPS, and this down-regulation also preceded NOS2 induction. Moreover, TGF-beta 1 significantly increased endogenous Elk-3 mRNA levels that had been down-regulated by LPS in macrophages. This increase in Elk-3 correlated with a TGF-beta 1-induced down-regulation of NOS2. Taken together, our data suggest that Elk-3 is a strong repressor of NOS2 promoter activity and mRNA levels and that endogenous expression of Elk-3 inversely correlates with NOS2. Thus, Elk-3 may serve as an important mediator of NOS2 gene expression.

  11. PdhR, the pyruvate dehydrogenase repressor, does not regulate lipoic acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Youjun; Cronan, John E

    2014-01-01

    Lipoic acid is a covalently-bound enzyme cofactor required for central metabolism all three domains of life. In the last 20 years the pathway of lipoic acid synthesis and metabolism has been established in Escherichia coli. Expression of the genes of the lipoic acid biosynthesis pathway was believed to be constitutive. However, in 2010 Kaleta and coworkers (BMC Syst. Biol. 4:116) predicted a binding site for the pyruvate dehydrogenase operon repressor, PdhR (referred to lipA site 1) upstream of lipA, the gene encoding lipoic acid synthase and concluded that PdhR regulates lipA transcription. We report in vivo and in vitro evidence that lipA is not controlled by PdhR and that the putative regulatory site deduced by the prior workers is nonfunctional and physiologically irrelevant. E. coli PdhR was purified to homogeneity and used for electrophoretic mobility shift assays. The lipA site 1 of Kaleta and coworkers failed to bind PdhR. The binding detected by these workers is due to another site (lipA site 3) located far upstream of the lipA promoter. Relative to the canonical PdhR binding site lipA site 3 is a half-palindrome and as expected had only weak PdhR binding ability. Manipulation of lipA site 3 to construct a palindrome gave significantly enhanced PdhR binding affinity. The native lipA promoter and the version carrying the artificial lipA3 palindrome were transcriptionally fused to a LacZ reporter gene to directly assay lipA expression. Deletion of pdhR gave no significant change in lipA promoter-driven β-galactosidase activity with either the native or constructed palindrome upstream sequences, indicating that PdhR plays no physiological role in regulation of lipA expression. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Covalent attachment of Arc repressor subunits by a peptide linker enhances affinity for operator DNA.

    PubMed

    Robinson, C R; Sauer, R T

    1996-01-09

    By designing a recombinant gene containing tandem copies of the arc coding sequence with intervening DNA encoding the linker sequence GGGSGGGTGGGSGGG, the two subunits of the P22 Are repressor dimer have been covalently linked to form a single-chain protein called Arc-L1-Arc. The 15-residue linker joins the C-terminus of one monomer to the N-terminus of the second, a distance of approximately 45 A in the Arc-operator cocrystal structure. Arc-L1-Arc is expressed at high levels in Escherichia coli, with no evidence of degradation or proteolytic clipping of the linker, and is more active than wild-type Arc in repression assays. The purified Arc-L1-Arc protein has the molecular weight expected for the designed protein and unfolds cooperatively, reversibly, and with no concentration dependence in thermal-denaturation studies. Arc-L1-Arc protects operator DNA in a manner indistinguishable from that of wild-type Arc in DNase I and copper-phenanthroline footprinting studies, but the covalent attachment of the two monomers results in enhanced affinity for operator DNA. Arc-L1-Arc binds operator DNA half-maximally at a concentration of 1.7 pM, compared with the wild-type value of 185 pM, and also binds DNA fragments containing the left or right operator half-sites more tightly than wild type. Because wild-type Arc is monomeric at sub-nanomolar concentrations and must dimerize before binding to the operator, it was anticipated that Arc-L1-Arc would exhibit a lower half-maximal binding concentration. However, even when the change from a monomeric to a dimeric species is taken into account, the affinity of Arc-L1-Arc for operator and half-operator DNA is greater than the wild-type affinity. This tighter binding appears to result from slower dissociation, as Arc-L1-Arc DNA complexes with full or half-site operators dissociate at rates 5-10 times slower than the corresponding Arc--DNA complexes. Hence, the activity of the designed Arc-L1-Arc protein is substantially increased

  13. The influence of repressor DNA binding site architecture on transcriptional control.

    PubMed

    Park, Dan M; Kiley, Patricia J

    2014-08-26

    How the architecture of DNA binding sites dictates the extent of repression of promoters is not well understood. Here, we addressed the importance of the number and information content of the three direct repeats (DRs) in the binding and repression of the icdA promoter by the phosphorylated form of the global Escherichia coli repressor ArcA (ArcA-P). We show that decreasing the information content of the two sites with the highest information (DR1 and DR2) eliminated ArcA binding to all three DRs and ArcA repression of icdA. Unexpectedly, we also found that DR3 occupancy functions principally in repression, since mutation of this low-information-content site both eliminated DNA binding to DR3 and significantly weakened icdA repression, despite the fact that binding to DR1 and DR2 was intact. In addition, increasing the information content of any one of the three DRs or addition of a fourth DR increased ArcA-dependent repression but perturbed signal-dependent regulation of repression. Thus, our data show that the information content and number of DR elements are critical architectural features for maintaining a balance between high-affinity binding and signal-dependent regulation of icdA promoter function in response to changes in ArcA-P levels. Optimization of such architectural features may be a common strategy to either dampen or enhance the sensitivity of DNA binding among the members of the large OmpR/PhoB family of regulators as well as other transcription factors. In Escherichia coli, the response regulator ArcA maintains homeostasis of redox carriers under O2-limiting conditions through a comprehensive repression of carbon oxidation pathways that require aerobic respiration to recycle redox carriers. Although a binding site architecture comprised of a variable number of sequence recognition elements has been identified within the promoter regions of ArcA-repressed operons, it is unclear how this variable architecture dictates transcriptional regulation. By

  14. Drought-Up-Regulated TaNAC69-1 is a Transcriptional Repressor of TaSHY2 and TaIAA7, and Enhances Root Length and Biomass in Wheat.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dandan; Richardson, Terese; Chai, Shoucheng; Lynne McIntyre, C; Rae, Anne L; Xue, Gang-Ping

    2016-10-01

    A well-known physiological adaptation process of plants encountering drying soil is to achieve water balance by reducing shoot growth and maintaining or promoting root elongation, but little is known about the molecular basis of this process. This study investigated the role of a drought-up-regulated Triticum aestivum NAC69-1 (TaNAC69-1) in the modulation of root growth in wheat. TaNAC69-1 was predominantly expressed in wheat roots at the early vegetative stage. Overexpression of TaNAC69-1 in wheat roots using OsRSP3 (essentially root-specific) and OsPIP2;3 (root-predominant) promoters resulted in enhanced primary seminal root length and a marked increase in maturity root biomass. Competitive growth analysis under water-limited conditions showed that OsRSP3 promoter-driven TaNAC69-1 transgenic lines produced 32% and 35% more above-ground biomass and grains than wild-type plants, respectively. TaNAC69-1 overexpression in the roots down-regulated the expression of TaSHY2 and TaIAA7, which are from the auxin/IAA (Aux/IAA) transcriptional repressor gene family and are the homologs of negative root growth regulators SHY2/IAA3 and IAA7 in Arabidopsis. The expression of TaSHY2 and TaIAA7 in roots was down-regulated by drought stress and up-regulated by cytokinin treatment, which inhibited root growth. DNA binding and transient expression analyses revealed that TaNAC69-1 bound to the promoters of TaSHY2 and TaIAA7, acted as a transcriptional repressor and repressed the expression of reporter genes driven by the TaSHY2 or TaIAA7 promoter. These data suggest that TaNAC69-1 is a transcriptional repressor of TaSHY2 and TaIAA7 homologous to Arabidopsis negative root growth regulators and is likely to be involved in promoting root elongation in drying soil. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Murine T-box transcription factor Tbx20 acts as a repressor during heart development, and is essential for adult heart integrity, function and adaptation.

    PubMed

    Stennard, Fiona A; Costa, Mauro W; Lai, Donna; Biben, Christine; Furtado, Milena B; Solloway, Mark J; McCulley, David J; Leimena, Christiana; Preis, Jost I; Dunwoodie, Sally L; Elliott, David E; Prall, Owen W J; Black, Brian L; Fatkin, Diane; Harvey, Richard P

    2005-05-01

    The genetic hierarchies guiding lineage specification and morphogenesis of the mammalian embryonic heart are poorly understood. We now show by gene targeting that murine T-box transcription factor Tbx20 plays a central role in these pathways, and has important activities in both cardiac development and adult function. Loss of Tbx20 results in death of embryos at mid-gestation with grossly abnormal heart morphogenesis. Underlying these disturbances was a severely compromised cardiac transcriptional program, defects in the molecular pre-pattern, reduced expansion of cardiac progenitors and a block to chamber differentiation. Notably, Tbx20-null embryos showed ectopic activation of Tbx2 across the whole heart myogenic field. Tbx2 encodes a transcriptional repressor normally expressed in non-chamber myocardium, and in the atrioventricular canal it has been proposed to inhibit chamber-specific gene expression through competition with positive factor Tbx5. Our data demonstrate a repressive activity for Tbx20 and place it upstream of Tbx2 in the cardiac genetic program. Thus, hierarchical, repressive interactions between Tbx20 and other T-box genes and factors underlie the primary lineage split into chamber and non-chamber myocardium in the forming heart, an early event upon which all subsequent morphogenesis depends. Additional roles for Tbx20 in adult heart integrity and contractile function were revealed by in-vivo cardiac functional analysis of Tbx20 heterozygous mutant mice. These data suggest that mutations in human cardiac transcription factor genes, possibly including TBX20, underlie both congenital heart disease and adult cardiomyopathies.

  16. Human MI-ER1 Alpha and Beta Function as Transcriptional Repressors by Recruitment of Histone Deacetylase 1 to Their Conserved ELM2 Domain

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhihu; Gillespie, Laura L.; Paterno, Gary D.

    2003-01-01

    mi-er1 (previously called er1) was first isolated from Xenopus laevis embryonic cells as a novel fibroblast growth factor-regulated immediate-early gene. Xmi-er1 was shown to encode a nuclear protein with an N-terminal acidic transcription activation domain. The human orthologue of mi-er1 (hmi-er1) displays 91% similarity to the Xenopus sequence at the amino acid level and was shown to be upregulated in breast carcinoma cell lines and tumors. Alternative splicing at the 3′ end of hmi-er1 produces two major isoforms, hMI-ER1α and hMI-ER1β, which contain distinct C-terminal domains. In this study, we investigated the role of hMI-ER1α and hMI-ER1β in the regulation of transcription. Using fusion proteins of hMI-ER1α or hMI-ER1β tethered to the GAL4 DNA binding domain, we show that both isoforms, when recruited to the G5tkCAT minimal promoter, function to repress transcription. We demonstrate that this repressor activity is due to interaction and recruitment of a trichostatin A-sensitive histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1). Furthermore, deletion analysis revealed that recruitment of HDAC1 to hMI-ER1α and hMI-ER1β occurs through their common ELM2 domain. The ELM2 domain was first described in the Caenorhabditis elegans Egl-27 protein and is present in a number of SANT domain-containing transcription factors. This is the first report of a function for the ELM2 domain, highlighting its role in the regulation of transcription. PMID:12482978

  17. Human MI-ER1 alpha and beta function as transcriptional repressors by recruitment of histone deacetylase 1 to their conserved ELM2 domain.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhihu; Gillespie, Laura L; Paterno, Gary D

    2003-01-01

    mi-er1 (previously called er1) was first isolated from Xenopus laevis embryonic cells as a novel fibroblast growth factor-regulated immediate-early gene. Xmi-er1 was shown to encode a nuclear protein with an N-terminal acidic transcription activation domain. The human orthologue of mi-er1 (hmi-er1) displays 91% similarity to the Xenopus sequence at the amino acid level and was shown to be upregulated in breast carcinoma cell lines and tumors. Alternative splicing at the 3' end of hmi-er1 produces two major isoforms, hMI-ER1alpha and hMI-ER1beta, which contain distinct C-terminal domains. In this study, we investigated the role of hMI-ER1alpha and hMI-ER1beta in the regulation of transcription. Using fusion proteins of hMI-ER1alpha or hMI-ER1beta tethered to the GAL4 DNA binding domain, we show that both isoforms, when recruited to the G5tkCAT minimal promoter, function to repress transcription. We demonstrate that this repressor activity is due to interaction and recruitment of a trichostatin A-sensitive histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1). Furthermore, deletion analysis revealed that recruitment of HDAC1 to hMI-ER1alpha and hMI-ER1beta occurs through their common ELM2 domain. The ELM2 domain was first described in the Caenorhabditis elegans Egl-27 protein and is present in a number of SANT domain-containing transcription factors. This is the first report of a function for the ELM2 domain, highlighting its role in the regulation of transcription.

  18. O-GlcNAcylation of master growth repressor DELLA by SECRET AGENT modulates multiple signaling pathways in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zentella, Rodolfo; Hu, Jianhong; Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Matsumoto, Peter A.; Dawdy, Andrew; Barnhill, Benjamin; Oldenhof, Harriëtte; Hartweck, Lynn M.; Maitra, Sushmit; Thomas, Stephen G.; Cockrell, Shelley; Boyce, Michael; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F.; Olszewski, Neil E.; Sun, Tai-ping

    2016-01-01

    The DELLA family of transcription regulators functions as master growth repressors in plants by inhibiting phytohormone gibberellin (GA) signaling in response to developmental and environmental cues. DELLAs also play a central role in mediating cross-talk between GA and other signaling pathways via antagonistic direct interactions with key transcription factors. However, how these crucial protein–protein interactions can be dynamically regulated during plant development remains unclear. Here, we show that DELLAs are modified by the O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) transferase (OGT) SECRET AGENT (SEC) in Arabidopsis. O-GlcNAcylation of the DELLA protein REPRESSOR OF ga1-3 (RGA) inhibits RGA binding to four of its interactors—PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR3 (PIF3), PIF4, JASMONATE-ZIM DOMAIN1, and BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT1 (BZR1)—that are key regulators in light, jasmonate, and brassinosteroid signaling pathways, respectively. Consistent with this, the sec-null mutant displayed reduced responses to GA and brassinosteroid and showed decreased expression of several common target genes of DELLAs, BZR1, and PIFs. Our results reveal a direct role of OGT in repressing DELLA activity and indicate that O-GlcNAcylation of DELLAs provides a fine-tuning mechanism in coordinating multiple signaling activities during plant development. PMID:26773002

  19. The CsoR-like sulfurtransferase repressor (CstR) is a persulfide sensor in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Luebke, Justin L; Shen, Jiangchuan; Bruce, Kevin E; Kehl-Fie, Thomas E; Peng, Hui; Skaar, Eric P; Giedroc, David P

    2014-12-01

    How cells regulate the bioavailability of utilizable sulfur while mitigating the effects of hydrogen sulfide toxicity is poorly understood. CstR [Copper-sensing operon repressor (CsoR)-like sulfurtransferase repressor] represses the expression of the cst operon encoding a putative sulfide oxidation system in Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we show that the cst operon is strongly and transiently induced by cellular sulfide stress in an acute phase and specific response and that cst-encoded genes are necessary to mitigate the effects of sulfide toxicity. Growth defects are most pronounced when S. aureus is cultured in chemically defined media with thiosulfate (TS) as a sole sulfur source, but are also apparent when cystine is used or in rich media. Under TS growth conditions, cells fail to grow as a result of either unregulated expression of the cst operon in a ΔcstR strain or transformation with a non-inducible C31A/C60A CstR that blocks cst induction. This suggests that the cst operon contributes to cellular sulfide homeostasis. Tandem high-resolution mass spectrometry reveals derivatization of CstR by both inorganic tetrasulfide and an organic persulfide, glutathione persulfide, to yield a mixture of Cys31-Cys60' interprotomer cross-links, including di-, tri- and tetrasulfide bonds, which allosterically inhibit cst operator DNA binding by CstR. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The CsoR-like sulfurtransferase repressor (CstR) is a persulfide sensor in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Luebke, Justin L.; Shen, Jiangchuan; Bruce, Kevin E.; Kehl-Fie, Thomas E.; Peng, Hui; Skaar, Eric P.; Giedroc, David P.

    2014-01-01

    How cells regulate the bioavailability of utilizable sulfur while mitigating the effects of hydrogen sulfide toxicity is poorly understood. CstR (Copper-sensing operon repressor (CsoR)-like sulfurtransferase repressor) represses the expression of the cst operon encoding a putative sulfide oxidation system in Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we show that the cst operon is strongly and transiently induced by cellular sulfide stress in an acute phase and specific response and that cst-encoded genes are necessary to mitigate the effects of sulfide toxicity. Growth defects are most pronounced when S. aureus is cultured in chemically defined media with thiosulfate (TS) as a sole sulfur source, but are also apparent when cystine is used or in rich media. Under TS growth conditions, cells fail to grow as a result of either unregulated expression of the cst operon in a ΔcstR strain or transformation with a non-inducible C31A/C60A CstR that blocks cst induction. This suggests that the cst operon contributes to cellular sulfide homeostasis. Tandem high resolution mass spectrometry reveals derivatization of CstR by both inorganic tetrasulfide and an organic persulfide, glutathione persulfide, to yield a mixture of Cys31-Cys60’ interprotomer crosslinks, including di-, tri- and tetrasulfide bonds, which allosterically inhibit cst operator DNA binding by CstR. PMID:25318663

  1. O-GlcNAcylation of master growth repressor DELLA by SECRET AGENT modulates multiple signaling pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zentella, Rodolfo; Hu, Jianhong; Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Matsumoto, Peter A; Dawdy, Andrew; Barnhill, Benjamin; Oldenhof, Harriëtte; Hartweck, Lynn M; Maitra, Sushmit; Thomas, Stephen G; Cockrell, Shelley; Boyce, Michael; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F; Olszewski, Neil E; Sun, Tai-Ping

    2016-01-15

    The DELLA family of transcription regulators functions as master growth repressors in plants by inhibiting phytohormone gibberellin (GA) signaling in response to developmental and environmental cues. DELLAs also play a central role in mediating cross-talk between GA and other signaling pathways via antagonistic direct interactions with key transcription factors. However, how these crucial protein-protein interactions can be dynamically regulated during plant development remains unclear. Here, we show that DELLAs are modified by the O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) transferase (OGT) SECRET AGENT (SEC) in Arabidopsis. O-GlcNAcylation of the DELLA protein REPRESSOR OF ga1-3 (RGA) inhibits RGA binding to four of its interactors-PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR3 (PIF3), PIF4, JASMONATE-ZIM DOMAIN1, and BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT1 (BZR1)-that are key regulators in light, jasmonate, and brassinosteroid signaling pathways, respectively. Consistent with this, the sec-null mutant displayed reduced responses to GA and brassinosteroid and showed decreased expression of several common target genes of DELLAs, BZR1, and PIFs. Our results reveal a direct role of OGT in repressing DELLA activity and indicate that O-GlcNAcylation of DELLAs provides a fine-tuning mechanism in coordinating multiple signaling activities during plant development. © 2016 Zentella et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of trp-repressor/operator complex: analysis of hydrogen bond patterns of protein DNA interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suenaga, A.; Yatsu, C.; Komeiji, Y.; Uebayasi, M.; Meguro, T.; Yamato, I.

    2000-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation of Escherichia colitrp-repressor/operator complex was performed to elucidate protein-DNA interactions in solution for 800 ps on special-purpose computer MD-GRAPE. The Ewald summation method was employed to treat the electrostatic interaction without cutoff. DNA kept stable conformation in comparison with the result of the conventional cutoff method. Thus, the trajectories obtained were used to analyze the protein-DNA interaction and to understand the role of dynamics of water molecules forming sequence specific recognition interface. The dynamical cross-correlation map showed a significant positive correlation between the helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motifs and the major grooves of operator DNA. The extensive contact surface was stable during the simulation. Most of the contacts consisted of direct interactions between phosphates of DNA and the protein, but several water-mediated polar contacts were also observed. These water-mediated interactions, which were also seen in the crystal structure (Z. Otwinowski, et al., Nature, 335 (1998) 321) emerged spontaneously from the randomized initial configuration of the solvent. This result suggests the importance of the water-mediated interaction in specific recognition of DNA by the trp-repressor, consistent with X-ray structural information.

  3. A chimeric repressor of petunia PH4 R2R3-MYB family transcription factor generates margined flowers in torenia.

    PubMed

    Kasajima, Ichiro; Sasaki, Katsutomo

    2016-05-03

    The development of new phenotypes is key to the commercial development of the main floricultural species and cultivars. Important new phenotypes include features such as multiple-flowers, color variations, increased flower size, new petal shapes, variegation and distinctive petal margin colourations. Although their commercial use is not yet common, the transgenic technologies provide a potentially rapid means of generating interesting new phenotypes. In this report, we construct 5 vectors which we expected to change the color of the flower anthocyanins, from purple to blue, regulating vacuolar pH. When these constructs were transformed into purple torenia, we unexpectedly recovered some genotypes having slightly margined petals. These transgenic lines expressed a chimeric repressor of the petunia PhPH4 gene under the control of Cauliflower mosaic virus 35 S RNA promoter. PhPH4 is an R2R3-type MYB transcription factor. The transgenic lines lacked pigmentation in the petal margin cells both on the adaxial and abaxial surfaces. Expressions of Flavanone 3-hydroxylase (F3H), Flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H) and Flavonoid 3'5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H) genes were reduced in the margins of these transgenic lines, suggesting an inhibitory effect of PhPH4 repressor on anthocyanin synthesis.

  4. A Set of Activators and Repressors Control Peripheral Glucose Pathways in Pseudomonas putida To Yield a Common Central Intermediate▿

    PubMed Central

    del Castillo, Teresa; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan L.

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 channels glucose to the central Entner-Doudoroff intermediate 6-phosphogluconate through three convergent pathways. The genes for these convergent pathways are clustered in three independent regions on the host chromosome. A number of monocistronic units and operons coexist within each of these clusters, favoring coexpression of catabolic enzymes and transport systems. Expression of the three pathways is mediated by three transcriptional repressors, HexR, GnuR, and PtxS, and by a positive transcriptional regulator, GltR-2. In this study, we generated mutants in each of the regulators and carried out transcriptional assays using microarrays and transcriptional fusions. These studies revealed that HexR controls the genes that encode glucokinase/glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase that yield 6-phosphogluconate; the genes for the Entner-Doudoroff enzymes that yield glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and pyruvate; and gap-1, which encodes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. GltR-2 is the transcriptional regulator that controls specific porins for the entry of glucose into the periplasmic space, as well as the gtsABCD operon for glucose transport through the inner membrane. GnuR is the repressor of gluconate transport and gluconokinase responsible for the conversion of gluconate into 6-phosphogluconate. PtxS, however, controls the enzymes for oxidation of gluconate to 2-ketogluconate, its transport and metabolism, and a set of genes unrelated to glucose metabolism. PMID:18245293

  5. Structure of the effector-binding domain of the arabinose repressor AraR from Bacillus subtilis

    SciT

    Procházková, Kateřina; Čermáková, Kateřina; Pachl, Petr

    2012-02-01

    The crystal structure of the effector-binding domain of the transcriptional repressor AraR from B. subtilis in complex with the effector molecule (l-arabinose) was determined at 2.2 Å resolution. A detailed analysis of the crystal identified a dimer organization that is distinctive from that of other members of the GalR/LacI family. In Bacillus subtilis, the arabinose repressor AraR negatively controls the expression of genes in the metabolic pathway of arabinose-containing polysaccharides. The protein is composed of two domains of different phylogenetic origin and function: an N-terminal DNA-binding domain belonging to the GntR family and a C-terminal effector-binding domain that shows similaritymore » to members of the GalR/LacI family. The crystal structure of the C-terminal effector-binding domain of AraR in complex with the effector l-arabinose has been determined at 2.2 Å resolution. The l-arabinose binding affinity was characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry and differential scanning fluorimetry; the K{sub d} value was 8.4 ± 0.4 µM. The effect of l-arabinose on the protein oligomeric state was investigated in solution and detailed analysis of the crystal identified a dimer organization which is distinctive from that of other members of the GalR/LacI family.« less

  6. TGF-{beta} signals the formation of a unique NF1/Smad4-dependent transcription repressor-complex in human diploid fibroblasts

    SciT

    Luciakova, Katarina, E-mail: katarina.luciakova@savba.sk; Kollarovic, Gabriel; Kretova, Miroslava

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} TGF-{beta} induces the formation of unique nuclear NF1/Smad4 complexes that repress expression of the ANT-2 gene. {yields} Repression is mediated through an NF1-dependent repressor element in the promoter. {yields} The formation of NF1/Smad4 complexes and the repression of ANT2 are prevented by inhibitors of p38 kinase and TGF-{beta} RI. {yields} NF1/Smad complexes implicate novel role for NF1 and Smad proteins in the regulation of growth. -- Abstract: We earlier reported the formation of a unique nuclear NF1/Smad complex in serum-restricted fibroblasts that acts as an NF1-dependent repressor of the human adenine nucleotide translocase-2 gene (ANT2) [K. Luciakova, G.more » Kollarovic, P. Barath, B.D. Nelson, Growth-dependent repression of human adenine nucleotide translocator-2 (ANT2) transcription: evidence for the participation of Smad and Sp family proteins in the NF1-dependent repressor complex, Biochem. J. 412 (2008) 123-130]. In the present study, we show that TGF-{beta}, like serum-restriction: (a) induces the formation of NF1/Smad repressor complexes, (b) increases binding of the complexes to the repressor elements (Go elements) in the ANT2 promoter, and (c) inhibits ANT2 expression. Repression of ANT2 by TGF-{beta} is eliminated by mutating the NF1 binding sites in the Go repressor elements. All of the above responses to TGF-{beta} are prevented by inhibitors of TGF-{beta} RI and MAPK p38. These inhibitors also prevent NF1/Smad4 repressor complex formation and repression of ANT2 expression in serum-restricted cells, suggesting that similar signaling pathways are initiated by TGF-{beta} and serum-restriction. The present finding that NF1/Smad4 repressor complexes are formed through TGF-{beta} signaling pathways suggests a new, but much broader, role for these complexes in the initiation or maintenance of the growth-inhibited state.« less

  7. Purification and DNA binding properties of the blaI gene product, repressor for the beta-lactamase gene, blaP, of Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, M J; Lampen, J O

    1987-01-01

    The location of the repressor gene, blaI, for the beta-lactamase gene blaP of Bacillus licheniformis 749, on the 5' side of blaP, was confirmed by sequencing the bla region of the constitutive mutant 749/C. An amber stop codon, likely to result in a nonfunctional truncated repressor, was found at codon 32 of the 128 codon blaI open reading frame (ORF) located 5' to blaP. In order to study the DNA binding activity of the repressor, the structural gene for blaI, from strain 749, with its ribosome binding site was expressed using a two plasmid T7 RNA polymerase/promotor system (S. Tabor and C. C. Richardson. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 82, 1074-1078 (1985). Heat induction of this system in Escherichia coli K38 resulted in the production of BlaI as 5-10% of the soluble cell protein. Repressor protein was then purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation and cation exchange chromatography. The sequence of the N-terminal 28 amino acid residues was determined and was as predicted from the DNA. Binding of BlaI to DNA was detected by the slower migration of protein DNA complexes during polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. BlaI was shown to selectively bind DNA fragments carrying the promoter regions of blaI and blaP. Images PMID:3498148

  8. λ-Repressor Oligomerization Kinetics at High Concentrations Using Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy in Zero-Mode Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Samiee, K. T.; Foquet, M.; Guo, L.; Cox, E. C.; Craighead, H. G.

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) has demonstrated its utility for measuring transport properties and kinetics at low fluorophore concentrations. In this article, we demonstrate that simple optical nanostructures, known as zero-mode waveguides, can be used to significantly reduce the FCS observation volume. This, in turn, allows FCS to be applied to solutions with significantly higher fluorophore concentrations. We derive an empirical FCS model accounting for one-dimensional diffusion in a finite tube with a simple exponential observation profile. This technique is used to measure the oligomerization of the bacteriophage λ repressor protein at micromolar concentrations. The results agree with previous studies utilizing conventional techniques. Additionally, we demonstrate that the zero-mode waveguides can be used to assay biological activity by measuring changes in diffusion constant as a result of ligand binding. PMID:15613638

  9. Pseudomonas syringae Type III Effector HopBB1 Promotes Host Transcriptional Repressor Degradation to Regulate Phytohormone Responses and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Teixeira, Paulo José Pereira Lima; Biswas, Surojit; Finkel, Omri M; He, Yijian; Salas-Gonzalez, Isai; English, Marie E; Epple, Petra; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Dangl, Jeffery L

    2017-02-08

    Independently evolved pathogen effectors from three branches of life (ascomycete, eubacteria, and oomycete) converge onto the Arabidopsis TCP14 transcription factor to manipulate host defense. However, the mechanistic basis for defense control via TCP14 regulation is unknown. We demonstrate that TCP14 regulates the plant immune system by transcriptionally repressing a subset of the jasmonic acid (JA) hormone signaling outputs. A previously unstudied Pseudomonas syringae (Psy) type III effector, HopBB1, interacts with TCP14 and targets it to the SCF COI1 degradation complex by connecting it to the JA signaling repressor JAZ3. Consequently, HopBB1 de-represses the TCP14-regulated subset of JA response genes and promotes pathogen virulence. Thus, HopBB1 fine-tunes host phytohormone crosstalk by precisely manipulating part of the JA regulon to avoid pleiotropic host responses while promoting pathogen proliferation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Expression of a repressor form of the Arabidopsis thaliana transcription factor TCP16 induces the formation of ectopic meristems.

    PubMed

    Uberti-Manassero, Nora G; Coscueta, Ezequiel R; Gonzalez, Daniel H

    2016-11-01

    Plants that express a fusion of the Arabidopsis thaliana class I TCP transcription factor TCP16 to the EAR repressor domain develop several phenotypic alterations, including rounder leaves, short petioles and pedicels, and delayed elongation of sepals, petals and anthers. In addition, these plants develop lobed cotyledons and ectopic meristems. Ectopic meristems are formed on the adaxial side of cotyledon petioles and arise from a cleft that is formed at this site. Analysis of the expression of reporter genes indicated that meristem genes are reactivated at the site of emergence of ectopic meristems, located near the bifurcation of cotyledon veins. The plants also show increased transcript levels of the boundary-specific CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON (CUC) genes. The results suggest that TCP16 is able to modulate the induction of meristematic programs and the differentiation state of plant cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Adaptor proteins GIR1 and GIR2. I. Interaction with the repressor GLABRA2 and regulation of root hair development.

    PubMed

    Wu, Renhong; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2017-07-01

    Plants use specialized root outgrowths, termed root hairs, to enhance acquisition of nutrients and water, help secure anchorage, and facilitate interactions with soil microbiome. One of the major regulators of this process is GLABRA2 (GL2), a transcriptional repressor of root hair differentiation. However, regulation of the GL2-function is relatively well characterized, it remains completely unknown whether GL2 itself functions in complex with other transcriptional regulators. We identified GIR1 and GIR2, a plant-specific two-member family of closely related proteins that interact with GL2. Loss-of-function mutants of GIR1 and GIR2 enhanced development of root hair whereas gain-of-function mutants repressed it. Thus, GIR1 and GIR2 might function as adaptor proteins that associate with GL2 and participate in control of root hair formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Replication initiator protein RepE of mini-F plasmid: functional differentiation between monomers (initiator) and dimers (autogenous repressor).

    PubMed Central

    Ishiai, M; Wada, C; Kawasaki, Y; Yura, T

    1994-01-01

    Replication of mini-F plasmid requires the plasmid-encoded RepE initiator protein and several host factors including DnaJ, DnaK, and GrpE, heat shock proteins of Escherichia coli. The RepE protein plays a crucial role in replication and exhibits two major functions: initiation of replication from the origin, ori2, and autogenous repression of repE transcription. One of the mini-F plasmid mutants that can replicate in the dnaJ-defective host produces an altered RepE (RepE54) with a markedly enhanced initiator activity but little or no repressor activity. RepE54 has been purified from cell extracts primarily in monomeric form, unlike the wild-type RepE that is recovered in dimeric form. Gel-retardation assays revealed that RepE54 monomers bind to ori2 (direct repeats) with a very high efficiency but hardly bind to the repE operator (inverted repeat), in accordance with the properties of RepE54 in vivo. Furthermore, the treatment of wild-type RepE dimers with protein denaturants enhanced their binding to ori2 but reduced binding to the operator: RepE dimers were partially converted to monomers, and the ori2 binding activity was uniquely associated with monomers. These results strongly suggest that RepE monomers represent an active form by binding to ori2 to initiate replication, whereas dimers act as an autogenous repressor by binding to the operator. We propose that RepE is structurally and functionally differentiated and that monomerization of RepE dimers, presumably mediated by heat shock protein(s), activates the initiator function and participates in regulation of mini-F DNA replication. Images PMID:8170998

  13. Sp1 is a transcription repressor to stanniocalcin-1 expression in TSA-treated human colon cancer cells, HT29.

    PubMed

    Law, Alice Y S; Yeung, B H Y; Ching, L Y; Wong, Chris K C

    2011-08-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that, stanniocalcin-1 (STC1) was a target of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and was involved in trichostatin A (TSA) induced apoptosis in the human colon cancer cells, HT29. In this study, we reported that the transcriptional factor, specificity protein 1 (Sp1) in association with retinoblastoma (Rb) repressed STC1 gene transcription in TSA-treated HT29 cells. Our data demonstrated that, a co-treatment of the cells with TSA and Sp1 inhibitor, mithramycin A (MTM) led to a marked synergistic induction of STC1 transcript levels, STC1 promoter (1 kb)-driven luciferase activity and an increase of apoptotic cell population. The knockdown of Sp1 gene expression in TSA treated cells, revealed the repressor role of Sp1 in STC1 transcription. Using a protein phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid (OKA), an increase of Sp1 hyperphosphorylation and so a reduction of its transcriptional activity, led to a significant induction of STC1 gene expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay revealed that Sp1 binding on STC1 proximal promoter in TSA treated cells. The binding of Sp1 to STC1 promoter was abolished by the co-treatment of MTM or OKA in TSA-treated cells. Re-ChIP assay illustrated that Sp1-mediated inhibition of STC1 transcription was associated with the recruitment of another repressor molecule, Rb. Collectively our findings identify STC1 is a downstream target of Sp1. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Kcnip1 a Ca²⁺-dependent transcriptional repressor regulates the size of the neural plate in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Néant, Isabelle; Mellström, Britt; Gonzalez, Paz; Naranjo, Jose R; Moreau, Marc; Leclerc, Catherine

    2015-09-01

    In amphibian embryos, our previous work has demonstrated that calcium transients occurring in the dorsal ectoderm at the onset of gastrulation are necessary and sufficient to engage the ectodermal cells into a neural fate by inducing neural specific genes. Some of these genes are direct targets of calcium. Here we search for a direct transcriptional mechanism by which calcium signals are acting. The only known mechanism responsible for a direct action of calcium on gene transcription involves an EF-hand Ca²⁺ binding protein which belongs to a group of four proteins (Kcnip1 to 4). Kcnip protein can act in a Ca²⁺-dependent manner as a transcriptional repressor by binding to a specific DNA sequence, the Downstream Regulatory Element (DRE) site. In Xenopus, among the four kcnips, we show that only kcnip1 is timely and spatially present in the presumptive neural territories and is able to bind DRE sites in a Ca²⁺-dependent manner. The loss of function of kcnip1 results in the expansion of the neural plate through an increased proliferation of neural progenitors. Later on, this leads to an impairment in the development of anterior neural structures. We propose that, in the embryo, at the onset of neurogenesis Kcnip1 is the Ca²⁺-dependent transcriptional repressor that controls the size of the neural plate. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. An oocyte-specific ELAVL2 isoform is a translational repressor ablated from meiotically competent antral oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chalupnikova, Katerina; Solc, Petr; Sulimenko, Vadym; Sedlacek, Radislav; Svoboda, Petr

    2014-01-01

    At the end of the growth phase, mouse antral follicle oocytes acquire full developmental competence. In the mouse, this event is marked by the transition from the so-called non-surrounded nucleolus (NSN) chromatin configuration into the transcriptionally quiescent surrounded nucleolus (SN) configuration, which is named after a prominent perinucleolar condensed chromatin ring. However, the SN chromatin configuration alone is not sufficient for determining the developmental competence of the SN oocyte. There are additional nuclear and cytoplamic factors involved, while a little is known about the changes occurring in the cytoplasm during the NSN/SN transition. Here, we report functional analysis of maternal ELAVL2 an AU-rich element binding protein. Elavl2 gene encodes an oocyte-specific protein isoform (denoted ELAVL2°), which acts as a translational repressor. ELAVL2° is abundant in fully grown NSN oocytes, is ablated during the NSN/SN transition and remains low during the oocyte-to-embryo transition (OET). ELAVL2° overexpression during meiotic maturation causes errors in chromosome segregation, indicating the significance of naturally reduced ELAVL2° levels in SN oocytes. On the other hand, during oocyte growth, prematurely reduced Elavl2 expression results in lower yields of fully grown and meiotically matured oocytes, suggesting that Elavl2 is necessary for proper oocyte maturation. Moreover, Elavl2 knockdown showed stimulating effects on translation in fully grown oocytes. We propose that ELAVL2 has an ambivalent role in oocytes: it functions as a pleiotropic translational repressor in efficient production of fully grown oocytes, while its disposal during the NSN/SN transition contributes to the acquisition of full developmental competence. PMID:24553115

  16. The Groucho Co-repressor Is Primarily Recruited to Local Target Sites in Active Chromatin to Attenuate Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Barbara H.

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated by the complex interaction between transcriptional activators and repressors, which function in part by recruiting histone-modifying enzymes to control accessibility of DNA to RNA polymerase. The evolutionarily conserved family of Groucho/Transducin-Like Enhancer of split (Gro/TLE) proteins act as co-repressors for numerous transcription factors. Gro/TLE proteins act in several key pathways during development (including Notch and Wnt signaling), and are implicated in the pathogenesis of several human cancers. Gro/TLE proteins form oligomers and it has been proposed that their ability to exert long-range repression on target genes involves oligomerization over broad regions of chromatin. However, analysis of an endogenous gro mutation in Drosophila revealed that oligomerization of Gro is not always obligatory for repression in vivo. We have used chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) to profile Gro recruitment in two Drosophila cell lines. We find that Gro predominantly binds at discrete peaks (<1 kilobase). We also demonstrate that blocking Gro oligomerization does not reduce peak width as would be expected if Gro oligomerization induced spreading along the chromatin from the site of recruitment. Gro recruitment is enriched in “active” chromatin containing developmentally regulated genes. However, Gro binding is associated with local regions containing hypoacetylated histones H3 and H4, which is indicative of chromatin that is not fully open for efficient transcription. We also find that peaks of Gro binding frequently overlap the transcription start sites of expressed genes that exhibit strong RNA polymerase pausing and that depletion of Gro leads to release of polymerase pausing and increased transcription at a bona fide target gene. Our results demonstrate that Gro is recruited to local sites by transcription factors to attenuate rather than silence gene expression by promoting histone deacetylation

  17. Target gene analysis by microarrays and chromatin immunoprecipitation identifies HEY proteins as highly redundant bHLH repressors.

    PubMed

    Heisig, Julia; Weber, David; Englberger, Eva; Winkler, Anja; Kneitz, Susanne; Sung, Wing-Kin; Wolf, Elmar; Eilers, Martin; Wei, Chia-Lin; Gessler, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    HEY bHLH transcription factors have been shown to regulate multiple key steps in cardiovascular development. They can be induced by activated NOTCH receptors, but other upstream stimuli mediated by TGFß and BMP receptors may elicit a similar response. While the basic and helix-loop-helix domains exhibit strong similarity, large parts of the proteins are still unique and may serve divergent functions. The striking overlap of cardiac defects in HEY2 and combined HEY1/HEYL knockout mice suggested that all three HEY genes fulfill overlapping function in target cells. We therefore sought to identify target genes for HEY proteins by microarray expression and ChIPseq analyses in HEK293 cells, cardiomyocytes, and murine hearts. HEY proteins were found to modulate expression of their target gene to a rather limited extent, but with striking functional interchangeability between HEY factors. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed a much greater number of potential binding sites that again largely overlap between HEY factors. Binding sites are clustered in the proximal promoter region especially of transcriptional regulators or developmental control genes. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that HEY proteins primarily act as direct transcriptional repressors, while gene activation seems to be due to secondary or indirect effects. Mutagenesis of putative DNA binding residues supports the notion of direct DNA binding. While class B E-box sequences (CACGYG) clearly represent preferred target sequences, there must be additional and more loosely defined modes of DNA binding since many of the target promoters that are efficiently bound by HEY proteins do not contain an E-box motif. These data clearly establish the three HEY bHLH factors as highly redundant transcriptional repressors in vitro and in vivo, which explains the combinatorial action observed in different tissues with overlapping expression.

  18. Target Gene Analysis by Microarrays and Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Identifies HEY Proteins as Highly Redundant bHLH Repressors

    PubMed Central

    Englberger, Eva; Winkler, Anja; Kneitz, Susanne; Sung, Wing-Kin; Wolf, Elmar; Eilers, Martin; Wei, Chia-Lin; Gessler, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    HEY bHLH transcription factors have been shown to regulate multiple key steps in cardiovascular development. They can be induced by activated NOTCH receptors, but other upstream stimuli mediated by TGFß and BMP receptors may elicit a similar response. While the basic and helix-loop-helix domains exhibit strong similarity, large parts of the proteins are still unique and may serve divergent functions. The striking overlap of cardiac defects in HEY2 and combined HEY1/HEYL knockout mice suggested that all three HEY genes fulfill overlapping function in target cells. We therefore sought to identify target genes for HEY proteins by microarray expression and ChIPseq analyses in HEK293 cells, cardiomyocytes, and murine hearts. HEY proteins were found to modulate expression of their target gene to a rather limited extent, but with striking functional interchangeability between HEY factors. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed a much greater number of potential binding sites that again largely overlap between HEY factors. Binding sites are clustered in the proximal promoter region especially of transcriptional regulators or developmental control genes. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that HEY proteins primarily act as direct transcriptional repressors, while gene activation seems to be due to secondary or indirect effects. Mutagenesis of putative DNA binding residues supports the notion of direct DNA binding. While class B E-box sequences (CACGYG) clearly represent preferred target sequences, there must be additional and more loosely defined modes of DNA binding since many of the target promoters that are efficiently bound by HEY proteins do not contain an E-box motif. These data clearly establish the three HEY bHLH factors as highly redundant transcriptional repressors in vitro and in vivo, which explains the combinatorial action observed in different tissues with overlapping expression. PMID:22615585

  19. The MalR type regulator AcrC is a transcriptional repressor of acarbose biosynthetic genes in Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Timo; Droste, Julian; Gren, Tetiana; Ortseifen, Vera; Schneiker-Bekel, Susanne; Zemke, Till; Pühler, Alfred; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2017-07-25

    Acarbose is used in the treatment of diabetes mellitus type II and is produced by Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110. Although the biosynthesis of acarbose has been intensively studied, profound knowledge about transcription factors involved in acarbose biosynthesis and their binding sites has been missing until now. In contrast to acarbose biosynthetic gene clusters in Streptomyces spp., the corresponding gene cluster of Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110 lacks genes for transcriptional regulators. The acarbose regulator C (AcrC) was identified through an in silico approach by aligning the LacI family regulators of acarbose biosynthetic gene clusters in Streptomyces spp. with the Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110 genome. The gene for acrC, located in a head-to-head arrangement with the maltose/maltodextrin ABC transporter malEFG operon, was deleted by introducing PCR targeting for Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110. Characterization was carried out through cultivation experiments, genome-wide microarray hybridizations, and RT-qPCR as well as electrophoretic mobility shift assays for the elucidation of binding motifs. The results show that AcrC binds to the intergenic region between acbE and acbD in Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110 and acts as a transcriptional repressor on these genes. The transcriptomic profile of the wild type was reconstituted through a complementation of the deleted acrC gene. Additionally, regulatory sequence motifs for the binding of AcrC were identified in the intergenic region of acbE and acbD. It was shown that AcrC expression influences acarbose formation in the early growth phase. Interestingly, AcrC does not regulate the malEFG operon. This study characterizes the first known transcription factor of the acarbose biosynthetic gene cluster in Actinoplanes sp. SE50/110. It therefore represents an important step for understanding the regulatory network of this organism. Based on this work, rational strain design for improving the biotechnological production of acarbose can now be

  20. Identification of NAB1, a repressor of NGFI-A- and Krox20-mediated transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Russo, M W; Sevetson, B R; Milbrandt, J

    1995-01-01

    NGFI-A (also called Egr1, Zif268, or Krox24) and the closely related proteins Krox20, NGFI-C, and Egr3 are zinc-finger transcription factors encoded by immediate-early genes which are induced by a wide variety of extracellular stimuli. NGFI-A has been implicated in cell proliferation, macrophage differentiation, synaptic activation, and long-term potentiation, whereas Krox20 is critical for proper hindbrain segmentation and peripheral nerve myelination. In previous work, a structure/function analysis of NGFI-A revealed a 34-aa inhibitory domain that was hypothesized to be the target of a cellular factor that represses NGFI-A transcriptional activity. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we have isolated a cDNA clone which encodes a protein that interacts with this inhibitory domain and inhibits the ability of NGFI-A to activate transcription. This NGFI-A-binding protein, NAB1, is a 570-aa nuclear protein that bears no obvious sequence homology to known proteins. NAB1 also represses Krox20 activity, but it does not influence Egr3 or NGFI-G, thus providing a mechanism for the differential regulation of this family of immediate-early transcription factors. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7624335

  1. The Catabolite Repressor Protein-Cyclic AMP Complex Regulates csgD and Biofilm Formation in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hufnagel, David A; Evans, Margery L; Greene, Sarah E; Pinkner, Jerome S; Hultgren, Scott J; Chapman, Matthew R

    2016-12-15

    The extracellular matrix protects Escherichia coli from immune cells, oxidative stress, predation, and other environmental stresses. Production of the E. coli extracellular matrix is regulated by transcription factors that are tuned to environmental conditions. The biofilm master regulator protein CsgD upregulates curli and cellulose, the two major polymers in the extracellular matrix of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) biofilms. We found that cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates curli, cellulose, and UPEC biofilms through csgD The alarmone cAMP is produced by adenylate cyclase (CyaA), and deletion of cyaA resulted in reduced extracellular matrix production and biofilm formation. The catabolite repressor protein (CRP) positively regulated csgD transcription, leading to curli and cellulose production in the UPEC isolate, UTI89. Glucose, a known inhibitor of CyaA activity, blocked extracellular matrix formation when added to the growth medium. The mutant strains ΔcyaA and Δcrp did not produce rugose biofilms, pellicles, curli, cellulose, or CsgD. Three putative CRP binding sites were identified within the csgD-csgB intergenic region, and purified CRP could gel shift the csgD-csgB intergenic region. Additionally, we found that CRP binded upstream of kpsMT, which encodes machinery for K1 capsule production. Together our work shows that cAMP and CRP influence E. coli biofilms through transcriptional regulation of csgD IMPORTANCE The catabolite repressor protein (CRP)-cyclic AMP (cAMP) complex influences the transcription of ∼7% of genes on the Escherichia coli chromosome (D. Zheng, C. Constantinidou, J. L. Hobman, and S. D. Minchin, Nucleic Acids Res 32:5874-5893, 2004, https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkh908). Glucose inhibits E. coli biofilm formation, and ΔcyaA and Δcrp mutants show impaired biofilm formation (D. W. Jackson, J.W. Simecka, and T. Romeo, J Bacteriol 184:3406-3410, 2002, https://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.184.12.3406-3410.2002). We determined that the c

  2. Expression, Purification And Preliminary X-Ray Analysis of the C-Terminal Domain of An Arginine Repressor Protein From Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    SciT

    Lu, G.J.; Garen, C.R.; Cherney, M.M.

    2009-06-03

    The gene product of an open reading frame Rv1657 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a putative arginine repressor protein (ArgR), a transcriptional factor that regulates the expression of arginine-biosynthetic enzymes. Rv1657 was expressed and purified and a C-terminal domain was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Diffraction data were collected and processed to a resolution of 2.15 {angstrom}. The crystals belong to space group P1 and the Matthews coefficient suggests that the crystals contain six C-terminal domain molecules per unit cell. Previous structural and biochemical studies on the arginine repressor proteins from other organisms have likewise shown the presence of sixmore » molecules per unit cell.« less

  3. Adaptor proteins GIR1 and GIR2. II. Interaction with the co-repressor TOPLESS and promotion of histone deacetylation of target chromatin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Renhong; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2017-07-08

    Understanding how root hair development is controlled is important for understanding of many fundamental aspects of plant biology. Previously, we identified two plant-specific adaptor proteins GIR1 and GIR2 that interact with the major regulator of root hair development GL2 and suppress formation of root hair. Here, we show that GIR1 and GIR2 also interact with the co-repressor TOPLESS (TPL). This interaction required the GIR1 protein EAR motif, and was essential for the transcriptional repressor activity of GIR1. Both GIR1 and GIR2 promoted histone hypoacetylation of their target chromatin. Potentially, GIR1 and GIR2 might may link TPL to and participate in epigenetic regulation of root hair development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Parallel SCF Adaptor Capture Proteomics Reveals a Role for SCFFBXL17 in NRF2 Activation via BACH1 Repressor Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Meng-Kwang Marcus; Lim, Hui-Jun; Bennett, Eric J.; Shi, Yang; Harper, J. Wade

    2014-01-01

    Modular Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) use substrate binding adaptor proteins to specify target ubiquitylation. Many of the ~200 human CRL adaptor proteins remain poorly studied due to a shortage of efficient methods to identify biologically relevant substrates. Here, we report the development of Parallel Adaptor Capture (PAC) proteomics, and its use to systematically identify candidate targets for the leucine-rich repeat family of F-box proteins (FBXLs) that function with SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein (SCF) E3s. In validation experiments, we identify the unstudied F-box protein FBXL17 as a regulator of the NFR2 oxidative stress pathway. We demonstrate that FBXL17 controls the transcription of the NRF2 target HMOX1 via turnover of the transcriptional repressor BACH1 in the absence or presence of extrinsic oxidative stress. This work identifies a role for SCFFBXL17 in controlling the threshold for NRF2-dependent gene activation and provides a framework for elucidating the functions of CRL adaptor proteins. PMID:24035498

  5. Parallel SCF adaptor capture proteomics reveals a role for SCFFBXL17 in NRF2 activation via BACH1 repressor turnover.

    PubMed

    Tan, Meng-Kwang Marcus; Lim, Hui-Jun; Bennett, Eric J; Shi, Yang; Harper, J Wade

    2013-10-10

    Modular cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) use substrate binding adaptor proteins to specify target ubiquitylation. Many of the ~200 human CRL adaptor proteins remain poorly studied due to a shortage of efficient methods to identify biologically relevant substrates. Here, we report the development of parallel adaptor capture (PAC) proteomics and its use to systematically identify candidate targets for the leucine-rich repeat family of F-box proteins (FBXLs) that function with SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein (SCF) E3s. In validation experiments, we identify the unstudied F-box protein FBXL17 as a regulator of the NFR2 oxidative stress pathway. We demonstrate that FBXL17 controls the transcription of the NRF2 target HMOX1 via turnover of the transcriptional repressor BACH1 in the absence or presence of extrinsic oxidative stress. This work identifies a role for SCF(FBXL17) in controlling the threshold for NRF2-dependent gene activation and provides a framework for elucidating the functions of CRL adaptor proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Second-hit mosaic mutation in mTORC1 repressor DEPDC5 causes focal cortical dysplasia-associated epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ribierre, Théo; Deleuze, Charlotte; Bacq, Alexandre; Baldassari, Sara; Marsan, Elise; Chipaux, Mathilde; Muraca, Giuseppe; Roussel, Delphine; Navarro, Vincent; Leguern, Eric; Miles, Richard; Baulac, Stéphanie

    2018-04-30

    DEP domain-containing 5 protein (DEPDC5) is a repressor of the recently recognized amino acid-sensing branch of the mTORC1 pathway. So far, its function in the brain remains largely unknown. Germline loss-of-function mutations in DEPDC5 have emerged as a major cause of familial refractory focal epilepsies, with case reports of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). Remarkably, a fraction of patients also develop focal cortical dysplasia (FCD), a neurodevelopmental cortical malformation. We therefore hypothesized that a somatic second-hit mutation arising during brain development may support the focal nature of the dysplasia. Here, using postoperative human tissue, we provide the proof of concept that a biallelic 2-hit - brain somatic and germline - mutational mechanism in DEPDC5 causes focal epilepsy with FCD. We discovered a mutation gradient with a higher rate of mosaicism in the seizure-onset zone than in the surrounding epileptogenic zone. Furthermore, we demonstrate the causality of a Depdc5 brain mosaic inactivation using CRISPR-Cas9 editing and in utero electroporation in a mouse model recapitulating focal epilepsy with FCD and SUDEP-like events. We further unveil a key role of Depdc5 in shaping dendrite and spine morphology of excitatory neurons. This study reveals promising therapeutic avenues for treating drug-resistant focal epilepsies with mTORC1-targeting molecules.

