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Sample records for early secondary prevention

  1. Promoting Good Mental Health from Primary to Early Secondary Grades--Preventive Interventions in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jason, Leonard A.; Ferone, Louise

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes a four-year research effort aimed at developing preventive educational interventions for children with behavior problems in inner city schools. The implications of switching the emphasis from early secondary to primary preventive programs are discussed. (Author)

  2. GP-delivered secondary prevention cardiovascular disease programme; early predictors of likelihood of patient non-adherence.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Patricia; Lonergan, Moira; Collins, Claire; Daly, Leslie

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how routinely recorded data could predict early the likelihood of patient non-adherence to a primary care-delivered secondary prevention programme for established coronary heart disease (CHD), with patients with CHD (10,851) invited to attend four times per year. Non-adherence was defined as attending no more than three GP visits ever. The study sample was selected to allow a possible two-year recorded follow-up period in which patients could take up invitations. Administrative recordings of visit dates and intervals between visits, baseline results of key parameters and early changes were examined using logistic regression to determine independent predictors of non-adherence. Longer interval between early visits, no family history of CHD, smoking and being outside target for exercise at baseline were independently associated with non-adherence. Early identification by GPs of those who fail to attend on time or who defer appointments, in addition to persistence of lifestyle factors unchanged by a prior serious cardiac event should serve as a warning sign that targeted interventions to maintain adherence in primary care-delivered secondary prevention programmes are necessary.

  3. Effect of chiropractic treatment on primary or early secondary prevention: a systematic review with a pedagogic approach.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Guillaume; Le Scanff, Christine; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2018-01-01

    The chiropractic vitalistic approach to the concept of 'subluxation' as a cause of disease lacks both biological plausibility and possibly proof of validity. Nonetheless, some chiropractors purport to prevent disease in general through the use of chiropractic care. Evidence of its effect is needed to be allowed to continue this practice. The objective of this systematic review was therefore to investigate if there is any evidence that spinal manipulations/chiropractic care can be used in primary prevention (PP) and/or early secondary prevention in diseases other than musculoskeletal conditions. We searched PubMed, Embase, Index to Chiropractic Literature , and some specialized chiropractic journals, from inception to October 2017, using terms including: "chiropractic", "subluxation", "wellness", "prevention", "spinal manipulation", "mortality". Included were English language articles that indicated that they studied the clinical preventive effec t of or benefit from manipulative therapy/chiropractic treatment in relation to PP and/or early treatment of physical diseases/morbidity in general, other than musculoskeletal disorders. Also, population studies were eligible. Checklists were designed in relation to the description of the reviewed articles and some basic quality criteria. Outcomes of studies were related to their methodological quality, disregarding results from those unable to answer the research questions on effect of treatment. Of the 13.099 titles scrutinized, 13 articles were included (eight clinical studies and five population studies). These studies dealt with various disorders of public health importance such as diastolic blood pressure, blood test immunological markers, and mortality. Only two clinical studies could be used for data synthesis. None showed any effect of spinal manipulation/chiropractic treatment. We found no evidence in the literature of an effect of chiropractic treatment in the scope of PP or early secondary prevention for

  4. Secondary Prevention of Chronic PTSD by Early and Short-Term Administration of Escitalopram: A Prospective Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Trial.

    PubMed

    Zohar, Joseph; Fostick, Leah; Juven-Wetzler, Alzabeta; Kaplan, Zeev; Shalev, Hadar; Schreiber, Gavriel; Miroshnik, Natalie; Shalev, Arieh Y; Stein, Dan J; Seedat, Soraya; Suliman, Sharain; Klein, Ehud

    Prospective studies have not identified a viable pharmacologic strategy for secondary prevention of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The authors examined whether preventive intervention via early and short-term administration of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), within 1 month of exposure to a traumatic event (before diagnosis of PTSD could be made), may reduce the severity of PTSD symptoms according to DSM-IV at 13 months' follow-up. Over 25,000 screening calls to patients referred to an emergency department for a traumatic event performed between June 2006 and December 2008 yielded 353 participants who were recruited within the month following a traumatic event . Participants were randomly assigned in a double-blind design to escitalopram (n = 176) or placebo (n = 177). The per-protocol analysis comprised 198 participants (escitalopram, n = 102; placebo, n = 96) who received treatment for 12 to 24 weeks and were available for follow-up at week 56. The primary outcome measure, the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS), revealed no prevention effect. However, a secondary outcome, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Inventory (PSQI), showed better results for the SSRI group than for the placebo group. For a subset of participants who experienced intentional trauma (missile attacks, rape, or physical assault; n = 50), the prevention effect was found on both primary and secondary measures (CAPS, PSQI and measures of depression and global illness severity). Early and short-term administration of escitalopram was not shown to prevent PTSD, although it did improve sleep quality. In a subgroup of participants who experienced intentional trauma, however, this early-treatment approach may be effective as secondary prevention. This large study is the first to investigate the preventive effect of early administration of escitalopram on PTSD. It highlights the relevance of the type of trauma (intentional vs unintentional) to the outcome. Clinical

  5. [Preventive dentistry 5. Secondary caries].

    PubMed

    Hollanders, A C C; Kuper, N K; Opdam, N J M; Huysmans, M C D N J M

    2017-05-01

    Secondary caries is reported as one of the most important reasons for replacing restorations. The patient's general caries risk plays an important role in the development of secondary caries. The connection, at the patient level, between various factors, the risk of caries and restoration factors, such as the presence of a gap and the kind of restoration material, deserves additional investigation. The minimum gap width in which secondary caries can develop is most likely less than 100 µm and could depend on the patient's caries risk. Composite restorations seem more susceptible to secondary caries than amalgam restorations in patients with high caries risk. So far, there is no unambiguous explanation for this difference. The prevention of secondary caries is comparable to that of primary caries and stresses the importance of fluoride, diet and oral hygiene.

  6. Secondary and tertiary preventions of thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Fereidoun; Mehran, Ladan; Hosseinpanah, Farhad; Delshad, Hossein; Amouzegar, Atieh

    2018-05-01

    Secondary and tertiary preventions are concerned with the recognition of the disease process in a very early stage and delay in progression to complete disease and minimization of complications and the impact of illness. All articles related to secondary and tertiary prevention of thyroid diseases were reviewed. Using related key words, articles published between 2001 and 2015 were evaluated, categorized, and analyzed. In secondary prevention, congenital hypothyroidism and subclinical hypo and hyperthyroidism are equally important. Routine screening of patients with multinodular goiter by either ultrasonography or calcitonin is a controversial issue, while calcitonin assessments in medullary cancer and RET in family members are recommended. Screening of thyroid disease in pregnancy is limited to those with risk factors. Views regarding the importance of thyroid autoimmunity in secondary prevention are also presented. In tertiary prevention, prescribing excessive doses of levothyroxine, in the elderly in particular and appropriate care of all patients to avoid progression and complications are the key issues. Optimization of management of thyroid diseases requires timely screening, prevention of progression to more sever disease, optimal medical care, and avoidance of iatrogenic conditions.

  7. Primary and secondary prevention of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kolak, Agnieszka; Kamińska, Marzena; Sygit, Katarzyna; Budny, Agnieszka; Surdyka, Dariusz; Kukiełka-Budny, Bożena; Burdan, Franciszek

    2017-12-23

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women and is the second cancer frequently occurring worldwide of newly-diagnosed cancers. There is much evidence showing the influence of life style and environmental factors on the development of mammary gland cancer (high-fat diet, alcohol consumption, lack of physical exercise), the elimination of which (primary prevention) may contribute to a decrease in morbidity and mortality. Secondary prevention, comprising diagnostic tests (e.g. mammography, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, breast self-examination, as well as modern and more precise imaging methods) help the early detection of tumours or lesions predisposing to tumours. The aim of this study paper is to review current knowledge and reports regarding primary and secondary prevention of breast cancer. It is estimated that nearly 70% of malign tumours are caused by environmental factors, whereas in breast cancer this percentage reaches 90-95%. There are national programmes established in many countries to fight cancer, where both types of prevention are stressed as serving to decrease morbidity and mortality due to cancers. Cancer prevention is currently playing a key role in the fight against the disease. Behaviour modification, as well as greater awareness among women regarding breast cancer, may significantly contribute towards reducing the incidence of this cancer. Another important aspect is the number of women undergoing diagnostic tests, which still remains at an unsatisfactory level.

  8. Secondary School Students: Prevention Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Office for Substance Abuse Prevention.

    This prevention resource guide (compiled from a variety of publications and data bases and representing the most currently available information) focuses on secondary school students, and is divided into four sections. The first section contains facts from current research about substance abuse prevention for secondary school students. For…

  9. Risk stratification in secondary cardiovascular prevention.

    PubMed

    Lazzeroni, Davide; Coruzzi, Paolo

    2018-02-19

    Worldwide, more than 7 million people experience acute myocardial infarction (AMI) every year (1), and although substantial reduction in mortality has been obtained in recent decades, one-year mortality rates are still in the range of 10%. Among patients who survive AMI, 20% suffer a second cardiovascular event in the first year and approximately 50% of major coronary events occur in those with a previous hospital discharge diagnosis of AMI (2). Despite the evidence that lifestyle changes and risk factors management strongly improve long-term prognosis, preventive care post-AMI remains sub-optimal. Cross-sectional data from the serially conducted EUROASPIRE surveys in patients with established ischemic heart disease (IHD) and people at high cardiovascular risk have demonstrated a high prevalence of unhealthy lifestyle, modifiable risk factors and inadequate use of drug therapies to achieve blood pressure and lipid goals (3). Secondary prevention programmes, defined as the level of preventive care focusing on early risk stratification, are highly recommended in all IHD patients, to restore quality of life, maintain or improve functional capacity and prevent recurrence.

  10. The Uptake of Secondary Prevention by Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouellette-Kuntz, H.; Cobigo, V.; Balogh, R.; Wilton, A.; Lunsky, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Secondary prevention involves the early detection of disease while it is asymptomatic to prevent its progression. For adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities, secondary prevention is critical as they may not have the ability to recognize the early signs and symptoms of disease or lack accessible information about these.…

  11. Preventing Early Learning Failure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sornson, Bob, Ed.

    Noting that thousands of young children with the capacity to experience school success do not because they are unprepared for school learning activities, have experienced physical or emotional setbacks that cause them to be at risk for early learning failure, have never experienced limits on their behavior, or have mild sensory or motor deficits,…

  12. Primary and secondary prevention of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Tárraga López, Pedro J; Albero, Juan Solera; Rodríguez-Montes, José Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a worldwide problem as it will affect one in three men and one in four women during their lifetime. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most frequent cancer in men, after lung and prostate cancer, and is the second most frequent cancer in women after breast cancer. It is also the third cause of death in men and women separately, and is the second most frequent cause of death by cancer if both genders are considered together. CRC represents approximately 10% of deaths by cancer. Modifiable risk factors of CRC include smoking, physical inactivity, being overweight and obesity, eating processed meat, and drinking alcohol excessively. CRC screening programs are possible only in economically developed countries. However, attention should be paid in the future to geographical areas with ageing populations and a western lifestyle.19,20 Sigmoidoscopy screening done with people aged 55-64 years has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of CRC by 33% and mortality by CRC by 43%. To assess the effect on the incidence and mortality of CRC diet and lifestyle and to determine the effect of secondary prevention through early diagnosis of CRC. A comprehensive search of Medline and Pubmed articles related to primary and secondary prevention of CRC and subsequently, a meta-analysis of the same blocks are performed. 225 articles related to primary or secondary prevention of CRC were retrieved. Of these 145 were considered valid on meta-analysis: 12 on epidemiology, 56 on diet and lifestyle, and over 77 different screenings for early detection of CRC. Cancer is a worldwide problem as it will affect one in three men and one in four women during their lifetime. There is no doubt whatsoever which environmental factors, probably diet, may account for these cancer rates. Excessive alcohol consumption and cholesterol-rich diet are associated with a high risk of colon cancer. A diet poor in folic acid and vitamin B6 is also associated with a higher risk of developing colon

  13. Primary and Secondary Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tárraga López, Pedro J; Albero, Juan Solera; Rodríguez-Montes, José Antonio

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cancer is a worldwide problem as it will affect one in three men and one in four women during their lifetime. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most frequent cancer in men, after lung and prostate cancer, and is the second most frequent cancer in women after breast cancer. It is also the third cause of death in men and women separately, and is the second most frequent cause of death by cancer if both genders are considered together. CRC represents approximately 10% of deaths by cancer. Modifiable risk factors of CRC include smoking, physical inactivity, being overweight and obesity, eating processed meat, and drinking alcohol excessively. CRC screening programs are possible only in economically developed countries. However, attention should be paid in the future to geographical areas with ageing populations and a western lifestyle.19,20 Sigmoidoscopy screening done with people aged 55–64 years has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of CRC by 33% and mortality by CRC by 43%. OBJECTIVE To assess the effect on the incidence and mortality of CRC diet and lifestyle and to determine the effect of secondary prevention through early diagnosis of CRC. METHODOLOGY: A comprehensive search of Medline and Pubmed articles related to primary and secondary prevention of CRC and subsequently, a meta-analysis of the same blocks are performed. RESULTS 225 articles related to primary or secondary prevention of CRC were retrieved. Of these 145 were considered valid on meta-analysis: 12 on epidemiology, 56 on diet and lifestyle, and over 77 different screenings for early detection of CRC. Cancer is a worldwide problem as it will affect one in three men and one in four women during their lifetime. There is no doubt whatsoever which environmental factors, probably diet, may account for these cancer rates. Excessive alcohol consumption and cholesterol-rich diet are associated with a high risk of colon cancer. A diet poor in folic acid and vitamin B6 is also

  14. Early Prevention of Childhood Disability in Developing Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simeonsson, Rune J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a disability prevention framework for community-based rehabilitation services, by conceptualizing early intervention in terms of primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of prevention. The framework views prevention as the effort to reduce a disability's expression, duration, or extended impact. (Author/JDD)

  15. [Secondary prevention of ischemic non cardioembolic stroke].

    PubMed

    Armario, Pedro; Pinto, Xavier; Soler, Cristina; Cardona, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Stroke patients are at high risk for recurrence or new occurrence of other cardiovascular events or cardiovascular mortality. It is estimated that a high percentage of non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke can be prevented by a suitable modification of lifestyle (diet and exercise), reducing blood pressure (BP) with antihypertensive medication, platelet aggregation inhibitors, statins and high intake reducing consumption of. Unfortunately the degree of control of the different risk factors in secondary prevention of stroke is low. The clinical practice guidelines show clear recommendations with corresponding levels of evidence, but only if implemented in a general way they will get a better primary and secondary stroke prevention. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. School-based secondary prevention programmes for preventing violence.

    PubMed

    Mytton, J; DiGuiseppi, C; Gough, D; Taylor, R; Logan, S

    2006-07-19

    Early aggressive behaviour is a risk factor for later violence and criminal behaviour. Despite over 20 years of violence prevention interventions being delivered in the school setting, questions remain regarding the effectiveness of different interventions for children exhibiting aggressive behaviour. To examine the effect of school based violence prevention programmes for children identified as aggressive or at risk of being aggressive. We searched CENTRAL, Cochrane Injuries Group specialised register, MEDLINE, EMBASE, other specialised databases and reference lists of articles. We also contacted authors and organisations to identify any further studies. We included trials meeting the following criteria; 1) participants were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups; 2) outcome data were collected concurrently; 3) participants comprised children in mandatory education identified as exhibiting, or at risk of, aggressive behaviour; 4) interventions designed to reduce aggression, violence, bullying, conflict or anger; 5) school based interventions; 6) outcomes included aggressive behaviour, school and agency responses to acts of aggression, or violent injuries. Data were collected on design, participants, interventions, outcomes and indicators of study quality. Results of any intervention to no intervention were compared immediately post-intervention and at 12 months using meta-analysis where appropriate. Of 56 trials identified, none reported data on violent injuries. Aggressive behaviour was significantly reduced in intervention groups compared to no intervention groups immediately post intervention in 34 trials with data, (Standardised Mean Difference (SMD) = -0.41; 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.56 to -0.26). This effect was maintained in the seven studies reporting 12 month follow-up (SMD = -0.40, (95% CI -0.73 to -0.06)). School or agency disciplinary actions in response to aggressive behaviour were reduced in intervention groups for nine trials

  17. Dendrite preventing separator for secondary lithium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, David H. (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Dendrites are prevented from shorting a secondary lithium battery by use of a first porous separator, such as porous polypropylene, adjacent to the lithium anode that is unreactive with lithium and a second porous fluoropolymer separator between the cathode and the first separator, such as polytetrafluoroethylene, that is reactive with lithium. As the tip of a lithium dendrite contacts the second separator, an exothermic reaction occurs locally between the lithium dendrite and the fluoropolymer separator. This results in the prevention of the dendrite propagation to the cathode.

  18. Dendrite preventing separator for secondary lithium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, David H. (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Dendrites are prevented from shorting a secondary lithium battery by use of a first porous separator such as porous polypropylene adjacent the lithium anode that is unreactive with lithium and a second porous fluoropolymer separator between the cathode and the first separator such as polytetrafluoroethylene that is reactive with lithium. As the tip of a lithium dendrite contacts the second separator, an exothermic reaction occurs locally between the lithium dendrite and the fluoropolymer separator. This results in the prevention of the dendrite propagation to the cathode.

  19. USE OF STROKE SECONDARY PREVENTION SERVICES

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Joseph S.; Halm, Ethan A.; Bravata, Dawn M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine whether there are disparities in use of stroke secondary prevention services because disparities in stroke outcomes have been found among older adults, women, racial minorities, and within Stroke Belt states. Methods Using the nationally-representative 2005 Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance System, we examined self-reported use of 11 stroke secondary prevention services queried in the survey. We used multivariable logistic regression to examine the association between service use and age, sex, race, and Stroke Belt state residence, controlling for other socio-demographic and health care access characteristics. Results Among 11,862 adults with a history of stroke, 16% were 80 or older, 54% were women, 13% were non-Hispanic black, and 23% lived within a Stroke Belt state. Overall service use varied: 31% reported post-stroke outpatient rehabilitation, 57% regular exercise, 66% smoking cessation counseling, and 91% current use of anti-hypertensive medications. Age 80 or older was not associated with lower use of any of the 11 services. Women were less likely to report post-stroke outpatient rehabilitation and regular exercise when compared with men (P values ≤ 0.005); there were no sex-based differences in use of the 9 other services. Blacks were less likely to report pneumococcal vaccination when compared with whites, but were more likely to report post-stroke outpatient rehabilitation (P values ≤ 0.005); there were no race-based differences in use of the 9 other services. Stroke Belt state residence was not associated with lower use of any of the 11 services. Conclusions Use of many stroke secondary prevention services was suboptimal. We did not find consistent age, sex, racial, or Stroke Belt state residence disparities in care. CONDENSED ABSTRACT We examined the association between stroke secondary prevention service use and age, sex, race, and Stroke Belt state residence using nationally-representative data. Although use of many stroke

  20. Primary and Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vandvik, Per Olav; Lincoff, A. Michael; Gore, Joel M.; Gutterman, David D.; Sonnenberg, Frank A.; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Akl, Elie A.; Lansberg, Maarten G.; Guyatt, Gordon H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: This guideline focuses on long-term administration of antithrombotic drugs designed for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, including two new antiplatelet therapies. Methods: The methods of this guideline follow those described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: We present 23 recommendations for pertinent clinical questions. For primary prevention of cardiovascular disease, we suggest low-dose aspirin (75-100 mg/d) in patients aged > 50 years over no aspirin therapy (Grade 2B). For patients with established coronary artery disease, defined as patients 1-year post-acute coronary syndrome, with prior revascularization, coronary stenoses > 50% by coronary angiogram, and/or evidence for cardiac ischemia on diagnostic testing, we recommend long-term low-dose aspirin or clopidogrel (75 mg/d) (Grade 1A). For patients with acute coronary syndromes who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stent placement, we recommend for the first year dual antiplatelet therapy with low-dose aspirin in combination with ticagrelor 90 mg bid, clopidogrel 75 mg/d, or prasugrel 10 mg/d over single antiplatelet therapy (Grade 1B). For patients undergoing elective PCI with stent placement, we recommend aspirin (75-325 mg/d) and clopidogrel for a minimum duration of 1 month (bare-metal stents) or 3 to 6 months (drug-eluting stents) (Grade 1A). We suggest continuing low-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel for 12 months for all stents (Grade 2C). Thereafter, we recommend single antiplatelet therapy over continuation of dual antiplatelet therapy (Grade 1B). Conclusions: Recommendations continue to favor single antiplatelet therapy for patients with established coronary artery disease. For patients with acute coronary

  1. Secondary stroke prevention: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Esenwa, Charles; Gutierrez, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the USA and a major cause of mortality worldwide. One out of four strokes is recurrent. Secondary stroke prevention starts with deciphering the most likely stroke mechanism. In general, one of the main goals in stroke reduction is to control vascular risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and smoking cessation. Changes in lifestyle like a healthy diet and aerobic exercise are also recommended strategies. In the case of cardioembolism due to atrial fibrillation, mechanical valves, or cardiac thrombus, anticoagulation is the mainstay of therapy. The role of anticoagulation is less evident in the case of bioprosthetic valves, patent foramen ovale, and dilated cardiomyopathy with low ejection fraction. Strokes due to larger artery atherosclerosis account for approximately a third of all strokes. In the case of symptomatic extracranial carotid stenosis, surgical intervention as close as possible in time to the index event seems highly beneficial. In the case of intracranial large artery atherosclerosis, the best medical therapy consists of antiplatelets, high-dose statins, aggressive controls of vascular risk factors, and lifestyle modifications, with no role for intracranial arterial stenting or angioplasty. For patients with small artery occlusion (ie, lacunar stroke), the therapy is similar to that used in patients with intracranial large artery atherosclerosis. Despite the constant new evidence on how to best treat patients who have suffered a stroke, the risk of stroke recurrence remains unacceptably high, thus evidencing the need for novel therapies.

  2. Genomics in Primary and Secondary Prevention of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Malats, Núria; Molina-Montes, Esther; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide for which little clinical progress has been made in the last decades. Furthermore, increased trends of PC mortality rates have been reported in Westernised countries. PC is usually diagnosed in advanced stages, precluding patients of an effective treatment. Identifying high-risk populations and early detection markers is the first and crucial step to impact on these figures and change the PC horizon. To discuss the published body of evidence on host and tumor genomics promising markers for primary and/or secondary personalised PC prevention, as well as the future perspectives in the field. A review of the literature was performed to identify germline and tumor DNA and RNA markers that showed potential usefulness in defining the high-risk population, diagnosing the disease early, and identifying new carcinogens associated with PC. Only high-penetrance inherited mutations are used, at present, to define the high-risk PC population. Although there are some promising genomics markers to be used as early detection tests, none has been validated adequately to be integrated into the clinics routine. Despite of important efforts made in the recent time, little progress has been made to better characterise high-risk PC populations and to identify genomics-based markers for its early diagnosis. PC rates continue to rise, and this disease is becoming a real public health problem in the Westernised world. International and multidisciplinary strategies to identify new markers and properly validate the promising ones are urgently needed to implement cost-efficient primary and secondary prevention interventions in PC. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Benefits of a Secondary Prevention Program in Suicide.

    PubMed

    Farré, Adriana; Portella, Maria J; De Angel, Luis; Díaz, Ana; de Diego-Adeliño, Javier; Vegué, Joan; Duran-Sindreu, Santiago; Faus, Gustavo; Tejedor, Carmen; Álvarez, Enric; Pérez, Víctor

    2016-07-01

    The effectiveness of suicide intervention programs has not been assessed with experimental designs. To determine the risk of suicide reattempts in patients engaged in a secondary prevention program. We included 154 patients with suicidal behavior in a quasi-experimental study with a nontreatment concurrent control group. In all, 77 patients with suicidal behavior underwent the Suicide Behavior Prevention Program (SBPP), which includes specialized early assistance during a period of 3-6 months. A matched sample of patients with suicidal behavior (n = 77) was selected without undergoing any specific suicide prevention program. Data on sociodemographics, clinical characteristics, and suicidal behavior were collected at baseline (before SBPP) and at 12 months. After 12 months, SBPP patients showed a 67% lower relative risk of reattempt (χ 2 = 11.75, p = .001, RR = 0.33 95% CI = 0.17-0.66). Cox proportional hazards models revealed that patients under SBPP made a new suicidal attempt significantly much later than control patients did (Cox regression = 0.293, 95% CI = 0.138-0.624, p = .001). The effect was even stronger among first attempters. Sampling was naturalistic and patients were not randomized. The SBPP was effective in delaying and preventing suicide reattempts at least within the first year after the suicide behavior. In light of our results, implementation of suicide prevention programs is strongly advisable.

  4. Suicide Prevention for Counselors Working with Youth in Secondary and Post-Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Cindy

    2012-01-01

    According to the latest statistics, suicide is the 3rd leading cause of death in those aged 15-24 (CDC, 2010), when many are enrolled in secondary and post-secondary institutions. Because of such alarming statistics, the need for prevention education is great. However, many counselors and educators feel ill- equipped in prevention and intervention…

  5. Early Intervention To Prevent Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumsden, Linda

    2000-01-01

    This publication summarizes five works exploring the key role schools can play in dealing with emotionally disturbed students, in part because teachers are more reliable sources of information about troubled youths. The importance of interpersonal cognitive problem-solving (ICPS) skills is analyzed in "Preventing Violence the Problem Solving…

  6. Preventing secondary traumatic stress in educators.

    PubMed

    Hydon, Stephen; Wong, Marleen; Langley, Audra K; Stein, Bradley D; Kataoka, Sheryl H

    2015-04-01

    Teachers can be vulnerable to secondary traumatic stress (STS) because of their supportive role with students and potential exposure to students' experiences with traumas, violence, disasters, or crises. STS symptoms, similar to those found in posttraumatic stress disorder, include nightmares, avoidance, agitation, and withdrawal, and can result from secondary exposure to hearing about students' traumas. This article describes how STS presents, how teachers can be at risk, and how STS can manifest in schools. A US Department of Education training program is presented, and thoughts on future directions are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevention Starts in Early Childhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciel, B. A. P. C.; Neto, R. P.; Hartmann, R. P.; Melo, M. O.; Gonçalves, M.; Marques, G.; Rocha, F. L.; Silveira, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    Unlike other natural hazards, earthquakes strike suddenly and without warning. Consequently, prevention is the best we can do to ensure safety. In spite of the large and medium earthquakes, some of them tsunamigenic, that affected Portugal in the past, the Portuguese society is little aware of the seismic risk and has not developed an adequate culture of prevention. This is most probably due to the long time interval between destructive earthquakes. Earthquakes can be a real danger to societies, damaging human-made structures and endangering human lives. Earthquakes can trigger additional emergencies, and individuals should also be prepared to contend with it. By planning and practicing what to do if an earthquake strikes, children and their family can learn to react correctly and automatically when the shaking begins. Risks can then be dramatically lessened if the population is educated on how to react before, during and after an earthquake. Children's knowledge is ever growing. They have a fundamental role in changing societies. By educating the children of today we are forming better adults of tomorrow. We are simultaneously passing this knowledge to their caregivers and families. Through demonstrating how fundamental it is to be conscious of those issues, not only will the children will be informed, but also their relatives will be aware of such risks. We use this approach to explain children how to assess risk in a broader sense. We teach them other preventive measures, namely those related with electricity, gas and the danger on non-potable water, essential topics on "what to do before an earthquake" but also on the daily routines. This presentation will highlight the importance of encouraging a culture of prevention. This project funded by the Portuguese "Ciência Viva" program, and is conducted by science high-school students, teachers and the parents association. Scientific support is given by the seismology research group at Instituto Dom Luíz.

  8. Helpers in Distress: Preventing Secondary Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitfield, Natasha; Kanter, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Those in close contact with trauma survivors are themselves at risk for trauma (e.g., Bride, 2007; Figley, 1995). Family, friends, and professionals who bear witness to the emotional retelling and re-enacting of traumatic events can experience what is called "secondary trauma" (Elwood, Mott, Lohr, & Galovski, 2011). The literature…

  9. Gastric cancer: Prevention, screening and early diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Pasechnikov, Victor; Chukov, Sergej; Fedorov, Evgeny; Kikuste, Ilze; Leja, Marcis

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer continues to be an important healthcare problem from a global perspective. Most of the cases in the Western world are diagnosed at late stages when the treatment is largely ineffective. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a well-established carcinogen for gastric cancer. While lifestyle factors are important, the efficacy of interventions in their modification, as in the use of antioxidant supplements, is unconvincing. No organized screening programs can be found outside Asia (Japan and South Korea). Although several screening approaches have been proposed, including indirect atrophy detection by measuring pepsinogen in the circulation, none of them have so far been implemented, and more study data is required to justify any implementation. Mass eradication of H. pylori in high-risk areas tends to be cost-effective, but its adverse effects and resistance remain a concern. Searches for new screening biomarkers, including microRNA and cancer-autoantibody panels, as well as detection of volatile organic compounds in the breath, are in progress. Endoscopy with a proper biopsy follow-up remains the standard for early detection of cancer and related premalignant lesions. At the same time, new advanced high-resolution endoscopic technologies are showing promising results with respect to diagnosing mucosal lesions visually and targeting each biopsy. New histological risk stratifications (classifications), including OLGA and OLGIM, have recently been developed. This review addresses the current means for gastric cancer primary and secondary prevention, the available and emerging methods for screening, and new developments in endoscopic detection of early lesions of the stomach. PMID:25320521

  10. Early Childhood Violence Prevention. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massey, Marilyn S.

    Noting that all Americans are stakeholders in the quest to prevent violence in the critical early years, this Digest focuses on preventing violence in children's lives and suggests ways caregivers, parents, and teachers can reduce the damaging effects of violence. Even before a child is born, violence can have a profound effect upon its life.…

  11. Violence Prevention in United States Society of Jesus Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonds, Thomas Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Using data from a representative number of Society of Jesus secondary schools, the researcher reports what these schools are doing to prevent violence, and tests an explanatory model of school violence he created. The researcher proposes that this model can be used to explain and prevent school violence by identifying and addressing the…

  12. Alzheimer's disease prevention: from risk factors to early intervention.

    PubMed

    Crous-Bou, Marta; Minguillón, Carolina; Gramunt, Nina; Molinuevo, José Luis

    2017-09-12

    Due to the progressive aging of the population, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is becoming a healthcare burden of epidemic proportions for which there is currently no cure. Disappointing results from clinical trials performed in mild-moderate AD dementia combined with clear epidemiological evidence on AD risk factors are contributing to the development of primary prevention initiatives. In addition, the characterization of the long asymptomatic stage of AD is allowing the development of intervention studies and secondary prevention programmes on asymptomatic at-risk individuals, before substantial irreversible neuronal dysfunction and loss have occurred, an approach that emerges as highly relevant.In this manuscript, we review current strategies for AD prevention, from primary prevention strategies based on identifying risk factors and risk reduction, to secondary prevention initiatives based on the early detection of the pathophysiological hallmarks and intervention at the preclinical stage of the disease. Firstly, we summarize the evidence on several AD risk factors, which are the rationale for the establishment of primary prevention programmes as well as revising current primary prevention strategies. Secondly, we review the development of public-private partnerships for disease prevention that aim to characterize the AD continuum as well as serving as platforms for secondary prevention trials. Finally, we summarize currently ongoing clinical trials recruiting participants with preclinical AD or a higher risk for the onset of AD-related cognitive impairment.The growing body of research on the risk factors for AD and its preclinical stage is favouring the development of AD prevention programmes that, by delaying the onset of Alzheimer's dementia for only a few years, would have a huge impact on public health.

  13. Secondary prevention of stroke in Saskatchewan, Canada: hypertension control.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Janelle Ann; Teare, Gary F; Neufeld, Anne; Hudema, Nedeene; Muhajarine, Nazeem

    2013-10-01

    In the province of Saskatchewan, Canada, stroke is the third leading cause of death as well as the major cause of adult disability. Once a person suffers a stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA), they are at high risk for having a secondary stroke. Hypertension (elevated blood pressure) is the single most important modifiable risk factor for both first and recurrent stroke, and is thus an important risk factor to be controlled. According to the Canadian Stroke Strategy (CSS) Best Practice Recommendations, blood pressure lowering treatment should be initiated before discharge from hospital for all stroke/TIA patients. The purpose of this study was to examine the quality of medically driven secondary stroke prevention care in Saskatchewan as applied to hypertension control. The objectives of the study were to: (1) develop methodology and calculate a secondary stroke process of care measure using available data in Saskatchewan, based on an appropriate hypertension therapy indicator recommendation from the CSS Performance Measurement Manual; (2) examine variation in secondary stroke prevention hypertensive care among the Saskatchewan Regional Health Authorities; and (3) investigate factors associated with receiving evidence-based hypertensive secondary stroke prevention. This multi-year cross-sectional study was an analysis of deidentified health data derived from linkage of administrative health data. A select indicator from the CSS Performance Measurement Manual that measures adherence to a CSS Best Practice Guidelines concerning use of antihypertensive medications for secondary stroke prevention was calculated. Logistic regression was used to quantify the association of patient demographic and socioeconomic characteristics and geographic location of care with receipt of guideline-recommended hypertensive secondary stroke prevention. The target population was all Saskatchewan residents who were hospitalized in Saskatchewan for a stroke or TIA between April 1, 2001

  14. Early Intervention Methods for Child Abuse Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, David A.

    A longitudinal study was made of a prevention-oriented early intervention program intended to help parents who had insufficient and inappropriate childrearing abilities. The program was designed for young parents with fewer than 5 years of childrearing experience; participants were referred from a child protection agency following investigation of…

  15. [Secondary cardiovascular prevention after acute coronary syndrome in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Colivicchi, Furio; Di Roma, Angelo; Uguccioni, Massimo; Scotti, Emilio; Ammirati, Fabrizio; Arcas, Marcello; Avallone, Aniello; Bonaccorso, Orazio; Germanò, Giuseppe; Letizia, Claudio; Manfellotto, Dario; Minardi, Giovanni; Pristipino, Christian; D'Amore, Francesco; Di Veroli, Claudio; Fierro, Aldo; Pastorellio, Ruggero; Tozzi, Quinto; Tubaro, Marco; Santini, Massimo; Angelico, Francesco; Azzolini, Paolo; Bellasi, Antonio; Brocco, Paola; Calò, Leonardo; Cerquetani, Elena; De Biase, Luciano; Di Napoli, Mauro; Galati, Alfonso; Gallieni, Maurizio; Jesi, Anna Patrizia; Lombardo, Antonella; Loricchio, Vincenzo; Menghini, Fabio; Mezzanotte, Roberto; Minutolos, Roberto; Mocini, David; Patti, Giuseppe; Patrizi, Roberto; Pajes, Giuseppe; Pulignano, Giovanni; Ricci, Renato Pietro; Ricci, Roberto; Sardella, Gennaro; Strano, Stefano; Terracina, David; Testa, Marco; Tomai, Fabrizio; Volpes, Roberto; Volterrani, Maurizio

    2010-05-01

    Secondary prevention after acute coronary syndromes should be aimed at reducing the risk of further adverse cardiovascular events, thereby improving quality of life, and lengthening survival. Despite compelling evidence from large randomized controlled trials, secondary prevention is not fully implemented in most cases after hospitalization for acute coronary syndrome. The Lazio Region (Italy) has about 5.3 million inhabitants (9% of the entire Italian population). Every year about 11 000 patients are admitted for acute coronary syndrome in hospitals of the Lazio Region. Most of these patients receive state-of-the art acute medical and interventional care during hospitalization. However, observational data suggest that after discharge acute coronary syndrome patients are neither properly followed nor receive all evidence-based treatments. This consensus document has been developed by 11 Scientific Societies of Cardiovascular and Internal Medicine in order develop a sustainable and effective clinical approach for secondary cardiovascular prevention after acute coronary syndrome in the local scenario of the Lazio Region. An evidence-based simplified decalogue for secondary cardiovascular prevention is proposed as the cornerstone of clinical intervention, taking into account regional laws and relative shortage of resources. The following appropriate interventions should be consistently applied: smoking cessation, blood pressure control (blood pressure < 130/80 mmHg), optimal lipid management (LDL cholesterol < 80 mmHg), weight and diabetes management, promotion of physical activity and rehabilitation, correct use of antiplatelet agents, beta-blockers, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockers.

  16. Prevention of food allergy - Early dietary interventions.

    PubMed

    Du Toit, George; Foong, Ru-Xin M; Lack, Gideon

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence of food allergy has increased over the last 30 years and remains a disease, which significantly impacts on the quality of life of children and their families. Several hypotheses have been formulated to explain the increasing prevalence; this review will focus on the hypothesis that dietary factors may influence the development of food allergy. Historically, the prevention of food allergy has focused on allergen avoidance. However, recent findings from interventional studies have prompted a shift in the mind set from avoidance to early introduction of potentially allergenic foods. This review aims to facilitate a better understanding of contemporary research studies that make use of early introduction of common allergenic foods into infant diets as a preventative strategy against the development of food allergy. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. School-Based Violence Prevention Programs: Systematic Review of Secondary Prevention Trials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mytton, Julie A.; DiGuiseppi, Carolyn; Gough, David A.; Taylor, Rod S.; Logan, Stuart

    2002-01-01

    Conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled secondary prevention trials to explore the effects of school-based violence prevention programs on aggressive and violent behavior in children at high risk for violence. Results indicated that such programs produced modest reductions in aggressive and violent behaviors in…

  18. Secondary prevention fallacy: pitfalls in comparing with primary.

    PubMed

    Caro, J J; Huybrechts, K F; Klittich, W S

    2001-10-01

    A basic tenet of our culture is the idea that preventing ills is better than curing them. This principle is entrenched in many proverbs and popular admonitions: 'A stitch in time saves nine', 'An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure'. These well-worn sayings crisply convey our sense that it is preferable to intervene before a bad event occurs than to wait and try to mitigate it afterwards. Yet, economic analyses have demonstrated that in healthcare this does not hold: 'primary prevention' does not provide as good value-for-money as 'secondary prevention'. Is this reversal of folk wisdom correct? Or, instead, is it a result of faults in the application of the relatively new methodology of cost-effectiveness analyses?

  19. Early Career Challenges in Secondary School Music Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, G.; Purves, R.; Hargreaves, D.; Marshall, N.

    2011-01-01

    The article reports an Economic and Social Research Council-funded study of the early career experiences of secondary school music teachers in England, set within a wider national picture of decreasing age-related pupil engagement with school music, career perceptions of music teaching, variable patterns of teacher recruitment and possible…

  20. Dabigatran in Secondary Stroke Prevention: Clinical Experience with 106 Patients

    PubMed Central

    DeFelipe-Mimbrera, Alicia; Cánovas, Araceli Alonso; Guillán, Marta; Matute, Consuelo; Cruz, Antonio; Vera, Rocío; Masjuan, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Our aim was to analyze our clinical experience with dabigatran etexilate in secondary stroke prevention. Methods. We retrospectively included patients starting dabigatran etexilate for secondary stroke prevention from March 2010 to December 2012. Efficacy and safety variables were registered. Results. 106 patients were included, median follow-up of 12 months (range 1–31). Fifty-six females (52.8%), mean age 76.4 (range 50–95, SD 9.8), median CHADS2 4 (range 2–6), CHA2DS2-VASc 5 (range 2–9), and HAS-BLED 2 (range 1–5). Indication for dabigatran etexilate was ischemic stroke in 101 patients and acute cerebral hemorrhage (CH) due to warfarin in 5 (4.7%). Dabigatran etexilate 110 mg bid was prescribed in 71 cases (67%) and 150 mg bid was prescribed in the remaining. Seventeen patients (16%) suffered 20 complications during follow-up. Ischemic complications (10) were 6 transient ischemic attacks (TIA), 3 ischemic strokes, and 1 acute coronary syndrome. Hemorrhagic complications (10) were CH (1), gastrointestinal bleeding (6), mild hematuria (2), and mild metrorrhagia (1), leading to dabigatran etexilate discontinuation in 3 patients. Patients with previous CH remained uneventful. Three patients died (pneumonia, congestive heart failure, and acute cholecystitis) and 9 were lost during follow-up. Conclusions. Dabigatran etexilate was safe and effective in secondary stroke prevention in clinical practice, including a small number of patients with previous history of CH. PMID:25133166

  1. Belongingness in Early Secondary School: Key Factors that Primary and Secondary Schools Need to Consider

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Sharmila; Falkmer, Marita; Ciccarelli, Marina; Passmore, Anne; Parsons, Richard; Black, Melissa; Cuomo, Belinda; Tan, Tele; Falkmer, Torbjörn

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown if, and how, students redefine their sense of school belongingness after negotiating the transition to secondary school. The current study used longitudinal data from 266 students with, and without, disabilities who negotiated the transition from 52 primary schools to 152 secondary schools. The study presents the 13 most significant personal student and contextual factors associated with belongingness in the first year of secondary school. Student perception of school belongingness was found to be stable across the transition. No variability in school belongingness due to gender, disability or household-socio-economic status (SES) was noted. Primary school belongingness accounted for 22% of the variability in secondary school belongingness. Several personal student factors (competence, coping skills) and school factors (low-level classroom task-goal orientation), which influenced belongingness in primary school, continued to influence belongingness in secondary school. In secondary school, effort-goal orientation of the student and perception of their school’s tolerance to disability were each associated with perception of school belongingness. Family factors did not influence belongingness in secondary school. Findings of the current study highlight the need for primary schools to foster belongingness among their students at an early age, and transfer students’ belongingness profiles as part of the hand-over documentation. Most of the factors that influenced school belongingness before and after the transition to secondary are amenable to change. PMID:26372554

  2. Belongingness in Early Secondary School: Key Factors that Primary and Secondary Schools Need to Consider.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Sharmila; Falkmer, Marita; Ciccarelli, Marina; Passmore, Anne; Parsons, Richard; Black, Melissa; Cuomo, Belinda; Tan, Tele; Falkmer, Torbjörn

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown if, and how, students redefine their sense of school belongingness after negotiating the transition to secondary school. The current study used longitudinal data from 266 students with, and without, disabilities who negotiated the transition from 52 primary schools to 152 secondary schools. The study presents the 13 most significant personal student and contextual factors associated with belongingness in the first year of secondary school. Student perception of school belongingness was found to be stable across the transition. No variability in school belongingness due to gender, disability or household-socio-economic status (SES) was noted. Primary school belongingness accounted for 22% of the variability in secondary school belongingness. Several personal student factors (competence, coping skills) and school factors (low-level classroom task-goal orientation), which influenced belongingness in primary school, continued to influence belongingness in secondary school. In secondary school, effort-goal orientation of the student and perception of their school's tolerance to disability were each associated with perception of school belongingness. Family factors did not influence belongingness in secondary school. Findings of the current study highlight the need for primary schools to foster belongingness among their students at an early age, and transfer students' belongingness profiles as part of the hand-over documentation. Most of the factors that influenced school belongingness before and after the transition to secondary are amenable to change.

  3. Prevention and Early Detection of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cuzick, Jack; Thorat, Mangesh A.; Andriole, Gerald; Brawley, Otis W.; Brown, Powel H.; Culig, Zoran; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Ford, Leslie G.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Holmberg, Lars; Ilic, Dragan; Key, Timothy J.; La Vecchia, Carlo; Lilja, Hans; Marberger, Michael; Meyskens, Frank L.; Minasian, Lori M.; Parker, Chris; Parnes, Howard L.; Perner, Sven; Rittenhouse, Harry; Schalken, Jack; Schmid, Hans-Peter; Schmitz-Dräger, Bernd J.; Schröder, Fritz H.; Stenzl, Arnulf; Tombal, Bertrand; Wilt, Timothy J.; Wolk, Alicja

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men and the global burden of this disease is rising. Lifestyle modifications like smoking cessation, exercise and weight control offer opportunities to decrease the risk of developing prostate cancer. Early detection of prostate cancer by PSA screening remains controversial; yet, changes in PSA threshold, frequency of screening, and addition of other biomarkers have potential to minimise overdiagnosis associated with PSA screening. Several new biomarkers appear promising in individuals with elevated PSA levels or those diagnosed with prostate cancer, these are likely to guide in separating individuals who can be spared of aggressive treatment from those who need it. Several pharmacological agents like 5α-reductase inhibitors, aspirin etc. have a potential to prevent development of prostate cancer. In this review, we discuss the current evidence and research questions regarding prevention, early detection of prostate cancer and management of men either at high risk of prostate cancer or diagnosed with low-grade prostate cancer. PMID:25281467

  4. Prevention of secondary household transmission during Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, K; Yahata, Y; Sunagawa, T

    2016-10-01

    Prevention of secondary household transmission of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is important in outbreak settings. We examined factors contributing to secondary household transmission during STEC outbreaks in daycare centres in Japan. Suspected STEC outbreaks in daycare centres were identified by the National Epidemiological Surveillance of Infectious Diseases. Questionnaires were sent to local health centres that responded to outbreaks. Secondary household transmission rates were calculated, and factors affecting secondary household transmission rate were analysed by multilevel analysis. The secondary household transmission rates in 16 outbreaks ranged from 0% to 34·4% (median 4·4%). The highest rate (23·0%) was observed in siblings aged 6-9 years, and the infection rate was significantly higher for mothers than for fathers and grandparents (P < 0·05). Using multilevel analysis, the following variables were selected in the best model: information provided face-to-face (vs. letter or telephone) to families of children in daycare centres (at initial response), STEC type and lag time (days) between onset and providing information. Early response and hygiene education by visiting local health centre staff may be effective measures to prevent secondary household transmission in STEC outbreaks. Hygiene education should be emphasized for children aged 6-9 years, as well as for younger children.

  5. Secondary preventive medication persistence and adherence 1 year after stroke.

    PubMed

    Bushnell, C D; Olson, D M; Zhao, X; Pan, W; Zimmer, L O; Goldstein, L B; Alberts, M J; Fagan, S C; Fonarow, G C; Johnston, S C; Kidwell, C; Labresh, K A; Ovbiagele, B; Schwamm, L; Peterson, E D

    2011-09-20

    Data on long-term use of secondary prevention medications following stroke are limited. The Adherence eValuation After Ischemic stroke-Longitudinal (AVAIL) Registry assessed patient, provider, and system-level factors influencing continuation of prevention medications for 1 year following stroke hospitalization discharge. Patients with ischemic stroke or TIA discharged from 106 hospitals participating in the American Heart Association Get With The Guidelines-Stroke program were surveyed to determine their use of warfarin, antiplatelet, antihypertensive, lipid-lowering, and diabetes medications from discharge to 12 months. Reasons for stopping medications were ascertained. Persistence was defined as continuation of all secondary preventive medications prescribed at hospital discharge, and adherence as continuation of prescribed medications except those stopped according to health care provider instructions. Of the 2,880 patients enrolled in AVAIL, 88.4% (2,457 patients) completed 1-year interviews. Of these, 65.9% were regimen persistent and 86.6% were regimen adherent. Independent predictors of 1-year medication persistence included fewer medications prescribed at discharge, having an adequate income, having an appointment with a primary care provider, and greater understanding of why medications were prescribed and their side effects. Independent predictors of adherence were similar to those for persistence. Although up to one-third of stroke patients discontinued one or more secondary prevention medications within 1 year of hospital discharge, self-discontinuation of these medications is uncommon. Several potentially modifiable patient, provider, and system-level factors associated with persistence and adherence may be targets for future interventions.

  6. What can we do in secondary prevention of cigarette smoking?

    PubMed

    Haustein, Knut-Olaf

    2003-12-01

    Cigarette smoking kills about six million smokers per year worldwide, and the cigarette has become a symbol of threat to mankind, particularly in industrialized countries. Tobacco smoking causes signs of addiction due to nicotine, but it is the inhaled and exhaled smoke that causes damage to health if cigarette smoking is continued for one or more decades. It is very difficult to attain a high efficacy of stopping smoking using methods of primary prevention in children and young adults. Secondary and tertiary prevention methods use medical and psychological support to the smoker (behavioural and aversion therapy) as well as medical advice in combination with drugs such as nicotine replacement or bupropion. Using a combination of these methods can increase effectiveness up to 45%. Use of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) in combination with medical advice is the method of smoking cessation recommended by the World Health Organization. Bupropion causes several severe side effects which are not observed with NRT. This article reviews various NRT formulations, including chewing gum, patch, nasal spray, tablet and inhaler, and our experience of using NRT in medical practice, such as adverse events, withdrawal symptoms and the efficacy of NRT in patients with coronary heart disease (angina pectoris, cardiac arrhythmias, etc.), are briefly mentioned. Overall, we need greater efforts in practising primary and secondary prevention among current and future physicians to solve the health problems associated with tobacco use in many nations.

  7. Secondary stroke prevention: from guidelines to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Graham, Glenn D

    2008-10-01

    Stroke remains a leading cause of mortality and is associated with substantial morbidity in the United States. The majority of strokes are of ischemic origin, with an atherothrombotic trigger, and the clinical manifestation of atherothrombosis depends on the affected vascular site. The systemic nature of atherosclerosis means that stroke patients are at increased risk of ischemic events in several vascular beds, including cerebral, coronary and peripheral sites. Because stroke patients are at heightened risk of more ischemic events, secondary prevention is an important therapeutic goal. Recently, the American Heart Association and its division, the American Stroke Association, released new evidence-based guidelines for secondary stroke prevention in patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. The new guidelines emphasize an individualized, patient-oriented approach to treatment based on clinical evidence. Evidence-based recommendations are set forth for the management of risk factors, including hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes, through lifestyle modifications and pharmacological interventions. The purpose of this paper is to review the topic of stroke prevention in light of current guidelines and clinical implementation patterns for primary care physicians, and to discuss new and emerging clinical evidence, with a focus on antiplatelet treatment.

  8. [Secondary and tertiary prevention of allergic asthma in children].

    PubMed

    Rancé, F; Deschildre, A; Bidat, E; Just, J; Couderc, L; Wanin, S; Weiss, L

    2010-12-01

    Asthma is a disease of the lung epithelial barrier, most often associated with allergy in children. Asthma and allergy are two distinct diseases, but the phenotypic expression of asthma depends on atopic status. A better definition of phenotypes of asthma would result in better targeting of prevention and treatment modalities. Secondary prevention aims to prevent the onset of asthma and the acquisition of new sensitizations in sensitized children. Studies concerning allergen avoidance are insufficient to reach a definitive conclusion and antihistamines have not been shown to be effective. The results for specific immunotherapy suggest a benefit to prevent transition from allergic rhinitis to asthma and the onset of new sensitizations. Tertiary prevention aims to reduce symptoms in children with an existing allergic asthma diagnosis. The avoidance of known respiratory allergens will only be effective in combination with management of the whole environment. Specific immunotherapy has a real place, in combination with background therapy. It should be used according to guidelines in appropriately treated patients. Copyright © 2010 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Depression Prevention for Early Adolescent Girls

    PubMed Central

    Chaplin, Tara M.; Gillham, Jane E.; Reivich, Karen; Elkon, Andrea G. L.; Samuels, Barbra; Freres, Derek R.; Winder, Breanna; Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2015-01-01

    Given the dramatic increase in depression that occurs during early adolescence in girls, interventions must address the needs of girls. The authors examined whether a depression prevention program, the Penn Resiliency Program, was more effective for girls in all-girls groups than in co-ed groups. Within co-ed groups, the authors also tested whether there were greater effects for boys than for girls. Participants were 208 11- to 14-year-olds. Girls were randomly assigned to all-girls groups, co-ed groups, or control. Boys were assigned to co-ed groups or control. Students completed questionnaires on depressive symptoms, hopelessness, and explanatory style before and after the intervention. Girls groups were better than co-ed groups in reducing girls’hopelessness and for session attendance rates but were similar to co-ed groups in reducing depressive symptoms. Co-ed groups decreased depressive symptoms, but this did not differ by gender. Findings support prevention programs and suggest additional benefits of girls groups. PMID:26139955

  10. Preventing secondary infections among HIV-positive persons.

    PubMed Central

    Filice, G A; Pomeroy, C

    1991-01-01

    Secondary infectious diseases contribute substantially to morbidity and mortality of people infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The authors developed comprehensive, practical recommendations for prevention of infectious complications in HIV-infected people. Recommendations are concerned with the pathogens that are more common or more severe in HIV-infected people. Several infectious complications can be prevented by avoiding ingestion of contaminated food or water. Zoonoses can be prevented by precautions to be taken in contacts with animals. The risk of several fungal diseases can be reduced if activities likely to lead to inhalation of spores are avoided. HIV-infected people should be advised how to lower adverse health effects of travel, especially international travel. The potential for infectious complications of sexual activity and illicit drug use should be stressed, and recommendations to reduce the risk are discussed. Recommendations for use of vaccines in HIV-infected people are reviewed. Blood CD4+ lymphocyte concentrations, tuberculin skin testing, Toxoplasma serology, and sexually transmitted disease screening should be performed in certain subsets of HIV-infected people. Guidelines for chemoprophylaxis against Pneumocystis carinii and tuberculosis are presented. Recent data suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin therapy may prevent bacterial infections in HIV-infected children. PMID:1910184

  11. Randomized controlled trial of a coordinated care intervention to improve risk factor control after stroke or transient ischemic attack in the safety net: Secondary stroke prevention by Uniting Community and Chronic care model teams Early to End Disparities (SUCCEED).

    PubMed

    Towfighi, Amytis; Cheng, Eric M; Ayala-Rivera, Monica; McCreath, Heather; Sanossian, Nerses; Dutta, Tara; Mehta, Bijal; Bryg, Robert; Rao, Neal; Song, Shlee; Razmara, Ali; Ramirez, Magaly; Sivers-Teixeira, Theresa; Tran, Jamie; Mojarro-Huang, Elizabeth; Montoya, Ana; Corrales, Marilyn; Martinez, Beatrice; Willis, Phyllis; Macias, Mireya; Ibrahim, Nancy; Wu, Shinyi; Wacksman, Jeremy; Haber, Hilary; Richards, Adam; Barry, Frances; Hill, Valerie; Mittman, Brian; Cunningham, William; Liu, Honghu; Ganz, David A; Factor, Diane; Vickrey, Barbara G

    2017-02-06

    Recurrent strokes are preventable through awareness and control of risk factors such as hypertension, and through lifestyle changes such as healthier diets, greater physical activity, and smoking cessation. However, vascular risk factor control is frequently poor among stroke survivors, particularly among socio-economically disadvantaged blacks, Latinos and other people of color. The Chronic Care Model (CCM) is an effective framework for multi-component interventions aimed at improving care processes and outcomes for individuals with chronic disease. In addition, community health workers (CHWs) have played an integral role in reducing health disparities; however, their effectiveness in reducing vascular risk among stroke survivors remains unknown. Our objectives are to develop, test, and assess the economic value of a CCM-based intervention using an Advanced Practice Clinician (APC)-CHW team to improve risk factor control after stroke in an under-resourced, racially/ethnically diverse population. In this single-blind randomized controlled trial, 516 adults (≥40 years) with an ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack or intracerebral hemorrhage within the prior 90 days are being enrolled at five sites within the Los Angeles County safety-net setting and randomized 1:1 to intervention vs usual care. Participants are excluded if they do not speak English, Spanish, Cantonese, Mandarin, or Korean or if they are unable to consent. The intervention includes a minimum of three clinic visits in the healthcare setting, three home visits, and Chronic Disease Self-Management Program group workshops in community venues. The primary outcome is blood pressure (BP) control (systolic BP <130 mmHg) at 1 year. Secondary outcomes include: (1) mean change in systolic BP; (2) control of other vascular risk factors including lipids and hemoglobin A1c, (3) inflammation (C reactive protein [CRP]), (4) medication adherence, (5) lifestyle factors (smoking, diet, and physical activity

  12. Using "get with the guidelines" to improve cardiovascular secondary prevention.

    PubMed

    LaBresh, Kenneth A; Gliklich, Richard; Liljestrand, James; Peto, Randolph; Ellrodt, A Gray

    2003-10-01

    "Get With The Guidelines (GWTG)" was developed and piloted by the American Heart Association (AHA), New England Affiliate; MassPRO, Inc.; and other organizations to reduce the gap in the application of secondary prevention guidelines in hospitalized cardiovascular disease patients. Collaborative learning programs and technology solutions were created for the project. The interactive Web-based patient management tool (PMT) was developed using quality measures derived from the AHA/American College of Cardiology secondary prevention guidelines. It provided data entry, embedded reminders and guideline summaries, and online reports of quality measure performance, including comparisons with the aggregate performance of all hospitals. Multidisciplinary teams from 24 hospitals participated in the 2000-2001 pilot. Four collaborative learning sessions and monthly conference calls supported team interaction. Best-practices sharing and the use of an Internet tool enabled hospitals to change systems and collect data on 1,738 patients. The GWTG program, a template of learning sessions with didactic presentations, best-practices sharing, and collaborative multidisciplinary team meetings supported by the Internet-based data collection and reporting system, can be extended to multiple regions without requiring additional development. Following the completion of the pilot, the AHA adopted GWTG as a national program.

  13. [Medication adherence to secondary prevention for coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    Rossi, Emiliano; Perman, Gastón; Michelangelo, Hernán; Alonzo, Claudia B; Brescacin, Laura; Kopitowski, Karin S; Navarro Estrada, José L

    2014-01-01

    We compared the use of evidence-based secondary prevention drugs for coronary artery disease at hospital discharge and 3 years of follow-up in a group of patients associated to an integrated network of health services. We conducted a retrospective group study that included 125 patients under 80 years of age who were hospitalized for acute coronary syndrome. McNemar's test was used to compare values at baseline and 3 years. The mean age of of participants was 63.7 years (SD ± 10.08) and 65.6% (95% CI 56.6-73.9) of male sex. The average follow-up time was 2.94 years (SD ± 0.25). The use of secondary prevention drugs for coronary heart disease decreased at 3 years of follow-up: anti-platelet 97.6 to 88.0% (p = 0.012), beta-blockers 94.4 to 84.8% (p = 0.021) and statins 83.7 to 91.2% (p = 0.035). Patients medicated with a combination of anti-platelet, beta blockers and statins showed a decrease from 86.4 to 66.3% (p < 0.0001). It is necessary to study the causes for the decreased adherence to long-term cardio-protective drugs.

  14. Challenges and opportunities for primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention of Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Rassi, A; Dias, J C P; Marin-Neto, J A; Rassi, A

    2009-04-01

    A century after its discovery, Chagas' disease still represents a major public health challenge in Latin America. Moreover, because of growing population movements, an increasing number of cases of imported Chagas' disease have now been detected in non-endemic areas, such as North America and some European countries. This parasitic zoonosis, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is transmitted to humans by infected Triatominae insects, or occasionally by non-vectorial mechanisms, such as blood transfusion, mother to fetus, or oral ingestion of materials contaminated with parasites. Following the acute phase of the infection, untreated individuals enter a chronic phase that is initially asymptomatic or clinically unapparent. Usually, a few decades later, 40-50% of patients develop progressive cardiomyopathy and/or motility disturbances of the oesophagus and colon. In the last decades several interventions targeting primary, secondary and tertiary prevention of Chagas' disease have been attempted. While control of both vectorial and blood transfusion transmission of T cruzi (primary prevention) has been successful in many regions of Latin America, early detection and aetiological treatment of asymptomatic subjects with Chagas' disease (secondary prevention) have been largely underutilised. At the same time, in patients with established chronic disease, several pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions are currently available and have been increasingly used with the intention of preventing or delaying complications of the disease (tertiary prevention). In this review we discuss in detail each of these issues.

  15. Impact of Secondary Prevention on Mortality after a First Ischemic Stroke in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Maria E; Marsh, Wallace; Felici-Giovanini, Marcos E; Rodríguez-Benitez, Rosa J; Zevallos, Juan C

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of the prescription of secondary prevention therapies on mortality in Puerto Rican patients hospitalized with a first ischemic stroke. This was a retrospective secondary data analysis of the 2007 and 2009 Puerto Rico Stroke Registry electronic database. Information was obtained from the medical charts of patients discharged with ICD-9 codes 434 and 436 from 20 hospitals located in Puerto Rico. Descriptive analyses were conducted for demographics and comorbidities. Chi2 statistics compared the proportion of patients prescribed secondary prevention therapy and the proportion of patients not prescribed secondary prevention therapy. Lastly, survival rates were calculated from 2007 up to and including December 2010. The mean age of the 3,965 patients was 70 (±14) years. Secondary prevention therapy was prescribed to only 1% of the patients. The most frequent comorbidities were hypertension (85%), diabetes (52%), and hyperlipidemia (25%). The case fatality rate for patients prescribed secondary prevention therapy was 16%, compared to 26% for patients not prescribed secondary prevention therapy (p<0.01). The mean survival for stroke patients prescribed secondary preventions was 450 days (95% CI;182−718), compared to 266 days (95% CI; 244−287) for those not prescribed secondary prevention therapy (p = 0.175). A low percentage of patients with a first ischemic stroke were prescribed secondary prevention therapy. While not statistically significant, survival analysis suggests that secondary prevention therapy decreased mortality in patients with a stroke.

  16. Early Detection | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    [[{"fid":"171","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Early Detection Research Group Homepage Logo","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"Early Detection Research Group Homepage Logo","field_folder[und]":"15"},"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"default","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Early

  17. Promotion, Prevention and Early Intervention for Mental Health: National Consultation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    This report provides a description of a national consultation that was undertaken in 2001-2002 to provide feedback on two companion national policy documents: "National Action Plan for Promotion, Prevention and Early Intervention for Mental Health 2000" and "Promotion, Prevention and Early Intervention for Mental Health: A…

  18. Beyond Primary Prevention of Alcohol Use: A Culturally Specific Secondary Prevention Program for Mexican Heritage Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, Stephanie; Gance-Cleveland, Bonnie; Mettler, Kathleen; Booth, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    Classroom-based primary prevention programs with adolescents are effective in inhibiting the onset of drug use, but these programs are not designed to directly address the unique needs of adolescents at higher risk of use or already using alcohol and other drugs. This article describes the initial efficacy evaluation of a companion psychosocial small group program which aims at addressing the needs of Mexican heritage students identified by their teachers as being at higher risk for substance use or already experimenting with alcohol and other drugs. The adolescent (7th grade) small group curricula, REAL Groups, is a secondary prevention program which supplements the primary classroom-based substance use prevention program, keepin’ it REAL. Following a mutual aid approach, a total of 109 7th grade students were referred by their teachers and participated in the REAL Groups. The remaining 252 7th grade students who did not participate served as the control group. To account for biased selection into REAL Groups, propensity score matching (PSM) was employed. The estimated average treatment effect for participants’ use of alcohol was calculated at the end of the 8th grade. Results indicate that alcohol use decreased among students who participated in the REAL Groups relative to matched students who did not participate. These findings suggest that REAL Groups may be an effective secondary prevention program for higher-risk Mexican heritage adolescents. PMID:22193861

  19. Secondary prevention of stroke--results from the Southern Africa Stroke Prevention Initiative (SASPI) study.

    PubMed Central

    Thorogood, M.; Connor, M. D.; Lewando-Hundt, G.; Tollman, S.; Ngoma, B.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of risk factors and experience of preventive interventions in stroke survivors, and identilfy barriers to secondary prevention in rural South Africa. METHODS: A clinician visited individuals in the Agincourt field site (in South Africa's rural north east) who were identified in a census as possible stroke victims to confirm the diagnosis of stroke. We explored the impact of stroke on the individual's family, and health-seeking behaviour following stroke by conducting in-depth interviews in the households of 35 stroke survivors. We held two workshops to understand the knowledge, experience, and views of primary care nurses, who provide the bulk of professional health care. FINDINGS :We identified 103 stroke survivors (37 men), 73 (71%) of whom had hypertension, but only 8 (8%) were taking anti-hypertensive treatment. Smoking was uncommon; 8 men and 1 woman smoked a maximum of ten cigarettes daily. 94 (91%) stroke survivors had sought help, which involved allopathic health care for most of them (81; 79%). 42 had also sought help from traditional healers and churches, while another 13 people had sought help only from those sources. Of the 35 survivors who were interviewed, 29 reported having been prescribed anti-hypertensive pills after their stroke. Barriers to secondary prevention included cost of treatment, reluctance to use pills, difficulties with access to drugs, and lack of equipment to measure blood pressure. A negative attitude to allopathic care was not an important factor. CONCLUSION: In this rural area hypertension is the most important modifiable risk factor in stroke survivors. Effective secondary prevention may reduce the incidence of recurrent strokes, but there is no system to deliver such care. New strategies for care are needed involving both allopathic and non-allopathic-health care providers. PMID:15500283

  20. Fibrates for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and stroke.

    PubMed

    Wang, Deren; Liu, Bian; Tao, Wendan; Hao, Zilong; Liu, Ming

    2015-10-25

    Fibrates are a class of drugs characterised by mainly lowering high triglyceride, raising high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and lowering the small dense fraction of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Their efficacy for secondary prevention of serious vascular events is unclear, and to date no systematic review focusing on secondary prevention has been undertaken. To assess the efficacy and safety of fibrates for the prevention of serious vascular events in people with previous cardiovascular disease (CVD), including coronary heart disease and stroke. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; Issue 9, 2014) on the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (OVID, 1946 to October week 1 2014), EMBASE (OVID, 1980 to 2014 week 41), the China Biological Medicine Database (CBM) (1978 to 2014), the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) (1979 to 2014), Chinese Science and Technique Journals Database (VIP) (1989 to 2014). We also searched other resources, such as ongoing trials registers and databases of conference abstracts, to identify further published, unpublished, and ongoing studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in which a fibrate (for example gemfibrozil, fenofibrate) was compared with placebo or no treatment. We excluded RCTs with only laboratory outcomes. We also excluded trials comparing two different fibrates without a placebo or no-treatment control. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed risk of bias, and extracted the data. We contacted authors of trials for missing data. We included 13 trials involving a total of 16,112 participants. Eleven trials recruited participants with history of coronary heart disease, two trials recruited participants with history of stroke, and one trial recruited participants with a mix of people with CVD. We judged overall risk of bias to be moderate. The meta-analysis (including all fibrate trials) showed evidence for a protective

  1. Atherothrombotic Risk Stratification and Ezetimibe for Secondary Prevention.

    PubMed

    Bohula, Erin A; Morrow, David A; Giugliano, Robert P; Blazing, Michael A; He, Ping; Park, Jeong-Gun; Murphy, Sabina A; White, Jennifer A; Kesaniemi, Y Antero; Pedersen, Terje R; Brady, Adrian J; Mitchel, Yale; Cannon, Christopher P; Braunwald, Eugene

    2017-02-28

    Ezetimibe improves cardiovascular (CV) outcomes in patients stabilized after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) when added to statin therapy. After ACS, patients vary considerably in their risk for recurrent CV events. This study tested the hypothesis that atherothrombotic risk stratification may be useful to identify post-ACS patients who have the greatest potential for benefit from the addition of ezetimibe to statin therapy. The TIMI (Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction) Risk Score for Secondary Prevention (TRS 2°P) is a simple 9-point risk stratification tool, previously developed in a large population with atherothrombosis to predict CV death, myocardial infarction (MI), and ischemic stroke (CV death/MI/ischemic cerebrovascular accident [iCVA]). The current study applied this tool prospectively to 17,717 post-ACS patients randomized either to ezetimibe and simvastatin or to placebo and simvastatin in IMPROVE-IT (Improved Reduction of Outcomes: Vytorin Efficacy International Trial). Treatment efficacy was assessed by baseline risk for CV death/MI/iCVA, the IMPROVE-IT composite endpoints (CE), and individual component endpoints at 7 years. All 9 clinical variables in the TRS 2°P were independent risk indicators for CV death/MI/iCVA (p < 0.001). The integer-based scheme showed a strong graded relationship with the rate of CV death/MI/iCVA, the trial CE, and the individual components (p trend <0.0001 for each). High-risk patients (n = 4,393; 25%), defined by ≥3 risk indicators, had a 6.3% (95% confidence interval: 2.9% to 9.7%) absolute risk reduction in CV death/MI/iCVA at 7 years with ezetimibe/simvastatin, thus translating to a number-needed-to-treat of 16. Intermediate-risk patients (2 risk indicators; n = 5,292; 30%) had a 2.2% (95% confidence interval: -0.3% to 4.6%) absolute risk reduction. Low-risk patients (0 to 1 risk indicators; n = 8,032; 45%) did not appear to derive benefit from the addition of ezetimibe (p interaction = 0.010). Similar

  2. PM Program Prevents Early AM Repairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McRae, David

    1974-01-01

    Discusses how to initiate a preventive maintenance (PM) program: (1) make inventory of equipment that needs a PM program; (2) gather data about each piece of equipment; and (3) set maintenance goals. (Author/PG)

  3. Early school leaving among immigrants in Toronto secondary schools.

    PubMed

    Anisef, Paul; Brown, Robert S; Phythian, Kelli; Sweet, Robert; Walters, David

    2010-05-01

    While education statistics confirm that there is little difference in the dropout rates of native-born and immigrant youth, analyses of Toronto District School Board (TDSB) data have revealed significant variation in school persistence within immigrant groups. Among newcomer youth, the decision to leave school early has been reported to be strongly influenced by socioeconomic status as well as such factors as country of origin, age at arrival, generational status, family structure, and academic performance. While living in low-income conditions is thought to place both foreign- and Canadian-born youth at risk of poor school performance and early school withdrawal, their substantially higher incidence of poverty suggests that today's immigrant youth are likely to face greater obstacles to academic success that may in turn have detrimental, long-term consequences. This paper uses TDSB data to investigate the extent to which living below the low-income cutoff affects the likelihood of dropping out of secondary school, while taking into account generational status as well as a variety risk factors, noted above. Policy implications are discussed.

