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Sample records for early ureteric bud

  1. Hs2st mediated kidney mesenchyme induction regulates early ureteric bud branching.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mita M; Sakurai, Hiroyuki; Sweeney, Derina E; Gallegos, Thomas F; Bush, Kevin T; Esko, Jeffrey D; Nigam, Sanjay K

    2010-03-15

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are central modulators of developmental processes likely through their interaction with growth factors, such as GDNF, members of the FGF and TGFbeta superfamilies, EGF receptor ligands and HGF. Absence of the biosynthetic enzyme, heparan sulfate 2-O-sulfotransferase (Hs2st) leads to kidney agenesis. Using a novel combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches, we have reanalyzed the defect in morphogenesis of the Hs2st(-)(/)(-) kidney. Utilizing assays that separately model distinct stages of kidney branching morphogenesis, we found that the Hs2st(-/-) UB is able to undergo branching and induce mesenchymal-to-epithelial transformation when recombined with control MM, and the isolated Hs2st null UB is able to undergo branching morphogenesis in the presence of exogenous soluble pro-branching growth factors when embedded in an extracellular matrix, indicating that the UB is intrinsically competent. This is in contrast to the prevailing view that the defect underlying the renal agenesis phenotype is due to a primary role for 2-O sulfated HS in UB branching. Unexpectedly, the mutant MM was also fully capable of being induced in recombination experiments with wild-type tissue. Thus, both the mutant UB and mutant MM tissue appear competent in and of themselves, but the combination of mutant tissues fails in vivo and, as we show, in organ culture. We hypothesized a 2OS-dependent defect in the mutual inductive process, which could be on either the UB or MM side, since both progenitor tissues express Hs2st. In light of these observations, we specifically examined the role of the HS 2-O sulfation modification on the morphogenetic capacity of the UB and MM individually. We demonstrate that early UB branching morphogenesis is not primarily modulated by factors that depend on the HS 2-O sulfate modification; however, factors that contribute to MM induction are markedly sensitive to the 2-O sulfation modification. These data suggest that key

  2. Stromal Protein Ecm1 Regulates Ureteric Bud Patterning and Branching

    PubMed Central

    Paroly, Suneeta S.; Wang, Fengwei; Spraggon, Lee; Merregaert, Joseph; Batourina, Ekatherina; Tycko, Benjamin; Schmidt-Ott, Kai M.; Grimmond, Sean; Little, Melissa; Mendelsohn, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    The interactions between the nephrogenic mesenchyme and the ureteric bud during kidney development are well documented. While recent studies have shed some light on the importance of the stroma during renal development, many of the signals generated in the stroma, the genetic pathways and interaction networks involving the stroma are yet to be identified. Our previous studies demonstrate that retinoids are crucial for branching of the ureteric bud and for patterning of the cortical stroma. In the present study we demonstrate that autocrine retinoic acid (RA) signaling in stromal cells is critical for their survival and patterning, and show that Extracellular matrix 1, Ecm1, a gene that in humans causes irritable bowel syndrome and lipoid proteinosis, is a novel RA-regulated target in the developing kidney, which is secreted from the cortical stromal cells surrounding the cap mesenchyme and ureteric bud. Our studies suggest that Ecm1 is required in the ureteric bud for regulating the distribution of Ret which is normally restricted to the tips, as inhibition of Ecm1 results in an expanded domain of Ret expression and reduced numbers of branches. We propose a model in which retinoid signaling in the stroma activates expression of Ecm1, which in turn down-regulates Ret expression in the ureteric bud cleft, where bifurcation normally occurs and normal branching progresses. PMID:24391906

  3. Intracellular and extracellular regulation of ureteric bud morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    DAVIES, JAMIE

    2001-01-01

    The urinary collecting duct system of the permanent kidney develops by growth and branching of an initially unbranched epithelial tubule, the ureteric bud. Formation of the ureteric bud as an outgrowth of the wolffian duct is induced by signalling molecules (such as GDNF) that emanate from the adjacent metanephrogenic mesenchyme. Once it has invaded the mesenchyme, growth and branching of the bud is controlled by a variety of molecules, such as the growth factors GDNF, HGF, TGFβ, activin, BMP-2, BMP-7, and matrix molecules such as heparan sulphate proteoglycans and laminins. These various influences are integrated by signal transduction systems inside ureteric bud cells, with the MAP kinase, protein kinase A and protein kinase C pathways appearing to play major roles. The mechanisms of morphogenetic change that produce branching remain largely obscure, but matrix metalloproteinases are known to be necessary for the process, and there is preliminary evidence for the involvement of the actin/myosin contractile cytoskeleton in creating branch points. PMID:11322719

  4. Genes in the Ureteric Budding Pathway: Association Study on Vesico-Ureteral Reflux Patients

    PubMed Central

    van Eerde, Albertien M.; de Kovel, Carolien G. F.; Koeleman, Bobby P. C.; Knoers, Nine V. A. M.; Renkema, Kirsten Y.; van der Horst, Henricus J. R.; Bökenkamp, Arend; van Hagen, Johanna M.; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Wolffenbuttel, Katja P.; van den Hoek, Joop; Feitz, Wouter F.; de Jong, Tom P. V. M.; Giltay, Jacques C.; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2012-01-01

    Vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR) is the retrograde passage of urine from the bladder to the urinary tract and causes 8.5% of end-stage renal disease in children. It is a complex genetic developmental disorder, in which ectopic embryonal ureteric budding is implicated in the pathogenesis. VUR is part of the spectrum of Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract (CAKUT). We performed an extensive association study for primary VUR using a two-stage, case-control design, investigating 44 candidate genes in the ureteric budding pathway in 409 Dutch VUR patients. The 44 genes were selected from the literature and a set of 567 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) capturing their genetic variation was genotyped in 207 cases and 554 controls. The 14 SNPs with p<0.005 were included in a follow-up study in 202 cases and 892 controls. Of the total cohort, ∼50% showed a clear-cut primary VUR phenotype and ∼25% had both a duplex collecting system and VUR. We also looked for association in these two extreme phenotype groups. None of the SNPs reached a significant p-value. Common genetic variants in four genes (GREM1, EYA1, ROBO2 and UPK3A) show a trend towards association with the development of primary VUR (GREM1, EYA1, ROBO2) or duplex collecting system (EYA1 and UPK3A). SNPs in three genes (TGFB1, GNB3 and VEGFA) have been shown to be associated with VUR in other populations. Only the result of rs1800469 in TGFB1 hinted at association in our study. This is the first extensive study of common variants in the genes of the ureteric budding pathway and the genetic susceptibility to primary VUR. PMID:22558067

  5. Luminal mitosis drives epithelial cell dispersal within the branching ureteric bud.

    PubMed

    Packard, Adam; Georgas, Kylie; Michos, Odyssé; Riccio, Paul; Cebrian, Cristina; Combes, Alexander N; Ju, Adler; Ferrer-Vaquer, Anna; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; Zong, Hui; Little, Melissa H; Costantini, Frank

    2013-11-11

    The ureteric bud is an epithelial tube that undergoes branching morphogenesis to form the renal collecting system. Although development of a normal kidney depends on proper ureteric bud morphogenesis, the cellular events underlying this process remain obscure. Here, we used time-lapse microscopy together with several genetic labeling methods to observe ureteric bud cell behaviors in developing mouse kidneys. We observed an unexpected cell behavior in the branching tips of the ureteric bud, which we term "mitosis-associated cell dispersal." Premitotic ureteric tip cells delaminate from the epithelium and divide within the lumen; although one daughter cell retains a basal process, allowing it to reinsert into the epithelium at the site of origin, the other daughter cell reinserts at a position one to three cell diameters away. Given the high rate of cell division in ureteric tips, this cellular behavior causes extensive epithelial cell rearrangements that may contribute to renal branching morphogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Luminal mitosis drives epithelial cell dispersal within the branching ureteric bud

    PubMed Central

    Packard, Adam; Georgas, Kylie; Michos, Odyssé; Riccio, Paul; Cebrian, Cristina; Combes, Alexander N.; Ju, Adler; Ferrer-Vaquer, Anna; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; Zong, Hui; Little, Melissa H.; Costantini, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Summary The ureteric bud is an epithelial tube that undergoes branching morphogenesis to form the renal collecting system. Though development of a normal kidney depends on proper ureteric bud morphogenesis, the cellular events underlying this process remain obscure. Here, we used time-lapse microscopy together with several genetic labeling methods to observe ureteric bud cell behaviors in developing mouse kidneys. We observed an unexpected cell behavior in the branching tips of the ureteric bud, which we term “mitosis-associated cell dispersal”. Pre-mitotic ureteric tip cells delaminate from the epithelium and divide within the lumen; while one daughter cell retains a basal process, allowing it to reinsert into the epithelium at the site of origin, the other daughter cell reinserts at a position one to three cell diameters away. Given the high rate of cell division in ureteric tips, this cellular behavior causes extensive epithelial cell rearrangements that may contribute to renal branching morphogenesis. PMID:24183650

  7. The ureteric bud epithelium: morphogenesis and roles in metanephric kidney patterning.

    PubMed

    Nagalakshmi, Vidya K; Yu, Jing

    2015-03-01

    The mammalian metanephric kidney is composed of two epithelial components, the collecting duct system and the nephron epithelium, that differentiate from two different tissues -the ureteric bud epithelium and the nephron progenitors, respectively-of intermediate mesoderm origin. The collecting duct system is generated through reiterative ureteric bud branching morphogenesis, whereas the nephron epithelium is formed in a process termed nephrogenesis, which is initiated with the mesenchymal-epithelial transition of the nephron progenitors. Ureteric bud branching morphogenesis is regulated by nephron progenitors, and in return, the ureteric bud epithelium regulates nephrogenesis. The metanephric kidney is physiologically divided along the corticomedullary axis into subcompartments that are enriched with specific segments of these two epithelial structures. Here, we provide an overview of the major molecular and cellular processes underlying the morphogenesis and patterning of the ureteric bud epithelium and its roles in the cortico-medullary patterning of the metanephric kidney.

  8. Disruption of polycystin-1 function interferes with branching morphogenesis of the ureteric bud in developing mouse kidneys.

    PubMed

    Polgar, Katalin; Burrow, Christopher R; Hyink, Deborah P; Fernandez, Hilda; Thornton, Katie; Li, Xiaohong; Gusella, G Luca; Wilson, Patricia D

    2005-10-01

    The polycystic kidney disease (PKD1) gene-encoded protein, polycystin-1, is developmentally regulated, with highest expression levels seen in normal developing kidneys, where it is distributed in a punctate pattern at the basal surface of ureteric bud epithelia. Overexpression in ureteric epithelial cell membranes of an inhibitory pMyr-GFP-PKD1 fusion protein via a retroviral (VVC) delivery system and microinjection into the ureteric bud lumen of embryonic day 11 mouse metanephric kidneys resulted in disrupted branching morphogenesis. Using confocal quantitative analysis, significant reductions were measured in the numbers of ureteric bud branch points and tips, as well as in the total ureteric bud length, volume and area, while significant increases were seen as dilations of the terminal branches, where significant increases in outer diameter and volumes were measured. Microinjection of an activating 5TM-GFP-PKD1 fusion protein had an opposite effect and showed significant increases in ureteric bud length and area. These are the first studies to experimentally manipulate polycystin-1 expression by transduction in the embryonic mouse kidney and suggest that polycystin-1 plays a critical role in the regulation of epithelial morphogenesis during renal development.

  9. Renin-angiotensin system in ureteric bud branching morphogenesis: implications for kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Yosypiv, Ihor V

    2014-04-01

    Failure of normal branching morphogenesis of the ureteric bud (UB), a key ontogenic process that controls organogenesis of the metanephric kidney, leads to congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT), the leading cause of end-stage kidney disease in children. Recent studies have revealed a central role of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), the cardinal regulator of blood pressure and fluid/electrolyte homeostasis, in the control of normal kidney development. Mice or humans with mutations in the RAS genes exhibit a spectrum of CAKUT which includes renal medullary hypoplasia, hydronephrosis, renal hypodysplasia, duplicated renal collecting system and renal tubular dysgenesis. Emerging evidence indicates that severe hypoplasia of the inner medulla and papilla observed in angiotensinogen (Agt)- or angiotensin (Ang) II AT 1 receptor (AT 1 R)-deficient mice is due to aberrant UB branching morphogenesis resulting from disrupted RAS signaling. Lack of the prorenin receptor (PRR) in the UB in mice causes reduced UB branching, resulting in decreased nephron endowment, marked kidney hypoplasia, urinary concentrating and acidification defects. This review provides a mechanistic rational supporting the hypothesis that aberrant signaling of the intrarenal RAS during distinct stages of metanephric kidney development contributes to the pathogenesis of the broad phenotypic spectrum of CAKUT. As aberrant RAS signaling impairs normal renal development, these findings advocate caution for the use of RAS inhibitors in early infancy and further underscore a need to avoid their use during pregnancy and to identify the types of molecular processes that can be targeted for clinical intervention.

  10. A mathematical model for the induction of the mammalian ureteric bud.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Brodie A J; Flegg, Mark B

    2016-04-07

    Congenital abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract collectively form the most common type of prenatally diagnosed malformations. Whilst many of the crucial genes that direct the kidney developmental program are known, the mechanisms by which kidney organogenesis is achieved is still largely unclear. In this paper, we propose a mathematical model for the localisation of the ureteric bud, the precursor to the ureter and collecting duct system of the kidney. The mathematical model presented fundamentally implicates Schnakenberg-like ligand-receptor Turing patterning as the mechanism by which the ureteric bud is localised on the Wolfian duct as proposed by Menshykaul and Iber (2013). This model explores the specific roles of regulatory proteins GREM1 and BMP as well as the domain properties of GDNF production. Our model demonstrates that this proposed pattern formation mechanism is capable of naturally predicting the phenotypical outcomes of many genetic experiments from the literature. Furthermore, we conclude that whilst BMP inhibits GDNF away from the budding site and GREM1 permits GDNF to signal, GREM1 also stabilises the effect of BMP on GDNF signalling from fluctuations in BMP sensitivity but not signal strength.

  11. Ureteric bud apoptosis and renal hypoplasia in transgenic PAX2-Bax fetal mice mimics the renal-coloboma syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dziarmaga, Alison; Clark, Patsy; Stayner, Cherie; Julien, Jean Pierre; Torban, Elena; Goodyer, Paul; Eccles, Michael

    2003-11-01

    In humans, PAX2 haploinsufficiency causes renal-coloboma syndrome (RCS) involving eye abnormalities, renal hypoplasia, and renal failure in early life. The authors previously showed that heterozygous mutant Pax2 mice have smaller kidneys with fewer nephrons, associated with elevated apoptosis in the ureteric bud (UB). However, PAX2 may have a variety of developmental functions such as effects on cell fate and differentiation. To determine whether apoptosis alone is sufficient to cause a UB branching deficit, the authors targeted a pro-apoptotic gene (Baxalpha) to the embryonic kidney under the control of human PAX2 regulatory elements. The exogenous PAX2 promoter directed Baxalpha gene expression specifically to the developing kidney UB, eye, and mid/hindbrain. At E15.5 PAX2Promoter-Baxalpha fetal mice exhibited renal hypoplasia, elevated UB apoptosis, and retinal defects, mimicking the phenotype observed in RCS. The kidneys of E15.5 PAX2Promoter-Baxalpha fetal mice were 55% smaller than those of wild-type fetal mice, and they contained 70% of the normal level of UB branching. The data indicate that loss of Pax2 anti-apoptotic activity is sufficient to account for the reduced UB branching observed in RCS and suggest that elevated UB apoptosis may be a key process responsible for renal hypoplasia. The authors propose a morphogenic unit model in which cell survival influences the rate of UB branching and determines final nephron endowment.

  12. Deletion of the Prorenin Receptor from the Ureteric Bud Causes Renal Hypodysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Song, Renfang; Preston, Graeme; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Yosypiv, Ihor V.

    2013-01-01

    The role of the prorenin receptor (PRR) in the regulation of ureteric bud (UB) branching morphogenesis is unknown. Here, we investigated whether PRR acts specifically in the UB to regulate UB branching, kidney development and function. We demonstrate that embryonic (E) day E13.5 mouse metanephroi, isolated intact E11.5 UBs and cultured UB cells express PRR mRNA. To study its role in UB development, we conditionally ablated PRR in the developing UB (PRRUB−/−) using Hoxb7Cre mice. On E12.5, PRRUB−/− mice had decreased UB branching and increased UB cell apoptosis. These defects were associated with decreased expression of Ret, Wnt11, Etv4/Etv5, and reduced phosphorylation of Erk1/2 in the UB. On E18.5, mutants had marked kidney hypoplasia, widespread apoptosis of medullary collecting duct cells and decreased expression of Foxi1, AE1 and H+-ATPase α4 mRNA. Ultimately, they developed occasional small cysts in medullary collecting ducts and had decreased nephron number. To test the functional consequences of these alterations, we determined the ability of PRRUB−/− mice to acidify and concentrate the urine on postnatal (P) day P30. PRRUB−/− mice were polyuric, had lower urine osmolality and a higher urine pH following 48 hours of acidic loading with NH4Cl. Taken together, these data show that PRR present in the UB epithelia performs essential functions during UB branching morphogenesis and collecting duct development via control of Ret/Wnt11 pathway gene expression, UB cell survival, activation of Erk1/2, terminal differentiation and function of collecting duct cells needed for maintaining adequate water and acid-base homeostasis. We propose that mutations in PRR could possibly cause renal hypodysplasia and renal tubular acidosis in humans. PMID:23704941

  13. Deletion of the prorenin receptor from the ureteric bud causes renal hypodysplasia.

    PubMed

    Song, Renfang; Preston, Graeme; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Yosypiv, Ihor V

    2013-01-01

    The role of the prorenin receptor (PRR) in the regulation of ureteric bud (UB) branching morphogenesis is unknown. Here, we investigated whether PRR acts specifically in the UB to regulate UB branching, kidney development and function. We demonstrate that embryonic (E) day E13.5 mouse metanephroi, isolated intact E11.5 UBs and cultured UB cells express PRR mRNA. To study its role in UB development, we conditionally ablated PRR in the developing UB (PRR (UB-/-)) using Hoxb7 (Cre) mice. On E12.5, PRR (UB-/-) mice had decreased UB branching and increased UB cell apoptosis. These defects were associated with decreased expression of Ret, Wnt11, Etv4/Etv5, and reduced phosphorylation of Erk1/2 in the UB. On E18.5, mutants had marked kidney hypoplasia, widespread apoptosis of medullary collecting duct cells and decreased expression of Foxi1, AE1 and H(+)-ATPase α4 mRNA. Ultimately, they developed occasional small cysts in medullary collecting ducts and had decreased nephron number. To test the functional consequences of these alterations, we determined the ability of PRR (UB-/-) mice to acidify and concentrate the urine on postnatal (P) day P30. PRR (UB-/-) mice were polyuric, had lower urine osmolality and a higher urine pH following 48 hours of acidic loading with NH4Cl. Taken together, these data show that PRR present in the UB epithelia performs essential functions during UB branching morphogenesis and collecting duct development via control of Ret/Wnt11 pathway gene expression, UB cell survival, activation of Erk1/2, terminal differentiation and function of collecting duct cells needed for maintaining adequate water and acid-base homeostasis. We propose that mutations in PRR could possibly cause renal hypodysplasia and renal tubular acidosis in humans.

  14. Reactive oxygen species in the presence of high glucose alter ureteric bud morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Ling; Chen, Yun-Wen; Tran, Stella; Chenier, Isabelle; Hébert, Marie-Josée; Ingelfinger, Julie R

    2007-07-01

    Renal malformations are a major cause of childhood renal failure. During the development of the kidney, ureteric bud (UB) branching morphogenesis is critical for normal nephrogenesis. These studies investigated whether renal UB branching morphogenesis is altered by a high ambient glucose environment and studied underlying mechanism(s). Kidney explants that were isolated from different periods of gestation (embryonic days 12 to 18) from Hoxb7-green fluorescence protein mice were cultured for 24 h in either normal d-glucose (5 mM) or high d-glucose (25 mM) medium with or without various inhibitors. Alterations in renal morphogenesis were assessed by fluorescence microscopy. Paired-homeobox 2 (Pax-2) gene expression was determined by real-time quantitative PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistology. The results revealed that high d-glucose (25 mM) specifically stimulates UB branching morphogenesis via Pax-2 gene expression, whereas other glucose analogs, such as d-mannitol, l-glucose, and 2-deoxy-d-glucose, had no effect. The stimulatory effect of high glucose on UB branching was blocked in the presence of catalase and inhibitors of NADPH oxidase, mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I, and Akt signaling. Moreover, in in vivo studies, it seems that high glucose induces, via Pax-2 (mainly localized in UB), acceleration of UB branching but not nephron formation. Taken together, these data demonstrate that high glucose alters UB branching morphogenesis. This occurs, at least in part, via reactive oxygen species generation, activation of Akt signaling, and upregulation of Pax-2 gene expression.

  15. Reduction of BMP4 activity by gremlin 1 enables ureteric bud outgrowth and GDNF/WNT11 feedback signalling during kidney branching morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Michos, Odyssé; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Lopez-Rios, Javier; Tiecke, Eva; Naillat, Florence; Beier, Konstantin; Galli, Antonella; Vainio, Seppo; Zeller, Rolf

    2007-07-01

    Antagonists act to restrict and negatively modulate the activity of secreted signals during progression of embryogenesis. In mouse embryos lacking the extra-cellular BMP antagonist gremlin 1 (Grem1), metanephric development is disrupted at the stage of initiating ureteric bud outgrowth. Treatment of mutant kidney rudiments in culture with recombinant gremlin 1 protein induces additional epithelial buds and restores outgrowth and branching. All epithelial buds express Wnt11, and Gdnf is significantly upregulated in the surrounding mesenchyme, indicating that epithelial-mesenchymal (e-m) feedback signalling is restored. In the wild type, Bmp4 is expressed by the mesenchyme enveloping the Wolffian duct and ureteric bud and Grem1 is upregulated in the mesenchyme around the nascent ureteric bud prior to initiation of its outgrowth. In agreement, BMP activity is reduced locally as revealed by lower levels of nuclear pSMAD protein in the mesenchyme. By contrast, in Grem1-deficient kidney rudiments, pSMAD proteins are detected in many cell nuclei in the metanephric mesenchyme, indicative of excessive BMP signal transduction. Indeed, genetic lowering of BMP4 levels in Grem1-deficient mouse embryos completely restores ureteric bud outgrowth and branching morphogenesis. The reduction of BMP4 levels in Grem1 mutant embryos enables normal progression of renal development and restores adult kidney morphology and functions. This study establishes that initiation of metanephric kidney development requires the reduction of BMP4 activity by the antagonist gremlin 1 in the mesenchyme, which in turn enables ureteric bud outgrowth and establishment of autoregulatory GDNF/WNT11 feedback signalling.

  16. GDNF-independent ureteric budding: role of PI3K-independent activation of AKT and FOSB/JUN/AP-1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tee, James B.; Choi, Yohan; Dnyanmote, Ankur; Decambre, Marvalyn; Ito, Chiharu; Bush, Kevin T.; Nigam, Sanjay K.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A significant fraction of mice deficient in either glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) or its co-receptors (Gfrα1, Ret), undergoes ureteric bud (UB) outgrowth leading to the formation of a rudimentary kidney. Previous studies using the isolated Wolffian duct (WD) culture indicate that activation of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor signaling, together with suppression of BMP/Activin signaling, is critical for GDNF-independent WD budding (Maeshima et al., 2007). By expression analysis of embryonic kidney from Ret(−/−) mice, we found the upregulation of several FGFs, including FGF7. To examine the intracellular pathways, we then analyzed GDNF-dependent and GDNF-independent budding in the isolated WD culture. In both conditions, Akt activation was found to be important; however, whereas this occurred through PI3-kinase in GDNF-dependent budding, in the case of GDNF-independent budding, Akt activation was apparently via a PI3-kinase independent mechanism. Jnk signaling and the AP-1 transcription factor complex were also implicated in GDNF-independent budding. FosB, a binding partner of c-Jun in the formation of AP-1, was the most highly upregulated gene in the ret knockout kidney (in which budding had still occurred), and we found that its siRNA-mediated knockdown in isolated WDs also blocked GDNF-independent budding. Taken together with the finding that inhibition of Jnk signaling does not block Akt activation/phosphorylation in GDNF-independent budding, the data support necessary roles for both FosB/Jun/AP-1 signaling and PI3-kinase-independent activation of Akt in GDNF-independent budding. A model is proposed for signaling events that involve Akt and JNK working to regulate GDNF-independent WD budding. PMID:24143282

  17. GDNF-independent ureteric budding: role of PI3K-independent activation of AKT and FOSB/JUN/AP-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Tee, James B; Choi, Yohan; Dnyanmote, Ankur; Decambre, Marvalyn; Ito, Chiharu; Bush, Kevin T; Nigam, Sanjay K

    2013-01-01

    A significant fraction of mice deficient in either glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) or its co-receptors (Gfrα1, Ret), undergoes ureteric bud (UB) outgrowth leading to the formation of a rudimentary kidney. Previous studies using the isolated Wolffian duct (WD) culture indicate that activation of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor signaling, together with suppression of BMP/Activin signaling, is critical for GDNF-independent WD budding (Maeshima et al., 2007). By expression analysis of embryonic kidney from Ret((-/-)) mice, we found the upregulation of several FGFs, including FGF7. To examine the intracellular pathways, we then analyzed GDNF-dependent and GDNF-independent budding in the isolated WD culture. In both conditions, Akt activation was found to be important; however, whereas this occurred through PI3-kinase in GDNF-dependent budding, in the case of GDNF-independent budding, Akt activation was apparently via a PI3-kinase independent mechanism. Jnk signaling and the AP-1 transcription factor complex were also implicated in GDNF-independent budding. FosB, a binding partner of c-Jun in the formation of AP-1, was the most highly upregulated gene in the ret knockout kidney (in which budding had still occurred), and we found that its siRNA-mediated knockdown in isolated WDs also blocked GDNF-independent budding. Taken together with the finding that inhibition of Jnk signaling does not block Akt activation/phosphorylation in GDNF-independent budding, the data support necessary roles for both FosB/Jun/AP-1 signaling and PI3-kinase-independent activation of Akt in GDNF-independent budding. A model is proposed for signaling events that involve Akt and JNK working to regulate GDNF-independent WD budding.

  18. The GDNF Target Vsnl1 Marks the Ureteric Tip

    PubMed Central

    Ola, Roxana; Jakobson, Madis; Kvist, Jouni; Perälä, Nina; Kuure, Satu; Braunewell, Karl-Heinz; Bridgewater, Darren; Rosenblum, Norman D.; Chilov, Dmitri; Immonen, Tiina; Sainio, Kirsi

    2011-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is indispensable for ureteric budding and branching. If applied exogenously, GDNF promotes ectopic ureteric buds from the Wolffian duct. Although several downstream effectors of GDNF are known, the identification of early response genes is incomplete. Here, microarray screening detected several GDNF-regulated genes in the Wolffian duct, including Visinin like 1 (Vsnl1), which encodes a neuronal calcium-sensor protein. We observed renal Vsnl1 expression exclusively in the ureteric epithelium, but not in Gdnf-null kidneys. In the tissue culture of Gdnf-deficient kidney primordium, exogenous GDNF and alternative bud inducers (FGF7 and follistatin) restored Vsnl1 expression. Hence, Vsnl1 characterizes the tip of the ureteric bud epithelium regardless of the inducer. In the tips, Vsnl1 showed a mosaic expression pattern that was mutually exclusive with β-catenin transcriptional activation. Vsnl1 was downregulated in both β-catenin-stabilized and β-catenin-deficient kidneys. Moreover, in a mouse collecting duct cell line, Vsnl1 compromised β-catenin stability, suggesting a counteracting relationship between Vsnl1 and β-catenin. In summary, Vsnl1 marks ureteric bud tips in embryonic kidneys, and its mosaic pattern demonstrates a heterogeneity of cell types that may be critical for normal ureteric branching. PMID:21289216

  19. The GDNF target Vsnl1 marks the ureteric tip.

    PubMed

    Ola, Roxana; Jakobson, Madis; Kvist, Jouni; Perälä, Nina; Kuure, Satu; Braunewell, Karl-Heinz; Bridgewater, Darren; Rosenblum, Norman D; Chilov, Dmitri; Immonen, Tiina; Sainio, Kirsi; Sariola, Hannu

    2011-02-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is indispensable for ureteric budding and branching. If applied exogenously, GDNF promotes ectopic ureteric buds from the Wolffian duct. Although several downstream effectors of GDNF are known, the identification of early response genes is incomplete. Here, microarray screening detected several GDNF-regulated genes in the Wolffian duct, including Visinin like 1 (Vsnl1), which encodes a neuronal calcium-sensor protein. We observed renal Vsnl1 expression exclusively in the ureteric epithelium, but not in Gdnf-null kidneys. In the tissue culture of Gdnf-deficient kidney primordium, exogenous GDNF and alternative bud inducers (FGF7 and follistatin) restored Vsnl1 expression. Hence, Vsnl1 characterizes the tip of the ureteric bud epithelium regardless of the inducer. In the tips, Vsnl1 showed a mosaic expression pattern that was mutually exclusive with β-catenin transcriptional activation. Vsnl1 was downregulated in both β-catenin-stabilized and β-catenin-deficient kidneys. Moreover, in a mouse collecting duct cell line, Vsnl1 compromised β-catenin stability, suggesting a counteracting relationship between Vsnl1 and β-catenin. In summary, Vsnl1 marks ureteric bud tips in embryonic kidneys, and its mosaic pattern demonstrates a heterogeneity of cell types that may be critical for normal ureteric branching.

  20. Oriented cell motility and division underlie early limb bud morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wyngaarden, Laurie A; Vogeli, Kevin M; Ciruna, Brian G; Wells, Mathew; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; Hopyan, Sevan

    2010-08-01

    The vertebrate limb bud arises from lateral plate mesoderm and its overlying ectoderm. Despite progress regarding the genetic requirements for limb development, morphogenetic mechanisms that generate early outgrowth remain relatively undefined. We show by live imaging and lineage tracing in different vertebrate models that the lateral plate contributes mesoderm to the early limb bud through directional cell movement. The direction of cell motion, longitudinal cell axes and bias in cell division planes lie largely parallel to one another along the rostrocaudal (head-tail) axis in lateral plate mesoderm. Transition of these parameters from a rostrocaudal to a mediolateral (outward from the body wall) orientation accompanies early limb bud outgrowth. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Wnt5a acts as a chemoattractant in the emerging limb bud where it contributes to the establishment of cell polarity that is likely to underlie the oriented cell behaviours.

  1. Histological and Molecular Characterization of Grape Early Ripening Bud Mutant.

    PubMed

    Guo, Da-Long; Yu, Yi-He; Xi, Fei-Fei; Shi, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Guo-Hai

    2016-01-01

    An early ripening bud mutant was analyzed based on the histological, SSR, and methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) analysis and a layer-specific approach was used to investigate the differentiation between the bud mutant and its parent. The results showed that the thickness of leaf spongy tissue of mutant (MT) is larger than that of wild type (WT) and the differences are significant. The mean size of cell layer L2 was increased in the mutant and the difference is significant. The genetic background of bud mutant revealed by SSR analysis is highly uniform to its parent; just the variations from VVS2 SSR marker were detected in MT. The total methylation ratio of MT is lower than that of the corresponding WT. The outside methylation ratio in MT is much less than that in WT; the average inner methylation ratio in MT is larger than that in WT. The early ripening bud mutant has certain proportion demethylation in cell layer L2. All the results suggested that cell layer L2 of the early ripening bud mutant has changed from the WT. This study provided the basis for a better understanding of the characteristic features of the early ripening bud mutant in grape.

  2. Histological and Molecular Characterization of Grape Early Ripening Bud Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yi-He; Xi, Fei-Fei; Shi, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Guo-Hai

    2016-01-01

    An early ripening bud mutant was analyzed based on the histological, SSR, and methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) analysis and a layer-specific approach was used to investigate the differentiation between the bud mutant and its parent. The results showed that the thickness of leaf spongy tissue of mutant (MT) is larger than that of wild type (WT) and the differences are significant. The mean size of cell layer L2 was increased in the mutant and the difference is significant. The genetic background of bud mutant revealed by SSR analysis is highly uniform to its parent; just the variations from VVS2 SSR marker were detected in MT. The total methylation ratio of MT is lower than that of the corresponding WT. The outside methylation ratio in MT is much less than that in WT; the average inner methylation ratio in MT is larger than that in WT. The early ripening bud mutant has certain proportion demethylation in cell layer L2. All the results suggested that cell layer L2 of the early ripening bud mutant has changed from the WT. This study provided the basis for a better understanding of the characteristic features of the early ripening bud mutant in grape. PMID:27610363

  3. Overexpression of Robo2 causes defects in the recruitment of metanephric mesenchymal cells and ureteric bud branching morphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Jiayao; Li, Qinggang; Xie, Yuansheng; Zhang, Xueguang; Cui, Shaoyuan; Shi, Suozhu; Chen, Xiangmei

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of Robo2 caused reduced UB branching and glomerular number. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fewer MM cells surrounding the UB after overexpression of Robo2 in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No abnormal Epithelial Morphology of UB or apoptosis of mm cells in the kidney. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of Robo2 affected MM cells migration and caused UB deficit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reduced glomerular number can also be caused by fewer MM cells. -- Abstract: Roundabout 2 (Robo2) is a member of the membrane protein receptor family. The chemorepulsive effect of Slit2-Robo2 signaling plays vital roles in nervous system development and neuron migration. Slit2-Robo2 signaling is also important for maintaining the normal morphogenesis of the kidney and urinary collecting system, especially for the branching of the ureteric bud (UB) at the proper site. Slit2 or Robo2 mouse mutants exhibit multilobular kidneys, multiple ureters, and dilatation of the ureter, renal pelvis, and collecting duct system, which lead to vesicoureteral reflux. To understand the effect of Robo2 on kidney development, we used microinjection and electroporation to overexpress GFP-Robo2 in an in vitro embryonic kidney model. Our results show reduced UB branching and decreased glomerular number after in vitro Robo2 overexpression in the embryonic kidneys. We found fewer metanephric mesenchymal (MM) cells surrounding the UB but no abnormal morphology in the branching epithelial UB. Meanwhile, no significant change in MM proliferation or apoptosis was observed. These findings indicate that Robo2 is involved in the development of embryonic kidneys and that the normal expression of Robo2 can help maintain proper UB branching and glomerular morphogenesis. Overexpression of Robo2 leads to reduced UB branching caused by fewer surrounding MM cells, but MM cell apoptosis is not involved in this effect. Our study demonstrates that

  4. Early epithelial signaling center governs tooth budding morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Thesleff, Irma

    2016-01-01

    During organogenesis, cell fate specification and patterning are regulated by signaling centers, specialized clusters of morphogen-expressing cells. In many organs, initiation of development is marked by bud formation, but the cellular mechanisms involved are ill defined. Here, we use the mouse incisor tooth as a model to study budding morphogenesis. We show that a group of nonproliferative epithelial cells emerges in the early tooth primordium and identify these cells as a signaling center. Confocal live imaging of tissue explants revealed that although these cells reorganize dynamically, they do not reenter the cell cycle or contribute to the growing tooth bud. Instead, budding is driven by proliferation of the neighboring cells. We demonstrate that the activity of the ectodysplasin/Edar/nuclear factor κB pathway is restricted to the signaling center, and its inactivation leads to fewer quiescent cells and a smaller bud. These data functionally link the signaling center size to organ size and imply that the early signaling center is a prerequisite for budding morphogenesis. PMID:27621364

  5. Total ureteral avulsion leading to early nephrectomy as a rare complication of simple lumbar discectomy; a case report

    PubMed Central

    Omidi-Kashani, Farzad; Mousavi, Seyed Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Lumbar discectomy constitutes the most common and probably easiest spine surgery but it is not without complications. The aim of this work is to report a case with total ureteral avulsion during lumbar discectomy due to careless advancement of the pituitary rongeur. Methods: A 59-year-old male presented with refractory left L5-S1 lumbar disc herniation. During the surgery, left sided total ureteral avulsion occurred. Early postoperative progressive abdominal pain was the main clue for further investigation and diagnostic work-up. Results: Abdominal ultrasonography, intravenous pyelography, and abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) detected a left ureteral injury. Although the injury was detected early, ureteral repair or renal autotransplantation was not possible and nephrectomy was finally indicated, due to a significant ureteral loss. Discussion: Careful use of discectomy instruments, avoidance of excessive advancement of pituitary rongeurs (more than 3 cm), and thorough knowledge of the relevant anatomy are critical in preventing ureteral injury. PMID:27163085

  6. Endourological treatment of bilateral ureteral stones in bilateral ureteral duplication with right ureterocele

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Volkan; Aydogdu, Ozgu; Yonguc, Tarık; Bozkurt, Ibrahim Halil; Polat, Salih; Basmaci, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral collecting system duplication is a very rare abnormality, including the splitting of the ureteric bud. Complete ureteral duplication with two separate openings in the urinary bladder is also extremely rare. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first case of bilateral ureteral stones in bilateral duplicated collecting system. PMID:26279727

  7. EARLY BUD-BREAK1 (EBB1) defines a conserved mechanism for control of bud-break in woody perennials

    PubMed Central

    Busov, Victor; Carneros, Elena; Yakovlev, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Bud-break is an environmentally and economically important trait in trees, shrubs and vines from temperate latitudes. Poor synchronization of bud-break timing with local climates can lead to frost injuries, susceptibility to pests and pathogens and poor crop yields in fruit trees and vines. The rapid climate changes outpace the adaptive capacities of plants to respond through natural selection. This is particularly true for trees which have long generation cycle and thus the adaptive changes are significantly delayed. Therefore, to devise appropriate breeding and conservation strategies, it is imperative to understand the molecular underpinnings that govern dormancy mechanisms. We have recently identified and characterized the poplar EARLY BUD-BREAK 1 (EBB1) gene. EBB1 is a positive regulator of bud-break and encodes a transcription factor from the AP2/ERF family. Here, using comparative and functional genomics approaches we show that EBB1 function in regulation of bud-break is likely conserved across wide range of woody perennial species with importance to forestry and agriculture. PMID:26317150

  8. EARLY BUD-BREAK1 (EBB1) defines a conserved mechanism for control of bud-break in woody perennials.

    PubMed

    Busov, Victor; Carneros, Elena; Yakovlev, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Bud-break is an environmentally and economically important trait in trees, shrubs and vines from temperate latitudes. Poor synchronization of bud-break timing with local climates can lead to frost injuries, susceptibility to pests and pathogens and poor crop yields in fruit trees and vines. The rapid climate changes outpace the adaptive capacities of plants to respond through natural selection. This is particularly true for trees which have long generation cycle and thus the adaptive changes are significantly delayed. Therefore, to devise appropriate breeding and conservation strategies, it is imperative to understand the molecular underpinnings that govern dormancy mechanisms. We have recently identified and characterized the poplar EARLY BUD-BREAK 1 (EBB1) gene. EBB1 is a positive regulator of bud-break and encodes a transcription factor from the AP2/ERF family. Here, using comparative and functional genomics approaches we show that EBB1 function in regulation of bud-break is likely conserved across wide range of woody perennial species with importance to forestry and agriculture.

  9. Sucrose is an early modulator of the key hormonal mechanisms controlling bud outgrowth in Rosa hybrida

    PubMed Central

    Barbier, François; Péron, Thomas; Lecerf, Marion; Perez-Garcia, Maria-Dolores; Barrière, Quentin; Rolčík, Jakub; Boutet-Mercey, Stéphanie; Citerne, Sylvie; Lemoine, Remi; Porcheron, Benoît; Roman, Hanaé; Leduc, Nathalie; Le Gourrierec, José; Bertheloot, Jessica; Sakr, Soulaiman

    2015-01-01

    Sugar has only recently been identified as a key player in triggering bud outgrowth, while hormonal control of bud outgrowth is already well established. To get a better understanding of sugar control, the present study investigated how sugar availability modulates the hormonal network during bud outgrowth in Rosa hybrida. Other plant models, for which mutants are available, were used when necessary. Buds were grown in vitro to manipulate available sugars. The temporal patterns of the hormonal regulatory network were assessed in parallel with bud outgrowth dynamics. Sucrose determined bud entrance into sustained growth in a concentration-dependent manner. Sustained growth was accompanied by sustained auxin production in buds, and sustained auxin export in a DR5::GUS-expressing pea line. Several events occurred ahead of sucrose-stimulated bud outgrowth. Sucrose upregulated early auxin synthesis genes (RhTAR1, RhYUC1) and the auxin efflux carrier gene RhPIN1, and promoted PIN1 abundance at the plasma membrane in a pPIN1::PIN1-GFP-expressing tomato line. Sucrose downregulated both RwMAX2, involved in the strigolactone-transduction pathway, and RhBRC1, a repressor of branching, at an early stage. The presence of sucrose also increased stem cytokinin content, but sucrose-promoted bud outgrowth was not related to that pathway. In these processes, several non-metabolizable sucrose analogues induced sustained bud outgrowth in R. hybrida, Pisum sativum, and Arabidopsis thaliana, suggesting that sucrose was involved in a signalling pathway. In conclusion, we identified potential hormonal candidates for bud outgrowth control by sugar. They are central to future investigations aimed at disentangling the processes that underlie regulation of bud outgrowth by sugar. PMID:25873679

  10. Sucrose is an early modulator of the key hormonal mechanisms controlling bud outgrowth in Rosa hybrida.

    PubMed

    Barbier, François; Péron, Thomas; Lecerf, Marion; Perez-Garcia, Maria-Dolores; Barrière, Quentin; Rolčík, Jakub; Boutet-Mercey, Stéphanie; Citerne, Sylvie; Lemoine, Remi; Porcheron, Benoît; Roman, Hanaé; Leduc, Nathalie; Le Gourrierec, José; Bertheloot, Jessica; Sakr, Soulaiman

    2015-05-01

    Sugar has only recently been identified as a key player in triggering bud outgrowth, while hormonal control of bud outgrowth is already well established. To get a better understanding of sugar control, the present study investigated how sugar availability modulates the hormonal network during bud outgrowth in Rosa hybrida. Other plant models, for which mutants are available, were used when necessary. Buds were grown in vitro to manipulate available sugars. The temporal patterns of the hormonal regulatory network were assessed in parallel with bud outgrowth dynamics. Sucrose determined bud entrance into sustained growth in a concentration-dependent manner. Sustained growth was accompanied by sustained auxin production in buds, and sustained auxin export in a DR5::GUS-expressing pea line. Several events occurred ahead of sucrose-stimulated bud outgrowth. Sucrose upregulated early auxin synthesis genes (RhTAR1, RhYUC1) and the auxin efflux carrier gene RhPIN1, and promoted PIN1 abundance at the plasma membrane in a pPIN1::PIN1-GFP-expressing tomato line. Sucrose downregulated both RwMAX2, involved in the strigolactone-transduction pathway, and RhBRC1, a repressor of branching, at an early stage. The presence of sucrose also increased stem cytokinin content, but sucrose-promoted bud outgrowth was not related to that pathway. In these processes, several non-metabolizable sucrose analogues induced sustained bud outgrowth in R. hybrida, Pisum sativum, and Arabidopsis thaliana, suggesting that sucrose was involved in a signalling pathway. In conclusion, we identified potential hormonal candidates for bud outgrowth control by sugar. They are central to future investigations aimed at disentangling the processes that underlie regulation of bud outgrowth by sugar. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  11. Synchronisms between bud and cambium phenology in black spruce: early-flushing provenances exhibit early xylem formation.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Magali; Rossi, Sergio; Isabel, Nathalie

    2017-03-03

    Bud and cambial phenology represent the adaptation of species to the local environment that allows the growing season to be maximized while minimizing the risk of frost for the developing tissues. The temporal relationship between the apical and radial meristems can help in the understanding of tree growth as a whole process. The aim of this study was to compare cambial phenology in black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.) provenances classified as early and late bud flushing. The different phases of cambial phenology were assessed on wood microcores sampled weekly from April to October in 2014 and 2015 from 61 trees growing in a provenance trial in Quebec, Canada. Trees showing an early bud flush also exhibited early reactivation of xylem differentiation, although an average difference of 12 days for buds corresponded to small although significant differences of 4 days for xylem. Provenances with early bud flush had an early bud set and completed xylem formation earlier than late bud flush provenances. No significant difference in the period of xylem formation and total growth was observed between the flushing classes. Our results demonstrate that the ecotype differentiation of black spruce provenances represented by the phenological adaptation of buds to the local climate corresponds to specific growth dynamics of the xylem.

  12. Tumor Budding Is Independently Predictive for Lymph Node Involvement in Early Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gulluoglu, Mine; Yegen, Gulcin; Ozluk, Yasemin; Keskin, Metin; Dogan, Serap; Gundogdu, Gökçen; Onder, Semen; Balik, Emre

    2015-08-01

    The most important prognostic factor for early gastric cancer (EGC) is the lymph node status. It is important to predict early lesions without lymph node metastasis (LNM) before proceeding to radical surgery in locally excised lesions. Tumor budding is a feature known to be related to aggressive tumor behavior in several solid tumors. We aimed to assess the predictive value of tumor budding for LNM in pT1a and pT1b gastric cancer. We retrospectively investigated radical gastrectomy specimens for of 126 EGC patients and assess the possible relation between the clinicopathologic features, including age, gender, tumor location, tumor size, macroscopic tumor type, histologic differentiation, depth and width of submucosal invasion, lymphovascular invasion, and tumor budding with lymph node involvement. Among the 126 EGCs, 38 were stages as pT1a and 88 as pT1b. LNM rate in pT1a tumors was 13% whereas it was 33% in pT1b tumors. Tumor budding was the only factor significantly and independently related to LNM in pT1a patients. Female gender and tumor budding were found to be independent risk factors in pT1b group. Other clinicopathologic features were not related to LNM. Based on these results, we suggest that budding is a promising parameter to assess for prediction of LNM in EGC removed by endoscopic surgery, and to decide on the appropriate surgical approach. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Prognostic Value of Tumor Budding in Early-Stage Cervical Adenocarcinomas

    PubMed

    Satabongkoch, Nopporn; Khunamornpong, Surapan; Pongsuvareeyakul, Tip; Settakorn, Jongkolnee; Sukpan, Kornkanok; Soongkhaw, Aungsumalee; intaraphet, Suthida; Suprasert, Prapaporn; Siriaunkgul, Sumalee

    2017-06-25

    Background: Tumor budding has recently been reported as an independent adverse prognostic factor for colorectal adenocarcinomas and other types of carcinoma in the digestive tract. This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of tumor budding in patients with early-stage cervical adenocarcinomas and any associations with other clinical and pathological features. Methods: Histological slides of patients with early-stage (IB-IIA) usual-type endocervical adenocarcinoma who underwent radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection, without preoperative chemotherapy, between January 2006 and December 2012 were reviewed. Tumor budding was evaluated in routinely-stained sections and defined as detached single cells or clusters of fewer than 5 cells in a tumor invasive front and was stratified based on the number of bud counts in 10-high-power fields as low (<15 buds) and high (≥15 buds). Correlations between tumor bud count and other clinical and pathological variables including follow-up outcomes were assessed. Results: Of 129 patients, a high tumor bud count was observed in 15 (11.6%), positively associated with histologic grade 3 (p<0.001), invasive pattern C (Silva System) (p=0.004), lymph node metastasis (p=0.008), stage IB2-IIA (p=0.016), and tumor size >2 cm (p=0.036). Kaplan-Meyer analysis showed a significant decrease in both disease-free survival and cancer-specific survival for patients with a high tumor bud count (p=0.027 and 0.031, respectively). On multivariate analysis, histologic grade 3 was the only independent predictor for decreased disease-free survival (p=0.004) and cancer-specific survival (p=0.003). Conclusions: A high tumor budding count based on assessment of routinely-stained sections was found to be associated with decreased disease-free and cancer-specific survival in patients with early-stage cervical adenocarcinomas. However, it was not found to be an independent prognostic predictor in this study. Creative Commons Attribution

  14. High-Grade Tumor Budding Stratifies Early-Stage Cervical Cancer with Recurrence Risk

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xia; Guo, Shuang; Wang, Zehua

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study investigated prognostic significance of tumor budding in early-stage cervical cancer (ESCC) following radical surgery and its contribution to improve the stratification of patients with recurrence risk. Methods The archival medical records and H&E-stained slides of 643 patients with IA2-IIA stage cervical cancer who underwent radical surgery were retrospectively reviewed. Clinicopathological parameters were noted, and tumor buds were counted using immunohistochemistry for each case. The prognostic significance of tumor budding was analyzed. Prediction models that comprised tumor budding were established, and the performance was compared between the novel models and classic criteria via log-rank test and receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results Tumors with high-grade tumor budding (HTB) exhibited a substantially increased risk of recurrence (hazard ratio = 4.287, P < 0.001). Nine predictive models for recurrence were established, in which HTB was combined with recognized risk factors. The model using of at least two risk factors of HTB, tumor size ≥ 4 cm, deep stromal invasion of outer 1/3, and lymphovascular space invasion to stratify patients with an intermediate risk was most predictive of recurrence compared with the classic criteria. Conclusions Tumor budding is an independent, unfavorable, prognostic factor for ESCC patients following radical surgery and holds promise for improved recurrence risk stratification. PMID:27861522

  15. High-Grade Tumor Budding Stratifies Early-Stage Cervical Cancer with Recurrence Risk.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bangxing; Cai, Jing; Xu, Xia; Guo, Shuang; Wang, Zehua

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated prognostic significance of tumor budding in early-stage cervical cancer (ESCC) following radical surgery and its contribution to improve the stratification of patients with recurrence risk. The archival medical records and H&E-stained slides of 643 patients with IA2-IIA stage cervical cancer who underwent radical surgery were retrospectively reviewed. Clinicopathological parameters were noted, and tumor buds were counted using immunohistochemistry for each case. The prognostic significance of tumor budding was analyzed. Prediction models that comprised tumor budding were established, and the performance was compared between the novel models and classic criteria via log-rank test and receiver operating characteristic analysis. Tumors with high-grade tumor budding (HTB) exhibited a substantially increased risk of recurrence (hazard ratio = 4.287, P < 0.001). Nine predictive models for recurrence were established, in which HTB was combined with recognized risk factors. The model using of at least two risk factors of HTB, tumor size ≥ 4 cm, deep stromal invasion of outer 1/3, and lymphovascular space invasion to stratify patients with an intermediate risk was most predictive of recurrence compared with the classic criteria. Tumor budding is an independent, unfavorable, prognostic factor for ESCC patients following radical surgery and holds promise for improved recurrence risk stratification.

  16. Involvement of EARLY BUD-BREAK, an AP2/ERF Transcription Factor Gene, in Bud Break in Japanese Pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai) Lateral Flower Buds: Expression, Histone Modifications and Possible Target Genes.

    PubMed

    Anh Tuan, Pham; Bai, Songling; Saito, Takanori; Imai, Tsuyoshi; Ito, Akiko; Moriguchi, Takaya

    2016-05-01

    In the Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai) 'Kosui', three developmental stages of lateral flower buds have been proposed to occur during ecodormancy to the flowering phase, i.e. rapid enlargement, sprouting and flowering. Here, we report an APETALA2/ethylene-responsive factor (AP2/ERF) transcription factor gene, named pear EARLY BUD-BREAK (PpEBB), which was highly expressed during the rapid enlargement stage occurring prior to the onset of bud break in flower buds. Gene expression analysis revealed that PpEBB expression was dramatically increased during the rapid enlargement stage in three successive growing seasons. PpEBB transcript levels peaked 1 week prior to onset of bud break in 'Kosui' potted plants treated with hydrogen cyanamide or water under forcing conditions. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative PCR showed that higher levels of active histone modifications (trimethylation of the histone H3 tail at Lys4) in the 5'-upstream and start codon regions of the PpEBB gene were associated with the induced expression level of PpEBB during the rapid enlargement stage. In addition, we provide evidence that PpEBB may interact with and regulate pear four D-type cyclin (PpCYCD3) genes during bud break in 'Kosui' lateral flower buds. PpEBB significantly increased the promoter activities of four PpCYCD3 genes in a dual-luciferase assay using tobacco leaves. Taken together, our findings uncovered aspects of the bud break regulatory mechanism in the Japanese pear and provided further evidence that the EBB family plays an important role in bud break in perennial plants.

  17. HAND2 Targets Define a Network of Transcriptional Regulators that Compartmentalize the Early Limb Bud Mesenchyme

    DOE PAGES

    Osterwalder, Marco; Speziale, Dario; Shoukry, Malak; ...

    2014-11-10

    The genetic networks that govern vertebrate development are well studied, but how the interactions of trans-acting factors with cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) are integrated into spatiotemporal regulation of gene expression is not clear. The transcriptional regulator HAND2 is required during limb, heart, and branchial arch development. Here, we identify the genomic regions enriched in HAND2 chromatin complexes from mouse embryos and limb buds. Then we analyze the HAND2 target CRMs in the genomic landscapes encoding transcriptional regulators required in early limb buds. HAND2 controls the expression of genes functioning in the proximal limb bud and orchestrates the establishment of anterior andmore » posterior polarity of the nascent limb bud mesenchyme by impacting Gli3 and Tbx3 expression. TBX3 is required downstream of HAND2 to refine the posterior Gli3 expression boundary. In conclusion, our analysis uncovers the transcriptional circuits that function in establishing distinct mesenchymal compartments downstream of HAND2 and upstream of SHH signaling.« less

  18. HAND2 Targets Define a Network of Transcriptional Regulators that Compartmentalize the Early Limb Bud Mesenchyme

    PubMed Central

    Osterwalder, Marco; Speziale, Dario; Shoukry, Malak; Mohan, Rajiv; Ivanek, Robert; Kohler, Manuel; Beisel, Christian; Wen, Xiaohui; Scales, Suzie J.; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Visel, Axel; Lopez-Rios, Javier; Zeller, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Summary The genetic networks that govern vertebrate development are well studied, but how the interactions of trans-acting factors with cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) are integrated into spatio-temporal regulation of gene expression is not clear. The transcriptional regulator HAND2 is required during limb, heart and branchial arch development. Here, we identify the genomic regions enriched in HAND2 chromatin complexes from mouse embryos and limb buds. Then, we analyze the HAND2 target CRMs in the genomic landscapes encoding transcriptional regulators required in early limb buds. HAND2 controls the expression of genes functioning in the proximal limb bud and orchestrates the establishment of anterior and posterior polarity of the nascent limb bud mesenchyme by impacting on Gli3 and Tbx3 expression. TBX3 is required downstream of HAND2 to refine the posterior Gli3 expression boundary. Our analysis uncovers the transcriptional circuits that function in establishing distinct mesenchymal compartments downstream of HAND2 and upstream of SHH signaling. PMID:25453830

  19. Proteomic analysis of 'Zaosu' pear (Pyrus bretschneideri Rehd.) and its early-maturing bud sport.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueting; Zhai, Rui; Feng, Wenting; Zhang, Shiwei; Wang, Zhigang; Qiu, Zonghao; Zhang, Junke; Ma, Fengwang; Xu, Lingfei

    2014-07-01

    Maturation of fruits involves a series of physiological, biochemical, and organoleptic changes that eventually make fleshy fruits attractive, palatable, and nutritional. In order to understand the mature mechanism of the early-maturing bud sport of 'Zaosu' pear, we analyzed the differences of proteome expression between the both pears in different mature stages by the methods of a combination of two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. Seventy-five differential expressed protein spots (p<0.05) were obtained between 'Zaosu' pear and its early-maturing bud sport, but only sixty-eight were demonstratively identified in the database of NCBI and uniprot. The majority of proteins were linked to metabolism, energy, stress response/defense and cell structure. Additionally, our data confirmed an increase of proteins related to cell-wall modification, oxidative stress and pentose phosphate metabolism and a decrease of proteins related to photosynthesis and glycolysis during the development process of both pears, but all these proteins increased or decreased faster in the early-maturing bud sport. This comparative analysis between both pears showed that these proteins were closely associated with maturation and could provide more detailed characteristics of the maturation process of both pears.

  20. Percutaneous Balloon Dilatation for the Treatment of Early and Late Ureteral Strictures After Renal Transplantation: Long-Term Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Bachar, Gil N. Mor, E.; Bartal, G.; Atar, Eli; Goldberg, N.; Belenky, A.

    2004-08-15

    We report our experience with percutaneous balloon dilatation (PBD) for the treatment of ureteral strictures in patients with renal allografts. Of the 422 consecutive patients after renal transplantation in our center 10 patients had ureteral strictures. An additional 11 patients were referred from other centers. The 21 patients included 15 men and 6 women aged 16 to 67 years. Strictures were confirmed by sonography and scintigraphy in all cases. Patients underwent 2 to 4 PBDs at 7-10-day intervals. Clinical success was defined as resolution of the stenosis and hydronephrosis on sequential ultrasound and normalization of creatinine levels. Patients were divided into two groups: those who underwent transplantation more than 3 months previously and those who underwent transplantation less than 3 months previously. PBD was successful in 13 of the 21 patients (62%). There was no statistically significant difference in success rate between the patients with early (n 12) and those with late (n = 9) obstruction: 58.4% and 66%, respectively. No major complications were documented. PBD is a safe and simple tool for treating ureteral strictures and procedure-related morbidity is low. It can serve as an initial treatment in patients with early or late ureteral strictures after renal transplantation.

  1. [Ureteral reimplantation].

    PubMed

    Aboutaieb, R; Rabii, R; Joual, A; el Mrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    1996-01-01

    Various techniques of ureteral reimplantation have been described for different indications. After a retrospective study concerning 109 cases and 178 ureteral reimplantations, the authors propose the selective indications for each technique noting the most important results. The indications for reimplantations are numerous and varied: enterocystoplasty (60 cases), iatrogenic lesion of the pelvic ureter (11 cases), inflammatory stenosis (13 cases), renal transplantation (20 cases), primary megaureter (4 cases), stenosis of reimplantation (2 cases). 5 techniques were used in this study: Leduc-Camey, Leadbetter-Politano, Direct, Manchette, Lich-Gregoir. We conclude that in ureterodigestive reimplantation, Leduc-Camey modified method is indicated. In renal transplantation, Lich-Gregoir is the ideal technique. In primary megaureter, the Leadbetter-Politano procedure possibly with ureter modelling improves the results. In iatrogenic lesions of the pelvic ureter, Leadbetter-Politano technique and possibly a hitch-bladder gives a good result.

  2. Procalcitonin determined at emergency department as na early indicator of progression to septic shock in patient with sepsis associated with ureteral calculi.

    PubMed

    Ko, Young Hwii; Ji, Yoon Seob; Park, Sin-Youl; Kim, Su Jin; Song, Phil Hyun

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the role of initial procalcitonin (PCT) level as an early predictor of septic shock for the patient with sepsis induced by acute pyelonephritis (APN) secondary to ureteral calculi. The data from 49 consecutive patients who met criteria of sepsis due to APN following ureteral stone were collected and divided into two groups: with (n=15) or without (n=34) septic shock. The clinical variables including PCT level for this outcome were retrospectively compared by univariate analysis, followed by multivariable logistic regression model. All subjects had hydronephrosis, and were hospitalized with the mean of 11.8 days (3-42 days). The mean size of the ureteral stones was 7.5mm (3-30mm), and 57% were located in upper ureter. At univariate analysis, patients with septic shock were significantly older, a higher proportion had hypertension, lower platelet count and serum albumin level, higher CRP and PCT level, and higher positive blood culture rate. Multivariate models indicated that lower platelet count and higher PCT level are independent risk factors (p=0.043 and 0.046, respectively). In ROC curve, the AUC was significantly wider in PCT (0.929), compared with the platelet count (0.822, p=0.004). At the cut-off of 0.52ng/mL, the sensitivity and specificity were 86.7% and 85.3%. Our study demonstrated elevated initial PCT levels as an early independente predictor to progress into septic shock in patients with sepsis associated with ureteral calculi.

  3. Procalcitonin determined at emergency department as an early indicator of progression to septic shock in patient with sepsis associated with ureteral calculi

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Young Hwii; Ji, Yoon Seob; Park, Sin-Youl; Kim, Su Jin; Song, Phil Hyun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: To investigate the role of initial procalcitonin (PCT) level as an early predictor of septic shock for the patient with sepsis induced by acute pyelonephritis (APN) secondary to ureteral calculi. Materials and Methods: The data from 49 consecutive patients who met criteria of sepsis due to APN following ureteral stone were collected and divided into two groups: with (n=15) or without (n=34) septic shock. The clinical variables including PCT level for this outcome were retrospectively compared by univariate analysis, followed by multivariable logistic regression model. Results: All subjects had hydronephrosis, and were hospitalized with the mean of 11.8 days (3–42 days). The mean size of the ureteral stones was 7.5mm (3–30mm), and 57% were located in upper ureter. At univariate analysis, patients with septic shock were significantly older, a higher proportion had hypertension, lower platelet count and serum albumin level, higher CRP and PCT level, and higher positive blood culture rate. Multivariate models indicated that lower platelet count and higher PCT level are independent risk factors (p=0.043 and 0.046, respectively). In ROC curve, the AUC was significantly wider in PCT (0.929), compared with the platelet count (0.822, p=0.004). At the cut-off of 0.52ng/mL, the sensitivity and specificity were 86.7% and 85.3%. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated elevated initial PCT levels as an early independent predictor to progress into septic shock in patients with sepsis associated with ureteral calculi. PMID:27256181

  4. EARLY BUD-BREAK 1 (EBB1) is a regulator of release from seasonal dormancy in poplar trees

    PubMed Central

    Yordanov, Yordan S.; Ma, Cathleen; Strauss, Steven H.; Busov, Victor B.

    2014-01-01

    Trees from temperate latitudes transition between growth and dormancy to survive dehydration and freezing stress during winter months. We used activation tagging to isolate a dominant mutation affecting release from dormancy and identified the corresponding gene EARLY BUD-BREAK 1 (EBB1). We demonstrate through positioning of the tag, expression analysis, and retransformation experiments that EBB1 encodes a putative APETALA2/Ethylene responsive factor transcription factor. Transgenic up-regulation of the gene caused early bud-flush, whereas down-regulation delayed bud-break. Native EBB1 expression was highest in actively growing apices, undetectable during the dormancy period, but rapidly increased before bud-break. The EBB1 transcript was localized in the L1/L2 layers of the shoot meristem and leaf primordia. EBB1-overexpressing transgenic plants displayed enlarged shoot meristems, open and poorly differentiated buds, and a higher rate of cell division in the apex. Transcriptome analyses of the EBB1 transgenics identified 971 differentially expressed genes whose expression correlated with the EBB1 expression changes in the transgenic plants. Promoter analysis among the differentially expressed genes for the presence of a canonical EBB1-binding site identified 65 putative target genes, indicative of a broad regulatory context of EBB1 function. Our results suggest that EBB1 has a major and integrative role in reactivation of meristem activity after winter dormancy. PMID:24951507

  5. TROP2 expressed in the trunk of the ureteric duct regulates branching morphogenesis during kidney development.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Yuko; Tanaka, Minoru; Miyajima, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    TROP2, a cell surface protein structurally related to EpCAM, is expressed in various carcinomas, though its function remains largely unknown. We examined the expression of TROP2 and EpCAM in fetal mouse tissues, and found distinct patterns in the ureteric bud of the fetal kidney, which forms a tree-like structure. The tip cells in the ureteric bud proliferate to form branches, whereas the trunk cells differentiate to form a polarized ductal structure. EpCAM was expressed throughout the ureteric bud, whereas TROP2 expression was strongest at the trunk but diminished towards the tips, indicating the distinct cell populations in the ureteric bud. The cells highly expressing TROP2 (TROP2(high)) were negative for Ki67, a proliferating cell marker, and TROP2 and collagen-I were co-localized to the basal membrane of the trunk cells. TROP2(high) cells isolated from the fetal kidney failed to attach and spread on collagen-coated plates. Using MDCK cells, a well-established model for studying the branching morphogenesis of the ureteric bud, TROP2 was shown to inhibit cell spreading and motility on collagen-coated plates, and also branching in collagen-gel cultures, which mimic the ureteric bud's microenvironment. These results together suggest that TROP2 modulates the interaction between the cells and matrix and regulates the formation of the ureteric duct by suppressing branching from the trunk during kidney development.

  6. Laparoscopic ureteroneocystostomy for ureteral injuries after hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Pompeo, Alexandre; Molina, Wilson R; Sehrt, David; Tobias-Machado, Marcos; Mariano Costa, Renato M; Pompeo, Antonio Carlos Lima; Kim, Fernando J

    2013-01-01

    To examine the feasibility of early laparoscopic ureteroneocystostomy for ureteral obstruction due to hysterectomy injury. We retrospectively reviewed a 10-y experience from 2 institutions in patients who underwent early (<30 d) or late (>30 d) laparoscopic ureteroneocystostomy for ureteral injury after hysterectomy. Evaluation of the surgery included the cause of the stricture and intraoperative and postoperative outcomes. A total of 9 patients with distal ureteral injury after hysterectomy were identified. All injuries were identified and treated as early as 21 d after hysterectomy. Seven of 9 patients underwent open hysterectomy, and the remaining patients had vaginal and laparoscopic radical hysterectomy. All ureteroneocystostomy cases were managed laparoscopically without conversion to open surgery and without any intraoperative complications. The Lich-Gregoir reimplantation technique was applied in all patients, and 2 patients required a psoas hitch. The mean operative time was 206.6 min (range, 120-280 min), the mean estimated blood loss was 122.2 cc (range, 25-350 cc), and the mean admission time was 3.3 d (range, 1-7 d). Cystography showed no urine leak when the ureteral stent was removed at 4 to 6 wk after the procedure. Ureteroneocystostomy patency was followed up with cystography at 6 mo and at least 10 y after ureteroneocystostomy. Early laparoscopic ureteral reimplantation may offer an alternative surgical approach to open surgery for the management of distal ureteral injuries, with favorable cosmetic results and recovery time from ureteral obstruction due to hysterectomy injury.

  7. Functions of early (AP-2) and late (AIP1/ALIX) endocytic proteins in equine infectious anemia virus budding.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaoping; Vincent, Olivier; Jin, Jing; Weisz, Ora A; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2005-12-09

    The proline-rich L domains of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and other retroviruses interact with late endocytic proteins during virion assembly and budding. In contrast, the YPDL L domain of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is apparently unique in its reported ability to interact both with the mu2 subunit of the AP-2 adaptor protein complex and with ALG-2-interacting protein 1 (AIP1/Alix) protein factors involved in early and late endosome formation, respectively. To define further the mechanisms by which EIAV adapts vesicle trafficking machinery to facilitate virion production, we have examined the specificity of EIAV p9 binding to endocytic factors and the effects on virion production of alterations in early and late endocytic protein expression. The results of these studies demonstrated that (i) an approximately 300-residue region of AIP1/Alix-(409-715) was sufficient for binding to the EIAV YPDL motif; (ii) overexpression of AIP1/Alix or AP-2 mu2 subunit specifically inhibited YPDL-mediated EIAV budding; (iii) virion budding from a replication-competent EIAV variant with its L domain replaced by the HIV PTAP sequence was inhibited by wild type or mutant mu2 to a level similar to that observed when a dominant-negative mutant of Tsg101 was expressed; and (iv) overexpression or siRNA silencing of AIP1/Alix and AP-2 revealed additive suppression of YPDL-mediated EIAV budding. Taken together, these results indicated that both early and late endocytic proteins facilitate EIAV production mediated by either YPDL or PTAP L domains, suggesting a comprehensive involvement of endocytic factors in retroviral assembly and budding that can be accessed by distinct L domain specificities.

  8. Nlrp3 prevents early renal interstitial edema and vascular permeability in unilateral ureteral obstruction.

    PubMed

    Pulskens, Wilco P; Butter, Loes M; Teske, Gwendoline J; Claessen, Nike; Dessing, Mark C; Flavell, Richard A; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S; Florquin, Sandrine; Leemans, Jaklien C

    2014-01-01

    Progressive renal disease is characterized by tubulo-interstitial injury with ongoing inflammation and fibrosis. The Nlrp3 inflammasome contributes to these pathophysiological processes through its canonical effects in cytokine maturation. Nlrp3 may additionally exert inflammasome-independent effects following tissue injury. Hence, in this study we investigated potential non-canonical effects of Nlrp3 following progressive renal injury by subjecting WT and Nlrp3-deficient (-/-) mice to unilateral ureter obstruction (UUO). Our results revealed a progressive increase of renal Nlrp3 mRNA in WT mice following UUO. The absence of Nlrp3 resulted in enhanced tubular injury and dilatation and an elevated expression of injury biomarker NGAL after UUO. Moreover, interstitial edema was significantly elevated in Nlrp3-/- mice. This could be explained by increased intratubular pressure and an enhanced tubular and vascular permeability. In accordance, renal vascular leakage was elevated in Nlrp3-/- mice that associated with reduced mRNA expression of intercellular junction components. The decreased epithelial barrier function in Nlrp3-/- mice was not associated with increased apoptosis and/or proliferation of renal epithelial cells. Nlrp3 deficiency did not affect renal fibrosis or inflammation. Together, our data reveal a novel non-canonical effect of Nlrp3 in preserving renal integrity and protection against early tubular injury and interstitial edema following progressive renal injury.

  9. Development of flower buds in the Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) from late autumn to early spring.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takanori; Tuan, Pham Anh; Katsumi-Horigane, Akemi; Bai, Songling; Ito, Akiko; Sekiyama, Yasuyo; Ono, Hiroshi; Moriguchi, Takaya

    2015-06-01

    We periodically investigated the lateral flower bud morphology of 1-year shoots of 'Kosui' pears (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai) in terms of dormancy progression, using magnetic resonance imaging. The size of flower buds did not change significantly during endodormancy, but rapid enlargement took place at the end of the ecodormancy stage. To gain insight into the physiological status during this period, we analyzed gene expression related to cell cycle-, cell expansion- and water channel-related genes, namely cyclin (CYC), expansin (EXPA), tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIP) and plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIP). Constant but low expression of pear cyclin genes (PpCYCD3s) was observed in the transition phase from endodormancy to ecodormancy. The expression levels of PpCYCD3s were consistent with few changes in flower bud size, but up-regulated before the sprouting stage. In contrast, the expression of pear expansin and water channel-related genes (PpEXPA2, PpPIP2A, PpPIP2B, PpIδTIP1A and PpIδTIP1B) were low until onset of the rapid enlargement stage of flower buds. However, expression of these genes rapidly increased during sprouting along with a gradual increase of free water content in the floral primordia of buds. Taken together, these results suggest that flower bud size tends to stay constant until the endodormancy phase transition. Rapid enlargement of flower buds observed in March is partly due to the enhancement of the cell cycle. Then, sprouting takes place concomitant with the increase in cell expansion and free water movement.