  7. High-throughput cell-based screening reveals a role for ZNF131 as a repressor of ERalpha signaling

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiao; Guo, Jinhai; Deng, Weiwei; Zhang, Chenying; Du, Peige; Shi, Taiping; Ma, Dalong

    2008-01-01

    Background Estrogen receptor α (ERα) is a transcription factor whose activity is affected by multiple regulatory cofactors. In an effort to identify the human genes involved in the regulation of ERα, we constructed a high-throughput, cell-based, functional screening platform by linking a response element (ERE) with a reporter gene. This allowed the cellular activity of ERα, in cells cotransfected with the candidate gene, to be quantified in the presence or absence of its cognate ligand E2. Results From a library of 570 human cDNA clones, we identified zinc finger protein 131 (ZNF131) as a repressor of ERα mediated transactivation. ZNF131 is a typical member of the BTB/POZ family of transcription factors, and shows both ubiquitous expression and a high degree of sequence conservation. The luciferase reporter gene assay revealed that ZNF131 inhibits ligand-dependent transactivation by ERα in a dose-dependent manner. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay clearly demonstrated that the interaction between ZNF131 and ERα interrupts or prevents ERα binding to the estrogen response element (ERE). In addition, ZNF131 was able to suppress the expression of pS2, an ERα target gene. Conclusion We suggest that the functional screening platform we constructed can be applied for high-throughput genomic screening candidate ERα-related genes. This in turn may provide new insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms of ERα regulation in mammalian cells. PMID:18847501

  8. The LSD1 Family of Histone Demethylases and the Pumilio Posttranscriptional Repressor Function in a Complex Regulatory Feedback Loop

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Wayne O.; Lepesant, Julie M. J.; Bourdeaux, Jessie; Texier, Manuela; Kerenyi, Marc A.; Nakakido, Makoto; Hamamoto, Ryuji; Orkin, Stuart H.; Dyson, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    The lysine (K)-specific demethylase (LSD1) family of histone demethylases regulates chromatin structure and the transcriptional potential of genes. LSD1 is frequently deregulated in tumors, and depletion of LSD1 family members causes developmental defects. Here, we report that reductions in the expression of the Pumilio (PUM) translational repressor complex enhanced phenotypes due to dLsd1 depletion in Drosophila. We show that the PUM complex is a target of LSD1 regulation in fly and mammalian cells and that its expression is inversely correlated with LSD1 levels in human bladder carcinoma. Unexpectedly, we find that PUM posttranscriptionally regulates LSD1 family protein levels in flies and human cells, indicating the existence of feedback loops between the LSD1 family and the PUM complex. Our results highlight a new posttranscriptional mechanism regulating LSD1 activity and suggest that the feedback loop between the LSD1 family and the PUM complex may be functionally important during development and in human malignancies. PMID:26438601

  9. MDM2 Associates with Polycomb Repressor Complex 2 and Enhances Stemness-Promoting Chromatin Modifications Independent of p53.

    PubMed

    Wienken, Magdalena; Dickmanns, Antje; Nemajerova, Alice; Kramer, Daniela; Najafova, Zeynab; Weiss, Miriam; Karpiuk, Oleksandra; Kassem, Moustapha; Zhang, Yanping; Lozano, Guillermina; Johnsen, Steven A; Moll, Ute M; Zhang, Xin; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2016-01-07

    The MDM2 oncoprotein ubiquitinates and antagonizes p53 but may also carry out p53-independent functions. Here we report that MDM2 is required for the efficient generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from murine embryonic fibroblasts, in the absence of p53. Similarly, MDM2 depletion in the context of p53 deficiency also promoted the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells and diminished clonogenic survival of cancer cells. Most of the MDM2-controlled genes also responded to the inactivation of the Polycomb Repressor Complex 2 (PRC2) and its catalytic component EZH2. MDM2 physically associated with EZH2 on chromatin, enhancing the trimethylation of histone 3 at lysine 27 and the ubiquitination of histone 2A at lysine 119 (H2AK119) at its target genes. Removing MDM2 simultaneously with the H2AK119 E3 ligase Ring1B/RNF2 further induced these genes and synthetically arrested cell proliferation. In conclusion, MDM2 supports the Polycomb-mediated repression of lineage-specific genes, independent of p53. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cloning and characterization of GETS-1, a goldfish Ets family member that functions as a transcriptional repressor in muscle.

    PubMed

    Goldman, D; Sapru, M K; Stewart, S; Plotkin, J; Libermann, T A; Wasylyk, B; Guan, K

    1998-10-15

    An Ets transcription factor family member, GETS-1, was cloned from a goldfish retina cDNA library. GETS-1 contains a conserved Ets DNA-binding domain at its N-terminus and is most similar to ternary complex factor (TCF) serum-response-factor protein-1a (SAP-1a). GETS-1 is expressed in many tissues, but is enriched in retina and brain. As with the TCFs SAP-1a and ets-related protein (ERP), overexpression of the GETS-1 promoter suppresses nicotinic acetylcholine receptor epsilon-subunit gene expression in cultured muscle cells. A consensus Ets binding site sequence in the promoter of the epsilon-subunit gene is required for GETS-1-mediated repression. GETS-1 repressor activity is abrogated by overexpression of an activated Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) or by mutation of Ser-405, a MAP kinase phosphorylation site in GETS-1. Fusion proteins created between GETS-1 and the Gal4 DNA-binding domain show that, like other TCFs, GETS-1 contains a C-terminal activation domain that is activated by a Ras/MAP kinase signalling cascade. Interestingly, mutation of Ser-405 located within this activation domain abrogated transcriptional activation of the fusion protein.

  11. Cutting edge: A transcriptional repressor and corepressor induced by the STAT3-regulated anti-inflammatory signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    El Kasmi, Karim C; Smith, Amber M; Williams, Lynn; Neale, Geoffrey; Panopoulos, Athanasia D; Panopolous, Athanasia; Watowich, Stephanie S; Häcker, Hans; Foxwell, Brian M J; Murray, Peter J

    2007-12-01

    IL-10 regulates anti-inflammatory signaling via the activation of STAT3, which in turn controls the induction of a gene expression program whose products execute inhibitory effects on proinflammatory mediator production. In this study we show that IL-10 induces the expression of an ETS family transcriptional repressor, ETV3, and a helicase family corepressor, Strawberry notch homologue 2 (SBNO2), in mouse and human macrophages. IL-10-mediated induction of ETV3 and SBNO2 expression was dependent upon both STAT3 and a stimulus through the TLR pathway. We also observed that ETV3 expression was strongly induced by the STAT3 pathway regulated by IL-10 but not by STAT3 signaling activated by IL-6, which cannot activate the anti-inflammatory signaling pathway. ETV3 and SBNO2 repressed NF-kappaB- but not IFN regulatory factor 7 (IRF7)-activated transcriptional reporters. Collectively our data suggest that ETV3 and SBNO2 are components of the pathways that contribute to the downstream anti-inflammatory effects of IL-10.

  12. Conformational and thermodynamic hallmarks of DNA operator site specificity in the copper sensitive operon repressor from Streptomyces lividans

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Benedict G.; Vijgenboom, Erik; Worrall, Jonathan A. R.

    2014-01-01

    Metal ion homeostasis in bacteria relies on metalloregulatory proteins to upregulate metal resistance genes and enable the organism to preclude metal toxicity. The copper sensitive operon repressor (CsoR) family is widely distributed in bacteria and controls the expression of copper efflux systems. CsoR operator sites consist of G-tract containing pseudopalindromes of which the mechanism of operator binding is poorly understood. Here, we use a structurally characterized CsoR from Streptomyces lividans (CsoRSl) together with three specific operator targets to reveal the salient features pertaining to the mechanism of DNA binding. We reveal that CsoRSl binds to its operator site through a 2-fold axis of symmetry centred on a conserved 5′-TAC/GTA-3′ inverted repeat. Operator recognition is stringently dependent not only on electropositive residues but also on a conserved polar glutamine residue. Thermodynamic and circular dichroic signatures of the CsoRSl–DNA interaction suggest selectivity towards the A-DNA-like topology of the G-tracts at the operator site. Such properties are enhanced on protein binding thus enabling the symmetrical binding of two CsoRSl tetramers. Finally, differential binding modes may exist in operator sites having more than one 5′-TAC/GTA-3′ inverted repeat with implications in vivo for a mechanism of modular control. PMID:24121681

  13. Functional analysis of the global repressor Tup1 for maltose metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: different roles of the functional domains.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xue; Yu, Ai-Qun; Zhang, Cui-Ying; Pi, Li; Bai, Xiao-Wen; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2017-11-09

    Tup1 is a general transcriptional repressor of diverse gene families coordinately controlled by glucose repression, mating type, and other mechanisms in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several functional domains of Tup1 have been identified, each of which has differing effects on transcriptional repression. In this study, we aim to investigate the role of Tup1 and its domains in maltose metabolism of industrial baker's yeast. To this end, a battery of in-frame truncations in the TUP1 gene coding region were performed in the industrial baker's yeasts with different genetic background, and the maltose metabolism, leavening ability, MAL gene expression levels, and growth characteristics were investigated. The results suggest that the TUP1 gene is essential to maltose metabolism in industrial baker's yeast. Importantly, different domains of Tup1 play different roles in glucose repression and maltose metabolism of industrial baker's yeast cells. The Ssn6 interaction, N-terminal repression and C-terminal repression domains might play roles in the regulation of MAL transcription by Tup1 for maltose metabolism of baker's yeast. The WD region lacking the first repeat could influence the regulation of maltose metabolism directly, rather than indirectly through glucose repression. These findings lay a foundation for the optimization of industrial baker's yeast strains for accelerated maltose metabolism and facilitate future research on glucose repression in other sugar metabolism.

  14. STERILE APETALA modulates the stability of a repressor protein complex to control organ size in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhibiao; Ru, Licong; Baekelandt, Alexandra; Goossens, Alain; Xu, Ran; Zhu, Zhengge; Inzé, Dirk; Li, Yunhai

    2018-01-01

    Organ size control is of particular importance for developmental biology and agriculture, but the mechanisms underlying organ size regulation remain elusive in plants. Meristemoids, which possess stem cell-like properties, have been recognized to play important roles in leaf growth. We have recently reported that the Arabidopsis F-box protein STERILE APETALA (SAP)/SUPPRESSOR OF DA1 (SOD3) promotes meristemoid proliferation and regulates organ size by influencing the stability of the transcriptional regulators PEAPODs (PPDs). Here we demonstrate that KIX8 and KIX9, which function as adaptors for the corepressor TOPLESS and PPD, are novel substrates of SAP. SAP interacts with KIX8/9 and modulates their protein stability. Further results show that SAP acts in a common pathway with KIX8/9 and PPD to control organ growth by regulating meristemoid cell proliferation. Thus, these findings reveal a molecular mechanism by which SAP targets the KIX-PPD repressor complex for degradation to regulate meristemoid cell proliferation and organ size. PMID:29401459

  15. The Response Regulator YycF Inhibits Expression of the Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Repressor FabT in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Mohedano, Maria L.; Amblar, Mónica; de la Fuente, Alicia; Wells, Jerry M.; López, Paloma

    2016-01-01

    The YycFG (also known as WalRK, VicRK, MicAB, or TCS02) two-component system (TCS) is highly conserved among Gram-positive bacteria with a low G+C content. In Streptococcus pneumoniae the YycF response regulator has been reported to be essential due to its control of pcsB gene expression. Previously we showed that overexpression of yycF in S. pneumoniae TIGR4 altered the transcription of genes involved in cell wall metabolism and fatty acid biosynthesis, giving rise to anomalous cell division and increased chain length of membrane fatty acids. Here, we have overexpressed the yycFG system in TIGR4 wild-type strain and yycF in a TIGR4 mutant depleted of YycG, and analyzed their effects on expression of proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis during activation of the TCS. We demonstrate that transcription of the fab genes and levels of their products were only altered in the YycF overexpressing strain, indicating that the unphosphorylated form of YycF is involved in the regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis. In addition, DNA-binding assays and in vitro transcription experiments with purified YycF and the promoter region of the FabTH-acp operon support a direct inhibition of transcription of the FabT repressor by YycF, thus confirming the role of the unphosphorylated form in transcriptional regulation. PMID:27610104

  16. Crystal structure of caspase recruiting domain (CARD) of apoptosis repressor with CARD (ARC) and its implication in inhibition of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Tae-ho; Kim, Seong Hyun; Jeong, Jae-Hee; Kim, Sunghwan; Kim, Yeun Gil; Park, Hyun Ho

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis repressor with caspase recruiting domain (ARC) is a multifunctional inhibitor of apoptosis that is unusually over-expressed or activated in various cancers and in the state of the pulmonary hypertension. Therefore, ARC might be an optimal target for therapeutic intervention. Human ARC is composed of two distinct domains, N-terminal caspase recruiting domain (CARD) and C-terminal P/E (proline and glutamic acid) rich domain. ARC inhibits the extrinsic apoptosis pathway by interfering with DISC formation. ARC CARD directly interacts with the death domains (DDs) of Fas and FADD, as well as with the death effector domains (DEDs) of procaspase-8. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the CARD domain of ARC at a resolution of 2.4 Å. Our structure was a dimer with novel homo-dimerization interfaces that might be critical to its inhibitory function. Interestingly, ARC did not exhibit a typical death domain fold. The sixth helix (H6), which was detected at the typical death domain fold, was not detected in the structure of ARC, indicating that H6 may be dispensable for the function of the death domain superfamily. PMID:26038885

  17. A Critical Role for the Anti-apoptotic Protein ARC (Apoptosis Repressor with CARD) in Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zaiman, Ari L; Damico, Rachel; Thoms-Chesley, Alan; Files, D Clark; Kesari, Priya; Johnston, Laura; Swaim, Mara; Mozammel, Shehzin; Myers, Alan C; Halushka, Marc; El-Haddad, Hasim; Shimoda, Larissa A; Peng, Chang-Fu; Hassoun, Paul M; Champion, Hunter C; Kitsis, Richard N; Crow, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    Background Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a lethal syndrome associated with the pathogenic remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature and the emergence of apoptosis-resistant cells. ARC (Apoptosis Repressor with Caspase Recruitment Domain) is an inhibitor of multiple forms of cell death known to be abundantly expressed in striated muscle. We show for the first time that ARC is expressed in arterial smooth muscle cells of the pulmonary vasculature and is markedly up-regulated in several experimental models of PH. In this study, we test the hypothesis that ARC expression is essential for the development of chronic hypoxia-induced PH. Methods and Results Experiments in which cells or mice were rendered ARC-deficient revealed that ARC not only protected pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells from hypoxia-induced death, but also facilitated growth factor-induced proliferation and hypertrophy and hypoxia-induced down-regulation of selective voltage-gated potassium channels, the latter a hallmark of the syndrome in humans. Moreover, ARC-deficient mice exhibited diminished vascular remodeling, increased apoptosis, and decreased proliferation in response to chronic hypoxia, resulting in marked protection from PH in vivo. Patients with PH have significantly increased ARC expression not only in remodeled vessels but also in the lumen-occluding lesions associated with severe disease. Conclusions These data show that ARC, previously unlinked to pulmonary hypertension, is a critical determinant of vascular remodeling in this syndrome. PMID:22082675

  18. Rce1, a novel transcriptional repressor, regulates cellulase gene expression by antagonizing the transactivator Xyr1 in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanli; Zheng, Fanglin; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Guolei; Chen, Guanjun; Zhang, Weixin; Liu, Weifeng

    2017-07-01

    Cellulase gene expression in the model cellulolytic fungus Trichoderma reesei is supposed to be controlled by an intricate regulatory network involving multiple transcription factors. Here, we identified a novel transcriptional repressor of cellulase gene expression, Rce1. Disruption of the rce1 gene not only facilitated the induced expression of cellulase genes but also led to a significant delay in terminating the induction process. However, Rce1 did not participate in Cre1-mediated catabolite repression. Electrophoretic mobility shift (EMSA) and DNase I footprinting assays in combination with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) demonstrated that Rce1 could bind directly to a cbh1 (cellobiohydrolase 1-encoding) gene promoter region containing a cluster of Xyr1 binding sites. Furthermore, competitive binding assays revealed that Rce1 antagonized Xyr1 from binding to the cbh1 promoter. These results indicate that intricate interactions exist between a variety of transcription factors to ensure tight and energy-efficient regulation of cellulase gene expression in T. reesei. This study also provides important clues regarding increased cellulase production in T. reesei. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. A novel principle for partial agonism of liver X receptor ligands. Competitive recruitment of activators and repressors.

    PubMed

    Albers, Michael; Blume, Beatrix; Schlueter, Thomas; Wright, Matthew B; Kober, Ingo; Kremoser, Claus; Deuschle, Ulrich; Koegl, Manfred

    2006-02-24

    Partial, selective activation of nuclear receptors is a central issue in molecular endocrinology but only partly understood. Using LXRs as an example, we show here that purely agonistic ligands can be clearly and quantitatively differentiated from partial agonists by the cofactor interactions they induce. Although a pure agonist induces a conformation that is incompatible with the binding of repressors, partial agonists such as GW3965 induce a state where the interaction not only with coactivators, but also corepressors is clearly enhanced over the unliganded state. The activities of the natural ligand 22(R)-hydroxycholesterol and of a novel quinazolinone ligand, LN6500 can be further differentiated from GW3965 and T0901317 by their weaker induction of coactivator binding. Using biochemical and cell-based assays, we show that the natural ligand of LXR is a comparably weak partial agonist. As predicted, we find that a change in the coactivator to corepressor ratio in the cell will affect NCoR recruiting compounds more dramatically than NCoR-dissociating compounds. Our data show how competitive binding of coactivators and corepressors can explain the tissue-specific behavior of partial agonists and open up new routes to a rational design of partial agonists for LXRs.

  20. Regulatory T cells with reduced repressor capacities are extensively amplified in pulmonary sarcoid lesions and sustain granuloma formation.

    PubMed

    Rappl, Gunter; Pabst, Stefan; Riemann, Dagmar; Schmidt, Annette; Wickenhauser, Claudia; Schütte, Wolfgang; Hombach, Andreas A; Seliger, Barbara; Grohé, Christian; Abken, Hinrich

    2011-07-01

    Sarcoidosis can evolve into a chronic disease with persistent granulomas accompanied by progressive fibrosis. While an unlimited inflammatory response suggests an impaired immune control in sarcoid lesions, it stands in contrast to the massive infiltration with CD4(+)CD25(high)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells. We here revealed that those Treg cells in affected lung lesions were mainly derived from activated natural Treg cells with GARP (LRRC32)-positive phenotype but exhibited reduced repressor capacities despite high IL-10 and TGF-beta 1 levels. The repressive capacity of blood Treg cells, in contrast, was not impaired compared to age-matched healthy donors. Treg derived cells in granuloma lesions have undergone extensive rounds of amplifications indicated by shortened telomeres compared to blood Treg cells of the same patient. Lesional Treg derived cells moreover secreted pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-4 which sustains granuloma formation through fibroblast amplification and the activation of mast cells, the latter indicated by the expression of membrane-bound oncostatin M. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Quaternary re-arrangement analysed by spectral enhancement: the interaction of a sporulation repressor with its antagonist.

    PubMed

    Scott, D J; Leejeerajumnean, S; Brannigan, J A; Lewis, R J; Wilkinson, A J; Hoggett, J G

    1999-11-12

    The protein/protein interaction between SinI and SinR has been studied by analytical ultracentrifugation and gel electrophoresis in an attempt to understand how these proteins contribute to developmental control of sporulation in Bacillus subtilis. SinR was found to be tetrameric, while SinI was found to exist as monomers and dimers in a rapidly reversible equilibrium. Labelling of SinR by incorporating the tryptophan analogue 7-azatryptophan (7AW) into the protein in place of tryptophan shifts the UV absorbance spectrum, thus allowing selective monitoring of 7AWSinR at 315 nm using the UV absorption optics of the analytical ultracentrifuge. Selective monitoring of SinR in mixtures of SinR and SinI enables the binding and stoichiometry of the interaction to be investigated quantitatively and unambiguously. We demonstrate that the oligomeric forms of SinR and SinI re-arrange to form a tight 1:1 SinR:SinI complex, with no stable intermediate species. A fragment of SinR, SinR(1-69), which contains only the DNA-binding domain, was found to be monomeric, showing that the protein appears not to oligomerise in a similar manner to the Cro repressor, a protein with which it shares a marked structural similarity. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  2. Phosphorylation of the chromatin remodeling factor DPF3a induces cardiac hypertrophy through releasing HEY repressors from DNA.

    PubMed

    Cui, Huanhuan; Schlesinger, Jenny; Schoenhals, Sophia; Tönjes, Martje; Dunkel, Ilona; Meierhofer, David; Cano, Elena; Schulz, Kerstin; Berger, Michael F; Haack, Timm; Abdelilah-Seyfried, Salim; Bulyk, Martha L; Sauer, Sascha; Sperling, Silke R

    2016-04-07

    DPF3 (BAF45c) is a member of the BAF chromatin remodeling complex. Two isoforms have been described, namely DPF3a and DPF3b. The latter binds to acetylated and methylated lysine residues of histones. Here, we elaborate on the role of DPF3a and describe a novel pathway of cardiac gene transcription leading to pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Upon hypertrophic stimuli, casein kinase 2 phosphorylates DPF3a at serine 348. This initiates the interaction of DPF3a with the transcriptional repressors HEY, followed by the release of HEY from the DNA. Moreover, BRG1 is bound by DPF3a, and is thus recruited to HEY genomic targets upon interaction of the two components. Consequently, the transcription of downstream targets such as NPPA and GATA4 is initiated and pathological cardiac hypertrophy is established. In human, DPF3a is significantly up-regulated in hypertrophic hearts of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or aortic stenosis. Taken together, we show that activation of DPF3a upon hypertrophic stimuli switches cardiac fetal gene expression from being silenced by HEY to being activated by BRG1. Thus, we present a novel pathway for pathological cardiac hypertrophy, whose inhibition is a long-term therapeutic goal for the treatment of the course of heart failure. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Repressors Nrg1 and Nrg2 Regulate a Set of Stress-Responsive Genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae§

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Valmik K.; Berkey, Cristin D.; Miyao, Takenori; Carlson, Marian

    2005-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae responds to environmental stress by rapidly altering the expression of large sets of genes. We report evidence that the transcriptional repressors Nrg1 and Nrg2 (Nrg1/Nrg2), which were previously implicated in glucose repression, regulate a set of stress-responsive genes. Genome-wide expression analysis identified 150 genes that were upregulated in nrg1Δ nrg2Δ double mutant cells, relative to wild-type cells, during growth in glucose. We found that many of these genes are regulated by glucose repression. Stress response elements (STREs) and STRE-like elements are overrepresented in the promoters of these genes, and a search of available expression data sets showed that many are regulated in response to a variety of environmental stress signals. In accord with these findings, mutation of NRG1 and NRG2 enhanced the resistance of cells to salt and oxidative stress and decreased tolerance to freezing. We present evidence that Nrg1/Nrg2 not only contribute to repression of target genes in the absence of stress but also limit induction in response to salt stress. We suggest that Nrg1/Nrg2 fine-tune the regulation of a set of stress-responsive genes. PMID:16278455

  4. Drosophila melanogaster cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes is a lysosomal protein essential for fly development

    PubMed Central

    Kowalewski-Nimmerfall, Elisabeth; Schähs, Philipp; Maresch, Daniel; Rendic, Dubravko; Krämer, Helmut; Mach, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes is a lysosomal glycoprotein implicated in cellular growth and differentiation. The genome of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster encodes a putative orthologue (dCREG), suggesting evolutionarily conserved physiological functions of this protein. In D. melanogaster S2 cells, dCREG was found to localize in lysosomes. Further studies revealed that intracellular dCREG is subject of proteolytic maturation. Processing and turnover could be substantially reduced by RNAi-mediated silencing of cathepsin L. In contrast to mammalian cells, lysosomal delivery of dCREG does not depend on its carbohydrate moiety. Furthermore, depletion of the putative D. melanogaster lysosomal sorting receptor lysosomal enzyme receptor protein did not compromise cellular retention of dCREG. We also investigated the developmental consequences of dCREG ablation in whole D. melanogaster flies. Ubiquitous depletion of dCREG proved lethal at the late pupal stage once a knock-down efficiency of > 95% was achieved. These results demonstrate that dCREG is essential for proper completion of fly development. PMID:25173815

  5. Drosophila melanogaster cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes is a lysosomal protein essential for fly development.

    PubMed

    Kowalewski-Nimmerfall, Elisabeth; Schähs, Philipp; Maresch, Daniel; Rendic, Dubravko; Krämer, Helmut; Mach, Lukas

    2014-12-01

    Mammalian cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes is a lysosomal glycoprotein implicated in cellular growth and differentiation. The genome of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster encodes a putative orthologue (dCREG), suggesting evolutionarily conserved physiological functions of this protein. In D. melanogaster S2 cells, dCREG was found to localize in lysosomes. Further studies revealed that intracellular dCREG is subject of proteolytic maturation. Processing and turnover could be substantially reduced by RNAi-mediated silencing of cathepsin L. In contrast to mammalian cells, lysosomal delivery of dCREG does not depend on its carbohydrate moiety. Furthermore, depletion of the putative D. melanogaster lysosomal sorting receptor lysosomal enzyme receptor protein did not compromise cellular retention of dCREG. We also investigated the developmental consequences of dCREG ablation in whole D. melanogaster flies. Ubiquitous depletion of dCREG proved lethal at the late pupal stage once a knock-down efficiency of >95% was achieved. These results demonstrate that dCREG is essential for proper completion of fly development. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. The transcription repressor, ZEB1, cooperates with CtBP2 and HDAC1 to suppress IL-2 gene activation in T cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Lee, Seungsoo; Teh, Charis En-Yi; Bunting, Karen; Ma, Lina; Shannon, M Frances

    2009-03-01

    Activation of T cells leads to the induction of many cytokine genes that are required for appropriate immune responses, including IL-2, a key cytokine for T cell proliferation and homeostasis. The activating transcription factors such as nuclear factor of activated T cells, nuclear factor kappaB/Rel and activated protein-1 family members that regulate inducible IL-2 gene expression have been well documented. However, negative regulation of the IL-2 gene is less studied. Here we examine the role of zinc finger E-box-binding protein (ZEB) 1, a homeodomain/Zn finger transcription factor, as a repressor of IL-2 gene transcription. We show here that ZEB1 is expressed in non-stimulated and stimulated T cells and using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays we show that ZEB1 binds to the IL-2 promoter. Over-expression of ZEB1 can repress IL-2 promoter activity, as well as endogenous IL-2 mRNA production in EL-4 T cells, and this repression is dependent on the ZEB-binding site at -100. ZEB1 cooperates with the co-repressor C-terminal-binding protein (CtBP) 2 and with histone deacetylase 1 to repress the IL-2 promoter and this cooperation depends on the ZEB-binding site in the promoter as well as the Pro-X-Asp-Leu-Ser protein-protein interaction domain in CtBP2. Thus, ZEB1 may function to recruit a repressor complex to the IL-2 promoter.

  7. The Arabidopsis RING-Type E3 Ligase TEAR1 Controls Leaf Development by Targeting the TIE1 Transcriptional Repressor for Degradation[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinzhe; Wei, Baoye; Yuan, Rongrong; Yu, Hao

    2017-01-01

    The developmental plasticity of leaf size and shape is important for leaf function and plant survival. However, the mechanisms by which plants form diverse leaves in response to environmental conditions are not well understood. Here, we identified TIE1-ASSOCIATED RING-TYPE E3 LIGASE1 (TEAR1) and found that it regulates leaf development by promoting the degradation of TCP INTERACTOR-CONTAINING EAR MOTIF PROTEIN1 (TIE1), an important repressor of CINCINNATA (CIN)-like TEOSINTE BRANCHED1/CYCLOIDEA/PCF (TCP) transcription factors, which are key for leaf development. TEAR1 contains a typical C3H2C3-type RING domain and has E3 ligase activity. We show that TEAR1 interacts with the TCP repressor TIE1, which is ubiquitinated in vivo and degraded by the 26S proteasome system. We demonstrate that TEAR1 is colocalized with TIE1 in nuclei and negatively regulates TIE1 protein levels. Overexpression of TEAR1 rescued leaf defects caused by TIE1 overexpression, whereas disruption of TEAR1 resulted in leaf phenotypes resembling those caused by TIE1 overexpression or TCP dysfunction. Deficiency in TEAR partially rescued the leaf defects of TCP4 overexpression line and enhanced the wavy leaf phenotypes of jaw-5D. We propose that TEAR1 positively regulates CIN-like TCP activity to promote leaf development by mediating the degradation of the TCP repressor TIE1. PMID:28100709

  8. Short linear motif acquisition, exon formation and alternative splicing determine a pathway to diversity for NCoR-family co-repressors

    PubMed Central

    Short, Stephen; Peterkin, Tessa; Guille, Matthew; Patient, Roger; Sharpe, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrate NCoR-family co-repressors play central roles in the timing of embryo and stem cell differentiation by repressing the activity of a range of transcription factors. They interact with nuclear receptors using short linear motifs (SLiMs) termed co-repressor for nuclear receptor (CoRNR) boxes. Here, we identify the pathway leading to increasing co-repressor diversity across the deuterostomes. The final complement of CoRNR boxes arose in an ancestral cephalochordate, and was encoded in one large exon; the urochordates and vertebrates then split this region between 10 and 12 exons. In Xenopus, alternative splicing is prevalent in NCoR2, but absent in NCoR1. We show for one NCoR1 exon that alternative splicing can be recovered by a single point mutation, suggesting NCoR1 lost the capacity for alternative splicing. Analyses in Xenopus and zebrafish identify that cellular context, rather than gene sequence, predominantly determines species differences in alternative splicing. We identify a pathway to diversity for the NCoR family beginning with the addition of a SLiM, followed by gene duplication, the generation of alternatively spliced isoforms and their differential deployment. PMID:26289800

  9. Loss of the co-repressor GPS2 sensitizes macrophage activation upon metabolic stress induced by obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rongrong; Toubal, Amine; Goñi, Saioa; Drareni, Karima; Huang, Zhiqiang; Alzaid, Fawaz; Ballaire, Raphaelle; Ancel, Patricia; Liang, Ning; Damdimopoulos, Anastasios; Hainault, Isabelle; Soprani, Antoine; Aron-Wisnewsky, Judith; Foufelle, Fabienne; Lawrence, Toby; Gautier, Jean-Francois; Venteclef, Nicolas; Treuter, Eckardt

    2016-07-01

    Humans with obesity differ in their susceptibility to developing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D). This variation may relate to the extent of adipose tissue (AT) inflammation that develops as their obesity progresses. The state of macrophage activation has a central role in determining the degree of AT inflammation and thus its dysfunction, and these states are driven by epigenomic alterations linked to gene expression. The underlying mechanisms that regulate these alterations, however, are poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that a co-repressor complex containing G protein pathway suppressor 2 (GPS2) crucially controls the macrophage epigenome during activation by metabolic stress. The study of AT from humans with and without obesity revealed correlations between reduced GPS2 expression in macrophages, elevated systemic and AT inflammation, and diabetic status. The causality of this relationship was confirmed by using macrophage-specific Gps2-knockout (KO) mice, in which inappropriate co-repressor complex function caused enhancer activation, pro-inflammatory gene expression and hypersensitivity toward metabolic-stress signals. By contrast, transplantation of GPS2-overexpressing bone marrow into two mouse models of obesity (ob/ob and diet-induced obesity) reduced inflammation and improved insulin sensitivity. Thus, our data reveal a potentially reversible disease mechanism that links co-repressor-dependent epigenomic alterations in macrophages to AT inflammation and the development of T2D.

  10. Ski co-repressor complexes maintain the basal repressed state of the TGF-beta target gene, SMAD7, via HDAC3 and PRMT5.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Takanori; Kokura, Kenji; Ten Dijke, Peter; Ishii, Shunsuke

    2009-01-01

    The products encoded by ski and its related gene, sno, (Ski and Sno) act as transcriptional co-repressors and interact with other co-repressors such as N-CoR/SMRT and mSin3A. Ski and Sno mediate transcriptional repression by various repressors, including Mad, Rb and Gli3. Ski/Sno also suppress transcription induced by multiple activators, such as Smads and c-Myb. In particular, the inhibition of TGF-beta-induced transcription by binding to Smads is correlated with the oncogenic activity of Ski and Sno. However, the molecular mechanism by which Ski and Sno mediate transcriptional repression remains unknown. In this study, we report the purification and characterization of Ski complexes. The Ski complexes purified from HeLa cells contained histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) and protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5), in addition to multiple Smad proteins (Smad2, Smad3 and Smad4). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that these components of the Ski complexes were localized on the SMAD7 gene promoter, which is the TGF-beta target gene, in TGF-beta-untreated HepG2 cells. Knockdown of these components using siRNA led to up-regulation of SMAD7 mRNA. These results indicate that Ski complexes serve to maintain a TGF-beta-responsive promoter at a repressed basal level via the activities of histone deacetylase and histone arginine methyltransferase.

  11. Expression, purification and preliminary X-ray analysis of the C-terminal domain of an arginine repressor protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciT

    Lu, George J.; Garen, Craig R.; Cherney, Maia M.

    2007-11-01

    The C-terminal portion of the arginine repressor protein from M. tuberculosis H37Rv has been crystallized. The complete transcriptional factor regulates arginine biosynthesis by binding operator DNA when arginine is bound at the C-terminal domain. The gene product of an open reading frame Rv1657 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a putative arginine repressor protein (ArgR), a transcriptional factor that regulates the expression of arginine-biosynthetic enzymes. Rv1657 was expressed and purified and a C-terminal domain was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Diffraction data were collected and processed to a resolution of 2.15 Å. The crystals belong to space group P1 and themore » Matthews coefficient suggests that the crystals contain six C-terminal domain molecules per unit cell. Previous structural and biochemical studies on the arginine repressor proteins from other organisms have likewise shown the presence of six molecules per unit cell.« less

  12. Decreased expression of Freud-1/CC2D1A, a transcriptional repressor of the 5-HT1A receptor, in the prefrontal cortex of subjects with major depression.

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Albert, Paul R; Rogaeva, Anastasia; Fitzgibbon, Heidi; May, Warren L; Rajkowska, Grazyna; Miguel-Hidalgo, Jose J; Stockmeier, Craig A; Woolverton, William L; Kyle, Patrick B; Wang, Zhixia; Austin, Mark C

    2010-09-01

    Serotonin1A (5-HT(1A)) receptors are reported altered in the brain of subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD). Recent studies have identified transcriptional regulators of the 5-HT(1A) receptor and have documented gender-specific alterations in 5-HT(1A) transcription factor and 5-HT(1A) receptors in female MDD subjects. The 5' repressor element under dual repression binding protein-1 (Freud-1) is a calcium-regulated repressor that negatively regulates the 5-HT(1A) receptor gene. This study documented the cellular expression of Freud-1 in the human prefrontal cortex (PFC) and quantified Freud-1 protein in the PFC of MDD and control subjects as well as in the PFC of rhesus monkeys chronically treated with fluoxetine. Freud-1 immunoreactivity was present in neurons and glia and was co-localized with 5-HT(1A) receptors. Freud-1 protein level was significantly decreased in the PFC of male MDD subjects (37%, p=0.02) relative to gender-matched control subjects. Freud-1 protein was also reduced in the PFC of female MDD subjects (36%, p=0.18) but was not statistically significant. When the data was combined across genders and analysed by age, the decrease in Freud-1 protein level was greater in the younger MDD subjects (48%, p=0.01) relative to age-matched controls as opposed to older depressed subjects. Similarly, 5-HT(1A) receptor protein was significantly reduced in the PFC of the younger MDD subjects (48%, p=0.01) relative to age-matched controls. Adult male rhesus monkeys administered fluoxetine daily for 39 wk revealed no significant change in cortical Freud-1 or 5-HT(1A) receptor proteins compared to vehicle-treated control monkeys. Reduced protein expression of Freud-1 in MDD subjects may reflect dysregulation of this transcription factor, which may contribute to the altered regulation of 5-HT(1A) receptors observed in subjects with MDD. These data may also suggest that reductions in Freud-1 protein expression in the PFC may be associated with early onset of

  13. The Structure of the Transcriptional Repressor KstR in Complex with CoA Thioester Cholesterol Metabolites Sheds Light on the Regulation of Cholesterol Catabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ngoc Anh Thu; Dawes, Stephanie S.; Crowe, Adam M.; Casabon, Israël; Gao, Chen; Kendall, Sharon L.; Baker, Edward N.; Eltis, Lindsay D.; Lott, J. Shaun

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol can be a major carbon source for Mycobacterium tuberculosis during infection, both at an early stage in the macrophage phagosome and later within the necrotic granuloma. KstR is a highly conserved TetR family transcriptional repressor that regulates a large set of genes responsible for cholesterol catabolism. Many genes in this regulon, including kstR, are either induced during infection or are essential for survival of M. tuberculosis in vivo. In this study, we identified two ligands for KstR, both of which are CoA thioester cholesterol metabolites with four intact steroid rings. A metabolite in which one of the rings was cleaved was not a ligand. We confirmed the ligand-protein interactions using intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and showed that ligand binding strongly inhibited KstR-DNA binding using surface plasmon resonance (IC50 for ligand = 25 nm). Crystal structures of the ligand-free form of KstR show variability in the position of the DNA-binding domain. In contrast, structures of KstR·ligand complexes are highly similar to each other and demonstrate a position of the DNA-binding domain that is unfavorable for DNA binding. Comparison of ligand-bound and ligand-free structures identifies residues involved in ligand specificity and reveals a distinctive mechanism by which the ligand-induced conformational change mediates DNA release. PMID:26858250

  14. Analysis of mouse models carrying the I26T and R160C substitutions in the transcriptional repressor HESX1 as models for septo-optic dysplasia and hypopituitarism

    PubMed Central

    Sajedi, Ezat; Gaston-Massuet, Carles; Signore, Massimo; Andoniadou, Cynthia L.; Kelberman, Daniel; Castro, Sandra; Etchevers, Heather C.; Gerrelli, Dianne; Dattani, Mehul T.; Martinez-Barbera, Juan Pedro

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY A homozygous substitution of the highly conserved isoleucine at position 26 by threonine (I26T) in the transcriptional repressor HESX1 has been associated with anterior pituitary hypoplasia in a human patient, with no forebrain or eye defects. Two individuals carrying a homozygous substitution of the conserved arginine at position 160 by cysteine (R160C) manifest septo-optic dysplasia (SOD), a condition characterised by pituitary abnormalities associated with midline telencephalic structure defects and optic nerve hypoplasia. We have generated two knock-in mouse models containing either the I26T or R160C substitution in the genomic locus. Hesx1I26T/I26T embryos show pituitary defects comparable with Hesx1−/− mouse mutants, with frequent occurrence of ocular abnormalities, although the telencephalon develops normally. Hesx1R160C/R160C mutants display forebrain and pituitary defects that are identical to those observed in Hesx1−/− null mice. We also show that the expression pattern of HESX1 during early human development is very similar to that described in the mouse, suggesting that the function of HESX1 is conserved between the two species. Together, these results suggest that the I26T mutation yields a hypomorphic allele, whereas R160C produces a null allele and, consequently, a more severe phenotype in both mice and humans. PMID:19093031

  15. Assessing the Role of ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR Transcriptional Repressors in Salicylic Acid-Mediated Suppression of Jasmonic Acid-Responsive Genes.

    PubMed

    Caarls, Lotte; Van der Does, Dieuwertje; Hickman, Richard; Jansen, Wouter; Verk, Marcel C Van; Proietti, Silvia; Lorenzo, Oscar; Solano, Roberto; Pieterse, Corné M J; Van Wees, Saskia C M

    2017-02-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) cross-communicate in the plant immune signaling network to finely regulate induced defenses. In Arabidopsis, SA antagonizes many JA-responsive genes, partly by targeting the ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR (ERF)-type transcriptional activator ORA59. Members of the ERF transcription factor family typically bind to GCC-box motifs in the promoters of JA- and ethylene-responsive genes, thereby positively or negatively regulating their expression. The GCC-box motif is sufficient for SA-mediated suppression of JA-responsive gene expression. Here, we investigated whether SA-induced ERF-type transcriptional repressors, which may compete with JA-induced ERF-type activators for binding at the GCC-box, play a role in SA/JA antagonism. We selected ERFs that are transcriptionally induced by SA and/or possess an EAR transcriptional repressor motif. Several of the 16 ERFs tested suppressed JA-dependent gene expression, as revealed by enhanced JA-induced PDF1.2 or VSP2 expression levels in the corresponding erf mutants, while others were involved in activation of these genes. However, SA could antagonize JA-induced PDF1.2 or VSP2 in all erf mutants, suggesting that the tested ERF transcriptional repressors are not required for SA/JA cross-talk. Moreover, a mutant in the co-repressor TOPLESS, that showed reduction in repression of JA signaling, still displayed SA-mediated antagonism of PDF1.2 and VSP2. Collectively, these results suggest that SA-regulated ERF transcriptional repressors are not essential for antagonism of JA-responsive gene expression by SA. We further show that de novo SA-induced protein synthesis is required for suppression of JA-induced PDF1.2, pointing to SA-stimulated production of an as yet unknown protein that suppresses JA-induced transcription. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Complex binding of the FabR repressor of bacterial unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis to its cognate promoters.

    PubMed

    Feng, Youjun; Cronan, John E

    2011-04-01

    Two transcriptional regulators, the FadR activator and the FabR repressor, control biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids in Escherichia coli. FabR represses expression of the two genes, fabA and fabB, required for unsaturated fatty acid synthesis and has been reported to require the presence of an unsaturated thioester (of either acyl carrier protein or CoA) in order to bind the fabA and fabB promoters in vitro. We report in vivo experiments in which unsaturated fatty acid synthesis was blocked in the absence of exogenous unsaturated fatty acids in a ΔfadR strain and found that the rates of transcription of fabA and fabB were unaffected by the lack of unsaturated thioesters. To examine the discrepancy between our in vivo results and the prior in vitro results we obtained active, natively folded forms of the E. coli and Vibrio cholerae FabRs by use of an in vitro transcription-translation system. We report that FabR bound the intact promoter regions of both fabA and fabB in the absence of unsaturated acyl thioesters, but bound the two promoters differently. Native FabR bound the fabA promoter region provided that the canonical FabR binding site is extended by inclusion of flanking sequences that overlap the neighbouring FadR binding site. In contrast, although binding to the fabB operator also required a flanking sequence, a non-specific sequence could suffice. However, unsaturated thioesters did allow FabR binding to the minimal FabR operator sites of both promoters which otherwise were not bound. Thus unsaturated thioester ligands were not essential for FabR/target DNA interaction, but acted to enhance binding. The gel mobility shift data plus in vivo expression data indicate that despite the remarkably similar arrangements of promoter elements, FadR predominately regulates fabA expression whereas FabR is the dominant regulator of fabB expression. We also report that E. coli fabR expression is not autoregulated. Complementation, qRT-PCR and fatty acid

  17. Dual Role of OhrR as a Repressor and an Activator in Response to Organic Hydroperoxides in Streptomyces coelicolor▿

    PubMed Central

    Oh, So-Young; Shin, Jung-Ho; Roe, Jung-Hye

    2007-01-01

    Organic hydroperoxide resistance in bacteria is achieved primarily through reducing oxidized membrane lipids. The soil-inhabiting aerobic bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor contains three paralogous genes for organic hydroperoxide resistance: ohrA, ohrB, and ohrC. The ohrA gene is transcribed divergently from ohrR, which encodes a putative regulator of MarR family. Both the ohrA and ohrR genes were induced highly by various organic hydroperoxides. The ohrA gene was induced through removal of repression by OhrR, whereas the ohrR gene was induced through activation by OhrR. Reduced OhrR bound to the ohrA-ohrR intergenic region, which contains a central (primary) and two adjacent (secondary) inverted-repeat motifs that overlap with promoter elements. Organic peroxide decreased the binding affinity of OhrR for the primary site, with a concomitant decrease in cooperative binding to the adjacent secondary sites. The single cysteine C28 in OhrR was involved in sensing oxidants, as determined by substitution mutagenesis. The C28S mutant of OhrR bound to the intergenic region without any change in binding affinity in response to organic peroxides. These results lead us to propose a model for the dual action of OhrR as a repressor and an activator in S. coelicolor. Under reduced conditions, OhrR binds cooperatively to the intergenic region, repressing transcription from both genes. Upon oxidation, the binding affinity of OhrR decreases, with a concomitant loss of cooperative binding, which allows RNA polymerase to bind to both the ohrA and ohrR promoters. The loosely bound oxidized OhrR can further activate transcription from the ohrR promoter. PMID:17586628

  18. The translational repressor Crc controls the Pseudomonas putida benzoate and alkane catabolic pathways using a multi-tier regulation strategy.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Arranz, Sofía; Moreno, Renata; Rojo, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Metabolically versatile bacteria usually perceive aromatic compounds and hydrocarbons as non-preferred carbon sources, and their assimilation is inhibited if more preferable substrates are available. This is achieved via catabolite repression. In Pseudomonas putida, the expression of the genes allowing the assimilation of benzoate and n-alkanes is strongly inhibited by catabolite repression, a process controlled by the translational repressor Crc. Crc binds to and inhibits the translation of benR and alkS mRNAs, which encode the transcriptional activators that induce the expression of the benzoate and alkane degradation genes respectively. However, sequences similar to those recognized by Crc in benR and alkS mRNAs exist as well in the translation initiation regions of the mRNA of several structural genes of the benzoate and alkane pathways, which suggests that Crc may also regulate their translation. The present results show that some of these sites are functional, and that Crc inhibits the induction of both pathways by limiting not only the translation of their transcriptional activators, but also that of genes coding for the first enzyme in each pathway. Crc may also inhibit the translation of a gene involved in benzoate uptake. This multi-tier approach probably ensures the rapid regulation of pathway genes, minimizing the assimilation of non-preferred substrates when better options are available. A survey of possible Crc sites in the mRNAs of genes associated with other catabolic pathways suggested that targeting substrate uptake, pathway induction and/or pathway enzymes may be a common strategy to control the assimilation of non-preferred compounds. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. The switch from fermentation to respiration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by the Ert1 transcriptional activator/repressor.

    PubMed

    Gasmi, Najla; Jacques, Pierre-Etienne; Klimova, Natalia; Guo, Xiao; Ricciardi, Alessandra; Robert, François; Turcotte, Bernard

    2014-10-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, fermentation is the major pathway for energy production, even under aerobic conditions. However, when glucose becomes scarce, ethanol produced during fermentation is used as a carbon source, requiring a shift to respiration. This adaptation results in massive reprogramming of gene expression. Increased expression of genes for gluconeogenesis and the glyoxylate cycle is observed upon a shift to ethanol and, conversely, expression of some fermentation genes is reduced. The zinc cluster proteins Cat8, Sip4, and Rds2, as well as Adr1, have been shown to mediate this reprogramming of gene expression. In this study, we have characterized the gene YBR239C encoding a putative zinc cluster protein and it was named ERT1 (ethanol regulated transcription factor 1). ChIP-chip analysis showed that Ert1 binds to a limited number of targets in the presence of glucose. The strongest enrichment was observed at the promoter of PCK1 encoding an important gluconeogenic enzyme. With ethanol as the carbon source, enrichment was observed with many additional genes involved in gluconeogenesis and mitochondrial function. Use of lacZ reporters and quantitative RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that Ert1 regulates expression of its target genes in a manner that is highly redundant with other regulators of gluconeogenesis. Interestingly, in the presence of ethanol, Ert1 is a repressor of PDC1 encoding an important enzyme for fermentation. We also show that Ert1 binds directly to the PCK1 and PDC1 promoters. In summary, Ert1 is a novel factor involved in the regulation of gluconeogenesis as well as a key fermentation gene. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  20. Sequence of ligand binding and structure change in the diphtheria toxin repressor upon activation by divalent transition metals.

    PubMed

    Rangachari, Vijayaraghavan; Marin, Vedrana; Bienkiewicz, Ewa A; Semavina, Maria; Guerrero, Luis; Love, John F; Murphy, John R; Logan, Timothy M

    2005-04-19

    The diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR) is an Fe(II)-activated transcriptional regulator of iron homeostatic and virulence genes in Corynebacterium diphtheriae. DtxR is a two-domain protein that contains two structurally and functionally distinct metal binding sites. Here, we investigate the molecular steps associated with activation by Ni(II)Cl(2) and Cd(II)Cl(2). Equilibrium binding energetics for Ni(II) were obtained from isothermal titration calorimetry, indicating apparent metal dissociation constants of 0.2 and 1.7 microM for two independent sites. The binding isotherms for Ni(II) and Cd(II) exhibited a characteristic exothermic-endothermic pattern that was used to infer the metal binding sequence by comparing the wild-type isotherm with those of several binding site mutants. These data were complemented by measuring the distance between specific backbone amide nitrogens and the first equivalent of metal through heteronuclear NMR relaxation measurements. Previous studies indicated that metal binding affects a disordered to ordered transition in the metal binding domain. The coupling between metal binding and structure change was investigated using near-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy. Together, the data show that the first equivalent of metal is bound by the primary metal binding site. This binding orients the DNA binding helices and begins to fold the N-terminal domain. Subsequent binding at the ancillary site completes the folding of this domain and formation of the dimer interface. This model is used to explain the behavior of several mutants.

  1. Regulation of nif expression in Methanococcus maripaludis: roles of the euryarchaeal repressor NrpR, 2-oxoglutarate, and two operators.

    PubMed

    Lie, Thomas J; Wood, Gwendolyn E; Leigh, John A

    2005-02-18

    The methanogenic archaean Methanococcus maripaludis can use ammonia, alanine, or dinitrogen as a nitrogen source for growth. The euryarchaeal nitrogen repressor NrpR controls the expression of the nif (nitrogen fixation) operon, resulting in full repression with ammonia, intermediate repression with alanine, and derepression with dinitrogen. NrpR binds to two tandem operators in the nif promoter region, nifOR(1) and nifOR(2). Here we have undertaken both in vivo and in vitro approaches to study the way in which NrpR, nifOR(1), nifOR(2), and the effector 2-oxoglutarate (2OG) combine to regulate nif expression, leading to a comprehensive understanding of this archaeal regulatory system. We show that NrpR binds as a dimer to nifOR(1) and cooperatively as two dimers to both operators. Cooperative binding occurs only with both operators present. nifOR(1) has stronger binding and by itself can mediate the repression of nif transcription during growth on ammonia, unlike the weakly binding nifOR(2). However, nifOR(2) in combination with nifOR(1) is critical for intermediate repression during growth on alanine. Accordingly, NrpR binds to both operators together with higher affinity than to nifOR(1) alone. NrpR responds directly to 2OG, which weakens its binding to the operators. Hence, 2OG is an intracellular indicator of nitrogen deficiency and acts as an inducer of nif transcription via NrpR. This model is upheld by the recent finding (J. A. Dodsworth and J. A. Leigh, submitted for publication) in our laboratory that 2OG levels in M. maripaludis vary with growth on different nitrogen sources.

