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Sample records for early-type galaxies detection

  1. Age Dating Merger Events in Early Type Galaxies via the Detection of AGB Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothun, G.

    2005-01-01

    A thorough statistical analysis of the J-H vs. H-K color plane of all detected early type galaxies in the 2MASS catalog with velocities less than 5000 km/s has been performed. This all sky survey is not sensitive to one particular galactic environment and therefore a representative range of early type galaxy environments have been sampled. Virtually all N-body simulation so major mergers produces a central starburst due to rapid collection of gas. This central starburst is of sufficient amplitude to change the stellar population in the central regions of the galaxy. Intermediate age populations are given away by the presence of AGB stars which will drive the central colors redder in H-K relative to the J- H baseline. This color anomaly has a lifetime of 2-5 billion years depending on the amplitude of the initial starburst Employing this technique on the entire 2MASS sample (several hundred galaxies) reveals that the AGB signature occurs less than 1% of the time. This is a straightforward indication that virtually all nearby early type galaxies have not had a major merger occur within the last few billion years.

  2. Chandra Early Type Galaxy Atals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Woo; Anderson, Craig; Burke, Douglas J.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Fruscione, Antonella; Lauer, Jennifer; McCollough, Michael; Morgan, Douglas; Mossman, Amy; O'Sullivan, Ewan; Paggi, Alessandro; Vrtilek, Saeqa Dil; Trinchieri, Ginevra

    2017-08-01

    The hot gas in early type galaxies (ETGs) plays a crucial role in understanding their formation and evolution. As the hot gas is often extended to the outskirts beyond the optical size, the large scale structural features identified by Chandra (including jets, cavities, cold fronts, filaments and tails) point to key evolutionary mechanisms, e.g., AGN feedback, merging history, accretion, stripping and star formation and its quenching. We have systematically analyzed the archival Chandra data of ~100 ETGs to study the hot ISM. We produce the uniformly derived data products with spatially resolved spectral information and will make them accessible via a public web site. With 2D spectral infomation, we further discuss gas morphology, scaling relations, X-ray based mass profiles and their implications related to various physical mechanisms (e.g., stellar and AGN feedback).

  3. The molecular cloud content of early type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiklind, Tommy; Henkel, Christian

    1990-01-01

    A survey of the CO content of early type galaxies led to 24 new detections, mostly lenticular galaxies. The galaxies, which are situated in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, were selected as being far-IR luminous compared to their blue luminosity, and situated at distances less than about 50 Mpc (H sub o=100 km/s Mpc(-1). Results for some early galaxies (NGC 404, NGC 3593 and NGC 4369 are given.

  4. Neutral Gas Properties of Extremely Isolated Early-type Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Trisha; Marcum, Pamela M.; Fanelli, Michael N., E-mail: trisha.l.ashley@nasa.gov, E-mail: pamela.m.marcum@nasa.gov, E-mail: michael.n.fanelli@nasa.gov

    We present the results of single-dish atomic hydrogen (H i) observations of six highly isolated early-type galaxies. These objects are a representative subset of galaxies previously studied at optical wavelengths and selected to be separated by at least 2.5 Mpc from companions brighter than M{sub V}  = −16.5 mag. Each galaxy was observed with a single pointing using the NRAO Green Bank Telescope L -band receiver. Five of these systems were strongly detected in H i. These five galaxies exhibit H i profiles with a range of properties: single Gaussian-like peaks, separate double peaks, and double horn-like profiles. The four bluestmore » galaxies ( B − V < 0.54) all contain significant gas with H i masses ranging from 1.1 × 10{sup 8} to 1.4 × 10{sup 9}.« less

  5. Herschel Spectroscopy of Early-type Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Lapham, Ryen Carl; Young, Lisa M.; Crocker, Alison, E-mail: ryen.lapham@student.nmt.edu, E-mail: lyoung@physics.nmt.edu, E-mail: crockera@reed.edu

    We present Herschel spectroscopy of atomic lines arising in photodissociation regions as well as ionization regions of nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs), focusing on the volume-limited Atlas3D sample. Our data include the [C ii], [O i], and [N ii] 122 and 205 μ m lines, along with ancillary data including CO and H i maps. We find that ETGs have [C ii]/FIR ratios slightly lower than spiral galaxies in the KINGFISH sample, and several ETGs have unusually large [N ii] 122/[C ii] ratios. The [N ii] 122/[C ii] ratio is correlated with UV colors and there is a strong anti-correlation ofmore » [C ii]/FIR with NUV-K seen in both spirals and ETGs, likely due to a softer radiation field with fewer photons available to ionize carbon and heat the gas. The correlation thus makes a [C ii] deficit in galaxies with redder stellar populations. The high [N ii] 122/[C ii] (and low [C ii]/FIR) line ratios could also be affected by the removal of much of the diffuse, low-density gas, which is consistent with the low H i/H{sub 2} ratios. [C ii] is now being used as a star-formation indicator, and we find that it is just as good for ETGs as in spirals. The [C ii]/CO ratios found are also similar to those found in spiral galaxies. Through the use of the [N ii] 205 μ m line, estimates of the percentage of [C ii] emission arising from ionized gas indicate that a significant portion could arise in ionized regions.« less

  6. A survey of the properties of early-type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Joel N.; Roberts, M. S.; Hogg, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    A compilation of the properties of elliptical and early disk galaxies was completed. In addition to material from the literature, such as Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) fluxes, the compilation includes recent measurements of HI and CO, as well as a review of the x ray properties by Forman and Jones. The data are used to evaluate the gas content of early systems and to search for correlations with x ray emission. The interstellar medium in early-type galaxies is generally dominated by hot interstellar gas (T approx. 10 to the 7th power K; c.f. the review by Fabbiano 1989 and references therein). In addition, a significant fraction of these galaxies show infrared emission (Knapp, et al., 1989), optical emission lines, and visible dust. Sensitive studies in HI and CO of a number of these galaxies have been completed recently, resulting in several detections, particularly of the later types. Researchers wish to understand the connection among these different forms of the interstellar medium, and to examine the theoretical picture of the fate of the hot gas. To do so, they compiled observations of several forms of interstellar matter for a well-defined sample of early-type galaxies. Here they present a statistical analysis of this data base and discuss the implications of the results.

  7. Detection of Enhanced Central Mass-to-light Ratios in Low-mass Early-type Galaxies: Evidence for Black Holes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechetti, Renuka; Seth, Anil; Cappellari, Michele; McDermid, Richard; den Brok, Mark; Mieske, Steffen; Strader, Jay

    2017-11-01

    We present dynamical measurements of the central mass-to-light ratio (M/L) of a sample of 27 low-mass early-type {{ATLAS}}3{{D}} galaxies. We consider all {{ATLAS}}3{{D}} galaxies with 9.7 < log({M}\\star /{M}⊙ ) < 10.5 in our analysis, selecting out galaxies with available high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data, and eliminating galaxies with significant central color gradients or obvious dust features. We use the HST images to derive mass models for these galaxies and combine these with the central velocity dispersion values from {{ATLAS}}3{{D}} data to obtain a central dynamical M/L estimate. These central dynamical {\\text{}}M/L{{s}} are higher than dynamical {\\text{}}M/L{{s}} derived at larger radii and stellar population estimates of the galaxy centers in ˜80% of galaxies, with a median enhancement of ˜14% and a statistical significance of 3.3σ. We show that the enhancement in the central M/L is best described either by the presence of black holes in these galaxies or by radial initial mass function variations. Assuming a black hole model, we derive black hole masses for the sample of galaxies. In two galaxies, NGC 4458 and NGC 4660, the data suggest significantly overmassive black holes, while in most others only upper limits are obtained. We also show that the level of M/L enhancements we see in these early-type galaxy nuclei are consistent with the larger enhancements seen in ultracompact dwarf galaxies (UCDs), supporting the scenario where massive UCDs are created by stripping galaxies of these masses.

  8. Demise of faint satellites around isolated early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Changbom; Hwang, Ho Seong; Park, Hyunbae; Lee, Jong Chul

    2018-02-01

    The hierarchical galaxy formation scenario in the Cold Dark Matter cosmology with a non-vanishing cosmological constant Λ and geometrically flat space (ΛCDM) has been very successful in explaining the large-scale distribution of galaxies. However, there have been claims that ΛCDM over-predicts the number of satellite galaxies associated with massive galaxies compared with observations—the missing satellite galaxy problem1-3. Isolated groups of galaxies hosted by passively evolving massive early-type galaxies are ideal laboratories for identifying the missing physics in the current theory4-11. Here, we report—based on a deep spectroscopic survey—that isolated massive and passive early-type galaxies without any signs of recent wet mergers or accretion episodes have almost no satellite galaxies fainter than the r-band absolute magnitude of about Mr = -14. If only early-type satellites are used, the cutoff is at the somewhat brighter magnitude of about Mr = -15. Such a cutoff has not been found in other nearby satellite galaxy systems hosted by late-type galaxies or those with merger features. Various physical properties of satellites depend strongly on the host-centric distance. Our observations indicate that the satellite galaxy luminosity function is largely determined by the interaction of satellites with the environment provided by their host.

  9. Imaging the Hot Stellar Content of Early Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertola, Francesco

    1991-07-01

    WE PROPOSE TO IMAGE WITH THE FOC IN THE F/96 CONFIGURATION FIVE EARLY TYPE GALAXIES IN FOUR PASSBANDS CENTERED AT 1500 A, 2200 A, 2800 A AND 3400 A. WHEN COUPLED WITH PHOTOMETRY OBTAINED FROM THE GROUND OUR OBSERVATIONS WILL ALLOW US TO DERIVE COMPLETE SED OF THESE GALAXIES AS A FUNCTION OF THE DISTANCE FROM THE CENTER. THIS IS A KEY STEP TOWARDS THE UNDERSTANDING OF STELLAR POPULATIONS - IN PARTICULAR THE ONE RESPONSIBLE FOR THE UV EMISSION - IN EARLY TYPE GALAXIES AND WILL PROVIDE IMPORTANT INSIGHT IN THEIR FORMATION AND EVOLUTION. WE PLAN TO OBSERVE NGC 1399, NGC 2681, NGC 4552, NGC 5018 AND NGC 4627 WHICH SAMPLE A WIDE RANGE OF INTRINSIC PROPERTIES AS INDICATED BY PREVIOUS IUE OBSERVATIONS. FOR NGC 4627 THERE IS EVIDENCE OF ONGOING STAR FORMATION AND THE HST WILL BE ABLE TO SHOW THE CHARACTERISTIC CLUMPINESS. NGC 2681 HAD A STARBUST OF AGE GREATER THAN 1 GYR. NGC 4552 IS ONE OF THE MOST METAL RICH GALAXY KNOWN. NGC 1399 HAS THE SAME METALLICITY AND LUMINOSITY OF THE PREVIOUS GALAXY BUT IS A MUCH STRONGER X-RAY EMITTER. NGC 5018 IS A VERY GOOD CANDIDATE FOR ONGOING STAR FORMATION. WE BELIEVE IN THIS WAY WE CAN OBTAIN SED FOR THE TWO-DIMENSIONAL IMAGES OF EARLY TYPE GALAXIES FROM BROAD BAND IMAGING ALONE. THE CALIBRATION OF OUR FILTER SYSTEM WILL ALLOW US TO APPLY IT TO THE BIDIMENSIONAL ANALYSIS OF THE GENERAL SAMPLE OF EARLY TYPE GALAXIES.

  10. Early-type galaxies in the Chandra cosmos survey

    SciTech Connect

    Civano, F.; Fabbiano, G.; Kim, D.-W.

    2014-07-20

    We study a sample of 69 X-ray detected early-type galaxies (ETGs), selected from the Chandra COSMOS survey, to explore the relation between the X-ray luminosity of hot gaseous halos (L{sub X,{sub gas}}) and the integrated stellar luminosity (L{sub K} ) of the galaxies, in a range of redshift extending out to z = 1.5. In the local universe, a tight, steep relationship has been established between these two quantities (L{sub X,gas}∼L{sub K}{sup 4.5}), suggesting the presence of largely virialized halos in X-ray luminous systems. We use well-established relations from the study of local universe ETGs, together with the expected evolutionmore » of the X-ray emission, to subtract the contribution of low-mass X-ray binary populations from the X-ray luminosity of our sample. Our selection minimizes the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), yielding a sample representative of normal passive COSMOS ETGs; therefore, the resulting luminosity should be representative of gaseous halos, although we cannot exclude other sources such as obscured AGNs or enhanced X-ray emission connected with embedded star formation in the higher-z galaxies. We find that most of the galaxies with estimated L{sub X} < 10{sup 42} erg s{sup –1} and z < 0.55 follow the L{sub X,{sub gas}}-L{sub K} relation of local universe ETGs. For these galaxies, the gravitational mass can be estimated with a certain degree of confidence from the local virial relation. However, the more luminous (10{sup 42} erg s{sup –1}« less

  11. Interstellar matter in early-type galaxies. I. The catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.S.; Hogg, D.E.; Bregman, J.N.

    1991-03-01

    A catalog is given of the currently available measurements of interstellar matter in the 467 early-type galaxies listed in the second edition of the Revised Shapley-Ames Catalog of Bright Galaxies. The morphological type range is E, SO, and Sa. The ISM tracers are emission in the following bands: IRAS 100 micron, X-ray, radio, neutral hydrogen, and carbon monoxide. Nearly two-thirds of the Es and SOs have been detected in one or more of these tracers. Additional observed quantities that are tabulated include: magnitude, colors, radial velocity, central velocity dispersion, maximum of the rotation curve, angular size, 60 micron flux, andmore » supernovae. Qualitative statements as to the presence of dust or emission lines, when available in the literature, are given. Quantities derivative from the observed values are also listed and include masses of H I, CO, X-ray gas, and dust as well as an estimate of the total mass and mass-to-luminosity ratio of the individual galaxies. 204 refs.« less

  12. The stellar populations of nearby early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concannon, Kristi Dendy

    The recent completion of comprehensive photometric and spectroscopic galaxy surveys has revealed that early-type galaxies form a more heterogeneous family than previously thought. To better understand the star formation histories of early-type galaxies, we have obtained a set of high resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra for a sample of 180 nearby early-type galaxies with the FAST spectrograph and the 1.5m telescope at F. L. Whipple Observatory. The spectra cover the wavelength range 3500 5500 Å which allows the comparison of various Balmer lines, most importantly the higher order lines in the blue, and have a S/N ratio higher than that of previous samples, which makes it easier to investigate the intrinsic spread in the observed parameters. The data set contains galaxies in both the local field and Virgo cluster environment and spans the velocity dispersion range 50 < log σ < 250km s -1. In conjunction with recent improvements in population synthesis modeling, our data set enables us to investigate the star formation history of E/S0 galaxies as a function of mass (σ), environment, and to some extent morphology. We are able to probe the effects of age and metallicity on fundamental observable relations such as the Mg-σ relation, and show that there is a significant spread in age in such diagrams, at all log σ, such that their “uniformity” can not be interpreted as a homogeneous history for early-type galaxies. Analyzing the age and [Fe/H] distribution as a function of the galaxy mass, we find that an age-σ relation exists among galaxies in both the local field and the Virgo cluster, such that the lower log σ galaxies have younger luminosity-weighted mean ages. The age spread of the low σ galaxies suggests that essentially all of the low-mass galaxies contain young to intermediate age populations, whereas the spread in age of the high log σ galaxies (log σ >˜ 2.0) is much larger, with galaxies spanning the age range of 4 19 Gyr. Thus, rather

  13. The Origin of Dwarf Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloba, Elisa

    2012-10-01

    Abridge. We have conducted a spectrophotometric study of dwarf early-type galaxies (dEs) in the Virgo cluster and in regions of lower density. We have found that these galaxies show many properties in common with late-type galaxies but not with more massive early-types (E/S0). The properties of the dEs in Virgo show gradients within the cluster. dEs in the outer parts of the Virgo cluster are kinematically supported by rotation, while those in the center are supported by the random motions of their stars (i.e. pressure supported). The rotationally supported dEs have disky isophotes and faint underlying spiral/irregular substructures, they also show younger ages than those pressure supported, which have boxy isophotes and are smooth and regular, without any substructure. We compare the position of these dEs with massive early-type galaxies in the Faber-Jackson and Fundamental Plane relations, and we find that, although there is no difference between the position of rotationally and pressure supported dEs, both deviate from the relations of massive early-type galaxies in the direction of dwarf spheroidal systems (dSphs). We have used their offset with respect to the Fundamental Plane of E/S0 galaxies to estimate their dark matter fraction. All the properties studied in this work agree with a ram pressure stripping scenario, where late-type galaxies infall into the cluster, their interaction with the intergalactic medium blows away their gas and, as a result, they are quenched in a small amount of time. However, those dEs in the center of the cluster seem to have been fully transformed leaving no trace of their possible spiral origin, thus, if that is the case, they must have experienced a more violent mechanism in combination with ram pressure stripping.

  14. The Outer Halos of Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, Ortwin; Arnaboldi, Magda; Longobardi, Alessia

    2015-04-01

    The outer halos of massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) are dark matter dominated and may have formed by accretion of smaller systems during galaxy evolution. Here a brief report is given of some recent work on the kinematics, angular momentum, and mass distributions of simulated ETG halos, and of corresponding properties of observed halos measured with planetary nebulae (PNe) as tracers. In the outermost regions of the Virgo-central galaxy M87, the PN data show that the stellar halo and the co-spatial intracluster light are distinct kinematic components.

  15. The onset of galactic winds in early-type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Christine

    1992-01-01

    We completed the spectral analysis of 31 early-type galaxies to investigate whether their x-ray emission was predominantly due to thermal bremsstrahlung from a hot gaseous corona or emission from discrete, galactic sources such as x-ray binaries. If a corona dominates the x-ray emission, its spectra is expected to be relatively cool (0.5 - 1 keV) compared to the harder emission associated with x-ray binaries in our galaxy, the Magellanic Clouds and M31. While it is generally accepted that the x-ray emission in luminous E and S0 galaxies arises from hot coronae, the status of hot gas in lower luminosity (and hence lower mass) galaxies is less clear. Calculations show that, for a given supernova rate, a critical galaxy luminosity (mass) exists below which the gas cannot be gravitationally confined and a galactic wind is predicted to be effective in expelling gas from the galaxy. Since significant mass (a dark halo) is required to hold a hot, gaseous corona around a galaxy, we expect that the faintest, smallest galaxies will not have a hot corona, but their x-ray emission will be dominated by galactic sources or by an active galactic nuclei. In the sample we tested which spanned the absolute magnitude range from -21.5 to -19.5, we found that except for two galaxies whose x-ray emission was dominated by an active nucleus, that the others were consistent with emission from hot gas. We also found that there is a correlation between gas temperature and galaxy magnitude (mass), such that the brighter, more luminous galaxies have hotter gas temperatures. Thus even at relatively faint magnitudes, the dominant emission from early-type galaxies appears to be hot gas. We also carried out an investigation of the x-ray surface brightness distribution of the x-ray emission for about 100 early type galaxies to determine whether the x-ray emission from galaxies are extended. Extended x-ray emission is expected if the emission is due to a hot gaseous corona. We determined the ratio

  16. Central stellar mass deficits of early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsige Dullo, Bililign; Graham, Alister

    2016-01-01

    The centers of giant galaxies display stellar mass deficits (Mdef) which are thought to be a signature left by inspiraling supermassive black holes (SMBHs) from pre-merged galaxies. We quantify these deficits using the core-Sérsic model for the largest ever sample of early-type galaxies and find Mdef ˜ 0.5 to 4 MBH (SMBH mass). We find that lenticular disc galaxies with bulge magnitudes MV ≤ -21.0 mag also have central stellar deficits, suggesting that their bulges may have formed from major merger events while their surroundingdisc was subsequently built up, perhaps via cold gas accretion scenarios. Interestingly, these bulges have sizes and mass densities comparable to the compact galaxies found at z ˜ 1.5 to 2.

  17. Enviromental Effects on Internal Color Gradients of Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Barbera, F.; de Carvalho, R. R.; Gal, R. R.; Busarello, G.; Haines, C. P.; Mercurio, A.; Merluzzi, P.; Capaccioli, M.; Djorgovski, S. G.

    2007-05-01

    One of the most debated issues of observational and theoretical cosmology is that of how the environment affects the formation and evolution of galaxies. To gain new insight into this subject, we have derived surface photometry for a sample of 3,000 early-type galaxies belonging to 163 clusters with different richness, spanning a redshift range of 0.05 to 0.25. This large data-set is used to analyze how the color distribution inside galaxies depends on several parameters, such as cluster richness, local galaxy density, galaxy luminosity and redshift. We find that the internal color profile of galaxies strongly depends on the environment where galaxies reside. Galaxies in poor and rich clusters are found to follow two distinct trends in the color gradient vs. redshift diagram, with color gradients beeing less steep in rich rather than in poor clusters. No dependence of color gradients on galaxy luminosity is detected both for poor and rich clusters. We find that color gradients strongly depend on local galaxy density, with more shallow gradients in high density regions. Interestingly, this result holds only for low richness clusters, with color gradients of galaxies in rich clusters showing no dependence on local galaxy density. Our results support a reasonable picture whereby young early-type galaxies form in a dissipative collapse process, and then undergo increased (either major or minor) merging activity in richer rather than in poor clusters.

  18. Environmental Effects on the Metallicities of Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor); Jones, Christine

    2004-01-01

    In this multi-year project to investigate the metal enrichment of early-type galaxies, we have used ROSAT, ASCA and now Chandra observations to study samples of galaxies. We have published two papers and a third paper that incorporates Chandra archival observations is nearing completion. Below, we briefly describe our findings. Our first paper "SN IA Enrichment in Virgo Early-type Galaxies from ROSAT and ASCA Observations" was published in the Astrophysical Journal (vol 539, 603) reported on the properties of nine X-ray bright elliptical galaxies in the Virgo cluster observed by ROSAT and ASCA. We measured iron abundance gradients as a function of radius in three galaxies. We found that the magnesium and silicon abundance gradients were in general flatter than those of iron. We suggest this is due to a metallicity dependence in the metal production rates of SN Ia's. We calculate SN Ia rates in the center of these galaxies that are comparable to those measured optically. Our second paper "ASCA Observations of Groups at Radii of Low Overdensity: Implications for Cosmic Preheating" also was published in the Astrophysical Journal (vol 578, 74). This paper reported on the ASCA spectroscopy of nine groups of galaxies. We found that the entropy profile in groups is driven by nongravitational heating processes, and could be explained by a short period of preheating by galactic winds. The third paper (in preparation) uses a sample of about 200 galaxies from both ROSAT and Chandra observations. In this paper we characterize both the nuclear and the extended X-ray emission for this sample. We will use these observations to determine the "on-time" of the X-ray emitting AGN and the fraction of "fossil groups" as well as to investigate how large AGN outbursts can sweep the galaxy of its hot ISM, thus leading to changes in the ISM metal enrichment.

  19. The origin of dwarf early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloba, E.

    2013-05-01

    We have conducted a spectrophotometric study of dwarf early-type galaxies (dEs) in the Virgo cluster and in regions of lower density. We have found that these galaxies show many properties in common with late-type galaxies but not with more massive early-types (E/S0). The properties of the dEs in Virgo show gradients within the cluster. dEs in the outer parts of the Virgo cluster are kinematically supported by rotation, while those in the center are supported by the random motions of their stars (i.e. pressure supported). The rotationally supported dEs have disky isophotes and faint underlying spiral/irregular substructures, they also show younger ages than those pressure supported, which have boxy isophotes and are smooth and regular, without any substructure. We compare the position of these dEs with massive early-type galaxies in the Faber-Jackson and Fundamental Plane relations, and we find that, although there is no difference between the position of rotationally and pressure supported dEs, both deviate from the relations of massive early-type galaxies in the direction of dwarf spheroidal systems (dSphs). We have used their offset with respect to the Fundamental Plane of E/S0 galaxies to estimate their dark matter fraction. All the properties studied in this work agree with a ram pressure stripping scenario, where late-type galaxies infall into the cluster, their interaction with the intergalactic medium blows away their gas and, as a result, they are quenched in a small amount of time. However, those dEs in the center of the cluster seem to have been fully transformed leaving no trace of their possible spiral origin, thus, if that is the case, they must have experienced a more violent mechanism in combination with ram pressure stripping, the open problem is that even galaxy harassment does not fully explain the observed properties for the pressure supported dEs in the center of the Virgo cluster.

  20. Environmental Effects on the Metallicities of Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Christine; Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    We completed and published two papers in the Astrophysical Journal based on research from grant. In the first paper we analyzed nine X-ray-bright Virgo early-type galaxies observed by both ASCA and ROSAT. Through spatially resolved spectroscopy, we determined the radial temperature profiles and abundances of Mg, Si, and Fe for six galaxies. The temperature profiles are consistent with isothermal temperatures outside of cooler regions at the galaxies' centers. We present new evidence for iron abundance gradients in NGC 4472 and NGC 4649 and confirm the previous results on NGC 4636. Mg and Si abundance gradients on average are flatter than those of iron and correspond to an underabundance of α-process elements at high Fe values, while at low iron the element ratios favor enrichment by Type II supernovae (SNe). We explain the observed trend using the metallicity dependence of SN Ia metal production and present constraints on the available theoretical modeling for low-metallicity inhibition of SNe Ia. In the second paper We analyzed nine X-ray-bright Virgo early-type galaxies observed by both ASCA and ROSAT. Through spatially resolved spectroscopy, we determined the radial temperature profiles and abundances of Mg, Si, and Fe for six galaxies. The temperature profiles are consistent with isothermal temperatures outside of cooler regions at the galaxies' centers. We present new evidence for iron abundance gradients in NGC 4472 and NGC 4649 and confirm the previous results on NGC 4636. Mg and Si abundance gradients on average are flatter than those of iron and correspond to an underabundance of α-process elements at high Fe values, while at low iron the element ratios favor enrichment by Type I1 supernovae (SNe). We explain the observed trend using the metallicity dependence of SN Ia metal production and present constraints on the available theoretical modeling for low-metallicity inhibition of SNe Ia.

  1. The ATLAS3D project - XXVII. Cold gas and the colours and ages of early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Lisa M.; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Alatalo, Katherine; Bayet, Estelle; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, Martin; Crocker, Alison F.; Cappellari, Michele; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; McDermid, Richard M.; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Weijmans, Anne-Marie

    2014-11-01

    We present a study of the cold gas contents of the ATLAS3D early-type galaxies, in the context of their optical colours, near-ultraviolet colours and Hβ absorption line strengths. Early-type (elliptical and lenticular) galaxies are not as gas poor as previously thought, and at least 40 per cent of local early-type galaxies are now known to contain molecular and/or atomic gas. This cold gas offers the opportunity to study recent galaxy evolution through the processes of cold gas acquisition, consumption (star formation) and removal. Molecular and atomic gas detection rates range from 10 to 34 per cent in red sequence early-type galaxies, depending on how the red sequence is defined, and from 50 to 70 per cent in blue early-type galaxies. Notably, massive red sequence early-type galaxies (stellar masses >5 × 1010 M⊙, derived from dynamical models) are found to have H I masses up to M(H I)/M* ˜ 0.06 and H2 masses up to M(H2)/M* ˜ 0.01. Some 20 per cent of all massive early-type galaxies may have retained atomic and/or molecular gas through their transition to the red sequence. However, kinematic and metallicity signatures of external gas accretion (either from satellite galaxies or the intergalactic medium) are also common, particularly at stellar masses ≤5 × 1010 M⊙, where such signatures are found in ˜50 per cent of H2-rich early-type galaxies. Our data are thus consistent with a scenario in which fast rotator early-type galaxies are quenched former spiral galaxies which have undergone some bulge growth processes, and in addition, some of them also experience cold gas accretion which can initiate a period of modest star formation activity. We discuss implications for the interpretation of colour-magnitude diagrams.

  2. Probing the interstellar medium in early-type galaxies with Infrared Space Oberservatory observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malhotra, S.; Hollenbach, D.; Helou, D.; Silbermann, N.; Valjavec, E.; Rubin, R.; Dale, D.; Hunter, D.; Lu, N.; Lord, S.; hide

    2000-01-01

    Four IRAS-detected early-type galaxies were observed with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). With the exception of the 15 mu m image of NGC 1052, the mid-IR images of NGC 1052, NGC 1155, NGC 5866, and NGC 6958 at 4.5, 7, and 15 mu m show extended emission.

  3. Analysis of the Einstein sample of early-type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eskridge, Paul B.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina

    1993-01-01

    The EINSTEIN galaxy catalog contains x-ray data for 148 early-type (E and SO) galaxies. A detailed analysis of the global properties of this sample are studied. By comparing the x-ray properties with other tracers of the ISM, as well as with observables related to the stellar dynamics and populations of the sample, we expect to determine more clearly the physical relationships that determine the evolution of early-type galaxies. Previous studies with smaller samples have explored the relationships between x-ray luminosity (L(sub x)) and luminosities in other bands. Using our larger sample and the statistical techniques of survival analysis, a number of these earlier analyses were repeated. For our full sample, a strong statistical correlation is found between L(sub X) and L(sub B) (the probability that the null hypothesis is upheld is P less than 10(exp -4) from a variety of rank correlation tests. Regressions with several algorithms yield consistent results.

  4. Environmental Effects on the Metallicities of Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Christine; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    We have completed and published two papers based on research from this grant. Our first paper "SN IA Enrichment in Virgo Early-type Galaxies from ROSAT and ASCA Observations" was published in the Astrophysical Journal (vol 539,603) reported on the properties of nine X-ray bright elliptical galaxies in the Virgo cluster observed by ROSAT and ASCA. We measured iron abundance gradients as a function of radius in three galaxies. We found that the magnesium and silicon abundance gradients were in general flatter than those of iron. We suggest this is due to a metallicity dependence in the metal production rates of SN Ia's. We calculate SN Ia rates in the center of these galaxies that are comparable to those measured optically. Our second paper "ASCA Observations of Groups at Radii of Low Overdensity: Implications for Cosmic Preheating" also was published in the Astrophysical Journal (vol 578, 74). This paper reported on the ASCA spectroscopy of nine groups of galaxies. We found that the entropy profile in groups is driven by nongravitational heating processes, and could be explained by a short period of preheating by galactic winds.

  5. X-ray Scaling Relations of Early Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Woo

    2015-08-01

    We will review recent results of the X-ray scaling relations of early type galaxies. With high quality Chandra X-ray data, the properties (Lx and T) of hot ISM are accurately measured from gas-poor to gas-rich galaxies. We found a strong correlation between Lx(gas) and M(total) among ETGs with independently measured M(total), indicating that the total mass is the primary factor in regulating the amount of hot gas. We found a tight correlation between Lx(gas) and T(gas) among normal (non-cD), genuine (passively evolving, sigma-supported) ellipticals. This relation holds in a large range of Lx (several 1038 - a few 1041 erg/s). While this relation can be understood among gas-rich galaxies (Lx > 1040 erg/s) as a consequence of virialized gaseous halos in the dark matter potentials, the same tight relation is unexpected among gas-poor galaxies where the hot gas is in a wind/outflow state. We also found an interesting difference between cDs and giant Es, the former having an order of magnitude higher Lx(gas) with a similar T(gas). We will discuss the implications of our results by comparing with other observations of galaxies/groups and recent simulations.

