Science.gov

Sample records for early-time optical afterglow

  1. Optical GRB Afterglows Detected with UVOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, F. E.

    2008-05-01

    The automated response of the UltraViolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT) on Swift to new GRBs has several parameters, including exposure time, filter sequence and data mode, that can be adjusted to optimize the science return of early afterglow observations. After some initial changes, the response has remained stable since March 15, 2006. From then through August 10, 2007, UVOT observed 122 of the 130 GRBs detected with Swift's Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). UVOT typically takes an initial 100-s exposure with the White filter (160-650 nm) starting 60-180 s after the trigger and then takes exposures with the other 6 filters. In its first finding chart exposure UVOT detected 39% of the 84 long (T90>2.0 s) GRBs that were not heavily reddened in the Milky Way (EB-V<0.5) and were observed within 500 seconds of the trigger. Another 4% were detected after including subsequent exposures. Afterglow magnitudes ranged from 12.8 to the sensitivity limit of ~21. Only 1 of 11 short GRBs were detected, and its magnitude was near the sensitivity limit. We also report correlations of afterglow magnitudes with other GRB properties.

  2. Early optical polarization of a gamma-ray burst afterglow.

    PubMed

    Mundell, Carole G; Steele, Iain A; Smith, Robert J; Kobayashi, Shiho; Melandri, Andrea; Guidorzi, Cristiano; Gomboc, Andreja; Mottram, Chris J; Clarke, David; Monfardini, Alessandro; Carter, David; Bersier, David

    2007-03-30

    We report the optical polarization of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow, obtained 203 seconds after the initial burst of gamma-rays from GRB 060418, using a ring polarimeter on the robotic Liverpool Telescope. Our robust (2sigma) upper limit on the percentage of polarization, less than 8%, coincides with the fireball deceleration time at the onset of the afterglow. The combination of the rate of decay of the optical brightness and the low polarization at this critical time constrains standard models of GRB ejecta, ruling out the presence of a large-scale ordered magnetic field in the emitting region.

  3. Early-time VLA Observations and Broadband Afterglow Analysis of the Fermi/LAT Detected GRB 130907A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, Péter; Corsi, Alessandra; Frail, Dale A.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Perley, Daniel A.

    2015-09-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of the hyper-energetic gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130907A, a Swift-discovered burst with early radio observations starting at ≈4 hr after the γ-ray trigger. GRB 130907A was also detected by the Fermi/LAT instrument and at late times showed a strong spectral evolution in X-rays. We focus on the early-time radio observations, especially at >10 GHz, to attempt to identify reverse shock signatures. While our radio follow-up of GRB 130907A ranks among the earliest observations of a GRB with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, we did not see an unambiguous signature of a reverse shock. While a model with both reverse and forward shock can correctly describe the observations, the data is not constraining enough to decide upon the presence of the reverse-shock component. We model the broadband data using a simple forward-shock synchrotron scenario with a transition from a wind environment to a constant density interstellar medium (ISM) in order to account for the observed features. Within the confines of this model, we also derive the underlying physical parameters of the fireball, which are within typical ranges except for the wind density parameter (A*), which is higher than those for bursts with wind-ISM transition, but typical for the general population of bursts. We note the importance of early-time radio observations of the afterglow (and of well-sampled light curves) for unambiguously identifying the potential contribution of the reverse shock.

  4. Circular polarization in the optical afterglow of GRB 121024A.

    PubMed

    Wiersema, K; Covino, S; Toma, K; van der Horst, A J; Varela, K; Min, M; Greiner, J; Starling, R L C; Tanvir, N R; Wijers, R A M J; Campana, S; Curran, P A; Fan, Y; Fynbo, J P U; Gorosabel, J; Gomboc, A; Götz, D; Hjorth, J; Jin, Z P; Kobayashi, S; Kouveliotou, C; Mundell, C; O'Brien, P T; Pian, E; Rowlinson, A; Russell, D M; Salvaterra, R; di Serego Alighieri, S; Tagliaferri, G; Vergani, S D; Elliott, J; Fariña, C; Hartoog, O E; Karjalainen, R; Klose, S; Knust, F; Levan, A J; Schady, P; Sudilovsky, V; Willingale, R

    2014-05-08

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are most probably powered by collimated relativistic outflows (jets) from accreting black holes at cosmological distances. Bright afterglows are produced when the outflow collides with the ambient medium. Afterglow polarization directly probes the magnetic properties of the jet when measured minutes after the burst, and it probes the geometric properties of the jet and the ambient medium when measured hours to days after the burst. High values of optical polarization detected minutes after the burst of GRB 120308A indicate the presence of large-scale ordered magnetic fields originating from the central engine (the power source of the GRB). Theoretical models predict low degrees of linear polarization and no circular polarization at late times, when the energy in the original ejecta is quickly transferred to the ambient medium and propagates farther into the medium as a blast wave. Here we report the detection of circularly polarized light in the afterglow of GRB 121024A, measured 0.15 days after the burst. We show that the circular polarization is intrinsic to the afterglow and unlikely to be produced by dust scattering or plasma propagation effects. A possible explanation is to invoke anisotropic (rather than the commonly assumed isotropic) electron pitch-angle distributions, and we suggest that new models are required to produce the complex microphysics of realistic shocks in relativistic jets.

  5. Early-Time Observations of the GRB 050319 Optical Transient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quimby, R. M.; Rykoff, E. S.; Yost, S. A.; Aharonian, F.; Akerlof, C. W.; Alatalo, K.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Göǧüş, E.; Güver, T.; Horns, D.; Kehoe, R. L.; Kιzιloǧlu, Ü.; Mckay, T. A.; Özel, M.; Phillips, A.; Schaefer, B. E.; Smith, D. A.; Swan, H. F.; Vestrand, W. T.; Wheeler, J. C.; Wren, J.

    2006-03-01

    We present the unfiltered ROTSE-III light curve of the optical transient associated with GRB 050319 beginning 4 s after the cessation of γ-ray activity. We fit a power-law function to the data using the revised trigger time given by Chincarini and coworkers, and a smoothly broken power-law to the data using the original trigger disseminated through the GCN notices. Including the RAPTOR data from Woźniak and coworkers, the best-fit power-law indices are α=-0.854+/-0.014 for the single power-law and α1=-0.364+0.020-0.019, α2=-0.881+0.030-0.031, with a break at tb=418+31-30 s for the smoothly broken fit. We discuss the fit results, with emphasis placed on the importance of knowing the true start time of the optical transient for this multipeaked burst. As Swift continues to provide prompt GRB locations, it becomes more important to answer the question, ``when does the afterglow begin?'' in order to correctly interpret the light curves.

  6. Rapid fading of optical afterglows as evidence for beaming in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. F.; Dai, Z. G.; Lu, T.

    2000-03-01

    Based on the refined dynamical model proposed by us earlier for beamed gamma -ray burst ejecta, we carry out detailed numerical procedure to study those gamma -ray bursts with rapidly fading afterglows (i.e., ~ t-2). It is found that optical afterglows from GRB 970228, 980326, 980519, 990123, 990510 and 991208 can be satisfactorily fitted if the gamma -ray burst ejecta are highly collimated, with a universal initial half opening angle theta_0 ~ 0.1. The obvious light curve break observed in GRB 990123 is due to the relativistic-Newtonian transition of the beamed ejecta, and the rapidly fading optical afterglows come from synchrotron emissions during the mildly relativistic and non-relativistic phases. We strongly suggest that the rapid fading of afterglows currently observed in some gamma -ray bursts is evidence for beaming in these cases.

  7. The bright optical flash and afterglow from the gamma-ray burst GRB 130427A.

    PubMed

    Vestrand, W T; Wren, J A; Panaitescu, A; Wozniak, P R; Davis, H; Palmer, D M; Vianello, G; Omodei, N; Xiong, S; Briggs, M S; Elphick, M; Paciesas, W; Rosing, W

    2014-01-03

    The optical light generated simultaneously with x-rays and gamma rays during a gamma-ray burst (GRB) provides clues about the nature of the explosions that occur as massive stars collapse. We report on the bright optical flash and fading afterglow from powerful burst GRB 130427A. The optical and >100-megaelectron volt (MeV) gamma-ray flux show a close correlation during the first 7000 seconds, which is best explained by reverse shock emission cogenerated in the relativistic burst ejecta as it collides with surrounding material. At later times, optical observations show the emergence of emission generated by a forward shock traversing the circumburst environment. The link between optical afterglow and >100-MeV emission suggests that nearby early peaked afterglows will be the best candidates for studying gamma-ray emission at energies ranging from gigaelectron volts to teraelectron volts.

  8. The Remarkable Afterglow of GRB 061007: Implications for Optical Flashes and GRB Fireballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundell, C. G.; Melandri, A.; Guidorzi, C.; Kobayashi, S.; Steele, I. A.; Malesani, D.; Amati, L.; D'Avanzo, P.; Bersier, D. F.; Gomboc, A.; Rol, E.; Bode, M. F.; Carter, D.; Mottram, C. J.; Monfardini, A.; Smith, R. J.; Malhotra, S.; Wang, J.; Bannister, N.; O'Brien, P. T.; Tanvir, N. R.

    2007-05-01

    We present a multiwavelength analysis of Swift GRB 061007. The 2 m robotic Faulkes Telescope South began observing 137 s after the onset of the γ-ray emission, when the optical counterpart was already decaying from R~10.3 mag, and continued observing for the next 5.5 hr. These observations begin during the final γ-ray flare and continue through and beyond a long, soft tail of γ-ray emission whose flux shows an underlying simple power-law decay identical to that seen at optical and X-ray wavelengths, with temporal slope α~1.7 (F~t-α). This remarkably simple decay in all of these bands is rare for Swift bursts, which often show much more complex light curves. We suggest the afterglow emission begins as early as 30-100 s and is contemporaneous with the ongoing variable prompt emission from the central engine, but originates from a physically distinct region dominated by the forward shock. The observed multiwavelength evolution of GRB 061007 is explained by an expanding fireball whose optical, X-ray, and late-time γ-ray emission is dominated by emission from a forward shock with typical synchrotron frequency, νm, that is already below the optical band as early as t=137 s and a cooling frequency, νc, above the X-ray band to at least t=105 s. In contrast, the typical frequency of the reverse shock lies in the radio band at early time. We suggest that the unexpected lack of bright optical flashes from the majority of Swift GRBs may be explained with a low νm originating from small microphysics parameters, ɛe and ɛB. Finally, the optical light curves imply a minimum jet opening angle θ=4.7deg, and no X-ray jet break before t~106 s makes GRB 061007 a secure outlier to spectral energy correlations.

  9. The Bright Gamma-Ray Burst 991208: Tight Constraints on Afterglow Models from Observations of the Early-Time Radio Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galama, T. J.; Bremer, M.; Bertoldi, F.; Menten, K. M.; Lisenfeld, U.; Shepherd, D. S.; Mason, B.; Walter, F.; Pooley, G. G.; Frail, D. A.; Sari, R.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Berger, E.; Bloom, J. S.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Granot, J.

    2000-10-01

    The millimeter wavelength emission from GRB 991208 is the second brightest ever detected, yielding a unique data set. We present here well-sampled spectra and light curves over more than two decades in frequency for a 2 week period. This data set has allowed us for the first time to trace the evolution of the characteristic synchrotron self-absorption frequency νa, peak frequency νm, and the peak flux density Fm; we obtain νa~t-0.15+/-0.23, νm~t-1.7+/-0.7, and Fm~t-0.47+/-0.20. From the radio data we find that models of homogeneous or wind-generated ambient media with a spherically symmetric outflow can be ruled out. A model in which the relativistic outflow is collimated (a jet) can account for the observed evolution of the synchrotron parameters, the rapid decay at optical wavelengths, and the observed radio-to-optical spectral flux distributions that we present here, provided that the jet transition has not been fully completed in the first 2 weeks after the event. These observations provide additional evidence that rapidly decaying optical/X-ray afterglows are due to jets and that such transitions either develop very slowly or perhaps never reach the predicted asymptotic decay F(t)~t-p.

  10. The bright optical afterglow of the nearby gamma-ray burst of 29 March 2003.

    PubMed

    Price, P A; Fox, D W; Kulkarni, S R; Peterson, B A; Schmidt, B P; Soderberg, A M; Yost, S A; Berger, E; Djorgovski, S G; Frail, D A; Harrison, F A; Sari, R; Blain, A W; Chapman, S C

    2003-06-19

    Past studies of cosmological gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been hampered by their extreme distances, resulting in faint afterglows. A nearby GRB could potentially shed much light on the origin of these events, but GRBs with a redshift z optical afterglow emission from the burst of 29 March 2003 (GRB030329; ref. 2). The brightness of the afterglow and the prompt report of its position resulted in extensive follow-up observations at many wavelengths, along with the measurement of the redshift, z = 0.169 (ref. 4). The gamma-ray and afterglow properties of GRB030329 are similar to those of GRBs at cosmological redshifts. Observations have already identified the progenitor as a massive star that exploded as a supernova.

  11. The optical afterglow of the short gamma-ray burst GRB 050709.

    PubMed

    Hjorth, Jens; Watson, Darach; Fynbo, Johan P U; Price, Paul A; Jensen, Brian L; Jørgensen, Uffe G; Kubas, Daniel; Gorosabel, Javier; Jakobsson, Páll; Sollerman, Jesper; Pedersen, Kristian; Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2005-10-06

    It has long been known that there are two classes of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), mainly distinguished by their durations. The breakthrough in our understanding of long-duration GRBs (those lasting more than approximately 2 s), which ultimately linked them with energetic type Ic supernovae, came from the discovery of their long-lived X-ray and optical 'afterglows', when precise and rapid localizations of the sources could finally be obtained. X-ray localizations have recently become available for short (duration <2 s) GRBs, which have evaded optical detection for more than 30 years. Here we report the first discovery of transient optical emission (R-band magnitude approximately 23) associated with a short burst: GRB 050709. The optical afterglow was localized with subarcsecond accuracy, and lies in the outskirts of a blue dwarf galaxy. The optical and X-ray afterglow properties 34 h after the GRB are reminiscent of the afterglows of long GRBs, which are attributable to synchrotron emission from ultrarelativistic ejecta. We did not, however, detect a supernova, as found in most nearby long GRB afterglows, which suggests a different origin for the short GRBs.

  12. Energy input and response from prompt and early optical afterglow emission in gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Vestrand, W T; Wren, J A; Wozniak, P R; Aptekar, R; Golentskii, S; Pal'shin, V; Sakamoto, T; White, R R; Evans, S; Casperson, D; Fenimore, E

    2006-07-13

    The taxonomy of optical emission detected during the critical first few minutes after the onset of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) defines two broad classes: prompt optical emission correlated with prompt gamma-ray emission, and early optical afterglow emission uncorrelated with the gamma-ray emission. The standard theoretical interpretation attributes prompt emission to internal shocks in the ultra-relativistic outflow generated by the internal engine; early afterglow emission is attributed to shocks generated by interaction with the surrounding medium. Here we report on observations of a bright GRB that, for the first time, clearly show the temporal relationship and relative strength of the two optical components. The observations indicate that early afterglow emission can be understood as reverberation of the energy input measured by prompt emission. Measurements of the early afterglow reverberations therefore probe the structure of the environment around the burst, whereas the subsequent response to late-time impulsive energy releases reveals how earlier flaring episodes have altered the jet and environment parameters. Many GRBs are generated by the death of massive stars that were born and died before the Universe was ten per cent of its current age, so GRB afterglow reverberations provide clues about the environments around some of the first stars.

  13. Constraints on an Optical Afterglow and on Supernova Light Following the Short Burst GRB 050813

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrero, P.; Sanchez, S. F.; Kann, D. A.; Klose, S.; Greiner, J.; Gorosabel, J.; Hartmann, D. H.; Henden, A. A.; Moller, P.; Palazzi, E.; hide

    2006-01-01

    We report early follow-up observations of the error box of the short burst 050813 using the telescopes at Calar Alto and at Observatorio Sierra Nevada (OSN), followed by deep VLT/FORS2 I-band observations obtained under very good seeing conditions 5.7 and 11.7 days after the event. No evidence for a GRB afterglow was found in our Calar Alto and OSN data, no rising supernova component was detected in our FORS2 images. A potential host galaxy can be identified in our FORS2 images, even though we cannot state with certainty its association with GRB 050813. IN any case, the optical afterglow of GRB 050813 was very faint, well in agreement with what is known so far about the optical properties of afterglows of short bursts. We conclude that all optical data are not in conflict with the interpretation that GRB 050813 was a short burst.

  14. GRB 110530A: Peculiar Broad Bump and Delayed Plateau in Early Optical Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Shu-Qing; Xin, Li-Ping; Liang, En-Wei; Wei, Jian-Yan; Urata, Yuji; Huang, Kui-Yun; Qiu, Yu-Lei; Deng, Can-Min; Wang, Yuan-Zhu; Deng, Jin-Song

    2016-11-01

    We report our very early optical observations of GRB 110530A and investigate its jet properties together with its X-ray afterglow data. A peculiar broad onset bump followed by a plateau is observed in its early R band afterglow light curve. The optical data in the other bands and the X-ray data are well consistent with the temporal feature of the R band light curve. Our joint spectral fits of the optical and X-ray data show that they are in the same regime, with a photon index of ∼1.70. The optical and X-ray afterglow light curves are well fitted with the standard external shock model by considering a delayed energy injection component. Based on our modeling results, we find that the radiative efficiency of the gamma-ray burst jet is ∼ 1 % and the magnetization parameter of the afterglow jet is \\lt 0.04 with a derived extremely low {ε }B (the ratio of shock energy to the magnetic field) of (1.64+/- 0.25)× {10}-6. These results indicate that the jet may be matter dominated. A discussion on delayed energy injection from the accretion of the late fall-back material of its pre-supernova star is also presented.

  15. The Faint Optical Afterglow and Host Galaxy of GRB 020124: Implications for the Nature of Dark Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, E.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Bloom, J. S.; Price, P. A.; Fox, D. W.; Frail, D. A.; Axelrod, T. S.; Chevalier, R. A.; Colbert, E.; Costa, E.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Frontera, F.; Galama, T. J.; Halpern, J. P.; Harrison, F. A.; Holtzman, J.; Hurley, K.; Kimble, R. A.; McCarthy, P. J.; Piro, L.; Reichart, D.; Ricker, G. R.; Sari, R.; Schmidt, B. P.; Wheeler, J. C.; Vanderppek, R.; Yost, S. A.

    2002-12-01

    We present ground-based optical observations of GRB 020124 starting 1.6 hr after the burst, as well as subsequent Very Large Array and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations. The optical afterglow of GRB 020124 is one of the faintest afterglows detected to date, and it exhibits a relatively rapid decay, Fν~t-1.60+/-0.04, followed by further steepening. In addition, a weak radio source was found coincident with the optical afterglow. The HST observations reveal that a positionally coincident host galaxy must be the faintest host to date, R>~29.5 mag. The afterglow observations can be explained by several models requiring little or no extinction within the host galaxy, AhostV~0-0.9 mag. These observations have significant implications for the interpretation of the so-called dark bursts (bursts for which no optical afterglow is detected), which are usually attributed to dust extinction within the host galaxy. The faintness and relatively rapid decay of the afterglow of GRB 020124, combined with the low inferred extinction, indicate that some dark bursts are intrinsically dim and not dust obscured. Thus, the diversity in the underlying properties of optical afterglows must be observationally determined before substantive inferences can be drawn from the statistics of dark bursts.

  16. An Estimation of the Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Apparent Optical Brightness Distribution Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerlof, Carl W.; Swan, Heather F.

    2007-12-01

    By using recent publicly available observational data obtained in conjunction with the NASA Swift gamma-ray burst (GRB) mission and a novel data analysis technique, we have been able to make some rough estimates of the GRB afterglow apparent optical brightness distribution function. The results suggest that 71% of all burst afterglows have optical magnitudes with mR<22.1 at 1000 s after the burst onset, the dimmest detected object in the data sample. There is a strong indication that the apparent optical magnitude distribution function peaks at mR~19.5. Such estimates may prove useful in guiding future plans to improve GRB counterpart observation programs. The employed numerical techniques might find application in a variety of other data analysis problems in which the intrinsic distributions must be inferred from a heterogeneous sample.

  17. Optical flashes from internal pairs formed in gamma-ray burst afterglows

    SciT

    Panaitescu, A.

    We develop a numerical formalism for calculating the distribution with energy of the (internal) pairs formed in a relativistic source from unscattered MeV–TeV photons. For gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows, this formalism is more suitable if the relativistic reverse shock that energizes the ejecta is the source of the GeV photons. The number of pairs formed is set by the source GeV output (calculated from the Fermi-LAT fluence), the unknown source Lorentz factor, and the unmeasured peak energy of the LAT spectral component. We show synchrotron and inverse-Compton light curves expected from pairs formed in the shocked medium and identify some criteria for testing a pair origin of GRB optical counterparts. Pairs formed in bright LAT afterglows with a Lorentz factor in the few hundreds may produce bright optical counterparts (more » $$R\\lt 10$$) lasting for up to one hundred seconds. As a result, the number of internal pairs formed from unscattered seed photons decreases very strongly with the source Lorentz factor, thus bright GRB optical counterparts cannot arise from internal pairs if the afterglow Lorentz factor is above several hundreds.« less

  18. Optical flashes from internal pairs formed in gamma-ray burst afterglows

    DOE PAGES

    Panaitescu, A.

    2015-06-09

    We develop a numerical formalism for calculating the distribution with energy of the (internal) pairs formed in a relativistic source from unscattered MeV–TeV photons. For gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows, this formalism is more suitable if the relativistic reverse shock that energizes the ejecta is the source of the GeV photons. The number of pairs formed is set by the source GeV output (calculated from the Fermi-LAT fluence), the unknown source Lorentz factor, and the unmeasured peak energy of the LAT spectral component. We show synchrotron and inverse-Compton light curves expected from pairs formed in the shocked medium and identify some criteria for testing a pair origin of GRB optical counterparts. Pairs formed in bright LAT afterglows with a Lorentz factor in the few hundreds may produce bright optical counterparts (more » $$R\\lt 10$$) lasting for up to one hundred seconds. As a result, the number of internal pairs formed from unscattered seed photons decreases very strongly with the source Lorentz factor, thus bright GRB optical counterparts cannot arise from internal pairs if the afterglow Lorentz factor is above several hundreds.« less

  19. On the nature of the extremely fast optical rebrightening of the afterglow of GRB 081029

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardini, M.; Greiner, J.; Krühler, T.; Filgas, R.; Klose, S.; Afonso, P.; Clemens, C.; Guelbenzu, A. N.; Olivares E., F.; Rau, A.; Rossi, A.; Updike, A.; Küpcü Yoldaş, A.; Yoldaş, A.; Burlon, D.; Elliott, J.; Kann, D. A.

    2011-07-01

    Context. After the launch of the Swift satellite, the gamma-ray burst (GRB) optical light-curve smoothness paradigm has been questioned thanks to the faster and better sampled optical follow-up, which has unveiled a very complex behaviour. This complexity is triggering the interest of the whole GRB community. The GROND multi-channel imager is used to study optical and near-infrared (NIR) afterglows of GRBs with unprecedented optical and near-infrared temporal and spectral resolution. The GRB 081029 has a very prominent optical rebrightening event and is an outstanding example of the application of the multi-channel imager to GRB afterglows. Aims: Here we exploit the rich GROND multi-colour follow-up of GRB 081029 combined with XRT observations to study the nature of late-time rebrightenings that appear in the optical-NIR light-curves of some GRB afterglows. Methods: We analyse the optical and NIR observations obtained with the seven-channel Gamma-Ray burst Optical and Near-infrared Detector (GROND) at the 2.2 m MPI/ESO telescope and the X-ray data obtained with the XRT telescope on board the Swift observatory. The multi-wavelength temporal and spectral evolution is discussed in the framework of different physical models. Results: The extremely steep optical and NIR rebrightening observed in GRB 081029 cannot be explained in the framework of the standard forward shock afterglow model. The absence of a contemporaneous X-ray rebrightening and the evidence of a strong spectral evolution in the optical-NIR bands during the rise suggest two separate components that dominate in the early and late-time light-curves, respectively. The steepness of the optical rise cannot be explained even in the framework of the alternative scenarios proposed in the literature unless a late-time activity of the central engine is assumed. Full GROND photometry of GRB 081029 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http

  20. The extraordinarily bright optical afterglow of GRB 991208 and its host galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Sokolov, V. V.; Gorosabel, J.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Greiner, J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Jensen, B. L.; Hjorth, J.; Toft, S.; Pedersen, H.; Palazzi, E.; Pian, E.; Masetti, N.; Sagar, R.; Mohan, V.; Pandey, A. K.; Pandey, S. B.; Dodonov, S. N.; Fatkhullin, T. A.; Afanasiev, V. L.; Komarova, V. N.; Moiseev, A. V.; Hudec, R.; Simon, V.; Vreeswijk, P.; Rol, E.; Klose, S.; Stecklum, B.; Zapatero-Osorio, M. R.; Caon, N.; Blake, C.; Wall, J.; Heinlein, D.; Henden, A.; Benetti, S.; Magazzù, A.; Ghinassi, F.; Tommasi, L.; Bremer, M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Guziy, S.; Shlyapnikov, A.; Hopp, U.; Feulner, G.; Dreizler, S.; Hartmann, D.; Boehnhardt, H.; Paredes, J. M.; Martí, J.; Xanthopoulos, E.; Kristen, H. E.; Smoker, J.; Hurley, K.

    2001-05-01

    Broad-band optical observations of the extraordinarily bright optical afterglow of the intense gamma-ray burst GRB 991208 started ~2.1 days after the event and continued until 4 Apr. 2000. The flux decay constant of the optical afterglow in the R-band is -2.30 +/- 0.07 up to ~5 days, which is very likely due to the jet effect, and it is followed by a much steeper decay with constant -3.2 +/- 0.2, the fastest one ever seen in a GRB optical afterglow. A negative detection in several all-sky films taken simultaneously with the event, that otherwise would have reached naked eye brightness, implies either a previous additional break prior to ~2 days after the occurrence of the GRB (as expected from the jet effect) or a maximum, as observed in GRB 970508. The existence of a second break might indicate a steepening in the electron spectrum or the superposition of two events, resembling GRB 000301C. Once the afterglow emission vanished, contribution of a bright underlying supernova was found on the basis of the late-time R-band measurements, but the light curve is not sufficiently well sampled to rule out a dust echo explanation. Our redshift determination of z = 0.706 indicates that GRB 991208 is at 3.7 Gpc (for Ho = 60 km s-1 Mpc-1, OMEGAo = 1 and LAMDAo = 0), implying an isotropic energy release of 1.15 x 1053 erg which may be relaxed by beaming by a factor >102. Precise astrometry indicates that the GRB coincides within 0.2" with the host galaxy, thus supporting a massive star origin. The absolute magnitude of the galaxy is MB = -18.2, well below the knee of the galaxy luminosity function and we derive a star-forming rate of (11.5 +/- 7.1) Msun yr-1, which is much larger than the present-day rate in our Galaxy. The quasi-simultaneous broad-band photometric spectral energy distribution of the afterglow was determined ~3.5 day after the burst (Dec. 12.0) implying a cooling frequency nuc below the optical band, i.e. supporting a jet model with p = -2.30 as the index of

  1. Understanding the flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA) ambient ionization source through optical means.

    PubMed

    Shelley, Jacob T; Chan, George C-Y; Hieftje, Gary M

    2012-02-01

    The advent of ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS) has led to the development of a large number of atmospheric-pressure ionization sources. The largest group of such sources is based on electrical discharges; yet, the desorption and ionization processes that they employ remain largely uncharacterized. Here, the atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) and afterglow of a helium flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA) ionization source were examined by optical emission spectroscopy. Spatial emission profiles of species created in the APGD and afterglow were recorded under a variety of operating conditions, including discharge current, electrode polarity, and plasma-gas flow rate. From these studies, it was found that an appreciable amount of atmospheric H(2)O vapor, N(2), and O(2) diffuses through the hole in the plate electrode into the discharge to become a major source of reagent ions in ADI-MS analyses. Spatially resolved plasma parameters, such as OH rotational temperature (T(rot)) and electron number density (n(e)), were also measured in the APGD. Maximum values for T(rot) and n(e) were found to be ~1100 K and ~4×10(19) m(-3), respectively, and were both located at the pin cathode. In the afterglow, rotational temperatures from OH and N(2)(+) yielded drastically different values, with OH temperatures matching those obtained from infrared thermography measurements. The higher N(2)(+) temperature is believed to be caused by charge-transfer ionization of N(2) by He(2)(+). These findings are discussed in the context of previously reported ADI-MS analyses with the FAPA source. © American Society for Mass Spectrometry, 2011

  2. Understanding the Flowing Atmospheric-Pressure Afterglow (FAPA) Ambient Ionization Source through Optical Means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelley, Jacob T.; Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2012-02-01

    The advent of ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS) has led to the development of a large number of atmospheric-pressure ionization sources. The largest group of such sources is based on electrical discharges; yet, the desorption and ionization processes that they employ remain largely uncharacterized. Here, the atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) and afterglow of a helium flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA) ionization source were examined by optical emission spectroscopy. Spatial emission profiles of species created in the APGD and afterglow were recorded under a variety of operating conditions, including discharge current, electrode polarity, and plasma-gas flow rate. From these studies, it was found that an appreciable amount of atmospheric H2O vapor, N2, and O2 diffuses through the hole in the plate electrode into the discharge to become a major source of reagent ions in ADI-MS analyses. Spatially resolved plasma parameters, such as OH rotational temperature (Trot) and electron number density (ne), were also measured in the APGD. Maximum values for Trot and ne were found to be ~1100 K and ~4 × 1019 m-3, respectively, and were both located at the pin cathode. In the afterglow, rotational temperatures from OH and N{2/+} yielded drastically different values, with OH temperatures matching those obtained from infrared thermography measurements. The higher N{2/+} temperature is believed to be caused by charge-transfer ionization of N2 by He{2/+}. These findings are discussed in the context of previously reported ADI-MS analyses with the FAPA source.

  3. GRB 091208B: FIRST DETECTION OF THE OPTICAL POLARIZATION IN EARLY FORWARD SHOCK EMISSION OF A GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOW

    SciT

    Uehara, T.; Chiyonobu, S.; Fukazawa, Y.

    We report that the optical polarization in the afterglow of GRB 091208B is measured at t = 149-706 s after the burst trigger, and the polarization degree is P = 10.4( {+-} 2.5%. The optical light curve at this time shows a power-law decay with index -0.75 {+-} 0.02, which is interpreted as the forward shock synchrotron emission, and thus this is the first detection of the early-time optical polarization in the forward shock (rather than that in the reverse shock reported by Steele et al.). This detection disfavors the afterglow model in which the magnetic fields in the emissionmore » region are random on the plasma skin depth scales, such as those amplified by the plasma instabilities, e.g., Weibel instability. We suggest that the fields are amplified by the magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, which would be tested by future observations of the temporal changes of the polarization degrees and angles for other bursts.« less

  4. The Achromatic Light Curve of the Optical Afterglow of GRB 030226 at a Redshift of z Approximately 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klose, S.; Greiner, J.; Rau, A.; Henden, A. A.; Hartmann, D. H.; Zeh, A.; Masetti, N.; Guenther, E.; Stecklum, B.; Lindsay, K.

    2003-01-01

    Abstract. We report on optical and near-infrared (NIR) follow-up observations of the afterglow of GRB 030226, mainly performed with the telescopes at ESO La Silla and Paranal, with additional data obtained at other places. Our first observations started 0.2 days after the burst when the afterglow was at a magnitude of R approximately equal to 19 . One week later the magnitude of the afterglow had fallen to R=25, and at two weeks after the burst it could no longer be detected (R > 26). Our VLT blueband spectra show two absorption line systems at redshifts z = 1.962 +/- 0.001 and at z = 1.986 +/- 0.001, placing the redshift of the burster close to 2. Within our measurement errors no evidence for variations in the line strengths has been found between 0.2 and 1.2 days after the burst. An overabundance of alpha-group elements might indicate that the burst occurred in a chemically young interstellar region shaped by the nucleosynthesis from type II supernovae. The spectral slope of the afterglow shows no signs for cosmic dust along the line of sight in the GRB host galaxy, which itself remained undetected (R > 26.2). At the given redshift no supernova component affected the light from the GRB afterglow, so that the optical transient was essentially only powered by the radiation from the GRB fireball, allowing for a detailed investigation of the color evolution of the afterglow light. In our data set no obvious evidence for color changes has been found before, during, or after the smooth break in the light curve approximately 1 day after the burst. In comparison with investigations by others, our data favor the interpretation that the afterglow began to develop into a homogeneous interstellar medium before the break in the light curve became apparent.

  5. Gamma-Ray Burst Optical Afterglows with Two-component Jets: Polarization Evolution Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Mi-Xiang; Wu, Xue-Feng; Dai, Zi-Gao

    2018-06-01

    Gamma-ray bursts have been widely argued to originate from binary compact object mergers or core collapse of massive stars. Jets from these systems may have two components: an inner, narrow sub-jet and an outer, wider sub-jet. Such a jet subsequently interacts with its ambient gas, leading to a reverse shock (RS) and a forward shock. The magnetic field in the narrow sub-jet is very likely to be mixed by an ordered component and a random component during the afterglow phase. In this paper, we calculate light curves and polarization evolution of optical afterglows with this mixed magnetic field in the RS region of the narrow sub-jet in a two-component jet model. The resultant light curve has two peaks: an early peak arising from the narrow sub-jet and a late-time rebrightening due to the wider sub-jet. We find the polarization degree (PD) evolution under such a mixed magnetic field confined in the shock plane is very similar to that under the purely ordered magnetic field condition. The two-dimensional “mixed” magnetic fields confined in the shock plane are essentially the ordered magnetic fields only with different configurations. The position angle (PA) of the two-component jet can change gradually or abruptly by 90°. In particular, an abrupt 90° change of the PA occurs when the PD changes from its decline phase to the rise phase.

  6. Prompt and Afterglow Emission from Short GRB Cocoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsony, Brian; Lazzati, Davide; López-Cámara, Diego; Workman, Jared; Moskal, Jeremiah; Cantiello, Matteo; Perna, Rosalba

    2018-01-01

    We present simulations of short GRB jets that create a wide cocoon of mildly relativistic material surrounding the narrow, highly relativistic jet. We model the prompt and afterglow emission from the jet and cocoon at a range of observer angles relative to the jet axis. Even far off axis, prompt X-ray and gamma-ray emission from the cocoon may be detectable by FERMI GBM out to several 10’s of Mpc. Afterglow emission off-axis is dominated by cocoon material at early times (hours - days). The afterglow should be detectable at a wide range of frequencies (radio, optical, X-ray) for a large fraction of off-axis short GRBs within 200 Mpc, the detection range of aLIGO at design sensitivity. Given recent events, cocoon emission may be very important in the future for localizing LIGO-detected neutron star mergers.

  7. A Morphological Analysis of Gamma-Ray Burst Early-optical Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, He; Wang, Xiang-Gao; Mészáros, Peter; Zhang, Bing

    2015-09-01

    Within the framework of the external shock model of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows, we perform a morphological analysis of the early-optical light curves to directly constrain model parameters. We define four morphological types, i.e., the reverse shock-dominated cases with/without the emergence of the forward shock peak (Type I/Type II), and the forward shock-dominated cases without/with νm crossing the band (Type III/IV). We systematically investigate all of the Swift GRBs that have optical detection earlier than 500 s and find 3/63 Type I bursts (4.8%), 12/63 Type II bursts (19.0%), 30/63 Type III bursts (47.6%), 8/63 Type IV bursts (12.7%), and 10/63 Type III/IV bursts (15.9%). We perform Monte Carlo simulations to constrain model parameters in order to reproduce the observations. We find that the favored value of the magnetic equipartition parameter in the forward shock ({ɛ }B{{f}}) ranges from 10-6 to 10-2, and the reverse-to-forward ratio of ɛB ({{R}}B) is about 100. The preferred electron equipartition parameter {ɛ }{{e}}{{r},{{f}}} value is 0.01, which is smaller than the commonly assumed value, e.g., 0.1. This could mitigate the so-called “efficiency problem” for the internal shock model, if ɛe during the prompt emission phase (in the internal shocks) is large (say, ˜0.1). The preferred {{R}}B value is in agreement with the results in previous works that indicate a moderately magnetized baryonic jet for GRBs.

  8. Colour variations in the GRB 120327A afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melandri, A.; Covino, S.; Zaninoni, E.; Campana, S.; Bolmer, J.; Cobb, B. E.; Gorosabel, J.; Kim, J.-W.; Kuin, P.; Kuroda, D.; Malesani, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Nappo, F.; Sbarufatti, B.; Smith, R. J.; Steele, I. A.; Topinka, M.; Trotter, A. S.; Virgili, F. J.; Bernardini, M. G.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; Fugazza, D.; Ghirlanda, G.; Gomboc, A.; Greiner, J.; Guidorzi, C.; Haislip, J. B.; Hanayama, H.; Hanlon, L.; Im, M.; Ivarsen, K. M.; Japelj, J.; Jelínek, M.; Kawai, N.; Kobayashi, S.; Kopac, D.; LaCluyzé, A. P.; Martin-Carrillo, A.; Murphy, D.; Reichart, D. E.; Salvaterra, R.; Salafia, O. S.; Tagliaferri, G.; Vergani, S. D.

    2017-10-01

    Aims: We present a comprehensive temporal and spectral analysis of the long Swift GRB 120327A afterglow data to investigate possible causes of the observed early-time colour variations. Methods: We collected data from various instruments and telescopes in X-ray, ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared bands, and determined the shapes of the afterglow early-time light curves. We studied the overall temporal behaviour and the spectral energy distributions from early to late times. Results: The ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared light curves can be modelled with a single power-law component between 200 and 2 × 104 s after the burst event. The X-ray light curve shows a canonical steep-shallow-steep behaviour that is typical of long gamma-ray bursts. At early times a colour variation is observed in the ultraviolet/optical bands, while at very late times a hint of a re-brightening is visible. The observed early-time colour change can be explained as a variation in the intrinsic optical spectral index, rather than an evolution of the optical extinction. Table 2 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/607/A29

  9. Evolution of the polarization of the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB030329.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Jochen; Klose, Sylvio; Reinsch, Klaus; Schmid, Hans Martin; Sari, Re'em; Hartmann, Dieter H; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Rau, Arne; Palazzi, Eliana; Straubmeier, Christian; Stecklum, Bringfried; Zharikov, Sergej; Tovmassian, Gaghik; Bärnbantner, Otto; Ries, Christoph; Jehin, Emmanuel; Henden, Arne; Kaas, Anlaug A; Grav, Tommy; Hjorth, Jens; Pedersen, Holger; Wijers, Ralph A M J; Kaufer, Andreas; Park, Hye-Sook; Williams, Grant; Reimer, Olaf

    2003-11-13

    The association of a supernova with GRB030329 strongly supports the 'collapsar' model of gamma-ray bursts, where a relativistic jet forms after the progenitor star collapses. Such jets cannot be spatially resolved because gamma-ray bursts lie at cosmological distances; their existence is instead inferred from 'breaks' in the light curves of the afterglows, and from the theoretical desire to reduce the estimated total energy of the burst by proposing that most of it comes out in narrow beams. Temporal evolution of the polarization of the afterglows may provide independent evidence for the jet structure of the relativistic outflow. Small-level polarization ( approximately 1-3 per cent) has been reported for a few bursts, but its temporal evolution has yet to be established. Here we report polarimetric observations of the afterglow of GRB030329. We establish the polarization light curve, detect sustained polarization at the per cent level, and find significant variability. The data imply that the afterglow magnetic field has a small coherence length and is mostly random, probably generated by turbulence, in contrast with the picture arising from the high polarization detected in the prompt gamma-rays from GRB021206 (ref. 18).

  10. NuSTAR observations of GRB 130427A establish a single component synchrotron afterglow origin for the late optical to multi-GEV emission

    DOE PAGES

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Granot, J.; Racusin, J. L.; ...

    2013-11-21

    Here, GRB 130427A occurred in a relatively nearby galaxy; its prompt emission had the largest GRB fluence ever recorded. The afterglow of GRB 130427A was bright enough for the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray ( NuSTAR) to observe it in the 3-79 keV energy range long after its prompt emission (~1.5 and 5 days). This range, where afterglow observations were previously not possible, bridges an important spectral gap. Combined with Swift, Fermi, and ground-based optical data, NuSTAR observations unambiguously establish a single afterglow spectral component from optical to multi-GeV energies a day after the event, which is almost certainly synchrotron radiation.more » Such an origin of the late-time Fermi/Large Area Telescope >10 GeV photons requires revisions in our understanding of collisionless relativistic shock physics.« less

  11. GRB 021211 as a Faint Analogue of GRB 990123: Exploring the Similarities and Differences in the Optical Afterglows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Stephen T.; Bersier, David; Bloom, J. S.; Garnavich, Peter M.; Caldwell, Nelson; Challis, Peter; Kirshner, Robert; Luhman, Kevin; McLeod, Brian; Stanek, K. Z.

    2004-01-01

    We present BVR(sub c)JHK(sub s) photometry of the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB 021211 taken at the Magellan, MMT, and WIYN observatories between 0.7 and 50 days after the burst. We find an intrinsic spectral slope at optical and near-infrared wavelengths of 0.69 +/- 0.14 at 0.87 days. The optical decay during the first day is almost identical to that of GRB 990123 except that GRB 021211's optical afterglow was intrinsically approximately 38 times fainter and the transition from the reverse shock to the forward shock may have occurred earlier than it did for GRB 990123. We find no evidence for a jet break or the cooling break passing through optical frequencies during the first day after the burst. There is weak evidence for a break in the J-band decay between 0.89 and 1.87 days which may be due to a jet. The optical and infrared data are consistent with a relativistic fireball where the shocked electrons are in the slow cooling regime and the electron index is 2.3 +/- 0.1. The burst appears to have occurred in a homogeneous ambient medium. Our analysis suggests that the jet of GRB 021211 may have a small opening angle (1.4 deg-4.4 deg) and that the total gamma-ray energy is much less than the canonical value of 1.33 x 10(exp 51) erg. If, this is the case then most of the energy of the burst may be in another form such as a frozen magnetic field, in supernova ejecta, or in a second jet component. The host galaxy of GRB 021211 is subluminous and has a star formation rate of at least 1 solar mass/yr.

  12. Short GRB Prompt and Afterglow Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2007-01-01

    The Swift data set on short GRBs has now grown large enough to study correlations of key parameters. The goal is to compare long and short bursts to better understand similarities and differences in the burst origins. In this study we consider the both prompt and afterglow fluxes. It is found that the optical, X-ray and gamma-ray emissions are linearly correlated - stronger bursts tend to have brighter afterglows, and bursts with brighter X-ray afterglow tend to have brighter optical afterglow. Both the prompt and afterglow fluxes are, on average, lower for short bursts than for long. Although there are short GRBs with undetected optical emission, there is no evidence for "dark" short bursts with anomalously low opt/X ratios. The weakest short bursts have a low X-ray/gamma-ray ratio.

  13. Hydrodynamics of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sari, Re'em

    1997-11-01

    The detection of delayed emission at X-ray optical and radio wavelengths (``afterglow'') following gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) suggests that the relativistic shell that emitted the initial GRB as the result of internal shocks decelerates on encountering an external medium, giving rise to the afterglow. We explore the interaction of a relativistic shell with a uniform interstellar medium (ISM) up to the nonrelativistic stage. We demonstrate the importance of several effects that were previously ignored and must be included in a detailed radiation analysis. At a very early stage (few seconds), the observed bolometric luminosity increases as t2. On longer timescales (more than ~10 s), the luminosity drops as t-1. If the main burst is long enough, an intermediate stage of constant luminosity will form. In this case, the afterglow overlaps the main burst; otherwise there is a time separation between the two. On the long timescale, the flow decelerates in a self-similar way, reaching nonrelativistic velocities after ~30 days. Explicit expressions for the radial profiles of this self-similar deceleration are given. As a result of the deceleration and the accumulation of ISM material, the relation between the observed time, the shock radius, and its Lorentz factor is given by t=R/16γ2c, which is a factor of 8 different from the usual expression. We show that even though only a small fraction of the internal energy is given to the electrons, most of the energy can be radiated over time. If the fraction of energy in electrons is greater than ~10%, radiation losses will significantly influence the hydrodynamical evolution at early times (less than ~1 day).

  14. An optical spectrum of the afterglow of a gamma-ray burst at a redshift of z = 6.295.

    PubMed

    Kawai, N; Kosugi, G; Aoki, K; Yamada, T; Totani, T; Ohta, K; Iye, M; Hattori, T; Aoki, W; Furusawa, H; Hurley, K; Kawabata, K S; Kobayashi, N; Komiyama, Y; Mizumoto, Y; Nomoto, K; Noumaru, J; Ogasawara, R; Sato, R; Sekiguchi, K; Shirasaki, Y; Suzuki, M; Takata, T; Tamagawa, T; Terada, H; Watanabe, J; Yatsu, Y; Yoshida, A

    2006-03-09

    The prompt gamma-ray emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) should be detectable out to distances of z > 10 (ref. 1), and should therefore provide an excellent probe of the evolution of cosmic star formation, reionization of the intergalactic medium, and the metal enrichment history of the Universe. Hitherto, the highest measured redshift for a GRB has been z = 4.50 (ref. 5). Here we report the optical spectrum of the afterglow of GRB 050904 obtained 3.4 days after the burst; the spectrum shows a clear continuum at the long-wavelength end of the spectrum with a sharp cut-off at around 9,000 A due to Lyman alpha absorption at z approximately 6.3 (with a damping wing). A system of absorption lines of heavy elements at z = 6.295 +/- 0.002 was also detected, yielding the precise measurement of the redshift. The Si ii fine-structure lines suggest a dense, metal-enriched environment around the progenitor of the GRB.

  15. Optical light curve of GRB 121011A: a textbook for the onset of GRB afterglow in a mixture of ISM and wind-type medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Li-Ping; Wei, Jian-Yan; Qiu, Yu-Lei; Deng, Jin-Song; Wang, Jing; Han, Xu-Hui

    2016-01-01

    We report the optical observations of GRB 121011A by the 0.8m TNT facility at Xinglong observatory, China. The light curve of the optical afterglow shows a smooth and featureless bump during the epoch of ˜130 s and ˜5000 s with a rising index of 1.57 ± 0.28 before the break time of 539 ± 44 s, and a decaying index of about 1.29 ± 0.07 up to the end of our observations. Moreover, the X-ray light curve decays in a single power-law with a slope of about 1.51 ± 0.03 observed by XRT onboard Swift from 100 s to about 10 000 s after the burst trigger. The featureless optical light curve could be understood as an onset process under the external-shock model. The typical frequency has been below or near the optical one before the deceleration time, and the cooling frequency is located between the optical and X-ray wavelengths. The external medium density has a transition from a mixed stage of ISM and wind-type medium before the peak time to the ISM at the later phase. The joint-analysis of X-ray and optical light curves shows that the emissions from both frequencies are consistent with the prediction of the standard afterglow model without any energy injections, indicating that the central engine has stopped its activity and does not restart anymore after the prompt phase.

  16. Chameleon induced atomic afterglow

    SciT

    Brax, Philippe; Burrage, Clare

    2010-11-01

    The chameleon is a scalar field whose mass depends on the density of its environment. Chameleons are necessarily coupled to matter particles and will excite transitions between atomic energy levels in an analogous manner to photons. When created inside an optical cavity by passing a laser beam through a constant magnetic field, chameleons are trapped between the cavity walls and form a standing wave. This effect will lead to an afterglow phenomenon even when the laser beam and the magnetic field have been turned off, and could be used to probe the interactions of the chameleon field with matter.

  17. IS THE LINE-LIKE OPTICAL AFTERGLOW SED OF GRB 050709 DUE TO A FLARE?

    SciT

    Liu, Cong; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Wei, Da-Ming, E-mail: jin@pmo.ac.cn

    Recently, Jin et al. reanalyzed the optical observation data of GRB 050709 and reported a line-like spectral energy distribution (SED) component observed by the Very Large Telescope at t  ∼ 2.5 days after the trigger of the burst, which had been interpreted as a broadened line signal arising from a macronova dominated by an iron group. In this work, we show that an optical flare origin of such a peculiar optical SED is still possible. Interestingly, even in such a model, an “unusual” origin of the late-time long-lasting Hubble Space Telescope F 814 W -band emission is still needed and a macronova/kilonovamore » is the natural interpretation.« less

  18. Strategies for Prompt Searches for GRB Afterglows: The Discovery of GRB 001011 Optical/Near-Infrared Counterpart Using Colour-Colour Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorosabel, J.; Fynbo, J. U.; Hjorth, J.; Wolf, C.; Andersen, M. I.; Pedersen, H.; Christensen, L.; Jensen, B. L.; Moller, P.; Afonso, J.; hide

    2001-01-01

    We report the discovery of the optical and near-infrared counterpart to GRB 001011. The GRB 001011 error box determined by Beppo-SAX was simultaneously imaged in the near-infrared by the 3.58-m. New Technology Telescope and in the optical by the 1.54-m Danish Telescope - 8 hr after the gamma-ray event. We implement the colour-colour discrimination technique proposed by Rhoads (2001) and extend it using near-IR data as well. We present the results provided by an automatic colour-colour discrimination pipe-line developed to discern the different populations of objects present in the GRB 001011 error box. Our software revealed three candidates based on single-epoch images. Second-epoch observations carried out approx. 3.2 days after the burst revealed that the most likely candidate had faded thus identifying it with the counterpart to the GRB. In deep R-band images obtained 7 months after the burst a faint (R=25.38 plus or minus 0.25) elongated object, presumably the host galaxy of GRB 001011, was detected at the position of the afterglow. The GRB 001011 afterglow is the first discovered with the assistance of colour-colour diagram techniques. We discuss the advantages of using this method and its application to boxes determined by future missions.

  19. The 2175 Å Extinction Feature in the Optical Afterglow Spectrum of GRB 180325A at z = 2.25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, T.; Heintz, K. E.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Malesani, D.; Bolmer, J.; Ledoux, C.; Arabsalmani, M.; Kaper, L.; Campana, S.; Starling, R. L. C.; Selsing, J.; Kann, D. A.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Schweyer, T.; Christensen, L.; Møller, P.; Japelj, J.; Perley, D.; Tanvir, N. R.; D’Avanzo, P.; Hartmann, D. H.; Hjorth, J.; Covino, S.; Sbarufatti, B.; Jakobsson, P.; Izzo, L.; Salvaterra, R.; D’Elia, V.; Xu, D.

    2018-06-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) extinction feature at 2175 Å is ubiquitously observed in the Galaxy but is rarely detected at high redshifts. Here we report the spectroscopic detection of the 2175 Å bump on the sightline to the γ-ray burst (GRB) afterglow GRB 180325A at z = 2.2486, the only unambiguous detection over the past 10 years of GRB follow-up, at four different epochs with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) and the Very Large Telescope (VLT)/X-shooter. Additional photometric observations of the afterglow are obtained with the Gamma-Ray burst Optical and Near-Infrared Detector (GROND). We construct the near-infrared to X-ray spectral energy distributions (SEDs) at four spectroscopic epochs. The SEDs are well described by a single power law and an extinction law with R V ≈ 4.4, A V ≈ 1.5, and the 2175 Å extinction feature. The bump strength and extinction curve are shallower than the average Galactic extinction curve. We determine a metallicity of [Zn/H] > ‑0.98 from the VLT/X-shooter spectrum. We detect strong neutral carbon associated with the GRB with equivalent width of W r(λ 1656) = 0.85 ± 0.05. We also detect optical emission lines from the host galaxy. Based on the Hα emission-line flux, the derived dust-corrected star formation rate is ∼46 ± 4 M ⊙ yr‑1 and the predicted stellar mass is log M */M ⊙ ∼ 9.3 ± 0.4, suggesting that the host galaxy is among the main-sequence star-forming galaxies. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated by the Nordic Optical Telescope Scientific Association at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos, La Palma, Spain, of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere under ESO program 0100.D‑0649(A).

  20. GRB 120729A: External Shock Origin for Both the Prompt Gamma-Ray Emission and Afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Li-Ye; Wang, Xiang-Gao; Zheng, WeiKang; Liang, En-Wei; Lin, Da-bin; Zhong, Shu-Qing; Zhang, Hai-Ming; Huang, Xiao-Li; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Zhang, Bing

    2018-06-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) 120729A was detected by Swift/BAT and Fermi/GBM, and then rapidly observed by Swift/XRT, Swift/UVOT, and ground-based telescopes. It had a single long and smooth γ-ray emission pulse, which extends continuously to the X-rays. We report Lick/KAIT observations of the source, and make temporal and spectral joint fits of the multiwavelength light curves of GRB 120729A. It exhibits achromatic light-curve behavior, consistent with the predictions of the external shock model. The light curves are decomposed into four typical phases: onset bump (Phase I), normal decay (Phase II), shallow decay (Phase III), and post-jet break (Phase IV). The spectral energy distribution (SED) evolves from prompt γ-ray emission to the afterglow with a photon index from Γ γ = 1.36 to Γ ≈ 1.75. There is no obvious evolution of the SED during the afterglow. The multiwavelength light curves from γ-ray to optical can be well modeled with an external shock by considering energy injection, and a time-dependent microphysics model with {ε }B\\propto {t}{α B} for the emission at early times, T< {T}0+157 {{s}}. Therefore, we conclude that both the prompt γ-ray emission and afterglow of GRB 120729A have the same external shock physical origin. Our model indicates that the ɛ B evolution can be described as a broken power-law function with α B,1 = 0.18 ± 0.04 and α B,2 = 0.84 ± 0.04. We also systematically investigate single-pulse GRBs in the Swift era, finding that only a small fraction of GRBs (GRBs 120729A, 051111, and 070318) are likely to originate from an external shock for both the prompt γ-ray emission and afterglow.

  1. The air afterglow revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, F.

    1972-01-01

    The air afterglow, 0 + NO2 chemiluminescence, is discussed in terms of fluorescence, photodissociation, and quantum theoretical calculations of NO2. The experimental results presented include pressure dependence, M-dependence, spectral dependence of P and M, temperature dependence, and infrared measurements. The NO2 energy transfer model is also discussed.

  2. Methodology in the Afterglow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofsess, Brooke Anne

    2013-01-01

    My dissertation study seeks to understand how artist-teacher renewal may be nurtured through aesthetic experiential play in a Masters of Art Education degree program, and beyond, as my former students/participants and myself experience finding ourselves in its afterglow. "Aesthetic experiential play" could be described as a playful,…

  3. Gamma-ray burst: evolution of the fireball and afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W. G.; Yang, P. B.; Lu, Y.

    2001-02-01

    After the main part of a GRB, its fireball continuously expands. With the hydrodynamic equations for the postburst fireball, the authors study the distribution of electrons which changes with time. The equations are solved numerically and the relations of the flux density of Optical afterglow in R band as well as the X-ray afterglow with time have been obtained. The results fit the observations quite well. Finally the shortcomings of the fireball + blast model are discussed.

  4. GRB-081029: A Step Towards Understanding Multiple Afterglow Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland Stephen T.

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of the unusual optical light curve of the gamma-ray burst-081029 at a redshift of z = 3.8474. We combine X-ray and optical observations from (Swift) with optical and infrared data from REM to obtain a detailed data set extending from approx 10(exp 2)s to approx 10(exp 5)s after the BAT trigger, and from approx.10 keV to 16,000 AA. The X-ray afterglow showed a shallow initial decay followed by u rapid decay after about 18,000 s. The optical afterglow, however, shows an uncharecteristic rise at about 5000 s that has no corresponding feature in the X-ray light curve. The data are not consistent with a single-component jet. It is possible that there are multiple physical components contributing to the afterglow of GRB-081029.

  5. Study of argon-oxygen flowing afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazánková, V.; Trunec, D.; Navrátil, Z.; Raud, J.; Krčma, F.

    2016-06-01

    The reaction kinetics in argon-oxygen flowing afterglow (post-discharge) was studied using NO titration and optical emission spectroscopy. The flowing DC post-discharge in argon-oxygen mixture was created in a quartz tube at the total gas pressure of 1000 Pa and discharge power of 90 W. The O(3P) atom concentration was determined by NO titration at different places along the flow tube. The optical emission spectra were also measured along the flow tube. Argon spectral lines, oxygen lines at 777 nm and 844.6 nm and atmospheric A-band of {{\\text{O}}2} were identified in the spectra. Rotational temperature of {{\\text{O}}2} was determined from the oxygen atmospheric A-band and also the outer wall temperature of the flow tube was measured by a thermocouple and by an IR thermometer. A zero-dimensional kinetic model for the reactions in the afterglow was developed. This model allows the time dependencies of particle concentrations and of gas temperature to be calculated. The wall recombination probability for O(3P) atoms {γ\\text{O≤ft(\\text{P}\\right)}}=≤ft(1.63+/- 0.06\\right)× {{10}-3} and wall deactivation probability for {{\\text{O}}2} (b {{}1}Σ\\text{g}+ ) molecules {γ{{\\text{O}2}≤ft(\\text{b}\\right)}}=≤ft(1.7+/- 0.1\\right)× {{10}-3} were determined from the fit of model results to experimental data. Sensitivity analysis was applied for the analysis of kinetic model in order to reveal the most important reactions in the model. The calculated gas temperature increases in the afterglow and then decreases at later afterglow times after reaching the maximum. This behavior is in good agreement with the spatial rotational temperature dependence. A similar trend was also observed at outer wall temperature measurement.

  6. Deep Photometry of GRB 041006 Afterglow: Hypernova Bump at Redshift z = 0.716

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanek, K. Z.; Garnavich, P. M.; Nutzman, P. A.; Hartman, J. D.; Garg, A.; Adelberger, K.; Berlind, P.; Bonanos, A. Z.; Calkins, M. L.; Challis, P.; Gaudi, B. S.; Holman, M. J.; Kirshner, R. P.; McLeod, B. A.; Osip, D.; Pimenova, T.; Reiprich, T. H.; Romanishin, W.; Spahr, T.; Tegler, S. C.; Zhao, X.

    2005-06-01

    We present deep optical photometry of the afterglow of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 041006 and its associated hypernova obtained over 65 days after detection (55 R-band epochs on 10 different nights). Our early data (t<4 days) joined with published GCN data indicate a steepening decay, approaching Fν~t-0.6 at early times (t<<1 day) and Fν~t-1.3 at late times. The break at tb=0.16+/-0.04 days is the earliest reported jet break among all GRB afterglows. During our first night, we obtained 39 exposures spanning 2.15 hr from 0.62 to 0.71 days after the burst that reveal a smooth afterglow, with an rms deviation of 0.024 mag from the local power-law fit, consistent with photometric errors. After t~4 days, the decay slows considerably, and the light curve remains approximately flat at R~24 mag for a month before decaying by another magnitude to reach R~25 mag 2 months after the burst. This ``bump'' is well fit by a k-corrected light curve of supernova SN 1998bw, but only if stretched by a factor of 1.38 in time. In comparison with the other GRB-related SN bumps, GRB 041006 stakes out new parameter space for GRBs/SNe, with a very bright and significantly stretched late-time SN light curve. Within a small sample of fairly well observed GRB/SN bumps, we see a hint of a possible correlation between their peak luminosity and their ``stretch factor,'' broadly similar to the well-studied Phillips relation for the Type Ia supernovae. Based on data from the MMT Observatory 6.5 m telescope, the 1.8 m Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope, the Magellan 6.5 m Baade and Clay telescopes, and the Keck II 10 m telescope.

  7. The two-component afterglow of Swift GRB 050802

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oates, S. R.; de Pasquale, M.; Page, M. J.; Blustin, A. J.; Zane, S.; McGowan, K.; Mason, K. O.; Poole, T. S.; Schady, P.; Roming, P. W. A.; Page, K. L.; Falcone, A.; Gehrels, N.

    2007-09-01

    This paper investigates GRB 050802, one of the best examples of a Swift gamma-ray burst afterglow that shows a break in the X-ray light curve, while the optical counterpart decays as a single power law. This burst has an optically bright afterglow of 16.5 mag, detected throughout the 170-650nm spectral range of the Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT) onboard Swift. Observations began with the X-ray Telescope and UVOT telescopes 286s after the initial trigger and continued for 1.2 ×106s. The X-ray light curve consists of three power-law segments: a rise until 420s, followed by a slow decay with α =0.63 +/-0.03 until 5000s, after which, the light curve decays faster with a slope of α3 =1.59 +/-0.03. The optical light curve decays as a single power law with αO =0.82 +/-0.03 throughout the observation. The X-ray data on their own are consistent with the break at 5000s being due to the end of energy injection. Modelling the optical to X-ray spectral energy distribution, we find that the optical afterglow cannot be produced by the same component as the X-ray emission at late times, ruling out a single-component afterglow. We therefore considered two-component jet models and find that the X-ray and optical emission is best reproduced by a model in which both components are energy injected for the duration of the observed afterglow and the X-ray break at 5000s is due to a jet break in the narrow component. This bright, well-observed burst is likely a guide for interpreting the surprising finding of Swift that bursts seldom display achromatic jet breaks.

  8. Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urata, Y.; Huang, K.; Takahashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations including sub-millimeter follow-ups for two GRB afterglows. The rapid SMA and multi-wavelength observations for GRB120326A revealed their complex emissions as the synchrotron self-inverse Compton radiation from reverse shock. The observations including ALMA for GRB131030A also showed the significant X-ray excess from the standard forward shock synchrotron model. Based on these results, we also discuss further observations for (A) constraining of the mass of progenitor with polarization, (B) the first confirmation of GRB jet collimation, and (C) revealing the origin of optically dark GRBs.

  9. Atmospheric pressure helium afterglow discharge detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Rice, G.; D'Silva, A.P.; Fassel, V.A.

    1985-04-05

    An apparatus for providing a simple, low-frequency, electrodeless discharge system for atmospheric pressure afterglow generation. A single quartz tube through which a gas mixture is passed is extended beyond a concentric electrode positioned thereabout. A grounding rod is placed directly above the tube outlet to permit optical viewing of the discharge between the electrodes.

  10. Atmospheric pressure helium afterglow discharge detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Gary; D'Silva, Arthur P.; Fassel, Velmer A.

    1986-05-06

    An apparatus for providing a simple, low-frequency electrodeless discharge system for atmospheric pressure afterglow generation. A single quartz tube through which a gas mixture is passed is extended beyond a concentric electrode positioned thereabout. A grounding rod is placed directly above the tube outlet to permit optical viewing of the discharge between the electrodes.

  11. Exploring short-GRB afterglow parameter space for observations in coincidence with gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, M.; Resmi, L.; Misra, Kuntal; Pai, Archana; Arun, K. G.

    2018-03-01

    Short duration Gamma Ray Bursts (SGRB) and their afterglows are among the most promising electromagnetic (EM) counterparts of Neutron Star (NS) mergers. The afterglow emission is broad-band, visible across the entire electromagnetic window from γ-ray to radio frequencies. The flux evolution in these frequencies is sensitive to the multidimensional afterglow physical parameter space. Observations of gravitational wave (GW) from BNS mergers in spatial and temporal coincidence with SGRB and associated afterglows can provide valuable constraints on afterglow physics. We run simulations of GW-detected BNS events and assuming that all of them are associated with a GRB jet which also produces an afterglow, investigate how detections or non-detections in X-ray, optical and radio frequencies can be influenced by the parameter space. We narrow down the regions of afterglow parameter space for a uniform top-hat jet model, which would result in different detection scenarios. We list inferences which can be drawn on the physics of GRB afterglows from multimessenger astronomy with coincident GW-EM observations.

  12. On the anomalous afterglow seen in a chameleon afterglow search

    SciT

    Steffen, Jason H.; Baumbaugh, Alan; Chou, Aaron S.

    2012-05-01

    We present data from our investigation of the anomalous orange-colored afterglow that was seen in the GammeV Chameleon Afterglow Search (CHASE). These data include information about the broadband color of the observed glow, the relationship between the glow and the temperature of the apparatus, and other data taken prior to, and during the science operations of CHASE. While differing in several details, the generic properties of the afterglow from CHASE are similar to luminescence seen in some vacuum compounds. Contamination from this, or similar, luminescent signatures will likely impact the design of implementation of future experiments involving single photon detectorsmore » and high intensity light sources in a cryogenic environment.« less

  13. Early afterglows in wind environments revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Y. C.; Wu, X. F.; Dai, Z. G.

    2005-10-01

    When a cold shell sweeps up the ambient medium, a forward shock and a reverse shock will form. We analyse the reverse-forward shocks in a wind environment, including their dynamics and emission. An early afterglow is emitted from the shocked shell, e.g. an optical flash may emerge. The reverse shock behaves differently in two approximations: the relativistic and Newtonian cases, which depend on the parameters, e.g. the initial Lorentz factor of the ejecta. If the initial Lorentz factor is much less than 114E1/453Δ-1/40,12A-1/4*,-1, the early reverse shock is Newtonian. This may take place for the wider of a two-component jet, an orphan afterglow caused by a low initial Lorentz factor and so on. The synchrotron self-absorption effect is significant especially for the Newtonian reverse shock case, as the absorption frequency νa is larger than the cooling frequency νc and the minimum synchrotron frequency νm for typical parameters. For the optical to X-ray band, the flux is nearly unchanged with time during the early period, which may be a diagnostic for the low initial Lorentz factor of the ejecta in a wind environment. We also investigate the early light curves with different wind densities and compare them with those in the interstellar medium model.

  14. Gamma Ray Bursts-Afterglows and Counterparts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J

    1998-01-01

    Several breakthrough discoveries were made last year of x-ray, optical and radio afterglows and counterparts to gamma-ray bursts, and a redshift has been associated with at least one of these. These discoveries were made possible by the fast, accurate gamma-ray burst locations of the BeppoSAX satellite. It is now generally believed that the burst sources are at cosmological distances and that they represent the most powerful explosions in the Universe. These observations also open new possibilities for the study of early star formation, the physics of extreme conditions and perhaps even cosmology. This session will concentrate on recent x-ray, optical and radio afterglow observations of gamma-ray bursts, associated redshift measurements, and counterpart observations. Several review and theory talks will also be presented, along with a summary of the astrophysical implications of the observations. There will be additional poster contributions on observations of gamma-ray burst source locations at wavelengths other than gamma rays. Posters are also solicited that describe new observational capabilities for rapid follow-up observations of gamma-ray bursts.

  15. The Ultra-long GRB 111209A. II. Prompt to Afterglow and Afterglow Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratta, G.; Gendre, B.; Atteia, J. L.; Boër, M.; Coward, D. M.; De Pasquale, M.; Howell, E.; Klotz, A.; Oates, S.; Piro, L.

    2013-12-01

    The "ultra-long" gamma-ray burst GRB 111209A at redshift z = 0.677 is the longest GRB ever observed thus far, with a rest frame prompt emission duration of ~4 hr. In order to explain the burst exceptional longevity, a low-metallicity blue supergiant progenitor was invoked. In this article we further constrain the phenomenology and progenitor properties of this peculiar GRB by performing a multiband temporal and spectral analysis of both the prompt and the afterglow emission. We use proprietary and publicly available data from Swift, Konus WIND, XMM-Newton, and TAROT, as well as from other ground-based optical and radio telescopes. We find some peculiar properties that are possibly connected to the exceptional nature of this burst, namely: (1) an unprecedented large optical delay of 410 ± 50 s between the peak time in gamma-rays and the peak time in the optical of a marked multiwavelength flare; (2) multiwavelength prompt emission spectral modeling requires a certain amount of dust in the circumburst environment. The dust produces a rest frame visual extinction of AV = 0.3-1.5 mag, and may undergo destruction at late times; and (3) we detect the presence of a hard spectral extra power-law component at the end of the X-ray steep steep decay phase and before the start of the X-ray afterglow, which has never been revealed thus far in past GRBs. The optical afterglow shows more usual properties; it has a flux power-law decay with an index of 1.6 ± 0.1 and a late rebrightening feature observed at ~1.1 the day after the first Burst Alert Telescope trigger. We discuss our findings in the context of several possible interpretations that have been given thus far of the complex multiband GRB phenomenology and propose a binary channel formation for the blue supergiant progenitor.