  2. The insulator protein Suppressor of Hairy-wing is an essential transcriptional repressor in the Drosophila ovary.

    PubMed

    Soshnev, Alexey A; Baxley, Ryan M; Manak, J Robert; Tan, Kai; Geyer, Pamela K

    2013-09-01

    Suppressor of Hairy-wing [Su(Hw)] is a DNA-binding factor required for gypsy insulator function and female germline development in Drosophila. The insulator function of the gypsy retrotransposon depends on Su(Hw) binding to clustered Su(Hw) binding sites (SBSs) and recruitment of the insulator proteins Centrosomal Protein 190 kD (CP190) and Modifier of mdg4 67.2 kD (Mod67.2). By contrast, the Su(Hw) germline function involves binding to non-clustered SBSs and does not require CP190 or Mod67.2. Here, we identify Su(Hw) target genes, using genome-wide analyses in the ovary to uncover genes with an ovary-bound SBS that are misregulated upon Su(Hw) loss. Most Su(Hw) target genes demonstrate enriched expression in the wild-type CNS. Loss of Su(Hw) leads to increased expression of these CNS-enriched target genes in the ovary and other tissues, suggesting that Su(Hw) is a repressor of neural genes in non-neural tissues. Among the Su(Hw) target genes is RNA-binding protein 9 (Rbp9), a member of the ELAV/Hu gene family. Su(Hw) regulation of Rbp9 appears to be insulator independent, as Rbp9 expression is unchanged in a genetic background that compromises the functions of the CP190 and Mod67.2 insulator proteins, even though both localize to Rbp9 SBSs. Rbp9 misregulation is central to su(Hw)(-/-) sterility, as Rbp9(+/-), su(Hw)(-/-) females are fertile. Eggs produced by Rbp9(+/-), su(Hw)(-/-) females show patterning defects, revealing a somatic requirement for Su(Hw) in the ovary. Our studies demonstrate that Su(Hw) is a versatile transcriptional regulatory protein with an essential developmental function involving transcriptional repression.

  3. Involvement of Sp1 and Microsatellite Repressor Sequences in the Transcriptional Control of the Human CD30 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Croager, Emma J.; Gout, Alexander M.; Abraham, Lawrence J.

    2000-01-01

    CD30, as a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family, is expressed on the surface of activated lymphoid cells. CD30 overexpression is a characteristic of lymphoproliferative diseases such as Hodgkin’s/non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas, embryonal carcinoma, and a number of Th2-associated diseases. The CD30 gene has been mapped to a region of the murine genome that is involved in susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus. Functionally, CD30 may play a role in the deletion of autoreactive T cells. We were interested in determining the molecular nature of CD30 overexpression. Sequence comparison has revealed significant identity between the TATA-less human and murine CD30 promoters; they share a number of common consensus binding motifs. Transfection assays identified three regions of transcriptional importance; the region between position −1.2 kb and −336 bp, containing a CCAT microsatellite sequence, a conserved Sp1 site at positions −43 to −38, and a downstream promoter element (DPE) at positions +24 to +29. EMSA and DNase I footprinting showed specific DNA-protein interactions of the CD30 promoter with the Sp1 site and the CCAT repeat region. The DPE element was shown to be essential for start site selection. We conclude that the conserved Sp1 site at −43 to −38 is associated with maximum reporter gene activity, the DPE element is required for start site selection, and the CCAT tetranucleotide repeats act to repress transcription. We also have shown that the microsatellite is multiallelic, when we screened a random healthy population. Further studies are required to determine whether microsatellite instability in the repressor predisposes susceptible individuals to CD30 overexpression. PMID:10793083

  4. Structure-based functional characterization of repressor of toxin (Rot), a central regulator of staphylococcus aureus virulence

    DOE PAGES

    Killikelly, April; Jakoncic, Jean; Benson, Meredith A.; ...

    2014-10-20

    Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for a large number of diverse infections worldwide. In order to support its pathogenic lifestyle, S. aureus has to regulate the expression of virulence factors in a coordinated fashion. One of the central regulators of the S. aureus virulence regulatory networks is the transcription factor repressor of toxin (Rot). Rot plays a key role in regulating S. aureus virulence through activation or repression of promoters that control expression of a large number of critical virulence factors. However, the mechanism by which Rot mediates gene regulation has remained elusive. Here, we have determined the crystal structure ofmore » Rot and used this information to probe the contribution made by specific residues to Rot function. Rot was found to form a dimer, with each monomer harboring a winged helix-turn-helix (WHTH) DNA-binding motif. Despite an overall acidic pI, the asymmetric electrostatic charge profile suggests that Rot can orient the WHTH domain to bind DNA. Structure-based site-directed mutagenesis studies demonstrated that R 91, at the tip of the wing, plays an important role in DNA binding, likely through interaction with the minor groove. We also found that Y 66, predicted to bind within the major groove, contributes to Rot interaction with target promoters. Evaluation of Rot binding to different activated and repressed promoters revealed that certain mutations on Rot exhibit promoter-specific effects, suggesting for the first time that Rot differentially interacts with target promoters. As a result, this work provides insight into a precise mechanism by which Rot controls virulence factor regulation in S. aureus.« less

  5. Structure-based functional characterization of repressor of toxin (Rot), a central regulator of staphylococcus aureus virulence

    SciT

    Killikelly, April; Jakoncic, Jean; Benson, Meredith A.

    Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for a large number of diverse infections worldwide. In order to support its pathogenic lifestyle, S. aureus has to regulate the expression of virulence factors in a coordinated fashion. One of the central regulators of the S. aureus virulence regulatory networks is the transcription factor repressor of toxin (Rot). Rot plays a key role in regulating S. aureus virulence through activation or repression of promoters that control expression of a large number of critical virulence factors. However, the mechanism by which Rot mediates gene regulation has remained elusive. Here, we have determined the crystal structure ofmore » Rot and used this information to probe the contribution made by specific residues to Rot function. Rot was found to form a dimer, with each monomer harboring a winged helix-turn-helix (WHTH) DNA-binding motif. Despite an overall acidic pI, the asymmetric electrostatic charge profile suggests that Rot can orient the WHTH domain to bind DNA. Structure-based site-directed mutagenesis studies demonstrated that R 91, at the tip of the wing, plays an important role in DNA binding, likely through interaction with the minor groove. We also found that Y 66, predicted to bind within the major groove, contributes to Rot interaction with target promoters. Evaluation of Rot binding to different activated and repressed promoters revealed that certain mutations on Rot exhibit promoter-specific effects, suggesting for the first time that Rot differentially interacts with target promoters. As a result, this work provides insight into a precise mechanism by which Rot controls virulence factor regulation in S. aureus.« less

  6. Isolation and Functional Characterization of a Floral Repressor, BcMAF1, From Pak-choi (Brassica rapa ssp. Chinensis).

    PubMed

    Huang, Feiyi; Liu, Tongkun; Hou, Xilin

    2018-01-01

    MADS-box genes form a large gene family in plants and are involved in multiple biological processes, such as flowering. However, the regulation mechanism of MADS-box genes in flowering remains unresolved, especially under short-term cold conditions. In the present study, we isolated BcMAF1 , a Pak-choi ( Brassica rapa ssp. Chinensis ) MADS AFFECTING FLOWERING ( MAF ), as a floral repressor and functionally characterized BcMAF1 in Arabidopsis and Pak-choi. Subcellular localization and sequence analysis indicated that BcMAF1 was a nuclear protein and contained a conserved MADS-box domain. Expression analysis revealed that BcMAF1 had higher expression levels in leaves, stems, and petals, and could be induced by short-term cold conditions in Pak-choi. Overexpressing BcMAF1 in Arabidopsis showed that BcMAF1 had a negative function in regulating flowering, which was further confirmed by silencing endogenous BcMAF1 in Pak-choi. In addition, qPCR results showed that AtAP3 expression was reduced and AtMAF2 expression was induced in BcMAF1 -overexpressing Arabidopsis . Meanwhile, BcAP3 transcript was up-regulated and BcMAF2 transcript was down-regulated in BcMAF1 -silencing Pak-choi. Yeast one-hybrid and dual luciferase transient assays showed that BcMAF1 could bind to the promoters of BcAP3 and BcMAF2 . These results indicated that BcAP3 and BcMAF2 might be the targets of BcMAF1. Taken together, our results suggested that BcMAF1 could negatively regulate flowering by directly activating BcMAF2 and repressing BcAP3 .

  7. The CreB deubiquitinating enzyme does not directly target the CreA repressor protein in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Ashiqul; Kamlangdee, Niyom; Kelly, Joan M

    2017-08-01

    Ubiquitination/deubiquitination pathways are now recognized as key components of gene regulatory mechanisms in eukaryotes. The major transcriptional repressor for carbon catabolite repression in Aspergillus nidulans is CreA, and mutational analysis led to the suggestion that a regulatory ubiquitination/deubiquitination pathway is involved. A key unanswered question is if and how this pathway, comprising CreB (deubiquitinating enzyme) and HulA (ubiquitin ligase) and other proteins, is involved in the regulatory mechanism. Previously, missense alleles of creA and creB were analysed for genetic interactions, and here we extended this to complete loss-of-function alleles of creA and creB, and compared morphological and biochemical phenotypes, which confirmed genetic interaction between the genes. We investigated whether CreA, or a protein in a complex with it, is a direct target of the CreB deubiquitination enzyme, using co-purifications of CreA and CreB, first using strains that overexpress the proteins and then using strains that express the proteins from their native promoters. The Phos-tag system was used to show that CreA is a phosphorylated protein, but no ubiquitination was detected using anti-ubiquitin antibodies and Western analysis. These findings were confirmed using mass spectrometry, which confirmed that CreA was differentially phosphorylated but not ubiquitinated. Thus, CreA is not a direct target of CreB, and nor are proteins that form part of a stable complex with CreA a target of CreB. These results open up new questions regarding the molecular mechanism of CreA repressing activity, and how the ubiquitination pathway involving CreB interacts with this regulatory network.

  8. The leukemia associated ETO nuclear repressor gene is regulated by the GATA-1 transcription factor in erythroid/megakaryocytic cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Eight-Twenty-One (ETO) nuclear co-repressor gene belongs to the ETO homologue family also containing Myeloid Translocation Gene on chromosome 16 (MTG16) and myeloid translocation Gene-Related protein 1 (MTGR1). By chromosomal translocations ETO and MTG16 become parts of fusion proteins characteristic of morphological variants of acute myeloid leukemia. Normal functions of ETO homologues have as yet not been examined. The goal of this work was to identify structural and functional promoter elements upstream of the coding sequence of the ETO gene in order to explore lineage-specific hematopoietic expression and get hints to function. Results A putative proximal ETO promoter was identified within 411 bp upstream of the transcription start site. Strong ETO promoter activity was specifically observed upon transfection of a promoter reporter construct into erythroid/megakaryocytic cells, which have endogeneous ETO gene activity. An evolutionary conserved region of 228 bp revealed potential cis-elements involved in transcription of ETO. Disruption of the evolutionary conserved GATA -636 consensus binding site repressed transactivation and disruption of the ETS1 -705 consensus binding site enhanced activity of the ETO promoter. The promoter was stimulated by overexpression of GATA-1 into erythroid/megakaryocytic cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay with erythroid/megakaryocytic cells showed specific binding of GATA-1 to the GATA -636 site. Furthermore, results from chromatin immunoprecipitation showed GATA-1 binding in vivo to the conserved region of the ETO promoter containing the -636 site. The results suggest that the GATA -636 site may have a role in activation of the ETO gene activity in cells with erythroid/megakaryocytic potential. Leukemia associated AML1-ETO strongly suppressed an ETO promoter reporter in erythroid/megakaryocytic cells. Conclusions We demonstrate that the GATA-1 transcription factor binds and transactivates the ETO proximal

  9. Molecular cloning of TA16, a transcriptional repressor that may mediate glucocorticoid-induced growth arrest of leiomyosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, W; Ma, J X; Cheng, L; Norris, J S

    1997-08-01

    The DDT1 MF2 smooth muscle tumor cell line was derived from an estrogen/androgen-induced leiomyosarcoma that arose in the ductus deferens of a Syrian hamster. The growth of this cell line is arrested at the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle after treatment with glucocorticoids. To identify the putative gene(s) that are potentially involved in this hormone-induced cell growth arrest, we have used a differential screening technique to clone those genes whose expression is induced or up-regulated by glucocorticoids. A number of glucocorticoid response genes were thereby isolated from the leiomyosarcoma cells. One of these clones, termed TA16, was found to be markedly up-regulated by glucocorticoids in DDT1 MF2 cells, but only marginally changed in GR1 cells, a glucocorticoid-resistant variant that was selected from the wild type DDT1 MF2 cell. Isolation and sequencing of its intact cDNA indicated that the TA16 encodes a protein 485 amino acids long, and its sequence is closely homologous to a novel transcriptional repressor that presumably represses the transcription activity of some zinc finger transcriptional factors through a direct interaction. Transfection assays demonstrated that introduction of an antisense TA16 cDNA expression vector, controlled by an MMTV promoter, into the DDT1 MF2 cell significantly relieved the glucocorticoid-induced cell growth arrest. This finding suggests that TA16 might participate in the mediation of glucocorticoid-induced cell cycle arrest in leiomyosarcoma cells.

  10. Repressor of Estrogen Receptor Activity (REA) Is Essential for Mammary Gland Morphogenesis and Functional Activities: Studies in Conditional Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sunghee; Zhao, Yuechao; Yoon, Sangyeon; Xu, Jianming; Liao, Lan; Lydon, John; DeMayo, Franco; O'Malley, Bert W.

    2011-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) is a key regulator of mammary gland development and is also implicated in breast tumorigenesis. Because ER-mediated activities depend critically on coregulator partner proteins, we have investigated the consequences of reduction or loss of function of the coregulator repressor of ER activity (REA) by conditionally deleting one allele or both alleles of the REA gene at different stages of mammary gland development. Notably, we find that heterozygosity and nullizygosity for REA result in very different mammary phenotypes and that REA has essential roles in the distinct morphogenesis and functions of the mammary gland at different stages of development, pregnancy, and lactation. During puberty, mice homozygous null for REA in the mammary gland (REAf/f PRcre/+) showed severely impaired mammary ductal elongation and morphogenesis, whereas mice heterozygous for REA (REAf/+ PRcre/+) displayed accelerated mammary ductal elongation, increased numbers of terminal end buds, and up-regulation of amphiregulin, the major paracrine mediator of estrogen-induced ductal morphogenesis. During pregnancy and lactation, mice with homozygous REA gene deletion in mammary epithelium (REAf/f whey acidic protein-Cre) showed a loss of lobuloalveolar structures and increased apoptosis of mammary alveolar epithelium, leading to impaired milk production and significant reduction in growth of their offspring, whereas body weights of the offspring nursed by females heterozygous for REA were slightly greater than those of control mice. Our findings reveal that REA is essential for mammary gland development and has a gene dosage-dependent role in the regulation of stage-specific physiological functions of the mammary gland. PMID:21862609

  11. Cost-effectiveness of early detection of breast cancer in Catalonia (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Breast cancer (BC) causes more deaths than any other cancer among women in Catalonia. Early detection has contributed to the observed decline in BC mortality. However, there is debate on the optimal screening strategy. We performed an economic evaluation of 20 screening strategies taking into account the cost over time of screening and subsequent medical costs, including diagnostic confirmation, initial treatment, follow-up and advanced care. Methods We used a probabilistic model to estimate the effect and costs over time of each scenario. The effect was measured as years of life (YL), quality-adjusted life years (QALY), and lives extended (LE). Costs of screening and treatment were obtained from the Early Detection Program and hospital databases of the IMAS-Hospital del Mar in Barcelona. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was used to compare the relative costs and outcomes of different scenarios. Results Strategies that start at ages 40 or 45 and end at 69 predominate when the effect is measured as YL or QALYs. Biennial strategies 50-69, 45-69 or annual 45-69, 40-69 and 40-74 were selected as cost-effective for both effect measures (YL or QALYs). The ICER increases considerably when moving from biennial to annual scenarios. Moving from no screening to biennial 50-69 years represented an ICER of 4,469€ per QALY. Conclusions A reduced number of screening strategies have been selected for consideration by researchers, decision makers and policy planners. Mathematical models are useful to assess the impact and costs of BC screening in a specific geographical area. PMID:21605383

  12. The Phenylpropanoid Pathway Is Controlled at Different Branches by a Set of R2R3-MYB C2 Repressors in Grapevine1

    PubMed Central

    Cavallini, Erika; Matus, José Tomás; Finezzo, Laura; Zenoni, Sara; Loyola, Rodrigo; Guzzo, Flavia; Schlechter, Rudolf; Ageorges, Agnès; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Because of the vast range of functions that phenylpropanoids possess, their synthesis requires precise spatiotemporal coordination throughout plant development and in response to the environment. The accumulation of these secondary metabolites is transcriptionally controlled by positive and negative regulators from the MYB and basic helix-loop-helix protein families. We characterized four grapevine (Vitis vinifera) R2R3-MYB proteins from the C2 repressor motif clade, all of which harbor the ethylene response factor-associated amphiphilic repression domain but differ in the presence of an additional TLLLFR repression motif found in the strong flavonoid repressor Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) AtMYBL2. Constitutive expression of VvMYB4a and VvMYB4b in petunia (Petunia hybrida) repressed general phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes and selectively reduced the amount of small-weight phenolic compounds. Conversely, transgenic petunia lines expressing VvMYBC2-L1 and VvMYBC2-L3 showed a severe reduction in petal anthocyanins and seed proanthocyanidins together with a higher pH of crude petal extracts. The distinct function of these regulators was further confirmed by transient expression in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) leaves and grapevine plantlets. Finally, VvMYBC2-L3 was ectopically expressed in grapevine hairy roots, showing a reduction in proanthocyanidin content together with the down-regulation of structural and regulatory genes of the flavonoid pathway as revealed by a transcriptomic analysis. The physiological role of these repressors was inferred by combining the results of the functional analyses and their expression patterns in grapevine during development and in response to ultraviolet B radiation. Our results indicate that VvMYB4a and VvMYB4b may play a key role in negatively regulating the synthesis of small-weight phenolic compounds, whereas VvMYBC2-L1 and VvMYBC2-L3 may additionally fine tune flavonoid levels, balancing the inductive effects of

  13. Candida albicans Hap43 Is a Repressor Induced under Low-Iron Conditions and Is Essential for Iron-Responsive Transcriptional Regulation and Virulence ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Po-Chen; Yang, Cheng-Yao; Lan, Chung-Yu

    2011-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that exists as normal flora in healthy human bodies but causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised patients. In addition to innate and adaptive immunities, hosts also resist microbial infections by developing a mechanism of “natural resistance” that maintains a low level of free iron to restrict the growth of invading pathogens. C. albicans must overcome this iron-deprived environment to cause infections. There are three types of iron-responsive transcriptional regulators in fungi; Aft1/Aft2 activators in yeast, GATA-type repressors in many fungi, and HapX/Php4 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Aspergillus species. In this study, we characterized the iron-responsive regulator Hap43, which is the C. albicans homolog of HapX/Php4 and is repressed by the GATA-type repressor Sfu1 under iron-sufficient conditions. We provide evidence that Hap43 is essential for the growth of C. albicans under low-iron conditions and for C. albicans virulence in a mouse model of infection. Hap43 was not required for iron acquisition under low-iron conditions. Instead, it was responsible for repression of genes that encode iron-dependent proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration and iron-sulfur cluster assembly. We also demonstrated that Hap43 executes its function by becoming a transcriptional repressor and accumulating in the nucleus in response to iron deprivation. Finally, we found a connection between Hap43 and the global corepressor Tup1 in low-iron-induced flavinogenesis. Taken together, our data suggest a complex interplay among Hap43, Sfu1, and Tup1 to coordinately regulate iron acquisition, iron utilization, and other iron-responsive metabolic activities. PMID:21131439

  14. Modified nucleotides reveal the indirect role of the central base pairs in stabilizing the lac repressor-operator complex.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X; Gottlieb, P A

    1995-01-01

    Guanine residues in the lac operator were replaced by 2-aminopurine or purine analogues, pairing the modified nucleotides with C. The observed equilibrium dissociation constants for lac repressor binding to substituted operators were measured in 10 mM Tris, 150 mM KCl, 0.1 mM EDTA, 0.1 mM DTE, pH 7.6 at 25 degrees C. These measurements revealed five positions that destabilized the complex when substituted with either analogue. Two positions, which are related by a 2-fold symmetry, are in the major groove of the operator thought to directly interact with the protein. Three sites were in the central region of the operator. A purine analogue at a sixth site perturbed the local DNA structure and destabilized the complex. Alkylation interference experiments of the 2-aminopurine substituted operators demonstrated that, of the five affected, two substitutions displayed altered phosphate interference patterns at the phosphate adjacent to the substituted base. For these operators, complex formation was measured in different concentrations of KCl to assess the contribution of counterion release to the bimolecular process. The results indicated that both complexes were similar to wild-type, although minor changes were observed. The Kobs of the complex was then measured when 2-aminopurine or purine analogues were paired with uracil nucleotide, a base pair that serves to stabilize the DNA. The introduction of the new base pairs revealed two effects on the bimolecular interaction. For those operator sites that are thought to perturb the interaction directly, the affinity of the complex was weakened to levels observed for the singly-substituted operators. In contrast, the nucleotides of 2-aminopurine paired with uracil positioned in the central region of the operator served to enhance the stability of the complex. The purine-uracil base pair substitution on the other hand had a significant destabilizing effect on the interaction. We propose that the central base pairs modulate

  15. Bacillus subtilis IolQ (DegA) is a transcriptional repressor of iolX encoding NAD+-dependent scyllo-inositol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dong-Min; Michon, Christophe; Morinaga, Tetsuro; Tanaka, Kosei; Takenaka, Shinji; Ishikawa, Shu; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi

    2017-07-11

    Bacillus subtilis is able to utilize at least three inositol stereoisomers as carbon sources, myo-, scyllo-, and D-chiro-inositol (MI, SI, and DCI, respectively). NAD + -dependent SI dehydrogenase responsible for SI catabolism is encoded by iolX. Even in the absence of functional iolX, the presence of SI or MI in the growth medium was found to induce the transcription of iolX through an unknown mechanism. Immediately upstream of iolX, there is an operon that encodes two genes, yisR and iolQ (formerly known as degA), each of which could encode a transcriptional regulator. Here we performed an inactivation analysis of yisR and iolQ and found that iolQ encodes a repressor of the iolX transcription. The coding sequence of iolQ was expressed in Escherichia coli and the gene product was purified as a His-tagged fusion protein, which bound to two sites within the iolX promoter region in vitro. IolQ is a transcriptional repressor of iolX. Genetic evidences allowed us to speculate that SI and MI might possibly be the intracellular inducers, however they failed to antagonize DNA binding of IolQ in in vitro experiments.

  16. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Novel p-(methylthio)styryl Substituted Quindoline Derivatives as Neuroblastoma RAS (NRAS) Repressors via Specific Stabilizing the RNA G-Quadruplex.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wang; Sun, Zhi-Yin; Zhang, Qi; Cheng, Sui-Qi; Wang, Shi-Ke; Wang, Xiao-Na; Kuang, Guo-Tao; Su, Xiao-Xuan; Tan, Jia-Heng; Huang, Zhi-Shu; Ou, Tian-Miao

    2018-05-25

    The human proto-oncogene neuroblastoma RAS (NRAS) contains a guanine-rich sequence in the 5'-untranslated regions (5'-UTR) of the mRNA that could form an RNA G-quadruplex structure. This structure acts as a repressor for NRAS translation and could be a potential target for anti-cancer drugs. Our previous studies found an effective scaffold, the quindoline scaffold, for binding and stabilizing the DNA G-quadruplex structures. Here, basing on the previous studies and reported RNA-specific probes, a series of novel p-(methylthio)styryl substituted quindoline (MSQ) derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated as NRAS RNA G-quadruplex ligands. Panels of experiments turned out that the introduction of p-(methylthio)styryl side chain could enhance the specific binding to the NRAS RNA G-quadruplex. One of the hits, 4a-10, showed strong stabilizing activity on the G-quadruplex, and subsequently repressed NRAS's translation and inhibited tumor cells proliferation. Our finding provided a novel strategy to discover novel NRAS repressors by specifically binding to the RNA G-quadruplex in the 5'-UTR of mRNA.

  17. A Negative-Feedback Loop between the Detoxification/Antioxidant Response Factor SKN-1 and Its Repressor WDR-23 Matches Organism Needs with Environmental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Chi K.; Wang, Ying; Deonarine, Andrew; Tang, Lanlan; Prasse, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Negative-feedback loops between transcription factors and repressors in responses to xenobiotics, oxidants, heat, hypoxia, DNA damage, and infection have been described. Although common, the function of feedback is largely unstudied. Here, we define a negative-feedback loop between the Caenorhabditis elegans detoxification/antioxidant response factor SKN-1/Nrf and its repressor wdr-23 and investigate its function in vivo. Although SKN-1 promotes stress resistance and longevity, we find that tight regulation by WDR-23 is essential for growth and reproduction. By disabling SKN-1 transactivation of wdr-23, we reveal that feedback is required to set the balance between growth/reproduction and stress resistance/longevity. We also find that feedback is required to set the sensitivity of a core SKN-1 target gene to an electrophile. Interestingly, the effect of feedback on target gene induction is greatly reduced when the stress response is strongly activated, presumably to ensure maximum activation of cytoprotective genes during potentially fatal conditions. Our work provides a framework for understanding the function of negative feedback in inducible stress responses and demonstrates that manipulation of feedback alone can shift the balance of competing animal processes toward cell protection, health, and longevity. PMID:23836880

  18. Light-induced carotenogenesis in Myxococcus xanthus: evidence that CarS acts as an anti-repressor of CarA.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, D E; Hodgson, D A

    2001-11-01

    In the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus, carotenoids are produced in response to illumination, as a result of expression of the crt carotenoid biosynthesis genes. The majority of crt genes are clustered in the crtEBDC operon, which is repressed in the dark by CarA. Genetic data suggest that, in the light, CarS is synthesized and achieves activation of the crtEBDC operon by removing the repressive action of CarA. As CarS contains no known DNA-binding motif, the relief of CarA-mediated repression was postulated to result from a direct interaction between these two proteins. Use of the yeast two-hybrid system demonstrated direct interaction between CarA and CarS. The two-hybrid system also implied that CarA and, possibly, CarS are capable of homodimerization. Direct evidence for CarS anti-repressor action was provided in vitro. A glutathione S-transferase (GST)-CarA protein fusion was shown to bind specifically to a palindromic operator sequence within the crtEBDC promoter. CarA was prevented from binding to its operator, and prebound CarA was removed by the addition of purified CarS. CarS is therefore an anti-repressor.

  19. A stationary-phase protein of Escherichia coli that affects the mode of association between the trp repressor protein and operator-bearing DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, W; Ni, L; Somerville, R L

    1993-01-01

    Highly purified preparations of trp repressor (TrpR) protein derived from Escherichia coli strains that were engineered to overexpress this material were found to contain another protein, of 21 kDa. The second protein, designated WrbA [for tryptophan (W) repressor-binding protein] remained associated with its namesake through several sequential protein fractionation steps. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the WrbA protein guided the design of two degenerate oligonucleotides that were used as probes in the cloning of the wrbA gene (198 codons). The WrbA protein, in purified form, was found by several criteria to enhance the formation and/or stability of noncovalent complexes between TrpR holorepressor and its primary operator targets. The formation of an operator-holorepressor-WrbA ternary complex was demonstrated by gel mobility-shift analysis. The WrbA protein alone does not interact with the trp operator. During the stationary phase, cells deficient in the WrbA protein were less efficient than wild type in their ability to repress the trp promoter. It is proposed that the WrbA protein functions as an accessory element in blocking TrpR-specific transcriptional processes that might be physiologically disadvantageous in the stationary phase of the bacterial life cycle. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8516330

  20. A stationary-phase protein of Escherichia coli that affects the mode of association between the trp repressor protein and operator-bearing DNA.

    PubMed

    Yang, W; Ni, L; Somerville, R L

    1993-06-15

    Highly purified preparations of trp repressor (TrpR) protein derived from Escherichia coli strains that were engineered to overexpress this material were found to contain another protein, of 21 kDa. The second protein, designated WrbA [for tryptophan (W) repressor-binding protein] remained associated with its namesake through several sequential protein fractionation steps. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the WrbA protein guided the design of two degenerate oligonucleotides that were used as probes in the cloning of the wrbA gene (198 codons). The WrbA protein, in purified form, was found by several criteria to enhance the formation and/or stability of noncovalent complexes between TrpR holorepressor and its primary operator targets. The formation of an operator-holorepressor-WrbA ternary complex was demonstrated by gel mobility-shift analysis. The WrbA protein alone does not interact with the trp operator. During the stationary phase, cells deficient in the WrbA protein were less efficient than wild type in their ability to repress the trp promoter. It is proposed that the WrbA protein functions as an accessory element in blocking TrpR-specific transcriptional processes that might be physiologically disadvantageous in the stationary phase of the bacterial life cycle.

  1. Non-transmissible Sendai virus vector encoding c-myc suppressor FBP-interacting repressor for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Shimada, Hideaki; Ueda, Yasuji; Inoue, Makoto; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Nomura, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate a novel therapeutic strategy to target and suppress c-myc in human cancers using far up stream element (FUSE)-binding protein-interacting repressor (FIR). METHODS: Endogenous c-Myc suppression and apoptosis induction by a transient FIR-expressing vector was examined in vivo via a HA-tagged FIR (HA-FIR) expression vector. A fusion gene-deficient, non-transmissible, Sendai virus (SeV) vector encoding FIR cDNA, SeV/dF/FIR, was prepared. SeV/dF/FIR was examined for its gene transduction efficiency, viral dose dependency of antitumor effect and apoptosis induction in HeLa (cervical squamous cell carcinoma) cells and SW480 (colon adenocarcinoma) cells. Antitumor efficacy in a mouse xenograft model was also examined. The molecular mechanism of the anti-tumor effect and c-Myc suppression by SeV/dF/FIR was examined using Spliceostatin A (SSA), a SAP155 inhibitor, or SAP155 siRNA which induce c-Myc by increasing FIR∆exon2 in HeLa cells. RESULTS: FIR was found to repress c-myc transcription and in turn the overexpression of FIR drove apoptosis through c-myc suppression. Thus, FIR expressing vectors are potentially applicable for cancer therapy. FIR is alternatively spliced by SAP155 in cancer cells lacking the transcriptional repression domain within exon 2 (FIR∆exon2), counteracting FIR for c-Myc protein expression. Furthermore, FIR forms a complex with SAP155 and inhibits mutual well-established functions. Thus, both the valuable effects and side effects of exogenous FIR stimuli should be tested for future clinical application. SeV/dF/FIR, a cytoplasmic RNA virus, was successfully prepared and showed highly efficient gene transduction in in vivo experiments. Furthermore, in nude mouse tumor xenograft models, SeV/dF/FIR displayed high antitumor efficiency against human cancer cells. SeV/dF/FIR suppressed SSA-activated c-Myc. SAP155 siRNA, potentially produces FIR∆exon2, and led to c-Myc overexpression with phosphorylation at Ser62. HA-FIR suppressed

  2. The cost-effectiveness of using chronic kidney disease risk scores to screen for early-stage chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Yarnoff, Benjamin O; Hoerger, Thomas J; Simpson, Siobhan K; Leib, Alyssa; Burrows, Nilka R; Shrestha, Sundar S; Pavkov, Meda E

    2017-03-13

    Better treatment during early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) may slow progression to end-stage renal disease and decrease associated complications and medical costs. Achieving early treatment of CKD is challenging, however, because a large fraction of persons with CKD are unaware of having this disease. Screening for CKD is one important method for increasing awareness. We examined the cost-effectiveness of identifying persons for early-stage CKD screening (i.e., screening for moderate albuminuria) using published CKD risk scores. We used the CKD Health Policy Model, a micro-simulation model, to simulate the cost-effectiveness of using CKD two published risk scores by Bang et al. and Kshirsagar et al. to identify persons in the US for CKD screening with testing for albuminuria. Alternative risk score thresholds were tested (0.20, 0.15, 0.10, 0.05, and 0.02) above which persons were assigned to receive screening at alternative intervals (1-, 2-, and 5-year) for follow-up screening if the first screening was negative. We examined incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs), incremental lifetime costs divided by incremental lifetime QALYs, relative to the next higher screening threshold to assess cost-effectiveness. Cost-effective scenarios were determined as those with ICERs less than $50,000 per QALY. Among the cost-effective scenarios, the optimal scenario was determined as the one that resulted in the highest lifetime QALYs. ICERs ranged from $8,823 per QALY to $124,626 per QALY for the Bang et al. risk score and $6,342 per QALY to $405,861 per QALY for the Kshirsagar et al. risk score. The Bang et al. risk score with a threshold of 0.02 and 2-year follow-up screening was found to be optimal because it had an ICER less than $50,000 per QALY and resulted in the highest lifetime QALYs. This study indicates that using these CKD risk scores may allow clinicians to cost-effectively identify a broader population for CKD screening with testing for albuminuria

  3. The Viral Gene ORF79 Encodes a Repressor Regulating Induction of the Lytic Life Cycle in the Haloalkaliphilic Virus ϕCh1

    PubMed Central

    Selb, Regina; Derntl, Christian; Klein, Reinhard; Alte, Beatrix; Hofbauer, Christoph; Kaufmann, Martin; Beraha, Judith; Schöner, Léa

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this study, we describe the construction of the first genetically modified mutant of a halovirus infecting haloalkaliphilic Archaea. By random choice, we targeted ORF79, a currently uncharacterized viral gene of the haloalkaliphilic virus ϕCh1. We used a polyethylene glycol (PEG)-mediated transformation method to deliver a disruption cassette into a lysogenic strain of the haloalkaliphilic archaeon Natrialba magadii bearing ϕCh1 as a provirus. This approach yielded mutant virus particles carrying a disrupted version of ORF79. Disruption of ORF79 did not influence morphology of the mature virions. The mutant virus was able to infect cured strains of N. magadii, resulting in a lysogenic, ORF79-disrupted strain. Analysis of this strain carrying the mutant virus revealed a repressor function of ORF79. In the absence of gp79, onset of lysis and expression of viral proteins occurred prematurely compared to their timing in the wild-type strain. Constitutive expression of ORF79 in a cured strain of N. magadii reduced the plating efficiency of ϕCh1 by seven orders of magnitude. Overexpression of ORF79 in a lysogenic strain of N. magadii resulted in an inhibition of lysis and total absence of viral proteins as well as viral progeny. In further experiments, gp79 directly regulated the expression of the tail fiber protein ORF34 but did not influence the methyltransferase gene ORF94. Further, we describe the establishment of an inducible promoter for in vivo studies in N. magadii. IMPORTANCE Genetic analyses of haloalkaliphilic Archaea or haloviruses are only rarely reported. Therefore, only little insight into the in vivo roles of proteins and their functions has been gained so far. We used a reverse genetics approach to identify the function of a yet undescribed gene of ϕCh1. We provide evidence that gp79, a currently unknown protein of ϕCh1, acts as a repressor protein of the viral life cycle, affecting the transition from the lysogenic to the lytic state of

  4. A modular and optimized single marker system for generating Trypanosoma brucei cell lines expressing T7 RNA polymerase and the tetracycline repressor.

    PubMed

    Poon, S K; Peacock, L; Gibson, W; Gull, K; Kelly, S

    2012-02-01

    Here, we present a simple modular extendable vector system for introducing the T7 RNA polymerase and tetracycline repressor genes into Trypanosoma brucei. This novel system exploits developments in our understanding of gene expression and genome organization to produce a streamlined plasmid optimized for high levels of expression of the introduced transgenes. We demonstrate the utility of this novel system in bloodstream and procyclic forms of Trypanosoma brucei, including the genome strain TREU927/4. We validate these cell lines using a variety of inducible experiments that recapture previously published lethal and non-lethal phenotypes. We further demonstrate the utility of the single marker (SmOx) TREU927/4 cell line for in vivo experiments in the tsetse fly and provide a set of plasmids that enable both whole-fly and salivary gland-specific inducible expression of transgenes.

  5. A modular and optimized single marker system for generating Trypanosoma brucei cell lines expressing T7 RNA polymerase and the tetracycline repressor

    PubMed Central

    Poon, S. K.; Peacock, L.; Gibson, W.; Gull, K.; Kelly, S.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we present a simple modular extendable vector system for introducing the T7 RNA polymerase and tetracycline repressor genes into Trypanosoma brucei. This novel system exploits developments in our understanding of gene expression and genome organization to produce a streamlined plasmid optimized for high levels of expression of the introduced transgenes. We demonstrate the utility of this novel system in bloodstream and procyclic forms of Trypanosoma brucei, including the genome strain TREU927/4. We validate these cell lines using a variety of inducible experiments that recapture previously published lethal and non-lethal phenotypes. We further demonstrate the utility of the single marker (SmOx) TREU927/4 cell line for in vivo experiments in the tsetse fly and provide a set of plasmids that enable both whole-fly and salivary gland-specific inducible expression of transgenes. PMID:22645659

  6. Two bHLH-type transcription factors, JA-ASSOCIATED MYC2-LIKE2 and JAM3, are transcriptional repressors and affect male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Nakata, Masaru; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    The jasmonate (JA) plant hormones regulate responses to biotic and abiotic stress and aspects of plant development, including male fertility in Arabidopsis thaliana. The bHLH-type transcription factor JA-ASSOCIATED MYC2-LIKE1 (JAM1) negatively regulates JA signaling and gain-of-function JAM1 transgenic plants have impaired JA-mediated male fertility. Here we report that JAM2 and JAM3, 2 bHLHs closely related to JAM1, also act as transcriptional repressors. Moreover, overexpression of JAM2 and JAM3 also results in reduced male fertility. These results suggest that JAM1, JAM2, and JAM3 act redundantly as negative regulators of JA-mediated male fertility. PMID:24056034

  7. T cell fates ‘zipped up’: how the Bach2 basic leucine zipper transcriptional repressor directs T cell differentiation and function1

    PubMed Central

    Richer, Martin J.; Lang, Mark L.; Butler, Noah S.

    2016-01-01

    Recent data illustrate a key role for the transcriptional regulator Bach2 in orchestrating T cell differentiation and function. Although Bach2 has a well-described role in B cell differentiation, emerging data show that Bach2 is a prototypical member of a novel class of transcription factors that regulates transcriptional activity in T cells at super enhancers, or regions of high transcriptional activity. Accumulating data demonstrate specific roles for Bach2 in favoring regulatory T cell generation, restraining effector T cell differentiation and potentiating memory T cell development. Evidence suggests that Bach2 regulates various facets of T cell function by repressing other key transcriptional regulator such as Blimp-1. This review examines our current understanding of the role of Bach2 in T cell function and highlights the growing evidence that this transcriptional repressor functions as a key regulator involved in maintenance of T cell quiescence, T cell subset differentiation and memory T cell generation. PMID:27496973

  8. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor - More than a simple feedback inhibitor of AhR signaling: Clues for its role in inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Christoph F A; Haarmann-Stemmann, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AhRR) was first described as a specific competitive repressor of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activity based on its ability to dimerize with the AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) and through direct competition of AhR/ARNT and AhRR/ARNT complexes for binding to dioxin-responsive elements (DREs). Like AhR, AhRR belongs to the basic Helix-Loop-Helix/Per-ARNT-Sim (bHLH/PAS) protein family but lacks functional ligand-binding and transactivation domains. Transient transfection experiments with ARNT and AhRR mutants examining the inhibitory mechanism of AhRR suggested a more complex mechanism than the simple mechanism of negative feedback through sequestration of ARNT to regulate AhR signaling. Recently, AhRR has been shown to act as a tumor suppressor gene in several types of cancer cells. Furthermore, epidemiological studies have found epigenetic changes and silencing of AhRR associated with exposure to cigarette smoke and cancer development. Additional studies from our laboratories have demonstrated that AhRR represses other signaling pathways including NF-κB and is capable of regulating inflammatory responses. A better understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of AhRR in AhR signaling and adverse outcome pathways leading to deregulated inflammatory responses contributing to tumor promotion and other adverse health effects is expected from future studies. This review article summarizes the characteristics of AhRR as an inhibitor of AhR activity and highlights more recent findings pointing out the role of AhRR in inflammation and tumorigenesis.

  9. Genome-wide mapping and analysis of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)- and aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AHRR)-binding sites in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sunny Y; Ahmed, Shaimaa; Satheesh, Somisetty V; Matthews, Jason

    2018-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediates the toxic actions of environmental contaminants, such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-ρ-dioxin (TCDD), and also plays roles in vascular development, the immune response, and cell cycle regulation. The AHR repressor (AHRR) is an AHR-regulated gene and a negative regulator of AHR; however, the mechanisms of AHRR-dependent repression of AHR are unclear. In this study, we compared the genome-wide binding profiles of AHR and AHRR in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells treated for 24 h with TCDD using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next-generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq). We identified 3915 AHR- and 2811 AHRR-bound regions, of which 974 (35%) were common to both datasets. When these 24-h datasets were also compared with AHR-bound regions identified after 45 min of TCDD treatment, 67% (1884) of AHRR-bound regions overlapped with those of AHR. This analysis identified 994 unique AHRR-bound regions. AHRR-bound regions mapped closer to promoter regions when compared with AHR-bound regions. The AHRE was identified and overrepresented in AHR:AHRR-co-bound regions, AHR-only regions, and AHRR-only regions. Candidate unique AHR- and AHRR-bound regions were validated by ChIP-qPCR and their ability to regulate gene expression was confirmed by luciferase reporter gene assays. Overall, this study reveals that AHR and AHRR exhibit similar but also distinct genome-wide binding profiles, supporting the notion that AHRR is a context- and gene-specific repressor of AHR activity.

  10. The Zinc Finger Proteins Mxr1p and Repressor of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase (ROP) Have the Same DNA Binding Specificity but Regulate Methanol Metabolism Antagonistically in Pichia pastoris*

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nallani Vijay; Rangarajan, Pundi N.

    2012-01-01

    The methanol-inducible alcohol oxidase I (AOXI) promoter of the methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris, is used widely for the production of recombinant proteins. AOXI transcription is regulated by the zinc finger protein Mxr1p (methanol expression regulator 1). ROP (repressor of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, PEPCK) is a methanol- and biotin starvation-inducible zinc finger protein that acts as a negative regulator of PEPCK in P. pastoris cultured in biotin-deficient, glucose-ammonium medium. The function of ROP during methanol metabolism is not known. In this study, we demonstrate that ROP represses methanol-inducible expression of AOXI when P. pastoris is cultured in a nutrient-rich medium containing yeast extract, peptone, and methanol (YPM). Deletion of the gene encoding ROP results in enhanced expression of AOXI and growth promotion whereas overexpression of ROP results in repression of AOXI and growth retardation of P. pastoris cultured in YPM medium. Surprisingly, deletion or overexpression of ROP has no effect on AOXI gene expression and growth of P. pastoris cultured in a minimal medium containing yeast nitrogen base and methanol (YNBM). Subcellular localization studies indicate that ROP translocates from cytosol to nucleus of cells cultured in YPM but not YNBM. In vitro DNA binding studies indicate that AOXI promoter sequences containing 5′ CYCCNY 3′ motifs serve as binding sites for Mxr1p as well as ROP. Thus, Mxr1p and ROP exhibit the same DNA binding specificity but regulate methanol metabolism antagonistically in P. pastoris. This is the first report on the identification of a transcriptional repressor of methanol metabolism in any yeast species. PMID:22888024

  11. THAP5 is a DNA-binding transcriptional repressor that is regulated in melanoma cells during DNA damage-induced cell death

    SciT

    Balakrishnan, Meenakshi P.; Cilenti, Lucia; Ambivero, Camilla

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. {yields} THAP5 is induced in melanoma cells upon exposure to UV or treatment with cisplatin. {yields} THAP5 induction correlates with the degree of apoptosis in melanoma cell population. {yields} THAP5 is a pro-apoptotic protein involved in melanoma cell death. -- Abstract: THAP5 was originally isolated as a specific interactor and substrate of the mitochondrial pro-apoptotic Omi/HtrA2 protease. It is a human zinc finger protein characterized by a restricted pattern of expression and the lack of orthologs in mouse and rat. The biological function of THAP5 is unknown butmore » our previous studies suggest it could regulate G2/M transition in kidney cells and could be involved in human cardiomyocyte cell death associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). In this report, we expanded our studies on the properties and function of THAP5 in human melanoma cells. THAP5 was expressed in primary human melanocytes as well as in all melanoma cell lines that were tested. THAP5 protein level was significantly induced by UV irradiation or cisplatin treatment, conditions known to cause DNA damage. The induction of THAP5 correlated with a significant increase in apoptotic cell death. In addition, we show that THAP5 is a nuclear protein that could recognize and bind a specific DNA motif. THAP5 could also repress the transcription of a reporter gene in a heterologous system. Our work suggests that THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. Furthermore, THAP5 has a pro-apoptotic function and it was induced in melanoma cells under conditions that promoted cell death.« less

  12. The B-subdomain of the Xenopus laevis XFIN KRAB-AB domain is responsible for its weaker transcriptional repressor activity compared to human ZNF10/Kox1.

    PubMed

    Born, Nadine; Thiesen, Hans-Jürgen; Lorenz, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Krüppel-associated box (KRAB) domain interacts with the nuclear hub protein TRIM28 to initiate or mediate chromatin-dependent processes like transcriptional repression, imprinting or suppression of endogenous retroviruses. The prototype KRAB domain initially identified in ZNF10/KOX1 encompasses two subdomains A and B that are found in hundreds of zinc finger transcription factors studied in human and murine genomes. Here we demonstrate for the first time transcriptional repressor activity of an amphibian KRAB domain. After sequence correction, the updated KRAB-AB domain of zinc finger protein XFIN from the frog Xenopus laevis was found to confer transcriptional repression in reporter assays in Xenopus laevis A6 kidney cells as well as in human HeLa, but not in the minnow Pimephales promelas fish cell line EPC. Binding of the XFIN KRAB-AB domain to human TRIM28 was demonstrated in a classical co-immunoprecipitation approach and visualized in a single-cell compartmentalization assay. XFIN-AB displayed reduced potency in repression as well as lower strength of interaction with TRIM28 compared to ZNF10 KRAB-AB. KRAB-B subdomain swapping between the two KRAB domains indicated that it was mainly the KRAB-B subdomain of XFIN that was responsible for its lower capacity in repression and binding to human TRIM28. In EPC fish cells, ZNF10 and XFIN KRAB repressor activity could be partially restored to low levels by adding exogenous human TRIM28. In contrast to XFIN, we did not find any transcriptional repression activity for the KRAB-like domain of human PRDM9 in HeLa cells. PRDM9 is thought to harbor an evolutionary older domain related to KRAB whose homologs even occur in invertebrates. Our results support the notion that functional bona fide KRAB domains which confer transcriptional repression and interact with TRIM28 most likely co-evolved together with TRIM28 at the beginning of tetrapode evolution.

  13. Salmonella typhimurium PtsJ is a novel MocR-like transcriptional repressor involved in regulating the vitamin B6 salvage pathway.

    PubMed

    Tramonti, Angela; Milano, Teresa; Nardella, Caterina; di Salvo, Martino L; Pascarella, Stefano; Contestabile, Roberto

    2017-02-01

    The vitamin B 6 salvage pathway, involving pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase (PNPOx) and pyridoxal kinase (PLK), recycles B 6 vitamers from nutrients and protein turnover to produce pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), the catalytically active form of the vitamin. Regulation of this pathway, widespread in living organisms including humans and many bacteria, is very important to vitamin B 6 homeostasis but poorly understood. Although some information is available on the enzymatic regulation of PNPOx and PLK, little is known on their regulation at the transcriptional level. In the present work, we identified a new MocR-like regulator, PtsJ from Salmonella typhimurium, which controls the expression of the pdxK gene encoding one of the two PLKs expressed in this organism (PLK1). Analysis of pdxK expression in a ptsJ knockout strain demonstrated that PtsJ acts as a transcriptional repressor. This is the first case of a MocR-like regulator acting as repressor of its target gene. Expression and purification of PtsJ allowed a detailed characterisation of its effector and DNA-binding properties. PLP is the only B 6 vitamer acting as effector molecule for PtsJ. A DNA-binding region composed of four repeated nucleotide sequences is responsible for binding of PtsJ to its target promoter. Analysis of binding stoichiometry revealed that protein subunits/DNA molar ratio varies from 4 : 1 to 2 : 1, depending on the presence or absence of PLP. Structural characteristics of DNA transcriptional factor-binding sites suggest that PtsJ binds DNA according to a different model with respect to other characterised members of the MocR subgroup. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  14. Functional regulation of Q by microRNA172 and transcriptional co-repressor TOPLESS in controlling bread wheat spikelet density.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pan; Liu, Jie; Dong, Huixue; Sun, Jiaqiang

    2018-02-01

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) spike architecture is an important agronomic trait. The Q gene plays a key role in the domestication of bread wheat spike architecture. However, the regulatory mechanisms of Q expression and transcriptional activity remain largely unknown. In this study, we show that overexpression of bread wheat tae-miR172 caused a speltoid-like spike phenotype, reminiscent of that in wheat plants with the q gene. The reduction in Q transcript levels in the tae-miR172 overexpression transgenic bread wheat lines suggests that the Q expression can be suppressed by tae-miR172 in bread wheat. Indeed, our RACE analyses confirmed that the Q mRNA is targeted by tae-miR172 for cleavage. According to our analyses, the Q protein is localized in nucleus and confers transcriptional repression activity. Meanwhile, the Q protein could physically interact with the bread wheat transcriptional co-repressor TOPLESS (TaTPL). Specifically, the N-terminal ethylene-responsive element binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) (LDLNVE) motif but not the C-terminal EAR (LDLDLR) motif of Q protein mediates its interaction with the CTLH motif of TaTPL. Moreover, we show that the N-terminal EAR motif of Q protein is also essentially required for the transcriptional repression activity of Q protein. Taken together, we reveal the functional regulation of Q protein by tae-miR172 and transcriptional co-repressor TaTPL in controlling the bread wheat spike architecture. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Cost-effectiveness analysis of early versus non-early intervention in acute migraine based on evidence from the 'Act when Mild' study.

    PubMed

    Slof, John

    2012-05-01

    In spite of the important progress made in the abortive treatment of acute migraine episodes since the introduction of triptans, reduction of pain and associated symptoms is in many cases still not as effective nor as fast as would be desirable. Recent research pays more attention to the timing of the treatment, and taking triptans early in the course of an attack when pain is still mild has been found more efficacious than the usual strategy of waiting for the attack to develop to a higher pain intensity level. To investigate the cost effectiveness of early versus non-early intervention with almotriptan in acute migraine. An economic evaluation was conducted from the perspectives of French society and the French public health system based on patient-level data collected in the AwM (Act when Mild) study, a placebo-controlled trial that compared the response to early and non-early treatment of acute migraine with almotriptan. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were determined in terms of QALYs, migraine hours and productive time lost. Costs were expressed in Euros (year 2010 values). Bootstrapping was used to derive cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. Early treatment has shown to lead to shorter attack duration, less productive time lost, better quality of life, and is, with 92% probability, overall cost saving from a societal point of view. In terms of drug costs only, however, non-early treatment is less expensive. From the public health system perspective, the (bootstrap) mean ICER of early treatment amounts to €0.38 per migraine hour avoided, €1.29 per hour of productive time lost avoided, and €14,296 per QALY gained. Considering willingness-to-pay values of approximately €1 to avoid an hour of migraine, €10 to avoid the loss of a productive hour, or €30,000 to gain one QALY, the approximate probability that early treatment is cost effective is 90%, 90% and 70%, respectively. These results remain robust in different scenarios for the

  16. Cost-Effectiveness of Tight Control of Inflammation in Early Psoriatic Arthritis: Economic Analysis of a Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    O'Dwyer, John L; Meads, David M; Hulme, Claire T; Mcparland, Lucy; Brown, Sarah; Coates, Laura C; Moverley, Anna R; Emery, Paul; Conaghan, Philip G; Helliwell, Philip S

    2018-03-01

    Treat-to-target approaches have proved to be effective in rheumatoid arthritis, but have not been studied in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). This study was undertaken to examine the cost-effectiveness of tight control (TC) of inflammation in early PsA compared to standard care. Cost-effectiveness analyses were undertaken alongside a UK-based, open-label, multicenter, randomized controlled trial. Taking the perspective of the health care sector, effectiveness was measured using the 3-level EuroQol 5-domain, which allows for the calculation of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) are presented, which represent the additional cost per QALY gained over a 48-week time horizon. Sensitivity analyses are presented assessing the impact of variations in the analytical approach and assumptions on the cost-effectiveness estimates. The mean cost and QALYs were higher in the TC group: £4,198 versus £2,000 and 0.602 versus 0.561. These values yielded an ICER of £53,948 per QALY. Bootstrapped uncertainty analysis suggests that the TC has a 0.07 probability of being cost-effective at a £20,000 threshold. Stratified analysis suggests that with certain costs being controlled, an ICER of £24,639 can be calculated for patients with a higher degree of disease severity. A tight control strategy to treat PsA is an effective intervention in the treatment pathway; however, this study does not find tight control to be cost-effective in most analyses. Lower drug prices, targeting polyarthritis patients, or reducing the frequency of rheumatology visits may improve value for money metrics in future studies. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  17. Electrostatic occlusion and quaternary structural ion pairing are key determinants of Cu(I)-mediated allostery in the copper-sensing operon repressor (CsoR).