  10. Overexpression of DEMETER, a DNA demethylase, promotes early apical bud maturation in poplar.

    PubMed

    Conde, Daniel; Moreno-Cortés, Alicia; Dervinis, Christopher; Ramos-Sánchez, José M; Kirst, Matias; Perales, Mariano; González-Melendi, Pablo; Allona, Isabel

    2017-08-15

    The transition from active growth to dormancy is critical for the survival of perennial plants. We identified a DEMETER-like (CsDML) cDNA from a winter-enriched cDNA subtractive library in chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill.), an economically and ecologically important species. Next, we characterized this DNA demethylase and its putative orthologue in the more experimentally tractable hybrid poplar (Populus tremula x alba), under the signals that trigger bud dormancy in trees. We performed phylogenetic and protein sequence analysis, gene expression profiling and 5mC immunodetection studies to evaluate the role of CsDML and its homologue in poplar, PtaDML6. Transgenic hybrid poplars overexpressing CsDML were produced and analyzed. Short days (SD) and cold temperatures induced CsDML and PtaDML6. Overexpression of CsDML accelerated SD-induced bud formation, specifically from stage 1 to 0. Bud acquired a red-brown coloration earlier than wild type (WT) plants, alongside with the up regulation of flavonoid biosynthesis enzymes and accumulation of flavonoids in the SAM and bud scales. Our data shows that the CsDML gene induces bud formation needed for the survival of the apical meristem under the harsh conditions of winter. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Tumour budding evaluated in biopsy specimens is a useful predictor of prognosis in patients with cN0 early stage oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Seki, Mai; Sano, Takaaki; Yokoo, Satoshi; Oyama, Tetsunari

    2017-05-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) prognosis depends upon lymph node metastasis (LNM). We have reported recently that tumour budding is a good predictive factor for LNM in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tongue and floor of the mouth (FOM). Our aim was to evaluate whether tumour budding is a good prognostic factor in OSCC. We examined conventional histopathological assessment and a new factor, tumour budding, in 209 cases of OSCC in incisional biopsy specimens. The relationship of tumour budding with LNM and prognosis was studied. The budding score was evaluated using immunostaining for pan-cytokeratin in all biopsies specimens; the number of budding foci was counted using a ×20 objective lens. Significant factors using univariate analysis (P < 0.05) in association with LNM were the budding score (intermediate or high score ≥3; high score ≥5), tumour grade (2 and 3), tumour depth (≥5 mm), infiltrative pattern (INF), lymphatic invasion and vessel invasion. In multivariate analysis, the budding score, INF and lymphatic invasion were found to be independent risk factors for LNM; in particular, budding score concerning relapse-free survival was statistically significant among patients with T1/2 stage and cN0 cancer using the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test. The assessment of tumour budding is effective in predicting prognosis in cN0 early stage OSCC. In T1/2 stage and cN0 cancer, prophylactic neck dissection to prevent LNM should be considered when the tumour budding score regarding pre-operative biopsy specimens is intermediate or high. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Unique bioactive polyphenolic profile of guava (Psidium guajava) budding leaf tea is related to plant biochemistry of budding leaves in early dawn.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chi-Huang; Hsieh, Chiu-Lan; Wang, Hui-Er; Peng, Chiung-Chi; Chyau, Charng-Cherng; Peng, Robert Y

    2013-03-15

    Guava leaf tea (GLT), exhibiting a diversity of medicinal bioactivities, has become a popularly consumed daily beverage. To improve the product quality, a new process was recommended to the Ser-Tou Farmers' Association (SFA), who began field production in 2005. The new process comprised simplified steps: one bud-two leaves were plucked at 3:00-6:00 am, in the early dawn period, followed by withering at ambient temperature (25-28 °C), rolling at 50 °C for 50-70 min, with or without fermentation, then drying at 45-50 °C for 70-90 min, and finally sorted. The product manufactured by this new process (named herein GLTSF) exhibited higher contents (in mg g(-1), based on dry ethyl acetate fraction/methanolic extract) of polyphenolics (417.9 ± 12.3) and flavonoids (452.5 ± 32.3) containing a compositional profile much simpler than previously found: total quercetins (190.3 ± 9.1), total myricetin (3.3 ± 0.9), total catechins (36.4 ± 5.3), gallic acid (8.8 ± 0.6), ellagic acid (39.1 ± 6.4) and tannins (2.5 ± 9.1). We have successfully developed a new process for manufacturing GLTSF with a unique polyphenolic profile. Such characteristic compositional distribution can be ascribed to the right harvesting hour in the early dawn and appropriate treatment process at low temperature, avoiding direct sunlight. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Tumor budding correlates with occult cervical lymph node metastasis and poor prognosis in clinical early-stage tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xie, Nan; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Xiqiang; Li, Ruyao; Hou, Jinsong; Chen, Xiaohua; Huang, Hongzhang

    2015-04-01

    Tumor budding has been suggested to be a prognostic factor in various human cancers. However, the prognostic value of tumor budding for early-stage (cT1/2N0) tongue squamous cell carcinoma remains inconclusive. This study analyzed the correlation of tumor budding with the clinicopathologic features, and its prognostic significance for cT1/2N0 stage tongue squamous cell carcinoma. One hundred and ninety-five patients with T1/2 stage tongue squamous cell carcinoma enrolled in the retrospective study. Tumor invasive depth, the intensity of tumor budding, and other clinicopathological features were reviewed. Overall survivals were evaluated by the Kaplan-Meier method. For multivariable analysis, Cox's proportional hazards regression models were performed. The frequency of tumor buds in tongue squamous cell carcinoma is about 85.6% in this study. The intensity of tumor budding showed strong correlations with occult lymph node metastasis (P < 0.05), local relapse (P < 0.01), worse invasive pattern (P < 0.01), and invasive depth (P < 0.05). The invasive depth was significantly associated with T classification (P < 0.01) and lymph node metastasis (P < 0.01). And both high intensity of tumor budding and deeper invasive depth correlated with reduced overall survival. Cox's regression models proved tumor budding to be an independent prognostic factor in clinical early-stage tongue squamous cell carcinoma. Tumor local relapses were also a predictor of tongue squamous cell carcinoma progression. Tumor budding is a frequent event in tongue squamous cell carcinoma. It independently predicted prognosis of patients with T1/2 stage tongue squamous cell carcinoma and may be used for routing pathological diagnosis and the decision of elective lymph node dissection. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Ureteral perigraft fistula.

    PubMed

    Deem, Samuel; Stone, Patrick; Schlarb, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Ureteral injury following aortic surgery occurs in less than 1% of all cases. Ureteral-arterial fistulae rarely occur in the current literature and only in case reports. This case involves a suspected ureteral aortic graft fistula presenting with acute hematuria with distant history of redo aortic bifemoral graft for aortoenteric fistula. Cystoscopy with retrograde pyelogram was performed and demonstrated what appeared to be a fistula between the left ureter and the aortic graft with a proximal hydroureter and hydronephrosis. After a detailed review of the films, we diagnosed a more benign ureteral perigraft fistula. Multidisciplinary management including urology and vascular surgery suggested conservative management. However, the patient later required more definitive therapy for his illness. This case demonstrates a ureteral perigraft fistula and displays how it appears radiographically. Here we present our experience with this new radiological diagnosis.

  15. Predictive Significance of Tumor Depth and Budding for Late Lymph Node Metastases in Patients with Clinical N0 Early Oral Tongue Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hori, Yukiko; Kubota, Akira; Yokose, Tomoyuki; Furukawa, Madoka; Matsushita, Takeshi; Takita, Morihito; Mitsunaga, Sachiyo; Mizoguchi, Nobutaka; Nonaka, Tetsuo; Nakayama, Yuko; Oridate, Nobuhiko

    2017-04-03

    In clinical N0 early oral tongue carcinoma, treatment of occult lymph node metastasis is controversial. The purpose of this study was to assess the histopathological risk factors for predicting late lymph node metastasis in early oral tongue carcinoma. We retrospectively reviewed 48 patients with early oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma. Associations between the histopathological factors (depth of tumor, differentiation, blood vessel invasion, lymphatic invasion, and tumor budding) and late lymph metastasis were analyzed. Although the univariate analysis identified blood vessel invasion, lymphatic invasion, and high-grade tumor budding as predictive factors for neck recurrence (p < 0.001), the Cox proportional hazards model identified high-grade tumor budding as an independent predictive factor (p < 0.01). The combination of a tumor depth ≥ 3 mm and high-grade tumor budding yielded high diagnostic accuracy. Tumor depth and budding grade were identified as histopathological risk factors for late neck recurrence in clinical N0 early oral tongue carcinoma.

  16. Studies on the mechanism of retinoid-induced pattern duplications in the early chick limb bud: temporal and spatial aspects

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid causes striking digit pattern changes when it is continuously released from a bead implanted in the anterior margin of an early chick wing bud. In addition to the normal set of digits (234), extra digits form in a mirror-symmetrical arrangement, creating digit patterns such as a 432234. These retinoic acid-induced pattern duplications closely mimic those found after grafts of polarizing region cells to the same positions with regard to dose-response, timing, and positional effects. To elucidate the mechanism by which retinoic acid induces these pattern duplications, we have studied the temporal and spatial distribution of all-trans-retinoic acid and its potent analogue TTNPB in these limb buds. We find that the induction process is biphasic: there is an 8-h lag phase followed by a 6-h duplication phase, during which additional digits are irreversibly specified in the sequence digit 2, digit 3, digit 4. On average, formation of each digit seems to require between 1 and 2 h. The tissue concentrations, metabolic pattern, and spatial distribution of all- trans-retinoic acid and TTNPB in the limb rapidly reach a steady state, in which the continuous release of the retinoid is balanced by loss from metabolism and blood circulation. Pulse-chase experiments reveal that the half-time of clearance from the bud is 20 min for all-trans- retinoic acid and 80 min for TTNPB. Manipulations that change the experimentally induced steep concentration gradient of TTNPB suggest that a graded distribution of retinoid concentrations across the limb is required during the duplication phase to induce changes in the digit pattern. The extensive similarities between results obtained with retinoids and with polarizing region grafts raise the possibility that retinoic acid serves as a natural "morphogen" in the limb. PMID:4055899

  17. Limb development in a primitive crustacean, Triops longicaudatus: subdivision of the early limb bud gives rise to multibranched limbs.

    PubMed

    Williams, T A; Müller, G B

    1996-11-01

    Recent advances in developmental genetics of Drosophila have uncovered some of the key molecules involved in the positioning and outgrowth of the leg primordia. Although expression patterns of these molecules have been analyzed in several arthropod species, broad comparisons of mechanisms of limb development among arthropods remain somewhat speculative since no detailed studies of limb development exist for crustaceans, the postulated sister group of insects. As a basis for such comparisons, we analysed limb development in a primitive branchiopod crustacean, Triops longicaudatus. Adults have a series of similar limbs with eight branches or lobes that project from the main shaft. Phalloidin staining of developing limbs buds shows the distal epithelial ridge of the early limb bud exhibits eight folds that extend in a dorsal ventral (D/V) arc across the body. These initial folds subsequently form the eight lobes of the adult limb. This study demonstrates that, in a primitive crustacean, branched limbs do not arise via sequential splitting. Current models of limb development based on Drosophila do not provide a mechanism for establishing eight branches along the D/V axis of a segment. Although the events that position limbs on a body segment appear to be conserved between insects and crustaceans, mechanisms of limb branching may not.

  18. [Management of ureteral injuries].

    PubMed

    Benoit, L; Spie, R; Favoulet, P; Cheynel, N; Kretz, B; Gouy, S; Dubruille, T; Fraisse, J; Cuisenier, J

    2005-09-01

    Ureteral injury is a rare but potential serious complication that can occur during a variety of general surgical procedures. Knowledge of the course of the ureter is the first step toward preventing ureteral injuries. While some injuries are noticed intraoperatively, most are missed and present later with pain, sepsis, urinary drainage or renal loss. The choice of treatment is based on the location, type and extend of ureteral injury. For injuries recognized during open surgery, when involving the distal 5 cm of the ureter, an antireflux ureterocystostomy such as the Politano-Leadbetter procedure or a vesicopsoas hitch can be performed. For the middle ureter, an ureteroureterostomy is satisfactory and for the proximal ureter, most injuries can be managed by transureteroureterostomy. In complex situations intestinal interposition, autotransplantation or even nephrectomy can be considered. The majority of patients with delayed diagnosed ureteral injuries should be managed by an initial endo-urologic approach.

  19. Bilateral guaifenesin ureteral calculi.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Chris; Schwartz, Bradley F

    2004-01-01

    We report on a patient with bilateral ureteral calculi composed of guaifenesin metabolite as determined by infrared spectroscopy. These stones may be associated with excessive guaifenesin intake related to the current popularity of ephedrine preparations.

  20. Biodegradable Ureteral Stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, Ben H.; Hadaschik, Boris A.; Paterson, Ryan F.; Lange, Dirk

    2008-09-01

    Ureteral stents have been associated with painful symptoms and require a secondary procedure for removal if the suture tether is removed. Biodegradable stents have been attempted in the past, but are no longer used since they resulted in histological inflammation or unpredictable variability in degradation time. This article reviews past degradable materials used in both the prostatic urethra and ureter as well as identifies a new degradable ureteral stent that lasts between 2 to 4 weeks in a porcine model.

  1. Forgotten ureteric stents in renal transplant recipients: three case reports.

    PubMed

    Bardapure, Mallikarjun; Sharma, Ajay; Hammad, Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Ureteric stents are widely used in renal transplantation to minimize the early urological complications. Ureteric stents are removed between two and 12 weeks following trans-plantation, once the vesico-ureteric anastomosis is healed. Ureteric stents are associated with considerable morbidity due to complications such as infection, hematuria, encrustations and migration. Despite the patient having a regular follow-up in the renal transplant clinic, ureteric stents may be overlooked and forgotten. The retained or forgotten ureteric stents may adversely affect renal allograft function and could be potentially life-threatening in immunocompromised transplant recipients with a single transplant kidney. Retrieving these retained ureteric stents could be challenging and may necessitate multimodal urological treatments. We report three cases of forgotten stents in renal transplant recipients for more than four years. These cases emphasize the importance of patient education about the indwelling ureteric stent and possibly providing with a stent card to the patient. Maintaining a stent register, with a possible computer tracking system, is highly recommended to prevent such complications.

  2. FT-IR microscopic mappings of early mineralization in chick limb bud mesenchymal cell cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boskey, A. L.; Camacho, N. P.; Mendelsohn, R.; Doty, S. B.; Binderman, I.

    1992-01-01

    Chick limb bud mesenchymal cells differentiate into chondrocytes and form a cartilaginous matrix in culture. In this study, the mineral formed in different areas within cultures supplemented with 4 mM inorganic phosphate, or 2.5, 5.0, and 10 mM beta-glycerophosphate (beta GP), was characterized by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) microscopy. The relative mineral-to-matrix ratios, and distribution of crystal sizes at specific locations throughout the matrix were measured from day 14 to day 30. The only mineral phase detected was a poorly crystalline apatite. Cultures receiving 4 mM inorganic phosphate had smaller crystals which were less randomly distributed around the cartilage nodules than those in the beta GP-treated cultures. beta GP-induced mineral consisted of larger, more perfect apatite crystals. In cultures receiving 5 or 10 mM beta GP, the relative mineral-to-matrix ratios (calculated from the integrated intensities of the phosphate and amide I bands, respectively) were higher than in the cultures with 4 mM inorganic phosphate or in the in vivo calcified chick cartilage.

  3. FT-IR microscopic mappings of early mineralization in chick limb bud mesenchymal cell cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boskey, A. L.; Camacho, N. P.; Mendelsohn, R.; Doty, S. B.; Binderman, I.

    1992-01-01

    Chick limb bud mesenchymal cells differentiate into chondrocytes and form a cartilaginous matrix in culture. In this study, the mineral formed in different areas within cultures supplemented with 4 mM inorganic phosphate, or 2.5, 5.0, and 10 mM beta-glycerophosphate (beta GP), was characterized by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) microscopy. The relative mineral-to-matrix ratios, and distribution of crystal sizes at specific locations throughout the matrix were measured from day 14 to day 30. The only mineral phase detected was a poorly crystalline apatite. Cultures receiving 4 mM inorganic phosphate had smaller crystals which were less randomly distributed around the cartilage nodules than those in the beta GP-treated cultures. beta GP-induced mineral consisted of larger, more perfect apatite crystals. In cultures receiving 5 or 10 mM beta GP, the relative mineral-to-matrix ratios (calculated from the integrated intensities of the phosphate and amide I bands, respectively) were higher than in the cultures with 4 mM inorganic phosphate or in the in vivo calcified chick cartilage.

  4. Arenavirus Budding

    PubMed Central

    Urata, Shuzo; de la Torre, Juan Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Several arenaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever disease in humans and pose a significant public health concern in their endemic regions. On the other hand, the prototypic arenavirus LCMV is a superb workhorse for the investigation of virus-host interactions and associated disease. The arenavirus small RING finger protein called Z has been shown to be the main driving force of virus budding. The budding activity of Z is mediated by late (L) domain motifs, PT/SAP, and PPXY, located at the C-terminus of Z. This paper will present the current knowledge on arenavirus budding including the diversity of L domain motifs used by different arenaviruses. We will also discuss how improved knowledge of arenavirus budding may facilitate the development of novel antiviral strategies to combat human pathogenic arenaviruses. PMID:22312335

  5. Ureteroscopic removal of forgotten ureteral stent

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Takashi; Ishida, Hiroaki; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Matsuzaki, Junichi

    2012-01-01

    A 69-year-old female had a right ureteral stent placed due to ureteral stricture resulting from cervical cancer in March 2008. The ureteral stent migrated to the ureter and was not exchanged. A new ureteral stent was inserted, and was exchanged every 3 months. The patient was referred to our department to remove the forgotten ureteral stent. In January 2012, her old ureteral stent was removed ureteroscopically, and no ureteral stent encrustation was found. PMID:22707678

  6. Posthysterectomy ureteric injuries: Presentation and outcome of management

    PubMed Central

    Patil, S. B.; Guru, Nilesh; Kundargi, V. S.; Patil, B. S.; Patil, Nikhil; Ranka, Kshitiz

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the presentation and management of posthysterectomy ureteral injuries. Patients and Methods: Fourteen patients with ureteric injuries after hysterectomy for benign diseases were evaluated. The diagnosis was done based on clinical presentation, intravenous urogram, computed tomography, cystoscopy, and retrograde pyelogram (RGP) depending on the clinical situation. Results: Sixteen iatrogenic ureteric injuries in 14 patients over a 2-year period were evaluated. Hysterectomy was the cause of injury in all the cases, 12 abdominal and 2 were vaginal. Two patients presented with anuria, one had ureteric, and bladder injury with hemoperitoneum underwent emergency laparotomy and bilateral ureteral reimplantation. Another patient underwent RGP followed by stenting on the right side, left side unable to put stent so percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) was done followed by antegrade stenting later. Two patients presented with septicemia and pyonephrosis were managed initially with PCN followed by balloon dilatation and JJ stenting. RGP and retrograde stenting was done in seven of the remaining ten patients and ureteric reimplantation in three patients. Conclusion: Patient with ureteric injury should be evaluated and intervened at the earliest. Patients presenting early, within 2 weeks after hysterectomy have higher chances of success with endourological procedures, obviating the need for open surgery. PMID:28216920

  7. Ureteric avulsion caused by lumbar exostosis.

    PubMed

    Miernik, A; Halscheid, C; Frankenschmidt, A

    2011-01-01

    A 72-year-old woman sustained a ureteric avulsion following circulatory collapse at home. Urosonographic imaging revealed hydronephrosis at the left kidney, and abdominal emergency computed tomography showed some fluid around it. Left retrograde pyelography proved ureteral disruption at the level of the ureteropelvic junction (UPJ). Immediate open surgery was performed to restore ureteropelvic continuity. Correct and early diagnosis of UPJ transsection is difficult under emergency service conditions and lack of symptoms. With the rapid increase in the aging population, the presence of degenerative exostoses will increase, and its exclusive pathomechanism and pattern of injury might be seen more frequently in emergency care. Trauma specialists should be aware of this pathology. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Dicer regulates the development of nephrogenic and ureteric compartments in the mammalian kidney

    PubMed Central

    Nagalakshmi, Vidya K.; Ren, Qun; Pugh, Margaret M.; Valerius, M. Todd; McMahon, Andrew P.; Yu, Jing

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a large and growing class of small, non-coding, regulatory RNAs that control gene expression predominantly at the post-transcriptional level. The production of most functional miRNAs depends on the enzymatic activity of Dicer, an RNase III class enzyme. To address the potential action of Dicer-dependent miRNAs in mammalian kidney development, we conditionally ablated Dicer function within cells of nephron lineage and the ureteric bud-derived collecting duct system. Six2Cre-mediated removal of Dicer activity from the progenitors of the nephron epithelium led to elevated apoptosis and premature termination of nephrogenesis. Thus, Dicer action is important for maintaining the viability of this critical self-renewing progenitor pool and, consequently, development of a normal nephron complement. HoxB7Cre-mediated removal of Dicer function from the ureteric bud epithelium led to the development of renal cysts. This was preceded by excessive cell proliferation and apoptosis, and accompanied by disrupted ciliogenesis within the ureteric bud epithelium. Dicer removal also disrupted branching morphogenesis with the phenotype correlating with downregulation of Wnt11 and c-Ret expression at ureteric tips. Thus Dicer, and by inference Dicer-dependent miRNA activity, have distinct regulatory roles within different components of the developing mouse kidney. Furthermore, an understanding of miRNA action may provide new insights into the etiology and pathogenesis of renal cyst-based kidney disease. PMID:20944551

  9. Use of Pediatric Open, Laparoscopic and Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Ureteral Reimplantation in the United States: 2000 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Diana K; Faasse, Mark A; Liu, Dennis B; Gong, Edward M; Lindgren, Bruce W; Johnson, Emilie K

    2016-07-01

    reimplantation is decreasing. Robot-assisted laparoscopic ureteral reimplantation is becoming more prevalent but remains relatively uncommon. Length of stay is shorter for the robotic approach but the costs are higher. Nationally robot-assisted laparoscopic ureteral reimplantation appears to still be in the early phase of adoption and is clustered at a small number of hospitals. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ureteric Suture Urolithiasis Following Open Emergency Ureteric Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sarmah, Piyush B.; Kelly, Brian D.; Devarajan, Raghuram

    2016-01-01

    Suture urolithiasis is an unusual but recognised phenomenon following surgery on the urinary tract. We report a case in a 30-year-old man who sustained a gunshot injury to the left ureter in Burundi and underwent open ureteric repair in a regional hospital. He migrated to the UK and presented one year later with left loin pain. An intravenous urogram revealed two foci of calcification to the left of L3, within a peri-ureteric position. The patient underwent left-sided ureteroscopy where two calculi each formed around a nylon suture were discovered within a ureteric pseudo-diverticulum, and basketed. This is the first reported case of suture urolithiasis occurring following ureteric surgery. PMID:26989371

  11. EST library sequencing of genes expressed during early limb regeneration in the fiddler crab and transcriptional responses to ecdysteroid exposure in limb bud explants.

    PubMed

    Durica, David S; Kupfer, Doris; Najar, Fares; Lai, Hongshing; Tang, Yuhong; Griffin, Kathryn; Hopkins, Penny M; Roe, Bruce

    2006-12-01

    We have constructed directional and randomly primed cDNA libraries from mRNAs isolated during progressive stages of fiddler crab (Uca pugilator) limb regeneration. Data from these libraries are being assembled into an on-line database (http://www.genome.ou.edu/crab.html) that is both BLAST and keyword searchable; the data set is also available through GenBank. The first characterized library was made from mRNA isolated 4 days post-autotomy, when the first sign of morphological differentiation, cuticle secretion, is observed. Analysis of 1698 cDNA clones led to assignment of 473 contigs and 417 singlets, for a total of 890 sequences. Of these, ∼86% showed no assignments to characterized genes on database searching, while 14% could be assigned to a known ortholog in the COG (Clusters of Orthologous Groups) database. BLAST searches to specific protein domains in the Gene Ontology database led to assignments for ∼40% of the assembled sequences. Sequence similarity searches of other crustacean EST databases produced hits to 13-30% of the Uca query sequences. The ESTs include several genes that may be potentially ecdysteroid-responsive, such as homologs to chaperone proteins and cuticle protein genes, as well as homologs to arthropod proteins involved in retinoid/terpenoid metabolism. We have tested 3 potential candidate genes for their ability to be induced by ecdysteroid in limb bud explants; an arthropodial cuticle protein gene, and the nuclear receptor genes EcR and RXR. A subset of early blastemal limb buds (8 days post autotomy) show a positive response to ecdysteroid by 1-1.5 h, followed by a decrease in transcript abundance at longer periods of sustained incubation. Later stage buds (12 days post autotomy-late premolt) show decreases in steady-state mRNA levels by 1.5 h, or are completely refractory to ecdysteroid exposure.

  12. Outcome of ureteroscopy for treatment of pediatric ureteral stones.

    PubMed

    Galal, Ehab Mohamad; Fath El-Bab, Tarek Khalaf; Abdelhamid, Amr Mohamad

    2013-08-01

    We assess the efficacy and safety of semirigid ureteroscopy for treatment of ureteral stones in children. The records of 18 non-consecutive children with symptomatic ureteral stones treated with ureteroscopy in 2008-2010 were reviewed. Mean age was 7.6 years (range 15 months-14 years). A semirigid (8F) ureteroscope was used in all cases. A 0.038-inch floppy-tipped guidewire was passed through the selected ureteric orifice, advanced under direct vision, and monitored fluoroscopically. Dilatation of the ureteral orifice was necessary in 7 cases. Either direct extraction or disintegration using a pneumatic lithotripter was performed. The follow-up period was 6 months. Ureteroscopic procedures were successfully completed in 16 children (89%). Stones were located at the middle ureter in 3 (19%) cases and various levels of the lower third ureter in 13 (81%) cases. Stone size was 4-10 mm (mean 7 mm). Stones were fragmented with pneumatic lithotripsy in 9 (56%) cases and removed by forceps without fragmentation in 7 (44%). Stent was left in place for 3 days to 3 weeks in 12 (75%) cases. Early postoperative complications were insignificant hematuria in 2 patients and renal colic and fever in 3 patients. No complications were observed during the period of follow up. Ureteroscopy is a feasible treatment option for ureteral stones in children, when in skilled hands and with the aid of experience gained in the adult population. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. MWF rats with spontaneous albuminuria inherit a reduced efficiency of nephron induction during early nephrogenesis in comparison to SHR rats.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Leonard; Schulz, Angela; Unland, Johannes; Schulz, Herbert; Hubner, Norbert; Schmidt-Ott, Kai M; Kreutz, Reinhold

    2012-10-01

    A congenital nephron deficit has been linked to the progression of arterial hypertension and to the development of chronic kidney disease. The Munich Wistar Frömter (MWF) inbred rat develops hypertension, progressive albuminuria, and exhibits an inherited nephron deficit of about 27% compared to spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) with low-grade albuminuria. Introgression of rat chromosome (RNO)6 from SHRs into MWF rats markedly suppresses albuminuria and abolishes the nephron deficit in 4-week-old MWF-6 rats. Differences in early nephrogenesis may account for the nephron deficit in MWF rats. We compared ureteric bud branching morphogenesis and nephron induction in E15.5-E16.0 stage-matched rat embryos between MWF rats, SHRs, and consomic MWF-6 rats. Comparative analysis of three-dimensional reconstructions of the ureteric bud tree suggested normal qualitative branching morphogenesis. Surprisingly, the number of ureteric bud tips was higher in MWF rats compared to SHRs (+22%; P = 0.004). However, the nephron number induced per ureteric bud tip was markedly lower in MWF rats compared to SHRs (-46%; P < 0.0001). This deficit was partially corrected in MWF-6 rats (+18% vs. MWF; P = 0.02). In gene expression analysis of 59 candidate genes involved in kidney development, hepatocyte growth factor (Hgf) gene expression was significantly reduced in embryonic kidneys of MWF and MWF-6 rats (approximately -70%; P < 0.004) compared to SHRs. These results suggest a reduced efficiency of nephron induction in MWF rats during the early stages of nephrogenesis that is partially dependent on genetic loci on RNO6. In addition, Hgf that maps to RNO4 may represent an interesting candidate gene that contributes to the nephron deficit in MWF rats.

  14. Improved Methods in the Diagnosis of Ureteral Duplication and Ectopia

    PubMed Central

    Amar, Arjan D.

    1966-01-01

    Ureteral duplication with ectopia is of clinical importance because it is attended by a high incidence of persistent urinary disease. Its diagnosis is frequently made difficult by the obscure position of the extravesical ureteral orifice, and often by its obstruction, which may block the passage of radiopaque medium. But it is in precisely such cases that early diagnosis and treatment are most essential to the preservation of renal function. The chances of diagnosis have been increased within recent years by the development of new or modified radiographic and nonradiographic techniques. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:5928521

  15. Nipping early risk factors in the bud: preventing substance abuse, delinquency, and violence in adolescence through interventions targeted at young children (0-8 years).

    PubMed

    Webster-Stratton, C; Taylor, T

    2001-09-01

    This bulletin describes state-of-the-art universal and selective prevention programs designed to promote parent and teacher competencies and to prevent conduct problems. In addition, it describes indicated interventions designed for children who already have been diagnosed with oppositional defiant disorder and/or conduct disorder. Emphasis is placed on empirically supported programs that have identified key malleable risk factors in children, families, and schools, which have been shown in longitudinal research to be related to later development of substance abuse, delinquency, and violence. We have targeted preschool and primary grade children, ages 0-8 years, in this review because research suggests that the most effective interventions can nip in the bud risk behaviors in the early years, before antisocial behaviors become crystallized. Guidelines for selecting effective interventions are provided.

  16. Arterio-Ureteric Fistula Following Iliac Angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Aarvold, Alexander; Wales, Lucy Papadakos, Nikolaos; Munneke, Graham; Loftus, Ian; Thompson, Matt

    2008-07-15

    Arterio-ureteric fistulae are rare but can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We describe a novel case in which an arterio-ureteric fistula occurred as a complication following external iliac artery angioplasty and stenting, in a patient who had undergone previous pelvic surgery, radiotherapy, ureteric stenting, and urinary diversion surgery. Prompt recognition enabled successful endovascular management using a covered stent.

  17. 21 CFR 876.4620 - Ureteral stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ureteral stent. 876.4620 Section 876.4620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4620 Ureteral stent. (a) Identification. A ureteral stent...

  18. 21 CFR 876.4620 - Ureteral stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ureteral stent. 876.4620 Section 876.4620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4620 Ureteral stent. (a) Identification. A ureteral stent...

  19. Advances in Ureteral Stent Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denstedt, John D.

    2007-04-01

    Ureteral stents are commonly used in urolithiasis patients for relief of obstruction or in association with stone treatments such as ureteroscopy and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. There are currently many different bulk materials and coatings available for the manufacture of ureteral stents, however the ideal material has yet to be discovered. All potential biomaterials must undergo rigorous physical and biocompatibility testing before commercialization and use in humans. Despite significant advances in basic science research involving biocompatibility issues and biofilm formation, infection and encrustation remain associated with the use of biomaterials in the urinary tract. There have been many significant advances in the design of ureteral stents in recent years and these will be highlighted along with a discussion of future aspects of biomaterials and use of stents in association with urolithiasis.

  20. What Are Taste Buds?

    MedlinePlus

    ... taste buds all the credit for your favorite flavors, it's important to thank your nose . Olfactory (say: ... with your taste buds to create the true flavor of that yummy slice of pizza by telling ...

  1. Sema4C-Plexin B2 signalling modulates ureteric branching in developing kidney.

    PubMed

    Perälä, Nina; Jakobson, Madis; Ola, Roxana; Fazzari, Pietro; Penachioni, Junia Y; Nymark, Mariann; Tanninen, Tiina; Immonen, Tiina; Tamagnone, Luca; Sariola, Hannu

    2011-02-01

    Semaphorins, originally identified as axon guidance molecules, have also been implicated in angiogenesis, function of the immune system and cancerous growth. Here we show that deletion of Plexin B2 (Plxnb2), a semaphorin receptor that is expressed both in the pretubular aggregates and the ureteric epithelium in the developing kidney, results in renal hypoplasia and occasional double ureters. The rate of cell proliferation in the ureteric epithelium and consequently the number of ureteric tips are reduced in the kidneys lacking Plexin B2 (Plxnb2-/-). Semaphorin 4C, a ligand for Plexin B2, stimulates branching of the ureteric epithelium in wild type and Plxnb2+/- kidney explants, but not in Plxnb2-/- explants. As shown by co-immunoprecipitation Plexin B2 interacts with the Ret receptor tyrosine kinase, the receptor of Glial-cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor (Gdnf), in embryonic kidneys. Isolated Plxnb2-/- ureteric buds fail to respond to Gdnf by branching, but this response is rescued by Fibroblast growth factor 7 and Follistatin as well as by the metanephric mesenchyme. The differentiation of the nephrogenic mesenchyme, its morphology and the rate of apoptosis in the Plxnb2-/- kidneys are normal. Plexin B2 is co-expressed with Plexin B1 (Plxnb1) in the kidney. The double homozygous Plxnb1-Plxnb2-deficient mice show high embryonic lethality prior to onset of nephrogenesis. The only double homozygous embryo surviving to E12 showed hypoplastic kidneys with ureteric branches and differentiating mesenchyme. Taken together, our results show that Sema4C-Plexin B2 signalling regulates ureteric branching, possibly through modulation of Gdnf signalling by interaction with Ret, and suggest non-redundant roles for Plexin B1 and Plexin B2 in kidney development. Copyright © 2010 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Ureteral obstruction of renal transplant due to ureteral candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Walzer, Y; Bear, R A

    1983-03-01

    In a diabetic renal transplant recipient a nephrocutaneous fistula developed after percutaneous renal graft biopsy, and ureteral obstruction due to Candida albicans fungus balls was demonstrated. Local irrigation with amphotericin B, systemic antifungal therapy, and rigid blood sugar control led to rapid clearing of the fungal infections. This cause of renal transplant insufficiency should be considered prior to renal biopsy in diabetic patients with yeast forms in the urine.

  3. Ureteral stents: new ideas, new designs

    PubMed Central

    Al-Aown, Abdulrahman; Kyriazis, Iason; Kallidonis, Panagiotis; Kraniotis, Pantelis; Rigopoulos, Christos; Karnabatidis, Dimitrios; Petsas, Theodore; Liatsikos, Evangelos

    2010-01-01

    Ureteral stents represent a minimally invasive alternative to preserve urinary drainage whenever ureteral patency is deteriorated or is under a significant risk to be occluded due to extrinsic or intrinsic etiologies. The ideal stent that would combine perfect long-term efficacy with no stent-related morbidity is still lacking and stent usage is associated with several adverse effects that limit its value as a tool for long-term urinary drainage. Several new ideas on stent design, composition material and stent coating currently under evaluation, foreseen to eliminate the aforementioned drawbacks of ureteral stent usage. In this article we review the currently applied novel ideas and new designs of ureteral stents. Moreover, we evaluate potential future prospects of ureteral stent development adopted mostly by the pioneering cardiovascular stent industry, focusing, however, on the differences between ureteral and endothelial tissue. PMID:21789086

  4. [Clinical evaluation of ureteral stenting for managing extrinsic ureteral obstruction due to gynecological and gastrointestinal cancer].

    PubMed

    Takehara, Kosuke; Onita, Toru; Mochizuki, Yasushi; Miyata, Yasuyoshi; Igawa, Tsukasa; Sakai, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed patients who were treated with an indwelling ureteral stent to manage extrinsic ureteral obstruction due to advanced gynecological and gastrointestinal cancers. A total of 34 patients, including 17 with gynecological cancer and 17 with gastrointestinal cancer, underwent a successful initial ureteral stent placement from January 2007 to December 2011. Functional ureteral stent failures, which required percutaneous nephrostomy within 3 months after initial ureteral stenting, occurred in 14 of the 34 patients (41%) during follow-up. The risk factors of functional ureteral stent failure were bilateral ureteral obstruction, elevated serum creatinine level, poor performance status, subsequent therapy for primary cancer after ureteral stent placement, presence of peritonitis carcinomatosa, and gastrointestinal cancer. Patients with gastrointestinal cancer had a higher rate of stent failure than did those with gynecological cancer (p = 0.01). Median survival from the diagnosis of hydronephrosis for patients with gastrointestinal and gynecological cancers was 9 and 23 months, respectively (p = 0. 02). Retrograde ureteral stenting is a useful treatment for malignant ureteral obstruction. However, patients with gastrointestinal cancer had a high stent failure rate and a short survival time from the diagnosis of hydronephrosis. Indications for retrograde ureteral stenting for malignant ureteral obstruction should be carefully considered while taking into account stent failure risk, patient prognosis and quality of life.

  5. Photoperiod and temperature responses of bud swelling and bud burst in four temperate forest tree species.

    PubMed

    Basler, David; Körner, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Spring phenology of temperate forest trees is optimized to maximize the length of the growing season while minimizing the risk of freezing damage. The release from winter dormancy is environmentally mediated by species-specific responses to temperature and photoperiod. We investigated the response of early spring phenology to temperature and photoperiod at different stages of dormancy release in cuttings from four temperate tree species in controlled environments. By tracking bud development, we were able to identify the onset of bud swelling and bud growth in Acer pseudoplatanus L., Fagus sylvatica L., Quercus petraea (Mattuschka) Liebl. and Picea abies (L.) H. Karst. At a given early stage of dormancy release, the onset and duration of the bud swelling prior to bud burst are driven by concurrent temperature and photoperiod, while the maximum growth rate is temperature dependent only, except for Fagus, where long photoperiods also increased bud growth rates. Similarly, the later bud burst was controlled by temperature and photoperiod (in the photoperiod sensitive species Fagus, Quercus and Picea). We conclude that photoperiod is involved in the release of dormancy during the ecodormancy phase and may influence bud burst in trees that have experienced sufficient chilling. This study explored and documented the early bud swelling period that precedes and defines later phenological stages such as canopy greening in conventional phenological works. It is the early bud growth resumption that needs to be understood in order to arrive at a causal interpretation and modelling of tree phenology at a large scale. Classic spring phenology events mark visible endpoints of a cascade of processes as evidenced here.

  6. The Nrf2–Keap1 cellular defense pathway and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) response. Role in protection against oxidative stress in early neonatal unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO)

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi Tosi, Martin E.; Bocanegra, Victoria; Manucha, Walter; Gil Lorenzo, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Perturbation of renal tubular antioxidants and overproduction of reactive oxygen species may amplify the proinflammatory state of renal obstruction, culminating in oxidative stress and tubular loss. Here, we analyzed the heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) response and the function and signal transduction of NF-E2-related protein 2 (Nrf2) transcription factor on oxidative stress modulation in obstruction. Rats were subjected to unilateral ureteral obstruction or sham operation and kidneys harvested at 5, 7, 10, and 14 days after obstruction. Hsp70 expression and Nrf2 activity and its downstream target gene products were assessed. After 10 and 14 days of obstruction, enhanced lipid peroxidation through higher thiobarbituric acid reactive substances levels and increased oxidative stress resulted in reduced total antioxidant activity and enhanced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced (NADPH) oxidase activity were demonstrated. This was accompanied by decreased inducible Hsp70 expression and a progressive reduction of nuclear Nrf2 and its target gene products glutathione S-transferase A2 (GSTA2) and NADPH/quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), whereas the Nrf2 repressor Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1 (Keap1) was upregulated. By contrast, on early obstruction for 7 days, lack of increased oxidative markers associated with higher inducible Hsp70 protein levels and a rapid nuclear accumulation of Nrf2, Keap1 downregulation, and mRNA induction of the identified Nrf2-dependent genes, NQO1 and GSTA2, were shown. For these results, we suggest that the magnitude of cytoprotection in early obstruction depends on the combined contribution of induced activation of Nrf2 upregulating its downstream gene products and Hsp70 response. Impaired ability to mount the biological response to the prevailing oxidative stress leading to renal injury was shown in prolonged obstruction. PMID:20734248

  7. [Medical treatment of ureteral calculi].

    PubMed

    Vaessen, C; Roumeguere, T; Simon, J; Schulman, C

    1997-10-01

    Antiinflammatory drugs are the first choice in the treatment of the acute nephretic colic. This is due to their fast and direct action on the ureteral wall. The use of antispasmodics are still controversial and opioïds are not indicated. During the acute crisis, an hydric restriction should be associated to the medical treatment. After the crisis an increase of diuresis could help to "wash out" the stone. A spontaneous elimination can be expected, especially if the stone is small and located in the third part of the ureter. The ureteral rupture is rare but serious and must be treated by antibiotics and some time to be drained. The rapidity of a more aggressive treatment is function of numerous factors.

  8. Perioperative serum creatinine changes and ureteral injury.

    PubMed

    Siddighi, Sam; Yune, Junchan J; Kwon, Nicole B; Hardesty, Jeffrey S; Kim, Joo H; Chan, Philip J

    2017-09-01

    To illustrate a simple method that screens for ureteral injury in the acute postoperative period after urogynecologic surgeries. Serum creatinine measurements in the preoperative (baseline) and postoperative periods of urogynecologic surgeries were determined and the correlation of the change to ureteral injury and/or obstruction analyzed. The sample size calculation showed 7 cases and 28 controls were sufficient to detect significant changes in creatinine. Each of the seven cases was matched for age and type of surgery with a control patient in a 1:4 ratio following standard protocol. Chart review of patients (273 cases) undergoing urogynecologic surgeries from October 2009 to June 2014 were undertaken. There were 7 cases of ureteral injury and 28 matching control cases. All cases had intraoperative cystoscopy confirming bilateral ureteral flow. In the ureteral injury group, blockage of ureter was confirmed by CT scan with IV contrast. There was a 59.8% increase in serum creatinine levels postoperative in the ureteral injury group versus a 3.8% decrease in controls. A difference of creatinine levels greater than or equal to 0.3 mg/dL over baseline was evident in ureteral injury cases. A small change in serum creatinine level over baseline after urogynecologic surgery alerted the possibility of ureteral injury or obstruction. A simple and inexpensive evaluation of perioperative creatinine levels can promptly diagnose ureteral damage in the acute postoperative period for gynecologic reconstructive surgeries.

  9. Unilateral ureteral obstruction: beyond obstruction.

    PubMed

    Ucero, Alvaro C; Benito-Martin, Alberto; Izquierdo, Maria C; Sanchez-Niño, Maria D; Sanz, Ana B; Ramos, Adrian M; Berzal, Sergio; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesus; Ortiz, Alberto

    2014-04-01

    Unilateral ureteral obstruction is a popular experimental model of renal injury. However, the study of the kidney response to urinary tract obstruction is only one of several advantages of this model. Unilateral ureteral obstruction causes subacute renal injury characterized by tubular cell injury, interstitial inflammation and fibrosis. For this reason, it serves as a model both of irreversible acute kidney injury and of events taking place during human chronic kidney disease. Being a unilateral disease, it is not useful to study changes in global kidney function, but has the advantage of a low mortality and the availability of an internal control (the non-obstructed kidney). Experimental unilateral ureteral obstruction has illustrated the molecular mechanisms of apoptosis, inflammation and fibrosis, all three key processes in kidney injury of any cause, thus providing information beyond obstruction. Recently this model has supported key concepts on the role in kidney fibrosis of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, tubular epithelial cell G2/M arrest, the anti-aging hormone Klotho and renal innervation. We now review the experimental model and its contribution to identifying novel therapeutic targets in kidney injury and fibrosis, independently of the noxa.

  10. Management of ureteral stenting for postrenal failure during pregnancy after ureteral reimplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yoneoka, Yutaka; Kaku, Shoji; Tsuji, Shunichiro; Yamashita, Hiroto; Inoue, Takashi; Kimura, Fuminori; Murakami, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux is thought to predispose to urinary tract infection and renal scarring, and ureteral reimplantation in childhood remains the gold standard for its treatment. It has been reported that the risk of postrenal failure during pregnancy is increased among women with Politano-Leadbetter ureteral reimplantation. In previous case reports on patients with progressive hydronephrosis and renal failure during pregnancy after ureteral reimplantation, percutaneous nephrostomy was always required, so there has been no information about the clinical management of such patients by ureteral stenting. Here we report a patient with a history of bilateral ureteral reimplantation, in whom severe hydronephrosis during pregnancy was managed with ureteral stents. A primigravida with severe hydronephrosis was referred to us at 29 weeks of gestation. Bilateral Politano-Leadbetter ureteral reimplantation had been performed at the age of 3 years. She was hospitalized immediately, and bilateral ureteral stents were successfully inserted. Post-obstructive diuresis occurred after the stents were placed. Urinary tract infection developed after removal of the urethral catheter 1 week later, but responded to antibiotic therapy and catheter replacement. Labor was induced at 39 weeks of gestation, with vaginal delivery of a healthy male infant. Both stents were found to have spontaneously migrated into the urethra after delivery. Repeat stenting under spinal anesthesia was required to improve postpartum symptoms of back pain and fever. Right distal ureteral obstruction persisted at 6 months after delivery and repeat ureteral reimplantation is planned. General obstetricians will not necessarily pay attention to a history of Politano-Leadbetter ureteral reimplantation, but these patients should undergo careful monitoring of renal function and urinary tract morphology during perinatal care. In the present case, ureteral stenting was effective for postrenal failure during pregnancy

  11. 21 CFR 876.5470 - Ureteral dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ureteral dilator. 876.5470 Section 876.5470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5470 Ureteral dilator. (a...

  12. 21 CFR 876.5470 - Ureteral dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ureteral dilator. 876.5470 Section 876.5470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5470 Ureteral dilator. (a...

  13. The resonance® metallic ureteric stent in the treatment of chronic ureteric obstruction: a safety and efficacy analysis from a contemporary clinical series.

    PubMed

    Patel, C; Loughran, D; Jones, R; Abdulmajed, M; Shergill, I

    2017-03-10

    We evaluate the efficacy and safety of metallic ureteric stenting using the Cook Resonance® stent in the treatment of chronic ureteric obstruction of benign and malignant aetiology. Published experience of using this stent in this context is limited. We add to the body of literature on this topic. All patients who had a Resonance® metallic stent inserted between April 2009 and November 2014 in our institution were identified from a prospectively maintained stent-database. Primary outcome was relief of ureteric obstruction, defined by successful clinical and radiological treatment of hydronephrosis/hydroureter. Secondary outcome measures included operative time, radiological exposure, total stent dwell time (defined as the cumulative time in months for which a Resonance® metallic stent was in situ), and early and late complications. Twenty-one patients underwent 52 stent insertion episodes (SIE). Median age was 58 years (range 39-90). Stent insertion resulted in successful treatment of hydronephrosis/hydroureter in 96% (2 SIE resulted in failure to relieve ureteric obstruction). Median operative time was 21 min (range 12-90) Median radiation exposure was 815.3 cGy/cm2 (range 192.9-5366.3). Median stent dwell time was 19.5 months (range 6-52) in non-malignant and 12 months (range 2-48) in malignant ureteric obstruction. One stent migrated proximally during insertion and had to be retrieved using an antegrade approach. 5 patients re-admitted with haematuria: all resolved without intervention or blood transfusion. 3 episodes of post-operative urinary infection were recorded; all were successfully treated with oral antibiotics. Metallic ureteric stenting using the Resonance® stent is safe and effective for treating ureteric obstruction from both malignant and benign causes. The success rate in our series is 96%.

  14. Clinical experience with ureteral metal stents

    PubMed Central

    Al Aown, Abdulrahman; Iason, Kyriazis; Panagiotis, Kallidonis; Liatsikos, Evangelos N.

    2010-01-01

    Ureteral metal stents (MSs) present a minimally invasive tool to preserve the drainage of renal pelvis whenever ureteral patency is at risk to be obstructed due to extrinsic or intrinsic etiologies. Clinical experience with these stents demonstrates that they impose a promising alternative treatment option in ureteral pathologies that are difficult to be treated via common polymeric stents. Current application of MSs in the treatment of both benign and malignant ureteral obstruction reveals quite promising results. Nevertheless, the ideal MS that would provide uncomplicated long-term effectiveness is still lucking and current MS usage is facing several adverse effects between which stent obstruction, encrustation, infection, migration, and patient discomfort. Ongoing attempts to create more inert stent with sophisticated novel designs are expected to improve current MS efficiency. MSs will play a major role in the future as a routine management of a variety of ureteral pathologies. PMID:21369375

  15. Construction of a pathological risk model of occult lymph node metastases for prognostication by semi-automated image analysis of tumor budding in early-stage oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Nicklas Juel; Jensen, David Hebbelstrup; Lelkaitis, Giedrius; Kiss, Katalin; Charabi, Birgitte; Specht, Lena; von Buchwald, Christian

    2017-02-14

    It is challenging to identify at diagnosis those patients with early oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), who have a poor prognosis and those that have a high risk of harboring occult lymph node metastases. The aim of this study was to develop a standardized and objective digital scoring method to evaluate the predictive value of tumor budding. We developed a semi-automated image-analysis algorithm, Digital Tumor Bud Count (DTBC), to evaluate tumor budding. The algorithm was tested in 222 consecutive patients with early-stage OSCC and major endpoints were overall (OS) and progression free survival (PFS). We subsequently constructed and cross-validated a binary logistic regression model and evaluated its clinical utility by decision curve analysis. A high DTBC was an independent predictor of both poor OS and PFS in a multivariate Cox regression model. The logistic regression model was able to identify patients with occult lymph node metastases with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.83 (95% CI: 0.78-0.89, P <0.001) and a 10-fold cross-validated AUC of 0.79. Compared to other known histopathological risk factors, the DTBC had a higher diagnostic accuracy. The proposed, novel risk model could be used as a guide to identify patients who would benefit from an up-front neck dissection.

  16. What Are Taste Buds?

    MedlinePlus

    ... your taste buds for letting you appreciate the saltiness of pretzels and the sweetness of ice cream. ... allow you to experience tastes that are sweet, salty, sour, and bitter. How exactly do your taste ...

  17. Tropical Storm Bud

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  A Strengthening Eastern Pacific Storm     View Larger Image ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) show then Tropical Storm Bud as it was intensifying toward hurricane status, which it acquired ...

  18. Use of percutaneous nephrostomy and ureteral stenting in management of ureteral obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Linda; Li, Hanhan; Pucheril, Daniel; Hansen, Moritz; Littleton, Raymond; Peabody, James; Sammon, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    The management options for ureteral obstruction are diverse, including retrograde ureteral stent insertion or antegrade nephrostomy placement, with or without eventual antegrade stent insertion. There is currently no consensus on the ideal treatment or treatment pathway for ureteral obstruction owing, in part, to the varied etiologies of obstruction and diversity of institutional practices. Additionally, different clinicians such as internists, urologists, oncologists and radiologists are often involved in the care of patients with ureteral obstruction and may have differing opinions concerning the best management strategy. The purpose of this manuscript was to review available literature that compares percutaneous nephrostomy placement vs ureteral stenting in the management of ureteral obstruction from both benign and malignant etiologies. PMID:26981442

  19. Image-guided ureteral reconstruction using rendezvous technique for complex ureteric transection after gunshot injuries

    PubMed Central

    Arabi, Mohammad; Mat’hami, Abdulaziz; Said, Mohammad T.; Bulbul, Muhammad; Haddad, Maurice; Al-Kutoubi, Aghiad

    2016-01-01

    Management of complex ureteric transection poses a significant clinical challenge, particularly after gunshot injuries due to marked distortion of anatomy and associated tissue loss. We report two cases of total ureteric transection due to gunshot injury successfully repaired using fluoroscopy-guided rendezvous procedure and double J stent placement. This minimally invasive approach may offer a safe and effective technique to repair complete ureteral transection and obviate the need for complex surgical procedures. PMID:26955601

  20. Ureteral fibroepithelial polyp causing urinary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Shive, Melissa L; Baskin, Laurence S; Harris, Catherine R; Bonham, Michael; MacKenzie, John D

    2012-07-01

    Ureteral polyps are rare causes of ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction, particularly in children. We report a nine year-old boy with UPJ obstruction initially suggestive of an obstructive urinary stone. CT showed intraureteral calcification at the UPJ and hydronephrosis. A retrograde pyelogram showed narrowing at the UPJ and partial obstruction that was found to be a ureteral polyp. This case illustrates a rare cause of UPJ obstruction that should be considered when the imaging findings and presentation are atypical for more common etiologies of ureteral obstruction.

  1. Bilateral Ureteral Obstruction in Children after Appendectomy

    PubMed Central

    Grande, M.; Lisi, G.; Bianchi, D.; Bove, P.; Miano, R.; Esser, A.; De Sanctis, F.; Neri, A.; Grande, S.; Villa, M.

    2015-01-01

    Acute renal failure due to bilateral ureteral obstruction is a rare complication after appendectomy in children. We report a case of bilateral ureteric obstruction in a 14-year-old boy nine days after surgery for an acute appendicitis. After saline-filling of the urinary bladder, transabdominal ultrasound demonstrated bilateral hydronephrosis of moderate degree. No abscess was found with CT but presence of millimetric stones on both distal ureters was shown, with bilateral calyceal dilatation. Cystoscopy revealed inflammatory changes in the bladder base. Following introduction of bilateral ureteric stents, there was rapid normalisation of urinary output and serum creatinine. PMID:26295001

  2. Percutaneous Therapy of Ureteral Obstructions and Leak After Renal Transplantation: Long-Term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Aytekin, Cueneyt Boyvat, Fatih; Harman, Ali; Ozyer, Umut; Colak, Turan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2007-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of percutaneous therapy of ureteral complications after renal transplantation. Between January 2000 and June 2006 we percutaneously treated 26 renal transplant patients with ureteral obstruction (n=19) and leak (n=7). Obstructions were classified as early (<2 months after transplantation) or late (>2 months). Patients with leak were treated with nephro-ureteral catheter placement and subsequent double-J stenting. Balloon dilatation, stent placement, and basket extraction were used to treat ureteral obstructions. Patients were followed with ultrasonography. No major procedure-related complication occurred. The mean follow-up time was 34.3 months (range: 6 to 74 months). Initial clinical success was achieved in all 19 patients with obstruction and 6 of 7 patients with leak. Four of 9 early obstructions and 4 of 10 late obstructions recurred during the follow-up. All recurrences were initially managed again with percutaneous methods, including cutting balloon technique and metallic stent placement. Although there was no recurrence in patients with successfully treated leak, stricture was seen at the previous leak site in two patients. These strictures were also successfully managed percutaneously. We conclude that in the treatment of ureteral obstruction and leak following renal transplantation, percutaneous therapy is an effective alternative to surgery. However, further interventions are usually needed to maintain long-term patency.

  3. Ureteral Stents. New Materials and Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monga, Manoj

    2008-09-01

    Issues of stent migration and challenges of stent placement can be addressed adequately with current stent designs and materials, and an emphasis on precision in technique. Future changes in ureteral stents will need to maintain the current standard that has been set with existing devices in these regards. In contrast, new advances are sorely needed in encrustation and infection associated with ureteral stents. The main target for future development in ureteral stent materials lies in a biodegradable stent that degrades either on demand or degrades reliably within one-month with predictable degradation patterns that do not predispose to urinary obstruction, discomfort or need for secondary procedures. The main target for future development in ureteral stent design is improved patient comfort.

  4. Developing a preoperative predictive model for ureteral length for ureteral stent insertion.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Takashi; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Ito, Hiroki; Kuroda, Shinnosuke; Terao, Hideyuki; Makiyama, Kazuhide; Uemura, Hiroji; Yao, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Matsuzaki, Junichi

    2016-11-30

    Ureteral stenting has been a fundamental part of various urological procedures. Selecting a ureteral stent of optimal length is important for decreasing the incidence of stent migration and complications. The aim of the present study was to develop and internally validate a model for predicting the ureteral length for ureteral stent insertion. This study included a total of 127 patients whose ureters had previously been assessed by both intravenous urography (IVU) and CT scan. The actual ureteral length was determined by direct measurement using a 5-Fr ureteral catheter. Multiple linear regression analysis with backward selection was used to model the relationship between the factors analyzed and actual ureteral length. Bootstrapping was used to internally validate the predictive model. Patients all of whom had stone disease included 76 men (59.8%) and 51 women (40.2%), with the median and mean (± SD) ages of 60 and 58.7 (±14.2) years. In these patients, 53 (41.7%) right and 74 (58.3%) left ureters were analyzed. The median and mean (± SD) actual ureteral lengths were 24.0 and 23.3 (±2.0) cm, respectively. Using the bootstrap methods for internal validation, the correlation coefficient (R2) was 0.57 ± 0.07. We have developed a predictive model, for the first time, which predicts ureteral length using the following five preoperative characteristics: age, side, sex, IVU measurement, and CT calculation. This predictive model can be used to reliably predict ureteral length based on clinical and radiological factors and may thus be a useful tool to help determining the optimal length of ureteral stent.

  5. Forecasting emergence and movement of overwintering hazelnut big bud mites from big buds.

    PubMed

    Webber, Janette; Bruce Chapman, R; Worner, S P

    2008-06-01

    Eriophyoid big bud mites are key pests of hazelnut throughout the world, but they are difficult to control with chemicals or other methods because they are protected inside the bud. The most effective time for control is during the relatively short emergence period which is difficult for growers to predict. The key objectives of this study were to monitor mite emergence from big buds in spring, determine the phenology of mites in relation to tree phenology and weather, and identify the optimum timing for control measures. Mite emergence was found to occur between early and late spring in Canterbury, New Zealand. Mite emergence and movement occurred when daily maximum temperatures were >15 degrees C and when mean temperatures were >9 degrees C, with mite emergence increasing with temperature. The developmental status of new buds during mite emergence was a crucial factor in the infestation of new buds. An accumulated heat sum model (DD), starting at Julian date 152 and using a lower threshold temperature of 6 degrees C, predicted the onset of emergence on two cultivars and at two sites at approximately 172 DD. A regression model based on leaf number, bud length, bud width, DD and Julian date provided a more satisfactory prediction of percent accumulated mite emergence. It is recommended both peak mite emergence and the developmental status of hazelnut buds be used to optimise the time to apply control measures. The optimum time to apply a control was predicted to be before buds measure 0.5 x 0.5 mm (width x length), are enclosed within the axil, and have a rounded tip, or, when 50% accumulated mite emergence has occurred, whichever occurs first.

  6. Ureteral access strategies: pro-access sheath.

    PubMed

    Vanlangendonck, Richard; Landman, Jaime

    2004-02-01

    Routine use of the ureteral access sheath during flexible ureteroscopic procedures provides consistent, reliable, and unencumbered access to the upper tracts. The ureteral access sheath can be reliably and easily deployed if used properly and requires no special training. As such, it can be easily adopted into current urologic practice. Not only does the access sheath facilitate rapid, repeated, and atraumatic access to the upper tracts, but it also avoids back-loading over a superstiff guidewire, which may incur costly damage to the ureteroscope. The access sheath reduces overall costs and decreases operative times. Furthermore, application of a ureteral access sheath reduces the frustration associated with complex and some routine ureteroscopic procedures by optimizing irrigant flow to improve the surgeon's endoscopic vision while minimizing the intrarenal pressures that the kidney must tolerate. There is no evidence that the access sheath results in clinically significant ureteral ischemia, and extensive clinical use of the access sheath for long procedures has not resulted in increased stricture formation. Finally, the ureteral access sheath is useful for other procedures, such as PCNL, by improving visualization and minimizing the requirement for multiple percutaneous access sites. Winston Churchill said it best: "Give us the tools and we will finish the job." Industry has provided urologists with the tools in the form of advanced flexible ureteroscopes, the holmium laser, nitinol baskets, and the ureteral access sheath. Now it is up to urologists to finish the job.

  7. Pseudotumoral tuberculous ureteritis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis is still endemic in Morocco and the urogenital form is common. This form is characterized by clinical polymorphism. However, the isolated ureteric form is very rare. The differential diagnosis might be raised in tumoral cases while undertaking surgical excision which is the realistic choice. Hence, we report an isolated ureteric tuberculosis case, and we discuss the clinical, imaging, diagnostic and therapeutical features. Case presentation A 30-year-old Moroccan man consulted us for left back pain associated with urinary frequency and a few macroscopic episodes of hematuria for the past six months. A computed tomography urography revealed a left hydronephrosis and hydroureter secondary to focal wall thickening of the left lumbar ureter. Hence, we had diagnosed a ureteral tumor. However, a clinical examination showed irritative voiding symptoms and epididymal disorders associated with prostate infection suggesting a Koch’s bacillus assessment of the patient’s urine of which the results proved strongly positive. The treatment consisted of establishing a double-J ureteric stent to drain the left kidney, followed by antituberculous antibiotics. Conclusion Urogenital tuberculosis is common in endemic countries, however isolated ureter affection is rare. It is important to consider a ureteral tuberculosis diagnosis whenever ureteral thickening is revealed in a patient living in a country in which tuberculosis is endemic. PMID:23414595

  8. Biofilm formation on ureteral stents - Incidence, clinical impact, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Zumstein, Valentin; Betschart, Patrick; Albrich, Werner C; Buhmann, Matthias T; Ren, Qun; Schmid, Hans-Peter; Abt, Dominik

    2017-02-06

    Ureteral stents are a simple, minimally invasive method of maintaining ureteral drainage to assure renal function, treat pain caused by ureteral obstruction and avoid external or visible devices. Ureteral stenting is, however, associated with a clear side-effect profile, including irritation on voiding, pain and haematuria. Complications such as stent dysfunction and clinically significant urinary tract infections are also regularly observed. Although this has not yet been thoroughly researched, it appears that biofilm formation on ureteral stents plays a key role in the associated morbidity. In this review, we summarise the current evidence and identify areas that should be further studied to reduce the morbidity associated with ureteral stenting.

  9. Bilingual Buds: The Evolution of a Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    The impetus to begin Bilingual Buds came about six years ago when the author, pregnant with twins and commuting into New York City, was reading about the numerous cognitive benefits for children of acquiring a second language early in their lives. She was surprised to learn that even by the age of six months, children begin to lose the ability to…

  10. Bilingual Buds: The Evolution of a Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    The impetus to begin Bilingual Buds came about six years ago when the author, pregnant with twins and commuting into New York City, was reading about the numerous cognitive benefits for children of acquiring a second language early in their lives. She was surprised to learn that even by the age of six months, children begin to lose the ability to…

  11. Tgfβ2 and 3 are coexpressed with their extracellular regulator Ltbp1 in the early limb bud and modulate mesodermal outgrowth and BMP signaling in chicken embryos

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Transforming growth factor β proteins (Tgfβs) are secreted cytokines with well-defined functions in the differentiation of the musculoskeletal system of the developing limb. Here we have studied in chicken embryos, whether these cytokines are implicated in the development of the embryonic limb bud at stages preceding tissue differentiation. Results Immunohistochemical detection of phosphorylated Smad2 and Smad3 indicates that signaling by this pathway is active in the undifferentiated mesoderm and AER. Gene expression analysis shows that transcripts of tgfβ2 and tgfβ3 but not tgfβ1 are abundant in the growing undifferentiated limb mesoderm. Transcripts of tgfβ2 are also found in the AER, which is the signaling center responsible for limb outgrowth. Furthermore, we show that Latent Tgfβ Binding protein 1 (LTBP1), which is a key extracellular modulator of Tgfβ ligand bioavailability, is coexpressed with Tgfβs in the early limb bud. Administration of exogenous Tgfβs to limb buds growing in explant cultures provides evidence of these cytokines playing a role in the regulation of mesodermal limb proliferation. In addition, analysis of gene regulation in these experiments revealed that Tgfβ signaling has no effect on the expression of master genes of musculoskeletal tissue differentiation but negatively regulates the expression of the BMP-antagonist Gremlin. Conclusion We propose the occurrence of an interplay between Tgfβ and BMP signaling functionally associated with the regulation of early limb outgrowth by modulating limb mesenchymal cell proliferation. PMID:20565961

  12. Malignant Ureteral Obstruction: Functional Duration of Metallic versus Polymeric Ureteral Stents

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Po-Ming; Chiang, I-Ni; Chen, Chia-Yen; Huang, Kuo-How; Hsu, Jui-Shan; Wang, Shuo-Meng; Lee, Yuan-Ju; Yu, Hong-Jeng; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Huang, Chao-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Ureteral obstruction caused by extrinsic compression is often associated with intra-abdominal cancers. Internal drainage with ureteral stents is typically the first-line therapy to relieve such obstructions. Novel designs of ureteral stents made of different materials have been invented to achieve better drainage. In this study, we described the functional outcomes of a Resonance metallic ureteral stent (Cook Medical, Bloomington, Indiana, USA) in patients with malignant ureteral obstruction and compare the functional duration of Resonance stents with regular polymeric stents in the same cohort. Methods Cancer patients who received polymeric stents and subsequent Resonance stents for ureteral obstruction between July 2009 and November 2012 were included in a chart review. Stent failure was detected by clinical symptoms, imaging studies, and renal function tests. The functional durations of each stent were calculated, and possible factors affecting stent patency were investigated. Results A total of 50 stents were successfully inserted into 50 ureteral units in 42 patients with malignant ureteral obstruction. There were 7 antegrade stents and 43 retrograde stents. There were no major complications. Stent-related symptoms were similar in both kinds of stents. After polymeric stents were replaced with Resonance metallic stents, hydronephrosis subsided or remained stable in 90% (45/50) of the ureteral units. Serum creatinine decreased or remained stable in 90% (38/42) of these patients. The Resonance stent exhibited a mean increase in functional duration of 4 months compared with the polymeric stents (p<0.0001), and 50% (25/50) of the Resonance stents exhibited a significant increase in functional duration (more than 3 months). Pre-operative serum creatinine < 2 was associated with a substantial increase in stent duration. Conclusions Resonance stents are effective and safe in relieving malignant ureteral obstructions after polymeric stents failure

  13. "Bud, Not Buddy."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the award-winning book "Bud, Not Buddy" written by Christopher Paul Curtis. Lists different versions of the book; suggests learning activities; lists sources for biographical information and interviews with Curtis, teacher guides, professional articles, and other Depression era novels; and provides a citation for the author's…

  14. "Bud, Not Buddy."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the award-winning book "Bud, Not Buddy" written by Christopher Paul Curtis. Lists different versions of the book; suggests learning activities; lists sources for biographical information and interviews with Curtis, teacher guides, professional articles, and other Depression era novels; and provides a citation for the author's…

  15. Berkeley UXO Discriminator (BUD)

    SciTech Connect

    Gasperikova, Erika; Smith, J. Torquil; Morrison, H. Frank; Becker, Alex

    2007-01-01

    The Berkeley UXO Discriminator (BUD) is an optimally designed active electromagnetic system that not only detects but also characterizes UXO. The system incorporates three orthogonal transmitters and eight pairs of differenced receivers. it has two modes of operation: (1) search mode, in which BUD moves along a profile and exclusively detects targets in its vicinity, providing target depth and horizontal location, and (2) discrimination mode, in which BUD, stationary above a target, from a single position, determines three discriminating polarizability responses together with the object location and orientation. The performance of the system is governed by a target size-depth curve. Maximum detection depth is 1.5 m. While UXO objects have a single major polarizability coincident with the long axis of the object and two equal transverse polarizabilities, scrap metal has three different principal polarizabilities. The results clearly show that there are very clear distinctions between symmetric intact UXO and irregular scrap metal, and that BUD can resolve the intrinsic polarizabilities of the target. The field survey at the Yuma Proving Ground in Arizona showed excellent results within the predicted size-depth range.

  16. Laparoscopic Management of Ureteral Endometriosis and Hydronephrosis Associated With Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Alves, João; Puga, Marco; Fernandes, Rodrigo; Pinton, Anne; Miranda, Ignacio; Kovoor, Elias; Wattiez, Arnaud

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To evaluate if laparoscopic treatment of ureteral endometriosis is feasible, safe, and effective and to determine if ureteral dilatation and/or the number of incisions increases complications.

  17. Fluoroscopy Guided Transurethral Placement of Ureteral Metallic Stents

    PubMed Central

    Myung Gyu, Song; Seo, Tae Seok; Park, Cheol Min; Choi, Jae Woong; Lee, Jong Mee; Park, Yang Shin

    2015-01-01

    Ureteral stent exchange is usually performed under both fluoroscopic and cystoscopic guidance. We experienced two cases with retrograde placement of metallic ureteral stent via urethra under fluoroscopic guidance. When patients with double-J ureteral stent (DJUS)have symptom and want to change DJUS to metallic stent, fluoroscopic guided transurethral placement of ureteral metallic stent is a good option as alternative of cystoscopic procedure or percutaneous procedure through percutaneous nephrostomy tract. PMID:26557281

  18. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  19. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  20. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  1. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  2. Roles of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor and the met receptor in the early development of the metanephros

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF), a soluble protein secreted by embryo fibroblasts and several fibroblast lines, may elicit morphogenesis in adjacent epithelial cells. We investigated the role of HGF/SF and its membrane receptor, the product of the c-met protooncogene, in the early development of the metanephric kidney. At the inception of the mouse metanephros at embryonic day 11, HGF/SF was expressed in the mesenchyme, while met was expressed in both the ureteric bud and the mesenchyme, as assessed by reverse transcription PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. To further investigate the expression of met in renal mesenchyme, we isolated 13 conditionally immortal clonal cell lines from transgenic mice expressing a temperature-sensitive mutant of the SV-40 large T antigen. Five had the HGF/SF+/met+ phenotype and eight had the HGF/SF-/met+ phenotype. None had the HGF/SF+/met- nor the HGF/SF-/met- phenotypes. Thus the renal mesenchyme contains cells that express HGF/SF and met or met alone. When metanephric rudiments were grown in serum-free organ culture, anti- HGF/SF antibodies (a) inhibited the differentiation of metanephric mesenchymal cells into the epithelial precursors of the nephron; (b) increased cell death within the renal mesenchyme; and (c) perturbed branching morphogenesis of the ureteric bud. These data provide the first demonstration for coexpression of the HGF/SF and met genes in mesenchymal cells during embryonic development and also imply an autocrine and/or paracrine role for HGF/SF and met in the survival of the renal mesenchyme and in the mesenchymal-epithelial transition that occurs during nephrogenesis. They also confirm the postulated paracrine role of HGF/SF in the branching of the ureteric bud. PMID:7822413

  3. How does a virus bud?

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, D M; Deutsch, J M; Oster, G F

    1993-01-01

    How does a virus bud from the plasma membrane of its host? Here we investigate several possible rate-limiting processes, including thermal fluctuations of the plasma membrane, hydrodynamic interactions, and diffusion of the glycoprotein spikes. We find that for bending moduli greater than 3 x 10(-13) ergs, membrane thermal fluctuations are insufficient to wrap the viral capsid, and the mechanical force driving the budding process must arise from some other process. If budding is limited by the rate at which glycoprotein spikes can diffuse to the budding site, we compute that the budding time is 10-20 min, in accord with the experimentally determined upper limit of 20 min. In light of this, we suggest some alternative mechanisms for budding and provide a rationale for the observation that budding frequently occurs in regions of high membrane curvature. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:8369463

  4. [HIV budding and Tsg101].

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Jiro

    2005-12-01

    HIV, as well as many enveloped viruses, exits the cells by budding directly from the plasma membrane. HIV budding is dependent on a PTAP motif, which is located within the p6 domain of Gag. Recent studies have shown that the cellular protein Tsg101 binds to the PTAP L-domain motif of HIV p6 and facilitates the final stages of virus release. Tsg101 function in the cellular vacuolar protein sorting pathway, where they play central roles in selecting cargo for incorporation into vesicles that bud into the maturing endosome to create multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Vesicle budding into the MVB and viral budding at the plasma membrane are topologically equivalent, and the same machinery could catalyze both processes. It will be important to understand the mechanism of virus budding in detail, since virus budding may be a potential target for interference with HIV propagation.

  5. The reconstruction of "complex" ureteral lesions.

    PubMed

    Graziotti, Pierpaolo; Piccinelli, Alessandro; Giusti, Guido; Taverna, Mauro Seveso Gianluigi; Benetti, Alessio; Pasini, Luisa; Zandegiacomo, Silvia

    2005-06-01

    A total of 13 patients with ureteral lesions wider than 12 cm in length and/or previous radiation treatment have been submitted to reconstructive treatment. Four patients with lesions after radiation therapy were treated with ileal ureter and contemporary bladder augmentation, one with ureteroneocystostomy combined with psoas hitch procedure and one combining psoas hitch and Boori Flap technique. The association of psoas hitch with Boari Flap technique were also used to treat two patients with the undesired outcome of vascular procedure. A patient after complete ureteral stripping following ureteroscopy was submitted to ileal bladder substitution. Two renal autotransplantations were performed in a patient with extensive stricture of the ureter following multiple endourological procedure and in a patient with negative outcome of previous attempt of open ureteral defect reconstruction following abdominal trauma.

  6. Spontaneous proximal ureteric rupture secondary to ureterolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Keith; Spiteri, Karl; German, Karl

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 37-year-old lady who presented with severe colicky left sided flank pain associated with vomiting, chills and rigors. A non-contrast Computed Tomography of the Kidney Ureter and Bladder was performed which showed a 2–3 mm stone in the pelvic part of the left ureter. Following 2 days of conservative treatment she was still complaining of increasingly severe pain. A contrast computed tomography of the abdomen was performed which was suggestive of a perforation of the left collecting system. A diagnosis of spontaneous left proximal ureteric perforation secondary to urolithiasis was made. We opted to treat her with retrograde endoscopic ureteric stent insertion. Spontaneous rupture of the ureter is a relatively rare urological occurrence with only a small number of cases reported in the literature. Although there are no recommendations, ureteric double-J stenting is the most commonly used management option with good results reported. PMID:28069871

  7. [Ureteral triplication, an unusual isolated presentation].

    PubMed

    Villanueva Peña, A; De Diego Rodríguez, E

    2004-01-01

    We report the case of a 26 years old female who presented, as a casual finding, a right complete ureteral triplicity (probably Campbell's tipe I) with no other associated abnormalities. Despite ureteral duplication is a frequent urological anomaly, the presence of three ureters occurring in the same side, in a complete or incomplete form, is a true rarity, with less than 100 cases publicated up to date. The present case is singular, not only because of its exceptional presentation but also because no other urological or extraurological anomalies were associated and no clinical manifestations were present. The most relevant literature is reviewed.

