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Sample records for early static pressure-related

  1. 19. HISTORIC VIEW OF MAX VALIER IN AN EARLY STATIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. HISTORIC VIEW OF MAX VALIER IN AN EARLY STATIC TEST. THE ROCKET IS SITTING ON A SCALE. VALIER IS MEASURING THRUST BY ADDING WEIGHT LIKE THE ONE IN HIS RIGHT HAND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  2. Assessment of early onset of driver fatigue using multimodal fatigue measures in a static simulator.

    PubMed

    Jagannath, M; Balasubramanian, Venkatesh

    2014-07-01

    Driver fatigue is an important contributor to road accidents. This paper reports a study that evaluated driver fatigue using multimodal fatigue measures, i.e., surface electromyography (sEMG), electroencephalography (EEG), seat interface pressure, blood pressure, heart rate and oxygen saturation level. Twenty male participants volunteered in this study by performing 60 min of driving on a static simulator. Results from sEMG showed significant physical fatigue (ρ < 0.05) in back and shoulder muscle groups. EEG showed significant (ρ < 0.05) increase of alpha and theta activities and a significant decrease of beta activity during monotonous driving. Results also showed significant change in bilateral pressure distribution on thigh and buttocks region during the study. These findings demonstrate the use of multimodal measures to assess early onset of fatigue. This will help us understand the influence of physical and mental fatigue on driver during monotonous driving. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Visual Detection Under Uncertainty Operates Via an Early Static, Not Late Dynamic, Non-Linearity

    PubMed Central

    Neri, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Signals in the environment are rarely specified exactly: our visual system may know what to look for (e.g., a specific face), but not its exact configuration (e.g., where in the room, or in what orientation). Uncertainty, and the ability to deal with it, is a fundamental aspect of visual processing. The MAX model is the current gold standard for describing how human vision handles uncertainty: of all possible configurations for the signal, the observer chooses the one corresponding to the template associated with the largest response. We propose an alternative model in which the MAX operation, which is a dynamic non-linearity (depends on multiple inputs from several stimulus locations) and happens after the input stimulus has been matched to the possible templates, is replaced by an early static non-linearity (depends only on one input corresponding to one stimulus location) which is applied before template matching. By exploiting an integrated set of analytical and experimental tools, we show that this model is able to account for a number of empirical observations otherwise unaccounted for by the MAX model, and is more robust with respect to the realistic limitations imposed by the available neural hardware. We then discuss how these results, currently restricted to a simple visual detection task, may extend to a wider range of problems in sensory processing. PMID:21212835

  4. Early detection of cataract and response to pantethine therapy with non-invasive static and dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; King, James F.; Seeberger, Teri; Clark, John I.

    2003-07-01

    Cataractogenesis is a risk factor for space travelers. Here on earth, half of all blindness is due to cataracts. At this time, the only known treatment is surgical removal of the lens. In this paper, we present static and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements of early onset of cataract before it has any effect on vision and to test the effectiveness of pantethine as an anticataract agent in reversing cataracts. In this preliminary study, experiments were conducted on 12 rodents. Static measurements were performed by scanning the animal eye (cornea to retina) at a laser power of 80 microwatts to collect photons or scattered intensity in steps of 10 microns. The rodents studied were control, selenite injected, and selenite plus pantethine injected. Selenite was used to induce cataracts. Static and dynamic changes (increase in light scatter and crystalline size) in the lenses are quantitatively measured as early as 1 day post selenite injections. Scattering intensity and DLS measurements from lenses of animals administered pantethine resembled controls. These subtle molecular changes are not noticeable when the animals are examined with conventional ophthalmic instruments because their lenses remain transparent. Acknowledgements: Technical support from C.Ganders, University of Washington, Seattle, NEI research grant EY04542 (JIC) and support under a NASA-NEI/NIH interagency agreement (RRA) are greatly appreciated. JFK works for QSS Inc. at NASA GRC.

  5. Undesirable dispersal of eggs and early-stage nymphs of the bed bug Hemiptera: cimicidae) by static electricity and air currents

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Movement of whole live insects or other small arthropods attributed to static electricity has been reported only rarely. While viewing bed bugs in plastic or glass Petri dishes using a dissecting microscope, individual eggs and early stage nymphs were occasionally observed to move suddenly and rapid...

  6. Differences In Early T-Cell Signaling In Cultures Grown In a Rotating Clinostat vs. Static Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexamder. M.; Nelman-Gonzales, M.; Penkala, J.; Sams, C.

    1999-01-01

    Altered gravity has previously been demonstrated to be a stress that can influence components of the immune system. Specifically, T-cell activation has been shown to be affected by changes in gravity, exhibiting a decrease in proliferative response to in vitro stimulation in microgravity. Subsequent ground based studies utilizing a rotating clinostat to model some of the effects of microgravity have been consistent with earlier flight based experiments. These ground and flight experiments have examined T-cell activation by measuring various responses including production of cytokines, DNA synthesis and the production of various cell surface activation markers. These indicators of T-cell activation were measured anywhere from 4 to 72 hours after stimulation. Prior to the work described here, the initial signaling events in T-cell activation had not been directly examined. The goal of this project was to determine how the process of early signal transduction was affected by growth in a rotating clinostat. Here we directly show a defect in signaling from TCR to MAPK in purified peripheral T-cells activated in the clinostat by OKT3/antiCD28 coated microbeads as compared to static controls.

  7. Comparative dosimetry of volumetric modulated arc therapy and limited-angle static intensity-modulated radiation therapy for early-stage larynx cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Riegel, Adam C.; Antone, Jeffrey; Schwartz, David L., E-mail: dschwartz3@nshs.edu

    2013-04-01

    To compare relative carotid and normal tissue sparing using volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for early-stage larynx cancer. Seven treatment plans were retrospectively created on 2 commercial treatment planning systems for 11 consecutive patients with T1-2N0 larynx cancer. Conventional plans consisted of opposed-wedged fields. IMRT planning used an anterior 3-field beam arrangement. Two VMAT plans were created, a full 360° arc and an anterior 180° arc. Given planning target volume (PTV) coverage of 95% total volume at 95% of 6300 cGy and maximum spinal cord dose below 2500 cGy, mean carotid artery dose was pushed asmore » low as possible for each plan. Deliverability was assessed by comparing measured and planned planar dose with the gamma (γ) index. Full-arc planning provided the most effective carotid sparing but yielded the highest mean normal tissue dose (where normal tissue was defined as all soft tissue minus PTV). Static IMRT produced next-best carotid sparing with lower normal tissue dose. The anterior half-arc produced the highest carotid artery dose, in some cases comparable with conventional opposed fields. On the whole, carotid sparing was inversely related to normal tissue dose sparing. Mean γ indexes were much less than 1, consistent with accurate delivery of planned treatment. Full-arc VMAT yields greater carotid sparing than half-arc VMAT. Limited-angle IMRT remains a reasonable alternative to full-arc VMAT, given its ability to mediate the competing demands of carotid and normal tissue dose constraints. The respective clinical significance of carotid and normal tissue sparing will require prospective evaluation.« less

  8. Rectifier cabinet static breaker

    DOEpatents

    Costantino, Jr, Roger A.; Gliebe, Ronald J.

    1992-09-01

    A rectifier cabinet static breaker replaces a blocking diode pair with an SCR and the installation of a power transistor in parallel with the latch contactor to commutate the SCR to the off state. The SCR serves as a static breaker with fast turnoff capability providing an alternative way of achieving reactor scram in addition to performing the function of the replaced blocking diodes. The control circuitry for the rectifier cabinet static breaker includes on-line test capability and an LED indicator light to denote successful test completion. Current limit circuitry provides high-speed protection in the event of overload.

  9. Tying the spectral ends of the M9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake sequence: High-frequency radiators and early quasi-static afterslip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inbal, A.; Ampuero, J. P.; Avouac, J.; Lengliné, O.; Helmberger, D. V.

    2012-12-01

    The March 11, 2011 M9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake was recorded by dense seismological and geodetical networks deployed in Japan, as well as by a vast number of seismic stations worldwide. These observations allow us to study the properties of the subduction interface with unprecedented accuracy and resolution. Here we examine the spectral tails of the co- and post-seismic stages using local geodetic and seismological recordings. First, we study the details of high-frequency (HF) energy radiation during the rupture by using strong-motion recordings. Second, we jointly invert 1Hz GPS, ocean-bottom GPS and aftershock data for the spatio-temporal distribution of early afterslip. In order to constrain the spatial distribution of HF radiators we model waveform envelopes recorded by Kik-net borehole accelerometers located in northeastern Japan. We compute theoretical envelopes for waves traveling in a heterogeneous scattering medium, and invert for the location and amplitude of energy radiators for frequencies ranging from 1 to 16 Hz. Because the inversion is extremely sensitive to the response of individual sites, we adopt an empirical approach and iteratively separate the source and site terms from the stacked spectra of numerous events recorded by the network. The output response functions for each site are used to stabilize the inversion. Preliminary results are consistent with far-field observations and suggest that the HF energy emitted during the M9.0 event originated at the down-dip limit of the rupture zone. We apply waveform cross-correlation to identify repeating events within the aftershock sequence, and locate them by match-filtering their waveforms with known templates. Many of these events occur on seismic asperities loaded by the surrounding creep. We jointly invert the slip histories on these fault patches and the available GPS data for the spatio-temporal distribution of afterslip during the first few hours following the mainshock. We use the Principal

  10. Observing the Forces Involved in Static Friction under Static Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Static friction is an important concept in introductory physics. Later in the year students apply their understanding of static friction under more complex conditions of static equilibrium. Traditional lab demonstrations in this case involve exceeding of the maximum level of static friction, resulting in the "onset of motion." (Contains…

  11. 18F-FET PET prior to recurrent high-grade glioma re-irradiation-additional prognostic value of dynamic time-to-peak analysis and early static summation images?

    PubMed

    Fleischmann, Daniel F; Unterrainer, Marcus; Bartenstein, Peter; Belka, Claus; Albert, Nathalie L; Niyazi, Maximilian

    2017-04-01

    Most high-grade gliomas (HGG) recur after initial multimodal therapy and re-irradiation (Re-RT) has been shown to be a valuable re-treatment option in selected patients. We evaluated the prognostic value of dynamic time-to-peak analysis and early static summation images in O-(2- 18 F-fluoroethyl)-l-tyrosine ( 18 F-FET) PET for patients treated with Re-RT ± concomitant bevacizumab. We retrospectively analyzed 72 patients suffering from recurrent HGG with 18 F-FET PET prior to Re-RT. PET analysis revealed the maximal tumor-to-background-ratio (TBR max ), the biological tumor volume, the number of PET-foci and pattern of time-activity-curves (TACs; increasing vs. decreasing). Furthermore, the novel PET parameters early TBR max (at 5-15 min post-injection) and minimal time-to-peak (TTP min ) were evaluated. Additional analysis was performed for gender, age, KPS, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase methylation status, isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutational status, WHO grade and concomitant bevacizumab therapy. The influence of PET and clinical parameters on post-recurrence survival (PRS) was investigated. Shorter TTP min was related to shorter PRS after Re-RT with 6 months for TTP min  < 12.5 min, 7 months for TTP min 12.5-25 min and 11 months for TTP min >25 min (p = 0.027). TTP min had a significant impact on PRS both on univariate (p = 0.027; continuous) and multivariate analysis (p = 0.011; continuous). Other factors significantly related to PRS on multivariate analysis were increasing vs. decreasing TACs (p = 0.008) and Karnofsky Performance Score (p = 0.015; <70 vs. ≥70). Early TBR max as well as the other conventional PET parameters were not significantly related to PRS on univariate analysis. Dynamic 18 F-FET PET with TTP min provides a high prognostic value for recurrent HGG prior to Re-RT, whereas early TBR max does not. Dynamic 18 F-FET PET using TTP min might help to personalize Re-RT treatment regimens in future through

  12. Automated static perimetry to evaluate diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Federman, J L; Lloyd, J

    1984-01-01

    The Octopus automated static perimeter was used to evaluate patients with early diabetic retinopathy. It showed islands of threshold sensitivity depression that were equal to areas of nonperfusion seen on fluorescein angiography. The geographic area of the fundus at risk of developing these field defects was found to be between 20 and 45 degrees, representing the central area of the midperiphery. This procedure has potential as an excellent screening test for early diabetic retinopathy. Images FIGURE 1 (Cont'd) C PMID:6549516

  13. Why Static Clings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naab, Laurie; Henry, David

    2009-01-01

    Using Wiggins and McTighe's (1998) concept of Big Ideas, the authors planned and designed an electricity investigation to address common student misconceptions about static electricity. With Styrofoam plates and transparent tape, elementary students investigated many properties of electrically charged and uncharged objects in a 5E learning cycle…

  14. Production against static electricity

    SciTech Connect

    Shteiner, A.L.; Minaev, G.S.; Shatkov, O.P.

    1978-01-01

    Coke industry shops process electrifiable, highly inflammable and explosive substances (benzene, toluene, xylenes, sulfur, coal dust, and coke-oven gas). The electrification of those materials creates a danger of buildup of static electricity charges in them and on the surface of objects interacting with them, followed by an electrical discharge which may cause explosion, fire, or disruption of the technological process. Some of the regulations for protection against static electricity do not reflect modern methods of static electricity control. The regulations are not always observed by workers in the plant services. The main means of protection used to remove static electricitymore » charges in grounding. In many cases it completely drains the charge from the surface of the electrifiable bodies. However, in the processing of compounds with a high specific volumetric electrical resistence grounding is insufficient, since it does not drain the charge from the interior of the substance. Gigh adsorption capacity) are generally met by brown coal low-temperature ompared with predictions using the hourly computer program. The concept of a lumped thermal network for predicting heat losses from in-ground heat storage tanks, developed earlier in the project, has beethe cased-hole log data from various companies and additional comparison factors were calculated for the cased-hole log data. These comparison factors allow for some quantification of these uncalibrated log data.« less

  15. A planning comparison of 3-dimensional conformal multiple static field, conformal arc, and volumetric modulated arc therapy for the delivery of stereotactic body radiotherapy for early stage lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Dickey, Mike; Roa, Wilson; Drodge, Suzanne; Ghosh, Sunita; Murray, Brad; Scrimger, Rufus; Gabos, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to compare dosimetric variables as well as treatment times of multiple static fields (MSFs), conformal arcs (CAs), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) techniques for the treatment of early stage lung cancer using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Treatments of 23 patients previously treated with MSF of 48Gy to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) in 4 fractions were replanned using CA and VMAT techniques. Dosimetric parameters of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0915 trial were evaluated, along with the van׳t Riet conformation number (CN), monitor units (MUs), and actual and calculated treatment times. Paired t-tests for noninferiority were used to compare the 3 techniques. CA had significant dosimetric improvements over MSF for the ratio of the prescription isodose volume to PTV (R100%, p < 0.0001), the maximum dose 2cm away from the PTV (D2cm, p = 0.005), and van׳t Riet CN (p < 0.0001). CA was not statistically inferior to MSF for the 50% prescription isodose volume to PTV (R50%, p = 0.05). VMAT was significantly better than CA for R100% (p < 0.0001), R50% (p < 0.0001), D2cm (p = 0.006), and CN (p < 0.0001). CA plans had significantly shorter treatment times than those of VMAT (p < 0.0001). Both CA and VMAT planning showed significant dosimetric improvements and shorter treatment times over those of MSF. VMAT showed the most favorable dosimetry of all 3 techniques; however, the dosimetric effect of tumor motion was not evaluated. CA plans were significantly faster to treat, and minimize the interplay of tumor motion and dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) motion effects. Given these results, CA has become the treatment technique of choice at our facility. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Axial static mixer

    DOEpatents

    Sandrock, H.E.

    1982-05-06

    Static axial mixing apparatus includes a plurality of channels, forming flow paths of different dimensions. The axial mixer includes a flow adjusting device for adjustable selective control of flow resistance of various flow paths in order to provide substantially identical flows through the various channels, thereby reducing nonuniform coating of interior surfaces of the channels. The flow adjusting device may include diaphragm valves, and may further include a pressure regulating system therefor.

  17. Photovoltaic static concentrator analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almonacid, G.; Luque, A.; Molledo, A. G.

    1984-12-01

    Ray tracing is the basis of the present analysis of truncated bifacial compound parabolic concentrators filled with a dielectric substance, which are of interest in photovoltaic applications where the bifacial cells allow higher static concentrations to be achieved. Among the figures of merit for this type of concentrator, the directional intercept factor plays a major role and is defined as the ratio of the power of the collector to that at the entry aperture, in a lossless concentrator illuminated by light arriving from a given direction. A procedure for measuring outdoor, full size panels has been developed, and a correction method for avoiding the effect of unwanted diffuse radiation during the measurements is presented.

  18. Static electricity: A literature review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow, Rita M.

    1991-11-01

    The major concern with static electricity is its discharging in a flammable atmosphere which can explode and cause a fire. Textile materials can have their electrical resistivity decreased by the addition of antistatic finishes, imbedding conductive particles into the fibres or by adding metal fibers to the yarns. The test methods used in the studies of static electricity include measuring the static properties of materials, of clothed persons, and of the ignition energy of flammable gases. Surveys have shown that there is sparse evidence for fires definitively being caused by static electricity. However, the 'worst-case' philosophy has been adopted and a static electricity safety code is described, including correct grounding procedures and the wearing of anti-static clothing and footwear.

  19. Static Analysis Using Abstract Interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arthaud, Maxime

    2017-01-01

    Short presentation about static analysis and most particularly abstract interpretation. It starts with a brief explanation on why static analysis is used at NASA. Then, it describes the IKOS (Inference Kernel for Open Static Analyzers) tool chain. Results on NASA projects are shown. Several well known algorithms from the static analysis literature are then explained (such as pointer analyses, memory analyses, weak relational abstract domains, function summarization, etc.). It ends with interesting problems we encountered (such as C++ analysis with exception handling, or the detection of integer overflow).

  20. Earthquake triggering by transient and static deformations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.; Beeler, N.M.; Blanpied, M.L.; Bodin, P.

    1998-01-01

    Observational evidence for both static and transient near-field and far-field triggered seismicity are explained in terms of a frictional instability model, based on a single degree of freedom spring-slider system and rate- and state-dependent frictional constitutive equations. In this study a triggered earthquake is one whose failure time has been advanced by ??t (clock advance) due to a stress perturbation. Triggering stress perturbations considered include square-wave transients and step functions, analogous to seismic waves and coseismic static stress changes, respectively. Perturbations are superimposed on a constant background stressing rate which represents the tectonic stressing rate. The normal stress is assumed to be constant. Approximate, closed-form solutions of the rate-and-state equations are derived for these triggering and background loads, building on the work of Dieterich [1992, 1994]. These solutions can be used to simulate the effects of static and transient stresses as a function of amplitude, onset time t0, and in the case of square waves, duration. The accuracies of the approximate closed-form solutions are also evaluated with respect to the full numerical solution and t0. The approximate solutions underpredict the full solutions, although the difference decreases as t0, approaches the end of the earthquake cycle. The relationship between ??t and t0 differs for transient and static loads: a static stress step imposed late in the cycle causes less clock advance than an equal step imposed earlier, whereas a later applied transient causes greater clock advance than an equal one imposed earlier. For equal ??t, transient amplitudes must be greater than static loads by factors of several tens to hundreds depending on t0. We show that the rate-and-state model requires that the total slip at failure is a constant, regardless of the loading history. Thus a static load applied early in the cycle, or a transient applied at any time, reduces the stress

  1. Static Orbits in Rotating Spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collodel, Lucas G.; Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta

    2018-05-01

    We show that under certain conditions an axisymmetric rotating spacetime contains a ring of points in the equatorial plane, where a particle at rest with respect to an asymptotic static observer remains at rest in a static orbit. We illustrate the emergence of such orbits for boson stars. Further examples are wormholes, hairy black holes, and Kerr-Newman solutions.

  2. Measurement of compartment elasticity using pressure related ultrasound: a method to identify patients with potential compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sellei, R M; Hingmann, S J; Kobbe, P; Weber, C; Grice, J E; Zimmerman, F; Jeromin, S; Gansslen, A; Hildebrand, F; Pape, H C

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Decision-making in treatment of an acute compartment syndrome is based on clinical assessment, supported by invasive monitoring. Thus, evolving compartment syndrome may require repeated pressure measurements. In suspected cases of potential compartment syndromes clinical assessment alone seems to be unreliable. The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a non-invasive application estimating whole compartmental elasticity by ultrasound, which may improve accuracy of diagnostics. MATERIAL AND METHODS In an in-vitro model, using an artificial container simulating dimensions of the human anterior tibial compartment, intracompartmental pressures (p) were raised subsequently up to 80 mm Hg by infusion of saline solution. The compartmental depth (mm) in the cross-section view was measured before and after manual probe compression (100 mm Hg) upon the surface resulting in a linear compartmental displacement (Δd). This was repeated at rising compartmental pressures. The resulting displacements were related to the corresponding intra-compartmental pressures simulated in our model. A hypothesized relationship between pressures related compartmental displacement and the elasticity at elevated compartment pressures was investigated. RESULTS With rising compartmental pressures, a non-linear, reciprocal proportional relation between the displacement (mm) and the intra-compartmental pressure (mm Hg) occurred. The Pearson's coefficient showed a high correlation (r2 = -0.960). The intraobserver reliability value kappa resulted in a statistically high reliability (κ = 0.840). The inter-observer value indicated a fair reliability (κ = 0.640). CONCLUSIONS Our model reveals that a strong correlation between compartmental strain displacements assessed by ultrasound and the intra-compartmental pressure changes occurs. Further studies are required to prove whether this assessment is transferable to human muscle tissue. Determining the complete

  3. Static and Dynamic Traversable Wormholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamiak, Jaroslaw P.

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this work is to discuss the effects found in static and dynamic wormholes that occur as a solution of Einstein equations in general relativity. The ground is prepared by presentation of faster than light effects, then the focus is narrowed to Morris-Thorne framework for a static spherically symmetric wormhole. Two types of dynamic worm-holes, evolving and rotating, are considered.

  4. 35. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT THE STATIC TEST TOWER. A ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT THE STATIC TEST TOWER. A 'DUMMY' SATURN I BOOSTER IS BEING HOISTED INTO THE TEST STAND TO TEST THE MATING OF THE BOOSTER AND THE TEST STAND. EARLY 1960, PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN, MSFC PHOTO LAB. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  5. Static heterogeneities in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. Eugene; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2004-10-01

    The thermodynamic behavior of water seems to be closely related to static heterogeneities. These static heterogeneities are related to the local structure of water molecules, and when properly characterized, may offer an economical explanation of thermodynamic data. The key feature of liquid water is not so much that the existence of hydrogen bonds, first pointed out by Linus Pauling, but rather the local geometry of the liquid molecules is not spherical or oblong but tetrahedral. In the consideration of static heterogeneities, this local geometry is critical. Recent experiments suggested more than one phase of amorphous solid water, while simulations suggest that one of these phases is metastable with respect to another, so that in fact there are only two stable phases.

  6. Feynman propagators on static spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dereziński, Jan; Siemssen, Daniel

    We consider the Klein-Gordon equation on a static spacetime and minimally coupled to a static electromagnetic potential. We show that it is essentially self-adjoint on Cc∞. We discuss various distinguished inverses and bisolutions of the Klein-Gordon operator, focusing on the so-called Feynman propagator. We show that the Feynman propagator can be considered the boundary value of the resolvent of the Klein-Gordon operator, in the spirit of the limiting absorption principle known from the theory of Schrödinger operators. We also show that the Feynman propagator is the limit of the inverse of the Wick rotated Klein-Gordon operator.

  7. Voltage Sensors Monitor Harmful Static

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    A tiny sensor, small enough to be worn on clothing, now monitors voltage changes near sensitive instruments after being created to alert Agency workers to dangerous static buildup near fuel operations and avionics. San Diego s Quasar Federal Systems received a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from Kennedy Space Center to develop its remote voltage sensor (RVS), a dime-sized electrometer designed to measure triboelectric changes in the environment. One of the unique qualities of the RVS is that it can detect static at greater distances than previous devices, measuring voltage changes from a few centimeters to a few meters away, due to its much-improved sensitivity.

  8. Static Verification for Code Contracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fähndrich, Manuel

    The Code Contracts project [3] at Microsoft Research enables programmers on the .NET platform to author specifications in existing languages such as C# and VisualBasic. To take advantage of these specifications, we provide tools for documentation generation, runtime contract checking, and static contract verification.

  9. Static penetration resistance of soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durgunoglu, H. T.; Mitchell, J. K.

    1973-01-01

    Model test results were used to define the failure mechanism associated with the static penetration resistance of cohesionless and low-cohesion soils. Knowledge of this mechanism has permitted the development of a new analytical method for calculating the ultimate penetration resistance which explicitly accounts for penetrometer base apex angle and roughness, soil friction angle, and the ratio of penetration depth to base width. Curves relating the bearing capacity factors to the soil friction angle are presented for failure in general shear. Strength parameters and penetrometer interaction properties of a fine sand were determined and used as the basis for prediction of the penetration resistance encountered by wedge, cone, and flat-ended penetrometers of different surface roughness using the proposed analytical method. Because of the close agreement between predicted values and values measured in laboratory tests, it appears possible to deduce in-situ soil strength parameters and their variation with depth from the results of static penetration tests.

  10. Static models with conformal symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjonjo, A. M.; Maharaj, S. D.; Moopanar, S.

    2018-02-01

    We study static spherically symmetric spacetimes with a spherical conformal symmetry and a nonstatic conformal factor associated with the conformal Killing field. With these assumptions we find an explicit relationship relating two metric components of the metric tensor field. This leads to the general solution of the Einstein field equations with a conformal symmetry in a static spherically symmetric spacetime. For perfect fluids we can find all metrics explicitly and show that the models always admit a barotropic equation of state. Contained within this class of spacetimes are the well known metrics of (interior) Schwarzschild, Tolman, Kuchowicz, Korkina and Orlyanskii, Patwardhan and Vaidya, and Buchdahl and Land. The isothermal metric of Saslaw et al also admits a conformal symmetry. For imperfect fluids an infinite family of exact solutions to the field equations can be generated.

  11. Water cooled static pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagen, Nicholas T. (Inventor); Eves, John W. (Inventor); Reece, Garland D. (Inventor); Geissinger, Steve L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved static pressure probe containing a water cooling mechanism is disclosed. This probe has a hollow interior containing a central coolant tube and multiple individual pressure measurement tubes connected to holes placed on the exterior. Coolant from the central tube symmetrically immerses the interior of the probe, allowing it to sustain high temperature (in the region of 2500 F) supersonic jet flow indefinitely, while still recording accurate pressure data. The coolant exits the probe body by way of a reservoir attached to the aft of the probe. The pressure measurement tubes are joined to a single, larger manifold in the reservoir. This manifold is attached to a pressure transducer that records the average static pressure.

  12. Precipitation-Static-Reduction Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1943-03-31

    if» 85 z \\ PRECIPITATION-STATIC-REDUCTION RESEARCH study of the effects of flame length , flame spacing, and burner spacing on B shows that there...unod: Flame length *. The visual length of the flame from the burner tip to the flame tip when examined in a darkened room against a black background...Postlve and Negative Flames The use of the second flame-conduction coefficient, B, facilitates considerably the study of the effect of flame length , spacing

  13. Three Inexpensive Static-Electricity Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore, Gordon R.; Gregg, William R.

    1992-01-01

    Describes demonstrations to (1) construct an inexpensive static electricity detector; (2) obtain an abundant supply of either negative or positive charge using household items; and (3) create static electricity using a Tesla coil or Van de Graaff generator. (MDH)

  14. Comparative Tests of Pitot-static Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merriam, Kenneth G; Spaulding, Ellis R

    1935-01-01

    Comparative tests were made on seven conventional Pitot-static tubes to determine their static, dynamic, and resultant errors. The effect of varying the dynamic opening, static opening, wall thickness, and inner-tube diameter was investigated. Pressure-distribution measurements showing stem and tip effects were also made. A tentative design for a standard Pitot-static tube for use in measuring air velocity is submitted.

  15. In-Flight Pitot-Static Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John V. (Inventor); Cunningham, Kevin (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A GPS-based pitot-static calibration system uses global output-error optimization. High data rate measurements of static and total pressure, ambient air conditions, and GPS-based ground speed measurements are used to compute pitot-static pressure errors over a range of airspeed. System identification methods rapidly compute optimal pressure error models with defined confidence intervals.

  16. 30 CFR 18.26 - Static electricity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Static electricity. 18.26 Section 18.26 Mineral... § 18.26 Static electricity. Nonmetallic rotating parts, such as belts and fans, shall be provided with a means to prevent an accumulation of static electricity. ...

  17. 30 CFR 18.26 - Static electricity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Static electricity. 18.26 Section 18.26 Mineral... § 18.26 Static electricity. Nonmetallic rotating parts, such as belts and fans, shall be provided with a means to prevent an accumulation of static electricity. ...

  18. 30 CFR 18.26 - Static electricity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Static electricity. 18.26 Section 18.26 Mineral... § 18.26 Static electricity. Nonmetallic rotating parts, such as belts and fans, shall be provided with a means to prevent an accumulation of static electricity. ...

  19. 30 CFR 18.26 - Static electricity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static electricity. 18.26 Section 18.26 Mineral... § 18.26 Static electricity. Nonmetallic rotating parts, such as belts and fans, shall be provided with a means to prevent an accumulation of static electricity. ...

  20. 30 CFR 18.26 - Static electricity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Static electricity. 18.26 Section 18.26 Mineral... § 18.26 Static electricity. Nonmetallic rotating parts, such as belts and fans, shall be provided with a means to prevent an accumulation of static electricity. ...

  1. Static feed water electrolysis module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Jensen, F. C.

    1974-01-01

    An advanced static feed water electrolysis module (SFWEM) and associated instrumentation for generating breathable O2 was developed. The system also generates a H2 byproduct for use in an air revitalization system for O2 recovery from metabolic CO2. Special attention was given to: (1) eliminating water feed compartment degassing, (2) eliminating need for zero gravity condenser/separators, (3) increasing current density capability, and (4) providing a self contained module so that operation is independent of laboratory instrumentation and complicated startup/shutdown procedures.

  2. Quasi-static acoustic tweezing thromboelastometry.

    PubMed

    Holt, R G; Luo, D; Gruver, N; Khismatullin, D B

    2017-07-01

    Essentials Blood coagulation measurement during contact with an artificial surface leads to unreliable data. Acoustic tweezing thromboelastometry is a novel non-contact method for coagulation monitoring. This method detects differences in the blood coagulation state within 10 min. Coagulation data were obtained using a much smaller sample volume (4 μL) than currently used. Background Thromboelastography is widely used as a tool to assess the coagulation status of critical care patients. It allows observation of changes in material properties of whole blood, beginning with early stages of clot formation and ending with clot lysis. However, the contact activation of the coagulation cascade at surfaces of thromboelastographic systems leads to inherent variability and unreliability in predicting bleeding or thrombosis risks. Objectives To develop acoustic tweezing thromboelastometry as a non-contact method for perioperative assessment of blood coagulation. Methods Acoustic tweezing is used to levitate microliter drops of biopolymer and human blood samples. By quasi-statically changing the acoustic pressure we control the sample drop location and deformation. Sample size, deformation and location are determined by digital imaging at each pressure. Results Simple Newtonian liquid solutions maintain a constant, reversible location vs. deformation curve. In contrast, the location/deformation curves for gelatin, alginate, whole blood and blood plasma uniquely change as the samples solidify. Increasing elasticity causes the sample to deform less, leading to steeper stress/strain curves. By extracting a linear regime slope, we show that whole blood or blood plasma exhibits a unique slope profile as it begins to clot. By exposing blood samples to pro- or antithrombotic agents, the slope profile changes, allowing detection of hyper- or hypocoagulable states. Conclusions We demonstrate that quasi-static acoustic tweezing can yield information about clotting onset, maturation

  3. Measurement of static pressure on aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gracey, William

    1958-01-01

    Existing data on the errors involved in the measurement of static pressure by means of static-pressure tubes and fuselage vents are presented. The errors associated with the various design features of static-pressure tubes are discussed for the condition of zero angle of attack and for the case where the tube is inclined to flow. Errors which result from variations in the configuration of static-pressure vents are also presented. Errors due to the position of a static-pressure tube in the flow field of the airplane are given for locations ahead of the fuselage nose, ahead of the wing tip, and ahead of the vertical tail fin. The errors of static-pressure vents on the fuselage of an airplane are also presented. Various methods of calibrating static-pressure installations in flight are briefly discussed.

  4. Effect of olive oil phenolic compounds on the expression of blood pressure-related genes in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Martín-Peláez, Sandra; Castañer, Olga; Konstantinidou, Valentini; Subirana, Isaac; Muñoz-Aguayo, Daniel; Blanchart, Gemma; Gaixas, Sonia; de la Torre, Rafael; Farré, Magí; Sáez, Guillermo T; Nyyssönen, Kristina; Zunft, Hans Joachim; Covas, Maria Isabel; Fitó, Montse

    2017-03-01

    To investigate whether the ingestion of olive oil having different phenolic contents influences the expression of blood pressure-related genes, involved in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, in healthy humans. A randomized, double-blind, crossover human trial with 18 healthy subjects, who ingested 25 mL/day of olive oils (1) high (366 mg/kg, HPC) and (2) low (2.7 mg/kg, LPC) in phenolic compounds for 3 weeks, preceded by 2-week washout periods. Determination of selected blood pressure-related gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) by qPCR, blood pressure and systemic biomarkers. HPC decreased systolic blood pressure compared to pre-intervention values and to LPC, and maintained diastolic blood pressure values compared to LPC. HPC decreased ACE and NR1H2 gene expressions compared with pre-intervention values, and IL8RA gene expression compared with LPC. The introduction to the diet of an extra-virgin olive oil rich in phenolic compounds modulates the expression of some of the genes related to the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. These changes could underlie the decrease in systolic blood pressure observed.

  5. Ares I Static Tests Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, William; Lindemuth, Kathleen; Mich, John; White, K. Preston; Parker, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Probabilistic engineering design enhances safety and reduces costs by incorporating risk assessment directly into the design process. In this paper, we assess the format of the quantitative metrics for the vehicle which will replace the Space Shuttle, the Ares I rocket. Specifically, we address the metrics for in-flight measurement error in the vector position of the motor nozzle, dictated by limits on guidance, navigation, and control systems. Analyses include the propagation of error from measured to derived parameters, the time-series of dwell points for the duty cycle during static tests, and commanded versus achieved yaw angle during tests. Based on these analyses, we recommend a probabilistic template for specifying the maximum error in angular displacement and radial offset for the nozzle-position vector. Criteria for evaluating individual tests and risky decisions also are developed.

  6. Static latching arrangement and method

    DOEpatents

    Morrison, Larry

    1988-01-01

    A latching assembly for use in latching a cable to and unlatching it from a given object in order to move an object from one location to another is disclosed herein. This assembly includes a weighted sphere mounted to one end of a cable so as to rotate about a specific diameter of the sphere. The assembly also includes a static latch adapted for connection with the object to be moved. This latch includes an internal latching cavity for containing the sphere in a latching condition and a series of surfaces and openings which cooperate with the sphere in order to move the sphere into and out of the latching cavity and thereby connect the cable to and disconnect it from the latch without using any moving parts on the latch itself.

  7. Stability of the Einstein static universe in Einstein-Cartan theory

    SciTech Connect

    Atazadeh, K., E-mail: atazadeh@azaruniv.ac.ir

    The existence and stability of the Einstein static solution have been built in the Einstein-Cartan gravity. We show that this solution in the presence of perfect fluid with spin density satisfying the Weyssenhoff restriction is cyclically stable around a center equilibrium point. Thus, study of this solution is interesting because it supports non-singular emergent cosmological models in which the early universe oscillates indeterminately about an initial Einstein static solution and is thus past eternal.

  8. Static response of deformable microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christov, Ivan C.; Sidhore, Tanmay C.

    2017-11-01

    Microfluidic channels manufactured from PDMS are a key component of lab-on-a-chip devices. Experimentally, rectangular microchannels are found to deform into a non-rectangular cross-section due to fluid-structure interactions. Deformation affects the flow profile, which results in a nonlinear relationship between the volumetric flow rate and the pressure drop. We develop a framework, within the lubrication approximation (l >> w >> h), to self-consistently derive flow rate-pressure drop relations. Emphasis is placed on handling different types of elastic response: from pure plate-bending, to half-space deformation, to membrane stretching. The ``simplest'' model (Stokes flow in a 3D rectangular channel capped with a linearly elastic Kirchhoff-Love plate) agrees well with recent experiments. We also simulate the static response of such microfluidic channels under laminar flow conditions using ANSYSWorkbench. Simulations are calibrated using experimental flow rate-pressure drop data from the literature. The simulations provide highly resolved deformation profiles, which are difficult to measure experimentally. By comparing simulations, experiments and our theoretical models, we show good agreement in many flow/deformation regimes, without any fitting parameters.

  9. Statical longitudinal stability of airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Edward P

    1921-01-01

    This report, which is a continuation of the "Preliminary report on free flight testing" (report no. NACA-TR-70), presents a detailed theoretical analysis of statical stability with free and locked controls and also the results of many free flight test on several types of airplanes. In developing the theory of stability with locked controls an expression for pitching moment is derived in simple terms by considering the total moment as the sum of the moments due to wings and tail surface. This expression, when differentiated with respect to angle of incidence, enables an analysis to be made of the factors contributing to the pitching moment. The effects of slipstream and down wash are also considered and it is concluded that the C. G. Location has but slight effect or stability, and that stability is much improved by increasing the efficiency of the tail surfaces, which may be done by using an "inverted" tail plane. The results of free flight tests with locked controls are discussed at length and it is shown that the agreement between the experimental results and theory is very satisfactory. The theory of stability with free controls is not amendable to the simple mathematical treatment used in the case of locked controls, but a clear statement of the conditions enables several conclusions to be drawn, one of which is that the fixed tail surfaces should be much larger than the movable surfaces.

  10. Static posturography and intravenous alcohol.

    PubMed

    Uimonen, S; Laitakari, K; Bloigu, R; Reinilä, M; Sorri, M

    1994-01-01

    Twelve health subjects were assessed using static posturography before and after intravenous alcohol infusion in a double-blind experiment. The dose was 0.5 g ethanol per kg body weight in 15 minutes, which raised the blood alcohol concentration to a level of approximately 1 mg/mL. Among other parameters, the average body sway velocity (BSV) and area of body sway (BSA) were measured. BSV was the most sensitive parameter for detecting increased body sway after alcohol infusion, and a significant effect of alcohol on its values was seen at 0.46 to 1.0 mg/mL alcohol concentrations. The second best indicator was the BSA. There was a positive correlation between the BSV and the BSA. The other parameters were not affected. The Romberg quotient remained constant during the alcohol test. The test battery used was relevant to distinguish the effect of alcohol on balance. In this study, acute blood alcohol concentrations of around 0.5 to 1.0 mg/mL affected BSV more significantly than BSA. The authors do not, however, recommend the test for forensic purposes in examining drivers with alcohol in their blood, as there is too much interindividual dispersion in the results.

  11. The Neglect of Monotone Comparative Statics Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremblay, Carol Horton; Tremblay, Victor J.

    2010-01-01

    Monotone methods enable comparative static analysis without the restrictive assumptions of the implicit-function theorem. Ease of use and flexibility in solving comparative static and game-theory problems have made monotone methods popular in the economics literature and in graduate courses, but they are still absent from undergraduate…

  12. Compartment elasticity measured by pressure-related ultrasound to determine patients "at risk" for compartment syndrome: an experimental in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Sellei, Richard Martin; Hingmann, Simon Johannes; Kobbe, Philipp; Weber, Christian; Grice, John Edward; Zimmerman, Frauke; Jeromin, Sabine; Hildebrand, Frank; Pape, Hans-Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Decision-making in treatment of an acute compartment syndrome is based on clinical assessment, supported by invasive monitoring. Thus, evolving compartment syndrome may require repeated pressure measurements. In suspected cases of potential compartment syndromes clinical assessment alone seems to be unreliable. The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a non-invasive application estimating whole compartmental elasticity by ultrasound, which may improve accuracy of diagnostics. In an in vitro model, using an artificial container simulating dimensions of the human anterior tibial compartment, intra-compartmental pressures (p) were raised subsequently up to 80 mmHg by infusion of saline solution. The compartmental depth (mm) in the cross-section view was measured before and after manual probe compression (100 mmHg) upon the surface resulting in a linear compartmental displacement (∆d). This was repeated at rising compartmental pressures. The resulting displacements were related to the corresponding intra-compartmental pressures simulated in our model. A hypothesized relationship between pressures related compartmental displacement and the elasticity at elevated compartment pressures was investigated. With rising compartmental pressures, a non-linear, reciprocal proportional relation between the displacement (mm) and the intra-compartmental pressure (mmHg) occurred. The Pearson coefficient showed a high correlation (r(2) = -0.960). The intra-observer reliability value kappa resulted in a statistically high reliability (κ = 0.840). The inter-observer value indicated a fair reliability (κ = 0.640). Our model reveals that a strong correlation between compartmental strain displacements assessed by ultrasound and the intra-compartmental pressure changes occurs. Further studies are required to prove whether this assessment is transferable to human muscle tissue. Determining the complete compartmental elasticity by ultrasound

  13. The Riemann problem for the relativistic full Euler system with generalized Chaplygin proper energy density-pressure relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Zhiqiang

    2018-04-01

    The relativistic full Euler system with generalized Chaplygin proper energy density-pressure relation is studied. The Riemann problem is solved constructively. The delta shock wave arises in the Riemann solutions, provided that the initial data satisfy some certain conditions, although the system is strictly hyperbolic and the first and third characteristic fields are genuinely nonlinear, while the second one is linearly degenerate. There are five kinds of Riemann solutions, in which four only consist of a shock wave and a centered rarefaction wave or two shock waves or two centered rarefaction waves, and a contact discontinuity between the constant states (precisely speaking, the solutions consist in general of three waves), and the other involves delta shocks on which both the rest mass density and the proper energy density simultaneously contain the Dirac delta function. It is quite different from the previous ones on which only one state variable contains the Dirac delta function. The formation mechanism, generalized Rankine-Hugoniot relation and entropy condition are clarified for this type of delta shock wave. Under the generalized Rankine-Hugoniot relation and entropy condition, we establish the existence and uniqueness of solutions involving delta shocks for the Riemann problem.

  14. Martian Atmospheric Pressure Static Charge Elimination Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansen, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    A Martian pressure static charge elimination tool is currently in development in the Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory (ESPL) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. In standard Earth atmosphere conditions, static charge can be neutralized from an insulating surface using air ionizers. These air ionizers generate ions through corona breakdown. The Martian atmosphere is 7 Torr of mostly carbon dioxide, which makes it inherently difficult to use similar methods as those used for standard atmosphere static elimination tools. An initial prototype has been developed to show feasibility of static charge elimination at low pressure, using corona discharge. A needle point and thin wire loop are used as the corona generating electrodes. A photo of the test apparatus is shown below. Positive and negative high voltage pulses are sent to the needle point. This creates positive and negative ions that can be used for static charge neutralization. In a preliminary test, a floating metal plate was charged to approximately 600 volts under Martian atmospheric conditions. The static elimination tool was enabled and the voltage on the metal plate dropped rapidly to -100 volts. This test data is displayed below. Optimization is necessary to improve the electrostatic balance of the static elimination tool.

  15. 14 CFR 23.1325 - Static pressure system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Static pressure system. 23.1325 Section 23...: Installation § 23.1325 Static pressure system. (a) Each instrument provided with static pressure case...

  16. 14 CFR 23.1325 - Static pressure system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Static pressure system. 23.1325 Section 23...: Installation § 23.1325 Static pressure system. (a) Each instrument provided with static pressure case...

  17. 14 CFR 23.1325 - Static pressure system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Static pressure system. 23.1325 Section 23...: Installation § 23.1325 Static pressure system. (a) Each instrument provided with static pressure case...

  18. 14 CFR 23.1325 - Static pressure system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Static pressure system. 23.1325 Section 23...: Installation § 23.1325 Static pressure system. (a) Each instrument provided with static pressure case...

  19. Static Electricity-Responsive Supramolecular Assembly.

    PubMed

    Jintoku, Hirokuni; Ihara, Hirotaka; Matsuzawa, Yoko; Kihara, Hideyuki

    2017-12-01

    Stimuli-responsive materials can convert between molecular scale and macroscopic scale phenomena. Two macroscopic static electricity-responsive phenomena based on nanoscale supramolecular assemblies of a zinc porphyrin derivative are presented. One example involves the movement of supramolecular assemblies in response to static electricity. The assembly of a pyridine (Py) complex of the above-mentioned derivative in cyclohexane is drawn to a positively charged material, whereas the assembly of a 3,5-dimethylpyridine complex is drawn to a negatively charged material. The second phenomenon involves the movement of a non-polar solvent in response to static electrical stimulation. A cyclohexane solution containing a small quantity of the Py-complexed assembly exhibited a strong movement response towards negatively charged materials. Based on spectroscopic measurements and electron microscope observations, it was revealed that the assembled formation generates the observed response to static electricity. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Static Fatigue of a Siliconized Silicon Carbide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    flexitral stress rupture and stepped temperature stress rupture (STSR) testing were performed to assess the static fatigue and creep resistances. Isothermal... stress rupture experiments were performed at 1200 0C in air for com- parison to previous results. - 10 STSR experiments 15 were under deadweight...temperature and stress levels that static fatigue and creep processes are active. The applied stresses were computed on the basis of the elastic

  1. Static solutions for fourth order gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, William

    2010-11-15

    The Lichnerowicz and Israel theorems are extended to higher order theories of gravity. In particular it is shown that Schwarzschild is the unique spherically symmetric, static, asymptotically flat, black-hole solution, provided the spatial curvature is less than the quantum gravity scale outside the horizon. It is then shown that in the presence of matter (satisfying certain positivity requirements), the only static and asymptotically flat solutions of general relativity that are also solutions of higher order gravity are the vacuum solutions.