    PubMed

    Chang, Feng-Ming James; Martin, Julia E; Giedroc, David P

    2015-04-21

    The copper-sensing operon repressor (CsoR) is an all-α-helical disc-shaped D2-symmetric homotetramer that forms a 2:1 tetramer/DNA operator complex and represses the expression of copper-resistance genes in a number of bacteria. A previous bioinformatics analysis of CsoR-family repressors distributes Cu(I)-sensing CsoRs in four of seven distinct clades on the basis of global sequence similarity. In this work, we define energetically important determinants of DNA binding in the apo-state (ΔΔGbind), and for allosteric negative coupling of Cu(I) binding to DNA binding (ΔΔGc) in a model clade IV CsoR from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans (Gt) of known structure, by selectively targeting for mutagenesis those charged residues uniquely conserved in clade IV CsoRs. These include a folded N-terminal "tail" and a number of Cu(I)-sensor and clade-specific residues that when mapped onto a model of Cu(I)-bound Gt CsoR define a path across one face of the tetramer. We find that Cu(I)-binding prevents formation of the 2:1 "sandwich" complex rather than DNA binding altogether. Folding of the N-terminal tail (residues R18, E22, R74) upon Cu-binding to the periphery of the tetramer inhibits assembly of the 2:1 apoprotein-DNA complex. In contrast, Ala substitution of residues that surround the central "hole" (R65, K101) in the tetramer, as well R48, impact DNA binding. We also identify a quaternary structural ion-pair, E73-K101″, that crosses the tetramer interface, charge-reversal of which restores DNA binding activity, allosteric regulation by Cu(I), and transcriptional derepression by Cu(I) in cells. These findings suggest an "electrostatic occlusion" model, in which basic residues important for DNA binding and/or allostery become sequestered via ion-pairing specifically in the Cu(I)-bound state, and this aids in copper-dependent disassembly of a repression complex.

  18. Increased expression of c-Ski as a co-repressor in transforming growth factor-beta signaling correlates with progression of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fukuchi, Minoru; Nakajima, Masanobu; Fukai, Yasuyuki; Miyazaki, Tatsuya; Masuda, Norihiro; Sohda, Makoto; Manda, Ryokuhei; Tsukada, Katsuhiko; Kato, Hiroyuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2004-03-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) regulates cell growth inhibition, and inactivation of the TGF-beta signaling pathway contributes to tumor development. In our previous study, altered expression of TGF-beta, TGF-beta-specific receptors and Smad4 was shown to correlate with tumor progression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). These components, however, were maintained normally in some patients with esophageal SCC. In our study, the mechanism by which aggressive esophageal SCC maintains these components was investigated, with particular emphasis on the participation of c-Ski and SnoN as transcriptional co-repressors in TGF-beta signaling. Immunohistochemistry for c-Ski and SnoN was carried out on surgical specimens obtained from 80 patients with esophageal SCC. The expression of c-Ski and SnoN was also studied in 6 established cell lines derived from esophageal SCC and compared to an immortalized human esophageal cell line by Western blotting. High levels of expression of c-Ski, detected immunohistologically, were found to correlate with depth of invasion (p = 0.0080) and pathologic stage (p = 0.0447). There was, however, no significant correlation between expression of SnoN and clinicopathologic characteristics. A significant correlation between c-Ski and TGF-beta expression was observed. Moreover, in patients with TGF-beta negative expression, the survival rates of patients with c-Ski positive expression were significantly lower than those of patients with c-Ski negative expression (p = 0.0486). c-Ski was expressed at a high level in 5 of 6 cell lines derived from esophageal SCC compared to immortalized esophageal keratinocytes. Furthermore, the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor, p21 that was up-regulated by TGF-beta signaling was expressed at a low level in the 5 cell lines. The expression of c-Ski protein as a transcriptional co-repressor in TGF-beta signaling seems to be correlated with tumor progression of esophageal SCC. Copyright 2003

  19. Prophage Rs551 and Its Repressor Gene orf14 Reduce Virulence and Increase Competitive Fitness of Its Ralstonia solanacearum Carrier Strain UW551.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Abdelmonim Ali; Stulberg, Michael J; Huang, Qi

    2017-01-01

    We previously characterized a filamentous lysogenic bacteriophage, ϕRs551, isolated directly from the race 3 biovar 2 phylotype IIB sequevar 1 strain UW551 of Ralstonia solanacearum grown under normal culture conditions. The genome of ϕRs551 was identified with 100% identity in the deposited genomes of 11 race 3 biovar 2 phylotype IIB sequevar 1 strains of R. solanacearum , indicating evolutionary and biological importance, and ORF14 of ϕRs551 was annotated as a putative type-2 repressor. In this study, we determined the effect of the prophage and its ORF14 on the virulence and competitive fitness of its carrier strain UW551 by deleting the orf14 gene only (the UW551 orf14 mutant), and nine of the prophage's 14 genes including orf14 and six out of seven structural genes (the UW551 prophage mutant), respectively, from the genome of UW551. The two mutants were increased in extracellular polysaccharide production, twitching motility, expression of targeted virulence and virulence regulatory genes ( pilT, egl, pehC, hrPB, and phcA ), and virulence, suggesting that the virulence of UW551 was negatively regulated by ϕRs551, at least partially through ORF14. Interestingly, we found that the wt ϕRs551-carrying strain UW551 of R. solanacearum significantly outcompeted the wt strain RUN302 which lacks the prophage in tomato plants co-inoculated with the two strains. When each of the two mutant strains was co-inoculated with RUN302, however, the mutants were significantly out-competed by RUN302 for the same colonization site. Our results suggest that ecologically, ϕRs551 may play an important role by regulating the virulence of and offering a competitive fitness advantage to its carrier bacterial strain for persistence of the bacterium in the environment, which in turn prolongs the symbiotic relationship between the phage ϕRs551 and the R. solanacearum strain UW551. Our study is the first toward a better understanding of the co-existence between a lysogenic phage and

  20. Prophage Rs551 and Its Repressor Gene orf14 Reduce Virulence and Increase Competitive Fitness of Its Ralstonia solanacearum Carrier Strain UW551

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Abdelmonim Ali; Stulberg, Michael J.; Huang, Qi

    2017-01-01

    We previously characterized a filamentous lysogenic bacteriophage, ϕRs551, isolated directly from the race 3 biovar 2 phylotype IIB sequevar 1 strain UW551 of Ralstonia solanacearum grown under normal culture conditions. The genome of ϕRs551 was identified with 100% identity in the deposited genomes of 11 race 3 biovar 2 phylotype IIB sequevar 1 strains of R. solanacearum, indicating evolutionary and biological importance, and ORF14 of ϕRs551 was annotated as a putative type-2 repressor. In this study, we determined the effect of the prophage and its ORF14 on the virulence and competitive fitness of its carrier strain UW551 by deleting the orf14 gene only (the UW551 orf14 mutant), and nine of the prophage’s 14 genes including orf14 and six out of seven structural genes (the UW551 prophage mutant), respectively, from the genome of UW551. The two mutants were increased in extracellular polysaccharide production, twitching motility, expression of targeted virulence and virulence regulatory genes (pilT, egl, pehC, hrPB, and phcA), and virulence, suggesting that the virulence of UW551 was negatively regulated by ϕRs551, at least partially through ORF14. Interestingly, we found that the wt ϕRs551-carrying strain UW551 of R. solanacearum significantly outcompeted the wt strain RUN302 which lacks the prophage in tomato plants co-inoculated with the two strains. When each of the two mutant strains was co-inoculated with RUN302, however, the mutants were significantly out-competed by RUN302 for the same colonization site. Our results suggest that ecologically, ϕRs551 may play an important role by regulating the virulence of and offering a competitive fitness advantage to its carrier bacterial strain for persistence of the bacterium in the environment, which in turn prolongs the symbiotic relationship between the phage ϕRs551 and the R. solanacearum strain UW551. Our study is the first toward a better understanding of the co-existence between a lysogenic phage and

  1. Cost-effectiveness of early palliative care intervention in recurrent platinum-resistant ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Lowery, William J; Lowery, Ashlei W; Barnett, Jason C; Lopez-Acevedo, Micael; Lee, Paula S; Secord, Angeles Alvarez; Havrilesky, Laura

    2013-09-01

    To determine if early palliative care intervention in patients with recurrent, platinum-resistant ovarian cancer is potentially cost saving or cost-effective. A decision model with a 6 month time horizon evaluated routine care versus routine care plus early referral to a palliative medicine specialist (EPC) for recurrent platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. Model parameters included rates of inpatient admissions, emergency department (ED) visits, chemotherapy administration, and quality of life (QOL). From published ovarian cancer data, we assumed baseline rates over the final 6 months: hospitalization 70%, chemotherapy 60%, and ED visit 30%. Published data from a randomized trial evaluating EPC in metastatic lung cancer were used to model odds ratios (ORs) for potential reductions in hospitalization (OR 0.69), chemotherapy (OR 0.77), and emergency department care (OR 0.74) and improvement in QOL (OR 1.07). The costs of hospitalization, ED visit, chemotherapy, and EPC were based on published data. Ranges were used for sensitivity analysis. Effectiveness was quantified in quality adjusted life years (QALYs); survival was assumed equivalent between strategies. EPC was associated with a cost savings of $1285 per patient over routine care. In sensitivity analysis incorporating QOL, EPC was either dominant or cost-effective, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) <$50,000/QALY, unless the cost of outpatient EPC exceeded $2400. Assuming no clinical benefit other than QOL (no change in chemotherapy administration, hospitalizations or ED visits), EPC remained highly cost-effective with ICER $37,440/QALY. Early palliative care intervention has the potential to reduce costs associated with end of life care in patients with ovarian cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Molecular dynamics studies of a DNA-binding protein: 2. An evaluation of implicit and explicit solvent models for the molecular dynamics simulation of the Escherichia coli trp repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Guenot, J.; Kollman, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    Although aqueous simulations with periodic boundary conditions more accurately describe protein dynamics than in vacuo simulations, these are computationally intensive for most proteins. Trp repressor dynamic simulations with a small water shell surrounding the starting model yield protein trajectories that are markedly improved over gas phase, yet computationally efficient. Explicit water in molecular dynamics simulations maintains surface exposure of protein hydrophilic atoms and burial of hydrophobic atoms by opposing the otherwise asymmetric protein-protein forces. This properly orients protein surface side chains, reduces protein fluctuations, and lowers the overall root mean square deviation from the crystal structure. For simulations with crystallographic waters only, a linear or sigmoidal distance-dependent dielectric yields a much better trajectory than does a constant dielectric model. As more water is added to the starting model, the differences between using distance-dependent and constant dielectric models becomes smaller, although the linear distance-dependent dielectric yields an average structure closer to the crystal structure than does a constant dielectric model. Multiplicative constants greater than one, for the linear distance-dependent dielectric simulations, produced trajectories that are progressively worse in describing trp repressor dynamics. Simulations of bovine pancreatic trypsin were used to ensure that the trp repressor results were not protein dependent and to explore the effect of the nonbonded cutoff on the distance-dependent and constant dielectric simulation models. The nonbonded cutoff markedly affected the constant but not distance-dependent dielectric bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor simulations. As with trp repressor, the distance-dependent dielectric model with a shell of water surrounding the protein produced a trajectory in better agreement with the crystal structure than a constant dielectric model, and the physical

  3. Sestrin-2, a repressor of PDGFRβ signalling, promotes cigarette-smoke-induced pulmonary emphysema in mice and is upregulated in individuals with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Heidler, Juliana; Fysikopoulos, Athanasios; Wempe, Frank; Seimetz, Michael; Bangsow, Thorsten; Tomasovic, Ana; Veit, Florian; Scheibe, Susan; Pichl, Alexandra; Weisel, Friederike; Lloyd, K. C. Kent; Jaksch, Peter; Klepetko, Walter; Weissmann, Norbert; von Melchner, Harald

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. COPD is caused by chronic exposure to cigarette smoke and/or other environmental pollutants that are believed to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that gradually disrupt signalling pathways responsible for maintaining lung integrity. Here we identify the antioxidant protein sestrin-2 (SESN2) as a repressor of PDGFRβ signalling, and PDGFRβ signalling as an upstream regulator of alveolar maintenance programmes. In mice, the mutational inactivation of Sesn2 prevents the development of cigarette-smoke-induced pulmonary emphysema by upregulating PDGFRβ expression via a selective accumulation of intracellular superoxide anions (O2−). We also show that SESN2 is overexpressed and PDGFRβ downregulated in the emphysematous lungs of individuals with COPD and to a lesser extent in human lungs of habitual smokers without COPD, implicating a negative SESN2-PDGFRβ interrelationship in the pathogenesis of COPD. Taken together, our results imply that SESN2 could serve as both a biomarker and as a drug target in the clinical management of COPD. PMID:24046361

  4. The transcriptional repressor Sum1p counteracts Sir2p in regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, mitochondrial quality control and replicative lifespan in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Higuchi-Sanabria, Ryo; Vevea, Jason D; Charalel, Joseph K; Sapar, Maria L; Pon, Liza A

    2016-01-18

    Increasing the stability or dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton can extend lifespan in C. elegans and S. cerevisiae . Actin cables of budding yeast, bundles of actin filaments that mediate cargo transport, affect lifespan control through effects on mitochondrial quality control. Sir2p, the founding member of the Sirtuin family of lifespan regulators, also affects actin cable dynamics, assembly, and function in mitochondrial quality control. Here, we obtained evidence for novel interactions between Sir2p and Sum1p, a transcriptional repressor that was originally identified through mutations that genetically suppress sir2 ∆ phenotypes unrelated to lifespan. We find that deletion of SUM1 in wild-type cells results in increased mitochondrial function and actin cable abundance. Furthermore, deletion of SUM1 suppresses defects in actin cables and mitochondria of sir2 ∆ yeast, and extends the replicative lifespan and cellular health span of sir2 ∆ cells. Thus, Sum1p suppresses Sir2p function in control of specific aging determinants and lifespan in budding yeast.

  5. Regulation of the sol Locus Genes for Butanol and Acetone Formation in Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 by a Putative Transcriptional Repressor

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Ramesh V.; Green, Edward M.; Watson, David E.; Bennett, George N.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.

    1999-01-01

    A gene (orf1, now designated solR) previously identified upstream of the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase gene aad (R. V. Nair, G. N. Bennett, and E. T. Papoutsakis, J. Bacteriol. 176:871–885, 1994) was found to encode a repressor of the sol locus (aad, ctfA, ctfB and adc) genes for butanol and acetone formation in Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824. Primer extension analysis identified a transcriptional start site 35 bp upstream of the solR start codon. Amino acid comparisons of SolR identified a potential helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif in the C-terminal half towards the center of the protein, suggesting a regulatory role. Overexpression of SolR in strain ATCC 824(pCO1) resulted in a solvent-negative phenotype owing to its deleterious effect on the transcription of the sol locus genes. Inactivation of solR in C. acetobutylicum via homologous recombination yielded mutants B and H (ATCC 824 solR::pO1X) which exhibited deregulated solvent production characterized by increased flux towards butanol and acetone formation, earlier induction of aad, lower overall acid production, markedly improved yields of solvents on glucose, a prolonged solvent production phase, and increased biomass accumulation compared to those of the wild-type strain. PMID:9864345

  6. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 ASP RNA promotes viral latency by recruiting the Polycomb Repressor Complex 2 and promoting nucleosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Juan C.; Campilongo, Federica; Barclay, Robert A.; DeMarino, Catherine; Iglesias-Ussel, Maria D.; Kashanchi, Fatah; Romerio, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Various epigenetic marks at the HIV-1 5′LTR suppress proviral expression and promote latency. Cellular antisense transcripts known as long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) recruit the polycomb repressor complex 2 (PRC2) to gene promoters, which catalyzes trimethylation of lysine 27 on histone H3 (H3K27me3), thus promoting nucleosome assembly and suppressing gene expression. We found that an HIV-1 antisense transcript expressed from the 3′LTR and encoding the antisense protein ASP promotes proviral latency. Expression of ASP RNA reduced HIV-1 replication in Jurkat cells. Moreover, ASP RNA expression promoted the establishment and maintenance of HIV-1 latency in Jurkat E4 cells. We show that this transcript interacts with and recruits PRC2 to the HIV-1 5′LTR, increasing accumulation of the suppressive epigenetic mark H3K27me3, while reducing RNA Polymerase II and thus proviral transcription. Altogether, our results suggest that the HIV-1 ASP transcript promotes epigenetic silencing of the HIV-1 5′LTR and proviral latency through the PRC2 pathway. PMID:28340355

  7. Atypical E2F transcriptional repressor DEL1 acts at the intersection of plant growth and immunity by controlling the hormone salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Divya; Rickert, Joshua; Huang, Yingxiang; Steinwand, Michael A; Marr, Sharon K; Wildermuth, Mary C

    2014-04-09

    In plants, the activation of immunity is often inversely correlated with growth. Mechanisms that control plant growth in the context of pathogen challenge and immunity are unclear. Investigating Arabidopsis infection with the powdery mildew fungus, we find that the Arabidopsis atypical E2F DEL1, a transcriptional repressor known to promote cell proliferation, represses accumulation of the hormone salicylic acid (SA), an established regulator of plant immunity. DEL1-deficient plants are more resistant to pathogens and slightly smaller than wild-type. The resistance and size phenotypes of DEL1-deficient plants are due to the induction of SA and activation of immunity in the absence of pathogen challenge. Moreover, Enhanced Disease Susceptibility 5 (EDS5), a SA transporter required for elevated SA and immunity, is a direct repressed target of DEL1. Together, these findings indicate that DEL1 control of SA levels contributes to regulating the balance between growth and immunity in developing leaves. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes is a bona fide lysosomal protein which undergoes proteolytic maturation during its biosynthesis

    SciT

    Schaehs, Philipp; Weidinger, Petra; Probst, Olivia C.

    2008-10-01

    Cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes (CREG) has been reported to be a secretory glycoprotein implicated in cellular growth and differentiation. We now show that CREG is predominantly localized within intracellular compartments. Intracellular CREG was found to lack an N-terminal peptide present in the secreted form of the protein. In contrast to normal cells, CREG is largely secreted by fibroblasts missing both mannose 6-phosphate receptors. This is not observed in cells lacking only one of them. Mass spectrometric analysis of recombinant CREG revealed that the protein contains phosphorylated oligosaccharides at either of its two N-glycosylation sites. Cellular CREG was found tomore » cosediment with lysosomal markers upon subcellular fractionation by density-gradient centrifugation. In fibroblasts expressing a CREG-GFP fusion construct, the heterologous protein was detected in compartments containing lysosomal proteins. Immunolocalization of endogenous CREG confirmed that intracellular CREG is localized in lysosomes. Proteolytic processing of intracellular CREG involves the action of lysosomal cysteine proteinases. These results establish that CREG is a lysosomal protein that undergoes proteolytic maturation in the course of its biosynthesis, carries the mannose 6-phosphate recognition marker and depends on the interaction with mannose 6-phosphate receptors for efficient delivery to lysosomes.« less

  9. In vivo estradiol-dependent dephosphorylation of the repressor MDBP-2-H1 correlates with the loss of in vitro preferential binding to methylated DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Bruhat, A; Jost, J P

    1995-01-01

    We have previously shown that estradiol treatment of roosters resulted in a rapid loss of binding activity of the repressor MDBP-2-H1 (a member of the histone H1 family) to methylated DNA that was not due to a decrease in MDBP-2-H1 concentration. Here we demonstrate that MDBP-2-H1 from rooster liver nuclear extracts is a phosphoprotein. Phosphoamino acid analysis reveals that the phosphorylation occurs exclusively on serine residues. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and tryptic phosphopeptide analysis show that MDBP-2-H1 is phosphorylated at several sites. Treatment of roosters with estradiol triggers a dephosphorylation of at least two sites in the protein. Phosphatase treatment of purified rooster MDBP-2-H1 combined with gel mobility shift assay indicates that phosphorylation of MDBP-2-H1 is essential for the binding to methylated DNA and that the dephosphorylation can occur on the protein bound to methylated DNA causing its release from DNA. Thus, these results suggest that in vivo modification of the phosphorylation status of MDBP-2-H1 caused by estradiol treatment may be a key step for the down regulation of its binding to methylated DNA. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7731964

  10. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 ASP RNA promotes viral latency by recruiting the Polycomb Repressor Complex 2 and promoting nucleosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Juan C; Campilongo, Federica; Barclay, Robert A; DeMarino, Catherine; Iglesias-Ussel, Maria D; Kashanchi, Fatah; Romerio, Fabio

    2017-06-01

    Various epigenetic marks at the HIV-1 5'LTR suppress proviral expression and promote latency. Cellular antisense transcripts known as long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) recruit the polycomb repressor complex 2 (PRC2) to gene promoters, which catalyzes trimethylation of lysine 27 on histone H3 (H3K27me3), thus promoting nucleosome assembly and suppressing gene expression. We found that an HIV-1 antisense transcript expressed from the 3'LTR and encoding the antisense protein ASP promotes proviral latency. Expression of ASP RNA reduced HIV-1 replication in Jurkat cells. Moreover, ASP RNA expression promoted the establishment and maintenance of HIV-1 latency in Jurkat E4 cells. We show that this transcript interacts with and recruits PRC2 to the HIV-1 5'LTR, increasing accumulation of the suppressive epigenetic mark H3K27me3, while reducing RNA Polymerase II and thus proviral transcription. Altogether, our results suggest that the HIV-1 ASP transcript promotes epigenetic silencing of the HIV-1 5'LTR and proviral latency through the PRC2 pathway. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The banana fruit Dof transcription factor MaDof23 acts as a repressor and interacts with MaERF9 in regulating ripening-related genes

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bi-hong; Han, Yan-chao; Xiao, Yun-yi; Kuang, Jian-fei; Fan, Zhong-qi; Chen, Jian-ye; Lu, Wang-jin

    2016-01-01

    The DNA binding with one finger (Dof) proteins, a family of plant-specific transcription factors, are involved in a variety of plant biological processes. However, little information is available on their involvement in fruit ripening. We have characterized 25 MaDof genes from banana fruit (Musa acuminata), designated as MaDof1–MaDof25. Gene expression analysis in fruit subjected to different ripening conditions revealed that MaDofs were differentially expressed during different stages of ripening. MaDof10, 23, 24, and 25 were ethylene-inducible and nuclear-localized, and their transcript levels increased during fruit ripening. Moreover, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analyses demonstrated a physical interaction between MaDof23 and MaERF9, a potential regulator of fruit ripening reported in a previous study. We determined that MaDof23 is a transcriptional repressor, whereas MaERF9 is a transcriptional activator. We suggest that they might act antagonistically in regulating 10 ripening-related genes, including MaEXP1/2/3/5, MaXET7, MaPG1, MaPME3, MaPL2, MaCAT, and MaPDC, which are associated with cell wall degradation and aroma formation. Taken together, our findings provide new insight into the transcriptional regulation network controlling banana fruit ripening. PMID:26889012

  12. Repression of YdaS Toxin Is Mediated by Transcriptional Repressor RacR in the Cryptic rac Prophage of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthi, Revathy; Ghosh, Swagatha; Khedkar, Supriya; Seshasayee, Aswin Sai Narain

    2017-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer is a major driving force behind the genomic diversity seen in prokaryotes. The cryptic rac prophage in Escherichia coli K-12 carries the gene for a putative transcription factor RacR, whose deletion is lethal. We have shown that the essentiality of racR in E. coli K-12 is attributed to its role in transcriptionally repressing toxin gene(s) called ydaS and ydaT , which are adjacent to and coded divergently to racR . IMPORTANCE Transcription factors in the bacterium E. coli are rarely essential, and when they are essential, they are largely toxin-antitoxin systems. While studying transcription factors encoded in horizontally acquired regions in E. coli , we realized that the protein RacR, a putative transcription factor encoded by a gene on the rac prophage, is an essential protein. Here, using genetics, biochemistry, and bioinformatics, we show that its essentiality derives from its role as a transcriptional repressor of the ydaS and ydaT genes, whose products are toxic to the cell. Unlike type II toxin-antitoxin systems in which transcriptional regulation involves complexes of the toxin and antitoxin, repression by RacR is sufficient to keep ydaS transcriptionally silent.

  13. Haploinsufficiency of MeCP2-interacting transcriptional co-repressor SIN3A causes mild intellectual disability by affecting the development of cortical integrity.

    PubMed

    Witteveen, Josefine S; Willemsen, Marjolein H; Dombroski, Thaís C D; van Bakel, Nick H M; Nillesen, Willy M; van Hulten, Josephus A; Jansen, Eric J R; Verkaik, Dave; Veenstra-Knol, Hermine E; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M A; Wassink-Ruiter, Jolien S Klein; Vincent, Marie; David, Albert; Le Caignec, Cedric; Schieving, Jolanda; Gilissen, Christian; Foulds, Nicola; Rump, Patrick; Strom, Tim; Cremer, Kirsten; Zink, Alexander M; Engels, Hartmut; de Munnik, Sonja A; Visser, Jasper E; Brunner, Han G; Martens, Gerard J M; Pfundt, Rolph; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Kolk, Sharon M

    2016-08-01

    Numerous genes are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders such as intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but their dysfunction is often poorly characterized. Here we identified dominant mutations in the gene encoding the transcriptional repressor and MeCP2 interactor switch-insensitive 3 family member A (SIN3A; chromosome 15q24.2) in individuals who, in addition to mild intellectual disability and ASD, share striking features, including facial dysmorphisms, microcephaly and short stature. This phenotype is highly related to that of individuals with atypical 15q24 microdeletions, linking SIN3A to this microdeletion syndrome. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed subtle abnormalities, including corpus callosum hypoplasia and ventriculomegaly. Intriguingly, in vivo functional knockdown of Sin3a led to reduced cortical neurogenesis, altered neuronal identity and aberrant corticocortical projections in the developing mouse brain. Together, our data establish that haploinsufficiency of SIN3A is associated with mild syndromic intellectual disability and that SIN3A can be considered to be a key transcriptional regulator of cortical brain development.

  14. Structural and functional characterization of the LldR from Corynebacterium glutamicum: a transcriptional repressor involved in l-lactate and sugar utilization

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yong-Gui; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Itou, Hiroshi; Zhou, Yong; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Wachi, Masaaki; Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Tanaka, Isao; Yao, Min

    2008-01-01

    LldR (CGL2915) from Corynebacterium glutamicum is a transcription factor belonging to the GntR family, which is typically involved in the regulation of oxidized substrates associated with amino acid metabolism. In the present study, the crystal structure of LldR was determined at 2.05-Å resolution. The structure consists of N- and C-domains similar to those of FadR, but with distinct domain orientations. LldR and FadR dimers achieve similar structures by domain swapping, which was first observed in dimeric assembly of transcription factors. A structural feature of Zn2+ binding in the regulatory domain was also observed, as a difference from the FadR subfamily. DNA microarray and DNase I footprint analyses suggested that LldR acts as a repressor regulating cgl2917-lldD and cgl1934-fruK-ptsF operons, which are indispensable for l-lactate and fructose/sucrose utilization, respectively. Furthermore, the stoichiometries and affinities of LldR and DNAs were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry measurements. The transcriptional start site and repression of LldR on the cgl2917-lldD operon were analysed by primer extension assay. Mutation experiments showed that residues Lys4, Arg32, Arg42 and Gly63 are crucial for DNA binding. The location of the putative ligand binding cavity and the regulatory mechanism of LldR on its affinity for DNA were proposed. PMID:18988622

  15. Purification and DNA-binding properties of the cro-type regulatory repressor protein cng encoded by the Lactobacillus plantarum phage phi g1e.

    PubMed

    Kakikawa, M; Ohkubo, S; Sakate, T; Sayama, M; Taketo, A; Kodaira, K

    2000-05-16

    The putative repressor protein Cng (10kDa on an SDS gel) for the lytic pathway of Lactobacillus plantarum phage φg1e was purified using the Escherichia coli Pt7 system, and its DNA-binding ability for the seven operator-like sequences, the GATAC-boxes (Gb1 to Gb7), was investigated in vitro. In gel-shift assays, Cng selectively bound to the DNA fragments containing the GATAC-box(es). In addition, DNase I footprinting analysis with supercoiled DNA demonstrated that Cng can specifically cover about a 25bp region centered around each of the GATAC-boxes, although two boxes, Gb4 and Gb6, were only partially protected. Moreover, protein crosslinking experiments using glutaraldehyde suggested that Cng most likely functions as a dimer. On the other hand, the binding ability of Cpg for the GATAC-boxes in supercoiled DNA was also examined under the same conditions as in Cng; unlike Cng, Cpg covered Gb4 and Gb6 completely sufficiently as well as the other five boxes. Thus, the present and previous [Kakikawa et al., Gene 215 (1998) 371-379; 242 (2000) 155-166] results indicate a possibility that the two proteins Cng and Cpg selectively bind to the GATAC-boxes that act as operators, and can decide between the lytic or lysogenic pathways through repression of the promoter activity of P(R) as well as P(L).

  16. The basic helix-loop-helix region of the transcriptional repressor hairy and enhancer of split 1 is preorganized to bind DNA.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Matija; Wienk, Hans; Coglievina, Maristella; Boelens, Rolf; Pongor, Sándor; Pintar, Alessandro

    2014-04-01

    Hairy and enhancer of split 1, one of the main downstream effectors in Notch signaling, is a transcriptional repressor of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family. Using nuclear magnetic resonance methods, we have determined the structure and dynamics of a recombinant protein, H1H, which includes an N-terminal segment, b1, containing functionally important phosphorylation sites, the basic region b2, required for binding to DNA, and the HLH domain. We show that a proline residue in the sequence divides the protein in two parts, a flexible and disordered N-terminal region including b1 and a structured, mainly helical region comprising b2 and the HLH domain. Binding of H1H to a double strand DNA oligonucleotide was monitored through the chemical shift perturbation of backbone amide resonances, and showed that the interaction surface involves not only the b2 segment but also several residues in the b1 and HLH regions. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A high-resolution structure of the DNA-binding domain of AhrC, the arginine repressor/activator protein from Bacillus subtilis

    SciT

    Garnett, James A.; Baumberg, Simon; Stockley, Peter G.

    2007-11-01

    The structure of the winged helix–turn–helix DNA-binding domain of AhrC has been determined at 1.0 Å resolution. The largely hydrophobic β-wing shows high B factors and may mediate the dimer interface in operator complexes. In Bacillus subtilis the concentration of l-arginine is controlled by the transcriptional regulator AhrC, which interacts with 18 bp DNA operator sites called ARG boxes in the promoters of arginine biosynthetic and catabolic operons. AhrC is a 100 kDa homohexamer, with each subunit having two domains. The C-terminal domains form the core, mediating intersubunit interactions and binding of the co-repressor l-arginine, whilst the N-terminal domains containmore » a winged helix–turn–helix DNA-binding motif and are arranged around the periphery. The N-terminal domain of AhrC has been expressed, purified and characterized and it has been shown that the fragment still binds DNA operators as a recombinant monomer. The DNA-binding domain has also been crystallized and the crystal structure refined to 1.0 Å resolution is presented.« less

  18. Tunable Control of an Escherichia coli Expression System for the Overproduction of Membrane Proteins by Titrated Expression of a Mutant lac Repressor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong Keun; Lee, Dae-Hee; Kim, Oh Cheol; Kim, Jihyun F; Yoon, Sung Ho

    2017-09-15

    Most inducible expression systems suffer from growth defects, leaky basal induction, and inhomogeneous expression levels within a host cell population. These difficulties are most prominent with the overproduction of membrane proteins that are toxic to host cells. Here, we developed an Escherichia coli inducible expression system for membrane protein production based on titrated expression of a mutant lac repressor (mLacI). Performance of the mLacI inducible system was evaluated in conjunction with commonly used lac operator-based expression vectors using a T7 or tac promoter. Remarkably, expression of a target gene can be titrated by the dose-dependent addition of l-rhamnose, and the expression levels were homogeneous in the cell population. The developed system was successfully applied to overexpress three membrane proteins that were otherwise difficult to produce in E. coli. This gene expression control system can be easily applied to a broad range of existing protein expression systems and should be useful in constructing genetic circuits that require precise output signals.

  19. Evidence for involvement of the C-terminal domain in the dimerization of the CopY repressor protein from Enterococcus hirae

    SciT

    Pazehoski, Kristina O., E-mail: pazehosk@pitt.edu; Cobine, Paul A., E-mail: pac0006@auburn.edu; Winzor, Donald J.

    2011-03-11

    Research highlights: {yields} A metal-binding protein domain is directly involved in protein dimerization. {yields} Fusing the metal-binding domain to a monomeric protein induces dimerization. {yields} Frontal size-exclusion chromatography measures the strength of dimer interaction. {yields} Ultracentrifugation studies confirm the influence of metal binding on dimerization. -- Abstract: Metal binding to the C-terminal region of the copper-responsive repressor protein CopY is responsible for homodimerization and the regulation of the copper homeostasis pathway in Enterococcus hirae. Specific involvement of the 38 C-terminal residues of CopY in dimerization is indicated by zonal and frontal (large zone) size-exclusion chromatography studies. The studies demonstrate thatmore » the attachment of these CopY residues to the immunoglobulin-binding domain of streptococcal protein G (GB1) promotes dimerization of the monomeric protein. Although sensitivity of dimerization to removal of metal from the fusion protein is smaller than that found for CopY (as measured by ultracentrifugation studies), the demonstration that an unrelated protein (GB1) can be induced to dimerize by extending its sequence with the C-terminal portion of CopY confirms the involvement of this region in CopY homodimerization.« less

  20. Inhibition of IL-1{beta}-mediated inflammatory responses by the I{kappa}B{alpha} super-repressor in human fibroblast-like synoviocytes

    SciT

    Lee, Young-Rae; Kweon, Suc-Hyun; Kwon, Kang-Beom

    The IL-1{beta}-NF-{kappa}B axis is a key pathway in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is central in the production of proinflammatory mediators in the inflamed synovium. Therefore, we examined whether fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) could be spared from IL-1{beta}-induced toxicity by an overexpressing I{kappa}B super-repressor. Infection of FLS with Ad-I{kappa}B{alpha} (S32A, S36A), an adenovirus-containing mutant I{kappa}B{alpha}, inhibited IL-1{beta}-induced nuclear translocation and DNA binding of NF-{kappa}B. In addition, Ad-I{kappa}B{alpha} (S32A, S36A) prevented IL-1{beta}-induced inflammatory responses; namely, the production of chemokines, such as ENA-78 and RANTES, and activation of MMP-1 and MMP-3. Finally, increased cellular proliferation of FLS after IL-1{beta} treatment wasmore » significantly reduced by Ad-I{kappa}B{alpha} (S32A, S36A). However, Ad-I{kappa}B{beta} (S19A, S23A), the I{kappa}B{beta} mutant, was not effective in preventing IL-1{beta} toxicity. These results suggest that inhibition of I{kappa}B{alpha} degradation is a potential target for the prevention of joint destruction in patients with RA.« less

  1. The bZIP repressor proteins, c-Jun dimerization protein 2 and activating transcription factor 3, recruit multiple HDAC members to the ATF3 promoter.

    PubMed

    Darlyuk-Saadon, Ilona; Weidenfeld-Baranboim, Keren; Yokoyama, Kazunari K; Hai, Tsonwin; Aronheim, Ami

    2012-01-01

    JDP2, is a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) protein displaying a high degree of homology with the stress inducible transcription factor, ATF3. Both proteins bind to cAMP and TPA response elements and repress transcription by multiple mechanisms. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play a key role in gene inactivation by deacetylating lysine residues on histones. Here we describe the association of JDP2 and ATF3 with HDACs 1, 2-6 and 10. Association of HDAC3 and HDAC6 with JDP2 and ATF3 occurs via direct protein-protein interactions. Only part of the N-terminal bZIP motif of JDP2 and ATF3 basic domain is necessary and sufficient for the interaction with HDACs in a manner that is independent of coiled-coil dimerization. Class I HDACs associate with the bZIP repressors via the DAC conserved domain whereas the Class IIb HDAC6 associates through its C-terminal unique binder of ubiquitin Zn finger domain. Both JDP2 and ATF3 are known to bind and repress the ATF3 promoter. MEF cells treated with histone deacetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA) display enhanced ATF3 transcription. ATF3 enhanced transcription is significantly reduced in MEF cells lacking both ATF3 and JDP2. Collectively, we propose that the recruitment of multiple HDAC members to JDP2 and ATF3 is part of their transcription repression mechanism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Additional regulatory activities of MrkH for the transcriptional expression of the Klebsiella pneumoniae mrk genes: Antagonist of H-NS and repressor.

    PubMed

    Ares, Miguel A; Fernández-Vázquez, José L; Pacheco, Sabino; Martínez-Santos, Verónica I; Jarillo-Quijada, Ma Dolores; Torres, Javier; Alcántar-Curiel, María D; González-Y-Merchand, Jorge A; De la Cruz, Miguel A

    2017-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common opportunistic pathogen causing nosocomial infections. One of the main virulence determinants of K. pneumoniae is the type 3 pilus (T3P). T3P helps the bacterial interaction to both abiotic and biotic surfaces and it is crucial for the biofilm formation. T3P is genetically organized in three transcriptional units: the mrkABCDF polycistronic operon, the mrkHI bicistronic operon and the mrkJ gene. MrkH is a regulatory protein encoded in the mrkHI operon, which positively regulates the mrkA pilin gene and its own expression. In contrast, the H-NS nucleoid protein represses the transcriptional expression of T3P. Here we reported that MrkH and H-NS positively and negatively regulate mrkJ expression, respectively, by binding to the promoter of mrkJ. MrkH protein recognized a sequence located at position -63.5 relative to the transcriptional start site of mrkJ gene. Interestingly, our results show that, in addition to its known function as classic transcriptional activator, MrkH also positively controls the expression of mrk genes by acting as an anti-repressor of H-NS; moreover, our results support the notion that high levels of MrkH repress T3P expression. Our data provide new insights about the complex regulatory role of the MrkH protein on the transcriptional control of T3P in K. pneumoniae.

  3. Additional regulatory activities of MrkH for the transcriptional expression of the Klebsiella pneumoniae mrk genes: Antagonist of H-NS and repressor

    PubMed Central

    Ares, Miguel A.; Fernández-Vázquez, José L.; Pacheco, Sabino; Martínez-Santos, Verónica I.; Jarillo-Quijada, Ma. Dolores; Torres, Javier; Alcántar-Curiel, María D.; González-y-Merchand, Jorge A.; De la Cruz, Miguel A.

    2017-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common opportunistic pathogen causing nosocomial infections. One of the main virulence determinants of K. pneumoniae is the type 3 pilus (T3P). T3P helps the bacterial interaction to both abiotic and biotic surfaces and it is crucial for the biofilm formation. T3P is genetically organized in three transcriptional units: the mrkABCDF polycistronic operon, the mrkHI bicistronic operon and the mrkJ gene. MrkH is a regulatory protein encoded in the mrkHI operon, which positively regulates the mrkA pilin gene and its own expression. In contrast, the H-NS nucleoid protein represses the transcriptional expression of T3P. Here we reported that MrkH and H-NS positively and negatively regulate mrkJ expression, respectively, by binding to the promoter of mrkJ. MrkH protein recognized a sequence located at position -63.5 relative to the transcriptional start site of mrkJ gene. Interestingly, our results show that, in addition to its known function as classic transcriptional activator, MrkH also positively controls the expression of mrk genes by acting as an anti-repressor of H-NS; moreover, our results support the notion that high levels of MrkH repress T3P expression. Our data provide new insights about the complex regulatory role of the MrkH protein on the transcriptional control of T3P in K. pneumoniae. PMID:28278272

  4. REPRESSOR OF SILENCING5 Encodes a Member of the Small Heat Shock Protein Family and Is Required for DNA Demethylation in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yusheng; Xie, Shaojun; Li, Xiaojie; Wang, Chunlei; Chen, Zhongzhou; Lai, Jinsheng; Gong, Zhizhong

    2014-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, active DNA demethylation is initiated by the DNA glycosylase REPRESSOR OF SILENCING1 (ROS1) and its paralogs DEMETER, DEMETER-LIKE2 (DML2), and DML3. How these demethylation enzymes are regulated, however, is poorly understood. Here, using a transgenic Arabidopsis line harboring the stress-inducible RESPONSIVE TO DEHYDRATION29A (RD29A) promoter–LUCIFERASE (LUC) reporter gene and the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (35S)–NEOMYCIN PHOSPHOTRANSFERASE II (NPTII) antibiotic resistance marker gene, we characterize a ROS locus, ROS5, that encodes a protein in the small heat shock protein family. ROS5 mutations lead to the silencing of the 35S-NPTII transgene due to DNA hypermethylation but do not affect the expression of the RD29A-LUC transgene. ROS5 physically interacts with the histone acetyltransferase ROS4/INCREASED DNA METHYLATION1 (IDM1) and is required to prevent the DNA hypermethylation of some genes that are also regulated by ROS1 and IDM1. We propose that ROS5 regulates DNA demethylation by interacting with IDM1, thereby creating a chromatin environment that facilitates the binding of ROS1 to erase DNA methylation. PMID:24920332

  5. Cloning and Characterization of a Putative R2R3 MYB Transcriptional Repressor of the Rosmarinic Acid Biosynthetic Pathway from Salvia miltiorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuncang; Ma, Pengda; Yang, Dongfeng; Li, Wenjing; Liang, Zongsuo; Liu, Yan; Liu, Fenghua

    2013-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge is one of the most renowned traditional medicinal plants in China. Phenolic acids that are derived from the rosmarinic acid pathway, such as rosmarinic acid and salvianolic acid B, are important bioactive components in S. miltiorrhiza. Accumulations of these compounds have been reported to be induced by various elicitors, while little is known about transcription factors that function in their biosynthetic pathways. We cloned a subgroup 4 R2R3 MYB transcription factor gene (SmMYB39) from S. miltiorrhiza and characterized its roles through overexpression and RNAi-mediated silencing. As the results showed, the content of 4-coumaric acid, rosmarinic acid, salvianolic acid B, salvianolic acid A and total phenolics was dramatically decreased in SmMYB39-overexpressing S. miltiorrhiza lines while being enhanced by folds in SmMYB39-RNAi lines. Quantitative real-time PCR and enzyme activities analyses showed that SmMYB39 negatively regulated transcripts and enzyme activities of 4-hydroxylase (C4H) and tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT). These data suggest that SmMYB39 is involved in regulation of rosmarinic acid pathway and acts as a repressor through suppressing transcripts of key enzyme genes. PMID:24039895

  6. Specification of skeletal muscle differentiation by repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor (REST)-regulated Kv7.4 potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Iannotti, Fabio Arturo; Barrese, Vincenzo; Formisano, Luigi; Miceli, Francesco; Taglialatela, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Changes in the expression of potassium (K+) channels is a pivotal event during skeletal muscle differentiation. In mouse C2C12 cells, similarly to human skeletal muscle cells, myotube formation increased the expression of Kv7.1, Kv7.3, and Kv7.4, the last showing the highest degree of regulation. In C2C12 cells, Kv7.4 silencing by RNA interference reduced the expression levels of differentiation markers (myogenin, myosin heavy chain, troponinT-1, and Pax3) and impaired myotube formation and multinucleation. In Kv7.4-silenced cells, the differentiation-promoting effect of the Kv7 activator N-(2-amino-4-(4-fluorobenzylamino)-phenyl)-carbamic acid ethyl ester (retigabine) was abrogated. Expression levels for the repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) declined during myotube formation. Transcript levels for Kv7.4, as well as for myogenin, troponinT-1, and Pax3, were reduced by REST overexpression and enhanced upon REST suppression by RNA interference. Four regions containing potential REST-binding sites in the 5′ untranslated region and in the first intron of the Kv7.4 gene were identified by bioinformatic analysis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that REST binds to these regions, exhibiting a higher efficiency in myoblasts than in myotubes. These data suggest that Kv7.4 plays a permissive role in skeletal muscle differentiation and highlight REST as a crucial transcriptional regulator for this K+ channel subunit. PMID:23242999

  7. Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on early intervention. The four articles presented on this theme are: (1) "Deaf Infants, Hearing Mothers: A Research Report" (Kathryn P. Meadow-Orlans, and others), reporting findings on effects of auditory loss on early development; (2) "Maintaining Involvement of Inner City Families in Early Intervention Programs through…

  8. Modelling the cost-effectiveness of public awareness campaigns for the early detection of non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hinde, S; McKenna, C; Whyte, S; Peake, M D; Callister, M E J; Rogers, T; Sculpher, M

    2015-06-30

    Survival rates in lung cancer in England are significantly lower than in many similar countries. A range of Be Clear on Cancer (BCOC) campaigns have been conducted targeting lung cancer and found to improve the proportion of diagnoses at the early stage of disease. This paper considers the cost-effectiveness of such campaigns, evaluating the effect of both the regional and national BCOC campaigns on the stage distribution of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) at diagnosis. A natural history model of NSCLC was developed using incidence data, data elicited from clinical experts and model calibration techniques. This structure is used to consider the lifetime cost and quality-adjusted survival implications of the early awareness campaigns. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) in terms of additional costs per quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained are presented. Two scenario analyses were conducted to investigate the role of changes in the 'worried-well' population and the route of diagnosis that might occur as a result of the campaigns. The base-case theoretical model found the regional and national early awareness campaigns to be associated with QALY gains of 289 and 178 QALYs and ICERs of £13 660 and £18 173 per QALY gained, respectively. The scenarios found that increases in the 'worried-well' population may impact the cost-effectiveness conclusions. Subject to the available evidence, the analysis suggests that early awareness campaigns in lung cancer have the potential to be cost-effective. However, significant additional research is required to address many of the limitations of this study. In addition, the estimated natural history model presents previously unavailable estimates of the prevalence and rate of disease progression in the undiagnosed population.

  9. Modelling the cost-effectiveness of public awareness campaigns for the early detection of non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hinde, S; McKenna, C; Whyte, S; Peake, M D; Callister, M E J; Rogers, T; Sculpher, M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Survival rates in lung cancer in England are significantly lower than in many similar countries. A range of Be Clear on Cancer (BCOC) campaigns have been conducted targeting lung cancer and found to improve the proportion of diagnoses at the early stage of disease. This paper considers the cost-effectiveness of such campaigns, evaluating the effect of both the regional and national BCOC campaigns on the stage distribution of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) at diagnosis. Methods: A natural history model of NSCLC was developed using incidence data, data elicited from clinical experts and model calibration techniques. This structure is used to consider the lifetime cost and quality-adjusted survival implications of the early awareness campaigns. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) in terms of additional costs per quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained are presented. Two scenario analyses were conducted to investigate the role of changes in the ‘worried-well' population and the route of diagnosis that might occur as a result of the campaigns. Results: The base-case theoretical model found the regional and national early awareness campaigns to be associated with QALY gains of 289 and 178 QALYs and ICERs of £13 660 and £18 173 per QALY gained, respectively. The scenarios found that increases in the ‘worried-well' population may impact the cost-effectiveness conclusions. Conclusions: Subject to the available evidence, the analysis suggests that early awareness campaigns in lung cancer have the potential to be cost-effective. However, significant additional research is required to address many of the limitations of this study. In addition, the estimated natural history model presents previously unavailable estimates of the prevalence and rate of disease progression in the undiagnosed population. PMID:26010412

  10. Early hospital discharge of infants born to group B streptococci-positive mothers: a decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Berger, M B; Xu, X; Williams, J A; Van de Ven, C J M; Mozurkewich, E L

    2012-03-01

    To compare the cost-effectiveness of an additional 24-hour inpatient observation for asymptomatic term neonates born to group B streptococcus (GBS)-colonised mothers with adequate intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP) after an initial 24-hour in-hospital observation. Cost-effectiveness analysis from a societal perspective. United States. Asymptomatic term neonates born to GBS-colonised mothers with IAP after an initial 24-hour in-hospital observation. Monte Carlo simulation for a decision tree model incorporating the following chance events: development of GBS sepsis during the second 24 hours of life, development of GBS sepsis between 48 hours and 7 days of life, prompt versus delayed treatment for sepsis, neonatal mortality and long-term health sequelae. Expected cost and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Delayed, versus early, hospital discharge results in similar mean expected QALYs, but substantially higher expected cost. The mean difference in QALY is 0.00016 (95% CI 0.00005-0.00040), whereas the mean difference in cost is $1170.96 (95% CI $750.13-1584.32). The ICER is estimated to be $9,771,520.87 per QALY (95% CI $2,573,139.89-24,407,017.82). The proportion of early-onset GBS that develops during the second 24 hours of life, the cost of 24 hours of inpatient observation, and the probability of long-term sequelae following prompt versus delayed treatment play important roles in determining the cost-effectiveness of delayed hospital discharge. Cost-effectiveness analysis suggests that with adequate IAP, discharging asymptomatic term neonates to home after 24 hours is the preferred approach compared with 48 hours inpatient observation. © 2012 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology © 2012 RCOG.

  11. Leukemia/lymphoma-related factor, a POZ domain-containing transcriptional repressor, interacts with histone deacetylase-1 and inhibits cartilage oligomeric matrix protein gene expression and chondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan-ju; Prazak, Lisa; Fajardo, Marc; Yu, Shuang; Tyagi, Neetu; Di Cesare, Paul E

    2004-11-05

    Mutations in the human cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) gene have been linked to the development of pseudoachondroplasia and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia. We previously cloned the promoter region of the COMP gene and delineated a minimal negative regulatory element (NRE) that is both necessary and sufficient to repress its promoter (Issack, P. S., Fang, C. H., Leslie, M. P., and Di Cesare, P. E. (2000) J. Orthop. Res. 18, 345-350; Issack, P. S., Liu, C. J., Prazak, L., and Di Cesare, P. E. (2004) J. Orthop. Res. 22, 751-758). In this study, a yeast one-hybrid screen for proteins that associate with the NRE led to the identification of the leukemia/lymphoma-related factor (LRF), a transcriptional repressor that contains a POZ (poxvirus zinc finger) domain, as an NRE-binding protein. LRF bound directly to the NRE both in vitro and in living cells. Nine nucleotides (GAGGGTCCC) in the 30-bp NRE are essential for binding to LRF. LRF showed dose-dependent inhibition of COMP-specific reporter gene activity, and exogenous overexpression of LRF repressed COMP gene expression in both rat chondrosarcoma cells and bone morphogenetic protein-2-treated C3H10T1/2 progenitor cells. In addition, LRF also inhibited bone morphogenetic protein-2-induced chondrogenesis in high density micromass cultures of C3H10T1/2 cells, as evidenced by lack of expression of other chondrocytic markers, such as aggrecan and collagen types II, IX, X, and XI, and by Alcian blue staining. LRF associated with histone deacetylase-1 (HDAC1), and experiments utilizing the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A revealed that LRF-mediated repression requires deacetylase activity. LRF is the first transcription factor found to bind directly to the COMP gene promoter, to recruit HDAC1, and to regulate both COMP gene expression and chondrogenic differentiation.

  12. Genetic control of osmoadaptive glycine betaine synthesis in Bacillus subtilis through the choline-sensing and glycine betaine-responsive GbsR repressor.

    PubMed

    Nau-Wagner, Gabriele; Opper, Daniela; Rolbetzki, Anne; Boch, Jens; Kempf, Bettina; Hoffmann, Tamara; Bremer, Erhard

    2012-05-01

    Synthesis of the compatible solute glycine betaine confers a considerable degree of osmotic stress tolerance to Bacillus subtilis. This osmoprotectant is produced through the uptake of the precursor choline via the osmotically inducible OpuB and OpuC ABC transporters and a subsequent two-step oxidation process by the GbsB and GbsA enzymes. We characterized a regulatory protein, GbsR, controlling the transcription of both the structural genes for the glycine betaine biosynthetic enzymes (gbsAB) and those for the choline-specific OpuB transporter (opuB) but not of that for the promiscuous OpuC transporter. GbsR acts genetically as a repressor and functions as an intracellular choline sensor. Spectroscopic analysis of the purified GbsR protein showed that it binds the inducer choline with an apparent K(D) (equilibrium dissociation constant) of approximately 165 μM. Based on the X-ray structure of a protein (Mj223) from Methanococcus jannaschii, a homology model for GbsR was derived. Inspection of this GbsR in silico model revealed a possible ligand-binding pocket for choline resembling those of known choline-binding sites present in solute receptors of microbial ABC transporters, e.g., that of the OpuBC ligand-binding protein of the OpuB ABC transporter. GbsR was not only needed to control gbsAB and opuB expression in response to choline availability but also required to genetically tune down glycine betaine production once cellular adjustment to high osmolarity has been achieved. The GbsR regulatory protein from B. subtilis thus records and integrates cellular and environmental signals for both the onset and the repression of the synthesis of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine.