  16. The SEDs and Host Galaxies of the Dustiest GRB Afterglows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruhler, T.; Greiner, J.; Schady, P.; Savaglio, S.; Afonso, P. M. J.; Clemens, C.; Elliott, J.; Filgas, R.; Gruber, D.; Kann, D. A.; hide

    2011-01-01

    The afterglows and host galaxies of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer unique opportunities to study star-forming galaxies in the high-z Universe, Until recently, however. the information inferred from GRB follow-up observations was mostly limited to optically bright afterglows. biasing all demographic studies against sight-lines that contain large amounts of dust. Aims. Here we present afterglow and host observations for a sample of bursts that are exemplary of previously missed ones because of high visual extinction (A(sub v) (Sup GRB) approx > 1 mag) along the sight-line. This facilitates an investigation of the properties, geometry and location of the absorbing dust of these poorly-explored host galaxies. and a comparison to hosts from optically-selected samples. Methods. This work is based on GROND optical/NIR and Swift/XRT X-ray observations of the afterglows, and multi-color imaging for eight GRB hosts. The afterglow and galaxy spectral energy distributions yield detailed insight into physical properties such as the dust and metal content along the GRB sight-line as well as galaxy-integrated characteristics like the host's stellar mass, luminosity. color-excess and star-formation rate. Results. For the eight afterglows considered in this study we report for the first time the redshift of GRBs 081109 (z = 0.97S7 +/- 0.0005). and the visual extinction towards GRBs 0801109 (A(sub v) (Sup GRB) = 3.4(sup +0.4) (sub -0.3) mag) and l00621A (A(sub v) (Sup GRB) = 3.8 +/- 0.2 mag), which are among the largest ever derived for GRB afterglows. Combined with non-extinguished GRBs. there is a strong anti-correlation between the afterglow's metals-to-dust ratio and visual extinction. The hosts of the dustiest afterglows are diverse in their properties, but on average redder(((R - K)(sub AB)) approximates 1.6 mag), more luminous ( approximates 0.9 L (sup *)) and massive ((log M(sup *) [M(solar]) approximates 9.8) than the hosts of optically-bright events. We hence probe

  17. A Correlation Between the Intrinsic Brightness and Average Decay Rate of Gamma-Ray Burst X-Ray Afterglow Light Curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, J. L.; Oates, S. R.; De Pasquale, M.; Kocevski, D.

    2016-01-01

    We present a correlation between the average temporal decay (alpha X,avg, greater than 200 s) and early-time luminosity (LX,200 s) of X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts as observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. Both quantities are measured relative to a rest-frame time of 200 s after the gamma-ray trigger. The luminosity â€" average decay correlation does not depend on specific temporal behavior and contains one scale-independent quantity minimizing the role of selection effects. This is a complementary correlation to that discovered by Oates et al. in the optical light curves observed by the Swift Ultraviolet Optical Telescope. The correlation indicates that, on average, more luminous X-ray afterglows decay faster than less luminous ones, indicating some relative mechanism for energy dissipation. The X-ray and optical correlations are entirely consistent once corrections are applied and contamination is removed. We explore the possible biases introduced by different light-curve morphologies and observational selection effects, and how either geometrical effects or intrinsic properties of the central engine and jet could explain the observed correlation.

  18. Hidden in the light: Magnetically induced afterglow from trapped chameleon fields

    SciT

    Gies, Holger; Mota, David F.; Shaw, Douglas J.

    2008-01-15

    We propose an afterglow phenomenon as a unique trace of chameleon fields in optical experiments. The vacuum interaction of a laser pulse with a magnetic field can lead to a production and subsequent trapping of chameleons in the vacuum chamber, owing to their mass dependence on the ambient matter density. Magnetically induced reconversion of the trapped chameleons into photons creates an afterglow over macroscopic timescales that can conveniently be searched for by current optical experiments. We show that the chameleon parameter range accessible to available laboratory technology is comparable to scales familiar from astrophysical stellar energy-loss arguments. We analyze quantitativelymore » the afterglow properties for various experimental scenarios and discuss the role of potential background and systematic effects. We conclude that afterglow searches represent an ideal tool to aim at the production and detection of cosmologically relevant scalar fields in the laboratory.« less

  19. Transient survey rates for orphan afterglows from compact merger jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Gavin P.; Tanaka, Masaomi; Kobayashi, Shiho

    2018-06-01

    Orphan afterglows from short γ-ray bursts (GRBs) are potential candidates for electromagnetic (EM) counterpart searches to gravitational wave (GW) detected neutron star or neutron star black hole mergers. Various jet dynamical and structure models have been proposed that can be tested by the detection of a large sample of GW-EM counterparts. We make predictions for the expected rate of optical transients from these jet models for future survey telescopes, without a GW or GRB trigger. A sample of merger jets is generated in the redshift limits 0 ≤ z ≤ 3.0, and the expected peak r-band flux and time-scale above the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) or Zwicky Transient Factory (ZTF) detection threshold, mr = 24.5 and 20.4, respectively, is calculated. General all-sky rates are shown for mr ≤ 26.0 and mr ≤ 21.0. The detected orphan and GRB afterglow rate depends on jet model, typically 16≲ R≲ 76 yr-1 for the LSST, and 2≲ R ≲ 8 yr-1 for ZTF. An excess in the rate of orphan afterglows for a survey to a depth of mr ≤ 26 would indicate that merger jets have a dominant low-Lorentz factor population, or the jets exhibit intrinsic jet structure. Careful filtering of transients is required to successfully identify orphan afterglows from either short- or long-GRB progenitors.

  20. GRB 110715A: the peculiar multiwavelength evolution of the first afterglow detected by ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Hancock, P. J.; Jóhannesson, G.; Murphy, Tara; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Gorosabel, J.; Kann, D. A.; Krühler, T.; Oates, S. R.; Japelj, J.; Thöne, C. C.; Lundgren, A.; Perley, D. A.; Malesani, D.; de Gregorio Monsalvo, I.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; D'Elia, V.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Garcia-Appadoo, D.; Goldoni, P.; Greiner, J.; Hu, Y.-D.; Jelínek, M.; Jeong, S.; Kamble, A.; Klose, S.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Llorente, A.; Martín, S.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Rossi, A.; Schady, P.; Sparre, M.; Sudilovsky, V.; Tello, J. C.; Updike, A.; Wiersema, K.; Zhang, B.-B.

    2017-02-01

    We present the extensive follow-up campaign on the afterglow of GRB 110715A at 17 different wavelengths, from X-ray to radio bands, starting 81 s after the burst and extending up to 74 d later. We performed for the first time a GRB afterglow observation with the ALMA observatory. We find that the afterglow of GRB 110715A is very bright at optical and radio wavelengths. We use the optical and near-infrared spectroscopy to provide further information about the progenitor's environment and its host galaxy. The spectrum shows weak absorption features at a redshift z = 0.8225, which reveal a host-galaxy environment with low ionization, column density, and dynamical activity. Late deep imaging shows a very faint galaxy, consistent with the spectroscopic results. The broad-band afterglow emission is modelled with synchrotron radiation using a numerical algorithm and we determine the best-fitting parameters using Bayesian inference in order to constrain the physical parameters of the jet and the medium in which the relativistic shock propagates. We fitted our data with a variety of models, including different density profiles and energy injections. Although the general behaviour can be roughly described by these models, none of them are able to fully explain all data points simultaneously. GRB 110715A shows the complexity of reproducing extensive multiwavelength broad-band afterglow observations, and the need of good sampling in wavelength and time and more complex models to accurately constrain the physics of GRB afterglows.

  1. Correlations of Prompt and Afterglow Emission in Swift Long and Short Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrel, Neil; Barthelmy, S. d.; Burrows, D. N.; Cannizzo, J. K.; Chincarini, G.; Feinmore, E.; Kouveliotou, C.; O'Brien, P.; Palmer, D. M.; Racusin, J.; hide

    2008-01-01

    Correlation studies of prompt and afterglow emissions from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) between different spectral bands has been difficult to do in the past because few bursts had comprehensive and intercomparable afterglow measurements. In this paper we present a large and uniform data set for correlation analysis based on bursts detected by the Swift mission. For the first time, short and long bursts can be analyzed and compared. It is found for both classes that the optical, X-ray and gamma-ray emissions are linearly correlated, but with a large spread about the correlation line; stronger bursts tend to have brighter afterglows, and bursts with brighter X-ray afterglow tend to have brighter optical afterglow. Short bursts are, on average, weaker in both prompt and afterglow emissions. No short bursts are seen with extremely low optical to X-ray ratio as occurs for 'dark' long bursts. Although statistics are still poor for short bursts, there is no evidence yet for a subgroup of short bursts with high extinction as there is for long bursts. Long bursts are detected in the dark category at the same fraction as for pre-Swift bursts. Interesting cases are discovered of long bursts that are detected in the optical, and yet have low enough optical to X-ray ratio to be classified as dark. For the prompt emission, short and long bursts have different average tracks on flux vs fluence plots. In Swift, GRB detections tend to be fluence limited for short bursts and flux limited for long events.

  2. The Late-time Afterglow of the Extremely Energetic Short Burst GRB 090510 Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guelbenzu, A. Nicuesa; Klose, S.; Kruehler, T.; Greiner, J.; Rossi, A.; Kann, D. A.; Olivares, F.; Rau, A.; Afonso, P. M. J.; Elliott, J.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Context. The Swift discovery of the short burst GRB 090510 has raised considerable attention mainly because of two reasons: first, it had a bright optical afterglow, and second it is among the most energetic events detected so far within the entire GRB population (long plus short). The afterglow of GRB 090510 was observed with Swift/UVOT and Swift/XRT and evidence of a jet break around 1.5 ks after the burst has been reported in the literature, implying that after this break the optical and X-ray light curve should fade with the same decay slope. Aims. As noted by several authors, the post-break decay slope seen in the UVOT data is much shallower than the steep decay in the X-ray band, pointing to a (theoretically hard to understand) excess of optical flux at late times. We assess here the validity of this peculiar behavior. Methods. We reduced and analyzed new afterglow light-curve data obtained with the multichannel imager GROND. These additional g'r'i'z' data were then combined with the UVOT and XRT data to study the behavior of the afterglow at late times more stringently. Results. Based on the densely sampled data set obtained with GROND, we find that the optical afterglow of GRB 090510 did indeed enter a steep decay phase starting around 22 ks after the burst. During this time the GROND optical light curve is achromatic, and its slope is identical to the slope of the X-ray data. In combination with the UVOT data this implies that a second break must have occurred in the optical light curve around 22 ks post burst, which, however, has no obvious counterpart in the X-ray band, contradicting the interpretation that this could be another jet break. Conclusions. The GROND data provide the missing piece of evidence that the optical afterglow of GRB 090510 did follow a post-jet break evolution at late times. The break seen in the optical light curve around 22 ks in combination with its missing counterpart in the X-ray band could be due to the passage of the

  3. Radio afterglow rebrightening: evidence for multiple active phases in gamma-ray burst central engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long-Biao; Zhang, Zhi-Bin; Rice, Jared

    2015-09-01

    The rebrightening phenomenon is an interesting feature in some X-ray, optical, and radio afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Here, we propose a possible energy-supply assumption to explain the rebrightenings of radio afterglows, in which the central engine with multiple active phases can supply at least two GRB pulses in a typical GRB duration time. Considering the case of double pulses supplied by the central engine, the double pulses have separate physical parameters, except for the number density of the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM). Their independent radio afterglows are integrated by the ground detectors to form the rebrightening phenomenon. In this Letter, we firstly simulate diverse rebrightening light curves under consideration of different and independent physical parameters. Using this assumption, we also give our best fit to the radio afterglow of GRB 970508 at three frequencies of 1.43, 4.86, and 8.46 GHz. We suggest that the central engine may be active continuously at a timescale longer than that of a typical GRB duration time as many authors have suggested (e.g., Zhang et al., Astrophys. J. 787:66, 2014; Gao and Mészáros, Astrophys. J. 802:90, 2015), and that it may supply enough energy to cause the long-lasting rebrightenings observed in some GRB afterglows.

  4. OT1_mhuang01_1: GRB Afterglow Photometry with Herschel Infrared Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M.

    2010-07-01

    GRB Afterglow Photometry with Herschel Infrared Cameras (GRAPHICS) Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous explosions in the universe. It has been difficult to obtain a full spectral picture of the phenomena in the short period when GRBs become ``alive'', i.e. when they generate bursts in Gamma-ray and produce afterglows in other wavelengths. Between NIR (12micron) and submillimeter (850micron) there lies nearly two orders of magnitude of spectral range where GRB afterglows have never been detected. Herschel is unique in its cutting edge sensitivity, efficiency, and readiness in FIR observations, and is capable of detecting GRB afterglows. Observing GRB afterglows with Herschel would greatly enrich our understanding of GRB physics and conditions of the Universe in early epochs. We propose Target of Opportunity studies using the SPIRE and PACS instruments of Herschel to observe 3 bright GRB afterglows, each within a few hours to a few tens of days after burst. We will make follow-up observations after the initial one to photometrically measure GRB light curves and IR SEDs. We will make ground optical observations to compliment Herschel data, and have the the GRB community informed. Observing the forward shock peak in the FIR light curve and compare it (both the flux and time) with those in the optical and radio bands would give a unambiguous test to the fireball model, and offer a direct measurement of the density profile of the circumburst material. Catching the short-lived reverse shock emission and measure its magnitude would lead to constraints on some important parameters of the GRB ejecta and address the unknown composition of GRBs, baryonic vs. magnetic.

  5. `Orphan' afterglows in the Universal structured jet model for γ-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Elena M.; Perna, Rosalba; Daigne, Frédéric

    2008-10-01

    The paucity of reliable achromatic breaks in γ-ray burst afterglow light curves motivates independent measurements of the jet aperture. Serendipitous searches of afterglows, especially at radio wavelengths, have long been the classic alternative. These survey data have been interpreted assuming a uniformly emitting jet with sharp edges (`top-hat' jet), in that case the ratio of weakly relativistically beamed afterglows to GRBs scales with the jet solid angle. In this paper, we consider, instead, a very wide outflow with a luminosity that decreases across the emitting surface. In particular, we adopt the universal structured jet (USJ) model, which is an alternative to the top-hat model for the structure of the jet. However, the interpretation of the survey data is very different: in the USJ model, we only observe the emission within the jet aperture and the observed ratio of prompt emission rate to afterglow rate should solely depend on selection effects. We compute the number and rate of afterglows expected in all-sky snapshot observations as a function of the survey sensitivity. We find that the current (negative) results for OA searches are in agreement with our expectations. In radio and X-ray bands, this was mainly due to the low sensitivity of the surveys, while in the optical band the sky coverage was not sufficient. In general, we find that X-ray surveys are poor tools for OA searches, if the jet is structured. On the other hand, the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm radio survey and future instruments like the Allen Telescope Array (in the radio band) and especially GAIA, Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (in the optical band) will have chances to detect afterglows.

  6. Jet simulations and gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eerten, H. J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Keppens, R.

    2011-01-01

    The conventional derivation of the gamma-ray burst afterglow jet break time uses only the blast wave fluid Lorentz factor and therefore leads to an achromatic break. We show that in general gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks are chromatic across the self-absorption break. Depending on circumstances, the radio jet break may be postponed significantly. Using high-accuracy adaptive mesh fluid simulations in one dimension, coupled to a detailed synchrotron radiation code, we demonstrate that this is true even for the standard fireball model and hard-edged jets. We confirm these effects with a simulation in two dimensions. The frequency dependence of the jet break is a result of the angle dependence of the emission, the changing optical depth in the self-absorbed regime and the shape of the synchrotron spectrum in general. In the optically thin case the conventional analysis systematically overestimates the jet break time, leading to inferred opening angles that are underestimated by a factor of ˜1.3 and explosion energies that are underestimated by a factor of ˜1.7, for explosions in a homogeneous environment. The methods presented in this paper can be applied to adaptive mesh simulations of arbitrary relativistic fluid flows. All analysis presented here makes the usual assumption of an on-axis observer.

  7. Study of nitrogen flowing afterglow with mercury vapor injection

    SciT

    Mazánková, V., E-mail: mazankova@fch.vutbr.cz; Krčma, F.; Trunec, D.

    2014-10-21

    The reaction kinetics in nitrogen flowing afterglow with mercury vapor addition was studied by optical emission spectroscopy. The DC flowing post-discharge in pure nitrogen was created in a quartz tube at the total gas pressure of 1000 Pa and discharge power of 130 W. The mercury vapors were added into the afterglow at the distance of 30 cm behind the active discharge. The optical emission spectra were measured along the flow tube. Three nitrogen spectral systems – the first positive, the second positive, and the first negative, and after the mercury vapor addition also the mercury resonance line at 254more » nm in the spectrum of the second order were identified. The measurement of the spatial dependence of mercury line intensity showed very slow decay of its intensity and the decay rate did not depend on the mercury concentration. In order to explain this behavior, a kinetic model for the reaction in afterglow was developed. This model showed that the state Hg(6 {sup 3}P{sub 1}), which is the upper state of mercury UV resonance line at 254 nm, is produced by the excitation transfer from nitrogen N{sub 2}(A{sup 3}Σ{sup +}{sub u}) metastables to mercury atoms. However, the N{sub 2}(A{sup 3}Σ{sup +}{sub u}) metastables are also produced by the reactions following the N atom recombination, and this limits the decay of N{sub 2}(A{sup 3}Σ{sup +}{sub u}) metastable concentration and results in very slow decay of mercury resonance line intensity. It was found that N atoms are the most important particles in this late nitrogen afterglow, their volume recombination starts a chain of reactions which produce excited states of molecular nitrogen. In order to explain the decrease of N atom concentration, it was also necessary to include the surface recombination of N atoms to the model. The surface recombination was considered as a first order reaction and wall recombination probability γ = (1.35 ± 0.04) × 10{sup −6} was determined from the experimental data. Also

  8. Radio observations of GRB 100418a: Test of an energy injection model explaining long-lasting GRB afterglows

    SciT

    Moin, A.; Wang, Z.; Chandra, P.

    We present the results of our radio observational campaign of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 100418a, for which we used the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the Very Large Array, and the Very Long Baseline Array. GRB 100418a was a peculiar GRB with unusual X-ray and optical afterglow profiles featuring a plateau phase with a very shallow rise. This observed plateau phase was believed to be due to a continued energy injection mechanism that powered the forward shock, giving rise to an unusual and long-lasting afterglow. The radio afterglow of GRB 100418a was detectable several weeks after the prompt emission. We conducted long-termmore » monitoring observations of the afterglow and attempted to test the energy injection model advocating that the continuous energy injection is due to shells of material moving at a wide range of Lorentz factors. We obtained an upper limit of γ < 7 for the expansion rate of the GRB 100418a radio afterglow, indicating that the range-of-Lorentz factor model could only be applicable for relatively slow-moving ejecta. A preferred explanation could be that continued activity of the central engine may have powered the long-lasting afterglow.« less

  9. The Very Red Afterglow of GRB 000418: Further Evidence for Dust Extinction in a Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, S.; Stecklum, B.; Masetti, N.; Pian, E.; Palazzi, E.; Henden, A. A.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fischer, O.; Gorosabel, J.; Sánchez-Fernández, C.; Butler, D.; Ott, Th.; Hippler, S.; Kasper, M.; Weiss, R.; Castro-Tirado, A.; Greiner, J.; Bartolini, C.; Guarnieri, A.; Piccioni, A.; Benetti, S.; Ghinassi, F.; Magazzú, A.; Hurley, K.; Cline, T.; Trombka, J.; McClanahan, T.; Starr, R.; Goldsten, J.; Gold, R.; Mazets, E.; Golenetskii, S.; Noeske, K.; Papaderos, P.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Tanvir, N.; Oscoz, A.; Muñoz, J. A.; Castro Cerón, J. M.

    2000-12-01

    We report near-infrared and optical follow-up observations of the afterglow of the GRB 000418 starting 2.5 days after the occurrence of the burst and extending over nearly 7 weeks. GRB 000418 represents the second case for which the afterglow was initially identified by observations in the near-infrared. During the first 10 days its R-band afterglow was well characterized by a single power-law decay with a slope of 0.86. However, at later times the temporal evolution of the afterglow flattens with respect to a simple power-law decay. Attributing this to an underlying host galaxy, we find its magnitude to be R=23.9 and an intrinsic afterglow decay slope of 1.22. The afterglow was very red with R-K~4 mag. The observations can be explained by an adiabatic, spherical fireball solution and a heavy reddening due to dust extinction in the host galaxy. This supports the picture that (long) bursts are associated with events in star-forming regions. Based on observations collected at the Bologna Astronomical Observatory in Loiano, Italy; at the TNG, Canary Islands, Spain; at the German-Spanish Astronomical Centre, Calar Alto, operated by the Max-Planck-Institut for Astronomy, Heidelberg, jointly with the Spanish National Commission for Astronomy; at the US Naval Observatory; and at the UK Infrared Telescope.

  10. GRB afterglows in the nonrelativistic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. F.; Lu, T.

    2008-10-01

    When discussing the afterglows of gamma-ray bursts analytically, it is usually assumed that the external shock is always ultra-relativisitc, with the bulk Lorentz factor much larger than 1. However, we show that the deceleration of the external shock is actually very quick. The afterglow may typically enter the nonrelativistic phase in several days to teens of days, and may even enter the deep Newtonian phase in tens of days to several months. One thus should be careful in using those familiar analytical expressions that are derived only under the ultra-relativistic assumption. To explain the observed afterglows that typically last for a few weeks to several months, we need to consider the dynamics and radiation in the nonrelativisitic phase.

  11. GRB 081029: A Gamma-Ray Burst with a Multi-Component Afterglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Stephen T.; DePasquale, Massimiliano; Mao, Jirong; Sakamoto, Taka; Shady, Patricia; Covino, Stefano; Yi-Zhong, Fan; Zhi-Ping, Jin; D'Avanzo, Paolo; Antonelli, Angelo; hide

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of the unusual optical light curve of the gamma-ray burst GRB 081029, a long-soft burst with a redshift of z = 3.8479. We combine X-ray and optical observations from the Swift X-Ray Telescope and the Swift UltraViolet Optical Telescope with ground-based optical and infrared data obtained using the REM and ROTSE telescopes to construct a detailed data set extending from 86 s to approx. 100000 s after the BAT trigger. Our data cover a wide energy range, from 10 keV to 0.77 eV (1.24 A to 16000 A). The X-ray afterglow shows a shallow initial decay followed by a rapid decay starting at about 18000 s. The optical and infrared afterglow, however, shows an uncharacteristic rise at about 5000 s that does not correspond to any feature in the X-ray light curve. Our data are not consistent with synchrotron radiation from a jet interacting with an external medium, a two-component jet, or continuous energy injection from the central engine. We find that the the optical light curves can be broadly explained by a collision between two ejecta shells within a two-component jet. A growing number of gamma-ray burst afterglows are consistent with complex jets, which suggests that some (or all) gamma-ray burst jets are complex and will require detailed modelling to fully understand them.

  12. Fermi and Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Population Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, Judith L.; Oates, S. R.; Schady, P.; Burrows, D. N.; dePasquale, M.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; Koch, S.; McEnery, J.; Piran, T.; hide

    2011-01-01

    The new and extreme population of GRBs detected by Fermi -LAT shows several new features in high energy gamma-rays that are providing interesting and unexpected clues into GRB prompt and afterglow emission mechanisms. Over the last 6 years, it has been Swift that has provided the robust dataset of UV/optical and X-ray afterglow observations that opened many windows into components of GRB emission structure. The relationship between the LAT detected GRBs and the well studied, fainter, less energetic GRBs detected by Swift -BAT is only beginning to be explored by multi-wavelength studies. We explore the large sample of GRBs detected by BAT only, BAT and Fermi -GBM, and GBM and LAT, focusing on these samples separately in order to search for statistically significant differences between the populations, using only those GRBs with measured redshifts in order to physically characterize these objects. We disentangle which differences are instrumental selection effects versus intrinsic properties, in order to better understand the nature of the special characteristics of the LAT bursts.

  13. Fermi and Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Population Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, J. L.; Oates, S. R.; Schady, P.; Burrows, D. N.; de Pasquale, M.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; Koch, S.; McEnery, J.; Piran, T.; hide

    2011-01-01

    The new and extreme population of GRBs detected by Fermi-LAT shows several new features in high energy gamma-rays that are providing interesting and unexpected clues into GRB prompt and afterglow emission mechanisms. Over the last 6 years, it has been Swift that has provided the robust data set of UV/optical and X-ray afterglow observations that opened many windows into components of GRB emission structure. The relationship between the LAT GRBs and the well studied, fainter, less energetic GRBs detected by Swift-BAT is only beginning to be explored by multiwavelength studies. We explore the large sample of GRBs detected by BAT only, BAT and Fermi-GBM, and GBM and LAT, focusing on these samples separately in order to search for statistically significant differences between the populations, using only those GRBs with measured redshifts in order to physically characterize these objects. We disentangle which differences are instrumental selection effects versus intrinsic properties, in order to better understand the nature of the special characteristics of the LAT bursts.

  14. Fermi and Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Population Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, Judith I.

    2011-01-01

    The new and extreme population of GRBs detected by Fermi-LAT shows several new features in high energy gamma-rays that are providing interesting and unexpected clues into GRB prompt and afterglow emission mechanisms. Over the last 6 years, it has been Swift that has provided the robust data set of UV/optical and X-ray afterglow observations that opened many windows into components of GRB emission structure. The relationship between the LAT GRBs and the well studied, fainter, less energetic GRBs detected by Swift-BAT is only beginning to be explored by multi-wavelength studies. We explore the large sample of GRBs detected by BAT only, BAT and Fermi-GBM, and GBM and LAT, focusing on these samples separately in order to search for statistically significant differences between the populations, using only those GRBs with measured redshifts in order to physically characterize these objects. We disentangle which differences are instrumental selection effects versus intrinsic properties, in order to better understand the nature of the special characteristics of the LAT bursts.

  15. Multiband Optical Follow-up Observations of GRB 020813 at the Kiso and Bisei Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urata, Y.; Nishiura, S.; Miyata, T.; Mito, H.; Kawabata, T.; Nakada, Y.; Aoki, T.; Soyano, T.; Tarusawa, K.; Yoshida, A.; Tamagawa, T.; Makishima, K.

    2003-09-01

    Observations were made of the optical afterglow of GRB 020813 (Fox, Blake, & Price) with the Kiso observatory 1.05 m Schmidt telescope and the Bisei astronomical observatory 1.01 m telescope. Four-band (B, V, R, and I) photometric data points were obtained on 2002 August 13 (10:52-16:46 UT), or 0.346-0.516 days after the burst. In order to investigate the early-time (<1 day) evolution of the afterglow, four-band light curves were produced by analyzing the data taken at these two astronomical observatories as well as the publicly released data taken using the Magellan Baade telescope (Gladders & Hall). The light curves can be approximated by a broken power law, of which the indices are approximately 0.46 and 1.33 before and after a break at ~0.2 days, respectively. The optical spectral index stayed approximately constant at ~0.9 over 0.17-4.07 days after the burst. Since the temporal decay index after the break and the spectral index measured at that time are both consistent with those predicted by a spherical expansion model, the early break is unlikely to be a jet break but is likely to represent the end of an early bump in the light curve, as was observed in the optical afterglow of GRB 021004.

  16. Multiband Optical Follow-Up Observations of GRB 020813 AT KISO and Bisei Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urata, Y.; Nishiura, S.; Miyata, T.; Mito, H.; Kawabata, T.; Nakada, Y.; Aoki, T.; Soyano, T.; Tarusawa, K.; Yoshida, A.; Tamagawa, T.; Makishima, K.

    Four color (l B,V,R,I) photometric observations of the optical afterglow of GRB 020813 were obtained from 0.346 to 0.516 days after the burst. In order to investigate the early-time (<1 day) evolution of the afterglow, four-band light curves were produced by analyzing the data taken at these two sites, as well as publicly released data taken by the Magellan Baade telescope. The light curves can be approximated by a broken power law, of which the indices are approximately 0.46 and 1.33 before and after a break at ˜0.2 days, respectively. The optical spectral index stayed approximately constant at ˜0.9 over 0.17--4.07 days after the burst. Since the temporal decay index after the break and the spectral index measured at that time are both consistent with those predicted by a spherical expansion model, the early break is unlikely to be a jet break, but likely to represent the end of an early bump in the light curve as was observed in the optical afterglow of GRB 021004.

  17. Multi-wavelength observations of the GRB 080319B afterglow and the modeling constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, S. B.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Jelínek, M.; Kamble, A. P.; Gorosabel, J.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Prins, S.; Oreiro, R.; Chantry, V.; Trushkin, S.; Bremer, M.; Winters, J. M.; Pozanenko, A.; Krugly, Yu.; Slyusarev, I.; Kornienko, G.; Erofeeva, A.; Misra, K.; Ramprakash, A. N.; Mohan, V.; Bhattacharya, D.; Volnova, A.; Plá, J.; Ibrahimov, M.; Im, M.; Volvach, A.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2009-09-01

    Context: We present observations of the GRB 080319B afterglow at optical, mm, and radio frequencies between a few hours and 67 days after the burst. Aims: We attempt to understand the nature of this extraordinarily bright explosion based on the observed properties and its comparison with afterglow models. Methods: Our observations and other published multiwavelength data were used to reconstruct the light curves and spectral energy distributions of the burst afterglow. Results: Our results indicate that the observed features of the afterglow agrees equally well with the inter stellar matter and the stellar wind density profiles of the circumburst medium. In the case of both density profiles, the maximum synchrotron frequency νm is below optical value and the cooling break frequency νc is below X-rays, ~104 s after the burst. The derived value of the Lorentz factor at the time of naked-eye brightness is also ~300 for a corresponding blast-wave size of ~1018 cm. Conclusions: The numerical fit to the multiwavelength afterglow data constraints the values of physical parameters and the emission mechanism of the burst. Based on observations obtained with the 0.22 m telescope at Russia the 0.7 m telescope at of Kharkov University, Ukraine, the 0.8 m telescope at Observatorio del Teide (IAC-80), Spain the 1.2 m Mercator telescope at La Palma, Spain, the 1.5 m telescope of Maidanak observatory Uzbekistan, the 2.0 m IGO Telescope at IUCAA Pune, India, the 2.5 m NOT, the PdB millimeter interferometric array France, the RATAN-600 Radio Telescope at Russia and the RT-22 radio telescope of CrAO, Ukraine.

  18. Afterglow Observations Shed New Light on the Nature of X-ray Flashes

    SciT

    Granot, J

    X-ray flashes (XRFs) and X-ray rich gamma-ray bursts (XRGRBs) share many observational characteristics with long duration ({approx}> 2 s) GRBs, but the reason for which the spectral energy distribution of their prompt emission peaks at lower photon energies, E{sub p}, is still a subject of debate. Although many different models have been invoked in order to explain the lower values of E{sub p}, their implications for the afterglow emission were not considered in most cases, mainly because observations of XRF afterglows have become available only recently. Here we examine the predictions of the various XRF models for the afterglow emission,more » and test them against the observations of XRF 030723 and XRGRB 041006, the events with the best monitored afterglow light curves in their respective class. We show that most existing XRF models are hard to reconcile with the observed afterglow light curves, which are very flat at early times. Such light curves are, however, naturally produced by a roughly uniform jet with relatively sharp edges that is viewed off-axis (i.e. from outside of the jet aperture). This type of model self consistently accommodates both the observed prompt emission and the afterglow light curves of XRGRB 041006 and XRF 030723, implying viewing angles {theta}{sub obs} from the jet axis of ({theta}{sub obs}-{theta}{sub 0}) {approx} 0.15 {theta}{sub 0} and ({theta}{sub obs}-{theta}{sub 0}) {approx} {theta}{sub 0}, respectively, where {theta}{sub 0} {approx} 3{sup o} is the half-opening angle of the jet. This suggests that GRBs, XRGRBs and XRFs are intrinsically similar relativistic jets viewed from different angles. It is then natural to identify GRBs with {gamma}({theta}{sub obs} - {theta}{sub 0}) {approx}< 1, XRGRBs with 1 {approx}< ({theta}{sub obs} - {theta}{sub 0}) {approx}< a few, and XRFs with {gamma}({theta}{sub obs} - {theta}{sub 0}) {approx}> a few, where {gamma} is the Lorentz factor of the outflow near the edge of the jet from which most

  19. TESTING MODELS FOR THE SHALLOW DECAY PHASE OF GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS WITH POLARIZATION OBSERVATIONS

    SciT

    Lan, Mi-Xiang; Dai, Zi-Gao; Wu, Xue-Feng, E-mail: dzg@nju.edu.cn

    2016-08-01

    The X-ray afterglows of almost one-half of gamma-ray bursts have been discovered by the Swift satellite to have a shallow decay phase of which the origin remains mysterious. Two main models have been proposed to explain this phase: relativistic wind bubbles (RWBs) and structured ejecta, which could originate from millisecond magnetars and rapidly rotating black holes, respectively. Based on these models, we investigate polarization evolution in the shallow decay phase of X-ray and optical afterglows. We find that in the RWB model, a significant bump of the polarization degree evolution curve appears during the shallow decay phase of both opticalmore » and X-ray afterglows, while the polarization position angle abruptly changes its direction by 90°. In the structured ejecta model, however, the polarization degree does not evolve significantly during the shallow decay phase of afterglows whether the magnetic field configuration in the ejecta is random or globally large-scale. Therefore, we conclude that these two models for the shallow decay phase and relevant central engines would be testable with future polarization observations.« less

  20. Rapid Identification of GRB Afterglows with Swift/UVOT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, F. E.

    2006-01-01

    As part of the automated response to a new gamma-ray burst (GRB), the Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT) instrument on Swift starts a 200-second exposure with the V filter within approximately 100 seconds of the BAT burst trigger. The instrument searches for sources in a 8' x 8' region, and sends the list of sources and a 160" x 160" sub-image centered on the burst position to the ground via Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). These raw products and additional products calculated on the ground are then distributed through the GCN within a few minutes of the trigger. We describe the sensitivity of these data for detecting afterglows, summarize current results, and outline plans for rapidly distributing future detections.

  1. Ultrahigh energy neutrino afterglows of nearby long duration gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Jessymol K.; Moharana, Reetanjali; Razzaque, Soebur

    2017-11-01

    Detection of ultrahigh energy (UHE, ≳1 PeV ) neutrinos from astrophysical sources will be a major advancement in identifying and understanding the sources of UHE cosmic rays (CRs) in nature. Long duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) blast waves have been considered as potential acceleration sites of UHECRs. These CRs are expected to interact with GRB afterglow photons, which are synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons coaccelerated with CRs in the blast wave, and naturally produce UHE neutrinos. Fluxes of these neutrinos are uncertain, however, and crucially depend on the observed afterglow modeling. We have selected a sample of 23 long duration GRBs within redshift 0.5 for which adequate electromagnetic afterglow data are available and which could produce high flux of UHE afterglow neutrinos, being nearby. We fit optical, x-ray, and γ -ray afterglow data with an adiabatic blast wave model in a constant density interstellar medium and in a wind environment where the density of the wind decreases as the inverse square of the radius from the center of the GRB. The blast wave model parameters extracted from these fits are then used for calculating UHECR acceleration and p γ interactions to produce UHE neutrino fluxes from these GRBs. We have also explored the detectability of these neutrinos by currently running and upcoming large area neutrino detectors, such as the Pierre Auger Observatory, IceCube Gen-2, and KM3NeT observatories. We find that our realistic flux models from nearby GRBs will be unconstrained in the foreseeable future.

  2. On the non-existence of a sharp cooling break in gamma-ray burst afterglow spectra

    SciT

    Uhm, Z. Lucas; Zhang, Bing, E-mail: uhm@physics.unlv.edu, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    Although the widely used analytical afterglow model of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) predicts a sharp cooling break ν {sub c} in its afterglow spectrum, the GRB observations so far rarely show clear evidence for a cooling break in their spectra or a corresponding temporal break in their light curves. Employing a Lagrangian description of the blast wave, we conduct a sophisticated calculation of the afterglow emission. We precisely follow the cooling history of non-thermal electrons accelerated into each Lagrangian shell. We show that a detailed calculation of afterglow spectra does not in fact give rise to a sharp cooling break atmore » ν {sub c}. Instead, it displays a very mild and smooth transition, which occurs gradually over a few orders of magnitude in energy or frequency. The main source of this slow transition is that different mini shells have different evolutionary histories of the comoving magnetic field strength B, so that deriving the current value of ν {sub c} of each mini shell requires an integration of its cooling rate over the time elapsed since its creation. We present the time evolution of optical and X-ray spectral indices to demonstrate the slow transition of spectral regimes and discuss the implications of our result in interpreting GRB afterglow data.« less

  3. THE PROPERTIES OF THE 2175 A EXTINCTION FEATURE DISCOVERED IN GRB AFTERGLOWS

    SciT

    Zafar, Tayyaba; Watson, Darach; Eliasdottir, Ardis

    The unequivocal, spectroscopic detection of the 2175 A bump in extinction curves outside the Local Group is rare. To date, the properties of the bump have been examined in only two gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows (GRB 070802 and GRB 080607). In this work, we analyze in detail the detections of the 2175 Angstrom-Sign extinction bump in the optical spectra of two further GRB afterglows: GRB 080605 and 080805. We gather all available optical/near-infrared photometric, spectroscopic, and X-ray data to construct multi-epoch spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for both GRB afterglows. We fit the SEDs with the Fitzpatrick and Massa model withmore » a single or broken power law. We also fit a sample of 38 GRB afterglows, known to prefer a Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC)-type extinction curve, with the same model. We find that the SEDs of GRB 080605 and GRB 080805 at two epochs are fit well with a single power law with a derived extinction of A{sub V} = 0.52{sup +0.13}{sub -0.16} and 0.50{sup +0.13}{sub -0.10}, and 2.1{sup +0.7}{sub -0.6} and 1.5 {+-} 0.2, respectively. While the slope of the extinction curve of GRB 080805 is not well constrained, the extinction curve of GRB 080605 has an unusual very steep far-UV rise together with the 2175 A bump. Such an extinction curve has previously been found in only a small handful of sightlines in the Milky Way. One possible explanation of such an extinction curve may be dust arising from two different regions with two separate grain populations, however we cannot distinguish the origin of the curve. We finally compare the four 2175 A bump sightlines to the larger GRB afterglow sample and to Local Group sightlines. We find that while the width and central positions of the bumps are consistent with what is observed in the Local Group, the relative strength of the detected bump (A{sub bump}) for GRB afterglows is weaker for a given A{sub V} than for almost any Local Group sightline. Such dilution of the bump strength may offer

  4. Rates of short-GRB afterglows in association with binary neutron star mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, M.; Pai, Archana; Misra, Kuntal; Resmi, L.; Arun, K. G.

    2018-03-01

    Assuming all binary neutron star (BNS) mergers produce short gamma-ray bursts, we combine the merger rates of BNS from population synthesis studies, the sensitivities of advanced gravitational wave (GW) interferometer networks, and of the electromagnetic (EM) facilities in various wavebands, to compute the detection rate of associated afterglows in these bands. Using the inclination angle measured from GWs as a proxy for the viewing angle and assuming a uniform distribution of jet opening angle between 3° and 30°, we generate light curves of the counterparts using the open access afterglow hydrodynamics package BOXFIT for X-ray, optical, and radio bands. For different EM detectors, we obtain the fraction of EM counterparts detectable in these three bands by imposing appropriate detection thresholds. In association with BNS mergers detected by five (three) detector networks of advanced GW interferometers, assuming a BNS merger rate of 0.6-774 Gpc-3 yr-1 from population synthesis models, we find the afterglow detection rates (per year) to be 0.04-53 (0.02-27), 0.03-36 (0.01-19), and 0.04-47 (0.02-25) in the X-ray, optical, and radio bands, respectively. Our rates represent maximum possible detections for the given BNS rate since we ignore effects of cadence and field of view in EM follow-up observations.

  5. Characterization of a Plasmoid in the Afterglow of a Supersonic Flowing Microwave Discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, D. J.; Miller, S.; Nikolic, M.; Popovic, S.; Vuskovic, L.

    2009-01-01

    We performed a detailed characterization a plasmoid in the afterglow region of an Ar supersonic microwave cavity discharge. The supersonic flow was generated using a convergent-divergent nozzle upstream of the discharge region. A cylindrical cavity was used to sustain a discharge in the pressure range of 100-600 Pa. Optical emission spectroscopy was used to observe populations of excited and ionic species in the plasmoid region. Plasmoid formation in the supersonic flowing afterglow located downstream from the primary microwave cavity discharge was characterized by measuring the radial and axial distributions of Argon excited states and Argon ions. More experiments are being carried out on the plasmoid to understand the discharge parameters within the region, i.e. rotational temperature, vibrational temperature, electron density, and how the electrodynamic and aerodynamic effects combine to form this plasmoid.

  6. Afterglows from the largest explosions in the universe

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Dieter H.

    1999-01-01

    The distinction of “largest explosions in the universe” has been bestowed on cosmic gamma-ray bursts. Their afterglows are brighter than supernovae and therefore are called hypernovae. Photometry and spectroscopy of these afterglows have provided major breakthroughs in our understanding of this mysterious phenomenon. PMID:10220364

  7. In Search of Progenitors for Supernovaless Gamma-Ray Bursts 060505 and 060614: Re-examination of Their Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, D.; Starling, R. L. C.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Sollerman, J.; Yost, S.; Watson, D.; Foley, S.; O'Brien, P. T.; Hjorth, J.

    2009-05-01

    GRB 060505 and GRB 060614 are nearby long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) without accompanying supernovae (SNe) down to very strict limits. They thereby challenge the conventional LGRB-SN connection and naturally give rise to the question: are there other peculiar features in their afterglows which would help shed light on their progenitors? To answer this question, we combine new observational data with published data and investigate the multiband temporal and spectral properties of the two afterglows. We find that both afterglows can be well interpreted within the framework of the jetted standard external shock wave model, and that the afterglow parameters for both bursts fall well within the range observed for other LGRBs. Hence, from the properties of the afterglows there is nothing to suggest that these bursts should have another progenitor than other LGRBs. Recently, Swift-discovered GRB 080503 also has the spike + tail structure during its prompt γ-ray emission seemingly similar to GRB 060614. We analyze the prompt emission of this burst and find that this GRB is actually a hard-spike + hard-tail burst with a spectral lag of 0.8 ± 0.4 s during its tail emission. Thus, the properties of the prompt emission of GRB 060614 and GRB 080503 are clearly different, motivating further thinking of GRB classification (and even identification of faint core-collapse SNe). Finally, we note that, whereas the progenitor of the two SN-less bursts remains uncertain, the core-collapse origin for the SN-less bursts would be quite certain if a windlike environment can be observationally established, e.g., from an optical decay faster than the X-ray decay in the afterglow's slow cooling phase. Based on observations collected at the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, under programs 077.D-0661 and 177.A-0591.

  8. GRB 081029: A Gamma-Ray Burst with a Multi-Component Afterglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Stephen T.; De Pasquale, Massimiliano; Mao, Jirong; Sakamoto, Takanori; Schady, Patricia; Covino, Stefano; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Jin, Zhi-Ping; D'Avanzo, Paolo; Antonelli, Angelo; hide

    2012-01-01

    We present an analysis of the unusual optical light curve of the gamma-ray burst GRB 081029, a long-soft burst with a redshift of z = 3.8479. We combine X-ray and optical observations from the Swift X-Ray Telescope and the Swift Ultra Violet/Optical Telescope with ground-based optical and infrared data obtained using the REM, ROTSE, and CTIO 1.3-m telescopes to construct a detailed data set extending from 86 s to approx.100,000 s after the BAT trigger. Our data covers a wide energy range, from 10 keV to 0.77 eV (1.24 A to 16000 A). The X-ray afterglow shows a shallow initial decay followed by a rapid decay starting at about 18,000 s. The optical and infrared afterglow, however, shows an uncharacteristic rise at about 3000 s that does not correspond to any feature in the X-ray light curve. Our data are not consistent with synchrotron radiation from a jet interacting with an external medium, a two-component jet, or continuous energy injection from the central engine. We find that the optical light curves can be broadly explained by a collision between two ejecta shells within a two-component jet. A growing number of gamma-ray burst afterglows are consistent with complex jets, which suggests that some (or all) gamma-ray burst jets are complex and will require detailed modelling to fully understand them.injection

  9. X-ray Afterglows of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, David N.

    2006-12-01

    The Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) has discovered about 20 short GRBs in its first two years of operation. The Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) has detected X-ray afterglows for roughly 75% of these, allowing host galaxies, redshifts and source characteristics to be studied for the first time. As a result, our knowledge of the properties of short GRBs and their afterglows has increased tremendously in the past year and a half. I will discuss the X-ray afterglows of short GRBs as observed by the Swift XRT and by Chandra. These afterglows are generally much fainter than those of long GRBs, and therefore fade rapidly below detection thresholds. However, some brighter, long-lived afterglows provide intriguing insights into the properties of the progenitors and their environments.

  10. The Needle in the 100 deg2 Haystack: Uncovering Afterglows of Fermi GRBs with the Palomar Transient Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Leo P.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Perley, Daniel A.; Anderson, Gemma E.; Anupama, G. C.; Arcavi, Iair; Bhalerao, Varun; Bue, Brian D.; Cao, Yi; Connaughton, Valerie; Corsi, Alessandra; Cucchiara, Antonino; Fender, Rob P.; Fox, Derek B.; Gehrels, Neil; Goldstein, Adam; Gorosabel, J.; Horesh, Assaf; Hurley, Kevin; Johansson, Joel; Kann, D. A.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Huang, Kuiyun; Kulkarni, S. R.; Masci, Frank; Nugent, Peter; Rau, Arne; Rebbapragada, Umaa D.; Staley, Tim D.; Svinkin, Dmitry; Thöne, C. C.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Urata, Yuji; Weinstein, Alan

    2015-06-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has greatly expanded the number and energy window of observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). However, the coarse localizations of tens to a hundred square degrees provided by the Fermi GRB Monitor instrument have posed a formidable obstacle to locating the bursts’ host galaxies, measuring their redshifts, and tracking their panchromatic afterglows. We have built a target-of-opportunity mode for the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory in order to perform targeted searches for Fermi afterglows. Here, we present the results of one year of this program: 8 afterglow discoveries out of 35 searches. Two of the bursts with detected afterglows (GRBs 130702A and 140606B) were at low redshift (z = 0.145 and 0.384, respectively) and had spectroscopically confirmed broad-line Type Ic supernovae. We present our broadband follow-up including spectroscopy as well as X-ray, UV, optical, millimeter, and radio observations. We study possible selection effects in the context of the total Fermi and Swift GRB samples. We identify one new outlier on the Amati relation. We find that two bursts are consistent with a mildly relativistic shock breaking out from the progenitor star rather than the ultra-relativistic internal shock mechanism that powers standard cosmological bursts. Finally, in the context of the Zwicky Transient Facility, we discuss how we will continue to expand this effort to find optical counterparts of binary neutron star mergers that may soon be detected by Advanced LIGO and Virgo.

  11. Afterglow Population Studies from Swift Follow-Up Observations of Fermi LAT GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, Judith L.; Oates, S. R.; McEnery, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Troja, E.; Gehrels, N.

    2010-01-01

    The small population of Fermi LAT detected GRBs discovered over the last year has been providing interesting and unexpected clues into GRB prompt and afterglow emission mechanisms. Over the last 5 years, it has been Swift that has provided the robust data set of UV/optical and X-ray afterglow observations that opened many windows into other components of GRB emission structure. We explore the new ability to utilize both of these observatories to study the same GRBs over 10 orders of magnitude in energy, although not always concurrently. Almost all LAT GRBs that have been followed-up by Swift within 1-day have been clearly detected and carefully observed. We will present the context of the lower-energy afterglows of this special subset of GRBs that has > 100 MeV emission compared to the hundreds in the Swift database that may or may not have been observed by LAT, and theorize upon the relationship between these properties and the origin of the high energy gamma-ray emission.

  12. Extremely Soft X-Ray Flash as the Indicator of Off-axis Orphan GRB Afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urata, Yuji; Huang, Kuiyun; Yamazaki, Ryo; Sakamoto, Takanori

    2015-06-01

    We verified the off-axis jet model of X-ray flashes (XRFs) and examined a discovery of off-axis orphan gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows. The XRF sample was selected on the basis of the following three factors: (1) a constraint on the lower peak energy of the prompt spectrum {E}{obs}{src}, (2) redshift measurements, and (3) multicolor observations of an earlier (or brightening) phase. XRF 020903 was the only sample selected on the basis of these criteria. A complete optical multicolor afterglow light curve of XRF 020903 obtained from archived data and photometric results in the literature showed an achromatic brightening around 0.7 days. An off-axis jet model with a large observing angle (0.21 rad, which is twice the jet opening half-angle, {θ }{jet}) can naturally describe the achromatic brightening and the prompt X-ray spectral properties. This result indicates the existence of off-axis orphan GRB afterglow light curves. Events with a larger viewing angle (\\gt ∼ 2{θ }{jet}) could be discovered using an 8 m class telescope with wide-field imagers such as the Subaru Hyper-Suprime-Cam and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  13. THE UNUSUAL RADIO AFTERGLOW OF THE ULTRA-LONG GAMMA-RAY BURST GRB 130925A

    SciT

    Horesh, Assaf; Cenko, S. Bradley; Perley, Daniel A.

    2015-10-10

    GRB 130925A is one of the recent additions to the growing family of ultra-long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs; T90 ≳1000 s). While the X-ray emission of ultra-long GRBs have been studied extensively in the past, no comprehensive radio data set has been obtained so far. We report here the early discovery of an unusual radio afterglow associated with the ultra-long GRB 130925A. The radio emission peaks at low-frequencies (∼7 GHz) at early times, only 2.2 days after the burst occurred. More notably, the radio spectrum at frequencies above 10 GHz exhibits a rather steep cut-off, compared to other long GRB radiomore » afterglows. This cut-off can be explained if the emitting electrons are either mono-energetic or originate from a rather steep, dN/dE ∝ E{sup −4}, power-law energy distribution. An alternative electron acceleration mechanism may be required to produce such an electron energy distribution. Furthermore, the radio spectrum exhibits a secondary underlying and slowly varying component. This may hint that the radio emission we observed is comprised of emission from both a reverse and a forward shock. We discuss our results in comparison with previous works that studied the unusual X-ray spectrum of this event and discuss the implications of our findings on progenitor scenarios.« less

  14. Modeling the Multi-band Afterglow of GRB 130831A: Evidence for a Spinning-down Magnetar Dominated by Gravitational Wave Losses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Huang, Y. F.; Zong, H. S.

    2016-06-01

    The X-ray afterglow of GRB 130831A shows an “internal plateau” with a decay slope of ˜0.8, followed by a steep drop at around 105 s with a slope of ˜6. After the drop, the X-ray afterglow continues with a much shallower decay. The optical afterglow exhibits two segments of plateaus separated by a luminous optical flare, followed by a normal decay with a slope basically consistent with that of the late-time X-ray afterglow. The decay of the internal X-ray plateau is much steeper than what we expect in the simplest magnetar model. We propose a scenario in which the magnetar undergoes gravitational-wave-driven r-mode instability, and the spin-down is dominated by gravitational wave losses up to the end of the steep plateau, so that such a relatively steep plateau can be interpreted as the internal emission of the magnetar wind and the sharp drop can be produced when the magnetar collapses into a black hole. This scenario also predicts an initial X-ray plateau lasting for hundreds of seconds with an approximately constant flux which is compatible with observation. Assuming that the magnetar wind has a negligible contribution in the optical band, we interpret the optical afterglow as the forward shock emission by invoking the energy injection from a continuously refreshed shock following the prompt emission phase. It is shown that our model can basically describe the temporal evolution of the multi-band afterglow of GRB 130831A.

  15. MODELING THE MULTI-BAND AFTERGLOW OF GRB 130831A: EVIDENCE FOR A SPINNING-DOWN MAGNETAR DOMINATED BY GRAVITATIONAL WAVE LOSSES?

    SciT

    Zhang, Q.; Zong, H. S.; Huang, Y. F., E-mail: zonghs@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: hyf@nju.edu.cn

    2016-06-01

    The X-ray afterglow of GRB 130831A shows an “internal plateau” with a decay slope of ∼0.8, followed by a steep drop at around 10{sup 5} s with a slope of ∼6. After the drop, the X-ray afterglow continues with a much shallower decay. The optical afterglow exhibits two segments of plateaus separated by a luminous optical flare, followed by a normal decay with a slope basically consistent with that of the late-time X-ray afterglow. The decay of the internal X-ray plateau is much steeper than what we expect in the simplest magnetar model. We propose a scenario in which themore » magnetar undergoes gravitational-wave-driven r-mode instability, and the spin-down is dominated by gravitational wave losses up to the end of the steep plateau, so that such a relatively steep plateau can be interpreted as the internal emission of the magnetar wind and the sharp drop can be produced when the magnetar collapses into a black hole. This scenario also predicts an initial X-ray plateau lasting for hundreds of seconds with an approximately constant flux which is compatible with observation. Assuming that the magnetar wind has a negligible contribution in the optical band, we interpret the optical afterglow as the forward shock emission by invoking the energy injection from a continuously refreshed shock following the prompt emission phase. It is shown that our model can basically describe the temporal evolution of the multi-band afterglow of GRB 130831A.« less

  16. The influence of the N(2D) and N(2P) states in the ionization of the pink afterglow of the nitrogen flowing DC discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levaton, J.; Klein, A. N.; Binder, C.

    2018-01-01

    In the present work, we extensively discuss the role of N(2D) and N(2P) atoms in the ionization processes of pink afterglow based on optical emission spectroscopy analysis and kinetic numerical modelling. We studied the pink afterglow generated by a nitrogen DC discharge operating at 0.6 Slm-1 flow rate, 45 mA discharge current and pressures ranging from 250 to 1050 Pa. The 391.4 nm nitrogen band was monitored along the afterglow furnishing the relative density of the N2+(B2Σ+u, v = 0) state. A numerical model developed to calculate the nitrogen species densities in the afterglow fits the excited ion density profiles well for the experimental conditions. From the modelling results, we determine the densities of the N+, N2+, N3+, and N4+ ions; the calculations show that the N3+ ion density predominates in the afterglow at the typical residence times of the pink afterglow. This behaviour has been observed experimentally and reported in the literature. Furthermore, we calculate the fractional contribution in the ionization for several physical-chemical mechanisms in the post-discharge. Even with the N3+ ion density being dominant in the afterglow, we find through the calculations that the ionization is dominated by the reactions N(2D) + N(2P) → N2+(X2Σ+g) + e and N2(a'1Σ-u) + N2(X 1Σg+, v > 24) → N4+ + e. The ion conversion mechanisms, or ion transfer reactions, which are responsible for the fact that the N3+ density dominates in the post-discharge, are investigated.

  17. Densities of Active species in N2/H2 RF and HF afterglows: application to surface nitriding of TiO2 nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard, André; Sarrette, Jean-Philippe; Wang, Yunfei; Kim, Yu-Kwon

    2017-10-01

    N2/0-5% H2 flowing afterglows from Radio Frequency (RF) and High Frequency (HF) sources have been analyzed by optical emission spectroscopy. In similar conditions (pressure 5-6 Torr, flow rate 0.5 slm and power 100 W), it is found in pure N2 a nearly constant N-atom density from the pink to the late afterglow, which is higher in HF than in RF: (1-2) and 0.4 × 1015 cm-3, respectively. With a N2/2% H2 gas mixture, the early afterglows is changed to a late afterglow with about the same N-atom density for both RF and HF cases: (8-9) × 1014 cm-3. Anatase TiO2 nanocrystals and Atomic Layer Deposition-grown films were exposed to the RF afterglows at room temperature. XPS analysis of the samples has shown that the highest N/Ti ratio of 0.24 can be achieved with the pure N2 late afterglow. In the HF pure N2 late afterglow, however, the N/Ti coverage was limited to 0.04 in spite of higher N-atom density. Such differences in the N content between the two RF and HF cases are attributed to the presence of a high O-atom impurity of 2 × 1013 cm-3 in HF as compared to that (8 × 1011 cm-3) in RF. Contribution to the topical issue "Plasma Sources and Plasma Processes (PSPP)", edited by Luis Lemos Alves, Thierry Belmonte and Tiberiu Minea

  18. TGF Afterglows: A New Radiation Mechanism From Thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutjes, C.; Diniz, G.; Ferreira, I. S.; Ebert, U.

    2017-10-01

    Thunderstorms are known to create terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) which are microsecond-long bursts created by runaway of thermal electrons from propagating lightning leaders, as well as gamma ray glows that possibly are created by relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREA) that can last for minutes or more and are sometimes terminated by a discharge. In this work we predict a new intermediate thunderstorm radiation mechanism, which we call TGF afterglow, as it is caused by the capture of photonuclear neutrons produced by a TGF. TGF afterglows are milliseconds to seconds long; this duration is caused by the thermalization time of the intermediate neutrons. TGF afterglows indicate that the primary TGF has produced photons in the energy range of 10-30 MeV; they are nondirectional in contrast to the primary TGF. Gurevich et al. might have reported TGF afterglows in 2011.

  19. Thermal Electrons in Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    SciT

    Ressler, Sean M.; Laskar, Tanmoy

    2017-08-20

    To date, nearly all multi-wavelength modeling of long-duration γ -ray bursts has ignored synchrotron radiation from the significant population of electrons expected to pass the shock without acceleration into a power-law distribution. We investigate the effect of including the contribution of thermal, non-accelerated electrons to synchrotron absorption and emission in the standard afterglow model, and show that these thermal electrons provide an additional source of opacity to synchrotron self-absorption, and yield an additional emission component at higher energies. The extra opacity results in an increase in the synchrotron self-absorption frequency by factors of 10–100 for fiducial parameters. The nature ofmore » the additional emission depends on the details of the thermal population, but is generally observed to yield a spectral peak in the optical brighter than radiation from the nonthermal population by similar factors a few seconds after the burst, remaining detectable at millimeter and radio frequencies several days later.« less

  20. Analysis of the X-ray emission of nine Swift afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panaitescu, A.; Mészáros, P.; Gehrels, N.; Burrows, D.; Nousek, J.

    2006-03-01

    The X-ray light curves of nine Swift XRT afterglows (050126, 050128, 050219A, 050315, 050318, 050319, 050401, 050408 and 050505) display a complex behaviour: a steep t-3.0+/-0.3 decay until ~400 s, followed by a significantly slower t-0.65+/-0.20 fall-off, which at 0.2-2 day after the burst evolves into a t-1.7+/-0.5 decay. We consider three possible models for the geometry of relativistic blast-waves (spherical outflows, non-spreading jets and spreading jets), two possible dynamical regimes for the forward shock (adiabatic and fully radiative), and we take into account a possible angular structure of the outflow and delayed energy injection in the blast-wave to identify the models which reconcile the X-ray light-curve decay with the slope of the X-ray continuum for each of the above three afterglow phases. By piecing together the various models for each phase in a way that makes physical sense, we identify possible models for the entire X-ray afterglow. The major conclusion of this work is that a long-lived episode of energy injection in the blast-wave, during which the shock energy increases at t1.0+/-0.5, is required for five afterglows and could be at work in the other four as well. For some afterglows, there may be other mechanisms that can explain the t < 400 s fast falling-off X-ray light curve (e.g. the large-angle gamma-ray burst emission), the 400 s to 5 h slow decay (e.g. a structured outflow), or the steepening at 0.2-2 day (e.g. a jet-break, a collimated outflow transiting from a wind with a r-3 radial density profile to a homogeneous or outward-increasing density region). Optical observations in conjunction with the X-ray can distinguish among these various models. Our simple tests allow the determination of the location of the cooling frequency relative to the X-ray domain and, thus, of the index of the electron power-law distribution with energy in the blast-wave. The resulting indices are clearly inconsistent with a universal value.

  1. The afterglow of GRB 050709 and the nature of the short-hard gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Fox, D B; Frail, D A; Price, P A; Kulkarni, S R; Berger, E; Piran, T; Soderberg, A M; Cenko, S B; Cameron, P B; Gal-Yam, A; Kasliwal, M M; Moon, D-S; Harrison, F A; Nakar, E; Schmidt, B P; Penprase, B; Chevalier, R A; Kumar, P; Roth, K; Watson, D; Lee, B L; Shectman, S; Phillips, M M; Roth, M; McCarthy, P J; Rauch, M; Cowie, L; Peterson, B A; Rich, J; Kawai, N; Aoki, K; Kosugi, G; Totani, T; Park, H-S; MacFadyen, A; Hurley, K C

    2005-10-06

    The final chapter in the long-standing mystery of the gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) centres on the origin of the short-hard class of bursts, which are suspected on theoretical grounds to result from the coalescence of neutron-star or black-hole binary systems. Numerous searches for the afterglows of short-hard bursts have been made, galvanized by the revolution in our understanding of long-duration GRBs that followed the discovery in 1997 of their broadband (X-ray, optical and radio) afterglow emission. Here we present the discovery of the X-ray afterglow of a short-hard burst, GRB 050709, whose accurate position allows us to associate it unambiguously with a star-forming galaxy at redshift z = 0.160, and whose optical lightcurve definitively excludes a supernova association. Together with results from three other recent short-hard bursts, this suggests that short-hard bursts release much less energy than the long-duration GRBs. Models requiring young stellar populations, such as magnetars and collapsars, are ruled out, while coalescing degenerate binaries remain the most promising progenitor candidates.

  2. Multiwavelength Observations of GRB 110731A: GeV Emission From Onset to Afterglow

    DOE PAGES

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; ...

    2013-01-09

    In this paper, we report on the multiwavelength observations of the bright, long gamma-ray burst GRB 110731A, by the Fermi and Swift observatories, and by the MOA and GROND optical telescopes. The analysis of the prompt phase reveals that GRB 110731A shares many features with bright Large Area Telescope bursts observed by Fermi during the first three years on-orbit: a light curve with short time variability across the whole energy range during the prompt phase, delayed onset of the emission above 100 MeV, extra power-law component and temporally extended high-energy emission. In addition, this is the first GRB for whichmore » simultaneous GeV, X-ray, and optical data are available over multiple epochs beginning just after the trigger time and extending for more than 800 s, allowing temporal and spectral analysis in different epochs that favor emission from the forward shock in a wind-type medium. Lastly, the observed temporally extended GeV emission is most likely part of the high-energy end of the afterglow emission. Both the single-zone pair transparency constraint for the prompt signal and the spectral and temporal analysis of the forward-shock afterglow emission independently lead to an estimate of the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet Γ ~ 500-550.« less

  3. Multiwavelength Observations of GRB 110731A: GeV Emission from Onset to Afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Granot, J.; Greiner, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Mészáros, P.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Nymark, T.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Romoli, C.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sanchez, D. A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Sonbas, E.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Gruber, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Briggs, M. S.; Burgess, J. M.; Connaughton, V.; Foley, S.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; McBreen, S.; McGlynn, S.; Paciesas, W. S.; Pelassa, V.; Preece, R.; Rau, A.; van der Horst, A. J.; von Kienlin, A.; Kann, D. A.; Filgas, R.; Klose, S.; Krühler, T.; Fukui, A.; Sako, T.; Tristram, P. J.; Oates, S. R.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Littlejohns, O.

    2013-02-01

    We report on the multiwavelength observations of the bright, long gamma-ray burst GRB 110731A, by the Fermi and Swift observatories, and by the MOA and GROND optical telescopes. The analysis of the prompt phase reveals that GRB 110731A shares many features with bright Large Area Telescope bursts observed by Fermi during the first three years on-orbit: a light curve with short time variability across the whole energy range during the prompt phase, delayed onset of the emission above 100 MeV, extra power-law component and temporally extended high-energy emission. In addition, this is the first GRB for which simultaneous GeV, X-ray, and optical data are available over multiple epochs beginning just after the trigger time and extending for more than 800 s, allowing temporal and spectral analysis in different epochs that favor emission from the forward shock in a wind-type medium. The observed temporally extended GeV emission is most likely part of the high-energy end of the afterglow emission. Both the single-zone pair transparency constraint for the prompt signal and the spectral and temporal analysis of the forward-shock afterglow emission independently lead to an estimate of the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet Γ ~ 500-550.

  4. The Arcminute Microkelvin Imager catalogue of gamma-ray burst afterglows at 15.7 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, G. E.; Staley, T. D.; van der Horst, A. J.; Fender, R. P.; Rowlinson, A.; Mooley, K. P.; Broderick, J. W.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Rumsey, C.; Titterington, D. J.

    2018-01-01

    We present the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI) Large Array catalogue of 139 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). AMI observes at a central frequency of 15.7 GHz and is equipped with a fully automated rapid-response mode, which enables the telescope to respond to high-energy transients detected by Swift. On receiving a transient alert, AMI can be on-target within 2 min, scheduling later start times if the source is below the horizon. Further AMI observations are manually scheduled for several days following the trigger. The AMI GRB programme probes the early-time (<1 d) radio properties of GRBs, and has obtained some of the earliest radio detections (GRB 130427A at 0.36 and GRB 130907A at 0.51 d post-burst). As all Swift GRBs visible to AMI are observed, this catalogue provides the first representative sample of GRB radio properties, unbiased by multiwavelength selection criteria. We report the detection of six GRB radio afterglows that were not previously detected by other radio telescopes, increasing the rate of radio detections by 50 per cent over an 18-month period. The AMI catalogue implies a Swift GRB radio detection rate of ≳ 15 per cent, down to ∼0.2 mJy beam-1. However, scaling this by the fraction of GRBs AMI would have detected in the Chandra & Frail sample (all radio-observed GRBs between 1997 and 2011), it is possible ∼ 44-56 per cent of Swift GRBs are radio bright, down to ∼0.1-0.15 mJy beam-1. This increase from the Chandra & Frail rate (∼30 per cent) is likely due to the AMI rapid-response mode, which allows observations to begin while the reverse-shock is contributing to the radio afterglow.

  5. The Supercritical Pile GRB Model: The Prompt to Afterglow Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2008-01-01

    The 'Supercritical Pile' is a very economical gamma ray burst (GRB) model that provides for the efficient conversion of the energy stored in the protons of a Relativistic Blast Wave (RBW) into radiation and at the same time produces - in the prompt GRB phase, even in the absence of any particle acceleration - a spectral peak at an energy sim 1 MeV. We extend this model to include also the evolution of the RBW Lorentz factor Gamma and thus follow the spectral and temporal features of this model into the early GRB afterglow stage. One of the novel features of the present treatment is the inclusion of the feedback of the GRB produced radiation on the evolution of Gamma with radius. This feedback and the presence of kinematic and dynamic thresholds in the model can be the sources of rich time evolution which we have begun to explore. In particular, one can this way obtain afterglow light curves with steep decays followed by the more conventional flatter afterglow slopes, while at the same time preserving the desirable features of the model, i.e. the well defined relativistic electron source and radiative processes that produce the proper peak in the nu F spectra. Furthermore, the existence of a kinematic threshold in this model provides for a operational distinction of the prompt and afterglow GRB stages; in fact, the afterglow stage sets in when the RBW Lorentz factor cannot anymore fulfill the kinematic condition for pair formation in the photon - proton pair production reactions that constitute the fundamental process for the dissipation of the blast wave kinetic energy. We present the results of a specific set of parameters of this model with emphasis on the multiwavelength prompt emission and transition to the early afterglow.