  2. Behaviour change strategies for reducing blood pressure-related disease burden: findings from a global implementation research programme.

    PubMed

    Peiris, David; Thompson, Simon R; Beratarrechea, Andrea; Cárdenas, María Kathia; Diez-Canseco, Francisco; Goudge, Jane; Gyamfi, Joyce; Kamano, Jemima Hoine; Irazola, Vilma; Johnson, Claire; Kengne, Andre P; Keat, Ng Kien; Miranda, J Jaime; Mohan, Sailesh; Mukasa, Barbara; Ng, Eleanor; Nieuwlaat, Robby; Ogedegbe, Olugbenga; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Plange-Rhule, Jacob; Praveen, Devarsetty; Salam, Abdul; Thorogood, Margaret; Thrift, Amanda G; Vedanthan, Rajesh; Waddy, Salina P; Webster, Jacqui; Webster, Ruth; Yeates, Karen; Yusoff, Khalid

    2015-11-09

    The Global Alliance for Chronic Diseases comprises the majority of the world's public research funding agencies. It is focussed on implementation research to tackle the burden of chronic diseases in low- and middle-income countries and amongst vulnerable populations in high-income countries. In its inaugural research call, 15 projects were funded, focussing on lowering blood pressure-related disease burden. In this study, we describe a reflexive mapping exercise to identify the behaviour change strategies undertaken in each of these projects. Using the Behaviour Change Wheel framework, each team rated the capability, opportunity and motivation of the various actors who were integral to each project (e.g. community members, non-physician health workers and doctors in projects focussed on service delivery). Teams then mapped the interventions they were implementing and determined the principal policy categories in which those interventions were operating. Guidance was provided on the use of Behaviour Change Wheel to support consistency in responses across teams. Ratings were iteratively discussed and refined at several group meetings. There was marked variation in the perceived capabilities, opportunities and motivation of the various actors who were being targeted for behaviour change strategies. Despite this variation, there was a high degree of synergy in interventions functions with most teams utilising complex interventions involving education, training, enablement, environmental restructuring and persuasion oriented strategies. Similar policy categories were also targeted across teams particularly in the areas of guidelines, communication/marketing and service provision with few teams focussing on fiscal measures, regulation and legislation. The large variation in preparedness to change behaviour amongst the principal actors across these projects suggests that the interventions themselves will be variably taken up, despite the similarity in approaches taken

  3. Aftershocks halted by static stress shadows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toda, Shinji; Stein, Ross S.; Beroza, Gregory C.; Marsan, David

    2012-01-01

    Earthquakes impart static and dynamic stress changes to the surrounding crust. Sudden fault slip causes small but permanent—static—stress changes, and passing seismic waves cause large, but brief and oscillatory—dynamic—stress changes. Because both static and dynamic stresses can trigger earthquakes within several rupture dimensions of a mainshock, it has proven difficult to disentangle their contributions to the triggering process1–3. However, only dynamic stress can trigger earthquakes far from the source4,5, and only static stress can create stress shadows, where the stress and thus the seismicity rate in the shadow area drops following an earthquake6–9 . Here we calculate the stress imparted by the magnitude 6.1 Joshua Tree and nearby magnitude 7.3 Landers earthquakes that occurred in California in April and June 1992, respectively, and measure seismicity through time. We show that, where the aftershock zone of the first earthquake was subjected to a static stress increase from the second, the seismicity rate jumped. In contrast, where the aftershock zone of the first earthquake fell under the stress shadow of the second and static stress dropped, seismicity shut down. The arrest of seismicity implies that static stress is a requisite element of spatial clustering of large earthquakes and should be a constituent of hazard assessment.

  4. Dynamic Imaging of Mouse Embryos and Cardiodynamics in Static Culture.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Andrew L; Larina, Irina V

    2018-01-01

    The heart is a dynamic organ that quickly undergoes morphological and mechanical changes through early embryonic development. Characterizing these early moments is important for our understanding of proper embryonic development and the treatment of heart disease. Traditionally, tomographic imaging modalities and fluorescence-based microscopy are excellent approaches to visualize structural features and gene expression patterns, respectively, and connect aberrant gene programs to pathological phenotypes. However, these approaches usually require static samples or fluorescent markers, which can limit how much information we can derive from the dynamic and mechanical changes that regulate heart development. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is unique in this circumstance because it allows for the acquisition of three-dimensional structural and four-dimensional (3D + time) functional images of living mouse embryos without fixation or contrast reagents. In this chapter, we focus on how OCT can visualize heart morphology at different stages of development and provide cardiodynamic information to reveal mechanical properties of the developing heart.

  5. Static Analysis of Programming Exercises: Fairness, Usefulness and a Method for Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutbrown, Stephen; Higgins, Colin

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the suitability of static analysis techniques based on the abstract syntax tree (AST) for the automated assessment of early/mid degree level programming. Focus is on fairness, timeliness and consistency of grades and feedback. Following investigation into manual marking practises, including a survey of markers, the assessment…

  6. Acceleration of a Static Observer Near the Event Horizon of a Static Isolated Black Hole.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doughty, Noel A.

    1981-01-01

    Compares the magnitude of the proper acceleration of a static observer in a static, isolated, spherically symmetric space-time region with the Newtonian result including the situation in the interior of a perfect-fluid star. This provides a simple physical interpretation of surface gravity and illustrates the global nature of the event horizon.…

  7. Sawja: Static Analysis Workshop for Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Laurent; Barré, Nicolas; Besson, Frédéric; Demange, Delphine; Jensen, Thomas; Monfort, Vincent; Pichardie, David; Turpin, Tiphaine

    Static analysis is a powerful technique for automatic verification of programs but raises major engineering challenges when developing a full-fledged analyzer for a realistic language such as Java. Efficiency and precision of such a tool rely partly on low level components which only depend on the syntactic structure of the language and therefore should not be redesigned for each implementation of a new static analysis. This paper describes the Sawja library: a static analysis workshop fully compliant with Java 6 which provides OCaml modules for efficiently manipulating Java bytecode programs. We present the main features of the library, including i) efficient functional data-structures for representing a program with implicit sharing and lazy parsing, ii) an intermediate stack-less representation, and iii) fast computation and manipulation of complete programs. We provide experimental evaluations of the different features with respect to time, memory and precision.

  8. Pheromone Static Routing Strategy for Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Mao-Bin; Henry, Y. K. Lau; Ling, Xiang; Jiang, Rui

    2012-12-01

    We adopt the concept of using pheromones to generate a set of static paths that can reach the performance of global dynamic routing strategy [Phys. Rev. E 81 (2010) 016113]. The path generation method consists of two stages. In the first stage, a pheromone is dropped to the nodes by packets forwarded according to the global dynamic routing strategy. In the second stage, pheromone static paths are generated according to the pheromone density. The output paths can greatly improve traffic systems' overall capacity on different network structures, including scale-free networks, small-world networks and random graphs. Because the paths are static, the system needs much less computational resources than the global dynamic routing strategy.

  9. Thermal static bending of deployable interlocked booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staugaitis, C. L.; Predmore, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Metal ribbons processed with a heat-forming treatment are enabled to form tubelike structures when deployed from a roll. Deployable booms of this have been utilized for gravity-gradient stabilization on the RAE, ATS, and Nimbus D satellites. An experimental thermal-mechanics test apparatus was developed to measure the thermal static bending and twist of booms up to 3 meters long. The apparatus was calibrated by using the correlation between calculated and observed thermal bending of a seamless tube. Thermal static bending values of 16 interlocked deployable booms were observed to be within a factor of 2.5 of the values calculated from seamless-tube theory. Out-of-Sun-plane thermal bending was caused by complex heat transfer across the interlocked seam. Significant thermal static twisting was not observed.

  10. Utility of the Static-99 and Static-99R With Latino Sex Offenders.

    PubMed

    Leguízamo, Alejandro; Lee, Seung C; Jeglic, Elizabeth L; Calkins, Cynthia

    2017-12-01

    The predictive validity of the Static-99 measures with ethnic minorities in the United States has only recently been assessed with mixed results. We assessed the predictive validity of the Static-99 and Static-99R with a sample of Latino sex offenders ( N = 483) as well as with two subsamples (U.S.-born, including Puerto Rico, and non-U.S.-born). The overall sexual recidivism rate was very low (1.9%). Both the Static-99 measures were able to predict sexual recidivism for offenders born in the United States and Puerto Rico, but neither was effective in doing so for other Latino immigrants. Calibration analyses ( N = 303) of the Static-99R were consistent with the literature and provided support for the potential use of the measure with Latinos born in the United States and Puerto Rico. These findings and their implications are discussed as they pertain to the assessment of Latino sex offenders.

  11. 30 CFR 57.6602 - Static electricity dissipation during loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Static electricity dissipation during loading... MINES Explosives Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6602 Static electricity dissipation... generates a static electricity hazard— (a) An evaluation of the potential static electricity hazard shall be...

  12. 30 CFR 57.6602 - Static electricity dissipation during loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Static electricity dissipation during loading... MINES Explosives Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6602 Static electricity dissipation... generates a static electricity hazard— (a) An evaluation of the potential static electricity hazard shall be...

  13. 30 CFR 57.6602 - Static electricity dissipation during loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Static electricity dissipation during loading... MINES Explosives Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6602 Static electricity dissipation... generates a static electricity hazard— (a) An evaluation of the potential static electricity hazard shall be...

  14. 30 CFR 57.6602 - Static electricity dissipation during loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static electricity dissipation during loading... MINES Explosives Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6602 Static electricity dissipation... generates a static electricity hazard— (a) An evaluation of the potential static electricity hazard shall be...

  15. 30 CFR 57.6602 - Static electricity dissipation during loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Static electricity dissipation during loading... MINES Explosives Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6602 Static electricity dissipation... generates a static electricity hazard— (a) An evaluation of the potential static electricity hazard shall be...

  16. Comments on Static vs Kinetic Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Gabriel

    2009-09-01

    I'm writing to comment on the article published in the March edition of The Physics Teacher titled "Choose Wisely: Static or Kinetic Friction—The Power of Dimensionless Plots." As I was reading the article, something caught my eye that I couldn't reconcile with. It was the phrase on page 160 in the first column near the bottom. The statement was that the experimental value for the coefficient of kinetic friction was "unexpectedly greater than the coefficient of static friction!"

  17. INTRODUCTION AND STATIC ELECTRICITY, VOLUME 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KLAUS, DAVID J.; AND OTHERS

    THIS VOLUME, PART OF A TWO-VOLUME SET, PROVIDES AUTOINSTRUCTION IN PHYSICS. THE MATERIAL COVERS UNITS ON (1) STATIC ELECTRICITY AND ELECTRICAL CHARGES, (2) COULOMB'S LAW, (3) DISTRIBUTION OF CHARGE AND FLOW OF CURRENT, (4) DIFFERENCE OF POTENTIAL, (5) BATTERIES AND CIRCUITS, (6) RESISTANCE AND RESISTORS, (7) POTENTIAL DIVIDER AND WHEATSTONE…

  18. The Influence of Notches Under Static Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaes, K

    1938-01-01

    From the described experiments it is seen that notches are a potential source of strength decrease even under static stress, which the designer must take into consideration. Section I is a general treatment of notch influence under the various types of stresses. Section II treats the influence of notches in thin sheet as is used in airplane construction.

  19. Static RAM data recorder for flight tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoner, D. C.; Eklund, T. F. F.

    A static random access memory (RAM) data recorder has been developed to recover strain and acceleration data during development tests of high-speed earth penetrating vehicles. Bilevel inputs are also available for continuity measurements. An iteration of this system was modified for use on water entry evaluations.

  20. Static structure of a pointed charged drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez de La Mora, Juan

    2017-11-01

    The static equilibrium structure of an equipotential drop with two symmetric Taylor cones is computed by assigning a charge distribution along the z axis q (z) = ∑Bn (L2 -z2)n + 1 / 2 . Taylor's local equilibrium at the poles z = L , - L fixes two of the Bn coefficients as a function of the other, determined by minimizing stress imbalance. Just two optimally chosen terms in the Bn expansion yield imperceptible errors. Prior work has argued that an exploding drop initially carrying Rayleigh's charge qR is quasi static. Paradoxically, quasi-static predictions on the size of the progeny drops emitted during a Coulombic explosion disagree with observations. The static drop structure found here also models poorly a Coulomb explosion having an equatorial over polar length ratio (0.42) and the a drop charge exceeding those observed (0.28-0.36 and qR / 2). Our explanation for this paradox is that, while the duration tc of a Coulomb explosion is much larger than the charge relaxation time, the dynamic time scale for drop elongation is typically far longer than tc. Therefore, the pressure distribution within the exploding drop is not uniform. A similar analysis for a drop in an external field fits well the experimental shape.

  1. A Progression of Static Equilibrium Laboratory Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutzner, Mickey; Kutzner, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Although simple architectural structures like bridges, catwalks, cantilevers, and Stonehenge have been integral in human societies for millennia, as have levers and other simple tools, modern students of introductory physics continue to grapple with Newton's conditions for static equilibrium. As formulated in typical introductory physics…

  2. On Static and Dynamic Intuitive Ontologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, David; Gupta, Ayush; Redish, Edward F.

    2011-01-01

    The authors appreciate Professor Slotta's responding to their critique (Slotta, this issue). For their part, they believe that Professor Slotta has misinterpreted aspects of their position. In this commentary, the authors clarify two particular points. First, they explain their use of "static ontologies," which they maintain applies. Second, they…

  3. A study of static stability of airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzo, Frank

    1924-01-01

    The first section deals with the theoretical side of statical stability of airships in general. The second section deals with preliminary tests of the model and experiments for the determination of effects due to change of tail area, aspect ratio, tail form, and tail thickness.

  4. Propfan test assessment propfan propulsion system static test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orourke, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    The propfan test assessment (PTA) propulsion system successfully completed over 50 hours of extensive static ground tests, including a 36 hour endurance test. All major systems performed as expected, verifying that the large-scale 2.74 m diameter propfan, engine, gearbox, controls, subsystems, and flight instrumentation will be satisfactory with minor modifications for the upcoming PTA flight tests on the GII aircraft in early 1987. A test envelope was established for static ground operation to maintain propfan blade stresses within limits for propfan rotational speeds up to 105 percent and power levels up to 3880 kW. Transient tests verified stable, predictable response of engine power and propfan speed controls. Installed engine TSFC was better than expected, probably due to the excellent inlet performance coupled with the supercharging effect of the propfan. Near- and far-field noise spectra contained three dominant components, which were dependent on power, tip speed, and direction. The components were propfan blade tones, propfan random noise, and compressor/propfan interaction noise. No significant turbine noise or combustion noise was evident.

  5. Quasi-Static Electric Field Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A generator for producing an electric field for with an inspection technology system is provided. The generator provides the required variable magnitude quasi-static electric fields for the "illumination" of objects, areas and volumes to be inspected by the system, and produces human-safe electric fields that are only visible to the system. The generator includes a casing, a driven, non-conducting and triboelectrically neutral rotation shaft mounted therein, an ungrounded electrostatic dipole element which works in the quasi-static range, and a non-conducting support for mounting the dipole element to the shaft. The dipole element has a wireless motor system and a charging system which are wholly contained within the dipole element and the support that uses an electrostatic approach to charge the dipole element.

  6. Shock and Static Compression of Nitrobenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozu, Naoshi; Arai, Mitsuru; Tamura, Masamitsu; Fujihisa, Hiroshi; Aoki, Katsutoshi; Yoshida, Masatake

    2000-08-01

    The Hugoniot and static compression curve (isotherm) were investigated using explosive plane wave generators and diamond anvil cells, respectively. The obtained Hugoniot from the shock experiments is represented by two linear lines: Us=2.52+1.23 up (0.8static high pressure over 7 GPa, nitrobenzene undergoes a reaction that is expected to be polymerization. Considering the Hugoniot and the isotherm, it is plausible that shocked nitrobenzene (<15 GPa) is in the liquid state.

  7. Static shape control for flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Scheid, R. E., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An integrated methodology is described for defining static shape control laws for large flexible structures. The techniques include modeling, identifying and estimating the control laws of distributed systems characterized in terms of infinite dimensional state and parameter spaces. The models are expressed as interconnected elliptic partial differential equations governing a range of static loads, with the capability of analyzing electromagnetic fields around antenna systems. A second-order analysis is carried out for statistical errors, and model parameters are determined by maximizing an appropriate defined likelihood functional which adjusts the model to observational data. The parameter estimates are derived from the conditional mean of the observational data, resulting in a least squares superposition of shape functions obtained from the structural model.

  8. Theory for solubility in static systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, Andrei A.; Suter, Ulrich W.

    1991-06-01

    A theory for the solubility of small particles in static structures has been developed. The distribution function of the solute in a frozen solid has been derived in analytical form for the quantum and the quasiclassical cases. The solubility at infinitesimal gas pressure (Henry's constant) as well as the pressure dependence of the solute concentration at elevated pressures has been found from the statistical equilibrium between the solute in the static matrix and the ideal-gas phase. The distribution function of a solute containing different particles has been evaluated in closed form. An application of the theory to the sorption of methane in the computed structures of glassy polycarbonate has resulted in a satisfactory agreement with experimental data.

  9. Static magnetotherapy for the treatment of insomnia.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Yao Y; Tsai, Fong Y

    2008-01-01

    Magnets have been used for centuries to treat a number of physical disorders. The vast majority of research, however, on static magnet therapy for insomnia has been confined to the auricular type of therapy, with publications limited to Chinese journals. Most of these studies have depended on the subjective self-assessment of participants rather than objective scientific measurements. In this study, the authors report the positive preliminary results of insomnia treatment using pillows with embedded magnets, magnetic insoles and TriPhase bracelets. The analysis is based on objective actigraphic and polysomnographic data. A theory of accelerated transition from wakefulness to sleep is proposed to explain the process of insomnia relief through low-strength static magnetic fields. Analysis by functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is used to further investigate the theory.

  10. Manipulating Cells with Static Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valles, J. M.; Guevorkian, K.

    2005-07-01

    We review our investigations of the use of static magnetic fields, B, for manipulating cells and cellular processes. We describe how B fields modify the cell division pattern of frog embryos and consequently can be used to probe the pattern determinants. We also observe that magnetic fields modify the swimming behavior of Paramecium Caudatum. We describe these modifications and their potential application to investigations of their swimming behavior.

  11. Calibration of a pitot-static rake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stump, H. P.

    1977-01-01

    A five-element pitot-static rake was tested to confirm its accuracy and determine its suitability for use at Langley during low-speed tunnel calibration primarily at full-scale tunnel. The rake was tested at one airspeed of 74 miles per hour (33 meters per second) and at pitch and yaw angles of 0 to + or - 20 degrees in 4 deg increments.

  12. Static Analysis Alert Audits: Lexicon and Rules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-04

    collaborators • Includes a standard set of well-defined determinations for static analysis alerts • Includes a set of auditing rules to help auditors make...consistent decisions in commonly-encountered situations Different auditors should make the same determination for a given alert! Improve the quality and...scenarios • Establish assumptions auditors can make • Overall: help make audit determinations more consistent We developed 12 rules • Drew on our own

  13. Static Scene Statistical Non-Uniformity Correction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    Error NUC Non-Uniformity Correction RMSE Root Mean Squared Error RSD Relative Standard Deviation S3NUC Static Scene Statistical Non-Uniformity...Deviation ( RSD ) which normalizes the standard deviation, σ, to the mean estimated value, µ using the equation RS D = σ µ × 100. The RSD plot of the gain...estimates is shown in Figure 4.1(b). The RSD plot shows that after a sample size of approximately 10, the different photocount values and the inclusion

  14. Holistic processing of static and moving faces.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mintao; Bülthoff, Isabelle

    2017-07-01

    Humans' face ability develops and matures with extensive experience in perceiving, recognizing, and interacting with faces that move most of the time. However, how facial movements affect 1 core aspect of face ability-holistic face processing-remains unclear. Here we investigated the influence of rigid facial motion on holistic and part-based face processing by manipulating the presence of facial motion during study and at test in a composite face task. The results showed that rigidly moving faces were processed as holistically as static faces (Experiment 1). Holistic processing of moving faces persisted whether facial motion was presented during study, at test, or both (Experiment 2). Moreover, when faces were inverted to eliminate the contributions of both an upright face template and observers' expertise with upright faces, rigid facial motion facilitated holistic face processing (Experiment 3). Thus, holistic processing represents a general principle of face perception that applies to both static and dynamic faces, rather than being limited to static faces. These results support an emerging view that both perceiver-based and face-based factors contribute to holistic face processing, and they offer new insights on what underlies holistic face processing, how information supporting holistic face processing interacts with each other, and why facial motion may affect face recognition and holistic face processing differently. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Statistics of Static Stress Earthquake Triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandan, S.; Ouillon, G.; Woessner, J.; Sornette, D.; Wiemer, S.

    2014-12-01

    A likely source of earthquake clustering is static and/or dynamic stresses transferred by individual events. Previous attempts to quantify the role of static stress generally considered only the stress changes caused by large events, and often discarded data uncertainties. We test the static stress change hypothesis empirically by considering all events of magnitude M≥ 2.1 and the uncertainties in location and focal mechanism in the focal mechanism catalog for Southern California between 1981 and 2010 (Yang et al., 2011). We quantify: How the waiting time between earthquakes (1) relates to the Coulomb stress change (2) induced by event Ei at the location of Ej; How significant is the Coulomb Index (CI), fraction of source-receiver pairs with positive ΔCFS interactions, conditioned on time and amplitude of ΔCFS, compared to a mean-field CI derived from the time-independent structure of the fault network. We approximate the waiting time distributions empirically by (3), which respectively consists of triggering and background rate components, tapered by an exponential term to model the finiteness of the catalog. We observe that K/(Bc^p ) (the ratio of the triggering to the background rates at t=0), the exponent p, and the Maxwell time τ all increase with |ΔCFS| and are significantly larger for positive than for negative ΔCFS's. τ varies between ~90 days and ~150 days (approximately 0.3 decades over 6 decades of variation in stress). It defines the time beyond which the memory of stress is overprinted by occurrence of other events. The CI values become significant above a threshold |ΔCFS|. The mean-field CI is 52%, while the maximum observed CI value is ~60%. Correcting for the focal plane ambiguity, those values become respectively ~55% and ~72%. Lastly, the CI values decrease with the waiting time and converge to the mean-field CI value. The increase of p-value and K/(Bc^p ) with |ΔCFS| contradicts the prediction of stress shadow regions where seismicity

  16. 14 CFR 27.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ambient atmospheric static pressure is not altered when the rotorcraft encounters icing conditions. An... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 27.1325 Section 27... pressure systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case connections must be vented so that the influence...

  17. 14 CFR 27.610 - Lightning and static electricity protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Lightning and static electricity protection....610 Lightning and static electricity protection. (a) The rotorcraft must be protected against... static electricity must— (1) Minimize the accumulation of electrostatic charge; (2) Minimize the risk of...

  18. 14 CFR 27.610 - Lightning and static electricity protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lightning and static electricity protection....610 Lightning and static electricity protection. (a) The rotorcraft must be protected against... static electricity must— (1) Minimize the accumulation of electrostatic charge; (2) Minimize the risk of...

  19. 30 CFR 56.6602 - Static electricity dissipation during loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Static electricity dissipation during loading... Explosives Extraneous Electricity § 56.6602 Static electricity dissipation during loading. When explosive material is loaded pneumatically into a blasthole in a manner that generates a static electricity hazard...

  20. 30 CFR 56.6602 - Static electricity dissipation during loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Static electricity dissipation during loading... Explosives Extraneous Electricity § 56.6602 Static electricity dissipation during loading. When explosive material is loaded pneumatically into a blasthole in a manner that generates a static electricity hazard...

  1. 14 CFR 27.610 - Lightning and static electricity protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Lightning and static electricity protection....610 Lightning and static electricity protection. (a) The rotorcraft must be protected against... static electricity must— (1) Minimize the accumulation of electrostatic charge; (2) Minimize the risk of...

  2. 30 CFR 56.6602 - Static electricity dissipation during loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Static electricity dissipation during loading... Explosives Extraneous Electricity § 56.6602 Static electricity dissipation during loading. When explosive material is loaded pneumatically into a blasthole in a manner that generates a static electricity hazard...

  3. 14 CFR 27.610 - Lightning and static electricity protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Lightning and static electricity protection....610 Lightning and static electricity protection. (a) The rotorcraft must be protected against... static electricity must— (1) Minimize the accumulation of electrostatic charge; (2) Minimize the risk of...

  4. 30 CFR 56.6602 - Static electricity dissipation during loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Static electricity dissipation during loading... Explosives Extraneous Electricity § 56.6602 Static electricity dissipation during loading. When explosive material is loaded pneumatically into a blasthole in a manner that generates a static electricity hazard...

  5. 14 CFR 27.610 - Lightning and static electricity protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Lightning and static electricity protection....610 Lightning and static electricity protection. (a) The rotorcraft must be protected against... static electricity must— (1) Minimize the accumulation of electrostatic charge; (2) Minimize the risk of...

  6. 30 CFR 56.6602 - Static electricity dissipation during loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static electricity dissipation during loading... Explosives Extraneous Electricity § 56.6602 Static electricity dissipation during loading. When explosive material is loaded pneumatically into a blasthole in a manner that generates a static electricity hazard...

  7. 14 CFR 27.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... pressure systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case connections must be vented so that the influence... located in such manner that the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 27.1325 Section 27...

  8. 14 CFR 27.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... pressure systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case connections must be vented so that the influence... located in such manner that the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 27.1325 Section 27...

  9. 14 CFR 27.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... pressure systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case connections must be vented so that the influence... located in such manner that the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 27.1325 Section 27...

  10. 14 CFR 25.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... pressure systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case connections must be vented to the outside... or other foreign matter, and that the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 25.1325 Section 25...

  11. 14 CFR 25.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... pressure systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case connections must be vented to the outside... or other foreign matter, and that the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 25.1325 Section 25...

  12. 14 CFR 25.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... pressure systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case connections must be vented to the outside... or other foreign matter, and that the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 25.1325 Section 25...

  13. 14 CFR 25.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... pressure systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case connections must be vented to the outside... or other foreign matter, and that the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 25.1325 Section 25...

  14. 14 CFR 27.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... pressure systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case connections must be vented so that the influence... located in such manner that the correlation between air pressure in the static pressure system and true... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Static pressure systems. 27.1325 Section 27...

  15. LLNL small-scale static spark machine: static spark sensitivity test

    SciTech Connect

    Foltz, M F; Simpson, L R

    1999-08-23

    Small-scale safety testing of explosives and other energetic materials is done in order to determine their sensitivity to various stimuli, such as friction, static spark, and impact. Typically this testing is done to discover potential handling problems that may exist for either newly synthesized materials of unknown behavior, or materials that have been stored for long periods of time. This report describes the existing ''Static Spark Test Apparatus'' at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), as well as the method used to evaluate the relative static spark sensitivity of energetic materials. The basic design, originally developed by the Picatinny Arsenal inmore » New Jersey, is discussed. The accumulated data for the materials tested to date is not included here, with the exception of specific examples that have yielded interesting or unusual results during the tests.« less

  16. Quasi-static evolution of coronal magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longcope, D. W.; Sudan, R. N.

    1992-01-01

    A formalism is developed to describe the purely quasi-static part of the evolution of a coronal loop driven by its footpoints. This is accomplished under assumptions of a long, thin loop. The quasi-static equations reveal the possibility for sudden 'loss of equilibrium' at which time the system evolves dynamically rather than quasi-statically. Such quasi-static crises produce high-frequency Alfven waves and, in conjunction with Alfven wave dissipation models, form a viable coronal heating mechanism. Furthermore, an approximate solution to the quasi-static equations by perturbation method verifies the development of small-scale spatial current structure.

  17. Compiler-assisted static checkpoint insertion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Junsheng; Fuchs, W. K.; Abraham, Jacob A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a compiler-assisted approach for static checkpoint insertion. Instead of fixing the checkpoint location before program execution, a compiler enhanced polling mechanism is utilized to maintain both the desired checkpoint intervals and reproducible checkpoint 1ocations. The technique has been implemented in a GNU CC compiler for Sun 3 and Sun 4 (Sparc) processors. Experiments demonstrate that the approach provides for stable checkpoint intervals and reproducible checkpoint placements with performance overhead comparable to a previously presented compiler assisted dynamic scheme (CATCH) utilizing the system clock.

  18. Optimum structural design with static aeroelastic constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Keith B; Grandhi, Ramana V.; Eastep, F. E.

    1989-01-01

    The static aeroelastic performance characteristics, divergence velocity, control effectiveness and lift effectiveness are considered in obtaining an optimum weight structure. A typical swept wing structure is used with upper and lower skins, spar and rib thicknesses, and spar cap and vertical post cross-sectional areas as the design parameters. Incompressible aerodynamic strip theory is used to derive the constraint formulations, and aerodynamic load matrices. A Sequential Unconstrained Minimization Technique (SUMT) algorithm is used to optimize the wing structure to meet the desired performance constraints.

  19. Engineering mechanics: statics and dynamics. [Textbook

    SciTech Connect

    Sandor, B.I.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this textbook is to provide engineering students with basic learning material about statics and dynamics which are fundamental engineering subjects. The chapters contain information on: an introduction to engineering mechanics; forces on particles, rigid bodies, and structures; kinetics of particles, particle systems, and rigid bodies in motion; kinematics; mechanical vibrations; and friction, work, moments of inertia, and potential energy. Each chapter contains introductory material, the development of the essential equations, worked-out example problems, homework problems, and, finally, summaries of the essential methods and equations, graphically illustrated where appropriate. (LCL)

  20. Static Properties of Fibre Metal Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagenbeek, M.; van Hengel, C.; Bosker, O. J.; Vermeeren, C. A. J. R.

    2003-07-01

    In this article a brief overview of the static properties of Fibre Metal Laminates is given. Starting with the stress-strain relation, an effective calculation tool for uniaxial stress-strain curves is given. The method is valid for all Glare types. The Norris failure model is described in combination with a Metal Volume Fraction approach leading to a useful tool to predict allowable blunt notch strength. The Volume Fraction approach is also useful in the case of the shear yield strength of Fibre Metal Laminates. With the use of the Iosipescu test shear yield properties are measured.

  1. Superconductor in a weak static gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ummarino, Giovanni Alberto; Gallerati, Antonio

    2017-08-01

    We provide the detailed calculation of a general form for Maxwell and London equations that takes into account gravitational corrections in linear approximation. We determine the possible alteration of a static gravitational field in a superconductor making use of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations, providing also an analytic solution in the weak field condition. Finally, we compare the behavior of a high-T_ {c} superconductor with a classical low-T_ {c} superconductor, analyzing the values of the parameters that can enhance the reduction of the gravitational field.

  2. Poroelastic metamaterials with negative effective static compressibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Jingyuan; Kadic, Muamer; Wegener, Martin

    2017-04-01

    We suggest a three-dimensional metamaterial structure exhibiting an isotropic expansion in response to an increased hydrostatic pressure imposed by a surrounding gas or liquid. We show that this behavior corresponds to a negative absolute (rather than only differential) effective compressibility under truly static and stable conditions. The poroelastic metamaterial is composed of only a single ordinary constituent solid. By detailed numerical parameter studies, we find that a pressure increase of merely one bar can lead to a relative increase in the effective volume exceeding one percent for geometrical structure parameters that should be accessible to fabrication by 3D printing.

  3. MAVEN SupraThermal and Thermal Ion Compostion (STATIC) Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFadden, J. P.; Kortmann, O.; Curtis, D.; Dalton, G.; Johnson, G.; Abiad, R.; Sterling, R.; Hatch, K.; Berg, P.; Tiu, C.; Gordon, D.; Heavner, S.; Robinson, M.; Marckwordt, M.; Lin, R.; Jakosky, B.

    2015-12-01

    The MAVEN SupraThermal And Thermal Ion Compostion (STATIC) instrument is designed to measure the ion composition and distribution function of the cold Martian ionosphere, the heated suprathermal tail of this plasma in the upper ionosphere, and the pickup ions accelerated by solar wind electric fields. STATIC operates over an energy range of 0.1 eV up to 30 keV, with a base time resolution of 4 seconds. The instrument consists of a toroidal "top hat" electrostatic analyzer with a 360° × 90° field-of-view, combined with a time-of-flight (TOF) velocity analyzer with 22.5° resolution in the detection plane. The TOF combines a -15 kV acceleration voltage with ultra-thin carbon foils to resolve H+, He^{++}, He+, O+, O2+, and CO2+ ions. Secondary electrons from carbon foils are detected by microchannel plate detectors and binned into a variety of data products with varying energy, mass, angle, and time resolution. To prevent detector saturation when measuring cold ram ions at periapsis (˜10^{1 1} eV/cm2 s sr eV), while maintaining adequate sensitivity to resolve tenuous pickup ions at apoapsis (˜103 eV/cm2 s sr eV), the sensor includes both mechanical and electrostatic attenuators that increase the dynamic range by a factor of 103. This paper describes the instrument hardware, including several innovative improvements over previous TOF sensors, the ground calibrations of the sensor, the data products generated by the experiment, and some early measurements during cruise phase to Mars.

  4. Performance tradeoffs in static and dynamic load balancing strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iqbal, M. A.; Saltz, J. H.; Bokhart, S. H.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of uniformly distributing the load of a parallel program over a multiprocessor system was considered. A program was analyzed whose structure permits the computation of the optimal static solution. Then four strategies for load balancing were described and their performance compared. The strategies are: (1) the optimal static assignment algorithm which is guaranteed to yield the best static solution, (2) the static binary dissection method which is very fast but sub-optimal, (3) the greedy algorithm, a static fully polynomial time approximation scheme, which estimates the optimal solution to arbitrary accuracy, and (4) the predictive dynamic load balancing heuristic which uses information on the precedence relationships within the program and outperforms any of the static methods. It is also shown that the overhead incurred by the dynamic heuristic is reduced considerably if it is started off with a static assignment provided by either of the other three strategies.

  5. Adaptive wing static aeroelastic roll control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Steven M.; Weisshaar, Terrence A.

    1993-09-01

    Control of the static aeroelastic characteristics of a swept uniform wing in roll using an adaptive structure is examined. The wing structure is modeled as a uniform beam with bending and torsional deformation freedom. Aerodynamic loads are obtained from strip theory. The structure model includes coefficients representing torsional and bending actuation provided by embedded piezoelectric material layers. The wing is made adaptive by requiring the electric field applied to the piezoelectric material layers to be proportional to the wing root loads. The proportionality factor, or feedback gain, is used to control static aeroelastic rolling properties. Example wing configurations are used to illustrate the capabilities of the adaptive structure. The results show that rolling power, damping-in-roll and aileron effectiveness can be controlled by adjusting the feedback gain. And that dynamic pressure affects the gain required. Gain scheduling can be used to set and maintain rolling properties over a range of dynamic pressures. An adaptive wing provides a method for active aeroelastic tailoring of structural response to meet changing structural performance requirements during a roll maneuver.

  6. Static axisymmetric equilibria in general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, Manuel

    2008-01-15

    While the definition of static equilibria is not clear in a general relativistic context, in many cases of astrophysical interest a natural 3+1 split exists which allows us to define physically meaningful spatial and temporal coordinates. We study the possibility of axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic equilibria in this setting. The presence of a nontrivial shift velocity provides a constraint not present in the Newtonian case, while the momentum equation may be set in a Grad-Shafranov-like form with the presence of additional terms involving the space-time metric coefficients. It is found that whenever the magnetic field or the shift velocity possesses poloidal component,more » the existence of even local static equilibria demands that the metric parameters satisfy such strong conditions that these equilibria are extremely unlikely. Only very particular cases such as purely toroidal fields and shifts yield existence of equilibria, provided we are able to choose arbitrarily the plasma pressure and density.« less

  7. Static network structure can stabilize human cooperation.

    PubMed

    Rand, David G; Nowak, Martin A; Fowler, James H; Christakis, Nicholas A

    2014-12-02

    The evolution of cooperation in network-structured populations has been a major focus of theoretical work in recent years. When players are embedded in fixed networks, cooperators are more likely to interact with, and benefit from, other cooperators. In theory, this clustering can foster cooperation on fixed networks under certain circumstances. Laboratory experiments with humans, however, have thus far found no evidence that fixed network structure actually promotes cooperation. Here, we provide such evidence and help to explain why others failed to find it. First, we show that static networks can lead to a stable high level of cooperation, outperforming well-mixed populations. We then systematically vary the benefit that cooperating provides to one's neighbors relative to the cost required to cooperate (b/c), as well as the average number of neighbors in the network (k). When b/c > k, we observe high and stable levels of cooperation. Conversely, when b/c ≤ k or players are randomly shuffled, cooperation decays. Our results are consistent with a quantitative evolutionary game theoretic prediction for when cooperation should succeed on networks and, for the first time to our knowledge, provide an experimental demonstration of the power of static network structure for stabilizing human cooperation.

  8. Static non-reciprocity in mechanical metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Coulais, Corentin; Sounas, Dimitrios; Alù, Andrea

    2017-02-23

    Reciprocity is a general, fundamental principle governing various physical systems, which ensures that the transfer function-the transmission of a physical quantity, say light intensity-between any two points in space is identical, regardless of geometrical or material asymmetries. Breaking this transmission symmetry offers enhanced control over signal transport, isolation and source protection. So far, devices that break reciprocity (and therefore show non-reciprocity) have been mostly considered in dynamic systems involving electromagnetic, acoustic and mechanical wave propagation associated with fields varying in space and time. Here we show that it is possible to break reciprocity in static systems, realizing mechanical metamaterials that exhibit vastly different output displacements under excitation from different sides, as well as one-way displacement amplification. This is achieved by combining large nonlinearities with suitable geometrical asymmetries and/or topological features. In addition to extending non-reciprocity and isolation to statics, our work sheds light on energy propagation in nonlinear materials with asymmetric crystalline structures and topological properties. We anticipate that breaking reciprocity will open avenues for energy absorption, conversion and harvesting, soft robotics, prosthetics and optomechanics.

  9. Static network structure can stabilize human cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Rand, David G.; Nowak, Martin A.; Fowler, James H.; Christakis, Nicholas A.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of cooperation in network-structured populations has been a major focus of theoretical work in recent years. When players are embedded in fixed networks, cooperators are more likely to interact with, and benefit from, other cooperators. In theory, this clustering can foster cooperation on fixed networks under certain circumstances. Laboratory experiments with humans, however, have thus far found no evidence that fixed network structure actually promotes cooperation. Here, we provide such evidence and help to explain why others failed to find it. First, we show that static networks can lead to a stable high level of cooperation, outperforming well-mixed populations. We then systematically vary the benefit that cooperating provides to one’s neighbors relative to the cost required to cooperate (b/c), as well as the average number of neighbors in the network (k). When b/c > k, we observe high and stable levels of cooperation. Conversely, when b/c ≤ k or players are randomly shuffled, cooperation decays. Our results are consistent with a quantitative evolutionary game theoretic prediction for when cooperation should succeed on networks and, for the first time to our knowledge, provide an experimental demonstration of the power of static network structure for stabilizing human cooperation. PMID:25404308

  10. Ocular static and dynamic light scattering: a noninvasive diagnostic tool for eye research and clinical practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.

    2004-01-01

    The noninvasive techniques of static and dynamic light scattering are emerging as valuable diagnostic tools for the early detection of ocular and systemic diseases. These include corneal abnormalities, pigmentary dispersion syndrome, glaucoma, cataract, diabetic vitreopathy, and possibly macular degeneration. Systemic conditions such as diabetes and possibly Alzheimer's disease can potentially be detected early via ocular tissues. The current state of development of these techniques for application to ophthalmic research and ultimately clinical practice is reviewed. (c) 2004 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

  11. Using Models at the Mesoscopic Scale in Teaching Physics: Two Experimental Interventions in Solid Friction and Fluid Statics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besson, Ugo; Viennot, Laurence

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the didactic suitability of introducing models at an intermediate (i.e. mesoscopic) scale in teaching certain subjects, at an early stage. The design and evaluation of two short sequences based on this rationale will be outlined: one bears on propulsion by solid friction, the other on fluid statics in the presence of gravity.…

  12. Static shape control for adaptive wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Fred; Rossi, Michael J.; van Nostrand, William; Knowles, Gareth; Jameson, Antony

    1994-09-01

    A theoretical method was developed and experimentally validated, to control the static shape of flexible structures by employing internal translational actuators. A finite element model of the structure, without the actuators present, is employed to obtain the multiple-input, multiple-output control-system gain matrices for actuator-load control as well as actuator-displacement control. The method is applied to the quasistatic problem of maintaining an optimum-wing cross section during various transonic-cruise flight conditions to obtain significant reductions in the shock-induced drag. Only small, potentially achievable, adaptive modifications to the profile are required. The adaptive-wing concept employs actuators as truss elements of active ribs to reshape the wing cross section by deforming the structure. Finite element analyses of an adaptive-rib model verify the controlled-structure theory. Experiments on the model were conducted, and arbitrarily selected deformed shapes were accurately achieved.

  13. The spectrum of static subtracted geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Tomás; Castro, Alejandra; Cohen-Maldonado, Diego

    2017-05-01

    Subtracted geometries are black hole solutions of the four dimensional STU model with rather interesting ties to asymptotically flat black holes. A peculiar feature is that the solutions to the Klein-Gordon equation on this subtracted background can be organized according to representations of the conformal group SO(2, 2). We test if this behavior persists for the linearized fluctuations of gravitational and matter fields on static, electrically charged backgrounds of this kind. We find that there is a subsector of the modes that do display conformal symmetry, while some modes do not. We also discuss two different effective actions that describe these subtracted geometries and how the spectrum of quasinormal modes is dramatically different depending upon the action used.

  14. Orienting Paramecium with intense static magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valles, James M., Jr.; Guevorkian, Karine; Quindel, Carl

    2004-03-01

    Recent experiments on cell division suggest the application of intense static magnetic fields as a novel tool for the manipulation of biological systems [1]. The magnetic field appears to couple to the intrinsic anisotropies in the diamagnetic components of the cells. Here, we present measurements of the intrinsic average diamagnetic anisotropy of the whole single celled ciliate, Paramecium Caudatum. Magnetic fields, 2.5 T < B < 8 T were applied to immobilized (non-swimming) Paramecium Caudatum that were suspended in a density matched medium. The organisms align with their long axis parallel to the applied magnetic field. Their intrinsic diamagnetic anisotropy is 3x10-11 in cgs units. We will discuss the implications of these results for employing magnetic fields to probe the behavior of swimming Paramecium. [1] J. M. Valles, Jr. et al., Expt. Cell Res.274, 112-118 (2002).

  15. Static Chemistry in Disks or Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, D.; Wiebe, D.

    2006-11-01

    This FORTRAN77 code can be used to model static, time-dependent chemistry in ISM and circumstellar disks. Current version is based on the OSU'06 gas-grain astrochemical network with all updates to the reaction rates, and includes surface chemistry from Hasegawa & Herbst (1993) and Hasegawa, Herbst, and Leung (1992). Surface chemistry can be modeled either with the standard rate equation approach or modified rate equation approach (useful in disks). Gas-grain interactions include sticking of neutral molecules to grains, dissociative recombination of ions on grains as well as thermal, UV, X-ray, and CRP-induced desorption of frozen species. An advanced X-ray chemistry and 3 grain sizes with power-law size distribution are also included. An deuterium extension to this chemical model is available.

  16. Dynamics and statics of nonaxisymmetric liquid bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Resnick, Andy; Zhang, Yiqiang; Fedoseyev, A.

    1994-01-01

    We finished the construction of the experimental apparatus and the design and testing of some of the visualization and data acquisition techniques. Experimental work focused on three areas: force measurements, loss of stability to nonaxisymmetric bridges, and vibration behavior. The experimental work is summarized in section 2. Selected results from our force measurement experiments are outlined in section 3. In addition we worked on the theory of the dynamic stability of axisymmetric bridges and undertook numerical simulation of the effects of inclined gravity vectors on the minimum volume stability limit for static bridges. The results and status of our theoretical work and numerical simulation are described in section 4. Papers published and in preparation, conference presentations, etc., are described in section 5. Work planned for the third year is discussed in section 6. References cited in the report are listed in section 7.

  17. Multipoint vibrometry with dynamic and static holograms.

    PubMed

    Haist, T; Lingel, C; Osten, W; Winter, M; Giesen, M; Ritter, F; Sandfort, K; Rembe, C; Bendel, K

    2013-12-01

    We report on two multipoint vibrometers with user-adjustable position of the measurement spots. Both systems are using holograms for beam deflection. The measurement is based on heterodyne interferometry with a frequency difference of 5 MHz between reference and object beam. One of the systems uses programmable positioning of the spots in the object volume but is limited concerning the light efficiency. The other system is based on static holograms in combination with mechanical adjustment of the measurement spots and does not have such a general efficiency restriction. Design considerations are given and we show measurement results for both systems. In addition, we analyze the sensitivity of the systems which is a major limitation compared to single point scanning systems.

  18. Multipoint vibrometry with dynamic and static holograms

    SciTech Connect

    Haist, T.; Lingel, C.; Osten, W.

