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Sample records for early time evolution

  1. Early time evolution of a chemically produced electron depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scales, W. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Ganguli, G.

    1995-01-01

    The early time evolution of an ionospheric electron depletion produced by a radially expanding electron attachment chemical release is studied with a two-dimensional simulation model. The model includes electron attachment chemistry, incorporates fluid electrons, particle ions and neutrals, and considers the evolution in a plane perpendicular to the geomagnetic field for a low beta plasma. Timescales considered are of the order of or less than the cyclotron period of the negative ions that result as a by-product of the electron attacment reaction. This corresponds to time periods of tenths of seconds during recent experiemts. Simulation results show that a highly sheared azimuthal electron flow velocity develops in the radially expanding depletion boundary. This sheared electron flow velocity and the steep density gradients in the boundary give rise to small-scale irregulatities in the form of electron density cavities and spikes. The nonlinear evolution of these irregularities results in trapping and ultimately turbulent heating of the negative ions.

  2. Oxygen and Early Animal Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, S.

    2012-12-01

    It is often hypothesized that the rise of animals was triggered by an increase in O2 levels in the atmosphere and oceans. However, this hypothesis is remarkably difficult to test, because the timing of animal divergences is poorly resolved, the physiology of early animals is often unknown, estimates of past pO2 levels come with large error bars, and causal relationships between oxygenation and animal evolution are difficult to establish. Nonetheless, existing phylogenetic, paleontological, and geochemical data indicate that the evolution of macroscopic animals and motile macrometazoans with energetically expensive lifestyles may be temporally coupled with ocean oxygenation events in the Ediacaran Period. Thus, it is plausible that ocean oxygenation may have been a limiting factor in the early evolution of macroscopic, complex, and metabolically aggressive animals (particularly bilaterian animals). However, ocean oxygenation and animal evolution were likely engaged in two-way interactions: Ediacaran oxygenation may have initially lifted a physiological barrier for the evolution of animal size, motility, and active lifestyles, but subsequent animal diversification in the Paleozoic may have also changed oceanic redox structures. Viewed in a broader context, the early evolutionary history of animals was contingent upon a series of events, including genetic preparation (developmental genetics), environmental facilitation (oceanic oxygenation), and ecological escalation (Cambrian explosion), but the rise of animals to ecological importance also had important geobiological impacts on oceanic redox structures, sedimentary fabrics, and global geochemical cycles.

  3. Early evolution of transversally thermalized partons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, Andrzej; Chojnacki, Mikolaj; Florkowski, Wojciech

    2008-03-01

    The idea that the parton system created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions (i) emerges in a state with transverse momenta close to thermodynamic equilibrium and (ii) its evolution at early times is dominated by the 2-dimensional (transverse) hydrodynamics of the ideal fluid is investigated. It is argued that this mechanism may help to solve the problem of early equilibration.

  4. Novel scenarios of early animal evolution--is it time to rewrite textbooks?

    PubMed

    Dohrmann, Martin; Wörheide, Gert

    2013-09-01

    Understanding how important phenotypic, developmental, and genomic features of animals originated and evolved is essential for many fields of biological research, but such understanding depends on robust hypotheses about the phylogenetic interrelationships of the higher taxa to which the studied species belong. Molecular approaches to phylogenetics have proven able to revolutionize our knowledge of organismal evolution. However, with respect to the deepest splits in the metazoan Tree of Life-the relationships between Bilateria and the four non-bilaterian phyla (Porifera, Placozoa, Ctenophora, and Cnidaria)-no consensus has been reached yet, since a number of different, often contradictory, hypotheses with sometimes spectacular implications have been proposed in recent years. Here, we review the recent literature on the topic and contrast it with more classical perceptions based on analyses of morphological characters. We conclude that the time is not yet ripe to rewrite zoological textbooks and advocate a conservative approach when it comes to developing scenarios of the early evolution of animals.

  5. Solar Radiation as Driving Force In Early Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has provided an evolutionary challenge to life on Earth in that it is both an agent of mutation and as well as a selective force. Today surface fluxes of UVR vary diurnally, seasonally, etc. Still, the UVR flux was probably substantially higher during the early phases of evolution, suggesting that its role in evolution was even more prominent during this time. In this presentation, the creative role of UVR in evolution is discussed, specifically in connection with the role that UVR may have played in the evolution of early microbial ecosystems. The presentation will include discussions of the direct influence of UVR on such processes as photosynthesis and genetic damage, as well as the indirect influence of UVR as mediated through the production of reactive oxygen species. These biological effects of UVR will be viewed against the backdrop of the physical nature of the early Earth, surely a very different place then than now.

  6. Early time evolution of negative ion clouds and electron density depletions produced during electron attachment chemical release experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scales, W. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Ganguli, G.

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations are used to study the early time evolution of electron depletions and negative ion clouds produced during electron attachment chemical releases in the ionosphere. The simulation model considers the evolution in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field and a three-species plasma that contains electrons, positive ions, and also heavy negative ions that result as a by-product of the electron attachment reaction. The early time evolution (less than the negative ion cyclotron period) of the system shows that a negative charge surplus initially develops outside of the depletion boundary as the heavy negative ions move across the boundary. The electrons are initially restricted from moving into the depletion due to the magnetic field. An inhomogenous electric field develops across the boundary layer due to this charge separation. A highly sheared electron flow velocity develops in the depletion boundary due to E x B and Delta-N x B drifts that result from electron density gradients and this inhomogenous electric field. Structure eventually develops in the depletion boundary layer due to low-frequency electrostatic waves that have growth times shorter than the negative ion cyclotron period. It is proposed that these waves are most likely produced by the electron-ion hybrid instability that results from sufficiently large shears in the electron flow velocity.

  7. Palaeogeographic evolution of the central segment of the South Atlantic during Early Cretaceous times: palaeotopographic and geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaboureau, A. C.; Guillocheau, F.; Robin, C.; Rohais, S.; Moulin, M.; Aslanian, D.

    2012-04-01

    The tectonic and sedimentary evolution of the Early Cretaceous rift of the central segment of the South Atlantic Ocean is debated. Our objective is to better constraint the timing of its evolution by drawing palaeogeographic and deformation maps. Eight palaeogeographic and deformations maps were drawn from the Berriasian to the Middle-Late Aptian, based on a biostratigraphic (ostracodes and pollens) chart recalibrated on absolute ages (chemostratigraphy, interstratified volcanics, Re-Os dating of the organic matter). The central segment of the South Atlantic is composed of two domains that have a different history in terms of deformation and palaeogeography. The southern domain includes Namibe, Santos and Campos Basins. The northern domain extends from Espirito Santo and North Kwanza Basins, in the South, to Sergipe-Alagoas and North Gabon Basins to the North. Extension started in the northern domain during Late Berriasian (Congo-Camamu Basin to Sergipe-Alagoas-North Gabon Basins) and migrated southward. At that time, the southern domain was not a subsiding domain. This is time of emplacement of the Parana-Etendeka Trapp (Late Hauterivian-Early Barremian). Extension started in this southern domain during Early Barremian. The brittle extensional period is shorter in the South (5-6 Ma, Barremian to base Aptian) than in the North (19 to 20 Myr, Upper Berriasian to Base Aptian). From Late Berriasian to base Aptian, the northern domain evolves from a deep lake with lateral highs to a shallower one, organic-rich with no more highs. The lake migrates southward in two steps, until Valanginian at the border between the northern and southern domains, until Early Barremian, North of Walvis Ridge. The Sag phase is of Middle to Late Aptian age. In the southern domain, the transition between the brittle rift and the sag phase is continuous. In the northern domain, this transition corresponds to a hiatus of Early to Middle Aptian age, possible period of mantle exhumation. Marine

  8. Early bioenergetic evolution

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Filipa L.; Thiergart, Thorsten; Landan, Giddy; Nelson-Sathi, Shijulal; Pereira, Inês A. C.; Allen, John F.; Lane, Nick; Martin, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Life is the harnessing of chemical energy in such a way that the energy-harnessing device makes a copy of itself. This paper outlines an energetically feasible path from a particular inorganic setting for the origin of life to the first free-living cells. The sources of energy available to early organic synthesis, early evolving systems and early cells stand in the foreground, as do the possible mechanisms of their conversion into harnessable chemical energy for synthetic reactions. With regard to the possible temporal sequence of events, we focus on: (i) alkaline hydrothermal vents as the far-from-equilibrium setting, (ii) the Wood–Ljungdahl (acetyl-CoA) pathway as the route that could have underpinned carbon assimilation for these processes, (iii) biochemical divergence, within the naturally formed inorganic compartments at a hydrothermal mound, of geochemically confined replicating entities with a complexity below that of free-living prokaryotes, and (iv) acetogenesis and methanogenesis as the ancestral forms of carbon and energy metabolism in the first free-living ancestors of the eubacteria and archaebacteria, respectively. In terms of the main evolutionary transitions in early bioenergetic evolution, we focus on: (i) thioester-dependent substrate-level phosphorylations, (ii) harnessing of naturally existing proton gradients at the vent–ocean interface via the ATP synthase, (iii) harnessing of Na+ gradients generated by H+/Na+ antiporters, (iv) flavin-based bifurcation-dependent gradient generation, and finally (v) quinone-based (and Q-cycle-dependent) proton gradient generation. Of those five transitions, the first four are posited to have taken place at the vent. Ultimately, all of these bioenergetic processes depend, even today, upon CO2 reduction with low-potential ferredoxin (Fd), generated either chemosynthetically or photosynthetically, suggesting a reaction of the type ‘reduced iron → reduced carbon’ at the beginning of bioenergetic evolution

  9. The early stages of duplicate gene evolution

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Richard C.; Purugganan, Michael D.

    2003-01-01

    Gene duplications are one of the primary driving forces in the evolution of genomes and genetic systems. Gene duplicates account for 8–20% of the genes in eukaryotic genomes, and the rates of gene duplication are estimated at between 0.2% and 2% per gene per million years. Duplicate genes are believed to be a major mechanism for the establishment of new gene functions and the generation of evolutionary novelty, yet very little is known about the early stages of the evolution of duplicated gene pairs. It is unclear, for example, to what extent selection, rather than neutral genetic drift, drives the fixation and early evolution of duplicate loci. Analysis of recently duplicated genes in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome reveals significantly reduced species-wide levels of nucleotide polymorphisms in the progenitor and/or duplicate gene copies, suggesting that selective sweeps accompany the initial stages of the evolution of these duplicated gene pairs. Our results support recent theoretical work that indicates that fates of duplicate gene pairs may be determined in the initial phases of duplicate gene evolution and that positive selection plays a prominent role in the evolutionary dynamics of the very early histories of duplicate nuclear genes. PMID:14671323

  10. On the origin and early evolution of biological catalysis and other studies on chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oro, J.; Lazcano, A.

    1991-01-01

    One of the lines of research in molecular evolution which we have developed for the past three years is related to the experimental and theoretical study of the origin and early evolution of biological catalysis. In an attempt to understand the nature of the first peptidic catalysts and coenzymes, we have achieved the non-enzymatic synthesis of the coenzymes ADPG, GDPG, and CDP-ethanolamine, under conditions considered to have been prevalent on the primitive Earth. We have also accomplished the prebiotic synthesis of histidine, as well as histidyl-histidine, and we have measured the enhancing effects of this catalytic dipeptide on the dephosphorylation of deoxyribonucleotide monophosphates, the hydrolysis of oligo A, and the oligomerization 2', 3' cAMP. We reviewed and further developed the hypothesis that RNA preceded double stranded DNA molecules as a reservoir of cellular genetic information. This led us to undertake the study of extant RNA polymerases in an attempt to discover vestigial sequences preserved from early Archean times. In addition, we continued our studies of on the chemical evolution of organic compounds in the solar system and beyond.

  11. Human evolution. Evolution of early Homo: an integrated biological perspective.

    PubMed

    Antón, Susan C; Potts, Richard; Aiello, Leslie C

    2014-07-04

    Integration of evidence over the past decade has revised understandings about the major adaptations underlying the origin and early evolution of the genus Homo. Many features associated with Homo sapiens, including our large linear bodies, elongated hind limbs, large energy-expensive brains, reduced sexual dimorphism, increased carnivory, and unique life history traits, were once thought to have evolved near the origin of the genus in response to heightened aridity and open habitats in Africa. However, recent analyses of fossil, archaeological, and environmental data indicate that such traits did not arise as a single package. Instead, some arose substantially earlier and some later than previously thought. From ~2.5 to 1.5 million years ago, three lineages of early Homo evolved in a context of habitat instability and fragmentation on seasonal, intergenerational, and evolutionary time scales. These contexts gave a selective advantage to traits, such as dietary flexibility and larger body size, that facilitated survival in shifting environments. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. MEVTV Workshop on Early Tectonic and Volcanic Evolution of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Although not ignored, the problems of the early tectonic and volcanic evolution of Mars have generally received less attention than those later in the evolution of the planet. Specifically, much attention was devoted to the evolution of the Tharsis region of Mars and to the planet itself at the time following the establishment of this major tectonic and volcanic province. By contrast, little attention was directed at fundamental questions, such as the conditions that led to the development of Tharsis and the cause of the basic fundamental dichotomy of the Martian crust. It was to address these and related questions of the earliest evolution of Mars that a workshop was organized under the auspices of the Mars: Evolution of Volcanism, Tectonism, and Volatiles (MEVTV) Program. Four sessions were held: crustal dichotomy; crustal differentiation/volcanism; Tharsis, Elysium, and Valles Marineris; and ridges and fault tectonics.

  13. Vestibular evidence for the evolution of aquatic behaviour in early cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Spoor, F; Bajpai, S; Hussain, S T; Kumar, K; Thewissen, J G M

    2002-05-09

    Early cetaceans evolved from terrestrial quadrupeds to obligate swimmers, a change that is traditionally studied by functional analysis of the postcranial skeleton. Here we assess the evolution of cetacean locomotor behaviour from an independent perspective by looking at the semicircular canal system, one of the main sense organs involved in neural control of locomotion. Extant cetaceans are found to be unique in that their canal arc size, corrected for body mass, is approximately three times smaller than in other mammals. This reduces the sensitivity of the canal system, most plausibly to match the fast body rotations that characterize cetacean behaviour. Eocene fossils show that the new sensory regime, incompatible with terrestrial competence, developed quickly and early in cetacean evolution, as soon as the taxa are associated with marine environments. Dedicated agile swimming of cetaceans thus appeared to have originated as a rapid and fundamental shift in locomotion rather than as the gradual transition suggested by postcranial evidence. We hypothesize that the unparalleled modification of the semicircular canal system represented a key 'point of no return' event in early cetacean evolution, leading to full independence from life on land.

  14. Molecular clocks and the early evolution of metazoan nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Wray, Gregory A

    2015-12-19

    The timing of early animal evolution remains poorly resolved, yet remains critical for understanding nervous system evolution. Methods for estimating divergence times from sequence data have improved considerably, providing a more refined understanding of key divergences. The best molecular estimates point to the origin of metazoans and bilaterians tens to hundreds of millions of years earlier than their first appearances in the fossil record. Both the molecular and fossil records are compatible, however, with the possibility of tiny, unskeletonized, low energy budget animals during the Proterozoic that had planktonic, benthic, or meiofaunal lifestyles. Such animals would likely have had relatively simple nervous systems equipped primarily to detect food, avoid inhospitable environments and locate mates. The appearance of the first macropredators during the Cambrian would have changed the selective landscape dramatically, likely driving the evolution of complex sense organs, sophisticated sensory processing systems, and diverse effector systems involved in capturing prey and avoiding predation. © 2015 The Author(s).

  15. Precambrian Time - The Story of the Early Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    The Precambrian is the least-understood part of Earth history, yet it is arguably the most important. Precambrian time spans almost nine-tenths of Earth history, from the formation of the Earth to the dawn of the Cambrian Period. It represents time so vast and long ago that it challenges all comprehension. The Precambrian is the time of big questions. How old is the Earth? How old are the oldest rocks and continents? What was the early Earth like? What was the early atmosphere like? When did life appear, and what did it look like? And, how do we know this? In recent years, remarkable progress has been made in understanding the early evolution of the Earth and life itself. Yet, the scientific story of the early Earth is still a work in progress, humankind's latest attempt to understand the planet. Like previous attempts, it too will change as we learn more about the Earth. Read on to discover what we know now, in the early 21st century.

  16. Late stages of accumulation and early evolution of the planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vityazev, Andrey V.; Perchernikova, G. V.

    1991-01-01

    Recently developed solutions of problems are discussed that were traditionally considered fundamental in classical solar system cosmogony: determination of planetary orbit distribution patterns, values for mean eccentricity and orbital inclinations of the planets, and rotation periods and rotation axis inclinations of the planets. Two important cosmochemical aspects of accumulation are examined: the time scale for gas loss from the terrestrial planet zone, and the composition of the planets in terms of isotope data. It was concluded that the early beginning of planet differentiation is a function of the heating of protoplanets during collisions with large (thousands of kilometers) bodies. Energetics, heat mass transfer processes, and characteristic time scales of these processes at the early stages of planet evolution are considered.

  17. Origin and early evolution of photosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Photosynthesis was well-established on the earth at least 3.5 thousand million years ago, and it is widely believed that these ancient organisms had similar metabolic capabilities to modern cyanobacteria. This requires that development of two photosystems and the oxygen evolution capability occurred very early in the earth's history, and that a presumed phase of evolution involving non-oxygen evolving photosynthetic organisms took place even earlier. The evolutionary relationships of the reaction center complexes found in all the classes of currently existing organisms have been analyzed using sequence analysis and biophysical measurements. The results indicate that all reaction centers fall into two basic groups, those with pheophytin and a pair of quinones as early acceptors, and those with iron sulfur clusters as early acceptors. No simple linear branching evolutionary scheme can account for the distribution patterns of reaction centers in existing photosynthetic organisms, and lateral transfer of genetic information is considered as a likely possibility. Possible scenarios for the development of primitive reaction centers into the heterodimeric protein structures found in existing reaction centers and for the development of organisms with two linked photosystems are presented.

  18. The evolution of early vertebrate photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Collin, Shaun P; Davies, Wayne L; Hart, Nathan S; Hunt, David M

    2009-10-12

    Meeting the challenge of sampling an ancient aquatic landscape by the early vertebrates was crucial to their survival and would establish a retinal bauplan to be used by all subsequent vertebrate descendents. Image-forming eyes were under tremendous selection pressure and the ability to identify suitable prey and detect potential predators was thought to be one of the major drivers of speciation in the Early Cambrian. Based on the fossil record, we know that hagfishes, lampreys, holocephalans, elasmobranchs and lungfishes occupy critical stages in vertebrate evolution, having remained relatively unchanged over hundreds of millions of years. Now using extant representatives of these 'living fossils', we are able to piece together the evolution of vertebrate photoreception. While photoreception in hagfishes appears to be based on light detection and controlling circadian rhythms, rather than image formation, the photoreceptors of lampreys fall into five distinct classes and represent a critical stage in the dichotomy of rods and cones. At least four types of retinal cones sample the visual environment in lampreys mediating photopic (and potentially colour) vision, a sampling strategy retained by lungfishes, some modern teleosts, reptiles and birds. Trichromacy is retained in cartilaginous fishes (at least in batoids and holocephalans), where it is predicted that true scotopic (dim light) vision evolved in the common ancestor of all living gnathostomes. The capacity to discriminate colour and balance the tradeoff between resolution and sensitivity in the early vertebrates was an important driver of eye evolution, where many of the ocular features evolved were retained as vertebrates progressed on to land.

  19. The early thermal evolution of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, G. K.; Sahijpal, S.

    2016-01-01

    Hf-W isotopic systematics of Martian meteorites have provided evidence for the early accretion and rapid core formation of Mars. We present the results of numerical simulations performed to study the early thermal evolution and planetary scale differentiation of Mars. The simulations are confined to the initial 50 Myr (Ma) of the formation of solar system. The accretion energy produced during the growth of Mars and the decay energy due to the short-lived radio-nuclides 26Al, 60Fe, and the long-lived nuclides, 40K, 235U, 238U, and 232Th are incorporated as the heat sources for the thermal evolution of Mars. During the core-mantle differentiation of Mars, the molten metallic blobs were numerically moved using Stoke's law toward the center with descent velocity that depends on the local acceleration due to gravity. Apart from the accretion and the radioactive heat energies, the gravitational energy produced during the differentiation of Mars and the associated heat transfer is also parametrically incorporated in the present work to make an assessment of its contribution to the early thermal evolution of Mars. We conclude that the accretion energy alone cannot produce widespread melting and differentiation of Mars even with an efficient consumption of the accretion energy. This makes 26Al the prime source for the heating and planetary scale differentiation of Mars. We demonstrate a rapid accretion and core-mantle differentiation of Mars within the initial ~1.5 Myr. This is consistent with the chronological records of Martian meteorites.

  20. Modeling the early evolution of Vesta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisfeiler, Marie; Turcotte, Donald L.; Kellogg, Louise H.

    2017-05-01

    The early evolution of the asteroid Vesta has been extensively studied because of the availability of relevant data, especially important new studies of HED meteorites which originated from Vesta and the Dawn mission to Vesta in 2011-2012. These studies have concluded that an early melting episode led to the differentiation of Vesta into crust, mantle, and core. This melting episode is attributed to the decay of 26Al, which has a half-life of 7.17 × 105 yr. This heating produced a global magma ocean. Surface cooling of this magma ocean will produce a solid crust. In this paper, we propose a convective heat-transfer mechanism that effectively cools the asteroid when the degree of melting reaches about 50%. We propose that a cool solid surface crust, which is gravitationally unstable, will founder into the solid-liquid mix beneath and will very effectively transfer heat that prevents further melting of the interior. In this paper, we quantify this process. If Vesta had a very early formation, melting would commence at an age of about 1,30,000 yr, and solidification would occur at an age of about 10 Myr. If Vesta formed with a time delay greater than about 2 Myr, no melting would have occurred. An important result of our model is that the early melting episode is restricted to the first 10 Myr. This result is in good agreement with the radiometric ages of the HED meteorites.

  1. Evolution of early embryogenesis in rhabditid nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Brauchle, Michael; Kiontke, Karin; MacMenamin, Philip; Fitch, David H. A.; Piano, Fabio

    2009-01-01

    The cell biological events that guide early embryonic development occur with great precision within species but can be quite diverse across species. How these cellular processes evolve and which molecular components underlie evolutionary changes is poorly understood. To begin to address these questions, we systematically investigated early embryogenesis, from the one- to the four-cell embryo, in 34 nematode species related to C. elegans. We found 40 cell-biological characters that captured the phenotypic differences between these species. By tracing the evolutionary changes on a molecular phylogeny, we found that these characters evolved multiple times and independently of one another. Strikingly, all these phenotypes are mimicked by single-gene RNAi experiments in C. elegans. We use these comparisons to hypothesize the molecular mechanisms underlying the evolutionary changes. For example, we predict that a cell polarity module was altered during the evolution of the Protorhabditis group and show that PAR-1, a kinase localized asymmetrically in C. elegans early embryos, is symmetrically localized in the one-cell stage of Protorhabditis group species. Our genome-wide approach identifies candidate molecules—and thereby modules—associated with evolutionary changes in cell-biological phenotypes. PMID:19643102

  2. Early Precambrian crustal evolution of south India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.

    1986-01-01

    The Early Precambrian sequence in Karnataka, South India provides evidences for a distinct trend of evolution which differs from trends exhibited in many other Early Precambrian regions of the world. The supracrustal rock associations preserved in greenstone belts and as inclusions in gneisses and granulites suggest the evolution of the terrain from a stable to a mobile regime. The stable regime is represented by (1) layered ultramafic-mafic complexes, (2) orthoquartzite-basalt-rhyodacite-iron formation, and (30 ortho-quartzite-carbonate-Mn-Fe formation. The mobile regime, which can be shown on sedimentological grounds to have succeeded the stable regime, witnessed the accumulation of a greywacke-pillow basalt-dacite-rhyolite-iron formation association. Detrital sediments of the stable zone accumulated dominantly in fluvial environment and the associated volcanics are ubaerial. The volcanics of the stable regime are tholeiites derived from a zirconium and LREE-enriched sources. The greywackes of the mobile regime are turbidities, and the volcanic rocks possess continental margin (island-arc or back-arc) affinity; they show a LREE depleted to slightly LREE-enriched pattern. The evolution from a stable to a mobile regime is in contrast to the trend seen in most other regions of the world, where an early dominantly volcanic association of a mobile regime gives way upward in the sequence to sediments characteristic of a stable regime.

  3. Paleomagnetic and Geochronologic Data from Central Asia: Inferences for Early Paleozoic Tectonic Evolution and Timing of Worldwide Glacial Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, L. C.; Meert, J. G.; Levashova, N.; Grice, W. C.; Gibsher, A.; Rybanin, A.

    2007-12-01

    The Neoproterozoic to early Paleozoic Ural-Mongol belt that runs through Central Asia is crucial for determining the enigmatic amalgamation of microcontinents that make up the Eurasian subcontinent. Two unique models have been proposed for the evolution of Ural-Mongol belt. One involves a complex assemblage of cratonic blocks that have collided and rifted apart during diachronous opening and closing of Neoproterozoic to Devonian aged ocean basins. The opposing model of Sengor and Natal"in proposes a long-standing volcanic arc system that connected Central Asian blocks with the Baltica continent. The Aktau-Mointy and Dzabkhan microcontinents in Kazakhstan and Central Mongolia make up the central section of the Ural-Mongol belt, and both contain glacial sequences characteristic of the hypothesized snowball earth event. These worldwide glaciations are currently under considerable debate, and paleomagnetic data from these microcontients are a useful contribution to the snowball controversy. We have sampled volcanic and sedimentary sequences in Central Mongolia, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan for paleomagnetic and geochronologic study. U-Pb data, 13C curves and abundant fossil records place age constraints on sequences that contain glacial deposits of the hypothesized snowball earth events. Carbonates in the Zavkhan Basin in Mongolia are likely remagnetized, but fossil evidence within the sequence suggests a readjusted age control on two glacial events that were previously labeled as Sturtian and Marinoan. U-Pb ages from both Kazakhstan and Mongolian volcanic sequences imply a similar evolution history of the areas as part of the Ural-Mongol fold belt, and these ages paired with paleomagnetic and 13C records have important tectonic implications. We will present these data in order to place better constraints on the Precambrian to early Paleozoic tectonic evolution of Central Asia and the timing of glacial events recorded in the area.

  4. Divergence times and the evolution of morphological complexity in an early land plant lineage (Marchantiopsida) with a slow molecular rate.

    PubMed

    Villarreal A, Juan Carlos; Crandall-Stotler, Barbara J; Hart, Michelle L; Long, David G; Forrest, Laura L

    2016-03-01

    We present a complete generic-level phylogeny of the complex thalloid liverworts, a lineage that includes the model system Marchantia polymorpha. The complex thalloids are remarkable for their slow rate of molecular evolution and for being the only extant plant lineage to differentiate gas exchange tissues in the gametophyte generation. We estimated the divergence times and analyzed the evolutionary trends of morphological traits, including air chambers, rhizoids and specialized reproductive structures. A multilocus dataset was analyzed using maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches. Relative rates were estimated using local clocks. Our phylogeny cements the early branching in complex thalloids. Marchantia is supported in one of the earliest divergent lineages. The rate of evolution in organellar loci is slower than for other liverwort lineages, except for two annual lineages. Most genera diverged in the Cretaceous. Marchantia polymorpha diversified in the Late Miocene, giving a minimum age estimate for the evolution of its sex chromosomes. The complex thalloid ancestor, excluding Blasiales, is reconstructed as a plant with a carpocephalum, with filament-less air chambers opening via compound pores, and without pegged rhizoids. Our comprehensive study of the group provides a temporal framework for the analysis of the evolution of critical traits essential for plants during land colonization. © 2015 Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Early evolution without a tree of life.

    PubMed

    Martin, William F

    2011-06-30

    Life is a chemical reaction. Three major transitions in early evolution are considered without recourse to a tree of life. The origin of prokaryotes required a steady supply of energy and electrons, probably in the form of molecular hydrogen stemming from serpentinization. Microbial genome evolution is not a treelike process because of lateral gene transfer and the endosymbiotic origins of organelles. The lack of true intermediates in the prokaryote-to-eukaryote transition has a bioenergetic cause.

  6. MEVTV study: Early tectonic evolution of Mars: Crustal dichotomy to Valles Marineris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Herbert V.; Schultz, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    Several fundamental problems were addressed in the early impact, tectonic, and volcanic evolution of the martian lithosphere: (1) origin and evolution of the fundamental crustal dichotomy, including development of the highland/lowland transition zone; (2) growth and evolution of the Valles Marineris; and (3) nature and role of major resurfacing events in early martian history. The results in these areas are briefly summarized.

  7. The Origin and Early Evolution of Membrane Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Schweighofter, Karl; Wilson, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    The origin and early evolution of membrane proteins, and in particular ion channels, are considered from the point of view that the transmembrane segments of membrane proteins are structurally quite simple and do not require specific sequences to fold. We argue that the transport of solute species, especially ions, required an early evolution of efficient transport mechanisms, and that the emergence of simple ion channels was protobiologically plausible. We also argue that, despite their simple structure, such channels could possess properties that, at the first sight, appear to require markedly larger complexity. These properties can be subtly modulated by local modifications to the sequence rather than global changes in molecular architecture. In order to address the evolution and development of ion channels, we focus on identifying those protein domains that are commonly associated with ion channel proteins and are conserved throughout the three main domains of life (Eukarya, Prokarya, and Archaea). We discuss the potassium-sodium-calcium superfamily of voltage-gated ion channels, mechanosensitive channels, porins, and ABC-transporters and argue that these families of membrane channels have sufficiently universal architectures that they can readily adapt to the diverse functional demands arising during evolution.

  8. A New Basal Sauropod Dinosaur from the Middle Jurassic of Niger and the Early Evolution of Sauropoda

    PubMed Central

    Remes, Kristian; Ortega, Francisco; Fierro, Ignacio; Joger, Ulrich; Kosma, Ralf; Marín Ferrer, José Manuel; Ide, Oumarou Amadou; Maga, Abdoulaye

    2009-01-01

    Background The early evolution of sauropod dinosaurs is poorly understood because of a highly incomplete fossil record. New discoveries of Early and Middle Jurassic sauropods have a great potential to lead to a better understanding of early sauropod evolution and to reevaluate the patterns of sauropod diversification. Principal Findings A new sauropod from the Middle Jurassic of Niger, Spinophorosaurus nigerensis n. gen. et sp., is the most complete basal sauropod currently known. The taxon shares many anatomical characters with Middle Jurassic East Asian sauropods, while it is strongly dissimilar to Lower and Middle Jurassic South American and Indian forms. A possible explanation for this pattern is a separation of Laurasian and South Gondwanan Middle Jurassic sauropod faunas by geographic barriers. Integration of phylogenetic analyses and paleogeographic data reveals congruence between early sauropod evolution and hypotheses about Jurassic paleoclimate and phytogeography. Conclusions Spinophorosaurus demonstrates that many putatively derived characters of Middle Jurassic East Asian sauropods are plesiomorphic for eusauropods, while South Gondwanan eusauropods may represent a specialized line. The anatomy of Spinophorosaurus indicates that key innovations in Jurassic sauropod evolution might have taken place in North Africa, an area close to the equator with summer-wet climate at that time. Jurassic climatic zones and phytogeography possibly controlled early sauropod diversification. PMID:19756139

  9. Early bursts of body size and shape evolution are rare in comparative data.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Luke J; Losos, Jonathan B; Jonathan Davies, T; Gillespie, Rosemary G; Gittleman, John L; Bryan Jennings, W; Kozak, Kenneth H; McPeek, Mark A; Moreno-Roark, Franck; Near, Thomas J; Purvis, Andy; Ricklefs, Robert E; Schluter, Dolph; Schulte Ii, James A; Seehausen, Ole; Sidlauskas, Brian L; Torres-Carvajal, Omar; Weir, Jason T; Mooers, Arne Ø

    2010-08-01

    George Gaylord Simpson famously postulated that much of life's diversity originated as adaptive radiations-more or less simultaneous divergences of numerous lines from a single ancestral adaptive type. However, identifying adaptive radiations has proven difficult due to a lack of broad-scale comparative datasets. Here, we use phylogenetic comparative data on body size and shape in a diversity of animal clades to test a key model of adaptive radiation, in which initially rapid morphological evolution is followed by relative stasis. We compared the fit of this model to both single selective peak and random walk models. We found little support for the early-burst model of adaptive radiation, whereas both other models, particularly that of selective peaks, were commonly supported. In addition, we found that the net rate of morphological evolution varied inversely with clade age. The youngest clades appear to evolve most rapidly because long-term change typically does not attain the amount of divergence predicted from rates measured over short time scales. Across our entire analysis, the dominant pattern was one of constraints shaping evolution continually through time rather than rapid evolution followed by stasis. We suggest that the classical model of adaptive radiation, where morphological evolution is initially rapid and slows through time, may be rare in comparative data.

  10. The early evolution of eukaryotes - A geological perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoll, Andrew H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines the goodness of fit between patterns of biological and environmental history implied by molecular phylogenies of eukaryotic organisms and the geological records of early eukaryote evolution. It was found that Precambrian geological records show evidence that episodic increases in biological diversity roughly coincided with episodic environmental changes and by sharp increases in atmospheric oxygen concentrations which significantly changed the earth surface environments. Although the goodness of fit among physical and biological changes is gratifyingly high, the records of these changes do not always coincide in time. The additional information in these fields that is needed for complete integration of geological and phylogenic records is suggested.

  11. Early evolution without a tree of life

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Life is a chemical reaction. Three major transitions in early evolution are considered without recourse to a tree of life. The origin of prokaryotes required a steady supply of energy and electrons, probably in the form of molecular hydrogen stemming from serpentinization. Microbial genome evolution is not a treelike process because of lateral gene transfer and the endosymbiotic origins of organelles. The lack of true intermediates in the prokaryote-to-eukaryote transition has a bioenergetic cause. This article was reviewed by Dan Graur, W. Ford Doolittle, Eugene V. Koonin and Christophe Malaterre. PMID:21714942

  12. Clades reach highest morphological disparity early in their evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Martin; Gerber, Sylvain; Wills, Matthew Albion

    2013-01-01

    There are few putative macroevolutionary trends or rules that withstand scrutiny. Here, we test and verify the purported tendency for animal clades to reach their maximum morphological variety relatively early in their evolutionary histories (early high disparity). We present a meta-analysis of 98 metazoan clades radiating throughout the Phanerozoic. The disparity profiles of groups through time are summarized in terms of their center of gravity (CG), with values above and below 0.50 indicating top- and bottom-heaviness, respectively. Clades that terminate at one of the “big five” mass extinction events tend to have truncated trajectories, with a significantly top-heavy CG distribution overall. The remaining 63 clades show the opposite tendency, with a significantly bottom-heavy mean CG (relatively early high disparity). Resampling tests are used to identify groups with a CG significantly above or below 0.50; clades not terminating at a mass extinction are three times more likely to be significantly bottom-heavy than top-heavy. Overall, there is no clear temporal trend in disparity profile shapes from the Cambrian to the Recent, and early high disparity is the predominant pattern throughout the Phanerozoic. Our results do not allow us to distinguish between ecological and developmental explanations for this phenomenon. To the extent that ecology has a role, however, the paucity of bottom-heavy clades radiating in the immediate wake of mass extinctions suggests that early high disparity more probably results from the evolution of key apomorphies at the base of clades rather than from physical drivers or catastrophic ecospace clearing. PMID:23884651

  13. Contributions of Planetary Science to Studies of Early Biosphere Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Jack D.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The history of impact cratering on the Moon, and extrapolations of crater chronologies to the inner planets, suggests that the late accretionary history of the Earth overlapped with other crucial events in the its history, including the origin of terrestrial life. This evidence, acquired from studies of other planetary bodies in the inner solar system, has profoundly affected how we view the early history of the Earth and evolution of the biosphere. Pre-biotic chemical evolution and the origin of life would have been delayed by the probable existence of a global magma ocean until -4.2 Ga. The early crust was largely destroyed by recycling, thus accounting for the sparse Archean record on Earth. Once life had developed, large impacts may have extinguished it several times before it finally gained a foothold. Potentially sterilizing impacts could have occurred as late as 3.7 Ga. At the very least, large impacts would have forced the biosphere through major environmental "bottlenecks" thereby canalizing its subsequent evolution. One legacy of these early events may be the structure of the present RNA-tree which indicates that extreme thermophiles are primitive within the Archaea, and may be the last common ancestors of life. By 3.5 Ga, marine sedimentary sequences contain unequivocal microbial fossils that attest to the presence of a terrestrial biosphere. The diversity of microbial forms present in these earliest fossil assemblages implies a preceding interval of evolution during which major evolutionary advances (e.g. photosynthesis) could have taken place. Evidence cited above places the origin of life within the interval 3.5 and 4.2 Ga, a period of 700 Ma. Thus, it appears that terrestrial life not only evolved rapidly, but perhaps more than once. This expands the possibilities that life may have also developed elsewhere. Of the other planets in our solar system, Mars holds the greatest chance of having developed life. But, the present surface of Mars is hostile

  14. Body size and premolar evolution in the early-middle eocene euprimates of Wyoming.

    PubMed

    Jones, Katrina E; Rose, Kenneth D; Perry, Jonathan M G

    2014-01-01

    The earliest euprimates to arrive in North America were larger-bodied notharctids and smaller-bodied omomyids. Through the Eocene, notharctids generally continued to increase in body size, whereas omomyids generally radiated within small- and increasingly mid-sized niches in the middle Eocene. This study examines the influence of changing body size and diet on the evolution of the lower fourth premolar in Eocene euprimates. The P4 displays considerable morphological variability in these taxa. Despite the fact that most studies of primate dental morphology have focused on the molars, P4 can also provide important paleoecological insights. We analyzed the P4 from 177 euprimate specimens, representing 35 species (11 notharctids and 24 omomyids), in three time bins of approximately equal duration: early Wasatchian, late Wasatchian, and Bridgerian. Two-dimensional surface landmarks were collected from lingual photographs, capturing important variation in cusp position and tooth shape. Disparity metrics were calculated and compared for the three time bins. In the early Eocene, notharctids have a more molarized P4 than omomyids. During the Bridgerian, expanding body size range of omomyids was accompanied by a significant increase in P4 disparity and convergent evolution of the semimolariform condition in the largest omomyines. P4 morphology relates to diet in early euprimates, although patterns vary between families. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Gauss-Bonnet cosmology unifying late and early-time acceleration eras with intermediate eras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that with vacuum F(G) gravity it is possible to describe the unification of late and early-time acceleration eras with the radiation and matter domination era. The Hubble rate of the unified evolution contains two mild singularities, so called Type IV singularities, and the evolution itself has some appealing features, such as the existence of a deceleration-acceleration transition at late times. We also address quantitatively a fundamental question related to modified gravity models description of cosmological evolution: Is it possible for all modified gravity descriptions of our Universe evolution, to produce a nearly scale invariant spectrum of primordial curvature perturbations? As we demonstrate, the answer for the F(G) description is no, since the resulting power spectrum is not scale invariant, in contrast to the F(R) description studied in the literature. Therefore, although the cosmological evolution can be realized in the context of vacuum F(G) gravity, the evolution is not compatible with the observational data, in contrast to the F(R) gravity description of the same cosmological evolution.

  16. A new hypothesis of dinosaur relationships and early dinosaur evolution.

    PubMed

    Baron, Matthew G; Norman, David B; Barrett, Paul M

    2017-03-22

    For 130 years, dinosaurs have been divided into two distinct clades-Ornithischia and Saurischia. Here we present a hypothesis for the phylogenetic relationships of the major dinosaurian groups that challenges the current consensus concerning early dinosaur evolution and highlights problematic aspects of current cladistic definitions. Our study has found a sister-group relationship between Ornithischia and Theropoda (united in the new clade Ornithoscelida), with Sauropodomorpha and Herrerasauridae (as the redefined Saurischia) forming its monophyletic outgroup. This new tree topology requires redefinition and rediagnosis of Dinosauria and the subsidiary dinosaurian clades. In addition, it forces re-evaluations of early dinosaur cladogenesis and character evolution, suggests that hypercarnivory was acquired independently in herrerasaurids and theropods, and offers an explanation for many of the anatomical features previously regarded as notable convergences between theropods and early ornithischians.

  17. Early School-Leaving in Spain: Evolution, Intensity and Determinants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez-Macias, Enrique; Anton, Jose-Ignacio; Brana, Francisco-Javier; De Bustillo, Rafael Munoz

    2013-01-01

    Spain has one of the highest levels of early school leaving and educational failure of the European Union. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the anatomy of early school leaving in Spain and its characteristics. In order to do so, in the first part we discuss the measurement problems related with this concept and the evolution of drop-out…

  18. Temporal variations in early developmental decisions: an engine of forebrain evolution.

    PubMed

    Bielen, H; Pal, S; Tole, S; Houart, C

    2017-02-01

    Tight control of developmental timing is pivotal to many major processes in developmental biology, such as patterning, fate specification, cell cycle dynamics, cell migration and connectivity. Temporal change in these ontogenetic sequences is known as heterochrony, a major force in the evolution of body plans and organogenesis. In the last 5 years, studies in fish and rodents indicate that heterochrony in signaling during early development generates diversity in forebrain size and complexity. Here, we summarize these findings and propose that, additionally to spatio-temporal tuning of neurogenesis, temporal and quantitative modulation of signaling events drive pivotal changes in shape, size and complexity of the forebrain across evolution, participating to the generation of diversity in animal behavior and emergence of cognition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evolution of time-keeping mechanisms: early emergence and adaptation to photoperiod

    PubMed Central

    Hut, R. A.; Beersma, D. G. M.

    2011-01-01

    Virtually all species have developed cellular oscillations and mechanisms that synchronize these cellular oscillations to environmental cycles. Such environmental cycles in biotic (e.g. food availability and predation risk) or abiotic (e.g. temperature and light) factors may occur on a daily, annual or tidal time scale. Internal timing mechanisms may facilitate behavioural or physiological adaptation to such changes in environmental conditions. These timing mechanisms commonly involve an internal molecular oscillator (a ‘clock’) that is synchronized (‘entrained’) to the environmental cycle by receptor mechanisms responding to relevant environmental signals (‘Zeitgeber’, i.e. German for time-giver). To understand the evolution of such timing mechanisms, we have to understand the mechanisms leading to selective advantage. Although major advances have been made in our understanding of the physiological and molecular mechanisms driving internal cycles (proximate questions), studies identifying mechanisms of natural selection on clock systems (ultimate questions) are rather limited. Here, we discuss the selective advantage of a circadian system and how its adaptation to day length variation may have a functional role in optimizing seasonal timing. We discuss various cases where selective advantages of circadian timing mechanisms have been shown and cases where temporarily loss of circadian timing may cause selective advantage. We suggest an explanation for why a circadian timing system has emerged in primitive life forms like cyanobacteria and we evaluate a possible molecular mechanism that enabled these bacteria to adapt to seasonal variation in day length. We further discuss how the role of the circadian system in photoperiodic time measurement may explain differential selection pressures on circadian period when species are exposed to changing climatic conditions (e.g. global warming) or when they expand their geographical range to different latitudes or

  20. Early chemo-dynamical evolution of dwarf galaxies deduced from enrichment of r-process elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Yutaka; Ishimaru, Yuhri; Saitoh, Takayuki R.; Fujii, Michiko S.; Hidaka, Jun; Kajino, Toshitaka

    2017-04-01

    The abundance of elements synthesized by the rapid neutron-capture process (r-process elements) of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars in the Local Group galaxies gives us clues to clarify the early evolutionary history of the Milky Way halo. The Local Group dwarf galaxies would have similarly evolved with building blocks of the Milky Way halo. However, how the chemo-dynamical evolution of the building blocks affects the abundance of r-process elements is not yet clear. In this paper, we perform a series of simulations using dwarf galaxy models with various dynamical times and total mass, which determine star formation histories. We find that galaxies with dynamical times longer than 100 Myr have star formation rates less than 10-3 M⊙ yr-1 and slowly enrich metals in their early phase. These galaxies can explain the observed large scatters of r-process abundance in EMP stars in the Milky Way halo regardless of their total mass. On the other hand, the first neutron star merger appears at a higher metallicity in galaxies with a dynamical time shorter than typical neutron star merger times. The scatters of r-process elements mainly come from the inhomogeneity of the metals in the interstellar medium whereas the scatters of α-elements are mostly due to the difference in the yield of each supernova. Our results demonstrate that the future observations of r-process elements in EMP stars will be able to constrain the early chemo-dynamical evolution of the Local Group galaxies.

  1. Archean komatiite volcanism controlled by the evolution of early continents.

    PubMed

    Mole, David R; Fiorentini, Marco L; Thebaud, Nicolas; Cassidy, Kevin F; McCuaig, T Campbell; Kirkland, Christopher L; Romano, Sandra S; Doublier, Michael P; Belousova, Elena A; Barnes, Stephen J; Miller, John

    2014-07-15

    The generation and evolution of Earth's continental crust has played a fundamental role in the development of the planet. Its formation modified the composition of the mantle, contributed to the establishment of the atmosphere, and led to the creation of ecological niches important for early life. Here we show that in the Archean, the formation and stabilization of continents also controlled the location, geochemistry, and volcanology of the hottest preserved lavas on Earth: komatiites. These magmas typically represent 50-30% partial melting of the mantle and subsequently record important information on the thermal and chemical evolution of the Archean-Proterozoic Earth. As a result, it is vital to constrain and understand the processes that govern their localization and emplacement. Here, we combined Lu-Hf isotopes and U-Pb geochronology to map the four-dimensional evolution of the Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia, and reveal the progressive development of an Archean microcontinent. Our results show that in the early Earth, relatively small crustal blocks, analogous to modern microplates, progressively amalgamated to form larger continental masses, and eventually the first cratons. This cratonization process drove the hottest and most voluminous komatiite eruptions to the edge of established continental blocks. The dynamic evolution of the early continents thus directly influenced the addition of deep mantle material to the Archean crust, oceans, and atmosphere, while also providing a fundamental control on the distribution of major magmatic ore deposits.

  2. Archean komatiite volcanism controlled by the evolution of early continents

    PubMed Central

    Mole, David R.; Fiorentini, Marco L.; Thebaud, Nicolas; Cassidy, Kevin F.; McCuaig, T. Campbell; Kirkland, Christopher L.; Romano, Sandra S.; Doublier, Michael P.; Belousova, Elena A.; Barnes, Stephen J.; Miller, John

    2014-01-01

    The generation and evolution of Earth’s continental crust has played a fundamental role in the development of the planet. Its formation modified the composition of the mantle, contributed to the establishment of the atmosphere, and led to the creation of ecological niches important for early life. Here we show that in the Archean, the formation and stabilization of continents also controlled the location, geochemistry, and volcanology of the hottest preserved lavas on Earth: komatiites. These magmas typically represent 50–30% partial melting of the mantle and subsequently record important information on the thermal and chemical evolution of the Archean–Proterozoic Earth. As a result, it is vital to constrain and understand the processes that govern their localization and emplacement. Here, we combined Lu-Hf isotopes and U-Pb geochronology to map the four-dimensional evolution of the Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia, and reveal the progressive development of an Archean microcontinent. Our results show that in the early Earth, relatively small crustal blocks, analogous to modern microplates, progressively amalgamated to form larger continental masses, and eventually the first cratons. This cratonization process drove the hottest and most voluminous komatiite eruptions to the edge of established continental blocks. The dynamic evolution of the early continents thus directly influenced the addition of deep mantle material to the Archean crust, oceans, and atmosphere, while also providing a fundamental control on the distribution of major magmatic ore deposits. PMID:24958873

  3. Early Pleistocene third metacarpal from Kenya and the evolution of modern human-like hand morphology

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Carol V.; Tocheri, Matthew W.; Plavcan, J. Michael; Brown, Francis H.; Manthi, Fredrick Kyalo

    2014-01-01

    Despite discoveries of relatively complete hands from two early hominin species (Ardipithecus ramidus and Australopithecus sediba) and partial hands from another (Australopithecus afarensis), fundamental questions remain about the evolution of human-like hand anatomy and function. These questions are driven by the paucity of hand fossils in the hominin fossil record between 800,000 and 1.8 My old, a time interval well documented for the emergence and subsequent proliferation of Acheulian technology (shaped bifacial stone tools). Modern and Middle to Late Pleistocene humans share a suite of derived features in the thumb, wrist, and radial carpometacarpal joints that is noticeably absent in early hominins. Here we show that one of the most distinctive features of this suite in the Middle Pleistocene to recent human hand, the third metacarpal styloid process, was present ∼1.42 Mya in an East African hominin from Kaitio, West Turkana, Kenya. This fossil thus provides the earliest unambiguous evidence for the evolution of a key shared derived characteristic of modern human and Neandertal hand morphology and suggests that the distinctive complex of radial carpometacarpal joint features in the human hand arose early in the evolution of the genus Homo and probably in Homo erectus sensu lato. PMID:24344276

  4. Fossil evidence for the early ant evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrichot, Vincent; Lacau, Sébastien; Néraudeau, Didier; Nel, André

    2008-02-01

    Ants are one of the most studied insects in the world; and the literature devoted to their origin and evolution, systematics, ecology, or interactions with plants, fungi and other organisms is prolific. However, no consensus yet exists on the age estimate of the first Formicidae or on the origin of their eusociality. We review the fossil and biogeographical record of all known Cretaceous ants. We discuss the possible origin of the Formicidae with emphasis on the most primitive subfamily Sphecomyrminae according to its distribution and the Early Cretaceous palaeogeography. And we review the evidence of true castes and eusociality of the early ants regarding their morphological features and their manner of preservation in amber. The mid-Cretaceous amber forest from south-western France where some of the oldest known ants lived, corresponded to a moist tropical forest close to the shore with a dominance of gymnosperm trees but where angiosperms (flowering plants) were already diversified. This palaeoenvironmental reconstruction supports an initial radiation of ants in forest ground litter coincident with the rise of angiosperms, as recently proposed as an ecological explanation for their origin and successful evolution.

  5. Multiplicity in Early Stellar Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reipurth, B.; Clarke, C. J.; Boss, A. P.; Goodwin, S. P.; Rodríguez, L. F.; Stassun, K. G.; Tokovinin, A.; Zinnecker, H.

    Observations from optical to centimeter wavelengths have demonstrated that multiple systems of two or more bodies is the norm at all stellar evolutionary stages. Multiple systems are widely agreed to result from the collapse and fragmentation of cloud cores, despite the inhibiting influence of magnetic fields. Surveys of class 0 protostars with millimeter interferometers have revealed a very high multiplicity frequency of about 2/3, even though there are observational difficulties in resolving close protobinaries, thus supporting the possibility that all stars could be born in multiple systems. Near-infrared adaptive optics observations of class I protostars show a lower binary frequency relative to the class 0 phase, a declining trend that continues through the class II/III stages to the field population. This loss of companions is a natural consequence of dynamical interplay in small multiple systems, leading to ejection of members. We discuss observational consequences of this dynamical evolution, and its influence on circumstellar disks, and we review the evolution of circumbinary disks and their role in defining binary mass ratios. Special attention is paid to eclipsing PMS binaries, which allow for observational tests of evolutionary models of early stellar evolution. Many stars are born in clusters and small groups, and we discuss how interactions in dense stellar environments can significantly alter the distribution of binary separations through dissolution of wider binaries. The binaries and multiples we find in the field are the survivors of these internal and external destructive processes, and we provide a detailed overview of the multiplicity statistics of the field, which form a boundary condition for all models of binary evolution. Finally, we discuss various formation mechanisms for massive binaries, and the properties of massive trapezia.

  6. Origin and evolution of the atmospheres of early Venus, Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammer, Helmut; Zerkle, Aubrey L.; Gebauer, Stefanie; Tosi, Nicola; Noack, Lena; Scherf, Manuel; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Güdel, Manuel; Grenfell, John Lee; Godolt, Mareike; Nikolaou, Athanasia

    2018-05-01

    We review the origin and evolution of the atmospheres of Earth, Venus and Mars from the time when their accreting bodies were released from the protoplanetary disk a few million years after the origin of the Sun. If the accreting planetary cores reached masses ≥ 0.5 M_Earth before the gas in the disk disappeared, primordial atmospheres consisting mainly of H_2 form around the young planetary body, contrary to late-stage planet formation, where terrestrial planets accrete material after the nebula phase of the disk. The differences between these two scenarios are explored by investigating non-radiogenic atmospheric noble gas isotope anomalies observed on the three terrestrial planets. The role of the young Sun's more efficient EUV radiation and of the plasma environment into the escape of early atmospheres is also addressed. We discuss the catastrophic outgassing of volatiles and the formation and cooling of steam atmospheres after the solidification of magma oceans and we describe the geochemical evidence for additional delivery of volatile-rich chondritic materials during the main stages of terrestrial planet formation. The evolution scenario of early Earth is then compared with the atmospheric evolution of planets where no active plate tectonics emerged like on Venus and Mars. We look at the diversity between early Earth, Venus and Mars, which is found to be related to their differing geochemical, geodynamical and geophysical conditions, including plate tectonics, crust and mantle oxidation processes and their involvement in degassing processes of secondary N_2 atmospheres. The buildup of atmospheric N_2, O_2, and the role of greenhouse gases such as CO_2 and CH_4 to counter the Faint Young Sun Paradox (FYSP), when the earliest life forms on Earth originated until the Great Oxidation Event ≈ 2.3 Gyr ago, are addressed. This review concludes with a discussion on the implications of understanding Earth's geophysical and related atmospheric evolution in relation

  7. Early evolution of Tubulogenerina during the Paleogene of Europe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibson, T.G.; Barbin, V.; Poignant, A.; Sztrakos, K.

    1991-01-01

    The early evolution of Tubulogenerina took place in Europe where eight species occur in lower Eocene to uppermost Oligocene or lower Miocene strata. Species diversity within Tubulogenerina dropped significantly in the early Oligocne; only a single species persisted from the late Eocene, and it became extinct before the end of the early Oligocene. Morphologic changes during the European phylogeny of Tubulogenerina include (1) the development of costate and more complex tubulopore ornamentation, and (2) the change from a single elongated apertural slit with a single toothplate to multiple apertures and toothplates. Three new Tubulogenerina species are described. -from Authors

  8. Evolution of Cupido and Coahuila carbonate platforms, early Cretaceous, northeastern Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lehmann, Christoph; Osleger, David A.; Montañez, Isabel P.; Sliter, William V.; Arnaud Vanneau, Annie; Banner, Jay L.

    1999-01-01

    The Cupido and Coahuila platforms of northeastern Mexico are part of the extensive carbonate platform system that rimmed the ancestral Gulf of Mexico during Barremian to Albian time. Exposures of Cupido and Coahuila lithofacies in several mountain ranges spanning an ∼80000 km2 area reveal information about platform morphology and composition, paleoenvironmental relations, and the chronology of platform evolution. New biostratigraphic data, integrated with carbon and strontium isotope stratigraphy, significantly improve chronostratigraphic relations across the region. These data substantially change previous age assignments of several formations and force a revision of the longstanding stratigraphy in the region. The revised stratigraphy and enhanced time control, combined with regional facies associations, allow the construction of cross sections, isopach maps, and time-slice paleogeographic maps that collectively document platform morphology and evolution.The orientation of the Cupido (Barremian-Aptian) shelf margin was controlled by the emergent Coahuila basement block to the northwest. The south-facing margin is a high-energy grainstone shoal, whereas the margin facing the ancestral Gulf of Mexico to the east is a discontinuous rudist-coral reef. A broad shelf lagoon developed in the lee of the Cupido margin, where as much as 660 m of cyclic peritidal deposits accumulated. During middle to late Aptian time, a major phase of flooding forced a retrograde backstep of the Cupido platform, shifting the locus of shallow-marine sedimentation northwestward toward the Coahuila block. This diachronous flooding event records both the demise of the Cupido shelf and the consequent initiation of the Coahuila ramp.The backstepped Coahuila ramp (Aptian-Albian) consisted of a shallow shoal margin separating an interior evaporitic lagoon from a low-energy, muddy deep ramp. More than 500 m of cyclic carbonates and evaporites accumulated in the evaporitic lagoon during early to

  9. Endocranial morphology of Palaeocene Plesiadapis tricuspidens and evolution of the early primate brain.

    PubMed

    Orliac, Maeva J; Ladevèze, Sandrine; Gingerich, Philip D; Lebrun, Renaud; Smith, Thierry

    2014-04-22

    Expansion of the brain is a key feature of primate evolution. The fossil record, although incomplete, allows a partial reconstruction of changes in primate brain size and morphology through time. Palaeogene plesiadapoids, closest relatives of Euprimates (or crown-group primates), are crucial for understanding early evolution of the primate brain. However, brain morphology of this group remains poorly documented, and major questions remain regarding the initial phase of euprimate brain evolution. Micro-CT investigation of the endocranial morphology of Plesiadapis tricuspidens from the Late Palaeocene of Europe--the most complete plesiadapoid cranium known--shows that plesiadapoids retained a very small and simple brain. Plesiadapis has midbrain exposure, and minimal encephalization and neocorticalization, making it comparable with that of stem rodents and lagomorphs. However, Plesiadapis shares a domed neocortex and downwardly shifted olfactory-bulb axis with Euprimates. If accepted phylogenetic relationships are correct, then this implies that the euprimate brain underwent drastic reorganization during the Palaeocene, and some changes in brain structure preceded brain size increase and neocortex expansion during evolution of the primate brain.

  10. Open Listening: Creative Evolution in Early Childhood Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Bronwyn

    2011-01-01

    This article sketches out a philosophy and practice of open listening, linking open listening to Bergson's (1998) concept of creative evolution. I draw on examples of small children at play from a variety of sources, including Reggio-Emilia-inspired preschools in Sweden. The article offers a challenge to early childhood educators to listen and to…

  11. Early dynamical evolution of substructured stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorval, Julien; Boily, Christian

    2015-08-01

    It is now widely accepted that stellar clusters form with a high level of substructure (Kuhn et al. 2014, Bate 2009), inherited from the molecular cloud and the star formation process. Evidence from observations and simulations also indicate the stars in such young clusters form a subvirial system (Kirk et al. 2007, Maschberger et al. 2010). The subsequent dynamical evolution can cause important mass loss, ejecting a large part of the birth population in the field. It can also imprint the stellar population and still be inferred from observations of evolved clusters. Nbody simulations allow a better understanding of these early twists and turns, given realistic initial conditions. Nowadays, substructured, clumpy young clusters are usually obtained through pseudo-fractal growth (Goodwin et al. 2004) and velocity inheritance. Such models are visually realistics and are very useful, they are however somewhat artificial in their velocity distribution. I introduce a new way to create clumpy initial conditions through a "Hubble expansion" which naturally produces self consistent clumps, velocity-wise. A velocity distribution analysis shows the new method produces realistic models, consistent with the dynamical state of the newly created cores in hydrodynamic simulation of cluster formation (Klessen & Burkert 2000). I use these initial conditions to investigate the dynamical evolution of young subvirial clusters, up to 80000 stars. I find an overall soft evolution, with hierarchical merging leading to a high level of mass segregation. I investigate the influence of the mass function on the fate of the cluster, specifically on the amount of mass loss induced by the early violent relaxation. Using a new binary detection algorithm, I also find a strong processing of the native binary population.

  12. Time evolution of the Lamb shift.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-Wei; Li, Zheng-Hong; Wang, Li-Gang; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Zubairy, M Suhail

    2010-09-01

    The time evolution of the Lamb shift that accompanies the real photon emission is studied for the first time (to our knowledge). The investigation of the explicit time dependence of the Lamb shift becomes possible because the self-energy of the free electron, which is divergent, is subtracted from the Hamiltonian after a unitary transformation. The Lamb shift can then be separated into two parts: one is the time-independent shift due to the virtual photon exchange, and the other is the time-dependent shift due to the real photon emission. The time evolution depends on the nature of the coupling spectrum of the reservoir.

  13. Molecular Evolution of Aminoacyl tRNA Synthetase Proteins in the Early History of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Gregory P.; Andam, Cheryl P.; Alm, Eric J.; Gogarten, J. Peter

    2011-12-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) consist of several families of functionally conserved proteins essential for translation and protein synthesis. Like nearly all components of the translation machinery, most aaRS families are universally distributed across cellular life, being inherited from the time of the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA). However, unlike the rest of the translation machinery, aaRS have undergone numerous ancient horizontal gene transfers, with several independent events detected between domains, and some possibly involving lineages diverging before the time of LUCA. These transfers reveal the complexity of molecular evolution at this early time, and the chimeric nature of genomes within cells that gave rise to the major domains. Additionally, given the role of these protein families in defining the amino acids used for protein synthesis, sequence reconstruction of their pre-LUCA ancestors can reveal the evolutionary processes at work in the origin of the genetic code. In particular, sequence reconstructions of the paralog ancestors of isoleucyl- and valyl- RS provide strong empirical evidence that at least for this divergence, the genetic code did not co-evolve with the aaRSs; rather, both amino acids were already part of the genetic code before their cognate aaRSs diverged from their common ancestor. The implications of this observation for the early evolution of RNA-directed protein biosynthesis are discussed.

  14. Origin and early evolution of photosynthetic eukaryotes in freshwater environments: reinterpreting proterozoic paleobiology and biogeochemical processes in light of trait evolution.

    PubMed

    Blank, Carrine E

    2013-12-01

    Phylogenetic analyses were performed on concatenated data sets of 31 genes and 11,789 unambiguously alignable characters from 37 cyanobacterial and 35 chloroplast genomes. The plastid lineage emerged somewhat early in the cyanobacterial tree, at a time when Cyanobacteria were likely unicellular and restricted to freshwater ecosystems. Using relaxed molecular clocks and 22 age constraints spanning cyanobacterial and eukaryote nodes, the common ancestor to the photosynthetic eukaryotes was predicted to have also inhabited freshwater environments around the time that oxygen appeared in the atmosphere (2.0-2.3 Ga). Early diversifications within each of the three major plastid clades were also inferred to have occurred in freshwater environments, through the late Paleoproterozoic and into the middle Mesoproterozoic. The colonization of marine environments by photosynthetic eukaryotes may not have occurred until after the middle Mesoproterozoic (1.2-1.5 Ga). The evolutionary hypotheses proposed here predict that early photosynthetic eukaryotes may have never experienced the widespread anoxia or euxinia suggested to have characterized marine environments in the Paleoproterozoic to early Mesoproterozoic. It also proposes that earliest acritarchs (1.5-1.7 Ga) may have been produced by freshwater taxa. This study highlights how the early evolution of habitat preference in photosynthetic eukaryotes, along with Cyanobacteria, could have contributed to changing biogeochemical conditions on the early Earth. © 2013 Phycological Society of America.

  15. Enhanced transcription and translation in clay hydrogel and implications for early life evolution

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dayong; Peng, Songming; Hartman, Mark R.; Gupton-Campolongo, Tiffany; Rice, Edward J.; Chang, Anna Kathryn; Gu, Zi; Lu, G. Q. (Max); Luo, Dan

    2013-01-01

    In most contemporary life forms, the confinement of cell membranes provides localized concentration and protection for biomolecules, leading to efficient biochemical reactions. Similarly, confinement may have also played an important role for prebiotic compartmentalization in early life evolution when the cell membrane had not yet formed. It remains an open question how biochemical reactions developed without the confinement of cell membranes. Here we mimic the confinement function of cells by creating a hydrogel made from geological clay minerals, which provides an efficient confinement environment for biomolecules. We also show that nucleic acids were concentrated in the clay hydrogel and were protected against nuclease, and that transcription and translation reactions were consistently enhanced. Taken together, our results support the importance of localized concentration and protection of biomolecules in early life evolution, and also implicate a clay hydrogel environment for biochemical reactions during early life evolution. PMID:24196527

  16. THE EVOLUTION OF EARLY- AND LATE-TYPE GALAXIES IN THE COSMIC EVOLUTION SURVEY UP TO z {approx} 1.2

    SciTech Connect

    Pannella, Maurilio; Gabasch, Armin; Drory, Niv

    2009-08-10

    The Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) allows for the first time a highly significant census of environments and structures up to redshift 1, as well as a full morphological description of the galaxy population. In this paper we present a study aimed to constrain the evolution, in the redshift range 0.2 < z < 1.2, of the mass content of different morphological types and its dependence on the environmental density. We use a deep multicolor catalog, covering an area of {approx}0.7 deg{sup 2} inside the COSMOS field, with accurate photometric redshifts (i {approx}< 26.5 and {delta}z/(z {sub spec} + 1) {approx}more » 0.035). We estimate galaxy stellar masses by fitting the multicolor photometry to a grid of composite stellar population models. We quantitatively describe the galaxy morphology by fitting point-spread function convolved Sersic profiles to the galaxy surface brightness distributions down to F814 = 24 mag for a sample of 41,300 objects. We confirm an evolution of the morphological mix with redshift: the higher the redshift the more disk-dominated galaxies become important. We find that the morphological mix is a function of the local comoving density: the morphology density relation extends up to the highest redshift explored. The stellar mass function of disk-dominated galaxies is consistent with being constant with redshift. Conversely, the stellar mass function of bulge-dominated systems shows a decline in normalization with redshift. Such different behaviors of late-types and early-types stellar mass functions naturally set the redshift evolution of the transition mass. We find a population of relatively massive, early-type galaxies, having high specific star formation rate (SSFR) and blue colors which live preferentially in low-density environments. The bulk of massive (>7 x 10{sup 10} M {sub sun}) early-type galaxies have similar characteristic ages, colors, and SSFRs independently of the environment they belong to, with those hosting the oldest stars

  17. Early dynamical evolution of young substructured clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorval, Julien; Boily, Christian

    2017-03-01

    Stellar clusters form with a high level of substructure, inherited from the molecular cloud and the star formation process. Evidence from observations and simulations also indicate the stars in such young clusters form a subvirial system. The subsequent dynamical evolution can cause important mass loss, ejecting a large part of the birth population in the field. It can also imprint the stellar population and still be inferred from observations of evolved clusters. Nbody simulations allow a better understanding of these early twists and turns, given realistic initial conditions. Nowadays, substructured, clumpy young clusters are usually obtained through pseudo-fractal growth and velocity inheritance. We introduce a new way to create clumpy initial conditions through a ''Hubble expansion'' which naturally produces self consistent clumps, velocity-wise. In depth analysis of the resulting clumps shows consistency with hydrodynamical simulations of young star clusters. We use these initial conditions to investigate the dynamical evolution of young subvirial clusters. We find the collapse to be soft, with hierarchical merging leading to a high level of mass segregation. The subsequent evolution is less pronounced than the equilibrium achieved from a cold collapse formation scenario.

  18. Merger-driven evolution of the effective stellar initial mass function of massive early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Nipoti, Carlo; Treu, Tommaso

    2017-02-01

    The stellar initial mass function (IMF) of early-type galaxies is the combination of the IMF of the stellar population formed in situ and that of accreted stellar populations. Using as an observable the effective IMF αIMF, defined as the ratio between the true stellar mass of a galaxy and the stellar mass inferred assuming a Salpeter IMF, we present a theoretical model for its evolution as a result of dry mergers. We use a simple dry-merger evolution model, based on cosmological N-body simulations, together with empirically motivated prescriptions for the IMF to make predictions on how the effective IMF of massive early-type galaxies changes from z = 2 to z = 0. We find that the IMF normalization of individual galaxies becomes lighter with time. At fixed velocity dispersion, αIMF is predicted to be constant with redshift. Current dynamical constraints on the evolution of the IMF are in slight tension with this prediction, even though systematic uncertainties, including the effect of radial gradients in the IMF, prevent a conclusive statement. The correlation of αIMF with stellar mass becomes shallower with time, while the correlation between αIMF and velocity dispersion is mostly preserved by dry mergers. We also find that dry mergers can mix the dependence of the IMF on stellar mass and velocity dispersion, making it challenging to infer, from z = 0 observations of global galactic properties, what is the quantity that is originally coupled with the IMF.

  19. Early Evolution of Earth's Geochemical Cycle and Biosphere: Implications for Mars Exobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Carbon (C) has played multiple key roles for life and its environment. C has formed organics, greenhouse gases, aquatic pH buffers, redox buffers, and magmatic constituents affecting plutonism and volcanism. These roles interacted across a network of reservoirs and processes known as the biogeochemical C cycle. Changes in the cycle over geologic time were driven by increasing solar luminosity, declining planetary heat flow, and continental and biological evolution. The early Archean C cycle was dominated by hydrothermal alteration of crustal rocks and by thermal emanations of CO2 and reduced species (eg., H2, Fe(2+) and sulfides). Bioorganic synthesis was achieved by nonphotosynthetic CO2-fixing bacteria (chemoautotrophs) and, possibly, bacteria (organotrophs) utilizing any available nonbiological organic C. Responding both to abundant solar energy and to a longterm decline in thermal sources of chemical energy and reducing power, the blaspheme first developed anoxygenic photosynthesis, then, ultimately, oxygenic photosynthesis. O2-photosynthesis played a central role in transforming the ancient environment and blaspheme to the modem world. The geochemical C cycles of early Earth and Mars were quite similar. The principal differences between the modem C cycles of these planets arose during the later evolution of their heat flows, crusts, atmospheres and, perhaps, their blasphemes.