  13. A distinct role of Riplet-mediated K63-Linked polyubiquitination of the RIG-I repressor domain in human antiviral innate immune responses.

    PubMed

    Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Miyashita, Moeko; Matsumoto, Misako; Seya, Tsukasa

    2013-01-01

    The innate immune system is essential for controlling viral infections, but several viruses have evolved strategies to escape innate immunity. RIG-I is a cytoplasmic viral RNA sensor that triggers the signal to induce type I interferon production in response to viral infection. RIG-I activation is regulated by the K63-linked polyubiquitin chain mediated by Riplet and TRIM25 ubiquitin ligases. TRIM25 is required for RIG-I oligomerization and interaction with the IPS-1 adaptor molecule. A knockout study revealed that Riplet was essential for RIG-I activation. However the molecular mechanism underlying RIG-I activation by Riplet remains unclear, and the functional differences between Riplet and TRIM25 are also unknown. A genetic study and a pull-down assay indicated that Riplet was dispensable for RIG-I RNA binding activity but required for TRIM25 to activate RIG-I. Mutational analysis demonstrated that Lys-788 within the RIG-I repressor domain was critical for Riplet-mediated K63-linked polyubiquitination and that Riplet was required for the release of RIG-I autorepression of its N-terminal CARDs, which leads to the association of RIG-I with TRIM25 ubiquitin ligase and TBK1 protein kinase. Our data indicate that Riplet is a prerequisite for TRIM25 to activate RIG-I signaling. We investigated the biological importance of this mechanism in human cells and found that hepatitis C virus (HCV) abrogated this mechanism. Interestingly, HCV NS3-4A proteases targeted the Riplet protein and abrogated endogenous RIG-I polyubiquitination and association with TRIM25 and TBK1, emphasizing the biological importance of this mechanism in human antiviral innate immunity. In conclusion, our results establish that Riplet-mediated K63-linked polyubiquitination released RIG-I RD autorepression, which allowed the access of positive factors to the RIG-I protein.

  14. A Distinct Role of Riplet-Mediated K63-Linked Polyubiquitination of the RIG-I Repressor Domain in Human Antiviral Innate Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Miyashita, Moeko; Matsumoto, Misako; Seya, Tsukasa

    2013-01-01

    The innate immune system is essential for controlling viral infections, but several viruses have evolved strategies to escape innate immunity. RIG-I is a cytoplasmic viral RNA sensor that triggers the signal to induce type I interferon production in response to viral infection. RIG-I activation is regulated by the K63-linked polyubiquitin chain mediated by Riplet and TRIM25 ubiquitin ligases. TRIM25 is required for RIG-I oligomerization and interaction with the IPS-1 adaptor molecule. A knockout study revealed that Riplet was essential for RIG-I activation. However the molecular mechanism underlying RIG-I activation by Riplet remains unclear, and the functional differences between Riplet and TRIM25 are also unknown. A genetic study and a pull-down assay indicated that Riplet was dispensable for RIG-I RNA binding activity but required for TRIM25 to activate RIG-I. Mutational analysis demonstrated that Lys-788 within the RIG-I repressor domain was critical for Riplet-mediated K63-linked polyubiquitination and that Riplet was required for the release of RIG-I autorepression of its N-terminal CARDs, which leads to the association of RIG-I with TRIM25 ubiquitin ligase and TBK1 protein kinase. Our data indicate that Riplet is a prerequisite for TRIM25 to activate RIG-I signaling. We investigated the biological importance of this mechanism in human cells and found that hepatitis C virus (HCV) abrogated this mechanism. Interestingly, HCV NS3-4A proteases targeted the Riplet protein and abrogated endogenous RIG-I polyubiquitination and association with TRIM25 and TBK1, emphasizing the biological importance of this mechanism in human antiviral innate immunity. In conclusion, our results establish that Riplet-mediated K63-linked polyubiquitination released RIG-I RD autorepression, which allowed the access of positive factors to the RIG-I protein. PMID:23950712

  15. Ski acts as a co-repressor with Smad2 and Smad3 to regulate the response to type β transforming growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weidong; Angelis, Konstantina; Danielpour, David; Haddad, Maher M.; Bischof, Oliver; Campisi, Judith; Stavnezer, Ed; Medrano, Estela E.

    2000-01-01

    The c-ski protooncogene encodes a transcription factor that binds DNA only in association with other proteins. To identify co-binding proteins, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen. The results of the screen and subsequent co-immunoprecipitation studies identified Smad2 and Smad3, two transcriptional activators that mediate the type β transforming growth factor (TGF-β) response, as Ski-interacting proteins. In Ski-transformed cells, all of the Ski protein was found in Smad3-containing complexes that accumulated in the nucleus in the absence of added TGF-β. DNA binding assays showed that Ski, Smad2, Smad3, and Smad4 form a complex with the Smad/Ski binding element GTCTAGAC (SBE). Ski repressed TGF-β-induced expression of 3TP-Lux, the natural plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 promoter and of reporter genes driven by the SBE and the related CAGA element. In addition, Ski repressed a TGF-β-inducible promoter containing AP-1 (TRE) elements activated by a combination of Smads, Fos, and/or Jun proteins. Ski also repressed synergistic activation of promoters by combinations of Smad proteins but failed to repress in the absence of Smad4. Thus, Ski acts in opposition to TGF-β-induced transcriptional activation by functioning as a Smad-dependent co-repressor. The biological relevance of this transcriptional repression was established by showing that overexpression of Ski abolished TGF-β-mediated growth inhibition in a prostate-derived epithelial cell line. PMID:10811875

  16. Up-regulated transcriptional repressors SnoN and Ski bind Smad proteins to antagonize transforming growth factor-beta signals during liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Macias-Silva, Marina; Li, Wei; Leu, Julia I; Crissey, Mary Ann S; Taub, Rebecca

    2002-08-09

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) functions as an antiproliferative factor for hepatocytes. However, for unexplained reasons, hepatocytes become resistant to TGF-beta signals and can proliferate despite the presence of TGF-beta during liver regeneration. TGF-beta is up-regulated during liver regeneration, although it is not known whether it is active or latent. TGF-beta activity may be examined by assessing Smad activation, a downstream signaling pathway. Smad pathway activation during liver regeneration induced by partial hepatectomy or CC4 injury was examined by assessing the levels of phospho-Smad2 and Smad2-Smad4 complexes. We found that Smad proteins were slightly activated in quiescent liver, but that their activation was further enhanced in regenerating liver. Interestingly, TGF-beta/Smad pathway inhibitors (SnoN and Ski) were up-regulated during regeneration, and notably, SnoN was induced mainly in hepatocytes. SnoN and Ski are transcriptional repressors that may render some cells resistant to TGF-beta via binding Smad proteins. Complexes between SnoN, Ski, and the activated Smad proteins were detected from 2 to 120 h during the major proliferative phase in regenerating liver. Inhibitory complexes decreased after liver mass restitution (5-15 days), suggesting that persistently activated Smad proteins might participate in returning the liver to a quiescent state. Our data show that active TGF-beta/Smad signals are present during regeneration and suggest that SnoN/Ski induction might explain hepatocyte resistance to TGF-beta during the proliferative phase.

  17. Ski acts as a co-repressor with Smad2 and Smad3 to regulate the response to type beta transforming growth factor.

    PubMed

    Xu, W; Angelis, K; Danielpour, D; Haddad, M M; Bischof, O; Campisi, J; Stavnezer, E; Medrano, E E

    2000-05-23

    The c-ski protooncogene encodes a transcription factor that binds DNA only in association with other proteins. To identify co-binding proteins, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen. The results of the screen and subsequent co-immunoprecipitation studies identified Smad2 and Smad3, two transcriptional activators that mediate the type beta transforming growth factor (TGF-beta) response, as Ski-interacting proteins. In Ski-transformed cells, all of the Ski protein was found in Smad3-containing complexes that accumulated in the nucleus in the absence of added TGF-beta. DNA binding assays showed that Ski, Smad2, Smad3, and Smad4 form a complex with the Smad/Ski binding element GTCTAGAC (SBE). Ski repressed TGF-beta-induced expression of 3TP-Lux, the natural plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 promoter and of reporter genes driven by the SBE and the related CAGA element. In addition, Ski repressed a TGF-beta-inducible promoter containing AP-1 (TRE) elements activated by a combination of Smads, Fos, and/or Jun proteins. Ski also repressed synergistic activation of promoters by combinations of Smad proteins but failed to repress in the absence of Smad4. Thus, Ski acts in opposition to TGF-beta-induced transcriptional activation by functioning as a Smad-dependent co-repressor. The biological relevance of this transcriptional repression was established by showing that overexpression of Ski abolished TGF-beta-mediated growth inhibition in a prostate-derived epithelial cell line.

  18. Nitric oxide sensitizes tumor cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis via inhibition of the DR5 transcription repressor Yin Yang 1.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Yepez, Sara; Vega, Mario; Escoto-Chavez, Saul E; Murdock, Benjamin; Sakai, Toshiyuki; Baritaki, Stavroula; Bonavida, Benjamin

    2009-02-01

    Treatment of TRAIL-resistant tumor cells with the nitric oxide donor DETANONOate sensitizes the tumor cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis concomitantly with DR5 upregulation. The mechanism of sensitization was examined based on the hypothesis that DETANONOate inhibits a transcription repressor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) that negatively regulates DR5 transcription. Treatment of the prostate carcinoma cell lines with DETANONOate inhibited both NF-kappaB and YY1 DNA-binding activities concomitantly with upregulation of DR5 expression. The direct role of YY1 in the regulation of TRAIL resistance was demonstrated in cells treated with YY1 siRNA resulting in TRAIL-induced apoptosis. The role of YY1 in the transcriptional regulation of DR5 was examined in cells treated with a DR5 luciferase reporter system (pDR5) and two constructs, namely, the pDR5/-605 construct with a deletion of the putative YY1 DNA-binding region (-1224 to -605) and a construct pDR5-YY1 with a mutation of the YY1 DNA-binding site. A significant (3-fold) augmentation of luciferase activity over baseline transfection with pDR5 was observed in cells transfected with the modified constructs. ChIP analysis corroborated the YY1 binding to the DR5 promoter. In vivo, tissues from nude mice bearing the PC-3 xenograft and treated with DETANONOate showed inhibition of YY1 and upregulation of DR5. The present findings demonstrate that YY1 negatively regulates DR5 transcription and expression and these correlated with resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. DETANONOate inhibits both NF-kappaB and YY1 and in combination with TRAIL reverses tumor cell resistance to TRAIL apoptosis.

  19. The global repressor FliZ antagonizes gene expression by σS-containing RNA polymerase due to overlapping DNA binding specificity.

    PubMed

    Pesavento, Christina; Hengge, Regine

    2012-06-01

    FliZ, a global regulatory protein under the control of the flagellar master regulator FlhDC, was shown to antagonize σ(S)-dependent gene expression in Escherichia coli. Thereby it plays a pivotal role in the decision between alternative life-styles, i.e. FlhDC-controlled flagellum-based motility or σ(S)-dependent curli fimbriae-mediated adhesion and biofilm formation. Here, we show that FliZ is an abundant DNA-binding protein that inhibits gene expression mediated by σ(S) by recognizing operator sequences that resemble the -10 region of σ(S)-dependent promoters. FliZ does so with a structural element that is similar to region 3.0 of σ(S). Within this element, R108 in FliZ corresponds to K173 in σ(S), which contacts a conserved cytosine at the -13 promoter position that is specific for σ(S)-dependent promoters. R108 as well as C(-13) are also crucial for DNA binding by FliZ. However, while a number of FliZ binding sites correspond to known σ(S)-dependent promoters, promoter activity is not a prerequisite for FliZ binding and repressor function. Thus, we demonstrate that FliZ also feedback-controls flagellar gene expression by binding to a site in the flhDC control region that shows similarity only to a -10 element of a σ(S)-dependent promoter, but does not function as a promoter.

  20. Genetic Control of Osmoadaptive Glycine Betaine Synthesis in Bacillus subtilis through the Choline-Sensing and Glycine Betaine-Responsive GbsR Repressor

    PubMed Central

    Nau-Wagner, Gabriele; Opper, Daniela; Rolbetzki, Anne; Boch, Jens; Kempf, Bettina; Hoffmann, Tamara

    2012-01-01

    Synthesis of the compatible solute glycine betaine confers a considerable degree of osmotic stress tolerance to Bacillus subtilis. This osmoprotectant is produced through the uptake of the precursor choline via the osmotically inducible OpuB and OpuC ABC transporters and a subsequent two-step oxidation process by the GbsB and GbsA enzymes. We characterized a regulatory protein, GbsR, controlling the transcription of both the structural genes for the glycine betaine biosynthetic enzymes (gbsAB) and those for the choline-specific OpuB transporter (opuB) but not of that for the promiscuous OpuC transporter. GbsR acts genetically as a repressor and functions as an intracellular choline sensor. Spectroscopic analysis of the purified GbsR protein showed that it binds the inducer choline with an apparent KD (equilibrium dissociation constant) of approximately 165 μM. Based on the X-ray structure of a protein (Mj223) from Methanococcus jannaschii, a homology model for GbsR was derived. Inspection of this GbsR in silico model revealed a possible ligand-binding pocket for choline resembling those of known choline-binding sites present in solute receptors of microbial ABC transporters, e.g., that of the OpuBC ligand-binding protein of the OpuB ABC transporter. GbsR was not only needed to control gbsAB and opuB expression in response to choline availability but also required to genetically tune down glycine betaine production once cellular adjustment to high osmolarity has been achieved. The GbsR regulatory protein from B. subtilis thus records and integrates cellular and environmental signals for both the onset and the repression of the synthesis of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine. PMID:22408163

  1. Global Analysis of the Fungal Microbiome in Cystic Fibrosis Patients Reveals Loss of Function of the Transcriptional Repressor Nrg1 as a Mechanism of Pathogen Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Hu; Clark, Shawn T.; Surendra, Anuradha; Copeland, Julia K.; Wang, Pauline W.; Ammar, Ron; Collins, Cathy; Tullis, D. Elizabeth; Nislow, Corey; Hwang, David M.; Guttman, David S.; Cowen, Leah E.

    2015-01-01

    The microbiome shapes diverse facets of human biology and disease, with the importance of fungi only beginning to be appreciated. Microbial communities infiltrate diverse anatomical sites as with the respiratory tract of healthy humans and those with diseases such as cystic fibrosis, where chronic colonization and infection lead to clinical decline. Although fungi are frequently recovered from cystic fibrosis patient sputum samples and have been associated with deterioration of lung function, understanding of species and population dynamics remains in its infancy. Here, we coupled high-throughput sequencing of the ribosomal RNA internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) with phenotypic and genotypic analyses of fungi from 89 sputum samples from 28 cystic fibrosis patients. Fungal communities defined by sequencing were concordant with those defined by culture-based analyses of 1,603 isolates from the same samples. Different patients harbored distinct fungal communities. There were detectable trends, however, including colonization with Candida and Aspergillus species, which was not perturbed by clinical exacerbation or treatment. We identified considerable inter- and intra-species phenotypic variation in traits important for host adaptation, including antifungal drug resistance and morphogenesis. While variation in drug resistance was largely between species, striking variation in morphogenesis emerged within Candida species. Filamentation was uncoupled from inducing cues in 28 Candida isolates recovered from six patients. The filamentous isolates were resistant to the filamentation-repressive effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, implicating inter-kingdom interactions as the selective force. Genome sequencing revealed that all but one of the filamentous isolates harbored mutations in the transcriptional repressor NRG1; such mutations were necessary and sufficient for the filamentous phenotype. Six independent nrg1 mutations arose in Candida isolates from different patients

  2. Expression of ERCC1, RRM1, TUBB3 in correlation with apoptosis repressor ARC, DNA mismatch repair proteins and p53 in liver metastasis of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Csaba; Sükösd, Farkas; Valicsek, Erzsébet; Herpel, Esther; Schirmacher, Peter; Renner, Marcus; Mader, Christoph; Tiszlavicz, László; Kriegsmann, Jörg

    2017-11-01

    Liver metastasis in colorectal cancer is common and the primary treatment is chemotherapy. To date, there is no routinely used test in clinical practice to predict the effectiveness of conventional chemotherapy. Therefore, biomarkers with predictive value for conventional chemotherapy would be of considerable benefit in treatment planning. We analysed three proteins [excision repair cross-complementing 1 (ERCC1), ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase 1 (RRM1) and class III β-tubulin (TUBB3)] in colorectal cancer liver metastasis. We used tissue microarray slides with 101 liver metastasis samples, stained for ERCC1, RRM1 and TUBB3 and established scoring systems (fitted for tissue microarray) for each protein. In statistical analysis, we compared the expression of ERCC1, RRM1 and TUBB3 to mismatch proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2), p53 and to apoptosis repressor protein (ARC). Statistically significant correlations were found between ERCC1, TUBB3 and MLH1, MSH2 and RRM1 and MSH2, MSH6. Noteworthy, our analysis revealed a strong significant correlation between cytoplasmic ARC expression and RRM1, TUBB3 (p=0.000 and p=0.001, respectively), implying an additional role of TUBB3 and RRM1 not only in therapy resistance, but also in the apoptotic machinery. Our data strengthens the importance of ERCC1, TUBB3 and RRM1 in the prediction of chemotherapy effectiveness and suggest new functional connections in DNA repair, microtubule network and apoptotic signaling (i.e. ARC protein). In conclusion, we showed the importance and need of predictive biomarkers in metastasized colorectal cancer and pointed out the relevance not only of single predictive markers but also of their interactions with other known and newly explored relations between different signaling pathways.

  3. Positive Regulation of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin H by Rot (Repressor of Toxin) Protein and Its Importance in Clonal Complex 81 Subtype 1 Lineage-Related Food Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Sato'o, Yusuke; Hisatsune, Junzo; Nagasako, Yuria; Ono, Hisaya K.; Omoe, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the clonal complex 81 (CC81) subtype 1 lineage is the major staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP)-associated lineage in Japan (Y. Sato'o et al., J Clin Microbiol 52:2637–2640, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.00661-14). Strains of this lineage produce staphylococcal enterotoxin H (SEH) in addition to SEA. However, an evaluation of the risk for the recently reported SEH has not been sufficiently conducted. We first searched for staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) genes and SE proteins in milk samples that caused a large SFP outbreak in Japan. Only SEA and SEH were detected, while there were several SE genes detected in the samples. We next designed an experimental model using a meat product to assess the productivity of SEs and found that only SEA and SEH were detectably produced in situ. Therefore, we investigated the regulation of SEH production using a CC81 subtype 1 isolate. Through mutant analysis of global regulators, we found the repressor of toxin (Rot) functioned oppositely as a stimulator of SEH production. SEA production was not affected by Rot. seh mRNA expression correlated with rot both in media and on the meat product, and the Rot protein was shown to directly bind to the seh promoter. The seh promoter sequence was predicted to form a loop structure and to hide the RNA polymerase binding sequences. We propose Rot binds to the promoter sequence of seh and unfolds the secondary structure that may lead the RNA polymerase to bind the promoter, and then seh mRNA transcription begins. This alternative Rot regulation for SEH may contribute to sufficient toxin production by the CC81 subtype 1 lineage in foods to induce SFP. PMID:26341202

  4. Positive Regulation of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin H by Rot (Repressor of Toxin) Protein and Its Importance in Clonal Complex 81 Subtype 1 Lineage-Related Food Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Sato'o, Yusuke; Hisatsune, Junzo; Nagasako, Yuria; Ono, Hisaya K; Omoe, Katsuhiko; Sugai, Motoyuki

    2015-11-01

    We previously demonstrated the clonal complex 81 (CC81) subtype 1 lineage is the major staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP)-associated lineage in Japan (Y. Sato'o et al., J Clin Microbiol 52:2637-2640, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.00661-14). Strains of this lineage produce staphylococcal enterotoxin H (SEH) in addition to SEA. However, an evaluation of the risk for the recently reported SEH has not been sufficiently conducted. We first searched for staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) genes and SE proteins in milk samples that caused a large SFP outbreak in Japan. Only SEA and SEH were detected, while there were several SE genes detected in the samples. We next designed an experimental model using a meat product to assess the productivity of SEs and found that only SEA and SEH were detectably produced in situ. Therefore, we investigated the regulation of SEH production using a CC81 subtype 1 isolate. Through mutant analysis of global regulators, we found the repressor of toxin (Rot) functioned oppositely as a stimulator of SEH production. SEA production was not affected by Rot. seh mRNA expression correlated with rot both in media and on the meat product, and the Rot protein was shown to directly bind to the seh promoter. The seh promoter sequence was predicted to form a loop structure and to hide the RNA polymerase binding sequences. We propose Rot binds to the promoter sequence of seh and unfolds the secondary structure that may lead the RNA polymerase to bind the promoter, and then seh mRNA transcription begins. This alternative Rot regulation for SEH may contribute to sufficient toxin production by the CC81 subtype 1 lineage in foods to induce SFP. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. LEUNIG_HOMOLOG transcriptional co-repressor mediates aluminium sensitivity through PECTIN METHYLESTERASE46-modulated root cell wall pectin methylesterification in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xiaoyu; Horst, Walter J; Golz, John F; Lee, Joanne E; Ding, Zhaojun; Yang, Zhong-Bao

    2017-05-01

    A major factor determining aluminium (Al) sensitivity in higher plants is the binding of Al to root cell walls. The Al binding capacity of cell walls is closely linked to the extent of pectin methylesterification, as the presence of methyl groups attached to the pectin backbone reduces the net negative charge of this polymer and hence limits Al binding. Despite recent progress in understanding the molecular basis of Al resistance in a wide range of plants, it is not well understood how the methylation status of pectin is mediated in response to Al stress. Here we show in Arabidopsis that mutants lacking the gene LEUNIG_HOMOLOG (LUH), a member of the Groucho-like family of transcriptional co-repressor, are less sensitive to Al-mediated repression of root growth. This phenotype is correlated with increased levels of methylated pectin in the cell walls of luh roots as well as altered expression of cell wall-related genes. Among the LUH-repressed genes, PECTIN METHYLESTERASE46 (PME46) was identified as reducing Al binding to cell walls and hence alleviating Al-induced root growth inhibition by decreasing PME enzyme activity. seuss-like2 (slk2) mutants responded to Al in a similar way as luh mutants suggesting that a LUH-SLK2 complex represses the expression of PME46. The data are integrated into a model in which it is proposed that PME46 is a major inhibitor of pectin methylesterase activity within root cell walls. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Global Analysis of the Fungal Microbiome in Cystic Fibrosis Patients Reveals Loss of Function of the Transcriptional Repressor Nrg1 as a Mechanism of Pathogen Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Hu; Clark, Shawn T; Surendra, Anuradha; Copeland, Julia K; Wang, Pauline W; Ammar, Ron; Collins, Cathy; Tullis, D Elizabeth; Nislow, Corey; Hwang, David M; Guttman, David S; Cowen, Leah E

    2015-11-01

    The microbiome shapes diverse facets of human biology and disease, with the importance of fungi only beginning to be appreciated. Microbial communities infiltrate diverse anatomical sites as with the respiratory tract of healthy humans and those with diseases such as cystic fibrosis, where chronic colonization and infection lead to clinical decline. Although fungi are frequently recovered from cystic fibrosis patient sputum samples and have been associated with deterioration of lung function, understanding of species and population dynamics remains in its infancy. Here, we coupled high-throughput sequencing of the ribosomal RNA internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) with phenotypic and genotypic analyses of fungi from 89 sputum samples from 28 cystic fibrosis patients. Fungal communities defined by sequencing were concordant with those defined by culture-based analyses of 1,603 isolates from the same samples. Different patients harbored distinct fungal communities. There were detectable trends, however, including colonization with Candida and Aspergillus species, which was not perturbed by clinical exacerbation or treatment. We identified considerable inter- and intra-species phenotypic variation in traits important for host adaptation, including antifungal drug resistance and morphogenesis. While variation in drug resistance was largely between species, striking variation in morphogenesis emerged within Candida species. Filamentation was uncoupled from inducing cues in 28 Candida isolates recovered from six patients. The filamentous isolates were resistant to the filamentation-repressive effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, implicating inter-kingdom interactions as the selective force. Genome sequencing revealed that all but one of the filamentous isolates harbored mutations in the transcriptional repressor NRG1; such mutations were necessary and sufficient for the filamentous phenotype. Six independent nrg1 mutations arose in Candida isolates from different patients

  7. Identification of a transcriptional activation domain in yeast repressor activator protein 1 (Rap1) using an altered DNA-binding specificity variant

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Amanda N.; Weil, P. Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Repressor activator protein 1 (Rap1) performs multiple vital cellular functions in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These include regulation of telomere length, transcriptional repression of both telomere-proximal genes and the silent mating type loci, and transcriptional activation of hundreds of mRNA-encoding genes, including the highly transcribed ribosomal protein- and glycolytic enzyme-encoding genes. Studies of the contributions of Rap1 to telomere length regulation and transcriptional repression have yielded significant mechanistic insights. However, the mechanism of Rap1 transcriptional activation remains poorly understood because Rap1 is encoded by a single copy essential gene and is involved in many disparate and essential cellular functions, preventing easy interpretation of attempts to directly dissect Rap1 structure-function relationships. Moreover, conflicting reports on the ability of Rap1-heterologous DNA-binding domain fusion proteins to serve as chimeric transcriptional activators challenge use of this approach to study Rap1. Described here is the development of an altered DNA-binding specificity variant of Rap1 (Rap1AS). We used Rap1AS to map and characterize a 41-amino acid activation domain (AD) within the Rap1 C terminus. We found that this AD is required for transcription of both chimeric reporter genes and authentic chromosomal Rap1 enhancer-containing target genes. Finally, as predicted for a bona fide AD, mutation of this newly identified AD reduced the efficiency of Rap1 binding to a known transcriptional coactivator TFIID-binding target, Taf5. In summary, we show here that Rap1 contains an AD required for Rap1-dependent gene transcription. The Rap1AS variant will likely also be useful for studies of the functions of Rap1 in other biological pathways. PMID:28196871

  8. Structural Explanation for Allolactose (lac Operon Inducer) Synthesis by lacZ β-Galactosidase and the Evolutionary Relationship between Allolactose Synthesis and the lac Repressor

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley, Robert W.; Lo, Summie; Jancewicz, Larisa J.; Dugdale, Megan L.; Huber, Reuben E.

    2013-01-01

    β-Galactosidase (lacZ) has bifunctional activity. It hydrolyzes lactose to galactose and glucose and catalyzes the intramolecular isomerization of lactose to allolactose, the lac operon inducer. β-Galactosidase promotes the isomerization by means of an acceptor site that binds glucose after its cleavage from lactose and thus delays its exit from the site. However, because of its relatively low affinity for glucose, details of this site have remained elusive. We present structural data mapping the glucose site based on a substituted enzyme (G794A-β-galactosidase) that traps allolactose. Various lines of evidence indicate that the glucose of the trapped allolactose is in the acceptor position. The evidence includes structures with Bis-Tris (2,2-bis(hydroxymethyl)-2,2′,2″-nitrilotriethanol) and l-ribose in the site and kinetic binding studies with substituted β-galactosidases. The site is composed of Asn-102, His-418, Lys-517, Ser-796, Glu-797, and Trp-999. Ser-796 and Glu-797 are part of a loop (residues 795–803) that closes over the active site. This loop appears essential for the bifunctional nature of the enzyme because it helps form the glucose binding site. In addition, because the loop is mobile, glucose binding is transient, allowing the release of some glucose. Bioinformatics studies showed that the residues important for interacting with glucose are only conserved in a subset of related enzymes. Thus, intramolecular isomerization is not a universal feature of β-galactosidases. Genomic analyses indicated that lac repressors were co-selected only within the conserved subset. This shows that the glucose binding site of β-galactosidase played an important role in lac operon evolution. PMID:23486479

  9. Sex differences in acute translational repressor 4E-BP1 activity and sprint performance in response to repeated-sprint exercise in team sport athletes.

    PubMed

    Dent, Jessica R; Edge, Johann A; Hawke, Emma; McMahon, Christopher; Mündel, Toby

    2015-11-01

    The physiological requirements underlying soccer-specific exercise are incomplete and sex-based comparisons are sparse. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a repeated-sprint protocol on the translational repressor 4E-BP1 and sprint performance in male and female soccer players. Cross-over design involving eight female and seven male university soccer players. Participants performed four bouts of 6 × 30-m maximal sprints spread equally over 40 min. Heart rate, sprint time and sprint decrement were measured for each sprint and during the course of each bout. Venous blood samples and muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis were taken at rest, at 15 min and 2h post-exercise. While males maintained a faster mean sprint time for each bout (P < 0.05) females exhibited a greater decrement in sprint performance for each bout (P < 0.05), indicating a superior maintenance of sprint performance in males, with no sex differences for heart rate or lactate. Muscle analyses revealed sex differences in resting total (P < 0.05) and phosphorylated (P < 0.05) 4E-BP1 Thr37/46, and 15 min post-exercise the 4E-BP1 Thr37/46 ratio decreased below resting levels in males only (P < 0.05), indicative of a decreased translation initiation following repeated sprints. We show that females have a larger sprint decrement indicating that males have a superior ability to recover sprint performance. Sex differences in resting 4E-BP1 Thr37/46 suggest diversity in the training-induced phenotype of the muscle of males and females competing in equivalent levels of team-sport competition. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A comprehensive catalog of human KRAB-associated zinc finger genes: Insights into the evolutionary history of a large family of transcriptional repressors

    PubMed Central

    Huntley, Stuart; Baggott, Daniel M.; Hamilton, Aaron T.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Yang, Shan; Kim, Joomyeong; Gordon, Laurie; Branscomb, Elbert; Stubbs, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    Krüppel-type zinc finger (ZNF) motifs are prevalent components of transcription factor proteins in all eukaryotes. KRAB-ZNF proteins, in which a potent repressor domain is attached to a tandem array of DNA-binding zinc-finger motifs, are specific to tetrapod vertebrates and represent the largest class of ZNF proteins in mammals. To define the full repertoire of human KRAB-ZNF proteins, we searched the genome sequence for key motifs and then constructed and manually curated gene models incorporating those sequences. The resulting gene catalog contains 423 KRAB-ZNF protein-coding loci, yielding alternative transcripts that altogether predict at least 742 structurally distinct proteins. Active rounds of segmental duplication, involving single genes or larger regions and including both tandem and distributed duplication events, have driven the expansion of this mammalian gene family. Comparisons between the human genes and ZNF loci mined from the draft mouse, dog, and chimpanzee genomes not only identified 103 KRAB-ZNF genes that are conserved in mammals but also highlighted a substantial level of lineage-specific change; at least 136 KRAB-ZNF coding genes are primate specific, including many recent duplicates. KRAB-ZNF genes are widely expressed and clustered genes are typically not coregulated, indicating that paralogs have evolved to fill roles in many different biological processes. To facilitate further study, we have developed a Web-based public resource with access to gene models, sequences, and other data, including visualization tools to provide genomic context and interaction with other public data sets. PMID:16606702

  11. Clinical Impact and Cost-effectiveness of Diagnosing HIV Infection During Early Infancy in South Africa: Test Timing and Frequency.

    PubMed

    Francke, Jordan A; Penazzato, Martina; Hou, Taige; Abrams, Elaine J; MacLean, Rachel L; Myer, Landon; Walensky, Rochelle P; Leroy, Valériane; Weinstein, Milton C; Parker, Robert A; Freedberg, Kenneth A; Ciaranello, Andrea

    2016-11-01

     Diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection during early infancy (commonly known as "early infant HIV diagnosis" [EID]) followed by prompt initiation of antiretroviral therapy dramatically reduces mortality. EID testing is recommended at 6 weeks of age, but many infant infections are missed.  We simulated 4 EID testing strategies for HIV-exposed infants in South Africa: no EID (diagnosis only after illness; hereafter, "no EID"), testing once (at birth alone or at 6 weeks of age alone; hereafter, "birth alone" and "6 weeks alone," respectively), and testing twice (at birth and 6 weeks of age; hereafter "birth and 6 weeks"). We calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs), using discounted costs and life expectancies for all HIV-exposed (infected and uninfected) infants.  In the base case (guideline-concordant care), the no EID strategy produced a life expectancy of 21.1 years (in the HIV-infected group) and 61.1 years (in the HIV-exposed group); lifetime cost averaged $1430/HIV-exposed infant. The birth and 6 weeks strategy maximized life expectancy (26.5 years in the HIV-infected group and 61.4 years in the HIV-exposed group), costing $1840/infant tested. The ICER of the 6 weeks alone strategy versus the no EID strategy was $1250/year of life saved (19% of South Africa's per capita gross domestic product); the ICER for the birth and 6 weeks strategy versus the 6 weeks alone strategy was $2900/year of life saved (45% of South Africa's per capita gross domestic product). Increasing the proportion of caregivers who receive test results and the linkage of HIV-positive infants to antiretroviral therapy with the 6 weeks alone strategy improved survival more than adding a second test.  EID at birth and 6 weeks improves outcomes and is cost-effective, compared with EID at 6 weeks alone. If scale-up costs are comparable, programs should add birth testing after strengthening 6-week testing programs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford

  12. Recruitment by the Repressor Freud-1 of Histone Deacetylase-Brg1 Chromatin Remodeling Complexes to Strengthen HTR1A Gene Repression.

    PubMed

    Souslova, Tatiana; Mirédin, Kim; Millar, Anne M; Albert, Paul R

    2017-12-01

    Five-prime repressor element under dual repression binding protein-1 (Freud-1)/CC2D1A is genetically linked to intellectual disability and implicated in neuronal development. Freud-1 represses the serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) receptor gene HTR1A by histone deacetylase (HDAC)-dependent or HDAC-independent mechanisms in 5-HT1A-negative (e.g., HEK-293) or 5-HT1A-expressing cells (SK-N-SH), respectively. To identify the underlying mechanisms, Freud-1-associated proteins were affinity-purified from HEK-293 nuclear extracts and members of the Brg1/SMARCCA chromatin remodeling and Sin3A-HDAC corepressor complexes were identified. Pull-down assays using recombinant proteins showed that Freud-1 interacts directly with the Brg1 carboxyl-terminal domain; interaction with Brg1 required the carboxyl-terminal of Freud-1. Freud-1 complexes in HEK-293 and SK-N-SH cells differed, with low levels of BAF170/SMARCC2 and BAF57/SMARCE1 in HEK-293 cells and low-undetectable BAF155/SMARCC1, Sin3A, and HDAC1/2 in SK-N-SH cells. Similarly, by quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation, Brg1-BAF170/57 and Sin3A-HDAC complexes were observed at the HTR1A promoter in HEK-293 cells, whereas in SK-N-SH cells, Sin3A-HDAC proteins were not detected. Quantifying 5-HT1A receptor mRNA levels in cells treated with siRNA to Freud-1, Brg1, or both RNAs addressed the functional role of the Freud-1-Brg1 complex. In HEK-293 cells, 5-HT1A receptor mRNA levels were increased only when both Freud-1 and Brg1 were depleted, but in SK-N-SH cells, depletion of either protein upregulated 5-HT1A receptor RNA. Thus, recruitment by Freud-1 of Brg1, BAF155, and Sin3A-HDAC complexes appears to strengthen repression of the HTR1A gene to prevent its expression inappropriate cell types, while recruitment of the Brg1-BAF170/57 complex is permissive to 5-HT1A receptor expression. Alterations in Freud-1-Brg1 interactions in mutants associated with intellectual disability could impair gene repression leading to altered neuronal

  13. Recruitment by the Repressor Freud-1 of Histone Deacetylase-Brg1 Chromatin Remodeling Complexes to Strengthen HTR1A Gene Repression

    PubMed Central

    Souslova, Tatiana; Mirédin, Kim; Millar, Anne M.

    2017-01-01

    Five-prime repressor element under dual repression binding protein-1 (Freud-1)/CC2D1A is genetically linked to intellectual disability and implicated in neuronal development. Freud-1 represses the serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) receptor gene HTR1A by histone deacetylase (HDAC)-dependent or HDAC-independent mechanisms in 5-HT1A-negative (e.g., HEK-293) or 5-HT1A-expressing cells (SK-N-SH), respectively. To identify the underlying mechanisms, Freud-1-associated proteins were affinity-purified from HEK-293 nuclear extracts and members of the Brg1/SMARCCA chromatin remodeling and Sin3A-HDAC corepressor complexes were identified. Pull-down assays using recombinant proteins showed that Freud-1 interacts directly with the Brg1 carboxyl-terminal domain; interaction with Brg1 required the carboxyl-terminal of Freud-1. Freud-1 complexes in HEK-293 and SK-N-SH cells differed, with low levels of BAF170/SMARCC2 and BAF57/SMARCE1 in HEK-293 cells and low-undetectable BAF155/SMARCC1, Sin3A, and HDAC1/2 in SK-N-SH cells. Similarly, by quantitative chromatin immuno-precipitation, Brg1-BAF170/57 and Sin3A-HDAC complexes were observed at the HTR1A promoter in HEK-293 cells, whereas in SK-N-SH cells, Sin3A-HDAC proteins were not detected. Quantifying 5-HT1A receptor mRNA levels in cells treated with siRNA to Freud-1, Brg1, or both RNAs addressed the functional role of the Freud-1-Brg1 complex. In HEK-293 cells, 5-HT1A receptor mRNA levels were increased only when both Freud-1 and Brg1 were depleted, but in SK-N-SH cells, depletion of either protein upregulated 5-HT1A receptor RNA. Thus, recruitment by Freud-1 of Brg1, BAF155, and Sin3A-HDAC complexes appears to strengthen repression of the HTR1A gene to prevent its expression inappropriate cell types, while recruitment of the Brg1-BAF170/57 complex is permissive to 5-HT1A receptor expression. Alterations in Freud-1-Brg1 interactions in mutants associated with intellectual disability could impair gene repression leading to altered neuronal

  14. Overexpression of cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced apoptosis via NF-{kappa}B in mesenchymal stem cells

    SciT

    Peng, Cheng-Fei; Cardiovascular Research Institute and Department of Cardiology, Shenyang Northern Hospital, Shenyang; Han, Ya-Ling, E-mail: hanyaling53@gmail.com

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} CREG protected MSCs from tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) induced apoptosis. {yields} CREG inhibits the phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and prevents the activation of NF-{kappa}B. {yields} CREG inhibits NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation and pro-apoptosis protein transcription. {yields} CREG anti-apoptotic effect involves inhibition of the death receptor pathway. {yields} p53 is downregulated by CREG via NF-{kappa}B pathway under TNF-{alpha} stimulation. -- Abstract: Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) show great potential for therapeutic repair after myocardial infarction. However, poor viability of transplanted MSCs in the ischemic heart has limited their use. Cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes (CREG) has been identified asmore » a potent inhibitor of apoptosis. This study therefore aimed to determine if rat bone marrow MSCs transfected with CREG-were able to effectively resist apoptosis induced by inflammatory mediators, and to demonstrate the mechanism of CREG action. Apoptosis was determined by flow cytometric and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling assays. The pathways mediating these apoptotic effects were investigated by Western blotting. Overexpression of CREG markedly protected MSCs from tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) induced apoptosis by 50% after 10 h, through inhibition of the death-receptor-mediated apoptotic pathway, leading to attenuation of caspase-8 and caspase-3. Moreover, CREG resisted the serine phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and prevented the nuclear translocation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) under TNF-{alpha} stimulation. Treatment of cells with the NF-{kappa}B inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) significantly increased the transcription of pro-apoptosis proteins (p53 and Fas) by NF-{kappa}B, and attenuated the anti-apoptotic effects of CREG on MSCs. The results of this

  15. The glycerol-dependent metabolic persistence of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 reflects the regulatory logic of the GlpR repressor.

    PubMed

    Nikel, Pablo I; Romero-Campero, Francisco J; Zeidman, Joshua A; Goñi-Moreno, Ángel; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2015-03-31

    The growth of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 on glycerol as the sole carbon source is characterized by a prolonged lag phase, not observed with other carbon substrates. We examined the bacterial growth in glycerol cultures while monitoring the metabolic activity of individual cells. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, as well as the analysis of the temporal start of growth in single-cell cultures, revealed that adoption of a glycerol-metabolizing regime was not the result of a gradual change in the whole population but rather reflected a time-dependent bimodal switch between metabolically inactive (i.e., nongrowing) and fully active (i.e., growing) bacteria. A transcriptional Φ(glpD-gfp) fusion (a proxy of the glycerol-3-phosphate [G3P] dehydrogenase activity) linked the macroscopic phenotype to the expression of the glp genes. Either deleting glpR (encoding the G3P-responsive transcriptional repressor that controls the expression of the glpFKRD gene cluster) or altering G3P formation (by overexpressing glpK, encoding glycerol kinase) abolished the bimodal glpD expression. These manipulations eliminated the stochastic growth start by shortening the otherwise long lag phase. Provision of glpR in trans restored the phenotypes lost in the ΔglpR mutant. The prolonged nongrowth regime of P. putida on glycerol could thus be traced to the regulatory device controlling the transcription of the glp genes. Since the physiological agonist of GlpR is G3P, the arrangement of metabolic and regulatory components at this checkpoint merges a positive feedback loop with a nonlinear transcriptional response, a layout fostering the observed time-dependent shift between two alternative physiological states. Phenotypic variation is a widespread attribute of prokaryotes that leads, inter alia, to the emergence of persistent bacteria, i.e., live but nongrowing members within a genetically clonal population. Persistence allows a fraction of cells to avoid the

  16. Modeling of the structure and interactions of the B. anthracis antitoxin, MoxX: deletion mutant studies highlight its modular structure and repressor function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Nikita; Agarwal, Shivangi; Verma, Shashikala; Bhatnagar, Sonika; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2011-03-01

    Our previous report on Bacillus anthracis toxin-antitoxin module (MoxXT) identified it to be a two component system wherein, PemK-like toxin (MoxT) functions as a ribonuclease (Agarwal S et al. JBC 285:7254-7270, 2010). The labile antitoxin (MoxX) can bind to/neutralize the action of the toxin and is also a DNA-binding protein mediating autoregulation. In this study, molecular modeling of MoxX in its biologically active dimeric form was done. It was found that it contains a conserved Ribbon-Helix-Helix (RHH) motif, consistent with its DNA-binding function. The modeled MoxX monomers dimerize to form a two-stranded antiparallel ribbon, while the C-terminal region adopts an extended conformation. Knowledge guided protein-protein docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and energy minimization was performed to obtain the structure of the MoxXT complex, which was exploited for the de novo design of a peptide capable of binding to MoxT. It was found that the designed peptide caused a decrease in MoxX binding to MoxT by 42% at a concentration of 2 μM in vitro. We also show that MoxX mediates negative transcriptional autoregulation by binding to its own upstream DNA. The interacting regions of both MoxX and DNA were identified in order to model their complex. The repressor activity of MoxX was found to be mediated by the 16 N-terminal residues that contains the ribbon of the RHH motif. Based on homology with other RHH proteins and deletion mutant studies, we propose a model of the MoxX-DNA interaction, with the antiparallel β-sheet of the MoxX dimer inserted into the major groove of its cognate DNA. The structure of the complex of MoxX with MoxT and its own upstream regulatory region will facilitate design of molecules that can disrupt these interactions, a strategy for development of novel antibacterials.

  17. Central role of the flowering repressor ZCCT2 in the redox control of freezing tolerance and the initial development of flower primordia in wheat

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As both abiotic stress response and development are under redox control, it was hypothesised that the pharmacological modification of the redox environment would affect the initial development of flower primordia and freezing tolerance in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Results Pharmacologically induced redox changes were monitored in winter (T. ae. ssp. aestivum cv. Cheyenne, Ch) and spring (T. ae. ssp. spelta; Tsp) wheat genotypes grown after germination at 20/17°C for 9 d (chemical treatment: last 3 d), then at 5°C for 21 d (chemical treatment: first 4 d) and subsequently at 20/17°C for 21 d (recovery period). Thiols and their disulphide forms were measured and based on these data reduction potentials were calculated. In the freezing-tolerant Ch the chemical treatments generally increased both the amount of thiol disulphides and the reduction potential after 3 days at 20/17°C. In the freezing-sensitive Tsp a similar effect of the chemicals on these parameters was only observed after the continuation of the treatments for 4 days at 5°C. The applied chemicals slightly decreased root fresh weight and increased freezing tolerance in Ch, whereas they increased shoot fresh weight in Tsp after 4 days at 5°C. As shown after the 3-week recovery at 20/17°C, the initial development of flower primordia was accelerated in Tsp, whereas it was not affected by the treatments in Ch. The chemicals differently affected the expression of ZCCT2 and that of several other genes related to freezing tolerance and initial development of flower primordia in Ch and Tsp after 4 d at 5°C. Conclusions Various redox-altering compounds and osmotica had differential effects on glutathione disulphide content and reduction potential, and consequently on the expression of the flowering repressor ZCCT2 in the winter wheat Ch and the spring wheat Tsp. We propose that the higher expression of ZCCT2 in Ch may be associated with activation of genes of cold acclimation and its lower

  18. Central role of the flowering repressor ZCCT2 in the redox control of freezing tolerance and the initial development of flower primordia in wheat.

    PubMed

    Gulyás, Zsolt; Boldizsár, Akos; Novák, Aliz; Szalai, Gabriella; Pál, Magda; Galiba, Gábor; Kocsy, Gábor

    2014-04-07

    As both abiotic stress response and development are under redox control, it was hypothesised that the pharmacological modification of the redox environment would affect the initial development of flower primordia and freezing tolerance in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Pharmacologically induced redox changes were monitored in winter (T. ae. ssp. aestivum cv. Cheyenne, Ch) and spring (T. ae. ssp. spelta; Tsp) wheat genotypes grown after germination at 20/17°C for 9 d (chemical treatment: last 3 d), then at 5°C for 21 d (chemical treatment: first 4 d) and subsequently at 20/17°C for 21 d (recovery period). Thiols and their disulphide forms were measured and based on these data reduction potentials were calculated. In the freezing-tolerant Ch the chemical treatments generally increased both the amount of thiol disulphides and the reduction potential after 3 days at 20/17°C. In the freezing-sensitive Tsp a similar effect of the chemicals on these parameters was only observed after the continuation of the treatments for 4 days at 5°C. The applied chemicals slightly decreased root fresh weight and increased freezing tolerance in Ch, whereas they increased shoot fresh weight in Tsp after 4 days at 5°C. As shown after the 3-week recovery at 20/17°C, the initial development of flower primordia was accelerated in Tsp, whereas it was not affected by the treatments in Ch. The chemicals differently affected the expression of ZCCT2 and that of several other genes related to freezing tolerance and initial development of flower primordia in Ch and Tsp after 4 d at 5°C. Various redox-altering compounds and osmotica had differential effects on glutathione disulphide content and reduction potential, and consequently on the expression of the flowering repressor ZCCT2 in the winter wheat Ch and the spring wheat Tsp. We propose that the higher expression of ZCCT2 in Ch may be associated with activation of genes of cold acclimation and its lower expression in Tsp with the

  19. Nutrient-induced stimulation of protein synthesis in mouse skeletal muscle is limited by the mTORC1 repressor REDD1.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Bradley S; Williamson, David L; Lang, Charles H; Jefferson, Leonard S; Kimball, Scot R

    2015-04-01

    In skeletal muscle, the nutrient-induced stimulation of protein synthesis requires signaling through the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Expression of the repressor of mTORC1 signaling, regulated in development and DNA damage 1 (REDD1), is elevated in muscle during various atrophic conditions and diminished under hypertrophic conditions. The question arises as to what extent REDD1 limits the nutrient-induced stimulation of protein synthesis. The objective was to examine the role of REDD1 in limiting the response of muscle protein synthesis and mTORC1 signaling to a nutrient stimulus. Wild type REDD1 gene (REDD1(+/+)) and disruption in the REDD1 gene (REDD1(-/-)) mice were feed deprived for 16 h and randomized to remain feed deprived or refed for 15 or 60 min. The tibialis anterior was then removed for analysis of protein synthesis and mTORC1 signaling. In feed-deprived mice, protein synthesis and mTORC1 signaling were significantly lower in REDD1(+/+) than in REDD1(-/-) mice. Thirty minutes after the start of refeeding, protein synthesis in REDD1(+/+) mice was stimulated by 28%, reaching a value similar to that observed in feed-deprived REDD1(-/-) mice, and was accompanied by increased phosphorylation of mTOR (Ser2448), p70S6K1 (Thr389), and 4E-BP1 (Ser65) by 81%, 167%, and 207%, respectively. In refed REDD1(-/-) mice, phosphorylation of mTOR (Ser2448), p70S6K1 (Thr389), and 4E-BP1 (Ser65) were significantly augmented above the values observed in refed REDD1(+/+) mice by 258%, 405%, and 401%, respectively, although protein synthesis was not coordinately increased. Seventy-five minutes after refeeding, REDD1 expression in REDD1(+/+) mice was reduced (∼15% of feed-deprived REDD1(+/+) values), and protein synthesis and mTORC1 signaling were not different between refed REDD1(+/+) mice and REDD1(-/-) mice. The results show that REDD1 expression limits protein synthesis in mouse skeletal muscle by inhibiting mTORC1 signaling during periods of feed

  20. Early Rockets

    2004-04-15

    In addition to Dr. Robert Goddard's pioneering work, American experimentation in rocketry prior to World War II grew, primarily in technical societies. This is an early rocket motor designed and developed by the American Rocket Society in 1932.

  1. Cost-effectiveness of Early Treatment of Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1 by Stage of Liver Fibrosis in a US Treatment-Naive Population

    PubMed Central

    Chahal, Harinder S.; Marseille, Elliot A.; Tice, Jeffrey A.; Pearson, Steve D.; Ollendorf, Daniel A.; Fox, Rena K.; Kahn, James G.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Novel treatments for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are highly efficacious but costly. Thus, many insurers cover therapy only in advanced fibrosis stages. The added health benefits and costs of early treatment are unknown. OBJECTIVE To assess the cost-effectiveness of (1) treating all patients with HCV vs only those with advanced fibrosis and (2) treating each stage of fibrosis. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This study used a decision-analytic model for the treatment of HCV genotype 1. The model used a lifetime horizon and societal perspective and was representative of all US patients with HCV genotype 1 who had not received previous treatment. Comparisons in the model included antiviral treatment of all fibrosis stages (METAVIR [Meta-analysis of Histological Data in Virial Hepatitis] stages F0 [no fibrosis] to F4 [cirrhosis]) vs treatment of stages F3 (numerous septa without cirrhosis) and F4 only and by specific fibrosis stage. Data were collected from March 1 to September 1, 2014, and analyzed from September 1, 2014, to June 30, 2015. INTERVENTIONS Six HCV therapy options (particularly combined sofosbuvir and ledipasvir therapy) or no treatment. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Cost and health outcomes were measured using total medical costs, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs), calculated as the difference in costs between strategies divided by the difference in QALYs. RESULTS We simulated 1000 individuals, but present the results normalized to a single HCV-infected person. In the base-case analysis, among patients receiving 8 or 12 weeks of sofosbuvir-ledipasvir treatment, treating all fibrosis stages compared with treating stages F3 and F4 adds 0.73 QALYs and $28 899, for an ICER of $39 475 per QALY gained. Treating at stage F2 (portal fibrosis with rare septa) costs $19 833 per QALY gained vs waiting until stage F3; treating at stage F1 (portal fibrosis without septa), $81 165 per QALY gained

  2. Mi2β is required for γ-globin gene silencing: temporal assembly of a GATA-1-FOG-1-Mi2 repressor complex in β-YAC transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Costa, Flávia C; Fedosyuk, Halyna; Chazelle, Allen M; Neades, Renee Y; Peterson, Kenneth R

    2012-01-01

    Activation of γ-globin gene expression in adults is known to be therapeutic for sickle cell disease. Thus, it follows that the converse, alleviation of repression, would be equally effective, since the net result would be the same: an increase in fetal hemoglobin. A GATA-1-FOG-1-Mi2 repressor complex was recently demonstrated to be recruited to the -566 GATA motif of the (A)γ-globin gene. We show that Mi2β is essential for γ-globin gene silencing using Mi2β conditional knockout β-YAC transgenic mice. In addition, increased expression of (A)γ-globin was detected in adult blood from β-YAC transgenic mice containing a T>G HPFH point mutation at the -566 GATA silencer site. ChIP experiments demonstrated that GATA-1 is recruited to this silencer at day E16, followed by recruitment of FOG-1 and Mi2 at day E17 in wild-type β-YAC transgenic mice. Recruitment of the GATA-1-mediated repressor complex was disrupted by the -566 HPFH mutation at developmental stages when it normally binds. Our data suggest that a temporal repression mechanism is operative in the silencing of γ-globin gene expression and that either a trans-acting Mi2β knockout deletion mutation or the cis-acting -566 (A)γ-globin HPFH point mutation disrupts establishment of repression, resulting in continued γ-globin gene transcription during adult definitive erythropoiesis.