  6. Testing gamma-ray burst models with the afterglow of GRB 090102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendre, B.; Klotz, A.; Palazzi, E.; Krühler, T.; Covino, S.; Afonso, P.; Antonelli, L. A.; Atteia, J. L.; D'Avanzo, P.; Boër, M.; Greiner, J.; Klose, S.

    2010-07-01

    We present the observations of the afterglow of gamma-ray burst GRB 090102. Optical data taken by the Telescope a Action Rapide pour les Objets Transitoires (TAROT), Rapid Eye Mount (REM), Gamma-Ray burst Optical/Near-Infrared Detector (GROND), together with publicly available data from Palomar, Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) telescopes, and X-ray data taken by the XRT instrument on board the Swift spacecraft were used. This event features an unusual light curve. In X-rays, it presents a constant decrease with no hint of temporal break from 0.005 to 6d after the burst. In the optical, the light curve presents a flattening after 1ks. Before this break, the optical light curve is steeper than that of the X-ray. In the optical, no further break is observed up to 10d after the burst. We failed to explain these observations in light of the standard fireball model. Several other models, including the cannonball model were investigated. The explanation of the broad-band data by any model requires some fine-tuning when taking into account both optical and X-ray bands. Based on observations obtained with TAROT, REM, GROND. E-mail: bruce.gendre@asdc.asi.it ‡ Present address: ASDC, Via Galileo Galilei, 00044 Frascati, Italy.

  7. The Supercritical Pile GRB Model: The Prompt to Afterglow Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastichiadis, A.; Kazanas, D.

    2009-01-01

    The "Supercritical Pile" is a very economical GRB model that provides for the efficient conversion of the energy stored in the protons of a Relativistic Blast Wave (RBW) into radiation and at the same time produces - in the prompt GRB phase, even in the absence of any particle acceleration - a spectral peak at energy approx. 1 MeV. We extend this model to include the evolution of the RBW Lorentz factor Gamma and thus follow its spectral and temporal features into the early GRB afterglow stage. One of the novel features of the present treatment is the inclusion of the feedback of the GRB produced radiation on the evolution of Gamma with radius. This feedback and the presence of kinematic and dynamic thresholds in the model can be the sources of rich time evolution which we have began to explore. In particular. one can this may obtain afterglow light curves with steep decays followed by the more conventional flatter afterglow slopes, while at the same time preserving the desirable features of the model, i.e. the well defined relativistic electron source and radiative processes that produce the proper peak in the (nu)F(sub nu), spectra. In this note we present the results of a specific set of parameters of this model with emphasis on the multiwavelength prompt emission and transition to the early afterglow.

  8. MODELING THE EARLY AFTERGLOW IN THE SHORT AND HARD GRB 090510

    SciT

    Fraija, N.; Lee, W. H.; Veres, P.

    2016-11-01

    The bright, short, and hard GRB 090510 was detected by all instruments aboard the Fermi and Swift satellites. The multiwavelength observations of this burst presented similar features to the Fermi -LAT-detected gamma-ray bursts. In the framework of the external shock model of early afterglow, a leptonic scenario that evolves in a homogeneous medium is proposed to revisit GRB 090510 and explain the multiwavelength light curve observations presented in this burst. These observations are consistent with the evolution of a jet before and after the jet break. The long-lasting LAT, X-ray, and optical fluxes are explained in the synchrotron emission frommore » the adiabatic forward shock. Synchrotron self-Compton emission from the reverse shock is consistent with the bright LAT peak provided that the progenitor environment is entrained with strong magnetic fields. It could provide compelling evidence of magnetic field amplification in the neutron star merger.« less

  9. Modeling the Early Afterglow in the Short and Hard GRB 090510

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraija, N.; Lee, W. H.; Veres, P.; Barniol Duran, R.

    2016-11-01

    The bright, short, and hard GRB 090510 was detected by all instruments aboard the Fermi and Swift satellites. The multiwavelength observations of this burst presented similar features to the Fermi-LAT-detected gamma-ray bursts. In the framework of the external shock model of early afterglow, a leptonic scenario that evolves in a homogeneous medium is proposed to revisit GRB 090510 and explain the multiwavelength light curve observations presented in this burst. These observations are consistent with the evolution of a jet before and after the jet break. The long-lasting LAT, X-ray, and optical fluxes are explained in the synchrotron emission from the adiabatic forward shock. Synchrotron self-Compton emission from the reverse shock is consistent with the bright LAT peak provided that the progenitor environment is entrained with strong magnetic fields. It could provide compelling evidence of magnetic field amplification in the neutron star merger.

  10. Wind-Interaction Models for the Early Afterglows of Gamma-Ray Bursts: The Case of GRB 021004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Yun; Chevalier, Roger A.

    2003-06-01

    Wind-interaction models for gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows predict that the optical emission from the reverse shock drops below that from the forward shock within hundreds of seconds of the burst. The typical frequency νm of the synchrotron emission from the forward shock passes through the optical band typically on a timescale of minutes to hours. Before the passage of νm, the optical flux evolves as t-1/4, and after the passage, the decay steepens to t-(3p-2)/4, where p is the exponent for the assumed power-law energy distribution of nonthermal electrons and is typically ~2. The steepening in the slope of temporal decay should be readily identifiable in the early afterglow light curves. We propose that such a steepening was observed in the R-band light curve of GRB 021004 around day 0.1. Available data at several radio frequencies are consistent with this interpretation, as are the X-ray observations around day 1. The early evolution of GRB 021004 contrasts with that of GRB 990123, which can be described by emission from interaction with a constant density medium.

  11. Gamma--Ray burst afterglows with the Watcher robotic telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topinka, M.; Hanlon, L.; Meehan, S.; Tisdall, P.; Jelínek, M.; Kubánek, P.; van Heerden, H.; Meintjes, P.

    2014-12-01

    The main scientific goal of the Watcher robotic telescope is the rapid follow-up observation of gamma--ray burst afterglows. Some examples of recent observations, including GRB 120327A and GRB 130606A, at a redshift of 5.9, are presented. The telescope has recently been successfully integrated into the GLORIA global robotic telescope network, which allows users to use the array for their own scientific projects.

  12. Seven-year Collection of Well-monitored Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panaitescu, A.

    2017-03-01

    We present the light curves and spectra of 24 afterglows that have been monitored by Fermi-LAT at 0.1-100 GeV over more than a decade. All light curves (except 130427) are consistent with a single power law starting from their peaks, which occur in most cases before the burst end. The light curves display a brightness-decay rate correlation, with all but one (130427) of the bright afterglows decaying faster than the dimmer afterglows. We attribute this dichotomy to the quick deposition of relativistic ejecta energy in the external shock for the brighter/faster-decaying afterglows and to an extended energy injection in the afterglow shock for the dimmer/slower-decaying light curves. The spectra of six afterglows (090328, 100414, 110721, 110731, 130427, 140619B) indicate the existence of a harder component above a spectral dip or ankle at energies of 0.3-3 GeV, offering evidence for inverse-Compton emission at higher energies and suggesting that the harder power-law spectra of five other LAT afterglows (130327B, 131231, 150523, 150627, 160509) could also be inverse-Compton, while the remaining, softer LAT afterglows should be synchrotron emission. Marginal evidence for a spectral break and softening at higher energies is found for two afterglows (090902B and 090926).

  13. Seven-year Collection of Well-monitored Fermi -LAT Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    DOE PAGES

    Panaitescu, Alin-Daniel

    2017-02-27

    Here we present the light curves and spectra of 24 afterglows that have been monitored by Fermi-LAT at 0.1–100 GeV over more than a decade. All light curves (except 130427) are consistent with a single power law starting from their peaks, which occur in most cases before the burst end. The light curves display a brightness–decay rate correlation, with all but one (130427) of the bright afterglows decaying faster than the dimmer afterglows. We attribute this dichotomy to the quick deposition of relativistic ejecta energy in the external shock for the brighter/faster-decaying afterglows and to an extended energy injection inmore » the afterglow shock for the dimmer/slower-decaying light curves. The spectra of six afterglows (090328, 100414, 110721, 110731, 130427, 140619B) indicate the existence of a harder component above a spectral dip or ankle at energies of 0.3–3 GeV, offering evidence for inverse-Compton emission at higher energies and suggesting that the harder power-law spectra of five other LAT afterglows (130327B, 131231, 150523, 150627, 160509) could also be inverse-Compton, while the remaining, softer LAT afterglows should be synchrotron emission. Finally, marginal evidence for a spectral break and softening at higher energies is found for two afterglows (090902B and 090926).« less

  14. Seven-year Collection of Well-monitored Fermi -LAT Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    SciT

    Panaitescu, Alin-Daniel

    Here we present the light curves and spectra of 24 afterglows that have been monitored by Fermi-LAT at 0.1–100 GeV over more than a decade. All light curves (except 130427) are consistent with a single power law starting from their peaks, which occur in most cases before the burst end. The light curves display a brightness–decay rate correlation, with all but one (130427) of the bright afterglows decaying faster than the dimmer afterglows. We attribute this dichotomy to the quick deposition of relativistic ejecta energy in the external shock for the brighter/faster-decaying afterglows and to an extended energy injection inmore » the afterglow shock for the dimmer/slower-decaying light curves. The spectra of six afterglows (090328, 100414, 110721, 110731, 130427, 140619B) indicate the existence of a harder component above a spectral dip or ankle at energies of 0.3–3 GeV, offering evidence for inverse-Compton emission at higher energies and suggesting that the harder power-law spectra of five other LAT afterglows (130327B, 131231, 150523, 150627, 160509) could also be inverse-Compton, while the remaining, softer LAT afterglows should be synchrotron emission. Finally, marginal evidence for a spectral break and softening at higher energies is found for two afterglows (090902B and 090926).« less

  15. Impact cratering calculations. Part 1: Early time results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, J. M.; Sauer, F. N.; Austin, M. G.; Ruhl, S. F.; Shultz, P. H.; Orphal, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    Early time two dimensional finite difference calculations of laboratory scale hypervelocity impact of 0.3 g spherical 2024 aluminum projectiles into homogeneous plasticene clay targets were performed. Analysis of resulting material motions showed that energy and momentum were coupled quickly from the aluminum projectile to the target material. In the process of coupling, some of the plasticene clay target was vaporized while the projectile become severely deformed. The velocity flow field developed within the target was shown to have features similar to those found in calculations of near surface explosion cratering. Specific application of Maxwell's analytic Z-Model showed that this model can be used to describe the early time flow fields resulting from the impact cratering calculations as well, provided the flow field centers are located beneath the target surface and most of the projectile momentum is dissipated before the model is applied.

  16. iPTF14yb: The First Discovery of a Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Independent of a High-Energy Trigger

    DOE PAGES

    Cenko, S. Bradley; Urban, Alex L.; Perley, Daniel A.; ...

    2015-04-20

    We report here the discovery by the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) of iPTF14yb, a luminous (Msub>r ≈ ₋27.8 mag), cosmological (redshift 1.9733), rapidly fading optical transient. We demonstrate, based on probabilistic arguments and a comparison with the broader population, that iPTF14yb is the optical afterglow of the long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB140226A. This marks the rst unambiguous discovery of a GRB afterglow prior to (and thus entirely independent of) an associated high-energy trigger. We estimate the rate of iPTF14yb-like sources (i.e., cosmologically dis- tant relativistic explosions) based on iPTF observations, inferring an all-sky value ofmore » $$R_{rel}$$ = 610yr -1 (68% con dence interval of 110{2000 yr -1). Our derived rate is consistent (within the large uncer- tainty) with the all-sky rate of on-axis GRBs derived by the Swift satellite. Finally, we brie y discuss the implications of the nondetection to date of bona de \\orphan" afterglows (i.e., those lacking de- tectable high-energy emission) on GRB beaming and the degree of baryon loading in these relativistic jets.« less

  17. iPTF14yb: The First Discovery of a Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Independent of a High-Energy Trigger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cenko, S. Bradley; Urban, Alex L.; Perley, Daniel A.; Horesh, Assaf; Corsi, Alessandra; Fox, Derek B.; Cao, Yi; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Lien, Amy; Arcavi, Iair; hide

    2015-01-01

    We report here the discovery by the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) of iPTF14yb, a luminous (Mr >> -27.8 mag), cosmological (redshift 1.9733), rapidly fading optical transient. We demonstrate, based on probabilistic arguments and a comparison with the broader population, that iPTF14yb is the optical afterglow of the long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 140226A. This marks the first unambiguous discovery of a GRB afterglow prior to (and thus entirely independent of) an associated high-energy trigger. We estimate the rate of iPTF14yb-like sources (i.e., cosmologically distant relativistic explosions) based on iPTF observations, inferring an all-sky value of Rrel = 610/yr (68% confidence interval of 110-2000/yr). Our derived rate is consistent (within the large uncertainty) with the all-sky rate of on-axis GRBs derived by the Swift satellite. Finally, we briefly discuss the implications of the nondetection to date of bona fide "orphan" afterglows (i.e., those lacking detectable high-energy emission) on GRB beaming and the degree of baryon loading in these relativistic jets.

  18. iPTF14yb: The First Discovery of a Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Independent of a High-energy Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenko, S. Bradley; Urban, Alex L.; Perley, Daniel A.; Horesh, Assaf; Corsi, Alessandra; Fox, Derek B.; Cao, Yi; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Lien, Amy; Arcavi, Iair; Bloom, Joshua S.; Butler, Nat R.; Cucchiara, Antonino; de Diego, José A.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Gehrels, Neil; Georgiev, Leonid; Jesús González, J.; Graham, John F.; Greiner, Jochen; Kann, D. Alexander; Klein, Christopher R.; Knust, Fabian; Kulkarni, S. R.; Kutyrev, Alexander; Laher, Russ; Lee, William H.; Nugent, Peter E.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Richer, Michael G.; Rubin, Adam; Urata, Yuji; Varela, Karla; Watson, Alan M.; Wozniak, Przemek R.

    2015-04-01

    We report here the discovery by the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) of iPTF14yb, a luminous ({{M}r}≈ -27.8 mag), cosmological (redshift 1.9733), rapidly fading optical transient. We demonstrate, based on probabilistic arguments and a comparison with the broader population, that iPTF14yb is the optical afterglow of the long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 140226A. This marks the first unambiguous discovery of a GRB afterglow prior to (and thus entirely independent of) an associated high-energy trigger. We estimate the rate of iPTF14yb-like sources (i.e., cosmologically distant relativistic explosions) based on iPTF observations, inferring an all-sky value of {{\\Re }rel}=610 yr-1 (68% confidence interval of 110-2000 yr-1). Our derived rate is consistent (within the large uncertainty) with the all-sky rate of on-axis GRBs derived by the Swift satellite. Finally, we briefly discuss the implications of the nondetection to date of bona fide “orphan” afterglows (i.e., those lacking detectable high-energy emission) on GRB beaming and the degree of baryon loading in these relativistic jets.

  19. Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows as Probes of Environment and Blastwave Physics. 1; Absorption by Host Galaxy Gas and Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starling, R. L. C.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wiersema, K.; Rol, E.; Curran, P. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; vanderHorst, A. J.; Heemskerk, M. H. M.

    2006-01-01

    We use a new approach to obtain limits on the absorbing columns towards an initial sample of 10 long Gamma-Ray Bursts observed with BeppoSAX and selected on the basis of their good optical and nIR coverage, from simultaneous fits to nIR, optical and X-ray afterglow data, in count space and including the effects of metallicity. In no cases is a MIV-like ext,inction preferred, when testing MW, LMC and SMC extinction laws. The 2175A bump would in principle be detectable in all these afterglows, but is not present in the data. An SMC-like gas-to-dust ratio or lower value can be ruled out for 4 of the hosts analysed here (assuming Sh4C metallicity and extinction law) whilst the remainder of the sample have too large an error to discriminate. We provide a more accurate estimate of the line-of-sight extinction and improve upon the uncertainties for the majority of the extinction measurements made in previous studies of this sample. We discuss this method to determine extinction values in comparison with the most commonly employed existing methods.

  20. Constraining Gamma-ray Burst Initial Lorentz Factor with the Afterglow Onset Feature and Discovery of a Tight Γ0-E γ,iso Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, En-Wei; Yi, Shuang-Xi; Zhang, Jin; Lü, Hou-Jun; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Zhang, Bing

    2010-12-01

    The onset of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow is characterized by a smooth bump in the early afterglow light curve as the GRB fireball is decelerated by the circumburst medium. We extensively search for GRBs with such an onset feature in their optical and X-ray light curves from the literature and from the catalog established with the Swift/XRT. Twenty optically selected GRBs and 12 X-ray-selected GRBs are obtained, among which 17 optically selected and 2 X-ray-selected GRBs have redshift measurements. We fit these light curves with a smooth broken power law and measure the width (w), rising timescale (t r), and decaying timescale (t d) at full width at half-maximum. Strong mutual correlations among these timescales and with the peak time (t p) are found. The ratio t r/t d is almost universal among bursts, but the ratio t r/t p varies from 0.3 to ~1. The optical peak luminosity in the R band (L R,p) is anti-correlated with t p and w in the burst frame, indicating a dimmer and broader bump peaking at a later time. The isotropic prompt gamma-ray energy (E γ,iso) is also tightly correlated with L R,p and t p in the burst frame. Assuming that the bumps signal the deceleration of the GRB fireballs in a constant density medium, we calculate the initial Lorentz factor (Γ0) and the deceleration radius (R d) of the GRBs with redshift measurements. The derived Γ0 is typically a few hundreds, and the deceleration radius is R dec ~ 2 × 1017 cm. More intriguingly, a tight correlation between Γ0 and E γ,iso is found, namely Γ0 ~= 182(E γ,iso/1052 erg)0.25. This correlation also applies to the small sample of GRBs which show the signature of the afterglow onset in their X-ray afterglow, and to two bursts (GRBs 990123 and 080319B) whose early optical emission is dominated by a reverse shock. The lower limits of Γ0 derived from a sample of optical afterglow light curves showing a decaying feature from the beginning of the observation are also generally consistent with such

  1. Irregular oscillatory patterns in the early-time region of coherent phonon generation in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yohei; Hino, Ken-ichi; Hase, Muneaki; Maeshima, Nobuya

    2017-09-01

    Coherent phonon (CP) generation in an undoped Si crystal is theoretically investigated to shed light on unexplored quantum-mechanical effects in the early-time region immediately after the irradiation of ultrashort laser pulses. We examine time signals attributed to an induced charge density of an ionic core, placing the focus on the effects of the Rabi frequency Ω0 c v on the signals; this frequency corresponds to the peak electric-field of the pulse. It is found that at specific Ω0 c v's, where the energy of plasmon caused by photoexcited carriers coincides with the longitudinal-optical phonon energy, the energetically resonant interaction between these two modes leads to striking anticrossings, revealing irregular oscillations with anomalously enhanced amplitudes in the observed time signals. Also, the oscillatory pattern is subject to the Rabi flopping of the excited carrier density that is controlled by Ω0 c v. These findings show that the early-time region is enriched with quantum-mechanical effects inherent in the CP generation, though experimental signals are more or less masked by the so-called coherent artifact due to nonlinear optical effects.

  2. A new method for unambiguous determination of trap parameters from afterglow and TSL curves connection: Example on garnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanin, Vasilii; Venevtsev, Ivan; Spoor, Sandra; Boerekamp, Jack; van Dongen, Anne-Marie; Wieczorek, Herfried; Chernenko, Kirill; Buettner, Daniela; Ronda, Cees; Rodnyi, Piotr

    2017-10-01

    Due to presence of charge carrier traps, many scintillating materials exhibit afterglow. The de-trapping mechanisms are usually studied separately via either thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) or isothermal decay (afterglow) measurements. In this paper, we develop procedures to determine trap parameters such as thermal trap depth and frequency factor in an unambiguous manner by connecting TSL and afterglow measurements. In order to accomplish that, we have devised a special method of extracting the lifetime of trapped carriers from afterglow measurements, independent of kinetic order. The procedures are first shown on simulated TSL and afterglow curves and then illustrated using (Y,Gd)3Al5O12:Ce garnets as example.

  3. Afterglow dosimetry performance of beta particle irradiated lithium zirconate.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Pérez, T C; Bernal, R; Cruz-Vázquez, C; Brown, F; Mendoza-Córdova, A; Salas-Juárez, Ch J; Avilés-Monreal, R

    2018-08-01

    In this work, we report for the very first time on the thermoluminescence (TL) and afterglow (AG) properties of Li 2 ZrO 3 . The ternary oxide Li 2 ZrO 3 was synthesized by solid state reaction of a mixture of Li 2 CO 3 and ZrO 2 subjected to thermal annealing at 400°C for 2h and 1000°C during 24h in air. The characteristic glow curves of beta particle irradiated samples exhibit an intense TL emission located around 150°C. From the shape of the TL curve, a 0.4 form factor was determined, suggesting that first order kinetics processes are involved. The afterglow decay curves were recorded after exposure to beta particle irradiation in the dose range from 0.5 up to 2kGy. The AG integrated in the time interval from 510 to 600s after radiation exposure shows a linear dependence as a function of the irradiation dose from 0.5 up to 256Gy. A method is proposed to compute the lower detection limit and the AG sensitivity and applied to the studied phosphors. Structural and morphological characterization were carried out by X-ray diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy, respectively. From the results presented, it is concluded that the AG response of the synthesized Li 2 ZrO 3 presents features suitable to develop radiation detectors and dosimeters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. On the Afterglow and Progenitor of FRB 150418

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bing

    2016-05-01

    Keane et al. recently detected a fading radio source following FRB 150418, leading to the identification of a putative host galaxy at z = 0.492 ± 0.008. Assuming that the fading source is the afterglow of FRB 150418, I model the afterglow and constrain the isotropic energy of the explosion to be a few 1050 erg, comparable to that of a short-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB). The outflow may have a jet opening angle of ˜0.22 rad, so that the beaming-corrected energy is below 1049 erg. The results rule out most fast radio burst (FRB) progenitor models for this FRB, but may be consistent with either of the following two scenarios. The first scenario invokes a merger of an NS-NS binary, which produced an undetected short GRB and a supra-massive neutron star, which subsequently collapsed into a black hole, probably hundreds of seconds after the short GRB. The second scenario invokes a merger of a compact star binary (BH-BH, NS-NS, or BH-NS) system whose pre-merger dynamical magnetospheric activities made the FRB, which is followed by an undetected short GRB-like transient. The gravitational-wave (GW) event GW 150914 would be a sister of FRB 150418 in this second scenario. In both cases, one expects an exciting prospect of GW/FRB/GRB associations.

  5. First limits on the very-high energy gamma-ray afterglow emission of a fast radio burst. H.E.S.S. observations of FRB 150418

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abdalla, H.; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Andersson, T.; Angüner, E. O.; Arakawa, M.; Arrieta, M.; Aubert, P.; Backes, M.; Balzer, A.; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Büchele, M.; Bulik, T.; Capasso, M.; Carr, J.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Chevalier, J.; Chrétien, M.; Coffaro, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Decock, J.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; Dewilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O.'c.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Eschbach, S.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goyal, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Hawkes, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Iwasaki, H.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jingo, M.; Jogler, T.; Jouvin, L.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katsuragawa, M.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khangulyan, D.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Kraus, M.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Leser, E.; Lohse, T.; Lorentz, M.; Liu, R.; López-Coto, R.; Lypova, I.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Morå, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Nakashima, S.; de Naurois, M.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Öttl, S.; Ohm, S.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Padovani, M.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Piel, Q.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Prokhorov, D.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de Los Reyes, R.; Richter, S.; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Saito, S.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seglar-Arroyo, M.; Settimo, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shilon, I.; Simoni, R.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Takahashi, T.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tibaldo, L.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tsuji, N.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; van der Walt, D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Rensburg, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zanin, R.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Ziegler, A.; Żywucka, N.; Superb Collaboration; Jankowski, F.; Keane, E. F.; Petroff, E.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Following the detection of the fast radio burst FRB150418 by the SUPERB project at the Parkes radio telescope, we aim to search for very-high energy gamma-ray afterglow emission. Methods: Follow-up observations in the very-high energy gamma-ray domain were obtained with the H.E.S.S. imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope system within 14.5 h of the radio burst. Results: The obtained 1.4 h of gamma-ray observations are presented and discussed. At the 99% C.L. we obtained an integral upper limit on the gamma-ray flux of Φγ(E > 350 GeV) < 1.33 × 10-8 m-2 s-1. Differential flux upper limits as function of the photon energy were derived and used to constrain the intrinsic high-energy afterglow emission of FRB 150418. Conclusions: No hints for high-energy afterglow emission of FRB 150418 were found. Taking absorption on the extragalactic background light into account and assuming a distance of z = 0.492 based on radio and optical counterpart studies and consistent with the FRB dispersion, we constrain the gamma-ray luminosity at 1 TeV to L < 5.1 × 1047 erg/s at 99% C.L.

  6. Calculational investigation of impact cratering dynamics - Early time material motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, J. M.; Austin, M. G.; Ruhl, S. F.; Schultz, P. H.; Orphal, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    Early time two-dimensional finite difference calculations of laboratory-scale hypervelocity (6 km/sec) impact of 0.3 g spherical 2024 aluminum projectiles into homogeneous plasticene clay targets were performed and the resulting material motions analyzed. Results show that the initial jetting of vaporized target material is qualitatively similar to experimental observation. The velocity flow field developed within the target is shown to have features quite similar to those found in calculations of near-surface explosion cratering. Specific application of Maxwell's analytic Z-Model (developed to interpret the flow fields of near-surface explosion cratering calculations), shows that this model can be used to describe the flow fields resulting from the impact cratering calculations, provided that the flow field center is located beneath the target surface, and that application of the model is made late enough in time that most of the projectile momentum has been dissipated.

  7. Early time evolution of a chemically produced electron depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scales, W. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Ganguli, G.

    1995-01-01

    The early time evolution of an ionospheric electron depletion produced by a radially expanding electron attachment chemical release is studied with a two-dimensional simulation model. The model includes electron attachment chemistry, incorporates fluid electrons, particle ions and neutrals, and considers the evolution in a plane perpendicular to the geomagnetic field for a low beta plasma. Timescales considered are of the order of or less than the cyclotron period of the negative ions that result as a by-product of the electron attacment reaction. This corresponds to time periods of tenths of seconds during recent experiemts. Simulation results show that a highly sheared azimuthal electron flow velocity develops in the radially expanding depletion boundary. This sheared electron flow velocity and the steep density gradients in the boundary give rise to small-scale irregulatities in the form of electron density cavities and spikes. The nonlinear evolution of these irregularities results in trapping and ultimately turbulent heating of the negative ions.

  8. Looking inside jets: optical polarimetry as a probe of Gamma-Ray Bursts physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopac, D.; Mundell, C.

    2015-07-01

    It is broadly accepted that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are powered by accretion of matter by black holes, formed during massive stellar collapse, which launch ultra-relativistic, collimated outflows or jets. The nature of the progenitor star, the structure of the jet, and thus the underlying mechanisms that drive the explosion and provide collimation, remain some of the key unanswered questions. To approach these problems, and in particular the role of magnetic fields in GRBs, early time-resolved polarimetry is the key, because it is the only direct probe of the magnetic fields structure. Using novel fast RINGO polarimeter developed for use on the 2-m robotic optical Liverpool Telescope, we have made the first measurements of optical linear polarization of the early optical afterglows of GRBs, finding linear percentage polarization as high as 30% and, for the first time, making time-resolved polarization measurements. I will present the past 8 years of RINGO observations, discuss how the results fit into the GRB theoretical picture, and highlight recent data, in particular high-time resolution multi-colour optical photometry performed during the prompt GRB phase, which also provides some limits on polarization.

  9. Langmuir-Probe Measurements in Flowing-Afterglow Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsen, R.; Shunko, E. V.; Gougousi, T.; Golde, M. F.

    1994-01-01

    The validity of the orbital-motion theory for cylindrical Langmuir probes immersed in flowing- afterglow plasmas is investigated experimentally. It is found that the probe currents scale linearly with probe area only for electron-collecting but not for ion-collecting probes. In general, no agreement is found between the ion and electron densities derived from the probe currents. Measurements in recombining plasmas support the conclusion that only the electron densities derived from probe measurements can be trusted to be of acceptable accuracy. This paper also includes a brief derivation of the orbital-motion theory, a discussion of perturbations of the plasma by the probe current, and the interpretation of plasma velocities obtained from probe measurements.

  10. Gamma-ray line afterglow from burst environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fencl, H. S.; Boyd, R. N.; Hartmann, Dieter

    1992-01-01

    We consider photoerosion and direct pair production in a medium surrounding a gamma-ray burst. The resulting secondary gamma-rays may provide diagnostic tools of these environments and, in turn, of the nature of the bursters themselves. In some instances short-lived nuclides are formed; the beta-delayed gamma-rays produced from their decays provide the signatures of the photoerosion. In addition, annihilation radiation produced from positrons resulting from direct pair production is related to the plasma conditions in the medium. We investigate the plausibility of detecting the various radiations. Under extremely favorable conditions, the photoerosion afterglow might be detectable with the present generation of detectors. However, the positron annihilation line should be detectable under a fairly wide range in the conditions of the medium.

  11. Pink splash of active nitrogen in the discharge afterglow

    SciT

    Akishev, Yu. S.; Grushin, M. E.; Karal'nik, V. B.

    2007-09-15

    Results are presented from experimental studies of the glow dynamics of active nitrogen in the stage of its excitation by a current pulse and during the discharge afterglow. The mechanism is proposed for the generation of a light splash in a highly activated nitrogen after the end of its pulsed excitation. The key role in the generation of this splash is played by the D-V processes, by which the dissociation energy is transferred to the vibrational degrees of freedom in the course of recombination of nitrogen atoms, and the V-E processes, by which the vibrational energy of highly excited moleculesmore » N{sub 2}(X, v {>=} 25-27) is transferred to the emitting electronic states N{sub 2}(B, v) after the V-V delay. Results of simulations based on the mechanism proposed are also presented.« less

  12. Solvation suppression of ion recombination in gas discharge afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirov, R. Kh.; Lankin, A. V.; Norman, G. E.

    2018-03-01

    An effect which suppresses recombination in ion plasmas is considered both theoretically and experimentally. Experimental results are presented for the ion recombination rate in fluorine plasma, which are obtained from data for the gas discharge afterglow. To interpret them, a suppression factor is considered: ion solvation in weakly ionized plasma. It is shown that the recombination process has a two-stage character with the formation of intermediate metastable ion pairs. The pairs consist of negative and positive ion-molecular clusters. A theoretical explanation is given for the slowing down of the ion recombination with the increase of the Coulomb coupling compared to the ion recombination rate calculated in the ideal plasma approximation. The approximate similarity of the recombination rate of the ion temperature and concentration and reasons for the slight deviation from the similarity are elucidated.

  13. MAGIC upper limits on the GRB 090102 afterglow

    DOE PAGES

    Aleksic, J.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; ...

    2013-12-09

    Indications of a GeV component in the emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are known since the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope observations during the 1990s and they have been confirmed by the data of the Fermi satellite. Our results have, however, shown that our understanding of GRB physics is still unsatisfactory. The new generation of Cherenkov observatories and in particular the MAGIC telescope, allow for the first time the possibility to extend the measurement of GRBs from several tens up to hundreds of GeV energy range. Both leptonic and hadronic processes have been suggested to explain the possible GeV/TeV counterpart ofmore » GRBs. Observations with ground-based telescopes of very high energy (VHE) photons (E > 30 GeV) from these sources are going to play a key role in discriminating among the different proposed emission mechanisms, which are barely distinguishable at lower energies. MAGIC telescope observations of the GRB 090102 (z = 1.547) field and Fermi Large Area Telescope data in the same time interval are analysed to derive upper limits of the GeV/TeV emission. We compare these results to the expected emissions evaluated for different processes in the framework of a relativistic blastwave model for the afterglow. Simultaneous upper limits with Fermi and a Cherenkov telescope have been derived for this GRB observation. We obtained results compatible with the expected emission although the difficulties in predicting the HE and VHE emission for the afterglow of this event makes it difficult to draw firmer conclusions. Nonetheless, MAGIC sensitivity in the energy range of overlap with space-based instruments (above about 40 GeV) is about one order of magnitude better with respect to Fermi. This makes evident the constraining power of ground-based observations and shows that the MAGIC telescope has reached the required performance to make possible GRB multiwavelength studies in the VHE range.« less

  14. Experimental investigation of early-time diffusion in the quantum kicked rotor using a Bose-Einstein condensate.

    PubMed

    Duffy, G J; Parkins, S; Müller, T; Sadgrove, M; Leonhardt, R; Wilson, A C

    2004-11-01

    We report measurements of the early-time momentum diffusion for the atom-optical delta-kicked rotor. In this experiment a Bose-Einstein condensate provides a source of ultracold atoms with an ultranarrow initial momentum distribution, which is then subjected to periodic pulses (or "kicks") using an intense far-detuned optical standing wave. We characterize the effect of varying the effective Planck's constant for the system, while keeping all other parameters fixed. The observed behavior includes both quantum resonances (ballistic energy growth) and antiresonances (re-establishment of the initial state). Our experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions.

  15. GRB 020410: A Gamma-ray burst afterglow discovered by its supernova light

    SciT

    Levan, Andrew; Nugent, Peter; Fruchter, Andrew

    2004-03-19

    We present the discovery and monitoring of the optical transient (OT) associated with GRB 020410. The fading OT was found by Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations taken 28 and 65 days after burst at a position consistent with the X-ray afterglow. Subsequent re-examination of early ground based observations revealed that a faint OT was present 6 hours after burst, confirming the source association with GRB 020410. A deep non-detection after one week requires that the OT re-brightened between day 7 and day 28, and further late time HST data taken approximately 100 days after burst imply that it is verymore » red (F{sub nu} proportional to nu-2.7). We compare both the flux and color of the excess with supernova models and show that the data are best explained by the presence of a Type I b/c supernova at a redshift z approx. equal 0.5, which occurred roughly coincident with the day of GRB.« less

  16. Diagnostic of N2(A) concentration in high velocity nitrogen afterglow at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pointu, Anne-Marie; Mintusov, Evgeny

    2009-10-01

    An optical emission diagnostic was used to measure N2(A) concentration in a high velocity (1000 cm/s) N2 flowing afterglow of corona discharge at atmospheric pressure, used for biological decontamination. Introducing impurities of NO (<1e-5) we used two well separated and relatively intense lines of NO gamma and beta bands (248nm and 321 nm), easily studied with a low resolution spectrometer. Based on a simplified transport kinetics, the technique is validated using a variation of lines intensity ratios used as coordinates, for numerous experimental points, measured at different axial distances and for different values of NO injected flow. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that N2(A) creation comes from N+N+N2 atom recombination with a global rate around 2e-33 cm^6/s, a result which agrees with literature, as well as N2(A) loss mechanisms were confirmed to go via quenching with O and N atoms. The order of magnitude of obtained N2(A) concentration, about 1e11 cm-3, coincides with the results of direct measurement (by Vegard-Kaplan band), using a spectrometer of better resolution.

  17. Spectral models for early time SN 2011fe observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, E.; Hoeflich, P.; Friesen, Brian; Sullivan, M.; Hsiao, E.; Ellis, R. S.; Gal-Yam, A.; Howell, D. A.; Nugent, P. E.; Dominguez, I.; Krisciunas, K.; Phillips, M. M.; Suntzeff, N.; Wang, L.; Thomas, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    We use observed UV through near-IR spectra to examine whether SN 2011fe can be understood in the framework of Branch-normal Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and to examine its individual peculiarities. As a benchmark, we use a delayed-detonation model with a progenitor metallicity of Z⊙/20. We study the sensitivity of features to variations in progenitor metallicity, the outer density profile, and the distribution of radioactive nickel. The effect of metallicity variations in the progenitor have a relatively small effect on the synthetic spectra. We also find that the abundance stratification of SN 2011fe resembles closely that of a delayed-detonation model with a transition density that has been fit to other Branch-normal SNe Ia. At early times, the model photosphere is formed in material with velocities that are too high, indicating that the photosphere recedes too slowly or that SN 2011fe has a lower specific energy in the outer ≈0.1 M⊙ than does the model. We discuss several explanations for the discrepancies. Finally, we examine variations in both the spectral energy distribution and in the colours due to variations in the progenitor metallicity, which suggests that colours are only weak indicators for the progenitor metallicity, in the particular explosion model that we have studied. We do find that the flux in the U band is significantly higher at maximum light in the solar metallicity model than in the lower metallicity model and the lower metallicity model much better matches the observed spectrum.

  18. Spectral models for early time SN 2011fe observations

    DOE PAGES

    Baron, E.; Hoeflich, P.; Friesen, Brian; ...

    2015-10-13

    We use observed UV through near-IR spectra to examine whether SN 2011fe can be understood in the framework of Branch-normal Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and to examine its individual peculiarities. As a benchmark, we use a delayed-detonationmodel with a progenitormetallicity of Z ⊙/20. We study the sensitivity of features to variations in progenitor metallicity, the outer density profile, and the distribution of radioactive nickel. The effect of metallicity variations in the progenitor have a relatively small effect on the synthetic spectra. We also find that the abundance stratification of SN 2011fe resembles closely that of a delayed-detonation model withmore » a transition density that has been fit to other Branch-normal SNe Ia. At early times, the model photosphere is formed in material with velocities that are too high, indicating that the photosphere recedes too slowly or that SN 2011fe has a lower specific energy in the outer ≈0.1 M ⊙ than does the model. We discuss several explanations for the discrepancies. Lastly, we examine variations in both the spectral energy distribution and in the colours due to variations in the progenitor metallicity, which suggests that colours are only weak indicators for the progenitor metallicity, in the particular explosion model that we have studied. Here we do find that the flux in the U band is significantly higher at maximum light in the solar metallicity model than in the lower metallicity model and the lower metallicity model much better matches the observed spectrum.« less

  19. The VLT/X-shooter GRB afterglow legacy survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaper, Lex; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Pugliese, Vanna; van Rest, Daan

    2017-11-01

    The Swift satellite allows us to use gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) to peer through the hearts of star forming galaxies through cosmic time. Our open collaboration, representing most of the active European researchers in this field, builds a public legacy sample of GRB X-shooter spectroscopy while Swift continues to fly. To date, our spectroscopy of more than 100 GRB afterglows covers a redshift range from 0.059 to about 8 (Tanvir et al. 2009, Nature 461, 1254), with more than 20 robust afterglow-based metallicity measurements (over a redshift range from 1.7 to 5.9). With afterglow spectroscopy (throughout the electromagnetic spectrum from X-rays to the sub-mm) we can hence characterize the properties of star-forming galaxies over cosmic history in terms of redshift, metallicity, molecular content, ISM temperature, UV-flux density, etc.. These observations provide key information on the final evolution of the most massive stars collapsing into black holes, with the potential of probing the epoch of the formation of the first (very massive) stars. VLT/X-shooter (Vernet et al. 2011, A&A 536, A105) is in many ways the ideal GRB follow-up instrument and indeed GRB follow-up was one of the primary science cases behind the instrument design and implementation. Due to the wide wavelength coverage of X-shooter, in the same observation one can detect molecular H2 absorption near the atmospheric cut-off and many strong emission lines from the host galaxy in the near-infrared (e.g., Friis et al. 2015, MNRAS 451, 167). For example, we have measured a metallicity of 0.1 Z ⊙ for GRB 100219A at z = 4.67 (Thöne et al. 2013, MNRAS 428, 3590), 0.02 Z ⊙ for GRB 111008A at z = 4.99 (Sparre et al. 2014, ApJ 785, 150) and 0.05 Z ⊙ for GRB 130606A at z = 5.91 (Hartoog et al. 2015, A&A 580, 139). In the latter, the very high value of [Al/Fe]=2.40 +/- 0.78 might be due to a proton capture process and may be a signature of a previous generation of massive (perhaps even the first) stars

  20. MODELING EXTRAGALACTIC EXTINCTION THROUGH GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS

    SciT

    Zonca, Alberto; Mulas, Giacomo; Casu, Silvia

    We analyze extragalactic extinction profiles derived through gamma-ray burst afterglows, using a dust model specifically constructed on the assumption that dust grains are not immutable but respond, time-dependently, to the local physics. Such a model includes core-mantle spherical particles of mixed chemical composition (silicate core, sp{sup 2}, and sp{sup 3} carbonaceous layers), and an additional molecular component in the form of free-flying polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. We fit most of the observed extinction profiles. Failures occur for lines of sight, presenting remarkable rises blueward of the bump. We find a tendency for the carbon chemical structure to become more aliphatic withmore » the galactic activity, and to some extent with increasing redshifts. Moreover, the contribution of the molecular component to the total extinction is more important in younger objects. The results of the fitting procedure (either successes and failures) may be naturally interpreted through an evolutionary prescription based on the carbon cycle in the interstellar medium of galaxies.« less

  1. Determination of hexabromocyclododecane by flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Smoluch, Marek; Silberring, Jerzy; Reszke, Edward; Kuc, Joanna; Grochowalski, Adam

    2014-10-01

    The first application of a flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow ion source for mass spectrometry (FAPA-MS) for the chemical characterization and determination of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is presented. The samples of technical HBCD and expanded polystyrene foam (EPS) containing HBCD as a flame retardant were prepared by dissolving the appropriate solids in dichloromethane. The ionization of HBCD was achieved with a prototype FAPA source. The ions were detected in the negative-ion mode. The ions corresponding to a deprotonated HBCD species (m/z 640.7) as well as chlorine (m/z 676.8), nitrite (m/z 687.8) and nitric (m/z 703.8) adducts were observed in the spectra. The observed isotope pattern is characteristic for a compound containing six bromine atoms. This technique is an effective approach to detect HBCD, which is efficiently ionized in a liquid phase, resulting in high detection efficiency and sensitivity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Impulsive and Varying Injection in Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows.

    PubMed

    Sari; Mészáros

    2000-05-20

    The standard model of gamma-ray burst afterglows is based on synchrotron radiation from a blast wave produced when the relativistic ejecta encounters the surrounding medium. We reanalyze the refreshed shock scenario, in which slower material catches up with the decelerating ejecta and reenergizes it. This energization can be done either continuously or in discrete episodes. We show that such a scenario has two important implications. First, there is an additional component coming from the reverse shock that goes into the energizing ejecta. This persists for as long as the reenergization itself, which could extend for up to days or longer. We find that during this time the overall spectral peak is found at the characteristic frequency of the reverse shock. Second, if the injection is continuous, the dynamics will be different from that in constant energy evolution and will cause a slower decline of the observed fluxes. A simple test of the continuously refreshed scenario is that it predicts a spectral maximum in the far-infrared or millimeter range after a few days.

  3. Relaxation of heavy species and gas temperature in the afterglow of a N2 microwave discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintassilgo, Carlos D.; Guerra, Vasco

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we present a self-consistent kinetic model to study the temporal variation of the gas temperature in the afterglow of a 440 Pa microwave nitrogen discharge operating at 433 MHz in a 3.8 cm diameter tube. The initial conditions in the afterglow are determined by a kinetic model that solves the electron Boltzmann equation coupled to the gas thermal balance equation and a system of rate-balance equations for N2(X 1∑g+, v) molecules, electronically excited states of N2, ground and excited states of atomic nitrogen and the main positive ions. Once the initial concentrations of the heavy species and gas temperature are known, their relaxation in the afterglow is obtained from the solutions to the corresponding time-dependent equations. Modelling predictions are found to be in good agreement with previously measured values for the concentrations of N(4S) atoms and N2(A 3∑u+) molecules, and the radially averaged gas temperature Tg along the afterglow of a microwave discharge in N2 under the same working conditions. It is shown that gas heating in the afterglow comes essentially from the energy transfer involving non-resonant vibration-vibration (V-V) collisions between vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules, as well as from energy exchanges in vibration-translation (V-T) on N2-N collisions. Contribution to the topical issue "Plasma Sources and Plasma Processes (PSPP)", edited by Luis Lemos Alves, Thierry Belmonte and Tiberiu Minea

  4. Observational Implications of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Jet Simulations and Numerical Light Curve Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eerten, Hendrik J.; MacFadyen, Andrew I.

    2012-06-01

    We discuss jet dynamics for narrow and wide gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow jets and the observational implications of numerical simulations of relativistic jets in two dimensions. We confirm earlier numerical results that sideways expansion of relativistic jets during the bulk of the afterglow emission phase is logarithmic in time and find that this also applies to narrow jets with half opening angle of 0.05 rad. As a result, afterglow jets remain highly nonspherical until after they have become nonrelativistic. Although sideways expansion steepens the afterglow light curve after the jet break, the jet edges becoming visible dominates the jet break, which means that the jet break is sensitive to the observer angle even for narrow jets. Failure to take the observer angle into account can lead to an overestimation of the jet energy by up to a factor of four. This weakens the challenge posed to the magneter energy limit by extreme events such as GRB090926A. Late-time radio calorimetry based on a spherical nonrelativistic outflow model remains relevant when the observer is approximately on-axis and where differences of a few in flux level between the model and the simulation are acceptable. However, this does not imply sphericity of the outflow and therefore does not translate to high observer angles relevant to orphan afterglows. For more accurate calorimetry and in order to model significant late-time features such as the rise of the counterjet, detailed jet simulations remain indispensable.

  5. MODELING THE AFTERGLOW OF THE POSSIBLE FERMI -GBM EVENT ASSOCIATED WITH GW150914

    SciT

    Morsony, Brian J.; Workman, Jared C.; Ryan, Dominic M., E-mail: morsony@astro.umd.edu

    2016-07-10

    We model the possible afterglow of the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) event associated with LIGO detection GW150914, under the assumption that the gamma-rays are produced by a short GRB-like relativistic outflow. We model GW150914-GBM as both a weak, on-axis short GRB and normal short GRB seen far off-axis. Given the large uncertainty in the position of GW150914, we determine that the best chance of finding the afterglow is with ASKAP or possibly the Murchinson Widefield Array (MWA), with the flux from an off-axis short GRB reaching 0.2–4 mJy (0.12–16 mJy) at 150 MHz (863.5 MHz) by 1–12 months aftermore » the initial event. At low frequencies, the source would evolve from a hard to soft spectrum over several months. The radio afterglow would be detectable for several months to years after it peaks, meaning the afterglow may still be detectable and increasing in brightness NOW (2016 mid-July). With a localization from the MWA or ASKAP, the afterglow would be detectable at higher radio frequencies with the ATCA and in X-rays with Chandra or XMM .« less

  6. The evolution of the X-ray afterglow emission of GW 170817/ GRB 170817A in XMM-Newton observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Avanzo, P.; Campana, S.; Salafia, O. S.; Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Melandri, A.; Bernardini, M. G.; Branchesi, M.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Covino, S.; D'Elia, V.; Nava, L.; Salvaterra, R.; Tagliaferri, G.; Vergani, S. D.

    2018-05-01

    We report our observation of the short gamma-ray burst (GRB) GRB 170817A, associated to the binary neutron star merger gravitational wave (GW) event GW 170817, performed in the X-ray band with XMM-Newton 135 d after the event (on 29 December, 2017). We find evidence for a flattening of the X-ray light curve with respect to the previously observed brightening. This is also supported by a nearly simultaneous optical Hubble Space Telescope observation and successive X-ray Chandra and low-frequency radio observations recently reported in the literature. Since the optical-to-X-ray spectral slope did not change with respect to previous observations, we exclude that the change in the temporal evolution of the light curve is due to the passage of the cooling frequency: its origin must be geometric or dynamical. We interpret all the existing afterglow data with two models: i) a structured jet and ii) a jet-less isotropic fireball with some stratification in its radial velocity structure. Both models fit the data and predict that the radio flux must decrease simultaneously with the optical and X-ray emission, making it difficult to distinguish between them at the present stage. Polarimetric measurements and the rate of short GRB-GW associations in future LIGO/Virgo runs will be key to disentangle these two geometrically different scenarios.

  7. On the Lack of a Radio Afterglow from Some Gamma-Ray Bursts - Insight into Their Progenitors?

    DOE PAGES

    Lloyd-Ronning, Nicole Marie; Fryer, Christopher L.

    2017-02-07

    We investigate the intrinsic properties of a sample of bright (with isotropic equivalent energy Eiso > 10 52 erg) gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), comparing those with and without radio afterglow. We find that the sample of bursts with no radio afterglows has a significantly shorter mean intrinsic duration of the prompt gamma-ray radiation, and the distribution of this duration is significantly different from those bursts with a radio afterglow. Although the sample with no radio afterglow has on average lower isotropic energy, the lack of radio afterglow does not appear to be a result of simply energetics of the burst, butmore » a reflection of a separate physical phenomenon likely related to the circumburst density profile. We also find a weak correlation between the isotropic gamma-ray energy and intrinsic duration in the sample with no radio afterglow, but not in the sample that have observed radio afterglows. We give possible explanations for why there may exist a sample of GRBs with no radio afterglow depending on whether the radio emission comes from the forward or reverse shock, and why these bursts appear to have intrinsically shorter prompt emission durations. Lastly, we discuss how our results may have implications for progenitor models of GRBs.« less

  8. On the Lack of a Radio Afterglow from Some Gamma-Ray Bursts - Insight into Their Progenitors?

    SciT

    Lloyd-Ronning, Nicole Marie; Fryer, Christopher L.

    We investigate the intrinsic properties of a sample of bright (with isotropic equivalent energy Eiso > 10 52 erg) gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), comparing those with and without radio afterglow. We find that the sample of bursts with no radio afterglows has a significantly shorter mean intrinsic duration of the prompt gamma-ray radiation, and the distribution of this duration is significantly different from those bursts with a radio afterglow. Although the sample with no radio afterglow has on average lower isotropic energy, the lack of radio afterglow does not appear to be a result of simply energetics of the burst, butmore » a reflection of a separate physical phenomenon likely related to the circumburst density profile. We also find a weak correlation between the isotropic gamma-ray energy and intrinsic duration in the sample with no radio afterglow, but not in the sample that have observed radio afterglows. We give possible explanations for why there may exist a sample of GRBs with no radio afterglow depending on whether the radio emission comes from the forward or reverse shock, and why these bursts appear to have intrinsically shorter prompt emission durations. Lastly, we discuss how our results may have implications for progenitor models of GRBs.« less

  9. On the lack of a radio afterglow from some gamma-ray bursts - insight into their progenitors?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd-Ronning, Nicole M.; Fryer, Christopher L.

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the intrinsic properties of a sample of bright (with isotropic equivalent energy Eiso > 1052 erg) gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), comparing those with and without radio afterglow. We find that the sample of bursts with no radio afterglows has a significantly shorter mean intrinsic duration of the prompt gamma-ray radiation, and the distribution of this duration is significantly different from those bursts with a radio afterglow. Although the sample with no radio afterglow has on average lower isotropic energy, the lack of radio afterglow does not appear to be a result of simply energetics of the burst, but a reflection of a separate physical phenomenon likely related to the circumburst density profile. We also find a weak correlation between the isotropic gamma-ray energy and intrinsic duration in the sample with no radio afterglow, but not in the sample that have observed radio afterglows. We give possible explanations for why there may exist a sample of GRBs with no radio afterglow depending on whether the radio emission comes from the forward or reverse shock, and why these bursts appear to have intrinsically shorter prompt emission durations. We discuss how our results may have implications for progenitor models of GRBs.

  10. A Large Catalog of Multiwavelength GRB Afterglows. I. Color Evolution and Its Physical Implication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Wang, Yu; Shao, Lang; Wu, Xue-Feng; Huang, Yong-Feng; Zhang, Bing; Ryde, Felix; Yu, Hoi-Fung

    2018-02-01

    The spectrum of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows can be studied with color indices. Here, we present a large comprehensive catalog of 70 GRBs with multiwavelength optical transient data on which we perform a systematic study to find the temporal evolution of color indices. We categorize them into two samples based on how well the color indices are evaluated. The Golden sample includes 25 bursts mostly observed by GROND, and the Silver sample includes 45 bursts observed by other telescopes. For the Golden sample, we find that 96% of the color indices do not vary over time. However, the color indices do vary during short periods in most bursts. The observed variations are consistent with effects of (i) the cooling frequency crossing the studied energy bands in a wind medium (43%) and in a constant-density medium (30%), (ii) early dust extinction (12%), (iii) transition from reverse-shock to forward-shock emission (5%), or (iv) an emergent SN emission (10%). We also study the evolutionary properties of the mean color indices for different emission episodes. We find that 86% of the color indices in the 70 bursts show constancy between consecutive ones. The color index variations occur mainly during the late GRB–SN bump, the flare, and early reverse-shock emission components. We further perform a statistical analysis of various observational properties and model parameters (spectral index {β }o{CI}, electron spectral indices p CI, etc.) using color indices. Overall, we conclude that ∼90% of colors are constant in time and can be accounted for by the simplest external forward-shock model, while the varying color indices call for more detailed modeling.

  11. Investigating the Impact of Optical Selection Effects on Observed Rest-frame Prompt GRB Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turpin, D.; Heussaff, V.; Dezalay, J.-P.; Atteia, J.-L.; Klotz, A.; Dornic, D.

    2016-11-01

    Measuring gamma-ray burst (GRB) properties in their rest frame is crucial for understanding the physics at work in GRBs. This can only be done for GRBs with known redshifts. Since redshifts are usually measured from the optical spectrum of the afterglow, correlations between prompt and afterglow emissions may introduce biases into the distribution of the rest-frame properties of the prompt emission, especially considering that we measure the redshift of only one-third of Swift GRBs. In this paper, we study the optical flux of GRB afterglows and its connection to various intrinsic properties of GRBs. We also discuss the impact of the optical selection effect on the distribution of rest-frame prompt properties of GRBs. Our analysis is based on a sample of 90 GRBs with good optical follow-up and well-measured prompt emission. Seventy-six of them have a measure of redshift and 14 have no redshift. We compare the rest-frame prompt properties of GRBs with different afterglow optical fluxes in order to check for possible correlations between the promt properties and the optical flux of the afterglow. The optical flux is measured two hours after the trigger, which is a typical time for the measure of the redshift. We find that the optical flux of GRB afterglows in our sample is mainly driven by their optical luminosity and depends only slightly on their redshift. We show that GRBs with low and high afterglow optical fluxes have similar E {}{{pi}}, E {}{{iso}}, and L {}{{iso}}, indicating that the rest-frame distributions computed from GRBs with a redshift are not significantly distorted by optical selection effects. However, we found that the {T}90{rest} distribution is not immune to optical selection effects, which favor the selection of GRBs with longer durations. Finally, we note that GRBs well above the E {}{{pi}}-E {}{{iso}} relation have lower optical fluxes and we show that optical selection effects favor the detection of GRBs with bright optical afterglows located

  12. Fluorescence and afterglow of Ca2Sn2Al2O9:Mn2+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemoto, Minoru; Iseki, Takahiro

    2018-03-01

    By using a polymerized complex method, we synthesized manganese (Mn)-doped Ca2Sn2Al2O9, which exhibits yellow fluorescence and afterglow at room temperature when excited by UV radiation. The material emits a broad, featureless fluorescence band centered at 564 nm, which we attribute to the presence of Mn2+ ions. The afterglow decay is well fit by a power-law function, rather than an exponential function. In addition, thermoluminescence analyses demonstrate that two different types of electron traps form in this material. Based on experimental results, we conclude that the fluorescence and afterglow both result from thermally assisted tunneling, in which trapped electrons are thermally excited to higher-level traps and subsequently tunnel to recombination centers.

  13. Decay of the electron number density in the nitrogen afterglow using a hairpin resonator probe

    SciT

    Siefert, Nicholas S.; Ganguly, Biswa N.; Sands, Brian L.

    A hairpin resonator was used to measure the electron number density in the afterglow of a nitrogen glow discharge (p=0.25-0.75 Torr). Electron number densities were measured using a time-dependent approach similar to the approach used by Spencer et al. [J. Phys. D 20, 923 (1987)]. The decay time of the electron number density was used to determine the electron temperature in the afterglow, assuming a loss of electrons via ambipolar diffusion to the walls. The electron temperature in the near afterglow remained between 0.4 and 0.6 eV, depending on pressure. This confirms the work by Guerra et al. [IEEE Trans.more » Plasma. Sci. 31, 542 (2003)], who demonstrated experimentally and numerically that the electron temperature stays significantly above room temperature via superelastic collisions with highly vibrationally excited ground state molecules and metastables, such as A {sup 3}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +}.« less

  14. Degravitation, inflation and the cosmological constant as an afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Subodh P.

    2009-01-01

    In this report, we adopt the phenomenological approach of taking the degravitation paradigm seriously as a consistent modification of gravity in the IR, and investigate its consequences for various cosmological situations. We motivate degravitation — where Netwon's constant is promoted to a scale dependent filter function — as arising from either a small (resonant) mass for the graviton, or as an effect in semi-classical gravity. After addressing how the Bianchi identities are to be satisfied in such a set up, we turn our attention towards the cosmological consequences of degravitation. By considering the example filter function corresponding to a resonantly massive graviton (with a filter scale larger than the present horizon scale), we show that slow roll inflation, hybrid inflation and old inflation remain quantitatively unchanged. We also find that the degravitation mechanism inherits a memory of past energy densities in the present epoch in such a way that is likely significant for present cosmological evolution. For example, if the universe underwent inflation in the past due to it having tunneled out of some false vacuum, we find that degravitation implies a remnant `afterglow' cosmological constant, whose scale immediately afterwards is parametrically suppressed by the filter scale (L) in Planck units Λ ~ l2pl/L2. We discuss circumstances through which this scenario reasonably yields the presently observed value for Λ ~ O(10-120). We also find that in a universe still currently trapped in some false vacuum state, resonance graviton models of degravitation only degravitate initially Planck or GUT scale energy densities down to the presently observed value over timescales comparable to the filter scale. We argue that different functional forms for the filter function will yield similar conclusions. In this way, we argue that although the degravitation models we study have the potential to explain why the cosmological constant is not large in addition to

  15. Spatiotemporal dynamics of charged species in the afterglow of plasmas containing negative ions.

    PubMed

    Kaganovich, I D; Ramamurthi, B N; Economou, D J

    2001-09-01

    The spatiotemporal evolution of charged species densities and wall fluxes during the afterglow of an electronegative discharge has been investigated. The decay of a plasma with negative ions consists of two stages. During the first stage of the afterglow, electrons dominate plasma diffusion and negative ions are trapped inside the vessel by the static electric field; the flux of negative ions to the walls is nearly zero. During this stage, the electron escape frequency increases considerably in the presence of negative ions, and can eventually approach free electron diffusion. During the second stage of the afterglow, electrons have disappeared, and positive and negative ions diffuse to the walls with the ion-ion ambipolar diffusion coefficient. Theories for plasma decay have been developed for equal and strongly different ion (T(i)) and electron (T(e)) temperatures. In the case T(i)=T(e), the species spatial profiles are similar and an analytic solution exists. When detachment is important in the afterglow (weakly electronegative gases, e.g., oxygen) the plasma decay crucially depends on the product of negative ion detachment frequency (gamma(d)) and diffusion time (tau(d)). If gamma(d)tau(d)>2, negative ions convert to electrons during their diffusion towards the walls. The presence of detached electrons results in "self-trapping" of the negative ions, due to emerging electric fields, and the negative ion flux to the walls is extremely small. In the case T(i)afterglow, although negative ions diffuse freely in the plasma core, the negative ion fronts propagate towards the chamber walls with a nearly constant velocity. The evolution of ion fronts in the afterglow of electronegative plasmas is important, since it determines the time needed for negative ions to reach the wall, and thus influence surface reactions in plasma processing.

  16. Bright x-ray flares in gamma-ray burst afterglows.

    PubMed

    Burrows, D N; Romano, P; Falcone, A; Kobayashi, S; Zhang, B; Moretti, A; O'brien, P T; Goad, M R; Campana, S; Page, K L; Angelini, L; Barthelmy, S; Beardmore, A P; Capalbi, M; Chincarini, G; Cummings, J; Cusumano, G; Fox, D; Giommi, P; Hill, J E; Kennea, J A; Krimm, H; Mangano, V; Marshall, F; Mészáros, P; Morris, D C; Nousek, J A; Osborne, J P; Pagani, C; Perri, M; Tagliaferri, G; Wells, A A; Woosley, S; Gehrels, N

    2005-09-16

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows have provided important clues to the nature of these massive explosive events, providing direct information on the nearby environment and indirect information on the central engine that powers the burst. We report the discovery of two bright x-ray flares in GRB afterglows, including a giant flare comparable in total energy to the burst itself, each peaking minutes after the burst. These strong, rapid x-ray flares imply that the central engines of the bursts have long periods of activity, with strong internal shocks continuing for hundreds of seconds after the gamma-ray emission has ended.

  17. Afterglows and Kilonovae Associated with Nearby Low-luminosity Short-duration Gamma-Ray Bursts: Application to GW170817/GRB 170817A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Di; Liu, Liang-Duan; Dai, Zi-Gao; Wu, Xue-Feng

    2017-12-01

    Very recently, the gravitational-wave (GW) event GW170817 was discovered to be associated with the short gamma-ray burst (GRB) 170817A. Multi-wavelength follow-up observations were carried out, and X-ray, optical, and radio counterparts to GW170817 were detected. The observations undoubtedly indicate that GRB 170817A originates from a binary neutron star merger. However, the GRB falls into the low-luminosity class that could have a higher statistical occurrence rate and detection probability than the normal (high-luminosity) class. This implies the possibility that GRB 170817A is intrinsically powerful, but we are off-axis and only observe its side emission. In this Letter, we provide a timely modeling of the multi-wavelength afterglow emission from this GRB and the associated kilonova signal from the merger ejecta, under the assumption of a structured jet, a two-component jet, and an intrinsically less-energetic quasi-isotropic fireball, respectively. Comparing the afterglow properties with the multi-wavelength follow-up observations, we can distinguish between these three models. Furthermore, a few model parameters (e.g., the ejecta mass and velocity) can be constrained.

  18. Constraining chameleon field theories using the GammeV afterglow experiments

    SciT

    Upadhye, A.; Steffen, J. H.; Weltman, A.

    2010-01-01

    The GammeV experiment has constrained the couplings of chameleon scalar fields to matter and photons. Here, we present a detailed calculation of the chameleon afterglow rate underlying these constraints. The dependence of GammeV constraints on various assumptions in the calculation is studied. We discuss the GammeV-CHameleon Afterglow SEarch, a second-generation GammeV experiment, which will improve upon GammeV in several major ways. Using our calculation of the chameleon afterglow rate, we forecast model-independent constraints achievable by GammeV-CHameleon Afterglow SEarch. We then apply these constraints to a variety of chameleon models, including quartic chameleons and chameleon dark energy models. The new experimentmore » will be able to probe a large region of parameter space that is beyond the reach of current tests, such as fifth force searches, constraints on the dimming of distant astrophysical objects, and bounds on the variation of the fine structure constant.« less

  19. Revisiting gamma-ray burst afterglows with time-dependent parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao; Zou, Yuan-Chuan; Chen, Wei; Liao, Bin; Lei, Wei-Hua; Liu, Yu

    2018-02-01

    The relativistic external shock model of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows has been established with five free parameters, i.e., the total kinetic energy E, the equipartition parameters for electrons {{ε }}{{e}} and for the magnetic field {{ε }}{{B}}, the number density of the environment n and the index of the power-law distribution of shocked electrons p. A lot of modified models have been constructed to consider the variety of GRB afterglows, such as: the wind medium environment by letting n change with radius, the energy injection model by letting kinetic energy change with time and so on. In this paper, by assuming all four parameters (except p) change with time, we obtain a set of formulas for the dynamics and radiation, which can be used as a reference for modeling GRB afterglows. Some interesting results are obtained. For example, in some spectral segments, the radiated flux density does not depend on the number density or the profile of the environment. As an application, through modeling the afterglow of GRB 060607A, we find that it can be interpreted in the framework of the time dependent parameter model within a reasonable range.

  20. Afterglow luminescence in sol-gel/Pechini grown oxide materials: persistence or phosphorescence process? (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sontakke, Atul; Ferrier, Alban; Viana, Bruno

    2017-03-01

    Persistent luminescence and phosphorescence, both yields afterglow luminescence, but are completely different mechanisms. Persistent luminescence involves a slow thermal release of trapped electrons stored in defect states, whereas the phosphorescence is caused due to triplet to singlet transition [1,2]. Many persistent luminescence phosphors are based on oxide inorganic hosts, and exhibit long afterglow luminescence after ceasing the excitation. We observed intense and long afterglow luminescence in sol-gel/pechini grown inorganic oxides, and as a first interpretation thought to be due to persistence mechanism. However, some of these materials do not exhibit defect trap centers, and a detailed investigation suggested it is due to phosphorescence, but not the persistence. Phosphorescence is not common in inorganic solids, and that too at room temperature, and therefore usually misinterpreted as persistence luminescence [3]. Here we present a detailed methodology to distinguish phosphorescence from persistence luminescence in inorganic solids, and the process to harvest highly efficient long phosphorescence afterglow at room temperature. 1. Jian Xu, Setsuhisa Tanabe, Atul D. Sontakke, Jumpei Ueda, Appl. Phys. Lett. 107, 081903 (2015) 2. Sebastian Reineke, Marc A. Baldo, Scientific Reports, 4, 3797 (2014) 3. Pengchong Xue, Panpan Wang, Peng Chen, Boqi Yao, Peng Gong, Jiabao Sun, Zhenqi Zhang, Ran Lu, Chem. Sci. (2016) DOI: 10.1039/C5SC03739E

  1. Structure in the early afterglow light curve of the gamma-ray burst of 29 March 2003.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Makoto; Kato, Taichi; Ishioka, Ryoko; Yamaoka, Hitoshi; Monard, Berto; Nogami, Daisaku; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Sugie, Atsushi; Takahashi, Susumu

    2003-06-19

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are energetic explosions that for 0.01-100 s are the brightest gamma-ray sources in the sky. Observations of the early evolution of afterglows are expected to provide clues about the nature of the bursts, but their rapid fading has hampered such studies; some recent rapid localizations of bursts have improved the situation. Here we report an early detection of the very bright afterglow of the burst of 29 March 2003 (GRB030329). Our data show that, even early in the afterglow phase, the light curve shows unexpectedly complicated structures superimposed on the fading background.

  2. Very Large Telescope/Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph and FORS2 spectroscopy of the GRB 081008 afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Elia, V.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; D'Avanzo, P.; Piranomonte, S.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2011-11-01

    We aim at studying the gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 081008, environment by analysing the spectra of its optical afterglow. Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph/Very Large Telescope (UVES/VLT) high-resolution spectroscopy of GRB 081008 was secured ˜5 h after the Swift-BAT trigger. Our data set also comprises three VLT/FORS2 nearly simultaneous spectra of the same source. The availability of nearly simultaneous high- and low-resolution spectra for a GRB afterglow is an extremely rare event. The GRB-damped Lyman α system at z= 1.9683 shows that the interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy is constituted by at least three components which contribute to the line profiles. Component I is the redmost one, and is 20 and 78 km s-1 redward components II and III, respectively. We detect several ground state and excited absorption features in components I and II. These features have been used to compute the distances between the GRB and the absorbers. Component I is found to be 52 ± 6 pc away from the GRB, while component II presents few excited transitions and its distance is 200+60- 80 pc. Component III only features a few, low-ionization and saturated lines suggesting that it is even farther from the GRB. Component I represents the closest absorber ever detected near a GRB. This (relatively) low distance can possibly be a consequence of a dense GRB environment, which prevents the GRB prompt/afterglow emission to strongly affect the ISM up to higher distances. The hydrogen column density associated with GRB 081008 is log NH/cm-2= 21.11 ± 0.10, and the metallicity of the host galaxy is in the range of [X/H] =-1.29 to -0.52. In particular, we found [Fe/H] =-1.19 ± 0.11 and [Zn/H] =-0.52 ± 0.11 with respect to solar values. This discrepancy can be explained by the presence of dust in the GRB ISM, given the opposite refractory properties of iron and zinc. By deriving the depletion pattern for GRB 081008, we find the optical extinction in the visual band to be AV

  3. HAPPY BIRTHDAY SWIFT: ULTRA-LONG GRB 141121A AND ITS BROADBAND AFTERGLOW

    SciT

    Cucchiara, A.; Veres, P.; Corsi, A.