  20. Evolution of domain walls in the early universe. Ph.D. Thesis - Chicago Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawano, Lawrence

    1989-01-01

    The evolution of domain walls in the early universe is studied via 2-D computer simulation. The walls are initially configured on a triangular lattice and then released from the lattice, their evolution driven by wall curvature and by the universal expansion. The walls attain an average velocity of about 0.3c and their surface area per volume (as measured in comoving coordinates) goes down with a slope of -1 with respect to conformal time, regardless of whether the universe is matter or radiation dominated. The additional influence of vacuum pressure causes the energy density to fall away from this slope and steepen, thus allowing a situation in which domain walls can constitute a significant portion of the energy density of the universe without provoking an unacceptably large perturbation upon the microwave background.

  1. Root evolution at the base of the lycophyte clade: insights from an Early Devonian lycophyte

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Kelly K. S.; Tomescu, Alexandru M. F.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims The evolution of complex rooting systems during the Devonian had significant impacts on global terrestrial ecosystems and the evolution of plant body plans. However, detailed understanding of the pathways of root evolution and the architecture of early rooting systems is currently lacking. We describe the architecture and resolve the structural homology of the rooting system of an Early Devonian basal lycophyte. Insights gained from these fossils are used to address lycophyte root evolution and homology. Methods Plant fossils are preserved as carbonaceous compressions at Cottonwood Canyon (Wyoming), in the Lochkovian–Pragian (∼411 Ma; Early Devonian) Beartooth Butte Formation. We analysed 177 rock specimens and documented morphology, cuticular anatomy and structural relationships, as well as stratigraphic position and taphonomic conditions. Key Results The rooting system of the Cottonwood Canyon lycophyte is composed of modified stems that bear fine, dichotomously branching lateral roots. These modified stems, referred to as root-bearing axes, are produced at branching points of the above-ground shoot system. Root-bearing axes preserved in growth position exhibit evidence of positive gravitropism, whereas the lateral roots extend horizontally. Consistent recurrence of these features in successive populations of the plant preserved in situ demonstrates that they represent constitutive structural traits and not opportunistic responses of a flexible developmental programme. Conclusions This is the oldest direct evidence for a rooting system preserved in growth position. These rooting systems, which can be traced to a parent plant, include some of the earliest roots known to date and demonstrate that substantial plant–substrate interactions were under way by Early Devonian time. The morphological relationships between stems, root-bearing axes and roots corroborate evidence that positive gravitropism and root identity were evolutionarily

  2. Root evolution at the base of the lycophyte clade: insights from an Early Devonian lycophyte.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Kelly K S; Tomescu, Alexandru M F

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of complex rooting systems during the Devonian had significant impacts on global terrestrial ecosystems and the evolution of plant body plans. However, detailed understanding of the pathways of root evolution and the architecture of early rooting systems is currently lacking. We describe the architecture and resolve the structural homology of the rooting system of an Early Devonian basal lycophyte. Insights gained from these fossils are used to address lycophyte root evolution and homology. Plant fossils are preserved as carbonaceous compressions at Cottonwood Canyon (Wyoming), in the Lochkovian-Pragian (∼411 Ma; Early Devonian) Beartooth Butte Formation. We analysed 177 rock specimens and documented morphology, cuticular anatomy and structural relationships, as well as stratigraphic position and taphonomic conditions. The rooting system of the Cottonwood Canyon lycophyte is composed of modified stems that bear fine, dichotomously branching lateral roots. These modified stems, referred to as root-bearing axes, are produced at branching points of the above-ground shoot system. Root-bearing axes preserved in growth position exhibit evidence of positive gravitropism, whereas the lateral roots extend horizontally. Consistent recurrence of these features in successive populations of the plant preserved in situ demonstrates that they represent constitutive structural traits and not opportunistic responses of a flexible developmental programme. This is the oldest direct evidence for a rooting system preserved in growth position. These rooting systems, which can be traced to a parent plant, include some of the earliest roots known to date and demonstrate that substantial plant-substrate interactions were under way by Early Devonian time. The morphological relationships between stems, root-bearing axes and roots corroborate evidence that positive gravitropism and root identity were evolutionarily uncoupled in lycophytes, and challenge the hypothesis that

  3. Conference on Early Mars: Geologic and Hydrologic Evolution, Physical and Chemical Environments, and the Implications for Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifford, S. M. (Editor); Treiman, A. H. (Editor); Newsom, H. E. (Editor); Farmer, J. D. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    Topics considered include: Geology alteration and life in an extreme environment; developing a chemical code to identify magnetic biominerals; effect of impacts on early Martin geologic evolution; spectroscopic identification of minerals in Hematite-bearing soils and sediments; exopaleontology and the search for a Fossil record on Mars; geochemical evolution of the crust of Mars; geological evolution of the early earth;solar-wind-induced erosion of the Mars atmosphere. Also included geological evolution of the crust of Mars.

  4. Early to Middle Jurassic tectonic evolution of the Bogda Mountains, Northwest China: Evidence from sedimentology and detrital zircon geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Hongjie; Tao, Huifei; Wang, Qi; Qiu, Zhen; Ma, Dongxu; Qiu, Junli; Liao, Peng

    2018-03-01

    The Bogda Mountains, as an important intracontinental orogenic belt, are situated in the southern part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), and are a key area for understanding the Mesozoic evolution of the CAOB. However, the tectonic evolution of the Bogda Mountains remains controversial during the Mesozoic Era, especially the Early to Middle Jurassic Periods. The successive Lower to Middle Jurassic strata are well preserved and exposed along the northern flank of the Western Bogda Mountains and record the uplift processes of the Bogda Mountains. In this study, we analysed sedimentary facies combined with detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology at five sections of Lower to Middle Jurassic strata to detect the tectonic evolution and changes of provenance in the Bogda area. During Early to Middle Jurassic times, the fluvial, deltaic and lacustrine environments dominated in the western section of the Bogda area. The existence of Early Triassic peak age indicates that the Bogda Mountains did not experience uplift during the period of early Badaowan Formation deposition. The Early Triassic to Late Permian granitoid plutons and Carboniferous volcanic rocks from the Barkol and Santanghu areas were the main provenances. The significant change in the U-Pb age spectrum implies that the Eastern Bogda Mountains initiated uplift in the period of late Badaowan Formation deposition, and the Eastern Junggar Basin and the Turpan-Hami Basin were partially partitioned. The Eastern Bogda Mountains gradually became the major provenance. From the period of early Sangonghe to early Toutunhe Formations deposition, the provenance of the sediments and basin-range frame were similar to that of late Badaowan. However, the Eastern Bogda Mountains suffered intermittent uplift three times, and successive denudation. The uplifts respectively happened in early Sangonghe, late Sangonghe to early Xishanyao, and late Xishanyao to early Toutunhe. During the deposition stage of Toutunhe Formation, a

  5. Spin polarization effects and their time evolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernes, A.; Weinberger, P.

    2015-04-01

    The time evolution of the density corresponding to the polarization operator, originally constructed to commute with the Dirac Hamiltonian in the absence of an external electromagnetic field, is investigated in terms of the time-dependent Dirac equation taking the presence of an external electromagnetic field into account. It is found that this time evolution leads to 'tensorial' and 'vectorial' particle current densities and to the interaction of the spin density with the external electromagnetic field. As the time evolution of the spin density does not refer to a constant of motion (continuity condition) it only serves as auxiliary density. By taking the non-relativistic limit, it is shown that the polarization, spin and magnetization densities are independent of electric field effects and, in addition, no preferred directions can be defined.

  6. Early Stages of the Evolution of Life: a Cybernetic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melkikh, Alexey V.; Seleznev, Vladimir D.

    2008-08-01

    Early stages of the evolution of life are considered in terms of control theory. A model is proposed for the transport of substances in a protocell possessing the property of robustness with regard to changes in the environmental concentration of a substance.

  7. Early stages of the evolution of life: a cybernetic approach.

    PubMed

    Melkikh, Alexey V; Seleznev, Vladimir D

    2008-08-01

    Early stages of the evolution of life are considered in terms of control theory. A model is proposed for the transport of substances in a protocell possessing the property of robustness with regard to changes in the environmental concentration of a substance.

  8. Evolution of CO2 and H2O on Mars: A cold Early History?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, P. B.; Michalski, J.

    2011-01-01

    The martian climate has long been thought to have evolved substantially through history from a warm and wet period to the current cold and dry conditions on the martian surface. This view has been challenged based primarily on evidence that the early Sun had a substantially reduced luminosity and that a greenhouse atmosphere would be difficult to sustain on Mars for long periods of time. In addition, the evidence for a warm, wet period of martian history is far from conclusive with many of the salient features capable of being explained by an early cold climate. An important test of the warm, wet early Mars hypothesis is the abundance of carbonates in the crust [1]. Recent high precision isotopic measurements of the martian atmosphere and discoveries of carbonates on the martian surface provide new constraints on the evolution of the martian atmosphere. This work seeks to apply these constraints to test the feasibility of the cold early scenario

  9. Early Microbial Evolution: The Age of Anaerobes

    PubMed Central

    Martin, William F.; Sousa, Filipa L.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the term “early microbial evolution” refers to the phase of biological history from the emergence of life to the diversification of the first microbial lineages. In the modern era (since we knew about archaea), three debates have emerged on the subject that deserve discussion: (1) thermophilic origins versus mesophilic origins, (2) autotrophic origins versus heterotrophic origins, and (3) how do eukaryotes figure into early evolution. Here, we revisit those debates from the standpoint of newer data. We also consider the perhaps more pressing issue that molecular phylogenies need to recover anaerobic lineages at the base of prokaryotic trees, because O2 is a product of biological evolution; hence, the first microbes had to be anaerobes. If molecular phylogenies do not recover anaerobes basal, something is wrong. Among the anaerobes, hydrogen-dependent autotrophs—acetogens and methanogens—look like good candidates for the ancestral state of physiology in the bacteria and archaea, respectively. New trees tend to indicate that eukaryote cytosolic ribosomes branch within their archaeal homologs, not as sisters to them and, furthermore tend to root archaea within the methanogens. These are major changes in the tree of life, and open up new avenues of thought. Geochemical methane synthesis occurs as a spontaneous, abiotic exergonic reaction at hydrothermal vents. The overall similarity between that reaction and biological methanogenesis fits well with the concept of a methanogenic root for archaea and an autotrophic origin of microbial physiology. PMID:26684184

  10. Early evolution of the angiosperm clade Asteraceae in the Cretaceous of Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Barreda, Viviana D; Palazzesi, Luis; Tellería, Maria C; Olivero, Eduardo B; Raine, J Ian; Forest, Félix

    2015-09-01

    The Asteraceae (sunflowers and daisies) are the most diverse family of flowering plants. Despite their prominent role in extant terrestrial ecosystems, the early evolutionary history of this family remains poorly understood. Here we report the discovery of a number of fossil pollen grains preserved in dinosaur-bearing deposits from the Late Cretaceous of Antarctica that drastically pushes back the timing of assumed origin of the family. Reliably dated to ∼76-66 Mya, these specimens are about 20 million years older than previously known records for the Asteraceae. Using a phylogenetic approach, we interpreted these fossil specimens as members of an extinct early diverging clade of the family, associated with subfamily Barnadesioideae. Based on a molecular phylogenetic tree calibrated using fossils, including the ones reported here, we estimated that the most recent common ancestor of the family lived at least 80 Mya in Gondwana, well before the thermal and biogeographical isolation of Antarctica. Most of the early diverging lineages of the family originated in a narrow time interval after the K/P boundary, 60-50 Mya, coinciding with a pronounced climatic warming during the Late Paleocene and Early Eocene, and the scene of a dramatic rise in flowering plant diversity. Our age estimates reduce earlier discrepancies between the age of the fossil record and previous molecular estimates for the origin of the family, bearing important implications in the evolution of flowering plants in general.

  11. Early evolution of the angiosperm clade Asteraceae in the Cretaceous of Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Barreda, Viviana D.; Palazzesi, Luis; Tellería, Maria C.; Olivero, Eduardo B.; Raine, J. Ian; Forest, Félix

    2015-01-01

    The Asteraceae (sunflowers and daisies) are the most diverse family of flowering plants. Despite their prominent role in extant terrestrial ecosystems, the early evolutionary history of this family remains poorly understood. Here we report the discovery of a number of fossil pollen grains preserved in dinosaur-bearing deposits from the Late Cretaceous of Antarctica that drastically pushes back the timing of assumed origin of the family. Reliably dated to ∼76–66 Mya, these specimens are about 20 million years older than previously known records for the Asteraceae. Using a phylogenetic approach, we interpreted these fossil specimens as members of an extinct early diverging clade of the family, associated with subfamily Barnadesioideae. Based on a molecular phylogenetic tree calibrated using fossils, including the ones reported here, we estimated that the most recent common ancestor of the family lived at least 80 Mya in Gondwana, well before the thermal and biogeographical isolation of Antarctica. Most of the early diverging lineages of the family originated in a narrow time interval after the K/P boundary, 60–50 Mya, coinciding with a pronounced climatic warming during the Late Paleocene and Early Eocene, and the scene of a dramatic rise in flowering plant diversity. Our age estimates reduce earlier discrepancies between the age of the fossil record and previous molecular estimates for the origin of the family, bearing important implications in the evolution of flowering plants in general. PMID:26261324

  12. Space Station evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, David C.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Station that will be launched and made operational in the early 1990s should be viewed as a beginning, a facility that will evolve with the passing of time to better meet the needs and requirements of a diverse set of users. Evolution takes several forms, ranging from simple growth through addition of infrastructure elements to upgrading of system capability through inclusion of advanced technologies. Much of the early considerations of Space Station evolution focused on physical growth. However, a series of recent workshops have revealed that the more likely mode of Space Station evolution will not be through growth but rather through a process known as 'branching'.

  13. The early evolution of protostellar disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahler, Steven W.; Korycansky, D. G.; Brothers, Maxwell J.; Touma, Jihad

    1994-01-01

    We consider the origin and intital growth of the disks that form around protostars during the collapse of rotating molecular cloud cores. These disks are assumed to be inviscid and pressure free, and to have masses small compared to those of their central stars. We find that there exist three distinct components-an outer disk, in which shocked gas moves with comparable azimuthal and radical velocities; and inner disk, where material follows nearly circular orbits, but spirals slowly toward the star because of the drag exerted by adjacent onfalling matter, and a turbulent ring adjoining the first two regions. Early in the evolution, i.e., soon after infalling matter begins to miss the star, only the outer disk is present, and the total mass acceration rate onto the protostar is undiminished. Once the outer disk boundary grows to more than 2.9 times the stellar radius, first the ring, and then the inner disk appear. Thereafter, the radii of all three components expand as t(exp 3). The mass of the ring increase with time and is always 13% of the total mass that has fallen from the cloud. Concurrently with the buildup of the inner disk and ring, the accretion rate onto the star falls off. However, the protostellar mass continue to rise, asymptotically as t(exp 1/4). We calculated the radiated flux from the inner and outer disk components due to the release of gravitational potential energy. The flux from the inner disk is dominant and rises steeply toward the stellar surface. We also determine the surface temperature of the inner disk as a function of radius. The total disk luminosity decreases slowly with time, while the contributions from the ring and inner disk both fall as t(exp -2).

  14. Virtual endocasts of Eocene Paramys (Paramyinae): oldest endocranial record for Rodentia and early brain evolution in Euarchontoglires.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Ornella C; Amador-Mughal, Farrah; Silcox, Mary T

    2016-01-27

    Understanding the pattern of brain evolution in early rodents is central to reconstructing the ancestral condition for Glires, and for other members of Euarchontoglires including Primates. We describe the oldest virtual endocasts known for fossil rodents, which pertain to Paramys copei (Early Eocene) and Paramys delicatus (Middle Eocene). Both specimens of Paramys have larger olfactory bulbs and smaller paraflocculi relative to total endocranial volume than later occurring rodents, which may be primitive traits for Rodentia. The encephalization quotients (EQs) of Pa. copei and Pa. delicatus are higher than that of later occurring (Oligocene) Ischyromys typus, which contradicts the hypothesis that EQ increases through time in all mammalian orders. However, both species of Paramys have a lower relative neocortical surface area than later rodents, suggesting neocorticalization occurred through time in this Order, although to a lesser degree than in Primates. Paramys has a higher EQ but a lower neocortical ratio than any stem primate. This result contrasts with the idea that primates were always exceptional in their degree of overall encephalization and shows that relative brain size and neocortical surface area do not necessarily covary through time. As such, these data contradict assumptions made about the pattern of brain evolution in Euarchontoglires. © 2016 The Author(s).

  15. Virtual endocasts of Eocene Paramys (Paramyinae): oldest endocranial record for Rodentia and early brain evolution in Euarchontoglires

    PubMed Central

    Amador-Mughal, Farrah

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the pattern of brain evolution in early rodents is central to reconstructing the ancestral condition for Glires, and for other members of Euarchontoglires including Primates. We describe the oldest virtual endocasts known for fossil rodents, which pertain to Paramys copei (Early Eocene) and Paramys delicatus (Middle Eocene). Both specimens of Paramys have larger olfactory bulbs and smaller paraflocculi relative to total endocranial volume than later occurring rodents, which may be primitive traits for Rodentia. The encephalization quotients (EQs) of Pa. copei and Pa. delicatus are higher than that of later occurring (Oligocene) Ischyromys typus, which contradicts the hypothesis that EQ increases through time in all mammalian orders. However, both species of Paramys have a lower relative neocortical surface area than later rodents, suggesting neocorticalization occurred through time in this Order, although to a lesser degree than in Primates. Paramys has a higher EQ but a lower neocortical ratio than any stem primate. This result contrasts with the idea that primates were always exceptional in their degree of overall encephalization and shows that relative brain size and neocortical surface area do not necessarily covary through time. As such, these data contradict assumptions made about the pattern of brain evolution in Euarchontoglires. PMID:26817776

  16. Dialysate Sodium: Rationale for Evolution over Time

    PubMed Central

    Flythe, Jennifer E.; Mc Causland, Finnian R.

    2016-01-01

    Oligo-anuric individuals receiving hemodialysis (HD) are dependent on the dialysis machine to regulate sodium and water balance. Interest in adjusting the dialysate sodium concentration to promote tolerance of the HD procedure dates back to the early years of dialysis therapy. Evolution of dialysis equipment technologies and clinical characteristics of the dialysis population have prompted clinicians to increase the dialysate sodium concentration over time. Higher dialysate sodium concentrations generally promote hemodynamic stabilization and reduce intradialytic symptoms but often do so at the expense of stimulating thirst and promoting volume expansion. The opposite may be true for lower dialysate sodium concentrations. Observational data suggest that the association between dialysate sodium and outcomes may differ by serum sodium levels, supporting the trend toward individualization of the dialysate sodium prescription. However, lack of randomized controlled clinical trial data, along with operational safety concerns related to individualized dialysate sodium prescriptions, have prevented expert consensus regarding the optimal approach to the dialysate sodium prescription. PMID:28066913

  17. The early evolution of feathers: fossil evidence from Cretaceous amber of France

    PubMed Central

    Perrichot, Vincent; Marion, Loïc; Néraudeau, Didier; Vullo, Romain; Tafforeau, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The developmental stages of feathers are of major importance in the evolution of body covering and the origin of avian flight. Until now, there were significant gaps in knowledge of early morphologies in theoretical stages of feathers as well as in palaeontological material. Here we report fossil evidence of an intermediate and critical stage in the incremental evolution of feathers which has been predicted by developmental theories but hitherto undocumented by evidence from both the recent and the fossil records. Seven feathers have been found in an Early Cretaceous (Late Albian, ca 100 Myr) amber of western France, which display a flattened shaft composed by the still distinct and incompletely fused bases of the barbs forming two irregular vanes. Considering their remarkably primitive features, and since recent discoveries have yielded feathers of modern type in some derived theropod dinosaurs, the Albian feathers from France might have been derived either from an early bird or from a non-avian dinosaur. PMID:18285280

  18. Origin and Evolution of The Early- Silurian Land Vascular Plants: Evidence From Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, R.

    2016-12-01

    Origin and early evolution of land vascular plants, is one of the most intriguing hotspots in the life science research. During the 1970s and 1980s,Pinnatiramosus qianensis was found in early-Silurian strata in guizhou of south China.43 years have passed. But so far, the biological characteristics and belonging of the age of this unique plant have been debated again and again, up in the air.Biomarkers have a good stability in the process of organic evolution, no more or less changed, so they have a special `function of mark'. While biomarkers can provide information about organic matter of hydrocarbon source rock (the source), the period of deposition and burial (diagenesis) environmental conditions, and many other aspects of information.This paper obtained the sedimentary environment, source of organic matter input and other relevant information, through extracting and analyzing biomarkers of the 26 samples in the late Ordovician to early Silurian strata in NorthGuizhou areas. According to the results, Pr/Ph of late Ordovician Meitan Fm-early Silurian Hanjiadian Fm is high.It manifests more pristane, characterized by reductive environment. At the bottom of the Hanjiadian Fm, Pr/Ph has a volatility.Some huge environmental changes may have taken place in the corresponding period. N-alkanes do not have parity advantage or has even carbon advantage slightly.The peak carbon is mainly in low carbon number.(C21 + C22)/(C28 + C29) is high.Aquatic organisms is a major source of organic matter during this period,C21-/C22+ is low.This may be caused by the relatively serious loss of light hydrocarbon during the separation of components. In the Hanjiadian Fm,information of C29/C27 sterane ratios and oleanane index showed a trend of rising at the same time, indicating that during this period, there was a gradual increase input in the number of higher plants.The stable carbon isotope of saturated hydrocarbon and aromatic hydrocarbon in the Hanjiadian Fm also gradually become

  19. Ecological variation in South American geophagine cichlids arose during an early burst of adaptive morphological and functional evolution

    PubMed Central

    Arbour, Jessica Hilary; López-Fernández, Hernán

    2013-01-01

    Diversity and disparity are unequally distributed both phylogenetically and geographically. This uneven distribution may be owing to differences in diversification rates between clades resulting from processes such as adaptive radiation. We examined the rate and distribution of evolution in feeding biomechanics in the extremely diverse and continentally distributed South American geophagine cichlids. Evolutionary patterns in multivariate functional morphospace were examined using a phylomorphospace approach, disparity-through-time analyses and by comparing Brownian motion (BM) and adaptive peak evolutionary models using maximum likelihood. The most species-rich and functionally disparate clade (CAS) expanded more efficiently in morphospace and evolved more rapidly compared with both BM expectations and its sister clade (GGD). Members of the CAS clade also exhibited an early burst in functional evolution that corresponds to the development of modern ecological roles and may have been related to the colonization of a novel adaptive peak characterized by fast oral jaw mechanics. Furthermore, reduced ecological opportunity following this early burst may have restricted functional evolution in the GGD clade, which is less species-rich and more ecologically specialized. Patterns of evolution in ecologically important functional traits are consistent with a pattern of adaptive radiation within the most diverse clade of Geophagini. PMID:23740780

  20. The Origin and Early Evolution of Membrane Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Schweighofer, Karl; Wilson, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Membrane proteins mediate functions that are essential to all cells. These functions include transport of ions, nutrients and waste products across cell walls, capture of energy and its transduction into the form usable in chemical reactions, transmission of environmental signals to the interior of the cell, cellular growth and cell volume regulation. In the absence of membrane proteins, ancestors of cell (protocells), would have had only very limited capabilities to communicate with their environment. Thus, it is not surprising that membrane proteins are quite common even in simplest prokaryotic cells. Considering that contemporary membrane channels are large and complex, both structurally and functionally, a question arises how their presumably much simpler ancestors could have emerged, perform functions and diversify in early protobiological evolution. Remarkably, despite their overall complexity, structural motifs in membrane proteins are quite simple, with a-helices being most common. This suggests that these proteins might have evolved from simple building blocks. To explain how these blocks could have organized into functional structures, we performed large-scale, accurate computer simulations of folding peptides at a water-membrane interface, their insertion into the membrane, self-assembly into higher-order structures and function. The results of these simulations, combined with analysis of structural and functional experimental data led to the first integrated view of the origin and early evolution of membrane proteins.

  1. Robust regression and posterior predictive simulation increase power to detect early bursts of trait evolution.

    PubMed

    Slater, Graham J; Pennell, Matthew W

    2014-05-01

    A central prediction of much theory on adaptive radiations is that traits should evolve rapidly during the early stages of a clade's history and subsequently slowdown in rate as niches become saturated--a so-called "Early Burst." Although a common pattern in the fossil record, evidence for early bursts of trait evolution in phylogenetic comparative data has been equivocal at best. We show here that this may not necessarily be due to the absence of this pattern in nature. Rather, commonly used methods to infer its presence perform poorly when when the strength of the burst--the rate at which phenotypic evolution declines--is small, and when some morphological convergence is present within the clade. We present two modifications to existing comparative methods that allow greater power to detect early bursts in simulated datasets. First, we develop posterior predictive simulation approaches and show that they outperform maximum likelihood approaches at identifying early bursts at moderate strength. Second, we use a robust regression procedure that allows for the identification and down-weighting of convergent taxa, leading to moderate increases in method performance. We demonstrate the utility and power of these approach by investigating the evolution of body size in cetaceans. Model fitting using maximum likelihood is equivocal with regards the mode of cetacean body size evolution. However, posterior predictive simulation combined with a robust node height test return low support for Brownian motion or rate shift models, but not the early burst model. While the jury is still out on whether early bursts are actually common in nature, our approach will hopefully facilitate more robust testing of this hypothesis. We advocate the adoption of similar posterior predictive approaches to improve the fit and to assess the adequacy of macroevolutionary models in general.

  2. A model for the evolution of the Earth's mantle structure since the Early Paleozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nan; Zhong, Shijie; Leng, Wei; Li, Zheng-Xiang

    2010-06-01

    Seismic tomography studies indicate that the Earth's mantle structure is characterized by African and Pacific seismically slow velocity anomalies (i.e., superplumes) and circum-Pacific seismically fast anomalies (i.e., a globally spherical harmonic degree 2 structure). However, the cause for and time evolution of the African and Pacific superplumes and the degree 2 mantle structure remain poorly understood with two competing proposals. First, the African and Pacific superplumes have remained largely unchanged for at least the last 300 Myr and possibly much longer. Second, the African superplume is formed sometime after the formation of Pangea (i.e., at 330 Ma) and the mantle in the African hemisphere is predominated by cold downwelling structures before and during the assembly of Pangea, while the Pacific superplume has been stable for the Pangea supercontinent cycle (i.e., globally a degree 1 structure before the Pangea formation). Here, we construct a proxy model of plate motions for the African hemisphere for the last 450 Myr since the Early Paleozoic using the paleogeographic reconstruction of continents constrained by paleomagnetic and geological observations. Coupled with assumed oceanic plate motions for the Pacific hemisphere, this proxy model for the plate motion history is used as time-dependent surface boundary condition in three-dimensional spherical models of thermochemical mantle convection to study the evolution of mantle structure, particularly the African mantle structure, since the Early Paleozoic. Our model calculations reproduce well the present-day mantle structure including the African and Pacific superplumes and generally support the second proposal with a dynamic cause for the superplume structure. Our results suggest that while the mantle in the African hemisphere before the assembly of Pangea is predominated by the cold downwelling structure resulting from plate convergence between Gondwana and Laurussia, it is unlikely that the bulk of

  3. Singular F(R) cosmology unifying early- and late-time acceleration with matter and radiation domination era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-06-01

    We present some cosmological models which unify the late- and early-time acceleration eras with the radiation and the matter domination era, and we realize the cosmological models by using the theoretical framework of F(R) gravity. Particularly, the first model unifies the late- and early-time acceleration with the matter domination era, and the second model unifies all the evolution eras of our Universe. The two models are described in the same way at early and late times, and only the intermediate stages of the evolution have some differences. Each cosmological model contains two Type IV singularities which are chosen to occur one at the end of the inflationary era and one at the end of the matter domination era. The cosmological models at early times are approximately identical to the R 2 inflation model, so these describe a slow-roll inflationary era which ends when the slow-roll parameters become of order one. The inflationary era is followed by the radiation era and after that the matter domination era follows, which lasts until the second Type IV singularity, and then the late-time acceleration era follows. The models have two appealing features: firstly they produce a nearly scale invariant power spectrum of primordial curvature perturbations and a scalar-to-tensor ratio which are compatible with the most recent observational data and secondly, it seems that the deceleration-acceleration transition is crucially affected by the presence of the second Type IV singularity which occurs at the end of the matter domination era. As we demonstrate, the Hubble horizon at early times shrinks, as expected for an initially accelerating Universe, then during the matter domination era, it expands and finally after the Type IV singularity, the Hubble horizon starts to shrink again, during the late-time acceleration era. Intriguingly enough, the deceleration-acceleration transition, occurs after the second Type IV singularity. In addition, we investigate which F(R) gravity

  4. Reference results for time-like evolution up to

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertone, Valerio; Carrazza, Stefano; Nocera, Emanuele R.

    2015-03-01

    We present high-precision numerical results for time-like Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution in the factorisation scheme, for the first time up to next-to-next-to-leading order accuracy in quantum chromodynamics. First, we scrutinise the analytical expressions of the splitting functions available in the literature, in both x and N space, and check their mutual consistency. Second, we implement time-like evolution in two publicly available, entirely independent and conceptually different numerical codes, in x and N space respectively: the already existing APFEL code, which has been updated with time-like evolution, and the new MELA code, which has been specifically developed to perform the study in this work. Third, by means of a model for fragmentation functions, we provide results for the evolution in different factorisation schemes, for different ratios between renormalisation and factorisation scales and at different final scales. Our results are collected in the format of benchmark tables, which could be used as a reference for global determinations of fragmentation functions in the future.

  5. A Time Scale for Major Events in Early Mars Crustal Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Herbert V.

    2004-01-01

    The population of visible and buried impact basins > 200 km diameter revealed by high resolution gridded MOLA data and the cumulative frequency curves derived for these pvide a basis for a chronology of major events in early martian history. The relative chronology can be given in terms of N(200) crater retention ages; 'absolute ages' can be assigued using the Hartmann-Neukum (H&N) model chronology. In terms of billions of H&N years, the crustal dichotomy formed by large impact basins at 4.12 +/- 0.08 BYA (N(200) = 3.0-3.2) and the global magnetic field died at about or slightly before the same time (4.15 +/- 0.08 BYA (N(200) = 3.5). In this chronology, the buried lowlands are approx. 120 my younger than the buried highlands, approx. 160 my younger than the highlands overall and approx. 340 my younger than the oldest crater retention surface we see, defined by the largest impact basins.

  6. Early animal evolution: emerging views from comparative biology and geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoll, A. H.; Carroll, S. B.

    1999-01-01

    The Cambrian appearance of fossils representing diverse phyla has long inspired hypotheses about possible genetic or environmental catalysts of early animal evolution. Only recently, however, have data begun to emerge that can resolve the sequence of genetic and morphological innovations, environmental events, and ecological interactions that collectively shaped Cambrian evolution. Assembly of the modern genetic tool kit for development and the initial divergence of major animal clades occurred during the Proterozoic Eon. Crown group morphologies diversified in the Cambrian through changes in the genetic regulatory networks that organize animal ontogeny. Cambrian radiation may have been triggered by environmental perturbation near the Proterozoic-Cambrian boundary and subsequently amplified by ecological interactions within reorganized ecosystems.

  7. Early Stages of Microstructure and Texture Evolution during Beta Annealing of Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilchak, A. L.; Sargent, G. A.; Semiatin, S. L.

    2018-03-01

    The early stages of microstructure evolution during annealing of Ti-6Al-4V in the beta phase field were established. For this purpose, a series of short-time heat treatments was performed using sheet samples that had a noticeable degree of alpha-phase microtexture in the as-received condition. Reconstruction of the beta-grain structure from electron-backscatter-diffraction measurements of the room-temperature alpha-phase texture revealed that microstructure evolution at short times was controlled not by general grain growth, but rather by nucleation-and-growth events analogous to discontinuous recrystallization. The nuclei comprised a small subset of beta grains that were highly misoriented relative to those comprising the principal texture component of the beta matrix. From a quantitative standpoint, the transformation kinetics were characterized by an Avrami exponent of approximately unity, thus suggestive of metadynamic recrystallization. The recrystallization process led to the weakening and eventual elimination of the initial beta texture through the growth of a population of highly misoriented grains.

  8. Young Binaries and Early Stellar Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandner, Wolfgang

    1996-07-01

    Most main-sequence stars are members of binary or multiple systems. The same is true for pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars, as recent surveys have shown. Therefore studying star formation means to a large extent studying the formation of binary systems. Similarly, studying early stellar evolution primarily involves PMS binary systems. In this thesis I have studied the binary frequency among ROSAT selected T Tauri stars in the Chamaeleon T association and the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association, and the evolutionary status of Hα-selected PMS binaries in the T associations of Chamaeleon, Lupus, and ρ Ophiuchi. The direct imaging and spectroscopic observations in the optical have been carried out under subarcsec seeing conditions at the ESO New Technology Telescope (NTT) at La Silla. Furthermore, high-spatial resolution images of selected PMS stars in the near infrared were obtained with the ESO adaptive optics system COME-ON+/ADONIS. Among 195 T Tauri stars observed using direct imaging 31 binaries could be identified, 12 of them with subarcsec separation. Based on statistical arguments alone I conclude that almost all of them are indeed physical (i.e. gravitationally bound) binary or multiple systems. Using astrometric measurements of some binaries I showed that the components of these binaries are common proper motion pairs, very likely in a gravitationally bound orbit around each other. The overall binary frequency among T Tauri stars with a range of separations between 120 and 1800 AU is in agreement with the binary frequency observed among main-sequence stars in the solar neighbourhood. However, within individual regions the spatial distribution of binaries is non-uniform. In particular, in Upper Scorpius, weak-line T Tauri stars in the vicinity of early type stars seem to be almost devoid of multiple systems, whereas in another area in Upper Scorpius half of all weak-line T Tauri stars have a companion in a range of separation between 0.''7 and 3.''0. For a sample

  9. Principles of time evolution in classical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güémez, J.; Fiolhais, M.

    2018-07-01

    We address principles of time evolution in classical mechanical/thermodynamical systems in translational and rotational motion, in three cases: when there is conservation of mechanical energy, when there is energy dissipation and when there is mechanical energy production. In the first case, the time derivative of the Hamiltonian vanishes. In the second one, when dissipative forces are present, the time evolution is governed by the minimum potential energy principle, or, equivalently, maximum increase of the entropy of the universe. Finally, in the third situation, when internal sources of work are available to the system, it evolves in time according to the principle of minimum Gibbs function. We apply the Lagrangian formulation to the systems, dealing with the non-conservative forces using restriction functions such as the Rayleigh dissipative function.

  10. Could Martian Strawberries Be? -- Prebiotic Chemical Evolution on an Early Wet Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerman, L.

    2005-03-01

    The universality of chemical physics dictates the ubiquity of bubbles, aerosols, and droplets on planets with water and simple amphiphiles. Their ability to functionally support prebiotic chemical evolution seems critical: on the early Earth and Mars, and quite likely for Titan and Europa.

  11. On the temporal evolution of long-wavelength mantle structure of the Earth since the early Paleozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Shijie; Rudolph, Maxwell L.

    2015-05-01

    The seismic structure of the Earth's lower mantle is characterized by a dominantly degree-2 pattern with the African and Pacific large low shear velocity provinces (i.e., LLSVP) that are separated by circum-Pacific seismically fast anomalies. It is important to understand the origin of such a degree-2 mantle structure and its temporal evolution. In this study, we investigated the effects of plate motion history and mantle viscosity on the temporal evolution of the lower mantle structure since the early Paleozoic by formulating 3-D spherical shell models of thermochemical convection. For convection models with realistic mantle viscosity and no initial structure, it takes about ˜50 Myr to develop dominantly degree-2 lower mantle structure using the published plate motion models for the last either 120 Ma or 250 Ma. However, it takes longer time to develop the mantle structure for more viscous mantle. While the circum-Pangea subduction in plate motion history models promotes the formation of degree-2 mantle structure, the published pre-Pangea plate motions before 330 Ma produce relatively cold lower mantle in the African hemisphere and significant degree-1 structure in the early Pangea (˜300 Ma) or later times, even if the lower mantle has an initially degree-2 structure and a viscosity as high as 1023 Pas. This suggests that the African LLSVP may not be stationary since the early Paleozoic. With the published plate motion models and lower mantle viscosity of 1022 Pas, our mantle convection models suggest that the present-day degree-2 mantle structure may have largely been formed by ˜200 Ma.

  12. Adaptability and evolution.

    PubMed

    Bateson, Patrick

    2017-10-06

    The capacity of organisms to respond in their own lifetimes to new challenges in their environments probably appeared early in biological evolution. At present few studies have shown how such adaptability could influence the inherited characteristics of an organism's descendants. In part, this has been because organisms have been treated as passive in evolution. Nevertheless, their effects on biological evolution are likely to have been important and, when they occurred, accelerated the pace of evolution. Ways in which this might have happened have been suggested many times since the 1870s. I review these proposals and discuss their relevance to modern thought.

  13. Early-late life trade-offs and the evolution of ageing in the wild.

    PubMed

    Lemaître, Jean-François; Berger, Vérane; Bonenfant, Christophe; Douhard, Mathieu; Gamelon, Marlène; Plard, Floriane; Gaillard, Jean-Michel

    2015-05-07

    Empirical evidence for declines in fitness components (survival and reproductive performance) with age has recently accumulated in wild populations, highlighting that the process of senescence is nearly ubiquitous in the living world. Senescence patterns are highly variable among species and current evolutionary theories of ageing propose that such variation can be accounted for by differences in allocation to growth and reproduction during early life. Here, we compiled 26 studies of free-ranging vertebrate populations that explicitly tested for a trade-off between performance in early and late life. Our review brings overall support for the presence of early-late life trade-offs, suggesting that the limitation of available resources leads individuals to trade somatic maintenance later in life for high allocation to reproduction early in life. We discuss our results in the light of two closely related theories of ageing-the disposable soma and the antagonistic pleiotropy theories-and propose that the principle of energy allocation roots the ageing process in the evolution of life-history strategies. Finally, we outline research topics that should be investigated in future studies, including the importance of natal environmental conditions in the study of trade-offs between early- and late-life performance and the evolution of sex-differences in ageing patterns. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Early evolution of an X-ray emitting solar active region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfson, C. J.; Acton, L. W.; Leibacher, J. W.; Roethig, D. T.

    1977-01-01

    The birth and early evolution of a solar active region has been investigated using X-ray observations from the mapping X-ray heliometer on board the OSO-8 spacecraft. X-ray emission is observed within three hours of the first detection of H-alpha plage. At that time, a plasma temperature of four million K in a region having a density on the order of 10 to the 10th power per cu cm is inferred. During the fifty hours following birth almost continuous flares or flare-like X-ray bursts are superimposed on a monotonically increasing base level of X-ray emission produced by the plasma. If the X-rays are assumed to result from heating due to dissipation of current systems or magnetic field reconnection, it may be concluded that flare-like X-ray emission soon after active region birth implies that the magnetic field probably emerges in a stressed or complex configuration.

  15. HAZMAT. I. The evolution of far-UV and near-UV emission from early M stars

    SciTech Connect

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Barman, Travis S., E-mail: shkolnik@lowell.edu, E-mail: barman@lpl.arizona.edu

    2014-10-01

    The spectral energy distribution, variability, and evolution of the high-energy radiation from an M dwarf planet host is crucial in understanding the planet's atmospheric evolution and habitability and in interpreting the planet's spectrum. The star's extreme-UV (EUV), far-UV (FUV), and near-UV (NUV) emission can chemically modify, ionize, and erode the atmosphere over time. This makes determining the lifetime exposure of such planets to stellar UV radiation critical for both the evolution of a planet's atmosphere and our potential to characterize it. Using the early M star members of nearby young moving groups, which sample critical ages in planet formation andmore » evolution, we measure the evolution of the GALEX NUV and FUV flux as a function of age. The median UV flux remains at a 'saturated' level for a few hundred million years, analogous to that observed for X-ray emission. By the age of the Hyades Cluster (650 Myr), we measure a drop in UV flux by a factor of 2-3 followed by a steep drop from old (several Gyrs) field stars. This decline in activity beyond 300 Myr follows roughly t {sup –1}. Despite this clear evolution, there remains a wide range, of 1-2 orders of magnitude, in observed emission levels at every age. These UV data supply the much-needed constraints to M dwarf upper-atmosphere models, which will provide empirically motivated EUV predictions and more accurate age-dependent UV spectra as inputs to planetary photochemical models.« less

  16. Conflict and cooperation in eukaryogenesis: implications for the timing of endosymbiosis and the evolution of sex.

    PubMed

    Radzvilavicius, Arunas L; Blackstone, Neil W

    2015-10-06

    Roughly 1.5-2.0 Gya, the eukaryotic cell evolved from an endosymbiosis of an archaeal host and proteobacterial symbionts. The timing of this endosymbiosis relative to the evolution of eukaryotic features remains subject to considerable debate, yet the evolutionary process itself constrains the timing of these events. Endosymbiosis entailed levels-of-selection conflicts, and mechanisms of conflict mediation had to evolve for eukaryogenesis to proceed. The initial mechanisms of conflict mediation (e.g. signalling with calcium and soluble adenylyl cyclase, substrate carriers, adenine nucleotide translocase, uncouplers) led to metabolic homeostasis in the eukaryotic cell. Later mechanisms (e.g. mitochondrial gene loss) contributed to the chimeric eukaryotic genome. These integral features of eukaryotes were derived because of, and therefore subsequent to, endosymbiosis. Perhaps the greatest opportunity for conflict arose with the emergence of eukaryotic sex, involving whole-cell fusion. A simple model demonstrates that competition on the lower level severely hinders the evolution of sex. Cytoplasmic mixing, however, is beneficial for non-cooperative endosymbionts, which could have used their aerobic metabolism to manipulate the life history of the host. While early evolution of sex may have facilitated symbiont acquisition, sex would have also destabilized the subsequent endosymbiosis. More plausibly, the evolution of sex and the true nucleus concluded the transition. © 2015 The Author(s).

  17. Conflict and cooperation in eukaryogenesis: implications for the timing of endosymbiosis and the evolution of sex

    PubMed Central

    Radzvilavicius, Arunas L.; Blackstone, Neil W.

    2015-01-01

    Roughly 1.5–2.0 Gya, the eukaryotic cell evolved from an endosymbiosis of an archaeal host and proteobacterial symbionts. The timing of this endosymbiosis relative to the evolution of eukaryotic features remains subject to considerable debate, yet the evolutionary process itself constrains the timing of these events. Endosymbiosis entailed levels-of-selection conflicts, and mechanisms of conflict mediation had to evolve for eukaryogenesis to proceed. The initial mechanisms of conflict mediation (e.g. signalling with calcium and soluble adenylyl cyclase, substrate carriers, adenine nucleotide translocase, uncouplers) led to metabolic homeostasis in the eukaryotic cell. Later mechanisms (e.g. mitochondrial gene loss) contributed to the chimeric eukaryotic genome. These integral features of eukaryotes were derived because of, and therefore subsequent to, endosymbiosis. Perhaps the greatest opportunity for conflict arose with the emergence of eukaryotic sex, involving whole-cell fusion. A simple model demonstrates that competition on the lower level severely hinders the evolution of sex. Cytoplasmic mixing, however, is beneficial for non-cooperative endosymbionts, which could have used their aerobic metabolism to manipulate the life history of the host. While early evolution of sex may have facilitated symbiont acquisition, sex would have also destabilized the subsequent endosymbiosis. More plausibly, the evolution of sex and the true nucleus concluded the transition. PMID:26468067

  18. The Dramatic Size and Kinematic Evolution of Massive Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapi, A.; Pantoni, L.; Zanisi, L.; Shi, J.; Mancuso, C.; Massardi, M.; Shankar, F.; Bressan, A.; Danese, L.

    2018-04-01

    We aim to provide a holistic view on the typical size and kinematic evolution of massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) that encompasses their high-z star-forming progenitors, their high-z quiescent counterparts, and their configurations in the local Universe. Our investigation covers the main processes playing a relevant role in the cosmic evolution of ETGs. Specifically, their early fast evolution comprises biased collapse of the low angular momentum gaseous baryons located in the inner regions of the host dark matter halo; cooling, fragmentation, and infall of the gas down to the radius set by the centrifugal barrier; further rapid compaction via clump/gas migration toward the galaxy center, where strong heavily dust-enshrouded star formation takes place and most of the stellar mass is accumulated; and ejection of substantial gas amount from the inner regions by feedback processes, which causes a dramatic puffing-up of the stellar component. In the late slow evolution, passive aging of stellar populations and mass additions by dry merger events occur. We describe these processes relying on prescriptions inspired by basic physical arguments and by numerical simulations to derive new analytical estimates of the relevant sizes, timescales, and kinematic properties for individual galaxies along their evolution. Then we obtain quantitative results as a function of galaxy mass and redshift, and compare them to recent observational constraints on half-light size R e , on the ratio v/σ between rotation velocity and velocity dispersion (for gas and stars) and on the specific angular momentum j ⋆ of the stellar component; we find good consistency with the available multiband data in average values and dispersion, both for local ETGs and for their z ∼ 1–2 star-forming and quiescent progenitors. The outcomes of our analysis can provide hints to gauge sub-grid recipes implemented in simulations, to tune numerical experiments focused on specific processes, and to plan

  19. Three neuropeptide Y receptor genes in the spiny dogfish, Squalus acanthias, support en bloc duplications in early vertebrate evolution.

    PubMed

    Salaneck, Erik; Ardell, David H; Larson, Earl T; Larhammar, Dan

    2003-08-01

    It has been debated whether the increase in gene number during early vertebrate evolution was due to multiple independent gene duplications or synchronous duplications of many genes. We describe here the cloning of three neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor genes belonging to the Y1 subfamily in the spiny dogfish, Squalus acanthias, a cartilaginous fish. The three genes are orthologs of the mammalian subtypes Y1, Y4, and Y6, which are located in paralogous gene regions on different chromosomes in mammals. Thus, these genes arose by duplications of a chromosome region before the radiation of gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates). Estimates of duplication times from linearized trees together with evidence from other gene families supports two rounds of chromosome duplications or tetraploidizations early in vertebrate evolution. The anatomical distribution of mRNA was determined by reverse-transcriptase PCR and was found to differ from mammals, suggesting differential functional diversification of the new gene copies during the radiation of the vertebrate classes.

  20. Molybdenite Mineral Evolution: A Study Of Trace Elements Through Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, M. M.; Downs, R. T.; Stein, H. J.; Zimmerman, A.; Beitscher, B. A.; Sverjensky, D. A.; Papineau, D.; Armstrong, J. T.; Hazen, R. M.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral evolution explores changes through time in Earth’s near-surface mineralogy, including diversity of species, relative abundances of species, and compositional ranges of major, minor and trace elements. Such studies elucidate the co-evolution of the geosphere and biosphere. Accordingly, we investigated trace and minor elements in molybdenite (MoS2) with known ages from 3 billion years to recent. Molybdenite, the commonest mineral of Mo, may prove to be a useful case study as a consequence of its presence in Earth’s early history, the effects of oxidation on Mo mobility, and the possible role of Mo mineral coevolution with biology via its role in the nitrogen fixation enzyme nitrogenase. We employed ICPMS, SEM and electron microprobe analyses to detect trace and minor elements. We detected significant amounts of Mn and Cu (~100 ppm) and greater amounts of Fe, W, and Re (to ~4000 ppm). Molybdenites commonly contain micro inclusions, resulting in local concentrations in otherwise homogeneous samples. Inhomogeneities in Fe, Zn and Sn concentrations, for example, point to the presence of pyrite, sphalerite and cassiterite inclusions, respectively. Analyses examined as a function of time reveal that samples containing significant concentrations (>200 ppm, compared to average values < 100 ppm) of W and Re formed primarily within the last billion years. These trends may reflect changes in the mobility of W and Re in oxic hydrothermal fluids at shallow crustal conditions following the Great Oxidation Event.

  1. Unifying time evolution and optimization with matrix product states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haegeman, Jutho; Lubich, Christian; Oseledets, Ivan; Vandereycken, Bart; Verstraete, Frank

    2016-10-01

    We show that the time-dependent variational principle provides a unifying framework for time-evolution methods and optimization methods in the context of matrix product states. In particular, we introduce a new integration scheme for studying time evolution, which can cope with arbitrary Hamiltonians, including those with long-range interactions. Rather than a Suzuki-Trotter splitting of the Hamiltonian, which is the idea behind the adaptive time-dependent density matrix renormalization group method or time-evolving block decimation, our method is based on splitting the projector onto the matrix product state tangent space as it appears in the Dirac-Frenkel time-dependent variational principle. We discuss how the resulting algorithm resembles the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm for finding ground states so closely that it can be implemented by changing just a few lines of code and it inherits the same stability and efficiency. In particular, our method is compatible with any Hamiltonian for which ground-state DMRG can be implemented efficiently. In fact, DMRG is obtained as a special case of our scheme for imaginary time evolution with infinite time step.

  2. Symbiosis in cell evolution: Life and its environment on the early earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.

    1981-01-01

    The book treats cell evolution from the viewpoint of the serial endosymbiosis theory of the origin of organelles. Following a brief outline of the symbiotic theory, which holds that eukaryotes evolved by the association of free-living bacteria with a host prokaryote, the diversity of life is considered, and five kingdoms of organisms are distinguished: the prokaryotic Monera and the eukaryotic Protoctista, Animalia, Fungi and Plantae. Symbiotic and traditional direct filiation theories of cell evolution are compared. Recent observations of cell structure and biochemistry are reviewed in relation to early cell evolution, with attention given to the geological context for the origin of eukaryotic cells, the origin of major bacterial anaerobic pathways, the relationship between aerobic metabolism and atmospheric oxygen, criteria for distinguishing symbiotic organelles from those that originated by differentiation, and the major classes of eukaryotic organelles: mitochondria, cilia, microtubules, the mitotic and meiotic apparatuses, and pastids. Cell evolution during the Phanerozoic is also discussed with emphasis on the effects of life on the biosphere

  3. Early diagnosis and multidisciplinary care reduce the hospitalization time and duration of tube feeding and prevent early obesity in PWS infants.

    PubMed

    Bacheré, N; Diene, G; Delagnes, V; Molinas, C; Moulin, P; Tauber, M

    2008-01-01

    To describe and evaluate the impact of very early diagnosis and multidisciplinary care on the evolution and care of infants presenting with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). 19 infants diagnosed with PWS before the second month of life were followed by a multidisciplinary team. Median age at the time of analysis was 3.1 years [range 0.4-6.5]. The data were compared with data collected in 1997 from 113 questionnaires filled out by members of the French PWS Association. The patients from this latter data set were 12.0 years [range 4 months to 41 years] at the time of analysis, with a median age of 36 months at diagnosis. The duration of their hospitalization time was significantly reduced from 30.0 [range 0-670] to 21 [range 0-90] days (p = 0.043). The duration of gastric tube feeding was significantly reduced from 30.5 [range 0-427] to 15 [range 0-60] days (p = 0.017). Growth hormone treatment was started at a mean age of 1.9 +/- 0.5 years in 10 infants and L-thyroxine in 6 infants. Only 1 infant became obese at 2.5 years. Early diagnosis combined with multidisciplinary care decreases the hospitalization time, duration of gastric tube feeding and prevents early obesity in PWS infants. (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Early evolution of the extraordinary Nova Delphini 2013 (V339 Del)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skopal, A.; Drechsel, H.; Tarasova, T.; Kato, T.; Fujii, M.; Teyssier, F.; Garde, O.; Guarro, J.; Edlin, J.; Buil, C.; Antao, D.; Terry, J.-N.; Lemoult, T.; Charbonnel, S.; Bohlsen, T.; Favaro, A.; Graham, K.

    2014-09-01

    Aims: We determine the temporal evolution of the luminosity (LWD), radius (RWD) and effective temperature (Teff) of the white dwarf (WD) pseudophotosphere of V339 Del from its discovery to around day 40. Another main objective was studying the ionization structure of the ejecta. Methods: These aims were achieved by modelling the optical/near-IR spectral energy distribution (SED) using low-resolution spectroscopy (3500-9200 Å), UBVRCIC and JHKLM photometry. Important insights in the physical conditions of the ejecta were gained from an analysis of the evolution of the Hα and Raman-scattered 6825 Å O vi line using medium-resolution spectroscopy (R ~ 10 000). Results: During the fireball stage (Aug. 14.8-19.9, 2013), Teff was in the range of 6000-12 000 K, RWD was expanding non-uniformly in time from ~66 to ~300 (d/ 3 kpc) R⊙, and LWD was super-Eddington, but not constant. Its maximum of ~9 × 1038 (d/ 3 kpc)2 erg s-1 occurred around Aug. 16.0, at the maximum of Teff, half a day before the visual maximum. After the fireball stage, a large emission measure of 1.0-2.0 × 1062 (d/ 3 kpc)2 cm-3 constrained the lower limit of LWD to be well above the super-Eddington value. The mass of the ionized region was a few × 10-4 M⊙, and the mass-loss rate was decreasing from ~5.7 (Aug. 22) to ~0.71 × 10-4 M⊙ yr-1 (Sept. 20). The evolution of the Hα line and mainly the transient emergence of the Raman-scattered O vi 1032 Å line suggested a biconical ionization structure of the ejecta with a disk-like H i region persisting around the WD until its total ionization, around day 40. On Sept. 20 (day 35), the model SED indicated a dust emission component in the spectrum. The dust was located beyond the H i zone, where it was shielded from the hard, ≳105 K, radiation of the burning WD at that time. Conclusions: Our extensive spectroscopic observations of the classical nova V339 Del allowed us to map its evolution from the very early phase after its explosion. It is evident

  5. Evolution and ecology of retinal photoreception in early vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Collin, Shaun P

    2010-01-01

    Visual ecology or the relationship between the visual system of an animal and its environment has proven to be a crucial research field for establishing general concepts of adaptation, specialization and evolution. The visual neuroscientist is indeed confronted with a plethora of different visual characteristics, each seemingly optimised for each species' ecological niche, but often without a clear understanding of the evolutionary constraints at play. However, before we are able to fully understand the influence(s) of ecology and phylogeny on visual system design in vertebrates, it is first necessary to understand the basic bauplan of key representatives of each taxa. This review examines photoreception in hagfishes, lampreys, cartilaginous fishes and lungfishes with an eye to their ecology using a range of neurobiological methods including anatomy, microspectrophotometry and molecular genetics. These early vertebrates represent critical stages in evolution and surprisingly possess a level of visual complexity that is almost unrivalled in other vertebrates. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Long-term preservation of early formed mantle heterogeneity by mobile lid convection: Importance of grainsize evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Bradford J.; Rizo, Hanika

    2017-10-01

    The style of tectonics on the Hadean and Archean Earth, particularly whether plate tectonics was in operation or not, is debated. One important, albeit indirect, constraint on early Earth tectonics comes from observations of early-formed geochemical heterogeneities: 142Nd and 182W anomalies recorded in Hadean to Phanerozoic rocks from different localities indicate that chemically heterogeneous reservoirs, formed during the first ∼500 Myrs of Earth's history, survived their remixing into the mantle for over 1 Gyrs. Such a long mixing time is difficult to explain because hotter mantle temperatures, expected for the early Earth, act to lower mantle viscosity and increase convective vigor. Previous studies found that mobile lid convection typically erases heterogeneity within ∼100 Myrs under such conditions, leading to the hypothesis that stagnant lid convection on the early Earth was responsible for the observed long mixing times. However, using two-dimensional Cartesian convection models that include grainsize evolution, we find that mobile lid convection can preserve heterogeneity at high mantle temperature conditions for much longer than previously thought, because higher mantle temperatures lead to larger grainsizes in the lithosphere. These larger grainsizes result in stronger plate boundaries that act to slow down surface and interior convective motions, in competition with the direct effect temperature has on mantle viscosity. Our models indicate that mobile lid convection can preserve heterogeneity for ≈0.4-1 Gyrs at early Earth mantle temperatures when the initial heterogeneity has the same viscosity as the background mantle, and ≈1-4 Gyrs when the heterogeneity is ten times more viscous than the background mantle. Thus, stagnant lid convection is not required to explain long-term survival of early formed geochemical heterogeneities, though these heterogeneities having an elevated viscosity compared to the surrounding mantle may be essential for their

  7. The origin and early evolution of life on earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oro, J.; Miller, Stanley L.; Lazcano, Antonio

    1990-01-01

    Results of the studies that have provided insights into the cosmic and primitive earth environments are reviewed with emphasis on those environments in which life is thought to have originated. The evidence bearing on the antiquity of life on the earth and the prebiotic significance of organic compounds found in interstellar clouds and in primitive solar-system bodies such as comets, dark asteroids, and carbonaceous chondrites are assessed. The environmental models of the Hadean and early Archean earth are discussed, as well as the prebiotic formation of organic monomers and polymers essential to life. The processes that may have led to the appearance in the Archean of the first cells are considered, and possible effects of these processes on the early steps of biological evolution are analyzed. The significance of these results to the study of the distribution of life in the universe is evaluated.

  8. A continued role for signaling functions in the early evolution of feathers.

    PubMed

    Ruxton, Graeme D; Persons Iv, W Scott; Currie, Philip J

    2017-03-01

    Persons and Currie (2015) argued against either flight, thermoregulation, or signaling as a functional benefit driving the earliest evolution of feathers; rather, they favored simple feathers having an initial tactile sensory function, which changed to a thermoregulatory function as density increased. Here, we explore the relative merits of early simple feathers that may have originated as tactile sensors progressing instead toward a signaling, rather than (or in addition to) a thermoregulatory function. We suggest that signaling could act in concert with a sensory function more naturally than could thermoregulation. As such, the dismissal of a possible signaling function and the presumption that an initial sensory function led directly to a thermoregulatory function (implicit in the title "bristles before down") are premature. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  9. Two new fern chloroplasts and decelerated evolution linked to the long generation time in tree ferns.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Bojian; Fong, Richard; Collins, Lesley J; McLenachan, Patricia A; Penny, David

    2014-04-30

    We report the chloroplast genomes of a tree fern (Dicksonia squarrosa) and a "fern ally" (Tmesipteris elongata), and show that the phylogeny of early land plants is basically as expected, and the estimates of divergence time are largely unaffected after removing the fastest evolving sites. The tree fern shows the major reduction in the rate of evolution, and there has been a major slowdown in the rate of mutation in both families of tree ferns. We suggest that this is related to a generation time effect; if there is a long time period between generations, then this is probably incompatible with a high mutation rate because otherwise nearly every propagule would probably have several lethal mutations. This effect will be especially strong in organisms that have large numbers of cell divisions between generations. This shows the necessity of going beyond phylogeny and integrating its study with other properties of organisms. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  10. The early evolution of Jean Piaget's clinical method.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Susan Jean

    2005-11-01

    This article analyzes the early evolution of Jean Piaget's renowned "clinical method" in order to investigate the method's strikingly original and generative character. Throughout his 1st decade in the field, Piaget frequently discussed and justified the many different approaches to data collection he used. Analysis of his methodological progression during this period reveals that Piaget's determination to access the genuine convictions of children eventually led him to combine 3 distinct traditions in which he had been trained-naturalistic observation, psychometrics, and the psychiatric clinical examination. It was in this amalgam, first evident in his 4th text, that Piaget discovered the clinical dynamic that would drive the classic experiments for which he is most well known.

  11. Recent Structural Evolution of Early-Type Galaxies: Size Growth from z = 1 to z = 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wel, Arjen; Holden, Bradford P.; Zirm, Andrew W.; Franx, Marijn; Rettura, Alessandro; Illingworth, Garth D.; Ford, Holland C.

    2008-11-01

    Strong size and internal density evolution of early-type galaxies between z ~ 2 and the present has been reported by several authors. Here we analyze samples of nearby and distant (z ~ 1) galaxies with dynamically measured masses in order to confirm the previous, model-dependent results and constrain the uncertainties that may play a role. Velocity dispersion (σ) measurements are taken from the literature for 50 morphologically selected 0.8 < z < 1.2 field and cluster early-type galaxies with typical masses Mdyn = 2 × 1011 M⊙. Sizes (Reff) are determined with Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging. We compare the distant sample with a large sample of nearby (0.04 < z < 0.08) early-type galaxies extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey for which we determine sizes, masses, and densities in a consistent manner, using simulations to quantify systematic differences between the size measurements of nearby and distant galaxies. We find a highly significant difference between the σ - Reff distributions of the nearby and distant samples, regardless of sample selection effects. The implied evolution in Reff at fixed mass between z = 1 and the present is a factor of 1.97 +/- 0.15. This is in qualitative agreement with semianalytic models; however, the observed evolution is much faster than the predicted evolution. Our results reinforce and are quantitatively consistent with previous, photometric studies that found size evolution of up to a factor of 5 since z ~ 2. A combination of structural evolution of individual galaxies through the accretion of companions and the continuous formation of early-type galaxies through increasingly gas-poor mergers is one plausible explanation of the observations. Based on observations with the Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555, and observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  12. Spinal cord evolution in early Homo.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Marc R; Haeusler, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The discovery at Nariokotome of the Homo erectus skeleton KNM-WT 15000, with a narrow spinal canal, seemed to show that this relatively large-brained hominin retained the primitive spinal cord size of African apes and that brain size expansion preceded postcranial neurological evolution. Here we compare the size and shape of the KNM-WT 15000 spinal canal with modern and fossil taxa including H. erectus from Dmanisi, Homo antecessor, the European middle Pleistocene hominins from Sima de los Huesos, and Pan troglodytes. In terms of shape and absolute and relative size of the spinal canal, we find all of the Dmanisi and most of the vertebrae of KNM-WT 15000 are within the human range of variation except for the C7, T2, and T3 of KNM-WT 15000, which are constricted, suggesting spinal stenosis. While additional fossils might definitively indicate whether H. erectus had evolved a human-like enlarged spinal canal, the evidence from the Dmanisi spinal canal and the unaffected levels of KNM-WT 15000 show that unlike Australopithecus, H. erectus had a spinal canal size and shape equivalent to that of modern humans. Subadult status is unlikely to affect our results, as spinal canal growth is complete in both individuals. We contest the notion that vertebrae yield information about respiratory control or language evolution, but suggest that, like H. antecessor and European middle Pleistocene hominins from Sima de los Huesos, early Homo possessed a postcranial neurological endowment roughly commensurate to modern humans, with implications for neurological, structural, and vascular improvements over Pan and Australopithecus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Time evolution of an SLR reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angermann, D.; Gerstl, M.; Kelm, R.; Müller, H.; Seemüller, W.; Vei, M.

    2002-07-01

    On the basis of LAGEOS-1 and LAGEOS-2 data we computed a 10-years (1990-2000) solution for SLR station positions and velocities. The paper describes the data processing with the DGFI software package DOGS. We present results for station coordinates and their time variation for 41 stations of the global SLR network, and discuss the stability and time evolution of the SLR reference frame established in the same way. We applied different methods to assess the quality and consistency of the SLR results. The results presented in this paper include: (1) a time series of weekly estimated station coordinates; (2) a comparison of a 10-year LAGEOS-1 and LAGEOS-2 solution; (3) a comparison of 2.5-year solutions with the combined 10-year solution to assess the internal stability and the time evolution of the SLR reference frame; (4) a comparison of the SLR reference frame with ITRF97; and (5) a comparison of SLR station velocities with those of ITRF97 and NNR NUVEL-1A.

  14. The oldest known primate skeleton and early haplorhine evolution.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xijun; Gebo, Daniel L; Dagosto, Marian; Meng, Jin; Tafforeau, Paul; Flynn, John J; Beard, K Christopher

    2013-06-06

    Reconstructing the earliest phases of primate evolution has been impeded by gaps in the fossil record, so that disagreements persist regarding the palaeobiology and phylogenetic relationships of the earliest primates. Here we report the discovery of a nearly complete and partly articulated skeleton of a primitive haplorhine primate from the early Eocene of China, about 55 million years ago, the oldest fossil primate of this quality ever recovered. Coupled with detailed morphological examination using propagation phase contrast X-ray synchrotron microtomography, our phylogenetic analysis based on total available evidence indicates that this fossil is the most basal known member of the tarsiiform clade. In addition to providing further support for an early dichotomy between the strepsirrhine and haplorhine clades, this new primate further constrains the age of divergence between tarsiiforms and anthropoids. It also strengthens the hypothesis that the earliest primates were probably diurnal, arboreal and primarily insectivorous mammals the size of modern pygmy mouse lemurs.

  15. Time in Early Childhood: Creative Possibilities with Different Conceptions of Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farquhar, Sandy

    2016-01-01

    Time is an important driver of pedagogy which is often overlooked in the busy atmosphere of an early childhood centre. Engaging philosophically with three different concepts of time, and drawing examples from literature and art to focus attention on how time is constituted in early childhood centres, this article argues that we inhabit the…

  16. Microbes, Mineral Evolution, and the Rise of Microcontinents-Origin and Coevolution of Life with Early Earth.

    PubMed

    Grosch, Eugene G; Hazen, Robert M

    2015-10-01

    Earth is the most mineralogically diverse planet in our solar system, the direct consequence of a coevolving geosphere and biosphere. We consider the possibility that a microbial biosphere originated and thrived in the early Hadean-Archean Earth subseafloor environment, with fundamental consequences for the complex evolution and habitability of our planet. In this hypothesis paper, we explore possible venues for the origin of life and the direct consequences of microbially mediated, low-temperature hydrothermal alteration of the early oceanic lithosphere. We hypothesize that subsurface fluid-rock-microbe interactions resulted in more efficient hydration of the early oceanic crust, which in turn promoted bulk melting to produce the first evolved fragments of felsic crust. These evolved magmas most likely included sialic or tonalitic sheets, felsic volcaniclastics, and minor rhyolitic intrusions emplaced in an Iceland-type extensional setting as the earliest microcontinents. With the further development of proto-tectonic processes, these buoyant felsic crustal fragments formed the nucleus of intra-oceanic tonalite-trondhjemite-granitoid (TTG) island arcs. Thus microbes, by facilitating extensive hydrothermal alteration of the earliest oceanic crust through bioalteration, promoted mineral diversification and may have been early architects of surface environments and microcontinents on young Earth. We explore how the possible onset of subseafloor fluid-rock-microbe interactions on early Earth accelerated metavolcanic clay mineral formation, crustal melting, and subsequent metamorphic mineral evolution. We also consider environmental factors supporting this earliest step in geosphere-biosphere coevolution and the implications for habitability and mineral evolution on other rocky planets, such as Mars.

  17. Energy, time, and channel evolution in catastrophically disturbed fluvial systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, A.

    1992-01-01

    Specific energy is shown to decrease nonlinearly with time during channel evolution and provides a measure of reductions in available energy at the channel bed. Data from two sites show convergence towards a minimum specific energy with time. Time-dependent reductions in specific energy at a point act in concert with minimization of the rate of energy dissipation over a reach during channel evolution as the fluvial systems adjust to a new equilibrium.

  18. Sequential Bottlenecks Drive Viral Evolution in Early Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    McElroy, Kerensa; Gaudieri, Silvana; Pham, Son T.; Chopra, Abha; Cameron, Barbara; Maher, Lisa; Dore, Gregory J.; White, Peter A.; Lloyd, Andrew R.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C is a pandemic human RNA virus, which commonly causes chronic infection and liver disease. The characterization of viral populations that successfully initiate infection, and also those that drive progression to chronicity is instrumental for understanding pathogenesis and vaccine design. A comprehensive and longitudinal analysis of the viral population was conducted in four subjects followed from very early acute infection to resolution of disease outcome. By means of next generation sequencing (NGS) and standard cloning/Sanger sequencing, genetic diversity and viral variants were quantified over the course of the infection at frequencies as low as 0.1%. Phylogenetic analysis of reassembled viral variants revealed acute infection was dominated by two sequential bottleneck events, irrespective of subsequent chronicity or clearance. The first bottleneck was associated with transmission, with one to two viral variants successfully establishing infection. The second occurred approximately 100 days post-infection, and was characterized by a decline in viral diversity. In the two subjects who developed chronic infection, this second bottleneck was followed by the emergence of a new viral population, which evolved from the founder variants via a selective sweep with fixation in a small number of mutated sites. The diversity at sites with non-synonymous mutation was higher in predicted cytotoxic T cell epitopes, suggesting immune-driven evolution. These results provide the first detailed analysis of early within-host evolution of HCV, indicating strong selective forces limit viral evolution in the acute phase of infection. PMID:21912520

  19. Macroscopic dielectric function within time-dependent density functional theory—Real time evolution versus the Casida approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, Tobias; Kresse, Georg

    2017-02-01

    Linear optical properties can be calculated by solving the time-dependent density functional theory equations. Linearization of the equation of motion around the ground state orbitals results in the so-called Casida equation, which is formally very similar to the Bethe-Salpeter equation. Alternatively one can determine the spectral functions by applying an infinitely short electric field in time and then following the evolution of the electron orbitals and the evolution of the dipole moments. The long wavelength response function is then given by the Fourier transformation of the evolution of the dipole moments in time. In this work, we compare the results and performance of these two approaches for the projector augmented wave method. To allow for large time steps and still rely on a simple difference scheme to solve the differential equation, we correct for the errors in the frequency domain, using a simple analytic equation. In general, we find that both approaches yield virtually indistinguishable results. For standard density functionals, the time evolution approach is, with respect to the computational performance, clearly superior compared to the solution of the Casida equation. However, for functionals including nonlocal exchange, the direct solution of the Casida equation is usually much more efficient, even though it scales less beneficial with the system size. We relate this to the large computational prefactors in evaluating the nonlocal exchange, which renders the time evolution algorithm fairly inefficient.