  6. Herschel-ATLAS: Dusty early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowlands, K.; Dunne, L.; Maddox, S.

    2015-03-01

    Early-type galaxies (ETGs) are thought to be devoid of dust and star-formation, having formed most of their stars at early epochs. We present the detection of the dustiest ETGs in a large-area blind submillimetre survey with Herschel (H-ATLAS, Eales et al. 2010), where the lack of pre-selection in other bands makes it the first unbiased survey for cold dust in ETGs. The parent sample of 1087 H-ATLAS galaxies in this study have a >= 5σ detection at 250μm, a reliable optical counterpart to the submillimetre source (Smith et al. 2011) and a spectroscopic redshift from the GAMA survey (Driver et al. 2011). Additionally, we construct a control sample of 1052 optically selected galaxies undetected at 250μm and matched in stellar mass to the H-ATLAS parent sample to eliminate selection effects. ETGs were selected from both samples via visual classifications using SDSS images. Further details can be found in Rowlands et al. (2012). Physical parameters are derived for each galaxy using the multiwavelength spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting code of da Cunha, Charlot and Elbaz (2008), Smith et al. 2012, using an energy balance argument. We investigate the differences between the dusty ETGs and the general ETG population, and find that the H-ATLAS ETGs are more than an order of magnitude dustier than the control ETGs. The mean dust mass of the 42 H-ATLAS ETGs is 5.5 × 107M⊙ (comparable to the dust mass of spirals in our sample), whereas the dust mass of the 233 control ETGs inferred from stacking at optical positions on the 250μm map is (0.8 - 4.0) × 106M⊙ for 25-15 K dust. The average star-formation rate of the H-ATLAS ETGs is 1.0 dex higher than that of control ETGs, and the mean r-band light-weighted age of the H-ATLAS ETGs is 1.8 Gyr younger than the control ETGs. The rest-frame NUV - r colours of the H-ATLAS ETGs are 1.0 magnitudes bluer than the control ETGs, and some ETGs may be transitioning from the blue cloud to the red sequence. Some H-ATLAS ETGs

  7. The Origin of Dwarf Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloba, Elisa; Boselli, A.; Gorgas, J.

    2013-01-01

    The physical mechanisms involved in the formation and evolution of dwarf early-type galaxies (dEs) are not well understood yet. Whether these objects, that outnumber any other class of object in clusters, are the low luminosity extension of massive early-type galaxies, i.e. formed through similar processes, or are a different group of objects possibly formed through the transformation of low luminosity spiral galaxies, is still an open debate. Studying the kinematic properties of dEs is a powerful way to distinguish between these two scenarios. In my PhD, awarded with a Fulbright postdoctoral Fellowship and with the 2011 prize to the best Spanish PhD dissertation in Astronomy, we used this technique to make a spectrophotometric analysis of 18 dEs in the Virgo cluster. I found some differences for these dEs within the cluster. The dEs in the outer parts of Virgo have rotation curves with shapes and amplitudes similar to late-type galaxies of the same luminosity. They are rotationally supported, have disky isophotes, and younger ages than those dEs in the center of Virgo, which are pressure supported, often have boxy isophotes and are older. Ram pressure stripping, which removes the gas of galaxies leaving the stars untouched, explains the properties of the dEs located in the outskirts of Virgo. However, the dEs in the central cluster regions, which have lost their angular momentum, must have suffered a more violent transformation. A combination of ram pressure stripping and harassment is not enough to remove the rotation and the disky structures of these galaxies. I am conducting new analysis with 20 new dEs to throw some light in this direction. I also analysed the Faber-Jackson and the Fundamental Plane relations, and I found that dEs deviate from the trends of massive elliptical galaxies towards the position of dark matter dominated systems such as the dwarf spheroidal satellites of the Milky Way and M31. This indicates that dEs have a non-negligible dark matter

  8. The Cool Stellar Populations of Early-Type Galaxies and the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houdashelt, Mark Lee

    1995-01-01

    Red (6800-9200 A) and near-infrared (K-band) spectra have been obtained for 34 early-type galaxies in the Virgo cluster, the Coma cluster and the field. The strengths of the Ca II triplet (lambdalambda 8498, 8542, 8662 A), the Na I doublet ( lambdalambda8183, 8195 A), the Mg I lambda8807 A line, and molecular bands of TiO and VO were measured from the red spectra. Absorption due to the CO band with bandhead at 2.29 mu m was measured from the near-infrared spectra. The behavior of the spectral indices was examined for the Virgo galaxy nuclei as functions of luminosity and color. Overall, the CO, TiO and Na I indices were found to be stronger in redder and brighter galaxies. The Mg I and the Ca II triplet lines did not vary significantly among galaxies of different color or brightness. These trends are consistent with a change in chemical composition producing the well-known color-magnitude relation for early -type galaxies. No significant differences were detected among galaxies of similar luminosity in the Virgo cluster, the Coma cluster and the field. To simulate the stellar population changes implied by the radial color gradients observed in early-type galaxies, models were constructed to represent the integrated light of the Galactic bulge as a function of latitude. A field in Baade's Window (BW) was studied first and the stellar population there was found to be quite inhomogeneous. The BW model indicated that the integrated light of BW is giant -dominated, and the BW spectral energy distribution is very similar to that of the nucleus of a low-luminosity early -type galaxy. From models of BW and a field at b = -8^circ, radial gradients were estimated for the Galactic bulge and compared to the changes which occur along a luminosity sequence of early -type galaxies in the Virgo cluster. This comparison showed that: (1) the Na I and I(8197) indices increase steeply with redder colors in the Virgo galaxies but appear to decrease with color in the Galactic bulge

  9. Stellar haloes in massive early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitrago, F.

    2017-03-01

    The Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) opens up an unique window to witness galaxy assembly at all cosmic distances. Thanks to its extraordinary depth, it is a privileged tool to beat the cosmological dimming, which affects any extragalactic observations and has a very strong dependence with redshift (1 +z)^4. In particular, massive (M_{stellar}>5 × 10^{10} M_⊙) Early Type Galaxies (ETGs) are the most interesting candidates for these studies, as they must grow in an inside-out fashion developing an extended stellar envelope/halo that accounts for their remarkable size evolution (˜5 times larger in the nearby Universe than at z=2-3). To this end we have analysed the 6 most massive ETGs at z <1 in the HUDF12. Because of the careful data reduction and the exhaustive treatment of the Point Spread Function (PSF), we are able to trace the galaxy surface brightness profiles up to the same levels as in the local Universe but this time at = 0.65 (31 mag arcsec^{-2} in all 8 HST bands, ˜ 29 mag arcsec^{-2} restframe or beyond 25 effective radii). This fact enables us to investigate the galactic outskirts or stellar haloes at a previously unexplored era, characterising their light and mass profiles, colors and for the first time the amount of mass in ongoing mergers.

  10. Hidden Active Galactic Nuclei in Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paggi, Alessandro; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Civano, Francesca; Pellegrini, Silvia; Elvis, Martin; Kim, Dong-Woo

    2016-06-01

    We present a stacking analysis of the complete sample of early-type galaxies (ETGs) in the Chandra COSMOS (C-COSMOS) survey, to explore the nature of the X-ray luminosity in the redshift and stellar luminosity ranges 0\\lt z\\lt 1.5 and {10}9\\lt {L}K/{L}⊙ \\lt {10}13. Using established scaling relations, we subtract the contribution of X-ray binary populations to estimate the combined emission of hot ISM and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). To discriminate between the relative importance of these two components, we (1) compare our results with the relation observed in the local universe {L}X,{gas}\\propto {L}K4.5 for hot gaseous halos emission in ETGs, and (2) evaluate the spectral signature of each stacked bin. We find two regimes where the non-stellar X-ray emission is hard, consistent with AGN emission. First, there is evidence of hard, absorbed X-ray emission in stacked bins including relatively high z (˜1.2) ETGs with average high X-ray luminosity ({L}X {- {LMXB}}≳ 6× {10}42 {{erg}} {{{s}}}-1). These luminosities are consistent with the presence of highly absorbed “hidden” AGNs in these ETGs, which are not visible in their optical-IR spectra and spectral energy distributions. Second, confirming the early indication from our C-COSMOS study of X-ray detected ETGs, we find significantly enhanced X-ray luminosity in lower stellar mass ETGs ({L}K≲ {10}11{L}⊙ ), relative to the local {L}X,{gas}\\propto {L}K4.5 relation. The stacked spectra of these ETGs also suggest X-ray emission harder than expected from gaseous hot halos. This emission is consistent with inefficient accretion {10}-5-{10}-4{\\dot{M}}{Edd} onto {M}{BH}˜ {10}6-{10}8 {M}⊙ .

  11. Revealing the origin of the cold ISM in massive early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, T. A.; Alatalo, K.; Bureau, M.; Young, L.; Blitz, L.; Crocker, A.; Bayet, E.; Bois, M.; Bournaud, F.; Cappellari, M.; Davies, R. L.; Duc, P.-A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Emsellem, E.; Falcon-Barroso, J.; Khochfar, S.; Krajnovic, D.; Kuntschner, H.; Lablanche, P.-Y.; McDermid, R. M.; Morganti, R.; Naab, T.; Sarzi, M.; Scott, N.; Serra, P.; Weijmans, A.

    2013-07-01

    Recently, massive early-type galaxies have shed their red-and-dead moniker, thanks to the discovery that many host residual star formation. As part of the ATLAS-3D project, we have conducted a complete, volume-limited survey of the molecular gas in 260 local early-type galaxies with the IRAM-30m telescope and the CARMA interferometer, in an attempt to understand the fuel powering this star formation. We find that around 22% of early-type galaxies in the local volume host molecular gas reservoirs. This detection rate is independent of galaxy luminosity and environment. Here we focus on how kinematic misalignment measurements and gas-to-dust ratios can be used to put constraints on the origin of the cold ISM in these systems. The origin of the cold ISM seems to depend strongly on environment, with misaligned, dust poor gas (indicative of externally acquired material) being common in the field but completely absent in rich groups and in the Virgo cluster. Very massive galaxies also appear to be devoid of accreted gas. This suggests that in the field mergers and/or cold gas accretion dominate the gas supply, while in clusters internal secular processes become more important. This implies that environment has a strong impact on the cold gas properties of ETGs.

  12. X-Ray Scaling Relations of Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babyk, Iu. V.; McNamara, B. R.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Hogan, M. T.; Vantyghem, A. N.; Russell, H. R.; Pulido, F. A.; Edge, A. C.

    2018-04-01

    X-ray luminosity, temperature, gas mass, total mass, and their scaling relations are derived for 94 early-type galaxies (ETGs) using archival Chandra X-ray Observatory observations. Consistent with earlier studies, the scaling relations, L X ∝ T 4.5±0.2, M ∝ T 2.4±0.2, and L X ∝ M 2.8±0.3, are significantly steeper than expected from self-similarity. This steepening indicates that their atmospheres are heated above the level expected from gravitational infall alone. Energetic feedback from nuclear black holes and supernova explosions are likely heating agents. The tight L X –T correlation for low-luminosity systems (i.e., below 1040 erg s‑1) are at variance with hydrodynamical simulations, which generally predict higher temperatures for low-luminosity galaxies. We also investigate the relationship between total mass and pressure, Y X = M g × T, finding M\\propto {Y}X0.45+/- 0.04. We explore the gas mass to total mass fraction in ETGs and find a range of 0.1%–1.0%. We find no correlation between the gas-to-total mass fraction with temperature or total mass. Higher stellar velocity dispersions and higher metallicities are found in hotter, brighter, and more massive atmospheres. X-ray core radii derived from β-model fitting are used to characterize the degree of core and cuspiness of hot atmospheres.

  13. Testing Verlinde's emergent gravity in early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortora, C.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Napolitano, N. R.; Valentijn, E. A.

    2018-01-01

    Emergent Gravity (EG) has been proposed to resolve the missing mass problem in galaxies, replacing the potential of dark matter (DM) by the effect of the entropy displacement of dark energy by baryonic matter. This apparent DM depends only on the baryonic mass distribution and the present-day value of the Hubble parameter. In this paper we test the EG proposition, formalized by Verlinde for a spherical and isolated mass distribution using the central dynamics (Sloan Digital Sky Survey velocity dispersion, σ) and the K-band light distribution in a sample of 4032 massive (M_{\\star }≳ 10^{10} M_{⊙}) and local early-type galaxies (ETGs) from the SPIDER datasample. Our results remain unaltered if we consider the sample of 750 roundest field galaxies. Using these observations we derive the predictions by EG for the stellar mass-to-light ratio (M/L) and the initial mass function (IMF). We demonstrate that, consistently with a classical Newtonian framework with a DM halo component or alternative theories of gravity as MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND), the central dynamics can be fitted if the IMF is assumed non-universal and systematically changing with σ. For the case of EG, we find lower, but still acceptable, stellar M/L if compared with the DM-based Navarro, Frenk & White (NFW) model and with MOND, but pretty similar to adiabatically contracted DM haloes and with expectations from spectral gravity-sensitive features. If the strain caused by the entropy displacement would be not maximal, as adopted in the current formulation, then the dynamics of ETGs could be reproduced with larger M/L.

  14. Early-type galaxies: Automated reduction and analysis of ROSAT PSPC data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackie, G.; Fabbiano, G.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Kim, D.-W.; Maggio, A.; Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Ciliegi, P.

    1996-01-01

    Preliminary results of early-type galaxies that will be part of a galaxy catalog to be derived from the complete Rosat data base are presented. The stored data were reduced and analyzed by an automatic pipeline. This pipeline is based on a command language scrip. The important features of the pipeline include new data time screening in order to maximize the signal to noise ratio of faint point-like sources, source detection via a wavelet algorithm, and the identification of sources with objects from existing catalogs. The pipeline outputs include reduced images, contour maps, surface brightness profiles, spectra, color and hardness ratios.

  15. Early-Type Galaxy Star Formation Histories in Different Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, Patrick; Graves, G.

    2014-01-01

    We use very high-S/N stacked spectra of ˜29,000 nearby quiescent early-type galaxies (ETGs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to investigate variations in their star formation histories (SFHs) with environment at fixed position along and perpendicular to the Fundamental Plane (FP). We separate galaxies in the three-dimensional FP space defined by galaxy effective radius Re, central stellar velocity dispersion σ, and surface brightness residual from the FP, ΔIe. We use the SDSS group catalogue of Yang et al. to further separate galaxies into three categories by their “identities” within their respective dark matter halos: central “Brightest Group Galaxies” (BGGs); Satellites; and Isolateds (those which are “most massive” in a dark matter halo with no Satellites). Within each category, we construct high-S/N mean stacked spectra to determine mean singleburst ages, [Fe/H], and [Mg/Fe] based on the stellar population synthesis models of R. Schiavon. This allows us to study variations in the stellar population properties (SPPs) with local group environment at fixed structure (i.e., fixed position in FP-space). We find that the SFHs of quiescent ETGs are almost entirely determined by their structural parameters σ and ΔIe. Any variation with local group environment at fixed structure is only slight: Satellites have the oldest stellar populations, 0.02 dex older than BGGs and 0.04 dex older than Isolateds; BGGs have the highest Fe-enrichments, 0.01 dex higher than Isolateds and 0.02 dex higher than Satellites; there are no differences in Mg-enhancement between BGGs, Isolateds, and Satellites. Our observation that, to zeroth-order, the SFHs of quiescent ETGs are fully captured by their structures places important qualitative constraints on the degree to which late-time evolutionary processes (those which occur after a galaxy’s initial formation and main star-forming lifetime) can alter their SFHs/structures.

  16. Early type galaxies: Mapping out the two-dimensional space of galaxy star formation histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, Genevieve J.

    Early type galaxies form a multi-parameter family, as evidenced by the two- dimensional (2-D) Fundamental Plane relationship. However, their star formation histories are often treated as a one-dimensional mass sequence. This dissertation presents a systematic study of the relationship between the multi- parameter structural properties of early type galaxies and their star formation histoires. We demonstrate that the stellar populations of early type galaxies span a 2-D space, which means that their star formation histories form a two- parameter family. This 2-D family is then mapped onto several familiar early type galaxy scaling relations, including the color-magnitude relation, the Fundamental Plane, and a cross-section through the Fundamental Plane. We find that the stellar population properties, and therefore the star formation histories of early type galaxies depend most strongly on galaxy velocity dispersion (s), rather than on luminosity ( L ), stellar mass ( M [low *] ), or dynamical mass ( M dyn ). Interestingly, stellar populations are independent of the radius ( R e ) of the galaxies. At fixed s, they show correlated residuals through the thickness of the Fundamental Plane (FP) in the surface-brightness ( I e ) dimension, such that low-surface-brightness galaxies are older, less metal-enriched, and more enhanced in Mg relative to Fe than their counterparts at the same s and R e on the FP midplane. Similarly, high- surface-brightness galaxies are younger, more metal-rich, and less Mg-enhanced than their counterparts on the FP midplane. These differences suggest that the duration of star formation varies through the thickness of the FP. If the dynamical mass-to-light ratios of early type galaxies ( M dyn /L ) were constant for all such galaxies, the FP would be equivalent to the plane predicted by the virial relation. However, the observed FP does not exactly match the virial plane. The FP is tilted from the virial plane, indicating that M dyn /L varies

  17. The extent of CO in the early-type galaxy NGC 4472

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchtmeier, W. K.; Bregman, J. N.; Hogg, D. E.; Roberts, M. S.

    1994-01-01

    NGC 4472, and E/SO system, is the earliest type normal galaxy with detected CO emission, and here we present additional radio observations in the lines of CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) to determine the distribution and internal properties of this gas. The original detection is reconfirmed, but observations at five surrounding locations and at two other locations in the galaxy do not show the gas to be extended; the total H2 gas mass is estimated to be 4 x 10(exp 7) solar mass. A high CO(1-0)/CO(2-1) brightness temperature ratio is found (greater than 3), which is indicative of subthermal excitation of the CO(2-1) line that can occur at low gas temperatures and low gas densities. Also, upper limits are given for the CO(2-1) fluxes in four other early-type galaxies.

  18. Young stellar populations in early-type galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, Louisa A.; Raychaudhury, Somak; Kabán, Ata

    2007-02-01

    We use a purely data-driven rectified factor analysis to identify early-type galaxies with recent star formation in Data Release 4 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Spectroscopic Catalogue. We compare the spectra and environment of these galaxies with those of `normal' early-type galaxies, and a sample of independently selected E+A galaxies. We calculate the projected local galaxy surface density from the nearest five and 10 neighbours (Σ5 and Σ10) for each galaxy in our sample, and find that the dependence on projected local density, of the properties of E+A galaxies, is not significantly different from that of early-type galaxies with young stellar populations, dropping off rapidly towards denser environments, and flattening off at densities <~0.1-0.3 Mpc-2. The dearth of E+A galaxies in dense environments confirms that E+A galaxies are most likely the products of galaxy-galaxy merging or interactions, rather than star-forming galaxies whose star formation has been quenched by processes unique to dense environments, such as ram-pressure stripping or galaxy harassment. We see a tentative peak in the number of E+A galaxies at Σ10 ~ 0.1-0.3 Mpc-2, which may represent the local galaxy density at which the rate of galaxy-galaxy merging or interaction rate peaks. Analysis of the spectra of our early-type galaxies with young stellar populations suggests that they have a stellar component dominated by F stars, ~1-4 Gyr old, together with a mature, metal-rich population characteristic of `typical' early-type galaxies. The young stars represent >~10 per cent of the stellar mass in these galaxies. This, together with the similarity of the environments in which this `E+F' population and the E+A galaxy sample are found, suggests that E+F galaxies used to be E+A galaxies, but have evolved by a further ~ one to a few Gyr. Our rectified factor analysis is sensitive enough to identify this hidden population, which allows us to study the global and intrinsic properties of early-type

  19. Extended nebular emission in CALIFA early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, J. M.; Papaderos, P.; Kehrig, C.; Vílchez, J. M.; Lehnert, M. D.

    2015-02-01

    The morphological, spectroscopic and kinematical properties of the warm interstellar medium ( wim ) in early-type galaxies (ETGs) hold key observational constraints to nuclear activity and the buildup history of these massive quiescent systems. High-quality integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data with a wide spectral and spatial coverage, such as those from the CALIFA survey, offer a precious opportunity for advancing our understanding in this respect. We use deep IFS data from CALIFA (califa.caha.es) to study the wim over the entire extent and optical spectral range of 32 nearby ETGs. We find that all ETGs in our sample show faint (Hα equivalent width EW(Hα)~0.5 ... 2 Å) extranuclear nebular emission extending out to >=2 Petrosian50 radii. Confirming and strengthening our conclusions in Papaderos et al. (2013, hereafter P13) we argue that ETGs span a broad continuous sequence with regard to the properties of their wim , and they can be roughly subdivided into two characteristic classes. The first one (type i) comprises ETGs with a nearly constant EW(Hα)~1-3 Å in their extranuclear component, in quantitative agreement with (even though, no proof for) the hypothesis of photoionization by the post-AGB stellar component being the main driver of extended wim emission. The second class (type ii) consists of virtually wim -evacuated ETGs with a large Lyman continuum (Ly c) photon escape fraction and a very low (<=0.5 Å) EW(Hα) in their nuclear zone. These two ETG classes appear indistinguishable from one another by their LINER-specific emission-line ratios. Additionally, here we extend the classification by P13 by the class i+ which stands for a subset of type i ETGs with low-level star-forming activity in contiguous spiral-arm like features in their outermost periphery. These faint features, together with traces of localized star formation in several type i&i+ systems point to a non-negligible contribution from young massive stars to the global ionizing photon

  20. The influence of galaxy environment on the stellar initial mass function of early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosani, Giulio; Pasquali, Anna; La Barbera, Francesco; Ferreras, Ignacio; Vazdekis, Alexandre

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate whether the stellar initial mass function (IMF) of early-type galaxies depends on their host environment. To this purpose, we have selected a sample of early-type galaxies from the SPIDER catalogue, characterized their environment through the group catalogue of Wang et al., and used their optical Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra to constrain the IMF slope, through the analysis of IMF-sensitive spectral indices. To reach a high enough signal-to-noise ratio, we have stacked spectra in velocity dispersion (σ0) bins, on top of separating the sample by galaxy hierarchy and host halo mass, as proxies for galaxy environment. In order to constrain the IMF, we have compared observed line strengths and predictions of MIUSCAT/EMILES synthetic stellar population models, with varying age, metallicity, and `bimodal' (low-mass tapered) IMF slope (Γ _b). Consistent with previous studies, we find that Γ _b increases with σ0, becoming bottom-heavy (i.e. an excess of low-mass stars with respect to the Milky Way like IMF) at high σ0. We find that this result is robust against the set of isochrones used in the stellar population models, as well as the way the effect of elemental abundance ratios is taken into account. We thus conclude that it is possible to use currently state-of-the-art stellar population models and intermediate resolution spectra to consistently probe IMF variations. For the first time, we show that there is no dependence of Γb on environment or galaxy hierarchy, as measured within the 3 arcsec SDSS fibre, thus leaving the IMF as an intrinsic galaxy property, possibly set already at high redshift.

  1. The components of mid- and far-infrared emission from S0 and early-type shell galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, Harley A., Jr.; Bally, John; Hacking, Perry

    1989-01-01

    The IRAS database has been used to study detections of about 150 early-type elliptical and S0 galaxies exhibiting a shell structure. No strong evidence for the expected enhancement of either star formation rates or heating of the interstellar medium is found. It is suggested that for some of the sample galaxies either a contribution from warm dust surrounding evolved stars or emission from an active nucleus may be significant.

  2. Discovery of the Kinematic Alignment of Early-type Galaxies in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Suk; Jeong, Hyunjin; Lee, Jaehyun; Lee, Youngdae; Joo, Seok-Joo; Kim, Hak-Sub; Rey, Soo-Chang

    2018-06-01

    Using the kinematic position angles (PAkin), an accurate indicator for the spin axis of a galaxy, obtained from the ATLAS3D integral-field-unit (IFU) spectroscopic data, we discovered that 57 Virgo early-type galaxies tend to prefer the specific PAkin values of 20° and 100°, suggesting that they are kinematically aligned with each other. These kinematic alignment angles are further associated with the directions of the two distinct axes of the Virgo cluster extending east–west and north–south, strongly suggesting that the two distinct axes are the filamentary structures within the cluster as a trace of infall patterns of galaxies. Given that the spin axis of a massive early-type galaxy does not change easily even in clusters from the hydrodynamic simulations, Virgo early-type galaxies are likely to fall into the cluster along the filamentary structures while maintaining their angular momentum. This implies that many early-type galaxies in clusters are formed in filaments via major mergers before subsequently falling into the cluster. Investigating the kinematic alignment in other clusters will allow us to understand the formation of galaxy clusters and early-type galaxies.

  3. The diversity of atomic hydrogen in slow rotator early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Lisa M.; Serra, Paolo; Krajnović, Davor; Duc, Pierre-Alain

    2018-06-01

    We present interferometric observations of H I in nine slow rotator early-type galaxies of the Atlas3D sample. With these data, we now have sensitive H I searches in 34 of the 36 slow rotators. The aggregate detection rate is 32 per cent ± 8 per cent, consistent with the previous work; however, we find two detections with extremely high H I masses, whose gas kinematics are substantially different from what was previously known about H I in slow rotators. These two cases (NGC 1222 and NGC 4191) broaden the known diversity of H I properties in slow rotators. NGC 1222 is a merger remnant with prolate-like rotation and, if it is indeed prolate in shape, an equatorial gas disc; NGC 4191 has two counter-rotating stellar discs and an unusually large H I disc. We comment on the implications of this disc for the formation of 2σ galaxies. In general, the H I detection rate, the incidence of relaxed H I discs, and the H I/stellar mass ratios of slow rotators are indistinguishable from those of fast rotators. These broad similarities suggest that the H I we are detecting now is unrelated to the galaxies' formation processes and was often acquired after their stars were mostly in place. We also discuss the H I non-detections; some of these galaxies that are undetected in H I or CO are detected in other tracers (e.g. FIR fine structure lines and dust). The question of whether there is cold gas in massive galaxies' scoured nuclear cores still needs work. Finally, we discuss an unusual isolated H I cloud with a surprisingly faint (undetected) optical counterpart.

  4. The Sloan Lens ACS Survey. I. A Large Spectroscopically Selected Sample of Massive Early-Type Lens Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolton, Adam S.; Burles, Scott; Koopmans, Leon V. E.; Treu, Tommaso; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2006-01-01

    The Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) Survey is an efficient Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Snapshot imaging survey for new galaxy-scale strong gravitational lenses. The targeted lens candidates are selected spectroscopically from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database of galaxy spectra for having multiple nebular emission lines at a redshift significantly higher than that of the SDSS target galaxy. The SLACS survey is optimized to detect bright early-type lens galaxies with faint lensed sources in order to increase the sample of known gravitational lenses suitable for detailed lensing, photometric, and dynamical modeling. In this paper, the first in a series on the current results of our HST Cycle 13 imaging survey, we present a catalog of 19 newly discovered gravitational lenses, along with nine other observed candidate systems that are either possible lenses, nonlenses, or nondetections. The survey efficiency is thus >=68%. We also present Gemini 8 m and Magellan 6.5 m integral-field spectroscopic data for nine of the SLACS targets, which further support the lensing interpretation. A new method for the effective subtraction of foreground galaxy images to reveal faint background features is presented. We show that the SLACS lens galaxies have colors and ellipticities typical of the spectroscopic parent sample from which they are drawn (SDSS luminous red galaxies and quiescent MAIN sample galaxies), but are somewhat brighter and more centrally concentrated. Several explanations for the latter bias are suggested. The SLACS survey provides the first statistically significant and homogeneously selected sample of bright early-type lens galaxies, furnishing a powerful probe of the structure of early-type galaxies within the half-light radius. The high confirmation rate of lenses in the SLACS survey suggests consideration of spectroscopic lens discovery as an explicit science goal of future spectroscopic galaxy surveys.

  5. The host galaxy/AGN connection in nearby early-type galaxies. Is there a miniature radio-galaxy in every "core" galaxy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmaverde, B.; Capetti, A.

    2006-02-01

    This is the second of a series of three papers exploring the connection between the multiwavelength properties of AGN in nearby early-type galaxies and the characteristics of their hosts. We selected two samples with 5 GHz VLA radio flux measurements down to 1 mJy, reaching levels of radio luminosity as low as 1036 erg s-1. In Paper I we presented a study of the surface brightness profiles for the 65 objects with available archival HST images out of the 116 radio-detected galaxies. We classified early-type galaxies into "core" and "power-law" galaxies, discriminating on the basis of the slope of their nuclear brightness profiles, following the Nukers scheme. Here we focus on the 29 core galaxies (hereafter CoreG). We used HST and Chandra data to isolate their optical and X-ray nuclear emission. The CoreG invariably host radio-loud nuclei, with an average radio-loudness parameter of Log R = L5 {GHz} / LB ˜ 3.6. The optical and X-ray nuclear luminosities correlate with the radio-core power, smoothly extending the analogous correlations already found for low luminosity radio-galaxies (LLRG) toward even lower power, by a factor of ˜ 1000, covering a combined range of 6 orders of magnitude. This supports the interpretation of a common non-thermal origin of the nuclear emission also for CoreG. The luminosities of the nuclear sources, most likely dominated by jet emission, set firm upper limits, as low as L/L_Edd ˜ 10-9 in both the optical and X-ray band, on any emission from the accretion process. The similarity of CoreG and LLRG when considering the distributions host galaxies luminosities and black hole masses, as well as of the surface brightness profiles, indicates that they are drawn from the same population of early-type galaxies. LLRG represent only the tip of the iceberg associated with (relatively) high activity levels, with CoreG forming the bulk of the population. We do not find any relationship between radio-power and black hole mass. A minimum black hole

  6. Demography of SDSS Early-type Galaxies from the Perspective of Radial Color Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Hyewon; Jeong, H.; Oh, K.; Yi, S. K.; Ferreras, I.; Schawinski, K.

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the radial g-r color gradients of early-type galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR6 in the redshift range 0.00 < z < 0.06. The majority of massive early-type galaxies show a negative color gradient (centers being redder). On the other hand, roughly 30 percent of the galaxies in this sample show positive color gradients (centers being bluer). These positive-gradient galaxies often show strong Hβ absorption line strengths and/or emission line ratios that are consistent with containing young stellar populations. Combining the optical data with Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) UV photometry, we find that all positive-gradient galaxies show blue UV-optical colors. This implies that the residual star formation in early-type galaxies is centrally concentrated. These positive-gradient galaxies tend to live in lower density regions. They are also a bit more likely to have a late-type companion galaxy, hinting at a possible role of interactions with a gas-rich companion. A simplistic population analysis shows that these positive color gradients are visible only for half a billion years after a star burst. Moreover, the positive-gradient galaxies occupy different regions in the fundamental planes from the outnumbering negative-gradient galaxies. However, the positions of the positive-gradient galaxies on the fundamental planes cannot be attributed to any reasonable amount of recent star formation alone but require substantially lower velocity dispersions to begin with. Our results based on the optical data are consistent with the residual star formation interpretation which was based on the GALEX UV data. A low-level residual star formation seems continuing in most of the less-massive early-type galaxies in their centers.

  7. Structural analysis of star-forming blue early-type galaxies. Merger-driven star formation in elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Koshy

    2017-02-01

    Context. Star-forming blue early-type galaxies at low redshift can give insight to the stellar mass growth of L⋆ elliptical galaxies in the local Universe. Aims: We wish to understand the reason for star formation in these otherwise passively evolving red and dead stellar systems. The fuel for star formation can be acquired through recent accretion events such as mergers or flyby. The signatures of such events should be evident from a structural analysis of the galaxy image. Methods: We carried out structural analysis on SDSS r-band imaging data of 55 star-forming blue elliptical galaxies, derived the structural parameters, analysed the residuals from best-fit to surface brightness distribution, and constructed the galaxy scaling relations. Results: We found that star-forming blue early-type galaxies are bulge-dominated systems with axial ratio >0.5 and surface brightness profiles fitted by Sérsic profiles with index (n) mostly >2. Twenty-three galaxies are found to have n< 2; these could be hosting a disc component. The residual images of the 32 galaxy surface brightness profile fits show structural features indicative of recent interactions. The star-forming blue elliptical galaxies follow the Kormendy relation and show the characteristics of normal elliptical galaxies as far as structural analysis is concerned. There is a general trend for high-luminosity galaxies to display interaction signatures and high star formation rates. Conclusions: The star-forming population of blue early-type galaxies at low redshifts could be normal ellipticals that might have undergone a recent gas-rich minor merger event. The star formation in these galaxies will shut down once the recently acquired fuel is consumed, following which the galaxy will evolve to a normal early-type galaxy.