  8. Taking the STING Out of Ureteral Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Aw, Ivan; Tan, Philip Huang Min; Clarke, David

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is diagnosed in ∼1% of children. The main goal of treatment is preservation of renal function by preventing recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) refractory to antibiotic therapy. Surgical treatment options include endoscopic injection or ureteral reimplantation. Subureteral Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene) injection (STING) is an endoscopic treatment option no longer in common practice. Use of Teflon is no longer advised because of a number of documented complications secondary to local and distant migration of injected material. We present a case of delayed ureteral obstruction secondary to the STING procedure occurring 21 years after initial surgery and managed using a novel endoscopic method. PMID:27785466

  9. Laparoscopic management of large ureteral fibroepithelial polyp.

    PubMed

    Kijvikai, Kittinut; Maynes, Lincoln J; Herrell, S Duke

    2007-08-01

    Fibroepithelial polyps of the ureter are rare benign mesothelial tumors. Most polyps are small; however, very rare large polyps have also been reported. Currently, most investigators encourage endoscopic management in these patients. Nevertheless, endoscopic resection can be difficult in patients with a long or large polypoid lesion. We describe our experience and laparoscopic technique for treatment of a symptomatic 42-year-old woman who presented with a 17-cm-long fibroepithelial polyp in the proximal ureter associated with ureteral obstruction. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of laparoscopic management of a large ureteral fibroepithelial polyp.

  10. [Case of mid-ureteral fibroepithelial polyps in a child].

    PubMed

    Fukui, Shinji; Watanabe, Masato; Yoshino, Kaoru

    2011-11-01

    A 11-year-old boy showed gross hematuria and left flank pain. Ultrasonography and CT revealed left hydroureteronephrosis, and he was referred to us for the further evaluation. MRI revealed left hydroureteronephrosis with filling defect at the distal end of the dilated ureter suggesting ureteral polyp. Open surgery was performed with the diagnosis of mid-ureteral obstruction. In the operative findings, multiple stalks of ureteral polyps arose from the entire ureteral wall over 5 cm in length at the site of ureteral obstruction. Mid-ureter with polyps was completely resected, and end-to-end anastomosis was performed. The pathological diagnosis was fibroepithelial polyp of the ureter.

  11. Routine intraoperative ureteric stenting for kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C H; Bhatti, A A; Rix, D A; Manas, D M

    2005-10-19

    Major urological complications (MUCs) after kidney transplantation contribute to patient morbidity and compromise graft function. The majority arise from the vesico-ureteric anastomosis and present early after transplantation. Ureteric stents have been successfully used to treat such complications. A number of centres have adopted a policy of universal prophylactic stenting, at the time of graft implantation, to reduce the incidence of urine leaks and ureteric stenosis. Stents are associated with specific complications and some centres advocate a policy of only stenting selected anastomoses. To examine the benefits and harms of routine ureteric stenting to prevent urological complications in kidney transplant recipients. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE, reference lists of articles, books and abstracts and contacted companies, authors and experts to identify relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs). All RCTs and quasi-RCTs were included in our meta-analysis. Four reviewers assessed the trials for quality against four criteria (allocation concealment, blinding, intention-to-treat and completeness of follow-up). The primary outcome was the incidence of MUCs. Further outcomes of interest were graft and patient survival and the incidence of adverse events (urinary tract infection (UTI), haematuria, irritative symptoms, pain and stent migration). Statistical analyses were performed using the random effects model and the results expressed as relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Seven RCTs (1154 patients) of low or moderate quality were identified. The incidence of MUCs was significantly reduced (RR 0.24, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.77, P = 0.02, NNT 13) by universal prophylactic stenting. This was dependent on whether the same surgeon performed, or was in attendance, during the operations. Two patients lost their grafts to infective urinary tract complications in the stented group

  12. Differences in stone size and ureteral dilation between obstructing proximal and distal ureteral calculi.

    PubMed

    Eisner, Brian H; Pedro, Renato; Namasivayam, Saravanan; Kambadakone, Avinash; Sahani, Dushyant V; Dretler, Stephen P; Monga, Manoj

    2008-09-01

    To examine the differences in ureteral dilation and calculus size between obstructing proximal and distal ureteral stones. A retrospective review of computed tomography (CT) scans from 176 consecutive patients with obstructing ureteral calculi was performed. For the calculi, the axial diameter was defined as the largest stone diameter on the axial CT images, and the coronal length was defined as the cephalocaudal length of the stone measured on the coronal CT images. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were performed. A total of 65 proximal and 111 distal ureteral calculi were analyzed. On univariate analysis, the proximal calculi were associated with a greater degree of ureteral dilation (mean 6.1 mm vs 5.3 mm, P = .01) and had a greater coronal length (mean 9.9 mm vs 8.3 mm, P = .005) than distal calculi. This association was also true on the multivariate analysis, which controlled for age and sex (P = .0004). No statistically significant difference was found in the axial calculus diameter for the proximal and distal stones (mean 5.3 mm vs 5.0 mm, P = .29). In a subset of 50 patients whose contralateral ureters (without stones) were measured for control comparison, the ureteral dilation in the ureters with stones was significantly greater than in the control ureters (proximal ureter 6.2 mm vs 4.3 mm, P = .001; distal ureter 4.7 mm vs 3.8 mm, P = .004). For proximal calculi, 72.3% were associated with ureteral dilation of less than 7 mm, 23.1% with 7-10 mm, and 4.6% with greater than 10 mm. For the distal calculi, 90.1% were associated with ureteral dilation of less than 7 mm, 6.3% with 7-10 mm, and 3.6% with greater than 10 mm. The coronal length was the largest measured diameter in 94% of the calculi, and the mean calculus coronal length was significantly greater than the mean axial diameter (8.9 mm vs 5.1 mm, respectively, P < .001). The results of our study have shown that proximal ureteral calculi are associated with a significantly greater

  13. Laparoscopic reconstruction of iatrogenic-induced lower ureteric strictures: Does timing of repair influence the outcome?

    PubMed

    Abraham, George P; Das, Krishanu; Ramaswami, Krishnamohan; George, Datson P; Abraham, Jisha J; Thachil, Thomas

    2011-10-01

    Influence of timing of repair on outcome following laparoscopic reconstruction of lower ureteric strictures To assess the influence of timing of repair on outcome following laparoscopic reconstruction of lower ureteric strictures in our adult patient population. Single surgeon operative experience in two institutes. Retrospective analysis. All patients were worked up in detail. All patients underwent cystoscopy and retrograde pyelography prior to laparoscopic approach. Patients were categorised into two groups: early repair (within seven days of inciting event) and delayed repair (after two weeks). Operative parameters and postoperative events were recorded. Postprocedure all patients were evaluated three monthly. Follow-up imaging was ordered at six months postoperatively. Improvement in renal function, resolution of hydronephrosis and unhindered drainage of contrast through the reconstructed unit on follow-up imaging was interpreted as a satisfactory outcome. Mean, standard deviation, equal variance t test, Mann Whitney Z test, Aspin-Welch unequal variance t test. Thirty-six patients (37 units, 36 unilateral and 1 simultaneous bilateral) underwent laparoscopic ureteral reconstruction of lower ureteric stricture following iatrogenic injury - 21 early repair (Group I) and 15 delayed repair (Group II). All patients were hemodynamically stable at presentation. Early repair was more technically demanding with increased operation duration. There was no difference in blood loss, operative complications, postoperative parameters, or longterm outcome. In hemodynamically stable patients, laparoscopic repair of iatrogenically induced lower ureteric strictures can be conveniently undertaken without undue delay from the inciting event. Compared to delayed repairs, the procedure is technically more demanding but morbidity incurred and outcome is at par.

  14. Influenza virus morphogenesis and budding

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Debi P.; Balogun, Rilwan A.; Yamada, Hiroshi; Zhou, Z. Hong; Barman, Subrata

    2009-01-01

    Influenza viruses are enveloped, negative stranded, segmented RNA viruses belonging to Orthomyxoviridae family. Each virion consists of three major subviral components, namely (i) a viral envelope decorated with three transmembrane proteins hemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA) and M2, (ii) an intermediate layer of matrix protein (M1), and (iii) an innermost helical viral ribonucleocapsid [vRNP] core formed by nucleoprotein (NP) and negative strand viral RNA (vRNA). Since complete virus particles are not found inside the cell, the processes of assembly, morphogenesis, budding and release of progeny virus particles at the plasma membrane of the infected cells are critically important for the production of infectious virions and pathogenesis of influenza viruses as well. Morphogenesis and budding require that all virus components must be brought to the budding site which is the apical plasma membrane in polarized epithelial cells whether in vitro cultured cells or in vivo infected animals. HA and NA forming the outer spikes on the viral envelope possess apical sorting signals and use exocytic pathways and lipid rafts for cell surface transport and apical sorting. NP also has apical determinant(s) and is probably transported to the apical budding site similarly via lipid rafts and/or through cortical actin microfilaments. M1 binds the NP and the exposed RNAs of vRNPs, as well as to the cytoplasmic tails (CT) and transmembrane (TM) domains of HA, NA and M2, and is likely brought to the budding site on the piggy-back of vRNP and transmembrane proteins. Budding processes involve bud initiation, bud growth and bud release. Presence of lipid rafts and assembly of viral components at the budding site can cause asymmetry of lipid bilayers and outward membrane bending leading to bud initiation and bud growth. Bud release requires fusion of the apposing viral and cellular membranes and scission of the virus buds from the infected cellular membrane. The processes involved in

  15. Aftermath of Grade 3 Ureteral Injury from Passage of a Ureteral Access Sheath: Disaster or Deliverance?

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Roshan M.; Okhunov, Zhamshid; Kaler, Kamaljot

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The ureteral access sheath (UAS) has revolutionized the management of urinary pathology in the upper tract by providing rapid repeatable access to the upper urinary tract. However, in many practices, it remains a controversial tool in endourology given concerns of possible ureteral injury and presumed long-term sequela from those injuries. This case suggests that these concerns may be more hypothetical than real. Case Presentation: A 32-year-old female with a history of recurrent nephrolithiasis presented with left-sided symptomatic renal colic. She was found to have bilateral nephrolithiasis plus a left 6 × 5 mm proximal ureteral stone with associated moderate hydroureteronephrosis. The patient failed a trial of passage and as such was taken to the operating room for an elective ureteroscopy (URS) during which she sustained a Grade 3 ureteral splitting injury, measuring ∼2–3 cm, to the distal ureter from passage of the 16F UAS. At the end of the procedure a 7/10F endopyelotomy stent was placed. On follow-up URS at 6 weeks, there was no visual evidence of ureteral injury. A Lasix renal scan obtained 8 weeks after stent removal showed no evidence of obstruction. Conclusion: High-grade ureteral injuries sustained from UAS passage are rare. However, when injuries of this nature occur, the concern over long-term damage to the ureter may well be overstated. PMID:27868091

  16. [Pseudocystic ureteritis. Apropos of a case].

    PubMed

    Joual, A; Sarf, I; Aboutaieb, R; el Mrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    1995-01-01

    The authors report one case of ureteritis cystica in a young adult. The diagnosis was made by intravenous urography and confirmed by histologic examination. The patient was treated surgically (nephro-ureterectomy). The etiopathogenic, clinical and therapeutic aspects are discussed with a review of literature.

  17. Forgotten Ureteral Stents: An Avoidable Morbidity.

    PubMed

    Murtaza, Badar; Alvi, Sarwar

    2016-03-01

    To assess the clinical presentation of forgotten ureteral stents and highlight the etiological factors resulting in the retention of these stents. Observational study. Department of Urology, Armed Forces Institute of Urology, Rawalpindi, from January 2010 to June 2011. Thirty-eight patients, with forgotten ureteral stents, retained for more than 6 months duration, were enrolled. A detailed evaluation was performed, along with the questions regarding the patients' opinion about the ureteral stents. They were specially asked whether they knew about the stents or were they formally informed regarding the stents. Subsequently, the patients were managed according to their clinical condition. The male to female ratio was 2.1:1 aged 23 - 69 years, mean being 40.24 ±12.59 years. The time of presentation after the ureteral stenting was 7 - 180 months (mean = 28.89 ±33.435 years). Seven patients (18.4%) reported with chronic kidney disease, including ESRD in two cases. Recurrent UTI was seen in 28 cases (73.6%), calculus formed over the stents in 20 cases (52.6%), and stent fragmented in 5 patients (13.1%). Majority of patients, (n = 23, 60.5%), were not even aware of the placement of these stents while 8 (21.0%) knew but were reluctant about its removal. In 3 cases (7.8%), the relatives knew about the stent but never informed the patients. The stent had been removed in 2 cases (5.2%), but the other broken fragment was missed. One case (2.6%) each had a misconception about the permanent placement of the stents like cardiac stents and regarding degradation of the stents in situ. Forgotten ureteral stents produce clinical features ranging from recurrent UTI to ESRD. This preventable urological complication is primarily due to the unawareness or ignorance of the patients and their relatives regarding the stent.

  18. Ureteral stents: a risk factor for polyomavirus BK viremia in kidney transplant recipients undergoing protocol screening.

    PubMed

    Siparsky, N F; Kushnir, L F; Gallichio, M H; Conti, D J

    2011-09-01

    Polyomavirus BK nephropathy (BKN) remains a common cause of early renal transplant dysfunction and graft loss. To date, little has been reported on the role, if any, of transplant ureteral stents in the development of polyomavirus BK viremia (BVK) and BKN. We performed a single-center, retrospective analysis of renal transplant recipients who underwent renal transplantation followed by monthly BKV screening at Albany Medical Center between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2009. A transplant ureteral stent was placed at the discretion of the surgeon. The immunosuppression protocol employed for deceased donor and unrelated living -donor recipients was antithymocyte antibody induction with methylprednisolone, mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus, and sirolimus. During the study period, 186 recipients were identified; 124 (67%) underwent intraoperative transplant ureteral stent placement, while 62 patients (33%) did not undergo stent placement. With our monthly screening protocol, we detected BKV in 32 of the 186 recipients (17%) following transplantation; 27 of the 32 (84%) viremic patients were stent recipients. In all patients who developed BKV, an immunosuppression dose reduction protocol was employed. Ureteral stent placement conferred a statistically significant elevated risk of developing BKV (odds ratio = 3.17, 95% confidence interval 1.16-8.70). Patient gender, age, ethnicity, diabetes status, and retransplant status were not statistically significant factors in the development of BKV. Our study demonstrated the elevated risk of BKV in recipients who undergo transplant ureteral stenting. Monthly BK polymerase chain reaction screening appears to be a useful tool for the early detection of BKV in this higher-risk group. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Colon Cryptogenesis: Asymmetric Budding

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chin Wee; Hirokawa, Yumiko; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Smith, David W.; Burgess, Antony W.

    2013-01-01

    The process of crypt formation and the roles of Wnt and cell-cell adhesion signaling in cryptogenesis are not well described; but are important to the understanding of both normal and cancer colon crypt biology. A quantitative 3D-microscopy and image analysis technique is used to study the frequency, morphology and molecular topography associated with crypt formation. Measurements along the colon reveal the details of crypt formation and some key underlying biochemical signals regulating normal colon biology. Our measurements revealed an asymmetrical crypt budding process, contrary to the previously reported symmetrical fission of crypts. 3D immunofluorescence analyses reveals heterogeneity in the subcellular distribution of E-cadherin and β-catenin in distinct crypt populations. This heterogeneity was also found in asymmetrical budding crypts. Singular crypt formation (i.e. no multiple new crypts forming from one parent crypt) were observed in crypts isolated from the normal colon mucosa, suggestive of a singular constraint mechanism to prevent aberrant crypt production. The technique presented improves our understanding of cryptogenesis and suggests that excess colon crypt formation occurs when Wnt signaling is perturbed (e.g. by truncation of adenomatous polyposis coli, APC protein) in most colon cancers. PMID:24205248

  20. The mode of origin of root buds and root sprouts in the clonal tree Sassafras albidum (Lauraceae).

    PubMed

    Bosela, M; Ewers, F

    1997-11-01

    The developmental anatomy of root buds and root sprouts was examined in the clonal tree Sassafras albidum. Root samples from 13 clones that varied widely in age and vigor were sectioned and two types of buds were found, "additional" buds and "reparative" buds. Additional buds form during the early growth of uninjured roots and they perennate by growing outwards in concert with the vascular cambium such that bud traces are produced in the secondary xylem. Reparative buds form de novo in response to senescence, injuries, or other types of disturbance. Reparative buds were found on the roots of seven of the clones, whereas additional buds were found on the roots of all 13 clones. The reparative buds had originated in the proliferated pericycle, where they were subtended by sphaeroblasts, or spherical nodules of wood. Few of the reparative buds were vascularized and none were connected with the vasculature of their parent roots. In contrast, most of the additional buds were vascularized, and the leaf traces of several of the additional buds appeared to be contiguous with the conducting xylem of their parent roots. To determine whether both bud types were functional, 82 field-collected root sprouts and 44 incubation-induced sprouts were sectioned at the root-sprout junction and examined for evidence relating to their mode of origin. None of the sprouts were subtended by sphaeroblasts, but 98% were subtended by bud traces, which indicated that they had originated from additional buds. Although reparative buds were more common than additional buds on some of the root samples, they appear to be dysfunctional at sprouting. Additional buds, on the other hand, are able to sprout both as a normal part of clonal spread and from root cuttings.

  1. Comparison of Two Types of Double-J Ureteral Stents that Differ in Diameter and the Existence of Multiple Side Holes along the Straight Portion in Malignant Ureteral Strictures

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Myung Gyu Seo, Tae-Seok Lee, Chang Hee Kim, Kyeong Ah; Kim, Jun Suk Oh, Sang Cheul; Lee, Jae-Kwan

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThis study was decided to evaluate the impact of diameter and the existences of multiple side holes along the straight portion of double-J ureteral stents (DJUS) on early dysfunction of stents placed for malignant ureteral strictures.MethodsBetween April 2007 and December 2011, 141 DJUSs were placed via a percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) tract in 110 consecutive patients with malignant ureteral strictures. 7F DJUSs with multiple side holes in the straight portion were placed in 58 ureters of 43 patients (Group 1). 8F DJUSs with three side holes in the proximal 2-cm of the straight portion were placed in 83 ureters of 67 patients (Group 2). The incidence of early DJUS dysfunction was compared between the two groups, and nephrostographic findings were evaluated in the cases of early dysfunction.ResultsEarly dysfunction of the DJUS was noted in 14 of 58 patients (24.1 %) in Group 1, which was significantly higher (p = 0.001) than in Group 2 in which only 1 of 83 patients (1.2 %) had early dysfunction of the DJUS. Nephrostographic findings of early dysfunction included dilatation of the pelvicalyceal system, filling defects in the ureteral stent, and no passage of contrast media into the urinary bladder.ConclusionsIn malignant ureteral strictures, multiple side holes in the straight portion of the 7-F DJUS seem to cause early dysfunction. The 8F DJUSs with three side holes in the proximal 2-cm of the straight portion may be superior at preventing early dysfunction.

  2. [Intrinsic ureteral endometriosis: description of a striking instance].

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Alessandro; Finotto, Elena; Zambolin, Tiziano; Fisogni, Simona; Simeone, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsic ureteral endometriosis is a very rare condition. A 41 y. o. woman with right hydroureteronephrosis and other aspecific symptoms came to our attention. The CT scan showed an ureteral obstacle causing the hydroureteronephrosis. She underwent ureterorenoscopy with biopsies of the lesion that did not result to be diriment. Suspecting a ureteral neoplasm, the patient then underwent ureteral resection and ureterocystoneostomy, and the extemporary histological examination resulted as endometriosis. The abdominal exploration showed a parametrial and a peritoneal growth - both compatible with the extemporary histological examination - that were also excised. The post-operative course was uneventful. The definitive hystological examination confirmed the perioperatory diagnosis. Intrinsic ureteral endometriosis is confirmed as a rare pathology with an indefinite clinical presentation; its typical presentation, namely cyclic hematuria, seems to be an anecdotal feature. Therefore the diagnostics of intrinsic ureteral endometriosis is still difficult even despite such a striking presentation.

  3. [Ureteral polyp occurring as renal dysfunction with contralateral ureteral calculi: a case report].

    PubMed

    Segawa, Naoki; Abe, Hirokazu; Nishida, Takeshi; Katsuoka, Yoji

    2005-07-01

    A 46-year-old man was admitted to our hospital complaining of macroscopic hematuria with dull pain in the right flank. Laboratory finding showed renal dysfunction and abdominal ultrasound sonograph revealed bilateral hydronephrosis (right > left). Retrograde pyelography showed left ureteral calculi and a filling defect in the middle portion of the right ureter. Renal function improved after bilateral single-J ureteral stent placement. Selective wash cytology of right renal pelvis was class II. Ureteroscopy demonstrated right ureteral obstruction with smooth-surfaced protruded tumor and cold cup biopsy was performed. Histopathological diagnosis was a fibroepithelial polyp but with no malignancy. In addition, left transurethral lithotripsy was performed under ureteroscopy. After the endoscopic examination, a double pigtail stent inserted into the right ureter. We performed conservative management by repeat urine cytologies and retrograde pyelography due to thrombocytopenia. The urine cytologies all proved negative and retrograde pyelography showed no abnormal changes. A ureteroscopic procedure is considered to be useful for the diagnosis of ureteral polyps. Transurethral resection of ureteral polyps with a ureteroscope is recommended for treatment.

  4. Postoperative ureteral obstruction after endoscopic treatment for vesicoureteral reflux

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Min; Park, Chang Soo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We undertook this study to evaluate the incidence, risk factors, management, and outcome of postoperative ureteral obstruction after endoscopic treatment for vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). Materials and Methods Ninety patients undergoing endoscopic treatment for VUR were retrospectively reviewed and classified into two groups according to ureteral obstruction: the nonobstruction group (83 cases, 122 ureters; mean age, 7.0±2.8 years) and the obstruction group (7 cases, 10 ureters; mean age, 6.2±8.1 years). We analyzed the following factors: age, sex, injection material, laterality, voiding dysfunction, constipation, renal scarring, preoperative and postoperative ultrasound findings, endoscopic findings, injection number, and injection volume. Additionally, we reviewed the clinical manifestations, natural course, management, and outcome of ureteral obstruction after endoscopic treatment. Results The incidence of ureteral obstruction after endoscopic treatment was 7.6% (10/132 ureters). The type of bulking agent used and injection volume tended to be associated with ureteral obstruction. However, no significant risk factors for obstruction were identified between the two groups. Three patients showed no symptoms or signs after the onset of ureteral obstruction. Most of the patients with ureteral obstruction experienced spontaneous resolution within 1 month with conservative therapy. Two patients required temporary ureteral stents to release the ureteral obstruction. Conclusions In our experience, the incidence of ureteral obstruction was slightly higher than in previous reports. Our study identified no predictive risk factors for developing ureteral obstruction after endoscopic treatment. Although most of the ureteral obstructions resolved spontaneously within 1 month, some cases required drainage to relieve symptoms or to prevent renal function deterioration. PMID:26175873

  5. Innervation of the undifferentiated limb bud in rabbit embryo.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J; McCredie, J

    1982-01-01

    The concept that there are no nerves in the limb bud of mammalian embryos prior to differentiation has been re-examined. Rabbit embryos were collected at 260 and 290 hours gestation, which is prior to cartilage formation in the forelimb at 320 hours. Forelimb buds and adjacent neural tube were excised, fixed and embedded for light and electron microscopy. The limb buds were sectioned in two planes by serial 1 micrometer sections and inspected by light microscopy. Bundles of nerve fibres were seen within the proximal third of the limb bud, with distal ramification into adjacent zones of condensing mesenchyme. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of axons and associated immature Schwann cells. These results demonstrate the existence of an anatomical framework through which a neurotrophic influence might be brought to bear upon mesenchyme prior to early differentiation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:7130041

  6. Studies on Cytokinin-Controlled Bud Formation in Moss Protonemata

    PubMed Central

    Brandes, H.; Kende, H.

    1968-01-01

    Application of cytokinins to moss protonemata of the proper physiological age causes bud formation on specific cells (caulonema). During the early stages of their development, buds revert to protonemal filaments if the cytokinin has been removed by washing the protonemata. This indicates that the hormone is not acting as a “trigger” but has to be present during a critical period of time until differentiation is stabilized. Autoradiographs of protonemata treated with a labeled cytokinin, benzyladenine-benzyl-7-14C, show a striking accumulation of the radioactivity in caulonema cells which are in the stage of bud formation, and in the buds themselves. Cells which did not react to the hormone contained very little radioactivity. The accumulation of benzyladenine in the “target cells” may be due to the presence of binding sites which, in turn, may distinguish responding cells from non-responding ones. Images PMID:16656847

  7. Cyclical acute renal failure due to bilateral ureteral endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Akçay, A; Altun, B; Usalan, C; Ulusoy, S; Erdem, Y; Yasavul, U; Turgan, C; Caglar, S

    1999-09-01

    Endometriosis is a common disease but ureteral involvement is relatively rare. Ureteric endometriosis is mostly unilateral. Endometriotic ureteral obstruction is a serious event commonly diagnosed late and therefore associated with a major risk of hydronephrotic renal atrophy. We present the cyclical acute renal failure associated with menstruation in a patient who developed severe bilateral ureteral obstruction due to endometriosis. Physicians should be aware of this uncommon but serious manifestation of endometriosis, especially if the clinical presentation is cyclical acute renal dysfunction in a premenopausal woman.

  8. The number of fetal nephron progenitor cells limits ureteric branching and adult nephron endowment

    PubMed Central

    Cebrian, Cristina; Asai, Naoya; D’Agati, Vivette; Costantini, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Summary Nephrons, the functional units of the kidney, develop from progenitor cells (cap mesenchyme, CM) surrounding the epithelial ureteric bud (UB) tips. Reciprocal signaling between UB and CM induces nephrogenesis and UB branching. While low nephron number is implicated in hypertension and renal disease, the mechanisms determining nephron number are obscure. To test the importance of nephron progenitor cell number, we genetically ablated 40% of these cells, asking if this would limit kidney size and nephron number, or if compensatory mechanisms would allow the developing organ to recover. The reduction in CM cell number decreased the rate of branching, in turn allowing the number of CM cells per UB tip to normalize, revealing a self-correction mechanism. However, the retarded UB branching impaired kidney growth, leaving a permanent nephron deficit. Thus, the number of fetal nephron progenitor cells is an important determinant of nephron endowment, largely via its effect on UB branching. PMID:24656820

  9. Ureteral Stents and Foley Catheters-Associated Urinary Tract Infections: The Role of Coatings and Materials in Infection Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Joey; Lange, Dirk; Chew, Ben H.

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infections affect many patients, especially those who are admitted to hospital and receive a bladder catheter for drainage. Catheter associated urinary tract infections are some of the most common hospital infections and cost the health care system billions of dollars. Early removal is one of the mainstays of prevention as 100% of catheters become colonized. Patients with ureteral stents are also affected by infection and antibiotic therapy alone may not be the answer. We will review the current evidence on how to prevent infections of urinary biomaterials by using different coatings, new materials, and drug eluting technologies to decrease infection rates of ureteral stents and catheters. PMID:27025736

  10. Outcomes of ureteral surgery and ureteral stenting in cats: 117 cases (2006-2014).

    PubMed

    Wormser, Chloe; Clarke, Dana L; Aronson, Lillian R

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate and compare outcomes in cats following ureteral surgery or ureteral stent placement. Retrospective case series. 117 cats. Data regarding signalment, history, concurrent disease, clinical signs, clinicopathologic tests, surgical procedures, and perioperative complications (including death) were recorded. Follow-up data, including presence of signs of chronic lower urinary tract disease, chronic urinary tract infection, reobstruction, and death, if applicable, were obtained by records review or telephone contact with owners. Variables of interest were compared statistically between cats treated with and without stent placement. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression were performed to assess differences in survival time between cats with and without ureteral stents. Perioperative complications referable to the urinary tract were identified in 6 of 43 (14%) cats that had ≥ 1 ureteral stent placed and 2 of 74 (3%) cats that underwent ureteral surgery without stenting. Perioperative mortality rates were similar between cats with (4/43 [9%]) and without (6/74 [8%]) stents. After surgery, signs of chronic lower urinary tract disease and chronic urinary tract infection were significantly more common among cats with than cats without stents. Nineteen of 87 (22%) cats with follow-up information available had recurrent obstruction; incidence of reobstruction did not differ between cats with and without stents. Median survival time did not differ between the 2 groups. The potential for signs of chronic lower urinary tract disease and chronic infection, particularly among cats that receive ureteral stents, warrants appropriate client counseling. Judicious long-term follow-up for detection of reobstruction is recommended.

  11. Influenza Virus Assembly and Budding

    PubMed Central

    Rossman, Jeremy S.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Influenza A virus causes seasonal epidemics, sporadic pandemics and is a significant global heath burden. Influenza virus is an enveloped virus that contains a segmented negative strand RNA genome. Assembly and budding of progeny influenza virions is a complex, multistep process that occurs in lipid raft domains on the apical membrane of infected cells. The viral proteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) are targeted to lipid rafts, causing the coalescence and enlargement of the raft domains. This clustering of HA and NA may cause a deformation of the membrane and the initiation of the virus budding event. M1 is then thought to bind to the cytoplasmic tails of HA and NA where it can then polymerize and form the interior structure of the emerging virion. M1, bound to the cytoplasmic tails of HA and NA, additionally serves as a docking site for the recruitment of the viral RNPs and may mediate the recruitment of M2 to the site of virus budding. M2 initially stabilizes the site of budding, possibly enabling the polymerization of the matrix protein and the formation of filamentous virions. Subsequently, M2 is able to alter membrane curvature at the neck of the budding virus, causing membrane scission and the release of the progeny virion. This review investigates the latest research on influenza virus budding in an attempt to provide a step-by-step analysis of the assembly and budding processes for influenza viruses. PMID:21237476

  12. ESCRT requirements for EIAV budding.

    PubMed

    Sandrin, Virginie; Sundquist, Wesley I

    2013-10-09

    Retroviruses and many other enveloped viruses usurp the cellular ESCRT pathway to bud from cells. However, the stepwise process of ESCRT-mediated virus budding can be challenging to analyze in retroviruses like HIV-1 that recruit multiple different ESCRT factors to initiate budding. In this study, we characterized the ESCRT factor requirements for budding of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV), whose only known direct ESCRT protein interaction is with ALIX. siRNA depletion of endogenous ESCRT proteins and "rescue" experiments with exogenous siRNA-resistant wild type and mutant constructs revealed budding requirements for the following ESCRT proteins: ALIX, CHMP4B, CHMP2A and VPS4A or VPS4B. EIAV budding was inhibited by point mutations that abrogate the direct interactions between ALIX:CHMP4B, CHMP4B:CHMP2A, and CHMP2A:VPS4A/B, indicating that each of these interactions is required for EIAV budding. Unexpectedly, CHMP4B depletion led to formation of multi-lobed and long tubular EIAV virions. We conclude that EIAV budding requires an ESCRT protein network that comprises EIAV Gag-ALIX-CHMP4B-CHMP2A-VPS4 interactions. Our experiments also suggest that CHMP4B recruitment/polymerization helps control Gag polymerization and/or processing to ensure that ESCRT factor assembly and membrane fission occur at the proper stage of virion assembly. These studies help establish EIAV as a streamlined model system for dissecting the stepwise processes of lentivirus assembly and ESCRT-mediated budding.

  13. End-to-end ureteral anastomosis and double-pigtail ureteral stent placement for treatment of iatrogenic ureteral trauma in two dogs.

    PubMed

    Wormser, Chloe; Clarke, Dana L; Aronson, Lillian R

    2015-07-01

    A 6-month-old spayed female Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier and 8-month-old spayed female Shih Tzu were referred because of complications related to inadvertent ureteral ligation and transection during recent ovariohysterectomy. The Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier had a 2-day history of stranguria and polyuria that began after ovariohysterectomy. Initial examination findings were unremarkable with the exception of high rectal temperature. The Shih Tzu had a 10-day history of pyrexia, vomiting, diarrhea, and stranguria that began after ovariohysterectomy. On examination, the dog had signs of depression; clinicopathologic tests revealed hypoalbuminemia, neutrophilia, lymphocytosis, and monocytosis. Abdominal ultrasonography was performed for both dogs, revealing severe unilateral pyelectasia and hydroureter (proximal portion). Both dogs underwent exploratory celiotomy; ureteral ligation and transection was confirmed. Ventral cystotomy was performed to allow retrograde placement of a double-pigtail ureteral stent into the affected ureter and renal pelvis. End-to-end ureteral anastomosis was performed over the stent with the aid of an operating microscope. Stent position was confirmed via fluoroscopy, and incisions were closed routinely. Dogs continued to have intermittent signs of stranguria until stent removal via cystoscopy 6 or 7 weeks after surgery. Ultrasonographic examination of the urogenital tract was performed 2 or 4 months after surgery, revealing resolution of pyelectasia and hydroureter. The surgical technique used provided a viable option for preserving renal function in dogs with focal, iatrogenic ureteral trauma. Use of a ureteral stent facilitated ureteral anastomosis and minimized postoperative complications.

  14. Bud8p and Bud9p, Proteins That May Mark the Sites for Bipolar Budding in YeastV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Harkins, Heidi A.; Pagé, Nicolas; Schenkman, Laura R.; De Virgilio, Claudio; Shaw, Sidney; Bussey, Howard; Pringle, John R.

    2001-01-01

    The bipolar budding pattern of a/α Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells appears to depend on persistent spatial markers in the cell cortex at the two poles of the cell. Previous analysis of mutants with specific defects in bipolar budding identified BUD8 and BUD9 as potentially encoding components of the markers at the poles distal and proximal to the birth scar, respectively. Further genetic analysis reported here supports this hypothesis. Mutants deleted for BUD8 or BUD9 grow normally but bud exclusively from the proximal and distal poles, respectively, and the double-mutant phenotype suggests that the bipolar budding pathway has been totally disabled. Moreover, overexpression of these genes can cause either an increased bias for budding at the distal (BUD8) or proximal (BUD9) pole or a randomization of bud position, depending on the level of expression. The structures and localizations of Bud8p and Bud9p are also consistent with their postulated roles as cortical markers. Both proteins appear to be integral membrane proteins of the plasma membrane, and they have very similar overall structures, with long N-terminal domains that are both N- and O-glycosylated followed by a pair of putative transmembrane domains surrounding a short hydrophilic domain that is presumably cytoplasmic. The putative transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the two proteins are very similar in sequence. When Bud8p and Bud9p were localized by immunofluorescence and tagging with GFP, each protein was found predominantly in the expected location, with Bud8p at presumptive bud sites, bud tips, and the distal poles of daughter cells and Bud9p at the necks of large-budded cells and the proximal poles of daughter cells. Bud8p localized approximately normally in several mutants in which daughter cells are competent to form their first buds at the distal pole, but it was not detected in a bni1 mutant, in which such distal-pole budding is lost. Surprisingly, Bud8p localization to the presumptive bud

  15. Lessons learned over a decade of pediatric robotic ureteral reimplantation

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Minki

    2017-01-01

    The da Vinci robotic system has improved surgeon dexterity, ergonomics, and visualization to allow for a minimally invasive option for complex reconstructive procedures in children. Over the past decade, robot-assisted laparoscopic ureteral reimplantation (RALUR) has become a viable minimally invasive surgical option for pediatric vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). However, higher-than-expected complication rates and suboptimal reflux resolution rates at some centers have also been reported. The heterogeneity of surgical outcomes may arise from the inherent and underestimated complexity of the RALUR procedure that may justify its reclassification as a complex reconstructive procedure and especially for robotic surgeons early in their learning curve. Currently, no consensus exists on the role of RALUR for the surgical management of VUR. High success rates and low major complication rates are the expected norm for the current gold standard surgical option of open ureteral reimplantation. Similar to how robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery has gradually replaced open surgery as the most utilized option for prostatectomy in prostate cancer patients, RALUR may become a higher utilized surgical option in children with VUR if the adoption of standardized surgical techniques that have been associated with optimal outcomes can be adopted during the second decade of RALUR. A future standard of RALUR for children with VUR whose parents seek a minimally invasive surgical option can arise if widespread achievement of high success rates and low major complication rates can be obtained, similar to the replacement of open surgery with robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostectomy as the new strandard for men with prostate cancer. PMID:28097262

  16. Herniorrhaphy: an unusual cause of ureteral injury in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Eziyi, Amogu K; Etonyeaku, Amarachukwu C; Olajide, Abimbola O; Adejumobi, Musibau O

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Herniorrhaphy is a common surgery worldwide. Common complications include hemorrhage, infection, chronic pain, and recurrence. Ureteric injury from herniorrhaphy is unusual. We present a case of ureteric injury complicating an inguinal herniorrhaphy for a huge right inguino-scrotal hernia. Patient had primary uretero-neocystostomy but died from septicemia in the postoperative period. PMID:25548623

  17. A review of ureteral injuries after external trauma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Ureteral trauma is rare, accounting for less than 1% of all urologic traumas. However, a missed ureteral injury can result in significant morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this article is to review the literature since 1961 with the primary objective to present the largest medical literature review, to date, regarding ureteral trauma. Several anatomic and physiologic considerations are paramount regarding ureteral injuries management. Literature review Eighty-one articles pertaining to traumatic ureteral injuries were reviewed. Data from these studies were compiled and analyzed. The majority of the study population was young males. The proximal ureter was the most frequently injured portion. Associated injuries were present in 90.4% of patients. Admission urinalysis demonstrated hematuria in only 44.4% patients. Intravenous ureterogram (IVU) failed to diagnose ureteral injuries either upon admission or in the operating room in 42.8% of cases. Ureteroureterostomy, with or without indwelling stent, was the surgical procedure of choice for both trauma surgeons and urologists (59%). Complications occurred in 36.2% of cases. The mortality rate was 17%. Conclusion The mechanism for ureteral injuries in adults is more commonly penetrating than blunt. The upper third of the ureter is more often injured than the middle and lower thirds. Associated injuries are frequently present. CT scan and retrograde pyelography accurately identify ureteral injuries when performed together. Ureteroureterostomy, with or without indwelling stent, is the surgical procedure of choice of both trauma surgeons and urologists alike. Delay in diagnosis is correlated with a poor prognosis. PMID:20128905

  18. Acute kidney injury due to bilateral ureteral obstruction in children

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Daniele; Vespasiani, Giuseppe; Bove, Pierluigi

    2014-01-01

    Bilateral ureteral obstruction in children is a rare condition arising from several medical or surgical pictures. It needs to be promptly suspected in order to attempt a quick renal function recovery. In this paper we concentrated on uncommon causes of obstruction, with the aim of giving a summary of such multiple, rare and heterogeneous conditions joint together by the common denominator of sudden bilateral ureteral obstruction, difficult to be suspected at times. Conversely, typical and well-known diseases have been just run over. We considered pediatric cases of ureteral obstruction presenting as bilateral, along with some cases which truly appeared as single-sided, because of their potential bilateral presentation. We performed a review of the literature by a search on PubMed, CrossRef Metadata Search, internet and reference lists of single articles updated to May 2014, with no time limits in the past. Given that we deal with rare conditions, we decided to include also papers in non-English languages, published with an English abstract. For the sake of clearness, we divided our research results into 8 categories: (1) urolithiasis; (2) congenital urinary tract malformations; (3) immuno-rheumatologic causes of ureteral obstruction; (4) ureteral localization of infections; (5) other systemic infective causes of ureteral obstructions; (6) neoplastic intrinsic ureteral obstructions; (7) extrinsic ureteral obstructions; and (8) iatrogenic trigonal obstruction or inflammation. Of course, different pathogenic mechanisms underlay those clinical pictures, partly well-known and partly not completely understood. PMID:25374811

  19. Acute kidney injury due to bilateral ureteral obstruction in children.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Daniele; Vespasiani, Giuseppe; Bove, Pierluigi

    2014-11-06

    Bilateral ureteral obstruction in children is a rare condition arising from several medical or surgical pictures. It needs to be promptly suspected in order to attempt a quick renal function recovery. In this paper we concentrated on uncommon causes of obstruction, with the aim of giving a summary of such multiple, rare and heterogeneous conditions joint together by the common denominator of sudden bilateral ureteral obstruction, difficult to be suspected at times. Conversely, typical and well-known diseases have been just run over. We considered pediatric cases of ureteral obstruction presenting as bilateral, along with some cases which truly appeared as single-sided, because of their potential bilateral presentation. We performed a review of the literature by a search on PubMed, CrossRef Metadata Search, internet and reference lists of single articles updated to May 2014, with no time limits in the past. Given that we deal with rare conditions, we decided to include also papers in non-English languages, published with an English abstract. For the sake of clearness, we divided our research results into 8 categories: (1) urolithiasis; (2) congenital urinary tract malformations; (3) immuno-rheumatologic causes of ureteral obstruction; (4) ureteral localization of infections; (5) other systemic infective causes of ureteral obstructions; (6) neoplastic intrinsic ureteral obstructions; (7) extrinsic ureteral obstructions; and (8) iatrogenic trigonal obstruction or inflammation. Of course, different pathogenic mechanisms underlay those clinical pictures, partly well-known and partly not completely understood.

  20. Polyglycolic and Polylactic Acid Copolymers as Ureteral Replacements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-08-25

    and Identify by block number) ureteral: regeneration employing polyglycolic- polylactic acid cylinders. Although prolonged patency was not...1473 EDITION OF I NOV 65 IS OBSOLETE UVICLASSTFIED SECURITY CLASSIrICATION OF THIS PAGE (117 sn beta Entered) ’I 4 POLYGLYCOLIC AND POLYLACTIC ACID...UnlimIitod I/1 POLYGLYCOLLC AND POLYLACTIC ACID COPOLYMERS AS URETERAL REPLACEMENTS Abstract Preliminary experimentation in rats and dogs

  1. Reversible bilateral ureteric obstruction due to a pancreatic pseudocyst.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, G E; Tiernan, E; Cronin, C C; Ferriss, J B

    1993-01-01

    An unusual case of bilateral ureteric obstruction and hydronephrosis due to pancreatic pseudocyst formation, after an episode of acute pancreatitis is reported. All abnormalities resolved with conservative management. Possible reasons for such ureteric obstruction include periureteric fat necrosis by pancreatic enzymes and compression by the inflammatory mass. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8406165

  2. Endourologic implants to treat complex ureteral stenosis after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Burgos, F J; Bueno, G; Gonzalez, R; Vazquez, J J; Diez-Nicolás, V; Marcen, R; Fernández, A; Pascual, J

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of nitinol stents and the Detour extra-anatomical ureteral bypass graft in treatment of ureteral stenosis after kidney transplantation. Eighteen kidney transplant recipients with complex stenosis caused by failure of primary treatment or with high surgical risk or a poorly functioning graft (serum creatinine concentration >2.5 mg/dL) were treated using antegrade percutaneous implantation of nitinol stents (n = 16) or extra-anatomical ureteral bypass grafts (n = 3); 1 patient was treated with both techniques. Mean (range) follow-up of ureteral stents was 51.2 (3-118) months. Patency rate at last follow-up, resumption of dialysis therapy, or death was 75% (12 of 16 patients). In 4 patients (25%), stent occlusion developed, which was treated using a double-J catheter in 2 patients, stent removal and pyeloureterostomy using the native ureter in 1 patient, and implantation of an extra-anatomical bypass graft in 1 patient. Mean follow-up in patients with extra-anatomical ureteral bypass grafts was 32 (8-64) months. One patient developed a urinary tract infection, and another had encrustation with obstruction. Use of nitinol ureteral stents and extra-anatomical ureteral bypass grafts is a safe and effective alternative to surgery for treatment of post-kidney transplantation ureteral stenosis in patients with chronic graft dysfunction, those at high surgical risk, and those in whom previous surgical treatment has failed.

  3. Microscopic hematuria and calculus-related ureteral obstruction.

    PubMed

    Stewart, D P; Kowalski, R; Wong, P; Krome, R

    1990-01-01

    The evaluation of patients with ureteral calculi in the emergency department has historically included urinalysis (UA) and intravenous pyelograms (IVP). This retrospective study was done to determine if a statistically significant relationship existed between the degree of calculus-related ureteral obstruction, proven by IVP, and the presence or absence of microscopic hematuria. Urine red blood cells were recorded as less than 3 rbc/hpf (negative) or greater than or equal to 3 rbc/hpf (positive). IVPs were recorded as nonsevere or severe. IVP criteria were based on the presence or absence of extravasation, greater than 2-hour ureteral filling times, and a numerical scoring system of 1 to 4 for ureteral or calyceal dilatation and nephrogenic effect. Eighty-nine men (72%) had non-severe obstructions and 34 (28%) had severe obstructions. Twenty-five women (68%) had nonsevere obstructions and 12 (32%) had severe obstructions. Of the 28 patients with normal UAs, 11 had severe ureteral obstructions and 17 had nonsevere ureteral obstructions. There were no statistically significant differences between the presence or absence of significant microscopic hematuria and the presence or absence of severe ureteral obstruction. Microscopic hematuria is neither sensitive nor specific in determining the degree of calculus-related ureteral obstruction.

  4. 21 CFR 876.4680 - Ureteral stone dislodger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ureteral stone dislodger. 876.4680 Section 876.4680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4680 Ureteral stone dislodger. (a...

  5. 21 CFR 876.4680 - Ureteral stone dislodger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ureteral stone dislodger. 876.4680 Section 876.4680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4680 Ureteral stone dislodger. (a...

  6. [Appendicular ureteroplasty to repair a ureteric lesion during disk surgery].

    PubMed

    Joual, Abdenbi; Taha, Abdellatif; Querfani, Badereddine; Sahnoun, Abderrazak; Hamid, Fekak; El Mrini, Mohamed

    2005-09-01

    Extensive ureteric lesions raise difficult problems of surgical repair. This is also the case for upper ureteric lesions that often require replacement of the damaged segment or even autologous transplantation. The authors report a case of iatrogenic ureteric lesion resulting in a large defect in a patient operated 6 months previously for an L4-L5 disk hernia, which was treated successfully by interposition of an appendicular graft between the two ureteric stumps. In the light of this case, the authors discuss the various appearances of iatrogenic ureteric lesions with particular emphasis on the value of appendicular ureteroplasty due to its simplicity and low morbidity, while waiting for progress in the field of biocompatible substitutes.

  7. Dicer function is required in the metanephric mesenchyme for early kidney development

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jessica Y. S.; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Bushnell, Daniel S.; Bodnar, Andrew J.; Kreidberg, Jordan A.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding regulatory RNAs that act as posttranscriptional repressors by binding to the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) of target genes. They require processing by Dicer, an RNase III enzyme, to become mature regulatory RNAs. Previous work from our laboratory revealed critical roles for miRNAs in nephron progenitors at midgestation (Ho J, Pandey P, Schatton T, Sims-Lucas S, Khalid M, Frank MH, Hartwig S, Kreidberg JA. J Am Soc Nephrol 22: 1053–1063, 2011). To interrogate roles for miRNAs in the early metanephric mesenchyme, which gives rise to nephron progenitors as well as the renal stroma during kidney development, we conditionally ablated Dicer function in this lineage. Despite normal ureteric bud outgrowth and condensation of the metanephric mesenchyme to form nephron progenitors, early loss of miRNAs in the metanephric mesenchyme resulted in severe renal dysgenesis. Nephron progenitors are initially correctly specified in the mutant kidneys, with normal expression of several transcription factors known to be critical in progenitors, including Six2, Pax2, Sall1, and Wt1. However, there is premature loss of the nephron progenitor marker Cited1, marked apoptosis, and increased expression of the proapoptotic protein Bim shortly after the initial inductive events in early kidney development. Subsequently, there is a failure in ureteric bud branching and nephron progenitor differentiation. Taken together, our data demonstrate a previously undetermined requirement for miRNAs during early kidney organogenesis and indicate a crucial role for miRNAs in regulating the survival of this lineage. PMID:24500693

  8. Fluids and diuretics for acute ureteric colic.

    PubMed

    Worster, Andrew S; Bhanich Supapol, Wendy

    2012-02-15

    Acute ureteric colic is commonly associated with severe and debilitating pain. Theoretically, increasing fluid flow through the affected kidney might expedite stone passage, thereby improving symptoms more quickly. The efficacy and safety of interventions such as high volume intravenous (IV) or oral fluids and diuretics aimed at expediting ureteric stone passage is, however, uncertain. To look at the benefits and harms of diuretics and high volume (above maintenance) IV or oral fluid therapy for treating adult patients presenting with uncomplicated acute ureteric colic. We searched the Cochrane Renal Group's specialised register (3 January 2012). Previously we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (from 1966), EMBASE (from 1980) and handsearched reference lists of nephrology and urology textbooks, review articles, relevant studies, and abstracts from nephrology scientific meetings. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs (including the first period of randomised cross-over studies) looking at diuretics or high volume IV or oral fluids for treating uncomplicated acute ureteric colic in adult patients presenting to the emergency department for the first time during that episode were included. Two authors independently assessed study quality and extracted data. Statistical analyses were performed using the random-effects model for multiple studies of the same outcomes, otherwise the fixed-effect model was used. Results were expressed as risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous outcomes or as mean differences (MD) for continuous data with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Two studies (enrolling 118 participants) examined the association between intense hydration and ureteric colic outcomes. There was no significant difference in pain at six hours (1 study, 60 participants: RR 1.06, 95% CI 0.71 to 1.57), surgical stone removal (1 study, 60 participants: RR 1.20, 95% CI 0.41 to 3.51) or manipulation by

  9. Transumbilical laparoendoscopic single-site ureteral reimplantation.

    PubMed

    Gimbernat, H; Redondo, C; García-Tello, A; Mateo, E; García-Mediero, J M; Angulo, J C

    2015-04-01

    To analyze the outcomes of umbilical laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) ureteral reimplantation using a reusable single-port platform. The casuistic of LESS ureteral reimplantation in 5 patients is presented. The surgical technique using KeyPort system (reusable umbilical single-site platform) is described. Dissection, suctioning and suturing by minilaparoscopy through 3.5mm accessory port in the iliac fossa are performed. Operative and postoperative outcomes are presented. The median follow-up at time of analysis was 11 ± 14 months. The median age of patients was a 49 ± 34 year; male-female ratio was 1:1.15. Left surgery was carried out in all cases. In 4 patients, the etiology was secondary to stenosis (3 iatrogenic and 1 pelvic endometriosis). In the remaining case, the procedure was performed after excision of a symptomatic adult ureterocele. In all cases, bladder catheter and double-J ureteral catheter were inserted for 7 ± 3 and 30 ± 15 days and then removed. No conversion to convectional laparoscopic or open surgery occurred. The surgery time was 145 ± 60 min, and intraoperative bleeding was 100 ± 75 cc. Neither transfusion nor high analgesia was necessary. No postoperative complications, minor or major, have been reported. Hospital stay was 2 ± 0.5 days. In any patient, restenosis or worsening of renal function occurred. In experimented centers, transumbilical laparoendoscopic single-site ureteroneocystostomy is a safe alternative with comparable results to conventional laparoscopy and an excellent cosmetic result at low cost thanks to device reuse. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Endoluminal release of ureteral ligature after hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Jen; Lin, Victor Chia-Hsiang; Huang, Ching-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic ureteral injury is a well-recognized complication of abdominal total hysterectomy. We report a case of a 57-year-old female who underwent abdominal total hysterectomy for a uterine myoma and experienced severe right flank pain postoperatively. The imaging study displayed an obstruction of the right distal ureter. Under ureteroscopy, an extraluminal ligature was released with a holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. The stenotic segment was immediately relieved. Two months later, the intravenous urogram illustrated patency of the distal ureter with regression of right hydronephrosis. There was no recurrent hydronephrosis during 1 year of follow-up.

  11. The anillin-related region of Bud4 is the major functional determinant for Bud4's function in septin organization during bud growth and axial bud site selection in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huan; Guo, Jia; Zhou, Ya-Ting; Gao, Xiang-Dong

    2015-03-01

    The anillin-related protein Bud4 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for axial bud site selection by linking the axial landmark to the septins, which localize at the mother bud neck. Recent studies indicate that Bud4 plays a role in septin organization during cytokinesis. Here we show that Bud4 is also involved in septin organization during bud growth prior to cytokinesis, as bud4Δ shs1Δ cells displayed an elongated bud morphology and defective septin organization at 18°C. Bud4 overexpression also affected septin organization during bud growth in shs1Δ cells at 30°C. Bud4 was previously thought to associate with the septins via its central region, while the C-terminal anillin-related region was not involved in septin association. Surprisingly, we found that the central region of Bud4 alone targets to the bud neck throughout the cell cycle, unlike full-length Bud4, which localizes to the bud neck only during G2/M phase. We identified the anillin-related region to be a second targeting domain that cooperates with the central region for proper septin association. In addition, the anillin-related region could largely mediate Bud4's function in septin organization during bud growth and bud site selection. We show that this region interacts with the C terminus of Bud3 and the two segments depend on each other for association with the septins. Moreover, like the bud4Δ mutant, the bud3Δ mutant genetically interacts with shs1Δ and cdc12-6 mutants in septin organization, suggesting that Bud4 and Bud3 may cooperate in septin organization during bud growth. These observations provide new insights into the interaction of Bud4 with the septins and Bud3.

  12. The Anillin-Related Region of Bud4 Is the Major Functional Determinant for Bud4's Function in Septin Organization during Bud Growth and Axial Bud Site Selection in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huan; Guo, Jia; Zhou, Ya-Ting

    2015-01-01

    The anillin-related protein Bud4 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for axial bud site selection by linking the axial landmark to the septins, which localize at the mother bud neck. Recent studies indicate that Bud4 plays a role in septin organization during cytokinesis. Here we show that Bud4 is also involved in septin organization during bud growth prior to cytokinesis, as bud4Δ shs1Δ cells displayed an elongated bud morphology and defective septin organization at 18°C. Bud4 overexpression also affected septin organization during bud growth in shs1Δ cells at 30°C. Bud4 was previously thought to associate with the septins via its central region, while the C-terminal anillin-related region was not involved in septin association. Surprisingly, we found that the central region of Bud4 alone targets to the bud neck throughout the cell cycle, unlike full-length Bud4, which localizes to the bud neck only during G2/M phase. We identified the anillin-related region to be a second targeting domain that cooperates with the central region for proper septin association. In addition, the anillin-related region could largely mediate Bud4's function in septin organization during bud growth and bud site selection. We show that this region interacts with the C terminus of Bud3 and the two segments depend on each other for association with the septins. Moreover, like the bud4Δ mutant, the bud3Δ mutant genetically interacts with shs1Δ and cdc12-6 mutants in septin organization, suggesting that Bud4 and Bud3 may cooperate in septin organization during bud growth. These observations provide new insights into the interaction of Bud4 with the septins and Bud3. PMID:25576483

  13. Glycoconjugate in rat taste buds.

    PubMed

    Kano, K; Ube, M; Taniguchi, K

    2001-05-01

    The taste buds of the fungiform papillae, circumvallate papilla, foliate papillae, soft palate and epiglottis of the rat oral cavity were examined by lectin histochemistry to elucidate the relationships between expression of glycoconjugates and innervation. Seven out of 21 lectins showed moderate to intense staining in at least more than one taste bud. They were succinylated wheat germ agglutinin (s-WGA). Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin-I (BSL-I), Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-I), peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I) and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-L (PHA-L). UEA-I and BSL-I showed moderate to intense staining in all of the taste buds examined. They strongly stained the taste buds of the epiglottis, which are innervated by the cranial nerve X. UEA-I intensely stained the taste buds of the fungiform papillae and soft palate, both of which are innervated by the cranial nerve VII. The taste buds of circumvallate papilla and foliate papillae were innervated by the cranial nerve IX and strongly stained by BSL-I. Thus, UEA-I and BSL-I binding glycoconjugates, probably alpha-linked fucose and alpha-D-galactose, respectively, might be specific for taste buds. Although the expression of these glycoconjugates would be related to the innervation of the cranial nerve X, the differential expression of alpha-linked fucose and alpha-D-galactose might be related to the innervation of the cranial nerve VII and IX, respectively.

  14. The bladder ran dry: bilateral ureteral obstruction.

    PubMed

    Schattner, Ami; Drahy, Yosef; Dubin, Ina

    2017-08-07

    A relatively young healthy man (barring obesity and distant gouty arthritis) was admitted with severe acute kidney injury (serum creatinine, 15.9 mg/dL) following acute gastroenteritis and occasional use of diclofenac. Abdominal ultrasound revealed mild left hydronephrosis due to staghorn stone and normal right kidney. Soon after, complete anuria necessitating haemodialysis developed without pain or evidence of infection. CT imaging revealed stones obstructing the right ureter. Following urological surgery, postobstructive diuresis developed and the serum creatinine came down to near normal. The stones were identified as uric acid stones.Anuria has a relatively narrow differential and painless (partially non-dilated) bilateral ureteral obstruction is a distinctly unusual cause. A review of the literature to cover all reported causes of bilateral ureteral obstruction is presented. Only a minority of cases were not associated with an underlying malignant disease or its treatment. The multifactorial aetiology of the patient's acute kidney injury (volume depletion, diclofenac and obstructive uropathy) is presented and discussed. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. [Experimental study regarding the ureteral cicatrization pattern in rabbit].

    PubMed

    Pintilie, R A; Grigorovici, Mirela

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to elaborate an experimental model for ureteral cicatrization following surgical lesion, with direct involvement in urological therapy. The study was realized on a group of 9 female rabbits on which we have performed ureteral surgery. First surgical event consisted in partial cut of the left ureter following transperitoneal approach, ureteral stent insertion and the suture of the ureteral wound. The second surgical event has accomplished the harvesting of the ureteral fragment during cicatrisation process and was performed at various times from the first surgical event, accordingly at 1, 2, 3...6 days--on different rabbits. 3 rabbits composed the witness group. Fragments were fixed in formol 4%, and histologically stained with hematoxilin-eosin and van Gieson. In the first two days we have observed an obvious inflammatory process on the postoperative ureteral scar. In days 3 and 4, the limited fibrosis appeared in the 2nd day engaged a peak in the 4th day when appeared a sketch of ureteral lumen constriction. In the 5th and 6th day the fibrosis process underwent a moderate resolution, simultaneously with a local diffuse congestion, marker for the remodeling processes of the connective matrix. Animal cicatrisation model follows the same pattern as in human but at different timing so as extrapolation requires considering these facts.

  16. Sonography in acute ureteric colic: an experience in Dhulikhel Hospital.

    PubMed

    Joshi, K S; Karki, S; Regmi, S; Joshi, H N; Adhikari, S P

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography is considered as an imaging modality of choice in acute ureteric colic. However due to concerns regarding radiation exposure, sonograms are re-emerging as imaging methods in such situations. To evaluate the role of sonography in detection of calculus in acute ureteric colic. Total 384 patients were enrolled. Hydronephrosis was graded as mild, moderate or severe. Calculus was detected as an intraluminal echogenic focus with distal shadowing with twinkling artifact. Number, size and position of the calculi were assessed. Patients were categorized into four groups:I. ureteric colic only II. ureteric colic with hematuria III. ureteric colic with hydronephrosis and IV. ureteric colic with hematuria and hydronephrosis and then the possibility of detection of calculi has been compared among these groups. Out of 384 patients, 254 were found to have calculi ranging between 2.7-27 mm. Nineteen had in the pelvis/ pelviureteric junction, 64 in proximal ureter, 125 in distal ureter, 6 at iliac crossing and 40 at vesicoureteric junction. Two hundred forty one had single and 14 had multiple calculi. Calculus detection is easier in category III and IV patients. The sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonography were 87.98% and 93.07%. Degree of hydronephrosis is strongly correlated with the number of calculi but weakly correlated with the size of the calculus. Sonogram can be used in all cases of acute ureteric colic. Hydronephrosis is the most important finding because it paves the way out for the detection of calculus.

  17. Factors that predict the spontaneous passage of ureteric stones in children

    PubMed Central

    Mokhless, Ibrahim; Zahran, Abdel-Rahman; Youssif, Mohamed; Fouda, Khaled; Fahmy, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the natural history of stone passage in children with ureterolithiasis and to define factors predictive of spontaneous passage. Patients and methods In all, 72 children with ureteric stones were evaluated; patients with ureteric calculi of >10 mm were excluded, as were those with absolute indications for surgical stone removal. Stone size, location, side, presence of hydronephrosis, perinephric stranding and degree of the tissue-rim sign were estimated by unenhanced helical computed tomography (UHCT). All patients were sent home with no administration of an α-blocker. The stone status was evaluated by a plain abdominal film or CT at ≈6 weeks after the initial diagnostic evaluation. The time from the initial complaint to the passage of the stone was recorded for each patient. Results In all, 54 (75%) children with ureteric stones of ⩽6 mm eventually passed their stones spontaneously. However, stones of <4 mm and those in the distal ureter had a significantly higher spontaneous passage rate and shorter time to stone passage (P < 0.05). The UHCT findings of a higher degree of the tissue-rim sign, hydronephrosis and perinephric fat stranding were associated with a lower likelihood of stone passage. Conclusions The rate of spontaneous passage of ureteric stones in children varies with stone location, and perinephric stranding on UHCT seems to be useful for predicting the possibility of spontaneous passage. In cases with unfavourable signs an early intervention might have better outcomes than conservative therapy. PMID:26558058

  18. [Pelvic lipomatosis. A case with ureteral and venous obstruction].

    PubMed

    Pocholle, P; Chautard, D; Bali, B; François, O; Deen, M; Soret, J Y

    1991-10-01

    The authors report a case of pelvic lipomatosis in a 62 year old man associated with venous obstruction (third case reported in the literature), diagnosed after bilateral ureteric obstruction, and review of the literature on this subject. The diagnosis was suggested by the radiological triad of hyperlucency of the pelvis on plain abdominal X-ray, "hot air balloon" appearance of the bladder on IVU and a rigid and ascended rectosigmoid on barium enema, and was confirmed by CT and MRI. Treatment combining corticosteroids and urinary tract disinfection was partially effective. A double J ureteric stent resolved the problem of persistent right ureteric obstruction.

  19. Percutaneous ureteral stent placement for the treatment of a benign ureteral obstruction in a Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae).

    PubMed

    Delk, Katie W; Wack, Raymund F; Burgdorf-Moisuk, Anne; Palm, Carrie A; Zwingenberger, Allison; Glaiberman, Craig B; Ferguson, Kenneth H; Culp, William T N

    2015-01-01

    A 15-year-old, 113 kg intact male Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) was evaluated for weight loss, polydipsia, and intermittent hematuria. The tiger was immobilized for diagnostic testing including blood work, urinalysis, and abdominal ultrasound. Laboratory testing demonstrated macro- and microhematuria, azotemia, and an increased urine protein:creatinine ratio. Abdominal ultrasound revealed bilateral ureterolithiasis as well as hydronephrosis and ureteral dilation. Ultrasonography performed 5 months later revealed worsening of the right-sided hydronephrosis and hydroureter and a decrease in the severity of dilation on the left side presumably from passage of the left-sided ureteral calculi. Nephroureteral decompression via the placement of a stent was elected. A pigtail ureteral catheter (8.2 French diameter) was placed in the right ureter via an antegrade percutaneous approach utilizing ultrasound and fluoroscopic-guidance. Following stent placement, macrohematuria resolved although microhematuria was noted in opportunistic urine samples. Five months after stent placement, the azotemia had mildly progressed, the urine protein:creatinine ratio was improved, the right hydronephrosis and hydroureter had completely resolved, and the ureteral stent remained in the appropriate position. The tiger had clinically improved with a substantial increase in appetite, weight, and activity level. Ureteral stenting allowed for nephroureteral decompression in the captive large felid of this report, and no complications were encountered. Ureteral stenting provided a minimally invasive method of managing ureteral obstruction in this patient and could be considered in future cases due to the clinical improvement and low morbidity.

  20. Double-ended pigtail ureteral stent: useful modification to single end ureteral stent.

    PubMed

    Camacho, M F; Pereiras, R; Carrion, H; Bondhus, M; Politano, V A

    1979-05-01

    A newly created ureteral stenting catheter of double-ended pigtail design is introduced. The pigtail design at both ends maintains the catheter in place by serving as a solid anchoring device, both intravesically and within the renal pelvis; upward or downward migration of the stent is thus prevented. It is designed also to minimize trigonal irritation. The catheter can be introduced easily either cystoendoscopically or through a percutaneous antegrade route, or by a combination of both methods. It offers the additional advantage of being readily available from an inexpensive stock source; it may be quickly and easily custom made and shaped for any ureter by the physician immediately prior to its insertion. It thus avoids having to have premanufactured, more expensive ureteral stents of different lengths. Open surgery for upper urinary tract decompression can thus be avoided.

  1. Mitochondrial inheritance in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Boldogh, I R; Yang, H C; Pon, L A

    2001-06-01

    During the past decade significant advances were made toward understanding the mechanism of mitochondrial inheritance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A combination of genetics, cell-free assays and microscopy has led to the discovery of a great number of components. These fall into three major categories: cytoskeletal elements, mitochondrial membrane components and regulatory proteins. These proteins mediate activities, including movement of mitochondria from mother cells to buds, segregation of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA, and equal distribution of the organelle between mother cells and buds during yeast cell division.

  2. The Race against Protease Activation Defines the Role of ESCRTs in HIV Budding.

    PubMed

    Bendjennat, Mourad; Saffarian, Saveez

    2016-06-01

    HIV virions assemble on the plasma membrane and bud out of infected cells using interactions with endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs). HIV protease activation is essential for maturation and infectivity of progeny virions, however, the precise timing of protease activation and its relationship to budding has not been well defined. We show that compromised interactions with ESCRTs result in delayed budding of virions from host cells. Specifically, we show that Gag mutants with compromised interactions with ALIX and Tsg101, two early ESCRT factors, have an average budding delay of ~75 minutes and ~10 hours, respectively. Virions with inactive proteases incorporated the full Gag-Pol and had ~60 minutes delay in budding. We demonstrate that during budding delay, activated proteases release critical HIV enzymes back to host cytosol leading to production of non-infectious progeny virions. To explain the molecular mechanism of the observed budding delay, we modulated the Pol size artificially and show that virion release delays are size-dependent and also show size-dependency in requirements for Tsg101 and ALIX. We highlight the sensitivity of HIV to budding "on-time" and suggest that budding delay is a potent mechanism for inhibition of infectious retroviral release.

  3. The Race against Protease Activation Defines the Role of ESCRTs in HIV Budding

    PubMed Central

    Bendjennat, Mourad; Saffarian, Saveez

    2016-01-01

    HIV virions assemble on the plasma membrane and bud out of infected cells using interactions with endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs). HIV protease activation is essential for maturation and infectivity of progeny virions, however, the precise timing of protease activation and its relationship to budding has not been well defined. We show that compromised interactions with ESCRTs result in delayed budding of virions from host cells. Specifically, we show that Gag mutants with compromised interactions with ALIX and Tsg101, two early ESCRT factors, have an average budding delay of ~75 minutes and ~10 hours, respectively. Virions with inactive proteases incorporated the full Gag-Pol and had ~60 minutes delay in budding. We demonstrate that during budding delay, activated proteases release critical HIV enzymes back to host cytosol leading to production of non-infectious progeny virions. To explain the molecular mechanism of the observed budding delay, we modulated the Pol size artificially and show that virion release delays are size-dependent and also show size-dependency in requirements for Tsg101 and ALIX. We highlight the sensitivity of HIV to budding “on-time” and suggest that budding delay is a potent mechanism for inhibition of infectious retroviral release. PMID:27280284

  4. β-Catenin signaling regulates temporally discrete phases of anterior taste bud development

    PubMed Central

    Thirumangalathu, Shoba; Barlow, Linda A.

    2015-01-01

    The sense of taste is mediated by multicellular taste buds located within taste papillae on the tongue. In mice, individual taste buds reside in fungiform papillae, which develop at mid-gestation as epithelial placodes in the anterior tongue. Taste placodes comprise taste bud precursor cells, which express the secreted factor sonic hedgehog (Shh) and give rise to taste bud cells that differentiate around birth. We showed previously that epithelial activation of β-catenin is the primary inductive signal for taste placode formation, followed by taste papilla morphogenesis and taste bud differentiation, but the degree to which these later elements were direct or indirect consequences of β-catenin signaling was not explored. Here, we define discrete spatiotemporal functions of β-catenin in fungiform taste bud development. Specifically, we show that early epithelial activation of β-catenin, before taste placodes form, diverts lingual epithelial cells from a taste bud fate. By contrast, β-catenin activation a day later within Shh+ placodes, expands taste bud precursors directly, but enlarges papillae indirectly. Further, placodal activation of β-catenin drives precocious differentiation of Type I glial-like taste cells, but not other taste cell types. Later activation of β-catenin within Shh+ precursors during papilla morphogenesis also expands taste bud precursors and accelerates Type I cell differentiation, but papilla size is no longer enhanced. Finally, although Shh regulates taste placode patterning, we find that it is dispensable for the accelerated Type I cell differentiation induced by β-catenin. PMID:26525674

  5. Model of human immunodeficiency virus budding and self-assembly: Role of the cell membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Nguyen, Toan T.

    2008-11-01

    Budding from the plasma membrane of the host cell is an indispensable step in the life cycle of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which belongs to a large family of enveloped RNA viruses, retroviruses. Unlike regular enveloped viruses, retrovirus budding happens concurrently with the self-assembly of the main retrovirus protein subunits (called Gag protein after the name of the genetic material that codes for this protein: Group-specific AntiGen) into spherical virus capsids on the cell membrane. Led by this unique budding and assembly mechanism, we study the free energy profile of retrovirus budding, taking into account the Gag-Gag attraction energy and the membrane elastic energy. We find that if the Gag-Gag attraction is strong, budding always proceeds to completion. During early stage of budding, the zenith angle of partial budded capsids, α , increases with time as α∝t1/2 . However, if the Gag-Gag attraction is weak, a metastable state of partial budding appears. The zenith angle of these partially spherical capsids is given by α0≃(τ2/κσ)1/4 in a linear approximation, where κ and σ are the bending modulus and the surface tension of the membrane, and τ is a line tension of the capsid proportional to the strength of Gag-Gag attraction. Numerically, we find α0<0.3π without any approximations. Using experimental parameters, we show that HIV budding and assembly always proceed to completion in normal biological conditions. On the other hand, by changing Gag-Gag interaction strength or membrane rigidity, it is relatively easy to tune it back and forth between complete budding and partial budding. Our model agrees reasonably well with experiments observing partial budding of retroviruses including HIV.

  6. Electron Tomography Reveals the Steps in Filovirus Budding

    PubMed Central

    Welsch, Sonja; Kolesnikova, Larissa; Krähling, Verena; Riches, James D.; Becker, Stephan; Briggs, John A. G.

    2010-01-01

    The filoviruses, Marburg and Ebola, are non-segmented negative-strand RNA viruses causing severe hemorrhagic fever with high mortality rates in humans and nonhuman primates. The sequence of events that leads to release of filovirus particles from cells is poorly understood. Two contrasting mechanisms have been proposed, one proceeding via a “submarine-like” budding with the helical nucleocapsid emerging parallel to the plasma membrane, and the other via perpendicular “rocket-like” protrusion. Here we have infected cells with Marburg virus under BSL-4 containment conditions, and reconstructed the sequence of steps in the budding process in three dimensions using electron tomography of plastic-embedded cells. We find that highly infectious filamentous particles are released at early stages in infection. Budding proceeds via lateral association of intracellular nucleocapsid along its whole length with the plasma membrane, followed by rapid envelopment initiated at one end of the nucleocapsid, leading to a protruding intermediate. Scission results in local membrane instability at the rear of the virus. After prolonged infection, increased vesiculation of the plasma membrane correlates with changes in shape and infectivity of released viruses. Our observations demonstrate a cellular determinant of virus shape. They reconcile the contrasting models of filovirus budding and allow us to describe the sequence of events taking place during budding and release of Marburg virus. We propose that this represents a general sequence of events also followed by other filamentous and rod-shaped viruses. PMID:20442788

  7. Spontaneous ureteral rupture in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, C.H.; Pennebaker, J.B.; Harisdangkul, V.; Songcharoen, S.

    1983-08-01

    A patient with known systemic lupus erythematosus had fever and symptoms of a lower urinary tract infection. Bone scintigraphy showed left ureteral perforation and necrosis with no demonstrable nephrolithiasis. It is speculated that this episode was due to lupus vasculitis.

  8. An Indwelling Ureteral Stent Forgotten for Over 12 Years

    PubMed Central

    Bidnur, Samir; Huynh, Melissa; Hoag, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ureteral stents are one of the most commonly used urologic devices with the purpose of establishing and maintaining ureteral patency. They are also associated with a number of complications including infection, migration, stent-related symptoms, and encrustation, leading to lithiasis. Prolonged stent dwell time is associated with a greater degree of these complications. We present the case of a 36-year-old man who presented with a severely encrusted ureteral stent that had been placed 12.5 years prior for an obstructive left-sided ureteral stone and was lost to follow-up. The patient underwent a combination of percutaneous nephrolithomy, cystolitholapaxy, and ureteroscopy to remove the stent and associated 1.7 cm renal pelvic stone and 4.1 cm bladder stone, necessitating two operative sittings to render him stone free. PMID:27579442

  9. [Endoscopic modified technique of ureteral resection during nephroureterectomy].