  20. New Postcranial Material of the Early Caseid Casea broilii Williston, 1910 (Synapsida: Caseidae) with a Review of the Evolution of the Sacrum in Paleozoic Non-Mammalian Synapsids

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Aaron R. H.; Reisz, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    Here we use the description of a new specimen of the small caseid synapsid Casea broilii that preserves the sacral, pelvic and hind limb regions in great detail and in three dimensions, as a unique opportunity to reevaluate the early stages in the evolution of the sacrum in the lineage that led to mammals. We place this new material in the context of sacral evolution in early caseid synapsids and conclude that the transition from two to three sacral vertebrae occurred in small-bodied species, suggesting that it was not an adaptation to heavy weight bearing. Furthermore, we compare descriptions of sacral anatomy among known early synapsids, including caseids, ophiacodontids, edaphosaurids, varanopids, and sphenacodontians and review sacral evolution in early synapsids. Based on the descriptions of new species of caseids, edaphosaurids, and varanopids over the past several decades, it is clear that a sacrum consisting of three vertebrae evolved independently at least four times in synapsids during the Late Carboniferous and Early Permian. Furthermore, similarities in the morphologies of the sacral vertebrae and ribs of these early synapsids lead us to conclude that an anterior caudal vertebra had been incorporated into the sacral series convergently in these groups. Given the repeated acquisition of a three-vertebra sacrum in early synapsids and no apparent link to body size, we argue that this sacral anatomy was related to more efficient terrestrial locomotion than to increased weight bearing. PMID:25545624

  1. Helical vortices: Quasiequilibrium states and their time evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selçuk, Can; Delbende, Ivan; Rossi, Maurice

    2017-08-01

    The time evolution of a viscous helical vortex is investigated by direct numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations where helical symmetry is enforced. Using conservation laws in the framework of helical symmetry, we elaborate an initial condition consisting in a finite core vortex, the time evolution of which leads to a generic quasiequilibrium state independent of the initial core size. Numerical results at different helical pitch values provide an accurate characterization in time for such helical states, for which specific techniques have been introduced: helix radius, angular velocity, stream function-velocity-vorticity relationships, and core properties (size, self-similarity, and ellipticity). Viscosity is shown to be at the origin of a small helical velocity component, which we relate to the helical vorticity component. Finally, changes in time of the flow topology are studied using the helical stream function and three-dimensional Lagrangian orbits.

  2. Detection of early landscape evolution through controlled experimentation, data analysis, and numerical modeling at the Landscape Evolution Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troch, Peter A.; Pangle, Luke; Niu, Guo-Yue; Dontsova, Katerina; Barron-Gafford, Greg; van Haren, Joost; Pavao-Zuckerman, Mitch

    2014-05-01

    The Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO) at Biosphere 2-The University of Arizona consists of three identical, sloping, 333 m2 convergent landscapes inside a 5,000 m2 environmentally controlled facility. These engineered landscapes contain 1-meter depth of basaltic tephra, ground to homogenous loamy sand that will undergo physical, chemical, and mineralogical changes over many years. Each landscape contains a spatially dense sensor and sampler network capable of resolving meter-scale lateral heterogeneity and sub-meter scale vertical heterogeneity in moisture, energy and carbon states and fluxes. The density of sensors and frequency at which they can be polled allows for data collection at spatial and temporal scales that are impossible in natural field settings. Embedded solution and gas samplers allow for quantification of biogeochemical processes, and facilitate the use of chemical tracers to study water movement at very high spatial resolutions. Each ~600 metric ton landscape has load cells embedded into the structure to measure changes in total system mass with 0.05% full-scale repeatability (equivalent to less than 1 cm of precipitation). This facilitates the real time accounting of hydrological partitioning at the hillslope scale. Each hillslope is equipped with an engineered rain system capable of raining at rates between 3 and 45 mm/hr in a range of spatial patterns. The rain systems are capable of creating long-term steady state conditions or running complex simulations. The precipitation water supply storage system is flexibly designed to facilitate addition of tracers at constant or time-varying rates for any of the three hillslopes. This presentation will discuss detection of early landscape evolution in terms of hydrological, geochemical and microbial processes through controlled experimentation, data analysis, and numerical modeling during the commissioning phase of the first hillslope at LEO.

  3. Hydrogen, metals, bifurcating electrons, and proton gradients: the early evolution of biological energy conservation.

    PubMed

    Martin, William F

    2012-03-09

    Life is a persistent, self-specified set of far from equilibrium chemical reactions. In modern microbes, core carbon and energy metabolism are what keep cells alive. In very early chemical evolution, the forerunners of carbon and energy metabolism were the processes of generating reduced carbon compounds from CO(2) and the mechanisms of harnessing energy as compounds capable of doing some chemical work. The process of serpentinization at alkaline hydrothermal vents holds promise as a model for the origin of early reducing power, because Fe(2+) in the Earth's crust reduces water to H(2) and inorganic carbon to methane. The overall geochemical process of serpentinization is similar to the biochemical process of methanogenesis, and methanogenesis is similar to acetogenesis in that both physiologies allow energy conservation from the reduction of CO(2) with electrons from H(2). Electron bifurcation is a newly recognized cytosolic process that anaerobes use generate low potential electrons, it plays an important role in some forms of methanogenesis and, via speculation, possibly in acetogenesis. Electron bifurcation likely figures into the early evolution of biological energy conservation. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. The TIM Barrel Architecture Facilitated the Early Evolution of Protein-Mediated Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Aaron David; Beatty, Joshua T; Landweber, Laura F

    2016-01-01

    The triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel protein fold is a structurally repetitive architecture that is present in approximately 10% of all enzymes. It is generally assumed that this ubiquity in modern proteomes reflects an essential historical role in early protein-mediated metabolism. Here, we provide quantitative and comparative analyses to support several hypotheses about the early importance of the TIM barrel architecture. An information theoretical analysis of protein structures supports the hypothesis that the TIM barrel architecture could arise more easily by duplication and recombination compared to other mixed α/β structures. We show that TIM barrel enzymes corresponding to the most taxonomically broad superfamilies also have the broadest range of functions, often aided by metal and nucleotide-derived cofactors that are thought to reflect an earlier stage of metabolic evolution. By comparison to other putatively ancient protein architectures, we find that the functional diversity of TIM barrel proteins cannot be explained simply by their antiquity. Instead, the breadth of TIM barrel functions can be explained, in part, by the incorporation of a broad range of cofactors, a trend that does not appear to be shared by proteins in general. These results support the hypothesis that the simple and functionally general TIM barrel architecture may have arisen early in the evolution of protein biosynthesis and provided an ideal scaffold to facilitate the metabolic transition from ribozymes, peptides, and geochemical catalysts to modern protein enzymes.

  5. The Atmospheres of the Terrestrial Planets:Clues to the Origins and Early Evolution of Venus, Earth, and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baines, Kevin H.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Bullock, Mark A.; Grinspoon, David H,; Mahaffy, Paul; Russell, Christopher T.; Schubert, Gerald; Zahnle, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    We review the current state of knowledge of the origin and early evolution of the three largest terrestrial planets - Venus, Earth, and Mars - setting the stage for the chapters on comparative climatological processes to follow. We summarize current models of planetary formation, as revealed by studies of solid materials from Earth and meteorites from Mars. For Venus, we emphasize the known differences and similarities in planetary bulk properties and composition with Earth and Mars, focusing on key properties indicative of planetary formation and early evolution, particularly of the atmospheres of all three planets. We review the need for future in situ measurements for improving our understanding of the origin and evolution of the atmospheres of our planetary neighbors and Earth, and suggest the accuracies required of such new in situ data. Finally, we discuss the role new measurements of Mars and Venus have in understanding the state and evolution of planets found in the habitable zones of other stars.

  6. Time rescaling and pattern formation in biological evolution.

    PubMed

    Igamberdiev, Abir U

    2014-09-01

    Biological evolution is analyzed as a process of continuous measurement in which biosystems interpret themselves in the environment resulting in changes of both. This leads to rescaling of internal time (heterochrony) followed by spatial reconstructions of morphology (heterotopy). The logical precondition of evolution is the incompleteness of biosystem's internal description, while the physical precondition is the uncertainty of quantum measurement. The process of evolution is based on perpetual changes in interpretation of information in the changing world. In this interpretation the external biospheric gradients are used for establishment of new features of organization. It is concluded that biological evolution involves the anticipatory epigenetic changes in the interpretation of genetic symbolism which cannot generally be forecasted but can provide canalization of structural transformations defined by the existing organization and leading to predictable patterns of form generation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Time evolution of complexity in Abelian gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Koji; Iizuka, Norihiro; Sugishita, Sotaro

    2017-12-01

    Quantum complexity is conjectured to probe inside of black hole horizons (or wormholes) via gauge gravity correspondence. In order to have a better understanding of this correspondence, we study time evolutions of complexities for Abelian pure gauge theories. For this purpose, we discretize the U (1 ) gauge group as ZN and also the continuum spacetime as lattice spacetime, and this enables us to define a universal gate set for these gauge theories and to evaluate time evolutions of the complexities explicitly. We find that to achieve a large complexity ˜exp (entropy), which is one of the conjectured criteria necessary to have a dual black hole, the Abelian gauge theory needs to be maximally nonlocal.

  8. Crustal evolution of the early earth: The role of major impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H.

    1979-01-01

    The role of major impact basins (such as those which formed on the moon before 4 billion years ago) is examined to determine the effects of such impacts on the early crustal evolution of the earth. Specifically addressed is the fundamental problem of what is the origin of the earth's fundamental crustal dichotomy of low density continental and high density oceanic crust and its relationship to the superficially similar highlands/maria crustal dichotomies of the moon, Mercury and Mars.

  9. The Importance of Lake Overflow Floods for Early Martian Landscape Evolution: Insights From Licus Vallis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goudge, T. A.; Fassett, C. I.

    2017-01-01

    Open-basin lake outlet valleys are incised when water breaches the basin-confining topography and overflows. Outlet valleys record this flooding event and provide insight into how the lake and surrounding terrain evolved over time. Here we present a study of the paleolake outlet Licus Vallis, a >350 km long, >2 km wide, >100 m deep valley that heads at the outlet breach of an approx.30 km diameter impact crater. Multiple geomorphic features of this valley system suggest it records a more complex evolution than formation from a single lake overflow flood. This provides unique insight into the paleohydrology of lakes on early Mars, as we can make inferences beyond the most recent phase of activity..

  10. Periodic collapse and long-time evolution of strong Langmuir turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, P. Y.; Wong, A. Y.

    1985-10-01

    Experimental measurements on the long-time evolution of strong Langmuir turbulence in a beam-plasma system reveal a picture of periodic, short bursts of Langmuir wave collapse instead of the existence of long-lived solitons. The remnants of density cavities from burnout cavitons are observed to curtail wave growth periodically, creating time intervals of low wave activity between successive cycles of wave collapse, and establishing three regimes of wave evolution.

  11. Early post-metamorphic, Carboniferous blastoid reveals the evolution and development of the digestive system in echinoderms.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Imran A; Waters, Johnny A; Sumrall, Colin D; Astolfo, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    Inferring the development of the earliest echinoderms is critical to uncovering the evolutionary assembly of the phylum-level body plan but has long proven problematic because early ontogenetic stages are rarely preserved as fossils. Here, we use synchrotron tomography to describe a new early post-metamorphic blastoid echinoderm from the Carboniferous (approx. 323 Ma) of China. The resulting three-dimensional reconstruction reveals a U-shaped tubular structure in the fossil interior, which is interpreted as the digestive tract. Comparisons with the developing gut of modern crinoids demonstrate that crinoids are an imperfect analogue for many extinct groups. Furthermore, consideration of our findings in a phylogenetic context allows us to reconstruct the evolution and development of the digestive system in echinoderms more broadly; there was a transition from a straight to a simple curved gut early in the phylum's evolution, but additional loops and coils of the digestive tract (as seen in crinoids) were not acquired until much later. © 2015 The Author(s).

  12. The origin and early evolution of life on Earth.

    PubMed

    Oró, J; Miller, S L; Lazcano, A

    1990-01-01

    We do not have a detailed knowledge of the processes that led to the appearance of life on Earth. In this review we bring together some of the most important results that have provided insights into the cosmic and primitive Earth environments, particularly those environments in which life is thought to have originated. To do so, we first discuss the evidence bearing on the antiquity of life on our planet and the prebiotic significance of organic compounds found in interstellar clouds and in primitive solar system bodies such as comets, dark asteroids, and carbonaceous chondrites. This is followed by a discussion on the environmental models of the Hadean and early Archean Earth, as well as on the prebiotic formation of organic monomers and polymers essential to life. We then consider the processes that may have led to the appearance in the Archean of the first cells, and how these processes may have affected the early steps of biological evolution. Finally, the significance of these results to the study of the distribution of life in the Universe is discussed.

  13. Convective radiation fluid-dynamics: formation and early evolution of ultra low-mass objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuchterl, G.

    2005-12-01

    The formation process of ultra low-mass objects is some kind of extension of the star formation process. The physical changes towards lower mass are discussed by investigating the collapse of cloud cores that are modelled as Bonnor-Ebert spheres. Their collapse is followed by solving the equations of fluid dynamics with radiation and a model of time-dependent convection that has been calibrated to the Sun. For a sequence of cloud-cores with 1 to 0.01 solar masses, evolutionary tracks and isochrones are shown in the mass-radius diagram, the Hertzsprung-Russel diagram and the effective temperature-surface gravity or Kiel diagram. The collapse and the early hydrostatic evolution to ages of few Ma are briefly discussed and compared to observations of objects in Upper Scorpius and the low-mass components of GG Tau.

  14. Large-Scale Impact Cratering and Early Earth Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grieve, R. A. F.; Cintala, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    The surface of the Moon attests to the importance of large-scale impact in its early crustal evolution. Previous models of the effects of a massive bombardment on terrestrial crustal evolution have relied on analogies with the Moon, with allowances for the presence of water and a thinner lithosphere. It is now apparent that strict lunar-terrestrial analogies are incorrect because of the "differential scaling" of crater dimensions and melt volumes with event size and planetary gravity. Impact melt volumes and "ancient cavity dimensions for specific impacts were modeled according to previous procedures. In the terrestrial case, the melt volume (V(sub m)) exceeds that of the transient cavity (V(sub tc)) at diameters > or = 400 km. This condition is reached on the Moon only with transient cavity diameters > or = 3000 km, equivalent to whole Moon melting. The melt volumes in these large impact events are minimum estimates, since, at these sizes, the higher temperature of the target rocks at depth will increase melt production. Using the modification-scaling relation of Croft, a transient cavity diameter of about 400 km in the terrestrial environment corresponds to an expected final impact "basin" diameter of about 900 km. Such a "basin" would be comparable in dimensions to the lunar basin Orientale. This 900-km "basin" on the early Earth, however, would not have had the appearance of Orientale. It would have been essentially a melt pool, and, morphologically, would have had more in common with the palimpsests structures on Callisto and Ganymede. With the terrestrial equivalents to the large multiring basins of the Moon being manifested as muted palimpsest-like structures filled with impact melt, it is unlikely they played a role in establishing the freeboard on the early Earth. The composition of the massive impact melt sheets (> 10 (exp 7) cu km) produced in "basin-forming" events on the early Earth would have most likely ranged from basaltic to more mafic for the

  15. Inception and Early Evolution of the Aleutian Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezard, R.; Hoernle, K.; Hauff, F.; Portnyagin, M.; Werner, R.; Yogodzinski, G.; Jicha, B.; Garbe-Schönberg, D.; Turner, S.; Schaefer, B. F.

    2017-12-01

    Constraining the timing and style of subduction initiation in the Aleutian system is critical to model the Cenozoic geodynamic evolution of the Pacific. Until now, the oldest ages for the Aleutian arc suggest a subduction inception at c.a. 46-47 Ma. However, the compositions of these samples (arc tholeiites and calc-alkaline rocks) are different from those of typical early-arc sequences found at extensively studied subduction systems (Izu-Bonin-Mariana), dominated by FABs and boninites. Thus, if the FAB/boninite model applies to the Aleutian, the oldest units might not have been recovered yet and the arc inception could have occurred earlier than 47 Ma. To test this hypothesis, we have sampled the lowermost submarine Aleutian sequences at ten forearc and rear-arc localities during the R/V SONNE Cruise 249. We present preliminary whole-rock major and trace element concentrations, Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotopes as well as U-Pb zircon dating on the recovered igneous rocks. The sample compositions range from tholeiitic to calc-alkaline. No boninites were found. Most of the samples show strong subduction signatures. However, the remaining rocks present no or minor arc-type trace element features. These samples are either depleted tholeiites with similar trace element characteristics to FABs or enriched calc-alkaline rocks. Preliminary zircon dating suggests an age of 47.2 ± 1.2 Ma for one of the samples with strong arc signatures, consistent with the oldest published ages for the Aleutian so far. However, based on their compositional similarities to FABs, the depleted tholeiites should be older than the arc-type rocks, suggesting that subduction initiation could have occurred earlier than the above-mentioned age. The absence of boninite could either reflect an incomplete sampling of the early-arc sequences or a different initiation style compared to other Pacific subduction zones. Further ages and radiogenic isotope data should refine these interpretations.

  16. Apollo experience report: Evolution of the attitude time line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    The evolution of the attitude time line is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the operational need for and constraints on the time line and on how these factors were involved in the time line generation procedure. Examples of constraints on and applications of the complete time line are given.

  17. Timing of tectonic evolution of the East Kunlun Orogen, Northern Tibet Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yunpeng

    2017-04-01

    and Ti, and enrichment of LILEs, LREEs, K, Pb, Sr and Nd, accounting for a subduction relation setting. The gabbro yields a LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb age of 243 Ma, representing the formation age of the ophiolite. Taking into account of evidence from the Early Paleozoic ophiolites in the Buqinshan ( Bian Qiantao et al., 2001, 2007; Li Zuochen et al., 2013; Li Ruibao et al., 2014; Liu Zhanqing et al., 2011) and the Derni areas (Chen Liang et al., 2001, 2003), the Central Kunlun ocean might be existed from Early Paleozoic to Middle Triassic time. The Northern Qimantagh tectonic belt, to the north of the Qimantagh suture, exposes a large volume of Early Paleozoic granitic plutons and volcanic rocks. Geochemistry of the granites suggests an arc setting. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb ages ranging from ca. 440 to 402 Ma constrain the time of the subduction and arc setting. The Central Kunlun tectonic belt is characterized by occurring of Paleo-Proterozoic basement which was intruded by large amounts of Triassic granitoids. The basement represented by the Jinshuikou Group including gneisses, amphibolites and marbles, yields a protolith formation age of 2.2 Ga which was overprinted by Neoproterozoic tectono-thermal event. The plutonic intrusions display LA-ICP-MS zircon ages mainly of 260-200 Ma with minor ages of 470-400 Ma, revealing a long-lived subduction from Early Paleozoic to Late Triassic. Taken into together all above evidence, trench-arc-back arc basin tectonics were suggested here accounting for the tectonic evolution of the East Kunlun Orogeny during Early Paleozoic to Triassic time.

  18. Insight as a social identity process in the evolution of psychosocial functioning in the early phase of psychosis.

    PubMed

    Klaas, H S; Clémence, A; Marion-Veyron, R; Antonietti, J-P; Alameda, L; Golay, P; Conus, P

    2017-03-01

    Awareness of illness (insight) has been found to have contradictory effects for different functional outcomes after the early course of psychosis. Whereas it is related to psychotic symptom reduction and medication adherence, it is also associated with increased depressive symptoms. In this line, the specific effects of insight on the evolution of functioning over time have not been identified, and social indicators, such as socio-occupational functioning have barely been considered. Drawing from social identity theory we investigated the impact of insight on the development of psychosocial outcomes and the interactions of these variables over time. The participants, 240 patients in early phase of psychosis from the Treatment and Early Intervention in Psychosis Program (TIPP) of the University Hospital of Lausanne, Switzerland, were assessed at eight time points over 3 years. Cross-lagged panel analyses and multilevel analyses were conducted on socio-occupational and general functioning [Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale (SOFAS) and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF)] with insight, time and depressive symptoms as independent variables. Results from multilevel analyses point to an overall positive impact of insight on psychosocial functioning, which increases over time. Yet the cross-lagged panel analysis did not reveal a systematic positive and causal effect of insight on SOFAS and GAF scores. Depressive symptoms seem only to be relevant in the beginning of the treatment process. Our results point to a complex process in which the positive impact of insight on psychosocial functioning increases over time, even when considering depressive symptoms. Future studies and treatment approaches should consider the procedural aspect of insight.

  19. Hypermagnetic helicity evolution in early universe: leptogenesis and hypermagnetic diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Semikoz, V.B.; Smirnov, A.Yu.; Sokoloff, D.D., E-mail: semikoz@yandex.ru, E-mail: smirnoff.alexandr@gmail.com, E-mail: sokoloff.dd@gmail.com

    2013-10-01

    We study hypermagnetic helicity and lepton asymmetry evolution in plasma of the early Universe before the electroweak phase transition (EWPT) accounting for chirality flip processes via inverse Higgs decays and sphaleron transitions which violate the left lepton number and wash out the baryon asymmetry of the Universe (BAU). In the scenario where the right electron asymmetry supports the BAU alone through the conservation law B/3−L{sub eR} = const at temperatures T > T{sub RL} ≅ 10 TeV the following universe cooling leads to the production of a non-zero left lepton (electrons and neutrinos) asymmetry. This is due to the Higgsmore » decays becoming more faster when entering the equilibrium at T = T{sub RL} with the universe expansion, Γ{sub RL} ∼ T > H ∼ T{sup 2}, resulting in the parallel evolution of both the right and the left electron asymmetries at T < T{sub RL} through the corresponding Abelian anomalies in SM in the presence of a seed hypermagnetic field. The hypermagnetic helicity evolution proceeds in a self-consistent way with the lepton asymmetry growth. The role of sphaleron transitions decreasing the left lepton number turns out to be negligible in given scenario. The hypermagnetic helicity can be a supply for the magnetic one in Higgs phase assuming a strong seed hypermagnetic field in symmetric phase.« less

  20. Five-year evolution of reperfusion strategies and early mortality in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction in France.

    PubMed

    El Khoury, Carlos; Bochaton, Thomas; Flocard, Elodie; Serre, Patrice; Tomasevic, Danka; Mewton, Nathan; Bonnefoy-Cudraz, Eric

    2017-10-01

    To assess 5-year evolutions in reperfusion strategies and early mortality in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. Using data from the French RESCUe network, we studied patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction treated in mobile intensive care units between 2009 and 2013. Among 2418 patients (median age 62 years; 78.5% male), 2119 (87.6%) underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention and 299 (12.4%) pre-hospital thrombolysis (94.0% of whom went on to undergo percutaneous coronary intervention). Use of primary percutaneous coronary intervention increased from 78.4% in 2009 to 95.9% in 2013 ( P trend <0.001). Median delays included: first medical contact to percutaneous coronary intervention centre 48 minutes; first medical contact to balloon inflation 94 minutes; and percutaneous coronary intervention centre to balloon inflation 43 minutes. Times from symptom onset to first medical contact and first medical contact to thrombolysis remained stable during 2009-2013, but times from symptom onset to first balloon inflation, and first medical contact to percutaneous coronary intervention centre to first balloon inflation decreased ( P<0.001). Among patients with known timings, 2146 (89.2%) had a first medical contact to percutaneous coronary intervention centre delay ⩽90 minutes, while 260 (10.8%) had a longer delay, with no significant variation over time. Primary percutaneous coronary intervention use increased over time in both delay groups, but was consistently higher in the ⩽90 versus >90 minutes delay group (83.0% in 2009 to 97.7% in 2013; P trend <0.001 versus 34.1% in 2009 to 79.2% in 2013; P trend <0.001). In-hospital (4-6%) and 30-day (6-8%) mortalities remained stable from 2009 to 2013. In the RESCUe network, the use of primary percutaneous coronary intervention increased from 2009 to 2013, in line with guidelines, but there was no evolution in early mortality.

  1. Collective Landmarks for Deep Time: A New Tool for Evolution Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delgado, Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Evolution is a fundamental, organising concept in biology, yet there is widespread resistance to evolution among US students and there are rising creationist challenges in Europe. Resistance to evolution is linked to lack of understanding of the age of the Earth. An understanding of deep time is thus essential for effective biology education.…

  2. Coupling of thermal evolution and despinning of early Iapetus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robuchon, G.; Choblet, G.; Tobie, G.; Čadek, O.; Sotin, C.; Grasset, O.

    2010-06-01

    and 15 ppb, initial spin rates smaller than 8.5 h are required. For smaller values of [ 26Al], the body is too cold and viscous to acquire a significant flattening even if a rotation period close to the body disruption limit is considered. Even with a thin lithosphere during the early stage, our simulations show that Iapetus never reaches the equilibrium figure for a hydrostatic body due to the non-zero rigidity of the lithosphere. The 35 km value of the flattening is the result of the partial relaxation of an ancient larger flattening ranging between 45 and 80 km, depending on the evolution of the lithosphere thickness mainly controlled by the radiogenic content. A thin lithosphere is consistent with an early building of the equatorial ridge. The lithosphere thickening due to interior cooling can explain the preservation of the ridge throughout the remaining evolution of Iapetus.

  3. Towards a High-resolution Time Scale for the Early Devonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekkers, M. J.; da Silva, A. C.

    2017-12-01

    High-resolution time scales are crucial to understand Earth's history in detail. The construction of a robust geological time scale, however, inevitably becomes increasingly harder further back in time. Uncertainties associated with anchor radiometric ages increase in size, not speaking of the mere presence of suitable datable strata. However, durations of stages can be tightly constrained by making use of cyclic expressions in sediments, an approach that revolutionized the Cenozoic time scale. When precisely determined durations are stitched together, ultimately, a very precise time scale is the result. For the Mesozoic and Paleozoic an astronomical solution as a tuning target is not available but the dominant periods of eccentricity, obliquity and precession are reasonably well constrained for the entire Phanerozoic which enables their detection by means of spectral analysis. Eccentricity is time-invariant and is used as the prime building block. Here we focus on the Early Devonian, on its lowermost three stages: the Lochkovian, Pragian and Emsian. The uncertainties on the Devonian stage boundaries are currently in the order of several millions of years. The preservation of climatic cycles in diagenetically or even anchimetamorphically affected successions, however, is essential. The fit of spectral peak ratios with those calculated for orbital cycles, is classically used as a strong argument for a preserved climatic signal. Here we use primarily the low field magnetic susceptibility (MS) as proxy parameter, supported by gamma-ray spectrometry to test for consistency. Continuous Wavelet Transform, Evolutive Harmonic Analysis, Multitaper Method, and Average Spectral Misfit are used to reach an optimal astronomical interpretation. We report on classic Early Devonian sections from the Czech Republic: the Pozar-CS (Lochkovian and Pragian), Pod Barrandovem (Pragian and Lower Emsian), and Zlichov (Middle-Upper Emsian). Also a Middle-Upper Emsian section from the US

  4. The early Miocene balaenid Morenocetus parvus from Patagonia (Argentina) and the evolution of right whales

    PubMed Central

    Cozzuol, Mario A.; Fitzgerald, Erich M.G.

    2017-01-01

    Balaenidae (right and bowhead whales) are a key group in understanding baleen whale evolution, because they are the oldest surviving lineage of crown Mysticeti, with a fossil record that dates back ∼20 million years. However, this record is mostly Pliocene and younger, with most of the Miocene history of the clade remaining practically unknown. The earliest recognized balaenid is the early Miocene Morenocetus parvus Cabrera, 1926 from Argentina. M. parvus was originally briefly described from two incomplete crania, a mandible and some cervical vertebrae collected from the lower Miocene Gaiman Formation of Patagonia. Since then it has not been revised, thus remaining a frequently cited yet enigmatic fossil cetacean with great potential for shedding light on the early history of crown Mysticeti. Here we provide a detailed morphological description of this taxon and revisit its phylogenetic position. The phylogenetic analysis recovered the middle Miocene Peripolocetus as the earliest diverging balaenid, and Morenocetus as the sister taxon of all other balaenids. The analysis of cranial and periotic morphology of Morenocetus suggest that some of the specialized morphological traits of modern balaenids were acquired by the early Miocene and have remained essentially unchanged up to the present. Throughout balaenid evolution, morphological changes in skull arching and ventral displacement of the orbits appear to be coupled and functionally linked to mitigating a reduction of the field of vision. The body length of Morenocetus and other extinct balaenids was estimated and the evolution of body size in Balaenidae was reconstructed. Optimization of body length on our phylogeny of Balaenidae suggests that the primitive condition was a relatively small body length represented by Morenocetus, and that gigantism has been acquired independently at least twice (in Balaena mysticetus and Eubalaena spp.), with the earliest occurrence of this trait in the late Miocene–early

  5. Early cellular evolution.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the evolutionary developments that occurred subsequent to the origin of ancestral cells. Microbial physiology and ecology are potential sharp tools for shaping concepts of microbial evolution. Some popular unjustified assumptions are discussed. It is considered that certain principles derived mainly from the advances of molecular biology can be used to order the natural groups (genera) of extant prokaryotes and their patterns phylogenetically.

  6. Possible tidal resonance of the early Earth's ocean due to the lunar orbit evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoyama, M.; Tsunakawa, H.; Takahashi, F.

    2016-12-01

    The ocean tide is one of the most important factors affecting the Earth's surface environment and the evolution of the Earth-Moon system (e.g. Goldreich, 1966). According to the Giant Impact hypothesis, the Moon was formed very near the Earth 4.6 billion years ago (Hartmann and Davis, 1979). At that time, the tidal force would be about several thousand times as strong as the present. However previous studies pointed out that significant attenuation of tidal waves might have occurred due to mechanical response of water motion (e.g. Hansen, 1982; Abe and Ooe, 2001), resulting in relatively calm state like the present ocean.In the present study, we analyze tidal response of the ocean on the early Earth using a model of constant-depth ocean covering all the surface of the rigid Earth. The examined modes of response are not only M2 corresponding to spherical harmonics Y22 but also others such as Y21, since the lunar orbital plane would be inclined.First, estimated is an ocean depth for possible resonance of the individual mode. Eigen frequencies of the fluid on a rotating sphere with no friction are calculated on the basis of previous study (Longuet-Higgins, 1968). These frequencies depend on the Earth's rotation rate and the ocean depth. The Earth's rotation period is assumed to have changed from 5 hours to 24 hours for the past 4.6 billion years (e.g. Mignard, 1980; Stacey and Davis, 2008). It is found that resonance could occur for diurnal modes of Y21 and Y31 with reasonable depths of the ancient ocean (1300 - 5200 m).Then we obtain a 2D response function on a sphere with friction in order to estimate the tidal amplitude of the ocean for main modes . The response function in the present study shows good agreement with the numerical simulation result of the tidal torque response of M2 (Abe et al., 1997). The calculation results suggest that diurnal modes of Y21 and Y31 would grown on the early Earth, while the other modes would fairly be attenuated. In particular

  7. Chemical Evolution and the Formation of Dwarf Galaxies in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cote, Benoit; JINA-CEE, NuGrid, ChETEC

    2018-06-01

    Stellar abundances in local dwarf galaxies offer a unique window into the nature and nucleosynthesis of the first stars. They also contain clues regarding how galaxies formed and assembled in the early stages of the universe. In this talk, I will present our effort to connect nuclear astrophysics with the field of galaxy formation in order to define what can be learned about galaxy evolution using stellar abundances. In particular, I will describe the current state of our numerical chemical evolution pipeline which accounts for the mass assembly history of galaxies, present how we use high-redshift cosmological hydrodynamic simulations to calibrate our models and to learn about the formation of dwarf galaxies, and address the challenge of identifying the dominant r-process site(s) using stellar abundances.

  8. When should we expect early bursts of trait evolution in comparative data? Predictions from an evolutionary food web model.

    PubMed

    Ingram, T; Harmon, L J; Shurin, J B

    2012-09-01

    Conceptual models of adaptive radiation predict that competitive interactions among species will result in an early burst of speciation and trait evolution followed by a slowdown in diversification rates. Empirical studies often show early accumulation of lineages in phylogenetic trees, but usually fail to detect early bursts of phenotypic evolution. We use an evolutionary simulation model to assemble food webs through adaptive radiation, and examine patterns in the resulting phylogenetic trees and species' traits (body size and trophic position). We find that when foraging trade-offs result in food webs where all species occupy integer trophic levels, lineage diversity and trait disparity are concentrated early in the tree, consistent with the early burst model. In contrast, in food webs in which many omnivorous species feed at multiple trophic levels, high levels of turnover of species' identities and traits tend to eliminate the early burst signal. These results suggest testable predictions about how the niche structure of ecological communities may be reflected by macroevolutionary patterns. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2012 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  9. Time-limited environments affect the evolution of egg-body size allometry.

    PubMed

    Eckerström-Liedholm, Simon; Sowersby, Will; Gonzalez-Voyer, Alejandro; Rogell, Björn

    2017-07-01

    Initial offspring size is a fundamental component of absolute growth rate, where large offspring will reach a given adult body size faster than smaller offspring. Yet, our knowledge regarding the coevolution between offspring and adult size is limited. In time-constrained environments, organisms need to reproduce at a high rate and reach a reproductive size quickly. To rapidly attain a large adult body size, we hypothesize that, in seasonal habitats, large species are bound to having a large initial size, and consequently, the evolution of egg size will be tightly matched to that of body size, compared to less time-limited systems. We tested this hypothesis in killifishes, and found a significantly steeper allometric relationship between egg and body sizes in annual, compared to nonannual species. We also found higher rates of evolution of egg and body size in annual compared to nonannual species. Our results suggest that time-constrained environments impose strong selection on rapidly reaching a species-specific body size, and reproduce at a high rate, which in turn imposes constraints on the evolution of egg sizes. In combination, these distinct selection pressures result in different relationships between egg and body size among species in time-constrained versus permanent habitats. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  10. Early descriptions of acromegaly and gigantism and their historical evolution as clinical entities.

    PubMed

    Mammis, Antonios; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Liu, James K

    2010-10-01

    Giants have been a subject of fascination throughout history. Whereas descriptions of giants have existed in the lay literature for millennia, the first attempt at a medical description was published by Johannes Wier in 1567. However, it was Pierre Marie, in 1886, who established the term "acromegaly" for the first time and established a distinct clinical diagnosis with clear clinical descriptions in 2 patients with the characteristic presentation. Multiple autopsy findings revealed a consistent correlation between acromegaly and pituitary enlargement. In 1909, Harvey Cushing postulated a “hormone of growth" as the underlying pathophysiological trigger involved in pituitary hypersecretion in patients with acromegaly. This theory was supported by his observations of clinical remission in patients with acromegaly in whom he had performed hypophysectomy. In this paper, the authors present some of the early accounts of acromegaly and gigantism, and describe its historical evolution as a medical and surgical entity.

  11. A Burst of miRNA Innovation in the Early Evolution of Butterflies and Moths

    PubMed Central

    Quah, Shan; Hui, Jerome H.L.; Holland, Peter W.H.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. Because several miRNAs are known to affect the stability or translation of developmental regulatory genes, the origin of novel miRNAs may have contributed to the evolution of developmental processes and morphology. Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) is a species-rich clade with a well-established phylogeny and abundant genomic resources, thereby representing an ideal system in which to study miRNA evolution. We sequenced small RNA libraries from developmental stages of two divergent lepidopterans, Cameraria ohridella (Horse chestnut Leafminer) and Pararge aegeria (Speckled Wood butterfly), discovering 90 and 81 conserved miRNAs, respectively, and many species-specific miRNA sequences. Mapping miRNAs onto the lepidopteran phylogeny reveals rapid miRNA turnover and an episode of miRNA fixation early in lepidopteran evolution, implying that miRNA acquisition accompanied the early radiation of the Lepidoptera. One lepidopteran-specific miRNA gene, miR-2768, is located within an intron of the homeobox gene invected, involved in insect segmental and wing patterning. We identified cubitus interruptus (ci) as a likely direct target of miR-2768, and validated this suppression using a luciferase assay system. We propose a model by which miR-2768 modulates expression of ci in the segmentation pathway and in patterning of lepidopteran wing primordia. PMID:25576364

  12. Os isotopes in SNC meteorites and their implications to the early evolution of Mars and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagoutz, E.; Luck, J. M.; Othman, D. Ben; Wanke, H.

    1993-01-01

    A new development on the measurement of the Os isotopic composition by mass spectrometry using negative ions opened a new field of applications. The Re-Os systematic provides time information on the differentiation of the nobel metals. The nobel metals are strongly partitioned into metal and sulphide phases, but also the generation of silicate melts might fractionate the Re-Os system. Compared to the other isotopic systems which are mainly dating the fractionation of the alkalis and alkali-earth elements, the Re-Os system is expected to disclose entirely new information about the geochemistry. Especially the differentiation and early evolution of the planets such as the formation of the core will be elucidated with this method.

  13. Ancestral Ca2+ Signaling Machinery in Early Animal and Fungal Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xinjiang; Clapham, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Animals and fungi diverged from a common unicellular ancestor of Opisthokonta, yet they exhibit significant differences in their components of Ca2+ signaling pathways. Many Ca2+ signaling molecules appear to be either animal-specific or fungal-specific, which is generally believed to result from lineage-specific adaptations to distinct physiological requirements. Here, by analyzing the genomic data from several close relatives of animals and fungi, we demonstrate that many components of animal and fungal Ca2+ signaling machineries are present in the apusozoan protist Thecamonas trahens, which belongs to the putative unicellular sister group to Opisthokonta. We also identify the conserved portion of Ca2+ signaling molecules in early evolution of animals and fungi following their divergence. Furthermore, our results reveal the lineage-specific expansion of Ca2+ channels and transporters in the unicellular ancestors of animals and in basal fungi. These findings provide novel insights into the evolution and regulation of Ca2+ signaling critical for animal and fungal biology. PMID:21680871

  14. Time evolution of Wikipedia network ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Young-Ho; Frahm, Klaus M.; Benczúr, András; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2013-12-01

    We study the time evolution of ranking and spectral properties of the Google matrix of English Wikipedia hyperlink network during years 2003-2011. The statistical properties of ranking of Wikipedia articles via PageRank and CheiRank probabilities, as well as the matrix spectrum, are shown to be stabilized for 2007-2011. A special emphasis is done on ranking of Wikipedia personalities and universities. We show that PageRank selection is dominated by politicians while 2DRank, which combines PageRank and CheiRank, gives more accent on personalities of arts. The Wikipedia PageRank of universities recovers 80% of top universities of Shanghai ranking during the considered time period.

  15. The mineralogic evolution of the Martian surface through time: Implications from chemical reaction path modeling studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumlee, G. S.; Ridley, W. I.; Debraal, J. D.; Reed, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reaction path calculations were used to model the minerals that might have formed at or near the Martian surface as a result of volcano or meteorite impact driven hydrothermal systems; weathering at the Martian surface during an early warm, wet climate; and near-zero or sub-zero C brine-regolith reactions in the current cold climate. Although the chemical reaction path calculations carried out do not define the exact mineralogical evolution of the Martian surface over time, they do place valuable geochemical constraints on the types of minerals that formed from an aqueous phase under various surficial and geochemically complex conditions.

  16. The minimal kinome of Giardia lamblia illuminates early kinase evolution and unique parasite biology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The major human intestinal pathogen Giardia lamblia is a very early branching eukaryote with a minimal genome of broad evolutionary and biological interest. Results To explore early kinase evolution and regulation of Giardia biology, we cataloged the kinomes of three sequenced strains. Comparison with published kinomes and those of the excavates Trichomonas vaginalis and Leishmania major shows that Giardia's 80 core kinases constitute the smallest known core kinome of any eukaryote that can be grown in pure culture, reflecting both its early origin and secondary gene loss. Kinase losses in DNA repair, mitochondrial function, transcription, splicing, and stress response reflect this reduced genome, while the presence of other kinases helps define the kinome of the last common eukaryotic ancestor. Immunofluorescence analysis shows abundant phospho-staining in trophozoites, with phosphotyrosine abundant in the nuclei and phosphothreonine and phosphoserine in distinct cytoskeletal organelles. The Nek kinase family has been massively expanded, accounting for 198 of the 278 protein kinases in Giardia. Most Neks are catalytically inactive, have very divergent sequences and undergo extensive duplication and loss between strains. Many Neks are highly induced during development. We localized four catalytically active Neks to distinct parts of the cytoskeleton and one inactive Nek to the cytoplasm. Conclusions The reduced kinome of Giardia sheds new light on early kinase evolution, and its highly divergent sequences add to the definition of individual kinase families as well as offering specific drug targets. Giardia's massive Nek expansion may reflect its distinctive lifestyle, biphasic life cycle and complex cytoskeleton. PMID:21787419

  17. The evolution of surface magnetic fields in young solar-type stars II: the early main sequence (250-650 Myr)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folsom, C. P.; Bouvier, J.; Petit, P.; Lèbre, A.; Amard, L.; Palacios, A.; Morin, J.; Donati, J.-F.; Vidotto, A. A.

    2018-03-01

    There is a large change in surface rotation rates of sun-like stars on the pre-main sequence and early main sequence. Since these stars have dynamo-driven magnetic fields, this implies a strong evolution of their magnetic properties over this time period. The spin-down of these stars is controlled by interactions between stellar and magnetic fields, thus magnetic evolution in turn plays an important role in rotational evolution. We present here the second part of a study investigating the evolution of large-scale surface magnetic fields in this critical time period. We observed stars in open clusters and stellar associations with known ages between 120 and 650 Myr, and used spectropolarimetry and Zeeman Doppler Imaging to characterize their large-scale magnetic field strength and geometry. We report 15 stars with magnetic detections here. These stars have masses from 0.8 to 0.95 M⊙, rotation periods from 0.326 to 10.6 d, and we find large-scale magnetic field strengths from 8.5 to 195 G with a wide range of geometries. We find a clear trend towards decreasing magnetic field strength with age, and a power law decrease in magnetic field strength with Rossby number. There is some tentative evidence for saturation of the large-scale magnetic field strength at Rossby numbers below 0.1, although the saturation point is not yet well defined. Comparing to younger classical T Tauri stars, we support the hypothesis that differences in internal structure produce large differences in observed magnetic fields, however for weak-lined T Tauri stars this is less clear.

  18. Bar Evolution and Bar Properties from Disc Galaxies in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson-Smith, Tenley; Simmons, Brooke

    2017-01-01

    Bars in disc galaxies indicate a large collection of stars in a specific configuration of orbits that give the galaxy center a rectangular looking feature. Astronomers have discovered that these bars affect the distribution of matter in galaxies, and are also related to galaxy stellar mass and star formation history. Little is known about the specifics of how bars evolve and drive the evolution of their host galaxies because only a handful of bars have been studied in detail so far. I have examined a sample of 8,221 barred galaxies from the early universe to identify and examine correlations with galaxy properties. The data comes from Galaxy Zoo, an online citizen science project that allows anyone to classify and measure detailed properties of galaxies. I present results including the fraction of galaxies in the sample that have bars, and the variation of galaxy properties with bar length, including galaxy color and stellar mass. I also compare these results to barred galaxies in the local universe. I will discuss the implications of these results in the context of galaxy evolution overall, including the effect of dark matter on bars and galaxy evolution.

  19. Early-state damage detection, characterization, and evolution using high-resolution computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandin, Robert John

    Safely using materials in high performance applications requires adequately understanding the mechanisms which control the nucleation and evolution of damage. Most of a material's operational life is spent in a state with noncritical damage, and, for example in metals only a small portion of its life falls within the classical Paris Law regime of crack growth. Developing proper structural health and prognosis models requires understanding the behavior of damage in these early stages within the material's life, and this early-stage damage occurs on length scales at which the material may be considered "granular'' in the sense that the discrete regions which comprise the whole are large enough to require special consideration. Material performance depends upon the characteristics of the granules themselves as well as the interfaces between granules. As a result, properly studying early-stage damage in complex, granular materials requires a means to characterize changes in the granules and interfaces. The granular-scale can range from tenths of microns in ceramics, to single microns in fiber-reinforced composites, to tens of millimeters in concrete. The difficulty of direct-study is often overcome by exhaustive testing of macro-scale damage caused by gross material loads and abuse. Such testing, for example optical or electron microscopy, destructive and further, is costly when used to study the evolution of damage within a material and often limits the study to a few snapshots. New developments in high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) provide the necessary spatial resolution to directly image the granule length-scale of many materials. Successful application of HRCT with fiber-reinforced composites, however, requires extending the HRCT performance beyond current limits. This dissertation will discuss improvements made in the field of CT reconstruction which enable resolutions to be pushed to the point of being able to image the fiber-scale damage structures and

  20. Phylogenetic ctDNA analysis depicts early stage lung cancer evolution

    PubMed Central

    Abbosh, Christopher; Birkbak, Nicolai J.; Wilson, Gareth A.; Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam; Constantin, Tudor; Salari, Raheleh; Le Quesne, John; Moore, David A; Veeriah, Selvaraju; Rosenthal, Rachel; Marafioti, Teresa; Kirkizlar, Eser; Watkins, Thomas B K; McGranahan, Nicholas; Ward, Sophia; Martinson, Luke; Riley, Joan; Fraioli, Francesco; Al Bakir, Maise; Grönroos, Eva; Zambrana, Francisco; Endozo, Raymondo; Bi, Wenya Linda; Fennessy, Fiona M.; Sponer, Nicole; Johnson, Diana; Laycock, Joanne; Shafi, Seema; Czyzewska-Khan, Justyna; Rowan, Andrew; Chambers, Tim; Matthews, Nik; Turajlic, Samra; Hiley, Crispin; Lee, Siow Ming; Forster, Martin D.; Ahmad, Tanya; Falzon, Mary; Borg, Elaine; Lawrence, David; Hayward, Martin; Kolvekar, Shyam; Panagiotopoulos, Nikolaos; Janes, Sam M; Thakrar, Ricky; Ahmed, Asia; Blackhall, Fiona; Summers, Yvonne; Hafez, Dina; Naik, Ashwini; Ganguly, Apratim; Kareht, Stephanie; Shah, Rajesh; Joseph, Leena; Quinn, Anne Marie; Crosbie, Phil; Naidu, Babu; Middleton, Gary; Langman, Gerald; Trotter, Simon; Nicolson, Marianne; Remmen, Hardy; Kerr, Keith; Chetty, Mahendran; Gomersall, Lesley; Fennell, Dean; Nakas, Apostolos; Rathinam, Sridhar; Anand, Girija; Khan, Sajid; Russell, Peter; Ezhil, Veni; Ismail, Babikir; Irvin-sellers, Melanie; Prakash, Vineet; Lester, Jason; Kornaszewska, Malgorzata; Attanoos, Richard; Adams, Haydn; Davies, Helen; Oukrif, Dahmane; Akarca, Ayse U; Hartley, John A; Lowe, Helen L; Lock, Sara; Iles, Natasha; Bell, Harriet; Ngai, Yenting; Elgar, Greg; Szallasi, Zoltan; Schwarz, Roland F; Herrero, Javier; Stewart, Aengus; Quezada, Sergio A; Peggs, Karl S.; Van Loo, Peter; Dive, Caroline; Lin, Jimmy; Rabinowitz, Matthew; Aerts, Hugo JWL; Hackshaw, Allan; Shaw, Jacqui A; Zimmermann, Bernhard G.; Swanton, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Summary The early detection of relapse following primary surgery for non-small cell lung cancer and the characterization of emerging subclones seeding metastatic sites might offer new therapeutic approaches to limit tumor recurrence. The potential to non-invasively track tumor evolutionary dynamics in ctDNA of early-stage lung cancer is not established. Here we conduct a tumour-specific phylogenetic approach to ctDNA profiling in the first 100 TRACERx (TRAcking non-small cell lung Cancer Evolution through therapy (Rx)) study participants, including one patient co-recruited to the PEACE (Posthumous Evaluation of Advanced Cancer Environment) post-mortem study. We identify independent predictors of ctDNA release and perform tumor volume limit of detection analyses. Through blinded profiling of post-operative plasma, we observe evidence of adjuvant chemotherapy resistance and identify patients destined to experience recurrence of their lung cancer. Finally, we show that phylogenetic ctDNA profiling tracks the subclonal nature of lung cancer relapse and metastases, providing a new approach for ctDNA driven therapeutic studies PMID:28445469

  1. Phylogenetic ctDNA analysis depicts early-stage lung cancer evolution.

    PubMed

    Abbosh, Christopher; Birkbak, Nicolai J; Wilson, Gareth A; Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam; Constantin, Tudor; Salari, Raheleh; Le Quesne, John; Moore, David A; Veeriah, Selvaraju; Rosenthal, Rachel; Marafioti, Teresa; Kirkizlar, Eser; Watkins, Thomas B K; McGranahan, Nicholas; Ward, Sophia; Martinson, Luke; Riley, Joan; Fraioli, Francesco; Al Bakir, Maise; Grönroos, Eva; Zambrana, Francisco; Endozo, Raymondo; Bi, Wenya Linda; Fennessy, Fiona M; Sponer, Nicole; Johnson, Diana; Laycock, Joanne; Shafi, Seema; Czyzewska-Khan, Justyna; Rowan, Andrew; Chambers, Tim; Matthews, Nik; Turajlic, Samra; Hiley, Crispin; Lee, Siow Ming; Forster, Martin D; Ahmad, Tanya; Falzon, Mary; Borg, Elaine; Lawrence, David; Hayward, Martin; Kolvekar, Shyam; Panagiotopoulos, Nikolaos; Janes, Sam M; Thakrar, Ricky; Ahmed, Asia; Blackhall, Fiona; Summers, Yvonne; Hafez, Dina; Naik, Ashwini; Ganguly, Apratim; Kareht, Stephanie; Shah, Rajesh; Joseph, Leena; Marie Quinn, Anne; Crosbie, Phil A; Naidu, Babu; Middleton, Gary; Langman, Gerald; Trotter, Simon; Nicolson, Marianne; Remmen, Hardy; Kerr, Keith; Chetty, Mahendran; Gomersall, Lesley; Fennell, Dean A; Nakas, Apostolos; Rathinam, Sridhar; Anand, Girija; Khan, Sajid; Russell, Peter; Ezhil, Veni; Ismail, Babikir; Irvin-Sellers, Melanie; Prakash, Vineet; Lester, Jason F; Kornaszewska, Malgorzata; Attanoos, Richard; Adams, Haydn; Davies, Helen; Oukrif, Dahmane; Akarca, Ayse U; Hartley, John A; Lowe, Helen L; Lock, Sara; Iles, Natasha; Bell, Harriet; Ngai, Yenting; Elgar, Greg; Szallasi, Zoltan; Schwarz, Roland F; Herrero, Javier; Stewart, Aengus; Quezada, Sergio A; Peggs, Karl S; Van Loo, Peter; Dive, Caroline; Lin, C Jimmy; Rabinowitz, Matthew; Aerts, Hugo J W L; Hackshaw, Allan; Shaw, Jacqui A; Zimmermann, Bernhard G; Swanton, Charles

    2017-04-26

    The early detection of relapse following primary surgery for non-small-cell lung cancer and the characterization of emerging subclones, which seed metastatic sites, might offer new therapeutic approaches for limiting tumour recurrence. The ability to track the evolutionary dynamics of early-stage lung cancer non-invasively in circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) has not yet been demonstrated. Here we use a tumour-specific phylogenetic approach to profile the ctDNA of the first 100 TRACERx (Tracking Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Evolution Through Therapy (Rx)) study participants, including one patient who was also recruited to the PEACE (Posthumous Evaluation of Advanced Cancer Environment) post-mortem study. We identify independent predictors of ctDNA release and analyse the tumour-volume detection limit. Through blinded profiling of postoperative plasma, we observe evidence of adjuvant chemotherapy resistance and identify patients who are very likely to experience recurrence of their lung cancer. Finally, we show that phylogenetic ctDNA profiling tracks the subclonal nature of lung cancer relapse and metastasis, providing a new approach for ctDNA-driven therapeutic studies.

  2. Chloroplast Genome Evolution in Early Diverged Leptosporangiate Ferns

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoung Tae; Chung, Myong Gi; Kim, Ki-Joong

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the chloroplast (cp) genome sequences from three early diverged leptosporangiate ferns were completed and analyzed in order to understand the evolution of the genome of the fern lineages. The complete cp genome sequence of Osmunda cinnamomea (Osmundales) was 142,812 base pairs (bp). The cp genome structure was similar to that of eusporangiate ferns. The gene/intron losses that frequently occurred in the cp genome of leptosporangiate ferns were not found in the cp genome of O. cinnamomea. In addition, putative RNA editing sites in the cp genome were rare in O. cinnamomea, even though the sites were frequently predicted to be present in leptosporangiate ferns. The complete cp genome sequence of Diplopterygium glaucum (Gleicheniales) was 151,007 bp and has a 9.7 kb inversion between the trnL-CAA and trnV-GCA genes when compared to O. cinnamomea. Several repeated sequences were detected around the inversion break points. The complete cp genome sequence of Lygodium japonicum (Schizaeales) was 157,142 bp and a deletion of the rpoC1 intron was detected. This intron loss was shared by all of the studied species of the genus Lygodium. The GC contents and the effective numbers of co-dons (ENCs) in ferns varied significantly when compared to seed plants. The ENC values of the early diverged leptosporangiate ferns showed intermediate levels between eusporangiate and core leptosporangiate ferns. However, our phylogenetic tree based on all of the cp gene sequences clearly indicated that the cp genome similarity between O. cinnamomea (Osmundales) and eusporangiate ferns are symplesiomorphies, rather than synapomorphies. Therefore, our data is in agreement with the view that Osmundales is a distinct early diverged lineage in the leptosporangiate ferns. PMID:24823358

  3. Chloroplast genome evolution in early diverged leptosporangiate ferns.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung Tae; Chung, Myong Gi; Kim, Ki-Joong

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the chloroplast (cp) genome sequences from three early diverged leptosporangiate ferns were completed and analyzed in order to understand the evolution of the genome of the fern lineages. The complete cp genome sequence of Osmunda cinnamomea (Osmundales) was 142,812 base pairs (bp). The cp genome structure was similar to that of eusporangiate ferns. The gene/intron losses that frequently occurred in the cp genome of leptosporangiate ferns were not found in the cp genome of O. cinnamomea. In addition, putative RNA editing sites in the cp genome were rare in O. cinnamomea, even though the sites were frequently predicted to be present in leptosporangiate ferns. The complete cp genome sequence of Diplopterygium glaucum (Gleicheniales) was 151,007 bp and has a 9.7 kb inversion between the trnL-CAA and trnVGCA genes when compared to O. cinnamomea. Several repeated sequences were detected around the inversion break points. The complete cp genome sequence of Lygodium japonicum (Schizaeales) was 157,142 bp and a deletion of the rpoC1 intron was detected. This intron loss was shared by all of the studied species of the genus Lygodium. The GC contents and the effective numbers of codons (ENCs) in ferns varied significantly when compared to seed plants. The ENC values of the early diverged leptosporangiate ferns showed intermediate levels between eusporangiate and core leptosporangiate ferns. However, our phylogenetic tree based on all of the cp gene sequences clearly indicated that the cp genome similarity between O. cinnamomea (Osmundales) and eusporangiate ferns are symplesiomorphies, rather than synapomorphies. Therefore, our data is in agreement with the view that Osmundales is a distinct early diverged lineage in the leptosporangiate ferns.

  4. Real-time evolution of a large-scale relativistic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martí, Josep; Luque-Escamilla, Pedro L.; Romero, Gustavo E.; Sánchez-Sutil, Juan R.; Muñoz-Arjonilla, Álvaro J.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Astrophysical jets are ubiquitous in the Universe on all scales, but their large-scale dynamics and evolution in time are hard to observe since they usually develop at a very slow pace. Aims: We aim to obtain the first observational proof of the expected large-scale evolution and interaction with the environment in an astrophysical jet. Only jets from microquasars offer a chance to witness the real-time, full-jet evolution within a human lifetime, since they combine a "short", few parsec length with relativistic velocities. Methods: The methodology of this work is based on a systematic recalibraton of interferometric radio observations of microquasars available in public archives. In particular, radio observations of the microquasar GRS 1758-258 over less than two decades have provided the most striking results. Results: Significant morphological variations in the extended jet structure of GRS 1758-258 are reported here that were previously missed. Its northern radio lobe underwent a major morphological variation that rendered the hotspot undetectable in 2001 and reappeared again in the following years. The reported changes confirm the Galactic nature of the source. We tentatively interpret them in terms of the growth of instabilities in the jet flow. There is also evidence of surrounding cocoon. These results can provide a testbed for models accounting for the evolution of jets and their interaction with the environment.

  5. The emergence and early evolution of biological carbon-fixation.

    PubMed

    Braakman, Rogier; Smith, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The fixation of CO₂ into living matter sustains all life on Earth, and embeds the biosphere within geochemistry. The six known chemical pathways used by extant organisms for this function are recognized to have overlaps, but their evolution is incompletely understood. Here we reconstruct the complete early evolutionary history of biological carbon-fixation, relating all modern pathways to a single ancestral form. We find that innovations in carbon-fixation were the foundation for most major early divergences in the tree of life. These findings are based on a novel method that fully integrates metabolic and phylogenetic constraints. Comparing gene-profiles across the metabolic cores of deep-branching organisms and requiring that they are capable of synthesizing all their biomass components leads to the surprising conclusion that the most common form for deep-branching autotrophic carbon-fixation combines two disconnected sub-networks, each supplying carbon to distinct biomass components. One of these is a linear folate-based pathway of CO₂ reduction previously only recognized as a fixation route in the complete Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, but which more generally may exclude the final step of synthesizing acetyl-CoA. Using metabolic constraints we then reconstruct a "phylometabolic" tree with a high degree of parsimony that traces the evolution of complete carbon-fixation pathways, and has a clear structure down to the root. This tree requires few instances of lateral gene transfer or convergence, and instead suggests a simple evolutionary dynamic in which all divergences have primary environmental causes. Energy optimization and oxygen toxicity are the two strongest forces of selection. The root of this tree combines the reductive citric acid cycle and the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway into a single connected network. This linked network lacks the selective optimization of modern fixation pathways but its redundancy leads to a more robust topology, making it more

  6. Self-similar space-time evolution of an initial density discontinuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekaa, V. L.; Pécseli, H. L.; Trulsen, J. K.

    2013-07-01

    The space-time evolution of an initial step-like plasma density variation is studied. We give particular attention to formulate the problem in a way that opens for the possibility of realizing the conditions experimentally. After a short transient time interval of the order of the electron plasma period, the solution is self-similar as illustrated by a video where the space-time evolution is reduced to be a function of the ratio x/t. Solutions of this form are usually found for problems without characteristic length and time scales, in our case the quasi-neutral limit. By introducing ion collisions with neutrals into the numerical analysis, we introduce a length scale, the collisional mean free path. We study the breakdown of the self-similarity of the solution as the mean free path is made shorter than the system length. Analytical results are presented for charge exchange collisions, demonstrating a short time collisionless evolution with an ensuing long time diffusive relaxation of the initial perturbation. For large times, we find a diffusion equation as the limiting analytical form for a charge-exchange collisional plasma, with a diffusion coefficient defined as the square of the ion sound speed divided by the (constant) ion collision frequency. The ion-neutral collision frequency acts as a parameter that allows a collisionless result to be obtained in one limit, while the solution of a diffusion equation is recovered in the opposite limit of large collision frequencies.

  7. Fossil scales illuminate the early evolution of lepidopterans and structural colors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingqing; Starkey, Timothy A.; McNamara, Maria E.; Jarzembowski, Edmund A.; Kelly, Richard; Ren, Xiaoyin; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Haichun

    2018-01-01

    Lepidopteran scales exhibit remarkably complex ultrastructures, many of which produce structural colors that are the basis for diverse communication strategies. Little is known, however, about the early evolution of lepidopteran scales and their photonic structures. We report scale architectures from Jurassic Lepidoptera from the United Kingdom, Germany, Kazakhstan, and China and from Tarachoptera (a stem group of Amphiesmenoptera) from mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber. The Jurassic lepidopterans exhibit a type 1 bilayer scale vestiture: an upper layer of large fused cover scales and a lower layer of small fused ground scales. This scale arrangement, plus preserved herringbone ornamentation on the cover scale surface, is almost identical to those of some extant Micropterigidae. Critically, the fossil scale ultrastructures have periodicities measuring from 140 to 2000 nm and are therefore capable of scattering visible light, providing the earliest evidence of structural colors in the insect fossil record. Optical modeling confirms that diffraction-related scattering mechanisms dominate the photonic properties of the fossil cover scales, which would have displayed broadband metallic hues as in numerous extant Micropterigidae. The fossil tarachopteran scales exhibit a unique suite of characteristics, including small size, elongate-spatulate shape, ridged ornamentation, and irregular arrangement, providing novel insight into the early evolution of lepidopteran scales. Combined, our results provide the earliest evidence for structural coloration in fossil lepidopterans and support the hypothesis that fused wing scales and the type 1 bilayer covering are groundplan features of the group. Wing scales likely had deep origins in earlier amphiesmenopteran lineages before the appearance of the Lepidoptera. PMID:29651455

  8. Fossil scales illuminate the early evolution of lepidopterans and structural colors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingqing; Mey, Wolfram; Ansorge, Jörg; Starkey, Timothy A; McDonald, Luke T; McNamara, Maria E; Jarzembowski, Edmund A; Wichard, Wilfried; Kelly, Richard; Ren, Xiaoyin; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Haichun; Wang, Bo

    2018-04-01

    Lepidopteran scales exhibit remarkably complex ultrastructures, many of which produce structural colors that are the basis for diverse communication strategies. Little is known, however, about the early evolution of lepidopteran scales and their photonic structures. We report scale architectures from Jurassic Lepidoptera from the United Kingdom, Germany, Kazakhstan, and China and from Tarachoptera (a stem group of Amphiesmenoptera) from mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber. The Jurassic lepidopterans exhibit a type 1 bilayer scale vestiture: an upper layer of large fused cover scales and a lower layer of small fused ground scales. This scale arrangement, plus preserved herringbone ornamentation on the cover scale surface, is almost identical to those of some extant Micropterigidae. Critically, the fossil scale ultrastructures have periodicities measuring from 140 to 2000 nm and are therefore capable of scattering visible light, providing the earliest evidence of structural colors in the insect fossil record. Optical modeling confirms that diffraction-related scattering mechanisms dominate the photonic properties of the fossil cover scales, which would have displayed broadband metallic hues as in numerous extant Micropterigidae. The fossil tarachopteran scales exhibit a unique suite of characteristics, including small size, elongate-spatulate shape, ridged ornamentation, and irregular arrangement, providing novel insight into the early evolution of lepidopteran scales. Combined, our results provide the earliest evidence for structural coloration in fossil lepidopterans and support the hypothesis that fused wing scales and the type 1 bilayer covering are groundplan features of the group. Wing scales likely had deep origins in earlier amphiesmenopteran lineages before the appearance of the Lepidoptera.

  9. Early evolution of the venom system in lizards and snakes.

    PubMed

    Fry, Bryan G; Vidal, Nicolas; Norman, Janette A; Vonk, Freek J; Scheib, Holger; Ramjan, S F Ryan; Kuruppu, Sanjaya; Fung, Kim; Hedges, S Blair; Richardson, Michael K; Hodgson, Wayne C; Ignjatovic, Vera; Summerhayes, Robyn; Kochva, Elazar

    2006-02-02

    Among extant reptiles only two lineages are known to have evolved venom delivery systems, the advanced snakes and helodermatid lizards (Gila Monster and Beaded Lizard). Evolution of the venom system is thought to underlie the impressive radiation of the advanced snakes (2,500 of 3,000 snake species). In contrast, the lizard venom system is thought to be restricted to just two species and to have evolved independently from the snake venom system. Here we report the presence of venom toxins in two additional lizard lineages (Monitor Lizards and Iguania) and show that all lineages possessing toxin-secreting oral glands form a clade, demonstrating a single early origin of the venom system in lizards and snakes. Construction of gland complementary-DNA libraries and phylogenetic analysis of transcripts revealed that nine toxin types are shared between lizards and snakes. Toxinological analyses of venom components from the Lace Monitor Varanus varius showed potent effects on blood pressure and clotting ability, bioactivities associated with a rapid loss of consciousness and extensive bleeding in prey. The iguanian lizard Pogona barbata retains characteristics of the ancestral venom system, namely serial, lobular non-compound venom-secreting glands on both the upper and lower jaws, whereas the advanced snakes and anguimorph lizards (including Monitor Lizards, Gila Monster and Beaded Lizard) have more derived venom systems characterized by the loss of the mandibular (lower) or maxillary (upper) glands. Demonstration that the snakes, iguanians and anguimorphs form a single clade provides overwhelming support for a single, early origin of the venom system in lizards and snakes. These results provide new insights into the evolution of the venom system in squamate reptiles and open new avenues for biomedical research and drug design using hitherto unexplored venom proteins.

  10. Development of efficient time-evolution method based on three-term recurrence relation

    SciTech Connect

    Akama, Tomoko, E-mail: a.tomo---s-b-l-r@suou.waseda.jp; Kobayashi, Osamu; Nanbu, Shinkoh, E-mail: shinkoh.nanbu@sophia.ac.jp

    The advantage of the real-time (RT) propagation method is a direct solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation which describes frequency properties as well as all dynamics of a molecular system composed of electrons and nuclei in quantum physics and chemistry. Its applications have been limited by computational feasibility, as the evaluation of the time-evolution operator is computationally demanding. In this article, a new efficient time-evolution method based on the three-term recurrence relation (3TRR) was proposed to reduce the time-consuming numerical procedure. The basic formula of this approach was derived by introducing a transformation of the operator using the arcsine function.more » Since this operator transformation causes transformation of time, we derived the relation between original and transformed time. The formula was adapted to assess the performance of the RT time-dependent Hartree-Fock (RT-TDHF) method and the time-dependent density functional theory. Compared to the commonly used fourth-order Runge-Kutta method, our new approach decreased computational time of the RT-TDHF calculation by about factor of four, showing the 3TRR formula to be an efficient time-evolution method for reducing computational cost.« less

  11. Major transitions in the evolution of early land plants: a bryological perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ligrone, Roberto; Duckett, Jeffrey G.; Renzaglia, Karen S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Molecular phylogeny has resolved the liverworts as the earliest-divergent clade of land plants and mosses as the sister group to hornworts plus tracheophytes, with alternative topologies resolving the hornworts as sister to mosses plus tracheophytes less well supported. The tracheophytes plus fossil plants putatively lacking lignified vascular tissue form the polysporangiophyte clade. Scope This paper reviews phylogenetic, developmental, anatomical, genetic and paleontological data with the aim of reconstructing the succession of events that shaped major land plant lineages. Conclusions Fundamental land plant characters primarily evolved in the bryophyte grade, and hence the key to a better understanding of the early evolution of land plants is in bryophytes. The last common ancestor of land plants was probably a leafless axial gametophyte bearing simple unisporangiate sporophytes. Water-conducting tissue, if present, was restricted to the gametophyte and presumably consisted of perforate cells similar to those in the early-divergent bryophytes Haplomitrium and Takakia. Stomata were a sporophyte innovation with the possible ancestral functions of producing a transpiration-driven flow of water and solutes from the parental gametophyte and facilitating spore separation before release. Stomata in mosses, hornworts and polysporangiophytes are viewed as homologous, and hence these three lineages are collectively referred to as the ‘stomatophytes’. An indeterminate sporophyte body (the sporophyte shoot) developing from an apical meristem was the key innovation in polysporangiophytes. Poikilohydry is the ancestral condition in land plants; homoiohydry evolved in the sporophyte of polysporangiophytes. Fungal symbiotic associations ancestral to modern arbuscular mycorrhizas evolved in the gametophytic generation before the separation of major present-living lineages. Hydroids are imperforate water-conducting cells specific to advanced mosses. Xylem vascular

  12. Lower bound on the time complexity of local adiabatic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhenghao; Koh, Pang Wei; Zhao, Yan

    2006-11-01

    The adiabatic theorem of quantum physics has been, in recent times, utilized in the design of local search quantum algorithms, and has been proven to be equivalent to standard quantum computation, that is, the use of unitary operators [D. Aharonov in Proceedings of the 45th Annual Symposium on the Foundations of Computer Science, 2004, Rome, Italy (IEEE Computer Society Press, New York, 2004), pp. 42-51]. Hence, the study of the time complexity of adiabatic evolution algorithms gives insight into the computational power of quantum algorithms. In this paper, we present two different approaches of evaluating the time complexity for local adiabatic evolution using time-independent parameters, thus providing effective tests (not requiring the evaluation of the entire time-dependent gap function) for the time complexity of newly developed algorithms. We further illustrate our tests by displaying results from the numerical simulation of some problems, viz. specially modified instances of the Hamming weight problem.