  4. Preventing Obesity Across Generations: Evidence for Early Life Intervention.

    PubMed

    Haire-Joshu, Debra; Tabak, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    To prevent the intergenerational transfer of obesity and end the current epidemic, interventions are needed across the early life stages, from preconception to prenatal to infancy through the age of 2 years. The foundation for obesity is laid in early life by actions and interactions passed from parent to child that have long-lasting biologic and behavioral consequences. The purpose of this paper is to examine the best evidence about (a) factors in parents and offspring that promote obesity during the early life stages, (b) the social determinants and dimensions of obesity in early life, (c) promising and effective interventions for preventing obesity in early life, and (d) opportunities for future research into strategies to disrupt the intergenerational cycle of obesity that begins early in life. The pathway for halting the intergenerational obesity epidemic requires the discovery and development of evidence-based interventions that can act across multiple dimensions of influence on early life.

  5. Preventing Obesity Across Generations: Evidence for Early Life Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Haire-Joshu, Debra; Tabak, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    To prevent the intergenerational transfer of obesity and end the current epidemic, interventions are needed across the early life stages, from preconception to prenatal to infancy through the age of 2 years. The foundation for obesity is laid in early life by actions and interactions passed from parent to child that have long-lasting biologic and behavioral consequences. The purpose of this paper is to examine the best evidence about (a) factors in parents and offspring that promote obesity during the early life stages, (b) the social determinants and dimensions of obesity in early life, (c) promising and effective interventions for preventing obesity in early life, and (d) opportunities for future research into strategies to disrupt the intergenerational cycle of obesity that begins early in life. The pathway for halting the intergenerational obesity epidemic requires the discovery and development of evidence-based interventions that can act across multiple dimensions of influence on early life. PMID:26989828

  6. Preventing Early Reading Failure: An Argument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Darrell

    2015-01-01

    Across the pendulum-like changes in beginning reading instruction over the past 30 years, three interrelated ideas emerge as the key to preventing reading failure in kindergarten and first grade: (1) an interesting, carefully-leveled book curriculum; (2) a leveled phonics curriculum; and (3) a well-trained teacher who knows how to integrate guided…

  7. Early Detection Staff | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  8. Outcomes and secondary prevention strategies for male hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Riley, Rebecca L; Carnes, Molly L; Gudmundsson, Adalsteinn; Elliott, Mary E

    2002-01-01

    To assess clinical outcomes and determine whether osteoporosis assessment and secondary prevention strategies were performed for male veterans hospitalized for hip fractures. Retrospective chart review for male veterans hospitalized for hip fracture from January 1993 through July 1999. The Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Madison, WI. Medical charts were available for 46 of 53 male patients admitted for hip fracture during the study period. Three subjects were excluded because hip fracture was associated with high-impact trauma. Mean age of the 43 study patients was 72 years (range 43-91 y), and mean length of hospitalization was 16 days (median 11 d, range 3-108 d). Thirty-two (82%) of 39 veterans whose disposition was documented were discharged to a nursing home. Eleven (26%) of 43 men died within 12 months after fracture. Twelve (28%) had fractured previously. Four (10%) subsequently had another fracture. Three of 9 patients with documented ambulation status were ambulatory at 1 year. Three patients received a bone mass measurement within a prespecified time interval of 6 months subsequent to fracture. No patient's records included a diagnosis of osteoporosis either before or within 6 months after fracture. One-third of the patients had documentation of calcium or multivitamin supplementation at discharge. One patient was receiving calcitonin at the time of fracture and continued to receive it afterward. No other patient was prescribed antiresorptive therapy by the time of hospital discharge. Male veterans with hip fractures received inadequate evaluation and treatment for osteoporosis, although a substantial portion had documentation of recurrent fractures. Education of clinicians and creation of algorithms for management of established osteoporosis may improve outcomes for these individuals.

  9. Bullying Prevention Strategies in Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saracho, Olivia N.

    2017-01-01

    Bullying is a serious problem that affects the young children's well being. Early childhood educators find it difficult to manage bullying in the classroom. Preschool is the first environment outside of the home setting where children encounter difficulties when they socially interact with their peers. Based on the principles of protecting and…

  10. Early Violence Prevention: Tools for Teachers of Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaby, Ronald G.; And Others

    Based on the latest knowledge about early violence prevention and effective teaching strategies, this book describes practical ways for early childhood educators to handle children's aggression and shows how to help children become assertive, nonviolent problem solvers. The book's repertoire of proven approaches includes teaching children how to…

  11. Preventing urinary tract infections in early childhood.

    PubMed

    Williams, Gabrielle J; Craig, Jonathan C; Carapetis, Jonathan R

    2013-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is common in children, causes them considerable discomfort, as well as distress to parents and has a tendency to recur. Approximately 20% of those children who experience one infection will have a repeat episode. Since 1975, 11 trials of long-term antibiotics compared with placebo or no treatment in 1,550 children have been published. Results have been heterogeneous, but the largest trial demonstrated a small reduction (6% absolute risk reduction, risk ratio 0.65) in the risk of repeat symptomatic UTI over 12 months of treatment. This effect was consistent across sub groups of children based upon age, gender, vesicoureteric reflux status and number of prior infections. Trials involving re-implantation surgery (and antibiotics compared with antibiotics alone) for the sub-group of children with vesicoureteric reflux have not shown a reduction in repeat UTI, with the possible exception of a very small benefit for febrile UTI. Systematic reviews have shown that circumcision reduces the risk of repeat infection but 111 circumcisions would need to be performed to prevent one UTI in unpredisposed boys. Given the need for anaesthesia and the risk of surgical complication, net clinical benefit is probably restricted to those who are predisposed (such as those with recurrent infection). Many small trials in complementary therapies have been published and many suggest some benefit, however inclusion of children is limited. Only three trials involving 394 children for cranberry products, two trials with a total of 252 children for probiotics and one trial with 24 children for vitamin A are published. Estimates of efficacy vary widely and imprecision is evident. Multiple interventions to prevent UTI in children exist. Of those, long-term low dose antibiotics has the strongest evidence base, but the benefit is small. Circumcision in boys reduces the risk substantially, but should be restricted to those at risk. There is little evidence of benefit of

  12. Prevention of early childhood caries: a public health perspective.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, J A

    1998-01-01

    This paper proposes strategies for preventing early childhood caries (ECC), preferably for the greatest number of children at the lowest cost. Population-based, public health approaches are more likely to reach the target population groups at risk of developing ECC than individual, private practice-based approaches. Different prevention and early intervention strategies are discussed and the following recommendations are made: 1) Continue to promote community water fluoridation. 2) Evaluate the effectiveness of other public health oriented measures to prevent ECC. 3) Develop a national ECC and rampant caries registry. 4) Link oral health screening and easily implemented, low-cost interventions with immunization schedules and public health nursing activities. 5) Increase opportunities for community-based interventions conducted by dental hygienists. 6) Change insurance reimbursement schedules to provide incentives for dentists to prevent disease. 7) Include dentistry in new child health insurance legislation for children as well as parents of infants and preschool children.

  13. Australian community pharmacists' awareness and practice in supporting secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Puspitasari, Hanni Prihhastuti; Aslani, Parisa; Krass, Ines

    2013-12-01

    Pharmacists are well placed to identify, prevent and resolve medicine related problems as well as monitor the effectiveness of treatments in cardiovascular disease (CVD). Pharmacists' interventions in CVD secondary prevention have been shown to improve outcomes for clients with established CVD. To explore the scope of pharmacists' activities in supporting CVD secondary prevention. Community pharmacies in New South Wales, Australia. Twenty-one in-depth, semi-structured interviews with a range of community pharmacists were conducted. All interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed ad verbatim. Data were analyzed using a 'grounded-theory' approach by applying methods of constant comparison. Community pharmacists' awareness and current practice in supporting secondary prevention of CVD. Four key themes identified included 'awareness', 'patient counselling', 'patient monitoring', and 'perceptions of the role of pharmacists in CVD secondary prevention'. The pharmacists demonstrated a moderate understanding of CVD secondary prevention. There was considerable variability in the scope of practice among the participants, ranging from counselling only about medicines to providing continuity of care. A minority of pharmacists who had negative beliefs about their roles in CVD secondary prevention offered limited support to their clients. The majority of pharmacists, however, believed that they have an important role to play in supporting clients with established CVD. Community pharmacists in Australia make a contribution to the care of clients with established CVD despite the gap in their knowledge and understanding of CVD secondary prevention. The scope of practice in CVD secondary prevention ranged from only counselling about medicines to offering continuity of care. The extent of pharmacists' involvement in offering disease management appears to be influenced by their beliefs regarding what is required within their scope of practice.

  14. Early childhood caries: risk-based disease prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Ng, Man Wai; Chase, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Early childhood caries (ECC), common in preschoolers, can lead to pain and infection if left untreated. Yet, ECC is largely preventable, and if it is identified early and the responsible risk factors are addressed, its progression can be halted or slowed. This article reviews the rationale for a first dental visit by age 1 year, caries risk assessment, and risk-based prevention and management of ECC and discusses strategies for providers to implement these contemporary evidence-based concepts into clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Blood transfusion for preventing primary and secondary stroke in people with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Winfred C; Dwan, Kerry

    2013-11-14

    terminated early. The transfusion group had a high complications rate, including iron overload, alloimmunisation, and transfusion reactions. The second trial (STOP II) investigated risk of stroke when transfusion was stopped after at least 30 months in this population. The trial closed early due to a significant difference in risk of stroke between participants who stopped transfusion and those who continued as measured by reoccurrence of abnormal velocities on Doppler examination or the occurrence of overt stroke in the group that stopped transfusion. The third trial (SWiTCH) was a non-inferiority trial comparing transfusion and iron chelation (standard management) with hydroxyurea and phlebotomy (alternative treatment) with the combination endpoint of prevention of stroke recurrence and reduction of iron overload. This trial was stopped early after enrolment and follow up of 133 children because of analysis showing futility in reaching the composite primary endpoint. The stroke rate (seven strokes on hydroxyurea and phlebotomy, none on transfusion and chelation, odds ratio 16.49 (95% confidence interval 0.92 to 294.84)) was within the non-inferiority margin, but the liver iron content was not better in the alternative arm. The STOP trial demonstrated a significantly reduced risk of stroke in participants with abnormal transcranial Doppler ultrasonography velocities receiving regular blood transfusions. The follow-up trial (STOP 2) indicated that individuals may revert to former risk status if transfusion is discontinued. The degree of risk must be balanced against the burden of chronic transfusions. The combination of hydroxyurea and phlebotomy is not as effective as "standard" transfusion and chelation in preventing secondary stroke and iron overload. Ongoing multicentre trials are investigating the use of chronic transfusion to prevent silent infarcts, the use of hydroxyurea as an alternative to transfusion in children with abnormal transcranial Doppler ultrasonography

  16. Care assessment platform: an ICT-enabled home care model for secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Karunanithi, Mohanraj; Varnfield, Marlien; Ding, Hang; Garcia, Elsa; Whittaker, Frank; Sarela, Antti

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading chronic diseases affecting developed countries. Traditional approach to secondary prevention of CVD through hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is hampered by the lack of uptake and adherence.

  17. Primary and secondary prevention of skin cancer in mountain guides: attitude and motivation for or against participation.

    PubMed

    Zink, A; Thomé, F; Schielein, M; Spinner, C D; Biedermann, T; Tizek, L

    2018-05-30

    Outdoor professionals such as mountain guides are at a substantial risk of developing non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) due to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure. Despite major recent primary prevention efforts, studies on secondary skin cancer prevention efforts are limited and corresponding data on outdoor workers scarce. To assess the sun protective behaviour and individual motivations for or against skin cancer screening examinations in the German mountain guide population to aid in the development of effective awareness and prevention strategies. A cross-sectional study among all registered mountain guides in Germany was conducted using a 35-item online questionnaire on primary and secondary prevention of NMSC as well as perceived barriers for prevention. A total of 145 mountain guides participated in the study in January 2017. Of these, 86.2% reported using sunscreen often or always, 62.1% with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30-50% and 60.7% had undergone dermatological examination by a medical professional. The most common reasons for using secondary prevention efforts were hope of an early diagnosis (77.3%), fear of skin cancer (73.9%) and the intention to be aware of one's own health (70.5%). The main reasons for not doing so were absence of conspicuous skin conditions (63.2%) and feeling healthy (59.6%). Awareness of prevention strategies recommended by the scientific community is low among affected occupationally high-risk mountain guide populations. Understanding the specific needs of this high-risk group is essential for the development of sustainable awareness and prevention strategies. © 2018 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  18. Secondary Stroke Prevention: Improving Diagnosis and Management with Newer Technologies.

    PubMed

    Imam, Yahia Z; D'Souza, Atlantic; Malik, Rayaz A; Shuaib, Ashfaq

    2016-12-01

    Treatment of hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol, smoking cessation, and healthy lifestyle have all contributed to the decline in the incidence of vascular disease over the last several decades. Patients who suffer an acute stroke are at a high risk for recurrence. Introduction of newer technologies and their wider use allows for better identification of patients in whom the risk of recurrence following an acute stroke may be very high. Traditionally, the major focus for diagnosis and management has focused on patient history, examination, imaging for carotid stenosis/occlusion, and detection of AF and paroxysmal AF (PAF) with 24-48 h cardiac monitoring. This review focuses on the usefulness of three newer investigative tools that are becoming widely available and lead to better prevention. Continuous ambulatory blood pressure measurements for 24 h or longer and 3D Doppler measures of the carotid arteries provide key useful information on the state of vascular health and enhance our ability to monitor the response to preventive therapies. Furthermore, the detection of PAF can be significantly improved with prolonged cardiac monitoring for 3 weeks or longer, enabling the initiation of appropriate prevention therapy. This review will focus on the potential impact and importance of these emerging technologies on the prevention of recurrent stroke in high-risk patients.

  19. A Cognitive Behavioral Depression Prevention Program for Early Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miloseva, Lence

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present results of our one year experience with Cognitive Behavioral Psychology Program, in order to contribute to the building of whole school approach and positive psychology preventive mental health problems model. Based on Penn Resilience program (PRP), we modify and create program for early adolescents: how to…

  20. Selective Prevention Approaches to Build Protective Factors in Early Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Cheri J.

    2014-01-01

    Young children with disabilities may be at elevated risk for behavior problems as well as maltreatment. preventive approaches that can be infused into early intervention services are needed to support parents, build competencies among young children, and enhance protective factors that may temper risk. Two interventions--Stepping Stones Triple P,…

  1. Prevention of overweight and obesity in early life.

    PubMed

    Lanigan, Julie

    2018-05-29

    Childhood obesity is a serious challenge for public health. The problem begins early with most excess childhood weight gained before starting school. In 2016, the WHO estimated that 41 million children under 5 were overweight or obese. Once established, obesity is difficult to reverse, likely to persist into adult life and is associated with increased risk of CVD, type 2 diabetes and certain cancers. Preventing obesity is therefore of high importance. However, its development is multi-factorial and prevention is a complex challenge. Modifiable lifestyle behaviours such as diet and physical activity are the most well-known determinants of obesity. More recently, early-life factors have emerged as key influencers of obesity in childhood. Understanding risk factors and how they interact is important to inform interventions that aim to prevent obesity in early childhood. Available evidence supports multi-component interventions as effective in obesity prevention. However, relatively few interventions are available in the UK and only one, TrimTots, has been evaluated in randomised controlled trials and shown to be effective at reducing obesity risk in preschool children (age 1-5 years). BMI was lower in children immediately after completing TrimTots compared with waiting list controls and this effect was sustained at long-term follow-up, 2 years after completion. Developing and evaluating complex interventions for obesity prevention is a challenge for clinicians and researchers. In addition, parents encounter barriers engaging with interventions. This review considers early-life risk factors for obesity, highlights evidence for preventative interventions and discusses barriers and facilitators to their success.

  2. Reinforcing Alcohol Prevention (RAP) Program: A Secondary School Curriculum to Combat Underage Drinking and Impaired Driving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Will, Kelli England; Sabo, Cynthia Shier

    2010-01-01

    The Reinforcing Alcohol Prevention (RAP) Program is an alcohol prevention curriculum developed in partnership with secondary schools to serve their need for a brief, evidence-based, and straightforward program that aligned with state learning objectives. Program components included an educational lesson, video, and interactive activities delivered…

  3. Parental Communication as a Tool Kit for Preventing Sexual Abuse among Adolescent Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tayo, Ajayi Beatrice; Olawuyi, B. O.

    2016-01-01

    This study employed the survey design to investigate the relevance of parent communication in preventing sexual abuse among secondary school students in Nigeria. The instrument for data collection tagged "Parent Communication Strategy for Preventing Sexual Abuse questionnaire" (PCOSPSAQ), was a researcher designed instrument. It was…

  4. Measuring Promotion and Prevention Orientations of Secondary School Students: It Is More Than Meets the Eye

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodis, Flaviu A.; Hattie, John A. C.; Hodis, Georgeta M.

    2016-01-01

    The General Regulatory Focus Measure has been used extensively in psychological research to gauge promotion and prevention orientations. Findings of this research show that for New Zealand secondary school students, the General Regulatory Focus Measure does not measure promotion and prevention as theoretically independent constructs.

  5. [Reduction of in-hospital mortality and improved secondary prevention after acute myocardial infarction. First results from the registry of secondary prevention after acute myocardial infarction (SAMI)].

    PubMed

    Tebbe, U; Messer, C; Stammwitz, E; The, G S; Dietl, J; Bischoff, K-O; Schulten-Baumer, U; Tebbenjohanns, J; Gohlke, H; Bramlage, P

    2007-07-30

    In hospital mortality of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has been reduced due to the availability of better therapeutic strategies. But there is still a gap between mortality rates in randomised trials and daily clinical practice. Thus, it was aim of the present registry to document the course and outcome of patients with AMI and to improve patient care by implementing recent guidelines. In a nationwide registry study in hospitals in Germany with a cardiology unit or an internal medicine department data on consecutive patients were recorded for six to twelve months at admission, discharge and during a follow-up of one year. From 02/2003 until 10/2004 a total of 5,353 patients with acute myocardial infarction (65.7 % male, mean age of 67.6 +/- 17.7 years; 55.1 % of them with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) were included in the registry. Of the patients with STEMI, 76.6 % underwent acute intervention, 37.1 % had thrombolysis, 69.7 % percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). 40.0 % of those with non-Stemi (NSTEMI) had an acute intervention, 6.6 % thrombolysis, 73.5 % PTCA. Recommended secondary prevention consisted of ASS (93.2 %), beta-blockers (93.0 %), CSE-inhibitors (83.5 %), ACE-inhibitors (80.9 %) and clopidogrel (74.0 %). In-hospital mortality was 10.5 % (STEMI) and 7.4 % (NSTEMI). The 9 % mortality among patients with acute myocardial infarction treated in the hospitals participating in the SAMI registry is low compared to that in similar collectives. The high number of patients who had thrombofibrinolysis and coronary interventions as well as the early initiation of drug therapy contributed to these results. Medical treatment in the prehospital phase of these patients remains still insufficient and to a substantial extent contributes to the mortality of acute myocardial infarction.

  6. Comparative proteomic analysis of Populus trichocarpa early stem from primary to secondary growth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinwen; Hai, Guanghui; Wang, Chong; Cao, Shenquan; Xu, Wenjing; Jia, Zhigang; Yang, Chuanping; Wang, Jack P; Dai, Shaojun; Cheng, Yuxiang

    2015-08-03

    Wood is derived from the secondary growth of tree stems. In this study, we investigated the global changes of protein abundance in Populus early stems using a proteomic approach. Morphological and histochemical analyses revealed three typical stages during Populus early stems, which were the primary growth stage, the transition stage from primary to secondary growth and the secondary growth stage. A total of 231 spots were differentially abundant during various growth stages of Populus early stems. During Populus early stem lignifications, 87 differential spots continuously increased, while 49 spots continuously decreased. These two categories encompass 58.9% of all differential spots, which suggests significant molecular changes from primary to secondary growth. Among 231 spots, 165 unique proteins were identified using LC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS, which were classified into 14 biological function groups. The proteomic characteristics indicated that carbohydrate metabolism, oxido-reduction, protein degradation and secondary cell wall metabolism were the dominantly occurring biochemical processes during Populus early stem development. This study helps in elucidating biochemical processes and identifies potential wood formation-related proteins during tree early stem development. It is a comprehensive proteomic investigation on tree early stem development that, for the first time, reveals the overall molecular networks that occur during Populus early stem lignifications. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Collaborative Leadership Practices among Ohio's Early College High School Principals and Their Post-Secondary Partners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Allia L.

    2012-01-01

    This constructivist multiple-case study examined the collaborative leadership practices of seven secondary and seven post-secondary leaders who participate in Ohio's Early College High School Initiative (ECHSI). The 14 educational leaders in this study partnered in an effort to respond to the access and success of traditionally underrepresented…

  8. Early College High Schools: A Proposed Solution to Secondary Transition Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, Jeanne M.; Maxwell, Gerri M.

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative case study examines the challenges facing rural secondary schools in transitioning youth from high school to post-secondary education and careers, and whether the interventions, strategies and support built into the Early College High School could offer a solution to this long-standing challenge to better meet the needs of special…

  9. Mobile Phone Interventions for the Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, Linda G.; Beatty, Alexis; Stafford, Zoey; Whooley, Mary A.

    2016-01-01

    Mobile health in the form of text messaging and mobile applications provides an innovative and effective approach to promote prevention and management of cardiovascular disease (CVD); however, the magnitude of these effects is unclear. Through a comprehensive search of databases from 2002–2016, we conducted a quantitative systematic review. The selected studies were critically evaluated to extract and summarize pertinent characteristics and outcomes. A large majority of studies (22 of 28, 79%) demonstrated text messaging, mobile applications, and telemonitoring via mobile phones were effective in improving outcomes. Some key factors associated with successful interventions included personalized messages with tailored advice, greater engagement (2-way text messaging, higher frequency of messages), and use of multiple modalities. Overall, text messaging appears more effective than smartphone-based interventions. Incorporating principles of behavioral activation will help promote and sustain healthy lifestyle behaviors in patients with CVD that result in improved clinical outcomes. PMID:27001245

  10. Mobile Phone Interventions for the Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Linda G; Beatty, Alexis; Stafford, Zoey; Whooley, Mary A

    2016-01-01

    Mobile health in the form of text messaging and mobile applications provides an innovative and effective approach to promote prevention and management of cardiovascular disease (CVD); however, the magnitude of these effects is unclear. Through a comprehensive search of databases from 2002-2016, we conducted a quantitative systematic review. The selected studies were critically evaluated to extract and summarize pertinent characteristics and outcomes. A large majority of studies (22 of 28, 79%) demonstrated text messaging, mobile applications, and telemonitoring via mobile phones were effective in improving outcomes. Some key factors associated with successful interventions included personalized messages with tailored advice, greater engagement (2-way text messaging, higher frequency of messages), and use of multiple modalities. Overall, text messaging appears more effective than smartphone-based interventions. Incorporating principles of behavioral activation will help promote and sustain healthy lifestyle behaviors in patients with CVD that result in improved clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of primary and secondary prevention in atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Michalak, Iwonna; Gutfreund, Katarzyna; Bienias, Wojciech; Matych, Marta; Szewczyk, Anna; Kaszuba, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a serious epidemiological problem in industrialized countries. The incidence of AD has increased considerably over the last 30 years. Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, recurrent, inflammatory skin disease accompanied by strong itching. It is characterized by typical features depending on age. The parents of children suffering from AD must be prepared to change their lifestyle. They should avoid factors which can promote skin lesions and apply appropriate, regular skin care. The article describes primary prevention of AD as well as prophylactic measures to avoid skin eczema. It presents the role of infections, vaccinations, breastfeeding and the influence of domestic animals, house renovation and moulds on development of AD. The article also describes the significance of the epidermal barrier, skin colonization by microbial agents, pruritus, stress, food and inhalant allergy among people who suffer from AD. PMID:26755903

  12. The effects of preventive mental health programmes in secondary schools.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Bror Just

    2013-01-01

    The author wanted to test the effects of preventive mental health programmes in schools and established a longitudinal study with a test group and a control group, using Solomon's method. Data was collected through questionnaires prior to intervention and at 1, 6, 12, and 24 months after the intervention. The size of the effect on the various indices were estimated in terms of (a) differences in improvement of total percentage scores and (b) Cohen's d. From to to t1, t2 and t3 the intervention group showed significantly greater progress in six out of seven knowledge indexes, and 12 months later we found significant effects on the level of mental health problems.

  13. Randomised controlled trial of a secondary prevention program for myocardial infarction patients ('ProActive Heart'): study protocol. Secondary prevention program for myocardial infarction patients.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Anna L; Atherton, John; Taylor, C Barr; Scuffham, Paul; Eadie, Kathy; Miller, Nancy Houston; Oldenburg, Brian

    2009-05-09

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a significant cause of health and economic burden. Secondary prevention programs play a pivotal role in the treatment and management of those affected by CHD although participation rates are poor due to patient, provider, health system and societal-level barriers. As such, there is a need to develop innovative secondary prevention programs to address the treatment gap. Telephone-delivered care is convenient, flexible and has been shown to improve behavioural and clinical outcomes following myocardial infarction (MI). This paper presents the design of a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of a six-month telephone-delivered secondary prevention program for MI patients (ProActive Heart). 550 adult MI patients have been recruited over a 14 month period (December 2007 to January 2009) through two Brisbane metropolitan hospitals, and randomised to an intervention or control group (n = 225 per group). The intervention commences within two weeks of hospital discharge delivered by study-trained health professionals ('health coaches') during up to 10 x 30 minute scripted telephone health coaching sessions. Participants also receive a ProActive Heart handbook and an educational resource to use during the health coaching sessions. The intervention focuses on appropriate modification of CHD risk factors, compliance with pharmacological management, and management of psychosocial issues. Data collection occurs at baseline or prior to commencement of the intervention (Time 1), six months follow-up or the completion of the intervention (Time 2), and at 12 months follow-up for longer term outcomes (Time 3). Primary outcome measures include quality of life (Short Form-36) and physical activity (Active Australia Survey). A cost-effective analysis of the costs and outcomes for patients in the intervention and control groups is being conducted from the perspective of health care costs to the government. The results of this study will

  14. Economic Evaluation of Obesity Prevention in Early Childhood: Methods, Limitations and Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Döring, Nora; Mayer, Susanne; Rasmussen, Finn; Sonntag, Diana

    2016-09-13

    Despite methodological advances in the field of economic evaluations of interventions, economic evaluations of obesity prevention programmes in early childhood are seldom conducted. The aim of the present study was to explore existing methods and applications of economic evaluations, examining their limitations and making recommendations for future cost-effectiveness assessments. A systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed, Cochrane Library, the British National Health Service Economic Evaluation Databases and EconLit. Eligible studies included trial-based or simulation-based cost-effectiveness analyses of obesity prevention programmes targeting preschool children and/or their parents. The quality of included studies was assessed. Of the six studies included, five were intervention studies and one was based on a simulation approach conducted on secondary data. We identified three main conceptual and methodological limitations of their economic evaluations: Insufficient conceptual approach considering the complexity of childhood obesity, inadequate measurement of effects of interventions, and lack of valid instruments to measure child-related quality of life and costs. Despite the need for economic evaluations of obesity prevention programmes in early childhood, only a few studies of varying quality have been conducted. Moreover, due to methodological and conceptual weaknesses, they offer only limited information for policy makers and intervention providers. We elaborate reasons for the limitations of these studies and offer guidance for designing better economic evaluations of early obesity prevention.

  15. Economic Evaluation of Obesity Prevention in Early Childhood: Methods, Limitations and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Döring, Nora; Mayer, Susanne; Rasmussen, Finn; Sonntag, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Despite methodological advances in the field of economic evaluations of interventions, economic evaluations of obesity prevention programmes in early childhood are seldom conducted. The aim of the present study was to explore existing methods and applications of economic evaluations, examining their limitations and making recommendations for future cost-effectiveness assessments. A systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed, Cochrane Library, the British National Health Service Economic Evaluation Databases and EconLit. Eligible studies included trial-based or simulation-based cost-effectiveness analyses of obesity prevention programmes targeting preschool children and/or their parents. The quality of included studies was assessed. Of the six studies included, five were intervention studies and one was based on a simulation approach conducted on secondary data. We identified three main conceptual and methodological limitations of their economic evaluations: Insufficient conceptual approach considering the complexity of childhood obesity, inadequate measurement of effects of interventions, and lack of valid instruments to measure child-related quality of life and costs. Despite the need for economic evaluations of obesity prevention programmes in early childhood, only a few studies of varying quality have been conducted. Moreover, due to methodological and conceptual weaknesses, they offer only limited information for policy makers and intervention providers. We elaborate reasons for the limitations of these studies and offer guidance for designing better economic evaluations of early obesity prevention. PMID:27649218

  16. [Primary and secondary prevention of urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Wagenlehner, F M E; Vahlensieck, W; Bauer, H W; Weidner, W; Naber, K G; Piechota, H J

    2011-10-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most frequent bacterial infections in the community and health care setting. Mostly young and, to some extent, postmenopausal women are affected by recurrent UTI (rUTI) defined as ≥3 UTI/year. On the other hand rUTI are frequently found in patients with complicating urological factors, e.g. urinary catheters. Modifiable predisposing factors in uncomplicated rUTI in women are rare. Continuous antibiotic prophylaxis or postcoital prophylaxis, if there is close correlation with sexual intercourse, are most effective to prevent rUTI. Nitrofurantoin, trimethoprim (or cotrimoxazole), and fosfomycin trometamol are available as first-line drugs. Oral cephalosporins and quinolones should be restricted to specific indications. Antibiotic prophylaxis reduces the number of uropathogens in the gut and/or vaginal flora and reduces bacterial"fitness". Given the correct indication, the recurrence rate of rUTI can be reduced by about 90%. In postmenopausal patients vaginal substitution of oestriol should be started first. Oral or parenteral immunoprophylaxis is another option in patients with rUTI. Other possibilities with varying scientific evidence are prophylaxis with cranberries or probiotics. The prophylaxis of catheter-associated UTI or asymptomatic bacteriuria should employ strategies which result in a reduction of frequency and duration of catheter drainage of the urinary tract. The currently available catheter materials have only little influence on reducing catheter-associated rUTI.

  17. Familial breast cancer - targeted therapy in secondary and tertiary prevention.

    PubMed

    Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin

    2015-02-01

    The introduction of an increasing number of individualized molecular targeted therapies into clinical routine mirrors their importance in modern cancer prevention and treatment. Well-known examples for targeted agents are the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab and the selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen. The identification of an unaltered gene in tumor tissue in colon cancer (KRAS) is a predictor for the patient's response to targeted therapy with a monoclonal antibody (cetuximab). Targeted therapy for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer has become a reality with the approval of olaparib for platin-sensitive late relapsed BRCA-associated ovarian cancer in December 2014. This manuscript reviews the status quo of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase inhibitors (PARPi) in the therapy of breast and ovarian cancer as well as the struggle for carboplatin as a potential standard of care for triple-negative and, in particular, BRCA-associated breast cancer. Details of the mechanism of action with information on tumor development are provided, and an outlook for further relevant research is given. The efficacy of agents against molecular targets together with the identification of an increasing number of cancer-associated genes will open the floodgates to a new era of treatment decision-making based on molecular tumor profiles. Current clinical trials involving patients with BRCA-associated cancer explore the efficacy of the molecular targeted therapeutics platinum and PARPi.

  18. Early Colleges at Scale: Impacts on Secondary and Postsecondary Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauen, Douglas L.; Fuller, Sarah; Barrett, Nathan; Janda, Ludmila

    2017-01-01

    We examine the impacts of early college high schools, small schools of choice located on college campuses. These schools provide a no-cost opportunity for students to earn college credit--or a 2-year degree--while in high school. Using rich administrative data on multiple cohorts of students and quasiexperimental methods informed by the…

  19. Cost-effectiveness model for prevention of early childhood caries.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Gomez, F J; Shepard, D S

    1999-07-01

    This study presents and illustrates a model that determines the cost-effectiveness of three successively more complete levels of preventive intervention (minimal, intermediate, and comprehensive) in treating dental caries in disadvantaged children up to 6 years of age. Using existing data on the costs of early childhood caries (ECC), the authors estimated the probable cost-effectiveness of each of the three preventive intervention levels by comparing treatment costs to prevention costs as applied to a typical low-income California child for five years. They found that, in general, prevention becomes cost-saving if at least 59 percent of carious lesions receive restorative treatment. Assuming an average restoration cost of $112 per surface, the model predicts cost savings of $66 to $73 in preventing a one-surface, carious lesion. Thus, all three levels of preventive intervention should be relatively cost-effective. Comprehensive intervention would provide the greatest oral health benefit; however, because more children would receive reparative care, overall program costs would rise even as per-child treatment costs decline.

  20. Breast cancer risk accumulation starts early: prevention must also.

    PubMed

    Colditz, Graham A; Bohlke, Kari; Berkey, Catherine S

    2014-06-01

    Nearly one in four breast cancers is diagnosed before the age of 50, and many early-stage premalignant lesions are present but not yet diagnosed. Therefore, we review evidence to support the strategy that breast cancer prevention efforts must begin early in life. This study follows the literature review methods and format. Exposures during childhood and adolescence affect a woman's long-term risk of breast cancer, but have received far less research attention than exposures that occur later in life. Breast tissue undergoes rapid cellular proliferation between menarche and first full-term pregnancy, and risk accumulates rapidly until the terminal differentiation that accompanies first pregnancy. Evidence on childhood diet and growth in height, and adolescent alcohol intake, among other adolescent factors is related to breast cancer risk and risk of premalignant proliferative benign lesions. Breast cancer prevention efforts will have the greatest effect when initiated at an early age and continued over a lifetime. Gaps in knowledge are identified and deserve increase attention to inform prevention.

  1. Breast cancer risk accumulation starts earlyPrevention must also

    PubMed Central

    Colditz, Graham A; Bohlke, Kari; Berkey, Catherine S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Nearly 1 in 4 breast cancers is diagnosed before the age of 50, and many early-stage premalignant lesions are present but not yet diagnosed. Therefore, we review evidence to support the strategy that breast cancer prevention efforts must begin early in life. Methods Literature review Results Exposures during childhood and adolescence affect a woman’s long-term risk of breast cancer, but have received far less research attention than exposures that occur later in life. Breast tissue undergoes rapid cellular proliferation between menarche and first full-term pregnancy, and risk accumulates rapidly until the terminal differentiation that accompanies first pregnancy. Evidence on childhood diet and growth in height, and adolescent alcohol intake, among other adolescent factors are related to breast cancer risk and risk of premalignant proliferative benign lesions. Conclusion Breast cancer prevention efforts will have the greatest effect when initiated at an early age and continued over a lifetime. Gaps in knowledge are identified and deserve increase attention to inform prevention. PMID:24820413

  2. Improving socio-emotional health for pupils in early secondary education with Pyramid: A school-based, early intervention model.

    PubMed

    Jayman, Michelle; Ohl, Maddie; Hughes, Bronach; Fox, Pauline

    2018-05-01

    Policymakers are focusing increased attention on the role of schools to promote and support children's mental health, and evidence-based models of good practice are in demand. Pyramid Club is a school-based, socio-emotional intervention, demonstrably effective with primary-aged pupils. This study extends previous Pyramid Club evaluations by examining effectiveness with pupils in early secondary education; service users' perceptions and experiences were investigated to increase understanding of Pyramid's impact, thus supporting enhanced practice. Participants (n = 126) comprised selected pupils, aged 11-14 (52 males; 74 females), who completed the 10 week programme (Pyramid group) and a non-intervention comparison group. Club leaders (n = 23) were trained, Pyramid volunteers. A mixed-methods design was implemented. The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), informant-rated version (Goodman, 1997, J Child Psychol Psychiat, 38, 581) and self-report version (Goodman, Meltzer, & Bailey, 1998, Europ Child Adolesc Psychiatry, 7, 125), was used to measure socio-emotional well-being: pre-club (baseline assessment), post-test (within 2 weeks of programme completion), and at 12-month follow-up (informant-rated version only). Focus groups were conducted separately with Pyramid pupils and Club leaders. Findings from informants and self-reports identified significant improvements for the Pyramid group in total difficulties and on pertinent SDQ subscales (e.g., emotional symptoms and peer relationship problems) at post-test. Improvements were sustained at 12-month follow-up. Comparison pupils demonstrated minimal change over time. Thematic analysis of qualitative data supported the quantitative findings and provided valuable insights into the Pyramid Club experience. Findings contribute to evidence-based, preventative models for the early adolescent population and support the social validity of Pyramid Club. © 2018 The Authors. British Journal of Education

  3. Knowledge assessment regarding secondary prevention of coronary heart disease--a multi centre survey.

    PubMed

    Matthias, Anne Thushara; Lokunarangoda, Niroshan C; Ekanayaka, Ruvan

    2014-06-06

    Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) is a major cause of mortality worldwide. Control and reduction of cardiovascular risk factors such as elevated blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, excess of body weight, smoking and lack of exercise can contribute to a reduction of CVD mortality. A standardized questionnaire was administered to all medical officers willing to participate in the study, who were working in the Cardiology Units all over Sri Lanka to assess the source of continuous medical education, attitudes on secondary prevention, barriers to secondary prevention and knowledge assessment of secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Chi square was used to compare groups and p < 0.05 was considered significant. 132 participants with equal numbers of males and female doctors participated. While 56 doctors have had no training in cardiology, 75 doctors have had some training in a cardiology unit. The barriers for secondary prevention were, poor knowledge/understanding of patients 3.82 (1.06), too many drugs 3.74 (0.98), presence of co-morbid conditions 3.68(0.97), cost of medications 3.69 (0.97) and poor adherence to prevention strategies by patients 3.44 (1.15). Routine clinic visits 85 (65%) and public awareness day seminars 30 (22.2%) were the most effective methods of secondary prevention. Guidelines were the most popular method of continuous medical education. Those who have had some training in cardiology did not differ in their knowledge from those who have never had training in cardiology. Knowledge about prevention with regard to diet was inadequate and exercise and lipids were adequate but not good. Rates of knowledge on smoking cessation were much higher than for other CVD risk factors. There needs to be more adherences to clinical guidelines and attention paid to CVD prevention, in particular, the importance of dietary modifications, adequate exercise, and lipid control.

  4. Knowledge assessment regarding secondary prevention of coronary heart disease- a multi centre survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) is a major cause of mortality worldwide. Control and reduction of cardiovascular risk factors such as elevated blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, excess of body weight, smoking and lack of exercise can contribute to a reduction of CVD mortality. Methods A standardized questionnaire was administered to all medical officers willing to participate in the study, who were working in the Cardiology Units all over Sri Lanka to assess the source of continuous medical education, attitudes on secondary prevention, barriers to secondary prevention and knowledge assessment of secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Chi square was used to compare groups and p < 0.05 was considered significant. Results 132 participants with equal numbers of males and female doctors participated. While 56 doctors have had no training in cardiology, 75 doctors have had some training in a cardiology unit. The barriers for secondary prevention were, poor knowledge/understanding of patients 3.82 (1.06), too many drugs 3.74 (0.98), presence of co-morbid conditions 3.68(0.97), cost of medications 3.69 (0.97) and poor adherence to prevention strategies by patients 3.44 (1.15). Routine clinic visits 85 (65%) and public awareness day seminars 30 (22.2%) were the most effective methods of secondary prevention. Guidelines were the most popular method of continuous medical education. Those who have had some training in cardiology did not differ in their knowledge from those who have never had training in cardiology. Knowledge about prevention with regard to diet was inadequate and exercise and lipids were adequate but not good. Rates of knowledge on smoking cessation were much higher than for other CVD risk factors. Conclusion There needs to be more adherences to clinical guidelines and attention paid to CVD prevention, in particular, the importance of dietary modifications, adequate exercise, and lipid control. PMID:24903262

  5. Regulation of Hypertension for Secondary Prevention of Stroke: The Possible 'Bridging Function' of Acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Haizhen; Han, Yuhui; Du, Yuzheng; Shi, Xuemin; Huang, Huiyuan; Yu, Xiaoyang; Tan, Xiaochan; Hu, Chunxiao; Wang, Yue; Zhou, Shiyuan

    2018-01-01

    Worldwide, stroke is the leading cause of mortality and disability, with hypertension being an independent risk factor for a secondary stroke. Acupuncture for the treatment of hypertension gains more attention in alternative and complementary medicine, but the results are inconsistent. Few studies regarding the secondary prevention of stroke by managing hypertension with acupuncture have been carried out as there are some problems regarding the antihypertensive drug status in the secondary prevention of stroke. Still, the potential of acupuncture in regulating the blood pressure for secondary stroke prevention deserves our focus. This review is based on papers recorded in the PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases, from their inception until March 28, 2017, and retrieved with the following search terms: hypertension and acupuncture, limited in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), stress-induced (or cold-induced) hypertensive or pre-hypertensive models. We find that, in these hypertensive animals, acupuncture could mainly influence factors related to the nervous system, oxidative stress, the endocrine system, cardiovascular function, and hemorheology, which are closely associated with the stroke outcome. This trend may give us a hint that acupuncture might well participate in the secondary prevention of stroke through these pathways when used in the management of hypertension. © 2018 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  6. Influence of primary and secondary prevention indications on anxiety about the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Rahmawati, Anita; Chishaki, Akiko; Ohkusa, Tomoko; Sawatari, Hiroyuki; Tsuchihashi-Makaya, Miyuki; Ohtsuka, Yuko; Nakai, Mori; Miyazono, Mami; Hashiguchi, Nobuko; Sakurada, Harumizu; Takemoto, Masao; Mukai, Yasushi; Inoue, Shujirou; Sunagawa, Kenji; Chishaki, Hiroaki

    2016-04-01

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) have been established for primary and secondary prevention of fatal arrhythmias. However, little is known about the influence of ICD indications on quality of life (QOL) and psychological disturbances. This study aimed to examine whether there were differences in QOL and psychological distress in patients that have an ICD for primary or secondary prevention of fatal arrhythmias. A multicenter survey of 179 consecutive outpatients (29.1% primary prevention) with ICD implantations completed the Short Form-8 (SF-8), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and Worries about ICD (WAICD). Patients with an ICD for primary prevention had a higher trait anxiety score and worries about ICD score than patients with an ICD for secondary prevention (41.7±12.4 vs. 34.7±12.3, p=0.001 and 39.6±18.0 vs. 30.0±18.9, p=0.002, respectively), even after adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics. In multivariable analysis of variance, primary prevention ICD recipients reported a poorer QOL on the vitality subscale of the SF-8. In our study population, which mostly consisted of New York Heart Association (NYHA) class I and II subjects, primary prevention ICD recipients were more prone to experience worries about their ICD, anxiety, and a poorer QOL compared to secondary prevention ICD recipients. In clinical practice, primary prevention ICD patients should be closely monitored. If warranted, they should be offered psychological intervention, as anxiety and low QOL were predictors of mortality.

  7. Influence of primary and secondary prevention indications on anxiety about the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator

    PubMed Central

    Rahmawati, Anita; Chishaki, Akiko; Ohkusa, Tomoko; Sawatari, Hiroyuki; Tsuchihashi-Makaya, Miyuki; Ohtsuka, Yuko; Nakai, Mori; Miyazono, Mami; Hashiguchi, Nobuko; Sakurada, Harumizu; Takemoto, Masao; Mukai, Yasushi; Inoue, Shujirou; Sunagawa, Kenji; Chishaki, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Background Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) have been established for primary and secondary prevention of fatal arrhythmias. However, little is known about the influence of ICD indications on quality of life (QOL) and psychological disturbances. This study aimed to examine whether there were differences in QOL and psychological distress in patients that have an ICD for primary or secondary prevention of fatal arrhythmias. Methods A multicenter survey of 179 consecutive outpatients (29.1% primary prevention) with ICD implantations completed the Short Form-8 (SF-8), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and Worries about ICD (WAICD). Results Patients with an ICD for primary prevention had a higher trait anxiety score and worries about ICD score than patients with an ICD for secondary prevention (41.7±12.4 vs. 34.7±12.3, p=0.001 and 39.6±18.0 vs. 30.0±18.9, p=0.002, respectively), even after adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics. In multivariable analysis of variance, primary prevention ICD recipients reported a poorer QOL on the vitality subscale of the SF-8. Conclusions In our study population, which mostly consisted of New York Heart Association (NYHA) class I and II subjects, primary prevention ICD recipients were more prone to experience worries about their ICD, anxiety, and a poorer QOL compared to secondary prevention ICD recipients. In clinical practice, primary prevention ICD patients should be closely monitored. If warranted, they should be offered psychological intervention, as anxiety and low QOL were predictors of mortality. PMID:27092190

  8. Implantable Cardioverter-defibrillator Therapy for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Usefulness in Primary and Secondary Prevention.

    PubMed

    Sarrias, Axel; Galve, Enrique; Sabaté, Xavier; Moya, Àngel; Anguera, Ignacio; Núñez, Elaine; Villuendas, Roger; Alcalde, Óscar; García-Dorado, David

    2015-06-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a frequent cause of sudden death. Clinical practice guidelines indicate defibrillator implantation for primary prevention in patients with 1 or more risk factors and for secondary prevention in patients with a history of aborted sudden death or sustained ventricular arrhythmias. The aim of the present study was to analyze the follow-up of patients who received an implantable defibrillator following the current guidelines in nonreferral centers for this disease. This retrospective observational study included all patients who underwent defibrillator implantation between January 1996 and December 2012 in 3 centers in the province of Barcelona. The study included 69 patients (mean age [standard deviation], 44.8 [17] years; 79.3% men), 48 in primary prevention and 21 in secondary prevention. The mean number of risk factors per patient was 1.8 in the primary prevention group and 0.5 in the secondary prevention group (P=.029). The median follow-up duration was 40.5 months. The appropriate therapy rate was 32.7/100 patient-years in secondary prevention and 1.7/100 patient-years in primary prevention (P<.001). Overall mortality was 10.1%. Implant-related complications were experienced by 8.7% of patients, and 13% had inappropriate defibrillator discharges. In patients with a defibrillator for primary prevention, the appropriate therapy rate is extremely low, indicating the low predictive power of the current risk stratification criteria. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. [Awareness of the methods of primary and secondary childbirth trauma prevention among parturients].

    PubMed

    Veverková, A; Kališ, V; Rušavý, Z

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the awareness of fresh mothers regarding the primary prevention of pelvic floor disorders after childbirth. The secondary objective was to identify sources of information, reality of childbirth trauma prevention and attitude to pelvic floor muscle training. Prospective survey study. Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital and Medical Faculty in Pilsen, Charles University. We included 202 women after a vaginal delivery at our center from 6/2015 to 12/2015. These women completed anonymous questionnaire with six questions. 83% of respondents were informed regarding the possibility of primary prevention of childbirth, nulliparas were informed better (88%). The main source of information was the Internet (46%), while only 5% of women received information from their doctor. Despite the high awareness of postpartum trauma prevention, less than half of interviewed women actually performed it (35%). The most widely used method was the massage of the perineum (29%), vaginal dilatation balloons were used less (7%) and alternative methods were pursued by only 4% of women. Experience with pelvic floor muscle exercises had 79% of women, while 90% wanted to exercise after the delivery. Awareness of mothers regarding primary and secondary prevention of pelvic floor disorders is satisfactory. Nevertheless, the information from doctors is inadequate. Despite high awareness, the antepartum prevention methods are used relatively rarely. The study clearly shows the level of awareness and reality of primary and secondary prevention of pelvic floor disorders in our region.

  10. Suboptimal primary and secondary cardiovascular disease prevention in HIV-positive individuals on antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    van Zoest, Rosan A; van der Valk, Marc; Wit, Ferdinand W; Vaartjes, Ilonca; Kooij, Katherine W; Hovius, Joppe W; Prins, Maria; Reiss, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Background We aimed to identify the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, and investigate preventive cardiovascular medication use and achievement of targets as per Dutch cardiovascular risk management guidelines among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and HIV-negative individuals. Design The design was a cross-sectional analysis within an ongoing cohort study. Methods Data on medication use and cardiovascular disease prevalence were available for 528 HIV-positive and 521 HIV-negative participants. We identified cardiovascular risk factors and applied cardiovascular risk management guidelines, mainly focusing on individuals eligible for (a) primary prevention because of high a priori cardiovascular risk, or for (b) secondary prevention. Results One hundred and three (20%) HIV-positive and 77 (15%) HIV-negative participants were classified as having high cardiovascular risk; 53 (10%) HIV-positive and 27 (5%) HIV-negative participants were eligible for secondary prevention. Of HIV-positive individuals 57% at high cardiovascular risk and 42% of HIV-positive individuals eligible for secondary prevention had systolic blood pressures above guideline-recommended thresholds. Cholesterol levels were above guideline-recommended thresholds in 81% of HIV-positive individuals at high cardiovascular risk and 57% of HIV-positive individuals eligible for secondary prevention. No statistically significant differences were observed between HIV-positive and HIV-negative participants regarding achievement of targets, except for glycaemic control (glycated haemoglobin ≤ 53 mmol/mol) among individuals using diabetes medication (90% vs 50%, p = 0.017) and antiplatelet/anticoagulant use for secondary prevention (85% vs 63%, p = 0.045), which were both superior among HIV-positive participants. Conclusions Cardiovascular risk management is suboptimal in both HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals and should be improved.

  11. Suboptimal primary and secondary cardiovascular disease prevention in HIV-positive individuals on antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    van der Valk, Marc; Wit, Ferdinand W; Vaartjes, Ilonca; Kooij, Katherine W; Hovius, Joppe W; Prins, Maria; Reiss, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Background We aimed to identify the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, and investigate preventive cardiovascular medication use and achievement of targets as per Dutch cardiovascular risk management guidelines among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and HIV-negative individuals. Design The design was a cross-sectional analysis within an ongoing cohort study. Methods Data on medication use and cardiovascular disease prevalence were available for 528 HIV-positive and 521 HIV-negative participants. We identified cardiovascular risk factors and applied cardiovascular risk management guidelines, mainly focusing on individuals eligible for (a) primary prevention because of high a priori cardiovascular risk, or for (b) secondary prevention. Results One hundred and three (20%) HIV-positive and 77 (15%) HIV-negative participants were classified as having high cardiovascular risk; 53 (10%) HIV-positive and 27 (5%) HIV-negative participants were eligible for secondary prevention. Of HIV-positive individuals 57% at high cardiovascular risk and 42% of HIV-positive individuals eligible for secondary prevention had systolic blood pressures above guideline-recommended thresholds. Cholesterol levels were above guideline-recommended thresholds in 81% of HIV-positive individuals at high cardiovascular risk and 57% of HIV-positive individuals eligible for secondary prevention. No statistically significant differences were observed between HIV-positive and HIV-negative participants regarding achievement of targets, except for glycaemic control (glycated haemoglobin ≤ 53 mmol/mol) among individuals using diabetes medication (90% vs 50%, p = 0.017) and antiplatelet/anticoagulant use for secondary prevention (85% vs 63%, p = 0.045), which were both superior among HIV-positive participants. Conclusions Cardiovascular risk management is suboptimal in both HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals and should be improved. PMID:28578613

  12. Early detection and prevention of diabetic nephropathy: a challenge calling for mandatory action for Mexico and the developing world.

    PubMed

    Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; González-Michaca, Luis

    2005-09-01

    During the last decades, developing countries have experienced an epidemiologic transition characterized by a reduction of infectious diseases and an increase of chronic degenerative diseases. This situation is generating tormenting public health, financial, and social consequences. Of particular relevance is type 2 diabetes mellitus and its chronic complications, particularly cardiovascular disease and diabetic nephropathy, because mortality of the patient with diabetes is, in most instances, related to these complications. There is a clear need to implement diagnostic and treatment strategies to reduce risk factors for development of diabetes (primary prevention), to detect risk factors of chronic complications in early stages of diabetes (secondary prevention), and to prevent further progression of those that already have renal injury (tertiary prevention). Microalbuminuria is an early marker of renal injury in diabetes, and its early detection can help the timely use of renal preventive measures, which would avoid the extremely high costs of renal replacement treatment for end-stage renal disease as well as that of other cardiovascular complications. Preventive strategies are of very little or no impact, if the primary physician has limited knowledge about the natural history of diabetic nephropathy, the beneficial effect of early preventive maneuvers for delaying its progression, and the social and economic impact of end-stage renal disease. It is therefore imperative to assure in our health systems that general practitioners have the ability and commitment to detect early diabetes complications, in order to promote actions that support regression or retard highly morbid cardiovascular and renal conditions.

  13. Internal Medicine Hospitalists' Perceived Barriers and Recommendations for Optimizing Secondary Prevention of Osteoporotic Hip Fractures.

    PubMed

    Tan, Eng Keong; Loh, Kah Poh; Goff, Sarah L

    2017-12-01

    Osteoporosis is a major public health concern affecting an estimated 10 million people in the United States. To the best of our knowledge, no qualitative study has explored barriers perceived by medicine hospitalists to secondary prevention of osteoporotic hip fractures. We aimed to describe these perceived barriers and recommendations regarding how to optimize secondary prevention of osteoporotic hip fracture. In-depth, semistructured interviews were performed with 15 internal medicine hospitalists in a tertiary-care referral medical center. The interviews were analyzed with directed content analysis. Internal medicine hospitalists consider secondary osteoporotic hip fracture prevention as the responsibility of outpatient physicians. Identified barriers were stratified based on themes including physicians' perception, patients' characteristics, risks and benefits of osteoporosis treatment, healthcare delivery system, and patient care transition from the inpatient to the outpatient setting. Some of the recommendations include building an integrated system that involves a multidisciplinary team such as the fracture liaison service, initiating a change to the hospital policy to facilitate inpatient care and management of osteoporosis, and creating a smooth patient care transition to the outpatient setting. Our study highlighted how internal medicine hospitalists perceive their role in the secondary prevention of osteoporotic hip fractures and what they perceive as barriers to initiating preventive measures in the hospital. Inconsistency in patient care transition and the fragmented nature of the existing healthcare system were identified as major barriers. A fracture liaison service could remove some of these barriers.

  14. Probiotics in early life: a preventative and treatment approach.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Ashkan; Villa, Christopher R; Comelli, Elena M

    2016-04-01

    Microbial colonization of the infant gut plays a key role in immunological and metabolic pathways impacting human health. Since the maturation of the gut microbiota coincides with early life development, failure to develop a health compatible microbiota composition may result in pathology and disease in later life. Probiotics are live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host. Maternal transfer of microorganisms is possible during pregnancy and lactation, and the mother's diet and microbiota can influence that of her offspring. Furthermore, pre-term birth, Caesarean section birth, formula feeding, antibiotic use, and malnutrition have been linked to dysbiosis, which in turn is associated with several pathologies such as necrotizing enterocolitis, inflammatory bowel diseases, antibiotic associated diarrhea, colic, and allergies. Thus, early life should represent a preferred stage of life for probiotic interventions. In this context, they could be regarded as a means to 'program' the individual for health maintenance, in order to prevent pathologies associated with dysbiosis. In order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the benefits of probiotic administration, pre-clinical studies have been conducted and found an array of positive results such as improved microbial composition, intestinal maturation, decreased pathogenic load and infections, and improved immune response. Moreover, specific probiotic strains administered during the perinatal period have shown promise in attenuating severity of necrotizing enterocolitis. The mechanisms elucidated suggest that probiotic interventions in early life can be envisaged for disease prevention in both healthy offspring and offspring at risk of chronic disease.

  15. Early endovascular treatment of superior mesenteric occlusion secondary to thromboemboli.

    PubMed

    Jia, Z; Jiang, G; Tian, F; Zhao, J; Li, S; Wang, K; Wang, Y; Jiang, L; Wang, W

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate our early experience with endovascular revascularization in patients with acute thromboembolic occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). A retrospective review was conducted of all patients who underwent endovascular revascularization for acute thromboembolic SMA occlusion from May 2005 to May 2012. Endovascular revascularization was performed using aspiration, intra-arterial thrombolysis, and adjunctive stent-placement techniques. Laparotomy was performed if the patient developed clinical signs of advanced bowel ischemia after endovascular procedure. Twenty-one patients underwent endovascular revascularization for acute thromboembolic SMA occlusion. All presented with acute-onset abdominal pain. Three patients had rebound tenderness before the procedure. Computed tomography angiography revealed complete occlusion in seven cases and incomplete occlusion in 14 cases, with no evidence of free gas or bowel necrosis. The median duration from onset of symptoms to revascularization was 8.7 ± 4.1 hours (range, 2-18 hours). Completely successful endovascular revascularization occurred in six cases (aspiration alone, 3 cases; combined aspiration and urokinase, 3 cases); partial success was achieved in 15 cases (aspiration alone, 4 cases; combined aspiration and urokinase, 10 cases; and combined aspiration, urokinase, and stent placement, 1 case). Laparotomy was required in five patients, all of whom had SMA main trunk complete occlusion and required small bowel resection. The 30-day mortality for all patients was 9.5%. During a median follow-up of 26 months, 15 patients remained asymptomatic, three patients reported occasional abdominal pain, and one patient had temporary short-bowel syndrome. Percutaneous revascularization is a promising alternative to surgery for acute SMA occlusion in selected patients who have no signs of advanced bowel ischemia. Early diagnosis followed by prompt endovascular intervention with close postprocedural monitoring is

  16. SECONDARY WASTE MANAGEMENT FOR HANFORD EARLY LOW ACTIVITY WASTE VITRIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    UNTERREINER BJ

    2008-07-18

    More than 200 million liters (53 million gallons) of highly radioactive and hazardous waste is stored at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The DOE's Hanford Site River Protection Project (RPP) mission includes tank waste retrieval, waste treatment, waste disposal, and tank farms closure activities. This mission will largely be accomplished by the construction and operation of three large treatment facilities at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP): (1) a Pretreatment (PT) facility intended to separate the tank waste into High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW); (2) a HLW vitrification facilitymore » intended to immobilize the HLW for disposal at a geologic repository in Yucca Mountain; and (3) a LAW vitrification facility intended to immobilize the LAW for shallow land burial at Hanford's Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The LAW facility is on target to be completed in 2014, five years prior to the completion of the rest of the WTP. In order to gain experience in the operation of the LAW vitrification facility, accelerate retrieval from single-shell tank (SST) farms, and hasten the completion of the LAW immobilization, it has been proposed to begin treatment of the low-activity waste five years before the conclusion of the WTP's construction. A challenge with this strategy is that the stream containing the LAW vitrification facility off-gas treatment condensates will not have the option of recycling back to pretreatment, and will instead be treated by the Hanford Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Here the off-gas condensates will be immobilized into a secondary waste form; ETF solid waste.« less

  17. Comparison Of Efficacy Of Phenytoin And Levetiracetam For Prevention Of Early Post Traumatic Seizures.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahbaz Ali; Bhatti, Sajid Nazir; Khan, Aftab Alam; Khan Afridi, Ehtisham Ahmed; Muhammad, Gul; Gul, Nasim; Zadran, Khalid Khan; Alam, Sudhair; Aurangzeb, Ahsan

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of early post-traumatic seizures after civilian traumatic brain injury ranges 4-25%. The control of early post-traumatic seizure is mandatory because these acute insults may add secondary damage to the already damaged brain with poor outcome. Prophylactic use of anti-epileptic drugs have been found to be have variable efficacy against early post-traumatic seizures. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of Phenytion and Levetiracetam in prevention of early post-traumatic seizures in moderate to severe traumatic brain injury. This randomized controlled trial was conducted in department of Neurosurgery, Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad from March, 2012 to March 2013. The patients with moderate to severe head injury were randomly allocated in two groups. Patients in group A were given phenytoin and patients in group B were given Levetiracetam. Patients were followed for one week to detect efficacy of drug in terms of early post traumatic seizures. The 154 patients included in the study were equally divided into two groups. Out of 154 patients 115 (74.7%) were male while 29 (25.3%) were females. Age of patients ranges from 7-48 (24.15±9.56) years. Ninety one (59.1%) patients had moderate head injury while 63 (40.9%) patients had severe head injury. Phenytoin was effective in preventing early post traumatic seizures in 73 (94.8%) patients whereas Levetiracetam effectively controlled seizures in 70 (90.95%) cases (p-value of .348). There is no statistically significant difference in the efficacy of Phenytoin and Levetiracetam in prophylaxis of early posttraumatic seizures in cases of moderate to severe traumatic brain injury.

  18. CRACKDOWN: A Guide to Preventing Substance Abuse Secondary. Citywide Teach-in--September 30.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    This secondary school curriculum guide, the subject of a citywide teach-in in the New York City schools, provides facts, lessons, and learning activities designed to provide information about and to prevent the use of crack, a form of cocaine. The guide covers the facts about crack, the reasons given for using crack, strategies for saying no to…

  19. An Analysis of Family-School Collaboration in Preventing Adolescent Violence in Urban Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, C. J. Gerda; Emslie, Annemarie

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe how school staff members, learners and parents collaborate to prevent adolescent learner violence in two different urban secondary schools. The increase in acts of interpersonal learner violence has a destructive effect on the safe and positive development of young people. Empirical evidence indicates…

  20. Preventing Teen Pregnancy. Secondary Learning Guide 4. Project Connect. Linking Self-Family-Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.

    This competency-based secondary learning guide on preventing teen pregnancy is part of a series that are adaptations of guides developed for adult consumer and homemaking education programs. The guides provide students with experiences that help them learn to do the following: make decisions; use creative approaches to solve problems; establish…

  1. Effect of Dementia on the Use of Drugs for Secondary Prevention of Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Nicole R.; Barnato, Amber E.; Degenholtz, Howard B.; Curcio, Angela M.; Becker, James T.; Kuller, Lewis H.; Lopez, Oscar L.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Dementia and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are frequently comorbid. The presence of dementia may have an effect on how CVD is treated. Objective. To examine the effect of dementia on the use of four medications recommended for secondary prevention of ischemic heart disease (IHD): angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, beta-blockers, lipid-lowering medications, and antiplatelet medications. Design. Retrospective analysis of data from the Cardiovascular Health Study: Cognition Study. Setting and Subjects. 1,087 older adults in four US states who had or developed IHD between 1989 and 1998. Methods. Generalized estimating equations to explore the association between dementia and the use of guideline-recommended medications for the secondary prevention of IHD. Results. The length of follow-up for the cohort was 8.7 years and 265 (24%) had or developed dementia during the study. Use of medications for the secondary prevention of IHD for patients with and without dementia increased during the study period. In models, subjects with dementia were not less likely to use any one particular class of medication but were less likely to use two or more classes of medications as a group (OR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.36–0.99). Conclusions. Subjects with dementia used fewer guideline-recommended medications for the secondary prevention of IHD than those without dementia. PMID:24719764

  2. Early administration of trimetazidine may prevent or ameliorate diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Wenmeng, Wang; Qizhu, Tang

    2011-02-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a type of cardiac dysfunction resulting from diabetes, independent of vascular or valvular pathology. It clinically manifests initially as asymptomatic diastolic dysfunction and then progresses to symptomatic heart failure. Two major contributors to the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy, which are unique to diabetes, are hyperglycemia and diabetes-related alterations in myocardial metabolism. Diabetes mellitus is characterized by reduced glucose and lactate metabolism and enhanced fatty acid metabolism, which are the early consequences of the disease. Studies on the effect of intensive glucose control on heart failure events in patients with diabetes have been conducted with neutral results. However, no study on the effect of metabolic modulators on the prevention of heart failure has been reported. Trimetazidine, a 3-ketoacyl coenzyme A thiolase (3-KAT) inhibitor, shifts cardiac energy metabolism from free fatty acid oxidation to glucose oxidation by inhibiting mitochondrial long-chain 3-KAT, and is used clinically as an effective antianginal agent. Studies have shown that trimetazidine improves heart function in patients with idiopathic cardiomyopathy and in diabetic patients with cardiac ischemia or heart failure. In addition to being effective, trimetazidine has only mild side effects. Therefore, instead of routine administration of trimetazidine for the treatment of diabetic cardiomyopathy, we hypothesize that the early application of trimetazidine may prevent or ameliorate diabetic cardiomyopathy. In addition to life style modifications, ACEI, ARB, and beta-blockers, which have been recommended in the past, trimetazidine should be administered to those patients with impaired glucose tolerance or patients in the early course of diabetes. In this way, we may reduce the prevalence of heart failure and improve the long-term survival of patients with diabetes through early normalization of the myocardial substrate metabolism

  3. HIV, other STD, and pregnancy prevention education in public secondary schools -- 45 states, 2008-2010.

    PubMed

    2012-04-06

    In the United States, 46% of high school students have had sexual intercourse and potentially are at risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and pregnancy. The National HIV/AIDS Strategy for the United States recommends educating young persons about HIV before they begin engaging in behaviors that place them at risk for HIV infection. The Community Preventive Services Task Force (CPSTF) also recommends risk reduction interventions to prevent HIV, other STDs, and pregnancy among adolescents. To estimate changes in the percentage of secondary schools that teach specific HIV, other STD, and pregnancy risk reduction topics, a key intervention consistent with those supported by the National HIV/AIDS Strategy and CPSTF, CDC analyzed 2008 and 2010 School Health Profiles data for public secondary schools in 45 states. This report summarizes the results of those analyses, which indicated that in 2010, compared with 2008, the percentage of secondary schools teaching 11 topics on HIV, other STD, and pregnancy prevention in a required course in grades 6, 7, or 8 was significantly lower in 11 states and significantly higher in none; the percentage of secondary schools teaching eight topics in a required course in grades 9, 10, 11, or 12 was significantly lower in one state and significantly higher in two states; and the percentage of secondary schools teaching three condom-related topics in a required course in grades 9, 10, 11, or 12 was significantly lower in eight states and significantly higher in three states. Secondary schools can increase efforts to teach all age-appropriate HIV, other STD, and pregnancy prevention topics to help reduce risk behaviors among students.

  4. Consensus document for the use of the Polypill in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    González-Juanatey, José Ramón; Mostaza, José María; Lobos, José María; Abarca, Benjamín; Llisterri, José Luis; Baron-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Galve, Enrique; Lidón, Rosa María; Garcia-Moll, Francisco Xavier; Sánchez, Pedro Luis; Suárez, Carmen; Millán, Jesús; Pallares, Vicente; Alemán, José Juan; Egocheaga, Isabel

    2017-02-09

    Cardiovascular disease is a chronic disorder which is usually already at an advanced stage when the first symptoms develop. The fact that the initial clinical presentation can be lethal or highly incapacitating emphasizes the need for primary and secondary prevention. It is estimated that the ratio of patients with good adherence to secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease is low and also decreases gradually over time. The Polypill for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease is the first fixed-dose combination therapy of salicylic acid, atorvastatin and ramipril approved in Spain. The purpose of this consensus document was to define and recommend, through the evidence available in the literature and clinical expert opinion, the impact of treatment adherence in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and the use of the Polypill in daily clinical practice as part of a global strategy including adjustments in patient lifestyle. A RAND/UCLA methodology based on scientific evidence, as well as the collective judgment and clinical expertise of an expert panel was used for this assessment. As a result, a final report of recommendations on the impact of the lack of adherence to treatment of secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and the effect of using a Polypill in adherence of patients was produced. The recommendations included in this document have been addressed to all those specialists, cardiologists, internists and primary care physicians with competence in prescribing and monitoring patients with high and very high cardiovascular risks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Optimising secondary prevention in the acute period following a TIA of ischaemic origin.

    PubMed

    Heron, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs) are highly prevalent conditions, with at least 46 000 people per year in the UK having a TIA for the first time. TIAs are a warning that the patient is at risk of further vascular events and the 90-day risk of vascular events following a TIA, excluding events within the first week after diagnosis when the risk is highest, can be as high as 18%. Immediate assessment of patients with TIA, either at accident and emergency, general practice and/or TIA clinics, is therefore required to address secondary prevention and prevent further vascular events. This article addresses the need for optimising secondary prevention in the acute period following a TIA of ischaemic origin to reduce the risk of further vascular events as per recent Cochrane review advice and presents a novel project, Stroke Prevention Rehabilitation Intervention Trial of Exercise (SPRITE), to do this. One novel way to tackle vascular risk factors and promote secondary prevention in patients with TIA could be to adapt a cardiac rehabilitation programme for these patients. SPRITE, a feasibility and pilot study (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02712385) funded by the National Institute for Health Research, is attempting to adapt a home-based cardiac rehabilitation programme, 'The Healthy Brain Rehabilitation Manual', for use in the acute period following a TIA. The use of cardiac rehabilitation programmes post-TIA requires further research, particularly within the primary care setting.