    2015-10-20

    We present our extensive observational campaign on the Swift-discovered GRB 141121A, almost 10 years after its launch. Our observations cover radio through X-rays and extend for more than 30 days after discovery. The prompt phase of GRB 141121A lasted 1410 s and, at the derived redshift of z = 1.469, the isotropic energy is E{sub γ,iso} = 8.0 × 10{sup 52} erg. Due to the long prompt duration, GRB 141121A falls into the recently discovered class of ultra-long GRBs (UL-GRBs). Peculiar features of this burst are (1) a flat early-time optical light curve and (2) a radio-to-X-ray rebrightening around threemore » days after the burst. The latter is followed by a steep optical-to-X-ray decay and a much shallower radio fading. We analyze GRB 141121A in the context of the standard forward–reverse shock (FS, RS) scenario and we disentangle the FS and RS contributions. Finally, we comment on the puzzling early-time (t ≲ 3 days) behavior of GRB 141121A, and suggest that its interpretation may require a two-component jet model. Overall, our analysis confirms that the class of UL-GRBs represents our best opportunity to firmly establish the prominent emission mechanisms in action during powerful gamma-ray burst explosions, and future missions (like SVOM, XTiDE, or ISS-Lobster) will provide many more of such objects.« less

  4. Photoluminescence and afterglow luminescence properties of a green-emitting Na2BeGeO4:Mn2+ phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jie; Shen, Linjiang

    2018-07-01

    Recently, developing free rare-earth (RE) doped afterglow phosphors has received great attentions in the lighting field. In this work, we prepare and report a RE-free phosphor, Na2BeGeO4:Mn2+, which can simultaneously emit the green fluorescence and afterglow luminescence upon excitation at UV light. Our results reveal that the as-prepared samples crystallize in orthorhombic type with the space group of Pmn21 (31). The green emission is a broad band centered at 525 nm, corresponds to the 4T1(4G)-6A1(6S) transition of Mn2+ ions. After exposing to a 254 nm UV lamp for 10 min, the green afterglow luminescence seen with naked eyes can last more than 5 h. Together with the structural analysis and thermoluminescence (TL) spectra, the afterglow luminescence mechanism is also discussed in this work.

  5. Brightening X-Ray/Optical/Radio Emission of GW170817/SGRB 170817A: Evidence for an Electron–Positron Wind from the Central Engine?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jin-Jun; Dai, Zi-Gao; Huang, Yong-Feng; Wu, Xue-Feng; Li, Long-Biao; Li, Bing; Meng, Yan-Zhi

    2018-04-01

    Recent follow-up observations of the binary neutron star (NS) merging event GW170817/SGRB 170817A reveal that its X-ray/optical/radio emissions are brightening continuously up to ∼100 days post-merger. This late-time brightening is unexpected from the kilonova model or the off-axis top-hat jet model for gamma-ray burst (SGRB) afterglows. In this Letter, by assuming that the merger remnant is a long-lived NS, we propose that the interaction between an electron–positron-pair (e + e ‑) wind from the central NS and the jet could produce a long-lived reverse shock, from which a new emission component would rise and can interpret current observations well. The magnetic-field-induced ellipticity of the NS is taken to be 4 × 10‑5 in our modeling, so that the braking of the NS is mainly through the gravitational wave (GW) radiation rather than the magnetic dipole radiation, and the emission luminosity at early times would not exceed the observational limits. In our scenario, because the peak time of the brightening is roughly equal to the spin-down timescale of the NS, the accurate peak time may help constrain the ellipticity of the remnant NS. We suggest that radio polarization observations of the brightening would help to distinguish our scenario from other scenarios. Future observations on a large sample of short gamma-ray burst afterglows or detections of GW signals from merger remnants would test our scenario.

  6. Blue–green afterglow of BaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphors

    SciT

    Zhai, Bao-gai; Ma, Qing-lan; School of Electronics and Information, Nantong University, Jiangsu 226019

    Highlights: • Afterglow can be achieved when Eu{sup 2+} is absent in the DyAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphors. • The afterglow of DyAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphors is discernible to naked eyes for minutes. • Dy{sup 3+} introduced trap centers are believed to be responsible for the afterglow. - Abstract: Dy{sup 3+} doped barium aluminate (BaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+}) phosphors were prepared via the sol–gel combustion route at the ignition temperature of 600 °C. The phosphors were characterized with X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Regardless of themore » absence of Eu{sup 2+} luminescent centers, broadband blue–green afterglow with its peak at about 490 nm was recorded in the BaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphors. The decay profile of the blue–green afterglow can be best fitted into a two-component exponential function with the two lifetime decay constants to be 8.81 and 45.25 s, respectively. The observation of blue–green afterglow from BaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} in the absence of Eu{sup 2+} provides unique opportunity in unveiling the afterglow mechanisms of rare-earth doped alkaline-metal aluminates. Possible mechanisms on the blue–green afterglow in BaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphors are discussed in terms of the Dy{sup 3+} ions introduced trap centers as well as luminescent centers in the crystal lattice.« less

  7. A Search for Early High-Energy Afterglows in BATSE Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giblin, Timothy W.

    2003-01-01

    The scope of this project was to perform a detailed search for the early high-energy afterglow component of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in the BATSE GRB data archive. GRBs are believed to be the product of shock waves generated in a relativistic outflow from the demise of extremely massive stars and/or binary neutron star mergers. The outflow undeniably encounters the ambient medium of the progenitor object and another shock wave is set up. A forward shock propagates into the medium and a reverse shock propagates through the ejecta. This "external" shock dissipates the kinetic energy of the ejecta in the form of radiation via synchrotron losses and slows the outflow eventually to a non-relativistic state. Radiation from the forward external shock is therefore expected to be long-lived, lasting days, weeks, and even months. This radiation is referred to as the 'afterglow'.

  8. Pinus Pinaster surface treatment realized in spatial and temporal afterglow DBD conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoq, E.; Clément, F.; Panousis, E.; Loiseau, J.-F.; Held, B.; Castetbon, A.; Guimon, C.

    2008-04-01

    This experimental work deals with the exposition of Pinus Pinaster wood samples to a DBD afterglow. Electrical parameters like duty cycle and injected energy in the gas are being varied and the modifications induced by the afterglow on the wood are analysed by several macroscopic and microscopic ways like wettability, XPS analyses and also soaking tests of treated wood in a commercial fungicide solution. Soaking tests show that plasma treatment could enhance the absorption of fungicide into the wood. The wettability results point out that the plasma treatment can inflict on the wood different surface properties, making it hydrophilic or hydrophobic, when varying electrical parameters. XPS analyses reveal several chemical modifications like an increase of the O/C ratio and the presence of carboxyl groups on the surface after plasma treatments.

  9. Constraining chameleon field theories using the GammeV afterglow experiments

    SciT

    Upadhye, A.; /Chicago U., EFI /KICP, Chicago; Steffen, J.H.

    2009-11-01

    The GammeV experiment has constrained the couplings of chameleon scalar fields to matter and photons. Here we present a detailed calculation of the chameleon afterglow rate underlying these constraints. The dependence of GammeV constraints on various assumptions in the calculation is studied. We discuss GammeV-CHASE, a second-generation GammeV experiment, which will improve upon GammeV in several major ways. Using our calculation of the chameleon afterglow rate, we forecast model-independent constraints achievable by GammeV-CHASE. We then apply these constraints to a variety of chameleon models, including quartic chameleons and chameleon dark energy models. The new experiment will be able to probemore » a large region of parameter space that is beyond the reach of current tests, such as fifth force searches, constraints on the dimming of distant astrophysical objects, and bounds on the variation of the fine structure constant.« less

  10. The effectiveness of strong afterglow phosphor powder in the detection of fingermarks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Zhang, Zhongliang; Zhang, Limei; Zhai, Yuchun

    2009-01-10

    There are numerous types of fluorescent fingermark powders or reagents used with the visualization of latent fingermarks deposited on multicolored substrate surfaces that can present a contrast problem if developed with regular fingermark powders. The developed fingermarks can show bright fluorescence upon exposure to laser, ultraviolet light and other light sources. These kinds of methods share a common concern, where surfaces and other substrates may fluoresce also. To overcome this concern, we have developed a phosphor powder which offers a strong afterglow effect which aid in the establishment of better fingermark detection. With the advent of a phosphor powder no special devices are required and the results obtained from fresh or a few days aged latent fingermarks left on: non-porous; semi-porous and also on some porous surfaces have been good. The strong afterglow effect offered by phosphor powder is also applicable for cyanoacrylate fumed fingermarks. Lift off and photography procedures of the developed fingermarks are incorporated in this paper.

  11. Efficient electron heating in relativistic shocks and gamma-ray-burst afterglow.

    PubMed

    Gedalin, M; Balikhin, M A; Eichler, D

    2008-02-01

    Electrons in shocks are efficiently energized due to the cross-shock potential, which develops because of differential deflection of electrons and ions by the magnetic field in the shock front. The electron energization is necessarily accompanied by scattering and thermalization. The mechanism is efficient in both magnetized and nonmagnetized relativistic electron-ion shocks. It is proposed that the synchrotron emission from the heated electrons in a layer of strongly enhanced magnetic field is responsible for gamma-ray-burst afterglows.

  12. Population III Gamma-ray Burst Afterglows: Constraints on Stellar Masses and External Medium Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, Kenji; Sakamoto, Takanori; Mészáros, Peter

    2011-04-01

    Population (Pop.) III stars are theoretically expected to be prominent around redshifts z ~ 20, consisting of mainly very massive stars with M * >~ 100 M sun, though there is no direct observational evidence for these objects. They may produce collapsar gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), with jets driven by magnetohydrodynamic processes, whose total isotropic-equivalent energy could be as high as E iso >~ 1057 erg over a cosmological-rest-frame duration of td >~ 104 s, depending on the progenitor mass. Here, we calculate the afterglow spectra of such Pop. III GRBs based on the standard external shock model and show that they will be detectable with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT)/XRT and Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) instruments. We find that in some cases a spectral break due to electron-positron pair creation will be observable in the LAT energy range, which can put constraints on the ambient density of the pre-collapse Pop. III star. Thus, high-redshift GRB afterglow observations could be unique and powerful probes of the properties of Pop. III stars and their environments. We examine the trigger threshold of the BAT instrument in detail, focusing on the image trigger system, and show that the prompt emission of Pop. III GRBs could also be detected by BAT. Finally we briefly show that the late-time radio afterglows of Pop. III GRBs for typical parameters, despite the large distances, can be very bright: ~= 140 mJy at 1 GHz, which may lead to a constraint on the Pop. III GRB rate from the current radio survey data, and ~= 2.4 mJy at 70 MHz, which implies that Pop. III GRB radio afterglows could be interesting background source candidates for 21 cm absorption line detections.

  13. Novel methods for measuring afterglow in developmental scintillators for X-ray and neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartle, C. M.; Edgar, A.; Dixie, L.; Varoy, C.; Piltz, R.; Buchanan, S.; Rutherford, K.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper we discuss two novel methods of measuring afterglow in scintillators. One method is designed for X-ray detection and the other for neutron detection applications. In the first method a commercial fan-beam scanner of basic design similar to those seen at airports is used to deliver a typically 12 ms long X-ray pulse to a scintillator by passing the test equipment through the scanner on the conveyor belt. In the second method the thermal neutron beam from a research reactor is incident on the scintillator. The beam is cut-off in about 1 ms using a 10B impregnated aluminum pneumatic shutter, and the afterglow is recorded on a dual range storage oscilloscope to capture both the steady state intensity and the weak decay. We describe these measurement methods and the results obtained for a range of developmental ceramic and glass scintillators, as well as some standard scintillators such as NaI(Tl), LiI(Eu) and the plastic scintillator NE102A. Preliminary modeling of the afterglow is presented.

  14. Multi-Band Light Curves from Two-Dimensional Simulations of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacFadyen, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of gamma-ray burst outflows is inherently multi-dimensional. 1.) We present high resolution two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamics simulations of GRBs in the afterglow phase using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Using standard synchrotron radiation models, we compute multi-band light curves, from the radio to X-ray, directly from the 2D hydrodynamics simulation data. We will present on-axis light curves for both constant density and wind media. We will also present off-axis light curves relevant for searches for orphan afterglows. We find that jet breaks are smoothed due to both off-axis viewing and wind media effects. 2.) Non-thermal radiation mechanisms in GRB afterglows require substantial magnetic field strengths. In turbulence driven by shear instabilities in relativistic magnetized gas, we demonstrate that magnetic field is naturally amplified to half a percent of the total energy (epsilon B = 0.005). We will show high resolution three dimensional relativistic MHD simulations of this process as well as particle in cell (PIC) simulations of mildly relativistic collisionless shocks.

  15. Determination of Cosmological Parameters from GRB Correlation between E_iso (gamma) and Afterglow Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannachi, Zitouni; Guessoum, Nidhal; Azzam, Walid

    2016-07-01

    Context: We use the correlation relations between the energy emitted by the GRBs in their prompt phases and the X-ray afterglow fluxes, in an effort to constrain cosmological parameters and construct a Hubble diagram at high redshifts, i.e. beyond those found in Type Ia supernovae. Methods: We use a sample of 128 Swift GRBs, which we have selected among more than 800 ones observed until July 2015. The selection is based on a few observational constraints: GRB flux higher than 0.4 photons/cm^2/s in the band 15-150 keV; spectrum fitted with simple power law; redshift accurately known and given; and X-ray afterglow observed and flux measured. The statistical method of maximum likelihood is then used to determine the best cosmological parameters (Ω_M, Ω_L) that give the best correlation between the isotropic gamma energies E_{iso} and the afterglow fluxes at the break time t_{b}. The χ^2 statistical test is also used as a way to compare results from two methods. Results & Conclusions: Although the number of GRBs with high redshifts is rather small, and despite the notable dispersion found in the data, the results we have obtained are quite encouraging and promising. The values of the cosmological parameters obtained here are close to those currently used.

  16. Hydrothermal synthesis and afterglow luminescence properties of hollow SnO{sub 2}:Sm{sup 3+},Zr{sup 4+} spheres for potential application in drug delivery

    SciT

    Feng, Pengfei; Zhang, Jiachi, E-mail: zhangjch@lzu.edu.cn; Qin, Qingsong

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • We designed a novel afterglow labeling material SnO{sub 2}:Sm{sup 3+},Zr{sup 4+} for the first time. • Hollow SnO{sub 2}:Sm{sup 3+},Zr{sup 4+} spheres with afterglow were prepared by hydrothermal method. • Hollow SnO{sub 2}:Sm{sup 3+},Zr{sup 4+} is a potential afterglow labeling medium for drug delivery. - Abstract: A novel afterglow labeling material SnO{sub 2}:Sm{sup 3+},Zr{sup 4+} with hollow sphere shape and intense afterglow luminescence is prepared by hydrothermal method at 180 °C for the first time. The morphology and the sphere growth process of this material are investigated by scanning electron microscopy in detail. The afterglow measurement shows thatmore » this hydrothermal obtained material exhibits obvious red afterglow luminescence (550–700 nm) of Sm{sup 3+} which can last for 542 s (0.32 mcd/m{sup 2}). The depth of traps in this hydrothermal obtained material is calculated to be as shallow as 0.58 eV. The results demonstrate that although it is necessary to further improve the afterglow performance of the hydrothermal derived hollow SnO{sub 2}:Sm{sup 3+},Zr{sup 4+} spheres, it still can be regarded as a potential afterglow labeling medium for drug delivery.« less

  17. Simulations of Gamma-Ray Burst Jets in a Stratified External Medium: Dynamics, Afterglow Light Curves, Jet Breaks, and Radio Calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Colle, Fabio; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Granot, Jonathan; Lopez-Camara, Diego

    2012-05-01

    The dynamics of gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets during the afterglow phase is most reliably and accurately modeled using hydrodynamic simulations. All published simulations so far, however, have considered only a uniform external medium, while a stratified external medium is expected around long duration GRB progenitors. Here, we present simulations of the dynamics of GRB jets and the resulting afterglow emission for both uniform and stratified external media with ρextvpropr -k for k = 0, 1, 2. The simulations are performed in two dimensions using the special relativistic version of the Mezcal code. Common to all calculations is the initiation of the GRB jet as a conical wedge of half-opening angle θ0 = 0.2 whose radial profile is taken from the self-similar Blandford-McKee solution. The dynamics for stratified external media (k = 1, 2) are broadly similar to those derived for expansion into a uniform external medium (k = 0). The jet half-opening angle is observed to start increasing logarithmically with time (or radius) once the Lorentz factor Γ drops below θ-1 0. For larger k values, however, the lateral expansion is faster at early times (when Γ > θ-1 0) and slower at late times with the jet expansion becoming Newtonian and slowly approaching spherical symmetry over progressively longer timescales. We find that, contrary to analytic expectations, there is a reasonably sharp jet break in the light curve for k = 2 (a wind-like external medium), although the shape of the break is affected more by the viewing angle (for θobs <= θ0) than by the slope of the external density profile (for 0 <= k <= 2). Steeper density profiles (i.e., increasing k values) are found to produce more gradual jet breaks while larger viewing angles cause smoother and later appearing jet breaks. The counterjet becomes visible as it becomes sub-relativistic, and for k = 0 this results in a clear bump-like feature in the light curve. However, for larger k values the jet decelerates more

  18. The Supercritical Pile Gamma-Ray Burst Model: The GRB Afterglow Steep Decline and Plateau Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sultana, Joseph; Kazanas, D.; Mastichiadis, A.

    2013-01-01

    We present a process that accounts for the steep decline and plateau phase of the Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT) light curves, vexing features of gamma-ray burst (GRB) phenomenology. This process is an integral part of the "supercritical pile" GRB model, proposed a few years ago to account for the conversion of the GRB kinetic energy into radiation with a spectral peak at E(sub pk) is approx. m(sub e)C(exp 2). We compute the evolution of the relativistic blast wave (RBW) Lorentz factor Gamma to show that the radiation-reaction force due to the GRB emission can produce an abrupt, small (approx. 25%) decrease in Gamma at a radius that is smaller (depending on conditions) than the deceleration radius R(sub D). Because of this reduction, the kinematic criticality criterion of the "supercritical pile" is no longer fulfilled. Transfer of the proton energy into electrons ceases and the GRB enters abruptly the afterglow phase at a luminosity smaller by approx. m(sub p)/m(sub e) than that of the prompt emission. If the radius at which this slow-down occurs is significantly smaller than R(sub D), the RBW internal energy continues to drive the RBW expansion at a constant (new) Gamma and its X-ray luminosity remains constant until R(sub D) is reached, at which point it resumes its more conventional decay, thereby completing the "unexpected" XRT light curve phase. If this transition occurs at R is approx. equal to R(sub D), the steep decline is followed by a flux decrease instead of a "plateau," consistent with the conventional afterglow declines. Besides providing an account of these peculiarities, the model suggests that the afterglow phase may in fact begin before the RBW reaches R is approx. equal to R(sub D), thus providing novel insights into GRB phenomenology.

  19. The supercritical pile gamma-ray burst model: The GRB afterglow steep decline and plateau phase

    SciT

    Sultana, J.; Kazanas, D.; Mastichiadis, A., E-mail: joseph.sultana@um.edu.mt

    2013-12-10

    We present a process that accounts for the steep decline and plateau phase of the Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT) light curves, vexing features of gamma-ray burst (GRB) phenomenology. This process is an integral part of the 'supercritical pile' GRB model, proposed a few years ago to account for the conversion of the GRB kinetic energy into radiation with a spectral peak at E {sub pk} ∼ m{sub e}c {sup 2}. We compute the evolution of the relativistic blast wave (RBW) Lorentz factor Γ to show that the radiation-reaction force due to the GRB emission can produce an abrupt, small (∼25%)more » decrease in Γ at a radius that is smaller (depending on conditions) than the deceleration radius R{sub D} . Because of this reduction, the kinematic criticality criterion of the 'supercritical pile' is no longer fulfilled. Transfer of the proton energy into electrons ceases and the GRB enters abruptly the afterglow phase at a luminosity smaller by ∼m{sub p} /m{sub e} than that of the prompt emission. If the radius at which this slow-down occurs is significantly smaller than R{sub D} , the RBW internal energy continues to drive the RBW expansion at a constant (new) Γ and its X-ray luminosity remains constant until R{sub D} is reached, at which point it resumes its more conventional decay, thereby completing the 'unexpected' XRT light curve phase. If this transition occurs at R ≅ R{sub D} , the steep decline is followed by a flux decrease instead of a 'plateau,' consistent with the conventional afterglow declines. Besides providing an account of these peculiarities, the model suggests that the afterglow phase may in fact begin before the RBW reaches R ≅ R{sub D} , thus providing novel insights into GRB phenomenology.« less

  20. Magnetic scavengers as carriers of analytes for flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow mass spectrometry (FAPA-MS).

    PubMed

    Cegłowski, Michał; Kurczewska, Joanna; Smoluch, Marek; Reszke, Edward; Silberring, Jerzy; Schroeder, Grzegorz

    2015-09-07

    In this paper, a procedure for the preconcentration and transport of mixtures of acids, bases, and drug components to a mass spectrometer using magnetic scavengers is presented. Flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow mass spectrometry (FAPA-MS) was used as an analytical method for identification of the compounds by thermal desorption from the scavengers. The proposed procedure is fast and cheap, and does not involve time-consuming purification steps. The developed methodology can be applied for trapping harmful substances in minute quantities, to transport them to specialized, remotely located laboratories.

  1. Nitric oxide kinetics in the afterglow of a diffuse plasma filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnette, D.; Montello, A.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2014-08-01

    A suite of laser diagnostics is used to study kinetics of vibrational energy transfer and plasma chemical reactions in a nanosecond pulse, diffuse filament electric discharge and afterglow in N2 and dry air at 100 Torr. Laser-induced fluorescence of NO and two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence of O and N atoms are used to measure absolute, time-resolved number densities of these species after the discharge pulse, and picosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy is used to measure time-resolved rotational temperature and ground electronic state N2(v = 0-4) vibrational level populations. The plasma filament diameter, determined from plasma emission and NO planar laser-induced fluorescence images, remains nearly constant after the discharge pulse, over a few hundred microseconds, and does not exhibit expansion on microsecond time scale. Peak temperature in the discharge and the afterglow is low, T ≈ 370 K, in spite of significant vibrational nonequilibrium, with peak N2 vibrational temperature of Tv ≈ 2000 K. Significant vibrational temperature rise in the afterglow is likely caused by the downward N2-N2 vibration-vibration (V-V) energy transfer. Simple kinetic modeling of time-resolved N, O, and NO number densities in the afterglow, on the time scale longer compared to relaxation and quenching time of excited species generated in the plasma, is in good agreement with the data. In nitrogen, the N atom density after the discharge pulse is controlled by three-body recombination and radial diffusion. In air, N, NO and O concentrations are dominated by the reverse Zel'dovich reaction, N + NO → N2 + O, and ozone formation reaction, O + O2 + M → O3 + M, respectively. The effect of vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules and excited N atoms on NO formation kinetics is estimated to be negligible. The results suggest that NO formation in the nanosecond pulse discharge is dominated by reactions of excited electronic states of nitrogen, occurring on

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 8 Fermi GRB afterglows follow-up (Singer+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, L. P.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Cenko, S. B.; Perley, D. A.; Anderson, G. E.; Anupama, G. C.; Arcavi, I.; Bhalerao, V.; Bue, B. D.; Cao, Y.; Connaughton, V.; Corsi, A.; Cucchiara, A.; Fender, R. P.; Fox, D. B.; Gehrels, N.; Goldstein, A.; Gorosabel, J.; Horesh, A.; Hurley, K.; Johansson, J.; Kann, D. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Huang, K.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Masci, F.; Nugent, P.; Rau, A.; Rebbapragada, U. D.; Staley, T. D.; Svinkin, D.; Thone, C. C.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Urata, Y.; Weinstein, A.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we present the GBM-iPTF (intermediate Palomar Transient Factory) afterglows from the first 13 months of this project. Follow-up observations include R-band photometry from the P48, multicolor photometry from the P60, spectroscopy (acquired with the P200, Keck, Gemini, APO, Magellan, Very Large Telescope (VLT), and GTC), and radio observations with the Very Large Array (VLA), the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA), the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), and the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI). (3 data files).

  3. Recombination of H3(+) and D3(+) Ions in a Flowing Afterglow Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gougousi, T.; Johnsen, R.; Golde, M. F.

    1995-01-01

    The analysis of flowing afterglow plasmas containing H3(+) or D3(+) ions indicates that the de-ionization of such plasmas does not occur by simple dissociative recombination of ions with electrons. An alternative model of de-ionization is proposed in which electrons are captured into H3(**) auto-ionization Rydberg states that are stabilized by collisional mixing of the Rydberg molecules' angular momenta. The proposed mechanism would enable de-ionization to occur without the need for dissociative recombination by the mechanisms of potential-surface crossings.

  4. Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows as Probes of Environment and Blastwave Physics II: The Distribution of p and Structure of the Circumburst Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starling, R. L. C.; vanderHorst, A. J.; Rol, E.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wiersema, K.; Curran, P. A.; Weltevrede, P.

    2007-01-01

    We constrain blastwave parameters and the circumburst media of a subsample of BeppoSAX Gamma-Ray Bursts. For this sample we derive the values of the injected electron energy distribution index, p, and the density structure index of the circumburst medium, k, from simultaneous spectral fits to their X-ray, optical and nIR afterglow data. The spectral fits have been done in count space and include the effects of metallicity, and are compared with the previously reported optical and X-ray temporal behaviour. Assuming the fireball model, we can find a mean value of p for the sample as a whole of 2.035. A statistical analysis Of the distribution demonstrates that the p values in this sample are inconsistent with a single universal value for p at the 3sigma level or greater. This approach provides us with a measured distribution of circumburst density structures rather than considering only the cases of k = 0 (homogeneous) and k = 2 (wind-like). We find five GRBs for which k can be well constrained, and in four of these cases the circumburst medium is clearly wind-like. The fifth source has a value of 0 less than or equal to k less than or equal to 1, consistent with a homogeneous circumburst medium.

  5. Stationary-Afterglow measurements of dissociative recombination of H2D+ and HD2+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohnal, Petr; Kalosi, Abel; Plasil, Radek; Johnsen, Rainer; Glosik, Juraj

    2016-09-01

    Binary recombination rate coefficients of H2D+ and HD2+ ions have been measured at a temperature of 80 K in an afterglow plasma experiment in which the fractional abundances of H3+, H2D+, HD2+, and D3+ ions were varied by adjusting the [D2]/([D2] + [H2]) ratio of the neutral gas. The fractional abundances of the four ion species during the afterglow and their rotational states were determined in situ by continuous-wave cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy (CRDS), using overtone transitions from the ground vibrational states of the ions. The experimentally determined recombination rate coefficients will be compared to results of advanced theoretical calculations and to the known H3+ and D3+ recombination rate coefficients. We conclude that the recombination coefficients depend only weakly on the isotopic composition. Astrophysical implications of the measured recombination rate coefficients will be also discussed. Work supported by: Czech Science Foundation projects GACR 14-14649P, GACR 15-15077S, GACR P209/12/0233, and by Charles University in Prague Project Nr. GAUK 692214.

  6. The afterglow and elliptical host galaxy of the short gamma-ray burst GRB 050724.

    PubMed

    Berger, E; Price, P A; Cenko, S B; Gal-Yam, A; Soderberg, A M; Kasliwal, M; Leonard, D C; Cameron, P B; Frail, D A; Kulkarni, S R; Murphy, D C; Krzeminski, W; Piran, T; Lee, B L; Roth, K C; Moon, D-S; Fox, D B; Harrison, F A; Persson, S E; Schmidt, B P; Penprase, B E; Rich, J; Peterson, B A; Cowie, L L

    2005-12-15

    Despite a rich phenomenology, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are divided into two classes based on their duration and spectral hardness--the long-soft and the short-hard bursts. The discovery of afterglow emission from long GRBs was a watershed event, pinpointing their origin to star-forming galaxies, and hence the death of massive stars, and indicating an energy release of about 10(51) erg. While theoretical arguments suggest that short GRBs are produced in the coalescence of binary compact objects (neutron stars or black holes), the progenitors, energetics and environments of these events remain elusive despite recent localizations. Here we report the discovery of the first radio afterglow from the short burst GRB 050724, which unambiguously associates it with an elliptical galaxy at a redshift z = 0.257. We show that the burst is powered by the same relativistic fireball mechanism as long GRBs, with the ejecta possibly collimated in jets, but that the total energy release is 10-1,000 times smaller. More importantly, the nature of the host galaxy demonstrates that short GRBs arise from an old (> 1 Gyr) stellar population, strengthening earlier suggestions and providing support for coalescing compact object binaries as the progenitors.

  7. NASA Space Observatories Glimpse Faint Afterglow of Nearby Stellar Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-10-01

    creation of chemical elements such as oxygen through nuclear reactions in their cores. Such observations also help reveal how the interstellar medium (the gas that occupies the vast spaces between the stars) is enriched with chemical elements because of supernova explosions. Later on, these elements are incorporated into new generations of stars and their accompanying planets. Visible only from Earth's southern hemisphere, the LMC is an irregular galaxy lying about 160,000 light-years from the Milky Way. The supernova remnant appears to be about 3,000 years old, but since its light took 160,000 years to reach us, the explosion actually occurred some 163,000 years ago. This composite image of N132D was created by the Hubble Heritage team from visible-light data taken in January 2004 with Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys, and X-ray images obtained in July 2000 by Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer. This marks the first Hubble Heritage image that combines pictures taken by two separate space observatories. The Hubble data include color filters that sample starlight in the blue, green, and red portions of the spectrum, as well as the pink emission from glowing hydrogen gas. The Chandra data are assigned blue in the color composite, in accordance with the much higher energy of the X-rays, emitted from extremely hot gas. This gas does not emit a significant amount of optical light, and was only detected by Chandra. Image Credit: NASA, ESA, and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) Acknowledgment: J.C. Green (Univ. of Colorado) and the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) GTO team; NASA/CXO/SAO Electronic image files, video, illustrations and additional information are available at: http://hubblesite.org/news/2005/30 http://heritage.stsci.edu/2005/30 The Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA), for NASA, under contract with the Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. The Hubble

  8. ON THE LATE-TIME SPECTRAL SOFTENING FOUND IN X-RAY AFTERGLOWS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciT

    Wang, Yuan-Zhu; Liang, En-Wei; Lu, Zu-Jia

    2016-02-20

    Strong spectral softening has been revealed in the late X-ray afterglows of some gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The scenario of X-ray scattering around the circumburst dusty medium has been supported by previous works due to its overall successful prediction of both the temporal and spectral evolution of some X-ray afterglows. To further investigate the observed feature of spectral softening we now systematically search the X-ray afterglows detected by the X-ray telescope aboard Swift and collect 12 GRBs with significant late-time spectral softening. We find that dust scattering could be the dominant radiative mechanism for these X-ray afterglows regarding their temporal andmore » spectral features. For some well-observed bursts with high-quality data, the time-resolved spectra could be well-produced within the scattering scenario by taking into account the X-ray absorption from the circumburst medium. We also find that during spectral softening the power-law index in the high-energy end of the spectra does not vary much. The spectral softening is mainly manifested by the spectral peak energy continually moving to the soft end.« less

  9. Addendum to `numerical modeling of an enhanced very early time electromagnetic (VETEM) prototype system'

    Cui, T.J.; Chew, W.C.; Aydiner, A.A.; Wright, D.L.; Smith, D.V.; Abraham, J.D.

    2000-01-01

    Two numerical models to simulate an enhanced very early time electromagnetic (VETEM) prototype system that is used for buried-object detection and environmental problems are presented. In the first model, the transmitting and receiving loop antennas accurately analyzed using the method of moments (MoM), and then conjugate gradient (CG) methods with the fast Fourier transform (FFT) are utilized to investigate the scattering from buried conducting plates. In the second model, two magnetic dipoles are used to replace the transmitter and receiver. Both the theory and formulation are correct and the simulation results for the primary magnetic field and the reflected magnetic field are accurate.

  10. Electron-Ion Recombination Rate Coefficient Measurements in a Flowing Afterglow Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gougousi, Theodosia; Golde, Michael F.; Johnsen, Rainer

    1996-01-01

    The flowing-afterglow technique in conjunction with computer modeling of the flowing plasma has been used to determine accurate dissociative-recombination rate coefficients alpha for the ions O2(+), HCO(+), CH5(+), C2H5(+), H3O(+), CO2(+), HCO2(+), HN2O(+), and N2O(+) at 295 K. We find that the simple form of data analysis that was employed in earlier experiments was adequate and we largely confirm earlier results. In the case of HCO(+) ions, published coefficients range from 1.1 X 10(exp -7) to 2.8 x 10(exp -7) cu cm/S, while our measurements give a value of 1.9 x 10(exp -7) cu cm/S.

  11. Miniature flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow ion source for facile interfacing of CE with MS.

    PubMed

    Jecklin, Matthias C; Schmid, Stefan; Urban, Pawel L; Amantonico, Andrea; Zenobi, Renato

    2010-10-01

    Here, we present a miniaturized version of the flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (miniFAPA) ion source and use it for sheathless coupling of CE with MS. The simple design of the CE-miniFAPA-MS interface makes it easy to separate the electric potentials used for CE and for ionization. A pneumatically assisted nebulization of the CE effluent transfers the analytes from the liquid phase into the gas phase before they are ionized by interacting with reactive species produced by the FAPA. An important advantage of this interface is its high stability during operation: optimization of five different parameters indicated that the interface is not sensitive to minor deviations from the optimum values. Other advantages include ease of construction and maintenance, as well as relatively low cost. Samples with complex matrices, such as yeast extract, soil extract and urine, spiked with the test compounds, were successfully analyzed using the CE-miniFAPA-MS setup.

  12. A possible macronova in the late afterglow of the long-short burst GRB 060614.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Li, Xiang; Covino, Stefano; Zheng, Xian-Zhong; Hotokezaka, Kenta; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Piran, Tsvi; Wei, Da-Ming

    2015-06-11

    Long-duration (>2 s) γ-ray bursts that are believed to originate from the death of massive stars are expected to be accompanied by supernovae. GRB 060614, that lasted 102 s, lacks a supernova-like emission down to very stringent limits and its physical origin is still debated. Here we report the discovery of near-infrared bump that is significantly above the regular decaying afterglow. This red bump is inconsistent with even the weakest known supernova. However, it can arise from a Li-Paczyński macronova--the radioactive decay of debris following a compact binary merger. If this interpretation is correct, GRB 060614 arose from a compact binary merger rather than from the death of a massive star and it was a site of a significant production of heavy r-process elements. The significant ejected mass favours a black hole-neutron star merger but a double neutron star merger cannot be ruled out.

  13. An Evolving GeV Spectrum from Prompt to Afterglow: The Case of GRB 160509A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Pak-Hin Thomas; He, Xin-Bo; Tang, Qing-Wen; Wang, Xiang-Yu

    2017-07-01

    We present the high-energy emission properties of GRB 160509A, from its prompt mission to late afterglow phase. GRB 160509A contains two emission episodes: 0-40 s and 280-420 s after the burst onset ({t}0). The relatively high fluence of GRB 160509A allows us to establish an evolving spectrum above 100 MeV. During the first emission episode, the >100 MeV spectrum is soft with Γ ≥ 3.0, which can be smoothly connected to keV energies with a Band function with or without a high-energy cutoff. The >100 MeV spectrum rapidly changes to a hard spectrum with Γ ≤ 1.5 after {t}0+40 s. The existence of very energetic photons, e.g., a 52 GeV that arrives at {t}0+77 s and a 29 GeV that arrives at {t}0+70 ks, is hard to reconcile by the synchrotron emission from forward-shock electrons, but is likely due to an inverse-Compton (IC) mechanism (e.g., synchrotron self-Compton emission). A soft spectrum (Γ ˜ 2) between 300 and 1000 s after the burst onset is also found at a significance of about 2 standard deviations, which suggests a different emission mechanism at work for this short period of time. GRB 160509A represents the latest example where IC emission has to be taken into account in explaining the afterglow GeV emission, which had been suggested long before the launch of the Fermi Large Area Telescope.

  14. Gamma-Ray Burst Dynamics and Afterglow Radiation from Adaptive Mesh Refinement, Special Relativistic Hydrodynamic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Colle, Fabio; Granot, Jonathan; López-Cámara, Diego; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2012-02-01

    We report on the development of Mezcal-SRHD, a new adaptive mesh refinement, special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) code, developed with the aim of studying the highly relativistic flows in gamma-ray burst sources. The SRHD equations are solved using finite-volume conservative solvers, with second-order interpolation in space and time. The correct implementation of the algorithms is verified by one-dimensional (1D) and multi-dimensional tests. The code is then applied to study the propagation of 1D spherical impulsive blast waves expanding in a stratified medium with ρvpropr -k , bridging between the relativistic and Newtonian phases (which are described by the Blandford-McKee and Sedov-Taylor self-similar solutions, respectively), as well as to a two-dimensional (2D) cylindrically symmetric impulsive jet propagating in a constant density medium. It is shown that the deceleration to nonrelativistic speeds in one dimension occurs on scales significantly larger than the Sedov length. This transition is further delayed with respect to the Sedov length as the degree of stratification of the ambient medium is increased. This result, together with the scaling of position, Lorentz factor, and the shock velocity as a function of time and shock radius, is explained here using a simple analytical model based on energy conservation. The method used for calculating the afterglow radiation by post-processing the results of the simulations is described in detail. The light curves computed using the results of 1D numerical simulations during the relativistic stage correctly reproduce those calculated assuming the self-similar Blandford-McKee solution for the evolution of the flow. The jet dynamics from our 2D simulations and the resulting afterglow light curves, including the jet break, are in good agreement with those presented in previous works. Finally, we show how the details of the dynamics critically depend on properly resolving the structure of the relativistic flow.

  15. Early optical emission from the gamma-ray burst of 4 October 2002.

    PubMed

    Fox, D W; Yost, S; Kulkarni, S R; Torii, K; Kato, T; Yamaoka, H; Sako, M; Harrison, F A; Sari, R; Price, P A; Berger, E; Soderberg, A M; Djorgovski, S G; Barth, A J; Pravdo, S H; Frail, D A; Gal-Yam, A; Lipkin, Y; Mauch, T; Harrison, C; Buttery, H

    2003-03-20

    Observations of the long-lived emission--or 'afterglow'--of long-duration gamma-ray bursts place them at cosmological distances, but the origin of these energetic explosions remains a mystery. Observations of optical emission contemporaneous with the burst of gamma-rays should provide insight into the details of the explosion, as well as into the structure of the surrounding environment. One bright optical flash was detected during a burst, but other efforts have produced negative results. Here we report the discovery of the optical counterpart of GRB021004 only 193 seconds after the event. The initial decline is unexpectedly slow and requires varying energy content in the gamma-ray burst blastwave over the course of the first hour. Further analysis of the X-ray and optical afterglow suggests additional energy variations over the first few days.

  16. The Discovery of the Optical Transient For GRB 010222

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henden, Arne A.

    2001-04-01

    On February 22, 2001, a very bright gamma-ray burst was detected by the Italian BeppoSAX satellite. The localization was posted about 4 hours after the burst. Prompt notification by phone and by the AAVSO Gamma-Ray Burst Network pager alert system resulted in the discovery of the optical afterglow within the first hour after the locatlization posting. This paper gives a brief history of the event and how the AAVSO was essential to the discovery.

  17. Early-Time Solution of the Horizontal Unconfined Aquifer in the Buildup Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravanis, Elias; Akylas, Evangelos

    2017-10-01

    We derive the early-time solution of the Boussinesq equation for the horizontal unconfined aquifer in the buildup phase under constant recharge and zero inflow. The solution is expressed as a power series of a suitable similarity variable, which is constructed so that to satisfy the boundary conditions at both ends of the aquifer, that is, it is a polynomial approximation of the exact solution. The series turns out to be asymptotic and it is regularized by resummation techniques that are used to define divergent series. The outflow rate in this regime is linear in time, and the (dimensionless) coefficient is calculated to eight significant figures. The local error of the series is quantified by its deviation from satisfying the self-similar Boussinesq equation at every point. The local error turns out to be everywhere positive, hence, so is the integrated error, which in turn quantifies the degree of convergence of the series to the exact solution.

  18. Afterglow Imaging and Polarization of Misaligned Structured GRB Jets and Cocoons: Breaking the Degeneracy in GRB 170817A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Ramandeep; Granot, Jonathan

    2018-05-01

    The X-ray to radio afterglow emission of GRB 170817A / GW 170817 so far scales as Fν∝ν-0.6t0.8 with observed frequency and time, consistent with a single power-law segment of the synchrotron spectrum from the external shock going into the ambient medium. This requires the effective isotropic equivalent afterglow shock energy in the visible region to increase as ˜t1.7. The two main channels for such an energy increase are (i) radial: more energy carried by slower material (in the visible region) gradually catches up with the afterglow shock and energizes it, and (ii) angular: more energy in relativistic outflow moving at different angles to our line of sight, whose radiation is initially beamed away from us but its beaming cone gradually reaches our line of sight as it decelerates. One cannot distinguish between these explanations (or combinations of them) using only the X-ray to radio Fν(t). Here we demonstrate that the most promising way to break this degeneracy is through afterglow imaging and polarization, by calculating the predicted evolution of the afterglow image (its size, shape and flux centroid) and linear polarization Π(t) for different angular and/or radial outflow structures that fit Fν(t). We consider two angular profiles - a Gaussian and a narrow core with power-law wings in energy per solid angle, as well as a (cocoon motivated) (quasi-) spherical flow with radial velocity profile. For a jet viewed off-axis (and a magnetic field produced in the afterglow shock) Π(t) peaks when the jet's core becomes visible, at ≈2tp where the lightcurve peaks at tp, and the image can be elongated with aspect ratios ≳ 2. A quasi-spherical flow has an almost circular image and a much lower Π(t) (peaking at ≈tp) and flux centroid displacement θfc (a spherical flow has Π(t) = θfc = 0 and a perfectly circular image).

  19. Use of Interrupted Helium Flow in the Analysis of Vapor Samples with Flowing Atmospheric-Pressure Afterglow-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, Andrew P.; Zeiri, Offer M.; Ray, Steven J.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2017-02-01

    The flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA) source was used for the mass-spectrometric analysis of vapor samples introduced between the source and mass spectrometer inlet. Through interrupted operation of the plasma-supporting helium flow, helium consumption is greatly reduced and dynamic gas behavior occurs that was characterized by schlieren imaging. Moreover, mass spectra acquired immediately after the onset of helium flow exhibit a signal spike before declining and ultimately reaching a steady level. This initial signal appears to be due to greater interaction of sample vapor with the afterglow of the source when helium flow resumes. In part, the initial spike in signal can be attributed to a pooling of analyte vapor in the absence of helium flow from the source. Time-resolved schlieren imaging of the helium flow during on and off cycles provided insight into gas-flow patterns between the FAPA source and the MS inlet that were correlated with mass-spectral data.

  20. Thermal Emissions Spanning the Prompt and the Afterglow Phases of the Ultra-long GRB 130925A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Rupal; Rao, A. R.

    2015-07-01

    GRB 130925A is an ultra-long gamma-ray burst (GRB), and it shows clear evidence for thermal emission in the soft X-ray data of the Swift/X-ray Telescope (XRT; ∼0.5 keV), lasting until the X-ray afterglow phase. Due to the long duration of the GRB, the burst could be studied in hard X-rays with high-resolution focusing detectors (NuSTAR). The blackbody temperature, as measured by the Swift/XRT, shows a decreasing trend until the late phase (Piro et al.) whereas the high-energy data reveal a significant blackbody component during the late epochs at an order of magnitude higher temperature (∼5 keV) compared to contemporaneous low energy data (Bellm et al.). We resolve this apparent contradiction by demonstrating that a model with two black bodies and a power law (2BBPL) is consistent with the data right from the late prompt emission to the afterglow phase. Both blackbodies show a similar cooling behavior up to late times. We invoke a structured jet, having a fast spine and a slower sheath layer, to identify the location of these blackbodies. Independent of the physical interpretation, we propose that the 2BBPL model is a generic feature of the prompt emission of all long GRBs, and the thermal emission found in the afterglow phase of different GRBs reflects the lingering thermal component of the prompt emission with different timescales. We strengthen this proposal by pointing out a close similarity between the spectral evolutions of this GRB and GRB 090618, a source with significant wide band data during the early afterglow phase.

  1. Simulation of the Plasma Afterglow in the Discharge Gap of a Subnanosecond Switch Based on an Open Discharge in Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A. L.; Schweigert, I. V.

    2018-05-01

    The phenomenon of subnanosecond electrical breakdown in a strong electric field observed in an open discharge in helium at pressures of 6-20 Torr can be used to create ultrafast plasma switches triggering into a conducting state for a time shorter than 1 ns. To evaluate the possible repetition rate of such a subnanosecond switch, it is interesting to study the decay dynamics of the plasma remaining in the discharge gap after ultrafast breakdown. In this paper, a kinetic model based on the particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision method is used to study the dynamics of the plasma afterglow in the discharge gap of a subnanosecond switch operating with helium at a pressure of 6 Torr. The simulation results show that the radiative, collisional-radiative, and three-body collision recombination mechanisms significantly contribute to the afterglow decay only while the plasma density remains higher than 1012 cm-3; the main mechanism of the further plasma decay is diffusion of plasma particles onto the wall. Therefore, the effect of recombination in the plasma bulk is observed only during the first 10-20 μs of the afterglow. Over nearly the same time, plasma electrons become thermalized. The afterglow time can be substantially reduced by applying a positive voltage U c to the cathode. Since diffusive losses are limited by the ion mobility, the additional ion drift toward the wall significantly accelerates plasma decay. As U c increases from 0 to +500 V, the characteristic time of plasma decay is reduced from 35 to 10 μs.

  2. Vibrational and Rotational CARS Measurements of Nitrogen in Afterglow of Streamer Discharge in Atmospheric Pressure Fuel/Air Mixtures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    in a variety of different ignition regimes, including pulsed detonation engines ( PDEs ) and automobile engines, with experiments demonstrating TPI to...Vibrational and rotational CARS measurements of nitrogen in afterglow of streamer discharge in atmospheric pressure fuel/air mixtures This article...DATE 2012 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Vibrational and rotational CARS measurements of

  3. The Production and Evolution of Atomic Oxygen in the Afterglow of Streamer Discharge in Atmospheric Pressure Fuel/Air Mixtures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-02

    in streamer discharge afterglow in a variety of fueVair mixtures in order to account for the 0 reaction pathways in transient plasma ignition. It is... plasma ignition (TPI), the use of streamers for ignition in combustion engines, holds great promise for improving performance. TPI has been tested...standard spark gap or arc ignition methods [1-4]. These improvements to combustion allow increasing power and efficiency in existing engines such as

  4. Polarization of gamma-ray burst afterglows in the synchrotron self-Compton process from a highly relativistic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hai-Nan; Li, Xin; Chang, Zhe

    2017-04-01

    Linear polarization has been observed in both the prompt phase and afterglow of some bright gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Polarization in the prompt phase spans a wide range, and may be as high as ≳ 50%. In the afterglow phase, however, it is usually below 10%. According to the standard fireball model, GRBs are produced by synchrotron radiation and Compton scattering process in a highly relativistic jet ejected from the central engine. It is widely accepted that prompt emissions occur in the internal shock when shells with different velocities collide with each other, and the magnetic field advected by the jet from the central engine can be ordered on a large scale. On the other hand, afterglows are often assumed to occur in the external shock when the jet collides with interstellar medium, and the magnetic field produced by the shock through, for example, Weibel instability, is possibly random. In this paper, we calculate the polarization properties of the synchrotron self-Compton process from a highly relativistic jet, in which the magnetic field is randomly distributed in the shock plane. We also consider the generalized situation where a uniform magnetic component perpendicular to the shock plane is superposed on the random magnetic component. We show that it is difficult for the polarization to be larger than 10% if the seed electrons are isotropic in the jet frame. This may account for the observed upper limit of polarization in the afterglow phase of GRBs. In addition, if the random and uniform magnetic components decay with time at different speeds, then the polarization angle may change 90° during the temporal evolution. Supported by Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (106112016CDJCR301206), National Natural Science Fund of China (11375203, 11603005), and Open Project Program of State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China (Y5KF181CJ1)

  5. Off-axis Gamma-ray Burst Afterglow Modeling Based on a Two-dimensional Axisymmetric Hydrodynamics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eerten, Hendrik; Zhang, Weiqun; MacFadyen, Andrew

    2010-10-01

    Starting as highly relativistic collimated jets, gamma-ray burst outflows gradually slow down and become nonrelativistic spherical blast waves. Although detailed analytical solutions describing the afterglow emission received by an on-axis observer during both the early and late phases of the outflow evolution exist, a calculation of the received flux during the intermediate phase and for an off-axis observer requires either a more simplified analytical model or direct numerical simulations of the outflow dynamics. In this paper, we present light curves for off-axis observers covering the long-term evolution of the blast wave, calculated from a high-resolution two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamics simulation using a synchrotron radiation model. We compare our results to earlier analytical work and calculate the consequence of the observer angle with respect to the jet axis both for the detection of orphan afterglows and for jet break fits to the observational data. We confirm earlier results in the literature finding that only a very small number of local type Ibc supernovae can harbor an orphan afterglow. For off-axis observers, the observable jet break can be delayed up to several weeks, potentially leading to overestimation of the beaming-corrected total energy. In addition we find that, when using our off-axis light curves to create synthetic Swift X-ray data, jet breaks are likely to remain hidden in the data.

  6. Implications from the Upper Limit of Radio Afterglow Emission of FRB 131104/Swift J0644.5-5111

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, He; Zhang, Bing

    2017-02-01

    A γ-ray transient, Swift J0644.5-5111, has been claimed to be associated with FRB 131104. However, a long-term radio imaging follow-up observation only placed an upper limit on the radio afterglow flux of Swift J0644.5-5111. Applying the external shock model, we perform a detailed constraint on the afterglow parameters for the FRB 131104/Swift J0644.5-5111 system. We find that for the commonly used microphysics shock parameters (e.g., {ɛ }e=0.1, {ɛ }B=0.01, and p = 2.3), if the fast radio burst (FRB) is indeed cosmological as inferred from its measured dispersion measure (DM), the ambient medium number density should be ≤slant {10}-3 {{cm}}-3, which is the typical value for a compact binary merger environment but disfavors a massive star origin. Assuming a typical ISM density, one would require that the redshift of the FRB be much smaller than the value inferred from DM (z\\ll 0.1), implying a non-cosmological origin of DM. The constraints are much looser if one adopts smaller {ɛ }B and {ɛ }e values, as observed in some gamma-ray burst afterglows. The FRB 131104/Swift J0644.5-5111 association remains plausible. We critically discuss possible progenitor models for the system.

  7. Recombination of electrons with water cluster ions in the afterglow of a high-voltage nanosecond discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, M. A.; Kochetov, I. V.; Starikovskiy, A. Yu; Aleksandrov, N. L.

    2018-07-01

    The results of the experimental and numerical study of high-voltage nanosecond discharge afterglow in H2O:N2 and H2O:O2 mixtures are presented for room temperature and at pressures from 2 to 5 Torr. Time-resolved electron density during the plasma decay was measured with a microwave interferometer for initial electron densities in the range between 1  ×  1012 and 2  ×  1012 cm‑3. Calculations showed that the plasma decay was controlled by recombination of thermalized electrons with H3O+(H2O) n ions for n from 0 to 4. Agreement between calculated and measured electron density histories was obtained only when using the recombination coefficients measured in the pulsed plasma afterglow experiments. The electron densities calculated using the data from the storage ring experiments were consistently greater than the values measured in this work for all conditions. It was concluded that the measurements of recombination coefficients for H3O+(H2O) n ions in the pulsed plasma afterglow were more appropriate for simulating the properties of high-density plasmas with high fractions of H2O, O2 and N2, such as discharge plasmas in water vapor and in humid air instead of the measurements in the storage ring experiments.

  8. SWIFT Discovery of Gamma-ray Bursts without Jet Break Feature in their X-ray Afterglows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, G.; Yamazaki, R.; Sakamoto, T.; Takahashi, T; Nakazawa, K.; Nakamura, T.; Toma, K.; Hullinger, D.; Tashiro, M.; Parsons, A. M.; hide

    2007-01-01

    We analyze Swift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and X-ray afterglows for three GRBs with spectroscopic redshift determinations - GRB 050401, XRF 050416a, and GRB 050525a. We find that the relation between spectral peak energy and isotropic energy of prompt emissions (the Amati relation) is consistent with that for the bursts observed in pre-Swift era. However, we find that the X-ray afterglow lightcurves, which extend up to 10 - 70 days, show no sign of the jet break that is expected in the standard framework of collimated outflows. We do so by showing that none of the X-ray afterglow lightcurves in our sample satisfies the relation between the spectral and temporal indices that is predicted for the phase after jet break. The jet break time can be predicted by inverting the tight empirical relation between the peak energy of the spectrum and the collimation-corrected energy of the prompt emission (the Ghirlanda relation). We find that there are no temporal breaks within the predicted time intervals in X-ray band. This requires either that the Ghirlanda relation has a larger scatter than previously thought, that the temporal break in X-rays is masked by some additional source of X-ray emission, or that it does not happen because of some unknown reason.

  9. Gauss-Bonnet cosmology unifying late and early-time acceleration eras with intermediate eras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that with vacuum F(G) gravity it is possible to describe the unification of late and early-time acceleration eras with the radiation and matter domination era. The Hubble rate of the unified evolution contains two mild singularities, so called Type IV singularities, and the evolution itself has some appealing features, such as the existence of a deceleration-acceleration transition at late times. We also address quantitatively a fundamental question related to modified gravity models description of cosmological evolution: Is it possible for all modified gravity descriptions of our Universe evolution, to produce a nearly scale invariant spectrum of primordial curvature perturbations? As we demonstrate, the answer for the F(G) description is no, since the resulting power spectrum is not scale invariant, in contrast to the F(R) description studied in the literature. Therefore, although the cosmological evolution can be realized in the context of vacuum F(G) gravity, the evolution is not compatible with the observational data, in contrast to the F(R) gravity description of the same cosmological evolution.

  10. Numerical modeling of an enhanced very early time electromagnetic (VETEM) prototype system

    Cui, T.J.; Chew, W.C.; Aydiner, A.A.; Wright, D.L.; Smith, D.V.; Abraham, J.D.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, two numerical models are presented to simulate an enhanced very early time electromagnetic (VETEM) prototype system, which is used for buried-object detection and environmental problems. Usually, the VETEM system contains a transmitting loop antenna and a receiving loop antenna, which run on a lossy ground to detect buried objects. In the first numerical model, the loop antennas are accurately analyzed using the Method of Moments (MoM) for wire antennas above or buried in lossy ground. Then, Conjugate Gradient (CG) methods, with the use of the fast Fourier transform (FFT) or MoM, are applied to investigate the scattering from buried objects. Reflected and scattered magnetic fields are evaluated at the receiving loop to calculate the output electric current. However, the working frequency for the VETEM system is usually low and, hence, two magnetic dipoles are used to replace the transmitter and receiver in the second numerical model. Comparing these two models, the second one is simple, but only valid for low frequency or small loops, while the first modeling is more general. In this paper, all computations are performed in the frequency domain, and the FFT is used to obtain the time-domain responses. Numerical examples show that simulation results from these two models fit very well when the frequency ranges from 10 kHz to 10 MHz, and both results are close to the measured data.

  11. Detection of buried targets using a new enhanced very early time electromagnetic (VETEM) prototype system

    Cui, T.J.; Chew, W.C.; Aydiner, A.A.; Wright, D.L.; Smith, D.V.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, numerical simulations of a new enhanced very early time electromagnetic (VETEM) prototype system are presented, where a horizontal transmitting loop and two horizontal receiving loops are used to detect buried targets, in which three loops share the same axis and the transmitter is located at the center of receivers. In the new VETEM system, the difference of signals from two receivers is taken to eliminate strong direct-signals from the transmitter and background clutter and furthermore to obtain a better SNR for buried targets. Because strong coupling exists between the transmitter and receivers, accurate analysis of the three-loop antenna system is required, for which a loop-tree basis function method has been utilized to overcome the low-frequency breakdown problem. In the analysis of scattering problem from buried targets, a conjugate gradient (CG) method with fast Fourier transform (FFT) is applied to solve the electric field integral equation. However, the convergence of such CG-FFT algorithm is extremely slow at very low frequencies. In order to increase the convergence rate, a frequency-hopping approach has been used. Finally, the primary, coupling, reflected, and scattered magnetic fields are evaluated at receiving loops to calculate the output electric current. Numerous simulation results are given to interpret the new VETEM system. Comparing with other single-transmitter-receiver systems, the new VETEM has better SNR and ability to reduce the clutter.

  12. Occipital MEG Activity in the Early Time Range (<300 ms) Predicts Graded Changes in Perceptual Consciousness.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Lau M; Pedersen, Michael N; Sandberg, Kristian; Overgaard, Morten

    2016-06-01

    Two electrophysiological components have been extensively investigated as candidate neural correlates of perceptual consciousness: An early, occipitally realized component occurring 130-320 ms after stimulus onset and a late, frontally realized component occurring 320-510 ms after stimulus onset. Recent studies have suggested that the late component may not be uniquely related to perceptual consciousness, but also to sensory expectations, task associations, and selective attention. We conducted a magnetoencephalographic study; using multivariate analysis, we compared classification accuracies when decoding perceptual consciousness from the 2 components using sources from occipital and frontal lobes. We found that occipital sources during the early time range were significantly more accurate in decoding perceptual consciousness than frontal sources during both the early and late time ranges. These results are the first of its kind where the predictive values of the 2 components are quantitatively compared, and they provide further evidence for the primary importance of occipital sources in realizing perceptual consciousness. The results have important consequences for current theories of perceptual consciousness, especially theories emphasizing the role of frontal sources. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. A Late-time Flattening of Light Curves in Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, Lorenzo; Giannios, Dimitrios

    2013-12-01

    The afterglow emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is usually interpreted as synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons accelerated at the GRB external shock. We investigate the temporal decay of the afterglow emission at late times, when the bulk of the shock-accelerated electrons are non-relativistic (the "deep Newtonian phase," as denoted by Huang and Cheng). We assume that the electron spectrum in the deep Newtonian phase is a power-law distribution in momentum with slope p, as dictated by the theory of Fermi acceleration in non-relativistic shocks. For a uniform circumburst medium, the deep Newtonian phase begins at t{_{\\scriptsize {DN}}}\\sim 3\\,\\epsilon _{e,-1}^{5/6}t{_{\\scriptsize {ST}}}, where t ST marks the transition of the blast wave to the non-relativistic, spherically symmetric Sedov-Taylor (ST) solution, and epsilon e = 0.1 epsilon e, -1 quantifies the amount of shock energy transferred to the electrons. For typical parameters, the deep Newtonian stage starts ~0.5 to several years after the GRB. The radio flux in this phase decays as F νvpropt -3(p + 1)/10vpropt -(0.9÷1.2), for a power-law slope 2 < p < 3. This is shallower than the scaling F νvpropt -3(5p - 7)/10vpropt -(0.9÷2.4) derived by Frail et al., which only applies if the GRB shock is non-relativistic, but the electron distribution still peaks at ultra-relativistic energies (a regime that is relevant for a narrow time interval, and only if t DN >~ t ST, namely, epsilon e >~ 0.03). We discuss how the deep Newtonian phase can be reliably used for GRB calorimetry, and we comment on the good detection prospects of trans-relativistic blast waves at 0.1÷10 GHz with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array and LOw-Frequency ARray.

  14. Estimating formation properties from early-time oscillatory water levels in a pumped well

    Shapiro, A.M.; Oki, D.S.

    2000-01-01

    Hydrologists often attempt to estimate formation properties from aquifer tests for which only the hydraulic responses in a pumped well are available. Borehole storage, turbulent head losses, and borehole skin, however, can mask the hydraulic behavior of the formation inferred from the water level in the pumped well. Also, in highly permeable formations or in formations at significant depth below land surface, where there is a long column of water in the well casing, oscillatory water levels may arise during the onset of pumping to further mask formation responses in the pumped well. Usually borehole phenomena are confined to the early stages of pumping or recovery, and late-time hydraulic data can be used to estimate formation properties. In many instances, however, early-time hydraulic data provide valuable information about the formation, especially if there are interferences in the late-time data. A mathematical model and its Laplace transform solution that account for inertial influences and turbulent head losses during pumping is developed for the coupled response between the pumped borehole and the formation. The formation is assumed to be homogeneous, isotropic, of infinite areal extent, and uniform thickness, with leakage from an overlying aquifer, and the screened or open interval of the pumped well is assumed to fully penetrate the pumped aquifer. Other mathematical models of aquifer flow can also be coupled with the equations describing turbulent head losses and the inertial effects on the water column in the pumped well. The mathematical model developed in this paper is sufficiently general to consider both underdamped conditions for which oscillations arise, and overdamped conditions for which there are no oscillations. Through numerical inversion of the Laplace transform solution, type curves from the mathematical model are developed to estimate formation properties through comparison with the measured hydraulic response in the pumped well. The

  15. No Flares from Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Blast Waves Encountering Sudden Circumburst Density Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gat, Ilana; van Eerten, Hendrik; MacFadyen, Andrew

    2013-08-01

    Afterglows of gamma-ray bursts are observed to produce light curves with the flux following power-law evolution in time. However, recent observations reveal bright flares at times on the order of minutes to days. One proposed explanation for these flares is the interaction of a relativistic blast wave with a circumburst density transition. In this paper, we model this type of interaction computationally in one and two dimensions, using a relativistic hydrodynamics code with adaptive mesh refinement called RAM, and analytically in one dimension. We simulate a blast wave traveling in a stellar wind environment that encounters a sudden change in density, followed by a homogeneous medium, and compute the observed radiation using a synchrotron model. We show that flares are not observable for an encounter with a sudden density increase, such as a wind termination shock, nor for an encounter with a sudden density decrease. Furthermore, by extending our analysis to two dimensions, we are able to resolve the spreading, collimation, and edge effects of the blast wave as it encounters the change in circumburst medium. In all cases considered in this paper, we find that a flare will not be observed for any of the density changes studied.

  16. Afterglow based detection and dosimetry of beta particle irradiated ZrO2.

    PubMed

    Salas-Juárez, Ch J; Cruz-Vázquez, C; Avilés-Monreal, R; Bernal, R

    2018-08-01

    In this work, we report on the afterglow (AG) response characterization of commercially available ZrO 2 . Pellet shaped samples previously annealed in air at 1000°C during 24h were exposed to beta particle irradiation in the dose range from 0.5 up to 128Gy and their AG decay curves recorded during 600s after irradiation exposure. The characteristic glow curves of beta particle irradiated ZrO 2 show two maxima located around 80°C and 150°C. The first one rapidly vanishes at room temperature, giving rise to AG. The integrated AG signal increases as dose increases from 0.5 to 128Gy, with a linear dependence from 0.5 up to ca. 32Gy. Excellent reproducibility of the AG response was observed in 10 irradiation - AG readout cycles, showing that the studied ZrO 2 samples are reusable. The results here presented show that ZrO 2 is a promising material for use as a radiation dosimeter based on the AG phenomenon. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. NO FLARES FROM GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOW BLAST WAVES ENCOUNTERING SUDDEN CIRCUMBURST DENSITY CHANGE

    SciT

    Gat, Ilana; Van Eerten, Hendrik; MacFadyen, Andrew

    2013-08-10

    Afterglows of gamma-ray bursts are observed to produce light curves with the flux following power-law evolution in time. However, recent observations reveal bright flares at times on the order of minutes to days. One proposed explanation for these flares is the interaction of a relativistic blast wave with a circumburst density transition. In this paper, we model this type of interaction computationally in one and two dimensions, using a relativistic hydrodynamics code with adaptive mesh refinement called RAM, and analytically in one dimension. We simulate a blast wave traveling in a stellar wind environment that encounters a sudden change inmore » density, followed by a homogeneous medium, and compute the observed radiation using a synchrotron model. We show that flares are not observable for an encounter with a sudden density increase, such as a wind termination shock, nor for an encounter with a sudden density decrease. Furthermore, by extending our analysis to two dimensions, we are able to resolve the spreading, collimation, and edge effects of the blast wave as it encounters the change in circumburst medium. In all cases considered in this paper, we find that a flare will not be observed for any of the density changes studied.« less

  18. The 'Supercritical Pile' GRB Model: Afterglows and GRB, XRR, XRF Unification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, D.

    2007-01-01

    We present the general notions and observational consequences of the "Supercritical Pile" GRB model; the fundamental feature of this model is a detailed process for the conversion of the energy stored in relativistic protons in the GRB Relativistic Blast Waves (RBW) into relativistic electrons and then into radiation. The conversion is effected through the $p \\, \\gamma \\rightarrow p \\, e circumflex + e circumflex -$ reaction, whose kinematic threshold is imprinted on the GRB spectra to provide a peak of their emitted luminosity at energy \\Ep $\\sim 1$ MeV in the lab frame. We extend this model to include, in addition to the (quasi--)thermal relativistic post-shock protons an accelerated component of power law form. This component guarantees the production of $e circumflex +e circumflex- - $pairs even after the RBW has slowed down to the point that its (quasi-) thermal protons cannot fulfill the threshold of the above reaction. We suggest that this last condition marks the transition from the prompt to the afterglow GRB phase. We also discuss conditions under which this transition is accompanied by a significant drop in the flux and could thus account for several puzzling, recent observations. Finally, we indicate that the same mechanism applied to the late stages of the GRB evolution leads to a decrease in \\Ep $\\propto \\Gamma circumflex 2(t)\\propto t circumflex {-3/4}$, a feature amenable to future observational tests.

  19. Dissociative recombination of HCl+, H2Cl+, DCl+, and D2Cl+ in a flowing afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiens, Justin P.; Miller, Thomas M.; Shuman, Nicholas S.; Viggiano, Albert A.

    2016-12-01

    Dissociative recombination of electrons with HCl+, H2Cl+, DCl+, and D2Cl+ has been measured under thermal conditions at 300, 400, and 500 K using a flowing afterglow-Langmuir probe apparatus. Measurements for HCl+ and DCl+ employed the variable electron and neutral density attachment mass spectrometry (VENDAMS) method, while those for H2Cl+ and D2Cl+ employed both VENDAMS and the more traditional technique of monitoring electron density as a function of reaction time. At 300 K, HCl+ and H2Cl+ recombine with kDR = 7.7±2.14.5 × 10-8 cm3 s-1 and 2.6 ± 0.8 × 10-7 cm3 s-1, respectively, whereas D2Cl+ is roughly half as fast as H2Cl+ with kDR = 1.1 ± 0.3 × 10-7 cm3 s-1 (2 σ confidence intervals). DCl+ recombines with a rate coefficient below the approximate detection limit of the method (≲5 × 10-8 cm3 s-1) at all temperatures. Relatively slow dissociative recombination rates have been speculated to be responsible for the large HCl+ and H2Cl+ abundances in interstellar clouds compared to current astrochemical models, but our results imply that the discrepancy must originate elsewhere.