  13. Leaf evolution in early-diverging ferns: insights from a new fern-like plant from the Late Devonian of China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, De-Ming; Xu, Hong-He; Xue, Jin-Zhuang; Wang, Qi; Liu, Le

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims With the exception of angiosperms, the main euphyllophyte lineages (i.e. ferns sensu lato, progymnosperms and gymnosperms) had evolved laminate leaves by the Late Devonian. The evolution of laminate leaves, however, remains unclear for early-diverging ferns, largely represented by fern-like plants. This study presents a novel fern-like taxon with pinnules, which provides new insights into the early evolution of laminate leaves in early-diverging ferns. Methods Macrofossil specimens were collected from the Upper Devonian (Famennian) Wutong Formation of Anhui and Jiangsu Provinces, South China. A standard degagement technique was employed to uncover compressed plant portions within the rock matrix. Key Results A new fern-like taxon, Shougangia bella gen. et sp. nov., is described and represents an early-diverging fern with highly derived features. It has a partially creeping stem with adventitious roots only on one side, upright primary and secondary branches arranged in helices, tertiary branches borne alternately or (sub)oppositely, laminate and usually lobed leaves with divergent veins, and complex fertile organs terminating tertiary branches and possessing multiple divisions and numerous terminal sporangia. Conclusions Shougangia bella provides unequivocal fossil evidence for laminate leaves in early-diverging ferns. It suggests that fern-like plants, along with other euphyllophyte lineages, had independently evolved megaphylls by the Late Devonian, possibly in response to a significant decline in atmospheric CO2 concentration. Among fern-like plants, planate ultimate appendages are homologous with laminate pinnules, and in the evolution of megaphylls, fertile organs tend to become complex. PMID:25979918

  14. Understanding the Early Evolution of M dwarf Extreme Ultraviolet Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, Sarah; Barman, Travis; Shkolnik, Evgenya

    2015-11-01

    The chemistry and evolution of planetary atmospheres depends on the evolution of high-energy radiation emitted by its host star. High levels of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation can drastically alter the atmospheres of terrestrial planets through ionizing, heating, expanding, chemically modifying and eroding them during the first few billion years of a planetary lifetime. While there is evidence that stars emit their highest levels of far and near ultraviolet (FUV; NUV) radiation in the earliest stages of their evolution, we are currently unable to directly measure the EUV radiation. Most previous stellar atmosphere models under-predict FUV and EUV emission from M dwarfs; here we present new models for M stars that include prescriptions for the hot, lowest density atmospheric layers (chromosphere, transition region and corona), from which this radiation is emitted. By comparing our model spectra to GALEX near and far ultraviolet fluxes, we are able to predict the evolution of EUV radiation for M dwarfs from 10 Myr to a few Gyr. This research is the next major step in the HAZMAT (HAbitable Zones and M dwarf Activity across Time) project to analyze how the habitable zone evolves with the evolving properties of stellar and planetary atmospheres.

  15. Purely Dry Mergers do not Explain the Observed Evolution of Massive Early-type Galaxies since z ~ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Nipoti, Carlo; Treu, Tommaso

    2014-05-01

    Several studies have suggested that the observed size evolution of massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) can be explained as a combination of dry mergers and progenitor bias, at least since z ~ 1. In this paper we carry out a new test of the dry-merger scenario based on recent lensing measurements of the evolution of the mass density profile of ETGs. We construct a theoretical model for the joint evolution of the size and mass density profile slope γ' driven by dry mergers occurring at rates given by cosmological simulations. Such dry-merger model predicts a strong decrease of γ' with cosmic time, inconsistent with the almost constant γ' inferred from observations in the redshift range 0 < z < 1. We then show with a simple toy model that a modest amount of cold gas in the mergers—consistent with the upper limits on recent star formation in ETGs—is sufficient to reconcile the model with measurements of γ'. By fitting for the amount of gas accreted during mergers, we find that models with dissipation are consistent with observations of the evolution in both size and density slope, if ~4% of the total final stellar mass arises from the gas accreted since z ~ 1. Purely dry merger models are ruled out at >99% CL. We thus suggest a scenario where the outer regions of massive ETGs grow by accretion of stars and dark matter, while small amounts of dissipation and nuclear star formation conspire to keep the mass density profile constant and approximately isothermal.

  16. Timing of Orphanhood, Early Sexual Debut, and Early Marriage in Four Sub-Saharan African Countries

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    According to a growing body of literature, some orphans are at heightened risk of early sexual debut and early marriage. This study examines a rarely explored aspect of orphanhood: the timing and type of parental death and their relationship to these outcomes. The study also explores whether education mediates orphans’ risk of early sexual initiation and early marriage. The data are drawn from the 2004 National Survey of Adolescents, which includes interviews with 12–19-year-old adolescents in Burkina Faso, Ghana, Malawi, and Uganda. Results from discrete-time event history analysis indicate that female double orphans, regardless of timing of orphanhood, have greater odds of early sexual debut than do nonorphans. Education explains little of their increased risk. In contrast, male orphans of any type reveal no increased vulnerability to early sexual debut. Uganda is the only country where female orphans, specifically double orphans and those who are paternal orphans before age 10, have greater odds of early marriage, with education accounting for a small portion of the risk. PMID:23719999

  17. Question 7: Comparative Genomics and Early Cell Evolution: A Cautionary Methodological Note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islas, Sara; Hernández-Morales, Ricardo; Lazcano, Antonio

    2007-10-01

    Inventories of the gene content of the last common ancestor (LCA), i.e., the cenancestor, include sequences that may have undergone horizontal transfer events, as well as sequences that have originated in different pre-cenancestral epochs. However, the universal distribution of highly conserved genes involved in RNA metabolism provide insights into early stages of cell evolution during which RNA played a much more conspicuous biological role, and is consistent with the hypothesis that extant living systems were preceded by an RNA/protein world. Insights into the traits of primitive entities from which the LCA evolved may be derived from the analysis of paralogous gene families, including those formed by sequences that resulted from internal elongation events. Three major types of paralogous gene families can be recognized. The importance of this grouping for understanding the traits of early cells is discussed.

  18. Early evolution of the earth - Accretion, atmosphere formation, and thermal history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abe, Yutaka; Matsui, Takafumi

    1986-01-01

    The thermal and atmospheric evolution of the earth growing planetesimal impacts are studied. The generation of an H2O protoatmosphere is examined, and the surface temperatures are estimated. The evolution of an impact-induced H2O atmosphere is analyzed. Consideration is given to the formation time of a 'magma ocean'and internal water budgets. The thermal history of an accreting earth is reviewed. The wet convection and greenhouse effects are discussed, and the role of Fe oxidation on the evolution of an impact-induced H2O atmopshere is described. The relationship between differentiation processes and core segregation, the H2O and FeO content of the mantle, and the origin of the hydrosphere is also examined.

  19. Workshop on Evolution of Martian Volatiles. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakosky, B. (Editor); Treiman, A. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    Different aspects of martian science are discussed. Topics covered include: early Mars volatile inventory, evolution through time, geological influences, present atmospheric properties, soils, exobiology, polar volatiles, and seasonal and diurnal cycles

  20. The Moon as a recorder of organic evolution in the early solar system: a lunar regolith analog study.

    PubMed

    Matthewman, Richard; Court, Richard W; Crawford, Ian A; Jones, Adrian P; Joy, Katherine H; Sephton, Mark A

    2015-02-01

    The organic record of Earth older than ∼3.8 Ga has been effectively erased. Some insight is provided to us by meteorites as well as remote and direct observations of asteroids and comets left over from the formation of the Solar System. These primitive objects provide a record of early chemical evolution and a sample of material that has been delivered to Earth's surface throughout the past 4.5 billion years. Yet an effective chronicle of organic evolution on all Solar System objects, including that on planetary surfaces, is more difficult to find. Fortunately, early Earth would not have been the only recipient of organic matter-containing objects in the early Solar System. For example, a recently proposed model suggests the possibility that volatiles, including organic material, remain archived in buried paleoregolith deposits intercalated with lava flows on the Moon. Where asteroids and comets allow the study of processes before planet formation, the lunar record could extend that chronicle to early biological evolution on the planets. In this study, we use selected free and polymeric organic materials to assess the hypothesis that organic matter can survive the effects of heating in the lunar regolith by overlying lava flows. Results indicate that the presence of lunar regolith simulant appears to promote polymerization and, therefore, preservation of organic matter. Once polymerized, the mineral-hosted newly formed organic network is relatively protected from further thermal degradation. Our findings reveal the thermal conditions under which preservation of organic matter on the Moon is viable.

  1. Exploring the Hydrothermal System in the Chicxulub Crater and Implications for the Early Evolution of Life on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kring, D. A.; Schmieder, M.; Tikoo, S.; Riller, U. P.; Simpson, S. L.; Osinski, G.; Cockell, C. S.; Coolen, M.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Morgan, J. V.

    2017-12-01

    Impact cratering, particularly large basin-size craters with diameters >100 km, have the potential to generate vast subsurface hydrothermal systems. There were dozens of such impacts during the Hadean and early Archean, some of which vaporized seas for brief periods of time, during which the safest niches for early life may have been in those subsurface hydrothermal systems. The Chicxulub crater can serve as a proxy for those events. New IODP-ICDP core recovered by Expedition 364 reveals a high-temperature (>300 degree C) system that may have persisted for more than 100,000 years. Of order 105 to 106 km3 of crust was structurally deformed, melted, and vaporized within about 10 minutes of the impact. The crust had to endure immense strain rates of 104/s to 106/s, up to 12 orders of magnitude greater than those associated with igneous and metamorphic processes. The outcome is a porous, permeable region that is a perfect host for hydrothermal circulation across the entire diameter of the crater to depths up to 5 or 6 km. The target rocks at Chicxulub are composed of an 3 km-thick carbonate platform sequence over a crystalline basement composed of igneous granite, granodiorite, and a few other intrusive components, such as dolerite, and metamorphic assemblages composed, in part, of gneiss and mica schist. Post-impact hydrothermal alteration includes Ca-Na- and K-metasomatism, pervasive hydration to produce layered silicates, and lower-temperature vug-filling zeolites as the system cycled from high temperatures to low temperatures. While the extent of granitic crust on early Earth is still debated and, thus, the direct application of those mineral reactions to the Hadean and early Archean can be debated, the thermal evolution of the system should be applicable to diverse crustal compositions. It is important to point out that pre-impact thermal conditions of Hadean and early Archean crust can affect the size of an impact basin and, in turn, the proportion of that basin

  2. The tectonometamorphic evolution of the Apuseni Mountains (Romania): Geodynamic constraints for the evolution of the Alps-Carpathians-Dinaride system of orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiser, Martin; Schuster, Ralf; Fügenschuh, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    New structural, thermobarometric and geochronological data allow integrating kinematics, timing and intensity of tectonic phases into a geodynamic model of the Apuseni Mountain, which provides new constraints for the evolution of the Alps-Carpathians-Dinaride system of orogens. Strong differences in terms of deformation directions between Early and Late Cretaceous events provide new constraints on the regional geodynamic evolution during the Cretaceous. Geochronological and structural data evidence a Late Jurassic emplacement of the South Apuseni Ophiolites on top of the Biharia Nappe System (Dacia Mega-Unit), situated in an external position at the European margin. Following the emplacement of the ophiolites, three compressive deformation phases affected the Apuseni Mountains during Alpine orogeny: a) NE-directed in-sequence nappe stacking and regional metamorphic overprinting under amphibolite-facies conditions during the Early Cretaceous ("Austrian Phase"), b) NW-directed thrusting and folding, associated with greenschist-facies overprinting, during the early Late Cretaceous ("Turonian Phase") and c) E-W internal folding together with brittle thrusting during the latest Cretaceous ("Laramian Phase"). Major tectonic unroofing and exhumation at the transition from Early to Late Cretaceous times is documented through new Sm-Nd Grt, Ar-Ar Ms and Rb-Sr Bt ages from the study area and resulted in a complex thermal structure with strong lateral and vertical thermal gradients. Nappe stacking and medium-grade metamorphic overprinting during the Early Cretaceous exhibits striking parallels between the evolution of the Tisza-Dacia Mega-Units and the Austroalpine Nappes (ALCAPA Mega-Unit) and evidences a close connection. However, Late Cretaceous tectonic events in the study area exhibit strong similarities with the Dinarides. Thus, the Apuseni Mountains represent the "missing link" between the Early Cretaceous Meliata subduction (associated with obduction of ophiolites

  3. Discovering significant evolution patterns from satellite image time series.

    PubMed

    Petitjean, François; Masseglia, Florent; Gançarski, Pierre; Forestier, Germain

    2011-12-01

    Satellite Image Time Series (SITS) provide us with precious information on land cover evolution. By studying these series of images we can both understand the changes of specific areas and discover global phenomena that spread over larger areas. Changes that can occur throughout the sensing time can spread over very long periods and may have different start time and end time depending on the location, which complicates the mining and the analysis of series of images. This work focuses on frequent sequential pattern mining (FSPM) methods, since this family of methods fits the above-mentioned issues. This family of methods consists of finding the most frequent evolution behaviors, and is actually able to extract long-term changes as well as short term ones, whenever the change may start and end. However, applying FSPM methods to SITS implies confronting two main challenges, related to the characteristics of SITS and the domain's constraints. First, satellite images associate multiple measures with a single pixel (the radiometric levels of different wavelengths corresponding to infra-red, red, etc.), which makes the search space multi-dimensional and thus requires specific mining algorithms. Furthermore, the non evolving regions, which are the vast majority and overwhelm the evolving ones, challenge the discovery of these patterns. We propose a SITS mining framework that enables discovery of these patterns despite these constraints and characteristics. Our proposal is inspired from FSPM and provides a relevant visualization principle. Experiments carried out on 35 images sensed over 20 years show the proposed approach makes it possible to extract relevant evolution behaviors.

  4. The imprint of dark matter haloes on the size and velocity dispersion evolution of early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posti, Lorenzo; Nipoti, Carlo; Stiavelli, Massimo; Ciotti, Luca

    2014-05-01

    Early-type galaxies (ETGs) are observed to be more compact, on average, at z ≳ 2 than at z ≃ 0, at fixed stellar mass. Recent observational works suggest that such size evolution could reflect the similar evolution of the host dark matter halo density as a function of the time of galaxy quenching. We explore this hypothesis by studying the distribution of halo central velocity dispersion (σ0) and half-mass radius (rh) as functions of halo mass M and redshift z, in a cosmological Λ cold dark matter N-body simulation. In the range 0 ≲ z ≲ 2.5, we find σ0∝M0.31-0.37 and rh∝M0.28-0.32, close to the values expected for homologous virialized systems. At fixed M in the range 1011 M⊙ ≲ M ≲ 5.5 × 1014 M⊙ we find σ0 ∝ (1 + z)0.35 and rh ∝ (1 + z)-0.7. We show that such evolution of the halo scaling laws is driven by individual haloes growing in mass following the evolutionary tracks σ0 ∝ M0.2 and rh ∝ M0.6, consistent with simple dissipationless merging models in which the encounter orbital energy is accounted for. We compare the N-body data with ETGs observed at 0 ≲ z ≲ 3 by populating the haloes with a stellar component under simple but justified assumptions: the resulting galaxies evolve consistently with the observed ETGs up to z ≃ 2, but the model has difficulty in reproducing the fast evolution observed at z ≳ 2. We conclude that a substantial fraction of the size evolution of ETGs can be ascribed to a systematic dependence on redshift of the dark matter haloes structural properties.

  5. Diffusion equations and the time evolution of foreign exchange rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, Annibal; de Castro, Marcio T.; da Fonseca, Regina C. B.; Gleria, Iram

    2013-10-01

    We investigate which type of diffusion equation is most appropriate to describe the time evolution of foreign exchange rates. We modify the geometric diffusion model assuming a non-exponential time evolution and the stochastic term is the sum of a Wiener noise and a jump process. We find the resulting diffusion equation to obey the Kramers-Moyal equation. Analytical solutions are obtained using the characteristic function formalism and compared with empirical data. The analysis focus on the first four central moments considering the returns of foreign exchange rate. It is shown that the proposed model offers a good improvement over the classical geometric diffusion model.

  6. On the (Non)Evolution of H I Gas in Galaxies Over Cosmic Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochaska, J. Xavier; Wolfe, Arthur M.

    2009-05-01

    We present new results on the frequency distribution of projected H I column densities f(N H I , X), total comoving covering fraction, and integrated mass densities ρH I of high-redshift, H I galactic gas from a survey of damped Lyα systems (DLAs) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Data Release 5. For the full sample spanning z = 2.2-5 (738 DLAs), f(N H I , X) is well fitted by a double power law with a break column density Nd = 1021.55±0.04 cm-2 and low/high-end exponents α = -2.00 ± 0.05, - 6.4+1.1 -1.6. The shape of f(N H I , X) is invariant during this redshift interval and also follows the projected surface density distribution of present-day H I disks as inferred from 21 cm observations. We conclude that H I gas has been distributed in a self-similar fashion for the past 12 Gyr. The normalization of f(N H I , X), in contrast, decreases by a factor of 2 during the ≈2 Gyr interval from z = 4-2.2 with coincident decreases in both the total covering fraction and ρH I . At z ≈ 2, these quantities match the present-day values suggesting no evolution during the past ≈10 Gyr. We argue that the evolution at early times is driven by "violent" processes that removes gas from nearly half the galaxies at z ≈ 3 establishing the antecedents of current early-type galaxies. The perceived constancy of ρH I , meanwhile, implies that H I gas is a necessary but insufficient precondition for star formation and that the global star formation rate is driven by the accretion and condensation of fresh gas from the intergalactic medium.

  7. Evolution of Degenerate Space-Time from Non-Degenerate Initial Value in Ashtekar's Formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yongge; Liang, Canbin

    1998-09-01

    The possibility of evolving a degenerate space-time from non-degenerate initial value in Ashtekar's formalism is considered in a constructed example. It is found that this possibility could be realized in the time evolution given by Ashtekar's equations, but the topology change of space makes it fail to be a Cauchy evolution.

  8. Leaf evolution in early-diverging ferns: insights from a new fern-like plant from the Late Devonian of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, De-Ming; Xu, Hong-He; Xue, Jin-Zhuang; Wang, Qi; Liu, Le

    2015-06-01

    With the exception of angiosperms, the main euphyllophyte lineages (i.e. ferns sensu lato, progymnosperms and gymnosperms) had evolved laminate leaves by the Late Devonian. The evolution of laminate leaves, however, remains unclear for early-diverging ferns, largely represented by fern-like plants. This study presents a novel fern-like taxon with pinnules, which provides new insights into the early evolution of laminate leaves in early-diverging ferns. Macrofossil specimens were collected from the Upper Devonian (Famennian) Wutong Formation of Anhui and Jiangsu Provinces, South China. A standard degagement technique was employed to uncover compressed plant portions within the rock matrix. A new fern-like taxon, SHOUGANGIA BELLA GEN ET SP NOV: , is described and represents an early-diverging fern with highly derived features. It has a partially creeping stem with adventitious roots only on one side, upright primary and secondary branches arranged in helices, tertiary branches borne alternately or (sub)oppositely, laminate and usually lobed leaves with divergent veins, and complex fertile organs terminating tertiary branches and possessing multiple divisions and numerous terminal sporangia. Shougangia bella provides unequivocal fossil evidence for laminate leaves in early-diverging ferns. It suggests that fern-like plants, along with other euphyllophyte lineages, had independently evolved megaphylls by the Late Devonian, possibly in response to a significant decline in atmospheric CO2 concentration. Among fern-like plants, planate ultimate appendages are homologous with laminate pinnules, and in the evolution of megaphylls, fertile organs tend to become complex. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Time evolution of gamma rays from supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaggero, Daniele; Zandanel, Fabio; Cristofari, Pierre; Gabici, Stefano

    2018-04-01

    We present a systematic phenomenological study focused on the time evolution of the non-thermal radiation - from radio waves to gamma rays - emitted by typical supernova remnants via hadronic and leptonic mechanisms, for two classes of progenitors: thermonuclear and core-collapse. To this aim, we develop a numerical tool designed to model the evolution of the cosmic ray spectrum inside a supernova remnant, and compute the associated multi-wavelength emission. We demonstrate the potential of this tool in the context of future population studies based on large collection of high-energy gamma-ray data. We discuss and explore the relevant parameter space involved in the problem, and focus in particular on their impact on the maximum energy of accelerated particles, in order to study the effectiveness and duration of the PeVatron phase. We outline the crucial role of the ambient medium through which the shock propagates during the remnant evolution. In particular, we point out the role of dense clumps in creating a significant hardening in the hadronic gamma-ray spectrum.

  10. Lunge feeding in early marine reptiles and fast evolution of marine tetrapod feeding guilds.

    PubMed

    Motani, Ryosuke; Chen, Xiao-hong; Jiang, Da-yong; Cheng, Long; Tintori, Andrea; Rieppel, Olivier

    2015-03-10

    Traditional wisdom holds that biotic recovery from the end-Permian extinction was slow and gradual, and was not complete until the Middle Triassic. Here, we report that the evolution of marine predator feeding guilds, and their trophic structure, proceeded faster. Marine reptile lineages with unique feeding adaptations emerged during the Early Triassic (about 248 million years ago), including the enigmatic Hupehsuchus that possessed an unusually slender mandible. A new specimen of this genus reveals a well-preserved palate and mandible, which suggest that it was a rare lunge feeder as also occurs in rorqual whales and pelicans. The diversity of feeding strategies among Triassic marine tetrapods reached their peak in the Early Triassic, soon after their first appearance in the fossil record. The diet of these early marine tetrapods most likely included soft-bodied animals that are not preserved as fossils. Early marine tetrapods most likely introduced a new trophic mechanism to redistribute nutrients to the top 10 m of the sea, where the primary productivity is highest. Therefore, a simple recovery to a Permian-like trophic structure does not explain the biotic changes seen after the Early Triassic.

  11. Lunge feeding in early marine reptiles and fast evolution of marine tetrapod feeding guilds

    PubMed Central

    Motani, Ryosuke; Chen, Xiao-hong; Jiang, Da-yong; Cheng, Long; Tintori, Andrea; Rieppel, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Traditional wisdom holds that biotic recovery from the end-Permian extinction was slow and gradual, and was not complete until the Middle Triassic. Here, we report that the evolution of marine predator feeding guilds, and their trophic structure, proceeded faster. Marine reptile lineages with unique feeding adaptations emerged during the Early Triassic (about 248 million years ago), including the enigmatic Hupehsuchus that possessed an unusually slender mandible. A new specimen of this genus reveals a well-preserved palate and mandible, which suggest that it was a rare lunge feeder as also occurs in rorqual whales and pelicans. The diversity of feeding strategies among Triassic marine tetrapods reached their peak in the Early Triassic, soon after their first appearance in the fossil record. The diet of these early marine tetrapods most likely included soft-bodied animals that are not preserved as fossils. Early marine tetrapods most likely introduced a new trophic mechanism to redistribute nutrients to the top 10 m of the sea, where the primary productivity is highest. Therefore, a simple recovery to a Permian-like trophic structure does not explain the biotic changes seen after the Early Triassic. PMID:25754468

  12. Echo movement and evolution from real-time processing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffner, M. R.

    1972-01-01

    Preliminary experimental data on the effectiveness of conventional radars in measuring the movement and evolution of meteorological echoes when the radar is connected to a programmable real-time processor are examined. In the processor programming is accomplished by conceiving abstract machines which constitute the actual programs used in the methods employed. An analysis of these methods, such as the center of gravity method, the contour-displacement method, the method of slope, the cross-section method, the contour crosscorrelation method, the method of echo evolution at each point, and three-dimensional measurements, shows that the motions deduced from them may differ notably (since each method determines different quantities) but the plurality of measurement may give additional information on the characteristics of the precipitation.

  13. The Moon as a Recorder of Organic Evolution in the Early Solar System: A Lunar Regolith Analog Study

    PubMed Central

    Court, Richard W.; Crawford, Ian A.; Jones, Adrian P.; Joy, Katherine H.; Sephton, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The organic record of Earth older than ∼3.8 Ga has been effectively erased. Some insight is provided to us by meteorites as well as remote and direct observations of asteroids and comets left over from the formation of the Solar System. These primitive objects provide a record of early chemical evolution and a sample of material that has been delivered to Earth's surface throughout the past 4.5 billion years. Yet an effective chronicle of organic evolution on all Solar System objects, including that on planetary surfaces, is more difficult to find. Fortunately, early Earth would not have been the only recipient of organic matter–containing objects in the early Solar System. For example, a recently proposed model suggests the possibility that volatiles, including organic material, remain archived in buried paleoregolith deposits intercalated with lava flows on the Moon. Where asteroids and comets allow the study of processes before planet formation, the lunar record could extend that chronicle to early biological evolution on the planets. In this study, we use selected free and polymeric organic materials to assess the hypothesis that organic matter can survive the effects of heating in the lunar regolith by overlying lava flows. Results indicate that the presence of lunar regolith simulant appears to promote polymerization and, therefore, preservation of organic matter. Once polymerized, the mineral-hosted newly formed organic network is relatively protected from further thermal degradation. Our findings reveal the thermal conditions under which preservation of organic matter on the Moon is viable. Key Words: Moon—Regolith—Organic preservation—Biomarkers. Astrobiology 15, 154–168. PMID:25615648

  14. Timely Healthcare Checkup Catches Melanoma Early

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Skin Cancer Timely Healthcare Checkup Catches Melanoma Early Past Issues / Summer 2013 ... left the Congress and starting working as a healthcare consultant, when I finally decided to have a ...

  15. Prediction of Ripple Properties in Shelf Seas. Mark 2 Predictor for Time Evolution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    respectively. It is seen in Figure 15 that the time -evolving ripple predictor manages to predict many of the features seen in the data: the growth from a...UNCLASSIFIED Prediction of Ripple Properties in Shelf Seas Mark 2 Predictor for Time Evolution Final Technical Report Prepared for US Office of Naval...distribution is unlimited j~j HR Wallingford UNCLASSIFIED Prediction of Ripple Properties in Shelf Seas Mark 2 Predictor for Time Evolution

  16. Early to middle Miocene climate evolution: benthic oxygen and carbon isotope records from Walvis Ridge Site 1264.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourens, L. J.; Beddow, H.; Liebrand, D.; Schrader, C.; Hilgen, F. J.

    2016-12-01

    Across the early to middle Miocene, high-resolution records from the Pacific Ocean indicate a dynamic climate system, encompassing a 2 Myr global warming event from 17 Ma to 14.7 Ma, followed by a major Cenozoic cooling step at 14.2 Ma -13.8 Ma. Currently, no high-resolution benthic record from the Atlantic Ocean exists covering both events, limiting global coverage of this intriguing period in Cenozoic climate evolution. Here, we present the first early to middle Miocene high-resolution from the Atlantic basin. These records, from Site 1264 on the Walvis Ridge, span a 5.5 Myr long interval (13.24-18.90 ma) in high temporal resolution ( 4 kyr) and are tuned to eccentricity. The d18O record shows a sudden (high-latitude) warming/deglaciation on Antarctica at 17.1 Ma, a rapid cooling/glaciation of Antarctica at 13.8 Ma, and high-amplitude ( 1‰) variability on astronomical time-scales throughout this interval. Together with other records from this time interval located in the Pacific, which show similar features, the data strongly suggests a highly dynamic global climate system. We find cooling steps in d18O at 14.7, 14.2 and 13.8 Ma, suggesting concurrent cooling in the Pacific and Atlantic deep waters during the MMCT. The benthic foraminiferal stable isotope records reveal that the dominant astronomical frequencies present at ODP Site 1264 during the early to middle Miocene interval are the 405 kyr and 110 kyr eccentricity periodicities. This is a contrast to other early to middle Miocene records from drill-sites in the Pacific and South China Sea, which show a strong expression of obliquity in particular between 14.2 and 14.7 Ma.

  17. The Bright Gamma-Ray Burst 991208: Tight Constraints on Afterglow Models from Observations of the Early-Time Radio Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galama, T. J.; Bremer, M.; Bertoldi, F.; Menten, K. M.; Lisenfeld, U.; Shepherd, D. S.; Mason, B.; Walter, F.; Pooley, G. G.; Frail, D. A.; Sari, R.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Berger, E.; Bloom, J. S.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Granot, J.

    2000-10-01

    The millimeter wavelength emission from GRB 991208 is the second brightest ever detected, yielding a unique data set. We present here well-sampled spectra and light curves over more than two decades in frequency for a 2 week period. This data set has allowed us for the first time to trace the evolution of the characteristic synchrotron self-absorption frequency νa, peak frequency νm, and the peak flux density Fm; we obtain νa~t-0.15+/-0.23, νm~t-1.7+/-0.7, and Fm~t-0.47+/-0.20. From the radio data we find that models of homogeneous or wind-generated ambient media with a spherically symmetric outflow can be ruled out. A model in which the relativistic outflow is collimated (a jet) can account for the observed evolution of the synchrotron parameters, the rapid decay at optical wavelengths, and the observed radio-to-optical spectral flux distributions that we present here, provided that the jet transition has not been fully completed in the first 2 weeks after the event. These observations provide additional evidence that rapidly decaying optical/X-ray afterglows are due to jets and that such transitions either develop very slowly or perhaps never reach the predicted asymptotic decay F(t)~t-p.

  18. Fuxianhuiid ventral nerve cord and early nervous system evolution in Panarthropoda.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Ortega-Hernández, Javier; Butterfield, Nicholas J; Liu, Yu; Boyan, George S; Hou, Jin-Bo; Lan, Tian; Zhang, Xi-Guang

    2016-03-15

    Panarthropods are typified by disparate grades of neurological organization reflecting a complex evolutionary history. The fossil record offers a unique opportunity to reconstruct early character evolution of the nervous system via exceptional preservation in extinct representatives. Here we describe the neurological architecture of the ventral nerve cord (VNC) in the upper-stem group euarthropod Chengjiangocaris kunmingensis from the early Cambrian Xiaoshiba Lagerstätte (South China). The VNC of C. kunmingensis comprises a homonymous series of condensed ganglia that extend throughout the body, each associated with a pair of biramous limbs. Submillimetric preservation reveals numerous segmental and intersegmental nerve roots emerging from both sides of the VNC, which correspond topologically to the peripheral nerves of extant Priapulida and Onychophora. The fuxianhuiid VNC indicates that ancestral neurological features of Ecdysozoa persisted into derived members of stem-group Euarthropoda but were later lost in crown-group representatives. These findings illuminate the VNC ground pattern in Panarthropoda and suggest the independent secondary loss of cycloneuralian-like neurological characters in Tardigrada and Euarthropoda.

  19. Fuxianhuiid ventral nerve cord and early nervous system evolution in Panarthropoda

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Ortega-Hernández, Javier; Butterfield, Nicholas J.; Liu, Yu; Boyan, George S.; Hou, Jin-bo; Lan, Tian; Zhang, Xi-guang

    2016-01-01

    Panarthropods are typified by disparate grades of neurological organization reflecting a complex evolutionary history. The fossil record offers a unique opportunity to reconstruct early character evolution of the nervous system via exceptional preservation in extinct representatives. Here we describe the neurological architecture of the ventral nerve cord (VNC) in the upper-stem group euarthropod Chengjiangocaris kunmingensis from the early Cambrian Xiaoshiba Lagerstätte (South China). The VNC of C. kunmingensis comprises a homonymous series of condensed ganglia that extend throughout the body, each associated with a pair of biramous limbs. Submillimetric preservation reveals numerous segmental and intersegmental nerve roots emerging from both sides of the VNC, which correspond topologically to the peripheral nerves of extant Priapulida and Onychophora. The fuxianhuiid VNC indicates that ancestral neurological features of Ecdysozoa persisted into derived members of stem-group Euarthropoda but were later lost in crown-group representatives. These findings illuminate the VNC ground pattern in Panarthropoda and suggest the independent secondary loss of cycloneuralian-like neurological characters in Tardigrada and Euarthropoda. PMID:26933218

  20. Early Evolution of Comet 67P Studied with the RPC-LAP onboard Rosetta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloch, W. J.; Yang, L.; Paulsson, J. J.; Wedlund, C. S.; Odelstad, E.; Edberg, N. J. T.; Koenders, C.; Eriksson, A.

    2016-12-01

    In-situ measurements within the Rosetta mission allow for studies of the cometary environment at different stages of cometary evolution. The Rosetta Plasma Consortium (RPC) is a set of five instruments on board the spacecraft that specialise in the measurements of plasma environment of comet 67P. One of the instruments is RPC-LAP, which consists of two Langmuir Probes and can measure the density, temperature, and flow speed of the plasma in the vicinity of the comet. At the early stage of the Rosetta mission, when the spacecraft is far from the nucleus of comet 67P, the ion part of the current-voltage characteristics of RPC-LAP1 is dominated by the photoemission current, which surpasses the currents from the dilute solar wind plasma. As Rosetta starts orbiting around the nucleus in September 2014, LAP1 picks up signatures of local plasma density enhancements corresponding to variations of water-group ions observed in the vicinity of the comet. With the help of current-voltage characteristics and the spacecraft potential, we identify and characterise in space and time the entering of this coma-dominated, high-density plasma region. This high-density region is observed at the northern hemisphere of the comet during early activity. The transition manifests as a steep gradient in the density with respect to the distance to the comet nucleus. We discuss these RPC-LAP results together with the corresponding measurements by other instruments to provide a comprehensive picture of the transition. We show that the early cometary plasma can be seen as composed of two distinct regions: an outer region characterised by solar wind plasma and small quantities of pickup ions, and an inner region with enhanced plasma densities.

  1. Time evolution as refining, coarse graining and entangling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, Bianca; Steinhaus, Sebastian

    2014-12-01

    We argue that refining, coarse graining and entangling operators can be obtained from time evolution operators. This applies in particular to geometric theories, such as spin foams. We point out that this provides a construction principle for the physical vacuum in quantum gravity theories and more generally allows construction of a (cylindrically) consistent continuum limit of the theory.

  2. Two New Fern Chloroplasts and Decelerated Evolution Linked to the Long Generation Time in Tree Ferns

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Bojian; Fong, Richard; Collins, Lesley J.; McLenachan, Patricia A.; Penny, David

    2014-01-01

    We report the chloroplast genomes of a tree fern (Dicksonia squarrosa) and a “fern ally” (Tmesipteris elongata), and show that the phylogeny of early land plants is basically as expected, and the estimates of divergence time are largely unaffected after removing the fastest evolving sites. The tree fern shows the major reduction in the rate of evolution, and there has been a major slowdown in the rate of mutation in both families of tree ferns. We suggest that this is related to a generation time effect; if there is a long time period between generations, then this is probably incompatible with a high mutation rate because otherwise nearly every propagule would probably have several lethal mutations. This effect will be especially strong in organisms that have large numbers of cell divisions between generations. This shows the necessity of going beyond phylogeny and integrating its study with other properties of organisms. PMID:24787621

  3. Real time forecasting of near-future evolution.

    PubMed

    Gerrish, Philip J; Sniegowski, Paul D

    2012-09-07

    A metaphor for adaptation that informs much evolutionary thinking today is that of mountain climbing, where horizontal displacement represents change in genotype, and vertical displacement represents change in fitness. If it were known a priori what the 'fitness landscape' looked like, that is, how the myriad possible genotypes mapped onto fitness, then the possible paths up the fitness mountain could each be assigned a probability, thus providing a dynamical theory with long-term predictive power. Such detailed genotype-fitness data, however, are rarely available and are subject to change with each change in the organism or in the environment. Here, we take a very different approach that depends only on fitness or phenotype-fitness data obtained in real time and requires no a priori information about the fitness landscape. Our general statistical model of adaptive evolution builds on classical theory and gives reasonable predictions of fitness and phenotype evolution many generations into the future.

  4. Characterization of time dynamical evolution of electroencephalographic epileptic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosso, Osvaldo A.; Mairal, María. Liliana

    2002-09-01

    Since traditional electrical brain signal analysis is mostly qualitative, the development of new quantitative methods is crucial for restricting the subjectivity in the study of brain signals. These methods are particularly fruitful when they are strongly correlated with intuitive physical concepts that allow a better understanding of the brain dynamics. The processing of information by the brain is reflected in dynamical changes of the electrical activity in time, frequency, and space. Therefore, the concomitant studies require methods capable of describing the qualitative variation of the signal in both time and frequency. The entropy defined from the wavelet functions is a measure of the order/disorder degree present in a time series. In consequence, this entropy evaluates over EEG time series gives information about the underlying dynamical process in the brain, more specifically of the synchrony of the group cells involved in the different neural responses. The total wavelet entropy results independent of the signal energy and becomes a good tool for detecting dynamical changes in the system behavior. In addition the total wavelet entropy has advantages over the Lyapunov exponents, because it is parameter free and independent of the stationarity of the time series. In this work we compared the results of the time evolution of the chaoticity (Lyapunov exponent as a function of time) with the corresponding time evolution of the total wavelet entropy in two different EEG records, one provide by depth electrodes and other by scalp ones.

  5. The origin of the animals and a 'Savannah' hypothesis for early bilaterian evolution.

    PubMed

    Budd, Graham E; Jensen, Sören

    2017-02-01

    The earliest evolution of the animals remains a taxing biological problem, as all extant clades are highly derived and the fossil record is not usually considered to be helpful. The rise of the bilaterian animals recorded in the fossil record, commonly known as the 'Cambrian explosion', is one of the most significant moments in evolutionary history, and was an event that transformed first marine and then terrestrial environments. We review the phylogeny of early animals and other opisthokonts, and the affinities of the earliest large complex fossils, the so-called 'Ediacaran' taxa. We conclude, based on a variety of lines of evidence, that their affinities most likely lie in various stem groups to large metazoan groupings; a new grouping, the Apoikozoa, is erected to encompass Metazoa and Choanoflagellata. The earliest reasonable fossil evidence for total-group bilaterians comes from undisputed complex trace fossils that are younger than about 560 Ma, and these diversify greatly as the Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary is crossed a few million years later. It is generally considered that as the bilaterians diversified after this time, their burrowing behaviour destroyed the cyanobacterial mat-dominated substrates that the enigmatic Ediacaran taxa were associated with, the so-called 'Cambrian substrate revolution', leading to the loss of almost all Ediacara-aspect diversity in the Cambrian. Why, though, did the energetically expensive and functionally complex burrowing mode of life so typical of later bilaterians arise? Here we propose a much more positive relationship between late-Ediacaran ecologies and the rise of the bilaterians, with the largely static Ediacaran taxa acting as points of concentration of organic matter both above and below the sediment surface. The breaking of the uniformity of organic carbon availability would have signalled a decisive shift away from the essentially static and monotonous earlier Ediacaran world into the dynamic and burrowing world

  6. A bizarre new toothed mysticete (Cetacea) from Australia and the early evolution of baleen whales.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Erich M G

    2006-12-07

    Extant baleen whales (Cetacea, Mysticeti) are all large filter-feeding marine mammals that lack teeth as adults, instead possessing baleen, and feed on small marine animals in bulk. The early evolution of these superlative mammals, and their unique feeding method, has hitherto remained enigmatic. Here, I report a new toothed mysticete from the Late Oligocene of Australia that is more archaic than any previously described. Unlike all other mysticetes, this new whale was small, had enormous eyes and lacked derived adaptations for bulk filter-feeding. Several morphological features suggest that this mysticete was a macrophagous predator, being convergent on some Mesozoic marine reptiles and the extant leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx). It thus refutes the notions that all stem mysticetes were filter-feeders, and that the origins and initial radiation of mysticetes was linked to the evolution of filter-feeding. Mysticetes evidently radiated into a variety of disparate forms and feeding ecologies before the evolution of baleen or filter-feeding. The phylogenetic context of the new whale indicates that basal mysticetes were macrophagous predators that did not employ filter-feeding or echolocation, and that the evolution of characters associated with bulk filter-feeding was gradual.

  7. A bizarre new toothed mysticete (Cetacea) from Australia and the early evolution of baleen whales

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Erich M.G

    2006-01-01

    Extant baleen whales (Cetacea, Mysticeti) are all large filter-feeding marine mammals that lack teeth as adults, instead possessing baleen, and feed on small marine animals in bulk. The early evolution of these superlative mammals, and their unique feeding method, has hitherto remained enigmatic. Here, I report a new toothed mysticete from the Late Oligocene of Australia that is more archaic than any previously described. Unlike all other mysticetes, this new whale was small, had enormous eyes and lacked derived adaptations for bulk filter-feeding. Several morphological features suggest that this mysticete was a macrophagous predator, being convergent on some Mesozoic marine reptiles and the extant leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx). It thus refutes the notions that all stem mysticetes were filter-feeders, and that the origins and initial radiation of mysticetes was linked to the evolution of filter-feeding. Mysticetes evidently radiated into a variety of disparate forms and feeding ecologies before the evolution of baleen or filter-feeding. The phylogenetic context of the new whale indicates that basal mysticetes were macrophagous predators that did not employ filter-feeding or echolocation, and that the evolution of characters associated with bulk filter-feeding was gradual. PMID:17015308

  8. Finite-element time evolution operator for the anharmonic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milton, Kimball A.

    1995-01-01

    The finite-element approach to lattice field theory is both highly accurate (relative errors approximately 1/N(exp 2), where N is the number of lattice points) and exactly unitary (in the sense that canonical commutation relations are exactly preserved at the lattice sites). In this talk I construct matrix elements for dynamical variables and for the time evolution operator for the anharmonic oscillator, for which the continuum Hamiltonian is H = p(exp 2)/2 + lambda q(exp 4)/4. Construction of such matrix elements does not require solving the implicit equations of motion. Low order approximations turn out to be extremely accurate. For example, the matrix element of the time evolution operator in the harmonic oscillator ground state gives a results for the anharmonic oscillator ground state energy accurate to better than 1 percent, while a two-state approximation reduces the error to less than 0.1 percent.

  9. Transformation and diversification in early mammal evolution.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhe-Xi

    2007-12-13

    Evolution of the earliest mammals shows successive episodes of diversification. Lineage-splitting in Mesozoic mammals is coupled with many independent evolutionary experiments and ecological specializations. Classic scenarios of mammalian morphological evolution tend to posit an orderly acquisition of key evolutionary innovations leading to adaptive diversification, but newly discovered fossils show that evolution of such key characters as the middle ear and the tribosphenic teeth is far more labile among Mesozoic mammals. Successive diversifications of Mesozoic mammal groups multiplied the opportunities for many dead-end lineages to iteratively evolve developmental homoplasies and convergent ecological specializations, parallel to those in modern mammal groups.

  10. The Evolution of REM Sleep Behavior Disorder in Early Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sixel-Döring, Friederike; Zimmermann, Johannes; Wegener, Andrea; Mollenhauer, Brit; Trenkwalder, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the development of REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and REM sleep behavioral events (RBE) not yet fulfilling diagnostic criteria for RBD as markers for neurodegeneration in a cohort of Parkinson disease (PD) patients between their de novo baseline assessment and two-year follow-up in comparison to healthy controls (HC). Methods: Clinically confirmed PD patients and HC with video-supported polysomnography (vPSG) data at baseline were re-investigated after two years. Diagnostic scoring for RBE and RBD was performed in both groups and related to baseline findings. Results: One hundred thirteen PD patients and 102 healthy controls (HC) were included in the study. Within two years, the overall occurrence of behaviors during REM sleep in PD patients increased from 50% to 63% (P = 0.02). RBD increased from 25% to 43% (P < 0.001). Eleven of 29 (38%) RBE positive PD patients and 10/56 (18%) patients with normal REM sleep at baseline converted to RBD. In HC, the occurrence of any REM behavior increased from 17% to 20% (n.s.). RBD increased from 2% to 4% (n.s.). One of 15 (7%) RBE positive HC and 1/85 (1%) HC with normal REM at baseline converted to RBD. Conclusions: RBD increased significantly in PD patients from the de novo state to two-year follow-up. We propose RBE being named “prodromal RBD” as it may follow a continuous evolution in PD possibly similar to the spreading of Lewy bodies in PD patients. RBD itself was shown as a robust and stable marker of early PD. Citation: Sixel-Döring F, Zimmermann J, Wegener A, Mollenhauer B, Trenkwalder C. The evolution of REM sleep behavior disorder in early Parkinson disease. SLEEP 2016;39(9):1737–1742. PMID:27306265

  11. Revalidation of the genus Chiloguembelitria Hofker: Implications for the evolution of early Danian planktonic foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenillas, Ignacio; Arz, José A.; Gilabert, Vicente

    2017-10-01

    Guembelitria is the only planktonic foraminiferal genus whose survival from the mass extinction event of the Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary has been clearly proven. The evolution of Guembelitria after the K/Pg boundary led to the appearance of two guembelitriid lineages in the early Danian: one biserial, represented by Woodringina and culminating in Chiloguembelina, and the other trochospiral, represented by Trochoguembelitria and culminating in Globoconusa. We have re-examined the genus Chiloguembelitria, another guembelitriid descended from Guembelitria and whose taxonomic validity had been questioned, it being considered a junior synonym of the latter. Nevertheless, Chiloguembelitria differs from Guembelitria mainly in the wall texture (pustulate to rugose vs. pore-mounded) and the position of the aperture (umbilical-extraumbilical to extraumbilical vs. umbilical). Chiloguembelitria shares its wall texture with Trochoguembelitria and some of the earliest specimens of Woodringina, suggesting that it played an important role in the evolution of early Danian guembelitriids, as it seems to be the most immediate ancestor of both trochospiral and biserial lineages. Morphological and morphostatistical analyses of Chiloguembelitria discriminate at least five species: Chg. danica, Chg. irregularis, and three new species: Chg. hofkeri, Chg. trilobata and Chg. biseriata.

  12. Time-Dependent Simulations of the Formation and Evolution of Disk-Accreted Atmospheres Around Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoekl, Alexander; Dorfi, Ernst

    2014-05-01

    In the early, embedded phase of evolution of terrestrial planets, the planetary core accumulates gas from the circumstellar disk into a planetary envelope. This atmosphere is very significant for the further thermal evolution of the planet by forming an insulation around the rocky core. The disk-captured envelope is also the staring point for the atmospheric evolution where the atmosphere is modified by outgassing from the planetary core and atmospheric mass loss once the planet is exposed to the radiation field of the host star. The final amount of persistent atmosphere around the evolved planet very much characterizes the planet and is a key criterion for habitability. The established way to study disk accumulated atmospheres are hydrostatic models, even though in many cases the assumption of stationarity is unlikely to be fulfilled. We present, for the first time, time-dependent radiation hydrodynamics simulations of the accumulation process and the interaction between the disk-nebula gas and the planetary core. The calculations were performed with the TAPIR-Code (short for The adaptive, implicit RHD-Code) in spherical symmetry solving the equations of hydrodynamics, gray radiative transport, and convective energy transport. The models range from the surface of the solid core up to the Hill radius where the planetary envelope merges into the surrounding protoplanetary disk. Our results show that the time-scale of gas capturing and atmospheric growth strongly depends on the mass of the solid core. The amount of atmosphere accumulated during the lifetime of the protoplanetary disk (typically a few Myr) varies accordingly with the mass of the planet. Thus, a core with Mars-mass will end up with about 10 bar of atmosphere while for an Earth-mass core, the surface pressure reaches several 1000 bar. Even larger planets with several Earth masses quickly capture massive envelopes which in turn become gravitationally unstable leading to runaway accretion and the eventual

  13. Time-evolution of in vivo protein corona onto blood-circulating PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin (DOXIL) nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hadjidemetriou, Marilena; Al-Ahmady, Zahraa; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2016-04-07

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are instantly modified once injected in the bloodstream because of their interaction with the blood components. The spontaneous coating of NPs by proteins, once in contact with biological fluids, has been termed the 'protein corona' and it is considered to be a determinant factor for the pharmacological, toxicological and therapeutic profile of NPs. Protein exposure time is thought to greatly influence the composition of protein corona, however the dynamics of protein interactions under realistic, in vivo conditions remain unexplored. The aim of this study was to quantitatively and qualitatively investigate the time evolution of in vivo protein corona, formed onto blood circulating, clinically used, PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin. Protein adsorption profiles were determined 10 min, 1 h and 3 h post-injection of liposomes into CD-1 mice. The results demonstrated that a complex protein corona was formed as early as 10 min post-injection. Even though the total amount of protein adsorbed did not significantly change over time, the fluctuation of protein abundances observed indicated highly dynamic protein binding kinetics.

  14. The Storm Time Evolution of the Ionospheric Disturbance Plasma Drifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruilong; Liu, Libo; Le, Huijun; Chen, Yiding; Kuai, Jiawei

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we use the C/NOFS and ROCSAT-1 satellites observations to analyze the storm time evolution of the disturbance plasma drifts in a 24 h local time scale during three magnetic storms driven by long-lasting southward IMF Bz. The disturbance plasma drifts during the three storms present some common features in the periods dominated by the disturbance dynamo. The newly formed disturbance plasma drifts are upward and westward at night, and downward and eastward during daytime. Further, the disturbance plasma drifts are gradually evolved to present significant local time shifts. The westward disturbance plasma drifts gradually migrate from nightside to dayside. Meanwhile, the dayside downward disturbance plasma drifts become enhanced and shift to later local time. The local time shifts in disturbance plasma drifts are suggested to be mainly attributed to the evolution of the disturbance winds. The strong disturbance winds arisen around midnight can constantly corotate to later local time. At dayside the westward and equatorward disturbance winds can drive the F region dynamo to produce the poleward and westward polarization electric fields (or the westward and downward disturbance drifts). The present results indicate that the disturbance winds corotated to later local time can affect the local time features of the disturbance dynamo electric field.

  15. Early-type Galaxy Spin Evolution in the Horizon-AGN Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hoseung; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Dubois, Yohan; Kimm, Taysun; Devriendt, Julien. E. G.; Pichon, Christophe

    2018-04-01

    Using the Horizon-AGN simulation data, we study the relative role of mergers and environmental effects in shaping the spin of early-type galaxies (ETGs) after z ≃ 1. We follow the spin evolution of 10,037 color-selected ETGs more massive than {10}10 {M}ȯ that are divided into four groups: cluster centrals (3%), cluster satellites (33%), group centrals (5%), and field ETGs (59%). We find a strong mass dependence of the slow rotator fraction, f SR, and the mean spin of massive ETGs. Although we do not find a clear environmental dependence of f SR, a weak trend is seen in the mean value of the spin parameter driven by the satellite ETGs as they gradually lose their spin as their environment becomes denser. Galaxy mergers appear to be the main cause of total spin changes in 94% of the central ETGs of halos with {M}vir}> {10}12.5 {M}ȯ , but only 22% of satellite and field ETGs. We find that non-merger-induced tidal perturbations better correlate with the galaxy spin down in satellite ETGs than in mergers. Given that the majority of ETGs are not central in dense environments, we conclude that non-merger tidal perturbation effects played a key role in the spin evolution of ETGs observed in the local (z < 1) universe.

  16. Black-hole universe: time evolution.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Chul-Moon; Okawa, Hirotada; Nakao, Ken-ichi

    2013-10-18

    Time evolution of a black hole lattice toy model universe is simulated. The vacuum Einstein equations in a cubic box with a black hole at the origin are numerically solved with periodic boundary conditions on all pairs of faces opposite to each other. Defining effective scale factors by using the area of a surface and the length of an edge of the cubic box, we compare them with that in the Einstein-de Sitter universe. It is found that the behavior of the effective scale factors is well approximated by that in the Einstein-de Sitter universe. In our model, if the box size is sufficiently larger than the horizon radius, local inhomogeneities do not significantly affect the global expansion law of the Universe even though the inhomogeneity is extremely nonlinear.

  17. Mesozoic Calcareous Nannofossil Evolution: Relation to Paleoceanographic Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Peter H.

    1987-12-01

    The taxonomic evolution of Jurassic and Cretaceous calcareous nannofossil species is described using the following indices: species diversity, rate of speciation, rate of extinction, rate of diversification, rate of turnover, survivorship, and species accretion. The Jurassic prior to the late Oxfordian is characterized by positive diversification rates, that is, rates of speciation exceeded rates of extinction. Highest rates of diversification occurred in the late Lias and early Oxfordian. During the generally regressive latest Jurassic, diversification rates remained low and rates of extinctions exceed rates of speciation. In the early Cretaceous, rates of diversification are positive and peak in the early Valanginian, early Aptian, and middle Albian, after which time rates of extinction generally exceed rates of speciation. Such peaks in rate of evolution coincide with times of increased accumulation of organic carbon in the ocean ("anoxic events"). Peaks in rates of extinction result in very high rates of turnover during times of major regressions, in particular, in the Tithonian and Maastrichtian. Survivorship analyses for three datum planes (74.5, 144, and 160 Ma) show relatively constant extinction rates with some stepping in the older part; they are best explained by a temporally fluctuating abiotic environment causing changes in the probability of extinction. Species accretion curves are also relatively linear with some indication of changing rates of speciation. The coincidences of major changes in evolutionary rates with major paleoceanographic events are indicative of a predominantly abiotic control of nannoplankton evolution. Relationships of evolutionary rates of calcareous nannoplankton with deep ocean ventilation, sea level, and ocean fertility indicates that global tectonic processes are the ultimate causes of evolutionary change.

  18. Quantitative conditions for time evolution in terms of the von Neumann equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, WenHua; Cao, HuaiXin; Chen, ZhengLi; Wang, Lie

    2018-07-01

    The adiabatic theorem describes the time evolution of the pure state and gives an adiabatic approximate solution to the Schödinger equation by choosing a single eigenstate of the Hamiltonian as the initial state. In quantum systems, states are divided into pure states (unite vectors) and mixed states (density matrices, i.e., positive operators with trace one). Accordingly, mixed states have their own corresponding time evolution, which is described by the von Neumann equation. In this paper, we discuss the quantitative conditions for the time evolution of mixed states in terms of the von Neumann equation. First, we introduce the definitions for uniformly slowly evolving and δ-uniformly slowly evolving with respect to mixed states, then we present a necessary and sufficient condition for the Hamiltonian of the system to be uniformly slowly evolving and we obtain some upper bounds for the adiabatic approximate error. Lastly, we illustrate our results in an example.

  19. The evolution of early cellular systems viewed through the lens of biological interactions.

    PubMed

    Poole, Anthony M; Lundin, Daniel; Rytkönen, Kalle T

    2015-01-01

    The minimal cell concept represents a pragmatic approach to the question of how few genes are required to run a cell. This is a helpful way to build a parts-list, and has been more successful than attempts to deduce a minimal gene set for life by inferring the gene repertoire of the last universal common ancestor, as few genes trace back to this hypothetical ancestral state. However, the study of minimal cellular systems is the study of biological outliers where, by practical necessity, coevolutionary interactions are minimized or ignored. In this paper, we consider the biological context from which minimal genomes have been removed. For instance, some of the most reduced genomes are from endosymbionts and are the result of coevolutionary interactions with a host; few such organisms are "free-living." As few, if any, biological systems exist in complete isolation, we expect that, as with modern life, early biological systems were part of an ecosystem, replete with organismal interactions. We favor refocusing discussions of the evolution of cellular systems on processes rather than gene counts. We therefore draw a distinction between a pragmatic minimal cell (an interesting engineering problem), a distributed genome (a system resulting from an evolutionary transition involving more than one cell) and the looser coevolutionary interactions that are ubiquitous in ecosystems. Finally, we consider the distributed genome and coevolutionary interactions between genomic entities in the context of early evolution.

  20. Continuous variable quantum optical simulation for time evolution of quantum harmonic oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xiaowei; Hao, Shuhong; Guo, Hong; Xie, Changde; Su, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Quantum simulation enables one to mimic the evolution of other quantum systems using a controllable quantum system. Quantum harmonic oscillator (QHO) is one of the most important model systems in quantum physics. To observe the transient dynamics of a QHO with high oscillation frequency directly is difficult. We experimentally simulate the transient behaviors of QHO in an open system during time evolution with an optical mode and a logical operation system of continuous variable quantum computation. The time evolution of an atomic ensemble in the collective spontaneous emission is analytically simulated by mapping the atomic ensemble onto a QHO. The measured fidelity, which is used for quantifying the quality of the simulation, is higher than its classical limit. The presented simulation scheme provides a new tool for studying the dynamic behaviors of QHO. PMID:26961962

  1. Time evolution of the condensed state of interacting bosons with reduced number fluctuation in a leaky box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Akira; Inoue, Jun-Ichi

    1999-10-01

    We study the nonequilibrium time evolution of the Bose-Einstein condensate of interacting bosons confined in a leaky box, when its number fluctuation is initially (t=0) suppressed. We take account of quantum fluctuations of all modes, including k=0, of the bosons. As the wave function of the ground state that has a definite number N of interacting bosons, we use a variational form \\|N,y>, which is obtained by operating a unitary operator eiG(y) on the number state of free bosons. Using eiG(y), we identify a ``natural coordinate'' b𔊊 of the interacting bosons, by which many physical properties can be simply described. The \\|N,y> can be represented simply as a number state of b𔊊 we thus call it the ``number state of interacting bosons'' (NSIB). To simulate real systems, for which if one fixes N at t=0 N will fluctuate at later times because of a finite probability of exchanging bosons between the box and the environment, we evaluate the time evolution of the reduced density operator ρ⁁(t) of the bosons in the box as a function of the leakage flux J. We concentrate on the most interesting and nontrivial time stage, i.e., the early time stage for which Jt<time when the system approaches the equilibrium state. It is shown that the time evolution can be described very simply as the evolution from a single NSIB at t<0, into a classical mixture, with a time-dependent distribution, of NSIBs of various values of N at t>0. Using b𔊊, we successfully define the cosine and sine operators for interacting many bosons, by which we can analyze the phase fluctuation in a fully quantum-mechanical manner. We define a new state \\|ξ,N,y> called the ``number-phase-squeezed state of interacting bosons'' (NPIB), which is characterized by a complex parameter ξ. It is shown that ρ⁁(t) for t>0 can be rewritten as the phase-randomized mixture (PRM) of NPIBs. Among many possible representations of ρ⁁(t), this representation is

  2. Early-time VLA Observations and Broadband Afterglow Analysis of the Fermi/LAT Detected GRB 130907A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, Péter; Corsi, Alessandra; Frail, Dale A.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Perley, Daniel A.

    2015-09-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of the hyper-energetic gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130907A, a Swift-discovered burst with early radio observations starting at ≈4 hr after the γ-ray trigger. GRB 130907A was also detected by the Fermi/LAT instrument and at late times showed a strong spectral evolution in X-rays. We focus on the early-time radio observations, especially at >10 GHz, to attempt to identify reverse shock signatures. While our radio follow-up of GRB 130907A ranks among the earliest observations of a GRB with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, we did not see an unambiguous signature of a reverse shock. While a model with both reverse and forward shock can correctly describe the observations, the data is not constraining enough to decide upon the presence of the reverse-shock component. We model the broadband data using a simple forward-shock synchrotron scenario with a transition from a wind environment to a constant density interstellar medium (ISM) in order to account for the observed features. Within the confines of this model, we also derive the underlying physical parameters of the fireball, which are within typical ranges except for the wind density parameter (A*), which is higher than those for bursts with wind-ISM transition, but typical for the general population of bursts. We note the importance of early-time radio observations of the afterglow (and of well-sampled light curves) for unambiguously identifying the potential contribution of the reverse shock.

  3. Geologically Controlled Isotope-Time Patterns Reveal Early Differentiation and Crust Formation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, V. C.; Nutman, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanisms of continental crust production and evolution in the early Earth remain controversial, as are questions of the relative roles of early differentiation versus subsequent tectonic procssing in creating Earth's chemical signatures. Here we present geologic observations integrated with whole rock major, trace element and Sm-Nd isotopic signatures and combined with U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopic compositions of zircon populations from the same rocks, from the most extensive early rock record comprising the 3.9 Ga to 3.6 Ga terranes of southwest Greenland. These data reveal repeated patterns of formation of juvenile TTG crust and associated mafic and ultramafic rocks in convergent margin settings followed by formation of more evolved granites [1]. Our new zircon Lu-Hf data from rare 3.6-3.7 Ga tonalites within the Itsaq Gneiss Complex, obtained from single component, non-migmatitic gneisses with simple zircon populations, limited within sample Hf isotopic variability and accurate U-Pb ages, now document extraction of juvenile tonalites from a near chondritic mantle source between 3.9 Ga and 3.6 Ga. The more evolved, granitic rocks in each area show slightly negative initial ɛHf in accord with crustal reworking of the older (3.8-3.9 Ga) gniesses. There is no evidence for Hadean material in the sources of the granitoids. The Hf isotope-time patterns are consistent with juvenile crust production from a mantle source that experienced only modest amounts of prior crustal extraction. They are distinct from those predicted by reprocessing of an enriched Hadean mafic crust, as has been proposed for this region [2] and for the source of the Hadean Jack Hills zircons [3]. The well-documented, time decreasing, positive 142Nd anomalies [e.g., 4] from these rocks are further evidence of crustal derivation from a convecting mantle source, rather than reworking of an enriched mafic lithosphere. The 143Nd isotopic -time patterns are more complex, reflecting the interplay

  4. Diet and the evolution of the earliest human ancestors

    PubMed Central

    Teaford, Mark F.; Ungar, Peter S.

    2000-01-01

    Over the past decade, discussions of the evolution of the earliest human ancestors have focused on the locomotion of the australopithecines. Recent discoveries in a broad range of disciplines have raised important questions about the influence of ecological factors in early human evolution. Here we trace the cranial and dental traits of the early australopithecines through time, to show that between 4.4 million and 2.3 million years ago, the dietary capabilities of the earliest hominids changed dramatically, leaving them well suited for life in a variety of habitats and able to cope with significant changes in resource availability associated with long-term and short-term climatic fluctuations. PMID:11095758

  5. Sibling cooperation in earwig families provides insights into the early evolution of social life.

    PubMed

    Falk, Joachim; Wong, Janine W Y; Kölliker, Mathias; Meunier, Joël

    2014-04-01

    The evolutionary transition from solitary to social life is driven by direct and indirect fitness benefits of social interactions. Understanding the conditions promoting the early evolution of social life therefore requires identification of these benefits in nonderived social systems, such as animal families where offspring are mobile and able to disperse and will survive independently. Family life is well known to provide benefits to offspring through parental care, but research on sibling interactions generally focused on fitness costs to offspring due to competitive behaviors. Here we show experimentally that sibling interactions also reflect cooperative behaviors in the form of food sharing in nonderived families of the European earwig, Forficula auricularia. Food ingested by individual offspring was transferred to their siblings through mouth-to-anus contacts and active allo-coprophagy. These transfers occurred in both the presence and the absence of the tending mothers, even though the direct contact with the mothers limited sibling food sharing. Neither food deprivation or relatedness influenced the total amount of transferred food, but relatedness affected frass release and the behavioral mechanisms mediating food sharing. Related offspring obtained food predominately through allo-coprophagy, whereas unrelated offspring obtained food through mouth-to-anus contacts. Overall, this study emphasizes that sibling cooperation may be a key process promoting the early evolution of social life.

  6. Evolution of the early Antarctic ice ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebrand, Diederik; de Bakker, Anouk T. M.; Beddow, Helen M.; Wilson, Paul A.; Bohaty, Steven M.; Ruessink, Gerben; Pälike, Heiko; Batenburg, Sietske J.; Hilgen, Frederik J.; Hodell, David A.; Huck, Claire E.; Kroon, Dick; Raffi, Isabella; Saes, Mischa J. M.; van Dijk, Arnold E.; Lourens, Lucas J.

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the stability of the early Antarctic ice cap in the geological past is of societal interest because present-day atmospheric CO2 concentrations have reached values comparable to those estimated for the Oligocene and the Early Miocene epochs. Here we analyze a new high-resolution deep-sea oxygen isotope (δ18O) record from the South Atlantic Ocean spanning an interval between 30.1 My and 17.1 My ago. The record displays major oscillations in deep-sea temperature and Antarctic ice volume in response to the ˜110-ky eccentricity modulation of precession. Conservative minimum ice volume estimates show that waxing and waning of at least ˜85 to 110% of the volume of the present East Antarctic Ice Sheet is required to explain many of the ˜110-ky cycles. Antarctic ice sheets were typically largest during repeated glacial cycles of the mid-Oligocene (˜28.0 My to ˜26.3 My ago) and across the Oligocene-Miocene Transition (˜23.0 My ago). However, the high-amplitude glacial-interglacial cycles of the mid-Oligocene are highly symmetrical, indicating a more direct response to eccentricity modulation of precession than their Early Miocene counterparts, which are distinctly asymmetrical—indicative of prolonged ice buildup and delayed, but rapid, glacial terminations. We hypothesize that the long-term transition to a warmer climate state with sawtooth-shaped glacial cycles in the Early Miocene was brought about by subsidence and glacial erosion in West Antarctica during the Late Oligocene and/or a change in the variability of atmospheric CO2 levels on astronomical time scales that is not yet captured in existing proxy reconstructions.

  7. Evolution of the early Antarctic ice ages

    PubMed Central

    de Bakker, Anouk T. M.; Beddow, Helen M.; Wilson, Paul A.; Bohaty, Steven M.; Pälike, Heiko; Batenburg, Sietske J.; Hilgen, Frederik J.; Hodell, David A.; Huck, Claire E.; Kroon, Dick; Raffi, Isabella; Saes, Mischa J. M.; van Dijk, Arnold E.; Lourens, Lucas J.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the stability of the early Antarctic ice cap in the geological past is of societal interest because present-day atmospheric CO2 concentrations have reached values comparable to those estimated for the Oligocene and the Early Miocene epochs. Here we analyze a new high-resolution deep-sea oxygen isotope (δ18O) record from the South Atlantic Ocean spanning an interval between 30.1 My and 17.1 My ago. The record displays major oscillations in deep-sea temperature and Antarctic ice volume in response to the ∼110-ky eccentricity modulation of precession. Conservative minimum ice volume estimates show that waxing and waning of at least ∼85 to 110% of the volume of the present East Antarctic Ice Sheet is required to explain many of the ∼110-ky cycles. Antarctic ice sheets were typically largest during repeated glacial cycles of the mid-Oligocene (∼28.0 My to ∼26.3 My ago) and across the Oligocene−Miocene Transition (∼23.0 My ago). However, the high-amplitude glacial−interglacial cycles of the mid-Oligocene are highly symmetrical, indicating a more direct response to eccentricity modulation of precession than their Early Miocene counterparts, which are distinctly asymmetrical—indicative of prolonged ice buildup and delayed, but rapid, glacial terminations. We hypothesize that the long-term transition to a warmer climate state with sawtooth-shaped glacial cycles in the Early Miocene was brought about by subsidence and glacial erosion in West Antarctica during the Late Oligocene and/or a change in the variability of atmospheric CO2 levels on astronomical time scales that is not yet captured in existing proxy reconstructions. PMID:28348211

  8. The early evolution of Jupiter in the absence of solar tidal forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schofield, N.; Woolfson, M. M.

    1982-03-01

    The early evolution of a Jupiter-like protoplanet is simulated by constructing a physically detailed computer-based model which solves the equations of hydrodynamics and radiative energy transfer for the spherically symmetric case. The model is specifically developed to study the initial and boundary conditions relevant to the capture theory for the origin of the solar system. It is found that the absence of an external medium promotes the rapid expansion of surface material which is enhanced by solar irradiation. Only when the Jeans criterion is less than 0.8 does a spontaneous hydrodynamic collapse of the interior allow a substantial proportion of the protoplanet to condense to planetary densities.

  9. The formation and early evolution of meteoroid streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorhead, Althea

    2018-04-01

    Meteor showers occur when the Earth encounters a stream of particles liberated from the surface of a comet or, more rarely, an asteroid. Initially, meteoroids follow a trajectory that is similar to that of their parent comet but modified by both the outward flow of gas from the nucleus and radiation pressure. Sublimating gases impart an “ejection velocity” to solid particles in the coma; this ejection velocity is larger for smaller particles but cannot exceed the speed of the gas itself. Radiation pressure provides a repulsive force that, like gravity, follows an inverse square law, and thus effectively reduces the central potential experienced by small particles. Depending on the optical properties of the particle, the speed of the particle may exceed its effective escape velocity; such particles will be unbound and hence excluded from meteoroid streams and meteor showers. These processes also modify the heliocentric distance at which meteoroid orbits cross the ecliptic plane, and can thus move portions of the stream out of range of the Earth. This talk presents recent work on these components of the early evolution of meteoroid streams and their implications for the meteoroid environment seen at Earth.