    PubMed

    Aguirre Benites, F; Blanco Carballo, O; Pamplona Casamayor, M; Díaz González, R; Leiva Galvis, O

    2007-01-01

    We show a technical modification of the ureteral endoscopic resection with which we try to avoid comunication between urine and surgical bed in order to prevent tumor local spread of upper urotelial tumor.

  10. Evolving Guidance on Ureteric Calculi Management in the Acute Setting.

    PubMed

    Makanjuola, Jonathan K; Rintoul-Hoad, Sophie; Bultitude, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Ureteric colic is a common presentation to acute emergency services. The gold standard test for the diagnosis of acute ureteric colic is a non-contrast computer tomography of the kidneys ureters and bladder (CT KUB). Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) should be used as first-line analgesia, with studies showing that there is no role for steroid or phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors. There is emerging evidence that a high body mass index (BMI) is a risk factor. The drugs used to facilitate stone passage are known as medical expulsive therapy (MET). The most evaluated being alpha-blockers. The Spontaneous Urinary Stone Passage Enabled by Drugs (SUSPEND) trial was designed to evaluate the use of MET (tamsulosin and nifedipine). This trial showed that there was no difference with MET and placebo for the spontaneous passage of ureteric stones. There is an emerging role for the use of primary ureteroscopy in the management of non-infective ureteric stones.

  11. Laser lithotripsy for ureteric calculi: results in 250 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, J. D.; Keane, P. F.; Johnston, S. R.; Kernohan, R. M.

    1995-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty patients with 290 stones presenting to the Department of Urology were treated with the Candela MDL 2000 Laser Lithotripter. Overall stone clearance rate was 95%. The more proximal the calculus the lower the success rate. Ninety eight percent of stones in the lower ureter, 95% of mid ureteric and 91% of upper ureteric stones were cleared. The major complication was perforation which occurred in 6% of cases. This procedure is a safe and effective treatment for ureteric calculi and is associated with a low complication rate and a high clearance rate. Laser lithotripsy is the optimum ureteroscopic method of treating ureteric calculi and is complimentary to extra corporeal shock wave lithotripsy. PMID:8533176

  12. [Problems with Ureteral Stents – a Never-Ending Story].

    PubMed

    Betschart, Patrick; Schmid, Hans-Peter; Abt, Dominik

    2016-03-16

    Temporary drainage of the upper urinary tract by internal ureteral stents is a common procedure to assure renal function and to treat pain caused by ureteral obstruction. Ureteral stents are frequently associated with side effects like urinary symptoms, pain or hematuria resulting in frequent medical consultations. In addition to good patient education, symptomatic drug therapy of stent-associated symptoms is often indicated and sufficient. However, complications like stent dysfunction or significant urinary tract infections have to be kept in mind, as they require further diagnostics and treatment. Therefore, especially general practitioners as a primary point of contact for the patients should be familiar with common ureteral stent-associated problems, their treatment and indications for patient referrals.

  13. Foamy Virus Budding and Release

    PubMed Central

    Hütter, Sylvia; Zurnic, Irena; Lindemann, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Like all other viruses, a successful egress of functional particles from infected cells is a prerequisite for foamy virus (FV) spread within the host. The budding process of FVs involves steps, which are shared by other retroviruses, such as interaction of the capsid protein with components of cellular vacuolar protein sorting (Vps) machinery via late domains identified in some FV capsid proteins. Additionally, there are features of the FV budding strategy quite unique to the spumaretroviruses. This includes secretion of non-infectious subviral particles and a strict dependence on capsid-glycoprotein interaction for release of infectious virions from the cells. Virus-like particle release is not possible since FV capsid proteins lack a membrane-targeting signal. It is noteworthy that in experimental systems, the important capsid-glycoprotein interaction could be bypassed by fusing heterologous membrane-targeting signals to the capsid protein, thus enabling glycoprotein-independent egress. Aside from that, other systems have been developed to enable envelopment of FV capsids by heterologous Env proteins. In this review article, we will summarize the current knowledge on FV budding, the viral components and their domains involved as well as alternative and artificial ways to promote budding of FV particle structures, a feature important for alteration of target tissue tropism of FV-based gene transfer systems. PMID:23575110

  14. [URETERAL TISSUE ENGINEERING: CHALLENGES AND PROSPECTS].

    PubMed

    Glybochko, P V; Alaev, Ju G; Vinarov, A Z; Butnaru, D V; Titov, A S; Bibikova, E E; Sevostjanova, S I

    2015-01-01

    A broad range of pathologic conditions of the ureter (strictures, obliterations, fistulas, and so on) requiring reconstructive plastic surgery is a challenging urological problem. A variety of approaches to solve the problem indicates the need of searching for new opportunities. A new direction in reconstructive surgery of the ureter is the tissue engineering. Tissue engineering involves the usage of matrices and cells. The matrices can be used both with cultured cells, and without them. This review represents the results of preclinical studies on feasibility of tissue engineering using as a matrix both natural and synthetic materials for different ureter impairments. Presently, there are no data on the use of tissue-engineering for the ureter reconstruction in clinical trials (i.e. involving human subjects). The results of studies presented in the review inspire certain optimism, but ureteral tissue-engineering is a difficult task requiring a balanced approach and well-thought-out design of preclinical studies.

  15. Current status of minimally invasive endoscopic management of ureteric strictures

    PubMed Central

    Kachrilas, Stefanos; Karaolides, Theocharis; Nikitopoulou, Stavroula; Papadopoulos, George; Buchholz, Noor; Masood, Junaid

    2013-01-01

    Endourological techniques are used more often nowadays in the treatment of ureteric strictures of various etiologies. Advances in technology have provided new tools to the armamentarium of the endoscopic urological surgeon. Numerous studies exist that investigate the efficiency and safety of each of the therapeutic modalities available. In this review, we attempt to demonstrate the available and contemporary evidence supporting each minimally invasive modality in the management of ureteric strictures. PMID:24294293

  16. Danazol in the management of ureteral obstruction secondary to endometriosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rivlin, M.E.; Krueger, R.P.; Wiser, W.L.

    1985-08-01

    A case is reported in which a woman was diagnosed with ureteral obstruction secondary to endometriosis after cystourethrogram, retrograde pyelogram and a renal scan. After unsuccessful treatment with danazol, a retroperitoneal ureteroneocystotomy was performed. The ureter was found to be obstructed by dense fibrous tissue that contained endometrial glands. It was concluded that danazol is unlikely to relieve endometriotic ureteric obstruction once dense fibrosis has occurred. 8 references, 2 figures.

  17. Dissolution of ureteral uric acid calculi with local litholytic irrigation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiqiang; Yao, Linfang; Ye, Zhangqun; Yang, Weimin

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of local litholytic irrigation (LLI) in the treatment of ureteral uric acid calculi. Fourteen cases of ureteral uric acid calculi were diagnosed by abdominal plain radiography (KUB), retrograde urography, ultrasonography (B-mode ultrasound), spiral computerized tomography(CT) and blood biochemical examinations. A ureteral catheter was passed retrogradely across ureteral calculi by cystoscopy. LLI with tromethamine-E (THAM-E) was performed via the ureteral catheter after the improvement of renal function and general situation and the control of urinary tract infection under the condition of intravenous application of antibiotics. The irrigation rate varied from 1000 to 1500 ml per day. Retrograde pyelography demonstrated complete dissolution of all the stones, 13 cases within 10 days and 1 within 12 days. Mild hematuria was observed in the majority of the cases and temporary aggravated lumbago in 1 case, with no other side effects. It is concluded that LLI is a practical and effective method in the treatment of ureteral uric acid calculi for its advantages of shorter duration,lower cost, less physical suffering and no severe complications.

  18. The Role of Pharmacology in Ureteral Physiology and Expulsive Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerde, Travis J.; Nakada, Stephen Y.

    2007-04-01

    Research in the field of ureteral physiology and pharmacology has traditionally been directed toward relaxation of ureteral spasm as a mechanism of analgesia during painful ureteral obstruction, most often stone-induced episodes. However, interest in this field has expanded greatly in recent years with the expanded use of alpha-blocker therapy for inducing stone passage, a usage now termed "medical expulsive therapy". While most clinical reports involving expulsive therapy have focused on alpha receptor or calcium channel blockade, there are diverse studies investigating pharmacological ureteral relaxation with novel agents including cyclooxygenase inhibitors, small molecule beta receptor agonists, neurokinin antagonists, and phosphodiesterase inhibitors. In addition, cutting edge molecular biology research is revealing promising potential therapeutic targets aimed at specific molecular changes that occur during the acute obstruction that accompanies stone disease. The purpose of this report is to review the use of pharmacological agents as ureteral smooth muscle relaxants clinically, and to look into the future of expulsive therapy by reviewing the available literature of ureteral physiology and pharmacology research.

  19. Magnetic resonance urography for diagnosis of pediatric ureteral stricture.

    PubMed

    Arlen, Angela M; Kirsch, Andrew J; Cuda, Scott P; Little, Stephen B; Jones, Richard A; Grattan-Smith, J Damien; Cerwinka, Wolfgang H

    2014-10-01

    Ureteral stricture is a rare cause of hydronephrosis in children and is often misdiagnosed on ultrasound (US) and diuretic renal scintigraphy (DRS), requiring intraoperative diagnosis. We evaluated ureteral strictures diagnosed by magnetic resonance urography (MRU) at our institution. Children with ureteral stricture who underwent MRU were identified. Patient demographics, prior imaging, MRU findings, and management were assessed. The efficacy of MRU in diagnosis of stricture was compared with US and DRS. Patients with ureteropelvic or ureterovesical junction obstruction were excluded. Twenty-eight ureteral strictures diagnosed by MRU between 2003 and 2013 were identified; 22% of strictures were diagnosed by DRS ± US. The mean age at MRU diagnosis was 2.4 years (range 4 weeks-15 years). Hydronephrosis was the most common presentation, accounting for 20 (71%) cases. Other etiologies included pain (3), incontinence (2), and urinary tract infection, cystic kidney, and absent kidney, present in one case each. A mean of 2.7 imaging studies was obtained prior to MRU diagnosis. Twenty-one (75%) ureteral strictures required surgical intervention, with the approach dependent upon location. MRU provides excellent anatomic and functional detail of the collecting system, leading to accurate diagnosis and management of ureteral stricture in children. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Dynamics of bud flow and bud bank of Phragmites communis population in dry land habitat of alkalinized meadow in the Songnen Plains of China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunfei; Wei, Chunyan; Zhang, Baotian; Liu, Bao

    2005-05-01

    In the dry land habitat of alkalinized meadow in Songnen Plains, the rhizomes of Phragmites communis population are distributed in different depths of one meter soil layer, which usually live for 6 years and a few for 7-9 years or even longer. Based on the investigation of their buds, a "bud flow" model of the population was established, and the method for estimating the dynamics of its bud bank storage, i.e., adding the input rate of 1st year age-class rhizome buds to the storage rate of other age-classes dormant buds in the bank, was put forward. The results showed that the input rate of the bud bank increased with plant growth seasons while the burgeoned output rate exhibited a decreasing trend, whereas the output rate of the dead remained at a low level on the whole. By the end of September in the early dormant period, the input rate of the bud bank was as 2.04 times as its output rate, and the dormant buds of each age-class manifested a steady burgeoned output. Quantitative analysis indicated that the burgeoned output rate of dormant buds increased by 11% each year. In another word, 11% of different age-classes dormant buds would germinate and form one-year class new rhizomes. The top of one-year class new rhizomes would develop to ramets in the next year, which would transport nutrients to nearby old-age rhizomes, and thus, maintain the vitality of old-age class rhizomes.

  1. Radiological noninvasive assessment of ureteral stone impaction into the ureteric wall: A critical evaluation with objective radiological parameters

    PubMed Central

    Safak, Kadihan Yalcin; Buz, Ayse; Eryildirim, Bilal; Erdem, Kutluhan; Sarica, Kemal

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To determine the predictive value of certain radiological parameters for an objective asssessment of the presence of ureteral stone impaction. Materials and Methods Seventy-nine patients with a single proximal ureteral stones were retrieved from the departmental database. Both clinical and particularly radiological data of all cases were well evaluated on this aspect. In addition to the time period between the first colic attack and definitive management; diameter of proximal ureter and renal pelvis, longitudinal and transverse stone size, Hounsfied unit (HU) of the stone and lastly ureteral wall thickness at the impacted stone site were all carefully evaluated and noted. Results Patients had a single proximal ureteral stone. While mean age of the cases was ranged 20 to 78 years; mean stone size was 15.62±4.26 mm. Evaluation of our data demonstrated that although there was a statistically significant correlation between ureteral wall thickness and patients age, transverse diameter of the stone, ureteral diameter just proximal to the stone, renal pelvic diameter and the duration of renal colic attacks; no correlation could be demonstrated between patients sex and the HU of the stone. Conclusions Prediction of the presence and degree of proximal ureteral stone impaction is a challenging issue and our data indicated a highly significant correlation between ureteral wall thickness and the some certain radiological as well as clinical parameters evaluated which will give an objective information about the presence of impaction which may in turn be helpful in the follow-up and also management plans of such calculi. PMID:28868505

  2. Ureteroiliac Artery Fistula Caused by a Metallic Memokath Ureteral Stent in a Radiation-Induced Ureteral Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Das, Krishanu; Ordones, Flavio; Welikumbura, Sumudu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Memokath 051™ stents are increasingly used for management of benign and malignant ureteral strictures refractory to management with single or tandem polymeric Double-J ureteral stents. Migration, encrustation, and difficulty in extraction during stent exchange are the chief problems reported so far with these thermoexpandable metallic stents. We report an unusual complication of ureteroexternal iliac artery fistula (UEAF) caused by Memokath stent inserted for radiation-induced ureteral stricture. Case Presentation: A 71-year-old male with history of colorectal cancer (underwent extirpative surgery + chemoradiotherapy) and subsequently radiation-induced ureteral stricture had bilateral Memokath ureteral stents inserted. Three months later, he presented with sepsis and hemodynamic instability secondary to UEAF, confirmed on angiography. A covered vascular stent was inserted as an immediate management. Conclusion: Memokath stent insertion in radiation-induced ureteral strictures may be associated with an increased risk of erosion and the rare potential complication of UEAF. This potential risk needs to be considered in the overall setting of such strictures and the difficulty in treating them. Prompt imaging (angiography) and placement of an endovascular stent are the ideal immediate options in such cases. PMID:27785465

  3. Resonance metallic ureteric stent in a case of ketamine bladder induced bilateral ureteric obstruction with one year follow up.

    PubMed

    Yong, Guo Liang; Kong, Chia Yew; Ooi, Michelle Wei Xin; Lee, Eng Geap

    2015-01-01

    Upper urinary tract occlusion is well recognized in patients with chronic ketamine abuse. The mechanism is generally unknown, but the ulcerative cystitis contracture may be responsible for obstruction. We present the first reported use of the Resonance metallic ureteric stent in the management ureteric obstruction caused by ketamine-induced uropathy. A 31-year-old lady with one-year history of recreational ketamine abuse presented with symptoms related to drug-induced ulcerative cystitis over twelve-months. She presented with acute renal failure with bilateral pyonephrosis and sepsis, and was initially treated with bilateral nephrostomy insertions and antegrade stenting. The J stents recovered the renal function, but the patient suffered from recurrent urinary tract infections (UTI's) with the prosthesis in-situ. The patient successfully underwent bilateral insertion of 12cm 6.0 French Cook Resonance metallic ureteric stents. One year following the placement of the metallic stents, the patient maintained optimal renal function with no episode of UTI. Ketamine induced uropathy is a well documented complication of chronic drug-induced ulcerative cystitis. The mechanical strength and inert property of metallic ureteric stents make it an ideal device to manage this problematic benign cause of ureteric obstruction. This is the first reported case of therapeutic bilateral metallic ureteric stents in the management of patients with ketamine induced uropathy with one year follow up. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. The Gachon University Ureteral Narrowing score: A comprehensive standardized system for predicting necessity of ureteral dilatation to treat proximal ureteral calculi

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Kyu; Kim, Tae Beom; Ko, Kwang-Pil; Kim, Chang Hee; Kim, Kwang Taek; Chung, Kyung Jin; Kim, Khae Hawn; Jung, Han; Yoon, Sang Jin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose For treating proximal ureteral calculi, treatment decision has been known still difficult to choose ureteroscopic lithotripsy (URS) or shockwave lithotripsy. The aims of our study are to identify the possible predictors for necessity of URS and to propose the Gachon University Ureteral Narrowing scoring system (GUUN score) as a helpful predictor. Materials and Methods We evaluated 83 consecutive patients who underwent semirigid URS due to proximal ureteral calculi between April 2011 and February 2014 by a single surgeon. We reviewed patient characteristics and pre- and postoperative parameters and surgical records. We divided the patients into 2 groups (group 1, nondilation group; group 2, dilation group) according to whether or not balloon dilation was performed. A stepwise logistic regression was performed to identify the factors that predict dilatation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were plotted and areas under the ROC curve (AUC) were calculated to GUUN score. Results Mean patients' age and their stone size were 48.53±12.90 years and 7.79±2.57 cm, respectively. Significantly smaller stone size (p=0.009), lower stone density (p=0.005), and lower ureteral density differences between ureteral narrowing level and far distal ureter (UD) (p<0.001) were observed in group 1 (n=34) than in group 2 (n=49). GUUN score consists of age, stone size and UD (AUC, 0.938). Overall stone-free clearance rate was 85.5%. Conclusions We suggest that the GUUN score is an excellent scoring system to predict the necessity of ureteral dilatation for decision making whether or not to perform surgical manipulation. PMID:27437538

  5. Evolution from open surgical to endovascular treatment of ureteral-iliac artery fistula

    PubMed Central

    Malgor, Rafael D.; Oderich, Gustavo S.; Andrews, James C.; McKusick, Michael; Kalra, Manju; Misra, Sanjay; Gloviczki, Peter; Bower, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To review the indications and results of open surgical and endovascular treatment for ureteral-iliac artery fistula (UIAF). Methods We reviewed the clinical data of 20 consecutive patients treated for 21 UIAFs between 1996 and 2010. Since 2004, iliac artery stent grafts were the primary treatment except for complex fistulas with enteric contamination or abscess. Endpoints were early morbidity and mortality, patient survival, vessel or graft patency, freedom from vascular or stent graft/graft infection, and freedom from recurrent bleeding. Results There were 20 patients, 15 females, and five males, with mean age of 63 ± 13 years. Predisposing factors for UIAF were prior tumor resection in 18 patients, radiation in 15, ureteral stents in 15, ileal conduits in four, and ileofemoral grafts in three. All patients presented with hematuria, which was massive in 10. Treatment included iliac stent grafts in 11 patients/12 fistulas (55%), with internal iliac artery (IAA) exclusion in nine, femoral crossover graft with IAA exclusion in five, direct arterial repair in three, and ureteral exclusion with percutaneous nephrostomy and no arterial repair in one. There were no early deaths. Five of eight patients treated by open surgical repair developed complications, which included enterocutaneous fistula in three and superficial wound infection in two. Four patients (36%) treated by iliac stent grafts had complications, including pneumonia, non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction, buttock claudication, and early stent occlusion in one each. After a median follow-up of 26 months, no one had recurrent massive hematuria, but minor bleeding was reported in three. Patient survival at 5 years was 42% compared with 93% for the general population (P < .001). Freedom from any recurrent bleeding at 3 years was 76%. In the stent graft group, primary and secondary patency rates and freedom from stent graft infection at 3 years were 81%, 92%, and 100%. Conclusions UIAF is a

  6. GATA6 Is a Crucial Regulator of Shh in the Limb Bud

    PubMed Central

    Kozhemyakina, Elena; Ionescu, Andreia; Lassar, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    In the limb bud, patterning along the anterior-posterior (A-P) axis is controlled by Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), a signaling molecule secreted by the “Zone of Polarizing Activity”, an organizer tissue located in the posterior margin of the limb bud. We have found that the transcription factors GATA4 and GATA6, which are key regulators of cell identity, are expressed in an anterior to posterior gradient in the early limb bud, raising the possibility that GATA transcription factors may play an additional role in patterning this tissue. While both GATA4 and GATA6 are expressed in an A-P gradient in the forelimb buds, the hindlimb buds principally express GATA6 in an A-P gradient. Thus, to specifically examine the role of GATA6 in limb patterning we generated Prx1-Cre; GATA6fl/fl mice, which conditionally delete GATA6 from their developing limb buds. We found that these animals display ectopic expression of both Shh and its transcriptional targets specifically in the anterior mesenchyme of the hindlimb buds. Loss of GATA6 in the developing limbs results in the formation of preaxial polydactyly in the hindlimbs. Conversely, forced expression of GATA6 throughout the limb bud represses expression of Shh and results in hypomorphic limbs. We have found that GATA6 can bind to chromatin (isolated from limb buds) encoding either Shh or Gli1 regulatory elements that drive expression of these genes in this tissue, and demonstrated that GATA6 works synergistically with FOG co-factors to repress expression of luciferase reporters driven by these sequences. Most significantly, we have found that conditional loss of Shh in limb buds lacking GATA6 prevents development of hindlimb polydactyly in these compound mutant embryos, indicating that GATA6 expression in the anterior region of the limb bud blocks hindlimb polydactyly by repressing ectopic expression of Shh. PMID:24415953

  7. The Energy of COPI for Budding Membranes.

    PubMed

    Thiam, Abdou Rachid; Pincet, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    As a major actor of cellular trafficking, COPI coat proteins assemble on membranes and locally bend them to bud 60 nm-size coated particles. Budding requires the energy of the coat assembly to overcome the one necessary to deform the membrane which primarily depends on the bending modulus and surface tension, γ. Using a COPI-induced oil nanodroplet formation approach, we modulated the budding of nanodroplets using various amounts and types of surfactant. We found a Heaviside-like dependence between the budding efficiency and γ: budding was only dependent on γ and occurred beneath 1.3 mN/m. With the sole contribution of γ to the membrane deformation energy, we assessed that COPI supplies ~1500 kBT for budding particles from membranes, which is consistent with common membrane deformation energies. Our results highlight how a simple remodeling of the composition of membranes could mechanically modulate budding in cells.

  8. The Energy of COPI for Budding Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Thiam, Abdou Rachid; Pincet, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    As a major actor of cellular trafficking, COPI coat proteins assemble on membranes and locally bend them to bud 60 nm-size coated particles. Budding requires the energy of the coat assembly to overcome the one necessary to deform the membrane which primarily depends on the bending modulus and surface tension, γ. Using a COPI-induced oil nanodroplet formation approach, we modulated the budding of nanodroplets using various amounts and types of surfactant. We found a Heaviside-like dependence between the budding efficiency and γ: budding was only dependent on γ and occurred beneath 1.3 mN/m. With the sole contribution of γ to the membrane deformation energy, we assessed that COPI supplies ~1500 kBT for budding particles from membranes, which is consistent with common membrane deformation energies. Our results highlight how a simple remodeling of the composition of membranes could mechanically modulate budding in cells. PMID:26218078

  9. The Role of Tandem Double-J Ureteral Stents in the Management of Malignant Ureteral Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Varnavas, Michalis; Bolgeri, Marco; Mukhtar, Saheel; Anson, Ken

    2016-04-01

    The management of malignant ureteral obstruction (MUO) is a challenging but common problem for urologists. The different techniques currently used to address this complicated issue include percutaneous nephrostomy, extra-anatomical stents, retrograde (single) stent insertion, and metallic stents. In those situations where single ureteral stent insertion has failed, retrograde tandem or twin ureteral stent (TUS) insertion can be completed. The aim of this study was to report our clinical experience and also assess the efficacy of TUS insertion within our tertiary referral center. Data were prospectively collected from patients requiring TUSs over an 8-year period between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2014. A number of variables, including the improvement in renal function following TUS insertion, were recorded. Twenty-two TUS insertion procedures were performed on 15 patients between the period of January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2014. The mean patient age was 68.0 years (39-85 years). There were 15 primary insertions as well as 7 subsequent stent changes. The average prenephrostomy creatinine was 428 μmol/L; an average improvement of 196 μmol/L was observed after percutaneous drainage. Serum creatinine after TUS remained stable on discharge, 214 μmol/L vs 227 μmol/L preoperatively, p = 0.34. Eleven patients died at a median 131 days post-TUS insertion. TUS failure occurred in three patients; this was characterized by rising creatinine and worsening hydronephrosis. Patients with failing TUS had a median life expectancy of 45.6 days compared with 162.5 days for those with functioning TUS (p < 0.05). Overall, the patency rate at 3 months was 80%. TUS insertion is a technically efficient and effective procedure in the management of MUO, with the majority of patients treated dying of the underlying condition with functioning stents in situ.

  10. Colonization of Dormant Walnut Buds by Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis Is Predictive of Subsequent Disease.

    PubMed

    Lindow, Steven; Olson, William; Buchner, Richard

    2014-11-01

    The potential role of walnut buds as a driver of walnut blight disease, caused by Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis, was addressed by quantifying its temporal dynamics in a large number of orchards in California. The abundance of X. arboricola pv. juglandis on individual dormant and developing buds and shoots of walnut trees varied by >10(6)-fold at any sample time and within a given tree. X. arboricola pv. juglandis population size in shoots was often no larger than that in the buds from which the shoots were derived but was strongly correlated with prior pathogen population sizes in buds. X. arboricola pv. juglandis populations on developing nuts were strongly related to that on the shoots on which they were borne. The incidence of disease of nuts in June was strongly correlated with the logarithm of the population size of X. arboricola pv. juglandis in dormant buds in March. Inoculum efficiency, the slope of this linear relationship, varied between years but was strongly related to the number of rain events following bud break in each year. Thus, inoculum of X. arboricola pv. juglandis present on dormant buds is the primary determinant of nut infections and the risk of disease can be predicted from both the numbers of X. arboricola pv. juglandis in buds and the incidence of early spring rain.

  11. Floral determination in the terminal bud of the short-day plant Pharbitis nil.

    PubMed

    Larkin, J C; Felsheim, R; Das, A

    1990-02-01

    Temporal and spatial aspects of floral determination in seedling terminal buds of the qualitative short-day plant Pharbitis nil were examined using a grafting assay. Floral determination in the terminal buds of 6-day-old P. nil seedlings is rapid; by 9 hr after the end of a 14-hr inductive dark period more than 50% of the induced terminal buds grafted onto uninduced stock plants produced a full complement of flower buds. When grafted at early times after the end of the dark period the terminal buds of induced plants produced three discrete populations of plants: plants with no flowers, plants with two axillary flowers at nodes 3 and 4 and a vegetative terminal shoot apex, and plants with five to seven flowers including a terminal flower. The temporal relationship among these populations of plants produced by apices grafted at different times indicates that under our conditions, the region of the terminal bud that will form the axillary buds at nodes 3 and 4 becomes florally determined prior to floral determination of the region of the terminal bud giving rise to the nodes above node 4.

  12. Metabolite changes in conifer buds and needles during forced bud break in Norway spruce (Picea abies) and European silver fir (Abies alba)

    PubMed Central

    Dhuli, Priyanka; Rohloff, Jens; Strimbeck, G. Richard

    2014-01-01

    Environmental changes such as early spring and warm spells induce bud burst and photosynthetic processes in cold-acclimated coniferous trees and consequently, cellular metabolism in overwintering needles and buds. The purpose of the study was to examine metabolism in conifers under forced deacclimation (artificially induced spring) by exposing shoots of Picea abies (boreal species) and Abies alba (temperate species) to a greenhouse environment (22°C, 16/8 h D/N cycle) over a 9 weeks period. Each week, we scored bud opening and collected samples for GC/MS–based metabolite profiling. We detected a total of 169 assigned metabolites and 80 identified metabolites, comprising compounds such as mono- and disaccharides, Krebs cycle acids, amino acids, polyols, phenolics, and phosphorylated structures. Untargeted multivariate statistical analysis based on PCA and cluster analysis segregated samples by species, tissue type, and stage of tissue deacclimations. Similar patterns of metabolic regulation in both species were observed in buds (amino acids, Krebs cycle acids) and needles (hexoses, pentoses, and Krebs cycle acids). Based on correlation of bud opening score with compound levels, distinct metabolites could be associated with bud and shoot development, including amino acids, sugars, and acids with known osmolyte function, and secondary metabolites. This study has shed light on how elevated temperature affects metabolism in buds and needles of conifer species during the deacclimation phase, and contributes to the discussion about how phenological characters in conifers may respond to future global warming. PMID:25566281

  13. Ureteric obstruction in familial adenomatous polyposis-associated desmoid disease.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Myles; Mignanelli, Emilio; Church, James

    2010-03-01

    Intra-abdominal desmoid disease is the second leading cause of death in familial adenomatous polyposis patients. The aim of this study was to identify the incidence, management, and outcomes for familial adenomatous polyposis associated intra-abdominal desmoids causing ureteric obstruction. Clinical data were abstracted from an institutional review board-approved, prospectively maintained familial polyposis registry. Of 107 patients identified with familial adenomatous polyposis related desmoid disease, 30 (28%) had documented CT scan evidence of ureteric obstruction. There was a 1:2.3 female predominance. Preceding surgery was the most prominent risk factor for development of desmoid disease (28 of 30 patients); 2 patients were diagnosed with desmoids before abdominal surgery. Overall, 11 patients had ureteric obstruction at the time of diagnosis. In the other 19 patients, median time from desmoid diagnosis to ureteric obstruction was 2 years. Pharmacologic management alone was effective in 8 patients. Eighteen patients (60%) underwent retrograde ureteric stent insertion. Five patients (17%) required percutaneous nephrostomy tubes. Three patients (10%) underwent autotransplant of 4 kidneys, and 4 patients (13%) required nephrectomy. One patient underwent ureterolysis, and another underwent ureteric resection with reimplantation. One-third of patients required more than one urologic procedure, and 63% had extensive small-bowel involvement with desmoid. The majority of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis associated desmoid disease who develop hydronephrosis require stenting. Complete obstruction may necessitate a nephrostomy. Renal autotransplant is an option for persistent symptomatic obstruction. Physicians treating patients with familial adenomatous polyposis and desmoid disease must be aware of the potential for development of ureteric obstruction and available treatment options.

  14. Tropical Storms Bud and Dera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Like dancers pirouetting in opposite directions, the rotational patterns of two different tropical storms are contrasted in this pair of MISR nadir-camera images.

    The left-hand image is of Tropical Storm Bud, acquired on June 17, 2000 (Terra orbit 2656) as the storm was dissipating. Bud was situated in the eastern Pacific Ocean between Socorro Island and the southern tip of Baja California. South of the storm's center is a vortex pattern caused by obstruction of the prevailing flow by tiny Socorro Island. Sonora, Mexico and Baja California are visible at the top of the image.

    The right-hand image is of Tropical Cyclone Dera, acquired on March 12, 2001 (Terra orbit 6552). Dera was located in the Indian Ocean, south of Madagascar. The southern end of this large island is visible in the top portion of this image.

    Northern hemisphere tropical storms, like Bud, rotate in a counterclockwise direction, whereas those in the southern hemisphere, such as Dera, rotate clockwise. The opposite spins are a consequence of Earth's rotation.

    Each image covers a swath approximately 380 kilometers wide.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  15. Tropical Storms Bud and Dera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Like dancers pirouetting in opposite directions, the rotational patterns of two different tropical storms are contrasted in this pair of Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) nadir-camera images. The left-hand image is of Tropical Storm Bud, acquired on June 17, 2000 (Terra orbit 2656) as the storm was dissipating. Bud was situated in the eastern Pacific Ocean between Socorro Island and the southern tip of Baja California. South of the storm's center is a vortex pattern caused by obstruction of the prevailing flow by tiny Socorro Island. Sonora, Mexico and Baja California are visible at the top of the image. The right-hand image is of Tropical Cyclone Dera, acquired on March 12, 2001. Dera was located in the Indian Ocean, south of Madagascar. The southern end of this large island is visible in the top portion of this image. Northern hemisphere tropical storms, like Bud, rotate in a counterclockwise direction, whereas those in the southern hemisphere, such as Dera, rotate clockwise. The opposite spins are a consequence of Earth's rotation. Each image covers a swath approximately 380 kilometers wide. Image courtesy NASA/JPL/GSFC/LaRC, MISR Team

  16. Tropical Storms Bud and Dera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Like dancers pirouetting in opposite directions, the rotational patterns of two different tropical storms are contrasted in this pair of MISR nadir-camera images.

    The left-hand image is of Tropical Storm Bud, acquired on June 17, 2000 (Terra orbit 2656) as the storm was dissipating. Bud was situated in the eastern Pacific Ocean between Socorro Island and the southern tip of Baja California. South of the storm's center is a vortex pattern caused by obstruction of the prevailing flow by tiny Socorro Island. Sonora, Mexico and Baja California are visible at the top of the image.

    The right-hand image is of Tropical Cyclone Dera, acquired on March 12, 2001 (Terra orbit 6552). Dera was located in the Indian Ocean, south of Madagascar. The southern end of this large island is visible in the top portion of this image.

    Northern hemisphere tropical storms, like Bud, rotate in a counterclockwise direction, whereas those in the southern hemisphere, such as Dera, rotate clockwise. The opposite spins are a consequence of Earth's rotation.

    Each image covers a swath approximately 380 kilometers wide.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  17. Tropical Storms Bud and Dera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Like dancers pirouetting in opposite directions, the rotational patterns of two different tropical storms are contrasted in this pair of Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) nadir-camera images. The left-hand image is of Tropical Storm Bud, acquired on June 17, 2000 (Terra orbit 2656) as the storm was dissipating. Bud was situated in the eastern Pacific Ocean between Socorro Island and the southern tip of Baja California. South of the storm's center is a vortex pattern caused by obstruction of the prevailing flow by tiny Socorro Island. Sonora, Mexico and Baja California are visible at the top of the image. The right-hand image is of Tropical Cyclone Dera, acquired on March 12, 2001. Dera was located in the Indian Ocean, south of Madagascar. The southern end of this large island is visible in the top portion of this image. Northern hemisphere tropical storms, like Bud, rotate in a counterclockwise direction, whereas those in the southern hemisphere, such as Dera, rotate clockwise. The opposite spins are a consequence of Earth's rotation. Each image covers a swath approximately 380 kilometers wide. Image courtesy NASA/JPL/GSFC/LaRC, MISR Team

  18. Tropical Storms Bud and Dera

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-04

    Like dancers pirouetting in opposite directions, the rotational patterns of two different tropical storms are contrasted in this pair of MISR nadir-camera images. The left-hand image is of Tropical Storm Bud, acquired on June 17, 2000 (Terra orbit 2656) as the storm was dissipating. Bud was situated in the eastern Pacific Ocean between Socorro Island and the southern tip of Baja California. South of the storm's center is a vortex pattern caused by obstruction of the prevailing flow by tiny Socorro Island. Sonora, Mexico and Baja California are visible at the top of the image. The right-hand image is of Tropical Cyclone Dera, acquired on March 12, 2001 (Terra orbit 6552). Dera was located in the Indian Ocean, south of Madagascar. The southern end of this large island is visible in the top portion of this image. Northern hemisphere tropical storms, like Bud, rotate in a counterclockwise direction, whereas those in the southern hemisphere, such as Dera, rotate clockwise. The opposite spins are a consequence of Earth's rotation. Each image covers a swath approximately 380 kilometers wide. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03400

  19. Coevolutionary patterning of teeth and taste buds

    PubMed Central

    Bloomquist, Ryan F.; Parnell, Nicholas F.; Phillips, Kristine A.; Fowler, Teresa E.; Yu, Tian Y.; Sharpe, Paul T.; Streelman, J. Todd

    2015-01-01

    Teeth and taste buds are iteratively patterned structures that line the oro-pharynx of vertebrates. Biologists do not fully understand how teeth and taste buds develop from undifferentiated epithelium or how variation in organ density is regulated. These organs are typically studied independently because of their separate anatomical location in mammals: teeth on the jaw margin and taste buds on the tongue. However, in many aquatic animals like bony fishes, teeth and taste buds are colocalized one next to the other. Using genetic mapping in cichlid fishes, we identified shared loci controlling a positive correlation between tooth and taste bud densities. Genome intervals contained candidate genes expressed in tooth and taste bud fields. sfrp5 and bmper, notable for roles in Wingless (Wnt) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, were differentially expressed across cichlid species with divergent tooth and taste bud density, and were expressed in the development of both organs in mice. Synexpression analysis and chemical manipulation of Wnt, BMP, and Hedgehog (Hh) pathways suggest that a common cichlid oral lamina is competent to form teeth or taste buds. Wnt signaling couples tooth and taste bud density and BMP and Hh mediate distinct organ identity. Synthesizing data from fish and mouse, we suggest that the Wnt-BMP-Hh regulatory hierarchy that configures teeth and taste buds on mammalian jaws and tongues may be an evolutionary remnant inherited from ancestors wherein these organs were copatterned from common epithelium. PMID:26483492

  20. Coevolutionary patterning of teeth and taste buds.

    PubMed

    Bloomquist, Ryan F; Parnell, Nicholas F; Phillips, Kristine A; Fowler, Teresa E; Yu, Tian Y; Sharpe, Paul T; Streelman, J Todd

    2015-11-03

    Teeth and taste buds are iteratively patterned structures that line the oro-pharynx of vertebrates. Biologists do not fully understand how teeth and taste buds develop from undifferentiated epithelium or how variation in organ density is regulated. These organs are typically studied independently because of their separate anatomical location in mammals: teeth on the jaw margin and taste buds on the tongue. However, in many aquatic animals like bony fishes, teeth and taste buds are colocalized one next to the other. Using genetic mapping in cichlid fishes, we identified shared loci controlling a positive correlation between tooth and taste bud densities. Genome intervals contained candidate genes expressed in tooth and taste bud fields. sfrp5 and bmper, notable for roles in Wingless (Wnt) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, were differentially expressed across cichlid species with divergent tooth and taste bud density, and were expressed in the development of both organs in mice. Synexpression analysis and chemical manipulation of Wnt, BMP, and Hedgehog (Hh) pathways suggest that a common cichlid oral lamina is competent to form teeth or taste buds. Wnt signaling couples tooth and taste bud density and BMP and Hh mediate distinct organ identity. Synthesizing data from fish and mouse, we suggest that the Wnt-BMP-Hh regulatory hierarchy that configures teeth and taste buds on mammalian jaws and tongues may be an evolutionary remnant inherited from ancestors wherein these organs were copatterned from common epithelium.

  1. Ureteral stenting can be a negative predictor for successful outcome following shock wave lithotripsy in patients with ureteral stones

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dong Hyuk; Cho, Kang Su; Ham, Won Sik; Chung, Doo Yong; Kwon, Jong Kyou; Choi, Young Deuk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate ureteral stenting as a negative predictive factor influencing ureteral stone clearance and to estimate the probability of one-session success in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) patients with a ureteral stone. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 1,651 patients who underwent their first SWL. Among these patients, 680 had a ureteral stone measuring 4–20 mm and were thus eligible for our study. The 57 patients who underwent ureteral stenting during SWL were identified. Maximal stone length (MSL), mean stone density (MSD), skin-to-stone distance (SSD), and stone heterogeneity index (SHI) were determined by pre-SWL noncontrast computed tomography. Results After propensity score matching, 399 patients were extracted from the total patient cohort. There were no significant differences between stenting and stentless groups after matching, except for a higher one-session success rate in the stentless group (78.6% vs. 49.1%, p=0.026). In multivariate analysis, shorter MSL, lower MSD, higher SHI, and absence of a stent were positive predictors for one-session success in patients who underwent SWL. Using cutoff values of MSL and MSD obtained from receiver operator curve analysis, in patients with a lower MSD (≤784 HU), the success rate was lower in those with a stent (61.1%) than in those without (83.5%) (p=0.001). However, in patients with a higher MSL (>10 mm), the success rate was lower in those with a stent (23.6%) than in those without (52.2%) (p=0.002). Conclusions Ureteral stenting during SWL was a negative predictor of one-session success in patients with a ureteral stone. PMID:27847914

  2. Ureteral wall thickness at the impacted ureteral stone site: a critical predictor for success rates after SWL.

    PubMed

    Sarica, Kemal; Kafkasli, Alper; Yazici, Özgür; Çetinel, Ali Cihangir; Demirkol, Mehmet Kutlu; Tuncer, Murat; Şahin, Cahit; Eryildirim, Bilal

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the possible predictive value of certain patient- and stone-related factors on the stone-free rates and auxiliary procedures after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with impacted proximal ureteral calculi. A total of 111 patients (86 male, 25 females M/F: 3.44/1) with impacted proximal ureteral stones treated with shock wave lithotripsy were evaluated. Cases were retrieved from a departmental shock wave lithotripsy database. Variables analyzed included BMI of the case, diameter of proximal ureter and renal pelvis, stone size and Hounsfield unit, ureteral wall thickness at the impacted stone site. Stone-free status on follow-up imaging at 3 months was considered a successful outcome. All patients had a single impacted proximal ureteral stone. While the mean age of the cases was 46 ± 13 years (range 26-79 years), mean stone size was 8.95 mm (5.3-15.1 mm). Following shock wave lithotripsy although 87 patients (78.4%) were completely stone-free at 3-month follow-up visit, 24 (21.6%) cases had residual fragments requiring further repeat procedures. Prediction of the final outcome of SWL in patients with impacted proximal ureteral stones is a challenging issue and our data did clearly indicate a highly significant relationship between ureteral wall thickness and the success rates of shock wave lithotripsy particularly in cases requiring additional procedures. Of all the evaluated stone- and patient-related factors, only ureteral wall thickness at the impacted stone site independently predicted shock wave lithotripsy success.

  3. Use of indocyanine green during robot-assisted ureteral reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ziho; Moore, Blake; Giusto, Laura; Eun, Daniel D

    2015-02-01

    Although there are reports of robot-assisted ureteral reconstructions (RURs) with excellent safety and efficacy, the procedures remain technically challenging. In the robotic setting the surgeon must rely on visual cues in the absence of tactile feedback. Indocyanine green (ICG) is a dye that can be visualized under near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF). To describe our novel technique, which utilizes intraureteral injection of ICG and subsequent visualization under NIRF to facilitate RUR, and report our outcomes after these procedures. This is a retrospective review of 25 patients who underwent 26 RURs for various ureteral pathologies between June 2012 and October 2013. After full disclosure, all patients consented to off-label use of ICG. A ureteral catheter and/or percutaneous nephrostomy tube were used to inject 10ml of ICG into the diseased ureter, above and below the stricture. Intraoperatively, NIRF was activated to assist in identification of the ureter and to localize the margins of ureteral strictures. Postoperatively, RURs were assessed for clinical success (absence of symptoms attributable to ureteral pathology) and radiological success (absence of a ureteral stricture on imaging). Our technique provided visual cues and aided in successful performance of 26 RURs in 25 patients. The procedures included ureterolysis (n=4), pyeloplasty (n=8), ureteroureterostomy (n=9), and ureteroneocystostomy (n=5). There were no perioperative complications attributable to ICG use. At a mean overall follow-up of 12 mo, all procedures were clinically and radiologically successful. This study is limited by the small sample size and short-term follow-up. Intraureteral injection of ICG and subsequent visualization under NIRF facilitates RUR by aiding in rapid and accurate identification of the ureter, and precise localization of the proximal and distal ureteral stricture margins. In our experience, our technique is safe, easy to perform, and reproducible. In this report, we

  4. Involvement of R-cadherin in the early stage of glomerulogenesis.

    PubMed

    Goto, S; Yaoita, E; Matsunami, H; Kondo, D; Yamamoto, T; Kawasaki, K; Arakawa, M; Kihara, I

    1998-07-01

    The earliest commitment to the formation of glomeruli is recognizable in S-shaped bodies. Although cell-cell adhesion seems likely to play a crucial role in this process, how glomerular epithelial cells segregate from the other parts of the nephron is unknown. In this study, immunofluorescence microscopy and monoclonal antibodies specific for mouse R-, E-, P- and N-cadherins were used to examine which of these adhesion molecules are involved in glomerulogenesis of the mouse kidney. Weak R-cadherin staining was first found in the vesicle stage, becoming restricted to glomerular visceral epithelial cells (VEC) during the S-shaped body stage. The intensity of this staining became stronger in the capillary loop stage, whereas parietal epithelial cells (PEC) and tubular cells did not stain. In the maturing stage, VEC gradually lost their staining for R-cadherin. E-cadherin was detected in ureteric buds and the upper limb of S-shaped bodies. From the capillary loop to the maturing stage, anti-E-cadherin stained epithelial cells in all tubule segments, but no label was seen in VEC or PEC. P-cadherin was also stained in the ureteric buds and in the upper limb of S-shaped bodies. N-Cadherin was weakly stained in cells at the vesicle stage, but thereafter staining of N-cadherin was not detected at any stage of glomerular formation. Immunoelectron microscopy of differentiating VEC was performed using antibodies specific to alpha-catenin, which is associated with cadherin. Subsequently, immunogold particles identifying alpha-catenin were localized on junctions between primary processes of VEC. These findings indicate that R-cadherin is uniquely expressed in differentiating VEC, suggesting an important role in the early stages of glomerulogenesis.

  5. Aip3p/Bud6p, a yeast actin-interacting protein that is involved in morphogenesis and the selection of bipolar budding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Amberg, D C; Zahner, J E; Mulholland, J W; Pringle, J R; Botstein, D

    1997-01-01

    A search for Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins that interact with actin in the two-hybrid system and a screen for mutants that affect the bipolar budding pattern identified the same gene, AIP3/BUD6. This gene is not essential for mitotic growth but is necessary for normal morphogenesis. MATa/alpha daughter cells lacking Aip3p place their first buds normally at their distal poles but choose random sites for budding in subsequent cell cycles. This suggests that actin and associated proteins are involved in placing the bipolar positional marker at the division site but not at the distal tip of the daughter cell. In addition, although aip3 mutant cells are not obviously defective in the initial polarization of the cytoskeleton at the time of bud emergence, they appear to lose cytoskeletal polarity as the bud enlarges, resulting in the formation of cells that are larger and rounder than normal. aip3 mutant cells also show inefficient nuclear migration and nuclear division, defects in the organization of the secretory system, and abnormal septation, all defects that presumably reflect the involvement of Aip3p in the organization and/or function of the actin cytoskeleton. The sequence of Aip3p is novel but contains a predicted coiled-coil domain near its C terminus that may mediate the observed homo-oligomerization of the protein. Aip3p shows a distinctive localization pattern that correlates well with its likely sites of action: it appears at the presumptive bud site prior to bud emergence, remains near the tips of small bund, and forms a ring (or pair of rings) in the mother-bud neck that is detectable early in the cell cycle but becomes more prominent prior to cytokinesis. Surprisingly, the localization of Aip3p does not appear to require either polarized actin or the septin proteins of the neck filaments. Images PMID:9247651

  6. Ureteral Avulsion Associated with Ureteroscopy: Insights from the MAUDE Database.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, Ryuta; Cleary, Ryan C; Bagley, Demetrius H; Hubosky, Scott G

    2016-03-01

    Flexible and semirigid ureteroscopy (URS) are widely performed for the treatment of upper tract calculi and tumors. Ureteral avulsion is a rare, but devastating complication of endoscopic stone removal having multiple possible etiologies. Awareness and avoidance of this rare complication depend on identifying responsible mechanisms. This study examines the situations in which ureteral avulsion occurs as described anonymously in the Manufacturer and User facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database. The MAUDE database was systematically reviewed to account for all reported complications of flexible and semirigid URS. Keywords "ureteroscopy, injury, death, malfunction and other" were entered in the database and medical device reports were reviewed to capture any cases resulting in ureteral avulsion. Attention was paid to the type of ureteroscope involved and the mechanism for avulsion. A total of 104 entries were found detailing the reported complications of flexible and semirigid URS. Ureteral avulsion was clearly noted in six reports with flexible (2) and semirigid ureteroscopes (4). Potential mechanisms included locked deflection of a flexible ureteroscope (1), bunching of the distal bending rubber in a flexible ureteroscope (1), scabbard avulsion (3), and stone basketing (1). Although the incidence of ureteral avulsion cannot truly be determined from this study, some potentially novel mechanisms for this rare complication are observed. This may target future educational efforts to maximize awareness and avoidance of this complication.

  7. Forgotten and fragmented ureteral j stent with stone formation: combined endoscopic management.

    PubMed

    Sen, Volkan; Bozkurt, Halil Ibrahim; Yonguc, Tarık; Aydogdu, Ozgu; Yarimoglu, Serkan; Degirmenci, Tansu; Minareci, Suleyman

    2015-01-01

    Ureteral stents are widely used in endo-urological procedures. However, ureteral stents can be forgotten and cause serious complications, including fragmentation, migration and urosepsis.There are few reports about forgotten and fragmented ureteral stents with stone formation. We aimed to present this rare case with successful combined endo-urological management.

  8. Novel Features of the Prenatal Horn Bud Development in Cattle (Bos taurus).

    PubMed

    Wiener, Dominique Judith; Wiedemar, Natalie; Welle, Monika Maria; Drögemüller, Cord

    2015-01-01

    Whereas the genetic background of horn growth in cattle has been studied extensively, little is known about the morphological changes in the developing fetal horn bud. In this study we histologically analyzed the development of horn buds of bovine fetuses between ~70 and ~268 days of pregnancy and compared them with biopsies taken from the frontal skin of the same fetuses. In addition we compared the samples from the wild type (horned) fetuses with samples taken from the horn bud region of age-matched genetically hornless (polled) fetuses. In summary, the horn bud with multiple layers of vacuolated keratinocytes is histologically visible early in fetal life already at around day 70 of gestation and can be easily differentiated from the much thinner epidermis of the frontal skin. However, at the gestation day (gd) 212 the epidermis above the horn bud shows a similar morphology to the epidermis of the frontal skin and the outstanding layers of vacuolated keratinocytes have disappeared. Immature hair follicles are seen in the frontal skin at gd 115 whereas hair follicles below the horn bud are not present until gd 155. Interestingly, thick nerve bundles appear in the dermis below the horn bud at gd 115. These nerve fibers grow in size over time and are prominent shortly before birth. Prominent nerve bundles are not present in the frontal skin of wild type or in polled fetuses at any time, indicating that the horn bud is a very sensitive area. The samples from the horn bud region from polled fetuses are histologically equivalent to samples taken from the frontal skin in horned species. This is the first study that presents unique histological data on bovine prenatal horn bud differentiation at different developmental stages which creates knowledge for a better understanding of recent molecular findings.

  9. [Subcutaneous ureteral bypass devices as a treatment option for bilateral ureteral obstruction in a cat with ureterolithiasis].

    PubMed

    Heilmann, Romy M; Pashmakova, Medora; Lamb, Jodie H; Spaulding, Kathy A; Cook, Audrey K

    2016-06-16

    A 6-year-old female spayed Domestic Shorthair cat was presented with acute lethargy, dehydration, marked azotemia, metabolic acidosis, left-sided renomegaly, and bilateral hydronephrosis. Ureterolithiasis and ureteral obstruction were suspected based on further diagnostics including abdominal sonography. Medical treatment was not successful. Fluoroscopically guided antegrade pyelography confirmed the diagnosis of bilateral ureteral obstruction due to ureterolithiasis. Subcutaneous ureteral bypass (SUB) devices were placed bilaterally, followed by close patient monitoring. Frequent reassessment of patient parameters and blood work served to adjust the fluid needs of the patient and to ensure proper hydration, correction of azotemia at an appropriate rate, and cardiovascular stability. After significant improvement of all patient parameters within 5 days, the patient was discharged from the hospital. Treatment included a dietary change to reduce the risk of stone formation as well as a phosphorus binder. Clinical and clinicopathologic parameters were unchanged at the 1- and 4- and 7-month rechecks (consistent with IRIS CKD stage II-NP-AP0), and both SUB devices continued to provide unobstructed urine flow. Bilateral placement of subcutaneous ureteral bypass devices may be a safe and potentially effective treatment option for acute bilateral ureteral obstruction in cats with ureterolithiasis. Strict patient monitoring and patient-centered postoperative treatment decisions are crucial to successful treatment outcomes.

  10. Does ureteral manipulation improve the effect of extracorporeal electromagnetic shock wave treatment on impacted ureteral calculi?--an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Chen, W C; Lee, Y H; Huang, J K

    1997-01-01

    We used an experimental study to evaluate the effects of ureteral manipulation on the disintegration of impacted ureteral calculi. Fifteen urinary calculi were divided into 3 groups according to the type of ureteral manipulation. Group 1: control group, no manipulation; group 2: bypass catheterization, and group 3: below irrigation in porcine ureter. Each calculus was subjected to 500 shock wave pulses with 0.28 mJ/mm2 power density by a Siemens Lithostar II lithotriptor. The successful disintegration ratio for calculus sizes less than 4 and 2 mm was 79.4 +/- 13.1 and 42.2 +/- 7.5% (group 1), 82.3 +/- 5.2 and 43.5 +/- 2.4% (group 2) and 84.3 +/- 17.3 and 49.7 +/- 14.6% (group 3). There was no statistical difference among the 3 groups by Anova and the Kruskal-Wallis test. The ureteral manipulation of impacted ureteral calculi was unable to improve stone disintegration by shock wave.

  11. Metallic stents in the management of ureteric strictures

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Management of ureteric strictures is a challenging task. Subtle presentation, silent progression and complex aetiology may delay diagnosis. A wide range of available treatment options combined with the lack of adequate randomised trials has led to the introduction of personal bias in the management of this difficult group of patients. Metallic ureteric stents offer an alternative to the conventional treatment modalities. A review of the currently available metallic stents and their role in the long-term management of ureteric strictures is presented. Materials used in the manufacture of indwelling urological devices are evolving all the time. Improved endo-urological techniques combined with new devices made from better compounds will continue to improve patient experience. PMID:24497686

  12. Is extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy suitable treatment for lower ureteric stones?

    PubMed

    Cole, R S; Shuttleworth, K E

    1988-12-01

    Forty patients with lower ureteric calculi for which intervention was considered desirable have been treated by in situ extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) on the Dornier HM3 Lithotripter using a modified technique. Stone localisation was satisfactory in all patients. Adequate disintegration was achieved in 90% of patients following one treatment; 34 patients have been followed up for at least 3 months and 27 of these are stone-free (79%). Treatment failed in 4 patients and 2 of these had dense lower ureteric stone streets as a result of previous ESWL. The retreatment rate, post-treatment auxiliary procedure rate and complication rate were minimal. It was concluded that in situ ESWL is an effective and safe method for treating certain selected lower ureteric stones and should be considered as a feasible alternative to the more conventional methods of treatment.

  13. The number of fetal nephron progenitor cells limits ureteric branching and adult nephron endowment.

    PubMed

    Cebrian, Cristina; Asai, Naoya; D'Agati, Vivette; Costantini, Frank

    2014-04-10

    Nephrons, the functional units of the kidney, develop from progenitor cells (cap mesenchyme [CM]) surrounding the epithelial ureteric bud (UB) tips. Reciprocal signaling between UB and CM induces nephrogenesis and UB branching. Although low nephron number is implicated in hypertension and renal disease, the mechanisms that determine nephron number are obscure. To test the importance of nephron progenitor cell number, we genetically ablated 40% of these cells, asking whether this would limit kidney size and nephron number or whether compensatory mechanisms would allow the developing organ to recover. The reduction in CM cell number decreased the rate of branching, which in turn allowed the number of CM cells per UB tip to normalize, revealing a self-correction mechanism. However, the retarded UB branching impaired kidney growth, leaving a permanent nephron deficit. Thus, the number of fetal nephron progenitor cells is an important determinant of nephron endowment, largely via its effect on UB branching. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Emphysematous pyelonephritis in type II diabetes: A case report of an undiagnosed ureteric colic.

    PubMed

    Vollans, Samuel R; Sehjal, Ranjit; Forster, James A; Rogawski, Karol M

    2008-09-30

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) is a severe acute necrotising infection of the renal parenchyma and perirenal tissue, characterised by gas formation. 90% of cases are seen in association with diabetes mellitus. We report a case of undiagnosed ureteric obstruction in a type II diabetic, leading to EPN requiring emergency nephrectomy. A 59-year-old type II tablet controlled diabetic woman presented complaining of a five day history of right sided abdominal pain associated with vomiting, abdominal distension and absolute constipation. There were no lower urinary tract symptoms. Past surgical history included an open appendectomy and an abdominal hysterectomy. On examination, she was haemodynamically stable, the abdomen was soft, distended, and tender in the right upper and lower quadrants with no bowel sounds. Investigations revealed a CRP of 365 and 2+ blood and nitrite positive on the urine dipstick. The AXR was reported as normal on admission, however when reviewed in retrospect revealed the diagnosis. She was managed, therefore, as having adhesional bowel obstruction and a simple UTI. After four days, a CT was organised as she was not settling. This showed a right pyohydronephrosis with gas in the collecting system secondary to an 8 mm obstructing ureteric calculus. The kidney was drained percutaneously via a nephrostomy and the patient was commenced on a broad spectrum intravenous antibiotics. Despite this, she went on to need an emergency nephrectomy for uncontrolled severe sepsis. She was discharged in good health 15 days later. EPN carries a mortality of up to 40% with medical management alone. Early recognition of EPN in an obstructed kidney is essential to guide aggressive management, and in the presence of continued severe sepsis or organ dysfunction an urgent nephrectomy should be carried out. Diabetic patients who are known to have renal or ureteric calculi, whether symptomatic or not, should be considered for percutanous or ureteroscopic treatment. In

  15. Experimental evolution in budding yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    I will discuss our progress in analyzing evolution in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We take two basic approaches. The first is to try and examine quantitative aspects of evolution, for example by determining how the rate of evolution depends on the mutation rate and the population size or asking whether the rate of mutation is uniform throughout the genome. The second is to try to evolve qualitatively novel, cell biologically interesting phenotypes and track the mutations that are responsible for the phenotype. Our efforts include trying to alter cell morphology, evolve multicellularity, and produce a biological oscillator.

  16. Complete Ureteral Duplication: Outcome of Different Surgical Approaches.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Isabel; Estevão-Costa, José; Fragoso, Ana Catarina

    2016-04-01

    The surgical management of complete ureteral duplication anomalies is not consensual. To characterize the pediatric population who underwent surgery for complete ureteral duplication and assess the outcomes of different approaches. Clinical records from patients treated between January 2008 and June 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical manifestations and surgical procedures were collected and analysed. Ureteral units were divided into two groups: A, with ureterocele; and B, without it. Forty-one ureteral units from 32 patients with complete duplication underwent surgery. In group A (n = 18), the selected primary procedure was: ureterocele punction (12); ureter reimplantation (3); pyelopyelostomy (2); heminephrectomy (1). A reintervention was required in 3 of the 12 units submitted to punction: heminephrectomy (1), ureteroureterostomy (1), and ureteric reimplantation (1). In group B (n = 23), STING was performed in 10 units, ureteric reimplantation in 3, pyelopyelostomy in 3, ureteroureterostomy in 1, and heminephrectomy in 6; two cases required reintervention. A conservative primary approach was favoured in cases with ureterocele and/or reflux in hemisystems worth preserving (53.7%); it was effective per se in 75% (n = 9/12) units in group A and 80% (n = 8/10) in group B. An ablative primary procedure was adopted in 17% (n = 7/41) cases, 5.6% of group A (n = 1/18) and 26.1% of group B (n = 6/23). A conservative approach is effective as a primary and isolated procedure in the majority of cases with ureterocele or vesicoureteral reflux. Further studies are needed to establish the advantages over primary invasive or ablative approaches.

  17. The burden of chronic ureteral stenting in cervical cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yunhua; Jarosek, Stephanie; Elliott, Sean P.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose Ureteral obstruction in cervical cancer occurs in up to 11% of patients, many of whom undergo ureteral stenting. Our aim was to describe the patient burden of chronic ureteral stenting in a population-based cohort by detailing two objectives: (1) the frequency of repeat procedures for ureteral obstruction; and, (2) the frequency of urinary adverse effects (UAEs) (e.g., lower urinary tract symptoms, flank pain). Materials and Methods From SEER-Medicare, we identified 202 women who underwent ureteral stent placement prior to or following cervical cancer treatment. The frequency of repeat procedures and rate ratios were compared between treatment modalities. The rates and rate ratios of UAEs were compared between our primary cohort (stent + cervical cancer) and the following groups: no stent + cervical cancer, stent + no cancer, and no stent + no cancer. The “no cancer” group was drawn from the 5% Medicare sample. Results 117/202 women (58%) underwent >1 stent procedure. The frequency of additional procedures was significantly higher in patients who received radiation as part of their treatment. UAEs were very common in women with stent + cancer. The rate of UTI was 190 (per 100 person-years), 67 for LUTS, 42 for stones, and 6 for flank pain. These rates were 3-10 fold higher than in the no stent + no cancer control group; rates were also higher than in the no stent + cancer and the stent + no cancer women. Conclusions The burden of disease associated with ureteral stents is higher than expected and urologists should be actively involved in stent management, screening for associated symptoms and offering definitive reconstruction when appropriate. PMID:27649113

  18. Endometriosis on the uterosacral ligament: a marker of ureteral involvement.

    PubMed

    Lima, Raquel; Abdalla-Ribeiro, Helizabet; Nicola, Ana Luisa; Eras, Aline; Lobao, Anna; Ribeiro, Paulo Ayroza

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the association between ultrasound measurements of endometriosis nodules on the uterosacral ligament (USL) and the risk of ureteral involvement, as well as to assess whether associations with other ultrasound variables increase the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnosis of ureteral endometriosis. Cross-sectional, observational study. University hospital. Four hundred sixty-three women with deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE). Patients diagnosed with DIE underwent transvaginal ultrasound endometriosis mapping before laparoscopic surgery for full excision of endometriotic lesions. Preoperative ultrasound evaluation, intra- and postoperative assessment, and anatomopathologic confirmation. Of the 463 patients who participated in the study, 111 (23.97%) presented with endometriosis nodules with USL involvement on ultrasound examination conducted by a single radiologist. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the size of the USL nodule had a statistically significant association with ipsilateral ureteral involvement. After multivariate logistic regression, the variables reduction in ovarian mobility, ureteral changes on the right side, size of the USL nodule, and presence of endometrioma on the left side were significantly associated with a ureteral endometriosis nodule. However, the combined result for the variables cited was worse than the diagnostic analysis using only the size of the USL nodule. Uterosacral ligament nodules with ultrasound measurements of 1.75 cm and 1.95 cm on the right and left sides, respectively, significantly increase the risk of ureteral involvement. Even with the association of other ultrasound variables, there was no improvement in sensitivity. Therefore, USL nodule size is a key measure for therapeutic planning and consent of the patient. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Development and growth of primordial shoots in Norway spruce buds before visible bud burst in relation to time and temperature in the field.

    PubMed

    Sutinen, Sirkka; Partanen, Jouni; Viherä-Aarnio, Anneli; Häkkinen, Risto

    2012-08-01

    The timing of bud development in ecodormancy is critical for trees in boreal and temperate regions with seasonally alternating climates. The development of vegetative buds and the growth of primordial shoots (the primordial shoot ratio) in Norway spruce were followed by the naked eye and at stereo and light microscopic levels in fresh-cut and fixed buds obtained by regular field samplings during the spring of 2007, 2008 and 2009. Buds were collected from 15 randomly selected trees (all 16 years old in 2007) of one southern Finnish half-sib family. The air temperature was recorded hourly throughout the observation period. In 2008 and 2009, initial events in the buds, seen as accumulation of lipid droplets in the cortex area, started in mid-March and were depleted in late April, simultaneously with the early development of vascular tissue and primordial needles. In mid-April 2007, however, the development of the buds was at least 10 days ahead as a result of warm spells in March and early April. Variation in the timing of different developmental phases within and among the sample trees was negligible. There was no clear one-to-one correspondence between the externally visible and the internal development of the buds. The dependence of the primordial shoot ratio on different types of temperature sum was studied by means of regression analysis. High coefficients of determination (R(2) ≈ 95%) were attained with several combinations of the starting time (beginning of the year/vernal equinox), the threshold value (from -3 to +5 °C), and the time step (hour/day) used in the temperature summation, i.e., the prediction power of the primordial shoot ratio models turned out to be high, but the parameter estimate values were not unambiguous. According to our results, temperature sums describe the growth of the primordial shoot inside the bud before bud burst. Thus, the results provide a realistic interpretation for the present phenological models of bud development that

  20. Bioresorbable ureteral stents from natural origin polymers.

    PubMed

    Barros, Alexandre A; Rita, Ana; Duarte, C; Pires, Ricardo A; Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Ludovico, Paula; Lima, Estevão; Mano, João F; Reis, Rui L

    2015-04-01

    In this work, stents were produced from natural origin polysaccharides. Alginate, gellan gum, and a blend of these with gelatin were used to produce hollow tube (stents) following a combination of templated gelation and critical point carbon dioxide drying. Morphological analysis of the surface of the stents was carried out by scanning electron microscopy. Indwelling time, encrustation, and stability of the stents in artificial urine solution was carried out up to 60 days of immersion. In vitro studies carried out with simulated urine demonstrated that the tubes present a high fluid uptake ability, about 1000%. Despite this, the materials are able to maintain their shape and do not present an extensive swelling behavior. The bioresorption profile was observed to be highly dependent on the composition of the stent and it can be tuned. Complete dissolution of the materials may occur between 14 and 60 days. Additionally, no encrustation was observed within the tested timeframe. The ability to resist bacterial adherence was evaluated with Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and two Gram-negatives Escherichia coli DH5 alpha and Klebsiella oxytoca. For K. oxytoca, no differences were observed in comparison with a commercial stent (Biosoft(®) duo, Porges), although, for S. aureus all tested compositions had a higher inhibition of bacterial adhesion compared to the commercial stents. In case of E. coli, the addition of gelatin to the formulations reduced the bacterial adhesion in a highly significant manner compared to the commercial stents. The stents produced by the developed technology fulfill the requirements for ureteral stents and will contribute in the development of biocompatible and bioresorbable urinary stents.

  1. HIV Pol Inhibits HIV Budding and Mediates the Severe Budding Defect of Gag-Pol

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Xin; Gould, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    The prevailing hypothesis of HIV budding posits that the viral Gag protein drives budding, and that the Gag p6 peptide plays an essential role by recruiting host-cell budding factors to sites of HIV assembly. HIV also expresses a second Gag protein, p160 Gag-Pol, which lacks p6 and fails to bud from cells, consistent with the prevailing hypothesis of HIV budding. However, we show here that the severe budding defect of Gag-Pol is not caused by the absence of p6, but rather, by the presence of Pol. Specifically, we show that (i) the budding defect of Gag-Pol is unaffected by loss of HIV protease activity and is therefore an intrinsic property of the Gag-Pol polyprotein, (ii) the N-terminal 433 amino acids of Gag and Gag-Pol are sufficient to drive virus budding even though they lack p6, (iii) the severe budding defect of Gag-Pol is caused by a dominant, cis-acting inhibitor of budding in the HIV Pol domain, and (iv) Gag-Pol inhibits Gag and virus budding in trans, even at normal levels of Gag and Gag-Pol expression. These and other data support an alternative hypothesis of HIV budding as a process that is mediated by the normal, non-viral pathway of exosome/microvesicle biogenesis. PMID:22235295

  2. [Impact of TDZ and NAA on adventitious bud induction and cluster bud multiplication in Tulipa edulis].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li-Fang; Xu, Chao; Zhu, Zai-Biao; Yang, He-Tong; Guo, Qiao-Sheng; Xu, Hong-jian; Ma, Hong-Jian; Zhao, Gui-Hua

    2014-08-01

    To explore the method of explants directly induced bud and establish the tissue culture system of mutiple shoot by means of direct organogenesis, core bud and daughter bulbs (the top of bud stem expanded to form daughter bulb) of T. edulis were used as explants and treated with thidiazuron (TDZ) and 1-naphthlcetic acid (NAA). The results showed that the optimal medium for bud inducted form core bud and daughter bulb were MS + TDZ 2.0 mg x L(-1) + NAA 4.0 mg x L(-1) and MS +TDZ 2.0 mg x L(-1) + NAA 2.0 mg x L(-1) respectively, both of them had a bud induction rate of 72.92%, 79.22%. The optimal medium for cluster buds multiplication was MS + TDZ 0.2 mg x L(-1) + NAA 0.2 mg x L(-1), and proliferation coefficient was 2.23. After proliferation, cluster buds rooting occurred on MS medium with IBA 1.0 mg x L(-1) and the rooting rate was 52.6%, three to five seedlings in each plant. Using core bud and daughter bulb of T. edulis, the optimum medium for adventitious bud directly inducted from daughter bulb, core bud and cluster bud multiplication were screened out and the tissue culture system of multiple shoot by means of direct organogenesis was established.

  3. Verification of relationships between anthropometric variables among ureteral stents recipients and ureteric lengths: a challenge for Vitruvian-da Vinci theory.

    PubMed

    Acelam, Philip A

    2015-01-01

    To determine and verify how anthropometric variables correlate to ureteric lengths and how well statistical models approximate the actual ureteric lengths. In this work, 129 charts of endourological patients (71 females and 58 males) were studied retrospectively. Data were gathered from various research centers from North and South America. Continuous data were studied using descriptive statistics. Anthropometric variables (age, body surface area, body weight, obesity, and stature) were utilized as predictors of ureteric lengths. Linear regressions and correlations were used for studying relationships between the predictors and the outcome variables (ureteric lengths); P-value was set at 0.05. To assess how well statistical models were capable of predicting the actual ureteric lengths, percentages (or ratios of matched to mismatched results) were employed. The results of the study show that anthropometric variables do not correlate well to ureteric lengths. Statistical models can partially estimate ureteric lengths. Out of the five anthropometric variables studied, three of them: body frame, stature, and weight, each with a P<0.0001, were significant. Two of the variables: age (R (2)=0.01; P=0.20) and obesity (R (2)=0.03; P=0.06), were found to be poor estimators of ureteric lengths. None of the predictors reached the expected (match:above:below) ratio of 1:0:0 to qualify as reliable predictors of ureteric lengths. There is not sufficient evidence to conclude that anthropometric variables can reliably predict ureteric lengths. These variables appear to lack adequate specificity as they failed to reach the expected (match:above:below) ratio of 1:0:0. Consequently, selections of ureteral stents continue to remain a challenge. However, height (R (2)=0.68) with the (match:above:below) ratio of 3:3:4 appears suited for use as estimator, but on the basis of decision rule. Additional research is recommended for stent improvements and ureteric length determinations.

  4. Actin cable dynamics in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hyeong-Cheol; Pon, Liza A.

    2002-01-01

    Actin cables, bundles of actin filaments that align along the long axis of budding yeast, are crucial for establishment of cell polarity. We fused green fluorescent protein (GFP) to actin binding protein 140 (Abp140p) and visualized actin cable dynamics in living yeast. We detected two populations of actin cables: (i) bud-associated cables, which extend from the bud along the mother-bud axis, and (ii) randomly oriented cables, which are relatively short. Time-lapse imaging of Abp140p–GFP revealed an apparent increase in the length of bud-associated actin cables. Analysis of movement of Abp140p–GFP fiduciary marks on bud-associated cables and fluorescence loss in photobleaching experiments revealed that this apparent elongation occurs by assembly of new material at the end of the cable within the bud and movement of the opposite end of the cable toward the tip of the mother cell distal to the bud. The rate of extension of the tip of an elongating actin cable is 0.29 ± 0.08 μm/s. Latrunculin A (Lat-A) treatment completely blocked this process. We also observed movement of randomly oriented cables around the cortex of cells at a rate of 0.59 ± 0.14 μm/s. Mild treatment with Lat-A did not affect the velocity of movement of randomly oriented cables. However, Lat-A treatment did increase the number of randomly oriented, motile cables per cell. Our observations suggest that establishment of bud-associated actin cables during the cell cycle is accomplished not by realignment of existing cables but by assembly of new cables within the bud or bud neck, followed by elongation. PMID:11805329

  5. Ureteral Stent Coatings: What's Here and What's Coming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razvi, Hassan

    2008-09-01

    Ureteral stents have become an indispensable tool to the urologist in the management of various disorders afflicting the urinary tract. While the ideal stent remains elusive, novel technical advances in stent coating technology offer the potential of enhancing stent biocompatibility and clinical application. Currently available stent coatings as well as new and emerging devices will be reviewed.