  3. Early Rockets

    2004-04-15

    During the 19th century, rocket enthusiasts and inventors began to appear in almost every country. Some people thought these early rocket pioneers were geniuses, and others thought they were crazy. Claude Ruggieri, an Italian living in Paris, apparently rocketed small animals into space as early as 1806. The payloads were recovered by parachute. As depicted here by artist Larry Toschik, French authorities were not always impressed with rocket research. They halted Ruggieri's plans to launch a small boy using a rocket cluster. (Reproduced from a drawing by Larry Toschik and presented here courtesy of the artist and Motorola Inc.)

  4. PchR, a regulator of ferripyochelin receptor gene (fptA) expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, functions both as an activator and as a repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Heinrichs, D E; Poole, K

    1996-01-01

    , fptA mutants were unable to grow in the presence of pyochelin, suggesting that FptA is the sole outer membrane receptor for ferric pyochelin. These data indicate that PchR functions as both an activator and a repressor in controlling the expression of fptA and pchR. The involvement of FptA in this control is unclear, although it may be important in mediating the pyochelin effect on fptA expression, possibly by modulating PchR activity. PMID:8626326

  5. Early Rockets

    1950-01-01

    Test firing of a Redstone Missile at Redstone Test Stand in the early 1950's. The Redstone was a high-accuracy, liquid-propelled, surface-to-surface missile developed by the von Braun Team under the management of the U.S. Army. The Redstone was the first major rocket development program in the United States.

  6. Early Math.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Nuys, Ute Elisabeth

    1986-01-01

    Presents reviews of the following mathematics software designed to teach young children counting, number recognition, visual discrimination, matching, addition, and subtraction skills; Stickybear Numbers, Learning with Leeper, Getting Ready to Read and Add, Counting Parade, Early Games for Young Children, Charlie Brown's 1,2,3's, Let's Go Fishing,…

  7. Early Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Donald L.; Willis, Sherry L.

    This book summarizes theory and discusses major issues pertaining to child development in the early childhood years. Chapter I provides an introduction to the conceptual framework and major theories of child development. Chapter II deals with motor, sensory, and perceptual development. Chapter III focuses on the cognitive-developmental theory of…

  8. Early Rockets

    2004-04-15

    During the early introduction of rockets to Europe, they were used only as weapons. Enemy troops in India repulsed the British with rockets. Later, in Britain, Sir William Congreve developed a rocket that could fire to about 9,000 feet. The British fired Congreve rockets against the United States in the War of 1812.

  9. Early Rockets

    2004-04-15

    In the 19th Century, experiments in America, Europe, and elsewhere attempted to build postal rockets to deliver mail from one location to another. The idea was more novel than successful. Many stamps used in these early postal rockets have become collector's items.

  10. Early Risers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asquith, Chistina

    2002-01-01

    In this article, the author features Bard High School Early College, the first public school in the country to offer a free, full-time college curriculum--and all the credits that go with it--to high schoolers. In Bard's four-year program, students race through high school requirements in 9th and 10th grades, then take college courses in 11th and…

  11. Early lens extraction with intraocular lens implantation for the treatment of primary angle closure glaucoma: an economic evaluation based on data from the EAGLE trial

    PubMed Central

    Javanbakht, Mehdi; Azuara-Blanco, Augusto; Burr, Jennifer M; Ramsay, Craig; Cooper, David; Cochran, Claire; Norrie, John; Scotland, Graham

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the cost-effectiveness of early lens extraction with intraocular lens implantation for the treatment of primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG) compared to standard care. Design Cost-effectiveness analysis alongside a multicentre pragmatic two-arm randomised controlled trial. Patients were followed-up for 36 months, and data on health service usage and health state utility were collected and analysed within the trial time horizon. A Markov model was developed to extrapolate the results over a 5-year and 10-year time horizon. Setting 22 hospital eye services in the UK. Population Males and females aged 50 years or over with newly diagnosed PACG or primary angle closure (PAC). Interventions Lens extraction compared to standard care (ie, laser iridotomy followed by medical therapy and glaucoma surgery). Outcome measures Costs of primary and secondary healthcare usage (UK NHS perspective), quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for lens extraction versus standard care. Results The mean age of participants was 67.5 (8.42), 57.5% were women, 44.6% had both eyes eligible, 1.4% were of Asian ethnicity and 35.4% had PAC. The mean health service costs were higher in patients randomised to lens extraction: £2467 vs £1486. The mean adjusted QALYs were also higher with early lens extraction: 2.602 vs 2.533. The ICER for lens extraction versus standard care was £14 284 per QALY gained at three years. Modelling suggests that the ICER may drop to £7090 per QALY gained by 5 years and that lens extraction may be cost saving by 10 years. Our results are generally robust to changes in the key input parameters and assumptions. Conclusions We find that lens extraction has a 67–89% chance of being cost-effective at 3 years and that it may be cost saving by 10 years. Trial registration number ISRCTN44464607; Results. PMID:28087548

  12. Early neurologically focused follow-up after cardiac arrest is cost-effective: A trial-based economic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Moulaert, Véronique R M; Goossens, Mariëlle; Heijnders, Irene L C; Verbunt, Jeanine A; Heugten, Caroline M van

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of an early intervention service for cardiac arrest survivors called 'Stand still …, and move on' from a societal perspective. This concise nursing intervention consists of screening for cognitive and emotional problems, information provision and support, self-management promotion, and further referral if necessary. Earlier research confirmed the feasibility of the intervention and its effectiveness in improving emotional functioning and quality of life. In this multicentre randomized controlled trial with one year follow-up 185 patients were included between April 2007 and December 2010. The experimental group received the intervention, the control group received care-as-usual. Intervention costs, other direct healthcare costs (e.g. hospital care, rehabilitation, medication, home care) and indirect costs (productivity loss) were measured during ten months using monthly cost-diaries. The economic evaluation comprised a cost-utility analysis (SF-36) and a cost-effectiveness analysis (QOLIBRI) using bootstrapping (5000 replications) to quantify uncertainty concerning the incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER), and the probability of the intervention being cost-effective was estimated. To check the robustness of the findings, two sensitivity analyses were performed using the EQ-5D and the complete cases respectively. Of 136 (74%) participants sufficient data concerning costs were collected to be included in this economic evaluation. Intervention costs were on average €127 (SD 85). No significant differences between groups were found with regard to overall costs. The ICERs of the cost-utility and the cost-effectiveness analyses supported the cost-effectiveness of the intervention. The probability of the intervention being cost-effective was 54-76% for the SF-36 and 94% for the QOLIBRI. Findings were robust. The intervention 'Stand still …, and move on' has positive societal economic effects and has a high probability to be

  13. Promoter/repressor system of Lactobacillus plantarum phage og1e: characterization of the promoters pR49-pR-pL and overproduction of the cro-like protein cng in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kakikawa, M; Watanabe, N; Funawatashi, T; Oki, M; Yasukawa, H; Taketo, A; Kodaira, K I

    1998-07-30

    The Lactobacillus plantarum phage og1e (42259bp) has two repressor-like genes cng and cpg oriented oppositely, accompanied by three potential promoters pR, pL and pR49, and seven operator-like sequences (GATAC-boxes) (Kodaira et al., 1997). In this study, the og1e putative promoters were introduced into the Escherichia coli promoter-detecting plasmid pKK232-8. In E. coli CK111, pR (pKPR1), pL (pKPL1) and pR49 (pKPR49) exhibited distinct CAT activities. When pKPR1 or pKPL1 was coexistent with a compatible plasmid pACYC184 carrying pR-cng (pA4PRCN1), the CAT activity was decreased significantly. On the other hand, cng directed a protein (Cng) of 10.1 kDa in E. coli under the control of T7 promoter. Gel mobility-shift assays demonstrated that Cng binds specifically to a DNA region containing the GATAC-boxes. In addition, primer extension analyses demonstrated that the two sequences pR and pL act as a promoter in L. plantarum as well as in E. coli. These results suggested that the potential promoters pR and pL probably function for the lytic and lysogenic pathways, respectively, and Cng may act as a repressor presumably through the GATAC-boxes as operators.

  14. Lysines 72, 80 and 213 and aspartic acid 210 of the Lactococcus lactis LacR repressor are involved in the response to the inducer tagatose-6-phosphate leading to induction of lac operon expression.

    PubMed

    van Rooijen, R J; Dechering, K J; Niek, C; Wilmink, J; de Vos, W M

    1993-02-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis of the Lactococcus lactis lacR gene was performed to identify residues in the LacR repressor that are involved in the induction of lacABCDFEGX operon expression by tagatose-6-phosphate. A putative inducer binding domain located near the C-terminus was previously postulated based on homology studies with the Escherichia coli DeoR family of repressors, which all have a phosphorylated sugar as inducer. Residues within this domain and lysine residues that are charge conserved in the DeoR family were changed into alanine or arginine. The production of the LacR mutants K72A, K80A, K80R, D210A, K213A and K213R in the LacR-deficient L.lactis strain NZ3015 resulted in repressed phospho-beta-galactosidase (LacG) activities and decreased growth rates on lactose. Gel mobility shift assays showed that the complex between a DNA fragment carrying the lac operators and LacR mutants K72A, K80A, K213A and D210A did not dissociate in the presence of tagatose-6-phosphate, in contrast to wild type LacR. Other mutations (K62A/K63A, K72R, K73A, K73R, T212A, F214R, R216R and R216K) exhibited no gross effects on inducer response. The results strongly suggest that the lysines at positions 72, 80 and 213 and aspartic acid at position 210 are involved in the induction of lac operon expression by tagatose-6-phosphate.

  15. Concomitant expression of far upstream element (FUSE) binding protein (FBP) interacting repressor (FIR) and its splice variants induce migration and invasion of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells.

    PubMed

    Müller, Benedikt; Bovet, Michael; Yin, Yi; Stichel, Damian; Malz, Mona; González-Vallinas, Margarita; Middleton, Alistair; Ehemann, Volker; Schmitt, Jennifer; Muley, Thomas; Meister, Michael; Herpel, Esther; Singer, Stephan; Warth, Arne; Schirmacher, Peter; Drasdo, Dirk; Matthäus, Franziska; Breuhahn, Kai

    2015-11-01

    Transcription factors integrate a variety of oncogenic input information, facilitate tumour growth and cell dissemination, and therefore represent promising therapeutic target structures. Because over-expression of DNA-interacting far upstream element binding protein (FBP) supports non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) migration, we asked whether its repressor, FBP-interacting repressor (FIR) is functionally inactivated and how FIR might affect NSCLC cell biology. Different FIR splice variants were highly expressed in the majority of NSCLCs, with the highest levels in tumours carrying genomic gains of chromosome 8q24.3, which contained the FIR gene locus. Nuclear FIR expression was significantly enriched at the invasion front of primary NSCLCs, but this did not correlate with tumour cell proliferation. FIR accumulation was associated with worse patient survival and tumour recurrence; in addition, FIR over-expression significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis in squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). In vitro, we applied newly developed methods and modelling approaches for the quantitative and time-resolved description of the pro-migratory and pro-invasive capacities of SCC cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of all FIR variants significantly reduced the speed and directional movement of tumour cells in all phases of migration. Furthermore, sprouting efficiency and single cell invasiveness were diminished following FIR inhibition. Interestingly, the silencing of FIR isoforms lacking exon 2 (FIR(Δexon2)) alone was sufficient to reduce lateral migration and invasion. In summary, by using scale-spanning data derived from primary human tissues, quantitative cellular analyses and mathematical modelling, we have demonstrated that concomitant over-expression of FIR and its splice variants drives NSCLC migration and dissemination. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Mi2β Is Required for γ-Globin Gene Silencing: Temporal Assembly of a GATA-1-FOG-1-Mi2 Repressor Complex in β-YAC Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Flávia C.; Fedosyuk, Halyna; Chazelle, Allen M.; Neades, Renee Y.; Peterson, Kenneth R.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of γ-globin gene expression in adults is known to be therapeutic for sickle cell disease. Thus, it follows that the converse, alleviation of repression, would be equally effective, since the net result would be the same: an increase in fetal hemoglobin. A GATA-1-FOG-1-Mi2 repressor complex was recently demonstrated to be recruited to the −566 GATA motif of the Aγ-globin gene. We show that Mi2β is essential for γ-globin gene silencing using Mi2β conditional knockout β-YAC transgenic mice. In addition, increased expression of Aγ-globin was detected in adult blood from β-YAC transgenic mice containing a T>G HPFH point mutation at the −566 GATA silencer site. ChIP experiments demonstrated that GATA-1 is recruited to this silencer at day E16, followed by recruitment of FOG-1 and Mi2 at day E17 in wild-type β-YAC transgenic mice. Recruitment of the GATA-1–mediated repressor complex was disrupted by the −566 HPFH mutation at developmental stages when it normally binds. Our data suggest that a temporal repression mechanism is operative in the silencing of γ-globin gene expression and that either a trans-acting Mi2β knockout deletion mutation or the cis-acting −566 Aγ-globin HPFH point mutation disrupts establishment of repression, resulting in continued γ-globin gene transcription during adult definitive erythropoiesis. PMID:23284307

  17. Complementary Gli activity mediates early patterning of the mouse visual system.

    PubMed

    Furimsky, Marosh; Wallace, Valerie A

    2006-03-01

    The Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway plays a key role in the development of the vertebrate central nervous system, including the eye. This pathway is mediated by the Gli transcription factors (Gli1, Gli2, and Gli3) that differentially activate and repress the expression of specific downstream target genes. In this study, we investigated the roles of the three vertebrate Glis in mediating midline Shh signaling in early ocular development. We examined the ocular phenotypes of Shh and Gli combination mutant mouse embryos and monitored proximodistal and dorsoventral patterning by the expression of specific eye development regulatory genes using in situ hybridization. We show that midline Shh signaling relieves the repressor activity of Gli3 adjacent to the midline and then promotes eye pattern formation through the nonredundant activities of all three Gli proteins. Gli3, in particular, is required to specify the dorsal optic stalk and to define the boundary between the optic stalk and the optic cup.

  18. Early Rockets

    2004-04-15

    This photograph is of the engine for the Redstone rocket. The Redstone ballistic missile was a high-accuracy, liquid-propelled, surface-to-surface missile developed by the Army Ballistic Missile Agency, Redstone Arsenal, in Huntsville, Alabama, under the direction of Dr. von Braun. The Redstone engine was a modified and improved version of the Air Force's Navaho cruise missile engine of the late forties. The A-series, as this would be known, utilized a cylindrical combustion chamber as compared with the bulky, spherical V-2 chamber. By 1951, the Army was moving rapidly toward the design of the Redstone missile, and the production was begun in 1952. Redstone rockets became the "reliable workhorse" for America's early space program. As an example of its versatility, the Redstone was utilized in the booster for Explorer 1, the first American satellite, with no major changes to the engine or missile.

  19. Early Rockets

    2004-04-15

    The image depicts Redstone missile being erected. The Redstone ballistic missile was a high-accuracy, liquid-propelled, surface-to-surface missile developed by Army Ballistic Missile Agency, Redstone Arsenal, in Huntsville, Alabama, under the direction of Dr. von Braun. The Redstone engine was a modified and improved version of the Air Force's Navaho cruise missile engine of the late forties. The A-series, as this would be known, utilized a cylindrical combustion chamber as compared with the bulky, spherical V-2 chamber. By 1951, the Army was moving rapidly toward the design of the Redstone missile, and the production was begun in 1952. Redstone rockets became the "reliable workhorse" for America's early space program. As an example of the versatility, Redstone was utilized in the booster for Explorer 1, the first American satellite, with no major changes to the engine or missile

  20. Early Rockets

    1958-05-15

    Redstone missile No. 1002 on the launch pad at Cape Canaveral, Florida, on May 16, 1958. The Redstone ballistic missile was a high-accuracy, liquid-propelled, surface-to-surface missile developed by the Army Ballistic Missile Agency, Redstone Arsenal, in Huntsville, Alabama, under the direction of Dr. von Braun. The Redstone engine was a modified and improved version of the Air Force's Navaho cruise missile engine of the late forties. The A-series, as this would be known, utilized a cylindrical combustion chamber as compared with the bulky, spherical V-2 chamber. By 1951, the Army was moving rapidly toward the design of the Redstone missile, and production was begun in 1952. Redstone rockets became the "reliable workhorse" for America's early space program. As an example of the versatility, Redstone was utilized in the booster for Explorer 1, the first American satellite, with no major changes to the engine or missile

  1. Regulation of early gene expression from the bovine papillomavirus genome in transiently transfected C127 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Szymanski, P; Stenlund, A

    1991-01-01

    Expression of bovine papillomavirus (BPV) early gene products is required for viral DNA replication and establishment of the transformed phenotype. By the use of a highly efficient electroporation system, we have examined for the first time the transcriptional activity of BPV promoters in their natural genomic context in a replication-permissive cell line. We have determined that a qualitatively distinct stage of transcription is not detectable prior to DNA replication in transiently transfected cells. This suggests that the transcriptional activity of the BPV genome in stably transformed cells represents the early stage of BPV gene expression. Quantitative differences in promoter activity between transiently transfected and stably transformed cells suggest that subtle changes in gene expression may control progression of the viral life cycle. Deletion analysis demonstrated that the E2 transactivator protein stimulates all of the early promoters through sequences located in the upstream regulatory region. This E2-dependent enhancer was found to be highly redundant, and particular E2 binding sites did not display a preference for particular promoters. Despite this dependence on a common cis-acting sequence, the various promoters displayed different sensitivities to the E2 transactivator. The findings that E2 regulates all promoters and, with the exception of the E2 repressors, that no other known viral gene product appears to affect transcription indicate that the E2 system functions as the master regulator of BPV early gene expression. Images PMID:1656065

  2. MiRNA-mediated regulation of cell signaling and homeostasis in the early mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Pernaute, Barbara; Spruce, Thomas; Rodriguez, Tristan A; Manzanares, Miguel

    2011-02-15

    At the time of implantation the mouse embryo is composed of three tissues the epiblast, trophectoderm and primitive endoderm. As development progresses the epiblast goes on to form the foetus whilst the trophectoderm and primitive endoderm give rise to extra-embryonic structures with important roles in embryo patterning and nutrition. Dramatic changes in gene expression occur during early embryo development and these require regulation at different levels. miRNAs are small non coding RNAs that have emerged over the last decade as important post-transcriptional repressors of gene expression. The roles played by miRNAs during early mammalian development are only starting to be elucidated. In order to gain insight into the function of miRNAs in the different lineages of the early mouse embryo we have analysed in depth the phenotype of embryos and extra-embryonic stem cells mutant for the miRNA maturation protein Dicer. This study revealed that miRNAs are involved in regulating cell signaling and homeostasis in the early embryo. Specifically, we identified a role for miRNAs in regulating the Erk signaling pathway in the extra-embryonic endoderm, cell cycle progression in extra-embryonic tissues and apoptosis in the epiblast.

  3. Economic evaluation of intensive chemotherapy with prophylactic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for patients with high-risk early breast cancer in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Kondo, Masahide; Hoshi, Shu-Ling; Takada, Masahiro; Nakamura, Seigo; Teramukai, Satoshi; Yanagihara, Kazuhiro; Toi, Masakazu

    2010-02-01

    This study assessed the cost-effectiveness and budget impact of third-generation chemotherapy regimens with prophylactic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) relative to second-generation regimens without prophylactic G-CSF for patients with high-risk early breast cancer in Japan. We conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis with Markov modeling and calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) for the comparison between second-generation regimens without prophylactic G-CSF and third-generation regimens with prophylactic G-CSF. The comparisons consisted of fluorouracil, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide, a second-generation regimen, versus docetaxel, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (TAC) with G-CSF, a third-generation regimen; and doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and paclitaxel (AC-T) q3wk, a second-generation regimen, versus dose-dense (DD) AC-T q2wk with G-CSF, a third-generation regimen. Patients were stratified by the age at which chemotherapy was started into cohorts aged 35, 45, and 55 years. Outcomes were estimated in terms of life-years (LYs) and quality-adjusted LYs (QALYs). ICER calculations were done from a societal perspective. We also estimated the budget impact, which included the additional public medical expenditures that would cover all subsequent changes after the additional cost of choosing third-generation regimens if G-CSF were approved for use in third-generation regimens for breast cancer. Costs were calculated using prescription drug prices as of 2006. Estimated ICER values for TAC with prophylactic G-CSF were yen956,471/LY and yen919,443/ QALY for age 35 years, yen1,125,540/LY and yen1,078,967/QALY for age 45 years, and yen1,302,746/LY and yen1,224,896/QALY for age 55 years. Values for DD AC-T q2wk with prophylactic G-CSF were yen291,931/LY and yen311,232/QALY for age 35 years, yen357,354/LY and yen380,148/QALY for age 45 years, and yen377,011/LY and yen399,761/QALY for age 55 years. TAC or DD AC-T q2wk with prophylactic G

  4. The stretch responsive microRNA miR-148a-3p is a novel repressor of IKBKB, NF-κB signaling, and inflammatory gene expression in human aortic valve cells

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vishal; Carrion, Katrina; Hollands, Andrew; Hinton, Andrew; Gallegos, Thomas; Dyo, Jeffrey; Sasik, Roman; Leire, Emma; Hardiman, Gary; Mohamed, Salah A.; Nigam, Sanjay; King, Charles C.; Nizet, Victor; Nigam, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valves calcify at a significantly higher rate than normal aortic valves, a process that involves increased inflammation. Because we have previously found that bicuspid aortic valve experience greater stretch, we investigated the potential connection between stretch and inflammation in human aortic valve interstitial cells (AVICs). Microarray, quantitative PCR (qPCR), and protein assays performed on AVICs exposed to cyclic stretch showed that stretch was sufficient to increase expression of interleukin and metalloproteinase family members by more than 1.5-fold. Conditioned medium from stretched AVICs was sufficient to activate leukocytes. microRNA sequencing and qPCR experiments demonstrated that miR-148a-3p was repressed in both stretched AVICs (43% repression) and, as a clinical correlate, human bicuspid aortic valves (63% reduction). miR-148a-3p was found to be a novel repressor of IKBKB based on data from qPCR, luciferase, and Western blot experiments. Furthermore, increasing miR-148a-3p levels in AVICs was sufficient to decrease NF-κB (nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells) signaling and NF-κB target gene expression. Our data demonstrate that stretch-mediated activation of inflammatory pathways is at least partly the result of stretch-repression of miR-148a-3p and a consequent failure to repress IKBKB. To our knowledge, we are the first to report that cyclic stretch of human AVICs activates inflammatory genes in a tissue-autonomous manner via a microRNA that regulates a central inflammatory pathway.—Patel, V., Carrion, K., Hollands, A., Hinton, A., Gallegos, T., Dyo, J., Sasik, R., Leire, E., Hardiman, G., Mohamed, S. A., Nigam, S., King, C. C., Nizet, V., Nigam V. The stretch responsive microRNA miR-148a-3p is a novel repressor of IKBKB, NF-κB signaling, and inflammatory gene expression in human aortic valve cells. PMID:25630970

  5. Transducin β-like 1, X-linked and nuclear receptor co-‍repressor cooperatively augment the ligand-independent stimulation of TRH and TSHβ gene promoters by thyroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Takamizawa, Tetsuya; Satoh, Tetsurou; Miyamoto, Tomoko; Nakajima, Yasuyo; Ishizuka, Takahiro; Tomaru, Takuya; Yoshino, Satoshi; Katano-Toki, Akiko; Nishikido, Ayaka; Sapkota, Santosh; Watanabe, Takuya; Okamura, Takashi; Ishida, Emi; Horiguchi, Kazuhiko; Matsumoto, Syunichi; Ishii, Sumiyasu; Ozawa, Atsushi; Shibusawa, Nobuyuki; Okada, Shuichi; Yamada, Masanobu

    2018-05-23

    Mutations in TBL1X, a component of the nuclear receptor co-repressor (N-CoR) and silencing mediator of retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptor co-repressor complexes, have recently been implicated in isolated central hypothyroidism (CeH). However, the mechanisms by which TBL1X mutations affect negative feedback regulation in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis remain unclear. N-CoR was previously reported to paradoxically enhance the ligand-independent stimulation of TRH and TSHβ gene promoters by thyroid hormone receptors (TR) in cell culture systems. We herein investigated whether TBL1X affects the unliganded TR-mediated stimulation of the promoter activities of genes negatively regulated by T3 in cooperation with N-CoR. In a hypothalamic neuronal cell line, the unliganded TR-mediated stimulation of the TRH gene promoter was significantly enhanced by co-transfected TBL1X, and the co-transfection of TBL1X with N-CoR further enhanced promoter activity. In contrast, the knockdown of endogenous Tbl1x using short interfering RNA significantly attenuated the N-CoR-mediated enhancement of promoter activity in the presence of unliganded TR. The co-transfection of N365Y or Y458C, TBL1X mutants identified in CeH patients, showed impaired co-activation with N-CoR for the ligand-independent stimulation of the TRH promoter by TR. In the absence of T3, similar or impaired enhancement of the TSHβ gene promoter by the wild type or TBL1X mutants, respectively, was observed in the presence of co-transfected TR and N-CoR in CV-1 cells. These results suggest that TBL1X is needed for the full activation of TRH and TSHβ gene promoters by unliganded TR. Mutations in TBL1X may cause CeH due to the impaired up-regulation of TRH and/or TSHβ gene transcription despite low T3 levels.

  6. Influence of De-icers on the Corrosion and Fatigue Behavior of 4140 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, William P.; Sanford, Brittain J.; Wright, Matthew R.; Evans, Jeffrey L.

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this test was to evaluate the effects of calcium magnesium acetate (CMA) and sodium chloride (NaCl)—two common substances used to de-ice roadways—on the corrosion and fatigue behavior of annealed AISI 4140 steel. When CMA-corroded, NaCl-corroded, and as-machined samples were tested using R = 0.1, and f = 20 Hz, it was found that, within the scope of this study, samples corroded in both 3.5% CMA solution and 3.5% NaCl solution exhibited a lower fatigue strength than samples tested in the as-machined, uncorroded condition. For the short lives tested in this study, the difference in the effects of CMA and NaCl is minimal. However, at longer lives it is suspected, based on the trends, that the CMA solution would be less detrimental to the fatigue life.

  7. The ICER Value Framework: Integrating Cost Effectiveness and Affordability in the Assessment of Health Care Value.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Steven D

    2018-03-01

    What should be the relationship between the concepts of cost effectiveness and affordability in value assessments for health care interventions? This question has received greater attention in recent years given increasing financial pressures on health systems, leading to different views on how assessment reports and decision-making processes can provide the best structure for considering both elements. In the United States, the advent of explicit value frameworks to guide drug assessments has also focused attention on this issue, driven in part by the prominent inclusion of affordability within the value framework used to guide reports from the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review. After providing a formal definition of affordability for health care systems, this article argues that, even after using empirical estimates of true health system opportunity cost, cost-effectiveness thresholds cannot by themselves be set in a way that subsumes questions about short-term affordability. The article then presents an analysis of different approaches to integrating cost effectiveness and budget impact assessments within information to guide decision making. The evolution and experience with the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review value framework are highlighted, providing lessons learned and guiding principles for future efforts to bring measures of affordability within the scope of value assessment. Copyright © 2018 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Treating to the target of remission in early rheumatoid arthritis is cost-effective: results of the DREAM registry.

    PubMed

    Vermeer, Marloes; Kievit, Wietske; Kuper, Hillechiena H; Braakman-Jansen, Louise M A; Bernelot Moens, Hein J; Zijlstra, Theo R; den Broeder, Alfons A; van Riel, Piet L C M; Fransen, Jaap; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2013-12-13

    Where health economic studies are frequently performed using modelling, with input from randomized controlled trials and best guesses, we used real-life data to analyse the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of a treatment strategy aiming to the target of remission compared to usual care in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We used real-life data from comparable cohorts in the Dutch Rheumatoid Arthritis Monitoring (DREAM) registry: the DREAM remission induction cohort (treat-to-target, T2T) and the Nijmegen early RA inception cohort (usual care, UC). Both cohorts were followed prospectively using the DREAM registry methodology. All patients fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology criteria for RA and were included in the cohort at the time of diagnosis. The T2T cohort was treated according to a protocolised strategy aiming at remission (Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28) < 2.6). The UC cohort was treated without DAS28-guided treatment decisions. EuroQol-5D utility scores were estimated from the Health Assessment Questionnaire. A health care perspective was adopted and direct medical costs were collected. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) per patient in remission and incremental cost utility ratio (ICUR) per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained were calculated over two and three years of follow-up. Two year data were available for 261 T2T patients and 213 UC patients; an extended follow-up of three years was available for 127 and 180 patients, respectively. T2T produced higher remission percentages and a larger gain in QALYs than UC. The ICER was € 3,591 per patient in remission after two years and T2T was dominant after three years. The ICUR was € 19,410 per QALY after two years and T2T was dominant after three years. We can conclude that treating to the target of remission in early RA is cost-effective compared with UC. The data suggest that in the third year, T2T becomes cost-saving.

  9. Hormonal regulation and developmental role of Krüppel homolog 1, a repressor of metamorphosis, in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Kayukawa, Takumi; Murata, Mika; Kobayashi, Isao; Muramatsu, Daisuke; Okada, Chieko; Uchino, Keiro; Sezutsu, Hideki; Kiuchi, Makoto; Tamura, Toshiki; Hiruma, Kiyoshi; Ishikawa, Yukio; Shinoda, Tetsuro

    2014-04-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) has an ability to repress the precocious metamorphosis of insects during their larval development. Krüppel homolog 1 (Kr-h1) is an early JH-inducible gene that mediates this action of JH; however, the fine hormonal regulation of Kr-h1 and the molecular mechanism underlying its antimetamorphic effect are little understood. In this study, we attempted to elucidate the hormonal regulation and developmental role of Kr-h1. We found that the expression of Kr-h1 in the epidermis of penultimate-instar larvae of the silkworm Bombyx mori was induced by JH secreted by the corpora allata (CA), whereas the CA were not involved in the transient induction of Kr-h1 at the prepupal stage. Tissue culture experiments suggested that the transient peak of Kr-h1 at the prepupal stage is likely to be induced cooperatively by JH derived from gland(s) other than the CA and the prepupal surge of ecdysteroid, although involvement of unknown factor(s) could not be ruled out. To elucidate the developmental role of Kr-h1, we generated transgenic silkworms overexpressing Kr-h1. The transgenic silkworms grew normally until the spinning stage, but their development was arrested at the prepupal stage. The transgenic silkworms from which the CA were removed in the penultimate instar did not undergo precocious pupation or larval-larval molt but fell into prepupal arrest. This result demonstrated that Kr-h1 is indeed involved in the repression of metamorphosis but that Kr-h1 alone is incapable of implementing normal larval molt. Moreover, the expression profiles and hormonal responses of early ecdysone-inducible genes (E74, E75, and Broad) in transgenic silkworms suggested that Kr-h1 is not involved in the JH-dependent modulation of these genes, which is associated with the control of metamorphosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of early indicators of altered metabolism in normal development using a rodent model system.

    PubMed

    Prabakaran, Ashok Daniel; Karakkat, Jimsheena Valiyakath; Vijayan, Ranjit; Chalissery, Jisha; Ibrahim, Marwa F; Kaimala, Suneesh; Adeghate, Ernest A; Al-Marzouqi, Ahmed Hassan; Ansari, Suraiya Anjum; Mensah-Brown, Eric; Emerald, Bright Starling

    2018-03-01

    Although the existence of a close relationship between the early maternal developmental environment, fetal size at birth and the risk of developing disease in adulthood has been suggested, most studies, however, employed experimentally induced intrauterine growth restriction as a model to link this with later adult disease. Because embryonic size variation also occurs under normal growth and differentiation, elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying these changes and their relevance to later adult disease risk becomes important. The birth weight of rat pups vary according to the uterine horn positions. Using birth weight as a marker, we compared two groups of rat pups - lower birth weight (LBW, 5th to 25th percentile) and average birth weight (ABW, 50th to 75th percentile) - using morphological, biochemical and molecular biology, and genetic techniques. Our results show that insulin metabolism, Pi3k/Akt and Pparγ signaling and the genes regulating growth and metabolism are significantly different in these groups. Methylation at the promoter of the InsII ( Ins2 ) gene and DNA methyltransferase 1 in LBW pups are both increased. Additionally, the Dnmt1 repressor complex, which includes Hdac1, Rb (Rb1) and E2f1, was also upregulated in LBW pups. We conclude that the Dnmt1 repressor complex, which regulates the restriction point of the cell cycle, retards the rate at which cells traverse the G1 or G0 phase of the cell cycle in LBW pups, thereby slowing down growth. This regulatory mechanism mediated by Dnmt1 might contribute to the production of small-size pups and altered physiology and pathology in adult life. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Identification of early indicators of altered metabolism in normal development using a rodent model system

    PubMed Central

    Prabakaran, Ashok Daniel; Karakkat, Jimsheena Valiyakath; Chalissery, Jisha; Ibrahim, Marwa F.; Kaimala, Suneesh; Adeghate, Ernest A.; Al-Marzouqi, Ahmed Hassan; Ansari, Suraiya Anjum

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although the existence of a close relationship between the early maternal developmental environment, fetal size at birth and the risk of developing disease in adulthood has been suggested, most studies, however, employed experimentally induced intrauterine growth restriction as a model to link this with later adult disease. Because embryonic size variation also occurs under normal growth and differentiation, elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying these changes and their relevance to later adult disease risk becomes important. The birth weight of rat pups vary according to the uterine horn positions. Using birth weight as a marker, we compared two groups of rat pups – lower birth weight (LBW, 5th to 25th percentile) and average birth weight (ABW, 50th to 75th percentile) – using morphological, biochemical and molecular biology, and genetic techniques. Our results show that insulin metabolism, Pi3k/Akt and Pparγ signaling and the genes regulating growth and metabolism are significantly different in these groups. Methylation at the promoter of the InsII (Ins2) gene and DNA methyltransferase 1 in LBW pups are both increased. Additionally, the Dnmt1 repressor complex, which includes Hdac1, Rb (Rb1) and E2f1, was also upregulated in LBW pups. We conclude that the Dnmt1 repressor complex, which regulates the restriction point of the cell cycle, retards the rate at which cells traverse the G1 or G0 phase of the cell cycle in LBW pups, thereby slowing down growth. This regulatory mechanism mediated by Dnmt1 might contribute to the production of small-size pups and altered physiology and pathology in adult life. PMID:29434026

  12. CalA, a Cyanobacterial AbrB Protein, Interacts with the Upstream Region of hypC and Acts as a Repressor of Its Transcription in the Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. Strain PCC 7120▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Agervald, Åsa; Zhang, Xiaohui; Stensjö, Karin; Devine, Ellenor; Lindblad, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The filamentous, heterocystous, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 may contain, depending on growth conditions, up to two hydrogenases directly involved in hydrogen metabolism. HypC is one out of at least seven auxiliary gene products required for synthesis of a functional hydrogenase, specifically involved in the maturation of the large subunit. In this study we present a protein, CalA (Alr0946 in the genome), belonging to the transcription regulator family AbrB, which in protein-DNA assays was found to interact with the upstream region of hypC. Transcriptional investigations showed that calA is cotranscribed with the downstream gene alr0947, which encodes a putative protease from the abortive infection superfamily, Abi. CalA was shown to interact specifically not only with the upstream region of hypC but also with its own upstream region, acting as a repressor on hypC. The bidirectional hydrogenase activity was significantly downregulated when CalA was overexpressed, demonstrating a correlation with the transcription factor, either direct or indirect. In silico studies showed that homologues to both CalA and Alr0947 are highly conserved proteins within cyanobacteria with very similar physical organizations of the corresponding structural genes. Possible functions of the cotranscribed downstream protein Alr0947 are presented. In addition, we present a three-dimensional (3D) model of the DNA binding domain of CalA and putative DNA binding mechanisms are discussed. PMID:20023111

  13. Repressor- and Activator-Type Ethylene Response Factors Functioning in Jasmonate Signaling and Disease Resistance Identified via a Genome-Wide Screen of Arabidopsis Transcription Factor Gene Expression[w

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Ken C.; Dombrecht, Bruno; Manners, John M.; Schenk, Peer M.; Edgar, Cameron I.; Maclean, Donald J.; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger; Udvardi, Michael K.; Kazan, Kemal

    2005-01-01

    To identify transcription factors (TFs) involved in jasmonate (JA) signaling and plant defense, we screened 1,534 Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) TFs by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR for their altered transcript at 6 h following either methyl JA treatment or inoculation with the incompatible pathogen Alternaria brassicicola. We identified 134 TFs that showed a significant change in expression, including many APETALA2/ethylene response factor (AP2/ERF), MYB, WRKY, and NAC TF genes with unknown functions. Twenty TF genes were induced by both the pathogen and methyl JA and these included 10 members of the AP2/ERF TF family, primarily from the B1a and B3 subclusters. Functional analysis of the B1a TF AtERF4 revealed that AtERF4 acts as a novel negative regulator of JA-responsive defense gene expression and resistance to the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum and antagonizes JA inhibition of root elongation. In contrast, functional analysis of the B3 TF AtERF2 showed that AtERF2 is a positive regulator of JA-responsive defense genes and resistance to F. oxysporum and enhances JA inhibition of root elongation. Our results suggest that plants coordinately express multiple repressor- and activator-type AP2/ERFs during pathogen challenge to modulate defense gene expression and disease resistance. PMID:16183832

  14. The Translational Repressor T-cell Intracellular Antigen-1 (TIA-1) is a Key Modulator of Th2 and Th17 Responses Driving Pulmonary Inflammation Induced by Exposure to House Dust Mite

    PubMed Central

    Simarro, Maria; Giannattasio, Giorgio; Xing, Wei; Lundequist, Emma-Maria; Stewart, Samantha; Stevens, Richard L.; Orduña, Antonio; Boyce, Joshua A.; Anderson, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    T-cell Intracellular Antigen-1 (TIA-1) is a translational repressor that dampens the production of proinflammatory cytokines and enzymes. In this study we investigated the role of TIA-1 in a mouse model of pulmonary inflammation induced by exposure to the allergenic extract (Df) of the house dust mite Dermatophagoides farinae. When intranasally challenged with a low dose of Df, mice lacking TIA-1 protein (Tia-1−/−) showed more severe airway and tissue eosinophilia, infiltration of lung bronchovascular bundles, and goblet cell metaplasia than wild-type littermates. Tia-1−/− mice also had higher levels of Df-specific IgE and IgG1 in serum and ex vivo restimulated Tia-1−/− lymph node cells and splenocytes transcribed and released more Th2/Th17 cytokines. To evaluate the site of action of TIA-1, we studied the response to Df in bone marrow chimeras. These experiments revealed that TIA-1 acts on both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells to dampen pulmonary inflammation. Our results identify TIA-1 as a negative regulator of allergen-mediated pulmonary inflammation in vivo. Thus, TIA-1 might be an important player in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma. PMID:22525013

  15. The translational repressor T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) is a key modulator of Th2 and Th17 responses driving pulmonary inflammation induced by exposure to house dust mite.

    PubMed

    Simarro, Maria; Giannattasio, Giorgio; Xing, Wei; Lundequist, Emma-Maria; Stewart, Samantha; Stevens, Richard L; Orduña, Antonio; Boyce, Joshua A; Anderson, Paul J

    2012-08-30

    T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) is a translational repressor that dampens the production of proinflammatory cytokines and enzymes. In this study we investigated the role of TIA-1 in a mouse model of pulmonary inflammation induced by exposure to the allergenic extract (Df) of the house dust mite Dermatophagoides farinae. When intranasally challenged with a low dose of Df, mice lacking TIA-1 protein (Tia-1(-/-)) showed more severe airway and tissue eosinophilia, infiltration of lung bronchovascular bundles, and goblet cell metaplasia than wild-type littermates. Tia-1(-/-) mice also had higher levels of Df-specific IgE and IgG(1) in serum and ex vivo restimulated Tia-1(-/-) lymph node cells and splenocytes transcribed and released more Th2/Th17 cytokines. To evaluate the site of action of TIA-1, we studied the response to Df in bone marrow chimeras. These experiments revealed that TIA-1 acts on both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells to dampen pulmonary inflammation. Our results identify TIA-1 as a negative regulator of allergen-mediated pulmonary inflammation in vivo. Thus, TIA-1 might be an important player in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A) Represses Transcription of the Tumor Suppressor Rb Gene via Binding Competition with Sp1 and Recruitment of Co-repressors*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Choi, Won-Il; Lee, Choong-Eun; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Hur, Man-Wook

    2008-01-01

    FBI-1 (also called Pokemon/ZBTB7A) is a BTB/POZ-domain Krüppel-like zinc-finger transcription factor. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a proto-oncogenic protein, which represses tumor suppressor ARF gene transcription. The expression of FBI-1 is increased in many cancer tissues. We found that FBI-1 potently represses transcription of the Rb gene, a tumor suppressor gene important in cell cycle arrest. FBI-1 binds to four GC-rich promoter elements (FREs) located at bp –308 to –188 of the Rb promoter region. The Rb promoter also contains two Sp1 binding sites: GC-box 1 (bp –65 to –56) and GC-box 2 (bp –18 to –9), the latter of which is also bound by FBI-1. We found that FRE3 (bp –244 to –236) is also a Sp1 binding element. FBI-1 represses transcription of the Rb gene not only by binding to the FREs, but also by competing with Sp1 at the GC-box 2 and the FRE3. By binding to the FREs and/or the GC-box, FBI-1 represses transcription of the Rb gene through its POZ-domain, which recruits a co-repressor-histone deacetylase complex and deacetylates histones H3 and H4 at the Rb gene promoter. FBI-1 inhibits C2C12 myoblast cell differentiation by repressing Rb gene expression. PMID:18801742

  17. Osmotic stress response in Acinetobacter baylyi: identification of a glycine-betaine biosynthesis pathway and regulation of osmoadaptive choline uptake and glycine-betaine synthesis through a choline-responsive BetI repressor.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Anica; Stahl, Julia; de Berardinis, Veronique; Müller, Volker; Averhoff, Beate

    2016-04-01

    Acinetobacter baylyi, a ubiquitous soil bacterium, can cope with high salinity by uptake of choline as precursor of the compatible solute glycine betaine. Here, we report on the identification of a choline dehydrogenase (BetA) and a glycine betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BetB) mediating the oxidation of choline to glycine betaine. The betAB genes were found to form an operon together with the potential transcriptional regulator betI. The transcription of the betIBA operon and the two recently identified choline transporters was upregulated in response to choline and choline plus salt. The finding that the osmo-independent transporter BetT1 undergoes a higher upregulation in response to choline alone than betT2 suggests that BetT1 does not primarily function in osmoadaptation. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays led to the conclusion that BetI mediates transcriptional regulation of both, the betIBA gene operon and the choline transporters. BetI was released from the DNA in response to choline which together with the transcriptional upregulation of the bet genes in the presence of choline suggests that BetI is a choline sensing transcriptional repressor. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. PigZ, a TetR/AcrR family repressor, modulates secondary metabolism via the expression of a putative four-component resistance-nodulation-cell-division efflux pump, ZrpADBC, in Serratia sp. ATCC 39006.

    PubMed

    Gristwood, Tamzin; Fineran, Peter C; Everson, Lee; Salmond, George P C

    2008-07-01

    The Gram-negative enterobacterium, Serratia sp. ATCC 39006 synthesizes several secondary metabolites, including prodigiosin (Pig) and a carbapenem antibiotic (Car). A complex hierarchical network of regulatory proteins control Pig and Car production. In this study we characterize a TetR family regulator, PigZ, which represses transcription of a divergently transcribed putative resistance-nodulation-cell-division (RND) efflux pump, encoded by zrp (PigZ repressed pump) ADBC, via direct binding to the zrpA-pigZ intergenic region. Unusually, this putative RND pump contains two predicted membrane fusion proteins (MFPs), ZrpA and ZrpD. A mutation in pigZ resulted in multiple phenotypic changes, including exoenzyme production, motility and differential regulation of Pig and Car production. A polar suppressor mutation, within zrpA, restored all tested phenotypes to parental strain levels, indicating that the changes observed are due to the increase in expression of ZrpADBC in the absence of the repressor, PigZ. Genomic deletions of zrpA and zrpD indicate that the MFP ZrpD, but not ZrpA, is essential for activity of the putative pump. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that putative RND efflux pumps encoding two MFP components are not uncommon, particularly among plant-associated, Gram-negative bacteria. In addition, based on phylogenetic analysis, we propose that these pairs of MFPs consist of two distinct subtypes.

  19. Arabidopsis KANADI1 acts as a transcriptional repressor by interacting with a specific cis-element and regulates auxin biosynthesis, transport, and signaling in opposition to HD-ZIPIII factors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tengbo; Harrar, Yaël; Lin, Changfa; Reinhart, Brenda; Newell, Nicole R; Talavera-Rauh, Franklin; Hokin, Samuel A; Barton, M Kathryn; Kerstetter, Randall A

    2014-01-01

    The formation of leaves and other lateral organs in plants depends on the proper specification of adaxial-abaxial (upper-lower) polarity. KANADI1 (KAN1), a member of the GARP family of transcription factors, is a key regulator of abaxial identity, leaf growth, and meristem formation in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we demonstrate that the Myb-like domain in KAN1 binds the 6-bp motif GNATA(A/T) and that this motif alone is sufficient to squelch transcription of a linked reporter in vivo. In addition, we report that KAN1 acts as a transcriptional repressor. Among its targets are genes involved in auxin biosynthesis, auxin transport, and auxin response. Furthermore, we find that the adaxializing HD-ZIPIII transcription factor REVOLUTA has opposing effects on multiple components of the auxin pathway. We hypothesize that HD-ZIPIII and KANADI transcription factors pattern auxin accumulation and responsiveness in the embryo. Specifically, we propose the opposing actions of KANADI and HD-ZIPIII factors on cotyledon formation (KANADI represses and HD-ZIPIII promotes cotyledon formation) occur through their opposing actions on genes acting at multiple steps in the auxin pathway.

  20. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A) represses transcription of the tumor suppressor Rb gene via binding competition with Sp1 and recruitment of co-repressors.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Choi, Won-Il; Lee, Choong-Eun; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Hur, Man-Wook

    2008-11-28

    FBI-1 (also called Pokemon/ZBTB7A) is a BTB/POZ-domain Krüppel-like zinc-finger transcription factor. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a proto-oncogenic protein, which represses tumor suppressor ARF gene transcription. The expression of FBI-1 is increased in many cancer tissues. We found that FBI-1 potently represses transcription of the Rb gene, a tumor suppressor gene important in cell cycle arrest. FBI-1 binds to four GC-rich promoter elements (FREs) located at bp -308 to -188 of the Rb promoter region. The Rb promoter also contains two Sp1 binding sites: GC-box 1 (bp -65 to -56) and GC-box 2 (bp -18 to -9), the latter of which is also bound by FBI-1. We found that FRE3 (bp -244 to -236) is also a Sp1 binding element. FBI-1 represses transcription of the Rb gene not only by binding to the FREs, but also by competing with Sp1 at the GC-box 2 and the FRE3. By binding to the FREs and/or the GC-box, FBI-1 represses transcription of the Rb gene through its POZ-domain, which recruits a co-repressor-histone deacetylase complex and deacetylates histones H3 and H4 at the Rb gene promoter. FBI-1 inhibits C2C12 myoblast cell differentiation by repressing Rb gene expression.

  1. LacR Is a Repressor of lacABCD and LacT Is an Activator of lacTFEG, Constituting the lac Gene Cluster in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Muhammad; Shafeeq, Sulman

    2014-01-01

    Comparison of the transcriptome of Streptococcus pneumoniae strain D39 grown in the presence of either lactose or galactose with that of the strain grown in the presence of glucose revealed the elevated expression of various genes and operons, including the lac gene cluster, which is organized into two operons, i.e., lac operon I (lacABCD) and lac operon II (lacTFEG). Deletion of the DeoR family transcriptional regulator lacR that is present downstream of the lac gene cluster revealed elevated expression of lac operon I even in the absence of lactose. This suggests a function of LacR as a transcriptional repressor of lac operon I, which encodes enzymes involved in the phosphorylated tagatose pathway in the absence of lactose or galactose. Deletion of lacR did not affect the expression of lac operon II, which encodes a lactose-specific phosphotransferase. This finding was further confirmed by β-galactosidase assays with PlacA-lacZ and PlacT-lacZ in the presence of either lactose or glucose as the sole carbon source in the medium. This suggests the involvement of another transcriptional regulator in the regulation of lac operon II, which is the BglG-family transcriptional antiterminator LacT. We demonstrate the role of LacT as a transcriptional activator of lac operon II in the presence of lactose and CcpA-independent regulation of the lac gene cluster in S. pneumoniae. PMID:24951784

  2. Cost and Expected Visual Effect of Interventions to Improve Follow-up After Cataract Surgery: Prospective Review of Early Cataract Outcomes and Grading (PRECOG) Study.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, Mirjam E; Congdon, Nathan; Kymes, Steven M; Yan, Xixi; Lansingh, Van C; Sisay, Alemayehu; Müller, Andreas; Chan, Ving Fai; Jin, Ling; Karumanchi, Sasipriya M; Guan, Chunhong; Vuong, Quy; Rivera, Nelson; McCleod-Omawale, Joan; He, Mingguang

    2016-12-15

    Some experts recommend increasing low rates of follow-up after cataract surgery in low- and middle-income countries using various interventions. However, little is known about the cost and effect of such interventions. To examine whether promoting follow-up after cataract surgery creates economic value. The Prospective Review of Early Cataract Outcomes and Grading (PRECOG) is a cohort study with data from patients undergoing cataract surgery from January 19, 2010, to April 18, 2012. Final follow-up was completed on August 10, 2012. Data were collected before surgery, at discharge, and at follow-up at least 40 days after surgery from 27 centers in 8 countries in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Each center enrolled 40 to 120 consecutive patients undergoing cataract surgery. If patients did not return to the hospital for the follow-up visit, hospitals could use telephone calls or transportation subsidies to increase follow-up rate. Data were analyzed from December 2013 to January 2016. Cost of interventions (telephone calls and transportation subsidies) to increase follow-up at least 40 days after surgery, visual acuity (VA) in the eye undergoing cataract surgery, presence of complications, patient and facility costs per visit, and willingness to pay for treatment or glasses if needed. The maximum incremental cost of improving VA in 1 patient (incremental cost-effect ratio [ICER]) was calculated for spontaneous follow-up (compared with no follow-up) and follow-up with the telephone and transportation interventions. Expected ICERs were estimated including only those patients willing to pay. Among 2487 patients (1068 men [42.9%]; 1405 women [56.5%]; 14 missing [0.6%]; mean [SD] age, 68.4 [11.3] years), 2316 (93.1%) received follow-up, of whom 369 (16.0%) were seen in an outside facility or home and were in the cost-effectiveness analysis as unable to follow up. A grand mean (a mean of means of the different countries) of 56.3% of patients needed glasses, of whom 56

  3. The bHLH Repressor Deadpan Regulates the Self-renewal and Specification of Drosophila Larval Neural Stem Cells Independently of Notch

    PubMed Central

    Younger, Susan; Huang, Yaling; Lee, Tzumin

    2012-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are able to self-renew while giving rise to neurons and glia that comprise a functional nervous system. However, how NSC self-renewal is maintained is not well understood. Using the Drosophila larval NSCs called neuroblasts (NBs) as a model, we demonstrate that the Hairy and Enhancer-of-Split (Hes) family protein Deadpan (Dpn) plays important roles in NB self-renewal and specification. The loss of Dpn leads to the premature loss of NBs and truncated NB lineages, a process likely mediated by the homeobox protein Prospero (Pros). Conversely, ectopic/over-expression of Dpn promotes ectopic self-renewing divisions and maintains NB self-renewal into adulthood. In type II NBs, which generate transit amplifying intermediate neural progenitors (INPs) like mammalian NSCs, the loss of Dpn results in ectopic expression of type I NB markers Asense (Ase) and Pros before these type II NBs are lost at early larval stages. Our results also show that knockdown of Notch leads to ectopic Ase expression in type II NBs and the premature loss of type II NBs. Significantly, dpn expression is unchanged in these transformed NBs. Furthermore, the loss of Dpn does not inhibit the over-proliferation of type II NBs and immature INPs caused by over-expression of activated Notch. Our data suggest that Dpn plays important roles in maintaining NB self-renewal and specification of type II NBs in larval brains and that Dpn and Notch function independently in regulating type II NB proliferation and specification. PMID:23056424

  4. Cost-effectiveness of sentinel node biopsy and pathological ultrastaging in patients with early-stage cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Brar, Harinder; Hogen, Liat; Covens, Al

    2017-05-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the cost-effectiveness of radical hysterectomy (RH) and sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) for the management of early-stage cervical cancer (stage IA2-IB1). A simple decision tree model was developed to follow a simulated cohort of patients with early-stage cervical cancer treated with RH and 1 of 3 lymph node assessment strategies: systematic pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND), SLNB using technetium 99 (Tc99) and blue dye, and SLNB using Tc99 only. SLNB using indocyanine green (ICG) was used as an exploratory strategy. Relevant studies were identified to extract the probability data and utility parameters and to estimate quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and absolute life-years (ALYs). Only direct medical costs were modeled, and the time horizon for the study was 5 years. SLNB using Tc99 and blue dye cost $21,089 and yielded 4.54 QALYs and 4.90 ALYs. PLND cost $22,353 and yielded 4.47 QALYs and 4.91 ALYs. SLNB using blue dye and Tc99 was the most cost-effective strategy when ALYs were considered with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $144,531. When QALYs were considered, the SLNB technique using Tc99 and blue dye dominated all other strategies. SLNB using ICG cost $20,624 and yielded 4.90 ALYs and 4.54 QALYs. It was clinically superior to and less expensive than all other strategies when QALYs were the outcome of interest and had an ICER of $221,171 per ALY in comparison with RH plus PLND. SLNB using Tc99 and blue dye with ultrastaging is considered the most cost-effective strategy with respect to 5-year progression-free survival and morbidity-free survival. Although it was included only as an exploratory strategy in this study, SLNB with ICG has the potential to be the most cost-effective strategy. Cancer 2017;123:1751-1759. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  5. Protein linear indices of the 'macromolecular pseudograph alpha-carbon atom adjacency matrix' in bioinformatics. Part 1: prediction of protein stability effects of a complete set of alanine substitutions in Arc repressor.