    2013-12-15

    We report on two multipoint vibrometers with user-adjustable position of the measurement spots. Both systems are using holograms for beam deflection. The measurement is based on heterodyne interferometry with a frequency difference of 5 MHz between reference and object beam. One of the systems uses programmable positioning of the spots in the object volume but is limited concerning the light efficiency. The other system is based on static holograms in combination with mechanical adjustment of the measurement spots and does not have such a general efficiency restriction. Design considerations are given and we show measurement results for both systems. Inmore » addition, we analyze the sensitivity of the systems which is a major limitation compared to single point scanning systems.« less

  19. Distributed parameter statics of magnetic catheters.

    PubMed

    Tunay, Ilker

    2011-01-01

    We discuss how to use special Cosserat rod theory for deriving distributed-parameter static equilibrium equations of magnetic catheters. These medical devices are used for minimally-invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and can be operated remotely or controlled by automated algorithms. The magnetic material can be lumped in rigid segments or distributed in flexible segments. The position vector of the cross-section centroid and quaternion representation of an orthonormal triad are selected as DOF. The strain energy for transversely isotropic, hyperelastic rods is augmented with the mechanical potential energy of the magnetic field and a penalty term to enforce the quaternion unity constraint. Numerical solution is found by 1D finite elements. Material properties of polymer tubes in extension, bending and twist are determined by mechanical and magnetic experiments. Software experiments with commercial FEM software indicate that the computational effort with the proposed method is at least one order of magnitude less than standard 3D FEM.

  20. Static impedance behavior of programmable metallization cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, S.; Saremi, M.; Barnaby, H. J.; Edwards, A.; Kozicki, M. N.; Mitkova, M.; Mahalanabis, D.; Gonzalez-Velo, Y.; Mahmud, A.

    2015-04-01

    Programmable metallization cell (PMC) devices work by growing and dissolving a conducting metallic bridge across a chalcogenide glass (ChG) solid electrolyte, which changes the resistance of the cell. PMC operation relies on the incorporation of metal ions in the ChG films via photo-doping to lower the off-state resistance and stabilize resistive switching, and subsequent transport of these ions by electric fields induced from an externally applied bias. In this paper, the static on- and off-state resistance of a PMC device composed of a layered (Ag-rich/Ag-poor) Ge30Se70 ChG film with active Ag and inert Ni electrodes is characterized and modeled using three dimensional simulation code. Calibrating the model to experimental data enables the extraction of device parameters such as material bandgaps, workfunctions, density of states, carrier mobilities, dielectric constants, and affinities.

  1. Static hand gesture recognition from a video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokade, Rajeshree S.; Doye, Dharmpal

    2011-10-01

    A sign language (also signed language) is a language which, instead of acoustically conveyed sound patterns, uses visually transmitted sign patterns to convey meaning- "simultaneously combining hand shapes, orientation and movement of the hands". Sign languages commonly develop in deaf communities, which can include interpreters, friends and families of deaf people as well as people who are deaf or hard of hearing themselves. In this paper, we proposed a novel system for recognition of static hand gestures from a video, based on Kohonen neural network. We proposed algorithm to separate out key frames, which include correct gestures from a video sequence. We segment, hand images from complex and non uniform background. Features are extracted by applying Kohonen on key frames and recognition is done.

  2. Static Frequency Converter System Installed and Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Donald P.; Sadhukhan, Debashis

    2003-01-01

    A new Static Frequency Converter (SFC) system has been installed and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center s Central Air Equipment Building to provide consistent, reduced motor start times and improved reliability for the building s 14 large exhausters and compressors. The operational start times have been consistent around 2 min, 20 s per machine. This is at least a 3-min improvement (per machine) over the old variable-frequency motor generator sets. The SFC was designed and built by Asea Brown Boveri (ABB) and installed by Encompass Design Group (EDG) as part of a Construction of Facilities project managed by Glenn (Robert Scheidegger, project manager). The authors designed the Central Process Distributed Control Systems interface and control between the programmable logic controller, solid-state exciter, and switchgear, which was constructed by Gilcrest Electric.

  3. Static structure of active Brownian hard disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Macedo Biniossek, N.; Löwen, H.; Voigtmann, Th; Smallenburg, F.

    2018-02-01

    We explore the changes in static structure of a two-dimensional system of active Brownian particles (ABP) with hard-disk interactions, using event-driven Brownian dynamics simulations. In particular, the effect of the self-propulsion velocity and the rotational diffusivity on the orientationally-averaged fluid structure factor is discussed. Typically activity increases structural ordering and generates a structure factor peak at zero wave vector which is a precursor of motility-induced phase separation. Our results provide reference data to test future statistical theories for the fluid structure of active Brownian systems. This manuscript was submitted for the special issue of the Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter associated with the Liquid Matter Conference 2017.

  4. A Progression of Static Equilibrium Laboratory Exercises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutzner, Mickey; Kutzner, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    Although simple architectural structures like bridges, catwalks, cantilevers, and Stonehenge have been integral in human societies for millennia, as have levers and other simple tools, modern students of introductory physics continue to grapple with Newton's conditions for static equilibrium. As formulated in typical introductory physics textbooks, these two conditions appear as ΣF=0(1) and Στ=0,(2) where each torque τ is defined as the cross product between the lever arm vector r and the corresponding applied force F, τ =r×F,(3) having magnitude, τ =Frsinθ.(4) The angle θ here is between the two vectors F and r. In Eq. (1), upward (downward) forces are considered positive (negative). In Eq. (2), counterclockwise (clockwise) torques are considered positive (negative). Equation (1) holds that the vector sum of the external forces acting on an object must be zero to prevent linear accelerations; Eq. (2) states that the vector sum of torques due to external forces about any axis must be zero to prevent angular accelerations. In our view these conditions can be problematic for students because a) the equations contain the unfamiliar summation notation Σ, b) students are uncertain of the role of torques in causing rotations, and c) it is not clear why the sum of torques is zero regardless of the choice of axis. Gianino5 describes an experiment using MBL and a force sensor to convey the meaning of torque as applied to a rigid-body lever system without exploring quantitative aspects of the conditions for static equilibrium.

  5. Bacterial Adhesion under Static and Dynamic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rijnaarts, Huub H. M.; Norde, Willem; Bouwer, Edward J.; Lyklema, Johannes; Zehnder, Alexander J. B.

    1993-01-01

    The deposition of various pseudomonads and coryneform bacteria with different hydrophobicities (water contact angles) and negative cell surface charges on negatively charged Teflon and glass surfaces was investigated. The levels of deposition varied between 5.0 × 104 and 1.6 × 107 cells cm-2 and between 5.0 × 104 and 3.6 × 107 cells cm-2 for dynamic column and static batch systems, respectively, indicating that there was a wide variation in physicochemical interactions. Batch and column results were compared in order to better distinguish between hydrodynamic and other system-dependent influences and method-independent physicochemical interactions. Despite the shorter suspension-solid contact time in columns (1 h) than in batch systems (4 h), the level of deposition (expressed as the number of cells that adhered) divided by the applied ambient cell concentration was 4.12 ± 1.63 times higher in columns than in batch sytems for 15 of 22 strain-surface combinations studied. This demonstrates that transport of microbial particles from bulk liquid to surfaces is more efficient in dynamic columns (transport dominated by convection and diffusion) than in static batch systems (transport by diffusion only). The relative constancy of this ratio for the 15 combinations shows that physicochemical interactions affect adhesion similarly in the two systems. The deviating deposition behavior of the other seven strain-surface combinations could be attributed to method-dependent effects resulting from specific cell characteristics (e.g., to the presence of capsular polymers, to an ability to aggregate, to large cell sizes, or to a tendency to desorb after passage through an air-liquid interface). Images PMID:16349063

  6. Investigation of two pitot-static tubes at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasel, Lowell E; Coletti, Donald E

    1948-01-01

    The results of tests at a Mach number of 1.94 of an ogives-nose cylindrical pitot-static tube and similar tests at Mach numbers of 1.93 and 1.62 of a service pitot-static tube to determine body static pressures and indicated Mach numbers are presented and discussed. The radial pressure distribution on the cylindrical bodies is compared with that calculated by an approximate theory.

  7. Static Multiple-Pole Homopolar Generator With a Superconducting Screen,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-03

    STANAR193-A OlCFILE GORY 00 FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIVISION STATIC MULTIPLE-POLE HOMOPOLAR GENERATOR WITH A SUPERC9ONDUCTING SCREEN by V.P. Kartsev, avld...November 1983 MICROFICHE MJR: FTD-83-C-001336 STATIC %fULTIPLE-POLE HOMOPOLAR GENERATOR WITH A SUPRCONDUCTING SCREEN By: V.P. Kartsev, and I.M. Yegorov...this translation were extracted from the best quality copy available. STATIC MULTIPLE-POLE HOMOPOLAR GENERATOR WITH A SUPERCONDUCTING SCREEN V.P

  8. 8. STATIC TEST TOWER NORTHWEST ELEVATION FROM THE POWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. STATIC TEST TOWER - NORTHWEST ELEVATION FROM THE POWER PLANT TEST STAND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  9. Jung's dissociable psyche and the ec-static self.

    PubMed

    Austin, Sue

    2009-11-01

    Much of Jung's later work assumes that the self is an a priori phenomenon in which centripetal dynamics dominate. There is, however, another current in Jung's writings which recognizes the self to be an emergent phenomenon. This view is increasingly prevalent in post-Jungian discourse, and Louis Zinkin's exploration of a post-Jungian-constructivist model of the self can be seen as part of this tendency. My paper privileges an emergent understanding of the self by focusing on the 'unravelling', 'de-centring', centrifugal experiences of otherness in the psyche. It offers a post-Jungian reading of a number of writers who have been influenced by the psychoanalyst Jean Laplanche and proposes a model of the self which focuses on our fantasies, terrors and longings about coming undone and bringing others undone. This model is then linked to Judith Butler's understanding of the self as an ec-static phenomenon, in which the self is, of necessity, outside itself, such that 'there is no final moment in which my return to myself takes place'. I suggest that Jung's early clinical researches into the dissociability of the psyche and the clinical tools which he developed as a result of this work are especially suitable for engaging with these emergent, centrifugal dynamics.

  10. Static Aeroelastic Analysis with an Inviscid Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, David L.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Nemec, Marian; Smith, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    An embedded-boundary Cartesian-mesh flow solver is coupled with a three degree-offreedom structural model to perform static, aeroelastic analysis of complex aircraft geometries. The approach solves the complete system of aero-structural equations using a modular, loosely-coupled strategy which allows the lower-fidelity structural model to deform the highfidelity CFD model. The approach uses an open-source, 3-D discrete-geometry engine to deform a triangulated surface geometry according to the shape predicted by the structural model under the computed aerodynamic loads. The deformation scheme is capable of modeling large deflections and is applicable to the design of modern, very-flexible transport wings. The interface is modular so that aerodynamic or structural analysis methods can be easily swapped or enhanced. This extended abstract includes a brief description of the architecture, along with some preliminary validation of underlying assumptions and early results on a generic 3D transport model. The final paper will present more concrete cases and validation of the approach. Preliminary results demonstrate convergence of the complete aero-structural system and investigate the accuracy of the approximations used in the formulation of the structural model.

  11. Ontogenetic and static allometry in the human face: contrasting Khoisan and Inuit.

    PubMed

    Freidline, Sarah E; Gunz, Philipp; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2015-09-01

    Regional differences in modern human facial features are present at birth, and ontogenetic allometry contributes to variation in adults. However, details regarding differential rates of growth and timing among regional groups are lacking. We explore ontogenetic and static allometry in a cross-sectional sample spanning Africa, Europe and North America, and evaluate tempo and mode in two regional groups with very different adult facial morphology, the Khoisan and Inuit. Semilandmark geometric morphometric methods, multivariate statistics and growth simulations were used to quantify and compare patterns of facial growth and development. Regional-specific facial morphology develops early in ontogeny. The Inuit has the most distinct morphology and exhibits heterochronic differences in development compared to other regional groups. Allometric patterns differ during early postnatal development, when significant increases in size are coupled with large amounts of shape changes. All regional groups share a common adult static allometric trajectory, which can be attributed to sexual dimorphism, and the corresponding allometric shape changes resemble developmental patterns during later ontogeny. The amount and pattern of growth and development may not be shared between regional groups, indicating that a certain degree of flexibility is allowed for in order to achieve adult size. In early postnatal development the face is less constrained compared to other parts of the cranium allowing for greater evolvability. The early development of region-specific facial features combined with heterochronic differences in timing or rate of growth, reflected in differences in facial size, suggest different patterns of postnatal growth. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Spirometry, Static Lung Volumes, and Diffusing Capacity.

    PubMed

    Vaz Fragoso, Carlos A; Cain, Hilary C; Casaburi, Richard; Lee, Patty J; Iannone, Lynne; Leo-Summers, Linda S; Van Ness, Peter H

    2017-09-01

    Spirometric Z-scores from the Global Lung Initiative (GLI) rigorously account for age-related changes in lung function and are thus age-appropriate when establishing spirometric impairments, including a restrictive pattern and air-flow obstruction. However, GLI-defined spirometric impairments have not yet been evaluated regarding associations with static lung volumes (total lung capacity [TLC], functional residual capacity [FRC], and residual volume [RV]) and gas exchange (diffusing capacity). We performed a retrospective review of pulmonary function tests in subjects ≥40 y old (mean age 64.6 y), including pre-bronchodilator measures for: spirometry ( n = 2,586), static lung volumes by helium dilution with inspiratory capacity maneuver ( n = 2,586), and hemoglobin-adjusted single-breath diffusing capacity ( n = 2,508). Using multivariable linear regression, adjusted least-squares means (adj LS Means) were calculated for TLC, FRC, RV, and hemoglobin-adjusted single-breath diffusing capacity. The adj LS Means were expressed with and without height-cubed standardization and stratified by GLI-defined spirometry, including normal ( n = 1,251), restrictive pattern ( n = 663), and air-flow obstruction (mild, [ n = 128]; moderate, [ n = 150]; and severe, [ n = 394]). Relative to normal spirometry, restrictive-pattern had lower adj LS Means for TLC, FRC, RV, and hemoglobin-adjusted single-breath diffusing capacity ( P ≤ .001). Conversely, relative to normal spirometry, mild, moderate, and severe air-flow obstruction had higher adj LS Means for FRC and RV ( P < .001). However, only mild and moderate air-flow obstruction had higher adj LS Means for TLC ( P < .001), while only moderate and severe air-flow obstruction had higher adj LS Means for RV/TLC ( P < .001) and lower adj LS Means for hemoglobin-adjusted single-breath diffusing capacity ( P < .001). Notably, TLC (calculated as FRC + inspiratory capacity) was not increased in severe air-flow obstruction ( P ≥ .11

  13. Radiographic signs of static carpal instability with distal end radius fractures: is current treatment adequate?

    PubMed

    Bunker, D L J; Pappas, G; Moradi, P; Dowd, M B

    2012-01-01

    Patients presenting with distal end radius fractures may have concomitant carpal instability due to disruption of the scapholunate ligament. This study examined the incidence of static radiographic signs of carpal instability in patients with distal radial fractures before and after fracture treatment. We performed a retrospective radiographic study of 141 patients presenting to Central Middlesex Hospital, London between January 2002-May 2004 with distal end radius fractures. We used abnormal scapholunate angle as the primary indicator of possible carpal dissociation. Abnormal scapholunate angles were noted in 39% of patients at presentation and 35% of patients after treatment with no statistically significant intra-patient variability. Persistent static radiographic signs of carpal instability are high in this subset of patients. The long-term morbidity of persistent wrist instability may be avoided by early radiological diagnosis with clinical correlation to identify carpal ligament injuries and initiate treatment that addresses both the bony and ligamentous components of the injury.

  14. Static Magnetic Cloak without a Superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei; Ma, Yungui; He, Sailing

    2018-05-01

    Similar to its electromagnetic counterpart, magnetic cloaking also has very important technological applications. However, the traditional method to build a static magnetic cloak requires the use of superconducting materials as the diamagnetic component, which seriously limits the practical potential because of the cryogenic condition. We show that a diamagnetic active current boundary combined with a high-permeability magnetic inner shell (MIS) can be designed to solve this problem, rendering an ideal magnetic cloaking effect at zero frequency. We first theoretically prove that a current boundary could magnetically behave as a superconductor to external observers. Based on this phenomena, we introduce a high-permeability MIS made of magnetically ultrasoft metallic sheets (permeability μ >103 ) and experimentally prove that the bilayer combination can exactly balance out the disturbance to the external probing field and, meanwhile, have a large invisible inner space. We also show that the active boundary currents can be accordingly configured to overcome the permeability and frequency band limits, leading to a robust cloak over the entire quasistatic frequency region. Our work creates an efficient way to circumvent the traditional limits of metamaterials to build magnetic cloaks for ultralow frequencies. The active-passive hybrid approach could be generally extended to yield other artificial magnetic devices or systems as well.

  15. Intense cavitation at extreme static pressure.

    PubMed

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A; Gutierrez, Joel; Dunbar, Wylene W; Philpott, Richard W

    2016-02-01

    Cavitation is usually performed at hydrostatic pressures at or near 0.1 MPa. Higher static pressure produces more intense cavitation, but requires an apparatus that can build high amplitude acoustic waves with rarefactions exceeding the cavitation threshold. The absence of such an apparatus has prevented the achievement of intense acoustic cavitation, hindering research and the development of new applications. Here we describe a new high-pressure spherical resonator system, as well as experimental and modeling results in water and liquid metal (gallium), for cavitation at hydrostatic pressures between 10 and 150 MPa. Our computational data, using HYADES plasma hydrodynamics code, show the formation of dense plasma that, under these conditions, reaches peak pressures of about three to four orders of magnitude greater than the hydrostatic pressure in the bulk liquid and temperatures in the range of 100,000 K. Passive cavitation detection (PCD) data validate both a linear increase in shock wave amplitude and the production of highly intense concentrations of mechanical energy in the collapsing bubbles. High-speed camera observations show the formation of bubble clusters from single bubbles. The increased shock wave amplitude produced by bubble clusters, measured using PCD and fiber optic probe hydrophone, was consistent with current understanding that bubble clusters enable amplification of energy produced. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparative statics of games between relatives.

    PubMed

    Milchtaich, Igal

    2006-03-01

    According to Hamilton's theory of kin selection, species tend to evolve behavior such that each organism appears to be attempting to maximize its inclusive fitness. In particular, two neighbors are likely to help each other if the cost of doing so is less than the benefit multiplied by r, their coefficient of relatedness. Since the latter is less than unity, mutual altruism benefits both neighbors. However, is it theoretically possible that acting so as to maximize the inclusive, rather than personal, fitness may harm both parties. This may occur in strategic symmetric pairwise interactions (more specifically, nxn games), in which the outcome depends on both sides' actions. In this case, the equilibrium outcome may be less favorable to the interactants' personal fitness than if each of them acted so as to maximize the latter. This paper shows, however, that such negative effect of relatedness on fitness is incompatible with evolutionary stability. If the symmetric equilibrium strategies are evolutionarily stable, a higher coefficient of relatedness can only entail higher personal fitness for the two neighbors. This suggests that negative comparative statics as above are not likely to occur in nature.

  17. Static viscoelasticity of biomass polyethylene composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Keyan; Cai, Hongzhen; Yi, Weiming; Zhang, Qingfa; Zhao, Kunpeng

    The biomass polyethylene composites filled with poplar wood flour, rice husk, cotton stalk or corn stalk were prepared by extrusion molding. The static viscoelasticity of composites was investigated by the dynamic thermal mechanical analyzer (DMA). Through the stress-strain scanning, it is found that the linear viscoelasticity interval of composites gradually decreases as the temperature rises, and the critical stress and strain values are 0.8 MPa and 0.03% respectively. The experiment shows that as the temperature rises, the creep compliance of biomass polyethylene composites is increased; under the constant temperature, the creep compliance decreases with the increase of content of biomass and calcium carbonate. The biomass and calcium carbonate used to prepare composites as filler can improve damping vibration attenuation and reduce stress deformation of composites. The stress relaxation modulus of composites is reduced and the relaxation rate increases at the higher temperature. The biomass and calcium carbonate used to prepare composites as filler not only can reduce costs, but also can increase stress relaxation modulus and improve the size thermostability of composites. The corn stalk is a good kind of biomass raw material for composites since it can improve the creep resistance property and the stress relaxation resistance property of composites more effectively than other three kinds of biomass (poplar wood flour, rice husk and cotton stalk).

  18. Statistical mechanics framework for static granular matter.

    PubMed

    Henkes, Silke; Chakraborty, Bulbul

    2009-06-01

    The physical properties of granular materials have been extensively studied in recent years. So far, however, there exists no theoretical framework which can explain the observations in a unified manner beyond the phenomenological jamming diagram. This work focuses on the case of static granular matter, where we have constructed a statistical ensemble which mirrors equilibrium statistical mechanics. This ensemble, which is based on the conservation properties of the stress tensor, is distinct from the original Edwards ensemble and applies to packings of deformable grains. We combine it with a field theoretical analysis of the packings, where the field is the Airy stress function derived from the force and torque balance conditions. In this framework, Point J characterized by a diverging stiffness of the pressure fluctuations. Separately, we present a phenomenological mean-field theory of the jamming transition, which incorporates the mean contact number as a variable. We link both approaches in the context of the marginal rigidity picture proposed by Wyart and others.

  19. Static Stress Transfers Causes Delayed Seismicity Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, K.; Richards-Dinger, K. B.; Dieterich, J. H.; Cochran, E. S.

    2015-12-01

    It has been long debated what role static stress changes play in the enhancement and suppression of seismicity in the near-field region of large earthquakes. While numerous observations have correlated earthquake triggering and elevated seismicity rates with regions of increased Coulomb failure stress (CFS), observations of seismic quiescence in stress shadow regions are more controversial. When observed, seismicity shutdowns are often delayed by days to months following a negative stress perturbation. Some studies propose that the delay in the seismic shutdown can be caused by rupture promoting failure on one fault type while suppressing activity on another; thus the observed seismicity reflects the weighted contribution of the two faulting populations. For example, it was noted that in the 75 years following the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, strike-slip faulting earthquakes were inhibited, while thrust faulting events were promoted. However, definitive observations supporting this delayed shutdown mechanism are rare. In this study, we report seismicity rate increases and decreases that correlate with regions of Coulomb stress transfer, and show observations of a delayed shutdown in the Yuha Desert, California. We use a Coulomb stress change model coupled with a rate-and state- earthquake model to show that the delay in the shutdown is due to the combined changes in the rates of normal and strike-slip faulting events following the 2010 M5.72 Ocotillo aftershock of the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake.

  20. Advanced high temperature static strain sensor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulse, C. O.; Stetson, K. A.; Grant, H. P.; Jameikis, S. M.; Morey, W. W.; Raymondo, P.; Grudkowski, T. W.; Bailey, R. S.

    1986-08-01

    An examination was made into various techniques to be used to measure static strain in gas turbine liners at temperatures up to 1150 K (1600 F). The methods evaluated included thin film and wire resistive devices, optical fibers, surface acoustic waves, the laser speckle technique with a heterodyne readout, optical surface image and reflective approaches and capacitive devices. A preliminary experimental program to develop a thin film capacitive device was dropped because calculations showed that it would be too sensitive to thermal gradients. In a final evaluation program, the laser speckle technique appeared to work well up to 1150 K when it was used through a relatively stagnant air path. The surface guided acoustic wave approach appeared to be interesting but to require too much development effort for the funds available. Efforts to develop a FeCrAl resistive strain gage system were only partially successful and this part of the effort was finally reduced to a characterization study of the properties of the 25 micron diameter FeCrAl (Kanthal A-1) wire. It was concluded that this particular alloy was not suitable for use as the resistive element in a strain gage above about 1000 K.

  1. Liquid methanol under a static electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassone, Giuseppe; Giaquinta, Paolo V.; Saija, Franz; Saitta, A. Marco

    2015-02-01

    We report on an ab initio molecular dynamics study of liquid methanol under the effect of a static electric field. We found that the hydrogen-bond structure of methanol is more robust and persistent for field intensities below the molecular dissociation threshold whose value (≈0.31 V/Å) turns out to be moderately larger than the corresponding estimate obtained for liquid water. A sustained ionic current, with ohmic current-voltage behavior, flows in this material for field intensities above 0.36 V/Å, as is also the case of water, but the resulting ionic conductivity (≈0.40 S cm-1) is at least one order of magnitude lower than that of water, a circumstance that evidences a lower efficiency of proton transfer processes. We surmise that this study may be relevant for the understanding of the properties and functioning of technological materials which exploit ionic conduction, such as direct-methanol fuel cells and Nafion membranes.

  2. Contact angle hysteresis in a microchannel: statics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatipogullari, Metin; Wylock, Christophe; Pradas, Marc; Kalliadasis, Serafim; Colinet, Pierre

    2017-11-01

    We study contact angle hysteresis by tracking static meniscus configurations upon varying the volume of a liquid inside a chemically heterogeneous microchannel. We first construct a graphical force balance similar to the classical theory of Joanny and de Gennes for this system, though here with a straight contact line (2D channel). Hysteresis is induced by wettability gradients above a finite threshold value. This is also visualized in a phase plot enabling to easily predict stick-slip events of the contact line and the occurrence of hysteresis. Above the threshold and for non-overlapping Gaussian defects, we find good agreement with the classical formulas for the hysteresis amplitude induced by a dilute system of defects. In particular it is found to be proportional to the square of the defect force and to the defect concentration. For a sinusoidal heterogeneity, decreasing the ratio between the heterogeneity wavelength and the microchannel gap size, brings the system from a sub threshold regime, to a stick-slip dominated regime, and finally to a regime with a quasi-constant advancing and receding angle. In the latter, the hysteresis amplitude is found to be proportional to the defect force.

  3. Static versus dynamic sampling for data mining

    SciTech Connect

    John, G.H.; Langley, P.

    1996-12-31

    As data warehouses grow to the point where one hundred gigabytes is considered small, the computational efficiency of data-mining algorithms on large databases becomes increasingly important. Using a sample from the database can speed up the datamining process, but this is only acceptable if it does not reduce the quality of the mined knowledge. To this end, we introduce the {open_quotes}Probably Close Enough{close_quotes} criterion to describe the desired properties of a sample. Sampling usually refers to the use of static statistical tests to decide whether a sample is sufficiently similar to the large database, in the absence of any knowledgemore » of the tools the data miner intends to use. We discuss dynamic sampling methods, which take into account the mining tool being used and can thus give better samples. We describe dynamic schemes that observe a mining tool`s performance on training samples of increasing size and use these results to determine when a sample is sufficiently large. We evaluate these sampling methods on data from the UCI repository and conclude that dynamic sampling is preferable.« less

  4. Fermion determinants in static, inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, M.P.

    1995-01-15

    The renormalized fermionic determinant of QED in 3+1 dimensions, det[sub ren], in a static, unidirectional, inhomogeneous magnetic field with finite flux can be calculated from the massive Euclidean Schwinger model's determinant det[sub Sch] in the same field by integrating det[sub Sch] over the fermion's mass. Since det[sub ren] for general fields is central to QED, it is desirable to have nonperturbative information on this determinant, even for the restricted magnetic fields considered here. To this end we continue our study of the physically relevant determinant det[sub Sch]. It is shown that the contribution of the massless Schwinger model to det[submore » Sch] is canceled by a contribution from the massive sector of QED in 1+1 dimensions and that zero modes are suppressed in det[sub Sch]. We then calculate det[sub Sch] analytically in the presence of a finite flux, cylindrical magnetic field. Its behavior for large flux and small fermion mass suggests that the zero-energy bound states of the two-dimensional Pauli Hamiltonian are the controlling factor in the growth of ln det[sub Sch]. Evidence is presented that det[sub Sch] does not converge to the determinant of the massless Schwinger model in the small mass limit for finite, nonzero flux magnetic fields.« less

  5. Advanced high temperature static strain sensor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulse, C. O.; Stetson, K. A.; Grant, H. P.; Jameikis, S. M.; Morey, W. W.; Raymondo, P.; Grudkowski, T. W.; Bailey, R. S.

    1986-01-01

    An examination was made into various techniques to be used to measure static strain in gas turbine liners at temperatures up to 1150 K (1600 F). The methods evaluated included thin film and wire resistive devices, optical fibers, surface acoustic waves, the laser speckle technique with a heterodyne readout, optical surface image and reflective approaches and capacitive devices. A preliminary experimental program to develop a thin film capacitive device was dropped because calculations showed that it would be too sensitive to thermal gradients. In a final evaluation program, the laser speckle technique appeared to work well up to 1150 K when it was used through a relatively stagnant air path. The surface guided acoustic wave approach appeared to be interesting but to require too much development effort for the funds available. Efforts to develop a FeCrAl resistive strain gage system were only partially successful and this part of the effort was finally reduced to a characterization study of the properties of the 25 micron diameter FeCrAl (Kanthal A-1) wire. It was concluded that this particular alloy was not suitable for use as the resistive element in a strain gage above about 1000 K.

  6. Slipping and Tipping: Measuring Static Friction with a Straightedge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, Eric; Aguilar, Isaac

    2012-01-01

    Following a discussion of forces, torques, and the conditions for static equilibrium, I tell my introductory mechanics class that I will show them how to measure the coefficient of static friction, us, between the surfaces of a block and the front bench using "nothing but a straightedge". After a few seconds of hushed anticipation, I nudge the…

  7. GENERAL VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT THE SATURN V STATIC TEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT THE SATURN V STATIC TEST FACILITY. THIS TEST FACILITY WAS DESIGNED TO RESIST THE 12 MILLION POUNDES OF THRUST GENERATED BY THE THE SATURN V FIRST STAGE ENGINE CLUSTER. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn V S-IC Static Test Facility, West Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  8. 14 CFR 25.1325 - Static pressure systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... installation of the static pressure system must be such that— (1) Positive drainage of moisture is provided..., the other is blocked off; and (2) Both sources cannot be blocked off simultaneously. (h) For... other static pressure source being open or blocked. [Doc. No. 5066, 29 FR 18291, Dec. 24, 1964, as...

  9. Hanging an Airplane: A Case Study in Static Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Debora M.

    2009-01-01

    Our classrooms are filled with engineering majors who take a semester-long course in static equilibrium. Many students find this class too challenging and drop their engineering major. In our introductory physics class, we often breeze through static equilibrium; to physicists equilibrium is just a special case of Newton's second law. While it is…

  10. All Charged Up!--Experimenting with Static Electricity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2011-01-01

    Build-up of static electricity happens readily when the air is cold and dry and is a common part of life. There are lots of ways to make students aware of static electricity--and many things one can teach them about its applications in today's industry. In this article, the author describes examples and experiments that will bring static…

  11. 14 CFR 29.610 - Lightning and static electricity protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Lightning and static electricity protection... § 29.610 Lightning and static electricity protection. (a) The rotorcraft structure must be protected... electricity must— (1) Minimize the accumulation of electrostatic charge; (2) Minimize the risk of electric...

  12. 14 CFR 29.610 - Lightning and static electricity protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Lightning and static electricity protection... § 29.610 Lightning and static electricity protection. (a) The rotorcraft structure must be protected... electricity must— (1) Minimize the accumulation of electrostatic charge; (2) Minimize the risk of electric...

  13. 14 CFR 29.610 - Lightning and static electricity protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Lightning and static electricity protection... § 29.610 Lightning and static electricity protection. (a) The rotorcraft structure must be protected... electricity must— (1) Minimize the accumulation of electrostatic charge; (2) Minimize the risk of electric...

  14. 14 CFR 29.610 - Lightning and static electricity protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lightning and static electricity protection... § 29.610 Lightning and static electricity protection. (a) The rotorcraft structure must be protected... electricity must— (1) Minimize the accumulation of electrostatic charge; (2) Minimize the risk of electric...

  15. 14 CFR 29.610 - Lightning and static electricity protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Lightning and static electricity protection... § 29.610 Lightning and static electricity protection. (a) The rotorcraft structure must be protected... electricity must— (1) Minimize the accumulation of electrostatic charge; (2) Minimize the risk of electric...

  16. 14 CFR 25.175 - Demonstration of static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... stability. 25.175 Section 25.175 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 25.175 Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. Static longitudinal stability must be shown as follows: (a...

  17. 14 CFR 29.177 - Static directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static directional stability. 29.177... Static directional stability. (a) The directional controls must operate in such a manner that the sense... versus directional control position curve may have a negative slope within a small range of angles around...

  18. 14 CFR 29.173 - Static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static longitudinal stability. 29.173... Static longitudinal stability. (a) The longitudinal control must be designed so that a rearward movement... constant during the maneuvers specified in § 29.175(a) through (d), the slope of the control position...

  19. 30 CFR 7.307 - Static pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static pressure test. 7.307 Section 7.307 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Electric Motor Assemblies § 7.307 Static...

  20. 40 CFR 53.64 - Test procedure: Static fractionator test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test procedure: Static fractionator test. 53.64 Section 53.64 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Performance Characteristics of Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 § 53.64 Test procedure: Static...

  1. 40 CFR 53.64 - Test procedure: Static fractionator test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test procedure: Static fractionator test. 53.64 Section 53.64 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Performance Characteristics of Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 § 53.64 Test procedure: Static...

  2. On the relationship between ontogenetic and static allometry.

    PubMed

    Pélabon, Christophe; Bolstad, Geir H; Egset, Camilla K; Cheverud, James M; Pavlicev, Mihaela; Rosenqvist, Gunilla

    2013-02-01

    Ontogenetic and static allometries describe how a character changes in size when the size of the organism changes during ontogeny and among individuals measured at the same developmental stage, respectively. Understanding the relationship between these two types of allometry is crucial to understanding the evolution of allometry and, more generally, the evolution of shape. However, the effects of ontogenetic allometry on static allometry remain largely unexplored. Here, we first show analytically how individual variation in ontogenetic allometry and body size affect static allometry. Using two longitudinal data sets on ontogenetic and static allometry, we then estimate variances and covariances for the different parameters of the ontogenetic allometry defined in our model and assess their relative contribution to the static allometric slope. The mean ontogenetic allometry is the main parameter that determines the static allometric slope, while the covariance between the ontogenetic allometric slope and body size generates most of the discrepancies between ontogenetic and static allometry. These results suggest that the apparent evolutionary stasis of the static allometric slope is not generated by internal (developmental) constraints but more likely results from external constraints imposed by selection.

  3. pH Static Titration: A Quasistatic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalowski, Tadeusz; Toporek, Marcin; Rymanowski, Maciej

    2007-01-01

    The pH-static titration is applicable to those systems where at least two types of reactions occur in comparable intensities. The commonalities in titrimetric procedure realized according to pH-static titration, irrespective of the kind of chemical processes occurring are discussed.

  4. Does Static-99 predict recidivism among older sexual offenders?

    PubMed

    Hanson, R K

    2006-10-01

    Static-99 (Hanson & Thornton, 2000) is the most commonly used actuarial risk tool for estimating sexual offender recidivism risk. Recent research has suggested that its methods of accounting for the offenders' ages may be insufficient to capture declines in recidivism risk associated with advanced age. Using data from 8 samples (combined size of 3,425 sexual offenders), the present study found that older offenders had lower Static-99 scores than younger offenders and that Static-99 was moderately accurate in estimating relative recidivism risk in all age groups. Older offenders, however, had lower sexual recidivism rates than would be expected based on their Static-99 risk categories. Consequently, evaluators using Static-99 should considered advanced age in their overall estimate of risk.

  5. A short static-pressure probe design for supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinckney, S. Z.

    1975-01-01

    A static-pressure probe design concept was developed which has the static holes located close to the probe tip and is relatively insensitive to probe angle of attack and circumferential static hole location. Probes were constructed with 10 and 20 deg half-angle cone tips followed by a tangent conic curve section and a tangent cone section of 2, 3, or 3.5 deg, and were tested at Mach numbers of 2.5 and 4.0 and angles of attack up to 12 deg. Experimental results indicate that for stream Mach numbers of 2.5 and 4.0 and probe angle of attack within + or - 10 deg, values of stream static pressure can be determined from probe calibration to within about + or - 4 percent. If the probe is aligned within about 7 deg of the flow experimental results indicated, the stream static pressures can be determined to within 2 percent from probe calibration.

  6. An easily implemented static condensation method for structural sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangadharan, S. N.; Haftka, R. T.; Nikolaidis, E.

    1990-01-01

    A black-box approach to static condensation for sensitivity analysis is presented with illustrative examples of a cube and a car structure. The sensitivity of the structural response with respect to joint stiffness parameter is calculated using the direct method, forward-difference, and central-difference schemes. The efficiency of the various methods for identifying joint stiffness parameters from measured static deflections of these structures is compared. The results indicate that the use of static condensation can reduce computation times significantly and the black-box approach is only slightly less efficient than the standard implementation of static condensation. The ease of implementation of the black-box approach recommends it for use with general-purpose finite element codes that do not have a built-in facility for static condensation.

  7. Vibration control in statically indeterminate adaptive truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baycan, C. M.; Utku, Senol; Wada, Ben K.

    1993-01-01

    In this work vibration control of statically indeterminate adaptive truss structures is investigated. Here, the actuators (i.e., length adjusting devices) that are used for vibration control, work against the axial forces caused by the inertial forces. In statically determinate adaptive trusses no axial force is induced by the actuation. The control problem in statically indeterminate trusses may be dominated by the actuation-induced axial element forces. The creation of actuation-induced axial forces puts the system to a higher energy state, thus aggravates the controls. It is shown that by the usage of sufficient number of slave actuators in addition to the actual control actuators, the actuation-induced axial element forces can be nullified, and the control problem of the statically indeterminate adaptive truss problem is reduced to that of a statically determinate one. It is also shown that the usage of slave actuators saves a great amount of control energy and provides robustness for the controls.

  8. Qualitative models of seat discomfort including static and dynamic factors.

    PubMed

    Ebe, K; Griffin, M J

    2000-06-01

    Judgements of overall seating comfort in dynamic conditions sometimes correlate better with the static characteristics of a seat than with measures of the dynamic environment. This study developed qualitative models of overall seat discomfort to include both static and dynamic seat characteristics. A dynamic factor that reflected how vibration discomfort increased as vibration magnitude increased was combined with a static seat factor which reflected seating comfort without vibration. The ability of the model to predict the relative and overall importance of dynamic and static seat characteristics on comfort was tested in two experiments. A paired comparison experiment, using four polyurethane foam cushions (50, 70, 100, 120 mm thick), provided different static and dynamic comfort when 12 subjects were exposed to one-third octave band random vertical vibration with centre frequencies of 2.5 and 5.5 Hz, at magnitudes of 0.00, 0.25 and 0.50 m x s(-2) rms measured beneath the foam samples. Subject judgements of the relative discomfort of the different conditions depended on both static and dynamic characteristics in a manner consistent with the model. The effect of static and dynamic seat factors on overall seat discomfort was investigated by magnitude estimation using three foam cushions (of different hardness) and a rigid wooden seat at six vibration magnitudes with 20 subjects. Static seat factors (i.e. cushion stiffness) affected the manner in which vibration influenced the overall discomfort: cushions with lower stiffness were more comfortable and more sensitive to changes in vibration magnitude than those with higher stiffness. The experiments confirm that judgements of overall seat discomfort can be affected by both the static and dynamic characteristics of a seat, with the effect depending on vibration magnitude: when vibration magnitude was low, discomfort was dominated by static seat factors; as the vibration magnitude increased, discomfort became dominated

  9. Activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) influences how retinal ganglion cell neurons respond to pressure-related stress

    PubMed Central

    Sappington, Rebecca M; Sidorova, Tatiana; Ward, Nicholas J; Chakravarthy, Rohini; Ho, Karen W; Calkins, David J

    2015-01-01

    Our recent studies implicate the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) channel as a mediator of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) function and survival. With elevated pressure in the eye, TRPV1 increases in RGCs, supporting enhanced excitability, while Trpv1 -/- accelerates RGC degeneration in mice. Here we find TRPV1 localized in monkey and human RGCs, similar to rodents. Expression increases in RGCs exposed to acute changes in pressure. In retinal explants, contrary to our animal studies, both Trpv1 -/- and pharmacological antagonism of the channel prevented pressure-induced RGC apoptosis, as did chelation of extracellular Ca2+. Finally, while TRPV1 and TRPV4 co-localize in some RGC bodies and form a protein complex in the retina, expression of their mRNA is inversely related with increasing ocular pressure. We propose that TRPV1 activation by pressure-related insult in the eye initiates changes in expression that contribute to a Ca2+-dependent adaptive response to maintain excitatory signaling in RGCs. PMID:25713995

  10. High temperature static strain gage development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulse, C. O.; Bailey, R. S.; Grant, H. P.; Anderson, W. L.; Przybyszewski, J. S.

    1991-01-01

    Final results are presented from a program to develop a thin film static strain gage for use on the blades and vanes of running, test stand gas turbine engines with goals of an 3 x 3 mm gage area and total errors of less than 10 pct. of + or - 2,000 microstrain after 50 hrs at 1250 K. Pd containing 13 Wt. pct. Cr was previously identified as a new strain sensor alloy that appeared to be potentially usable to 1250 K. Subsequently, it was discovered, in contrast with its behavior in bulk, that Pd-13Cr suffered from oxidation attack when prepared as a 4.5 micron thick thin film. Continuing problems with electrical leakage to the substrate and the inability of sputtered alumina overcoats to prevent oxidation led to the discovery that sputtered alumina contains appreciable amounts of entrapped argon. After the argon has been exsolved by heating to elevated temperatures, the alumina films undergo a linear shrinkage of about 2 pct. resulting in formation of cracks. These problems can be largely overcome by sputtering the alumina with the substrate heated to 870 K. With 2 micron thick hot sputtered alumina insulation and overcoat films, total 50 hr drifts of about 100 microstrain (2 tests) and about 500 microstrain (1 test) were observed at 1000 and 1100 K, respectively. Results of tests on complete strain gage systems on constant moment bend bars with Pd temperature compensation grids revealed that oxidation of the Pd grid was a major problem even when the grid was overcoated with a hot or cold sputtered alumina overcoat.

  11. A multinuclear static NMR study of geopolymerisation

    SciTech Connect

    Favier, Aurélie, E-mail: aurelie.favier@epfl.ch; Habert, Guillaume; Roussel, Nicolas

    2015-09-15

    Geopolymers are inorganic binders obtained by alkali activation of aluminosilicates. While the structure of geopolymers is now well understood, the details of the geopolymerisation reaction and their impact on the rheology of the paste remain uncertain. In this work, we follow the elastic properties of a paste made with metakaolin and sodium silicate solution. After the first sharp increase of elastic modulus occurring a few hundred of seconds after mixing and related to the heterogeneous formation of an alumina–silicate gel with a molar ratio Si/Al < 4 located at the grains boundaries, we focus on the progressive increase in elasticmore » modulus on a period of few hours during the setting of the geopolymer. In this study, we combine the study of rheological properties of the paste with {sup 23}Na, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si static NMR measurement in order to better understand the origin of this second increase in elastic modulus. Our results show that, after a few hours, Al and Na evolution in the liquid phase are concomitant. This suggests the precipitation of an aluminosilicate phase where Al is in tetrahedral position and Na compensates the charge. Furthermore, Si speciation confirms this result and allows us to identify the precipitation of a product, which has a chemical composition close to the final composition of geopolymer. This study provides strong evidence for a heterogeneous formation of an aluminosilicate glass directly from the first gel and the silicate solution without the need for a reorganisation of Gel 1 into Gel 2.« less

  12. Compact static stars in minimal dilatonic gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiziev, Plamen P.

    2017-09-01

    In the version1 of this paper we presented for the first time the basic equations and relations for relativistic static spherically symmetric stars (SSSS) in the model of minimal dilatonic gravity (MDG). This model is locally equivalent to the f(R) theory of gravity and gives an alternative description of the effects of dark matter and dark energy using the Brans-Dicke dilaton Φ. To outline the basic properties of the MDG model of SSSS and to compare them with general relativistic results, in this paper we use the relativistic equation of state (EOS) of neutron matter as an ideal Fermi neutron gas at zero temperature. We overcome the well-known difficulties of the physics of SSSS in the f(R) theories of gravity2,3 applying novel highly nontrivial nonlinear boundary conditions, which depend on the global properties of the solution and on the EOS. We also introduce two pairs of new notions: cosmological-energy-pressure densities and dilaton-energy-pressure densities, as well as two new EOSs for them: cosmological EOS (CEOS) and dilaton EOS (DEOS). Special attention is paid to the dilatonic sphere (in brief — disphere) of SSSS, introduced in this paper for the first time. Using several realistic EOS for neutron star (NS): SLy, BSk19, BSk20 and BSk21, and current observational two-solar-masses-limit, we derive an estimate for scalar-field-mass mΦ ˜ 10-13eV/c2 ÷ 4 × 10-11eV/c2. Thus, the present version of the paper reflects some of the recent developments of the topic.

  13. [Reliability of static posturography in elderly persons].

    PubMed

    Bauer, C M; Gröger, I; Rupprecht, R; Tibesku, C O; Gassmann, K G

    2010-08-01

    Static posturography is used to quantify body sway. It is used to assess the balance of elderly persons who are prone to falls. There is still no general opinion concerning the reliability of force platform measurements. The aim of this study was to test the reliability of force platform parameters when measuring elderly persons. The reliability of 11 force platform parameters was tested measuring 30 elderly persons. The following parameters were calculated: mean speed of center of pressure displacement in mm/s, length of sway in mm, sway area in mm(2), amplitudes of center of pressure movement, the axis of oscillation in degrees and the person's angles of inclination in degrees. Three measurements were taken on the same day, with a resting period of 2 min. Four different test conditions were used: normal standing and narrow stand with eyes open and eyes closed, respectively. Reliability was determined by using intraclass correlation coefficients. Six parameters had excellent reliability with a correlation coefficient of >0.9: mean speed of center of pressure movement during narrow stand, area of sway during narrow stand, length of sway during normal and narrow stand, and the angle of inclination in the sagittal plane during normal stand and narrow stand. The condition "narrow stand eyes closed" proved to be the most reliable test position. Six parameters proved to have excellent reliability and are recommended to be used in further investigations. Narrow stand with eyes closed should be used as the test position. The tested protocol proved to be reliable. Whether these parameters can be used to predict falls in elderly persons remains to be investigated.

  14. Modeling high resolution stratigraphy in the Cusiana Field, Eastern Colombia; static builds to dynamic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Pulham, A.; MacDonald, D.; Colin, D.