  10. Early evolution of radial glial cells in Bilateria

    PubMed Central

    Karl, Anett; Beckers, Patrick; Kaul-Strehlow, Sabrina; Ulbricht, Elke; Kourtesis, Ioannis; Kuhrt, Heidrun; Hausen, Harald; Reichenbach, Andreas; Bleidorn, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Bilaterians usually possess a central nervous system, composed of neurons and supportive cells called glial cells. Whereas neuronal cells are highly comparable in all these animals, glial cells apparently differ, and in deuterostomes, radial glial cells are found. These particular secretory glial cells may represent the archetype of all (macro) glial cells and have not been reported from protostomes so far. This has caused controversial discussions of whether glial cells represent a homologous bilaterian characteristic or whether they (and thus, centralized nervous systems) evolved convergently in the two main clades of bilaterians. By using histology, transmission electron microscopy, immunolabelling and whole-mount in situ hybridization, we show here that protostomes also possess radial glia-like cells, which are very likely to be homologous to those of deuterostomes. Moreover, our antibody staining indicates that the secretory character of radial glial cells is maintained throughout their various evolutionary adaptations. This implies an early evolution of radial glial cells in the last common ancestor of Protostomia and Deuterostomia. Furthermore, it suggests that an intraepidermal nervous system—composed of sensory cells, neurons and radial glial cells—was probably the plesiomorphic condition in the bilaterian ancestor. PMID:28724733

  11. Exponential evolution: implications for intelligent extraterrestrial life.

    PubMed

    Russell, D A

    1983-01-01

    Some measures of biologic complexity, including maximal levels of brain development, are exponential functions of time through intervals of 10(6) to 10(9) yrs. Biological interactions apparently stimulate evolution but physical conditions determine the time required to achieve a given level of complexity. Trends in brain evolution suggest that other organisms could attain human levels within approximately 10(7) yrs. The number (N) and longevity (L) terms in appropriate modifications of the Drake Equation, together with trends in the evolution of biological complexity on Earth, could provide rough estimates of the prevalence of life forms at specified levels of complexity within the Galaxy. If life occurs throughout the cosmos, exponential evolutionary processes imply that higher intelligence will soon (10(9) yrs) become more prevalent than it now is. Changes in the physical universe become less rapid as time increases from the Big Bang. Changes in biological complexity may be most rapid at such later times. This lends a unique and symmetrical importance to early and late universal times.

  12. Remnants of an ancient forest provide ecological context for Early Miocene fossil apes.

    PubMed

    Michel, Lauren A; Peppe, Daniel J; Lutz, James A; Driese, Steven G; Dunsworth, Holly M; Harcourt-Smith, William E H; Horner, William H; Lehmann, Thomas; Nightingale, Sheila; McNulty, Kieran P

    2014-01-01

    The lineage of apes and humans (Hominoidea) evolved and radiated across Afro-Arabia in the early Neogene during a time of global climatic changes and ongoing tectonic processes that formed the East African Rift. These changes probably created highly variable environments and introduced selective pressures influencing the diversification of early apes. However, interpreting the connection between environmental dynamics and adaptive evolution is hampered by difficulties in locating taxa within specific ecological contexts: time-averaged or reworked deposits may not faithfully represent individual palaeohabitats. Here we present multiproxy evidence from Early Miocene deposits on Rusinga Island, Kenya, which directly ties the early ape Proconsul to a widespread, dense, multistoried, closed-canopy tropical seasonal forest set in a warm and relatively wet, local climate. These results underscore the importance of forested environments in the evolution of early apes.

  13. UV SURFACE ENVIRONMENT OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS ORBITING FGKM STARS THROUGH GEOLOGICAL EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Rugheimer, S.; Sasselov, D.; Segura, A.

    2015-06-10

    The UV environment of a host star affects the photochemistry in the atmosphere, and ultimately the surface UV environment for terrestrial planets and therefore the conditions for the origin and evolution of life. We model the surface UV radiation environment for Earth-sized planets orbiting FGKM stars in the circumstellar Habitable Zone for Earth through its geological evolution. We explore four different types of atmospheres corresponding to an early-Earth atmosphere at 3.9 Gyr ago and three atmospheres covering the rise of oxygen to present-day levels at 2.0 Gyr ago, 0.8 Gyr ago, and modern Earth. In addition to calculating the UVmore » flux on the surface of the planet, we model the biologically effective irradiance, using DNA damage as a proxy for biological damage. We find that a pre-biotic Earth (3.9 Gyr ago) orbiting an F0V star receives 6 times the biologically effective radiation as around the early Sun and 3520 times the modern Earth–Sun levels. A pre-biotic Earth orbiting GJ 581 (M3.5 V) receives 300 times less biologically effective radiation, about 2 times modern Earth–Sun levels. The UV fluxes calculated here provide a grid of model UV environments during the evolution of an Earth-like planet orbiting a range of stars. These models can be used as inputs into photo-biological experiments and for pre-biotic chemistry and early life evolution experiments.« less

  14. Origin and tectonic evolution of early Paleozoic arc terranes abutting the northern margin of North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hao; Pei, Fu-Ping; Zhang, Ying; Zhou, Zhong-Biao; Xu, Wen-Liang; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Cao, Hua-Hua; Yang, Chuan

    2017-12-01

    The origin and tectonic evolution of the early Paleozoic arc terranes abutting the northern margin of the North China Craton (NCC) are widely debated. This paper presents detrital zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopic data of early Paleozoic strata in the Zhangjiatun arc terrane of central Jilin Province, northeast (NE) China, and compares them with the Bainaimiao and Jiangyu arc terranes abutting the northern margin of the NCC. Detrital zircons from early Paleozoic strata in three arc terranes exhibit comparable age groupings of 539-430, 1250-577, and 2800-1600 Ma. The Paleoproterozoic to Neoarchean ages and Hf isotopic composition of the detrital zircons imply the existence of the Precambrian fragments beneath the arc terranes. Given the evidences from geology, igneous rocks, and detrital zircons, we proposed that the early Paleozoic arc terranes abutting the northern margin of the NCC are a united arc terrane including the exotic Precambrian fragments, and these fragments shared a common evolutionary history from Neoproterozoic to early-middle Paleozoic.

  15. The Formation and Early Evolution of Embedded Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Peter

    We propose to combine Spitzer, WISE, Herschel, and other archival spacecraft data with an existing ground- and space-based mm-wave to near-IR survey of molecular clouds over a large portion of the Milky Way, in order to systematically study the formation and early evolution of massive stars and star clusters, and provide new observational calibrations for a theoretical paradigm of this key astrophysical problem. Central Objectives: The Galactic Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars (CHaMP) is a large, unbiased, uniform, and panchromatic survey of massive star and cluster formation and early evolution, covering 20°x6° of the Galactic Plane. Its uniqueness lies in the comprehensive molecular spectroscopy of 303 massive dense clumps, which have also been included in several archival spacecraft surveys. Our objective is a systematic demographic analysis of massive star and cluster formation, one which has not been possible without knowledge of our CHaMP cloud sample, including all clouds with embedded clusters as well as those that have not yet formed massive stars. For proto-clusters deeply embedded within dense molecular clouds, analysis of these space-based data will: 1. Yield a complete census of Young Stellar Objects in each cluster. 2. Allow systematic measurements of embedded cluster properties: spectral energy distributions, luminosity functions, protostellar and disk fractions, and how these vary with cluster mass, age, and density. Combined with other, similarly complete and unbiased infrared and mm data, CHaMP's goals include: 3. A detailed comparison of the embedded stellar populations with their natal dense gas to derive extinction maps, star formation efficiencies and feedback effects, and the kinematics, physics, and chemistry of the gas in and around the clusters. 4. Tying the demographics, age spreads, and timescales of the clusters, based on pre-Main Sequence evolution, to that of the dense gas clumps and Giant Molecular Clouds. 5. A

  16. A multi-wavelength study of the evolution of early-type galaxies in groups: the ultraviolet view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampazzo, R.; Mazzei, P.; Marino, A.; Bianchi, L.; Plana, H.; Trinchieri, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Wolter, A.

    2018-04-01

    The ultraviolet-optical colour magnitude diagram of rich galaxy groups is characterised by a well developed Red Sequence, a Blue Cloud and the so-called Green Valley. Loose, less evolved groups of galaxies which are probably not virialised yet may lack a well defined Red Sequence. This is actually explained in the framework of galaxy evolution. We are focussing on understanding galaxy migration towards the Red Sequence, checking for signatures of such a transition in their photometric and morphological properties. We report on the ultraviolet properties of a sample of early-type (ellipticals+S0s) galaxies inhabiting the Red Sequence. The analysis of their structures, as derived by fitting a Sérsic law to their ultraviolet luminosity profiles, suggests the presence of an underlying disk. This is the hallmark of dissipation processes that still must have a role to play in the evolution of this class of galaxies. Smooth particle hydrodynamic simulations with chemo-photometric implementations able to match the global properties of our targets are used to derive their evolutionary paths through ultraviolet-optical colour magnitude diagrams, providing some fundamental information such as the crossing time through the Green Valley, which depends on their luminosity. The transition from the Blue Cloud to the Red Sequence takes several Gyrs, being about 3-5 Gyr for the brightest galaxies and longer for fainter ones, if occurring. The photometric study of nearby galaxy structures in the ultraviolet is seriously hampered by either the limited field of view of the cameras (e.g., in Hubble Space Telescope) or by the low spatial resolution of the images (e.g., in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer). Current missions equipped with telescopes and cameras sensitive to ultraviolet wavelengths, such as Swift- UVOT and Astrosat-UVIT, provide a relatively large field of view and a better resolution than the Galaxy Evolution Explorer. More powerful ultraviolet instruments (size, resolution

  17. Trojan Tour and Rendezvous (TTR): A New Frontiers Mission to Explore the Origin and Evolution of the Early Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, J. F., III; Olkin, C.; Castillo, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The orbital properties, compositions, and physical properties of the diverse populations of small outer solar system bodies provide a forensic map of how our solar system formed and evolved. Perhaps the most potentially diagnostic, but least explored, of those populations are the Jupiter Trojan asteroids, which orbit at ~5 AU in the L4 and L5 Lagrange points of Jupiter. More than 6200 Jupiter Trojans are presently known, but these are predicted to be only a small fraction of the 500,000 to 1 million Trojans >1 km in size. The Trojans are hypothesized to be either former Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) that were scattered into the inner solar system by early giant planet migration and then trapped in the 1:1 Jupiter mean motion resonance, or bodies formed near 5 AU in a much more quiescent early solar system, and then trapped at L4 and L5. The 2011 Planetary Science Decadal Survey identified important questions about the origin and evolution of the solar system that can be addressed by studying of the Trojan asteroids, including: (a) How did the giant planets and their satellite systems accrete, and is there evidence that they migrated to new orbital positions? (b) What is the relationship between large and small KBOs? Is the small population derived by impact disruption of the large one? (c) What kinds of surface evolution, radiation chemistry, and surface-atmosphere interactions occur on distant icy primitive bodies? And (d) What are the sources of asteroid groups (Trojans and Centaurs) that remain to be explored by spacecraft? The Trojan Tour and Rendezvous (TTR) is a New Frontiers-class mission designed to answer these questions, and to test hypotheses for early giant planet migration and solar system evolution. Via close flybys of a large number of these objects,, and orbital characterization of at least one large Trojan, TTR will enable the first-time exploration of this population. Our primary mission goals are to characterize the overall surface geology

  18. Computer simulation on the cooperation of functional molecules during the early stages of evolution.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wentao; Hu, Jiming

    2012-01-01

    It is very likely that life began with some RNA (or RNA-like) molecules, self-replicating by base-pairing and exhibiting enzyme-like functions that favored the self-replication. Different functional molecules may have emerged by favoring their own self-replication at different aspects. Then, a direct route towards complexity/efficiency may have been through the coexistence/cooperation of these molecules. However, the likelihood of this route remains quite unclear, especially because the molecules would be competing for limited common resources. By computer simulation using a Monte-Carlo model (with "micro-resolution" at the level of nucleotides and membrane components), we show that the coexistence/cooperation of these molecules can occur naturally, both in a naked form and in a protocell form. The results of the computer simulation also lead to quite a few deductions concerning the environment and history in the scenario. First, a naked stage (with functional molecules catalyzing template-replication and metabolism) may have occurred early in evolution but required high concentration and limited dispersal of the system (e.g., on some mineral surface); the emergence of protocells enabled a "habitat-shift" into bulk water. Second, the protocell stage started with a substage of "pseudo-protocells", with functional molecules catalyzing template-replication and metabolism, but still missing the function involved in the synthesis of membrane components, the emergence of which would lead to a subsequent "true-protocell" substage. Third, the initial unstable membrane, composed of prebiotically available fatty acids, should have been superseded quite early by a more stable membrane (e.g., composed of phospholipids, like modern cells). Additionally, the membrane-takeover probably occurred at the transition of the two substages of the protocells. The scenario described in the present study should correspond to an episode in early evolution, after the emergence of single

  19. Early antiretroviral treatment (eART) limits viral diversity over time in a long-term HIV viral suppressed perinatally infected child.

    PubMed

    Palma, Paolo; Zangari, Paola; Alteri, Claudia; Tchidjou, Hyppolite K; Manno, Emma Concetta; Liuzzi, Giuseppina; Perno, Carlo Federico; Rossi, Paolo; Bertoli, Ada; Bernardi, Stefania

    2016-12-09

    HIV genetic diversity implicates major challenges for the control of viral infection by the immune system and for the identification of an effective immunotherapeutic strategy. With the present case report we underline as HIV evolution could be effectively halted by early antiretroviral treatment (eART). Few cases supported this evidence due to the difficulty of performing amplification and sequencing analysis in long-term viral suppressed patients. Here, we reported the case of limited HIV-1 viral evolution over time in a successful early treated child. A perinatally HIV-1 infected infant was treated within 7 weeks of age with zidovudine, lamivudine, nevirapine and lopinavir/ritonavir. At antiretroviral treatment (ART) initiation HIV-1 viral load (VL) and CD4 percentage were >500,000 copies/ml and 35%, respectively. Plasma genotypic resistance test showed a wild-type virus. The child reached VL undetectability after 33 weeks of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) since he maintained a stable VL <40copies/ml. After 116 weeks on ART we were able to perform amplification and sequencing assay on the plasma virus. At this time VL was <40 copies/ml and CD4 percentage was 40%. Again the genotypic resistance test revealed a wild-type virus. The phylogenetic analysis performed on the HIV-1 pol sequences of the mother and the child revealed that sequences clustered with C subtype reference strains and formed a monophyletic cluster distinct from the other C sequences included in the analysis (bootstrap value >90%). Any major evolutionary divergence was detected. eART limits the viral evolution avoiding the emergence of new viral variants. This result may have important implications in host immune control and may sustain the challenge search of new personalized immunotherapeutic approaches to achieve a prolonged viral remission.

  20. The Pennsylvanian-early permian bird spring carbonate shelf, Southeastern California: Fusulinid biostratigraphy, paleogeographic evolution, and tectonic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, C.H.; Stone, P.

    2007-01-01

    The Bird Spring Shelf in southeastern California, along with coeval turbidite basins to the west, records a complex history of late Paleozoic sedimentation, sea-level changes, and deformation along the western North American continental margin. We herein establish detailed correlations between deposits of the shelf and the flanking basins, which we then use to reconstruct the depositional history, paleogeography, and deformational history, including Early Permian emplacement of the regionally significant Last Chance allochthon. These correlations are based on fusulinid faunas, which are numerous both on the shelf and in the adjoining basins. Study of 69 fusulinid species representing all major fusulinid-bearing Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian limestone outcrops of the Bird Spring Shelf in southeastern California, including ten new species of the genera Triticites, Leptotriticites, Stewartina, Pseudochusenella, and Cuniculinella, forms the basis for our correlations. We group these species into six fusulinid zones that we correlate with fusulinid-bearing strata in east-central and southern Nevada, Kansas, and West Texas, and we propose some regional correlations not previously suggested. In addition, we utilize recent conodont data from these areas to correlate our Early Permian fusulinid zones with the standard Global Permian Stages, strengthening their chronostratigraphic value. Our detailed correlations between the fusulinid-bearing rocks of the Bird Spring Shelf and deep-water deposits to the northwest reveal relationships between the history of shelf sedimentation and evolution of basins closer to the continental margin. In Virgilian to early Asselian (early Wolfcampian) time (Fusulinid Zones 1 and 2), the Bird Spring Shelf was flanked on the west by the deep-water Keeler Basin in which calcareous turbidites derived from the shelf were deposited. In early Sakmarian (early middle Wolfcampian) time (Fusulinid Zone 3), the Keeler Basin deposits were uplifted and

  1. Minimal evolution time and quantum speed limit of non-Markovian open systems

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangyi; Wu, Chengjun; Guo, Hong

    2015-01-01

    We derive a sharp bound as the quantum speed limit (QSL) for the minimal evolution time of quantum open systems in the non-Markovian strong-coupling regime with initial mixed states by considering the effects of both renormalized Hamiltonian and dissipator. For a non-Markovian quantum open system, the possible evolution time between two arbitrary states is not unique, among the set of which we find that the minimal one and its QSL can decrease more steeply by adjusting the coupling strength of the dissipator, which thus provides potential improvements of efficiency in many quantum physics and quantum information areas. PMID:26565062

  2. Dental histology of Coelophysis bauri and the evolution of tooth attachment tissues in early dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Fong, Raymond K M; LeBlanc, Aaron R H; Berman, David S; Reisz, Robert R

    2016-07-01

    Studies of dinosaur teeth have focused primarily on external crown morphology and thus, use shed or in situ tooth crowns, and are limited to the enamel and dentine dental tissues. As a result, the full suites of periodontal tissues that attach teeth to the jaws remain poorly documented, particularly in early dinosaurs. These tissues are an integral part of the tooth and thus essential to a more complete understanding of dental anatomy, development, and evolution in dinosaurs. To identify the tooth attachment tissues in early dinosaurs, histological thin sections were prepared from the maxilla and dentary of a partial skull of the early theropod Coelophysis bauri from the Upper Triassic (Rhaetian- 209-201 Ma) Whitaker Quarry, New Mexico, USA. As one of the phylogenetically and geologically oldest dinosaurs, it is an ideal candidate for examining dental tissues near the base of the dinosaurian clade. The teeth of C. bauri exhibited a fibrous tooth attachment in which the teeth possessed five tissues: enamel, dentine, cementum, periodontal ligament (PDL), and alveolar bone. Our findings, coupled with those of more recent studies of ornithischian teeth, indicate that a tripartite periodontium, similar to that of crocodilians and mammals, is the plesiomorphic condition for dinosaurs. The occurrence of a tripartite periodontium in dinosaurs adds to the growing consensus that the presence of these tissues is the plesiomorphic condition for the major amniote clades. Furthermore, this study establishes the relative timing of tissue development and growth directions of periodontal tissues and provides the first comparative framework for future studies of dinosaur periodontal development, tooth replacement, and histology. J. Morphol. 277:916-924, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Fourth Symposium on Chemical Evolution and the Origin and Evolution of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wharton, Robert A., Jr. (Editor); Andersen, Dale T. (Editor); Bzik, Sara E. (Editor); Rummel, John D. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    This symposium was held at the NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, July 24-27, 1990. The NASA exobiology investigators reported their recent research findings. Scientific papers were presented in the following areas: cosmic evolution of biogenic compounds, prebiotic evolution (planetary and molecular), early evolution of life (biological and geochemical), evolution of advanced life, solar system exploration, and the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI).

  4. Early Human Evolution in the Western Palaearctic: Ecological Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrión, José S.; Rose, James; Stringer, Chris

    2011-06-01

    This review presents the themes of a special issue dealing with environmental scenarios of human evolution during the Early Pleistocene (2.6-0.78 Ma; MIS 103-MIS 19) and early Middle Pleistocene (0.78-0.47 Ma; MIS 19-base of MIS 12) within the western Palaearctic. This period is one of dramatic changes in the climates and the distribution of Palaearctic biota. These changes have played their role in generating adaptive and phyletic patterns within the human ancestry, involving several species such as Homo habilis, "Homo georgicus", Homo erectus, Homo antecessor and Homo heidelbergensis. In the archaeological record, these species include the Oldowan (Mode 1) and Acheulian (Mode 2) lithic technologies. Taphonomic considerations of palaeoecological research in hominin-bearing sites are provided and evaluated. Syntheses are provided for north Africa, western Asia, the Mediterranean Basin, Britain, and continental Europe. Palaeoenvironmental reconstructions based on multidisciplinary data are given for Ain Boucherit, Ain Hanech and El-Kherba in Algeria, Dmanisi in Georgia, Atapuerca, Cueva Negra, and the Orce Basin in Spain, Monte Poggiolo and Pirro Nord in Italy, Pont-de-Lavaud in France, and Mauer in Germany. The state of the art with the Out of Africa 1 dispersal model is reviewed. A source-sink dynamics model for Palaeolithic Europe is described to explain the morphological disparity of H. heidelbergensis (we will sometimes use the informal name "Heidelbergs") and early Neanderthals. Other aspects debated here are the selective value of habitat mosaics including reconstructions based on mammal and avian databases, and the role of geological instability combined with topographic complexity. This review is completed by addressing the question of whether the appearance of evolutionary trends within hominins is concentrated in regions of highest worldwide biological diversity (biodiversity hotspots). It is concluded that the keys for the activation of evolutionary

  5. Time evolution and dynamical phase transitions at a critical time in a system of one-dimensional bosons after a quantum quench.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Aditi

    2012-12-28

    A renormalization group approach is used to show that a one-dimensional system of bosons subject to a lattice quench exhibits a finite-time dynamical phase transition where an order parameter within a light cone increases as a nonanalytic function of time after a critical time. Such a transition is also found for a simultaneous lattice and interaction quench where the effective scaling dimension of the lattice becomes time dependent, crucially affecting the time evolution of the system. Explicit results are presented for the time evolution of the boson interaction parameter and the order parameter for the dynamical transition as well as for more general quenches.

  6. Time evolution of Rényi entropy under the Lindblad equation.

    PubMed

    Abe, Sumiyoshi

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, the Rényi entropy has repeatedly been discussed for characterization of quantum critical states and entanglement. Here, time evolution of the Rényi entropy is studied. A compact general formula is presented for the lower bound on the entropy rate.

  7. Characterization of Inclusions in Evolution of Sodium Sulfate Using Terahertz Time-domain Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bao, Rima; Wu, Zhikui; Li, Hao; Wang, Fang; Miao, Xinyang; Feng, Chengjing

    2017-01-01

    The study of fluid inclusion is one of the important means to understanding the evolution of mineral crystals, and can therefore provide original information of mineral evolution. In the process of evolution, outside factors such as temperature and pressure, directly affect the number and size of inclusions, and thus are related to the properties of crystals. In this paper, terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) was used to detect sodium sulfate crystals with different growth temperatures, and absorption coefficient spectra of the samples were obtained. It is suggested that the evolution of sodium sulfate could be divided into two stages, and 80°C was the turning point. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and polarizing microscopy were used to support this conclusion. The research showed that THz-TDS could characterize the evolution of mineral crystals, and it had a unique advantage in terms of crystal evolution.

  8. Volatile inventory and early evolution of the planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marov, Mikhail Ya.; Ipatov, Sergei I.

    Formation of atmospheres of the inner planets involved the concurrent processes of mantle degassing and collisions that culminated during the heavy bombardment. Volatile-rich icy planetesimals impacting on the planets as a late veneer strongly contributed to the volatile inventory. Icy remnants of the outer planet accretion significantly complemented the accumulation of the lithophile and atmophile elements forced out onto the surface of the inner planets from silicate basaltic magma enriched in volatiles. Orbital dynamics of small bodies, including near-Earth asteroids, comets, and bodies from the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt evolving to become inner planet crossers, is addressed to examine different plausible amounts of volatile accretion. The relative importance of comets and chondrites in the delivery of volatiles is constrained by the observed fractionation pattern of noble gas abundances in the atmospheres of inner planets. The following development of the early atmospheres depended on the amount of volatiles expelled from the interiors and deposited by impactors, while the position of the planet relative to the Sun and its mass affected its climatic evolution.

  9. Evolution of solitary density waves in stellar winds of early-type stars: A simple explanation of discrete absorption component behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldron, Wayne L.; Klein, Larry; Altner, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    We model the evolution of a density shell propagating through the stellar wind of an early-type star, in order to investigate the effects of such shells on UV P Cygni line profiles. Unlike previous treatments, we solve the mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations, using an explicit time-differencing scheme, and present a parametric study of the density, velocity, and temperature response. Under the assumed conditions, relatively large spatial scale, large-amplitude density shells propagate as stable waves through the supersonic portion of the wind. Their dynamical behavior appears to mimic propagating 'solitary waves,' and they are found to accelerate at the same rate as the underlying steady state stellar wind (i.e., the shell rides the wind). These hydrodynamically stable structures quantitatively reproduce the anomalous 'discrete absorption component' (DAC) behavior observed in the winds of luminous early-type stars, as illustrated by comparisons of model predictions to an extensive International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) time series of spectra of zeta Puppis (O4f). From these comparisons, we find no conclusive evidence indicative of DACs accelerating at a significantly slower rate than the underlying stellar wind, contrary to earlier reports. In addition, these density shells are found to be consistent within the constraints set by the IR observations. We conclude that the concept of propagating density shells should be seriously reconsidered as a possible explanation of the DAC phenomenon in early-type stars.

  10. Solar-Type Stars with the Suppression of Convection at an Early Stage of Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreshina, A. V.; Baturin, V. A.; Ayukov, S. V.; Gorshkov, A. B.

    2017-12-01

    The evolution of a solar-mass star before and on the main sequence is analyzed in light of the diminished efficiency of convection in the first 500 Myr. A numerical simulation has been performed with the CESAM2k code. It is shown that the suppression of convection in the early stages of evolution leads to a somewhat higher lithium content than that predicted by the classical solar model. In addition, the star's effective temperature decreases. Ignoring this phenomenon may lead to errors in age and mass determinations for young stars (before the main sequence) from standard evolutionary tracks in the temperature-luminosity diagram. At a later stage of evolution, after 500 Myr, the efficiency of convection tends to the solar value. At this stage, the star's inner structure becomes classical; it does not depend on the previous history. On the contrary, the photospheric lithium abundance contains information about the star's past. In other words, there may exist main-sequence solar-mass stars of the same age (above 500 Myr), radius, and luminosity, yet with different photospheric lithium contents. The main results of this work add considerably to the popular method for determining the age of solar-type stars from lithium abundances.

  11. Early Earth(s) Across Time and Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojzsis, S.

    2014-04-01

    The geochemical and cosmochemical record of our solar system is the baseline for exploring the question: "when could life appear on a world similar to our own?" Data arising from direct analysis of the oldest terrestrial rocks and minerals from the first 500 Myr of Earth history - termed the Hadean Eon - inform us about the timing for the establishment of a habitable silicate world. Liquid water is the key medium for life. The origin of water, and its interaction with the crust as revealed in the geologic record, guides our exploration for a cosmochemically Earth-like planets. From the time of primary planetary accretion to the start of the continuous rock record on Earth at ca. 3850 million years ago, our planet experienced a waning bolide flux that partially or entirely wiped out surface rocks, vaporized oceans, and created transient serpentinizing atmospheres. Arguably, "Early Earths" across the galaxy may start off as ice planets due to feeble insolation from their young stars, occasionally punctuated by steam atmospheres generated by cataclysmic impacts. Alternatively, early global environments conducive to life spanned from a benign surface zone to deep into crustal rocks and sediments. In some scenarios, nascent biospheres benefit from the exogenous delivery of essential bio-elements via leftovers of accretion, and the subsequent establishment of planetary-scale hydrothermal systems. If what is now known about the early dynamical regime of the Earth serves as any measure of the potential habitability of worlds across space and time, several key boundary conditions emerge. These are: (i) availability and long-term stability of liquid water; (ii) presence of energy resources; (iii) accessibility of organic raw materials; (iv) adequate inventory of radioisotopes to drive internal heating; (v) gross compositional parameters such as mantle/core mass ratio, and (vi) P-T conditions at or near the surface suitable for sustaining biological activity. Life could

  12. Early Precambrian Carbonate and Evapolite Sediments: Constraints on Environmental and Biological Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grotzinger, John P.

    2002-01-01

    The work accomplished under NASA Grant NAG5-6722 was very successful. Our lab was able to document the occurrence and distribution of evaporite-to-carbonate transitions in several basins during Precambrian time, to help constrain the long-term chemical evolution of seawater.

  13. Time-dependent quantum oscillator as attenuator and amplifier: noise and statistical evolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portes, D.; Rodrigues, H.; Duarte, S. B.; Baseia, B.

    2004-10-01

    We revisit the quantum oscillator, modelled as a time-dependent LC-circuit. Nonclassical properties concerned with attenuation and amplification regions are considered, as well as time evolution of quantum noise and statistics, with emphasis on revivals of the statistical distribution.

  14. Calibrating rates of early Cambrian evolution.

    PubMed

    Bowring, S A; Grotzinger, J P; Isachsen, C E; Knoll, A H; Pelechaty, S M; Kolosov, P

    1993-09-03

    An explosive episode of biological diversification occurred near the beginning of the Cambrian period. Evolutionary rates in the Cambrian have been difficult to quantify accurately because of a lack of high-precision ages. Currently, uranium-lead zircon geochronology is the most powerful method for dating rocks of Cambrian age. Uranium-lead zircon data from lower Cambrian rocks located in northeast Siberia indicate that the Cambrian period began at approximately 544 million years ago and that its oldest (Manykaian) stage lasted no less than 10 million years. Other data indicate that the Tommotian and Atdabanian stages together lasted only 5 to 10 million years. The resulting compression of Early Cambrian time accentuates the rapidity of both the faunal diversification and subsequent Cambrian turnover.

  15. Calibrating rates of early Cambrian evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowring, Samuel A.; Grotzinger, John P.; Isachsen, Clark E.; Knoll, Andrew H.; Pelechaty, Shane M.; Kolosov, Peter

    1993-01-01

    An explosive episode of biological diversification occurred near the beginning of the Cambrian period. Evolutionary rates in the Cambrian have been difficult to quantify accurately because of a lack of high-precision ages. Currently, uranium-lead zircon geochronology is the most powerful method for dating rocks of Cambrian age. Uranium-lead zircon data from lower Cambrian rocks located in northeast Siberia indicate that the Cambrian period began about 544 million years ago and that its oldest (Manykaian) stage lasted no less than 10 million years. Other data indicate that the Tommotian and Atdabanian stages together lasted only 5 to 10 million years. The resulting compression of Early Cambrian time accentuates the rapidity of both the faunal diversification and subsequent Cambrian turnover.

  16. How Do Early Career Agriculture Teachers Talk about Their Time?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Misty D.; Henry, Anna L.; Tummons, John D.

    2011-01-01

    This phenomenological study of early career agriculture teachers sought to determine the meaning early career agriculture teachers ascribe to their time. Seven teachers with a range of experience from mid-first year to beginning of sixth year were chosen. Interviews were used to make meaning of their time. Five themes were found in the…

  17. Bayesian Morphological Clock Methods Resurrect Placoderm Monophyly and Reveal Rapid Early Evolution in Jawed Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    King, Benedict; Qiao, Tuo; Lee, Michael S Y; Zhu, Min; Long, John A

    2017-07-01

    The phylogeny of early gnathostomes provides an important framework for understanding one of the most significant evolutionary events, the origin and diversification of jawed vertebrates. A series of recent cladistic analyses have suggested that the placoderms, an extinct group of armoured fish, form a paraphyletic group basal to all other jawed vertebrates. We revised and expanded this morphological data set, most notably by sampling autapomorphies in a similar way to parsimony-informative traits, thus ensuring this data (unlike most existing morphological data sets) satisfied an important assumption of Bayesian tip-dated morphological clock approaches. We also found problems with characters supporting placoderm paraphyly, including character correlation and incorrect codings. Analysis of this data set reveals that paraphyly and monophyly of core placoderms (excluding maxillate forms) are essentially equally parsimonious. The two alternative topologies have different root positions for the jawed vertebrates but are otherwise similar. However, analysis using tip-dated clock methods reveals strong support for placoderm monophyly, due to this analysis favoring trees with more balanced rates of evolution. Furthermore, enforcing placoderm paraphyly results in higher levels and unusual patterns of rate heterogeneity among branches, similar to that generated from simulated trees reconstructed with incorrect root positions. These simulations also show that Bayesian tip-dated clock methods outperform parsimony when the outgroup is largely uninformative (e.g., due to inapplicable characters), as might be the case here. The analysis also reveals that gnathostomes underwent a rapid burst of evolution during the Silurian period which declined during the Early Devonian. This rapid evolution during a period with few articulated fossils might partly explain the difficulty in ascertaining the root position of jawed vertebrates. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University

  18. Multi-locus analysis of genomic time series data from experimental evolution.

    PubMed

    Terhorst, Jonathan; Schlötterer, Christian; Song, Yun S

    2015-04-01

    Genomic time series data generated by evolve-and-resequence (E&R) experiments offer a powerful window into the mechanisms that drive evolution. However, standard population genetic inference procedures do not account for sampling serially over time, and new methods are needed to make full use of modern experimental evolution data. To address this problem, we develop a Gaussian process approximation to the multi-locus Wright-Fisher process with selection over a time course of tens of generations. The mean and covariance structure of the Gaussian process are obtained by computing the corresponding moments in discrete-time Wright-Fisher models conditioned on the presence of a linked selected site. This enables our method to account for the effects of linkage and selection, both along the genome and across sampled time points, in an approximate but principled manner. We first use simulated data to demonstrate the power of our method to correctly detect, locate and estimate the fitness of a selected allele from among several linked sites. We study how this power changes for different values of selection strength, initial haplotypic diversity, population size, sampling frequency, experimental duration, number of replicates, and sequencing coverage depth. In addition to providing quantitative estimates of selection parameters from experimental evolution data, our model can be used by practitioners to design E&R experiments with requisite power. We also explore how our likelihood-based approach can be used to infer other model parameters, including effective population size and recombination rate. Then, we apply our method to analyze genome-wide data from a real E&R experiment designed to study the adaptation of D. melanogaster to a new laboratory environment with alternating cold and hot temperatures.

  19. HIV evolution in early infection: selection pressures, patterns of insertion and deletion, and the impact of APOBEC.

    PubMed

    Wood, Natasha; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Keele, Brandon F; Giorgi, Elena; Liu, Michael; Gaschen, Brian; Daniels, Marcus; Ferrari, Guido; Haynes, Barton F; McMichael, Andrew; Shaw, George M; Hahn, Beatrice H; Korber, Bette; Seoighe, Cathal

    2009-05-01

    The pattern of viral diversification in newly infected individuals provides information about the host environment and immune responses typically experienced by the newly transmitted virus. For example, sites that tend to evolve rapidly across multiple early-infection patients could be involved in enabling escape from common early immune responses, could represent adaptation for rapid growth in a newly infected host, or could represent reversion from less fit forms of the virus that were selected for immune escape in previous hosts. Here we investigated the diversification of HIV-1 env coding sequences in 81 very early B subtype infections previously shown to have resulted from transmission or expansion of single viruses (n = 78) or two closely related viruses (n = 3). In these cases, the sequence of the infecting virus can be estimated accurately, enabling inference of both the direction of substitutions as well as distinction between insertion and deletion events. By integrating information across multiple acutely infected hosts, we find evidence of adaptive evolution of HIV-1 env and identify a subset of codon sites that diversified more rapidly than can be explained by a model of neutral evolution. Of 24 such rapidly diversifying sites, 14 were either i) clustered and embedded in CTL epitopes that were verified experimentally or predicted based on the individual's HLA or ii) in a nucleotide context indicative of APOBEC-mediated G-to-A substitutions, despite having excluded heavily hypermutated sequences prior to the analysis. In several cases, a rapidly evolving site was embedded both in an APOBEC motif and in a CTL epitope, suggesting that APOBEC may facilitate early immune escape. Ten rapidly diversifying sites could not be explained by CTL escape or APOBEC hypermutation, including the most frequently mutated site, in the fusion peptide of gp41. We also examined the distribution, extent, and sequence context of insertions and deletions, and we provide

  20. HIV Evolution in Early Infection: Selection Pressures, Patterns of Insertion and Deletion, and the Impact of APOBEC

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Natasha; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Keele, Brandon F.; Giorgi, Elena; Liu, Michael; Gaschen, Brian; Daniels, Marcus; Ferrari, Guido; Haynes, Barton F.; McMichael, Andrew; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Korber, Bette; Seoighe, Cathal

    2009-01-01

    The pattern of viral diversification in newly infected individuals provides information about the host environment and immune responses typically experienced by the newly transmitted virus. For example, sites that tend to evolve rapidly across multiple early-infection patients could be involved in enabling escape from common early immune responses, could represent adaptation for rapid growth in a newly infected host, or could represent reversion from less fit forms of the virus that were selected for immune escape in previous hosts. Here we investigated the diversification of HIV-1 env coding sequences in 81 very early B subtype infections previously shown to have resulted from transmission or expansion of single viruses (n = 78) or two closely related viruses (n = 3). In these cases, the sequence of the infecting virus can be estimated accurately, enabling inference of both the direction of substitutions as well as distinction between insertion and deletion events. By integrating information across multiple acutely infected hosts, we find evidence of adaptive evolution of HIV-1 env and identify a subset of codon sites that diversified more rapidly than can be explained by a model of neutral evolution. Of 24 such rapidly diversifying sites, 14 were either i) clustered and embedded in CTL epitopes that were verified experimentally or predicted based on the individual's HLA or ii) in a nucleotide context indicative of APOBEC-mediated G-to-A substitutions, despite having excluded heavily hypermutated sequences prior to the analysis. In several cases, a rapidly evolving site was embedded both in an APOBEC motif and in a CTL epitope, suggesting that APOBEC may facilitate early immune escape. Ten rapidly diversifying sites could not be explained by CTL escape or APOBEC hypermutation, including the most frequently mutated site, in the fusion peptide of gp41. We also examined the distribution, extent, and sequence context of insertions and deletions, and we provide

  1. The evolution of Phanerozoic seawater - Isotope paleothermometry finds consensus on Early Paleozoic warmth and constant seawater δ18O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, E. L.; Henkes, G. A.; Passey, B. H.; Shenton, B.; Yancey, T. E.; Perez-Huerta, A.

    2015-12-01

    Evolution of metazoan life is closely linked to the Phanerozoic evolution of ocean temperatures and chemistry. Oxygen isotopic evidence for early Phanerozoic paleotemperatures has been equivocal, with decreasing δ18O values with age being interpreted as warmer early oceans, decreasing seawater δ18O with age, or increasing diagenetic alteration in older samples. Here we compare an updated compilation of oxygen isotope data for carbonate and phosphate fossils and microfossils (Grossman, 2012, Geol. Time Scale, Elsevier, 195-220) with a compilation of new and existing clumped isotope data. Importantly, these data are curated based on sample preservation with special consideration given to screening techniques, and tectonic and burial history. Burial history is critical in the preservation of carbonate clumped isotope temperatures in particular, which can undergo reordering in the solid state. We use a model derived for reordering kinetics (Henkes et al., 2014, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 139:362-382) to screen clumped isotope data for the effects of solid-state burial alteration. With minor but significant exceptions (Late Cretaceous, Early Triassic), average δ18O values (4 m.y. window, 2 m.y. steps) for post-Devonian brachiopods, belemnites, and foraminifera, representing tropical-subtropical surface ocean conditions, yield average isotopic temperatures below 30°C (assuming a seawater δ18O value [ -1‰ VSMOW] of an "ice-free" world). In contrast, Ordovician to Devonian data show sustained temperatures of 35-40°C. Likewise, isotopic paleotemperatures from conodont apatite, known to be resistant to isotopic exchange, follow the same pattern. Clumped isotope data derived from Paleozoic brachiopod shells that experienced minimal burial (< 100 °C) and <1% reordering according to the taxon-specific clumped isotope reordering model yield typical temperatures of 25-30°C for the Carboniferous, and 35-40°C for the Ordovician-Silurian. Inserting clumped temperatures and

  2. Time evolution of pore system in lime - Pozzolana composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doleželová, Magdaléna; Čáchová, Monika; Scheinherrová, Lenka; Keppert, Martin

    2017-11-01

    The lime - pozzolana mortars and plasters are used in restoration works on building cultural heritage but these materials are also following the trend of energy - efficient solutions in civil engineering. Porosity and pore size distribution is one of crucial parameters influencing engineering properties of porous materials. The pore size distribution of lime based system is changing in time due to chemical processes occurring in the material. The present paper describes time evolution of pore system in lime - pozzolana composites; the obtained results are useful in prediction of performance of lime - pozzolana systems in building structures.

  3. The First Molecular Phylogeny of Strepsiptera (Insecta) Reveals an Early Burst of Molecular Evolution Correlated with the Transition to Endoparasitism

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Dino P.; Hayward, Alexander; Kathirithamby, Jeyaraney

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive model of evolution requires an understanding of the relationship between selection at the molecular and phenotypic level. We investigate this in Strepsiptera, an order of endoparasitic insects whose evolutionary biology is poorly studied. We present the first molecular phylogeny of Strepsiptera, and use this as a framework to investigate the association between parasitism and molecular evolution. We find evidence of a significant burst in the rate of molecular evolution in the early history of Strepsiptera. The evolution of morphological traits linked to parasitism is significantly correlated with the pattern in molecular rate. The correlated burst in genotypic-phenotypic evolution precedes the main phase of strepsipteran diversification, which is characterised by the return to a low and even molecular rate, and a period of relative morphological stability. These findings suggest that the transition to endoparasitism led to relaxation of selective constraint in the strepsipteran genome. Our results indicate that a parasitic lifestyle can affect the rate of molecular evolution, although other causal life-history traits correlated with parasitism may also play an important role. PMID:21738621

  4. Hydraulics of Asteroxylon mackei, an early Devonian vascular plant, and the early evolution of water transport tissue in terrestrial plants.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J P; Fischer, W W

    2011-03-01

    The core of plant physiology is a set of functional solutions to a tradeoff between CO(2) acquisition and water loss. To provide an important evolutionary perspective on how the earliest land plants met this tradeoff, we constructed a mathematical model (constrained geometrically with measurements of fossils) of the hydraulic resistance of Asteroxylon, an Early Devonian plant. The model results illuminate the water transport physiology of one of the earliest vascular plants. Results show that Asteroxylon's vascular system contains cells with low hydraulic resistances; these resistances are low because cells were covered by scalariform pits, elliptical structures that permit individual cells to have large areas for water to pass from one cell to another. Asteroxylon could move a large amount of water quickly given its large pit areas; however, this would have left these plants particularly vulnerable to damage from excessive evapotranspiration. These results highlight a repeated pattern in plant evolution, wherein the evolution of highly conductive vascular tissue precedes the appearance of adaptations to increase water transport safety. Quantitative insight into the vascular transport of Asteroxylon also allows us to reflect on the quality of CO(2) proxy estimates based on early land plant fossils. Because Asteroxylon's vascular tissue lacked any safety features to prevent permanent damage, it probably used stomatal abundance and behavior to prevent desiccation. If correct, low stomatal frequencies in Asteroxylon reflect the need to limit evapotranspiration, rather than adaptation to high CO(2) concentrations in the atmosphere. More broadly, methods to reveal and understand water transport in extinct plants have a clear use in testing and bolstering fossil plant-based paleoclimate proxies. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Time-dependent entropy evolution in microscopic and macroscopic electromagnetic relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker-Jarvis, James

    This paper is a study of entropy and its evolution in the time and frequency domains upon application of electromagnetic fields to materials. An understanding of entropy and its evolution in electromagnetic interactions bridges the boundaries between electromagnetism and thermodynamics. The approach used here is a Liouville-based statistical-mechanical theory. I show that the microscopic entropy is reversible and the macroscopic entropy satisfies an H theorem. The spectral entropy development can be very useful for studying the frequency response of materials. Using a projection-operator based nonequilibrium entropy, different equations are derived for the entropy and entropy production and are applied tomore » the polarization, magnetization, and macroscopic fields. I begin by proving an exact H theorem for the entropy, progress to application of time-dependent entropy in electromagnetics, and then apply the theory to relevant applications in electromagnetics. The paper concludes with a discussion of the relationship of the frequency-domain form of the entropy to the permittivity, permeability, and impedance.« less

  6. Toward a better understanding of nearshore meteotsunami evolution, and effective meteotsunami early-warning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheremet, A.; Li, C.; Shrira, V. I.

    2017-12-01

    We present high-resolution observations collected in 2008 on the Atcahfalaya shelf that capture the shoaling evolution of a meteotsunami (MT), including the disintegration into the train of solitons (solibore). One of the intriguing elements of this process is a spectacular 1.5-m solitary-wave (soliton), that precedes the arrival of the MT solibore by approximately 5 min, reaching the observation site propagating through a background of nearly-calm waters (20-cm height wind waves). Solitons, products of the MT disintegration process, are observed at all experiment sites, covering approx. 200 km shoreline. We interpret observations employing numerical simulations of a simplified hydrodynamic model based on the variable coefficient KdV equation. The analysis shows that observed wide-spread soliton presence and the soliton/solibore formation are the result of a complicated evolution process involving refraction, collision, and nonlinear interaction of multiple meteotsunami waves.Our results highlight the substantial lack of detail of the current picture of the nonlinear transformation of a MT from generation to its shoreline manifestation. A realistic reconstruction of MT evolution is at present almost impossible based on the current poor spatial and temporal resolution MT observations, overwhelmingly confined to the shoreline. Since the MTs tend to disintegrate into very short (down to 10s) pulses, even modern tidal gauges (1 min resolution) fail to capture essential features of its evolution. We also briefly discuss an ongoing field experiment that carries further the effort to collect high-resolution MT measurements, and that will investigate and test methodologies for early warning systems.

  7. Oxidative Alteration of Ferrous Smectites and Implications for the Redox Evolution of Early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemtob, Steven M.; Nickerson, Ryan D.; Morris, Richard V.; Agresti, David G.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2017-12-01

    Surface conditions on early Mars were likely anoxic, similar to early Earth, but the timing of the evolution to oxic conditions characteristic of contemporary Mars is unresolved. Ferrous trioctahedral smectites are the thermodynamically predicted products of anoxic basalt weathering, but orbital analyses of Noachian-aged terrains find primarily Fe3+-bearing clay minerals. Rover-based detection of Fe2+-bearing trioctahedral smectites at Gale Crater suggests that ferrous smectites are the unoxidized progenitors of orbitally detected ferric smectites. To assess this pathway, we conducted ambient-temperature oxidative alteration experiments on four synthetic ferrous smectites having molar Fe/(Mg + Fe) from 1.00 to 0.33. Smectite suspension in air-saturated solutions produced incomplete oxidation (24-38% Fe3+/ΣFe). Additional smectite oxidation occurred upon reexposure to air-saturated solutions after anoxic hydrothermal recrystallization, which accelerated cation and charge redistribution in the octahedral sheet. Oxidation was accompanied by contraction of the octahedral sheet (d(060) decreased from 1.53-1.56 Å to 1.52 Å), consistent with a shift toward dioctahedral structure. Ferrous smectite oxidation by aqueous hydrogen peroxide solutions resulted in nearly complete Fe2+ oxidation but also led to partial Fe3+ ejection from the structure, producing nanoparticulate hematite. Reflectance spectra of oxidized smectites were characterized by (Fe3+,Mg)2-OH bands at 2.28-2.30 μm, consistent with oxidative formation of dioctahedral nontronite. Accordingly, ferrous smectites are plausible precursors to observed ferric smectites on Mars, and their presence in late-Noachian sedimentary units suggests that anoxic conditions may have persisted on Mars beyond the Noachian.

  8. Clonal status of actionable driver events and the timing of mutational processes in cancer evolution

    PubMed Central

    McGranahan, Nicholas; Favero, Francesco; de Bruin, Elza C.; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Szallasi, Zoltan; Swanton, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Deciphering whether actionable driver mutations are found in all or a subset of tumor cells will likely be required to improve drug development and precision medicine strategies. We analyzed nine cancer types to determine the subclonal frequencies of driver events, to time mutational processes during cancer evolution, and to identify drivers of subclonal expansions. Although mutations in known driver genes typically occurred early in cancer evolution, we also identified later subclonal “actionable” mutations, including BRAF(V600E), IDH1(R132H), PIK3CA(E545K), EGFR(L858R), and KRAS(G12D), which may compromise the efficacy of targeted therapy approaches. More than 20% of IDH1 mutations in glioblastomas, and 15% of mutations in genes in the PI3K(phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase)–AKT–mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signaling axis across all tumor types were subclonal. Mutations in the RAS–MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase) signaling axis were less likely to be subclonal than mutations in genes associated with PI3K-AKT-mTORsignaling. Analysis of late mutations revealed a link between APOBEC-mediated mutagenesis and the acquisition of subclonal driver mutations and uncovered putative cancer genes involved in subclonal expansions, including CTNNA2 and ATXN1. Our results provide a pan-cancer census of driver events within the context of intratumor heterogeneity and reveal patterns of tumor evolution across cancers. The frequent presence of subclonal driver mutations suggests the need to stratify targeted therapy response according to the proportion of tumor cells in which the driver is identified. PMID:25877892

  9. Clonal status of actionable driver events and the timing of mutational processes in cancer evolution.

    PubMed

    McGranahan, Nicholas; Favero, Francesco; de Bruin, Elza C; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Szallasi, Zoltan; Swanton, Charles

    2015-04-15

    Deciphering whether actionable driver mutations are found in all or a subset of tumor cells will likely be required to improve drug development and precision medicine strategies. We analyzed nine cancer types to determine the subclonal frequencies of driver events, to time mutational processes during cancer evolution, and to identify drivers of subclonal expansions. Although mutations in known driver genes typically occurred early in cancer evolution, we also identified later subclonal "actionable" mutations, including BRAF (V600E), IDH1 (R132H), PIK3CA (E545K), EGFR (L858R), and KRAS (G12D), which may compromise the efficacy of targeted therapy approaches. More than 20% of IDH1 mutations in glioblastomas, and 15% of mutations in genes in the PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase)-AKT-mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signaling axis across all tumor types were subclonal. Mutations in the RAS-MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase) signaling axis were less likely to be subclonal than mutations in genes associated with PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling. Analysis of late mutations revealed a link between APOBEC-mediated mutagenesis and the acquisition of subclonal driver mutations and uncovered putative cancer genes involved in subclonal expansions, including CTNNA2 and ATXN1. Our results provide a pan-cancer census of driver events within the context of intratumor heterogeneity and reveal patterns of tumor evolution across cancers. The frequent presence of subclonal driver mutations suggests the need to stratify targeted therapy response according to the proportion of tumor cells in which the driver is identified. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. On the Evolution of the Late-time Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of the Outburst of the Recurrent Nova RS Ophiuchi (2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, V. A. R. M.; Bode, M. F.; Williams, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    We modelled the late-time Hubble Space Telescope imaging of RS Ophiuchi with models from Ribeiro et al. (2009), which at the time due to the unknown availability of simultaneous ground-based spectroscopy left some open questions as to the evolution of the expanding nebular from the early to the late time observations. Initial emission line identifications suggest that no forbidden lines are present in the spectra and that the emission lines arising in the region of the WFPC2 F502N images are due to N II and He I + Fe II. The best model fit to the spectrum is one where the outer faster moving material expands linearly with time while the inner over-density material either suffered some deceleration or did not change in physical size. The origin of this inner over-density requires further exploration.

  11. On the Time Evolution of Gamma-Ray Burst Pulses: A Self-Consistent Description.

    PubMed

    Ryde; Svensson

    2000-01-20

    For the first time, the consequences of combining two well-established empirical relations that describe different aspects of the spectral evolution of observed gamma-ray burst (GRB) pulses are explored. These empirical relations are (1) the hardness-intensity correlation and (2) the hardness-photon fluence correlation. From these we find a self-consistent, quantitative, and compact description for the temporal evolution of pulse decay phases within a GRB light curve. In particular, we show that in the case in which the two empirical relations are both valid, the instantaneous photon flux (intensity) must behave as 1&solm0;&parl0;1+t&solm0;tau&parr0;, where tau is a time constant that can be expressed in terms of the parameters of the two empirical relations. The time evolution is fully defined by two initial constants and two parameters. We study a complete sample of 83 bright GRB pulses observed by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory and identify a major subgroup of GRB pulses ( approximately 45%) which satisfy the spectral-temporal behavior described above. In particular, the decay phase follows a reciprocal law in time. It is unclear what physics causes such a decay phase.

  12. The evolution of photosynthesis...again?

    PubMed

    Rothschild, Lynn J

    2008-08-27

    'Replaying the tape' is an intriguing 'would it happen again?' exercise. With respect to broad evolutionary innovations, such as photosynthesis, the answers are central to our search for life elsewhere. Photosynthesis permits a large planetary biomass on Earth. Specifically, oxygenic photosynthesis has allowed an oxygenated atmosphere and the evolution of large metabolically demanding creatures, including ourselves. There are at least six prerequisites for the evolution of biological carbon fixation: a carbon-based life form; the presence of inorganic carbon; the availability of reductants; the presence of light; a light-harvesting mechanism to convert the light energy into chemical energy; and carboxylating enzymes. All were present on the early Earth. To provide the evolutionary pressure, organic carbon must be a scarce resource in contrast to inorganic carbon. The probability of evolving a carboxylase is approached by creating an inventory of carbon-fixation enzymes and comparing them, leading to the conclusion that carbon fixation in general is basic to life and has arisen multiple times. Certainly, the evolutionary pressure to evolve new pathways for carbon fixation would have been present early in evolution. From knowledge about planetary systems and extraterrestrial chemistry, if organic carbon-based life occurs elsewhere, photosynthesis -- although perhaps not oxygenic photosynthesis -- would also have evolved.

  13. The origin and early evolution of Sauria: reassessing the permian Saurian fossil record and the timing of the crocodile-lizard divergence.

    PubMed

    Ezcurra, Martín D; Scheyer, Torsten M; Butler, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Sauria is the crown-group of Diapsida and is subdivided into Lepidosauromorpha and Archosauromorpha, comprising a high percentage of the diversity of living and fossil tetrapods. The split between lepidosauromorphs and archosauromorphs (the crocodile-lizard, or bird-lizard, divergence) is considered one of the key calibration points for molecular analyses of tetrapod phylogeny. Saurians have a very rich Mesozoic and Cenozoic fossil record, but their late Paleozoic (Permian) record is problematic. Several Permian specimens have been referred to Sauria, but the phylogenetic affinity of some of these records remains questionable. We reexamine and review all of these specimens here, providing new data on early saurian evolution including osteohistology, and present a new morphological phylogenetic dataset. We support previous studies that find that no valid Permian record for Lepidosauromorpha, and we also reject some of the previous referrals of Permian specimens to Archosauromorpha. The most informative Permian archosauromorph is Protorosaurus speneri from the middle Late Permian of Western Europe. A historically problematic specimen from the Late Permian of Tanzania is redescribed and reidentified as a new genus and species of basal archosauromorph: Aenigmastropheus parringtoni. The supposed protorosaur Eorasaurus olsoni from the Late Permian of Russia is recovered among Archosauriformes and may be the oldest known member of the group but the phylogenetic support for this position is low. The assignment of Archosaurus rossicus from the latest Permian of Russia to the archosauromorph clade Proterosuchidae is supported. Our revision suggests a minimum fossil calibration date for the crocodile-lizard split of 254.7 Ma. The occurrences of basal archosauromorphs in the northern (30°N) and southern (55°S) parts of Pangea imply a wider paleobiogeographic distribution for the group during the Late Permian than previously appreciated. Early archosauromorph growth

  14. The Origin and Early Evolution of Sauria: Reassessing the Permian Saurian Fossil Record and the Timing of the Crocodile-Lizard Divergence

    PubMed Central

    Ezcurra, Martín D.; Scheyer, Torsten M.; Butler, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Sauria is the crown-group of Diapsida and is subdivided into Lepidosauromorpha and Archosauromorpha, comprising a high percentage of the diversity of living and fossil tetrapods. The split between lepidosauromorphs and archosauromorphs (the crocodile-lizard, or bird-lizard, divergence) is considered one of the key calibration points for molecular analyses of tetrapod phylogeny. Saurians have a very rich Mesozoic and Cenozoic fossil record, but their late Paleozoic (Permian) record is problematic. Several Permian specimens have been referred to Sauria, but the phylogenetic affinity of some of these records remains questionable. We reexamine and review all of these specimens here, providing new data on early saurian evolution including osteohistology, and present a new morphological phylogenetic dataset. We support previous studies that find that no valid Permian record for Lepidosauromorpha, and we also reject some of the previous referrals of Permian specimens to Archosauromorpha. The most informative Permian archosauromorph is Protorosaurus speneri from the middle Late Permian of Western Europe. A historically problematic specimen from the Late Permian of Tanzania is redescribed and reidentified as a new genus and species of basal archosauromorph: Aenigmastropheus parringtoni. The supposed protorosaur Eorasaurus olsoni from the Late Permian of Russia is recovered among Archosauriformes and may be the oldest known member of the group but the phylogenetic support for this position is low. The assignment of Archosaurus rossicus from the latest Permian of Russia to the archosauromorph clade Proterosuchidae is supported. Our revision suggests a minimum fossil calibration date for the crocodile-lizard split of 254.7 Ma. The occurrences of basal archosauromorphs in the northern (30°N) and southern (55°S) parts of Pangea imply a wider paleobiogeographic distribution for the group during the Late Permian than previously appreciated. Early archosauromorph growth

  15. Characteristics and time evolution of a hollow cathode produced glow discharge plasma in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregor, Joseph Atilla

    Current radar systems use mechanical directors and phased array technology for beam steering. Use of a sheet plasma as a microwave reflector promises several advantages over these methods. Operation is inherently broad-band, since all frequencies below the plasma frequency are reflected. The orientation and shape of the reflector may be changed directly through electronic control without resort to moving parts or expensive RF switches. The relatively fast plasma formation and extinction times ([/approx]10/ /mus) allow for rapid redirection of the microwave beam. An experimental system, dubbed the Agile Mirror, has been constructed using a cylindrical LexanTM vacuum chamber suspended within a water cooled Helmholtz coil pair capable of producing a uniform 500 Gauss field. Using this system we have created plasmas capable of reflecting 10 GHz microwaves with characteristics comparable to that of a plane metallic reflector. Most previous glow discharge work has concentrated either on the DC characteristics, or on the very early evolution (<1-2 μs), of the discharge. To create a practical agile mirror direction, we must be able to produce a stable, flat, homogeneous plasma sheet with predictable characteristics timescales from 5 μs to 1 ms-a regime where little pertinent quantitative data exists. This work concentrates on diagnosing the time resolved behavior of the agile mirror plasma during the mid-time, from t = 5-300 μs, in a regime which accentuates observed changes in the discharge circuit characteristics. Measurements on an air discharge produced using VD/approx2.2 kV, p ≈ 208 mTorr, and B ≈ 250 G reveal an ne=1011/ cm-3,/ Te=1[-]3 eV plasma with distinct negative glow, Faraday dark space, and positive column regions. Analysis of time resolved potential, temperature, and spectroscopic data reveal that this discharge transitions-on time scales of [/approx]100/ /mus-into a pure negative glow discharge. The characteristics and evolution of the discharge are

  16. Workshop on Early Crustal Genesis: Implications from Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, W. C. (Compiler)

    1981-01-01

    Ways to foster increased study of the early evolution of the Earth, considering the planet as a whole, were explored and recommendations were made to NASA with the intent of exploring optimal ways for integrating Archean studies with problems of planetary evolution. Major themes addressed include: (1) Archean contribution to constraints for modeling planetary evolution; (2) Archean surface conditions and processes as clues to early planetary history; and (3) Archean evidence for physical, chemical and isotopic transfer processes in early planetary crusts. Ten early crustal evolution problems are outlined.

  17. Early human communication helps in understanding language evolution.

    PubMed

    Lenti Boero, Daniela

    2014-12-01

    Building a theory on extant species, as Ackermann et al. do, is a useful contribution to the field of language evolution. Here, I add another living model that might be of interest: human language ontogeny in the first year of life. A better knowledge of this phase might help in understanding two more topics among the "several building blocks of a comprehensive theory of the evolution of spoken language" indicated in their conclusion by Ackermann et al., that is, the foundation of the co-evolution of linguistic motor skills with the auditory skills underlying speech perception, and the possible phylogenetic interactions of protospeech production with referential capabilities.

  18. The nucleosynthetic origins and chemical evolution of phosphorus in the early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frebel, Anna

    2013-10-01

    Relatively little is known about the chemical evolution of the element phosphorus, despite its relatively large abundance in the Sun and its importance for biological life. The goal of this archive proposal is to establish the chemical evolution trend of phosphorus, extending our knowledge from solar metallicity to stars with less than 1/1000th the solar metallicity.Previous studies have used weak near-infrared P I lines to establish phosphorus abundance trends from -1.0 < [Fe/H] < 0. We have identified a strong P I doublet in the UV at 2136 Angstroms, which is present in the spectra of 22 stars available in the HST archives. Our study will {1} improve on the limited observations of the abundance trend at high metallicity and extend it to metallicities lower by 2 dex and {2} determine whether [P/Fe] flattens out towards lower metallicities {like the alpha-elements Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti} or whether it continues to increase {like Co and Zn}. Our results will provide the first tight constraints on the nucleosynthesis of phosphorus and its production sites in the early Universe.We request one semester of funding to support a graduate student to lead the spectral analysis work, one month of summer salary, and miscellaneous travel and publication costs.

  19. Novel insights into early neuroanatomical evolution in penguins from the oldest described penguin brain endocast.

    PubMed

    Proffitt, J V; Clarke, J A; Scofield, R P

    2016-08-01

    Digital methodologies for rendering the gross morphology of the brain from X-ray computed tomography data have expanded our current understanding of the origin and evolution of avian neuroanatomy and provided new perspectives on the cognition and behavior of birds in deep time. However, fossil skulls germane to extracting digital endocasts from early stem members of extant avian lineages remain exceptionally rare. Data from early-diverging species of major avian subclades provide key information on ancestral morphologies in Aves and shifts in gross neuroanatomical structure that have occurred within those groups. Here we describe data on the gross morphology of the brain from a mid-to-late Paleocene penguin fossil from New Zealand. This most basal and geochronologically earliest-described endocast from the penguin clade indicates that described neuroanatomical features of early stem penguins, such as lower telencephalic lateral expansion, a relatively wider cerebellum, and lack of cerebellar folding, were present far earlier in penguin history than previously inferred. Limited dorsal expansion of the wulst in the new fossil is a feature seen in outgroup waterbird taxa such as Gaviidae (Loons) and diving Procellariiformes (Shearwaters, Diving Petrels, and allies), indicating that loss of flight may not drastically affect neuroanatomy in diving taxa. Wulst enlargement in the penguin lineage is first seen in the late Eocene, at least 25 million years after loss of flight and cooption of the flight stroke for aquatic diving. Similar to the origin of avian flight, major shifts in gross brain morphology follow, but do not appear to evolve quickly after, acquisition of a novel locomotor mode. Enlargement of the wulst shows a complex pattern across waterbirds, and may be linked to sensory modifications related to prey choice and foraging strategy. © 2016 Anatomical Society.

  20. Enceladus-Mimas paradox: a result of different early evolutions of satellites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czechowski, Leszek; Witek, Piotr

    2015-04-01

    the coefficient of the heat conduction in the considered layer, i.e.: kconv =Nu k. This approach is used successfully in parameterized theory of convection for SSC in the Earth and other planets (e.g. [3], [4]). Parameterization of liquid state convection (LSC) is even simpler. Ra in molten region is very high (usually higher than 1016). The LSC could be very intensive resulting in almost adiabatic temperature gradient given by: dT-= gαmT-, dr cpm where αm and cpm are thermal expansion coefficient and specific heat in molten region, g is the local gravity. In Enceladus and Mimas the adiabatic gradient is low and therefore LSC region is almost isothermal. 2. Results: Comparison of thermal models of Mimas and Enceladus indicates that conditions favorable for starting tidal heating (interior hot enough) lasted for short time (~107yr) in Mimas and for ~108 yr in Enceladus. This could explain Mimas-Enceladus paradox. 3. Conclusions: The Mimas-Enceladus paradox is probably the result of short time when Mimas was hot enough to allow for substantial tidal heating. The Mimas-Tethys resonance formed later when Mimas was already cool. (see also [1, 4]) The full text of the paper will be published in Acta Geophysica [5]. Acknowledgements: The research is partly supported by National Science Centre (grant 2011/ 01/ B/ ST10/06653). References : [1] Czechowski, L. (2014) Some remarks on the early evolution of Enceladus. Planet. Sp. Sc. 104, 185-199. [2] Merk, R., Breuer, D., Spohn, T. (2002). Numerical modeling of 26Al induced radioactive melting of asteroids concerning accretion. Icarus 199, 183-191. [3] Sharpe, H.N., Peltier, W.R., (1978) Parameterized mantle convection and the Earth's thermal history. Geophys. Res. Lett. 5, 737-740. [4] Czechowski, L. (2006) Parameterized model of convection driven by tidal and radiogenic heating. Adv. Space Res. 38, 788-793. [5] Czechowski, L., Witek, P. (2015) Comparisons of early evolutions of Mimas and Enceladus. Submitted to Acta

  1. Time constants for the evolution of sea spray droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreas, Edgar L.

    1990-11-01

    Sea spray droplets start with the same temperature as the ocean surface from which they form. In high-latitude, polar-low conditions, they therefore cool and evaporate in a relatively cold wind and may alter the air sea exchange of heat and moisture. This paper presents equations that model the thermal and size (moisture) evolution of a spray droplet from the time it forms until it reaches equilibrium with its environment. The model does well when tested against some of the scanty data available on the evolution of saline droplets. We parameterize the thermal and size evolution of spray droplets with the time constants τT and τr, which are, respectively, the times required for a droplet to come to within e-1 of its equilibrium temperature and within e-1 of its equilibrium radius. τr is always about three orders of magnitude larger than τT; the thermal exchange is thus complete before the moisture exchange even starts. Consequently, the ambient humidity has little effect on the thermal exchange rate, and the initial droplet temperature has negligible effect on the moisture exchange rate. We also parameterize the gravitational settling of droplets and their potential for turbulent suspension with the time scales τf and τw, respectively. Comparing the four time scales, we see that spray droplets with initial radii less than 10μm reach both thermal and size equilibrium with the ambient air. Droplets with initial radii greater than 300μm, on the other hand, fall back into the sea before exchanging appreciable heat or moisture; they thus have little impact on air sea exchange. In the mid-range, droplets with initial radii between 10 and 300μm, the physics is more complex. Even after comparing τT and τr with τf and τw, we still cannot say unequivocally which process is fastest

  2. Fire feedbacks over geological time and the evolution of atmospheric oxygen concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, B.; Belcher, C.; Lenton, T. M.

    2017-12-01

    During the 4.5 billion year history of the Earth, the concentration of oxygen in the atmosphere has risen from trace levels to today's 21%. Yet over the last 400 million years, O2 concentration appears to have remained within a relatively narrow range (around 15% - 30%), despite dramatic changes in the nature of global biogeochemical cycling. This stability has been crucial for continued animal evolution, and is thought to have arisen through feedbacks between oxygen, wildfire and plant productivity: the strong oxygen- dependence of fire initiation and spread means that global photosynthetic primary productivity is suppressed when oxygen levels are high, and enhanced when levels are low. We present biogeochemical modelling of the long term carbon and oxygen cycles, which aims to capture the operation of the wildfire feedback alongside other key processes. We find that wildfire can effectively stabilize long term oxygen concentrations, but that the nature of this feedback has changed as plant evolution has provided different fuels. Specifically, the evolution of early angiosperms during the Cretaceous period provided new understory fuels that more easily facilitated crown and canopy fires. Adding these dynamics to our model produces a more stable system over long timescales, and the model predicts that oxygen concentration has declined towards the present day - a prediction that is supported by other independent estimates.

  3. Early time excited-state structural evolution of pyranine in methanol revealed by femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanli; Liu, Weimin; Tang, Longteng; Oscar, Breland; Han, Fangyuan; Fang, Chong

    2013-07-25

    To understand chemical reactivity of molecules in condensed phase in real time, a structural dynamics technique capable of monitoring molecular conformational motions on their intrinsic time scales, typically on femtoseconds to picoseconds, is needed. We have studied a strong photoacid pyranine (8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid, HPTS, pK(a)* ≈ 0) in pure methanol and observed that excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) is absent, in sharp contrast with our previous work on HPTS in aqueous solutions wherein ESPT prevails following photoexcitation. Two transient vibrational marker bands at ~1477 (1454) and 1532 (1528) cm(-1) appear in CH3OH (CD3OD), respectively, rising within the instrument response time of ~140 fs and decaying with 390-470 (490-1400) fs and ~200 ps time constants in CH3OH (CD3OD). We attribute the mode onset to small-scale coherent proton motion along the pre-existing H-bonding chain between HPTS and methanol, and the two decay stages to the low-frequency skeletal motion-modulated Franck-Condon relaxation within ~1 ps and subsequent rotational diffusion of H-bonding partners in solution before fluorescence. The early time kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of ~3 upon methanol deuteration argues active proton motions particularly within the first few picoseconds when coherent skeletal motions are underdamped. Pronounced quantum beats are observed for high-frequency modes consisting of strong phenolic COH rocking (1532 cm(-1)) or H-out-of-plane wagging motions (952 cm(-1)) due to anharmonic coupling to coherent low-frequency modes impulsively excited at ca. 96, 120, and 168 cm(-1). The vivid illustration of atomic motions of HPTS in varying H-bonding geometry with neighboring methanol molecules unravels the multidimensional energy relaxation pathways immediately following photoexcitation, and provides compelling evidence that, in lieu of ESPT, the photoacidity of HPTS promptly activates characteristic low-frequency skeletal motions to search phase

  4. A revision of Sanpasaurus yaoi Young, 1944 from the Early Jurassic of China, and its relevance to the early evolution of Sauropoda (Dinosauria)

    PubMed Central

    Upchurch, Paul; Mannion, Philip D.; Sullivan, Corwin; Butler, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The Early Jurassic of China has long been recognized for its diverse array of sauropodomorph dinosaurs. However, the contribution of this record to our understanding of early sauropod evolution is complicated by a dearth of information on important transitional taxa. We present a revision of the poorly known taxon Sanpasaurus yaoi Young, 1944 from the late Early Jurassic Ziliujing Formation of Sichuan Province, southwest China. Initially described as the remains of an ornithopod ornithischian, we demonstrate that the material catalogued as IVPP V156 is unambiguously referable to Sauropoda. Although represented by multiple individuals of equivocal association, Sanpasaurus is nonetheless diagnosable with respect to an autapomorphic feature of the holotypic dorsal vertebral series. Additional material thought to be collected from the type locality is tentatively referred to Sanpasaurus. If correctly attributed, a second autapomorphy is present in a referred humerus. The presence of a dorsoventrally compressed pedal ungual in Sanpasaurus is of particular interest, with taxa possessing this typically ‘vulcanodontid’ character exhibiting a much broader geographic distribution than previously thought. Furthermore, the association of this trait with other features of Sanpasaurus that are broadly characteristic of basal eusauropods underscores the mosaic nature of the early sauropod–eusauropod transition. Our revision of Sanpasaurus has palaeobiogeographic implications for Early Jurassic sauropods, with evidence that the group maintained a cosmopolitan Pangaean distribution. PMID:27781168

  5. Influence of first-time mothers' early employment on severe early childhood caries in their child.

    PubMed

    Plutzer, Kamila; Keirse, Marc J N C

    2012-01-01

    Aim. To examine whether mothers' early employment status is related to the development of severe early childhood caries in their child. Methods. Questionnaire survey of 429 first-time mothers in metropolitan Adelaide, South Australia, and dental examinations of their child at 20 months of age. Results. At 20 ± 2.5 months of age, 5.6% of children exhibited caries defined as one or more demineralized or cavitated lesions on the upper incisors. Of the mothers, 52.2% had no paid employment, 39.6% were part-time and 8.2% full-time employed. Overall, mothers' participation in the workforce had no influence on the frequency of severe early childhood caries in their child, but there was a significant interaction with family structure. For mothers without employment there was no difference between single, and two-parent families, but children with an employed single mother more frequently had caries than those with a working mother in a two-parent family (P < 0.04). However, there were no significant differences in children's reported general health. Conclusions. The data indicate a need to explore strategies that may assist single mothers and especially those in the workforce to prevent severe early childhood caries in their child.