    PubMed

    Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Medina-Marrero, Ricardo; Castillo-Garit, Juan A; Romero-Zaldivar, Vicente; Torrens, Francisco; Castro, Eduardo A

    2005-04-15

    A novel approach to bio-macromolecular design from a linear algebra point of view is introduced. A protein's total (whole protein) and local (one or more amino acid) linear indices are a new set of bio-macromolecular descriptors of relevance to protein QSAR/QSPR studies. These amino-acid level biochemical descriptors are based on the calculation of linear maps on Rn[f k(xmi):Rn-->Rn] in canonical basis. These bio-macromolecular indices are calculated from the kth power of the macromolecular pseudograph alpha-carbon atom adjacency matrix. Total linear indices are linear functional on Rn. That is, the kth total linear indices are linear maps from Rn to the scalar R[f k(xm):Rn-->R]. Thus, the kth total linear indices are calculated by summing the amino-acid linear indices of all amino acids in the protein molecule. A study of the protein stability effects for a complete set of alanine substitutions in the Arc repressor illustrates this approach. A quantitative model that discriminates near wild-type stability alanine mutants from the reduced-stability ones in a training series was obtained. This model permitted the correct classification of 97.56% (40/41) and 91.67% (11/12) of proteins in the training and test set, respectively. It shows a high Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC=0.952) for the training set and an MCC=0.837 for the external prediction set. Additionally, canonical regression analysis corroborated the statistical quality of the classification model (Rcanc=0.824). This analysis was also used to compute biological stability canonical scores for each Arc alanine mutant. On the other hand, the linear piecewise regression model compared favorably with respect to the linear regression one on predicting the melting temperature (tm) of the Arc alanine mutants. The linear model explains almost 81% of the variance of the experimental tm (R=0.90 and s=4.29) and the LOO press statistics evidenced its predictive ability (q2=0.72 and scv=4.79). Moreover, the

  6. Cellular homeoproteins, SATB1 and CDP, bind to the unique region between the human cytomegalovirus UL127 and major immediate-early genes

    SciT

    Lee Jialing; Klase, Zachary; Gao Xiaoqi

    An AT-rich region of the human cytomegalovirus (CMV) genome between the UL127 open reading frame and the major immediate-early (MIE) enhancer is referred to as the unique region (UR). It has been shown that the UR represses activation of transcription from the UL127 promoter and functions as a boundary between the divergent UL127 and MIE genes during human CMV infection [Angulo, A., Kerry, D., Huang, H., Borst, E.M., Razinsky, A., Wu, J., Hobom, U., Messerle, M., Ghazal, P., 2000. Identification of a boundary domain adjacent to the potent human cytomegalovirus enhancer that represses transcription of the divergent UL127 promoter. J.more » Virol. 74 (6), 2826-2839; Lundquist, C.A., Meier, J.L., Stinski, M.F., 1999. A strong negative transcriptional regulatory region between the human cytomegalovirus UL127 gene and the major immediate-early enhancer. J. Virol. 73 (11), 9039-9052]. A putative forkhead box-like (FOX-like) site, AAATCAATATT, was identified in the UR and found to play a key role in repression of the UL127 promoter in recombinant virus-infected cells [Lashmit, P.E., Lundquist, C.A., Meier, J.L., Stinski, M.F., 2004. Cellular repressor inhibits human cytomegalovirus transcription from the UL127 promoter. J. Virol. 78 (10), 5113-5123]. However, the cellular factors which associate with the UR and FOX-like region remain to be determined. We reported previously that pancreatic-duodenal homeobox factor-1 (PDX1) bound to a 45-bp element located within the UR [Chao, S.H., Harada, J.N., Hyndman, F., Gao, X., Nelson, C.G., Chanda, S.K., Caldwell, J.S., 2004. PDX1, a Cellular Homeoprotein, Binds to and Regulates the Activity of Human Cytomegalovirus Immediate Early Promoter. J. Biol. Chem. 279 (16), 16111-16120]. Here we demonstrate that two additional cellular homeoproteins, special AT-rich sequence binding protein 1 (SATB1) and CCAAT displacement protein (CDP), bind to the human CMV UR in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, CDP is identified as a FOX-like binding

  7. Interaction between repressor Opi1p and ER membrane protein Scs2p facilitates transit of phosphatidic acid from the ER to mitochondria and is essential for INO1 gene expression in the presence of choline

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Maria L.; Chang, Yu-Fang; Jesch, Stephen A.; Aregullin, Manuel; Henry, Susan A.

    2017-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Opi1p repressor controls the expression of INO1 via the Opi1p/Ino2p–Ino4p regulatory circuit. Inositol depletion favors Opi1p interaction with both Scs2p and phosphatidic acid at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. Inositol supplementation, however, favors the translocation of Opi1p from the ER into the nucleus, where it interacts with the Ino2p–Ino4p complex, attenuating transcription of INO1. A strain devoid of Scs2p (scs2Δ) and a mutant, OPI1FFAT, lacking the ability to interact with Scs2p were utilized to examine the specific role(s) of the Opi1p–Scs2p interaction in the regulation of INO1 expression and overall lipid metabolism. Loss of the Opi1p–Scs2p interaction reduced INO1 expression and conferred inositol auxotrophy. Moreover, inositol depletion in strains lacking this interaction resulted in Opi1p being localized to sites of lipid droplet formation, coincident with increased synthesis of triacylglycerol. Supplementation of choline to inositol-depleted growth medium led to decreased TAG synthesis in all three strains. However, in strains lacking the Opi1p–Scs2p interaction, Opi1p remained in the nucleus, preventing expression of INO1. These data support the conclusion that a specific pool of phosphatidic acid, associated with lipid droplet formation in the perinuclear ER, is responsible for the initial rapid exit of Opi1p from the nucleus to the ER and is required for INO1 expression in the presence of choline. Moreover, the mitochondria-specific phospholipid, cardiolipin, was significantly reduced in both strains compromised for Opi1p–Scs2p interaction, indicating that this interaction is required for the transfer of phosphatidic acid from the ER to the mitochondria for cardiolipin synthesis. PMID:28924045

  8. Genetic modifications to temperate Enterococcus faecalis phage ϕEf11 that abolish the establishment of lysogeny and sensitivity to repressor, and increase host range and productivity of lytic infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H.; Fouts, D. E.; DePew, J.

    2013-01-01

    ϕEf11 is a temperate bacteriophage originally isolated by induction from a lysogenic Enterococcus faecalis strain recovered from an infected root canal, and the ϕEf11 prophage is widely disseminated among strains of E. faecalis. Because E. faecalis has emerged as a significant opportunistic human pathogen, we were interested in examining the genes and regulatory sequences predicted to be critical in the establishment/maintenance of lysogeny by ϕEf11 as a first step in the construction of the genome of a virulent, highly lytic phage that could be used in treating serious E. faecalis infections. Passage of ϕEf11 in E. faecalis JH2-2 yielded a variant that produced large, extensively spreading plaques in lawns of indicator cells, and elevated phage titres in broth cultures. Genetic analysis of the cloned virus producing the large plaques revealed that the variant was a recombinant between ϕEf11 and a defective ϕFL1C-like prophage located in the E. faecalis JH2-2 chromosome. The recombinant possessed five ORFs of the defective ϕFL1C-like prophage in place of six ORFs of the ϕEf11 genome. Deletion of the putative lysogeny gene module (ORFs 31–36) and replacement of the putative cro promoter from the recombinant phage genome with a nisin-inducible promoter resulted in no loss of virus infectivity. The genetic construct incorporating all the aforementioned ϕEf11 genomic modifications resulted in the generation of a variant that was incapable of lysogeny and insensitive to repressor, rendering it virulent and highly lytic, with a notably extended host range. PMID:23579685

  9. Early Childhood Systems: Transforming Early Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagan, Sharon Lynn, Ed.; Kauertz, Kristie, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    In this seminal volume, leading authorities strategize about how to create early childhood systems that transcend politics and economics to serve the needs of all young children. The authors offer different interpretations of the nature of early childhood systems, discuss the elements necessary to support their development, and examine how…

  10. Novel Variants in ZNF34 and Other Brain-Expressed Transcription Factors are Shared Among Early-Onset MDD Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Subaran, Ryan L.; Odgerel, Zagaa; Swaminathan, Rajeswari; Glatt, Charles E.; Weissman, Myrna M.

    2018-01-01

    There are no known genetic variants with large effects on susceptibility to major depressive disorder (MDD). Although one proposed study approach is to increase sensitivity by increasing sample sizes, another is to focus on families with multiple affected individuals to identify genes with rare or novel variants with strong effects. Choosing the family-based approach, we performed whole-exome analysis on affected individuals (n = 12) across five MDD families, each with at least five affected individuals, early onset, and prepubertal diagnoses. We identified 67 genes where novel deleterious variants were shared among affected relatives. Gene ontology analysis shows that of these 67 genes, 18 encode transcriptional regulators, eight of which are expressed in the human brain, including four KRAB-A box-containing Zn2+ finger repressors. One of these, ZNF34, has been reported as being associated with bipolar disorder and as differentially expressed in bipolar disorder patients compared to healthy controls. We found a novel variant—encoding a non-conservative P17R substitution in the conserved repressor domain of ZNF34 protein—segregating completely with MDD in all available individuals in the family in which it was discovered. Further analysis showed a common ZNF34 coding indel segregating with MDD in a separate family, possibly indicating the presence of an unobserved, linked, rare variant in that particular family. Our results indicate that genes encoding transcription factors expressed in the brain might be an important group of MDD candidate genes and that rare variants in ZNF34 might contribute to susceptibility to MDD and perhaps other affective disorders. PMID:26823146

  11. Reframing Early Childhood Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stamopoulos, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Rapid changes in Australian education have intensified the role of early childhood leaders and led to unprecedented challenges. The Australian Curriculum (ACARA, 2011), mandated Australian "National Quality Framework" (NQF) for Early Childhood Education & Care (DEEWR, 2010b) and the "National Early Years Learning Framework"…

  12. Interaction between repressor Opi1p and ER membrane protein Scs2p facilitates transit of phosphatidic acid from the ER to mitochondria and is essential for INO1 gene expression in the presence of choline.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Maria L; Chang, Yu-Fang; Jesch, Stephen A; Aregullin, Manuel; Henry, Susan A

    2017-11-10

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae , the Opi1p repressor controls the expression of INO1 via the Opi1p/Ino2p-Ino4p regulatory circuit. Inositol depletion favors Opi1p interaction with both Scs2p and phosphatidic acid at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. Inositol supplementation, however, favors the translocation of Opi1p from the ER into the nucleus, where it interacts with the Ino2p-Ino4p complex, attenuating transcription of INO1 A strain devoid of Scs2p ( scs2 Δ) and a mutant, OPI1FFAT , lacking the ability to interact with Scs2p were utilized to examine the specific role(s) of the Opi1p-Scs2p interaction in the regulation of INO1 expression and overall lipid metabolism. Loss of the Opi1p-Scs2p interaction reduced INO1 expression and conferred inositol auxotrophy. Moreover, inositol depletion in strains lacking this interaction resulted in Opi1p being localized to sites of lipid droplet formation, coincident with increased synthesis of triacylglycerol. Supplementation of choline to inositol-depleted growth medium led to decreased TAG synthesis in all three strains. However, in strains lacking the Opi1p-Scs2p interaction, Opi1p remained in the nucleus, preventing expression of INO1 These data support the conclusion that a specific pool of phosphatidic acid, associated with lipid droplet formation in the perinuclear ER, is responsible for the initial rapid exit of Opi1p from the nucleus to the ER and is required for INO1 expression in the presence of choline. Moreover, the mitochondria-specific phospholipid, cardiolipin, was significantly reduced in both strains compromised for Opi1p-Scs2p interaction, indicating that this interaction is required for the transfer of phosphatidic acid from the ER to the mitochondria for cardiolipin synthesis. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. The role of apoptosis repressor with a CARD domain (ARC) in the therapeutic resistance of renal cell carcinoma (RCC): the crucial role of ARC in the inhibition of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic signalling.

    PubMed

    Toth, Csaba; Funke, Sarah; Nitsche, Vanessa; Liverts, Anna; Zlachevska, Viktoriya; Gasis, Marcia; Wiek, Constanze; Hanenberg, Helmut; Mahotka, Csaba; Schirmacher, Peter; Heikaus, Sebastian

    2017-05-02

    Renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) display broad resistance against conventional radio- and chemotherapies, which is due at least in part to impairments in both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. One important anti-apoptotic factor that is strongly overexpressed in RCCs and known to inhibit both apoptotic pathways is ARC (apoptosis repressor with a CARD domain). Expression and subcellular distribution of ARC in RCC tissue samples and RCC cell lines were determined by immunohistochemistry and fluorescent immunohistochemistry, respectively. Extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis signalling were induced by TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand), ABT-263 or topotecan. ARC knock-down was performed in clearCa-12 cells using lentiviral transduction of pGIPZ. shRNAmir constructs. Extrinsic respectively intrinsic apoptosis were induced by TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand), ABT263 or topotecan. Potential synergistic effects were tested by pre-treatment with topotecan and subsequent treatment with ABT263. Activation of different caspases and mitochondrial depolarisation (JC-1 staining) were analysed by flow cytometry. Protein expression of Bcl-2 family members and ARC in RCC cell lines was measured by Western blotting. Statistical analysis was performed by Student's t-test. Regarding the extrinsic pathway, ARC knockdown strongly enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis by increasing the activation level of caspase-8. Regarding the intrinsic pathway, ARC, which was only weakly expressed in the nuclei of RCCs in vivo, exerted its anti-apoptotic effect by impairing mitochondrial activation rather than inhibiting p53. Topotecan- and ABT-263-induced apoptosis was strongly enhanced following ARC knockdown in RCC cell lines. In addition, topotecan pre-treatment enhanced ABT-263-induced apoptosis and this effect was amplified in ARC-knockdown cells. Taken together, our results are the first to demonstrate the importance of ARC protein in the inhibition of both the extrinsic

  14. Tightly Regulated Expression of Autographa californica Multicapsid Nucleopolyhedrovirus Immediate Early Genes Emerges from Their Interactions and Possible Collective Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Taka, Hitomi; Asano, Shin-ichiro; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Bando, Hisanori

    2015-01-01

    To infect their hosts, DNA viruses must successfully initiate the expression of viral genes that control subsequent viral gene expression and manipulate the host environment. Viral genes that are immediately expressed upon infection play critical roles in the early infection process. In this study, we investigated the expression and regulation of five canonical regulatory immediate-early (IE) genes of Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus: ie0, ie1, ie2, me53, and pe38. A systematic transient gene-expression analysis revealed that these IE genes are generally transactivators, suggesting the existence of a highly interactive regulatory network. A genetic analysis using gene knockout viruses demonstrated that the expression of these IE genes was tolerant to the single deletions of activator IE genes in the early stage of infection. A network graph analysis on the regulatory relationships observed in the transient expression analysis suggested that the robustness of IE gene expression is due to the organization of the IE gene regulatory network and how each IE gene is activated. However, some regulatory relationships detected by the genetic analysis were contradictory to those observed in the transient expression analysis, especially for IE0-mediated regulation. Statistical modeling, combined with genetic analysis using knockout alleles for ie0 and ie1, showed that the repressor function of ie0 was due to the interaction between ie0 and ie1, not ie0 itself. Taken together, these systematic approaches provided insight into the topology and nature of the IE gene regulatory network. PMID:25816136

  15. Waterford Early Reading Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    This paper provides an overview of the Waterford Early Reading Program (WERP), which is designed to shift teaching and learning away from remediation and failure to prevention, early achievement, and sustained growth for every student. WERP includes three levels of instruction: emergent, beginning, and fluent readers. It targets pre-K through…

  16. Early College High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2011-01-01

    For at-risk students who stand little chance of going to college, or even finishing high school, a growing number of districts have found a solution: Give them an early start in college while they still are in high school. The early college high school (ECHS) movement that began with funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation 10 years ago…

  17. Early Childhood Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkind, David

    In five sections, this paper explores dimensions of early childhood education: schooling generally construed as nonparental instruction in knowledge, values, and skills. Section 1 looks at some of the factors which have contributed to the rapid growth of early childhood education in modern times. Section 2 briefly highlights the contributions of…

  18. Rethinking Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelo, Ann, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Rethinking Early Childhood Education" is alive with the conviction that teaching young children involves values and vision. This anthology collects inspiring stories about social justice teaching with young children. Included here is outstanding writing from childcare teachers, early-grade public school teachers, scholars, and parents.…

  19. Early Retirement Payoff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Maria D.; Lovenheim, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    As public budgets have grown tighter over the past decade, states and school districts have sought ways to control the growth of spending. One increasingly common strategy employed to rein in costs is to offer experienced teachers with high salaries financial incentives to retire early. Although early retirement incentive (ERI) programs have been…

  20. Early Pregnancy Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... known pregnancies. What causes early pregnancy loss? About one half of cases of early pregnancy loss are caused by a ... do not show any signs of an infection, one option is to wait and let the ... may take longer in some cases. Another option is to take medication that helps ...

  1. Rethinking Early Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celeste, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) says in its current policy paper that, for high-quality early education to exist outside of tiny islands across the country, the following must be addressed: (1) teacher preparation; (2) ongoing professional learning; and (3) disparity in early education teacher pay. To achieve…

  2. Early Loss of Splenic Tfh Cells in SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Moukambi, Félicien; Rabezanahary, Henintsoa; Rodrigues, Vasco; Racine, Gina; Robitaille, Lynda; Krust, Bernard; Andreani, Guadalupe; Soundaramourty, Calayselvy; Silvestre, Ricardo; Laforge, Mireille; Estaquier, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Follicular T helper cells (Tfh), a subset of CD4 T lymphocytes, provide crucial help to B cells in the production of antigen-specific antibodies. Although several studies have analyzed the dynamics of Tfh cells in peripheral blood and lymph nodes (LNs) during Aids, none has yet addressed the impact of SIV infection on the dynamics of Tfh cells in the spleen, the primary organ of B cell activation. We show here a significant decrease in splenic Tfh cells in SIVmac251-infected rhesus macaques (RMs) during the acute phase of infection, which persists thereafter. This profound loss is associated with lack of sustained expression of the Tfh-defining transcription factors, Bcl-6 and c-Maf but with higher expression of the repressors KLF2 and Foxo1. In this context of Tfh abortive differentiation and loss, we found decreased percentages of memory B cell subsets and lower titers of SIV-specific IgG. We further demonstrate a drastic remodeling of the lymphoid architecture of the spleen and LNs, which disrupts the crucial cell-cell interactions necessary to maintain memory B cells and Tfh cells. Finally, our data demonstrated the early infection of Tfh cells. Paradoxically, the frequencies of SIV DNA were higher in splenic Tfh cells of RMs progressing more slowly suggesting sanctuaries for SIV in the spleen. Our findings provide important information regarding the impact of HIV/SIV infection on Tfh cells, and provide new clues for future vaccine strategies. PMID:26640894

  3. The PHD-containing protein EARLY BOLTING IN SHORT DAYS regulates seed dormancy in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Narro-Diego, Laura; López-González, Leticia; Jarillo, Jose A; Piñeiro, Manuel

    2017-10-01

    The Arabidopsis protein EARLY BOLTING IN SHORT DAYS (EBS), a plant-specific transcriptional regulator, is involved in the control of flowering time by repressing the floral integrator FT. The EBS protein binds the H3K4me3 histone mark and interacts with histone deacetylases to modulate gene expression. Here, we show that EBS also participates in the regulation of seed dormancy. ebs mutations cause a reduction in seed dormancy, and the concurrent loss of function of the EBS homologue SHORT LIFE (SHL) enhances this dormancy alteration. Transcriptomic analyses in ebs mutant seeds uncovered the misregulation of several regulators of seed dormancy including the MADS box gene AGAMOUS-LIKE67 (AGL67). AGL67 interacts genetically with EBS in seed dormancy regulation, indicating that both loci act in the same pathway. Interestingly, EBS functions independently of the master regulator gene of dormancy DELAY OF GERMINATION 1 (DOG1) and other genes encoding chromatin remodelling factors involved in the control of seed dormancy. Altogether, these data show that EBS is a central repressor of germination during seed dormancy and that SHL acts redundantly with EBS in the control of this developmental process. Our observations suggest that a tightly regulated crosstalk among histone modifications is necessary for a proper control of seed dormancy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Personalized treatment of women with early breast cancer: a risk-group specific cost-effectiveness analysis of adjuvant chemotherapy accounting for companion prognostic tests OncotypeDX and Adjuvant!Online.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Beate; Rochau, Ursula; Kurzthaler, Christina; Hubalek, Michael; Miksad, Rebecca; Sroczynski, Gaby; Paulden, Mike; Bundo, Marvin; Stenehjem, David; Brixner, Diana; Krahn, Murray; Siebert, Uwe

    2017-10-16

    Due to high survival rates and the relatively small benefit of adjuvant therapy, the application of personalized medicine (PM) through risk stratification is particularly beneficial in early breast cancer (BC) to avoid unnecessary harms from treatment. The new 21-gene assay (OncotypeDX, ODX) is a promising prognostic score for risk stratification that can be applied in conjunction with Adjuvant!Online (AO) to guide personalized chemotherapy decisions for early BC patients. Our goal was to evaluate risk-group specific cost effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy for women with early stage BC in Austria based on AO and ODX risk stratification. A previously validated discrete event simulation model was applied to a hypothetical cohort of 50-year-old women over a lifetime horizon. We simulated twelve risk groups derived from the joint application of ODX and AO and included respective additional costs. The primary outcomes of interest were life-years gained, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), costs and incremental cost-effectiveness (ICER). The robustness of results and decisions derived were tested in sensitivity analyses. A cross-country comparison of results was performed. Chemotherapy is dominated (i.e., less effective and more costly) for patients with 1) low ODX risk independent of AO classification; and 2) low AO risk and intermediate ODX risk. For patients with an intermediate or high AO risk and an intermediate or high ODX risk, the ICER is below 15,000 EUR/QALY (potentially cost effective depending on the willingness-to-pay). Applying the AO risk classification alone would miss risk groups where chemotherapy is dominated and thus should not be considered. These results are sensitive to changes in the probabilities of distant recurrence but not to changes in the costs of chemotherapy or the ODX test. Based on our modeling study, chemotherapy is effective and cost effective for Austrian patients with an intermediate or high AO risk and an intermediate or high

  5. Earth's early biosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Des Marais, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Understanding our own early biosphere is essential to our search for life elsewhere, because life arose on Earth very early and rocky planets shared similar early histories. The biosphere arose before 3.8 Ga ago, was exclusively unicellular and was dominated by hyperthermophiles that utilized chemical sources of energy and employed a range of metabolic pathways for CO2 assimilation. Photosynthesis also arose very early. Oxygenic photosynthesis arose later but still prior to 2.7 Ga. The transition toward the modern global environment was paced by a decline in volcanic and hydrothermal activity. These developments allowed atmospheric O2 levels to increase. The O2 increase created new niches for aerobic life, most notably the more advanced Eukarya that eventually spawned the megascopic fauna and flora of our modern biosphere.

  6. Supporting Early Learning Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Himes, James A. [D-CT-4

    2014-02-03

    House - 06/13/2014 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  7. Early Learning Innovation Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Himes, James A. [D-CT-4

    2009-10-29

    House - 12/08/2009 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. Early Life Stages

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Childhood should be viewed as a sequence of lifestages, from birth through infancy and adolescence. When assessing early life risks, consideration is given to risks resulting from fetal exposure via the pregnant mother, as well as postnatal exposures.

  9. Mercury's Early Geologic History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denevi, B. W.; Ernst, C. M.; Klima, R. L.; Robinson, M. S.

    2018-05-01

    A combination of geologic mapping, compositional information, and geochemical models are providing a better understanding of Mercury's early geologic history, and allow us to place it in the context of the Moon and the terrestrial planets.

  10. Early Learning Alignment Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Altmire, Jason [D-PA-4

    2010-09-29

    House - 11/18/2010 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. Colorado Early Childhood Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver. Planning and Evaluation Unit.

    The Colorado State Board of Education allocated Title IV-V funds in 1975 for a study of the status of early childhood education in Colorado. The purposes of the study were to: (1) gather data relevant to early childhood education on the status of all children from birth through age 5; (2) identify needs of children of this age within the state;…

  12. Cost-effectiveness assessment of lumpectomy cavity boost in elderly women with early stage estrogen receptor positive breast cancer receiving adjuvant radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lester-Coll, Nataniel H; Rutter, Charles E; Evans, Suzanne B

    2016-04-01

    Breast radiotherapy (RT) for elderly women with estrogen receptor positive early stage breast cancer (ER+ESBC) improves local recurrence (LR) rates without benefitting overall survival. Breast boost is a common practice, although the absolute benefit decreases with age. Consequently, an analysis of its cost-effectiveness in the elderly ESBC populations is warranted. A Markov model was used to compare cost-effectiveness of RT with or without a boost in elderly ER+ESBC patients. The ten-year probability of LR with boost was derived from the CALGB 9343 trial and adjusted by the hazard ratio for LR from boost radiotherapy trial data, yielding the LR rate without boost. Remaining parameters were estimated using published data. Boost RT was associated with an increase in mean cost ($7139 vs $6193) and effectiveness (5.66 vs 5.64 quality adjusted life years; QALYs) relative to no boost. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for boost was $55,903 per QALY. On one-way sensitivity analysis, boost remained cost-effective if the hazard ratio of LR with boost was <0.67. Boost RT for ER+ESBC patients was cost-effective over a wide range of assumptions and inputs over commonly accepted willingness-to pay-thresholds, but particularly in women at higher risk for LR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Redefining early gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Savio G; Windsor, John A

    2016-01-01

    The problem is that current definitions of early gastric cancer allow the inclusion of regional lymph node metastases. The increasing use of endoscopic submucosal dissection to treat early gastric cancer is a concern because regional lymph nodes are not addressed. The aim of the study was thus to critically evaluate current evidence with regard to tumour-specific factors associated with lymph node metastases in "early gastric cancer" to develop a more precise definition and improve clinical management. A systematic and comprehensive search of major reference databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed and the Cochrane Library) was undertaken using a combination of text words "early gastric cancer", "lymph node metastasis", "factors", "endoscopy", "surgery", "lymphadenectomy" "mucosa", "submucosa", "lymphovascular invasion", "differentiated", "undifferentiated" and "ulcer". All available publications that described tumour-related factors associated with lymph node metastases in early gastric cancer were included. The initial search yielded 1494 studies, of which 42 studies were included in the final analysis. Over time, the definition of early gastric cancer has broadened and the indications for endoscopic treatment have widened. The mean frequency of lymph node metastases increased on the basis of depth of infiltration (mucosa 6% vs. submucosa 28%), presence of lymphovascular invasion (absence 9% vs. presence 53%), tumour differentiation (differentiated 13% vs. undifferentiated 34%) and macroscopic type (elevated 13% vs. flat 26%) and tumour diameter (≤2 cm 8% vs. >2 cm 25%). There is a need to re-examine the diagnosis and staging of early gastric cancer to ensure that patients with one or more identifiable risk factor for lymph node metastases are not denied appropriate chemotherapy and surgical resection.

  14. Early cosmology constrained

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verde, Licia; Bellini, Emilio; Pigozzo, Cassio; Heavens, Alan F.; Jimenez, Raul

    2017-04-01

    We investigate our knowledge of early universe cosmology by exploring how much additional energy density can be placed in different components beyond those in the ΛCDM model. To do this we use a method to separate early- and late-universe information enclosed in observational data, thus markedly reducing the model-dependency of the conclusions. We find that the 95% credibility regions for extra energy components of the early universe at recombination are: non-accelerating additional fluid density parameter ΩMR < 0.006 and extra radiation parameterised as extra effective neutrino species 2.3 < Neff < 3.2 when imposing flatness. Our constraints thus show that even when analyzing the data in this largely model-independent way, the possibility of hiding extra energy components beyond ΛCDM in the early universe is seriously constrained by current observations. We also find that the standard ruler, the sound horizon at radiation drag, can be well determined in a way that does not depend on late-time Universe assumptions, but depends strongly on early-time physics and in particular on additional components that behave like radiation. We find that the standard ruler length determined in this way is rs = 147.4 ± 0.7 Mpc if the radiation and neutrino components are standard, but the uncertainty increases by an order of magnitude when non-standard dark radiation components are allowed, to rs = 150 ± 5 Mpc.

  15. Early Intervention in Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    McGorry, Patrick D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Early intervention for potentially serious disorder is a fundamental feature of healthcare across the spectrum of physical illness. It has been a major factor in the reductions in morbidity and mortality that have been achieved in some of the non-communicable diseases, notably cancer and cardiovascular disease. Over the past two decades, an international collaborative effort has been mounted to build the evidence and the capacity for early intervention in the psychotic disorders, notably schizophrenia, where for so long deep pessimism had reigned. The origins and rapid development of early intervention in psychosis are described from a personal and Australian perspective. This uniquely evidence-informed, evidence-building and cost-effective reform provides a blueprint and launch pad to radically change the wider landscape of mental health care and dissolve many of the barriers that have constrained progress for so long. PMID:25919380

  16. [Early flat colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Castelletto, R H; Chiarenza, C; Ottino, A; Garay, M L

    1991-01-01

    We report three cases of flat early colorectal carcinoma which were detected during the examination of 51 surgical specimens of colorectal resection. Two of them were endoscopically diagnosed, but the smallest one was not seen in the luminal instrumental examination. From the bibliographic analysis and our own experience we deduce the importance of flat lesions in the development of early colorectal carcinoma, either originated from pre-existent adenoma or de novo. Flat variants of adenoma, and presumably flush or depressed ones, must be considered as important factors in the early sequence adenoma-cancer. An appropriate endoscopic equipment with employment of additional staining techniques (such as carmine indigo and methylene blue) and the correct investigation during inflation-deflation procedures facilitates the identification of small lesions, their eradication and prevention from advanced forms of colorectal carcinoma.

  17. Inhibition of early T cell cytokine production by arsenic trioxide occurs independently of Nrf2.

    PubMed

    VanDenBerg, Kelly R; Freeborn, Robert A; Liu, Sheng; Kennedy, Rebekah C; Zagorski, Joseph W; Rockwell, Cheryl E

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a stress-activated transcription factor that induces a variety of cytoprotective genes. Nrf2 also mediates immunosuppressive effects in multiple inflammatory models. Upon activation, Nrf2 dissociates from its repressor protein, Keap1, and translocates to the nucleus where it induces Nrf2 target genes. The Nrf2-Keap1 interaction is disrupted by the environmental toxicant and chemotherapeutic agent arsenic trioxide (ATO). The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of ATO on early events of T cell activation and the role of Nrf2 in those effects. The Nrf2 target genes Hmox-1, Nqo-1, and Gclc were all upregulated by ATO (1-2 μM) in splenocytes derived from wild-type, but not Nrf2-null, mice, suggesting that Nrf2 is activated by ATO in splenocytes. ATO also inhibited IFNγ, IL-2, and GM-CSF mRNA and protein production in wild-type splenocytes activated with the T cell activator, anti-CD3/anti-CD28. However, ATO also decreased production of these cytokines in activated splenocytes from Nrf2-null mice, suggesting the inhibition is independent of Nrf2. Interestingly, ATO inhibited TNFα protein secretion, but not mRNA expression, in activated splenocytes suggesting the inhibition is due to post-transcriptional modification. In addition, c-Fos DNA binding was significantly diminished by ATO in wild-type and Nrf2-null splenocytes activated with anti-CD3/anti-CD28, consistent with the observed inhibition of cytokine production by ATO. Collectively, this study suggests that although ATO activates Nrf2 in splenocytes, inhibition of early T cell cytokine production by ATO occurs independently of Nrf2 and may instead be due to impaired AP-1 DNA binding.

  18. Cognitive Development in Early Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Chari; Elkind, David

    Some studies of early readers are discussed. It is pointed out that study of early readers has relevance for practical and theoretical issues in psychology and education. Of interest in this document are the following questions: (1) Are there any special talents or traits distinguishing early from non-early readers? (2) Do children who read early…

  19. Early College Entrance in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Jae Yup; Young, Marie; Gross, Miraca U. M.

    2015-01-01

    Early college entry is an educational intervention that is being increasingly used in Australia. Following a review of the current Australian literature on early college entry, an overview is provided of the characteristics of, and the procedures associated with, one formal Australian early college entry program (the Early Admission for…

  20. Early Adolescent Ego Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Michael A.

    1980-01-01

    Presented are the theoretical characteristics of social identity in early adolescence (ages 10 to 15). It is suggested that no longer is identity thought to begin with adolescence, but may have its beginnings in the preteen years. The article draws heavily on Eriksonian concepts. (Editor/KC)

  1. Early Childhood Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koh, Edgar, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Focused on early childhood development, this "UNICEF Intercom" asserts that developmental programs should aim to give children a fair chance at growth beyond survival. First presented are moral, scientific, social equity, economic, population, and programatic arguments for looking beyond the fundamental objective of saving young lives.…

  2. Early Screening Inventory (ESI).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welge-Crow, Patricia; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The Early Screening Inventory is designed to identify English- or Spanish-speaking children, ages 4-6, who may need special education services. The instrument measures the ability to acquire new skills in the areas of visual-motor/adaptive, language/cognition, and gross-motor/body-awareness. This paper describes administration, summation of data,…

  3. Preventing Early Learning Failure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sornson, Bob, Ed.

    Noting that thousands of young children with the capacity to experience school success do not because they are unprepared for school learning activities, have experienced physical or emotional setbacks that cause them to be at risk for early learning failure, have never experienced limits on their behavior, or have mild sensory or motor deficits,…

  4. Early Program Development

    1971-01-01

    This 1971 artist's concept shows a Nuclear Shuttle and an early Space Shuttle docked with an Orbital Propellant Depot. As envisioned by Marshall Space Flight Center Program Development persornel, an orbital modular propellant storage depot, supplied periodically by the Space Shuttle or Earth-to-orbit fuel tankers, would be critical in making available large amounts of fuel to various orbital vehicles and spacecraft.

  5. Early Program Development

    1970-01-01

    This artist's concept from 1970 shows a Nuclear Shuttle docked to an Orbital Propellant Depot and an early Space Shuttle. As envisioned by Marshall Space Flight Center Program Development plarners, the Nuclear Shuttle, in either manned or unmanned mode, would deliver payloads to lunar orbit or other destinations then return to Earth orbit for refueling and additonal missions.

  6. Early Childhood Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Early childhood trauma generally refers to the traumatic experiences that occur to children aged 0-6. Because infants' and young children's reactions may be different from older children's, and because they may not be able to verbalize their reactions to threatening or dangerous events, many people assume that young age protects children from the…

  7. Early Program Development

    1969-01-01

    As part of the Space Task Group's recommendations for more commonality and integration in America's space program, Marshall Space Flight Center engineers proposed an orbiting propellant storage facility to augment Space Shuttle missions. In this artist's concept from 1969 an early version of the Space Shuttle is shown refueling at the facility.

  8. Early Developments, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Loyd, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This document consists of the two 1998 issues of a journal reporting new research in early child development conducted by the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In the Spring 1998 issue, articles highlight the Center's diverse cross-cultural projects and global research, training and…

  9. Creativity: The Early Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shade, Rick; Shade, Patti Garrett

    2016-01-01

    There is a myth that some people are creative and others are not. However, all children are born creative. They love to explore, ask questions, and are incredibly imaginative. Parents are key in nurturing their child's creativity in the early years. This article offers resources and strategies parents can use at different ages and stages (newborn,…

  10. Early malignant syphilis*

    PubMed Central

    Ortigosa, Yara Martins; Bendazzoli, Paulo Salomão; Barbosa, Angela Marques; Ortigosa, Luciena Cegatto Martins

    2016-01-01

    Early malignant syphilis is a rare and severe variant of secondary syphilis. It is clinically characterized by lesions, which can suppurate and be accompanied by systemic symptoms such as high fever, asthenia, myalgia, and torpor state. We report a diabetic patient with characteristic features of the disease showing favorable evolution of the lesions after appropriate treatment. PMID:28300925

  11. Early Childhood Military Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelo, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Does the country's national security rely on top-quality early childhood education? Yes, say the military leaders of Mission: Readiness, an organization led by retired military commanders that promotes investment in education, child health, and parenting support. Actually, the generals are right, but for all the wrong reasons. The generals' aim is…

  12. Early Childhood Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advocate, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This special theme issue of the journal "The Advocate," offers articles on early interventions for preschoolers with special needs, including three articles in Spanish. Contents include: "Providing An Orientation for Life" (Galen D. Kirkland); "AFC Fights Cuts in Education at 'Speak Out' Rally" (Nadine Renazile);…

  13. Early Humour Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoicka, Elena; Akhtar, Nameera

    2012-01-01

    The current studies explored early humour as a complex socio-cognitive phenomenon by examining 2- and 3-year-olds' humour production with their parents. We examined whether children produced novel humour, whether they cued their humour, and the types of humour produced. Forty-seven parents were interviewed, and videotaped joking with their…

  14. Understanding Early Years Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldock, Peter; Fitzgerald, Damien; Kay, Janet

    2005-01-01

    The book is about policy in the area of early years services and that phrase may need some clarification. For the most part, therefore, this book deals with nursery schools and classes and with services provided by full day care nurseries, pre-schools, creches, childminders, after-school clubs and holiday play schemes. This book begins with…

  15. Early Childhood Indicators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Kathy; Zimanyi, Louise

    2001-01-01

    Recognizing the need to identify the level, nature, and impact of Early Childhood Care and Development (ECCD) programs on children and their families, this theme issue of "Coordinators' Notebook" seeks to complement and further the international efforts at collecting information on ECCD for use at national and international levels.…

  16. Early Indian People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doermann, Elisabeth

    1979-01-01

    Using bits and pieces of the past such as charred bits of wood from campfires, broken pieces of clay pots, stone spearpoints and arrowheads, and shell or copper ornaments, the archaeologist tries to put together the story of early Indian people in the Minnesota region. A short story, one of eight articles, re-creates the kill of an Itasca bison…

  17. Early Identification of Autism

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Sara Jane; Jones, Emily J.H.

    2016-01-01

    In the first year of life, infants who later go on to develop autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) may exhibit subtle disruptions in social interest and attention, communication, temperament, and head circumference growth that occur prior to the onset of clinical symptoms. These disruptions may reflect the early course of ASD development and may also contribute to the later development of clinical symptoms through alterations in the child’s experience of his or her environment. By age 2, developmental precursors of autism symptoms can be used to diagnose children reliably, and by age 3, the diagnosis is thought to be relatively stable. The downward extension of the autism diagnosis poses important questions for therapists in designing interventions that are applicable for infants who demonstrate early risk factors. We review current knowledge of the early signs of ASD in the infancy period (0–12 months) and the manifestation of symptoms in toddlerhood (12– 36 months), noting the importance of considering the variability in onset and trajectory of ASD. Finally, we consider the implications of this emerging research for those who work or interact with young children, including the importance of early monitoring and the development and evaluation of age-appropriate interventions. PMID:28090148

  18. Early cosmology constrained

    SciT

    Verde, Licia; Jimenez, Raul; Bellini, Emilio

    We investigate our knowledge of early universe cosmology by exploring how much additional energy density can be placed in different components beyond those in the ΛCDM model. To do this we use a method to separate early- and late-universe information enclosed in observational data, thus markedly reducing the model-dependency of the conclusions. We find that the 95% credibility regions for extra energy components of the early universe at recombination are: non-accelerating additional fluid density parameter Ω{sub MR} < 0.006 and extra radiation parameterised as extra effective neutrino species 2.3 < N {sub eff} < 3.2 when imposing flatness. Our constraintsmore » thus show that even when analyzing the data in this largely model-independent way, the possibility of hiding extra energy components beyond ΛCDM in the early universe is seriously constrained by current observations. We also find that the standard ruler, the sound horizon at radiation drag, can be well determined in a way that does not depend on late-time Universe assumptions, but depends strongly on early-time physics and in particular on additional components that behave like radiation. We find that the standard ruler length determined in this way is r {sub s} = 147.4 ± 0.7 Mpc if the radiation and neutrino components are standard, but the uncertainty increases by an order of magnitude when non-standard dark radiation components are allowed, to r {sub s} = 150 ± 5 Mpc.« less

  19. Adjuvant Trastuzumab in HER2-Positive Early Breast Cancer by Age and Hormone Receptor Status: A Cost-Utility Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Leung, William; Kvizhinadze, Giorgi; Nair, Nisha; Blakely, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Background The anti–human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) monoclonal antibody trastuzumab improves outcomes in patients with node-positive HER2+ early breast cancer. Given trastuzumab’s high cost, we aimed to estimate its cost-effectiveness by heterogeneity in age and estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status, which has previously been unexplored, to assist prioritisation. Methods and Findings A cost-utility analysis was performed using a Markov macro-simulation model, with a lifetime horizon, comparing a 12-mo regimen of trastuzumab with chemotherapy alone using the latest (2014) effectiveness measures from landmark randomised trials. A New Zealand (NZ) health system perspective was adopted, employing high-quality national administrative data. Incremental quality-adjusted life-years for trastuzumab versus chemotherapy alone are two times higher (2.33 times for the age group 50–54 y; 95% CI 2.29–2.37) for the worst prognosis (ER−/PR−) subtype compared to the best prognosis (ER+/PR+) subtype, causing incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) for the former to be less than half those of the latter for the age groups from 25–29 to 90–94 y (0.44 times for the age group 50–54 y; 95% CI 0.43–0.45). If we were to strictly apply an arbitrary cost-effectiveness threshold equal to the NZ gross domestic product per capita (2011 purchasing power parity [PPP]–adjusted: US$30,300; €23,700; £21,200), our study suggests that trastuzumab (2011 PPP-adjusted US$45,400/€35,900/£21,900 for 1 y at formulary prices) may not be cost-effective for ER+ (which are 61% of all) node-positive HER2+ early breast cancer patients but cost-effective for ER−/PR− subtypes (37% of all cases) to age 69 y. Market entry of trastuzumab biosimilars will likely reduce the ICER to below this threshold for premenopausal ER+/PR− cancer but not for ER+/PR+ cancer. Sensitivity analysis using the best-case effectiveness measure for ER+ cancer had

  20. Adjuvant Trastuzumab in HER2-Positive Early Breast Cancer by Age and Hormone Receptor Status: A Cost-Utility Analysis.

    PubMed

    Leung, William; Kvizhinadze, Giorgi; Nair, Nisha; Blakely, Tony

    2016-08-01

    The anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) monoclonal antibody trastuzumab improves outcomes in patients with node-positive HER2+ early breast cancer. Given trastuzumab's high cost, we aimed to estimate its cost-effectiveness by heterogeneity in age and estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status, which has previously been unexplored, to assist prioritisation. A cost-utility analysis was performed using a Markov macro-simulation model, with a lifetime horizon, comparing a 12-mo regimen of trastuzumab with chemotherapy alone using the latest (2014) effectiveness measures from landmark randomised trials. A New Zealand (NZ) health system perspective was adopted, employing high-quality national administrative data. Incremental quality-adjusted life-years for trastuzumab versus chemotherapy alone are two times higher (2.33 times for the age group 50-54 y; 95% CI 2.29-2.37) for the worst prognosis (ER-/PR-) subtype compared to the best prognosis (ER+/PR+) subtype, causing incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) for the former to be less than half those of the latter for the age groups from 25-29 to 90-94 y (0.44 times for the age group 50-54 y; 95% CI 0.43-0.45). If we were to strictly apply an arbitrary cost-effectiveness threshold equal to the NZ gross domestic product per capita (2011 purchasing power parity [PPP]-adjusted: US$30,300; €23,700; £21,200), our study suggests that trastuzumab (2011 PPP-adjusted US$45,400/€35,900/£21,900 for 1 y at formulary prices) may not be cost-effective for ER+ (which are 61% of all) node-positive HER2+ early breast cancer patients but cost-effective for ER-/PR- subtypes (37% of all cases) to age 69 y. Market entry of trastuzumab biosimilars will likely reduce the ICER to below this threshold for premenopausal ER+/PR- cancer but not for ER+/PR+ cancer. Sensitivity analysis using the best-case effectiveness measure for ER+ cancer had the same result. A key limitation was a lack of treatment

  1. Samuel Goudsmit - Early Influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudsmit, Esther

    2010-03-01

    Samuel Goudsmit, born in 1902 in The Hague, Netherlands, earned his Ph.D. at the University of Leiden in 1926 with Paul Ehrenfest. The present talk will describe some aspects of his background and early formative years in order to provide context for the broad range of his professional life. Sam belonged to a large tribe of paternal and maternal uncles, aunts and first cousins; including his parents, grandparents and sister Ro, they numbered forty. Sam was the first of the tribe to be educated beyond high school. Early interests as a child and later as a university student in the Netherlands prefigured his significant and diverse contributions in several realms including not only physics but also teaching, Egyptology and scientific Intelligence. Bibliographic sources will include: The American Institute of Physics' Oral History Transcripts and photographs from the Emilio Segre visual archives, memoirs and conversations of those who knew Sam and also letters to his daughter, Esther.

  2. Early Childhood Caries

    PubMed Central

    Kawashita, Yumiko; Kitamura, Masayasu; Saito, Toshiyuki

    2011-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the most common childhood diseases, and people continue to be susceptible to it throughout their lives. Although dental caries can be arrested and potentially even reversed in its early stages, it is often not self-limiting and progresses without proper care until the tooth is destroyed. Early childhood caries (ECC) is often complicated by inappropriate feeding practices and heavy infection with mutans streptococci. Such children should be targeted with a professional preventive program that includes oral hygiene instructions for mothers or caregivers, along with fluoride and diet counseling. However, these strategies alone are not sufficient to prevent dental caries in high-risk children; prevention of ECC also requires addressing the socioeconomic factors that face many families in which ECC is endemic. The aim of this paper is to systematically review information about ECC and to describe why many children are suffering from dental caries. PMID:22007218

  3. Early bioenergetic evolution

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Filipa L.; Thiergart, Thorsten; Landan, Giddy; Nelson-Sathi, Shijulal; Pereira, Inês A. C.; Allen, John F.; Lane, Nick; Martin, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Life is the harnessing of chemical energy in such a way that the energy-harnessing device makes a copy of itself. This paper outlines an energetically feasible path from a particular inorganic setting for the origin of life to the first free-living cells. The sources of energy available to early organic synthesis, early evolving systems and early cells stand in the foreground, as do the possible mechanisms of their conversion into harnessable chemical energy for synthetic reactions. With regard to the possible temporal sequence of events, we focus on: (i) alkaline hydrothermal vents as the far-from-equilibrium setting, (ii) the Wood–Ljungdahl (acetyl-CoA) pathway as the route that could have underpinned carbon assimilation for these processes, (iii) biochemical divergence, within the naturally formed inorganic compartments at a hydrothermal mound, of geochemically confined replicating entities with a complexity below that of free-living prokaryotes, and (iv) acetogenesis and methanogenesis as the ancestral forms of carbon and energy metabolism in the first free-living ancestors of the eubacteria and archaebacteria, respectively. In terms of the main evolutionary transitions in early bioenergetic evolution, we focus on: (i) thioester-dependent substrate-level phosphorylations, (ii) harnessing of naturally existing proton gradients at the vent–ocean interface via the ATP synthase, (iii) harnessing of Na+ gradients generated by H+/Na+ antiporters, (iv) flavin-based bifurcation-dependent gradient generation, and finally (v) quinone-based (and Q-cycle-dependent) proton gradient generation. Of those five transitions, the first four are posited to have taken place at the vent. Ultimately, all of these bioenergetic processes depend, even today, upon CO2 reduction with low-potential ferredoxin (Fd), generated either chemosynthetically or photosynthetically, suggesting a reaction of the type ‘reduced iron → reduced carbon’ at the beginning of bioenergetic evolution

  4. PHOBOS, the Early Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephans, George S. F.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Holynski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michalowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wyslouch, B.

    2002-06-01

    The PHOBOS detector, one of the two small experiments at RHIC, focuses on measurements of charged particle multiplicity over almost the full phase space and identified particles near mid-rapidity. Results will be presented from the early RHIC gold--gold runs at nucleon--nucleon center of mass energies of 56 and 130 GeV as well as the recently concluded run at the full RHIC energy of 200 GeV.

  5. Coaching in Early Mathematics.

    PubMed

    Germeroth, Carrie; Sarama, Julie

    2017-01-01

    Falling scores in math have prompted a renewed interest in math instruction at early ages. By their own admission, early childhood educators are generally underprepared and not always comfortable teaching math. Professional development (PD) in early mathematics is widely considered a main way to increase teachers' skills and efficacy (e.g., Guskey, 2000; Hyson & Woods, 2014; Munby, Russell, & Martin, 2001; Piasta, Logan, Pelatti, Capps, & Petrill, 2015; Richardson & Placier, 2001; Sarama, Clements, Wolfe, & Spitler, 2016; Sarama & DiBiase, 2004; Zaslow, 2014). However, it has been documented that stand-alone PD is not as effective in changing practice (e.g., Biancarosa & Bryk, 2011; Garet et al., 2008; Guskey, 2000; Hyson & Woods, 2014; Institute of Medicine and National Research Council, 2015; Joyce & Showers, 2002; Zaslow, 2014). Site-embedded ongoing support in the form of coaching or mentoring has been shown to be critical for successful implementation (Neuman & Cunningham, 2009; Powell, Diamond, Burchinal, & Koehler, 2010). In this chapter, we describe coaching models and abstract characteristics of effective coaching from the research. With this background, we provide an in-depth view of the coaching aspect of two large empirical studies in early mathematics. We introduce the theoretical framework from which the coaching models for these projects were developed and describe the research on which they were based. We then summarize how the planned models were instantiated and challenges to their implementation within each project. In the final section, we summarize what we have learned and described implications and challenges for the field. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Hands of early primates.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Doug M; Yapuncich, Gabriel S; Chester, Stephen G B; Bloch, Jonathan I; Godinot, Marc

    2013-12-01

    Questions surrounding the origin and early evolution of primates continue to be the subject of debate. Though anatomy of the skull and inferred dietary shifts are often the focus, detailed studies of postcrania and inferred locomotor capabilities can also provide crucial data that advance understanding of transitions in early primate evolution. In particular, the hand skeleton includes characteristics thought to reflect foraging, locomotion, and posture. Here we review what is known about the early evolution of primate hands from a comparative perspective that incorporates data from the fossil record. Additionally, we provide new comparative data and documentation of skeletal morphology for Paleogene plesiadapiforms, notharctines, cercamoniines, adapines, and omomyiforms. Finally, we discuss implications of these data for understanding locomotor transitions during the origin and early evolutionary history of primates. Known plesiadapiform species cannot be differentiated from extant primates based on either intrinsic hand proportions or hand-to-body size proportions. Nonetheless, the presence of claws and a different metacarpophalangeal [corrected] joint form in plesiadapiforms indicate different grasping mechanics. Notharctines and cercamoniines have intrinsic hand proportions with extremely elongated proximal phalanges and digit rays relative to metacarpals, resembling tarsiers and galagos. But their hand-to-body size proportions are typical of many extant primates (unlike those of tarsiers, and possibly Teilhardina, which have extremely large hands). Non-adapine adapiforms and omomyids exhibit additional carpal features suggesting more limited dorsiflexion, greater ulnar deviation, and a more habitually divergent pollex than observed plesiadapiforms. Together, features differentiating adapiforms and omomyiforms from plesiadapiforms indicate increased reliance on vertical prehensile-clinging and grasp-leaping, possibly in combination with predatory behaviors in

  7. Guideline for Early Interventions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    desensitization and reprocessing ( EMDR ) as a early mental health intervention, following mass violence and disasters, is a treatment of choice over other...village. Military operations take place under the eye of the world and are surrounded by high political attention. International missions far exceed...consistently reduce risks of later post-traumatic stress disorder or related adjustment difficulties. • There is no evidence that eye movement

  8. The Effectiveness of Early Group Intervention for Military Reserves Soldiers: The Role of the Repressive Coping Style.