  6. Proximal ureteral ectopia causing hydronephrosis in a kitten.

    PubMed

    D'Ippolito, Paola; Nicoli, Stefano; Zatelli, Andrea

    2006-12-01

    A 2-month-old, female cat was presented for abdomen dilation. The patient was undernourished, and severe left hydronephrosis was diagnosed after clinical, ultrasonographical and radiographical examination. Although pyelography was performed in order to visualise the ureteral course, surgery was necessary to reach a final aetiological diagnosis and treatment. At gross examination, the left ureter crossed the renal capsula at the level of the caudal renal pole, and the subcapsular ureteral segment was markedly dilated. Distal to the renal capsula, the left ureter was very thin when compared to the right. The parenchyma of the left kidney, as suggested by ultrasonographical evaluation, was extremely reduced in thickness. An ureteronephrectomy was performed. Histopathological evaluation revealed glomerular sclerosis and diffuse parenchymal fibrosis. Severe hydronephrosis derived from an altered renal pelvic anatomy and abnormal ureteral course determining functional stenosis. Diagnosis of congenital anomaly before development of complications such as hydronephrosis could have allowed a surgical renal capsulectomy and obstruction relief. To the author's knowledge, this is the first report of severe hydronephrosis associated to altered renal pelvic anatomy and proximal ureteral ectopia in cat.

  7. The efficacy of tamsulosin in lower ureteral calculi

    PubMed Central

    Griwan, M.S.; Singh, Santosh Kumar; Paul, Himanshu; Pawar, Devendra Singh; Verma, Manish

    2010-01-01

    Context: There has been a paradigm shift in the management of ureteral calculi in the last decade with the introduction of new less invasive methods, such as ureterorenoscopy and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). Aims: Recent studies have reported excellent results with medical expulsive therapy (MET) for distal ureteral calculi, both in terms of stone expulsion and control of ureteral colic pain. Settings and Design: We conducted a comparative study in between watchful waiting and MET with tamsulosin. Materials and Methods: We conducted a comparative study in between watchful waiting (Group I) and MET with tamsulosin (Group II) in 60 patients, with a follow up of 28 days. Statistical Analysis: Independent 't' test and chi-square test. Results: Group II showed a statistically significant advantage in terms of the stone expulsion rate. The mean number of episodes of pain, mean days to stone expulsion and mean amount of analgesic dosage used were statistically significantly lower in Group II (P value is 0.007, 0.01 and 0.007, respectively) as compared to Group I. Conclusions: It is concluded that MET should be considered for uncomplicated distal ureteral calculi before ureteroscopy or extracorporeal lithotripsy. Tamsulosin has been found to increase and hasten stone expulsion rates, decrease acute attacks by acting as a spasmolytic, reduces mean days to stone expulsion and decreases analgesic dose usage. PMID:20882156

  8. AN IN VITRO MODEL FOR MURINE URETERIC EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents a model developed to study growth and differentiation of primary cultures of ureteric epithelial cells from embryonic C57BL/6N mouse urinary tracts. Single cells were resuspended in medium and plated onto transwells coated with collagen IV and laminin. Basa...

  9. AN IN VITRO MODEL FOR MURINE URETERIC EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents a model developed to study growth and differentiation of primary cultures of ureteric epithelial cells from embryonic C57BL/6N mouse urinary tracts. Single cells were resuspended in medium and plated onto transwells coated with collagen IV and laminin. Basa...

  10. The efficacy of tamsulosin in lower ureteral calculi.

    PubMed

    Griwan, M S; Singh, Santosh Kumar; Paul, Himanshu; Pawar, Devendra Singh; Verma, Manish

    2010-05-01

    There has been a paradigm shift in the management of ureteral calculi in the last decade with the introduction of new less invasive methods, such as ureterorenoscopy and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). Recent studies have reported excellent results with medical expulsive therapy (MET) for distal ureteral calculi, both in terms of stone expulsion and control of ureteral colic pain. We conducted a comparative study in between watchful waiting and MET with tamsulosin. We conducted a comparative study in between watchful waiting (Group I) and MET with tamsulosin (Group II) in 60 patients, with a follow up of 28 days. Independent 't' test and chi-square test. Group II showed a statistically significant advantage in terms of the stone expulsion rate. The mean number of episodes of pain, mean days to stone expulsion and mean amount of analgesic dosage used were statistically significantly lower in Group II (P value is 0.007, 0.01 and 0.007, respectively) as compared to Group I. It is concluded that MET should be considered for uncomplicated distal ureteral calculi before ureteroscopy or extracorporeal lithotripsy. Tamsulosin has been found to increase and hasten stone expulsion rates, decrease acute attacks by acting as a spasmolytic, reduces mean days to stone expulsion and decreases analgesic dose usage.

  11. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020 Section 876.4020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light...

  12. Effect of lisinopril on renal tissue damage in unilateral ureteral obstruction in rats.

    PubMed

    Karabuga, Ilker; Akbay, Kaan; Turna, Burak; Vatansever, H Seda; Altay, Barış; Güzel, Elif; Turkoz Uluer, Elgin; Ustun, Güven; Ekren, Fatih; Nazli, Oktay; Muftuoglu, Sevda; Apaydin, Erdal

    2012-02-01

    In this study, it was aimed to investigate apoptosis in renal injury and the effect of lisinopril in rat model, which constitute unilateral ureteral obstruction. The retroperitoneal ureter was ligated with a 4.0 silk for the experimental model of ureteral obstruction in Wistar albino rats. Untreated group (n = 20) received no treatment. For the lisinopril-treated group (n = 20), 20 mg/kg/day of drug was given orally. Ultrastructural differences were analyzed using electron microscopic technique; apoptotic distribution was analyzed using the TUNEL method. After electron microscopic evaluation, on the 4th and 14th day in the untreated group, edema in the glomeruli, loss of microvillus and apoptotic cells in proximal tubule cells and sclerosis in the glomeruli were detected. On the 4th day in the lisinopril-treated group, the kidney was ultrastructurally normal and a less number of apoptotic cells were only observed on the 14th day. On light microscopic examination on the 4th and 14th day in the untreated group, while the glomeruli were normal in structure, the boundary of the proximal tubule was disrupted and some picnotic cells in both the proximal and collecting tubules were observed. In both 4th and 14th day of the lisinopril-treated group, kidney showed normal structure, although in some places picnotic cells in the collecting tubules were observed. In conclusion, lisinopril was effective and it may prevent early renal damage in the direct obstruction model.

  13. Distinct Domains of Yeast Cortical Tag Proteins Bud8p and Bud9p Confer Polar Localization and Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Krappmann, Anne-Brit; Taheri, Naimeh; Heinrich, Melanie

    2007-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, diploid yeast cells follow a bipolar budding program, which depends on the two transmembrane glycoproteins Bud8p and Bud9p that potentially act as cortical tags to mark the cell poles. Here, we have performed systematic structure-function analyses of Bud8p and Bud9p to identify functional domains. We find that polar transport of Bud8p and Bud9p does not depend on N-terminal sequences but instead on sequences in the median part of the proteins and on the C-terminal parts that contain the transmembrane domains. We show that the guanosine diphosphate (GDP)/guanosine triphosphate (GTP) exchange factor Bud5p, which is essential for bud site selection and physically interacts with Bud8p, also interacts with Bud9p. Regions of Bud8p and Bud9p predicted to reside in the extracellular space are likely to confer interaction with the N-terminal region of Bud5p, implicating indirect interactions between the cortical tags and the GDP/GTP exchange factor. Finally, we have identified regions of Bud8p and Bud9p that are required for interaction with the cortical tag protein Rax1p. In summary, our study suggests that Bud8p and Bud9p carry distinct domains for delivery of the proteins to the cell poles, for interaction with the general budding machinery and for association with other cortical tag proteins. PMID:17581861

  14. Contribution of Underlying Connective Tissue Cells to Taste Buds in Mouse Tongue and Soft Palate.

    PubMed

    Boggs, Kristin; Venkatesan, Nandakumar; Mederacke, Ingmar; Komatsu, Yoshihiro; Stice, Steve; Schwabe, Robert F; Mistretta, Charlotte M; Mishina, Yuji; Liu, Hong-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Taste buds, the sensory organs for taste, have been described as arising solely from the surrounding epithelium, which is in distinction from other sensory receptors that are known to originate from neural precursors, i.e., neural ectoderm that includes neural crest (NC). Our previous study suggested a potential contribution of NC derived cells to early immature fungiform taste buds in late embryonic (E18.5) and young postnatal (P1-10) mice. In the present study we demonstrated the contribution of the underlying connective tissue (CT) to mature taste buds in mouse tongue and soft palate. Three independent mouse models were used for fate mapping of NC and NC derived connective tissue cells: (1) P0-Cre/R26-tdTomato (RFP) to label NC, NC derived Schwann cells and derivatives; (2) Dermo1-Cre/RFP to label mesenchymal cells and derivatives; and (3) Vimentin-CreER/mGFP to label Vimentin-expressing CT cells and derivatives upon tamoxifen treatment. Both P0-Cre/RFP and Dermo1-Cre/RFP labeled cells were abundant in mature taste buds in lingual taste papillae and soft palate, but not in the surrounding epithelial cells. Concurrently, labeled cells were extensively distributed in the underlying CT. RFP signals were seen in the majority of taste buds and all three types (I, II, III) of differentiated taste bud cells, with the neuronal-like type III cells labeled at a greater proportion. Further, Vimentin-CreER labeled cells were found in the taste buds of 3-month-old mice whereas Vimentin immunoreactivity was only seen in the CT. Taken together, our data demonstrate a previously unrecognized origin of taste bud cells from the underlying CT, a conceptually new finding in our knowledge of taste bud cell derivation, i.e., from both the surrounding epithelium and the underlying CT that is primarily derived from NC.

  15. β-Catenin signaling regulates temporally discrete phases of anterior taste bud development.

    PubMed

    Thirumangalathu, Shoba; Barlow, Linda A

    2015-12-15

    The sense of taste is mediated by multicellular taste buds located within taste papillae on the tongue. In mice, individual taste buds reside in fungiform papillae, which develop at mid-gestation as epithelial placodes in the anterior tongue. Taste placodes comprise taste bud precursor cells, which express the secreted factor sonic hedgehog (Shh) and give rise to taste bud cells that differentiate around birth. We showed previously that epithelial activation of β-catenin is the primary inductive signal for taste placode formation, followed by taste papilla morphogenesis and taste bud differentiation, but the degree to which these later elements were direct or indirect consequences of β-catenin signaling was not explored. Here, we define discrete spatiotemporal functions of β-catenin in fungiform taste bud development. Specifically, we show that early epithelial activation of β-catenin, before taste placodes form, diverts lingual epithelial cells from a taste bud fate. By contrast, β-catenin activation a day later within Shh(+) placodes, expands taste bud precursors directly, but enlarges papillae indirectly. Further, placodal activation of β-catenin drives precocious differentiation of Type I glial-like taste cells, but not other taste cell types. Later activation of β-catenin within Shh(+) precursors during papilla morphogenesis also expands taste bud precursors and accelerates Type I cell differentiation, but papilla size is no longer enhanced. Finally, although Shh regulates taste placode patterning, we find that it is dispensable for the accelerated Type I cell differentiation induced by β-catenin. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Contribution of Underlying Connective Tissue Cells to Taste Buds in Mouse Tongue and Soft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Mederacke, Ingmar; Komatsu, Yoshihiro; Stice, Steve; Schwabe, Robert F.; Mistretta, Charlotte M.; Mishina, Yuji; Liu, Hong-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Taste buds, the sensory organs for taste, have been described as arising solely from the surrounding epithelium, which is in distinction from other sensory receptors that are known to originate from neural precursors, i.e., neural ectoderm that includes neural crest (NC). Our previous study suggested a potential contribution of NC derived cells to early immature fungiform taste buds in late embryonic (E18.5) and young postnatal (P1-10) mice. In the present study we demonstrated the contribution of the underlying connective tissue (CT) to mature taste buds in mouse tongue and soft palate. Three independent mouse models were used for fate mapping of NC and NC derived connective tissue cells: (1) P0-Cre/R26-tdTomato (RFP) to label NC, NC derived Schwann cells and derivatives; (2) Dermo1-Cre/RFP to label mesenchymal cells and derivatives; and (3) Vimentin-CreER/mGFP to label Vimentin-expressing CT cells and derivatives upon tamoxifen treatment. Both P0-Cre/RFP and Dermo1-Cre/RFP labeled cells were abundant in mature taste buds in lingual taste papillae and soft palate, but not in the surrounding epithelial cells. Concurrently, labeled cells were extensively distributed in the underlying CT. RFP signals were seen in the majority of taste buds and all three types (I, II, III) of differentiated taste bud cells, with the neuronal-like type III cells labeled at a greater proportion. Further, Vimentin-CreER labeled cells were found in the taste buds of 3-month-old mice whereas Vimentin immunoreactivity was only seen in the CT. Taken together, our data demonstrate a previously unrecognized origin of taste bud cells from the underlying CT, a conceptually new finding in our knowledge of taste bud cell derivation, i.e., from both the surrounding epithelium and the underlying CT that is primarily derived from NC. PMID:26741369

  17. [A CASE OF ASCENDING COLON CANCER RECURRENCE WITH INTRALUMINAL URETERAL DISSEMINATION MIMICKING PRIMARY URETERAL CANCER, DETECTED DURING INVESTIGATION FOR FEVER].

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Ryuichi; Kubota, Masashi; Kanno, Toru; Okada, Takashi; Higashi, Yoshihito; Yamada, Hitoshi

    2015-10-01

    A 69-year-old woman visited our hospital with a chief complaint of fever. Five years ago, she was diagnosed as ascending colon cancer and received right hemi-colectomy. One year later, local recurrence with right hydronephrosis was detected, and she received chemotherapy -4 cycles of modified fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (mFOLFOX6) plus bevacizumab, and 12 cycles of fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI) plus bevacizumab- for two years. Local recurrence and right hydronephrosis disappeared on positron emission tomography performed 4 years postoperatively. This time, abdominal computed tomography for investigation of fever showed a relapse of right hydronephrosis and pyonephrosis. Cystoscopy revealed non-papillary tumor from the right ureteral orifice. Pelvic magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple tumors in the right ureter, and the distal lesion projecting into the bladder. After the general condition became well by right nephrostomy for infection control, transurethral resection of bladder tumor was performed. Histological examination of the specimen revealed a metastatic tubular adenocarcinoma (colon origin). Although right nephrectomy was performed for pyonephrosis control, she died of local progression of ascending colon cancer 10 months after first visit. Intraluminal ureteral progression of carcinoma originating from organs other than urinary tract is very rare. To our knowledge, this is the 9th report in the English or Japanese literature. In this case we could not rule out primary ureteral cancer preoperatively, and histological examination revealed intraluminal ureteral dissemination of ascending colon cancer.

  18. Placement of subcutaneous ureteral bypasses without fluoroscopic guidance in cats with ureteral obstruction: 19 cases (2014-2016).

    PubMed

    Livet, Véronique; Pillard, Paul; Goy-Thollot, Isabelle; Maleca, David; Cabon, Quentin; Remy, Denise; Fau, Didier; Viguier, Éric; Pouzot, Céline; Carozzo, Claude; Cachon, Thibaut

    2016-09-30

    The purpose of this study was to describe the perioperative and postoperative complications as well as short-term and long-term outcomes in cats with ureteral obstructions treated by placement of a subcutaneous ureteral bypass (SUB) device without imaging control. The second objective of this study was to compare cats treated by SUB device with cats treated by traditional surgical intervention. Data were obtained retrospectively from the medical records (2014-2016) of cats that underwent SUB placement (SUB cats) and cats that underwent traditional ureteral surgery (C cats). Nineteen SUB devices were placed without fluoroscopic, radiographic or ultrasonographic guidance in 13 cats. Fifteen traditional interventions (ureterotomy and neoureterocystostomy) were performed in 11 cats. Successful placement of the SUB device was achieved in all cats with only one major intraoperative complication (kinking of the kidney catheter) and one minor intraoperative complication (misplacement of the kidney catheter). Eleven SUB cats recovered from the surgical procedure; two SUB cats and three C cats died during the anaesthesia recovery period. Postoperative SUB complications included anaemia (n = 2), urinary tract infection (UTI) (n = 4), non-infectious cystitis (n = 5) and SUB device obstruction (n = 1). Postoperative traditional surgery complications included anaemia (n = 7), UTIs (n = 6), non-infectious cystitis (n = 1), re-obstruction (n = 4) and ureteral stricture (n = 1). Median postoperative duration of hospitalisation (3 days) was significantly shorter for SUB cats than for C cats (P = 0.013). Ten SUB cats (76.9%) and four C cats (40%) were still alive at a median follow-up of 225 days and 260 days, respectively. Owners were completely (90%) or mostly (10%) satisfied with the SUB device placement. SUB device placement appears to be an effective and safe option for treating ureteral obstruction in cats, and this study has shown that fluoroscopic guidance is not essential in

  19. Management of iatrogenic ureteric injury with retrograde ureteric stenting: an analysis of factors affecting technical success and long-term outcome.

    PubMed

    Chung, Daniel; Briggs, James; Turney, Benjamin W; Tapping, Charles Ross

    2017-02-01

    Background Iatrogenic ureteral injuries arise as serious complication following obstetrics, gynecological, general, and urological surgery with incidence in the range of 0.5-10%. Retrograde placement of double-J ureteric stent is a possible treatment option if the injury is not recognized at the time of surgery. Purpose To assess technical success and long-term outcome associated with retrograde ureteric stent insertion for iatrogenic ureteric injury. Material and Methods Between 1999 and 2011, 26 patients with initially unrecognized iatrogenic ureteric injury underwent initial management with retrograde ureteric stenting. Full case-notes were available for review in 25 patients. Results The mean interval from injury to attempted stenting was 19.4 days. Successful retrograde ureteric stenting was achieved in 21/25 patients (81%). Retrograde stenting failed in four patients, and nephrostomy followed by alternative procedures were performed instead. At a median follow-up interval of 9.7 months, normal anatomy was demonstrated on 12/21 patients (57%) and a stricture was observed in 6/21 patients (28%) with three requiring surgical intervention. Conclusion Retrograde stenting is a safe and efficient initial management in patients with iatrogenic ureteric injuries.

  20. Bud sprouting and floral induction and expression of FT in loquat [Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl.].

    PubMed

    Reig, Carmina; Gil-Muñoz, Francisco; Vera-Sirera, Francisco; García-Lorca, Ana; Martínez-Fuentes, Amparo; Mesejo, Carlos; Pérez-Amador, Miguel A; Agustí, Manuel

    2017-07-14

    EjFT1 and EjFT2 genes were isolated and sequenced from leaves of loquat. EjFT1 is involved in bud sprouting and leaf development, and EjFT2 in floral bud induction. Loquat [Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl.] is an evergreen species belonging to the family Rosaceae, such as apple and pear, whose reproductive development, in contrast with these species, is a continuous process that is not interrupted by winter dormancy. Thus, the study of the mechanism of flowering in loquat has the potential to uncover the environmental and genetic networks that trigger flowering more accurately, contributing for a better understanding of the Rosaceae floral process. As a first step toward understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling flowering, extensive defoliation and defruiting assays, together with molecular studies of the key FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) gene, were carried out. FT exhibited two peaks of expression in leaves, the first one in early to mid-May, the second one in mid-June. Two FT genes, EjFT1 and EjFT2, were isolated and sequenced and studied their expression. Expression of EjFT1 and EjFT2 peaks in mid-May, at bud sprouting. EjFT2 expression peaks again in mid-June, coinciding with the floral bud inductive period. Thus, when all leaves of the tree were continuously removed from early to late May vegetative apex differentiated into panicle, but when defoliation was performed from early to late June apex did not differentiate. On the other hand, fruit removal advanced EjFT1 expression in old leaves and the sooner the fruit detached, the sooner the bud sprouted. Accordingly, results strongly suggest that EjFT1 might be related to bud sprouting and leaf development, while EjFT2 might be involved in floral bud induction. An integrative model for FT functions in loquat is discussed.

  1. The dormant buds of Rhabdopleura compacta (Hemichordata).

    PubMed

    Dilly, P N

    1975-06-13

    Rhabdopleura has an overwintering stage that consists of two layers of cells surrounding a central yolk mass. This cellular part is surrounded by a thick electron dense capsule which is secreted by the bud itself. The capsule is probably impervious and protective to its contents. Blood vessels join the buds to the zooids of the colony. They form the probable route of transfer of yolk from the zooids to the dormant bud. The capsule of the dormant bud has some structural features in common with the black stolon of the adult zooids. The black stolon is probably formed in a manner similar to that which made the fusellar fabric of the periderm of fossil graptolities.

  2. Supercooling in Overwintering Azalea Flower Buds 1

    PubMed Central

    George, Milon F.; Burke, Michael J.; Weiser, Conrad J.

    1974-01-01

    Differential thermal analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments on whole flower buds and excised floral primordia of azalea (Rhododendron kosterianum, Schneid.) proved that supercooling is the mode of freezing resistance (avoidance) of azalea flower primordia. Increase in the linewidth of nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for water upon thawing supports the view that injury to the primordia occurs at the moment of freezing. Nonliving primordia freeze at the same temperatures as living primordia, indicating that morphological features of primordial tissues are a key factor in freezing avoidance of dormant azalea flower primordia. Differential thermal analyses was used to study the relationship of cooling rate to the freezing points of floral primordia in whole flower buds. At a cooling rate of 8.5 C per hour, primordia in whole buds froze at about the same subfreezing temperatures as did excised primordia cooled at 37 C per hour. At more rapid cooling rates primordia in intact buds froze at higher temperatures. PMID:16658832

  3. Expression of the hyaluronan-mediated motility receptor RHAMM in tumor budding cells identifies aggressive colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Koelzer, Viktor Hendrik; Huber, Bettina; Mele, Valentina; Iezzi, Giandomenica; Trippel, Mafalda; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Zlobec, Inti; Lugli, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    Expression of the hyaluronan-mediated motility receptor (RHAMM, CD168) predicts adverse clinicopathological features and decreased survival for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Using full tissue sections, we investigated the expression of RHAMM in tumor budding cells of 103 primary CRCs to characterize the biological processes driving single-cell invasion and early metastatic dissemination. RHAMM expression in tumor buds was analyzed with clinicopathological data, molecular features and survival. Tumor budding cells at the invasive front of CRC expressed RHAMM in 68% of cases. Detection of RHAMM-positive tumor budding cells was significantly associated with poor survival outcome (P = .0312), independent of TNM stage and adjuvant therapy in multivariate analysis (P = .0201). RHAMM-positive tumor buds were associated with frequent lymphatic invasion (P = .0007), higher tumor grade (P = .0296), and nodal metastasis (P = .0364). Importantly, the prognostic impact of RHAMM expression in tumor buds was maintained independently of the number of tumor buds found in an individual case (P = .0246). No impact of KRAS/BRAF mutation, mismatch repair deficiency and CpG island methylation was observed. RHAMM expression identifies an aggressive subpopulation of tumor budding cells and is an independent adverse prognostic factor for CRC patients. These data support ongoing efforts to develop RHAMM as a target for precision therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Diagnostic reproducibility of tumour budding in colorectal cancer: a multicentre, multinational study using virtual microscopy.

    PubMed

    Puppa, Giacomo; Senore, Carlo; Sheahan, Kieran; Vieth, Michael; Lugli, Alessandro; Zlobec, Inti; Pecori, Sara; Wang, Lai Mun; Langner, Cord; Mitomi, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Takatoshi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Ueno, Hideki; Chasle, Jacques; Conley, Stephen A; Herlin, Paulette; Lauwers, Gregory Y; Risio, Mauro

    2012-10-01

    Despite the established prognostic relevance of tumour budding in colorectal cancer, the reproducibility of the methods reported for its assessment has not yet been determined, limiting its use and reporting in routine pathology practice. A morphometric system within telepathology was devised to evaluate the reproducibility of the various methods published for the assessment of tumour budding in colorectal cancer. Five methods were selected to evaluate the diagnostic reproducibility among 10 investigators, using haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and AE1-3 cytokeratin-immunostained, whole-slide digital scans from 50 pT1-pT4 colorectal cancers. The overall interobserver agreement was fair for all methods, and increased to moderate for pT1 cancers. The intraobserver agreement was also fair for all methods and moderate for pT1 cancers. Agreement was dependent on the participants' experience with tumour budding reporting and performance time. Cytokeratin immunohistochemistry detected a higher percentage of tumour budding-positive cases with all methods compared to H&E-stained slides, but did not influence agreement levels. An overall fair level of diagnostic agreement for tumour budding in colorectal cancer was demonstrated, which was significantly higher in early cancer and among experienced gastrointestinal pathologists. Cytokeratin immunostaining facilitated detection of budding cancer cells, but did not result in improved interobserver agreement. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE EXPRESSION PATTERN OF ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS IN RAT TASTE BUDS

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Y.; KOLLI, T.; HIVLEY, R.; JABER, L.; ZHAO, F-l.; YAN, J.; HERNESS, S.

    2010-01-01

    Taste buds signal the presence of chemical stimuli in the oral cavity to the central nervous system using both early transduction mechanisms, which allow single cells to be depolarized via receptor-mediated signaling pathways, and late transduction mechanisms, which involve extensive cell-to-cell communication among the cells in the bud. The latter mechanisms, which involve a large number of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides, are less well understood. Among neurotransmitters, multiple lines of evidence suggest that norepinephrine plays a yet unknown role in the taste bud. This study investigated the expression pattern of adrenergic receptors in the rat posterior taste bud. Expression of α1A, α1B, α1D, α2A, α2B, α2C, β1, and the β2 adrenoceptor subtypes was observed in taste buds using RT-PCR and immunocytochemical techniques. Taste buds also expressed the biosynthetic enzyme for norepinephrine, dopamine β-hydroxylase (DβH), as well as the norepinephrine transporter. Further, expression of the epinephrine synthetic enzyme, phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT), was observed suggesting a possible role for this transmitter in the bud. Phenotyping adrenoceptor expression patterns with double labeling experiments to gustducin, synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25), and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) suggests they are prominently expressed in subsets of cells known to express taste receptor molecules but segregated from cells known to have synapses with the afferent nerve fiber. Alpha and beta adrenoceptors co-express with one another in unique patterns as observed with immunocytochemistry and single cell RT-PCR. These data suggest that single cells express multiple adrenergic receptors and that adrenergic signaling may be particularly important in bitter, sweet, and umami taste qualities. In summary, adrenergic signaling in the taste bud occurs through complex pathways that include presynaptic and postsynaptic receptors and likely play

  6. Ultrastructural and physiological analysis of cytokinin-induced bud formation in the moss Funaria hygrometrica

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    The author proposes that the morphological events associated with Fumaria budding are due to cytokinin activating the Ca/sup 2 +/-CAM branch of the Ca/sup 2 +/ messenger system to initiate the response, and the protein kinase C branch to maintain the response. Several lines of evidence support this hypothesis. (1) 1,4-dihydropyridine (DHP) ligands, which alter Ca/sup 2 +/ flux through voltage-operated channels, vary the budding response. The DHP antagonists, (-) 202-791 and nifedipine, block cytokinin-induced bud formation, while the agonists, (+)202-791 and CGP 28392, in the absence of hormone, stimulate initial formation of every cell. These initials rarely develop further, suggesting that increasing Ca/sup 2 +/ flux can initiate the response but is inadequate to maintain the response. (2) The amount of /sup 3/-H label incorporated into inositol phosphates increases with cytokinin treatment, suggesting that cytokinin stimulates the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP/sub 2/), and event that triggers both branches of the Ca/sup 2 +/ messenger system. (3) TPA activates protein kinase C and works synergistically with the Ca/sup 2 +/ ionophore A23187 to bypass the hormone-receptor mediated events and directly activate both arms of the Ca/sup 2 +/ messenger system. In Funaria these agents, when used separately, cause a slight increase in the number of buds; when used simultaneously they stimulate budding 9 fold. (4) 5-hydroxytryptamine, a stimulator of PIP/sub 2/ hydrolysis, increases the number of caulonemata. When used in conjunction with (+) 202-791, the early stages of budding are enhanced. Neomycin, used in concentrations that block PIP/sub 2/ hydrolysis (blocks IP/sub 3/ but not DG formation) increases the number of cytokinin-induced buds. These data suggest that protein kinase C activation is operating during sustained bud formation.

  7. Bilateral ureteric obstruction secondary to renal papillary necrosis.

    PubMed

    Broadis, Emily; Barbour, Louise; O'Toole, Stuart; Fyfe, Alasdair; Flett, Martyn; Irwin, Greg; Ramage, Ian J

    2010-08-01

    A 2-year-old male presented to hospital with a 5-day history of vomiting and pyrexia. He was initially treated with non-steroidal medication as an anti-pyretic. Initial investigations demonstrated a raised urea and creatinine and he was treated with intravenous fluids. Within 24 h he became anuric with progressive renal insufficiency. Ultrasound scan demonstrated minimal bilateral hydronephrosis with debris in the lower pole calyces. The bladder was empty. Cystoscopy and retrograde contrast imaging revealed bilateral ureteric obstruction. Double J stents were inserted and his renal function returned to normal within 4 days. We believe the aetiology to be renal papillary necrosis and bilateral ureteric obstruction secondary to the administration of ibuprofen in association with dehydration.

  8. Detection of ureteral obstruction on radionuclide bone scans

    SciTech Connect

    Pollen, J.J.; Gerber, K.; Heil, B.J.; Talner, L.B.

    1983-09-01

    The kidneys are nearly always visible on a routine radionuclide bone scan. To assess the reliability of the bone scan in detecting ureteral obstruction, 220 bone scans and excretory urograms were compared in 53 patients followed serially for prostatic cancer. There were 15 kidneys obstructed on excretory urograms. Only nine were diagnosed as obstructed on the bone scans. Seven of the nine cases of unilaterally obstructed kidneys were detected, whereas only two of the six kidneys in three patients with bilateral obstruction were correctly diagnosed. The results indicate that unilateral obstruction is more likely to be detected, whereas bilateral obstruction is more likely to be missed, on bone scans. Therefore, the routine radionuclide bone scan is an unreliable test for ureteral obstruction.

  9. Ureteral inguinal hernia: an uncommon trap for general surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Yahya, Zarif; Al-habbal, Yahya; Hassen, Sayed

    2017-01-01

    Inguinal hernias involving the ureter, a retroperitoneal structure, is an uncommon phenomenon. It can occur with or without obstructive uropathy, the latter posing a trap for the unassuming general surgeon performing a routine inguinal hernia repair. Ureteral inguinal hernia should be included as a differential when a clinical inguinal hernia is diagnosed concurrently with unexplained hydronephrosis, renal failure or urinary tract infection particularly in a male. The present case describes a patient with a known ureteroinguinal hernia who proceeded to having a planned hernia repair and ureteric protection. The case is a reminder that when faced with an unexpected finding such an indirect sliding inguinal hernia, extreme care should be taken to ensure that no structures are inadvertently damaged and that a rare possibility is the entrapment of the ureter in the inguinal canal. PMID:28275027

  10. An Everting Ureteral Access Sheath: Concepts and In Vitro Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Keith L.; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2007-04-01

    Ureteral access sheaths have been a recent innovation in facilitating ureteral stone surgery. Once properly placed, access sheaths allow the movement of ureteroscopes and other instruments through the ureter with minimal injury to the urothelium. However, there are shortcomings of the current device designs. Initial sheath placement requires significant force, and shear stress can injure the ureter. In addition, inadvertent advancement of the outer sheath without the inner introducer stylet can tear and avulse the ureter. A novel eversion design incorporating a lubricous film provides marked improvement over current access sheaths. In bench top and animal models, the eversion shealths require less force during advancement, cause less injury to the urothelial tissue, and have a lower potential of introducing extraneous materials (e.g., microbes) into a simulated urinary tract. While, the everting design provides important advantages over traditional non-everting designs, further preclinical and clinical trials are required.

  11. Properties of Peach Flower Buds Which Facilitate Supercooling

    PubMed Central

    Ashworth, Edward N.

    1982-01-01

    Water in dormant peach (Prunus persica [L.] Batsch. var. `Harbrite') flower buds deep supercooled. Both supercooling and the freezing of water within the bud axis and primordium as distinct components depended on the viability of the bud axis tissue. The viability of the primordium was not critical. Supercooling was prevented by wounding buds with a dissecting needle, indicating that bud structural features were important. Bud morphological features appeared to prevent the propagation of ice through the vascular tissue and into the primordium. In dormant buds, procambial cells had not yet differentiated into xylem vessel elements. Xylem continuity between the bud primordium and adjacent tissues did not appear to be established until buds had deacclimated. It was concluded that structural, morphological, and physiological features of the bud facilitated supercooling. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:16662701

  12. Different Management Options for Transplant Ureteral Obstructions within an Inguinal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Felix; Debartolo, Merrit Marion; Copertino, Leonard Michael; Szafran, April Adams; Estrada, Chelsea Caron; Lynch, Patrick Gerard; Darras, Frank Sam

    2016-01-01

    Ureteral obstruction secondary to an inguinal hernia with transplant ureteral component is an extremely rare entity with only several case reports found in literature. In all previously reported cases, management of the obstruction involved temporary drainage with ureteral stenting or nephrostomy tube placements followed by delayed definitive repair. We present two case reports, here one being the first one managed by immediate definitive repair via ureteral reimplant and herniorrhaphy and a second case by delayed definitive repair after percutaneous nephrostomy tube placement. Both patients continued to do well postoperatively with normalization of renal function on follow-up. PMID:27144049

  13. Unilateral ureteric stone associated with gross hydronephrosis and kidney shrinkage: a cadaveric report

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Ern-Wei; Bay, Boon-Huat

    2014-01-01

    Ureteric stones are a common cause of obstruction of the urinary tract, usually presenting with characteristic signs and symptoms, such as acute ureteric colic and hematuria. Occasionally, stones may present with non-specific symptoms such as low back pain and remain unidentified, leading to stone growth, chronic ureteric obstruction and complications such as hydronephrosis and renal damage. Here, we report a large ureteric stone in a cadaver with complete obstruction at the left ureterovesical junction, resulting in severe dilatation of the left ureter and renal pelvis. PMID:25548725

  14. Acute bilateral ureteral obstruction secondary to guaifenesin toxicity.

    PubMed

    Cockerill, Patrick A; de Cógáin, Mitra R; Krambeck, Amy E

    2013-10-01

    Several medications or their metabolites have been associated with urolithiasis, although overall they remain an infrequent cause of urolithiasis. Guaifenesin stones were originally reported as complexed with ephedrine, and subsequent reports have demonstrated pure guaifenesin stones, occurring after long term abuse. We report a case of a 23-year-old male who ingested a large, one time dose of guaifenesin, resulting in acute bilateral ureteral obstruction, which, to our knowledge, is the first such reported case in the literature.

  15. [Percutaneous endourologic treatment of obstructive ureteral lithiasis in renal transplant].

    PubMed

    de Fata Chillón, F Ramón; Núñez Mora, C; García Mediero, J M; Alonso Dorrego, J M; Hidalgo Togores, L; de la Peña Barthel, J J

    2003-01-01

    Donor graft lithiasis is a unusual complication of renal transplantation, however, it is associated to a high morbidity. This pathology is due to several causes such us: metabolic factors, infectious disease, drugs, foreign bodies or transferred in the donor graft. The objective of the treatment is to remove the lithiasis without damaging the renal unit. We report the successful percutaneous anterograde treatment of an ureteral obstructive hard calculi, in renal allograft.

  16. Self-expanding wallstent endoprosthesis for malignant ureteral obstruction.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Lucas, E F; Martínez-Torres, J L; Fernández Mena, J; Carazo Martínez, O; de la Fuente Serrano, A; Zuluaga Gómez, A

    1997-12-01

    We present our experience with the self-expanding Wallstent endoprosthesis for ureteral recanalization in obstructive uropathy secondary to malignant pelvic disease. In total, 19 stents were inserted in 14 ureters. The follow-up included 100% of the patients. To date, except for one case, the patency of the stent has always persisted for the period of the survival of the patients, the longest ones being 4 and 4.1 years.

  17. Is fluoroscopy essential for retrieval of lower ureteric stones?

    PubMed

    Mandhani, A; Chaudhury, H; Gupta, N; Singh, H K; Kapoor, R; Kumar, A

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of ureteroscopy for lower ureteric stones without the use of fluoroscopy. Between June 2001 and January 2005, a total of 110 patients with a mean age of 33.5 years (range 12-65) suffering from of lower ureteral calculi (below the upper margin of the sacroiliac joint) prospectively underwent ureteroscopic removal. Retrograde pyelography was avoided, and no safety guidewire was placed. Whenever required, the ureteric meatus was dilated with a ureteric balloon under direct vision. Double-J stent placement was done with the aid of ureteroscopy. A fluoroscope was kept standby. The patients had a postoperative X-ray of the kidney-ureter-bladder region to document the stone clearance. The mean stone size was 8.7 mm (range 6-15). Complete clearance without the use of fluoroscopy was achieved in 99 patients (94.2%). Fluoroscopy was required in 6 patients (4%) for calcified stricture (n = 1), duplex system (n = 1), narrow and tortuous meatus causing difficulty in passing the 5-Fr balloon dilator (n = 3), and confirmation of spontaneous passage of the stone (n = 1). Of the 13 patients who required balloon dilatation it was successfully achieved without fluoroscopy. Double-J stenting was done due to mucosal ulceration (n = 3), polypoid reaction (n = 2), and perforation (n = 1). All these patients had correct placement of the stent, as confirmed by X-ray of the kidney-ureter-bladder region postoperatively. To uphold the notion for radiation exposure to be as low as reasonably achievable, ureteroscopic stone retrieval can safely be done without the use of fluoroscopy in a significant number of patients.

  18. Lower ureteral stones revisited: expanding the horizons of robotics.

    PubMed

    Dogra, Prem Nath; Regmi, Subodh K; Singh, Prabhjot; Saini, Ashish K; Nayak, Brusabhanu

    2013-07-01

    To study the feasibility of robot-assisted laparoscopic ureterolithotomy for large (>2 cm) or impacted lower ureteral stones and the immediate outcome measures such as the stone-free rate and occurrence of intra- and postoperative complications. From April 2010 to August 2012, 52 robotic stone surgeries were performed in our department. Robot-assisted laparoscopic ureterolithotomy was performed in 16 patients for large (>2 cm) or impacted lower ureteral stones. The stone was most commonly located in the juxtavesical position in all 16 patients. The average stone size was 2.2 cm, and all stones were impacted. The mean operative time was 45.3 minutes (range, 38-63), including stent placement time, and the mean blood loss was 10 mL. The mean console time was 20.3 minutes. No conversion to an open procedure was required. Robot-assisted laparoscopic ureterolithotomy for large, impacted, lower ureteral stones is an acceptable alternative. The ease of surgery and shorter operative times are significant advantages compared with the laparoscopic approach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Artificial Ureter in Patients with Extensive Ureteral Damage.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Mohammad; Javid, Amir; Mohammadi Sichani, Mehrdad; Gharaati, Mohammad Reza; Yazdani, Emad

    2017-05-23

    loss of significant lengths of ureter when substitution with bowel or bladder fails is a disaster in urology. This study is conducted to evaluate the results of subcutaneous nephron-vesical bypass (SNVB) in ureteral damage of different etiologies. Seventeen SNVB were employed in patients with ureteral injuries. We employed a device consisted of an internal silicone tube covered by a coiled PTFE tube to replace the ureter. This is called artificial ureter (AU). Proximal end of the AU was introduced in the kidney percutaneously, the tube was passed through a subcutaneous tunnel, while the distal end was inserted in the bladder through a small suprapubic incision. Follow-up ranged from six months to ten years. We removed the prosthetic ureter in one patient due to gross hematuria two months after insertion. One of the patients was reoperated two days after the procedure because of urinary leakage. In all other patients, the procedure was safe and effective. Subcutaneous nephron-vesical bypass is a safe and appealing alternative to a nephrostomy tube. This is a permanent device with no need for exchange. The technique can be applied in ureteral injuries due to various causes.

  20. [Choice of surgical correction of urodynamics in ureteral tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Kamyshan, I S

    2008-01-01

    To determine an optimal choice of surgical correction of urodynamic disorders and time of its conduction in ureteral tuberculosis, we made a retrospective analysis of 271 case histories of primary patients with tuberculosis of the kidneys who had x-ray picture of ureteral lesions, hydro- or ureterohydronephrosis. We used the following methods of this correction: calycoureteroanastomosis (n = 7, 2.5%), plastic reconstruction of the pelvoureteral segment (n = 9, 3.3%), ureteroureterostomy (n = 6, 2.2%), ureterocystostomy (n = 125, 46.1%), ureteroileoplasty (n = 6, 2.2%), ureteroileocystoplasty (n = 12, 4.4%), intestinal cystoplasty with ureteral transplantation (n = 86, 31.7%). Three-four months was an optimal preoperative preparation (treatment with antituberculous drugs). Long-term administration of the drugs (up to 1 year and longer) and late surgical urodynamic correction leads to complete dysfunction of the kidney which may result in removal of this organ (35%). Palliative operations (cystostomy, nephrostomy, ureterostomy, ureterocutanestomy) often invalidate the patients and degrade quality of their life (n = 20, 7.4%). Only high qualification of the surgeon in reconstructive plastic surgery provides good results of medical rehabilitation.

  1. Stage specific requirement of Gfrα1 in the ureteric epithelium during kidney development.

    PubMed

    Keefe Davis, T; Hoshi, Masato; Jain, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) binds a coreceptor GDNF family receptor α1 (GFRα1) and forms a signaling complex with the receptor tyrosine kinase RET. GDNF-GFRα1-RET signaling activates cellular pathways that are required for normal induction of the ureteric bud (UB) from the Wolffian duct (WD). Failure of UB formation results in bilateral renal agenesis and perinatal lethality. Gfrα1 is expressed in both the epithelial and mesenchymal compartments of the developing kidney while Ret expression is specific to the epithelium. The biological importance of Gfrα1's wider tissue expression and its role in later kidney development are unclear. We discovered that conditional loss of Gfrα1 in the WD epithelium prior to UB branching is sufficient to cause renal agenesis. This finding indicates that Gfrα1 expressed in the nonepithelial structures cannot compensate for this loss. To determine Gfrα1's role in branching morphogenesis after UB induction we used an inducible Gfrα1-specific Cre-deletor strain and deleted Gfrα1 from the majority of UB tip cells post UB induction in vivo and in explant kidney cultures. We report that Gfrα1 excision from the epithelia compartment after UB induction caused a modest reduction in branching morphogenesis. The loss of Gfrα1 from UB-tip cells resulted in reduced cell proliferation and decreased activated ERK (pERK). Further, cells without Gfrα1 expression are able to populate the branching UB tips. These findings delineate previously unclear biological roles of Gfrα1 in the urinary tract and demonstrate its cell-type and stage-specific requirements in kidney development.

  2. Budded baculovirus particle structure revisited.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiushi; Bosch, Berend-Jan; Vlak, Just M; van Oers, Monique M; Rottier, Peter J; van Lent, Jan W M

    2016-02-01

    Baculoviruses are a group of enveloped, double-stranded DNA insect viruses with budded (BV) and occlusion-derived (ODV) virions produced during their infection cycle. BVs are commonly described as rod shaped particles with a high apical density of protein extensions (spikes) on the lipid envelope surface. However, due to the fragility of BVs the conventional purification and electron microscopy (EM) staining methods considerably distort the native viral structure. Here, we use cryo-EM analysis to reveal the near-native morphology of two intensively studied baculoviruses, Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) and Spodoptera exigua MNPV (SeMNPV), as models for BVs carrying GP64 and F as envelope fusion protein on the surface. The now well-preserved AcMNPV and SeMNPV BV particles have a remarkable elongated, ovoid shape leaving a large, lateral space between nucleocapsid (NC) and envelope. Consistent with previous findings the NC has a distinctive cap and base structure interacting tightly with the envelope. This tight interaction may explain the partial retaining of the envelope on both ends of the NC and the disappearance of the remainder of the BV envelope in the negative-staining EM images. Cryo-EM also reveals that the viral envelope contains two layers with a total thickness of ≈ 6-7 nm, which is significantly thicker than a usual biological membrane (<4 nm) as measured by X-ray scanning. Most spikes are densely clustered at the two apical ends of the virion although some envelope proteins are also found more sparsely on the lateral regions. The spikes on the surface of AcMNPV BVs appear distinctly different from those of SeMNPV. Based on our observations we propose a new near-native structural model of baculovirus BVs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Neural crest contribution to lingual mesenchyme, epithelium and developing taste papillae and taste buds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Xiang; Komatsu, Yoshihiro; Mishina, Yuji; Mistretta, Charlotte M

    2012-08-15

    The epithelium of mammalian tongue hosts most of the taste buds that transduce gustatory stimuli into neural signals. In the field of taste biology, taste bud cells have been described as arising from "local epithelium", in distinction from many other receptor organs that are derived from neurogenic ectoderm including neural crest (NC). In fact, contribution of NC to both epithelium and mesenchyme in the developing tongue is not fully understood. In the present study we used two independent, well-characterized mouse lines, Wnt1-Cre and P0-Cre that express Cre recombinase in a NC-specific manner, in combination with two Cre reporter mouse lines, R26R and ZEG, and demonstrate a contribution of NC-derived cells to both tongue mesenchyme and epithelium including taste papillae and taste buds. In tongue mesenchyme, distribution of NC-derived cells is in close association with taste papillae. In tongue epithelium, labeled cells are observed in an initial scattered distribution and progress to a clustered pattern between papillae, and within papillae and early taste buds. This provides evidence for a contribution of NC to lingual epithelium. Together with previous reports for the origin of taste bud cells from local epithelium in postnatal mouse, we propose that NC cells migrate into and reside in the epithelium of the tongue primordium at an early embryonic stage, acquire epithelial cell phenotypes, and undergo cell proliferation and differentiation that is involved in the development of taste papillae and taste buds. Our findings lead to a new concept about derivation of taste bud cells that include a NC origin.

  4. Direct Primary or Secondary Percutaneous Ureteral Stenting: What Is the Most Compliant Option in Patients with Malignant Ureteral Obstructions?

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Lagana, Domenico; Lumia, Domenico; Giorgianni, Andrea; Mangini, Monica; Santoro, Domenico; Cuffari, Salvatore; Marconi, Alberto; Novario, Raffaele; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2007-09-15

    The objective of this study was to analyze three ureteral stenting techniques in patients with malignant ureteral obstructions, considering the indications, techniques, procedural costs, and complications. In the period between June 2003 and June 2006, 45 patients with bilateral malignant ureteral obstructions were evaluated (24 males, 21 females; average age, 68.3; range, 42-87). All of the patients were treated with ureteral stenting: 30 (mild strictures) with direct stenting (insertion of the stent without predilation), 30 (moderate/severe strictures) with primary stenting (insertion of the stent after predilation in a one-stage procedure), and 30 (mild/moderate/severe strictures with infection) with secondary stenting (insertion of the stent after predilation and 2-3 days after nephrostomy). The incidence of complications and procedural costs were compared by a statistical analysis. The primary technical success rate was 98.89%. We did not observe any major complications. The minor complication rate was 11.1%. The incidence of complications for the various techniques was not statistically significantly. The statistical analysis of costs demonstrated that the average cost of secondary stenting ( Euro 637; SD, Euro 115) was significantly higher than that of procedures which involved direct or primary stenting ( Euro 560; SD, Euro 108). We conclude that one-step stenting (direct or primary) is a valid option to secondary stenting in correctly selected patients, owing to the fact that when the procedure is performed by expert interventional radiologists there are high technical success rates, low complication rates, and a reduction in costs.

  5. Assessing the value of ureteral stent placement in pediatric kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Dharnidharka, Vikas R; Araya, Carlos E; Wadsworth, Christopher S; McKinney, Michael C; Howard, Richard J

    2008-04-15

    Ureteral stent placement at kidney transplantation may reduce stenosis or leakage (S/L) complication rates. However, stent placement may also increase risk for early urinary tract infection (early UTI; <3 months after transplant) and BK virus allograft nephropathy (BKVAN). In children, the usefulness of stent placement is not well defined. We analyzed retrospective data from children transplanted at our center for the three above outcomes in relation to stents. At our center, stent placement decision is driven by surgeon preference. Among 129 transplants from 1996 to 2006, early UTI was seen in 9.3% and S/L in 4.6%. By univariate analyses, stent placement was a significant risk factor for early UTI (P=0.0399) but not protective for S/L (P=0.23). In multivariate analyses, stent placement, human leukocyte antigen match, and bladder augmentation increased the odds ratio for early UTI. Only deceased donor source increased the odds ratio for S/L. In a truncated data set from 1999 to 2006, BKVAN occurred in 9 of 93 (9.6%). Per minute increase in warm ischemia time was the only significant risk factor for BKVAN by both univariate and Cox regression analyses. Stent placement did not improve graft survival (P=0.5726) but required general anesthesia for removal in the operating room, leading to additional cost and potential risk. Routine stent placement in children in this era of low urological complication rates and BKVAN needs reevaluation.

  6. Preformation in vegetative buds of Prunus persica: factors influencing number of leaf primordia in overwintering buds.

    PubMed

    Gordon, D; Damiano, C; DeJong, T M

    2006-04-01

    We investigated the influence of bud position, cultivar, tree age, tree carbohydrate status, sampling date, drought and light exposure on the number of leaf primordia formed in dormant vegetative peach buds (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) relative to the number of primordia formed after bud break (neoformed). During winter dormancy, vegetative peach buds from California and Italy were dissected and the number of leaf primordia recorded. Between leaf drop and bud break, the number of leaf primordia doubled from about five to about 10. Parent shoot length, number of nodes on the parent shoot, cross-sectional area of the parent shoot, bud position along the parent shoot and bud cross-sectional area were correlated with the number of leaf primordia. Previous season light exposure, drought and tree carbohydrate status did not affect the number of leaf primordia present. The number of leaf primordia differed significantly among peach varieties and tree ages at leaf drop, but not at bud break. Our results indicate that neoformation accounted for all shoot growth beyond about 10 nodes. The predominance of neoformed shoot growth in peach allows this species great plasticity in its response to current-season conditions.

  7. Prophylactic pre-operative bilateral ureteric catheters for major gynaecological surgery.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Anita J; Crosbie, Emma J; Charova, Judith; Achiampong, Josephine; Zommere, Ilze; Winter-Roach, Brett; Slade, Richard J

    2013-11-01

    The use of prophylactic pre-operative bilateral ureteric catheters for major gynaecological surgery is controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of ureteric catheter-associated morbidity in our Unit, where systematic pre-operative ureteric catheterisation is performed. We conducted a retrospective casenote review of 337 gynaecology patients undergoing laparotomy at Salford Royal Hospital between January 2007 and September 2010. The mean age was 56.36 (range 17-89). Procedures included TAH BSO (n = 249, 74 %), BSO (n = 17, 5 %), radical hysterectomy (n = 36, 11 %), and other (n = 35, 10 %), for indications of ovarian (n = 189, 56 %), uterine (n = 88, 26 %) or cervical cancer (n = 18, 5.3 %), massive fibroids (n = 27, 8 %), severe endometriosis (n = 6, 1.78 %), or other (n = 9, 2.67 %). Bilateral ureteric catheters were attempted in most patients and successfully placed in 315/337 (93 %) patients. In 22 patients (7 %), either no ureteric catheters or a single ureteric catheter was placed due to pre-existing ureteric anomaly, technical difficulty, or surgeon choice. Bilateral ureteric catheterisation took an average of 5.4 min (SD 2.0, range 3.2-9.2) for an experienced consultant or 8.4 min (SD 3.9, range 6.4-18.6) for an SpR trainee to complete. There were no intra-operative ureteric complications. Post-operative complications included urinary tract infection (5/337 patients, 1.48 %), acute renal failure (2/337, 0.6 %), and uretero-vaginal fistulae (1/337 patients, 0.3 %). Prophylactic pre-operative ureteric catheters are quick and easy to insert and associated with low complication rates. Routine use before major gynaecological surgery can expedite intra-operative identification of the ureters and may reduce accidental ureteric injury.

  8. Tumor budding is associated with an increased risk of lymph node metastasis and poor prognosis in superficial esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Landau, Michael S; Hastings, Steven M; Foxwell, Tyler J; Luketich, James D; Nason, Katie S; Davison, Jon M

    2014-12-01

    The treatment approach for superficial (stage T1) esophageal adenocarcinoma critically depends on the pre-operative assessment of metastatic risk. Part of that assessment involves evaluation of the primary tumor for pathologic characteristics known to predict nodal metastasis: depth of invasion (intramucosal vs submucosal), angiolymphatic invasion, tumor grade, and tumor size. Tumor budding is a histologic pattern that is associated with poor prognosis in early-stage colorectal adenocarcinoma and a predictor of nodal metastasis in T1 colorectal adenocarcinoma. In a retrospective study, we used a semi-quantitative histologic scoring system to categorize 210 surgically resected, superficial (stage T1) esophageal adenocarcinomas according to the extent of tumor budding (none, focal, and extensive) and also evaluated other known risk factors for nodal metastasis, including depth of invasion, angiolymphatic invasion, tumor grade, and tumor size. We assessed the risk of nodal metastasis associated with tumor budding in univariate analyses and controlled for other risk factors in a multivariate logistic regression model. In all, 41% (24 out of 59) of tumors with extensive tumor budding (tumor budding in ≥3 20X microscopic fields) were metastatic to regional lymph nodes, compared with 10% (12 out of 117) of tumors with no tumor budding, and 15% (5 out of 34) of tumors with focal tumor budding (P<0.001). When controlling for all pathologic risk factors in a multivariate analysis, extensive tumor budding remains an independent risk factor for lymph node metastasis in superficial esophageal adenocarcinoma associated with a 2.5-fold increase (95% CI=1.1-6.3, P=0.039) in the risk of nodal metastasis. Extensive tumor budding is also a poor prognostic factor with respect to overall survival and time to recurrence in univariate and multivariate analyses. As an independent risk factor for nodal metastasis and poor prognosis after esophagectomy, tumor budding should be evaluated

  9. Tumor Budding Is Associated with an Increased Risk of Lymph Node Metastasis and Poor Prognosis in Superficial Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Landau, Michael S.; Hastings, Steven M.; Foxwell, Tyler J.; Luketich, James D.; Nason, Katie S.; Davison, Jon M.

    2014-01-01

    The treatment approach for superficial (stage T1) esophageal adenocarcinoma critically depends on the pre-operative assessment of metastatic risk. Part of that assessment involves evaluation of the primary tumor for pathologic characteristics known to predict nodal metastasis: depth of invasion (intramucosal versus submucosal), angiolymphatic invasion, tumor grade and tumor size. Tumor budding is a histologic pattern that is associated with poor prognosis in early stage colorectal adenocarcinoma and a predictor of nodal metastasis in T1 colorectal adenocarcinoma. In a retrospective study, we used a semi-quantitative histologic scoring system to categorize 210 surgically resected, superficial (stage T1) esophageal adenocarcinoma according to the extent of tumor budding (none, focal and extensive) and also evaluated other known risk factors for nodal metastasis, including depth of invasion, angiolymphatic invasion, tumor grade and tumor size. We assessed the risk of nodal metastasis associated with tumor budding in univariate analyses and controlled for other risk factors in a multivariate logistic regression model. Forty-one percent (24/59) of tumors with extensive tumor budding (tumor budding in ≥3 20X microscopic fields) were metastatic to regional lymph nodes, compared to 10% (12/117) of tumors with no tumor budding and 15% (5/34) of tumors with focal tumor budding (p<0.001). When controlling for all pathologic risk factors in a multivariate analysis, extensive tumor budding remains an independent risk factor for lymph node metastasis in superficial esophageal adenocarcinoma associated with a 2.5-fold increase (95% CI,1.1–6.3, p=0.039) in the risk of nodal metastasis. Extensive tumor budding is also a poor prognostic factor with respect to overall survival and time to recurrence in univariate and multivariate analyses. As an independent risk factor for nodal metastasis and survival after esophagectomy, tumor budding should be evaluated in superficial (T1

  10. Oxytocin signaling in mouse taste buds.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Michael S; Perea-Martinez, Isabel; Dvoryanchikov, Gennady; Yoshida, Masahide; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Roper, Stephen D; Chaudhari, Nirupa

    2010-08-05

    The neuropeptide, oxytocin (OXT), acts on brain circuits to inhibit food intake. Mutant mice lacking OXT (OXT knockout) overconsume salty and sweet (i.e. sucrose, saccharin) solutions. We asked if OXT might also act on taste buds via its receptor, OXTR. Using RT-PCR, we detected the expression of OXTR in taste buds throughout the oral cavity, but not in adjacent non-taste lingual epithelium. By immunostaining tissues from OXTR-YFP knock-in mice, we found that OXTR is expressed in a subset of Glial-like (Type I) taste cells, and also in cells on the periphery of taste buds. Single-cell RT-PCR confirmed this cell-type assignment. Using Ca2+ imaging, we observed that physiologically appropriate concentrations of OXT evoked [Ca2+]i mobilization in a subset of taste cells (EC50 approximately 33 nM). OXT-evoked responses were significantly inhibited by the OXTR antagonist, L-371,257. Isolated OXT-responsive taste cells were neither Receptor (Type II) nor Presynaptic (Type III) cells, consistent with our immunofluorescence observations. We also investigated the source of OXT peptide that may act on taste cells. Both RT-PCR and immunostaining suggest that the OXT peptide is not produced in taste buds or in their associated nerves. Finally, we also examined the morphology of taste buds from mice that lack OXTR. Taste buds and their constituent cell types appeared very similar in mice with two, one or no copies of the OXTR gene. We conclude that OXT elicits Ca2+ signals via OXTR in murine taste buds. OXT-responsive cells are most likely a subset of Glial-like (Type I) taste cells. OXT itself is not produced locally in taste tissue and is likely delivered through the circulation. Loss of OXTR does not grossly alter the morphology of any of the cell types contained in taste buds. Instead, we speculate that OXT-responsive Glial-like (Type I) taste bud cells modulate taste signaling and afferent sensory output. Such modulation would complement central pathways of appetite

  11. Release of apical dominance in potato tuber is accompanied by programmed cell death in the apical bud meristem.

    PubMed

    Teper-Bamnolker, Paula; Buskila, Yossi; Lopesco, Yael; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Saad, Inbal; Holdengreber, Vered; Belausov, Eduard; Zemach, Hanita; Ori, Naomi; Lers, Amnon; Eshel, Dani

    2012-04-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber, a swollen underground stem, is used as a model system for the study of dormancy release and sprouting. Natural dormancy release, at room temperature, is initiated by tuber apical bud meristem (TAB-meristem) sprouting characterized by apical dominance (AD). Dormancy is shortened by treatments such as bromoethane (BE), which mimics the phenotype of dormancy release in cold storage by inducing early sprouting of several buds simultaneously. We studied the mechanisms governing TAB-meristem dominance release. TAB-meristem decapitation resulted in the development of increasing numbers of axillary buds with time in storage, suggesting the need for autonomous dormancy release of each bud prior to control by the apical bud. Hallmarks of programmed cell death (PCD) were identified in the TAB-meristems during normal growth, and these were more extensive when AD was lost following either extended cold storage or BE treatment. Hallmarks included DNA fragmentation, induced gene expression of vacuolar processing enzyme1 (VPE1), and elevated VPE activity. VPE1 protein was semipurified from BE-treated apical buds, and its endogenous activity was fully inhibited by a cysteinyl aspartate-specific protease-1-specific inhibitor N-Acetyl-Tyr-Val-Ala-Asp-CHO (Ac-YVAD-CHO). Transmission electron microscopy further revealed PCD-related structural alterations in the TAB-meristem of BE-treated tubers: a knob-like body in the vacuole, development of cytoplasmic vesicles, and budding-like nuclear segmentations. Treatment of tubers with BE and then VPE inhibitor induced faster growth and recovered AD in detached and nondetached apical buds, respectively. We hypothesize that PCD occurrence is associated with the weakening of tuber AD, allowing early sprouting of mature lateral buds.

  12. Removal of ureteral calculi in two geldings via a standing flank approach.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Jeremy; Freeman, David E; MacKay, Robert J; Matyjaszek, Sarah; Lewis, Jordan; Sanchez, L Chris; Meyer, Stephanie

    2012-11-01

    Two geldings, aged 11 and 17 years, were examined for treatment of ureteroliths located approximately 10 cm proximal to the bladder. Ureteral obstruction was an incidental finding in 1 horse that was referred because of urinary tract obstruction and a cystic calculus. This horse did not have clinical or laboratory evidence of renal failure, although severe hydronephrosis was evident on transabdominal ultrasonography. The second patient had a serum creatinine concentration of 6.3 mg/dL (reference range, 0.8 to 2.2 mg/dL) and mild hydronephrosis of the affected left kidney. In both patients, the obstructed ureter was exteriorized through a flank incision as a standing procedure, and the calculus was crushed and removed with a uterine biopsy forceps introduced through a ureterotomy approximately 25 cm proximal to the calculus. The cystic calculus was removed through a perineal urethrostomy by lithotripsy, piecemeal extraction, and lavage. The horse without azotemia developed pyelonephritis in the affected kidney and was euthanatized because of complications of a nephrectomy 13 months later. In the horse with azotemia, the serum creatinine concentration decreased after surgery, and the horse returned to its intended use. However, it was euthanatized approximately 2 years after surgery because of progressive renal failure, and a large nephrolith was found in the previously unobstructed right kidney. The technique used for ureterolith removal was successful in both horses in this report, did not require sophisticated equipment, and could be effective in the early stages of ureteral obstruction as a means of restoring urine flow and renal function. The outcome in the horse with advanced unilateral renal disease without azotemia would suggest that nephrectomy should be considered as a treatment in such patients.

  13. Ureteropyeloscopy and homium: YAG laser lithotripsy for treatment of ureteral calculi (report of 356 cases)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhong; Din, Qiang; Jiang, Hao-wen; Zen, Jing-cun; Yu, Jiang; Zhang, Yuanfang

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of holmium YAG laser lithotripsy for the treatment of ureteral calculi. Methods: A total of 356 patients underwent ureteropyeloscopic lithotripsy using holmium YAG laser with a semirigid uretesopyeloscope, 93 upper, 135 middle, and 128 lower ureteral stones were treated. Results: The overall successful fragmentation rate for all ureteral stones in a single session achieved 98% (349/356). The successful fragmentation rate stratified by stone location was 95% 88/93 in the upper ureter, 99% (134/135) in the mid ureter , and 99%(127/128) in the distal ureter. 12 cases with bilateral ureteral stones which caused acute renal failure and anuria were treated rapidly and effectively by the holmium YAG laser lithotripsy. No complications such as perforation and severe trauma were encountered during the operations. 2 weeks 17months (with an average of 6.8 month ) follow up postoperatively revealed that the overall stone-free rate was 98%(343/349) and no ureteral stenosis was found. Conclusions Holmium YAG laser lithotripsy is a highly effective, minimally invasive and safe therapy for ureteral calculi. It is indicated as a first choice of treatment for patients with ureteral calculi, especially for the ones with mid- lower levels of ureteral calculi.

  14. The Role of Medical Expulsive Therapy for Ureteral Stones: Pro MET.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Thomas; Türk, Christian

    2017-02-01

    Medical expulsive therapy is efficacious in patients with ureteric stones who are amenable to conservative management. The greatest benefit might be among those with larger stones. Therefore, the European Association of Urology Guideline Panel has kept the recommendation to offer α-blockers for patients with distal ureteral stones of 5-10mm. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. DNA methylation/demethylation programming during peach flower bud dormancy release, development and blooming

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peach flower bud development undergoes a long, complex and temperature-dependent regulation process with cessation of growth in response to cool temperatures in late fall, a slow but gradual development during the chilling period in winter, and eventually blooming in early spring. It has been demon...

  16. Chorio-Allantoic Membrane Grafting of Chick Limb Buds as a Class Practical.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLachlan, John C.

    1981-01-01

    A new method of carrying out grafts of early embryonic chick limb buds to the chick chorio-allantoic membrane and a processing schedule which renders cartilage elements visible in whole mount are discussed, including implications for the procedures and their results. (Author/DC)

  17. Chorio-Allantoic Membrane Grafting of Chick Limb Buds as a Class Practical.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLachlan, John C.

    1981-01-01

    A new method of carrying out grafts of early embryonic chick limb buds to the chick chorio-allantoic membrane and a processing schedule which renders cartilage elements visible in whole mount are discussed, including implications for the procedures and their results. (Author/DC)

  18. Retrograde exchange of heavily encrusted ureteric stents via the ileal conduit: a technical report.

    PubMed

    Tapping, Charles Ross; Boardman, Phil

    2014-02-01

    We describe two cases of retrograde ureteric stent exchange of heavily encrusted ureteric stents (JJ) via tortuous ileal conduits. The blocked ureteric stents were snared from inside the conduit so they could be accessed and a wire inserted. The lumens of the stents were unblocked with a wire but the stents could not be withdrawn due to heavy encrustation of the ureteric stent in the renal pelvis. A stiff wire was inserted to provide support and a 9 French peel away sheath was used to remove the encrustations allowing the stents to be withdrawn and exchanged. This is a safe and successful technique allowing ureteric stents to be removed when heavily encrusted. © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  19. Interaction between bud-site selection and polarity-establishment machineries in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chi-Fang; Savage, Natasha S.; Lew, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells polarize in order to form a single bud in each cell cycle. Distinct patterns of bud-site selection are observed in haploid and diploid cells. Genetic approaches have identified the molecular machinery responsible for positioning the bud site: during bud formation, specific locations are marked with immobile landmark proteins. In the next cell cycle, landmarks act through the Ras-family GTPase Rsr1 to promote local activation of the conserved Rho-family GTPase, Cdc42. Additional Cdc42 accumulates by positive feedback, creating a concentrated patch of GTP-Cdc42, which polarizes the cytoskeleton to promote bud emergence. Using time-lapse imaging and mathematical modelling, we examined the process of bud-site establishment. Imaging reveals unexpected effects of the bud-site-selection system on the dynamics of polarity establishment, raising new questions about how that system may operate. We found that polarity factors sometimes accumulate at more than one site among the landmark-specified locations, and we suggest that competition between clusters of polarity factors determines the final location of the Cdc42 cluster. Modelling indicated that temporally constant landmark-localized Rsr1 would weaken or block competition, yielding more than one polarity site. Instead, we suggest that polarity factors recruit Rsr1, effectively sequestering it from other locations and thereby terminating landmark activity. PMID:24062579

  20. Genetic locus on chromosome 6p for multicystic renal dysplasia, pelvi-ureteral junction stenosis, and vesicoureteral reflux

    SciTech Connect

    Devriendt, K.; Fryns, J.P.

    1995-11-20

    Robson et al. suggest that renal agenesis, multicystic renal dysplasia (MRD), and uretero-pelvic junction (PUJ) stenosis are pathogenetically related. They proposed a vascular disruption as the cause, with the variable severity of the disorder related to the timing of the abnormal blood supply to the ureteric bud. Alternatively, there exists convincing evidence of a genetic cause transmitted as an autosomal dominant disorder with variable expression, and with a candidate gene localized on chromosome arm 6p. Combinations of these urological malformations occur in the same individual or in different relatives in the same family. In several families with PUJ-stenosis, linkage with the HLA-locus on 6p has been demonstrated. Furthermore, we recently described a patient with a de novo reciprocal translocation involving the same region on 6p in a patient with bilateral multicystic renal dysplasia. Most disease-associated reciprocal translocations appear to have a breakpoint within a candidate gene: therefore, it is reasonable to hypothesize that the breakpoint on 6p in this patient resides within a gene causing MRD. This suggests that mutations in the same gene may lead either to PUJ-stenosis or, when the stenosis is complete, to MRD. A translocation is expected to result in a complete disruption of the gene, and this could explain the severe clinical expression of bilateral MRD. Less severe mutations in the same gene, associated with a partially conserved gene function, could lead to PUJ-stenosis. 11 refs.

  1. Ureteral stricture as a late complication of radiotherapy for stage IB carcinoma of the uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, J F; Eifel, P J; Levenback, C; Oswald, M J

    1995-02-01

    Ureteral stricture is a rare late complication of curative radiotherapy for carcinoma of the cervix. A retrospective study was performed to determine the incidence and latency of radiation-induced ureteral stricture, to investigate possible contributing factors, and to compare the time course and presenting characteristics of ureteral compromise caused by late radiation injury or tumor recurrence. The records of 1784 patients with FIGO stage IB carcinoma of the cervix treated with radiotherapy at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center between 1960 and 1989 were reviewed. The characteristics of patients who developed ureteral stricture as a first manifestation of recurrent disease or without evidence of pelvic recurrence were compared. The risk of ureteral compromise was calculated actuarially. There were 29 patients with severe radiation-induced ureteral stricture. The overall incidences of severe ureteral stenosis were 1.0, 1.2, 2.2, and 2.5% at 5, 10, 15, and 20 years, respectively, reflecting a continuous actuarial risk increase of approximately 0.15% per year. Four patients died of complications from bilateral ureteral stricture. Patients who were treated with centrally blocked external fields or who received more than two transvaginal radiation treatments were at increased risk for developing ureteral stenosis. The risk was similar for patients treated with radiation alone or followed by extrafascial hysterectomy. During the first 5 years after treatment, tumor recurrence is the most common cause of ureteral stricture in patients treated with radiotherapy for carcinoma of the cervix. However, radiation injury to the ureter, although rare, may not become apparent for many years, necessitating continued vigilance throughout the lives of these patients.

  2. Outcomes of Kidney Transplant Recipients With Percutaneous Ureteral Interventions: A Single-Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Dushyanth; Stoffel, John T.; James, Chrystina; Bradley, Kori; Sung, Randall S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Long-term outcomes of kidney transplantation recipients with percutaneous ureteral management of transplant ureteral complications are not well characterized. Methods Electronic records of 1753 recipients of kidney-alone transplant between January 2000 and December 2008 were reviewed. One hundred thirty-one patients were identified to have undergone percutaneous ureteral management, with placement of percutaneous nephrostomy tube or additional intervention (nephroureteral stenting and/or balloon dilation). Indications for intervention included transplant ureteral stricture or ureteral leak. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and multivariable regression modeling were performed to determine survival outcomes. Results Kaplan- Meier graft survival (P = 0.04) was lower in patients with percutaneous ureteral intervention for transplant ureteral complication. Graft survival at 1, 5, and 10 years was 94.3% 78.3%, and 59.1% for no intervention and 97.2%, 72.1%, and 36.2% for intervention cohort. Patient survival (P = 0.69) was similar between cohorts. Multivariate analysis demonstrated no association with graft failure (hazard ratio, 1.21; 95% confidence interval, 0.67-2.19; P = 0.53) or patient death (hazard ratio, 0.56; 95% confidence interval, 0.22-1.41; P = 0.22) in intervention group. The major cause of graft failure was infection for percutaneous ureteral intervention group (20.4%) and chronic rejection for those without intervention (17.3%). Conclusions Kidney transplant recipients with percutaneous ureteral interventions for ureteral complications do not have a significant difference in graft and patient survival outcomes. Therefore, aggressive nonoperative management can be confidently pursued in the appropriate clinical setting. PMID:28349123

  3. Molecular Pathology of Murine Ureteritis Causing Obstructive Uropathy with Hydronephrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ichii, Osamu; Otsuka, Saori; Namiki, Yuka; Hashimoto, Yoshiharu; Kon, Yasuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Primary causes of urinary tract obstruction that induces urine retention and results in hydronephrosis include uroliths, inflammation, and tumors. In this study, we analyzed the molecular pathology of ureteritis causing hydronephrosis in laboratory rodents. F2 progenies of C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mice were studied histopathologically and by comprehensive gene expression analysis of their ureters. Incidence of hydronephrosis was approximately 5% in F2 progenies. Histopathologically, this hydronephrosis was caused by stenosis of the proximal ureter, which showed fibrosis and papillary malformations of the proliferative epithelium with infiltrations of B-cell-dominated lymphocytes. Additionally, CD16-positive large granular leukocytes and eosinophils infiltrated from the ureteral mucosa to the muscular layer. Eosinophilic crystals were characteristically observed in the lumen of the ureter and the cytoplasm of large granular leukocytes, eosinophils, and transitional epithelial cells. Comprehensive gene profiling revealed remarkably elevated expression of genes associated with hyperimmune responses through activation of B cells in diseased ureters. Furthermore, diseased ureters showed dramatically higher gene expression of chitinase 3-like 3, known as Ym1, which is associated with formation both of adenomas in the transitional epithelium and of eosinophilic crystals in inflammatory conditions. The Ym1 protein was mainly localized to the cytoplasm of the transitional epithelium, infiltrated cells, and eosinophilic crystals in diseased ureters. We determined that the primary cause of hydronephrosis in F2 mice was ureteritis mediated by the local hyperimmune response with malformation of the transitional epithelium. Our data provide a novel molecular pathogenesis for elucidating causes of aseptic inflammation in human upper urinary tracts. PMID:22114694

  4. Comparison of a biodegradable ureteral stent versus the traditional double-J stent for the treatment of ureteral injury: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wei-Jun; Wang, Zhong-Xin; Li, Gang; Cui, Fu-Zhai; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xu

    2012-12-01

    Ureteral injury remains a major clinical problem; here we developed a biodegradable ureteral stent and compared its effectiveness with a double-J stent for treating ureteral injury. Eighteen dogs with injured ureters were subdivided into two groups. In group A, one injured ureter was treated with a biodegradable stent, whereas only end-to-end anastomosis was performed on the other side. In group B, one injured ureter was treated with a biodegradable stent, while a double-J stent was used on the other side. Intravenous urography, radioactive renography, histological examinations, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and elemental composition analysis were performed at 40, 80 and 120 days postoperatively. Results showed that the biodegradable stent could effectively prevent hydronephrosis and hydroureter secondary to ureteral injury. Moreover all biodegradable stents gradually degraded and discharged completely in 120 days. SEM and elemental composition analysis of the surface of the double-J stent confirmed calcification at 80 days and calcific plaque at 120 days, while no signs of calcification were found in the biodegradable stent group. Histological studies found no difference between the biodegradable stented ureters and double-J stented ureters. It is concluded that the biodegradable ureteral stent was more advantageous than the double-J stent for treating ureteral injury in a canine model.