  6. Evolution of Late-type Galaxies in a Cluster Environment: Effects of High-speed Multiple Encounters with Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jeong-Sun; Park, Changbom; Banerjee, Arunima; Hwang, Ho Seong

    2018-04-01

    Late-type galaxies falling into a cluster would evolve being influenced by the interactions with both the cluster and the nearby cluster member galaxies. Most numerical studies, however, tend to focus on the effects of the former with little work done on those of the latter. We thus perform a numerical study on the evolution of a late-type galaxy interacting with neighboring early-type galaxies at high speed using hydrodynamic simulations. Based on the information obtained from the Coma cluster, we set up the simulations for the case where a Milky Way–like late-type galaxy experiences six consecutive collisions with twice as massive early-type galaxies having hot gas in their halos at the closest approach distances of 15–65 h ‑1 kpc at the relative velocities of 1500–1600 km s‑1. Our simulations show that the evolution of the late-type galaxy can be significantly affected by the accumulated effects of the high-speed multiple collisions with the early-type galaxies, such as on cold gas content and star formation activity of the late-type galaxy, particularly through the hydrodynamic interactions between cold disk and hot gas halos. We find that the late-type galaxy can lose most of its cold gas after the six collisions and have more star formation activity during the collisions. By comparing our simulation results with those of galaxy–cluster interactions, we claim that the role of the galaxy–galaxy interactions on the evolution of late-type galaxies in clusters could be comparable with that of the galaxy–cluster interactions, depending on the dynamical history.

  7. WMAP - A Portrait of the Early Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, Edward J.

    2008-01-01

    A host of astrophysical observations suggest that early Universe was incredibly hot, dense, and homogeneous. A powerful probe of this time is provided by the relic radiation which we refer to today as the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Images produced from this light contain the earliest glimpse of the Universe after the 'Big Bang' and the signature of the evolution of its contents. By exploiting these clues, constraints on the age, mass density, and geometry of the early Universe can be derived. A brief history of the evolution of the microwave radiometer systems and map making approaches used in advancing these aspects our understanding of cosmological will be reviewed. In addition, an overview of the results from NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy (WMAP) will be presented.

  8. Archean Pb Isotope Evolution: Implications for the Early Earth.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vervoort, J. D.; Thorpe, R.; Albarede, F.; Blichert-Toft, J.

    2008-12-01

    The U-Pb isotope system provides us with a powerful tool for understanding the chemical evolution of the Earth. Pb isotopes in Archean rocks, however, have not been widely utilized because U mobility makes initial Pb isotope ratios from old silicate rocks difficult, if not impossible, to determine. Galenas in syngenetic volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits, however, provide snapshots of initial Pb ratios because their Pb isotopic composition is time invariant at their formation (U/Pb=0). The Pb isotopic record from galenas from rocks of all age have been utilized for over 70 years to answer a wide range of scientific problems beginning with Al Nier's pioneering work analyzing Pb isotopes in the 1930's but are no longer widely used by the isotopic community because they have been produced by older TIMS techniques. We have begun a re-examination of Archean Pb by an extensive analysis of over 100 galena samples from Archean VMS deposits throughout the Superior and Slave Provinces in Canada as well as from other VMS deposits in Finland, South Africa and Western Australia. The goal of this work is to provide modern, high precision measurements and update an old, but venerable, Pb isotopic data set. We feel these data provide important constraints on not only the Pb isotopic evolution of the Earth, but planetary differentiation and recycling processes operating in the first 2 b.y. of Earth's history. Our analytical techniques include dissolving the Pb sulfide minerals, purifying them with ion chromatography, and analyzing them using MC-ICPMS at both Washington State University (Neptune) and Ecole Normale Superieure in Lyon, France (Nu). All Pb solutions are doped with Tl in order to correct for mass fractionation. In this abstract we report preliminary galena Pb isotope data from 6 VMS deposits in the Abitibi greenstone belt: Chibougamu, Matagami, Noranda, Normetal, Timmins, and Val d"Or. These deposits are all approximately 2.7 Ga in age but in detail vary from 2

  9. Modern Microbial Ecosystems are a Key to Understanding Our Biosphere's Early Evolution and its Contributions To The Atmosphere and Rock Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The survival of our early biosphere depended upon efficient coordination anion- diverse microbial populations. Microbial mats exhibit a 3.46-billion-year fossil record, thus they are the oldest known ecosystems. Photosynthetic microbial mats were key because, today, sunlight powers more than 99 percent of global primary productivity. Thus photosynthetic ecosystems have affected the atmosphere profoundly and have created the most pervasive, easily-detected fossils. Photosynthetic biospheres elsewhere will be most detectible via telescopes or spacecraft. As a part of the Astrobiology Institute, our Ames Microbial Ecosystems group examines the roles played by ecological processes in the early evolution of our biosphere, as recorded in geologic fossils and in the macromolecules of living cells: (1) We are defining the microbial mat microenvironment, which was an important milieu for early evolution. (2) We are comparing mats in contrasting environments to discern strategies of adaptation and diversification, traits that were key for long-term survival. (3) We have selected sites that mimic key environmental attributes of early Earth and thereby focus upon evolutionary adaptations to long-term changes in the global environment. (4) Our studies of gas exchange contribute to better estimates of biogenic gases in Earth's early atmosphere. This group therefore directly addresses the question: How have the Earth and its biosphere influenced each other over time Our studies strengthen the systematics for interpreting the microbial fossil record and thereby enhance astrobiological studies of martian samples. Our models of biogenic gas emissions will enhance models of atmospheres that might be detected on inhabited extrasolar planets. This work therefore also addresses the question: How can other biospheres be recogniZed" Our choice of field sites helps us explore Earth's evolving early environment. For example, modern mats that occupy thermal springs and certain freshwater

  10. Plio-Pleistocene time evolution of the 100-ky cycle in marine paleoclimate records

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Jeffrey; Maasch, Kirk A.

    1992-01-01

    To constrain theories for the dynamical evolution of global ice mass through the late Neogene, it is important to determine whether major changes in the record were gradual or rapid. Of particular interest is the evolution of the near 100-ky ice age cycle in the middle Pleistocene. We have applied a new technique based on multiple taper spectrum analysis which allows us to model the time evolution of quasi-periodic signals. This technique uses both phase and amplitude information, and enables us to address the question of abrupt versus gradual onset of the 100-ky periodicity in the middle Pleistocene.

  11. Chemical evolution and the preservation of organic compounds on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia; Mancinelli, Rocco L.

    1989-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the environment on early Mars and early Earth were very similar. Since life is abundant on Earth, it seems likely that conditions on early Earth were conducive to chemical evolution and the origin of life. The similarity between early Mars and early Earth encourages the hypothesis that chemical evolution might have also occurred on Mars, but that decreasing temperatures and the loss of its atmosphere brought the evolution to a halt. The possibility of finding on Mars remnants of organic material dating back to this early clement period is addressed.

  12. Online evolution reconstruction from a single measurement record with random time intervals for quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hua; Su, Yang; Wang, Rong; Zhu, Yong; Shen, Huiping; Pu, Tao; Wu, Chuanxin; Zhao, Jiyong; Zhang, Baofu; Xu, Zhiyong

    2017-10-01

    Online reconstruction of a time-variant quantum state from the encoding/decoding results of quantum communication is addressed by developing a method of evolution reconstruction from a single measurement record with random time intervals. A time-variant two-dimensional state is reconstructed on the basis of recovering its expectation value functions of three nonorthogonal projectors from a random single measurement record, which is composed from the discarded qubits of the six-state protocol. The simulated results prove that our method is robust to typical metro quantum channels. Our work extends the Fourier-based method of evolution reconstruction from the version for a regular single measurement record with equal time intervals to a unified one, which can be applied to arbitrary single measurement records. The proposed protocol of evolution reconstruction runs concurrently with the one of quantum communication, which can facilitate the online quantum tomography.

  13. Insights into the early evolution of animal calcium signaling machinery: A unicellular point of view

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xinjiang; Wang, Xiangbing; Patel, Sandip; Clapham, David E.

    2014-01-01

    The basic principles of Ca2+ regulation emerged early in prokaryotes. Ca2+ signaling acquired more extensive and varied functions when life evolved into multicellular eukaryotes with intracellular organelles. Animals, fungi and plants display differences in the mechanisms that control cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations. The aim of this review is to examine recent findings from comparative genomics of Ca2+ signaling molecules in close unicellular relatives of animals and in common unicellular ancestors of animals and fungi. Also discussed are the evolution and origins of the sperm-specific CatSper channel complex, cation/Ca2+ exchangers and four-domain voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. Newly identified evolutionary evidence suggests that the distinct Ca2+ signaling machineries in animals, plants and fungi likely originated from an ancient Ca2+ signaling machinery prior to early eukaryotic radiation. PMID:25498309

  14. Insights into the early evolution of animal calcium signaling machinery: a unicellular point of view.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xinjiang; Wang, Xiangbing; Patel, Sandip; Clapham, David E

    2015-03-01

    The basic principles of Ca(2+) regulation emerged early in prokaryotes. Ca(2+) signaling acquired more extensive and varied functions when life evolved into multicellular eukaryotes with intracellular organelles. Animals, fungi and plants display differences in the mechanisms that control cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations. The aim of this review is to examine recent findings from comparative genomics of Ca(2+) signaling molecules in close unicellular relatives of animals and in common unicellular ancestors of animals and fungi. Also discussed are the evolution and origins of the sperm-specific CatSper channel complex, cation/Ca(2+) exchangers and four-domain voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. Newly identified evolutionary evidence suggests that the distinct Ca(2+) signaling machineries in animals, plants and fungi likely originated from an ancient Ca(2+) signaling machinery prior to early eukaryotic radiation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Early-time dynamics of gluon fields in high energy nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guangyao; Fries, Rainer J.; Kapusta, Joseph I.; Li, Yang

    2015-12-01

    Nuclei colliding at very high energy create a strong, quasiclassical gluon field during the initial phase of their interaction. We present an analytic calculation of the initial space-time evolution of this field in the limit of very high energies using a formal recursive solution of the Yang-Mills equations. We provide analytic expressions for the initial chromoelectric and chromomagnetic fields and for their energy-momentum tensor. In particular, we discuss event-averaged results for energy density and energy flow as well as for longitudinal and transverse pressure of this system. For example, we find that the ratio of longitudinal to transverse pressure very early in the system behaves as pL/pT=-[1 -3/2 a (Qτ ) 2] /[1 -1/a (Qτ ) 2] +O (Qτ ) 4 , where τ is the longitudinal proper time, Q is related to the saturation scales Qs of the two nuclei, and a =ln(Q2/m̂2) with m ̂ a scale to be defined later. Our results are generally applicable if τ ≲1 /Q . As already discussed in a previous paper, the transverse energy flow Si of the gluon field exhibits hydrodynamiclike contributions that follow transverse gradients of the energy density ∇iɛ . In addition, a rapidity-odd energy flow also emerges from the non-Abelian analog of Gauss' law and generates nonvanishing angular momentum of the field. We discuss the space-time picture that emerges from our analysis and its implications for observables in heavy-ion collisions.

  16. Biogeography in deep time - What do phylogenetics, geology, and paleoclimate tell us about early platyrrhine evolution?

    PubMed

    Kay, Richard F

    2015-01-01

    Molecular data have converged on a consensus about the genus-level phylogeny of extant platyrrhine monkeys, but for most extinct taxa and certainly for those older than the Pleistocene we must rely upon morphological evidence from fossils. This raises the question as to how well anatomical data mirror molecular phylogenies and how best to deal with discrepancies between the molecular and morphological data as we seek to extend our phylogenies to the placement of fossil taxa. Here I present parsimony-based phylogenetic analyses of extant and fossil platyrrhines based on an anatomical dataset of 399 dental characters and osteological features of the cranium and postcranium. I sample 16 extant taxa (one from each platyrrhine genus) and 20 extinct taxa of platyrrhines. The tree structure is constrained with a "molecular scaffold" of extant species as implemented in maximum parsimony using PAUP with the molecular-based 'backbone' approach. The data set encompasses most of the known extinct species of platyrrhines, ranging in age from latest Oligocene (∼26 Ma) to the Recent. The tree is rooted with extant catarrhines, and Late Eocene and Early Oligocene African anthropoids. Among the more interesting patterns to emerge are: (1) known early platyrrhines from the Late Oligocene through Early Miocene (26-16.5Ma) represent only stem platyrrhine taxa; (2) representatives of the three living platyrrhine families first occur between 15.7 Ma and 13.5 Ma; and (3) recently extinct primates from the Greater Antilles (Cuba, Jamaica, Hispaniola) are sister to the clade of extant platyrrhines and may have diverged in the Early Miocene. It is probable that the crown platyrrhine clade did not originate before about 20-24 Ma, a conclusion consistent with the phylogenetic analysis of fossil taxa presented here and with recent molecular clock estimates. The following biogeographic scenario is consistent with the phylogenetic findings and climatic and geologic evidence: Tropical South

  17. Early evolution of vertebrate photoreception: lessons from lampreys and lungfishes.

    PubMed

    Collin, Shaun P

    2009-03-01

    Lampreys (Agnatha) and lungfish (Dipnoi) are representatives of the earliest and the intermediate stages in vertebrate evolution, respectively, and survived in the Cambrian (approximately 540 mA, lampreys) and Devonian (approximately 400 mA, lungfishes) Periods. The unique phylogenetic position of these two groups presents us with an exciting opportunity to understand life in ancient times and to begin to trace the evolution of vision and photoreception in vertebrates. Using a multidisciplinary approach employing anatomical and molecular techniques, the evolution of photoreception is explored in these extant, living fossils to predict the environmental lighting conditions to which our vertebrate ancestors were exposed. Contrary to expectations, the retinae of the southern hemisphere lamprey (Geotria australis Gray, 1851) and the Australian lungfish (Neoceratodus forsteri Krefft, 1870) are far from "primitive," each possessing five types of photoreceptors, many with spectral filters for tuning the light. Detailed ultrastructural analysis reveals that all five receptor types in G. australis are cone-like, whereas N. forsteri possesses four cone types and a single type of rod. Each receptor type also contains a different visual pigment (opsin gene); that is, LWS, SWS1, SWS2, RhA and RhB in G. australis and LWS, SWS1, SWS2, Rh1 and Rh2 in N. forsteri, all of which are expressed within the retina and are sensitive to different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, providing the potential for pentachromatic and tetrachromatic color vision, respectively. © 2009 ISZS, Blackwell Publishing and IOZ/CAS.

  18. Vocal Development as a Guide to Modeling the Evolution of Language.

    PubMed

    Oller, D Kimbrough; Griebel, Ulrike; Warlaumont, Anne S

    2016-04-01

    Modeling of evolution and development of language has principally utilized mature units of spoken language, phonemes and words, as both targets and inputs. This approach cannot address the earliest phases of development because young infants are unable to produce such language features. We argue that units of early vocal development-protophones and their primitive illocutionary/perlocutionary forces-should be targeted in evolutionary modeling because they suggest likely units of hominin vocalization/communication shortly after the split from the chimpanzee/bonobo lineage, and because early development of spontaneous vocal capability is a logically necessary step toward vocal language, a root capability without which other crucial steps toward vocal language capability are impossible. Modeling of language evolution/development must account for dynamic change in early communicative units of form/function across time. We argue for interactive contributions of sender/infants and receiver/caregivers in a feedback loop involving both development and evolution and propose to begin computational modeling at the hominin break from the primate communicative background. Copyright © 2016 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  19. Sixth Symposium on Chemical Evolution and the Origin and Evolution of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acevedo, Sara (Editor); DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Editor); Chang, Sherwood (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    The 6th Symposium on Chemical Evolution and the Origin and Evolution of Life was convened at NASA Ames Research Center, November 17-20, 1997. This Symposium is convened every three years under the auspices of NASA's Exobiology Program Office. All Principal Investigators funded by this Program present their most recent research accomplishments at the Symposium. Scientific papers were presented in the following areas: cosmic evolution of the biogenic elements, prebiotic evolution (both planetary and chemical), evolution of early organisms and evolution of organisms in extreme environments, solar system exploration, and star and planet formation. The Symposium was attended by over 200 scientists from NASA centers and Universities nationwide.

  20. Evolution of neuronal signalling: transmitters and receptors.

    PubMed

    Hoyle, Charles H V

    2011-11-16

    Evolution is a dynamic process during which the genome should not be regarded as a static entity. Molecular and morphological information yield insights into the evolution of species and their phylogenetic relationships, and molecular information in particular provides information into the evolution of signalling processes. Many signalling systems have their origin in primitive, even unicellular, organisms. Through time, and as organismal complexity increased, certain molecules were employed as intercellular signal molecules. In the autonomic nervous system the basic unit of chemical transmission is a ligand and its cognate receptor. The general mechanisms underlying evolution of signal molecules and their cognate receptors have their basis in the alteration of the genome. In the past this has occurred in large-scale events, represented by two or more doublings of the whole genome, or large segments of the genome, early in the deuterostome lineage, after the emergence of urochordates and cephalochordates, and before the emergence of vertebrates. These duplications were followed by extensive remodelling involving subsequent small-scale changes, ranging from point mutations to exon duplication. Concurrent with these processes was multiple gene loss so that the modern genome contains roughly the same number of genes as in early deuterostomes despite the large-scale genomic duplications. In this review, the principles that underlie evolution that have led to large and small families of autonomic neurotransmitters and their receptors are discussed, with emphasis on G protein-coupled receptors. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A palaeoequatorial ornithischian and new constraints on early dinosaur diversification.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Paul M; Butler, Richard J; Mundil, Roland; Scheyer, Torsten M; Irmis, Randall B; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2014-09-22

    Current characterizations of early dinosaur evolution are incomplete: existing palaeobiological and phylogenetic scenarios are based on a fossil record dominated by saurischians and the implications of the early ornithischian record are often overlooked. Moreover, the timings of deep phylogenetic divergences within Dinosauria are poorly constrained owing to the absence of a rigorous chronostratigraphical framework for key Late Triassic-Early Jurassic localities. A new dinosaur from the earliest Jurassic of the Venezuelan Andes is the first basal ornithischian recovered from terrestrial deposits directly associated with a precise radioisotopic date and the first-named dinosaur from northern South America. It expands the early palaeogeographical range of Ornithischia to palaeoequatorial regions, an area sometimes thought to be devoid of early dinosaur taxa, and offers insights into early dinosaur growth rates, the evolution of sociality and the rapid tempo of the global dinosaur radiation following the end-Triassic mass extinction, helping to underscore the importance of the ornithischian record in broad-scale discussions of early dinosaur history. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Thermal Evolution of Charon and the Major Satellites of Uranus: Constraints on Early Differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spohn, T.; Multhaup, K.

    2007-12-01

    A thermal history model developed for medium-sized icy satellites containing silicate rock at low volume fractions is applied to Charon and the satellites of Uranus Ariel, Umbriel, Titania, Oberon and Miranda. The model assumes homogeneously accreted satellites. To calculate the initial temperature profile we assume that infalling planetesimals deposit a fraction h of their kinetic energy as heat at the instantaneous surface of the growing satellites. The parameter h is varied between models. The model continuously checks for convectively unstable shells in the interior by updating the temperature profile and calculating the Rayleigh number and the temperature-dependent viscosity. The viscosity parameter values are taken as those of ice I although the satellites under consideration likely contain admixtures of lighter constituents. Their effects and those of rock on the viscosity are discussed. Convective heat transport is calculated assuming the stagnant lid model for strongly temperature dependent viscosity. In convectively stable regions heat transfer is by conduction with a temperature dependent thermal conductivity. Thermal evolution calculations considering radiogenic heating by the long-lived radiogenic isotopes of U, Th, and K suggest that Ariel, Umbriel, Titania, Oberon and Charon may have started to differentiate after a few hundred million years of evolution. With short-lived isotopes -- if present in sizeable concentrations -- this time will move earlier. Results for Miranda -- the smallest satellite of Uranus -- indicate that it never convected or differentiated if heated by the said long-lived isotopes only. Miranda's interior temperature was found to be not even close to the melting temperatures of reasonable mixtures of water and ammonia. This finding is in contrast to its heavily modified surface and supports theories that propose alternative heating mechanisms such as the decay of short-lived isotopes or early tidal heating.

  3. Structure and Evolution of the Foreign Exchange Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwapień, J.; Gworek, S.; Drożdż, S.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate topology and temporal evolution of the foreign currency exchange market viewed from a weighted network perspective. Based on exchange rates for a set of 46 currencies (including precious metals), we construct different representations of the FX network depending on a choice of the base currency. Our results show that the network structure is not stable in time, but there are main clusters of currencies, which persist for a long period of time despite the fact that their size and content are variable. We find a long-term trend in the network's evolution which affects the USD and EUR nodes. In all the network representations, the USD node gradually loses its centrality, while, on contrary, the EUR node has become slightly more central than it used to be in its early years. Despite this directional trend, the overall evolution of the network is noisy.

  4. Introducing time delay in the evolution of new technology: the case study of nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgalis, Evangelos E.; Aifantis, Elias C.

    2013-12-01

    Starting with Feynman's "There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom" prophetic lecture at Caltech in the 1960s, the term "nanotechnology" was first coined in the scientific literature in the 1980s. This was followed by the unprecedented growth in the corresponding scientific field in 2000 due to the financial incentive provided by President Clinton in the US, followed up by similar efforts in Europe, Japan, China and Russia. Today, nanotechnology has become a driving force for economic development, with applications in all fields of engineering, information technology, transport and energy, as well as biology and medicine. Thus, it is important to forecast its future growth and evolution on the basis of two different criteria: (1) the government and private capital invested in related activities, and (2) the number of scientific publications and popular articles dedicated to this field. This article aims to extract forecasts on the evolution of nanotechnology, using the standard logistic equation that result in familiar sigmoid curves, as well as to explore the effect of time delay on its evolution. Time delay is commonly known from previous biological and ecological models, in which time lag is either already known or can be experimentally measured. In contrast, in the case of a new technology, we must first define the method for determining time delay and then interpret its existence and role. Then we describe the implications that time delay may have on the stability of the sigmoidal behavior of nanotechnology evolution and on the related oscillations that may appear.

  5. Biologist Edwin Grant Conklin and the idea of the religious direction of human evolution in the early 1920s.

    PubMed

    Pavuk, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Edwin Grant Conklin, renowned US embryologist and evolutionary popularizer, publicly advocated a social vision of evolution that intertwined science and modernist Protestant theology in the early 1920s. The moral prestige of professional science in American culture - along with Conklin's own elite scientific status - diverted attention from the frequency with which his work crossed boundaries between natural science, religion and philosophy. Writing for broad audiences, Conklin was one of the most significant of the religious and modernist biological scientists whose rhetoric went well beyond simply claiming that certain kinds of religion were amenable to evolutionary science; he instead incorporated religion itself into evolution's broadest workings. A sampling of Conklin's widely-resonant discourse suggests that there was substantially more to the religion-evolution story in the 1920s US than many creationist-centred narratives of the era imply.

  6. The early development and evolution of the human brain.

    PubMed

    Crawford, M A

    1990-01-01

    THE CHEMISTRY OF THE BRAIN: The brain and nervous system is characterised by a heavy investment in lipid chemistry which accounts for up to 60% of its structural material. In the different mammalian species so far studied, only the 20 and 22 carbon chain length polyenoic fatty acids were present and the balance of the n-3 to n-6 fatty acids was consistently 1:1. The difference observed between species, was not in the chemistry but in the extent to which the brain is developed. This paper discusses the possibility that essential fatty acids may have played a part in it evolution. THE ORIGIN OF AIR BREATHING ANIMALS: The first phase of the planet's existence indulged in high temperature reactions in which oxygen combined with everything feasible: from silicon to make rocks to hydrogen to make water. Once the planet's temperature dropped to a point at which water could condense on the surface allowing chemical reactions to take place in it. The atmosphere was at that time devoid of oxygen so life evolved in a reducing atmosphere. Oxygen was liberated by photolysis of water and as a by-product of the blue-green algae through photosynthesis. When the point was reached at which oxidative metabolism became thermodynamically possible, animal life evolved with all the principle phyla establishing themselves within a relatively short space of geological time. (Bernal 1973). DHA and nerve cell membranes DHA AND NERVE CELL MEMBRANES: From the chemistry of contemporary algae it is likely that animal life evolved in an n-3 rich environment although not exclusively so as smaller amounts of n-6 fatty acids would have been present. A key feature of the first animals was the evolution of the photoreceptor: in examples of marine, amphibian and modern mammalian species, it has been found to use docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) as the principle membrane fatty acid in the phosphoglycerides. It is likely that the first animals did so as well. Coincidentally, the synaptic membranes involved in

  7. A First-Principles Model of Early Evolution: Emergence of Gene Families, Species, and Preferred Protein Folds

    PubMed Central

    Zeldovich, Konstantin B; Chen, Peiqiu; Shakhnovich, Boris E; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2007-01-01

    In this work we develop a microscopic physical model of early evolution where phenotype—organism life expectancy—is directly related to genotype—the stability of its proteins in their native conformations—which can be determined exactly in the model. Simulating the model on a computer, we consistently observe the “Big Bang” scenario whereby exponential population growth ensues as soon as favorable sequence–structure combinations (precursors of stable proteins) are discovered. Upon that, random diversity of the structural space abruptly collapses into a small set of preferred proteins. We observe that protein folds remain stable and abundant in the population at timescales much greater than mutation or organism lifetime, and the distribution of the lifetimes of dominant folds in a population approximately follows a power law. The separation of evolutionary timescales between discovery of new folds and generation of new sequences gives rise to emergence of protein families and superfamilies whose sizes are power-law distributed, closely matching the same distributions for real proteins. On the population level we observe emergence of species—subpopulations that carry similar genomes. Further, we present a simple theory that relates stability of evolving proteins to the sizes of emerging genomes. Together, these results provide a microscopic first-principles picture of how first-gene families developed in the course of early evolution. PMID:17630830

  8. A first-principles model of early evolution: emergence of gene families, species, and preferred protein folds.

    PubMed

    Zeldovich, Konstantin B; Chen, Peiqiu; Shakhnovich, Boris E; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2007-07-01

    In this work we develop a microscopic physical model of early evolution where phenotype--organism life expectancy--is directly related to genotype--the stability of its proteins in their native conformations-which can be determined exactly in the model. Simulating the model on a computer, we consistently observe the "Big Bang" scenario whereby exponential population growth ensues as soon as favorable sequence-structure combinations (precursors of stable proteins) are discovered. Upon that, random diversity of the structural space abruptly collapses into a small set of preferred proteins. We observe that protein folds remain stable and abundant in the population at timescales much greater than mutation or organism lifetime, and the distribution of the lifetimes of dominant folds in a population approximately follows a power law. The separation of evolutionary timescales between discovery of new folds and generation of new sequences gives rise to emergence of protein families and superfamilies whose sizes are power-law distributed, closely matching the same distributions for real proteins. On the population level we observe emergence of species--subpopulations that carry similar genomes. Further, we present a simple theory that relates stability of evolving proteins to the sizes of emerging genomes. Together, these results provide a microscopic first-principles picture of how first-gene families developed in the course of early evolution.

  9. Recalibrating Equus evolution using the genome sequence of an early Middle Pleistocene horse.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Ludovic; Ginolhac, Aurélien; Zhang, Guojie; Froese, Duane; Albrechtsen, Anders; Stiller, Mathias; Schubert, Mikkel; Cappellini, Enrico; Petersen, Bent; Moltke, Ida; Johnson, Philip L F; Fumagalli, Matteo; Vilstrup, Julia T; Raghavan, Maanasa; Korneliussen, Thorfinn; Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo; Vogt, Josef; Szklarczyk, Damian; Kelstrup, Christian D; Vinther, Jakob; Dolocan, Andrei; Stenderup, Jesper; Velazquez, Amhed M V; Cahill, James; Rasmussen, Morten; Wang, Xiaoli; Min, Jiumeng; Zazula, Grant D; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Mortensen, Cecilie; Magnussen, Kim; Thompson, John F; Weinstock, Jacobo; Gregersen, Kristian; Røed, Knut H; Eisenmann, Véra; Rubin, Carl J; Miller, Donald C; Antczak, Douglas F; Bertelsen, Mads F; Brunak, Søren; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Ryder, Oliver; Andersson, Leif; Mundy, John; Krogh, Anders; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Kjær, Kurt; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Olsen, Jesper V; Hofreiter, Michael; Nielsen, Rasmus; Shapiro, Beth; Wang, Jun; Willerslev, Eske

    2013-07-04

    The rich fossil record of equids has made them a model for evolutionary processes. Here we present a 1.12-times coverage draft genome from a horse bone recovered from permafrost dated to approximately 560-780 thousand years before present (kyr BP). Our data represent the oldest full genome sequence determined so far by almost an order of magnitude. For comparison, we sequenced the genome of a Late Pleistocene horse (43 kyr BP), and modern genomes of five domestic horse breeds (Equus ferus caballus), a Przewalski's horse (E. f. przewalskii) and a donkey (E. asinus). Our analyses suggest that the Equus lineage giving rise to all contemporary horses, zebras and donkeys originated 4.0-4.5 million years before present (Myr BP), twice the conventionally accepted time to the most recent common ancestor of the genus Equus. We also find that horse population size fluctuated multiple times over the past 2 Myr, particularly during periods of severe climatic changes. We estimate that the Przewalski's and domestic horse populations diverged 38-72 kyr BP, and find no evidence of recent admixture between the domestic horse breeds and the Przewalski's horse investigated. This supports the contention that Przewalski's horses represent the last surviving wild horse population. We find similar levels of genetic variation among Przewalski's and domestic populations, indicating that the former are genetically viable and worthy of conservation efforts. We also find evidence for continuous selection on the immune system and olfaction throughout horse evolution. Finally, we identify 29 genomic regions among horse breeds that deviate from neutrality and show low levels of genetic variation compared to the Przewalski's horse. Such regions could correspond to loci selected early during domestication.

  10. Disease evolution in late-onset and early-onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Aljohani, R; Gladman, D D; Su, J; Urowitz, M B

    2017-10-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to compare clinical features, disease activity, and outcome in late-onset versus early-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) over 5 years of follow up Method Patients with SLE since 1970 were followed prospectively according to standard protocol and tracked on a computerized database. Patients entering the cohort within one year of diagnosis constitute the inception cohort. Patients with late-onset (age at diagnosis ≥50) disease were identified and matched 1:2 based on gender and first clinic visit (±5) years with patients with early-onset disease (age at diagnosis 18-40 years). Results A total of 86 patients with late-onset disease (84.9% female, 81.4% Caucasian, mean age at SLE diagnosis ± SD 58.05 ± 7.30) and 169 patients with early-onset disease (86.4% female, 71% Caucasian, mean age at SLE diagnosis ± SD 27.80 ± 5.90) were identified. At enrollment, late-onset SLE patients had a lower total number of American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, with less renal and neurologic manifestations. Mean SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K) scores were lower in late-onset SLE, especially renal features and anti-dsDNA positivity. Over 5 years, mean SLEDAI-2K scores decreased in both groups, while mean Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/ACR Damage Index (SDI) scores increased more significantly in the late-onset group; they developed more cardiovascular, renal, and ocular damage, and had higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors. Conclusion Although the late-onset SLE group had a milder presentation and less active disease, with the evolution of disease, they developed more organ damage likely as a consequence of cardiovascular risk factors and aging.

  11. Post-early cretaceous landform evolution along the western margin of the banca~nnia trough, western nsw

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibson, D.L.

    2000-01-01

    Previously undated post-Devonian sediments outcropping north of Fowlers Gap station near the western margin of the Bancannia Trough are shown by plant macro- and microfossil determinations to be of Early Cretaceous (most likely Neocomian and/or Aptian) age, and thus part of the Eromanga Basin. They are assigned to the previously defined Telephone Creek Formation. Study of the structural configuration of this unit and the unconformably underlying Devonian rocks suggests that the gross landscape architecture of the area results from post-Early Cretaceous monoclinal folding along blind faults at the western margin of the trough, combined with the effects of differential erosion. This study shows that, while landscape evolution in the area has been dynamic, the major changes that have occurred are on a geological rather than human timescale.

  12. Evolution of CO lines in time-dependent models of protostellar disk formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harsono, D.; Visser, R.; Bruderer, S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kristensen, L. E.

    2013-07-01

    Context. Star and planet formation theories predict an evolution in the density, temperature, and velocity structure as the envelope collapses and forms an accretion disk. While continuum emission can trace the dust evolution, spectrally resolved molecular lines are needed to determine the physical structure and collapse dynamics. Aims: The aim of this work is to model the evolution of the molecular excitation, line profiles, and related observables during low-mass star formation. Specifically, the signatures of disks during the deeply embedded stage (Menv > M⋆) are investigated. Methods: The semi-analytic 2D axisymmetric model of Visser and collaborators has been used to describe the evolution of the density, stellar mass, and luminosity from the pre-stellar to the T-Tauri phase. A full radiative transfer calculation is carried out to accurately determine the time-dependent dust temperatures. The time-dependent CO abundance is obtained from the adsorption and thermal desorption chemistry. Non-LTE near-IR (NIR), far-IR (FIR), and submm lines of CO have been simulated at a number of time steps. Results: In single dish (10-20'' beams), the dynamics during the collapse are best probed through highly excited 13CO and C18O lines, which are significantly broadened by the infall process. In contrast to the dust temperature, the CO excitation temperature derived from submm/FIR data does not vary during the protostellar evolution, consistent with C18O observations obtained with Herschel and from ground-based telescopes. The NIR spectra provide complementary information to the submm lines by probing not only the cold outer envelope but also the warm inner region. The NIR high-J (≥8) absorption lines are particularly sensitive to the physical structure of the inner few AU, which does show evolution. The models indicate that observations of 13CO and C18O low-J submm lines within a ≤1″ (at 140 pc) beam are well suited to probe embedded disks in Stage I (Menv < M

  13. GrainGenes: Changing Times, Changing Databases, Digital Evolution.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The GrainGenes database is one of few agricultural databases that had an early start on the Internet and that has changed with the times. Initial goals were to collect a wide range of data relating to the developing maps and attributes of small grains crops, and to make them easily accessible. The ...

  14. The Afar-Red Sea-Gulf of Aden volcanic margins system : early syn-rift segmentation and tectono-magmatic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stab, Martin; Leroy, Sylvie; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Pik, Raphaël; Ayalew, Dereje; Yirgu, Gezahegn; Khanbari, Khaled

    2017-04-01

    The Afro-Arabian rift system is characterized by complex interactions between magmatism and rifting, leading to long-term segmentation of the associated continental margins. However, past studies focused on specific rift segments and no attempt has yet been made to reconcile them into a single comprehensive geodynamic model. To address this, we present interpretations of seismic profiles offshore the Eritrea-Yemeni margins in the southern Red Sea and the Yemeni margin in the Gulf of Aden and reassess the regional geodynamic evolution including the new tectonic evolution of the Central Afar Magmatic margin. We point out the role of two major transform zones in structuring the volcanism and faulting of the Red Sea-Afar-Aden margins. We show that those transform zones not only control the present-day rift organization, but were also active since the onset of rifting in Oligocene times. Early syn-rift transform zones control the emplacement and the development of seaward-dipping-reflector wedges immediately after the Continental Flood basalts (30 Ma), and are closely associated with mantle plume melts in the course of the segment extension. The margins segmentation thus appears to reflect the underlying mantle dynamics and thermal anomaly, which have directly influenced the style of rifting (wide vs. narrow rift), in controlling the development of preferential lithospheric thinning and massive transfer of magmas in the crust.

  15. Organic chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.

    1981-01-01

    The course of organic chemical evolution preceding the emergence of life on earth is discussed based on evidence of processes occurring in interstellar space, the solar system and the primitive earth. Following a brief review of the equilibrium condensation model for the origin and evolution of the solar system, consideration is given to the nature and organic chemistry of interstellar clouds, comets, Jupiter, meteorites, Venus and Mars, and the prebiotic earth. Major issues to be resolved in the study of organic chemical evolution on earth are identified regarding condensation and accretion in the solar nebula, early geological evolution, the origin and evolution of the atmosphere, organic production rates, organic-inorganic interactions, environmental fluctuations, phase separation and molecular selectivity.

  16. The Early Spectral Evolution of the Classical Nova ASASSN-15th in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R. Mark; Neric, Marko; Darnley, Matt J.; Williams, Steven; Starrfield, Sumner; Woodward, Charles E.; Prieto, Jose Luis

    2016-06-01

    During the course of the All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) a new transient source designated ASASSN-15th was identified on images of the nearby galaxy M33 obtained with the 14 cm Brutus telescope in Haleakala, Hawaii on 2015 Dec 1.4 UT at V ~ 16.5 mag. Given the location of the transient in M33 and its apparent V magnitude at discovery, the implied absolute visual magnitude was about -8.5 mag suggesting that the transient was a new classical nova outburst in M33. Optical spectroscopy obtained by us on 2015 Dec 2.3 showed broad emission lines of Balmer, Fe II, and Na I D with P Cygni-type line profiles superposed on a blue continuum. The spectrum was consistent with a Fe II-type classical nova in M33 discovered early in the outburst. Subsequent spectra obtained by us on 2015 Dec 10.9 UT showed significant evolution since our first spectrum in that the deep P Cygni-type line profiles seen earlier were now extremely shallow or had almost completely disappeared with the emission component growing in strength. Additional emission lines from O I, Si II, and possibly He I were also present. We obtained optical spectroscopy of ASASSN-15th on 17 epochs between 2015 Dec 1 and 2016 Feb 11 UT with the 2.4 m Hiltner telescope (+OSMOS) of the MDM Observatory, the 2 m fully robotic Liverpool Telescope (+SPRAT), and the 2 x 8.4 m Large Binocular Telescope (+MODS). We will present our spectroscopy and discuss the early evolution of ASASSN-15th in the context of Galactic Fe II-class novae.

  17. Potomacapnos apeleutheron gen. et sp. nov., a new Early Cretaceous angiosperm from the Potomac Group and its implications for the evolution of eudicot leaf architecture.

    PubMed

    Jud, Nathan A; Hickey, Leo J

    2013-12-01

    Eudicots diverged early in the evolution of flowering plants and now comprise more than 70% of angiosperm species. In spite of the importance of eudicots, our understanding of the early evolution of this clade is limited by a poor fossil record and uncertainty about the order of early phylogenetic branching. The study of Lower Cretaceous fossils can reveal much about the evolution, morphology, and ecology of the eudicots. Fossils described here were collected from Aptian sediments of the Potomac Group exposed at the Dutch Gap locality in Virginia, USA. Specimens were prepared by degaging, then described and compared with leaves of relevant extant and fossil plants. We conducted a phylogenetic analysis of morphological characters using parsimony while constraining the tree search with the topology found through molecular phylogenetic analyses. The new species is closely related to ranunculalean eudicots and has leaf architecture remarkably similar to some living Fumarioideae (Papaveraceae). These are the oldest eudicot megafossils from North America, and they show complex leaf architecture reflecting developmental pathways unique to extant eudicots. The morphology and small size of the fossils suggest that they were herbaceous plants, as is seen in other putative early eudicots. The absence of co-occurring tricolpate pollen at Dutch Gap either (1) reflects low preservation probability for pollen of entomophilous herbs or (2) indicates that some leaf features of extant eudicots appeared before the origin of tricolpate pollen.

  18. [Relevant factors of early puberty timing in urban primary schools in Chongqing].

    PubMed

    Luo, Yan; Liu, Qin; Wen, Yi; Liu, Shudan; Lei, Xun; Wang, Hong

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the status of puberty timing and relevant factors of early puberty timing in children from grade one to four in urban primary schools of Chongqing. According to the purposive sample method, four urban primary schools in Chongqing were selected and of which 1471 children from grade one to four who have obtained informed consent were recruited. Questionnaire survey on social-demographic characteristics and family environment (e.g., age, parents' relationship, diet and lifestyle, etc), and Pubertal Development Scale (PDS) survey and physical examination (measurements of height, weight, pubertal development status, etc) were conducted. P25, P50, P75 ages of each important pubertal event were calculated by probit regression. Univariate and multivariate analysis were used to analyze relevant factors. The detection rate of early puberty timing was 17.7%, and the median ages of the onset of breast and testicular development were 10.77 and 11.48 years old, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression showed that early puberty timing occurred more likely in girls than in boys (OR = 0.561, 95% CI 0.406-0.774), and bad relationship between parents (OR = 1.320, 95% CI 1.007-1.729) and hair-products-use (OR = 1.685, 95%, CI 1.028-2.762) were risk factors of early puberty timing. Early onset of puberty in urban Chongqing is still exist. Gender, parents' relationship, and hair-products-use have an essential impact on early puberty timing.

  19. Some remarks on the early evolution of Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czechowski, Leszek

    2014-12-01

    Thermal history of Enceladus is investigated from the beginning of accretion to formation of its core (~400 My). We consider model with solid state convection (in a solid layer) as well as liquid state convection (in molten parts of the satellite). The numerical model of convection uses full conservative finite difference method. The roles of two modes of convection are considered using the parameterized theory of convection. The following heat sources are included: short lived and long lived radioactive isotopes, accretion, serpentinization, and phase changes. Heat transfer processes are: conduction, solid state convection, and liquid state convection. It is found that core formation was completed only when liquid state convection had slowed down. Eventually, the porous core with pores filled with water was formed. Recent data concerning gravity field of Enceladus confirm low density of the core. We investigated also thermal history for different values of the following parameters: time of beginning of accretion tini, duration of accretion tacr, viscosity of ice close to the melting point ηm, activation energy in formula for viscosity E, thermal conductivity of silicate component ksil, ammonia content XNH3, and energy of serpentinization cserp. All these parameters are important for evolution, but not dramatic differences are found for realistic values. Moreover, the hypothesis of proto-Enceladus (stating that initially Enceladus was substantially larger) is considered and thermal history of such body is calculated. The last subject is the Mimas-Enceladus paradox. Comparison of thermal models of Mimas and Enceladus indicates that period favorable for 'excited path of evolution' was significantly shorter for Mimas than for Enceladus.

  20. Time evolution of linearized gauge field fluctuations on a real-time lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkela, A.; Lappi, T.; Peuron, J.

    2016-12-01

    Classical real-time lattice simulations play an important role in understanding non-equilibrium phenomena in gauge theories and are used in particular to model the prethermal evolution of heavy-ion collisions. Due to instabilities, small quantum fluctuations on top of the classical background may significantly affect the dynamics of the system. In this paper we argue for the need for a numerical calculation of a system of classical gauge fields and small linearized fluctuations in a way that keeps the separation between the two manifest. We derive and test an explicit algorithm to solve these equations on the lattice, maintaining gauge invariance and Gauss' law.

  1. Evolution of allosteric regulation in chorismate mutases from early plants

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, Kourtney; Holland, Cynthia K.; Starks, Courtney M.

    Plants, fungi, and bacteria synthesize the aromatic amino acids: l-phenylalanine, l-tyrosine, and l-tryptophan. Chorismate mutase catalyzes the branch point reaction of phenylalanine and tyrosine biosynthesis to generate prephenate. In Arabidopsis thaliana, there are two plastid-localized chorismate mutases that are allosterically regulated (AtCM1 and AtCM3) and one cytosolic isoform (AtCM2) that is unregulated. Previous analysis of plant chorismate mutases suggested that the enzymes from early plants (i.e. bryophytes/moss, lycophytes, and basal angiosperms) formed a clade distinct from the isoforms found in flowering plants; however, no biochemical information on these enzymes is available. To understand the evolution of allosteric regulation in plantmore » chorismate mutases, we analyzed a basal lineage of plant enzymes homologous to AtCM1 based on sequence similarity. The chorismate mutases from the moss/bryophyte Physcomitrella patens (PpCM1 and PpCM2), the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii (SmCM), and the basal angiosperm Amborella trichopoda (AmtCM1 and AmtCM2) were characterized biochemically. Tryptophan was a positive effector for each of the five enzymes examined. Histidine was a weak positive effector for PpCM1 and AmtCM1. Neither tyrosine nor phenylalanine altered the activity of SmCM; however, tyrosine was a negative regulator of the other four enzymes. Phenylalanine down-regulates both moss enzymes and AmtCM2. The 2.0 Å X-ray crystal structure of PpCM1 in complex with the tryptophan identified the allosteric effector site and reveals structural differences between the R- (more active) and T-state (less active) forms of plant chorismate mutases. Molecular insight into the basal plant chorismate mutases guides our understanding of the evolution of allosteric regulation in these enzymes.« less

  2. Sequence stratigraphy on an early wet Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Donald C.; Bhattacharya, Janok P.

    2018-02-01

    The evolution of Mars as a water-bearing body is of considerable interest for the understanding of its early history and evolution. The principles of terrestrial sequence stratigraphy provide a useful conceptual framework to hypothesize about the stratigraphic history of the planets northern plains. We present a model based on the hypothesized presence of an early ocean and the accumulation of lowland sediments eroded from highland terrain during the time of the valley networks and later outflow channels. Ancient, global environmental changes, induced by a progressively cooling climate would have led to a protracted loss of surface and near surface water from low-latitudes and eventual cold-trapping at higher latitudes - resulting in a unique and prolonged, perpetual forced regression within basins and lowland depositional environments. The Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC) serves as a potential terrestrial analogue of the depositional and environmental consequences relating to the progressive removal of large standing bodies of water. We suggest that the evolution of similar conditions on Mars would have led to the emplacement of diagnostic sequences of deposits and regional scale unconformities, consistent with intermittent resurfacing of the northern plains and the progressive loss of an early ocean by the end of the Hesperian era.

  3. First-Time Mothers' Knowledge and Beliefs Regarding Early Communication Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Vicki; Pearce, Wendy M.; Devine, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Limited literature exists in the Australian context about first-time mothers' knowledge of early communication milestones, their strategies to facilitate speech and language development and understanding of the relationship between early communication skills and future development. A cross-sectional online survey was administered to 53 first-time…

  4. Functional Characterization of Cnidarian HCN Channels Points to an Early Evolution of Ih.

    PubMed

    Baker, Emma C; Layden, Michael J; van Rossum, Damian B; Kamel, Bishoy; Medina, Monica; Simpson, Eboni; Jegla, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    HCN channels play a unique role in bilaterian physiology as the only hyperpolarization-gated cation channels. Their voltage-gating is regulated by cyclic nucleotides and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Activation of HCN channels provides the depolarizing current in response to hyperpolarization that is critical for intrinsic rhythmicity in neurons and the sinoatrial node. Additionally, HCN channels regulate dendritic excitability in a wide variety of neurons. Little is known about the early functional evolution of HCN channels, but the presence of HCN sequences in basal metazoan phyla and choanoflagellates, a protozoan sister group to the metazoans, indicate that the gene family predates metazoan emergence. We functionally characterized two HCN channel orthologs from Nematostella vectensis (Cnidaria, Anthozoa) to determine which properties of HCN channels were established prior to the emergence of bilaterians. We find Nematostella HCN channels share all the major functional features of bilaterian HCNs, including reversed voltage-dependence, activation by cAMP and PIP2, and block by extracellular Cs+. Thus bilaterian-like HCN channels were already present in the common parahoxozoan ancestor of bilaterians and cnidarians, at a time when the functional diversity of voltage-gated K+ channels was rapidly expanding. NvHCN1 and NvHCN2 are expressed broadly in planulae and in both the endoderm and ectoderm of juvenile polyps.

  5. The Evolution of Deep Space Navigation: 1989-1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Lincoln J.

    2008-01-01

    The exploration of the planets of the solar system using robotic vehicles has been underway since the early 1960s. During this time the navigational capabilities employed have increased greatly in accuracy, as required by the scientific objectives of the missions and as enabled by improvements in technology. This paper is the second in a chronological sequence dealing with the evolution of deep space navigation. The time interval covered extends from the 1989 launch of the Magellan spacecraft to Venus through a multiplicity of planetary exploration activities in 1999. The paper focuses on the observational techniques that have been used to obtain navigational information, propellant-efficient means for modifying spacecraft trajectories, and the computational methods that have been employed, tracing their evolution through a dozen planetary missions.

  6. Group Time in Early Childhood Centers: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAfee, Oralie

    To investigate the current status of group time in early childhood centers, a small-scale exploratory study was designed and executed. Results of interviews with 35 teachers and observations in five classrooms serving children ages 2 1/2 through kindergarten revealed that all classrooms had at least one group time or circle time, usually in the…

  7. Evolution of angiosperm seed disperser mutualisms: the timing of origins and their consequences for coevolutionary interactions between angiosperms and frugivores.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Ove

    2016-02-01

    , and many of the originations of fleshy fruits occurred well after the peak in the early Eocene. (vi) During periods associated with environmental change altering coevolutionary networks and opening of niche space, reciprocal coevolution may result in strong directional selection formative for both fruit and frugivore evolution. Further evidence is needed to test this hypothesis. Based on the abundance of plant lineages with various forms of fleshy fruits, and the diversity of frugivores, it is suggested that periods of rapid coevolution in angiosperms and frugivores occurred numerous times during the 80 million years of angiosperm-frugivore evolution. © 2014 The Authors. Biological Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  8. The Supercritical Pile GRB Model: The Prompt to Afterglow Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastichiadis, A.; Kazanas, D.

    2009-01-01

    The "Supercritical Pile" is a very economical GRB model that provides for the efficient conversion of the energy stored in the protons of a Relativistic Blast Wave (RBW) into radiation and at the same time produces - in the prompt GRB phase, even in the absence of any particle acceleration - a spectral peak at energy approx. 1 MeV. We extend this model to include the evolution of the RBW Lorentz factor Gamma and thus follow its spectral and temporal features into the early GRB afterglow stage. One of the novel features of the present treatment is the inclusion of the feedback of the GRB produced radiation on the evolution of Gamma with radius. This feedback and the presence of kinematic and dynamic thresholds in the model can be the sources of rich time evolution which we have began to explore. In particular. one can this may obtain afterglow light curves with steep decays followed by the more conventional flatter afterglow slopes, while at the same time preserving the desirable features of the model, i.e. the well defined relativistic electron source and radiative processes that produce the proper peak in the (nu)F(sub nu), spectra. In this note we present the results of a specific set of parameters of this model with emphasis on the multiwavelength prompt emission and transition to the early afterglow.

  9. Milgram's Obedience to Authority experiments: origins and early evolution.

    PubMed

    Russell, Nestar John Charles

    2011-03-01

    Stanley Milgram's Obedience to Authority experiments remain one of the most inspired contributions in the field of social psychology. Although Milgram undertook more than 20 experimental variations, his most (in)famous result was the first official trial run - the remote condition and its 65% completion rate. Drawing on many unpublished documents from Milgram's personal archive at Yale University, this article traces the historical origins and early evolution of the obedience experiments. Part 1 presents the previous experiences that led to Milgram's conception of his rudimentary research idea and then details the role of his intuition in its refinement. Part 2 traces the conversion of Milgram's evolving idea into a reality, paying particular attention to his application of the exploratory method of discovery during several pilot studies. Both parts illuminate Milgram's ad hoc introduction of various manipulative techniques and subtle tension-resolving refinements. The procedural adjustments continued until Milgram was confident that the first official experiment would produce a high completion rate, a result contrary to expectations of people's behaviour. Showing how Milgram conceived of, then arrived at, this first official result is important because the insights gained may help others to determine theoretically why so many participants completed this experiment. ©2010 The British Psychological Society.

  10. CoCoNuT: General relativistic hydrodynamics code with dynamical space-time evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimmelmeier, Harald; Novak, Jérôme; Cerdá-Durán, Pablo

    2012-02-01

    CoCoNuT is a general relativistic hydrodynamics code with dynamical space-time evolution. The main aim of this numerical code is the study of several astrophysical scenarios in which general relativity can play an important role, namely the collapse of rapidly rotating stellar cores and the evolution of isolated neutron stars. The code has two flavors: CoCoA, the axisymmetric (2D) magnetized version, and CoCoNuT, the 3D non-magnetized version.

  11. Early Evolution of Vertebrate Mybs: An Integrative Perspective Combining Synteny, Phylogenetic, and Gene Expression Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Campanini, Emeline B.; Vandewege, Michael W.; Pillai, Nisha E.; Tay, Boon-Hui; Jones, Justin L.; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Hoffmann, Federico G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The genes in the Myb superfamily encode for three related transcription factors in most vertebrates, A-, B-, and c-Myb, with functionally distinct roles, whereas most invertebrates have a single Myb. B-Myb plays an essential role in cell division and cell cycle progression, c-Myb is involved in hematopoiesis, and A-Myb is involved in spermatogenesis and regulating expression of pachytene PIWI interacting RNAs, a class of small RNAs involved in posttranscriptional gene regulation and the maintenance of reproductive tissues. Comparisons between teleost fish and tetrapods suggest that the emergence and functional divergence of the Myb genes were linked to the two rounds of whole-genome duplication early in vertebrate evolution. We combined phylogenetic, synteny, structural, and gene expression analyses of the Myb paralogs from elephant shark and lampreys with data from 12 bony vertebrates to reconstruct the early evolution of vertebrate Mybs. Phylogenetic and synteny analyses suggest that the elephant shark and Japanese lamprey have copies of the A-, B-, and c-Myb genes, implying their origin could be traced back to the common ancestor of lampreys and gnathostomes. However, structural and gene expression analyses suggest that their functional roles diverged between gnathostomes and cyclostomes. In particular, we did not detect A-Myb expression in testis suggesting that the involvement of A-Myb in the pachytene PIWI interacting RNA pathway is probably a gnathostome-specific innovation. We speculate that the secondary loss of a central domain in lamprey A-Myb underlies the functional differences between the cyclostome and gnathostome A-Myb proteins. PMID:26475318

  12. TIME EVOLUTION OF KELVIN–HELMHOLTZ VORTICES ASSOCIATED WITH COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS IN LASER-PRODUCED PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Kuramitsu, Y.; Moritaka, T.; Mizuta, A.

    2016-09-10

    We report experimental results on Kelvin–Helmholtz (KH) instability and resultant vortices in laser-produced plasmas. By irradiating a double plane target with a laser beam, asymmetric counterstreaming plasmas are created. The interaction of the plasmas with different velocities and densities results in the formation of asymmetric shocks, where the shear flow exists along the contact surface and the KH instability is excited. We observe the spatial and temporal evolution of plasmas and shocks with time-resolved diagnostics over several shots. Our results clearly show the evolution of transverse fluctuations, wavelike structures, and circular features, which are interpreted as the KH instability andmore » resultant vortices. The relevant numerical simulations demonstrate the time evolution of KH vortices and show qualitative agreement with experimental results. Shocks, and thus the contact surfaces, are ubiquitous in the universe; our experimental results show general consequences where two plasmas interact.« less

  13. Background experiences, time allocation, time on teaching and perceived support of early-career college science faculty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagendorf, Kenneth S.

    The purposes of this research were to create an inventory of the research, teaching and service background experiences of and to document the time allocation and time spent on teaching by early-career college science faculty members. This project is presented as three distinct papers. Thirty early-career faculty in the science disciplines from sixteen different institutions in their first year of employment participated in this study. For the first two papers, a new survey was developed asking participants to choose which experiences they had acquired prior to taking their current faculty position and asking them to document their time allocation and time spent on teaching activities in an average work week. In addition, a third component documents the support early-career college faculty in the sciences are receiving from the perspective of faculty members and their respective department chairpersons and identifies areas of disagreement between these two different groups. Twenty early-career college science faculty and their respective department chairpersons completed a newly-designed survey regarding the support offered to new faculty. The survey addressed the areas of feedback on performance, clarity of tenure requirements, mentoring, support for teaching and scholarship and balancing faculty life. This dissertation presents the results from these surveys, accounting for different demographic variables such as science discipline, gender and institutional category.

  14. Hydrogen peroxide and the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, C. P.; Hartman, H.

    1991-01-01

    Possible pathways for the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis in the early reducing atmosphere of the earth are discussed. It is suggested that the abiotic production of atmospheric oxidants could have provided a mechanism by which locally oxidizing conditions were sustained within spatially confined habitats thus removing the available reductants and forcing photosynthetic organisms to utilize water (rather than ferrous or sulfide ions) as the electron donor. It is argued that atmospheric H2O2 played the key role in inducing oxygenic photosynthesis, because, as peroxide concentrations local environments increased, primitive organisms would not only be faced with a loss of a reductant, but would be also forced to develop a biochemical apparatus (such as catalase) that would protect them against the products of oxygenic photosynthesis. This scenario allows for the early evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis at the time when global conditions were still anaerobic.

  15. Dynamic evolutionary change in post-Paleozoic echinoids and the importance of scale when interpreting changes in rates of evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Melanie J.; Smith, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    How ecological and morphological diversity accrues over geological time has been much debated by paleobiologists. Evidence from the fossil record suggests that many clades reach maximal diversity early in their evolutionary history, followed by a decline in evolutionary rates as ecological space fills or due to internal constraints. Here, we apply recently developed methods for estimating rates of morphological evolution during the post-Paleozoic history of a major invertebrate clade, the Echinoidea. Contrary to expectation, rates of evolution were lowest during the initial phase of diversification following the Permo-Triassic mass extinction and increased over time. Furthermore, although several subclades show high initial rates and net decreases in rates of evolution, consistent with “early bursts” of morphological diversification, at more inclusive taxonomic levels, these bursts appear as episodic peaks. Peak rates coincided with major shifts in ecological morphology, primarily associated with innovations in feeding strategies. Despite having similar numbers of species in today’s oceans, regular echinoids have accrued far less morphological diversity than irregular echinoids due to lower intrinsic rates of morphological evolution and less morphological innovation, the latter indicative of constrained or bounded evolution. These results indicate that rates of evolution are extremely heterogenous through time and their interpretation depends on the temporal and taxonomic scale of analysis. PMID:25713369

  16. Dynamic evolutionary change in post-Paleozoic echinoids and the importance of scale when interpreting changes in rates of evolution.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Melanie J; Smith, Andrew B

    2015-03-24

    How ecological and morphological diversity accrues over geological time has been much debated by paleobiologists. Evidence from the fossil record suggests that many clades reach maximal diversity early in their evolutionary history, followed by a decline in evolutionary rates as ecological space fills or due to internal constraints. Here, we apply recently developed methods for estimating rates of morphological evolution during the post-Paleozoic history of a major invertebrate clade, the Echinoidea. Contrary to expectation, rates of evolution were lowest during the initial phase of diversification following the Permo-Triassic mass extinction and increased over time. Furthermore, although several subclades show high initial rates and net decreases in rates of evolution, consistent with "early bursts" of morphological diversification, at more inclusive taxonomic levels, these bursts appear as episodic peaks. Peak rates coincided with major shifts in ecological morphology, primarily associated with innovations in feeding strategies. Despite having similar numbers of species in today's oceans, regular echinoids have accrued far less morphological diversity than irregular echinoids due to lower intrinsic rates of morphological evolution and less morphological innovation, the latter indicative of constrained or bounded evolution. These results indicate that rates of evolution are extremely heterogenous through time and their interpretation depends on the temporal and taxonomic scale of analysis.

  17. The Baculum was Gained and Lost Multiple Times during Mammalian Evolution.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Nicholas G; Lough-Stevens, Michael; Abreu, Eric; Orr, Teri; Dean, Matthew D

    2016-10-01

    The rapid evolution of male genitalia is a nearly ubiquitous pattern across sexually reproducing organisms, likely driven by the evolutionary pressures of male-male competition, male-female interactions, and perhaps pleiotropic effects of selection. The penis of many mammalian species contains a baculum, a bone that displays astonishing morphological diversity. The evolution of baculum size and shape does not consistently correlate with any aspects of mating system, hindering our understanding of the evolutionary processes affecting it. One potential explanation for the lack of consistent comparative results is that the baculum is not actually a homologous structure. If the baculum of different groups evolved independently, then the assumption of homology inherent in comparative studies is violated. Here, we specifically test this hypothesis by modeling the presence/absence of bacula of 954 mammalian species across a well-established phylogeny and show that the baculum evolved a minimum of nine times, and was lost a minimum of ten times. Three different forms of bootstrapping show our results are robust to species sampling. Furthermore, groups with a baculum show evidence of higher rates of diversification. Our study offers an explanation for the inconsistent results in the literature, and provides insight into the evolution of this remarkable structure. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Evolution of herbivore-induced early defense signaling was shaped by genome-wide duplications in Nicotiana

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wenwu; Brockmöller, Thomas; Ling, Zhihao; Omdahl, Ashton; Baldwin, Ian T; Xu, Shuqing

    2016-01-01

    Herbivore-induced defenses are widespread, rapidly evolving and relevant for plant fitness. Such induced defenses are often mediated by early defense signaling (EDS) rapidly activated by the perception of herbivore associated elicitors (HAE) that includes transient accumulations of jasmonic acid (JA). Analyzing 60 HAE-induced leaf transcriptomes from closely-related Nicotiana species revealed a key gene co-expression network (M4 module) which is co-activated with the HAE-induced JA accumulations but is elicited independently of JA, as revealed in plants silenced in JA signaling. Functional annotations of the M4 module were consistent with roles in EDS and a newly identified hub gene of the M4 module (NaLRRK1) mediates a negative feedback loop with JA signaling. Phylogenomic analysis revealed preferential gene retention after genome-wide duplications shaped the evolution of HAE-induced EDS in Nicotiana. These results highlight the importance of genome-wide duplications in the evolution of adaptive traits in plants. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19531.001 PMID:27813478

  19. Impact cratering calculations. Part 1: Early time results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, J. M.; Sauer, F. N.; Austin, M. G.; Ruhl, S. F.; Shultz, P. H.; Orphal, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    Early time two dimensional finite difference calculations of laboratory scale hypervelocity impact of 0.3 g spherical 2024 aluminum projectiles into homogeneous plasticene clay targets were performed. Analysis of resulting material motions showed that energy and momentum were coupled quickly from the aluminum projectile to the target material. In the process of coupling, some of the plasticene clay target was vaporized while the projectile become severely deformed. The velocity flow field developed within the target was shown to have features similar to those found in calculations of near surface explosion cratering. Specific application of Maxwell's analytic Z-Model showed that this model can be used to describe the early time flow fields resulting from the impact cratering calculations as well, provided the flow field centers are located beneath the target surface and most of the projectile momentum is dissipated before the model is applied.

  20. Early evolution and dynamics of Earth from a molten initial stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louro Lourenço, Diogo; Tackley, Paul J.

    2016-04-01

    It is now well established that most of the terrestrial planets underwent a magma ocean stage during their accretion. On Earth, it is probable that at the end of accretion, giant impacts like the hypothesised Moon-forming impact, together with other sources of heat, melted a substantial part of the mantle. The thermal and chemical evolution of the resulting magma ocean most certainly had dramatic consequences on the history of the planet. Considerable research has been done on magma oceans using simple 1-D models (e.g.: Abe, PEPI 1997; Solomatov, Treat. Geophys. 2007; Elkins-Tanton EPSL 2008). However, some aspects of the dynamics may not be adequately addressed in 1-D and require the use of 2-D or 3-D models. Moreover, new developments in mineral physics that indicate that melt can be denser than solid at high pressures (e.g.: de Koker et al., EPSL 2013) can have very important impacts on the classical views of the solidification of magma oceans (Labrosse et al., Nature 2007). The goal of our study is to understand and characterize the influence of melting on the long-term thermo-chemical evolution of rocky planet interiors, starting from an initial molten state (magma ocean). Our approach is to model viscous creep of the solid mantle, while parameterizing processes that involve melt as previously done in 1-D models, including melt-solid separation at all melt fractions, the use of an effective diffusivity to parameterize turbulent mixing, coupling to a parameterized core heat balance and a radiative surface boundary condition. These enhancements have been made to the numerical code StagYY (Tackley, PEPI 2008). We present results for the evolution of an Earth-like planet from a molten initial state to present day, while testing the effect of uncertainties in parameters such as melt-solid density differences, surface heat loss and efficiency of turbulent mixing. Our results show rapid cooling and crystallization until the rheological transition then much slower

  1. Early evolution and dynamics of Earth from a molten initial stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourenço, Diogo; Tackley, Paul

    2015-04-01

    It is now well established that most of the terrestrial planets underwent a magma ocean stage during their accretion. On Earth, it is probable that at the end of accretion, giant impacts like the hypothesised Moon-forming impact, together with other sources of heat, melted a substantial part of the mantle. The thermal and chemical evolution of the resulting magma ocean most certainly had dramatic consequences on the history of the planet. Considerable research has been done on magma oceans using simple 1-D models (e.g.: Abe, PEPI 1997; Solomatov, Treat. Geophys. 2007; Elkins-Tanton EPSL 2008). However, some aspects of the dynamics may not be adequately addressed in 1-D and require the use of 2-D or 3-D models. Moreover, new developments in mineral physics that indicate that melt can be denser than solid at high pressures (e.g.: de Koker et al., EPSL 2013) can have very important impacts on the classical views of the solidification of magma oceans (Labrosse et al., Nature 2007). The goal of our study is to understand and characterize the influence of melting on the long-term thermo-chemical evolution of rocky planet interiors, starting from an initial molten state (magma ocean). Our approach is to model viscous creep of the solid mantle, while parameterizing processes that involve melt as previously done in 1-D models, including melt-solid separation at all melt fractions, the use of an effective diffusivity to parameterize turbulent mixing, coupling to a parameterized core heat balance and a radiative surface boundary condition. These enhancements have been made to the numerical code StagYY (Tackley, PEPI 2008). We will present results for the evolution of an Earth-like planet from a molten initial state to present day, while testing the effect of uncertainties in parameters such as melt-solid density differences, surface heat loss and efficiency of turbulent mixing. Our results show rapid cooling and crystallization until the rheological transition then much

  2. Early evolution and dynamics of Earth from a molten initial stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louro Lourenço, D. J.; Tackley, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    It is now well established that most of the terrestrial planets underwent a magma ocean stage during their accretion. On Earth, it is probable that at the end of accretion, giant impacts like the hypothesised Moon-forming impact, together with other sources of heat, melted a substantial part of the mantle. The thermal and chemical evolution of the resulting magma ocean most certainly had dramatic consequences on the history of the planet. Considerable research has been done on magma oceans using simple 1-D models (e.g.: Abe, PEPI 1997; Solomatov, Treat. Geophys. 2007; Elkins-Tanton EPSL 2008). However, some aspects of the dynamics may not be adequately addressed in 1-D and require the use of 2-D or 3-D models. Moreover, new developments in mineral physics that indicate that melt can be denser than solid at high pressures (e.g.: de Koker et al., EPSL 2013) can have very important impacts on the classical views of the solidification of magma oceans (Labrosse et al., Nature 2007). The goal of our study is to understand and characterize the influence of melting on the long-term thermo-chemical evolution of rocky planet interiors, starting from an initial molten state (magma ocean). Our approach is to model viscous creep of the solid mantle, while parameterizing processes that involve melt as previously done in 1-D models, including melt-solid separation at all melt fractions, the use of an effective diffusivity to parameterize turbulent mixing, coupling to a parameterized core heat balance and a radiative surface boundary condition. These enhancements have been made to the numerical code StagYY (Tackley, PEPI 2008). We will present results for the evolution of an Earth-like planet from a molten initial state to present day, while testing the effect of uncertainties in parameters such as melt-solid density differences, surface heat loss and efficiency of turbulent mixing. Our results show rapid cooling and crystallization until the rheological transition then much

  3. Habitable Zone Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltham, D.; Lota, J.

    2012-12-01

    The location of the habitable zone around a star depends upon stellar luminosity and upon the properties of a potentially habitable planet such as its mass and near-surface volatile inventory. Stellar luminosity generally increases as a star ages whilst planetary properties change through time as a consequence of biological and geological evolution. Hence, the location of the habitable zone changes through time as a result of both stellar evolution and planetary evolution. Using the Earth's Phanerozoic temperature history as a constraint, it is shown that changes in our own habitable zone over the last 540 My have been dominated by planetary evolution rather than solar evolution. Furthermore, sparse data from earlier times suggests that planetary evolution may have dominated habitable zone development throughout our biosphere's history. Hence, the existence of a continuously habitable zone depends upon accidents of complex bio-geochemical evolution more than it does upon relatively simple stellar-evolution. Evolution of the inner margin of the habitable zone through time using three different estimates for climate sensitivity. The dashed line shows a typical predicted evolution assuming this was driven simply by a steady increase in solar luminosity. Solar evolution does not account for the observations. Evolution of the outer margin of the habitable zone through time using three different estimates for climate sensitivity. The dashed line shows a typical predicted evolution assuming this was driven simply by a steady increase in solar luminosity. Solar evolution does not account for the observations.