    1996-12-31

    The Cusiana Field (BP, Ecopetrol, Total and Triton) is located in the Llanos Foothills of Eastern Colombia. The Cusiana reservoirs range from late Cretaceous, passive margin deltaic to early Tertiary, early foreland basin estuarine-fluvial. The key reservoir is the late Eocene Mirador Formation which comprises over 50% of reserves. Currently the Mirador reservoir is providing nearly all of the 180,00 bopd of production from the Cusiana Field. The Mirador reservoir comprises a stack of incised valley deposits. The fills of the valleys are sandstone-dominated and comprise the majority of the reservoir quality in the reservoir. Critical to an effective understandingmore » of reservoir behavior has been a detailed reservoir description and reservoir modeling of the incised valley stratigraphy in the Mirador. Models have been constructed using the deterministic information provided by extensive core (3000 feet) coupled with stochastic tools and techniques. Dynamic data, provided by extensive acquisition of production logs during early development drilling, have been integrated within the static-descriptions. Important reservoir characteristics such as degree of valley connectivity, intra-valley heterogeneities and textural controls on permeability have been captured in the modeling process. Upscaling of the high resolution static model has preserved the key sequence stratigraphic facets of the reservoir and also incorporated textural controls on relative permeability. Prediction of pressure transient behavior and fluid movement is working well in the full field simulator, VIP.« less

  15. 14 CFR 29.1325 - Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static pressure and pressure altimeter...: Installation § 29.1325 Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case...

  16. 14 CFR 29.1325 - Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...: Installation § 29.1325 Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case... between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Static pressure and pressure altimeter...

  17. 14 CFR 29.1325 - Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...: Installation § 29.1325 Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case... between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Static pressure and pressure altimeter...

  18. 14 CFR 29.1325 - Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...: Installation § 29.1325 Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case... between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Static pressure and pressure altimeter...

  19. 14 CFR 29.1325 - Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...: Installation § 29.1325 Static pressure and pressure altimeter systems. (a) Each instrument with static air case... between air pressure in the static pressure system and true ambient atmospheric static pressure is not... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Static pressure and pressure altimeter...

  20. Non-Invasive Evaluation of Corneal Abnormalities Using Static and Dynamic Light Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Misra, Anup K.; Leung, Alfred B.; King, James F.; Datiles, Manuel B., III

    2002-01-01

    A preliminary study of corneal abnormalities in intact bovine eyes is presented. Twenty-one eyes were treated with chemicals, cotton swabs, and radial and photo-refractive surgeries. Dynamic and static light scattering was performed as a function of the penetration depth into the corneal tissue. Topographical maps of corneal refractive power from untreated and treated corneas were also obtained using videokeratoscopy and results compared. The ultimate aim is to develop the technique of dynamic light scattering (DLS) for clinical applications in early evaluation of corneal complications after laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) surgeries and other corneal abnormalities.

  1. Noninvasive evaluation of corneal abnormalities using static and dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Misra, Anup K.; Leung, Alfred B.; King, James F.; Datiles, Manuel B., III

    2002-06-01

    A preliminary study of corneal abnormalities in intact bovine eyes is presented. Twenty-one eyes were treated with chemicals, cotton swabs, and radial and photo-refractive surgeries. Dynamic and static light scattering was performed as a function of the penetration depth into the corneal tissue. Topographical maps of corneal refractive power from untreated and treated corneas were also obtained using videokeratoscopy and results compared. The ultimate aim is to develop the technique of dynamic light scattering (DLS) for clinical applications in early evaluation of corneal complications after laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) surgeries and other corneal abnormalities.

  2. Quasi-static analysis of foil journal bearings for a Brayton cycle turboalternator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eshel, A.

    1974-01-01

    A quasi-static analysis is presented for foil journal bearings designed for a NASA Brayton Cycle Turboalternator. Included in the analysis are effects of 'slack' (due to flexural rigidity of the foil), of frictionally restrained extension of the foil-length in contact with cylindrical guides, of fluid inertia and compressibility, and of thermal expansion of rotor, foil and supporting structure. Comparisons are made with results of early experiments performed by Licht (1968, 1969) and recent data of Licht and Branger (1973). Variatons of film thickness, foil tension and bearing stiffness are presented graphically as functions of pertinent parameters for the case of operation in zero-gravity environment.

  3. Dynamic and static fatigue behavior of sintered silicon nitrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J.; Khandelwal, P.; Heitman, P. W.

    1987-01-01

    The dynamic and static fatigue behavior of Kyocera SN220M sintered silicon nitride at 1000 C was studied. Fractographic analysis of the material failing in dynamic fatigue revealed the presence of slow crack growth (SCG) at stressing rates below 41 MPa/min. Under conditions of static fatigue this material also displayed SCG at stresses below 345 MPa. SCG appears to be controlled by microcracking of the grain boundaries. The crack velocity exponent (n) determined from both dynamic and static fatigue tests ranged from 11 to 16.

  4. Towards a formal definition of static and dynamic electronic correlations.

    PubMed

    Benavides-Riveros, Carlos L; Lathiotakis, Nektarios N; Marques, Miguel A L

    2017-05-24

    Some of the most spectacular failures of density-functional and Hartree-Fock theories are related to an incorrect description of the so-called static electron correlation. Motivated by recent progress in the N-representability problem of the one-body density matrix for pure states, we propose a method to quantify the static contribution to the electronic correlation. By studying several molecular systems we show that our proposal correlates well with our intuition of static and dynamic electron correlation. Our results bring out the paramount importance of the occupancy of the highest occupied natural spin-orbital in such quantification.

  5. Static sampling of dynamic processes - a paradox?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mälicke, Mirko; Neuper, Malte; Jackisch, Conrad; Hassler, Sibylle; Zehe, Erwin

    2017-04-01

    Environmental systems monitoring aims at its core at the detection of spatio-temporal patterns of processes and system states, which is a pre-requisite for understanding and explaining their baffling heterogeneity. Most observation networks rely on distributed point sampling of states and fluxes of interest, which is combined with proxy-variables from either remote sensing or near surface geophysics. The cardinal question on the appropriate experimental design of such a monitoring network has up to now been answered in many different ways. Suggested approaches range from sampling in a dense regular grid using for the so-called green machine, transects along typical catenas, clustering of several observations sensors in presumed functional units or HRUs, arrangements of those cluster along presumed lateral flow paths to last not least a nested, randomized stratified arrangement of sensors or samples. Common to all these approaches is that they provide a rather static spatial sampling, while state variables and their spatial covariance structure dynamically change in time. It is hence of key interest how much of our still incomplete understanding stems from inappropriate sampling and how much needs to be attributed to an inappropriate analysis of spatial data sets. We suggest that it is much more promising to analyze the spatial variability of processes, for instance changes in soil moisture values, than to investigate the spatial variability of soil moisture states themselves. This is because wetting of the soil, reflected in a soil moisture increase, is causes by a totally different meteorological driver - rainfall - than drying of the soil. We hence propose that the rising and the falling limbs of soil moisture time series belong essentially to different ensembles, as they are influenced by different drivers. Positive and negative temporal changes in soil moisture need, hence, to be analyzed separately. We test this idea using the CAOS data set as a benchmark

  6. Earthquake source parameters from GPS-measured static displacements with potential for real-time application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Toole, Thomas B.; Valentine, Andrew P.; Woodhouse, John H.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a method for determining an optimal centroid-moment tensor solution of an earthquake from a set of static displacements measured using a network of Global Positioning System receivers. Using static displacements observed after the 4 April 2010, MW 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah, Mexico, earthquake, we perform an iterative inversion to obtain the source mechanism and location, which minimize the least-squares difference between data and synthetics. The efficiency of our algorithm for forward modeling static displacements in a layered elastic medium allows the inversion to be performed in real-time on a single processor without the need for precomputed libraries of excitation kernels; we present simulated real-time results for the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake. The only a priori information that our inversion scheme needs is a crustal model and approximate source location, so the method proposed here may represent an improvement on existing early warning approaches that rely on foreknowledge of fault locations and geometries.

  7. Survival of Apache Trout eggs and alevins under static and fluctuating temperature regimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Recsetar, Matthew S.; Bonar, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Increased stream temperatures due to global climate change, livestock grazing, removal of riparian cover, reduction of stream flow, and urbanization will have important implications for fishes worldwide. Information exists that describes the effects of elevated water temperatures on fish eggs, but less information is available on the effects of fluctuating water temperatures on egg survival, especially those of threatened and endangered species. We tested the posthatch survival of eyed eggs and alevins of Apache Trout Oncorhynchus gilae apache, a threatened salmonid, in static temperatures of 15, 18, 21, 24, and 27°C, and also in treatments with diel fluctuations of ±3°C around those temperatures. The LT50 for posthatch survival of Apache Trout eyed eggs and alevins was 17.1°C for static temperatures treatments and 17.9°C for the midpoints of ±3°C fluctuating temperature treatments. There was no significant difference in survival between static temperatures and fluctuating temperatures that shared the same mean temperature, yet there was a slight difference in LT50s. Upper thermal tolerance of Apache Trout eyed eggs and alevins is much lower than that of fry to adult life stages (22–23°C). Information on thermal tolerance of early life stages (eyed egg and alevin) will be valuable to those restoring streams or investigating thermal tolerances of imperiled fishes.

  8. Short-term predictive validity of the static-99 and static-99-R for indigenous and nonindigenous Australian sexual offenders.

    PubMed

    Smallbone, Stephen; Rallings, Mark

    2013-06-01

    Actuarial risk assessment (Static-99 and Static-99-R) scores were obtained for 399 Australian adult sexual offenders who were subsequently released from prison and followed up with searches of police arrest records (mean follow-up period = 29 months; range = 15-53 months). Indigenous offenders (n = 67; 16.8%) scored significantly higher on both the Static-99 (M = 4.04 vs. 2.89, p < .001) and Static-99-R (M = 3.72 vs. 2.22, p < .001), were more than twice as likely to be arrested for sexual offenses (9.0% vs. 4.1%, ns), and were significantly more likely to be arrested for nonsexual violent (28.4% vs. 1.9%, p < .001), any violent (including sexual; 37% vs. 5.9%, p < .001), and any offenses (58.2% vs. 21.6%, p < .001). For the combined groups, predictive accuracy of both instruments was comparable to results reported elsewhere. Predictive accuracy of the Static-99 was similar for indigenous and nonindigenous offenders. The Static-99-R was only marginally predictive of any violent recidivism (AUC = .65, 95% CI = [.52, .79]), and did not predict sexual (AUC = .61, 95% CI = [.45, .77]) or nonsexual violent recidivism (AUC = .65, 95% CI = [.48, .78]), for indigenous offenders. Higher risk scores, indigenous race, and unsupervised release all contributed unique variance to any violent recidivism. Results suggest that the Static-99 may be appropriate for assessing Australian indigenous sexual offenders, but more research is needed to test the validity of the Static-99-R for this population. We conclude that practitioners should consider the potential effects of racial differences and postrelease factors, as well as static risk factors, in their assessments.

  9. Predicting Reading Difficulty in First Grade Using Dynamic Assessment of Decoding in Early Kindergarten: A Large-Scale Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Douglas B.; Allen, Melissa M.; Spencer, Trina D.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the classification accuracy of early static prereading measures and early dynamic assessment reading measures administered to 600 kindergarten students. At the beginning of kindergarten, all of the participants were administered two commonly used static prereading measures. The participants were…

  10. Growth plate cartilage shows different strain patterns in response to static versus dynamic mechanical modulation.

    PubMed

    Kaviani, Rosa; Londono, Irene; Parent, Stefan; Moldovan, Florina; Villemure, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Longitudinal growth of long bones and vertebrae occurs in growth plate cartilage. This process is partly regulated by mechanical forces, which are one of the underlying reasons for progression of growth deformities such as idiopathic adolescent scoliosis and early-onset scoliosis. This concept of mechanical modulation of bone growth is also exploited in the development of fusionless treatments of these deformities. However, the optimal loading condition for the mechanical modulation of growth plate remains to be identified. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of in vitro static versus dynamic modulation and of dynamic loading parameters, such as frequency and amplitude, on the mechanical responses and histomorphology of growth plate explants. Growth plate explants from distal ulnae of 4-week-old swines were extracted and randomly distributed among six experimental groups: baseline ([Formula: see text]), control ([Formula: see text]), static ([Formula: see text]) and dynamic ([Formula: see text]). For static and dynamic groups, mechanical modulation was performed in vitro using an Indexed CartiGen bioreactor. A stress relaxation test combined with confocal microscopy and digital image correlation was used to characterize the mechanical responses of each explant in terms of peak stress, equilibrium stress, equilibrium modulus of elasticity and strain pattern. Histomorphometrical measurements were performed on toluidine blue tissue sections using a semi-automatic custom-developed MATLAB toolbox. Results suggest that compared to dynamic modulation, static modulation changes the strain pattern of the tissue and thus is more detrimental for tissue biomechanics, while the histomorphological parameters are not affected by mechanical modulation. Also, under dynamic modulation, changing the frequency or amplitude does not affect the biomechanical response of the tissue. Results of this study will be useful in finding optimal and non-damaging parameters

  11. The effect of saccular function on static balance ability of profound hearing-impaired children.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Zahra; Asad Malayeri, Saeed

    2011-07-01

    Researches have shown that in clinical practice, balance disorders in children with congenital or early acquired severe to profound hearing loss are probable. The purposes of present study were to specify the percentage of vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) and an acoustically evoked, short latency negative response (ASNR) recordings and the relation between their presence and static balance ability and postural control of children with profound sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Thirty children with profound SNHL, with an average age of 6.93 years, underwent the VEMP and auditory brainstem response (ABR) tests. Both VEMP and ABR were recorded at the threshold level through air-conduction stimulation via an insert receiver. The static balance performance of the hearing-impaired children was tested with six exercises and compared with that of 30 age- and sex-matched normal-hearing children as controls. VEMP was recorded in 53.3% of ears and ASNR in 40.0%. VEMP was revealed in all ears with ASNR, and a significant correlation was shown between their presence (p=0.005) and also between the ASNR wave latency and P1 (p=0.0001) and N1 (p=0.004) wave amplitude of VEMP. There was a significant correlation between the presence of VEMP and ASNR with the performance of the children in two static balance skills, namely standing on one leg with eyes open on a line and the same practice on the balance beam (p≤0.008). There was a close relation between the presence of VEMP and ASNR. Additionally, when ASNR was present, the recording of VEMP could be expected. Successful performance in the static balance exercises with reduced vestibular and somatosensory inputs increased the possibility of the recording of ASNR and VEMP. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. 30 CFR 7.307 - Static pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Electric Motor Assemblies § 7.307 Static...) Permanent deformation exceeding 0.040 inches per linear foot; or (iii) Clearances, in excess of those...

  13. 30 CFR 7.307 - Static pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Electric Motor Assemblies § 7.307 Static...) Permanent deformation exceeding 0.040 inches per linear foot; or (iii) Clearances, in excess of those...

  14. 30 CFR 7.307 - Static pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Electric Motor Assemblies § 7.307 Static...) Permanent deformation exceeding 0.040 inches per linear foot; or (iii) Clearances, in excess of those...

  15. 30 CFR 7.307 - Static pressure test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Electric Motor Assemblies § 7.307 Static...) Permanent deformation exceeding 0.040 inches per linear foot; or (iii) Clearances, in excess of those...

  16. 29. SATURN ROCKET ENGINE LOCATED ON NORTH SIDE OF STATIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. SATURN ROCKET ENGINE LOCATED ON NORTH SIDE OF STATIC TEST STAND - DETAILS OF THE EXPANSION NOZZLE. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  17. Induced matter brane gravity and Einstein static universe

    SciTech Connect

    Heydarzade, Y.; Darabi, F., E-mail: heydarzade@azaruniv.edu, E-mail: f.darabi@azaruniv.edu

    We investigate stability of the Einstein static universe against the scalar, vector and tensor perturbations in the context of induced matter brane gravity. It is shown that in the framework of this model, the Einstein static universe has a positive spatial curvature. In contrast to the classical general relativity, it is found that a stable Einstein static universe against the scalar perturbations does exist provided that the variation of time dependent geometrical equation of state parameter is proportional to the minus of the variation of the scale factor, δ ω{sub g}(t) = −Cδ a(t). We obtain neutral stability against the vector perturbations, and themore » stability against the tensor perturbations is guaranteed due to the positivity of the spatial curvature of the Einstein static universe in induced matter brane gravity.« less

  18. Static electricity of polymers reduced by treatment with iodine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermann, A. M.; Landel, R. F.; Rembaum, A.

    1967-01-01

    Treating organic polymers with iodine improves the electrical conductivity. Diffusion enables products of desired properties to be custom formulated. This eliminates a buildup of static electricity and the need for fillers or bound metal salts.

  19. Secure communication of static information by electronic means

    DOEpatents

    Gritton, Dale G.

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus (10) for the secure transmission of static data (16) from a tag (11) to a remote reader (12). Each time the static data (16) is to be transmitted to the reader (12), the 10 bits of static data (16) are combined with 54 bits of binary data (21), which constantly change from one transmission to the next, into a 64-bit number (22). This number is then encrypted and transmitted to the remote reader (12) where it is decrypted (26) to produce the same 64 bit number that was encrypted in the tag (11). With a continual change in the value of the 64 bit number (22) in the tag, the encrypted numbers transmitted to the reader (12) will appear to be dynamic in character rather than being static.

  20. Measurement of the True Dynamic and Static Pressures in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiel, Georg

    1939-01-01

    In this report, two reliable methods are presented, with the aid of which the undisturbed flight dynamic pressure and the true static pressure may be determined without error. These problems were solved chiefly through practical flight tests.

  1. VIEW OF EAST TEST SITE FROM TOP OF STATIC TEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF EAST TEST SITE FROM TOP OF STATIC TEST TOWER VIEW INCLUDES STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS TEST STAND COLD CALIBRATION TEST STAND AND COMPONENTS TEST LAB. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  2. 20. UNCOVERED TEST CELL AT THE STATIC TEST TOWER ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. UNCOVERED TEST CELL AT THE STATIC TEST TOWER ON THE WEST SIDE WHERE F-1 ENGINE WAS TESTED. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  3. Combining Static Analysis and Model Checking for Software Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brat, Guillaume; Visser, Willem; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    We present an iterative technique in which model checking and static analysis are combined to verify large software systems. The role of the static analysis is to compute partial order information which the model checker uses to reduce the state space. During exploration, the model checker also computes aliasing information that it gives to the static analyzer which can then refine its analysis. The result of this refined analysis is then fed back to the model checker which updates its partial order reduction. At each step of this iterative process, the static analysis computes optimistic information which results in an unsafe reduction of the state space. However we show that the process converges to a fired point at which time the partial order information is safe and the whole state space is explored.

  4. 13. TOP OF STATIC TEST TOWER VIEW OF STEEL TRUSS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. TOP OF STATIC TEST TOWER VIEW OF STEEL TRUSS STRUCTURE AND OVERHEAD CRANE. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  5. Determination of the static friction coefficient from circular motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Bolívar, J. A.; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, M. A.

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes a physics laboratory exercise for determining the coefficient of static friction between two surfaces. The circular motion of a coin placed on the surface of a rotating turntable has been studied. For this purpose, the motion is recorded with a high-speed digital video camera recording at 240 frames s-1, and the videos are analyzed using Tracker video-analysis software, allowing the students to dynamically model the motion of the coin. The students have to obtain the static friction coefficient by comparing the centripetal and maximum static friction forces. The experiment only requires simple and inexpensive materials. The dynamics of circular motion and static friction forces are difficult for many students to understand. The proposed laboratory exercise addresses these topics, which are relevant to the physics curriculum.

  6. Stability of the Einstein static universe in open cosmological models

    SciTech Connect

    Canonico, Rosangela; Parisi, Luca; INFN, Sezione di Napoli, GC di Salerno, Via Ponte Don Melillo, I-84081 Baronissi

    2010-09-15

    The stability properties of the Einstein static solution of general relativity are altered when corrective terms arising from modification of the underlying gravitational theory appear in the cosmological equations. In this paper the existence and stability of static solutions are considered in the framework of two recently proposed quantum gravity models. The previously known analysis of the Einstein static solutions in the semiclassical regime of loop quantum cosmology with modifications to the gravitational sector is extended to open cosmological models where a static neutrally stable solution is found. A similar analysis is also performed in the framework of Horava-Lifshitz gravitymore » under detailed balance and projectability conditions. In the case of open cosmological models the two solutions found can be either unstable or neutrally stable according to the admitted values of the parameters.« less

  7. Einstein's conversion from his static to an expanding universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaumer, Harry

    2014-02-01

    In 1917 Einstein initiated modern cosmology by postulating, based on general relativity, a homogenous, static, spatially curved universe. To counteract gravitational contraction he introduced the cosmological constant. In 1922 Alexander Friedman showed that Albert Einstein's fundamental equations also allow dynamical worlds, and in 1927 Georges Lemaître, backed by observational evidence, concluded that our universe was expanding. Einstein impetuously rejected Friedman's as well as Lemaître's findings. However, in 1931 he retracted his former static model in favour of a dynamic solution. This investigation follows Einstein on his hesitating path from a static to the expanding universe. Contrary to an often advocated belief the primary motive for his switch was not observational evidence, but the realisation that his static model was unstable.

  8. 18. STATIC TEST TOWER VIEW FROM REMOVABLE LEVEL DOWN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. STATIC TEST TOWER - VIEW FROM REMOVABLE LEVEL DOWN TOWARDS GANTRY CRANE AND THREE TEST CELLS. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  9. Miniature Flow-Direction/Pitot-Static Pressure Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, George C., Jr.; Coombs, David S.; Eves, John W.; Price, Howard E.; Vasquez, Peter

    1989-01-01

    Precision flow-direction/pitot-static pressure probes, ranging from 0.035 to 0.090 inch (0.89 to 2.29 mm) in outside diameter, successfully fabricated and calibrated for use in Langley 20-inch Mach 6 Tunnel. Probes simultaneously measure flow direction and static and pitot pressures in flow fields about configurations in hypersonic flow at temperatures up to 500 degree F (260 degree C).

  10. Hydrogen generation through static-feed water electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, F. C.; Schubert, F. H.

    1975-01-01

    A static-feed water electrolysis system (SFWES), developed under NASA sponsorship, is presented for potential applicability to terrestrial hydrogen production. The SFWES concept uses (1) an alkaline electrolyte to minimize power requirements and materials-compatibility problems, (2) a method where the electrolyte is retained in a thin porous matrix eliminating bulk electrolyte, and (3) a static water-feed mechanism to prevent electrode and electrolyte contamination and to promote system simplicity.

  11. Static Standing Balance in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villarroya, M. Adoracion; Gonzalez-Aguero, Alejandro; Moros-Garcia, Teresa; de la Flor Marin, Mario; Moreno, Luis A.; Casajus, Jose A.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To analyse static-standing-balance of adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). Methods: Thirty-two adolescents with DS aged 10-19 years (DSG); 33 adolescents, age/sex-matched, without DS (CG). Static-standing-balance under four conditions (C1: open-eyes/fixed-foot-support; C2: closed-eyes/fixed-foot-support; C3: open-eyes/compliant-foot-support;…

  12. 37. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH AT THE STATIC TEST TOWER. THIS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH AT THE STATIC TEST TOWER. THIS VIEW SHOWS TWO MAJOR CHANGES TO THE STATIC TEST TOWER: THE ADDITION OF THE NASA LOGO TO THE FACADE AND THE ADDITION OF THE UPPER STAGES TO THE JUPITER MISSILE IN THE WEST POSITION ON THE TOWER TO REPRESENT THE JUNO II CONFIGURATION. 1961, PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN, FRED ORDWAY COLLECTION, U. S. SPACE AND ROCKET CENTER, HUNTSVILLE, AL. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  13. Pilot Study: Foam Wedge Chin Support Static Tolerance Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-24

    AFRL-SA-WP-SR-2017-0026 Pilot Study : Foam Wedge Chin Support Static Tolerance Testing Austin M. Fischer, BS1; William W...COVERED (From – To) April – October 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Pilot Study : Foam Wedge Chin Support Static Tolerance Testing 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...prototype to mitigate the increase in helmet weight and forward center of gravity. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the feasibility and

  14. Static electricity as a hazard in industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Laar, Ir. G. F. M.

    1991-08-01

    Looking at the German and Dutch statistics, the percentage of dust explosions in all industries dealing with explosible dust-air mixtures which have been ignited by electrostatic discharges is about 8-10%. However, in the plastics industry this value is much higher: 25%. In particular in the last few years some rather large industrial incidents probably have been caused by electrostatic charges. To understand why accidents may happen due to static electricity the several dangerous electrostatic discharges will be discussed briefly in connection with dust explosion hazards. In particular the propagating brush discharge and the cone or " Maurer " discharge are important. Ignitions are caused mainly in the case of easily ignitable powders or hybrid mixtures (powders in combination with flammable vapours) due to isolated conductors and non-conducting materials as the product itself or such process parts as flexible hoses, internally coated silos and ducts. To illustrate how hazards by electrostatic discharges may develop in real life both on a small and a large scale a few examples will be briefly discussed. Une consultation des statistiques allemandes et néerlandaises révèle que dans toutes les industries traitant des mélanges poussière-air explosifs le pourcentage des explosions de poussière qui se sont produites par des décharges électrostatiques ne s'élève qu'à environ 8-10 %. Dans l'industrie des matières plastiques cependant, ce pourcentage est bien plus grand: 25 %. Les dernières années en particulier nous ont rapporté plusieurs incidents industriels assez graves qui sont probablement causés par des charges électrostatiques. Pour comprendre comment des accidents pareils dus à l'électricité statique peuvent se produire, les différentes décharges électrostatiques dangereuses pouvant produire des explosions de poussière se discuteront brièvement. Ce sont surtout la décharge brosse de surface et la décharge " Maurer " qui sont d

  15. Alkaline static feed electrolyzer based oxygen generation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, L. D.; Kovach, A. J.; Fortunato, F. A.; Schubert, F. H.; Grigger, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    In preparation for the future deployment of the Space Station, an R and D program was established to demonstrate integrated operation of an alkaline Water Electrolysis System and a fuel cell as an energy storage device. The program's scope was revised when the Space Station Control Board changed the energy storage baseline for the Space Station. The new scope was aimed at the development of an alkaline Static Feed Electrolyzer for use in an Environmental Control/Life Support System as an oxygen generation system. As a result, the program was divided into two phases. The phase 1 effort was directed at the development of the Static Feed Electrolyzer for application in a Regenerative Fuel Cell System. During this phase, the program emphasized incorporation of the Regenerative Fuel Cell System design requirements into the Static Feed Electrolyzer electrochemical module design and the mechanical components design. The mechanical components included a Pressure Control Assembly, a Water Supply Assembly and a Thermal Control Assembly. These designs were completed through manufacturing drawing during Phase 1. The Phase 2 effort was directed at advancing the Alkaline Static Feed Electrolyzer database for an oxygen generation system. This development was aimed at extending the Static Feed Electrolyzer database in areas which may be encountered from initial fabrication through transportation, storage, launch and eventual Space Station startup. During this Phase, the Program emphasized three major areas: materials evaluation, electrochemical module scaling and performance repeatability and Static Feed Electrolyzer operational definition and characterization.

  16. Ultrasound to Detect Pressure-related Deep Tissue Injuries in Adults Admitted via the Emergency Department: A Prospective, Descriptive, Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Scheiner, Jonathan; Farid, Karen; Raden, Mark; Demisse, Seleshi

    2017-03-01

    Stage 4 pressure ulcers (PUs) start with tissue death at the level of the bone, also known as deep tissue injury (DTI). Studies have shown the appearance of DTI on the skin is delayed for several days after the original pressure-related injury to the deep soft tissues. Studies also suggest DTI can be seen using ultrasound (US) technology. A prospective, descriptive, correlational pilot study was conducted to evaluate the use of US technology to detect DTI in the soft tissues that are not visible on the skin upon hospital admission. Study participants included a convenience sample of 33 persons at risk for PUs (ie, Braden score <18) admitted through the emergency department. Each participant had US scans of 13 common PU body sites. All scans were documented in the radiologist report in the electronic medical record. Creatinine phosphokinase, calcium levels, and urine myoglobin levels also were assessed upon enrollment. Skin failure risk factors (SFRFs), including fever, hypotension, weight loss, coagulopathy, and acidosis/respiratory failure, also were documented. Patients were examined for skin PUs every day for 7 days after US scan. Twenty-three (23) patients completed the study. US scans identified pressure necrosis at 2 levels: bone (54 positive [US+]) and subcutaneous (SC); 79 US+, respectively). US+ bone sites resulted in 5 PUs appearing 6 to 7 days post-admission (sensitivity = 100%, specificity 84.7%, positive predictive value 10%, and negative predictive value 100%), indicating all DTI that later became purple skin DTI were detected by the US. US+ SC sites, located immediately under the skin, yielded 5 PUs appearing on day 2 after admission (sensitivity 100%, specificity 74.8%, positive predictive value 6.3%, and negative predictive value 100%). The participants with PU occurrence in both bone and SC groups had low Braden scores (bone group mean = 13.25, SC group mean = 11.2). Study patients who were positive for PU also had >4 SFRFs. Creatinine

  17. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1947-01-01

    A V-2 rocket is hoisted into a static test facility at White Sands, New Mexico. The German engineers and scientists who developed the V-2 came to the United States at the end of World War II and continued rocket testing under the direction of the U. S. Army, launching more than sixty V-2s.

  18. Thermal stabilization of static single-mirror Fourier transform spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schardt, Michael; Schwaller, Christian; Tremmel, Anton J.; Koch, Alexander W.

    2017-05-01

    Fourier transform spectroscopy has become a standard method for spectral analysis of infrared light. With this method, an interferogram is created by two beam interference which is subsequently Fourier-transformed. Most Fourier transform spectrometers used today provide the interferogram in the temporal domain. In contrast, static Fourier transform spectrometers generate interferograms in the spatial domain. One example of this type of spectrometer is the static single-mirror Fourier transform spectrometer which offers a high etendue in combination with a simple, miniaturized optics design. As no moving parts are required, it also features a high vibration resistance and high measurement rates. However, it is susceptible to temperature variations. In this paper, we therefore discuss the main sources for temperature-induced errors in static single-mirror Fourier transform spectrometers: changes in the refractive index of the optical components used, variations of the detector sensitivity, and thermal expansion of the housing. As these errors manifest themselves in temperature-dependent wavenumber shifts and intensity shifts, they prevent static single-mirror Fourier transform spectrometers from delivering long-term stable spectra. To eliminate these shifts, we additionally present a work concept for the thermal stabilization of the spectrometer. With this stabilization, static single-mirror Fourier transform spectrometers are made suitable for infrared process spectroscopy under harsh thermal environmental conditions. As the static single-mirror Fourier transform spectrometer uses the so-called source-doubling principle, many of the mentioned findings are transferable to other designs of static Fourier transform spectrometers based on the same principle.

  19. Enhancement of sedimentation and coagulation with static magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieliński, Marcin; Dębowski, Marcin; Hajduk, Anna; Rusanowska, Paulina

    2017-11-01

    The static magnetic field can be an alternative method for wastewater treatment. It has been proved that this physical factor, accelerates the biochemical processes, catalyzes advanced oxidation, intensifies anaerobic and aerobic processes or reduces swelling of activated sludge. There are also reports proving the positive impact of the static magnetic field on the coagulation and sedimentation, as well as the conditioning and dewatering of sludge. In order to be applied in larger scale the published results should be verified and confirmed. In the studies, the enhancement of sedimentation by the static magnetic field was observed. The best sedimentation was noted in the experiment, where magnetizers were placed on activated sludge bioreactor and secondary settling tank. No effect of the static magnetic field on coagulation with the utilization of PIX 113 was observed. However, the static magnetic field enhanced coagulation with the utilization of PAX-XL9. The results suggest that increased sedimentation of colloids and activated sludge, can in practice mean a reduction in the size of the necessary equipment for sedimentation with an unchanged efficiency of the process.

  20. Design and Analysis of AN Static Aeroelastic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Ying-Yu; Yuan, Kai-Hua; Lv, Ji-Nan; Liu, Zi-Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Static aeroelastic experiments are very common in the United States and Russia. The objective of static aeroelastic experiments is to investigate deformation and loads of elastic structure in flow field. Generally speaking, prerequisite of this experiment is that the stiffness distribution of structure is known. This paper describes a method for designing experimental models, in the case where the stiffness distribution and boundary condition of a real aircraft are both uncertain. The stiffness distribution form of the structure can be calculated via finite element modeling and simulation calculation and F141 steels and rigid foam are used to make elastic model. In this paper, the design and manufacturing process of static aeroelastic models is presented and a set of experiment model was designed to simulate the stiffness of the designed wings, a set of experiments was designed to check the results. The test results show that the experimental method can effectively complete the design work of elastic model. This paper introduces the whole process of the static aeroelastic experiment, and the experimental results are analyzed. This paper developed a static aeroelasticity experiment technique and established an experiment model targeting at the swept wing of a certain kind of large aspect ratio aircraft.

  1. Static elastica formulations of a pine conveying fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J. M. T.; Lunn, T. S.

    1981-07-01

    An elastic pipe in an equilibrium configuration of arbitrary large deflection discharging fluid from its end experiences static centrifugal and frictional drag forces along its complete length. These are, however, entirely equivalent to an end follower force of magnitude ρ AV2. This equivalence is examined in detail by using the intrinsic field equations which are suitable for closed form solutions in terms of elliptic integrals. Once the pipe moves it also experiences gyroscopic Coriolis forces along its length, but these are not considered in this static examination. It is shown in detail how a discharging pipe with end forces and moments is statically equivalent to a beam or strut with the same end forces and moments plus the reversed momentum vector ρ AV2. It is seen that a cantilevered pipe with a free end can have no statical equilibrium states at all, at either large or small deflections, while pipes with constrained ends have large static deflections identical to those of the equivalent struts.

  2. Integrated dynamic and static tactile sensor: focus on static force sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wettels, Nicholas; Pletner, Baruch

    2012-04-01

    Object grasping by robotic hands in unstructured environments demands a sensor that is durable, compliant, and responsive to static and dynamic force conditions. In order for a tactile sensor to be useful for grasp control in these, it should have the following properties: tri-axial force sensing (two shear plus normal component), dynamic event sensing across slip frequencies, compliant surface for grip, wide dynamic range (depending on application), insensitivity to environmental conditions, ability to withstand abuse and good sensing behavior (e.g. low hysteresis, high repeatability). These features can be combined in a novel multimodal tactile sensor. This sensor combines commercial-off-the-shelf MEMS technology with two proprietary force sensors: a high bandwidth device based on PZT technology and low bandwidth device based on elastomers and optics. In this study, we focus on the latter transduction mechanism and the proposed architecture of the completed device. In this study, an embedded LED was utilized to produce a constant light source throughout a layer of silicon rubber which covered a plastic mandrel containing a set of sensitive phototransistors. Features about the contacted object such as center of pressure and force vectors can be extracted from the information in the changing patterns of light. The voltage versus force relationship obtained with this molded humanlike finger had a wide dynamic range that coincided with forces relevant for most human grip tasks.

  3. How Static is the Statics Classroom? An investigation into how innovations, specifically Research-Based Instructional Strategies, are adopted into the Statics Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutler, Stephanie Leigh

    The purpose of this dissertation is to investigate how educational research, specifically Research-Based Instructional Strategies (RBIS), is adopted by education practice, specifically within the engineering Statics classroom. Using a systematic approach, changes in classroom teaching practices were investigated from the instructors' perspective. Both researchers and practitioners are included in the process, combining efforts to improve student learning, which is a critical goal for engineering education. The study is divided into 3 stages and each is discussed in an individual manuscript. Manuscript 1 provides an assessment of current teaching practices; Manuscript 2 explores RBIS use by Statics instructors and perceived barriers of adoption; and Manuscript 3 evaluates adoption using Fidelity of Implementation. A common set of concurrent mixed methods was used for each stage of this study. A quantitative national survey of Statics instructors (n =166) and 18 qualitative interviews were conducted to examine activities used in the Statics classroom and familiarity with nine RBIS. The results of this study show that lecturing is the most common activity throughout Statics classrooms, but is not the only activity. Other common activities included working examples and students working on problems individually and in groups. As discussed by the interview participants, each of Rogers' characteristics influenced adoption for different reasons. For example, Complexity (level of difficulty with implementation of an RBIS) was most commonly identified as a barrier. His study also evaluated the Fidelity of Implementation for each RBIS and found it to be higher for RBIS that were less complex (in terms of the number of critical components). Many of the critical components (i.e. activities required for implementation, as described in the literature) were found to statistically distinguish RBIS users and non-users. This dissertation offers four contributions: (1) an

  4. Technology advancement of the static feed water electrolysis process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Wynveen, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    A program to advance the technology of oxygen- and hydrogen-generating subsystems based on water electrolysis was studied. Major emphasis was placed on static feed water electrolysis, a concept characterized by low power consumption and high intrinsic reliability. The static feed based oxygen generation subsystem consists basically of three subassemblies: (1) a combined water electrolysis and product gas dehumidifier module; (2) a product gas pressure controller and; (3) a cyclically filled water feed tank. Development activities were completed at the subsystem as well as at the component level. An extensive test program including single cell, subsystem and integrated system testing was completed with the required test support accessories designed, fabricated, and assembled. Mini-product assurance activities were included throughout all phases of program activities. An extensive number of supporting technology studies were conducted to advance the technology base of the static feed water electrolysis process and to resolve problems.

  5. Static aeroelastic behavior of an adaptive laminated piezoelectric composite wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisshaar, T. A.; Ehlers, S. M.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of using an adaptive material to modify the static aeroelastic behavior of a uniform wing is examined. The wing structure is idealized as a laminated sandwich structure with piezoelectric layers in the upper and lower skins. A feedback system that senses the wing root loads applies a constant electric field to the piezoelectric actuator. Modification of pure torsional deformaton behavior and pure bending deformation are investigated, as is the case of an anisotropic composite swept wing. The use of piezoelectric actuators to create an adaptive structure is found to alter static aeroelastic behavior in that the proper choice of the feedback gain can increase or decrease the aeroelastic divergence speed. This concept also may be used to actively change the lift effectiveness of a wing. The ability to modify static aeroelastic behavior is limited by physical limitations of the piezoelectric material and the manner in which it is integrated into the parent structure.

  6. Adaptive function allocation reduces performance costs of static automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parasuraman, Raja; Mouloua, Mustapha; Molloy, Robert; Hilburn, Brian

    1993-01-01

    Adaptive automation offers the option of flexible function allocation between the pilot and on-board computer systems. One of the important claims for the superiority of adaptive over static automation is that such systems do not suffer from some of the drawbacks associated with conventional function allocation. Several experiments designed to test this claim are reported in this article. The efficacy of adaptive function allocation was examined using a laboratory flight-simulation task involving multiple functions of tracking, fuel-management, and systems monitoring. The results show that monitoring inefficiency represents one of the performance costs of static automation. Adaptive function allocation can reduce the performance cost associated with long-term static automation.

  7. Evaluation of conductive concrete for anti-static flooring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yehia, Sherif; Qaddoumi, Nasser; Hassan, Mohamed; Swaked, Bassam

    2015-04-01

    Static electricity, exchange of electrons, and retention of charge between any two materials due to contact and separation are affected by the condition of the materials being nonconductive or insulated from ground. Several work environments, such as electronics industry, hospitals, offices, and computer rooms all require electro-static discharge (ESD) mitigation. Carpet Tile, Carpet Broadloom, Vinyl Tile, Vinyl sheet, Epoxy and Rubber are examples of existing flooring systems in the market. However, each system has its advantages and limitations. Conductive concrete is a relatively new material technology developed to achieve high electrical conductivity and high mechanical strength. The conductive concrete material can be an economical alternative for these ESD flooring systems. In this paper, the effectiveness of conductive concrete as an anti-static flooring system was evaluated. The initial results indicated that the proposed conductive concrete flooring and ground system met the acceptance criteria stated by ASTM F150.

  8. Quantifying hypoxia in human cancers using static PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Edward; Yeung, Ivan; Keller, Harald; Wouters, Bradley G; Milosevic, Michael; Hedley, David W; Jaffray, David A

    2016-11-21

    Compared to FDG, the signal of 18 F-labelled hypoxia-sensitive tracers in tumours is low. This means that in addition to the presence of hypoxic cells, transport properties contribute significantly to the uptake signal in static PET images. This sensitivity to transport must be minimized in order for static PET to provide a reliable standard for hypoxia quantification. A dynamic compartmental model based on a reaction-diffusion formalism was developed to interpret tracer pharmacokinetics and applied to static images of FAZA in twenty patients with pancreatic cancer. We use our model to identify tumour properties-well-perfused without substantial necrosis or partitioning-for which static PET images can reliably quantify hypoxia. Normalizing the measured activity in a tumour voxel by the value in blood leads to a reduction in the sensitivity to variations in 'inter-corporal' transport properties-blood volume and clearance rate-as well as imaging study protocols. Normalization thus enhances the correlation between static PET images and the FAZA binding rate K 3 , a quantity which quantifies hypoxia in a biologically significant way. The ratio of FAZA uptake in spinal muscle and blood can vary substantially across patients due to long muscle equilibration times. Normalized static PET images of hypoxia-sensitive tracers can reliably quantify hypoxia for homogeneously well-perfused tumours with minimal tissue partitioning. The ideal normalizing reference tissue is blood, either drawn from the patient before PET scanning or imaged using PET. If blood is not available, uniform, homogeneously well-perfused muscle can be used. For tumours that are not homogeneously well-perfused or for which partitioning is significant, only an analysis of dynamic PET scans can reliably quantify hypoxia.

  9. Quantifying hypoxia in human cancers using static PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Edward; Yeung, Ivan; Keller, Harald; Wouters, Bradley G.; Milosevic, Michael; Hedley, David W.; Jaffray, David A.

    2016-11-01

    Compared to FDG, the signal of 18F-labelled hypoxia-sensitive tracers in tumours is low. This means that in addition to the presence of hypoxic cells, transport properties contribute significantly to the uptake signal in static PET images. This sensitivity to transport must be minimized in order for static PET to provide a reliable standard for hypoxia quantification. A dynamic compartmental model based on a reaction-diffusion formalism was developed to interpret tracer pharmacokinetics and applied to static images of FAZA in twenty patients with pancreatic cancer. We use our model to identify tumour properties—well-perfused without substantial necrosis or partitioning—for which static PET images can reliably quantify hypoxia. Normalizing the measured activity in a tumour voxel by the value in blood leads to a reduction in the sensitivity to variations in ‘inter-corporal’ transport properties—blood volume and clearance rate—as well as imaging study protocols. Normalization thus enhances the correlation between static PET images and the FAZA binding rate K 3, a quantity which quantifies hypoxia in a biologically significant way. The ratio of FAZA uptake in spinal muscle and blood can vary substantially across patients due to long muscle equilibration times. Normalized static PET images of hypoxia-sensitive tracers can reliably quantify hypoxia for homogeneously well-perfused tumours with minimal tissue partitioning. The ideal normalizing reference tissue is blood, either drawn from the patient before PET scanning or imaged using PET. If blood is not available, uniform, homogeneously well-perfused muscle can be used. For tumours that are not homogeneously well-perfused or for which partitioning is significant, only an analysis of dynamic PET scans can reliably quantify hypoxia.

  10. Static properties of hydrostatic thrust gas bearings with curved surfaces.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehsteiner, F. H.; Cannon, R. H., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    The classical treatment of circular, hydrostatic, orifice-regulated thrust gas bearings, in which perfectly plane bearing plates are assumed, is extended to include axisymmetric, but otherwise arbitrary, plate profiles. Plate curvature has a strong influence on bearing load capability, static stiffness, tilting stiffness, and side force per unit misalignment angle. By a suitable combination of gas inlet impedance and concave plate profile, the static stiffness can be made almost constant over a wide load range, and to remain positive at the closure load. Extensive measurements performed with convex and concave plates agree with theory to within the experimental error throughout and demonstrate the practical feasibility of using curved plates.

  11. Chemical Durability Improvement and Static Fatigue of Glasses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    Afl-Alla 837 RENSSELAER POLYIECmfJ!C INST TRtOY NY DEPT OF MATERIAL--ETC F/6 ii/ CHEMICAL DURABILITY IMPROVEMENT AND STATIC FATIGUE OF GLASSESW AUC2...82 M TOMOZAWA NOGGIN 7A-C-0315 UNC LASS IF IED N ENEEEEEE FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT For the period April 1, 1978 "u March 31, 198200 CHEMICAL DURABILITY...REPORT A PERIOD COVERED Chemical Durability Improvement and Static Final Technical Report Fatiue o GlasesApril 1, 1978"’,March 31, 1982 S. PERFORMING ORG

  12. Structural testing for static failure, flutter and other scary things

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricketts, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Ground test and flight test methods are described that may be used to highlight potential structural problems that occur on aircraft. Primary interest is focused on light-weight general aviation airplanes. The structural problems described include static strength failure, aileron reversal, static divergence, and flutter. An example of each of the problems is discussed to illustrate how the data acquired during the tests may be used to predict the occurrence of the structural problem. While some rules of thumb for the prediction of structural problems are given the report is not intended to be used explicitly as a structural analysis handbook.

  13. A static induction device manufactured by silicon direct bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin'an; Liu, Su; Huang, Qing'an

    2004-07-01

    It is always a key problem how to improve the gate-source breakdown voltage (VGK) of static induction devices during manufacturing. By using a silicon direct bonding process to replace the high resistivity epitaxy process, a bonding buried gate structure is formed, which is different from an epitaxy buried gate structure. The new structure can improve the gate-source breakdown voltage from the process and the structure. It is shown that the bonding buried gate structure is a promising structure, that can improve the VGK and other performances of devices, by manufacture of a static induction thyristor.