  6. Physical activity in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease: Overview updated.

    PubMed

    Alves, Alberto J; Viana, João L; Cavalcante, Suiane L; Oliveira, Nórton L; Duarte, José A; Mota, Jorge; Oliveira, José; Ribeiro, Fernando

    2016-10-26

    Although the observed progress in the cardiovascular disease treatment, the incidence of new and recurrent coronary artery disease remains elevated and constitutes the leading cause of death in the developed countries. Three-quarters of deaths due to cardiovascular diseases could be prevented with adequate changes in lifestyle, including increased daily physical activity. New evidence confirms that there is an inverse dose-response relationship between physical activity and cardiovascular disease and mortality risk. However, participation in moderate to vigorous physical activity may not fully attenuate the independent effect of sedentary activities on increased risk for cardiovascular diseases. Physical activity also plays an important role in secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases by reducing the impact of the disease, slowing its progress and preventing recurrence. Nonetheless, most of eligible cardiovascular patients still do not benefit from secondary prevention/cardiac rehabilitation programs. The present review draws attention to the importance of physical activity in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. It also addresses the mechanisms by which physical activity and regular exercise can improve cardiovascular health and reduce the burden of the disease.

  7. Intravenous calcitriol therapy in an early stage prevents parathyroid gland growth

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Masatomo; Tokumoto, Masanori; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Hirakata, Hideki; Iida, Mitsuo

    2008-01-01

    Background. Both the phenotypic alterations of parathyroid (PT) cells, e.g. down-regulation of the calcium-sensing receptor, and the increase of the PT cell number in nodular hyperplasia are the main causes of refractory secondary hyperparathyroidism. It is of great importance to prevent PT growth in an early stage. Methods. To examine a more effective method of calcitriol therapy for the prevention of PT hyperplasia, we randomized haemodialysis patients with mild hyperparathyroidism to receive either daily orally administered calcitriol (n = 33) or intravenous calcitriol (n = 27) over a 12-month study period. Calcitriol was modulated so as to keep the serum intact PTH level between 100 and 150 pg/ml. Results. Both groups showed similar reductions of the serum PTH level and similar increases in serum calcium. In both groups, there were no significant changes in the serum phosphate level. Long-term daily oral calcitriol therapy failed to prevent the increase of both maximum PT volume and total volume, as assessed by ultrasonography; however, intravenous calcitriol therapy successfully suppressed this progression. In the daily, oral group, both the bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP) and the N-telopeptide cross-linked of type I collagen (NTX) significantly decreased, which was probably due to the PTH suppression. However, these bone metabolism markers remained stable in the intravenous group. The total dosage of calcitriol during the study was comparable in both groups. Conclusions. These data indicate that intravenous calcitriol therapy in an early stage of secondary hyperparathyroidism is necessary to prevent PT growth and to keep a good condition of bone metabolism. PMID:18515308

  8. Mobile phone text messaging for improving secondary prevention in cardiovascular diseases: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Unal, Eda; Giakoumidakis, Konstantinos; Khan, Ehsan; Patelarou, Evridiki

    2018-05-23

    The aim of this study was to identify, retrieve, critically appraise and synthesize the existing mobile phone text messaging interventions that have been done for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD). A systematic review was conducted. The searching was conducted by using the MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO, CINAHL, PubMed and ScienceDirect databases. Nine randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were eligible and included. The preventive factors measured among studies varied. While the majority of studies examined medication adherence as a main outcome (4), the other 3 studies focused of CVD risk factors combining blood pressure (BP), smoking, body mass index (BMI), physical activity and dietary habits, only 2 studies examined both medication adherence and risk factor modification of CVD. Even though mobile phone text messaging may be beneficial for the secondary prevention of CVD, reliable conclusions on the effects of text messaging cannot be drawn. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Primary and Secondary Prevention Trials in Alzheimer Disease: Looking Back, Moving Forward

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, David C.; Marshall, Gad A.

    2015-01-01

    The field of Alzheimer disease (AD) prevention has been a culmination of basic science, clinical, and translational research. In the past three years since the new 2011 AD diagnostic guidelines, large-scale collaborative efforts have embarked on new clinical trials with the hope of someday preventing AD. This review will shed light on the historical and scientific contexts in which these trials were based on, as well as discuss potential challenges these trials may face in the coming years. Primary preventive measures, such as lifestyle, multidomain, medication, and supplemental interventions, will be analyzed. Secondary prevention as represented by disease-modifying interventions, such as anti-amyloid therapy and pioglitazone, will also be reviewed. Finally, hypotheses on future directions for AD prevention trials will be proposed. PMID:27697063

  10. Blood transfusion for preventing primary and secondary stroke in people with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Estcourt, Lise J; Fortin, Patricia M; Hopewell, Sally; Trivella, Marialena; Wang, Winfred C

    2017-01-17

    Sickle cell disease is one of the commonest severe monogenic disorders in the world, due to the inheritance of two abnormal haemoglobin (beta globin) genes. Sickle cell disease can cause severe pain, significant end-organ damage, pulmonary complications, and premature death. Stroke affects around 10% of children with sickle cell anaemia (HbSS). Chronic blood transfusions may reduce the risk of vaso-occlusion and stroke by diluting the proportion of sickled cells in the circulation.This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2002, and last updated in 2013. To assess risks and benefits of chronic blood transfusion regimens in people with sickle cell disease for primary and secondary stroke prevention (excluding silent cerebral infarcts). We searched for relevant trials in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1980), and ongoing trial databases; all searches current to 04 April 2016.We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register: 25 April 2016. Randomised controlled trials comparing red blood cell transfusions as prophylaxis for stroke in people with sickle cell disease to alternative or standard treatment. There were no restrictions by outcomes examined, language or publication status. Two authors independently assessed trial eligibility and the risk of bias and extracted data. We included five trials (660 participants) published between 1998 and 2016. Four of these trials were terminated early. The vast majority of participants had the haemoglobin (Hb)SS form of sickle cell disease.Three trials compared regular red cell transfusions to standard care in primary prevention of stroke: two in children with no previous long-term transfusions; and one in children and adolescents on long-term transfusion.Two trials compared the drug hydroxyurea (hydroxycarbamide) and phlebotomy to long-term transfusions and iron chelation therapy: one in

  11. Blood transfusion for preventing primary and secondary stroke in people with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Fortin, Patricia M; Hopewell, Sally; Trivella, Marialena; Wang, Winfred C

    2017-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease is one of the commonest severe monogenic disorders in the world, due to the inheritance of two abnormal haemoglobin (beta globin) genes. Sickle cell disease can cause severe pain, significant end-organ damage, pulmonary complications, and premature death. Stroke affects around 10% of children with sickle cell anaemia (HbSS). Chronic blood transfusions may reduce the risk of vaso-occlusion and stroke by diluting the proportion of sickled cells in the circulation. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2002, and last updated in 2013. Objectives To assess risks and benefits of chronic blood transfusion regimens in people with sickle cell disease for primary and secondary stroke prevention (excluding silent cerebral infarcts). Search methods We searched for relevant trials in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1980), and ongoing trial databases; all searches current to 04 April 2016. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register: 25 April 2016. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials comparing red blood cell transfusions as prophylaxis for stroke in people with sickle cell disease to alternative or standard treatment. There were no restrictions by outcomes examined, language or publication status. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed trial eligibility and the risk of bias and extracted data. Main results We included five trials (660 participants) published between 1998 and 2016. Four of these trials were terminated early. The vast majority of participants had the haemoglobin (Hb)SS form of sickle cell disease. Three trials compared regular red cell transfusions to standard care in primary prevention of stroke: two in children with no previous long-term transfusions; and one in children and adolescents on long-term transfusion. Two trials compared the drug

  12. A Guide for Dropout Prevention. Creating an Integrated Learning Environment in Secondary Schools. Dropout Prevention Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fennimore, Todd F.

    This guide explores ways that schools can put the idea of integrating educational and community support for dropout prevention to work in the school and community. Part 1, "Implementing a Plan for Restructuring the School," recommends the formation of a task force to involve the community and school staff from the start. It also describes the…

  13. Perioperative Acute Kidney Injury: Prevention, Early Recognition, and Supportive Measures.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, Stefano; Ricci, Zaccaria; Ronco, Claudio

    2018-06-26

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication of both cardiac and major non-cardiac surgery. AKI is independently associated with morbidity, mortality, and long-term adverse events including chronic kidney disease in postsurgical patients. Since specific treatment options for kidney failure are very limited, early identification, diagnosis, and renal support strategies are key steps to improve patients' outcome. According to current Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guidelines, AKI diagnosis is based on 2 functional markers, serum creatinine increase and urine output decrease, that are not renal-specific and have important limitations. However, preoperative risk stratification for postoperative AKI and/or early diagnosis after surgery could be the best way to apply preventive or timely supportive therapeutic measures. Clinical prediction scores, renal functional reserve assessment, and new biomarkers of kidney stress (suppression of tumorigenicity-2, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-7, tissue inhibitor metalloproteinase-2) may help the clinicians to identify patients at risk of AKI and that could benefit from the application of nephroprotective bundles suggested by the KDIGO guidelines. In severe AKI patients with oligoanuria and fluid accumulation, renal replacement therapy is the only supportive measure even if mode and timing remain open to investigation. Key messages: Perioperative AKI is an important and underdiagnosed complication. Identifying patients at high risk of AKI and diagnosing AKI early are major goals. Preventive interventions are mainly based on the KDIGO guidelines and bundles. Furthermore, a personalized multidisciplinary approach should always be considered to minimize the progression of disease and the complications related to kidney damage. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. The effects of a three-year smoking prevention programme in secondary schools in Helsinki.

    PubMed

    Vartiainen, Erkki; Pennanen, Marjaana; Haukkala, Ari; Dijk, Froukje; Lehtovuori, Riku; De Vries, Hein

    2007-06-01

    This study evaluates the effects of a 3-year smoking prevention programme in secondary schools in Helsinki. The study is part of the European Smoking prevention Framework Approach (ESFA), in which Denmark, Finland, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain and the UK participated. A total of 27 secondary schools in Finland participated in the programme (n = 1821). Schools were randomised into experimental (13) and control groups (14). The programme included 14 information lessons about smoking and refusal skills training. The 3-year smoking prevention programme was also integrated into the standard curriculum. The community-element of the programme included parents, parish confirmation camps and dentists. The schools in the experimental group received the prevention programme and the schools in the control group received the standard health education curriculum. Among baseline never smokers (60.8%), the programme had a significant effect on the onset of weekly smoking in the experimental group [OR = 0.63 (0.45-0.90) P = 0.009] when compared with the control group. Being female, doing poorly at school, having parents and best friends who smoke and more pocket money to spend compared with others were associated with an increased likelihood of daily and weekly smoking onset. These predictors did not have an interaction effect with the experimental condition. This study shows that a school- and community-based smoking prevention programme can prevent smoking onset among adolescents.

  15. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator implantation for primary and secondary prevention: indications and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pick, Justin M; Batra, Anjan S

    2017-01-01

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators effectively reduce the rate of sudden cardiac death in children. Significant efforts have been made to better characterise the indications for their placement, and over the past two decades there has been a shift in their use from secondary to primary prevention. Primary prevention includes placement in patients thought to be at high risk of sudden cardiac death before the patient experiences any event. Secondary prevention includes placement after a high-risk event including sustained ventricular tachycardia or resuscitated cardiac arrest. Although liberal device implantation may be appealing even in patients having marginal indications, studies have shown high rates of adverse effects including inappropriate device discharges and the need for re-intervention because of hardware malfunction. The indications for placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, whether for primary or secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death, vary based on cardiac pathology. This review will assist the provider in understanding the risks and benefits of device implantation in order to enhance the shared decision-making capacity of patients, families, and providers.

  16. Pre-Exercise Screening and Health Coaching in CHD Secondary Prevention: A Qualitative Study of the Patient Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, R.; Gillies, M.; Barber, J.; MacIntyre, K.; Harkins, C.; Findlay, I. N.; McCloy, K.; Gillie, A.; Scoular, A.; MacIntyre, P. D.

    2012-01-01

    Secondary prevention programmes can be effective in reducing morbidity and mortality from coronary heart disease (CHD). In particular, UK guidelines, including those from the Department of Health, emphasize physical activity. However, the effects of secondary prevention programmes with an exercise component are moderate and uptake is highly…

  17. Long-term secondary prevention of acute myocardial infarction (SEPAT) - guidelines adherence and outcome.

    PubMed

    Ergatoudes, Constantinos; Thunström, Erik; Rosengren, Annika; Björck, Lena; Bengtsson Boström, Kristina; Falk, Kristin; Fu, Michael

    2016-11-17

    A number of registry studies have reported suboptimal adherence to guidelines for cardiovascular prevention during the first year after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, only a few studies have addressed long-term secondary prevention after AMI. This study evaluates prevention guideline adherence and outcome of guideline-directed secondary prevention in patients surviving 2 years after AMI. Patients aged 18-85 years at the time of their index AMI were consecutively identified from hospital discharge records between July 2010 and December 2011 in Gothenburg, Sweden. All patients who agreed to participate in the study (16.2%) were invited for a structured interview, physical examinations and laboratory analysis 2 years after AMI. Guideline-directed secondary preventive goals were defined as optimally controlled blood pressure, serum cholesterol, glucose, regular physical activity, smoking cessation and pharmacological treatment. The mean age of the study cohort (n = 200) at the index AMI was 63.0 ± 9.7 years, 79% were men. Only 3.5% of the cohort achieved all six guideline-directed secondary preventive goals 2 years after infarction. LDL < 1.8 mmol/L was achieved in 18.5% of the cohort, regular exercise in 45.5% and systolic blood pressure <140 mmHg in 57.0%. Anti-platelet therapy was used by 97% of the patients, beta-blockers by 83.0%, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers by 76.5% and statins by 88.5%. During follow-up, non-fatal adverse cardiovascular events (cardiac hospitalization, recurrent acute coronary syndrome, angina pectoris, new percutaneous coronary intervention, new onset of atrial fibrillation, post-infarct heart failure, pacemaker implantation, stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA), cardiac surgery and cardiac arrest) occurred in 47% of the cohort and readmission due to cardiac causes in 30%. Our data showed the failure of secondary prevention in our daily clinical practice and high rate

  18. Secondary prevention at 360°: the important role of diagnostic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ciarrapico, Anna Micaela; Manenti, Guglielmo; Pistolese, Chiara; Fabiano, Sebastiano; Fiori, Roberto; Romagnoli, Andrea; Sergiacomi, Gianluigi; Stefanini, Matteo; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to underline the importance of the role of general practitioners (GPs) in distributing vital information about prevention to citizens, to highlight the importance of the so-called voluntary prevention programmes, both for conditions for which no organised screening programmes exist and for those for which they do exist but may well be obsolete or inefficient. Nowadays, voluntary prevention is made more effective thanks to the new sophisticated diagnostic technologies applied worldwide by diagnostic imaging. Epidemiological data about the incidence and causes of death among the Italian population have shown that screening programmes should be aimed first at fighting the following diseases: prostatic carcinoma, lung cancer, colorectal carcinoma, breast cancer, cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, aortic and peripheral vascular disease. GPs do not generally give good or adequate instructions concerning voluntary prevention programmes; GPs may not even be aware of this type of prevention which could represent a valuable option together with the existing mass screening programmes. Therefore, in the following analysis, we aim to outline the correct diagnostic pathway for the prevention of diseases having the highest incidence in our country and which represent the most frequent causes of death. If used correctly, these screening programmes may contribute to the success of secondary prevention, limiting the use of tertiary prevention and thus producing savings for the Italian National Health System.

  19. Health Literacy: Cancer Prevention Strategies for Early Adults.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Robert A; Cosgrove, Susan C; Romney, Martha C; Plumb, James D; Brawer, Rickie O; Gonzalez, Evelyn T; Fleisher, Linda G; Moore, Bradley S

    2017-09-01

    Health literacy, the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand health information and services needed to make health decisions, is an essential element for early adults (aged 18-44 years) to make informed decisions about cancer. Low health literacy is one of the social determinants of health associated with cancer-related disparities. Over the past several years, a nonprofit organization, a university, and a cancer center in a major urban environment have developed and implemented health literacy programs within healthcare systems and in the community. Health system personnel received extensive health literacy training to reduce medical jargon and improve their patient education using plain language easy-to-understand written materials and teach-back, and also designed plain language written materials including visuals to provide more culturally and linguistically appropriate health education and enhance web-based information. Several sustainable health system policy changes occurred over time. At the community level, organizational assessments and peer leader training on health literacy have occurred to reduce communication barriers between consumers and providers. Some of these programs have been cancer specific, including consumer education in such areas as cervical cancer, skin cancer, and breast cancer that are targeted to early adults across the cancer spectrum from prevention to treatment to survivorship. An example of consumer-driven health education that was tested for health literacy using a comic book-style photonovel on breast cancer with an intergenerational family approach for Chinese Americans is provided. Key lessons learned from the health literacy initiatives and overall conclusions of the health literacy initiatives are also summarized. Copyright © 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Primary and secondary coronary heart disease prevention using statins: is targeting Adam or Eve equally effective?

    PubMed

    Kakafika, Anna I; Athyros, Vasilios G; Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Karagiannis, Asterios; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2008-06-01

    Women differ from men in terms of their cardiovascular disease risk. The existing data suggest that primary cardiovascular disease prevention treatment with a statin could be cost effective for women and men with a high cardiovascular disease risk. In secondary cardiovascular disease prevention both men and women seem to benefit equally from statin treatment. However, the relatively small number of women included in several statin trials has limited the evidence available. With regard to the question of whether Eve is becoming Adam, the answer is not yet: we need more evidence!

  1. [Primary and secondary prevention procedures of temporo-mandibular joint disease in the evolutive age].

    PubMed

    Ciavarella, D; Mastrovincenzo, M; Sabatucci, A; Campisi, G; Di Cosola, M; Suriano, M; Lo Muzio, L

    2009-02-01

    In the last years prevention of temporomandiboular joint (TMJ) disease had acquired great importance. According to the neuro-occlusal rehabilitation (RNO) it is possible to say that TMJ disease starts since first years of life. So it is important both for dentist and for pediatric know what are the conditions and the atypical functions which predispose to this pathology. The aim of this work was to show how it is possible to intercept since primary teeth and the correct norms of primary and secondary prevention.

  2. Gender roles, physical and sexual violence prevention in primary extend to secondary school in Samutsakorn Province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chamroonsawasdi, Kanittha; Suparp, Jarueyporn; Kittipichai, Wirin; Khajornchaikul, Piyathida

    2010-03-01

    To enhance positive attitude and life skills on gender roles to prevent physical and sexual violence. A whole school-based participatory learning program using a quasi-experimental study with pre and post test design was conducted among 2 schools during June-September, 2005. The experimental group, were 134 students in a primary school and 179 students in a secondary school. While the control group, were 122 students in a primary school and 95 students in a secondary school. Means score of attitude toward gender roles before implementation in the experimental group was significantly lower than the control group (p < 0.05). After implementation, the means score in the experimental group was not significantly different from the control group (p > 0.05). Means paired different score (after-before) between the two groups was significantly different (p = 0.002). A whole school-based program on gender roles and violence prevention is suitable for youths and should be merged as school curricula and expanded as a nationwide program at all level of education. Gender equity should be taught at an early childhood. Parental involvement in school-based activities should be negotiated.

  3. Early Childhood Caries: Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Anil, Sukumaran; Anand, Pradeep S.

    2017-01-01

    Early childhood caries (ECC) is major oral health problem, mainly in socially disadvantaged populations. ECC affects infants and preschool children worldwide. The prevalence of ECC differs according to the group examined, and a prevalence of up to 85% has been reported for disadvantaged groups. ECC is the presence of one or more decayed, missing, or filled primary teeth in children aged 71 months (5 years) or younger. It begins with white-spot lesions in the upper primary incisors along the margin of the gingiva. If the disease continues, caries can progress, leading to complete destruction of the crown. The main risk factors in the development of ECC can be categorized as microbiological, dietary, and environmental risk factors. Even though it is largely a preventable condition, ECC remains one of the most common childhood diseases. The major contributing factors for the for the high prevalence of ECC are improper feeding practices, familial socioeconomic background, lack of parental education, and lack of access to dental care. Oral health plays an important role in children to maintain the oral functions and is required for eating, speech development, and a positive self-image. The review will focus on the prevalence, risk factors, and preventive strategies and the management of ECC. PMID:28770188

  4. Economic Evaluation of Lipid-Lowering Therapy in the Secondary Prevention Setting in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Tumanan-Mendoza, Bernadette A; Mendoza, Victor L

    2013-05-01

    To determine the cost-effectiveness of lipid-lowering therapy in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular events in the Philippines. A cost-utility analysis was performed by using Markov modeling in the secondary prevention setting. The models incorporated efficacy of lipid-lowering therapy demonstrated in randomized controlled trials and mortality rates obtained from local life tables. Average and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were obtained for simvastatin, atorvastatin, pravastatin, and gemfibrozil. The costs of the following were included: medications, laboratory examinations, consultation and related expenses, and production losses. The costs were expressed in current or nominal prices as of the first quarter of 2010 (Philippine peso). Utility was expressed in quality-adjusted life-years gained. Sensitivity analyses were performed by using variations in the cost centers, discount rates, starting age, and differences in utility weights for stroke. In the analysis using the lower-priced generic counterparts, therapy using 40 mg simvastatin daily was the most cost-effective option compared with the other therapies, while pravastatin 40 mg daily was the most cost-effective alternative if the higher-priced innovator drugs were used. In all sensitivity analyses, gemfibrozil was strongly dominated by the statins. In secondary prevention, simvastatin or pravastatin were the most cost-effective options compared with atorvastatin and gemfibrozil in the Philippines. Gemfibrozil was strongly dominated by the statins. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Long-term behavioral outcomes after attendance at a secondary prevention clinic for cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Worcester, Marian Una Christine; Stojcevski, Zlatko; Murphy, Barbara; Goble, Alan James

    2003-01-01

    Secondary prevention interventions, including hospital clinics, can help patients improve their risk factors and lifestyles after an acute cardiac event. This study aimed to investigate the long-term behavioral outcomes of attending and nonattending patients consecutively enrolled in a trial of a family-based clinic providing screening, advice, and support 3 months after hospital admission. The study also aimed to identify predictors of long-term smoking status, dietary habit, and physical activity. Semistructured interviews were conducted an average of 30 months after the acute cardiac event with 83 of the 103 nonattending patients and a random sample of 96 patients who had attended the clinic. Behavioral outcomes were investigated, and self-reported risk factors at the time of the acute illness were documented. The patients who had attended the clinic were significantly more likely than nonattenders to report positive dietary changes and, among former smokers, successful cessation of smoking. Furthermore, they reported being more physically active than nonattenders. Using logistic regression, clinic attendance was identified as a significant and independent predictor of all three outcomes. The results of this observational study suggest that attendance at a secondary prevention clinic facilitates maintenance of improved long-term health behaviors, although this finding is based on self-report. Factors possibly responsible for favorable outcomes include strong physician advice and support from a multidisciplinary team of health professionals. Furthermore, the timing of the intervention may have been appropriate for enrollment in a secondary prevention clinic.

  6. A systematic review of the effectiveness of secondary prevention lifestyle interventions designed to change lifestyle behaviour following stroke.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Maggie; Kerr, Susan; McVey, Ms Caroline; Godwin, Jon

    Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument, and extracted data using a review-specific data extraction form.Data analysis Where possible, results from the review papers were pooled in statistical meta-analysis using bespoke software based on the system used by the Early Breast Cancer Trialists Collaborative Group. Where statistical pooling was not possible, findings are presented in narrative form.Results Three studies, two RCTs and one quasi-experimental study, involving 581 participants (baseline) were included in the review. Two models of service delivery were reported: shared care and nurse-led. Interventions were delivered to groups or in one-to-one consultations.Meta-analyses of the pooled lifestyle data favoured the interventions (2p=0.02; Note: here and throughout, 2p represents the two-tailed probability). In terms of physiological outcomes, the pooled data favoured the interventions (2p=0.05), particularly those aiming to reduce blood pressure and cholesterol levels. The pooled secondary outcomes, including perceived health status and stroke knowledge favoured the interventions (2p<0.00001), however, the test for heterogeneity was also highly significant.Conclusions Stroke secondary prevention lifestyle interventions are effective in terms of affecting positive change in relation to lifestyle behaviours, physiological and secondary outcomes. However, there was insufficient evidence to determine the effect of intervention on incidence of stroke recurrence.Implications for practice Clinicians should implement stroke secondary prevention interventions which address lifestyle behaviours, physiological factors, psychological outcomes and stroke knowledge.Implications for research Further large-scale, well-designed trials are needed to determine the factors that impact on the effectiveness of secondary prevention interventions.

  7. Optimizing secondary prevention of cervical cancer: Recent advances and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Ogilvie, Gina; Nakisige, Carolyn; Huh, Warner K; Mehrotra, Ravi; Franco, Eduardo L; Jeronimo, Jose

    2017-07-01

    Although human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines offer enormous promise for the ultimate control and possible elimination of cervical cancer, barriers to uptake and coverage of the vaccine both in high- and low/middle-income settings mean that advances in secondary prevention continue to be essential to prevent unnecessary deaths and suffering from cervical cancer for decades to come. While cytology (the Pap smear) has reduced cervical cancer incidence and prevalence in jurisdictions where it has been systematically implemented in population-based programs-mainly in high-income settings-limitations inherent to this method, and to program delivery, leave many women still vulnerable to cervical cancer. Recent evidence has confirmed that screening based on HPV testing prevents more invasive cervical cancer and precancerous lesions, and offers innovative options such as self-collection of specimens to improve screening uptake broadly. In this paper, we review key advances, future opportunities, and ongoing challenges for secondary prevention of cervical cancer using HPV-based testing. © 2017 The Authors. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  8. Risk factors for secondary substance use disorders in people with childhood and adolescent-onset bipolar disorder: opportunities for prevention.

    PubMed

    Kenneson, Aileen; Funderburk, Jennifer S; Maisto, Stephen A

    2013-07-01

    Compared to other mental illnesses, bipolar disorder is associated with a disproportionately high rate of substance use disorders (SUDs), and the co-occurrence is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis of primary bipolar disorder may provide opportunities for SUD prevention, but little is known about the risk factors for secondary SUD among individuals with bipolar disorder. The purposes of this study were to describe the population of people with childhood and adolescent-onset primary bipolar disorder, and to identify risk factors for secondary SUD in this population. Using data collected from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication study, we identified 158 individuals with childhood-onset (<13 years) or adolescent-onset (13-18 years) primary bipolar disorder (I, II or subthreshold). Survival analysis was used to identify risk factors for SUD. Compared to adolescent-onset, people with childhood-onset bipolar disorder had increased likelihoods of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (adjusted odds ratio=2.81) and suicide attempt (aOR=3.61). Males were more likely than females to develop SUD, and did so at a faster rate. Hazard ratios of risk factors for SUD were: lifetime oppositional defiant disorder (2.048), any lifetime anxiety disorder (3.077), adolescent-onset bipolar disorder (1.653), and suicide attempt (15.424). SUD was not predicted by bipolar disorder type, family history of bipolar disorder, hospitalization for a mood episode, ADHD or conduct disorder. As clinicians struggle to help individuals with bipolar disorder, this study provides information that might be useful in identifying individuals at higher risk for SUD. Future research can examine whether targeting these risk factors may help prevent secondary SUD. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Supporting and Inhibiting the Well-Being of Early Career Secondary School Teachers: Extending Self-Determination Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Andrew J.; Maxwell, Bronwen

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports an original examination of the well-being of early career secondary school teachers in England, which extends the evidence bases relating to early career teachers' working lives, teacher well-being, self-determination theory and performativity, respectively. Drawing on a secondary analysis of qualitative data generated for four…

  10. [Factors associated with secondary breast cancer prevention in Maringá, Paraná State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Matos, Jéssica Carvalho de; Pelloso, Sandra Marisa; Carvalho, Maria Dalva de Barros

    2011-05-01

    This study analyzed the prevalence of secondary breast cancer prevention and associated factors in women 40 to 69 years of age in Maringá, Paraná State, Brazil. Prevalence was 64.5% for breast self-examination, 71.5% for clinical examination, and 79% for mammography. The data suggest that age, schooling, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, religion, and prior hormone replacement therapy influenced the rates of the three types of examination. Preventive practices were significantly more common among women of higher socioeconomic status. Proper orientation and performance of preventive measures and tests should be at the reach of all women in the highest-risk age bracket, thereby decreasing late diagnosis and avoidable deaths and increasing the odds of curing breast cancer.

  11. Transdermal Nitroglycerin Therapy May Not Prevent Early Postmenopausal Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Wimalawansa, Sunil J.; Grimes, Julia P.; Wilson, Alan C.; Hoover, Donald R.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Osteoporosis is common among postmenopausal women; animal studies and human pilot studies support the concept of nitric oxide (NO) donors reducing bone mineral density loss. Objective: The objective of the study was to evaluate whether NO donor, nitroglycerin, prevents postmenopausal bone loss. Design: This was a 3-yr randomized, double blinded, single-center, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Setting: The single-center study was conducted at the University of Medicine and Dentistry-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School (New Brunswick, NJ). Participants: Participants included 186 postmenopausal women aged 40–65 yr, with lumbar bone mineral density (BMD) T-scores of 0 to −2.5. Intervention: Women, stratified by lumbar T-score (<−1.50 and ≥−1.50) and years since menopause (≤5 and >5 yr), were randomized to receive nitroglycerin ointment (22.5 mg as Nitro-Bid) or placebo ointment received daily for 3 yr. Both groups took 630 mg daily calcium plus 400 IU vitamin D supplements. Measurements: BMD was measured at 6 months and annually by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Percent change in lumbar vertebrae BMD was the primary outcome. Hip BMD, total body bone mineral content, and height were secondary outcomes. Results: After 36 months of therapy, changes of −2.1% in the active group (n = 88) and −2.5% in the placebo group (n = 82) in lumbar spine BMD were seen (P = 0.59; 95% confidence interval −1.001, 1.975). Secondary outcomes also did not differ by intervention arm. The active group reported more headaches compared with the placebo group (57 vs. 14%, P < 0.001). Other adverse and serious adverse events were not different. Conclusions: BMD changes did not substantially differ between postmenopausal women who received the dose of nitroglycerin tested, in comparison with a placebo. Once-daily dosing with 22.5 mg of transdermal-administered nitroglycerin was not effective (compliance adjusted dose was only ∼16 mg/d); a sub-therapeutic dose. PMID

  12. Economic evaluation of osteoporosis liaison service for secondary fracture prevention in postmenopausal osteoporosis patients with previous hip fracture in Japan.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, K; Noto, S

    2017-02-01

    A model-based cost-effectiveness analysis was performed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of secondary fracture prevention by osteoporosis liaison service (OLS) relative to no therapy in patients with osteoporosis and a history of hip fracture. Secondary fracture prevention by OLS is cost-effective in Japanese women with osteoporosis who have suffered a hip fracture. The purpose of this study was to estimate, from the perspective of Japan's healthcare system, the cost-effectiveness of secondary fracture prevention by OLS relative to no therapy in patients with osteoporosis and a history of hip fracture. A patient-level state transition model was developed to predict lifetime costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) in patients with or without secondary fracture prevention by OLS. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of secondary fracture prevention compared with no therapy was estimated. Sensitivity analyses were performed to examine the influence of parameter uncertainty on the base case results. Compared with no therapy, secondary fracture prevention in patients aged 65 with T-score of -2.5 resulted in an additional lifetime cost of $3396 per person and conferred an additional 0.118 QALY, resulting in an ICER of $28,880 per QALY gained. Deterministic sensitivity analyses showed that treatment duration and offset time strongly affect the cost-effectiveness of OLS. According to the results of scenario analyses, secondary fracture prevention by OLS was cost-saving compared with no therapy in patients with a family history of hip fracture and high alcohol intake. Secondary fracture prevention by OLS is cost-effective in Japanese women with osteoporosis who have suffered a hip fracture. In addition, secondary fracture prevention is less expensive than no therapy in high-risk patients with multiple risk factors.

  13. Efficacy and safety of biosimilar filgrastim in primary and secondary prevention of febrile neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Kraj, Leszek; Krawczyk-Lipiec, Joanna; Górniewska, Joanna; Orlik, Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    Neutropenia and febrile neutropenia (FN) are among the most common side effects/complications of chemotherapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the practice of the use of biosimilar filgrastim in the primary and secondary prevention of FN, and assess its efficacy and safety. A multi-center, non-interventional epidemiological study of 170 cancer patients aged 23–82 years was conducted. Data were collected via a questionnaire completed based on medical documentation and patient examination over five chemotherapy visits. The risk of FN related to the chemotherapy protocol used was in the range of 10–20% in >50% of the patients (53.5%) and a majority (74.7%) had additional FN risk factors. 60% of the patients received filgrastim as primary prevention of FN, and 40% received it as secondary prevention. In 40.6% of cases, six cycles of chemotherapy were used. More than 90% of patients continued chemotherapy according to the initial recommended dose. In majority of patients, no FN was observed following the final cycle of chemotherapy. Median neutrophil count at visit 1 was 2.2×103/µl and did not fall below that level. Majority of patients (>70%) performed self-injections of filgrastim, and 86.3% of patients were continuing therapy with this drug at the last visit. No treatment-related side effects were recorded. The use of biosimilar filgrastim in the primary and secondary prevention of FN allows to maintain initial chemotherapy dosage. Furthermore, the use of biosimilar filgrastim is safe and tolerable, and has a high acceptance by patients. PMID:28804626

  14. Preventing growth in amphetamine use: long-term effects of the Midwestern Prevention Project (MPP) from early adolescence to early adulthood.

    PubMed

    Riggs, Nathaniel R; Chou, Chih-Ping; Pentz, Mary Ann

    2009-10-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine the long-term effect of an early adolescent substance abuse prevention program on trajectories and initiation of amphetamine use into early adulthood. Eight middle schools were assigned randomly to a program or control condition. The randomized controlled trial followed participants through 15 waves of data, from ages 11-28 years. This longitudinal study design includes four separate periods of development from early adolescence to early adulthood. The intervention took place in middle schools. A total of 1002 adolescents from one large mid-western US city were the participants in the study. The intervention was a multi-component community-based program delivered in early adolescence with a primary emphasis on tobacco, alcohol and marijuana use. At each wave of data collection participants completed a self-report survey that included questions about life-time amphetamine use. Compared to a control group, participants in the Midwestern Prevention Project (MPP) intervention condition had reduced growth (slope) in amphetamine use in emerging adulthood, a lower amphetamine use intercept at the commencement of the early adulthood and delayed amphetamine use initiation. The pattern of results suggests that the program worked first to prevent amphetamine use, and then to maintain the preventive effect into adulthood. Study findings suggest that early adolescent substance use prevention programs that focus initially on the 'gateway' drugs have utility for long-term prevention of amphetamine use. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  15. To examine the effectiveness of a hospital-based nurse-led secondary prevention clinic.

    PubMed

    Mainie, Paula M; Moore, Gillian; Riddell, John W; Adgey, A A Jennifer

    2005-12-01

    Modification of cardiovascular risk factors can reduce the incidence of myocardial infarction (MI), effectively extend survival, decrease the need for interventional procedures, and improve quality of life in persons with known cardiovascular disease. Pharmacological treatments and important lifestyle changes reduce people's risks substantially (by 1/3 to 2/3) and can slow and perhaps reverse progression of established coronary disease. When used appropriately, these interventions are more cost-effective than many other treatments, currently provided by the National Health Service [Department of Health National Service Frameworks: coronary heart disease. Preventing coronary heart disease in high risk patients. 2000. HMSO.] Secondary prevention clinics are effective means by which to ensure targets are achieved and assist primary care in long-term maintenance of lifestyle change and drug optimisation. A 2-year hospital-based pilot project was established at the Royal Hospitals, April 2001-April 2003. The aim of the project was to target patients with coronary heart disease, post-MI and/or coronary artery bypass grafting and/or percutaneous coronary intervention, 6 months following their cardiac event. The plan was to assess patient risk factors and medication a minimum of 6 months following their cardiac event to ascertain if government targets were being achieved; secondly, to examine the effectiveness of a hospital-based nurse-led secondary prevention clinic on modifying risk factors and optimising drug therapies.

  16. Cardiovascular disease risk and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease among patients with low health literacy.

    PubMed

    van Schaik, T M; Jørstad, H T; Twickler, T B; Peters, R J G; Tijssen, J P G; Essink-Bot, M L; Fransen, M P

    2017-07-01

    To explore the association between health literacy and the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and to assess the differential effects by health literacy level of a nurse-coordinated secondary prevention program (NCPP) in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Data were collected in two medical centres participating in the RESPONSE trial (Randomised Evaluation of Secondary Prevention by Outpatient Nurse SpEcialists). CVD risk profiles were assessed at baseline and 12-month follow-up using the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE). Health literacy was assessed by the short Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM-D) and the Newest Vital Sign (NVS-D); self-reported health literacy was evaluated by the Set of Brief Screening Questions (SBSQ-D). Among 201 CAD patients, 18% exhibited reading difficulties, 52% had difficulty understanding and applying written information, and 5% scored low on self-reported health literacy. Patients with low NVS-D scores had a higher CVD risk [mean SCORE 5.2 (SD 4.8) versus 3.3 (SD 4.1), p < 0.01]. Nurse-coordinated care seemed to reduce CVD risk irrespective of health literacy levels without significant differences. Inadequate health literacy is prevalent in CAD patients in the Netherlands, and is associated with less favourable CVD risk profiles. Where many other forms of CVD prevention fail, nurse-coordinated care seems to be effective among patients with inadequate health literacy.

  17. Improving secondary prevention screening in clinical encounters using mhealth among prelicensure master's entry clinical nursing students.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, Leah Z; Rorie, Anne; Salem, Benissa E

    2015-04-01

    To determine the feasibility and acceptability of a mHealth application among nursing students for health promotion and secondary prevention health recommendations for hospitalized adult patients. A pretest-posttest design with a convenience sample of 169 prelicensure master's entry clinical nursing students in a large urban public university. Survey questions assessed intention to use, perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, subjective norm, voluntariness, clinical area relevance, output quality, and result demonstrability of the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) evidence-based practice guidelines via the mHealth application. Descriptive statistics and frequencies were used to explore sociodemographics; paired t-tests were used to evaluate pre- and posttest differences. Pre- and posttest significant differences (p < .01) were found between intention to use, perceived usefulness, subjective norm, voluntariness, image, clinical relevance, result demonstrability, and output quality (p < .02). Ease use of a mHealth application was not significantly different. These findings highlight the need to integrate evidence-based practice tools using mHealth technology among prelicensure master's entry clinical nursing students in order to engage and foster translational learning and improve dissemination of secondary prevention screening guidelines among hospitalized patients. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  18. Global burden of CVD: focus on secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Bansilal, Sameer; Castellano, José M; Fuster, Valentín

    2015-12-01

    Despite encouraging advances in prevention and treatment of atherothrombosis, cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains a major cause of deaths and disability worldwide and will continue to grow mainly due to the increase in incidence in low and middle income countries (LMIC). In Europe and the United States of America (USA), coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality rates have decreased since the mid-1990s due to improvements in acute care, however the prevalence of CHD is increasing largely in part due to the overall aging of the population, increased prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors, and improved survival of patients after a CV event. Data from clinical trials has consistently proven the efficacy of pharmacologic interventions with aspirin, statins, and blood pressure (BP)-lowering agents in reducing the risk of CV events and total mortality in the ever growing pool of patients in secondary prevention. However, large gaps between indicated therapy and prescribed medication can be observed worldwide, with very low rates of use of effective therapies in LMIC countries. Adherence to medication is very poor in chronic patients, especially those treated with multiple pharmacologic agents, and has been directly correlated to a greater incidence of recurrent CV events and increase in direct and indirect healthcare costs. In this article, we review the global burden of CV disease, status of secondary prevention therapy and major barriers for treatment adherence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Aspirin in Older Adults: Need for Wider Utilization in Secondary Prevention and Individual Clinical Judgments in Primary Prevention.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Mandi; Wood, Sarah K; Ouslander, Joseph G; Hennekens, Charles H

    2017-11-01

    In the treatment or secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD), there is general consensus that the absolute benefits of aspirin far outweigh the absolute risks. Despite evidence from randomized trials and their meta-analyses, older adults, defined as aged 65 years or older, are less likely to be prescribed aspirin than their middle-aged counterparts. In primary prevention, the optimal utilization of aspirin is widely debated. There is insufficient randomized evidence among apparently healthy participants at moderate to high risk of a first CVD event, so general guidelines seem premature. Among older adults, randomized data are even more sparse but trials are ongoing. Further, older adults commonly take multiple medications due to comorbidities, which may increase deleterious interactions and side effects. Older adults have higher risks of occlusive events as well as bleeding. All these considerations support the need for individual clinical judgments in prescribing aspirin in the context of therapeutic lifestyle changes and other adjunctive drug therapies. These include statins for lipids and usually multiple drugs to achieve control of high blood pressure. As regards aspirin, the clinician should weigh the absolute benefit on occlusion against the absolute risk of bleeding. These issues should be considered with each patient to facilitate an informed and person-centered individual clinical judgment. The use of aspirin in primary prevention is particularly attractive because the drug is generally over the counter and, for developing countries where CVD is becoming the leading cause of death, is extremely inexpensive. The more widespread use of aspirin in older adults with prior CVD will confer net benefits to risks and even larger net benefits to costs in the United States as well as other developed and developing countries. In primary prevention among older adults, individual clinical judgments should be made by the health-care professional and each of

  20. Front-loading with clopidogrel plus aspirin followed by dual antiplatelet therapy in the prevention of early stroke recurrence.

    PubMed

    Censori, Bruno

    2014-07-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin plus clopidogrel is not recommended for secondary stroke prevention because of lack of effectiveness and increased hemorrhagic risk. Recent studies show that in patients with a very recent transient ischemic attack or minor ischemic stroke loading with 300 mg clopidogrel plus aspirin, followed by clopidogrel 75 mg plus aspirin once daily for up to 90 days significantly decreases the rate of recurrent stroke, especially strokes that occur within few days from the event that led to medical attention, without an increase in severe bleedings. This article reviews the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of clopidogrel, focusing on loading doses, and summarizes the results of the studies that have shown the effectiveness of the front-loading approach in the early secondary prevention of stroke.

  1. Variation in CAD Secondary Prevention Prescription among Outpatient Cardiology Practices: Insights from the NCDR®

    PubMed Central

    Maddox, Thomas M.; Chan, Paul S.; Spertus, John A.; Tang, Fengming; Jones, Phil; Ho, P. Michael; Bradley, Steven M.; Tsai, Thomas T.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Peterson, Pamela N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study assesses practice variation of secondary prevention medication prescription among coronary artery disease (CAD) patients treated in outpatient practices participating in the NCDR® PINNACLE Registry®. Background Among patients with CAD, secondary prevention with a combination of beta-blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers, and statins reduces cardiac mortality and myocardial infarction (MI). Accordingly, every CAD patient should receive the combination of these medications for which they are eligible. However, little is known about current prescription patterns of these medications and the variation in use among outpatient cardiology clinics. Methods Using data from NCDR® PINNACLE Registry®, a national outpatient cardiology practice registry, we assessed medication prescription patterns among eligible CAD patients between July 2008 and December 2010. Overall rates of prescription and variation by practice were calculated, adjusting for patient characteristics. Results Among 156,145 CAD patients in 58 practices, 103,830 (66.5%) were prescribed the optimal combination of medications for which they were eligible. The median rate of optimal combined prescription by practice was 73.5% and varied from 28.8% to 100%. After adjustment for patient factors, the practice median rate ratio for prescription was 1.25 (95% CI 1.2,1.32), indicating a 25% likelihood that 2 random practices would differ in treating identical CAD patients. Conclusions Among a national registry of CAD patients treated in outpatient cardiology practices, over one-third of patients failed to receive their optimal combination of secondary prevention medications. Significant variation was observed across practices, even after adjusting for patient characteristics, suggesting that quality improvement efforts may be needed to support more uniform practice. PMID:24184238

  2. Evaluation of a theory-driven e-learning intervention for future oral healthcare providers on secondary prevention of disordered eating behaviors.

    PubMed

    DeBate, Rita D; Severson, Herbert H; Cragun, Deborah L; Gau, Jeff M; Merrell, Laura K; Bleck, Jennifer R; Christiansen, Steve; Koerber, Anne; Tomar, Scott L; McCormack Brown, Kelli R; Tedesco, Lisa A; Hendricson, William

    2013-06-01

    Oral healthcare providers have a clinical opportunity for early detection of disordered eating behaviors because they are often the first health professionals to observe overt oral and physical signs. Curricula regarding early recognition of this oral/systemic medical condition are limited in oral health educational programs. Web-based learning can supplement and reinforce traditional learning and has the potential to develop skills. The study purpose was to determine the efficacy of a theory-driven Web-based training program to increase the capacity of oral health students to perform behaviors related to the secondary prevention of disordered eating behaviors. Using the Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance evaluation framework, a longitudinal group-randomized controlled trial involving 27 oral health classes from 12 oral health education programs in the United States was implemented to assess the efficacy of the Web-based training on attitudes, knowledge, self-efficacy and skills related to the secondary prevention of disordered eating behaviors. Mixed-model analysis of covariance indicated substantial improvements among students in the intervention group (effect sizes: 0.51-0.83) on all six outcomes of interest. Results suggest that the Web-based training program may increase the capacity of oral healthcare providers to deliver secondary prevention of disordered eating behaviors. Implications and value of using the Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance framework are discussed.

  3. Evaluation of a theory-driven e-learning intervention for future oral healthcare providers on secondary prevention of disordered eating behaviors

    PubMed Central

    DeBate, Rita D.; Severson, Herbert H.; Cragun, Deborah L.; Gau, Jeff M.; Merrell, Laura K.; Bleck, Jennifer R.; Christiansen, Steve; Koerber, Anne; Tomar, Scott L.; McCormack Brown, Kelli R.; Tedesco, Lisa A.; Hendricson, William

    2013-01-01

    Oral healthcare providers have a clinical opportunity for early detection of disordered eating behaviors because they are often the first health professionals to observe overt oral and physical signs. Curricula regarding early recognition of this oral/systemic medical condition are limited in oral health educational programs. Web-based learning can supplement and reinforce traditional learning and has the potential to develop skills. The study purpose was to determine the efficacy of a theory-driven Web-based training program to increase the capacity of oral health students to perform behaviors related to the secondary prevention of disordered eating behaviors. Using the Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance evaluation framework, a longitudinal group-randomized controlled trial involving 27 oral health classes from 12 oral health education programs in the United States was implemented to assess the efficacy of the Web-based training on attitudes, knowledge, self-efficacy and skills related to the secondary prevention of disordered eating behaviors. Mixed-model analysis of covariance indicated substantial improvements among students in the intervention group (effect sizes: 0.51–0.83) on all six outcomes of interest. Results suggest that the Web-based training program may increase the capacity of oral healthcare providers to deliver secondary prevention of disordered eating behaviors. Implications and value of using the Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance framework are discussed. PMID:23564725

  4. Interventions for improving modifiable risk factor control in the secondary prevention of stroke.

    PubMed

    Lager, Kate E; Mistri, Amit K; Khunti, Kamlesh; Haunton, Victoria J; Sett, Aung K; Wilson, Andrew D

    2014-05-02

    People with stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) are at increased risk of future stroke and other cardiovascular events. Evidence-based strategies for secondary stroke prevention have been established. However, the implementation of prevention strategies could be improved. To assess the effects of stroke service interventions for implementing secondary stroke prevention strategies on modifiable risk factor control, including patient adherence to prescribed medications, and the occurrence of secondary cardiovascular events. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (April 2013), the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group Trials Register (April 2013), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2013, issue 3), MEDLINE (1950 to April 2013), EMBASE (1981 to April 2013) and 10 additional databases. We located further studies by searching reference lists of articles and contacting authors of included studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated the effects of organisational or educational and behavioural interventions (compared with usual care) on modifiable risk factor control for secondary stroke prevention. Two review authors selected studies for inclusion and independently extracted data. One review author assessed the risk of bias for the included studies. We sought missing data from trialists. This review included 26 studies involving 8021 participants. Overall the studies were of reasonable quality, but one study was considered at high risk of bias. Fifteen studies evaluated predominantly organisational interventions and 11 studies evaluated educational and behavioural interventions for patients. Results were pooled where appropriate, although some clinical and methodological heterogeneity was present. The estimated effects of organisational interventions were compatible with improvements and no differences in the modifiable risk factors mean systolic blood pressure (mean difference (MD) -2.57 mmHg; 95% confidence

  5. Cardiac rehabilitation and exercise training in secondary coronary heart disease prevention.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Carl J; Milani, Richard V

    2011-01-01

    Substantial evidence indicates that increased levels of physical activity, exercise training, and overall cardiorespiratory fitness provide protection in primary and secondary coronary heart disease (CHD) prevention. Clearly, cardiac rehabilitation and exercise training (CRET) programs have been greatly underused in patients with CHD. We review the benefits of formal CRET programs on CHD risk factors including exercise capacity, obesity indices, plasma lipids, inflammation, and psychosocial stress as well as overall morbidity and mortality. These data support the fact that patients with CHD, especially after major CHD events, need routine referral to CRET programs; and patients should be vigorously encouraged to attend these valuable programs. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and exercise training in primary and secondary coronary prevention.

    PubMed

    Swift, Damon L; Lavie, Carl J; Johannsen, Neil M; Arena, Ross; Earnest, Conrad P; O'Keefe, James H; Milani, Richard V; Blair, Steven N; Church, Timothy S

    2013-01-01

    Substantial data have established that higher levels of physical activity (PA), participating in exercise training (ET), and higher overall cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) provide considerable protection in the primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD). This review surveys data from epidemiological and prospective ET studies supporting the favorable impact of PA, ET, and CRF in primary CHD prevention. Clearly, cardiac rehabilitation and ET (CRET) programs have been underutilized for patients with CHD, particularly considering the effect of CRET on CHD risk factors, including CRF, obesity indices, fat distribution, plasma lipids, inflammation, and psychological distress, as well as overall morbidity and mortality. These data strongly support the routine referral of patients with CHD to CRET programs and that patients should be vigorously encouraged to attend CRET following major CHD events.

  7. Incorporating primary and secondary prevention approaches to address childhood obesity prevention and treatment in a low-income, ethnically diverse population

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is consensus that development and evaluation of a systems-oriented approach for child obesity prevention and treatment that includes both primary and secondary prevention efforts is needed. This article describes the study design and baseline data from the Texas Childhood Obesity Research Demo...

  8. School Violence in Secondary Education in the Governorate of Mafraq: Forms, Causes and Prevention--A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khaled, Mohammad S. Bani

    2014-01-01

    This study considers school violence. It was investigated in secondary schools in the governorate of Mafraq. The aim is to identify the forms and causes of the phenomenon; hence to come out with the preventive and remedial measures, accordingly. The study was conducted in one of the secondary schools selected randomly in the city of Mafraq in the…

  9. Efficacy of antiplatelet therapy in secondary prevention following lacunar stroke: pooled analysis of randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Chun Shing; Shoamanesh, Ashkan; Copley, Hannah Charlotte; Myint, Phyo Kyaw; Loke, Yoon K; Benavente, Oscar R

    2015-04-01

    Lacunar stroke accounts for ≈25% of ischemic stroke, but optimal antiplatelet regimen to prevent stroke recurrence remains unclear. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of antiplatelet agents in secondary stroke prevention after a lacunar stroke. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane library for randomized controlled trials that reported risk of recurrent stroke or death with antiplatelet therapy in patients with lacunar stroke. We used random effects meta-analysis and evaluated heterogeneity with I(2). We included 17 trials with 42,234 participants (mean age 64.4 years, 65% male) and follow up ranging from 4 weeks to 3.5 years. Compared with placebo, any single antiplatelet agent was associated with a significant reduction in recurrence of any stroke (risk ratio [RR] 0.77, 0.62-0.97, 2 studies) and ischemic stroke (RR 0.48, 0.30-0.78, 2 studies), but not for the composite outcome of any stroke, myocardial infarction, or death (RR 0.89, 0.75-1.05, 2 studies). When other antiplatelet agents (ticlodipine, cilostazol, and dipyridamole) were compared with aspirin, there was no consistent reduction in stroke recurrence (RR 0.91, 0.75-1.10, 3 studies). Dual antiplatelet therapy did not confer clear benefit over monotherapy (any stroke RR 0.83, 0.68-1.00, 3 studies; ischemic stroke RR 0.80, 0.62-1.02, 3 studies; composite outcome RR 0.90, 0.80-1.02, 3 studies). Our results suggest that any of the single antiplatelet agents compared with placebo in the included trials is adequate for secondary stroke prevention after lacunar stroke. Dual antiplatelet therapy should not be used for long-term stroke prevention in this stroke subtype. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Interventions for primary prevention of suicide in university and other post-secondary educational settings.

    PubMed

    Harrod, Curtis S; Goss, Cynthia W; Stallones, Lorann; DiGuiseppi, Carolyn

    2014-10-29

    Suicide is a leading cause of death among post-secondary students worldwide. Suicidal thoughts and planning are common among post-secondary students. Previous reviews have examined the effectiveness of interventions for symptomatic individuals; however, many students at high risk of suicide are undiagnosed and untreated. We evaluated the effect on suicide and suicide-related outcomes of primary suicide prevention interventions that targeted students within the post-secondary setting. We searched the following sources up to June 2011: Specialised Registers of two Cochrane Groups, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and nine other databases, trial registers, conference proceedings, and websites of national and international organizations. We screened reference lists and contacted authors of included studies to identify additional studies. We updated the search in November 2013; we will include these results in the review's next update. We included studies that tested an intervention for the primary prevention of suicide using a randomized controlled trial (RCT), controlled before-and-after (CBA), controlled interrupted time series (CITS), or interrupted time series (ITS) study design. Interventions targeted students within the post-secondary setting (i.e. college, university, academy, vocational, or any other post-secondary educational institution) without known mental illness, previous suicide attempt or self-harm, or suicidal ideation. Outcomes included suicides, suicide attempts, suicidal ideation, changes in suicide-related knowledge, attitudes and behavior, and availability of means of suicide. We used standardized electronic forms for data extraction, risk of bias and quality of evidence determination, and analysis. We estimated standardised mean differences (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We analysed studies by intervention type and study design. We summarized RCT effect sizes using random-effects models meta-analyses; and analysed

  11. About the Early Detection Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Early Detection Research Group supports research that seeks to determine the effectiveness, operating characteristics and clinical impact (harms as well as benefits) of cancer early detection technologies and practices, such as imaging and molecular biomarker approaches.   The group ran two large-scale early detection trials for which data and biospecimens are available

  12. Prevention and early treatment of influenza in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Demicheli, V; Jefferson, T; Rivetti, D; Deeks, J

    2000-01-06

    We present three systematic reviews carried out within the Cochrane Collaboration, focusing on a different influenza intervention in healthy adults: Vaccines; Ion Channel Inhibitor antivirals and Neuraminidase Inhibitor (NIs) antivirals. The objectives were to identify, retrieve and assess all studies evaluating the effects of these interventions in prophylaxis and early treatments of influenza and the frequency of adverse events. Additionally we present the results of the economic evaluation of effective alternatives in order to define the most cost-effective intervention. The economic evaluation is set in the context of the British Army. Studies were identified using a standard Cochrane search strategy. Any randomised or quasi-randomised studies in healthy individuals aged 14-60 years were considered for inclusion in the systematic review. Those which met inclusion criteria were assessed for quality and their data meta-analysed. The economic model was constructed using Cost-effectiveness and Cost-utility study designs. Live aerosol vaccines reduced cases of clinical influenza A with virological confirmation (by serology and/or viral isolation) by 48% (95%CI: 24-64%), whilst recommended inactivated parenteral vaccines have an efficacy of 68% (95%CI: 49-79%). Vaccine effectiveness in reducing clinical influenza cases (i.e. without virological confirmation) was lower, with efficacies of 13 and 24% respectively. Use of the vaccine significantly reduced time off work, but only by 0.4 days (95%CI: 0. 1-0.8 days). Analysis of vaccines matching the circulating strain gave higher estimates of efficacy, whilst inclusion of all other vaccines reduced the efficacy. When compared to placebo for the prevention of influenza, oral amantadine was 61% (95%CI: 51-69%) efficacious (RR 0.39 - 95%CI: 0.31-0.49), and oral rimantadine was 64% (95%CI: 41-78%) efficacious (RR 0.36 -95%CI: 0.22-0.59). When compared to placebo for the treatment of influenza, oral amantadine significantly

  13. Probiotics for the Primary and Secondary Prevention of C. difficile Infections: A Meta-analysis and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Lynne V.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections are a global clinical concern and are one of the leading causes of nosocomial outbreaks. Preventing these infections has benefited from multidisciplinary infection control strategies and new antibiotics, but the problem persists. Probiotics are effective in preventing antibiotic-associated diarrhea and may also be a beneficial strategy for C. difficile infections, but randomized controlled trials are scarce. This meta-analysis pools 21 randomized, controlled trials for primary prevention of C. difficile infections (CDI) and four trials for secondary prevention of C. difficile recurrences and assesses the efficacy of specific probiotic strains. Four probiotics significantly improved primary CDI prevention: (Saccharomyces boulardii, Lactobacillus casei DN114001, a mixture of L. acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum, and a mixture of L. acidophilus, L. casei and L. rhamnosus). None of the tested probiotics significantly improved secondary prevention of CDI. More confirmatory randomized trials are needed to establish if probiotics are useful for preventing C. difficile infections. PMID:27025619

  14. Sonographic findings in acute urinary retention secondary to retroverted gravid uterus: pathophysiology and preventive measures.

    PubMed

    Yang, J-M; Huang, W-C

    2004-05-01

    To explore the pathophysiology of acute urinary retention in women with a retroverted gravid uterus and to suggest measures to prevent its recurrence. In five women with a retroverted gravid uterus and acute urinary retention necessitating catheterization, the morphology of the genitourinary system was assessed by using transabdominal, transvaginal and introital sonography. In the supine resting position, the cervix was displaced superiorly and anteriorly by the impacted and retroverted uterus so that it compressed the lower bladder, leading to obstruction of the internal urethral orifice. The upper bladder extended superiorly and overlay the uterus. During straining, urethral motion was not limited and there was an average rotational angle of the bladder neck of 32 degrees, ranging from 21 degrees to 44 degrees. Increasing abdominal pressure further compressed the lower bladder. Measures suggested to the women for the prevention of urinary retention included limiting fluid intake before sleep, changing from the supine to the prone position before getting up and avoiding a Valsalva maneuver but performing a Credé maneuver during voiding. In all except one case these measures successfully prevented recurrence. Acute urinary retention secondary to a retroverted gravid uterus is caused by a displaced cervix compressing the lower bladder and interfering with drainage to the urethra. The urethra itself is not compressed or distorted. Understanding the pathophysiology of the lower urinary tract may allow maneuvers which prevent acute urinary retention. Copyright 2004 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Non-completion of secondary education and early disability in Norway: geographic patterns, individual and community risks.

    PubMed

    Myhr, Arnhild; Haugan, Tommy; Lillefjell, Monica; Halvorsen, Thomas

    2018-05-31

    School non-completion and early work disability is a great public health challenge in Norway, as in most western countries. This study aims to investigate how medically based disability pension (DP) among young adults varies geographically and how municipal socioeconomic conditions interact with non-completion of secondary education in determining DP risk. The study includes a nationally representative sample of 30% of all Norwegians (N = 350,699) aged 21-40 in 2010 from Statistic Norway's population registries. Multilevel models incorporating factors at the individual, neighbourhood and municipal levels were applied to estimate the neighbourhood and municipality general contextual effects in DP receipt, and detect possible differences in the impact of municipal socioeconomic conditions on DP risk between completers and non-completers of secondary education. A pattern of spatial clustering at the neighbourhood (ICC = 0.124) and municipality (ICC = 0.021) levels are clearly evident, indicating that the underlying causes of DP receipt have a systematic neighbourhood and municipality variation in Norway. Non-completion of secondary education is strongly correlated with DP receipt among those younger than 40. Socioeconomic characteristics of the municipality are also significantly correlated with DP risk, but these associations are conditioned by the completion of secondary education. Living in a socioeconomically advantageous municipality (i.e. high income, high education levels and low unemployment and social security payment rates) is associated with a higher risk of DP, but only among those who do not complete their secondary education. Although the proportion of DPs was equal in rural and urban areas, it is evident that young people living in urban settings are more at risk of early DP than their counterparts living in rural parts of the country when controlling for other risk factors. The association between school non-completion and DP risk varies

  16. Zoledronic Acid for the Treatment and Prevention of Primary and Secondary Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Rizzoli, René

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing interest in therapies that can be administered less frequently and/or avoid gastrointestinal irritation. The efficacy of once-yearly zoledronic acid (5 mg) in the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis has been evaluated in different patient populations. In the 3-year HORIZON-Pivotal Fracture Trial in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, zoledronic acid reduced the risk of vertebral and hip fracture by 70% and 41%, respectively, versus placebo. The efficacy of zoledronic acid in preventing subsequent fracture in patients with a hip fracture was evaluated in the HORIZON-Recurrent Fracture Trial. New vertebral and nonvertebral fractures were significantly reduced by treatment initiated within 90 days of incident hip fracture, without evidence of delayed fracture healing. Data from a 1-year study show that a single zoledronic acid 5-mg infusion is superior to oral risedronate 5 mg/day for treatment and prevention of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. Increases in bone mineral density and decreases in bone turnover markers were significantly greater with zoledronic acid than with risedronate. Two different treatment regimens of zoledronic acid were found to be more effective than placebo for prevention of bone loss in postmenopausal women and reducing markers of bone turnover after 2 years. In conclusion, zoledronic acid 5 mg once-yearly infusion has demonstrated marked efficacy in the treatment and prevention of primary and secondary osteoporosis, with a combination of fracture risk reduction and prevention of bone loss at key sites. It is the only agent shown to reduce the incidence of fracture and mortality in patients with a previous low-trauma hip fracture. PMID:22870433

  17. Contemporary Reflections on the Safety of Long-Term Aspirin Treatment for the Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fanaroff, Alexander C.; Roe, Matthew T.

    2018-01-01

    Aspirin has been the cornerstone of therapy for the secondary prevention treatment of patients with cardiovascular disease since landmark trials were completed in the late 1970s and early 1980s that demonstrated the efficacy of aspirin for reducing the risk of ischemic events. Notwithstanding the consistent benefits demonstrated with apirin for both acute and chronic cardiovascular disease, there are a number of toxicities associated with aspirin that have been showcased by recent long-term clinical trials that have included an aspirin monotherapy arm. As an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase, aspirin impairs gastric mucosal protective mechanisms. Prior trials have shown that up to 15–20% of patients developed gastrointestinal symptoms with aspirin monotherapy and roughly 1% of patients per year had a clinically significant bleeding event, including 1 in 1000 patients who suffered an intracranial or fatal bleed. These risks have been shown to be compounded for patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), who are also treated with other anti-thrombotic agents during the acute care/procedural period, as well as for an extended time period afterwards. Given observations of substantial increases in bleeding rates from many prior long-term clinical trials that have evaluated aspirin together with other oral platelet inhibitors or oral anti-coagulants, the focus of contemporary research has pivoted towards tailored anti-thrombotic regimens that attempt to either shorten the duration of exposure to aspirin or replace aspirin with an alternative anti-thrombotic agent. While these shifts are occurring, the safety profile of aspirin when used for the secondary prevention treatment of patients with established cardiovascular disease deserves further consideration. PMID:27028617

  18. Experience with a Multinational, Secondary School Education Module with a Focus on Prevention of Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Doornekamp, Laura; Stegers-Jager, Karen M.; Vlek, Odette M.; Klop, Tanja; Goeijenbier, Marco; van Gorp, Eric C. M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract. Worldwide, virus infections are responsible for many diseases in terms of morbidity and mortality. Vaccinations and therapies are only available for relatively few virus infections and not always where they are needed. However, knowledge of transmission routes can prevent virus infection. In the context of this study, we measured the effects of a secondary school education module, named Viruskenner, on knowledge, attitude, and risk behavior as these relate to virus infections. A nonrandomized intervention study was conducted between April and August 2015 to assess the effect of this 2-month education module on knowledge, attitude, and behavior of 684 secondary school students in the Netherlands, Suriname, and Indonesia. For the Netherlands, a control group of a further 184 students was added. Factor analysis was performed on questions pertaining to attitude and behavior. Comparative analyses between pre- and posttest per country were done using multiple linear regression, independent sample T-tests, and one-way analysis of variance. These showed a significant increase in knowledge about virus infections and the prevention of infectious diseases among the Dutch and Surinamese groups, whereas a trend of increased knowledge was evident among the Indonesian participants. The Dutch control group showed an overall decrease in knowledge. Regression analyses showed that there was a significant interaction effect between participation and time on knowledge, attitude, and awareness and behavior and risk infection. Attitudes improved significantly in the intervention group. Pearson correlation coefficients between knowledge, attitude, and behavior were found to be positive. PMID:28719318

  19. Experience with a Multinational, Secondary School Education Module with a Focus on Prevention of Virus Infections.

    PubMed

    Doornekamp, Laura; Stegers-Jager, Karen M; Vlek, Odette M; Klop, Tanja; Goeijenbier, Marco; van Gorp, Eric C M

    2017-07-01

    Worldwide, virus infections are responsible for many diseases in terms of morbidity and mortality. Vaccinations and therapies are only available for relatively few virus infections and not always where they are needed. However, knowledge of transmission routes can prevent virus infection. In the context of this study, we measured the effects of a secondary school education module, named Viruskenner, on knowledge, attitude, and risk behavior as these relate to virus infections. A nonrandomized intervention study was conducted between April and August 2015 to assess the effect of this 2-month education module on knowledge, attitude, and behavior of 684 secondary school students in the Netherlands, Suriname, and Indonesia. For the Netherlands, a control group of a further 184 students was added. Factor analysis was performed on questions pertaining to attitude and behavior. Comparative analyses between pre- and posttest per country were done using multiple linear regression, independent sample T-tests, and one-way analysis of variance. These showed a significant increase in knowledge about virus infections and the prevention of infectious diseases among the Dutch and Surinamese groups, whereas a trend of increased knowledge was evident among the Indonesian participants. The Dutch control group showed an overall decrease in knowledge. Regression analyses showed that there was a significant interaction effect between participation and time on knowledge, attitude, and awareness and behavior and risk infection. Attitudes improved significantly in the intervention group. Pearson correlation coefficients between knowledge, attitude, and behavior were found to be positive.

  20. Secondary prevention for screening detected rheumatic heart disease: opportunities to improve adherence.

    PubMed

    Engelman, Daniel; Ah Kee, Maureen; Mataika, Reapi L; Kado, Joseph H; Colquhoun, Samantha M; Tulloch, Jim; Steer, Andrew C

    2017-04-01

    Secondary prevention is an effective treatment for rheumatic heart disease (RHD), but ensuring high adherence to prophylaxis over many years is challenging and requires understanding of local factors. Participants were young people diagnosed with RHD through echocardiographic screening in Fiji. We used a structured interview to evaluate the following: health seeking behaviours; attitudes, practice, barriers and potential improvement strategies for adherence to antibiotic prophylaxis; and adolescent-friendly qualities of the health service. One hundred and one participants were interviewed (median age, 17.2 years). Adherence was very low overall (adequate in 6%). Sore throat and fever with sore joints were experienced in the preceding year by 42% and 28%, respectively. Barriers to receiving treatment included taking alternate treatments and the perception that symptoms were benign and self-limiting. Reasons for missing prophylaxis injections included lack of awareness, feeling well, transport cost and access, and medication unavailability (>40% of participants each). The injection health service had many perceived strengths, but inclusion of adolescents in decision making, and quality of educational materials were deficiencies. Reminder strategies, particularly phone-based reminders, were considered helpful by 94%. We identified several factors influencing secondary prevention that may be used to develop interventions to improve adherence. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. The Early Impact Program: An Early Intervention and Prevention Program for Children and Families At-Risk of Conduct Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larmar, Stephen; Gatfield, Terry

    2007-01-01

    The Early Impact (EI) program is an early intervention and prevention program for reducing the incidence of conduct problems in pre-school aged children. The EI intervention framework is ecological in design and includes universal and indicated components. This paper delineates key principles and associated strategies that underpin the EI program.…

  2. Use of medications for secondary prevention in stroke patients at hospital discharge in Australia.

    PubMed

    Eissa, Ashraf; Krass, Ines; Bajorek, Beata V

    2014-04-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and disability. Significant proportions (33 %) of stroke presentations are by patients with a previous stroke or transient ischaemic attack. Consequently, the stroke management guidelines recommend that all ischaemic stroke patients should receive three key evidence-based preventive drug therapies: antihypertensive drug therapy, a statin and an antithrombotic drug therapy (anticoagulant and/or antiplatelet). To determine the rates of utilization of the three key evidence-based drug therapies for the secondary prevention of stroke and to identify factors associated with use of treatment at discharge. Five metropolitan hospitals in New South Wales, comprising two tertiary referral centres and three district hospitals. A retrospective clinical audit was conducted in the study hospitals. Patients discharged with a principal diagnosis of ischaemic stroke during a 12-month time period (July 2009-2010) were identified for review. The rate of utilization of each of the three key evidence-based drug therapies and the factors associated with use of treatment at discharge. A total of 521 medical records were reviewed. Of these, 469 patients were discharged alive with a mean age of 73.6 ± 14.4 years. Overall, 75.4 % were prescribed an antihypertensive agent at discharge versus only 65.7 % on admission (P < 0.05). Three hundred-sixty patients (77.6 % of the eligible patients) were prescribed a statin at discharge (compared to only 43.9 % on admission, P < 0.05), of whom 74.0 % received monotherapy. Almost all (97.6 %) eligible patients were prescribed an antithrombotic drug therapy at discharge, of whom 68.5 % were prescribed monotherapy and 28.2 % were prescribed dual therapy. Only 60.0 % of eligible patients were discharged on all three key guideline recommended secondary preventive drug therapies. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that hypertension (OR 6.67; 95 % CI 4.35-11.11), hypercholesterolemia (OR 2.04; 95

  3. Project Roadmap: Reeducating Older Adults in Maintaining AIDS Prevention--A Secondary Intervention for Older HIV-Positive Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illa, Lourdes; Echenique, Marisa; Saint Jean, Gilbert; Bustamante-Avellaneda, Victoria; Metsch, Lisa; Mendez-Mulet, Luis; Eisdorfer, Carl; Sanchez-Martinez, Mario

    2010-01-01

    The number of older adults living with HIV/AIDS is larger than ever. Little is known about their sexual behaviors, although contrary to stereotypes, older adults desire and engage in sexual activity. Despite increased recognition of the need for prevention interventions targeting HIV-positive individuals, no secondary HIV prevention interventions…

  4. Outcome of Secondary Stroke Prevention in Patients Taking Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Nakase, Taizen; Moroi, Junta; Ishikawa, Tatsuya

    2018-05-01

    Since non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) were released for clinical use, many studies have investigated its effectiveness in stroke prevention. In this study, to determine whether or not there is a difference in outcome in secondary stroke prevention between warfarin and NOACs, patients with embolic stroke with newly prescribed anticoagulants were prospectively analyzed. Patients with acute ischemic stroke, who newly started anticoagulant therapy, were consecutively asked to participate in this study. Enrolled patients (76.3 ± 11.0 years old) were classified into warfarin (n = 48), dabigatran (n = 73), rivaroxaban (n = 49), and apixaban (n = 65). The outcome in 1 year was prospectively investigated at outpatient clinic or telephone interview. Recurrence of stroke and death was considered as the critical incidence. The prevalence of risk factors was not different among all medicines. Patients with dabigatran showed significantly younger onset age (P < .001: 72.2 years old) and milder neurologic deficits than patients on other medicines (P < .001). Cumulative incident rates were 7.1%, 15.3%, 19.0%, and 29.7% for dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban, and warfarin, respectively. Dabigatran showed relatively better outcome compared with warfarin (P = .069) and rivaroxaban (P = .055). All patients on NOACs presented lower cumulative stroke recurrence compared with warfarin. Even in the situation of secondary stroke prevention, noninferiority of NOACs to warfarin might be demonstrated. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Early augmented language intervention for children with developmental delays: potential secondary motor outcomes.