  8. Galaxy populations in the Antlia cluster - III. Properties of faint early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith Castelli, Analía. V.; Cellone, Sergio A.; Faifer, Favio R.; Bassino, Lilia P.; Richtler, Tom; Romero, Gisela A.; Calderón, Juan Pablo; Caso, Juan Pablo

    2012-01-01

    We present a new analysis of the early-type galaxy population in the central region of the Antlia cluster, focusing on the faint systems such as dwarf ellipticals (dEs) and dwarf spheroidals (dSphs). The colour-magnitude relation (CMR) and the relation between luminosity and mean effective surface brightness for galaxies in the central region of Antlia have been previously studied in Paper I of the present series. Now we confirm 22 early-type galaxies as Antlia members, using Gemini-GMOS and Magellan-MIKE spectra. Among them, 15 are dEs from the FS90 Antlia Group catalogue, two belong to the rare type of compact ellipticals (cEs) and five are new faint dwarfs that had never been catalogued before. In addition, we present 16 newly identified low-surface-brightness galaxy candidates, almost half of them displaying morphologies consistent with being Antlia's counterparts of Local Group dSphs, which extend the faint luminosity limit of our study down to MB=-10.1(BT= 22.6) mag. With these new data, we built an improved CMR in the Washington photometric system, i.e. integrated T1 magnitudes versus (C-T1) colours, which extends ˜4 mag faintwards the limit of spectroscopically confirmed Antlia members. When only confirmed early-type members are considered, this relation extends over 10 mag in luminosity with no apparent change in slope or increase in colour dispersion towards its faint end. The intrinsic colour scatter of the relation is compared with those reported for other clusters of galaxies; we argue that it is likely that the large scatter of the CMR, usually reported at faint magnitudes, is mostly due to photometric errors along with an improper membership/morphological classification. The distinct behaviour of the luminosity versus mean effective surface brightness relation at the bright and faint ends is analysed, while it is confirmed that dE galaxies on the same relation present a very similar effective radius, regardless of their colour. The projected spatial

  9. Accounting for the dispersion in the x ray properties of early-type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Raymond E., III; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1990-01-01

    The x ray luminosities of early-type galaxies are correlated with their optical (e.g., blue) luminosities (L sub X approx. L sub B exp 1.6), but the x ray luminosities exhibit considerable scatter for a given optical luminosity L sub B. This dispersion in x ray luminosity is much greater than the dispersion of other properties of early-type galaxies (for a given L sub B), such as luminosity scale-length, velocity dispersion, color, and metallicity. Here, researchers consider several possible sources for the dispersion in x ray luminosity. Some of the scatter in x ray luminosity may result from stellar population variations between galaxies with similar L sub B. Since the x ray emitting gas is from accumulated stellar mass loss, the L sub X dispersion may be due to variations in integrated stellar mass loss rates. Another possible cause of the L sub X dispersion may be variations in the amount of cool material in the galaxies; cool gas may act as an energy sink for the hot gas. Infrared emission may be used to trace such cool material, so researchers look for a correlation between the infrared emission and the x ray emission of early-type galaxies at fixed L sub B. Velocity dispersion variations between galaxies of similar L sub B may also contribute to the L sub X dispersion. The most likely a priori source of the dispersion in L sub X is probably the varying amount of ram-pressure stripping in a range of galaxy environments. The hot gaseous halos of early-type galaxies can be stripped in encounters with other galaxies or with ambient cluster gas if the intracluster gas is sufficiently dense. Researchers find that the most likely cause of dispersion in the x ray properties of early type galaxies is probably the ram-pressure stripping of gaseous halos from galaxies. For a sample of 81 early-type galaxies with x ray luminosities or upper limits derived from Einstein Observatory observations (CFT) researchers calculated the cumulative distribution of angular distances

  10. Isolated Early-type Galaxies in the 2dFGRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuse, Christopher R.; Lamir, C.

    2014-01-01

    Isolated galaxies are systems that have experienced limited external perturbations, thus the properties of these galaxies are largely due to internal processes. The features of isolated early-type galaxies (IEGs) provide a baseline from which to compare early-type systems residing in higher-density environments. We use the Two-Degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) and the NASA Extragalactic Database (NED) to identify IEGs in the nearby universe. Search criteria in the 2dFGRS were chosen to insure that the IEGs have remained separated from neighboring galaxies for the majority of their lifetimes. Isolated galaxies are chosen utilizing a minimum projected physical separation of 1 Mpc from any neighboring non-dwarf galaxy brighter than Mb = -16.5 mags. A minimum redshift separation of 350 km/s between a candidate galaxy and a neighboring was imposed to further insure the candidate’s isolation. Early results of the search for isolated early-type galaxies in the southern sky are presented.

  11. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. XIII. Dust in early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Serego Alighieri, S.; Bianchi, S.; Pappalardo, C.; Zibetti, S.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G.; Corbelli, E.; Davies, J. I.; Davis, T.; De Looze, I.; Fritz, J.; Gavazzi, G.; Giovanardi, C.; Grossi, M.; Hunt, L. K.; Magrini, L.; Pierini, D.; Xilouris, E. M.

    2013-04-01

    Aims: We study the dust content of a large optical input sample of 910 early-type galaxies (ETG) in the Virgo cluster, also extending to the dwarf ETG, and examine the results in relation to those on the other cold ISM components. Methods: We have searched for far-infrared emission in all galaxies in the input sample using the 250 μm image of the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS). This image covers a large fraction of the cluster with an area of ~55 square degrees. For the detected ETG we measured fluxes in five bands from 100 to 500 μm, and estimated the dust mass and temperature with modified black-body fits. Results: Dust is detected above the completeness limit of 25.4 mJy at 250 μm in 46 ETG, 43 of which are in the optically complete part of the input sample. In addition, dust is present at fainter levels in another six ETG. We detect dust in the four ETG with synchrotron emission, including M 87. Dust appears to be much more concentrated than stars and more luminous ETG have higher dust temperatures. Considering only the optically complete input sample and correcting for the contamination by background galaxies, dust detection rates down to the 25.4 mJy limit are 17% for ellipticals, about 40% for lenticulars (S0 + S0a), and around 3% for dwarf ETG. Dust mass does not correlate clearly with stellar mass and is often much greater than expected for a passive galaxy in a closed-box model. The dust-to-stars mass ratio anticorrelates with galaxy luminosity, and for some dwarf ETG reaches values as high as for dusty late-type galaxies. In the Virgo cluster slow rotators appear more likely to contain dust than fast ones. Comparing the dust results with those on Hi there are only eight ETG detected both in dust and in Hi in the HeViCS area; 39 have dust but only an upper limit on Hi, and eight have Hi but only an upper limit on dust. The locations of these galaxies in the cluster are different, with the dusty ETG concentrated in the densest regions, while the

  12. The ATLAS3D project - X. On the origin of the molecular and ionized gas in early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Timothy A.; Alatalo, Katherine; Sarzi, Marc; Bureau, Martin; Young, Lisa M.; Blitz, Leo; Serra, Paolo; Crocker, Alison F.; Krajnović, Davor; McDermid, Richard M.; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frédéric; Cappellari, Michele; Davies, Roger L.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; de Zeeuw, P. Tim; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Kuntschner, Harald; Lablanche, Pierre-Yves; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Scott, Nicholas; Weijmans, Anne-Marie

    2011-10-01

    We make use of interferometric CO and H I observations, and optical integral-field spectroscopy from the ATLAS3D survey, to probe the origin of the molecular and ionized interstellar medium (ISM) in local early-type galaxies. We find that 36 ± 5 per cent of our sample of fast-rotating early-type galaxies have their ionized gas kinematically misaligned with respect to the stars, setting a strong lower limit on the importance of externally acquired gas (e.g. from mergers and cold accretion). Slow rotators have a flat distribution of misalignments, indicating that the dominant source of gas is external. The molecular, ionized and atomic gas in all the detected galaxies are always kinematically aligned, even when they are misaligned from the stars, suggesting that all these three phases of the ISM share a common origin. In addition, we find that the origin of the cold and warm gas in fast-rotating early-type galaxies is strongly affected by environment, despite the molecular gas detection rate and mass fractions being fairly independent of group/cluster membership. Galaxies in dense groups and the Virgo cluster nearly always have their molecular gas kinematically aligned with the stellar kinematics, consistent with a purely internal origin (presumably stellar mass loss). In the field, however, kinematic misalignments between the stellar and gaseous components indicate that at least 42 ± 5 per cent of local fast-rotating early-type galaxies have their gas supplied from external sources. When one also considers evidence of accretion present in the galaxies' atomic gas distributions, ≳46 per cent of fast-rotating field ETGs are likely to have acquired a detectable amount of ISM from accretion and mergers. We discuss several scenarios which could explain the environmental dichotomy, including preprocessing in galaxy groups/cluster outskirts and the morphological transformation of spiral galaxies, but we find it difficult to simultaneously explain the kinematic

  13. Tidal distortions in pairs of early-type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prugniel, Philippe; Davoust, E.

    1990-01-01

    The authors are conducting an imaging survey of pairs of elliptical galaxies which has already produced interesting results. Some pairs present a common pattern of distortion interpreted in terms of tidal effects (Davoust and Prugniel, 1988; Prugniel et al., 1989). Other examples drawn from the literature (Borne and Hoessel, 1988; Colina and Perez-Fournon, 1990) share the same morphology. New cases and lists of the characteristics of 24 such systems. The authors' pairs are drawn from a sample of binary and multiple galaxies which has in turn been extracted from the CGCG, UGC (Nilson, 1973) and VV (Vorontsov-Velyaminov, 1959) catalogues. This sample includes that of Karachentsev (1972). It contains 1800 pairs, among which 700 are S - S or mixed morphology pairs. The authors are working on the remainder to produce a sample of close physical pairs of elliptical galaxies (they also include bulge dominated SO's since the morphological discrimination from ellipticals is often ambiguous, in particular for interacting galaxies). One of the interests of this work is to provide a sample selected on purely optical criteria, at variance with other works (e.g., Valentijn and Casertano, 1988). This will allow statistical studies of non-optical properties of these pairs (in particular radio emission). The authors have so far obtained charge-coupled device (CCD) images of 125 pairs with a 2m telescope and velocities' differences of 78 pairs were obtained using the 1.93 meter telescope of Observatoire de Haute Provence and from the literature. One is an optical pair (VV 190). Eighteen of our pairs present the morphological effect described in Davoust and Prugniel (1988): the external parts of each member are stretched in opposite senses in a direction rougly perpendicular to the pair axis. The proportion of 15 plus or minus 4 percent distorted pairs confirms previous estimates. Except for a few cases involving flattened galaxies with nearly aligned major axes which deserve careful

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Massive early-type galaxies (Buitrago+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitrago, F.; Trujillo, I.; Conselice, C. J.; Haussler, B.

    2013-08-01

    Present-day massive galaxies are composed mostly of early-type objects. It is unknown whether this was also the case at higher redshifts. In a hierarchical assembling scenario the morphological content of the massive population is expected to change with time from disc-like objects in the early Universe to spheroid-like galaxies at present. In this paper we have probed this theoretical expectation by compiling a large sample of massive (Mstellar>=1011h-270M⊙) galaxies in the redshift interval 0galaxies selected from Sloan Digital Sky Survey plus 875 objects observed with the Hubble Space Telescope belonging to the Palomar Observatory Wide-field InfraRed/DEEP2 and GOODS NICMOS Survey surveys. 639 of our objects have spectroscopic redshifts. Our morphological classification is performed as close as possible to the optical rest frame according to the photometric bands available in our observations both quantitatively (using the Sersic index as a morphological proxy) and qualitatively (by visual inspection). Using both techniques we find an enormous change on the dominant morphological class with cosmic time. The fraction of early-type galaxies among the massive galaxy population has changed from ~20-30 per cent at z~3 to~70 per cent at z=0. Early-type galaxies have been the predominant morphological class for massive galaxies since only z~1. (1 data file).

  15. Systematic variation of the stellar initial mass function in early-type galaxies.

    PubMed

    Cappellari, Michele; McDermid, Richard M; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, M; Crocker, Alison F; Davies, Roger L; Davis, Timothy A; de Zeeuw, P T; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; Lablanche, Pierre-Yves; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M

    2012-04-25

    Much of our knowledge of galaxies comes from analysing the radiation emitted by their stars, which depends on the present number of each type of star in the galaxy. The present number depends on the stellar initial mass function (IMF), which describes the distribution of stellar masses when the population formed, and knowledge of it is critical to almost every aspect of galaxy evolution. More than 50 years after the first IMF determination, no consensus has emerged on whether it is universal among different types of galaxies. Previous studies indicated that the IMF and the dark matter fraction in galaxy centres cannot both be universal, but they could not convincingly discriminate between the two possibilities. Only recently were indications found that massive elliptical galaxies may not have the same IMF as the Milky Way. Here we report a study of the two-dimensional stellar kinematics for the large representative ATLAS(3D) sample of nearby early-type galaxies spanning two orders of magnitude in stellar mass, using detailed dynamical models. We find a strong systematic variation in IMF in early-type galaxies as a function of their stellar mass-to-light ratios, producing differences of a factor of up to three in galactic stellar mass. This implies that a galaxy's IMF depends intimately on the galaxy's formation history.

  16. Massive Galaxies Are Larger in Dense Environments: Environmental Dependence of Mass-Size Relation of Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Yongmin; Im, Myungshin; Kim, Jae-Woo

    2017-01-01

    Under the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmological models, massive galaxies are expected to be larger in denser environments through frequent hierarchical mergers with other galaxies. Yet, observational studies of low-redshift early-type galaxies have shown no such trend, standing as a puzzle to solve during the past decade. We analyzed 73,116 early-type galaxies at 0.1 ≤ z < 0.15, adopting a robust nonparametric size measurement technique and extending the analysis to many massive galaxies. We find for the first time that local early-type galaxies heavier than 1011.2 M⊙ show a clear environmental dependence in mass-size relation, in such a way that galaxies are as much as 20%-40% larger in the densest environments than in underdense environments. Splitting the sample into the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and non-BCGs does not affect the result. This result agrees with the ΛCDM cosmological simulations and suggests that mergers played a significant role in the growth of massive galaxies in dense environments as expected in theory.

  17. Mass and size growth of early-type galaxies by dry mergers in cluster environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oogi, Taira; Habe, Asao; Ishiyama, Tomoaki

    2016-02-01

    We perform dry merger simulations to investigate the role of dry mergers in the size growth of early-type galaxies in high-density environments. We replace the virialized dark matter haloes obtained by a large cosmological N-body simulation with N-body galaxy models consisting of two components, a stellar bulge and a dark matter halo, which have higher mass resolution than the cosmological simulation. We then resimulate nine cluster-forming regions, whose masses range from 1 × 1014 to 5 × 1014 M⊙. Masses and sizes of stellar bulges are also assumed to satisfy the stellar mass-size relation of high-z compact massive early-type galaxies. We find that dry major mergers considerably contribute to the mass and size growth of central massive galaxies. One or two dry major mergers double the average stellar mass and quadruple the average size between z = 2 and 0. These growths favourably agree with observations. Moreover, the density distributions of our simulated central massive galaxies grow from the inside-out, which is consistent with recent observations. The mass-size evolution is approximated as R∝ M_{{ast }}^{α }, with α ˜ 2.24. Most of our simulated galaxies are efficiently grown by dry mergers, and their stellar mass-size relations match the ones observed in the local Universe. Our results show that the central galaxies in the cluster haloes are potential descendants of high-z (z ˜ 2-3) compact massive early-type galaxies. This conclusion is consistent with previous numerical studies which investigate the formation and evolution of compact massive early-type galaxies.

  18. Interstellar matter in early-type galaxies. II - The relationship between gaseous components and galaxy types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Joel N.; Hogg, David E.; Roberts, Morton S.

    1992-01-01

    Interstellar components of early-type galaxies are established by galactic type and luminosity in order to search for relationships between the different interstellar components and to test the predictions of theoretical models. Some of the data include observations of neutral hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and radio continuum emission. An alternative distance model which yields LX varies as LB sup 2.45, a relation which is in conflict with simple cooling flow models, is discussed. The dispersion of the X-ray luminosity about this regression line is unlikely to result from stripping. The striking lack of clear correlations between hot and cold interstellar components, taken together with their morphologies, suggests that the cold gas is a disk phenomenon while the hot gas is a bulge phenomenon, with little interaction between the two. The progression of galaxy type from E to Sa is not only a sequence of decreasing stellar bulge-to-disk ratio, but also of hot-to-cold-gas ratio.

  19. Early-type galaxies have been the predominant morphological class for massive galaxies since only z ˜ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitrago, Fernando; Trujillo, Ignacio; Conselice, Christopher J.; Häußler, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Present-day massive galaxies are composed mostly of early-type objects. It is unknown whether this was also the case at higher redshifts. In a hierarchical assembling scenario the morphological content of the massive population is expected to change with time from disc-like objects in the early Universe to spheroid-like galaxies at present. In this paper we have probed this theoretical expectation by compiling a large sample of massive (Mstellar ≥ 1011 h- 270 M⊙) galaxies in the redshift interval 0 < z < 3. Our sample of 1082 objects comprises 207 local galaxies selected from Sloan Digital Sky Survey plus 875 objects observed with the Hubble Space Telescope belonging to the Palomar Observatory Wide-field InfraRed/DEEP2 and GOODS NICMOS Survey surveys. 639 of our objects have spectroscopic redshifts. Our morphological classification is performed as close as possible to the optical rest frame according to the photometric bands available in our observations both quantitatively (using the Sérsic index as a morphological proxy) and qualitatively (by visual inspection). Using both techniques we find an enormous change on the dominant morphological class with cosmic time. The fraction of early-type galaxies among the massive galaxy population has changed from ˜20-30 per cent at z ˜ 3 to ˜70 per cent at z = 0. Early-type galaxies have been the predominant morphological class for massive galaxies since only z ˜ 1.

  20. Integral-field kinematics and stellar populations of early-type galaxies out to three half-light radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boardman, Nicholas Fraser; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; van den Bosch, Remco; Kuntschner, Harald; Emsellem, Eric; Cappellari, Michele; de Zeeuw, Tim; Falcón-Barroso, Jesus; Krajnović, Davor; McDermid, Richard; Naab, Thorsten; van de Ven, Glenn; Yildirim, Akin

    2017-11-01

    We observed 12 nearby H I-detected early-type galaxies (ETGs) of stellar mass ˜1010 M⊙ ≤ M* ≤ ˜1011 M⊙ with the Mitchell Integral-Field Spectrograph, reaching approximately three half-light radii in most cases. We extracted line-of-sight velocity distributions for the stellar and gaseous components. We find little evidence of transitions in the stellar kinematics of the galaxies in our sample beyond the central effective radius, with centrally fast-rotating galaxies remaining fast-rotating and centrally slow-rotating galaxies likewise remaining slow-rotating. This is consistent with these galaxies having not experienced late dry major mergers; however, several of our objects have ionized gas that is misaligned with respect to their stars, suggesting some kind of past interaction. We extract Lick index measurements of the commonly used H β, Fe5015, Mg b, Fe5270 and Fe5335 absorption features, and we find most galaxies to have flat H β gradients and negative Mg b gradients. We measure gradients of age, metallicity and abundance ratio for our galaxies using spectral fitting, and for the majority of our galaxies find negative age and metallicity gradients. We also find the stellar mass-to-light ratios to decrease with radius for most of the galaxies in our sample. Our results are consistent with a view in which intermediate-mass ETGs experience mostly quiet evolutionary histories, but in which many have experienced some kind of gaseous interaction in recent times.

  1. The Neutral Gas Properties of Extremely Isolated Early-type Galaxies. II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, Trisha; Marcum, Pamela M.; Fanelli, Michael N.

    2018-01-01

    As part of an ongoing study of isolated early-type galaxies (IEG), we present neutral hydrogen (H I) observations of six IEGs obtained with the Green Bank Telescope. Two of the six IEGs presented in this paper have detected H I emission (KIG 870 and SDSS J102145.89+383249.8). KIG 870 has an H I emission profile that is strongly asymmetric about the optical systemic velocity with a redshifted double-horned profile and a blueshifted single-peaked component. KIG 870 is likely an advanced merger system. SDSS J102145.89+383249.8 has a Gaussian-like profile, indicating that the H I is not strongly rotating, is in a face-on disk, or is in a thick-disk similar to a dwarf galaxy. Our parent sample of H I observations is composed of 12 IEGs, 7 of which have now been detected in H I. The dwarf and luminous IEGs in our parent sample have median H I-mass-to-blue-luminosity ratios that are each three times larger than that of their non-cluster ETG counterparts, indicating that IEGs in our sample are significantly more gas rich than non-cluster ETGs.

  2. Effect of the Large Scale Environment on the Internal Dynamics of Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maubon, G.; Prugniel, Ph.

    We have studied the population-density relation in very sparse environments, from poor clusters to isolated galaxies, and we find that early-type galaxies with a young stellar population are preferably found in the lowest density environments. We show a marginal indication that this effect is due to an enhancement of the stellar formation independent of the morphological segregation, but we failed to find any effect from the internal dynamics.

  3. Dark matter-rich early-type galaxies in the CASSOWARY 5 strong lensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillo, C.; Christensen, L.

    2011-12-01

    We study the strong gravitational lensing system number 5 identified by the CAmbridge Sloan Survey Of Wide ARcs in the skY (CASSOWARY). In this system, a source at redshift 1.069 is lensed into four detected images by two early-type galaxies at redshift 0.388. The average projected angular distance of the multiple images from the primary lens is 12.6 kpc, corresponding to approximately 1.3 times the value of the galaxy effective radius. The observed positions of the multiple images are well reproduced by a model in which the total mass distribution of the deflector is described in terms of two singular isothermal sphere profiles and a small external shear component. The values of the effective velocity dispersions of the two lens galaxies are 328+7- 8 and 350+17- 18 km s-1. The best-fitting lensing model predicts magnification values larger than 2 for each multiple image and a total magnification factor of 17. By modelling the lens galaxy spectral energy distributions, we measure lens luminous masses of (3.09 ± 0.30) × 1011 and (5.87 ± 0.58) × 1011 M⊙ and stellar mass-to-light ratios of 2.5 ± 0.3 and 2.8 ± 0.3 M⊙ L-1⊙, i (in the observed i band). These values are used to disentangle the luminous and dark matter components in the vicinity of the multiple images. We estimate that the dark over total mass ratio projected within a cylinder centred on the primary lens and with a radius of 12.6 kpc is 0.8 ± 0.1. Inside the effective radii of the two galaxies, we measure projected total mass-to-light ratios of 12.6 ± 1.4 and 13.1 ± 1.7 M⊙ L-1⊙, i. We contrast these measurements with the typical values found at similar distances (in units of the effective radius) in isolated lens galaxies and show that the amount of dark matter present in these lens galaxies is almost a factor 4 larger than in field lens galaxies with comparable luminous masses. Data and models are therefore consistent with interpreting the lens of this system as a galaxy group. We infer

  4. GALEX studies on UV properties of Nearby Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, J.; Rich, R. M.; Sohn, Y.-J.; Lee, Y.-W.; Gil de Paz, A.; Deharveng, J.-M.; Donas, J.; Boselli, A.; Rey, S.-C.; Yi, S. K.; GALEX Team

    2005-12-01

    We present the results of surface photometry on the far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) images of 23 nearby elliptical galaxies and spiral bulges taken from the GALEX (Galaxy Evolution Explorer). Surface brightness profiles of most galaxies are consistent with de Vaucouleurs' r1/4 law except for some cases more consistent with exponential profiles. We analyze the radial profiles of UV color, (FUV - NUV), and Mg2 line index to investigate a correlation between the gradients of UV color and metal abundance for early-type galaxies. UV color gradients are calculated by applying least square fitting to UV color profile up to effective radius, while Mg2 line strength gradients are compiled for 12 galaxies from previous works. For the 12 early-type galaxies, we find that UV color profiles have a trend to become bluer inward and there is a weak correlation between the gradients of UV color and Mg2 line strength in the sense that galaxies with larger UV color gradients tend to have stronger metal abundance gradients. We also explore the properties of the GALEX-measured ultraviolet rising flux in 96 nearby elliptical galaxies, as a function Lick Mg2 index and velocity dispersion. We include 36 galaxies in the Virgo cluster from the sample of Boselli et al (2005). We find no correlation between the Mg2 index, and log σ and FUV-r. This confirms the findings of Rich et al (2005) for a sample of GALEX/SDSS quiescent early-type galaxies. This is true both for the integrated light, and for nuclear colors. We find a weak correlation between Mg2 and FUV-NUV. We gratefully acknowledge NASA's support for construction, operation, and science analysis for the GALEX mission, developed in cooperation with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales of France and the Korean Ministry of Science and Technology.

  5. Circumnuclear Molecular Disks in Early-type Galaxies: Physical Properties and Precision Black Hole Mass Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boizelle, Benjamin

    2018-01-01

    ALMA is now capable of providing the most precise determinations of the masses of supermassive black holes in early-type galaxies (ETGs). In ALMA Cycle 2 we began a program to map the molecular gas kinematics in nearby ETGs that host central dust disks as seen in Hubble Space Telescope imaging. These initial observations targeted CO(2-1) emission at ~0.3" resolution, corresponding roughly to the projected radii of influence of the central black holes. In all cases we detect significant (~108 M⊙) molecular gas reservoirs that are in dynamically cold rotation, providing the most sensitive probes of the inner gravitational potentials of luminous ETGs. Using these gas kinematics, we verify that these molecular disks are formally stable against gravitational fragmentation and collapse. In several galaxies we detect central high-velocity gas rotation that provides direct kinematic evidence for a black hole. For two of these targets, NGC 1332 and NGC 3258, we have obtained higher-resolution observations (0.044" and 0.09") in Cycles 3 and 4 that more fully map out the gas rotation within the gravitational sphere of influence. We present dynamical modeling results for these targets, demonstrating that ALMA observations can enable black hole mass measurements at a precision of 10% or better, with minimal susceptibility to the systematic uncertainties that affect other methods of black hole mass measurement in ETGs. We discuss the impact of future high-resolution ALMA observations on black hole demographics and their potential to refine the high-mass end of the black hole-host galaxy scaling relationships.

  6. The kinematic properties of dwarf early-type galaxies in the Virgo cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloba, E.; Boselli, A.; Peletier, R. F.; Gorgas, J.

    2011-11-01

    We present new medium resolution kinematic data for a sample of 21 dwarf early-type galaxies (dEs) mainly in the Virgo cluster. These data are used to study the origin of dEs inhabiting clusters. Within them we detect two populations: half of the sample (52%) are rotationally supported and the other half are pressure supported. We also find that the rotationally supported dEs are located in the outer parts of the cluster, present disky morphological shapes and are younger than those pressure supported that are concentrated in the core of the cluster without any underlying structures. Our analysis reveals that the rotationally supported objects have rotation curves similarly shaped to those of star forming galaxies of similar luminosities and follow the Tully-Fisher relation. This is expected if dEs are the descendant of low luminosity star forming systems which recently entered the cluster and lost their gas due to a ram pressure stripping event, quenching their star formation activity and transforming them into quiescent systems, but conserving their angular momentum.

  7. Tracing the Mass of Early-type Galaxies using Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluis, A. P. N.; William, T. B.

    2002-12-01

    We report on observations of two ellipticals (NGC 3379 and NGC 1549) and two S0s (NGC 3384 and NGC 4636) performed with the Rutgers Fabry-Perot (RFP). The observations are part of a larger project to study the distribution of mass in the outer regions of early-type galaxies. Efforts to determine this distribution are generally hampered by the scarcity of useful tracers of the potential at large radii. Ellipticals and S0s have steep surface brightness profiles that make absorption line spectroscopy of the stellar population practically impossible beyond a few kpc from the center. Also, their gas content is low and does not extend far beyond the nucleus. Planetary Nebulae (PNe) offer a way around these problems: as remants of intermediate mass stars we expect them to follow the stellar light distribution and be numerous enough to be an effective tracer. PNe radiate hundreds of solar luminosities in a few emission lines (mostly [OIII] 5007 Å), making it possible to detect them over extragalactic distances and at the same time measure their line of sight velocities using the RFP. We present the photometry and the kinematics of the PN systems as well as some simple dynamical mass models for the four galaxies mentioned above.

  8. VEGAS-SSS: A VST Early-Type GAlaxy Survey: Analysis of Small Stellar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantiello, M.

    VEGAS-SSS is a program devoted to study the properties of small stellar systems (SSSs) around bright galaxies, built on the VEGAS survey. At completion, the survey will have collected detailed photometric information of ˜ 100 bright early-type galaxies to study the properties of diffuse light (surface brightness, colours, SBF, etc.) and the clustered light (compact stellar systems) out to previously unreached projected galactocentric radii. VEGAS-SSS will define an accurate and homogeneous dataset that will have an important legacy value for studies of the evolution and transformation processes taking place in galaxies through the fossil information provided by SSSs.

  9. Hα imaging observations of early-type galaxies from the ATLAS3D survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavazzi, G.; Consolandi, G.; Pedraglio, S.; Fossati, M.; Fumagalli, M.; Boselli, A.

    2018-03-01

    Context. The traditional knowledge of the mechanisms that brought to the formation and evolution of early type galaxies (ETG) in a hierarchical Universe was challenged by the unexpected finding by ATLAS3D that 86% ETGs show signs of a fast rotating disk at their interior, implying an origin common to most spiral galaxies, followed by a quenching phase, while only a minority of the most massive systems are slow rotators and were likely to be the products of merger events. Aims: Our aim is to improve our knowledge on the content and distribution of ionised hydrogen and their usage to form stars in a representative sample of ETGs for which the kinematics and detailed morphological classification were known from ATLAS3D. Methods: Using narrow-band filters centered on the redshifted Hα line along with a broad-band (r-Gunn) filter to recover the stellar continuum, we observed or collected existing imaging observations for 147 ETG (including members of the Virgo cluster), representative of the whole ATLAS3D survey. Results: 55 ETGs (37%) were detected in the Hα line above our detection threshold (HαEW ≤ -1 Å) and 21 harbour a strong source (HαEW ≤ -5 Å) . Conclusions: The strong Hα emitters appear associated with mostly low-mass (M* 1010 M⊙) S0 galaxies which contain conspicuous stellar and gaseous disks, harbouring significant star formation at their interior, including their nuclei. The weak Hα emitters are almost one order of magnitude more massive, contain gas-poor disks and harbour an AGN at their centers. Their emissivity is dominated by [NII] and does not imply star formation. The 92 undetected ETGs constitute the majority in our sample and are gas-free systems which lack a disk and exhibit passive spectra even in their nuclei. These pieces of evidence reinforce the conclusion of Cappellari (2016, ARA&A, 54, 597) that the evolution of ETGs followed the secular channel for the less massive systems and the dry merging channel for the most massive

  10. On a connection between supernova occurrence and tidal interaction in early type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kochhar, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    There are three types of supernovae: two subtypes SNIa and Ib; and SNII. Late type galaxies produce all types of SN, whereas early types (E, SO, and non-Magellanic irregulars IO) have hosted only SNIa. The recently identified SNIb, like SNII, have massive stars as their progenitors. Reviving Oemler and Tinsley's (1979) suggestion that SNIa also come from short-lived stars, the author asserts that they need not occur in all early-type galaxies. SNIa occur only in those galaxies that have access to gas and can form stars in their main body. (SN in nuclear regions are a different matter altogether). In this model, SNIa are not associated with typical stellar population of E/SOs but with regions of localized star formation. Note that data on SNIa from spirals is already consistent with this model.

  11. The TESIS Project: Revealing Massive Early-Type Galaxies at z > 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saracco, P.; Longhetti, M.; Severgnini, P.; Della Ceca, R.; Braito, V.; Bender, R.; Drory, N.; Feulner, G.; Hopp, U.; Mannucci, F.; Maraston, C.

    How and when present-day massive early-type galaxies built up and what type of evolution has characterized their growth (star formation and/or merging) still remain open issues. The different competing scenarios of galaxy formation predict much different properties of early-type galaxies at z > 1. The "monolithic" collapse predicts that massive spheroids formed at high redshift (z > 2.5-3) and that their comoving density is constant at z < 2.5-3 since they evolve only in luminosity. On the contrary, in the hierarchical scenario massive spheroids are built up through subsequent mergers reaching their final masses at z < 1.5 [3,5]. As a consequence, massive systems are very rare at z > 1, their comoving density decreases from z = 0 to z ~ 1.5 and they should experience their last burst of star formation at z < 1.5, concurrent with the merging event(s) of their formation. These opposed predicted properties of early-types at z > 1 can be probed observationally once a well defined sample of massive early-types at z > 1 is available. We are constructing such a sample through a dedicated near-IR very low resolution (λ/Δλ≃50) spectroscopic survey (TNG EROs Spectroscopic Identification Survey, TESIS, [6]) of a complete sample of 30 bright (K < 18.5) Extremely Red Objects (EROs).

  12. The hELENa project - I. Stellar populations of early-type galaxies linked with local environment and galaxy mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sybilska, A.; Lisker, T.; Kuntschner, H.; Vazdekis, A.; van de Ven, G.; Peletier, R.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Vijayaraghavan, R.; Janz, J.