  14. Static telescope aberration measurement using lucky imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Marrero, Marcos; Rodríguez-Ramos, Luis Fernando; Marichal-Hernández, José Gil; Rodríguez-Ramos, José Manuel

    2012-07-01

    A procedure has been developed to compute static aberrations once the telescope PSF has been measured with the lucky imaging technique, using a nearby star close to the object of interest as the point source to probe the optical system. This PSF is iteratively turned into a phase map at the pupil using the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm and then converted to the appropriate actuation information for a deformable mirror having low actuator number but large stroke capability. The main advantage of this procedure is related with the capability of correcting static aberration at the specific pointing direction and without the need of a wavefront sensor.

  15. Effects of Static Stretching and Playing Soccer on Knee Laxity.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Christian; Gokeler, Alli; Donath, Lars; Hoppe, Matthias W; Freiwald, Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated exercise-induced effects of static stretching and playing soccer on anterior tibial translation (ATT) of the knee joint. Randomized controlled trial. University biomechanics laboratory. Thirty-one athletes were randomly assigned into a stretching (26.9 ± 6.2 years, 1.77 ± 0.09 m, 67.9 ± 10.7 kg) and a control group (27.9 ± 7.4 years, 1.75 ± 0.08 m, 72.0 ± 14.9 kg). Thirty-one amateur soccer players in an additional soccer group (25.1 ± 5.6 years, 1.74 ± 0.10 m, 71.8 ± 14.8 kg). All participants had no history of knee injury requiring surgery and any previous knee ligament or cartilage injury. The stretching group performed 4 different static stretching exercises with a duration of 2 × 20 seconds interspersed with breaks of 10 seconds. The soccer group completed a 90-minute soccer-specific training program. The control group did not perform any physical activity for approximately 30 minutes. Anterior tibial translation was measured with the KT-1000 knee arthrometer at forces of 67 N, 89 N, and maximal manual force (Max) before and after the intervention. There was a significant increase in ATT after static stretching and playing soccer at all applied forces. Maximal manual testing revealed a mean increase of ATT after static stretching of 2.1 ± 1.6 mm (P < 0.0005) and after playing soccer of 1.0 ± 1.5 mm (P = 0.001). The ATT increase after static stretching at 67 and 89 N is significantly higher than in controls. At maximum manual testing, significant differences were evident between all groups. Static stretching and playing soccer increase ATT and may consequently influence mechanical factors of the anterior cruciate ligament. The ATT increase after static stretching was greater than after playing soccer. The observed increase in ATT after static stretching and playing soccer may be associated with changes in kinesthetic perception and sensorimotor control, activation of muscles, joint stability, overall performance, and higher

  16. Static and quasi-static analysis of lobed-pumpkin balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashino, Kyoichi; Sasaki, Makoto; Hashimoto, Satoshi; Saito, Yoshitaka; Izutsu, Naoki

    The present study is motivated by the need to improve design methodology for super pressure balloon with 3D gore design concept, currently being developed at the Scientific Balloon Center of ISAS/JAXA. The distinctive feature of the 3-D gore design is that the balloon film has excess materials not only in the circumferential direction but also in the meridional direction; the meridional excess is gained by attaching the film boundaries to the corresponding tendons of a shorter length with a controlled shortening rate. The resulting balloon shape is a pumpkin-like shape with large bulges formed between adjacent tendons. The balloon film, when fully inflated, develops wrinkles in the circumferential direction over its entire region, so that the stresses in the film are limited to a small amount of uniaxial tension in the circumferential direction while the high meridional loads are carried by re-enforced tendons. Naturally, the amount of wrinkling in the film is dominated by the shortening rate between the film boundaries and the tendon curve. In the 3-D gore design, as a consequence, the shortening rate becomes a fundamental design parameter along with the geometric parameters of the gore. In view of this, we have carried out a series of numerical study of the lobed-pumpkin balloon with varying gore geometry as well as with varying shortening rate. The numerical simula-tions were carried out with a nonlinear finite element code incorporating the wrinkling effect. Numerical results show that there is a threshold value for the shortening rate beyond which the stresses in the balloon film increases disproportionately. We have also carried out quasi-static simulations of the inflation process of the lobed-pumpkin balloon, and have obtained asymmetric deformations when the balloon films are in uniaxial tension state.

  17. Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on early intervention. The four articles presented on this theme are: (1) "Deaf Infants, Hearing Mothers: A Research Report" (Kathryn P. Meadow-Orlans, and others), reporting findings on effects of auditory loss on early development; (2) "Maintaining Involvement of Inner City Families in Early Intervention Programs through…

  18. Static and Dynamic Cognitive Reserve Proxy Measures: Interactions with Alzheimer’s Disease Neuropathology and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Malek-Ahmadi, Michael; Lu, Sophie; Chan, YanYan; Perez, Sylvia E; Chen, Kewei; Mufson, Elliott J

    2018-01-01

    Objective Years of education are the most common proxy for measuring cognitive reserve (CR) when assessing the relationship between Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neuropathology and cognition. However, years of education may be limited as a CR proxy given that it represents a specific timeframe in early life and is static. Studies suggest that measures of intellectual function provide a dynamic estimate of CR that is superior to years of education since it captures the effect of continued learning over time. The present study determined whether dynamic measures of CR were better predictors of episodic memory and executive function in the presence of AD pathology than a static measure of CR. Methods Subjects examined died with a pre-mortem clinical diagnosis of no cognitive impaired, mild cognitive impairment and mild to moderate AD. CERAD and Braak stage were used to stratify the sample by AD pathology severity. Linear regression analyses using CR by CERAD and CR by Braak stage interaction terms were used to determine whether Extended Range Vocabulary Test (ERVT) scores or years of education were significantly associated with episodic memory composite (EMC) and executive function composite (EFC) performance. All models were adjusted for clinical diagnosis, age at death, gender, APOE e4 carrier status and Braak stage. Results For episodic memory, years of education by CERAD interaction were not statistically significant (β=-0.01, SE=0.01, p=0.53). By contrast, ERVT interaction with CERAD diagnosis was statistically significant (β=-0.03, SE=0.01, p=0.004). Among the models using Braak stages, none of the CR by pathology interactions were associated with EMC or EFC. Conclusion Results suggest that a dynamic rather than a static measure is a better indicator of CR and that the relationship between CR and cognition is dependent upon the severity of select AD criteria. PMID:29423338

  19. Determination of the Static Friction Coefficient from Circular Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molina-Bolívar, J. A.; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a physics laboratory exercise for determining the coefficient of static friction between two surfaces. The circular motion of a coin placed on the surface of a rotating turntable has been studied. For this purpose, the motion is recorded with a high-speed digital video camera recording at 240 frames s[superscript-1], and the…

  20. Cognitive Strategies for Learning from Static and Dynamic Visuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewalter, D.

    2003-01-01

    Studied the effects of including static or dynamic visuals in an expository text on a learning outcome and the use of learning strategies when working with these visuals. Results for 60 undergraduates for both types of illustration indicate different frequencies in the use of learning strategies relevant for the learning outcome. (SLD)

  1. Supporting secure programming in web applications through interactive static analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jun; Xie, Jing; Lipford, Heather Richter; Chu, Bill

    2014-07-01

    Many security incidents are caused by software developers' failure to adhere to secure programming practices. Static analysis tools have been used to detect software vulnerabilities. However, their wide usage by developers is limited by the special training required to write rules customized to application-specific logic. Our approach is interactive static analysis, to integrate static analysis into Integrated Development Environment (IDE) and provide in-situ secure programming support to help developers prevent vulnerabilities during code construction. No additional training is required nor are there any assumptions on ways programs are built. Our work is motivated in part by the observation that many vulnerabilities are introduced due to failure to practice secure programming by knowledgeable developers. We implemented a prototype interactive static analysis tool as a plug-in for Java in Eclipse. Our technical evaluation of our prototype detected multiple zero-day vulnerabilities in a large open source project. Our evaluations also suggest that false positives may be limited to a very small class of use cases.

  2. Emotion recognition in Parkinson's disease: Static and dynamic factors.

    PubMed

    Wasser, Cory I; Evans, Felicity; Kempnich, Clare; Glikmann-Johnston, Yifat; Andrews, Sophie C; Thyagarajan, Dominic; Stout, Julie C

    2018-02-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that Parkinson's disease (PD) participants would perform better in an emotion recognition task with dynamic (video) stimuli compared to a task using only static (photograph) stimuli and compared performances on both tasks to healthy control participants. In a within-subjects study, 21 PD participants and 20 age-matched healthy controls performed both static and dynamic emotion recognition tasks. The authors used a 2-way analysis of variance (controlling for individual participant variance) to determine the effect of group (PD, control) on emotion recognition performance in static and dynamic facial recognition tasks. Groups did not significantly differ in their performances on the static and dynamic tasks; however, the trend was suggestive that PD participants performed worse than controls. PD participants may have subtle emotion recognition deficits that are not ameliorated by the addition of contextual cues, similar to those found in everyday scenarios. Consistent with previous literature, the results suggest that PD participants may have underlying emotion recognition deficits, which may impact their social functioning. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Static Force-Deflection Properties of Automobile Steering Components

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1987-06-01

    This report provides the static force-deflection test results for 28 steering columns and 24 steering wheels used in domestic and import passener cars from model year 1975 to 1985. The steering columns and wheels tested include approzimately 90 perce...

  4. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Uniqueness of static black holes without analyticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chruściel, Piotr T.; Galloway, Gregory J.

    2010-08-01

    We show that the hypothesis of analyticity in the uniqueness theory of vacuum, or electrovacuum, static black holes is not needed. More generally, we show that prehorizons covering a closed set cannot occur in well-behaved domains of outer communications.

  5. Static electric dipole polarizability of lithium atoms in Debye plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Li-Na; Qi, Yue-Ying

    2012-12-01

    The static electric dipole polarizabilities of the ground state and n <= 3 excited states of a lithium atom embedded in a weekly coupled plasma environment are investigated as a function of the plasma screening radium. The plasma screening of the Coulomb interaction is described by the Debye—Hückel potential and the interaction between the valence electron and the atomic core is described by a model potential. The electron energies and wave functions for both the bound and continuum states are calculated by solving the Schrödinger equation numerically using the symplectic integrator. The oscillator strengths, partial-wave, and total static dipole polarizabilities of the ground state and n <= 3 excited states of the lithium atom are calculated. Comparison of present results with those of other authors, when available, is made. The results for the 2s ground state demonstrated that the oscillator strengths and the static dipole polarizabilities from np orbitals do not always increase or decrease with the plasma screening effect increasing, unlike that for hydrogen-like ions, especially for 2s→3p transition there is a zero value for both the oscillator strength and the static dipole polarizability for screening length D = 10.3106a0, which is associated with the Cooper minima.

  6. Constraints and vibrations in static packings of ellipsoidal particles.

    PubMed

    Schreck, Carl F; Mailman, Mitch; Chakraborty, Bulbul; O'Hern, Corey S

    2012-06-01

    We numerically investigate the mechanical properties of static packings of frictionless ellipsoidal particles in two and three dimensions over a range of aspect ratio and compression Δφ. While amorphous packings of spherical particles at jamming onset (Δφ=0) are isostatic and possess the minimum contact number z_{iso} required for them to be collectively jammed, amorphous packings of ellipsoidal particles generally possess fewer contacts than expected for collective jamming (zstatic packings of ellipsoidal particles into two important components: the stiffness H and stress S matrices. We find that the stiffness matrix possesses 2N(z_{iso}-z) eigenmodes e[over ̂]_{0} with zero eigenvalues even at finite compression, where N is the number of particles. In addition, these modes e[over ̂]_{0} are nearly eigenvectors of the dynamical matrix with eigenvalues that scale as Δφ, and thus finite compression stabilizes packings of ellipsoidal particles. At jamming onset, the harmonic response of static packings of ellipsoidal particles vanishes, and the total potential energy scales as δ^{4} for perturbations by amplitude δ along these "quartic" modes, e[over ̂]_{0}. These findings illustrate the significant differences between static packings of spherical and ellipsoidal particles.

  7. Static Mixer for Heat Transfer Enhancement for Mold Cooling Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, Rodolfo; Barbosa, Raul; Lee, Kye-Hwan; Park, Younggil

    Injection molding is the process by which a material is melted in a barrel and then it is injected through a nozzle in the mold cavity. When it cools down, the material solidifies into the shape of the cavity. Typical injection mold has cooling channels to maintain constant mold temperature during injection molding process. Even and constant temperature throughout the mold are very critical for a part quality and productivity. Conformal cooling improves the quality and productivity of injection molding process through the implementation of cooling channels that ``conform'' to the shape of the molded part. Recent years, the use of conformal cooling increases with advance of 3D printing technology such as Selective Laser Melting (SLM). Although it maximizes cooling, material and dimension limitations make SLM methods highly expensive. An alternative is the addition of static mixers in the molds with integrated cooling channels. A static mixer is a motionless mixing device that enhances heat transfer by producing improved flow mixing in the pipeline. In this study, the performance of the cooling channels will be evaluated with and without static mixers, by measuring temperature, pressure drop, and flow rate. The following question is addressed: Can a static mixer effectively enhance heat transfer for mold cooling application processes? This will provide insight on the development of design methods and guidelines that can be used to increase cooling efficiency at a lower cost.

  8. Static and Dynamic Moduli of Malm Carbonate: A Poroelastic Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadegan, Alireza; Guérizec, Romain; Reinsch, Thomas; Blöcher, Guido; Zimmermann, Günter; Milsch, Harald

    2016-08-01

    The static and poroelastic moduli of a porous rock, e.g., the drained bulk modulus, can be derived from stress-strain curves in rock mechanical tests, and the dynamic moduli, e.g., dynamic Poisson's ratio, can be determined by acoustic velocity and bulk density measurements. As static and dynamic elastic moduli are different, a correlation is often required to populate geomechanical models. A novel poroelastic approach is introduced to correlate static and dynamic bulk moduli of outcrop analogues samples, representative of Upper-Malm reservoir rock in the Molasse basin, southwestern Germany. Drained and unjacketed poroelastic experiments were performed at two different temperature levels (30 and 60°C). For correlating the static and dynamic elastic moduli, a drained acoustic velocity ratio is introduced, corresponding to the drained Poisson's ratio in poroelasticity. The strength of poroelastic coupling, i.e., the product of Biot and Skempton coefficients here, was the key parameter. The value of this parameter decreased with increasing effective pressure by about 56 ~% from 0.51 at 3 MPa to 0.22 at 73 MPa. In contrast, the maximum change in P- and S-wave velocities was only 3 % in this pressure range. This correlation approach can be used in characterizing underground reservoirs, and can be employed to relate seismicity and geomechanics (seismo-mechanics).

  9. An Economical Method for Static Headspace Enrichment for Arson Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olesen, Bjorn

    2010-01-01

    Static headspace analysis of accelerants from suspected arsons is accomplished by placing an arson sample in a sealed container with a carbon strip suspended above the sample. The sample is heated, cooled to room temperature, and then the organic components are extracted from the carbon strip with carbon disulfide followed by gas chromatography…

  10. 33. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH AT THE STATIC TEST TOWER DURING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH AT THE STATIC TEST TOWER DURING A TEST OF THE PROPULSION SYSTEM OF A JUPITER MISSILE. DATE AND PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN. FRED ORDWAY COLLECTION, U.S. SPACE AND ROCKET CENTER, HUNTSVILLE, AL. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  11. 14 CFR 25.173 - Static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Static longitudinal stability. 25.173 Section 25.173 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... forces (including friction) must be as follows: (a) A pull must be required to obtain and maintain speeds...

  12. 14 CFR 23.175 - Demonstration of static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. 23.175 Section 23.175 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... must be shown as follows: (a) Climb. The stick force curve must have a stable slope at speeds between...

  13. 14 CFR 23.173 - Static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Static longitudinal stability. 23.173 Section 23.173 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... airplane trimmed as indicated, the characteristics of the elevator control forces and the friction within...

  14. 14 CFR 23.173 - Static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Static longitudinal stability. 23.173 Section 23.173 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... airplane trimmed as indicated, the characteristics of the elevator control forces and the friction within...

  15. 14 CFR 25.177 - Static lateral-directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static lateral-directional stability. 25.177 Section 25.177 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... movements and forces must be substantially proportional to the angle of sideslip in a stable sense; and the...

  16. 14 CFR 23.177 - Static directional and lateral stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Static directional and lateral stability. 23.177 Section 23.177 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... these tests must be appropriate to the type of airplane. The rudder pedal force must not reverse at...

  17. 14 CFR 23.175 - Demonstration of static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Demonstration of static longitudinal stability. 23.175 Section 23.175 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... must be shown as follows: (a) Climb. The stick force curve must have a stable slope at speeds between...

  18. 14 CFR 23.173 - Static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Static longitudinal stability. 23.173 Section 23.173 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... airplane trimmed as indicated, the characteristics of the elevator control forces and the friction within...

  19. 14 CFR 25.177 - Static lateral-directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Static lateral-directional stability. 25.177 Section 25.177 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... movements and forces must be substantially proportional to the angle of sideslip in a stable sense; and the...

  20. 14 CFR 25.177 - Static lateral-directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Static lateral-directional stability. 25.177 Section 25.177 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... operation of the airplane, the aileron and rudder control movements and forces must be substantially...

  1. 14 CFR 23.173 - Static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Static longitudinal stability. 23.173 Section 23.173 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... airplane trimmed as indicated, the characteristics of the elevator control forces and the friction within...

  2. 14 CFR 25.173 - Static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Static longitudinal stability. 25.173 Section 25.173 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... forces (including friction) must be as follows: (a) A pull must be required to obtain and maintain speeds...

  3. 14 CFR 25.173 - Static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Static longitudinal stability. 25.173 Section 25.173 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... forces (including friction) must be as follows: (a) A pull must be required to obtain and maintain speeds...

  4. 14 CFR 23.173 - Static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static longitudinal stability. 23.173 Section 23.173 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... airplane trimmed as indicated, the characteristics of the elevator control forces and the friction within...

  5. 14 CFR 25.173 - Static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static longitudinal stability. 25.173 Section 25.173 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... forces (including friction) must be as follows: (a) A pull must be required to obtain and maintain speeds...

  6. 14 CFR 25.173 - Static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Static longitudinal stability. 25.173 Section 25.173 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... forces (including friction) must be as follows: (a) A pull must be required to obtain and maintain speeds...

  7. Static Solutions of Einstein's Equations with Cylindrical Symmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trendafilova, C. S.; Fulling, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    In analogy with the standard derivation of the Schwarzschild solution, we find all static, cylindrically symmetric solutions of the Einstein field equations for vacuum. These include not only the well-known cone solution, which is locally flat, but others in which the metric coefficients are powers of the radial coordinate and the spacetime is…

  8. Weber's gravitational force as static weak field approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiandho, Yuant

    2016-02-01

    Weber's gravitational force (WGF) is one of gravitational model that can accommodate a non-static system because it depends not only on the distance but also on the velocity and the acceleration. Unlike Newton's law of gravitation, WGF can predict the anomalous of Mercury and gravitational bending of light near massive object very well. Then, some researchers use WGF as an alternative model of gravitation and propose a new mechanics theory namely the relational mechanics theory. However, currently we have known that the theory of general relativity which proposed by Einstein can explain gravity with very accurate. Through the static weak field approximation for the non-relativistic object, we also have known that the theory of general relativity will reduce to Newton's law of gravity. In this work, we expand the static weak field approximation that compatible with relativistic object and we obtain a force equation which correspond to WGF. Therefore, WGF is more precise than Newton's gravitational law. The static-weak gravitational field that we used is a solution of the Einstein's equation in the vacuum that satisfy the linear field approximation. The expression of WGF with ξ = 1 and satisfy the requirement of energy conservation are obtained after resolving the geodesic equation. By this result, we can conclude that WGF can be derived from the general relativity.

  9. Static stall alleviation using a rail plasma actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Young-Joon; Gray, Miles; Sirohi, Jayant; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2018-07-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the ability of a rail plasma actuator (RailPAc) to alleviate static stall on an airfoil. The RailPAc device consists of parallel rails flush mounted on the upper surface of a VR-12 airfoil, with a high-current (∼1.3 kA) arc bridging the gap between the rails. A Lorentz force (∼0.3 N lasting  ∼1 ms) generated on the arc propels it along the airfoil chord and transfers momentum to the surrounding flow. Experiments were conducted in a low speed wind tunnel at two different Reynolds numbers ( and ) and various static angles of attack (up to  ∼30°). Particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to measure the flow over the passive and actuated airfoil, while the airfoil lift was measured using a force balance. The experiments showed that the RailPAc promotes flow reattachment and can suppress static stall over a wide range of angles of attack. Operation of a single RailPAc resulted in  ∼40 improvement in post-stall lift and  ∼4° increase in stall angle compared to a passive airfoil with an unpowered RailPAc. The results provide insight into the actuation mechanism and demonstrate, for the first time, the ability of the RailPAc to alleviate static stall on an airfoil.

  10. Auditory Spectral Integration in the Perception of Static Vowels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Robert Allen; Jacewicz, Ewa; Chang, Chiung-Yun

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate potential contributions of broadband spectral integration in the perception of static vowels. Specifically, can the auditory system infer formant frequency information from changes in the intensity weighting across harmonics when the formant itself is missing? Does this type of integration produce the same results in the lower…

  11. 14 CFR 33.64 - Pressurized engine static parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pressurized engine static parts. 33.64 Section 33.64 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.64 Pressurized...

  12. 14 CFR 33.64 - Pressurized engine static parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pressurized engine static parts. 33.64 Section 33.64 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.64 Pressurized...

  13. Mass properties measurement system: Dynamics and statics measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Keith L.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents and interprets experimental data obtained from the Mass Properties Measurement System (MPMS). Statics measurements yield the center-of-gravity of an unknown mass and dynamics measurements yield its inertia matrix. Observations of the MPMS performance has lead us to specific design criteria and an understanding of MPMS limitations.

  14. IMPORTANCE OF MOVEMENT VARIES IN STATIC AND DYNAMIC LANDSCAPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relative sensitivity of spatially explicit population models (SEPMs) to movement parameters is a topic of ongoing debate among theoretical ecologists. In this study, we add additional realism to this debate by examining a SEPM's sensitivity to dispersal ability in static vs....

  15. Aging and curvature discrimination from static and dynamic touch.

    PubMed

    Norman, J Farley; Kappers, Astrid M L; Cheeseman, Jacob R; Ronning, Cecilia; Thomason, Kelsey E; Baxter, Michael W; Calloway, Autum B; Lamirande, Davora N

    2013-01-01

    Two experiments evaluated the ability of 30 older and younger adults to discriminate the curvature of simple object surfaces from static and dynamic touch. The ages of the older adults ranged from 66 to 85 years, while those of the younger adults ranged from 20 to 29 years. For each participant in both experiments, the minimum curvature magnitude needed to reliably discriminate between convex and concave surfaces was determined. In Experiment 1, participants used static touch to make their judgments of curvature, while dynamic touch was used in Experiment 2. When static touch was used to discriminate curvature, a large effect of age occurred (the thresholds were 0.67 & 1.11/m for the younger and older participants, respectively). However, when participants used dynamic touch, there was no significant difference between the ability of younger and older participants to discriminate curvature (the thresholds were 0.58 & 0.59/m for the younger and older participants, respectively). The results of the current study demonstrate that while older adults can accurately discriminate surface curvature from dynamic touch, they possess significant impairments for static touch.

  16. Aging and Curvature Discrimination from Static and Dynamic Touch

    PubMed Central

    Norman, J. Farley; Kappers, Astrid M. L.; Cheeseman, Jacob R.; Ronning, Cecilia; Thomason, Kelsey E.; Baxter, Michael W.; Calloway, Autum B.; Lamirande, Davora N.

    2013-01-01

    Two experiments evaluated the ability of 30 older and younger adults to discriminate the curvature of simple object surfaces from static and dynamic touch. The ages of the older adults ranged from 66 to 85 years, while those of the younger adults ranged from 20 to 29 years. For each participant in both experiments, the minimum curvature magnitude needed to reliably discriminate between convex and concave surfaces was determined. In Experiment 1, participants used static touch to make their judgments of curvature, while dynamic touch was used in Experiment 2. When static touch was used to discriminate curvature, a large effect of age occurred (the thresholds were 0.67 & 1.11/m for the younger and older participants, respectively). However, when participants used dynamic touch, there was no significant difference between the ability of younger and older participants to discriminate curvature (the thresholds were 0.58 & 0.59/m for the younger and older participants, respectively). The results of the current study demonstrate that while older adults can accurately discriminate surface curvature from dynamic touch, they possess significant impairments for static touch. PMID:23844224

  17. Discharging Static Electricity From Inside A Glass Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellsbury, Walter L.

    1994-01-01

    Device that contains emitter of alpha particles discharges static electricity from inside wall of glass tube of volumetric-flow calibrator. Includes cylinder that has wall thickness of 1/16 in., diameter about 1/2 in. smaller than inside diameter of tube, and height that extends about 1/2 in. above piston that moves along tube and is part of calibrator.

  18. Matching Voice and Face Identity from Static Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mavica, Lauren W.; Barenholtz, Elan

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that people are unable to correctly choose which unfamiliar voice and static image of a face belong to the same person. Here, we present evidence that people can perform this task with greater than chance accuracy. In Experiment 1, participants saw photographs of two, same-gender models, while simultaneously…

  19. 32. VIEW LOOKING EAST AT THE STATIC TEST TOWER WHILE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. VIEW LOOKING EAST AT THE STATIC TEST TOWER WHILE A JUPITER MISSILE IS BEING POSITIONED ONTO THE TEST TOWER. DATE AND PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN, MSFC PHOTO LAB. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  20. 14 CFR 33.64 - Pressurized engine static parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pressurized engine static parts. 33.64 Section 33.64 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.64 Pressurized...

  1. 14 CFR 33.64 - Pressurized engine static parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pressurized engine static parts. 33.64 Section 33.64 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.64 Pressurized...

  2. 14 CFR 33.64 - Pressurized engine static parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pressurized engine static parts. 33.64 Section 33.64 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.64 Pressurized...

  3. 14 CFR 27.173 - Static longitudinal stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static longitudinal stability. 27.173... longitudinal stability. (a) The longitudinal control must be designed so that a rearward movement of the... the maneuvers specified in § 27.175(a) through (d), the slope of the control position versus airspeed...

  4. 14 CFR 27.177 - Static directional stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Static directional stability. 27.177... directional stability. (a) The directional controls must operate in such a manner that the sense and direction... sideslip angle versus directional control position curve may have a negative slope within a small range of...

  5. Relationship between static foot posture and foot mobility

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It is not uncommon for a person's foot posture and/or mobility to be assessed during a clinical examination. The exact relationship, however, between static posture and mobility is not known. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of association between static foot posture and mobility. Method The static foot posture and foot mobility of 203 healthy individuals was assessed and then analyzed to determine if low arched or "pronated" feet are more mobile than high arched or "supinated" feet. Results The study demonstrated that those individuals with a lower standing dorsal arch height and/or a wider standing midfoot width had greater mobility in their foot. In addition, those individuals with higher Foot Posture Index (FPI) values demonstrated greater mobility and those with lower FPI values demonstrated less mobility. Finally, the amount of foot mobility that an individual has can be predicted reasonably well using either a 3 or 4 variable linear regression model. Conclusions Because of the relationship between static foot posture and mobility, it is recommended that both be assessed as part of a comprehensive evaluation of a individual with foot problems. PMID:21244705

  6. Supporting secure programming in web applications through interactive static analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun; Xie, Jing; Lipford, Heather Richter; Chu, Bill

    2013-01-01

    Many security incidents are caused by software developers’ failure to adhere to secure programming practices. Static analysis tools have been used to detect software vulnerabilities. However, their wide usage by developers is limited by the special training required to write rules customized to application-specific logic. Our approach is interactive static analysis, to integrate static analysis into Integrated Development Environment (IDE) and provide in-situ secure programming support to help developers prevent vulnerabilities during code construction. No additional training is required nor are there any assumptions on ways programs are built. Our work is motivated in part by the observation that many vulnerabilities are introduced due to failure to practice secure programming by knowledgeable developers. We implemented a prototype interactive static analysis tool as a plug-in for Java in Eclipse. Our technical evaluation of our prototype detected multiple zero-day vulnerabilities in a large open source project. Our evaluations also suggest that false positives may be limited to a very small class of use cases. PMID:25685513

  7. Quark structure of static correlators in high temperature QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Claude; DeGrand, Thomas A.; DeTar, Carleton; Gottlieb, Steven; Krasnitz, A.; Ogilvie, Michael C.; Sugar, R. L.; Toussaint, D.

    1992-07-01

    We present results of numerical simulations of quantum chromodynamics at finite temperature with two flavors of Kogut-Susskind quarks on the Intel iPSC/860 parallel processor. We investigate the properties of the objects whose exchange gives static screening lengths by reconstructing their correlated quark-antiquark structure.

  8. 49 CFR 238.405 - Longitudinal static compressive strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... crash refuge for crewmembers occupying the cab of a power car, the underframe of the cab of a power car... volumes of a power car or a trailer car designed to crush as part of the crash energy management design...) The underframe of the occupied volume of each trailer car shall resist a minimum longitudinal static...

  9. 49 CFR 238.405 - Longitudinal static compressive strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... crash refuge for crewmembers occupying the cab of a power car, the underframe of the cab of a power car... volumes of a power car or a trailer car designed to crush as part of the crash energy management design...) The underframe of the occupied volume of each trailer car shall resist a minimum longitudinal static...

  10. 49 CFR 238.405 - Longitudinal static compressive strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... crash refuge for crewmembers occupying the cab of a power car, the underframe of the cab of a power car... volumes of a power car or a trailer car designed to crush as part of the crash energy management design...) The underframe of the occupied volume of each trailer car shall resist a minimum longitudinal static...

  11. 30 CFR 18.67 - Static-pressure tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static-pressure tests. 18.67 Section 18.67 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Inspections and Tests § 18...

  12. Dynamic and Quasi-Static Grade Crossing Collision Tests

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-03-02

    To support the development of a proposed rule [1], a fullscale : dynamic test and two full-scale quasi-static tests have : been performed on the posts of a state-of-the-art (SOA) end : frame. These tests were designed to evaluate the dynamic and : qu...

  13. VIEW OF EAST TEST SITE FROM TOP OF STATIC TEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF EAST TEST SITE FROM TOP OF STATIC TEST TOWER VIEW INCLUDES POWER PLANT TEST STAND AND SATURN V TEST STAND IN THE WEST TEST AREA (FAR BACKGROUND). - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  14. Real-time measurement of soil stiffness during static compaction.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-01-01

    Is continuous sensing of soil properties during static pad foot roller compaction achievable? A new pad-based, rollerintegrated system for real-time measurement of the elastic modulus of fine- and mixed-grain soils is the goal of Development of So...

  15. Fluorescent lamp with static magnetic field generating means

    DOEpatents

    Moskowitz, Philip E.; Maya, Jakob

    1987-01-01

    A fluorescent lamp wherein magnetic field generating means (e.g., permanent magnets) are utilized to generate a static magnetic field across the respective electrode structures of the lamp such that maximum field strength is located at the electrode's filament. An increase in efficacy during operation has been observed.

  16. Developmental model of static allometry in holometabolous insects.

    PubMed

    Shingleton, Alexander W; Mirth, Christen K; Bates, Peter W

    2008-08-22

    The regulation of static allometry is a fundamental developmental process, yet little is understood of the mechanisms that ensure organs scale correctly across a range of body sizes. Recent studies have revealed the physiological and genetic mechanisms that control nutritional variation in the final body and organ size in holometabolous insects. The implications these mechanisms have for the regulation of static allometry is, however, unknown. Here, we formulate a mathematical description of the nutritional control of body and organ size in Drosophila melanogaster and use it to explore how the developmental regulators of size influence static allometry. The model suggests that the slope of nutritional static allometries, the 'allometric coefficient', is controlled by the relative sensitivity of an organ's growth rate to changes in nutrition, and the relative duration of development when nutrition affects an organ's final size. The model also predicts that, in order to maintain correct scaling, sensitivity to changes in nutrition varies among organs, and within organs through time. We present experimental data that support these predictions. By revealing how specific physiological and genetic regulators of size influence allometry, the model serves to identify developmental processes upon which evolution may act to alter scaling relationships.

  17. 49 CFR 238.203 - Static end strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... inches by 24 inches. The alternative specified in this paragraph is not applicable to a cab car or an MU... use of the equipment; and (v) A quantitative risk assessment, incorporating the design information... Equipment § 238.203 Static end strength. (a)(1) Except as further specified in this paragraph or in...

  18. 49 CFR 238.203 - Static end strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... inches by 24 inches. The alternative specified in this paragraph is not applicable to a cab car or an MU... use of the equipment; and (v) A quantitative risk assessment, incorporating the design information... Equipment § 238.203 Static end strength. (a)(1) Except as further specified in this paragraph or in...

  19. 49 CFR 238.203 - Static end strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... inches by 24 inches. The alternative specified in this paragraph is not applicable to a cab car or an MU... use of the equipment; and (v) A quantitative risk assessment, incorporating the design information... Equipment § 238.203 Static end strength. (a)(1) Except as further specified in this paragraph or in...

  20. Fluorescent lamp with static magnetic field generating means

    DOEpatents

    Moskowitz, P.E.; Maya, J.

    1987-09-08

    A fluorescent lamp wherein magnetic field generating means (e.g., permanent magnets) are utilized to generate a static magnetic field across the respective electrode structures of the lamp such that maximum field strength is located at the electrode's filament. An increase in efficacy during operation has been observed. 2 figs.

  1. Interaction mechanisms and biological effects of static magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1994-06-01

    Mechanisms through which static magnetic fields interact with living systems are described and illustrated by selected experimental observations. These mechanisms include electrodynamic interactions with moving, ionic charges (blood flow and nerve impulse conduction), magnetomechanical interactions (orientation and translation of molecules structures and magnetic particles), and interactions with electronic spin states in charge transfer reactions (photo-induced electron transfer in photosynthesis). A general summary is also presented of the biological effects of static magnetic fields. There is convincing experimental evidence for magnetoreception mechanisms in several classes of lower organisms, including bacteria and marine organisms. However, in more highly evolved species of animals,more » there is no evidence that the interactions of static magnetic fields with flux densities up to 2 Tesla (1 Tesla [T] = 10{sup 4} Gauss) produce either behavioral or physiolocical alterations. These results, based on controlled studies with laboratory animals, are consistent with the outcome of recent epidemiological surveys on human populations exposed occupationally to static magnetic fields.« less

  2. 14 CFR 23.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.681 Limit load static tests. (a) Compliance with the limit load requirements of this... loading in the control system; and (2) Each fitting, pulley, and bracket used in attaching the system to...

  3. 14 CFR 23.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.681 Limit load static tests. (a) Compliance with the limit load requirements of this... loading in the control system; and (2) Each fitting, pulley, and bracket used in attaching the system to...

  4. 14 CFR 23.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.681 Limit load static tests. (a) Compliance with the limit load requirements of this... loading in the control system; and (2) Each fitting, pulley, and bracket used in attaching the system to...

  5. 14 CFR 23.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.681 Limit load static tests. (a) Compliance with the limit load requirements of this... loading in the control system; and (2) Each fitting, pulley, and bracket used in attaching the system to...

  6. 14 CFR 23.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.681 Limit load static tests. (a) Compliance with the limit load requirements of this... loading in the control system; and (2) Each fitting, pulley, and bracket used in attaching the system to...

  7. A Static Burst Test for Composite Flywheel Rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartl, Stefan; Schulz, Alexander; Sima, Harald; Koch, Thomas; Kaltenbacher, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    High efficient and safe flywheels are an interesting technology for decentralized energy storage. To ensure all safety aspects, a static test method for a controlled initiation of a burst event for composite flywheel rotors is presented with nearly the same stress distribution as in the dynamic case, rotating with maximum speed. In addition to failure prediction using different maximum stress criteria and a safety factor, a set of tensile and compressive tests is carried out to identify the parameters of the used carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) material. The static finite element (FE) simulation results of the flywheel static burst test (FSBT) compare well to the quasistatic FE-simulation results of the flywheel rotor using inertia loads. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the presented method is a very good controllable and observable possibility to test a high speed flywheel energy storage system (FESS) rotor in a static way. Thereby, a much more expensive and dangerous dynamic spin up test with possible uncertainties can be substituted.

  8. GENERAL VIEW LOOKING SOUTH AT THE SATURN I STATIC TEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW LOOKING SOUTH AT THE SATURN I STATIC TEST STAND. NOTE THE FIRST STAGE OF THE SATURN I ROCKET ON DISPLAY TO THE LEFT OF THE TEST STAND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  9. Maxwell-Higgs equation on higher dimensional static curved spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Mulyanto, E-mail: mulyanto37@gmail.com; Akbar, Fiki Taufik, E-mail: ftakbar@fi.itb.ac.id; Gunara, Bobby Eka, E-mail: bobby@fi.itb.ac.id

    In this paper we consider a class of solutions of Maxwell-Higgs equation in higher dimensional static curved spacetimes called Schwarzchild de-Sitter spacetimes. We obtain the general form of the electric fields and magnetic fields in background Schwarzchild de-Sitter spacetimes. However, determining the interaction between photons with the Higgs scalar fields is needed further studies.

  10. Visual processing of moving and static self body-parts.

    PubMed

    Frassinetti, Francesca; Pavani, Francesco; Zamagni, Elisa; Fusaroli, Giulia; Vescovi, Massimo; Benassi, Mariagrazia; Avanzi, Stefano; Farnè, Alessandro

    2009-07-01

    Humans' ability to recognize static images of self body-parts can be lost following a lesion of the right hemisphere [Frassinetti, F., Maini, M., Romualdi, S., Galante, E., & Avanzi, S. (2008). Is it mine? Hemispheric asymmetries in corporeal self-recognition. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 20, 1507-1516]. Here we investigated whether the visual information provided by the movement of self body-parts may be separately processed by right brain-damaged (RBD) patients and constitute a valuable cue to reduce their deficit in self body-parts processing. To pursue these aims, neurological healthy subjects and RBD patients were submitted to a matching-task of a pair of subsequent visual stimuli, in two conditions. In the dynamic condition, participants were shown movies of moving body-parts (hand, foot, arm and leg); in the static condition, participants were shown still images of the same body-parts. In each condition, on half of the trials at least one stimulus in the pair was from the participant's own body ('Self' condition), whereas on the remaining half of the trials both stimuli were from another person ('Other' condition). Results showed that in healthy participants the self-advantage was present when processing both static and dynamic body-parts, but it was more important in the latter condition. In RBD patients, however, the self-advantage was absent in the static, but present in the dynamic body-parts condition. These findings suggest that visual information from self body-parts in motion may be processed independently in patients with impaired static self-processing, thus pointing to a modular organization of the mechanisms responsible for the self/other distinction.

  11. Remote histology learning from static versus dynamic microscopic images.

    PubMed

    Mione, Sylvia; Valcke, Martin; Cornelissen, Maria

    2016-05-06

    Histology is the study of microscopic structures in normal tissue sections. Curriculum redesign in medicine has led to a decrease in the use of optical microscopes during practical classes. Other imaging solutions have been implemented to facilitate remote learning. With advancements in imaging technologies, learning material can now be digitized. Digitized microscopy images can be presented in either a static or dynamic format. This study of remote histology education identifies whether dynamic pictures are superior to static images for the acquisition of histological knowledge. Test results of two cohorts of second-year Bachelor in Medicine students at Ghent University were analyzed in two consecutive academic years: Cohort 1 (n = 190) and Cohort 2 (n = 174). Students in Cohort 1 worked with static images whereas students in Cohort 2 were presented with dynamic images. ANCOVA was applied to study differences in microscopy performance scores between the two cohorts, taking into account any possible initial differences in prior knowledge. The results show that practical histology scores are significantly higher with dynamic images as compared to static images (F (1,361) = 15.14, P < 0.01), regardless of student's gender and performance level. Several reasons for this finding can be explained in accordance with cognitivist learning theory. Since the findings suggest that knowledge construction with dynamic pictures is stronger as compared to static images, dynamic images should be introduced in a remote setting for microscopy education. Further implementation within a larger electronic learning management system needs to be explored in future research. Anat Sci Educ 9: 222-230. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  12. [Effect of static magnetic field on deep wound healing of SD rats].

    PubMed

    Shen, Jian-Guo; Chen, Wei-Shan; Wang, Chang-Xing; Jiang, Tao; Dong, Li-Qiang

    2009-05-01

    To investigate the effect of static magnetic field on deep wound healing of SD rats and VEGF during the wound healing and different strength static magnetic field on deep wound healing of SD rats. Divided forty-eight SD rats into three groups: 0.16 T magnetic disk treatment (0.16 T group), 0.32 T magnetic disk treatment (0.32 T group), control group. General wounds healing situation was observated on the 3, 6, 9, 12 day. The area of every wound was calculated. The tissue of granulation was dyeing by immune tissue chemical decoration method, in which VEGF protein content with its range in tissue was measured. The healing index of 0.16 T magnetic group wounds were larger than that of control group on 6th and 9th day, there were statistical difference. The healing index of 0.32 T magnetic group wounds were larger than that of control group on 3rd, 6th, 9th and 12th day, there were statistical difference. The healing index of 0.32 T group wounds contrasted to that of 0.16 T group wounds had no statistical significance. Observation of VEGF at the course of wound healing:the expressing of VEGF in magnetic group wounds on 3rd and 6th was stronger than in control group wounds, there were statistical difference. While there were no obvious difference between them on 9th and 12th day (P>0.05). But the contrast between that in 0.32 T group and in 0.16 T group had no statistical difference. The expressing strength of VEGF in magnetic group reached the peak amplitude on the 6th day, and that in control group reached peak amplitude on 9th day. And the peak amplitude of magnetic group was stronger than that of control group. Static magnetic disc of 0.16T and 0.32 T can promote deep wound of SD rats heal. The mechanism of static magnetic field promoting wound heal may be relative to the expressing highly of VEGF during early and middle time.

  13. Fungi diversity from different depths and times in chicken manure waste static aerobic composting.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wenjie; Lu, Yusheng; Tan, Zhiyuan; Xu, Peizhi; Xie, Kaizhi; Li, Xia; Sun, Lili

    2017-09-01

    The Dirichlet multinomial mixtures mode was used to analyse illumina sequencing data to reveal both temporal and spatial variations of the fungi community present in the aerobic composting. Results showed that 670 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were detected, and the dominant phylum was Ascomycota. There were four types of samples fungi communities during the composting process. Samples from the early composting stage were mainly grouped into type I and Saccharomycetales sp. was dominant. Fungi community in the medium composting stage were fallen into type II and III, Sordariales sp. and Acremonium alcalophilum, Saccharomycetales sp. and Scedosporium minutisporum were the dominant OTUs respectively. Samples from the late composting stage were mainly grouped into type IV and Scedosporium minutisporum was the dominant OTU; Scedosporium minutisporum was significantly affected by depth (P<0.05). Results indicate that time and depth both are factors that influence fungi distribution and variation in c waste during static aerobic composting. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. IMPS, A Static-Optics Application of Full-Stokes Spectropolarimetry to Search for Extraterrestrial Biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telesco, C. M.; Sparks, W. B.; Zhao, B.; Varosi, F.; Schofield, S.; Germer, T. A.; Kolokolova, L.; Parenteau, M. N.; Cooper, G.; Grundy, W. M.; Guzmán, R.; Pantin, E.

    2016-12-01

    Optical spectropolarimetry holds great promise in the search for extraterrestrial life. In particular, the detection of circular polarization can indicate chirality, a signature of biological significance. We describe an on-going effort to implement the full-Stokes (I, Q, U, V), static-optics concept for optical spectropolarimetry described by Sparks et al. [App. Optics, 51, 5495 (2012)]. Our early breadboard embodiments of the concept demonstrate its simplicity and indicate its potential for space missions in which a compact design with no moving parts is crucial to achieve the mission goals. We describe the instrument, called the Integrated Miniature Polarimeter and Spectrograph (IMPS), and consider one example for its deployment: a mission to land on an outer solar system body such as Europa.

  15. Speckle temporal stability in XAO coronagraphic images. II. Refine model for quasi-static speckle temporal evolution for VLT/SPHERE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, P.; Kasper, M.; Costille, A.; Sauvage, J. F.; Dohlen, K.; Puget, P.; Beuzit, J. L.

    2013-06-01

    Context. Observing sequences have shown that the major noise source limitation in high-contrast imaging is the presence of quasi-static speckles. The timescale on which quasi-static speckles evolve is determined by various factors, mechanical or thermal deformations, among others. Aims: Understanding these time-variable instrumental speckles and, especially, their interaction with other aberrations, referred to as the pinning effect, is paramount for the search for faint stellar companions. The temporal evolution of quasi-static speckles is, for instance, required for quantifying the gain expected when using angular differential imaging (ADI) and to determining the interval on which speckle nulling techniques must be carried out. Methods: Following an early analysis of a time series of adaptively corrected, coronagraphic images obtained in a laboratory condition with the high-order test bench (HOT) at ESO Headquarters, we confirm our results with new measurements carried out with the SPHERE instrument during its final test phase in Europe. The analysis of the residual speckle pattern in both direct and differential coronagraphic images enables the characterization of the temporal stability of quasi-static speckles. Data were obtained in a thermally actively controlled environment reproducing realistic conditions encountered at the telescope. Results: The temporal evolution of the quasi-static wavefront error exhibits a linear power law, which can be used to model quasi-static speckle evolution in the context of forthcoming high-contrast imaging instruments, with implications for instrumentation (design, observing strategies, data reduction). Such a model can be used for instance to derive the timescale on which non-common path aberrations must be sensed and corrected. We found in our data that quasi-static wavefront error increases with ~0.7 Å per minute.