  4. Track structure: time evolution from physics to chemistry.

    PubMed

    Dingfelder, M

    2006-01-01

    This review discusses interaction cross sections of charged particles (electrons, protons, light ions) with atoms and molecules. The focus is on biological relevant targets like liquid water which serves as a substitute of soft tissue in most Monte Carlo codes. The spatial distribution of energy deposition patterns by different radiation qualities and their importance to the time evolution from the physical to the chemical stage or radiation response is discussed. The determination of inelastic interaction cross sections for charged particles in condensed matter is discussed within the relativistic plane-wave Born approximation and semi-empirical models. The dielectric-response-function of liquid water is discussed.

  5. Effectiveness of early part-time sick leave in musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Martimo, Kari-Pekka; Kaila-Kangas, Leena; Kausto, Johanna; Takala, Esa-Pekka; Ketola, Ritva; Riihimäki, Hilkka; Luukkonen, Ritva; Karppinen, Jaro; Miranda, Helena; Viikari-Juntura, Eira

    2008-02-25

    The importance of staying active instead of bed rest has been acknowledged in the management of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). This emphasizes the potential benefits of adjusting work to fit the employee's remaining work ability. Despite part-time sick leave being an official option in many countries, its effectiveness has not been studied yet. We have designed a randomized controlled study to assess the health effects of early part-time sick leave compared to conventional full-day sick leave. Our hypothesis is that if work time is temporarily reduced and work load adjusted at the early stages of disability, employees with MSDs will have less disability days and faster return to regular work duties than employees on a conventional sick leave. The study population will consist of 600 employees, who seek medical advice from an occupational physician due to musculoskeletal pain. The inclusion requires that they have not been on a sick leave for longer than 14 days prior to the visit. Based on the physician's judgement, the severity of the symptoms must indicate a need for conventional sick leave, but the employee is considered to be able to work part-time without any additional risk. Half of the employees are randomly allocated to part-time sick leave group and their work time is reduced by 40-60%, whereas in the control group work load is totally eliminated with conventional sick leave. The main outcomes are the number of days from the initial visit to return to regular work activities, and the total number of sick leave days during 12 and 24 months of follow-up. The costs and benefits as well as the feasibility of early part-time sick leave will also be evaluated. This is the first randomised trial to our knowledge on the effectiveness of early part-time sick leave compared to conventional full-time sick leave in the management of MSDs. The data collection continues until 2011, but preliminary results on the feasibility of part-time sick leave will be available

  6. Unification of small and large time scales for biological evolution: deviations from power law.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Debashish; Stauffer, Dietrich; Kunwar, Ambarish

    2003-02-14

    We develop a unified model that describes both "micro" and "macro" evolutions within a single theoretical framework. The ecosystem is described as a dynamic network; the population dynamics at each node of this network describes the "microevolution" over ecological time scales (i.e., birth, ageing, and natural death of individual organisms), while the appearance of new nodes, the slow changes of the links, and the disappearance of existing nodes accounts for the "macroevolution" over geological time scales (i.e., the origination, evolution, and extinction of species). In contrast to several earlier claims in the literature, we observe strong deviations from power law in the regime of long lifetimes.

  7. Physiology and Evolution of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Early Diverging Animal Phyla: Cnidaria, Placozoa, Porifera and Ctenophora

    PubMed Central

    Senatore, Adriano; Raiss, Hamad; Le, Phuong

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium (Cav) channels serve dual roles in the cell, where they can both depolarize the membrane potential for electrical excitability, and activate transient cytoplasmic Ca2+ signals. In animals, Cav channels play crucial roles including driving muscle contraction (excitation-contraction coupling), gene expression (excitation-transcription coupling), pre-synaptic and neuroendocrine exocytosis (excitation-secretion coupling), regulation of flagellar/ciliary beating, and regulation of cellular excitability, either directly or through modulation of other Ca2+-sensitive ion channels. In recent years, genome sequencing has provided significant insights into the molecular evolution of Cav channels. Furthermore, expanded gene datasets have permitted improved inference of the species phylogeny at the base of Metazoa, providing clearer insights into the evolution of complex animal traits which involve Cav channels, including the nervous system. For the various types of metazoan Cav channels, key properties that determine their cellular contribution include: Ion selectivity, pore gating, and, importantly, cytoplasmic protein-protein interactions that direct sub-cellular localization and functional complexing. It is unclear when these defining features, many of which are essential for nervous system function, evolved. In this review, we highlight some experimental observations that implicate Cav channels in the physiology and behavior of the most early-diverging animals from the phyla Cnidaria, Placozoa, Porifera, and Ctenophora. Given our limited understanding of the molecular biology of Cav channels in these basal animal lineages, we infer insights from better-studied vertebrate and invertebrate animals. We also highlight some apparently conserved cellular functions of Cav channels, which might have emerged very early on during metazoan evolution, or perhaps predated it. PMID:27867359

  8. Optimal timing for early surgery in infective endocarditis: a meta-analysis†

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Fuxiang; Song, Bing; Liu, Ruisheng; Yang, Liu; Tang, Hanbo; Li, Yuanming

    2016-01-01

    To systematically review early surgery and the optimal timing of surgery in patients with infective endocarditis (IE), a search for foreign and domestic articles on cohort studies about the association between early surgery and infective endocarditis published from inception to January 2015 was conducted in the PubMed, EMBASE, Chinese Biomedical Literature (CBM), Wanfang and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases. The studies were screened according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, the data were extracted and the quality of the method of the included studies was assessed. Then, the meta-analysis was performed using the Stata 12.0 software. Sixteen cohort studies, including 8141 participants were finally included. The results of the meta-analysis revealed that, compared with non-early surgery, early surgery in IE lowers the incidence of in-hospital mortality [odds ratio (OR) = 0.57, 95% confidence interval (CI) (0.42, 0.77); P = 0.000, I2 = 73.1%] and long-term mortality [OR = 0.57, 95% CI (0.43, 0.77); P = 0.001, I2 = 67.4%]. Further, performing operation within 2 weeks had a more favourable effect on long-term mortality [OR = 0.63, 95% CI (0.41, 0.97); P = 0.192, I2 = 39.4%] than non-early surgery. In different kinds of IE, we found that early surgery for native valve endocarditis (NVE) had a lower in-hospital [OR = 0.46, 95% CI (0.31, 0.69); P = 0.001, I2 = 73.0%] and long-term [OR = 0.57, 95% CI (0.40, 0.81); P = 0.001, I2 = 68.9%] mortality than the non-early surgery group. However, for prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE), in-hospital mortality did not differ significantly [OR = 0.83, 95% CI (0.65, 1.06); P = 0.413, I2 = 0.0%] between early and non-early surgery. We concluded that early surgery was associated with lower in-hospital and long-term mortality compared with non-early surgical treatment for IE, especially in NVE. However, the optimal timing of surgery remains unclear. Additional larger prospective clinical trials will be

  9. The role of hard turbulent thermal convection in the Earth's early thermal evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Ulli; Yuen, David A.; Zhao, Wuling; Malevsky, Andrei V.

    1992-01-01

    In the last several years great progress was made in the study of a new transition in thermal convection, called hard turbulence. Initial experiments were conducted with helium gas, then with water. It was shown that for base-heated Newtonian convection a transition occurred at Rayleigh numbers between 10(exp 7) and 10(exp 8). This transition is characterized by the appearance of disconnected plume structures in contrast to continuous plumes with mushroom-shaped tops found for lower Rayleigh numbers. This new hydrodynamic transition is expected to play an important role in reshaping our concepts of mantle convection in the early stages of planetary evolution. We have conducted two-dimensional calculations for large and small aspect-ratio configuration to see whether such a transition would take place for infinite Prandtl number fluids.

  10. Archeology and evolution of QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rújula, A.

    2017-03-01

    These are excerpts from the closing talk at the "XIIth Conference on Quark Confinement and the Hadron Spectrum", which took place last Summer in Thessaloniki -an excellent place to enjoy an interest in archeology. A more complete personal view of the early days of QCD and the rest of the Standard Model is given in [1]. Here I discuss a few of the points which -to my judgement- illustrate well the QCD evolution (in time), both from a scientific and a sociological point of view.

  11. Time and Temporality in Early Childhood Educators' Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuttall, Joce; Thomas, Louise

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the persistence and significance of notions of time and temporality in interviews with early childhood educators in Victoria and Queensland, Australia, in two studies designed to explore the concept of "pedagogical leadership". Interpretive analysis of the interview transcripts of the 19 participants identified…

  12. Time scale controversy: Accurate orbital calibration of the early Paleogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehl, U.; Westerhold, T.; Laskar, J.

    2012-12-01

    Timing is crucial to understanding the causes and consequences of events in Earth history. The calibration of geological time relies heavily on the accuracy of radioisotopic and astronomical dating. Uncertainties in the computations of Earth's orbital parameters and in radioisotopic dating have hampered the construction of a reliable astronomically calibrated time scale beyond 40 Ma. Attempts to construct a robust astronomically tuned time scale for the early Paleogene by integrating radioisotopic and astronomical dating are only partially consistent. Here, using the new La2010 and La2011 orbital solutions, we present the first accurate astronomically calibrated time scale for the early Paleogene (47-65 Ma) uniquely based on astronomical tuning and thus independent of the radioisotopic determination of the Fish Canyon standard. Comparison with geological data confirms the stability of the new La2011 solution back to 54 Ma. Subsequent anchoring of floating chronologies to the La2011 solution using the very long eccentricity nodes provides an absolute age of 55.530 ± 0.05 Ma for the onset of the Paleocene/Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), 54.850 ± 0.05 Ma for the early Eocene ash -17, and 65.250 ± 0.06 Ma for the K/Pg boundary. The new astrochronology presented here indicates that the intercalibration and synchronization of U/Pb and 40Ar/39Ar radioisotopic geochronology is much more challenging than previously thought.

  13. Time scale controversy: Accurate orbital calibration of the early Paleogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerhold, Thomas; RöHl, Ursula; Laskar, Jacques

    2012-06-01

    Timing is crucial to understanding the causes and consequences of events in Earth history. The calibration of geological time relies heavily on the accuracy of radioisotopic and astronomical dating. Uncertainties in the computations of Earth's orbital parameters and in radioisotopic dating have hampered the construction of a reliable astronomically calibrated time scale beyond 40 Ma. Attempts to construct a robust astronomically tuned time scale for the early Paleogene by integrating radioisotopic and astronomical dating are only partially consistent. Here, using the new La2010 and La2011 orbital solutions, we present the first accurate astronomically calibrated time scale for the early Paleogene (47-65 Ma) uniquely based on astronomical tuning and thus independent of the radioisotopic determination of the Fish Canyon standard. Comparison with geological data confirms the stability of the new La2011 solution back to ˜54 Ma. Subsequent anchoring of floating chronologies to the La2011 solution using the very long eccentricity nodes provides an absolute age of 55.530 ± 0.05 Ma for the onset of the Paleocene/Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), 54.850 ± 0.05 Ma for the early Eocene ash -17, and 65.250 ± 0.06 Ma for the K/Pg boundary. The new astrochronology presented here indicates that the intercalibration and synchronization of U/Pb and 40Ar/39Ar radioisotopic geochronology is much more challenging than previously thought.

  14. Time Evolution of the Giant Molecular Cloud Mass Functions across Galactic Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Masato I. N.; Inutsuka, Shu-Ichiro; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    We formulate and conduct the time-integration of time evolution equation for the giant molecular cloud mass function (GMCMF) including the cloud-cloud collision (CCC) effect. Our results show that the CCC effect is only limited in the massive-end of the GMCMF and indicate that future high resolution and sensitivity radio observations may constrain giant molecular cloud (GMC) timescales by observing the GMCMF slope in the lower mass regime.

  15. Pubertal timing and early sexual intercourse in the offspring of teenage mothers.

    PubMed

    De Genna, Natacha M; Larkby, Cynthia; Cornelius, Marie D

    2011-10-01

    Early puberty is associated with stressful family environments, early sexual intercourse, and teenage pregnancy. We examined pubertal timing and sexual debut among the 14-year-old offspring of teenage mothers. Mothers (71% Black, 29% White) were recruited as pregnant teenagers (12-18 years old). Data were collected during pregnancy and when offspring were 6, 10 and 14 years old (n = 318). Adolescents (50% male) compared the timing of their pubertal maturation to same-sex peers. There was a significant 3-way interaction effect of race, sex, and pubertal timing on sexual debut (n = 305). This effect remained significant in a model controlling for maternal age at first intercourse, substance use, exposure to trauma, authoritative parenting, and peer sexual activity (n = 255). Early maturation was associated with early sex in daughters, and may be one pathway for the inter-generational transfer of risk for teenage pregnancy among daughters of teenage mothers.

  16. Dynamics and early post-tsunami evolution of floating marine debris near Fukushima Daiichi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, John Philip; Ostrovsky, Lev; Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Komori, Satoru; Tamura, Hitoshi

    2017-08-01

    The devastating tsunami triggered by the Tōhoku-Oki earthquake of 11 March 2011 caused a crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station where it overtopped the seawall defences. On retreating, the tsunami carried loose debris and wreckage seaward and marshalled buoyant material into extensive plumes. Widespread concern over the fate of these and numerous other Tōhoku tsunami depositions prompted attempts to simulate debris dispersion throughout the wider Pacific. However, the effects of locally perturbed wind and wave fields, active Langmuir circulation and current-induced attrition determine a complex and poorly understood morphology for large floating agglomerations. Here we show that the early post-tsunami evolution of marine-debris plumes near Fukushima Daiichi was also shaped by near-surface wind modifications that took place above relatively calm (lower surface roughness) waters covered by surface films derived from oil and other contaminants. High-spatial-resolution satellite tracking reveals faster-than-expected floating-debris motions and invigorated plume evolution within these regions, while numerical modelling of turbulent air flow over the low-drag, film-covered surface predicts typically metre-per-second wind strengthening at centimetric heights, sufficient to explain the observed debris-speed increases. Wind restructuring probably stimulates the dispersion of flotsam from both biological and anthropogenic sources throughout a global ocean of highly variable surface roughness.

  17. Estimating the time evolution of NMR systems via a quantum-speed-limit-like expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villamizar, D. V.; Duzzioni, E. I.; Leal, A. C. S.; Auccaise, R.

    2018-05-01

    Finding the solutions of the equations that describe the dynamics of a given physical system is crucial in order to obtain important information about its evolution. However, by using estimation theory, it is possible to obtain, under certain limitations, some information on its dynamics. The quantum-speed-limit (QSL) theory was originally used to estimate the shortest time in which a Hamiltonian drives an initial state to a final one for a given fidelity. Using the QSL theory in a slightly different way, we are able to estimate the running time of a given quantum process. For that purpose, we impose the saturation of the Anandan-Aharonov bound in a rotating frame of reference where the state of the system travels slower than in the original frame (laboratory frame). Through this procedure it is possible to estimate the actual evolution time in the laboratory frame of reference with good accuracy when compared to previous methods. Our method is tested successfully to predict the time spent in the evolution of nuclear spins 1/2 and 3/2 in NMR systems. We find that the estimated time according to our method is better than previous approaches by up to four orders of magnitude. One disadvantage of our method is that we need to solve a number of transcendental equations, which increases with the system dimension and parameter discretization used to solve such equations numerically.

  18. Study of the time evolution of correlation functions of the transverse Ising chain with ring frustration by perturbative theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhen-Yu; Li, Peng

    2018-04-01

    We consider the time evolution of two-point correlation function in the transverse-field Ising chain (TFIC) with ring frustration. The time-evolution procedure we investigated is equivalent to a quench process in which the system is initially prepared in a classical kink state and evolves according to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Within a framework of perturbative theory (PT) in the strong kink phase, the evolution of the correlation function is disclosed to demonstrate a qualitatively new behavior in contrast to the traditional case without ring frustration.

  19. Information-sharing tendency on Twitter and time evolution of tweeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, H. W.; Kim, H. S.; Lee, K.; Choi, M. Y.

    2013-03-01

    While topics on Twitter may be categorized according to their predictability and sustainability, some topics have characteristics depending on the time scale. Here we propose a good measure for the transition of sustainability, which we call the information-sharing tendency, and find that the unpredictability on Twitter is provoked by the exposure of Twitter users to external environments, e.g., mass media and other social network services. In addition, it is demonstrated that the numbers of articles and comments on on-line newspapers serve as plausible measures of exposure. From such measures of exposure, the time evolution of tweeting can be described, when the information-sharing tendency is known.

  20. Amino Acid Stability in the Early Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. T.; Brinton, K. L.; Burton, A. S.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Bada, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    It is likely that a variety of amino acids existed in the early oceans of the Earth at the time of the origin and early evolution of life. "Primordial soup", hydrothermal vent, and meteorite based processes could have contributed to such an inventory. Several "protein" amino acids were likely present, however, based on prebiotic synthesis experiments and carbonaceous meteorite studies, non-protein amino acids, which are rare on Earth today, were likely the most abundant. An important uncertainty is the length of time these amino acids could have persisted before their destruction by abiotic and biotic processes. Prior to life, amino acid concentrations in the oceans were likely regulated by circulation through hydro-thermal vents. Today, the entire ocean circulates through vent systems every 10(exp 7) years. On the early Earth, this value was likely smaller due to higher heat flow and thus marine amino acid life-time would have been shorter. After life, amino acids in the oceans could have been assimilated by primitive organisms.

  1. The effects of short-lived radionuclides and porosity on the early thermo-mechanical evolution of planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenberg, Tim; Golabek, Gregor J.; Gerya, Taras V.; Meyer, Michael R.

    2016-08-01

    The thermal history and internal structure of chondritic planetesimals, assembled before the giant impact phase of chaotic growth, potentially yield important implications for the final composition and evolution of terrestrial planets. These parameters critically depend on the internal balance of heating versus cooling, which is mostly determined by the presence of short-lived radionuclides (SLRs), such as 26Al and 60Fe, as well as the heat conductivity of the material. The heating by SLRs depends on their initial abundances, the formation time of the planetesimal and its size. It has been argued that the cooling history is determined by the porosity of the granular material, which undergoes dramatic changes via compaction processes and tends to decrease with time. In this study we assess the influence of these parameters on the thermo-mechanical evolution of young planetesimals with both 2D and 3D simulations. Using the code family I2ELVIS/I3ELVIS we have run numerous 2D and 3D numerical finite-difference fluid dynamic models with varying planetesimal radius, formation time and initial porosity. Our results indicate that powdery materials lowered the threshold for melting and convection in planetesimals, depending on the amount of SLRs present. A subset of planetesimals retained a powdery surface layer which lowered the thermal conductivity and hindered cooling. The effect of initial porosity was small, however, compared to those of planetesimal size and formation time, which dominated the thermo-mechanical evolution and were the primary factors for the onset of melting and differentiation. We comment on the implications of this work concerning the structure and evolution of these planetesimals, as well as their behavior as possible building blocks of terrestrial planets.

  2. Evolution of pressures and correlations in the glasma produced in high energy nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggieri, M.; Liu, J. H.; Oliva, L.; Peng, G. X.; Greco, V.

    2018-04-01

    We consider the SU(2) glasma with Gaussian fluctuations and study its evolution by means of classical Yang-Mills equations solved numerically on a lattice. Neglecting in this first study the longitudinal expansion, we follow the evolution of the pressures of the system and compute the effect of the fluctuations in the early stage up to t ≈2 fm /c , that is the time range in which the glasma is relevant for high energy collisions. We measure the ratio of the longitudinal over the transverse pressure, PL/PT, and we find that unless the fluctuations carry a substantial amount of the energy density at the initial time, they do not change significantly the evolution of PL/PT in the early stage and that the system remains quite anisotropic. We also measure the longitudinal fields correlators both in the transverse plane and along the longitudinal direction: while at initial time fields appear to be anticorrelated in the transverse plane, this anticorrelation disappears in the very early stage, and the correlation length in the transverse plane increases. On the other hand, we find a dependence of the gauge invariant correlator on the longitudinal coordinate, which we interpret as a partial loss of correlation induced by the dynamics that we dub the gauge invariant string breaking. We finally study the effect of fluctuations on the longitudinal correlations: we find that string breaking is accelerated by the fluctuations and waiting for a sufficiently long time fluctuations lead to the complete breaking of the color strings.

  3. Real-time image sequence segmentation using curve evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Liu, Weisong

    2001-04-01

    In this paper, we describe a novel approach to image sequence segmentation and its real-time implementation. This approach uses the 3D structure tensor to produce a more robust frame difference signal and uses curve evolution to extract whole objects. Our algorithm is implemented on a standard PC running the Windows operating system with video capture from a USB camera that is a standard Windows video capture device. Using the Windows standard video I/O functionalities, our segmentation software is highly portable and easy to maintain and upgrade. In its current implementation on a Pentium 400, the system can perform segmentation at 5 frames/sec with a frame resolution of 160 by 120.

  4. The Early Development and Evolution of the QARTOD for In-Situ Wave Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, R. H.; Thomas, J.; Teng, C. C.; Burnett, W.; Castel, D.

    2017-12-01

    In 2013 the US Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) Program Office issued manual was for the Real-Time Quality Control of In-Situ Surface Wave Data. This was one of the first Quality Assurance/Quality Control of Real-Time Oceanographic Data (QARTOD) manuals that now cover 11 different in situ measurements. This landmark document was the product of an effort initiated at a 2002 OCEANS.US workshop. The workshop identified and prioritized ocean variables with directional waves ranked as one of the highest key variables for inclusion into a national backbone of observations. The workshop was the impetus that led to the first QARTOD meeting in 2003 that involved over 80 participants and developed minimum standards for real-time observations. Over three more QARTOD meetings, two ad hoc meetings, and many hours of coordination and review involving dozens of wave measurement users and providers, consensus was reached on a list of essential "must Do's" for quality control tests that eventually formed the basis of the manual. The IOOS QARTOD manual established a standard format, provided greater detail, included codeable examples of the algorithms and established a framework for periodic reviews and updates. While the bulk of the quality control procedures originated with those being used by the Coastal Data Information Program (CDIP) and by NOAA's National Data Buoy Center (NDBC), QARTOD also enlisted the expertise of federal, academic, and industry partners. CDIP and NDBC each operated more than 100 wave measuring buoys and had long histories of wave buoy measurements. In addition to buoy measurements, users and providers of fixed and bottom-mounted wave systems were also included. This paper examines the individual contributions, early developments, and the evolution of the QARTOD wave measurement efforts that culminated in the US IOOS manual. These efforts serve as an example of how individuals with a common interest and dedication can achieve results for the common

  5. The origin and early evolution of vascular plant shoots and leaves.

    PubMed

    Harrison, C Jill; Morris, Jennifer L

    2018-02-05

    The morphology of plant fossils from the Rhynie chert has generated longstanding questions about vascular plant shoot and leaf evolution, for instance, which morphologies were ancestral within land plants, when did vascular plants first arise and did leaves have multiple evolutionary origins? Recent advances combining insights from molecular phylogeny, palaeobotany and evo-devo research address these questions and suggest the sequence of morphological innovation during vascular plant shoot and leaf evolution. The evidence pinpoints testable developmental and genetic hypotheses relating to the origin of branching and indeterminate shoot architectures prior to the evolution of leaves, and demonstrates underestimation of polyphyly in the evolution of leaves from branching forms in 'telome theory' hypotheses of leaf evolution. This review discusses fossil, developmental and genetic evidence relating to the evolution of vascular plant shoots and leaves in a phylogenetic framework.This article is part of a discussion meeting issue 'The Rhynie cherts: our earliest terrestrial ecosystem revisited'. © 2017 The Authors.

  6. The origin and early evolution of vascular plant shoots and leaves

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    The morphology of plant fossils from the Rhynie chert has generated longstanding questions about vascular plant shoot and leaf evolution, for instance, which morphologies were ancestral within land plants, when did vascular plants first arise and did leaves have multiple evolutionary origins? Recent advances combining insights from molecular phylogeny, palaeobotany and evo–devo research address these questions and suggest the sequence of morphological innovation during vascular plant shoot and leaf evolution. The evidence pinpoints testable developmental and genetic hypotheses relating to the origin of branching and indeterminate shoot architectures prior to the evolution of leaves, and demonstrates underestimation of polyphyly in the evolution of leaves from branching forms in ‘telome theory’ hypotheses of leaf evolution. This review discusses fossil, developmental and genetic evidence relating to the evolution of vascular plant shoots and leaves in a phylogenetic framework. This article is part of a discussion meeting issue ‘The Rhynie cherts: our earliest terrestrial ecosystem revisited’. PMID:29254961

  7. Pubertal Timing and Early Sexual Intercourse in the Offspring of Teenage Mothers

    PubMed Central

    De Genna, Natacha M.; Larkby, Cynthia; Cornelius, Marie D.

    2011-01-01

    Early puberty is associated with stressful family environments, early sexual intercourse, and teenage pregnancy. We examined pubertal timing and sexual debut among the 14-year-old offspring of teenage mothers. Mothers (71% Black, 29% White) were recruited as pregnant teenagers (12–18 years old). Data were collected during pregnancy and when offspring were 6, 10 and 14 years old (n = 318). Adolescents (50% male) compared the timing of their pubertal maturation to same-sex peers. There was a significant 3-way interaction effect of race, sex, and pubertal timing on sexual debut (n = 305). This effect remained significant in a model controlling for maternal age at first intercourse, substance use, exposure to trauma, authoritative parenting, and peer sexual activity (n = 255). Early maturation was associated with early sex in daughters, and may be one pathway for the inter-generational transfer of risk for teenage pregnancy among daughters of teenage mothers. PMID:21279428

  8. Explaining the apparent paradox of persistent selection for early flowering.

    PubMed

    Austen, Emily J; Rowe, Locke; Stinchcombe, John R; Forrest, Jessica R K

    2017-08-01

    Decades of observation in natural plant populations have revealed pervasive phenotypic selection for early flowering onset. This consistent pattern seems at odds with life-history theory, which predicts stabilizing selection on age and size at reproduction. Why is selection for later flowering rare? Moreover, extensive evidence demonstrates that flowering time can and does evolve. What maintains ongoing directional selection for early flowering? Several non-mutually exclusive processes can help to reconcile the apparent paradox of selection for early flowering. We outline four: selection through other fitness components may counter observed fecundity selection for early flowering; asymmetry in the flowering-time-fitness function may make selection for later flowering hard to detect; flowering time and fitness may be condition-dependent; and selection on flowering duration is largely unaccounted for. In this Viewpoint, we develop these four mechanisms, and highlight areas where further study will improve our understanding of flowering-time evolution. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  9. Archean sedimentary styles and early crustal evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    The distinctions between and implications of early and late Archean sedimentary styles are presented. Early Archean greenstone belts, such as the Barberton of South Africa and those in the eastern Pilbar Block of Australia are characterized by fresh or slightly reworked pyroclastic debris, orthochemical sediments such as carbonates, evaporites, and silica, and biogenic deposits including cherts and stromatolitic units. Terrigenous deposits are rare, and it is suggested that early Archean sediments were deposited on shallow simatic platforms, with little or no components derived from sialic sources. In contrast, late Archean greenstone belts in the Canadian Shield and the Yilgarn Block of Australia contain coarse terrigenous clastic rocks including conglomerate, sandstone, and shale derived largely from sialic basement. Deposition appears to have taken place in deepwater, tectonically unstable environments. These observations are interpreted to indicate that the early Archean greenstone belts formed as anorogenic, shallow water, simatic platforms, with little or no underlying or adjacent continental crust, an environment similar to modern oceanic islands formed over hot spots.

  10. Age of acquisition predicts rate of lexical evolution.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, Padraic

    2014-12-01

    The processes taking place during language acquisition are proposed to influence language evolution. However, evidence demonstrating the link between language learning and language evolution is, at best, indirect, constituting studies of laboratory-based artificial language learning studies or computational simulations of diachronic change. In the current study, a direct link between acquisition and evolution is established, showing that for two hundred fundamental vocabulary items, the age at which words are acquired is a predictor of the rate at which they have changed in studies of language evolution. Early-acquired words are more salient and easier to process than late-acquired words, and these early-acquired words are also more stably represented within the community's language. Analysing the properties of these early-acquired words potentially provides insight into the origins of communication, highlighting features of words that have been ultra-conserved in language. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Evolution of Particle Size Distributions in Fragmentation Over Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalambous, C. A.; Pike, W. T.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new model of fragmentation based on a probabilistic calculation of the repeated fracture of a particle population. The resulting continuous solution, which is in closed form, gives the evolution of fragmentation products from an initial block, through a scale-invariant power-law relationship to a final comminuted powder. Models for the fragmentation of particles have been developed separately in mainly two different disciplines: the continuous integro-differential equations of batch mineral grinding (Reid, 1965) and the fractal analysis of geophysics (Turcotte, 1986) based on a discrete model with a single probability of fracture. The first gives a time-dependent development of the particle-size distribution, but has resisted a closed-form solution, while the latter leads to the scale-invariant power laws, but with no time dependence. Bird (2009) recently introduced a bridge between these two approaches with a step-wise iterative calculation of the fragmentation products. The development of the particle-size distribution occurs with discrete steps: during each fragmentation event, the particles will repeatedly fracture probabilistically, cascading down the length scales to a final size distribution reached after all particles have failed to further fragment. We have identified this process as the equivalent to a sequence of trials for each particle with a fixed probability of fragmentation. Although the resulting distribution is discrete, it can be reformulated as a continuous distribution in maturity over time and particle size. In our model, Turcotte's power-law distribution emerges at a unique maturation index that defines a regime boundary. Up to this index, the fragmentation is in an erosional regime with the initial particle size setting the scaling. Fragmentation beyond this index is in a regime of comminution with rebreakage of the particles down to the size limit of fracture. The maturation index can increment continuously, for example under

  12. Evidence of size-selective evolution in the fighting conch from prehistoric subsistence harvesting.

    PubMed

    O'Dea, Aaron; Shaffer, Marian Lynne; Doughty, Douglas R; Wake, Thomas A; Rodriguez, Felix A

    2014-05-07

    Intensive size-selective harvesting can drive evolution of sexual maturity at smaller body size. Conversely, prehistoric, low-intensity subsistence harvesting is not considered an effective agent of size-selective evolution. Uniting archaeological, palaeontological and contemporary material, we show that size at sexual maturity in the edible conch Strombus pugilis declined significantly from pre-human (approx. 7 ka) to prehistoric times (approx. 1 ka) and again to the present day. Size at maturity also fell from early- to late-prehistoric periods, synchronous with an increase in harvesting intensity as other resources became depleted. A consequence of declining size at maturity is that early prehistoric harvesters would have received two-thirds more meat per conch than contemporary harvesters. After exploring the potential effects of selection biases, demographic shifts, environmental change and habitat alteration, these observations collectively implicate prehistoric subsistence harvesting as an agent of size-selective evolution with long-term detrimental consequences. We observe that contemporary populations that are protected from harvesting are slightly larger at maturity, suggesting that halting or even reversing thousands of years of size-selective evolution may be possible.

  13. Evidence of size-selective evolution in the fighting conch from prehistoric subsistence harvesting

    PubMed Central

    O'Dea, Aaron; Shaffer, Marian Lynne; Doughty, Douglas R.; Wake, Thomas A.; Rodriguez, Felix A.

    2014-01-01

    Intensive size-selective harvesting can drive evolution of sexual maturity at smaller body size. Conversely, prehistoric, low-intensity subsistence harvesting is not considered an effective agent of size-selective evolution. Uniting archaeological, palaeontological and contemporary material, we show that size at sexual maturity in the edible conch Strombus pugilis declined significantly from pre-human (approx. 7 ka) to prehistoric times (approx. 1 ka) and again to the present day. Size at maturity also fell from early- to late-prehistoric periods, synchronous with an increase in harvesting intensity as other resources became depleted. A consequence of declining size at maturity is that early prehistoric harvesters would have received two-thirds more meat per conch than contemporary harvesters. After exploring the potential effects of selection biases, demographic shifts, environmental change and habitat alteration, these observations collectively implicate prehistoric subsistence harvesting as an agent of size-selective evolution with long-term detrimental consequences. We observe that contemporary populations that are protected from harvesting are slightly larger at maturity, suggesting that halting or even reversing thousands of years of size-selective evolution may be possible. PMID:24648229

  14. Optimal timing for early surgery in infective endocarditis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fuxiang; Song, Bing; Liu, Ruisheng; Yang, Liu; Tang, Hanbo; Li, Yuanming

    2016-03-01

    To systematically review early surgery and the optimal timing of surgery in patients with infective endocarditis (IE), a search for foreign and domestic articles on cohort studies about the association between early surgery and infective endocarditis published from inception to January 2015 was conducted in the PubMed, EMBASE, Chinese Biomedical Literature (CBM), Wanfang and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases. The studies were screened according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, the data were extracted and the quality of the method of the included studies was assessed. Then, the meta-analysis was performed using the Stata 12.0 software. Sixteen cohort studies, including 8141 participants were finally included. The results of the meta-analysis revealed that, compared with non-early surgery, early surgery in IE lowers the incidence of in-hospital mortality [odds ratio (OR) = 0.57, 95% confidence interval (CI) (0.42, 0.77); P = 0.000, I(2) = 73.1%] and long-term mortality [OR = 0.57, 95% CI (0.43, 0.77); P = 0.001, I(2) = 67.4%]. Further, performing operation within 2 weeks had a more favourable effect on long-term mortality [OR = 0.63, 95% CI (0.41, 0.97); P = 0.192, I(2) = 39.4%] than non-early surgery. In different kinds of IE, we found that early surgery for native valve endocarditis (NVE) had a lower in-hospital [OR = 0.46, 95% CI (0.31, 0.69); P = 0.001, I(2) = 73.0%] and long-term [OR = 0.57, 95% CI (0.40, 0.81); P = 0.001, I(2) = 68.9%] mortality than the non-early surgery group. However, for prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE), in-hospital mortality did not differ significantly [OR = 0.83, 95% CI (0.65, 1.06); P = 0.413, I(2) = 0.0%] between early and non-early surgery. We concluded that early surgery was associated with lower in-hospital and long-term mortality compared with non-early surgical treatment for IE, especially in NVE. However, the optimal timing of surgery remains unclear. Additional larger prospective clinical

  15. A dinosaur missing-link? Chilesaurus and the early evolution of ornithischian dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Baron, Matthew G; Barrett, Paul M

    2017-08-01

    The enigmatic dinosaur taxon Chilesaurus diegosuarezi was originally described as a tetanuran theropod, but this species possesses a highly unusual combination of features that could provide evidence of alternative phylogenetic positions within the clade. In order to test the relationships of Chilesaurus , we added it to a new dataset of early dinosaurs and other dinosauromorphs. Our analyses recover Chilesaurus in a novel position, as the earliest diverging member of Ornithischia, rather than a tetanuran theropod. The basal position of Chilesaurus within the clade and its suite of anatomical characters suggest that it might represent a 'transitional' taxon, bridging the morphological gap between Theropoda and Ornithischia, thereby offering potential insights into the earliest stages of ornithischian evolution, which were previously obscure. For example, our results suggest that pubic retroversion occurred prior to some of the craniodental and postcranial modifications that previously diagnosed the clade (e.g. the presence of a predentary bone and ossified tendons). © 2017 The Author(s).

  16. Time-dependent evolution of cosmic-ray-modified shock structure: Transition to steady state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohue, D. J.; Zank, G. P.; Webb, G. M.

    1994-03-01

    Steady state solutions to the two-fluid equations of cosmic-ray-modified shock structure were investigated first by Drury and Volk (1981). Their analysis revealed, among other properties, that there exist regions of upstream parameter space where the equations possess three different downstream solutions for a given upstream state. In this paper we investigate whether or not all these solutions can occur as time-asymptotic states in a physically realistic evolution. To do this, we investigate the time-dependent evolution of the two-fluid cosmic-ray equations in going from a specified initial condition to a steady state. Our results indicate that the time-asymptotic solution is strictly single-valued, and it undergoes a transition from weakly to strongly cosmic-ray-modified at a critical value of the upstream cosmic ray energy density. The expansion of supernova remnant shocks is considered as an example, and it is shown that the strong to weak transition is in fact more likely. The third intermediate solution is shown to influence the time-dependent evolution of the shock, but it is not found to be a stable time-asymptotic state. Timescales for convergence to these states and their implications for the efficiency of shock acceleration are considered. We also investigate the effects of a recently introduced model for the injection of seed particles into the shock accelerated cosmic-ray population. The injection is found to result in a more strongly cosmic-ray-dominated shock, which supports our conclusion that for most classes of intermediate and strong cosmic-ray-modified shocks, the downstream cosmic-ray pressure component is at least as large as the thermal gas pressure, independent of the upstream state. As a result, cosmic rays almost always play a significant role in determining the shock structure and dissipation and they cannot be regarded as test particles.

  17. Time-dependent evolution of cosmic-ray-modified shock structure: Transition to steady state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, D. J.; Zank, G. P.; Webb, G. M.

    1994-01-01

    Steady state solutions to the two-fluid equations of cosmic-ray-modified shock structure were investigated first by Drury and Volk (1981). Their analysis revealed, among other properties, that there exist regions of upstream parameter space where the equations possess three different downstream solutions for a given upstream state. In this paper we investigate whether or not all these solutions can occur as time-asymptotic states in a physically realistic evolution. To do this, we investigate the time-dependent evolution of the two-fluid cosmic-ray equations in going from a specified initial condition to a steady state. Our results indicate that the time-asymptotic solution is strictly single-valued, and it undergoes a transition from weakly to strongly cosmic-ray-modified at a critical value of the upstream cosmic ray energy density. The expansion of supernova remnant shocks is considered as an example, and it is shown that the strong to weak transition is in fact more likely. The third intermediate solution is shown to influence the time-dependent evolution of the shock, but it is not found to be a stable time-asymptotic state. Timescales for convergence to these states and their implications for the efficiency of shock acceleration are considered. We also investigate the effects of a recently introduced model for the injection of seed particles into the shock accelerated cosmic-ray population. The injection is found to result in a more strongly cosmic-ray-dominated shock, which supports our conclusion that for most classes of intermediate and strong cosmic-ray-modified shocks, the downstream cosmic-ray pressure component is at least as large as the thermal gas pressure, independent of the upstream state. As a result, cosmic rays almost always play a significant role in determining the shock structure and dissipation and they cannot be regarded as test particles.

  18. Aural exostoses (surfer's ear) provide vital fossil evidence of an aquatic phase in Man's early evolution.

    PubMed

    Rhys Evans, P H; Cameron, M

    2017-11-01

    For over a century, otolaryngologists have recognised the condition of aural exostoses, but their significance and aetiology remains obscure, although they tend to be associated with frequent swimming and cold water immersion of the auditory canal. The fact that this condition is usually bilateral is predictable since both ears are immersed in water. However, why do exostoses only grow in swimmers and why do they grow in the deep bony meatus at two or three constant sites? Furthermore, from an evolutionary point of view, what is or was the purpose and function of these rather incongruous protrusions? In recent decades, paleoanthropological evidence has challenged ideas about early hominid evolution. In 1992 the senior author suggested that aural exostoses were evolved in early hominid Man for protection of the delicate tympanic membrane during swimming and diving by narrowing the ear canal in a similar fashion to other semiaquatic species. We now provide evidence for this theory and propose an aetiological explanation for the formation of exostoses.

  19. Discrete-time Quantum Walks via Interchange Framework and Memory in Quantum Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimcovic, Zlatko

    One of the newer and rapidly developing approaches in quantum computing is based on "quantum walks," which are quantum processes on discrete space that evolve in either discrete or continuous time and are characterized by mixing of components at each step. The idea emerged in analogy with the classical random walks and stochastic techniques, but these unitary processes are very different even as they have intriguing similarities. This thesis is concerned with study of discrete-time quantum walks. The original motivation from classical Markov chains required for discrete-time quantum walks that one adds an auxiliary Hilbert space, unrelated to the one in which the system evolves, in order to be able to mix components in that space and then take the evolution steps accordingly (based on the state in that space). This additional, "coin," space is very often an internal degree of freedom like spin. We have introduced a general framework for construction of discrete-time quantum walks in a close analogy with the classical random walks with memory that is rather different from the standard "coin" approach. In this method there is no need to bring in a different degree of freedom, while the full state of the system is still described in the direct product of spaces (of states). The state can be thought of as an arrow pointing from the previous to the current site in the evolution, representing the one-step memory. The next step is then controlled by a single local operator assigned to each site in the space, acting quite like a scattering operator. This allows us to probe and solve some problems of interest that have not had successful approaches with "coined" walks. We construct and solve a walk on the binary tree, a structure of great interest but until our result without an explicit discrete time quantum walk, due to difficulties in managing coin spaces necessary in the standard approach. Beyond algorithmic interests, the model based on memory allows one to explore

  20. Long-Term Evolution of the Sun and our Biosphere: Causes and Effects?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Des Marais, D. J.

    2000-05-01

    The course of early biological evolution felt the environmental consequences of changes in the solar output (discussed here), as well as long-term decreases in planetary heat flow and the flux of extraterrestrial impactors. A large, early UV flux fueled the photodissociation of atmospheric water vapor, sustaining a significant hydrogen flux to space. This flux caused Earth's crust to become oxidized, relative to its mantle. Accordingly, reduced gases and aqueous solutes that were erupted volcanically into the relatively more oxidized surface environment created sources of chemical redox energy for the origin and early evolution of life. Although the solar constant has increased some 30 percent over Earth's lifetime, oceans remained remarkably stable for more than 3.8 billion years. Thus a very effective climate regulation was probably achieved by decreasing over time the atmospheric inventories of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane. Such decreases probably had major consequences for the biosphere. Substantial early marine bicarbonate and carbon dioxide inventories sustained abundant abiotic precipitation of carbonates, with consequences for the stability and habitability of key aqueous environments. A long-term decline in carbon dioxide levels increased the bioenergetic requirements for carbon dioxide as well as other aspects of the physiology of photosynthetic microorganisms. The long-term trend of global mean surface temperature is still debated, as is the role of the sun's evolution in that trend. Future increases in the solar constant will drive atmospheric carbon dioxide levels down further, challenging plants to cope with ever-dwindling concentrations of carbon substrates. Climate regulation will be achieved by modulating an increasing abundance of high-albedo water vapor clouds. Future biological evolution defies precise predictions, however it is certain that the sun's continuing evolution will play a key role.

  1. Evolution of animal and plant dicers: early parallel duplications and recurrent adaptation of antiviral RNA binding in plants.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Krishanu; Campos, Henry; Kolaczkowski, Bryan

    2013-03-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a eukaryotic molecular system that serves two primary functions: 1) gene regulation and 2) protection against selfish elements such as viruses and transposable DNA. Although the biochemistry of RNAi has been detailed in model organisms, very little is known about the broad-scale patterns and forces that have shaped RNAi evolution. Here, we provide a comprehensive evolutionary analysis of the Dicer protein family, which carries out the initial RNA recognition and processing steps in the RNAi pathway. We show that Dicer genes duplicated and diversified independently in early animal and plant evolution, coincident with the origins of multicellularity. We identify a strong signature of long-term protein-coding adaptation that has continually reshaped the RNA-binding pocket of the plant Dicer responsible for antiviral immunity, suggesting an evolutionary arms race with viral factors. We also identify key changes in Dicer domain architecture and sequence leading to specialization in either gene-regulatory or protective functions in animal and plant paralogs. As a whole, these results reveal a dynamic picture in which the evolution of Dicer function has driven elaboration of parallel RNAi functional pathways in animals and plants.

  2. Early 20th-century research at the interfaces of genetics, development, and evolution: reflections on progress and dead ends.

    PubMed

    Deichmann, Ute

    2011-09-01

    Three early 20th-century attempts at unifying separate areas of biology, in particular development, genetics, physiology, and evolution, are compared in regard to their success and fruitfulness for further research: Jacques Loeb's reductionist project of unifying approaches by physico-chemical explanations; Richard Goldschmidt's anti-reductionist attempts to unify by integration; and Sewall Wright's combination of reductionist research and vision of hierarchical genetic systems. Loeb's program, demanding that all aspects of biology, including evolution, be studied by the methods of the experimental sciences, proved highly successful and indispensible for higher level investigations, even though evolutionary change and properties of biological systems up to now cannot be fully explained on the molecular level alone. Goldschmidt has been appraised as pioneer of physiological and developmental genetics and of a new evolutionary synthesis which transcended neo-Darwinism. However, this study concludes that his anti-reductionist attempts to integrate genetics, development and evolution have to be regarded as failures or dead ends. His grand speculations were based on the one hand on concepts and experimental systems that were too vague in order to stimulate further research, and on the other on experiments which in their core parts turned out not to be reproducible. In contrast, Sewall Wright, apart from being one of the architects of the neo-Darwinian synthesis of the 1930s, opened up new paths of testable quantitative developmental genetic investigations. He placed his research within a framework of logical reasoning, which resulted in the farsighted speculation that examinations of biological systems should be related to the regulation of hierarchical genetic subsystems, possibly providing a mechanism for development and evolution. I argue that his suggestion of basing the study of systems on clearly defined properties of the components has proved superior to

  3. Iterative adaptive radiations of fossil canids show no evidence for diversity-dependent trait evolution.

    PubMed

    Slater, Graham J

    2015-04-21

    A long-standing hypothesis in adaptive radiation theory is that ecological opportunity constrains rates of phenotypic evolution, generating a burst of morphological disparity early in clade history. Empirical support for the early burst model is rare in comparative data, however. One possible reason for this lack of support is that most phylogenetic tests have focused on extant clades, neglecting information from fossil taxa. Here, I test for the expected signature of adaptive radiation using the outstanding 40-My fossil record of North American canids. Models implying time- and diversity-dependent rates of morphological evolution are strongly rejected for two ecologically important traits, body size and grinding area of the molar teeth. Instead, Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes implying repeated, and sometimes rapid, attraction to distinct dietary adaptive peaks receive substantial support. Diversity-dependent rates of morphological evolution seem uncommon in clades, such as canids, that exhibit a pattern of replicated adaptive radiation. Instead, these clades might best be thought of as deterministic radiations in constrained Simpsonian subzones of a major adaptive zone. Support for adaptive peak models may be diagnostic of subzonal radiations. It remains to be seen whether early burst or ecological opportunity models can explain broader adaptive radiations, such as the evolution of higher taxa.

  4. Iterative adaptive radiations of fossil canids show no evidence for diversity-dependent trait evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Graham J.

    2015-04-01

    A long-standing hypothesis in adaptive radiation theory is that ecological opportunity constrains rates of phenotypic evolution, generating a burst of morphological disparity early in clade history. Empirical support for the early burst model is rare in comparative data, however. One possible reason for this lack of support is that most phylogenetic tests have focused on extant clades, neglecting information from fossil taxa. Here, I test for the expected signature of adaptive radiation using the outstanding 40-My fossil record of North American canids. Models implying time- and diversity-dependent rates of morphological evolution are strongly rejected for two ecologically important traits, body size and grinding area of the molar teeth. Instead, Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes implying repeated, and sometimes rapid, attraction to distinct dietary adaptive peaks receive substantial support. Diversity-dependent rates of morphological evolution seem uncommon in clades, such as canids, that exhibit a pattern of replicated adaptive radiation. Instead, these clades might best be thought of as deterministic radiations in constrained Simpsonian subzones of a major adaptive zone. Support for adaptive peak models may be diagnostic of subzonal radiations. It remains to be seen whether early burst or ecological opportunity models can explain broader adaptive radiations, such as the evolution of higher taxa.

  5. The Size Evolution of Passive Galaxies: Observations From the Wide-Field Camera 3 Early Release Science Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R. E., Jr.; Mccarthy, P.J.; Cohen, S. H.; Yan, H.; Hathi, N. P.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Rutkowski, M. J.; Mechtley, M. R.; Windhorst, R. A.; O’Connell, R. W.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We present the size evolution of passively evolving galaxies at z approximately 2 identified in Wide-Field Camera 3 imaging from the Early Release Science program. Our sample was constructed using an analog to the passive BzK galaxy selection criterion, which isolates galaxies with little or no ongoing star formation at z greater than approximately 1.5. We identify 30 galaxies in approximately 40 arcmin(sup 2) to H less than 25 mag. By fitting the 10-band Hubble Space Telescope photometry from 0.22 micrometers less than approximately lambda (sub obs) 1.6 micrometers with stellar population synthesis models, we simultaneously determine photometric redshift, stellar mass, and a bevy of other population parameters. Based on the six galaxies with published spectroscopic redshifts, we estimate a typical redshift uncertainty of approximately 0.033(1+z).We determine effective radii from Sersic profile fits to the H-band image using an empirical point-spread function. By supplementing our data with published samples, we propose a mass-dependent size evolution model for passively evolving galaxies, where the most massive galaxies (M(sub *) approximately 10(sup 11) solar mass) undergo the strongest evolution from z approximately 2 to the present. Parameterizing the size evolution as (1 + z)(sup - alpha), we find a tentative scaling of alpha approximately equals (-0.6 plus or minus 0.7) + (0.9 plus or minus 0.4) log(M(sub *)/10(sup 9 solar mass), where the relatively large uncertainties reflect the poor sampling in stellar mass due to the low numbers of highredshift systems. We discuss the implications of this result for the redshift evolution of the M(sub *)-R(sub e) relation for red galaxies.

  6. Approaches to Legacy System Evolution.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-01

    such as migrating legacy systems, to more distributed open environments. This framework draws out the important global issues early in the planning...ongoing system evolution initiatives, for drawing out important global issues early in the planning cycle using the checklists as a guide, and for

  7. Iron Speciation in Minerals and Melts at High Pressure: Implications for the Redox Evolution of the Early Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, K.; Frost, D. J.; McCammon, C. A.; Rubie, D. C.; Boffa Ballaran, T.; Miyajima, N.

    2016-12-01

    During the differentiation of the early Earth, the silicates of the mantle must have been in equilibrium with core-forming metal iron, as indicated by the depletion of siderophile elements from the mantle. Studies of ancient rocks suggest that by at least 3.9 Ga, the upper mantle was 4-5 log units more oxidized than metal saturation implies (Delano 2001). The process(es) by which the mantle was oxidized is unclear, but has implications for the timing of accretion, differentiation, and volatile delivery to the early Earth, as well as evolution of the early atmosphere. One plausible oxidation mechanism is suggested by the tendency of high-pressure silicate minerals to favor Fe3+ over Fe2+ in their structures, even at metal saturation. This preference in the lower mantle mineral bridgmanite has been proposed to drive the disproportionation reaction of FeO to form Fe­2O3 and iron metal (Frost and McCammon 2008). We have performed experiments at the Ru-RuO2 fO2 buffer which show that silicate melts may mirror this behavior and Fe3+ may be stabilized with pressure for a constant fO2; by 21 GPa, the previously observed trend of Fe3+ decreasing with pressure (O'Neill, 2006) reverses and ferric iron content had increased. If this is also the case at lower oxygen fugacities, FeO disproportionation may have occurred at the base of an early magma ocean, establishing a redox gradient similar to what is presumed for the mantle today. Here we report results of further multianvil and diamond anvil cell experiments exploring the plausibility of FeO disproportionation driving mantle oxidation. Experiments investigating Fe speciation in high pressure melts at variable fO2 will be discussed along with results of diamond anvil cell experiments investigating ferric iron content of lower mantle minerals at metal saturation.

  8. Space station evolution: Planning for the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, Alphonso V.; Askins, Barbara S.

    1987-01-01

    The need for permanently manned presence in space has been recognized by the United States and its international partners for many years. The development of this capability was delayed due to the concurrent recognition that reusable earth-to-orbit transportation was also needed and should be developed first. While the decision to go ahead with a permanently manned Space Station was on hold, requirements for the use of the Station were accumulating as ground-based research and the data from unmanned spacecraft sparked the imagination of both scientists and entrepreneurs. Thus, by the time of the Space Station implementation decision in the early 1980's, a variety of disciplines, with a variety of requirements, needed to be accommodated on one Space Station. Additional future requirements could be forecast for advanced missions that were still in the early planning stages. The logical response was the development of a multi-purpose Space Station with the ability to evolve on-orbit to new capabilities as required by user needs and national or international decisions, i.e., to build an evolutionary Space Station. Planning for evolution is conducted in parallel with the design and development of the baseline Space Station. Evolution planning is a strategic management process to facilitate change and protect future decisions. The objective is not to forecast the future, but to understand the future options and the implications of these on today's decisions. The major actions required now are: (1) the incorporation of evolution provisions (hooks and scars) in the baseline Space Station; and (2) the initiation of an evolution advanced development program.

  9. Space station evolution: Planning for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Alphonso V.; Askins, Barbara S.

    1987-06-01

    The need for permanently manned presence in space has been recognized by the United States and its international partners for many years. The development of this capability was delayed due to the concurrent recognition that reusable earth-to-orbit transportation was also needed and should be developed first. While the decision to go ahead with a permanently manned Space Station was on hold, requirements for the use of the Station were accumulating as ground-based research and the data from unmanned spacecraft sparked the imagination of both scientists and entrepreneurs. Thus, by the time of the Space Station implementation decision in the early 1980's, a variety of disciplines, with a variety of requirements, needed to be accommodated on one Space Station. Additional future requirements could be forecast for advanced missions that were still in the early planning stages. The logical response was the development of a multi-purpose Space Station with the ability to evolve on-orbit to new capabilities as required by user needs and national or international decisions, i.e., to build an evolutionary Space Station. Planning for evolution is conducted in parallel with the design and development of the baseline Space Station. Evolution planning is a strategic management process to facilitate change and protect future decisions. The objective is not to forecast the future, but to understand the future options and the implications of these on today's decisions. The major actions required now are: (1) the incorporation of evolution provisions (hooks and scars) in the baseline Space Station; and (2) the initiation of an evolution advanced development program.

  10. Dynamics of symmetry breaking during quantum real-time evolution in a minimal model system.

    PubMed

    Heyl, Markus; Vojta, Matthias

    2014-10-31

    One necessary criterion for the thermalization of a nonequilibrium quantum many-particle system is ergodicity. It is, however, not sufficient in cases where the asymptotic long-time state lies in a symmetry-broken phase but the initial state of nonequilibrium time evolution is fully symmetric with respect to this symmetry. In equilibrium, one particular symmetry-broken state is chosen as a result of an infinitesimal symmetry-breaking perturbation. From a dynamical point of view the question is: Can such an infinitesimal perturbation be sufficient for the system to establish a nonvanishing order during quantum real-time evolution? We study this question analytically for a minimal model system that can be associated with symmetry breaking, the ferromagnetic Kondo model. We show that after a quantum quench from a completely symmetric state the system is able to break its symmetry dynamically and discuss how these features can be observed experimentally.

  11. The origin and early evolution of dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Langer, Max C; Ezcurra, Martin D; Bittencourt, Jonathas S; Novas, Fernando E

    2010-02-01

    Spondylosoma absconditum. The identification of dinosaur apomorphies is jeopardized by the incompleteness of skeletal remains attributed to most basal dinosauromorphs, the skulls and forelimbs of which are particularly poorly known. Nonetheless, Dinosauria can be diagnosed by a suite of derived traits, most of which are related to the anatomy of the pelvic girdle and limb. Some of these are connected to the acquisition of a fully erect bipedal gait, which has been traditionally suggested to represent a key adaptation that allowed, or even promoted, dinosaur radiation during Late Triassic times. Yet, contrary to the classical "competitive" models, dinosaurs did not gradually replace other terrestrial tetrapods over the Late Triassic. In fact, the radiation of the group comprises at least three landmark moments, separated by controversial (Carnian-Norian, Triassic-Jurassic) extinction events. These are mainly characterized by early diversification in Carnian times, a Norian increase in diversity and (especially) abundance, and the occupation of new niches from the Early Jurassic onwards. Dinosaurs arose from fully bipedal ancestors, the diet of which may have been carnivorous or omnivorous. Whereas the oldest dinosaurs were geographically restricted to south Pangea, including rare ornithischians and more abundant basal members of the saurischian lineage, the group achieved a nearly global distribution by the latest Triassic, especially with the radiation of saurischian groups such as "prosauropods" and coelophysoids.

  12. Time evolution of coherent structures in networks of Hindmarch Rose neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainieri, M. S.; Erichsen, R.; Brunnet, L. G.

    2005-08-01

    In the regime of partial synchronization, networks of diffusively coupled Hindmarch-Rose neurons show coherent structures developing in a region of the phase space which is wider than in the correspondent single neuron. Such structures are kept, without important changes, during several bursting periods. In this work, we study the time evolution of these structures and their dynamical stability under damage. This system may model the behavior of ensembles of neurons coupled through a bidirectional gap junction or, in a broader sense, it could also account for the molecular cascades present in the formation of flash and short time memory.

  13. WMAP - A Glimpse of the Early Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, Edward

    2009-01-01

    The early Universe was incredibly hot, dense, and homogeneous. A powerful probe of this time is provided by the relic radiation which we refer to today as the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Images produced from this light contain the earliest glimpse of the Universe after the "Big Bang" and the signature of the evolution of its contents. By exploiting these clues, precise constraints on the age, mass density, and geometry of the early Universe can be derived. The history of this intriguing cosmological detective story will be reviewed. Recent results from NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) will be presented.

  14. The Formation and Early Evolution of a CME and the Associated Shock on 2014 January 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Linfeng; Cheng, Xin; Shi, Tong; Su, Wei; Ding, Mingde

    2017-08-01

    We study the formation and early evolution of a limb coronal mass ejection (CME) and its associated shock wave that occurred on 2014 January 8. The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images provided by AIA on board \\textit{Solar Dynamics Observatory} disclose that the CME first appears as a bubble-like structure. Subsequently, its expansion forms the CME and causes a quasi-circular EUV wave. Both the CME and the wave front are clearly visible at all of the AIA EUV passbands. Through a detailed kinematical analysis, it is found that the expansion of the CME undergoes two phases: a first phase with a strong but transient lateral over-expansion followed by a second phase with a self-similar expansion. The temporal evolution of the expansion velocity coincides very well with the variation of the 25--50 keV hard X-ray (HXR) flux of the associated flare, which indicates that magnetic reconnection most likely plays an important role in driving the expansion. Moreover, we find that, when the velocity of the CME reaches $\\sim$600 km s$^{-1}$, the EUV wave starts to evolve into a shock wave, which is evidenced by the appearance of a type II radio burst. Interestingly, we also notice an unusual solar radio signal at $\\sim$4 GHz that is similar to the pattern of a type II radio burst but drifts to higher frequencies at a rate of $\\sim$0.3 MHz per second during about 7 minutes. Its derived density is $\\sim$5$\\times$10$^{10}$ cm$^{-3}$ and increases slowly with time. Joint imaging observations of HXR and EUV help to locate the loop-top region and calculate its thermal proprieties, including slowly increasing densities ($\\sim$5$\\times$10$^{10}$ cm$^{-3}$) and temperatures ($\\sim$14 MK). The similar results obtained from two different ways above imply the possibility of this scenario: plasma blobs that are ejected along the current sheet via magnetic reconnection collide with underlying flare loops that are undergoing chromospheric evaporation. Finally, we also study the thermal

  15. Evolution of complexity following a quantum quench in free field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Daniel W. F.; Camilo, Giancarlo

    2018-06-01

    Using a recent proposal of circuit complexity in quantum field theories introduced by Jefferson and Myers, we compute the time evolution of the complexity following a smooth mass quench characterized by a time scale δ t in a free scalar field theory. We show that the dynamics has two distinct phases, namely an early regime of approximately linear evolution followed by a saturation phase characterized by oscillations around a mean value. The behavior is similar to previous conjectures for the complexity growth in chaotic and holographic systems, although here we have found that the complexity may grow or decrease depending on whether the quench increases or decreases the mass, and also that the time scale for saturation of the complexity is of order δ t (not parametrically larger).

  16. Socio-economic status and time trends associated with early ART initiation following primary HIV infection in Montreal, Canada: 1996 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Mehraj, Vikram; Cox, Joseph; Lebouché, Bertrand; Costiniuk, Cecilia; Cao, Wei; Li, Taisheng; Ponte, Rosalie; Thomas, Réjean; Szabo, Jason; Baril, Jean-Guy; Trottier, Benoit; Côté, Pierre; LeBlanc, Roger; Bruneau, Julie; Tremblay, Cécile; Routy, Jean-Pierre

    2018-02-01

    initiation. Early ART initiation during primary HIV infection was associated with diminished biological prognostic factors and calendar time mirroring evolution of treatment guidelines. In addition, socio-economic factors such as having a paid employment, contribute to early ART initiation in the context of universal access to care in Canada. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of the International AIDS Society published by John Wiley & sons Ltd on behalf of the International AIDS Society.

  17. Early evolution of salt structures in north Louisiana salt basin

    SciTech Connect

    Lobao, J.J.; Pilger, R.H. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    Several salt diapirs and pillows in southern and central north Louisiana have been studied using approximately 355 mi (570 km) of seismic reflection data and information from 57 deep well holes. Using seismic profiles with deep well-hole data is the most advantageous method to document regional salt tectonism through time. The following conclusions were reached on diapirism in the North Louisiana Salt basin. (1) The diapiric event began early (early Coahuilan) in the southern and central part of the basin, and later (late Coahuilan to Comanchean) in the northern part. (2) The initial diapiric event is much more abrupt andmore » intense in the southern and central diapirs when compared with the later diapiric event in the northern diapirs. (3) Regional depocenter shifting, relative sea level, local erosion with salt extrusion, and rapid depositional loading of sediments are the major controls on diapirism in the basin.« less

  18. The evolution of tumor metastases during clonal expansion.

    PubMed

    Haeno, Hiroshi; Michor, Franziska

    2010-03-07

    Cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in many countries. Solid tumors generally initiate at one particular site called the primary tumor, but eventually disseminate and form new colonies in other organs. The development of such metastases greatly diminishes the potential for a cure of patients and is thought to represent the final stage of the multi-stage progression of human cancer. The concept of early metastatic dissemination, however, postulates that cancer cell spread might arise early during the development of a tumor. It is important to know whether metastases are present at diagnosis since this determines treatment strategies and outcome. In this paper, we design a stochastic mathematical model of the evolution of tumor metastases in an expanding cancer cell population. We calculate the probability of metastasis at a given time during tumor evolution, the expected number of metastatic sites, and the total number of cancer cells as well as metastasized cells. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of drug administration and tumor resection on these quantities and predict the survival time of cancer patients. The model presented in this paper allows us to determine the probability and number of metastases at diagnosis and to identify the optimum treatment strategy to maximally prolong survival of cancer patients. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The hydrologic response of Mars to the onset of a colder climate and to the thermal evolution of its early crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifford, S. M.

    1993-01-01

    Morphologic similarities between the Martian valley networks and terrestrial runoff channel have been cited as evidence that the early Martian climate was originally more Earth-like, with temperatures and pressures high enough to permit the precipitation of H2O as snow or rain. Although unambiguous evidence that Mars once possessed a warmer, wetter climate is lacking, a study of the transition from such conditions to the present climate can benefit our understanding of both the early development of the cryosphere and the various ways in which the current subsurface hydrology of Mars is likely to differ from that of the Earth. Viewed from this perspective, the early hydrologic evolution of Mars is essentially identical to considering the hydrologic response of the Earth to the onset of a global subfreezing climate.

  20. A complete skull of an early cretaceous sauropod and the evolution of advanced titanosaurians.

    PubMed

    Zaher, Hussam; Pol, Diego; Carvalho, Alberto B; Nascimento, Paulo M; Riccomini, Claudio; Larson, Peter; Juarez-Valieri, Rubén; Pires-Domingues, Ricardo; da Silva, Nelson Jorge; Campos, Diógenes de Almeida

    2011-02-07

    Advanced titanosaurian sauropods, such as nemegtosaurids and saltasaurids, were diverse and one of the most important groups of herbivores in the terrestrial biotas of the Late Cretaceous. However, little is known about their rise and diversification prior to the Late Cretaceous. Furthermore, the evolution of their highly-modified skull anatomy has been largely hindered by the scarcity of well-preserved cranial remains. A new sauropod dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous of Brazil represents the earliest advanced titanosaurian known to date, demonstrating that the initial diversification of advanced titanosaurians was well under way at least 30 million years before their known radiation in the latest Cretaceous. The new taxon also preserves the most complete skull among titanosaurians, further revealing that their low and elongated diplodocid-like skull morphology appeared much earlier than previously thought.

  1. Novel Algorithms Enabling Rapid, Real-Time Earthquake Monitoring and Tsunami Early Warning Worldwide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomax, A.; Michelini, A.

    2012-12-01

    We have introduced recently new methods to determine rapidly the tsunami potential and magnitude of large earthquakes (e.g., Lomax and Michelini, 2009ab, 2011, 2012). To validate these methods we have implemented them along with other new algorithms within the Early-est earthquake monitor at INGV-Rome (http://early-est.rm.ingv.it, http://early-est.alomax.net). Early-est is a lightweight software package for real-time earthquake monitoring (including phase picking, phase association and event detection, location, magnitude determination, first-motion mechanism determination, ...), and for tsunami early warning based on discriminants for earthquake tsunami potential. In a simulation using archived broadband seismograms for the devastating M9, 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami, Early-est determines: the epicenter within 3 min after the event origin time, discriminants showing very high tsunami potential within 5-7 min, and magnitude Mwpd(RT) 9.0-9.2 and a correct shallow-thrusting mechanism within 8 min. Real-time monitoring with Early-est givess similar results for most large earthquakes using currently available, real-time seismogram data. Here we summarize some of the key algorithms within Early-est that enable rapid, real-time earthquake monitoring and tsunami early warning worldwide: >>> FilterPicker - a general purpose, broad-band, phase detector and picker (http://alomax.net/FilterPicker); >>> Robust, simultaneous association and location using a probabilistic, global-search; >>> Period-duration discriminants TdT0 and TdT50Ex for tsunami potential available within 5 min; >>> Mwpd(RT) magnitude for very large earthquakes available within 10 min; >>> Waveform P polarities determined on broad-band displacement traces, focal mechanisms obtained with the HASH program (Hardebeck and Shearer, 2002); >>> SeisGramWeb - a portable-device ready seismogram viewer using web-services in a browser (http://alomax.net/webtools/sgweb/info.html). References (see also: http

  2. Two-step relaxation mode analysis with multiple evolution times applied to all-atom molecular dynamics protein simulation.

    PubMed

    Karasawa, N; Mitsutake, A; Takano, H

    2017-12-01

    Proteins implement their functionalities when folded into specific three-dimensional structures, and their functions are related to the protein structures and dynamics. Previously, we applied a relaxation mode analysis (RMA) method to protein systems; this method approximately estimates the slow relaxation modes and times via simulation and enables investigation of the dynamic properties underlying the protein structural fluctuations. Recently, two-step RMA with multiple evolution times has been proposed and applied to a slightly complex homopolymer system, i.e., a single [n]polycatenane. This method can be applied to more complex heteropolymer systems, i.e., protein systems, to estimate the relaxation modes and times more accurately. In two-step RMA, we first perform RMA and obtain rough estimates of the relaxation modes and times. Then, we apply RMA with multiple evolution times to a small number of the slowest relaxation modes obtained in the previous calculation. Herein, we apply this method to the results of principal component analysis (PCA). First, PCA is applied to a 2-μs molecular dynamics simulation of hen egg-white lysozyme in aqueous solution. Then, the two-step RMA method with multiple evolution times is applied to the obtained principal components. The slow relaxation modes and corresponding relaxation times for the principal components are much improved by the second RMA.

  3. Two-step relaxation mode analysis with multiple evolution times applied to all-atom molecular dynamics protein simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasawa, N.; Mitsutake, A.; Takano, H.