    2017-09-01

    We present the first in a series of papers in The role of Environment in shaping Low-mass Early-type Nearby galaxies (hELENa) project. In this paper, we combine our sample of 20 low-mass early types (dEs) with 258 massive early types (ETGs) from the ATLAS3D survey - all observed with the SAURON integral field unit - to investigate early-type galaxies' stellar population scaling relations and the dependence of the population properties on local environment, extended to the low-σ regime of dEs. The ages in our sample show more scatter at lower σ values, indicative of less massive galaxies being affected by the environment to a higher degree. The shape of the age-σ relations for cluster versus non-cluster galaxies suggests that cluster environment speeds up the placing of galaxies on the red sequence. While the scaling relations are tighter for cluster than for the field/group objects, we find no evidence for a difference in average population characteristics of the two samples. We investigate the properties of our sample in the Virgo cluster as a function of number density (rather than simple clustrocentric distance) and find that dE ages correlate with the local density such that galaxies in regions of lower density are younger, likely because they are later arrivals to the cluster or have experienced less pre-processing in groups, and consequently used up their gas reservoir more recently. Overall, dE properties correlate more strongly with density than those of massive ETGs, which was expected as less massive galaxies are more susceptible to external influences.

  13. Snapshot Survey of the Globular Cluster Populations of Isolated Early Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Michael

    2017-08-01

    We propose WFC3/UVIS snapshot observations of a sample of 75 isolated early type galaxiesresiding in cosmic voids or extremely low density regions. The primary aim is to usetheir globular cluster populations to reconstruct their evolutionary history, revealingif, how, and why void ellipticals differ from cluster ellipticals. The galaxies span arange of luminosities, providing a varied sample for comparison with the well-documentedglobular cluster populations in denser environments. This proposed WFC3 study of isolatedearly type galaxies breaks new ground by targeting a sample which has thus far receivedlittle attention, and, significantly, this will be the first such study with HST.Characterizing early type galaxies in voids and their GC systems promises to increase ourunderstanding of galaxy formation and evolution of galaxies in general because isolatedobjects are the best approximation to a control sample that we have for understanding theinfluence of environment on formation and evolution. Whether these isolated objects turnout to be identical to or distinct from counterparts in other regions of the Universe,they will supply insight into the formation and evolution of all galaxies. Parallel ACSimaging will help to characterize the near field environments of the sample.

  14. Real & Simulated IFU Observations of Low-Mass Early-Type Galaxies: Environmental Influence Probed for Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sybilska, Agnieszka; Łokas, Ewa Luiza; Fouquet, Sylvain

    2017-03-01

    We combine high-quality IFU data with a new set of numerical simulations to study low-mass early type galaxies (dEs) in dense environments. Our earlier study of dEs in the Virgo cluster has produced the first large-scale maps of kinematic and stellar population properties of dEs in those environments (Ryś et al. 2013, 2014, 2015). A quantitative discrimination between various (trans)formation processes proposed for these objects is, however, a complex issue, requiring a priori assumptions about the progenitors of galaxies we observe and study today. To bridge this gap between observations and theoretical predictions, we use the expertise gained in the IFU data analysis to look ``through the eye of SAURON'' at our new suite of high-resolution N-body simulations of dEs in the Virgo cluster. Mimicking the observers perspective as closely as possible, we can also indicate the existing instrumental and viewer limitations regarding what we are/are not able to detect as observers.

  15. Investigating early-type galaxy evolution with a multiwavelength approach. II. The UV structure of 11 galaxies with Swift-UVOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampazzo, R.; Mazzei, P.; Marino, A.; Uslenghi, M.; Trinchieri, G.; Wolter, A.

    2017-06-01

    Context. GALEX detected a significant fraction of early-type galaxies, in particular S0s, showing far-UV bright structures, sometimes involving an entire galaxy out to its outskirts. These features suggest the presence of either recent ongoing and/or prolonged star formation episodes, shedding new light on the evolution of these systems. Aims: We aim at understanding the evolutionary path[s] of these early-type galaxies and the mechanisms at the origin of their UV-bright structures. We investigate with a multiwavelength approach the link between the inner and outer galaxy regions of a set of 11 early-type galaxies that were selected because of their nearly passive stage of evolution in the nuclear region. Methods: This paper, second of a series, focuses on the information coming from the comparison between UV features detected by Swift-UVOT, which trace recent star formation, and the galaxy optical structure, which maps older stellar populations. We performed a surface photometric study of these early-type galaxies, observed with the Swift-UVOT UV filters W2 2030 Å λ0, M2 2231 Å λ0, W1 2634 Å λ0 and the UBV bands. BVRI photometry from other sources in the literature was also used. Our integrated magnitude measurements were analyzed and compared with corresponding values in the literature. We characterize the overall galaxy structure that best fits the UV and optical luminosity profiles using a single Sérsic law. Results: The galaxies NGC 1366, NGC 1426, NGC 3818, NGC 3962, and NGC 7192 show featureless luminosity profiles. Excluding NGC 1366, which has a clear edge-on disk (n ≈ 1-2), and NGC 3818, the remaining three galaxies have Sérsic's indices n ≈ 3-4 in the optical and a lower index in the UV. Bright ring- or arm-like structures are revealed by UV images and luminosity profiles of NGC 1415, NGC 1533, NGC 1543, NGC 2685, NGC 2974, and IC 2006. The ring- or arm-like structures differ from galaxy to galaxy. Sérsic indices of UV profiles for these

  16. Young, metal-enriched cores in early-type dwarf galaxies in the Virgo cluster based on colour gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urich, Linda; Lisker, Thorsten; Janz, Joachim; van de Ven, Glenn; Leaman, Ryan; Boselli, Alessandro; Paudel, Sanjaya; Sybilska, Agnieszka; Peletier, Reynier F.; den Brok, Mark; Hensler, Gerhard; Toloba, Elisa; Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; Niemi, Sami-Matias

    2017-10-01

    Early-type dwarf galaxies are not simply featureless, old objects, but were found to be much more diverse, hosting substructures and a variety of stellar population properties. To explore the stellar content of faint early-type galaxies, and to investigate in particular those with recent central star formation, we study colours and colour gradients within one effective radius in optical (g - r) and near-infrared (I - H) bands for 120 Virgo cluster early-type galaxies with - 19 mag galaxies turn out to have blue cores, when defined as g - r colour gradients larger than 0.10 mag/Reff, which represents the positive tail of the gradient distribution. For these galaxies, we find that they have the strongest age gradients, and that even outside the blue core, their mean stellar population is younger than the mean of ordinary faint early-type galaxies. The metallicity gradients of these blue-cored early-type dwarf galaxies are, however, in the range of most normal faint early-type galaxies, which we find to have non-zero gradients with higher central metallicity. The blue central regions are consistent with star formation activity within the last few 100 Myr. We discuss whether these galaxies could be explained by environmental quenching of star formation in the outer galaxy regions while the inner star formation activity continued.

  17. Supermassive blackhole growth and the supernovae history in high-z early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca-Volmerange, Brigitte

    2015-08-01

    A large variety of feedback models, supported by many galaxy surveys, tentatively relate AGN to star formation by stimulation or quenching. However any accretion process from variable AGNs has never been observed to be turned on or off by star formation. We propose to follow the supernovae explosions through the star formation laws of early-type galaxies with the help of the galaxy evolution model Pégase.3. Applied to the continuous Spectral Energy Distribution, including Herschel data of two z=3.8 radio galaxies (4C41.17 and TN J2007-1316), the comparison with Supermassive BlackHole masses from SDSS opens a new interpretation of the AGN-starburst relation without any need of feedback (Rocca-Volmerange et al, 2015, 2013)

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: VEGAS: A VST Early-type GAlaxy Survey (Capaccioli+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capaccioli, M.; Spavone, M.; Grado, A.; Iodice, E.; Limatola, L.; Napolitano, N. R.; Cantiello, M.; Paolillo, M.; Romanowsky, A. J.; Forbes, D. A.; Puzia, T. H.; Raimondo, G.; Schipani, P.

    2015-11-01

    The VST Elliptical GAlaxies Survey (VEGAS) is a deep multiband (g,r,i) imaging survey of early-type galaxies in the southern hemisphere carried out with VST at the ESO Cerro Paranal Observatory (Chile). The large field of view (FOV) of the OmegaCAM mounted on VST (one square degree matched by pixels 0.21-arcsec wide), together with its high efficiency and spatial resolution (typically better than 1-arcsec; Kuijken, 2011Msngr.146....8K) allows us to map with a reasonable integration time the surface brightness of a galaxy out to isophotes encircling about 95% of the total light. Observations started in October 2011 (ESO Period 88), and since then, the survey has acquired exposures for about 20 bright galaxies (and for a wealth of companion objects in the field), for a totality of ~80h (up to Period 93). (1 data file).

  19. Supernovae in Early-Type Galaxies: Directly Connecting Age and Metallicity with Type Ia Luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Joseph S.; Garnavich, Peter M.; Caldwell, Nelson; Kirshner, Robert P.; Jha, Saurabh W.; Li, Weidong; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Filippenko, Alexei V.

    2008-10-01

    We have obtained optical spectra of 29 early-type (E/S0) galaxies that hosted Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). We have measured absorption-line strengths and compared them to a grid of models to extract the relations between the supernova properties and the luminosity-weighted age/composition of the host galaxies. Such a direct measurement is a marked improvement over existing analyses that tend to rely on general correlations between the properties of stellar populations and morphology. We find a strong correlation suggesting that SNe Ia in galaxies whose populations have a characteristic age greater than 5 Gyr are ~1 mag fainter at Vmax than those found in galaxies with younger populations. We find that SN Ia distance residuals in the Hubble diagram are correlated with host-galaxy metal abundance with higher iron abundance galaxies hosting less-luminous supernovae. We thus conclude that the time since progenitor formation primarily determines the radioactive Ni production while progenitor metal abundance has a weaker influence on peak luminosity, but one not fully corrected by light-curve shape and color fitters. This result, particularly the secondary dependence on metallicity, has significant implications for the determination of the equation-of-state parameter, w = P/(ρ c2) , and could impact planning for future dark-energy missions such as JDEM. Assuming no selection effects in discovering SNe Ia in local early-type galaxies, we find a higher specific SN Ia rate in E/S0 galaxies with ages below 3 Gyr than in older hosts. The higher rate and brighter luminosities seen in the youngest E/S0 hosts may be a result of recent star formation and represents a tail of the "prompt" SN Ia progenitors.

  20. The Environmental Impact of Intra-Cluster Medium on the Interstellar Medium in Early Type Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinchieri, Ginevra

    1993-01-01

    Draft versions of three articles submitted for publication are presented. The first two articles address high resolution X-ray images of early type galaxies observed with the ROSAT HRI and PSPC. Data for NGC 1553 and NGC 5846 indicate that the emission is highly irregular, with interesting features at different scales. The gas temperatures also vary both with the galactocentric radius and in correspondence to regions of higher emission and denser material. Strikingly similar features are observed in the X-ray and H-alpha morphologies of NGC 1553 and NGC 5846, while smooth, regular isophotes are observed in NGC 4649 at both wavelengths. The third article addresses ROSAT PSPC observations of 5 X-ray bright early type galaxies.

  1. Cooling flows and X-ray emission in early-type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarazin, Craig L.

    1990-01-01

    The X-ray properties of normal early-type galaxies and the limited theoretical understanding of the physics of the hot interstellar medium in these galaxies are reviewed. A number of simple arguments about the physical state of the gas are given. Steady-state cooling flow models for these galaxies are presented, and their time-dependent evolution is discussed. The X-ray emission found in early-type galaxies indicates that they contain significant amounts of hot interstellar gas, and that they are not the gas-poor systems they were previously thought to be. In the brighter X-ray galaxies, the amounts of hot gas observed are consistent with those expected given the present rates of stellar mass loss. The required rates of heating of the gas are consistent with those expected from the motions of gas-losing stars and supernovae. The X-ray observations are generally more consistent with a lower rate of Type I supernovae than was previously thought.

  2. A collisional model for the formation of ripples in early-type disk galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallin, John F.; Struck-Marcell, Curtis

    1988-01-01

    Restricted three-body calculations of high-inclination low-impact-parameter encounters between a disk galaxy and its companion are used to demonstrate that the shell-like ripples noted in a number of disk galaxies are also collisional artifacts. It is suggested that some of the ripples may be the results of internal oscillations following such encounters. It is assumed that the target is an early-type disk with a sufficiently low gas fraction that recent star formation does not dominate the appearance of the disturbed disk.

  3. Spiral-like star-forming patterns in CALIFA early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, J. M.; Papaderos, P.; Vílchez, J. M.; Kehrig, C.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Breda, I.; Lehnert, M. D.; Sánchez, S. F.; Ziegler, B.; Dos Reis, S. N.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Galbany, L.; Bomans, D. J.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Walcher, C. J.; García-Benito, R.; Márquez, I.; Del Olmo, A.; Mollá, M.; Marino, R. A.; Catalán-Torrecilla, C.; González Delgado, R. M.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Califa Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Based on a combined analysis of SDSS imaging and CALIFA integral field spectroscopy data, we report on the detection of faint (24 <μr mag/□″< 26) star-forming spiral-arm-like features in the periphery of three nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs). These features are of considerable interest because they document the still ongoing inside-out growth of some local ETGs and may add valuable observational insight into the origin and evolution of spiral structure in triaxial stellar systems. A characteristic property of the nebular component in the studied ETGs, classified I+, is a two-radial-zone structure, with the inner zone that displays faint (EW(Hα) ≃ 1 Å) low-ionization nuclear emission-line region (LINER) properties, and the outer one (3 Å

  4. Recent Structural Evolution of Early-Type Galaxies: Size Growth from z = 1 to z = 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wel, Arjen; Holden, Bradford P.; Zirm, Andrew W.; Franx, Marijn; Rettura, Alessandro; Illingworth, Garth D.; Ford, Holland C.

    2008-11-01

    Strong size and internal density evolution of early-type galaxies between z ~ 2 and the present has been reported by several authors. Here we analyze samples of nearby and distant (z ~ 1) galaxies with dynamically measured masses in order to confirm the previous, model-dependent results and constrain the uncertainties that may play a role. Velocity dispersion (σ) measurements are taken from the literature for 50 morphologically selected 0.8 < z < 1.2 field and cluster early-type galaxies with typical masses Mdyn = 2 × 1011 M⊙. Sizes (Reff) are determined with Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging. We compare the distant sample with a large sample of nearby (0.04 < z < 0.08) early-type galaxies extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey for which we determine sizes, masses, and densities in a consistent manner, using simulations to quantify systematic differences between the size measurements of nearby and distant galaxies. We find a highly significant difference between the σ - Reff distributions of the nearby and distant samples, regardless of sample selection effects. The implied evolution in Reff at fixed mass between z = 1 and the present is a factor of 1.97 +/- 0.15. This is in qualitative agreement with semianalytic models; however, the observed evolution is much faster than the predicted evolution. Our results reinforce and are quantitatively consistent with previous, photometric studies that found size evolution of up to a factor of 5 since z ~ 2. A combination of structural evolution of individual galaxies through the accretion of companions and the continuous formation of early-type galaxies through increasingly gas-poor mergers is one plausible explanation of the observations. Based on observations with the Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555, and observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  5. The sensitivity of harassment to orbit: mass loss from early-type dwarfs in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R.; Sánchez-Janssen, R.; Beasley, M. A.; Candlish, G. N.; Gibson, B. K.; Puzia, T. H.; Janz, J.; Knebe, A.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Lisker, T.; Hensler, G.; Fellhauer, M.; Ferrarese, L.; Yi, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    We conduct a comprehensive numerical study of the orbital dependence of harassment on early-type dwarfs consisting of 168 different orbits within a realistic, Virgo-like cluster, varying in eccentricity and pericentre distance. We find harassment is only effective at stripping stars or truncating their stellar discs for orbits that enter deep into the cluster core. Comparing to the orbital distribution in cosmological simulations, we find that the majority of the orbits (more than three quarters) result in no stellar mass loss. We also study the effects on the radial profiles of the globular cluster systems of early-type dwarfs. We find these are significantly altered only if harassment is very strong. This suggests that perhaps most early-type dwarfs in clusters such as Virgo have not suffered any tidal stripping of stars or globular clusters due to harassment, as these components are safely embedded deep within their dark matter halo. We demonstrate that this result is actually consistent with an earlier study of harassment of dwarf galaxies, despite the apparent contradiction. Those few dwarf models that do suffer stellar stripping are found out to the virial radius of the cluster at redshift = 0, which mixes them in with less strongly harassed galaxies. However when placed on phase-space diagrams, strongly harassed galaxies are found offset to lower velocities compared to weakly harassed galaxies. This remains true in a cosmological simulation, even when haloes have a wide range of masses and concentrations. Thus phase-space diagrams may be a useful tool for determining the relative likelihood that galaxies have been strongly or weakly harassed.

  6. The MASSIVE Survey - X. Misalignment between Kinematic and Photometric Axes and Intrinsic Shapes of Massive Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ene, Irina; Ma, Chung-Pei; Veale, Melanie; Greene, Jenny E.; Thomas, Jens; Blakeslee, John P.; Foster, Caroline; Walsh, Jonelle L.; Ito, Jennifer; Goulding, Andy D.

    2018-06-01

    We use spatially resolved two-dimensional stellar velocity maps over a 107″ × 107″ field of view to investigate the kinematic features of 90 early-type galaxies above stellar mass 1011.5M⊙ in the MASSIVE survey. We measure the misalignment angle Ψ between the kinematic and photometric axes and identify local features such as velocity twists and kinematically distinct components. We find 46% of the sample to be well aligned (Ψ < 15°), 33% misaligned, and 21% without detectable rotation (non-rotators). Only 24% of the sample are fast rotators, the majority of which (91%) are aligned, whereas 57% of the slow rotators are misaligned with a nearly flat distribution of Ψ from 15° to 90°. 11 galaxies have Ψ ≳ 60° and thus exhibit minor-axis ("prolate") rotation in which the rotation is preferentially around the photometric major axis. Kinematic misalignments occur more frequently for lower galaxy spin or denser galaxy environments. Using the observed misalignment and ellipticity distributions, we infer the intrinsic shape distribution of our sample and find that MASSIVE slow rotators are consistent with being mildly triaxial, with mean axis ratios of b/a = 0.88 and c/a = 0.65. In terms of local kinematic features, 51% of the sample exhibit kinematic twists of larger than 20°, and 2 galaxies have kinematically distinct components. The frequency of misalignment and the broad distribution of Ψ reported here suggest that the most massive early-type galaxies are mildly triaxial, and that formation processes resulting in kinematically misaligned slow rotators such as gas-poor mergers occur frequently in this mass range.

  7. The star formation history of early-type galaxies as a function of mass and environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, M. S.; Bressan, A.; Nikolic, B.; Alexander, P.; Annibali, F.; Rampazzo, R.

    2006-08-01

    Using the third data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we have rigorously defined a volume-limited sample of early-type galaxies in the redshift range 0.005 < z <= 0.1. We have defined the density of the local environment for each galaxy using a method which takes account of the redshift bias introduced by survey boundaries if traditional methods are used. At luminosities greater than our absolute r-band magnitude cut-off of -20.45, the mean density of environment shows no trend with redshift. We calculate the Lick indices for the entire sample and correct for aperture effects and velocity dispersion in a model-independent way. Although we find no dependence of redshift or luminosity on environment, we do find that the mean velocity dispersion, σ, of early-type galaxies in dense environments tends to be higher than in low-density environments. Taking account of this effect, we find that several indices show small but very significant trends with environment that are not the result of the correlation between indices and velocity dispersion. The statistical significance of the data is sufficiently high to reveal that models accounting only for α-enhancement struggle to produce a consistent picture of age and metallicity of the sample galaxies, whereas a model that also includes carbon enhancement fares much better. We find that early-type galaxies in the field are younger than those in environments typical of clusters but that neither metallicity, α-enhancement nor carbon enhancement are influenced by the environment. The youngest early-type galaxies in both field and cluster environments are those with the lowest σ. However, there is some evidence that the objects with the largest σ are slightly younger, especially in denser environments. Independent of environment both the metallicity and α-enhancement grow monotonically with σ. This suggests that the typical length of the star formation episodes which formed the stars of early-type galaxies

  8. THE SL2S GALAXY-SCALE LENS SAMPLE. V. DARK MATTER HALOS AND STELLAR IMF OF MASSIVE EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES OUT TO REDSHIFT 0.8

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Treu, Tommaso; Marshall, Philip J.

    2015-02-20

    We investigate the cosmic evolution of the internal structure of massive early-type galaxies over half of the age of the universe. We perform a joint lensing and stellar dynamics analysis of a sample of 81 strong lenses from the Strong Lensing Legacy Survey and Sloan ACS Lens Survey and combine the results with a hierarchical Bayesian inference method to measure the distribution of dark matter mass and stellar initial mass function (IMF) across the population of massive early-type galaxies. Lensing selection effects are taken into account. We find that the dark matter mass projected within the inner 5 kpc increasesmore » for increasing redshift, decreases for increasing stellar mass density, but is roughly constant along the evolutionary tracks of early-type galaxies. The average dark matter slope is consistent with that of a Navarro-Frenk-White profile, but is not well constrained. The stellar IMF normalization is close to a Salpeter IMF at log M {sub *} = 11.5 and scales strongly with increasing stellar mass. No dependence of the IMF on redshift or stellar mass density is detected. The anti-correlation between dark matter mass and stellar mass density supports the idea of mergers being more frequent in more massive dark matter halos.« less

  9. The SL2S galaxy-scale lens sample. V. dark matter halos and stellar IMF of massive early-type galaxies out to redshift 0.8

    DOE PAGES

    Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Treu, Tommaso; Marshall, Philip J.; ...

    2015-02-17

    Here, we investigate the cosmic evolution of the internal structure of massive early-type galaxies over half of the age of the universe. We also perform a joint lensing and stellar dynamics analysis of a sample of 81 strong lenses from the Strong Lensing Legacy Survey and Sloan ACS Lens Survey and combine the results with a hierarchical Bayesian inference method to measure the distribution of dark matter mass and stellar initial mass function (IMF) across the population of massive early-type galaxies. Lensing selection effects are taken into account. Furthermore, we found that the dark matter mass projected within the innermore » 5 kpc increases for increasing redshift, decreases for increasing stellar mass density, but is roughly constant along the evolutionary tracks of early-type galaxies. The average dark matter slope is consistent with that of a Navarro-Frenk-White profile, but is not well constrained. The stellar IMF normalization is close to a Salpeter IMF at log M * = 11.5 and scales strongly with increasing stellar mass. No dependence of the IMF on redshift or stellar mass density is detected. The anti-correlation between dark matter mass and stellar mass density supports the idea of mergers being more frequent in more massive dark matter halos.« less

  10. The assembly of stellar haloes in massive Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitrago, F.

    2017-03-01

    Massive (Mstellar >= 5×1010 M⊙) Early-Type Galaxies (ETGs) must build an outer stellar envelope over cosmic time in order to account for their remarkable size evolution. This is similar to what occurs to nearby Late-Type Galaxies (LTGs), which create their stellar haloes out of the debris of lower mass systems. We analysed the outer parts of massive ETGs at z < 1 by exploiting the Hubble Ultra Deep Field imaging. These galaxies store 10-30% of their stellar mass at distances 10 < R/kpc < 50, in contrast to the low percentages (< 5%) found for LTGs. We find evidence for a progressive outskirt development with redshift driven solely via merging.

  11. UV SEDs of early-type cluster galaxies: a new look at the UV upturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, S. S.; Bremer, M. N.; Phillipps, S.; De Propris, R.

    2018-05-01

    Using GALEX, Ultraviolet Optical Telescope (UVOT), and optical photometry, we explore the prevalence and strength of the Ultraviolet (UV) upturn in the spectra of quiescent early-type galaxies in several nearby clusters. Even for galaxies with completely passive optical colours, there is a large spread in vacuum UV colour consistent with almost all having some UV upturn component. Combining GALEX and UVOT data below 3000 Å, we generate for the first time comparatively detailed UV spectral energy distributions for Coma cluster galaxies. Fitting the UV upturn component with a blackbody, 26 of these show a range of characteristic temperatures (10 000-21 000K) for the UV upturn population. Assuming a single temperature to explain GALEX-optical colours could underestimate the fraction of galaxies with UV upturns and mis-classify some as systems with residual star formation. The UV upturn phenomenon is not an exclusive feature found only in giant galaxies; we identify galaxies with similar (or even bluer) FUV - V colours to the giants with upturns over a range of fainter luminosities. The temperature and strength of the UV upturn are correlated with galaxy mass. Under the plausible hypothesis that the sources of the UV upturn are blue horizontal branch stars, the most likely mechanism for this is the presence of a substantial (between 4 per cent and 20 per cent) Helium-rich (Y > 0.3) population of stars in these galaxies, potentially formed at z ˜ 4 and certainly at z > 2; this plausibly sets a lower limit of {˜ } {0.3- 0.8} × 10^{10} M⊙ to the in situ stellar mass of ˜L* galaxies at this redshift.

  12. Towards a physical classification of early-type galaxies. Profile of a key programme.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, R.; Capaccioli, M.; Macchetto, F.; Nieto, J.-L.

    1989-03-01

    Hubble was the first who succeeded in classifying galaxies within a scheme of some physical meaning. Although it soon became clear that Hubble's tuning fork does not represent an evolutionary sequence, this essential diagram has proven to be a powerful tool especially for the understanding of late-type galaxies. On the other hand, the "early-type" sequence of elliptical (E) and SO galaxies is less satisfying, because it does not seem to reflect a unique sequence of physical properties. The SO class, although conceived to bridge the gap between disk- and disk-Iess galaxies, has often been abused to host ellipticals exhibiting peculiarities incompatible with their definition as structureless objects. For the elliptical galaxies themselves, "ellipticity" has been found to be essentially meaningless with regard to their angular momentum properties, and shows Iittle, if any, correlation with other global parameters. This fact became apparent after the first stellar kinematical measurements of luminous ellipticals (Bertola and Capaccioli 1975, IIlingworth 1977); E galaxies are not necessarily f1attened by rotation and may have anisotropie velocity dispersions (Binney 1978).

  13. Evolution of the early-type galaxy fraction in clusters since z = 0.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simard, L.; Clowe, D.; Desai, V.; Dalcanton, J. J.; von der Linden, A.; Poggianti, B. M.; White, S. D. M.; Aragón-Salamanca, A.; De Lucia, G.; Halliday, C.; Jablonka, P.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Saglia, R. P.; Pelló, R.; Rudnick, G. H.; Zaritsky, D.

    2009-12-01

    We study the morphological content of a large sample of high-redshift clusters to determine its dependence on cluster mass and redshift. Quantitative morphologies are based on PSF-convolved, 2D bulge+disk decompositions of cluster and field galaxies on deep Very Large Telescope FORS2 images of eighteen, optically-selected galaxy clusters at 0.45 < z < 0.80 observed as part of the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (“EDisCS”). Morphological content is characterized by the early-type galaxy fraction f_et, and early-type galaxies are objectively selected based on their bulge fraction and image smoothness. This quantitative selection is equivalent to selecting galaxies visually classified as E or S0. Changes in early-type fractions as a function of cluster velocity dispersion, redshift and star-formation activity are studied. A set of 158 clusters extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey is analyzed exactly as the distant EDisCS sample to provide a robust local comparison. We also compare our results to a set of clusters from the Millennium Simulation. Our main results are: (1) the early-type fractions of the SDSS and EDisCS clusters exhibit no clear trend as a function of cluster velocity dispersion. (2) Mid-z EDisCS clusters around σ = 500 km s-1 have f_et ≃ 0.5 whereas high-z EDisCS clusters have f_et ≃ 0.4. This represents a ~25% increase over a time interval of 2 Gyr. (3) There is a marked difference in the morphological content of EDisCS and SDSS clusters. None of the EDisCS clusters have early-type galaxy fractions greater than 0.6 whereas half of the SDSS clusters lie above this value. This difference is seen in clusters of all velocity dispersions. (4) There is a strong and clear correlation between morphology and star formation activity in SDSS and EDisCS clusters in the sense that decreasing fractions of [OII] emitters are tracked by increasing early-type fractions. This correlation holds independent of cluster velocity dispersion and redshift even

  14. ROSAT PSPC observations of two X-ray-faint early-type galaxies: NGC 4365 and NGC 4382

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabbiano, G.; Kim, D.-W.; Trinchieri, G.

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of ROSAT Positive Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) observations of the two early-type galaxies NGC 4365 and NGC 4382. These galaxies are among those observed with Einstein to have the lowest X-ray to optical flux ratios of early-type galaxies. The PSCP data show that for radii r greater than 50 arcsec the radial distributions of the X-ray surface brightness are consistent with the optical distributions of King (1978). We also find that these galaxies have X-ray spectra significantly different from those observed in X-ray-bright ellipticals, with a relative excess of counts detected in the softest spectral channels. This confirms earlier Einstein results. The characteristics of the ROSAT PSPC do not allow us to discriminate between possible spectral models. If we adopt a two-component thermal model on the grounds of physical plausibility, we find that the spectral data can be fitted with a very soft optically thin component, with kT approximately 0.2 keV, and a hard component with kT greater than (1.0-1.5) keV. The hard component has a luminosity consistent with that expected from the integrated emission of a population of low mass-X-ray binaries in these galaxies; the nature of the very soft component is more speculative. Candidates include the coronal emission of late-type stars, supersoft X-ray sources, RS CVn, and perhaps a hot Interstellar Medium (ISM). Alternatively, the spectal data may be fitted with a 0.6-1 keV bremsstrahlung spectrum (expontential plus Gaunt), and may suggest the presence of a totally new population of X-ray sources.

  15. The MASSIVE survey - VIII. Stellar velocity dispersion profiles and environmental dependence of early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veale, Melanie; Ma, Chung-Pei; Greene, Jenny E.; Thomas, Jens; Blakeslee, John P.; Walsh, Jonelle L.; Ito, Jennifer

    2018-02-01

    We measure the radial profiles of the stellar velocity dispersions, σ(R), for 90 early-type galaxies (ETGs) in the MASSIVE survey, a volume-limited integral-field spectroscopic (IFS) galaxy survey targeting all northern-sky ETGs with absolute K-band magnitude MK < -25.3 mag, or stellar mass M* ≳ 4 × 1011M⊙, within 108 Mpc. Our wide-field 107 arcsec × 107 arcsec IFS data cover radii as large as 40 kpc, for which we quantify separately the inner (2 kpc) and outer (20 kpc) logarithmic slopes γinner and γouter of σ(R). While γinner is mostly negative, of the 56 galaxies with sufficient radial coverage to determine γouter we find 36 per cent to have rising outer dispersion profiles, 30 per cent to be flat within the uncertainties and 34 per cent to be falling. The fraction of galaxies with rising outer profiles increases with M* and in denser galaxy environment, with 10 of the 11 most massive galaxies in our sample having flat or rising dispersion profiles. The strongest environmental correlations are with local density and halo mass, but a weaker correlation with large-scale density also exists. The average γouter is similar for brightest group galaxies, satellites and isolated galaxies in our sample. We find a clear positive correlation between the gradients of the outer dispersion profile and the gradients of the velocity kurtosis h4. Altogether, our kinematic results suggest that the increasing fraction of rising dispersion profiles in the most massive ETGs are caused (at least in part) by variations in the total mass profiles rather than in the velocity anisotropy alone.

  16. Testing the Presence of Multiple Photometric Components in Nearby Early-type Galaxies using SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Semyeong; Greene, Jenny E.; Lackner, Claire N.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate two-dimensional image decomposition of nearby, morphologically selected early-type galaxies (ETGs). We are motivated by recent observational evidence of significant size growth of quiescent galaxies and theoretical development advocating a two-phase formation scenario for ETGs. We find that a significant fraction of nearby ETGs show changes in isophotal shape that require multi-component models. The characteristic sizes of the inner and outer component are ˜3 and ˜15 kpc. The inner component lies on the mass-size relation of ETGs at z ˜ 0.25-0.75, while the outer component tends to be more elliptical and hints at a stochastic buildup process. We find real physical differences between single- and double-component ETGs, with double-component galaxies being younger and more metal-rich. The fraction of double-component ETGs increases with increasing σ and decreases in denser environments. We hypothesize that double-component systems were able to accrete gas and small galaxies until later times, boosting their central densities, building up their outer parts, and lowering their typical central ages. In contrast, the oldest galaxies, perhaps due to residing in richer environments, have no remaining hints of their last accretion episode.