  20. Shock Corrugation by Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffell, Paul C.; MacFadyen, Andrew I.

    2014-08-01

    Afterglow jets are Rayleigh-Taylor unstable and therefore turbulent during the early part of their deceleration. There are also several processes which actively cool the jet. In this Letter, we demonstrate that if cooling significantly increases the compressibility of the flow, the turbulence collides with the forward shock, destabilizing and corrugating it. In this case, the forward shock is turbulent enough to produce the magnetic fields responsible for synchrotron emission via small-scale turbulent dynamo. We calculate light curves assuming the magnetic field is in energy equipartition with the turbulent kinetic energy and discover that dynamic magnetic fields are well approximated by a constant magnetic-to-thermal energy ratio of 1%, though there is a sizeable delay in the time of peak flux as the magnetic field turns on only after the turbulence has activated. The reverse shock is found to be significantly more magnetized than the forward shock, with a magnetic-to-thermal energy ratio of the order of 10%. This work motivates future Rayleigh-Taylor calculations using more physical cooling models.

  1. A New Era of Submillimeter GRB Afterglow Follow-Ups with the Greenland Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urata, Yuji; Huang, Kuiyun; Asada, Keiichi; Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Makoto; Ho, Paul T. P.

    A planned rapid submillimeter (submm) Gamma Ray Burst (GRBs) follow-up observations conducted using the Greenland Telescope (GLT) is presented. The GLT is a 12-m submm telescope to be located at the top of the Greenland ice sheet, where the high-altitude and dry weather porvides excellent conditions for observations at submm wavelengths. With its combination of wavelength window and rapid responding system, the GLT will explore new insights on GRBs. Summarizing the current achievements of submm GRB follow-ups, we identify the following three scientific goals regarding GRBs: (1) systematic detection of bright submm emissions originating from reverse shock (RS) in the early afterglow phase, (2) characterization of forward shock and RS emissions by capturing their peak flux and frequencies and performing continuous monitoring, and (3) detections of GRBs as a result of the explosion of first-generation stars result of GRBs at a high redshift through systematic rapid follow ups. The light curves and spectra calculated by available theoretical models clearly show that the GLT could play a crucial role in these studies.

  2. Simulation of blast-induced early-time intracranial wave physics leading to traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Paul A; Ford, Corey C

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this modeling and simulation study was to establish the role of stress wave interactions in the genesis of traumatic brain injury (TBI) from exposure to explosive blast. A high resolution (1 mm3 voxels) five material model of the human head was created by segmentation of color cryosections from the Visible Human Female data set. Tissue material properties were assigned from literature values. The model was inserted into the shock physics wave code, CTH, and subjected to a simulated blast wave of 1.3 MPa (13 bars) peak pressure from anterior, posterior, and lateral directions. Three-dimensional plots of maximum pressure, volumetric tension, and deviatoric (shear) stress demonstrated significant differences related to the incident blast geometry. In particular, the calculations revealed focal brain regions of elevated pressure and deviatoric stress within the first 2 ms of blast exposure. Calculated maximum levels of 15 KPa deviatoric, 3.3 MPa pressure, and 0.8 MPa volumetric tension were observed before the onset of significant head accelerations. Over a 2 ms time course, the head model moved only 1 mm in response to the blast loading. Doubling the blast strength changed the resulting intracranial stress magnitudes but not their distribution. We conclude that stress localization, due to early-time wave interactions, may contribute to the development of multifocal axonal injury underlying TBI. We propose that a contribution to traumatic brain injury from blast exposure, and most likely blunt impact, can occur on a time scale shorter than previous model predictions and before the onset of linear or rotational accelerations traditionally associated with the development of TBI.

  3. On the Early-Time Excess Emission in Hydrogen-Poor Superluminous Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vreeswijk, Paul M.; Leloudas, Giorgos; Gal-Yam, Avishay; De Cia, Annalisa; Perley, Daniel A.; Quimby, Robert M.; Waldman, Roni; Sullivan, Mark; Yan, Lin; Ofek, Eran O.; hide

    2017-01-01

    We present the light curves of the hydrogen-poor super-luminous supernovae (SLSNe I) PTF 12dam and iPTF 13dcc, discovered by the (intermediate) Palomar Transient Factory. Both show excess emission at early times and a slowly declining light curve at late times. The early bump in PTF 12dam is very similar in duration (approximately 10 days) and brightness relative to the main peak (23 mag fainter) compared to that observed in other SLSNe I. In contrast, the long-duration (greater than 30 days) early excess emission in iPTF 13dcc, whose brightness competes with that of the main peak, appears to be of a different nature. We construct bolometric light curves for both targets, and fit a variety of light-curve models to both the early bump and main peak in an attempt to understand the nature of these explosions. Even though the slope of the late-time decline in the light curves of both SLSNe is suggestively close to that expected from the radioactive decay of 56Ni and 56Co, the amount of nickel required to power the full light curves is too large considering the estimated ejecta mass. The magnetar model including an increasing escape fraction provides a reasonable description of the PTF 12dam observations. However, neither the basic nor the double-peaked magnetar model is capable of reproducing the light curve of iPTF 13dcc. A model combining a shock breakout in an extended envelope with late-time magnetar energy injection provides a reasonable fit to the iPTF 13dcc observations. Finally, we find that the light curves of both PTF 12dam and iPTF 13dcc can be adequately fit with the model involving interaction with the circumstellar medium.

  4. On The Early-Time Excess Emission In Hydrogen-Poor Superluminous Supernovae

    DOE PAGES

    Vreeswijk, Paul M.; Leloudas, Giorgos; Gal-Yam, Avishay; ...

    2017-01-18

    Here, we present the light curves of the hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSNe I) PTF 12dam and iPTF 13dcc, discovered by the (intermediate) Palomar Transient Factory. Both show excess emission at early times and a slowly declining light curve at late times. The early bump in PTF 12dam is very similar in duration (~10 days) and brightness relative to the main peak (2-3 mag fainter) compared to that observed in other SLSNe I. In contrast, the long-duration ( > 30 days) early excess emission in iPTF 13dcc, whose brightness competes with that of the main peak, appears to be of amore » different nature. We construct bolometric light curves for both targets, and fit a variety of light-curve models to both the early bump and main peak in an attempt to understand the nature of these explosions. Even though the slope of the late-time decline in the light curves of both SLSNe is suggestively close to that expected from the radioactive decay of 56Ni and 56Co, the amount of nickel required to power the full light curves is too large considering the estimated ejecta mass. The magnetar model including an increasing escape fraction provides a reasonable description of the PTF 12dam observations. However, neither the basic nor the double-peaked magnetar model is capable of reproducing the light curve of iPTF 13dcc. A model combining a shock breakout in an extended envelope with late-time magnetar energy injection provides a reasonable fit to the iPTF 13dcc observations. Finally, we find that the light curves of both PTF 12dam and iPTF 13dcc can be adequately fit with the model involving interaction with the circumstellar medium.« less

  5. ON THE EARLY-TIME EXCESS EMISSION IN HYDROGEN-POOR SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVAE

    SciT

    Vreeswijk, Paul M.; Leloudas, Giorgos; Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2017-01-20

    We present the light curves of the hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSNe I) PTF 12dam and iPTF 13dcc, discovered by the (intermediate) Palomar Transient Factory. Both show excess emission at early times and a slowly declining light curve at late times. The early bump in PTF 12dam is very similar in duration (∼10 days) and brightness relative to the main peak (2–3 mag fainter) compared to that observed in other SLSNe I. In contrast, the long-duration (>30 days) early excess emission in iPTF 13dcc, whose brightness competes with that of the main peak, appears to be of a different nature. Wemore » construct bolometric light curves for both targets, and fit a variety of light-curve models to both the early bump and main peak in an attempt to understand the nature of these explosions. Even though the slope of the late-time decline in the light curves of both SLSNe is suggestively close to that expected from the radioactive decay of {sup 56}Ni and {sup 56}Co, the amount of nickel required to power the full light curves is too large considering the estimated ejecta mass. The magnetar model including an increasing escape fraction provides a reasonable description of the PTF 12dam observations. However, neither the basic nor the double-peaked magnetar model is capable of reproducing the light curve of iPTF 13dcc. A model combining a shock breakout in an extended envelope with late-time magnetar energy injection provides a reasonable fit to the iPTF 13dcc observations. Finally, we find that the light curves of both PTF 12dam and iPTF 13dcc can be adequately fit with the model involving interaction with the circumstellar medium.« less

  6. Go Long, Go Deep: Finding Optical Jet Breaks for Swift-Era GRBs with the LBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, X.; Garnavich, P. M.; Prieto, J. L.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Bechtold, J.; Bouche, N.; Buschkamp, P.; Diolaiti, E.; Fan, X.; Giallongo, E.; Gredel, R.; Hill, J. M.; Jiang, L.; McClelland, C.; Milne, P.; Pedichini, F.; Pogge, R. W.; Ragazzoni, R.; Rhoads, J.; Smareglia, R.; Thompson, D.; Wagner, R. M.

    2008-08-01

    Using the 8.4 m Large Binocular Telescope, we observed six GRB afterglows from 2.8 hr to 30.8 days after the burst triggers to systematically probe the late-time behaviors of afterglows including jet breaks, flares, and supernova bumps. We detected five afterglows with Sloan r' magnitudes ranging from 23.0 to 26.3 mag. The depth of our observations allows us to extend the temporal baseline for measuring jet breaks by another decade in timescale. We detected two jet breaks and a third candidate, all of which are not detectable without deep, late-time optical observations. In the other three cases, we do not detect the jet breaks either because of contamination from the host galaxy light, the presence of a supernova bump, or the intrinsic faintness of the optical afterglow. This suggests that the basic picture that GRBs are collimated is still valid and that the apparent lack of Swift jet breaks is due to poorly sampled afterglow light curves, particularly at late times. Based on data acquired using the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are the University of Arizona on behalf of the Arizona university system; Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Italy; LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max Planck Society, the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam, and Heidelberg University; the Ohio State University; and the Research Corporation, on behalf of the University of Notre Dame, the University of Minnesota, and the University of Virginia.

  7. A Search for Early Optical Emission at Gamma-Ray Burst Locations by the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.; Buffington, Andrew; Jackson, Bernard V.; Hick, P. Paul; Smith, Aaron C.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) views nearly every point on the sky once every 102 minutes and can detect point sources as faint as R approx. 10th magnitude. Therefore, SMEI can detect or provide upper limits for the optical afterglow from gamma-ray bursts in the tens of minutes after the burst when different shocked regions may emit optically. Here we provide upper limits for 58 bursts between 2003 February and 2005 April.

  8. Halo-shaped Flowing Atmospheric Pressure Afterglow – a Heavenly New Design for Simplified Sample Introduction and Improved Ionization in Ambient Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Pfeuffer, Kevin P.; Schaper, J. Niklas; Shelley, Jacob T.; Ray, Steven J.; Chan, George C.-Y.; Bings, Nicolas H.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2013-01-01

    The flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) is a promising new source for atmospheric pressure, ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. However, problems exist with reproducible sample introduction into the FAPA source. To overcome this limitation, a new FAPA geometry has been developed in which concentric tubular electrodes are utilized to form a halo-shaped discharge; this geometry has been termed the halo-FAPA or h-FAPA. With this new geometry, it is still possible to achieve direct desorption and ionization from a surface; however, sample introduction through the inner capillary is also possible and improves interaction between the sample material (solution, vapor, or aerosol) and the plasma to promote desorption and ionization. The h-FAPA operates with a helium gas flow of 0.60 L/min outer, 0.30 L/min inner, applied current of 30 mA at 200 V for 6 watts of power. In addition, separation of the discharge proper and sample material prevents perturbations to the plasma. Optical-emission characterization and gas rotational temperatures reveal that the temperature of the discharge is not significantly affected (< 3% change at 450K) by water vapor during solution-aerosol sample introduction. The primary mass-spectral background species are protonated water clusters, and the primary analyte ions are protonated molecular ions (M+H+). Flexibility of the new ambient sampling source is demonstrated by coupling it with a laser ablation unit, a concentric nebulizer and a droplet-on-demand system for sample introduction. A novel arrangement is also presented in which the central channel of the h-FAPA is used as the inlet to a mass spectrometer. PMID:23808829

  9. Halo-shaped flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow: a heavenly design for simplified sample introduction and improved ionization in ambient mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pfeuffer, Kevin P; Schaper, J Niklas; Shelley, Jacob T; Ray, Steven J; Chan, George C-Y; Bings, Nicolas H; Hieftje, Gary M

    2013-08-06

    The flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA) is a promising new source for atmospheric-pressure, ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. However, problems exist with reproducible sample introduction into the FAPA source. To overcome this limitation, a new FAPA geometry has been developed in which concentric tubular electrodes are utilized to form a halo-shaped discharge; this geometry has been termed the halo-FAPA or h-FAPA. With this new geometry, it is still possible to achieve direct desorption and ionization from a surface; however, sample introduction through the inner capillary is also possible and improves interaction between the sample material (solution, vapor, or aerosol) and the plasma to promote desorption and ionization. The h-FAPA operates with a helium gas flow of 0.60 L/min outer, 0.30 L/min inner, and applied current of 30 mA at 200 V for 6 W of power. In addition, separation of the discharge proper and sample material prevents perturbations to the plasma. Optical-emission characterization and gas rotational temperatures reveal that the temperature of the discharge is not significantly affected (<3% change at 450 K) by water vapor during solution-aerosol sample introduction. The primary mass-spectral background species are protonated water clusters, and the primary analyte ions are protonated molecular ions (M + H(+)). Flexibility of the new ambient sampling source is demonstrated by coupling it with a laser ablation unit, a concentric nebulizer, and a droplet-on-demand system for sample introduction. A novel arrangement is also presented in which the central channel of the h-FAPA is used as the inlet to a mass spectrometer.

  10. Ag/BiOBr Film in a Rotating-Disk Reactor Containing Long-Afterglow Phosphor for Round-the-Clock Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Haibo; Chen, Xiaofang; Hou, Rujing; Zhu, Huijuan; Li, Shiqing; Huo, Yuning; Li, Hexing

    2015-09-16

    Ag/BiOBr film coated on the glass substrate was synthesized by a solvothermal method and a subsequent photoreduction process. Such a Ag/BiOBr film was then adhered to a hollow rotating disk filled with long-afterglow phosphor inside the chamber. The Ag/BiOBr film exhibited high photocatalytic activity for organic pollutant degradation owing to the improved visible-light harvesting and the separation of photoinduced charges. The long-afterglow phosphor could absorb the excessive daylight and emit light around 488 nm, activating the Ag/BiOBr film to realize round-the-clock photocatalysis. Because the Ag nanoparticles could extend the light absorbance of the Ag/BiOBr film to wavelengths of around 500 nm via a surface plasma resonance effect, they played a key role in realizing photocatalysis induced by long-afterglow phosphor.

  11. VLT/X-Shooter spectroscopy of the afterglow of the Swift GRB 130606A. Chemical abundances and reionisation at z ~ 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartoog, O. E.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Goto, T.; Krühler, T.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; De Cia, A.; Xu, D.; Møller, P.; Covino, S.; D'Elia, V.; Flores, H.; Goldoni, P.; Hjorth, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Krogager, J.-K.; Kaper, L.; Ledoux, C.; Levan, A. J.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Sollerman, J.; Sparre, M.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tanvir, N. R.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Vergani, S. D.; Wiersema, K.; Datson, J.; Salinas, R.; Mikkelsen, K.; Aghanim, N.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The reionisation of the Universe is a process that is thought to have ended around z ~ 6, as inferred from spectroscopy of distant bright background sources, such as quasars (QSO) and gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows. Furthermore, spectroscopy of a GRB afterglow provides insight in its host galaxy, which is often too dim and distant to study otherwise. Aims: For the Swift GRB 130606A at z = 5.913 we have obtained a high S/N spectrum covering the full optical and near-IR wavelength region at intermediate spectral resolution with VLT/X-Shooter. We aim to measure the degree of ionisation of the intergalactic medium (IGM) between z = 5.02-5.84 and to study the chemical abundance pattern and dust content of its host galaxy. Methods: We estimated the UV continuum of the GRB afterglow using a power-law extrapolation, then measured the flux decrement due to absorption at Lyα,β, and γ wavelength regions. Furthermore, we fitted the shape of the red damping wing of Lyα. The hydrogen and metal absorption lines formed in the host galaxy were fitted with Voigt profiles to obtain column densities. We investigated whether ionisation corrections needed to be applied. Results: Our measurements of the Lyα-forest optical depth are consistent with previous measurements of QSOs, but have a much smaller uncertainty. The analysis of the red damping wing yields a neutral fraction xH i< 0.05 (3σ). We obtain column density measurements of H, Al, Si, and Fe; for C, O, S and Ni we obtain limits. The ionisation due to the GRB is estimated to be negligible (corrections <0.03 dex), but larger corrections may apply due to the pre-existing radiation field (up to 0.4 dex based on sub-DLA studies). Assuming that [ Si/Fe ] = +0.79 ± 0.13 is due to dust depletion, the dust-to-metal ratio is similar to the Galactic value. Conclusions: Our measurements confirm that the Universe is already predominantly ionised over the redshift range probed in this work, but was slightly more neutral at z

  12. DISCOVERY OF SMOOTHLY EVOLVING BLACKBODIES IN THE EARLY AFTERGLOW OF GRB 090618: EVIDENCE FOR A SPINE–SHEATH JET?

    SciT

    Basak, Rupal; Rao, A. R., E-mail: rupalb@tifr.res.in, E-mail: arrao@tifr.res.in

    2015-10-20

    GRB 090618 is a bright gamma-ray burst (GRB) with multiple pulses. It shows evidence of thermal emission in the initial pulses as well as in the early afterglow phase. Because high-resolution spectral data from the Swift/X-ray Telescope (XRT) are available for the early afterglow, we investigate the shape and evolution of the thermal component in this phase using data from the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), the Swift/XRT, and the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor detectors. An independent fit to the BAT and XRT data reveals two correlated blackbodies with monotonically decreasing temperatures. Hence, we investigated the combined data with a model consistingmore » of two blackbodies and a power law (2BBPL), a model suggested for several bright GRBs. We elicit the following interesting features of the 2BBPL model: (1) the same model is applicable from the peak of the last pulse in the prompt emission to the afterglow emission, (2) the ratio of temperatures and the fluxes of the two blackbodies remains constant throughout the observations, (3) the blackbody temperatures and fluxes show a monotonic decrease with time, with the BB fluxes dropping about a factor of two faster than that of the power-law (PL) emission, and (4) attributing the blackbody emission to photospheric emissions, we find that the photospheric radii increase very slowly with time, and the lower-temperature blackbody shows a larger emitting radius than that of the higher-temperature blackbody. We find some evidence that the underlying shape of the nonthermal emission is a cutoff power law rather than a PL. We sketch a spine–sheath jet model to explain our observations.« less

  13. Electron and ion acceleration in relativistic shocks with applications to GRB afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Donald C.; Ellison, Donald C.; Bykov, Andrei M.; Lee, Shiu-Hang

    2015-09-01

    We have modelled the simultaneous first-order Fermi shock acceleration of protons, electrons, and helium nuclei by relativistic shocks. By parametrizing the particle diffusion, our steady-state Monte Carlo simulation allows us to follow particles from particle injection at non-relativistic thermal energies to above PeV energies, including the non-linear smoothing of the shock structure due to cosmic ray (CR) backpressure. We observe the mass-to-charge (A/Z) enhancement effect believed to occur in efficient Fermi acceleration in non-relativistic shocks and we parametrize the transfer of ion energy to electrons seen in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. For a given set of environmental and model parameters, the Monte Carlo simulation determines the absolute normalization of the particle distributions and the resulting synchrotron, inverse Compton, and pion-decay emission in a largely self-consistent manner. The simulation is flexible and can be readily used with a wide range of parameters typical of γ-ray burst (GRB) afterglows. We describe some preliminary results for photon emission from shocks of different Lorentz factors and outline how the Monte Carlo simulation can be generalized and coupled to hydrodynamic simulations of GRB blast waves. We assume Bohm diffusion for simplicity but emphasize that the non-linear effects we describe stem mainly from an extended shock precursor where higher energy particles diffuse further upstream. Quantitative differences will occur with different diffusion models, particularly for the maximum CR energy and photon emission, but these non-linear effects should be qualitatively similar as long as the scattering mean-free path is an increasing function of momentum.

  14. Tunable Ionization Modes of a Flowing Atmospheric-Pressure Afterglow (FAPA) Ambient Ionization Source.

    PubMed

    Badal, Sunil P; Michalak, Shawn D; Chan, George C-Y; You, Yi; Shelley, Jacob T

    2016-04-05

    Plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization sources are versatile in that they enable direct ionization of gaseous samples as well as desorption/ionization of analytes from liquid and solid samples. However, ionization matrix effects, caused by competitive ionization processes, can worsen sensitivity or even inhibit detection all together. The present study is focused on expanding the analytical capabilities of the flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA) source by exploring additional types of ionization chemistry. Specifically, it was found that the abundance and type of reagent ions produced by the FAPA source and, thus, the corresponding ionization pathways of analytes, can be altered by changing the source working conditions. High abundance of proton-transfer reagent ions was observed with relatively high gas flow rates and low discharge currents. Conversely, charge-transfer reagent species were most abundant at low gas flows and high discharge currents. A rather nonpolar model analyte, biphenyl, was found to significantly change ionization pathway based on source operating parameters. Different analyte ions (e.g., MH(+) via proton-transfer and M(+.) via charge-transfer) were formed under unique operating parameters demonstrating two different operating regimes. These tunable ionization modes of the FAPA were used to enable or enhance detection of analytes which traditionally exhibit low-sensitivity in plasma-based ADI-MS analyses. In one example, 2,2'-dichloroquaterphenyl was detected under charge-transfer FAPA conditions, which were difficult or impossible to detect with proton-transfer FAPA or direct analysis in real-time (DART). Overall, this unique mode of operation increases the number and range of detectable analytes and has the potential to lessen ionization matrix effects in ADI-MS analyses.

  15. Low-energy Electrons in Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jóhannesson, Guđlaugur; Björnsson, Gunnlaugur

    2018-05-01

    Observations of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows have long provided the most detailed information about the origin of this spectacular phenomenon. The model that is most commonly used to extract physical properties of the event from the observations is the relativistic fireball model, where ejected material moving at relativistic speeds creates a shock wave when it interacts with the surrounding medium. Electrons are accelerated in the shock wave, generating the observed synchrotron emission through interactions with the magnetic field in the downstream medium. It is usually assumed that the accelerated electrons follow a simple power-law distribution in energy between specific energy boundaries, and that no electron exists outside these boundaries. This Letter explores the consequences of adding a low-energy power-law segment to the electron distribution with energy that contributes insignificantly to the total energy budget of the distribution. The low-energy electrons have a significant impact on the radio emission, providing synchrotron absorption and emission at these long wavelengths. Shorter wavelengths are affected through the normalization of the distribution. The new model is used to analyze the light curves of GRB 990510, and the resulting parameters are compared to a model without the extra electrons. The quality of the fit and the best-fit parameters are significantly affected by the additional model component. The new component is in one case found to strongly affect the X-ray light curves, showing how changes to the model at radio frequencies can affect light curves at other frequencies through changes in best-fit model parameters.

  16. Probing radical kinetics in the afterglow of pulsed discharges by absorption spectroscopy with light emitting diodes: Application to BCl radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vempaire, D.; Cunge, G.

    2009-01-01

    Measuring decay rates of radical densities in the afterglow of pulsed plasmas is a powerful approach to determine their gas phase and surface loss kinetics. We show that this measurement can be achieved by absorption spectroscopy with low cost and simple apparatus by using light emitting diodes as a light source. The feasibility is demonstrated by monitoring BCl radicals in pulsed low pressure high-density BCl3 plasmas. It is shown that BCl is lost both in the gas phase by reacting with Cl2 with a cross section of 9 Å2 and in the chamber walls with a sticking coefficient of about 0.3.

  17. Early-time solution of the horizontal unconfined aquifer in the build-up phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravanis, Elias; Akylas, Evangelos

    2017-04-01

    goes away. Nonetheless, no analogue of the kinematic wave or the Boussinesq separable solution exists in this case. The late time state of the build-up phase under constant recharge rate is very simply the steady state solution. Our aim is to construct the early time asymptotic solution of this problem. The solution is expressed as a power series of a suitable similarity variable, which is constructed so that to satisfy the boundary conditions at both ends of the aquifer, that is, it is a polynomial approximation of the exact solution. The series turn out to be asymptotic and it is regularized by re-summation techniques which are used to define divergent series. The outflow rate in this regime is linear in time, and the (dimensionless) coefficient is calculated to eight significant figures. The local error of the series is quantified by its deviation from satisfying the self-similar Boussinesq equation at every point. The local error turns out to be everywhere positive, hence, so is the integrated error, which in turn quantifies the degree of convergence of the series to the exact solution.

  18. Thermal components in the early X-ray afterglows of GRBs: likely cocoon emission and constraints on the progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valan, Vlasta; Larsson, Josefin; Ahlgren, Björn

    2018-02-01

    The early X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are usually well described by absorbed power laws. However, in some cases, additional thermal components have been identified. The origin of this emission is debated, with proposed explanations including supernova shock breakout, emission from a cocoon surrounding the jet, as well as emission from the jet itself. A larger sample of detections is needed in order to place constraints on these different models. Here, we present a time-resolved spectral analysis of 74 GRBs observed by Swift X-ray Telescope in a search for thermal components. We report six detections in our sample, and also confirm an additional three cases that were previously reported in the literature. The majority of these bursts have a narrow range of blackbody radii around ˜2 × 1012 cm, despite having a large range of luminosities (Lpeak ˜ 1047-1051 erg s-1). This points to an origin connected to the progenitor stars, and we suggest that emission from a cocoon breaking out from a thick wind may explain the observations. For two of the bursts in the sample, an explanation in terms of late prompt emission from the jet is instead more likely. We also find that these thermal components are preferentially detected when the X-ray luminosity is low, which suggests that they may be hidden by bright afterglows in the majority of GRBs.

  19. Layered host-guest long-afterglow ultrathin nanosheets: high-efficiency phosphorescence energy transfer at 2D confined interface.

    PubMed

    Gao, Rui; Yan, Dongpeng

    2017-01-01

    Tuning and optimizing the efficiency of light energy transfer play an important role in meeting modern challenges of minimizing energy loss and developing high-performance optoelectronic materials. However, attempts to fabricate systems giving highly efficient energy transfer between luminescent donor and acceptor have achieved limited success to date. Herein, we present a strategy towards phosphorescence energy transfer at a 2D orderly crystalline interface. We first show that new ultrathin nanosheet materials giving long-afterglow luminescence can be obtained by assembling aromatic guests into a layered double hydroxide host. Furthermore, we demonstrate that co-assembly of these long-lived energy donors with an energy acceptor in the same host generates an ordered arrangement of phosphorescent donor-acceptor pairs spatially confined within the 2D nanogallery, which affords energy transfer efficiency as high as 99.7%. Therefore, this work offers an alternative route to develop new types of long-afterglow nanohybrids and efficient light transfer systems with potential energy, illumination and sensor applications.

  20. Spectral softening in the X-RAY afterglow of GRB 130925A as predicted by the dust scattering model

    SciT

    Zhao, Yi-Nan; Shao, Lang, E-mail: lshao@hebtu.edu.cn

    2014-07-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) usually occur in a dense star-forming region with a massive circumburst medium. The small-angle scattering of intense prompt X-ray emission off the surrounding dust grains will have observable consequences and sometimes can dominate the X-ray afterglow. In most of the previous studies, only the Rayleigh-Gans (RG) approximation is employed for describing the scattering process, which works accurately for the typical size of grains (with radius of a ≤ 0.1 μm) in the diffuse interstellar medium. When the size of the grains may significantly increase, as in a more dense region where GRBs would occur, the RG approximationmore » may not be valid enough for modeling detailed observational data. In order to study the temporal and spectral properties of the scattered X-ray emission more accurately with potentially larger dust grains, we provide a practical approach using the series expansions of anomalous diffraction (AD) approximation based on the complicated Mie theory. We apply our calculations to understand the puzzling X-ray afterglow of recently observed GRB 130925A that showed a significant spectral softening. We find that the X-ray scattering scenarios with either AD or RG approximation adopted could well reproduce both the temporal and spectral profile simultaneously. Given the plateau present in the early X-ray light curve, a typical distribution of smaller grains as in the interstellar medium would be suggested for GRB 130925A.« less

  1. Spectral Softening in the X-Ray Afterglow of GRB 130925A as Predicted by the Dust Scattering Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yi-Nan; Shao, Lang

    2014-07-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) usually occur in a dense star-forming region with a massive circumburst medium. The small-angle scattering of intense prompt X-ray emission off the surrounding dust grains will have observable consequences and sometimes can dominate the X-ray afterglow. In most of the previous studies, only the Rayleigh-Gans (RG) approximation is employed for describing the scattering process, which works accurately for the typical size of grains (with radius of a <= 0.1 μm) in the diffuse interstellar medium. When the size of the grains may significantly increase, as in a more dense region where GRBs would occur, the RG approximation may not be valid enough for modeling detailed observational data. In order to study the temporal and spectral properties of the scattered X-ray emission more accurately with potentially larger dust grains, we provide a practical approach using the series expansions of anomalous diffraction (AD) approximation based on the complicated Mie theory. We apply our calculations to understand the puzzling X-ray afterglow of recently observed GRB 130925A that showed a significant spectral softening. We find that the X-ray scattering scenarios with either AD or RG approximation adopted could well reproduce both the temporal and spectral profile simultaneously. Given the plateau present in the early X-ray light curve, a typical distribution of smaller grains as in the interstellar medium would be suggested for GRB 130925A.

  2. Microplasma-based flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA) source for ambient desorption-ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zeiri, Offer M; Storey, Andrew P; Ray, Steven J; Hieftje, Gary M

    2017-02-01

    A new direct-current microplasma-based flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) source was developed for use in ambient desorption-ionization mass spectrometry. The annular-shaped microplasma is formed in helium between two concentric stainless-steel capillaries that are separated by an alumina tube. Current-voltage characterization of the source shows that this version of the FAPA operates in the normal glow-discharge regime. A glass surface placed in the path of the helium afterglow reaches temperatures of up to approximately 400 °C; the temperature varies with distance from the source and helium flow rate through the source. Solid, liquid, and vapor samples were examined by means of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Results suggest that ionization occurs mainly through protonation, with only a small amount of fragmentation and adduct formation. The mass range of the source was shown to extend up to at least m/z 2722 for singly charged species. Limits of detection for several small organic molecules were in the sub-picomole range. Examination of competitive ionization revealed that signal suppression occurs only at high (mM) concentrations of competing substances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The signature of supernova ejecta in the X-ray afterglow of the gamma-ray burst 011211.

    PubMed

    Reeves, J N; Watson, D; Osborne, J P; Pounds, K A; O'Brien, P T; Short, A D T; Turner, M J L; Watson, M G; Mason, K O; Ehle, M; Schartel, N

    2002-04-04

    Now that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been determined to lie at cosmological distances, their isotropic burst energies are estimated to be as high as 1054 erg (ref. 2), making them the most energetic phenomena in the Universe. The nature of the progenitors responsible for the bursts remains, however, elusive. The favoured models range from the merger of two neutron stars in a binary system to the collapse of a massive star. Spectroscopic studies of the afterglow emission could reveal details of the environment of the burst, by indicating the elements present, the speed of the outflow and an estimate of the temperature. Here we report an X-ray spectrum of the afterglow of GRB011211, which shows emission lines of magnesium, silicon, sulphur, argon, calcium and possibly nickel, arising in metal-enriched material with an outflow velocity of the order of one-tenth the speed of light. These observations strongly favour models where a supernova explosion from a massive stellar progenitor precedes the burst event and is responsible for the outflowing matter.

  4. Electron energy distribution function, effective electron temperature, and dust charge in the temporal afterglow of a plasma

    SciT

    Denysenko, I. B.; Azarenkov, N. A.; Kersten, H.

    2016-05-15

    Analytical expressions describing the variation of electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in an afterglow of a plasma are obtained. Especially, the case when the electron energy loss is mainly due to momentum-transfer electron-neutral collisions is considered. The study is carried out for different EEDFs in the steady state, including Maxwellian and Druyvesteyn distributions. The analytical results are not only obtained for the case when the rate for momentum-transfer electron-neutral collisions is independent on electron energy but also for the case when the collisions are a power function of electron energy. Using analytical expressions for the EEDF, the effective electron temperaturemore » and charge of the dust particles, which are assumed to be present in plasma, are calculated for different afterglow durations. An analytical expression for the rate describing collection of electrons by dust particles for the case when the rate for momentum-transfer electron-neutral collisions is independent on electron energy is also derived. The EEDF profile and, as a result, the effective electron temperature and dust charge are sufficiently different in the cases when the rate for momentum-transfer electron-neutral collisions is independent on electron energy and when the rate is a power function of electron energy.« less

  5. Dynamics and Afterglow Light Curves of Gamma-Ray Burst Blast Waves Encountering a Density Bump or Void

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhm, Z. Lucas; Zhang, Bing

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the dynamics and afterglow light curves of gamma-ray burst blast waves that encounter various density structures (such as bumps, voids, or steps) in the surrounding ambient medium. We present and explain the characteristic response features that each type of density structure in the medium leaves on the forward shock (FS) and reverse shock (RS) dynamics for blast waves with either a long-lived or short-lived RS. We show that when the ambient medium density drops, the blast waves exhibit in some cases a period of an actual acceleration (even during their deceleration stage) due to adiabatic cooling of blast waves. Comparing numerical examples that have different shapes of bumps or voids, we propose a number of consistency tests that must be satisfied by correct modeling of blast waves. Our model results successfully pass these tests. Employing a Lagrangian description of blast waves, we perform a sophisticated calculation of afterglow emission. We show that as a response to density structures in the ambient medium, the RS light curves produce more significant variations than the FS light curves. Some observed features (such as rebrightenings, dips, or slow wiggles) can be more easily explained within the RS model. We also discuss the origin of these different features imprinted on the FS and RS light curves.

  6. Jansky Array mapping of Gravitational Bursts as Afterglows in Radio (JAGWAR): The VLA Large Program and Initial Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooley, Kunal; Hallinan, Gregg; Hotokezaka, Kenta; Frail, Dale; Myers, Steven T.; Horesh, Assaf; Kasliwal, Mansi; Kulkarni, Shri; Pound Singer, Leo; nissanke, Samaya; Rana, Javed

    2018-01-01

    The era of gravitational waves and multi-messenger astronomy has begun. Telescopes around the globe are now in hot pursuit of electromagnetic counterparts (EM) to aLIGO/VIRGO sources, especially double-neutron star (NS-NS) and neutron star-black hole mergers (NS-BH). The EM counterparts are crucial for 1) providing arcsecond localization and identifying the precise host galaxy and merger redshift, 2) understanding the energetics and physics of the merger, 3) mapping their environments and pre-merger mass ejection processes, and 4) confirming the validity of the GW signals at low signal-to-noise ratios. Radio wavelengths provide one of the best diagnostics of both the dynamical sub-relativistic ejecta and any ultra-relativistic jet launched, as well as the possible interaction of these two components. In this talk I will introduce the Jansky Array mapping of Gravitational Bursts as Afterglows in Radio (JAGWAR) program, running on the VLA, aimed at maximizing the discoveries of the radio afterglows of NS-NS and NS-BH mergers. I will also present the JAGWAR results from the aLIGO/VIRGO observing run O2, which concluded in August 2017.

  7. Dynamics and afterglow light curves of gamma-ray burst blast waves encountering a density bump or void

    SciT

    Uhm, Z. Lucas; Zhang, Bing, E-mail: uhm@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the dynamics and afterglow light curves of gamma-ray burst blast waves that encounter various density structures (such as bumps, voids, or steps) in the surrounding ambient medium. We present and explain the characteristic response features that each type of density structure in the medium leaves on the forward shock (FS) and reverse shock (RS) dynamics for blast waves with either a long-lived or short-lived RS. We show that when the ambient medium density drops, the blast waves exhibit in some cases a period of an actual acceleration (even during their deceleration stage) due to adiabatic cooling of blastmore » waves. Comparing numerical examples that have different shapes of bumps or voids, we propose a number of consistency tests that must be satisfied by correct modeling of blast waves. Our model results successfully pass these tests. Employing a Lagrangian description of blast waves, we perform a sophisticated calculation of afterglow emission. We show that as a response to density structures in the ambient medium, the RS light curves produce more significant variations than the FS light curves. Some observed features (such as rebrightenings, dips, or slow wiggles) can be more easily explained within the RS model. We also discuss the origin of these different features imprinted on the FS and RS light curves.« less

  8. Use of Interrupted Helium Flow in the Analysis of Vapor Samples with Flowing Atmospheric-Pressure Afterglow-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Storey, Andrew P; Zeiri, Offer M; Ray, Steven J; Hieftje, Gary M

    2017-02-01

    The flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA) source was used for the mass-spectrometric analysis of vapor samples introduced between the source and mass spectrometer inlet. Through interrupted operation of the plasma-supporting helium flow, helium consumption is greatly reduced and dynamic gas behavior occurs that was characterized by schlieren imaging. Moreover, mass spectra acquired immediately after the onset of helium flow exhibit a signal spike before declining and ultimately reaching a steady level. This initial signal appears to be due to greater interaction of sample vapor with the afterglow of the source when helium flow resumes. In part, the initial spike in signal can be attributed to a pooling of analyte vapor in the absence of helium flow from the source. Time-resolved schlieren imaging of the helium flow during on and off cycles provided insight into gas-flow patterns between the FAPA source and the MS inlet that were correlated with mass-spectral data. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  9. Another self-similar blast wave: Early time asymptote with shock heated electrons and high thermal conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. P.; Edgar, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Accurate approximations are presented for the self-similar structures of nonradiating blast waves with adiabatic ions, isothermal electrons, and equation ion and electron temperatures at the shock. The cases considered evolve in cavities with power law ambient densities (including the uniform density case) and have negligible external pressure. The results provide the early time asymptote for systems with shock heating of electrons and strong thermal conduction. In addition, they provide analytical results against which two fluid numerical hydrodynamic codes can be checked.

  10. Early time studies of cylindrical liner implosions at 1 MA on COBRA

    SciT

    Atoyan, L., E-mail: la296@cornell.edu; Byvank, T., E-mail: la296@cornell.edu; Cahill, A. D., E-mail: la296@cornell.edu

    Tests of the magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept will make use of the 27 MA Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, to implode a cylindrical metal liner to compress and heat preheated, magnetized plasma contained within it. While most pulsed power machines produce much lower currents than the Z-machine, there are issues that can still be addressed on smaller scale facilities. Recent work on the Cornell Beam Research Accelerator (COBRA) has made use of 10 mm long and 4 mm diameter metal liners having different wall thicknesses to study the initiation of plasma on the liner’s surface asmore » well as axial magnetic field compression [P.-A. Gourdain et al., Nucl. Fusion 53, 083006 (2013)]. This report presents experimental results with non-imploding liners, investigating the impact the liner’s surface structure has on initiation and ablation. Extreme ultraviolet (XUV) imaging and optical 12 frame camera imaging were used to observe and assess emission non-uniformities as they developed. Axial and side-on interferometry was used to determine the distribution of plasma near the liner surface, including the impact of non-uniformities during the plasma initiation and ablation phases of the experiments.« less

  11. Early time studies of cylindrical liner implosions at 1 MA on COBRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atoyan, L.; Byvank, T.; Cahill, A. D.; Hoyt, C. L.; de Grouchy, P. W. L.; Potter, W. M.; Kusse, B. R.; Hammer, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Tests of the magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept will make use of the 27 MA Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, to implode a cylindrical metal liner to compress and heat preheated, magnetized plasma contained within it. While most pulsed power machines produce much lower currents than the Z-machine, there are issues that can still be addressed on smaller scale facilities. Recent work on the Cornell Beam Research Accelerator (COBRA) has made use of 10 mm long and 4 mm diameter metal liners having different wall thicknesses to study the initiation of plasma on the liner's surface as well as axial magnetic field compression [P.-A. Gourdain et al., Nucl. Fusion 53, 083006 (2013)]. This report presents experimental results with non-imploding liners, investigating the impact the liner's surface structure has on initiation and ablation. Extreme ultraviolet (XUV) imaging and optical 12 frame camera imaging were used to observe and assess emission non-uniformities as they developed. Axial and side-on interferometry was used to determine the distribution of plasma near the liner surface, including the impact of non-uniformities during the plasma initiation and ablation phases of the experiments.

  12. What can we learn from "internal plateaus"? The peculiar afterglow of GRB 070110

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniamini, P.; Mochkovitch, R.

    2017-09-01

    Context. The origin of the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts is highly debated. Proposed scenarios involve various dissipation processes (shocks, magnetic reconnection, and inelastic collisions) above or below the photosphere of an ultra-relativistic outflow. Aims: We search for observational features that could help to favour one scenario over the others by constraining the dissipation radius, the magnetization of the outflow, or by indicating the presence of shocks. Bursts showing peculiar behaviours can emphasize the role of a specific physical ingredient, which becomes more apparent under certain circumstances. Methods: We study GRB 070110, which exhibited several remarkable features during its early afterglow; I.e. a very flat plateau terminated by an extremely steep drop and immediately followed by a bump. We modelled the plateau as the photospheric emission from a long-lasting outflow of moderate Lorentz factor (Γ 20), which lags behind an ultra-relativistic (Γ > 100) ejecta that is responsible for the prompt emission. We computed the dissipation of energy in the forward and reverse shocks resulting from the deceleration of this ejecta by the external medium (uniform or stellar wind). Results: We find that photospheric emission from the long-lasting outflow can account for the plateau properties (luminosity and spectrum) assuming that some dissipation takes place in the flow. The geometrical timescale at the photospheric radius is so short that the observed decline at the end of the plateau likely corresponds to the actual shutdown of the activity in the central engine. The bump that follows results from the power dissipated in the reverse shock, which develops when the material making the plateau catches up with the initially fast shell in front, after the fast shell has decelerated. Conclusions: The proposed interpretation suggests that the prompt phase results from dissipation above the photosphere while the plateau has a photospheric origin. If the

  13. Prompt Optical Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerlof, Carl; Balsano, Richard; Barthelmy, Scott; Bloch, Jeff; Butterworth, Paul; Casperson, Don; Cline, Tom; Fletcher, Sandra; Frontera, Fillippo; Gisler, Galen; Heise, John; Hills, Jack; Hurley, Kevin; Kehoe, Robert; Lee, Brian; Marshall, Stuart; McKay, Tim; Pawl, Andrew; Piro, Luigi; Szymanski, John; Wren, Jim

    2000-03-01

    The Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE) seeks to measure simultaneous and early afterglow optical emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). A search for optical counterparts to six GRBs with localization errors of 1 deg2 or better produced no detections. The earliest limiting sensitivity is mROTSE>13.1 at 10.85 s (5 s exposure) after the gamma-ray rise, and the best limit is mROTSE>16.0 at 62 minutes (897 s exposure). These are the most stringent limits obtained for the GRB optical counterpart brightness in the first hour after the burst. Consideration of the gamma-ray fluence and peak flux for these bursts and for GRB 990123 indicates that there is not a strong positive correlation between optical flux and gamma-ray emission.

  14. Electrical characterization of the flowing afterglow of N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} microwave plasmas at reduced pressure

    SciT

    Afonso Ferreira, J.; Stafford, L., E-mail: luc.stafford@umontreal.ca; Leonelli, R.

    2014-04-28

    A cylindrical Langmuir probe was used to analyze the spatial distribution of the number density of positive ions and electrons as well as the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in the flowing afterglow of a 6 Torr N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} plasma sustained by a propagating electromagnetic surface wave in the microwave regime. In pure N{sub 2} discharges, ion densities were in the mid 10{sup 14} m{sup −3} in the pink afterglow and in the mid 10{sup 12} m{sup −3} early in the late afterglow. In both pink and late afterglows, the ion population was much higher than the electron population,more » indicating non-macroscopically neutral media. The EEDF was close to a Maxwellian with an electron temperature of 0.5 ± 0.1 eV, except in the pink afterglow where the temperature rose to 1.1 ± 0.2 eV. This latter behavior is ascribed to N{sub 2} vibration-vibration pumping in the pink afterglow that increases the concentration of high N{sub 2} vibrational states and thus rises the electron temperature by vibration-electron collisions. After addition of small amounts of O{sub 2} in the nominally pure N{sub 2} discharge, the charged particles densities and average electron energy first strongly increased and then decreased with increasing O{sub 2} concentration. Based on these data and the evolution of the N{sub 2}{sup +}(B) band emission intensities, it is concluded that a significant change in the positive ion composition of the flowing afterglow occurs, going from N{sub 2}{sup +} in nominally pure N{sub 2} discharges to NO{sup +} after addition of trace amounts of O{sub 2} in N{sub 2}.« less

  15. GRB 090417B and its Host Galaxy: A Step Towards an Understanding of Optically-Dark Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Stephen T.; Sbarufatti, Boris; Shen, Rongfeng; Schady, Patricia; Cummings, Jay R.; Fonseca, Emmanuel; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Jakobsson, Pall; Leitet, Elisabet; Linne, Staffan; hide

    2009-01-01

    GRB 090417B was an unusually long burst with a T(sub 90) duration of at least 2130 s and a multi-peaked light curve at energies of 15-150 keV. It was optically dark and has been convincingly associated with a bright star-forming galaxy at a redshift of 0.345 that is broadly similar to the Milky Way. This is one of the few cases where a host galaxy has been clearly identified for a dark gamma-ray burst and thus an ideal candidate for studying the origin of dark bursts. We find that the dark nature of GRB 090417B can not be explained by high redshift, incomplete observations, or unusual physics in the production of the afterglow. The Swift/XRT X-ray data are consistent with the afterglow being obscured by a dense, localized sheet of dust approximately 30-80 pc from the burst along the line of sight. Assuming the standard relativistic fireball model for the afterglow we find that the optical flux is at least 2.5 mag fainter than predicted by the X -ray flux. We are able to explain the lack of an optical afterglow, and the evolution of the X -ray spectrum, by assuming that there is a sheet of dust along the line of sight approximately 30-80 pc from the progenitor. Our results suggest that this dust sheet imparts an extinction of A(sub v)> or = 12 mag, which is sufficient to explain the missing optical flux. GRB 090417B is an example of a gamma-ray burst that is dark due to the localized dust structure in its host galaxy.

  16. Inactivation of Candida glabrata by a humid DC argon discharge afterglow: dominant contributions of short-lived aqueous active species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Qing; Liu, Hongbin; Lu, Weiping; Chen, Qiang; Xu, Le; Wang, Xia; Zhu, Qunlin; Zeng, Xue; Yi, Ping

    2017-05-01

    Plasma medicine applications are currently attracting significant interest all over the world. Bactericidal treatments of Candida glabrata cultured in saline suspension are performed in this study by a room-temperature reactive afterglow of a DC-driven argon discharge. Water vapor was added to the discharge to study the inactivation contributions of reactive hydrolytic species including OH and H2O2 transporting along the gas flow to the treated solutions. The inactivation results indicate that the dominant roles in the bactericidal treatments are played by the short-lived aqueous active species, but not the stable species like H2O2aq (aq indicates an aqueous species). Further analysis shows that the ·OHaq radicals play an important role in the inactivation process. The ·OHaq radicals in the suspension are mostly produced from the direct dissolution of the OH species in the reactive afterglow. With the increase of added water vapor content, the ·OHaq production increases and enhances the inactivation efficiency of C. glabrata. Furthermore, it is found that the ambient air diffusion shows essential effects on the bactericidal activity of the remote humid argon discharge. Higher bactericidal effects can be obtained in open-space treatments compared to in a controlled Ar + H2O gas atmosphere. Key active air-byproduct species are believed to be generated in the suspension during the treatments and contributing to the inactivation process. Based on chemical analysis, the peroxynitrous acid ONOOHaq is considered as the key antimicrobial air-byproduct species. These results indicate the important dependence of plasma biomedical effects on the processing environment, which finally relates to the critical contributions of the key reactive species formed therein.

  17. Relativistic simulations of long-lived reverse shocks in stratified ejecta: the origin of flares in GRB afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberts, A.; Daigne, F.

    2018-02-01

    The X-ray light curves of the early afterglow phase from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) present a puzzling variability, including flares. The origin of these flares is still debated, and often associated with a late activity of the central engine. We discuss an alternative scenario where the central engine remains short-lived and flares are produced by the propagation of a long-lived reverse shock in a stratified ejecta. Here we focus on the hydrodynamics of the shock interactions. We perform one-dimensional ultrarelativistic hydrodynamic simulations with different initial internal structure in the GRB ejecta. We use them to extract bolometric light curves and compare with a previous study based on a simplified ballistic model. We find a good agreement between both approaches, with similar slopes and variability in the light curves, but identify several weaknesses in the ballistic model: the density is underestimated in the shocked regions, and more importantly, late shock reflections are not captured. With accurate dynamics provided by our hydrodynamic simulations, we confirm that internal shocks in the ejecta lead to the formation of dense shells. The interaction of the long-lived reverse shock with a dense shell then produces a fast and intense increase of the dissipated power. Assuming that the emission is due to the synchrotron radiation from shock-accelerated electrons, and that the external forward shock is radiatively inefficient, we find that this results in a bright flare in the X-ray light curve, with arrival times, shapes, and duration in agreement with the observed properties of X-ray flares in GRB afterglows.

  18. Early time evolution of negative ion clouds and electron density depletions produced during electron attachment chemical release experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scales, W. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Ganguli, G.

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations are used to study the early time evolution of electron depletions and negative ion clouds produced during electron attachment chemical releases in the ionosphere. The simulation model considers the evolution in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field and a three-species plasma that contains electrons, positive ions, and also heavy negative ions that result as a by-product of the electron attachment reaction. The early time evolution (less than the negative ion cyclotron period) of the system shows that a negative charge surplus initially develops outside of the depletion boundary as the heavy negative ions move across the boundary. The electrons are initially restricted from moving into the depletion due to the magnetic field. An inhomogenous electric field develops across the boundary layer due to this charge separation. A highly sheared electron flow velocity develops in the depletion boundary due to E x B and Delta-N x B drifts that result from electron density gradients and this inhomogenous electric field. Structure eventually develops in the depletion boundary layer due to low-frequency electrostatic waves that have growth times shorter than the negative ion cyclotron period. It is proposed that these waves are most likely produced by the electron-ion hybrid instability that results from sufficiently large shears in the electron flow velocity.

  19. Tunable Yellow-Red Photoluminescence and Persistent Afterglow in Phosphors Ca4LaO(BO3)3:Eu3+ and Ca4EuO(BO3)3.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Pan, Yuexiao; Xi, Luqing; Pang, Ran; Huang, Shaoming; Liu, Guokui

    2016-11-07

    In most Eu 3+ activated phosphors, only red luminescence from the 5 D 0 is obtainable, and efficiency is limited by concentration quenching. Herein we report a new phosphor of Ca 4 LaO(BO 3 ) 3 :Eu 3+ (CLBO:Eu) with advanced photoluminescence properties. The yellow luminescence emitted from the 5 D 1,2 states is not thermally quenched at room temperature. The relative intensities of the yellow and red emission bands depend strongly on the Eu 3+ doping concentration. More importantly, concentration quenching of Eu 3+ photoluminescence is absent in this phosphor, and the stoichiometric compound of Ca 4 EuO(BO 3 ) 3 emits stronger luminescence than the Eu 3+ doped compounds of CLBO:Eu; it is three times stronger than that of a commercial red phosphor of Y 2 O 3 :Eu 3+ . Another beneficial phenomenon is that ligand-to-metal charge transfer (CT) transitions occur in the long UV region with the lowest charge transfer band (CTB) stretched down to about 3.67 eV (∼330 nm). The CT transitions significantly enhance Eu 3+ excitation, and thus result in stronger photoluminescence and promote trapping of excitons for persistent afterglow emission. Along with structure characterization, optical spectra and luminescence dynamics measured under various conditions as a function of Eu 3+ doping, temperature, and excitation wavelength are analyzed for a fundamental understanding of electronic interactions and for potential applications.

  20. 3-D imaging of large scale buried structure by 1-D inversion of very early time electromagnetic (VETEM) data

    Aydmer, A.A.; Chew, W.C.; Cui, T.J.; Wright, D.L.; Smith, D.V.; Abraham, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    A simple and efficient method for large scale three-dimensional (3-D) subsurface imaging of inhomogeneous background is presented. One-dimensional (1-D) multifrequency distorted Born iterative method (DBIM) is employed in the inversion. Simulation results utilizing synthetic scattering data are given. Calibration of the very early time electromagnetic (VETEM) experimental waveforms is detailed along with major problems encountered in practice and their solutions. This discussion is followed by the results of a large scale application of the method to the experimental data provided by the VETEM system of the U.S. Geological Survey. The method is shown to have a computational complexity that is promising for on-site inversion.

  1. Particle-in-cell simulation of ion energy distributions on an electrode by applying tailored bias waveforms in the afterglow of a pulsed plasma

    SciT

    Diomede, Paola; Economou, Demetre J.; Donnelly, Vincent M.

    2011-04-15

    A Particle-in-Cell simulation with Monte Carlo Collisions (PIC-MCC) was conducted of the application of tailored DC voltage steps on an electrode, during the afterglow of a capacitively-coupled pulsed-plasma argon discharge, to control the energy of ions incident on the counter-electrode. Staircase voltage waveforms with selected amplitudes and durations resulted in ion energy distributions (IED) with distinct narrow peaks, with controlled energies and fraction of ions under each peak. Temporary electron heating at the moment of application of a DC voltage step did not influence the electron density decay in the afterglow. The IED peaks were 'smeared' by collisions, especially atmore » the higher pressures of the range (10-40 mTorr) investigated.« less

  2. Sterilization/disinfection using reduced-pressure plasmas: some differences between direct exposure of bacterial spores to a discharge and their exposure to a flowing afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisan, M.; Levif, P.; Séguin, J.; Barbeau, J.

    2014-07-01

    The use of plasma for sterilization or disinfection offers a promising alternative to conventional steam or chemical approaches. Plasma can operate at temperatures less damaging to some heat-sensitive medical devices and, in contrast to chemicals, can be non-toxic and non-polluting for the operator and the environment, respectively. Direct exposure to the gaseous discharge (comprising an electric field and ions/electrons) or exposure to its afterglow (no E-field) can both be envisaged a priori, since these two methods can achieve sterility. However, important issues must be considered besides the sterility goal. Direct exposure to the discharge, although yielding a faster inactivation of microorganisms, is shown to be potentially more aggressive to materials and sometimes subjected to the shadowing effect that precludes the sterilization of complex-form items. These two drawbacks can be successfully minimized with an adequate flowing-afterglow exposure. Most importantly, the current paper shows that direct exposure to the discharge can lead to the dislodgment and release of viable microorganisms from their substratum. Such a phenomenon could be responsible for the recontamination of sterilized devices as well as possible contamination of the ambient surroundings, additionally yielding an erroneous over-appreciation of the inactivation efficiency. The operation of the N2-O2 flowing afterglow system being developed in our group is such that there are no ions and electrons left in the process chamber (late-afterglow regime) in full contrast with their presence in the discharge. The dislodgment and release of spores could be attributed, based on the literature, to their electrostatic charging by electrons, leading to an (outward) electrostatic stress that exceeds the adhesion of the spores on their substrate.

  3. Modeling the Multiband Afterglows of GRB 060614 and GRB 060908: Further Evidence for a Double Power-law Hard Electron Energy Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Xiong, S. L.; Song, L. M.

    2018-04-01

    Electrons accelerated in relativistic collisionless shocks are usually assumed to follow a power-law energy distribution with an index of p. Observationally, although most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have afterglows that are consistent with p > 2, there are still a few GRBs suggestive of a hard (p < 2) electron energy spectrum. Our previous work showed that GRB 091127 gave strong evidence for a double power-law hard electron energy (DPLH) spectrum with 1 < p 1 < 2, p 2 > 2 and an “injection break” assumed as γ b ∝ γ q in the highly relativistic regime, where γ is the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet. In this paper, we show that GRB 060614 and GRB 060908 provide further evidence for such a DPLH spectrum. We interpret the multiband afterglow of GRB 060614 with the DPLH model in a homogeneous interstellar medium by taking into account a continuous energy injection process, while, for GRB 060908, a wind-like circumburst density profile is used. The two bursts, along with GRB 091127, suggest a similar behavior in the evolution of the injection break, with q ∼ 0.5. Whether this represents a universal law of the injection break remains uncertain and more afterglow observations such as these are needed to test this conjecture.

  4. Panchromatic Observations of the Textbook GRB 110205A: Constraining Physical Mechanisms of Prompt Emission and Afterglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, W.; Shen, R. F.; Sakamoto, T.; Beardmore, A. P.; De Pasquale, M.; Wu, X. F.; Gorosabel, J.; Urata, Y.; Sugita, S.; Zhang, B.; hide

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of a bright, long duration (T(sub 90) approx. 257 s) GRB 110205A at redshift z = 2.22. The optical prompt emission was detected by Swift/UVOT, ROTSE-IIIb and BOOTES telescopes when the GRB was still radiating in the gamma-ray band. Thanks to its long duration, nearly 200 s of observations were obtained simultaneously from optical, X-ray to gamma-ray (1 eV - 5 MeV), which makes it one of the exceptional cases to study the broadband spectral energy distribution across 6 orders of magnitude in energy during the prompt emission phase. In particular, by fitting the time resolved prompt spectra, we clearly identify, for the first time, an interesting two-break energy spectrum, roughly consistent with the standard GRB synchrotron emission model in the fast cooling regime. Although the prompt optical emission is brighter than the extrapolation of the best fit X/ -ray spectra, it traces the -ray light curve shape, suggesting a relation to the prompt high energy emission. The synchrotron + synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) scenario is disfavored by the data, but the models invoking a pair of internal shocks or having two emission regions can interpret the data well. Shortly after prompt emission (approx. 1100 s), a bright (R = 14.0) optical emission hump with very steep rise ( alpha approx. 5.5) was observed which we interpret as the emission from the reverse shock. It is the first time that the rising phase of a reverse shock component has been closely observed.

  5. Sterilization/disinfection of medical devices using plasma: the flowing afterglow of the reduced-pressure N2-O2 discharge as the inactivating medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisan, Michel; Boudam, Karim; Carignan, Denis; Kéroack, Danielle; Levif, Pierre; Barbeau, Jean; Séguin, Jacynthe; Kutasi, Kinga; Elmoualij, Benaïssa; Thellin, Olivier; Zorzi, Willy

    2013-07-01

    Potential sterilization/disinfection of medical devices (MDs) is investigated using a specific plasma process developed at the Université de Montréal over the last decade. The inactivating medium of the microorganisms is the flowing afterglow of a reduced-pressure N2-O2 discharge, which provides, as the main biocidal agent, photons over a broad ultraviolet (UV) wavelength range. The flowing afterglow is considered less damaging to MDs than the discharge itself. Working at gas pressures in the 400—700 Pa range (a few torr) ensures, through species diffusion, the uniform filling of large volume chambers with the species outflowing from the discharge, possibly allowing batch processing within them. As a rule, bacterial endospores are used as bio-indicators (BI) to validate sterilization processes. Under the present operating conditions, Bacillus atrophaeus is found to be the most resistant one and is therefore utilized as BI. The current paper reviews the main experimental results concerning the operation and characterization of this sterilizer/disinfector, updating and completing some of our previously published papers. It uses modeling results as guidelines, which are particularly useful when the corresponding experimental data are not (yet) available, hopefully leading to more insight into this plasma afterglow system. The species flowing out of the N2-O2 discharge can be divided into two groups, depending on the time elapsed after they left the discharge zone as they move toward the chamber, namely the early afterglow and the late afterglow. The early flowing afterglow from a pure N2 discharge (also called pink afterglow) is known to be comprised of N2+ and N4+ ions. In the present N2-O2 mixture discharge, NO+ ions are additionally generated, with a lifetime that extends over a longer period than that of the nitrogen molecular ions. We shall suppose that the disappearance of the NO+ ions marks the end of the early afterglow regime, thereby stressing our intent

  6. The presence of p53 influences the expression of multiple human cytomegalovirus genes at early times postinfection.

    PubMed

    Hannemann, Holger; Rosenke, Kyle; O'Dowd, John M; Fortunato, Elizabeth A

    2009-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised and immunosuppressed individuals. During infection, HCMV is known to employ host transcription factors to facilitate viral gene expression. To further understand the previously observed delay in viral replication and protein expression in p53 knockout cells, we conducted microarray analyses of p53(+/+) and p53(-/-) immortalized fibroblast cell lines. At a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 1 at 24 h postinfection (p.i.), the expression of 22 viral genes was affected by the absence of p53. Eleven of these 22 genes (group 1) were examined by real-time reverse transcriptase, or quantitative, PCR (q-PCR). Additionally, five genes previously determined to have p53 bound to their nearest p53-responsive elements (group 2) and three control genes without p53 binding sites in their upstream sequences (group 3) were also examined. At an MOI of 1, >3-fold regulation was found for five group 1 genes. The expression of group 2 and 3 genes was not changed. At an MOI of 5, all genes from group 1 and four of five genes from group 2 were found to be regulated. The expression of control genes from group 3 remained unchanged. A q-PCR time course of four genes revealed that p53 influences viral gene expression most at immediate-early and early times p.i., suggesting a mechanism for the reduced and delayed production of virions in p53(-/-) cells.

  7. Swift and Fermi observations of the early afterglow of the short gamma-ray burst 090510

    DOE PAGES

    De Pasquale, M.

    2010-01-14

    Here, we present the observations of GRB090510 performed by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope and the Swift observatory. In a GeV range, we detected a bright, short burst that shows an extended emission. Furthermore, its optical emission initially rises, a feature so far observed only in long bursts, while the X-ray flux shows an initial shallow decrease, followed by a steeper decay. This exceptional behavior enables us to investigate the physical properties of the gamma-ray burst outflow, poorly known in short bursts. Here, we discuss internal and external shock models for the broadband energy emission of this object.

  8. Peak experiences and the afterglow phenomenon: when and how do therapeutic effects of hallucinogens depend on psychedelic experiences?

    PubMed

    Majić, Tomislav; Schmidt, Timo T; Gallinat, Jürgen

    2015-03-01

    Interest in the therapeutic potential of psychedelic substances has recently resumed. During an early phase of human psychedelic research, their therapeutic application in different pathologies had been suggested, and the first evidence for efficacy was provided. The range of recent clinical applications of psychedelics spans from cluster headaches and obsessive-compulsive disorder to addiction and the treatment of fear and anxiety in patients suffering from terminal illness, indicating potentially different therapeutic mechanisms. A variety of approaches in psychotherapy emphasize subjective experiences, such as so-called peak experiences or afterglow phenomena, as differentially mediating therapeutic action. This review aims to re-evaluate earlier and recent concepts of how psychedelic substances may exert beneficial effects. After a short outline of neurophenomenological aspects, we discuss different approaches to how psychedelics are used in psychotherapy. Finally, we summarize evidence for the relationship between subjective experiences and therapeutic success. While the distinction between pharmacological and psychological action obviously cannot be clear-cut, they do appear to contribute differently from each other when their effects are compared with regard to pathologies. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Rapid temperature increase near the anode and cathode in the afterglow of a pulsed positive streamer discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Ryo

    2018-06-01

    The spatiotemporal evolution of the temperature in the afterglow of point-to-plane, pulsed positive streamer discharge was measured near the anode tip and cathode surface using laser-induced predissociation fluorescence of OH radicals. The temperature exhibited a rapid increase and displayed a steep spatial gradient after a discharge pulse. The rate of temperature rise reached 84 K μs‑1 at mm, where z represents the distance from the anode tip. The temperature rise was much faster than in the middle of the gap; it was only 2.8 K μs‑1 at mm. The temperature reached 1700 K near the anode tip at s and 1500 K near the cathode surface at s, where t represents the postdischarge time. The spatial gradient reached 1280 K mm‑1 near the anode tip at s. The mechanism responsible for the rapid temperature increase was discussed, including rapid heating of the gas in the early postdischarge phase (s), and vibration-to-translation energy transfer in the later postdischarge phase (s). The high temperatures near the anode tip and cathode surface are particularly important for the ignition of combustible mixtures and for surface treatments, including solid-surface treatments, water treatments, and plasma medicine using pulsed streamer discharges.

  10. Flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow combined with laser ablation for direct analysis of compounds separated by thin-layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cegłowski, Michał; Smoluch, Marek; Reszke, Edward; Silberring, Jerzy; Schroeder, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    A thin-layer chromatography-mass spectrometry (TLC-MS) setup for characterization of low molecular weight compounds separated on standard TLC plates has been constructed. This new approach successfully combines TLC separation, laser ablation, and ionization using flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) source. For the laser ablation, a low-priced 445-nm continuous-wave diode laser pointer, with a power of 1 W, was used. The combination of the simple, low-budget laser pointer and the FAPA ion source has made this experimental arrangement broadly available, also for small laboratories. The approach was successfully applied for the characterization of low molecular weight compounds separated on TLC plates, such as a mixture of pyrazole derivatives, alkaloids (nicotine and sparteine), and an extract from a drug tablet consisting of paracetamol, propyphenazone, and caffeine. The laser pointer used was capable of ablating organic compounds without the need of application of any additional substances (matrices, staining, etc.) on the TLC spots. The detection limit of the proposed method was estimated to be 35 ng/cm(2) of a pyrazole derivative.

  11. Measurement of the electron-impact transfer rate coefficients between the Kr(1s) states in an afterglow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jie; Cheng, Zhi-Wen; Zhu, Xi-Ming; Pu, Yi-Kang

    2018-04-01

    The rate coefficients for the electron-impact transfer from Kr(1s5) to Kr(1s4) and from Kr(1s3) to Kr(1s2) are measured in the electron temperature (T e) range between 0.07 eV and 1 eV. In the afterglow of a capacitive krypton discharge at a fixed pressure of 20 mTorr and a peak rf power ranging from 4 to 128 W, the densities of four krypton 1s states, the electron temperature and the electron density are measured by diode laser absorption, a Langmuir probe and a microwave interferometer, respectively. With these measured quantities, the rate coefficients are obtained from a population model for krypton metastable states. The measured rate coefficients are compared with those derived from the excitation cross sections of Kr metastable states calculated by different R-matrix models. It is found that our results agree best with that from Allan et al [1]. Moreover, we analyze the assumptions made in the population model and discuss their possible impact on the accuracy of the measured rate coefficients, especially for the low T e (0.1-0.2 eV) range and a higher T e (0.4-1 eV) range.