    PubMed

    Whitmore, Ani S; Romski, Mary Ann; Sevcik, Rose A

    2014-09-01

    This exploratory study examined the potential secondary outcome of an early augmented language intervention that incorporates speech-generating devices (SGD) on motor skill use for children with developmental delays. The data presented are from a longitudinal study by Romski and colleagues. Toddlers in the augmented language interventions were either required (Augmented Communication-Output; AC-O) or not required (Augmented Communication-Input; AC-I) to use the SGD to produce an augmented word. Three standardized assessments and five event-based coding schemes measured the participants' language abilities and motor skills. Toddlers in the AC-O intervention used more developmentally appropriate motor movements and became more accurate when using the SGD to communicate than toddlers in the AC-I intervention. AAC strategies, interventionist/parent support, motor learning opportunities, and physical feedback may all contribute to this secondary benefit of AAC interventions that use devices.

  6. New Directions and Challenges in Preventing Conduct Problems in Early Childhood.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Daniel S; Taraban, Lindsay E

    2017-06-01

    In this article, we review advances in developing and preventing conduct problems in early childhood and identify challenges. Among the topics we address are expanding the targets of prevention programs beyond improving parenting skills, implementing family-based interventions during early childhood for families living in impoverished communities, making greater use of community platforms that serve young children at risk for early conduct problems, and incorporating techniques such as motivational interviewing to improve families' engagement in nontraditional mental health settings.

  7. Preventive Intervention for Anxious Preschoolers and Their Parents: Strengthening Early Emotional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Jeremy K.; Warner, Carrie Masia; Lerner, Amy B.; Ludwig, Kristy; Ryan, Julie L.; Colognori, Daniela; Lucas, Christopher P.; Brotman, Laurie Miller

    2012-01-01

    The high prevalence and early onset of anxiety disorders have inspired innovative prevention efforts targeting young at-risk children. With parent-child prevention models showing success for older children and adolescents, the goal of this study was to evaluate a parent-child indicated preventive intervention for preschoolers with mild to moderate…

  8. Obesity Prevention in Early Adolescence: Student, Parent, and Teacher Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Thomas G.; Bindler, Ruth C.; Goetz, Summer; Daratha, Kenneth B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Obesity is a significant health problem among today's youth; however, most school-based prevention programs in this area have had limited success. Focus groups were conducted with seventh- to eighth-grade students, parents, and teachers to provide insight into the development of a comprehensive program for the prevention of adolescent…

  9. Prevention of Bullying in Early Educational Settings: Pedagogical and Organisational Factors Related to Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repo, Laura; Sajaniemi, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests that bullying behaviour begins at an early age (three to six years) and that preventive practices should target early educational settings. However, no previous studies focus on early educational settings (kindergartens) as an arena for bullying behaviour. The aim of this study was to find what kind of organisational and…

  10. Secondary Prevention Three and Six Years after Stroke Using the French National Insurance Healthcare System Database.

    PubMed

    Mechtouff, Laura; Haesebaert, Julie; Viprey, Marie; Tainturier, Valérie; Termoz, Anne; Porthault-Chatard, Sylvie; David, Jean-Stéphane; Derex, Laurent; Nighoghossian, Norbert; Schott, Anne-Marie

    2018-05-14

    Secondary prevention is inadequate in the first 2 years after stroke but what happens after that is less documented. The aim of this study was to assess the use and the adherence to preventive drugs 3 and 6 years after experiencing a transient ischemic attack (TIA) or an ischemic stroke (IS). The population study was from the AVC69 cohort (IS or TIA admitted in an emergency or stroke unit in the Rhône area, France, for an IS or a TIA during a 7-month period). Medication use was defined as ≥1 purchase during the studied year and adherence as Continuous Measure of Medication Acquisition ≥0.8 using the French medical insurance health care funding database. The study population consisted of 210 patients at 3 years and 163 patients at 6 years. Medication use at 3 and 6 years was, respectively, 80.9 and 79.8% for antithrombotics, 69.1 and 66.3% for antihypertensives, 60.5 and 55.2% for statins and 48.6 and 46.6% for optimal treatment defined as the treatment achieved by the use of the 3 drugs. Adherence to each class was good at 3 years and tends to decrease at 6 years. More than one patient out of 2 do not use the optimal preventive treatment. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Etiology and Early Marker Studies (EEMS) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Etiology and Early Marker Studies (EEMS) is a component of the PLCO Trial. By collecting biologic materials and risk factor information from trial participants before the diagnosis of disease, PLCO EEMS adds substantial value to the trial, providing a resource for cancer research, focused, in particular, on cancer etiology and early markers. Etiologic studies investigate

  12. Early Implantation of Primary Prevention Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Severe Nonischemic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Voskoboinik, Aleksandr; Bloom, Jason; Taylor, Andrew; Mariani, Justin

    2016-09-01

    Primary prevention implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) reduce mortality in selected patients with severe systolic dysfunction. Current guidelines suggest a 3- to 6-month waiting period before implantation. We retrospectively studied 29 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed nonischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM) who underwent primary prevention ICD implantation within 6 months of diagnosis between January 2008 and April 2014. Cardiac MRI (CMR) evaluated left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and regional fibrosis preimplant. The primary end point was "failure to qualify for an ICD at 12 months postimplant," either due to LVEF ≥ 35% or deterioration necessitating mechanical support or transplantation, without appropriate ICD therapy. Secondary end points were appropriate and inappropriate ICD therapy. Baseline mean age was 44.2 ± 14.8 years and median LVEF 16.4%. Median time from diagnosis to implant was 32 days. At 12 months, 17 patients (58.6%) no longer qualified for an ICD, mainly due to LVEF improvement. At follow-up (mean 32.0 ± 20.6 months), three patients received appropriate therapy (one for ventricular fibrillation). All three had CMR late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT) preimplant. Cardiac resynchronization at implant predicted LVEF improvement. Early appropriate therapy, particularly for ventricular fibrillation, is infrequent for patients with very severe NICM who have ICDs implanted within 6 months of diagnosis. The majority of these patients would not qualify for an ICD at 12 months postinsertion. In the absence of a multimodality risk score, early ICD insertion should only be considered in selected cases (presence of LGE and NSVT). Wearable cardioverter defibrillators may have a role as a bridge to ICD decision. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The Neurobiology of Intervention and Prevention in Early Adversity.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Philip A; Beauchamp, Kate G; Roos, Leslie E; Noll, Laura K; Flannery, Jessica; Delker, Brianna C

    2016-01-01

    Early adverse experiences are well understood to affect development and well-being, placing individuals at risk for negative physical and mental health outcomes. A growing literature documents the effects of adversity on developing neurobiological systems. Fewer studies have examined stress neurobiology to understand how to mitigate the effects of early adversity. This review summarizes the research on three neurobiological systems relevant to interventions for populations experiencing high levels of early adversity: the hypothalamic-adrenal-pituitary axis, the prefrontal cortex regions involved in executive functioning, and the system involved in threat detection and response, particularly the amygdala. Also discussed is the emerging field of epigenetics and related interventions to mitigate early adversity. Further emphasized is the need for intervention research to integrate knowledge about the neurobiological effects of prenatal stressors (e.g., drug use, alcohol exposure) and early adversity. The review concludes with a discussion of the implications of this research topic for clinical psychology practice and public policy.

  14. Risk of misclassification with a non-fasting lipid profile in secondary cardiovascular prevention.

    PubMed

    Klop, Boudewijn; Hartong, Simone C C; Vermeer, Henricus J; Schoofs, Mariette W C J; Kofflard, Marcel J M

    2017-09-01

    Routinely fasting is not necessary for measuring the lipid profile according to the latest European consensus. However, LDL-C tends to be lower in the non-fasting state with risk of misclassification. The extent of misclassification in secondary cardiovascular prevention with a non-fasting lipid profile was investigated. 329 patients on lipid lowering therapy for secondary cardiovascular prevention measured a fasting and non-fasting lipid profile. Cut-off values for LDL-C, non-HDL-C and apolipoprotein B were set at <1.8mmol/l, <2.6mmol/l and <0.8g/l, respectively. Study outcomes were net misclassification with non-fasting LDL-C (calculated using the Friedewald formula), direct LDL-C, non-HDL-C and apolipoprotein B. Net misclassification <10% was considered clinically irrelevant. Mean age was 68.3±8.5years and the majority were men (79%). Non-fasting measurements resulted in lower LDL-C (-0.2±0.4mmol/l, P<0.001), direct LDL-C (-0.1±0.2mmol/l, P=0.001), non-HDL-C (-0.1±0.4mmol/l, P=0.004) and apolipoprotein B (-0.02±0.10g/l, P=0.004). 36.0% of the patients reached a fasting LDL-C target of <1.8mmol/l with a significant net misclassification of 10.7% (95% CI 6.4-15.0%) in the non-fasting state. In the non-fasting state net misclassification with direct LDL-C was 5.7% (95% CI 2.1-9.2%), 4.0% (95% CI 1.0-7.4%) with non-HDL-C and 4.1% (95% CI 1.1-9.1%) with apolipoprotein B. Use of non-fasting LDL-C as treatment target in secondary cardiovascular prevention resulted in significant misclassification with subsequent risk of undertreatment, whereas non-fasting direct LDL-C, non-HDL-C and apolipoprotein B are reliable parameters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Cost-utility analysis of eprosartan compared to enalapril in primary prevention and nitrendipine in secondary prevention in Europe--the HEALTH model.

    PubMed

    Schwander, Björn; Gradl, Birgit; Zöllner, York; Lindgren, Peter; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Lüders, Stephan; Schrader, Joachim; Villar, Fernando Antoñanzas; Greiner, Wolfgang; Jönsson, Bengt

    2009-09-01

    To investigate the cost-utility of eprosartan versus enalapril (primary prevention) and versus nitrendipine (secondary prevention) on the basis of head-to-head evidence from randomized controlled trials. The HEALTH model (Health Economic Assessment of Life with Teveten for Hypertension) is an object-oriented probabilistic Monte Carlo simulation model. It combines a Framingham-based risk calculation with a systolic blood pressure approach to estimate the relative risk reduction of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events based on recent meta-analyses. In secondary prevention, an additional risk reduction is modeled for eprosartan according to the results of the MOSES study ("Morbidity and Mortality after Stroke--Eprosartan Compared to Nitrendipine for Secondary Prevention"). Costs and utilities were derived from published estimates considering European country-specific health-care payer perspectives. Comparing eprosartan to enalapril in a primary prevention setting the mean costs per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained were highest in Germany (Euro 24,036) followed by Belgium (Euro 17,863), the UK (Euro 16,364), Norway (Euro 13,834), Sweden (Euro 11,691) and Spain (Euro 7918). In a secondary prevention setting (eprosartan vs. nitrendipine) the highest costs per QALY gained have been observed in Germany (Euro 9136) followed by the UK (Euro 6008), Norway (Euro 1695), Sweden (Euro 907), Spain (Euro -2054) and Belgium (Euro -5767). Considering a Euro 30,000 willingness-to-pay threshold per QALY gained, eprosartan is cost-effective as compared to enalapril in primary prevention (patients >or=50 years old and a systolic blood pressure >or=160 mm Hg) and cost-effective as compared to nitrendipine in secondary prevention (all investigated patients).

  16. Breast cancer early detection via tracking of skin back-scattered secondary speckle patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Aviya; Sirkis, Talia; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Agdarov, Sergey; Beiderman, Yafim; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2018-02-01

    Breast cancer has become a major cause of death among women. The lifetime risk of a woman developing this disease has been established as one in eight. The most useful way to reduce breast cancer death is to treat the disease as early as possible. The existing methods of early diagnostics of breast cancer are mainly based on screening mammography or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) periodically conducted at medical facilities. In this paper the authors proposing a new approach for simple breast cancer detection. It is based on skin stimulation by sound waves, illuminating it by laser beam and tracking the reflected secondary speckle patterns. As first approach, plastic balls of different sizes were placed under the skin of chicken breast and detected by the proposed method.

  17. Testimony of Gina Adams, Senior Fellow, Urban Institute. Before the Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education Subcommittee Hearing on "Improving Early Childhood Development Policies and Practices"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Gina

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the testimony of Gina Adams before the Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education Subcommittee Hearing on "Improving Early Childhood Development Policies and Practices." This testimony was presented to the House Committee on Education and Labor, U.S. House of Representatives last March 19, 2009. She talks about how…

  18. Preventing Depression in Final Year Secondary Students: School-Based Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Yael; Werner-Seidler, Aliza; Calear, Alison; Mackinnon, Andrew; King, Catherine; Scott, Jan; Merry, Sally; Fleming, Theresa; Stasiak, Karolina; Batterham, Philip J

    2017-01-01

    Background Depression often emerges for the first time during adolescence. There is accumulating evidence that universal depression prevention programs may have the capacity to reduce the impact of depression when delivered in the school environment. Objective This trial investigated the effectiveness of SPARX-R, a gamified online cognitive behavior therapy intervention for the prevention of depression relative to an attention-matched control intervention delivered to students prior to facing a significant stressor—final secondary school exams. It was hypothesized that delivering a prevention intervention in advance of a stressor would reduce depressive symptoms relative to the control group. Methods A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted in 10 government schools in Sydney, Australia. Participants were 540 final year secondary students (mean 16.7 [SD 0.51] years), and clusters at the school level were randomly allocated to SPARX-R or the control intervention. Interventions were delivered weekly in 7 modules, each taking approximately 20 to 30 minutes to complete. The primary outcome was symptoms of depression as measured by the Major Depression Inventory. Intention-to-treat analyses were performed. Results Compared to controls, participants in the SPARX-R condition (n=242) showed significantly reduced depression symptoms relative to the control (n=298) at post-intervention (Cohen d=0.29) and 6 months post-baseline (d=0.21) but not at 18 months post-baseline (d=0.33). Conclusions This is the first trial to demonstrate a preventive effect on depressive symptoms prior to a significant and universal stressor in adolescents. It demonstrates that an online intervention delivered in advance of a stressful experience can reduce the impact of such an event on the potential development or exacerbation of depression. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12614000316606; https://www

  19. Edetate Disodium-Based Treatment for Secondary Prevention in Post-Myocardial Infarction Patients.

    PubMed

    Lamas, Gervasio A; Issa, Omar M

    2016-02-01

    An abundance of data, known for decades, is available linking metals, such as lead and cadmium, with cardiovascular disease. However, the idea that these toxic metals could be a modifiable risk factor for atherosclerosis did not become apparent clinically until the completion of the Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy in 2012. This pivotal study was the first double-blind, randomized, controlled trial of its kind to demonstrate a clear improvement in cardiovascular outcomes with edetate disodium therapy in a secondary prevention, post-myocardial infarction population. This effect size was most striking in diabetic patients, where the efficacy of edetate disodium was comparable, if not superior, to that of current guideline-based therapies. Given the economic burden of diabetes and cardiovascular disease, the potential impact of this therapy could be enormous if the results of this study are replicated.

  20. Mass media and marketing communication promoting primary and secondary cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Peggy; Lloyd, Gareth P; Viswanath, K; Smith, Tenbroeck; Basen-Engquist, Karen; Vernon, Sally W; Turner, Gina; Hesse, Bradford W; Crammer, Corinne; von Wagner, Christian; Backinger, Cathy L

    2009-01-01

    People often seek and receive cancer information from mass media (including television, radio, print media, and the Internet), and marketing strategies often inform cancer information needs assessment, message development, and channel selection. In this article, we present the discussion of a 2-hour working group convened for a cancer communications workshop held at the 2008 Society of Behavioral Medicine meeting in San Diego, CA. During the session, an interdisciplinary group of investigators discussed the current state of the science for mass media and marketing communication promoting primary and secondary cancer prevention. We discussed current research, new research areas, methodologies and theories needed to move the field forward, and critical areas and disciplines for future research.

  1. Prevention and early recognition: the role of family pediatrician.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Carlo; Foltran, Francesca

    2012-05-14

    Even if it is empirically evident that pediatricians play a key role in diagnosis, treatment and prevention of FB injuries, almost all studies have focused on the subset of injured children who receive medical care in the hospital or in the Emergency Department; moreover, a lack of scientific interest to improve information about pediatric injuries in primary care seems to exist. Primary care physicians can play an important role if they promptly identify suspect unrecognized FB aspiration in children. Moreover, prevention is a cornerstone of pediatric practice, and pediatricians, as reliable sources of information, may be efficacious in promoting injury prevention message. Given the paucity of works finalized to evaluate the role of injury preventive strategies in primary care it is arduous to identify an ideal approach to implement counseling strategies. However, evidences obtained elsewhere have suggested that effective preventive strategy origins from an effective communication technique, moreover, the probability of success is greater when the attention toward the problem is greater; particularly, the postpartum period is a time of tremendous change, increased health problems, and emotional upheaval for new parents. General practitioners are in an ideal position to assist families during this period and may consider a sooner rather than later, approach to injury prevention education. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Urban Flood Prevention and Early Warning System in Jinan City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shiyuan; Li, Qingguo

    2018-06-01

    The system construction of urban flood control and disaster reduction in China is facing pressure and challenge from new urban water disaster. Under the circumstances that it is difficult to build high standards of flood protection engineering measures in urban areas, it is particularly important to carry out urban flood early warning. In Jinan City, a representative inland area, based on the index system of early warning of flood in Jinan urban area, the method of fuzzy comprehensive evaluation was adopted to evaluate the level of early warning. Based on the cumulative rainfall of 3 hours, the CAflood simulation results based on cellular automaton model of urban flooding were used as evaluation indexes to realize the accuracy and integration of urban flood control early warning.

  3. Cost-effectiveness of apixaban vs warfarin for secondary stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Easton, J. Donald; Johnston, S. Claiborne; Kim, Anthony S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the cost-effectiveness of apixaban vs warfarin for secondary stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Methods: Using standard methods, we created a Markov decision model based on the estimated cost of apixaban and data from the Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) trial and other trials of warfarin therapy for AF. We quantified the cost and quality-adjusted life expectancy resulting from apixaban 5 mg twice daily compared with those from warfarin therapy targeted to an international normalized ratio of 2–3. Our base case population was a cohort of 70-year-old patients with no contraindication to anticoagulation and a history of stroke or TIA from nonvalvular AF. Results: Warfarin therapy resulted in a quality-adjusted life expectancy of 3.91 years at a cost of $378,500. In comparison, treatment with apixaban led to a quality-adjusted life expectancy of 4.19 years at a cost of $381,700. Therefore, apixaban provided a gain of 0.28 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) at an additional cost of $3,200, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $11,400 per QALY. Our findings were robust in univariate sensitivity analyses varying model inputs across plausible ranges. In Monte Carlo analysis, apixaban was cost-effective in 62% of simulations using a threshold of $50,000 per QALY and 81% of simulations using a threshold of $100,000 per QALY. Conclusions: Apixaban appears to be cost-effective relative to warfarin for secondary stroke prevention in patients with AF, assuming that it is introduced at a price similar to that of dabigatran. PMID:22993279

  4. Secondary prevention of work-related upper extremity disorders: recommendations from the Annapolis conference.

    PubMed

    Feuerstein, Michael; Harrington, Cherise B

    2006-09-01

    Efforts to improve the secondary prevention of work-related upper extremity (WRUE) symptoms continue to present a challenge. As with many occupational musculoskeletal pain disorders no single, direct cause-effect relationship exists among specific exposures, pathologic processes, and symptoms. The field has yet to create truly effective and efficient interventions for these problems that are based on current epidemiological and clinical knowledge. A working conference was held in Annapolis, Maryland on September 23rd and 24th, 2005 with leaders in research and application related to upper extremity disorders to address this challenge. The intent of the meeting was to review "state of the art" evidence in epidemiology and intervention research in order to develop suggestions regarding next steps in intervention research and application. On day 2 a number of stakeholders were present to discuss what they perceived as the missing pieces in both epidemiological research and applied intervention research in order to generate more effective workplace interventions. The papers in this series of the Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation indicate that scientifically sound progress has been made over the past decade in identifying ergonomic, workplace psychosocial, and individual factors in both the etiology and exacerbation of these symptoms/disorders. However, there is a gap between this knowledge and the development and practical implementation of comprehensive interventions for these problems. The conference also highlighted the paucity of economic analyses of the impact of these disorders as well as the economic study of the impact of intervention. Approaches for such evaluations were presented and are included in this special section of the journal. This series of papers and the summary of the invited group's discussions provided in this paper clearly emphasize the need for innovative ways to think about these problems and specific research topics that can help

  5. Development of a multifunctional adhesive system for prevention of root caries and secondary caries

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Melo, Mary A. S.; Chen, Chen; Liu, Jason; Weir, Michael D.; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a novel adhesive for prevention of tooth root caries and secondary caries by possessing a combination of protein-repellent, antibacterial, and remineralization capabilities for the first time; and (2) investigate the effects of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC), dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM), and nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) on dentine bond strength, protein-repellent properties, and dental plaque microcosm biofilm response. Methods MPC, DMAHDM and NACP were added into Scotchbond Multi-Purpose primer and adhesive. Dentine shear bond strengths were measured. Adhesive coating thickness, surface texture and dentine-adhesive interfacial structure were examined. Protein adsorption onto adhesive resin surface was determined by the micro bicinchoninic acid method. A human saliva microcosm biofilm model was used to investigate biofilm metabolic activity, colony-forming unit (CFU) counts, and lactic acid production. Results The resin with 7.5% MPC + 5% DMAHDM + 30% NACP did not adversely affect dentine shear bond strength (p > 0.1). The resin with 7.5% MPC + 5% DMAHDM + 30% NACP produced a coating on root dentine with a thickness of approximately 70 μm and completely sealed all the dentinal tubules. The resin with 7.5% MPC + 5% DMAHDM + 30% NACP had 95% reduction in protein adsorption, compared to SBMP control (p < 0.05). The resin with 7.5% MPC + 5% DMAHDM + 30% NACP was strongly antibacterial, with biofilm CFU being four orders of magnitude lower than that of SBMP control. Significance The novel multifunctional adhesive with strong protein-repellent, antibacterial and remineralization properties is promising to coat tooth roots to prevent root caries and secondary caries. The combined use of MPC, DMAHDM and NACP may have wide applicability to bonding agents, cements, sealants and composites to inhibit caries. PMID:26187532

  6. The antifungal protein AFP from Aspergillus giganteus prevents secondary growth of different Fusarium species on barley.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Hassan; Spielvogel, Anja; Hassan, Mahmoud; El-Desouky, Ahmed; El-Mansy, Hamdy; Rath, Frank; Meyer, Vera; Stahl, Ulf

    2010-06-01

    Secondary growth is a common post-harvest problem when pre-infected crops are attacked by filamentous fungi during storage or processing. Several antifungal approaches are thus pursued based on chemical, physical, or bio-control treatments; however, many of these methods are inefficient, affect product quality, or cause severe side effects on the environment. A protein that can potentially overcome these limitations is the antifungal protein AFP, an abundantly secreted peptide of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus giganteus. This protein specifically and at low concentrations disturbs the integrity of fungal cell walls and plasma membranes but does not interfere with the viability of other pro- and eukaryotic systems. We thus studied in this work the applicability of AFP to efficiently prevent secondary growth of filamentous fungi on food stuff and chose, as a case study, the malting process where naturally infested raw barley is often to be used as starting material. Malting was performed under lab scale conditions as well as in a pilot plant, and AFP was applied at different steps during the process. AFP appeared to be very efficient against the main fungal contaminants, mainly belonging to the genus Fusarium. Fungal growth was completely blocked after the addition of AFP, a result that was not observed for traditional disinfectants such as ozone, hydrogen peroxide, and chlorine dioxide. We furthermore detected reduced levels of the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol after AFP treatment, further supporting the fungicidal activity of the protein. As AFP treatments did not compromise any properties and qualities of the final products malt and wort, we consider the protein as an excellent biological alternative to combat secondary growth of filamentous fungi on food stuff.

  7. Alternative erythropoietin-mediated signaling prevents secondary microvascular thrombosis and inflammation within cutaneous burns

    PubMed Central

    Bohr, Stefan; Patel, Suraj J.; Shen, Keyue; Vitalo, Antonia G.; Brines, Michael; Cerami, Anthony; Berthiaume, Francois; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2013-01-01

    Alternate erythropoietin (EPO)–mediated signaling via the heteromeric receptor composed of the EPO receptor and the β-common receptor (CD131) exerts the tissue-protective actions of EPO in various types of injuries. Herein we investigated the effects of the EPO derivative helix beta surface peptide (synonym: ARA290), which specifically triggers alternate EPO-mediated signaling, but does not bind the erythropoietic EPO receptor homodimer, on the progression of secondary tissue damage following cutaneous burns. For this purpose, a deep partial thickness cutaneous burn injury was applied on the back of mice, followed by systemic administration of vehicle or ARA290 at 1, 12, and 24 h postburn. With vehicle-only treatment, wounds exhibited secondary microvascular thrombosis within 24 h postburn, and subsequent necrosis of the surrounding tissue, thus converting to a full-thickness injury within 48 h. On the other hand, when ARA290 was systemically administered, patency of the microvasculature was maintained. Furthermore, ARA290 mitigated the innate inflammatory response, most notably tumor necrosis factor-alpha–mediated signaling. These findings correlated with long-term recovery of initially injured yet viable tissue components. In conclusion, ARA290 may be a promising therapeutic approach to prevent the conversion of partial- to full-thickness burn injuries. In a clinical setting, the decrease in burn depth and area would likely reduce the necessity for extensive surgical debridement as well as secondary wound closure by means of skin grafting. This use of ARA290 is consistent with its tissue-protective properties previously reported in other models of injury, such as myocardial infarction and hemorrhagic shock. PMID:23401545

  8. Microcapsule-Type Self-Healing Protective Coating for Cementitious Composites with Secondary Crack Preventing Ability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Min; Yu, Hwan-Chul; Yang, Hye-In; Cho, Yu-Jin; Lee, Kwang-Myong; Chung, Chan-Moon

    2017-01-26

    A microcapsule-type self-healing protective coating with secondary crack preventing capability has been developed using a silanol-terminated polydimethylsiloxane (STP)/dibutyltin dilaurate (DD) healing agent. STP undergoes condensation reaction in the presence of DD to give a viscoelastic substance. STP- and DD-containing microcapsules were prepared by in-situ polymerization and interfacial polymerization methods, respectively. The microcapsules were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The microcapsules were integrated into commercial enamel paint or epoxy coating formulations, which were applied on silicon wafers, steel panels, and mortar specimens to make dual-capsule self-healing protective coatings. When the STP/DD-based coating was scratched, self-healing of the damaged region occurred, which was demonstrated by SEM, electrochemical test, and water permeability test. It was also confirmed that secondary crack did not occur in the healed region upon application of vigorous vibration to the self-healing coating.

  9. Microcapsule-Type Self-Healing Protective Coating for Cementitious Composites with Secondary Crack Preventing Ability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Min; Yu, Hwan-Chul; Yang, Hye-In; Cho, Yu-Jin; Lee, Kwang-Myong; Chung, Chan-Moon

    2017-01-01

    A microcapsule-type self-healing protective coating with secondary crack preventing capability has been developed using a silanol-terminated polydimethylsiloxane (STP)/dibutyltin dilaurate (DD) healing agent. STP undergoes condensation reaction in the presence of DD to give a viscoelastic substance. STP- and DD-containing microcapsules were prepared by in-situ polymerization and interfacial polymerization methods, respectively. The microcapsules were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The microcapsules were integrated into commercial enamel paint or epoxy coating formulations, which were applied on silicon wafers, steel panels, and mortar specimens to make dual-capsule self-healing protective coatings. When the STP/DD-based coating was scratched, self-healing of the damaged region occurred, which was demonstrated by SEM, electrochemical test, and water permeability test. It was also confirmed that secondary crack did not occur in the healed region upon application of vigorous vibration to the self-healing coating. PMID:28772475

  10. Slit ventricle syndrome and early-onset secondary craniosynostosis in an infant

    PubMed Central

    Ryoo, Hyun Gee; Kim, Seung-Ki; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Phi, Ji Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 14 months Final Diagnosis: Slit ventricle syndrome Symptoms: Hydrocephalus • lethargy and seizure • vomiting Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Pediatrics and Neonatology Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: Shunt surgery is a common solution for hydrocephalus in infancy. Slit ventricle syndrome and secondary craniosynostosis are late-onset complications after shunt placement; these 2 conditions occasionally occur together. Case Report: We report a case of early-onset secondary craniosynostosis with slit ventricle syndrome after shunt surgery in an infant, which led to a catastrophic increase in intracranial pressure (ICP). A 4-month-old girl with a Dandy-Walker malformation underwent a ventriculoperitoneal shunt procedure. Her head circumference (HC) gradually decreased to approximately the 5th percentile for her age group after shunt surgery. Seven months later, she developed increased ICP symptoms and underwent a shunt revision with a diagnosis of shunt malfunction. Her symptoms were temporarily relieved, but she repeatedly visited the emergency room (ER) for the same symptoms and finally collapsed, with an abrupt increase in ICP, 3 months later. Further evaluation revealed the emergence of sagittal synostosis at 7 months after initial shunt surgery. After reviewing all clinical data, slit ventricle syndrome combined with secondary craniosynostosis was diagnosed. Emergent cranial expansion surgery with shunt revision was performed, and the increased ICP signs subsided in the following days. Conclusions: Clinical suspicion and long-term HC monitoring are important in the diagnosis of slit ventricle syndrome and secondary craniosynostosis after shunt surgery, even in infants and young children. PMID:24944727

  11. Promoting Pedagogical Content Knowledge Development for Early Career Secondary Teachers in Science and Technology Using Content Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, John; Eames, Chris; Hume, Anne; Lockley, John

    2012-01-01

    Background: This research addressed the key area of early career teacher education and aimed to explore the use of a "content representation" (CoRe) as a mediational tool to develop early career secondary teacher pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). This study was situated in the subject areas of science and technology, where sound…

  12. Losing All Interest in School: Social Participation as a Predictor of the Intention to Leave Upper Secondary School Early

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frostad, Per; Pijl, Sip Jan; Mjaavatn, Per Egil

    2015-01-01

    Early school leaving in upper secondary education is a serious problem for both students and society. Several reviews have shown that there is no simple cause of early school leaving, but it seems to relate to demographic variables, social factors, academic achievement, and school factors. In this study, data from 2,045 students aged 16 from upper…

  13. Guidelines for prevention of venous thromboembolism in immobile patients secondary to neurological impairment.

    PubMed

    Gaber, Tarek A-Z K

    2007-10-15

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients and 7% of these cases are due to immobility secondary to a neurological impairment. Many guidelines are available to guide clinicians dealing with medical or surgical patients. However, and with the exception of spinal injuries, no guidelines are available to deal with other neurologically impaired patients at risk of VTE. Our study aimed at gathering evidence from the literature to enable us to deal with the main controversial issues of VTE prevention. Guidelines will be formulated. A Clinical Standards Group is responsible for the development of clinical guidelines for the Greater Manchester Neurorehabilitation network with services covering a population of around 3 million. The development of VTE prevention guidelines started with the formulation of the main questions, then gathering evidence from the literature to address these questions. Wide consultation then took place. The guidelines were then put before the group for endorsement. Answers for the main questions such as duration of thromboprophylaxis, TEDS and antiplatelets drugs use were suggested. The resulting document was summarized as a flow chart for use. We feel that the proposed guidelines are a useful tool for clinicians as they reflect the evidence available from the literature at the moment.

  14. Challenges in secondary prevention after acute myocardial infarction: A call for action.

    PubMed

    Piepoli, Massimo F; Corrà, Ugo; Dendale, Paul; Frederix, Ines; Prescott, Eva; Schmid, Jean Paul; Cupples, Margaret; Deaton, Christi; Doherty, Patrick; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo; Graham, Ian; Hansen, Tina Birgitte; Jennings, Catriona; Landmesser, Ulf; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Vrints, Christiaan; Walker, David; Bueno, Hector; Fitzsimons, Donna; Pelliccia, Antonio

    2017-06-01

    Worldwide, each year more than 7 million people experience myocardial infarction, in which one-year mortality rates are now in the range of 10%, but vary with patient characteristics. The consequences are even more dramatic: among patients who survive, 20% suffer a second cardiovascular event in the first year and approximately 50% of major coronary events occur in those with a previous hospital discharge diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease. The people behind these numbers spur this call for action. Prevention after myocardial infarction is crucial to reduce risk and suffering. Evidence-based interventions include optimal medical treatment with anti-platelets and statins, achievement of blood pressure, lipid and blood glucose targets, and appropriate lifestyle changes. The European Society of Cardiology and its constituent bodies are determined to embrace this challenge by developing a consensus document in which the existing gaps for secondary prevention strategies are reviewed. Effective interventions in relation to the patients, healthcare providers and healthcare systems are proposed and discussed. Finally, innovative strategies in hospital as well as in outpatient and long-term settings are endorsed.

  15. [Secondary Preventive Program of atherosclerosis in a university hospital. Results and predictors of clinical course].

    PubMed

    Pintó, Xavier; Meco, José F; Corbella, Emili; Figueras, Rosaura; Pallarés, Carlos; Esplugas, Enric; Castiñeiras, María J; Marrugat, Jaume; Pujol, Ramon

    2003-05-31

    Lipid therapeutic goals are not achieved in a high percentage of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). We describe in this paper the methodology and results of the Hospital Universitario de Bellvitge Atherosclerosis Secondary Preventive Program (PPSHB), which is aimed at preventing ischemic recurrences by controlling atherogenic factors. From January 1992 to December 1996, 882 patients with acute CAD entered the PPSHB and were seen on at least 2 occasions at the Unidad de Lípidos y Arteriosclerosis during a mean period of 10.4 (3.8) months. In 753 patients data on clinical follow-up were available. Follow-up data were collected by telephone interview and review of medical records. During the follow-up period at the Unidad de Lípidos y Arteriosclerosis, 71.9% of patients achieved the therapeutic goals or their LDLc improved >= 15%. These results were seen in 83.6%, 78.7% and 83.6% of patients with regard to HDLc, triglycerides and HDLc/LDLc ratio, respectively, while the percentage of patients receiving lipid-lowering drugs increased from 28% to 69%. During a follow-up of 33.7 (15.9) months, death (all causes; mean survival time: 20 [13.4] months) occurred in 41 patients (5.4%). On the other hand, hospitalization for cardiovascular disease was required in 113 patients (15%) during a mean follow-up until the first admission of 18.4 (14.2) months. The main independent predictor of unfavourable clinical course was not to reach the HDLc/LDLc ratio goal (HDLc/LDLc >= 0.27 or an increase >= 15%; OR = 2.1; 95% CI, 1.1-4.03). A systematic secondary preventive strategy may help achieve an adequate control of dyslipidemia in most CAD patients. In these patients, achieving the HDLc/LDLc therapeutic goal is associated with a less than half risk of hospitalization for cardiovascular disease or death from any cause.

  16. Multimodal Secondary Prevention Behavioral Interventions for TIA and Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Maggie; Pringle, Jan; Kerr, Susan; Booth, Joanne; Govan, Lindsay; Roberts, Nicola J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Guidelines recommend implementation of multimodal interventions to help prevent recurrent TIA/stroke. We undertook a systematic review to assess the effectiveness of behavioral secondary prevention interventions. Strategy Searches were conducted in 14 databases, including MEDLINE (1980-January 2014). We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) testing multimodal interventions against usual care/modified usual care. All review processes were conducted in accordance with Cochrane guidelines. Results Twenty-three papers reporting 20 RCTs (6,373 participants) of a range of multimodal behavioral interventions were included. Methodological quality was generally low. Meta-analyses were possible for physiological, lifestyle, psychosocial and mortality/recurrence outcomes. Note: all reported confidence intervals are 95%. Systolic blood pressure was reduced by 4.21 mmHg (mean) (−6.24 to −2.18, P = 0.01 I2 = 58%, 1,407 participants); diastolic blood pressure by 2.03 mmHg (mean) (−3.19 to −0.87, P = 0.004, I2 = 52%, 1,407 participants). No significant changes were found for HDL, LDL, total cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, high sensitivity-CR, BMI, weight or waist:hip ratio, although there was a significant reduction in waist circumference (−6.69 cm, −11.44 to −1.93, P = 0.006, I2 = 0%, 96 participants). There was no significant difference in smoking continuance, or improved fruit and vegetable consumption. There was a significant difference in compliance with antithrombotic medication (OR 1.45, 1.21 to 1.75, P<0.0001, I2 = 0%, 2,792 participants) and with statins (OR 2.53, 2.15 to 2.97, P< 0.00001, I2 = 0%, 2,636 participants); however, there was no significant difference in compliance with antihypertensives. There was a significant reduction in anxiety (−1.20, −1.77 to −0.63, P<0.0001, I2 = 85%, 143 participants). Although there was no significant difference in odds of death or recurrent TIA/stroke, there was a significant reduction in

  17. Perception of body image in early adolescence. An investigation in secondary schools.

    PubMed

    Juli, Maria Rosaria

    2017-09-01

    Raiting Scale test both males and females want to be of lesser weight. 91 subjects reached a BSQ test score of over 34, so most of the sample has a strong concern for their physical appearance. The results obtained by administering the BUT test also highlighted concern about the body with moderate gravity. Body dissatisfaction, as so many studies have confirmed, can be considered a precursor of psychopathology. Concerns concern both female gender and male gender. It is also necessary to pay close attention to the pressure exerted by family members, friends and the media towards a difficult to reach thinness ideal. That is why we need to focus on strengthening protective factors in adolescents with prevention and awareness campaigns which are properly targeted. The work resulted a useful reflection on the building of the body image as an early risk factor for the onset of pathologies linked to this concept. We need to commit to an educative practice of support for adolescent, recognition and sharing, which does not avoid the presence of the adults, but in fact it is enriched. It would be appreciated if we could introduce in the school, in the program of different subjects, the discussion regarding different aspects of a healthy nutrition and the formation of a solid self-esteem in order, for the students, to have a critical interpretation of the media message on food, body and beauty. It is desirable to promote the emancipation of the adolescents from a condition of dependence to discover their own place in the world. The educative action can help developing the research of the meaning of the own personality.

  18. Active Early Detection Grants | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  19. Active Early Detection Research Network Grants | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  20. Early Prevention of Severe Neurodevelopmental Behavior Disorders: An Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Stephen R.; Courtemanche, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    There is a very substantial literature over the past 50 years on the advantages of early detection and intervention on the cognitive, communicative, and social-emotional development of infants and toddlers at risk for developmental delay due to premature birth or social disadvantage. Most of these studies excluded children with severe delays or…

  1. Early Intervention and Prevention--Issues and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopfstein, Rosalind

    This paper reviews the American Association on Mental Retardation's (AAMR's) presentation of issues surrounding the field of early intervention. AAMR's publications are the primary sources of information in the paper. Specific sections address: (1) the impact of public laws on the rights of children and families to a free and appropriate public…

  2. Early Detection Research Network (EDRN) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    http://edrn.nci.nih.gov/EDRN is a collaborative network that maintains comprehensive infrastructure and resources critical to the discovery, development and validation of biomarkers for cancer risk and early detection. The program comprises a public/private sector consortium to accelerate the development of biomarkers that will change medical practice, ensure data

  3. Internet-based early intervention to prevent posttraumatic stress disorder in injury patients: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mouthaan, Joanne; Sijbrandij, Marit; de Vries, Giel-Jan; Reitsma, Johannes B; van de Schoot, Rens; Goslings, J Carel; Luitse, Jan S K; Bakker, Fred C; Gersons, Berthold P R; Olff, Miranda

    2013-08-13

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) develops in 10-20% of injury patients. We developed a novel, self-guided Internet-based intervention (called Trauma TIPS) based on techniques from cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) to prevent the onset of PTSD symptoms. To determine whether Trauma TIPS is effective in preventing the onset of PTSD symptoms in injury patients. Adult, level 1 trauma center patients were randomly assigned to receive the fully automated Trauma TIPS Internet intervention (n=151) or to receive no early intervention (n=149). Trauma TIPS consisted of psychoeducation, in vivo exposure, and stress management techniques. Both groups were free to use care as usual (nonprotocolized talks with hospital staff). PTSD symptom severity was assessed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months post injury with a clinical interview (Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale) by blinded trained interviewers and self-report instrument (Impact of Event Scale-Revised). Secondary outcomes were acute anxiety and arousal (assessed online), self-reported depressive and anxiety symptoms (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), and mental health care utilization. Intervention usage was documented. The mean number of intervention logins was 1.7, SD 2.5, median 1, interquartile range (IQR) 1-2. Thirty-four patients in the intervention group did not log in (22.5%), 63 (41.7%) logged in once, and 54 (35.8%) logged in multiple times (mean 3.6, SD 3.5, median 3, IQR 2-4). On clinician-assessed and self-reported PTSD symptoms, both the intervention and control group showed a significant decrease over time (P<.001) without significant differences in trend. PTSD at 12 months was diagnosed in 4.7% of controls and 4.4% of intervention group patients. There were no group differences on anxiety or depressive symptoms over time. Post hoc analyses using latent growth mixture modeling showed a significant decrease in PTSD symptoms in a subgroup of patients with severe initial symptoms (n=20) (P<.001). Our results do

  4. DCP's Early Detection Research Guides Future Science | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Early detection research funded by the NCI's Division of Cancer Prevention has positively steered both public health and clinical outcomes, and set the stage for findings in the next generation of research. |

  5. Secondary prevention lifestyle interventions initiated within 90 days after TIA or 'minor' stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis of rehabilitation programmes.

    PubMed

    Heron, Neil; Kee, Frank; Cardwell, Christopher; Tully, Mark A; Donnelly, Michael; Cupples, Margaret E

    2017-01-01

    Strokes are often preceded by a transient ischaemic attack (TIA) or 'minor' stroke. The immediate period after a TIA/minor stroke is a crucial time to initiate secondary prevention. However, the optimal approach to prevention, including non-pharmacological measures, after TIA is not clear. To systematically review evidence about the effectiveness of delivering secondary prevention, with lifestyle interventions, in comprehensive rehabilitation programmes, initiated within 90 days of a TIA/minor stroke. Also, to categorise the specific behaviour change techniques used. The review identified randomised controlled trials by searching the Cochrane Library, Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE, Web of Science, EBSCO CINAHL and Ovid PsycINFO. Two review authors independently screened titles and abstracts for eligibility (programmes initiated within 90 days of event; outcomes reported for TIA/minor stroke) and extracted relevant data from appraised studies; a meta-analysis was used to synthesise the results. A total of 31 potentially eligible papers were identified and four studies, comprising 774 patients post-TIA or minor stroke, met the inclusion criteria; two had poor methodological quality. Individual studies reported increased aerobic capacity but meta-analysis found no significant change in resting and peak systolic blood pressure, resting heart rate, aerobic capacity, falls, or mortality. The main behaviour change techniques were goal setting and instructions about how to perform given behaviours. There is limited evidence of the effectiveness of early post-TIA rehabilitation programmes with preventive lifestyle interventions. Further robust randomised controlled trials of comprehensive rehabilitation programmes that promote secondary prevention and lifestyle modification immediately after a TIA are needed. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  6. [Nurse involvement in primary care: it is the key to improve the outcomes in primary and secondary prevention?].

    PubMed

    Scardi, Sabino; Gori, Pierpaolo; Umari, Paolo

    2010-06-01

    Difficulties in management of risk factors, lifestyle and medications adherence to achieve secondary prevention of ischemic heart disease were described. Many studies indicate that the benefit of cardiac rehabilitation therapy after acute coronary events is only partially maintained during the following year. Thereafter, new strategies of medical care are needed to improve the long-term outcomes in coronary patients. Nurse co-ordinated, multidisciplinary cardiac rehabilitative programme could help patients to improve their lifestyle, to control their risk factors and to achieve their therapeutic goals for secondary prevention of ischemic heart disease.

  7. A managed care organization's use of integrated health management to improve secondary prevention of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Berthiaume, John T; Davis, Jim; Taira, Deborah A; Thein, Ko Ko

    2007-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of a managed care organization's multifactorial intervention program in optimizing secondary prevention of coronary artery disease (CAD). Retrospective observational analysis of claims-based data of health plan members with CAD receiving 1 or more prescriptions per year of any of the following classes of medications used for secondary prevention of CAD: lipid-lowering agents, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) and beta-blockers. Claims-based data of members from 2000 to 2004 were analyzed to discover trends in the use of medications for secondary prevention of CAD. chi(2) Test of proportion was used to determine whether the changes in the annual medication use rates were statistically significant. The annual medication use rates improved consistently throughout each year of the study period. From 2000 to 2004, the medication use rates increased for lipid-lowering agents (from 55% to 71%), ACE inhibitors or ARBs (from 44% to 55%), and beta-blockers (from 36% to 47%). Changes in all 3 indicators were statistically significant at P < .001. An integrated multifactorial approach is essential in addressing the underutilization of therapies available for secondary prevention of CAD. Managed care organizations are in a unique position to optimize the use of evidence-based pharmacological and behavioral therapies to effectively prevent and treat the underlying pathophysiology of CAD in member populations.

  8. Primary and secondary prevention of periodontal and peri-implant diseases: Introduction to, and objectives of the 11th European Workshop on Periodontology consensus conference.

    PubMed

    Tonetti, Maurizio S; Chapple, Iain L C; Jepsen, Søren; Sanz, Mariano

    2015-04-01

    Periodontitis prevalence remains high. Peri-implantitis is an emerging public health issue. Such a high burden of disease and its social, oral and systemic consequences are compelling reasons for increased attention towards prevention for individuals, professionals and public health officials. Sixteen systematic reviews and meta-reviews formed the basis for workshop discussions. Deliberations resulted in four consensus reports. This workshop calls for renewed emphasis on the prevention of periodontitis and peri-implantitis. A critical element is the recognition that prevention needs to be tailored to the individual's needs through diagnosis and risk profiling. Discussions identified critical aspects that may help in the large-scale implementation of preventive programs: (i) a need to communicate to the public the critical importance of gingival bleeding as an early sign of disease, (ii) the need for universal implementation of periodontal screening by the oral health care team, (iii) the role of the oral health team in health promotion and primary and secondary prevention, (iv) understanding the limitations of self-medication with oral health care products without a diagnosis of the underlying condition, and (v) access to appropriate and effective professional preventive care. The workshop provided specific recommendations for individuals, the oral health team and public health officials. Their implementation in different countries requires adaptation to respective specific national oral health care models. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Use of a computerized decision support system for primary and secondary prevention of work-related MSD disability.

    PubMed

    Womack, Sarah K; Armstrong, Thomas J

    2005-09-01

    The present study evaluates the effectiveness of a decision support system used to evaluate and control physical job stresses and prevent re-injury of workers who have experienced or are concerned about work-related musculoskeletal disorders. The software program is a database that stores detailed job information such as standardized work data, videos, and upper-extremity physical stress ratings for over 400 jobs in the plant. Additionally, the database users were able to record comments about the jobs and related control issues. The researchers investigated the utility and effectiveness of the software by analyzing its use over a 20-month period. Of the 197 comments entered by the users, 25% pertained to primary prevention, 75% pertained to secondary prevention, and 94 comments (47.7%) described ergonomic interventions. Use of the software tool improved primary and secondary prevention by improving the quality and efficiency of the ergonomic job analysis process.

  10. [Colonoscopy for early detection and prevention of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Niv, Yaron

    2010-08-01

    Colonoscopy has a limited success in the prevention of colorectal cancer of the right colon. Thus, there is place for improvement. The potential reasons for colonoscopy failure are the different biology of polyps on the right side of the colon or procedure quality. Preparation, withdrawal time, detection of all polyps and their removal using the best technique will overcome this problem. Furthermore, the implementation of a computerized database and report that includes quality assurance fields, will improve colonoscopy success rates.

  11. Therapeutic interventions and success in risk factor control for secondary prevention of stroke.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Sabin, Jose; Quintana, Manuel; Hernandez-Presa, Miguel Angel; Alvarez, Carlos; Chaves, Jose; Ribo, Marc

    2009-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the success rates in achieving preventive therapeutic goals in patients who experienced an ischemic stroke (IS) and compare them with those achieved in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). This was an observational multicenter case-control study (3 patients with IS and one control subject with CAD) performed in 1444 primary health centers in Spain. Preventive therapeutic objectives according to American Heart Association guidelines were predefined. Demographic data, vascular risk factors, and success/failure in achievement of objectives were recorded and compared between patients with IS and CAD. A total of 5458 patients were included, 4098 (75.1%) had IS and 1360 (24.9%) had CAD. Although more than 90% of patients with hypertension, diabetes, or dyslipidemia were under specific drug regimens, only about 25% achieved the recommended therapeutic objective for each risk factor. Success rate was especially low among patients with IS compared with CAD: hypertension (23.8% v 27.2%; P = .028); dyslipidemia (13.6% v 20.3%; P < .001); and abdominal obesity (49.1% v 54.6%; P = .002). The only objective widely achieved in both groups was the use of antithrombotic drugs in atrial fibrillation (97.2% v 94.7%; P = .125). Only 3.3% of patients with IS had all risk factors under control, compared with 5.6% of those with CAD (P = .006). For all patients, multivariate logistic regression model showed that independent predictors of full risk factor control were: presence of CAD as compared with IS (odds ratio [OR] 2.11; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.35-3.29; P = .001), older age (OR 1.02; 95% CI 1.00-1.04; P = .028), and having less than 3 risk factors (OR 16.98; 95% CI 9.02-31.97; P < .001). Success in achieving preventive therapeutic objectives for secondary prevention of vascular events is low, especially among patients with IS. There is an urgent need to devise strategies to improve risk factor control.

  12. Early Probiotic Supplementation for Eczema and Asthma Prevention: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Cabana, Michael D; McKean, Michelle; Caughey, Aaron B; Fong, Lawrence; Lynch, Susan; Wong, Angela; Leong, Russell; Boushey, Homer A; Hilton, Joan F

    2017-09-01

    To determine if probiotic administration during the first 6 months of life decreases childhood asthma and eczema. We conducted a randomized, double-blind controlled trial of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) supplementation on the cumulative incidence of eczema (primary end point) and asthma and rhinitis (secondary end points) in high-risk infants. For the first 6 months of life, intervention infants ( n = 92) received a daily dose of 10 billion colony-forming units of LGG and 225 mg of inulin (Amerifit Brands, Cromwell, CT), and control infants ( n = 92) received 325 mg of inulin alone. We used survival analysis methods to estimate disease incidences in the presence or absence of LGG and to estimate the efficacy of LGG in delaying or preventing these diseases. Infants were accrued over a 6-year period (median follow-up: 4.6 years; 95% retention rate at 2 years). At 2 years of age, the estimated cumulative incidence of eczema was 30.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 21.4%-40.4%) in the control arm and 28.7% (95% CI, 19.4%-38.0%) in the LGG arm, for a hazard ratio of 0.95 (95% CI, 0.59-1.53) (log-rank P = .83). At 5 years of age, the cumulative incidence of asthma was 17.4% (95% CI, 7.6%-27.1%) in the control arm and 9.7% (95% CI, 2.7%-16.6%) in the LGG arm, for a hazard ratio of 0.88 (95% CI, 0.41-1.87) (log-rank P = .25). For high-risk infants, early LGG supplementation for the first 6 months of life does not appear to prevent the development of eczema or asthma at 2 years of age. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  13. Pathogenesis and prevention of early pancreatic infection in experimental acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Foitzik, T; Fernández-del Castillo, C; Ferraro, M J; Mithöfer, K; Rattner, D W; Warshaw, A L

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors test antibiotic strategies aimed at either mitigating bacterial translocation from the gut or delivering antibiotics specifically concentrated by the pancreas for prevention of early secondary infection after acute necrotizing pancreatitis. BACKGROUND: Infection currently is the principal cause of death after severe pancreatitis. The authors have shown that the risk of bacterial infection correlates directly with the degree of tissue injury in a rodent model of pancreatitis. Bacteria most likely arrive by translocation from the colon. METHODS: Severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis was induced in rats by a combination of low-dose controlled intraductal infusion of glycodeoxycholic acid superimposed on intravenous cerulein hyperstimulation. At 6 hours, animals were randomly allocated to five treatment groups: controls, selective gut decontamination (oral antibiotics and cefotaxime), oral antibiotics alone, cefotaxime alone, or imipenem. At 96 hours, surviving animals were killed for quantitative bacterial study of the cecum, pancreas, and kidney. RESULTS: The 96-hour mortality (35%) was unaffected by any treatment regimen. Cecal gram-negative bacteria were significantly reduced only by the oral antibiotics. Pancreatic infection was significantly reduced by full-gut decontamination and by imipenem, but not by oral antibiotics or by cefotaxime alone. Renal infection was reduced by both intravenous antibiotics. CONCLUSIONS: Early pancreatic infection after acute necrotizing pancreatitis can be reduced with a full-gut decontamination regimen or with an antibiotic concentrated by the pancreas (imipenem) but not by unconcentrated antibiotics of similar spectrum (cefotaxime) or by oral antibiotics alone. These findings suggest that 1) both direct bacterial translocation from the gut and hematogenous seeding interplay in pancreatic infection while hematogenous seeding is dominant at extrapancreatic sites and 2) imipenem may be useful in clinical

  14. The influence of pharmacy and pharmacist characteristics on the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Puspitasari, Hanni Prihhastuti; Aslani, Parisa; Krass, Ines

    2015-10-01

    A range of extended/enhanced pharmacy services (EPS) are increasingly being offered in community pharmacies following a global paradigm shift in professional pharmacy practice from a product-oriented focus to a patient-centered approach. A number of pharmacy/pharmacist characteristics have been reported to influence EPS provision. To investigate the association between EPS provision and community pharmacists' support in CVD secondary prevention and to identify pharmacy/pharmacist characteristics which predict EPS provision and CVD support. Setting Australian community pharmacies. Mail surveys to 1350 randomly selected pharmacies, stratified by state/territory, exploring professional activities provided to clients with CVD, characteristics of pharmacies (including EPS provision), and pharmacist characteristics. The survey data were analyzed using univariate analyses and multiple linear regression analysis. The level of community pharmacists' CVD support, determined by summing respondents' score for seven CVD support-related activities, and the pharmacies' level of involvement in EPS provision, determined by summing respondents' score for four types of EPS. EPS provision was then used as an independent variable in the regression analysis of CVD support. A response rate of 15.8% (209/1320) was obtained after three waves of the survey. Pharmacy documentation, a private area, Quality Care Pharmacy Program accreditation, number of pharmacists, and pharmacists' resource adequacy were predictors of EPS provision (adjusted R2 = 0.299, p < 0.001). The provision of CVD support was predicted by EPS provision (β = 0.290, p < 0.001), pharmacists' frequent contacts with general practitioners (β = 0.298, p < 0.001), and pharmacy documentation (β = 0.134, p = 0.033). The regression model of CVD support explained 34.2% of the variation (p < 0.001). Community pharmacists could contribute to CVD secondary prevention if they had frequent contacts with general practitioners and

  15. Sports and Marfan Syndrome: Awareness and Early Diagnosis Can Prevent Sudden Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salim, Mubadda A.; Alpert, Bruce S.

    2001-01-01

    Physicians who work with athletes play an important role in preventing sudden death related to physical activity in people who have Marfan syndrome. Flagging those who have the physical stigmata and listening for certain cardiac auscultation sounds are early diagnostic keys that can help prevent deaths. People with Marfan syndrome should be…

  16. Early Childhood Intervention Programs: Opportunities and Challenges for Preventing Child Maltreatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asawa, Lindsay E.; Hansen, David J.; Flood, Mary Fran

    2008-01-01

    Due to the destructive impact of child maltreatment and limited available funding to address its consequences, the value of preventive measures is evident. Early Childhood Intervention Programs (ECIPs) provide excellent opportunities to prevent and identify cases of child maltreatment, among other varied objectives. These programs are typically…

  17. The Early Risers Preventive Intervention: Testing for Six-year Outcomes and Mediational Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernat, Debra H.; August, Gerald J.; Hektner, Joel M.; Bloomquist, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    We examined effects of the Early Risers "Skills for Success" early-age-targeted prevention program on serious conduct problems following 5 years of continuous intervention and one year of follow-up. We also examined if intervention effects on proximally-targeted variables found after 3 years mediated intervention effects on conduct…

  18. A Theater-Based Approach to Primary Prevention of Sexual Behavior for Early Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Lisa D.; Berlin, Cydelle; Palen, Lori-Ann; Ashley, Olivia Silber

    2012-01-01

    Early adolescence is a crucial period for preventing teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. This study evaluated STAR LO, a theater-based intervention designed to affect antecedents of sexual activity among urban early adolescents (N = 1,143). Public elementary/middle schools received the intervention or served as a wait-listed…

  19. Safe Start: How Early Experiences Can Help Reduce Violence. An Ounce of Prevention Fund Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawley, Theresa

    Noting that many communities have overlooked a promising approach to reducing violence in the United States, this report examines early risk factors for violence and discusses the potential of prevention and intervention programs for children ages birth to 5 years. The report defines violence and discusses the importance of early experiences in…

  20. Future Directions for Research on the Development and Prevention of Early Conduct Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes our state of knowledge regarding the development and prevention of conduct problems in early childhood, then identifies directions that would benefit future basic and applied research. Our understanding about the course and risk factors associated with early-developing conduct problems has been significantly enhanced during…

  1. Early Childhood Malaria Prevention and Children's Patterns of School Leaving in the Gambia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuilkowski, Stephanie S.; Jukes, Matthew C. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Early childhood malaria is often fatal, but its impact on the development and education of survivors has not received much attention. Malaria impacts cognitive development in a number of ways that may impact later educational participation. Aims: In this study, we examine the long-term educational effects of preventing early childhood…

  2. The Child and Family Traumatic Stress Intervention: secondary prevention for youth at risk of developing PTSD.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Steven J; Stover, Carla Smith; Marans, Steven R

    2011-06-01

    This pilot study evaluated the effectiveness of a four-session, caregiver-child Intervention, the Child and Family Traumatic Stress Intervention (CFTSI), to prevent the development of chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) provided within 30 days of exposure to a potentially traumatic event (PTE). One-hundred seventy-six 7 to 17-year-old youth were recruited through telephone screening based on report of one new distressing posttraumatic stress symptom after a PTE. Of those, 106 youth were randomly assigned to the Intervention (n = 53) or a four-session supportive Comparison condition (N = 53). Group differences in symptom severity were assessed using repeated measures with mixed effects models of intervention group, time, and the interaction of intervention and time. Logistic regression analyses were performed to assess treatment condition and any subsequent traumas experienced as predictors for full and partial PTSD diagnosis at 3-month follow-up. An exploratory chi-square analysis was performed to examine the differences in PTSD symptom criteria B, C, and D at follow-up. At baseline, youth in both groups had similar demographics, past trauma exposures and symptom severity. At follow-up, the Intervention group demonstrated significantly fewer full and partial PTSD diagnoses than the Comparison group on a standardized diagnostic measure of PTSD. Also, there was a significant group by time interaction for Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children's Posttraumatic Stress and Anxiety Indices as the CFTSI group had significantly lower posttraumatic and anxiety scores than the Comparison group. The results suggest that a caregiver-youth, brief preventative early intervention for youth exposed to a PTE is a promising approach to preventing chronic PTSD. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry. © 2010 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  3. Preventability of early vs. late readmissions in an academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Kelly L.; Dike, Ogechi; Doctoroff, Lauren; Jupiter, Marisa; Vanka, Anita

    2017-01-01

    Background It is unclear if the 30-day unplanned hospital readmission rate is a plausible accountability metric. Objective Compare preventability of hospital readmissions, between an early period [0–7 days post-discharge] and a late period [8–30 days post-discharge]. Compare causes of readmission, and frequency of markers of clinical instability 24h prior to discharge between early and late readmissions. Design, setting, patients 120 patient readmissions in an academic medical center between 1/1/2009-12/31/2010 Measures Sum-score based on a standard algorithm that assesses preventability of each readmission based on blinded hospitalist review; average causation score for seven types of adverse events; rates of markers of clinical instability within 24h prior to discharge. Results Readmissions were significantly more preventable in the early compared to the late period [median preventability sum score 8.5 vs. 8.0, p = 0.03]. There were significantly more management errors as causative events for the readmission in the early compared to the late period [mean causation score [scale 1–6, 6 most causal] 2.0 vs. 1.5, p = 0.04], and these errors were significantly more preventable in the early compared to the late period [mean preventability score 1.9 vs 1.5, p = 0.03]. Patients readmitted in the early period were significantly more likely to have mental status changes documented 24h prior to hospital discharge than patients readmitted in the late period [12% vs. 0%, p = 0.01]. Conclusions Readmissions occurring in the early period were significantly more preventable. Early readmissions were associated with more management errors, and mental status changes 24h prior to discharge. Seven-day readmissions may be a better accountability measure. PMID:28622384

  4. Another Treatment Gap: Restarting Secondary Prevention Medications The Women’s Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Jennifer G; Wallace, Robert; Safford, Monika M.; Pettinger, Mary; Cochrane, Barbara; Ko, Marcia G.; O’Sullivan, Mary Jo; Masaki, Kamal; Petrovich, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Background Women’s long-term patterns of evidence-based preventive medication utilization following a coronary heart disease (CHD) diagnosis have not been sufficiently studied. Methods Postmenopausal women 50–79 years were eligible for randomization in the Women’s Health Initiative’s (WHI) hormone trials if they met inclusion and exclusion criteria and were >80% adherent during a placebo-lead-in period and in the dietary modification trial if they were willing to follow a 20% fat diet. Those with adjudicated myocardial infarction or coronary revascularization after the baseline visit were included in the analysis (n=2627). Baseline visits occurred between 1993 and 1998, then annually until the trials ended in 2002 through 2005; medication inventories were obtained at baseline and years 1, 3, 6 and 9. Results Utilization at the first WHI visit following a CHD diagnosis increased over time for statins (49% to 72%; p<0.0001), beta-blockers (49% to 62%; p=0.003), and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin-II receptor blockers (ACEI/ARBs ) [26 to 43%; p<0.0001]. Aspirin use remained stable at 76% (p=0.09). Once women reported using a statin, aspirin, or beta-blocker, 84–89% reported use at 1 or more subsequent visits, with slightly lower rates for ACEI/ARBS (76%). Statin, aspirin, beta-blocker, or ACEI/ARB use was reported at 2 or more consecutive visits by 57%, 66%, 48%, and 28% respectively. These drugs were initiated or resumed at a later visit by 24%, 17%, 15%, and 17%, respectively, and were never used during the period of follow-up by 19%, 10%, 33%, and 49% respectively. Conclusions Efforts to improve secondary prevention medication utilization should target both drug initiation and restarting drugs in patients who have discontinued them. PMID:20354566

  5. Use of cardiovascular polypills for the secondary prevention of cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Masjuan, J; Gállego, J; Aguilera, J M; Arenillas, J F; Castellanos, M; Díaz, F; Portilla, J C; Purroy, F

    2018-01-08

    There is little control of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors in secondary prevention after an ischaemic stroke, in part due to a lack of adherence to treatment. The CV polypill may contribute to proper treatment adherence, which is necessary for CV disease prevention. This study aimed to establish how and in what cases the CV polypill should be administered. A group of 8 neurologists drafted consensus recommendations using structured brainstorming and based on their experience and a literature review. These recommendations are based on the opinion of the participating experts. The use of the CV polypill is beneficial for patients, healthcare professionals, and the health system. Its use is most appropriate for atherothrombotic stroke, lacunar stroke, stroke associated with cognitive impairment, cryptogenic stroke with CV risk factors, and silent cerebrovascular disease. It is the preferred treatment in cases of suspected poor adherence, polymedicated patients, elderly people, patients with polyvascular disease or severe atherothrombosis, young patients in active work, and patients who express a preference for the CV polypill. Administration options include switching from individual drugs to the CV polypill, starting treatment with the CV polypill in the acute phase in particular cases, use in patients receiving another statin or an angiotensin ii receptor antagonist, or de novo use if there is suspicion of poor adherence. Nevertheless, use of the CV polypill requires follow-up on the achievement of the therapeutic objectives to make dose adjustments. This document is the first to establish recommendations for the use of the CV polypill in cerebrovascular disease, beyond its advantages in terms of treatment adherence. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Blood pressure after recent stroke: baseline findings from the secondary prevention of small subcortical strokes trial.

    PubMed

    White, Carole L; Pergola, Pablo E; Szychowski, Jeff M; Talbert, Robert; Cervantes-Arriaga, Amin; Clark, Heather D; Del Brutto, Oscar H; Godoy, Ivan Esteban; Hill, Michael D; Pelegrí, Antoni; Sussman, Craig R; Taylor, Addison A; Valdivia, José; Anderson, Dave C; Conwit, Robin; Benavente, Oscar R

    2013-09-01

    Hypertension is the most powerful risk factor for stroke. The aim of this study was to characterize baseline blood pressure in participants in the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes trial. For this cross-sectional analysis, participants were categorized by baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP) < 120, 120-139, 140-159, 160-179, and ≥ 180 mm Hg and compared on demographic and clinical characteristics. Predictors of SBP < 140 mm Hg were examined. Mean SBP was 143±19 mm Hg while receiving an average of 1.7 antihypertensive medications; SBP ≥ 140 mm Hg for 53% and ≥ 160 mm Hg for 18% of the 3,020 participants. Higher SBP was associated with a history of hypertension and hypertension for longer duration (both P < 0.0001). Higher SBPs were associated with more extensive white matter disease on magnetic resonance imaging (P < 0.0001). There were significant differences in entry-level SBP when participants were categorized by race and region (both P < 0.0001). Black participants were more likely to have SBP ≥ 140 mm Hg. Multivariable logistic regression showed an independent effect for region with those from Canada more likely (odds ratio = 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.29, 2.32) to have SBP < 140 mm Hg compared with participants from United States. In this cohort with symptomatic lacunar stroke, more than half had uncontrolled hypertension at approximately 2.5 months after stroke. Regional, racial, and clinical differences should be considered to improve control and prevent recurrent stroke.