  17. VEGAS: A VST Early-type GAlaxy Survey. I. Presentation, wide-field surface photometry, and substructures in NGC 4472

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capaccioli, Massimo; Spavone, Marilena; Grado, Aniello; Iodice, Enrichetta; Limatola, Luca; Napolitano, Nicola R.; Cantiello, Michele; Paolillo, Maurizio; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Raimondo, Gabriella; Schipani, Pietro

    2015-09-01

    Context. We present the VST Early-type GAlaxy Survey (VEGAS), which is designed to obtain deep multiband photometry in g,r,i, of about one hundred nearby galaxies down to 27.3, 26.8, and 26 mag/arcsec2 respectively, using the ESO facility VST/OmegaCAM. Aims: The goals of the survey are 1) to map the light distribution up to ten effective radii, re; 2) to trace color gradients and surface brightness fluctuation gradients out to a few re for stellar population characterization; and 3) to obtain a full census of the satellite systems (globular clusters and dwarf galaxies) out to 20% of the galaxy virial radius. The external regions of galaxies retain signatures of the formation and evolution mechanisms that shaped them, and the study of nearby objects enables a detailed analysis of their morphology and interaction features. To clarify the complex variety of formation mechanisms of early-type galaxies (ETGs), wide and deep photometry is the primary observational step, which at the moment has been pursued with only a few dedicated programs. The VEGAS survey has been designated to provide these data for a volume-limited sample with exceptional image quality. Methods: In this commissioning photometric paper we illustrate the capabilities of the survey using g- and i-band VST/OmegaCAM images of the nearby galaxy NGC 4472 and of smaller ETGs in the surrounding field. Results: Our surface brightness profiles reach rather faint levels and agree excellently well with previous literature. Genuine new results concern the detection of an intracluster light tail in NGC 4472 and of various substructures at increasing scales. We have also produced extended (g - i) color profiles. Conclusions: The VST/OmegaCAM data that we acquire in the context of the VEGAS survey provide a detailed view of substructures in the optical emission from extended galaxies, which can be as faint as a hundred times below the sky level. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Kinematic properties and dark matter fraction of Virgo dwarf early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloba, E.; Boselli, A.; Peletier, R.; Gorgas, J.

    2015-03-01

    What happens to dwarf galaxies as they enter the cluster potential well is one of the main unknowns in studies of galaxy evolution. Several evidence suggests that late-type galaxies enter the cluster and are transformed to dwarf early-type galaxies (dEs). We study the Virgo cluster to understand which mechanisms are involved in this transformation. We find that the dEs in the outer parts of Virgo have rotation curves with shapes and amplitudes similar to late-type galaxies of the same luminosity (Fig. 1). These dEs are rotationally supported, have disky isophotes, and younger ages than those dEs in the center of Virgo, which are pressure supported, often have boxy isophotes and are older (Fig. 1). Ram pressure stripping, thus, explains the properties of the dEs located in the outskirts of Virgo. However, the dEs in the central cluster regions, which have lost their angular momentum, must have suffered a more violent transformation. A combination of ram pressure stripping and harassment is not enough to remove the rotation and the spiral/disky structures of these galaxies. We find that on the the Faber-Jackson and the Fundamental Plane relations dEs deviate from the trends of massive elliptical galaxies towards the position of dark matter dominated systems such as the dwarf spheroidal satellites of the Milky Way and M31. Both, rotationally and pressure supported dEs, however, populate the same region in these diagrams. This indicates that dEs have a non-negligible dark matter fraction within their half light radius.

  19. Timing the formation and assembly of early-type galaxies via spatially resolved stellar populations analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Navarro, Ignacio; Vazdekis, Alexandre; Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; La Barbera, Francesco; Yıldırım, Akın; van de Ven, Glenn

    2018-04-01

    To investigate star formation and assembly processes of massive galaxies, we present here a spatially resolved stellar population analysis of a sample of 45 elliptical galaxies (Es) selected from the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area survey. We find rather flat age and [Mg/Fe] radial gradients, weakly dependent on the effective velocity dispersion of the galaxy within half-light radius. However, our analysis shows that metallicity gradients become steeper with increasing galaxy velocity dispersion. In addition, we have homogeneously compared the stellar population gradients of our sample of Es to a sample of nearby relic galaxies, i.e. local remnants of the high-z population of red nuggets. This comparison indicates that, first, the cores of present-day massive galaxies were likely formed in gas-rich, rapid star formation events at high redshift (z ≳ 2). This led to radial metallicity variations steeper than observed in the local Universe, and positive [Mg/Fe] gradients. Secondly, our analysis also suggests that a later sequence of minor dry mergers, populating the outskirts of early-type galaxies (ETGs), flattened the pristine [Mg/Fe] and metallicity gradients. Finally, we find a tight age-[Mg/Fe] relation, supporting that the duration of the star formation is the main driver of the [Mg/Fe] enhancement in massive ETGs. However, the star formation time-scale alone is not able to fully explain our [Mg/Fe] measurements. Interestingly, our results match the expected effect that a variable stellar initial mass function would have on the [Mg/Fe] ratio.

  20. Formaldehyde in Absorption: Tracing Molecular Gas in Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollhopf, Niklaus M.; Donovan Meyer, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Early-Type Galaxies (ETGs) have been long-classified as the red, ellipsoidal branch of the classic Hubble tuning fork diagram of galactic structure. In part with this classification, ETGs are thought to be molecular and atomic gas-poor with little to no recent star formation. However, recent efforts have questioned this ingrained classification. Most notably, the ATLAS3D survey of 260 ETGs within ~40 Mpc found 22% contain CO, a common tracer for molecular gas. The presence of cold molecular gas also implies the possibility for current star formation within these galaxies. Simulations do not accurately predict the recent observations and further studies are necessary to understand the mechanisms of ETGs.CO traces molecular gas starting at densities of ~102 cm-3, which makes it a good tracer of bulk molecular gas, but does little to constrain the possible locations of star formation within the cores of dense molecular gas clouds. Formaldehyde (H2CO) traces molecular gas on the order of ~104 cm-3, providing a further constraint on the location of star-forming gas, while being simple enough to possibly be abundant in gas-poor ETGs. In cold molecular clouds at or above ~104 cm-3 densities, the structure of formaldehyde enables a phenomenon in which rotational transitions have excitation temperatures driven below the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), ~2.7 K. Because the CMB radiates isotropically, formaldehyde can be observed in absorption, independent of distance, as a tracer of moderately-dense molecular clouds and star formation.This novel observation technique of formaldehyde was incorporated for observations of twelve CO-detected ETGs from the ATLAS3D sample, including NGC 4710 and PGC 8815, to investigate the presence of cold molecular gas, and possible star formation, in ETGs. We present images from the Very Large Array, used in its C-array configuration, of the J = 11,0 - 11,1 transition of formaldehyde towards these sources. We report our

  1. The X-ray surface brightness distribution and spectral properties of six early-type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinchieri, G.; Fabbiano, G.; Canizares, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    Detailed analysis is presented of the Einstein X-ray observations of six early-type galaxies. The results show that effective cooling is probably present in these systems, at least in the innermost regions. Interaction with the surrounding medium has a major effect on the X-ray surface brightness distribution at large radii, at least for galaxies in clusters. The data do not warrant the general assumptions of isothermality and gravitational hydrostatic equilibrium at large radii. Comparison of the X-ray surface brightness profiles with model predictions indicate that 1/r-squared halos with masses of the order of 10 times the stellar masses are required to match the data. The physical model of White and Chevalier (1984) for steady cooling flows in a King law potential with no heavy halo gives a surface brightness distribution that resembles the data if supernovae heating is present.

  2. Depleted cores, multicomponent fits, and structural parameter relations for luminous early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dullo, Bililign T.; Graham, Alister W.

    2014-11-01

    New surface brightness profiles from 26 early-type galaxies with suspected partially depleted cores have been extracted from the full radial extent of Hubble Space Telescope images. We have carefully quantified the radial stellar distributions of the elliptical galaxies using the core-Sérsic model whereas for the lenticular galaxies a core-Sérsic bulge plus an exponential disc model gives the best representation. We additionally caution about the use of excessive multiple Sérsic functions for decomposing galaxies and compare with past fits in the literature. The structural parameters obtained from our fitted models are, in general, in good agreement with our initial study using radially limited (R ≲ 10 arcsec) profiles, and are used here to update several `central' as well as `global' galaxy scaling relations. We find near-linear relations between the break radius Rb and the spheroid luminosity L such that Rb ∝ L1.13±0.13, and with the supermassive black hole mass MBH such that R_b∝ M_BH^{0.83 ± 0.21}. This is internally consistent with the notion that major, dry mergers add the stellar and black hole mass in equal proportion, i.e. MBH ∝ L. In addition, we observe a linear relation R_b∝ R_e^{0.98 ± 0.15} for the core-Sérsic elliptical galaxies - where Re is the galaxies' effective half-light radii - which is collectively consistent with the approximately linear, bright-end of the curved L-Re relation. Finally, we measure accurate stellar mass deficits Mdef that are in general 0.5-4 MBH, and we identify two galaxies (NGC 1399, NGC 5061) that, due to their high Mdef/MBH ratio, may have experienced oscillatory core-passage by a (gravitational radiation)-kicked black hole. The galaxy scaling relations and stellar mass deficits favour core-Sérsic galaxy formation through a few `dry' major merger events involving supermassive black holes such that M_def ∝ M_BH^{3.70 ± 0.76}, for MBH ≳ 2 × 108 M⊙.

  3. UNDERSTANDING THE STRUCTURE OF THE HOT INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM IN NORMAL EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traynor, Liam; Kim, Dong-Woo; Chandra Galaxy Atlas

    2018-01-01

    The hot interstellar medium (ISM) of early-type galaxies (ETG's) provides crucial insight into the understanding of their formation and evolution. Mechanisms such as type Ia supernovae heating, AGN feedback, deepening potential depth through dark matter assembly and ramp-pressure stripping are known to affect the structure of the ISM. By using temperature maps and radial temperature profiles of the hot ISM from ~70 ETG's with archival Chandra data, it is possible to classify the galaxy's ISM into common structural types. This is extended by using 3D fitting of the radial temperature profile in order to provide models that further constrain the structural types. Five structural types are present, negative (temperature decreases with radii), positive (temperature increases with radii), hybrid-dip (temperature decreases at small radii and increases at large radii), hybrid-bump (inverse of hybrid-dip) and quasi-isothermal (temperature is constant at all radii). This work will be continued by 1) determining which mechanisms are present in which galaxies and 2) analysing the model parameters between galaxies within each structural type to determine whether each type can be described by a single set of model parameters, indicating that the same physical processes are responsible for creating that structural type.

  4. Gas-rich dwarfs and accretion phenomena in early-type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.; Norman, C.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the combined effects of cloud accretion and galactic winds and coronae. An accretion model is developed wherein gas-rich dwarf galaxies are accreted into galactic halos, which provides an adequate source of H I to account for observations of neutral gas in early-type galaxies. Accretion is found to fuel the wind, thereby regulating the accretion flow and yielding a time-dependent model for star formation, enrichment, and nuclear activity. The permissible parameter range for intergalactic gas clouds and galaxy groups is discussed, along with the frequency of gas-rich dwarfs and their large ratios of gas mass to luminosity. Also considered is the occurrence of gas stripping and the consequent formation of dwarf spheroidal systems that remain in the halo, and gas clouds that dissipate and suffer further infall. A cosmological implication of the model is that, because the characteristic time scale of a gas-rich dwarf galaxy to be accreted and lose its gas is comparable to a Hubble time, there may have been a far more extensive primordial distribution of such systems at earlier epochs.

  5. Active galactic nuclei feedback, quiescence and circumgalactic medium metal enrichment in early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenreich, Maximilian; Naab, Thorsten; Choi, Ena; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Emsellem, Eric

    2017-06-01

    We present three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations showing the effect of kinetic and radiative active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback on a model galaxy representing a massive quiescent low-redshift early-type galaxy of M* = 8.41 × 1010 M⊙, harbouring an MBH = 4 × 108 M⊙ black hole surrounded by a cooling gaseous halo. We show that, for a total baryon fraction of ˜20 per cent of the cosmological value, feedback from the AGN can keep the galaxy quiescent for about 4.35 Gyr and with properties consistent with black hole mass and X-ray luminosity scaling relations. However, this can only be achieved if the AGN feedback model includes both kinetic and radiative feedback modes. The simulation with only kinetic feedback fails to keep the model galaxy fully quiescent, while one with only radiative feedback leads to excessive black hole growth. For higher baryon fractions (e.g. 50 per cent of the cosmological value), the X-ray luminosities exceed observed values by at least one order of magnitude, and rapid cooling results in a star-forming galaxy. The AGN plays a major role in keeping the circumgalactic gas at observed metallicities of Z/Z⊙ ≳ 0.3 within the central ˜30 kpc by venting nuclear gas enriched with metals from residual star formation activity. As indicated by previous cosmological simulations, our results are consistent with a model for which the black hole mass and the total baryon fraction are set at higher redshifts z > 1 and the AGN alone can keep the model galaxy on observed scaling relations. Models without AGN feedback violate both the quiescence criterion as well as circumgalactic medium metallicity constraints.

  6. Constraints on early-type galaxy structure from spectroscopically selected gravitational lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, Adam Stallard

    2005-11-01

    This thesis describes all aspects of a unique spectroscopic survey for strong galaxy-galaxy gravitational lenses: motivation, candidate selection, ground- based spectroscopic follow-up, Hubble Space Telescope imaging, data analysis, and results on the radial density profile of the lens galaxies. The lens candidates are selected from within the spectroscopic database of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) based on the appearance of two significantly different redshifts along the same line of sight, and lenses are confirmed within the candidate sample by follow-up imaging and spectroscopy. The sample of [approximate]20 early-type lenses presented in this thesis represents the largest single strong-lens galaxy sample discovered and published to date. These lenses probe the mass of the lens galaxies on scales roughly equal to one-half effective radius. We find a dynamical normalization between isothermal lens-model velocity dispersions and aperture-corrected SDSS stellar velocity dispersions of f = s lens /s stars = 0.95 +/- 0.03. By combining lens-model Einstein radii and de Vaucouleurs effective radii with stellar velocity dispersions through the Jeans equation, we find that the logarithmic slope [Special characters omitted.] of the density profile in our lens galaxies (r 0 ( [Special characters omitted.] ) is on average slightly steeper than isothermal ([Special characters omitted.] = 2) with a modest intrinsic scatter. Parameterizing the intrinsic distribution in [Special characters omitted.] as Gaussian, we find a maximum-likelihood mean of [Special characters omitted. ] and standard deviation of s[Special characters omitted.] = [Special characters omitted.] (68% confidence, for isotropic velocity-dispersion models). Our results rule out a single universal logarithmic density slope at >99.995% confidence. The success of this spectroscopic lens survey suggests that similar projects should be considered as an explicit science goal of future redshift surveys. (Copies

  7. Early-type galaxies in the Antlia cluster: catalogue and isophotal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderón, Juan P.; Bassino, Lilia P.; Cellone, Sergio A.; Gómez, Matías

    2018-06-01

    We present a statistical isophotal analysis of 138 early-type galaxies in the Antlia cluster, located at a distance of ˜ 35 Mpc. The observational material consists of CCD images of four 36 × 36 arcmin2 fields obtained with the MOSAIC II camera at the Blanco 4-m telescope at Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory. Our present work supersedes previous Antlia studies in the sense that the covered area is four times larger, the limiting magnitude is MB ˜ -9.6 mag, and the surface photometry parameters of each galaxy are derived from Sérsic model fits extrapolated to infinity. In a companion previous study we focused on the scaling relations obtained by means of surface photometry, and now we present the data, on which the previous paper is based, the parameters of the isophotal fits as well as an isophotal analysis. For each galaxy, we derive isophotal shape parameters along the semimajor axis and search for correlations within different radial bins. Through extensive statistical tests, we also analyse the behaviour of these values against photometric and global parameters of the galaxies themselves. While some galaxies do display radial gradients in their ellipticity (ɛ) and/or their Fourier coefficients, differences in mean values between adjacent regions are not statistically significant. Regarding Fourier coefficients, dwarf galaxies usually display gradients between all adjacent regions, while non-dwarfs tend to show this behaviour just between the two outermost regions. Globally, there is no obvious correlation between Fourier coefficients and luminosity for the whole magnitude range (-12 ≳ MV ≳ -22); however, dwarfs display much higher dispersions at all radii.

  8. PHOTOMETRIC PROPERTIES AND LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF NEARBY MASSIVE EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    He, Y. Q.; Xia, X. Y.; Hao, C. N.

    We perform photometric analyses of a bright early-type galaxy sample with 2949 galaxies (M{sub r} < -22.5 mag) in the redshift range of 0.05-0.15, drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7 with morphological classification from Galaxy Zoo 1. We measure the Petrosian and isophotal magnitudes, as well as the corresponding half-light radius for each galaxy. We find that for the brightest galaxies (M{sub r} < -23 mag), our Petrosian magnitudes and isophotal magnitudes to 25 mag arcsec{sup -2} and 1% of the sky brightness are on average 0.16 mag, 0.20 mag, and 0.26 mag brighter than the SDSSmore » Petrosian values, respectively. In the first case, the underestimations are caused by overestimations in the sky background by the SDSS PHOTO algorithm, while the latter two are also due to deeper photometry. Similarly, the typical half-light radii (r{sub 50}) measured by the SDSS algorithm are smaller than our measurements. As a result, the bright end of the r-band luminosity function is found to decline more slowly than previous works. Our measured luminosity densities at the bright end are more than one order of magnitude higher than those of Blanton et al., and the stellar mass densities at M{sub *} {approx} 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} and M{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun} are a few tenths and a factor of a few higher than those of Bernardi et al. These results may significantly alleviate the tension in the assembly of massive galaxies between observations and predictions of the hierarchical structure formation model.« less

  9. EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES WITH TIDAL DEBRIS AND THEIR SCALING RELATIONS IN THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G)

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Taehyun; Sheth, Kartik; Munoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos

    2012-07-01

    Tidal debris around galaxies can yield important clues on their evolution. We have identified tidal debris in 11 early-type galaxies (T {<=} 0) from a sample of 65 early types drawn from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S{sup 4}G). The tidal debris includes features such as shells, ripples, and tidal tails. A variety of techniques, including two-dimensional decomposition of galactic structures, were used to quantify the residual tidal features. The tidal debris contributes {approx}3%-10% to the total 3.6 {mu}m luminosity of the host galaxy. Structural parameters of the galaxies were estimated using two-dimensional profile fitting. We investigatemore » the locations of galaxies with tidal debris in the fundamental plane and Kormendy relation. We find that galaxies with tidal debris lie within the scatter of early-type galaxies without tidal features. Assuming that the tidal debris is indicative of recent gravitational interaction or merger, this suggests that these galaxies have either undergone minor merging events so that the overall structural properties of the galaxies are not significantly altered, or they have undergone a major merging events but already have experienced sufficient relaxation and phase mixing so that their structural properties become similar to those of the non-interacting early-type galaxies.« less

  10. Star formation in early-type galaxies: the role of stellar winds and kinematics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Silvia; Negri, Andrea; Ciotti, Luca

    2015-08-01

    Early-Type galaxies (ETGs) host a hot ISM produced mainly by stellar winds, and heated by Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) and the thermalization of stellar motions. Recent high resolution 2D hydrodynamical simulations (Negri et al. 2014) showed that ordered rotation in the stellar component alters significantly the evolution of the hot ISM, and results in the formation of a centrifugally supported cold equatorial disc. This agrees well with the recent evidence that approximately 50% of massive ETGs host significant quantities of cold gas (Morganti et al. 2006; Young et al. 2014), often in settled configurations, sharing the same kinematics of the stars. In particular, in a systematic investigation of the ATLAS3D sample, the most massive fast-rotating ETGs always have kinematically aligned gas, which suggests an internal origin for it, and molecular gas is detected only in fast rotators (Davis et al. 2011). The observed cold gas seems also to provide material for low level star formation (SF) activity (Combes et al. 2007, Davis et al. 2014). Interestingly, in the ATLAS3D sample, SF and young stellar populations are detected only in fast rotators (Sarzi et al. 2013). In a recent work we investigated whether and how SF takes place in the cold gas disc typically produced in rotating ETGs by our previous 2D simulations, by adding to them the possibility for the gas to form stars (Negri et al. 2015). We also inserted the injection of mass, momentum and energy appropriate for the newly (and continuously) forming stellar population. We found that subsequent generations of stars are formed, and that most of the extended and massive cold disc is consumed by this process, leaving at the present epoch cold gas masses that compare well with those observed. The mass in secondary generations of stars resides mostly in a disc, and could be related to a younger, more metal rich disky stellar component indeed observed in fast rotator ETGs (Cappellari et al. 2013). Most of the mass in

  11. Early-type Galaxy Spin Evolution in the Horizon-AGN Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hoseung; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Dubois, Yohan; Kimm, Taysun; Devriendt, Julien. E. G.; Pichon, Christophe

    2018-04-01

    Using the Horizon-AGN simulation data, we study the relative role of mergers and environmental effects in shaping the spin of early-type galaxies (ETGs) after z ≃ 1. We follow the spin evolution of 10,037 color-selected ETGs more massive than {10}10 {M}ȯ that are divided into four groups: cluster centrals (3%), cluster satellites (33%), group centrals (5%), and field ETGs (59%). We find a strong mass dependence of the slow rotator fraction, f SR, and the mean spin of massive ETGs. Although we do not find a clear environmental dependence of f SR, a weak trend is seen in the mean value of the spin parameter driven by the satellite ETGs as they gradually lose their spin as their environment becomes denser. Galaxy mergers appear to be the main cause of total spin changes in 94% of the central ETGs of halos with {M}vir}> {10}12.5 {M}ȯ , but only 22% of satellite and field ETGs. We find that non-merger-induced tidal perturbations better correlate with the galaxy spin down in satellite ETGs than in mergers. Given that the majority of ETGs are not central in dense environments, we conclude that non-merger tidal perturbation effects played a key role in the spin evolution of ETGs observed in the local (z < 1) universe.

  12. Dry minor mergers and size evolution of high-z compact massive early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oogi, Taira; Habe, Asao

    2012-09-01

    Recent observations show evidence that high-z (z ~ 2 - 3) early-type galaxies (ETGs) are quite compact than that with comparable mass at z ~ 0. Dry merger scenario is one of the most probable one that can explain such size evolution. However, previous studies based on this scenario do not succeed to explain both properties of high-z compact massive ETGs and local ETGs, consistently. We investigate effects of sequential, multiple dry minor (stellar mass ratio M2/M1<1/4) mergers on the size evolution of compact massive ETGs. We perform N-body simulations of the sequential minor mergers with parabolic and head-on orbits, including a dark matter component and a stellar component. We show that the sequential minor mergers of compact satellite galaxies are the most efficient in the size growth and in decrease of the velocity dispersion of the compact massive ETGs. The change of stellar size and density of the merger remnant is consistent with the recent observations. Furthermore, we construct the merger histories of candidates of high-z compact massive ETGs using the Millennium Simulation Database, and estimate the size growth of the galaxies by dry minor mergers. We can reproduce the mean size growth factor between z = 2 and z = 0, assuming the most efficient size growth obtained in the case of the sequential minor mergers in our simulations.

  13. The hELENa project - II. Abundance distribution trends of early-type galaxies: from dwarfs to giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sybilska, A.; Kuntschner, H.; van de Ven, G.; Vazdekis, A.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Peletier, R. F.; Lisker, T.

    2018-06-01

    In this second paper of The role of Environment in shaping Low-mass Early-type Nearby galaxies (hELENa) series we study [Mg/Fe] abundance distribution trends of early-type galaxies (ETGs) observed with the Spectrographic Areal Unit for Research on Optical Nebulae integral field unit, spanning a wide range in mass and local environment densities: 20 low-mass early types (dEs) of Sybilska et al. and 258 massive early types (ETGs) of the ATLAS3D project, all homogeneously reduced and analysed. We show that the [Mg/Fe] ratios scale with velocity dispersion (σ) at fixed [Fe/H] and that they evolve with [Fe/H] along similar paths for all early types, grouped in bins of increasing local and global σ, as well as the second velocity moment Vrms, indicating a common inside-out formation pattern. We then place our dEs on the [Mg/Fe] versus [Fe/H] diagram of Local Group galaxies and show that dEs occupy the same region and show a similar trend line slope in the diagram as the high-metallicity stars of the Milky Way and the Large Magellanic Cloud. This finding extends the similar trend found for dwarf spheroidal versus dwarf irregular galaxies and supports the notion that dEs have evolved from late-type galaxies that have lost their gas at a point of their evolution, which likely coincided with them entering denser environments.

  14. The Environmental Impact of Intra-Cluster Medium on the Interstellar Medium in Early Type Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinchieri, Ginevra

    1997-01-01

    High resolution X-ray images of three early type galaxies observed with the ROSAT HRI are presented. Data for NGC 1553 and NGC 5846 indicate that the emission is highly irregular, with interesting features on scales from a few arcsec to a few arcmin. The gas temperatures also vary both with the galactocentric radius and in correspondence to regions of higher emission and denser material. Strikingly similar features are observed in the X-ray and H(alpha) morphologies of NGC 1553 and NGC 5846, while smoother, more regular isophotes are observed in NGC 4649 at both wavelengths. A connection between these two kinds of emission therefore seems likely. In the light of our observations we discuss possible scenarios that can and account for the connection between X-ray and H(alpha) emissions.

  15. Nebular emission and the Lyman continuum photon escape fraction in CALIFA early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaderos, P.; Gomes, J. M.; Vílchez, J. M.; Kehrig, C.; Lehnert, M. D.; Ziegler, B.; Sánchez, S. F.; Husemann, B.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; García-Benito, R.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, A.; del Olmo, A.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Galbany, L.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Marquez, I.; Mollá, M.; Mast, D.; van de Ven, G.; Wisotzki, L.

    2013-07-01

    We use deep integral field spectroscopy data from the CALIFA survey to study the warm interstellar medium (wim) over the entire extent and optical spectral range of 32 nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs). We find that faint nebular emission is extended in all cases, and its surface brightness decreases roughly as ∝ r-α. The large standard deviation in the derived α (1.09 ± 0.67) argues against a universal power-law index for the radial drop-off of nebular emission in ETGs. Judging from the properties of their extranuclear component, our sample ETGs span a broad, continuous sequence with respect to their α, Hα equivalent width (EW) and Lyman continuum (Lyc) photon leakage fraction (plf). We propose a tentative subdivision into two groups: Type i ETGs are characterized by rather steep Hα profiles (α ≃ 1.4), comparatively large (≳1 Å), nearly radially constant EWs, and plf ≃ 0. Photoionization by post-AGB stars appears to be the main driver of extended nebular emission in these systems, with nonthermal sources being potentially important only in their nuclei. Typical properties of type II ETGs are shallower Hα profiles (α ≃ 0.8), very low (≲0.5 Å) EWs with positive radial gradients, and a mean plf ≳ 0.7, rising to ≳0.9 in their centers. Such properties point to a low, and inwardly decreasing wim density and/or volume filling factor. We argue that, because of extensive Lyc photon leakage, emission-line luminosities and EWs are reduced in type II ETG nuclei by at least one order of magnitude. Consequently, the line weakness of these ETGs is by itself no compelling evidence for their containing merely "weak"(sub-Eddington accreting) active galactic nuclei (AGN). In fact, Lyc photon escape, which has heretofore not been considered, may constitute a key element in understanding why many ETGs with prominent signatures of AGN activity in radio continuum and/or X-ray wavelengths show only faint emission lines and weak signatures of AGN activity in

  16. EVIDENCE FOR A CONSTANT IMF IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES BASED ON THEIR X-RAY BINARY POPULATIONS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zepf, Stephen E.; Maccarone, T. J.; Kundu, A.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Lehmer, B.; Maraston, C.

    2014-01-01

    A number of recent studies have proposed that the stellar initial mass function (IMF) of early type galaxies varies systematically as a function of galaxy mass, with higher mass galaxies having steeper IMFs. These steeper IMFs have more low-mass stars relative to the number of high mass stars, and therefore naturally result in proportionally fewer neutron stars and black holes. In this paper, we specifically predict the variation in the number of black holes and neutron stars in early type galaxies based on the IMF variation required to reproduce the observed mass-to-light ratio trends with galaxy mass. We then test whether such variations are observed by studying the field low-mass X-ray binary populations (LMXBs) of nearby early-type galaxies. These binaries are field neutron stars or black holes accreting from a low-mass donor star. We specifically compare the number of field LMXBs per K-band light in a well-studied sample of elliptical galaxies, and use this result to distinguish between an invariant IMF and one that is Kroupa/Chabrier-like at low masses and steeper at high masses. We discuss how these observations constrain the possible forms of the IMF variations and how future Chandra observations can enable sharper tests of the IMF.

  17. The Evolution of Globular Cluster Systems In Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillmair, Carl

    1999-07-01

    We will measure structural parameters {core radii and concentrations} of globular clusters in three early-type galaxies using deep, four-point dithered observations. We have chosen globular cluster systems which have young, medium-age and old cluster populations, as indicated by cluster colors and luminosities. Our primary goal is to test the hypothesis that globular cluster luminosity functions evolve towards a ``universal'' form. Previous observations have shown that young cluster systems have exponential luminosity functions rather than the characteristic log-normal luminosity function of old cluster systems. We will test to see whether such young system exhibits a wider range of structural parameters than an old systems, and whether and at what rate plausible disruption mechanisms will cause the luminosity function to evolve towards a log-normal form. A simple observational comparison of structural parameters between different age cluster populations and between diff er ent sub-populations within the same galaxy will also provide clues concerning both the formation and destruction mechanisms of star clusters, the distinction between open and globular clusters, and the advisability of using globular cluster luminosity functions as distance indicators.

  18. Early-type galaxy archeology: Ages, abundance ratios, and effective temperatures from full-spectrum fitting

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Charlie; Graves, Genevieve J.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.

    2014-01-01

    The stellar populations of galaxies hold vital clues to their formation histories. In this paper we present results based on modeling stacked spectra of early-type galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey as a function of velocity dispersion, σ, from 90 km s{sup –1} to 300 km s{sup –1}. The spectra are of extremely high quality, with typical signal-to-noise ratio of 1000 Å{sup –1}, and a wavelength coverage of 4000 Å –8800 Å. Our population synthesis model includes variation in 16 elements from C to Ba, a two-component star formation history, the shift in effective temperature, Δ T {submore » eff}, of the stars with respect to a solar metallicity isochrone, and the stellar initial mass function, among other parameters. In our approach we fit the full optical spectra rather than a select number of spectral indices and are able to, for the first time, measure the abundances of the elements V, Cr, Mn, Co, and Ni from the integrated light of distant galaxies. Our main results are as follows: (1) light-weighted stellar ages range from 6-12 Gyr from low to high σ; (2) [Fe/H] varies by less than 0.1 dex across the entire sample; (3) Mg closely tracks O, and both increase from ≈0.0 at low σ to ∼0.25 at high σ; Si and Ti show a shallower rise with σ, and Ca tracks Fe rather than O; (4) the iron peak elements V, Cr, Mn, and Ni track Fe, while Co tracks O, suggesting that Co forms primarily in massive stars; (5) C and N track O over the full sample and [C/Fe] and [N/Fe] exceed 0.2 at high σ; and (6) the variation in Δ T {sub eff} with total metallicity closely follows theoretical predictions based on stellar evolution theory. This last result is significant because it implies that we are robustly solving not only for the detailed abundance patterns but also the detailed temperature distributions (i.e., isochrones) of the stars in these galaxies. A variety of tests reveal that the systematic uncertainties in our measurements are probably 0

  19. Spectroscopic aperture biases in inside-out evolving early-type galaxies from CALIFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, J. M.; Papaderos, P.; Vílchez, J. M.; Kehrig, C.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Breda, I.; Lehnert, M. D.; Sánchez, S. F.; Ziegler, B.; Dos Reis, S. N.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Galbany, L.; Bomans, D. J.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Walcher, C. J.; García-Benito, R.; Márquez, I.; Del Olmo, A.; Mollá, M.; Marino, R. A.; Catalán-Torrecilla, C.; González Delgado, R. M.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Califa Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    Integral field spectroscopy (IFS) studies based on CALIFA survey data have recently revealed ongoing low-level star formation (SF) in the periphery of a small fraction (~10%) of local early-type galaxies (ETGs), witnessing a still ongoing inside-out galaxy growth process. A distinctive property of the nebular component in these ETGs, classified I+, is a structure with two radial zones, the inner of which displays LINER emission with a Hα equivalent width EW(Hα) ≃ 1 Å, the outer (3 Å galaxy periphery leads to a strong aperture (or, correspondingly, redshift) bias in spectroscopic single-fiber studies of type I+ ETGs: at low redshift (z ≲ 0.45), SDSS spectroscopy is restricted to the inner (SF-devoid LINER) zone, which causes the galaxies to be erroneously classified as "retired", that is, systems entirely lacking SF, and whose faint nebular emissionis solely powered by the post-AGB stellar component. The SDSS aperture progressively encompasses the outer SF zone only at higher z, at which the galaxies are unambiguously classified as "composite SF/LINER". We also empirically demonstrate that the principal effect of a decreasing spectroscopic aperture on the classification of I+ ETGs through standard [Nii]/Hα vs. [Oiii]/Hβ emission-line (BPT) ratios consists of a monotonic shift upward and to the right precisely along the upper right wing of the "seagull" distribution on the BPT plane, that is, along the pathway connecting composite SF/Hii galaxies with AGN/LINERs. Motivated by these observational insights, we also investigate theoretically observational biases in aperture-limited studies of inside-out growing galaxies as a function of z. To this end, we devise a simple 1D model that involves an outward-propagating exponentially decreasing SF process since z ~ 10 and reproduces the radial extent and two-zone EW

  20. VEGAS-SSS: A VST Programme to Study the Satellite Stellar Systems around Bright Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantiello, M.; Capaccioli, M.; Napolitano, N.; Grado, A.; Limatola, L.; Paolillo, M.; Iodice, E.; Romanowsky, A. J.; Forbes, D. A.; Raimondo, G.; Spavone, M.; La Barbera, F.; Puzia, T. H.; Schipani, P.