  16. Static and dynamic properties of two-dimensional Coulomb clusters.

    PubMed

    Ash, Biswarup; Chakrabarti, J; Ghosal, Amit

    2017-10-01

    We study the temperature dependence of static and dynamic responses of Coulomb interacting particles in two-dimensional confinements across the crossover from solid- to liquid-like behaviors. While static correlations that investigate the translational and bond orientational order in the confinements show the footprints of hexatic-like phase at low temperatures, dynamics of the particles slow down considerably in this phase, reminiscent of a supercooled liquid. Using density correlations, we probe long-lived heterogeneities arising from the interplay of the irregularity in the confinement and long-range Coulomb interactions. The relaxation at multiple time scales show stretched-exponential decay of spatial correlations in irregular traps. Temperature dependence of characteristic time scales, depicting the structural relaxation of the system, show striking similarities with those observed for the glassy systems, indicating that some of the key signatures of supercooled liquids emerge in confinements with lower spatial symmetries.

  17. Test stand for Titan 34D SRM static firing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glozman, Vladimir; Shipway, George

    1988-01-01

    An existing liquid engine test stand at the AF Astronautics Laboratory was refurbished and extensively modified to accommodate the static firing of the Titan 34D solid rocket motor (SRM) in the vertical nozzle down orientation. The main load restraint structure was designed and built to secure the SRM from lifting off during the firing. In addition, the structure provided weather protection, temperature conditioning of the SRM, and positioning of the measurement and recording equipment. The structure was also used for stacking/de-stacking of SRM segments and other technological processes. The existing stand, its foundation and anchorage were thoroughly examined and reanalyzed. Necessary stand modifications were carried out to comply with the requirements of the Titan 34D SRM static firing.

  18. Statistical Reproducibility of the Dynamic and Static Fatigue Experiments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    82171a no 3 a s d e te rm-,I n ed7 from t Ynamic ’ra-,4-e 2x oe r imen. Figure 2. T-he c oeffic 4e nt o - v arari an ( C . o f .4eib L’ sIatce --ar a-:e...e rc lecnnique to aeterr-ine zne v~iidit of the assumptions. - .2 Static Fatioue Static -aticue tests entai- , the reDeatec measuremen- c - azure ...ress -ance ncreased, anc- tec.-ease: zs n :El ~ c a -amet: -7 4creas2c. -o r a ze sac, nC~e 3Es3 ra-.<e ~ D 3 s ar, c a s n amD-e , s e : ) rrc uCb c 0

  19. Spectra of turbulent static pressure fluctuations in jet mixing layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, B. G.; Adrian, R. J.; Nithianandan, C. K.; Planchon, H. P., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Spectral similarity laws are derived for the power spectra of turbulent static pressure fluctuations by application of dimensional analysis in the limit of large turbulent Reynolds number. The theory predicts that pressure spectra are generated by three distinct types of interaction in the velocity fields: a fourth order interaction between fluctuating velocities, an interaction between the first order mean shear and the third order velocity fluctuations, and an interaction between the second order mean shear rate and the second order fluctuating velocity. Measurements of one-dimensional power spectra of the turbulent static pressure fluctuations in the driven mixing layer of a subsonic, circular jet are presented, and the spectra are examined for evidence of spectral similarity. Spectral similarity is found for the low wavenumber range when the large scale flow on the centerline of the mixing layer is self-preserving. The data are also consistent with the existence of universal inertial subranges for the spectra of each interaction mode.

  20. Static holes in the geometrically frustrated bow-tie ladder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, George B.; Brenig, Wolfram

    2008-10-01

    We investigate the doping of a geometrically frustrated spin ladder with static holes by a complementary approach using exact diagonalization and quantum dimers. Results for thermodynamic properties, the singlet density of states, the hole-binding energy and the spin correlations will be presented. For the undoped systems the ground state is non-degenerate, with translationally invariant nearest-neighbor spin correlations. For the doped case, we find that static holes polarize their vicinity through a localization of singlets, reducing the frustration. This polarization induces short range repulsive forces between two holes and an oscillatory behavior of the long range two-hole energy. For most quantities investigated, we find very good agreement between the quantum dimer approach and the results from exact diagonalization.

  1. Subsonic Static and Dynamic Aerodynamics of Blunt Entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, Robert A.; Fremaux, Charles M.; Yates, Leslie A.

    1999-01-01

    The incompressible subsonic aerodynamics of four entry-vehicle shapes with variable c.g. locations are examined in the Langley 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel. The shapes examined are spherically-blunted cones with half-cone angles of 30, 45, and 60 deg. The nose bluntness varies between 0.25 and 0.5 times the base diameter. The Reynolds number based on model diameter for these tests is near 500,000. Quantitative data on attitude and location are collected using a video-based data acquisition system and reduced with a six deg-of-freedom inverse method. All of the shapes examined suffered from strong dynamic instabilities which could produced limit cycles with sufficient amplitudes to overcome static stability of the configuration. Increasing cone half-angle or nose bluntness increases drag but decreases static and dynamic stability.

  2. A static data flow simulation study at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barszcz, Eric; Howard, Lauri S.

    1987-01-01

    Demands in computational power, particularly in the area of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), led NASA Ames Research Center to study advanced computer architectures. One architecture being studied is the static data flow architecture based on research done by Jack B. Dennis at MIT. To improve understanding of this architecture, a static data flow simulator, written in Pascal, has been implemented for use on a Cray X-MP/48. A matrix multiply and a two-dimensional fast Fourier transform (FFT), two algorithms used in CFD work at Ames, have been run on the simulator. Execution times can vary by a factor of more than 2 depending on the partitioning method used to assign instructions to processing elements. Service time for matching tokens has proved to be a major bottleneck. Loop control and array address calculation overhead can double the execution time. The best sustained MFLOPS rates were less than 50% of the maximum capability of the machine.

  3. Static and Dynamic Compaction of CL-20 Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Marcia A.; Brundage, Aaron L.; Dudley, Evan C.

    2009-12-01

    Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) powders were compacted under quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. A uniaxial compression apparatus quasi-statically compressed the powders to 90% theoretical maximum density with applied stresses up to 0.4 GPa. Dynamic compaction measurements using low-density pressings approximately 64% theoretical maximum density (TMD) were obtained in a single-stage gas gun at impact velocities between 0.17-0.95 km/s. Experiments were conducted in a reverse ballistic arrangement in which the projectile contained the CL-20 powder bed and impacted a target consisting of an aluminized window. VISAR-measured particle velocities at the explosive-window interface determined the shock Hugoniot states for pressures up to 1.3 GPa. Approved for public release, SAND2009-4810C.

  4. Stable static structures in models with higher-order derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Bazeia, D., E-mail: bazeia@fisica.ufpb.br; Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, 58109-970 Campina Grande, PB; Lobão, A.S.

    2015-09-15

    We investigate the presence of static solutions in generalized models described by a real scalar field in four-dimensional space–time. We study models in which the scalar field engenders higher-order derivatives and spontaneous symmetry breaking, inducing the presence of domain walls. Despite the presence of higher-order derivatives, the models keep to equations of motion second-order differential equations, so we focus on the presence of first-order equations that help us to obtain analytical solutions and investigate linear stability on general grounds. We then illustrate the general results with some specific examples, showing that the domain wall may become compact and that themore » zero mode may split. Moreover, if the model is further generalized to include k-field behavior, it may contribute to split the static structure itself.« less

  5. Prediction of flyover jet noise spectra from static tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, U.; Michalke, A.

    A scaling law for predicting the overall flyover noise of a single stream shock-free circular jet from static experiments is outlined. It is valid for isothermal and hot jets. It assumes that the jet flow and turbulence field are axially stretched in flight. Effects of the boundary layer within the nozzle and along the engine nacelle are neglected. The scaling laws for the power spectral density and spectra with constant relative bandwidth can be derived. In order to compare static and inflight directivities, the far field point relative to the source position must be denoted by the emission angle and the wave normal distance. From the solution of the convective Lighthill equation in a coordinate system fixed to the jet nozzle (wind tunnel case), the power spectral density of sound pressure at a given frequency is found. Predictions for Aerotrain compare well with measured values.

  6. Simulations to study the static polarization limit for RHIC lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Zhe; Qin, Qing

    2016-01-01

    A study of spin dynamics based on simulations with the Polymorphic Tracking Code (PTC) is reported, exploring the dependence of the static polarization limit on various beam parameters and lattice settings for a practical RHIC lattice. It is shown that the behavior of the static polarization limit is dominantly affected by the vertical motion, while the effect of beam-beam interaction is small. In addition, the “nonresonant beam polarization” observed and studied in the lattice-independent model is also observed in this lattice-dependent model. Therefore, this simulation study gives insights of polarization evolution at fixed beam energies, that are not available in simple spin tracking. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-AC02-98CH10886), Hundred-Talent Program (Chinese Academy of Sciences), and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11105164)

  7. Non-Gaussian diffusion in static disordered media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Liang; Yi, Ming

    2018-04-01

    Non-Gaussian diffusion is commonly considered as a result of fluctuating diffusivity, which is correlated in time or in space or both. In this work, we investigate the non-Gaussian diffusion in static disordered media via a quenched trap model, where the diffusivity is spatially correlated. Several unique effects due to quenched disorder are reported. We analytically estimate the diffusion coefficient Ddis and its fluctuation over samples of finite size. We show a mechanism of population splitting in the non-Gaussian diffusion. It results in a sharp peak in the distribution of displacement P (x ,t ) around x =0 , that has frequently been observed in experiments. We examine the fidelity of the coarse-grained diffusion map, which is reconstructed from particle trajectories. Finally, we propose a procedure to estimate the correlation length in static disordered environments, where the information stored in the sample-to-sample fluctuation has been utilized.

  8. Static Corrosion Test of Porous Iron Material with Polymer Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markušová-Bučková, Lucia; Oriňaková, Renáta; Oriňak, Andrej; Gorejová, Radka; Kupková, Miriam; Hrubovčáková, Monika; Baláž, Matej; Kováľ, Karol

    2016-12-01

    At present biodegradable implants received increased attention due to their use in various fields of medicine. This work is dedicated to testing of biodegradable materials which could be used as bone implants. The samples were prepared from the carbonyl iron powder by replication method and surface polymer film was produced through sol-gel process. Corrosion testing was carried out under static conditions during 12 weeks in Hank's solution. The quantity of corrosion products increased with prolonging time of static test as it can be concluded from the results of EDX analysis. The degradation of open cell materials with polyethylene glycol coating layer was faster compared to uncoated Fe sample. Also the mass losses were higher for samples with PEG coating. The polymer coating brought about the desired increase in degradation rate of porous iron material.

  9. Design, Static Analysis And Fabrication Of Composite Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathiselvan, G.; Gobinath, R.; Yuvaraja, S.; Raja, T.

    2017-05-01

    The Bonded joints will be having one of the important issues in the composite technology is the repairing of aging in aircraft applications. In these applications and also for joining various composite material parts together, the composite materials fastened together either using adhesives or mechanical fasteners. In this paper, we have carried out design, static analysis of 3-D models and fabrication of the composite joints (bonded, riveted and hybrid). The 3-D model of the composite structure will be fabricated by using the materials such as epoxy resin, glass fibre material and aluminium rivet for preparing the joints. The static analysis was carried out with different joint by using ANSYS software. After fabrication, parametric study was also conducted to compare the performance of the hybrid joint with varying adherent width, adhesive thickness and overlap length. Different joint and its materials tensile test result have compared.

  10. Development of a static feed water electrolysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Lantz, J. B.; Hallick, T. M.

    1982-01-01

    A one person level oxygen generation subsystem was developed and production of the one person oxygen metabolic requirements, 0.82 kg, per day was demonstrated without the need for condenser/separators or electrolyte pumps. During 650 hours of shakedown, design verification, and endurance testing, cell voltages averaged 1.62 V at 206 mA/sq cm and at average operating temperature as low as 326 K, virtually corresponding to the state of the art performance previously established for single cells. This high efficiency and low waste heat generation prevented maintenance of the 339 K design temperature without supplemental heating. Improved water electrolysis cell frames were designed, new injection molds were fabricated, and a series of frames was molded. A modified three fluid pressure controller was developed and a static feed water electrolysis that requires no electrolyte in the static feed compartment was developed and successfully evaluated.

  11. Radio jet refraction in galactic atmospheres with static pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, R. N.; Vallee, J. P.; Bridle, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    A theory of double radio sources which have a 'Z' or 'S' morphology is proposed, based on the refraction of radio jets in the extended atmosphere of an elliptical galaxy. The model describes a collimated jet of supersonic material bending self-consistently under the influence of external static pressure gradients. Gravity and magnetic fields are neglected in the simplest case except insofar as they determine the static pressure distribution. The calculation is a straightforward extension of a method used to calculate a ram-pressure model for twin radio trails ('C' morphology). It may also be described as a continuous-jet version of a buoyancy model proposed in 1973. The model has the added virtue of invoking a galactic atmosphere similar to those already indicated by X-ray measurements of some other radio galaxies and by models for the collimation of other radio jets.

  12. Static friction boost in edge-driven incommensurate contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelli, Davide; Guerra, Roberto; Ouyang, Wengen; Urbakh, Michael; Vanossi, Andrea

    2018-04-01

    We present a numerical investigation of the size scaling of static friction in incommensurate two-dimensional contacts performed for different lateral loading configurations. Results of model simulations show that both the absolute value of the force Fs and the scaling exponent γ strongly depend on the loading configuration adopted to drive the slider along the substrate. Under edge loading, a sharp increase of static friction is observed above a critical size corresponding to the appearance of a localized commensurate dislocation. Noticeably, the existence of sublinear scaling, which is a fingerprint of superlubricity, does not conflict with the possibility to observe shear-induced localized commensurate regions at the contact interface. Atomistic simulations of gold islands sliding over graphite corroborate these findings, suggesting that similar elasticity effects should be at play in real frictional contacts.

  13. Eye Gaze during Observation of Static Faces in Deaf People

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Katsumi; Matsuda, Tetsuya; Nishioka, Tomoyuki; Namatame, Miki

    2011-01-01

    Knowing where people look when viewing faces provides an objective measure into the part of information entering the visual system as well as into the cognitive strategy involved in facial perception. In the present study, we recorded the eye movements of 20 congenitally deaf (10 male and 10 female) and 23 (11 male and 12 female) normal-hearing Japanese participants while they evaluated the emotional valence of static face stimuli. While no difference was found in the evaluation scores, the eye movements during facial observations differed among participant groups. The deaf group looked at the eyes more frequently and for longer duration than the nose whereas the hearing group focused on the nose (or the central region of face) more than the eyes. These results suggest that the strategy employed to extract visual information when viewing static faces may differ between deaf and hearing people. PMID:21359223

  14. EXACT RELATIVISTIC NEWTONIAN REPRESENTATION OF GRAVITATIONAL STATIC SPACETIME GEOMETRIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Shubhrangshu; Sarkar, Tamal; Bhadra, Arunava, E-mail: sghosh@jcbose.ac.in, E-mail: ta.sa.nbu@hotmail.com, E-mail: aru_bhadra@yahoo.com

    2016-09-01

    We construct a self-consistent relativistic Newtonian analogue corresponding to gravitational static spherical symmetric spacetime geometries, starting directly from a generalized scalar relativistic gravitational action in a Newtonian framework, which gives geodesic equations of motion identical to those of the parent metric. Consequently, the derived velocity-dependent relativistic scalar potential, which is a relativistic generalization of the Newtonian gravitational potential, exactly reproduces the relativistic gravitational features corresponding to any static spherical symmetric spacetime geometry in its entirety, including all the experimentally tested gravitational effects in the weak field up to the present. This relativistic analogous potential is expected to be quite usefulmore » in studying a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, especially in strong field gravity.« less

  15. Does a Growing Static Length Scale Control the Glass Transition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyart, Matthieu; Cates, Michael E.

    2017-11-01

    Several theories of the glass transition propose that the structural relaxation time τα is controlled by a growing static length scale ξ that is determined by the free energy landscape but not by the local dynamic rules governing its exploration. We argue, based on recent simulations using particle-radius-swap dynamics, that only a modest factor in the increase in τα on approach to the glass transition may stem from the growth of a static length, with a vastly larger contribution attributable, instead, to a slowdown of local dynamics. This reinforces arguments that we base on the observed strong coupling of particle diffusion and density fluctuations in real glasses.

  16. Matlab Stability and Control Toolbox: Trim and Static Stability Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the technical background of the Trim and Static module of the Matlab Stability and Control Toolbox. This module performs a low-fidelity stability and control assessment of an aircraft model for a set of flight critical conditions. This is attained by determining if the control authority available for trim is sufficient and if the static stability characteristics are adequate. These conditions can be selected from a prescribed set or can be specified to meet particular requirements. The prescribed set of conditions includes horizontal flight, take-off rotation, landing flare, steady roll, steady turn and pull-up/ push-over flight, for which several operating conditions can be specified. A mathematical model was developed allowing for six-dimensional trim, adjustable inertial properties, asymmetric vehicle layouts, arbitrary number of engines, multi-axial thrust vectoring, engine(s)-out conditions, crosswind and gyroscopic effects.

  17. Static electric fields modify the locomotory behaviour of cockroaches.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Christopher W; Hunt, Edmund; Sharkh, Suleiman; Newland, Philip L

    2011-06-15

    Static electric fields are found throughout the environment and there is growing interest in how electric fields influence insect behaviour. Here we have analysed the locomotory behaviour of cockroaches (Periplaneta americana) in response to static electric fields at levels equal to and above those found in the natural environment. Walking behaviour (including velocity, distance moved, turn angle and time spent walking) were analysed as cockroaches approached an electric field boundary in an open arena, and also when continuously exposed to an electric field. On approaching an electric field boundary, the greater the electric field strength the more likely a cockroach would be to turn away from, or be repulsed by, the electric field. Cockroaches completely exposed to electric fields showed significant changes in locomotion by covering less distance, walking slowly and turning more often. This study highlights the importance of electric fields on the normal locomotory behaviour of insects.

  18. Static and kinetic friction of granite at high normal stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.D.

    1970-01-01

    Frictional sliding on ground surfaces of granite, angle of sliding planes 30?? and 45??, was investigated as a function of confining pressure. Over the normal stress range of 2-12 kb, the static frictional shear stress ??s follows the relationship ??s = 0??5 + 0?? ??n and the kinetic frictional shear stress ??k was calculated to be ??k = 0??25 + 0??47 ??n. ?? 1970.

  19. Dynamic simulation of Static Var Compensators in distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    Koessler, R.J.

    1992-08-01

    This paper is a system study guide for the correction of voltage dips due to large motor startups with Static Var Compensators (SVCs). The method utilizes time simulations, which are an important aid in the equipment design and specification. The paper illustrates the process of setting-up a computer model and performing time simulations. The study process is demonstrated through an example, the Shawnee feeder in the Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation service area.

  20. A Reduced Dimension Static, Linearized Kalman Filter and Smoother

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukumori, I.

    1995-01-01

    An approximate Kalman filter and smoother, based on approximations of the state estimation error covariance matrix, is described. Approximations include a reduction of the effective state dimension, use of a static asymptotic error limit, and a time-invariant linearization of the dynamic model for error integration. The approximations lead to dramatic computational savings in applying estimation theory to large complex systems. Examples of use come from TOPEX/POSEIDON.

  1. Static and dynamic high power, space nuclear electric generating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetch, J. R.; Begg, L. L.; Koester, J. K.

    1985-01-01

    Space nuclear electric generating systems concepts have been assessed for their potential in satisfying future spacecraft high power (several megawatt) requirements. Conceptual designs have been prepared for reactor power systems using the most promising static (thermionic) and the most promising dynamic conversion processes. Component and system layouts, along with system mass and envelope requirements have been made. Key development problems have been identified and the impact of the conversion process selection upon thermal management and upon system and vehicle configuration is addressed.

  2. Sensitivity analysis of static resistance of slender beam under bending

    SciTech Connect

    Valeš, Jan

    2016-06-08

    The paper deals with statical and sensitivity analyses of resistance of simply supported I-beams under bending. The resistance was solved by geometrically nonlinear finite element method in the programme Ansys. The beams are modelled with initial geometrical imperfections following the first eigenmode of buckling. Imperfections were, together with geometrical characteristics of cross section, and material characteristics of steel, considered as random quantities. The method Latin Hypercube Sampling was applied to evaluate statistical and sensitivity resistance analyses.

  3. Dynamic and static fatigue of a machinable glass ceramic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magida, M. B.; Forrest, K. A.; Heslin, T. M.

    1984-01-01

    The dynamic and static fatigue behavior of a machinable glass ceramic was investigated to assess its susceptibility to stress corrosion-induced delayed failure. Fracture mechanics techniques were used to analyze the results so that lifetime predictions for components of this material could be made. The resistance to subcritical crack growth of this material was concluded to be only moderate and was found to be dependent on the size of its microstructure.

  4. Static Schedulers for Embedded Real-Time Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    Because of the need for having efficient scheduling algorithms in large scale real time systems , software engineers put a lot of effort on developing...provide static schedulers for he Embedded Real Time Systems with single processor using Ada programming language. The independent nonpreemptable...support the Computer Aided Rapid Prototyping for Embedded Real Time Systems so that we determine whether the system, as designed, meets the required

  5. Static stability and control effectiveness of a parametric launch vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, R. R.; Gamble, M.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation is reported to determine the static aerodynamic characteristics of a space shuttle parametric launch configuration. The orbiter control surfaces were deflected to obtain the control effectiveness for use in launch vehicle control studies. Experimental data were obtained for Mach number from 0.6 to 4.96, angles of attack from minus 10 to plus 10 degrees and angles of sideslip from minus six to six degrees at zero degrees angle of attack.

  6. Where Does Road Salt Go - a Static Salt Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, C. W.; Liu, F.; Moriarty, V. W.

    2017-12-01

    Each winter, more than 15 million tons of road salt is applied in the United States for the de-icing purpose. Considerable amount of chloride in road salt flows into streams/drainage systems with the snow melt runoff and spring storms, and eventually goes into ecologically sensitive low-lying areas in the watershed, such as ponds and lakes. In many watersheds in the northern part of US, the chloride level in the water body has increased significantly in the past decades, and continues an upward trend. The environmental and ecological impact of the elevated chloride level can no longer be ignored. However although there are many studies on the biological impact of elevated chloride levels, there are few investigations on how the spatially distributed road salt application affects various parts of the watershed. In this presentation, we propose a static road salt model as a first-order metric to address spacial distribution of salt loading. Derived from the Topological Wetness Index (TWI) in many hydrological models, this static salt model provides a spatial impact as- sessment of road salt applications. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the static model, National Elevation Dataset (NED) of ten-meter resolution of Lake George watershed in New York State is used to generate the TWI, which is used to compute a spatially dis- tributed "salt-loading coefficient" of the whole watershed. Spatially varying salt applica- tion rate is then aggregated, using the salt-loading coefficients as weights, to provide salt loading assessments of streams in the watershed. Time-aggregated data from five CTD (conductivity-temperature-depth) sensors in selected streams are used for calibration. The model outputs and the sensor data demonstrate a strong linear correlation, with the R value of 0.97. The investigation shows that the static modeling approach may provide an effective method for the understanding the input and transport of road salt to within watersheds.

  7. Decoherence in quantum systems in a static gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariati, Ahmad; Khorrami, Mohammad; Loran, Farhang

    2016-09-01

    A small quantum system is studied which is a superposition of states localized in different positions in a static gravitational field. The time evolution of the correlation between different positions is investigated, and it is seen that there are two time scales for such an evolution (decoherence). Both time scales are inversely proportional to the red shift difference between the two points. These time scales correspond to decoherences which are linear and quadratic, respectively, in time.

  8. Convergence of the Quasi-static Antenna Design Algorithm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    was the first antenna design with quasi-static methods. In electrostatics, a perfect conductor is the same as an equipotential surface . A line of...which can cause the equipotential surface to terminate on the disk or feed wire. This requires an additional step in the solution process; the... equipotential surface is sampled to verify that the charge is enclosed by the equipotential surface . The final solution must be verified with a detailed

  9. Night Vision Laboratory Static Performance Model for Thermal Viewing Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-01

    Research and Development Technical Report f ECOM-� • i’.__1’=• =•NIGHT VISION LABORATORY STATIC PERFORMANCE MODEL 1 S1=• : FOR THERMAL VIEWING...resolvable temperature Infrared imaging Minimum detectable temperature1.Detection and recognition performance Night visi,-)n Noise equivalent temperature...modulation transfer function (MTF). The noise charactcristics are specified by the noise equivalent temper- ature difference (NE AT), The next sections

  10. Forces associated with pneumatic power screwdriver operation: statics and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jia-Hua; Radwin, Robert G; Fronczak, Frank J; Richard, Terry G

    2003-10-10

    The statics and dynamics of pneumatic power screwdriver operation were investigated in the context of predicting forces acting against the human operator. A static force model is described in the paper, based on tool geometry, mass, orientation in space, feed force, torque build up, and stall torque. Three common power hand tool shapes are considered, including pistol grip, right angle, and in-line. The static model estimates handle force needed to support a power nutrunner when it acts against the tightened fastener with a constant torque. A system of equations for static force and moment equilibrium conditions are established, and the resultant handle force (resolved in orthogonal directions) is calculated in matrix form. A dynamic model is formulated to describe pneumatic motor torque build-up characteristics dependent on threaded fastener joint hardness. Six pneumatic tools were tested to validate the deterministic model. The average torque prediction error was 6.6% (SD = 5.4%) and the average handle force prediction error was 6.7% (SD = 6.4%) for a medium-soft threaded fastener joint. The average torque prediction error was 5.2% (SD = 5.3%) and the average handle force prediction error was 3.6% (SD = 3.2%) for a hard threaded fastener joint. Use of these equations for estimating handle forces based on passive mechanical elements representing the human operator is also described. These models together should be useful for considering tool handle force in the selection and design of power screwdrivers, particularly for minimizing handle forces in the prevention of injuries and work related musculoskeletal disorders.

  11. Analysis of muscle activation in lower extremity for static balance.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Kingshuk; Chatterjee, Debatri; Das, Rajat Kumar; Tripathy, Soumya Ranjan; Sinha, Aniruddha

    2017-07-01

    Balance plays an important role for human bipedal locomotion. Degeneration of balance control is prominent in stroke patients, elderly adults and even for majority of obese people. Design of personalized balance training program, in order to strengthen muscles, requires the analysis of muscle activation during an activity. In this paper we have proposed an affordable and portable approach to analyze the relationship between the static balance strategy and activation of various lower extremity muscles. To do that we have considered Microsoft Kinect XBox 360 as a motion sensing device and Wii balance board for measuring external force information. For analyzing the muscle activation pattern related to static balance, participants are asked to do the single limb stance (SLS) exercise on the balance board and in front of the Kinect. Static optimization to minimize the overall muscle activation pattern is carried out using OpenSim, which is an open-source musculoskeletal simulation software. The study is done on ten normal and ten obese people, grouped according to body mass index (BMI). Results suggest that the lower extremity muscles like biceps femoris, psoas major, sartorius, iliacus play the major role for both maintaining the balance using one limb as well as maintaining the flexion of the other limb during SLS. Further investigations reveal that the higher muscle activations of the flexed leg for normal group demonstrate higher strength. Moreover, the lower muscle activation of the standing leg for normal group demonstrate more headroom for the biceps femoris-short-head and psoas major to withstand the load and hence have better static balance control.

  12. Static black holes with back reaction from vacuum energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Pei-Ming; Matsuo, Yoshinori

    2018-03-01

    We study spherically symmetric static solutions to the semi-classical Einstein equation sourced by the vacuum energy of quantum fields in the curved space-time of the same solution. We found solutions that are small deformations of the Schwarzschild metric for distant observers, but without horizon. Instead of being a robust feature of objects with high densities, the horizon is sensitive to the energy–momentum tensor in the near-horizon region.

  13. 25. "GAFFTC 19 OCT 60, BLAST EFFECTS ON AIRFOILS, STATIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. "G-AFFTC 19 OCT 60, BLAST EFFECTS ON AIRFOILS, STATIC RUN 5." View of track rail mounting and the water brake trough at 20,000-foot track. Looking northeast. File no. 12,358-60. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Edwards Air Force Base, North of Avenue B, between 100th & 140th Streets East, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. Perception of static orientation in a constant gravitoinertial environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsby, C. C.; Young, L. R.

    1976-01-01

    The illusions associated with the perception of static tilt in various specific force environments have been reviewed and then classified in such a way that a simple perceptual model could be developed to account for the experimental data. The fundamental conclusion to be drawn from this model is that these illusions can be accounted for by a simple nonlinear transformation of the information primarily from the saccule.

  15. Static aeroelastic behavior of a subsonic plate wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berci, M.

    2017-07-01

    The static aeroelastic behavior of a subsonic plate wing is here described by semi-analytical means. Within a generalised modal formulation, any distribution of the plate's properties is allowed. Modified strip theory is employed for the aerodynamic modelling and a linear aeroelastic model is eventually derived. Numerical results are then shown for the plate's aeroelastic stability in terms of divergence speed, with respect to the most relevant aero-structural parameters.

  16. Delaminations in composite plates under transverse static loads - Experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, Scott R.; He, Yi-Fei; Springer, George S.

    1992-01-01

    Tests were performed measuring the damage initiation loads and the locations, shapes, and sizes of delaminations in Fiberite T300/976 graphite/epoxy, Fiberite IM7/977-2 graphite-toughened epoxy, and ICI APC-2 graphite-PEEK plates subjected to transverse static loads. The data were compared to the results of the Finn-Springer model, and good agreements were found between the measured and calculated delamination lengths and widths.

  17. A Planar Quasi-Static Constraint Mode Tire Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-10

    strikes a balance between simple tire models that lack the fidelity to make accurate chassis load predictions and computationally intensive models that...strikes a balance between heuristic tire models (such as a linear point-follower) that lack the fidelity to make accurate chassis load predictions...UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution Statement A. Cleared for public release A PLANAR QUASI-STATIC CONSTRAINT MODE TIRE MODEL Rui Maa John B. Ferris

  18. Quasi-Static Viscoelasticity Loading Measurements of an Aircraft Tire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Angela J.; Tanner, John A.; Johnson, Arthur R.

    1997-01-01

    Stair-step loading, cyclic loading, and long-term relaxation tests were performed on an aircraft tire to observe the quasi-static viscoelastic response of the tire. The data indicate that the tire continues to respond viscoelastically even after it has been softened by deformation. Load relaxation data from the stair-step test at the 15,000-lb loading was fit to a monotonically decreasing Prony series.

  19. Capturing Planar Tire Properties Using Static Constraint Modes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-13

    The In-plane Dynamics of Tyres on Uneven Roads . Vehicle System Dynamics, 1996: p. 714-730 10.1080/00423119608969231. [4] Loo, M., A Model...Virginia Tech Danville, VA, 24540 jbferris@vt.edu ABSTRACT The interaction between the tire and road has long been of interest for vehicle dynamic...spindle force with respect to tire- road interference is evaluated by comparing the simulation and experimental response for a quasi-static cleat test

  20. Hawking Radiation from a Spherically Symmetric Static Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Qian; Liu, Wenbiao

    2007-08-01

    The massive particles’ Hawking radiation from a spherically symmetric static black hole is investigated with Parikh-Wilczek method, Hamilton Jacobi method and Damour Ruffini’s method. When energy conservation is considered, the same result can be concluded that the radiation spectrum is not precisely thermal. The corrected spectrum is consistent to the underlying unitary quantum theory, which can be used to explain the information loss paradox possibly.

  1. Age, Sex, and Blood Pressure-Related Influences on Reference Values of Left Atrial Deformation and Mechanics From a Large-Scale Asian Population.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jo-Nan; Chao, Tze-Fan; Kuo, Jen-Yuan; Sung, Kuo-Tzu; Tsai, Jui-Peng; Lo, Chi-In; Lai, Yau-Huei; Su, Cheng-Huang; Hung, Chung-Lieh; Yeh, Hung-I; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2017-10-01

    Left atrial (LA) function is tightly linked to several cardiovascular diseases and confers key prognostic information. Speckle tracking-based deformation as a feasible and sensitive LA mechanical assessment has proven its clinical significance beyond volume measures; however, the reference values remain largely unknown. We studied 4042 participants undergoing annual cardiovascular survey. Among them, 2812 healthy participants (65% men; mean age, 47.4±9.9 years) were eligible for speckle tracking analysis. Peak atrial longitudinal systolic strain and strain rate (SR) at systolic (SRs), early diastolic (SRe), and late diastolic atrial contraction phases (SRa) were analyzed by dedicated software (EchoPAC, GE) and compared in terms of age, sex, and blood pressure. Overall, women demonstrated higher peak atrial longitudinal systolic strain (39.34±7.99% versus 37.95±7.96%; P<0.001) and showed age-dependent more pronounced peak atrial longitudinal systolic strain functional decay than those of men (P value for interaction, <0.05), with men showing higher SRs and SRa, although lower SRe (all P<0.001). Both increasing age and higher blood pressure were independently associated with deteriorated peak atrial longitudinal systolic strain, SRs, and SRe, although augmented LA SRa, even after accounting for baseline clinical covariates in multivariable models that incorporated LA volume, NT-proBNP (N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide), or left ventricular E/e' (all P<0.001). Our findings suggest LA mechanical functional decays in association with increasing age and higher blood pressure, which seem to be compensated for by augmentation of atrial pump function. We have also provided age- and sex-stratified reference values for strain and SR based on a large-scale Asian population. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Static Flow Characteristics of a Mass Flow Injecting Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattern, Duane; Paxson, Dan

    1995-01-01

    A sleeve valve is under development for ground-based forced response testing of air compression systems. This valve will be used to inject air and to impart momentum to the flow inside the first stage of a multi-stage compressor. The valve was designed to deliver a maximum mass flow of 0.22 lbm/s (0.1 kg/s) with a maximum valve throat area of 0.12 sq. in (80 sq. mm), a 100 psid (689 KPA) pressure difference across the valve and a 68 F, (20 C) air supply. It was assumed that the valve mass flow rate would be proportional to the valve orifice area. A static flow calibration revealed a nonlinear valve orifice area to mass flow relationship which limits the maximum flow rate that the valve can deliver. This nonlinearity was found to be caused by multiple choking points in the flow path. A simple model was used to explain this nonlinearity and the model was compared to the static flow calibration data. Only steady flow data is presented here. In this report, the static flow characteristics of a proportionally controlled sleeve valve are modelled and validated against experimental data.

  3. Augmenting Traditional Static Analysis With Commonly Available Metadata

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Devin

    Developers and security analysts have been using static analysis for a long time to analyze programs for defects and vulnerabilities with some success. Generally a static analysis tool is run on the source code for a given program, flagging areas of code that need to be further inspected by a human analyst. These areas may be obvious bugs like potential bu er over flows, information leakage flaws, or the use of uninitialized variables. These tools tend to work fairly well - every year they find many important bugs. These tools are more impressive considering the fact that they only examinemore » the source code, which may be very complex. Now consider the amount of data available that these tools do not analyze. There are many pieces of information that would prove invaluable for finding bugs in code, things such as a history of bug reports, a history of all changes to the code, information about committers, etc. By leveraging all this additional data, it is possible to nd more bugs with less user interaction, as well as track useful metrics such as number and type of defects injected by committer. This dissertation provides a method for leveraging development metadata to find bugs that would otherwise be difficult to find using standard static analysis tools. We showcase two case studies that demonstrate the ability to find 0day vulnerabilities in large and small software projects by finding new vulnerabilities in the cpython and Roundup open source projects.« less

  4. Hanging an Airplane: A Case Study in Static Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Debora M.

    2009-11-01

    Our classrooms are filled with engineering majors who take a semester-long course in static equilibrium. Many students find this class too challenging and drop their engineering major. In our introductory physics class, we often breeze through static equilibrium; to physicists equilibrium is just a special case of Newton's second law. While it is difficult to find more time in the syllabus for any one topic, a hands-on case study may help students to develop their physical intuition about static equilibrium and may help them to succeed in their subsequent classes. This article describes a hands-on case study that you may wish to use in your classroom. (You may also wish to check a case study involving a boat published in this journal in the 1990s. ) The hands-on case study presented here can be easily modified to work at the high school or introductory college level. There are three major components: I) planning, II) doing, and III) calculating.

  5. Atmospheric stability analysis over statically and dynamically rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maric, Emina; Metzger, Meredith; Singha, Arindam; Sadr, Reza

    2011-11-01

    The ratio of buoyancy flux to turbulent kinetic energy production in the atmospheric surface layer is investigated experimentally for air flow over two types of surfaces characterized by static and dynamic roughness. In this study, ``static'' refers to the time-invariant nature of naturally-occurring roughness over a mud/salt playa; while, ``dynamic'' refers to the behavior of water waves along an air-water interface. In both cases, time-resolved measurements of the momentum and heat fluxes were acquired from synchronized 3D sonic anemometers mounted on a vertical tower. Field campaigns were conducted at two sites, representing the ``statically'' and ``dynamically'' rough surfaces, respectively: (1) the SLTEST facility in Utah's western desert, and (2) the new Doha airport in Qatar under construction along the coast of the Persian Gulf. Note, at site 2, anemometers were located directly above the water by extension from a tower secured to the end of a 1 km-long pier. Comparisons of the Monin-Obukhov length, flux Richardson number, and gradient Richardson number are presented, and discussed in the context of the observed evolution of the turbulent spectra in response to diurnal variations of atmospheric stability. Supported by the Qatar National Research Fund.

  6. Wind Tunnel to Atmospheric Mapping for Static Aeroelastic Scaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Spain, Charles V.; Rivera, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    Wind tunnel to Atmospheric Mapping (WAM) is a methodology for scaling and testing a static aeroelastic wind tunnel model. The WAM procedure employs scaling laws to define a wind tunnel model and wind tunnel test points such that the static aeroelastic flight test data and wind tunnel data will be correlated throughout the test envelopes. This methodology extends the notion that a single test condition - combination of Mach number and dynamic pressure - can be matched by wind tunnel data. The primary requirements for affecting this extension are matching flight Mach numbers, maintaining a constant dynamic pressure scale factor and setting the dynamic pressure scale factor in accordance with the stiffness scale factor. The scaling is enabled by capabilities of the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) and by relaxation of scaling requirements present in the dynamic problem that are not critical to the static aeroelastic problem. The methodology is exercised in two example scaling problems: an arbitrarily scaled wing and a practical application to the scaling of the Active Aeroelastic Wing flight vehicle for testing in the TDT.

  7. Static and Dynamic Compaction of CL-20 Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Marcia; Brundage, Aaron; Dudley, Evan

    2009-06-01

    Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) powders were compacted under quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. A uniaxial compression apparatus quasi-statically compressed the powders to 90% theoretical maximum density with applied stresses up to 0.5 GPa. Dynamic compaction measurements using low-density pressings (62-70% theoretical maximum density) were obtained in a single-stage gas gun at impact velocities between 0.17-0.70 km/s. Experiments were conducted in a reverse ballistic arrangement in which the CL-20 ladened projectile impacted a target consisting of an aluminized window. VISAR-measured particle velocities at the explosive-window interface determined the shock Hugoniot states for pressures up to 0.9 GPa. The powder compaction behavior is found to be stiffer under dynamic loading than under quasi-static loading. Additional gas gun tests were conducted in which the low-density CL-20 pressings were confined within a target cup by the aluminized window. This arrangement enabled temporal measurement of the transmitted wave profiles in which elastic wave precursors were observed.

  8. Terapascal static pressure generation with ultrahigh yield strength nanodiamond

    PubMed Central

    Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Solopova, Natalia A.; Abakumov, Artem; Turner, Stuart; Hanfland, Michael; Bykova, Elena; Bykov, Maxim; Prescher, Clemens; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Petitgirard, Sylvain; Chuvashova, Irina; Gasharova, Biliana; Mathis, Yves-Laurent; Ershov, Petr; Snigireva, Irina; Snigirev, Anatoly

    2016-01-01

    Studies of materials’ properties at high and ultrahigh pressures lead to discoveries of unique physical and chemical phenomena and a deeper understanding of matter. In high-pressure research, an achievable static pressure limit is imposed by the strength of available strong materials and design of high-pressure devices. Using a high-pressure and high-temperature technique, we synthesized optically transparent microballs of bulk nanocrystalline diamond, which were found to have an exceptional yield strength (~460 GPa at a confining pressure of ~70 GPa) due to the unique microstructure of bulk nanocrystalline diamond. We used the nanodiamond balls in a double-stage diamond anvil cell high-pressure device that allowed us to generate static pressures beyond 1 TPa, as demonstrated by synchrotron x-ray diffraction. Outstanding mechanical properties (strain-dependent elasticity, very high hardness, and unprecedented yield strength) make the nanodiamond balls a unique device for ultrahigh static pressure generation. Structurally isotropic, homogeneous, and made of a low-Z material, they are promising in the field of x-ray optical applications. PMID:27453944

  9. Profile of student critical thinking ability on static fluid concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulasih; Suparmi, A.; Sarwanto

    2017-11-01

    Critical thinking ability is an important part of educational goals. It has higher complex processes, such as analyzing, synthesizing and evaluating, drawing conclusion and reflection. This study is aimed to know the critical thinking ability of students in learning static fluids of senior high school students. This research uses the descriptive method which its instruments based on the indicator of critical thinking ability developed according to Ennis. The population of this research is XIth grade science class Public Senior High School, SMA N 1, Sambungmacan, Sragen, Central Java. The static fluid teaching material is delivered using Problem Based Learning Model through class experiment. The results of this study shows that the average student of XIth science class have high critical thinking skills, particularly in the ability of providing simple explanation, build basic skill, and provide advanced explanation, but they do not have high enough in ability of drawing conclusion and strategic and tactical components of critical thinking ability in the study of static fluid teaching material. The average of students critical thinking ability is 72.94, with 27,94% of students are in a low category and 72,22% of students in the high category of critical thinking ability.

  10. Static Magnetic Fields in Semiconductor Floating-Zone Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croll, Arne; Benz, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    Heat and mass transfer in semiconductor float-zone processing are strongly influenced by convective flows in the zone, originating from sources such as buoyancy convection, thermocapillary (Marangoni) convection, differential rotation, or radio frequency heating. Because semiconductor melts are conducting, flows can be damped by the use of static magnetic fields to influence the interface shape and the segregation of dopants and impurities. An important objective is often the suppression of time-dependent flows and the ensuing dopant striations. In RF-heated Si-FZ - crystals, fields up to O.STesla show some flattening of the interface curvature and a reduction of striation amplitudes. In radiation-heated (small-scale) SI-FZ crystals, fields of 0.2 - 0.5 Tesla already suppress the majority of the dopant striations. The uniformity of the radial segregation is often compromised by using a magnetic field, due to the directional nature of the damping. Transverse fields lead to an asymmetric interface shape and thus require crystal rotation (resulting in rotational dopant striations) to achieve a radially symmetric interface, whereas axial fields introduce a coring effect. A complete suppression of dopant striations and a reduction of the coring to insignificant values, combined with a shift of the axial segregation profile towards a more diffusion-limited case, are possible with axial static fields in excess of 1 Tesla. Strong static magnetic fields, however, can also lead to the appearance of thermoelectromagnetic convection, caused by the interaction of thermoelectric currents with the magnetic field.

  11. Static knee alignment and its association with radiographic knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Teichtahl, A J; Cicuttini, F M; Janakiramanan, N; Davis, S R; Wluka, A E

    2006-09-01

    Although knee alignment is associated with the progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA), it is unclear which features that characterize radiographic OA are related to alignment. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between static knee joint alignment (measured as a continuous variable) and the radiographic features of knee OA (joint space narrowing and osteophytes). One hundred and twenty one adults with symptomatic knee OA were recruited using a combined strategy including referral from specialist centres, arthritis support groups and media advertising. X-rays were performed to classify the severity of disease and to determine static knee alignment. Increasing varus knee alignment was associated with increasing risk of medial compartment joint space narrowing (P < 0.001) and osteophytes (P = 0.005). Increasing valgus knee alignment was associated with an increased risk for lateral compartment joint space narrowing (P < 0.001) and osteophytes (P = 0.002). This study has demonstrated that the static knee angle, measured as a continuous variable, is an important determinant of the compartment-specific features of radiographic knee OA. Further work is required to determine whether interventions aimed at correcting these relatively minor levels of varus and valgus angulation will have an effect on the risk of tibiofemoral OA.

  12. Terapascal static pressure generation with ultrahigh yield strength nanodiamond.

    PubMed

    Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Solopova, Natalia A; Abakumov, Artem; Turner, Stuart; Hanfland, Michael; Bykova, Elena; Bykov, Maxim; Prescher, Clemens; Prakapenka, Vitali B; Petitgirard, Sylvain; Chuvashova, Irina; Gasharova, Biliana; Mathis, Yves-Laurent; Ershov, Petr; Snigireva, Irina; Snigirev, Anatoly

    2016-07-01

    Studies of materials' properties at high and ultrahigh pressures lead to discoveries of unique physical and chemical phenomena and a deeper understanding of matter. In high-pressure research, an achievable static pressure limit is imposed by the strength of available strong materials and design of high-pressure devices. Using a high-pressure and high-temperature technique, we synthesized optically transparent microballs of bulk nanocrystalline diamond, which were found to have an exceptional yield strength (~460 GPa at a confining pressure of ~70 GPa) due to the unique microstructure of bulk nanocrystalline diamond. We used the nanodiamond balls in a double-stage diamond anvil cell high-pressure device that allowed us to generate static pressures beyond 1 TPa, as demonstrated by synchrotron x-ray diffraction. Outstanding mechanical properties (strain-dependent elasticity, very high hardness, and unprecedented yield strength) make the nanodiamond balls a unique device for ultrahigh static pressure generation. Structurally isotropic, homogeneous, and made of a low-Z material, they are promising in the field of x-ray optical applications.