  7. Long-term outcome of early interventions to prevent posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Shalev, Arieh Y; Ankri, Yael; Gilad, Moran; Israeli-Shalev, Yossi; Adessky, Rhonda; Qian, Meng; Freedman, Sara

    2016-05-01

    Failing to prevent posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has major clinical and public health consequences. This work evaluates the 3-year outcome of offering early interventions to survivors with acute PTSD. Adults admitted consecutively to the hospital with acute DSM-IV PTSD were randomized, between June 2003 and October 2007, to 12 weeks of prolonged exposure (n = 63) or cognitive therapy (n = 40) or concealed SSRI (escitalopram; n = 23) versus placebo (n = 23). Eighty-two participants who declined treatment were followed as well. Treatment started 1 month after the traumatic event, and participants were reassessed 5 and 36 months later. Assessors were blinded to treatment allocation and acceptance. The Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) evaluated PTSD and PTSD symptoms. Self-reported symptoms, general functioning, and employment status were secondary outcomes. Participants lost to follow-up were missing completely at random. Prolonged exposure and cognitive therapy significantly reduced PTSD and PTSD symptoms between 1 and 5 months (mean CAPS total scores [95% CI] at 1 month: prolonged exposure = 73.59 [68.21-78.96] and cognitive therapy = 71.78 [66.92-78.93]; mean CAPS total scores [95% CI] at 5 months: prolonged exposure = 28.59 [21.89-35.29] and cognitive therapy = 29.48 [21.32-37.95], P < .001), and their results remained stable. At 3 years, however, the study groups had similar levels of PTSD symptoms (mean CAPS total scores [95% CI]: prolonged exposure = 31.51 [20.25-42.78]; cognitive therapy = 32.08 [20.74-43.42]; SSRI = 34.31 [16.54-52.07]; placebo = 32.13 [20.15-44.12]; and no intervention = 30.59 [19.40-41.78]), similar prevalence of PTSD (28.6%-46.2%), and similar secondary outcomes. Early prolonged exposure and cognitive therapy accelerated the recovery from acute PTSD. Their effect remained stable, however, without reducing the 3-year prevalence of the disorder. The lingering prevalence of PTSD, despite efficient interventions, illustrates a

  8. Application of nanotechnology in cancers prevention, early detection and treatment.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shraddha P; Patel, Parshottambhai B; Parekh, Bhavesh B

    2014-01-01

    Use of nanotechnology in medical science is a rapidly developing area. New opportunities of diagnosis, imaging and therapy have developed due to recent rapid advancement by nanotechnology. The most common areas to be affected are diagnostic, imaging and targeted drug delivery in gastroenterology, oncology, cardiovascular medicine, obstetrics and gynecology. Mass screening with inexpensive imaging might be possible in the near future with the help of nanotechnology. This review paper provides an overview of causes of cancer and the application of nanotechnology in cancer prevention, detection and treatment.

  9. [Practice and experience in early clinical education of dental students in preventive dentistry].

    PubMed

    Tao, Dan-ying; Shu, Chen-bin; Pan, Ying; Feng, Xi-ping

    2013-02-01

    To help dental students acquaint the medical environment, doctor-patient communication and relationship, early clinic education was arranged in our college of stomatology. The interesting topics were chosen to enhance the learning enthusiasm of the students in the teaching practice of preventive dentistry. Students were encouraged to practice the skill of doctor-patient communication. To obtain the satisfactory teaching effect and aim, it was important to pay attention to the aspects in the groups and clinical practice. Early clinic education in preventive dentistry help the students understand the specialty of preventive dentistry.

  10. Development of a mobile phone-based intervention to improve adherence to secondary prevention of coronary heart disease in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu; Gong, Enying; Kazi, Dhruv S; Gates, Ann B; Karaye, Kamilu Musa; Girerd, Nicolas; Bai, Rong; AlHabib, Khalid F; Li, Chaoyun; Sun, Kelly; Hong, Louisa; Fu, Hua; Peng, Weixia; Liu, Xianxia; Chen, Lei; Schwalm, J-D; Yan, Lijing L

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major disease burden globally and in China, but secondary prevention among CHD patients remains insufficient. Mobile health (mHealth) technology holds promise for improving secondary prevention but few previous studies included both provider-facing and patient-directed measures. We conducted a physician needs assessment survey (n = 59), physician interviews (n = 6), one focus group and a short cellphone message validation survey (n = 14) in Shanghai and Hainan, China. Based on these results, we developed a multifaceted mHealth intervention that includes: (1) a provider-facing bilingual mobile app guiding prescription of evidence-based medications for secondary prevention and (2) a patient-directed short messaging system automatically sending reminders to patients regarding medication adherence and lifestyle changes (4-5 messages per week for 12 weeks). This combined intervention has the potential to improve secondary prevention of CHD and to be adapted to other countries and healthcare conditions.

  11. Preventing Dropout in Secondary Schools. Educator's Practice Guide. What Works Clearinghouse. NCEE 2017-4028

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumberger, Russell W.; Addis, Howard; Allensworth, Elaine; Balfanz, Robert; Bruch, Julie; Dillon, Erin; Duardo, Debra; Dynarski, Mark; Furgeson, Joshua; Jayanthi, Madhavi; Newman-Gonchar, Rebecca; Place, Kate; Tuttle, Christina

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this practice guide is to offer educators specific, evidence-based recommendations that address the challenges of preventing dropout in secondary schools. This guide synthesizes the best publicly available research and shares practices that are supported by evidence. It is intended to be practical and easy for teachers and school…

  12. A qualitative assessment of program characteristics for preventing secondary conditions in individuals with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Patrenko, Christie L M; Tahir, Naira; Mahoney, Erin C; Chin, Nancy P

    2014-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) are a major public health problem that affects 2 to 5 percent of the population. Individuals with FASD are at high risk for secondary conditions, such as mental health problems, school disruptions, and trouble with the law. Evidence-based intervention programs are needed to prevent and treat secondary conditions in this population. The purpose of this study was to identify intervention program characteristics for preventing secondary conditions in individuals with FASD from the perspectives of parents and service providers. This qualitative study utilized a phenomenological approach to identify program characteristics for preventing secondary conditions. Twenty-five parents of children (ages 3 to 33) with FASD and 18 service providers participated in focus groups or individual interviews. Data was systematically analyzed using a framework approach. Themes did not differ by participant type. Participants emphasized five primary characteristics of intervention programs for individuals with FASD. Programs need to 1) be available to individuals across the lifespan, 2) have a prevention focus, 3) be individualized, 4) be comprehensive, and 5) be coordinated across systems and developmental stages. Participants discussed a variety of specific intervention strategies for each developmental stage and setting. Program characteristics identified in this study are consistent with a positive behavior support framework. This framework is discussed in the context of research on existing interventions for individuals with FASD, and recommendations for future intervention development and evaluation are highlighted.

  13. How Young People Perceive Factors That Support or Prevent Understanding between Worldviews: Perspectives of Finnish Lower Secondary School Pupils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimanen, Anuleena; Kuusisto, Elina

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigated Finnish youth's perceptions on what supports or prevents understanding between people holding different worldviews, especially religious and non-religious ones. A survey using projective, open-ended questions was conducted examining factors that enhance or damage inter-worldview dialogue among Finnish lower secondary school…

  14. Primary and Secondary HIV Prevention Among Persons with Severe Mental Illness: Recent Findings.

    PubMed

    Hobkirk, Andréa L; Towe, Sheri L; Lion, Ryan; Meade, Christina S

    2015-12-01

    Persons with severe mental illness (SMI) have been disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic, with higher rates of HIV prevalence and morbidity than the general population. Recent research has advanced our understanding of the complex factors that influence primary and secondary HIV prevention for those with SMI. Sex risk in this population is associated with socioeconomic factors (e.g., low income, history of verbal violence) and other health risk behaviors (e.g., substance use, no prior HIV testing). Several interventions are effective at reducing risk behavior, and reviews highlight the need for more well-controlled studies that assess long-term outcomes. Recent research has elucidated barriers that interfere with HIV treatment for SMI populations, including individual (e.g., apathy, substance use), social (e.g., stigma), and system factors (e.g., transportation, clinic wait times). Interventions that coordinate HIV care for individuals with SMI show promise as cost-effective methods for improving medication adherence and quality of life.

  15. Radon testing in rapid access lung clinics: an opportunity for secondary prevention.

    PubMed

    Smyth, R; Long, S; Wiseman, E; Sharpe, D; Breen, D; O'Regan, A

    2017-05-01

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas and a level 1 carcinogen. It acts synergistically with cigarette smoke to cause lung cancer. In Ireland, radon is estimated to be associated with 13 % of all lung cancers. Rapid access lung cancer clinics (RALC's) were established in the UK and Ireland to improve lung cancer management outcomes. There has been no attempt to date to provide advice on household radon exposure assessments in this setting. We performed a prospective feasibility study of radon assessment in our RALC to test the hypothesis that patients would avail of this service and that it would provide an opportunity for secondary prevention in at risk persons. We investigated household radon levels in consecutive patients who were newly referred with symptoms of lung cancer to the RALC in Galway University Hospital, Ireland over a 6-month period. Of 50 patients enrolled, 42 returned valid results. Overall 21 % of patients had radon levels recorded above the national reference level. Only 5 % of patients were aware of the association between radon gas and lung cancer. Smokers were significantly less likely to engage fully in radon testing. The development of RALC's offers a novel opportunity to integrate the concepts of radon exposure, cigarette smoking and the development of lung cancer, and to reinforce this message in the minds of at risk patients.

  16. Is there an app for that? Mobile phones and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Neubeck, Lis; Cartledge, Susie; Dawkes, Susan; Gallagher, Robyn

    2017-09-01

    Advances in technology coupled with increased penetration of mobile phones and smart devices are rapidly changing healthcare delivery. Mobile phone applications ('apps'), text messages, and Internet platforms used alone or in combination are now providing interventions targeting people with multiple cardiovascular risk factors. The present article will review the emerging evidence regarding apps and discuss their potential role in providing secondary prevention interventions via mobile phones. Seven recent randomized controlled trials used text messages or apps for six to 12 months, with or without differing combinations of other technology platforms. All studies, involved cardiac and diabetes populations, and demonstrated at least one positive improvement to cardiovascular risk factor profiles. When measured, acceptability of the intervention was high. Mobile apps and technology can deliver positive outcomes in the management of cardiovascular risk factors. However, because of the complexity of combination interventions, it is difficult to determine the 'active' ingredient. A future challenge for researchers and clinicians will be to respond quickly to these rapidly evolving interventions in order to ensure the delivery of effective, evidence-based outcomes.

  17. Cultural values and secondary prevention of breast cancer in african american women.

    PubMed

    Beckjord, Ellen Burke; Klassen, Ann C

    2008-01-01

    Improving mammography initiation and maintenance among African American women has been suggested as a strategy for reducing breast cancer mortality in this population. We examined cultural values in relation to self-reported breast cancer screening among 572 low-income, urban, African American women. Cultural values examined included time orientation, family authority, employment aspirations, value of past vs modern life, and reliance on medical professionals. Also, implications for continued development of culturally tailored health interventions and opportunities for the consideration of cultural values in health communication are discussed. Bivariate analyses showed that more traditional values were associated with worse screening histories and lower intentions for future screening. In multivariate analyses, two interactions were observed between cultural values and age: for younger women, more traditional values were associated with lower odds of having ever received a mammogram, and for older women, more traditional values were associated with lower odds of intentions to receive a mammogram in the next 2 years. This study adds to the evidence that cultural constructs, such as values, are associated with secondary prevention of breast cancer and supports the consideration of cultural constructs as important in increasing mammography and reducing breast cancer disparities for African American women.

  18. Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Fibrates for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and stroke.

    PubMed

    Pires da Rosa, Gilberto; Libânio, Diogo; Filipe Azevedo, Luís

    2017-01-01

    The influence of fibrates on cardiovascular risk has been the focus of several clinical trials. This Cochrane Collaboration Systematic Review evaluated the efficacy of fibrates for secondary prevention of cardiovascular events and stroke, analyzing 13 randomized controlled trials, in a total of 16 112 participants with a history of cardiovascular disease. Fibrates showed a protective effect for the composite outcome of non-fatal stroke, non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI) and vascular death, mainly due to reduction in the risk of non-fatal or fatal MI. Nonetheless, these results largely relied on studies including clofibrate, a drug withdrawn from the market in 2002. No statistically significant differences regarding adverse events were found between fibrates and placebo. Although insufficient to support the routine prescription of fibrates in this setting, this evidence should be taken into account when deciding on lipid-modifying therapy in dyslipidemic patients with a history of cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Barriers to healthy-lifestyle participation in stroke: consumer participation in secondary prevention design.

    PubMed

    Lennon, Olive C; Doody, Catherine; Ni Choisdealbh, Cliodhna; Blake, Catherine

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to explore community-dwelling stroke patients' perceived barriers to healthy-lifestyle participation for secondary disease prevention, as well as their preferred means for risk-reduction information dissemination and motivators to participation in healthy-lifestyle interventions. Four focus groups (5-6 stroke survivors per group) were defined from community support groups. Key questions addressed barriers to healthy-lifestyle adoption, preferred methods for receiving information and factors that would engage participants in a risk-reduction programme. Groups were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim and analysed for thematic content using a framework approach. Twenty-two participants, 12 men, 10 women, mean age 71.4 (53-87) years, were included in the study. Three overarching themes emerged as barriers to healthy-lifestyle participation: physical, mental and environmental. Exercise participation difficulties spread across all three themes; healthy eating and smoking cessation concentrated in environmental and mental dimensions. Talks (discussions) were noted as participants' preferred method of information provision. Risk-reduction programmes considered attractive were stroke specific, convenient and delivered by healthcare professionals and involved both social and exercise components. Many stroke patients appear unable to adopt healthy-lifestyle changes through advice alone because of physical, mental and environmental barriers. Risk-reduction programmes including interactive education should be specifically tailored to address barriers currently experienced and extend beyond the stroke survivor to others in their environment who influence lifestyle choices.

  20. Pan-Canadian development of cardiac rehabilitation and secondary prevention quality indicators.

    PubMed

    Grace, Sherry L; Poirier, Paul; Norris, Colleen M; Oakes, Garth H; Somanader, Deborah S; Suskin, Neville

    2014-08-01

    The Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) is implementing the Canadian Heart Health Strategy and Action Plan recommendation to build knowledge infrastructure, through its Data Definitions and Quality Indicator (QI) project. The CCS selected cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and secondary prevention as a content area for QI development. In accordance with the CCS QI Best Practice Methodology, rapid reviews of the literature were conducted. A long list of 37 QIs, in the areas of structure, process, and outcome were developed. Through an online survey, 26 (42%) of all contacted external experts rated each QI on importance, scientific acceptability, and feasibility, using a 7-point scale. The overall mean rating was 5.4 ± 1.4. Through a consensus process, the working group excluded 8 QIs based on this feedback, and several others were revised. A 30-day Web consultation was then undertaken, to solicit input from the broader CCS and CR community. A "top 5" list of QIs was requested by the CCS, which were: (1) inpatients referred to CR; (2) wait times from referral to CR enrollment; (3) patient self-management education; (4) increase in exercise capacity; and (5) emergency response strategy. Knowledge translation activities are now under way to promote utilization of the QIs and ultimately improve CR care. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Corruption Early Prevention: Decision Support System for President of the Republic of Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasmoko; Widhoyoko, S. A.; Ariyanto, S.; Indrianti, Y.; Noerlina; Muqsith, A. M.; Alamsyah, M.

    2017-01-01

    Corruption is an extraordinary crime, and then the prevention must also be extraordinary, simultaneously (national) in the form of early warning that involves all elements; government, industry, and society. To realize it the system needs to be built which in this study is called the Corruption Early Prevention (CEP) as a Decision Support System for President of the Republic of Indonesia. This study aims to examine 1) how is the construct of the Corruption Early Prevention as a Decision Support System for President of the Republic of Indonesia?, and 2) how is the design form of the system of Corruption Early Prevention as a Decision Support System for President of Republic of Indonesia? The research method is using Neuro-Research which is the collaboration of qualitative and quantitative research methods and the model development of Information Technology (IT). The research found that: 1) the construct of CEP is theoretically feasible, valid and reliable by content to be developed in the context of the prevention of corruption in Indonesia as an early prevention system that diagnoses Indonesia simultaneously and in real time, and 2) the concept of system design and business process of CEP is predicted to be realized in the IT-based program.

  2. [Compliance with recommendations in secondary prevention of stroke in primary care].

    PubMed

    Tamayo-Ojeda, Carmen; Parellada-Esquius, Neus; Salvador-González, Betlem; Oriol-Torón, Pilar Ángeles; Rodríguez-Garrido, M Dolores; Muñoz-Segura, Dolores

    Knowing compliance with secondary prevention recommendations of stroke in primary care and to identify factors associated with compliance. Multi-centre cross-sectional. Health primary care centres in a metropolitan area (944,280 inhabitants). Patients aged 18years and over with ischemic brain disease diagnosis prior to 6months before the study. Clinical history records of demographic variables, risk factors and cardiovascular comorbidity, drugs, blood pressure values (BP), LDL-cholesterol and medical visits by doctor and nurses after the event. Good adherence was considered when BP <140/90 mmHg, LDL-cholesterol <100 mg/dL, smoking abstention and preventive drugs prescription (anti-platelet/anticoagulants, statins and angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin-receptor-antagonists or diuretics) during the last 18months. A total of 21,976 patients, mean age 73.12 years (SD: 12.13), 48% women, 72.7% with stroke. Co-morbidity: hypertension 70.8%, dyslipidemia 55.1%, DM 30.9%, atrial fibrillation 14.1%, ischemic heart disease 13.5%, chronic renal failure 12.5%, heart failure 8.8%, peripheral arterial disease 6.2%, dementia 7.8%. No record was found for smoking in 3.7%, for BP in 3.5% and for LDL in 6.5%. Optimal control: abstention smoking in 3.7%, BP <140/90 in 65.7% and LDL <100 mg/dL in 41.0%. 86.2% anti-platelet/anticoagulants, 61.3% statins and 61.8% angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-receptor-antagonists or diuretic. Registration and risk factors control was higher in 66-79years aged and lower in 18-40years aged. The implementation of clinical guidelines recommendations for stroke prevention in primary care must be improved, especially among younger population. Organizational changes and more active involvement by professionals and strategies against therapeutic inertia must be taken. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Generative Mechanisms in Early Childhood Interventions: A Confirmatory Research Framework for Prevention.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Arthur J; Ou, Suh-Ruu

    2016-10-01

    This article reviews methodological and analytic approaches and impact evidence for understanding the mechanisms of effects of early childhood interventions, including delinquency and violence prevention. Illustrations from longitudinal studies of preschool preventive interventions are provided. We restrict our attention to preventive interventions for children from birth to age 5, including evidence from the Chicago Longitudinal Study (CLS), which investigates the impact of an established school-based early childhood intervention. Frameworks and evidence will be organized according to the Five-Hypothesis Model (5HM), which postulates that a variety of early childhood interventions impact later well-being through the promotion of cognitive and scholastic advantages, motivational advantages, social adjustment, family support behaviors, and school supports. Recommendations are made for advancing confirmatory approaches for identifying the most effective prevention programs using identification of generative mechanisms as a major methodological criterion.

  4. Generative Mechanisms in Early Childhood Interventions: A Confirmatory Research Framework for Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Arthur J.; Ou, Suh-Ruu

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews methodological and analytic approaches, and impact evidence for understanding the mechanisms of effects of early childhood interventions, including delinquency and violence prevention. Illustrations from longitudinal studies of preschool preventive interventions are provided. We restrict our attention to preventive interventions for children from birth to age 5, including evidence from the Chicago Longitudinal Study (CLS), which investigates the impact of an established school-based early childhood intervention. Frameworks and evidence will be organized according to the 5-Hypothesis Model (5HM), which postulates that a variety of early childhood interventions impact later well-being through the promotion of cognitive and scholastic advantages, motivational advantages, social adjustment, family support behaviors, and school supports. Recommendations are made for advancing confirmatory approaches for identifying the most effective prevention programs using identification of generative mechanisms as a major methodological criterion. PMID:26497315

  5. Outcomes Associated With Early Preventive Dental Care Among Medicaid-Enrolled Children in Alabama

    PubMed Central

    Morrisey, Michael A.; Sen, Bisakha

    2017-01-01

    Importance There is a recommendation for children to have a dental home by 6 months of age, but there is limited evidence supporting the effectiveness of early preventive dental care or whether primary care providers (PCPs) can deliver it. Objective To investigate the effectiveness of preventive dental care in reducing caries-related treatment visits among Medicaid enrollees. Design, Setting, and Participants High-dimensional propensity scores were used to address selection bias for a retrospective cohort study of children continuously enrolled in coverage from the Alabama Medicaid Agency from birth between 2008 and 2012, adjusting for demographics, access to care, and general health service use. Exposures Children receiving preventive dental care prior to age 2 years from PCPs or dentists vs no preventive dental care. Main Outcome and Measures Two-part models estimated caries-related treatment and expenditures. Results Among 19 658 eligible children, 25.8% (n = 3658) received early preventive dental care, of whom 44% were black, 37.6% were white, and 16.3% were Hispanic. Compared with matched children without early preventive dental care, children with dentist-delivered preventive dental care more frequently had a subsequent caries-related treatment (20.6% vs 11.3%, P < .001), higher rate of visits (0.29 vs 0.15 per child-year, P < .001), and greater dental expenditures ($168 vs $87 per year, P < .001). Dentist-delivered preventive dental care was associated with an increase in the expected number of caries-related treatment visits by 0.14 per child per year (95% CI, 0.11-0.16) and caries-related treatment expenditures by $40.77 per child per year (95% CI, $30.48-$51.07). Primary care provider–delivered preventive dental care did not significantly affect caries-related treatment use or expenditures. Conclusions and Relevance Children with early preventive care visits from dentists were more likely to have subsequent dental care, including caries

  6. A WIC-based intervention to prevent early childhood overweight.

    PubMed

    Whaley, Shannon E; McGregor, Samar; Jiang, Lu; Gomez, Judy; Harrison, Gail; Jenks, Eloise

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of a Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC)-based intervention on the food and beverage intake, physical activity, and television watching of children ages 1-5. Longitudinal surveys of intervention and control participants at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. Analysis of variance tests showed that the intervention had a small but significant impact on TV watching and fruit intake. The intervention was most protective for children younger than 2 years of age. Although the impact of the intervention was relatively small and limited to the youngest children served by WIC, findings suggest that the WIC setting is appropriate for improving healthful behaviors that are linked to reducing the rates of early childhood overweight. Copyright 2010 Society for Nutrition Education. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. How do stroke survivors and their carers use practitioners' advice on secondary prevention medications? Qualitative study of an online forum.

    PubMed

    Izuka, Nkeonye J; Alexander, Matthew A W; Balasooriya-Smeekens, Chantal; Mant, Jonathan; De Simoni, Anna

    2017-09-01

    Secondary prevention medications reduce risk of stroke recurrence, yet many people do not receive recommended treatment, nor take medications optimally. Exploring how patients report making use of practitioners' advice on secondary prevention medicines on an online forum and what feedback was received from other participants. Thematic analysis of the archive of Talkstroke (2004-2011), UK. Posts including any secondary prevention medication terms, General Practitioner (GP) and their replies were identified. Fifity participants talked about practitioners' advice on secondary prevention medications in 43 discussion threads. Patients consulted practitioners for reassurance and dealing with side effects. Practitioners' advice varied from altering to maintaining current treatment. Three main themes emerged from the use of practitioners' advice: patients following advice (reassured, happy when side effects made tolerable, or still retaining anxiety about treatment); patients not following advice (admitting adherence on-off or stopping medications as side effects still not tolerable); asking other participants for feedback on advice received. Practitioners' advice was disregarded mainly when related to dealing with statin side effects, after one or two consultations. Themes for feedback involved sharing experience, directing back to practitioners, or to external evidence. Side effects of secondary prevention medications and statins in particular, cause anxiety and resentment in some patients, and their concerns are not always addressed by practitioners. Practitioners could consider more proactive strategies to manage such side effects. Forum feedback was appropriate and supportive of the practitioners' advice received. Our findings from peer-to-peer online conversations confirm and widen previous research. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  8. Secondary Prevention of Cervical Cancer: ASCO Resource-Stratified Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Jeronimo, Jose; Castle, Philip E.; Temin, Sarah; Denny, Lynette; Gupta, Vandana; Kim, Jane J.; Luciani, Silvana; Murokora, Daniel; Ngoma, Twalib; Qiao, Youlin; Quinn, Michael; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Sasieni, Peter; Schmeler, Kathleen M.; Shastri, Surendra S.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To provide resource-stratified, evidence-based recommendations on the secondary prevention of cervical cancer globally. Methods ASCO convened a multidisciplinary, multinational panel of oncology, primary care, epidemiology, health economic, cancer control, public health, and patient advocacy experts to produce recommendations reflecting four resource-tiered settings. A review of existing guidelines, a formal consensus-based process, and a modified ADAPTE process to adapt existing guidelines were conducted. Other experts participated in formal consensus. Results Seven existing guidelines were identified and reviewed, and adapted recommendations form the evidence base. Four systematic reviews plus cost-effectiveness analyses provided indirect evidence to inform consensus, which resulted in ≥ 75% agreement. Recommendations Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing is recommended in all resource settings; visual inspection with acetic acid may be used in basic settings. Recommended age ranges and frequencies by setting are as follows: maximal: ages 25 to 65, every 5 years; enhanced: ages 30 to 65, if two consecutive negative tests at 5-year intervals, then every 10 years; limited: ages 30 to 49, every 10 years; and basic: ages 30 to 49, one to three times per lifetime. For basic settings, visual assessment is recommended as triage; in other settings, genotyping and/or cytology are recommended. For basic settings, treatment is recommended if abnormal triage results are present; in other settings, colposcopy is recommended for abnormal triage results. For basic settings, treatment options are cryotherapy or loop electrosurgical excision procedure; for other settings, loop electrosurgical excision procedure (or ablation) is recommended. Twelve-month post-treatment follow-up is recommended in all settings. Women who are HIV positive should be screened with HPV testing after diagnosis and screened twice as many times per lifetime as the general population. Screening

  9. Secondary Prevention of Cervical Cancer: ASCO Resource-Stratified Clinical Practice Guideline.

    PubMed

    Jeronimo, Jose; Castle, Philip E; Temin, Sarah; Denny, Lynette; Gupta, Vandana; Kim, Jane J; Luciani, Silvana; Murokora, Daniel; Ngoma, Twalib; Qiao, Youlin; Quinn, Michael; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Sasieni, Peter; Schmeler, Kathleen M; Shastri, Surendra S

    2017-10-01

    To provide resource-stratified, evidence-based recommendations on the secondary prevention of cervical cancer globally. ASCO convened a multidisciplinary, multinational panel of oncology, primary care, epidemiology, health economic, cancer control, public health, and patient advocacy experts to produce recommendations reflecting four resource-tiered settings. A review of existing guidelines, a formal consensus-based process, and a modified ADAPTE process to adapt existing guidelines were conducted. Other experts participated in formal consensus. Seven existing guidelines were identified and reviewed, and adapted recommendations form the evidence base. Four systematic reviews plus cost-effectiveness analyses provided indirect evidence to inform consensus, which resulted in ≥ 75% agreement. Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing is recommended in all resource settings; visual inspection with acetic acid may be used in basic settings. Recommended age ranges and frequencies by setting are as follows: maximal: ages 25 to 65, every 5 years; enhanced: ages 30 to 65, if two consecutive negative tests at 5-year intervals, then every 10 years; limited: ages 30 to 49, every 10 years; and basic: ages 30 to 49, one to three times per lifetime. For basic settings, visual assessment is recommended as triage; in other settings, genotyping and/or cytology are recommended. For basic settings, treatment is recommended if abnormal triage results are present; in other settings, colposcopy is recommended for abnormal triage results. For basic settings, treatment options are cryotherapy or loop electrosurgical excision procedure; for other settings, loop electrosurgical excision procedure (or ablation) is recommended. Twelve-month post-treatment follow-up is recommended in all settings. Women who are HIV positive should be screened with HPV testing after diagnosis and screened twice as many times per lifetime as the general population. Screening is recommended at 6 weeks postpartum in

  10. Possible prevention of chronic hepatitis B by early interferon therapy.

    PubMed

    Trépo, C; Chemin, I; Petit, M A; Chossegros, P; Zoulim, F; Chevallier, P; Sepetjan, M

    1990-01-01

    A study is currently underway to investigate the efficacy of interferon therapy in patients with prolonged (greater than or equal to 10 weeks but less than 6 months) hepatitis B infection. To date, a total of 15 patients have been enrolled in the study and randomly assigned to receive either placebo for 24 weeks (n = 8) or interferon 5 million units subcutaneously 3 times a week for 24 weeks (n = 7), with follow up for 1 year. Thirteen patients have completed the follow-up period: seven patients in the placebo group and six in the treated group. Five of the six treated patients completely eradicated the infection during interferon therapy, with clearance of hepatitis B e and surface antigens, and seroconversion to antibody positivity in each case. Two of the eight placebo patients seroconverted during the placebo period. Clearance of hepatitis B e antigen was associated with a sudden rise in serum transaminase levels and an exacerbation of hepatitis, a phenomenon that has also been reported in chronic hepatitis B patients who have responded well to interferon therapy. Therapy was well tolerated in all cases. Our results suggest that interferon treatment of patients with prolonged hepatitis B infection may prevent progression to chronicity. If confirmed by further study, they should trigger more vigilant screening for patients with raised serum transaminase levels and viral markers of hepatitis B infection.

  11. A randomised controlled trial for overweight and obese parents to prevent childhood obesity--Early STOPP (STockholm Obesity Prevention Program).

    PubMed

    Sobko, Tanja; Svensson, Viktoria; Ek, Anna; Ekstedt, Mirjam; Karlsson, Håkan; Johansson, Elin; Cao, Yingting; Hagströmer, Maria; Marcus, Claude

    2011-05-18

    Overweight and obesity have a dramatic negative impact on children's health not only during the childhood but also throughout the adult life. Preventing the development of obesity in children is therefore a world-wide health priority. There is an obvious urge for sustainable and evidenced-based interventions that are suitable for families with young children, especially for families with overweight or obese parents. We have developed a prevention program, Early STOPP, combating multiple obesity-promoting behaviors such unbalanced diet, physical inactivity and disturbed sleeping patterns. We also aim to evaluate the effectiveness of the early childhood obesity prevention in a well-characterized population of overweight or obese parents. This protocol outlines methods for the recruitment phase of the study. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) targets overweight and/or obese parents with infants, recruited from the Child Health Care Centers (CHCC) within the Stockholm area. The intervention starts when infants are one year of age and continues until they are six and is regularly delivered by a trained coach (dietitian, physiotherapist or a nurse). The key aspects of Early STOPP family intervention are based on Swedish recommendations for CHCC, which include advices on healthy food choices and eating patterns, increasing physical activity/reducing sedentary behavior and regulating sleeping patterns. The Early STOPP trial design addresses weaknesses of previous research by recruiting from a well-characterized population, defining a feasible, theory-based intervention and assessing multiple measurements to validate and interpret the program effectiveness. The early years hold promise as a time in which obesity prevention may be most effective. To our knowledge, this longitudinal RCT is the first attempt to demonstrate whether an early, long-term, targeted health promotion program focusing on healthy eating, physical activity/reduced sedentary behaviors and normalizing

  12. The 'diet heart' hypothesis in secondary prevention of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    de Lorgeril, M; Salen, P; Monjaud, I; Delaye, J

    1997-01-01

    From this detailed analysis of the main dietary trials conducted over the last 30 years in the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease, it can be said that the older trials were conducted on low risk patients and used high fat diets (about 40% of energy as lipids), comprising low saturated fat and cholesterol intake but very high (15 to 20% of energy) polyunsaturated fat intake, particularly from the omega-6 fatty acid family. These experimental diets were designed to reduce blood cholesterol and failed to improve prognosis. By contrast, recent trials were not primarily designed to reduce cholesterol, were conducted in medium- and high-risk patients and used low fat diets supplemented by omega-3 fatty acids from various sources. In two of these trials, the consumption of natural antioxidants, oligoelements and vegetable proteins was increased. Recurrence rate was reduced in the range of 30 to 70%. One conclusion from these well-conducted recent experiments on more than 3000 patients is that new and more specific dietary recommendations are clearly warranted in secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. They should be more specific and more clearly defined and therefore different from those generally provided in the U.S.A. and Europe at present. In a recent Consensus Panel statement, authors wrote less than one line to describe a cardioprotective diet in patients with coronary heart disease, summarized as < or = 30% fat, < 7% saturated fat, < 200 mg.day-1 cholesterol. This is both too much (too restrictive to hope that white European and American patients will adhere in the long-term) and insufficient because dietary counselling cannot be restricted to three factors. Ulbricht and Southgate recently emphasized that the relationship between diet and coronary heart disease is more complex than the current cholesterol hypothesis. They identified at least seven major dietary factors, including fibres, although the evidence of an effect on coronary heart

  13. Examining the Effectiveness of the Smoking Prevention Program "I Do Not Smoke, I Exercise" in Elementary and Secondary School Settings.

    PubMed

    Kolovelonis, Athanasios; Goudas, Marios; Theodorakis, Yannis

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effectiveness of the smoking prevention program "I do not smoke, I exercise" implemented with elementary and secondary school students. "I do not smoke, I exercise" is a theory-based smoking prevention program that promotes exercise as an alternative of smoking. The program consists of eight sessions implemented weekly. Participants were 338 Greek students (135 elementary and 203 secondary students) who were pre- and posttested in smoking, program, and exercise-related measures. The results showed that the program had significant effects on elementary students' attitudes toward smoking, intention to smoke, subjective norms, attitudes toward the application of the program, and knowledge about the health consequences of smoking. For secondary students, significant effects were found on students' perceived behavioral control and knowledge about the health consequences of smoking, while very few students reported a smoking experience before and after the intervention. Therefore the program "I do not smoke, I exercise" may have positive effects on variables related with smoking behavior. Differences in the program's impact on elementary and secondary students were identified. All these are discussed with reference to the need of implementing smoking prevention programs in schools contexts. © 2016 Society for Public Health Education.

  14. Prevention of secondary hyperparathyroidism in hemodialysis patients: the key role of native vitamin D supplementation.

    PubMed

    Jean, G; Vanel, T; Terrat, J-C; Chazot, C

    2010-10-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) is a frequent complication in chronic kidney disease, especially in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Treatments for SHPT include calcitriol analogues (CA), phosphate binders, cinacalcet (CC), and surgical parathyroidectomy (PTX). This study aimed to assess the incidence and prevalence of SHPT in a single center during the period when native vitamin D (N-VitD) supplementation and CC treatment became available. All incident and prevalent HD patients were prospectively recorded and compared using 3 periods from 2004 to 2005 (period 1), 2006 to 2007 (period 2), and 2008 to 2009 (period 3). SHPT was diagnosed with serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels >300 pg/mL or the need for CA, CC, or PTX. Between periods 1 and 3, in incident patients (n=120 and 101), N-VitD prescription increased from 11% to 68% (P<0.0001), CA prescription remained stable (40%), and patients with PTH>300 pg/mL decreased from 40% to 12% (P<0.0001). In prevalent HD patients (n=235), N-VitD treatment increased from 55% to 91% (P<0.0001), whereas treatment with CA decreased from 67% to 17% (P<0.0001). Patients with serum PTH>300 pg/mL decreased from 38% to 13% (P<0.001), whereas patients with PTH<150 pg/mL remained stable (<30%). New CC prescriptions decreased from 45 to 3 (P<0.0001). Since 2004, SHPT has decreased drastically in incident and prevalent HD patients. The preventive role of N-VitD supplementation appears to be obvious and represents one more argument for its general recommendation in CKD patients. © 2010 The Authors. Hemodialysis International © 2010 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  15. Improving secondary prevention in coronary bypass patients: closing the audit loop

    PubMed Central

    Martin, T N; Irving, R J; Sutherland, M; Sutherland, K; Bloomfield, P

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To complete the audit loop assessing secondary preventative care of patients who had had coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Design: Two separate surveys of 1000 patients who had had CABG at the regional centre between 1988 and 1997, selected in 1998 and 2001. A single page questionnaire was sent to the patient’s general practitioner. Interventions: A list was sent to each general practice in Lothian, Scotland, of their patients on the CABG database and the results of the original survey. Lothian Health organised a project to contact and recall patients with cardiac disease in each practice. Sixty five (of 128) practices participated. Main outcome measures: Blood pressure, smoking status, serum cholesterol concentrations, and prescription of lipid lowering drugs and aspirin. Results: 918 questionnaires (92%) in the second survey were returned describing 875 patients: 151 (17%) patients smoked and 752 patients (86%) took aspirin. Mean (SD) systolic blood pressure was lower in the second survey (142.5 (19.2) mm Hg in the first survey v 139.4 (19.1) mm Hg, p < 0.005). In our first survey 34% of patients had cholesterol concentrations less than target (5.2 mmol/l). This increased from 12% of patients operated on in 1988 to 50% of patients operated on in 1997 (Spearman rank correlation 0.77, p < 0.01). In the second survey this proportion had risen to 65% and the correlation with year of operation was abolished. Conclusions: By closing the audit loop, substantial improvements were shown in the management of risk factors in patients who have had coronary artery surgery in Lothian. PMID:15772197

  16. Translating policy into practice: a case study in the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Prior, Lindsay; Wilson, Joanne; Donnelly, Michael; Murphy, Andrew W; Smith, Susan M; Byrne, Mary; Byrne, Molly; Cupples, Margaret E

    2014-04-01

    This paper focuses on the relationships between health 'policy' as it is embodied in official documentation, and health 'practice' as reported and reflected on in the talk of policy-makers, health professionals and patients. The specific context for the study involves a comparison of policies relating to the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) in the two jurisdictions of Ireland - involving as they do a predominantly state funded (National Health Service) system in the north and a mixed health-care economy in the south. The key question is to determine how the detail of health policy as contained in policy documents connects to and gets translated into practice and action. The data sources for the study include relevant health-care policy documents (N=5) and progress reports (N=6) in the two Irish jurisdictions, and semi-structured interviews with a range of policy-makers (N=28), practice nurses (14), general practitioners (12) and patients (13) to explore their awareness of the documents' contents and how they saw the impact of 'policy' on primary care practice. The findings suggest that although strategic policy documents can be useful for highlighting and channelling attention to health issues that require concerted action, they have little impact on what either professionals or lay people do. To influence the latter and to encourage a systematic approach to the delivery of health care it seems likely that contractual arrangements - specifying tasks to be undertaken and methods for monitoring and reporting on activity - are required. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Translating policy into practice: a case study in the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Prior, Lindsay; Wilson, Joanne; Donnelly, Michael; Murphy, Andrew W.; Smith, Susan M.; Byrne, Mary; Byrne, Molly; Cupples, Margaret E.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background  This paper focuses on the relationships between health ‘policy’ as it is embodied in official documentation, and health ‘practice’ as reported and reflected on in the talk of policy‐makers, health professionals and patients. The specific context for the study involves a comparison of policies relating to the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) in the two jurisdictions of Ireland – involving as they do a predominantly state funded (National Health Service) system in the north and a mixed health‐care economy in the south. The key question is to determine how the detail of health policy as contained in policy documents connects to and gets translated into practice and action. Methods  The data sources for the study include relevant health‐care policy documents (N = 5) and progress reports (N = 6) in the two Irish jurisdictions, and semi‐structured interviews with a range of policy‐makers (N = 28), practice nurses (14), general practitioners (12) and patients (13) to explore their awareness of the documents’ contents and how they saw the impact of ‘policy’ on primary care practice. Results  The findings suggest that although strategic policy documents can be useful for highlighting and channelling attention to health issues that require concerted action, they have little impact on what either professionals or lay people do. Conclusion  To influence the latter and to encourage a systematic approach to the delivery of health care it seems likely that contractual arrangements – specifying tasks to be undertaken and methods for monitoring and reporting on activity – are required. PMID:22151698

  18. Implementation of cardiovascular secondary prevention guidelines in clinical practice: a nationwide survey in Italy.

    PubMed

    Perrone-Filardi, P; Poli, A; Ambrosio, G; Proto, C; Chimini, C; Chiariello, M

    2012-02-01

    To report the implementation of cardiovascular secondary prevention guidelines following a cardiovascular event in Italy. Data were collected from 878 consecutive patients, who had suffered a cardiovascular event requiring hospitalisation in the preceding 12-24 months and who presented at 49 outpatient clinics across Italy. Cardiovascular risk markers were assessed through clinical examination, interview and reviewing of patients' charts; in addition, we collected information on changes in prevalence of selected risk factors that occurred since the time of index event. At the time of evaluation, increased body mass index (BMI) was observed in 35% of patients, with 20% being obese; 26% had diabetes and 21% uncontrolled hypertension. Although 91% of patients were on statins, no measurement of low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol was available in the previous 6 months in 27% of patients and 16% had no knowledge of any lipid parameter in the same period. In the remaining patients, LDL was <100 mg dl(-1) in 57% and <70 mg dl(-1) in 20% of them. From the time of index event to interview, prevalence of uncontrolled hypertension remained stable, from 24% to 21% of patients; according to the patients' self-reporting, smoking had declined from 32% to 13% of patients and physical inactivity from 43% to 33% of patients. This survey shows, in a large national cohort, a suboptimal implementation of lifestyle changes and inadequate lipid control in patients at high cardiovascular risk after a cardiovascular event. Reinforcement of patients and physicians, implementation and adherence to guidelines is needed to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Point-of-care cluster randomized trial in stroke secondary prevention using electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Dregan, Alex; van Staa, Tjeerd P; McDermott, Lisa; McCann, Gerard; Ashworth, Mark; Charlton, Judith; Wolfe, Charles D A; Rudd, Anthony; Yardley, Lucy; Gulliford, Martin C; Trial Steering Committee

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the remote introduction of electronic decision support tools into family practices improves risk factor control after first stroke. This study also aimed to develop methods to implement cluster randomized trials in stroke using electronic health records. Family practices were recruited from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink and allocated to intervention and control trial arms by minimization. Remotely installed, electronic decision support tools promoted intensified secondary prevention for 12 months with last measure of systolic blood pressure as the primary outcome. Outcome data from electronic health records were analyzed using marginal models. There were 106 Clinical Practice Research Datalink family practices allocated (intervention, 53; control, 53), with 11 391 (control, 5516; intervention, 5875) participants with acute stroke ever diagnosed. Participants at trial practices had similar characteristics as 47,887 patients with stroke at nontrial practices. During the intervention period, blood pressure values were recorded in the electronic health records for 90% and cholesterol values for 84% of participants. After intervention, the latest mean systolic blood pressure was 131.7 (SD, 16.8) mm Hg in the control trial arm and 131.4 (16.7) mm Hg in the intervention trial arm, and adjusted mean difference was -0.56 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, -1.38 to 0.26; P=0.183). The financial cost of the trial was approximately US $22 per participant, or US $2400 per family practice allocated. Large pragmatic intervention studies may be implemented at low cost by using electronic health records. The intervention used in this trial was not found to be effective, and further research is needed to develop more effective intervention strategies. http://www.controlled-trials.com. Current Controlled Trials identifier: ISRCTN35701810. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Statins and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism: pooled analysis of published observational cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Kunutsor, Setor K; Seidu, Samuel; Khunti, Kamlesh

    2017-05-21

    There have been suggestions that statins may have a potential role in secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) [which includes deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE)], but the evidence is inconsistent. We aimed to evaluate the association between statin use and risk of recurrent VTE. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational cohort studies. All relevant studies which reported associations between statin use and recurrent VTE outcomes were identified from MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, and manual search of bibliographies from inception to January 2017. Study specific relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals were aggregated using random effects models. Eight eligible studies comprising of 103 576 participants and 13 168 recurrent VTE outcomes were included in the pooled analysis. In pooled analysis of 7 studies, the RR for recurrent VTE was 0.73 (0.68-0.79) when comparing statin use with no use. There was no evidence of heterogeneity between contributing studies (I2=0%, 0-71%; P = 0.93). The RRs for recurrent PE (three studies) and DVT (two studies) comparing statin use with no statin use were 0.75 (95% CI: 0.58-0.96) and 0.66 (95% CI: 0.60-0.71) respectively. Available evidence from observational cohort studies suggests a beneficial effect of statin use on VTE recurrence. Well-designed intervention studies are needed to corroborate these findings. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. [Lipid control in secondary prevention: multicenter observational study in primary care].

    PubMed

    Brotons, C; Maiques, A; Mostaza, J; Pintó, X; Vilaseca, J

    2004-06-30

    To assess the implementation of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment in coronary patients followed in primary care. Observational prospective study of 6 months of follow-up. Primary care centers all over Spain. Men and women, between 18 and 75 years old, diagnosed in the last 3 years of myocardial infarction, stable angina, and unstable angina, with cholesterol levels higher than the lipid therapeutical goal recommended by the Guía de Prevención Cardiovascular del Programa de Actividades y de Promoción de la Salud de la Sociedad Española de Medicina de Familia y Comunitaria. Patients were recruited between february of 1998 and july of 1999, and were followed for 6 months. Total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, weight, height, body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP). 4464 patients were included, mean age of 59 years (range, 20-96), 60% men. At 6 months, 66% of the patients had a cholesterol level higher than 200 mg/dL, 55% had LDL-C higher than 130 mg/dL, and 11% had triglycerides higher than 190 mg/dL. At 6 months a reduction of 70 mg/dL of total cholesterol, of 52 mg/dL of triglycerides, and of 51 mg/dL of LDL-C, and an increase of 4 mg/dL of HDL-Cholesterol was observed. Also, SBP and DBP were reduced 5 mm Hg and 3 mm Hg. Although a clear improved was observed in the control of lipids and other risk factors, there is still a considerable potential to raise standards in secondary prevention of coronary patients followed in primary care concerning control of cardiovascular risk factors, particularly total cholesterol and lipid fractions.

  2. Quality of life after lacunar stroke: the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes study.

    PubMed

    Dhamoon, Mandip S; McClure, Leslie A; White, Carole L; Lau, Helena; Benavente, Oscar; Elkind, Mitchell S V

    2014-01-01

    We sought to describe the course and predictors of quality of life (QOL) after lacunar stroke. We hypothesized that there is a decline in QOL after recovery from lacunar stroke. The Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes is a clinical trial in lacunar stroke patients with annual assessments of QOL with the stroke-specific QOL score. The overall score was used and analyzed as a continuous variable (range 0-5). We fit linear mixed models to assess the trend in QOL over time, assuming linearity of time, and adjusted for demographics, medical risk factors, cognitive factors, and functional status in univariable and multivariable models. Among 2870 participants, mean age was 63.4 years (SD 10.7), 63% were men, 51% White, 32% Hispanic, 36% had college education, 36% had diabetes, 89% had hypertension, and 10% had prior stroke. Mean poststroke Barthel Index (BI) score was 95.4 (assessed on average 6 months after stroke). In the final multivariable model, there was an average increase in QOL of .6% per year, and factors associated with decline in QOL over time included age (-.0003 per year, P < .0001), any college education (-.0013 per year, .01), prior stroke (-.004 per year, P < .0001), and BI (-.0002 per year, P < .0001). In this clinical trial of lacunar stroke patients, there was a slight annual increase in QOL overall, and age, level of education, and prior stroke were associated with changes in QOL over time. Multiple strokes may cause decline in QOL over time in the absence of recurrent events. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Vertebrobasilar ectasia in patients with lacunar stroke: the secondary prevention of small subcortical strokes trial.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Makoto; Pearce, Lesly A; Ohara, Nobuyuki; Field, Thalia S; Bazan, Carlos; Anderson, David C; Hart, Robert G; Benavente, Oscar R

    2015-05-01

    The clinical implications of vertebrobasilar ectasia (VBE) in patients with cerebral small-artery disease are not well defined. We investigated whether VBE is associated with recurrent stroke, major hemorrhage, and death in a large cohort of patients with recent lacunar stroke. Maximum diameters of the vertebral and basilar arteries were measured by magnetic resonance angiography and computed tomographic angiography in 2621 participants in the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes trial. VBE was defined a priori as basilar artery greater than 4.5 mm and/or vertebral artery greater than 4.0 mm. Patient characteristics and risks of stroke recurrence and mortality during follow-up (median, 3.5 years) were compared between patients with and without VBE. VBE affecting 1 or more arteries was present in 200 (7.6%) patients. Patient features independently associated with VBE were increasing age, male sex, white race ethnicity, hypertension, and higher baseline diastolic blood pressure. Baseline systolic blood pressure was inversely associated with VBE. After adjustment for other risk factors, VBE was not predictive of recurrent stroke (hazard ratio [HR], 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], .85-1.9) or major hemorrhage (HR, 1.5; CI, .94-2.6), but was of death (HR, 1.7; CI, 1.1-2.7). In this large well-characterized cohort of patients with recent lacunar stroke, VBE was predictive of death but not of recurrent stroke or major hemorrhage. In these exploratory analyses, the frequency of VBE was directly related to diastolic blood pressure but inversely related to systolic blood pressure. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Achieved Blood Pressure and Outcomes in the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes Trial.

    PubMed

    Odden, Michelle C; McClure, Leslie A; Sawaya, B Peter; White, Carole L; Peralta, Carmen A; Field, Thalia S; Hart, Robert G; Benavente, Oscar R; Pergola, Pablo E

    2016-01-01

    Studies suggest a J-shaped association between blood pressure and cardiovascular events in the setting of intensive systolic blood pressure control; whether there is a similar association with stroke remains less well established. The Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes was a randomized trial to evaluate higher (130-149 mm Hg) versus lower (<130 mm Hg) systolic blood pressure targets in participants with recent lacunar infarcts. We evaluated the association of mean achieved blood pressure, 6 months after randomization, and recurrent stroke, major vascular events, and all-cause mortality. After a mean follow up of 3.7 years, there was a J-shaped association between achieved blood pressure and outcomes; the lowest risk was at ≈124 and 67 mm Hg systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively. For example, above a systolic blood pressure of 124 mm Hg, 1 standard deviation higher (11.1 mm Hg) was associated with increased mortality (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.9; 95% confidence interval: 1.4, 2.7), whereas below this level, this relationship was inverted (0.29; 0.10, 0.79), P<0.001 for interaction. Above a diastolic blood pressure of 67 mm Hg, a 1 standard deviation higher (8.2 mm Hg) was associated with an increased risk of stroke (2.2; 1.4, 3.6), whereas below this level, the association was in the opposite direction (0.34; 0.13, 0.89), P=0.02 for interaction. The lowest risk of all events occurred at a nadir of ≈120 to 128 mm Hg systolic blood pressure and 65 to 70 mm Hg diastolic blood pressure. Future studies should evaluate the impact of excessive blood pressure reduction, especially in older populations with preexisting vascular disease. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00059306. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Mobile phone text messaging to improve medication adherence in secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Adler, Alma J; Martin, Nicole; Mariani, Javier; Tajer, Carlos D; Owolabi, Onikepe O; Free, Caroline; Serrano, Norma C; Casas, Juan P; Perel, Pablo

    2017-04-29

    Worldwide at least 100 million people are thought to have prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD). This population has a five times greater chance of suffering a recurrent cardiovascular event than people without known CVD. Secondary CVD prevention is defined as action aimed to reduce the probability of recurrence of such events. Drug interventions have been shown to be cost-effective in reducing this risk and are recommended in international guidelines. However, adherence to recommended treatments remains sub-optimal. In order to influence non-adherence, there is a need to develop scalable and cost-effective behaviour-change interventions. To assess the effects of mobile phone text messaging in patients with established arterial occlusive events on adherence to treatment, fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events, and adverse effects. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, the Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science on Web of Science on 7 November 2016, and two clinical trial registers on 12 November 2016. We contacted authors of included studies for missing information and searched reference lists of relevant papers. We applied no language or date restrictions. We included randomised trials with at least 50% of the participants with established arterial occlusive events. We included trials investigating interventions using short message service (SMS) or multimedia messaging service (MMS) with the aim to improve adherence to medication for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. Eligible comparators were no intervention or other modes of communication. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. In addition, we attempted to contact all authors on how the SMS were developed. We included seven trials (reported in 13 reports) with 1310 participants randomised. Follow-up ranged from one month to 12 months. Due to heterogeneity in the methods, population and outcome measures, we were unable to conduct meta-analysis on these studies

  6. Internet-based interventions for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Devi, Reena; Singh, Sally J; Powell, John; Fulton, Emily A; Igbinedion, Ewemade; Rees, Karen

    2015-12-22

    The Internet could provide a means of delivering secondary prevention programmes to people with coronary heart disease (CHD). To determine the effectiveness of Internet-based interventions targeting lifestyle changes and medicines management for the secondary prevention of CHD. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, in December 2014. We also searched six other databases in October 2014, and three trials registers in January 2015 together with reference checking and handsearching to identify additional studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating Internet-delivered secondary prevention interventions aimed at people with CHD. Two review authors independently assessed risk of bias and extracted data according to the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. We assessed evidence quality using the GRADE approach and presented this in a 'Summary of findings' table. Eighteen trials met our inclusion criteria. Eleven studies are complete (1392 participants), and seven are ongoing. Of the completed studies, seven interventions are broad, targeting the lifestyle management of CHD, and four focused on physical activity promotion. The comparison group in trials was usual care (n = 6), minimal intervention (n = 3), or traditional cardiac rehabilitation (n = 2).We found no effects of Internet-based interventions for all-cause mortality (odds ratio (OR) 0.27, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.04 to 1.63; participants = 895; studies = 6; low-quality evidence). There was only one case of cardiovascular mortality in a control group (participants = 895; studies = 6). No incidences of non-fatal re-infarction were reported across any of the studies. We found no effects for revascularisation (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.37 to 1.27; participants = 895; studies = 6; low-quality evidence).We found no effects for total cholesterol (mean difference (MD) 0.00, 95% CI -0.27 to 0.28; participants = 439; studies = 4; low

  7. Prevention of chronic PTSD with early cognitive behavioral therapy. A meta-analysis using mixed-effects modeling.

    PubMed

    Kliem, Sören; Kröger, Christoph

    2013-11-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is of great interest to public health, due to the high burden it places on both the individual and society. We meta-analyzed randomized-controlled trials to examine the effectiveness of early trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral treatment (TFCBT) for preventing chronic PTSD. Systematic bibliographic research was undertaken to find relevant literature from on-line databases (Pubmed, PsycINFO, Psyndex, Medline). Using a mixed-effect approach, we calculated effect sizes (ES) for the PTSD diagnoses (main outcome) as well as PTSD and depressive symptoms (secondary outcomes), respectively. Calculations of ES from pre-intervention to first follow-up assessment were based on 10 studies. A moderate effect (ES = 0.54) was found for the main outcome, whereas ES for secondary outcomes were predominantly small (ES = 0.27-0.45). The ES for the main outcome decreased to small (ES = 0.34) from first follow-up to long-term follow-up assessment. The mean dropout rate was 16.7% pre- to post-treatment. There was evidence for the impact of moderators on different outcomes (e.g., the number of sessions on PTSD symptoms). Future studies should include survivors of other trauma types (e.g., burn injuries) rather than predominantly survivors of accidents and physical assault, and should compare early TFCBT with other interventions that previously demonstrated effectiveness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparative Study of Early Secondary Nasal Revisions and Costs in Patients With Clefts Treated With and Without Nasoalveolar Molding.

    PubMed

    Patel, Parit A; Rubin, Marcie S; Clouston, Sean; Lalezaradeh, Frank; Brecht, Lawrence E; Cutting, Court B; Shetye, Pradip R; Warren, Stephen M; Grayson, Barry H

    2015-06-01

    The present study aims to determine the risk of early secondary nasal revisions in patients with complete unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate (U/BCLP) treated with and without nasoalveolar molding (NAM) and examine the associated costs of care. A retrospective cohort study from 1990 to 1999 was performed comparing the risk of early secondary nasal revision surgery in patients with a CLP treated with NAM and surgery (cleft lip repair and primary surgical nasal reconstruction) versus surgery alone in a private practice and tertiary level clinic. The NAM treatment group consisted of 172 patients with UCLP and 71 patients with BCLP, whereas the non-NAM-prepared group consisted of 28 patients with UCLP and 5 with BCLP. The risk of secondary nasal revision for patients with UCLP was 3% in the NAM group and 21% in the non-NAM group. The risk of secondary nasal revision for patients with BCLP was 7% in the NAM group compared with 40% in the non-NAM group. Using multicenter averages, the non-NAM revision rates were calculated at 37.8% and 48.5% for U/BCLP, respectively. Applying these risks of revision, NAM treatment led to an estimated savings of between $491 and $4893 depending on the type of cleft. In conclusion, NAM can reduce the number of early secondary nasal revision surgeries and, therefore, reduce the overall cost of care.

  9. Dabigatran for the Treatment and Secondary Prevention of Venous Thromboembolism; A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis for the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Stevanović, J; de Jong, L A; Kappelhoff, B S; Dvortsin, E P; Voorhaar, M; Postma, M J

    2016-01-01

    Dabigatran was proven to have similar effect on the prevention of recurrence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and a lower risk of bleeding compared to vitamin K antagonists (VKA). The aim of this study is to assess the cost-effectiveness (CE) of dabigatran for the treatment and secondary prevention in patients with VTE compared to VKAs in the Dutch setting. Previously published Markov model was modified and updated to assess the CE of dabigatran and VKAs for the treatment and secondary prevention in patients with VTE from a societal perspective in the base-case analysis. The model was populated with efficacy and safety data from major dabigatran trials (i.e. RE-COVER, RECOVER II, RE-MEDY and RE-SONATE), Dutch specific costs, and utilities derived from dabigatran trials or other published literature. Univariate, probabilistic sensitivity and a number of scenario analyses evaluating various decision-analytic settings (e.g. the perspective of analysis, use of anticoagulants only for treatment or only for secondary prevention, or comparison to no treatment) were tested on the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). In the base-case scenario, patients on dabigatran gained an additional 0.034 quality adjusted life year (QALY) while saving €1,598. Results of univariate sensitivity analysis were quite robust. The probability that dabigatran is cost-effective at a willingness-to-pay threshold of €20,000/QALY was 98.1%. From the perspective of healthcare provider, extended anticoagulation with dabigatran compared to VKAs was estimated at €2,158 per QALY gained. The ICER for anticoagulation versus no treatment in patients with equipoise risk of recurrent VTE was estimated at €33,379 per QALY gained. Other scenarios showed dabigatran was cost-saving. From a societal perspective, dabigatran is likely to be a cost-effective or even cost-saving strategy for treatment and secondary prevention of VTE compared to VKAs in the Netherlands.

  10. Early behavioral intervention, brain plasticity, and the prevention of autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Geraldine

    2008-01-01

    Advances in the fields of cognitive and affective developmental neuroscience, developmental psychopathology, neurobiology, genetics, and applied behavior analysis have contributed to a more optimistic outcome for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). These advances have led to new methods for early detection and more effective treatments. For the first time, prevention of ASD is plausible. Prevention will entail detecting infants at risk before the full syndrome is present and implementing treatments designed to alter the course of early behavioral and brain development. This article describes a developmental model of risk, risk processes, symptom emergence, and adaptation in ASD that offers a framework for understanding early brain plasticity in ASD and its role in prevention of the disorder.

  11. Preventive child health care findings on early childhood predict peer-group social status in early adolescence.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Merlijne; de Winter, Andrea F; Veenstra, René; Ormel, Johan; Verhulst, Frank C; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2012-12-01

    A disputed social status among peers puts children and adolescents at risk for developing a wide range of problems, such as being bullied. However, there is a lack of knowledge about which early predictors could be used to identify (young) adolescents at risk for a disputed social status. The aim of this study was to assess whether preventive child health care (PCH) findings on early childhood predict neglected and rejected status in early adolescence in a large longitudinal community-based sample. Data came from 898 participants who participated in TRAILS, a longitudinal study. Information on early childhood factors was extracted from the charts of routine PCH visits registered between infancy and age of 4 years. To assess social status, peer nominations were used at age of 10-12 years. Multinomial logistic regression showed that children who had a low birth weight, motor problems, and sleep problems; children of parents with a low educational level (odds ratios [ORs] between 1.71 and 2.90); and those with fewer attention hyperactivity problems (ORs = .43) were more likely to have a neglected status in early adolescence. Boys, children of parents with a low educational level, and children with early externalizing problems were more likely to have a rejected status in early adolescence (ORs between 1.69 and 2.56). PCH findings on early childhood-on motor and social development-are predictive of a neglected and a rejected status in early adolescence. PCH is a good setting to monitor risk factors that predict the social status of young adolescents. Copyright © 2012 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Early Childhood and Basic Elementary and Secondary Education: Needs, Programs, Demands, Costs. National Educational Finance Project; Special Study No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLure, William P.; Pence, Audra May

    This report describes two special studies that were funded separately as components of the National Educational Finance Project: (1) Early Childhood Education and (2) Basic Elementary and Secondary Education. For conceptual and operational reasons the two studies were merged into a single study which identifies the needs of individuals in American…

  13. Open Experimentation on Phenomena of Chemical Reactions via the Learning Company Approach in Early Secondary Chemistry Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Katharina; Witteck, Torsten; Eilks, Ingo

    2010-01-01

    Presented is a case study on the implementation of open and inquiry-type experimentation in early German secondary chemistry education. The teaching strategy discussed follows the learning company approach. Originally adopted from vocational education, the learning company method is used to redirect lab-oriented classroom practice towards a more…

  14. Investigating the Stress Levels of Early Childhood, Primary and Secondary Pre-Service Teachers during Teaching Practicum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geng, Gretchen; Midford, Richard; Buckworth, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated stress levels of pre-service teachers (PSTs) across three categories of teaching context: early childhood, primary and secondary. This paper focused on exploring the stressors in the completion of tasks in teaching practicum in the three categories of teaching context and an awareness of and access to support systems. The…

  15. Trajectories of risk for early sexual activity and early substance use in the Fast Track prevention program.

    PubMed

    2014-02-01

    Children who exhibit early-starting conduct problems are more likely than their peers to initiate sexual activity and substance use at an early age, experience pregnancy, and contract a sexually-transmitted disease [STD], placing them at risk for HIV/AIDS. Hence, understanding the development of multi-problem profiles among youth with early-starting conduct problems may benefit the design of prevention programs. In this study, 1,199 kindergarten children (51% African American; 47% European American; 69% boys) over-sampled for high rates of aggressive-disruptive behavior problems were followed through age 18. Latent class analyses (LCA) were used to define developmental profiles associated with the timing of initiation of sexual activity, tobacco and alcohol/drug use and indicators of risky adolescent sex (e.g. pregnancy and STD). Half of the high-risk children were randomized to a multi-component preventive intervention (Fast Track). The intervention did not significantly reduce membership in the classes characterized by risky sex practices. However, additional analyses examined predictors of poor outcomes, which may inform future prevention efforts.

  16. Assessment of a lecture on cancer prevention and the early detection of cancer.

    PubMed

    Banner, William P; Booroojian, Stefani; Hernandez, Lori; Lopez, Brad; Pinzon-Perez, Helda

    2002-01-01

    Cancer prevention and the early detection can affect morbidity and mortality. Through educational programs, recommendations for beneficial lifestyle changes and cancer screening may be introduced to the public. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a videotaped lecture concerning cancer prevention and early detection is of educational value. College students in a health science class participated in the study. The students' comprehension of the subject matter was assessed immediately before and a week after they viewed the lecture. The students' scores on the second test were significantly better as measured by a paired-difference experiment. This videotaped lecture has merit as an educational program.

  17. Challenges for the prevention of primary and secondary stroke: the importance of lowering blood pressure and total cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, J; Chapman, N

    2001-01-01

    It is well established that blood pressure lowering is effective for the primary prevention of stroke and other cardiovascular disorders in subjects with blood pressures as low as 140/90 mmHg, and up to 80 years of age. Despite this knowledge, blood pressure levels are controlled in less than 25% of the hypertensive population worldwide. It has taken longer to prove that blood pressure lowering is equally effective for the prevention of recurrent stroke. The results of PROGRESS (Perindopril Protection Against Recurrent Stroke Study) have confirmed that a perindopril-based regimen in subjects with cerebrovascular disease substantially reduces the incidence of secondary stroke and primary myocardial infarction. It is daunting to recall that it has taken almost two decades for beta-blockers to be widely used for the secondary prevention of myocardial infarction, since widespread use of the PROGRESS regimen would prevent more than half a million strokes worldwide each year. The real challenge now is to implement novel and effective strategies for the control of blood pressure and other cardiovascular risk factors worldwide. Strategies should include lifestyle measures, such as stopping smoking, exercise and reducing overweight. There is a real need to identify hypertensive subjects and treat them with blood pressure lowering drugs for primary prevention. In subjects with established cardiovascular disease, consideration should be given to a range of proven interventions for secondary prevention, such as blood pressure lowering, irrespective of current blood pressure, anti-platelet drugs, statins for lowering cholesterol and glycaemic control in diabetics. Among new strategies to lower overall cardiovascular risk, consideration should be given to the development of single-pill combinations of drugs of known efficacy, including various combinations of ACE inhibitors, diuretics, beta-blockers, aspirin and statins, among others.

  18. Implementation of secondary fracture prevention services after hip fracture: a qualitative study using extended Normalization Process Theory.

    PubMed

    Drew, Sarah; Judge, Andrew; May, Carl; Farmer, Andrew; Cooper, Cyrus; Javaid, M Kassim; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael

    2015-04-23

    National and international guidance emphasizes the need for hospitals to have effective secondary fracture prevention services, to reduce the risk of future fractures in hip fracture patients. Variation exists in how hospitals organize these services, and there remain significant gaps in care. No research has systematically explored reasons for this to understand how to successfully implement these services. The objective of this study was to use extended Normalization Process Theory to understand how secondary fracture prevention services can be successfully implemented. Forty-three semi-structured interviews were conducted with healthcare professionals involved in delivering secondary fracture prevention within 11 hospitals that receive patients with acute hip fracture in one region in England. These included orthogeriatricians, fracture prevention nurses and service managers. Extended Normalization Process Theory was used to inform study design and analysis. Extended Normalization Process Theory specifies four constructs relating to collective action in service implementation: capacity, potential, capability and contribution. The capacity of healthcare professionals to co-operate and co-ordinate their actions was achieved using dedicated fracture prevention co-ordinators to organize important processes of care. However, participants described effective communication with GPs as challenging. Individual potential and commitment to operationalize services was generally high. Shared commitments were promoted through multi-disciplinary team working, facilitated by fracture prevention co-ordinators. Healthcare professionals had capacity to deliver multiple components of services when co-ordinators 'freed up' time. As key agents in its intervention, fracture prevention coordinators were therefore indispensable to effective implementation. Aside from difficulty of co-ordination with primary care, the intervention was highly workable and easily integrated into practice

  19. Early Detection and Prevention of Mental Health Problems: Developmental Epidemiology and Systems of Support.

    PubMed

    Costello, E Jane

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the role of developmental epidemiology in the prevention of child and adolescent mental disorders and the implications for systems of support. The article distinguishes between universal or primary prevention, which operates at the level of the whole community to limit risk exposure before the onset of symptoms, and secondary or targeted prevention, which operates by identifying those at high risk of developing a disorder. It discusses different aspects of time as it relates to risk for onset of disease, such as age at first exposure, duration of exposure, age at onset of first symptoms, and time until treatment. The study compares universal and targeted prevention, describing the systems needed to support each, and their unintended consequences.

  20. Promoting pedagogical content knowledge development for early career secondary teachers in science and technology using content representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, John; Eames, Chris; Hume, Anne; Lockley, John

    2012-11-01

    Background: This research addressed the key area of early career teacher education and aimed to explore the use of a 'content representation' (CoRe) as a mediational tool to develop early career secondary teacher pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). This study was situated in the subject areas of science and technology, where sound teacher knowledge is particularly important to student engagement. Purpose: The study was designed to examine whether such a tool (a CoRe), co-designed by an early career secondary teacher with expert content and pedagogy specialists, can enhance the PCK of early career teachers. The research questions were: How can experts in content and pedagogy work together with early career teachers to develop one science topic CoRe and one technology topic CoRe to support the development of PCK for early career secondary teachers? How does the use of a collaboratively designed CoRe affect the planning of an early career secondary teacher in science or technology? How has engagement in the development and use of an expert-informed CoRe developed an early career teacher's PCK? Sample: The research design incorporated a unique partnership between two expert classroom teachers, two content experts, four early career teachers, and four researchers experienced in science and technology education. Design: This study employed an interpretivist-based methodology and an action research approach within a four-case study design. Data were gathered using qualitative research methods focused on semi-structured interviews, observations and document analysis. Results: The study indicated that CoRes, developed through this collaborative process, helped the early career teachers focus on the big picture of the topic, emphasize particularly relevant areas of content and consider alternative ways of planning for their teaching. Conclusions: This paper presents an analysis of the process of CoRe development by the teacher-expert partnerships and the effect that had on

  1. Microbleeds in the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes Trial: Stroke, mortality, and treatment interactions.

    PubMed

    Shoamanesh, Ashkan; Pearce, Lesly A; Bazan, Carlos; Catanese, Luciana; McClure, Leslie A; Sharma, Mukul; Marti-Fabregas, Joan; Anderson, David C; Kase, Carlos S; Hart, Robert G; Benavente, Oscar R

    2017-08-01

    To characterize cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) in lacunar stroke patients in the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes (SPS3) trial and to assess their relationship with recurrent stroke and death, and response to assigned treatment. SPS3 is a randomized, clinical trial conducted between 2003 and 2011. Patients with recent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-documented lacunar infarcts were randomly assigned in a factorial design to target levels of systolic blood pressure (130-149mmHg vs <130mmHg; open label) and to antiplatelet treatment (aspirin/clopidogrel vs aspirin/placebo; double-blinded). The current analysis involves 1,278 trial participants who had a baseline axial T2*-weighted gradient echo MRI sequence allowing for CMB detection. CMBs were present in 30% of 1,278 patients (mean age = 63 years). Male gender (odds ratio [OR] = 1.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.3-2.3), history of hypertension (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.2-2.3), increased systolic blood pressure (1.2 per 20mmHg, 95% CI = 1.1-1.4), nondiabetic status (OR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.1-1.9), multiple old lacunar infarcts (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.5-2.5), and moderate (OR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.2-2.3) or severe (OR = 4.2, 95% CI = 3.0-5.9) white matter hyperintensities on MRI were independently associated with CMBs. During a mean follow-up of 3.3 years, overall stroke recurrence was 2.5% per patient-year. Patients with CMBs had an adjusted 2-fold increased risk of recurrent stroke (hazard ratio = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.4-3.1). CMBs were not a risk factor for death. There were no statistically significant interactions between CMBs and treatment assignments. Patients with lacunar stroke and CMBs likely harbor a more advanced form of cerebral small vessel disease in need of efficacious therapeutic strategies. Ann Neurol 2017;82:196-207. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  2. Barriers to medication adherence for the secondary prevention of stroke: a qualitative interview study in primary care.