  5. Therapeutic ureteral occlusion in advanced pelvic malignant tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kinn, A.C.; Ohlsen, H.; Brehmer-Andersson, E.; Brundin, J.

    1986-01-01

    A technique for ureteral occlusion, combining insertion of nylon plugs with injection of polidocanol, is described. The method was used in 15 patients with vesicovaginal fistulas after operation and irradiation for advanced gynecological malignancy, or with severe malfunction and fibrosis of the bladder after radiotherapy for bladder carcinoma. The urinary leakage ceased in 11 patients, was greatly diminished in 2 and was unchanged in 2. Migration of plugs to the renal pelvis was the most serious complication and may have been the cause of pyelonephritis in 1 case. The technique is recommended for patients with a short life expectancy and uncontrolled, distressing leakage of urine.

  6. Retrograde ejaculation following open ureteric reimplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Au, Eleanor; Dasgupta, Ranan; Dasgupta, Prokar

    2009-08-18

    Retrograde ejaculation is not a recognized complication of ureteric reimplantation surgery. We describe this unusual complication in a 25-year-old man, with no other cause for his ejaculatory dysfunction. A 25-year-old Caucasian man presented with left hydronephrosis ascribed to a megaureter. Following open reimplantation of the ureter, the patient developed retrograde ejaculation that did not respond to medical therapy. The key result reported here is that retrograde ejaculation is a possible complication of open pelvic surgery, for which patients should receive counselling. This is relevant for both urologists and general physicians who consult relatively young men with ejaculatory difficulties.

  7. Retrograde ejaculation following open ureteric reimplantation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Retrograde ejaculation is not a recognized complication of ureteric reimplantation surgery. We describe this unusual complication in a 25-year-old man, with no other cause for his ejaculatory dysfunction. Case presentation A 25-year-old Caucasian man presented with left hydronephrosis ascribed to a megaureter. Following open reimplantation of the ureter, the patient developed retrograde ejaculation that did not respond to medical therapy. Conclusion The key result reported here is that retrograde ejaculation is a possible complication of open pelvic surgery, for which patients should receive counselling. This is relevant for both urologists and general physicians who consult relatively young men with ejaculatory difficulties. PMID:19918274

  8. Coordinated Spindle Assembly and Orientation Requires Clb5p-Dependent Kinase in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Marisa; Clarke, Duncan J.; Maddox, Paul; Salmon, E.D.; Bloom, Kerry; Reed, Steven I.

    2000-01-01

    The orientation of the mitotic spindle along a polarity axis is critical in asymmetric cell divisions. In the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, loss of the S-phase B-type cyclin Clb5p under conditions of limited cyclin-dependent kinase activity (cdc28-4 clb5Δ cells) causes a spindle positioning defect that results in an undivided nucleus entering the bud. Based on time-lapse digital imaging microscopy of microtubules labeled with green fluorescent protein fusions to either tubulin or dynein, we observed that the asymmetric behavior of the spindle pole bodies during spindle assembly was lost in the cdc28-4 clb5Δ cells. As soon as a spindle formed, both poles were equally likely to interact with the bud cell cortex. Persistent dynamic interactions with the bud ultimately led to spindle translocation across the bud neck. Thus, the mutant failed to assign one spindle pole body the task of organizing astral microtubules towards the mother cell. Our data suggest that Clb5p-associated kinase is required to confer mother-bound behavior to one pole in order to establish correct spindle polarity. In contrast, B-type cyclins, Clb3p and Clb4p, though partially redundant with Clb5p for an early role in spindle morphogenesis, preferentially promote spindle assembly. PMID:10662771

  9. Tumor budding in colorectal carcinoma assessed by cytokeratin immunostaining and budding areas: possible involvement of c-Met.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Keisuke; Nimura, Satoshi; Aoki, Mikiko; Hamasaki, Makoto; Koga, Kaori; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Yuichi; Kataoka, Hiroaki; Nabeshima, Kazuki

    2014-11-01

    Tumor budding/sprouting has been shown to be an independent adverse prognostic factor in T1 and T3N0 colorectal carcinomas, however, its assessment could be improved by more accurate identification of budding carcinoma cells and consideration of budding areas. Moreover, tumor budding mechanisms are yet to be defined. In this study, we evaluated the identification of budding tumor cells by either H&E staining alone or H&E with immunohistochemistry and developed a scoring system based on budding grades and areas. We examined whether the budding score correlated with clinicopathologic features and prognosis and the association between tumor budding/sprouting and c-Met protein expression and phosphorylation and MET gene copy numbers because c-Met is known to play an important role in colorectal carcinoma tumorigenesis. Cytokeratin immunohistochemistry could identify tumors with shorter disease-free survival (DFS) from the low-grade budding group assessed with H&E alone. High budding scores based on budding grade and area were more significantly correlated with DFS than scores obtained using the budding grade alone. In tumors with a high budding score, c-Met expression and phosphorylation levels and MET gene copy numbers were significantly increased at the invasive front compared with those in superficial tumor portions. This study showed for the first time that high levels of phospho-c-Met at the invasive front were significantly associated with a high budding score and shorter DFS. In conclusion, a budding score assessed by budding grades and budding-positive areas correlates highly with clinicopathologic aggressive features of colorectal carcinoma. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  10. Tumor budding in colorectal carcinoma assessed by cytokeratin immunostaining and budding areas: Possible involvement of c-Met

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Keisuke; Nimura, Satoshi; Aoki, Mikiko; Hamasaki, Makoto; Koga, Kaori; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Yuichi; Kataoka, Hiroaki; Nabeshima, Kazuki

    2014-01-01

    Tumor budding/sprouting has been shown to be an independent adverse prognostic factor in T1 and T3N0 colorectal carcinomas, however, its assessment could be improved by more accurate identification of budding carcinoma cells and consideration of budding areas. Moreover, tumor budding mechanisms are yet to be defined. In this study, we evaluated the identification of budding tumor cells by either H&E staining alone or H&E with immunohistochemistry and developed a scoring system based on budding grades and areas. We examined whether the budding score correlated with clinicopathologic features and prognosis and the association between tumor budding/sprouting and c-Met protein expression and phosphorylation and MET gene copy numbers because c-Met is known to play an important role in colorectal carcinoma tumorigenesis. Cytokeratin immunohistochemistry could identify tumors with shorter disease-free survival (DFS) from the low-grade budding group assessed with H&E alone. High budding scores based on budding grade and area were more significantly correlated with DFS than scores obtained using the budding grade alone. In tumors with a high budding score, c-Met expression and phosphorylation levels and MET gene copy numbers were significantly increased at the invasive front compared with those in superficial tumor portions. This study showed for the first time that high levels of phospho-c-Met at the invasive front were significantly associated with a high budding score and shorter DFS. In conclusion, a budding score assessed by budding grades and budding-positive areas correlates highly with clinicopathologic aggressive features of colorectal carcinoma. PMID:25220207

  11. Organogenesis during budding and lophophoral morphology of Hislopia malayensis Annandale, 1916 (Bryozoa, Ctenostomata)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bryozoans represent a large lophotrochozoan phylum with controversially discussed phylogenetic position and in group relationships. Developmental processes during the budding of bryozoans are in need for revision. Just recently a study on a phylactolaemate bryozoan gave a comprehensive basis for further comparisons among bryozoans. The aim of this study is to gain more insight into developmental patterns during polypide formation in the budding process of bryozoans. Particular focus is laid upon the lophophore, also its condition in adults. For this purpose we studied organogenesis during budding and lophophoral morphology of the ctenostome bryozoan Hislopia malayensis. Results Polypide buds develop on the frontal side of the developing cystid as proliferation of the epidermal and peritoneal layer. Early buds develop a lumen bordered by the inner budding layer resulting in the shape of a two-layered sac or vesicle. The hind- and midgut anlagen are first to develop as outpocketing of the prospective anal area. These grow towards the prospective mouth area where a comparatively small invagination marks the formation of the foregut. In between the prospective mouth and anus the ganglion develops as an invagination protruding in between the developing gut loop. Lophophore development starts with two lateral ridges which form tentacles very early. At the lophophoral base, intertentacular pits, previously unknown for ctenostomes, develop. The ganglion develops a circum-oral nerve ring from which the tentacle nerves branch off in adult zooids. Tentacles are innervated by medio-frontal nerves arising directly from the nerve ring, and medio-frontal and abfrontal nerves which originate both from an intertentacular fork. Conclusions We are able to show distinct similarities among bryozoans in the formation of the different organ systems: a two-layered vesicle-like early bud, the ganglion forming as an invagination of the epidermal layer in between the prospective

  12. Organogenesis during budding and lophophoral morphology of Hislopia malayensis Annandale, 1916 (Bryozoa, Ctenostomata).

    PubMed

    Schwaha, Thomas; Wood, Timothy S

    2011-04-18

    Bryozoans represent a large lophotrochozoan phylum with controversially discussed phylogenetic position and in group relationships. Developmental processes during the budding of bryozoans are in need for revision. Just recently a study on a phylactolaemate bryozoan gave a comprehensive basis for further comparisons among bryozoans. The aim of this study is to gain more insight into developmental patterns during polypide formation in the budding process of bryozoans. Particular focus is laid upon the lophophore, also its condition in adults. For this purpose we studied organogenesis during budding and lophophoral morphology of the ctenostome bryozoan Hislopia malayensis. Polypide buds develop on the frontal side of the developing cystid as proliferation of the epidermal and peritoneal layer. Early buds develop a lumen bordered by the inner budding layer resulting in the shape of a two-layered sac or vesicle. The hind- and midgut anlagen are first to develop as outpocketing of the prospective anal area. These grow towards the prospective mouth area where a comparatively small invagination marks the formation of the foregut. In between the prospective mouth and anus the ganglion develops as an invagination protruding in between the developing gut loop. Lophophore development starts with two lateral ridges which form tentacles very early. At the lophophoral base, intertentacular pits, previously unknown for ctenostomes, develop. The ganglion develops a circum-oral nerve ring from which the tentacle nerves branch off in adult zooids. Tentacles are innervated by medio-frontal nerves arising directly from the nerve ring, and medio-frontal and abfrontal nerves which originate both from an intertentacular fork. We are able to show distinct similarities among bryozoans in the formation of the different organ systems: a two-layered vesicle-like early bud, the ganglion forming as an invagination of the epidermal layer in between the prospective mouth and anal area, the

  13. Bud-grafting yellow-poplar

    Treesearch

    David T. Funk

    1963-01-01

    Several years ago we began work on the vegetative propagation of yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) with the aim of eventually establishing a clonal seed orchard. We tried field grafting, field budding, and air layering. We then attempted rooting cuttings in the greenhouse and in an indoor propagation bench. The best we could do with any of these methods was 4...

  14. Cryopreservation of Salix sp. dormant winter buds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In cryopreservation, using dormant winter buds (DB) as source plant materials is economically advantageous over tissue culture options (TC). Processing DB does not require aseptic conditions and elaborate cryopreservation procedures. However, the DB approach is only feasible for cryopreserving a sel...

  15. Radiation effects on bovine taste bud membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Shatzman, A.R.; Mossman, K.L.

    1982-11-01

    In order to investigate the mechanisms of radiation-induced taste loss, the effects of radiation on preparations of enriched bovine taste bud membranes were studied. Taste buds containing circumvallate papilae, and surrounding control epithelial tissues devoid of taste buds, were obtained from steers and given radiation doses of 0-7000 cGy (rad). Tissue fractions were isolated into membrane-enriched and heterogeneous components using differential and sucrose gradient centrifugation of tissue homogenates. The yield of membranes, as measured by protein content in the buoyant membrane-enriched fractions, was reduced in quantity with increasing radiation dose. The relation between radiation dose and membrane quantity in membrane-enriched fractions could be fit by a simple exponential model with taste bud-derived membranes twice as radiosensitive as membranes from control epithelial tissue. Binding of sucrose, sodium, and acetate and fluoride stimulation of adenylate cyclase were nearly identical in both irradiated and nonirradiated intact membranes. Radiation had no effect on fractions of heterogeneous components. While it is not clear what changes are occurring in enriched taste cell membranes, damage to membranes may play an important role in the taste loss observed in patients following radiotherapy.

  16. Sprouting of dormant buds on border trees

    Treesearch

    G.R., Jr. Trimble; H. Clay Smith; H. Clay Smith

    1970-01-01

    As part of an evaluation of silvicultura1 systems used in managing Appalachian hardwoods, we are studying degrade of border trees surrounding harvest-cut openings made in the patch cutting and group selection systems. One facet of this research dealt with determining what portion of visually evident dormant buds on border tree boles sprouted when the openings were cut...

  17. The first use of Resonance® metallic ureteric stent in a case of obstructed transplant kidney

    PubMed Central

    Abdulmajed, Mohamed I.; Jones, Vaughan W.; Shergill, Iqbal S.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION To date, double JJ stent is the mainstay ureteric stent used in a transplant kidney. We herein report the first use of Resonance® metallic ureteric stent to manage ureteric obstruction in a transplant kidney. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 45-year-old lady underwent an uneventful living related donor renal transplantation. Due to post-operative pelvi-ureteric obstruction and recurrent obstruction following multiple distal stent migration and expulsion necessitated frequent nephrostomy insertion and antegrade stenting, she underwent challenging but successful retrograde insertion of a 12 centimetres long and size 6.0 French Cook Resonance® metallic ureteric stent which was performed under general anaesthesia. DISCUSSION Metallic ureteric stents are a fairly recent introduction to modern urology and they have been successfully used in the management of benign and malignant obstruction of ureter. CONCLUSION This is the first case of therapeutic metallic ureteric stent insertion in a transplant kidney. PMID:24858983

  18. Three-Dimensional Analysis of Budding Sites and Released Virus Suggests a Revised Model for HIV-1 Morphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, L.; Simon, M.; Briggs, J. A. G.; Glass, B.; Riches, J. D.; Johnson, M. C.; Muller, B.; Grunewald, K.; Krausslich, H.-G.

    2008-12-11

    Current models of HIV-1 morphogenesis hold that newly synthesized viral Gag polyproteins traffic to and assemble at the cell membrane into spherical protein shells. The resulting late-budding structure is thought to be released by the cellular ESCRT machinery severing the membrane tether connecting it to the producer cell. Using electron tomography and scanning transmission electron microscopy, we find that virions have a morphology and composition distinct from late-budding sites. Gag is arranged as a continuous but incomplete sphere in the released virion. In contrast, late-budding sites lacking functional ESCRT exhibited a nearly closed Gag sphere. The results lead us to propose that budding is initiated by Gag assembly, but is completed in an ESCRT-dependent manner before the Gag sphere is complete. This suggests that ESCRT functions early in HIV-1 release - akin to its role in vesicle formation - and is not restricted to severing the thin membrane tether.

  19. Indoleacetic acid concentration and metabolism changes during bud development in tubers of two potato (Solanum tuberosum) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Sorce, Carlo; Lombardi, Lara; Giorgetti, Lucia; Parisi, Bruno; Ranalli, Paolo; Lorenzi, Roberto

    2009-07-01

    Plant growth regulators are involved in the control of potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber dormancy. Evidence concerning the role of IAA is controversial; we therefore investigated its role by analyzing two cultivars with varying lengths of dormancy. We examined the time course of free and conjugated IAA in tuber tissue isolates from the final stages of tuber growth to the end of dormancy, the distribution of free IAA in tuber tissues by in situ analysis, and the biosynthesis of the hormone by feeding experiments. The time course of free IAA showed marked differences between the examined cultivars, although the concentration of the auxin generally was the highest at the early stages of tuber dormancy. Immunodetection showed a similar pattern of IAA distribution in both genotypes: in dormant buds from freshly harvested tubers, the free hormone accumulated mostly in apical meristem, leaf and lateral bud primordia, and differentiating vascular tissues underlying the apical meristem, while at the end of the storage period only axillary bud primordia from growing buds displayed appreciable auxin levels. Feeding experiments indicated that changes in IAA biosynthesis rate were a major cause of auxin variation in buds. In both cultivars, dormancy apparently ceased when free IAA fell below a threshold value. Despite this, our data led us to conclude that IAA would not be directly responsible for inhibiting sprouting. Instead, auxin might shorten dormancy, in a cultivar-dependent manner, by enhancing early developmental processes in buds, ultimately leading to dormancy termination.

  20. Primary ureteral carcinoma. Experience in a general surgical service.

    PubMed

    Alessi, G; Giuliani, A; Fiori, E; Mauro, L; Cavallaro, A

    1985-01-01

    Five cases (3M, 2F) of ureteral transitional cell carcinoma are reported. they have been observed in the last two years in a general surgical service. All the patients have been treated surgically. Gross hematuria was present in all the patients. Three cases had multicentric tumor sites. Three tumors were located in the distal ureter. Four cases showed a non functioning kidney at IVP. In two, because of obstruction, retrograde pyelography was unsuccessful. Ultrasound was able to demonstrate hydronephrosis. In the two cases submitted to angio-CT the spread of the tumor was correctly diagnosed. Frequency, etiology, clinical, diagnostic findings and surgical therapy as well have all been taken into account, based on the literature. Histopathologic aspects, grade and stage, are considered too. The authors emphasize the necessity to find and understand the cause of an unexplained hematuria, since ureteral carcinoma is not as rare as previously thought. Being grade and stage closely related to prognosis, the diagnostic delay must be reduced.

  1. The Single Wire Ureteral Access Sheath, Both Safe and Economical

    PubMed Central

    Delto, Joan C.; Sidhu, Ajaydeep; Yanes, Rafael; Bhandari, Akshay

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Novel disposable products for ureteroscopy are often inherently more expensive than conventional ones. For example, the Cook Flexor© Parallel™ (Flexor) access sheath is designed for ease and efficiency of gaining upper tract access with a solitary wire. We analyze the cost combinations, efficiency, and safety of disposable products utilized for upper tract access, including the Flexor and standard ureteral access sheath. Methods. We performed a retrospective review from January 2014 to October 2014 of patients undergoing URS for nephrolithiasis, who were prestented for various reasons (e.g., infection). Common combinations most utilized at our institution include “Classic,” “Flexor,” and “Standard.” Total costs per technique were calculated. Patient characteristics, operative parameters, and outcomes were compared among the groups. Results. The most commonly used technique involved a standard ureteral sheath and was the most expensive ($294). The second most utilized and least expensive combination involved the Flexor, saving up to $80 per case (27%). All access sheaths were placed successfully and without complications. There were no significant differences in operative time, blood loss, or complications. Conclusions. In prestented patients within this study, the Flexor combination was the most economical. Although the savings appear modest, long-term impact on costs can be substantial. PMID:27974887

  2. Which ureteral access sheath is compatible with your flexible ureteroscope?

    PubMed

    Al-Qahtani, Saeed M; Letendre, Julien; Thomas, Alexandre; Natalin, Ricardo; Saussez, Thibaud; Traxer, Olivier

    2014-03-01

    Our aim is to evaluate different ureteral access sheaths (UASs), which are available in the international market and their compatibility with different available flexible ureteroscopes (F-URSs) to help the urologist choose the proper ureteral access sheath for his or her endoscope before commencing the procedure. A total of 21 UASs and 12 F-URSs were evaluated. Measurements were obtained in French (F) units considering different characteristics for each UAS and each F-URS. Insertion test without friction between F-URS and UAS was considered as a successful test and was referred as (YES). All UASs and F-URSs were successfully submitted to the insertion test. All F-URSs that were inserted into UASs without friction had an internal diameter of at least 12F. Different lengths of UAS did not influence the test outcome. This study was able to establish a correlation table between different UASs and different flexible ureteroscopes. As of now, the 12/14F UAS is considered the universal UAS that accepts all F-URSs that are available in the endourology field. Nevertheless, we are expecting a significant change with the new standard size 10/12F UAS as well as huge advances in minimizing the size of different endoscopes.

  3. Conservative Management of Ureteral Injury Caused by a Lumbar Osteophyte

    PubMed Central

    Brekhus, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Osteophytes are bony outgrowths commonly found on lumbar vertebrae. They rarely produce complications with the most common complication being nerve entrapment, but rarer complications including aorta or inferior vena cava rupture, superior mesenteric artery syndrome, compression of the iliopsoas muscle, and cerebrospinal fluid leaks have been described. Rare cases affecting the ureter resulting in ureteral colic or extravasation of urine have been described. Case Presentation: We describe a case in which a lumbar osteophyte bridging the L4 and L5 disks was encircling the ureter and minor trauma caused a ureteral injury, resulting in urine extravasation into the L4 and L5 disks space and the retroperitoneum. Owing to the comorbidities of this patient, this case was treated conservatively with stenting and the patient has suffered no further complications. Conclusion: This is a rare complication of a lumbar osteophyte but should be considered as a potential cause of ureter injury. Treatment should be individualized by patient preference and comorbidities, as some patients would elect to pursue more aggressive therapy whereas others would incline for conservative measures. PMID:28078328

  4. A case report on buccal mucosa graft for upper ureteral stricture repair

    PubMed Central

    Sabale, Vilas Pandurang; Thakur, Naveen; Kankalia, Sharad Kumar; Satav, Vikram Pramod

    2016-01-01

    Management of ureteric stricture especially long length upper one-third poses a challenging job for most urologists. With the successful use of buccal mucosa graft (BMG) for stricture urethra leads the foundation for its use in ureteric stricture also. A 35-year-old male diagnosedcase of left upper ureteric stricture, postureteroscopy with left percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) in situ. Cysto-retrograde pyelography and nephrostogram done simultaneously suggestive of left upper ureteric stricture of 3 cm at L3 level. On exploration, diseased ureteral segment exposed, BMG harvested and sutured as onlay patch graft with supportive omental wrap. The treatment choice for upper ureteric long length stricture is inferior nephropexy, autotransplantation, or bowel interposition. With PCN in situ, inferior nephropexy becomes technically difficult, other two are morbid procedures. Use of BMG in this situation is technically better choice with all the advantages of buccal mucosa. Onlay BMG for ureteral stricture is technically easy, less morbid procedure and can be important choice in future. PMID:28057996

  5. Management and outcome of cats with ureteral calculi: 153 cases (1984-2002).

    PubMed

    Kyles, Andrew E; Hardie, Elizabeth M; Wooden, Brent G; Adin, Christopher A; Stone, Elizabeth A; Gregory, Clare R; Mathews, Kyle G; Cowgill, Larry D; Vaden, Shelly; Nyland, Thomas G; Ling, Gerald V

    2005-03-15

    To determine outcome of medical and surgical treatment in cats with ureteral calculi. Retrospective study. 153 cats. Medical records were reviewed. Owners and referring veterinarians were contacted for follow-up information. All cats were initially treated medically before a decision was made to perform surgery. Medical treatment included parenteral administration of fluids and diuretics to promote urine production and passage of the ureteral calculus and supportive treatment for renal failure. Ureteral calculi in the proximal portion of the ureter were typically removed by ureterotomy, whereas ureteral calculi in the distal portion of the ureter were more likely to be removed by partial ureterectomy and ureteroneocystostomy. Ureterotomy could be performed without placement of a nephrostomy tube for postoperative urine diversion. Postoperative complication rate and perioperative mortality rate were 31% and 18%, respectively. The most common postoperative complications were urine leakage and persistent ureteral obstruction after surgery. Chronic renal failure was common at the time of diagnosis and continued after treatment, with serum creatinine concentration remaining greater than the upper reference limit in approximately half the cats. Twelve-month survival rates after medical and surgical treatment were 66% and 91%, respectively, with a number of cats dying of causes related to urinary tract disorders, including ureteral calculus recurrence and worsening of chronic renal failure. Results suggest that medical and surgical management of ureteral calculi in cats are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Treatment can stabilize renal function, although many surviving cats will continue to have impaired renal function.

  6. Treatment of ureteral calculi with an 8.3-Fr. disposable shaft rigid ureteroscope.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, F C; Belis, J A

    1996-01-01

    One hundred forty-two adult patients underwent ureteroscopy for treatment of ureteral calculi using a disposable shaft semirigid mini-ureteroscope. The ureteroscope has an 8.3-French (Fr.) outer diameter with a fiberoptic core that allows some flexibility of the shaft. It has a 4.0-Fr. working channel that allows simultaneous use of 3-Fr. instruments and irrigation. Twenty-nine patients had upper ureteral calculi and 113 patients had lower ureteral calculi. Forty-eight patients did not require ureteral dilation, and the remainder had minimal dilation to 10-12 Fr. One hundred fifteen patients underwent laser lithotripsy, 15 patients underwent basket extraction, and 12 patients underwent both. Ten patients required use of a flexible ureteroscope. Ninety-three percent of the patients went home the day of the procedure, 4% stayed one night in the hospital, and the remaining three percent had longer hospital stays. No major complications or infections were noted. Only 11% of the patients required intravenous or intramuscular narcotics for pain management postoperatively. The stone-free results at one month were 98% for lower ureteral calculi and 93% for upper ureteral calculi. We have found this ureteroscope to be similar to other rigid mini-ureteroscopes with some additional advantages. A larger working channel, increased flexibility, and improved optics make it useful for treating ureteral calculi in the lower ureter in men and the entire ureter in selected women.

  7. Lighted ureteral stents in laparoscopic colorectal surgery; a five-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Lavy, Daniel; Dinallo, Anthony; Otero, Javier; Roding, Annelie; Hanos, Dustin; Dressner, Roy; Arvanitis, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background Ureteral injuries during colorectal surgery are a rare event, ranging in the literature from 0.28–7.6%. Debate surrounds the use of prophylactic lighted ureteral stents to help protect the ureter during laparoscopic surgery. It has been suggested that they help to identify injuries but do not prevent them. The authors look to challenge this. Methods Over 66 months, every laparoscopic or colectomy involving ureteral stents was recorded. Researchers documented any injury to the ureter intraoperatively. The chart was also reviewed for the complications of urinary tract infection (UTI) and urinary retention post-operatively. Results During the 66 months, 402 laparoscopic colon resections were done. There were no ureteral injuries. The lighted ureteral stent was identified during every case in the effort to prevent injury during dissection and resection. No catheter associated UTIs were identified, while 14 (3.5%) suffered from post-operative urinary retention. Conclusions The authors of this study present a large series of colon resections with no intraoperative ureteral injuries. In addition, these catheters were not associated with any UTIs and a rate of urinary retention similar to that of the at large data. This series provides compelling data to use lighted ureteral stents during laparoscopic colon surgery. PMID:28251123

  8. Giant ureteric and staghorn calculi in a young adult Nigerian male: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gali, B M; Ali, A; Ibrahim, A G; Bakari, A; Minoza, K

    2010-01-01

    Ureteric calculi are usually small and solitary.The term giant has been applied to ureteric calculi that aremore than five cms in length and/or 50g or more in weight. These are uncommon and may present with few or no urological symptoms and might be ignored or be missed. To present a rare case of a giant left ureteric calculus associated with an ipsilateral staghorn calculus. A 31-year-old Nigerian male presented with recurrent left abdominal pain, dysuria, urinary frequency, and fever which had been on for 10 years. Patient was clinically evaluated. He had plain abdominal X-rays, abdominal ultrasonography and intravenous urography. He had to undergo nephrouterorectomy. Patient took analgesics and antibiotics purchased from patent chemist shops for relief of symptoms by himself. He was fit except for a hard cylindrical mass felt arising from the pelvis. Abdomino-pelvic ultrasound scan, plain abdominal X-ray and Intravenous urogram showed a giant ureteric calculus with an ipsilateral staghorn calculus in a nonfunctioning hydronephrotic left kidney. There was no evidence of underlying anatomic or metabolic abnormalities. He had left nephroureterectomy. The ureteric calculus measured 10.5 x 3.0cm and weighed 20.1gm. Giant ureteric calculi are rare. The association giant ureteric calculus with an ipsilateral staghorn renal calculus without underlying anatomic abnormalities appear not have been reported earlier.

  9. Pleiotropic functions of embryonic sonic hedgehog expression link jaw and taste bud amplification with eye loss during cavefish evolution.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Byerly, Mardi S; Jackman, William R; Jeffery, William R

    2009-06-01

    This study addresses the role of sonic hedgehog (shh) in increasing oral-pharyngeal constructive traits (jaws and taste buds) at the expense of eyes in the blind cavefish Astyanax mexicanus. In cavefish embryos, eye primordia degenerate under the influence of hyperactive Shh signaling. In concert, cavefish show amplified jaw size and taste bud numbers as part of a change in feeding behavior. To determine whether pleiotropic effects of hyperactive Shh signaling link these regressive and constructive traits, shh expression was compared during late development of the surface-dwelling (surface fish) and cave-dwelling (cavefish) forms of Astyanax. After an initial expansion along the midline of early embryos, shh was elevated in the oral-pharyngeal region in cavefish and later was confined to taste buds. The results of shh inhibition and overexpression experiments indicate that Shh signaling has an important role in oral and taste bud development. Conditional overexpression of an injected shh transgene at specific times in development showed that taste bud amplification and eye degeneration are sensitive to shh overexpression during the same early developmental period, although taste buds are not formed until much later. Genetic crosses between cavefish and surface fish revealed an inverse relationship between eye size and jaw size/taste bud number, supporting a link between oral-pharyngeal constructive traits and eye degeneration. The results suggest that hyperactive Shh signaling increases oral and taste bud amplification in cavefish at the expense of eyes. Therefore, selection for constructive oral-pharyngeal traits may be responsible for eye loss during cavefish evolution via pleiotropic function of the Shh signaling pathway.

  10. Gene expression analysis of bud and leaf color in tea.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kang; Zhang, Yazhen; Wu, Liyun; Li, Hailin; Ruan, Li; Bai, Peixian; Zhang, Chengcai; Zhang, Fen; Xu, Liyi; Wang, Liyuan; Cheng, Hao

    2016-10-01

    Purple shoot tea attributing to the high anthocyanin accumulation is of great interest for its wide health benefits. To better understand potential mechanisms involved in purple buds and leaves formation in tea plants, we performed transcriptome analysis of six green or purple shoot tea individuals from a F1 population using the Illumina sequencing method. Totally 292 million RNA-Seq reads were obtained and assembled into 112,233 unigenes, with an average length of 759 bp and an N50 of 1081 bp. Moreover, totally 2193 unigenes showed significant differences in expression levels between green and purple tea samples, with 1143 up- and 1050 down-regulated in the purple teas. Further real time PCR analysis confirmed RNA-Seq results. Our study identified 28 differentially expressed transcriptional factors and A CsMYB gene was found to be highly similar to AtPAP1 in Arabidopsis. Further analysis of differentially expressed genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis and transportation showed that the late biosynthetic genes and genes involved in anthocyanin transportation were largely affected but the early biosynthetic genes were less or none affected. Overall, the identification of a large number of differentially expressed genes offers a global view of the potential mechanisms associated with purple buds and leaves formation, which will facilitate molecular breeding in tea plants.

  11. Pruning time × cultivar effects on flower-bud hardiness in northern highbush and southern highbush blueberry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A study was conducted to determine if early-fall pruning of either northern highbush or southern highbush blueberries was detrimental to the development of optimum and levels of mid-winter cold-hardiness. Using a detached-shoot freeze-thaw assay, flower bud LT50 values were determined in early Janua...

  12. Acute ureteric calculus obstruction: unenhanced spiral CT versus HASTE MR urography and abdominal radiograph.

    PubMed

    Regan, F; Kuszyk, B; Bohlman, M E; Jackman, S

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the performance of unenhanced spiral CT to the combination of HASTE MR urography (MRU) and plain abdominal radiography (KUB) in patients suspected of having acute calculus ureteric obstruction. 64 patients with suspected acute calculus ureteric obstruction were evaluated. The presence of perirenal fluid, presence and level of ureteric obstruction and calculi were assessed on both techniques. 44 of 64 (69%) patients had acute calculus ureteric obstruction based on clinical, radiographic or surgical findings. MRU showed perirenal fluid in acute ureteric obstruction (77%) with a greater sensitivity than CT showed stranding (45%). The combination of fluid and ureteric dilation on MRU showed a sensitivity of 93% (CT 80%), specificity of 95% (CT 85%), and accuracy of 94% (CT 81%). There were 61 findings of either fluid or ureteric dilatation on MRU in 44 acutely obstructed kidneys compared with 37 similar findings on CT (p<0.005). Although there was excellent reproducibility (Kappa=/>0.75) in the finding of perirenal fluid on MRU, there was only fair interobserver agreement (Kappa<0.4) regarding perirenal stranding on CT. MRU/KUB showed ureteric calculi in 21/29 (72%) of patients with calculi seen by CT. Overall, MRU/KUB revealed 2.4 abnormalities per acutely obstructed ureter compared with 1.8 abnormalities detected by CT. MRU/KUB using HASTE sequences can diagnose the presence of acute calculus ureteric obstruction with similar accuracy to spiral CT. The technique has less observer variability and is more accurate than CT in detecting evidence of obstruction such as perirenal fluid.

  13. Distal Ureteral Diameter Ratio is Predictive of Breakthrough Febrile Urinary Tract Infection.

    PubMed

    Arlen, Angela M; Leong, Traci; Guidos, Paul J; Alexander, Siobhan E; Cooper, Christopher S

    2017-07-08

    Distal ureteral diameter ratio is an objective measure that is prognostic of spontaneous resolution of vesicoureteral reflux. Along with likelihood of resolution, improved identification of children at risk for recurrent febrile urinary tract infections may impact management decisions. We evaluated the usefulness of ureteral diameter ratio as a predictive factor for breakthrough febrile urinary tract infections. Children with primary vesicoureteral reflux and detailed voiding cystourethrogram were identified. Ureteral diameter ratio was computed by measuring largest ureteral diameter within the pelvis and dividing by the distance between L1 and L3 vertebral bodies. Demographics, vesicoureteral reflux grade, laterality, presence/absence of bladder-bowel dysfunction, and ureteral diameter ratio were tested in univariate and multivariable analyses. Primary outcome was breakthrough febrile urinary tract infections. We analyzed 112 girls and 28 boys with a mean ± SD age of 2.5 ± 2.3 years at diagnosis. Vesicoureteral reflux was grade 1 to 2 in 64 patients (45.7%), grade 3 in 50 (35.7%), grade 4 in 16 (11.4%) and grade 5 in 10 (7.2%). Mean ± SD followup was 3.2 ± 2.7 years. A total of 40 children (28.6%) experienced breakthrough febrile urinary tract infections. Ureteral diameter ratio was significantly greater in children with (0.36) vs without (0.25) breakthrough febrile infections (p = 0.004). Controlling for vesicoureteral reflux grade, every 0.1 U increase in ureteral diameter ratio resulted in 1.7 times increased odds of breakthrough infection (95% CI 1.24 to 2.26, p <0.0001). Children with increased distal ureteral diameter ratio are at greater risk for breakthrough febrile urinary tract infections independent of reflux grade. Ureteral diameter ratio provides valuable prognostic information about risk of recurrent pyelonephritis and may assist with clinical decision-making. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc

  14. Taste Bud-Derived BDNF Is Required to Maintain Normal Amounts of Innervation to Adult Taste Buds123

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lingbin; Ohman-Gault, Lisa; Ma, Liqun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Gustatory neurons transmit chemical information from taste receptor cells, which reside in taste buds in the oral cavity, to the brain. As adult taste receptor cells are renewed at a constant rate, nerve fibers must reconnect with new taste receptor cells as they arise. Therefore, the maintenance of gustatory innervation to the taste bud is an active process. Understanding how this process is regulated is a fundamental concern of gustatory system biology. We speculated that because brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is required for taste bud innervation during development, it might function to maintain innervation during adulthood. If so, taste buds should lose innervation when Bdnf is deleted in adult mice. To test this idea, we first removed Bdnf from all cells in adulthood using transgenic mice with inducible CreERT2 under the control of the Ubiquitin promoter. When Bdnf was removed, approximately one-half of the innervation to taste buds was lost, and taste buds became smaller because of the loss of taste bud cells. Individual taste buds varied in the amount of innervation each lost, and those that lost the most innervation also lost the most taste bud cells. We then tested the idea that that the taste bud was the source of this BDNF by reducing Bdnf levels specifically in the lingual epithelium and taste buds. Taste buds were confirmed as the source of BDNF regulating innervation. We conclude that BDNF expressed in taste receptor cells is required to maintain normal levels of innervation in adulthood. PMID:26730405

  15. Taste Bud-Derived BDNF Is Required to Maintain Normal Amounts of Innervation to Adult Taste Buds.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lingbin; Ohman-Gault, Lisa; Ma, Liqun; Krimm, Robin F

    2015-01-01

    Gustatory neurons transmit chemical information from taste receptor cells, which reside in taste buds in the oral cavity, to the brain. As adult taste receptor cells are renewed at a constant rate, nerve fibers must reconnect with new taste receptor cells as they arise. Therefore, the maintenance of gustatory innervation to the taste bud is an active process. Understanding how this process is regulated is a fundamental concern of gustatory system biology. We speculated that because brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is required for taste bud innervation during development, it might function to maintain innervation during adulthood. If so, taste buds should lose innervation when Bdnf is deleted in adult mice. To test this idea, we first removed Bdnf from all cells in adulthood using transgenic mice with inducible CreERT2 under the control of the Ubiquitin promoter. When Bdnf was removed, approximately one-half of the innervation to taste buds was lost, and taste buds became smaller because of the loss of taste bud cells. Individual taste buds varied in the amount of innervation each lost, and those that lost the most innervation also lost the most taste bud cells. We then tested the idea that that the taste bud was the source of this BDNF by reducing Bdnf levels specifically in the lingual epithelium and taste buds. Taste buds were confirmed as the source of BDNF regulating innervation. We conclude that BDNF expressed in taste receptor cells is required to maintain normal levels of innervation in adulthood.

  16. Localization of Bud2p, a GTPase-activating protein necessary for programming cell polarity in yeast to the presumptive bud site

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hay-Oak; Sanson, Anthony; Herskowitz, Ira

    1999-01-01

    Yeast cells of different cell type exhibit distinct budding patterns that reflect the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Bud1p (Rsr1p), a Ras-like GTPase, and Bud2p, a GTPase-activating protein for Bud1p, are essential for proper budding pattern. We show that Bud2p is localized at the presumptive bud site in G1 cells in all cell types and that this localization is independent of Bud1p. Bud2p subsequently localizes to the mother-bud neck after bud emergence; this localization depends on the integrity of the septins. These observations indicate that Bud2p becomes positioned in G1 cells by recognizing cell type-specific landmarks at the presumptive bud site. PMID:10444589

  17. Use of internal polyethylene ureteral stents in extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy of staghorn calculi.

    PubMed

    Pode, D; Shapiro, A; Verstandig, A; Pfau, A

    1987-01-01

    Ureteral stenting during extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) of complete staghorn calculi, using an internal polyethylene pigtail catheter, was found to be an efficient prophylactic measure against the high rate of complications in these cases. In the presence of a ureteral stent the stone fragments passed more easily into the bladder, accumulation of obstructing stone streets was prevented, and internal drainage of the urine was guaranteed. The need for auxiliary measures such as percutaneous nephrostomy, ureteroscopy or ureteral meatotomy was prevented in most cases. This prophylactic measure may turn ESWL to become the primary treatment of large staghorn calculi.

  18. Renal Transplant Ureteral Stenosis: Treatment by Self-Expanding Metallic Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Cantasdemir, Murat; Kantarci, Fatih; Numan, Furuzan; Mihmanli, Ismail; Kalender, Betul

    2003-02-15

    We report the use of a metallic stent in a transplant ureteral stenosis. A 28-year-old man with chronic renal failure due to chronic pyelonephritis, who received a living-donor renal transplant, presented with transplant ureteral stenosis. The stenosis was unresponsive to balloon dilation and was treated by antegrade placement of a self-expanding Memotherm stent. The stentedureter stayed patent for 3 years. It may be reasonable to treat post-transplant ureteral stenosis resistant to balloon dilation with self-expanding metallic stents. However, long-term follow-up is required to evaluate the efficacy of this treatment.

  19. Processing umami and other tastes in mammalian taste buds.

    PubMed

    Roper, Stephen D; Chaudhari, Nirupa

    2009-07-01

    Neuroscientists are now coming to appreciate that a significant degree of information processing occurs in the peripheral sensory organs of taste prior to signals propagating to the brain. Gustatory stimulation causes taste bud cells to secrete neurotransmitters that act on adjacent taste bud cells (paracrine transmitters) as well as on primary sensory afferent fibers (neurocrine transmitters). Paracrine transmission, representing cell-cell communication within the taste bud, has the potential to shape the final signal output that taste buds transmit to the brain. The following paragraphs summarize current thinking about how taste signals generally, and umami taste in particular, are processed in taste buds.

  20. Eukaryotic-Like Virus Budding in Archaea.

    PubMed

    Quemin, Emmanuelle R J; Chlanda, Petr; Sachse, Martin; Forterre, Patrick; Prangishvili, David; Krupovic, Mart

    2016-09-13

    Similar to many eukaryotic viruses (and unlike bacteriophages), viruses infecting archaea are often encased in lipid-containing envelopes. However, the mechanisms of their morphogenesis and egress remain unexplored. Here, we used dual-axis electron tomography (ET) to characterize the morphogenesis of Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus 1 (SSV1), the prototype of the family Fuselloviridae and representative of the most abundant archaea-specific group of viruses. Our results show that SSV1 assembly and egress are concomitant and occur at the cellular cytoplasmic membrane via a process highly reminiscent of the budding of enveloped viruses that infect eukaryotes. The viral nucleoprotein complexes are extruded in the form of previously unknown rod-shaped intermediate structures which have an envelope continuous with the host membrane. Further maturation into characteristic spindle-shaped virions takes place while virions remain attached to the cell surface. Our data also revealed the formation of constricted ring-like structures which resemble the budding necks observed prior to the ESCRT machinery-mediated membrane scission during egress of various enveloped viruses of eukaryotes. Collectively, we provide evidence that archaeal spindle-shaped viruses contain a lipid envelope acquired upon budding of the viral nucleoprotein complex through the host cytoplasmic membrane. The proposed model bears a clear resemblance to the egress strategy employed by enveloped eukaryotic viruses and raises important questions as to how the archaeal single-layered membrane composed of tetraether lipids can undergo scission. The replication of enveloped viruses has been extensively studied in eukaryotes but has remained unexplored for enveloped viruses infecting Archaea Here, we provide a sequential view on the assembly and egress of SSV1, a prototypic archaeal virus. The observed process is highly similar to the budding of eukaryotic enveloped viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus

  1. Budding of domains in mixed bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Jean; Komura, Shigeyuki; Andelman, David

    2015-01-01

    We propose a model that accounts for the budding behavior of domains in lipid bilayers, where each of the bilayer leaflets has a coupling between its local curvature and the local lipid composition. The compositional asymmetry between the two monolayers leads to an overall spontaneous curvature. The membrane free energy contains three contributions: the bending energy, the line tension, and a Landau free energy for a lateral phase separation. Within a mean-field treatment, we obtain various phase diagrams which contain fully budded, dimpled, and flat states. In particular, for some range of membrane parameters, the phase diagrams exhibit a tricritical behavior as well as a three-phase coexistence region. The global phase diagrams can be divided into three types and are analyzed in terms of the curvature-composition coupling parameter and domain size.

  2. Live confocal imaging of Arabidopsis flower buds.

    PubMed

    Prunet, Nathanaël; Jack, Thomas P; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2016-11-01

    Recent advances in confocal microscopy, coupled with the development of numerous fluorescent reporters, provide us with a powerful tool to study the development of plants. Live confocal imaging has been used extensively to further our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the formation of roots, shoots and leaves. However, it has not been widely applied to flowers, partly because of specific challenges associated with the imaging of flower buds. Here, we describe how to prepare and grow shoot apices of Arabidopsis in vitro, to perform both single-point and time-lapse imaging of live, developing flower buds with either an upright or an inverted confocal microscope. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Synchronization of the Budding Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Foltman, Magdalena; Molist, Iago; Sanchez-Diaz, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    A number of model organisms have provided the basis for our understanding of the eukaryotic cell cycle. These model organisms are generally much easier to manipulate than mammalian cells and as such provide amenable tools for extensive genetic and biochemical analysis. One of the most common model organisms used to study the cell cycle is the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This model provides the ability to synchronise cells efficiently at different stages of the cell cycle, which in turn opens up the possibility for extensive and detailed study of mechanisms regulating the eukaryotic cell cycle. Here, we describe methods in which budding yeast cells are arrested at a particular phase of the cell cycle and then released from the block, permitting the study of molecular mechanisms that drive the progression through the cell cycle.

  4. The ESCRT pathway and HIV-1 budding.

    PubMed

    Usami, Yoshiko; Popov, Sergei; Popova, Elena; Inoue, Michio; Weissenhorn, Winfried; G Göttlinger, Heinrich

    2009-02-01

    HIV-1 Gag engages components of the ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) pathway via so-called L (late-assembly) domains to promote virus budding. Specifically, the PTAP (Pro-Thr-Ala-Pro)-type primary L domain of HIV-1 recruits ESCRT-I by binding to Tsg101 (tumour susceptibility gene 101), and an auxiliary LYPX(n)L (Leu-Tyr-Pro-Xaa(n)-Leu)-type L domain recruits the ESCRT-III-binding partner Alix [ALG-2 (apoptosis-linked gene 2)-interacting protein X]. The structurally related CHMPs (charged multivesicular body proteins), which form ESCRT-III, are kept in an inactive state through intramolecular interactions, and become potent inhibitors of HIV-1 budding upon removal of an autoinhibitory region. In the absence of the primary L domain, HIV-1 budding is strongly impaired, but can be efficiently rescued through the overexpression of Alix. This effect of Alix depends on its ability to interact with CHMP4, suggesting that it is the recruitment of CHMPs that ultimately drives virus release. Surprisingly, HIV-1 budding defects can also be efficiently corrected by overexpressing Nedd (neural-precursor-cell-expressed developmentally down-regulated) 4-2s, a member of a family of ubiquitin ligases previously implicated in the function of PPXY (Pro-Pro-Xaa-Tyr)-type L domains, which are absent from HIV-1. At least under certain circumstances, Nedd4-2s stimulates the activity of PTAP-type L domains, raising the possibility that the ubiquitin ligase regulates the activity of ESCRT-I.

  5. Outcomes of Percutaneous Management of Anastomotic Ureteral Strictures in Renal Transplantation: Chronic Nephroureteral Stent Placement with and without Balloon Dilatation

    SciTech Connect

    Uflacker, A. Sheeran, D. Khaja, M.

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThis study was designed o evaluate outcomes of percutaneous management of anastomotic ureteral strictures in renal transplants using nephroureteral stents with or without balloon dilatation.MethodsA retrospective audit of 1,029 consecutive renal transplants was performed. Anastomotic ureteral strictures were divided into two groups: nephroureteral stent only (NUS) and NUS+PTA (nephroureteral stent plus percutaneous transluminal angioplasty), with each cohort subdivided into early versus late presentation (obstructive uropathy occurring <90 day or >90 days from transplant, respectively). Overall and 6-month technical success were defined as removal of NUS any time with <30 % residual stenosis (any time lapse less or more than 6 months) and at >6 months, respectively. Patency was evaluated from NUS removal to last follow-up for both groups and compared.ResultsSixty-seven transplant patients with 70 ureteric anastomotic strictures (6.8 %, n = 70/1,029) underwent 72 percutaneous treatments. 34 % were late (>90 days, n = 24/70), and 66 % were early (<90 days, n = 46/70). Overall technical success was 82 % (n = 59/72) and 6-month success was 58 % (n = 42/72). Major and minor complications were 2.8 % (n = 2/72), and 12.5 % (n = 9/72). NUS+PTA did not improve graft survival (p = 0.354) or patency (p = 0.9) compared with NUS alone. There was no difference in graft survival between treated and nontreated groups (p = 0.74).ConclusionsThere is no advantage to PTA in addition to placement of NUS, although PTA did not negatively impact graft survival or long-term patency and both interventions were safe and effective. Neither the late or early groups benefited from PTA in addition to NUS. Earlier obstructions showed greater improvement in serum creatinine than later obstructions.

  6. The role of tumour budding in predicting survival in patients with primary operable colorectal cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    van Wyk, H C; Park, James; Roxburgh, Campbell; Horgan, Paul; Foulis, Alan; McMillan, Donald C

    2015-02-01

    Tumour budding reflects a detachment of tumour cells at the invasive front of carcinomas and is presumed to be an early step in the metastatic process. Tumour budding has received some attention in colorectal cancer as it has been proposed as an additional prognostic factor in colorectal cancer that may stratify patients into risk categories. The purpose of the review was to examine (1): The different methods of detection using either routine stains (H&E) or immunohistochemistry; (2): to compare studies that examined the different methods used to identify tumour budding; and (3) to examine the impact of tumour budding on survival in primary operable colorectal cancer. Results from the present review suggest that tumour budding can be considered a promising and strong prognostic factor in colorectal cancer. However, the implementation of the assessment of tumour budding in routine pathological work will depend on a selected, internationally accepted scoring system and validation against other established prognostic factors in patients with colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Anisotropic stress orients remodelling of mammalian limb bud ectoderm

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Kimberly; Tao, Hirotaka; Liu, Haijiao; Wen, Jun; Sturgeon, Kendra; Sorfazlian, Natalie; Lazic, Savo; Burrows, Jeffrey T. A.; Wong, Michael D.; Li, Danyi; Deimling, Steven; Ciruna, Brian; Scott, Ian; Simmons, Craig; Henkelman, R. Mark; Williams, Trevor; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Sun, Yu; Hopyan, Sevan

    2016-01-01

    The physical forces that drive morphogenesis are not well characterized in vivo, especially among vertebrates. In the early limb bud, dorsal and ventral ectoderm converge to form the apical ectodermal ridge (AER), although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. By live imaging mouse embryos, we show that prospective AER progenitors intercalate at the dorsoventral boundary and that ectoderm remodels by concomitant cell division and neighbour exchange. Mesodermal expansion and ectodermal tension together generate a dorsoventrally biased stress pattern that orients ectodermal remodelling. Polarized distribution of cortical actin reflects this stress pattern in a β-catenin- and Fgfr2-dependent manner. Intercalation of AER progenitors generates a tensile gradient that reorients resolution of multicellular rosettes on adjacent surfaces, a process facilitated by β-catenin-dependent attachment of cortex to membrane. Therefore, feedback between tissue stress pattern and cell intercalations remodels mammalian ectoderm. PMID:25893915

  8. Eukaryotic-Like Virus Budding in Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Quemin, Emmanuelle R. J.; Chlanda, Petr; Sachse, Martin; Forterre, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Similar to many eukaryotic viruses (and unlike bacteriophages), viruses infecting archaea are often encased in lipid-containing envelopes. However, the mechanisms of their morphogenesis and egress remain unexplored. Here, we used dual-axis electron tomography (ET) to characterize the morphogenesis of Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus 1 (SSV1), the prototype of the family Fuselloviridae and representative of the most abundant archaea-specific group of viruses. Our results show that SSV1 assembly and egress are concomitant and occur at the cellular cytoplasmic membrane via a process highly reminiscent of the budding of enveloped viruses that infect eukaryotes. The viral nucleoprotein complexes are extruded in the form of previously unknown rod-shaped intermediate structures which have an envelope continuous with the host membrane. Further maturation into characteristic spindle-shaped virions takes place while virions remain attached to the cell surface. Our data also revealed the formation of constricted ring-like structures which resemble the budding necks observed prior to the ESCRT machinery-mediated membrane scission during egress of various enveloped viruses of eukaryotes. Collectively, we provide evidence that archaeal spindle-shaped viruses contain a lipid envelope acquired upon budding of the viral nucleoprotein complex through the host cytoplasmic membrane. The proposed model bears a clear resemblance to the egress strategy employed by enveloped eukaryotic viruses and raises important questions as to how the archaeal single-layered membrane composed of tetraether lipids can undergo scission. PMID:27624130

  9. Ureteral penetration caused by drilling during internal pelvic bone fixation: delayed recognition.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yu Seob; Park, Jong Hyuk; Raheem, Omer A; Jeong, Young Beom; Kim, Hyung Jin; Kim, Young Gon

    2013-06-01

    A 49-year-old man was referred to our department with profuse serous fluid discharge from a Penrose drain after undergoing internal fixation with metal screws for multiple pelvic bone fractures. A definite ureteral penetration was identified that was orientated from the lateral to the medial aspect of the right distal ureter. The patient was surgically treated with excision of the 2-cm injured ureteral segment, end-to-end ureteroureterostomy, and double J ureteral stent placement. To our knowledge, a penetrating ureteral injury caused by bone drilling has not been reported previously in the published literature. This case shows that surgeons who do pelvic surgery, including orthopedic surgeons, should be familiar with the anatomical relationship of the ureter and its potential injuries.

  10. Endourologic and Open Ureterolithotomy and Common Sheath Reimplant for Large Bladder and Distal Ureteral Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Joseph; Renzulli, Joseph; Pareek, Gyan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A twenty-eight-year-old female with a history of suprapubic pain and recurrent urinary tract infections presents for urology referral with a kidney, ureter, and bladder radiograph showing a 4.4 cm bladder calculus and 6.5 cm distal left ureteral stone. She underwent effective cystolitholapaxy of the bladder stone. Endourologic attempt (left ureteroscopy) was unsuccessful because of ureteral stone burden. Findings at ureteroscopy revealed a duplicated system on the left with the lower pole moiety joining just proximal to the ureteral orifice. The stone was found to be in the upper pole moiety ureter. An open ureterolithotomy was performed with intraoperative ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy and common sheath ureteral reimplant. Furthermore, a previously placed stent was found to be encrusted at the time of the ureterolithotomy. Effective ureteroscopy and lasering were performed through the ureterotomy up to the renal pelvis of the upper pole ureter. PMID:27868099

  11. Forgotten/retained double J ureteric stents: A source of severe morbidity in children.

    PubMed

    Nerli, Rajendra B; Magdum, Prasad V; Sharma, Vikas; Guntaka, Ajay Kumar; Hiremath, Murigendra B; Ghagane, Shridhar

    2016-01-01

    The increase in the usage of double J (DJ) ureteral stents in the management of a variety of urinary tract disease processes mandates familiarity with these devices, their consequences and their potential complications, which at times can be devastating. We retrospectively reviewed our series of children with forgotten/retained DJ ureteric stents. Hospital records of all patients' <18 years old who underwent removal of forgotten/retained DJ ureteral stent at our hospital were reviewed for age, gender, indication for insertion of DJ stent, duration of stent insertion, radiological images and surgical procedures performed. During the study period, January 2000 to December 2014 (a 15-year period), a total of 14 children underwent removal of forgotten/retained DJ ureteral stent. A combination of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, cystolitholapaxy and percutaneous nephrolithotomy was done to free the DJ stent and extract it. Forgotten/retained stents in children are a source of severe morbidity, additional/unnecessary hospitalisation and definitely financial strain.

  12. Epithelial mesenchymal transition and tumor budding in aggressive colorectal cancer: tumor budding as oncotarget.

    PubMed

    Zlobec, Inti; Lugli, Alessandro

    2010-11-01

    Epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) is proposed as a critical mechanism for the acquisition of malignant phenotypes by epithelial cells. In colorectal cancer, tumor cells having undergone EMT are histologically represented by the presence of tumor buds defined as single cells or small clusters of de-differentiated tumor cells at the invasive front. Tumor budding is not a static, histological feature rather it represents a snap-shot of a dynamic process undertaken by an aggressive tumor with the potential to disseminate and metastasize. Strong, consistent evidence shows that tumor budding is a predictor of lymph node metastasis, distant metastatic disease, local recurrence, worse overall and disease-free survival time and an independent prognostic factor. Moreover, the International Union against Cancer (UICC) recognizes tumor budding as a highly relevant, additional prognostic parameter. The aim of this review is to summarize the evidence supporting the implementation of tumor budding into diagnostic pathology and patient management and additionally to illustrate its worthiness as a potential therapeutic target.

  13. Epithelial mesenchymal transition and tumor budding in aggressive colorectal cancer: Tumor budding as oncotarget

    PubMed Central

    Zlobec, Inti; Lugli, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) is proposed as a critical mechanism for the acquisition of malignant phenotypes by epithelial cells. In colorectal cancer, tumor cells having undergone EMT are histologically represented by the presence of tumor buds defined as single cells or small clusters of de-differentiated tumor cells at the invasive front. Tumor budding is not a static, histological feature rather it represents a snap-shot of a dynamic process undertaken by an aggressive tumor with the potential to disseminate and metastasize. Strong, consistent evidence shows that tumor budding is a predictor of lymph node metastasis, distant metastatic disease, local recurrence, worse overall and disease-free survival time and an independent prognostic factor. Moreover, the International Union against Cancer (UICC) recognizes tumor budding as a highly relevant, additional prognostic parameter. The aim of this review is to summarize the evidence supporting the implementation of tumor budding into diagnostic pathology and patient management and additionally to illustrate its worthiness as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:21317460

  14. Tumor Budding, EMT and Cancer Stem Cells in T1-2/N0 Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Attramadal, Cecilie Gjøvaag; Kumar, Sheeba; Boysen, Morten E; Dhakal, Hari Prasad; Nesland, Jahn Marthin; Bryne, Magne

    2015-11-01

    Early oral carcinomas have a high recurrence rate despite surgery with clear margins. In an attempt to classify the risk of recurrence of oral squamous cell carcinomas, we explored the significance of tumor budding, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and certain cancer stem cell markers (CSC). Tumor budding (single cells or clusters of ≤5 cells in the tumor front, divided into high- and low-budding tumors), EMT and CSC markers were studied in 62 immunohistochemically stained slides of T1/2N0M0 oral squamous cell carcinomas. Tissues and records of follow-up were obtained from the Oslo University Hospital, Norway. Tumor budding, EMT and CSC markers were scored and analyzed. The only significant prognostic marker was tumor budding (p=0.043). Expression of the EMT marker E-cadherin was lost from the invasive front and tended to be a prognostic factor (p=0.17), and up-regulation of vimentin in tumor cells in the invasive front was found; this indicates that EMT had occurred. CSC markers were not associated with recurrence rate in the present study. A high budding index was related to poor prognosis in patients with oral cancer. Budding was associated with EMT-like changes. CSC factors were detected but reflected differentiation rather than stemness. Scoring of buds in patients with oral cancer may help discriminate invasive tumors prone to relapse, and thus, provide an indication for adjuvant therapy. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  15. Ureteral Clipping Simplifies Hand-Assisted Laparoscopic Donor Nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sajadi, Kamran P.; Wynn, James J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: We describe a technique of doubly clipping the distal ureter during hand-assisted laparoscopic donor nephrectomy (HALDN) to prevent urine accumulation, thereby simplifying renal hilar division and potentially decreasing the graft warm ischemic time. Methods: A technique of placing polymer-locking clips across the distal ureter prior to division was developed to prevent urine accumulation and the need for suctioning during critical hilar vessel division. Results: We found that ureteral clipping and the elimination of urine accumulation simplified renal hilar division. Retrospective assessment of a series of 27 sequential HALDNs (15 without and 12 with clipping) demonstrated similar estimated blood loss, total operative and warm ischemic times (P=0.13 to 0.18). No adverse impact on graft viability or recipient outcome was observed. Conclusion: Distal ureter clipping to prevent urine accumulation around the renal hilum during HALDN is safe and helpful. PMID:21605517

  16. Idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis causing unilateral ureteral and sigmoid colon obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ting; Wang, Yujuan; Liu, Zhijun; Zhang, Xiaolei; Wu, Qian; Xi, Mingrong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The present report aimed to present a unique case of idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis (RPF) presenting features of unilateral ureteral and sigmoid colon obstruction. RPF is a rare disorder with unclear etiology. Case report: A 43-year-old female had a 10-day history of lower right abdominal and lumbar pain. Gynecological examination, ultrasound, and computed tomography (CT) were all suggestive of right ovarian tumor. An enhanced CT showed right-sided hydronephrosis. The patient was diagnosed as having ovarian cancer. Ten days after hospitalization, a right intraureteral stent with a double-J catheter was inserted. Upon exploring the abdomen, unyielding RPF was encountered. A partial sigmoidectomy and colostomy were performed. Postoperative pathological results suggested idiopathic RPF. She received steroid treatments. Conclusion: RPF is a rare disease that can be misdiagnosed. Our understanding about its presentation has to be improved and it should be considered as a differential diagnosis for patients presenting with abdominal diseases. PMID:28207528

  17. A sign on CT that predicts a hazardous ureteral anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Allam, E.S.; Johnson, D.Y.; Grewal, S.G.; Johnson, F.E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction An aberrant course of the distal ureter can pose a risk of ureteral injury during surgery for inguinal hernia repair and other groin operations. In a recent case series of inguinoscrotal hernation of the ureter, we found that each affected ureter was markedly anterior to the psoas muscle at its mid-point on abdominal CT. We hypothesized that this abnormality in the abdominal course of the ureter would predict the potentially hazardous aberrant course of the distal ureter. Presentation of cases We reviewed all evaluable CT urograms performed at St. Louis University Hospital from June 2012 to July 2013 and measured the ureteral course at several anatomically fixed points. Discussion 93% (50/54) of ureters deviated by less than 1 cm from the psoas muscle in their mid-course (at the level of the L4 vertebra). Reasons for anterior deviation of the ureter in this study included morbid obesity with prominent retroperitoneal fat, congenital renal abnormality, and post-traumatic renal/retroperitoneal hematoma. We determined that the optimal level on abdominal CT to detect the displaced ureter was the mid-body of the L4 vertebra. Conclusion Anterior deviation of the ureter in its mid-course appears to predict inguinoscrotal herniation of the ureter. This finding is a sensitive predictor and should raise concern for this anomaly in the appropriate clinical setting. It is not entirely specific as morbid obesity and congenital anomalies may result in a similar imaging appearance. We believe that this association has not been reported previously. Awareness of this anomaly can have significant operative implications. PMID:27046105

  18. Is routine ureteral stenting really necessary after retrograde intrarenal surgery?

    PubMed

    Ozyuvali, Ekrem; Resorlu, Berkan; Oguz, Ural; Yildiz, Yildiray; Sahin, Tolga; Senocak, Cagri; Bozkurt, Omer Faruk; Damar, Erman; Yildirim, Murat; Unsal, Ali

    2015-03-31

    To investigate the situations in which ureteral double-J stent should be used after retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS). Patients with no ureteral double-J stent after RIRS constituted Group 1, and those with double- J stent after RIRS constituted Group 2. Patients' age and gender, renal stone characteristics (location and dimension), stone-free status, VAS score 8 hours after surgery, post-procedural renal colic attacks, length of hospitalization, requirement for re-hospitalization, time to rehospitalization and secondary procedure requirements were analyzed. RIRS was performed on 162 renal units. Double-J stent was used in 121 (74.6%) of these after RIRS, but not in the other 41 (25.4%). At radiological monitoring at the first month postoperatively after RIRS, complete stone-free status was determined in 122 (75.3%) renal units, while residual stone was present in 40 (24.6%). No significant differences were observed between the groups in terms of duration of fluoroscopy (p = 0.142), operation (p = 0.108) or hospitalization times (p = 0.798). VAS values determined routinely on the evening of surgery were significantly higher in Group 1 than in Group 2 (p = 0.025). Twenty-eight (17.2%) presentations were made to the emergency clinic due to renal colic within 1 month after surgery. Double-J catheter was present in 24 (85.7%) of these patients. Routine double-J stent insertion after RIRS is not essential since it increases costs, morbidity and operation time.

  19. Tamsulosin and the spontaneous passage of ureteral stones in children: A multi-institutional cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Tasian, Gregory E.; Cost, Nicholas G.; Granberg, Candace F.; Pulido, Jose E.; Rivera, Marcelino; Schwen, Zeyad; Schulte, Marion; Fox, Janelle A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Tamsulosin is associated with increased passage of ureteral stones in adults, but its effectiveness in children is uncertain. We determined the association between tamsulosin and the spontaneous passage of ureteral stones in children. Methods We performed a multi-institutional retrospective cohort study of children ≤ 18 years who presented between 2007 and 2012 with a ureteral stone ≤ 10 mm and were managed with tamsulosin or oral analgesics alone. The outcome was spontaneous stone passage defined as radiographic clearance and/or patient report of passage. Subjects prescribed tamsulosin were matched with subjects prescribed analgesics alone using nearest neighbor propensity score matching to adjust for treatment selection. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate the association between tamsulosin and spontaneous passage of ureteral stones, adjusting for stone size and location. Results Of 449 children with ureteral stones, 334 were eligible for inclusion, and complete data were available for 274 children from 4 institutions (99 tamsulosin; 175 analgesics alone). Following case matching, there were no differences in patient age, gender, weight, height, stone size, or stone location between the 99 subjects prescribed tamsulosin and the 99 propensity-score matched subjects prescribed analgesics alone. In the tamsulosin cohort, 55% of ureteral stones passed versus 44% in the analgesics alone cohort (p = 0.03). In multivariate analysis adjusting for stone size and location, tamsulosin was associated with spontaneous passage of ureteral stones (OR 3.31; 95% CI 1.49–7.34). Conclusions The odds of spontaneous passage of ureteral stones were higher in children prescribed tamsulosin versus analgesics alone. PMID:24518765

  20. Ureteral stent--help or hindrance? In healing of post traumatic nephrocutaneous fistula.

    PubMed

    Doddamani, D; Hemal, A K; Ansari, M S

    2001-01-01

    Nephrocutaneous fistulas are rare complications of blunt or penetrating renal trauma. The majority are managed conservatively, some may require percutaneous drainage or ureteral stenting and some require operative intervention. Diversion of the urine by a ureteral stent usually aids in the healing of the fistula. We present an unusual case of nephrocutaneous fistula following blunt renal trauma which persisted as long as a stent was in place but healed immediately after the stent was removed.

  1. Preventing the Forgotten Ureteral Stent by Using a Mobile Point-of-Care Application.

    PubMed

    Ziemba, Justin B; Ludwig, Wesley W; Ruiz, Leticia; Carvalhal, Eduardo; Matlaga, Brian R

    2017-07-01

    The forgotten ureteral stent (FUS) can lead to patient morbidity. To date, tracking ureteral stents is a cumbersome task, given their high frequency of insertion and variable indwelling times. To simplify this process, an application was developed to track patients with indwelling ureteral stents. We report our initial user experience and clinical outcomes with this application. Ureteral Stent Tracker™ (UST) is a secure, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA)-compliant, cloud-based point-of-care application. It is designed for logging stent insertion, scheduling the date of anticipated stent extraction, and confirming stent removal. It is accessible via a mobile phone application or web browser interface. We consecutively enrolled all patients who underwent ureteral stent insertion for any indication by two urologists from January 10, 2015, to October 10, 2016. A retrospective chart review was performed of all patients included in the UST database. Data extracted included patient demographics, diagnosis, procedure, and stent characteristics. A total of 115 patients were included with a mean age of 52.4 years; 54% (62/115) were male and 58% (67/115) were Caucasian. This cohort represented 146 ureteral stent care plans with 23 patients (23/115; 20%) having more than one care plan during the study period. The most common procedure performed was ureteroscopy (70/146; 48%) for a diagnosis of nephrolithiasis (108/146; 74%). The median indwelling ureteral stent time was 14 days (interquartile range: 7-45 days). A total of three patients (3/115; 3%) did not return for their scheduled extraction, but were identified only through the application. Each patient was contacted, resulting in effective removal of all three stents in the office. Tracking of ureteral stents is critical to prevent the patient safety issue of the FUS. The UST is a secure, HIPPA-compliant, cloud-based application, which once incorporated into the workflow of a urologic practice

  2. Tumor budding in colorectal cancer--ready for diagnostic practice?

    PubMed

    Koelzer, Viktor H; Zlobec, Inti; Lugli, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Tumor budding is an important additional prognostic factor for patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Defined as the presence of single tumor cells or small clusters of up to 5 cells in the tumor stroma, tumor budding has been likened to an epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Based on well-designed retrospective studies, tumor budding is linked to adverse outcome of CRC patients in 3 clinical scenarios: (1) in malignant polyps, detection of tumor buds is a risk factor for lymph node metastasis indicating the need for colorectal surgery; (2) tumor budding in stage II CRC is a highly adverse prognostic indicator and may aid patient selection for adjuvant therapy; (3) in the preoperative setting, presence of tumor budding in biopsy material may help to identify high-risk rectal cancer patients for neoadjuvant therapy. However, lack of consensus guidelines for standardized assessment still limits reporting in daily diagnostic practice. This article provides a practical and comprehensive overview on tumor budding aimed at the practicing pathologist. First, we review the prognostic value of tumor budding for the management of colon and rectal cancer patients. Second, we outline a practical, evidence-based proposal for the assessment of tumor budding in the daily sign-out. Last, we summarize the current knowledge of the molecular characteristics of high-grade budding tumors in the context of personalized treatment approaches and biomarker discovery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ureteral Reconstruction With Bowel Segments: Experience With Eight Patients in a Single Institute

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Motoi; Tsukamoto, Taiji

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Although replacement of the ureter with a bowel segment is indicated for large ureteral defects, it is still a challenging technique for urologists. We present our experience and outcome of ureteral reconstruction using bowel segments. Materials and Methods Ureteral reconstruction with bowel segments was performed in eight patients in our institute between 1969 and 2009. We investigated the position and length of the ureteral defect and methods of reconstruction as well as the patients' backgrounds, postoperative complications, and clinical outcomes. Results Five patients underwent ureteral replacement with isolated ileal segments alone. In one patient, the ureter was reconstructed by using the Yang-Monti procedure with the ileum. A colon segment was used in two patients who required bladder augmentation for tuberculous contracted bladder at the same time. Metabolic acidosis occurred in three patients having a solitary kidney and the ureter had to be replaced by a relatively long intestinal segment. Two patients who received preoperative radiation therapy were required to undergo additional operations. Long-term cancer-free survival was achieved in one patient who underwent ileal substitution for low-grade renal pelvic cancer. Conclusions Although ureteral replacement with a bowel segment is a challenging and useful procedure, attention must be paid to the possibility of metabolic acidosis, which is likely to occur in patients having a solitary kidney with renal insufficiency or in patients requiring a long intestinal segment for reconstruction. In addition, preoperative radiation therapy for the pelvic organs may cause postoperative complications. PMID:25405017

  4. Do New Vessel Sealing Devices and Harmonic Ace Increase Ureteric Injury in Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomy?

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Prakash; D’Costa, Sylvia; Shirkande, Preeti; Wahi, Meenu; Kumar, Shilpi

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the risk of ureteric injury in total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH) using new vessel sealing devices (VSDs) and harmonic scalpel with simple scissors, bipolar and suturing. This was an evaluation of 1209 cases, carried out from May 1999 to April 2010. Design and Setting: A retrospective comparative study was carried out at a tertiary gynecological endoscopic unit. Materials and Methods: Out of 1209 patients, who had hysterectomies for various indications, TLH was done in 892 patients, 273 had vaginal hysterectomy and 44 had abdominal hysterectomy. We evaluated the incidence of ureteric injury in these cases. Results: There was no mortality. In the group of vaginal and abdominal hysterectomy, there were no ureteric injuries. In the TLH group, we had 390 cases with simple scissors, bipolar and suturing with no ureteric injury. In 502 cases, new VSDs, e.g., plasma kinetic gyrus, Martin Maxim with Robi grasper, with or without harmonic 5 mm scalpel/ace were used. There were five ureteric injuries, all on the right side (one double ureter): first case was with Martin Maxim and Robi grasper, two with plasma kinetic gyrus 10 mm trissector, one with harmonic scalpel and the last one with scissors. We evaluated the reasons for such ureteric injuries, with experienced laparoscopic surgeons and the best possible set up. There were seven conversions to open surgery out of 892 cases of TLH, more due to poor case selection. PMID:22442518

  5. Intraoperative Ureteral Kinking During Uterosacral Ligament Suspension: Effect of Training Level on Occurrence.

    PubMed

    Richter, Lee A; Boileau, Jenine; Janni, Megan; Tefera, Eshetu; Iglesia, Cheryl B

    2016-01-01

    To determine the rate of ureteral kinking during uterosacral ligament suspension (USLS) procedures at a tertiary referral center and to describe the effect of surgical training level on this occurrence. The secondary aim is to determine the mean additional anesthesia time associated with management of this complication. This retrospective cohort study included all USLS procedures at our tertiary referral center from June 2011 to December 2013. Cases of USLS with ureteral kinking were compared to uncomplicated cases to determine the impact of surgeon training level on this occurrence. A total of 161 USLS procedures were performed during the study period; 10 had ureteral kinking (6.2%). Level of surgeon training significantly impacted ureteral kinking, with higher rates of kinking occurring among surgeons in earlier training. The occurrence of ureteral kinking during USLS significantly increased the procedure. time by a mean of 86 minutes when the surgery included vaginal hysterectomy and anterior/ posterior colporrhaphy (266.5±34.6 min vs. 180.1 ±43.0 min, respectively; p=0.0078). Ureteral kinking occurred in 6.2% of USLS procedures at a tertiary referral center and is associated with a learning curve with statistically significant higher kinking rates among less experienced surgeons. Novel teaching methods should be considered to reduce the learning curve for this procedure.