  13. A cumulant functional for static and dynamic correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Hollett, Joshua W., E-mail: j.hollett@uwinnipeg.ca; Department of Chemistry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2; Hosseini, Hessam

    A functional for the cumulant energy is introduced. The functional is composed of a pair-correction and static and dynamic correlation energy components. The pair-correction and static correlation energies are functionals of the natural orbitals and the occupancy transferred between near-degenerate orbital pairs, rather than the orbital occupancies themselves. The dynamic correlation energy is a functional of the statically correlated on-top two-electron density. The on-top density functional used in this study is the well-known Colle-Salvetti functional. Using the cc-pVTZ basis set, the functional effectively models the bond dissociation of H{sub 2}, LiH, and N{sub 2} with equilibrium bond lengths and dissociationmore » energies comparable to those provided by multireference second-order perturbation theory. The performance of the cumulant functional is less impressive for HF and F{sub 2}, mainly due to an underestimation of the dynamic correlation energy by the Colle-Salvetti functional.« less

  14. Stylized facts in social networks: Community-based static modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Murase, Yohsuke; Török, János; Kertész, János; Kaski, Kimmo

    2018-06-01

    The past analyses of datasets of social networks have enabled us to make empirical findings of a number of aspects of human society, which are commonly featured as stylized facts of social networks, such as broad distributions of network quantities, existence of communities, assortative mixing, and intensity-topology correlations. Since the understanding of the structure of these complex social networks is far from complete, for deeper insight into human society more comprehensive datasets and modeling of the stylized facts are needed. Although the existing dynamical and static models can generate some stylized facts, here we take an alternative approach by devising a community-based static model with heterogeneous community sizes and larger communities having smaller link density and weight. With these few assumptions we are able to generate realistic social networks that show most stylized facts for a wide range of parameters, as demonstrated numerically and analytically. Since our community-based static model is simple to implement and easily scalable, it can be used as a reference system, benchmark, or testbed for further applications.

  15. Vacuum energy density near static distorted black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, V.P.; Sanchez, N.

    1986-03-15

    We investigate the contribution of massless fields of spins 0, 1/2, and 1 to the vacuum polarization near the event horizon of static Ricci-flat space-times. We do not assume any particular spatial symmetry. Within the Page-Brown ''ansatz'' we calculate /sup ren/ and /sup ren/ near static distorted black holes, for both the Hartle-Hawking (Vertical Bar>/sub H/) and Boulware (Vertical Bar>/sub B/) vacua. Using Israel's description of static space-times, we express these quantities in an invariant geometric way. We obtain that /sub H//sup ren/ and /sub H//sup ren/ near the horizon depend only on the two-dimensional geometry of the horizon surface.more » We find /sub H//sup ren/ = (1/48..pi../sup 2/ )K/sub 0/, /sub H//sup ren/ = (7..cap alpha..+12..beta.. )K/sub 0/ /sup 2/-..cap alpha../sup(/sup 2/)..delta..K/sub 0/. $K sub 0: is the Gaussian curvature of the horizon, and ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. are numerical coefficients depending on the spin of a field. The term in /sup(/sup 2/)..delta..K/sub 0/ is characteristic of the distortion of the black hole. When the event horizon is not distorted, K/sub 0/ is a constant and this term disappears.« less

  16. Static and fatigue interlaminar tensile characterization of laminated composites

    SciTech Connect

    Koudela, K.L.; Strait, L.H.; Caiazzo, A.A.

    1997-12-31

    Spool and curved-beam specimens were evaluated to determine the viability of using either one or both of these configurations to characterize the static and fatigue interlaminar tensile behavior of carbon/epoxy laminates. Unidirectional curved-beam and quasi-isotropic spool specimens were fabricated, nondestructively inspected, and statically tested to failure. Tension-tension fatigue tests were conducted at 10 Hz and an R-ratio ({sigma}{sub min}/{sigma}{sub max}) equal to 0.1 for each specimen configuration. The interlaminar tensile strength of the spool specimen was 12% larger than the strength obtained using curved-beam specimens. In addition, data scatter associated with spool specimens was significantly less than the scatter associatedmore » with curved-beam specimens. The difference in data scatter was attributed to the influence of the fabrication process on the quality of the laminates tested. The fatigue limit at 0{sup 7} cycles for both specimen types was shown to be at least 40% of the average interlaminar tensile strength. Based on the results of this study, it was concluded that either the spool or the curved-beam specimens can be used to characterize the interlaminar tensile static and fatigue behavior of carbon/epoxy laminates. However, to obtain the most representative results, the test specimen configuration should be selected so that the specimen fabrication process closely simulates the actual component fabrication process.« less

  17. 78 FR 35645 - Certain Static Random Access Memories and Products Containing Same; Commission Determination...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-792] Certain Static Random Access Memories and Products Containing Same; Commission Determination Affirming a Final Initial Determination..., and the sale within the United States after importation of certain static random access memories and...

  18. Assessment of current AASHTO LRFD methods for static pile capacity analysis in Rhode Island soils.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-07-01

    This report presents an assessment of current AASHTO LRFD methods for static pile capacity analysis in Rhode : Island soils. Current static capacity methods and associated resistance factors are based on pile load test data in sands : and clays. Some...

  19. Influence of Cut-outs in Elevator on the Static Longitudinal Stability and on the Static Elevator Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biechteler, Curt

    1934-01-01

    The rudder effect of a sport airplane at high angles of attack was to be improved. This made it necessary to make a cut-out in the center of the continuous elevator so as to enlarge the rudder downward. This cut-out which reduced the rudder area by 12.5 percent changed the static stability of the airplane as well as the elevator effect. Flight measurements showed the stability zone with locked elevator to be 1.8 percent less at full throttle and at idling to be 1.3 percent less than the mean wing chord. The effect of the cut-out on the control forces could not be determined owing to insufficient instrumental accuracy at the extremely low existing forces. The measurement of the static controllability resulting from the cut-out manifested an 18 percent drop in elevator effect at full throttle and a 10 to 20 percent drop at idling, depending on lift.

  20. No static bubbling spacetimes in higher dimensional Einstein–Maxwell theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunduri, Hari K.; Lucietti, James

    2018-03-01

    We prove that any asymptotically flat static spacetime in higher dimensional Einstein–Maxwell theory must have no magnetic field. This implies that there are no static soliton spacetimes and completes the classification of static non-extremal black holes in this theory. In particular, these results establish that there are no asymptotically flat static spacetimes with non-trivial topology, with or without a black hole, in Einstein–Maxwell theory.

  1. Enrichment desired quality chitosan fraction and advance yield by sequential static and static-dynamic supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yi-Yin; Chin, Hui Yen; Tsai, Min-Lang

    2015-11-20

    This study aimed to establish the sequential static and static-dynamic supercritical carbon dioxide (SDCO2) fractionation conditions to obtain a higher yield and desired chitosan with lower polydispersity index (PDI) and higher degree of deacetylation (DD). The yield increased with increasing DD of used chitosan and amount of cosolvent. The yield of acetic acid cosolvent was higher than those of malic and citric acid cosolvents. SDCO2, compared to static supercritical carbon dioxide, has higher yield. The yield of extracted chitosan was 5.82-14.70% by SDCO2/acetic acid, which increases with increasing pressure. The DD of fractionated chitosan increased from 66.1% to 70.81-85.33%, while the PDI decreased from 3.97 to 1.69-3.16. The molecular weight changed from 622kDa to 412-649kDa, which increased as density of supercritical carbon dioxide increases. Hence, higher DD and lower PDI extracted chitosan can be obtained through controlling the temperature and pressure of SDCO2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. 14 CFR 25.899 - Electrical bonding and protection against static electricity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... static electricity. 25.899 Section 25.899 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Construction Miscellaneous § 25.899 Electrical bonding and protection against static electricity. (a) Electrical bonding and protection against static electricity must be designed to minimize accumulation of...

  3. 14 CFR 25.1715 - Electrical bonding and protection against static electricity: EWIS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... static electricity: EWIS. 25.1715 Section 25.1715 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Interconnection Systems (EWIS) § 25.1715 Electrical bonding and protection against static electricity: EWIS. (a) EWIS components used for electrical bonding and protection against static electricity must meet the...

  4. 14 CFR 25.899 - Electrical bonding and protection against static electricity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... static electricity. 25.899 Section 25.899 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Construction Miscellaneous § 25.899 Electrical bonding and protection against static electricity. (a) Electrical bonding and protection against static electricity must be designed to minimize accumulation of...

  5. 14 CFR 25.1715 - Electrical bonding and protection against static electricity: EWIS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... static electricity: EWIS. 25.1715 Section 25.1715 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Interconnection Systems (EWIS) § 25.1715 Electrical bonding and protection against static electricity: EWIS. (a) EWIS components used for electrical bonding and protection against static electricity must meet the...

  6. 14 CFR 25.1715 - Electrical bonding and protection against static electricity: EWIS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... static electricity: EWIS. 25.1715 Section 25.1715 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Interconnection Systems (EWIS) § 25.1715 Electrical bonding and protection against static electricity: EWIS. (a) EWIS components used for electrical bonding and protection against static electricity must meet the...

  7. 14 CFR 25.1715 - Electrical bonding and protection against static electricity: EWIS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... static electricity: EWIS. 25.1715 Section 25.1715 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Interconnection Systems (EWIS) § 25.1715 Electrical bonding and protection against static electricity: EWIS. (a) EWIS components used for electrical bonding and protection against static electricity must meet the...

  8. 14 CFR 25.899 - Electrical bonding and protection against static electricity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... static electricity. 25.899 Section 25.899 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Construction Miscellaneous § 25.899 Electrical bonding and protection against static electricity. (a) Electrical bonding and protection against static electricity must be designed to minimize accumulation of...

  9. 14 CFR 25.899 - Electrical bonding and protection against static electricity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... static electricity. 25.899 Section 25.899 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Construction Miscellaneous § 25.899 Electrical bonding and protection against static electricity. (a) Electrical bonding and protection against static electricity must be designed to minimize accumulation of...

  10. 14 CFR 25.899 - Electrical bonding and protection against static electricity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... static electricity. 25.899 Section 25.899 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Construction Miscellaneous § 25.899 Electrical bonding and protection against static electricity. (a) Electrical bonding and protection against static electricity must be designed to minimize accumulation of...

  11. 14 CFR 25.1715 - Electrical bonding and protection against static electricity: EWIS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... static electricity: EWIS. 25.1715 Section 25.1715 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Interconnection Systems (EWIS) § 25.1715 Electrical bonding and protection against static electricity: EWIS. (a) EWIS components used for electrical bonding and protection against static electricity must meet the...

  12. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    In addition to Dr. Robert Goddard's pioneering work, American experimentation in rocketry prior to World War II grew, primarily in technical societies. This is an early rocket motor designed and developed by the American Rocket Society in 1932.

  13. Effects of static stretching on 1-mile uphill run performance.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Ryan P; Joy, Jordan M; Brown, Lee E; Oliveira de Souza, Eduardo; Wistocki, David R; Davis, Gregory S; Naimo, Marshall A; Zito, Gina A; Wilson, Jacob M

    2014-01-01

    It is previously demonstrated that static stretching was associated with a decrease in running economy and distance run during a 30-minute time trial in trained runners. Recently, the detrimental effects of static stretching on economy were found to be limited to the first few minutes of an endurance bout. However, economy remains to be studied for its direct effects on performance during shorter endurance events. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of static stretching on 1-mile uphill run performance, electromyography (EMG), ground contact time (GCT), and flexibility. Ten trained male distance runners aged 24 ± 5 years with an average VO2max of 64.9 ± 6.5 mL·kg-1·min-1 were recruited. Subjects reported to the laboratory on 3 separate days interspersed by 72 hours. On day 1, anthropometrics and V[Combining Dot Above]O2max were determined on a motor-driven treadmill. On days 2 and 3, subjects performed a 5-minute treadmill warm-up and either performed a series of 6 lower-body stretches for three 30-second repetitions or sat still for 10 minutes. Time to complete a 1-mile run under stretching and nonstretching conditions took place in randomized order. For the performance run, subjects were instructed to run as fast as possible at a set incline of 5% until a distance of 1 mile was completed. Flexibility from the sit and reach test, EMG, GCT, and performance, determined by time to complete the 1-mile run, were recorded after each condition. Time to complete the run was significantly less (6:51 ± 0:28 minutes) in the nonstretching condition as compared with the stretching condition (7:04 ± 0:32 minutes). A significant condition-by-time interaction for muscle activation existed, with no change in the nonstretching condition (pre 91.3 ± 11.6 mV to post 92.2 ± 12.9 mV) but increased in the stretching condition (pre 91.0 ± 11.6 mV to post 105.3 ± 12.9 mV). A significant condition-by-time interaction for GCT was also present, with no changes in

  14. Scaffolding for solving problem in static fluid: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koes-H, Supriyono; Muhardjito, Wijaya, Charisma P.

    2018-01-01

    Problem solving is one of the basic abilities that should be developed from learning physics. However, students still face difficulties in the process of non-routine problem-solving. Efforts are necessary to be taken in order to identify such difficulties and the solutions to solve them. An effort in the form of a diagnosis of students' performance in problem solving can be taken to identify their difficulties, and various instructional scaffolding supports can be utilized to eliminate the difficulties. This case study aimed to describe the students' difficulties in solving static fluid problems and the effort to overcome such difficulties through different scaffolding supports. The research subjects consisted of four 10-grade students of (Public Senior High School) SMAN 4 Malang selected by purposive sampling technique. The data of students' difficulties were collected via think-aloud protocol implemented on students' performance in solving non-routine static fluid problems. Subsequently, combined scaffolding supports were given to the students based on their particular difficulties. The research findings pointed out that there were several conceptual difficulties discovered from the students when solving static fluid problems, i.e. the use of buoyancy force formula, determination of all forces acting on a plane in a fluid, the resultant force on a plane in a fluid, and determination of a plane depth in a fluid. An effort that can be taken to overcome such conceptual difficulties is providing a combination of some appropriate scaffolding supports, namely question prompts with specific domains, simulation, and parallel modeling. The combination can solve students' lack of knowledge and improve their conceptual understanding, as well as help them to find solutions by linking the problems with their prior knowledge. According to the findings, teachers are suggested to diagnose the students' difficulties so that they can provide an appropriate combination of

  15. Bacterial adherence to graft tissues in static and flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Veloso, Tiago Rafael; Claes, Jorien; Van Kerckhoven, Soetkin; Ditkowski, Bartosz; Hurtado-Aguilar, Luis G; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Mela, Petra; Jashari, Ramadan; Gewillig, Marc; Hoylaerts, Marc F; Meyns, Bart; Heying, Ruth

    2018-01-01

    Various conduits and stent-mounted valves are used as pulmonary valve graft tissues for right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction with good hemodynamic results. Valve replacement carries an increased risk of infective endocarditis (IE). Recent observations have increased awareness of the risk of IE after transcatheter implantation of a stent-mounted bovine jugular vein valve. This study focused on the susceptibility of graft tissue surfaces to bacterial adherence as a potential risk factor for subsequent IE. Adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Streptococcus sanguinis to bovine pericardium (BP) patch, bovine jugular vein (BJV), and cryopreserved homograft (CH) tissues was quantified under static and shear stress conditions. Microscopic analysis and histology were performed to evaluate bacterial adhesion to matrix components. In general, similar bacteria numbers were recovered from CH and BJV tissue surfaces for all strains, especially in flow conditions. Static bacterial adhesion to the CH wall was lower for S sanguinis adhesion (P < .05 vs BP patch). Adhesion to the BJV wall, CH wall, and leaflet was decreased for S epidermidis in static conditions (P < .05 vs BP patch). Bacterial adhesion under shear stress indicated similar bacterial adhesion to all tissues, except for lower adhesion to the BJV wall after S sanguinis incubation. Microscopic analysis showed the importance of matrix component exposure for bacterial adherence to CH. Our data provide evidence that the surface composition of BJV and CH tissues themselves, bacterial surface proteins, and shear forces per se are not the prime determinants of bacterial adherence. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Self-forces on static bodies in arbitrary dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harte, Abraham I.; Flanagan, Éanna É.; Taylor, Peter

    2016-06-01

    We derive exact expressions for the scalar and electromagnetic self-forces and self-torques acting on arbitrary static extended bodies in arbitrary static spacetimes with any number of dimensions. Nonperturbatively, our results are identical in all dimensions. Meaningful point particle limits are quite different in different dimensions, however. These limits are defined and evaluated, resulting in simple "regularization algorithms" which can be used in concrete calculations. In these limits, self-interaction is shown to be progressively less important in higher numbers of dimensions; it generically competes in magnitude with increasingly high-order extended-body effects. Conversely, we show that self-interaction effects can be relatively large in 1 +1 and 2 +1 dimensions. Our motivations for this work are twofold: First, no previous derivation of the self-force has been provided in arbitrary dimensions, and heuristic arguments presented by different authors have resulted in conflicting conclusions. Second, the static self-force problem in arbitrary dimensions provides a valuable test bed with which to continue the development of general, nonperturbative methods in the theory of motion. Several new insights are obtained in this direction, including a significantly improved understanding of the renormalization process. We also show that there is considerable freedom to use different "effective fields" in the laws of motion—a freedom which can be exploited to optimally simplify specific problems. Different choices give rise to different inertias, gravitational forces, and electromagnetic or scalar self-forces, but there is a sense in which none of these quantities are individually accessible to experiment. Certain combinations are observable, however, and these remain invariant under all possible field redefinitions.

  17. Cardiovascular responses to static exercise in distance runners and weight lifters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longhurst, J. C.; Kelly, A. R.; Gonyea, W. J.; Mitchell, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Three groups of athletes including long-distance runners, competitive and amateur weight lifters, and age- and sex-matched control subjects have been studied by hemodynamic and echocardiographic methods in order to determine the effect of the training programs on the cardiovascular response to static exercise. Blood pressure, heart rate, and double product data at rest and at fatigue suggest that competitive endurance (dynamic exercise) training alters the cardiovascular response to static exercise. In contrast to endurance exercise, weight lifting (static exercise) training does not alter the cardiovascular response to static exercise: weight lifters responded to static exercise in a manner very similar to that of the control subjects.

  18. Modeling the static fringe field of superconducting magnets.

    PubMed

    Jeglic, P; Lebar, A; Apih, T; Dolinsek, J

    2001-05-01

    The resonance frequency-space and the frequency gradient-space relations are evaluated analytically for the static fringe magnetic field of superconducting magnets used in the NMR diffusion measurements. The model takes into account the actual design of the high-homogeneity magnet coil system that consists of the main coil and the cryoshim coils and enables a precise calibration of the on-axis magnetic field gradient and the resonance frequency inside and outside of the superconducting coil. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  19. Static analysis of a sonar dome rubber window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    The application of NASTRAN (level 16.0.1) to the static analysis of a sonar dome rubber window (SDRW) was demonstrated. The assessment of the conventional model (neglecting the enclosed fluid) for the stress analysis of the SDRW was made by comparing its results to those based on a sophisticated model (including the enclosed fluid). The fluid was modeled with isoparametric linear hexahedron elements with approximate material properties whose shear modulus was much smaller than its bulk modulus. The effect of the chosen material property for the fluid is discussed.

  20. The static response of a bowed inclined hot wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smits, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    The directional sensitivity of a bowed, inclined hot wire is investigated using a simple model for the convective heat transfer. The static response is analyzed for subsonic and supersonic flows. It is shown that the effects of both end conduction and wire bowing are greater in supersonic flow. Regardless of the Mach number, however, these two phenomena have distinctly different effects; end conduction appears to be responsible for reducing the nonlinearity of the response, whereas bowing increases the directional sensitivity. Comparison with the available data suggests that the analysis is useful for interpreting the experimental results.

  1. Quasi-static axisymmetric eversion hemispherical domes made of elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabrits, Sergey A.; Kolpak, Eugeny P.

    2016-06-01

    The paper considers numerical solution for the problem of quasi-static axisymmetric eversion of a spherical shell (hemisphere) under action of external pressure. Results based on the general nonlinear theory of shells made of elastomers, proposed by K. F. Chernykh. It is used two models of shells based on the hypotheses of the Kirchhoff and Timoshenko, modified K.F. Chernykh for the case of hyperelastic rubber-like material. The article presents diagrams of equilibrium states of eversion hemispheres for both models as well as the shape of the shell at different points in the diagram.

  2. A three-level advanced static VAr compensator

    SciTech Connect

    Ekanayake, J.B.; Jenkins, N.

    1996-01-01

    An Advanced Static VAr Compensator (ASVC) employing a three level inverter has been investigated for three phase applications. The paper describes the operating principles of the ASVC using an elementary single phase ASVC circuit. The construction of a hardware model of the three phase, three level ASVC is then presented. The performance of the ASVC is obtained from an experimental study carried out on this laboratory model. The use of the selective harmonic elimination modulation (SHEM) technique to minimize harmonics is explored. Experimental studies have been carried out to determine the speed of response of the scheme by controlling itmore » in a closed loop.« less

  3. Properties of fiber reinforced plastics about static and dynamic loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudinov, Vladimir V.; Korneeva, Natalia V.

    2016-05-01

    A method for investigation of impact toughness of anisotropic polymer composite materials (reinforced plastics) with the help of CM model sample in the configuration of microplastic (micro plastic) and impact pendulum-type testing machine under static and dynamic loadings has been developed. The method is called "Break by Impact" (Impact Break IB). The estimation of impact resistance CFRP by this method showed that an increase in loading velocity ~104 times the largest changes occurs in impact toughness and deformation ability of a material.

  4. The effects of deuterium on static posture control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layne, Charles S.

    1990-01-01

    A significant operational problem impacting upon the Space Shuttle program involves the astronaut's ability to safely egress from the Orbiter during an emergency situation. Following space flight, astronauts display significant movement problems. One variable which may contribute to increased movement ataxia is deuterium (D2O). Deuterium is present in low levels within the Orbiter's water supply but may accumulate to significant physiological levels during lengthy missions. Deuterium was linked to a number of negative physiological responses, including motion sickness, decreased metabolism, and slowing of neural conduction velocity. The effects of D2O on static postural control in response to a range of dosage levels were investigated. Nine sugjects were divided into three groups of three subjects each. The groups were divided into a low, medium, and a high D2O dosage group. The subjects static posture was assessed with the use of the EquiTest systems, a commercially available postural control evaluation system featuring movable force plates and a visual surround that can be servoed to the subject's sway. In addition to the force plate information, data about the degree of subject sway about the hips and shoulders was obtained. Additionally, surface electromyographic (EMG) data from the selected lower limb muscles were collected along with saliva samples used to determine the amount of deuterium enrichment following D2O ingestion. Two baseline testing sessions were performed using the EquiTest testing protocol prior to ingestion of the D2O. Thirty minutes after dosing, subjects again performed the tests. Two more post-dosing tests were run with an interest interval of one hour. Preliminary data anlaysis indicates that only subjects in the igh dose group displayed any significant static postural problems. Future analyses of the sway and EMG is expected to reveal significant variations in the subject's postural control strategy following D2O dosing. While

  5. Modeling Quasi-Static and Fatigue-Driven Delamination Migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Carvalho, N. V.; Ratcliffe, J. G.; Chen, B. Y.; Pinho, S. T.; Baiz, P. M.; Tay, T. E.

    2014-01-01

    An approach was proposed and assessed for the high-fidelity modeling of progressive damage and failure in composite materials. It combines the Floating Node Method (FNM) and the Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) to represent multiple interacting failure mechanisms in a mesh-independent fashion. Delamination, matrix cracking, and migration were captured failure and migration criteria based on fracture mechanics. Quasi-static and fatigue loading were modeled within the same overall framework. The methodology proposed was illustrated by simulating the delamination migration test, showing good agreement with the available experimental data.

  6. Quasi-Static Analysis of LaRC THUNDER Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F.

    2007-01-01

    An analytic approach is developed to predict the shape and displacement with voltage in the quasi-static limit of LaRC Thunder Actuators. The problem is treated with classical lamination theory and Von Karman non-linear analysis. In the case of classical lamination theory exact analytic solutions are found. It is shown that classical lamination theory is insufficient to describe the physical situation for large actuators but is sufficient for very small actuators. Numerical results are presented for the non-linear analysis and compared with experimental measurements. Snap-through behavior, bifurcation, and stability are presented and discussed.

  7. Static performance tests of a flight-type STOVL ejector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barankiewicz, Wendy S.

    1991-01-01

    The design and development of thrust augmenting STOVL ejectors has typically been based on experimental iteration (i.e., trial and error). Static performance tests of a full scale vertical lift ejector were performed at primary flow temperatures up to 1560 R (1100 F). Flow visualization (smoke generators and yarn tufts) were used to view the inlet air flow, especially around the primary nozzle and end plates. Performance calculations are presented for ambient temperatures close to 480 R (20 F) and 535 R (75 F) which simulate seasonal aircraft operating conditions. Resulting thrust augmentation ratios are presented as functions of nozzle pressure ratio and temperature.

  8. Prediction of flyover jet noise spectra from static tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, U.; Michalke, A.

    1981-01-01

    A scaling law is derived for predicting the flyover noise spectra of a single-stream shock-free circular jet from static experiments. The theory is based on the Lighthill approach to jet noise. Density terms are retained to include the effects of jet heating. The influence of flight on the turbulent flow field is considered by an experimentally supported similarity assumption. The resulting scaling laws for the difference between one-third-octave spectra and the overall sound pressure level compare very well with flyover experiments with a jet engine and with wind tunnel experiments with a heated model jet.

  9. Brain Tumor Hyperthermia with Static and Moving Seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molloy, Janelle Arlene

    1990-01-01

    Thermodynamic studies are presented for both static and moving ferromagnetic "seeds" imbedded in biological media. These studies were performed in support of the development of a system which delivers localized hyperthermia to deep-seated brain tumors. In this system, a magnetic "seed" of approximately 5 mm dimension (length and diameter) is remotely repositioned within the brain by an externally produced magnetic field. The seed is inductively heated and repositioned throughout the tumor volume. An induction heating system was built for experimental use with tissue phantoms and animals. The maximum level of direct tissue heating produced by this system was measured in vivo in three animals. An upper limit on the power absorption was placed at 0.46 mW cm^{ -3}, a factor of 10^{-4 } below the power density produced in ferromagnetic seeds by the same system. Measurements were made of the temporal and spatial dependence of the temperature rise in the vicinity of a statically placed 6 mm diameter nickel sphere, in vivo in four pigs, and in one which was euthanized. These results were compared to a theroetical model which was based on a point source solution to the thermal diffusion equation and estimates of blood flow rates, tissue thermal conductivity and seed power absorption were found using a parameter estimation algorithm. Studies were also made of the temperature gradients produced by a heated iron ellipsoid of 4.8 mm diameter and 9.6 mm length in a brain tissue phantom. Temperature measurements were made both with the seed statically imbedded in the tissue phantom and with the phantom moving at a constant velocity of 0.11 mm s^{-1 } with respect to the seed. These static and moving data were compared to obtain an estimate for the thermal field and convective cooling of a moving seed. In addition, an exploratory study was performed in which the dependence of seed heating efficiency on material and geometry were tested. A "hybrid" seed was developed consisting of

  10. Dynamic versus static allocation policies in multipurpose multireservoir systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmant, A.; Goor, Q.; Pinte, D.; van der Zaag, P.

    2007-12-01

    As the competition for water is likely to increase in the near future due to socioeconomic development and population growth, water resources managers will face hard choices when allocating water between competing users. Because water is a vital resource used in multiple sectors, including the environment, the allocation is inherently a political and social process, which is likely to become increasingly scrutinized as the competition grows between the different sectors. Since markets are usually absent or ineffective, the allocation of water between competing demands is achieved administratively taking into account key objectives such as economic efficiency, equity and maintaining the ecological integrity. When crop irrigation is involved, water is usually allocated by a system of annual rights to use a fixed, static, volume of water. In a fully-allocated basin, moving from a static to a dynamic allocation process, whereby the policies are regularly updated according to the hydrologic status of the river basin, is the first step towards the development of river basin management strategies that increase the productivity of water. More specifically, in a multipurpose multireservoir system, continuously adjusting release and withdrawal decisions based on the latest hydrologic information will increase the benefits derived from the system. However, the extent to which such an adjustment can be achieved results from complex spatial and temporal interactions between the physical characteristics of the water resources system (storage, natural flows), the economic and social consequences of rationing and the impacts on natural ecosystems. The complexity of the decision-making process, which requires the continuous evaluation of numerous trade-offs, calls for the use of integrated hydrologic-economic models. This paper compares static and dynamic management approaches for a cascade of hydropower-irrigation reservoirs using stochastic dual dynamic programming (SDDP

  11. F-1 Engine for Saturn V Undergoing a Static Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    The flame and exhaust from the test firing of an F-1 engine blast out from the Saturn S-IB Static Test Stand in the east test area of the Marshall Space Flight Center. A Cluster of five F-1 engines, located in the S-IC (first) stage of the Saturn V vehicle, provided over 7,500,000 pounds of thrust to launch the giant rocket. The towering 363-foot Saturn V was a multistage, multiengine launch vehicle standing taller than the Statue of Liberty. Altogether, the Saturn V engines produced as much power as 85 Hoover Dams.

  12. Oscillating and static universes from a single barotropic fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Kehayias, John; Scherrer, Robert J.

    We consider cosmological solutions to general relativity with a single barotropic fluid, where the pressure is a general function of the density, p=f(ρ). We derive conditions for static and oscillating solutions and provide examples, extending earlier work to these simpler and more general single-fluid cosmologies. Generically we expect such solutions to suffer from instabilities, through effects such as quantum fluctuations or tunneling to zero size. We also find a classical instability (“no-go” theorem) for oscillating solutions of a single barotropic perfect fluid due to a necessarily negative squared sound speed.

  13. Oscillating and static universes from a single barotropic fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Kehayias, John; Scherrer, Robert J., E-mail: john.kehayias@vanderbilt.edu, E-mail: robert.scherrer@vanderbilt.edu

    We consider cosmological solutions to general relativity with a single barotropic fluid, where the pressure is a general function of the density, p = f(ρ). We derive conditions for static and oscillating solutions and provide examples, extending earlier work to these simpler and more general single-fluid cosmologies. Generically we expect such solutions to suffer from instabilities, through effects such as quantum fluctuations or tunneling to zero size. We also find a classical instability (''no-go'' theorem) for oscillating solutions of a single barotropic perfect fluid due to a necessarily negative squared sound speed.

  14. The Effects of Thunderstorm Static and Quasi-Static Electric Fields on the Lower Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Mohammad Ahmad

    few seconds due to the fast electron attachment process. The recovery time of the electron enhancement above ˜75 km altitude is controlled by a slower recombination process; it depends on the ambient density profile and can last for tens of minutes to hours. Finally, the modeling results of the lower ionosphere recovery time are analyzed to investigate the role of halos in producing early VLF events with long recovery time. It is found that these events can be explained when sufficient ionization is produced around ˜80 km altitude. Such ionization can be produced by the impact of impulsive negative cloud-to-ground lightning flashes with a relatively large charge moment change on a tenuous ionospheric density profile.

  15. Magnetic vortex nucleation modes in static magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Vanatka, Marek; Urbanek, Michal; Jira, Roman

    The magnetic vortex nucleation process in nanometer- and micrometer-sized magnetic disks undergoes several phases with distinct spin configurations called the nucleation states. Before formation of the final vortex state, small submicron disks typically proceed through the so-called C-state while the larger micron-sized disks proceed through the more complicated vortex-pair state or the buckling state. This work classifies the nucleation states using micromagnetic simulations and provides evidence for the stability of vortex-pair and buckling states in static magnetic fields using magnetic imaging techniques and electrical transport measurements. Lorentz Transmission Electron Microscopy and Magnetic Transmission X-ray Microscopy are employed to reveal themore » details of spin configuration in each of the nucleation states. We further show that it is possible to unambiguously identify these states by electrical measurements via the anisotropic magnetoresistance effect. Combination of the electrical transport and magnetic imaging techniques confirms stability of a vortex-antivortex-vortex spin configuration which emerges from the buckling state in static magnetic fields.« less

  16. Slipping and Tipping: Measuring Static Friction with a Straightedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietz, Eric; Aguilar, Isaac

    2012-11-01

    Following a discussion of forces, torques, and the conditions for static equilibrium, I tell my introductory mechanics class that I will show them how to measure the coefficient of static friction, μs, between the surfaces of a block and the front bench using nothing but a straightedge. After a few seconds of hushed anticipation, I nudge the block in Fig. 1 (a) gently with the straightedge, applying a horizontal force F that gradually increases from zero to a value that either causes the object to slip (Fs) or to tip (Ft). Which of these happens first depends on μs, the depth D of the block, and on h, the height above the bench surface at which F is applied. Starting at the bottom of the block, it tends to slip before tipping, but there is a critical height hc above which the block tips before slipping. The value of hc at which this transition occurs is then used to produce a value of μs for these surfaces.

  17. Quasi-Static Indentation Analysis of Carbon-Fiber Laminates.

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, Timothy; English, Shawn Allen; Nelson, Stacy Michelle

    2015-12-01

    A series of quasi - static indentation experiments are conducted on carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminates with a systematic variation of thicknesses and fixture boundary conditions. Different deformation mechanisms and their resulting damage mechanisms are activated b y changing the thickn ess and boundary conditions. The quasi - static indentation experiments have been shown to achieve damage mechanisms similar to impact and penetration, however without strain rate effects. The low rate allows for the detailed analysis on the load response. Moreover, interrupted tests allow for the incremental analysis of various damage mechanisms and pr ogressions. The experimentally tested specimens aremore » non - destructively evaluated (NDE) with optical imaging, ultrasonics and computed tomography. The load displacement responses and the NDE are then utilized in numerical simulations for the purpose of model validation and vetting. The accompanying numerical simulation work serves two purposes. First, the results further reveal the time sequence of events and the meaning behind load dro ps not clear from NDE . Second, the simulations demonstrate insufficiencies in the code and can then direct future efforts for development.« less

  18. Static aeroelastic analysis and tailoring of missile control fins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintosh, S. C., Jr.; Dillenius, M. F. E.

    1989-01-01

    A concept for enhancing the design of control fins for supersonic tactical missiles is described. The concept makes use of aeroelastic tailoring to create fin designs (for given planforms) that limit the variations in hinge moments that can occur during maneuvers involving high load factors and high angles of attack. It combines supersonic nonlinear aerodynamic load calculations with finite-element structural modeling, static and dynamic structural analysis, and optimization. The problem definition is illustrated. The fin is at least partly made up of a composite material. The layup is fixed, and the orientations of the material principal axes are allowed to vary; these are the design variables. The objective is the magnitude of the difference between the chordwise location of the center of pressure and its desired location, calculated for a given flight condition. Three types of constraints can be imposed: upper bounds on static displacements for a given set of load conditions, lower bounds on specified natural frequencies, and upper bounds on the critical flutter damping parameter at a given set of flight speeds and altitudes. The idea is to seek designs that reduce variations in hinge moments that would otherwise occur. The block diagram describes the operation of the computer program that accomplishes these tasks. There is an option for a single analysis in addition to the optimization.

  19. Case reports: molar distalization with static repelling magnets. Part II.

    PubMed

    Steger, E R; Blechman, A M

    1995-11-01

    The following two nonextraction therapy case reports demonstrate four important points: (1) Static repelling magnets, with certain characteristic parameters, distalize molars rapidly without adverse effects that are clinically discernable. Beneficial properties such as considerably reduced patient compliance requirements for force application, reduced mobility and discomfort, and mostly bodily movement are demonstrated clinically. (2) Anchorage can be controlled by using conventional techniques of anchorage augmentation or force reduction. (3) Treatment can be satisfactorily completed and documented in accord with contemporary criteria, with conventional therapeutic methods, once the initial, most difficult, magnetic molar distalization is completed. (4) The mechanism of action that accounts for the bioeffects remains unclear. However, we hypothesize that observed reduction of mobility and discomfort during rapid movement, combined with basic research and other clinical data, are attributable to the simultaneous, synergistic property of the magnetic force field, which disrupts the local equilibrium and also the static magnetic bioeffect. Among others, one distinguishing and pertinent bioeffect may be an increased rate of osteogenesis and bone remodeling, which may be very dependent on correct dosage through a possible biologic window and the field geometry.

  20. Static and kinematic positioning using WADGPS from geostationary satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cefalo, R.; Gatti, M.

    2003-04-01

    STATIC AND KINEMATIC POSITIONING USING WADGPS CORRECTIONS FROM GEOSTATIONARY SATELLITES Cefalo R. (1), Gatti M (2) (1) Department of Civil Engineering, University of Trieste, P.le Europa 1, 34127 Trieste, Italy, cefalo@dic.univ.trieste.it, (2) Department of Engineering, University of Ferrara, via Saragat 1, 44100 Ferrara, Italy, mgatti@ing.unife.it ABSTRACT. Starting from February 2000, static and kinematic experiments have been performed at the Department of Civil Engineering of University of Trieste, Italy and the Department of Engineering of University of Ferrara, Italy, using the WADGPS (Wide Area Differential GPS) corrections up linked by Geostationary Satellites belonging to the American WAAS and European EGNOS. Recently, a prototypal service by ESA (European Space Agency) named SISNet (Signal In Space through Internet), has been introduced using Internet to diffuse the messages up linked through AOR-E and IOR Geostationary Satellites. This service will overcome the problems relative to the availability of the corrections in urban areas. This system is currently under tests by the authors in order to verify the latency of the message and the applicability and accuracies obtainable in particular in dynamic applications.

  1. Static and cyclic loading of fiber-reinforced dental resin.

    PubMed

    Drummond, James L; Bapna, Mahendra S

    2003-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the flexure strength of unidirectional fiber-reinforced resins under static and cyclic loading with and without thermal cycling. The fiber-reinforced resin materials chosen for this project were commercially available endodontic posts and commercially procured bar samples. For all materials, controls for flexure strength were tested in air and in water using three-point loading. Specimens were thermal cycled between 7 and 63 degrees C for 6000 cycles. A staircase approach was used to determine the flexure fatigue limit and scanning microscopy was used to examine the microstructure. The carbon/graphite fiber-reinforced resin posts and the glass FiberKor posts were significantly stronger than the ceramic (zirconia) and the other glass-reinforced resin materials. Thermal cycling caused a significant lowering (11-24%) of the flexure strength for each resin based post system. The ceramic post system decreased only by 2%. Further, for standard size glass fiber-reinforced resin bars, no significant differences between testing in air and water was observed, but a significant difference between static and cyclic loading was noted. The decreases in the strength property due to thermal cycling and the cyclic loading of these materials indicates that their utilization in the oral environment enhances their degradation, and potentially shortens their clinical life.

  2. Dynamic Investigation of Static Divergence: Analysis and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer

    2000-01-01

    The phenomenon known as aeroelastic divergence is the focus of this work. The analyses and experiment presented here show that divergence can occur without a structural dynamic mode losing its oscillatory nature. Aeroelastic divergence occurs when the structural restorative capability or stiffness of a structure is overwhelmed by the static aerodynamic moment. This static aeroelastic coupling does not require the structural dynamic system behavior to cease, however. Aeroelastic changes in the dynamic mode behavior are governed not only by the stiffness, but by damping and inertial properties. The work presented here supports these fundamental assertions by examining a simple system: a typical section airfoil with only a rotational structural degree of freedom. Analytical results identified configurations that exhibit different types of dynamic mode behavior as the system encounters divergence. A wind tunnel model was designed and tested to examine divergence experimentally. The experimental results validate the analytical calculations and explicitly examine the divergence phenomenon where the dynamic mode persists. Three configurations of the wind tunnel model were tested. The experimental results agree very well with the analytical predictions of subcritical characteristics, divergence velocity, and behavior of the noncritical dynamic mode at divergence.

  3. Performance of Koyna dam based on static and dynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizan, Nik Zainab Nik; Majid, Taksiah A.; Nazri, Fadzli Mohamed; Maity, Damodar

    2017-10-01

    This paper discusses the performance of Koyna dam based on static pushover analysis (SPO) and incremental dynamic analysis (IDA). The SPO in this study considered two type of lateral load which is inertial load and hydrodynamic load. The structure was analyse until the damage appears on the structure body. The IDA curves were develop based on 7 ground motion, where the characteristic of the ground motions: i) the distance from the epicenter is less than 15km, (ii) the magnitude is equal to or greater than 5.5 and (iii) the PGA is equal to or greater than 0.15g. All the ground motions convert to respond spectrum and scaled according to the developed elastic respond spectrum in order to match the characteristic of the ground motion to the soil type. Elastic respond spectrum developed based on soil type B by using Eurocode 8. By using SPO and IDA method are able to determine the limit states of the dam. The limit state proposed in this study are yielding and ultimate state which is identified base on crack pattern perform on the structure model. The comparison of maximum crest displacement for both methods is analysed to define the limit state of the dam. The displacement of yielding state for Koyna dam is 23.84mm and 44.91mm for the ultimate state. The results are able to be used as a guideline to monitor Koyna dam under seismic loadings which are considering static and dynamic.

  4. Static Holes in Geometrically Frustrated Bow Tie Ladder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, George; Brenig, Wolfram

    2007-03-01

    Doping of the geometrically frustrated bow-tie spin ladder with static holes is investigated by a complementary approach using exact diagonalization and hard-core quantum dimers. Results for the thermodynamics in the undoped case, the singlet density of states, the hole-binding energy, and the spin correlations will be presented. We find that the static holes polarize their vicinity by a localization of singlets in order to reduce the frustration. As a consequence the singlet polarization cloud induces short range repulsive forces between the holes with oscillatory longer range behavior. For those systems we have studied, most results for the quantum dimer approach are found to be qualitatively if not quantitatively in agreement with exact diagonalization. The ground state of the undoped system is non-degenerate with translationally invariant nearest-neighbor spin correlations up to a few unit cells, which is consistent with a spin liquid state or a valence bond crystal with very large unit cell. C. Waldtmann, A. Kreutzmann, U. Schollwock, K. Maisinger, and H.-U. Everts, Phys. Rev. B 62, 9472 (2000).

  5. Photoionization of hydrogen in a strong static electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohgoda, Shun; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Morishita, Toru

    2017-04-01

    We analyze photoionization of hydrogen in the presence of a strong static electric field F ˜0.1 a.u. Such a field essentially modifies the spectrum of the unperturbed atom. Even the ground n =1 state acquires a non-negligible width, while the higher field-free bound states become overlapping resonances. At the same time, static-field-induced states (SFISs) found recently [A. V. Gets and O. I. Tolstikhin, Phys. Rev. A 87, 013419 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.87.013419] emerge in the field-free continuum. We formulate the theory of photoionization from a decaying initial state and define appropriate observables—the reduced photoionization rate and transverse momentum distribution of photoelectrons. These observables are calculated for the four initial states with n =1 and 2 in the different polarization cases. The SFISs are shown to manifest themselves as distinct peaks in the observables. Remarkably, even broad SFISs can be seen as narrow well-pronounced peaks at fields where their widths are comparable to that of the initial state. Such a resonance enhancement of the manifestations of SFISs is the main finding of this paper. This finding suggests that SFISs should manifest themselves also in photoelectron momentum distributions produced by photoionization in the presence of a quasistatic field of intense low-frequency laser pulses currently used in strong-field physics.

  6. Static, Drop, and Flight Tests on Musselman Type Airwheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peck, William C; Beard, Albert P

    1932-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to obtain quantitative information on the shock-reducing and energy-dissipating qualities of a set of 30 by 13-6 Musselman type airwheels. The investigation consisted of static, drop, and flight tests. The static tests were made with inflation pressures of approximately 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 pounds per square inch and loadings up to 9,600 pounds. The drop tests were with the inflation pressures approximately 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 pounds per square inch and loadings of 1,840, 2,440, 3,050, and 3,585 pounds. The flight tests were made with VE-7 airplane weighing 2,153 pounds, with the tires inflated to 5, 10, and 15 pounds per square inch. The landing gears used in conjunction with airwheels were practically rigid structures. The results of the tests showed that the walls of the tires carried a considerable portion of the load, each tire supporting a load of 600 pounds with a depression of approximately 6 inches. The shock-reducing qualities, under severe tests, and the energy dissipating characteristics of the tires, under all tests, were poor. The latter was evidenced by the rebound present in all landings made. In the severe drop tests, the free rebound reached as much as 60 per cent of the free drop. The results indicate that a shock-reducing and energy-dissipating mechanism should be used in conjunction with airwheels.

  7. Technology advancement of the static feed water electrolysis process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, F. C.; Schubert, F. H.

    1977-01-01

    Some results are presented of a research and development program to continue the development of a method to generate oxygen for crew metabolic consumption during extended manned space flights. The concept being pursued is that of static feed water electrolysis. Specific major results of the work included: (1) completion of a 30-day electrode test using a Life Systems, Inc.-developed high performance catalyst. During startup the cell voltages were as low as 1.38 V at current densities of 108 mA/sq cm (100 ASF) and temperatures of 355 K (180 F). At the end of 30 days of testing the cell voltages were still only 1.42 V at 108 mA/sq cm, (2) determination that the Static Feed Water Electrolysis Module does not release an aerosol of the cell electrolyte into the product gas streams after a break-in period of 24 hours following a new electrolyte charge, and (3) completion of a detailed design analysis of an electrochemical Oxygen Generation Subsystem at a three-man level (4.19 kg/day (9.24 lb/day) of oxygen).

  8. Materials and techniques for spacecraft static charge control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amore, L. J.; Eagles, A. E.

    1977-01-01

    An overview of the design, development, fabrication, and testing of transparent conductive coatings and conductive lattices deposited or formed on high resistivity spacecraft dielectric materials to obtain control static charge buildup on spacecraft external surfaces is presented. Fabrication techniques for the deposition of indium/tin oxide coatings and copper grid networks on Kapton and FEP Teflon films and special frit coatings for OSR and solar cell cover glasses are discussed. The techniques include sputtering, photoetching, silkscreening, and mechanical processes. A facility designed and built to simulate the electron plasma at geosynchronous altitudes is described along with test procedures. The results of material characterizations as well as electron irradiation aging effects in this facility for spacecraft polymers treated to control static charge are presented. The data presents results for electron beam energies up to 30 kV and electron current densities of 30 nA/cm squared. Parameters measured include secondary emission, surface leakage, and through the sample currents as a function of primary beam energy and voltage.

  9. Static investigation of several yaw vectoring concepts on nonaxisymmetric nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, M. L.; Berrier, B. L.