  12. Determination of psychostimulants and their metabolites by electrochemistry linked on-line to flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Smoluch, Marek; Mielczarek, Przemyslaw; Reszke, Edward; Hieftje, Gary M; Silberring, Jerzy

    2014-09-07

    The flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) ion source operates in the ambient atmosphere and has been proven to be a promising tool for direct and rapid determination of numerous compounds. Here we linked a FAPA-MS system to an electrochemical flow cell for the identification of drug metabolites generated electrochemically in order to study simulated metabolic pathways. Psychostimulants and their metabolites produced by electrochemistry (EC) were detected on-line by FAPA-MS. The FAPA source has never been used before for an on-line connection with liquid flow, neither for identification of products generated in an electrochemical flow cell. The system was optimized to achieve the highest ionization efficiency by adjusting several parameters, including distances and angles between the ion source and the outlet of the EC system, the high voltage for plasma generation, flow-rates, and EC parameters. Simulated metabolites from tested compounds [methamphetamine (MAF), para-methoxy-N-methylamphetamine (PMMA), dextromethorphan (DXM), and benzydamine (BAM)] were formed in the EC cell at various pH levels. In all cases the main products were oxidized substrates and compounds after N-demethylation. Generation of such products and their thorough on-line identification confirm that the cytochrome P450 - driven metabolism of pharmaceuticals can be efficiently simulated in an electrochemical cell; this approach may serve as a step towards predictive pharmacology using a fast and robust design.

  13. A flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow as an ion source coupled to a differential mobility analyzer for volatile organic compound detection.

    PubMed

    Bouza, Marcos; Orejas, Jaime; López-Vidal, Silvia; Pisonero, Jorge; Bordel, Nerea; Pereiro, Rosario; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2016-05-23

    Atmospheric pressure glow discharges have been widely used in the last decade as ion sources in ambient mass spectrometry analyses. Here, an in-house flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) has been developed as an alternative ion source for differential mobility analysis (DMA). The discharge source parameters (inter-electrode distance, current and helium flow rate) determining the atmospheric plasma characteristics have been optimized in terms of DMA spectral simplicity with the highest achievable sensitivity while keeping an adequate plasma stability and so the FAPA working conditions finally selected were: 35 mA, 1 L min(-1) of He and an inter-electrode distance of 8 mm. Room temperature in the DMA proved to be adequate for the coupling and chemical analysis with the FAPA source. Positive and negative ions for different volatile organic compounds were tested and analysed by FAPA-DMA using a Faraday cup as a detector and proper operation in both modes was possible (without changes in FAPA operational parameters). The FAPA ionization source showed simpler ion mobility spectra with narrower peaks and a better, or similar, sensitivity than conventional UV-photoionization for DMA analysis in positive mode. Particularly, the negative mode proved to be a promising field of further research for the FAPA ion source coupled to ion mobility, clearly competitive with other more conventional plasmas such as corona discharge.

  14. Influence of gas and treatment time on the surface modification of EPDM rubber treated at afterglow microwave plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Maia, J. V.; Pereira, F. P.; Dutra, J. C. N.; Mello, S. A. C.; Becerra, E. A. O.; Massi, M.; Sobrinho, A. S. da Silva

    2013-11-01

    The ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) rubber possesses excellent physical/chemical bulk properties, is cost-effective, and has been used in the mechanical and aerospace industry. However, it has an inert surface and needs a surface treatment in order to improve its adhesion properties. Plasma modification is the most accepted technique for surface modification of polymers without affecting the properties of the bulk. In this study, an afterglow microwave plasma reactor was used to generate the plasma species responsible for the EPDM surface modification. The plasma modified surfaces were analyzed by means of contact angle measurement, adhesion tests, attenuated total reflection-infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Two experimental variables were analyzed: type of the plasma gases and exposure time were considered. The predominant failure mode was adhesive, for long treatment times a mixture of adhesive and cohesive failure can be observed and the best conditions tested there was an increase of the rupture strength of about 27%, that can be associated mainly with the creation of oxygen containing functional groups on the rubber surface (CO, COC and CO) identified by spectroscopic methods. The predominant failure mode was adhesive, for long treatment times a mixture of adhesive and cohesive failure can be observed. In various conditions tested the contact angles easily decreased more than 500%. What can be concluded that high wettability is a necessary condition to obtain good adhesion, but this is not a sufficient condition.

  15. DETERMINATION OF THE INTRINSIC LUMINOSITY TIME CORRELATION IN THE X-RAY AFTERGLOWS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciT

    Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Petrosian, Vahe'; Singal, Jack

    2013-09-10

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which have been observed up to redshifts z Almost-Equal-To 9.5, can be good probes of the early universe and have the potential to test cosmological models. Dainotti's analysis of GRB Swift afterglow light curves with known redshifts and a definite X-ray plateau shows an anti-correlation between the rest-frame time when the plateau ends (the plateau end time) and the calculated luminosity at that time (or approximately an anti-correlation between plateau duration and luminosity). Here, we present an update of this correlation with a larger data sample of 101 GRBs with good light curves. Since some of thismore » correlation could result from the redshift dependences of these intrinsic parameters, namely, their cosmological evolution, we use the Efron-Petrosian method to reveal the intrinsic nature of this correlation. We find that a substantial part of the correlation is intrinsic and describe how we recover it and how this can be used to constrain physical models of the plateau emission, the origin of which is still unknown. The present result could help to clarify the debated nature of the plateau emission.« less

  16. Two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence of atomic oxygen in the afterglow of pulsed positive corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Ryo; Takezawa, Kei; Oda, Tetsuji

    2009-08-01

    Atomic oxygen is measured in the afterglow of pulsed positive corona discharge using time-resolved two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence. The discharge occurs in a 14 mm point-to-plane gap in dry air. After the discharge pulse, the atomic oxygen density decreases at a rate of 5×104 s-1. Simultaneously, ozone density increases at almost the same rate, where the ozone density is measured using laser absorption method. This agreement between the increasing rate of atomic oxygen and decreasing rate of ozone proves that ozone is mainly produced by the well-known three-body reaction, O+O2+M→O3+M. No other process for ozone production such as O2(v)+O2→O3+O is observed. The spatial distribution of atomic oxygen density is in agreement with that of the secondary streamer luminous intensity. This agreement indicates that atomic oxygen is mainly produced in the secondary streamer channels, not in the primary streamer channels.

  17. iPTF Archival Search for Fast Optical Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Anna Y. Q.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Nugent, Peter E.; Zhao, Weijie; Rusu, Florin; Cenko, S. Bradley; Ravi, Vikram; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Perley, Daniel A.; Adams, Scott M.; Bellm, Eric C.; Brady, Patrick; Fremling, Christoffer; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Kann, David Alexander; Kaplan, David; Laher, Russ R.; Masci, Frank; Ofek, Eran O.; Sollerman, Jesper; Urban, Alex

    2018-02-01

    There has been speculation about a class of relativistic explosions with an initial Lorentz factor Γinit smaller than that of classical gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). These “dirty fireballs” would lack prompt GRB emission but could be pursued via their optical afterglow, appearing as transients that fade overnight. Here we report a search for such transients (that fade by 5-σ in magnitude overnight) in four years of archival photometric data from the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF). Our search criteria yielded 50 candidates. Of these, two were afterglows to GRBs that had been found in dedicated follow-up observations to triggers from the Fermi GRB Monitor. Another (iPTF14yb) was a GRB afterglow discovered serendipitously. Eight were spurious artifacts of reference image subtraction, and one was an asteroid. The remaining 38 candidates have red stellar counterparts in external catalogs. The photometric and spectroscopic properties of the counterparts identify these transients as strong flares from M dwarfs of spectral type M3–M7 at distances of d ≈ 0.15–2.1 kpc; three counterparts were already spectroscopically classified as late-type M stars. With iPTF14yb as the only confirmed relativistic outflow discovered independently of a high-energy trigger, we constrain the all-sky rate of transients that peak at m = 18 and fade by Δm = 2 mag in Δt = 3 hr to be 680 {{yr}}-1, with a 68% confidence interval of 119{--}2236 {{yr}}-1. This implies that the rate of visible dirty fireballs is at most comparable to that of the known population of long-duration GRBs.

  18. iPTF Archival Search for Fast Optical Transients

    DOE PAGES

    Ho, Anna Y. Q.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Nugent, Peter E.; ...

    2018-02-09

    There has been speculation about a class of relativistic explosions with an initial Lorentz factor Γ init smaller than that of classical gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). These "dirty fireballs" would lack prompt GRB emission but could be pursued via their optical afterglow, appearing as transients that fade overnight. We report a search for such transients (that fade by 5-σ in magnitude overnight) in four years of archival photometric data from the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF). Our search criteria yielded 50 candidates. Of these, two were afterglows to GRBs that had been found in dedicated follow-up observations to triggers from themore » Fermi GRB Monitor. Another (iPTF14yb) was a GRB afterglow discovered serendipitously. Eight were spurious artifacts of reference image subtraction, and one was an asteroid. The remaining 38 candidates have red stellar counterparts in external catalogs. The photometric and spectroscopic properties of the counterparts identify these transients as strong flares from M dwarfs of spectral type M3-M7 at distances of d ≈ 0.15-2.1 kpc; three counterparts were already spectroscopically classified as late-type M stars. With iPTF14yb as the only confirmed relativistic outflow discovered independently of a high-energy trigger, we constrain the all-sky rate of transients that peak at m = 18 and fade by Δm = 2 mag in Δt = 3 hr to be 680 yr -1, with a 68% confidence interval of 1119-2236 yr -1. This implies that the rate of visible dirty fireballs is at most comparable to that of the known population of long-duration GRBs.« less

  19. Early-Time Excited-State Relaxation Dynamics of Iridium Compounds: Distinct Roles of Electron and Hole Transfer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang-Yang; Zhang, Ya-Hui; Fang, Wei-Hai; Cui, Ganglong

    2018-06-28

    Excited-state and photophysical properties of Ir-containing complexes have been extensively studied because of their potential applications as organic light-emitting diode emitting materials. However, their early time excited-state relaxation dynamics are less explored computationally. Herein we have employed our recently implemented TDDFT-based generalized surface-hopping dynamics method to simulate excited-state relaxation dynamics of three Ir(III) compounds having distinct ligands. According to our multistate dynamics simulations including five excited singlet states i.e., S n ( n = 1-5) and ten excited triplet states, i.e., T n ( n = 1-10), we have found that the intersystem crossing (ISC) processes from the S n to T n are very efficient and ultrafast in these three Ir(III) compounds. The corresponding ISC rates are estimated to be 65, 81, and 140 fs, which are reasonably close to the experimentally measured ca. 80, 80, and 110 fs. In addition, the internal conversion (IC) processes within respective singlet and triplet manifolds are also ultrafast. These ultrafast IC and ISC processes are caused by large nonadiabatic and spin-orbit couplings, respectively, as well as small energy gaps. Importantly, although these Ir(III) complexes share similar macroscopic phenomena, i.e., ultrafast IC and ISC, their microscopic excited-state relaxation mechanism and dynamics are qualitatively distinct. Specifically, the dynamical behaviors of electron and hole and their roles are variational in modulating the excited-state relaxation dynamics of these Ir(III) compounds. In other words, the electronic properties of the ligands that are coordinated with the central Ir(III) atom play important roles in regulating the microscopic excited-state relaxation dynamics. These gained insights could be useful for rationally designing Ir(III) compounds with excellent photoluminescence.

  20. Modeling and simulation of blast-induced, early-time intracranial wave physics leading to traumatic brain injury.

    SciT

    Ford, Corey C.; Taylor, Paul Allen

    The objective of this modeling and simulation study was to establish the role of stress wave interactions in the genesis of traumatic brain injury (TBI) from exposure to explosive blast. A high resolution (1 mm{sup 3} voxels), 5 material model of the human head was created by segmentation of color cryosections from the Visible Human Female dataset. Tissue material properties were assigned from literature values. The model was inserted into the shock physics wave code, CTH, and subjected to a simulated blast wave of 1.3 MPa (13 bars) peak pressure from anterior, posterior and lateral directions. Three dimensional plots ofmore » maximum pressure, volumetric tension, and deviatoric (shear) stress demonstrated significant differences related to the incident blast geometry. In particular, the calculations revealed focal brain regions of elevated pressure and deviatoric (shear) stress within the first 2 milliseconds of blast exposure. Calculated maximum levels of 15 KPa deviatoric, 3.3 MPa pressure, and 0.8 MPa volumetric tension were observed before the onset of significant head accelerations. Over a 2 msec time course, the head model moved only 1 mm in response to the blast loading. Doubling the blast strength changed the resulting intracranial stress magnitudes but not their distribution. We conclude that stress localization, due to early time wave interactions, may contribute to the development of multifocal axonal injury underlying TBI. We propose that a contribution to traumatic brain injury from blast exposure, and most likely blunt impact, can occur on a time scale shorter than previous model predictions and before the onset of linear or rotational accelerations traditionally associated with the development of TBI.« less

  1. Continued Brightening of the Afterglow of GW170817/GRB 170817A as Being Due to a Delayed Energy Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bing; Li, Long-Biao; Huang, Yong-Feng; Geng, Jin-Jun; Yu, Yong-Bo; Song, Li-Ming

    2018-05-01

    The brightness of the multi-wavelength afterglow of GRB 170817A is increasing unexpectedly even ∼160 days after the associated gravitational burst. Here we suggest that the brightening can be caused by a late-time energy injection process. We use an empirical expression to mimic the evolution of the injection luminosity, which consists of a power-law rising phase and a power-law decreasing phase. It is found that the power-law indices of the two phases are 0.92 and ‑2.8, respectively, with the peak time of the injection being ∼110 days. The energy injection could be due to some kind of accretion, with the total accreted mass being ∼0.006 M ⊙. However, normal fall-back accretion, which usually lasts for a much shorter period, cannot provide a natural explanation. Our best-fit decay index of ‑2.8 is also at odds with the expected value of ‑5/3 for normal fall-back accretion. Noting that the expansion velocities of the kilonova components associated with GW170817 are 0.1–0.3 c, we argue that there should also be some ejecta with correspondingly lower velocities during the coalescence of the double neutron star (NS) system. They are bound by the gravitational well of the remnant central compact object and might be accreted at a timescale of about 100 days, providing a reasonable explanation for the energy injection. Detailed studies on the long-lasting brightening of GRB 170817A thus may provide useful information on matter ejection during the merger process of binary neutron stars.

  2. Memory effects in the afterglow: open questions on long-lived species and the role of surface processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovic, Z. Lj; Markovic, V. Lj; Pejovic, M. M.; Gocic, S. R.

    2001-06-01

    The memory effect, the phenomenon that some active species survive very long afterglow periods and affect subsequent breakdown, was observed more than 40 years ago. The effects have been observed even over periods of several hours. Attempts to explain the memory effect in nitrogen were mostly based on hypothetical metastables and on the A3Σ state. However, such explanations had to neglect some quenching processes which are known to be very effective under the conditions of the experiments. The explanation based on atoms remaining from the previous discharge and recombining on the cathode to produce initial electrons was shown to be fully consistent with all the experimental data for nitrogen including a wide range of pressures and the addition of oxygen impurities. The memory effect was also shown to be sensitive to the work function of the cathode material. Thus, an attempt was made to use the memory effect as a diagnostic tool to establish the data on the dominant loss of nitrogen atoms from the discharge which is recombination on the walls of the tube. However, a possible role of higher vibrational levels has not been fully addressed, mainly due to the shortage of data. On the other hand, the memory effect which was observed for rare gases cannot be explained on the basis of the standard data unless the presence of molecular impurities is invoked. Another open issue would be the role of charges accumulated on the glass surfaces and whether those may be released to the gas phase. The aim of this paper is to summarize the achievements of the model based on atom recombination and to point out how the breakdown model associated with the memory effect may be completed and how it may be applied in practical discharges.

  3. Ultrasensitive Ambient Mass Spectrometric Analysis with a Pin-to-Capillary Flowing Atmospheric-Pressure Afterglow Source

    PubMed Central

    Shelley, Jacob T.; Wiley, Joshua S.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2011-01-01

    The advent of ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry has resulted in a strong interest in ionization sources that are capable of direct analyte sampling and ionization. One source that has enjoyed increasing interest is the Flowing Atmospheric-Pressure Afterglow (FAPA). FAPA has been proven capable of directly desorbing/ionizing samples in any phase (solid, liquid, or gas) and with impressive limits of detection (<100 fmol). The FAPA was also shown to be less affected by competitive-ionization matrix effects than other plasma-based sources. However, the original FAPA design exhibited substantial background levels, cluttered background spectra in the negative-ion mode, and significant oxidation of aromatic analytes, which ultimately compromised analyte identification and quantification. In the present study, a change in the FAPA configuration from a pin-to-plate to a pin-to-capillary geometry was found to vastly improve performance. Background signals in positive- and negative-ionization modes were reduced by 89% and 99%, respectively. Additionally, the capillary anode strongly reduced the amount of atomic oxygen that could cause oxidation of analytes. Temperatures of the gas stream that interacts with the sample, which heavily influences desorption capabilities, were compared between the two sources by means of IR thermography. The performance of the new FAPA configuration is evaluated through the determination of a variety of compounds in positive- and negative-ion mode, including agrochemicals and explosives. A detection limit of 4 amol was found for the direct determination of the agrochemical ametryn, and appears to be spectrometer-limited. The ability to quickly screen for analytes in bulk liquid samples with the pin-to-capillary FAPA is also shown. PMID:21627097

  4. Formation of Pyrylium from Aromatic Systems with a Helium:Oxygen Flowing Atmospheric Pressure Afterglow (FAPA) Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badal, Sunil P.; Ratcliff, Tyree D.; You, Yi; Breneman, Curt M.; Shelley, Jacob T.

    2017-06-01

    The effects of oxygen addition on a helium-based flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) ionization source are explored. Small amounts of oxygen doped into the helium discharge gas resulted in an increase in abundance of protonated water clusters by at least three times. A corresponding increase in protonated analyte signal was also observed for small polar analytes, such as methanol and acetone. Meanwhile, most other reagent ions (e.g., O2 +·, NO+, etc.) significantly decrease in abundance with even 0.1% v/v oxygen in the discharge gas. Interestingly, when analytes that contained aromatic constituents were subjected to a He:O2-FAPA, a unique (M + 3)+ ion resulted, while molecular or protonated molecular ions were rarely detected. Exact-mass measurements revealed that these (M + 3)+ ions correspond to (M - CH + O)+, with the most likely structure being pyrylium. Presence of pyrylium-based ions was further confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry of the (M + 3)+ ion compared with that of a commercially available salt. Lastly, rapid and efficient production of pyrylium in the gas phase was used to convert benzene into pyridine. Though this pyrylium-formation reaction has not been shown before, the reaction is rapid and efficient. Potential reactant species, which could lead to pyrylium formation, were determined from reagent-ion mass spectra. Thermodynamic evaluation of reaction pathways was aided by calculation of the formation enthalpy for pyrylium, which was found to be 689.8 kJ/mol. Based on these results, we propose that this reaction is initiated by ionized ozone (O3 +·), proceeds similarly to ozonolysis, and results in the neutral loss of the stable CHO2 · radical. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Ultrasensitive ambient mass spectrometric analysis with a pin-to-capillary flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow source.

    PubMed

    Shelley, Jacob T; Wiley, Joshua S; Hieftje, Gary M

    2011-07-15

    The advent of ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry has resulted in a strong interest in ionization sources that are capable of direct analyte sampling and ionization. One source that has enjoyed increasing interest is the flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA). The FAPA has been proven capable of directly desorbing/ionizing samples in any phase (solid, liquid, or gas) and with impressive limits of detection (<100 fmol). The FAPA was also shown to be less affected by competitive-ionization matrix effects than other plasma-based sources. However, the original FAPA design exhibited substantial background levels, cluttered background spectra in the negative-ion mode, and significant oxidation of aromatic analytes, which ultimately compromised analyte identification and quantification. In the present study, a change in the FAPA configuration from a pin-to-plate to a pin-to-capillary geometry was found to vastly improve performance. Background signals in positive- and negative-ionization modes were reduced by 89% and 99%, respectively. Additionally, the capillary anode strongly reduced the amount of atomic oxygen that could cause oxidation of analytes. Temperatures of the gas stream that interacts with the sample, which heavily influences desorption capabilities, were compared between the two sources by means of IR thermography. The performance of the new FAPA configuration is evaluated through the determination of a variety of compounds in positive- and negative-ion mode, including agrochemicals and explosives. A detection limit of 4 amol was found for the direct determination of the agrochemical ametryn and appears to be spectrometer-limited. The ability to quickly screen for analytes in bulk liquid samples with the pin-to-capillary FAPA is also shown.

  6. Formation of Pyrylium from Aromatic Systems with a Helium:Oxygen Flowing Atmospheric Pressure Afterglow (FAPA) Plasma Source.

    PubMed

    Badal, Sunil P; Ratcliff, Tyree D; You, Yi; Breneman, Curt M; Shelley, Jacob T

    2017-06-01

    The effects of oxygen addition on a helium-based flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) ionization source are explored. Small amounts of oxygen doped into the helium discharge gas resulted in an increase in abundance of protonated water clusters by at least three times. A corresponding increase in protonated analyte signal was also observed for small polar analytes, such as methanol and acetone. Meanwhile, most other reagent ions (e.g., O 2 +· , NO + , etc.) significantly decrease in abundance with even 0.1% v/v oxygen in the discharge gas. Interestingly, when analytes that contained aromatic constituents were subjected to a He:O 2 -FAPA, a unique (M + 3) + ion resulted, while molecular or protonated molecular ions were rarely detected. Exact-mass measurements revealed that these (M + 3) + ions correspond to (M - CH + O) + , with the most likely structure being pyrylium. Presence of pyrylium-based ions was further confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry of the (M + 3) + ion compared with that of a commercially available salt. Lastly, rapid and efficient production of pyrylium in the gas phase was used to convert benzene into pyridine. Though this pyrylium-formation reaction has not been shown before, the reaction is rapid and efficient. Potential reactant species, which could lead to pyrylium formation, were determined from reagent-ion mass spectra. Thermodynamic evaluation of reaction pathways was aided by calculation of the formation enthalpy for pyrylium, which was found to be 689.8 kJ/mol. Based on these results, we propose that this reaction is initiated by ionized ozone (O 3 +· ), proceeds similarly to ozonolysis, and results in the neutral loss of the stable CHO 2 · radical. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  7. Determination of Intrinsic Slope of the Luminosity-Time Correlation in X-Ray Afterglows of GRBs and its Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dainotti, Maria G.; Petrosian, Vahe'; Ostrowski, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which have been observed up to redshifts z ≈ 9.5 can be good probes of the early universe and have the potential of testing cosmological models. The analysis by Dainotti of GRB Swift afterglow lightcurves with known redshifts and definite X-ray plateau shows an anti-correlation between the rest frame time when the plateau ends (the plateau end time) and the calculated luminosity at that time (or approximately an anti-correlation between plateau duration and luminosity). We present here an update of this correlation with a larger data sample of 101 GRBs with good lightcurves. Since some of this correlation could result from the redshift dependences of these intrinsic parameters, namely their cosmological evolution we use the Efron-Petrosian method to reveal the intrinsic nature of this correlation. We find that a substantial part of the correlation is intrinsic and describe how we recover it and how this can be used to constrain physical models of the plateau emission, whose origin is still unknown. The present result could help clarifing the debated issue about the nature of the plateau emission. This result is very important also for cosmological implications, because in literature so far GRB correlations are not corrected for redshift evolution and selection biases. Therefore we are not aware of their intrinsic slopes and consequently how far the use of the observed correlations can influence the derived `best' cosmological settings. Therefore, we conclude that any approach that involves cosmology should take into consideration only intrinsic correlations not the observed ones.

  8. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of the Afterglow, Supernova and Host Galaxy Associated with the Extremely Bright GRB 130427A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levan, A.J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Fruchter, A. S.; Hjorth, J.; Pian, E.; Mazzali, P.; Hounsell, R. A.; Perley, D. A.; Cano, Z.; Graham, J.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst, GRB 130427A. At z=0.34 this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst (E(sub iso) greater than 10(exp 54) erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated supernova. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability and and invariant PSF of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host and supernova contributions to the observed light approximately 17 rest-frame days after the burst utilising a host subtraction spectrum obtained 1 year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) grism observations show that the associated supernova, SN 2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, vph approximately 15,000 kilometers per second). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN 2010bh (vph approximately 30,000 kilometers per second), but SN 2010bh (vph approximately 30,000 kilometers per second but this SN is significantly fainter, and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated approximately 4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 Solar Mass yr(exp-1)), possibly interacting disc galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it are also strikingly similar to those of GRB980425SN 1998bw. The similarity of supernovae and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.

  9. Prompt optical emission from gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehoe, Robert; Akerlof, Karl; Balsano, Richard; Barthelmy, Scott; Bloch, Jeff; Butterworth, Paul; Casperson, Don; Cline, Tom; Fletcher, Sandra; Frontera, Fillippo; Gisler, Galen; Heise, John; Hills, Jack; Hurley, Kevin; Lee, Brian; Marshall, Stuart; McKay, Tim; Pawl, Andrew; Piro, Luigi; Priedhorsky, Bill; Szymanski, John; Wren, Jim

    The Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE) seeks to measure contemporaneous and early afterglow optical emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The ROTSE-I telescope array has been fully automated and responding to burst alerts from the GRB Coordinates Network since March 1998, taking prompt optical data for 30 bursts in its first year. We will briefly review observations of GRB990123 which revealed the first detection of an optical burst occurring during the gamma-ray emission, reaching 9th magnitude at its peak. In addition, we present here preliminary optical results for seven other gamma-ray bursts. No other optical counterparts were seen in this analysis, and the best limiting senisitivities are mV > 13.0 at 14.7 seconds after the gamma-ray rise, and mmV > 16.4 at 62 minutes. These are the most stringent limits obtained for GRB optical counterpart brightness in the first hour after the burst. This analysis suggests that there is not a strong correlation between optical flux and gamma-ray emission.

  10. Early time excited-state structural evolution of pyranine in methanol revealed by femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanli; Liu, Weimin; Tang, Longteng; Oscar, Breland; Han, Fangyuan; Fang, Chong

    2013-07-25

    To understand chemical reactivity of molecules in condensed phase in real time, a structural dynamics technique capable of monitoring molecular conformational motions on their intrinsic time scales, typically on femtoseconds to picoseconds, is needed. We have studied a strong photoacid pyranine (8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid, HPTS, pK(a)* ≈ 0) in pure methanol and observed that excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) is absent, in sharp contrast with our previous work on HPTS in aqueous solutions wherein ESPT prevails following photoexcitation. Two transient vibrational marker bands at ~1477 (1454) and 1532 (1528) cm(-1) appear in CH3OH (CD3OD), respectively, rising within the instrument response time of ~140 fs and decaying with 390-470 (490-1400) fs and ~200 ps time constants in CH3OH (CD3OD). We attribute the mode onset to small-scale coherent proton motion along the pre-existing H-bonding chain between HPTS and methanol, and the two decay stages to the low-frequency skeletal motion-modulated Franck-Condon relaxation within ~1 ps and subsequent rotational diffusion of H-bonding partners in solution before fluorescence. The early time kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of ~3 upon methanol deuteration argues active proton motions particularly within the first few picoseconds when coherent skeletal motions are underdamped. Pronounced quantum beats are observed for high-frequency modes consisting of strong phenolic COH rocking (1532 cm(-1)) or H-out-of-plane wagging motions (952 cm(-1)) due to anharmonic coupling to coherent low-frequency modes impulsively excited at ca. 96, 120, and 168 cm(-1). The vivid illustration of atomic motions of HPTS in varying H-bonding geometry with neighboring methanol molecules unravels the multidimensional energy relaxation pathways immediately following photoexcitation, and provides compelling evidence that, in lieu of ESPT, the photoacidity of HPTS promptly activates characteristic low-frequency skeletal motions to search phase

  11. Characterizing a fast-response, low-afterglow liquid scintillator for neutron time-of-flight diagnostics in fast ignition experiments.

    PubMed

    Abe, Y; Hosoda, H; Arikawa, Y; Nagai, T; Kojima, S; Sakata, S; Inoue, H; Iwasa, Y; Iwano, K; Yamanoi, K; Fujioka, S; Nakai, M; Sarukura, N; Shiraga, H; Norimatsu, T; Azechi, H

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics of oxygen-enriched liquid scintillators with very low afterglow are investigated and optimized for application to a single-hit neutron spectrometer for fast ignition experiments. It is found that 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene has better characteristics as a liquid scintillator solvent than the conventional solvent, p-xylene. In addition, a benzophenon-doped BBQ liquid scintillator is shown to demonstrate very rapid time response, and therefore has potential for further use in neutron diagnostics with fast time resolution.

  12. Theoretical study of the A prime 5Sigma(+)g and C double prime 5Pi u states of N2 - Implications for the N2 afterglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Schwenke, David W.

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical spectroscopic constants are reported for the A prime 5Sigma(+)g and C double prime 5Pi u states of N2 based on CASSCF/MRCI calculations using large ANO Gaussian basis sets. The calculated A prime Sigma(+)g potential differs qualitatively from previous calculations in that the inner well is significantly deeper (De = 3450/cm). This deeper well provides considerable support for the suggestion of Berkowitz et al. (1956) that A prime 5Sigma(+)g is the primary precursor state involved in the yellow Lewis-Rayleigh afterglow of N2.

  13. Optical study of the counterpart to GRB 990712

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorosabel, J.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Saizar, P.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Bond, I. A.; Yock, P.; Hearnshaw, J.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Muraki, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Ohnishi, K.; Reid, M.; Saito, To; Noda, S.

    2000-09-01

    Quasi-simultaneous BVR-band observations performed from New Zealand and Argentina ~16 hr after the burst clearly detected the optical counterpart to GR-B 990712. Based on these measurements we construct the optical multi-band spectrum. We report that the spectrum between the R and B bands follows a power law Fv~νβ with index β=-0.50+/-0.16. The spectrum is consistent with a stretch of an afterglow spectrum between the peak frequency, νm, and the cooling break, νc. The photon index derived following the model of Sari et al. (1998), p=2.36+/-0.08 is compatible with β and the power law decay, α, only if no absorption is introduced. Thus, our results support that GRB 990712 occurred in a low density region, resembling GRB 970508. .

  14. BEAM ON TARGET MODEL Produces All Gamma Ray Burst Phenomena Including Afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greyber, H.

    2000-12-01

    While one must applaud the splendid research by L. Piro et al and L. Amati et al reported in SCIENCE recently, one must question, as M. Rees and S. Woolsey have done, their conclusion that a ``supranova model" is the only explanation for these new X-ray observations. In fact L. Piro was quoted as saying, ``Our data helps rule out the scenario where two neutron stars or black holes collide. We think GRBs result from something similar to a supernova explosion, but much more powerful." A relatively unknown physical model for GRBs, Greyber's Beam On Target model (BOT), dating back to the first CGRO observations, can plausibly explain the iron emission lines observed for GRB991216, and also the mass of the dense medium within a light-day of the GRB being roughly equivalent to at least one-tenth solar mass, as well as the initial shedding of material followed by the GRB event. When a galaxy forms under gravitational collapse in the presence of a primordial magnetic field, Mestel and Strittmatter demonstrated that, for finite Ohmic diffusion, a growing equatorial current loop is formed. Even if this stable ``Storage Ring" has only 10exp-9 of the total energy released during a typical galaxy's formation, the relativistic beam can possess 10exp58 ergs. The GRB ``fireball" occurs when a target star races across the powerful beam, blowing off target material as a hot, rapidly expanding plasma cloud, simulating an explosion. Since currents in space are known to be sometimes filamentary, sharp millisecond spikes can be expected in some GRBs. Proton and alpha particle nuclear reactions produce a gamma ray beam. Beam particles impinging on denser cloud material create an electromagnetic shower, producing X-ray, optical and radio radiation. Since the Storage Ring has an intense magnetic field around it, synchrotron radiation is expected. The beam, striking a highly evolved massive target star, produces the iron emission lines. H. D. Greyber, in ``After the Dark Ages:When Galaxies

  15. Comparing Time Domain Electromagnetics (TEM) and Early-Time TEM for Mapping Highly Conductive Groundwater in Mars Analog Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jernsletten, J. A.

    2005-05-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of (diffusive) Time Domain Electromagnetics (TEM) for sounding of subsurface water in conductive Mars analog environments. To provide a baseline for such studies, I show data from two field studies: 1) Diffusive sounding data (TEM) from Pima County, Arizona; and 2) Shallower sounding data using the Fast-Turnoff TEM method from Peña de Hierro in the Rio Tinto region of Spain. The latter is data from work conducted under the auspices of the Mars Analog Research and Technology Experiment (MARTE). Pima County TEM Survey: A TEM survey was carried out in Pima County, Arizona, in January 2003. Data was collected using 100 m Tx loops and a ferrite-cored magnetic coil Rx antenna, and processed using commercial software. The survey used a 16 Hz sounding frequency, which is sensitive to slightly salty groundwater. Prominent features in the data from Arizona are the ~500 m depth of investigation and the ~120 m depth to the water table, confirmed by data from four USGS test wells surrounding the field area. Note also the conductive (~20-40 ω m) clay-rich soil above the water table. Rio Tinto Fast-Turnoff TEM Survey: During May and June of 2003, a Fast-Turnoff (early time) TEM survey was carried out at the Peña de Hierro field area of the MARTE project, near the town of Nerva, Spain. Data was collected using 20 m and 40 m Tx loop antennae and 10 m loop Rx antennae, with a 32 Hz sounding frequency. Data from Line 4 (of 16) from this survey, collected using 40 m Tx loops, show ~200 m depth of investigation and a conductive high at ~90 m depth below Station 20 (second station of 10 along this line). This is the water table, matching the 431 m MSL elevation of the nearby pit lake. The center of the "pileup" below Station 60 is spatially coincident with the vertical fault plane located here. Data from Line 15 and Line 14 of the Rio Tinto survey, collected using 20 m Tx loops, achieve ~50 m depth of investigation and

  16. Temporal Evolution of the Gamma-ray Burst Afterglow Spectrum for an Observer: GeV-TeV Synchrotron Self-Compton Light Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Takuma; To, Sho; Asano, Katsuaki; Fujita, Yutaka

    2017-08-01

    We numerically simulate the gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow emission with a one-zone time-dependent code. The temporal evolutions of the decelerating shocked shell and energy distributions of electrons and photons are consistently calculated. The photon spectrum and light curves for an observer are obtained taking into account the relativistic propagation of the shocked shell and the curvature of the emission surface. We find that the onset time of the afterglow is significantly earlier than the previous analytical estimate. The analytical formulae of the shock propagation and light curve for the radiative case are also different from our results. Our results show that even if the emission mechanism is switching from synchrotron to synchrotron self-Compton, the gamma-ray light curves can be a smooth power law, which agrees with the observed light curve and the late detection of a 32 GeV photon in GRB 130427A. The uncertainty of the model parameters obtained with the analytical formula is discussed, especially in connection with the closure relation between spectral index and decay index.

  17. Kinetic study on non-thermal volumetric plasma decay in the early afterglow of air discharge generated by a short pulse microwave or laser

    SciT

    Yang, Wei, E-mail: yangwei861212@126.com; Zhou, Qianhong; Dong, Zhiwei

    This paper reports a kinetic study on non-thermal plasma decay in the early afterglow of air discharge generated by short pulse microwave or laser. A global self-consistent model is based on the particle balance of complex plasma chemistry, electron energy equation, and gas thermal balance equation. Electron-ion Coulomb collision is included in the steady state Boltzmann equation solver to accurately describe the electron mobility and other transport coefficients. The model is used to simulate the afterglow of microsecond to nanosecond pulse microwave discharge in N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and air, as well as femtosecond laser filament discharge in dry andmore » humid air. The simulated results for electron density decay are in quantitative agreement with the available measured ones. The evolution of plasma decay under an external electric field is also investigated, and the effect of gas heating is considered. The underlying mechanism of plasma density decay is unveiled through the above kinetic modeling.« less

  18. Investigation and Applications of In-Source Oxidation in Liquid Sampling-Atmospheric Pressure Afterglow Microplasma Ionization (LS-APAG) Source.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaobo; Wang, Zhenpeng; Li, Yafeng; Zhan, Lingpeng; Nie, Zongxiu

    2017-06-01

    A liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure afterglow microplasma ionization (LS-APAG) source is presented for the first time, which is embedded with both electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure afterglow microplasma ionization (APAG) techniques. This ion source is capable of analyzing compounds with diverse molecule weights and polarities. An unseparated mixture sample was detected as a proof-of-concept, giving complementary information (both polarities and non-polarities) with the two ionization modes. It should also be noted that molecular mass can be quickly identified by ESI with clean and simple spectra, while the structure can be directly studied using APAG with in-source oxidation. The ionization/oxidation mechanism and applications of the LS-APAG source have been further explored in the analysis of nonpolar alkanes and unsaturated fatty acids/esters. A unique [M + O - 3H] + was observed in the case of individual alkanes (C 5 -C 19 ) and complex hydrocarbons mixture under optimized conditions. Moreover, branched alkanes generated significant in-source fragments, which could be further applied to the discrimination of isomeric alkanes. The technique also facilitates facile determination of double bond positions in unsaturated fatty acids/esters due to diagnostic fragments (the acid/ester-containing aldehyde and acid oxidation products) generated by on-line ozonolysis in APAG mode. Finally, some examples of in situ APAG analysis by gas sampling and surface sampling were given as well. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  19. Investigation and Applications of In-Source Oxidation in Liquid Sampling-Atmospheric Pressure Afterglow Microplasma Ionization (LS-APAG) Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaobo; Wang, Zhenpeng; Li, Yafeng; Zhan, Lingpeng; Nie, Zongxiu

    2017-06-01

    A liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure afterglow microplasma ionization (LS-APAG) source is presented for the first time, which is embedded with both electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure afterglow microplasma ionization (APAG) techniques. This ion source is capable of analyzing compounds with diverse molecule weights and polarities. An unseparated mixture sample was detected as a proof-of-concept, giving complementary information (both polarities and non-polarities) with the two ionization modes. It should also be noted that molecular mass can be quickly identified by ESI with clean and simple spectra, while the structure can be directly studied using APAG with in-source oxidation. The ionization/oxidation mechanism and applications of the LS-APAG source have been further explored in the analysis of nonpolar alkanes and unsaturated fatty acids/esters. A unique [M + O - 3H]+ was observed in the case of individual alkanes (C5-C19) and complex hydrocarbons mixture under optimized conditions. Moreover, branched alkanes generated significant in-source fragments, which could be further applied to the discrimination of isomeric alkanes. The technique also facilitates facile determination of double bond positions in unsaturated fatty acids/esters due to diagnostic fragments (the acid/ester-containing aldehyde and acid oxidation products) generated by on-line ozonolysis in APAG mode. Finally, some examples of in situ APAG analysis by gas sampling and surface sampling were given as well. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Temporal Evolution of the Gamma-ray Burst Afterglow Spectrum for an Observer: GeV–TeV Synchrotron Self-Compton Light Curve

    SciT

    Fukushima, Takuma; Fujita, Yutaka; To, Sho

    We numerically simulate the gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow emission with a one-zone time-dependent code. The temporal evolutions of the decelerating shocked shell and energy distributions of electrons and photons are consistently calculated. The photon spectrum and light curves for an observer are obtained taking into account the relativistic propagation of the shocked shell and the curvature of the emission surface. We find that the onset time of the afterglow is significantly earlier than the previous analytical estimate. The analytical formulae of the shock propagation and light curve for the radiative case are also different from our results. Our results showmore » that even if the emission mechanism is switching from synchrotron to synchrotron self-Compton, the gamma-ray light curves can be a smooth power law, which agrees with the observed light curve and the late detection of a 32 GeV photon in GRB 130427A. The uncertainty of the model parameters obtained with the analytical formula is discussed, especially in connection with the closure relation between spectral index and decay index.« less

  1. Early-Time Symmetry Tuning in the Presence of Cross-Beam Energy Transfer in ICF Experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Dewald, E. L.; Milovich, J. L.; Michel, P.; ...

    2013-12-01

    At the National Ignition Facility (NIF) we have successfully tuned the early time (~2 ns) lowest order Legendre mode (P 2) of the incoming radiation drive asymmetry of indirectly driven ignition capsule implosions by varying the inner power cone fraction. The measured P 2/P 0 sensitivity vs come fraction is similar to calculations, but a significant -15 to -20% P 2/P 0 offset was observed. This can be explained by a considerable early time laser energy transfer from the outer to the inner beams during the laser burn-through of the Laser Entrance Hole (LEH) windows and hohlraum fill gas whenmore » the LEH plasma is still dense and relatively cold.« less

  2. The optical rebrightening of GRB100814A: an interplay of forward and reverse shocks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pasquale, Massimiliano; Kuin, N. P. M.; Oates, S.; Schulze, S.; Cano, Z.; Guidorzi, C.; Beardmore, A.; Evans, P. A.; Uhm, Z. L.; Zhang, B.; Page, M.; Kobayashi, S.; Castro-Tirado, A.; Gorosabel, J.; Sakamoto, T.; Fatkhullin, T.; Pandey, S. B.; Im, M.; Chandra, P.; Frail, D.; Gao, H.; Kopač, D.; Jeon, Y.; Akerlof, C.; Huang, K. Y.; Pak, S.; Park, W.-K.; Gomboc, A.; Melandri, A.; Zane, S.; Mundell, C. G.; Saxton, C. J.; Holland, S. T.; Virgili, F.; Urata, Y.; Steele, I.; Bersier, D.; Tanvir, N.; Sokolov, V. V.; Moskvitin, A. S.

    2015-05-01

    We present a wide data set of gamma-ray, X-ray, UV/Opt/IR (UVOIR), and radio observations of the Swift GRB100814A. At the end of the slow decline phase of the X-ray and optical afterglow, this burst shows a sudden and prominent rebrightening in the optical band only, followed by a fast decay in both bands. The optical rebrightening also shows chromatic evolution. Such a puzzling behaviour cannot be explained by a single component model. We discuss other possible interpretations, and we find that a model that incorporates a long-lived reverse shock and forward shock fits the temporal and spectral properties of GRB100814 the best.

  3. Drop-on-demand sample introduction system coupled with the flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow for direct molecular analysis of complex liquid micro-volume samples

    PubMed Central

    Schaper, J. Niklas; Pfeuffer, Kevin P.; Shelley, Jacob T.; Bings, Nicolas H.

    2012-01-01

    One of the fastest developing fields in analytical spectrochemistry in recent years is ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS). This burgeoning interest has been due to the demonstrated advantages of the method: simple mass spectra, little or no sample preparation, and applicability to samples in the solid, liquid, or gaseous state. One such ADI-MS source, the flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA), is capable of direct analysis of solids just by aiming the source at the solid surface and sampling the produced ions into a mass spectrometer. However, direct introduction of significant volumes of liquid samples into this source has not been possible, as solvent loads can quench the afterglow and, thus, the formation of reagent ions. As a result, the analysis of liquid samples is preferably carried out by analyzing dried residues or by desorbing small amounts of liquid samples directly from the liquid surface. In the former case, reproducibility of sample introduction is crucial if quantitative results are desired. In the present study, introduction of liquid samples as very small droplets helps overcome the issues of sample positioning and reduced levels of solvent intake. A recently developed “drop-on-demand” (DOD) aerosol generator is capable of reproducibly producing very small volumes of liquid (~17 pL). In this paper, the coupling of FAPA-MS and DOD is reported and applications are suggested. Analytes representing different classes of substances were tested and limits of detections were determined. Matrix tolerance was investigated for drugs of abuse and their metabolites by analyzing raw urine samples and quantification without the use of internal standards. Limits of detection below 2 µg/mL, without sample pretreatment, were obtained. PMID:23025277

  4. Drop-on-demand sample introduction system coupled with the flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow for direct molecular analysis of complex liquid microvolume samples.

    PubMed

    Schaper, J Niklas; Pfeuffer, Kevin P; Shelley, Jacob T; Bings, Nicolas H; Hieftje, Gary M

    2012-11-06

    One of the fastest developing fields in analytical spectrochemistry in recent years is ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS). This burgeoning interest has been due to the demonstrated advantages of the method: simple mass spectra, little or no sample preparation, and applicability to samples in the solid, liquid, or gaseous state. One such ADI-MS source, the flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA), is capable of direct analysis of solids just by aiming the source at the solid surface and sampling the produced ions into a mass spectrometer. However, direct introduction of significant volumes of liquid samples into this source has not been possible, as solvent loads can quench the afterglow and, thus, the formation of reagent ions. As a result, the analysis of liquid samples is preferably carried out by analyzing dried residues or by desorbing small amounts of liquid samples directly from the liquid surface. In the former case, reproducibility of sample introduction is crucial if quantitative results are desired. In the present study, introduction of liquid samples as very small droplets helps overcome the issues of sample positioning and reduced levels of solvent intake. A recently developed "drop-on-demand" (DOD) aerosol generator is capable of reproducibly producing very small volumes of liquid (∼17 pL). In this paper, the coupling of FAPA-MS and DOD is reported and applications are suggested. Analytes representing different classes of substances were tested and limits of detections were determined. Matrix tolerance was investigated for drugs of abuse and their metabolites by analyzing raw urine samples and quantification without the use of internal standards. Limits of detection below 2 μg/mL, without sample pretreatment, were obtained.

  5. ZnO:Zn/6LiF scintillator-A low afterglow alternative to ZnS:Ag/6LiF for thermal neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykora, G. Jeff; Schooneveld, Erik M.; Rhodes, Nigel J.

    2018-03-01

    Current ZnS:Ag/6LiF based scintillation detectors are often count rate limited by the long lifetime afterglow in the scintillator. Despite this drawback, new instruments at neutron scattering facilities, like ISIS in the UK, would still like to use ZnS:Ag/6LiF detectors due to their low gamma sensitivity, high light output, simplicity of detector design and relatively inexpensive production. One particular advantage of ZnS:Ag/6LiF detectors is their ability to provide strong pulse shape discrimination between neutrons and gammas. Despite the advantages of these detectors, it is becoming clear that new and upgraded instruments will be limited by the count rate capability of ZnS:Ag/6LiF, so an alternative scintillator technology with equivalent simplicity is being sought. ZnO:Zn/6LiF is investigated here as a low afterglow alternative to ZnS:Ag/6LiF. Basic scintillation properties of ZnO:Zn are studied and are discussed. Pulse shape discrimination between neutrons and gammas is explored and taken advantage of through simple single photon counting methods. A further step toward a realistic detector for neutron scattering is also taken by fiber coupling the ZnO:Zn/6LiF to a PMT. In an initial study of this fiber coupled configuration, 60Co gamma sensitivity of ∼ 7 × 10-6 is shown and improvements in count rate capability of at least a factor of 6 over ZnS:Ag/6LiF based neutron detectors are demonstrated.

  6. Can a Double Component Outflow Explain the X-Ray and Optical Lightcurves of Swift Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Pasquale, Massimiliano; Evans, P.; Oates, S.; Page, M.; Zane, S.; Schady, P.; Breeveld, A.; Holland, S.; Still, M.

    2011-01-01

    An increasing sample of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) observed by Swift show evidence of 'chromatic breaks', i.e. breaks that are present in the X-ray but not in the optical. We find that in a significant fraction of these GRB afterglows the X-ray and the optical emission cannot be produced by the same component. We propose that these afterglow lightcurves are the result of a two-component jet, in which both components undergo energy injection for the whole observation and the X-ray break is due to a jet break in the narrow outflow. Bursts with chromatic breaks also explain another surprising finding, the paucity of late achromatic breaks. We propose a model that may explain the behaviour of GRB emission in both X-ray and optical bands. This model can be a radical and noteworthy alternative to the current interpretation for the 'canonical' XRT and UVOT lightcurves, and it bears fundamental implications for GRB physics.

  7. Limits on Optical Polarization during the Prompt Phase of GRB 140430A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopač, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Japelj, J.; Arnold, D. M.; Steele, I. A.; Guidorzi, C.; Dichiara, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Gomboc, A.; Harrison, R. M.; Lamb, G. P.; Melandri, A.; Smith, R. J.; Virgili, F. J.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gorosabel, J.; Järvinen, A.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Oates, S. R.; Jelínek, M.

    2015-11-01

    Gamma-ray burst GRB 140430A was detected by the Swift satellite and observed promptly with the imaging polarimeter RINGO3 mounted on the Liverpool Telescope, with observations beginning while the prompt γ-ray emission was still ongoing. In this paper, we present densely sampled (10-s temporal resolution) early optical light curves (LCs) in 3 optical bands and limits to the degree of optical polarization. We compare optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray properties and present an analysis of the optical emission during a period of high-energy flaring. The complex optical LC cannot be explained merely with a combination of forward and reverse shock emission from a standard external shock, implying additional contribution of emission from internal shock dissipation. We estimate an upper limit for time averaged optical polarization during the prompt phase to be as low as P < 12% (1σ). This suggests that the optical flares and early afterglow emission in this GRB are not highly polarized. Alternatively, time averaging could mask the presence of otherwise polarized components of distinct origin at different polarization position angles.

  8. Early-time radiation flux symmetry optimization and its effect on gas-filled hohlraum ignition targets on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovich, J. L.; Dewald, E. L.; Pak, A.; Michel, P.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Landen, O.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Achieving ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is tied to our ability to control and minimize deviations from sphericity of the capsule implosion. Low-mode asymmetries of the hot spot result from the combined effect of radiation drive asymmetries throughout the laser pulse and initial roughness on the capsule surface. In this paper, we report on simulations and experiments designed to assess, measure, and correct the drive asymmetries produced by the early-time (≈first 2 ns or "picket") period of the laser pulse. The drive asymmetry during the picket is commonly thought to introduce distortions in the hot-spot shape at ignition time. However, a more subtle effect not previously considered is that it also leads to an asymmetry in shock velocity and timing, thereby increasing the fuel adiabat and reducing the margin for ignition. It is shown via hydrodynamic simulations that minimizing this effect requires that the early-time asymmetry be kept below 7.5% in the second Legendre mode (P2), thus keeping the loss of performance margin below ≈10% for a layered implosion. Asymmetries during the picket of the laser pulse are measured using the instantaneous self-emission of a high-Z re-emission sphere in place of an ignition capsule in a hohlraum with large azimuthal diagnostic windows. Three dimensional simulations using the code HYDRA (to capture the effect of non-azimuthal hohlraum features) coupled to a cross-beam energy transfer model [Michel et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056305 (2010)] are used to establish the surrogacy of the re-emit target and to assess the early-time drive symmetry. Calculations using this model exhibit the same sensitivity to variations in the relative input powers between the different cones of NIF beams as measured for the "Rev5" CH target [Haan et al., Phys Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)] and reported by Dewald et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 235001 (2013)]. The same methodology applied to recently improved implosions using different

  9. Early-time radiation flux symmetry optimization and its effect on gas-filled hohlraum ignition targets on the National Ignition Facility

    SciT

    Milovich, J. L., E-mail: milovich1@llnl.gov; Dewald, E. L.; Pak, A.

    2016-03-15

    Achieving ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is tied to our ability to control and minimize deviations from sphericity of the capsule implosion. Low-mode asymmetries of the hot spot result from the combined effect of radiation drive asymmetries throughout the laser pulse and initial roughness on the capsule surface. In this paper, we report on simulations and experiments designed to assess, measure, and correct the drive asymmetries produced by the early-time (≈first 2 ns or “picket”) period of the laser pulse. The drive asymmetry during the picket is commonly thought to introduce distortions in the hot-spot shape at ignition time.more » However, a more subtle effect not previously considered is that it also leads to an asymmetry in shock velocity and timing, thereby increasing the fuel adiabat and reducing the margin for ignition. It is shown via hydrodynamic simulations that minimizing this effect requires that the early-time asymmetry be kept below 7.5% in the second Legendre mode (P{sub 2}), thus keeping the loss of performance margin below ≈10% for a layered implosion. Asymmetries during the picket of the laser pulse are measured using the instantaneous self-emission of a high-Z re-emission sphere in place of an ignition capsule in a hohlraum with large azimuthal diagnostic windows. Three dimensional simulations using the code HYDRA (to capture the effect of non-azimuthal hohlraum features) coupled to a cross-beam energy transfer model [Michel et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056305 (2010)] are used to establish the surrogacy of the re-emit target and to assess the early-time drive symmetry. Calculations using this model exhibit the same sensitivity to variations in the relative input powers between the different cones of NIF beams as measured for the “Rev5” CH target [Haan et al., Phys Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)] and reported by Dewald et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 235001 (2013)]. The same methodology applied to recently improved

  10. Towards depth profiling of organic aerosols in real time using aerosol flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow mass spectrometry (AeroFAPA-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüggemann, Martin; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2014-05-01

    Organic aerosol accounts for a substantial fraction of tropospheric aerosol and has implications on the earth's climate and human health. However, the characterization of its chemical composition and transformations remain a major challenge and is still connected to large uncertainties (IPCC, 2013). Recent measurements revealed that organic aerosol particles may reside in an amorphous or semi-solid phase state which impedes the diffusion within the particles (Virtanen et al., 2010; Shiraiwa et al., 2011). This means that reaction products which are formed on the surface of a particle, e.g. by OH, NO3 or ozone chemistry, cannot diffuse into the particle's core and remain at the surface. Eventually, this leads to particles with a core/shell structure. In the particles' cores the initial compounds are preserved whereas the shells contain mainly the oxidation products. By analyzing the particles' cores and shells separately, thus, it is possible to obtain valuable information on the formation and evolution of the aerosols' particle and gas phase. Here we present the development of the aerosol flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (AeroFAPA) technique which allows the mass spectrometric analysis of organic aerosols in real time. The AeroFAPA is an ion source based on a helium glow discharge at atmospheric pressure. The plasma produces excited helium species and primary reagent ions which are transferred into the afterglow region where the ionization of the analytes takes place. Due to temperatures of only 80 ° C to 150 ° C and ambient pressure in the afterglow region, the ionization is very soft and almost no fragmentation of organic molecules is observed. Thus, the obtained mass spectra are easy to interpret and no extensive data analysis procedure is necessary. Additionally, first results of a combination of the AeroFAPA-MS with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) suggest that it is not only possible to analyze the entire particle phase but rather that a

  11. Real-time analysis of ambient organic aerosols using aerosol flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow mass spectrometry (AeroFAPA-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüggemann, Martin; Karu, Einar; Stelzer, Torsten; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    Organic aerosol accounts for a major fraction of atmospheric aerosols and has implications on the earth's climate and human health. However, due to the chemical complexity its measurement remains a major challenge for analytical instrumentation.1 Here, we present the development, characterization and application of a new soft ionization technique that allows mass spectrometric real-time detection of organic compounds in ambient aerosols. The aerosol flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (AeroFAPA) ion source utilizes a helium glow discharge plasma to produce excited helium species and primary reagent ions. Ionization of the analytes occurs in the afterglow region after thermal desorption and results mainly in intact molecular ions, facilitating the interpretation of the acquired mass spectra. In the past, similar approaches were used to detect pesticides, explosives or illicit drugs on a variety of surfaces.2,3 In contrast, the AeroFAPA source operates 'online' and allows the detection of organic compounds in aerosols without a prior precipitation or sampling step. To our knowledge, this is the first application of an atmospheric-pressure glow discharge ionization technique to ambient aerosol samples. We illustrate that changes in aerosol composition and concentration are detected on the time scale of seconds and in the ng-m-3 range. Additionally, the successful application of AeroFAPA-MS during a field study in a mixed forest region in Central Europe is presented. Several oxidation products of monoterpenes were clearly identified using the possibility to perform tandem MS experiments. The acquired data are in agreement with previous studies and demonstrate that AeroFAPA-MS is a suitable tool for organic aerosol analysis. Furthermore, these results reveal the potential of this technique to enable new insights into aerosol formation, growth and transformation in the atmosphere. References: 1) IPCC, 2013: Summary for Policymakers. In: Climate Change 2013: The

  12. RIMAS - Optical Design Development of the Imager/Spectrometer for the Discovery Channel Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, John

    2012-01-01

    The Rapid IMAger - Spectrometer (RIMAS) is a collaborative effort between the University of Maryland at College Park, NASA-GSFC and Lowell Observatory designed for use on the 4.3 meter Discovery Channel Telescope at Lowell. The primary science goal of the instrument is the study of gamma-ray burst (ORB) afterglow appearing in the near-infrared. Continuous operation will allow measurements beginning minutes after the prompt emission. We present the results of the RIMAS optical design development. The instrument consists of two arms separated by a dichroic: the first for the Y and J bands (0.9 - 1.35 microns) and the second for the Hand K-bands (1.5 - 1.8 and 2.0 - 2.4 microns). Each arm will be equipped with two broad band filters for imaging, as well as low resolution and echelle grisms. The imaging modes are designed to be diffraction limited, with one pixel corresponding to approx.0.35 arcseconds, while the diffractive modes have resolving powers of approximately 20 and 4,000. With photometric and spectroscopic capabilities, RIMAS will be well positioned to quickly determine redshifts, followed by high resolution spectroscopic studies of ORB afterglow.

  13. The Deep Lens Survey : Real--time Optical Transient and Moving Object Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Andy; Wittman, David; Stubbs, Chris; Dell'Antonio, Ian; Loomba, Dinesh; Schommer, Robert; Tyson, J. Anthony; Margoniner, Vera; DLS Collaboration

    2001-12-01

    We report on the real-time optical transient program of the Deep Lens Survey (DLS). Meeting the DLS core science weak-lensing objective requires repeated visits to the same part of the sky, 20 visits for 63 sub-fields in 4 filters, on a 4-m telescope. These data are reduced in real-time, and differenced against each other on all available timescales. Our observing strategy is optimized to allow sensitivity to transients on several minute, one day, one month, and one year timescales. The depth of the survey allows us to detect and classify both moving and stationary transients down to ~ 25th magnitude, a relatively unconstrained region of astronomical variability space. All transients and moving objects, including asteroids, Kuiper belt (or trans-Neptunian) objects, variable stars, supernovae, 'unknown' bursts with no apparent host, orphan gamma-ray burst afterglows, as well as airplanes, are posted on the web in real-time for use by the community. We emphasize our sensitivity to detect and respond in real-time to orphan afterglows of gamma-ray bursts, and present one candidate orphan in the field of Abell 1836. See http://dls.bell-labs.com/transients.html.

  14. Afterglow model for the radio emission from the jetted tidal disruption candidate Swift J1644+57

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Brian D.; Giannios, Dimitrios; Mimica, Petar

    2012-03-01

    The recent transient event Swift J1644+57 has been interpreted as emission from a collimated relativistic jet, powered by the sudden onset of accretion on to a supermassive black hole following the tidal disruption of a star. Here we model the radio-microwave emission as synchrotron radiation produced by the shock interaction between the jet and the gaseous circumnuclear medium (CNM). At early times after the onset of the jet (t≲ 5-10 d) a reverse shock propagates through and decelerates the ejecta, while at later times the outflow approaches the Blandford-McKee self-similar evolution (possibly modified by additional late energy injection). The achromatic break in the radio light curve of Swift J1644+57 is naturally explained as the transition between these phases. We show that the temporal indices of the pre- and post-break light curve are consistent with those predicted if the CNM has a wind-type radial density profile n∝r-2. The observed synchrotron frequencies and self-absorbed flux constrain the fraction of the post-shock thermal energy in relativistic electrons ɛe≈ 0.03-0.1, the CNM density at 1018 cm n18≈ 1-10 cm-3 and the initial Lorentz factor Γj≈ 10-20 and opening angle ? of the jet. Radio modelling thus provides robust independent evidence for a narrowly collimated outflow. Extending our model to the future evolution of Swift J1644+57, we predict that the radio flux at low frequencies (ν≲ few GHz) will begin to brighten more rapidly once the characteristic frequency νm crosses below the radio band after it decreases below the self-absorption frequency on a time-scale of months (indeed, such a transition may already have begun). Our results demonstrate that relativistic outflows from tidal disruption events provide a unique probe of the conditions in distant, previously inactive galactic nuclei, complementing studies of normal active galactic nuclei.

  15. Optical Eigenvector.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    it necessary and identify by blckci -. mbrr, ’At tile bneginninp, of this contract , bot], -,-j- .lc the rest of the optical community imagined * that...simple analog optical computer,, could produce satisfactory solutions to elgenproblems. Earl’ - in this contract we improved optical computing... contract both we and the rest of the optical community imagined that simple analog optical computers could produce . satisfactory solutions to

  16. Optical microspectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2004-05-25

    An optical microspectrometer comprises a grism to disperse the spectra in a line object. A single optical microspectrometer can be used to sequentially scan a planar object, such as a dye-tagged microchip. Because the optical microspectrometer is very compact, multiple optical microspectrometers can be arrayed to provide simultaneous readout across the width of the planar object The optical microspectrometer can be fabricated with lithographic process, such as deep X-ray lithography (DXRL), with as few as two perpendicular exposures.

  17. MS/MS studies on the selective on-line detection of sesquiterpenes using a Flowing Afterglow-Tandem Mass Spectrometer (FA-TMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimetz-Planchon, J.; Dhooghe, F.; Schoon, N.; Vanhaecke, F.; Amelynck, C.

    2011-04-01

    A Flowing Afterglow-Tandem Mass Spectrometer (FA-TMS) was used to investigate the feasibility of selective on-line detection of a series of seven sesquiterpenes (SQTs). These SQTs were chemically ionized by either H3O+ or NO+ reagent ions in the FA, resulting among others in protonated SQT and SQT molecular ions, respectively. These and other Chemical Ionization (CI) product ions were subsequently subjected to dissociation by collisions with Ar atoms in the collision cell of the tandem mass spectrometer. The fragmentation spectra show similarities with mass spectra obtained for these compounds with other instruments such as a Proton Transfer Reaction-Linear Ion Trap (PTR-LIT), a Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS), a Triple Quadrupole-Mass Spectrometer (QqQ-MS) and a Selected Ion Flow Tube-Mass Spectrometer (SIFT-MS). Fragmentation of protonated SQT is characterized by fragment ions at the same masses but with different intensities for the individual SQT. Distinction of SQTs is based on well-chosen intensity ratios and collision energies. The fragmentation patterns of SQT molecular ions show specific fragment ion tracers at m/z 119, m/z162, m/z 137 and m/z 131 for α-cedrene, δ-neoclovene, isolongifolene and α-humulene, respectively. Consequently, chemical ionization of SQT by NO+, followed by MS/MS of SQT+ seems to open a way for selective quantification of SQTs in mixtures.

  18. Characterization of Ar/N2/H2 middle-pressure RF discharge and application of the afterglow region for nitridation of GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raud, J.; Jõgi, I.; Matisen, L.; Navrátil, Z.; Talviste, R.; Trunec, D.; Aarik, J.

    2017-12-01

    This work characterizes the production and destruction of nitrogen and hydrogen atoms in RF capacitively coupled middle-pressure discharge in argon/nitrogen/hydrogen mixtures. Input power, electron concentration, electric field strength and mean electron energy were determined on the basis of electrical measurements. Gas temperature and concentration of Ar atoms in 1s states were determined from spectral measurements. On the basis of experimentally determined plasma characteristics, main production and loss mechanisms of H and N atoms were discussed. The plasma produced radicals were applied for the nitridation and oxide reduction of gallium arsenide in the afterglow region of discharge. After plasma treatment the GaAs samples were analyzed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) technique. Successful nitridation of GaAs sample was obtained in the case of Ar/5% N2 discharge. In this gas mixture the N atoms were generated via dissociative recombination of N2+ created by charge transfer from Ar+. The treatment in Ar/5% N2/1% H2 mixture resulted in the reduction of oxide signals in the XPS spectra. Negligible formation of GaN in the latter mixture was connected with reduced concentration of N atoms, which was, in turn, due to less efficient mechanism of N atom production (electron impact dissociation of N2 molecules) and additional loss channel in reaction with H2.

  19. Detection of positive and negative ions from a flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow using a Mattauch-Herzog mass spectrograph equipped with a Faraday-strip array detector.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Gregory D; Shelley, Jacob T; Barnes, James H; Sperline, Roger P; Denton, M Bonner; Barinaga, Charles J; Koppenaal, David W; Hieftje, Gary M

    2010-01-01

    An ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) source, known as the flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA), has been coupled to a Mattauch-Herzog mass spectrograph (MHMS) equipped with a focal plane camera (FPC) array detector. The FAPA ionization source enables direct mass spectral analysis of solids, liquids, and gases through either positive or negative ionization modes. In either case, spectra are generally simple with dominant peaks being the molecular ions or protonated molecular ions. Use of the FAPA source with the MHMS allows the FPC detector to be characterized for the determination of molecular species, whereas previously only atomic mass spectrometry (MS) has been demonstrated. Furthermore, the FPC is shown to be sensitive to negative ions without the need to change any detector parameters. The analysis of solid, liquid, and gaseous samples through positive and negative ionization is demonstrated with detection limits (1-25 fmol/s, approximately 0.3-10 pg of analyte per mL of helium) surpassing those obtained with the FAPA source coupled to a time-of-flight mass analyzer. 2010 American Society for Mass Spectrometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Optically tunable optical filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Robert T. B.; Wah, Christopher; Iizuka, Keigo; Shimotahira, Hiroshi

    1995-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an optically tunable optical filter that uses photorefractive barium titanate. With our filter we implement a spectrum analyzer at 632.8 nm with a resolution of 1.2 nm. We simulate a wavelength-division multiplexing system by separating two semiconductor laser diodes, at 1560 nm and 1578 nm, with the same filter. The filter has a bandwidth of 6.9 nm. We also use the same filter to take 2.5-nm-wide slices out of a 20-nm-wide superluminescent diode centered at 840 nm. As a result, we experimentally demonstrate a phenomenal tuning range from 632.8 to 1578 nm with a single filtering device.

  1. Early-time spectra of supernovae and their precursor winds. The luminous blue variable/yellow hypergiant progenitor of SN 2013cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groh, Jose H.

    2014-12-01

    We present the first quantitative spectroscopic modeling of an early-time supernova (SN) that interacts with its progenitor wind. Using the radiative transfer code CMFGEN, we investigate the recently reported 15.5 h post-explosion spectrum of the type IIb SN 2013cu. We are able to directly measure the chemical abundances of a SN progenitor and find a relatively H-rich wind, with H and He abundances (by mass) of X = 0.46 ± 0.2 and Y = 0.52 ± 0.2, respectively. The wind is enhanced in N and depleted in C relative to solar values (mass fractions of 8.2 × 10-3 and 1.0 × 10-5, respectively). We obtain that a slow, dense wind or circumstellar medium surrounds the precursor at the pre-SN stage, with a wind terminal velocity vwind ≲ 100 km s-1 and mass-loss rate of Ṁ ≃ 3 × 10-3 (vwind/ 100 km s-1) M⊙ yr-1. These values are lower than previous analytical estimates, although Ṁ/υ∞ is consistent with previous work. We also compute a CMFGEN model to constrain the progenitor spectral type; the high Ṁ and low vwind imply that the star had an effective temperature of ≃ 8000 K immediately before the SN explosion. Our models suggest that the progenitor was either an unstable luminous blue variable or a yellow hypergiant undergoing an eruptive phase, and rule out a Wolf-Rayet star. We classify the post-explosion spectra at 15.5 h as XWN5(h) and advocate for the use of the prefix "X" (eXplosion) to avoid confusion between post-explosion, non-stellar spectra, and those of massive stars. We show that the XWN spectrum results from the ionization of the progenitor wind after the SN, and that the progenitor spectral type is significantly different from the early post-explosion spectral type owing to the huge differences in the ionization structure before and after the SN event. We find the following temporal evolution: LBV/YHG → XWN5(h) → SN IIb. Future early-time spectroscopy in the UV will further constrain the properties of SN precursors, such as their

  2. CTCF Occupation of the Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Genome Is Disrupted at Early Times Postreactivation in a Transcription-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Ertel, Monica K.; Cammarata, Amy L.; Hron, Rebecca J.