  6. Ureteral Access Sheath Influence on the Ureteral Wall Evaluated by Cyclooxygenase-2 and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Lildal, Søren Kissow; Nørregaard, Rikke; Andreassen, Kim Hovgaard; Christiansen, Frederikke Eichner; Jung, Helene; Pedersen, Malene Roland

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To examine the effect of ureteral access sheath (UAS) on the expression of the pro-inflammatory mediators cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the ureteral wall. Material and Methods: In 22 pigs an UAS was inserted and removed after 2 minutes on one side and 2 hours on the contralateral side. Postoperatively ureters were excised in vivo, and tissue samples from the distal (2 minutes/2 hours) and proximal ureter (2 minutes/2 hours) were snap-frozen before quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of COX-2 and TNF-α. Five unmanipulated ureteral units from other pigs served as the control group. Results: Compared to controls COX-2 mRNA was significantly upregulated in all UAS treated ureteral groups. Similarly, TNF-α mRNA was upregulated in all groups except the 2-minute proximal ureteral group. Both COX-2 and TNF-α expression were significantly higher in the distal than in the proximal ureter in the UAS treated ureters. After UAS insertion for 2 minutes, expression levels in the distal ureter were increased 6.5- and 8-fold for COX-2 and TNF-α, respectively; and after 2 hours of UAS placement COX-2 and TNF-α mRNA expression levels were increased 9- and 9.5-fold, respectively. Conclusion: The pro-inflammatory mediators COX-2 and TNF-α were significantly upregulated in the ureteral wall by the influence of UAS. These findings may have implications for postoperative pain, drainage, and complications. PMID:27998175

  7. Longitudinal changes in MRI markers in a reversible unilateral ureteral obstruction mouse model: preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Haque, Muhammad E; Franklin, Tammy; Bokhary, Ujala; Mathew, Liby; Hack, Bradley K; Chang, Anthony; Puri, Tipu S; Prasad, Pottumarthi V

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate longitudinal changes in renal oxygenation and diffusion measurements in a model of reversible unilateral ureteral obstruction (rUUO) which has been shown to induce chronic renal functional deficits in a strain dependent way. C57BL/6 mice show higher degree of functional deficit compared with BALB/c mice. Because hypoxia and development of fibrosis are associated with chronic kidney diseases and are responsible for progression, we hypothesized that MRI measurements would be able to monitor the longitudinal changes in this model and will show strain dependent differences in response. Here blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) and diffusion MRI measurements were performed at three time points over a 30 day period in mice with rUUO. The studies were performed on a 4.7T scanner with the mice anesthetized with isoflurane before UUO, 2 and 28 days postrelease of 6 days of obstruction. We found at the early time point (∼2 days after releasing the obstruction), the relative oxygenation in C57Bl/6 mice were lower compared with BALB/c. Diffusion measurements were lower at this time point and reached statistical significance in BALB/c These methods may prove valuable in better understanding the natural progression of kidney diseases and in evaluating novel interventions to limit progression. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Singularity in polarization: rewiring yeast cells to make two buds.

    PubMed

    Howell, Audrey S; Savage, Natasha S; Johnson, Sam A; Bose, Indrani; Wagner, Allison W; Zyla, Trevin R; Nijhout, H Frederik; Reed, Michael C; Goryachev, Andrew B; Lew, Daniel J

    2009-11-13

    For budding yeast to ensure formation of only one bud, cells must polarize toward one, and only one, site. Polarity establishment involves the Rho family GTPase Cdc42, which concentrates at polarization sites via a positive feedback loop. To assess whether singularity is linked to the specific Cdc42 feedback loop, we disabled the yeast cell's endogenous amplification mechanism and synthetically rewired the cells to employ a different positive feedback loop. Rewired cells violated singularity, occasionally making two buds. Even cells that made only one bud sometimes initiated two clusters of Cdc42, but then one cluster became dominant. Mathematical modeling indicated that, given sufficient time, competition between clusters would promote singularity. In rewired cells, competition occurred slowly and sometimes failed to develop a single "winning" cluster before budding. Slowing competition in normal cells also allowed occasional formation of two buds, suggesting that singularity is enforced by rapid competition between Cdc42 clusters.

  9. Estimation of population effects in synchronized budding yeast experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemistoe, Antti; Aho, Tommi; Thesleff, Henna; Tiainen, Mikko; Marjanen, Kalle; Linne, Marja-Leena; Yli-Harja, Olli P.

    2003-05-01

    An approach for estimating the distribution of a synchronized budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cell population is discussed. This involves estimation of the phase of the cell cycle for each cell. The approach is based on counting the number of buds of different sizes in budding yeast images. An image processing procedure is presented for the bud-counting task. The procedure employs clustering of the local mean-variance space for segmentation of the images. The subsequent bud-detection step is based on an object separation method which utilizes the chain code representation of objects as well as labeling of connected components. The procedure is tested with microscopic images that were obtained in a time-series experiment of a synchronized budding yeast cell population. The use of the distribution estimate of the cell population for inverse filtering of signals that are obtained in time-series microarray measurements is discussed as well.

  10. Identification of an Amphipathic Helix Important for the Formation of Ectopic Septin Spirals and Axial Budding in Yeast Axial Landmark Protein Bud3p

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia; Gong, Ting; Gao, Xiang-Dong

    2011-01-01

    Correct positioning of polarity axis in response to internal or external cues is central to cellular morphogenesis and cell fate determination. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Bud3p plays a key role in the axial bud-site selection (axial budding) process in which cells assemble the new bud next to the preceding cell division site. Bud3p is thought to act as a component of a spatial landmark. However, it is not clear how Bud3p interacts with other components of the landmark, such as the septins, to control axial budding. Here, we report that overexpression of Bud3p causes the formation of small septin rings (∼1 µm in diameter) and arcs aside from previously reported spiral-like septin structures. Bud3p closely associates with the septins in vivo as Bud3p colocalizes with these aberrant septin structures and forms a complex with two septins, Cdc10p and Cdc11p. The interaction of Bud3p with the septins may involve multiple regions of Bud3p including 1–858, 850–1220, and 1221–1636 a.a. since they all target to the bud neck but exhibit different effects on septin organization when overexpressed. In addition, our study reveals that the axial budding function of Bud3p is mediated by the N-terminal region 1–858. This region shares an amphipathic helix (850–858) crucial for bud neck targeting with the middle portion 850–1103 involved in the formation of ectopic septin spirals and rings. Interestingly, the Dbl-homology domain located in 1–858 is dispensable for axial bud-site selection. Our findings suggest that multiple regions of Bud3p ensure efficient targeting of Bud3p to the bud neck in the assembly of the axial landmark and distinct domains of Bud3p are involved in axial bud-site selection and other cellular processes. PMID:21408200

  11. Late ureteral obstruction in an adult who had STING/Teflon in childhood: Should we expect an epidemic?

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Shilo; Lorber, Amitay; Landau, Ezekiel H.; Pode, Dov; Gofrit, Ofer N.; Hidas, Guy; Duvdevani, Mordechai; Sfoungaristos, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of left renal colic in a 25-year-old female patient. She had subureteral injection of Teflon (STING) at the age of 10 due to vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR) disease and recurrent urinary tract infections. Renal colic was the result of late ureteral obstruction due to Teflon-induced periureteral foreign body reaction. To our knowledge, this is the longest interval between STING and ureteral obstruction reported and the first case of delayed ureteral obstruction caused by Teflon. Monitoring the upper tracts of patients after STING should go beyond childhood. PMID:26664516

  12. Single ectopic ureteral orifice with bilateral duplicated renal collecting systems in an adult girl: Diagnosis by magnetic resonance urography.

    PubMed

    Tang, Min; Wang, Quanrongzi; Liu, Bianjiang; Li, Jie; Lu, Qiang; Song, Ninghong; Wang, Zengjun; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Renal duplication accompanied by ureteral ectopia is an uncommon urinary congenital abnormality. We report the case of a 21-year-old girl who suffered from lifelong continuous urinary leakage. She was finally diagnosed with bilateral duplicated collecting systems complicated with right ectopic ureteral orifice - an extremely rare case. The patient underwent ureteric re-implantation for the ectopic side, and her urinary incontinence ceased soon thereafter. In this case, traditional imaging failed to show the exact insertion of an ectopic ureter. However, magnetic resonance urography combined with retrograde intubation radiography successfully depicted the point of ureteric insertion, which may make the diagnostic process accurate and efficient.

  13. Structural and functional studies of Bud23-Trm112 reveal 18S rRNA N7-G1575 methylation occurs on late 40S precursor ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Létoquart, Juliette; Huvelle, Emmeline; Wacheul, Ludivine; Bourgeois, Gabrielle; Zorbas, Christiane; Graille, Marc; Heurgué-Hamard, Valérie; Lafontaine, Denis L J

    2014-12-23

    The eukaryotic small ribosomal subunit carries only four ribosomal (r) RNA methylated bases, all close to important functional sites. N(7)-methylguanosine (m(7)G) introduced at position 1575 on 18S rRNA by Bud23-Trm112 is at a ridge forming a steric block between P- and E-site tRNAs. Here we report atomic resolution structures of Bud23-Trm112 in the apo and S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-bound forms. Bud23 and Trm112 interact through formation of a β-zipper involving main-chain atoms, burying an important hydrophobic surface and stabilizing the complex. The structures revealed that the coactivator Trm112 undergoes an induced fit to accommodate its methyltransferase (MTase) partner. We report important structural similarity between the active sites of Bud23 and Coffea canephora xanthosine MTase, leading us to propose and validate experimentally a model for G1575 coordination. We identify Bud23 residues important for Bud23-Trm112 complex formation and recruitment to pre-ribosomes. We report that though Bud23-Trm112 binds precursor ribosomes at an early nucleolar stage, m(7)G methylation occurs at a late step of small subunit biogenesis, implying specifically delayed catalytic activation. Finally, we show that Bud23-Trm112 interacts directly with the box C/D snoRNA U3-associated DEAH RNA helicase Dhr1 supposedly involved in central pseudoknot formation; this suggests that Bud23-Trm112 might also contribute to controlling formation of this irreversible and dramatic structural reorganization essential to overall folding of small subunit rRNA. Our study contributes important new elements to our understanding of key molecular aspects of human ribosomopathy syndromes associated with WBSCR22 (human Bud23) malfunction.

  14. Genetic evidence for the roles of the bud-site-selection genes BUD5 and BUD2 in control of the Rsr1p (Bud1p) GTPase in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Bender, A

    1993-01-01

    Yeast cells normally display either an axial (for MATa or MAT alpha cells) or bipolar (for MATa/alpha cells) pattern of bud-site selection. The RSR1 gene, which was previously identified as a multicopy suppressor of Ts- mutations in the bud-emergence gene CDC24, encodes a GTPase of the Ras family that is required for both budding patterns. Mutations in Rsr1p that presumably block its ability to bind or hydrolyze GTP cause a randomized budding phenotype, suggesting that regulators of Rsr1p will prove to be required for proper bud positioning. The BUD5 gene product is required for proper bud-site selection and contains similarity to GDP-dissociation stimulators (GDS) for Ras-type proteins, suggesting that Bud5p may be a GDS for Rsr1p. Here I report that BUD5 is required for wild-type RSR1, but not for mutationally activated rsr1val12, to serve as a multicopy suppressor of cdc24, indicating that Bud5p functions as a GDS for Rsr1p in vivo. To identify the GAP (GTPase-activating protein) for Rsr1p, a genetic selection was designed based on the observation that mutationally activated rsr1val12, but not wild-type RSR1, can serve as a multicopy suppressor of yeast RAS2(Ts) mutants. Mutants were selected that allowed wild-type RSR1 to act as a multicopy suppressor of RAS2(Ts). Two such mutations proved to be in the BUD2 gene, suggesting that Bud2p functions as a GAP for Rsr1p in vivo. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8234337

  15. Cell Polarization and Cytokinesis in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Erfei; Park, Hay-Oak

    2012-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division, which includes cell polarization and cytokinesis, is essential for generating cell diversity during development. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae reproduces by asymmetric cell division, and has thus served as an attractive model for unraveling the general principles of eukaryotic cell polarization and cytokinesis. Polarity development requires G-protein signaling, cytoskeletal polarization, and exocytosis, whereas cytokinesis requires concerted actions of a contractile actomyosin ring and targeted membrane deposition. In this chapter, we discuss the mechanics and spatial control of polarity development and cytokinesis, emphasizing the key concepts, mechanisms, and emerging questions in the field. PMID:22701052

  16. Assembly and budding of negative-strand RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Lyles, Douglas S

    2013-01-01

    Assembly of negative-strand RNA viruses occurs by budding from host plasma membranes. The budding process involves association of the viral core or nucleocapsid with a region of cellular membrane that will become the virus budding site, which contains the envelope glycoproteins and matrix protein. This region of membrane then buds out and pinches off to become the virus envelope. This review will address the questions of what are the mechanisms that bring the nucleocapsid and envelope glycoproteins together to form the virus budding site, and how does this lead to release of progeny virions? Recent evidence supports the idea that viral envelope glycoproteins and matrix proteins are organized into membrane microdomains that coalesce to form virus budding sites. There has also been substantial progress in understanding the last step in virus release, referred to as the "late budding function," which often involves host proteins of the vacuolar protein sorting apparatus. Key questions are raised as to the mechanism of the initial steps in formation of virus budding sites: How are membrane microdomains brought together and how are nucleocapsids selected for incorporation into these budding sites, particularly in the case of viruses for which genome RNA sequences are important for envelopment of nucleocapsids? 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved

  17. Diagnosis and management of ureteral fibroepithelial polyps in children: a new treatment algorithm.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Lightfoot, M; Alsyouf, M; Nicolay, L; Baldwin, D D; Chamberlin, D A

    2015-02-01

    Fibroepithelial polyps are benign mesenchymal tumors arising from the urinary tract. With the advent of endoscopy in the pediatric population, more reports of endoscopic diagnosis and treatment have appeared. The present study reports experience with the diagnosis and treatment of fibroepithelial polyps of the upper urinary tract in the pediatric population. Incorporating past experience from literature, we propose an algorithm to guide the clinical diagnosis and treatment plan. Four pediatric patients undergoing pyeloplasty for ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction were diagnosed with ureteral polyps. Their demographics, radiologic, surgical and pathologic information were reviewed. In addition, a comprehensive literature search using the MEDLINE database yielded 37 reports containing 126 cases of ureteral polyps, including 5 series with 57 cases and 9 cases of synchronous bilateral ureteral polyps. Of 123 pediatric patients undergoing pyeloplasty from 2008 to 2013, four (3.3%) were found to have fibroepithelial polyps of the upper urinary tract. All patients were male and the mean age of presentation was 12 years. Ureteral polyps predominantly occurred unilaterally in the left ureter (75%) and one case of bilateral ureteral polyps was encountered. Along with three other recent case series [1-3], the combined incidence of ureteral polyps in patients undergoing evaluation for ureteral obstruction was 5.2%. Intraoperative retrograde pyelogram was used to identify filling defects in 4 of 5 affected ureters (see Figure). Ureterorenoscopy was performed in all three patients with filling defects for polyp mapping along the ureter and evaluation of the macroscopic polyp appearance. Based on ureteroscopic findings, Holmium laser polypectomy was performed in two patients with single, pedunculated polyps. Anderson-Hynes dismembered pyeloplasty was performed in three patients with broad based, multilobulated polyps too large for endoscopic treatment and in one patient for

  18. The formation of premuscle masses during chick wing bud development.

    PubMed

    Schramm, C; Solursh, M

    1990-01-01

    The skeletal musculature of chick limb buds is derived from somitic cells that migrate into the somatopleure of the future limb regions. These cells become organized into the earliest muscle primordia, the dorsal and ventral premuscle masses, prior to myogenic differentiation. Therefore, skeletal-muscle specific markers cannot be used to observe myogenic cells during the process of premuscle mass formation. In this study, an alternative marking method was used to determine the specific stages during which this process occurs. Quail somite strips were fluorescently labeled and implanted into chick hosts. Paraffin sections of the resulting chimeric wing buds were stained with the monoclonal antibody QH1 in order to identify graft-derived endothelium. Non-endothelial graft-derived cells present in the wing mesenchyme were assumed to be myogenic. At Hamburger and Hamilton stage 20, myogenic cells were distributed throughout the central region of the limb, including the future dorsal and ventral premuscle mass regions and the prechondrogenic core region. By stage 21, the myogenic cells were present at greater density in dorsal and ventral regions than in the core. By stage 23, nearly all myogenic cells were located in the dorsal and ventral premuscle masses. Therefore, the two premuscle masses become established by stage 21 and premuscle mass formation is not complete until stage 23 or later. Premuscle mass formation occurs concurrently with early chondrogenic events, as observed with the marker peanut agglutinin. To facilitate the investigation of possible underlying mechanisms of premuscle mass formation, the micromass culture system was evaluated, to determine whether or not it can serve as an accurate in vitro model system. The initially randomly distributed myogenic cells were observed to segregate from prechondrogenic regions prior to myogenic differentiation. This is similar to myogenic patterning in vivo.

  19. Complex bud architecture and cell-specific chemical patterns enable supercooling of Picea abies bud primordia.

    PubMed

    Kuprian, Edith; Munkler, Caspar; Resnyak, Anna; Zimmermann, Sonja; Tuong, Tan D; Gierlinger, Notburga; Müller, Thomas; Livingston, David P; Neuner, Gilbert

    2017-09-29

    Bud primordia of Picea abies, despite a frozen shoot, stay ice free down to -50°C by a mechanism termed supercooling whose biophysical and biochemical requirements are poorly understood. Bud architecture was assessed by 3D-reconstruction, supercooling and freezing patterns by infrared video thermography, freeze dehydration and extra-organ freezing by water potential measurements and cell-specific chemical patterns by RAMAN microscopy and Mass Spectrometry Imaging. A bowl-like ice barrier tissue insulates primordia from entrance by intrinsic ice. Water repellent and densely packed bud scales prevent extrinsic ice penetration. At -18°C break-down of supercooling was triggered by intrinsic ice nucleators while the ice barrier remained active. Temperature-dependent freeze dehydration (-0.1 MPa/K) caused accumulation of extra-organ ice masses that by rupture of the shoot pith tissue are accommodated in large voids. The barrier tissue has exceptionally pectin-rich cell walls and intercellular spaces and the cell lumina were lined or filled with proteins, especially near the primordium. Primordial cells close to the barrier accumulate di-, tri- and tetrasaccharides. Bud architecture efficiently prevents ice penetration but ice nucleators become active inside the primordium below a temperature threshold. Biochemical patterns indicate a complex cellular interplay enabling supercooling and the necessity for cell-specific biochemical analysis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Epicormic buds in trees: a review of bud establishment, development and dormancy release

    Treesearch

    Andrew R. ​Meier; Michael R. Saunders; Charles H. Michler

    2012-01-01

    The formation of epicormic sprouts on the boles of trees is a phenomenon that has, until recently, been poorly understood. Renewed interest in the topic in the last two decades has led to significant advances in our knowledge of the subject, especially in regard to bud anatomy, morphology and ontogeny. There exists, however, no comprehensive synthesis of results from...

  1. Hif-1α regulates differentiation of limb bud mesenchyme and joint development

    PubMed Central

    Provot, Sylvain; Zinyk, Dawn; Gunes, Yasemin; Kathri, Richa; Le, Quynh; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Johnson, Randall S.; Longaker, Michael T.; Giaccia, Amato J.; Schipani, Ernestina

    2007-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that low oxygen tension (hypoxia) may control fetal development and differentiation. A crucial mediator of the adaptive response of cells to hypoxia is the transcription factor Hif-1α. In this study, we provide evidence that mesenchymal condensations that give origin to endochondral bones are hypoxic during fetal development, and we demonstrate that Hif-1α is expressed and transcriptionally active in limb bud mesenchyme and in mesenchymal condensations. To investigate the role of Hif-1α in mesenchymal condensations and in early chondrogenesis, we conditionally inactivated Hif-1α in limb bud mesenchyme using a Prx1 promoter-driven Cre transgenic mouse. Conditional knockout of Hif-1α in limb bud mesenchyme does not impair mesenchyme condensation, but alters the formation of the cartilaginous primordia. Late hypertrophic differentiation is also affected as a result of the delay in early chondrogenesis. In addition, mutant mice show a striking impairment of joint development. Our study demonstrates a crucial, and previously unrecognized, role of Hif-1α in early chondrogenesis and joint formation. PMID:17470636

  2. [Electron microscopic study of the penetration and distribution of somitic cells in the mesoblast of the limb buds of reptiles (Anguis fragilis and Lacerta viridis)].

    PubMed

    Raynaud, A; Adrian, M

    1975-09-29

    Based on characteristics of mitochondria and on the amount of lipid inclusions, a distinction between somitic cells and mesoblastic somatopleural cells is possible, at the early stages of the development of the limb bud in Reptiles (Anguis fragilis and Lacerta viridis). The dislocation of the ventral processes of the somites and the localisation of the somitic cells in the mesoblast of the anterior limb buds could be studied.

  3. Release of Apical Dominance in Potato Tuber Is Accompanied by Programmed Cell Death in the Apical Bud Meristem[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Teper-Bamnolker, Paula; Buskila, Yossi; Lopesco, Yael; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Saad, Inbal; Holdengreber, Vered; Belausov, Eduard; Zemach, Hanita; Ori, Naomi; Lers, Amnon; Eshel, Dani

    2012-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber, a swollen underground stem, is used as a model system for the study of dormancy release and sprouting. Natural dormancy release, at room temperature, is initiated by tuber apical bud meristem (TAB-meristem) sprouting characterized by apical dominance (AD). Dormancy is shortened by treatments such as bromoethane (BE), which mimics the phenotype of dormancy release in cold storage by inducing early sprouting of several buds simultaneously. We studied the mechanisms governing TAB-meristem dominance release. TAB-meristem decapitation resulted in the development of increasing numbers of axillary buds with time in storage, suggesting the need for autonomous dormancy release of each bud prior to control by the apical bud. Hallmarks of programmed cell death (PCD) were identified in the TAB-meristems during normal growth, and these were more extensive when AD was lost following either extended cold storage or BE treatment. Hallmarks included DNA fragmentation, induced gene expression of vacuolar processing enzyme1 (VPE1), and elevated VPE activity. VPE1 protein was semipurified from BE-treated apical buds, and its endogenous activity was fully inhibited by a cysteinyl aspartate-specific protease-1-specific inhibitor N-Acetyl-Tyr-Val-Ala-Asp-CHO (Ac-YVAD-CHO). Transmission electron microscopy further revealed PCD-related structural alterations in the TAB-meristem of BE-treated tubers: a knob-like body in the vacuole, development of cytoplasmic vesicles, and budding-like nuclear segmentations. Treatment of tubers with BE and then VPE inhibitor induced faster growth and recovered AD in detached and nondetached apical buds, respectively. We hypothesize that PCD occurrence is associated with the weakening of tuber AD, allowing early sprouting of mature lateral buds. PMID:22362870

  4. Ureteropyeloscopic treatment of large, complex intrarenal and proximal ureteral calculi.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jacob; Cohen, Seth; Grasso, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Study Type - Therapy (case series) Level of Evidence 4 What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Large upper tract urinary calculi, greater than 2 cm, have historically been treated with percutaneous nephrostolithotomy. In general, there has been a growing interest in employing retrograde, flexible ureteroscopy and laser lithotripsy in select patients who are either poor medical candidates for percutaneous lithotripsy or who may prefer a less invasive intervention. Properly selecting patients for this approach, designing specific treatments based on complex stone presentation and offering general information with regard to long-term outcomes and surgical risks have historically been based on results from small, multicentre series lacking uniformity of technique and long-term outcomes. Our initial multicentre experience employing ureteroscopic techniques to treat large upper urinary tract calculi was presented in 1998. This current work represented the largest single-centre experience, accrued prospectively over 10 years, where there was uniformity of technique and treatment algorithms. This study frames an argument for retrograde ureteroscopic lithotripsy not only in those who are at high risk for percutaneous nephrostolithotomy but in all who present with large, non-infected stone burdens. To define the safety and efficacy of retrograde ureteroscopic lithotripsy in treating large, non-infectious intrarenal and proximal ureteral stone burdens. Between 2000 and 2011, 145 patients with 164 large (2 cm or greater in diameter on standard imaging) non-infectious upper intrarenal and proximal ureteral calculi were chosen for retrograde ureteroscopic lithotripsy. Patients were treated with small diameter flexible fibre-optic ureteroscopes and holmium laser lithotripsy by a single surgeon. Second-look ureteroscopy was performed in patients with the largest calculi in whom there was a high index of suspicion of significant residual fragments. Stone clearance

  5. [Stone Cone® in ureteroscopic ballistic lithotripsy of proximal ureteral stones].

    PubMed

    Arancio, M; Guglielmetti, S; Delsignore, A; Landi, A; Marchetti, C; Mina, A; Marcato, M; Martinengo, C

    2008-01-01

    Stone Cone® (Microvasive-Boston Scientific Corp, USA) is a device which prevents retrograde calculus migration during endoscopic ureterolithotripsy. We have studied the safety and efficacy of this device in endoscopic ureterolithotripsy with ballistic energy in proximal ureteral stones. MATERIALS AND METHODS. From 01/02/2006 to 01/02/2008 we carried out 36 ureterorenoscopies (URS) for proximal ureteral stones (average age: 46, range: 15-73). A ballistic energy was used for stones fragmentation. In 18 patients (Group A) we carried out URS with the aid of Stone Cone®, which was not used in the other 18 patients (Group B). Semirigid 8 Ch or 10 Ch Storz ureteroscope and ballistic lithotriptor Swiss Lithoclast Master EMS® were used. In cases of migration, edema, and ureteral damage, a ureteral stent was used. RESULTS. In Group B patients (URS performed without Stone Cone®) the migration of the whole stone, or of clinically significant fragments, occurred 8 times (45%). All of these patients underwent external shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) at a center equipped with a lithotriptor. A ureteral stent was placed in 14 cases (78%). In Group A, the migration of a stone requiring ESWL treatment occurred only once (5%). The ureteral stent was placed 8 times (45%). We had no significant complications during the procedure. CONCLUSIONS. The Stone Cone® is a safe and easy-to-use device. The cost of this device can be balanced by the reduction of postoperative ESWL treatments for lithiasic fragments pushing up into the kidneys (p<0.01), and of ureteral stent applications at the end of the procedure (p<0.05).

  6. Ketoprofen-eluting biodegradable ureteral stents by CO2 impregnation: In vitro study.

    PubMed

    Barros, Alexandre A; Oliveira, Carlos; Reis, Rui L; Lima, Estevão; Duarte, Ana Rita C

    2015-11-30

    Ureteral stents are indispensable tools in urologic practice. The main complications associated with ureteral stents are dislocation, infection, pain and encrustation. Biodegradable ureteral stents are one of the most attractive designs with the potential to eliminate several complications associated with the stenting procedure. In this work we hypothesize the impregnation of ketoprofen, by CO2-impregnation in a patented biodegradable ureteral stent previously developed in our group. The biodegradable ureteral stents with each formulation: alginate-based, gellan gum-based were impregnated with ketoprofen and the impregnation conditions tested were 100 bar, 2 h and three different temperatures (35 °C, 40 °C and 50 °C). The impregnation was confirmed by FTIR and DSC demonstrated the amorphization of the drug upon impregnation. The in vitro elution profile in artificial urine solution (AUS) during degradation of a biodegradable ureteral stent loaded with ketoprofen was evaluated. According to the kinetics results these systems have shown to be very promising for the release ketoprofen in the first 72 h, which is the necessary time for anti-inflammatory delivery after the surgical procedure. The in vitro release studied revealed an influence of the temperature on the impregnation yield, with a higher impregnation yield at 40 °C. Higher yields were also obtained for gellan gum-based stents. The non-cytotoxicity characteristic of the developed ketoprofen-eluting biodegradable ureteral stents was evaluated in L929 cell line by MTS assay which demonstrated the feasibility of this product as a medical device. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Is the Routine Check Nephrostogram Following Percutaneous Antegrade Ureteric Stent Placement Necessary?

    SciTech Connect

    Soh, Keng Chuan; Tay, Kiang Hiong Tan, Bien Soo; MM Htoo, Austin; HG Lo, Richard; Lin, Shueh En

    2008-05-15

    Our aim was to review our experience with percutaneous antegrade ureteric stent (PAUS) placement and to determine if the routinely conducted check nephrostogram on the day following ureteric stent placement was necessary. Retrospective review of patients who had undergone PAUS placement between January 2004 and December 2005 was performed. There were 83 subjects (36 males, 47 females), with a mean age of 59.9 years (range, 22-94 years). Average follow-up duration was 7.1 months (range, 1-24 months). The most common indications for PAUS placement were ureteric obstruction due to metastatic disease (n = 56) and urinary calculi (n = 34). Technical success was 93.2% (96/103 attempts), with no major immediate procedure-related complications or mortalities. The Bard 7Fr Urosoft DJ Stent was used in more than 95% of the cases. Eighty-one of 89 (91.0%) check nephrostograms demonstrated a patent ureteric stent with resultant safety catheter removal. Three check nephrostograms revealed distal stent migration requiring repositioning by a goose-snare, while five others showed stent occlusion necessitating permanent external drainage by nephrostomy drainage catheter reinsertion. Following PAUS placement, the serum creatinine level improved or stabilized in 82% of patients. The serum creatinine outcome difference between the groups with benign and malignant indications for PAUS placement was not statistically significant (p = 0.145) but resolution of hydronephrosis was significantly better (p = 0.008) in patients with benign indications. Percutaneous antegrade ureteric stent placement is a safe and effective means of relief for ureteric obstruction. The check nephrostogram following ureteric stent placement was unnecessary in the majority of patients.

  8. Treatment of ureteral calculus obstruction with laser lithotripsy in an Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Todd L; Sur, Roger L

    2012-03-01

    An adult female bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) presented with acute anorexia secondary to progressive azotemia (blood urea nitrogen = 213 mg/dl, creatinine [Cr] = 9.5 mg/dl) and electrolyte abnormalities (K = 7.4 mEq/L). It was later diagnosed with postrenal obstruction secondary to bilaterally obstructing ureteral calculi seen on ultrasound. Treatment of the obstruction required two endoscopic procedures, cystoscopy for ureteral stent placement and ureteroscopy to perform intracorporeal lithotripsy on the obstructing calculi. Before the first procedure, the dolphin's azotemia was stabilized with aggressive fluid therapy, peritoneal dialysis, and treatment for acidosis. Diuresis subsequent to the fluid therapy enabled passage of the right obstructing urolith. For both endoscopic procedures, the dolphin was placed in left lateral recumbency due to the peritoneal dialysis catheter in the right retroperitoneal region. For the first procedure, a 12-French (Fr) flexible cystoscope was inserted retrograde into the bladder via the urethra, whereupon a calculus was seen obstructing the left ureteral orifice. A 4.8-Fr, 26-cm double-pigtail ureteral stent was placed up the left ureter to relieve the postrenal obstruction. Inadvertent proximal migration of the left ureteral stent occurred during the procedure. However, renal parameters (serum Cr = 5.8, K = 5.4) improved significantly by the next day. For the second procedure, 28 hr later, ureteroscopy was performed to treat the calculus and replace the existing stent with a longer stent. The left ureteral calculus was pulverized into tiny fragments by using a holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser inserted through a 6.9-Fr semirigid ureteroscope. The migrated stent was visualized in the distal left ureter and replaced with a 90-cm single-pigtail ureteral stent that was sutured exterior to the urogenital slit and removed 3 days later. Renal function normalized over the next several days, and the dolphin recovered over

  9. A study of ureteric peristalsis using a single catheter to record EMG, impedance, and pressure changes.

    PubMed

    Roshani, H; Dabhoiwala, N F; Tee, S; Dijkhuis, T; Kurth, K H; Ongerboer de Visser, B W; de Jong, J M; Lamers, W H

    1999-03-01

    Ureteric peristalsis transports a urinary bolus from the renal pelvis to the bladder. We developed an intraluminal catheter with a pressure transducer on it to study intraluminal pressure changes and a twin bipolar electrode to record the ureteric EMG and impedance (Z) changes during a peristaltic wave. Five female New Yorkshire pigs (50-60 kg) were studied under light halothane anesthesia (5% at induction/1% for maintenance). A steady state of hydration was maintained using intravenous saline infusion. EMG spike burst activity was studied at a 10-cm interval using low (0-30) Hz filters. Impedance between the same electrodes is measured simultaneously in higher frequencies (1-5 KHz) as a function of ureteric motor activity. Pressure generation in the ureteric lumen was also measured simultaneously by a transducer on the same catheter. A digital signal processing program (Poly 4.9) was used for analysis. Parenteral furosemide was used to induce diuresis. Resting ureteric impedance (Z(R)) decreases to Z(B) (Z bolus) during the passage of the urinary bolus. Passage of a contractile zone during a peristaltic wave increases impedance from Z(B) to its Z(R) level and initiates a pressure rise. Bolus length (the length Z(B)) is not constant and decreases distally. EMG corresponds well in time to impedance. Z(R) disappears after infusion of furosemide because of increased urine load and changes of intraluminal ionic environment. The contractile segment of a ureteric peristaltic wave appears to be represented by an elevated Z segment (Z(C)). Pressure rise is recorded only at the beginning of a contractile zone. A specially adapted intraluminal catheter can be used to study peristalsis in the upper urinary tract. One can study all the three components of ureteric peristalsis (excitation, contraction, and intraluminal pressure rise) using such a catheter.

  10. The role of preoperative oral vitamin B in the cystoscopic assessment of ureteric patency.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Shavi; Dowling, Caroline; Rosamilia, Anna

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether oral vitamin B can be used as a marker of ureteric patency at cystoscopy, and thereby reduce the need for intraoperative intravenous indigo carmine. Patients scheduled for cystoscopy, or for an operation likely to require a cystoscopy, were given three tablets of vitamin B complex orally 1-4 h prior to their operation. The time of administration, time of operation, and time of cystoscopy were recorded. The time taken for ureteric jets to be visualized was also recorded. The color of the urine was graded by the operator as being clear (negative) or bright yellow (positive), indicating ureteric patency and that no indigo carmine was required. Sixty-nine women in total were given vitamin B prior to their cystoscopy. One case was cancelled because of presumed but unproven aspiration. In 49 of the remaining 68 cases (72.1%), yellow urine was seen at both ureteric orifices. In 19 (27.9%) cases, yellow urine was not seen at both ureteric orifices; however, unilateral yellow, clear, or turbulent jets were seen in all but one case. The mean time from dose to cystoscopy was 162 min and the mean time for visualization of both ureteric jets was 2.2 min with no significant difference between groups. Indigo carmine was used in only two cases (2.9%). The results of this study show that oral vitamin B administration preoperatively has the potential to be used to reduce the requirement for intravenous indigo carmine administration. This would have advantages in reducing the cost and toxicity of intravenous indigo carmine administration. Vitamin B warrants further investigation and refinement as a marker of ureteric patency at cystoscopy.

  11. Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Excision of Ureteral and Ureteropelvic Junction Fibroepithelial Polyps in Children.

    PubMed

    Osbun, Nathan; Ellison, Jonathan S; Lendvay, Thomas S

    2016-08-01

    Fibroepithelial polyps of the ureter are a rare cause of asymptomatic and symptomatic upper urinary tract obstruction in children. While these lesions can often be managed endoscopically, large or multifocal polyps may preclude such an approach. We aim to describe our institutional experience with robot-assisted laparoscopic treatment of ureteral polyps and show that a robotic approach is an effective alternative for large or multifocal polyps. Four children were identified with ureteral polyps over a 5-year period and underwent transperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic excision. Patients presented with flank pain and/or worsening hydronephrosis. All patients were evaluated preoperatively with ultrasound and Tc99m-mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3) diuretic renogram or MR urogram. Retrograde pyelography corroborated the diagnosis of ureteral polyps. We reviewed the charts of these patients and compared the specific robotic approach for each patient, length of hospitalization, surgical complications, need for additional procedures, and resolution of symptoms and hydronephrosis. In one patient, more than 20 polyps were identified over a long ureteral segment and all were excised; for the remaining three patients, 1 to 2 polyps were found. Mean postoperative length of stay was 1.5 days. One patient developed a ureteral stricture requiring repeat ureteroureterostomy, and another patient required repeat retrograde pyelography for gross hematuria that occurred several months after surgery. No polyps or obstruction was observed on retrograde pyelography in these patients. Mean duration of follow-up was 29 months (9-62 months). Symptoms and degree of hydronephrosis have improved in the three patients who have been followed for at least 12 months. Robot-assisted laparoscopy is a safe and feasible alternative to endoscopic treatment of fibroepithelial ureteral polyps. The robotic platform may be preferred in cases of multifocal or large ureteral polyps, or in cases in which a

  12. Ureteral Papilla Implantation as a Technique for Neoureterocystostomy in Cats Undergoing Renal Transplantation: 30 Cases.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Brian J; McAnulty, Jonathan F; Hardie, Robert J

    2016-05-01

    To describe the clinical outcome of donor and recipient cats undergoing ureteral papilla harvest and implantation as a technique for neoureterocystostomy in clinical kidney transplant. Retrospective case series. Donor (n=31) and recipient (n=30) cats that underwent kidney harvest and transplantation using ureteral papilla implantation technique for neoureterocystostomy. Medical records for donor and recipient cats presented to the University of Wisconsin Veterinary Teaching Hospital from January 2003 to December 2014 were reviewed. Data recorded included complete blood count, serum chemistry panel, surgical technique, diagnostic imaging results, short- and long-term complications, and anesthetic survival. All 30 recipients recovered from anesthesia. Four died within 24 hours and 26 survived to hospital discharge. Serum creatinine was within the reference interval by 72 hours in 22/26 cats (85%). Complications related to the ureteral papilla implantation technique were seen in only 1 cat (3%). Uroabdomen diagnosed on day 3 ultimately resolved over the following 24 hours without surgical intervention. All 31 donor cats survived to discharge. Four donors (13%) experienced mild, transiently increased serum creatinine. Ureteral papilla implantation is a viable technique for neoureterocystostomy in cats undergoing kidney transplantation. Proposed benefits for the recipient include a less technically challenging anastomosis, decreased risk of ureteral obstruction at the anastomosis site, and reduced risk of leakage compared to previous reports. Benefits for recipients should be weighed against risks to donors, including a more complex ureteral harvest, increased surgical time, and potential injury or obstruction of the contralateral ureteral papilla. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  13. Initial Experience with the Resonance Metallic Stent for Antegrade Ureteric Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Wah, Tze M. Irving, Henry C.; Cartledge, Jon

    2007-07-15

    Background and purpose. We describe our initial experience with a new metallic ureteric stent which has been designed to provide long-term urinary drainage in patients with malignant ureteric strictures. The aim is to achieve longer primary patency rates than conventional polyurethane ureteric stents, where encrustation and compression by malignant masses limit primary patency. The Resonance metallic double-pigtail ureteric stent (Cook, Ireland) is constructed from coiled wire spirals of a corrosion-resistant alloy designed to minimize tissue in-growth and resist encrustation, and the manufacturer recommends interval stent change at 12 months. Methods. Seventeen Resonance stents were inserted via an antegrade approach into 15 patients between December 2004 and March 2006. The causes of ureteric obstruction were malignancies of the bladder (n = 4), colon (n = 3), gynecologic (n = 5), and others (n = 3). Results. One patient had the stent changed after 12 months, and 3 patients had their stents changed at 6 months. These stents were draining adequately with minimal encrustation. Four patients are still alive with functioning stents in situ for 2-10 months. Seven patients died with functioning stents in place (follow-up periods of 1 week to 8 months). Three stents failed from the outset due to bulky pelvic malignancy resulting in high intravesical pressure, as occurs with conventional plastic stents. Conclusion. Our initial experience with the Resonance metallic ureteric stent indicates that it may provide adequate long-term urinary drainage (up to 12 months) in patients with malignant ureteric obstruction but without significantly bulky pelvic disease. This obviates the need for regular stent changes and would offer significant benefit for these patients with limited life expectancy.

  14. Emergency ureteroscopic lithotripsy in acute renal colic caused by ureteral calculi: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghazo, Mohammed A; Ghalayini, Ibrahim Fathi; Al-Azab, Rami S; Bani Hani, Osamah; Bani-Hani, Ibrahim; Abuharfil, Mohammad; Haddad, Yazan

    2011-12-01

    This work was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of emergency ureteroscopic lithotripsy in patients with ureteral stones. From May 2003 to December 2010, 244 patients (184 men and 60 women, mean age 45.6 ± 12.7 years (range 22-73 years) were treated with emergency ureteroscopic lithotripsy for ureteral calculi. All patients were divided into three groups according to the stone location in the ureter. Intracorporeal lithotripsy when necessary was performed with the Swiss lithoclast. The overall stone-free status was defined as the complete absence of stone fragments at 4 weeks, postoperatively. A double J stent was inserted in selected patients if there was significant ureteral wall trauma, edema at the stone impaction site, suspected or proved ureteral perforation, and if the stone migrated to the kidney. The overall success rate was 90.6%. The success rates were different according to the stone site. The success rate of groups A, B and C was 69.4, 94.8 and 96.6%, respectively. The overall rate of ureteral stent insertion at the end of the procedure was 177/244 (72.5%). The rate of stent insertion was 41/49 (83.7%), 32/46 (69.6%) and 104/149 (69.8%) in groups A, B and C, respectively. The overall complication, failure, and stricture rate was 32/244 (13.1%), 23/244 (9.4%) and 0.8%, respectively. With the recent advances in ureteroscopic technology, intracorporeal probes and stone extraction devices, emergency ureteroscopy is found to be a safe and effective procedure with immediate relief from ureteral colic and ureteral stone fragmentation.

  15. Morbidity associated with surgical treatment of ureteric calculi in a teaching hospital in Kuwait.

    PubMed Central

    Kehinde, E. O.; Al-Awadi, K. A.; Al-Hunayan, A.; Okasha, G. H.; Al-Tawheed, A.; Ali, Y.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ureteric lithiasis is a common urological problem in Kuwait. Because of the different interventional approaches, we carried out an audit on the morbidity associated with the surgical management of the disorder. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The surgical records were reviewed of all patients with the diagnosis of ureteric lithiasis that were managed surgically by ureteroscopy or ureterolithotomy in Mubarak Al-Kabeer Hospital in Kuwait between January 1996 and December 1999. Patients' bio-data, location of calculi, indications for surgical intervention, types of therapeutic interventions, operating surgeon and complications were analysed. Patients managed primarily and successfully by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy were excluded from this analysis. RESULTS: A total of 1383 patients with ureteric calculus were managed in the period under review--775 (56%), 567 (41%), and 41 (3%) patients were managed by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, ureteroscopy and ureterolithotomy, respectively. The 608 patients managed by ureteroscopy or ureterolithotomy had a total of 710 operations. The commonest surgical procedure performed was ureteroscopy with Dormia basket with or without double 'J' stenting and this accounted for 418 (58.9%) operations. The least common procedure was ureteric meatotomy with Dormia basket and with or without double 'J' stenting in 9 (1.3%) patients. The overall complication rate was 110 out of 710 (15.5%) operations. Of the complications, 101 (92%) were minor (e.g. haematuria, fever, and mucosal injury). Nine (8%) complications were major complications (e.g. ureteric perforation and ureteric avulsions). Ureterolithotomy and ureteroscopy with intracorporeal lithotripsy were associated with the highest complication rates. CONCLUSIONS: This analysis has shown that with technological advances, the treatment of ureteric lithiasis has improved and major complications have decreased. However, with so many therapeutic options to choose from, there

  16. Socioeconomic evaluation of the treatment of ureteral lithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Rombi, T; Triantafyllidis, A; Fotas, A; Konstantinidis, T; Touloupidis, S

    2011-01-01

    Background and aim: This study attempts to estimate the socioeconomic differences between three major alternatives for the management of upper and lower ureteral lithiasis. Material and methods: Two hundred and forty patients with upper and lower ureteral lithiasis, have been studied retrospectively, divided in six equal groups of forty. These patients have been treated either by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL), or with ureteroscopy with semirigid ureteroscope and the use of pneumatic lithoclast, or with ureteroscopy with flexible ureteroscope and the use of Holmium YAG Laser. For cost calculation, the reimbursement fee paid by insurance to the hospital was taken into account. For the estimation of the social burden, the length of hospital stay and the number of outpatient visits have been included as countable parameters. Results: The percentage of effective stone removal for upper ureter was 81.0% for SWL, 62.5% for ureteroscopy with semirigid ureteroscope and the use of pneumatic lithoclast and, 82.5% for ureteroscopy with flexible ureteroscope and the use of Holmium YAG Laser. The same percentages for lower ureter were 82.5%, 92.5% and 97.5% respectively. The cost of stone removal for both the upper and lower ureter using extracorporeal lithotripsy was significantly higher compared to the other two procedures (median cost for upper ureter 828 € vs 474.50 € and 396 € respectively, and for lower ureter 826 € vs 396 € and 271 €, p<0.001). Regarding the social aspect, SWL is mainly an outpatient procedure, requiring a short hospital stay (for upper ureter 1.63 vs 2.48 and 2.45 respectively and for lower ureter 1.35 vs 2.43 and 2.13days), but needing more and prevailing clinic visits (for upper ureter 1.43 vs 1.45 and 1 respectively and for lower ureter 1.45 vs 1.15 and 0.55 visitsgive numbers, compare), both in outpatient and in accident and emergency (A&E) department. Conclusion: The increase in the expenses with regard to health management

  17. Breast bud detection: a validation study in the Chilean growth obesity cohort study.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ana; Garmendia, María Luisa; González, Daniela; Kain, Juliana; Mericq, Verónica; Uauy, Ricardo; Corvalán, Camila

    2014-08-13

    Early puberty onset has been related to future chronic disease; however breast bud assessment in large scale population studies is difficult because it requires trained personnel. Thus our aim is to assess the validity of self and maternal breast bud detection, considering girl's body mass index (BMI) and maternal education. In 2010, 481 girls (mean age = 7.8) from the Growth and Obesity Chilean Cohort Study were evaluated by a nutritionist trained in breast bud detection. In addition, the girl(n = 481) and her mother(n = 341) classified the girl's breast development after viewing photographs of Tanner stages. Concordance between diagnostics was estimated (kappa, Spearman correlation) considering girls' BMI and mother's educational level. 14% of the girls presented breast buds and 43% had excess weight (BMI z-score > 1, World Health Organization 2007). Self-assessment showed low concordance with the evaluator (K < 0.1) and girls with excess weight over-diagnosed more than girls of normal weight (44% vs. 24%, p-value < 0.05). Instead, mothers showed good concordance with the evaluator (K = 0.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.6-0.9), even in overweight girls and/or in mothers with low education (K = 0.7, 95% CI = 0.6-0.8). Mothers were able to adequately evaluate the appearance of breast bud despite low educational level and girls' excess weight. Mother could be a useful resource for defining puberty onset in epidemiological studies, particularly developing countries.

  18. Breast bud detection: a validation study in the Chilean Growth Obesity Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Early puberty onset has been related to future chronic disease; however breast bud assessment in large scale population studies is difficult because it requires trained personnel. Thus our aim is to assess the validity of self and maternal breast bud detection, considering girl’s body mass index (BMI) and maternal education. Methods In 2010, 481 girls (mean age = 7.8) from the Growth and Obesity Chilean Cohort Study were evaluated by a nutritionist trained in breast bud detection. In addition, the girl(n = 481) and her mother(n = 341) classified the girl’s breast development after viewing photographs of Tanner stages. Concordance between diagnostics was estimated (kappa, Spearman correlation) considering girls’ BMI and mother’s educational level. Results 14% of the girls presented breast buds and 43% had excess weight (BMI z-score > 1, World Health Organization 2007). Self-assessment showed low concordance with the evaluator (K < 0.1) and girls with excess weight over-diagnosed more than girls of normal weight (44% vs. 24%, p-value < 0.05). Instead, mothers showed good concordance with the evaluator (K = 0.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.6-0.9), even in overweight girls and/or in mothers with low education (K = 0.7, 95% CI = 0.6-0.8). Conclusions Mothers were able to adequately evaluate the appearance of breast bud despite low educational level and girls’ excess weight. Mother could be a useful resource for defining puberty onset in epidemiological studies, particularly developing countries. PMID:25115568

  19. From Buds to Follicles: Matrix Metalloproteinases in Developmental Tissue Remodeling during Feather Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ting-Xin; Tuan, Tai Lan; Wu, Ping; Widelitz, Randall B.; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Organogenesis involves a series of dynamic morphogenesis and remodeling processes. Since feathers exhibit complex forms, we have been using the feather as a model to analyze how molecular pathways and cellular events are used. While several major molecular pathways have been studied, the roles of matrix degrading proteases and inhibitors in feather morphogenesis are unknown. Here we addressed this knowledge gap by studying the temporal and spatial expression of proteases and inhibitors in developing feathers using mammalian antibodies that cross react with chicken proteins. We also investigated the effect of protease inhibitors on feather development employing an in vitro feather bud culture system. The results show that antibodies specific for mammalian MMP2 and TIMP2 stained positive in both feather epithelium and mesenchyme. The staining co-localized in structures of E10 to E13 developing feathers. Interestingly, MMP2 and TIMP2 exhibited a complementary staining pattern in developing E15 and E20 feathers and in maturing feather filaments. Although they exhibited a slight delay in feather bud development, similar patterns of MMP2 and TIMP2 staining were observed in in vitro culture explants. The broad spectrum pharmacological inhibitors AG3340 and BB103 (MMP inhibitors) but not Aprotinin (a plasmin inhibitor) showed a reversible effect on epithelium invagination and feather bud elongation. TIMP2, a physiological inhibitor to MMPs, exhibited a similar effect. Markers of feather morphogenesis showed that MMP activity was required for both epithelium invagination and mesenchymal cell proliferation. Inhibition of MMP activity led to an overall delay in the expression of molecules that regulate either early feather bud growth and/or differentiation and thereby produced abnormal buds with incomplete follicle formation. This work demonstrates that MMPs and their inhibitors are not only important in injury repair, but also in development tissue remodeling as demonstrated

  20. From buds to follicles: matrix metalloproteinases in developmental tissue remodeling during feather morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ting-Xin; Tuan, Tai Lan; Wu, Ping; Widelitz, Randall B; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2011-06-01

    Organogenesis involves a series of dynamic morphogenesis and remodeling processes. Since feathers exhibit complex forms, we have been using the feather as a model to analyze how molecular pathways and cellular events are used. While several major molecular pathways have been studied, the roles of matrix degrading proteases and inhibitors in feather morphogenesis are unknown. Here we addressed this knowledge gap by studying the temporal and spatial expression of proteases and inhibitors in developing feathers using mammalian antibodies that cross react with chicken proteins. We also investigated the effect of protease inhibitors on feather development employing an in vitro feather bud culture system. The results show that antibodies specific for mammalian MMP2 and TIMP2 stained positive in both feather epithelium and mesenchyme. The staining co-localized in structures of E10-E13 developing feathers. Interestingly, MMP2 and TIMP2 exhibited a complementary staining pattern in developing E15 and E20 feathers and in maturing feather filaments. Although they exhibited a slight delay in feather bud development, similar patterns of MMP2 and TIMP2 staining were observed in in vitro culture explants. The broad spectrum pharmacological inhibitors AG3340 and BB103 (MMP inhibitors) but not Aprotinin (a plasmin inhibitor) showed a reversible effect on epithelium invagination and feather bud elongation. TIMP2, a physiological inhibitor to MMPs, exhibited a similar effect. Markers of feather morphogenesis showed that MMP activity was required for both epithelium invagination and mesenchymal cell proliferation. Inhibition of MMP activity led to an overall delay in the expression of molecules that regulate either early feather bud growth and/or differentiation and thereby produced abnormal buds with incomplete follicle formation. This work demonstrates that MMPs and their inhibitors are not only important in injury repair, but also in development tissue remodeling as demonstrated

  1. Tritrichomonas foetus: budding from multinucleated pseudocysts.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Neves, Antonio; Benchimol, Marlene

    2009-11-01

    Tritrichomonas foetus is a flagellated protozoan parasite that causes trichomoniasis, a major sexually transmitted disease in cattle. T. foetus presents a simple life cycle, exhibiting only the trophozoitic form. However, under unfavorable growth conditions, the trophozoites, which are polar and flagellated, can round up and internalize their flagella forming pseudocysts. In this form no cyst wall surrounds the cell and it also displays a distinct mitosis when compared with the trophozoite form. In pseudocyst mitosis, the cell proceeds with duplication of cytoskeletal and mastigont structures; nuclear division occurs but without the corresponding cytoplasm division. Thus, giant multinucleated cells which present many mastigont structures are formed (approximately 62% of the population). These polymastigont/multinucleated cells are maintained when the cells are under stress conditions. When environmental conditions become favorable, the flagella are externalized and new flagellated trophozoites one by one, gradually bud from the multinucleated cell. Thus, in order to better understand the pseudocyst mitosis, the polymastigont formation and the generation of new cells by this budding process, video microscopy and other complementary techniques, such as immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy were used.

  2. Electrochemical Regulation of Budding Yeast Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Piel, Matthieu; Chang, Fred; Minc, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Cells are naturally surrounded by organized electrical signals in the form of local ion fluxes, membrane potential, and electric fields (EFs) at their surface. Although the contribution of electrochemical elements to cell polarity and migration is beginning to be appreciated, underlying mechanisms are not known. Here we show that an exogenous EF can orient cell polarization in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells, directing the growth of mating projections towards sites of hyperpolarized membrane potential, while directing bud emergence in the opposite direction, towards sites of depolarized potential. Using an optogenetic approach, we demonstrate that a local change in membrane potential triggered by light is sufficient to direct cell polarization. Screens for mutants with altered EF responses identify genes involved in transducing electrochemical signals to the polarity machinery. Membrane potential, which is regulated by the potassium transporter Trk1p, is required for polarity orientation during mating and EF response. Membrane potential may regulate membrane charges through negatively charged phosphatidylserines (PSs), which act to position the Cdc42p-based polarity machinery. These studies thus define an electrochemical pathway that directs the orientation of cell polarization. PMID:25548923

  3. Glutamate: Tastant and Neuromodulator in Taste Buds.

    PubMed

    Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Kinnamon, Sue C

    2016-07-01

    In taste buds, glutamate plays a double role as a gustatory stimulus and neuromodulator. The detection of glutamate as a tastant involves several G protein-coupled receptors, including the heterodimer taste receptor type 1, member 1 and 3 as well as metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1 and mGluR4). Both receptor types participate in the detection of glutamate as shown with knockout animals and selective antagonists. At the basal part of taste buds, ionotropic glutamate receptors [N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA] are expressed and participate in the modulation of the taste signal before its transmission to the brain. Evidence suggests that glutamate has an efferent function on taste cells and modulates the release of other neurotransmitters such as serotonin and ATP. This short article reviews the recent developments in the field with regard to glutamate receptors involved in both functions as well as the influence of glutamate on the taste signal. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  4. Functional Diversity of Silencers in Budding Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Sjöstrand, Jimmy O. O.; Kegel, Andreas; Åström, Stefan U.

    2002-01-01

    We studied the silencing of the cryptic mating-type loci HMLα and HMRa in the budding yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. A 102-bp minimal silencer fragment was defined that was both necessary and sufficient for silencing of HMLα. Mutagenesis of the silencer revealed three distinct regions (A, B, and C) that were important for silencing. Recombinant K. lactis ribosomal DNA enhancer binding protein 1 (Reb1p) could bind the silencer in vitro, and point mutations in the B box abolished both Reb1p binding and silencer function. Furthermore, strains carrying temperature-sensitive alleles of the REB1 gene derepressed the transcription of the HMLα1 gene at the nonpermissive temperature. A functional silencer element from the K. lactis cryptic HMRa locus was also identified, which contained both Reb1p binding sites and A boxes, strongly suggesting a general role for these sequences in K. lactis silencing. Our data indicate that different proteins bind to Kluyveromyces silencers than to Saccharomyces silencers. We suggest that the evolution of silencers is rapid in budding yeasts and discuss the similarities and differences between silencers in Saccharomyces and Kluyveromyces. PMID:12456003

  5. Molecular Mechanism of Arenavirus Assembly and Budding

    PubMed Central

    Urata, Shuzo; Yasuda, Jiro

    2012-01-01

    Arenaviruses have a bisegmented negative-strand RNA genome, which encodes four viral proteins: GP and NP by the S segment and L and Z by the L segment. These four viral proteins possess multiple functions in infection, replication and release of progeny viruses from infected cells. The small RING finger protein, Z protein is a matrix protein that plays a central role in viral assembly and budding. Although all arenaviruses encode Z protein, amino acid sequence alignment showed a huge variety among the species, especially at the C-terminus where the L-domain is located. Recent publications have demonstrated the interactions between viral protein and viral protein, and viral protein and host cellular protein, which facilitate transportation and assembly of viral components to sites of virus egress. This review presents a summary of current knowledge regarding arenavirus assembly and budding, in comparison with other enveloped viruses. We also refer to the restriction of arenavirus production by the antiviral cellular factor, Tetherin/BST-2. PMID:23202453

  6. Molecular mechanism of arenavirus assembly and budding.

    PubMed

    Urata, Shuzo; Yasuda, Jiro

    2012-10-10

    Arenaviruses have a bisegmented negative-strand RNA genome, which encodes four viral proteins: GP and NP by the S segment and L and Z by the L segment. These four viral proteins possess multiple functions in infection, replication and release of progeny viruses from infected cells. The small RING finger protein, Z protein is a matrix protein that plays a central role in viral assembly and budding. Although all arenaviruses encode Z protein, amino acid sequence alignment showed a huge variety among the species, especially at the C-terminus where the L-domain is located. Recent publications have demonstrated the interactions between viral protein and viral protein, and viral protein and host cellular protein, which facilitate transportation and assembly of viral components to sites of virus egress. This review presents a summary of current knowledge regarding arenavirus assembly and budding, in comparison with other enveloped viruses. We also refer to the restriction of arenavirus production by the antiviral cellular factor, Tetherin/BST-2.

  7. Renal pelvic and ureteral ultrasonographic characteristics of cats with chronic kidney disease in comparison with normal cats, and cats with pyelonephritis or ureteral obstruction.

    PubMed

    Quimby, Jessica M; Dowers, Kristy; Herndon, Andrea K; Randall, Elissa K

    2017-08-01

    Objectives The objective was to describe ultrasonographic characteristics of cats with stable chronic kidney disease (CKD) and determine if these were significantly different from cats with pyelonephritis (Pyelo) and ureteral obstruction (UO), to aid in clinical assessment during uremic crisis. Methods Sixty-six cats with stable CKD were prospectively enrolled, as well as normal control cats (n = 10), cats with a clinical diagnosis of Pyelo (n = 13) and cats with UO confirmed by surgical resolution (n = 11). Renal ultrasound was performed and routine still images and cine loops were obtained. Analysis included degree of pelvic dilation, and presence and degree of ureteral dilation. Measurements were compared between groups using non-parametric one-way ANOVA with Dunn's post-hoc analysis. Results In total, 66.6% of CKD cats had measurable renal pelvic dilation compared with 30.0% of normal cats, 84.6% of Pyelo cats and 100% of UO cats. There was no statistically significant difference in renal pelvic widths between CKD cats and normal cats, or CKD cats and Pyelo cats. On almost all measurement categories, UO cats had significantly greater renal pelvic widths compared with CKD cats and normal cats ( P <0.05) but not Pyelo cats. Six percent of stable CKD cats had measurable proximal ureteral dilation on one or both sides vs 46.2% of Pyelo cats and 81.8% of UO cats. There was no statistically significant difference in proximal ureteral width between normal and CKD cats, or between Pyelo and UO cats. There was a statistically significant difference in proximal ureteral width between CKD and Pyelo cats, CKD and UO cats, normal and UO cats, and normal and Pyelo cats. Conclusions and relevance No significant difference in renal pelvic widths between CKD cats and Pyelo cats was seen. These data suggest CKD cats should have a baseline ultrasonography performed so that abnormalities documented during a uremic crisis can be better interpreted.

  8. Combined ureterorenoscopy for ureteral and renal calculi is not associated with adverse outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Turan, Mirac; Ozkanli, Oguz; Avci, Egemen; Basar, Mehmet Murad; Acar, Oguz; Balbay, Mevlana Derya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We intended to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of the simultaneous rigid and flexible ureteroscopic treatment of symptomatic ureteral and ipsilateral small simultaneous calyceal stones. Outcomes of combined therapy were compared with monotherapy alone. Material and methods In this retrospective study, group 1 consisted of 45 patients with middle or lower ureteral and ipsilateral small simultaneous calyceal stones treated by combined therapy. Group 2 included 45 patients with middle or lower ureteral stones only and treated by monotherapy. Stone characteristics, operative time, hospital stay, stone free rates, and complications were compared between groups 1 and 2. Stone free status was defined as no fragments and/or the presence of asymptomatic fragments smaller than 4 mm. Results Mean BMI were 29.3 ±0.9 kg/m2 and 27.6 ±0.6 kg/m2 in groups 1 and 2, respectively. Mean ureteral stone size (7.6 ±0.4 mm vs. 8.0 ±0.4 mm, p = 0.261) and ureteral stone burden (56.0 ±5.5 mm2 vs. 54.8 ±6.1 mm2, p = 0.487) were similar between groups. Mean renal stone size and renal stone burden for group 1 were 7.1 ±0.8 mm and 83.7 ±11.3 mm2. The mean operative time was significantly longer (for a mean of 32.5±1.2 minutes) for group 1 (p = 0.001). Ureteral stents were left in 38 (84.4%) and 19 (42.2%) patients in group 1 and group 2 (p = 0.001). Hospital stay and complication rates were similar between groups. SFRs were 100% for ureteral stones in both groups and 88.9% for renal stones within group 1. Conclusions Simultaneous ureteroscopic treatment of the ureteral and ipsilateral small calyceal stones prolongs operative time and increases use of ureteral stent without leaving any residual renal stones. PMID:26251739

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of ureteral calculi during pregnancy with rigid ureteroscopes.

    PubMed

    Scarpa, R M; De Lisa, A; Usai, E

    1996-03-01

    There is still excessive debate as to the preferred diagnostic and therapeutic approach to urolithiasis in pregnancy. We report our experience with 15 pregnant patients with renoureteral colic marked by pain not responsive to analgesia, dilatation and fever. We focused on the usefulness of ureteroscopy with thin instruments and ultrasound in the diagnosis and treatment of ureteral stone and ureteral colic during pregnancy. Between 1990 and 1993 we performed ureteroscopy and ureterolithotripsy on 15 pregnant patients 16 to 30 years old. Gestation time ranged from 20 to 34 weeks. All patients underwent ureteroscopy with thin rigid 7.0F or 9.5F ureteroscopes without dilation of the ureteral meatus. The use of ionizing radiation was avoided before, during and after the procedures. A stone was extracted from the lower third of the ureter in 2 cases, displaced into the kidney from the middle third of the ureter in 3, and fragmented with the pulsed dye laser in 3, the holmium:YAG laser in 3 and the ballistic lithotriptor in 2. Finally absence of ureteral calculi was confirmed in 2 cases. A double pigtail ureteral catheter was placed via echographic guidance in 14 cases to monitor curling of the pigtail in the renal pelvis, while in 1 a cylindrical ureteral catheter was used. In 5 cases no anesthesia was necessary, while 10 required neuroleptic analgesia. There were no complications after the procedure. All pregnancies were full term. Rigid ureteroscopy may be performed on the entire urinary tract even during advanced pregnancy. Stones may be fragmented, extracted or displaced and double pigtail ureteral catheters may be applied with only sonographic guidance, at times without use of anesthesia. The use of small instruments, such as the Gautier ureteroscope, that do not require dilation or any particular manipulation of the ureteral meatus seems to be essential together with an accurate ureteroscopic technique. In this manner it is possible to diagnose and treat ureteral

  10. Urological complications in ureteric stenting live related renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Hafiz Shahzad; Khan, Mohammad Usman; Hussain, Imran; Hyder, Imran

    2011-01-01

    To determine the frequency and types of post-transplant urological complications in live-related kidney transplantation with reference to the impact of JJ ureteric stent. Case series. Shaikh Zayed Postgraduate Medical Institute and National Institute of Kidney Diseases, Lahore, from June 2006 to July 2010. Consecutive renal transplantations, donors being alive were relatives, reterospectively reviewed. All patients underwent extravesical ureteroneocystostomy and all, except one were stented. From the retrieved clinical records, the frequency and types of various minor and major urological complications and their management was studied. All the complications were managed according to standard guidelines. The overall incidence of urological complications among transplant recipients was 11.9%, observed in 12 patients. The complications were urinary leakage in 2 (2%) and clot retention, ureterovesical junction obstruction and wound infection in one (1%) patient each. Urinary tract infection was observed in 7 (6.9%) patients. Urinary tract infection was the most common urologic complication in the studied cases. The technique of stented extravesical ureteronecystostomy had a low rate of urological complications in this series. Other factors which may reduce the urological complications are preserving adventitia, fat and blood supply of ureter by delicate dissection during donor nephrectomy and prevent kinking and twisting of ureter are important factors in reducing the post-transplant urological complications.

  11. Experience of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for kidney and upper ureteric stones by electromagnetic lithotriptor.

    PubMed

    Wazir, Bakhtawar Gul; Iftikhar ul Haq, Mian; Faheem ul Haq; Nawaz, Akhtar; Ikramullah, Ahmed Nawaz; Jamil, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL) is a non-invasive treatment of urinary stones which breaks them, by using externally applied, focused, high intensity acoustic pulse, into smaller pieces so that they can pass easily through ureter. Shock wave generation, focusing, coupling and stone localisation by fluoroscope or ultrasound are the basic components of ESWL. ESWL has some complications and is contraindicated in certain situations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of ESWL in kidney and upper ureteric stones by Electromagnetic Lithotriptor. All adult patients with renal and upper ureteric stones having a diameter of up to 1 Cm were included in the study. Basic evaluation such as history, examination, ultrasound and excretory urography were performed. Electromagnetic lithotripsy was done and data were collected on a printed proforma from 1st January 2008 to 30th March 2009 in Institute of Kidney Diseases, Peshawar. Out of a total of 625 patients 463 were male and 162 were female; 67.36% of patients were having renal stones, 23.84% upper ureteric and 8.8% both renal and ureteric stones. Complications noted were renal colic in 9.76%, haematuria in 3.2%, steinstrasse in 2.72%, and fever in 1.12% of patients. The stone free rate was 89% and 7% of patients were having stone fragments <4 mm. ESWL failed in 4% of patients. ESWL is a safe and effective way of treating kidney and upper ureteric stones.

  12. Flexible Ureteroscopy Can Be More Efficacious in the Treatment of Proximal Ureteral Stones in Select Patients

    PubMed Central

    Alkan, Erdal; Sarıbacak, Ali; Ozkanli, Ahmet Oguz; Basar, Mehmet Murad; Acar, Oguz; Balbay, Mevlana Derya

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We aimed to compare and evaluate the outcomes and complications of two endoscopic treatment procedures, semirigid ureteroscopy (SR-URS) and flexible ureteroscopy (F-URS), in the treatment of proximal ureteral stones (PUS). Methods. SR-URS (group 1) was done on 68 patients whereas 64 patients underwent F-URS (group 2) for the treatment of PUS. Success rate was defined as the absence of stone fragments or presence of asymptomatic insignificant residual fragments < 2 mm. Outcomes and complications were recorded. Results. The differences were statistically not significant in age, gender, body mass index (BMI), and stone characteristics between groups. Mean ureteral stone size was 9.1 ± 0.4 mm and 8.9 ± 0.5 mm for groups 1 and 2. Mean operative time was 34.1 ± 1.5 min and 49.4 ± 2.3 min for groups 1 and 2 (p = 0.001). SFRs were 76.5% and 87.5% for groups 1 and 2 (p = 0.078). Two major complications (ureteral avulsion and ureteral rupture) occurred in group 1. Conclusion. F-URS is safer and less invasive than SR-URS in patients with PUS. There is no statistically significant difference in the efficacy of either technique. Nonetheless we recommend F-URS in the management of PUS as a first-line treatment option in select cases of proximal ureteral calculi. PMID:26617636

  13. Prediction of outcome of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in the management of ureteric calculi.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingqing; Shi, Qiduo; Wang, Xuguang; Yang, Kun; Yang, Rui

    2011-02-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the clinical outcome of using extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) in the treatment of ureteric calculi and to establish a predictive model for the stone-free rate in patients receiving the treatment. A total of 831 patients with ureteric calculi were accepted in this study. Several parameters, including stone site, stone number, stone size, history of urolithiasis, renal colic, hydronephrosis, and double-J ureteric stent, were analyzed using univariate and multivariate analyses. A prediction model was established based on the logistic regression analysis of the significant factors, and the goodness-of-fit of the model was evaluated by employing the Hosmer-Lemeshow test. At a 3-month follow-up after ESWL treatment, the overall stone-free rate was 96.8% (804/831) with no serious complications being found, while the treatment failed in 3.2% (27/831) of the patients. Five factors, including stone number, stone size, history of urolithiasis, renal colic, and double-J ureteric stent contributed significantly to the clinical outcome of the ESWL treatment. The prediction model had a sensitivity and overall accuracy of 99.8 and 96.9%, respectively. The results show that ESWL remains an effective method for treating ureteric calculi. The prediction model established in this study could be used as a method for estimating prognosis in patients following ESWL treatment.

  14. Degradation and antibacterial properties of magnesium alloys in artificial urine for potential resorbable ureteral stent applications.

    PubMed

    Lock, Jaclyn Y; Wyatt, Eric; Upadhyayula, Srigokul; Whall, Andrew; Nuñez, Vicente; Vullev, Valentine I; Liu, Huinan

    2014-03-01

    This article presents an investigation on the effectiveness of magnesium and its alloys as a novel class of antibacterial and biodegradable materials for ureteral stent applications. Magnesium is a lightweight and biodegradable metallic material with beneficial properties for use in medical devices. Ureteral stent is one such example of a medical device that is widely used to treat ureteral canal blockages clinically. The bacterial colony formation coupled with the encrustation on the stent surface from extended use often leads to clinical complications and contributes to the failure of indwelling medical devices. We demonstrated that magnesium alloys decreased Escherichia coli viability and reduced the colony forming units over a 3-day incubation period in an artificial urine (AU) solution when compared with currently used commercial polyurethane stent. Moreover, the magnesium degradation resulted in alkaline pH and increased magnesium ion concentration in the AU solution. The antibacterial and degradation properties support the potential use of magnesium-based materials for next-generation ureteral stents. Further studies are needed for clinical translation of biodegradable metallic ureteral stents.

  15. Confirmation of ureteric patency during cystoscopy using phenazopyridine HCl: a low-cost approach.

    PubMed

    Hui, Jane Y C; Harvey, Marie-Andrée; Johnston, Shawna L

    2009-09-01

    To describe the use of oral phenazopyridine (Pyridium) prior to pelvic surgery to facilitate intraoperative confirmation of ureteric patency. We performed a chart review of women given phenazopyridine preoperatively prior to pelvic surgery in a tertiary care centre between July 2004 and June 2005. The primary outcome was the cystoscopic observation of bilateral ureteric urine efflux. Secondary outcomes included the visualization of bladder mucosa during cystoscopy, postoperative complications, and urinary tract injury diagnosed postoperatively (i.e., missed intraoperatively). Pelvic reconstructive surgery requiring intraoperative cystoscopy was performed in 124 women. Bilateral ureteric patency and bladder mucosal integrity was confirmed in all cases. Phenazopyridine was well tolerated by all patients, and its use was unequivocally documented in 32 subjects whose chart was reviewed to determine postoperative course. Bladder mucosal appearance was unaltered. Dye continued to be excreted during prolonged procedures. Postoperatively, no ureteric injuries were subsequently diagnosed in any patients. The cost per patient of phenazopyridine ($0.29) is substantially lower than indigo carmine ($34.50). Preoperative oral phenazopyridine is an inexpensive and safe dye that assists effectively in the confirmation of ureteric patency when cystoscopy is planned during pelvic surgery.