    1985-01-01

    A test has been conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the flow-turning capability and the effects on nozzle internal performance of several yaw vectoring concepts. Nonaxisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzles with throat areas simulating dry and afterburning power settings and single expansion ramp nozzles with a throat area simulating a dry power setting were modified for yaw thrust vectoring. Forward-thrust and pitch-vectored nozzle configurations were tested with each yaw vectoring concept. Four basic yaw vectoring concepts were investigated on the nonaxisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzles: (1) translating sidewall; (2) downstream (of throat) flaps; (3) upstream (of throat) port/flap; and (4) powered rudder. Selected combinations of the rudder with downstream flaps or upstream port/flap were also tested. A single yaw vectoring concept, post-exit flaps, was investigated on the single expansion ramp nozzles. All testing was conducted at static (no external flow) conditions and nozzle pressure ratios varied from 2.0 up to 10.0.

  10. Eye-lens accommodation load and static trapezius muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Richter, H O; Bänziger, T; Forsman, M

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this experimental study was to investigate if sustained periods of oculomotor load impacts on neck/scapular area muscle activity. The static trapezius muscle activity was assessed from bipolar surface electromyography, normalized to a submaximal contraction. Twenty-eight subjects with a mean age of 29 (range 19-42, SD 8) viewed a high-contrast fixation target for two 5-min periods through: (1) -3.5 dioptre (D) lenses; and (2) 0 D lenses. The target was placed 5 D away from the individual's near point of accommodation. Each subject's ability to compensate for the added blur was extracted via infrared photorefraction measurements. Subjects whose accommodative response was higher in the -D blur condition (1) showed relatively more static bilateral trapezius muscle activity level. During no blur (2) there were no signs of relationships. The results indicate that sustained eye-lens accommodation at near, during ergonomically unfavourable viewing conditions, could possibly represent a risk factor for trapezius muscle myalgia.

  11. Static-stress analysis of dual-axis safety vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bultman, D. H.

    1992-11-01

    An 8 ft diameter safety vessel, made of HSLA-100 steel, is evaluated to determine its ability to contain the quasi-static residual pressure from a high explosive (HE) blast. The safety vessel is designed for use with the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrotest (DARHT) facility being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A smaller confinement vessel fits inside the safety vessel and contains the actual explosion, and the safety vessel functions as a second layer of containment in the unlikely case of a confinement vessel leak. The safety vessel is analyzed as a pressure vessel based on the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section 8, Division 1, and the Welding Research Council Bulletin, WRC107. Combined stresses that result from internal pressure and external loads on nozzles are calculated and compared to the allowable stresses for HSLA-100 steel. Results confirm that the shell and nozzle components are adequately designed for a static pressure of 830 psi, plus the maximum expected external loads. Shell stresses at the 'shell to nozzle' interface, produced from external loads on the nozzles, were less than 700 psi. The maximum combined stress resulting from the internal pressure plus external loads was 17,384 psi, which is significantly less than the allowable stress of 42,375 psi for HSLA-100 steel.

  12. Quasi-static responses and variational principles in gradient plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Quoc-Son

    2016-12-01

    Gradient models have been much discussed in the literature for the study of time-dependent or time-independent processes such as visco-plasticity, plasticity and damage. This paper is devoted to the theory of Standard Gradient Plasticity at small strain. A general and consistent mathematical description available for common time-independent behaviours is presented. Our attention is focussed on the derivation of general results such as the description of the governing equations for the global response and the derivation of related variational principles in terms of the energy and the dissipation potentials. It is shown that the quasi-static response under a loading path is a solution of an evolution variational inequality as in classical plasticity. The rate problem and the rate minimum principle are revisited. A time-discretization by the implicit scheme of the evolution equation leads to the increment problem. An increment of the response associated with a load increment is a solution of a variational inequality and satisfies also a minimum principle if the energy potential is convex. The increment minimum principle deals with stables solutions of the variational inequality. Some numerical methods are discussed in view of the numerical simulation of the quasi-static response.

  13. OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE OF NMR SPECTROMETRISTS TO STATIC AND RADIOFREQUENCY FIELDS.

    PubMed

    Berlana, Tania; Úbeda, Alejandro

    2017-12-01

    Occupational exposure to static and radiofrequency fields emitted by nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers was assessed through systematic field metering during operation of 19 devices in nine research centers. Whereas no measurable levels of radiofrequency radiation were registered outside the spectrometers, significant exposure to static field was detected, with maximum values recorded at the user's hand (B = 683.00 mT) and head-thorax (B = 135.70 mT) during spectrometer manipulation. All values were well below the exposure limits set by the European standard for workers protection against the effects of acute field exposure only. As for potential effects of chronic exposure, waiting for more complete knowledge, adoption of technical and operational strategies for exposure minimizing is advisable. In this respect, the data revealed that compared with standard magnetic shielding, ultrashield technology allows a 20-65-fold reduction of the field strength received by the operator. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Variations of archived static-weight data and WIM

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, C.J.; Gillmann, R.; Kent, P.M.

    1998-12-01

    Using seven-card archived, static-weight and weigh-in-motion (WIM), truck data received by FHWA for 1966--1992, the authors examine the fluctuations of four fiducial weight measures reported at weight sites in the 50 states. The reduced 172 MB Class 9 (332000) database was prepared and ordered from 2 CD-ROMS with duplicate records removed. Front-axle weight and gross-vehicle weight (GVW) are combined conceptually by determining the front axle weight in four-quartile GVW categories. The four categories of front axle weight from the four GVW categories are combined in four ways. Three linear combinations are with fixed-coefficient fiducials and one is that optimal linearmore » combination producing the smallest standard deviation to mean value ratio. The best combination gives coefficients of variation of 2--3% for samples of 100 trucks, below the expected accuracy of single-event WIM measurements. Time tracking of data shows some high-variation sites have seasonal variations, or linear variations over the time-ordered samples. Modeling of these effects is very site specific but provides a way to reduce high variations. Some automatic calibration schemes would erroneously remove such seasonal or linear variations were they static effects.« less

  15. Static tests of the propulsion system. [Propfan Test Assessment program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withers, C. C.; Bartel, H. W.; Turnberg, J. E.; Graber, E. J.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced, highly-loaded, high-speed propellers, called propfans, are promising to revolutionize the transport aircraft industry by offering a 15- to 30-percent fuel savings over the most advanced turbofans without sacrificing passenger comfort or violating community noise standards. NASA Lewis Research Center and industry have been working jointly to develop the needed propfan technology. The NASA-funded Propfan Test Assessment (PTA) Program represents a key element of this joint program. In PTA, Lockheed-Georgia, working in concert with Hamilton Standard, Rohr Industries, Gulfstream Aerospace, and Allison, is developing a propfan propulsion system which will be mounted on the left wing of a modified Gulfstream GII aircraft and flight tested to verify the in-flight characteristics of a 9-foot diameter, single-rotation propfan. The propfan, called SR-7L, was designed and fabricated by Hamilton Standard under a separate NASA contract. Prior to flight testing, the PTA propulsion system was static tested at the Rohr Brown Field facility. In this test, propulsion system operational capability was verified and data was obtained on propfan structural response, system acoustic characteristics, and system performance. This paper reports on the results of the static tests.

  16. [Research on Spectral Polarization Imaging System Based on Static Modulation].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hai-bo; Li, Huan; Lin, Xu-ling; Wang, Zheng

    2015-04-01

    The main disadvantages of traditional spectral polarization imaging system are: complex structure, with moving parts, low throughput. A novel method of spectral polarization imaging system is discussed, which is based on static polarization intensity modulation combined with Savart polariscope interference imaging. The imaging system can obtain real-time information of spectral and four Stokes polarization messages. Compared with the conventional methods, the advantages of the imaging system are compactness, low mass and no moving parts, no electrical control, no slit and big throughput. The system structure and the basic theory are introduced. The experimental system is established in the laboratory. The experimental system consists of reimaging optics, polarization intensity module, interference imaging module, and CCD data collecting and processing module. The spectral range is visible and near-infrared (480-950 nm). The white board and the plane toy are imaged by using the experimental system. The ability of obtaining spectral polarization imaging information is verified. The calibration system of static polarization modulation is set up. The statistical error of polarization degree detection is less than 5%. The validity and feasibility of the basic principle is proved by the experimental result. The spectral polarization data captured by the system can be applied to object identification, object classification and remote sensing detection.

  17. Gas Measurement Using Static Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Michael H; Schardt, Michael; Rauscher, Markus S; Koch, Alexander W

    2017-11-13

    Online monitoring of gases in industrial processes is an ambitious task due to adverse conditions such as mechanical vibrations and temperature fluctuations. Whereas conventional Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers use rather complex optical and mechanical designs to ensure stable operation, static FTIR spectrometers do not require moving parts and thus offer inherent stability at comparatively low costs. Therefore, we present a novel, compact gas measurement system using a static single-mirror Fourier transform spectrometer (sSMFTS). The system works in the mid-infrared range from 650 cm - 1 to 1250 cm - 1 and can be operated with a customized White cell, yielding optical path lengths of up to 120 cm for highly sensitive quantification of gas concentrations. To validate the system, we measure different concentrations of 1,1,1,2-Tetrafluoroethane (R134a) and perform a PLS regression analysis of the acquired infrared spectra. Thereby, the measured absorption spectra show good agreement with reference data. Since the system additionally permits measurement rates of up to 200 Hz and high signal-to-noise ratios, an application in process analysis appears promising.

  18. Magnetic vortex nucleation modes in static magnetic fields

    DOE PAGES

    Vanatka, Marek; Urbanek, Michal; Jira, Roman; ...

    2017-10-03

    The magnetic vortex nucleation process in nanometer- and micrometer-sized magnetic disks undergoes several phases with distinct spin configurations called the nucleation states. Before formation of the final vortex state, small submicron disks typically proceed through the so-called C-state while the larger micron-sized disks proceed through the more complicated vortex-pair state or the buckling state. This work classifies the nucleation states using micromagnetic simulations and provides evidence for the stability of vortex-pair and buckling states in static magnetic fields using magnetic imaging techniques and electrical transport measurements. Lorentz Transmission Electron Microscopy and Magnetic Transmission X-ray Microscopy are employed to reveal themore » details of spin configuration in each of the nucleation states. We further show that it is possible to unambiguously identify these states by electrical measurements via the anisotropic magnetoresistance effect. Combination of the electrical transport and magnetic imaging techniques confirms stability of a vortex-antivortex-vortex spin configuration which emerges from the buckling state in static magnetic fields.« less

  19. Review of Static Approaches to Surgical Correction of Presbyopia

    PubMed Central

    Zare Mehrjerdi, Mohammad Ali; Mohebbi, Masomeh; Zandian, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Presbyopia is the primary cause of reduction in the quality of life of people in their 40s, due to dependence on spectacles. Therefore, presbyopia correction has become an evolving and rapidly progressive field in refractive surgery. There are two primary options for presbyopia correction: the dynamic approach uses the residual accommodative capacity of the eye, and the static approach attempts to enhance the depth of focus of the optical system. The dynamic approach attempts to reverse suspected pathophysiologic changes. Dynamic approaches such as accommodative intraocular lenses (IOLs), scleral expansion techniques, refilling, and photodisruption of the crystalline lens have attracted less clinical interest due to inconsistent results and the complexity of the techniques. We have reviewed the most popular static techniques in presbyopia surgery, including multifocal IOLs, PresbyLASIK, and corneal inlays, but we should emphasize that these techniques are very different from the physiologic status of an untouched eye. A systematic PubMed search for the keywords “presbylasik”, “multifocal IOL”, and “presbyopic corneal inlay” revealed 634 articles; 124 were controlled clinical trials, 95 were published in the previous 10 years, and 78 were English with available full text. We reviewed the abstracts and rejected the unrelated articles; other references were included as needed. This narrative review compares different treatments according to available information on the optical basis of each treatment modality, including the clinical outcomes such as near, intermediate, and far visual acuity, spectacles independence, quality of vision, and dysphotopic phenomena. PMID:29090052

  20. The possible equilibrium shapes of static pendant drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumesh, P. T.; Govindarajan, Rama

    2010-10-01

    Analytical and numerical studies are carried out on the shapes of two-dimensional and axisymmetric pendant drops hanging under gravity from a solid surface. Drop shapes with both pinned and equilibrium contact angles are obtained naturally from a single boundary condition in the analytical energy optimization procedure. The numerical procedure also yields optimum energy shapes, satisfying Young's equation without the explicit imposition of a boundary condition at the plate. It is shown analytically that a static pendant two-dimensional drop can never be longer than 3.42 times the capillary length. A related finding is that a range of existing solutions for long two-dimensional drops correspond to unphysical drop shapes. Therefore, two-dimensional drops of small volume display only one static solution. In contrast, it is known that axisymmetric drops can display multiple solutions for a given volume. We demonstrate numerically that there is no limit to the height of multiple-lobed Kelvin drops, but the total volume is finite, with the volume of successive lobes forming a convergent series. The stability of such drops is in question, though. Drops of small volume can attain large heights. A bifurcation is found within the one-parameter space of Laplacian shapes, with a range of longer drops displaying a minimum in energy in the investigated space. Axisymmetric Kelvin drops exhibit an infinite number of bifurcations.

  1. Effects of combustibles on internal quasi-static loads

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, N.R.; Hokanson, J.C.; Esparza, E.D.

    1984-08-01

    The phenomenon of quasi-static pressure enhancement produced when combustible materials are placed near HE sources has been recently discovered. The effects of placing solid and liquid combustible materials near detonating explosives on internal blast loading was measured during tests conducted in a one-eighth scale model of a containment structure. In many cases, dramatic increases in gas pressures resulted. Principal conclusions of this study are: combustible materials near explosives can markedly increase gas pressures in enclosed structures; there is a lack of data on HE-combustible combinations; quasi-static loading calculations should include estimates of contributions from the burning of combustible materials whenevermore » such materials are expected to be in intimate contact with HE sources; and effects of combustibles should be investigated further to determine methods for prediction. Variations in charge to combustible mass, charge type, structure volume, degree of venting and degree of contact between HE and combustible sbould be studied.« less

  2. MATLAB Stability and Control Toolbox Trim and Static Stability Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Sean P.; Crespo, Luis

    2012-01-01

    MATLAB Stability and Control Toolbox (MASCOT) utilizes geometric, aerodynamic, and inertial inputs to calculate air vehicle stability in a variety of critical flight conditions. The code is based on fundamental, non-linear equations of motion and is able to translate results into a qualitative, graphical scale useful to the non-expert. MASCOT was created to provide the conceptual aircraft designer accurate predictions of air vehicle stability and control characteristics. The code takes as input mass property data in the form of an inertia tensor, aerodynamic loading data, and propulsion (i.e. thrust) loading data. Using fundamental nonlinear equations of motion, MASCOT then calculates vehicle trim and static stability data for the desired flight condition(s). Available flight conditions include six horizontal and six landing rotation conditions with varying options for engine out, crosswind, and sideslip, plus three take-off rotation conditions. Results are displayed through a unique graphical interface developed to provide the non-stability and control expert conceptual design engineer a qualitative scale indicating whether the vehicle has acceptable, marginal, or unacceptable static stability characteristics. If desired, the user can also examine the detailed, quantitative results.

  3. Gas Measurement Using Static Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometers

    PubMed Central

    Schardt, Michael; Rauscher, Markus S.; Koch, Alexander W.

    2017-01-01

    Online monitoring of gases in industrial processes is an ambitious task due to adverse conditions such as mechanical vibrations and temperature fluctuations. Whereas conventional Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers use rather complex optical and mechanical designs to ensure stable operation, static FTIR spectrometers do not require moving parts and thus offer inherent stability at comparatively low costs. Therefore, we present a novel, compact gas measurement system using a static single-mirror Fourier transform spectrometer (sSMFTS). The system works in the mid-infrared range from 650 cm−1 to 1250 cm−1 and can be operated with a customized White cell, yielding optical path lengths of up to 120 cm for highly sensitive quantification of gas concentrations. To validate the system, we measure different concentrations of 1,1,1,2-Tetrafluoroethane (R134a) and perform a PLS regression analysis of the acquired infrared spectra. Thereby, the measured absorption spectra show good agreement with reference data. Since the system additionally permits measurement rates of up to 200 Hz and high signal-to-noise ratios, an application in process analysis appears promising. PMID:29137193

  4. Self-forces on static bodies in arbitrary dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Peter

    2016-03-01

    I will present exact expressions for the scalar and electromagnetic self-forces and self-torques acting on arbitrary static extended bodies in arbitrary static spacetimes with any number of dimensions. Non-perturbatively, these results are identical in all dimensions. Meaningful point particle limits are quite different, however. I will discuss how such limits are defined and evaluated, resulting in simple ``regularization algorithms'' which can be used in concrete calculations. In them, self-interaction is shown to be progressively less important in higher numbers of dimensions, generically competing in magnitude with increasingly high-order extended-body effects. Conversely, self-interaction effects can be relatively large in 1 + 1 and 2 + 1 dimensions. It will further be shown that there is considerable freedom to use different ``effective fields'' in the laws of motion. Different choices give rise to different inertias, gravitational forces, and electromagnetic or scalar self-forces. However, the particular combinations of these quantities which are observable remain invariant under all possible field redefinitions.

  5. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    During the 19th century, rocket enthusiasts and inventors began to appear in almost every country. Some people thought these early rocket pioneers were geniuses, and others thought they were crazy. Claude Ruggieri, an Italian living in Paris, apparently rocketed small animals into space as early as 1806. The payloads were recovered by parachute. As depicted here by artist Larry Toschik, French authorities were not always impressed with rocket research. They halted Ruggieri's plans to launch a small boy using a rocket cluster. (Reproduced from a drawing by Larry Toschik and presented here courtesy of the artist and Motorola Inc.)

  6. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1950-01-01

    Test firing of a Redstone Missile at Redstone Test Stand in the early 1950's. The Redstone was a high-accuracy, liquid-propelled, surface-to-surface missile developed by the von Braun Team under the management of the U.S. Army. The Redstone was the first major rocket development program in the United States.

  7. Early Math.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Nuys, Ute Elisabeth

    1986-01-01

    Presents reviews of the following mathematics software designed to teach young children counting, number recognition, visual discrimination, matching, addition, and subtraction skills; Stickybear Numbers, Learning with Leeper, Getting Ready to Read and Add, Counting Parade, Early Games for Young Children, Charlie Brown's 1,2,3's, Let's Go Fishing,…

  8. Early Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Donald L.; Willis, Sherry L.

    This book summarizes theory and discusses major issues pertaining to child development in the early childhood years. Chapter I provides an introduction to the conceptual framework and major theories of child development. Chapter II deals with motor, sensory, and perceptual development. Chapter III focuses on the cognitive-developmental theory of…

  9. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    During the early introduction of rockets to Europe, they were used only as weapons. Enemy troops in India repulsed the British with rockets. Later, in Britain, Sir William Congreve developed a rocket that could fire to about 9,000 feet. The British fired Congreve rockets against the United States in the War of 1812.

  10. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    In the 19th Century, experiments in America, Europe, and elsewhere attempted to build postal rockets to deliver mail from one location to another. The idea was more novel than successful. Many stamps used in these early postal rockets have become collector's items.

  11. Laser Speckle Imaging of Blood Flow Beneath Static Scattering Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, Caitlin Anderson

    Laser speckle imaging (LSI) is a wide-field optical imaging technique that provides information about the movement of scattering particles in biological samples. LSI is used to create maps of relative blood flow and perfusion in samples such as the skin, brain, teeth, gingiva, and other biological tissues. The presence of static, or non-moving, optical scatterers affects the ability of LSI to provide true quantitative and spatially resolved measurements of blood flow. With in vitro experiments using tissue-simulating phantoms, we determined that temporal analysis of raw speckle image sequences improved the quantitative accuracy of LSI to measure flow beneath a static scattering layer. We then applied the temporal algorithm to assess the potential of LSI to monitor oral health. We designed and tested two generations of miniature LSI devices to measure flow in the pulpal chamber of teeth and in the gingiva. Our preliminary clinical pilot data indicated that speckle contrast may correlate with gingival health. To improve visualization of subsurface blood vessels, we developed a technique called photothermal LSI. We applied a short pulse of laser energy to selectively perturb the motion of red blood cells, increasing the signal from vasculature relative to the surroundings. To study the spectral and depth dependence of laser speckle contrast, we developed a Monte Carlo model of light and momentum transport to simulate speckle contrast. With an increase in the thickness of the overlying static-scattering layer, we observed a quadratic decrease in the quantity of dynamically scattered light collected by the detector. We next applied the model to study multi-exposure speckle imaging (MESI), a method that purportedly improves quantitative accuracy of subsurface blood flow measurements. We unexpectedly determined that MESI faced similar depth limitations as conventional LSI, findings that were supported by in vitro experimental data. Finally, we used the model to study the

  12. Semiconductor Crystal Growth in Static and Rotating Magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic fields have been applied during the growth of bulk semiconductor crystals to control the convective flow behavior of the melt. A static magnetic field established Lorentz forces which tend to reduce the convective intensity in the melt. At sufficiently high magnetic field strengths, a boundary layer is established ahead of the solid-liquid interface where mass transport is dominated by diffusion. This can have a significant effect on segregation behavior and can eliminate striations in grown crystals resulting from convective instabilities. Experiments on dilute (Ge:Ga) and solid solution (Ge-Si) semiconductor systems show a transition from a completely mixed convective state to a diffusion-controlled state between 0 and 5 Tesla. In HgCdTe, radial segregation approached the diffusion limited regime and the curvature of the solid-liquid interface was reduced by a factor of 3 during growth in magnetic fields in excess of 0.5 Tesla. Convection can also be controlled during growth at reduced gravitational levels. However, the direction of the residual steady-state acceleration vector can compromise this effect if it cannot be controlled. A magnetic field in reduced gravity can suppress disturbances caused by residual transverse accelerations and by random non-steady accelerations. Indeed, a joint program between NASA and the NHMFL resulted in the construction of a prototype spaceflight magnet for crystal growth applications. An alternative to the suppression of convection by static magnetic fields and reduced gravity is the imposition of controlled steady flow generated by rotating magnetic fields (RMF)'s. The potential benefits of an RMF include homogenization of the melt temperature and concentration distribution, and control of the solid-liquid interface shape. Adjusting the strength and frequency of the applied magnetic field allows tailoring of the resultant flow field. A limitation of RMF's is that they introduce deleterious instabilities above a

  13. Static and Dynamic Verification of Critical Software for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, F.; Maia, R.; Costa, D.; Duro, N.; Rodríguez-Dapena, P.; Hjortnaes, K.

    Space technology is no longer used only for much specialised research activities or for sophisticated manned space missions. Modern society relies more and more on space technology and applications for every day activities. Worldwide telecommunications, Earth observation, navigation and remote sensing are only a few examples of space applications on which we rely daily. The European driven global navigation system Galileo and its associated applications, e.g. air traffic management, vessel and car navigation, will significantly expand the already stringent safety requirements for space based applications Apart from their usefulness and practical applications, every single piece of onboard software deployed into the space represents an enormous investment. With a long lifetime operation and being extremely difficult to maintain and upgrade, at least when comparing with "mainstream" software development, the importance of ensuring their correctness before deployment is immense. Verification &Validation techniques and technologies have a key role in ensuring that the onboard software is correct and error free, or at least free from errors that can potentially lead to catastrophic failures. Many RAMS techniques including both static criticality analysis and dynamic verification techniques have been used as a means to verify and validate critical software and to ensure its correctness. But, traditionally, these have been isolated applied. One of the main reasons is the immaturity of this field in what concerns to its application to the increasing software product(s) within space systems. This paper presents an innovative way of combining both static and dynamic techniques exploiting their synergy and complementarity for software fault removal. The methodology proposed is based on the combination of Software FMEA and FTA with Fault-injection techniques. The case study herein described is implemented with support from two tools: The SoftCare tool for the SFMEA and SFTA

  14. Static and dynamic characteristics of a piezoceramic strut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pokines, Brett J.; Belvin, W. Keith; Inman, Daniel J.

    1993-01-01

    The experimental study of a piezoceramic active truss is presented. This active strut is unique in that the piezoceramic configurations allow the stroke length of the strut not to be dependent on the piezoceramic material's expansion range but on the deflection range of the piezoceramic bender segment. A finite element model of a piezoceramic strut segment was constructed. Piezoceramic actuation was simulated using thermally induced strains. This model yielded information on the stiffness and force range of a bender element. The static and dynamic properties of the strut were identified experimentally. Feedback control was used to vary the stiffness of the strut. The experimentally verified model was used to explore implementation possibilities of the strut.

  15. Switchable static friction of piezoelectric composite—silicon wafer contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Ende, D. A.; Fischer, H. R.; Groen, W. A.; van der Zwaag, S.

    2013-04-01

    The meso-scale surface roughness of piezoelectric fiber composites can be manipulated by applying an electric field to a piezocomposite with a polished surface. In the absence of an applied voltage, the tips of the embedded piezoelectric ceramic fibers are below the surface of the piezocomposite and a silicon wafer counter surface rests solely on the matrix region of the piezocomposite surface. When actuated, the piezoelectric ceramic fibers protrude from the surface and the wafer rests solely on these protrusions. A threefold decrease in engineering static friction coefficient upon actuation of the piezocomposite was observed: from μ* = 1.65 to μ* = 0.50. These experimental results could be linked to the change in contact surface area and roughness using capillary adhesion theory, which relates the adhesive force to the number and size of the contacting asperities for the different surface states.

  16. Edgeless composite laminate specimen for static and fatigue testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liber, T.; Daniel, I. M.

    1978-01-01

    The influence of edge effects on the tensile properties of angle-ply laminate composites can be eliminated by using edgeless (round tubular) specimens. However, uniaxial tests with such specimens, static and fatigue, have been generally unsuccessful because of the differential Poisson effect between the test section and the grips. An edgeless cylindrical specimen, developed to circumvent these difficulties, is examined in the present paper. It is a flattened tube consisting of two flat sides connected by curved sections. It can be handled much like the standard flat coupon. The flat ends of the specimen are provided with crossplied fiberglass gripping tabs, the same as used for flat test coupons. As part of the tabbing, the hollow ends must be plugged with inserts to prevent crushing of the ends. A special insert design was developed to minimize detrimental Poisson effects ordinarily introduced by inserts.

  17. Space Launch System Ascent Static Aerodynamic Database Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinier, Jeremy T.; Bennett, David W.; Blevins, John A.; Erickson, Gary E.; Favaregh, Noah M.; Houlden, Heather P.; Tomek, William G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the wind tunnel testing work and data analysis required to characterize the static aerodynamic environment of NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) ascent portion of flight. Scaled models of the SLS have been tested in transonic and supersonic wind tunnels to gather the high fidelity data that is used to build aerodynamic databases. A detailed description of the wind tunnel test that was conducted to produce the latest version of the database is presented, and a representative set of aerodynamic data is shown. The wind tunnel data quality remains very high, however some concerns with wall interference effects through transonic Mach numbers are also discussed. Post-processing and analysis of the wind tunnel dataset are crucial for the development of a formal ascent aerodynamics database.

  18. Behaviour of Epoxy Silica Nanocomposites Under Static and Creep Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinescu, Dan Mihai; Picu, Radu Catalin; Sandu, Marin; Apostol, Dragos Alexandru; Sandu, Adriana; Baciu, Florin

    2017-12-01

    Specific manufacturing technologies were applied for the fabrication of epoxy-based nanocomposites with silica nanoparticles. For dispersing the fillers in the epoxy resin special equipment such as a shear mixer and a high energy sonicator with temperature control were used. Both functionalized and unfunctionalized silica nanoparticles were added in three epoxy resins. The considered filling fraction was in most cases 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 wt%.. The obtained nanocomposites were subjected to monotonic uniaxial and creep loading at room temperature. The static mechanical properties were not significantly improved regardless the filler percentage and type of epoxy resin. Under creep loading, by increasing the stress level, the nanocomposite with 0.1 wt% silica creeps less than all other materials. Also the creep rate is reduced by adding silica nanofillers.

  19. Topology and static response of interaction networks in molecular biology

    PubMed Central

    Radulescu, Ovidiu; Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Siegel, Anne; Veber, Philippe; Le Borgne, Michel

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a mathematical framework describing static response of networks occurring in molecular biology. This formalism has many similarities with the Laplace–Kirchhoff equations for electrical networks. We introduce the concept of graph boundary and we show how the response of the biological networks to external perturbations can be related to the Dirichlet or Neumann problems for the corresponding equations on the interaction graph. Solutions to these two problems are given in terms of path moduli (measuring path rigidity with respect to the propagation of interaction along the graph). Path moduli are related to loop products in the interaction graph via generalized Mason–Coates formulae. We apply our results to two specific biological examples: the lactose operon and the genetic regulation of lipogenesis. Our applications show consistency with experimental results and in the case of lipogenesis check some hypothesis on the behaviour of hepatic fatty acids on fasting. PMID:16849230

  20. Coagulation of grains in static and collapsing protostellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.; Ruzmaikina, T. V.

    1993-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of extinction in the diffuse interstellar medium implies that it is produced by particles of dominant size of approximately 10(exp -5) cm. There is some indication that in the cores of dense molecular clouds, sub-micron grains can coagulate to form larger particles; this process is probably driven by turbulence. The most primitive meteorites (carbonaceous chondrites) are composed of particles with a bimodal size distribution with peaks near 1 micron (matrix) and 1 mm (chondrules). Models for chondrule formation that involve processing of presolar material by chemical reactions or through an accretion shock during infall assume that aggregates of the requisite mass could form before or during collapse. The effectiveness of coagulation during collapse has been disputed; it appears to depend on specific assumptions. The first results of detailed numerical modeling of spatial and temporal variations of particle sizes in presolar clouds, both static and collapsing, is reported in this article.

  1. Static and dynamic friction in sliding colloidal monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Vanossi, Andrea; Manini, Nicola; Tosatti, Erio

    2012-01-01

    In a pioneer experiment, Bohlein et al. realized the controlled sliding of two-dimensional colloidal crystals over laser-generated periodic or quasi-periodic potentials. Here we present realistic simulations and arguments that besides reproducing the main experimentally observed features give a first theoretical demonstration of the potential impact of colloid sliding in nanotribology. The free motion of solitons and antisolitons in the sliding of hard incommensurate crystals is contrasted with the soliton–antisoliton pair nucleation at the large static friction threshold Fs when the two lattices are commensurate and pinned. The frictional work directly extracted from particles’ velocities can be analyzed as a function of classic tribological parameters, including speed, spacing, and amplitude of the periodic potential (representing, respectively, the mismatch of the sliding interface and the corrugation, or “load”). These and other features suggestive of further experiments and insights promote colloid sliding to a unique friction study instrument. PMID:23019582

  2. Thermal solitons as revealed by the static structure factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawryluk, Krzysztof; Brewczyk, Mirosław; Rzążewski, Kazimierz

    2017-04-01

    We study, within a framework of the classical fields approximation, the static structure factor of a weakly interacting Bose gas at thermal equilibrium. As in a recent experiment [R. Schley et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 055301 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.055301], we find that the thermal distribution of phonons in a three-dimensional Bose gas follows the Planck distribution. On the other hand we find a disagreement between the Planck and phonon (calculated just as for the bulk gas) distributions in the case of elongated quasi-one-dimensional systems. We attribute this discrepancy to the existence of spontaneous dark solitons [i.e., thermal solitons as reported in T. Karpiuk et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 205302 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.205302] in an elongated Bose gas at thermal equilibrium.

  3. Characterization of classical static noise via qubit as probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javed, Muhammad; Khan, Salman; Ullah, Sayed Arif

    2018-03-01

    The dynamics of quantum Fisher information (QFI) of a single qubit coupled to classical static noise is investigated. The analytical relation for QFI fixes the optimal initial state of the qubit that maximizes it. An approximate limit for the time of coupling that leads to physically useful results is identified. Moreover, using the approach of quantum estimation theory and the analytical relation for QFI, the qubit is used as a probe to precisely estimate the disordered parameter of the environment. Relation for optimal interaction time with the environment is obtained, and condition for the optimal measurement of the noise parameter of the environment is given. It is shown that all values, in the mentioned range, of the noise parameter are estimable with equal precision. A comparison of our results with the previous studies in different classical environments is made.

  4. Generalized transformations and coordinates for static spherically symmetric general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, James M.; O'Leary, Joseph

    2018-04-01

    We examine a static, spherically symmetric solution of the empty space field equations of general relativity with a non-orthogonal line element which gives rise to an opportunity that does not occur in the standard derivations of the Schwarzschild solution. In these derivations, convenient coordinate transformations and dynamical assumptions inevitably lead to the Schwarzschild solution. By relaxing these conditions, a new solution possibility arises and the resulting formalism embraces the Schwarzschild solution as a special case. The new solution avoids the coordinate singularity associated with the Schwarzschild solution and is achieved by obtaining a more suitable coordinate chart. The solution embodies two arbitrary constants, one of which can be identified as the Newtonian gravitational potential using the weak field limit. The additional arbitrary constant gives rise to a situation that allows for generalizations of the Eddington-Finkelstein transformation and the Kruskal-Szekeres coordinates.

  5. Static and dynamic characteristics of parallel-grooved seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwatsubo, Takuzo; Yang, Bo-Suk; Ibaraki, Ryuji

    1987-01-01

    Presented is an analytical method to determine static and dynamic characteristics of annular parallel-grooved seals. The governing equations were derived by using the turbulent lubrication theory based on the law of fluid friction. Linear zero- and first-order perturbation equations of the governing equations were developed, and these equations were analytically investigated to obtain the reaction force of the seals. An analysis is presented that calculates the leakage flow rate, the torque loss, and the rotordynamic coefficients for parallel-grooved seals. To demonstrate this analysis, we show the effect of changing number of stages, land and groove width, and inlet swirl on stability of the boiler feed water pump seals. Generally, as the number of stages increased or the grooves became wider, the leakage flow rate and rotor-dynamic coefficients decreased and the torque loss increased.

  6. Buchdahl compactness limit for a pure Lovelock static fluid star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadhich, Naresh; Chakraborty, Sumanta

    2017-03-01

    We obtain the Buchdahl compactness limit for a pure Lovelock static fluid star and verify that the limit following from the uniform-density Schwarzschild's interior solution, which is universal irrespective of the gravitational theory (Einstein or Lovelock), is true in general. In terms of surface potential Φ (r ) , it means at the surface of the star r =r0, Φ (r0)<2 N (d -N -1 )/(d -1 )2, where d and N indicate spacetime dimensions and Lovelock order, respectively. For a given N , Φ (r0) is maximum for d =2 N +2 , while it is always 4 /9 , Buchdahl's limit, for d =3 N +1 . It is also remarkable that for N =1 Einstein gravity, or for pure Lovelock in d =3 N +1 , Buchdahl's limit is equivalent to the criterion that gravitational field energy exterior to the star must be less than half its gravitational mass, having no reference to the interior at all.

  7. Radio jet refraction in galactic atmospheres with static pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, R. N.; Vallee, J. P.; Bridle, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    A theory based on the refraction of radio jets in the extended atmosphere of an elliptical galaxy, is proposed for double radio sources with a Z or S morphology. The model describes a collimated jet of supersonic material that bends self-consistently under the influence of external static pressure gradients, and may alternatively be seen as a continuous-jet version of the buoyancy model proposed by Gull (1973). Emphasis is placed on (1) S-shaped radio sources identified with isolated galaxies, such as 3C 293, whose radio structures should be free of distortions resulting from motion relative to a cluster medium, and (2) small-scale, galaxy-dominated rather than environment-dominated S-shaped sources such as the inner jet structure of Fornax A.

  8. Quasi-static MHD processes in earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voigt, Gerd-Hannes

    1988-01-01

    An attempt is made to use the MHD equilibrium theory to describe the global magnetic field configuration of earth's magnetosphere and its time evolution under the influence of magnetospheric convection. To circumvent the difficulties inherent in today's MHD codes, use is made of a restriction to slowly time-dependent convection processes with convective velocities well below the typical Alfven speed. This restriction leads to a quasi-static MHD theory. The two-dimensional theory is outlined, and it is shown how sequences of two-dimensional equilibria evolve into a steady state configuration that is likely to become tearing mode unstable. It is then concluded that magnetospheric substorms occur periodically in earth's magnetosphere, thus being an integral part of the entire convection cycle.

  9. Lensless microscopy technique for static and dynamic colloidal systems.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Palacio, D C; Garcia-Sucerquia, J

    2010-09-15

    We present the application of a lensless microscopy technique known as digital in-line holographic microscopy (DIHM) to image dynamic and static colloidal systems of microspheres. DIHM has been perfected up to the point that submicrometer lateral resolution with several hundreds of micrometers depth of field is achieved with visible light; it is shown that the lateral resolution of DIHM is enough to resolve self-assembled colloidal monolayers built up from polystyrene spheres with submicrometer diameters. The time resolution of DIHM is of the order of 4 frames/s at 2048 x 2048 pixels, which represents an overall improvement of 16 times the time resolution of confocal scanning microscopy. This feature is applied to the visualization of the migration of dewetting fronts in dynamic colloidal systems and the formation of front-like arrangements of particles. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Static solutions in Einstein-Chern-Simons gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Crisóstomo, J.; Gomez, F.; Mella, P.

    In this paper we study static solutions with more general symmetries than the spherical symmetry of the five-dimensional Einstein-Chern-Simons gravity. In this context, we study the coupling of the extra bosonic field h{sup a} with ordinary matter which is quantified by the introduction of an energy-momentum tensor field associated with h{sup a}. It is found that exist (i) a negative tangential pressure zone around low-mass distributions (μ < μ{sub 1}) when the coupling constant α is greater than zero; (ii) a maximum in the tangential pressure, which can be observed in the outer region of a field distribution that satisfiesmore » μ < μ{sub 2}; (iii) solutions that behave like those obtained from models with negative cosmological constant. In such a situation, the field h{sup a} plays the role of a cosmological constant.« less

  11. Dynamics of static friction between steel and silicon

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiping; Zhang, H. P.; Marder, M.

    2008-01-01

    We conducted experiments in which steel and silicon or quartz are clamped together. Even with the smallest tangential forces we could apply, we always found reproducible sliding motions on the nanometer scale. The velocities we study are thousands of times smaller than in previous investigations. The samples first slide and then lock up even when external forces hold steady. One might call the result “slip-stick” friction. We account for the results with a phenomenological theory that results from considering the rate and state theory of dynamic friction at low velocities. Our measurements lead us to set the instantaneous coefficient of static friction that normally enters rate and state theories to zero. PMID:18768792

  12. Evaluation of aero Commander propeller acoustic data: Static operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piersol, A. G.; Wilby, E. G.; Wilby, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic data are analyzed from a series of ground tests performed on an Aero Commander propeller-driven aircraft with an array of microphones flush-mounted on one side of the fuselage. The analyses were concerned with the propeller blade passage noise during static operation at several different engine speeds and included calculations of the magnitude and phase of the blade passage tones, the amplitude stability of the tones, and the spatial phase and coherence of the tones. The results indicate that the pressure field impinging on the fuselage represents primarily aerodynamic (near field) effects in the plane of the propeller at all frequencies. Forward and aft of the propeller plane aerodynamic effects still dominate the pressure field at frequencies below 200 Hz; but at higher frequencies, the pressure field is due to acoustic propagation from an equivalent center located about 0.15 to 0.30 blade diameters inboard from the propeller hub.

  13. Static spherical wormhole models in f (R, T) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousaf, Z.; Ilyas, M.; Zaeem-ul-Haq Bhatti, M.

    2017-06-01

    This paper explores the possibility of the existence of wormhole geometries coupled with relativistic matter configurations by taking a particular model of f(R,T) gravity (where T is the trace of energy-momentum tensor). For this purpose, we take the static form of spherically symmetric spacetime and after assuming a specific form of matter and combinations of shape function, the validity of energy conditions is checked. We have discussed our results through graphical representation and studied the equilibrium background of wormhole models by taking an anisotropic fluid. The extra curvature quantities coming from f(R,T) gravity could be interpreted as a gravitational entity supporting these non-standard astrophysical wormhole models. We have shown that in the context of anisotropic fluid and R+α R^2+λ T gravity, wormhole models could possibly exist in few zones in the space of parameters without the need for exotic matter.

  14. Photonic jet μ-etching: from static to dynamic process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdurrochman, A.; Lecler, S.; Zelgowski, J.; Mermet, F.; Fontaine, J.; Tumbelaka, B. Y.

    2017-05-01

    Photonic jet etching is a direct-laser etching method applying photonic jet phenomenon to concentrate the laser beam onto the proceeded material. We call photonic jet the phenomenon of the localized sub-wavelength propagative beam generated at the shadow-side surfaces of micro-scale dielectric cylinders or spheres, when they are illuminated by an electromagnetic plane-wave or laser beam. This concentration has made possible the laser to yield sub-μ etching marks, despite the laser was a near-infrared with nano-second pulses sources. We will present these achievements from the beginning when some spherical glasses were used for static etching to dynamic etching using an optical fiber with a semi-elliptical tip.

  15. Quasi-Static Probabilistic Structural Analyses Process and Criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, B.; Verderaime, V.

    1999-01-01

    Current deterministic structural methods are easily applied to substructures and components, and analysts have built great design insights and confidence in them over the years. However, deterministic methods cannot support systems risk analyses, and it was recently reported that deterministic treatment of statistical data is inconsistent with error propagation laws that can result in unevenly conservative structural predictions. Assuming non-nal distributions and using statistical data formats throughout prevailing stress deterministic processes lead to a safety factor in statistical format, which integrated into the safety index, provides a safety factor and first order reliability relationship. The embedded safety factor in the safety index expression allows a historically based risk to be determined and verified over a variety of quasi-static metallic substructures consistent with the traditional safety factor methods and NASA Std. 5001 criteria.

  16. Fermions tunneling from a general static Riemann black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ge-Rui; Huang, Yong-Chang

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we investigate the tunneling of fermions from a general static Riemann black hole by following Kerner and Mann (Class Quantum Gravit 25:095014, 2008a; Phys Lett B 665:277-283, 2008b) methods. By applying the WKB approximation and the Hamilton-Jacobi ansatz to the Dirac equation, we obtain the standard Hawking temperature. Furthermore, Kerner and Mann (Class Quantum Gravit 25:095014, 2008a; Phys Lett B 665:277-283, 2008b) only calculated the tunneling spectrum of the Dirac particles with spin-up, and we extend the methods to investigate the tunneling of Dirac particles with arbitrary spin directions and also obtain the expected Hawking temperature. Our result provides further evidence for the universality of black hole radiation.

  17. Generalized transformations and coordinates for static spherically symmetric general relativity.

    PubMed

    Hill, James M; O'Leary, Joseph

    2018-04-01

    We examine a static, spherically symmetric solution of the empty space field equations of general relativity with a non-orthogonal line element which gives rise to an opportunity that does not occur in the standard derivations of the Schwarzschild solution. In these derivations, convenient coordinate transformations and dynamical assumptions inevitably lead to the Schwarzschild solution. By relaxing these conditions, a new solution possibility arises and the resulting formalism embraces the Schwarzschild solution as a special case. The new solution avoids the coordinate singularity associated with the Schwarzschild solution and is achieved by obtaining a more suitable coordinate chart. The solution embodies two arbitrary constants, one of which can be identified as the Newtonian gravitational potential using the weak field limit. The additional arbitrary constant gives rise to a situation that allows for generalizations of the Eddington-Finkelstein transformation and the Kruskal-Szekeres coordinates.

  18. Generalized transformations and coordinates for static spherically symmetric general relativity

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    We examine a static, spherically symmetric solution of the empty space field equations of general relativity with a non-orthogonal line element which gives rise to an opportunity that does not occur in the standard derivations of the Schwarzschild solution. In these derivations, convenient coordinate transformations and dynamical assumptions inevitably lead to the Schwarzschild solution. By relaxing these conditions, a new solution possibility arises and the resulting formalism embraces the Schwarzschild solution as a special case. The new solution avoids the coordinate singularity associated with the Schwarzschild solution and is achieved by obtaining a more suitable coordinate chart. The solution embodies two arbitrary constants, one of which can be identified as the Newtonian gravitational potential using the weak field limit. The additional arbitrary constant gives rise to a situation that allows for generalizations of the Eddington–Finkelstein transformation and the Kruskal–Szekeres coordinates. PMID:29765624

  19. DICOM static and dynamic representation through unified modeling language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Martinez, Alfonso; Jimenez-Alaniz, Juan R.; Gonzalez-Marquez, A.; Chavez-Avelar, N.

    2004-04-01

    The DICOM standard, as all standards, specifies in generic way the management in network and storage media environments of digital medical images and their related information. However, understanding the specifications for particular implementation is not a trivial work. Thus, this work is about understanding and modelling parts of the DICOM standard using Object Oriented methodologies, as part of software development processes. This has offered different static and dynamic views, according with the standard specifications, and the resultant models have been represented through the Unified Modelling Language (UML). The modelled parts are related to network conformance claim: Network Communication Support for Message Exchange, Message Exchange, Information Object Definitions, Service Class Specifications, Data Structures and Encoding, and Data Dictionary. The resultant models have given a better understanding about DICOM parts and have opened the possibility of create a software library to develop DICOM conformable PACS applications.

  20. A static investigation of several STOVL exhaust system concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romine, B. M., Jr.; Meyer, B. E.; Re, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    A static cold flow scale model test was performed in order to determine the internal performance characteristics of various STOVL exhaust systems. All of the concepts considered included a vectorable cruise nozzle and a separate vectorable vertical thrust ventral nozzle mounted on the tailpipe. The two ventral nozzle configurations tested featured vectorable constant thickness cascade vanes for area control and improved performance during transition and vertical lift flight. The best transition performance was achieved using a butterfly door type ventral nozzle and a pitch vectoring 2DCD or axisymmetric cruise nozzle. The clamshell blocker type of ventral nozzle had reduced transition performance due to the choking of the tailpipe flow upstream of the cruise nozzle.