    2012-01-01

    In herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), binding clusters enriched in CTCF during latency have been previously identified. We hypothesized that CTCF binding to CTCF clusters in HSV-1 would be disrupted in a reactivation event. To investigate, CTCF occupation of three CTCF binding clusters in HSV-1 was analyzed following sodium butyrate (NaB)- and explant-induced reactivation in the mouse. Our data show that the CTCF domains positioned within the HSV-1 genome, specifically around the latency-associated transcript (LAT) and ICP0 and ICP4 regions of the genome, lose CTCF occupancy following the application of reactivation stimuli in wild-type virus. We also found that CTCF binding clusters upstream of the ICP0 and ICP4 promoters both function as classical insulators capable of acting as enhancer blockers of the LAT enhancer. Finally, our results suggest that CTCF occupation of domains in HSV-1 may be differentially regulated both during latency and at early times following reactivation by the presence of lytic transcripts and further implicate epigenetic regulation of HSV-1 as a critical component of the latency-reactivation transition. PMID:22973047

  3. Three-dimensional, two-species magnetohydrodynamic studies of the early time behaviors of the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite G2 barium release

    SciT

    Xie, Lianghai, E-mail: xielh@nssc.ac.cn; Li, Lei; Wang, Jingdong

    2014-04-15

    We present a three-dimensional, two-species (Ba{sup +} and H{sup +}) MHD model to study the early time behaviors of a barium release at about 1 R{sub E} like Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite G2, with emphasis placed on the three-dimensional evolution of the barium cloud and its effects on the ambient plasma environment. We find that the perturbations caused by the cloud are the combined results of the initial injection, the radial expansion, and the diamagnetic effect and propagate as fast MHD waves in the magnetosphere. In return, the transverse expansion and the cross-B motion of barium ions aremore » constrained by the magnetic force, which lead to a field-aligned striation of ions and the decoupling of these ions from the neutrals. Our simulation shows the formation and collapse of the diamagnetic cavity in the barium cloud. The estimated time scale for the cavity evolution might be much shorter if photoionization time scale and field aligned expansion of barium ions are considered. In addition, our two species MHD simulation also finds the snowplow effect resulting from the momentum coupling between barium ions and background H{sup +}, which creates density hole and bumps in the background H{sup +} when barium ions expanding along the magnetic field lines.« less

  4. Optical to optical interface device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, D. S.; Vohl, P.; Nisenson, P.

    1972-01-01

    The development, fabrication, and testing of a preliminary model of an optical-to-optical (noncoherent-to-coherent) interface device for use in coherent optical parallel processing systems are described. The developed device demonstrates a capability for accepting as an input a scene illuminated by a noncoherent radiation source and providing as an output a coherent light beam spatially modulated to represent the original noncoherent scene. The converter device developed under this contract employs a Pockels readout optical modulator (PROM). This is a photosensitive electro-optic element which can sense and electrostatically store optical images. The stored images can be simultaneously or subsequently readout optically by utilizing the electrostatic storage pattern to control an electro-optic light modulating property of the PROM. The readout process is parallel as no scanning mechanism is required. The PROM provides the functions of optical image sensing, modulation, and storage in a single active material.

  5. Optical probe

    DOEpatents

    Hencken, Kenneth; Flower, William L.

    1999-01-01

    A compact optical probe is disclosed particularly useful for analysis of emissions in industrial environments. The instant invention provides a geometry for optically-based measurements that allows all optical components (source, detector, rely optics, etc.) to be located in proximity to one another. The geometry of the probe disclosed herein provides a means for making optical measurements in environments where it is difficult and/or expensive to gain access to the vicinity of a flow stream to be measured. Significantly, the lens geometry of the optical probe allows the analysis location within a flow stream being monitored to be moved while maintaining optical alignment of all components even when the optical probe is focused on a plurality of different analysis points within the flow stream.

  6. Optical Solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. R.

    2005-08-01

    1. Optical solitons in fibres: theoretical review A. Hasegawa; 2. Solitons in optical fibres: an experimental account L. F. Mollenauer; 3. All-optical long-distance soliton-based transmission systems K. Smith and L. F. Mollenauer; 4. Nonlinear propagation effects in optical fibres: numerical studies K. J. Blow and N. J. Doran; 5. Soliton-soliton interactions C. Desem and P. L. Chu; 6. Soliton amplification in erbium-doped fibre amplifiers and its application to soliton communication M. Nakazawa; 7. Nonlinear transformation of laser radiation and generation of Raman solitons in optical fibres E. M. Dianov, A. B. Grudinin, A. M. Prokhorov and V. N. Serkin; 8. Generation and compression of femtosecond solitons in optical fibers P. V. Mamyshev; 9. Optical fibre solitons in the presence of higher order dispersion and birefringence C. R. Menyuk and Ping-Kong A. Wai; 10. Dark optical solitons A. M. Weiner; 11. Soliton Raman effects J. R. Taylor; Bibliography; Index.

  7. Optical Solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. R.

    1992-04-01

    1. Optical solitons in fibres: theoretical review A. Hasegawa; 2. Solitons in optical fibres: an experimental account L. F. Mollenauer; 3. All-optical long-distance soliton-based transmission systems K. Smith and L. F. Mollenauer; 4. Nonlinear propagation effects in optical fibres: numerical studies K. J. Blow and N. J. Doran; 5. Soliton-soliton interactions C. Desem and P. L. Chu; 6. Soliton amplification in erbium-doped fibre amplifiers and its application to soliton communication M. Nakazawa; 7. Nonlinear transformation of laser radiation and generation of Raman solitons in optical fibres E. M. Dianov, A. B. Grudinin, A. M. Prokhorov and V. N. Serkin; 8. Generation and compression of femtosecond solitons in optical fibers P. V. Mamyshev; 9. Optical fibre solitons in the presence of higher order dispersion and birefringence C. R. Menyuk and Ping-Kong A. Wai; 10. Dark optical solitons A. M. Weiner; 11. Soliton Raman effects J. R. Taylor; Bibliography; Index.

  8. Optical keyboard

    SciT

    Veligdan, James T.; Feichtner, John D.; Phillips, Thomas E.

    2001-01-01

    An optical keyboard includes an optical panel having optical waveguides stacked together. First ends of the waveguides define an inlet face, and opposite ends thereof define a screen. A projector transmits a light beam outbound through the waveguides for display on the screen as a keyboard image. A light sensor is optically aligned with the inlet face for sensing an inbound light beam channeled through the waveguides from the screen upon covering one key of the keyboard image.

  9. Optic neuritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... optic neuritis is unknown. The optic nerve carries visual information from your eye to the brain. The nerve can swell when it becomes suddenly ... may include: Color vision testing MRI of the brain , including special images of the optic nerve Visual acuity testing Visual field testing Examination of the ...

  10. A VLA Study of High-redshift GRBs. II. The Complex Radio Afterglow of GRB 140304A: Shell Collisions and Two Reverse Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskar, Tanmoy; Berger, Edo; Margutti, Raffaella; Zauderer, B. Ashley; Williams, Peter K. G.; Fong, Wen-fai; Sari, Re’em; Alexander, Kate D.; Kamble, Atish

    2018-06-01

    We present detailed multifrequency, multiepoch radio observations of GRB 140304A at z = 5.283 from 1 to 86 GHz and from 0.45 to 89 days. The radio and millimeter data exhibit unusual multiple spectral components, which cannot be simply explained by standard forward and reverse shock scenarios. Through detailed multiwavelength analysis spanning radio to X-rays, we constrain the forward shock parameters to E k,iso ≈ 4.9 × 1054 erg, {A}* ≈ 2.6 × 10‑2, {ε }{{e}} ≈ 2.5 × 10‑2, {ε }{{B}} ≈ 5.9 × 10‑2, p ≈ 2.6, and {θ }jet} ≈ 1.°1, yielding a beaming-corrected γ-ray and kinetic energy, {E}γ ≈ 2.3 × 1049 erg and {E}{{K}} ≈ 9.5 × 1050 erg, respectively. We model the excess radio emission as due to a combination of a late-time reverse shock (RS) launched by a shell collision, which also produces a rebrightening in the X-rays at ≈0.26 days, and either a standard RS or diffractive interstellar scintillation (ISS). Under the standard RS interpretation, we invoke consistency arguments between the forward and reverse shocks to derive a deceleration time, t dec ≈ 100 s, the ejecta Lorentz factor, Γ(t dec) ≈ 300, and a low RS magnetization, R B ≈ 0.6. Our observations highlight both the power of radio observations in capturing RS emission and thus constraining the properties of GRB ejecta and central engines and the challenge presented by ISS in conclusively identifying RS emission in GRB radio afterglows.

  11. Fast transient analysis and first-stage collision-induced dissociation with the flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow ionization source to improve analyte detection and identification.

    PubMed

    Shelley, Jacob T; Hieftje, Gary M

    2010-04-01

    The recent development of ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS) has enabled fast, simple analysis of many different sample types. The ADI-MS sources have numerous advantages, including little or no required sample pre-treatment, simple mass spectra, and direct analysis of solids and liquids. However, problems of competitive ionization and limited fragmentation require sample-constituent separation, high mass accuracy, and/or tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to detect, identify, and quantify unknown analytes. To maintain the inherent high throughput of ADI-MS, it is essential for the ion source/mass analyzer combination to measure fast transient signals and provide structural information. In the current study, the flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (FAPA) ionization source is coupled with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) to analyze fast transient signals (<500 ms FWHM). It was found that gas chromatography (GC) coupled with the FAPA source resulted in a reproducible (<5% RSD) and sensitive (detection limits of <6 fmol for a mixture of herbicides) system with analysis times of ca. 5 min. Introducing analytes to the FAPA in a transient was also shown to significantly reduce matrix effects caused by competitive ionization by minimizing the number and amount of constituents introduced into the ionization source. Additionally, MS/MS with FAPA-TOF-MS, enabling analyte identification, was performed via first-stage collision-induced dissociation (CID). Lastly, molecular and structural information was obtained across a fast transient peak by modulating the conditions that caused the first-stage CID.

  12. Studies in search of selective detection of isomeric biogenic hexen-1-ols and hexanal by flowing afterglow tandem mass spectrometry using [H3O]+ and [NO]+ reagent ions.

    PubMed

    Dhooghe, Frederik; Vansintjan, Robbe; Schoon, Niels; Amelynck, Crist

    2012-08-30

    Plants emit a blend of oxygenated volatile C(6) compounds, known as green leaf volatiles (GLVs), in response to leaf tissue damage related to stress conditions. On-line chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CI-MS) techniques have often been used to study the dynamics of these emissions but they fail to selectively detect some important GLV compounds. A flowing afterglow tandem mass spectrometer (FA-TMS) was used to investigate the feasibility of selective on-line detection of isomeric hexen-1-ols and hexanal. Product ions at m/z 101 and 83 from chemical ionization (CI) of these compounds by [H(3)O](+), and product ions at m/z 100, 99, 83, 82 and 72 from CI by [NO](+), have been subjected to collision-induced dissociation (CID) in the collision cell of the TMS at center-of-mass energies ranging between 0 and 9 eV. CID of product ions at m/z 101 and 83 from CI of GLVs with [H(3)O](+) and of product ions at m/z 83, 82 and 72 from CI of GLVs with [NO](+) resulted in identical fragmentation patterns for all measured compounds, ruling out any selectivity. However, CID of product ions at m/z 100 and 99 from CI by [NO](+) led to CID product ions with abundances differing largely between the compounds, allowing the fast selective detection of 2-hexen-1-ols, 3-hexen-1-ols and hexanal with a chosen accuracy within a well-defined range of relative concentrations. This research illustrates that, in contrast to common CI-MS techniques, FA-TMS allows the selective detection of hexanal in a mixture of hexanal and hexen-1-ols with a chosen accuracy for a well-defined range of relative concentrations and represents a step forward in the search for selective detection of GLVs in CI-TMS. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Fluidic optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitesides, George M.; Tang, Sindy K. Y.

    2006-09-01

    Fluidic optics is a new class of optical system with real-time tunability and reconfigurability enabled by the introduction of fluidic components into the optical path. We describe the design, fabrication, operation of a number of fluidic optical systems, and focus on three devices, liquid-core/liquid-cladding (L2) waveguides, microfluidic dye lasers, and diffraction gratings based on flowing, crystalline lattices of bubbles, to demonstrate the integration of microfluidics and optics. We fabricate these devices in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) with soft-lithographic techniques. They are simple to construct, and readily integrable with microanalytical or lab-on-a-chip systems.

  14. Optical Micromachining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Under an SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) with Marshall Space Flight Center, Potomac Photonics, Inc., constructed and demonstrated a unique tool that fills a need in the area of diffractive and refractive micro-optics. It is an integrated computer-aided design and computer-aided micro-machining workstation that will extend the benefits of diffractive and micro-optic technology to optical designers. Applications of diffractive optics include sensors and monitoring equipment, analytical instruments, and fiber optic distribution and communication. The company has been making diffractive elements with the system as a commercial service for the last year.

  15. The young and bright Type Ia supernova ASASSN-14lp: Discovery, early-time observations, first-light time, distance to NGC 4666, and progenitor constraints

    DOE PAGES

    Shappee, B. J.; Piro, A. L.; Holoien, T. W. -S.; ...

    2016-07-27

    On 2014 December 9.61, the All-sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin") discovered ASASSN-14lp just ~2 days after first light using a global array of 14 cm diameter telescopes. ASASSN-14lp went on to become a bright supernova (V = 11.94 mag), second only to SN 2014J for the year. We present prediscovery photometry (with a detection less than a day after first light) and ultraviolet through near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic data covering the rise and fall of ASASSN-14lp for more than 100 days. We find that ASASSN-14lp had a broad light curve (more » $${\\rm{\\Delta }}{m}_{15}(B)=0.80\\pm 0.05$$), a B-band maximum at 2457015.82 ± 0.03, a rise time of $${16.94}_{-0.10}^{+0.11}$$ days, and moderate host-galaxy extinction ($$E{(B-V)}_{\\mathrm{host}}=0.33\\pm 0.06$$). Using ASASSN-14lp, we derive a distance modulus for NGC 4666 of $$\\mu =30.8\\pm 0.2$$, corresponding to a distance of 14.7 ± 1.5 Mpc. However, adding ASASSN-14lp to the calibrating sample of Type Ia supernovae still requires an independent distance to the host galaxy. Lastly, using our early-time photometric and spectroscopic observations, we rule out red giant secondaries and, assuming a favorable viewing angle and explosion time, any nondegenerate companion larger than 0.34 $${R}_{\\odot }$$.« less

  16. MHC-driven HIV-1 control on the long run is not systematically determined at early times post-HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Antoni, Guillemette; Guergnon, Julien; Meaudre, Céline; Samri, Assia; Boufassa, Faroudy; Goujard, Cécile; Lambotte, Olivier; Autran, Brigitte; Rouzioux, Christine; Costagliola, Dominique; Meyer, Laurence; Theodorou, Ioannis

    2013-07-17

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I-driven long-term protection against HIV-1 is mainly associated with HLA-B*27 and HLA-B*57. This effect is observed early after infection. Clarification needs to be established concerning the moment of action for the other HLA-B or HLA-C alleles. HLA-B and HLA-C alleles from 111 individuals that control HIV-1 disease for over 8 years and from 747 seroconverters frequencies were compared. Also, HLA-B and HLA-C influence on early levels of plasma HIV-RNA, cellular HIV-DNA, CD4, CD8 and CD4/CD8 ratio was evaluated among the seroconverters. We performed univariate, multivariate and haplotypic analyses in order to disentangle the respective contribution of the HLA-B and HLA-C genes. The haplotypes analysis shows three patterns of protective effects of HLA-B and HLA-C alleles or haplotypes. First, the HLA B*57, HLA-B*27, HLA-B*13 and HLA-C*14 alleles, which have a strong effect on long-term disease control, also influence at least one of the early infection phenotypes. Second, HLA-B*52 has a strong effect during early time points on HIV-RNA without significant effect on the long-term control of HIV-1. Finally, the HLA-B*14-C*08 haplotype has a strong effect on the long-term protection, without influencing early viral control. Our study highlighted independent effects of HLA-B and HLA-C alleles on HIV-disease progression. Furthermore, some alleles appeared to be specifically associated with either long-term control or early virological parameters, suggesting different immunological mechanisms according to the disease stages.

  17. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: On the possibility of pumping Xe2* lasers and VUV lamps in the afterglow of a background-electron multiplication wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boichenko, Aleksandr M.; Yakovlenko, Sergei I.

    2006-12-01

    It was shown earlier that the ionisation propagation in a gas at about the atmospheric pressure may proceed due to the multiplication of the existing electrons with a low background density rather than the transfer of electrons or photons. We consider the feasibility of using the plasma produced in the afterglow of this background-electron multiplication wave for pumping plasma lasers (in particular, Xe2* xenon excimer lasers) as well as excilamps. Simulations show that it is possible to achieve the laser effect at λapprox172 nm as well as to substantially improve the peak specific power of the spontaneous radiation of xenon lamps.

  18. Cryogenic optical systems for the rapid infrared imager/spectrometer (RIMAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capone, John I.; Content, David A.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Robinson, Frederick D.; Lotkin, Gennadiy N.; Toy, Vicki L.; Veilleux, Sylvain; Moseley, Samuel H.; Gehrels, Neil A.; Vogel, Stuart N.

    2014-07-01

    The Rapid Infrared Imager/Spectrometer (RIMAS) is designed to perform follow-up observations of transient astronomical sources at near infrared (NIR) wavelengths (0.9 - 2.4 microns). In particular, RIMAS will be used to perform photometric and spectroscopic observations of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows to compliment the Swift satellite's science goals. Upon completion, RIMAS will be installed on Lowell Observatory's 4.3 meter Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) located in Happy Jack, Arizona. The instrument's optical design includes a collimator lens assembly, a dichroic to divide the wavelength coverage into two optical arms (0.9 - 1.4 microns and 1.4 - 2.4 microns respectively), and a camera lens assembly for each optical arm. Because the wavelength coverage extends out to 2.4 microns, all optical elements are cooled to ~70 K. Filters and transmission gratings are located on wheels prior to each camera allowing the instrument to be quickly configured for photometry or spectroscopy. An athermal optomechanical design is being implemented to prevent lenses from loosing their room temperature alignment as the system is cooled. The thermal expansion of materials used in this design have been measured in the lab. Additionally, RIMAS has a guide camera consisting of four lenses to aid observers in passing light from target sources through spectroscopic slits. Efforts to align these optics are ongoing.

  19. Significant and variable linear polarization during the prompt optical flash of GRB 160625B.

    PubMed

    Troja, E; Lipunov, V M; Mundell, C G; Butler, N R; Watson, A M; Kobayashi, S; Cenko, S B; Marshall, F E; Ricci, R; Fruchter, A; Wieringa, M H; Gorbovskoy, E S; Kornilov, V; Kutyrev, A; Lee, W H; Toy, V; Tyurina, N V; Budnev, N M; Buckley, D A H; González, J; Gress, O; Horesh, A; Panasyuk, M I; Prochaska, J X; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Lopez, R Rebolo; Richer, M G; Román-Zúñiga, C; Serra-Ricart, M; Yurkov, V; Gehrels, N

    2017-07-26

    Newly formed black holes of stellar mass launch collimated outflows (jets) of ionized matter that approach the speed of light. These outflows power prompt, brief and intense flashes of γ-rays known as γ-ray bursts (GRBs), followed by longer-lived afterglow radiation that is detected across the electromagnetic spectrum. Measuring the polarization of the observed GRB radiation provides a direct probe of the magnetic fields in the collimated jets. Rapid-response polarimetric observations of newly discovered bursts have probed the initial afterglow phase, and show that, minutes after the prompt emission has ended, the degree of linear polarization can be as high as 30 per cent-consistent with the idea that a stable, globally ordered magnetic field permeates the jet at large distances from the central source. By contrast, optical and γ-ray observations during the prompt phase have led to discordant and often controversial results, and no definitive conclusions have been reached regarding the origin of the prompt radiation or the configuration of the magnetic field. Here we report the detection of substantial (8.3 ± 0.8 per cent from our most conservative simulation), variable linear polarization of a prompt optical flash that accompanied the extremely energetic and long-lived prompt γ-ray emission from GRB 160625B. Our measurements probe the structure of the magnetic field at an early stage of the jet, closer to its central black hole, and show that the prompt phase is produced via fast-cooling synchrotron radiation in a large-scale magnetic field that is advected from the black hole and distorted by dissipation processes within the jet.

  20. Significant and variable linear polarization during the prompt optical flash of GRB 160625B.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troja, E.; Lipunov, V. M.; Mundell, C. G.; Butler, N. R.; Watson, A. M.; Kobayashi, S.; Cenko, S. B.; Marshall, F. E.; Ricci, R.; Fruchter, A.; Wieringa, M. H.; Gorbovskoy, E. S.; Kornilov, V.; Kutyrev, A.; Lee, W. H.; Toy, V.; Tyurina, N. V.; Budnev, N. M.; Buckley, D. A. H.; González, J.; Gress, O.; Horesh, A.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Prochaska, J. X.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Rebolo Lopez, R.; Richer, M. G.; Roman-Zuniga, C.; Serra-Ricart, M.; Yurkov, V.; Gehrels, N.

    2017-07-01

    Newly formed black holes of stellar mass launch collimated outflows (jets) of ionized matter that approach the speed of light. These outflows power prompt, brief and intense flashes of γ-rays known as γ-ray bursts (GRBs), followed by longer-lived afterglow radiation that is detected across the electromagnetic spectrum. Measuring the polarization of the observed GRB radiation provides a direct probe of the magnetic fields in the collimated jets. Rapid-response polarimetric observations of newly discovered bursts have probed the initial afterglow phase, and show that, minutes after the prompt emission has ended, the degree of linear polarization can be as high as 30 per cent - consistent with the idea that a stable, globally ordered magnetic field permeates the jet at large distances from the central source. By contrast, optical and γ-ray observations during the prompt phase have led to discordant and often controversial results, and no definitive conclusions have been reached regarding the origin of the prompt radiation or the configuration of the magnetic field. Here we report the detection of substantial (8.3 ± 0.8 per cent from our most conservative simulation), variable linear polarization of a prompt optical flash that accompanied the extremely energetic and long-lived prompt γ-ray emission from GRB 160625B. Our measurements probe the structure of the magnetic field at an early stage of the jet, closer to its central black hole, and show that the prompt phase is produced via fast-cooling synchrotron radiation in a large-scale magnetic field that is advected from the black hole and distorted by dissipation processes within the jet.

  1. Feeding prepubescent gilts a high-fat diet induces molecular changes in the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis and predicts early timing of puberty.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Yong; Zhou, Dongsheng; Che, Lianqiang; Fang, Zhengfeng; Lin, Yan; Wu, De

    2014-01-01

    The onset of puberty in females has been occurring earlier over the past decades, presumably as a result of improved nutrition in developed countries. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for the early attainment of puberty as a result of nutrition fortification remain largely unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the hormone and gene expression changes in prepubescent gilts fed a high-fat diet to investigate whether these changes could predict the early timing of puberty. Forty gilts were fed a daily basal diet (LE) or a basal diet with an additional 270 g/d or 340 g/d of fat (HE) during the prepubescent phase. Blood samples were collected during the prepubescent phase to detect hormone secretion changes in insulin-like growth factor-1, kisspeptin, estradiol, progesterone, and leptin. The gene expressions at the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis were examined on day 73 of the experiment (average age on day 177) during the prepubescent phase. An HE diet resulted in accelerated body weight gain and back-fat thickness at the P2 point compared with LE gilts during the prepubescent phase. Gilts that were fed HE diets attained puberty 12 d earlier than LE gilts, and a larger proportion of HE gilts reached puberty at day 180 or 190 of age. A postmortem analysis revealed a promoted development of the uterus and ovary tissue that was characterized by a 53.7% and 29.5% increase in the uterine and ovary weight, respectively, and an increased length of the uterine horn and oviduct tissue in HE gilts. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that HE gilts had higher Kiss-1, G protein-coupled receptor 54, gonadotropin-releasing hormone and estrogen receptor α mRNA expression levels in the hypothalamic anteroventral periventricular nucleus; the leptin receptor mRNA expression level was higher in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and ovary tissue; the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor expression was higher in the pituitary and

  2. Optical computing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroke, G. W.

    1972-01-01

    Applications of the optical computer include an approach for increasing the sharpness of images obtained from the most powerful electron microscopes and fingerprint/credit card identification. The information-handling capability of the various optical computing processes is very great. Modern synthetic-aperture radars scan upward of 100,000 resolvable elements per second. Fields which have assumed major importance on the basis of optical computing principles are optical image deblurring, coherent side-looking synthetic-aperture radar, and correlative pattern recognition. Some examples of the most dramatic image deblurring results are shown.

  3. Optical trapping

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Keir C.; Block, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    Since their invention just over 20 years ago, optical traps have emerged as a powerful tool with broad-reaching applications in biology and physics. Capabilities have evolved from simple manipulation to the application of calibrated forces on—and the measurement of nanometer-level displacements of—optically trapped objects. We review progress in the development of optical trapping apparatus, including instrument design considerations, position detection schemes and calibration techniques, with an emphasis on recent advances. We conclude with a brief summary of innovative optical trapping configurations and applications. PMID:16878180

  4. Single crystal and optical ceramic multicomponent garnet scintillators: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuntao; Luo, Zhaohua; Jiang, Haochuan; Meng, Fang; Koschan, Merry; Melcher, Charles L.

    2015-04-01

    Multicomponent garnet materials can be made in optical ceramic as well as single crystal form due to their cubic crystal structure. In this work, high-quality Gd3Ga3Al2O12:0.2 at% Ce (GGAG:Ce) single crystal and (Gd,Lu)3Ga3Al2O12:1 at% Ce (GLuGAG:Ce) optical ceramics were fabricated by the Czochralski method and a combination of hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) and annealing treatment, respectively. Under optical and X-ray excitation, the GLuGAG:Ce optical ceramic exhibits a broad Ce3+ transition emission centered at 550 nm, while the emission peak of the GGAG:Ce single crystal is centered at 540 nm. A self-absorption effect in GLuGAG:Ce optical ceramic results in this red-shift of the Ce3+ emission peak compared to that in the GGAG:Ce single crystal. The light yield under 662 keV γ-ray excitation was 45,000±2500 photons/MeV and 48,200±2410 photons/MeV for the GGAG:Ce single crystal and GLuGAG:Ce optical ceramic, respectively. An energy resolution of 7.1% for 662 keV γ-rays was achieved in the GLuGAG:Ce optical ceramic with a Hamamatsu R6231 PMT, which is superior to the value of 7.6% for a GGAG:Ce single crystal. Scintillation decay time measurements under 137Cs irradiation show two exponential decay components of 58 ns (47%) and 504 ns (53%) for the GGAG:Ce single crystal, and 84 ns (76%) and 148 ns (24%) for the GLuGAG:Ce optical ceramic. The afterglow level after X-ray cutoff in the GLuGAG:Ce optical ceramic is at least one order of magnitude lower than in the GGAG:Ce single crystal.

  5. Polarimetry and Photometry of Gamma-Ray Bursts with RINGO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, I. A.; Kopač, D.; Arnold, D. M.; Smith, R. J.; Kobayashi, S.; Jermak, H. E.; Mundell, C. G.; Gomboc, A.; Guidorzi, C.; Melandri, A.; Japelj, J.

    2017-07-01

    We present a catalog of early-time (˜ {10}2-{10}4 s) photometry and polarimetry of all gamma-ray burst (GRB) optical afterglows observed with the RINGO2 imaging polarimeter on the Liverpool Telescope. Of the 19 optical afterglows observed, the following nine were bright enough to perform photometry and attempt polarimetry: GRB 100805A, GRB 101112A, GRB 110205A, GRB 110726A, GRB 120119A, GRB 120308A, GRB 120311A, GRB 120326A, and GRB 120327A. We present multiwavelength light curves for these 9 GRBs, together with estimates of their optical polarization degrees and/or limits. We carry out a thorough investigation of detection probabilities, instrumental properties, and systematics. Using two independent methods, we confirm previous reports of significant polarization in GRB 110205A and 120308A, and report the new detection of P={6}-2+3% in GRB101112A. We discuss the results for the sample in the context of the reverse- and forward-shock afterglow scenario, and show that GRBs with detectable optical polarization at early time have clearly identifiable signatures of reverse-shock emission in their optical light curves. This supports the idea that GRB ejecta contain large-scale magnetic fields, and it highlights the importance of rapid-response polarimetry.

  6. Camera Optics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Michael J.

    1982-01-01

    The camera presents an excellent way to illustrate principles of geometrical optics. Basic camera optics of the single-lens reflex camera are discussed, including interchangeable lenses and accessories available to most owners. Several experiments are described and results compared with theoretical predictions or manufacturer specifications.…

  7. Optical Disks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, John C.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This four-article section focuses on information storage capacity of the optical disk covering the information workstation (uses microcomputer, optical disk, compact disc to provide reference information, information content, work product support); use of laser videodisc technology for dissemination of agricultural information; encoding databases…

  8. Optical biosensors.

    PubMed

    Damborský, Pavel; Švitel, Juraj; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-06-30

    Optical biosensors represent the most common type of biosensor. Here we provide a brief classification, a description of underlying principles of operation and their bioanalytical applications. The main focus is placed on the most widely used optical biosensors which are surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensors including SPR imaging and localized SPR. In addition, other optical biosensor systems are described, such as evanescent wave fluorescence and bioluminescent optical fibre biosensors, as well as interferometric, ellipsometric and reflectometric interference spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman scattering biosensors. The optical biosensors discussed here allow the sensitive and selective detection of a wide range of analytes including viruses, toxins, drugs, antibodies, tumour biomarkers and tumour cells. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  9. Fiber optic coupled optical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, Kevin J.

    2001-01-01

    A displacement sensor includes a first optical fiber for radiating light to a target, and a second optical fiber for receiving light from the target. The end of the first fiber is adjacent and not axially aligned with the second fiber end. A lens focuses light from the first fiber onto the target and light from the target onto the second fiber.

  10. Keratocyte Apoptosis and Not Myofibroblast Differentiation Mark the Graft/Host Interface at Early Time-Points Post-DSAEK in a Cat Model

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Adam J.; Huxlin, Krystel R.; Callan, Christine L.; DeMagistris, Margaret A.; Hindman, Holly B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate myofibroblast differentiation as an etiology of haze at the graft-host interface in a cat model of Descemet’s Stripping Automated Endothelial Keratoplasty (DSAEK). Methods DSAEK was performed on 10 eyes of 5 adult domestic short-hair cats. In vivo corneal imaging with slit lamp, confocal, and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were performed twice weekly. Cats were sacrificed and corneas harvested 4 hours, and 2, 4, 6, and 9 days post-DSAEK. Corneal sections were stained with the TUNEL method and immunohistochemistry was performed for α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and fibronectin with DAPI counterstain. Results At all in vivo imaging time-points, corneal OCT revealed an increase in backscatter of light and confocal imaging revealed an acellular zone at the graft-host interface. At all post-mortem time-points, immunohistochemistry revealed a complete absence of α-SMA staining at the graft-host interface. At 4 hours, extracellular fibronectin staining was identified along the graft-host interface and both fibronectin and TUNEL assay were positive within adjacent cells extending into the host stroma. By day 2, fibronectin and TUNEL staining diminished and a distinct acellular zone was present in the region of previously TUNEL-positive cells. Conclusions OCT imaging consistently showed increased reflectivity at the graft-host interface in cat corneas in the days post-DSAEK. This was not associated with myofibroblast differentiation at the graft-host interface, but rather with apoptosis and the development of a subsequent acellular zone. The roles of extracellular matrix changes and keratocyte cell death and repopulation should be investigated further as potential contributors to the interface optical changes. PMID:24098706

  11. Optic glioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a strong association between optic glioma and neurofibromatosis type 1 ( NF1 ). Symptoms The symptoms are due ... brain (intracranial pressure). There may be signs of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The following tests may be ...

  12. Fiber Optics,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-04

    effectiveness of new ships and ship systems. The basis of this new technology is the optical fiber, a thin, flex- ible glass or plastic waveguide through...His photophone used unguiled modulated sunlight to transmit speech about 700 feet (213 m). In 1910, researchers performed theoretical investigations...somewhat more con- troversial use of optical fibers in terms of cost effectiveness is in LANs, or as we sometimes call them in the Navy, "data transfer

  13. Over atmospheric pressure flowing afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganciu, Mihai; Orphal, Johannes; Vervloet, Michel; Pointu, Anne-Marie; Touzeau, Michel

    2002-10-01

    A Tabletop discharge * created above atmospheric pressure in a N2 gas flow, uses some 10 kV very fast high voltage pulses applied between needle electrodes with some 10 kHz repetition rate. It is followed by a post-discharge, in a plastic tube with 6-mm internal diameter. Adjusting the flow and the repetition rate, the post-discharge exhibits a surprisingly long size, 9-10 m, as shown by the tube fluorescence. Preliminary spectroscopic measurements demonstrate that fluorescence is due to internal gas excited molecules (CN and NH) that are locally created by active species interaction with organic impurities. The discharge emission spectrum evidences a high nitrogen atom production rate, much higher than attainable rate with a Dielectric Barrier Discharge with same applied voltage pulses. For small air quantities added in the post-discharge, spectrum exhibits rich UV range corresponding to NO excited states. Further studies will be devoted to the post-discharge kinetics and to possible applications to medical sterilization. *M. Ganciu, private communication

  14. The Infrared-Optical Telescope (IRT) of the Exist Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutyrev, Alexander; Bloom, Joshua; Gehrels, Neil; Golisano, Craig; Gong, Quan; Grindlay, Jonathan; Moseley, Samuel; Woodgate, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    The IRT is a 1.1m visible and infrared passively cooled telescope, which can locate, identify and obtain spectra of GRB afterglows at redshifts up to z 20. It will also acquire optical-IR, imaging and spectroscopy of AGN and transients discovered by the EXIST (The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope). The IRT imaging and spectroscopic capabilities cover a broad spectral range from 0.32.2m in four bands. The identical fields of view in the four instrument bands are each split in three subfields: imaging, objective prism slitless for the field and objective prism single object slit low resolution spectroscopy, and high resolution long slit on single object. This allows the instrument, to do simultaneous broadband photometry or spectroscopy of the same object over the full spectral range, thus greatly improving the efficiency of the observatory and its detection limits. A prompt follow up (within three minutes) of the transient discovered by the EXIST makes IRT a unique tool for detection and study of these events, which is particularly valuable at wavelengths unavailable to the ground based observatories.

  15. Mary, a Pipeline to Aid Discovery of Optical Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreoni, I.; Jacobs, C.; Hegarty, S.; Pritchard, T.; Cooke, J.; Ryder, S.

    2017-09-01

    The ability to quickly detect transient sources in optical images and trigger multi-wavelength follow up is key for the discovery of fast transients. These include events rare and difficult to detect such as kilonovae, supernova shock breakout, and `orphan' Gamma-ray Burst afterglows. We present the Mary pipeline, a (mostly) automated tool to discover transients during high-cadenced observations with the Dark Energy Camera at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). The observations are part of the `Deeper Wider Faster' programme, a multi-facility, multi-wavelength programme designed to discover fast transients, including counterparts to Fast Radio Bursts and gravitational waves. Our tests of the Mary pipeline on Dark Energy Camera images return a false positive rate of 2.2% and a missed fraction of 3.4% obtained in less than 2 min, which proves the pipeline to be suitable for rapid and high-quality transient searches. The pipeline can be adapted to search for transients in data obtained with imagers other than Dark Energy Camera.

  16. PROMPT: Panchromatic Robotic Optical Monitoring and Polarimetry Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichart, D.; Nysewander, M.; Moran, J.; Bartelme, J.; Bayliss, M.; Foster, A.; Clemens, J. C.; Price, P.; Evans, C.; Salmonson, J.; Trammell, S.; Carney, B.; Keohane, J.; Gotwals, R.

    2005-07-01

    Funded by .2M in grants and donations, we are now building PROMPT at CTIO. When completed in late 2005, PROMPT will consist of six 0.41-meter diameter Ritchey-Chrétien telescopes on rapidly slewing mounts that respond to GRB alerts within seconds, when the afterglow is potentially extremely bright. Each mirror and camera coating is being optimized for a different wavelength range and function, including a NIR imager, two red-optimized imagers, a blue-optimized imager, an UV-optimized imager, and an optical polarimeter. PROMPT will be able to identify high-redshift events by dropout and distinguish these events from the similar signatures of extinction. In this way, PROMPT will act as a distance-finder scope for spectroscopic follow up on the larger 4.1-meter diameter SOAR telescope, which is also located at CTIO. When not chasing GRBs, PROMPT serves broader educational objectives across the state of North Carolina. Enclosure construction and the first two telescopes are now complete and functioning: PROMPT observed Swift's first GRB in December 2004. We upgrade from two to four telescope in February 2005 and from four to six telescopes in mid-2005.

  17. Optical and scintillation properties of Nd-doped complex garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagida, Takayuki; Sato, Hiroki

    2014-12-01

    Nd 1% doped complex garnet scintillators were prepared by Furukawa and their optical and scintillation properties were investigated on a comparison with previously reported Nd-doped YAG. Chemical compositions of newly developed complex garnets were Lu2Y1Al5O12, Lu2Y1Ga3Al2O12, Lu2Gd1Al5O12, Lu2Gd1Ga3Al2O12, Gd1Y2Al5O12, Gd1Y2Ga3Al2O12, and Gd3Ga3Al2O12. They all showed 50-80% transmittance from ultraviolet to near infrared wavelengths with several absorption bands due to Gd3+ or Nd3+ 4f-4f transition. In X-ray induced radioluminescence spectra, all samples exhibited intense lines at 310 nm due to Gd3+ or 400 nm due to Nd3+ depending on their chemical composition. Among them, the highest scintillation light yield was achieved by Lu2Y1Al5O12. Typical scintillation decay times of them resulted 1.5-3 μs. Thermally stimulated glow curve after 1 Gy exposure and X-ray induced afterglow were also investigated.

  18. EDITORIAL: Transformation optics Transformation optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalaev, Vladimir M.; Pendry, John

    2011-02-01

    Metamaterials are artificial materials with versatile properties that can be tailored to fit almost any practical need and thus go well beyond what can be obtained with `natural' materials. Recent progress in developing optical metamaterials allows unprecedented extreme control over the flow of light at both the nano- and macroscopic scales. The innovative field of transformation optics, which is enabled by metamaterials, inspired researchers to take a fresh look at the very foundations of optics and helped to create a new paradigm for the science of light. Similar to general relativity, where time and space are curved, transformation optics shows that the space for light can also be bent in an almost arbitrary way. Most importantly, the optical space can be designed and engineered, opening up the fascinating possibility of controlling the flow of light with nanometer spatial precision. This new paradigm enables a number of novel optical devices guiding how, using metamaterials, the space for light can be curved in a pre-designed and well-controlled way. Metamaterials which incorporate the innovative theories of transformation optics are pertinent to the important areas of optical cloaking, optical black holes, super-resolution imaging, and other sci-fi-like devices. One such exciting device is an electromagnetic cloak that can bend light around itself, similar to the flow of water around a stone, making invisible both the cloak and the object hidden inside. Another important application is a flat hyperlens that can magnify the nanometer-scale features of an object that cannot be resolved with conventional optics. This could revolutionize the field of optical imaging, for instance, because such a meta-lens could become a standard add-on tool for microscopes. By enabling nanoscale resolution in optical microscopy, metamaterial-based transformation optics could allow one to literally see extremely small objects with the eye, including biological cells, viruses, and

  19. Optical coupler

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Weisenberger, Andrew G.

    2004-06-15

    In a camera or similar radiation sensitive device comprising a pixilated scintillation layer, a light guide and an array of position sensitive photomultiplier tubes, wherein there exists so-called dead space between adjacent photomultiplier tubes the improvement comprising a two part light guide comprising a first planar light spreading layer or portion having a first surface that addresses the scintillation layer and optically coupled thereto at a second surface that addresses the photomultiplier tubes, a second layer or portion comprising an array of trapezoidal light collectors defining gaps that span said dead space and are individually optically coupled to individual position sensitive photomultiplier tubes. According to a preferred embodiment, coupling of the trapezoidal light collectors to the position sensitive photomultiplier tubes is accomplished using an optical grease having about the same refractive index as the material of construction of the two part light guide.

  20. Optical resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor); Yariv, Amnon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention discloses a semi-ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP) optical resonator structure comprising a medium including an edge forming a reflective facet and a waveguide within the medium, the waveguide having opposing ends formed by the reflective facet. The performance of the SRFP resonator can be further enhanced by including a Mach-Zehnder interferometer in the waveguide on one side of the gain medium. The optical resonator can be employed in a variety of optical devices. Laser structures using at least one SRFP resonator are disclosed where the resonators are disposed on opposite sides of a gain medium. Other laser structures employing one or more resonators on one side of a gain region are also disclosed.

  1. Statistical optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, J. W.

    This book is based on the thesis that some training in the area of statistical optics should be included as a standard part of any advanced optics curriculum. Random variables are discussed, taking into account definitions of probability and random variables, distribution functions and density functions, an extension to two or more random variables, statistical averages, transformations of random variables, sums of real random variables, Gaussian random variables, complex-valued random variables, and random phasor sums. Other subjects examined are related to random processes, some first-order properties of light waves, the coherence of optical waves, some problems involving high-order coherence, effects of partial coherence on imaging systems, imaging in the presence of randomly inhomogeneous media, and fundamental limits in photoelectric detection of light. Attention is given to deterministic versus statistical phenomena and models, the Fourier transform, and the fourth-order moment of the spectrum of a detected speckle image.

  2. Optical correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotariu, Steven S.

    1991-12-01

    Pattern recognition may supplement or replace certain navigational aids on spacecraft in docking or landing activities. The need to correctly identify terrain features remains critical in preparation of autonomous planetary landing. One technique that may solve this problem is optical correlation. Correlation has been successfully demonstrated under ideal conditions; however, noise significantly affects the ability of the correlator to accurately identify input signals. Optical correlation in the presence of noise must be successfully demonstrated before this technology can be incorporated into system design. An optical correlator is designed and constructed using a modified 2f configuration. Liquid crystal televisions (LCTV) are used as the spatial light modulators (SLM) for both the input and filter devices. The filter LCTV is characterized and an operating curve is developed. Determination of this operating curve is critical for reduction of input noise. Correlation of live input with a programmable filter is demonstrated.

  3. Optical Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotariu, Steven S.

    1991-01-01

    Pattern recognition may supplement or replace certain navigational aids on spacecraft in docking or landing activities. The need to correctly identify terrain features remains critical in preparation of autonomous planetary landing. One technique that may solve this problem is optical correlation. Correlation has been successfully demonstrated under ideal conditions; however, noise significantly affects the ability of the correlator to accurately identify input signals. Optical correlation in the presence of noise must be successfully demonstrated before this technology can be incorporated into system design. An optical correlator is designed and constructed using a modified 2f configuration. Liquid crystal televisions (LCTV) are used as the spatial light modulators (SLM) for both the input and filter devices. The filter LCTV is characterized and an operating curve is developed. Determination of this operating curve is critical for reduction of input noise. Correlation of live input with a programmable filter is demonstrated.

  4. Optical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, A.D.

    1987-09-28

    An optical analyzer wherein a sample of particulate matter, and particularly of organic matter, which has been collected on a quartz fiber filter is placed in a combustion tube, and light from a light source is passed through the sample. The temperature of the sample is raised at a controlled rate and in a controlled atmosphere. The magnitude of the transmission of light through the sample is detected as the temperature is raised. A data processor, differentiator and a two pen recorder provide a chart of the optical transmission versus temperature and the rate of change of optical transmission versus temperature signatures (T and D) of the sample. These signatures provide information as to physical and chemical processes and a variety of quantitative and qualitative information about the sample. Additional information is obtained by repeating the run in different atmospheres and/or different rates or heating with other samples of the same particulate material collected on other filters. 7 figs.

  5. Characterization of X-ray Lobster Optics with a Hybrid CMOS sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Tanmoy; Falcone, Abraham; Burrows, David N.; Bray, Evan; McQuaide, Maria; Kern, Matthew; Wages, Mitchell; Hull, Samuel; Inneman, Adolf; Hudec, Rene; Stehlikova, Veronika

    2018-01-01

    X-ray lobster optics provide a unique way to focus X-rays onto a small focal plane imager with wide field of view imaging. Such an instrument with angular resolution of a few arcminutes can be used to study GRB afterglows, as well as the variability and spectroscopic characteristics for various astrophysical objects. At Penn State University, we have characterized a lobster optic with an H1RG X-Ray hybrid CMOS detector (100 μm thick Silicon with 18 μm pixel size). The light-weight compact lobster optic with a 25 cm focal length provides two dimensional imaging with ~25 cm2 effective area at 2 keV. We utilize a 47 meter long X-ray beam line at Penn state University to do our experiments where we characterize the overall effective area of the instrument at 1.5 - 8 keV for both on-axis and off-axis angles. In this presentation, we will describe the characterization test stand and methods, as well as the detailed results. While this is simply a proof-of-concept experiment, such an instrument with significant collecting area can be explored for future rocket or CubeSat experiments.

  6. Modeling of N2 and O optical emissions for ionosphere HF powerful heating experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergienko, T.; Gustavsson, B.

    Analyses of experiments of F region ionosphere modification by HF powerful radio waves show that optical observations are very useful tools for diagnosing of the interaction of the probing radio wave with the ionospheric plasma Hitherto the emissions usually measured in the heating experiment have been the 630 0 nm and the 557 7 nm lines of atomic oxygen Other emissions for instance O 844 8 nm and N2 427 8 nm have been measured episodically in only a few experiments although the very rich optical spectrum of molecular nitrogen potentially involves important information about ionospheric plasma in the heated region This study addresses the modeling of optical emissions from the O and the N2 triplet states first positive second positive Vegard-Kaplan infrared afterglow and Wu-Benesch band systems excited under a condition of the ionosphere heating experiment The auroral triplet state population distribution model was modified for the ionosphere heating conditions by using the different electron distribution functions suggested by Mishin et al 2000 2003 and Gustavsson at al 2004 2005 Modeling results are discussed from the point of view of efficiency of measurements of the N2 emissions in future experiments

  7. Optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    An optical switching device (10) is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber (16) or a second glass fiber (14) may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber (18). Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system (26, 28, 30). In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber (16) is reflected by a planar mirror (36) into the third glass fiber (18). In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber (14) passes directly into the third glass fiber (18). The planar mirror (36) is attached to a rotatable table (32) which is rotated to provide the optical switching.

  8. Optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, R.P.

    1985-01-18

    An optical switching device is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber or a second glass fiber may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber. Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system. In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber is reflected by a planar mirror into the third glass fiber. In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber passes directly into the third glass fiber. The planar mirror is attached to a rotatable table which is rotated to provide the optical switching.

  9. Optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, R.P.

    1987-11-10

    An optical switching device is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber or a second glass fiber may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber. Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system. In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber is reflected by a planar mirror into the third glass fiber. In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber passes directly into the third glass fiber. The planar mirror is attached to a rotatable table which is rotated to provide the optical switching. 3 figs.

  10. Optical superheterodyne receiver.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, K.; Lang, K.; Lucy, R. F.; Peters, C. J.

    1967-01-01

    Optical communication experiments to compare coherent and noncoherent optical detection fading characteristics in different weather conditions, using laser transmitter and optical superheterodyne receiver

  11. Optical Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergsten, Ronald

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the production and structure of a sequence of optical crystals which can serve as one-, two-, and three-dimensional diffraction plates to illustrate diffraction patterns by using light rather than x-rays or particles. Applications to qualitative presentations of Laue theory at the secondary and college levels are recommended. (CC)

  12. Optical profilometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieloszyńska, Aleksandra; StrÄ kowski, Marcin

    2016-09-01

    The profilometry plays a huge role in the most fields of science and technology. It allows to measure the profile of the surface with high-resolution. This technique is used in the fields like optic, electronic, medicine, automotive, and much more. The aim of the current work was to design and build optical profilometer based on the interference phenomena. The developed device has been working with He-Ne laser (632.8 nm). The optical parts have been chosen in order to reach the sized 2.0 mm x 1.6 mm of scanning area. The setup of the profilometer is based on Twyman-Green interferometer. Therefore, the phase distribution of the backreflected light from measured surface is recorded. The measurements are carried out with the aid of multiframe algorithms. In this approach we have used the Hariharan algorithm to obtain the exact value of the recorded phase. During tests, which have been carried out in order to check the functionality of the device, the interference patterns have been recoded and processed in order to obtain the 3D profile of measured surface. In this contribution the setup of the optical system, as well as signal processing methods are going to be presented. The brief discussion about the advantages and disadvantages, and usefulness of this approach will be carried out.

  13. The Origin of the Optical Flashes: The Case Study of GRB 080319B and GRB 130427A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraija, N.; Veres, P.

    2018-05-01

    Correlations between optical flashes and gamma-ray emissions in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been searched in order to clarify the question of whether these emissions occur at internal and/or external shocks. Among the most powerful GRBs ever recorded are GRB 080319B and GRB 130427A, which at early phases presented bright optical flashes possibly correlated with γ-ray components. Additionally, both bursts were fortuitously located within the field of view of the TeV γ-ray Milagro and HAWC observatories, and although no statistically significant excess of counts were collected, upper limits were placed on the GeV–TeV emission. Considering the synchrotron self-Compton emission from internal shocks and requiring the GeV–TeV upper limits, we found that the optical flashes and the γ-ray components are produced by different electron populations. Analyzing the optical flashes together with the multiwavelength afterglow observation, we found that these flashes can be interpreted in the framework of the synchrotron reverse shock model when outflows have arbitrary magnetizations.

  14. Soft optics in intelligent optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shue, Chikong; Cao, Yang

    2001-10-01

    In addition to the recent advances in Hard-optics that pushes the optical transmission speed, distance, wave density and optical switching capacity, Soft-optics provides the necessary intelligence and control software that reduces operational costs, increase efficiency, and enhances revenue generating services by automating optimal optical circuit placement and restoration, and enabling value-added new services like Optical VPN. This paper describes the advances in 1) Overall Hard-optics and Soft-optics 2) Layered hierarchy of Soft-optics 3) Component of Soft-optics, including hard-optics drivers, Management Soft-optics, Routing Soft-optics and System Soft-optics 4) Key component of Routing and System Soft-optics, namely optical routing and signaling (including UNI/NNI and GMPLS signaling). In summary, the soft-optics on a new generation of OXC's enables Intelligent Optical Networks to provide just-in-time service delivery and fast restoration, and real-time capacity management that eliminates stranded bandwidth. It reduces operational costs and provides new revenue opportunities.

  15. Optical Ethernet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Calvin C. K.; Lam, Cedric F.; Tsang, Danny H. K.

    2005-09-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Ethernet The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) is soliciting papers for a second feature issue on Optical Ethernet. Ethernet has evolved from a LAN technology connecting desktop computers to a universal broadband network interface. It is not only the vehicle for local data connectivity but also the standard interface for next-generation network equipment such as video servers and IP telephony. High-speed Ethernet has been increasingly assuming the volume of backbone network traffic from SONET/SDH-based circuit applications. It is clear that IP has become the universal network protocol for future converged networks, and Ethernet is becoming the ubiquitous link layer for connectivity. Network operators have been offering Ethernet services for several years. Problems and new requirements in Ethernet service offerings have been captured through previous experience. New study groups and standards bodies have been formed to address these problems. This feature issue aims at reviewing and updating the new developments and R&D efforts of high-speed Ethernet in recent years, especially those related to the field of optical networking. Scope of Submission The scope of the papers includes, but is not limited to, the following: Ethernet PHY development 10-Gbit Ethernet on multimode fiber Native Ethernet transport and Ethernet on legacy networks EPON Ethernet OAM Resilient packet ring (RPR) and Ethernet QoS definition and management on Ethernet Ethernet protection switching Circuit emulation services on Ethernet Transparent LAN service development Carrier VLAN and Ethernet Ethernet MAC frame expansion Ethernet switching High-speed Ethernet applications Economic models of high-speed Ethernet services Ethernet field deployment and standard activities To submit to this special issue, follow the normal procedure for submission to JON, indicating "Optical Ethernet feature" in the "Comments" field of the online submission form. For all other questions

  16. Biphoton optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry Vladimirovich

    1997-10-01

    The subject of this dissertation is the study of the two- photon entanglement. This phenomenon has been paid a great deal of attention since 1935, when A. Einstein, B. Podolsky and N. Rosen asked their famous question, 'Can quantum-mechanical description of physical reality be considered complete?' An entangled system behavior is inconsistent with many classical concepts. Therefore, the understanding of two-photon entanglement is important for the foundations of quantum theory. A two-photon entangled sate represents a two-photon, or a biphoton, rather than two photons. The concept of biphoton as a single nonlocal quantum object is fundamentally different from the concept of a photon pair, as has been experimentally demonstrated in the present dissertation. Two-photon entanglement gives rise to unusual 'ghost' interference and diffraction, nonlocal geometrical phase, and other quantum phenomena originally studied in the present dissertation. The variety of available results calls for bringing them into a general system which we call Biphoton Optics. This is the main goal of this dissertation. Biphoton optics operate with two-photon wave packets, or with an equivalent concept of advanced wave. We show that in the framework of the advanced wave concept two-photon phenomena can be effectively described in terms of classical optics. Therefore the biphoton optics has the same structure as the classical optics. It includes two- photon geometrical optics, dispersion and frequency beating, polarization effects, interference, diffraction, and geometrical phase. All these two-photon effects are represented by experiments included in this dissertation. Our approach does not make two-photon quantum effects 'classical', however. It should be understood that the advanced wave model operates with counter-propagation in time which does not correspond to any real physical process. Therefore it is just a model, but it is clearly a great advantage to have such a model that is both

  17. Fiber optic monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    Samborsky, James K.

    1993-01-01

    A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information.

  18. Optical Processing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    Further improvements are clearly necessary. 2.2.2 Future Work It would appear that transverse cross-talk is a serious problem in thermally based bistable... manufacturing purposes except under an agreement or with the consent in writing of Ferranti pic and then only on the condition that this notice is...applications which might: (a) appear to benefit from the advantages offered by optical processing (such as large parallelism and dense global inter

  19. Foveated optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Kyle R.

    2016-05-01

    Foveated imaging can deliver two different resolutions on a single focal plane, which might inexpensively allow more capability for military systems. The following design study results provide starting examples, lessons learned, and helpful setup equations and pointers to aid the lens designer in any foveated lens design effort. Our goal is to put robust sensor in a small package with no moving parts, but still be able to perform some of the functions of a sensor in a moving gimbal. All of the elegant solutions are out (for various reasons). This study is an attempt to see if lens designs can solve this problem and realize some gains in performance versus cost for airborne sensors. We determined a series of design concepts to simultaneously deliver wide field of view and high foveal resolution without scanning or gimbals. Separate sensors for each field of view are easy and relatively inexpensive, but lead to bulky detectors and electronics. Folding and beam-combining of separate optical channels reduces sensor footprint, but induces image inversions and reduced transmission. Entirely common optics provide good resolution, but cannot provide a significant magnification increase in the foveal region. Offsetting the foveal region from the wide field center may not be physically realizable, but may be required for some applications. The design study revealed good general guidance for foveated optics designs with a cold stop. Key lessons learned involve managing distortion, telecentric imagers, matching image inversions and numerical apertures between channels, reimaging lenses, and creating clean resolution zone splits near internal focal planes.

  20. Optical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Anthony D.

    1989-02-07

    An optical analyzer (10) wherein a sample (19) of particulate matter, and particularly of organic matter, which has been collected on a quartz fiber filter (20) is placed in a combustion tube (11), and light from a light source (14) is passed through the sample (19). The temperature of the sample (19) is raised at a controlled rate and in a controlled atmosphere. The magnitude of the transmission of light through the sample (19) is detected (18) as the temperature is raised. A data processor (23), differentiator (28) and a two pen recorder (24) provide a chart of the optical transmission versus temperature and the rate of change of optical transmission versus temperature signatures (T and D) of the sample (19). These signatures provide information as to physical and chemical processes and a variety of quantitative and qualitative information about the sample (19). Additional information is obtained by repeating the run in different atmospheres and/or different rates of heating with other samples of the same particulate material collected on other filters.

  1. Nonimaging optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winston, Roland

    1991-03-01

    Various uses of nonimaging concentrators and advances in the field of nonimaging optics are discussed. A nonimaging concentrator acts as a type of funnel for light by collecting and intensifying radiation far better than a lens or mirror would. It thus has found useful applications in fields ranging from high-energy physics to solar energy. The history of the field of nonimaging optics is traced, beginning with the design of the first compound parabolic concentrators in the mid-1960s. It is noted that at present there are two known ways to design nonimaging concentrators: the edge-ray method and the geometric vector flux approach. The use of nonimaging optical devices in the design of nontracking solar concentrators is traced. It is noted that the upper limit of concentration turns out to be about 46,000 times the intensity of sunlight at the surface of the earth. Methods used to maximize this concentration are discussed. The development and use of a solar-pumped laser which would have applications in satellite communications are discussed.

  2. Optical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Anthony D.

    1989-01-01

    An optical analyzer (10) wherein a sample (19) of particulate matter, and particularly of organic matter, which has been collected on a quartz fiber filter (20) is placed in a combustion tube (11), and light from a light source (14) is passed through the sample (19). The temperature of the sample (19) is raised at a controlled rate and in a controlled atmosphere. The magnitude of the transmission of light through the sample (19) is detected (18) as the temperature is raised. A data processor (23), differentiator (28) and a two pen recorder (24) provide a chart of the optical transmission versus temperature and the rate of change of optical transmission versus temperature signatures (T and D) of the sample (19). These signatures provide information as to physical and chemical processes and a variety of quantitative and qualitative information about the sample (19). Additional information is obtained by repeating the run in different atmospheres and/or different rates of heating with other samples of the same particulate material collected on other filters.

  3. Optical gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifollahi, Alireza

    It is said that future of the world is based on space exploration which leads us to think more about low cost and light weight instruments. Cheap and sensitive instruments should be de-signed and replace the expensive ones. One of the required instruments in space ships is gyroscope controls the direction of space ship. In this article I am going to give an idea to use optical properties in a new gyroscope which will be cheaper as well as more sensitive in com-pare with most of the being used normal gyroscope nowadays. This instrument uses an optical system to measure the angular changes in the direction of a space craft movements in any of the three axels. Any movement, even very small one, will move a crystal bulb which is lashed by some narrow elastic bands in a fixed box surrounded by three optical sources and light meters. Light meters measure the attitude and the angel of changes in the light beams going through the bulb which is related to the amount of changes in the space craft directions. The system will be very sensitive even against movement around its access. As an electro digital device in connection to a Main Process Unit (MPU) it can be used in Stability Augmentation System (SAS) in a space ship. The sensitivity rate of the instrument will be based on the quality and sensitivity of the light meters.

  4. Optical instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, I. R. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A wide angle, low focal ratio, high resolution, catoptric, image plane scanner is described. The scanner includes the following features: (1) a reflective improvement on the Schmidt principle, (2) a polar line scanner in which all field elements are brought to and corrected on axis, and (3) a scanner arrangement in which the aperture stop of the system is imaged at the center of curvature of a spherical primary mirror. The system scans are a large radial angle and an extremely high rate of speed with relatively small scanning mirrors. Because the system is symmetrical about the optical axis, the obscuration is independent of the scan angle.

  5. Optical devices

    DOEpatents

    Chaves, Julio C.; Falicoff, Waqidi; Minano, Juan C.; Benitez, Pablo; Dross, Oliver; Parkyn, Jr., William A.

    2010-07-13

    An optical manifold for efficiently combining a plurality of blue LED outputs to illuminate a phosphor for a single, substantially homogeneous output, in a small, cost-effective package. Embodiments are disclosed that use a single or multiple LEDs and a remote phosphor, and an intermediate wavelength-selective filter arranged so that backscattered photoluminescence is recycled to boost the luminance and flux of the output aperture. A further aperture mask is used to boost phosphor luminance with only modest loss of luminosity. Alternative non-recycling embodiments provide blue and yellow light in collimated beams, either separately or combined into white.

  6. Optical Processing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-31

    34 Optics Letters, 2 (1), 1-3 (1978). 7. Grossberg, S., "Adaptive Resonance in Development, Perception and Cognition ," SIAM-AMS Proc., 13, 107-156...Illusions," Biol. Cybernetics, 23, 187-202, (1976b). 11. Grossberg, S., "How Does A Brain Build a Cognitive Code?", Psychol. Review, 87 (1), 1-51 (1980...34perceptron" (F. Rosenblatt, Principles of Neurodynamics ), workers in the neural network field have been seeking to understand how neural networks can perform

  7. Optical microphone

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2000-01-11

    An optical microphone includes a laser and beam splitter cooperating therewith for splitting a laser beam into a reference beam and a signal beam. A reflecting sensor receives the signal beam and reflects it in a plurality of reflections through sound pressure waves. A photodetector receives both the reference beam and reflected signal beam for heterodyning thereof to produce an acoustic signal for the sound waves. The sound waves vary the local refractive index in the path of the signal beam which experiences a Doppler frequency shift directly analogous with the sound waves.

  8. RAPTOR: Closed-Loop monitoring of the night sky and the earliest optical detection of GRB 021211

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestrand, W. T.; Borozdin, K.; Casperson, D. J.; Fenimore, E.; Galassi, M.; McGowan, K.; Starr, D.; White, R. R.; Wozniak, P.; Wren, J.

    2004-10-01

    We discuss the RAPTOR (Rapid Telescopes for Optical Response) sky monitoring system at Los Alamos National Laboratory. RAPTOR is a fully autonomous robotic system that is designed to identify and make follow-up observations of optical transients with durations as short as one minute. The RAPTOR design is based on Biomimicry of Human Vision. The sky monitor is composed of two identical arrays of telescopes, separated by 38 kilometers, which stereoscopically monitor a field of about 1300 square-degrees for transients. Both monitoring arrays are carried on rapidly slewing mounts and are composed of an ensemble of wide-field telescopes clustered around a more powerful narrow-field telescope called the ``fovea'' telescope. All telescopes are coupled to real-time analysis pipelines that identify candidate transients and relay the information to a central decision unit that filters the candidates to find real celestial transients and command a response. When a celestial transient is found, the system can point the fovea telescopes to any position on the sky within five seconds and begin follow-up observations. RAPTOR also responds to Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) alerts generated by GRB monitoring spacecraft. Here we present RAPTOR observations of GRB 021211 that constitute the earliest detection of optical emission from that event and are the second fastest achieved for any GRB. The detection of bright optical emission from GRB021211, a burst with modest gamma-ray fluence, indicates that prompt optical emission, detectable with small robotic telescopes, is more common than previously thought. Further, the very fast decline of the optical afterglow from GRB 021211 suggests that some so-called ``optically dark'' GRBs were not detected only because of the slow response of the follow-up telescopes.

  9. EDITORIAL: Optical orientation Optical orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SAME ADDRESS *, Yuri; Landwehr, Gottfried

    2008-11-01

    priority of the discovery in the literature, which was partly caused by the existence of the Iron Curtain. I had already enjoyed contact with Boris in the 1980s when the two volumes of Landau Level Spectroscopy were being prepared [2]. He was one of the pioneers of magneto-optics in semiconductors. In the 1950s the band structure of germanium and silicon was investigated by magneto-optical methods, mainly in the United States. No excitonic effects were observed and the band structure parameters were determined without taking account of excitons. However, working with cuprous oxide, which is a direct semiconductor with a relative large energy gap, Zakharchenya and his co-worker Seysan showed that in order to obtain correct band structure parameters, it is necessary to take excitons into account [3]. About 1970 Boris started work on optical orientation. Early work by Hanle in Germany in the 1920s on the depolarization of luminescence in mercury vapour by a transverse magnetic field was not appreciated for a long time. Only in the late 1940s did Kastler and co-workers in Paris begin a systematic study of optical pumping, which led to the award of a Nobel prize. The ideas of optical pumping were first applied by Georges Lampel to solid state physics in 1968. He demonstrated optical orientation of free carriers in silicon. The detection method was nuclear magnetic resonance; optically oriented free electrons dynamically polarized the 29Si nuclei of the host lattice. The first optical detection of spin orientation was demonstrated by with the III-V semiconductor GaSb by Parsons. Due to the various interaction mechanisms of spins with their environment, the effects occurring in semiconductors are naturally more complex than those in atoms. Optical detection is now the preferred method to detect spin alignment in semiconductors. The orientation of spins in crystals pumped with circularly polarized light is deduced from the degree of circular polarization of the recombination

  10. Optical Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Precision Lapping and Optical Co. has developed a wide variety of hollow retroreflector systems for applications involving the entire optical spectrum; they are, according to company literature, cheaper, more accurate, lighter and capable of greater size than solid prisms. Precision Lapping's major customers are aerospace and defense companies, government organizations, R&D and commercial instrument companies. For example, Precision Lapping supplies hollow retroreflectors for the laser fire control system of the Army's Abrams tank, and retroreflectors have been and are being used in a number of space tests relative to the Air Force's Strategic Defense Initiative research program. An example of a customer/user is Chesapeake Laser Systems, producer of the Laser Tracker System CMS-2000, which has applications in SDI research and industrial robotics. Another customer is MDA Scientific, Inc., manufacturer of a line of toxic gas detection systems used to monitor hazardous gases present in oil fields, refineries, offshore platforms, chemical plants, waste storage sites and other locations where gases are released into the environment.

  11. Early-Time HANE Simulation and Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    we suggest attacking the question of structure with target variation. Irregular structure in laboratory simulations of HANE’s can arise from...plasma instabilities even when the illuminating laser beam and target are optimized to yield a very uniform initial expansion. Irregularities ... irregular structure be purposely explored. In particular we encourage the use of a wide variety of inhomogeneous targets. Target irregularities

  12. Flowing afterglow studies of the electron recombination of protonated cyanides (RCN)H+ and their proton-bound dimer ions (RCN)2H+ where R is H, CH3, and CH3CH2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLain, J. L.; Molek, C. D.; , D. Osborne, Jr.; Adams, N. G.

    2009-05-01

    A study has been made of the electron-ion dissociative recombination of the protonated cyanides (RCNH+, R = H, CH3, C2H5) and their proton-bound dimers (RCN)2H+ at 300 K. This has been accomplished with the flowing afterglow technique using an electrostatic Langmuir probe to determine the electron density decay along the flow tube. For the protonated species, the recombination coefficients, [alpha]e(cm3 s-1), are (3.6 +/- 0.5) × 10-7, (3.4 +/- 0.5) × 10-7, (4.6 +/- 0.7) × 10-7 for R = H, CH3, C2H5, respectively. For the proton-bound dimers, the [alpha]e are substantially greater being (2.4 +/- 0.4) × 10-6, (2.8 +/- 0.4) × 10-6, (2.3 +/- 0.3) × 10-6 for R = H, CH3, C2H5, respectively. Fitting of the electron density decay data to a simple model has shown that the rate coefficients for the three-body association of RCNH+ with RCN are very large being (2.0 +/- 0.5) × 10-26 cm6 s-1. The significance of these data to the Titan ionosphere is discussed.

  13. Optical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Page, N. A.; Shack, R. V.; Shannon, R. R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is an otpical system used in a spacecraft to observe a remote surface and provide a spatial and spectral image of this surface. The optical system includes aspheric and spherical mirrors aligned to focus at a first focal plane an image of the surface, and a mirror at this first focal plane which reflects light back on to the spherical mirror. This spherical mirror collimates the light and directs it through a prism which disperses it. The dispersed light is then focused on an array of light responsive elements disposed at a second focal plane. The prism is designed such that it disperses light into components of different wavelengths, with the components of shorter wavelengths being dispersed more than the components of longer wavelengths to present at the second focal plane a distribution pattern in which preselected groupings of the components are dispersed over essentially equal spacing intervals.