    2015-03-01

    The VEGAS-SSS programme is devoted to studying the properties of small stellar systems (SSSs) in and around bright galaxies, built on the VLT Survey Telescope early-type galaxy survey (VEGAS), an ongoing guaranteed time imaging survey distributed over many semesters (Principal Investigator: Capaccioli). On completion, the VEGAS survey will have collected detailed photometric information of ~ 100 bright early-type galaxies to study the properties of diffuse light (surface brightness, colours, surface brightness fluctuations, etc.) and the distribution of clustered light (compact ''small'' stellar systems) out to previously unreached projected galactocentric radii. VEGAS-SSS will define an accurate and homogeneous dataset that will have an important legacy value for studies of the evolution and transformation processes taking place in galaxies through the fossil information provided by SSSs.

  1. Dry minor mergers and size evolution of high-z compact massive early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oogi, Taira; Habe, Asao

    2013-01-01

    Recent observations show evidence that high-z (z ˜ 2-3) early-type galaxies (ETGs) are more compact than those with comparable mass at z ˜ 0. Such size evolution is most likely explained by the `dry merger sceanario'. However, previous studies based on this scenario cannot consistently explain the properties of both high-z compact massive ETGs and local ETGs. We investigate the effect of multiple sequential dry minor mergers on the size evolution of compact massive ETGs. From an analysis of the Millennium Simulation Data Base, we show that such minor (stellar mass ratio M2/M1 < 1/4) mergers are extremely common during hierarchical structure formation. We perform N-body simulations of sequential minor mergers with parabolic and head-on orbits, including a dark matter component and a stellar component. Typical mass ratios of these minor mergers are 1/20 < M2/M1 ≤q 1/10. We show that sequential minor mergers of compact satellite galaxies are the most efficient at promoting size growth and decreasing the velocity dispersion of compact massive ETGs in our simulations. The change of stellar size and density of the merger remnants is consistent with recent observations. Furthermore, we construct the merger histories of candidates for high-z compact massive ETGs using the Millennium Simulation Data Base and estimate the size growth of the galaxies through the dry minor merger scenario. We can reproduce the mean size growth factor between z = 2 and z = 0, assuming the most efficient size growth obtained during sequential minor mergers in our simulations. However, we note that our numerical result is only valid for merger histories with typical mass ratios between 1/20 and 1/10 with parabolic and head-on orbits and that our most efficient size-growth efficiency is likely an upper limit.

  2. The Dramatic Size and Kinematic Evolution of Massive Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapi, A.; Pantoni, L.; Zanisi, L.; Shi, J.; Mancuso, C.; Massardi, M.; Shankar, F.; Bressan, A.; Danese, L.

    2018-04-01

    We aim to provide a holistic view on the typical size and kinematic evolution of massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) that encompasses their high-z star-forming progenitors, their high-z quiescent counterparts, and their configurations in the local Universe. Our investigation covers the main processes playing a relevant role in the cosmic evolution of ETGs. Specifically, their early fast evolution comprises biased collapse of the low angular momentum gaseous baryons located in the inner regions of the host dark matter halo; cooling, fragmentation, and infall of the gas down to the radius set by the centrifugal barrier; further rapid compaction via clump/gas migration toward the galaxy center, where strong heavily dust-enshrouded star formation takes place and most of the stellar mass is accumulated; and ejection of substantial gas amount from the inner regions by feedback processes, which causes a dramatic puffing-up of the stellar component. In the late slow evolution, passive aging of stellar populations and mass additions by dry merger events occur. We describe these processes relying on prescriptions inspired by basic physical arguments and by numerical simulations to derive new analytical estimates of the relevant sizes, timescales, and kinematic properties for individual galaxies along their evolution. Then we obtain quantitative results as a function of galaxy mass and redshift, and compare them to recent observational constraints on half-light size R e , on the ratio v/σ between rotation velocity and velocity dispersion (for gas and stars) and on the specific angular momentum j ⋆ of the stellar component; we find good consistency with the available multiband data in average values and dispersion, both for local ETGs and for their z ∼ 1–2 star-forming and quiescent progenitors. The outcomes of our analysis can provide hints to gauge sub-grid recipes implemented in simulations, to tune numerical experiments focused on specific processes, and to plan

  3. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: Gravitational Potential and Surface Density Drive Stellar Populations. I. Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Tania M.; D’Eugenio, Francesco; Colless, Matthew; Scott, Nicholas; van de Sande, Jesse; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Bryant, Julia J.; Cortese, Luca; Croom, Scott M.; Foster, Caroline; Goodwin, Michael; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis S.; Lawrence, Jon S.; Lorente, Nuria P. F.; Medling, Anne M.; Owers, Matt S.; Richards, Samuel N.

    2018-03-01

    The well-established correlations between the mass of a galaxy and the properties of its stars are considered to be evidence for mass driving the evolution of the stellar population (SP). However, for early-type galaxies (ETGs), we find that g ‑ i color and stellar metallicity [Z/H] correlate more strongly with gravitational potential Φ than with mass M, whereas SP age correlates best with surface density Σ. Specifically, for our sample of 625 ETGs with integral-field spectroscopy from the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral-field Galaxy Survey, compared to correlations with mass, the color–Φ, [Z/H]–Φ, and age–Σ relations show both a smaller scatter and a lower residual trend with galaxy size. For the star formation duration proxy [α/Fe], we find comparable results for trends with Φ and Σ, with both being significantly stronger than the [α/Fe]–M relation. In determining the strength of a trend, we analyze both the overall scatter, and the observational uncertainty on the parameters, in order to compare the intrinsic scatter in each correlation. These results lead us to the following inferences and interpretations: (1) the color–Φ diagram is a more precise tool for determining the developmental stage of the SP than the conventional color–mass diagram; and (2) gravitational potential is the primary regulator of global stellar metallicity, via its relation to the gas escape velocity. Furthermore, we propose the following two mechanisms for the age and [α/Fe] relations with Σ: (a) the age–Σ and [α/Fe]–Σ correlations arise as results of compactness-driven quenching mechanisms; and/or (b) as fossil records of the {{{Σ }}}SFR}\\propto {{{Σ }}}gas} relation in their disk-dominated progenitors.

  4. The very soft X-ray emission of X-ray-faint early-type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellegrini, S.; Fabbiano, G.

    1994-01-01

    A recent reanaylsis of Einstein data, and new ROSAT observations, have revealed the presence of at least two components in the X-ray spectra of X-ray faint early-type galaxies: a relatively hard component (kT greater than 1.5 keV), and a very soft component (kT approximately 0.2-0.3 keV). In this paper we address the problem of the nature of the very soft component and whether it can be due to a hot interstellar medium (ISM), or is most likely originated by the collective emission of very soft stellar sources. To this purpose, hydrodynamical evolutionary sequences for the secular behavior of gas flows in ellipticals have been performed, varying the Type Ia supernovae rate of explosion, and the dark matter amount and distribution. The results are compared with the observational X-ray data: the average Einstein spectrum for six X-ray faint early-type galaxies (among which are NGC 4365 and NGC 4697), and the spectrum obtained by the ROSAT pointed observation of NGC 4365. The very soft component could be entirely explained with a hot ISM only in galaxies such as NGC 4697, i.e., when the depth of the potential well-on which the average ISM temperature strongly depends-is quite shallow; in NGC 4365 a diffuse hot ISM would have a temperature larger than that of the very soft component, because of the deeper potential well. So, in NGC 4365 the softest contribution to the X-ray emission comes certainly from stellar sources. As stellar soft X-ray emitters, we consider late-type stellar coronae, supersoft sources such as those discovered by ROSAT in the Magellanic Clouds and M31, and RS CVn systems. All these candidates can be substantial contributors to the very soft emission, though none of them, taken separately, plausibly accounts entirely for its properties. We finally present a model for the X-ray emission of NGC 4365, to reproduce in detail the results of the ROSAT pointed observation, including the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) spectrum and radial

  5. Strong gravitational lensing and the stellar IMF of early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leier, Dominik; Ferreras, Ignacio; Saha, Prasenjit; Charlot, Stéphane; Bruzual, Gustavo; La Barbera, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    Systematic variations of the initial mass function (IMF) in early-type galaxies, and their connection with possible drivers such as velocity dispersion or metallicity, have been much debated in recent years. Strong lensing over galaxy scales combined with photometric and spectroscopic data provides a powerful method to constrain the stellar mass-to-light ratio and hence the functional form of the IMF. We combine photometric and spectroscopic constraints from the latest set of population synthesis models of Charlot & Bruzual, including a varying IMF, with a non-parametric analysis of the lens masses of 18 ETGs from the SLACS survey, with velocity dispersions in the range 200-300 km s-1. We find that very bottom-heavy IMFs are excluded. However, the upper limit to the bimodal IMF slope (μ ≲ 2.2, accounting for a dark matter fraction of 20-30 per cent, where μ = 1.3 corresponds to a Kroupa-like IMF) is compatible at the 1σ level with constraints imposed by gravity-sensitive line strengths. A two-segment power-law parametrization of the IMF (Salpeter-like for high masses) is more constrained (Γ ≲ 1.5, where Γ is the power index at low masses) but requires a dark matter contribution of ≳25 per cent to reconcile the results with a Salpeter IMF. For a standard Milky Way-like IMF to be applicable, a significant dark matter contribution is required within 1Re. Our results reveal a large range of allowed IMF slopes, which, when interpreted as intrinsic scatter in the IMF properties of ETGs, could explain the recent results of Smith et al., who find Milky Way-like IMF normalizations in a few massive lensing ETGs.

  6. Evolution of Late-type Galaxies in a Cluster Environment: Effects of High-speed Multiple Encounters with Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jeong-Sun; Park, Changbom; Banerjee, Arunima; Hwang, Ho Seong

    2018-04-01

    Late-type galaxies falling into a cluster would evolve being influenced by the interactions with both the cluster and the nearby cluster member galaxies. Most numerical studies, however, tend to focus on the effects of the former with little work done on those of the latter. We thus perform a numerical study on the evolution of a late-type galaxy interacting with neighboring early-type galaxies at high speed using hydrodynamic simulations. Based on the information obtained from the Coma cluster, we set up the simulations for the case where a Milky Way–like late-type galaxy experiences six consecutive collisions with twice as massive early-type galaxies having hot gas in their halos at the closest approach distances of 15–65 h ‑1 kpc at the relative velocities of 1500–1600 km s‑1. Our simulations show that the evolution of the late-type galaxy can be significantly affected by the accumulated effects of the high-speed multiple collisions with the early-type galaxies, such as on cold gas content and star formation activity of the late-type galaxy, particularly through the hydrodynamic interactions between cold disk and hot gas halos. We find that the late-type galaxy can lose most of its cold gas after the six collisions and have more star formation activity during the collisions. By comparing our simulation results with those of galaxy–cluster interactions, we claim that the role of the galaxy–galaxy interactions on the evolution of late-type galaxies in clusters could be comparable with that of the galaxy–cluster interactions, depending on the dynamical history.

  7. Probing evolutionary population synthesis models in the near infrared with early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmer-Hahn, Luis Gabriel; Riffel, Rogério; Rodríguez-Ardila, Alberto; Martins, Lucimara P.; Kehrig, Carolina; Heckman, Timothy M.; Pastoriza, Miriani G.; Dametto, Natacha Z.

    2018-06-01

    We performed a near-infrared (NIR; ˜1.0 -2.4 μm) stellar population study in a sample of early-type galaxies. The synthesis was performed using five different evolutionary population synthesis libraries of models. Our main results can be summarized as follows: low-spectral-resolution libraries are not able to produce reliable results when applied to the NIR alone, with each library finding a different dominant population. The two newest higher resolution models, on the other hand, perform considerably better, finding consistent results to each other and to literature values. We also found that optical results are consistent with each other even for lower resolution models. We also compared optical and NIR results and found out that lower resolution models tend to disagree in the optical and in the NIR, with higher fraction of young populations in the NIR and dust extinction ˜1 mag higher than optical values. For higher resolution models, optical and NIR results tend to agree much better, suggesting that a higher spectral resolution is fundamental to improve the quality of the results.

  8. Merging Features and Optical-Near Infrared Color Gradients of Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Duho; Im, M.

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that merging plays an important role in the formation and the evolution of early-type galaxies (ETGs). Optical-NIR color gradients of ETGs in high density environments are found to be less steep than those of ETGs in low density environments, hinting frequent merger activities in ETGs in high density environments. In order to examine if the flat color gradients are the result of dry mergers, we studied the relations between merging features, color gradient, and environments of 198 low redshift ETGs selected from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe82. Near Infrared (NIR) images are taken from UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Large Area Survey (LAS). Color(r-K) gradients of ETGs with tidal features are a little flatter than relaxed ETGs, but not significant. We found that massive (>1011.3 M⊙) relaxed ETGs have 2.5 times less scattered color gradients than less massive ETGs. The less scattered color gradients of massive ETGs could be evidence of dry merger processes in the evolution of massive ETGs. We found no relation between color gradients of ETGs and their environments.

  9. Isophote Shapes Of Early-Type Galaxies In Massive Clusters At Z 1 And 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuda, Kazuma; Doi, Mamoru; Morokuma, Tomoki; Suzuki, Nao; Yasuda, Naoki; Perlmutter, Saul; Aldering, Greg; Meyers, Joshua

    2017-06-01

    Dynamics of early-type galaxies (ETGs), whether they are supported by rotation or dispersion, is a clue to understand their assembly history. We compare the isophote shape parameter a4 between z ˜ 1 and 0 as a proxy for dynamics to investigate the epoch at which the dynamical properties are established. We create cluster ETG samples with stellar masses of log(M✽/M⦿) ≥ 10.5 with spectroscopic redshifts. We have 130 ETGs from the Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Supernova Survey for z ˜ 1 and 355 ETGs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey for z ˜ 0. We find similar dependence of the a4 parameter on the mass at z ˜ 1 and 0; the main population changes from disky (a4 > 0) to boxy (a4 ≤ 0) at a critical mass of log(M✽/M⦿) 11.5 with the massive end dominated by boxy ETGs. The disky ETG fraction is consistent between these redshifts. Although uncertainties are large, the results suggest that the isophote shapes and probably dynamical properties of cluster ETGs are already in place at z > 1 and do not significantly evolve in z < 1, despite significant size evolution. The constant disky fraction imply that the processes responsible for the size evolution is not enough violent to convert the dynamical properties of ETGs.

  10. The X-Ray Luminosity Functions of Field Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries in Early-Type Galaxies: Evidence for a Stellar Age Dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehmer, B. D.; Berkeley, M.; Zezas, A.; Alexander, D. M.; Basu-Zych, A.; Bauer, F. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Fragos, T.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Kalogera, V.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present direct constraints on how the formation of low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) populations in galactic fields depends on stellar age. In this pilot study, we utilize Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data to detect and characterize the X-ray point source populations of three nearby early-type galaxies: NGC 3115, 3379, and 3384. The luminosity-weighted stellar ages of our sample span approximately equal to 3-10 Gyr. X-ray binary population synthesis models predict that the field LMXBs associated with younger stellar populations should be more numerous and luminous per unit stellar mass than older populations due to the evolution of LMXB donor star masses. Crucially, the combination of deep Chandra and HST observations allows us to test directly this prediction by identifying and removing counterparts to X-ray point sources that are unrelated to the field LMXB populations, including LMXBs that are formed dynamically in globular clusters, Galactic stars, and background AGN/galaxies. We find that the "young" early-type galaxy NGC 3384 (approximately equals 2-5 Gyr) has an excess of luminous field LMXBs (L(sub x) approximately greater than (5-10) × 10(exp 37) erg s(exp -1)) per unit K-band luminosity (L(sub K); a proxy for stellar mass) than the "old" early-type galaxies NGC 3115 and 3379 (approximately equals 8-10 Gyr), which results in a factor of 2-3 excess of L(sub X)/L(sub K) for NGC 3384. This result is consistent with the X-ray binary population synthesis model predictions; however, our small galaxy sample size does not allow us to draw definitive conclusions on the evolution field LMXBs in general. We discuss how future surveys of larger galaxy samples that combine deep Chandra and HST data could provide a powerful new benchmark for calibrating X-ray binary population synthesis models.

  11. Multiple populations within globular clusters in Early-type galaxies Exploring their effect on stellar initial mass function estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantereau, W.; Usher, C.; Bastian, N.

    2018-05-01

    It is now well-established that most (if not all) ancient globular clusters host multiple populations, that are characterised by distinct chemical features such as helium abundance variations along with N-C and Na-O anti-correlations, at fixed [Fe/H]. These very distinct chemical features are similar to what is found in the centres of the massive early-type galaxies and may influence measurements of the global properties of the galaxies. Additionally, recent results have suggested that M/L variations found in the centres of massive early-type galaxies might be due to a bottom-heavy stellar initial mass function. We present an analysis of the effects of globular cluster-like multiple populations on the integrated properties of early-type galaxies. In particular, we focus on spectral features in the integrated optical spectrum and the global mass-to-light ratio that have been used to infer variations in the stellar initial mass function. To achieve this we develop appropriate stellar population synthesis models and take into account, for the first time, an initial-final mass relation which takes into consideration a varying He abundance. We conclude that while the multiple populations may be present in massive early-type galaxies, they are likely not responsible for the observed variations in the mass-to-light ratio and IMF sensitive line strengths. Finally, we estimate the fraction of stars with multiple populations chemistry that come from disrupted globular clusters within massive ellipticals and find that they may explain some of the observed chemical patterns in the centres of these galaxies.

  12. SDSS-IV MaNGA: Variation of the Stellar Initial Mass Function in Spiral and Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongyu; Ge, Junqiang; Mao, Shude; Cappellari, Michele; Long, R. J.; Li, Ran; Emsellem, Eric; Dutton, Aaron A.; Li, Cheng; Bundy, Kevin; Thomas, Daniel; Drory, Niv; Lopes, Alexandre Roman

    2017-04-01

    We perform Jeans anisotropic modeling (JAM) on elliptical and spiral galaxies from the MaNGA DR13 sample. By comparing the stellar mass-to-light ratios estimated from stellar population synthesis and from JAM, we find a systematic variation of the initial mass function (IMF) similar to that in the earlier {{ATLAS}}3{{D}} results. Early-type galaxies (elliptical and lenticular) with lower velocity dispersions within one effective radius are consistent with a Chabrier-like IMF, while galaxies with higher velocity dispersions are consistent with a more bottom-heavy IMF such as the Salpeter IMF. Spiral galaxies have similar systematic IMF variations, but with slightly different slopes and larger scatters, due to the uncertainties caused by the higher gas fractions and extinctions for these galaxies. Furthermore, we examine the effects of stellar mass-to-light ratio gradients on our JAM modeling, and we find that the trends become stronger after considering the gradients.

  13. On the robustness of the Hβ Lick index as a cosmic clock in passive early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concas, Alice; Pozzetti, L.; Moresco, M.; Cimatti, A.

    2017-06-01

    We examine the Hβ Lick index in a sample of ˜24 000 massive (log(M/M_{⊙})>10.75) and passive early-type galaxies extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey at z < 0.3, in order to assess the reliability of this index to constrain the epoch of formation and age evolution of these systems. We further investigate the possibility of exploiting this index as `cosmic chronometer', I.e. to derive the Hubble parameter from its differential evolution with redshift, hence constraining cosmological models independently of other probes. We find that the Hβ strength increases with redshift as expected in passive evolution models, and shows at each redshift weaker values in more massive galaxies. However, a detailed comparison of the observed index with the predictions of stellar population synthesis models highlights a significant tension, with the observed index being systematically lower than expected. By analysing the stacked spectra, we find a weak [N II] λ6584 emission line (not detectable in the single spectra) that anti-correlates with the mass, which can be interpreted as a hint of the presence of ionized gas. We estimated the correction of the Hβ index by the residual emission component exploiting different approaches, but find it very uncertain and model dependent. We conclude that, while the qualitative trends of the observed Hβ-z relations are consistent with the expected passive and downsizing scenario, the possible presence of ionized gas even in the most massive and passive galaxies prevents us to use this index for a quantitative estimate of the age evolution and for cosmological applications.

  14. The SLUGGS survey: the mass distribution in early-type galaxies within five effective radii and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alabi, Adebusola B.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Strader, Jay; Janz, Joachim; Pota, Vincenzo; Pastorello, Nicola; Usher, Christopher; Spitler, Lee R.; Foster, Caroline; Jennings, Zachary G.; Villaume, Alexa; Kartha, Sreeja

    2016-08-01

    We study mass distributions within and beyond 5 effective radii (Re) in 23 early-type galaxies from the SAGES Legacy Unifying Globulars and Galaxies Survey, using their globular cluster (GC) kinematic data. The data are obtained with Keck/DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph, and consist of line-of-sight velocities for ˜3500 GCs, measured with a high precision of ˜15 km s-1 per GC and extending out to ˜13 Re. We obtain the mass distribution in each galaxy using the tracer mass estimator of Watkins et al. and account for kinematic substructures, rotation of the GC systems and galaxy flattening in our mass estimates. The observed scatter between our mass estimates and results from the literature is less than 0.2 dex. The dark matter fraction within 5 Re (fDM) increases from ˜0.6 to ˜0.8 for low- and high-mass galaxies, respectively, with some intermediate-mass galaxies (M* ˜ 1011 M⊙) having low fDM ˜ 0.3, which appears at odds with predictions from simple galaxy models. We show that these results are independent of the adopted orbital anisotropy, stellar mass-to-light (M/L) ratio, and the assumed slope of the gravitational potential. However, the low fDM in the ˜1011 M⊙ galaxies agrees with the cosmological simulations of Wu et al. where the pristine dark matter distribution has been modified by baryons during the galaxy assembly process. We find hints that these M* ˜ 1011 M⊙ galaxies with low fDM have very diffuse dark matter haloes, implying that they assembled late. Beyond 5 Re, the M/L gradients are steeper in the more massive galaxies and shallower in both low and intermediate mass galaxies.

  15. SDSS-IV MaNGA: Uncovering the Angular Momentum Content of Central and Satellite Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, J. E.; Leauthaud, A.; Emsellem, E.; Ge, J.; Aragón-Salamanca, A.; Greco, J.; Lin, Y.-T.; Mao, S.; Masters, K.; Merrifield, M.; More, S.; Okabe, N.; Schneider, D. P.; Thomas, D.; Wake, D. A.; Pan, K.; Bizyaev, D.; Oravetz, D.; Simmons, A.; Yan, R.; van den Bosch, F.

    2018-01-01

    We study 379 central and 159 satellite early-type galaxies with two-dimensional kinematics from the integral-field survey Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA) to determine how their angular momentum content depends on stellar and halo mass. Using the Yang et al. group catalog, we identify central and satellite galaxies in groups with halo masses in the range {10}12.5 {h}-1 {M}ȯ < {M}200b< {10}15 {h}-1 {M}ȯ . As in previous work, we see a sharp dependence on stellar mass, in the sense that ∼70% of galaxies with stellar mass {M}* > {10}11 {h}-2 {M}ȯ tend to have very little rotation, while nearly all galaxies at lower mass show some net rotation. The ∼30% of high-mass galaxies that have significant rotation do not stand out in other galaxy properties, except for a higher incidence of ionized gas emission. Our data are consistent with recent simulation results suggesting that major merging and gas accretion have more impact on the rotational support of lower-mass galaxies. When carefully matching the stellar mass distributions, we find no residual differences in angular momentum content between satellite and central galaxies at the 20% level. Similarly, at fixed mass, galaxies have consistent rotation properties across a wide range of halo mass. However, we find that errors in classification of central and satellite galaxies with group finders systematically lower differences between satellite and central galaxies at a level that is comparable to current measurement uncertainties. To improve constraints, the impact of group-finding methods will have to be forward-modeled via mock catalogs.

  16. The SLUGGS Survey: A Catalog of Over 4000 Globular Cluster Radial Velocities in 27 Nearby Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Duncan A.; Alabi, Adebusola; Brodie, Jean P.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Strader, Jay; Foster, Caroline; Usher, Christopher; Spitler, Lee; Bellstedt, Sabine; Pastorello, Nicola; Villaume, Alexa; Wasserman, Asher; Pota, Vincenzo

    2017-03-01

    Here, we present positions and radial velocities for over 4000 globular clusters (GCs) in 27 nearby early-type galaxies from the SLUGGS survey. The SLUGGS survey is designed to be representative of elliptical and lenticular galaxies in the stellar mass range 10 < log {M}* /M ⊙ < 11.7. The data have been obtained over many years, mostly using the very stable multi-object spectrograph DEIMOS on the Keck II 10 m telescope. Radial velocities are measured using the calcium triplet lines, with a velocity accuracy of ±10-15 km s-1. We use phase space diagrams (I.e., velocity-position diagrams) to identify contaminants such as foreground stars and background galaxies, and to show that the contribution of GCs from neighboring galaxies is generally insignificant. Likely ultra-compact dwarfs are tabulated separately. We find that the mean velocity of the GC system is close to that of the host galaxy systemic velocity, indicating that the GC system is in overall dynamical equilibrium within the galaxy potential. We also find that the GC system velocity dispersion scales with host galaxy stellar mass, in a similar manner to the Faber-Jackson relation for the stellar velocity dispersion. Publication of these GC radial velocity catalogs should enable further studies in many areas, such as GC system substructure, kinematics, and host galaxy mass measurements.

  17. Identifying the progenitors of present-day early-type galaxies in observational surveys: correcting `progenitor bias' using the Horizon-AGN simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, G.; Kaviraj, S.; Devriendt, J. E. G.; Dubois, Y.; Pichon, C.; Laigle, C.

    2018-03-01

    As endpoints of the hierarchical mass-assembly process, the stellar populations of local early-type galaxies encode the assembly history of galaxies over cosmic time. We use Horizon-AGN, a cosmological hydrodynamical simulation, to study the merger histories of local early-type galaxies and track how the morphological mix of their progenitors evolves over time. We provide a framework for alleviating `progenitor bias' - the bias that occurs if one uses only early-type galaxies to study the progenitor population. Early types attain their final morphology at relatively early epochs - by z ˜ 1, around 60 per cent of today's early types have had their last significant merger. At all redshifts, the majority of mergers have one late-type progenitor, with late-late mergers dominating at z > 1.5 and early-early mergers becoming significant only at z < 0.5. Progenitor bias is severe at all but the lowest redshifts - e.g. at z ˜ 0.6, less than 50 per cent of the stellar mass in today's early types is actually in progenitors with early-type morphology, while, at z ˜ 2, studying only early types misses almost all (80 per cent) of the stellar mass that eventually ends up in local early-type systems. At high redshift, almost all massive late-type galaxies, regardless of their local environment or star formation rate, are progenitors of local early-type galaxies, as are lower mass (M⋆ < 1010.5 M_{⊙}) late-types as long as they reside in high-density environments. In this new era of large observational surveys (e.g. LSST, JWST), this study provides a framework for studying how today's early-type galaxies have been built up over cosmic time.

  18. Subsonic evolution of the radio bubbles in the nearby massive early-type galaxy NGC 4472: uplift, buoyancy, and heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Ralph P.; Gendron Marsolais, Marie-Lou; Bogdan, Akos; Su, Yuanyuan; Forman, William R.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, Julie; Jones, Christine; Nulsen, Paul; Randall, Scott W.; Roediger, Elke

    2017-01-01

    We present results from a deep (380 ks) Chandra observation of the hot gas in the nearby massive early-type galaxy NGC 4472. X-ray cavities were previously reported coincident with the radio lobes (Biller et al. 2004). In our deeper observation, we confirm the presence of the cavities and detect rims of enhanced emission surrounding the bubbles. The temperature of the gas in these rims is less than that of the ambient medium, demonstrating that they cold, low entropy material that has been drawn up from the group center by the buoyant rise of the bubbles and not shocks from supersonic inflation of the lobes. Interestingly, the gravitational energy required to lift these lobes from the group center is a significant fraction of the bubble enthalpy. This suggests that uplift by AGN bubbles may play an important role in some cases in offsetting the radiative cooling at cluster and group centers. This uplift also provides an efficient means of transporting enriched material from the group center to large radii.

  19. An evolutionary missing link? A modest-mass early-type galaxy hosting an oversized nuclear black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loon, Jacco Th.; Sansom, Anne E.

    2015-11-01

    SAGE1C J053634.78-722658.5 is a galaxy at redshift z = 0.14, discovered behind the Large Magellanic Cloud in the Spitzer Space Telescope`Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution' Spectroscopy survey. It has very strong silicate emission at 10 μm but negligible far-IR and UV emission. This makes it a candidate for a bare active galactic nuclei (AGN) source in the IR, perhaps seen pole-on, without significant IR emission from the host galaxy. In this paper we present optical spectra taken with the Southern African Large Telescope to investigate the nature of the underlying host galaxy and its AGN. We find broad H α emission characteristic of an AGN, plus absorption lines associated with a mature stellar population (>9 Gyr), and refine its redshift determination to z = 0.1428 ± 0.0001. There is no evidence for any emission lines associated with star formation. This remarkable object exemplifies the need for separating the emission from any AGN from that of the host galaxy when employing IR diagnostic diagrams. We estimate the black hole mass, MBH = 3.5 ± 0.8 × 108 M⊙, host galaxy mass, M_stars=2.5^{2.5}_{1.2}× 10^{10} M⊙, and accretion luminosity, Lbol(AGN) = 5.3 ± 0.4 × 1045 erg s-1 (≈12 per cent of the Eddington luminosity), and find the AGN to be more prominent than expected for a host galaxy of this modest size. The old age is in tension with the downsizing paradigm in which this galaxy would recently have transformed from a star-forming disc galaxy into an early-type, passively evolving galaxy.