    PubMed

    Jamison, James; Graffy, Jonathan; Mullis, Ricky; Mant, Jonathan; Sutton, Stephen

    2016-08-01

    Medications are highly effective at reducing risk of recurrent stroke, but success is influenced by adherence to treatment. Among survivors of stroke and transient ischaemic attack (TIA), adherence to medication is known to be suboptimal. To identify and report barriers to medication adherence for the secondary prevention of stroke/TIA. A qualitative interview study was conducted within general practice surgeries in the East of England, UK. Patients were approached by letter and invited to take part in a qualitative research study. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with survivors of stroke, caregivers, and GPs to explore their perspectives and views around secondary prevention and perceived barriers to medication adherence. Key themes were identified using a grounded theory approach. Verbatim quotes describing the themes are presented here. In total, 28 survivors of stroke, including 14 accompanying caregivers and five GPs, were interviewed. Two key themes were identified. Patient level barriers included ability to self-care, the importance people attach to a stroke event, and knowledge of stroke and medication. Medication level barriers included beliefs about medication and beliefs about how pills work, medication routines, changing medications, and regimen complexity and burden of treatment. Patients who have had a stroke are faced with multiple barriers to taking secondary prevention medications in UK general practice. This research suggests that a collaborative approach between caregivers, survivors, and healthcare professionals is needed to address these barriers and facilitate medication-taking behaviour. © British Journal of General Practice 2016.

  3. The pursuit of secondary prevention targets in Czech coronary patients. A comparison of EuroAspire I and II surveys.

    PubMed

    Mayer, O; Simon, J; Rosolová, H; De Bacquer, Dirk

    2002-09-01

    Definite evidence has been established, that coronary patients benefit from appropriate secondary prevention measures, as recommended by the European and National Guidelines. EuroAspire I (1995) and EuroAspire II (1999) were surveys aimed to evaluate the state of the implementation of guidelines into the every-day medical practice in several European countries, including Czech Republic. We wondered to what extent the practice in secondary prevention of Czech physicians, since the guidelines were published, changed during 5 years, to pursue the targets. We compared two surveys, undertaken in the same geographical areas of the Czech Republic. Consecutive patients, males and females, less than 71 years of age were indentified following acute coronary event or revascularisation procedure and were interviewed and examined at least 6 months after hospitalization. The Czech surveys included 331 patients in EuroAspire I and 410 in EuroAspire II. In EuroAspire II, the total number of smokers decreased in males, but increased in females. The patients were more obese, had higher glucose levels as well, while blood pressure, total and LDL cholesterol and triacylglycerols were lower, than in EuroAspire I. Corresponding changes also occurred in the prevalence of hypertension and hyperlipidaemias by definitions. There was a significant increase in the use of betablockers, ACE inhibitors and hypolipidemic drugs, mainly statins. In conclusion, in spite that the compliance with the recommendations for secondary prevention improved, achievement of targets remained rather unsatisfactory, likewise in other European countries.

  4. Integrating Early Child Development and Violence Prevention Programs: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Efevbera, Yvette; McCoy, Dana C.; Wuermli, Alice J.; Betancourt, Theresa S.

    2018-01-01

    Limited evidence describes promoting development and reducing violence in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), a missed opportunity to protect children and promote development and human capital. This study presents a systematic literature review of integrated early childhood development plus violence prevention (ECD+VP) interventions in…

  5. Cross-National Perspectives on Early Adolescence: Implications and Strategies for Public Health Prevention and Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swahn, Monica H.

    2012-01-01

    The current special issue brings together intriguing and important cross-country comparisons of issues pertinent to early adolescence that can inform the design and implementation of broader and relevant public health prevention strategies. The findings illustrate the importance of cross-country analyses for better understanding a range of…

  6. Obesity Prevention Interventions in Early Childhood Education and Care Settings with Parental Involvement: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Heather; Skouteris, Helen; Edwards, Susan; Rutherford, Leonie

    2015-01-01

    Partnering early childhood education and care (ECEC) and the home together may be more effective in combating obesogenic risk factors in preschool children. Thus, an evaluation of ECEC obesity prevention interventions with a parental component was conducted, exploring parental engagement and its effect on obesity and healthy lifestyle outcomes. A…

  7. School Rampage Shootings and Other Youth Disturbances: Early Preventative Interventions. Psychosocial Stress Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nader, Kathleen, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Together, "School Rampage Shootings and Other Youth Disturbances" and its accompanying CD provide a complete toolkit for using early preventative interventions with elementary-school age children. In ten thoughtful, clearly written chapters, both new and experienced practitioners will find a wealth of research- and evidence-based…

  8. Feedback Facilitated Relaxation Training as Primary Prevention of Drug Abuse in Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volpe, Richard

    1977-01-01

    As a means of primary prevention this paper suggests the use of relaxation training to develop self-esteem and reduce drug abuse. The aims of this paper are to provide an overview of relaxation training and electromyography and focus this approach on the needs of early adolescents. (Author)

  9. Developing a Framework of System Change between Diametric and Concentric Spaces for Early School Leaving Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Paul

    2016-01-01

    A "spatial turn" is observed as taking place across a range of disciplines. This article discusses the relevance of this "spatial turn" to the issue of early school leaving prevention and engagement of marginalised students and their parents within the educational system and other support services. Building on…

  10. Oral anticoagulants for primary prevention, treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolic disease, and for prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation: systematic review, network meta-analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Sterne, Jonathan Ac; Bodalia, Pritesh N; Bryden, Peter A; Davies, Philippa A; López-López, Jose A; Okoli, George N; Thom, Howard Hz; Caldwell, Deborah M; Dias, Sofia; Eaton, Diane; Higgins, Julian Pt; Hollingworth, Will; Salisbury, Chris; Savović, Jelena; Sofat, Reecha; Stephens-Boal, Annya; Welton, Nicky J; Hingorani, Aroon D

    2017-03-01

    Warfarin is effective for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF), but anticoagulation is underused in clinical care. The risk of venous thromboembolic disease during hospitalisation can be reduced by low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH): warfarin is the most frequently prescribed anticoagulant for treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Warfarin-related bleeding is a major reason for hospitalisation for adverse drug effects. Warfarin is cheap but therapeutic monitoring increases treatment costs. Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have more rapid onset and offset of action than warfarin, and more predictable dosing requirements. To determine the best oral anticoagulant/s for prevention of stroke in AF and for primary prevention, treatment and secondary prevention of VTE. Four systematic reviews, network meta-analyses (NMAs) and cost-effectiveness analyses (CEAs) of randomised controlled trials. Hospital (VTE primary prevention and acute treatment) and primary care/anticoagulation clinics (AF and VTE secondary prevention). Patients eligible for anticoagulation with warfarin (stroke prevention in AF, acute treatment or secondary prevention of VTE) or LMWH (primary prevention of VTE). NOACs, warfarin and LMWH, together with other interventions (antiplatelet therapy, placebo) evaluated in the evidence network. Efficacy  Stroke, symptomatic VTE, symptomatic deep-vein thrombosis and symptomatic pulmonary embolism. Safety  Major bleeding, clinically relevant bleeding and intracranial haemorrhage. We also considered myocardial infarction and all-cause mortality and evaluated cost-effectiveness. MEDLINE and PREMEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE and The Cochrane Library, reference lists of published NMAs and trial registries. We searched MEDLINE and PREMEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE and The Cochrane Library. The stroke prevention in AF review search was run on the 12 March 2014 and updated on

  11. Primary and Secondary Stroke Prevention Using Left Atrial Appendage Closure with Watchman Devices in Atrial Fibrillation Patients: A Single Center Experience from Mainland China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanhong; Zhang, Yonghua; Huang, Weiping; Huang, Keqiang; Xu, Bei; Su, X I

    2017-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with increased stroke risk resulting from cardiac embolism of the left atrial appendage (LAA). Stroke tends to recur in NVAF patients. Yet safety and feasibility of secondary stroke preventions with LAA closure (LAAC) have not been assessed in detail. This retrospective study was designed to compare the feasibility and safety of LAAC in primary and secondary stroke preventions, in a real-world setting of Chinese patients. From 2014 to 2015, non-valvular AF patients with CHA2DS2-VASc ≥1 were selected for percutaneous LAAC operations. Outcome observations of primary and secondary stroke preventions with Watchman devices were analyzed and compared. Overall, 122 patients were included. LAAC with Watchman devices were attempted in 115 patients, of whom 68 were for primary stroke prevention and 47 were for secondary prevention. Both the CHA2DS2-VASc score and the HASBLED score were significantly higher in the secondary prevention group (4.09 ± 1.06 vs. 1.93 ± 1.09 for CHA2DS2-VASc and 1.83 ± 1.03 vs. 1.26 ± 0.87 for HASBLED, P < 0.01). In both groups LAAC were achieved with high successful rate (98.53% in the primary prevention group and 100% in the secondary prevention group, P > 0.05) and low complication rates. The stroke rates were at a low level in both groups (1.47% in primary prevention group vs. 2.13% in secondary prevention group, P > 0.05). In our initial single-center experience, percutaneous LAA closure was a feasible and safe procedure for both primary and secondary stroke preventions in Chinese patients with nonvalvular AF. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Prevention and early intervention to improve mental health in higher education students: a review.

    PubMed

    Reavley, Nicola; Jorm, Anthony F

    2010-05-01

    The age at which most young people are in higher education is also the age of peak onset for mental and substance use disorders, with these having their first onset before age 24 in 75% of cases. In most developed countries, over 50% of young people are in higher education. To review the evidence for prevention and early intervention in mental health problems in higher education students. The review was limited to interventions targeted to anxiety, depression and alcohol misuse. Interventions to review were identified by searching PubMed, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Interventions were included if they were designed to specifically prevent or intervene early in the general (non-health professional) higher education student population, in one or more of the following areas: anxiety, depression or alcohol misuse symptoms, mental health literacy, stigma and one or more behavioural outcomes. For interventions to prevent or intervene early for alcohol misuse, evidence of effectiveness is strongest for brief motivational interventions and for personalized normative interventions delivered using computers or in individual face-to-face sessions. Few interventions to prevent or intervene early with depression or anxiety were identified. These were mostly face-to-face, cognitive-behavioural/skill-based interventions. One social marketing intervention to raise awareness of depression and treatments showed some evidence of effectiveness. There is very limited evidence that interventions are effective in preventing or intervening early with depression and anxiety disorders in higher education students. Further studies, possibly involving interventions that have shown promise in other populations, are needed.

  13. Secondary prevention and cognitive function after stroke: a study protocol for a 5-year follow-up of the ASPIRE-S cohort

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David; Gaynor, Eva; Bennett, Kathleen; Dolan, Eamon; Callaly, Elizabeth; Large, Margaret; Hickey, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Cognitive impairment is common following stroke and can increase disability and levels of dependency of patients, potentially leading to greater burden on carers and the healthcare system. Effective cardiovascular risk factor control through secondary preventive medications may reduce the risk of cognitive decline. However, adherence to medications is often poor and can be adversely affected by cognitive deficits. Suboptimal medication adherence negatively impacts secondary prevention targets, increasing the risk of recurrent stroke and further cognitive decline. The aim of this study is to profile cognitive function and secondary prevention, including adherence to secondary preventive medications and healthcare usage, 5 years post-stroke. The prospective associations between cognition, cardiovascular risk factors, adherence to secondary preventive medications, and rates of recurrent stroke or other cardiovascular events will also be explored. Methods and analysis This is a 5-year follow-up of a prospective study of the Action on Secondary Prevention Interventions and Rehabilitation in Stroke (ASPIRE-S) cohort of patients with stroke. This cohort will have a detailed assessment of cognitive function, adherence to secondary preventive medications and cardiovascular risk factor control. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval for this study was granted by the Research Ethics Committees at Beaumont Hospital, Dublin and Connolly Hospital, Dublin, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, and the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Findings will be disseminated through presentations and peer-reviewed publications. PMID:28348196

  14. Caring Interactions in Secondary Prevention Programs: A Qualitative Inquiry of Individuals With Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Greviskes, Lindsey E; Podlog, Leslie; Newton, Maria; Dibble, Leland E; Burns, Ryan D; Pillow, Wanda; Hall, Morgan S; Hammer, Christopher

    2018-02-01

    With Parkinson's disease (PD) prevalence rates steadily increasing and long-term adherence to regular physical activity and exercise often difficult to achieve, it is imperative to investigate factors promoting adherence to secondary prevention programs (SPP) that help limit the progression of motor and nonmotor signs and symptoms of the disease. Caring interactions between patients and their rehabilitation team may be particularly germane to individuals with PD, given the physical and psychosocial issues that often accompany this disease (eg, loss of physical function, depression, apathy, and cognitive impairments). Considering this reasoning, the purpose of the present study was twofold: (1) to gain a better understanding of the nature of caring in an SPP setting from a patient perspective and (2) to discover what implications, if any, caring has on relevant patient-centered behaviors such as effort and adherence to SPPs. Ten individuals with PD were recruited. In-depth, qualitative interviews were performed using a semistructured interview guide. Inductive content analysis was used to identify themes representing participants' experiences of caring in the SPP setting. Six themes emerged from the data analysis. The first 4 themes described how rehabilitation providers fostered caring in the SPP setting: showing interest, creating a supportive atmosphere, benevolence, and paying attention. Participants described instances when rehabilitation providers (physical therapy assistants, physical therapy students, and exercise specialists) showed interest by asking personal questions and remembering personal information. A supportive environment was facilitated by making participants feel supported, welcomed, and valued. Benevolence was apparent when rehabilitation providers demonstrated kindness and approached their work as "more than just a job." Finally, the importance of feeling that rehabilitation providers "paid attention" to patients by giving them undivided

  15. Action seniors! - secondary falls prevention in community-dwelling senior fallers: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Liu-Ambrose, Teresa; Davis, Jennifer C; Hsu, Chun Liang; Gomez, Caitlin; Vertes, Kelly; Marra, Carlo; Brasher, Penelope M; Dao, Elizabeth; Khan, Karim M; Cook, Wendy; Donaldson, Meghan G; Rhodes, Ryan; Dian, Larry

    2015-04-10

    Falls are a 'geriatric giant' and are the third leading cause of chronic disability worldwide. About 30% of community-dwellers over the age of 65 experience one or more falls every year leading to significant risk for hospitalization, institutionalization, and even death. As the proportion of older adults increases, falls will place an increasing demand and cost on the health care system. Exercise can effectively and efficiently reduce falls. Specifically, the Otago Exercise Program has demonstrated benefit and cost-effectiveness for the primary prevention of falls in four randomized trials of community-dwelling seniors. Although evidence is mounting, few studies have evaluated exercise for secondary falls prevention (that is, preventing falls among those with a significant history of falls). Hence, we propose a randomized controlled trial powered for falls that will, for the first time, assess the efficacy and efficiency of the Otago Exercise Program for secondary falls prevention. A randomized controlled trial among 344 community-dwelling seniors aged 70 years and older who attend a falls prevention clinic to assess the efficacy and the cost-effectiveness of a 12-month Otago Exercise Program intervention as a secondary falls prevention strategy. Participants randomized to the control group will continue to behave as they did prior to study enrolment. The economic evaluation will examine the incremental costs and benefits generated by using the Otago Exercise Program intervention versus the control. The burden of falls is significant. The challenge is to make a difference - to discover effective, ideally cost-effective, interventions that prevent injurious falls that can be readily translated to the population. Our proposal is very practical - the exercise program requires minimal equipment, the physical therapist expertise is widely available, and seniors in Canada and elsewhere have adopted the program and complied with it. Our innovation includes applying the

  16. Early life programming as a target for prevention of child and adolescent mental disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This paper concerns future policy development and programs of research for the prevention of mental disorders based on research emerging from fetal and early life programming. The current review offers an overview of findings on pregnancy exposures such as maternal mental health, lifestyle factors, and potential teratogenic and neurotoxic exposures on child outcomes. Outcomes of interest are common child and adolescent mental disorders including hyperactive, behavioral and emotional disorders. This literature suggests that the preconception and perinatal periods offer important opportunities for the prevention of deleterious fetal exposures. As such, the perinatal period is a critical period where future mental health prevention efforts should be focused and prevention models developed. Interventions grounded in evidence-based recommendations for the perinatal period could take the form of public health, universal and more targeted interventions. If successful, such interventions are likely to have lifelong effects on (mental) health. PMID:24559477

  17. Prevention and Early Detection of Occupational Cancers - a View of Information Technology Solutions.

    PubMed

    Davoodi, Somayeh; Safdari, Reza; Ghazisaeidi, Marjan; Mohammadzadeh, Zeinab; Azadmanjir, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of people die each year from cancer due to occupational causes. To reduce cancer in workers, preventive strategies should be used in the high-risk workplace. The effective prevention of occupational cancer requires knowledge of carcinogen agents. Like other areas of healthcare industry, occupational health has been affected by information technology solutions to improve prevention, early detection, treatment and finally the efficiency and cost effectiveness of the healthcare system. Information technology solutions are thus an important issue in the healthcare field. Information about occupational cancer in information systems is important for policy makers, managers, physicians, patients and researchers; because examples that include high quality data about occupational cancer patients and occupational cancer causes are able to determine the worker groups which require special attention. As a result exposed workers who are vulnerable can undergo screening and be considered for preventive interventions.

  18. Social and school connectedness in early secondary school as predictors of late teenage substance use, mental health, and academic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bond, Lyndal; Butler, Helen; Thomas, Lyndal; Carlin, John; Glover, Sara; Bowes, Glenn; Patton, George

    2007-04-01

    To examine associations between social relationships and school engagement in early secondary school and mental health, substance use, and educational achievement 2-4 years later. School-based longitudinal study of secondary school students, surveyed at school in Year 8 (13-14-years-old) and Year 10 (16-years-old), and 1-year post-secondary school. A total of 2678 Year 8 students (74%) participated in the first wave of data collection. For the school-based surveys, attrition was <10%. Seventy-one percent of the participating Year 8 students completed the post-secondary school survey. Having both good school and social connectedness in Year 8 was associated with the best outcomes in later years. In contrast, participants with low school connectedness but good social connectedness were at elevated risk of anxiety/depressive symptoms (odds ratio [OR]: 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0, 1.76), regular smoking (OR: 2.0; 95% CI: 1.4, 2.9), drinking (OR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.3, 2.2), and using marijuana (OR: 2.0; 95% CI: 1.6, 2.5) in later years. The likelihood of completing school was reduced for those with either poor social connectedness, low school connectedness, or both. Overall, young people's experiences of early secondary school and their relationships with others may continue to affect their moods, their substance use in later years, and their likelihood of completing secondary school. Having both good school connectedness and good social connectedness is associated with the best outcomes. The challenge is how to promote both school and social connectedness to best achieve these health and learning outcomes.

  19. Effects of early prevention programs on adult criminal offending: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Deković, Maja; Slagt, Meike I; Asscher, Jessica J; Boendermaker, Leonieke; Eichelsheim, Veroni I; Prinzie, Peter

    2011-06-01

    This meta-analysis investigated the long term effects of prevention programs conducted during early and middle childhood on criminal offending during adulthood. The analyses included 3611 participants in 9 programs. The effect size for adult criminal offending was significant, but small in magnitude (OR=1.26; 95% CI=1.06-1.50, p=.011). The effects of the programs on positive outcomes (academic attainment and involvement in productive activity, such as being engaged in school or work) were somewhat larger and more consistent than effects on crime (OR=1.36, 95% CI=1.20-1.55, p<.001). Several participant and program characteristics moderated the effectiveness of (early) prevention. Children who were more at-risk and those from a lower SES benefited more. Shorter, but more intensive programs, and programs that focus on social and behavioral skills, rather than on academic skills or family support, tend to produce larger effects. Taken together, these results indicate that early prevention programs can help put children on a more positive developmental trajectory that is maintained into adulthood, but there is still no convincing evidence that they can prevent adult crime. Implications of the findings for research, policy and clinical practice are discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Early light reduction for preventing retinopathy of prematurity in very low birth weight infants.

    PubMed

    Jorge, Eliane C; Jorge, Edson N; El Dib, Regina P

    2013-08-06

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a complex condition of the developing retinal blood vessels and is one of the leading causes of preventable childhood blindness. Several risk factors for ROP have been studied over the past 50 years. Among them, general immaturity (low birth weight and low gestational age) and prolonged oxygen therapy have been consistently related to disease onset. However, it is understood that the progression of the disease is multifactorial and may be associated with others risk factors, such as multiple gestation, apnoea, intracranial haemorrhage, anaemia, sepsis, prolonged mechanical ventilation, multiple transfusions and light exposure. Furthermore, the precise role of these individual factors in the development of the disease has not yet been well established. To determine whether the reduction of early environmental light exposure reduces the incidence of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) or poor ROP outcomes among very low birth weight infants. We searched the following databases: the Cochrane Neonatal Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, HealthSTAR, Science Citation Index Database, CANCERLIT, the Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials and www.clinicaltrials.gov. We also searched previous reviews including cross-references, abstracts, conference and symposia proceedings, and contacted expert informants. This search was updated in October 2012. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials that reduced light exposure to premature infants within the first seven days following birth were considered for this review. We also considered cluster-randomised controlled trials. Data on clinical outcomes including any acute ROP and poor ROP outcome were extracted by both review authors independently and consensus reached. We conducted data analysis according to the standards of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. Data from four randomised trials with a total of 897 participants failed to show any

  1. Exploring resilience and mindfulness as preventative factors for psychological distress burnout and secondary traumatic stress among human service professionals.

    PubMed

    Harker, Rachel; Pidgeon, Aileen M; Klaassen, Frances; King, Steven

    2016-06-08

    Human service professionals are concerned with the intervention and empowerment of vulnerable social populations. The human service industry is laden with employment-related stressors and emotionally demanding interactions, which can lead to deleterious effects, such as burnout and secondary traumatic stress. Little attention has been given to developing knowledge of what might enable human service workers to persist and thrive. Cultivating and sustaining resilience can buffer the impact of occupational stressors on human service professionals. One of the psychological factors associated with cultivating resilience is mindfulness. The aim of this current research is to improve our understanding of the relationship between resilience, mindfulness, burnout, secondary traumatic stress, and psychological distress among human service professionals. The current study surveyed 133 human service professionals working in the fields of psychology, social work, counseling, youth and foster care work to explore the predictive relationship between resilience, mindfulness, and psychological distress. The results showed that higher levels of resilience were a significant predictor of lower levels of psychological distress, burnout and secondary traumatic stress. In addition, higher levels of mindfulness were a significant predictor of lower levels of psychological distress and burnout. The findings suggest that cultivating resilience and mindfulness in human service professionals may assist in preventing psychological distress burnout and secondary traumatic stress. Limitations of this study are discussed together with implications for future research.

  2. Prevention Rather than Cure? Primary or Secondary Intervention for Dealing with Media Exposure to Terrorism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slone, Michelle; Shoshani, Anat

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined the efficacy of primary versus secondary intervention in moderating state anxiety and state anger from media-based exposure to terrorism. Two hundred participants, allocated to a terrorism or nonterrorism media exposure and to antecedent or subsequent therapeutic or control intervention, were assessed for state anxiety and…

  3. Strategies for Prevention and Intervention of Drug Abuse among Students in Secondary Schools in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marais, Petro; Maithya, Redempta

    2015-01-01

    Drug abuse is becoming an increasing problem among students in Kenya. The major cause for concern is that a high proportion of the Kenyan youth in secondary schools are involved in drugs (NACADA 2012). As a result, these young people eventually become addicted, posing a threat to their own health and safety. This study sought to establish the…

  4. A Skin Cancer Prevention Facial-Aging Mobile App for Secondary Schools in Brazil: Appearance-Focused Interventional Study.

    PubMed

    Brinker, Titus Josef; Heckl, Marlene; Gatzka, Martina; Heppt, Markus V; Resende Rodrigues, Henrique; Schneider, Sven; Sondermann, Wiebke; de Almeida E Silva, Carolina; Kirchberger, Michael C; Klode, Joachim; Enk, Alexander H; Knispel, Sarah; von Kalle, Christof; Stoffels, Ingo; Schadendorf, Dirk; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Esser, Stefan; Assis, Aisllan; Bernardes-Souza, Breno

    2018-03-09

    The incidence of melanoma is increasing faster than any other major cancer both in Brazil and worldwide. Southeast Brazil has especially high incidences of melanoma, and early detection is low. Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a primary risk factor for developing melanoma. Increasing attractiveness is a major motivation among adolescents for tanning. A medical student-delivered intervention that takes advantage of the broad availability of mobile phones and adolescents' interest in their appearance indicated effectiveness in a recent study from Germany. However, the effect in a high-UV index country with a high melanoma prevalence and the capability of medical students to implement such an intervention remain unknown. In this pilot study, our objective was to investigate the preliminary success and implementability of a photoaging intervention to prevent skin cancer in Brazilian adolescents. We implemented a free photoaging mobile phone app (Sunface) in 15 secondary school classes in southeast Brazil. Medical students "mirrored" the pupils' altered 3-dimensional (3D) selfies reacting to touch on tablets via a projector in front of their whole grade accompanied by a brief discussion of means of UV protection. An anonymous questionnaire capturing sociodemographic data and risk factors for melanoma measured the perceptions of the intervention on 5-point Likert scales among 356 pupils of both sexes (13-19 years old; median age 16 years) in grades 8 to 12 of 2 secondary schools in Brazil. We measured more than 90% agreement in both items that measured motivation to reduce UV exposure and only 5.6% disagreement: 322 (90.5%) agreed or strongly agreed that their 3D selfie motivated them to avoid using a tanning bed, and 321 (90.2%) that it motivated them to improve their sun protection; 20 pupils (5.6%) disagreed with both items. The perceived effect on motivation was higher in female pupils in both tanning bed avoidance (n=198, 92.6% agreement in females vs n=123

  5. Select early type IA endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair will resolve without secondary intervention.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Thomas F X; Corey, Michael R; Deery, Sarah E; Tsougranis, Gregory; Maruthi, Rohit; Clouse, W Darrin; Cambria, Richard P; Conrad, Mark F

    2018-01-01

    ). Both an increase in aneurysm sac size and failure of the endoleak to resolve by case end were independent predictors of a need for reintervention (growth: OR, 8.3; 95% CI, 2.2-31.6; P < .01; persistent endoleak: OR, 7.6; 95% CI, 1.8-31.5; P < .01). A persistent type IA endoleak was not independently associated with an increase in sac size on surveillance imaging (P = .28). Aneurysm rupture secondary to persistent type IA endoleak is rare, and most will resolve within 1 year. Extensive neck calcification is the only independent predictor of persistent type IA endoleak, and an increase in sac size warrants reintervention. These data suggest that select early persistent type IA endoleaks can be safely observed. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Challenges in care of trauma patient in Spain. The need for implementation of scientific evidence including secondary prevention].

    PubMed

    Fernández Mondéjar, E; Alvarez, F J; González Luque, J C

    2014-01-01

    The mortality of trauma patients has improved significantly in recent decades due to a combination of factors: medical care, educational campaigns and structural changes. Generalization of out-of hospital emergence medical services and the hospital care in specific centers for traumatized has undoubtedly contributed to this decline, but other factors such as periodic campaigns to prevent workplace and traffic accidents, as well as improvements in the road network have played a key role. The challenge now is to continue to decrease mortality, for which is essential an analysis of the situation to detect potential areas of improvement. The application of diagnostic or therapeutic actions with scientific evidence is associated with lower mortality, but as in other areas of medicine, the application of scientific evidence in trauma patients is barely 50%. Moreover, nearly 90% of trauma deaths occur in the crash site or in the first 72h of hospitalization, the vast majority as a result of injuries incompatible with life. In these circumstances it is clear that prevention is the most cost-effective activity. As medical practitioners, our role in prevention is mainly focused on the secondary prevention to avoid recidivism, for which it is necessary to identify risk factor (frequently alcohol, illegal drugs, psychotropic medication etc.) and implement a brief motivational intervention. This activity can reduce recidivism by nearly 50%. In Spain, the activity in this field is negligible therefore measures should be implemented for dissemination of secondary prevention in trauma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  7. [Violence prevention in secondary schools: the Faustlos-curriculum for middle school].

    PubMed

    Schick, Andreas; Cierpka, Manfred

    2009-01-01

    Schools and kindergartens are particularly suitable for the implementation of violence prevention programs. Many German schools and kindergartens have securely established the violence prevention curriculum Faustlos. The Faustlos programs for kindergartens and elementary schools are now complemented with the version for middle schools. As the kindergarten- and elementary school versions the middle school program too focuses on the theoretically profound, age group-tailored promotion of empathy, impulse control and anger management. These dimensions are subdivided into the five themes "understanding the problem" "training for empathy"; "anger management", "problem solving" and "applying skills" and taught stepwise, highly structured and based on several video sequences in 31 lessons. US-American evaluation studies proof the effectiveness and the violence prevention potential of the program. With the curriculum for middle schools a comprehensive Faustlos program package is now made available to sustainably promote core violence prevention competences of children and adolescents on a developmentally appropriate level and with a consistent didactic approach.

  8. The national clinical audit of falls and bone health-secondary prevention of falls and fractures: a physiotherapy perspective.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Victoria; Martin, Finbarr C; Husk, Janet; Lowe, Derek; Grant, Robert; Potter, Jonathan

    2010-03-01

    To establish current physiotherapy practice in the secondary management of falls and fragility fractures compared with national guidance. Web-based national clinical audit. Acute trusts (n=157) and primary care trusts (n=146) in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Data were collected on 5642 patients with non-hip fragility fractures and 3184 patients with a hip fracture. Those patients who were bedbound or who declined assessment or rehabilitation were excluded from the analysis. Results indicate that of those with non-hip fractures, 28% received a gait and balance assessment, 22% participated in an exercise programme, and 3% were shown how to get up from the floor. For those with a hip fracture, the results were 68%, 44% and 7%, respectively. Physiotherapists have a significant role to play in the secondary prevention of falls and fractures. However, along with managers and professional bodies, more must be done to ensure that clinical practice reflects the evidence base and professional standards.

  9. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Atorvastatin versus Rosuvastatin in Primary and Secondary Cardiovascular Prevention Populations in Brazil and Columbia.

    PubMed

    Mould-Quevedo, Joaquín F; Gutiérrez-Ardila, Magda Vianey; Ordóñez Molina, Jaime Eduardo; Pinsky, Brett; Vargas Zea, Nicolás

    2014-12-01

    Latin America has witnessed a marked increase in cardiovascular (CV) disease, the leading cause of death in many countries. The benefits of lipid-lowering therapy to reduce CV-related events are widely accepted. Clinical evidence suggests that rosuvastatin is associated with slightly greater reductions in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels than is atorvastatin at comparable doses. Rosuvastatin, however, is often priced at a premium. Our objective was to examine the cost-effectiveness of using atorvastatin versus rosuvastatin in reducing CV events in Brazil and Colombia using real-world prices. A global Markov cohort model of primary and secondary CV prevention was developed and adapted to Brazilian and Colombian settings. The risks and costs of major CV events and efficacy, adherence, and costs of statins were considered. Total gains in life-years, quality-adjusted life-years, major CV events avoided, and costs over the lifetime horizon were estimated. Several dose comparisons were considered. In the Colombian analyses, differences in drug costs between therapies were considerable while outcomes were similar. The incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year gained for rosuvastatin versus atorvastatin was more than $700,000 and $200,000 in primary and secondary prevention, respectively. Brazilian analyses found lower incremental cost-effectiveness ratios for rosuvastatin at some dose comparisons due to similar pricing between statins. Sensitivity analyses revealed that changes in treatment efficacy and adherence had the largest impact on results. In primary and secondary CV prevention, the efficacy advantage of rosuvastatin was minimal, while its acquisition cost was higher, particularly in Colombia. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were, therefore, generally in favor of atorvastatin being the cost-effective option. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  10. The High Calcium, High Phosphorus Rescue Diet Is Not Suitable to Prevent Secondary Hyperparathyroidism in Vitamin D Receptor Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Grundmann, Sarah M; Brandsch, Corinna; Rottstädt, Daniela; Kühne, Hagen; Stangl, Gabriele I

    2017-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) knockout (KO) mouse is a common model to unravel novel metabolic functions of vitamin D. It is recommended to feed these mice a high calcium (2%), high phosphorus (1.25%) diet, termed rescue diet (RD) to prevent hypocalcaemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism. First, we characterized the individual response of VDR KO mice to feeding a RD and found that the RD was not capable of normalizing the parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations in each VDR KO mouse. In a second study, we aimed to study whether RD with additional 1 and 2% calcium (in total 3 and 4% of the diet) is able to prevent secondary hyperparathyroidism in the VDR KO mice. Wild type (WT) mice and VDR KO mice that received a normal calcium and phosphorus diet (ND) served as controls. Data demonstrated that the RD was no more efficient than the ND in normalizing PTH levels. An excessive dietary calcium concentration of 4% was required to reduce serum PTH concentrations in the VDR KO mice to PTH levels measured in WT mice. This diet, however, resulted in higher concentrations of circulating intact fibroblast growth factor 23 (iFGF23). To conclude, the commonly used RD is not suitable to normalize the serum PTH in VDR KO mice. Extremely high dietary calcium concentrations are necessary to prevent secondary hyperthyroidism in these mice, with the consequence that iFGF23 concentrations are being raised. Considering that PTH and iFGF23 exert numerous VDR independent effects, data obtained from VDR KO mice cannot be attributed solely to vitamin D.

  11. Initiation and adherence to secondary prevention pharmacotherapy after myocardial infarction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a nationwide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lindhardsen, Jesper; Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar; Madsen, Ole Rintek; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Hansen, Peter Riis

    2012-09-01

    To examine whether rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with less optimal secondary prevention pharmacotherapy after first-time myocardial infarction (MI). The authors identified all patients with first-time MI in the Danish National Patient Register from 2002 to 2009 and gathered individual level information including pharmacy records from nationwide registers. Initiation of standard care post-MI secondary prevention drugs, that is, aspirin, β-blockers, clopidogrel, renin angiotensin system (RAS) blockers and statins, was determined after discharge. In addition, adherence to each drug was evaluated as the proportion of patients on treatment during follow-up and time to first treatment gap. A total of 66 107 MI patients (37% women) were discharged alive; 877 were identified as RA patients (59% women). Thirty days after discharge, RA was associated with significantly lower initiation of aspirin (OR 0.80 (0.67-0.96)), β-blockers (0.77 (0.65-0.92)) and statins (0.69 (0.58-0.82)), while initiation of RAS blockers (0.80 (0.57-1.11)) and clopidogrel (0.88 (0.75-1.02)) was non-significantly reduced. These estimates were virtually unchanged at day 180 and the results were corroborated by Cox regression analyses. Adherence to statins was lower in RA patients relative to non-RA patients (HR for treatment gap of 90 days: 1.26 (1.07-1.48)), while no significant differences were found in adherence to the other drugs. In this nationwide study of unselected patients with first-time MI, a reduced initiation of secondary prevention pharmacotherapy was observed in RA patients. This undertreatment may contribute to the increased cardiovascular disease burden in RA and the underlying mechanisms warrant further study.

  12. Blood Pressure Reduction and Secondary Stroke Prevention: A Systematic Review and Metaregression Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Filippatou, Angeliki; Manios, Efstathios; Deftereos, Spyridon; Parissis, John; Frogoudaki, Alexandra; Vrettou, Agathi-Rosa; Ikonomidis, Ignatios; Pikilidou, Maria; Kargiotis, Odysseas; Voumvourakis, Konstantinos; Alexandrov, Anne W; Alexandrov, Andrei V; Tsivgoulis, Georgios

    2017-01-01

    Current recommendations do not specifically address the optimal blood pressure (BP) reduction for secondary stroke prevention in patients with previous cerebrovascular events. We conducted a systematic review and metaregression analysis on the association of BP reduction with recurrent stroke and cardiovascular events using data from randomized controlled clinical trials of secondary stroke prevention. For all reported events during each eligible study period, we calculated the corresponding risk ratios to express the comparison of event occurrence risk between patients randomized to antihypertensive treatment and those randomized to placebo. On the basis of the reported BP values, we performed univariate metaregression analyses according to the achieved BP values under the random-effects model (Method of Moments) for those adverse events reported in ≥10 total subgroups of included randomized controlled clinical trials. In pairwise meta-analyses, antihypertensive treatment lowered the risk for recurrent stroke (risk ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.62-0.87; P<0.001), disabling or fatal stroke (risk ratio, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.59-0.85; P<0.001), and cardiovascular death (risk ratio, 0.85; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-0.96; P=0.01). In metaregression analyses, systolic BP reduction was linearly related to the lower risk of recurrent stroke (P=0.049), myocardial infarction (P=0.024), death from any cause (P=0.001), and cardiovascular death (P<0.001). Similarly, diastolic BP reduction was linearly related to a lower risk of recurrent stroke (P=0.026) and all-cause mortality (P=0.009). Funnel plot inspection and Egger statistical test revealed no evidence of publication bias. The extent of BP reduction is linearly associated with the magnitude of risk reduction in recurrent cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events. Strict and aggressive BP control seems to be essential for effective secondary stroke prevention. © 2016 American Heart Association

  13. Primary care organisational interventions for secondary prevention of ischaemic heart disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Edel; Vellinga, Akke; Byrne, Molly; Cupples, Margaret E; Murphy, Andrew W; Buckley, Brian; Smith, Susan M

    2015-07-01

    Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) is the most common cause of death worldwide. To determine the long-term impact of organisational interventions for secondary prevention of IHD. Systematic review and meta-analysis of studies from CENTRAL, MEDLINE(®), Embase, and CINAHL published January 2007 to January 2013. Searches were conducted for randomised controlled trials of patients with established IHD, with long-term follow-up, of cardiac secondary prevention programmes targeting organisational change in primary care or community settings. A random-effects model was used and risk ratios were calculated. Five studies were included with 4005 participants. Meta-analysis of four studies with mortality data at 4.7-6 years showed that organisational interventions were associated with approximately 20% reduced mortality, with a risk ratio (RR) for all-cause mortality of 0.79 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.66 to 0.93), and a RR for cardiac-related mortality of 0.74 (95% CI = 0.58 to 0.94). Two studies reported mortality data at 10 years. Analysis of these data showed no significant differences between groups. There were insufficient data to conduct a meta-analysis on the effect of interventions on hospital admissions. Additional analyses showed no significant association between organisational interventions and risk factor management or appropriate prescribing at 4.7-6 years. Cardiac secondary prevention programmes targeting organisational change are associated with a reduced risk of death for at least 4-6 years. There is insufficient evidence to conclude whether this beneficial effect is maintained indefinitely. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  14. Pressure Ulcer Preventive Device Use Among Elderly Patients Early in the Hospital Stay

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Shayna E.; Shardell, Michelle; Margolis, David; Baumgarten, Mona

    2010-01-01

    Background Clinical guidelines for the prevention of pressure ulcers advise that pressure-reducing devices should be used for all patients at risk of or with pressure ulcers and that all pressure ulcers should be documented in the patient record. Adherence to these guidelines among elderly hospital patients early in the hospital stay has not been examined in prior studies. Objective The objective of this study was to examine adherence to guidelines by determining the frequency and correlates of use of preventive devices early in the hospital stay of elderly patients and by determining the frequency and correlates of recording pressure ulcers in the patient record. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of 792 patients aged 65 years or older admitted through the emergency department to the inpatient medical service at two teaching hospitals in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, between 1998 and 2001. Patients were examined by a research nurse on Hospital Day 3 (median of 48 hours after admission) to determine the use of preventive devices, presence of pressure ulcers, and risk of pressure ulcers (by Norton scale). Data on additional risk factors were obtained from the admission nursing assessment in the patient record. Data on documentation of pressure ulcers were obtained by chart abstraction. Results Only 15% of patients had any preventive devices in use at the time of the examination. Among patients considered at risk of pressure ulcers (Norton score ≤14), only 51% had a preventive device. In multivariable analyses, high risk of pressure ulcers was associated with use of preventive devices (odds ratio = 41.8, 95% confidence interval = 14.0–124.6), whereas the type and stage of pressure ulcer were not. Documentation of a pressure ulcer was present for only 68% of patients who had a pressure ulcer according to the research examination. Discussion Use of preventive devices and documentation of pressure ulcers are suboptimal even among patients at high risk. PMID

  15. Inequalities in the use of secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease by socioeconomic status: evidence from the PURE observational study.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Adrianna; Palafox, Benjamin; O'Donnell, Owen; Stuckler, David; Perel, Pablo; AlHabib, Khalid F; Avezum, Alvaro; Bai, Xiulin; Chifamba, Jephat; Chow, Clara K; Corsi, Daniel J; Dagenais, Gilles R; Dans, Antonio L; Diaz, Rafael; Erbakan, Ayse N; Ismail, Noorhassim; Iqbal, Romaina; Kelishadi, Roya; Khatib, Rasha; Lanas, Fernando; Lear, Scott A; Li, Wei; Liu, Jia; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio; Mohan, Viswanathan; Monsef, Nahed; Mony, Prem K; Puoane, Thandi; Rangarajan, Sumathy; Rosengren, Annika; Schutte, Aletta E; Sintaha, Mariz; Teo, Koon K; Wielgosz, Andreas; Yeates, Karen; Yin, Lu; Yusoff, Khalid; Zatońska, Katarzyna; Yusuf, Salim; McKee, Martin

    2018-03-01

    There is little evidence on the use of secondary prevention medicines for cardiovascular disease by socioeconomic groups in countries at different levels of economic development. We assessed use of antiplatelet, cholesterol, and blood-pressure-lowering drugs in 8492 individuals with self-reported cardiovascular disease from 21 countries enrolled in the Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) study. Defining one or more drugs as a minimal level of secondary prevention, wealth-related inequality was measured using the Wagstaff concentration index, scaled from -1 (pro-poor) to 1 (pro-rich), standardised by age and sex. Correlations between inequalities and national health-related indicators were estimated. The proportion of patients with cardiovascular disease on three medications ranged from 0% in South Africa (95% CI 0-1·7), Tanzania (0-3·6), and Zimbabwe (0-5·1), to 49·3% in Canada (44·4-54·3). Proportions receiving at least one drug varied from 2·0% (95% CI 0·5-6·9) in Tanzania to 91·4% (86·6-94·6) in Sweden. There was significant (p<0·05) pro-rich inequality in Saudi Arabia, China, Colombia, India, Pakistan, and Zimbabwe. Pro-poor distributions were observed in Sweden, Brazil, Chile, Poland, and the occupied Palestinian territory. The strongest predictors of inequality were public expenditure on health and overall use of secondary prevention medicines. Use of medication for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease is alarmingly low. In many countries with the lowest use, pro-rich inequality is greatest. Policies associated with an equal or pro-poor distribution include free medications and community health programmes to support adherence to medications. Full funding sources listed at the end of the paper (see Acknowledgments). Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article under the CC BY 4.0. license. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Stroke survivors', caregivers' and GPs' attitudes towards a polypill for the secondary prevention of stroke: a qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    Jamison, James; Graffy, Jonathan; Mullis, Ricky; Mant, Jonathan; Sutton, Stephen

    2016-05-13

    To understand the perspectives of stroke survivors, caregivers and general practitioners (GPs) on a polypill approach, consisting of blood pressure and cholesterol-lowering therapies, with or without aspirin, for the secondary prevention of stroke. A qualitative interview study was undertaken in 5 GP surgeries in the East of England. 28 survivors of stroke/transient ischaemic attack (TIA) were interviewed, 14 of them with a caregiver present, along with a convenience sample of 5 GPs, to assess attitudes towards a polypill and future use. Topic guides explored participants attitudes, potential uptake and long-term use, management of polypill medication and factors influencing the decision to prescribe. Data were analysed using a grounded theory approach. Key themes are presented and illustrated with verbatim quotes. The analysis identified 3 key themes: polypill benefits, polypill concerns and polypill lessons for implementation. Stroke/TIA survivors were positive about the polypill concept and considered it acceptable in the secondary prevention of stroke. Perceived benefits of a polypill included convenience resulting in improved adherence and reduced burden of treatment. Caregivers felt that a polypill would improve medication-taking practices, and GPs were open to prescribing it to those at increased cardiovascular risk. However, concerns raised included whether a polypill provided equivalent therapeutic benefit, side effects through combining medications, consequences of non-adherence, lack of flexibility in regulating dosage, disruption to current treatment and suitability to the wider stroke population. Participants acknowledged potential advantages in a polypill approach for secondary prevention of stroke; however, significant concerns remain. Further research on the efficacy of a polypill is needed to reassure practitioners whose concerns around inflexibility and treatment suitability are likely to influence the decision to prescribe a polypill for

  17. PCSK9 monoclonal antibodies for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Amand F; Pearce, Lucy S; Wilkins, John T; Overington, John P; Hingorani, Aroon D; Casas, Juan P

    2017-04-28

    Despite the availability of effective drug therapies that reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol (LDL-C), cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains an important cause of mortality and morbidity. Therefore, additional LDL-C reduction may be warranted, especially for patients who are unresponsive to, or unable to take, existing LDL-C-reducing therapies. By inhibiting the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) enzyme, monoclonal antibodies (PCSK9 inhibitors) may further reduce LDL-C, potentially reducing CVD risk as well. Primary To quantify short-term (24 weeks), medium-term (one year), and long-term (five years) effects of PCSK9 inhibitors on lipid parameters and on the incidence of CVD. Secondary To quantify the safety of PCSK9 inhibitors, with specific focus on the incidence of type 2 diabetes, cognitive function, and cancer. Additionally, to determine if specific patient subgroups were more or less likely to benefit from the use of PCSK9 inhibitors. We identified studies by systematically searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, and Web of Science. We also searched Clinicaltrials.gov and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform and screened the reference lists of included studies. We identified the studies included in this review through electronic literature searches conducted up to May 2016, and added three large trials published in March 2017. All parallel-group and factorial randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with a follow-up time of at least 24 weeks were eligible. Two review authors independently reviewed and extracted data. When data were available, we calculated pooled effect estimates. We included 20 studies with data on 67,237 participants (median age 61 years; range 52 to 64 years). Twelve trials randomised participants to alirocumab, three trials to bococizumab, one to RG7652, and four to evolocumab. Owing to the small number of trials using agents other than alirocumab

  18. Prevention and early intervention for behaviour problems in children with developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Einfeld, Stewart L; Tonge, Bruce J; Clarke, Kristina S

    2013-05-01

    To review the recent evidence regarding early intervention and prevention studies for children with developmental disabilities and behaviour problems from 2011 to 2013. Recent advances in the field are discussed and important areas for future research are highlighted. Recent reviews and studies highlight the utility of antecedent interventions and skills training interventions for reducing behaviour problems. There is preliminary evidence for the effectiveness of parent training interventions when delivered in minimally sufficient formats or in clinical settings. Two recent studies have demonstrated the utility of behavioural interventions for children with genetic causes of disability. Various forms of behavioural and parent training interventions are effective at reducing the behaviour problems in children with developmental disabilities. However, research on prevention and early intervention continues to be relatively scarce. Further large-scale dissemination studies and effectiveness studies in clinical or applied settings are needed.

  19. Mental health: early intervention and prevention in children and young people.

    PubMed

    Membride, Heather

    It is estimated that 10% of children and young people have mental health problems so significant that they impact not only on their day-to-day life but, if left untreated, they will continue into adulthood. In this article, the author discusses mental health issues affecting children and young people and examines evidence-based early intervention and prevention programmes that have been shown to support better outcomes for children, young people and their families.

  20. Are both early egg introduction and eczema treatment necessary for primary prevention of egg allergy?

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kenji; Mori, Rintaro; Miyazaki, Celine; Ohya, Yukihiro; Saito, Hirohisa

    2018-06-01

    The Learning Early About Peanut Allergy (LEAP) study proved that early introduction of peanut significantly prevented the development of peanut allergy. However, in regard to similar attempts to prevent egg allergy through early egg introduction, the Prevention of Egg Allergy in High-risk Infants with Eczema (PETIT) study is the only randomized intervention trial to show a statistically significant effect. Meta-analysis of those studies indicated that neither the total amount nor pretreatment of egg showed any effect on egg allergy at the age of 12 months. However, raw egg powder resulted in a significantly higher prevalence of allergic reactions at initial introduction, whereas use of boiled egg was much safer. The prevalence of atopic dermatitis/eczema at introduction of egg correlated significantly with the subsequent prevalence of allergic reactions at initial introduction. In addition, the prevalence of egg allergy in the late introduction group correlated significantly with the prevalence of atopic dermatitis at introduction, even when the atopic dermatitis was proactively treated with a topical corticosteroid ointment. It is definitely true that the number of trials and number of participants in each trial are insufficient for drawing firm conclusions, especially regarding the optimal dose, raw versus boiled, when to start, and for whom to intervene. Therefore we propose various studies that should be performed to generate stronger data and conclusions. However, on the basis of the most recent results, we postulate that simultaneous intervention by both early boiled egg introduction and eczema treatment is probably indispensable for primary prevention of egg allergy. Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Secondary benefit of maintaining normal transcranial Doppler velocities when using hydroxyurea for prevention of severe sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Ghafuri, Djamila Labib; Chaturvedi, Shruti; Rodeghier, Mark; Stimpson, Sarah-Jo; McClain, Brandi; Byrd, Jeannie; DeBaun, Michael R

    2017-07-01

    In a retrospective cohort study, we tested the hypothesis that when prescribing hydroxyurea (HU) to children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) to prevent vaso-occlusive events, there will be a secondary benefit of maintaining low transcranial Doppler (TCD) velocity, measured by imaging technique (TCDi). HU was prescribed for 90.9% (110 of 120) of children with SCA ≥5 years of age and followed for a median of 4.4 years, with 70% (n = 77) receiving at least one TCDi evaluation after starting HU. No child prescribed HU had a conditional or abnormal TCDi measurement. HU initiation for disease severity prevention decreases the prevalence of abnormal TCDi velocities. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Uric acid lowering to prevent kidney function loss in diabetes: the preventing early renal function loss (PERL) allopurinol study.

    PubMed

    Maahs, David M; Caramori, Luiza; Cherney, David Z I; Galecki, Andrzej T; Gao, Chuanyun; Jalal, Diana; Perkins, Bruce A; Pop-Busui, Rodica; Rossing, Peter; Mauer, Michael; Doria, Alessandro

    2013-08-01

    Diabetic kidney disease causes significant morbidity and mortality among people with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Intensive glucose and blood pressure control have thus far failed to adequately curb this problem and therefore a major need for novel treatment approaches exists. Multiple observations link serum uric acid levels to kidney disease development and progression in diabetes and strongly argue that uric acid lowering should be tested as one such novel intervention. A pilot of such a trial, using allopurinol, is currently being conducted by the Preventing Early Renal Function Loss (PERL) Consortium. Although the PERL trial targets T1D individuals at highest risk of kidney function decline, the use of allopurinol as a renoprotective agent may also be relevant to a larger segment of the population with diabetes. As allopurinol is inexpensive and safe, it could be cost-effective even for relatively low-risk patients, pending the completion of appropriate trials at earlier stages.

  3. Preventing Weight Gain and Obesity: Indirect Effects of the Family Check-Up in Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Justin D.; Montaño, Zorash; Dishion, Thomas J.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Wilson, Melvin N.

    2014-01-01

    The early signs of obesity are observable in early childhood. Although the most promising prevention approaches are family centered, few relevant early prevention programs exist. This study evaluated the effects of an evidence-based, home-visiting intervention, the Family Check-Up (FCU), on the trajectory of children’s weight gain. The FCU was designed to prevent the development of behavior problems by improving family management practices; children’s weight has not been an explicit target. On the basis of previous research and conceptual models, we hypothesized that intervention effects on parenting practices, specifically caregivers’ use of positive behavior support (PBS) strategies in toddlerhood, would mediate improvements in children’s weight trajectories. A total of 731 indigent caregiver–child dyads from a multisite randomized intervention trial were examined. Observational assessment of parenting and mealtime behaviors occurred from age 2 to 5. The child’s body mass index (BMI) was assessed yearly from age 5 to 9.5. Path analysis with a latent growth model revealed a significant indirect effect of the FCU on the trajectory of BMI in later childhood. Improvements in caregivers’ PBS in toddlerhood, which was related to the nutritional quality of the meals caregivers served to the child during the mealtime task, served as the intervening process. Further, findings indicate that the FCU prevents progression to overweight and obese status amongst at-risk children. These study results add to existing evidence that has demonstrated that family-based interventions aimed at improving general family management skills are effective at preventing weight gain. Future directions are discussed. PMID:25263212

  4. Impact of early complications on outcomes in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator for primary prevention.

    PubMed

    Ascoeta, Maria Soledad; Marijon, Eloi; Defaye, Pascal; Klug, Didier; Beganton, Frankie; Perier, Marie-Cécile; Gras, Daniel; Algalarrondo, Vincent; Deharo, Jean-Claude; Leclercq, Christophe; Fauchier, Laurent; Babuty, Dominique; Bordachar, Pierre; Sadoul, Nicolas; Boveda, Serge; Piot, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    The lifesaving benefit of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) has been demonstrated. Their use has increased considerably in the past decade, but related complications have become a major concern. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence and effect on outcomes of early (≤30 days) complications after ICD implantation for primary prevention in a large French population. We analyzed data from 5539 patients from the multicenter French DAI-PP (Défibrillateur Automatique Implantable-Prévention Primaire) registry (2002-2012) who had coronary artery disease or dilated cardiomyopathy and were implanted with an ICD for primary prevention. Overall, early complications occurred in 707 patients (13.5%), mainly related to lead dislodgment or hematoma (57%). Independent factors associated with occurrence of early complications were severe renal impairment (odds ratio [OR] 1.66, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17-2.37, P = .02), age ≥75 years (OR 1.01, 95% CI 1.00-1.02, P = .03), cardiac resynchronization therapy (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.16-2.17, P = .01), and anticoagulant therapy (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.02-1.61, P = .03). During a mean ± SD follow-up of 3.1 ± 2.3 years, 824 (15.8%) patients experienced ≥1 late complication (>30 days), and 782 (14.9%) patients died. After adjustment, early complications remained associated with occurrence of late complications (OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.73-2.66, P < .0001) and mortality (OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.34-2.17, P = .003). Early complications are common after ICD implantation for primary prevention, occurring in 1 in 7 patients, and are associated with an increased risk of late complications and overall mortality. Further studies are needed to investigate the underlying mechanisms of such associations. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Home visitation programs: An untapped opportunity for the delivery of early childhood obesity prevention

    PubMed Central

    Salvy, Sarah-Jeanne; de la Haye, Kayla; Galama, Titus; Goran, Michael I.

    2016-01-01

    Background Extant obesity efforts have had limited impact among low-income underserved children, in part because of limitations inherent to existing programs: 1) short duration and low intensity; 2) late timing of implementation, when children are already overweight or obese; 3) intervention delivery limiting their accessibility and sustainability; and 4) failure to address barriers such as a lack of culturally competent services, poverty and housing instability, which interfere with healthy lifestyle changes. Objective This concept paper proposes an innovative model of obesity prevention implemented in infancy and sustained throughout early childhood to address the limitations of current obesity prevention efforts. Specifically, we propose to integrate sustained, weekly, in-home obesity prevention as part of the services already delivered by ongoing Home Visitation Programs, which currently do not target obesity prevention. Conclusion The home visiting structure represents an ideal model for impactful obesity prevention as home visitation programs: (1) already provide comprehensive services to diverse low-income infants and families who are most at risk for obesity and poor health due to socio-economic and structural conditions; (2) services are initiated in infancy and sustained throughout critical developmental periods for the formation of healthy/unhealthy behaviors; and (3) have been in place for more than 40 years, with a widespread presence across the United States and nationwide, which is critical for the scalability and sustainability of obesity prevention. PMID:27911984

  6. Home visitation programs: an untapped opportunity for the delivery of early childhood obesity prevention.

    PubMed

    Salvy, S-J; de la Haye, K; Galama, T; Goran, M I

    2017-02-01

    Extant obesity efforts have had limited impact among low-income underserved children, in part because of limitations inherent to existing programs: (i) short duration and low intensity; (ii) late timing of implementation, when children are already overweight or obese; (iii) intervention delivery limiting their accessibility and sustainability; and (iv) failure to address barriers such as a lack of culturally competent services, poverty and housing instability, which interfere with healthy lifestyle changes. This concept paper proposes an innovative model of obesity prevention implemented in infancy and sustained throughout early childhood to address the limitations of current obesity prevention efforts. Specifically, we propose to integrate sustained, weekly, in-home obesity prevention as part of the services already delivered by ongoing Home Visitation Programs, which currently do not target obesity prevention. The home visiting structure represents an ideal model for impactful obesity prevention as home visitation programs: (i) already provide comprehensive services to diverse low-income infants and families who are most at risk for obesity and poor health because of socio-economic and structural conditions; (ii) services are initiated in infancy and sustained throughout critical developmental periods for the formation of healthy/unhealthy behaviors; and (iii) have been in place for more than 40 years, with a widespread presence across the United States and nationwide, which is critical for the scalability and sustainability of obesity prevention. © 2016 World Obesity Federation.

  7. Effectiveness of the Preschool Version of the First Step to Success Early Intervention Program for Preventing Antisocial Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çelik, Seçil; Arikan, Azru; Diken, Ibrahim H.; Aksoy, Funda; Çolak, Aysun; Tomris, Gözde

    2016-01-01

    Preventing antisocial behaviors appearing at an early age--before they become chronic--through effective early intervention programs, has become an important issue in recent years. In Turkey, the increase in the number of children at risk of antisocial behavior makes it necessary to get these behaviors under control at an early age through some…

  8. Preventive intervention for anxious preschoolers and their parents: strengthening early emotional development.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jeremy K; Masia Warner, Carrie; Lerner, Amy B; Ludwig, Kristy; Ryan, Julie L; Colognori, Daniela; Lucas, Christopher P; Brotman, Laurie Miller

    2012-08-01

    The high prevalence and early onset of anxiety disorders have inspired innovative prevention efforts targeting young at-risk children. With parent-child prevention models showing success for older children and adolescents, the goal of this study was to evaluate a parent-child indicated preventive intervention for preschoolers with mild to moderate anxiety symptoms. Sixteen children (ages 3-5) and at least one of their parents participated in Strengthening Early Emotional Development (SEED), a new 10-week intervention with concurrent groups for parents and children. Outcome measures included clinician-rated and parent-rated assessments of anxiety symptoms, as well as measures of emotion knowledge, parent anxiety, and parental attitudes about children's anxiety. Participation in SEED was associated with reduced child anxiety symptoms and improved emotion understanding skills. Parents reported decreases in their own anxiety, along with attitudes reflecting enhanced confidence in their children's ability to cope with anxiety. Reductions in child and parent anxiety were maintained at 3-month follow-up. Findings suggest that a parent-child cognitive-behavioral preventive intervention may hold promise for young children with mild to moderate anxiety. Improvements in parent anxiety and parental attitudes may support the utility of intervening with parents. Fostering increased willingness to encourage their children to engage in new and anxiety-provoking situations may help promote continued mastery of new skills and successful coping with anxiety.

  9. Preventive Intervention for Anxious Preschoolers and Their Parents: Strengthening Early Emotional Development

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Jeremy K.; Lerner, Amy B.; Ludwig, Kristy; Ryan, Julie L.; Colognori, Daniela; Lucas, Christopher P.; Brotman, Laurie Miller

    2013-01-01

    The high prevalence and early onset of anxiety disorders have inspired innovative prevention efforts targeting young at-risk children. With parent–child prevention models showing success for older children and adolescents, the goal of this study was to evaluate a parent–child indicated preventive intervention for preschoolers with mild to moderate anxiety symptoms. Sixteen children (ages 3–5) and at least one of their parents participated in Strengthening Early Emotional Development (SEED), a new 10-week intervention with concurrent groups for parents and children. Outcome measures included clinician-rated and parent-rated assessments of anxiety symptoms, as well as measures of emotion knowledge, parent anxiety, and parental attitudes about children’s anxiety. Participation in SEED was associated with reduced child anxiety symptoms and improved emotion understanding skills. Parents reported decreases in their own anxiety, along with attitudes reflecting enhanced confidence in their children’s ability to cope with anxiety. Reductions in child and parent anxiety were maintained at 3-month follow-up. Findings suggest that a parent–child cognitive-behavioral preventive intervention may hold promise for young children with mild to moderate anxiety. Improvements in parent anxiety and parental attitudes may support the utility of intervening with parents. Fostering increased willingness to encourage their children to engage in new and anxiety-provoking situations may help promote continued mastery of new skills and successful coping with anxiety. PMID:22331442

  10. Falls and Fall Prevention in Older Adults With Early-Stage Dementia: An Integrative Review.

    PubMed

    Lach, Helen W; Harrison, Barbara E; Phongphanngam, Sutthida

    2017-05-01

    Older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and early-stage dementia have an increased risk of falling, with risks to their health and quality of life. The purpose of the current integrative review was to evaluate evidence on fall risk and fall prevention in this population. Studies were included if they examined falls or fall risk factors in older adults with MCI or early-stage dementia, or reported interventions in this population; 40 studies met criteria. Evidence supports the increased risk of falls in individuals even in the early stages of dementia or MCI, and changes in gait, balance, and fear of falling that may be related to this increased fall risk. Interventions included exercise and multifactorial interventions that demonstrated some potential to reduce falls in this population. Few studies had strong designs to provide evidence for recommendations. Further study in this area is warranted. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2017; 10(03):139-148.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Reduced substance use as a secondary benefit of an indicated cognitive-behavioral adolescent depression prevention program.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Paul; Stice, Eric; Gau, Jeff M; Marti, C Nathan

    2012-09-01

    Our first aim was to test whether a group cognitive-behavioral (CB) depression prevention program reduces substance use escalation over 2-year follow-up relative to two active comparison interventions and a brochure assessment control. Our second aim examined whether reductions in depressive symptoms mediate intervention effects, as posited by the affect-regulation model of substance use. In this indicated prevention trial, 341 high school adolescents at risk for depression because of the presence of elevated depressive symptoms were randomized to a Group CB intervention, group supportive-expressive group intervention, CB bibliotherapy, or educational brochure control condition. Participants in Group CB had significantly lower rates of substance use compared with brochure control participants at both 1- and 2-year follow-up and lower substance use at 2-year follow-up relative to bibliotherapy participants; no other condition differences were significant. Mediational analyses suggested that reductions in depressive symptoms from baseline to posttest accounted for changes in substance use over 2 years for participants in Group CB relative to brochure control participants but did not mediate effects relative to those receiving bibliotherapy. Results suggest that a secondary benefit of this CB group indicated depression prevention program is lower rates of long-term substance use. Findings supported the hypothesis that, relative to a nonactive comparison condition, reductions in depressive symptoms mediated the effects of Group CB prevention on substance use escalation. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Theoretical Risk and Prevention Model for Secondary Health Conditions and Mortality After SCI: 15 Years of Research

    PubMed Central

    Krause, James S.; Saunders, Lee L.; DiPiro, Nicole D.; Reed, Karla S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: To successfully prevent secondary health conditions (SHCs) and promote longevity after spinal cord injury (SCI), we must first understand the risk factors precipitating their occurrence and develop strategies to address these risk factors. Conceptual models may aid in identifying the nature of SHCs and guide research, clinical practice, and the development of prevention strategies. Objective: Our purpose is to review and refine an existing theoretical risk and prevention model (TRPM) as a means of classifying risk and protective factors for SHCs and mortality after SCI and for identifying points of intervention. Methods: We describe conceptual work within the field of SCI research and SHCs, including a description of the TRPM, a review of research using the TRPM, and conceptual enhancements to the TRPM based on previous research. Conclusions: The enhanced TRPM directs research to the timing and chronicity of the SHCs and their relationship with overall health and physiologic decline. Future research should identify differences in the nature of SHCs, the extent to which they relate to risk and protective factors, and the degree to which they may be prevented with appropriate research-based strategies. PMID:23459002

  13. Stress-Prevention in Secondary Schools: Online- versus Face-to-Face-Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fridrici, Mirko; Lohaus, Arnold

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to focus on the evaluation of an internet-delivered stress-prevention program for adolescents as a possible alternative for school-based implementation of mental health promotion. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 904 adolescents in grades eight and nine were assigned to four treatment conditions…

  14. Secondary Prevention Efforts at the Middle School Level: An Application of the Behavior Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Capizzi, Andrea M.; Fisher, Marisa H.; Ennis, Robin Parks

    2012-01-01

    In this study we examine the impact of the Behavior Education Program (BEP; Hawken, MacLeod, & Rawlings, 2007) with four middle school students who were not responsive to a comprehensive primary prevention program including academic, behavioral and social components. To extend this line of inquiry we (a) conducted a functional behavioral…

  15. Secondary HIV prevention among kothi-identified MSM in Chennai, India.

    PubMed

    Chakrapani, Venkatesan; Newman, Peter A; Shunmugam, Murali

    2008-05-01

    This study explored experiences and contexts of HIV risk and prevention among HIV-positive kothi-identified men in Chennai, India. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 HIV-positive men and three service providers, recruited using purposive sampling. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed in Tamil and translated into English. Data were analysed using a narrative thematic approach and constant comparative method. Misconceptions about HIV transmission; cultural taboos around discussing sexual behaviour and HIV; stigma related to same-sex behaviour; harassment; and the criminalization of consensual sex between men present formidable challenges to HIV prevention. Frank and open discussion about male-to-male sexual behaviour and living with HIV, which may support health and HIV prevention, may be dangerous in the context of pervasive risks due to stigmatization, violence and criminalization. Instead, culturally appropriate, multi-level interventions developed in collaboration with community stakeholders are needed to support HIV prevention among kothi-identified men in South India.

  16. A Review of Eating Disorders in Athletes: Recommendations for Secondary School Prevention and Intervention Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildebrandt, Tom

    2005-01-01

    The current review aims to evaluate the literature on eating disorders and athletes with the purpose of making recommendations for sport psychologists and other relevant personnel on how to proceed in identifying, managing, and preventing eating disorders in school settings. Whereas the intention of this review is to make recommendations for…

  17. Cyclooxygenase inhibition targets neurons to prevent early behavioural decline in Alzheimer’s disease model mice

    PubMed Central

    Woodling, Nathaniel S.; Colas, Damien; Wang, Qian; Minhas, Paras; Panchal, Maharshi; Liang, Xibin; Mhatre, Siddhita D.; Brown, Holden; Ko, Novie; Zagol-Ikapitte, Irene; van der Hart, Marieke; Khroyan, Taline V.; Chuluun, Bayarsaikhan; Priyam, Prachi G.; Milne, Ginger L.; Rassoulpour, Arash; Boutaud, Olivier; Manning-Boğ, Amy B.; Heller, H. Craig

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Identifying preventive targets for Alzheimer’s disease is a central challenge of modern medicine. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, which inhibit the cyclooxygenase enzymes COX-1 and COX-2, reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease in normal ageing populations. This preventive effect coincides with an extended preclinical phase that spans years to decades before onset of cognitive decline. In the brain, COX-2 is induced in neurons in response to excitatory synaptic activity and in glial cells in response to inflammation. To identify mechanisms underlying prevention of cognitive decline by anti-inflammatory drugs, we first identified an early object memory deficit in APP Swe -PS1 ΔE9 mice that preceded previously identified spatial memory deficits in this model. We modelled prevention of this memory deficit with ibuprofen, and found that ibuprofen prevented memory impairment without producing any measurable changes in amyloid-β accumulation or glial inflammation. Instead, ibuprofen modulated hippocampal gene expression in pathways involved in neuronal plasticity and increased levels of norepinephrine and dopamine. The gene most highly downregulated by ibuprofen was neuronal tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase ( Tdo2 ), which encodes an enzyme that metabolizes tryptophan to kynurenine. TDO2 expression was increased by neuronal COX-2 activity, and overexpression of hippocampal TDO2 produced behavioural deficits. Moreover, pharmacological TDO2 inhibition prevented behavioural deficits in APP Swe -PS1 ΔE9 mice. Taken together, these data demonstrate broad effects of cyclooxygenase inhibition on multiple neuronal pathways that counteract the neurotoxic effects of early accumulating amyloid-β oligomers. PMID:27190010

  18. UV-induced occupational skin cancer: possibilities of secondary individual prevention in the "Dermatologist's Procedure".