  16. Antegrade retrieval of ureteral stents through an 8-French percutaneous nephrostomy route.

    PubMed

    Liang, Huei-Lung; Yang, Tsung-Lung; Huang, Jer-Shyung; Lin, Yih-Huie; Chou, Chen-Pin; Chen, Matt Chiung-Yu; Pan, Huay-Ben

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the technique of antegrade retrieval of ureteral stents under fluoroscopic guidance through an 8-French nephrostomy. During an 8-year period, we retrieved 26 ureteral stents from 24 patients who were not candidates for retrograde removal or had other conditions precluding use of a retrograde approach. A loop snare or grasping forceps was used to retrieve a ureteral stent in the renal pelvis or calyx or upper ureter through an 8-French vascular sheath with a safety wire in place. A snare catheter advanced into the bladder for retrieval of the bladder end was used in patients in whom retrieval with both a loop snare and a grasping forceps failed. All 26 ureteral stents were successfully retrieved by the antegrade approach. Ten stents were retrieved with a snare alone and nine with a forceps alone. Five stents were retrieved successfully with a forceps after initial failures with snare catheters. Two stents were retrieved with snare catheters advanced into the bladder. The major complication of nephrostomy wound infection occurred in a patient with a urinary tract infection who underwent a one-stage procedure. All minor complications, including pelvic perforation in one patient and blood clot in the renal pelvis in four patients, resolved spontaneously without adverse sequelae. Antegrade percutaneous retrieval of a ureteral stent through an 8-French nephrostomy is safe and effective and has a high degree of technical success. It can be used as a routine interventional practice in radiology.

  17. Season of fire manipulates bud bank dynamics in northern mixed-grass prairie

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In perennial grassland dominated systems, belowground bud banks regulate plant community dynamics. Plant community responses to disturbance are largely driven by the ability to generate future aboveground growth originating from belowground axillary buds. This study examined bud bank dynamics for...

  18. Recommendations for reporting tumor budding in colorectal cancer based on the International Tumor Budding Consensus Conference (ITBCC) 2016.

    PubMed

    Lugli, Alessandro; Kirsch, Richard; Ajioka, Yoichi; Bosman, Fred; Cathomas, Gieri; Dawson, Heather; El Zimaity, Hala; Fléjou, Jean-François; Hansen, Tine Plato; Hartmann, Arndt; Kakar, Sanjay; Langner, Cord; Nagtegaal, Iris; Puppa, Giacomo; Riddell, Robert; Ristimäki, Ari; Sheahan, Kieran; Smyrk, Thomas; Sugihara, Kenichi; Terris, Benoît; Ueno, Hideki; Vieth, Michael; Zlobec, Inti; Quirke, Phil

    2017-09-01

    Tumor budding is a well-established independent prognostic factor in colorectal cancer but a standardized method for its assessment has been lacking. The primary aim of the International Tumor Budding Consensus Conference (ITBCC) was to reach agreement on an international, evidence-based standardized scoring system for tumor budding in colorectal cancer. The ITBCC included nine sessions with presentations, a pre-meeting survey and an e-book covering the key publications on tumor budding in colorectal cancer. The 'Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation' method was used to determine the strength of recommendations and quality of evidence. The following 10 statements achieved consensus: tumor budding is defined as a single tumor cell or a cell cluster consisting of four tumor cells or less (22/22, 100%). Tumor budding is an independent predictor of lymph node metastases in pT1 colorectal cancer (23/23, 100%). Tumor budding is an independent predictor of survival in stage II colorectal cancer (23/23, 100%). Tumor budding should be taken into account along with other clinicopathological features in a multidisciplinary setting (23/23, 100%). Tumor budding is counted on H&E (19/22, 86%). Intratumoral budding exists in colorectal cancer and has been shown to be related to lymph node metastasis (22/22, 100%). Tumor budding is assessed in one hotspot (in a field measuring 0.785 mm(2)) at the invasive front (22/22, 100%). A three-tier system should be used along with the budding count in order to facilitate risk stratification in colorectal cancer (23/23, 100%). Tumor budding and tumor grade are not the same (23/23, 100%). Tumor budding should be included in guidelines/protocols for colorectal cancer reporting (23/23, 100%). Members of the ITBCC were able to reach strong consensus on a single international, evidence-based method for tumor budding assessment and reporting. It is proposed that this method be incorporated into colorectal cancer

  19. Bud gall midges - potential invaders on larches in North America

    Treesearch

    Yuri N. Baranchikov

    2007-01-01

    Larch bud gall midges (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) form a specialized group of gall insects inhabiting buds of larch (Larix) in the northern Palaearctic Region. Currently there are four described species in this group. Dasineura kellneri Henschel is found in Central Europe and infests Larix decidua; D....

  20. Dormancy induction and release in buds and seeds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dormancy is a complex trait in both buds and seeds, which is an important mechanism for survival during the life cycle of plants. Over the years, a vast wealth of information has been generated on how environmental and developmental signals impact dormancy in buds and seeds. At the molecular level, ...

  1. Kinetics of human immunodeficiency virus budding and assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Nguyen, Toan

    2009-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) belongs to a large family of RNA viruses, retroviruses. Unlike budding of regular enveloped viruses, retroviruses bud concurrently with the assembly of retroviral capsids on the cell membrane. The kinetics of HIV (and other retroviruses) budding and assembly is therefore strongly affected by the elastic energy of the membrane and fundamentally different from regular viruses. The main result of this work shows that the kinetics is tunable from a fast budding process to a slow and effectively trapped partial budding process, by varying the attractive energy of retroviral proteins (call Gags), relative to the membrane elastic energy. When the Gag-Gag attraction is relatively high, the membrane elastic energy provides a kinetic barrier for the two pieces of the partial capsids to merge. This energy barrier determines the slowest step in the kinetics and the budding time. In the opposite limit, the membrane elastic energy provides not only a kinetic energy barrier, but a free energy barrier. The budding and assembly is effectively trapped at local free energy minimum, corresponding to a partially budded state. The time scale to escape from this metastable state is exponentially large. In both cases, our result fit with experimental measurements pretty well.

  2. An elastic model of partial budding of retroviruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Nguyen, Toan

    2008-03-01

    Retroviruses are characterized by their unique infection strategy of reverse transcription, in which the genetic information flows from RNA back to DNA. The most well known representative is the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Unlike budding of traditional enveloped viruses, retrovirus budding happens together with the formation of spherical virus capsids at the cell membrane. Led by this unique budding mechanism, we proposed an elastic model of retrovirus budding in this work. We found that if the lipid molecules of the membrane are supplied fast enough from the cell interior, the budding always proceeds to completion. In the opposite limit, there is an optimal size of partially budded virions. The zenith angle of these partially spherical capsids, α, is given by α˜(2̂/κσ)^1/4, where κ is the bending modulus of the membrane, σ is the surface tension of the membrane, and τ characterizes the strength of capsid protein interaction. If τ is large enough such that α˜π, the budding is complete. Our model explained many features of retrovirus partial budding observed in experiments.

  3. Desiccation tolerance of dormant buds from selected Prunus species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dormant buds of woody plant species present a convenient material for backing-up of germplasm in liquid nitrogen. Routinely, this type of material is used in long-term preservation of only a few species (e.g. apple and sour cherry). Cryopreservation procedures of dormant buds are species dependent, ...

  4. Anatomy and morphology in developing vegetative buds on detached Norway spruce branches in controlled conditions before bud burst.

    PubMed

    Sutinen, Sirkka; Partanen, Jouni; Viherä-Aarnio, Anneli; Häkkinen, Risto

    2009-11-01

    We studied the light and stereomicroscopic structure of developing vegetative buds from a 16-year-old Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] of southern Finnish origin in relation to temperature sum and to externally visible changes in the buds before and during bud burst in forcing conditions. Branches were collected on 17 January and transferred to the greenhouse where they were first subjected to preforcing conditions (darkness, +4 degrees C) for 7 days and then to the forcing conditions (day length 12 h, +20 degrees C). Buds were sampled 20 times between 17 January and 13 February. Air temperature was recorded hourly throughout the study period. The first microscopic change was a temporary increase in the size and number of lipid droplets before the onset of temperature sum (T > or = +5 degrees C) accumulation. From the 4th to the 9th day under the forcing conditions, tracheids started to develop from the base up to the top of the bud. This was closely synchronized with an observed morphological change in the shape of needle tip from rounded to pointed ones. Development from the first visible change in the bud scales on the 12th forcing day to bud burst took 9 days when the temperature sum was 313 d.d. The temperature sums in our experiment overestimated the requirements of temperature sum for bud development phases measured in the field. Bud development could be divided into four structural phases. The first two phases, i.e., morphological changes in the primary needles, occurred without any externally visible changes in the buds. Thus, these phases have a potential for testing and improving the phenological models, which, up to now, have mainly been based on the bud burst observation by the naked eye.

  5. The Smad3/Smad4/CDK9 complex promotes renal fibrosis in mice with unilateral ureteral obstruction.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xinli; Jiang, Mengjie; Sun, Yu Bo Yang; Jiang, Xiaoyun; Fu, Ping; Ren, Yi; Wang, Die; Dai, Lie; Caruana, Georgina; Bertram, John F; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Li, Jinhua

    2015-12-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)/Smad signaling has a central role in the pathogenesis of renal fibrosis. Smad3 and Smad4 are pro-fibrotic, while Smad2 is anti-fibrotic. However, these Smads form heterogeneous complexes, the functions of which are poorly understood. Here we studied Smad complex function in renal fibrosis using the mouse model of unilateral ureteric obstruction. Mice heterozygous for Smad3/4 (Smad3/4(+/-)) exhibited substantial protection from renal fibrosis through day 7 of obstruction, whereas Smad2/3(+/-) and Smad2/4(+/-) mice showed only modest protection. Formation of Smad3/Smad4/CDK9 complexes was an early event following obstruction in wild-type mice, which involved nuclear phosphorylation of the linker regions of Smad3. Significantly, Smad3 or Smad4 deficiency decreased the formation of Smad4/CDK9 or Smad3/CDK9 complex, Smad3 linker phosphorylation, and fibrosis but at different degrees. In vitro, TGF-β1 stimulation of collagen I promoter activity involved formation of Smad3/Smad4/CDK9 complexes, and overexpression of each component gave additive increases in collagen promoter activity. Co-administration of a CDK9 inhibitor and Smad3-specific inhibition achieved better protection from TGF-β1-induced fibrotic response in vitro and renal interstitial fibrosis in vivo. Thus formation of Smad3/Smad4/CDK9 complex drives renal fibrosis during ureteral obstruction. Formation of this complex represents a novel target for antifibrotic therapies.

  6. Endovascular treatment of arterio-ureteral fistulae with covered stents: Case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dhruv; Kumar, Abhishek; Ranganath, Praveen; Contractor, Sohail

    2014-01-01

    Arterio-ureteral fistulae are abnormal connections between an artery and the ureter and carry a high mortality. We present two cases of arterio-ureteral fistulae that presented with life-threatening hematuria. Both patients were treated with endovascular covered stent placement.

  7. Conserved serines in simian immunodeficiency virus capsid are required for virus budding.

    PubMed

    Rue, Sarah M; Roos, Jason W; Clements, Janice E; Barber, Sheila A

    2005-05-25

    The simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) capsid protein (CA), a constituent of the Pr55Gag polyprotein, is phosphorylated in virions but not in virus-producing cells (Rue, S.M., Roos, J.W., Tarwater, P.M., Clements, J.E., Barber, S.A., 2005. Phosphorylation and proteolytic cleavage of gag proteins in budded simian immunodeficiency virus. J. Virol. 79 (4), 2484-2492.). Using phosphoamino acid analysis of CA, we show that serine is the primary phosphate acceptor. A series of substitution mutants of serines in the CA domain of Pr55Gag were constructed in the infectious viral clone SIVmac239. These virus mutants were examined for defects in virus replication and virion infectivity, release, and morphology, as well as alterations in phosphorylation of CA-containing proteins. Although the virus mutants exhibited a number of replication defects, none of these defects could be directly attributed to aberrant CA phosphorylation. A novel defect was a block in early budding, which was common among several virus mutants with substitutions in the CA N terminus. Together, these results indicate that certain residues in the CA N terminus are crucial for early budding events.

  8. Rabies virus inactivates cofilin to facilitate viral budding and release.

    PubMed

    Zan, Jie; An, Shu-Ting; Mo, Kai-Kun; Zhou, Jian-Wei; Liu, Juan; Wang, Hai-Long; Yan, Yan; Liao, Min; Zhou, Ji-Yong

    2016-09-02

    Cytoplasmic actin and actin-associated proteins have been identified in RABV particles. Although actin is involved in RABV entry into cells, the specific role of actin in RABV budding and release remains unknown. Our study found that RABV M protein-mediated virion budding depends on intact actin filaments. Confocal microscopy demonstrated a block to virions budding, with a number of M protein-mediated budding vesicles detained in the cell cytoplasm. Furthermore, RABV infection resulted in inactivation of cofilin and upregulation of phosphorylated cofilin. Knockdown of cofilin reduced RABV release. These results for the first time indicate that RABV infection resulted in upregulation of phosphorylated cofilin to facililtate actin polymerization for virus budding. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Genes expressed in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) buds isolated with a subtractive library.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, M P N; Batista, V G L; Martins, N F; Santos, R C; Melo Filho, P A; Silva, C R C; Lima, L M

    2013-01-16

    A subtractive cDNA library from cotton buds was constructed to prospect for differentially expressed genes related to early bud development. A library was constructed and 768 cDNA sequences were obtained, comprising 168 clusters, with 126 contigs and 42 singlets. Both the Gossypium as well as Arabidopsis databases were utilized for the in silico analysis, since some genes identified in cotton have not yet been studied for functionality, although they have homology with genes from other species. The transcriptome revealed a large number of transcripts, some of them with unknown function, and others related to pollen development, pollen tubes, ovules, and fibers at different stages. The most populated contig was identified as fiber from 0-10 days after anthesis, with 12 reads. The success and novelty rates generated from the library were 67 and 51%, respectively. The information obtained here will provide a framework for research on functional cotton genomics.

  10. High tumor budding stratifies breast cancer with metastatic properties.

    PubMed

    Salhia, Bodour; Trippel, Mafalda; Pfaltz, Katrin; Cihoric, Nikola; Grogg, André; Lädrach, Claudia; Zlobec, Inti; Tapia, Coya

    2015-04-01

    Tumor budding refers to single or small cluster of tumor cells detached from the main tumor mass. In colon cancer high tumor budding is associated with positive lymph nodes and worse prognosis. Therefore, we investigated the value of tumor budding as a predictive feature of lymph node status in breast cancer (BC). Whole tissue sections from 148 surgical resection specimens (SRS) and 99 matched preoperative core biopsies (CB) with invasive BC of no special type were analyzed on one slide stained with pan-cytokeratin. In SRS, the total number of intratumoral (ITB) and peripheral tumor buds (PTB) in ten high-power fields (HPF) were counted. A bud was defined as a single tumor cell or a cluster of up to five tumor cells. High tumor budding equated to scores averaging >4 tumor buds across 10HPFs. In CB high tumor budding was defined as ≥10 buds/HPF. The results were correlated with pathological parameters. In SRS high PTB stratified BC with lymph node metastases (p ≤ 0.03) and lymphatic invasion (p ≤ 0.015). In CB high tumor budding was significantly (p = 0.0063) associated with venous invasion. Pathologists are able, based on morphology, to categorize BC into a high and low risk groups based in part on lymph node status. This risk assessment can be easily performed during routine diagnostics and it is time and cost effective. These results suggest that high PTB is associated with loco-regional metastasis, highlighting the possibility that this tumor feature may help in therapeutic decision-making.

  11. Estrogen signaling is not required for prostatic bud patterning or for its disruption by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    SciTech Connect

    Allgeier, Sarah Hicks; Vezina, Chad M.; Lin, T.-M.; Moore, Robert W.; Silverstone, Allen E.; Mukai, Motoko; Gavalchin, Jerrie; Cooke, Paul S.; Peterson, Richard E.

    2009-08-15

    Estrogens play an important role in prostatic development, health, and disease. While estrogen signaling is essential for normal postnatal prostate development, little is known about its prenatal role in control animals. We tested the hypothesis that estrogen signaling is needed for normal male prostatic bud patterning. Budding patterns were examined by scanning electron microscopy of urogenital sinus epithelium from wild-type mice, mice lacking estrogen receptor (ER){alpha}, ER{beta}, or both, and wild-type mice exposed to the antiestrogen ICI 182,780. Budding phenotypes did not detectably differ among any of these groups, strongly suggesting that estrogen signaling is not needed to establish the prototypical prostatic budding pattern seen in control males. This finding contributes to our understanding of the effects of low-level estrogen exposure on early prostate development. In utero exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) can greatly alter the pattern in which prostatic buds form and reduce their number. For several reasons, including a prior observation that inhibitory effects of TCDD on prostatic budding in rats depend heavily on the sex of adjacent fetuses, we tested the hypothesis that estrogen signaling is needed for TCDD to disrupt prostatic budding. However, budding did not detectably differ among wild-type mice, or mice lacking ER{alpha}, ER{beta}, or both, that were exposed prenatally to TCDD (5 {mu}g/kg on embryonic day 13.5). Nor did ICI 182,780 detectably affect the response to TCDD. These results strongly suggest that estrogen signaling is not needed for TCDD to inhibit prostatic epithelial budding.

  12. Ureteral Rupture Caused by a Suprapubic Catheter in a Male Patient With Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) may lead to urinary system disturbances. Patients with SCI usually have neurogenic bladder, and treatment optionss for this condition include clean intermittent catheterization and a permanent indwelling urethral or suprapubic catheter. Complications of catheterization include urinary tract infection, calculi, urinary tract injury, bladder contraction, bladder spasm, renal dysfunction, bladder cancer, and so forth. To the best of our knowledge, ureteral rupture is an unusual complication of catheterization, and ureteral rupture has been rarely reported in SCI patients. Therefore, here we report a case of ureteral rupture caused by a suprapubic catheter used for the treatment of neurogenic bladder with vesicoureteral reflux in a male patient with SCI. Due to SCI with neurogenic bladder, ureteral size can be reduced and the suprapubic catheter tip can easily migrate to the distal ureteral orifice. Thus, careful attention is required when a catheter is inserted into the bladder in patients with SCI. PMID:28119847

  13. Constituents of the cotton bud: XII. The carotenoids in buds, seeds and other tissue.

    PubMed

    Thompson, A C; Henson, R D; Hedin, P A; Minyard, J P

    1968-11-01

    Eleven carotenoid pigments were found in the bud, leaf, flower petal, seedling and seed of the cotton plant; nine were identified and quantitated. The most abundant carotenoids in the green tissue of the cotton plant were beta-carotene and lutein. Carotene hydrocarbons comprised 12% of the total carotenoids in the seed, 15% in the 1-day-old flower petal, 51% in the bud and 57% in green leaves. Only 5,8-epoxy carotenoids were found in the flower petals and only 5,6-epoxides in the other tissue but both were present in the seed. The colorless phytoene precursors to the carotenoids comprised from 20% to 38% of the total carotenoid pigment in the growing tissue of the plant.

  14. Budding Yeast for Budding Geneticists: A Primer on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Model System

    PubMed Central

    Duina, Andrea A.; Miller, Mary E.; Keeney, Jill B.

    2014-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a powerful model organism for studying fundamental aspects of eukaryotic cell biology. This Primer article presents a brief historical perspective on the emergence of this organism as a premier experimental system over the course of the past century. An overview of the central features of the S. cerevisiae genome, including the nature of its genetic elements and general organization, is also provided. Some of the most common experimental tools and resources available to yeast geneticists are presented in a way designed to engage and challenge undergraduate and graduate students eager to learn more about the experimental amenability of budding yeast. Finally, a discussion of several major discoveries derived from yeast studies highlights the far-reaching impact that the yeast system has had and will continue to have on our understanding of a variety of cellular processes relevant to all eukaryotes, including humans. PMID:24807111

  15. Budding yeast for budding geneticists: a primer on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae model system.

    PubMed

    Duina, Andrea A; Miller, Mary E; Keeney, Jill B

    2014-05-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a powerful model organism for studying fundamental aspects of eukaryotic cell biology. This Primer article presents a brief historical perspective on the emergence of this organism as a premier experimental system over the course of the past century. An overview of the central features of the S. cerevisiae genome, including the nature of its genetic elements and general organization, is also provided. Some of the most common experimental tools and resources available to yeast geneticists are presented in a way designed to engage and challenge undergraduate and graduate students eager to learn more about the experimental amenability of budding yeast. Finally, a discussion of several major discoveries derived from yeast studies highlights the far-reaching impact that the yeast system has had and will continue to have on our understanding of a variety of cellular processes relevant to all eukaryotes, including humans.

  16. Mitochondrial movement and inheritance in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Boldogh, Istvan R; Fehrenbacher, Kammy L; Yang, Hyeong-Cheol; Pon, Liza A

    2005-07-18

    Mitochondria are essential organelles that perform fundamental cellular functions including aerobic energy mobilization, fatty acid oxidation, amino acid metabolism, heme biosynthesis and apoptosis. Mitochondria cannot be synthesized de novo. Therefore, the inheritance of this organelle is an essential part of the cell cycle; that is, daughter cells that do not inherit mitochondria will not survive. The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a facultative aerobe that can tolerate mitochondrial mutations that would be lethal in other organisms. Therefore, yeast has been used extensively to study inheritance and segregation of mitochondria. As a result, much of what we know regarding mitochondrial inheritance has been uncovered using yeast as a model system. Here, we describe the latest developments in mitochondrial motility and inheritance.

  17. Biofilm/Mat assays for budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Paul J

    2015-02-02

    Many microbial species form biofilms/mats under nutrient-limiting conditions, and fungal pathogens rely on this social behavior for virulence. In budding yeast, mat formation is dependent on the mucin-like flocculin Flo11, which promotes cell-to-cell and cell-to-substrate adhesion in mats. The biofilm/mat assays described here allow the evaluation of the role of Flo11 in the formation of mats. Cells are grown on surfaces with different degrees of rigidity to assess their expansion and three-dimensional architecture, and the cells are also exposed to plastic surfaces to quantify their adherence. These assays are broadly applicable to studying biofilm/mat formation in microbial species.

  18. Cell polarization in budding and fission yeasts.

    PubMed

    Martin, Sophie G; Arkowitz, Robert A

    2014-03-01

    Polarization is a fundamental cellular property, which is essential for the function of numerous cell types. Over the past three to four decades, research using the best-established yeast systems in cell biological research, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (or budding yeast) and Schizosaccharomyces pombe (or fission yeast), has brought to light fundamental principles governing the establishment and maintenance of a polarized, asymmetric state. These two organisms, though both ascomycetes, are evolutionarily very distant and exhibit distinct shapes and modes of growth. In this review, we compare and contrast the two systems. We first highlight common cell polarization pathways, detailing the contribution of Rho GTPases, the cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking, lipids, and protein scaffolds. We then contrast the major differences between the two organisms, describing their distinct strategies in growth site selection and growth zone dimensions and compartmentalization, which may be the basis for their distinct shapes. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for ureteral stone in patient with implanted cardiac pacemaker: a case report].

    PubMed

    Kato, Yuji; Hou, Kyokushin; Hori, Junichi; Taniguchi, Narumi; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Yachiku, Sunao; Azumi, Makoto; Osanai, Hiroaki

    2003-09-01

    We report a case of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) for ureteral stone in patient with implanted cardiac pacemaker. A 68-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for left back pain due to left single ureteral stone (13 x 7 mm) in 2002. A permanent cardiac pacemaker has been implanted for sick sinus syndrome in 1997. After evaluation for cardiac function and pacemaker function by a cardiologist and a pacemaker technician, SWL (MFL 5000, Dornier) was performed without changing pacemaker mode (DDD mode). Shock waves were incorrectly exposed a few time triggered by arterial pacing amplitude, but no cardiovascular event or malfunction of the pacemaker was occurred during or after SWL. The ureteral stone was successfully fragmented with 2,400 shock waves (24 kV) and the fragments were delivered immediately.

  20. Lethal hemorrhage from a ureteric-arterial-enteric fistula diagnosed by postmortem CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Saiful Nizam bin Abdul; Bouwer, Heinrich; O'Donnell, Chris

    2012-12-01

    Fistula formation following pelvic surgery and radiotherapy, including ureteric-arterial fistulas (UAF), is well documented, however, ureteric-arterial-enteric fistula is extremely rare. Conventional autopsy is usually required for the definitive diagnosis of pelvic vascular fistulas although an accurate diagnosis can still be complicated and challenging. The role of post-mortem computed tomography (PMCT) as an adjunct to conventional autopsy is well documented in the literature. One of the limitations of PMCT is the diagnosis of vascular conditions. Post-mortem computed tomography angiography (PMCTA) is a recently introduced technique that can assist in detecting such pathology. We present a case of post-radiotherapy ureteric-arterial-enteric fistula presenting as massive rectal and vaginal bleeding diagnosed prior to autopsy on PMCTA. The role of PMCTA in the diagnosis of such a UAF has not previously been reported in the literature.

  1. The full metallic double-pigtail ureteral stent: Review of the clinical outcome and current status

    PubMed Central

    Kallidonis, Panagiotis S.; Georgiopoulos, Ioannis S.; Kyriazis, Iason D.; Kontogiannis, Stavros; Al-Aown, Abdulrahman M.; Liatsikos, Evangelos N.

    2015-01-01

    The full metallic double-J ureteral stent (MS) was introduced as a method for providing long-term drainage in malignant ureteral obstruction. Experimental evaluation of the MS revealed that its mechanical features allow efficient drainage in difficult cases, which could not be managed by the insertion of a standard polymeric double-J stent. Clinical experience with the MS showed controversial results. Careful patient selection results in efficient long-term management of malignant ureteral obstruction. The use of the MS should also be considered in selected benign cases. Major complications are uncommon and the minor complications should not hinder its use. Experience in pediatric patients is limited and warrants additional study. The cost-effectiveness of the MS seems to be appropriate for long-term treatment. Further investigation with comparative clinical trials would document the outcome more extensively and establish the indications as well as the selection criteria for the MS. PMID:25624569

  2. Ureteral obstruction associated with pelvic inflammatory disease in a long-term intrauterine contraceptive device user.

    PubMed

    Yonemura, Shigenori; Moriya, Mitsuhiko; Hori, Yasuhide; Arima, Kiminobu; Toyoda, Nagayasu; Sugimura, Yoshiki

    2006-03-01

    We report herein a case of ureteral obstruction associated with pelvic inflammatory disease in a long-term intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) user. A 62-year-old woman presented with a 2-week history of left flank pain and high fever, but no abdominal pain. She had forgotten the use of an IUD. Retrograde pyelography showed a stricture in the lower third of the left ureter. Magnetic resonance showed swelling of the uterus wall and left parametria, but did not reveal the presence of an IUD. Subtotal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and left nephronureterectomy was performed. The IUD was then found in the uterine cavity. The results of pathological and bacteriological findings for Actinomyces infection were negative. Therefore we diagnosed this case as ureteral obstruction associated with pelvic inflammatory disease. Ureteral obstruction associated with pelvic inflammatory disease in a long-term IUD user is extremely rare.

  3. Upward migration of a ureteric stone in a military trainer: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Fallatah, Moayid; Tahaineh, Sakher; Abu Mughli, Rawan; Fallatah, Seddig M

    2017-01-01

    Retrograde ureteric stone migration is an extremely rare phenomenon with only one previously reported case in the literature. We report on a case of upward spontaneous migration of a ureteric stone in a 39-year-old male military trainer in Saudi Arabia who was diagnosed with upper left ureteric stone based on non-contrast spiral computerized tomography kidney ureter bladder (CT-KUB) scan. The plan was to treat the patient conservatively with alpha blockers and oral hydration. Two weeks after treatment started, repeated CT-KUB scan revealed an upward migration of the stone to the left renal calyx. Accordingly, we highly recommend performing a prior stone localizing imaging test to avoid unnecessary procedures or operations. PMID:28176914

  4. [Extravasation into a renal sinus cyst due to ureteral calculus: a case report].

    PubMed

    Taue, R; Naroda, T; Tamura, M; Kanayama, H; Kagawa, S

    1999-07-01

    A 71-year-old man who had been treated conservatively for advanced prostate cancer with hormonal therapy presented with complaint of left flank pain. Intravenous urography demonstrated obstruction caused by a left upper ureteral calculus and leakage of contrast medium outside the renal pelvis and calyces. Left percutaneous nephrostomy was performed, and subsequent nephrostography showed extravasation into a parapelvic renal sinus cyst previously recognized on follow-up computed tomography (CT). The left ureteral calculus was treated with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), after which obstruction and extravasation disappeared. One month later, abdominal CT demonstrated no left renal nor ureteral calculi, as well as a reduction in the left renal sinus cyst. Urinary extravasation sometimes occurs as a complication of acute urinary obstruction. However, extravasation into a cyst is very rare. We have found only one case reported in the literature, so far.

  5. Decellularized Tooth Bud Scaffolds for Tooth Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Vazquez, B; Oreadi, D; Yelick, P C

    2017-01-01

    Whole tooth regeneration approaches currently are limited by our inability to bioengineer full-sized, living replacement teeth. Recently, decellularized organ scaffolds have shown promise for applications in regenerative medicine by providing a natural extracellular matrix environment that promotes cell attachment and tissue-specific differentiation leading to full-sized organ regeneration. We hypothesize that decellularized tooth buds (dTBs) created from unerupted porcine tooth buds (TBs) can be used to guide reseeded dental cell differentiation to form whole bioengineered teeth, thereby providing a potential off-the-shelf scaffold for whole tooth regeneration. Porcine TBs were harvested from discarded 6-mo-old pig jaws, and decellularized by successive sodium dodecyl sulfate/Triton-X cycles. Four types of replicate implants were used in this study: 1) acellular dTBs; 2) recellularized dTBs seeded with porcine dental epithelial cells, human dental pulp cells, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (recell-dTBs); 3) dTBs seeded with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 (dTB-BMPs); and 4) freshly isolated nondecellularized natural TBs (nTBs). Replicate samples were implanted into the mandibles of host Yucatan mini-pigs and grown for 3 or 6 mo. Harvested mandibles with implanted TB constructs were fixed in formalin, decalcified, embedded in paraffin, sectioned, and analyzed via histological methods. Micro-computed tomography (CT) analysis was performed on harvested 6-mo samples prior to decalcification. All harvested constructs exhibited a high degree of cellularity. Significant production of organized dentin and enamel-like tissues was observed in dTB-recell and nTB implants, but not in dTB or dTB-BMP implants. Micro-CT analyses of 6-mo implants showed the formation of organized, bioengineered teeth of comparable size to natural teeth. To our knowledge, these results are the first to describe the potential use of dTBs for functional whole tooth regeneration.

  6. Measuring mitotic spindle dynamics in budding yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, Kemp

    In order to carry out its life cycle and produce viable progeny through cell division, a cell must successfully coordinate and execute a number of complex processes with high fidelity, in an environment dominated by thermal noise. One important example of such a process is the assembly and positioning of the mitotic spindle prior to chromosome segregation. The mitotic spindle is a modular structure composed of two spindle pole bodies, separated in space and spanned by filamentous proteins called microtubules, along which the genetic material of the cell is held. The spindle is responsible for alignment and subsequent segregation of chromosomes into two equal parts; proper spindle positioning and timing ensure that genetic material is appropriately divided amongst mother and daughter cells. In this thesis, I describe fluorescence confocal microscopy and automated image analysis algorithms, which I have used to observe and analyze the real space dynamics of the mitotic spindle in budding yeast. The software can locate structures in three spatial dimensions and track their movement in time. By selecting fluorescent proteins which specifically label the spindle poles and cell periphery, mitotic spindle dynamics have been measured in a coordinate system relevant to the cell division. I describe how I have characterised the accuracy and precision of the algorithms by simulating fluorescence data for both spindle poles and the budding yeast cell surface. In this thesis I also describe the construction of a microfluidic apparatus that allows for the measurement of long time-scale dynamics of individual cells and the development of a cell population. The tools developed in this thesis work will facilitate in-depth quantitative analysis of the non-equilibrium processes in living cells.

  7. The mother-bud neck as a signaling platform for the coordination between spindle position and cytokinesis in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Merlini, Laura; Piatti, Simonetta

    2011-08-01

    During asymmetric cell division, spindle positioning is critical for ensuring the unequal inheritance of polarity factors. In budding yeast, the mother-bud neck determines the cleavage plane and a correct nuclear division between mother and daughter cell requires orientation of the mitotic spindle along the mother-bud axis. A surveillance device called the spindle position/orientation checkpoint (SPOC) oversees this process and delays mitotic exit and cytokinesis until the spindle is properly oriented along the division axis, thus ensuring genome stability. Cytoskeletal proteins called septins form a ring at the bud neck that is essential for cytokinesis. Furthermore, septins and septin-associated proteins are implicated in spindle positioning and SPOC. In this review, we discuss the emerging connections between septins and the SPOC and the role of the mother-bud neck as a signaling platform to couple proper chromosome segregation to cytokinesis.

  8. Factors predicting success of emergency extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (eESWL) in ureteric calculi--a single centre experience from the United Kingdom (UK).

    PubMed

    Panah, A; Patel, S; Bourdoumis, A; Kachrilas, S; Buchholz, N; Masood, J

    2013-10-01

    Few studies show that "emergency extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (eESWL)" reduces the incidence of ureteroscopy in patients with ureteric calculi. We assess success of eESWL and look to study and identify factors which predict successful outcome. We retrospectively studied patients presenting with their first episode of ureteric colic undergoing eESWL (within 72 h of presentation) over a 5-year period. Patient's age, gender, stone size and location, time between presentation and ESWL, number of shock waves and ESWL sessions, and Hounsfield units (HU) were recorded. 97 patients (mean age 40 years; 76 males, 21 females) were included. 71 patients were stone free after eESWL (73.2 %) (group 1) and 26 patients failed treatment and proceeded to ureteroscopy (group 2). The two groups were well matched for age and gender. Mean stone size in group 1 and 2 was 6.4 mm and 7.7 mm, respectively, (p = 0.00141). Stone location was 34, 21, and 16 in upper, middle and lower ureter in group 1 compared to 11, 5, and 10 in group 2, respectively. Mean HU in group 1 was 480 and 612 in group 2 (p value 0.0036). In group 2, significantly, more patients received treatment after 24 h compared with group 1 (38 vs 22.5 %). The number of shock waves, maximal intensity, and ESWL sessions were not significantly different in the two groups. No complications were noted. eESWL is safe and effective in patients with ureteric colic. Stone size and Hounsfield units are important factors in predicting success. Early treatment (≤24 h) minimizes stone impaction and increases the success rate of ESWL.

  9. Laparoscopy for ureteral endometriosis: surgical details, long-term follow-up, and fertility outcomes.

    PubMed

    Uccella, Stefano; Cromi, Antonella; Casarin, Jvan; Bogani, Giorgio; Pinelli, Ciro; Serati, Maurizio; Ghezzi, Fabio

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate perioperative details, long-term outcomes, and postsurgical fertility in case of laparoscopic ureterolysis for deep endometriosis. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. Academic research center. One hundred nine consecutive women who underwent laparoscopic ureterolysis for deep endometriosis. Laparoscopic excision of ureteral endometriosis (ureteral shaving was attempted in all cases). Perioperative details, long-term outcomes, fertility rates, and need for secondary surgery, stratifying on presence/absence of hydronephrosis. Predictors of longer operative time, pain recurrence, and fertility were also investigated. No conversion to open surgery was necessary. Intraoperative ureteral injury occurred in one case (0.9%). Nine women (8.3%) underwent ureteral stenting. Eight cases (7.3%) of mild postoperative complications were registered; no case of severe complications or postoperative ureteral fistula occurred. An increase was observed in the risk of short-/long-term adverse outcomes, according to the grade of preoperative hydronephrosis. Of the 80 women with available follow-up data, secondary ureteral procedures were necessary in 5 women (6.3%), whereas 22 patients (27.5%) had recurrence of endometriosis symptoms. Among the 36 women who wished to conceive, a total of 26 pregnancies were registered in 20 women (55.6%). The miscarriage rate was 15.6%. Hydronephrosis grade≥2 was independently associated with longer operative time and higher rate of symptoms recurrence. Adjuvant hormonal therapy after ureterolysis was the only independent factor associated with lower fertility rates. Laparoscopic ureterolysis is a safe procedure, with encouraging pregnancy rates and satisfactory long-term results. However, hydronephrosis grade≥2 is associated with worse outcomes. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Innovation in Robotics and Pediatric Urology: Robotic Ureteroureterostomy for Duplex Systems with Ureteral Ectopia.

    PubMed

    Biles, Michael J; Finkelstein, Julia B; Silva, Mark V; Lambert, Sarah M; Casale, Pasquale

    2016-10-01

    Robotic technology has been increasingly utilized for complicated reconstructive surgeries in pediatric urology, such as ureteroureterostomy (UU). The literature is limited regarding the performance of minimally invasive UU in children, and the existing published series utilize indwelling ureteral stents. We sought to report on our pediatric experience with robot-assisted laparoscopic (RAL)-UU using a temporary ureteral catheter in duplex systems with ureteral ectopia. A retrospective chart review was performed of all pediatric patients who underwent RAL-UU at a single institution over a 2-year period. An externalized ureteral catheter was kept overnight and removed with the indwelling catheter on postoperative day 1. Intraoperative as well as postoperative complications, length of stay (LOS), and analgesia were recorded. Follow-up renal ultrasound (US) and evaluation for symptom resolution were completed 3 months postoperatively. Twelve patients (four male, eight female) underwent RAL-UU at a mean age of 19.4 months (range 9-48 months) during the study period. The majority of patients (83.3%) presented with hydronephrosis, and all were found to have duplicated systems with ureteral ectopia. No child had ipsilateral vesicoureteral reflux. Two children had bilateral duplicated systems, one of which required bilateral surgery. Median operative time was 138 minutes (IQR 119-180 minutes), and mean estimated blood loss was 1.5 mL. There were no intraoperative complications, and no case required open conversion. Median hospital LOS was 31 hours (IQR 30-39 hours). Median follow-up time was 11 months (range 3-22 months). One patient developed a postoperative febrile upper respiratory infection. All patients had improved hydroureteronephrosis on US at 3 months postoperatively. One patient with preoperative urinary incontinence was dry postoperatively. Therefore, the overall success rate was 100%. Our institutional results demonstrate that RAL-UU utilizing a temporary

  11. Functional aspects of silent ureteral stones investigated with MAG-3 renal scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To investigate functional aspects of silent ureteral stones with special focus on obstruction and its relationship to renal anatomy. The present study is the first investigation of renal excretory function in patients with silent ureteral stones. Methods Patients with primarily asymptomatic ureteral stones underwent a mercapto-acetyltriglycine (MAG-3) renal scintigraphy prior to treatment, in addition to anatomic evaluation of renal units and serum creatinine levels. The primary outcome measure was the presence or absence of obstruction. Secondary outcome measures were kidney anatomy, grade of hydronephrosis, location of stones, stone size, and serum creatinine levels. Results During a ten-year period, 14 patients (median age 52.6 years; range 37.3 to 80.7 years) were included in the study. The relative frequency of primarily asymptomatic ureteral stones among all patients treated for ureteral stones in the study period was 0.7%. Eleven renal units showed some degree of hydronephrosis while 3 kidneys were not dilated. On the MAG-3 scan, 7 patients had an obstruction of the ureter, 5 had no obstruction, and 2 had dysfunction of the kidney. A statistically significant correlation was established between the grade of obstruction and stone size (p = 0.02). Conclusions At the time of presentation, only 64.3% of the patients revealed an obstruction in the stone-bearing renal unit. The degree of hydronephrosis and renal function were very diverse in this subgroup of patients with ureteral stones. The onset of ureterolithiasis and the chronological sequence of obstruction remain unclear in patients who have never experienced symptoms due to their stones. PMID:24397735

  12. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic ureteral reimplantation with psoas hitch: a multi-institutional, multinational evaluation.

    PubMed

    Patil, Nilesh N; Mottrie, Alexandre; Sundaram, Bala; Patel, Vipul R

    2008-07-01

    To report the collective experience of three multinational institutions with the use of robotics to evaluate and treat complex distal ureteral obstruction. A total of 12 patients from The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio; Onze-Lieve-Vrouw Ziekenhuis, Aalst, Belgium; and Hospital Sultanah Aminah, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia underwent robotic-assisted laparoscopic ureteral reimplantation between August 2004 and July 2006. The indications for ureteral reimplantation included ureteral stricture (n = 10) and ureterovaginal fistula (n = 2). Nine patients had pathology on the left side and 4 patients had right-sided disease. Surgery was performed by three experienced laparoscopic robotic surgeons with the daVinci Surgical System. The mean patient age (range) was 41.3 years (19 to 67 years). The mean operative time was 208 minutes (80 to 360 minutes). The mean robot time was 173 minutes (75 to 300 minutes). The mean estimated blood loss was 48 mL (45 to 100 minutes). The mean length of hospitalization was 4.3 days (2 to 8 days). All the procedures were completed successfully robotically without open conversion. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. Postoperative intravenous urography and Mercapto Acetyl TriGlycine 3 showed normal findings in 10 patients and a mild residual hydronephrosis in 2 patients. After a mean follow-up of 15.5 months, all patients were asymptomatic of their initial disease state. This multi-institutional, multinational experience illustrates that ureteral reimplantation with psoas hitch can be performed safely and effectively to treat lower tract ureteral obstruction.

  13. PA03.12. Role of stonvil capsule with varunadi kwath in renal & ureteric calculi

    PubMed Central

    Khandare, Dnyaneshwar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Now a day's Renal & Ureteric calculi is very common problem in our society. In this patient experiences so much Renal pain, Ureteric colic, Haematuria, Recurrent UTI & they disturbed his daily routine work. Modern Medicines have limitations to treat it & advised Surgery to many patients. A poor & middle class patient was not tolerating surgical expenses. And there were chances of recurrences also. So I thought to use combinations to dissolve renal & Ureteric calculi and cure patients. Method: I had chosen Stonvil Capsule (Phyto Pharma) & Varunadi Kwath. Stonvil Capsule contains multiple ayurvedic drugs. I gave one Stonvil capsule with 10ml Varunadi Kwath three times a day. Before & after treatment I advised USG, Xray. Result: This Clinical study is done on 20 patients in K.G. Mittal Hospital. After starting treatment patient had relieves renal pain, Ureteric colic, Haematuria, Recurrent UTI within 1 to 4 days. Also relieves Burning Micturation & them able to do their daily routine work. This treatment was also effective in gall bladder calculi. After every 3 months advised to do USG. In some patients calculi disappeared (dissolved) after 3 months. But In some patients calculi took 6 months or more periods to dissolve. After dissolved the calculi, 1 month treatment also given for the nonrecurrence. Calculi didn’t recur after treatment. Multiple calculi in two patients also dissolved by this treatment. Conclusion: Over all study the patients cured from renal & Ureteric calculi. Patient had relieved Renal pain, Ureteric colic, Haematuria, Recurrent UTI within 1 to 4 days. Also relieved Burning Micturation. Calculi dissolved & flushed out through urethra & didn’t recur. Calculi disappeared in after treatment USG. Patients having multiple calculi didn’t need surgery.

  14. Urothelial-based reconstructive surgery for upper- and mid-ureteral defects: Long-term results.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, Barak; Mor, Yoram; Erlich, Tomer; Laufer, Menachem; Winkler, Harry; Kaver, Issac; Ramon, Jacob; Dotan, Zohar A

    2016-01-01

    Ureteral strictures can result in obstructive nephropathy and renal function deterioration. Surgical management of ureteral defects, especially in the proximal- and mid-ureter, is particularly challenging. Our purpose was to analyze the long-term outcomes of urothelial-based reconstructive surgery for upper- and mid-ureteral defects. We conducted a retrospective analysis of a single tertiary centre's database, including 149 patients treated for ureteral defects between 2001 and 2011. Thirty-one patients (21%) underwent complex urothelial-based surgical repairs for upper- and mid-ureter defects. Patients' median age was 61 years. The mean length of the ureteral strictures was 2.5 cm, located in upper-, mid-ureter, or in between in 19 (61%), 10 (32%), and two (6%) patients, respectively. All patients were treated with a primary urothelial-based repair. Median followup time was 26 months. The primary outcome of the study was the long-term preservation of renal function and lack of clinical obstruction. The secondary endpoint of the study was the assessment of the intra- and postoperative complication rates. Most of the lesions were benign (22, 71%), while nine strictures (29%) were malignant. Seven patients (23%) suffered from postoperative complications, five of which were infectious. The median pre- and postoperative calculated glomerular filtration rates were 66 ml/min/1.72m(2) and 64ml/min/1.72m(2), respectively. Success rate was 84%, defined as lack of need for re-operation or kidney drainage at the last followup. Upper- and mid-ureteral defects present a complex pathology necessitating experienced reconstructive surgical skills. Our data suggest good long-term results for primary urothelial-based reconstructions for these pathologies.

  15. Urothelial-based reconstructive surgery for upper- and mid-ureteral defects: Long-term results

    PubMed Central

    Rosenzweig, Barak; Mor, Yoram; Erlich, Tomer; Laufer, Menachem; Winkler, Harry; Kaver, Issac; Ramon, Jacob; Dotan, Zohar A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Ureteral strictures can result in obstructive nephropathy and renal function deterioration. Surgical management of ureteral defects, especially in the proximal- and mid-ureter, is particularly challenging. Our purpose was to analyze the long-term outcomes of urothelial-based reconstructive surgery for upper- and mid-ureteral defects. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of a single tertiary centre’s database, including 149 patients treated for ureteral defects between 2001 and 2011. Thirty-one patients (21%) underwent complex urothelial-based surgical repairs for upper- and mid-ureter defects. Patients’ median age was 61 years. The mean length of the ureteral strictures was 2.5 cm, located in upper-, mid-ureter, or in between in 19 (61%), 10 (32%), and two (6%) patients, respectively. All patients were treated with a primary urothelial-based repair. Median followup time was 26 months. The primary outcome of the study was the long-term preservation of renal function and lack of clinical obstruction. The secondary endpoint of the study was the assessment of the intra- and postoperative complication rates. Results: Most of the lesions were benign (22, 71%), while nine strictures (29%) were malignant. Seven patients (23%) suffered from postoperative complications, five of which were infectious. The median pre- and postoperative calculated glomerular filtration rates were 66 ml/min/1.72m2 and 64ml/min/1.72m2, respectively. Success rate was 84%, defined as lack of need for re-operation or kidney drainage at the last followup. Conclusions: Upper- and mid-ureteral defects present a complex pathology necessitating experienced reconstructive surgical skills. Our data suggest good long-term results for primary urothelial-based reconstructions for these pathologies. PMID:27695582

  16. Matched pair analysis of ureteroscopy vs. shock wave lithotripsy for the treatment of upper ureteric calculi.

    PubMed

    Stewart, G D; Bariol, S V; Moussa, S A; Smith, G; Tolley, D A

    2007-05-01

    There is controversy over whether shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) or ureteroscopy (URS) is the best management of ureteric calculi, especially for stones located in the upper ureter. This study compares URS and SWL management of upper ureteric stones directly for the first time using a different analysis tool, the matched pair analysis study design. This method enables meaningful comparisons to be made on a small number of matched patients, using precise like-for-like matching. Adult patients undergoing primary treatment of solitary radiopaque proximal ureteric stones were identified. Patients with stents, nephrostomies or stones at the pelvi-ureteric junction were excluded. Patients had a minimum of 3 months follow-up. Patients treated by primary URS were matched using four parameters (sex, laterality, stone size and location) to patients treated on a Dornier Compact Delta Lithotriptor. A total of 1479 patients had URS or SWL from which 27 upper ureteric stone matched pairs were identified. Three-month stone free rates were 82% for URS and 89% for SWL (McNemar's test, p=0.625). Re-treatment was required in 11% and 26% following URS and SWL respectively (p=0.219). Forty-one per cent of URS patients required an ancillary treatment, such as stent removal, compared with only 22% of SWL patients (p=0.227). Introduction of a holmium:YAG laser for use with URS improved the stone free rate for URS to 100%. Using a robust like-for-like comparison of similar patients with very similar upper ureteric stones the outcomes following SWL and URS were comparable. Choice of treatment should therefore be based on parameters such as availability of equipment, waiting times and patient preference.

  17. A Statistical-Thermodynamic Model of Viral Budding

    PubMed Central

    Tzlil, Shelly; Deserno, Markus; Gelbart, William M.; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam

    2004-01-01

    We present a simple statistical thermodynamic model for budding of viral nucleocapsids at the cell membrane. The membrane is modeled as a flexible lipid bilayer embedding linker (spike) proteins, which serve to anchor and thus wrap the membrane around the viral capsids. The free energy of a single bud is expressed as a sum of the bending energy of its membrane coat, the spike-mediated capsid-membrane adhesion energy, and the line energy associated with the bud's rim, all depending on the extent of wrapping (i.e., bud size), and density of spikes in the curved membrane. This self-energy is incorporated into a simple free energy functional for the many-bud system, allowing for different spike densities, and hence entropy, in the curved (budding) and planar membrane regions, as well as for the configurational entropy of the polydisperse bud population. The equilibrium spike densities in the coexisting, curved and planar, membrane regions are calculated as a function of the membrane bending energy and the spike-mediated adhesion energy, for different spike and nucleocapsid concentrations in the membrane plane, as well as for several values of the bud's rim energy. We show that complete budding (full wrapping of nucleocapsids) can only take place if the adhesion energy exceeds a certain, critical, bending free energy. Whenever budding takes place, the spike density in the mature virions is saturated, i.e., all spike adhesion sites are occupied. The rim energy plays an important role in determining the size distribution of buds. The fraction of fully wrapped buds increases as this energy increases, resulting eventually in an all-or-nothing mechanism, whereby nucleocapsids at the plasma membrane are either fully enveloped or completely naked (just touching the membrane). We also find that at low concentrations all capsids arriving at the membrane get tightly and fully enveloped. Beyond a certain concentration, corresponding approximately to a stoichiometric spike

  18. Transcriptome analysis of chestnut (Castanea sativa) tree buds suggests a putative role for epigenetic control of bud dormancy.

    PubMed

    Santamaría, María Estrella; Rodríguez, Roberto; Cañal, María Jesús; Toorop, Peter E

    2011-09-01

    Recent papers indicated that epigenetic control is involved in transitions in bud dormancy, purportedly controlling gene expression. The present study aimed to identify genes that are differentially expressed in dormant and non-dormant Castanea sativa buds. Two suppression subtractive hybridization cDNA libraries were constructed to characterize the transcriptomes of dormant apical buds of C. sativa, and buds in which dormancy was released. A total of 512 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were generated in a forward and reverse subtractive hybridization experiment. Classification of these ESTs into functional groups demonstrated that dormant buds were predominantly characterized by genes associated with stress response, while non-dormant buds were characterized by genes associated with energy, protein synthesis and cellular components for development and growth. ESTs for a few genes involved in different forms of epigenetic modification were found in both libraries, suggesting a role for epigenetic control in bud dormancy different from that in growth. Genes encoding histone mono-ubiquitinase HUB2 and histone acetyltransferase GCN5L were associated with dormancy, while a gene encoding histone H3 kinase AUR3 was associated with growth. Real-time RT-PCR with a selection of genes involved in epigenetic modification and stress tolerance confirmed the expression of the majority of investigated genes in various stages of bud development, revealing a cyclical expression pattern concurring with the growth seasons for most genes. However, senescing leaves also showed an increased expression of several of the genes associated with dormancy, implying pleiotropy. Furthermore, a comparison between these subtraction cDNA libraries and the poplar bud dormancy transcriptome and arabidopsis transcriptomes for seed dormancy and non-dormancy indicated a common basis for dormancy in all three systems. Bud dormancy and non-dormancy in C. sativa were characterized by distinct sets of genes

  19. Anuria Secondary to Bilateral Obstructing Ureteral Stones in the Absence of Renal Colic

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Christopher; Altamar, Hernan O.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Obstructing ureteral stones are a rare cause of anuria, which is typically from prerenal or renal etiologies. Classically, obstructive stones cause moderate to severe renal colic. Urolithiasis is rarely considered during evaluation of painless anuria. Case Presentation: We present an unusual case of a 73-year-old Caucasian female who presented with anuria and was found to have large bilateral obstructing ureteral stones in the absence of renal colic. Conclusion: Given that patients with obstructive anuria can be asymptomatic, urolithiasis should be considered in all patients presenting with anuria. PMID:27579429

  20. Ureterocalycostomy - final resort in the management of secondary pelvi-ureteric junction obstruction: our experience.

    PubMed

    Gite, Venkat A; Siddiqui, Ayub Karam Nabi; Bote, Sachin M; Patil, Saurabh Ramesh; Kandi, Anita J; Nikose, Jayant V

    2016-01-01

    Ureterocalycostomy can be performed in patients in whom desired methods of treating secondary PUJ (Pelvi-Ureteric Junction) obstructions either failed or could not be used. In our study, one child and two adults in whom one redo-ureterocalycostomy and two ureterocalycostomies were performed for severely scarred PUJ. The causes for secondary PUJ obstruction were post-pyelolithotomy in one case, post-pyeloplasty and ureterocalycostomy for PUJ obstruction in the second patient and the third patient had long upper ureteric stricture post-ureteropyeloplasty due to tuberculosis. In all these cases ureterocalycostomy proved to be salvage/final resort for preserving functional renal unit.

  1. Multimodality imaging of primary ureteral hemangiosarcoma with thoracic metastasis in an adult dog.

    PubMed

    Troiano, Daniele; Zarelli, Micaela

    2017-07-27

    A 12-year-old spayed female standard Poodle was presented for investigation of severe hematuria. Abdominal ultrasound and thoracic and abdominal computed tomography identified severe hydronephrosis due to an obstructive ureteral mass with no evidence of metastasis. Histological examination after nephrectomy and ureterectomy confirmed an obstructive ureteral hemangiosarcoma. Forty days after surgery, the dog was presented with severe dyspnea. Survey radiographs of the thorax revealed a severe diffuse nodular interstitial pattern. Postmortem histological examination revealed pulmonary metastasis of hemangiosarcoma. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  2. Ureteral fibroepithelial polyp associated with urolithiasis induced by steroid therapy in a child: a case report.

    PubMed

    Taki, T; Matuura, O; Isobe, Y; Kamihira, O; Yamada, S; Kondo, A; Yamada, Y; Honda, N

    2001-08-01

    A 14-year-old boy complained of left flank pain. He had been given high-dose corticosteroid therapy for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Retrograde pyelography revealed irregular defects at the left ureteropelvic junction (UPJ), and ureteroscopy demonstrated ureteral polyp. The polyp was removed and histologically diagnosed as fibroepithelial polyp. Hypercalciuria due to the corticosteroids and bedridden was assumed to have been a causative factor in the stone formation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a ureteral fibroepithelial polyp in children associated with urolithiasis, and associated with CIDP.

  3. A rare cause of massive haematuria: Internal iliac artery-ureteric fistula.

    PubMed

    Rao, Ahsan M; Khalil, Ahmed; Suttie, Stuart

    2015-04-01

    Ureteric fistula into the arterial tree is a well-recognised, but uncommon condition. The involvement of internal iliac artery is rare. We present a rare case of fistulous communication and subsequent infection of an internal iliac artery aneurysm and ureter secondary to insertion of ureteric stent following endovascular exclusion of the aneurysm and its management. Nephrostogram identified the fistula not seen on computerised tomography. This case highlights the awareness of such pathology allowing for prompt recognition of the condition and importance of appropriate imaging.

  4. Evaluation of ureteral jet dynamics in pediatric kidney stone formers: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Celik, S; Bozkurt, O; Altay, C; Celebi Celik, F; Uz, G; Soylu, A; Kefi, A; Kavukcu, S; Secil, M; Demir, O

    2016-12-01

    The risk of kidney stone formation increases with urinary stasis, which is associated with decreased peristaltism. The relationship between nonobstructive kidney stone formation and ureteral jet dynamics, which can be measured with Doppler ultrasonography (US) and provide information about ureteral peristaltism, has been demonstrated in adults. To investigate the relationship between ureteral jet dynamics, which provide information about ureteral peristaltism, and stone formation in children. Children admitted to Dokuz Eylul University Hospital with flank pain, and asymptomatic age-matched children for the control group, were prospectively enrolled and underwent Doppler US for diagnostic reasons and bilateral ureteral jet flow measurements. Children diagnosed with unilateral nonobstructive lower pole kidney stones formed Group 1, and the control group, without any evidence of stone disease, formed Group 2. Ureteral jet dynamics were compared between the affected renal units in Group 1, and healthy renal units in Group 1 and Group 2. A total of 32 children were included for each group. The mean average jet flow-rate (JETave (cm/second)) in affected renal units in Group 1 was found to be significantly lower than in the healthy renal units in Group 1 and left and right healthy renal units in Group 2 (P < 0.05). The continuous JETpattern rate in affected renal units in Group 1 was found to be significantly higher compared with healthy renal units in Groups 1 and 2 (P = 0.012) (Table). The odds ratio for kidney stone formation was 5.6 for renal units with JETave <9.5 cm/s when compared with renal units with JETave ≥9.5 cm/s. In a recent study, it was demonstrated in adults that low ureteral jet flow-rate and continuous JETpattern were significantly higher in affected renal units. The findings in children were also similar to adults: the mean JETave was significantly lower and determination rate of continuous flow pattern was significantly higher in affected

  5. Diagnosis of ureteral obstruction in patients with compromised renal function: the role of noninvasive imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Shokeir, Ahmed A; El-Diasty, Tarek; Eassa, Waleed; Mosbah, Ahmed; El-Ghar, Mohamed Abou; Mansour, Osama; Dawaba, Mohamed; El-Kappany, Hamdy

    2004-06-01

    We compared the role of noncontrast computerized tomography (NCCT), magnetic resonance urography (MRU), and combined abdominal radiography (KUB) and ultrasonography (US) in the diagnosis of the cause of ureteral obstruction in patients with compromised renal function. The study included 149 patients, of whom 110 had bilateral obstruction and 39 had obstruction of a solitary kidney. Therefore, the total number of renal units was 259. All patients had renal impairment with serum creatinine greater than 2.5 mg/dl. Besides conventional KUB and US all patients underwent NCCT and MRU. The gold standard for diagnosis of the cause of obstruction included retrograde or antegrade ureterogram, ureteroscopy and/or open surgery. The sensitivity, specificity and overall accuracy of NCCT, MRU, and combined KUB and US in the diagnosis of ureteral obstruction were calculated in comparison with the gold standard. The definitive cause of ureteral obstruction was calculous in 146 and noncalculous in 113 renal units, including ureteral stricture in 65, bladder or ureter in 43, extraurinary collection in 3 and retroperitoneal fibrosis in 2. The site of stone impaction was identified by NCCT in all 146 renal units (100% sensitivity), by MRU in 101 (69.2% sensitivity), and by combined KUB and US in 115 (78.7% sensitivity) with a difference of significant value in favor of NCCT (p <0.001). Ureteral strictures were identified by NCCT in 18 of the 65 cases (28%) and by MRU in 54 of 65 (83%). Bladder and ureteral tumors causing ureteral obstruction could be diagnosed in approximately half of the patients by NCCT (22 of 43) and in all except 1 by MRU (42 of 43). NCCT and MRU could identify all extraurinary causes of obstruction. Overall of the 113 kidneys with noncalculous obstruction the cause could be identified by MRU in 101 (89% sensitivity), by NCCT in 45 (40% sensitivity), and by combined KUB and US in only 20 (18% sensitivity) with a difference of significant value in favor of MRU (p <0

  6. A rare cause of anuria: Bilateral synchronous isolated mid-ureteric tubercular lesions

    PubMed Central

    Dangi, Anuj D.; Kodiatte, Thomas Alex; Kumar, Santosh; Kekre, Nitin S.

    2015-01-01

    A young female presenting with right flank pain, fever, raised creatinine and bilateral hydronephrosis was treated with antibiotics elsewhere, with presumptive diagnosis of bilateral pyelonephritis. She had partial relief in symptoms and her creatinine level showed an improvement. Three months later during evaluation at our center she had anuria, hypertensive crisis and pulmonary edema which were managed with emergency bilateral percutaneous nephrostomies. Cross-sectional imaging and ureteroscopy suggested bilateral synchronous intramural mid-ureteric lesions as underlying pathology. Histopathology of the ureteric segments during laparotomy revealed caseating granulomas suggestive of tuberculosis. This clinical presentation has not been previously described in urinary tuberculosis. PMID:26604451

  7. Uterine Artery Embolization for Ureteric Obstruction Secondary to Fibroids

    SciTech Connect

    Mirsadraee, Saeed; Tuite, David; Nicholson, Anthony

    2008-11-15

    This case series examines the safety and efficacy of uterine artery embolization (UAE) in the treatment of obstructive nephropathy caused by large fibroids. Between 2004 and 2007, 10 patients referred with symptomatic uterine fibroids that were found to be causing either unilateral (7 patients) or bilateral (3 patients) hydronephrosis were treated by UAE. Presenting complaints included menorrhagia, dysmenorrhea, bulk symptoms, loin pain, postobstructive atrophy, and mild renal impairment. All had posterior intramural dominant fibroids >11 cm in maximum sagittal diameter and uterine volumes between 3776 and 15,625 ml. Outcome measures at between 12 and 36 months included procedural success, repeat intervention, relief of symptoms, resolution of hydronephrosis, stable renal function and size, and avoidance of hysterectomy. In all cases the cause of renal obstruction was confirmed to be a giant fibroid compressing the ureter at the pelvic brim. In all cases UAE was technically successful, though two patients required a repeat procedure. In eight patients hydronephrosis resolved and the obstruction was relieved, though two still had some bulk symptoms not requiring further treatment. Renal function improved or was stable in all cases. Renal size was stable in all cases. Where menorrhagia was part of the symptom complex it was relieved in all cases. Two patients diagnosed as having postobstructive atrophy of one kidney underwent retrograde ureteric stenting on the nonatrophied side prior to UAE. This was unsuccessful in one of the cases due to the distortion caused by the fibroid. Despite improvement in hydronephrosis this patient underwent hysterectomy at 7 months after a renogram demonstrated persistent obstruction at the pelvic brim. In the second patient a double pigtail stent was inserted with difficulty and eventually removed at 8 months. This patient has had stable renal function and size for 3 years post-UAE. We conclude that UAE is safe and effective in

  8. Next generation biodegradable ureteral stent in a yucatan pig model.

    PubMed

    Chew, Ben H; Lange, Dirk; Paterson, Ryan F; Hendlin, Kari; Monga, Manoj; Clinkscales, Kenneth W; Shalaby, Shalaby W; Hadaschik, Boris A

    2010-02-01

    Ureteral stents are commonly used to facilitate kidney drainage but they may produce significant stent symptoms and morbidity, and require a secondary procedure for removal. Previous biodegradable stents showed bio-incompatibility or inconsistent degradation, requiring extra procedures to remove undegraded stent fragments. We previously reported a first generation biodegradable stent composed of suture-like material that required placement through the lumen of a sheath and degraded by 10 weeks. We now report second and third generation biodegradable stents that degrade more rapidly and can be placed directly over a polytetrafluoroethylene guidewire. Two groups of 16 Yucatan pigs each were unilaterally stented endoscopically with a control nondegradable (biostable) stent or a second generation degradable Uriprene stent. Blood studies, renal ultrasound and excretory urography were done throughout the study to determine renal function, hydronephrosis and stent degradation. Genitourinary organs were harvested at necropsy for pathological analysis. A third generation stent designed to improve degradation time was bilaterally implanted endoscopically into 4 Yorkshire Farm pigs (total of 8 stents), followed by excretory urography weekly to assess degradation and kidney function. Biomaterial parameters were tested. Second generation stents began degrading at 2 weeks and were completely degraded by 10 weeks. All third generation stents were degraded by 4 weeks. Hydronephrosis was considerably less in the Uriprene group than in control biostable stented kidneys. Biostable stented ureters showed an average higher degree of inflammation, uropathy and nephropathy. Physical characteristics indicate that Uriprene stents are significantly more resistant to stent compression and have markedly higher tensile strength and coil strength comparable to that of other commercially available plastic stents. Our study confirms that Uriprene stents are biocompatible and provide good renal

  9. MEDICAL EXPULSIVE TREATMENT OF DISTAL URETERAL STONE USING TAMSULOSIN.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Hussain; Azim, Waqar; Akmal, Muhammad; Murtaza, Badar; Mahmood, Arshad; Nadim, Amir; Shahzad, Khubaib

    2015-01-01

    Many minimally invasive interventional techniques as well as expectant treatment exist for the management of lower ureteric calculi. This study was conducted to evaluate th efficacy of tamsulosin as an expulsive pharmacologic therapy for the treatment of distal uretern stone. This randomized control trial included 100 patients over 18 years of age wit stone Size > or = mm in distal 1/3 of ureter. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups (A & B Group A Patients were given Capsule Tamsulosin 0.4 mg, 1 daily up to 4 weeks while group B patients were given placebo, 1 Capsule daily up to 4 weeks. The primary endpoint was expulsio rate. A written informed consent was taken from all the patients. Expulsion time, need for analgesics, need for hospitalization and drug side effects were secondary endpoints. A total of 49 patients in group A and 48 patients in group B reported back, therefore 97 out of 10 patients were evaluated. Mean age of the patients was 36.34 years (range 18-57 years). Mea stone size was 5.78 mm (range 4-8 mm) in greatest dimension. A stone expulsion rate of 85.71C (42 patients) was noted in group A and 54.20% (26 patients) in group B. Group A revealed statistically significant advantage in term of stone expulsion rate (p=0.032). Considering expulsio time in days group A showed statistically significant advantage (p=0.015). Regarding age, se) stone size and stone lateralization (right/left), there was no significant difference between th group A and B. No drug side effects were noted in both the groups. By usin tamsulosin a higher stone expulsion rates can be achieved in a shorter time. More randomize control trials are required to establish tamsulosin as a standard medical expulsive treatment fc

  10. Ureteral stent placement and BK viremia in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Kayler, L; Zendejas, I; Schain, D; Magliocca, J

    2013-04-01

    BK virus (BKV) infection is an important cause of kidney transplant dysfunction. A possible association of double-J ureteral stent placement and BK viremia has been suggested in previous studies; however, risk factors for BK are incompletely understood. We aimed to determine if stent placement is an independent risk factor for BK viremia. Data were collected on consecutive kidney-only transplant recipients between December 1, 2006 and June 30, 2010. All patients had at least 12 months of follow-up. Of 600 consecutive kidney transplants, BK viremia within the first post-transplant year was detected in 93 patients (15.5%); in 70 of these cases, the peak BKV polymerase chain reaction was ≥10,000 copies/mL. By multivariate analysis, significant risk factors for BK viremia were recipient age (P = 0.02) and stent placement (P = 0.03). Stents were placed in 49.2% and removed at a median of 46 days (range: 11-284) post transplantation; removals occurred within 0-30, 30-60, 60-90, 90-120, 120-150, and >150 days post transplantation in 18.4%, 67.2%, 10.5%, 2.4%, 1.0%, and 0.3% of cases, respectively. No association was found of BK viremia with stent duration >46 days (P = 0.70) or by the 6-level groupings (P = 0.92). Although we observed a significant association of BK viremia with stent placement, no dose-dependent effect was seen. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Taste bud homeostasis in health, disease, and aging.

    PubMed

    Feng, Pu; Huang, Liquan; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian taste bud is an onion-shaped epithelial structure with 50-100 tightly packed cells, including taste receptor cells, supporting cells, and basal cells. Taste receptor cells detect nutrients and toxins in the oral cavity and transmit the sensory information to gustatory nerve endings in the buds. Supporting cells may play a role in the clearance of excess neurotransmitters after their release from taste receptor cells. Basal cells are precursor cells that differentiate into mature taste cells. Similar to other epithelial cells, taste cells turn over continuously, with an average life span of about 8-12 days. To maintain structural homeostasis in taste buds, new cells are generated to replace dying cells. Several recent studies using genetic lineage tracing methods have identified populations of progenitor/stem cells for taste buds, although contributions of these progenitor/stem cell populations to taste bud homeostasis have yet to be fully determined. Some regulatory factors of taste cell differentiation and degeneration have been identified, but our understanding of these aspects of taste bud homoeostasis remains limited. Many patients with various diseases develop taste disorders, including taste loss and taste distortion. Decline in taste function also occurs during aging. Recent studies suggest that disruption or alteration of taste bud homeostasis may contribute to taste dysfunction associated with disease and aging.

  12. Alterations of membrane curvature during influenza virus budding.

    PubMed

    Martyna, Agnieszka; Rossman, Jeremy

    2014-10-01

    Influenza A virus belongs to the Orthomyxoviridae family. It is an enveloped virus that contains a segmented and negative-sense RNA genome. Influenza A viruses cause annual epidemics and occasional major pandemics, are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and have a significant financial impact on society. Assembly and budding of new viral particles are a complex and multi-step process involving several host and viral factors. Influenza viruses use lipid raft domains in the apical plasma membrane of polarized epithelial cells as sites of budding. Two viral glycoproteins, haemagglutinin and neuraminidase, concentrate in lipid rafts, causing alterations in membrane curvature and initiation of the budding process. Matrix protein 1 (M1), which forms the inner structure of the virion, is then recruited to the site followed by incorporation of the viral ribonucleoproteins and matrix protein 2 (M2). M1 can alter membrane curvature and progress budding, whereas lipid raft-associated M2 stabilizes the site of budding, allowing for proper assembly of the virion. In the later stages of budding, M2 is localized to the neck of the budding virion at the lipid phase boundary, where it causes negative membrane curvature, leading to scission and virion release.

  13. A permeability barrier surrounds taste buds in lingual epithelia.

    PubMed

    Dando, Robin; Pereira, Elizabeth; Kurian, Mani; Barro-Soria, Rene; Chaudhari, Nirupa; Roper, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial tissues are characterized by specialized cell-cell junctions, typically localized to the apical regions of cells. These junctions are formed by interacting membrane proteins and by cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix components. Within the lingual epithelium, tight junctions join the apical tips of the gustatory sensory cells in taste buds. These junctions constitute a selective barrier that limits penetration of chemosensory stimuli into taste buds (Michlig et al. J Comp Neurol 502: 1003-1011, 2007). We tested the ability of chemical compounds to permeate into sensory end organs in the lingual epithelium. Our findings reveal a robust barrier that surrounds the entire body of taste buds, not limited to the apical tight junctions. This barrier prevents penetration of many, but not all, compounds, whether they are applied topically, injected into the parenchyma of the tongue, or circulating in the blood supply, into taste buds. Enzymatic treatments indicate that this barrier likely includes glycosaminoglycans, as it was disrupted by chondroitinase but, less effectively, by proteases. The barrier surrounding taste buds could also be disrupted by brief treatment of lingual tissue samples with DMSO. Brief exposure of lingual slices to DMSO did not affect the ability of taste buds within the slice to respond to chemical stimulation. The existence of a highly impermeable barrier surrounding taste buds and methods to break through this barrier may be relevant to basic research and to clinical treatments of taste.

  14. Taste Bud Homeostasis in Health, Disease, and Aging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian taste bud is an onion-shaped epithelial structure with 50–100 tightly packed cells, including taste receptor cells, supporting cells, and basal cells. Taste receptor cells detect nutrients and toxins in the oral cavity and transmit the sensory information to gustatory nerve endings in the buds. Supporting cells may play a role in the clearance of excess neurotransmitters after their release from taste receptor cells. Basal cells are precursor cells that differentiate into mature taste cells. Similar to other epithelial cells, taste cells turn over continuously, with an average life span of about 8–12 days. To maintain structural homeostasis in taste buds, new cells are generated to replace dying cells. Several recent studies using genetic lineage tracing methods have identified populations of progenitor/stem cells for taste buds, although contributions of these progenitor/stem cell populations to taste bud homeostasis have yet to be fully determined. Some regulatory factors of taste cell differentiation and degeneration have been identified, but our understanding of these aspects of taste bud homoeostasis remains limited. Many patients with various diseases develop taste disorders, including taste loss and taste distortion. Decline in taste function also occurs during aging. Recent studies suggest that disruption or alteration of taste bud homeostasis may contribute to taste dysfunction associated with disease and aging. PMID:24287552

  15. A permeability barrier surrounds taste buds in lingual epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Dando, Robin; Pereira, Elizabeth; Kurian, Mani; Barro-Soria, Rene; Chaudhari, Nirupa

    2014-01-01