    2017-12-01

    Proteins implement their functionalities when folded into specific three-dimensional structures, and their functions are related to the protein structures and dynamics. Previously, we applied a relaxation mode analysis (RMA) method to protein systems; this method approximately estimates the slow relaxation modes and times via simulation and enables investigation of the dynamic properties underlying the protein structural fluctuations. Recently, two-step RMA with multiple evolution times has been proposed and applied to a slightly complex homopolymer system, i.e., a single [n ] polycatenane. This method can be applied to more complex heteropolymer systems, i.e., protein systems, to estimate the relaxation modes and times more accurately. In two-step RMA, we first perform RMA and obtain rough estimates of the relaxation modes and times. Then, we apply RMA with multiple evolution times to a small number of the slowest relaxation modes obtained in the previous calculation. Herein, we apply this method to the results of principal component analysis (PCA). First, PCA is applied to a 2-μ s molecular dynamics simulation of hen egg-white lysozyme in aqueous solution. Then, the two-step RMA method with multiple evolution times is applied to the obtained principal components. The slow relaxation modes and corresponding relaxation times for the principal components are much improved by the second RMA.

  4. 3D Architecture and evolution of the Po Plain-Northern Adriatic Foreland basin during Plio-Pleistocene time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amadori, Chiara; Toscani, Giovanni; Ghielmi, Manlio; Maesano, Francesco Emanuele; D'Ambrogi, Chiara; Lombardi, Stefano; Milanesi, Riccardo; Panara, Yuri; Di Giulio, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    The Pliocene-Pleistocene tectonic and sedimentary evolution of the eastern Po Plain and northern Adriatic Foreland Basin (PPAF) (extended ca. 35,000 km2) was the consequence of severe Northern Apennine compressional activity and climate-driven eustatic changes. According with the 2D seismic interpretation, facies analysis and sequence stratigraphy approach by Ghielmi et al. (2013 and references therein), these tectono-eustatic phases generated six basin-scale unconformities referred as Base Pliocene (PL1), Intra-Zanclean (PL2), Intra-Piacenzian (PL3), Gelasian (PL4), Base Calabrian (PS1) and Late Calabrian (PS2). We present a basin-wide detailed 3D model of the PPAF region, derived from the interpretation of these unconformities in a dense network of seismic lines (ca. 6,000 km) correlated with more than 200 well stratigraphies (courtesy of ENI E&P). The initial 3D time-model has been time-to-depth converted using the 3D velocity model created with Vel-IO 3D, a tool for 3D depth conversions and then validated and integrated with depth domain dataset from bibliography and well log. Resultant isobath and isopach maps are produced to inspect step-by-step the basin paleogeographic evolution; it occurred through alternating stages of simple and fragmented foredeeps. Changes in the basin geometry through time, from the inner sector located in the Emilia-Romagna Apennines to the outermost region (Veneto and northern Adriatic Sea), were marked by repeated phases of outward migration of two large deep depocenters located in front of Emilia arcs on the west, and in front of Ferrara-Romagna thrusts on the east. During late Pliocene-early Pleistocene, the inner side of the Emilia-Romagna arcs evolved into an elongated deep thrust-top basin due to a strong foredeep fragmentation then, an overall tectono-stratigraphic analysis shows also a decreasing trend of tectonic intensity of the Northern Apennine since Pleistocene until present.

  5. Dry minor mergers and size evolution of high-z compact massive early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oogi, Taira; Habe, Asao

    2012-09-01

    Recent observations show evidence that high-z (z ~ 2 - 3) early-type galaxies (ETGs) are quite compact than that with comparable mass at z ~ 0. Dry merger scenario is one of the most probable one that can explain such size evolution. However, previous studies based on this scenario do not succeed to explain both properties of high-z compact massive ETGs and local ETGs, consistently. We investigate effects of sequential, multiple dry minor (stellar mass ratio M2/M1<1/4) mergers on the size evolution of compact massive ETGs. We perform N-body simulations of the sequential minor mergers with parabolic and head-on orbits, including a dark matter component and a stellar component. We show that the sequential minor mergers of compact satellite galaxies are the most efficient in the size growth and in decrease of the velocity dispersion of the compact massive ETGs. The change of stellar size and density of the merger remnant is consistent with the recent observations. Furthermore, we construct the merger histories of candidates of high-z compact massive ETGs using the Millennium Simulation Database, and estimate the size growth of the galaxies by dry minor mergers. We can reproduce the mean size growth factor between z = 2 and z = 0, assuming the most efficient size growth obtained in the case of the sequential minor mergers in our simulations.

  6. Studying the laws of software evolution in a long-lived FLOSS project.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Barahona, Jesus M; Robles, Gregorio; Herraiz, Israel; Ortega, Felipe

    2014-07-01

    Some free, open-source software projects have been around for quite a long time, the longest living ones dating from the early 1980s. For some of them, detailed information about their evolution is available in source code management systems tracking all their code changes for periods of more than 15 years. This paper examines in detail the evolution of one of such projects, glibc, with the main aim of understanding how it evolved and how it matched Lehman's laws of software evolution. As a result, we have developed a methodology for studying the evolution of such long-lived projects based on the information in their source code management repository, described in detail several aspects of the history of glibc, including some activity and size metrics, and found how some of the laws of software evolution may not hold in this case. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Software: Evolution and Process published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Studying the laws of software evolution in a long-lived FLOSS project

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Barahona, Jesus M; Robles, Gregorio; Herraiz, Israel; Ortega, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Some free, open-source software projects have been around for quite a long time, the longest living ones dating from the early 1980s. For some of them, detailed information about their evolution is available in source code management systems tracking all their code changes for periods of more than 15 years. This paper examines in detail the evolution of one of such projects, glibc, with the main aim of understanding how it evolved and how it matched Lehman's laws of software evolution. As a result, we have developed a methodology for studying the evolution of such long-lived projects based on the information in their source code management repository, described in detail several aspects of the history of glibc, including some activity and size metrics, and found how some of the laws of software evolution may not hold in this case. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Software: Evolution and Process published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25893093

  8. Evolution of the cosmic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cautun, Marius; van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J. T.; Frenk, Carlos S.

    2014-07-01

    The cosmic web is the largest scale manifestation of the anisotropic gravitational collapse of matter. It represents the transitional stage between linear and non-linear structures and contains easily accessible information about the early phases of structure formation processes. Here we investigate the characteristics and the time evolution of morphological components. Our analysis involves the application of the NEXUS Multiscale Morphology Filter technique, predominantly its NEXUS+ version, to high resolution and large volume cosmological simulations. We quantify the cosmic web components in terms of their mass and volume content, their density distribution and halo populations. We employ new analysis techniques to determine the spatial extent of filaments and sheets, like their total length and local width. This analysis identifies clusters and filaments as the most prominent components of the web. In contrast, while voids and sheets take most of the volume, they correspond to underdense environments and are devoid of group-sized and more massive haloes. At early times the cosmos is dominated by tenuous filaments and sheets, which, during subsequent evolution, merge together, such that the present-day web is dominated by fewer, but much more massive, structures. The analysis of the mass transport between environments clearly shows how matter flows from voids into walls, and then via filaments into cluster regions, which form the nodes of the cosmic web. We also study the properties of individual filamentary branches, to find long, almost straight, filaments extending to distances larger than 100 h-1 Mpc. These constitute the bridges between massive clusters, which seem to form along approximatively straight lines.

  9. Tectonic evolution of the northern African margin in Tunisia from paleostress data and sedimentary record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouaziz, Samir; Barrier, Eric; Soussi, Mohamed; Turki, Mohamed M.; Zouari, Hédi

    2002-11-01

    A reconstruction of the tectonic evolution of the northern African margin in Tunisia since the Late Permian combining paleostress, tectonic stratigraphic and sedimentary approaches allows the characterization of several major periods corresponding to consistent stress patterns. The extension lasting from the Late Permian to the Middle Triassic is contemporaneous of the rifting related to the break up of Pangea. During Liassic times, regional extensional tectonics originated the dislocation of the initial continental platform. In northern Tunisia, the evolution of the Liassic NE-SW rifting led during Dogger times to the North African passive continental margin, whereas in southern Tunisia, a N-S extension, associated with E-W trending subsiding basins, lasted from the Jurassic until the Early Cretaceous. After an Upper Aptian-Early Albian transpressional event, NE-SW to ENE-WSW trending extensions prevailed during Late Cretaceous in relationship with the general tectonic evolution of the northeastern African plate. The inversions started in the Late Maastrichtian-Paleocene in northern Tunisia, probably as a consequence of the Africa-Eurasia convergence. Two major NW-SE trending compressions occurred in the Late Eocene and in the Middle-Late Miocene alternating with extensional periods in the Eocene, Oligocene, Early-Middle Miocene and Pliocene. The latter compressional event led to the complete inversion of the basins of the northwestern African plate, originating the Maghrebide chain. Such a study, supported by a high density of paleostress data and including complementary structural and stratigraphic approaches, provides a reliable way of determining the regional tectonic evolution.

  10. Cognitive Vulnerabilities Amplify the Effect of Early Pubertal Timing on Interpersonal Stress Generation During Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Stange, Jonathan P.; Kleiman, Evan M.; Hamlat, Elissa J.; Abramson, Lyn Y.; Alloy, Lauren B.

    2013-01-01

    Early pubertal timing has been found to confer risk for the occurrence of interpersonal stressful events during adolescence. However, pre-existing vulnerabilities may exacerbate the effects of early pubertal timing on the occurrence of stressors. Thus, the current study prospectively examined whether cognitive vulnerabilities amplified the effects of early pubertal timing on interpersonal stress generation. In a diverse sample of 310 adolescents (M age = 12.83 years, 55 % female; 53 % African American), early pubertal timing predicted higher levels of interpersonal dependent events among adolescents with more negative cognitive style and rumination, but not among adolescents with lower levels of these cognitive vulnerabilities. These findings suggest that cognitive vulnerabilities may heighten the risk of generating interpersonal stress for adolescents who undergo early pubertal maturation, which may subsequently place adolescents at greater risk for the development of psychopathology. PMID:24061858

  11. Early evolution of an energetic coronal mass ejection and its relation to EUV waves

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Rui; Wang, Yuming; Shen, Chenglong, E-mail: rliu@ustc.edu.cn

    2014-12-10

    We study a coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with an X-class flare whose initiation is clearly observed in the low corona with high-cadence, high-resolution EUV images, providing us a rare opportunity to witness the early evolution of an energetic CME in detail. The eruption starts with a slow expansion of cool overlying loops (∼1 MK) following a jet-like event in the periphery of the active region. Underneath the expanding loop system, a reverse S-shaped dimming is seen immediately above the brightening active region in hot EUV passbands. The dimming is associated with a rising diffuse arch (∼6 MK), which wemore » interpret as a preexistent, high-lying flux rope. This is followed by the arising of a double hot channel (∼10 MK) from the core of the active region. The higher structures rise earlier and faster than lower ones, with the leading front undergoing extremely rapid acceleration up to 35 km s{sup –2}. This suggests that the torus instability is the major eruption mechanism and that it is the high-lying flux rope rather than the hot channels that drives the eruption. The compression of coronal plasmas skirting and overlying the expanding loop system, whose aspect ratio h/r increases with time as a result of the rapid upward acceleration, plays a significant role in driving an outward-propagating global EUV wave and a sunward-propagating local EUV wave, respectively.« less

  12. New Views on the Early Evolution of Oxygen in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebolo, R.; Israelian, G.; García López, R. J.

    We have performed a detailed oxygen abundance analysis of 23 metal-poor (-3.0 < [Fe/H] < -0.3) unevolved halo stars and one giant through the OH bands in the near UV, using high-resolution echelle spectra. Oxygen is found to be overabundant with respect to iron in these stars, with the [O/Fe] ratio increasing from 0.6 to 1 between [Fe/H] = -1.5 and -3.0. The behavior of the oxygen overabundance with respect to [Fe/H] is similar to that seen in previous works based on the OI IR triplet data (Abia & Rebolo 1989; Tomkin et al. 1992; Cavallo, Pilachowski, & Rebolo 1997). Contrary to the previously accepted picture, our oxygen abundances, derived from low-excitation OH lines, agree well with those derived from high-excitation lines of the triplet. For nine stars in common with Tomkin et al. we obtain a mean difference of 0.00 plus or minus 0.11dex with respect to the abundances determined from the triplet using the same stellar parameters and model photospheres. Our new results show a smooth extension of the Edvardsson et al.'s (1993) [O/Fe] versus metallicity curve to much lower abundances. The oxygen abundances of unevolved stars when compared with values in the literature for giants of similar metallicity imply that the latter may have suffered a process of oxygen depletion. It appears that unevolved metal-poor stars are better tracers of the early chemical evolution of the Galaxy. The extrapolation of our results to very low metallicities indicates that the ratio of oxygen to iron emerging from the first Type II SNe in the early Galaxy was indeed close to unity. The higher [O/Fe] ratios we find in dwarfs has an impact on the age determination of globular clusters, and suggest that current age estimates have to be reduced by about 1-2 Gyr.

  13. Earth's oxygen cycle and the evolution of animal life.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Christopher T; Planavsky, Noah J; Olson, Stephanie L; Lyons, Timothy W; Erwin, Douglas H

    2016-08-09

    The emergence and expansion of complex eukaryotic life on Earth is linked at a basic level to the secular evolution of surface oxygen levels. However, the role that planetary redox evolution has played in controlling the timing of metazoan (animal) emergence and diversification, if any, has been intensely debated. Discussion has gravitated toward threshold levels of environmental free oxygen (O2) necessary for early evolving animals to survive under controlled conditions. However, defining such thresholds in practice is not straightforward, and environmental O2 levels can potentially constrain animal life in ways distinct from threshold O2 tolerance. Herein, we quantitatively explore one aspect of the evolutionary coupling between animal life and Earth's oxygen cycle-the influence of spatial and temporal variability in surface ocean O2 levels on the ecology of early metazoan organisms. Through the application of a series of quantitative biogeochemical models, we find that large spatiotemporal variations in surface ocean O2 levels and pervasive benthic anoxia are expected in a world with much lower atmospheric pO2 than at present, resulting in severe ecological constraints and a challenging evolutionary landscape for early metazoan life. We argue that these effects, when considered in the light of synergistic interactions with other environmental parameters and variable O2 demand throughout an organism's life history, would have resulted in long-term evolutionary and ecological inhibition of animal life on Earth for much of Middle Proterozoic time (∼1.8-0.8 billion years ago).

  14. Area/latency optimized early output asynchronous full adders and relative-timed ripple carry adders.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, P; Yamashita, S

    2016-01-01

    This article presents two area/latency optimized gate level asynchronous full adder designs which correspond to early output logic. The proposed full adders are constructed using the delay-insensitive dual-rail code and adhere to the four-phase return-to-zero handshaking. For an asynchronous ripple carry adder (RCA) constructed using the proposed early output full adders, the relative-timing assumption becomes necessary and the inherent advantages of the relative-timed RCA are: (1) computation with valid inputs, i.e., forward latency is data-dependent, and (2) computation with spacer inputs involves a bare minimum constant reverse latency of just one full adder delay, thus resulting in the optimal cycle time. With respect to different 32-bit RCA implementations, and in comparison with the optimized strong-indication, weak-indication, and early output full adder designs, one of the proposed early output full adders achieves respective reductions in latency by 67.8, 12.3 and 6.1 %, while the other proposed early output full adder achieves corresponding reductions in area by 32.6, 24.6 and 6.9 %, with practically no power penalty. Further, the proposed early output full adders based asynchronous RCAs enable minimum reductions in cycle time by 83.4, 15, and 8.8 % when considering carry-propagation over the entire RCA width of 32-bits, and maximum reductions in cycle time by 97.5, 27.4, and 22.4 % for the consideration of a typical carry chain length of 4 full adder stages, when compared to the least of the cycle time estimates of various strong-indication, weak-indication, and early output asynchronous RCAs of similar size. All the asynchronous full adders and RCAs were realized using standard cells in a semi-custom design fashion based on a 32/28 nm CMOS process technology.

  15. Early evolution of large micro-organisms with cytological complexity revealed by microanalyses of 3.4 Ga organic-walled microfossils.

    PubMed

    Sugitani, K; Mimura, K; Takeuchi, M; Lepot, K; Ito, S; Javaux, E J

    2015-11-01

    The Strelley Pool Formation (SPF) is widely distributed in the East Pilbara Terrane (EPT) of the Pilbara Craton, Western Australia, and represents a Paleoarchean shallow-water to subaerial environment. It was deposited ~3.4 billion years ago and displays well-documented carbonate stromatolites. Diverse putative microfossils (SPF microfossils) were recently reported from several localities in the East Strelley, Panorama, Warralong, and Goldsworthy greenstone belts. Thus, the SPF provides unparalleled opportunities to gain insights into a shallow-water to subaerial ecosystem on the early Earth. Our new micro- to nanoscale ultrastructural and microchemical studies of the SPF microfossils show that large (20-70 μm) lenticular organic-walled flanged microfossils retain their structural integrity, morphology, and chain-like arrangements after acid (HF-HCl) extraction (palynology). Scanning and transmitted electron microscopy of extracted microfossils revealed that the central lenticular body is either alveolar or hollow, and the wall is continuous with the surrounding smooth to reticulated discoidal flange. These features demonstrate the evolution of large micro-organisms able to form an acid-resistant recalcitrant envelope or cell wall with complex morphology and to form colonial chains in the Paleoarchean era. This study provides evidence of the evolution of very early and remarkable biological innovations, well before the presumed late emergence of complex cells. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The evolution of body size and shape in the human career.

    PubMed

    Jungers, William L; Grabowski, Mark; Hatala, Kevin G; Richmond, Brian G

    2016-07-05

    Body size is a fundamental biological property of organisms, and documenting body size variation in hominin evolution is an important goal of palaeoanthropology. Estimating body mass appears deceptively simple but is laden with theoretical and pragmatic assumptions about best predictors and the most appropriate reference samples. Modern human training samples with known masses are arguably the 'best' for estimating size in early bipedal hominins such as the australopiths and all members of the genus Homo, but it is not clear if they are the most appropriate priors for reconstructing the size of the earliest putative hominins such as Orrorin and Ardipithecus The trajectory of body size evolution in the early part of the human career is reviewed here and found to be complex and nonlinear. Australopith body size varies enormously across both space and time. The pre-erectus early Homo fossil record from Africa is poor and dominated by relatively small-bodied individuals, implying that the emergence of the genus Homo is probably not linked to an increase in body size or unprecedented increases in size variation. Body size differences alone cannot explain the observed variation in hominin body shape, especially when examined in the context of small fossil hominins and pygmy modern humans.This article is part of the themed issue 'Major transitions in human evolution'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  17. Early tracheostomy in trauma patients saves time and money.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Glendon A; Savage, Stephanie A; Zarzaur, Ben L; Hart-Hyde, Jensen E; Schaefer, Candace B; Croce, Martin A; Fabian, Timothy C

    2015-01-01

    Patients suffering traumatic brain and chest wall injuries are often difficult to liberate from the ventilator yet best timing of tracheostomy remains ill-defined. While prior studies have addressed early versus late tracheostomy, they generally suffer from the use of historical controls, which cannot account for variations in management over time. Propensity scoring can be utilized to identify controls from the same patient population, minimizing impact of confounding variables. The purpose of this study was to determine outcomes associated with early versus late tracheostomy by application of propensity scoring. Patients requiring intubation within 48h and receiving tracheostomy from January 2010 to June 2012 were identified. Early tracheostomy (ET) was a tracheostomy performed by the fifth hospital day. ET patients were matched to late tracheostomy patients (LT, tracheostomy after day 5) using propensity scoring and compared for multiple outcomes. Cost for services was calculated using average daily billing rates at our institution. One hundred and six patients were included, 53 each in the ET (mean day tracheostomy=4) and the LT (mean day tracheostomy=10) cohorts. The average age was 47 years and 94% suffered blunt injury, with an average NISS of 23.7. Patients in the ET group had significantly shorter TICU LOS (21.4 days vs. 28.6 days, p<0.0001) and significantly fewer ventilator days (16.7 days vs. 21.9, p<0.0001) compared to the LT group. ET patients also had significantly less VAP (34% vs. 64.2%, p=0.0019). In the current era of increased health-care costs, early tracheostomy significantly decreased both pulmonary morbidity and critical care resource utilization. This translates to an appreciable cost savings, at minimum $52,173 per patient and a potential total savings of $2.8million/year for the entire LT cohort. For trauma patients requiring prolonged ventilator support, early tracheostomy should be performed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  18. Global analysis of human duplicated genes reveals the relative importance of whole-genome duplicates originated in the early vertebrate evolution.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Debarun; Ghosh, Tapash C

    2016-01-22

    Gene duplication is a genetic mutation that creates functionally redundant gene copies that are initially relieved from selective pressures and may adapt themselves to new functions with time. The levels of gene duplication may vary from small-scale duplication (SSD) to whole genome duplication (WGD). Studies with yeast revealed ample differences between these duplicates: Yeast WGD pairs were functionally more similar, less divergent in subcellular localization and contained a lesser proportion of essential genes. In this study, we explored the differences in evolutionary genomic properties of human SSD and WGD genes, with the identifiable human duplicates coming from the two rounds of whole genome duplication occurred early in vertebrate evolution. We observed that these two groups of duplicates were also dissimilar in terms of their evolutionary and genomic properties. But interestingly, this is not like the same observed in yeast. The human WGDs were found to be functionally less similar, diverge more in subcellular level and contain a higher proportion of essential genes than the SSDs, all of which are opposite from yeast. Additionally, we explored that human WGDs were more divergent in their gene expression profile, have higher multifunctionality and are more often associated with disease, and are evolutionarily more conserved than human SSDs. Our study suggests that human WGD duplicates are more divergent and entails the adaptation of WGDs to novel and important functions that consequently lead to their evolutionary conservation in the course of evolution.

  19. Three-dimensional, two-species magnetohydrodynamic studies of the early time behaviors of the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite G2 barium release

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Lianghai, E-mail: xielh@nssc.ac.cn; Li, Lei; Wang, Jingdong

    2014-04-15

    We present a three-dimensional, two-species (Ba{sup +} and H{sup +}) MHD model to study the early time behaviors of a barium release at about 1 R{sub E} like Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite G2, with emphasis placed on the three-dimensional evolution of the barium cloud and its effects on the ambient plasma environment. We find that the perturbations caused by the cloud are the combined results of the initial injection, the radial expansion, and the diamagnetic effect and propagate as fast MHD waves in the magnetosphere. In return, the transverse expansion and the cross-B motion of barium ions aremore » constrained by the magnetic force, which lead to a field-aligned striation of ions and the decoupling of these ions from the neutrals. Our simulation shows the formation and collapse of the diamagnetic cavity in the barium cloud. The estimated time scale for the cavity evolution might be much shorter if photoionization time scale and field aligned expansion of barium ions are considered. In addition, our two species MHD simulation also finds the snowplow effect resulting from the momentum coupling between barium ions and background H{sup +}, which creates density hole and bumps in the background H{sup +} when barium ions expanding along the magnetic field lines.« less

  20. Second Symposium on Chemical Evolution and the Origin of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincenzi, D. L. (Editor); model. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Recent findings by NASA Exobiology investigators are reported. Scientific papers are presented in the following areas: cosmic evolution of biogenic compounds, prebiotic evolution (planetary and molecular), early evolution of life (biological and geochemical), evolution of advanced life, solar system exploration, and the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI).

  1. Second Symposium on Chemical Evolution and the Origin of Life

    SciTech Connect

    Devincenzi, D.L.; Dufour, P.A.

    1986-05-01

    Recent findings by NASA Exobiology investigators are reported. Scientific papers are presented in the following areas: cosmic evolution of biogenic compounds, prebiotic evolution (planetary and molecular), early evolution of life (biological and geochemical), evolution of advanced life, solar system exploration, and the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI).

  2. Early Childhood Maltreatment and Girls' Sexual Behavior: The Mediating Role of Pubertal Timing.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Rebecca M; Mendle, Jane; Markowitz, Anna J

    2015-09-01

    Although links between early childhood maltreatment and girls' sexual behavior in adolescence have been well established, it is unclear whether different forms of maltreatment are differentially associated with sexual outcomes and whether distinct mechanisms explain associations across maltreatment types. Using data from National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), the present study examines whether physical abuse, sexual abuse, and physical neglect in early childhood differentially predict girls' age at first intercourse and number of sexual partners in early adulthood. The study also tests whether early pubertal timing mediates the link between early maltreatment and sexual behavior (N = 6,364). Findings indicate that early sexual and physical abuse were equally predictive of earlier age at first intercourse and a greater number of sexual partners, but that only the sexual abuse-age at first intercourse link was mediated by early puberty. These results suggest that sexual abuse and physical abuse are associated with earlier and riskier sexual behavior in girls relative to no maltreatment and to similar degrees. However, only the link between sexual abuse and sexual behavior involves a biological mechanism manifested in early pubertal timing. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Real-time divergent evolution in plants driven by pollinators

    PubMed Central

    Gervasi, Daniel D. L.; Schiestl, Florian P

    2017-01-01

    Pollinator-driven diversification is thought to be a major source of floral variation in plants. Our knowledge of this process is, however, limited to indirect assessments of evolutionary changes. Here, we employ experimental evolution with fast cycling Brassica rapa plants to demonstrate adaptive evolution driven by different pollinators. Our study shows pollinator-driven divergent selection as well as divergent evolution in plant traits. Plants pollinated by bumblebees evolved taller size and more fragrant flowers with increased ultraviolet reflection. Bumblebees preferred bumblebee-pollinated plants over hoverfly-pollinated plants at the end of the experiment, showing that plants had adapted to the bumblebees' preferences. Plants with hoverfly pollination became shorter, had reduced emission of some floral volatiles, but increased fitness through augmented autonomous self-pollination. Our study demonstrates that changes in pollinator communities can have rapid consequences on the evolution of plant traits and mating system. PMID:28291771

  4. The first 50Myr of dinosaur evolution: macroevolutionary pattern and morphological disparity.

    PubMed

    Brusatte, Stephen L; Benton, Michael J; Ruta, Marcello; Lloyd, Graeme T

    2008-12-23

    The evolutionary radiation of dinosaurs in the Late Triassic and Early Jurassic was a pivotal event in the Earth's history but is poorly understood, as previous studies have focused on vague driving mechanisms and have not untangled different macroevolutionary components (origination, diversity, abundance and disparity). We calculate the morphological disparity (morphospace occupation) of dinosaurs throughout the Late Triassic and Early Jurassic and present new measures of taxonomic diversity. Crurotarsan archosaurs, the primary dinosaur 'competitors', were significantly more disparate than dinosaurs throughout the Triassic, but underwent a devastating extinction at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. However, dinosaur disparity showed only a slight non-significant increase after this event, arguing against the hypothesis of ecological release-driven morphospace expansion in the Early Jurassic. Instead, the main jump in dinosaur disparity occurred between the Carnian and Norian stages of the Triassic. Conversely, dinosaur diversity shows a steady increase over this time, and measures of diversification and faunal abundance indicate that the Early Jurassic was a key episode in dinosaur evolution. Thus, different aspects of the dinosaur radiation (diversity, disparity and abundance) were decoupled, and the overall macroevolutionary pattern of the first 50Myr of dinosaur evolution is more complex than often considered.

  5. Early Sexual Intercourse: Prospective Associations with Adolescents Physical Activity and Screen Time

    PubMed Central

    Wijtzes, Anne; van de Bongardt, Daphne; van de Looij-Jansen, Petra; Bannink, Rienke; Raat, Hein

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the prospective associations of physical activity behaviors and screen time with early sexual intercourse initiation (i.e., before 15 years) in a large sample of adolescents. Methods We used two waves of data from the Rotterdam Youth Monitor, a longitudinal study conducted in the Netherlands. The analysis sample consisted of 2,141 adolescents aged 12 to 14 years (mean age at baseline = 12.2 years, SD = 0.43). Physical activity (e.g., sports outside school), screen time (e.g., computer use), and early sexual intercourse initiation were assessed by means of self-report questionnaires. Logistic regression models were tested to assess the associations of physical activity behaviors and screen time (separately and simultaneously) with early sexual intercourse initiation, controlling for confounders (i.e., socio-demographics and substance use). Interaction effects with gender were tested to assess whether these associations differed significantly between boys and girls. Results The only physical activity behavior that was a significant predictor of early sexual intercourse initiation was sports club membership. Adolescent boys and girls who were members of a sports club) were more likely to have had early sex (OR = 2.17; 95% CI = 1.33, 3.56. Significant gender interaction effects indicated that boys who watched TV ≥2 hours/day (OR = 2.00; 95% CI = 1.08, 3.68) and girls who used the computer ≥2 hours/day (OR = 3.92; 95% CI = 1.76, 8.69) were also significantly more likely to have engaged in early sex. Conclusion These findings have implications for professionals in general pediatric healthcare, sexual health educators, policy makers, and parents, who should be aware of these possible prospective links between sports club membership, TV watching (for boys), and computer use (for girls), and early sexual intercourse initiation. However, continued research on determinants of adolescents’ early sexual initiation is needed to further contribute to

  6. Major transitions in human evolution.

    PubMed

    Foley, Robert A; Martin, Lawrence; Mirazón Lahr, Marta; Stringer, Chris

    2016-07-05

    Evolutionary problems are often considered in terms of 'origins', and research in human evolution seen as a search for human origins. However, evolution, including human evolution, is a process of transitions from one state to another, and so questions are best put in terms of understanding the nature of those transitions. This paper discusses how the contributions to the themed issue 'Major transitions in human evolution' throw light on the pattern of change in hominin evolution. Four questions are addressed: (1) Is there a major divide between early (australopithecine) and later (Homo) evolution? (2) Does the pattern of change fit a model of short transformations, or gradual evolution? (3) Why is the role of Africa so prominent? (4) How are different aspects of adaptation-genes, phenotypes and behaviour-integrated across the transitions? The importance of developing technologies and approaches and the enduring role of fieldwork are emphasized.This article is part of the themed issue 'Major transitions in human evolution'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  7. Modern mammal origins: evolutionary grades in the Early Cretaceous of North America.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, L L; Winkler, D A; Murry, P A

    1989-07-01

    Major groups of modern mammals have their origins in the Mesozoic Era, yet the mammalian fossil record is generally poor for that time interval. Fundamental morphological changes that led to modern mammals are often represented by small samples of isolated teeth. Fortunately, functional wear facets on teeth allow prediction of the morphology of occluding teeth that may be unrepresented by fossils. A major step in mammalian evolution occurred in the Early Cretaceous with the evolution of tribosphenic molars, which characterize marsupials and placentals, the two most abundant and diverse extant groups of mammals. A tooth from the Early Cretaceous (110 million years before present) of Texas tests previous predictions (based on lower molars) of the morphology of upper molars in early tribosphenic dentitions. The lingual cusp (protocone) is primitively without shear facets, as expected, but the cheek side of the tooth is derived (advanced) in having distinctive cusps along the margin. The tooth, although distressingly inadequate to define many features of the organism, demonstrates unexpected morphological diversity at a strategic stage of mammalian evolution and falsifies previous claims of the earliest occurrence of true marsupials.

  8. Modern mammal origins: evolutionary grades in the Early Cretaceous of North America.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, L L; Winkler, D A; Murry, P A

    1989-01-01

    Major groups of modern mammals have their origins in the Mesozoic Era, yet the mammalian fossil record is generally poor for that time interval. Fundamental morphological changes that led to modern mammals are often represented by small samples of isolated teeth. Fortunately, functional wear facets on teeth allow prediction of the morphology of occluding teeth that may be unrepresented by fossils. A major step in mammalian evolution occurred in the Early Cretaceous with the evolution of tribosphenic molars, which characterize marsupials and placentals, the two most abundant and diverse extant groups of mammals. A tooth from the Early Cretaceous (110 million years before present) of Texas tests previous predictions (based on lower molars) of the morphology of upper molars in early tribosphenic dentitions. The lingual cusp (protocone) is primitively without shear facets, as expected, but the cheek side of the tooth is derived (advanced) in having distinctive cusps along the margin. The tooth, although distressingly inadequate to define many features of the organism, demonstrates unexpected morphological diversity at a strategic stage of mammalian evolution and falsifies previous claims of the earliest occurrence of true marsupials. Images PMID:2740336

  9. The Timing Evolution of 4U 1630-47 During its Outbursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dieters, S. W.; Belloni, T.; Kuulkers, E.; Woods, P.; vanParadijs, J.; Cui, W.; Swank, J. H.; Zhang, S.-N.

    1999-01-01

    We report on the timing analysis of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of 4U 1630-47 made during its 1998 outburst. In addition we use two BeepoSAX observation on the late decline. 4U1630-47 showed seven distinct types of timing behaviour, most of which show differences with the canonical black hole spectral/timing states. In marked contrast to previous outbursts we find quasi periodic oscillation (QPO) signals during nearly all stages of the outburst. In addition to 2 to 13 Hz QPO slow 0.01Hz QPO are observed. These slow QPO can dominate the light curve as quasi-regular 5 sec, 9--16% deep dips. During these dips we track the behaviour of two QPO's; one remaining constant near 13.5 Hz and the other varying between 7 and 4 Hz. The evolution of the timing and the concurrent spectral changes are mapped using a combination harness-intensity and colour-colour diagrams.

  10. Early Stage Evolution of Nourished Beach under High-energy, Macro-tidal Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. H.; Cai, F.; Zhang, Z. W.; Li, B.

    2017-02-01

    Beach planform evolution, profile equilibration and sediment grain size change have been studied during the first 4 months from 4th September to 24th December 2011 after the construction of beach nourishment project at Longfengtou Beach, Haitan Bay. Monthly beach profiles, shoreline surveys, sediment sampling and nearshore wave measurements were carried out after implementation of the 1.3km long nourishment project which was completed on 20th August 2011. This study indicates that: (1) rapid beach profile equilibration occurred in the early stage after the construction of the project. A null point was observed, which is equal to the height of mean high tide, basically kept dynamic stable during the process of profile evolution. Shoreface sediment accumulated beneath the height of this point while erosion happened above it, the slope between the beach berm and the landward edge of low tidal zone became more gradual accompanied with seaward transportation of beach sediment. The velocity of beach slope adjustment in earlier period is faster than later. (2) Beach planform adjustment initiated simultaneously with the combination of the process of profile equilibration and longshore sediment transport. Shoreline retreated with an average distance of 11.1m and maximum of 31.02m from 4th September to 24th December, erosion in the south part was more serious than in the north, and 3 erosion hot spots were found along the coast. (3) Sediment redistributed with cross-shore profile equilibration, it showed a pattern across beach profile as medium sand (0.4-0.5mm) in beach berm, smaller (0.3-0.4mm) in high and middle tidal zone, coarse sand(0.6-1mm) in beach slope transitional zone, fine sand(0.1-0.25mm) in low tidal zone. The sediment grain size change of foreshore was rapidly response to the passage of storm surge.

  11. Seasonal and interannual evolution of Jakobshavn Isbrae, Greenland from a 2008-2015 high-res DEM and velocity time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shean, D. E.; Joughin, I.; Smith, B.; Floricioiu, D.

    2015-12-01

    Greenland's large marine-terminating outlet glaciers have displayed marked retreat, speedup, and thinning in recent decades. Jakobshavn Isbrae, one of Greenland's largest outlet glaciers, has retreated ~15 km, accelerated ~150%, and thinned ~200 m since the early 1990s. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of high-resolution elevation (~2-5 m/px) and velocity (~100 m/px) time series with dense temporal coverage (daily-monthly). The Jakobshavn DEM time series consists of >70 WorldView-1/2/3 stereo DEMs and >11 TanDEM-X DEMs spanning 2008-2015. Complementary point elevation data from Operation IceBridge (ATM, LVIS), pre-IceBridge ATM flights, and ICESat-1 GLAS extend the surface elevation record to 1999 and provide essential absolute control data, enabling sub-meter horizontal/vertical accuracy for gridded DEMs. Velocity data are primarily derived from TerraSAR-X/TanDEM-X image pairs with 11-day interval from 2009-2015. These elevation and velocity data capture outlet glacier evolution with unprecedented detail during the post-ICESat era. The lower trunk of Jakobshavn displays significant seasonal velocity variations, with recent rates of ~8 km/yr during winter and >17 km/yr during summer. DEM data show corresponding seasonal elevation changes of -30 to -45 m in summer and +15 to +20 m in winter, with decreasing magnitude upstream. Seasonal discharge varies from ~30-35 Gt/yr in winter to ~45-55 Gt/yr in summer, and we integrate these measurements for improved long-term mass-balance estimates. Recent interannual trends show increased discharge, velocity, and thinning (-15 to -20 m/yr), which is consistent with long-term altimetry records. The DEM time series also reveal new details about calving front and mélange evolution during the seasonal cycle. Similar time series are available for Kangerdlugssuaq and Helheim Glaciers. These observations are improving our understanding of outlet glacier dynamics, while complementing ongoing efforts to constrain estimates

  12. Dynamic evolution of light-induced orientation of dye-doped liquid crystals in liquid phase studied by time-resolved optically heterodyned optical Kerr effect technique.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pei; Liu, Liying; Xu, Lei

    2008-02-28

    Transient evolution of light-induced molecular reorientation both in 1-amino-anthraquinone (1AAQ) dye and azobenzene doped isotropic liquid crystals (LCs) were studied by time-resolved optically heterodyned optical Kerr effect method. The results give clear direct experimental proof that under short pulse (30 ps) excitation, LC molecules orientate toward the excitation light polarization direction in the 1AAQ/LC system. However, LC molecular orientation becomes orthogonal to the light polarization in azobenzene/LC system. Time-resolved excited-state absorption of 1AAQ and wavelength dependent excited-state absorption of azobenzene were also observed and their contributions to the early dynamics of the third order optical responses of the two systems were confirmed. A simplified two-level mean-field theory was derived to reveal the intensity dependence of orientation enhancement factor in azobenzene/LC system considering the photoisomerization process.

  13. Towards investigation of evolution of dynamical systems with independence of time accuracy: more classes of systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurzadyan, V. G.; Kocharyan, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    The recently developed method (Paper 1) enabling one to investigate the evolution of dynamical systems with an accuracy not dependent on time is developed further. The classes of dynamical systems which can be studied by that method are much extended, now including systems that are: (1) non-Hamiltonian, conservative; (2) Hamiltonian with time-dependent perturbation; (3) non-conservative (with dissipation). These systems cover various types of N-body gravitating systems of astrophysical and cosmological interest, such as the orbital evolution of planets, minor planets, artificial satellites due to tidal, non-tidal perturbations and thermal thrust, evolving close binary stellar systems, and the dynamics of accretion disks.

  14. Evolution of illustrations in anatomy: a study from the classical period in Europe to modern times.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sanjib Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Illustrations constitute an essential element of learning anatomy in modern times. However it required a significant evolutionary process spread over centuries, for illustrations to achieve the present status in the subject of anatomy. This review article attempts to outline the evolutionary process by highlighting on the works of esteemed anatomists in a chronological manner. Available literature suggests that illustrations were not used in anatomy during the classical period when the subject was dominated by the descriptive text of Galen. Guido da Vigevano was first to use illustrations in anatomy during the Late Middle Ages and this concept developed further during the Renaissance period when Andreas Vesalius pioneered in illustrations becoming an indispensable tool in conveying anatomical details. Toward later stages of the Renaissance period, Fabricius ab Aquapendente endeavored to restrict dramatization of anatomical illustrations which was a prevalent trend in early Renaissance. During the 18th century, anatomical artwork was characterized by the individual styles of prominent anatomists leading to suppression of anatomical details. In the 19th century, Henry Gray used illustrations in his anatomical masterpiece that focused on depicting anatomical structures and were free from any artistic style. From early part of the 20th century medical images and photographs started to complement traditional handmade anatomical illustrations. Computer technology and advanced software systems played a key role in the evolution of anatomical illustrations during the late 20th century resulting in new generation 3D image datasets that are being used in the 21st century in innovative formats for teaching and learning anatomy. © 2014 American Association of Anatomists.

  15. Evolution of attention mechanisms for early visual processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Thomas; Knoll, Alois

    2011-03-01

    Early visual processing as a method to speed up computations on visual input data has long been discussed in the computer vision community. The general target of a such approaches is to filter nonrelevant information from the costly higher-level visual processing algorithms. By insertion of this additional filter layer the overall approach can be speeded up without actually changing the visual processing methodology. Being inspired by the layered architecture of the human visual processing apparatus, several approaches for early visual processing have been recently proposed. Most promising in this field is the extraction of a saliency map to determine regions of current attention in the visual field. Such saliency can be computed in a bottom-up manner, i.e. the theory claims that static regions of attention emerge from a certain color footprint, and dynamic regions of attention emerge from connected blobs of textures moving in a uniform way in the visual field. Top-down saliency effects are either unconscious through inherent mechanisms like inhibition-of-return, i.e. within a period of time the attention level paid to a certain region automatically decreases if the properties of that region do not change, or volitional through cognitive feedback, e.g. if an object moves consistently in the visual field. These bottom-up and top-down saliency effects have been implemented and evaluated in a previous computer vision system for the project JAST. In this paper an extension applying evolutionary processes is proposed. The prior vision system utilized multiple threads to analyze the regions of attention delivered from the early processing mechanism. Here, in addition, multiple saliency units are used to produce these regions of attention. All of these saliency units have different parameter-sets. The idea is to let the population of saliency units create regions of attention, then evaluate the results with cognitive feedback and finally apply the genetic mechanism

  16. Efficient determination of the Markovian time-evolution towards a steady-state of a complex open quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Thorsteinn H.; Manolescu, Andrei; Goan, Hsi-Sheng; Abdullah, Nzar Rauf; Sitek, Anna; Tang, Chi-Shung; Gudmundsson, Vidar

    2017-11-01

    Master equations are commonly used to describe time evolution of open systems. We introduce a general computationally efficient method for calculating a Markovian solution of the Nakajima-Zwanzig generalized master equation. We do so for a time-dependent transport of interacting electrons through a complex nano scale system in a photon cavity. The central system, described by 120 many-body states in a Fock space, is weakly coupled to the external leads. The efficiency of the approach allows us to place the bias window defined by the external leads high into the many-body spectrum of the cavity photon-dressed states of the central system revealing a cascade of intermediate transitions as the system relaxes to a steady state. The very diverse relaxation times present in the open system, reflecting radiative or non-radiative transitions, require information about the time evolution through many orders of magnitude. In our approach, the generalized master equation is mapped from a many-body Fock space of states to a Liouville space of transitions. We show that this results in a linear equation which is solved exactly through an eigenvalue analysis, which supplies information on the steady state and the time evolution of the system.

  17. Pubertal Timing and Early Sexual Intercourse in the Offspring of Teenage Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Genna, Natacha M.; Larkby, Cynthia; Cornelius, Marie D.

    2011-01-01

    Early puberty is associated with stressful family environments, early sexual intercourse, and teenage pregnancy. We examined pubertal timing and sexual debut among the 14-year-old offspring of teenage mothers. Mothers (71% Black, 29% White) were recruited as pregnant teenagers (12-18 years old). Data were collected during pregnancy and when…

  18. Evolution of microwave sea ice signatures during early summer and midsummer in the marginal ice zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onstott, R. G.; Grenfell, T. C.; Matzler, C.; Luther, C. A.; Svendsen, E. A.

    1987-01-01

    Emissivities at frequencies from 5 to 94 GHz and backscatter at frequencies from 1 to 17 GHz were measured from sea ice in Fram Strait during the marginal Ice Zone Experiment in June and July of 1983 and 1984. The ice observed was primarily multiyear; the remainder, first-year ice, was often deformed. Results from this active and passive microwave study include the description of the evolution of the sea ice during early summer and midsummer; the absorption properties of summer snow; the interrelationship between ice thickness and the state and thickness of snow; and the modulation of the microwave signature, especially at the highest frequencies, by the freezing of the upper few centimeters of the ice.

  19. Experimental palaeobiomechanics: What can engineering tell us about evolution in deep time?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Philip

    2016-04-01

    What did Tyrannosaurus rex eat? This is the sort of question that immediately bombards any palaeontologist when interacting with the general public. Even among scientists, how extinct animals moved or fed is a major objective of the palaeobiological research agenda. The last decade has seen a sharp increase in the technology and experimental methods available for collecting biomechanical data, which has greatly improved out ability to examine the function of both live and extinct animals. With new technologies and methods come new pitfalls and opportunities. In this review, I address three aspects of experimental biomechanics that exemplify the challenges and opportunities it provides for addressing deep-time problems in palaeontology. 1) Interpretation: It has never been easier to acquire large amounts of high-quality biomechanical data on extinct animals. However, the lack of behavioural information means that interpreting this data can be problematic. We will never know precisely what a dinosaur ate, but we can explore what constraints there might have been on the mechanical function of its jaws. Palaeobiomechanics defines potential function and becomes especially effective when dealing with multiple examples. 2) Comparison: Understanding the potential function of one extinct animal is interesting; however, examining mechanical features across multiple taxa allows for a greater understanding of biomechanical variation. Comparative studies help identify common trends and underlying mechanical principles which can have long reaching influences on morphological evolution. 3) Evolution: The physical principles established through comparative biomechanical studies can be utilized in phylogenetic comparative methods in order to explore evolutionary morphology across clades. Comparative evolutionary biomechanics offers potential for exploring the evolution of functional systems in deep time utilizing experimental biomechanical data.

  20. Predictions of barrier island berm evolution in a time-varying storm climatology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plant, Nathaniel G.; Flocks, James; Stockdon, Hilary F.; Long, Joseph W.; Guy, Kristy K.; Thompson, David M.; Cormier, Jamie M.; Smith, Christopher G.; Miselis, Jennifer L.; Dalyander, P. Soupy

    2014-01-01

    Low-lying barrier islands are ubiquitous features of the world's coastlines, and the processes responsible for their formation, maintenance, and destruction are related to the evolution of smaller, superimposed features including sand dunes, beach berms, and sandbars. The barrier island and its superimposed features interact with oceanographic forces (e.g., overwash) and exchange sediment with each other and other parts of the barrier island system. These interactions are modulated by changes in storminess. An opportunity to study these interactions resulted from the placement and subsequent evolution of a 2 m high sand berm constructed along the northern Chandeleur Islands, LA. We show that observed berm length evolution is well predicted by a model that was fit to the observations by estimating two parameters describing the rate of berm length change. The model evaluates the probability and duration of berm overwash to predict episodic berm erosion. A constant berm length change rate is also predicted that persists even when there is no overwash. The analysis is extended to a 16 year time series that includes both intraannual and interannual variability of overwash events. This analysis predicts that as many as 10 or as few as 1 day of overwash conditions would be expected each year. And an increase in berm elevation from 2 m to 3.5 m above mean sea level would reduce the expected frequency of overwash events from 4 to just 0.5 event-days per year. This approach can be applied to understanding barrier island and berm evolution at other locations using past and future storm climatologies.

  1. Predictions of barrier island berm evolution in a time-varying storm climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plant, Nathaniel G.; Flocks, James; Stockdon, Hilary F.; Long, Joseph W.; Guy, Kristy; Thompson, David M.; Cormier, Jamie M.; Smith, Christopher G.; Miselis, Jennifer L.; Dalyander, P. Soupy

    2014-02-01

    Low-lying barrier islands are ubiquitous features of the world's coastlines, and the processes responsible for their formation, maintenance, and destruction are related to the evolution of smaller, superimposed features including sand dunes, beach berms, and sandbars. The barrier island and its superimposed features interact with oceanographic forces (e.g., overwash) and exchange sediment with each other and other parts of the barrier island system. These interactions are modulated by changes in storminess. An opportunity to study these interactions resulted from the placement and subsequent evolution of a 2 m high sand berm constructed along the northern Chandeleur Islands, LA. We show that observed berm length evolution is well predicted by a model that was fit to the observations by estimating two parameters describing the rate of berm length change. The model evaluates the probability and duration of berm overwash to predict episodic berm erosion. A constant berm length change rate is also predicted that persists even when there is no overwash. The analysis is extended to a 16 year time series that includes both intraannual and interannual variability of overwash events. This analysis predicts that as many as 10 or as few as 1 day of overwash conditions would be expected each year. And an increase in berm elevation from 2 m to 3.5 m above mean sea level would reduce the expected frequency of overwash events from 4 to just 0.5 event-days per year. This approach can be applied to understanding barrier island and berm evolution at other locations using past and future storm climatologies.

  2. Time evolution and emission factors of aerosol particles from day and night time savannah fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakkari, Ville; Beukes, Johan Paul; Tiitta, Petri; Venter, Andrew; Jaars, Kerneels; Josipovic, Miroslav; van Zyl, Pieter; Kulmala, Markku; Laakso, Lauri

    2013-04-01

    The largest uncertainties in the current global climate models originate from aerosol particle effects (IPCC, 2007) and at the same time aerosol particles also pose a threat to human health (Pope and Dockery, 2006). In southern Africa wild fires and prescribed burning are one of the most important sources of aerosol particles, especially during the dry season from June to September (e.g. Swap et al., 2003; Vakkari et al., 2012). The aerosol particle emissions from savannah fires in southern Africa have been studied in several intensive campaigns such as SAFARI 1992 and 2000 (Swap et al., 2003). However, all previous measurements have been carried out during the daytime, whereas most of the prescribed fires in southern Africa are lit up only after sunset. Furthermore, the previous campaigns followed the plume evolution for up to one hour after emission only. In this study, combining remote sensing fire observations to ground-based long-term measurements of aerosol particle and trace gas properties at the Welgegund measurement station (www.welgegund.org), we have been able to follow the time evolution of savannah fire plumes up to several hours in the atmosphere. For the first time the aerosol particle size distribution measurements in savannah fire plumes cover both day and night time plumes and also the ultrafine size range below 100 nm. During the period from May 20th 2010 to April 15th 2012 altogether 61 savannah fire plumes were observed at Welgegund. The evolution of the aerosol size distribution remained rapid for at least five hours after the fire: during this period the growth rate of the aerosol particle count mean diameter (size range 12 to 840 nm) was 24 nm h-1 for daytime plumes and 8 nm h-1 for night time plumes. The difference in the day and night time growth rate shows that photochemical reactions significantly increase the condensable vapour concentration in the plume. Furthermore, the condensable vapour concentration was found to affect both the

  3. A multigene phylogeny of Olpidium and its implications for early fungal evolution

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background From a common ancestor with animals, the earliest fungi inherited flagellated zoospores for dispersal in water. Terrestrial fungi lost all flagellated stages and reproduce instead with nonmotile spores. Olpidium virulentus (= Olpidium brassicae), a unicellular fungus parasitizing vascular plant root cells, seemed anomalous. Although Olpidium produces zoospores, in previous phylogenetic studies it appeared nested among the terrestrial fungi. Its position was based mainly on ribosomal gene sequences and was not strongly supported. Our goal in this study was to use amino acid sequences from four genes to reconstruct the branching order of the early-diverging fungi with particular emphasis on the position of Olpidium. Results We concatenated sequences from the Ef-2, RPB1, RPB2 and actin loci for maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses. In the resulting trees, Olpidium virulentus, O. bornovanus and non-flagellated terrestrial fungi formed a strongly supported clade. Topology tests rejected monophyly of the Olpidium species with any other clades of flagellated fungi. Placing Olpidium at the base of terrestrial fungi was also rejected. Within the terrestrial fungi, Olpidium formed a monophyletic group with the taxa traditionally classified in the phylum Zygomycota. Within Zygomycota, Mucoromycotina was robustly monophyletic. Although without bootstrap support, Monoblepharidomycetes, a small class of zoosporic fungi, diverged from the basal node in Fungi. The zoosporic phylum Blastocladiomycota appeared as the sister group to the terrestrial fungi plus Olpidium. Conclusions This study provides strong support for Olpidium as the closest living flagellated relative of the terrestrial fungi. Appearing nested among hyphal fungi, Olpidium's unicellular thallus may have been derived from ancestral hyphae. Early in their evolution, terrestrial hyphal fungi may have reproduced with zoospores. PMID:22085768

  4. An early Cambrian greenhouse climate.

    PubMed

    Hearing, Thomas W; Harvey, Thomas H P; Williams, Mark; Leng, Melanie J; Lamb, Angela L; Wilby, Philip R; Gabbott, Sarah E; Pohl, Alexandre; Donnadieu, Yannick

    2018-05-01

    The oceans of the early Cambrian (~541 to 509 million years ago) were the setting for a marked diversification of animal life. However, sea temperatures-a key component of the early Cambrian marine environment-remain unconstrained, in part because of a substantial time gap in the stable oxygen isotope (δ 18 O) record before the evolution of euconodonts. We show that previously overlooked sources of fossil biogenic phosphate have the potential to fill this gap. Pristine phosphatic microfossils from the Comley Limestones, UK, yield a robust δ 18 O signature, suggesting sea surface temperatures of 20° to 25°C at high southern paleolatitudes (~65°S to 70°S) between ~514 and 509 million years ago. These sea temperatures are consistent with the distribution of coeval evaporite and calcrete deposits, peak continental weathering rates, and also our climate model simulations for this interval. Our results support an early Cambrian greenhouse climate comparable to those of the late Mesozoic and early Cenozoic, offering a framework for exploring the interplay between biotic and environmental controls on Cambrian animal diversification.

  5. Early evolution of Martian volatiles: Nitrogen and noble gas components in ALH84001 and Chassigny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, K. J.; Marti, K.

    2001-01-01

    Studies on SNC meteorites have permitted the characterization of modern Martian atmospheric components as well as indigenous Martian nitrogen and solar-type xenon. New isotopic and elemental abundances of noble gases and nitrogen in ALH84001 and Chassigny provide important constraints on the early evolution of the planet. A primitive solar Xe component (Chass-S) and an evolved Xe component (Chass-E), augmented with fission Xe are identified in Chassigny. Both components represent interior reservoirs of Mars and are characterized by low 129Xe/132Xe (<1.07) and by distinct elemental ratios 36Ar/132Xe<5 and >130, respectively. Light nitrogen (δ15N=-30‰) is associated with the Chass-S component and is enriched in melt inclusions in olivine. An ancient (presumably incorporated ~4 Gyr ago) evolved Martian atmospheric component is identified in ALH84001 and has the following signatures: 129Xe/132Xe=2.16, 36Ar/38Ar>=5.0, 36Ar/132Xe=~50, 84Kr/132Xe=~6, and δ15N=7‰. The trapped Xe component in ALH84001 is not isotopically fractionated. We observe major shifts in nitrogen signatures due to cosmogenic N component in both Chassigny and ALH84001. A heavy nitrogen component of comparable magnitude (δ15N>150‰) has previously been interpreted as (heavy) Martian atmospheric N. In situ produced fission Xe components, due to 244Pu in ALH84001 and due to 238U in Chassigny, are identified. The ALH84001 data strongly constrain exchanges of Martian atmospheric and interior reservoirs. Mars retained abundant fission Xe components, and this may account for the low observed fission Xe component in the modern Martian atmosphere. Chronometric information regarding the evolution of the early Martian atmosphere can be secured from the relative abundances of radiogenic and fission Xe, as ~80% of the Martian 129Xer is observed in the atmospheric 129Xe/132Xe ratio ~ 4 Gyr ago.

  6. Human Life History Evolution Explains Dissociation between the Timing of Tooth Eruption and Peak Rates of Root Growth

    PubMed Central

    Dean, M. Christopher; Cole, Tim J.

    2013-01-01

    We explored the relationship between growth in tooth root length and the modern human extended period of childhood. Tooth roots provide support to counter chewing forces and so it is advantageous to grow roots quickly to allow teeth to erupt into function as early as possible. Growth in tooth root length occurs with a characteristic spurt or peak in rate sometime between tooth crown completion and root apex closure. Here we show that in Pan troglodytes the peak in root growth rate coincides with the period of time teeth are erupting into function. However, the timing of peak root velocity in modern humans occurs earlier than expected and coincides better with estimates for tooth eruption times in Homo erectus. With more time to grow longer roots prior to eruption and smaller teeth that now require less support at the time they come into function, the root growth spurt no longer confers any advantage in modern humans. We suggest that a prolonged life history schedule eventually neutralised this adaptation some time after the appearance of Homo erectus. The root spurt persists in modern humans as an intrinsic marker event that shows selection operated, not primarily on tooth tissue growth, but on the process of tooth eruption. This demonstrates the overarching influence of life history evolution on several aspects of dental development. These new insights into tooth root growth now provide an additional line of enquiry that may contribute to future studies of more recent life history and dietary adaptations within the genus Homo. PMID:23342167

  7. Real time evolution at finite temperatures with operator space matrix product states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pižorn, Iztok; Eisler, Viktor; Andergassen, Sabine; Troyer, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    We propose a method to simulate the real time evolution of one-dimensional quantum many-body systems at finite temperature by expressing both the density matrices and the observables as matrix product states. This allows the calculation of expectation values and correlation functions as scalar products in operator space. The simulations of density matrices in inverse temperature and the local operators in the Heisenberg picture are independent and result in a grid of expectation values for all intermediate temperatures and times. Simulations can be performed using real arithmetics with only polynomial growth of computational resources in inverse temperature and time for integrable systems. The method is illustrated for the XXZ model and the single impurity Anderson model.

  8. Evidence for determinism in species diversification and contingency in phenotypic evolution during adaptive radiation.

    PubMed

    Burbrink, Frank T; Chen, Xin; Myers, Edward A; Brandley, Matthew C; Pyron, R Alexander

    2012-12-07

    Adaptive radiation (AR) theory predicts that groups sharing the same source of ecological opportunity (EO) will experience deterministic species diversification and morphological evolution. Thus, deterministic ecological and morphological evolution should be correlated with deterministic patterns in the tempo and mode of speciation for groups in similar habitats and time periods. We test this hypothesis using well-sampled phylogenies of four squamate groups that colonized the New World (NW) in the Late Oligocene. We use both standard and coalescent models to assess species diversification, as well as likelihood models to examine morphological evolution. All squamate groups show similar early pulses of speciation, as well as diversity-dependent ecological limits on clade size at a continental scale. In contrast, processes of morphological evolution are not easily predictable and do not show similar pulses of early and rapid change. Patterns of morphological and species diversification thus appear uncoupled across these groups. This indicates that the processes that drive diversification and disparification are not mechanistically linked, even among similar groups of taxa experiencing the same sources of EO. It also suggests that processes of phenotypic diversification cannot be predicted solely from the existence of an AR or knowledge of the process of diversification.

  9. On the asymmetric evolution of the perihelion distances of near-Earth Jupiter family comets around the discovery time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa, A.; Fernández, J. A.; Pais, P.

    2012-12-01

    We study the dynamical evolution of the near-Earth Jupiter family comets (NEJFCs) that came close to or crossed the Earth's orbit at the epoch of their discovery (perihelion distances qdisc < 1.3 AU). We found a minimum in the time evolution of the mean perihelion distance bar{q} of the NEJFCs at the discovery time of each comet (taken as t = 0) and a past-future asymmetry of bar{q} in an interval -1000 yr, +1000 yr centred on t = 0, confirming previous results. The asymmetry indicates that there are more comets with greater q in the past than in the future. For comparison purposes, we also analysed the population of near-Earth asteroids in cometary orbits (defined as those with aphelion distances Q > 4.5 AU) and with absolute magnitudes H < 18. We found some remarkable differences in the dynamical evolution of both populations that argue against a common origin. To further analyse the dynamical evolution of NEJFCs, we integrated in time a large sample of fictitious comets, cloned from the observed NEJFCs, over a 20 000 yr time interval and started the integration before the comet's discovery time, when it had a perihelion distance q > 2 AU. By assuming that NEJFCs are mostly discovered when they decrease their perihelion distances below a certain threshold qthre = 1.05 AU for the first time during their evolution, we were able to reproduce the main features of the observed bar{q} evolution in the interval [-1000, 1000] yr with respect to the discovery time. Our best fits indicate that 40% of the population of NEJFCs would be composed of young, fresh comets that entered the region q < 2 AU a few hundred years before decreasing their perihelion distances below qthre, while 60% would be composed of older, more evolved comets, discovered after spending at least 3000 yr in the q < 2 AU region before their perihelion distances drop below qthre. As a byproduct, we put some constraints on the physical lifetime τphys of NEJFCs in the q < 2 AU region. We found a lower

  10. On the Early-Time Excess Emission in Hydrogen-Poor Superluminous Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vreeswijk, Paul M.; Leloudas, Giorgos; Gal-Yam, Avishay; De Cia, Annalisa; Perley, Daniel A.; Quimby, Robert M.; Waldman, Roni; Sullivan, Mark; Yan, Lin; Ofek, Eran O.; hide

    2017-01-01

    We present the light curves of the hydrogen-poor super-luminous supernovae (SLSNe I) PTF 12dam and iPTF 13dcc, discovered by the (intermediate) Palomar Transient Factory. Both show excess emission at early times and a slowly declining light curve at late times. The early bump in PTF 12dam is very similar in duration (approximately 10 days) and brightness relative to the main peak (23 mag fainter) compared to that observed in other SLSNe I. In contrast, the long-duration (greater than 30 days) early excess emission in iPTF 13dcc, whose brightness competes with that of the main peak, appears to be of a different nature. We construct bolometric light curves for both targets, and fit a variety of light-curve models to both the early bump and main peak in an attempt to understand the nature of these explosions. Even though the slope of the late-time decline in the light curves of both SLSNe is suggestively close to that expected from the radioactive decay of 56Ni and 56Co, the amount of nickel required to power the full light curves is too large considering the estimated ejecta mass. The magnetar model including an increasing escape fraction provides a reasonable description of the PTF 12dam observations. However, neither the basic nor the double-peaked magnetar model is capable of reproducing the light curve of iPTF 13dcc. A model combining a shock breakout in an extended envelope with late-time magnetar energy injection provides a reasonable fit to the iPTF 13dcc observations. Finally, we find that the light curves of both PTF 12dam and iPTF 13dcc can be adequately fit with the model involving interaction with the circumstellar medium.

  11. On The Early-Time Excess Emission In Hydrogen-Poor Superluminous Supernovae

    DOE PAGES

    Vreeswijk, Paul M.; Leloudas, Giorgos; Gal-Yam, Avishay; ...

    2017-01-18

    Here, we present the light curves of the hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSNe I) PTF 12dam and iPTF 13dcc, discovered by the (intermediate) Palomar Transient Factory. Both show excess emission at early times and a slowly declining light curve at late times. The early bump in PTF 12dam is very similar in duration (~10 days) and brightness relative to the main peak (2-3 mag fainter) compared to that observed in other SLSNe I. In contrast, the long-duration ( > 30 days) early excess emission in iPTF 13dcc, whose brightness competes with that of the main peak, appears to be of amore » different nature. We construct bolometric light curves for both targets, and fit a variety of light-curve models to both the early bump and main peak in an attempt to understand the nature of these explosions. Even though the slope of the late-time decline in the light curves of both SLSNe is suggestively close to that expected from the radioactive decay of 56Ni and 56Co, the amount of nickel required to power the full light curves is too large considering the estimated ejecta mass. The magnetar model including an increasing escape fraction provides a reasonable description of the PTF 12dam observations. However, neither the basic nor the double-peaked magnetar model is capable of reproducing the light curve of iPTF 13dcc. A model combining a shock breakout in an extended envelope with late-time magnetar energy injection provides a reasonable fit to the iPTF 13dcc observations. Finally, we find that the light curves of both PTF 12dam and iPTF 13dcc can be adequately fit with the model involving interaction with the circumstellar medium.« less

  12. ON THE EARLY-TIME EXCESS EMISSION IN HYDROGEN-POOR SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Vreeswijk, Paul M.; Leloudas, Giorgos; Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2017-01-20

    We present the light curves of the hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSNe I) PTF 12dam and iPTF 13dcc, discovered by the (intermediate) Palomar Transient Factory. Both show excess emission at early times and a slowly declining light curve at late times. The early bump in PTF 12dam is very similar in duration (∼10 days) and brightness relative to the main peak (2–3 mag fainter) compared to that observed in other SLSNe I. In contrast, the long-duration (>30 days) early excess emission in iPTF 13dcc, whose brightness competes with that of the main peak, appears to be of a different nature. Wemore » construct bolometric light curves for both targets, and fit a variety of light-curve models to both the early bump and main peak in an attempt to understand the nature of these explosions. Even though the slope of the late-time decline in the light curves of both SLSNe is suggestively close to that expected from the radioactive decay of {sup 56}Ni and {sup 56}Co, the amount of nickel required to power the full light curves is too large considering the estimated ejecta mass. The magnetar model including an increasing escape fraction provides a reasonable description of the PTF 12dam observations. However, neither the basic nor the double-peaked magnetar model is capable of reproducing the light curve of iPTF 13dcc. A model combining a shock breakout in an extended envelope with late-time magnetar energy injection provides a reasonable fit to the iPTF 13dcc observations. Finally, we find that the light curves of both PTF 12dam and iPTF 13dcc can be adequately fit with the model involving interaction with the circumstellar medium.« less

  13. Why do leafcutter bees cut leaves? New insights into the early evolution of bees.

    PubMed

    Litman, Jessica R; Danforth, Bryan N; Eardley, Connal D; Praz, Christophe J

    2011-12-07

    Stark contrasts in clade species diversity are reported across the tree of life and are especially conspicuous when observed in closely related lineages. The explanation for such disparity has often been attributed to the evolution of key innovations that facilitate colonization of new ecological niches. The factors underlying diversification in bees remain poorly explored. Bees are thought to have originated from apoid wasps during the Mid-Cretaceous, a period that coincides with the appearance of angiosperm eudicot pollen grains in the fossil record. The reliance of bees on angiosperm pollen and their fundamental role as angiosperm pollinators have contributed to the idea that both groups may have undergone simultaneous radiations. We demonstrate that one key innovation--the inclusion of foreign material in nest construction--underlies both a massive range expansion and a significant increase in the rate of diversification within the second largest bee family, Megachilidae. Basal clades within the family are restricted to deserts and exhibit plesiomorphic features rarely observed among modern bees, but prevalent among apoid wasps. Our results suggest that early bees inherited a suite of behavioural traits that acted as powerful evolutionary constraints. While the transition to pollen as a larval food source opened an enormous ecological niche for the early bees, the exploitation of this niche and the subsequent diversification of bees only became possible after bees had evolved adaptations to overcome these constraints.

  14. Divergent evolution of life span associated with mitochondrial DNA evolution.

    PubMed

    Stojković, Biljana; Sayadi, Ahmed; Đorđević, Mirko; Jović, Jelena; Savković, Uroš; Arnqvist, Göran

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in ageing. The pursuit of genes that regulate variation in life span and ageing have shown that several nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes are important. However, the role of mitochondrial encoded genes (mtDNA) is more controversial and our appreciation of the role of mtDNA for the evolution of life span is limited. We use replicated lines of seed beetles that have been artificially selected for long or short life for >190 generations, now showing dramatic phenotypic differences, to test for a possible role of mtDNA in the divergent evolution of ageing and life span. We show that these divergent selection regimes led to the evolution of significantly different mtDNA haplotype frequencies. Selection for a long life and late reproduction generated positive selection for one specific haplotype, which was fixed in most such lines. In contrast, selection for reproduction early in life led to both positive selection as well as negative frequency-dependent selection on two different haplotypes, which were both present in all such lines. Our findings suggest that the evolution of life span was in part mediated by mtDNA, providing support for the emerging general tenet that adaptive evolution of life-history syndromes may involve mtDNA. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  15. Predicting the conformations of peptides and proteins in early evolution. A review article submitted to Biology Direct

    PubMed Central

    Milner-White, E James; Russell, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Considering that short, mainly heterochiral, polypeptides with a high glycine content are expected to have played a prominent role in evolution at the earliest stage of life before nucleic acids were available, we review recent knowledge about polypeptide three-dimensional structure to predict the types of conformations they would have adopted. The possible existence of such structures at this time leads to a consideration of their functional significance, and the consequences for the course of evolution. This article was reviewed by Bill Martin, Eugene Koonin and Nick Grishin. PMID:18226248

  16. The Late-Time Evolution of SN 2002hh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, G. C.; Welch, D. L.

    2005-12-01

    We present new spectroscopic and photometric observations of the interesting Type II-P supernova, SN 2002hh, in NGC 6946. Gemini/GMOS-N has been used to acquire visible spectra and also g'r'i' photometry covering 5 epochs between August 2004 and October 2005, following the evolution of the supernova from 650 to 1050 d since its initial explosion. Supernova spectra obtained 3 years after outburst are rare. In addition, data have been obtained at several epochs in the JHK bands using the Steward 90" with the 256x256 imager and with Gemini/NIRI. Dust emission from SN 2002hh has been detected at mid-infrared wavelengths by SST/IRAC and confirmed by higher angular resolution Gemini/Michelle observations (Barlow et al. 2005, ApJ, 627, L113). There is a pre-existing optically thick dust shell having a mass of ˜0.1 Msun, suggesting a massive M supergiant or luminous blue variable precursor. However, the formation of new dust in the ejecta of SN 2002hh has not been ruled out. The IR emission from any such new dust would be swamped by the emission from the existing circumstellar dust. The new data, presented here, are being used to investigate the late-time evolution of SN 2002hh and whether new dust has been formed in its ejecta. In particular, we are looking for changes in the H-alpha emission line profiles and for variations in brightness due to changes in the extinction and emission due to dust. This study is partially supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC).

  17. Clay Tablets to Micro Chips: The Evolution of Archival Practice into the Twenty-First Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannestad, Stephen E.

    1991-01-01

    Describes archival concepts and theories and their evolution in recent times. Basic archival functions--appraisal, arrangement, description, reference, preservation, and publication--are introduced. Early applications of automation to archives (including SPINDEX, NARS-5, NARS-A-1, MARC AMC, presNET, CTRACK, PHOTO, and DIARY) and automation trends…

  18. Impact constraints on the environment for chemical evolution and the continuity of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberbeck, Verne R.; Fogleman