  14. Optical manifold

    DOEpatents

    Falicoff, Waqidi; Chaves, Julio C.; Minano, Juan Carlos; Benitez, Pablo; Dross, Oliver; Parkyn, Jr., William A.

    2010-02-23

    Optical systems are described that have at least one source of a beam of blue light with divergence under 15.degree.. A phosphor emits yellow light when excited by the blue light. A collimator is disposed with the phosphor and forms a yellow beam with divergence under 15.degree.. A dichroic filter is positioned to transmit the beam of blue light to the phosphor and to reflect the beam of yellow light to an exit aperture. In different embodiments, the beams of blue and yellow light are incident upon said filter with central angles of 15.degree., 22.degree., and 45.degree.. The filter may reflect all of one polarization and part of the other polarization, and a polarization rotating retroreflector may then be provided to return the unreflected light to the filter.

  15. PAIR-DOMINATED GeV-OPTICAL FLASH IN GRB 130427A

    SciT

    Vurm, Indrek; Hascoët, Romain; Beloborodov, Andrei M., E-mail: indrek.vurm@gmail.com

    2014-07-10

    We show that the light curve of the double GeV+optical flash in GRB 130427A is consistent with radiation from the blast wave in a wind-type medium with density parameter A = ρr {sup 2} ∼ 5 × 10{sup 10} g cm{sup –1}. The peak of the flash is emitted by copious e {sup ±} pairs created and heated in the blast wave; our first-principle calculation determines the pair-loading factor and temperature of the shocked plasma. Using detailed radiative transfer simulations, we reconstruct the observed double flash. The optical flash is dominated by synchrotron emission from the thermal plasma behind the forward shock, andmore » the GeV flash is produced via inverse Compton (IC) scattering by the same plasma. The seed photons for IC scattering are dominated by the prompt MeV radiation during the first tens of seconds, and by the optical to X-ray afterglow thereafter. IC cooling of the thermal plasma behind the forward shock reproduces all GeV data from a few seconds to ∼1 day. We find that the blast wave Lorentz factor at the peak of the flash is Γ ≈ 200, and the forward shock magnetization is ε{sub B} ∼ 2 × 10{sup –4}. An additional source is required by the data in the optical and X-ray bands at times >10{sup 2} s; we speculate that this additional source may be a long-lived reverse shock in the explosion ejecta.« less

  16. Optical data latch

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, G Allen [Corrales, NM

    2010-08-31

    An optical data latch is formed on a substrate from a pair of optical logic gates in a cross-coupled arrangement in which optical waveguides are used to couple an output of each gate to an photodetector input of the other gate. This provides an optical bi-stability which can be used to store a bit of optical information in the latch. Each optical logic gate, which can be an optical NOT gate (i.e. an optical inverter) or an optical NOR gate, includes a waveguide photodetector electrically connected in series with a waveguide electroabsorption modulator. The optical data latch can be formed on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate (e.g. an InP or GaAs substrate) from III-V compound semiconductor layers. A number of optical data latches can be cascaded to form a clocked optical data shift register.

  17. Fiber optic multiplex optical transmission system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, C. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A multiplex optical transmission system which minimizes external interference while simultaneously receiving and transmitting video, digital data, and audio signals is described. Signals are received into subgroup mixers for blocking into respective frequency ranges. The outputs of these mixers are in turn fed to a master mixer which produces a composite electrical signal. An optical transmitter connected to the master mixer converts the composite signal into an optical signal and transmits it over a fiber optic cable to an optical receiver which receives the signal and converts it back to a composite electrical signal. A de-multiplexer is coupled to the output of the receiver for separating the composite signal back into composite video, digital data, and audio signals. A programmable optic patch board is interposed in the fiber optic cables for selectively connecting the optical signals to various receivers and transmitters.

  18. Integrated optics technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B.; Findakly, T.; Innarella, R.

    1982-01-01

    The status and near term potential of materials and processes available for the fabrication of single mode integrated electro-optical components are discussed. Issues discussed are host material and orientation, waveguide formation, optical loss mechanisms, wavelength selection, polarization effects and control, laser to integrated optics coupling fiber optic waveguides to integrated optics coupling, sources, and detectors. Recommendations of the best materials, technology, and processes for fabrication of integrated optical components for communications and fiber gyro applications are given.

  19. Optic Nerve Decompression

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nerve Decompression Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly Optic Nerve Decompression John Lee, MD Introduction Optic nerve decompression is a surgical procedure aimed at ...

  20. Optical devices integrated with semiconductor optical amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Kwang R.; Park, Moon S.; Jeong, Jong S.; Baek, Yongsoon; Oh, Dae-Kon

    2000-07-01

    Semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA's) have been used as a key optical component for the high capacity communication systems. The monolithic integration is necessary for the stable operation of these devices and the wider applications. In this paper, the coupling technique between different waveguides and the integration of SSC's are discussed and the research results of optical devices integrated with SOA's are presented.

  1. Optical-to-optical interface device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, A. D.; Bleha, W. P.; Miller, L.; Grinberg, J.; Fraas, L.; Margerum, D.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to develop an optical-to-optical interface device capable of performing real-time incoherent-to-incoherent optical image conversion. The photoactivated liquid crystal light valve developed earlier represented a prototype liquid crystal light valve device capable of performing these functions. A device was developed which had high performance and extended lifetime.

  2. FIBER OPTICS: Fibre optics: Forty years later

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dianov, Evgenii M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of the state of the art in fibre optics and its main applications: optical fibre communications, fibre lasers and fibre sensors for various physical property measurements. The future of fibre optics and the status of this important area of the modern technology in Russia are discussed.

  3. Optical extensometer

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Ray A.; Reich, Fred R.; Russell, James T.

    1978-01-01

    An optical extensometer is described using sequentially pulsed light beams for measuring the dimensions of objects by detecting two opposite edges of the object without contacting the object. The light beams may be of different distinguishable light characteristics, such as polarization or wave length, and are time modulated in an alternating manner at a reference frequency. The light characteristics are of substantially the same total light energy and are distributed symmetrically. In the preferred embodiment two light beam segments of one characteristic are on opposite sides of a middle segment of another characteristic. As a result, when the beam segments are scanned sequentially across two opposite edges of the object, they produce a readout signal at the output of a photoelectric detector that is compared with the reference signal by a phase comparator to produce a measurement signal with a binary level transition when the light beams cross an edge. The light beams may be of different cross sectional geometries, including two superimposed and concentric circular beam cross sections of different diameter, or two rectangular cross sections which intersect with each other substantially perpendicular so only their central portions are superimposed. Alternately, a row of three light beams can be used including two outer beams on opposite sides and separate from a middle beam. The three beams may all be of the same light characteristic. However it is preferable that the middle beam be of a different characteristic but of the same total energy as the two outer beams.

  4. Optical NAND gate

    DOEpatents

    Skogen, Erik J [Albuquerque, NM; Raring, James [Goleta, CA; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-08-09

    An optical NAND gate is formed from two pair of optical waveguide devices on a substrate, with each pair of the optical waveguide devices consisting of an electroabsorption modulator and a photodetector. One pair of the optical waveguide devices is electrically connected in parallel to operate as an optical AND gate; and the other pair of the optical waveguide devices is connected in series to operate as an optical NOT gate (i.e. an optical inverter). The optical NAND gate utilizes two digital optical inputs and a continuous light input to provide a NAND function output. The optical NAND gate can be formed from III-V compound semiconductor layers which are epitaxially deposited on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate, and operates at a wavelength in the range of 0.8-2.0 .mu.m.

  5. Light Optics for Optical Stochastic Cooling

    SciT

    Andorf, Matthew; Lebedev, Valeri; Piot, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    In Optical Stochastic Cooling (OSC) radiation generated by a particle in a "pickup" undulator is amplified and transported to a downstream "kicker" undulator where it interacts with the same particle which radiated it. Fermilab plans to carry out both passive (no optical amplifier) and active (optical amplifier) tests of OSC at the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) currently in construction*. The performace of the optical system is analyzed with simulations in Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW) accounting for the specific temporal and spectral properties of undulator radiation and being augmented to include dispersion of lens material.

  6. Applications of Nano-optics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changhe; Fainman, Yeshaiahu; Sheng, Yunlong

    2011-11-01

    As nanoscale fabrication techniques advance, nano-optics continues to offer enabling solutions to numerous practical applications for information optics. This Applied Optics feature issue focuses on the Application of Nano-optics. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  7. Integrated Optical Circuit Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriram, S.

    1985-04-01

    Implementation of single-mode optical fiber systems depends largely on the availability of integrated optical components for such functions as switching, multiplexing, and modulation. The technology of integrated optics is maturing very rapidly, and its growth justifies the optimism that now exists in the optical community.

  8. The complete optical oscilloscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Cheng; Goda, Keisuke

    2018-04-01

    Observing ultrafast transient dynamics in optics is a challenging task. Two teams in Europe have now independently developed `optical oscilloscopes' that can capture both amplitude and phase information of ultrafast optical signals. Their schemes yield new insights into the nonlinear physics that takes place inside optical fibres.

  9. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawatari, Takeo (Inventor); Gaubis, Philip A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A fiber optic temperature sensor uses a light source which transmits light through an optical fiber to a sensor head at the opposite end of the optical fiber from the light source. The sensor head has a housing coupled to the end of the optical fiber. A metallic reflective surface is coupled to the housing adjacent the end of the optical fiber to form a gap having a predetermined length between the reflective surface and the optical fiber. A detection system is also coupled to the optical fiber which determines the temperature at the sensor head from an interference pattern of light which is reflected from the reflective surface.

  10. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawatari, Takeo (Inventor); Gaubis, Philip A. (Inventor); Mattes, Brenton L. (Inventor); Charnetski, Clark J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A fiber optic temperature sensor uses a light source which transmits light through an optical fiber to a sensor head at the opposite end of the optical fiber from the light source. The sensor head has a housing coupled to the end of the optical fiber. A metallic reflective surface is coupled to the housing adjacent the end of the optical fiber to form a gap having a predetermined length between the reflective surface and the optical fiber. A detection system is also coupled to the optical fiber which determines the temperature at the sensor head from an interference pattern of light which is reflected from the reflective surface.

  11. Optical computing research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Joseph W.

    1987-10-01

    Work Accomplished: OPTICAL INTERCONNECTIONS - the powerful interconnect abilities of optical beams have led much optimism about the possible roles for optics in solving interconnect problems at various levels of computer architecture. Examined were the powerful requirements of optical interconnects at the gate-to-gate and chip-to-chip levels. OPTICAL NEUTRAL NETWORKS - basic studies of the convergence properties on the Holfield model, based on mathematical approach - graph theory. OPTICS AND ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE - review the field of optical processing and artificial intelligence, with the aim of finding areas that might be particularly attractive for future investigation(s).

  12. Optical XOR gate

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, G. Allen

    2013-11-12

    An optical XOR gate is formed as a photonic integrated circuit (PIC) from two sets of optical waveguide devices on a substrate, with each set of the optical waveguide devices including an electroabsorption modulator electrically connected in series with a waveguide photodetector. The optical XOR gate utilizes two digital optical inputs to generate an XOR function digital optical output. The optical XOR gate can be formed from III-V compound semiconductor layers which are epitaxially deposited on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate, and operates at a wavelength in the range of 0.8-2.0 .mu.m.

  13. Optical NOR gate

    DOEpatents

    Skogen, Erik J [Albuquerque, NM; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-09-06

    An optical NOR gate is formed from two pair of optical waveguide devices on a substrate, with each pair of the optical waveguide devices consisting of an electroabsorption modulator electrically connected in series with a waveguide photodetector. The optical NOR gate utilizes two digital optical inputs and a continuous light input to provide a NOR function digital optical output. The optical NOR gate can be formed from III-V compound semiconductor layers which are epitaxially deposited on a III-V compound semiconductor substrate, and operates at a wavelength in the range of 0.8-2.0 .mu.m.

  14. Fiber optic connector

    DOEpatents

    Rajic, Slobodan; Muhs, Jeffrey D.

    1996-01-01

    A fiber optic connector and method for connecting composite materials within which optical fibers are imbedded. The fiber optic connector includes a capillary tube for receiving optical fibers at opposing ends. The method involves inserting a first optical fiber into the capillary tube and imbedding the unit in the end of a softened composite material. The capillary tube is injected with a coupling medium which subsequently solidifies. The composite material is machined to a desired configuration. An external optical fiber is then inserted into the capillary tube after fluidizing the coupling medium, whereby the optical fibers are coupled.

  15. Fiber optic connector

    DOEpatents

    Rajic, S.; Muhs, J.D.

    1996-10-22

    A fiber optic connector and method for connecting composite materials within which optical fibers are imbedded are disclosed. The fiber optic connector includes a capillary tube for receiving optical fibers at opposing ends. The method involves inserting a first optical fiber into the capillary tube and imbedding the unit in the end of a softened composite material. The capillary tube is injected with a coupling medium which subsequently solidifies. The composite material is machined to a desired configuration. An external optical fiber is then inserted into the capillary tube after fluidizing the coupling medium, whereby the optical fibers are coupled. 3 figs.

  16. Integrated optics technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B.

    1982-01-01

    The materials and processes available for the fabrication of single mode integrated electrooptical components are described. Issues included in the study are: (1) host material and orientation, (2) waveguide formation, (3) optical loss mechanisms, (4) wavelength selection, (5) polarization effects and control, (6) laser to integrated optics coupling,(7) fiber optic waveguides to integrated optics coupling, (8) souces, (9) detectors. The best materials, technology and processes for fabrication of integrated optical components for communications and fiber gyro applications are recommended.

  17. Optical Neural Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Warden, Melissa R.; Cardin, Jessica A.; Deisseroth, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Genetically encoded optical actuators and indicators have changed the landscape of neuroscience, enabling targetable control and readout of specific components of intact neural circuits in behaving animals. Here, we review the development of optical neural interfaces, focusing on hardware designed for optical control of neural activity, integrated optical control and electrical readout, and optical readout of population and single-cell neural activity in freely moving mammals. PMID:25014785

  18. Optical emission from a kilonova following a gravitational-wave-detected neutron-star merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcavi, Iair; Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; Howell, D. Andrew; McCully, Curtis; Poznanski, Dovi; Kasen, Daniel; Barnes, Jennifer; Zaltzman, Michael; Vasylyev, Sergiy; Maoz, Dan; Valenti, Stefano

    2017-11-01

    The merger of two neutron stars has been predicted to produce an optical-infrared transient (lasting a few days) known as a ‘kilonova’, powered by the radioactive decay of neutron-rich species synthesized in the merger. Evidence that short γ-ray bursts also arise from neutron-star mergers has been accumulating. In models of such mergers, a small amount of mass (10-4-10-2 solar masses) with a low electron fraction is ejected at high velocities (0.1-0.3 times light speed) or carried out by winds from an accretion disk formed around the newly merged object. This mass is expected to undergo rapid neutron capture (r-process) nucleosynthesis, leading to the formation of radioactive elements that release energy as they decay, powering an electromagnetic transient. A large uncertainty in the composition of the newly synthesized material leads to various expected colours, durations and luminosities for such transients. Observational evidence for kilonovae has so far been inconclusive because it was based on cases of moderate excess emission detected in the afterglows of γ-ray bursts. Here we report optical to near-infrared observations of a transient coincident with the detection of the gravitational-wave signature of a binary neutron-star merger and with a low-luminosity short-duration γ-ray burst. Our observations, taken roughly every eight hours over a few days following the gravitational-wave trigger, reveal an initial blue excess, with fast optical fading and reddening. Using numerical models, we conclude that our data are broadly consistent with a light curve powered by a few hundredths of a solar mass of low-opacity material corresponding to lanthanide-poor (a fraction of 10-4.5 by mass) ejecta.

  19. Topographic, optical and chemical properties of zinc particle coatings deposited by means of atmospheric pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallenhorst, L. M.; Loewenthal, L.; Avramidis, G.; Gerhard, C.; Militz, H.; Ohms, G.; Viöl, W.

    2017-07-01

    In this research, topographic, optical and chemical properties of zinc oxide layers deposited by a cold plasma-spray process were measured. Here, zinc micro particles were fed to the afterglow of a plasma spark discharge whereas the substrates were placed in a quite cold zone of the effluent plasma jet. In this vein, almost closed layers were realised on different samples. As ascertained by laser scanning and atomic force microscopic measurements the particle size of the basic layer is in the nanometre scale. Additionally, larger particles and agglomerates were found on its top. The results indicate a partial plasma-induced diminishment of the initial particles, most probably due to melting or vaporisation. It is further shown that the plasma gives rise to an increased oxidation of such particles as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Quantitative analysis of the resulting mixed layer was performed. It is shown that the deposited layers consist of zinc oxide and elemental zinc in approximately equal shares. In addition, the layer's band gap energy was determined by spectroscopic analysis. Here, considerable UV blocking properties of the deposited layers were observed. Possible underlying effects as well as potential applications are presented.

  20. Bidirectional optical coupler for plastic optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Tatsuya; Abe, Tomiya; Hirano, Kouki; Itoh, Yuzo

    2005-05-20

    We have developed a low-loss bidirectional optical coupler for high-speed optical communication with plastic optical fibers (POFs). The coupler, which is fabricated by an injection molding method that uses poly (methyl methacrylate), has an antisymmetric tapered shape. We show that the coupler has low insertion and branching losses. The tapered shape of the receiving branch reduces beam diameter and increases detection efficiency coupling to a photodetector, whose area is smaller than that of the plastic optical fiber. The possibility of more than 15-m bidirectional transmission with a signaling bit rate up to 500 Mbits/s for simplex step-index POFs is demonstrated.

  1. Optical CDMA components requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, James K.

    1998-08-01

    Optical CDMA is a complementary multiple access technology to WDMA. Optical CDMA potentially provides a large number of virtual optical channels for IXC, LEC and CLEC or supports a large number of high-speed users in LAN. In a network, it provides asynchronous, multi-rate, multi-user communication with network scalability, re-configurability (bandwidth on demand), and network security (provided by inherent CDMA coding). However, optical CDMA technology is less mature in comparison to WDMA. The components requirements are also different from WDMA. We have demonstrated a video transport/switching system over a distance of 40 Km using discrete optical components in our laboratory. We are currently pursuing PIC implementation. In this paper, we will describe the optical CDMA concept/features, the demonstration system, and the requirements of some critical optical components such as broadband optical source, broadband optical amplifier, spectral spreading/de- spreading, and fixed/programmable mask.

  2. Nonlinear Optics and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin A. (Editor); Frazier, Donald O. (Editor)

    2007-01-01

    Nonlinear optics is the result of laser beam interaction with materials and started with the advent of lasers in the early 1960s. The field is growing daily and plays a major role in emerging photonic technology. Nonlinear optics play a major role in many of the optical applications such as optical signal processing, optical computers, ultrafast switches, ultra-short pulsed lasers, sensors, laser amplifiers, and many others. This special review volume on Nonlinear Optics and Applications is intended for those who want to be aware of the most recent technology. This book presents a survey of the recent advances of nonlinear optical applications. Emphasis will be on novel devices and materials, switching technology, optical computing, and important experimental results. Recent developments in topics which are of historical interest to researchers, and in the same time of potential use in the fields of all-optical communication and computing technologies, are also included. Additionally, a few new related topics which might provoke discussion are presented. The book includes chapters on nonlinear optics and applications; the nonlinear Schrodinger and associated equations that model spatio-temporal propagation; the supercontinuum light source; wideband ultrashort pulse fiber laser sources; lattice fabrication as well as their linear and nonlinear light guiding properties; the second-order EO effect (Pockels), the third-order (Kerr) and thermo-optical effects in optical waveguides and their applications in optical communication; and, the effect of magnetic field and its role in nonlinear optics, among other chapters.

  3. Energies of GRB blast waves and prompt efficiencies as implied by modelling of X-ray and GeV afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniamini, Paz; Nava, Lara; Duran, Rodolfo Barniol; Piran, Tsvi

    2015-11-01

    We consider a sample of 10 gamma-ray bursts with long-lasting ( ≳ 102 s) emission detected by Fermi/Large Area Telescope and for which X-ray data around 1 d are also available. We assume that both the X-rays and the GeV emission are produced by electrons accelerated at the external forward shock, and show that the X-ray and the GeV fluxes lead to very different estimates of the initial kinetic energy of the blast wave. The energy estimated from GeV is on average ˜50 times larger than the one estimated from X-rays. We model the data (accounting also for optical detections around 1 d, if available) to unveil the reason for this discrepancy and find that good modelling within the forward shock model is always possible and leads to two possibilities: (i) either the X-ray emitting electrons (unlike the GeV emitting electrons) are in the slow-cooling regime or (ii) the X-ray synchrotron flux is strongly suppressed by Compton cooling, whereas, due to the Klein-Nishina suppression, this effect is much smaller at GeV energies. In both cases the X-ray flux is no longer a robust proxy for the blast wave kinetic energy. On average, both cases require weak magnetic fields (10-6 ≲ ɛB ≲ 10-3) and relatively large isotropic kinetic blast wave energies 10^{53} erg<{E}_{0,kin}<10^{55} erg corresponding to large lower limits on the collimated energies, in the range 10^{52} erg<{E}_{θ ,kin}<5× 10^{52} erg for an ISM (interstellar medium) environment with n ˜ 1 cm-3 and 10^{52} erg<{E}_{θ ,kin}<10^{53} erg for a wind environment with A* ˜ 1. These energies are larger than those estimated from the X-ray flux alone, and imply smaller inferred values of the prompt efficiency mechanism, reducing the efficiency requirements on the still uncertain mechanism responsible for prompt emission.

  4. Near-infrared instrumentation for rapid-response astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capone, John Isaac

    gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the Universe's most luminous transient events. Since the discovery of GRBs was announced in 1973, efforts have been ongoing to obtain data over a broader range of the electromagnetic spectrum at the earliest possible times following the initial detection. The discovery of the theorized "afterglow'' emission in radio through X-ray bands in the late 1990s confirmed the cosmological nature of these events. At present, GRB afterglows are among the best probes of the early Universe (z ≥ 9). In addition to informing theories about GRBs themselves, observations of afterglows probe the circum-burst medium (CBM), properties of the host galaxies and the progress of cosmic reionization. To explore the early-time variability of afterglows, I have developed a generalized analysis framework which models near-infrared (NIR), optical, ultra-violet (UV) and X-ray light curves without assuming an underlying model. These fits are then used to construct the spectral energy distribution (SED) of afterglows at arbitrary times within the observed window. Physical models are then used to explore the evolution of the SED parameter space with time. I demonstrate that this framework produces evidence of the photodestruction of dust in the CBM of GRB 120119A, similar to the findings from a previous study of this afterglow. The framework is additionally applied to the afterglows of GRB 140419A and GRB 080607. In these cases the evolution of the SEDs appears consistent with the standard fireball model. Having introduced the scientific motivations for early-time observations, I introduce the Rapid Infrared Imager-Spectrometer (RIMAS). Once commissioned on the 4.3 meter Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT), RIMAS will be used to study the afterglows of GRBs through photometric and spectroscopic observations beginning within minutes of the initial burst. The instrument will operate in the NIR, from 0.97 microm to 2.37 microm, permitting the detection of very high

  5. Fiber optic sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, J.; Sohler, W.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of the developments in the field of fiber optics sensor technology is presented along with a discussion of the advantages of optical measuring instruments as compared with electronic sensors. The two primary types of fiber optics sensors, specifically those with multiwave fibers and those with monowave fibers, are described. Examples of each major sensor type are presented and discussed. Multiwave detectors include external and internal fiber optics sensors. Among the monowave detectors are Mach-Zender interferometers, Michelson interferometers, Sagnac interferometers (optical gyroscopes), waveguide resonators, and polarimeter sensors. Integrated optical sensors and their application in spectroscopy are briefly discussed.

  6. Latching micro optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J; Polosky, Marc A

    2013-05-21

    An optical switch reliably maintains its on or off state even when subjected to environments where the switch is bumped or otherwise moved. In addition, the optical switch maintains its on or off state indefinitely without requiring external power. External power is used only to transition the switch from one state to the other. The optical switch is configured with a fixed optical fiber and a movable optical fiber. The movable optical fiber is guided by various actuators in conjunction with a latching mechanism that configure the switch in one position that corresponds to the on state and in another position that corresponds to the off state.

  7. From optics testing to micro optics testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Christian; Dorn, Ralf; Pfund, Johannes

    2017-10-01

    Testing micro optics, i.e. lenses with dimensions down to 0.1mm and less, with high precision requires a dedicated design of the testing device, taking into account propagation and wave-optical effects. In this paper, we discuss testing methods based on Shack-Hartmann wavefront technology for functional testing in transmission and for the measurement of surface shape in reflection. As a first example of more conventional optics testing, i.e. optics in the millimeter range, we present the measurement of binoculars in transmission, and discuss the measured wave aberrations and imaging quality. By repeating the measurement at different wavelengths, information on chromatic effects is retrieved. A task that is often tackled using Shack-Hartman wavefront sensors is the alignment of collimation optics in front of a light source. In case of a micro-optical collimation unit with a 1/e² beam diameter of ca. 1mm, we need adapted relay optics for suitable beam expansion and well-defined imaging conditions. In this example, we will discuss the alignment process and effects of the relay optics magnification, as well as typical performance data. Oftentimes, micro optics are fabricated not as single pieces, but as mass optics, e.g. by lithographic processes. Thus, in order to reduce tooling and alignment time, an automated test procedure is necessary. We present an approach for the automated testing of wafer- or tray-based micro optics, and discuss transmission and reflection measurement capabilities. Exemplary performance data is shown for a sample type with 30 microns in diameter, where typical repeatabilities of a few nanometers (rms) are reached.

  8. A modular optical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conklin, John Albert

    This dissertation presents the design of a modular, fiber-optic sensor and the results obtained from testing the modular sensor. The modular fiber-optic sensor is constructed in such manner that the sensor diaphragm can be replaced with different configurations to detect numerous physical phenomena. Additionally, different fiber-optic detection systems can be attached to the sensor. Initially, the modular sensor was developed to be used by university of students to investigate realistic optical sensors and detection systems to prepare for advance studies of micro-optical mechanical systems (MOMS). The design accomplishes this by doing two things. First, the design significantly lowers the costs associated with studying optical sensors by modularizing the sensor design. Second, the sensor broadens the number of physical phenomena that students can apply optical sensing techniques to in a fiber optics sensor course. The dissertation is divided into seven chapters covering the historical development of fiber-optic sensors, a theoretical overview of fiber-optic sensors, the design, fabrication, and the testing of the modular sensor developed in the course of this work. Chapter 1 discusses, in detail, how this dissertation is organized and states the purpose of the dissertation. Chapter 2 presents an historical overview of the development of optical fibers, optical pressure sensors, and fibers, optical pressure sensors, and optical microphones. Chapter 3 reviews the theory of multi-fiber optic detection systems, optical microphones, and pressure sensors. Chapter 4 presents the design details of the modular, optical sensor. Chapter 5 delves into how the modular sensor is fabricated and how the detection systems are constructed. Chapter 6 presents the data collected from the microphone and pressure sensor configurations of the modular sensor. Finally, Chapter 7 discusses the data collected and draws conclusions about the design based on the data collected. Chapter 7 also

  9. Active optical zoom system

    DOEpatents

    Wick, David V.

    2005-12-20

    An active optical zoom system changes the magnification (or effective focal length) of an optical imaging system by utilizing two or more active optics in a conventional optical system. The system can create relatively large changes in system magnification with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual active elements by leveraging the optical power of the conventional optical elements (e.g., passive lenses and mirrors) surrounding the active optics. The active optics serve primarily as variable focal-length lenses or mirrors, although adding other aberrations enables increased utility. The active optics can either be LC SLMs, used in a transmissive optical zoom system, or DMs, used in a reflective optical zoom system. By appropriately designing the optical system, the variable focal-length lenses or mirrors can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length (i.e., effective focal length), and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses. The active optics can provide additional flexibility by allowing magnification to occur anywhere within the FOV of the system, not just on-axis as in a conventional system.

  10. Optical Filter Assembly for Interplanetary Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yijiang; Hemmati, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Ground-based, narrow-band, high throughput optical filters are required for optical links from deep space. We report on the development of a tunable filter assembly that operates at telecommunication window of 1550 nanometers. Low insertion loss of 0.5 decibels and bandwidth of 90 picometers over a 2000 nanometers operational range of detectors has been achieved.

  11. Applied optics and optical engineering. Volume 9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, R. R.; Wyant, J. C.

    This volume of the series continues the variety of articles which have appeared in the past two volumes. The range of topics runs from the most applied to some fairly complex theory. Basic algorithms for optical engineering are considered along with diffraction gratings, recording and reading of information on optical disks, and the perfect point spread function. An atlas is provided of the imagery which can be expected from telescopes, or other optical systems with nonconventional aperture shapes. A chapter on simulators collects descriptions of the principal types of visual simulators into one article. The optics of the eye is discussed with special emphasis on modern concepts such as contact lenses and automatic refraction. Attention is given to the theory which is of great interest to the applied optical engineer who needs to understand some of the fundamental relations and limitations on image formation by lenses.

  12. Optic Nerve Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    The optic nerve is a bundle of more than 1 million nerve fibers that carry visual messages. You have one connecting ... retina) to your brain. Damage to an optic nerve can cause vision loss. The type of vision ...

  13. Optical application of electrowetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Mei; Peng, Runling; Chen, Jiabi

    2017-02-01

    Since electrowetting has been proposed, researchers began to apply eletrowetting into different fields, such as lab-on-chip systems, display technologies, printings and optics etc. This paper mainly introduced structure, theory and application of optical devices based on electrowetting. The optical devices include liquid optical prism, liquid optical lens and display. The paper introduced their principle, specific application and many advantages in optical applications. When they are applied to optical system, production and experiment, they can reduce mechanical moving parts, simplify the structure, operate easily, decrease manufacturing cost and energy consumption, improve working efficiency, and so on. We learn and research them in detail that will contribute to research and develop optical eletrowetting in the future.

  14. Optic Nerve Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Us Donate In This Section Optic Nerve Imaging email Send this article to a friend by ... may use one of these optic nerve computer imaging techniques as part of your glaucoma examination. By ...

  15. Fiber Optics Instrumentation Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Patrick Hon Man; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Richards, W. Lance

    2010-01-01

    This is a general presentation of fiber optics instrumentation development work being conducted at NASA Dryden for the past 10 years and recent achievements in the field of fiber optics strain sensors.

  16. High bandwidth optical mount

    DOEpatents

    Bender, D.A.; Kuklo, T.

    1994-11-08

    An optical mount, which directs a laser beam to a point by controlling the position of a light-transmitting optic, is stiffened so that a lowest resonant frequency of the mount is approximately one kilohertz. The optical mount, which is cylindrically-shaped, positions the optic by individually moving a plurality of carriages which are positioned longitudinally within a sidewall of the mount. The optical mount is stiffened by allowing each carriage, which is attached to the optic, to move only in a direction which is substantially parallel to a center axis of the optic. The carriage is limited to an axial movement by flexures or linear bearings which connect the carriage to the mount. The carriage is moved by a piezoelectric transducer. By limiting the carriage to axial movement, the optic can be kinematically clamped to a carriage. 5 figs.

  17. High bandwidth optical mount

    DOEpatents

    Bender, Donald A.; Kuklo, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    An optical mount, which directs a laser beam to a point by controlling the position of a light-transmitting optic, is stiffened so that a lowest resonant frequency of the mount is approximately one kilohertz. The optical mount, which is cylindrically-shaped, positions the optic by individually moving a plurality of carriages which are positioned longitudinally within a sidewall of the mount. The optical mount is stiffened by allowing each carriage, which is attached to the optic, to move only in a direction which is substantially parallel to a center axis of the optic. The carriage is limited to an axial movement by flexures or linear bearings which connect the carriage to the mount. The carriage is moved by a piezoelectric transducer. By limiting the carriage to axial movement, the optic can be kinematically clamped to a carriage.

  18. Fiber Optics Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, William E.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses various applications of fiber optics technology: information systems, industrial robots, medicine, television, transportation, and training. Types of jobs that will be available with fiber optics training (such as electricians and telephone cable installers and splicers) are examined. (CT)

  19. The Scanning Optical Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, C. J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the principle of the scanning optical microscope and explains its advantages over the conventional microscope in the improvement of resolution and contrast, as well as the possibility of producing a picture from optical harmonies generated within the specimen.

  20. Optical devices: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Technological developments in the field of optics devices which have potential utility outside the aerospace community are described. Optical instrumentation, light generation and transmission, and laser techniques are among the topics covered. Patent information is given.

  1. Optical signal processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, D.

    1978-01-01

    The article discusses several optical configurations used for signal processing. Electronic-to-optical transducers are outlined, noting fixed window transducers and moving window acousto-optic transducers. Folded spectrum techniques are considered, with reference to wideband RF signal analysis, fetal electroencephalogram analysis, engine vibration analysis, signal buried in noise, and spatial filtering. Various methods for radar signal processing are described, such as phased-array antennas, the optical processing of phased-array data, pulsed Doppler and FM radar systems, a multichannel one-dimensional optical correlator, correlations with long coded waveforms, and Doppler signal processing. Means for noncoherent optical signal processing are noted, including an optical correlator for speech recognition and a noncoherent optical correlator.

  2. Acousto-Optic Interactions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The document reports the results of the experimental and theoretical investigation of acousto - optic interactions in guided wave structure for optical...waves and acoustic surface waves and experimental results of isotropic and anisotropic diffraction in LiNbO3 and quartz. A simple acousto - optic plate...CVD ZnO films on sapphire, which may be needed for the acousto - optic devices in thin films are also included. (Author)

  3. Optical Inference Machines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-27

    de olf nessse end Id e ;-tl Sb ieeI smleo) ,Optical Artificial Intellegence ; Optical inference engines; Optical logic; Optical informationprocessing...common. They arise in areas such as expert systems and other artificial intelligence systems. In recent years, the computer science language PROLOG has...cal processors should in principle be well suited for : I artificial intelligence applications. In recent years, symbolic logic processing. , the

  4. Optical voltage reference

    DOEpatents

    Rankin, Richard; Kotter, Dale

    1994-01-01

    An optical voltage reference for providing an alternative to a battery source. The optical reference apparatus provides a temperature stable, high precision, isolated voltage reference through the use of optical isolation techniques to eliminate current and impedance coupling errors. Pulse rate frequency modulation is employed to eliminate errors in the optical transmission link while phase-lock feedback is employed to stabilize the frequency to voltage transfer function.

  5. Optical voltage reference

    DOEpatents

    Rankin, R.; Kotter, D.

    1994-04-26

    An optical voltage reference for providing an alternative to a battery source is described. The optical reference apparatus provides a temperature stable, high precision, isolated voltage reference through the use of optical isolation techniques to eliminate current and impedance coupling errors. Pulse rate frequency modulation is employed to eliminate errors in the optical transmission link while phase-lock feedback is employed to stabilize the frequency to voltage transfer function. 2 figures.

  6. Reflective optical imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Shafer, David R.

    2000-01-01

    An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation comprising four reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The four optical elements are characterized in order from object to image as convex, concave, convex and concave mirrors. The optical system is particularly suited for step and scan lithography methods. The invention increases the slit dimensions associated with ringfield scanning optics, improves wafer throughput and allows higher semiconductor device density.

  7. Fun with optical fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alti, Kamlesh

    2017-07-01

    Optical fibres play a very crucial role in today’s technologies. Academic courses in optical fibres start at the undergraduate level. Nevertheless, student’s curiosity towards optical fibres starts from the school level. In this paper, some fun experiments have been designed for both school and college students, which have some concrete implications at the research level also.

  8. Optical Disk Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, George L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    This special feature focuses on recent developments in optical disk technology. Nine articles discuss current trends, large scale image processing, data structures for optical disks, the use of computer simulators to create optical disks, videodisk use in training, interactive audio video systems, impacts on federal information policy, and…

  9. Multiplane optical microscope

    SciT

    Li, Tongcang; Ota, Sadao; Kim, Jeongmin

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to optical microscopy. In one aspect, an apparatus includes a sample holder, a first objective lens, a plurality of optical components, a second objective lens, and a mirror. The apparatus may directly image a cross-section of a sample oblique to or parallel to the optical axis of the first objective lens, without scanning.

  10. Nanoparticles and Ocean Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    could control in- fection by the dilution process. Subsequent dilution experiments have included eukaryotic hosts ( Emiliania huxleyi) and its... Emiliania huxleyi, at a rapid rate that we have never observed in a eukaryotic virus. Optical experiments demonstrated major optical changes on the time...Results of infection of eukaryotic coccolithophorid, Emiliania huxleyi, with new virus isolate ø 43, which demonstrates rapid optical changes

  11. Fun with Optical Fibres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alti, Kamlesh

    2017-01-01

    Optical fibres play a very crucial role in today's technologies. Academic courses in optical fibres start at the undergraduate level. Nevertheless, student's curiosity towards optical fibres starts from the school level. In this paper, some fun experiments have been designed for both school and college students, which have some concrete…

  12. Superfluid in a shaken optical lattice: quantum critical dynamics and topological defect engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaj, Anita; Feng, Lei; Clark, Logan W.; Chin, Cheng

    2017-04-01

    We present our recent studies of non-equilibrium dynamics in Bose-Einstein condensates using the shaken optical lattice. By increasing the shaking amplitude we observe a quantum phase transition from an ordinary superfluid to an effectively ferromagnetic superfluid composed of discrete domains with different quasi-momentum. We investigate the critical dynamics during which the domain structure and domain walls emerge. We demonstrate the use of a digital micromirror device to deterministically create desired domain structure. Using this technique we develop a clearer picture of the quantum critical dynamics at early times and its impact on the domain structure long after the transition.

  13. Fractal vector optical fields.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yue; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Cai, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Guan-Lin; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2016-07-15

    We introduce the concept of a fractal, which provides an alternative approach for flexibly engineering the optical fields and their focal fields. We propose, design, and create a new family of optical fields-fractal vector optical fields, which build a bridge between the fractal and vector optical fields. The fractal vector optical fields have polarization states exhibiting fractal geometry, and may also involve the phase and/or amplitude simultaneously. The results reveal that the focal fields exhibit self-similarity, and the hierarchy of the fractal has the "weeding" role. The fractal can be used to engineer the focal field.

  14. Fiber optic accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    August, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Low-cost, rugged lightweight accelerometer has been developed that converts mechanical motion into digitized optical outputs and is immune to electromagnetic and electrostatic interferences. Instrument can be placed in hostile environment, such as engine under test, and output led out through miscellany of electrical fields, high temperatures, etc., by optic fiber cables to benign environment of test panel. There, digitized optical signals can be converted to electrical signals for use in standard electrical equipment or used directly in optical devices, such as optical digital computer.

  15. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  16. Paraxial ray optics cloaking.

    PubMed

    Choi, Joseph S; Howell, John C

    2014-12-01

    Despite much interest and progress in optical spatial cloaking, a three-dimensional (3D), transmitting, continuously multidirectional cloak in the visible regime has not yet been demonstrated. Here we experimentally demonstrate such a cloak using ray optics, albeit with some edge effects. Our device requires no new materials, uses isotropic off-the-shelf optics, scales easily to cloak arbitrarily large objects, and is as broadband as the choice of optical material, all of which have been challenges for current cloaking schemes. In addition, we provide a concise formalism that quantifies and produces perfect optical cloaks in the small-angle ('paraxial') limit.

  17. Optical coatings on polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Thomas

    2005-09-01

    Optical transparent polymers are used for technical optics for more than 50 years and currently replace glass as optical material in several application fields. Optical functional coatings like mirrors, filters, beam splitters and anti-reflection coatings gain increasingly in importance. New light sources and head mounted systems need light and effective reflector designs. The paper gives an overview about vacuum coating technologies for metal and dielectric layers on polymers for technical optics. Especially for polymers controlling the complete process chain from injection moulding to storing, coating and shipping decides on the technological and commercial success.

  18. [Adaptive optics for ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Saleh, M

    2016-04-01

    Adaptive optics is a technology enhancing the visual performance of an optical system by correcting its optical aberrations. Adaptive optics have already enabled several breakthroughs in the field of visual sciences, such as improvement of visual acuity in normal and diseased eyes beyond physiologic limits, and the correction of presbyopia. Adaptive optics technology also provides high-resolution, in vivo imaging of the retina that may eventually help to detect the onset of retinal conditions at an early stage and provide better assessment of treatment efficacy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Ten per cent polarized optical emission from GRB 090102.

    PubMed

    Steele, I A; Mundell, C G; Smith, R J; Kobayashi, S; Guidorzi, C

    2009-12-10

    The nature of the jets and the role of magnetic fields in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) remains unclear. In a baryon-dominated jet only weak, tangled fields generated in situ through shocks would be present. In an alternative model, jets are threaded with large-scale magnetic fields that originate at the central engine and that accelerate and collimate the material. To distinguish between the models the degree of polarization in early-time emission must be measured; however, previous claims of gamma-ray polarization have been controversial. Here we report that the early optical emission from GRB 090102 was polarized at 10 +/- 1 per cent, indicating the presence of large-scale fields originating in the expanding fireball. If the degree of polarization and its position angle were variable on timescales shorter than our 60-second exposure, then the peak polarization may have been larger than ten per cent.

  20. Peptide Integrated Optics.

    PubMed

    Handelman, Amir; Lapshina, Nadezda; Apter, Boris; Rosenman, Gil

    2018-02-01

    Bio-nanophotonics is a wide field in which advanced optical materials, biomedicine, fundamental optics, and nanotechnology are combined and result in the development of biomedical optical chips. Silk fibers or synthetic bioabsorbable polymers are the main light-guiding components. In this work, an advanced concept of integrated bio-optics is proposed, which is based on bioinspired peptide optical materials exhibiting wide optical transparency, nonlinear and electrooptical properties, and effective passive and active waveguiding. Developed new technology combining bottom-up controlled deposition of peptide planar wafers of a large area and top-down focus ion beam lithography provides direct fabrication of peptide optical integrated circuits. Finding a deep modification of peptide optical properties by reconformation of biological secondary structure from native phase to β-sheet architecture is followed by the appearance of visible fluorescence and unexpected transition from a native passive optical waveguiding to an active one. Original biocompatibility, switchable regimes of waveguiding, and multifunctional nonlinear optical properties make these new peptide planar optical materials attractive for application in emerging technology of lab-on-biochips, combining biomedical photonic and electronic circuits toward medical diagnosis, light-activated therapy, and health monitoring. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Optical Circuit Switched Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monacos, Steve P. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a system and method embodied in an optical circuit switched protocol for the transmission of data through a network. The optical circuit switched protocol is an all-optical circuit switched network and includes novel optical switching nodes for transmitting optical data packets within a network. Each optical switching node comprises a detector for receiving the header, header detection logic for translating the header into routing information and eliminating the header, and a controller for receiving the routing information and configuring an all optical path within the node. The all optical path located within the node is solely an optical path without having electronic storage of the data and without having optical delay of the data. Since electronic storage of the header is not necessary and the initial header is eliminated by the first detector of the first switching node. multiple identical headers are sent throughout the network so that subsequent switching nodes can receive and read the header for setting up an optical data path.

  2. Optical Sidebands Multiplier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V.; Yu, Nan

    2010-01-01

    Optical sidebands have been generated with relative frequency tens to hundreds of GHz by using optical sidebands that are generated in a cascade process in high-quality optical resonators with Kerr nonlinearity, such as whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators. For this purpose, the WGM resonator needs to be optically pumped at two frequencies matching its resonances. These two optical components can be one or several free spectral ranges (FSRs), equal to approximately 12 GHz, in this example, apart from each other, and can be easily derived from a monochromatic pump with an ordinary EOM (electro-optic modulation) operating at half the FSR frequency. With sufficient nonlinearity, an optical cascade process will convert the two pump frequencies into a comb-like structure extending many FSRs around the carrier frequency. This has a demonstratively efficient frequency conversion of this type with only a few milliwatt optical pump power. The concept of using Kerr nonlinearity in a resonator for non-degenerate wave mixing has been discussed before, but it was a common belief that this was a weak process requiring very high peak powers to be observable. It was not thought possible for this approach to compete with electro-optical modulators in CW applications, especially those at lower optical powers. By using the high-Q WGM resonators, the effective Kerr nonlinearity can be made so high that, using even weak seeding bands available from a conventional EOM, one can effectively multiply the optical sidebands, extending them into an otherwise inaccessible frequency range.

  3. Automated optical assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala, John L.

    1995-08-01

    Automation and polymer science represent fundamental new technologies which can be directed toward realizing the goal of establishing a domestic, world-class, commercial optics business. Use of innovative optical designs using precision polymer optics will enable the US to play a vital role in the next generation of commercial optical products. The increased cost savings inherent in the utilization of optical-grade polymers outweighs almost every advantage of using glass for high volume situations. Optical designers must gain experience with combined refractive/diffractive designs and broaden their knowledge base regarding polymer technology beyond a cursory intellectual exercise. Implementation of a fully automated assembly system, combined with utilization of polymer optics, constitutes the type of integrated manufacturing process which will enable the US to successfully compete with the low-cost labor employed in the Far East, as well as to produce an equivalent product.

  4. Omnidirectional fiber optic tiltmeter

    DOEpatents

    Benjamin, B.C.; Miller, H.M.

    1983-06-30

    A tiltmeter is provided which is useful in detecting very small movements such as earth tides. The device comprises a single optical fiber, and an associated weight affixed thereto, suspended from a support to form a pendulum. A light source, e.g., a light emitting diode, mounted on the support transmits light through the optical fiber to a group of further optical fibers located adjacent to but spaced from the free end of the single optical fiber so that displacement of the single optical fiber with respect to the group will result in a change in the amount of light received by the individual optical fibers of the group. Photodetectors individually connectd to the fibers produce corresponding electrical outputs which are differentially compared and processed to produce a resultant continuous analog output representative of the amount and direction of displacement of the single optical fiber.

  5. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, Joseph B.; Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Tobin, Kenneth W.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  6. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  7. Fiber optic crossbar switch for automatically patching optical signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, C. H. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A system for automatically optically switching fiber optic data signals between a plurality of input optical fibers and selective ones of a plurality of output fibers is described. The system includes optical detectors which are connected to each of the input fibers for converting the optic data signals appearing at the respective input fibers to an RF signal. A plurality of RF to optical signal converters are arranged in rows and columns. The output of each of the optical detectors are each applied to a respective row of optical signal converted for being converters back to an optical signal when the particular optical signal converter is selectively activated by a dc voltage.

  8. Nonlinear Optical Acrylic Polymers and Use Thereof in Optical and Electro-Optic Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-07

    COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Nonlinear Optical Acrylic Polymers and Use Thereof in Optical and Electro - Optic Devices 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...generators, computational devices and the like. 15. SUBJECT TERMS optical devices, electro - optical devices, optical signal processing...THEREOF IN OPTICAL AND ELECTRO - OPTIC DEVICES [75] Inventors: Le*lie H. Sperling, Bethlehem; Clarence J. Murphy, Stroudsburg; Warren A. Rosen

  9. Fiber optic to integrated optical chip coupler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikulski, Joseph I. (Inventor); Ramer, O. Glenn (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Optical fibers are clamped by a block onto a substrate. Thereupon, metal is plated over the fibers to hold them in place upon the substrate. The clamp block is removed and the opening, resulting from the clamp block's presence, is then plated in. The built-up metallic body is a coupling which holds the fibers in position so that the ends can be polished for coupling to an integrated optical chip upon a coupling fixture.

  10. Persistent Luminescence Nanophosphor Involved Near-Infrared Optical Bioimaging for Investigation of Foodborne Probiotics Biodistribution in Vivo: A Proof-of-Concept Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaoyao; Liu, Jing-Min; Zhang, Dongdong; Ge, Kun; Wang, Peihua; Liu, Huilin; Fang, Guozhen; Wang, Shuo

    2017-09-20

    Probiotics has attracted great attention in food nutrition and safety research field, but thus far there are limited analytical techniques for visualized and real-time monitoring of the probiotics when they are ingested in vivo. Herein, the optical bioimaging technique has been introduced for investigation of foodborne probiotics biodistribution in vivo, employing the near-infrared (NIR) emitting persistent luminescence nanophosphors (PLNPs) of Cr 3+ -doped zinc gallogermanate (ZGGO) as the contrast nanoprobes. The ultrabrightness, super long afterglow, polydispersed size, low toxicity, and excellent photostability and biocompatibility of PLNPs were demonstrated to be qualified as a tracer for labeling probiotics via antibody (anti-Gram positive bacteria LTA antibody) recognition as well as contrast agent for long-term bioimaging the probiotics. In vivo optical bioimaging assay showed that the LTA antibody functionalized ZGGO nanoprobes that could be efficiently tagged to the probiobics were successfully applied for real-time monitoring and nondamaged probing of the biodistribution of probiotics inside the living body after oral administration. This work presents a proof-of-concept that exploited the bioimaging methodology for real-time and nondamaged researching the foodborne probiotics behaviors in vivo, which would open up a novel way of food safety detection and nutrition investigation.

  11. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    SciT

    Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

    1988-10-25

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic devicemore » to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.« less

  12. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOEpatents

    Hulstrom, Roland L.; Cannon, Theodore W.

    1988-01-01

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

  13. Multichannel optical sensing device

    DOEpatents

    Selkowitz, S.E.

    1985-08-16

    A multichannel optical sensing device is disclosed, for measuring the outdoor sky luminance or illuminance or the luminance or illuminance distribution in a room, comprising a plurality of light receptors, an optical shutter matrix including a plurality of liquid crystal optical shutter elements operable by electrical control signals between light transmitting and light stopping conditions, fiber optical elements connected between the receptors and the shutter elements, a microprocessor based programmable control unit for selectively supplying control signals to the optical shutter elements in a programmable sequence, a photodetector including an optical integrating spherical chamber having an input port for receiving the light from the shutter matrix and at least one detector element in the spherical chamber for producing output signals corresponding to the light, and output units for utilizing the output signals including a storage unit having a control connection to the microprocessor based programmable control unit for storing the output signals under the sequence control of the programmable control unit.

  14. Multichannel optical sensing device

    DOEpatents

    Selkowitz, Stephen E.

    1990-01-01

    A multichannel optical sensing device is disclosed, for measuring the outr sky luminance or illuminance or the luminance or illuminance distribution in a room, comprising a plurality of light receptors, an optical shutter matrix including a plurality of liquid crystal optical shutter elements operable by electrical control signals between light transmitting and light stopping conditions, fiber optic elements connected between the receptors and the shutter elements, a microprocessor based programmable control unit for selectively supplying control signals to the optical shutter elements in a programmable sequence, a photodetector including an optical integrating spherical chamber having an input port for receiving the light from the shutter matrix and at least one detector element in the spherical chamber for producing output signals corresponding to the light, and output units for utilizing the output signals including a storage unit having a control connection to the microprocessor based programmable control unit for storing the output signals under the sequence control of the programmable control unit.

  15. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOEpatents

    Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

    1988-10-25

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

  16. Scanning holographic optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Shaw, L A; Panas, Robert M; Spadaccini, C M; Hopkins, J B

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this Letter is to introduce a new optical tweezers approach, called scanning holographic optical tweezers (SHOT), which drastically increases the working area (WA) of the holographic-optical tweezers (HOT) approach, while maintaining tightly focused laser traps. A 12-fold increase in the WA is demonstrated. The SHOT approach achieves its utility by combining the large WA of the scanning optical tweezers (SOT) approach with the flexibility of the HOT approach for simultaneously moving differently structured optical traps in and out of the focal plane. This Letter also demonstrates a new heuristic control algorithm for combining the functionality of the SOT and HOT approaches to efficiently allocate the available laser power among a large number of traps. The proposed approach shows promise for substantially increasing the number of particles that can be handled simultaneously, which would enable optical tweezers additive fabrication technologies to rapidly assemble microgranular materials and structures in reasonable build times.

  17. PRISM Spectrograph Optical Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, Russell A.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this contract is to explore optical design concepts for the PRISM spectrograph and produce a preliminary optical design. An exciting optical configuration has been developed which will allow both wavelength bands to be imaged onto the same detector array. At present the optical design is only partially complete because PRISM will require a fairly elaborate optical system to meet its specification for throughput (area*solid angle). The most complex part of the design, the spectrograph camera, is complete, providing proof of principle that a feasible design is attainable. This camera requires 3 aspheric mirrors to fit inside the 20x60 cm cross-section package. A complete design with reduced throughput (1/9th) has been prepared. The design documents the optical configuration concept. A suitable dispersing prism material, CdTe, has been identified for the prism spectrograph, after a comparison of many materials.

  18. Transpiration purged optical probe

    DOEpatents

    VanOsdol, John; Woodruff, Steven

    2004-01-06

    An optical apparatus for clearly viewing the interior of a containment vessel by applying a transpiration fluid to a volume directly in front of the external surface of the optical element of the optical apparatus. The fluid is provided by an external source and transported by means of an annular tube to a capped end region where the inner tube is perforated. The perforation allows the fluid to stream axially towards the center of the inner tube and then axially away from an optical element which is positioned in the inner tube just prior to the porous sleeve. This arrangement draws any contaminants away from the optical element keeping it free of contaminants. In one of several embodiments, the optical element can be a lens, a viewing port or a laser, and the external source can provide a transpiration fluid having either steady properties or time varying properties.

  19. Compound semiconductor optical waveguide switch

    DOEpatents

    Spahn, Olga B.; Sullivan, Charles T.; Garcia, Ernest J.

    2003-06-10

    An optical waveguide switch is disclosed which is formed from III-V compound semiconductors and which has a moveable optical waveguide with a cantilevered portion that can be bent laterally by an integral electrostatic actuator to route an optical signal (i.e. light) between the moveable optical waveguide and one of a plurality of fixed optical waveguides. A plurality of optical waveguide switches can be formed on a common substrate and interconnected to form an optical switching network.

  20. Electro-Optic Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-30

    Electro - Optic Propagation Stephen Doss-Hammel SPAWARSYSCEN San Diego code 2858 49170 Propagation Path San Diego, CA 92152-7385 phone: (619...scenarios to extend the capabilities of TAWS to surface and low altitude situations. OBJECTIVES The electro - optical propagation objectives are: 1...development of a new propagation assessment tool called EOSTAR ( Electro - Optical Signal Transmission and Ranging). The goal of the EOSTAR project is to

  1. Electro-Optic Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-30

    Electro - Optic Propagation Stephen Doss-Hammel SPAWARSYSCEN San Diego code 2858 49170 Propagation Path San Diego, CA 92152-7385 phone: (619...OBJECTIVES The electro - optical propagation objectives are: 1) The acquisition and analysis of mid-wave and long-wave infrared transmission and...elements to the electro - optical propagation model development. The first element is the design and execution of field experiments to generate useful

  2. Optical atomic magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Budker, Dmitry; Higbie, James; Corsini, Eric P.

    2013-11-19

    An optical atomic magnetometers is provided operating on the principles of nonlinear magneto-optical rotation. An atomic vapor is optically pumped using linearly polarized modulated light. The vapor is then probed using a non-modulated linearly polarized light beam. The resulting modulation in polarization angle of the probe light is detected and used in a feedback loop to induce self-oscillation at the resonant frequency.

  3. Fiber Optic Feed

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-06

    Naval Research Laboratory IIK Washington, DC,20375 5000 NRL Memorandum Report 6741 0 N Fiber Optic Feed DENZIL STILWELL, MARK PARENT AND LEw GOLDBERG...SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Fiber Optic Feed 53-0611-A0 6. AUTHOR(S) P. D. Stilwell, M. G. Parent, L. Goldberg 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...DISTRIBUTION CODE Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) This report details a Fiber Optic Feeding

  4. Optically Tuned Fiber Gratings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    why we use a bulk polarization beam splitter . The fibre grating length was 50 cm with centre wavelength at 1550 nm. Fig.8 shows results of the...characteristics of glasses with enhanced non -linearity. In accordance with the specification, a fiber grating should be tuned within the range of 1...intensity pulse and has successfully demonstrated optically-tuned fiber grating. 19980617 115 14. SUBJECT TERMS Fibre Optics, Non -linear Optical

  5. Infrared fiber optic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    The development of IR fiber optics for use in astronomical and other space applications is summarized. Candidate materials were sought for use in the 1 to 200 micron and the 200 to 1000 micron wavelength range. Synthesis and optical characterization were carried out on several of these materials in bulk form. And the fabrication of a few materials in single crystal fiber optic form were studied.

  6. Optical Correlation Seeker.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-05

    not include noncoherent imaging optics 15 .-1 - Figure 13 shows a correlator design contained within a transparent solid. This monolithic...HARTMAN UNCLASSIFIED DRSMI/RR-SO-A-TR SBIE-AD-E950 083 N MMI LEYEL~ TECHNICAL REPORT RR-80-4 1l OPTICAL CORRELATION SEEKER Charles R. Christensen Richard L...Report RR-80-4 ! 4. TITLE (end Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED OPTICAL CORRELATION SEEKER 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(.) 8

  7. Replicated Composite Optics Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelhaupt, Darell

    1997-01-01

    Advanced optical systems for applications such as grazing incidence Wolter I x-ray mirror assemblies require extraordinary mirror surfaces in ten-ns of fine surface finish and figure. The impeccable mirror surface is on the inside of the rotational mirror form. One practical method of producing devices with these requirements is to first fabricate an exterior surface for the optical device then replicate that surface to have the inverse component with lightweight characteristics. The replicate optic is not better than the master or mandrel from which it is made. This task is a continuance of previous studies to identify methods and materials for forming these extremely low roughness optical components.

  8. Optical encryption interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Deborah J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An analog optical encryption system based on phase scrambling of two-dimensional optical images and holographic transformation for achieving large encryption keys and high encryption speed. An enciphering interface uses a spatial light modulator for converting a digital data stream into a two dimensional optical image. The optical image is further transformed into a hologram with a random phase distribution. The hologram is converted into digital form for transmission over a shared information channel. A respective deciphering interface at a receiver reverses the encrypting process by using a phase conjugate reconstruction of the phase scrambled hologram.

  9. Rules for Optical Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2014-01-01

    Based on 30 years of optical testing experience, a lot of mistakes, a lot of learning and a lot of experience, I have defined seven guiding principles for optical testing - regardless of how small or how large the optical testing or metrology task: Fully Understand the Task, Develop an Error Budget, Continuous Metrology Coverage, Know where you are, Test like you fly, Independent Cross-Checks, Understand All Anomalies. These rules have been applied with great success to the inprocess optical testing and final specification compliance testing of the JWST mirrors.

  10. Optical Computing Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-30

    1489-1496, 1985. 13. W.T. Welford and R. Winston , The Optics of Nonimaging Concentrators , Academic Press, New York, N.Y., 1978 (see Appendix A). 14. R.H...34, Applied Optics , Vol. 25, pp. 3033-3046 (1986). 2. P. Idell and J.W. Goodman, "Design of optical imaging concentrators for partially coherent light: absolute...AD-fIB? Ŗ OPTICAL CONPIITINO RESEAIRCII(U STANFORD UlNIV CA STINFORD / ELECTRONICS LASS J N 0000W4 30 OCT 97 SMAFOSR-TR-S?-1635 RFOSR-96

  11. Optical Pattern Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Francis T. S.; Jutamulia, Suganda

    2008-10-01

    Contributors; Preface; 1. Pattern recognition with optics Francis T. S. Yu and Don A. Gregory; 2. Hybrid neural networks for nonlinear pattern recognition Taiwei Lu; 3. Wavelets, optics, and pattern recognition Yao Li and Yunglong Sheng; 4. Applications of the fractional Fourier transform to optical pattern recognition David Mendlovic, Zeev Zalesky and Haldum M. Oxaktas; 5. Optical implementation of mathematical morphology Tien-Hsin Chao; 6. Nonlinear optical correlators with improved discrimination capability for object location and recognition Leonid P. Yaroslavsky; 7. Distortion-invariant quadratic filters Gregory Gheen; 8. Composite filter synthesis as applied to pattern recognition Shizhou Yin and Guowen Lu; 9. Iterative procedures in electro-optical pattern recognition Joseph Shamir; 10. Optoelectronic hybrid system for three-dimensional object pattern recognition Guoguang Mu, Mingzhe Lu and Ying Sun; 11. Applications of photrefractive devices in optical pattern recognition Ziangyang Yang; 12. Optical pattern recognition with microlasers Eung-Gi Paek; 13. Optical properties and applications of bacteriorhodopsin Q. Wang Song and Yu-He Zhang; 14. Liquid-crystal spatial light modulators Aris Tanone and Suganda Jutamulia; 15. Representations of fully complex functions on real-time spatial light modulators Robert W. Cohn and Laurence G. Hassbrook; Index.

  12. Optical limiting materials

    DOEpatents

    McBranch, Duncan W.; Mattes, Benjamin R.; Koskelo, Aaron C.; Heeger, Alan J.; Robinson, Jeanne M.; Smilowitz, Laura B.; Klimov, Victor I.; Cha, Myoungsik; Sariciftci, N. Serdar; Hummelen, Jan C.

    1998-01-01

    Optical limiting materials. Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO.sub.2) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400-1100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes.

  13. Advanced optical instruments technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Mike; Chrisp, Michael; Cheng, Li-Jen; Eng, Sverre; Glavich, Thomas; Goad, Larry; Jones, Bill; Kaarat, Philip; Nein, Max; Robinson, William

    1992-08-01

    The science objectives for proposed NASA missions for the next decades push the state of the art in sensitivity and spatial resolution over a wide range of wavelengths, including the x-ray to the submillimeter. While some of the proposed missions are larger and more sensitive versions of familiar concepts, such as the next generation space telescope, others use concepts, common on the Earth, but new to space, such as optical interferometry, in order to provide spatial resolutions impossible with other concepts. However, despite their architecture, the performance of all of the proposed missions depends critically on the back-end instruments that process the collected energy to produce scientifically interesting outputs. The Advanced Optical Instruments Technology panel was chartered with defining technology development plans that would best improve optical instrument performance for future astrophysics missions. At this workshop the optical instrument was defined as the set of optical components that reimage the light from the telescope onto the detectors to provide information about the spatial, spectral, and polarization properties of the light. This definition was used to distinguish the optical instrument technology issues from those associated with the telescope, which were covered by a separate panel. The panel identified several areas for optical component technology development: diffraction gratings; tunable filters; interferometric beam combiners; optical materials; and fiber optics. The panel also determined that stray light suppression instruments, such as coronagraphs and nulling interferometers, were in need of general development to support future astrophysics needs.

  14. Advanced optical instruments technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Mike; Chrisp, Michael; Cheng, Li-Jen; Eng, Sverre; Glavich, Thomas; Goad, Larry; Jones, Bill; Kaarat, Philip; Nein, Max; Robinson, William

    1992-01-01

    The science objectives for proposed NASA missions for the next decades push the state of the art in sensitivity and spatial resolution over a wide range of wavelengths, including the x-ray to the submillimeter. While some of the proposed missions are larger and more sensitive versions of familiar concepts, such as the next generation space telescope, others use concepts, common on the Earth, but new to space, such as optical interferometry, in order to provide spatial resolutions impossible with other concepts. However, despite their architecture, the performance of all of the proposed missions depends critically on the back-end instruments that process the collected energy to produce scientifically interesting outputs. The Advanced Optical Instruments Technology panel was chartered with defining technology development plans that would best improve optical instrument performance for future astrophysics missions. At this workshop the optical instrument was defined as the set of optical components that reimage the light from the telescope onto the detectors to provide information about the spatial, spectral, and polarization properties of the light. This definition was used to distinguish the optical instrument technology issues from those associated with the telescope, which were covered by a separate panel. The panel identified several areas for optical component technology development: diffraction gratings; tunable filters; interferometric beam combiners; optical materials; and fiber optics. The panel also determined that stray light suppression instruments, such as coronagraphs and nulling interferometers, were in need of general development to support future astrophysics needs.

  15. Interactive virtual optical laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuan; Yang, Yi

    2017-08-01

    Laboratory experiences are essential for optics education. However, college students have limited access to advanced optical equipment that is generally expensive and complicated. Hence there is a need for innovative solutions to expose students to advanced optics laboratories. Here we describe a novel approach, interactive virtual optical laboratory (IVOL) that allows unlimited number of students to participate the lab session remotely through internet, to improve laboratory education in photonics. Although students are not physically conducting the experiment, IVOL is designed to engage students, by actively involving students in the decision making process throughout the experiment.

  16. Optical contact micrometer

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Steven D.

    2014-08-19

    Certain examples provide optical contact micrometers and methods of use. An example optical contact micrometer includes a pair of opposable lenses to receive an object and immobilize the object in a position. The example optical contact micrometer includes a pair of opposable mirrors positioned with respect to the pair of lenses to facilitate viewing of the object through the lenses. The example optical contact micrometer includes a microscope to facilitate viewing of the object through the lenses via the mirrors; and an interferometer to obtain one or more measurements of the object.

  17. Management Of Optical Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Peter S.; Olson, David R.

    1981-03-01

    This paper discusses the management of optical projects from the concept stage, beginning with system specifications, through design, optical fabrication and test tasks. Special emphasis is placed on effective coupling of design engineering with fabrication development and utilization of available technology. Contrasts are drawn between accepted formalized management techniques, the realities of dealing with fragile components and the necessity of an effective project team which integrates the special characteristics of highly skilled optical specialists including lens designers, optical engineers, opticians, and metrologists. Examples are drawn from the HEAO-2 X-Ray Telescope and Space Telescope projects.

  18. Optical recording materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savant, Gajendra D.; Jannson, Joanna L.

    1991-07-01

    The increased emphasis on speed of operation, wavelength selectivity, compactness, and ruggedization has focused a great deal of attention on the solutions offered by all-optic devices and by hybrid electro-optic systems. In fact, many photonic devices are being considered for use as partial replacements for electronic systems. Optical components, which include modulators, switches, 3-D memory storage devices, wavelength division multiplexers, holographic optical elements, and others, are examples of such devices. The success or failure of these modern optical devices depends, to a great extent, on the performance and survivability of the optical materials used. This is particularly true for volume holographic filters, organic memory media, second- and third-order nonlinear material-based processors and neural networks. Due to the critical importance of these materials and their lack of availability, Physical Optics Corporation (POC) undertook a global advanced optical materials program which has enabled it to introduce several optical devices, based on the new and improved materials which will be described in this article.

  19. Optical programmable metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Cheng; Zhang, Nan; Dai, Zijie; Liu, Weiwei

    2018-02-01

    We suggest and demonstrate the concept of optical programmable metamaterials which can configure the device's electromagnetic parameters by the programmable optical stimuli. In such metamaterials, the optical stimuli produced by a FPGA controlled light emitting diode array can switch or combine the resonance modes which are coupled in. As an example, an optical programmable metamaterial terahertz absorber is proposed. Each cell of the absorber integrates four meta-rings (asymmetric 1/4 rings) with photo-resistors connecting the critical gaps. The principle and design of the metamaterials are illustrated and the simulation results demonstrate the functionalities for programming the metamaterial absorber to change its bandwidth and resonance frequency.

  20. Surface optical vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lembessis, V. E.; Babiker, M.; Andrews, D. L.

    2009-01-01

    It is shown how the total internal reflection of orbital-angular-momentum-endowed light can lead to the generation of evanescent light possessing rotational properties in which the intensity distribution is firmly localized in the vicinity of the surface. The characteristics of these surface optical vortices depend on the form of the incident light and on the dielectric mismatch of the two media. The interference of surface optical vortices is shown to give rise to interesting phenomena, including pattern rotation akin to a surface optical Ferris wheel. Applications are envisaged to be in atom lithography, optical surface tweezers, and spanners.