    PubMed

    Elsner, Peter; Blome, Otto; Diepgen, Thomas Ludwig

    2013-07-01

    Invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) as a "quasi occupational disease" according to §9 Section 2 of the German Social Code Book (SGB) VII typically develops on chronically UV-damaged skin from actinic keratoses. After the Medical Scientific Committee of the Federal Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs has confirmed the legal criteria for acknowledging UV-induced SCC as an occupational disease, it is expected that the condition will be added to the official list of occupational diseases issued by the Federal Government in the near future. The Social Accident Insurance is required by law (§3 Occupational Disease Regulation) to prevent these tumors by "all appropriate means". There are excellent therapeutic and preventive measures for the management of actinic keratoses to avoid the development of SCC. The "Dermatologist's Procedure" according to §§ 41-43 of the agreement between the Social Accident Insurance and the Federal Medical Association was established in Germany in 1972 to take preventive measures in insured persons with skin lesions possibly developing into an occupational disease, or worsening it, or leading to a recurrence of it This procedure proved to be very successful in the prevention of severe and/or recurring skin diseases forcing a worker to leave his job. On the basis of this agreement, the Social Accident Insurance has the instruments to independently provide preventive measures for the new occupational skin disease SCC induced by natural UV light according to §9 Section 2 of the German Social Code Book (SGB) VII. © The Authors • Journal compilation © Blackwell Verlag GmbH, Berlin.

  19. Primary and Secondary Prevention of Acute Coronary Syndromes: The Role of the Statins.

    PubMed

    Diamantis, Evangelos; Troupis, Theodoros; Mazarakis, Antonios; Kyriakos, Giorgos; Diamanti, S; Troupis, Georgios; Skandalakis, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    Poor prognosis is strongly associated with Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) and, even though a number of treatment strategies are available, the incidence of subsequent serious complications after an acute event is still high. Statins are hypolipidemic factors and recent studies have demonstrated that they have a protective role during the process of atherogenesis and that they reduce mortality caused by cardiovascular diseases. This review tries to reveal the function of the statins as a component of the primary and secondary action of acute coronary syndrome and to describe the lifestyle changes that have the same effect as the use of statins.

  20. [Control of major cardiovascular risk factors of ischemic heart disease in secondary prevention in Aragón: COCINA study].

    PubMed

    Cucalon Arenal, J M; Buisac Ramón, C; Marin Ibáñez, A; Castan Ruiz, S; Blay Cortes, M G; Barrasa Villar, J I

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease remains a leading cause of death in Spain. According to the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology (AHA/ACC) and European national societies, secondary prevention for these patients consists of control of major cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) and suitable lifestyle habits. To determine the degree of control of CVRF in the Aragonese population in secondary prevention. Cross-sectional study of a sample of 705 patients of Aragon who had suffered a cardiac event, selected opportunistically in consultations of family physicians participating in the 3 provinces of Aragon. The study was conducted in the second half of 2012. To measure the degree of control of different FRVC and lifestyle habits in this population. Anthropometric, different cardiovascular risk factors, treatment and lifestyle. 58% of men and 52% of women met criteria for monitoring of measured variables. The best result was obtained with smoking cessation and the worst with BMI. Hypertension, Dyslipidemia and Diabetes Mellitus achieve poor control results. The results show that the degree of control of CVRF is still low, especially in variables such as dyslipidemia and Diabetes Mellitus. Only 16.5% of control patients met criteria given the pharmacologically-modifiable cardiovascular risk factors. Copyright © 2015 SEHLELHA. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Cirrhotic portal hypertension: current and future medical therapy for primary and secondary prevention of variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Laleman, W; Nevens, F

    2006-08-01

    Portal hypertension (PHT) is the most common complication of chronic liver disease and develops in the vast majority of patients with cirrhosis. It is characterized by an increase of the portal vein pressure, and leads to the development of gastroesophageal varices, ascites, renal dysfunction and hepatic encephalopathy. Over the years, it has become clear that a decrease in portal pressure is not only protective against the risk of variceal (re)bleeding but is also associated with a lower long-term risk of developing other complications and with an improved long-term survival. At present, non-selective b-blockers remain the medical treatment of choice for both primary and secondary prophylaxis. However, recent advances in the knowledge of the pathophysiology of cirrhotic PHT have directed future therapy towards the increased intrahepatic vascular resistance, which in part is determined by an increased hepatic vascular tone. This increased vasculogenic component provides the motivation to the use of therapies aimed at increasing intrahepatic vasorelaxing capacity on the one hand and at antagonizing excessive intrahepatic vasoconstrictor force on the other hand. This review covers current and future developments in the treatment of PHT with regard to primary and secondary prophylaxis.

  2. Early Childhood Education: A Model for 21st Century Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berndt, Rene

    2012-01-01

    As the designer of primary and secondary educational facilities, the author has become familiar with educational thinkers such as Sir Kenneth Robinson, Peter Senge, Ewan McIntosh, Daniel Pink and Howard Gardner--each promoting an approach based on system-thinking, self-directed exploration and multidimensional, interactive learning. In 2009, he…

  3. Motivational Trajectories for Early Language Learning across the Primary-Secondary School Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Suzanne; Courtney, Louise; Tonkyn, Alan; Marinis, Theodoros

    2016-01-01

    The transition from primary to secondary school is an area of concern across a range of curriculum subjects and this is no less so for foreign language learning. Indeed problems with transition have been identified in England as an important barrier to the introduction of language learning to the primary school curriculum, with implications for…

  4. Obstacles to the Primary and Secondary Prevention of Breast Cancer in African-American Women.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    Obstacles to Breast Cancer Prevention 39. Howe, G.R., Hirohata, T., Hislop , T.G., et al. (1990). Dietary factors and risk of breast cancer: Combined...184). 171. Herman, C.P., & Polivy, J. ( 1980 ). Restrained eating. In A.J. Stunkard (Ed), Obesity. Philadelphia: Saunders (pp 208-225). 172. Stunkard...28, 1980 . 264. Hardy RE, Eckert C., Hargreaves MK, Jones T. Promoting screening mammography and Pap smears in a Medicaid population. J Health Care

  5. Eating Disorders: Prevention through Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagel, K. L.; Jones, Karen H.

    1993-01-01

    School prevention programs for teenage eating disorders should emphasize nutrition education (knowledge, attitudes, behavior) and living skills (self-concept, coping). Secondary prevention involves identifying early warning signs and places for referral; tertiary prevention creates a supportive school environment for recoverers with teachers as…

  6. Melatonin prevents secondary intra-abdominal hypertension in rats possibly through inhibition of the p38 MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mingtao; Li, Yang; Liu, Dong; Zhang, Lianyang; Zhang, Hongguang; Tang, Hao; Zhang, Huayu

    2016-08-01

    Exogenous administration of melatonin has been demonstrated to down-regulate inflammatory responses and attenuate organ damage in various models. However, the salutary effect of melatonin against secondary intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) remains unclear. This study sought to test the influence of melatonin on secondary IAH in a pathophysiological rat model and the underlying mechanisms involved. Before resuscitation, male rats underwent a combination of induced portal hypertension, applying an abdominal restraint device, and hemorrhaging to mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 40mmHg for 2h. After blood reinfusion, the rats were treated with lactated Ringer solution (LR) (30mL/h), melatonin (50mg/kg) +LR, and SB-203580 (10μmol/kg)+LR. LR was continuously infused for 6h. MAP, the inferior vena cava pressure and urine output were monitored. Histopathological examination, immunofluorescence of tight junction proteins, and transmission electron microscopy were administered. Intestinal permeability, myeloperoxidase activity, malondialdehyde, glutathione peroxidase, and levels of TNF-a, IL-2, and IL-6, were assessed. The expression of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, translocation of nuclear factor kappa B subunit, signal transducers and activators of transcription and tight junction proteins were detected by Western blot. We found that melatonin inhibited the inflammatory responses, decreased expression of p38 MAPK, attenuated intestinal injury, and prevented secondary IAH. Moreover, administration of SB203580 abolished the increase in p38 MAPK and also attenuated intestinal injury. These data indicate that melatonin exerts a protective effect in intestine in secondary IAH primarily by attenuating the inflammatory responses which are in part attributable to p38 MAPK inhibition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Vaccination in secondary school students expedites rubella control and prevents congenital rubella syndrome.

    PubMed

    He, Hanqing; Yan, Rui; Tang, Xuewen; Zhou, Yang; Deng, Xuan; Xie, Shuyun

    2016-11-30

    In order to control the spread of rubella and reduce the risk for congenital rubella syndrome, an additional rubella vaccination program was set up for all secondary school students since 2008 in Zhejiang, China. We conducted a descriptive analysis of rubella incidence among different age groups from 2005 to 2015 and a serosurvey of female subjects aged 15-39 years to understand the possible effects of this immunization program. The average annual rubella incidence rate had decreased from 15.86 per 100,000 population (2005-2007) to 0.75 per 100,000 population (2013-2015) in Zhejiang. The decrease in the rate of rubella incidence in girls aged 15-19 years was more accelerated (from 138.30 to 0.34 per 100,000) than in the total population during 2008-2015 (from 32.20 to 0.46 per 100,000). Of 1225 female subjects in the serosurvey, 256 (20.9%) were not immune to rubella. The proportion of subjects immune to rubella was significantly different among different age groups (Wald χ2 = 22.19, p = 0.000), and subjects aged 15-19 years old had the highest immunity (88.0%). Rubella antibody levels were significantly lower in women aged 25-30 years with 26.7% of them not immune, followed by the group aged 20-24 years (25.0%) and 30-35 years (24.5%). Rubella vaccine included in the Expanded Program on Immunization together with vaccination activities for secondary school students can help in rubella control, particularly in targeted age groups in the program. Seroprevalence of antibodies to the rubella virus amongst the female population within childbearing age in Zhejiang, China, is still too low to provide immunity. In addition to vaccination programs in the secondary schools, rubella vaccination should also be encouraged in women of childbearing age, which can be done effectively combined with pre-marital examination in China.

  8. [Secondary prevention in the clinical management of patients with cardiovascular diseases. Core components, standards and outcome measures for referral and delivery].

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Despite major improvements in diagnostics and interventional therapies, cardiovascular diseases remain a major health care and socio-economic burden both in western and developing countries, in which this burden is increasing in close correlation to economic growth. Health authorities and the general population have started to recognize that the fight against these diseases can only be won if their burden is faced by increasing our investment on interventions in lifestyle changes and prevention. There is an overwhelming evidence of the efficacy of secondary prevention initiatives including cardiac rehabilitation in terms of reduction in morbidity and mortality. However, secondary prevention is still too poorly implemented in clinical practice, often only on selected populations and over a limited period of time. The development of systematic and full comprehensive preventive programmes is warranted, integrated in the organization of national health systems. Furthermore, systematic monitoring of the process of delivery and outcomes is a necessity Cardiology and secondary prevention, including cardiac rehabilitation, have evolved almost independently of each other and although each makes a unique contribution it is now time to join forces under the banner of preventive cardiology and create a comprehensive model that optimizes long term outcomes for patients and reduces the future burden on health care services. These are the aims that the Cardiac Rehabilitation Section of the European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation has foreseen to promote secondary preventive cardiology in clinical practice.

  9. School-based intervention to prevent overweight and disordered eating in secondary school Malaysian adolescents: a study protocol.

    PubMed

    Sharif Ishak, Sharifah Intan Zainun; Chin, Yit Siew; Mohd Taib, Mohd Nasir; Mohd Shariff, Zalilah

    2016-10-20

    Obesity, eating disorders and unhealthy weight-loss practices have been associated with diminished growth in adolescents worldwide. Interventions that address relevant behavioural dimensions have been lacking in Malaysia. This paper describes the protocol of an integrated health education intervention namely 'Eat Right, Be Positive About Your Body and Live Actively' (EPaL), a primary prevention which aimed to promote healthy lifestyle in preventing overweight and disordered eating among secondary school adolescents aged 13-14 years old. Following quasi-experimental design, the intervention is conducted in two secondary schools located in the district of Hulu Langat, Selangor, Malaysia. Adolescents aged 13-14 years will be included in the study. A peer-education strategy is adopted to convey knowledge and teach skills relevant to achieving a healthy lifestyle. The intervention mainly promoted: healthy eating, positive body image and active lifestyle. The following parameters will be assessed: body weight, disordered eating status, stages of change (for healthy diet, breakfast, food portion size, screen viewing and physical activity), body image, health-related quality of life, self-esteem, eating and physical activity behaviours; and knowledge, attitude and practice towards a healthy lifestyle. Assessment will be conducted at three time points: baseline, post-intervention and 3-month follow-up. It is hypothesized that EPaL intervention will contribute in preventing overweight and disordered eating by giving the positive effects on body weight status, healthy lifestyle behaviour, as well as health-related quality of life of peer educators and participants. It may serve as a model for similar future interventions designed for the Malaysian community, specifically adolescents. UMIN Clinical Trial Registration UMIN000024349 (Date of registration: 11th. October 2016, retrospectively registered).

  10. "Greenlight study": a controlled trial of low-literacy, early childhood obesity prevention.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Lee M; Perrin, Eliana M; Yin, H Shonna; Bronaugh, Andrea; Rothman, Russell L

    2014-06-01

    Children who become overweight by age 2 years have significantly greater risks of long-term health problems, and children in low-income communities, where rates of low adult literacy are highest, are at increased risk of developing obesity. The objective of the Greenlight Intervention Study is to assess the effectiveness of a low-literacy, primary-care intervention on the reduction of early childhood obesity. At 4 primary-care pediatric residency training sites across the US, 865 infant-parent dyads were enrolled at the 2-month well-child checkup and are being followed through the 24-month well-child checkup. Two sites were randomly assigned to the intervention, and the other sites were assigned to an attention-control arm, implementing the American Academy of Pediatrics' The Injury Prevention Program. The intervention consists of an interactive educational toolkit, including low-literacy materials designed for use during well-child visits, and a clinician-centered curriculum for providing low-literacy guidance on obesity prevention. The study is powered to detect a 10% difference in the number of children overweight (BMI > 85%) at 24 months. Other outcome measures include observed physician-parent communication, as well as parent-reported information on child dietary intake, physical activity, and injury-prevention behaviors. The study is designed to inform evidence-based standards for early childhood obesity prevention, and more generally to inform optimal approaches for low-literacy messages and health literacy training in primary preventive care. This article describes the conceptual model, study design, intervention content, and baseline characteristics of the study population. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  11. “Greenlight Study”: A Controlled Trial of Low-Literacy, Early Childhood Obesity Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, Eliana M.; Yin, H. Shonna; Bronaugh, Andrea; Rothman, Russell L.

    2014-01-01

    Children who become overweight by age 2 years have significantly greater risks of long-term health problems, and children in low-income communities, where rates of low adult literacy are highest, are at increased risk of developing obesity. The objective of the Greenlight Intervention Study is to assess the effectiveness of a low-literacy, primary-care intervention on the reduction of early childhood obesity. At 4 primary-care pediatric residency training sites across the US, 865 infant-parent dyads were enrolled at the 2-month well-child checkup and are being followed through the 24-month well-child checkup. Two sites were randomly assigned to the intervention, and the other sites were assigned to an attention-control arm, implementing the American Academy of Pediatrics' The Injury Prevention Program. The intervention consists of an interactive educational toolkit, including low-literacy materials designed for use during well-child visits, and a clinician-centered curriculum for providing low-literacy guidance on obesity prevention. The study is powered to detect a 10% difference in the number of children overweight (BMI > 85%) at 24 months. Other outcome measures include observed physician–parent communication, as well as parent-reported information on child dietary intake, physical activity, and injury-prevention behaviors. The study is designed to inform evidence-based standards for early childhood obesity prevention, and more generally to inform optimal approaches for low-literacy messages and health literacy training in primary preventive care. This article describes the conceptual model, study design, intervention content, and baseline characteristics of the study population. PMID:24819570

  12. Coffee consumption prevents fibrosis in a rat model that mimics secondary biliary cirrhosis in humans.

    PubMed

    Arauz, Jonathan; Zarco, Natanael; Hernández-Aquino, Erika; Galicia-Moreno, Marina; Favari, Liliana; Segovia, José; Muriel, Pablo

    2017-04-01

    Investigations demonstrated that oxidative stress plays an important role in injury promotion in cholestatic liver disease. We hypothesized that coffee attenuates cholestasis-induced hepatic necrosis and fibrosis via its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antifibrotic properties. The major aim of this study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective properties of coffee and caffeine in a model of chronic bile duct ligation (BDL) in male Wistar rats. Liver injury was induced by 28-day BDL, and conventional coffee, decaffeinated coffee, or caffeine was administered daily. After treatment, the hepatic oxidative status was estimated by measuring lipid peroxidation, the reduced to oxidized glutathione ratio, and glutathione peroxidase. Fibrosis was assessed by measuring the liver hydroxyproline content. The transforming growth factor-β, connective tissue growth factor, α-smooth muscle actin, collagen 1, and interleukin-10 proteins and mRNAs were measured by Western blot and polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Conventional coffee suppressed most of the changes produced by BDL; however, caffeine showed better antifibrotic effects. Coffee demonstrated antioxidant properties by restoring the redox equilibrium, and it also prevented the elevation of liver enzymes as well as hepatic glycogen depletion. Interestingly, coffee and caffeine administration prevented collagen increases. Western blot assays showed decreased expression levels of transforming growth factor-β, connective tissue growth factor, α-smooth muscle actin, and collagen 1 in the coffee- and caffeine-treated BDL groups. Similarly, coffee decreased the mRNA levels of these proteins. We conclude that coffee prevents liver cirrhosis induced by BDL by attenuating the oxidant processes, blocking hepatic stellate cell activation, and downregulating the main profibrotic molecules involved in extracellular matrix deposition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Psychological project supporting weight reduction as a significant element in the prevention of secondary obesity].

    PubMed

    Bak-Sosnowska, Monika; Zahorska-Markiewicz, Barbara; Bargiel-Matusiewicz, Kamilla

    2004-01-01

    Psychological factors may contribute in creating and maintaining of overweight that often results of disturbances of individual's psychosocial functioning. That is why psychological impact should be a significant element of both obesity treatment and prevention of recurrence. The article presents a project implemented in the Obesity Treatment Centre "Waga" in Katowice. The project acts as a part of a group, complex treatment process leading to weight reduction. Design, target group and the achieved results are presented as well a psychological aspects helping the process of reduction of body weight.

  14. Long-term consequences of nutrition and growth in early childhood and possible preventive interventions.

    PubMed

    Adair, Linda S

    2014-01-01

    Maternal nutritional deficiencies and excesses during pregnancy, and faster infant weight gain in the first 2 years of life are associated with increased risk of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) in adulthood. The first 1,000 days of life (from conception until the child reaches age 2 years) represent a vulnerable period for programming of NCD risk, and are an important target for prevention of adult disease. This paper takes a developmental perspective to identify periconception, pregnancy, and infancy nutritional stressors, and to discuss mechanisms through which they influence later disease risk with the goal of informing age-specific interventions. Low- and middle-income countries need to address the dual burden of under- and overnutrition by implementing interventions to promote growth and enhance survival and intellectual development without increasing chronic disease risk. In the absence of good evidence from long-term follow-up of early life interventions, current recommendations for early life prevention of adult disease presume that interventions designed to optimize pregnancy outcomes and promote healthy infant growth and development will also reduce chronic disease risk. These include an emphasis on optimizing maternal nutrition prior to pregnancy, micronutrient adequacy in the preconception period and during pregnancy, promotion of breastfeeding and high-quality complementary foods, and prevention of obesity in childhood and adolescence. © 2014 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Does hopelessness of Turkish women affect their behavior regarding cervical cancer prevention and early diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Taşçi-Duran, Emel; Unsal-Atan, Şenay

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to investigate attitudes women of towards cervical cancer prevention applications and early diagnosis, and whether or not their hopelessness levels had any influence. The present study was carried out in Isparta with a descriptive design. A sample of 251 individuals was recruited from January 2011 through May 2011 in the largest tea garden (restaurant- cafe). The data collection tool consisted of two parts: a "Questionnaire Form" identifying women; and the "Beck Hopelessness Scale". Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 16.0 for Windows for the numerical and percentage distribution, average, standard deviation with the ANOVA and Mann-Whitney tests. Some 70.2 % of the woman indicated that they had not taken the Pap test. There was a significant relationship between the hopelessness level and women believing that they could protect themselves from getting cervical cancer (F=10.11 p=0.00). There was a significant relationship between hopelessness levels and believing whether or not early diagnosis tests are deterministic (F=8.781 p=0.00). Our study concluded that the hopelessness level of women had an effect on their thoughts about cervical cancer prevention and early diagnosis.

  16. Using Intervention Mapping to Develop an Oral Health e-Curriculum for Secondary Prevention of Eating Disorders.

    PubMed

    DeBate, Rita D; Bleck, Jennifer R; Raven, Jessica; Severson, Herb

    2017-06-01

    Preventing oral-systemic health issues relies on evidence-based interventions across various system-level target groups. Although the use of theory- and evidence-based approaches has been encouraged in developing oral health behavior change programs, the translation of theoretical constructs and principles to behavior change interventions has not been well described. Based on a series of six systematic steps, Intervention Mapping provides a framework for effective decision making with regard to developing, implementing, and evaluating theory- and evidence-informed, system-based behavior change programs. This article describes the application of the Intervention Mapping framework to develop the EAT (evaluating, assessing, and treating) evidence-based intervention with the goal of increasing the capacity of oral health providers to engage in secondary prevention of oral-systemic issues associated with disordered eating behaviors. Examples of data and deliverables for each step are described. In addition, results from evaluation of the intervention via randomized control trial are described, with statistically significant differences observed in behavioral outcomes in the intervention group with effect sizes ranging from r=0.62 to 0.83. These results suggest that intervention mapping, via the six systematic steps, can be useful as a framework for continued development of preventive interventions.

  17. Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: International Insights From the TECOS Trial (Trial Evaluating Cardiovascular Outcomes With Sitagliptin).

    PubMed

    Pagidipati, Neha J; Navar, Ann Marie; Pieper, Karen S; Green, Jennifer B; Bethel, M Angelyn; Armstrong, Paul W; Josse, Robert G; McGuire, Darren K; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Cornel, Jan H; Halvorsen, Sigrun; Strandberg, Timo E; Delibasi, Tuncay; Holman, Rury R; Peterson, Eric D

    2017-09-26

    Intensive risk factor modification significantly improves outcomes for patients with diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. However, the degree to which secondary prevention treatment goals are achieved in international clinical practice is unknown. Attainment of 5 secondary prevention parameters-aspirin use, lipid control (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol <70 mg/dL or statin therapy), blood pressure control (<140 mm Hg systolic, <90 mm Hg diastolic), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker use, and nonsmoking status-was evaluated among 13 616 patients from 38 countries with diabetes mellitus and known cardiovascular disease at entry into TECOS (Trial Evaluating Cardiovascular Outcomes With Sitagliptin). Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between individual and regional factors and secondary prevention achievement at baseline. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to determine the association between baseline secondary prevention achievement and cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. Overall, 29.9% of patients with diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease achieved all 5 secondary prevention parameters at baseline, although 71.8% achieved at least 4 parameters. North America had the highest proportion (41.2%), whereas Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and Latin America had proportions of ≈25%. Individually, blood pressure control (57.9%) had the lowest overall attainment, whereas nonsmoking status had the highest (89%). Over a median 3.0 years of follow-up, a higher baseline secondary prevention score was associated with improved outcomes in a step-wise graded relationship (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.60; 95% confidence interval, 0.47-0.77 for those patients achieving all 5 measures versus those achieving ≤2). In an international trial population, significant opportunities exist to improve the quality of cardiovascular secondary prevention care among patients

  18. Design and methods for evaluating an early childhood obesity prevention program in the childcare center setting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many unhealthy dietary and physical activity habits that foster the development of obesity are established by the age of five. Presently, approximately 70 percent of children in the United States are currently enrolled in early childcare facilities, making this an ideal setting to implement and evaluate childhood obesity prevention efforts. We describe here the methods for conducting an obesity prevention randomized trial in the child care setting. Methods/design A randomized, controlled obesity prevention trial is currently being conducted over a three year period (2010-present). The sample consists of 28 low-income, ethnically diverse child care centers with 1105 children (sample is 60% Hispanic, 15% Haitian, 12% Black, 2% non-Hispanic White and 71% of caregivers were born outside of the US). The purpose is to test the efficacy of a parent and teacher role-modeling intervention on children’s nutrition and physical activity behaviors. . The Healthy Caregivers-Healthy Children (HC2) intervention arm schools received a combination of (1) implementing a daily curricula for teachers/parents (the nutritional gatekeepers); (2) implementing a daily curricula for children; (3) technical assistance with meal and snack menu modifications such as including more fresh and less canned produce; and (4) creation of a center policy for dietary requirements for meals and snacks, physical activity and screen time. Control arm schools received an attention control safety curriculum. Major outcome measures include pre-post changes in child body mass index percentile and z score, fruit and vegetable and other nutritious food intake, amount of physical activity, and parental nutrition and physical activity knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs, defined by intentions and behaviors. All measures were administered at the beginning and end of the school year for year one and year two of the study for a total of 4 longitudinal time points for assessment. Discussion Although few

  19. Design and methods for evaluating an early childhood obesity prevention program in the childcare center setting.

    PubMed

    Natale, Ruby; Scott, Stephanie Hapeman; Messiah, Sarah E; Schrack, Maria Mesa; Uhlhorn, Susan B; Delamater, Alan

    2013-01-28

    Many unhealthy dietary and physical activity habits that foster the development of obesity are established by the age of five. Presently, approximately 70 percent of children in the United States are currently enrolled in early childcare facilities, making this an ideal setting to implement and evaluate childhood obesity prevention efforts. We describe here the methods for conducting an obesity prevention randomized trial in the child care setting. A randomized, controlled obesity prevention trial is currently being conducted over a three year period (2010-present). The sample consists of 28 low-income, ethnically diverse child care centers with 1105 children (sample is 60% Hispanic, 15% Haitian, 12% Black, 2% non-Hispanic White and 71% of caregivers were born outside of the US). The purpose is to test the efficacy of a parent and teacher role-modeling intervention on children's nutrition and physical activity behaviors. . The Healthy Caregivers-Healthy Children (HC2) intervention arm schools received a combination of (1) implementing a daily curricula for teachers/parents (the nutritional gatekeepers); (2) implementing a daily curricula for children; (3) technical assistance with meal and snack menu modifications such as including more fresh and less canned produce; and (4) creation of a center policy for dietary requirements for meals and snacks, physical activity and screen time. Control arm schools received an attention control safety curriculum. Major outcome measures include pre-post changes in child body mass index percentile and z score, fruit and vegetable and other nutritious food intake, amount of physical activity, and parental nutrition and physical activity knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs, defined by intentions and behaviors. All measures were administered at the beginning and end of the school year for year one and year two of the study for a total of 4 longitudinal time points for assessment. Although few attempts have been made to prevent obesity

  20. ACA-mandated elimination of cost sharing for preventive screening has had limited early impact.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Shivan J; Polsky, Daniel; Zhu, Jingsan; Lewis, James D; Kolstad, Jonathan T; Loewenstein, George; Volpp, Kevin G

    2015-07-01

    The Affordable Care Act eliminated patient cost sharing for evidence-based preventive care, yet the impact of this policy on colonoscopy and mammography rates is unclear. We examined the elimination of cost sharing among small business beneficiaries of Humana, a large national insurer. This was a retrospective interrupted time series analysis of whether the change in cost-sharing policy was associated with a change in screening utilization, using grandfathered plans as a comparison group. We compared beneficiaries in small business nongrandfathered plans that were required to eliminate cost sharing (intervention) with those in grandfathered plans that did not have to change cost sharing (control). There were 63,246 men and women aged 50 to 64 years eligible for colorectal cancer screening, and 30,802 women aged 50 to 64 years eligible for breast cancer screening. The primary outcome variables were rates of colonoscopy and mammography per person-month, with secondary analysis of colonoscopy rates coded as preventive only. There was no significant change in the level or slope of colonoscopy and mammography utilization for intervention plans relative to the control plans. There was also no significant relevant change among those colonoscopies coded as preventive. The results suggest that the implementation of the policy is not having its intended effects, as cost sharing rates for colonoscopy and mammography did not change substantially, and utilization of colonoscopy and mammography changed little, following this new policy approach.

  1. The plant secondary metabolite citral alters water status and prevents seed formation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Graña, E; Díaz-Tielas, C; López-González, D; Martínez-Peñalver, A; Reigosa, M J; Sánchez-Moreiras, A M

    2016-05-01

    Based on previous results, which showed that the secondary metabolite citral causes disturbances to plant water status, the present study is focused on demonstrating and detailing these effects on the water-related parameters of Arabidopsis thaliana adult plants, and their impact on plant fitness. Clear evidence of effects on water status and fitness were observed: plants treated with 1200 and 2400 μm citral showed decreased RWC, reduced Ψs , increased Ψw and reduced stomatal opening, even 7 days after the beginning of the experiment. Plant protection signals, such as leaf rolling or increased anthocyanin content, were also detected in these plants. In contrast, 14 days after beginning the treatment, treated plants showed signs of citral-related damage. Moreover, the reproductive success of treated plants was critically compromised, with prematurely withered flowers and no silique or seed development. This effect of citral on fitness of adult plants suggests a promising application of this natural compound in weed management by reducing the weed seed bank in the soil. © 2015 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  2. Anticoagulants for secondary prevention after acute myocardial infarction: lessons from the past decade.

    PubMed

    Atar, Dan; Bode, Christoph; Stuerzenbecher, André; Verheugt, Freek W A

    2014-08-01

    The impact of an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) event, such as an acute myocardial infarction (MI), is not limited to the acute management phase; patients face an elevated risk of residual atherothrombotic events that commonly requires chronic management for months or even years. Significant advances have been made in both the acute and chronic management of patients with acute MI over the past decade, resulting in improved prognoses. One of the hallmarks of modern treatment strategies is more aggressive antiplatelet treatment regimens. However, the risks of further ACS events, stroke and premature death remain elevated in these patients, and addressing this residual risk is challenging owing to interpatient variability, differences in management strategies between centres and countries, incomplete understanding of the specific pathophysiology of post-ACS thrombosis and limitations of current therapeutic approaches. The recent approval in Europe of the direct oral anticoagulant rivaroxaban for use in this setting in combination with clopidogrel and acetylsalicylic acid offers another strategy to consider in the management of these patients, and clinical strategies in this area continue to evolve. In this review, we chart the progress made over the past decade in reducing the burden of secondary thromboembolic events after acute MI and discuss the current position of and future perspectives on the inclusion of oral anticoagulants into care pathways in this setting. © 2014 The Authors. Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  3. Anticoagulants for secondary prevention after acute myocardial infarction: lessons from the past decade

    PubMed Central

    Atar, Dan; Bode, Christoph; Stuerzenbecher, André; Verheugt, Freek W A

    2014-01-01

    The impact of an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) event, such as an acute myocardial infarction (MI), is not limited to the acute management phase; patients face an elevated risk of residual atherothrombotic events that commonly requires chronic management for months or even years. Significant advances have been made in both the acute and chronic management of patients with acute MI over the past decade, resulting in improved prognoses. One of the hallmarks of modern treatment strategies is more aggressive antiplatelet treatment regimens. However, the risks of further ACS events, stroke and premature death remain elevated in these patients, and addressing this residual risk is challenging owing to interpatient variability, differences in management strategies between centres and countries, incomplete understanding of the specific pathophysiology of post-ACS thrombosis and limitations of current therapeutic approaches. The recent approval in Europe of the direct oral anticoagulant rivaroxaban for use in this setting in combination with clopidogrel and acetylsalicylic acid offers another strategy to consider in the management of these patients, and clinical strategies in this area continue to evolve. In this review, we chart the progress made over the past decade in reducing the burden of secondary thromboembolic events after acute MI and discuss the current position of and future perspectives on the inclusion of oral anticoagulants into care pathways in this setting. PMID:24494730

  4. Prevention of posttraumatic stress disorder by early treatment: results from the Jerusalem Trauma Outreach And Prevention study.

    PubMed

    Shalev, Arieh Y; Ankri, Yael; Israeli-Shalev, Yossi; Peleg, Tamar; Adessky, Rhonda; Freedman, Sara

    2012-02-01

    Preventing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a pressing public health need. To compare early and delayed exposure-based, cognitive, and pharmacological interventions for preventing PTSD. Equipoise-stratified randomized controlled study. Hadassah Hospital unselectively receives trauma survivors from Jerusalem and vicinity. Consecutively admitted survivors of traumatic events were assessed by use of structured telephone interviews a mean (SD) 9.61 (3.91) days after the traumatic event. Survivors with symptoms of acute stress disorder were referred for clinical assessment. Survivors who met PTSD symptom criteria during the clinical assessment were invited to receive treatment. Twelve weekly sessions of prolonged exposure (PE; n = 63), or cognitive therapy (CT; n = 40), or double blind treatment with 2 daily tablets of either escitalopram (10 mg) or placebo (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor/placebo; n = 46), or 12 weeks in a waiting list group (n = 93). Treatment started a mean (SD) 29.8 (5.7) days after the traumatic event. Waiting list participants with PTSD after 12 weeks received PE a mean (SD) 151.8 (42.4) days after the traumatic event (delayed PE). Proportion of participants with PTSD after treatment, as determined by the use of the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) 5 and 9 months after the traumatic event. Treatment assignment and attendance were concealed from the clinicians who used the CAPS. At 5 months, 21.6% of participants who received PE and 57.1% of comparable participants on the waiting list had PTSD (odds ratio [OR], 0.21 [95% CI, 0.09-0.46]). At 5 months, 20.0% of participants who received CT and 58.7% of comparable participants on the waiting list had PTSD (OR, 0.18 [CI, 0.06-0.48]). The PE group did not differ from the CT group with regard to PTSD outcome (OR, 0.87 [95% CI, 0.29-2.62]). The PTSD prevalence rates did not differ between the escitalopram and placebo subgroups (61.9% vs 55.6%; OR, 0.77 [95% CI, 0.21-2.77]). At 9

  5. A Mixed Methods Evaluation of Early Childhood Abuse Prevention Within Evidence-Based Home Visiting Programs.

    PubMed

    Matone, M; Kellom, K; Griffis, H; Quarshie, W; Faerber, J; Gierlach, P; Whittaker, J; Rubin, D M; Cronholm, P F

    2018-05-31

    Objectives In this large scale, mixed methods evaluation, we determined the impact and context of early childhood home visiting on rates of child abuse-related injury. Methods Entropy-balanced and propensity score matched retrospective cohort analysis comparing children of Pennsylvania Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP), Parents As Teachers (PAT), and Early Head Start (EHS) enrollees and children of Pennsylvania Medicaid eligible women from 2008 to 2014. Abuse-related injury episodes were identified in medical assistance claims with ICD-9 codes. Weighted frequencies and logistic regression odds of injury within 24 months are presented. In-depth interviews with staff and clients (n = 150) from 11 programs were analyzed using a modified grounded theory approach. Results The odds of a healthcare encounter for early childhood abuse among clients were significantly greater than comparison children (NFP: 1.32, 95% CI [1.08, 1.62]; PAT: 4.11, 95% CI [1.60, 10.55]; EHS: 3.15, 95% CI [1.41, 7.06]). Qualitative data illustrated the circumstances of and program response to client issues related to child maltreatment, highlighting the role of non-client caregivers. All stakeholders described curricular content aimed at prevention (e.g. positive parenting) with little time dedicated to addressing current or past abuse. Clients who reported a lack of abuse-related content supposed their home visitor's assumption of an absence of risk in their home, but were supportive of the introduction of abuse-related content. Approach, acceptance, and available resources were mediators of successfully addressing abuse. Conclusions for Practice Home visiting aims to prevent child abuse among high-risk families. Adequate home visitor capacity to proactively assess abuse risk, deliver effective preventive curriculum with fidelity to caregivers, and access appropriate resources is necessary.

  6. Early adolescent peer leader development in HIV prevention using youth-adult partnership with schools approach.

    PubMed

    Fongkaew, Warunee; Fongkaew, Kangwan; Suchaxaya, Prakin

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the development and evaluation of an HIV prevention program developed for early adolescents through participatory action research. The HIV prevention program included a curriculum that was delivered by trained younger youth leaders through a youth and adult partnership with 10 schools in Chiang Mai Province, Thailand. The curriculum used participatory learning experiences, "edutainment" approaches, and skills-building strategies for enhancing youth leaders' capacities. Results of the evaluation showed that the senior-junior peer education program was effective in leadership role preparation, in improving youth leaders' ability to share sexual and reproductive health knowledge, and in promoting positive attitudes toward themselves. Success also rested on the fact that adults took a critical role in providing the opportunities, assistance, and guidance so that young people could develop their leadership capacity in an atmosphere of trust and respect.

  7. Emergency response facilities including primary and secondary prevention strategies across 79 professional football clubs in England.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Aneil; Dhutia, Harshil; Gati, Sabiha; Yeo, Tee-Joo; Finocchiaro, Gherardo; Keteepe-Arachi, Tracey; Richards, Thomas; Walker, Mike; Birt, Robin; Stuckey, David; Robinson, Laurence; Tome, Maite; Beasley, Ian; Papadakis, Michael; Sharma, Sanjay

    2017-06-14

    To assess the emergency response planning and prevention strategies for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) across a wide range of professional football clubs in England. A written survey was sent to all professional clubs in the English football league, namely the Premiership, Championship, League 1 and League 2. Outcomes included: (1) number of clubs performing cardiac screening and frequency of screening; (2) emergency planning and documentation; (3) automated external defibrillator (AED) training and availability; and (4) provision of emergency services at sporting venues. 79 clubs (86%) responded to the survey. 100% clubs participated in cardiac screening. All clubs had AEDs available on match days and during training sessions. 100% Premiership clubs provided AED training to designated staff. In contrast, 30% of lower division clubs with AEDs available did not provide formal training. Most clubs (n=66; 83%) reported the existence of an emergency action plan for SCA but formal documentation was variable. All clubs in the Premiership and League 1 provided an ambulance equipped for medical emergencies on match days compared with 75% of clubs in the Championship and 66% in League 2. The majority of football clubs in England have satisfactory prevention strategies and emergency response planning in line with European recommendations. Additional improvements such as increasing awareness of European guidelines for emergency planning, AED training and mentorship with financial support to lower division clubs are necessary to further enhance cardiovascular safety of athletes and spectators and close the gap between the highest and lower divisions. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Oral cancer prevention and early detection knowledge and practices of Illinois dentists--a brief communication.

    PubMed

    Lehew, Charles W; Kaste, Linda M

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess Illinois dentists' self-reported knowledge and practices concerning oral cancer prevention, early detection, and management as a baseline prior to conducting interventions designed to increase dentists' capacity to detect and manage oral cancers and counsel their patients about risk reduction. A weighted sample to represent licensed dentists in 19 counties yielded 518 dentists who responded to a 38-item mailed survey in 2004. Over 92 percent of the dentists reported providing oral cancer exams. However, many are not doing them properly or at frequent intervals. Over two-thirds had oral cancer continuing education, but 40 percent had it more than 2 years prior to the survey. Training in risk counseling was rare. Interventions are needed to assure appropriate skill and knowledge levels for oral cancer early detection, management, and risk counseling by Illinois dentists.

  9. Oral cancer. Practical prevention and early detection for the dental team.

    PubMed

    Kerr, A Ross; Cruz, Gustavo D

    2002-01-01

    Approximately 2,000 patients a year are diagnosed with oral cancer in New York State. In an effort to control this deadly disease, Governor George Pataki has taken a leadership role in the United States by mandating and funding training for dentists in the prevention and early detection of oral cancer. The purpose of this article is to highlight the epidemiology of oral cancer, to show how the dental profession can contribute to the health of the citizens of New York State, and to provide practical guidelines for both tobacco cessation intervention and utilization of existing technology for the early detection of oral cancer and precancerous conditions in the general dental practice setting.

  10. [Mexican adolescentes' goals as determinants in the prevention of early pregnancies].

    PubMed

    Atienzo, Erika E; Campero, Lourdes; Lozada, Ana Lilia; Herrera, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to explore adolescents' intentions related to the early formation of a family. We administered a survey to students in eight schools in Morelos and Mexico City, in 2010. We analyzed intentions of marrying or having a child and fitted an exploratory path model to assess predictors of the intentions of having a child before the age of 20 (n=2974). Around 77% of adolescents expect to have their first child at 20 years or later; 21% show ambivalence or incongruence regarding this, whereas 2% expect to have a child before the age of 20. Parents' expectations for their child's education influence the importance that adolescents give to education. The latter promotes the idea of postponing childbearing until 20 years or later (β=0.13). In order to prevent early pregnancies, interventions and programs should encourage the construction of personal and professional goals.

  11. Early-Life Obesity Prevention: Critique of Intervention Trials During the First One Thousand Days.

    PubMed

    Reilly, John J; Martin, Anne; Hughes, Adrienne R

    2017-06-01

    To critique the evidence from recent and ongoing obesity prevention interventions in the first 1000 days in order to identify evidence gaps and weaknesses, and to make suggestions for more informative future intervention trials. Completed and ongoing intervention trials have had fairly modest effects, have been limited largely to high-income countries, and have used relatively short-term interventions and outcomes. Comparison of the evidence from completed prevention trials with the evidence from systematic reviews of behavioral risk factors shows that some life-course stages have been neglected (pre-conception and toddlerhood), and that interventions have neglected to target some important behavioral risk factors (maternal smoking during pregnancy, infant and child sleep). Finally, while obesity prevention interventions aim to modify body composition, few intervention trials have used body composition measures as outcomes, and this has limited their sensitivity to detect intervention effects. The new WHO Healthy Lifestyles Trajectory (HeLTI) initiative should address some of these weaknesses. Future early obesity prevention trials should be much more ambitious. They should, ideally: extend their interventions over the first 1000 days; have longer-term (childhood) outcomes, and improved outcome measures (body composition measures in addition to proxies for body composition such as the BMI for age); have greater emphasis on maternal smoking and child sleep; be global.

  12. Parent-Child Interaction, Self-Regulation, and Obesity Prevention in Early Childhood.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sarah E; Keim, Sarah A

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the epidemiologic evidence linking parent-child relationships, self-regulation, and weight status with a focus on early childhood. The emotional quality of parent-child interactions may influence children's risk for obesity through multiple pathways. Prospective studies linking observer ratings of young children's self-regulation, particularly inhibitory control, to future weight status are discussed. Although findings are preliminary, promoting positive relationships between parents/caregivers and young children holds promise as a component of efforts to prevent childhood obesity. Multi-disciplinary collaborations between researchers with training in developmental science and child health should be encouraged.

  13. Opportunities During Early Life for Cancer Prevention: Highlights From a Series of Virtual Meetings With Experts

    PubMed Central

    Holman, Dawn M.; Buchanan, Natasha D.

    2018-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that early life exposures can affect lifetime cancer risk. In 2014, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Cancer Prevention Across the Lifespan Workgroup hosted a series of virtual meetings with select experts to discuss the state of the evidence linking factors during the prenatal period and early childhood to subsequent risk of both pediatric and adult cancers. In this article, we present the results from a qualitative analysis of the meeting transcripts and summarize themes that emerged from our discussions with meeting participants. Themes included the state of the evidence linking early life factors to cancer risk, research gaps and challenges, the level of evidence needed to support taking public health action, and the challenges of communicating complex, and sometimes conflicting, scientific findings to the public. Opportunities for collaboration among public health agencies and other stakeholders were identified during these discussions. Potential next steps for the CDC and its partners included advancing and building upon epidemiology and surveillance work, developing and using evidence from multiple sources to inform decision-making, disseminating and communicating research findings in a clear and effective way, and expanding collaborations with grantees and other partners. As the science on early life factors and cancer risk continues to evolve, there are opportunities for collaboration to translate science into actionable public health practice. PMID:27940972

  14. A Step towards Clerical Preferment: Secondary School Teachers' Careers in Early Modern Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindmark, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    This article investigates the function served by embarking on a teaching career in the Latin school system for recruitment to the clergy in early modern Sweden. The study is restricted to the eighty-nine teachers serving at Pitea Grammar School in Northern Sweden in the period from 1650 to 1849. The investigation pays considerable attention to the…

  15. The Crucible of Classroom Practice: Alchemy and Early Professional Learning in Secondary English Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannon, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the metaphor of the classroom as a "crucible" for early professional learning where beginning teachers forge professional identities in complex, unpredictable, paradoxical, affectively and physically potent contexts of practice. It works into the dissonances and contradictions of the micro-narratives embedded in the…

  16. Seed Regeneration Potential of Canopy Gaps at Early Formation Stage in Temperate Secondary Forests, Northeast China

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Qiao-Ling; Zhu, Jiao-Jun; Yu, Li-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Promoting the seed regeneration potential of secondary forests undergoing gap disturbances is an important approach for achieving forest restoration and sustainable management. Seedling recruitment from seed banks strongly determines the seed regeneration potential, but the process is poorly understood in the gaps of secondary forests. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the effects of gap size, seed availability, and environmental conditions on the seed regeneration potential in temperate secondary forests. It was found that gap formation could favor the invasion of more varieties of species in seed banks, but it also could speed up the turnover rate of seed banks leading to lower seed densities. Seeds of the dominant species, Fraxinus rhynchophylla, were transient in soil and there was a minor and discontinuous contribution of the seed bank to its seedling emergence. For Quercus mongolica, emerging seedling number was positively correlated with seed density in gaps (R = 0.32, P<0.01), especially in medium and small gaps (<500 m2). Furthermore, under canopies, there was a positive correlation between seedling number and seed density of Acer mono (R = 0.43, P<0.01). Gap formation could promote seedling emergence of two gap-dependent species (i.e., Q. mongolica and A. mono), but the contribution of seed banks to seedlings was below 10% after gap creation. Soil moisture and temperature were the restrictive factors controlling the seedling emergence from seeds in gaps and under canopies, respectively. Thus, the regeneration potential from seed banks is limited after gap formation. PMID:22745771

  17. Characterization of xylan in the early stages of secondary cell wall formation in tobacco bright yellow-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Tadashi; Matsuoka, Keita; Ono, Hiroshi; Ohnishi-Kameyama, Mayumi; Yaoi, Katsuro; Nakano, Yoshimi; Ohtani, Misato; Demura, Taku; Iwai, Hiroaki; Satoh, Shinobu

    2017-11-15

    The major polysaccharides present in the primary and secondary walls surrounding plant cells have been well characterized. However, our knowledge of the early stages of secondary wall formation is limited. To address this, cell walls were isolated from differentiating xylem vessel elements of tobacco bright yellow-2 (BY-2) cells induced by VASCULAR-RELATED NAC-DOMAIN7 (VND7). The walls of induced VND7-VP16-GR BY-2 cells consisted of cellulose, pectic polysaccharides, hemicelluloses, and lignin, and contained more xylan and cellulose compared with non-transformed BY-2 and uninduced VND7-VP16-GR BY-2 cells. A reducing end sequence of xylan containing rhamnose and galaturonic acid- residues is present in the walls of induced, uninduced, and non-transformed BY-2 cells. Glucuronic acid residues in xylan from walls of induced cells are O-methylated, while those of xylan in non-transformed BY-2 and uninduced cells are not. Our results show that xylan changes in chemical structure and amounts during the early stages of xylem differentiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Improving Adherence to Secondary Stroke Prevention Strategies Through Motivational Interviewing: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Barker-Collo, Suzanne; Krishnamurthi, Rita; Witt, Emma; Feigin, Valery; Jones, Amy; McPherson, Kathryn; Starkey, Nicola; Parag, Varsha; Jiang, Yannan; Barber, P Alan; Rush, Elaine; Bennett, Derrick; Aroll, Bruce

    2015-12-01

    Stroke recurrence rates are high (20%-25%) and have not declined over past 3 decades. This study tested effectiveness of motivational interviewing (MI) for reducing stroke recurrence, measured by improving adherence to recommended medication and lifestyle changes compared with usual care. Single-blind, prospective phase III randomized controlled trial of 386 people with stroke assigned to either MI treatment (4 sessions at 28 days, 3, 6, and 9 months post stroke) or usual care; with outcomes assessed at 28 days, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months post stroke. Primary outcomes were change in systolic blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels as indicators of adherence at 12 months. Secondary outcomes included self-reported adherence, new stroke, or coronary heart disease events (both fatal and nonfatal); quality of life (Short Form-36); and mood (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). MI did not significantly change measures of blood pressure (mean difference in change, -0.2.35 [95% confidence interval, -6.16 to 1.47]) or cholesterol (mean difference in change, -0.0.12 [95% confidence interval, -0.30 to 0.06]). However, it had positive effects on self-reported medication adherence at 6 months (1.979; 95% confidence interval, 0.98-3.98; P=0.0557) and 9 months (4.295; 95% confidence interval, 1.56-11.84; P=0.0049) post stroke. Improvement across other measures was also observed, but the differences between MI and usual care groups were not statistically significant. MI improved self-reported medication adherence. All other effects were nonsignificant, though in the direction of a treatment effect. Further study is required to determine whether MI leads to improvement in other important areas of functioning (eg, caregiver burden). URL: http://www.anzctr.org.au. Unique identifier: ACTRN-12610000715077. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. [Effectiveness of school-based interventions to prevent traffic accidents: an overview of secondary literature].

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Chiara; Verdina, Federico; Ferri, Chiara; Pizzaguerra, Martina; Silvestri, Silvia; Tober, Nastassja; Ristagno, Quenya; Costa, Alessandro; Cerasuolo, Michele; Faggiano, Fabrizio; Allara, Elias

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUZIONE: gli incidenti stradali sono l'ottava causa di morte al mondo e la prima tra i giovani di 15-29 anni. In Italia il Piano nazionale sicurezza stradale raccomanda l'educazione scolastica per la prevenzione degli incidenti stradali; ad oggi non esistono documenti che raccolgano evidenze di efficacia sugli interventi educativi stradali e le rapportino al contesto italiano. OBIETTIVI: riassumere e discutere ciò che è noto in letteratura riguardo agli interventi scolastici per la prevenzione degli incidenti stradali. METODI: sono state ricercate linee guida e revisioni sistematiche usando i seguenti criteri di inclusione: popolazione di età inferiore ai 25 anni di entrambi i sessi; interventi scolastici di educazione stradale; effetti su indicatori primari di esito come riduzione degli incidenti stradali, astinenza dalla guida sotto l'effetto di alcol e dall'accettare passaggi in macchina da guidatori che sono sotto l'effetto di alcol; effetti su indicatori secondari di esito come conoscenze e competenze sui comportamenti di guida sicura. RISULTATI: sono state identificate due revisioni sistematiche. L'educazione stradale nelle scuole non mostra evidenza di efficacia (rischio relativo 1,03; IC95% 0,98-1,08) nel ridurre gli incidenti. Programmi scolastici più specifici mostrano risultati solo in parte convincenti per l'adozione di comportamenti sicuri come l'astinenza dal guidare sotto l'effetto di alcol e dall'accettare passaggi in macchina da guidatori che sono sotto l'effetto di alcol. DISCUSSIONE: le revisioni incluse non hanno trovato programmi efficaci nella riduzione degli incidenti stradali o dei fattori che possano determinarli. Nell'attesa di studi più recenti, appare opportuno promuovere l'implementazione di interventi misti, scolastici e di comunità, che hanno mostrato maggiori prove di efficacia.

  20. Mind-Body Medicine in the Secondary Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Holger; Lauche, Romy; Paul, Anna; Langhorst, Jost; Michalsen, Andreas; Dobos, Gustav

    2015-11-06

    In mind-body medicine (MBM), conventional lifestyle modification measures such as dietary counseling and exercise are supplemented with relaxation techniques and psychological motivational elements. This review studied the effect of MBM on cardiac events and mortality in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). This review is based on publications up to and including January 2015 that were retrieved by a systematic search in PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and Scopus. Randomized controlled trials of the effect of MBM programs (versus standard treatment) on cardiac events, overall mortality, and/or cardiac mortality were analyzed. Atherosclerosis, blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, and the body mass index (BMI) were chosen as secondary outcomes. Random-effects meta-analyses were performed. The risk of bias was assessed with the Cochrane tool. Twelve trials, performed on a total of 1085 patients, were included in the analysis. Significant differences between groups were found with respect to cardiac events (odds ratio [OR]: 0.38; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.23-0.61; p<0.01; heterogeneity [I2]: 0%), but not overall mortality (OR: 0.82; 95% CI: 0.46-1.45; p = 0.49; I2: 0%) or cardiac mortality (OR: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.43-2.25; p = 0.97; I2: 0%). Significant differences between groups were also found with respect to atherosclerosis (mean difference [MD] = -7.86% diameter stenosis; 95% CI: -15.06-[-0.65]; p = 0.03; I2: 0%) and systolic blood pressure (MD = -3.33 mm Hg; 95% CI: -5.76-[-0.91]; p<0.01; I2: 0%), but not with respect to diastolic blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, or BMI. In patients with CHD, MBM programs can lessen the occurrence of cardiac events, reduce atherosclerosis, and lower systolic blood pressure, but they do not reduce mortality. They can be used as a complement to conventional rehabilitation programs.

  1. Long-term cost effectiveness of cardiac secondary prevention in primary care in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Paddy; Murphy, Edel; Smith, Susan M; Cupples, Margaret E; Byrne, Molly; Murphy, Andrew W

    2017-04-01

    While cardiac secondary prevention in primary care is established practice, little is known about its long-term cost effectiveness. This study examines the cost effectiveness of a secondary prevention intervention in primary care in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland over 6 years. An economic evaluation, based on a cluster randomised controlled trial of 903 patients with heart disease, was conducted 4.5 years after the intervention ceased to be delivered. Patients originally randomised to the control received usual practice while those randomised to the intervention received a tailored care package over the 1.5-year delivery period. Data on healthcare costs and quality adjusted life expectancy were used to undertake incremental cost utility analysis. Multilevel regression was used to estimate mean cost effectiveness and uncertainty was examined using cost effectiveness acceptability curves. At 6 years, there was a divergence in the results across jurisdictions. While the probability of the intervention being cost effective in the Republic of Ireland was 0.434, 0.232, 0.180, 0.150, 0.115 and 0.098 at selected threshold values of €5000, €15,000, €20,000, €25,000, €35,000 and €45,000, respectively, all equivalent probabilities for Northern Ireland equalled 1.000. Our findings suggest that the intervention in its current format is likely to be more cost effective than usual general practice care in Northern Ireland, but this is not the case in the Republic of Ireland.

  2. [Perception of Primary Care physicians on the integration with cardiology through continuity of healthcare programs in secondary prevention].

    PubMed

    Cosin-Sales, J; Orozco Beltrán, D; Ledesma Rodríguez, R; Barbon Ortiz Casado, A; Fernández, G

    2018-02-17

    To determine the perception of Primary Care (PC) physicians on the integration with cardiology (CA) through continuity of healthcare programs. A cross-sectional and multicentre study was conducted, in which a total of 200 PC physicians from all over Spain completed a qualitative survey that evaluated the level of integration with CA in secondary prevention. Physicians were grouped according to the level of PC-CA integration. The integration between CA and PC was good, but it was better in those centres with a higher integration (74.0% vs. 60.0%; p=.02) and in general, physicians considered that integration had improved (92.0% vs. 73.0%; p<.001). Almost all PC physicians received the hospital discharge report. The majority of the hospital discharge reports included recommendations about the CA and PC follow-up, control of risk factors, as well as the duration of secondary prevention treatment, with not significant differences according to the level of integration. In 55.8%, 63.6%, and 51.3% of hospital discharge reports, indications were given on when to perform the follow-up blood analysis, as well as information about returning to working life and sexual activity, respectively. The most common communication method was the paper-based report (75 vs. 84%; p=NS). The communication between healthcare levels was greater in those Primary Care centres with a higher level of integration, as well as periodicity of the communication and the satisfaction of physicians (80.0% vs. 63.0%; p=.005). The level of integration between PC and CA is, in general, satisfactory, but those centres with a higher level of integration benefit more from a greater communication and satisfaction. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Antiplatelet Agents for the Secondary Prevention of Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack: A Network Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Weiming; Zhu, Qin; Lan, Qing; Zhao, Jizong

    2016-05-01

    Stroke can cause high morbidity and mortality, and ischemic stroke (IS) and transient ischemic attack (TIA) patients have a high stroke recurrence rate. Antiplatelet agents are the standard therapy for these patients, but it is often difficult for clinicians to select the best therapy from among the multiple treatment options. We therefore performed a network meta-analysis to estimate the efficacy of antiplatelet agents for secondary prevention of recurrent stroke. We systematically searched 3 databases (PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane) for relevant studies published through August 2015. The primary end points of this meta-analysis were overall stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, and fatal stroke. A total of 30 trials were included in our network meta-analysis and abstracted data. Among the therapies evaluated in the included trials, the estimates for overall stroke and hemorrhagic stroke for cilostazol (Cilo) were significantly better than those for aspirin (odds ratio [OR] = .64, 95% credibility interval [CrI], .45-.91; OR = .23, 95% CrI, .08-.58). The estimate for fatal stroke was highest for Cilo plus aspirin combination therapy, followed by Cilo therapy. The results of our meta-analysis indicate that Cilo significantly improves overall stroke and hemorrhagic stroke in IS or TIA patients and reduces fatal stroke, but with low statistical significance. Our results also show that Cilo was significantly more efficient than other therapies in Asian patients; therefore, future trials should focus on Cilo treatment for secondary prevention of recurrent stroke in non-Asian patients. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Development and Evaluation of a Web-Based Training Program for Oral Health Care Providers on Secondary Prevention of Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    DeBate, Rita D.; Severson, Herbert; Zwald, Marissa L.; Shaw, Tracy; Christiansen, Steve; Koerber, Anne; Tomar, Scott; Brown, Kelli McCormack; Tedesco, Lisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Although oral health care providers (OHP) are key in the secondary prevention of eating disorders (ED), the majority are not engaged in assessment, referral, and case management. This innovative pilot project developed and evaluated a web-based training program for dental and dental hygiene students and providers on the secondary prevention of ED. The intervention combined didactic and skill-based objectives to train OHP on ED and its oral health effects, OHP roles, skills in identifying the oral signs of ED, communication, treatment, and referral. Using a convenience sample of OHP (n=66), a pre-/post-test evaluated short-term outcomes and user satisfaction. Results revealed statistically significant improvements in self-efficacy (p<.001); knowledge of oral manifestations from restrictive behaviors (p<.001) and purging behaviors (p<.001); knowledge of oral treatment options (p<.001); and attitudes towards the secondary prevention of ED (p<.001). Most participants strongly agreed or agreed that the program provided more information (89 percent) and resources (89 percent) about the secondary prevention of ED than were currently available; 91 percent strongly agreed or agreed that they would access this program for information regarding the secondary prevention of ED. This pilot project provides unique training in the clinical evaluation, patient approach, referral, and oral treatment that takes a multidisciplinary approach to address ED. PMID:19491349

  5. Stress reduction in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease: randomized, controlled trial of transcendental meditation and health education in Blacks.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Robert H; Grim, Clarence E; Rainforth, Maxwell V; Kotchen, Theodore; Nidich, Sanford I; Gaylord-King, Carolyn; Salerno, John W; Kotchen, Jane Morley; Alexander, Charles N

    2012-11-01

    Blacks have disproportionately high rates of cardiovascular disease. Psychosocial stress may contribute to this disparity. Previous trials on stress reduction with the Transcendental Meditation (TM) program have reported improvements in cardiovascular disease risk factors, surrogate end points, and mortality in blacks and other populations. This was a randomized, controlled trial of 201 black men and women with coronary heart disease who were randomized to the TM program or health education. The primary end point was the composite of all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, or stroke. Secondary end points included the composite of cardiovascular mortality, revascularizations, and cardiovascular hospitalizations; blood pressure; psychosocial stress factors; and lifestyle behaviors. During an average follow-up of 5.4 years, there was a 48% risk reduction in the primary end point in the TM group (hazard ratio, 0.52; 95% confidence interval, 0.29-0.92; P=0.025). The TM group also showed a 24% risk reduction in the secondary end point (hazard ratio, 0.76; 95% confidence interval, 0.51-0.1.13; P=0.17). There were reductions of 4.9 mmHg in systolic blood pressure (95% confidence interval -8.3 to -1.5 mmHg; P=0.01) and anger expression (P<0.05 for all scales). Adherence was associated with survival. A selected mind-body intervention, the TM program, significantly reduced risk for mortality, myocardial infarction, and stroke in coronary heart disease patients. These changes were associated with lower blood pressure and psychosocial stress factors. Therefore, this practice may be clinically useful in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Clinical Trial Registration- URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov Unique identifier: NCT01299935.

  6. Early prevention of pressure ulcers among elderly patients admitted through emergency departments: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Pham, Ba'; Teague, Laura; Mahoney, James; Goodman, Laurie; Paulden, Mike; Poss, Jeff; Li, Jianli; Ieraci, Luciano; Carcone, Steven; Krahn, Murray

    2011-11-01

    Every year, approximately 6.2 million hospital admissions through emergency departments (ED) involve elderly patients who are at risk of developing pressure ulcers. We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of pressure-redistribution foam mattresses on ED stretchers and beds for early prevention of pressure ulcers in elderly admitted ED patients. Using a Markov model, we evaluated the incremental effectiveness (quality-adjusted life-days) and incremental cost (hospital and home care costs) between early prevention and current practice (with standard hospital mattresses) from a health care payer perspective during a 1-year time horizon. The projected incidence of ED-acquired pressure ulcers was 1.90% with current practice and 1.48% with early prevention, corresponding to a number needed to treat of 238 patients. The average upgrading cost from standard to pressure-redistribution mattresses was $0.30 per patient. Compared with current practice, early prevention was more effective, with 0.0015 quality-adjusted life-days gained, and less costly, with a mean cost saving of $32 per patient. If decisionmakers are willing to pay $50,000 per quality-adjusted life-year gained, early prevention was cost-effective even for short ED stay (ie, 1 hour), low hospital-acquired pressure ulcer risk (1% prevalence), and high unit price of pressure-redistribution mattresses ($3,775). Taking input uncertainty into account, early prevention was 81% likely to be cost-effective. Expected value-of-information estimates supported additional randomized controlled trials of pressure-redistribution mattresses to eliminate the remaining decision uncertainty. The economic evidence supports early prevention with pressure-redistribution foam mattresses in the ED. Early prevention is likely to improve health for elderly patients and save hospital costs. Copyright © 2011 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Health information system linkage and coordination are critical for increasing access to secondary prevention in Aboriginal health: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Digiacomo, Michelle; Davidson, Patricia M; Taylor, Kate P; Smith, Julie S; Dimer, Lyn; Ali, Mohammed; Wood, Marianne M; Leahy, Timothy G; Thompson, Sandra C

    2010-01-01

    Aboriginal Australians have low rates of participation in cardiac rehabilitation (CR), despite having high rates of cardiovascular disease. Barriers to CR participation reflect multiple patient-related issues. However, an examination of the broader context of health service delivery design and implementation is needed. To identify health professionals' perspectives of systems related barriers to implementation of the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) guidelines Strengthening Cardiac Rehabilitation and Secondary Prevention for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with health professionals involved in CR within mainstream and Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services in Western Australia (WA). Thirty-eight health professionals from 17 services (ten rural, seven metropolitan) listed in the WA Directory of CR services and seven Aboriginal Medical Services in WA were interviewed. Respondents reported barriers encountered in health information management and the impact of access to CR services for Aboriginal people. Crucial issues identified by participants were: poor communication across the health care sector and between providers, inconsistent and insufficient data collection processes (particularly relating to Aboriginal ethnicity identification), and challenges resulting from multiple clinical information systems and incompatible technologies. This study has demonstrated that inadequate information systems and communication strategies, particularly those representing the interface between primary and secondary care, contribute to the low participation rates of Aboriginal Australians in CR. Although these challenges are shared by non-Aboriginal Australians, the needs are greater for Aboriginal Australians and innovative solutions are required.

  8. Telemedicine-guided education on secondary stroke and fall prevention following inpatient rehabilitation for Texas patients with stroke and their caregivers: a feasibility pilot study.

    PubMed

    Jhaveri, Mansi M; Benjamin-Garner, Ruby; Rianon, Nahid; Sherer, Mark; Francisco, Gerard; Vahidy, Farhaan; Kobayashi, Kayta; Gaber, Mary; Shoemake, Paige; Vu, Kim; Trevino, Alyssa; Grotta, James; Savitz, Sean

    2017-09-03

    The aftermath of stroke leaves many consequences including cognitive deficits and falls due to imbalance. Stroke survivors and families struggle to navigate the complex healthcare system with little assistance posthospital discharge, often leading to early hospital readmission and worse stroke outcomes. Telemedicine Guided Education on Secondary Stroke and Fall Prevention Following Inpatient Rehabilitation feasibility study examines whether stroke survivors and their caregivers find value in telerehabilitation (TR) home visits that provide individualised care and education by a multidisciplinary team after discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. A prospective, single arm, pilot study is designed to evaluate the feasibility of weekly TR home visits initiated postdischarge from inpatient rehabilitation. Newly diagnosed patients with stroke are recruited from a Houston-based comprehensive stroke centre inpatient rehabilitation unit, loaned an iPad with data plan and trained to use information technology security-approved videoconferencing application. After hospital discharge, six weekly TR home visits are led by rotating specialists (pharmacist, physical/occupational therapist, speech therapist, rehabilitation physician, social worker, geriatrician specialised in fracture prevention) followed by satisfaction survey on week 7. Specialists visually assess patients in real time, educate them on secondary stroke and fall prevention and suggest ways to improve function including direct medical interventions when indicated. Primary outcomes are proportion of eligible patients consenting to the study, participation rate in all six TR home visits and satisfaction score. The study started 31 December 2015 with plan to enrol up to 50 patients over 24 months. Feasibility study results will inform us as to whether a randomised controlled trial is warranted to determine efficacy of TR home visit intervention in improving stroke outcomes. Ethics approval obtained by the

  9. Pathways to prevention: protocol for the CAP (Climate and Preventure) study to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of school-based universal, selective and combined alcohol misuse prevention into early adulthood.

    PubMed

    Newton, Nicola C; Stapinski, Lexine; Slade, Tim; Champion, Katrina E; Barrett, Emma L; Chapman, Catherine; Smout, Anna; Lawler, Siobhan; Mather, Marius; Castellanos-Ryan, Natalie; Conrod, Patricia J; Teesson, Maree

    2018-05-21

    Alcohol use and associated harms are among the leading causes of burden of disease among young people, highlighting the need for effective prevention. The Climate and Preventure (CAP) study was the first trial of a combined universal and selective school-based approach to preventing alcohol misuse among adolescents. Initial results indicate that universal, selective and combined prevention were all effective in delaying the uptake of alcohol use and binge drinking for up to 3 years following the interventions. However, little is known about the sustainability of prevention effects across the transition to early adulthood, a period of increased exposure to alcohol and other drug use. This paper describes the protocol for the CAP long-term follow-up study which will determine the effectiveness of universal, selective and combined alcohol misuse prevention up to 7 years post intervention, and across the transition from adolescence into early adulthood. A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted between 2012 and 2015 with 2190 students (mean age: 13.3 yrs) from 26 Australian high schools. Participants were randomized to receive one of four conditions; universal prevention for all students (Climate); selective prevention for high-risk students (Preventure); combined universal and selective prevention (Climate and Preventure; CAP); or health education as usual (Control). The positive effect of the interventions on alcohol use at 12-, 24- and 36-month post baseline have previously been reported. This study will follow up the CAP study cohort approximately 5- and 7-years post baseline. The primary outcome will be alcohol use and related harms. Secondary outcomes will be cannabis use, alcohol and other drug harms including violent behavior, and mental health symptomatology. Analyses will be conducted using multi-level, mixed effects models within an intention-to-treat framework. This study will provide the first ever evaluation of the long-term effectiveness of

  10. Economic evaluation of ticagrelor for secondary prevention following acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Miguel; Borges, Margarida; Trindade, Rosário; Rikner, Klas

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of ticagrelor in the treatment of patients with acute coronary syndromes (unstable angina or myocardial infarction with or without ST-segment elevation), including patients treated medically and those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass grafting. A short-term decision tree and a long-term Markov model were used to simulate the evolution of patients' life-cycles. Clinical effectiveness data were collected from the PLATO trial and resource use data were obtained from the Hospital de Santa Marta database, disease-related group legislation and the literature. Ticagrelor provides increases of 0.1276 life years and 0.1106 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) per patient. From a societal perspective these clinical gains entail an increase in expenditure of €610. Thus the incremental cost per life year saved is €4780 and the incremental cost per QALY is €5517. The simulation results show that ticagrelor reduces events compared to clopidogrel. The costs of ticagrelor are partially offset by lower costs arising from events prevented. The use of ticagrelor in clinical practice is therefore cost-effective compared to generic clopidogrel. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  11. Effectiveness of an employee skin cancer screening program for secondary prevention.

    PubMed

    Uslu, Ugur; Hees, Felix; Winnik, Eva; Uter, Wolfgang; Sticherling, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Incidences of UV-induced skin cancer are continuously increasing. For this reason, early diagnosis is becoming more important. In this study, 783 employees of a technical company participated in an employee skin cancer screening program, which consisted of a physical examination for benign and malignant skin lesions and premalignant conditions. To ensure the quality of the examinations, screening was only performed by 5 trained dermatologists. Participants also were asked to complete a standardized questionnaire prior to examination. A total of 661 skin lesions were diagnosed among 48% of participants; 12.8% of participants exhibited 50 or more melanocytic nevi and the risk for developing skin cancer was categorized as at least moderate for 64.9%. Additionally, 84.4% of participants with at least 1 skin lesion were advised to have a checkup within 1 year. The high rate of suspicious nevi detected in this study suggested that employee skin cancer screening programs are effective and also should be recommended at companies where employees are not at increased risk for developing skin cancer due to the nature of their work (eg, those who work outdoors). Despite the comparatively selective and young study population, these examinations provide evidence of the importance of skin cancer screening for the wider population.