  20. The MASSIVE Survey. IX. Photometric Analysis of 35 High-mass Early-type Galaxies with HST WFC3/IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goullaud, Charles F.; Jensen, Joseph B.; Blakeslee, John P.; Ma, Chung-Pei; Greene, Jenny E.; Thomas, Jens

    2018-03-01

    We present near-infrared observations of 35 of the most massive early-type galaxies in the local universe. The observations were made using the infrared channel of the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) in the F110W (1.1 μm) filter. We measured surface brightness profiles and elliptical isophotal fit parameters from the nuclear regions out to a radius of ∼10 kpc in most cases. We find that 37% (13) of the galaxies in our sample have isophotal position-angle rotations greater than 20° over the radial range imaged by WFC3/IR, which is often due to the presence of neighbors or multiple nuclei. Most galaxies in our sample are significantly rounder near the center than in the outer regions. This sample contains 6 fast rotators and 28 slow rotators. We find that all fast rotators are either disky or show no measurable deviation from purely elliptical isophotes. Among slow rotators, significantly disky and boxy galaxies occur with nearly equal frequency. The galaxies in our sample often exhibit changing isophotal shapes, sometimes showing both significantly disky and boxy isophotes at different radii. The fact that parameters vary widely between galaxies and within individual galaxies is evidence that these massive galaxies have complicated formation histories, and some of them have experienced recent mergers and have not fully relaxed. These data demonstrate the value of IR imaging of galaxies at high spatial resolution and provide measurements necessary for determining stellar masses, dynamics, and black hole masses in high-mass galaxies. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with Program GO-14219.

  1. Merger-driven evolution of the effective stellar initial mass function of massive early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Nipoti, Carlo; Treu, Tommaso

    2017-02-01

    The stellar initial mass function (IMF) of early-type galaxies is the combination of the IMF of the stellar population formed in situ and that of accreted stellar populations. Using as an observable the effective IMF αIMF, defined as the ratio between the true stellar mass of a galaxy and the stellar mass inferred assuming a Salpeter IMF, we present a theoretical model for its evolution as a result of dry mergers. We use a simple dry-merger evolution model, based on cosmological N-body simulations, together with empirically motivated prescriptions for the IMF to make predictions on how the effective IMF of massive early-type galaxies changes from z = 2 to z = 0. We find that the IMF normalization of individual galaxies becomes lighter with time. At fixed velocity dispersion, αIMF is predicted to be constant with redshift. Current dynamical constraints on the evolution of the IMF are in slight tension with this prediction, even though systematic uncertainties, including the effect of radial gradients in the IMF, prevent a conclusive statement. The correlation of αIMF with stellar mass becomes shallower with time, while the correlation between αIMF and velocity dispersion is mostly preserved by dry mergers. We also find that dry mergers can mix the dependence of the IMF on stellar mass and velocity dispersion, making it challenging to infer, from z = 0 observations of global galactic properties, what is the quantity that is originally coupled with the IMF.

  2. Analysis of Mass Profiles and Cooling Flows of Bright, Early-Type Galaxies AO2, AO3 and Surface Brightness Profiles and Energetics of Intracluster Gas in Cool Galaxy Clusters AO3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Raymond E., III

    1998-01-01

    This final report uses ROSAT observations to analyze two different studies. These studies are: Analysis of Mass Profiles and Cooling Flows of Bright, Early-Type Galaxies; and Surface Brightness Profiles and Energetics of Intracluster Gas in Cool Galaxy Clusters.

  3. The Cosmic History of Hot Gas Cooling and Radio AGN Activity in Massive Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, A. L. R.; Lehmer, B. D.; Alexander, D. M.; Brandt, W. M.; Luo, B.; Miller, N.; Xue, Y. Q.; Stott, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    We study the X-ray properties of 393 optically selected early-type galaxies (ETGs) over the redshift range of z approx equals 0.0-1.2 in the Chandra Deep Fields. To measure the average X-ray properties of the ETG population, we use X-ray stacking analyses with a subset of 158 passive ETGs (148 of which were individually undetected in X-ray). This ETG subset was constructed to span the redshift ranges of z = 0.1-1.2 in the approx equals 4 Ms CDF-S and approx equals 2 Ms CDF-N and z = 0.1-0.6 in the approx equals 250 ks E-CDF-S where the contribution from individually undetected AGNs is expected to be negligible in our stacking. We find that 55 of the ETGs are detected individually in the X-rays, and 12 of these galaxies have properties consistent with being passive hot-gas dominated systems (i.e., systems not dominated by an X-ray bright Active Galactic Nucleus; AGN). On the basis of our analyses, we find little evolution in the mean 0.5-2 keY to B-band luminosity ratio (L(sub x) /L(sub Beta) varies as [1 +z]) since z approx equals 1.2, implying that some heating mechanism prevents the gas from cooling in these systems. We consider that feedback from radio-mode AGN activity could be responsible for heating the gas. We select radio AGNs in the ETG population using their far-infrared/radio flux ratio. Our radio observations allow us to constrain the duty cycle history of radio AGN activity in our ETG sample. We estimate that if scaling relations between radio and mechanical power hold out to z approx equals 1.2 for the ETG population being studied here, the average mechanical power from AGN activity is a factor of approx equals1.4 -- 2.6 times larger than the average radiative cooling power from hot gas over the redshift range z approx equals 0-1.2. The excess of inferred AGN mechanical power from these ETGs is consistent with that found in the local Universe for similar types of galaxies.

  4. The ATLAS3D Project - XXX. Star formation histories and stellar population scaling relations of early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermid, Richard M.; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Crocker, Alison F.; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M.

    2015-04-01

    We present the stellar population content of early-type galaxies from the ATLAS3D survey. Using spectra integrated within apertures covering up to one effective radius, we apply two methods: one based on measuring line-strength indices and applying single stellar population (SSP) models to derive SSP-equivalent values of stellar age, metallicity, and alpha enhancement; and one based on spectral fitting to derive non-parametric star formation histories, mass-weighted average values of age, metallicity, and half-mass formation time-scales. Using homogeneously derived effective radii and dynamically determined galaxy masses, we present the distribution of stellar population parameters on the Mass Plane (MJAM, σe, R^maj_e), showing that at fixed mass, compact early-type galaxies are on average older, more metal-rich, and more alpha-enhanced than their larger counterparts. From non-parametric star formation histories, we find that the duration of star formation is systematically more extended in lower mass objects. Assuming that our sample represents most of the stellar content of today's local Universe, approximately 50 per cent of all stars formed within the first 2 Gyr following the big bang. Most of these stars reside today in the most massive galaxies (>1010.5 M⊙), which themselves formed 90 per cent of their stars by z ˜ 2. The lower mass objects, in contrast, have formed barely half their stars in this time interval. Stellar population properties are independent of environment over two orders of magnitude in local density, varying only with galaxy mass. In the highest density regions of our volume (dominated by the Virgo cluster), galaxies are older, alpha-enhanced, and have shorter star formation histories with respect to lower density regions.

  5. VEGAS: A VST Early-type GAlaxy Survey. II. Photometric study of giant ellipticals and their stellar halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spavone, Marilena; Capaccioli, Massimo; Napolitano, Nicola R.; Iodice, Enrichetta; Grado, Aniello; Limatola, Luca; Cooper, Andrew P.; Cantiello, Michele; Forbes, Duncan A.; Paolillo, Maurizio; Schipani, Pietro

    2017-07-01

    Observations of diffuse starlight in the outskirts of galaxies are thought to be a fundamental source of constraint on the cosmological context of galaxy assembly in the ΛCDM model. Such observations are not trivial because of the extreme faintness of such regions. In this work, we investigated the photometric properties of six massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) in the VEGAS sample (NGC 1399, NGC 3923, NGC 4365, NGC 4472, NGC 5044, and NGC 5846) out to extremely low surface brightness levels with the goal of characterizing the global structure of their light profiles for comparison to state-of-the-art galaxy formation models. We carried out deep and detailed photometric mapping of our ETG sample taking advantage of deep imaging with VST/OmegaCAM in the g and I bands. By fitting the light profiles, and comparing the results to simulations of elliptical galaxy assembly, we have identified signatures of a transition between relaxed and unrelaxed accreted components and can constrain the balance between in situ and accreted stars. The very good agreement of our results with predictions from theoretical simulations demonstrates that the full VEGAS sample of 100 ETGs will allow us to use the distribution of diffuse light as a robust statistical probe of the hierarchical assembly of massive galaxies.

  6. UIT Observations of Early-Type Galaxies and Analysis of the FUSE Spectrum of a Subdwarf B Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohl, Raymond G.; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This work covers Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) observations of early-type galaxies (155 nm) and Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) spectra of a Galactic subdwarf B star (sdB). Early UV space astronomy missions revealed that early-type galaxies harbor a population of stars with effective temperatures greater than that of the main sequence turn-off (about 6,000 K) and UV emission that is very sensitive to characteristics of the stellar population. We present UV (155 nm) surface photometry and UV-B color profiles for 8 E and SO galaxies observed by UIT. Some objects have de Vaucouleurs surface brightness profiles, while others have disk-like profiles, but we find no other evidence for the presence of a disk or young, massive stars. There is a wide range of UV-B color gradients, but there is no correlation with metallicity gradients. SdB stars are the leading candidate UV emitters in old, high metallicity stellar populations (e.g., early-type galaxies). We observed the Galactic sdB star PG0749+658 with FUSE and derived abundances with the aim of constraining models of the heavy element distribution in sdB atmospheres. All of the elements measured are depleted with respect to solar, except for Cr and Mn, which are about solar, and Ni, which is enhanced. This work was supported in part by NASA grants NAG5-700 and NAG5-6403 to the University of Virginia and NAS5-32985 to Johns Hopkins University.

  7. Evidence for a Constant Initial Mass Function in Early-type Galaxies Based on Their X-Ray Binary Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, Mark B.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Kundu, Arunav; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Lehmer, Bret D.; Maraston, Claudia

    2014-04-01

    A number of recent studies have proposed that the stellar initial mass function (IMF) of early type galaxies varies systematically as a function of galaxy mass, with higher mass galaxies having bottom-heavy IMFs. These bottom-heavy IMFs have more low-mass stars relative to the number of high mass stars, and therefore naturally result in proportionally fewer neutron stars (NSs) and black holes (BHs). In this paper, we specifically predict the variation in the number of BHs and NSs based on the power-law IMF variation required to reproduce the observed mass-to-light ratio trends with galaxy mass. We then test whether such variations are observed by studying the field low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) populations of nearby early-type galaxies. In these binaries, an NS or BH accretes matter from a low-mass donor star. Their number is therefore expected to scale with the number of BHs and NSs present in a galaxy. We find that the number of LMXBs per K-band light is similar among the galaxies in our sample. These data therefore demonstrate the uniformity of the slope of the IMF from massive stars down to those now dominating the K-band light and are consistent with an invariant IMF. Our results are inconsistent with an IMF which varies from a Kroupa/Chabrier like IMF for low-mass galaxies to a steep power-law IMF (with slope x = 2.8) for high mass galaxies. We discuss how these observations constrain the possible forms of the IMF variations and how future Chandra observations can enable sharper tests of the IMF. Based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, and obtained from the Hubble Legacy Archive, which is a collaboration between the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI/NASA), the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF/ESA) and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC/NRC/CSA). The scientific results reported in this article are based in part on data obtained from the Chandra Data Archive and observations made by the

  8. Eight luminous early-type galaxies in nearby pairs and sparse groups. I. Stellar populations spatially analysed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, D. A.; Milone, A. C.; Krabbe, A. C.; Rodrigues, I.

    2018-06-01

    We present a detailed spatial analysis of stellar populations based on long-slit optical spectra in a sample of eight luminous early-type galaxies selected from nearby sparse groups and pairs, three of them may have interaction with another galaxy of similar mass. We have spatially measured luminosity-weighted averages of age, [M/H], [Fe/H], and [α /Fe] in the sample galaxies to add empirical data relative to the influence of galaxy mass, environment, interaction, and AGN feedback in their formation and evolution. The stellar population of the individual galaxies were determined through the well-established stellar population synthesis code starlight using semi-empirical simple stellar population models. Radial variations of luminosity- weighted means of age, [M/H], [Fe/H], and [α /Fe] were quantified up to half of the effective radius of each galaxy. We found trends between representative values of age, [M/H], [α /Fe], and the nuclear stellar velocity dispersion. There are also relations between the metallicity/age gradients and the velocity dispersion. Contributions of 1-4 Gyr old stellar populations were quantified in IC 5328 and NGC 6758 as well as 4-8 Gyr old ones in NGC 5812. Extended gas is present in IC 5328, NGC 1052, NGC 1209, and NGC 6758, and the presence of a LINER is identified in all these galaxies. The regions up to one effective radius of all galaxies are basically dominated by α -enhanced metal-rich old stellar populations likely due to rapid star formation episodes that induced efficient chemical enrichment. On average, the age and [α /Fe] gradients are null and the [M/H] gradients are negative, although discordant cases were found. We found no correlation between the stellar population properties and the LINER presence as well as between the stellar properties and environment or gravitational interaction, suggesting that the influence of progenitor mass cannot be discarded in the formation and evolution of early-type galaxies.

  9. A CONSTANT LIMITING MASS SCALE FOR FLAT EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES FROM z {approx} 1 TO z = 0: DENSITY EVOLVES BUT SHAPES DO NOT

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, Bradford P.; Van der Wel, Arjen; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2012-04-20

    We measure the evolution in the intrinsic shape distribution of early-type galaxies from z {approx} 1 to z {approx} 0 by analyzing their projected axis-ratio distributions. We extract a low-redshift sample (0.04 < z < 0.08) of early-type galaxies with very low star formation rates from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, based on a color-color selection scheme and verified through the absence of emission lines in the spectra. The inferred intrinsic shape distribution of these early-type galaxies is strongly mass dependent: the typical short-to-long intrinsic axis ratio of high-mass early-type galaxies (>10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }) is 2:3, whereas atmore » masses below 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} this ratio narrows to 1:3, or more flattened galaxies. In an entirely analogous manner, we select a high-redshift sample (0.6 < z < 0.8) from two deep-field surveys with multi-wavelength and Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging: GEMS and COSMOS. We find a seemingly universal mass of {approx}10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} for highly flattened early-type systems at all redshifts. This implies that the process that grows an early-type galaxy above this ceiling mass, irrespective of cosmic epoch, involves forming round systems. Using both parametric and non-parametric tests, we find no evolution in the projected axis-ratio distribution for galaxies with masses >3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} with redshift. At the same time, our samples imply an increase of 2-3 Multiplication-Sign in comoving number density for early-type galaxies at masses >3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }, in agreement with previous studies. Given the direct connection between the axis-ratio distribution and the underlying bulge-to-disk ratio distribution, our findings imply that the number density evolution of early-type galaxies is not exclusively driven by the emergence of either bulge- or disk-dominated galaxies, but rather by a balanced mix that depends only on the stellar mass of

  10. A multi-wavelength study of the evolution of early-type galaxies in groups: the ultraviolet view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampazzo, R.; Mazzei, P.; Marino, A.; Bianchi, L.; Plana, H.; Trinchieri, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Wolter, A.

    2018-04-01

    The ultraviolet-optical colour magnitude diagram of rich galaxy groups is characterised by a well developed Red Sequence, a Blue Cloud and the so-called Green Valley. Loose, less evolved groups of galaxies which are probably not virialised yet may lack a well defined Red Sequence. This is actually explained in the framework of galaxy evolution. We are focussing on understanding galaxy migration towards the Red Sequence, checking for signatures of such a transition in their photometric and morphological properties. We report on the ultraviolet properties of a sample of early-type (ellipticals+S0s) galaxies inhabiting the Red Sequence. The analysis of their structures, as derived by fitting a Sérsic law to their ultraviolet luminosity profiles, suggests the presence of an underlying disk. This is the hallmark of dissipation processes that still must have a role to play in the evolution of this class of galaxies. Smooth particle hydrodynamic simulations with chemo-photometric implementations able to match the global properties of our targets are used to derive their evolutionary paths through ultraviolet-optical colour magnitude diagrams, providing some fundamental information such as the crossing time through the Green Valley, which depends on their luminosity. The transition from the Blue Cloud to the Red Sequence takes several Gyrs, being about 3-5 Gyr for the brightest galaxies and longer for fainter ones, if occurring. The photometric study of nearby galaxy structures in the ultraviolet is seriously hampered by either the limited field of view of the cameras (e.g., in Hubble Space Telescope) or by the low spatial resolution of the images (e.g., in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer). Current missions equipped with telescopes and cameras sensitive to ultraviolet wavelengths, such as Swift- UVOT and Astrosat-UVIT, provide a relatively large field of view and a better resolution than the Galaxy Evolution Explorer. More powerful ultraviolet instruments (size, resolution

  11. The Stellar Initial Mass Function in Early-type Galaxies from Absorption Line Spectroscopy. III. Radial Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dokkum, Pieter; Conroy, Charlie; Villaume, Alexa; Brodie, Jean; Romanowsky, Aaron J.

    2017-06-01

    There is good evidence that the centers of massive early-type galaxies have a bottom-heavy stellar initial mass function (IMF) compared to that of the Milky Way. Here we study the radial variation of the IMF within such galaxies, using a combination of high-quality Keck spectroscopy and a new suite of stellar population synthesis models that cover a wide range in metallicity. As in the previous studies in this series, the models are fitted directly to the spectra and treat all elemental abundance ratios as free parameters. Using newly obtained spectroscopy for six galaxies, including deep data extending to ˜ 1{R}{{e}} for the galaxies NGC 1407, NGC 1600, and NGC 2695, we find that the IMF varies strongly with galactocentric radius. For all six galaxies the IMF is bottom-heavy in the central regions, with average mass-to-light ratio “mismatch” parameter α \\equiv {({\\text{}}M/L)/({\\text{}}M/L)}{MW}≈ 2.5 at R = 0. The IMF rapidly becomes more bottom-light with increasing radius, flattening off near the Milky Way value (α ≈ 1.1) at R> 0.4{R}{{e}}. A consequence is that the luminosity-weighted average IMF depends on the measurement aperture: within R={R}{{e}} we find < α {> }L=1.3{--}1.5, consistent with recent lensing and dynamical results from SLACS and {{ATLAS}}3{{D}}. Our results are also consistent with several earlier studies that were based on analyses of radial gradients of line indices. The observed IMF gradients support galaxy formation models in which the central regions of massive galaxies had a different formation history than their outer parts. Finally, we make use of the high signal-to-noise central spectra of NGC 1407 and NGC 2695 to demonstrate how we can disentangle IMF effects and abundance effects.

  12. Properties of the X-ray emitting gas in early-type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canizares, Claude R.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Trinchieri, Ginevra

    1987-01-01

    The properties of the X-ray emitting gas in a sample of 81 E and S0 galaxies observed with the Einstein Observatory are studied. Measured fluxes for 55 of the galaxies and upper limits for 26 of them are reported. An attempt is made to use consistent optical parameters for the galaxies, including a correction to the velocities for the Virgocentric flow. The sample is then used to explore the contribution from discrete sources, the global physical properties of the hot gas, and the implications for heating by supernovae and gravity. Finally, the question of the presence of heavy halos is addressed.

  13. A multiparametric analysis of the Einstein sample of early-type galaxies. 1: Luminosity and ISM parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eskridge, Paul B.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Kim, Dong-Woo

    1995-01-01

    We have conducted bivariate and multivariate statistical analysis of data measuring the luminosity and interstellar medium of the Einstein sample of early-type galaxies (presented by Fabbiano, Kim, & Trinchieri 1992). We find a strong nonlinear correlation between L(sub B) and L(sub X), with a power-law slope of 1.8 +/- 0.1, steepening to 2.0 +/- if we do not consider the Local Group dwarf galaxies M32 and NGC 205. Considering only galaxies with log L(sub X) less than or equal to 40.5, we instead find a slope of 1.0 +/- 0.2 (with or without the Local Group dwarfs). Although E and S0 galaxies have consistent slopes for their L(sub B)-L(sub X) relationships, the mean values of the distribution functions of both L(sub X) and L(sub X)/L(sub B) for the S0 galaxies are lower than those for the E galaxies at the 2.8 sigma and 3.5 sigma levels, respectively. We find clear evidence for a correlation between L(sub X) and the X-ray color C(sub 21), defined by Kim, Fabbiano, & Trinchieri (1992b), which indicates that X-ray luminosity is correlated with the spectral shape below 1 keV in the sense that low-L(sub X) systems have relatively large contributions from a soft component compared with high-L(sub X) systems. We find evidence from our analysis of the 12 micron IRAS data for our sample that our S0 sample has excess 12 micron emission compared with the E sample, scaled by their optical luminosities. This may be due to emission from dust heated in star-forming regions in S0 disks. This interpretation is reinforced by the existence of a strong L(sub 12)-L(sub 100) correlation for our S0 sample that is not found for the E galaxies, and by an analysis of optical-IR colors. We find steep slopes for power-law relationships between radio luminosity and optical, X-ray, and far-IR (FIR) properties. This last point argues that the presence of an FIR-emitting interstellar medium (ISM) in early-type galaxies is coupled to their ability to generate nonthermal radio continuum, as

  14. SDSS-IV MaNGA: a distinct mass distribution explored in slow-rotating early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Yu; Li, Hongyu; Wang, Jie; Gao, Liang; Li, Ran; Ge, Junqiang; Jing, Yingjie; Pan, Jun; Fernández-Trincado, J. G.; Valenzuela, Octavio; Ortíz, Erik Aquino

    2018-06-01

    We study the radial acceleration relation (RAR) for early-type galaxies (ETGs) in the SDSS MaNGA MPL5 data set. The complete ETG sample show a slightly offset RAR from the relation reported by McGaugh et al. (2016) at the low-acceleration end; we find that the deviation is due to the fact that the slow rotators show a systematically higher acceleration relation than the McGaugh's RAR, while the fast rotators show a consistent acceleration relation to McGaugh's RAR. There is a 1σ significant difference between the acceleration relations of the fast and slow rotators, suggesting that the acceleration relation correlates with the galactic spins, and that the slow rotators may have a different mass distribution compared with fast rotators and late-type galaxies. We suspect that the acceleration relation deviation of slow rotators may be attributed to more galaxy merger events, which would disrupt the original spins and correlated distributions of baryons and dark matter orbits in galaxies.

  15. A Comparison of the Near-Infrared Spectral Features of Early-Type Galaxies in the Virgo and Coma Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houdashelt, M. L.

    1992-05-01

    Initial results are presented from an examination of near-infrared spectra (6800 - 9200 Angstroms) of 34 early-type galaxies - 17 in the Virgo cluster, 10 in the Coma cluster and seven field members. It has previously been speculated that E/S0 galaxies of similar luminosity in the Virgo and Coma clusters have different red stellar populations. To explore this possibility, pseudo-equivalent widths of a number of near-IR spectral features have been measured. The important features studied include the TiO bands near 7100, 7890, 8197, 8500 and 8950 Angstroms, which are mainly produced by the late-type stars whose flux contributes only about 10-20\\ the near-IR. The strengths of the Ca triplet (8498, 8542, 8662 Angstroms) and Na I doublet (8183, 8195 Angstroms) are also measured, since these features are affected by the relative contribution of dwarf stars to the red light. Although the main focus of this work is the search for spectral differences among the Coma, Virgo and field E/S0 populations, each subgroup of galaxies (and the sample as a whole) are also examined for correlations among the feature strengths, galaxy color and luminosity.

  16. Evidence for a Sizable Age Spread among Galaxies from the Ultraviolet-Upturn Phenomenon in Early-type Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jang-Hyun; Lee, Young-Wook

    1997-02-01

    The suggestion of Lee that the age spread among galaxies is responsible for the systematic variation of the ultraviolet upturn among early-type systems is examined here with detailed population synthesis models. Our models differ from previous ones by including (1) the effect of metallicity spreads and (2) detailed modeling of the variations in H-R diagram morphology (including the helium-burning phase) with age and metallicity. Our models suggest that the far-UV radiation of these systems is dominated by a minority population of metal-poor, hot horizontal-branch (HB) stars and their post-HB progeny, with some contribution from metal-rich post-asymptotic giant branch stars, while the optical radiation is dominated by a metal-rich population. The systematic variation of the UV upturn depends on the contribution from metal-poor, hot HB stars and their post-HB progeny, which in turn depends on the ages of old stellar populations in galaxies. Our result implies a prolonged epoch of galaxy formation, in the sense that more massive galaxies (in denser environments) formed first. With the assumption that the UV-upturn phenomenon is solely due to the age variations among galaxies, we estimate the difference in age between the giant elliptical galaxies and the spiral bulges of the Local Group to be ~3 Gyr. This suggests that the best estimate for the lower limit of the age of the universe is ~19 Gyr, which of course would be in conflict with the current estimate of H0, together with the standard cosmological models with zero cosmological constant.

  17. An ALMA view of star formation efficiency suppression in early-type galaxies after gas-rich minor mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Voort, Freeke; Davis, Timothy A.; Matsushita, Satoki; Rowlands, Kate; Shabala, Stanislav S.; Allison, James R.; Ting, Yuan-Sen; Sansom, Anne E.; van der Werf, Paul P.

    2018-05-01

    Gas-rich minor mergers contribute significantly to the gas reservoir of early-type galaxies (ETGs) at low redshift, yet the star formation efficiency (SFE; the star formation rate divided by the molecular gas mass) appears to be strongly suppressed following some of these events, in contrast to the more well-known merger-driven starbursts. We present observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) of six ETGs, which have each recently undergone a gas-rich minor merger, as evidenced by their disturbed stellar morphologies. These galaxies were selected because they exhibit extremely low SFEs. We use the resolving power of ALMA to study the morphology and kinematics of the molecular gas. The majority of our galaxies exhibit spatial and kinematical irregularities, such as detached gas clouds, warps, and other asymmetries. These asymmetries support the interpretation that the suppression of the SFE is caused by dynamical effects stabilizing the gas against gravitational collapse. Through kinematic modelling we derive high velocity dispersions and Toomre Q stability parameters for the gas, but caution that such measurements in edge-on galaxies suffer from degeneracies. We estimate merger ages to be about 100 Myr based on the observed disturbances in the gas distribution. Furthermore, we determine that these galaxies lie, on average, two orders of magnitude below the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation for star-forming galaxies as well as below the relation for relaxed ETGs. We discuss potential dynamical processes responsible for this strong suppression of star formation surface density at fixed molecular gas surface density.

  18. Identification of old tidal dwarfs near early-type galaxies from deep imaging and H I observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Pierre-Alain; Paudel, Sanjaya; McDermid, Richard M.; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Serra, Paolo; Bournaud, Frédéric; Cappellari, Michele; Emsellem, Eric

    2014-05-01

    It has recently been proposed that the dwarf spheroidal galaxies located in the Local Group discs of satellites (DoSs) may be tidal dwarf galaxies (TDGs) born in a major merger at least 5 Gyr ago. Whether TDGs can live that long is still poorly constrained by observations. As part of deep optical and H I surveys with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) MegaCam camera and Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope made within the ATLAS3D project, and follow-up spectroscopic observations with the Gemini-North telescope, we have discovered old TDG candidates around several early-type galaxies. At least one of them has an oxygen abundance close to solar, as expected for a tidal origin. This confirmed pre-enriched object is located within the gigantic, but very low surface brightness, tidal tail that emanates from the elliptical galaxy, NGC 5557. An age of 4 Gyr estimated from its SED fitting makes it the oldest securely identified TDG ever found so far. We investigated the structural and gaseous properties of the TDG and of a companion located in the same collisional debris, and thus most likely of tidal origin as well. Despite several Gyr of evolution close to their parent galaxies, they kept a large gas reservoir. Their central surface brightness is low and their effective radius much larger than that of typical dwarf galaxies of the same mass. This possibly provides us with criteria to identify tidal objects which can be more easily checked than the traditional ones requiring deep spectroscopic observations. In view of the above, we discuss the survival time of TDGs and question the tidal origin of the DoSs.

  19. Large Binocular Telescope/LUCIFER spectroscopy: kinematics of a compact early-type galaxy at z ≃ 1.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhetti, M.; Saracco, P.; Gargiulo, A.; Tamburri, S.; Lonoce, I.

    2014-04-01

    We present a high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N > 10) medium-resolution (R = 2000) Large Binocular Telescope/LUCIFER spectrum of the early-type galaxy (ETG) S2F1-142 at z ≃ 1.4. By means of the CaT line at 8662 Å, we measured its redshift z = 1.386 ± 0.001 and we estimated its velocity dispersion σ v=340^{-60}_{+120} km s-1. Its corresponding virial mass is 3.9 × 1011 M⊙, compatible with the stellar mass estimates obtained assuming initial mass functions (IMFs) less dwarf rich than the Salpeter one. S2F1-142 is a compact galaxy with Re = 3.1 ± 0.2 kpc, i.e. an effective radius more than three times smaller than the average Re of ETGs with the same mass in the local Universe. At the same time, we found local and high-redshift galaxies with a similar mass content and similar effective radius confirming that it is fully consistent with the already available measures of Re and σv both in the local and in the distant Universe. Considering the distribution of Re and σv as a function of the stellar mass content of ETGs, both in the local and in the distant Universe, we noticed that the measured velocity dispersions of the more compact galaxies are on average slightly lower than expected on the basis of their compactness and the virial theorem, suggesting that (i) their dark matter content is lower than in the more diffuse galaxies and/or (ii) their luminosity profiles are steeper than in the more diffuse galaxies and/or (iii) their larger compactness is an apparent effect caused by the overestimate of their stellar mass content (due to bottom lighter IMF and/or systematic affecting the stellar mass estimates).

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Compact early-type galaxies in SDSS (Saulder+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulder, C.; van den Bosch, R. C. E.; Mieske, S.

    2015-11-01

    As the baseline sample of our search for b19 analogues, we made broad use of the Sloan Digital Sky Surveys (SDSS) and especially of its tenth (Ahn et al., 2014ApJS..211...17A) and seventh (Abazajian et al., 2009ApJS..182..543A) data releases (DR10 and DR7). Furthermore, we used GalaxyZoo (Lintott et al., 2008MNRAS.389.1179L, 2011, Cat. J/MNRAS/410/166) for our galaxy classifications, the refits of SDSS DR7 using Sersic profiles done by Simard et al. (2011, Cat. J/ApJS/196/11), and the stellar masses from Mendel et al. (2014, Cat. J/ApJS/210/3), which is itself based on the previous work of Simard et al. (2011, Cat. J/ApJS/196/11). For comparison, we also used the list of 63 compact massive galaxies from Taylor et al. (2010, Cat. J/ApJ/720/723), which is based on SDSS DR7 as well as a list of 29 compact massive galaxies from Trujillo et al. (2009ApJ...692L.118T), which is based on the NYU Value-Added Galaxy Catalog (Blanton et al., 2005AJ....129.2562B) and covers a sub-sample of SDSS. (9 data files).

  1. The MASSIVE Survey. VI. The Spatial Distribution and Kinematics of Warm Ionized Gas in the Most Massive Local Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Viraj; Greene, Jenny E.; Ma, Chung-Pei; Veale, Melanie; Ene, Irina; Davis, Timothy A.; Blakeslee, John P.; Goulding, Andy D.; McConnell, Nicholas J.; Nyland, Kristina; Thomas, Jens

    2017-03-01

    We present the first systematic investigation of the existence, spatial distribution, and kinematics of warm ionized gas as traced by the [O II] 3727 Å emission line in 74 of the most massive galaxies in the local universe. All of our galaxies have deep integral-field spectroscopy from the volume- and magnitude-limited MASSIVE survey of early-type galaxies with stellar mass {log}({M}* /{M}⊙ )> 11.5 (M K < -25.3 mag) and distance D < 108 Mpc. Of the 74 galaxies in our sample, we detect warm ionized gas in 28, which yields a global detection fraction of 38 ± 6% down to a typical [O II] equivalent width limit of 2 Å. MASSIVE fast rotators are more likely to have gas than MASSIVE slow rotators with detection fractions of 80 ± 10% and 28 ± 6%, respectively. The spatial extents span a wide range of radii (0.6-18.2 kpc; 0.1-4R e ), and the gas morphologies are diverse, with 17/28 ≈ 61 ± 9% being centrally concentrated, 8/28 ≈ 29 ± 9% exhibiting clear rotation out to several kiloparsecs, and 3/28 ≈ 11 ± 6% being extended but patchy. Three out of four fast rotators show kinematic alignment between the stars and gas, whereas the two slow rotators with robust kinematic measurements available exhibit kinematic misalignment. Our inferred warm ionized gas masses are roughly ˜105 M ⊙. The emission line ratios and radial equivalent width profiles are generally consistent with excitation of the gas by the old underlying stellar population. We explore different gas origin scenarios for MASSIVE galaxies and find that a variety of physical processes are likely at play, including internal gas recycling, cooling out of the hot gaseous halo, and gas acquired via mergers.

  2. Dwarf galaxy populations in present-day galaxy clusters - II. The history of early-type and late-type dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisker, Thorsten; Weinmann, Simone M.; Janz, Joachim; Meyer, Hagen T.