    PubMed

    Shoval-Zuckerman, Yael; Dekel, Rachel; Solomon, Zahava; Levi, Ofir

    2015-01-01

    This study had two aims: 1. To examine whether soldiers who participated in Early Group Intervention (EGI) would show less distress and better functioning and physical health than soldiers who did not participate in EGI, and 2. To examine the contribution of the intervention to participants with repressive coping style. The sample comprised 166 male reserve soldiers who fought in the Second Lebanon War. The intervention was conducted three months after the traumatic event, was based on military protocol, and took place over the course of one day. Data were collected at two points in time (four months apart). The findings indicated that after EGI, the intervention group experienced less post-traumatic distress than did the control group. In addition, four months after the intervention, the functioning and physical health of the intervention group was significantly better than that of the control group. Notably, the intensity of post-traumatic distress before the intervention was lower among repressors and low-anxious soldiers than among soldiers in the other two groups (high-anxious and defensive). No significant differences were found after the intervention with regard to the various styles of coping with post-traumatic distress. Future clinical implications of the findings are discussed.

  9. Variation in the flowering gene SELF PRUNING 5G promotes day-neutrality and early yield in tomato.

    PubMed

    Soyk, Sebastian; Müller, Niels A; Park, Soon Ju; Schmalenbach, Inga; Jiang, Ke; Hayama, Ryosuke; Zhang, Lei; Van Eck, Joyce; Jiménez-Gómez, José M; Lippman, Zachary B

    2017-01-01

    Plants evolved so that their flowering is triggered by seasonal changes in day length. However, day-length sensitivity in crops limits their geographical range of cultivation, and thus modification of the photoperiod response was critical for their domestication. Here we show that loss of day-length-sensitive flowering in tomato was driven by the florigen paralog and flowering repressor SELF-PRUNING 5G (SP5G). SP5G expression is induced to high levels during long days in wild species, but not in cultivated tomato because of cis-regulatory variation. CRISPR/Cas9-engineered mutations in SP5G cause rapid flowering and enhance the compact determinate growth habit of field tomatoes, resulting in a quick burst of flower production that translates to an early yield. Our findings suggest that pre-existing variation in SP5G facilitated the expansion of cultivated tomato beyond its origin near the equator in South America, and they provide a compelling demonstration of the power of gene editing to rapidly improve yield traits in crop breeding.

  10. Early anaerobic metabolisms

    PubMed Central

    Canfield, Don E; Rosing, Minik T; Bjerrum, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Before the advent of oxygenic photosynthesis, the biosphere was driven by anaerobic metabolisms. We catalogue and quantify the source strengths of the most probable electron donors and electron acceptors that would have been available to fuel early-Earth ecosystems. The most active ecosystems were probably driven by the cycling of H2 and Fe2+ through primary production conducted by anoxygenic phototrophs. Interesting and dynamic ecosystems would have also been driven by the microbial cycling of sulphur and nitrogen species, but their activity levels were probably not so great. Despite the diversity of potential early ecosystems, rates of primary production in the early-Earth anaerobic biosphere were probably well below those rates observed in the marine environment. We shift our attention to the Earth environment at 3.8 Gyr ago, where the earliest marine sediments are preserved. We calculate, consistent with the carbon isotope record and other considerations of the carbon cycle, that marine rates of primary production at this time were probably an order of magnitude (or more) less than today. We conclude that the flux of reduced species to the Earth surface at this time may have been sufficient to drive anaerobic ecosystems of sufficient activity to be consistent with the carbon isotope record. Conversely, an ecosystem based on oxygenic photosynthesis was also possible with complete removal of the oxygen by reaction with reduced species from the mantle. PMID:17008221

  11. Early intervention for psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Max; Rathbone, John

    2014-01-01

    Background Proponents of early intervention have argued that outcomes might be improved if more therapeutic efforts were focused on the early stages of schizophrenia or on people with prodromal symptoms. Early intervention in schizophrenia has two elements that are distinct from standard care: early detection, and phase-specific treatment (phase-specific treatment is a psychological, social or physical treatment developed, or modified, specifically for use with people at an early stage of the illness). Early detection and phase-specific treatment may both be offered as supplements to standard care, or may be provided through a specialised early intervention team. Early intervention is now well established as a therapeutic approach in America, Europe and Australasia. Objectives To evaluate the effects of: (a) early detection; (b) phase-specific treatments; and (c) specialised early intervention teams in the treatment of people with prodromal symptoms or first-episode psychosis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (March 2009), inspected reference lists of all identified trials and reviews and contacted experts in the field. Selection criteria We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) designed to prevent progression to psychosis in people showing prodromal symptoms, or to improve outcome for people with first-episode psychosis. Eligible interventions, alone and in combination, included: early detection, phase-specific treatments, and care from specialised early intervention teams. We accepted cluster-randomised trials but excluded non-randomised trials. Data collection and analysis We reliably selected studies, quality rated them and extracted data. For dichotomous data, we estimated relative risks (RR), with the 95% confidence intervals (CI). Where possible, we calculated the number needed to treat/harm statistic (NNT/H) and used intention-to-treat analysis (ITT). Main results Studies were diverse, mostly small

  12. The 19S proteasome activator promotes human cytomegalovirus immediate early gene expression through proteolytic and nonproteolytic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Laura L; Kalejta, Robert F

    2014-10-01

    Proteasomes are large, multisubunit complexes that support normal cellular activities by executing the bulk of protein turnover. During infection, many viruses have been shown to promote viral replication by using proteasomes to degrade cellular factors that restrict viral replication. For example, the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) pp71 protein induces the proteasomal degradation of Daxx, a cellular transcriptional repressor that can silence viral immediate early (IE) gene expression. We previously showed that this degradation requires both the proteasome catalytic 20S core particle (CP) and the 19S regulatory particle (RP). The 19S RP associates with the 20S CP to facilitate protein degradation but also plays a 20S CP-independent role promoting transcription. Here, we present a nonproteolytic role of the 19S RP in HCMV IE gene expression. We demonstrate that 19S RP subunits are recruited to the major immediate early promoter (MIEP) that directs IE transcription. Depletion of 19S RP subunits generated a defect in RNA polymerase II elongation through the MIE locus during HCMV infection. Our results reveal that HCMV commandeers proteasome components for both proteolytic and nonproteolytic roles to promote HCMV lytic infection. Importance: Proteasome inhibitors decrease or eliminate 20S CP activity and are garnering increasing interest as chemotherapeutics. However, an increasing body of evidence implicates 19S RP subunits in important proteolytic-independent roles during transcription. Thus, pharmacological inhibition of the 20S CP as a means to modulate proteasome function toward therapeutic effect is an incomplete capitalization on the potential of this approach. Here, we provide an additional example of nonproteolytic 19S RP function in promoting HCMV transcription. These data provide a novel system with which to study the roles of different proteasome components during transcription, a rationale for previously described shifts in 19S RP subunit localization during

  13. Infusing Early Childhood Mental Health into Early Intervention Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabert, John C.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the process of enhancing early childhood mental health awareness and skills in non-mental health staff. The author describes a pilot training model, conducted the U.S. Army's Early Intervention Services, that involved: (a) increasing early childhood mental health knowledge through reflective readings, (b) enhancing…

  14. Early Life Exposures and Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Early-life events and exposures have important consequences for cancer development later in life, however, epidemiological studies of early-life factors and cancer development later in life have had significant methodological challenges.

  15. Why Recruits Separate Early

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    our sample were reportedly unable to adjust to the military environment due to social or emotional immaturity. This problem was especially prevalent...Table 9. Table 9 REASONS FOR EARLY SEPARATION 1. Mental health. Phobias , suicide threats and attempts, emotional immaturity, and personality and...hliurfl’lutf t’ htrtiuug tht .’ plinittol piioL’m.9 evIn’ thfll I b’ r i’lli. vre’.Ilv ifao~ , ýI ll.tv ill it](- rv ’: 111nil tln1 (i~..󈧏 4 P A W4.11

  16. Early Childhood Home Visiting.

    PubMed

    Duffee, James H; Mendelsohn, Alan L; Kuo, Alice A; Legano, Lori A; Earls, Marian F

    2017-09-01

    High-quality home-visiting services for infants and young children can improve family relationships, advance school readiness, reduce child maltreatment, improve maternal-infant health outcomes, and increase family economic self-sufficiency. The American Academy of Pediatrics supports unwavering federal funding of state home-visiting initiatives, the expansion of evidence-based programs, and a robust, coordinated national evaluation designed to confirm best practices and cost-efficiency. Community home visiting is most effective as a component of a comprehensive early childhood system that actively includes and enhances a family-centered medical home. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. Treat early, treat appropriately.

    PubMed

    Liebl, Andreas; Rutten, Guy; Abraira, Carlos

    2010-04-01

    The treatment of type 2 diabetes is shifting from secondary specialist centres to the primary care setting. However, for this shift to be sustainable and successful, primary care physicians (PCPs) must effectively provide aspects of diabetes care traditionally supplied by specialists. In particular, the early and appropriate use of insulin in type 2 diabetes will increasingly become the responsibility of PCPs. This review examines how patients with type 2 diabetes are currently managed across several European countries, and explores the evidence around insulin use in type 2 diabetes and the implications for primary care. 2010 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Early modern mathematical instruments.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Jim

    2011-12-01

    In considering the appropriate use of the terms "science" and "scientific instrument," tracing the history of "mathematical instruments" in the early modern period is offered as an illuminating alternative to the historian's natural instinct to follow the guiding lights of originality and innovation, even if the trail transgresses contemporary boundaries. The mathematical instrument was a well-defined category, shared across the academic, artisanal, and commercial aspects of instrumentation, and its narrative from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century was largely independent from other classes of device, in a period when a "scientific" instrument was unheard of.

  19. Early Program Development

    1969-01-01

    This 1969 artist's concept illustrates the use of three major elements of NASA's Integrated program, as proposed by President Nixon's Space Task Group. In Phases I and II, a Space Tug with a manipulator-equipped crew module removes a cargo module from an early Space Shuttle Orbiter and docks with it. In Phases III and IV, the Space Tug with attached cargo module flys toward a Nuclear Shuttle. As a result of the Space Task Group's recommendations for more commonality and integration in the American space program, Marshall Space Flight Center engineers studied many of the spacecraft depicted here.

  20. Crowdsourced earthquake early warning

    PubMed Central

    Minson, Sarah E.; Brooks, Benjamin A.; Glennie, Craig L.; Murray, Jessica R.; Langbein, John O.; Owen, Susan E.; Heaton, Thomas H.; Iannucci, Robert A.; Hauser, Darren L.

    2015-01-01

    Earthquake early warning (EEW) can reduce harm to people and infrastructure from earthquakes and tsunamis, but it has not been implemented in most high earthquake-risk regions because of prohibitive cost. Common consumer devices such as smartphones contain low-cost versions of the sensors used in EEW. Although less accurate than scientific-grade instruments, these sensors are globally ubiquitous. Through controlled tests of consumer devices, simulation of an Mw (moment magnitude) 7 earthquake on California’s Hayward fault, and real data from the Mw 9 Tohoku-oki earthquake, we demonstrate that EEW could be achieved via crowdsourcing. PMID:26601167

  1. Crowdsourced earthquake early warning.

    PubMed

    Minson, Sarah E; Brooks, Benjamin A; Glennie, Craig L; Murray, Jessica R; Langbein, John O; Owen, Susan E; Heaton, Thomas H; Iannucci, Robert A; Hauser, Darren L

    2015-04-01

    Earthquake early warning (EEW) can reduce harm to people and infrastructure from earthquakes and tsunamis, but it has not been implemented in most high earthquake-risk regions because of prohibitive cost. Common consumer devices such as smartphones contain low-cost versions of the sensors used in EEW. Although less accurate than scientific-grade instruments, these sensors are globally ubiquitous. Through controlled tests of consumer devices, simulation of an M w (moment magnitude) 7 earthquake on California's Hayward fault, and real data from the M w 9 Tohoku-oki earthquake, we demonstrate that EEW could be achieved via crowdsourcing.

  2. Early Psoriatic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Neil John

    2015-11-01

    Skin psoriasis is a major risk factor for the development of psoriatic arthritis. Recent studies have shown that delayed diagnosis is associated with long-term adverse outcomes. Screening questionnaires have revealed a potential burden of undiagnosed disease. Lifestyle factors and genetic and soluble biomarkers have come under scrutiny as risk factors. Imaging modalities may have an important role in detecting early change. With more effective treatments, it may be possible to prevent significant joint damage and associated disability. However, the precise nature of accurate and cost-effective screening strategies remains to be determined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Crowdsourced earthquake early warning

    Minson, Sarah E.; Brooks, Benjamin A.; Glennie, Craig L.; Murray, Jessica R.; Langbein, John O.; Owen, Susan E.; Heaton, Thomas H.; Iannucci, Robert A.; Hauser, Darren L.

    2015-01-01

    Earthquake early warning (EEW) can reduce harm to people and infrastructure from earthquakes and tsunamis, but it has not been implemented in most high earthquake-risk regions because of prohibitive cost. Common consumer devices such as smartphones contain low-cost versions of the sensors used in EEW. Although less accurate than scientific-grade instruments, these sensors are globally ubiquitous. Through controlled tests of consumer devices, simulation of an Mw (moment magnitude) 7 earthquake on California’s Hayward fault, and real data from the Mw 9 Tohoku-oki earthquake, we demonstrate that EEW could be achieved via crowdsourcing.

  4. Early Childhood Workforce Index, 2016

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitebook, Marcy; McLean, Caitlin; Austin, Lea J. E.

    2016-01-01

    The State of the Early Childhood Workforce (SECW) Initiative is a groundbreaking multi-year project to shine a steady spotlight on the nation's early childhood workforce. The SECW Initiative is designed to challenge entrenched ideas and policies that maintain an inequitable and inadequate status quo for early educators and for the children and…

  5. Value-Added Early Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dichter, Harriet

    2011-01-01

    Elected state leaders often prioritize economic prosperity and competitiveness, which provides an important opportunity too rarely taken for investing in early education. In 2003, Pennsylvania recognized the connection between early education and the economy, and smartly embraced early learning as part of its economic prosperity and…

  6. Early Reading and Concrete Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polk, Cindy L. Howes; Goldstein, David

    1980-01-01

    Indicated that early readers are more likely to be advanced in cognitive development than are nonearly-reading peers. After one year of formal reading instruction, early readers maintained their advantage in reading achievement. Measures of concrete operations were found to predict reading achievement for early and nonearly readers. (Author/DB)

  7. The Effectiveness of Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guralnick, Michael J., Ed.

    This book reviews research on the effectiveness of early intervention for children with disabilities or who are at risk. Program factors for children at risk and with disabilities, the effects of early intervention on different types of disabilities, and the outcomes of early intervention are explored. Chapters include: "Second-Generation Research…

  8. Early Attrition among Suicidal Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surgenor, P. W. G.; Meehan, V.; Moore, A.

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to identify the level of suicidal ideation in early attrition clients and their reasons for the early termination of their therapy. The cross-sectional design involved early attrition clients (C[subscript A]) who withdrew from therapy before their second session (n = 61), and continuing clients who (C[subscript C]) progressed…

  9. Early Childhood Special Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darrow, Alice-Ann

    2011-01-01

    The process of early intervention is a critical component of Early Childhood Special Music Education. Early intervention is the process of providing services, education, and support to young children who have disabilities or to children who are at-risk of developing needs that may affect their physical, cognitive, or emotional development. The…

  10. Early diagnosis in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Garway-Heath, David F

    2008-01-01

    This chapter reviews the evidence for the clinical application of vision function tests and imaging devices to identify early glaucoma, and sets out a scheme for the appropriate use and interpretation of test results in screening/case-finding and clinic settings. In early glaucoma, signs may be equivocal and the diagnosis is often uncertain. Either structural damage or vision function loss may be the first sign of glaucoma; neither one is consistently apparent before the other. Quantitative tests of visual function and measurements of optic-nerve head and retinal nerve fiber layer anatomy are useful to either raise or lower the probability that glaucoma is present. The posttest probability for glaucoma may be calculated from the pretest probability and the likelihood ratio of the diagnostic criterion, and the output of several diagnostic devices may be combined to achieve a final probability. However, clinicians need to understand how these diagnostic devices make their measurements, so that the validity of each test result can be adequately assessed. Only then should the result be used, together with the patient history and clinical examination, to derive a diagnosis.

  11. Early Earth slab stagnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrusta, R.; Van Hunen, J.

    2016-12-01

    At present day, the Earth's mantle exhibits a combination of stagnant and penetrating slabs within the transition zone, indicating a intermittent convection mode between layered and whole-mantle convection. Isoviscous thermal convection calculations show that in a hotter Earth, the natural mode of convection was dominated by double-layered convection, which may imply that slabs were more prone to stagnate in the transition zone. Today, slab penetration is to a large extent controlled by trench mobility for a plausible range of lower mantle viscosity and Clapeyron slope of the mantle phase transitions. Trench mobility is, in turn, governed by slab strength and density and upper plate forcing. In this study, we systematically investigate the slab-transition zone internation in the Early Earth, using 2D self-consistent numerical subduction models. Early Earth's higher mantle temperature facilitates decoupling between the plates and the underlying asthenosphere, and may result in slab sinking almost without trench retreat. Such behaviour together with a low resistance of a weak lower mantle may allow slabs to penetrate. The ability of slab to sink into the lower mantle throughout Earth's history may have important implications for Earth's evolution: it would provide efficient mass and heat flux through the transition zone therefore provide an efficient way to cool and mix the Earth's mantle.

  12. [In-patient (early) rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Wallesch, Claus-W; Lautenschläger, Sindy

    2017-04-01

    It is difficult to develop the financing and hospital provision of interventions for early rehabilitation within the diagnosis-related group (DRG) system. In addition to a range of partially rehabilitative complex interventions, the system recognizes three main forms of early rehabilitative interventions: geriatric, neurological/neurosurgical, and interdisciplinary and others. In this article, the appropriate definitions and cost-effectiveness of these procedures are analyzed and compared. The early rehabilitative interventions are characterized by constant cooperation in the therapeutic team, especially neurological early rehabilitation through the incorporation of nursing as a therapeutic profession. Whereas geriatric and neurological early rehabilitation are reflected in the DRG system, the former provided in many general hospitals and the latter mainly in specialized institutions, interdisciplinary early rehabilitation has only occasionally been represented in the DRG system so far. If all acute in-patients who require early rehabilitation should receive such an intervention, an additional fee must be implemented for this this interdisciplinary service.

  13. Early Treatment in HCV: Is it a Cost-Utility Option from the Italian Perspective?

    PubMed

    Marcellusi, Andrea; Viti, Raffaella; Damele, Francesco; Cammà, Calogero; Taliani, Gloria; Mennini, Francesco Saverio

    2016-08-01

    In Italy, the Italian Pharmaceutical Agency (AIFA) criteria used F3-F4 fibrosis stages as the threshold to prioritise the treatment with interferon (IFN)-free regimens, while in genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C (G1 CHC) patients with fibrosis of liver stage 2, an approach with pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN)-based triple therapy with simeprevir was suggested. The key clinical question is whether, in an era of financial constraints, the application of a universal IFN-free strategy in naïve G1 CHC patients is feasible within a short time horizon. The aim of this study is to perform an economic analysis to estimate the cost-utility of the early innovative therapy in Italy for managing hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients. The incremental cost-utility analysis was carried out to quantify the benefits of the early treatment approach in HCV subjects. A Markov simulation model including direct and indirect costs and health outcomes was developed from an Italian National Healthcare Service and societal perspective. A total of 5000 Monte Carlo simulations were performed on two distinct scenarios: standard of care (SoC) which includes 14,000 genotype 1 patients in Italy treated with innovative interferon-free regimens in the fibrosis of liver stages 3 and 4 (F3-F4) versus early-treatment scenario (ETS) where 2000 patients were additionally treated with simeprevir plus PEG-IFN and ribavirin in the fibrosis stage 2 (F2) (based on Italian Medicines Agency AIFA reimbursement criteria). A systematic literature review was carried out to identify epidemiological and economic data, which were subsequently used to inform the model. Furthermore, a one-way probabilistic sensitivity was performed to measure the relationship between the main parameters of the model and the cost-utility results. The model shows that, in terms of incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained, ETS appeared to be the most cost-utility option compared with both

  14. AWBATTM: Early Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberg, Victoria B.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to describe the early clinical experience with AWBAT. Methods: Burn patients requiring (1) donor sites or (2) treatment of a superficial burn wound injury were treated. A total of 45 patients with 69 distinct wounds were included. AWBATTM-D was evaluated in donor sites and AWBATTM-S was evaluated in superficial partial-thickness burns. Days to healing, pain, hematoma/seroma formation, and infection were noted. Ease of application, adherence, transparency, and physical adaptability details were collected. Results: Average period to healing of donor sites treated with AWBAT-D (n=22 patients with n=26 wounds) was 11.2 days, σ =1.95, with a range of 8–15 days and a median of 11 days. Pain rating at 24 hours was 1.2, σ =0.43 (n=18) and at 48 hours mean was 1.2, σ =0.46 (n=15). Average period to healing of superficial burns treated with AWBAT-S (n=15 patients with n=18 wounds) was 8.1 days, σ =2.48, with a range of 5–13 days and a median of 7 days. Pain rating at 24 hours was 1.5, σ =0.85 (n=10) and at 48 hours mean was 1.75, σ =0.89 (n=8). There was zero incidence of hematoma/seroma. No infections were seen. Results indicate that AWBAT was easily applied with good initial adherence. It was noted to be transparent, conformant, and pliable. Discussion: Early experience demonstrates that AWBAT performs well on donor sites and superficial partial-thickness burns and delivers the desired attributes of a temporary skin substitute including good adherence, infection control, transparency, adapatability, and pain control. PMID:20361005

  15. AWBAT: early clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Vandenberg, Victoria B

    2010-03-15

    The purpose of this article is to describe the early clinical experience with AWBAT. Burn patients requiring (1) donor sites or (2) treatment of a superficial burn wound injury were treated. A total of 45 patients with 69 distinct wounds were included. AWBAT-D was evaluated in donor sites and AWBAT-S was evaluated in superficial partial-thickness burns. Days to healing, pain, hematoma/seroma formation, and infection were noted. Ease of application, adherence, transparency, and physical adaptability details were collected. Average period to healing of donor sites treated with AWBAT-D (n=22 patients with n=26 wounds) was 11.2 days, sigma =1.95, with a range of 8-15 days and a median of 11 days. Pain rating at 24 hours was 1.2, sigma =0.43 (n=18) and at 48 hours mean was 1.2, sigma =0.46 (n=15). Average period to healing of superficial burns treated with AWBAT-S (n=15 patients with n=18 wounds) was 8.1 days, sigma =2.48, with a range of 5-13 days and a median of 7 days. Pain rating at 24 hours was 1.5, sigma =0.85 (n=10) and at 48 hours mean was 1.75, sigma =0.89 (n=8). There was zero incidence of hematoma/seroma. No infections were seen. Results indicate that AWBAT was easily applied with good initial adherence. It was noted to be transparent, conformant, and pliable. Early experience demonstrates that AWBAT performs well on donor sites and superficial partial-thickness burns and delivers the desired attributes of a temporary skin substitute including good adherence, infection control, transparency, adapatability, and pain control.

  16. Human Cytomegalovirus pUL97 Regulates the Viral Major Immediate Early Promoter by Phosphorylation-Mediated Disruption of Histone Deacetylase 1 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Bigley, Tarin M.; Reitsma, Justin M.; Mirza, Shama P.

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common agent of congenital infection and causes severe disease in immunocompromised patients. Current approved therapies focus on inhibiting viral DNA replication. The HCMV kinase pUL97 contributes to multiple stages of viral infection including DNA replication, controlling the cell cycle, and virion maturation. Our studies demonstrate that pUL97 also functions by influencing immediate early (IE) gene expression during the initial stages of infection. Inhibition of kinase activity using the antiviral compound maribavir or deletion of the UL97 gene resulted in decreased expression of viral immediate early genes during infection. Expression of pUL97 was sufficient to transactivate IE1 gene expression from the viral genome, which was dependent on viral kinase activity. We observed that pUL97 associates with histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1). HDAC1 is a transcriptional corepressor that acts to silence expression of viral genes. We observed that inhibition or deletion of pUL97 kinase resulted in increased HDAC1 and decreased histone H3 lysine 9 acetylation associating with the viral major immediate early (MIE) promoter. IE expression during pUL97 inhibition or deletion was rescued following inhibition of deacetylase activity. HDAC1 associates with chromatin by protein-protein interactions. Expression of active but not inactive pUL97 kinase decreased HDAC1 interaction with the transcriptional repressor protein DAXX. Finally, using mass spectrometry, we found that HDAC1 is uniquely phosphorylated upon expression of pUL97. Our results support the conclusion that HCMV pUL97 kinase regulates viral immediate early gene expression by phosphorylation-mediated disruption of HDAC1 binding to the MIE promoter. PMID:23616659

  17. Adenoviral bcl-2 transfer improves survival and early graft function after ischemia and reperfusion in rat liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rentsch, Markus; Kienle, Klaus; Mueller, Thomas; Vogel, Mandy; Jauch, Karl Walter; Püllmann, Kerstin; Obed, Aiman; Schlitt, Hans J; Beham, Alexander

    2005-11-27

    Primary graft dysfunction due to ischemia and reperfusion injury represents a major problem in liver transplantation. The related cell stress may induce apoptosis, which can be suppressed by bcl-2. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of adenoviral bcl-2 gene transfer on early graft function and survival in rat liver transplantation. An adenoviral construct that transfers bcl-2 under the control of a tetracycline inducible promoter was generated (advTetOn bcl-2) and used with a second adenovirus that transfers the repressor protein (advCMV Rep). Forty-eight hours before explantation, donor rats were treated with advTetOn bcl-2/ advCMV Rep (n=7) and doxycyclin, with the control adenoviral construct advCMV GFP (n=8) or with doxycyclin alone (n=8). Liver transplantation was performed following 16 hours of cold storage (UW). Bcl-2 expression and intrahepatic apoptosis was assessed. Bile flow was monitored 90 min posttransplantation. The endpoint for survival was 7 days. Bcl-2 was expressed in hepatocytes and sinusoidal lining cells. This was associated with a significant reduction of apoptotic sinusoidal lining cells and hepatocytes after 24 hours and 7 days. Bile production was significantly higher following bcl-2 pretreatment. Furthermore, bcl-2 transfer resulted in significantly improved survival (100% vs. 50% both control groups). Adenoviral bcl-2 transfer results in protein expression in hepatocytes and sinusoidal lining cells resulting in early graft function and survival enhancement after prolonged ischemia and reperfusion injury. The inhibition of apoptosis in the context of liver transplantation might be a reasonable approach in the treatment of graft dysfunction.

  18. Fine-tuning of chromatin composition and Polycomb recruitment by two Mi2 homologues during C. elegans early embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Käser-Pébernard, Stéphanie; Pfefferli, Catherine; Aschinger, Caroline; Wicky, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    The nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase complex promotes cell fate decisions throughout embryonic development. Its core enzymatic subunit, the SNF2-like ATPase and Helicase Mi2, is well conserved throughout the eukaryotic kingdom and can be found in multiple and highly homologous copies in all vertebrates and some invertebrates. However, the reasons for such duplications and their implications for embryonic development are unknown. Here we studied the two C. elegans Mi2 homologues, LET-418 and CHD-3, which displayed redundant activities during early embryonic development. At the transcriptional level, these two Mi2 homologues redundantly repressed the expression of a large gene population. We found that LET-418 physically accumulated at TSS-proximal regions on transcriptionally active genomic targets involved in growth and development. Moreover, LET-418 acted redundantly with CHD-3 to block H3K4me3 deposition at these genes. Our study also revealed that LET-418 was partially responsible for recruiting Polycomb to chromatin and for promoting H3K27me3 deposition. Surprisingly, CHD-3 displayed opposite activities on Polycomb, as it was capable of moderating its LET-418-dependent recruitment and restricted the amount of H3K27me3 on the studied target genes. Although closely homologous, LET-418 and CHD-3 showed both redundant and opposite functions in modulating the chromatin environment at developmental target genes. We identified the interplay between LET-418 and CHD-3 to finely tune the levels of histone marks at developmental target genes. More than just repressors, Mi2-containing complexes appear as subtle modulators of gene expression throughout development. The study of such molecular variations in vertebrate Mi2 counterparts might provide crucial insights to our understanding of the epigenetic control of early development.

  19. Consequences of early childbearing.

    PubMed

    Monroy De Velasco, A

    1982-12-01

    By 2000, developing countries will have an estimated 1 billion adolescents who are physically old enough to reproduce themselves but far too young to be responsible, healthy parents of healthy children. Governments must become involved in the issues surrounding adolescent pregnancy and both custom and the laws must change to reflect the needs of young people. The consequences of early childbearing are felt by society as well as the families directly affected. The incidence of births to very young women, both married and unmarried is growing; each year approximately 13 million children are born to young mothers. The percentage of live births to mothers under the age of 20 ranges from 20% in some African and Caribbean countries, to 10-15% in many Latin American countries, 5-10% in Asia, and 1% in Japan. Increased out-of-wedlock adolescent pregnancy is due to many factors: earlier sexual maturity from better childhood health and nutrition, a trend toward later marriage, increased opportunity for opposite sex interaction in schools and in the labor force, and rapid urbanization which weakens traditional family structures and social and cultural controls. Early childbirth is especially dangerous for adolescents and their infants. Compared to women between the ages of 20-35, pregnant women under 20 are at a greater risk for death and disease including bleeding during pregnancy, toxemia, hemorrhage, prolonged and difficult labor, severe anemia, and disability. Life-long social and economic disadvantages may be a consequence of teenage birth. Educational and career opportunities may be limited, as may be opportunities for marriage. Teen mothers tend to have larger completed family sizes, shorter birth intervals resulting in both poorer health status for the family, and a more severe level of poverty. The children also suffer; teens mothers have a higher incidence of low birth weight infants which is associated with birth injuries, serious childhood illness, and mental and

  20. The Early Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvey, Gerald

    2013-04-01

    Stuart Freedman obtained his PhD at Berkley with an experimental thesis providing very strong evidence against theories requiring local hidden variables. He then came to Princeton in 1972 and began collaboration on a search for second-class currents. These measurements are quite difficult as the effects are the order of 1%, demonstrating Freedman's drive to take on hard but important experiments. After carrying out some relatively standard nuclear physics measurements he moved on to Stanford in 1976. There, Freedman was involved in identifying measurements sensitive to the existence of light axions. He also carried out searches for various exotica that might be produced from cosmic rays or the SLAC beam stop. During this time he was collaborating with us at Argonne investigating nuclear parity violation and time-like axial beta decay. In 1982 Freedman came to Argonne where he worked on fundamental issues in neutron beta decay. He also initiated what was to become one of his trademarks, demonstrating that surprising peaks in the e^+-e^- spectrum observed in very heavy ion collisions were spurious. He further launched his first neutrino oscillation experiment. This period of early research was marked by a remarkable diversity of subject matter and approach.

  1. Biosignatures of early earths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilcher, Carl B.

    2003-01-01

    A major goal of NASA's Origins Program is to find habitable planets around other stars and determine which might harbor life. Determining whether or not an extrasolar planet harbors life requires an understanding of what spectral features (i.e., biosignatures) might result from life's presence. Consideration of potential biosignatures has tended to focus on spectral features of gases in Earth's modern atmosphere, particularly ozone, the photolytic product of biogenically produced molecular oxygen. But life existed on Earth for about 1(1/2) billion years before the buildup of atmospheric oxygen. Inferred characteristics of Earth's earliest biosphere and studies of modern microbial ecosystems that share some of those characteristics suggest that organosulfur compounds, particularly methanethiol (CH(3)SH, the sulfur analog of methanol), may have been biogenic products on early Earth. Similar production could take place on extrasolar Earth-like planets whose biota share functional chemical characteristics with Earth life. Since methanethiol and related organosulfur compounds (as well as carbon dioxide) absorb at wavelengths near or overlapping the 9.6-microm band of ozone, there is potential ambiguity in interpreting a feature around this wavelength in an extrasolar planet spectrum.

  2. Early physics results.

    PubMed

    Jenni, Peter

    2012-02-28

    For the past year, experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have started exploring physics at the high-energy frontier. Thanks to the superb turn-on of the LHC, a rich harvest of initial physics results have already been obtained by the two general-purpose experiments A Toroidal LHC Apparatus (ATLAS) and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS), which are the subject of this report. The initial data have allowed a test, at the highest collision energies ever reached in a laboratory, of the Standard Model (SM) of elementary particles, and to make early searches Beyond the Standard Model (BSM). Significant results have already been obtained in the search for the Higgs boson, which would establish the postulated electro-weak symmetry breaking mechanism in the SM, as well as for BSM physics such as Supersymmetry (SUSY), heavy new particles, quark compositeness and others. The important, and successful, SM physics measurements are giving confidence that the experiments are in good shape for their journey into the uncharted territory of new physics anticipated at the LHC.

  3. Biosignatures of early earths.

    PubMed

    Pilcher, Carl B

    2003-01-01

    A major goal of NASA's Origins Program is to find habitable planets around other stars and determine which might harbor life. Determining whether or not an extrasolar planet harbors life requires an understanding of what spectral features (i.e., biosignatures) might result from life's presence. Consideration of potential biosignatures has tended to focus on spectral features of gases in Earth's modern atmosphere, particularly ozone, the photolytic product of biogenically produced molecular oxygen. But life existed on Earth for about 1(1/2) billion years before the buildup of atmospheric oxygen. Inferred characteristics of Earth's earliest biosphere and studies of modern microbial ecosystems that share some of those characteristics suggest that organosulfur compounds, particularly methanethiol (CH(3)SH, the sulfur analog of methanol), may have been biogenic products on early Earth. Similar production could take place on extrasolar Earth-like planets whose biota share functional chemical characteristics with Earth life. Since methanethiol and related organosulfur compounds (as well as carbon dioxide) absorb at wavelengths near or overlapping the 9.6-microm band of ozone, there is potential ambiguity in interpreting a feature around this wavelength in an extrasolar planet spectrum.

  4. Zscan4 is regulated by PI3-kinase and DNA-damaging agents and directly interacts with the transcriptional repressors LSD1 and CtBP2 in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Storm, Michael P; Kumpfmueller, Benjamin; Bone, Heather K; Buchholz, Michael; Sanchez Ripoll, Yolanda; Chaudhuri, Julian B; Niwa, Hitoshi; Tosh, David; Welham, Melanie J

    2014-01-01

    The Zscan4 family of genes, encoding SCAN-domain and zinc finger-containing proteins, has been implicated in the control of early mammalian embryogenesis as well as the regulation of pluripotency and maintenance of genome integrity in mouse embryonic stem cells. However, many features of this enigmatic family of genes are poorly understood. Here we show that undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) lines simultaneously express multiple members of the Zscan4 gene family, with Zscan4c, Zscan4f and Zscan4-ps2 consistently being the most abundant. Despite this, between only 0.1 and 0.7% of undifferentiated mouse pluripotent stem cells express Zscan4 protein at a given time, consistent with a very restricted pattern of Zscan4 transcripts reported previously. Herein we demonstrate that Zscan4 expression is regulated by the p110α catalytic isoform of phosphoinositide 3-kinases and is induced following exposure to a sub-class of DNA-damage-inducing agents, including Zeocin and Cisplatin. Furthermore, we observe that Zscan4 protein expression peaks during the G2 phase of the cell cycle, suggesting that it may play a critical role at this checkpoint. Studies with GAL4-fusion proteins suggest a role for Zscan4 in transcriptional regulation, further supported by the fact that protein interaction analyses demonstrate that Zscan4 interacts with both LSD1 and CtBP2 in ESC nuclei. This study advances and extends our understanding of Zscan4 expression, regulation and mechanism of action. Based on our data we propose that Zscan4 may regulate gene transcription in mouse ES cells through interaction with LSD1 and CtBP2.

  5. Zscan4 Is Regulated by PI3-Kinase and DNA-Damaging Agents and Directly Interacts with the Transcriptional Repressors LSD1 and CtBP2 in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bone, Heather K.; Buchholz, Michael; Sanchez Ripoll, Yolanda; Chaudhuri, Julian B.; Niwa, Hitoshi; Tosh, David; Welham, Melanie J.

    2014-01-01

    The Zscan4 family of genes, encoding SCAN-domain and zinc finger-containing proteins, has been implicated in the control of early mammalian embryogenesis as well as the regulation of pluripotency and maintenance of genome integrity in mouse embryonic stem cells. However, many features of this enigmatic family of genes are poorly understood. Here we show that undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) lines simultaneously express multiple members of the Zscan4 gene family, with Zscan4c, Zscan4f and Zscan4-ps2 consistently being the most abundant. Despite this, between only 0.1 and 0.7% of undifferentiated mouse pluripotent stem cells express Zscan4 protein at a given time, consistent with a very restricted pattern of Zscan4 transcripts reported previously. Herein we demonstrate that Zscan4 expression is regulated by the p110α catalytic isoform of phosphoinositide 3-kinases and is induced following exposure to a sub-class of DNA-damage-inducing agents, including Zeocin and Cisplatin. Furthermore, we observe that Zscan4 protein expression peaks during the G2 phase of the cell cycle, suggesting that it may play a critical role at this checkpoint. Studies with GAL4-fusion proteins suggest a role for Zscan4 in transcriptional regulation, further supported by the fact that protein interaction analyses demonstrate that Zscan4 interacts with both LSD1 and CtBP2 in ESC nuclei. This study advances and extends our understanding of Zscan4 expression, regulation and mechanism of action. Based on our data we propose that Zscan4 may regulate gene transcription in mouse ES cells through interaction with LSD1 and CtBP2. PMID:24594919

  6. Early Childhood Diplomacy: Policy Planning for Early Childhood Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vargas-Barón, Emily; Diehl, Kristel

    2018-01-01

    Children who are well nurtured, appropriately cared for, and provided with positive learning opportunities in their early years have a better chance of becoming healthy and productive citizens of nations and of the world. This article reviews the art and science of policy planning for early childhood development (ECD) from a diplomacy perspective.…

  7. Early Attachment Relationships and the Early Childhood Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortazar, Alejandra; Herreros, Francisca

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the relationship between attachment theory and the early childhood curriculum. During the first years of life children develop early attachment relationships with their primary caregivers. These attachment relationships, either secure or insecure, will shape children's socio-emotional development. In the USA, the predominant…

  8. Wyoming Early Childhood Readiness Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming State Dept. of Education, Cheyenne.

    Because children entering kindergarten come with a variety of preschool and home experiences, and accordingly, with varying levels of school readiness, the Wyoming Early Childhood Readiness Standards have been developed to provide a more consistent definition of school readiness. The goal for the Standards is to provide early childhood educators…

  9. Promoting Health in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossin-Slater, Maya

    2015-01-01

    Children who are healthy early in life--from conception to age five--not only grow up to be healthier adults, they are also better educated, earn more, and contribute more to the economy. The United States lags behind other advanced countries in early childhood health, threatening both the health of future generations and the nation's long-term…

  10. Invest in Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagan, Sharon Lynn; Reid, Jeanne L.

    2009-01-01

    The history of American early education is one of changing roles and goals. As federal engagement in early childhood has shifted in response to social, political, and economic needs, few policy efforts have focused on long-term planning or coordination. The authors identify the appropriate roles of federal, state, and local governments and make 13…

  11. Oaklahoma: Early Head Start Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Oklahoma Early Childhood Program uses public and private funds to enhance and expand high quality early care and education opportunities for children birth through age 3. The George Kaiser Family Foundation initiated the pilot in 2006 by matching state general revenue with private donations. Since that time, other private funders and providers…

  12. Biological aspects of early osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Madry, Henning; Luyten, Frank P; Facchini, Andrea

    2012-03-01

    Early OA primarily affects articular cartilage and involves the entire joint, including the subchondral bone, synovial membrane, menisci and periarticular structures. The aim of this review is to highlight the molecular basis and histopathological features of early OA. Selective review of literature. Risk factors for developing early OA include, but are not limited to, a genetic predisposition, mechanical factors such as axial malalignment, and aging. In early OA, the articular cartilage surface is progressively becoming discontinuous, showing fibrillation and vertical fissures that extend not deeper than into the mid-zone of the articular cartilage, reflective of OARSI grades 1.0-3.0. Early changes in the subchondral bone comprise a progressive increase in subchondral plate and subarticular spongiosa thickness. Early OA affects not only the articular cartilage and the subchondral bone but also other structures of the joint, such as the menisci, the synovial membrane, the joint capsule, ligaments, muscles and the infrapatellar fat pad. Genetic markers or marker combinations may become useful in the future to identify early OA and patients at risk. The high socioeconomic impact of OA suggests that a better insight into the mechanisms of early OA may be a key to develop more targeted reconstructive therapies at this first stage of the disease. Systematic review, Level II.

  13. 75 FR 20830 - Early Learning

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ... meetings and written submissions, is seeking input from State agencies responsible for early learning and... intervention service providers and other providers of services to young children), students, technical... receive all written submissions of comments on the four early learning topics on or before 5 p.m...

  14. Nebraska: Early Head Start Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Since 1999, Nebraska's Early Head Start Infant/Toddler Quality Initiative has supported Early Head Start (EHS) and community child care partnerships to improve the quality and professionalism of infant and toddler care. EHS programs apply to receive funding to establish partnerships with center-based or home-based child care.The initiative has…

  15. Teachers in Early Childhood Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilderry, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines teacher accountability and authority in early childhood policy. It reports on data from a study that investigated the influences affecting early childhood teacher decision-making at the preschool level in Victoria, Australia. Using a question raised by Ball "Where are the teachers in all this [policy]?" provided a…

  16. Early Childhood Inclusion in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giné, Climent; Balcells-Balcells, Anna; Cañadas, Margarita; Paniagua, Gema

    2016-01-01

    This article describes early childhood inclusion in educational settings in Spain. First, we address the legislative framework of preschool education in Spain and offer a brief analysis of some relevant issues, including the current situation of early childhood education and inclusion at this stage. Second, current policies and practices relating…

  17. Missouri: Early Head Start Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Missouri's Early Head Start/Child Care Partnership Project expands access to Early Head Start (EHS) services for children birth to age 3 by developing partnerships between federal Head Start, EHS contractors, and child care providers. Head Start and EHS contractors that participate in the initiative provide services through community child care…

  18. Arizona Early Childhood Education Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

    In an effort to provide a sound basis for educational accountability for preschool programs, the Arizona Early Childhood Education (ECE) Standards were developed as a framework for literacy-based programs for 3- and 4-year-olds and to provide parents with a basic understanding of indicators of early learning. These standards, to be adopted by…

  19. Unlocking the Future: Early Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Leslie Asher, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This newsletter of the Southwest Educational Development Laboratory (SEDL)contains a collection of articles which discuss various aspects of early literacy. Articles in the newsletter are: "Introduction: Reading Instruction, a Key to the Future"; "Ensuring Early Literacy through Coherent Instruction" (Leslie Blair);…

  20. Early Childhood Education in Taiwan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barclay, Lisa K.

    1989-01-01

    Describes early childhood education in Taiwan, focusing on living patterns and child care arrangements, the position of the individual within the family and community, and the application of cultural norms to early childhood education. Compares the behavior of Chinese preschool children to that of American preschool children. (RJC)

  1. Early osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Madry, Henning; Kon, Elizaveta; Condello, Vincenzo; Peretti, Giuseppe M; Steinwachs, Matthias; Seil, Romain; Berruto, Massimo; Engebretsen, Lars; Filardo, Giuseppe; Angele, Peter

    2016-06-01

    There is an increasing awareness on the importance in identifying early phases of the degenerative processes in knee osteoarthritis (OA), the crucial period of the disease when there might still be the possibility to initiate treatments preventing its progression. Early OA may show a diffuse and ill-defined involvement, but also originate in the cartilage surrounding a focal lesion, thus necessitating a separate assessment of these two entities. Early OA can be considered to include a maximal involvement of 50 % of the cartilage thickness based on the macroscopic ICRS classification, reflecting an OARSI grade 4. The purpose of this paper was to provide an updated review of the current status of the diagnosis and definition of early knee OA, including the clinical, radiographical, histological, MRI, and arthroscopic definitions and biomarkers. Based on current evidence, practical classification criteria are presented. As new insights and technologies become available, they will further evolve to better define and treat early knee OA.

  2. Growth hormone and early treatment.

    PubMed

    Antoniazzi, F; Cavarzere, P; Gaudino, R

    2015-06-01

    Growth hormone (GH) treatment is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) not only for GH deficiency (GHD) but also for other childhood growth disorders with growth failure and/or short stature. GHD is the most frequent endocrine disorder presenting with short stature in childhood. During neonatal period, metabolic effects due to congenital GHD require a prompt replacement therapy to avoid possible life-threatening complications. In childhood and adolescence, growth impairment is the most evident effect of GHD and early treatment has the aim of restore normal growth and to reach normal adult height. We reassume in this review the conditions causing GHD and the diagnostic challenge to reach an early diagnosis, and an early treatment, necessary to obtain the best results. Finally, we summarize results obtained in clinical studies about pediatric patients with GHD treated at an early age, in which a marked early catch-up growth and a normalization of adult height were obtained.

  3. Early Diagnosis and Early Intervention in Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the opportunities and challenges for early diagnosis and early intervention in cerebral palsy (CP). CP describes a group of disorders of the development of movement and posture, causing activity limitation that is attributed to disturbances that occurred in the fetal or infant brain. Therefore, the paper starts with a summary of relevant information from developmental neuroscience. Most lesions underlying CP occur in the second half of gestation, when developmental activity in the brain reaches its summit. Variations in timing of the damage not only result in different lesions but also in different neuroplastic reactions and different associated neuropathologies. This turns CP into a heterogeneous entity. This may mean that the best early diagnostics and the best intervention methods may differ for various subgroups of children with CP. Next, the paper addresses possibilities for early diagnosis. It discusses the predictive value of neuromotor and neurological exams, neuroimaging techniques, and neurophysiological assessments. Prediction is best when complementary techniques are used in longitudinal series. Possibilities for early prediction of CP differ for infants admitted to neonatal intensive care and other infants. In the former group, best prediction is achieved with the combination of neuroimaging and the assessment of general movements, in the latter group, best prediction is based on carefully documented milestones and neurological assessment. The last part reviews early intervention in infants developing CP. Most knowledge on early intervention is based on studies in high-risk infants without CP. In these infants, early intervention programs promote cognitive development until preschool age; motor development profits less. The few studies on early intervention in infants developing CP suggest that programs that stimulate all aspects of infant development by means of family coaching are most promising. More research is urgently needed

  4. Transcriptional Activity and Nuclear Localization of Cabut, the Drosophila Ortholog of Vertebrate TGF-β-Inducible Early-Response Gene (TIEG) Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Belacortu, Yaiza; Weiss, Ron; Kadener, Sebastian; Paricio, Nuria

    2012-01-01

    Background Cabut (Cbt) is a C2H2-class zinc finger transcription factor involved in embryonic dorsal closure, epithelial regeneration and other developmental processes in Drosophila melanogaster. Cbt orthologs have been identified in other Drosophila species and insects as well as in vertebrates. Indeed, Cbt is the Drosophila ortholog of the group of vertebrate proteins encoded by the TGF-ß-inducible early-response genes (TIEGs), which belong to Sp1-like/Krüppel-like family of transcription factors. Several functional domains involved in transcriptional control and subcellular localization have been identified in the vertebrate TIEGs. However, little is known of whether these domains and functions are also conserved in the Cbt protein. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine the transcriptional regulatory activity of the Drosophila Cbt protein, we performed Gal4-based luciferase assays in S2 cells and showed that Cbt is a transcriptional repressor and able to regulate its own expression. Truncated forms of Cbt were then generated to identify its functional domains. This analysis revealed a sequence similar to the mSin3A-interacting repressor domain found in vertebrate TIEGs, although located in a different part of the Cbt protein. Using β-Galactosidase and eGFP fusion proteins, we also showed that Cbt contains the bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) previously identified in TIEG proteins, although it is non-functional in insect cells. Instead, a monopartite NLS, located at the amino terminus of the protein and conserved across insects, is functional in Drosophila S2 and Spodoptera exigua Sec301 cells. Last but not least, genetic interaction and immunohistochemical assays suggested that Cbt nuclear import is mediated by Importin-α2. Conclusions/Significance Our results constitute the first characterization of the molecular mechanisms of Cbt-mediated transcriptional control as well as of Cbt nuclear import, and demonstrate the existence of

  5. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciT

    David Storm; Govanon Nongbri; Steve Decanio

    2004-01-12

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase IImore » is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, Inc., GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. During Phase I, a design basis for the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis section was developed based on limited experience with the specified feed gas and operating conditions. The objective of this Task in Phase II RD&T work was to confirm the performance of the F-T reactor at the set design conditions. Although much of the research, development, and testing work were done by TES outside of this project, several

  6. Early College, Early Success: Early College High School Initiative Impact Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Andrea; Turk-Bicakci, Lori; Garet, Michael; Song, Mengli; Knudson, Joel; Haxton, Clarisse; Zeiser, Kristina; Hoshen, Gur; Ford, Jennifer; Stephan, Jennifer; Keating, Kaeli; Cassidy, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    In 2002, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation launched the Early College High School Initiative (ECHSI) with the primary goal of increasing the opportunity for underserved students to earn a postsecondary credential. To achieve this goal, Early Colleges provide underserved students with exposure to, and support in, college while they are in…

  7. Implementing Obstetric Early Warning Systems.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Alexander M; Campbell, Mary L; Kline, Carolyn R; Wiesner, Suzanne; D'Alton, Mary E; Shields, Laurence E

    2018-04-01

    Severe maternal morbidity and mortality are often preventable and obstetric early warning systems that alert care providers of potential impending critical illness may improve maternal safety. While literature on outcomes and test characteristics of maternal early warning systems is evolving, there is limited guidance on implementation. Given current interest in early warning systems and their potential role in care, the 2017 Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM) Annual Meeting dedicated a session to exploring early warning implementation across a wide range of hospital settings. This manuscript reports on key points from this session. While implementation experiences varied based on factors specific to individual sites, common themes relevant to all hospitals presenting were identified. Successful implementation of early warnings systems requires administrative and leadership support, dedication of resources, improved coordination between nurses, providers, and ancillary staff, optimization of information technology, effective education, evaluation of and change in hospital culture and practices, and support in provider decision-making. Evolving data on outcomes on early warning systems suggest that maternal risk may be reduced. To effectively reduce maternal, risk early warning systems that capture deterioration from a broad range of conditions may be required in addition to bundles tailored to specific conditions such as hemorrhage, thromboembolism, and hypertension.

  8. Morphogenesis of early stage melanoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatelain, Clément; Amar, Martine Ben

    2015-08-01

    Melanoma early detection is possible by simple skin examination and can insure a high survival probability when successful. However it requires efficient methods for identifying malignant lesions from common moles. This paper provides an overview first of the biological and physical mechanisms controlling melanoma early evolution, and then of the clinical tools available today for detecting melanoma in vivo at an early stage. It highlights the lack of diagnosis methods rationally linking macroscopic observables to the microscopic properties of the tissue, which define the malignancy of the tumor. The possible inputs of multiscale models for improving these methods are shortly discussed.

  9. [Early management of cerebrovascular accidents].

    PubMed

    Libot, Jérômie; Guillon, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    A cerebrovascular accident requires urgent diagnosis and treatment.The management of a stroke must be early and adapted in order to improve the overall clinical outcome and lower the risk of mortality.