  12. Carbon cycling and net ecosystem production at an early stage of secondary succession in an abandoned coppice forest.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki; Shizu, Yoko; Nishiwaki, Ai; Yashiro, Yuichiro; Koizumi, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    Secondary mixed forests are one of the dominant forest cover types in human-dominated temperate regions. However, our understanding of how secondary succession affects carbon cycling and carbon sequestration in these ecosystems is limited. We studied carbon cycling and net ecosystem production (NEP) over 4 years (2004-2008) in a cool-temperate deciduous forest at an early stage of secondary succession (18 years after clear-cutting). Net primary production of the 18-year-old forest in this study was 5.2 tC ha(-1 )year(-1), including below-ground coarse roots; this was partitioned into 2.5 tC ha(-1 )year(-1) biomass increment, 1.6 tC ha(-1 )year(-1) foliage litter, and 1.0 tC ha(-1 )year(-1) other woody detritus. The total amount of annual soil surface CO(2) efflux was 6.8 tC ha(-1 )year(-1), which included root respiration (1.9 tC ha(-1 )year(-1)) and heterotrophic respiration (RH) from soils (4.9 tC ha(-1 )year(-1)). The 18-year forest at this study site exhibited a great increase in biomass pool as a result of considerable total tree growth and low mortality of tree stems. In contrast, the soil organic matter (SOM) pool decreased markedly (-1.6 tC ha(-1 )year(-1)), although further study of below-ground detritus production and RH of SOM decomposition is needed. This young 18-year forest was a weak carbon sink (0.9 tC ha(-1 )year(-1)) at this stage of secondary succession. The NEP of this 18-year forest is likely to increase gradually because biomass increases with tree growth and with the improvement of the SOM pool through increasing litter and dead wood production with stand development.

  13. Drought resistance in early and late secondary successional species from a tropical dry forest: the interplay between xylem resistance to embolism, sapwood water storage and leaf shedding

    Treesearch

    Fernando Pineda-Garcia; Horacio Paz; Frederick C. Meinzer

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms of drought resistance that allow plants to successfully establish at different stages of secondary succession in tropical dry forests are not well understood. We characterized mechanisms of drought resistance in early and late-successional species and tested whether risk of drought differs across sites at different successional stages, and whether early...

  14. State-Level Implementation of Health and Safety Policies to Prevent Sudden Death and Catastrophic Injuries Within Secondary School Athletics

    PubMed Central

    Adams, William M.; Scarneo, Samantha E.; Casa, Douglas J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Sudden death and catastrophic injuries during sport can be attenuated with the implementation of evidence-based health and safety policies. However, the extent of the implementation of these policies within secondary school athletics is unknown. Purpose: To provide an assessment of the implementation of health and safety policies pertaining to the leading causes of sudden death and catastrophic injuries in sport within secondary school athletics in the United States. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: A rubric for evidence-based practices for preventing the leading causes of death and catastrophic injuries in sport was created. The rubric comprised 5 equally weighted sections for sudden cardiac arrest, head injuries, exertional heat stroke, appropriate medical coverage, and emergency preparedness. State high school athletic association (SHSAA) policies, enacted legislation, and Department of Education policies were extensively reviewed for all 50 states and the District of Columbia. States meeting the specific criteria in the rubric, which required policies to be mandated for all SHSAA member schools, were awarded credit; the weighted scores were tabulated to calculate an aggregate score. States were then ranked from 1 (best) to 51 (worst) based on the aggregate score achieved. Results: The median score on the rubric was 47.1% (range, 23.00%-78.75%). States ranked 1 through 10 (from 78.75% to 56.98%) were North Carolina, Kentucky, Massachusetts, New Jersey, South Dakota, Missouri, Washington, Hawaii, Wisconsin, and Georgia, respectively. States ranked 11 through 20 (from 56.03% to 50.55%) were Arkansas, New York, Mississippi, West Virginia, Oregon, Illinois, Tennessee, Arizona, Texas, and District of Columbia, respectively. States ranked 21 through 30 (from 49.40% to 44.00%) were Virginia, Pennsylvania, Florida, New Mexico, Alabama, Maine, Rhode Island, Indiana, Nevada, and Utah, respectively. States ranked 31 through 40 (from 43

  15. State-Level Implementation of Health and Safety Policies to Prevent Sudden Death and Catastrophic Injuries Within Secondary School Athletics.

    PubMed

    Adams, William M; Scarneo, Samantha E; Casa, Douglas J

    2017-09-01

    Sudden death and catastrophic injuries during sport can be attenuated with the implementation of evidence-based health and safety policies. However, the extent of the implementation of these policies within secondary school athletics is unknown. To provide an assessment of the implementation of health and safety policies pertaining to the leading causes of sudden death and catastrophic injuries in sport within secondary school athletics in the United States. Descriptive epidemiology study. A rubric for evidence-based practices for preventing the leading causes of death and catastrophic injuries in sport was created. The rubric comprised 5 equally weighted sections for sudden cardiac arrest, head injuries, exertional heat stroke, appropriate medical coverage, and emergency preparedness. State high school athletic association (SHSAA) policies, enacted legislation, and Department of Education policies were extensively reviewed for all 50 states and the District of Columbia. States meeting the specific criteria in the rubric, which required policies to be mandated for all SHSAA member schools, were awarded credit; the weighted scores were tabulated to calculate an aggregate score. States were then ranked from 1 (best) to 51 (worst) based on the aggregate score achieved. The median score on the rubric was 47.1% (range, 23.00%-78.75%). States ranked 1 through 10 (from 78.75% to 56.98%) were North Carolina, Kentucky, Massachusetts, New Jersey, South Dakota, Missouri, Washington, Hawaii, Wisconsin, and Georgia, respectively. States ranked 11 through 20 (from 56.03% to 50.55%) were Arkansas, New York, Mississippi, West Virginia, Oregon, Illinois, Tennessee, Arizona, Texas, and District of Columbia, respectively. States ranked 21 through 30 (from 49.40% to 44.00%) were Virginia, Pennsylvania, Florida, New Mexico, Alabama, Maine, Rhode Island, Indiana, Nevada, and Utah, respectively. States ranked 31 through 40 (from 43.93% to 39.80%) were Ohio, Delaware, Alaska, Vermont

  16. Food as Medicine for Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Events Following an Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Paruchuri, Vijayapraveena; Gaztanaga, Juan; Rambhujun, Vikash; Smith, Robin; Farkouh, Michael E

    2018-06-13

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in men and women in the USA. Once a patient experiences an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), they are at increased risk for hospital readmission within 30 days and 6 months after discharge and more importantly, they have worse survival. Hospital readmissions lead to poor clinical outcomes for the patient and also significantly increase healthcare costs due to repeat diagnostic evaluation, imaging, and coronary interventions. The goal after hospital discharge is to modify cardiovascular (CV) risk factors including hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes to prevent repeat coronary events; however, drug therapy is only one aspect. Several diets have been shown to decrease weight and reduce these risk factors over short durations; however, most people typically cannot sustain their diet and regain the weight. The Intelligent Quisine (IQ) diet is a prepared meal plan that was designed to meet the American Heart Association and American Diabetes Association nutritional guidelines and simplify the daily consumption of a nutritionally complete, calorie conscious meal. The IQ diet has been shown to significantly reduce blood pressure, cholesterol levels, glucose levels, and weight over a 10-week period. Additional studies have shown that patients are able to remain compliant on the diet for a year and maintain the reduction of their CV risk factors. If patients are consistent with a healthy calorie conscious and nutritionally complete diet modifying CV risk factors long term, then food could be as powerful in reducing CV events as evidence-based drug therapy. There is a need to begin conceptualizing food as medicine. To this end, it is time for a randomized control trial implementing the IQ diet versus current standard dietary recommendations in a large number of patients and measuring hard CV endpoints. Many readmissions can be avoided with proper patient education and support emphasizing lifestyle modifications such

  17. Classification tree analyses reveal limited potential for early targeted prevention against childhood overweight.

    PubMed

    Beyerlein, Andreas; Kusian, Dennis; Ziegler, Anette-Gabriele; Schaffrath-Rosario, Angelika; von Kries, Rüdiger

    2014-02-01

    Whether specific combinations of risk factors in very early life might allow identification of high-risk target groups for overweight prevention programs was examined. Data of n = 8981 children from the German KiGGS study were analyzed. Using a classification tree approach, predictive risk factor combinations were assessed for overweight in 3-6, 7-10, and 11-17-year-old children. In preschool children, the subgroup with the highest overweight risk were migrant children with at least one obese parent, with a prevalence of 36.6 (95% confidence interval or CI: 22.9, 50.4)%, compared to an overall prevalence of 10.0 (8.9, 11.2)%. The prevalence of overweight increased from 18.3 (16.8, 19.8)% to 57.9 (46.6, 69.3)% in 7-10-year-old children, if at least one parent was obese and the child had been born large-for-gestational-age. In 11-17-year-olds, the overweight risk increased from 20.1 (18.9, 21.3)% to 63.0 (46.4, 79.7)% in the highest risk group. However, high prevalence ratios were found only in small subgroups, containing <10% of all overweight cases in the respective age group. Our results indicate only a limited potential for early targeted preventions against overweight in children and adolescents. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  18. Tactile stimulation partially prevents neurodevelopmental changes in visual tract caused by early iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Horiquini-Barbosa, Everton; Gibb, Robbin; Kolb, Bryan; Bray, Douglas; Lachat, Joao-Jose

    2017-02-15

    Iron deficiency has a critical impact on maturational mechanisms of the brain and the damage related to neuroanatomical parameters is not satisfactorily reversed after iron replacement. However, emerging evidence suggest that enriched early experience may offer great therapeutic efficacy in cases of nutritional disorders postnatally, since the brain is remarkably responsive to its interaction with the environment. Given the fact that tactile stimulation (TS) treatment has been previously shown to be an effective therapeutic approach and with potential application to humans, here we ask whether exposure to TS treatment, from postnatal day (P) 1 to P32 for 3min/day, could also be employed to prevent neuroanatomical changes in the optic nerve of rats maintained on an iron-deficient diet during brain development. We found that iron deficiency changed astrocyte, oligodendrocyte, damaged fiber, and myelinated fiber density, however, TS reversed the iron-deficiency-induced alteration in oligodendrocyte, damaged fiber and myelinated fiber density, but failed to reverse astrocyte density. Our results suggest that early iron deficiency may act by disrupting the timing of key steps in visual system development thereby modifying the normal progression of optic nerve maturation. However, optic nerve development is sensitive to enriching experiences, and in the current study we show that this sensitivity can be used to prevent damage from postnatal iron deficiency during the critical period. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Parent Participation within Community Center or In-Home Outreach Delivery Models of the Early Risers Conduct Problems Prevention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloomquist, Michael L; August, Gerald J.; Lee, Susanne S.; Piehler, Timothy F.; Jensen, Marcia

    2012-01-01

    A variety of predictors of parent participation in prevention programming have been identified in past research, but few studies have investigated how those predictors may vary by implementation context. Patterns of parent participation were examined in the Early Risers Conduct Problems Prevention Program using two family-focused service delivery…

  20. Prevention of and Early Intervention for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: Systems to Support Data-Based Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Timothy J.; Mitchell, Barbara S.

    2012-01-01

    Students with emotional and behavioral disorders are at great risk for long-term negative outcomes. Researchers and practitioners alike acknowledge the need for evidence-based, preventive, and early intervention strategies. Accordingly, in this chapter an expanded view of prevention is presented as a series of data driven decisions to guide…

  1. The use of lipid-lowering therapy for secondary prevention in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jessica M; Jackevicius, Cynthia A; Genus, Uchenwa; Dzavik, Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recent literature suggests that lipid-lowering therapy may have an early beneficial effect among patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) because the therapy decreases cardiac mortality, morbidity and possibly restenosis. OBJECTIVE The primary objective of the present study was to determine the proportion of PCI patients receiving lipid-lowering therapy at a large, tertiary-care referral centre. METHODS Patients undergoing a first PCI between August 2000 and August 2002 with corresponding inpatient medication information were included in the study. Patient demographics, procedural variables, and lipid-lowering and other evidence-based cardiac medication data were collected. A multiple logistical regression model was constructed to evaluate the factors associated with the use of lipid-lowering therapy. RESULTS Of the 3254 cases included in the analyses, 52% were elective, 44% were urgent or salvage, and 4% were emergent. The mean patient age was 63 years, and 73% of patients were male. Over 76% of patients were receiving lipid-lowering therapy at the time of PCI. Patient use of other medications was as follows: acetylsalicylic acid in 96%, beta-blocker in 80% and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor in 59%. In the multiple regression analysis, variables significantly associated with lipid-lowering therapy use included hypercholesterolemia, beta-blocker use, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor use, case urgency, prior coronary artery bypass graft surgery, age and sex. CONCLUSION Lipid-lowering therapy use rates exceeded those previously reported in the literature. Women and patients undergoing elective procedures appear to be treated less often with lipid-lowering therapy. There remains an opportunity to further optimize use in this high-risk cohort at time of PCI. PMID:16639478

  2. Effectiveness of chin-down posture to prevent tracheal aspiration in dysphagia secondary to acquired brain injury. A videofluoroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Terré, R; Mearin, F

    2012-05-01

    The chin-down posture is generally recommended in patients with neurogenic dysphagia to prevent tracheal aspiration; however, its effectiveness has not been demonstrated. To videofluoroscopically (VDF) assess the effectiveness of chin-down posture to prevent aspiration in patients with neurogenic dysphagia secondary to acquired brain injury. Randomized, alternating, cross-over study (with and without the chin-down posture) in 47 patients with a VDF diagnosis of aspiration [31 stroke, 16 traumatic brain injury (TBI)] and 25 controls without aspiration (14 stroke, 11 TBI). During the chin-down posture, 55% of patients avoided aspiration (40% preswallow aspiration and 60% aspiration during swallow). The percentage was similar in both etiologies (58% stroke and 50% TBI). Fifty-one percent of patients had silent aspiration; of these, 48% persisted with aspiration while in the chin-down posture. A statistically significant relationship was found between the existence of pharyngeal residue, cricopharyngeal dysfunction, pharyngeal delay time and bolus volume with the persistence of aspiration. The chin-down posture did not change swallow biomechanics in patients without aspiration. Only half the patients with acquired brain injury avoided aspiration during cervical flexion; 48% of silent aspirators continued to aspire during the maneuver. Several videofluoroscopic parameters were related to inefficiency of the maneuver. Therefore, the indication for chin-down posture should be evaluated by videofluoroscopic examination. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. A skin cancer prevention photoageing intervention for secondary schools in Brazil delivered by medical students: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Bianca Lisa; Gatzka, Martina; de Faria, Olber Moreira; Heppt, Markus V; Kirchberger, Michael C; Schadendorf, Dirk; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Buslaff, Fabian; Lisboa, Oscar Campos; Oliveira, Ana Carla Cruz; Lino, Henrique Augusto; Bernardes-Souza, Breno

    2018-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of melanoma is increasing faster than any other major cancer both in Brazil and worldwide. The Southeast of Brazil has especially high incidences of melanoma, and early detection is low. Exposure to UV radiation represents a primary risk factor for developing melanoma. Increasing attractiveness is a major motivation for adolescents for tanning. A medical student-delivered intervention that harnesses the broad availability of mobile phones as well as adolescents’ interest in their appearance may represent a novel method to improve skin cancer prevention. Methods and analysis We developed a free mobile app (Sunface), which will be implemented in at least 30 secondary school classes, each with 21 students (at least 30 classes with 21 students for control) in February 2018 in Southeast Brazil via a novel method called mirroring. In a 45 min classroom seminar, the students’ altered three-dimensional selfies on tablets are ‘mirrored’ via a projector in front of their entire class, showing the effects of unprotected UV exposure on their future faces. External block randomisation via computer is performed on the class level with a 1:1 allocation. Sociodemographic data, as well as skin type, ancestry, UV protection behaviour and its predictors are measured via a paper–pencil questionnaire before as well as at 3 and 6 months postintervention. The primary end point is the group difference in the 30-day prevalence of daily sunscreen use at a 6-month follow-up. Secondary end points include (1) the difference in daily sunscreen use at a 3-month follow-up, (2) if a self-skin examination in accordance with the ABCDE rule was performed within the 6-month follow-up and (3) the number of tanning sessions. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval was obtained from the ethics committee of the University of Itauna. Results will be disseminated at conferences and in peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration number NCT03178240; Pre-results. PMID

  4. Early Intervention and Maltreated Children: A Current Look at the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act and Part C

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moxley, Kathleen M.; Squires, Jane; Lindstrom, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Current literature regarding the prevalence of child abuse and neglect, resulting developmental impacts on children, and early intervention services for children and families involved in the child welfare system is summarized. While early intervention eligibility referrals are mandated for this population under the Child Abuse Prevention and…

  5. Moving from Science to Service: Transposing and Sustaining the Early Risers Prevention Program in a Community Service System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloomquist, Michael L.; August, Gerald J.; Horowitz, Jason L.; Lee, Susanne S.; Jensen, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes an effort to transpose and sustain the evidence-based Early Risers "Skills for Success" conduct problems prevention program in a real world community service system. The Early Risers program had previously been implemented by a local agency within the context of research-based operations. In the current initiative,…

  6. Being in a safe and thus secure place, the core of early labour: A secondary analysis in a Swedish context

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Ing-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Background Early labour is the very first phase of the labour process and is considered to be a period of time when no professional attendance is needed. However there is a high frequency of women who seek care at the delivery wards during this phase. When a woman is admitted to the delivery ward, one role for midwives is to determine whether the woman is in established labour or not. If the woman is assessed as being in early labour she will probably then be advised to return home. This recommendation is made due to past research that found that the longer a woman is in hospital the higher the risk for complications for her and her child. Women have described how this situation leaves them in a vulnerable situation where their preferences are not always met and where they are not always included in the decision-making process. Aim The aim of this study was to generate a theory based on where a woman chooses to be during the early labour process and to increase our understanding about how experiences can differ from place to place. Methods The method was a secondary analysis with grounded theory. The data used in the analysis was from two qualitative interview studies and 37 transcripts. Conclusion The findings revealed a substantive theory that women needed to be in a safe and thus secure place during early labour. This theory also describes the interplay between how women ascribed their meaning of childbirth as either a natural live event or a medical one, how this influenced where they wanted to be during early labour, and how that chosen place influenced their experiences of labour and birth. PMID:27172510

  7. Secondary carbonate porosity as related to early teritiary depositional facies, Zelten field, Libya

    SciTech Connect

    Bebout, D.G.; Pendexter, C.

    1975-04-01

    Production from the Zelten field, Libya, is from the highly porous shelf limestones of the Zelten Member (Main Pay) of the Paleocene and lower Eocene Ruaga Limestone. Fifteen facies are recognized, mapped, and predicted. Seven of the facies comprise the larger part of the Zelten Member. These include miliolid-foraminiferal micrite, argillaceous bryozoan/echinoid micrite, argillaceous-molluscan micrite, coralgal micrite. Discocyclina-foraminiferal calcarenite, foraminiferal calcarenite and micrite, and Discocyclina-foraminiferal micrite. In the Zelten field secondary porosity is recorded as much as 40%; this porosity is related to the original depositional fabric of the sediment and, therefore, is facies controlled. Porosity is highest in themore » coralgal micrite and Discocyclina-foraminiferal calcarenite, which together form a NW.-SE. trend across the N. part of the field, and in the formaniniferal calcarenite and micrite. (10 refs.)« less

  8. Transcatheter closure of patent foramen ovale for secondary prevention of ischemic stroke: Quantitative synthesis of pooled randomized trial data.

    PubMed

    Hakeem, Abdul; Cilingiroglu, Mehmet; Katramados, Angelos; Boudoulas, Konstantinos Dean; Iliescu, Cezar; Gundogdu, Betul; Marmagkiolis, Konstantinos

    2018-01-14

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous device closure of patent foramen ovale (PFO) for secondary prevention of ischemic stroke BACKGROUND: Stroke remains the leading cause of serious long-term disability in the United States. The effectiveness of a percutaneous PFO closure in the prevention of recurrent cryptogenic strokes has not been established. We performed a literature search using PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Google Scholar, and Internet-based sources from January 2003 to September 2017. Randomized controlled trails (RCTs) comparing percutaneous PFO closure to medical therapy alone. Five RCTs (CLOSURE I, PC Trial, REDUCE, RESPECT, and CLOSE) with 1,829 patients in the device group and 1,611 patients in the medical group met inclusion criteria. The cumulative incidence of recurrent stroke was 2.02% in the PFO closure arm and 4.4% in the medical therapy group (RR 0.42, 95%CI 0.20, 0.91; P = 0.03). There was no difference in the incidence of death [0.7% vs. 0.9%; RR 0.76 (95% CI 0.35, 1.64), P = 0.49] or adverse events during the follow-up period [24.6% vs. 23.7% (RR 1.03; 95% CI 0.91, 1.16), P = 0.65] between the closure and medical therapy groups. Incidence of atrial fibrillation was significantly higher in closure group compared to medical therapy [4% vs. 0.6% (RR 4.73; 95% CI 2.09, 10.70), P = 0.0002]. The comparative effectiveness of PFO closure (compared to medical therapy) was significantly more pronounced in those younger than 45 years, males, larger shunts and disc design platforms (P < 0.05). Based on the results of this analysis of randomized trial data, percutaneous PFO closure appears to be a safe and effective therapeutic option for the secondary prevention of ischemic stroke in patients with PFO and cryptogenic stroke. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation for secondary prevention after transient ischemic attack or mild stroke: I: feasibility and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Prior, Peter L; Hachinski, Vladimir; Unsworth, Karen; Chan, Richard; Mytka, Sharon; O'Callaghan, Christina; Suskin, Neville

    2011-11-01

    Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CCR), which integrates structured lifestyle interventions and medications, reduces morbidity and mortality among cardiac patients. CCR has not typically been used with cerebrovascular populations, despite important commonalities with heart patients. We tested feasibility and effectiveness of 6-month outpatient CCR for secondary prevention after transient ischemic attack or mild, nondisabling stroke. This article presents risk factors. A future article will discuss psychological outcomes. Consecutive consenting subjects having sustained a transient ischemic attack or mild, nondisabling stroke within the previous 12 months (mean, 11.5 weeks; event-to-CCR entry) with ≥1 vascular risk factor, were recruited from a stroke prevention clinic providing usual care. We measured 6-month CCR outcomes following a prospective cohort design. Of 110 subjects recruited from January 2005 to April 2006, 100 subjects (mean age, 64.9 years; 46 women) entered and 80 subjects completed CCR. We obtained favorable, significant intake-to-exit changes in: aerobic capacity (+31.4%; P<0.001), total cholesterol (-0.30 mmol/L; P=0.008), total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein (-11.6%; P<0.001), triglycerides (-0.27 mmol/L; P=0.003), waist circumference (-2.44 cm; P<0.001), body mass index (-0.53 kg/m(2); P=0.003), and body weight (-1.43 kg; P=0.001). Low-density lipoprotein (-0.24 mmol/L), high-density lipoprotein (+0.06 mmol/L), systolic (-3.21 mm Hg) and diastolic (-2.34 mm Hg) blood pressure changed favorably, but nonsignificantly. A significant shift toward nonsmoking occurred (P=0.008). Compared with intake, 11 more individuals (25.6% increase) finished CCR in the lowest-mortality risk category of the Duke Treadmill Score (P<0.001). CCR is feasible and effective for secondary prevention after transient ischemic attack or mild, nondisabling stroke, offering a promising model for vascular protection across chronic disease entities. We know of no

  10. The Prevention of Early-Onset Neonatal Group B Streptococcal Disease.

    PubMed

    Money, Deborah; Allen, Victoria M

    2016-12-01

    To review the evidence in the literature and to provide recommendations on the management of pregnant women in labour for the prevention of early-onset neonatal group B streptococcal disease. The key revisions in this updated guideline include changed recommendations for regimens for antibiotic prophylaxis, susceptibility testing, and management of women with pre-labour rupture of membranes. Maternal outcomes evaluated included exposure to antibiotics in pregnancy and labour and complications related to antibiotic use. Neonatal outcomes of rates of early-onset group B streptococcal infections are evaluated. Published literature was retrieved through searches of MEDLINE, CINAHL, and The Cochrane Library from January 1980 to July 2012 using appropriate controlled vocabulary and key words (group B streptococcus, antibiotic therapy, infection, prevention). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date or language restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to May 2013. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). The recommendations in this guideline are designed to help clinicians identify and manage pregnancies at risk for neonatal group B streptococcal disease to optimize maternal and perinatal outcomes. No cost-benefit analysis is provided. There is good evidence based on randomized control trial data that in women with pre-labour rupture of membranes at term who are colonized with group B streptococcus, rates of neonatal infection are

  11. Maryland dental hygienists' knowledge, opinions and practices regarding dental caries prevention and early detection.

    PubMed

    Clovis, Joanne B; Horowitz, Alice M; Kleinman, Dushanka V; Wang, Min Qi; Massey, Meredith

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess Maryland dental hygienists' knowledge, practices and opinions regarding dental caries prevention and early detection. A 30 item survey was mailed to 1,258 Maryland dental hygienists. Two follow-up mailings and email reminders were sent. The response rate was 43% (n=540). Nearly all respondents were female (98%), and 58% practiced in solo settings. Knowledge and certainty of knowledge were moderate: sealants are needed regardless of topical fluoride use (55% certain, 40% less certain), newly erupted permanent molars are the best candidates for sealants (54%, 36%) and professionally applied fluorides are desirable in areas without fluoridated water (55%, 36%). Fewer were certain that incipient lesions can be remineralized before cavitation (23%, 69%), and dilute, frequently administered fluorides are more effective in caries prevention than concentrated, less frequently administered fluorides (6%, 24%). Opinions regarding effectiveness of protocols for 2 age groups from 6 months to 6 years, the challenges of early childhood caries (ECC), prevention practices regarding sealant and topical fluoride applications varied widely. Eighty-nine percent reported routinely assessing dental caries risk factors of child patients and 90% were interested in continuing education courses. There were no significant differences between different types of practice settings, year of graduation, race/ethnicity or gender. Knowledge of recommended guidelines for fluoride and sealant application support clinical decision-making and self-care counseling. Misinformation and lack of understanding of current research and recommendations identify a need for educational interventions in undergraduate dental hygiene programs and through continuing education for practicing hygienists.

  12. The Wisconsin Early Childhood Obesity Prevention Initiative: An Example of Statewide Collective Impact.

    PubMed

    Meinen, Amy; Hilgendorf, Amy; Korth, Amy L; Christens, Brian D; Breuer, Catherine; Joyner, Hilary; Polzin, Molle; Adams, Alexandra; Wolfe, Daithi; Braun, Abbe; Hoiting, Jill; Paulson, Jeanette; Cullen, Bridget; Stader, Kelli

    2016-11-01

    The Wisconsin Early Childhood Obesity Prevention Initiative (Initiative), established in 2007, seeks to address and prevent obesity in the early care and education system through nutrition and physical activity environmental and policy changes. The collaborative includes professionals from 3 state of Wisconsin Departments, the University of Wisconsin-Extension, the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and public health and early care and education organizations. This paper explores the efforts of the Initiative to advance our understanding of collective impact in practice and its value to health promotion efforts. Evaluators conducted a mixed methods case study to evaluate the application of collective impact principles by the Initiative. This included a survey of Initiative partners, review of archival documents, and qualitative interviews with Initiative leaders. Initiative partners noted progress in establishing the conditions for collective impact. Archival documents and interviews describe both formal and informal practices that helped set a common agenda, align and coordinate partner activities, and promote communication among Initiative leaders. Results also detail the important current and potential roles of “backbone” staff from healthTIDE to support the Initiative. Additionally, results suggest particularly challenging aspects of the Initiative’s impact model related to shared measurement and broader stakeholder communication. While the Initiative is still setting in place the conditions for collective impact, it has achieved significant policy, systems, and environment changes since its formation. Inclusion of nutrition and physical activity criteria in the state’s quality rating improvement system for child care centers is one of its outcomes. This case study offers several important insights about the application of collective impact in health promotion efforts, particularly in relation to the transition from previous collaborative activities, the

  13. Orthodontic findings in the deciduous and early mixed dentition--inferences for a preventive strategy.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Franka; Grabowski, Rosemarie

    2003-11-01

    The aim of the present epidemiologic study was to obtain representative basic data on the frequency, extent and age-dependence of malocclusions in the deciduous and early mixed dentition. The developmental tendencies of specific malocclusions were investigated from the aspect of orthodontic prevention. The collective comprised 8,864 preschool and school-aged children, of whom 1,225 were in the deciduous dentition (mean age 4.5 years) and 7,639 in the mixed dentition (mean age 8.9 years). The orthodontic data were clinically assessed as sagittal, transversal, or vertical single-arch and occlusal findings. In addition, the malocclusions were classified according to their primary symptoms. Early infantile habits, tongue dysfunctions, speech defects and incompetent lip closure were registered separately. 57% of the children were found to have malocclusions, with the frequency rising statistically significantly in dependence on age from the deciduous to the mixed dentition (p < or = 0.001). The mean extent of excessive overjet increased significantly from the deciduous to the mixed dentition. Crossbite with mandibular midline discrepancies were observed significantly more frequently in the deciduous dentition. Although the frequency of anterior open bite underwent a significant decline from the deciduous to the mixed dentition, open bite was the malocclusion most frequently associated with dysfunction in both groups. The significant increase in traumatic deep bite in the mixed dentition indicates an unfavorable developmental tendency in this anomaly until after the eruption of the permanent incisors. The need for preventive orthodontic therapy and for the intensified application of interceptive and early treatment measures is stressed in view of the high number of malalignments and malocclusions in the deciduous and mixed dentition and the tendency for some forms of malocclusion to deteriorate as the dentition develops.

  14. A Web-Based, Computer-Tailored Smoking Prevention Program to Prevent Children From Starting to Smoke After Transferring to Secondary School: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mercken, Liesbeth; Candel, Math; de Vries, Hein; Oenema, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Background Smoking prevalence rates among Dutch children increase rapidly after they transit to secondary school, in particular among children with a low socioeconomic status (SES). Web-based, computer-tailored programs supplemented with prompt messages may be able to empower children to prevent them from starting to smoke when they transit to secondary school. Objective The main aim of this study is to evaluate whether computer-tailored feedback messages, with and without prompt messages, are effective in decreasing children’s smoking intentions and smoking behavior after 12 and 25 months of follow-up. Methods Data were gathered at baseline (T0), and after 12 months (T1) and 25 months (T2) of follow-up of a smoking prevention intervention program called Fun without Smokes. A total of 162 schools were randomly allocated to a no-intervention control group, an intervention prompt group, or an intervention no-prompt group. A total of 3213 children aged 10 to 12 years old participated in the study and completed a Web-based questionnaire assessing their smoking intention, smoking behavior, and sociocognitive factors, such as attitude, social influence, and self-efficacy, related to smoking. After completion, children in the intervention groups received computer-tailored feedback messages in their own email inbox and those messages could be accessed on the intervention website. Children in the prompt group received prompt messages, via email and short message service (SMS) text messaging, to stimulate them to reuse the intervention website with nonsmoking content. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were performed using multiple imputations to assess the program effects on smoking intention and smoking behavior at T1 and T2. Results A total of 3213 children participated in the Fun without Smokes study at T0. Between T0 and T1 a total of 1067 children out of the original 3213 (33.21%) dropped out of the study. Between T0 and T2 the number of children that did not

  15. A Web-based, computer-tailored smoking prevention program to prevent children from starting to smoke after transferring to secondary school: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cremers, Henricus-Paul; Mercken, Liesbeth; Candel, Math; de Vries, Hein; Oenema, Anke

    2015-03-09

    Smoking prevalence rates among Dutch children increase rapidly after they transit to secondary school, in particular among children with a low socioeconomic status (SES). Web-based, computer-tailored programs supplemented with prompt messages may be able to empower children to prevent them from starting to smoke when they transit to secondary school. The main aim of this study is to evaluate whether computer-tailored feedback messages, with and without prompt messages, are effective in decreasing children's smoking intentions and smoking behavior after 12 and 25 months of follow-up. Data were gathered at baseline (T0), and after 12 months (T1) and 25 months (T2) of follow-up of a smoking prevention intervention program called Fun without Smokes. A total of 162 schools were randomly allocated to a no-intervention control group, an intervention prompt group, or an intervention no-prompt group. A total of 3213 children aged 10 to 12 years old participated in the study and completed a Web-based questionnaire assessing their smoking intention, smoking behavior, and sociocognitive factors, such as attitude, social influence, and self-efficacy, related to smoking. After completion, children in the intervention groups received computer-tailored feedback messages in their own email inbox and those messages could be accessed on the intervention website. Children in the prompt group received prompt messages, via email and short message service (SMS) text messaging, to stimulate them to reuse the intervention website with nonsmoking content. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were performed using multiple imputations to assess the program effects on smoking intention and smoking behavior at T1 and T2. A total of 3213 children participated in the Fun without Smokes study at T0. Between T0 and T1 a total of 1067 children out of the original 3213 (33.21%) dropped out of the study. Between T0 and T2 the number of children that did not participate in the final measurement was

  16. Early neuromodulation prevents the development of brain and behavioral abnormalities in a rodent model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hadar, R; Bikovski, L; Soto-Montenegro, M L; Schimke, J; Maier, P; Ewing, S; Voget, M; Wieske, F; Götz, T; Desco, M; Hamani, C; Pascau, J; Weiner, I; Winter, C

    2018-04-01

    The notion that schizophrenia is a neurodevelopmental disorder in which neuropathologies evolve gradually over the developmental course indicates a potential therapeutic window during which pathophysiological processes may be modified to halt disease progression or reduce its severity. Here we used a neurodevelopmental maternal immune stimulation (MIS) rat model of schizophrenia to test whether early targeted modulatory intervention would affect schizophrenia's neurodevelopmental course. We applied deep brain stimulation (DBS) or sham stimulation to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of adolescent MIS rats and respective controls, and investigated its behavioral, biochemical, brain-structural and -metabolic effects in adulthood. We found that mPFC-DBS successfully prevented the emergence of deficits in sensorimotor gating, attentional selectivity and executive function in adulthood, as well as the enlargement of lateral ventricle volumes and mal-development of dopaminergic and serotonergic transmission. These data suggest that the mPFC may be a valuable target for effective preventive treatments. This may have significant translational value, suggesting that targeting the mPFC before the onset of psychosis via less invasive neuromodulation approaches may be a viable preventive strategy.

  17. Aligning policy to promote cascade genetic screening for prevention and early diagnosis of heritable diseases.

    PubMed

    George, Rani; Kovak, Karen; Cox, Summer L

    2015-06-01

    Cascade genetic screening is a methodology for identifying and testing close blood relatives of individuals at increased risk for heritable conditions and follows a sequential process, minimizing testing costs and the number of family members who need to be tested. It offers considerable potential for cost savings and increased awareness of heritable conditions within families. CDC-classified Tier 1 genomic applications for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC), Lynch Syndrome (LS), and familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) are recommended for clinical use and support the use of cascade genetic screening. Most individuals are unaware of their increased risk for heritable conditions such as HBOC, LS, and FH. Consistent implementation of cascade genetic screening could significantly increase awareness and prevention of heritable conditions. Limitations to effective implementation of cascade genetic screening include: insufficient genetic risk assessment and knowledge by a majority of healthcare providers without genetics credentials; a shortage of genetic specialists, especially in rural areas; a low rate of reimbursement for comprehensive genetic counseling services; and an individual focus on prevention by clinical guidelines and insurance coverage. The family-centric approach of cascade genetic screening improves prevention and early diagnosis of heritable diseases on a population health level. Cascade genetic screening could be better supported and augmented through changes in health policy.

  18. Lactobacillus salivarius Ren prevent the early colorectal carcinogenesis in 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine-induced rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J; Zhu, C; Ge, S; Zhang, M; Jiang, L; Cui, J; Ren, F

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of Lactobacillus salivarius Ren (LS) on modulating colonic micro flora structure and influencing host colonic health in a rat model with colorectal precancerous lesions. Male F344 rats were injected with 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) and treated with LS of two doses (5 × 10(8) and 1 × 10(10) CFU kg(-1) body weight) for 15 weeks. The colonic microflora profiles, luminal metabolites, epithelial proliferation and precancerous lesions [aberrant crypt foci (ACF)] were determined. A distinct segregation of colonic microflora structures was observed in LS-treated group. The abundance of one Prevotella-related strain was increased, and the abundance of one Bacillus-related strain was decreased by LS treatment. These changes were accompanied by increased short-chain fatty acid levels and decreased azoreductase activity. LS treatment also reduced the number of ACF by c. 40% and suppressed epithelial proliferation. Lactobacillus salivarius Ren improved the colonic microflora structures and the luminal metabolisms in addition preventing the early colorectal carcinogenesis in DMH-induced rat model. Colonic microflora is an important factor in colorectal carcinogenesis. Modulating the structural shifts of microflora may provide a novel option for preventing colorectal carcinogenesis. This study suggested a potential probiotic-based approach to modulate the intestinal microflora in the prevention of colorectal carcinogenesis. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. [Early detection, prevention and management of renal failure in liver transplantation].

    PubMed

    Castells, Lluís; Baliellas, Carme; Bilbao, Itxarone; Cantarell, Carme; Cruzado, Josep Maria; Esforzado, Núria; García-Valdecasas, Juan Carlos; Lladó, Laura; Rimola, Antoni; Serón, Daniel; Oppenheimer, Federico

    2014-10-01

    Renal failure is a frequent complication in liver transplant recipients and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. A variety of risk factors for the development of renal failure in the pre- and post-transplantation periods have been described, as well as at the time of surgery. To reduce the negative impact of renal failure in this population, an active approach is required for the identification of those patients with risk factors, the implementation of preventive strategies, and the early detection of progressive deterioration of renal function. Based on published evidence and on clinical experience, this document presents a series of recommendations on monitoring RF in LT recipients, as well as on the prevention and management of acute and chronic renal failure after LT and referral of these patients to the nephrologist. In addition, this document also provides an update of the various immunosuppressive regimens tested in this population for the prevention and control of post-transplantation deterioration of renal function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  20. Maternal low intensity physical exercise prevents obesity in offspring rats exposed to early overnutrition.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Tatiane Aparecida; Tófolo, Laize Peron; Martins, Isabela Peixoto; Pavanello, Audrei; de Oliveira, Júlio Cezar; Prates, Kelly Valério; Miranda, Rosiane Aparecida; da Silva Franco, Claudinéia Conationi; Gomes, Rodrigo Mello; Francisco, Flávio Andrade; Alves, Vander Silva; de Almeida, Douglas Lopes; Moreira, Veridiana Mota; Palma-Rigo, Kesia; Vieira, Elaine; Fabricio, Gabriel Sergio; da Silva Rodrigues, Marcos Ricardo; Rinaldi, Wilson; Malta, Ananda; de Freitas Mathias, Paulo Cezar

    2017-08-09

    Low intensity exercise during pregnancy and lactation may create a protective effect against the development of obesity in offspring exposed to overnutrition in early life. To test these hypotheses, pregnant rats were randomly assigned into 2 groups: Sedentary and Exercised, low intensity, on a rodent treadmill at 30% VO 2Max /30-minute/session/3x/week throughout pregnancy and the lactation. Male offspring were raised in small litters (SL, 3 pups/dam) and normal litters (NL, 9 pups/dam) as models of early overnutrition and normal feed, respectively. Exercised mothers showed low mesenteric fat pad stores and fasting glucose and improved glucose-insulin tolerance, VO 2max during lactation and sympathetic activity. Moreover, the breast milk contained elevated levels of insulin. In addition, SL of sedentary mothers presented metabolic dysfunction and glucose and insulin intolerance and were hyperglycemic and hyperinsulinemic in adulthood. SL of exercised mothers showed lower fat tissue accretion and improvements in glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, insulinemia and glycemia. The results suggest that maternal exercise during the perinatal period can have a possible reprogramming effect to prevent metabolic dysfunction in adult rat offspring exposed to early overnutrition, which may be associated with the improvement in maternal health caused by exercise.

  1. Recruitment for health disparities preventive intervention trials: the early childhood caries collaborating centers.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Tamanna; Casciello, Alana; Gansky, Stuart A; Henshaw, Michelle; Ramos-Gomez, Francisco; Rasmussen, Margaret; Garcia, Raul I; Albino, Judith; Batliner, Terrence S

    2014-08-07

    Four trials of interventions designed to prevent early childhood caries are using community-engagement strategies to improve recruitment of low-income, racial/ethnic minority participants. The trials are being implemented by 3 centers funded by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research and known as the Early Childhood Caries Collaborating Centers (EC4): the Center for Native Oral Health Research at the University of Colorado, the Center to Address Disparities in Children's Oral Health at the University of California San Francisco, and the Center for Research to Evaluate and Eliminate Dental Disparities at Boston University. The community contexts for the EC4 trials include urban public housing developments, Hispanic communities near the US-Mexican border, and rural American Indian reservations. These communities have a high prevalence of early childhood caries, suggesting the need for effective, culturally acceptable interventions. Each center's intervention(s) used community-based participatory research approaches, identified community partners, engaged the community through various means, and developed communication strategies to enhance recruitment. All 3 centers have completed recruitment. Each center implemented several new strategies and approaches to enhance recruitment efforts, such as introducing new communication techniques, using media such as radio and newspapers to spread awareness about the studies, and hosting community gatherings. Using multiple strategies that build trust in the community, are sensitive to cultural norms, and are adaptable to the community environment can enhance recruitment in underserved communities.

  2. Tumstatin peptide, an inhibitor of angiogenesis, prevents glomerular hypertrophy in the early stage of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshihiko; Maeshima, Yohei; Kitayama, Hiroyuki; Kitamura, Shinji; Takazawa, Yuki; Sugiyama, Hitoshi; Yamasaki, Yasushi; Makino, Hirofumi

    2004-07-01

    In the early stage of diabetic nephropathy (one of the major microvascular complications of diabetes) glomerular hyperfiltration and hypertrophy are observed. It is clinically important to regulate glomerular hypertrophy for preventing glomerulosclerosis. The number of glomerular endothelial cells is known to be increased in diabetic nephropathy associated with enlarged glomerular tufts, suggesting that the mechanism is similar to that of angiogenesis. Tumstatin peptide is an angiogenesis inhibitor derived from type IV collagen and inhibits in vivo neovascularization induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), one of the mediators of glomerular hypertrophy in diabetic nephropathy. Here, we show the effect of tumstatin peptide in inhibiting alterations in early diabetic nephropathy. Glomerular hypertrophy, hyperfiltration, and albuminuria were suppressed by tumstatin peptide (1 mg/kg) in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Glomerular matrix expansion, the increase of total glomerular cell number and glomerular endothelial cells (CD31 positive), and monocyte/macrophage accumulation was inhibited by tumstatin peptide. Increase in renal expression of VEGF, flk-1, and angiopoietin-2, an antagonist of angiopoietin-1, was inhibited by tumstatin treatment in diabetic mice. Alteration of glomerular nephrin expression, a podocyte protein crucial for maintaining glomerular filtration barrier, was recovered by tumstatin in diabetic mice. Taken together, these results demonstrate the potential use of antiangiogenic tumstatin peptide as a novel therapeutic agent in early diabetic nephropathy.

  3. A randomized controlled trial of two primary school intervention strategies to prevent early onset tobacco smoking.

    PubMed

    Storr, Carla L; Ialongo, Nicholas S; Kellam, Sheppard G; Anthony, James C

    2002-03-01

    In this article, we examine the impact of two universal, grade 1 preventive interventions on the onset of tobacco smoking as assessed in early adolescence. The classroom-centered (CC) intervention was designed to reduce the risk for tobacco smoking by enhancing teachers' behavior management skills in first grade and, thereby, reducing child attention problems and aggressive and shy behavior-known risk behaviors for later substance use. The family-school partnership (FSP) intervention targeted these early risk behaviors via improvements in parent-teacher communication and parents' child behavior management strategies. A cohort of 678 urban, predominately African-American, public school students were randomly assigned to one of three Grade 1 classrooms at entrance to primary school (age 6). One classroom featured the CC intervention, a second the FSP intervention, and the third served as a control classroom. Six years later, 81% of the students completed audio computer-assisted self-interviews. Relative to controls, a modest attenuation in the risk of smoking initiation was found for students who had been assigned to either the CC or FSP intervention classrooms (26% versus 33%) (adjusted relative risk for CC/control contrast=0.57, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34-0.96; adjusted relative risk for FSP/control contrast=0.69, 95% CI, 0.50-0.97). Results lend support to targeting the early antecedent risk behaviors for tobacco smoking.

  4. Light adaptation does not prevent early retinal abnormalities in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Kur, Joanna; Burian, Michael A.; Newman, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    The aetiology of diabetic retinopathy (DR), the leading cause of blindness in the developed world, remains controversial. One hypothesis holds that retinal hypoxia, exacerbated by the high O2 consumption of rod photoreceptors in the dark, is a primary cause of DR. Based on this prediction we investigated whether early retinal abnormalities in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats are alleviated by preventing the rods from dark adapting. Diabetic rats and their non-diabetic littermates were housed in a 12:12 hour light-dim light photocycle (30 lux during the day and 3 lux at night). Progression of early retinal abnormalities in diabetic rats was assessed by monitoring the ERG b-wave and oscillatory potentials, Müller cell reactive gliosis, and neuronal cell death, as assayed by TUNEL staining and retinal thickness at 6 and 12 weeks after diabetes induction. Maintaining diabetic animals in a dim-adapting light did not slow the progression of these neuronal and glial changes when compared to diabetic rats maintained in a standard 12:12 hour light-dark photocycle (30 lux during the day and 0 lux at night). Our results indicate that neuronal and glial abnormalities in early stages of diabetes are not exacerbated by rod photoreceptor O2 consumption in the dark. PMID:26852722

  5. Whole grain cereals for the primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Sarah Am; Hartley, Louise; Loveman, Emma; Colquitt, Jill L; Jones, Helen M; Al-Khudairy, Lena; Clar, Christine; Germanò, Roberta; Lunn, Hannah R; Frost, Gary; Rees, Karen

    2017-08-24

    reported) to whole grain versus lower whole grain or refined grain control groups. We found no studies that reported the effect of whole grain diets on total cardiovascular mortality or cardiovascular events (total myocardial infarction, unstable angina, coronary artery bypass graft surgery, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, total stroke). All included studies reported the effect of whole grain diets on risk factors for cardiovascular disease including blood lipids and blood pressure. All studies were in primary prevention populations and had an unclear or high risk of bias, and no studies had an intervention duration greater than 16 weeks.Overall, we found no difference between whole grain and control groups for total cholesterol (mean difference 0.07, 95% confidence interval -0.07 to 0.21; 6 studies (7 comparisons); 722 participants; low-quality evidence).Using GRADE, we assessed the overall quality of the available evidence on cholesterol as low. Four studies were funded by independent national and government funding bodies, while the remaining studies reported funding or partial funding by organisations with commercial interests in cereals. There is insufficient evidence from RCTs of an effect of whole grain diets on cardiovascular outcomes or on major CVD risk factors such as blood lipids and blood pressure. Trials were at unclear or high risk of bias with small sample sizes and relatively short-term interventions, and the overall quality of the evidence was low. There is a need for well-designed, adequately powered RCTs with longer durations assessing cardiovascular events as well as cardiovascular risk factors.

  6. Protocol for the SEED-trial: Supported Employment and preventing Early Disability.

    PubMed

    Sveinsdottir, Vigdis; Tveito, Torill Helene; Bond, Gary R; Grasdal, Astrid Louise; Lie, Stein Atle; Reme, Silje Endresen

    2016-07-15

    Early withdrawal or exclusion from the labor market leads to significant personal and societal costs. In Norway, the increasing numbers of young adults receiving disability pension is a growing problem. While a large body of research demonstrates positive effects of Supported Employment (SE) in patients with severe mental illness, no studies have yet investigated the effectiveness of SE in young adults with a range of social and health conditions who are receiving benefits. The SEED-trial is a randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing traditional vocational rehabilitation (TVR) to SE in 124 unemployed individuals between the ages of 18-29 who are receiving benefits due to various social- or health-related problems. The primary outcome is labor market participation during the first year after enrollment. Secondary outcomes include physical and mental health, health behaviors, and well-being, collected at baseline, 6, and 12 months. A cost-benefit analysis will also be conducted. The SEED-trial is the first RCT to compare SE to TVR in this important and vulnerable group, at risk of being excluded from working life at an early age. Clinicaltrials.gov, registration number NCT02375074 . Registered on December 3rd 2014.

  7. Rivaroxaban versus warfarin in Japanese patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation for the secondary prevention of stroke: a subgroup analysis of J-ROCKET AF.

    PubMed

    Tanahashi, Norio; Hori, Masatsugu; Matsumoto, Masayasu; Momomura, Shin-ichi; Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Goto, Shinya; Izumi, Tohru; Koretsune, Yukihiro; Kajikawa, Mariko; Kato, Masaharu; Ueda, Hitoshi; Iwamoto, Kazuya; Tajiri, Masahiro

    2013-11-01

    The overall analysis of the rivaroxaban versus warfarin in Japanese patients with atrial fibrillation (J-ROCKET AF) trial revealed that rivaroxaban was not inferior to warfarin with respect to the primary safety outcome. In addition, there was a strong trend for a reduction in the rate of stroke/systemic embolism with rivaroxaban compared with warfarin. In this subanalysis of the J-ROCKET AF trial, we investigated the consistency of safety and efficacy profile of rivaroxaban versus warfarin among the subgroups of patients with previous stroke, transient ischemic attack, or non-central nervous system systemic embolism (secondary prevention group) and those without (primary prevention group). Patients in the secondary prevention group were 63.6% of the overall population of J-ROCKET AF. In the secondary prevention group, the rate of the principal safety outcome (% per year) was 17.02 in rivaroxaban-treated patients and 18.26 in warfarin-treated patients (hazard ratio [HR] 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.70-1.29), while the rate of the primary efficacy endpoint was 1.66 in rivaroxaban-treated patients and 3.25 in warfarin-treated patients (HR 0.51; 95% CI 0.23-1.14). There were no significant interactions in the principal safety and the primary efficacy endpoints of rivaroxaban compared to warfarin between the primary and secondary prevention groups (P=.090 and .776 for both interactions, respectively). The safety and efficacy profile of rivaroxaban compared with warfarin was consistent among patients in the primary prevention group and those in the secondary prevention group. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. QLF monitoring of therapies for early secondary caries arrestment and remineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Margherita; Gonzalez-Cabezas, Carlos; Stookey, George K.

    2000-03-01

    Secondary caries (SC) is the most common reason for restoration failure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Quantitative Light-Induced Fluorescence (QLF) method for monitoring therapies to inhibit SC progression. Forty-eight human teeth with resin restorations were demineralized for 4 days in a microbial caries model. Half of each specimen was then covered with an acid-resistant varnish to maintain the baseline lesion, and treated (group 1: non-treated control; group 2: chlorhexidine varnish for 24 h; group 3: fluoride varnish for 24 h; group 4: APF topical fluoride gel for 4 min), prior to being demineralized for 4 more days. Specimens were analyzed by QLF, sectioned, stained with Rhodamine B, and analyzed with a confocal microscope (CLSM) for lesion depth. The QLF results indicated that the control group was significantly (p less than 0.05) different (i.e., lesions progressed) from groups treated with fluoride (groups 3 and 4; lesions remineralized). All other group comparisons were not significantly different. Results obtained from CLSM analysis were similar to the ones obtained with QLF, except that lesions in group 2 were significantly deeper than the ones in the fluoride groups. Results suggest that the QLF method has a clear potential for monitoring remineralizing therapies for SC.

  9. Effects of Chronic Sleep Restriction during Early Adolescence on the Adult Pattern of Connectivity of Mouse Secondary Motor Cortex123

    PubMed Central

    Billeh, Yazan N.; Bernard, Amy; de Vivo, Luisa; Honjoh, Sakiko; Mihalas, Stefan; Ng, Lydia; Koch, Christof

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cortical circuits mature in stages, from early synaptogenesis and synaptic pruning to late synaptic refinement, resulting in the adult anatomical connection matrix. Because the mature matrix is largely fixed, genetic or environmental factors interfering with its establishment can have irreversible effects. Sleep disruption is rarely considered among those factors, and previous studies have focused on very young animals and the acute effects of sleep deprivation on neuronal morphology and cortical plasticity. Adolescence is a sensitive time for brain remodeling, yet whether chronic sleep restriction (CSR) during adolescence has long-term effects on brain connectivity remains unclear. We used viral-mediated axonal labeling and serial two-photon tomography to measure brain-wide projections from secondary motor cortex (MOs), a high-order area with diffuse projections. For each MOs target, we calculated the projection fraction, a combined measure of passing fibers and axonal terminals normalized for the size of each target. We found no homogeneous differences in MOs projection fraction between mice subjected to 5 days of CSR during early adolescence (P25–P30, ≥50% decrease in daily sleep, n=14) and siblings that slept undisturbed (n=14). Machine learning algorithms, however, classified animals at significantly above chance levels, indicating that differences between the two groups exist, but are subtle and heterogeneous. Thus, sleep disruption in early adolescence may affect adult brain connectivity. However, because our method relies on a global measure of projection density and was not previously used to measure connectivity changes due to behavioral manipulations, definitive conclusions on the long-term structural effects of early CSR require additional experiments. PMID:27351022

  10. The Cool Little Kids randomised controlled trial: Population-level early prevention for anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization predicts that by 2030 internalising problems (e.g. depression and anxiety) will be second only to HIV/AIDS in international burden of disease. Internalising problems affect 1 in 7 school aged children, impacting on peer relations, school engagement, and later mental health, relationships and employment. The development of early childhood prevention for internalising problems is in its infancy. The current study follows two successful 'efficacy' trials of a parenting group intervention to reduce internalising disorders in temperamentally inhibited preschool children. Cool Little Kids is a population-level randomised trial to determine the impacts of systematically screening preschoolers for inhibition then offering a parenting group intervention, on child internalising problems and economic costs at school entry. Methods/Design This randomised trial will be conducted within the preschool service system, attended by more than 95% of Australian children in the year before starting school. In early 2011, preschool services in four local government areas in Melbourne, Australia, will distribute the screening tool. The ≈16% (n≈500) with temperamental inhibition will enter the trial. Intervention parents will be offered Cool Little Kids, a 6-session group program in the local community, focusing on ways to develop their child's bravery skills by reducing overprotective parenting interactions. Outcomes one and two years post-baseline will comprise child internalising diagnoses and symptoms, parenting interactions, and parent wellbeing. An economic evaluation (cost-consequences framework) will compare incremental differences in costs of the intervention versus control children to incremental differences in outcomes, from a societal perspective. Analyses will use the intention-to-treat principle, using logistic and linear regression models (binary and continuous outcomes respectively) to compare outcomes between the trial arms

  11. The Cool Little Kids randomised controlled trial: population-level early prevention for anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Jordana K; Rapee, Ronald M; Hiscock, Harriet; Ukoumunne, Obioha C; Mihalopoulos, Cathrine; Clifford, Susan; Wake, Melissa

    2011-01-05

    The World Health Organization predicts that by 2030 internalising problems (e.g. depression and anxiety) will be second only to HIV/AIDS in international burden of disease. Internalising problems affect 1 in 7 school aged children, impacting on peer relations, school engagement, and later mental health, relationships and employment. The development of early childhood prevention for internalising problems is in its infancy. The current study follows two successful 'efficacy' trials of a parenting group intervention to reduce internalising disorders in temperamentally inhibited preschool children. Cool Little Kids is a population-level randomised trial to determine the impacts of systematically screening preschoolers for inhibition then offering a parenting group intervention, on child internalising problems and economic costs at school entry. This randomised trial will be conducted within the preschool service system, attended by more than 95% of Australian children in the year before starting school. In early 2011, preschool services in four local government areas in Melbourne, Australia, will distribute the screening tool. The ≈16% (n≈500) with temperamental inhibition will enter the trial. Intervention parents will be offered Cool Little Kids, a 6-session group program in the local community, focusing on ways to develop their child's bravery skills by reducing overprotective parenting interactions. Outcomes one and two years post-baseline will comprise child internalising diagnoses and symptoms, parenting interactions, and parent wellbeing. An economic evaluation (cost-consequences framework) will compare incremental differences in costs of the intervention versus control children to incremental differences in outcomes, from a societal perspective. Analyses will use the intention-to-treat principle, using logistic and linear regression models (binary and continuous outcomes respectively) to compare outcomes between the trial arms. This trial addresses gaps

  12. Fanconi Syndrome Secondary to Deferasirox in Diamond-Blackfan Anemia: Case Series and Recommendations for Early Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Papneja, Koyelle; Bhatt, Mihir D; Kirby-Allen, Melanie; Arora, Steven; Wiernikowski, John T; Athale, Uma H

    2016-08-01

    Deferasirox is an oral iron chelator used to treat patients with transfusion-related iron overload. We report, from two institutions, two children with Diamond-Blackfan anemia who developed Fanconi syndrome secondary to deferasirox administration, along with a review of the literature. The current recommendation for the laboratory monitoring of patients receiving deferasirox does not include serum electrolytes or urine analysis. Thus, despite routine clinic visits and bloodwork, these two patients presented with life-threatening electrolyte abnormalities requiring hospitalization. Hence, we propose the inclusion of serum electrolytes and urine analysis as part of routine monitoring to facilitate the early diagnosis of Fanconi syndrome in the context of high doses of deferasirox therapy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A Medical Student-Delivered Smoking Prevention Program, Education Against Tobacco, for Secondary Schools in Germany: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Owczarek, Andreas Dawid; Seeger, Werner; Groneberg, David Alexander; Brieske, Christian Martin; Jansen, Philipp; Klode, Joachim; Stoffels, Ingo; Schadendorf, Dirk; Izar, Benjamin; Fries, Fabian Norbert; Hofmann, Felix Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Background More than 8.5 million Germans suffer from chronic diseases attributable to smoking. Education Against Tobacco (EAT) is a multinational network of medical students who volunteer for school-based prevention in the classroom setting, amongst other activities. EAT has been implemented in 28 medical schools in Germany and is present in 13 additional countries around the globe. A recent quasi-experimental study showed significant short-term smoking cessation effects on 11-to-15-year-old adolescents. Objective The aim of this study was to provide the first randomized long-term evaluation of the optimized 2014 EAT curriculum involving a photoaging software for its effectiveness in reducing the smoking prevalence among 11-to-15-year-old pupils in German secondary schools. Methods A randomized controlled trial was undertaken with 1504 adolescents from 9 German secondary schools, aged 11-15 years in grades 6-8, of which 718 (47.74%) were identifiable for the prospective sample at the 12-month follow-up. The experimental study design included measurements at baseline (t1), 6 months (t2), and 12 months postintervention (t3), via questionnaire. The study groups consisted of 40 randomized classes that received the standardized EAT intervention (two medical student-led interactive modules taking 120 minutes total) and 34 control classes within the same schools (no intervention). The primary endpoint was the difference in smoking prevalence from t1 to t3 in the control group versus the difference from t1 to t3 in the intervention group. The differences in smoking behavior (smoking onset, quitting) between the two groups, as well as gender-specific effects, were studied as secondary outcomes. Results None of the effects were significant due to a high loss-to-follow-up effect (52.26%, 786/1504). From baseline to the two follow-up time points, the prevalence of smoking increased from 3.1% to 5.2% to 7.2% in the control group and from 3.0% to 5.4% to 5.8% in the intervention

  14. A Medical Student-Delivered Smoking Prevention Program, Education Against Tobacco, for Secondary Schools in Germany: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Brinker, Titus Josef; Owczarek, Andreas Dawid; Seeger, Werner; Groneberg, David Alexander; Brieske, Christian Martin; Jansen, Philipp; Klode, Joachim; Stoffels, Ingo; Schadendorf, Dirk; Izar, Benjamin; Fries, Fabian Norbert; Hofmann, Felix Johannes

    2017-06-06

    More than 8.5 million Germans suffer from chronic diseases attributable to smoking. Education Against Tobacco (EAT) is a multinational network of medical students who volunteer for school-based prevention in the classroom setting, amongst other activities. EAT has been implemented in 28 medical schools in Germany and is present in 13 additional countries around the globe. A recent quasi-experimental study showed significant short-term smoking cessation effects on 11-to-15-year-old adolescents. The aim of this study was to provide the first randomized long-term evaluation of the optimized 2014 EAT curriculum involving a photoaging software for its effectiveness in reducing the smoking prevalence among 11-to-15-year-old pupils in German secondary schools. A randomized controlled trial was undertaken with 1504 adolescents from 9 German secondary schools, aged 11-15 years in grades 6-8, of which 718 (47.74%) were identifiable for the prospective sample at the 12-month follow-up. The experimental study design included measurements at baseline (t1), 6 months (t2), and 12 months postintervention (t3), via questionnaire. The study groups consisted of 40 randomized classes that received the standardized EAT intervention (two medical student-led interactive modules taking 120 minutes total) and 34 control classes within the same schools (no intervention). The primary endpoint was the difference in smoking prevalence from t1 to t3 in the control group versus the difference from t1 to t3 in the intervention group. The differences in smoking behavior (smoking onset, quitting) between the two groups, as well as gender-specific effects, were studied as secondary outcomes. None of the effects were significant due to a high loss-to-follow-up effect (52.26%, 786/1504). From baseline to the two follow-up time points, the prevalence of smoking increased from 3.1% to 5.2% to 7.2% in the control group and from 3.0% to 5.4% to 5.8% in the intervention group (number needed to treat [NNT

  15. Efficacy of a Chronic Care-Based Intervention on Secondary Stroke Prevention Among Vulnerable Stroke Survivors: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Eric M; Cunningham, William E; Towfighi, Amytis; Sanossian, Nerses; Bryg, Robert J; Anderson, Thomas L; Barry, Frances; Douglas, Susan M; Hudson, Lillie; Ayala-Rivera, Monica; Guterman, Jeffrey J; Gross-Schulman, Sandra; Beanes, Sylvia; Jones, Andrea S; Liu, Honghu; Vickrey, Barbara G

    2018-01-01

    Disparities of care among stroke survivors are well documented. Effective interventions to improve recurrent stroke preventative care in vulnerable populations are lacking. In a randomized controlled trial, we tested the efficacy of components of a chronic care model-based intervention versus usual care among 404 subjects having an ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack within 90 days of enrollment and receiving care within the Los Angeles public healthcare system. Subjects had baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥120 mm Hg. The intervention included a nurse practitioner/physician assistant care manager, group clinics, self-management support, report cards, decision support, and ongoing care coordination. Outcomes were collected at 3, 8, and 12 months, analyzed as intention-to-treat, and used repeated-measures mixed-effects models. Change in SBP was the primary outcome. Low-density lipoprotein reduction, antithrombotic medication use, smoking cessation, and physical activity were secondary outcomes. Average age was 57 years; 18% were of black race; 69% were of Hispanic ethnicity. Mean baseline SBP was 150 mm Hg in both arms. SBP decreased to 17 mm Hg in the intervention arm and 14 mm Hg in the usual care arm; the between-arm difference was not significant (-3.6 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, -9.2 to 2.2). Among secondary outcomes, the only significant difference was that persons in the intervention arm were more likely to lower their low-density lipoprotein <100 md/dL (2.0 odds ratio; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.5). This intervention did not improve SBP control beyond that attained in usual care among vulnerable stroke survivors. A community-centered component could strengthen the intervention impact. URL: https://clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00861081. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Acupuncture lowering blood pressure for secondary prevention of stroke: a study protocol for a multicenter randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Du, Yu-Zheng; Gao, Xin-Xin; Wang, Cheng-Ting; Zheng, Hai-Zhen; Lei, Yun; Wu, Meng-Han; Shi, Xue-Min; Ban, Hai-Peng; Gu, Wen-Long; Meng, Xiang-Gang; Wei, Mao-Ti; Hu, Chun-Xiao

    2017-09-15

    Stroke is the prime cause of morbidity and mortality in the general population, and hypertension will increase the recurrence and mortality of stroke. We report a protocol of a pragmatic randomized controlled trial (RCT) using blood pressure (BP)-lowering acupuncture add-on treatment to treat patients with hypertension and stroke. This is a large-scale, multicenter, subject-, assessor- and analyst-blinded, pragmatic RCT. A total of 480 patients with hypertension and ischemic stroke will be randomly assigned to two groups: an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group will receive "HuoXueSanFeng" acupuncture combined with one antihypertensive medication in addition to routine ischemic stroke treatment. The control group will only receive one antihypertensive medication and basic treatments for ischemic stroke. HuoXueSanFeng acupuncture will be given for six sessions weekly for the first 6 weeks and three times weekly for the next 6 weeks. A 9-month follow-up will, thereafter, be conducted. Antihypertensive medication will be adjusted based on BP levels. The primary outcome will be the recurrence of stroke. The secondary outcomes including 24-h ambulatory BP, the TCM syndrome score, the Short Form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36), the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), as well as the Barthel Index (BI) scale will be assessed at baseline, 6 weeks and 12 weeks post initiating treatments; cardiac ultrasound, carotid artery ultrasound, transcranial Doppler, and lower extremity ultrasound will be evaluated at baseline and 12 weeks after treatment. The safety of acupuncture will also be assessed. We aim to determine the clinical effects of controlling BP for secondary prevention of stroke with acupuncture add-on treatment. ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT02967484 . Registered on 13 February 2017; last updated on 27 June 2017.

  17. Progenitors of Secondary Crest Myofibroblasts are Developmentally Committed in Early Lung Mesoderm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changgong; Li, Min; Li, Sha; Xing, Yiming; Yang, Chang-Yo; Li, Aimin; Borok, Zea; De Langhe, Stijn; Minoo, Parviz

    2015-01-01

    Development of the mammalian lung is predicated on cross-communications between two highly interactive tissues, the endodermally-derived epithelium and the mesodermally-derived pulmonary mesenchyme. While much attention has been paid the lung epithelium, the pulmonary mesenchyme, partly due to lack of specific tractable markers remains under-investigated. The lung mesenchyme is derived from the lateral plate mesoderm and is the principal recipient of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, a morphogenetic network that regulates multiple aspects of embryonic development. Using the Hh-responsive Gli1-creERT2 mouse line, we identified the mesodermal targets of Hh signaling at various time points during embryonic and postnatal lung development. Cell lineage analysis showed these cells serve as progenitors to contribute to multiple lineages of mesodermally-derived differentiated cell types that include parenchymal or interstitial myofibroblasts, parabronchial and perivascular smooth muscle as well as rare populations of cells within the mesothelium. Most importantly, Gli1-creERT2 identified the progenitors of secondary crest myofibroblasts, a hitherto intractable cell type that plays a key role in alveolar formation, a vital process about which little is currently known. Transcriptome analysis of Hh-targeted progenitor cells transitioning from the pseudoglandular to the saccular phase of lung development revealed important modulations of key signaling pathways. Amongst these, there was significant down-regulation of canonical WNT signaling. Ectopic stabilization of β-Catenin via inactivation of Apc by Gli1-creERT2 expanded the Hh-targeted progenitor pools, which caused the formation of fibroblastic masses within the lung parenchyma. The Gli1-creERT2 mouse line represents a novel tool in the analysis of mesenchymal cell biology and alveolar formation during lung development. PMID:25448080

  18. Geographic variation in secondary fracture prevention after a hip fracture during 1999-2013: a UK study.

    PubMed

    Shah, A; Prieto-Alhambra, D; Hawley, S; Delmestri, A; Lippett, J; Cooper, C; Judge, A; Javaid, M K

    2017-01-01

    Fragility fractures of the hip have a major impact on the lives of patients and their families. This study highlights significant geographical variation in secondary fracture prevention with even the highest performing regions failing the majority of patients despite robust evidence supporting the benefits of diagnosis and treatment. The purpose of the study is to describe the geographic variation in anti-osteoporosis drug therapy prescriptions before and after a hip fracture during 1999-2013 in the UK. We used primary care data (Clinical Practice Research Datalink) to identify patients with a hip fracture and primary care prescriptions of any anti-osteoporosis drugs prior to the index hip fracture and up to 5 years after. Geographic variations in prescribing before and after availability of generic oral bisphosphonates were analysed. Multivariable logistic regression models were adjusted for gender, age and body mass index (BMI). Thirteen thousand sixty-nine patients (76 % female) diagnosed with a hip fracture during 1999-2013 were identified. Eleven per cent had any anti-osteoporosis drug prescription in the 6 months prior to the index hip fracture. In the 0-4 months following a hip fracture, 5 % of patients were prescribed anti-osteoporosis drugs in 1999, increasing to 51 % in 2011 and then decreasing to 39 % in 2013. The independent predictors (OR (95 % CI)) of treatment initiation included gender (male 0.42 (0.36-0.49)), BMI (0.98 per kg/m 2 increase (0.97-1.00)) and geographic region (1.29 (0.89-1.87) North East vs. 0.56 (0.43-0.73) South Central region). Geographic differences in prescribing persisted over the 5-year follow-up. If all patients were treated at the rate of the highest performing region, then nationally, an additional 3214 hip fracture patients would be initiated on therapy every year. Significant geographic differences exist in prescribing of anti-osteoporosis drugs after hip fracture despite adjustment for potential confo