    2013-06-01

    How did the dwarf galaxy population of present-day galaxy clusters form and grow over time? We address this question by analysing the history of dark matter subhaloes in the Millennium II cosmological simulation. A semi-analytic model serves as the link to observations. We argue that a reasonable analogue to early morphological types or red-sequence dwarf galaxies are those subhaloes that experienced strong mass-loss, or alternatively those that have spent a long time in massive haloes. This approach reproduces well the observed morphology-distance relation of dwarf galaxies in the Virgo and Coma clusters, and thus provides insight into their history. Over their lifetime, present-day late types have experienced an amount of environmental influence similar to what the progenitors of dwarf ellipticals had already experienced at redshifts above 2. Therefore, dwarf ellipticals are more likely to be a result of early and continuous environmental influence in group- and cluster-size haloes, rather than a recent transformation product. The observed morphological sequences of late-type and early-type galaxies have developed in parallel, not consecutively. Consequently, the characteristics of today's late-type galaxies are not necessarily representative for the progenitors of today's dwarf ellipticals. Studies aiming to reproduce the present-day dwarf population thus need to start at early epochs, model the influence of various environments, and also take into account the evolution of the environments themselves.

  3. A General Precipitation-limited L X–T–R Relation among Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voit, G. Mark; Ma, C. P.; Greene, J.; Goulding, A.; Pandya, V.; Donahue, M.; Sun, M.

    2018-01-01

    The relation between X-ray luminosity (L X) and ambient gas temperature (T) among massive galactic systems is an important cornerstone of both observational cosmology and galaxy-evolution modeling. In the most massive galaxy clusters, the relation is determined primarily by cosmological structure formation. In less massive systems, it primarily reflects the feedback response to radiative cooling of circumgalactic gas. Here we present a simple but powerful model for the L X–T relation as a function of physical aperture R within which those measurements are made. The model is based on the precipitation framework for AGN feedback and assumes that the circumgalactic medium is precipitation-regulated at small radii and limited by cosmological structure formation at large radii. We compare this model with many different data sets and show that it successfully reproduces the slope and upper envelope of the L X–T–R relation over the temperature range from ∼0.2 keV through ≳ 10 {keV}. Our findings strongly suggest that the feedback mechanisms responsible for regulating star formation in individual massive galaxies have much in common with the precipitation-triggered feedback that appears to regulate galaxy-cluster cores.

  4. SDSS-IV MaNGA: The Spatially Resolved Stellar Initial Mass Function in ˜400 Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, Taniya; Thomas, Daniel; Maraston, Claudia; Westfall, Kyle B.; Goddard, Daniel; Lian, Jianhui; Meneses-Goytia, Sofia; Jones, Amy; Vaughan, Sam; Andrews, Brett H.; Bershady, Matthew; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Drory, Niv; Emsellem, Eric; Law, David R.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Wake, David; Yan, Renbin; Zheng, Zheng

    2018-03-01

    MaNGA provides the opportunity to make precise spatially resolved measurements of the IMF slope in galaxies owing to its unique combination of spatial resolution, wavelength coverage and sample size. We derive radial gradients in age, element abundances and IMF slope analysing optical and near-infrared absorption features from stacked spectra out to the half-light radius of 366 early-type galaxies with masses 9.9 - 10.8 log M/M⊙. We find flat gradients in age and [α/Fe] ratio, as well as negative gradients in metallicity, consistent with the literature. We further derive significant negative gradients in the [Na/Fe] ratio with galaxy centres being well enhanced in Na abundance by up to 0.5 dex. Finally, we find a gradient in IMF slope with a bottom-heavy IMF in the centre (typical mass excess factor of 1.5) and a Milky Way-type IMF at the half-light radius. This pattern is mass-dependent with the lowest mass galaxies in our sample featuring only a shallow gradient around a Milky Way IMF. Our results imply the local IMF-σ relation within galaxies to be even steeper than the global relation and hint towards the local metallicity being the dominating factor behind the IMF variations. We also employ different stellar population models in our analysis and show that a radial IMF gradient is found independently of the stellar population model used. A similar analysis of the Wing-Ford band provides inconsistent results and further evidence of the difficulty in measuring and modelling this particular feature.

  5. The Masses and Stellar Content of Nuclei in Early-Type Galaxies from Multi-Band Photometry and Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spengler, Chelsea; Côté, Patrick; Roediger, Joel; Ferrarese, Laura; Sánchez-Janssen, Rubén; Toloba, Elisa; Liu, Yiqing; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Gwyn, Stephen; Zirm, Andrew; Muñoz, Roberto; Puzia, Thomas; Lançon, Ariane; Peng, Eric; Mei, Simona; Powalka, Mathieu

    2018-01-01

    It is now established that most, if not all, massive galaxies host central supermassive black holes (SMBHs), and that these SMBHs are linked to the growth their host galaxies as shown by several scaling relations. Within the last couple of decades, it has become apparent that most lower-mass galaxies without obvious SMBHs nevertheless contain some sort of central massive object in the form of compact stellar nuclei that also follow identical (or similar) scaling relations. These nuclei are challenging to study given their small sizes and relatively faint magnitudes, but understanding their origins and relationship to their hosts is critical to gaining a more complete picture of galaxy evolution. To that end, we highlight selected results from an analysis of 39 nuclei and their early-type hosts in the Virgo Cluster using ten broadband filters: F300W, F475W, F850LP, F160W, u*griz, and Ks. We estimate masses, metallicities and ages using simple stellar population (SSP) models. For 19 nuclei, we compare to SSP parameters derived from Keck and Gemini spectra and find reasonable agreement between the photometric and spectroscopic metallicity: the RMS scatter is 0.3 dex. We reproduce the nucleus-galaxy mass fraction of 0.33 ± 0.08% for galaxy stellar masses 108.4-1010.3 M⊙ with a typical precision of ~35% for the nuclei masses. Based on available model predictions, there is no single preferred formation scenario for nuclei, suggesting that nuclei are formed stochastically through a mix of processes. Nuclei metallicities are statistically identical to those of their hosts, appearing 0.07 ± 0.3 dex more metal-rich on average — although, omitting galaxies with unusual origins (i.e., compact ellipticals), nuclei are 0.20 ± 0.28 dex more metal-rich. We find no clear age difference between nuclei and their galaxies, with nuclei displaying a broad range of ages. Interestingly, we find that the most massive nuclei may be flatter and more closely aligned with the semi

  6. The galaxy-wide initial mass function of dwarf late-type to massive early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, C.; Kroupa, P.; Pflamm-Altenburg, J.; Vazdekis, A.

    2013-12-01

    Observational studies are showing that the galaxy-wide stellar initial mass function (IMF) is top-heavy in galaxies with high star formation rates (SFRs). Calculating the integrated galactic stellar initial mass function (IGIMF) as a function of the SFR of a galaxy, it follows that galaxies which have or which formed with SFRs >10 M⊙ yr-1 would have a top-heavy IGIMF in excellent consistency with the observations. Consequently and in agreement with observations, elliptical galaxies would have higher mass-to-light ratios as a result of the overabundance of stellar remnants compared to a stellar population that formed with an invariant canonical stellar IMF. For the Milky Way, the IGIMF yields very good agreement with the disc- and the bulge IMF determinations. Our conclusions are that purely stochastic descriptions of star formation on the scales of a parsec and above are falsified. Instead, star formation follows the laws, stated here as axioms, which define the IGIMF theory. We also find evidence that the power-law index β of the embedded cluster mass function decreases with increasing SFR. We propose further tests of the IGIMF theory through counting massive stars in dwarf galaxies.

  7. The population of early-type galaxies: how it evolves with time and how it differs from passive and late-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburri, S.; Saracco, P.; Longhetti, M.; Gargiulo, A.; Lonoce, I.; Ciocca, F.

    2014-10-01

    Aims: There are two aims to our analysis. On the one hand we are interested in addressing whether a sample of morphologically selected early-type galaxies (ETGs) differs from a sample of passive galaxies in terms of galaxy statistics. On the other hand we study how the relative abundance of galaxies, the number density, and, the stellar mass density for different morphological types change over the redshift range 0.6 ≤ z ≤ 2.5. Methods: From the 1302 galaxies brighter than Ks(AB) = 22 selected from the GOODS-MUSIC catalogue, we classified the ETGs, i.e. elliptical (E) and spheroidal galaxies (E/S0), on the basis of their morphology and the passive galaxies on the basis of their specific star formation rate (sSFR ≤ 10-11 yr-1). Since the definition of a passive galaxy depends on the model parameters assumed to fit the spectral energy distribution of the galaxy, in addition to the assumed sSFR threshold, we probed the dependence of this definition and selection on the stellar initial mass function (IMF). Results: We find that spheroidal galaxies cannot be distinguished from the other morphological classes on the basis of their low star formation rate, irrespective of the IMF adopted in the models. In particular, we find that a large fraction of passive galaxies (>30%) are disc-shaped objects and that the passive selection misses a significant fraction (~26%) of morphologically classified ETGs. Using the sample of 1302 galaxies morphologically classified into spheroidal galaxies (ETGs) and non-spheroidal galaxies (LTGs), we find that the fraction of these two morphological classes is constant over the redshift range 0.6 ≤ z ≤ 2.5, being 20-30% the fraction of ETGs and 70-80% the fraction of LTGs. However, at z < 1 these fractions change among the population of the most massive (M∗ ≥ 1011 M⊙) galaxies, with the fraction of massive ETGs rising up to 40% and the fraction of massive LTGs decreasing to 60%. Parallel to this trend, we find that the number

  8. Active Galactic Nuclei Feedback and the Origin and Fate of the Hot Gas in Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Silvia; Ciotti, Luca; Negri, Andrea; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    2018-04-01

    A recent determination of the relationships between the X-ray luminosity of the ISM (L X) and the stellar and total mass for a sample of nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs) is used to investigate the origin of the hot gas, via a comparison with the results of hydrodynamical simulations of the ISM evolution for a large set of isolated ETGs. After the epoch of major galaxy formation (after z ≃ 2), the ISM is replenished by stellar mass losses and SN ejecta, at the rate predicted by stellar evolution, and is depleted by star formation; it is heated by the thermalization of stellar motions, SNe explosions, and the mechanical (from winds) and radiative AGN feedback. The models agree well with the observed relations, even for the largely different L X values at the same mass, thanks to the sensitivity of the gas flow to many galaxy properties; this holds for models including AGN feedback, and those without. Therefore, the mass input from the stellar population is able to account for a major part of the observed L X; and AGN feedback, while very important to maintain massive ETGs in a time-averaged quasi-steady state, keeping low star formation and the black hole mass, does not dramatically alter the gas content originating in stellar recycled material. These conclusions are based on theoretical predictions for the stellar population contributions in mass and energy, and on a self-consistent modeling of AGN feedback.

  9. Probing Minor-merger-driven Star Formation In Early-type Galaxies Using Spatially-resolved Spectro-photometric Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaviraj, Sugata; Crockett, M.; Silk, J.; O'Connell, R. W.; Whitmore, B.; Windhorst, R.; Cappellari, M.; Bureau, M.; Davies, R.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies that leverage the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) spectrum have revealed widespread recent star formation in early-type galaxies (ETGs), traditionally considered to be old, passively-evolving systems. This recent star formation builds 20% of the ETG stellar mass after z 1, driven by repeated minor mergers between ETGs and small, gas-rich satellites. We demonstrate how spatially-resolved studies, using a combination of high-resolution UV-optical imaging and integral-field spectroscopy (IFS), is a powerful tool to quantify the assembly history of individual ETGs and elucidate the poorly-understood minor-merger process. Using a combination of WFC3 UV-optical (2500-8200 angstroms) imaging and IFS from the SAURON project of the ETG NGC 4150, we show that this galaxy experienced a merger with mass ratio 1:15 around 0.9 Gyr ago, which formed 3% of its stellar mass and a young kinematically-decoupled core. A UV-optical analysis of its globular cluster system shows that the bulk of the stars locked up in these clusters likely formed 6-7 Gyrs in the past. We introduce a new HST-WFC3 programme, approved in Cycle 19, which will leverage similar UV-optical imaging of a representative sample of nearby ETGs from SAURON to study the recent star formation and its drivers in unprecedented detail and put definitive constraints on minor-merger-driven star formation in massive galaxies at late epochs.

  10. A photometric determination of twists in early-type galaxies. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, T. B.; Schwarzschild, M.

    1979-01-01

    In continuation of previous work, detailed photometric data have been obtained for two elliptical galaxies by using the Mount Lemmon 1.5-m telescope and a large SEC television camera. As before, the aim of this photometry is to gain additional information on the occurrence of twists in such galaxies; i.e., on the change of the position angle of the major axes of the isophotes from the center outward. No significant twist was found in NGC 1052. However, NGC 584 was found to have a securely observed twist of about 10 deg within 10 kpc from its center. These data strengthen previous indications that many ellipticals contain twists in their inner, bright portions.

  11. The interaction between hot and cold gas in early-type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Joel N.; Hogg, David E.; Roberts, Morton S.

    1995-01-01

    SO and Sa galaxies have approximately equal masses of H I and X-ray emitting gas and are ideal sites for studying the interaction between hot and cold gas. An X-ray observation of the Sa galaxy NGC 1291 with the ROSAT position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) shows a striking spatial anticorrelation between hot and cold gas where X-ray emitting material fills the large central black hole in the H I disk. This supports a previous suggestion that hot gas is a bulge phenomenon and neutral hydrogen is a disk phenomenon. The X-ray luminosity (1.5 x 10(exp 40) ergs/s) and radial surface brightness distribution (beta = 0.51) is the same as for elliptical galaxies with optical luminosities and velocity dispersions like that of the bulge of NGC 1291. Modeling of the X-ray spectrum requires a component with a temperature of 0.15 keV, similar to that expected from the velocity dispersion of the stars, and with a hotter component where kT = 1.07 keV. This hotter component is not due to emission from stars and its origin remains unclear. PSPC observations are reported for the SO NGC 4203, where a nuclear point source dominates the emission, preventing a study of the radial distribution of the hot gas relative to the H I.

  12. SDSS-IV MaNGA: Probing the Kinematic Morphology–Density Relation of Early-type Galaxies with MaNGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, J. E.; Leauthaud, A.; Emsellem, E.; Goddard, D.; Ge, J.; Andrews, B. H.; Brinkman, J.; Brownstein, J. R.; Greco, J.; Law, D.; Lin, Y.-T.; Masters, K. L.; Merrifield, M.; More, S.; Okabe, N.; Schneider, D. P.; Thomas, D.; Wake, D. A.; Yan, R.; Drory, N.

    2017-12-01

    The “kinematic” morphology–density relation for early-type galaxies posits that those galaxies with low angular momentum are preferentially found in the highest-density regions of the universe. We use a large sample of galaxy groups with halo masses {10}12.5< {M}{halo}< {10}14.5 {h}-1 {M}ȯ observed with the Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA) survey to examine whether there is a correlation between local environment and rotational support that is independent of stellar mass. We find no compelling evidence for a relationship between the angular momentum content of early-type galaxies and either local overdensity or radial position within the group at fixed stellar mass.

  13. Early-type galaxies: mass-size relation at z ˜ 1.3 for different environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raichoor, A.; Mei, S.; Stanford, S. A.; Holden, B. P.; Nakata, F.; Rosati, P.; Shankar, F.; Tanaka, M.; Ford, H.; Huertas-Company, M.; Illingworth, G.; Kodama, T.; Postman, M.; Rettura, A.; Blakeslee, J. P.; Demarco, R.; Jee, M. J.; White, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    We combine multi-wavelength data of the Lynx superstructure and GOODS/CDF-S to build a sample of 75 visually selected early-type galaxies (ETGs), spanning different environments (cluster/group/field) at z ˜ 1.3. By estimating their mass, age (SED fitting, with a careful attention to the stellar population model used) and size, we are able to probe the dependence on the environment of the mass-size relation. We find that, for ETGs with 10^{10} < M / M_⊙ < 10^{11.5}, (1) the mass-size relation in the field did not evolve overall from z ˜ 1.3 to present; (2) the mass-size relation in cluster/group environments at z ˜ 1.3 lies at smaller sizes than the local mass-size relation (R_{e,z ˜ 1.3}/R_{e,z = 0} ˜ 0.6-0.8).

  14. 2D modelling of the light distribution of early-type galaxies in a volume-limited sample - II. Results for real galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Onofrio, M.

    2001-10-01

    In this paper we analyse the results of the two-dimensional (2D) fit of the light distribution of 73 early-type galaxies belonging to the Virgo and Fornax clusters, a sample volume- and magnitude-limited down to MB=-17.3, and highly homogeneous. In our previous paper (Paper I) we have presented the adopted 2D models of the surface-brightness distribution - namely the r1/n and (r1/n+exp) models - we have discussed the main sources of error affecting the structural parameters, and we have tested the ability of the chosen minimization algorithm (MINUIT) in determining the fitting parameters using a sample of artificial galaxies. We show that, with the exception of 11 low-luminosity E galaxies, the best fit of the real galaxy sample is always achieved with the two-component (r1/n+exp) model. The improvement in the χ2 due to the addition of the exponential component is found to be statistically significant. The best fit is obtained with the exponent n of the generalized r1/n Sersic law different from the classical de Vaucouleurs value of 4. Nearly 42 per cent of the sample have n<2, suggesting the presence of exponential `bulges' also in early-type galaxies. 20 luminous E galaxies are fitted by the two-component model, with a small central exponential structure (`disc') and an outer big spheroid with n>4. We believe that this is probably due to their resolved core. The resulting scalelengths Rh and Re of each component peak approximately at ~1 and ~2kpc, respectively, although with different variances in their distributions. The ratio Re/Rh peaks at ~0.5, a value typical for normal lenticular galaxies. The first component, represented by the r1/n law, is probably made of two distinct families, `ordinary' and `bright', on the basis of their distribution in the μe-log(Re) plane, a result already suggested by Capaccioli, Caon and D'Onofrio. The bulges of spirals and S0 galaxies belong to the `ordinary' family, while the large spheroids of luminous E galaxies form the

  15. The co-evolution of total density profiles and central dark matter fractions in simulated early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remus, Rhea-Silvia; Dolag, Klaus; Naab, Thorsten; Burkert, Andreas; Hirschmann, Michaela; Hoffmann, Tadziu L.; Johansson, Peter H.

    2017-01-01

    We present evidence from cosmological hydrodynamical simulations for a co-evolution of the slope of the total (dark and stellar) mass density profile, γtot, and the dark matter fraction within the half-mass radius, fDM, in early-type galaxies. The relation can be described as γtot = A fDM + B for all systems at all redshifts. The trend is set by the decreasing importance of gas dissipation towards lower redshifts and for more massive systems. Early-type galaxies are smaller, more concentrated, have lower fDM and steeper γtot at high redshifts and at lower masses for a given redshift; fDM and γtot are good indicators for growth by `dry' merging. The values for A and B change distinctively for different feedback models, and this relation can be used as a test for such models. A similar correlation exists between γtot and the stellar mass surface density Σ*. A model with weak stellar feedback and feedback from black holes is in best agreement with observations. All simulations, independent of the assumed feedback model, predict steeper γtot and lower fDM at higher redshifts. While the latter is in agreement with the observed trends, the former is in conflict with lensing observations, which indicate constant or decreasing γtot. This discrepancy is shown to be artificial: the observed trends can be reproduced from the simulations using observational methodology to calculate the total density slopes.

  16. A multiparametric analysis of the Einstein sample of early-type galaxies. 2: Galaxy formation history and properties of the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eskridge, Paul B.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Kim, Dong-Woo

    1995-01-01

    We have conducted bivariate and multivariate statistical analysis of data measuring the integrated luminosity, shape, and potential depth of the Einstein sample of early-type galaxies (presented by Fabbiano et al. 1992). We find significant correlations between the X-ray properties and the axial ratios (a/b) of our sample, such that the roundest systems tend to have the highest L(sub x) and L(sub x)/L(sub B). The most radio-loud objects are also the roundest. We confirm the assertion of Bender et al. (1989) that galaxies with high L(sub x) are boxy (have negative a(sub 4)). Both a/b and a(sub 4) are correlated with L(sub B), but not with IRAS 12 um and 100 um luminosities. There are strong correlations between L(sub x), Mg(sub 2), and sigma(sub nu) in the sense that those systems with the deepest potential wells have the highest L(sub x) and Mg(sub 2). Thus the depth of the potential well appears to govern both the ability to reatin an ISM at the present epoch and to retain the enriched ejecta of early star formation bursts. Both L(sub x)/L(sub B) and L(sub 6) (the 6 cm radio luminosity) show threshold effects with sigma(sub nu) exhibiting sharp increases at log sigma(sub nu) approximately = 2.2. Finally, there is clearly an interrelationship between the various stellar and structural parameters: The scatter in the bivariate relationships between the shape parameters (a/b and a(sub 4)) and the depth parameter sigma(sub nu) is a function of abundance in the sense that, for a given a(sub 4) or a/b, the systems with the highest sigma(sub nu) also have the highest Mg(sub 2). Furthermore, for a constant sigma(sun nu), disky galaxies tend to have higher Mg(sub 2) than boxy ones. Alternatively, for a given abundance, boxy ellipticals tend to be more massive than disky ellipticals. One possibility is that early-type galaxies of a given mass, originating from mergers (boxy ellipticals), have lower abundances than 'primordial' (disky) early-type galaxies. Another is that

  17. Modelling dust rings in early-type galaxies through a sequence of radiative transfer simulations and 2D image fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfini, P.; González-Martín, O.; Fritz, J.; Bitsakis, T.; Bruzual, G.; Cervantes Sodi, B.

    2018-07-01

    A large fraction of early-type galaxies (ETGs) hosts prominent dust features, and central dust rings are arguably the most interesting among them. We present here `Lord of the Rings', a new methodology which allows to integrate the extinction by dust rings in a 2D-fittingmodelling of the surface brightness distribution. Our pipeline acts in two steps, first using the surface-fitting software GALFIT to determine the unabsorbed stellar emission, and then adopting the radiative transfer code SKIRT to apply dust extinction. We apply our technique to NGC 4552 and NGC 4494, two nearby ETGs. We show that the extinction by a dust ring can mimic, in a surface brightness profile, a central point source (e.g. an unresolved nuclear stellar cluster or an active galactic nucleus; AGN) superimposed to a `core' (i.e. a central flattening of the stellar light commonly observed in massive ETGs). We discuss how properly accounting for dust features is of paramount importance to derive correct fluxes, especially for low-luminosity AGNs (LLAGNs). We suggest that the geometries of dust features are strictly connected with how relaxed is the gravitational potential, i.e. with the evolutionary stage of the host galaxy. Additionally, we find hints that the dust mass contained in the ring relates to the AGN activity.

  18. Dark matter contraction and stellar-mass-to-light ratio gradients in massive early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Lindsay J.; Auger, Matthew W.

    2018-05-01

    We present models for the dark and luminous mass structure of 12 strong lensing early-type galaxies. We combine pixel-based modelling of multiband Hubble Space Telescope imaging with Jeans modelling of kinematics obtained from Keck/ESI spectra to disentangle the dark and luminous contributions to the mass. Assuming a generalised NFW (gNFW) profile for the dark matter halo and a spatially constant stellar-mass-to-light ratio ϒ⋆ for the baryonic mass, we infer distributions for ϒ⋆ consistent with initial mass functions (IMFs) that are heavier than the Milky Way's (with a global mean mismatch parameter relative to a Chabrier IMF μαc = 1.80 ± 0.14) and halo inner density slopes that span a large range but are generally cuspier than the dark-matter-only prediction (μ _{γ ^' }} = 2.01_{-0.22}^{+0.19}). We investigate possible reasons for overestimating the halo slope, including the neglect of spatially varying stellar-mass-to-light ratios and/or stellar orbital anisotropy, and find that a quarter of the systems prefer radially declining stellar-mass-to-light ratio gradients, but that the overall effect on our inference on the halo slope is small. We suggest a coherent explanation of these results in the context of inside-out galaxy growth, and that the relative importance of different baryonic processes in shaping the dark halo may depend on halo environment.

  19. Modelling dust rings in early-type galaxies through a sequence of radiative transfer simulations and 2D image fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfini, P.; González-Martín, O.; Fritz, J.; Bitsakis, T.; Bruzual, G.; Sodi, B. Cervantes

    2018-05-01

    A large fraction of early-type galaxies (ETGs) host prominent dust features, and central dust rings are arguably the most interesting among them. We present here `Lord Of The Rings' (LOTR), a new methodology which allows to integrate the extinction by dust rings in a 2D fitting modelling of the surface brightness distribution. Our pipeline acts in two steps, first using the surface fitting software GALFIT to determine the unabsorbed stellar emission, and then adopting the radiative transfer code SKIRT to apply dust extinction. We apply our technique to NGC 4552 and NGC 4494, two nearby ETGs. We show that the extinction by a dust ring can mimic, in a surface brightness profile, a central point source (e.g. an unresolved nuclear stellar cluster or an active galactic nucleus; AGN) superimposed to a `core' (i.e. a central flattening of the stellar light commonly observed in massive ETGs). We discuss how properly accounting for dust features is of paramount importance to derive correct fluxes especially for low luminosity AGNs (LLAGNs). We suggest that the geometries of dust features are strictly connected with how relaxed is the gravitational potential, i.e. with the evolutionary stage of the host galaxy. Additionally, we find hints that the dust mass contained in the ring relates to the AGN activity.

  20. The imprint of dark matter haloes on the size and velocity dispersion evolution of early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posti, Lorenzo; Nipoti, Carlo; Stiavelli, Massimo; Ciotti, Luca

    2014-05-01

    Early-type galaxies (ETGs) are observed to be more compact, on average, at z ≳ 2 than at z ≃ 0, at fixed stellar mass. Recent observational works suggest that such size evolution could reflect the similar evolution of the host dark matter halo density as a function of the time of galaxy quenching. We explore this hypothesis by studying the distribution of halo central velocity dispersion (σ0) and half-mass radius (rh) as functions of halo mass M and redshift z, in a cosmological Λ cold dark matter N-body simulation. In the range 0 ≲ z ≲ 2.5, we find σ0∝M0.31-0.37 and rh∝M0.28-0.32, close to the values expected for homologous virialized systems. At fixed M in the range 1011 M⊙ ≲ M ≲ 5.5 × 1014 M⊙ we find σ0 ∝ (1 + z)0.35 and rh ∝ (1 + z)-0.7. We show that such evolution of the halo scaling laws is driven by individual haloes growing in mass following the evolutionary tracks σ0 ∝ M0.2 and rh ∝ M0.6, consistent with simple dissipationless merging models in which the encounter orbital energy is accounted for. We compare the N-body data with ETGs observed at 0 ≲ z ≲ 3 by populating the haloes with a stellar component under simple but justified assumptions: the resulting galaxies evolve consistently with the observed ETGs up to z ≃ 2, but the model has difficulty in reproducing the fast evolution observed at z ≳ 2. We conclude that a substantial fraction of the size evolution of ETGs can be ascribed to a systematic dependence on redshift of the dark matter haloes structural properties.

  1. A comparison of the near-infrared spectral features of early-type galaxies in the Coma Cluster, the Virgo cluster and the field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houdashelt, Mark L.; Frogel, Jay A.

    1993-01-01

    Earlier researchers derived the relative distance between the Coma and Virgo clusters from color-magnitude relations of the early-type galaxies in each cluster. They found that the derived distance was color-dependent and concluded that the galaxies of similar luminosity in the two clusters differ in their red stellar populations. More recently, the color-dependence of the Coma-Virgo distance modulus has been called into question. However, because these two clusters differ so dramatically in their morphologies and kinematics, it is plausible that the star formation histories of the member galaxies also differed. If the conclusions of earlier researchers are indeed correct, then some signature of the resulting stellar population differences should appear in the near-infrared and/or infrared light of the respective galaxies. We have collected near-infrared spectra of 17 Virgo and 10 Coma early-type galaxies; this sample spans about four magnitudes in luminosity in each cluster. Seven field E/S0 galaxies have been observed for comparison. Pseudo-equivalent widths have been measured for all of the field galaxies, all but one of the Virgo members, and five of the Coma galaxies. The features examined are sensitive to the temperature, metallicity, and surface gravity of the reddest stars. A preliminary analysis of these spectral features has been performed, and, with a few notable exceptions, the measured pseudo-equivalent widths agree well with previously published values.

  2. IMF and [Na/Fe] abundance ratios from optical and NIR spectral features in early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Barbera, F.; Vazdekis, A.; Ferreras, I.; Pasquali, A.; Allende Prieto, C.; Röck, B.; Aguado, D. S.; Peletier, R. F.

    2017-01-01

    We present a joint analysis of the four most prominent sodium-sensitive features (Na D, Na I λ8190Å, Na I λ1.14 μm, and Na I λ2.21 μm), in the optical and near-infrared spectral ranges, of two nearby, massive (σ ˜ 300 km s-1), early-type galaxies (named XSG1 and XSG2). Our analysis relies on deep Very Large Telescope/X-Shooter long-slit spectra, along with newly developed stellar population models, allowing for [Na/Fe] variations, up to ˜1.2 dex, over a wide range of age, total metallicity, and initial mass function (IMF) slope. The new models show that the response of the Na-dependent spectral indices to [Na/Fe] is stronger when the IMF is bottom heavier. For the first time, we are able to match all four Na features in the central regions of massive early-type galaxies finding an overabundance of [Na/Fe] in the range 0.5-0.7 dex and a bottom-heavy IMF. Therefore, individual abundance variations cannot be fully responsible for the trends of gravity-sensitive indices, strengthening the case towards a non-universal IMF. Given current limitations of theoretical atmosphere models, our [Na/Fe] estimates should be taken as upper limits. For XSG1, where line strengths are measured out to ˜0.8 Re, the radial trend of [Na/Fe] is similar to [α/Fe] and [C/Fe], being constant out to ˜0.5 Re, and decreasing by ˜0.2-0.3 dex at ˜0.8 Re, without any clear correlation with local metallicity. Such a result seems to be in contrast to the predicted increase of Na nucleosynthetic yields from asymptotic giant branch stars and Type II supernovae. For XSG1, the Na-inferred IMF radial profile is consistent, within the errors, with that derived from TiO features and the Wing-Ford band presented in a recent paper.

  3. THE NEXT GENERATION VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY XVI: THE ANGULAR MOMENTUM OF DWARF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES FROM GLOBULAR CLUSTER SATELLITES

    SciTech Connect

    Toloba, Elisa; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Li, Biao

    2016-05-01

    We analyze the kinematics of six Virgo cluster dwarf early-type galaxies (dEs) from their globular cluster (GC) systems. We present new Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy for three of them and re-analyze the data found in the literature for the remaining three. We use two independent methods to estimate the rotation amplitude ( V {sub rot}) and velocity dispersion ( σ {sub GC}) of the GC systems and evaluate their statistical significance by simulating non-rotating GC systems with the same number of GC satellites and velocity uncertainties. Our measured kinematics agree with the published values for the three galaxies from the literature and,more » in all cases, some rotation is measured. However, our simulations show that the null hypothesis of being non-rotating GC systems cannot be ruled out. In the case of VCC 1861, the measured V {sub rot} and the simulations indicate that it is not rotating. In the case of VCC 1528, the null hypothesis can be marginally ruled out, and thus it might be rotating although further confirmation is needed. In our analysis, we find that, in general, the measured V {sub rot} tends to be overestimated and the measured σ {sub GC} tends to be underestimated by amounts that depend on the intrinsic V {sub rot}/ σ {sub GC}, the number of observed GCs ( N {sub GC}), and the velocity uncertainties. The bias is negligible when N {sub GC} ≳ 20. In those cases where a large N {sub GC} is not available, it is imperative to obtain data with small velocity uncertainties. For instance, errors of ≤2 km s{sup −1} lead to V {sub rot} < 10 km s{sup −1} for a system that is intrinsically not rotating.« less

  4. The evolution of early-type galaxies in nearby clusters: breaking the age-metallicity degeneracy with Spitzer IRS Blue Peak-Up Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressan, Alessandro; Buson, Lucio; Clemens, Marcel; Danese, Luigi; Granato, Gian Luigi; Panuzzo, Pasquale; Rampazzo, Roberto; Silva, Laura; Valdes, Jose Ramon

    2005-06-01

    We have shown with Cycle 1 observations that Spitzer has the capability of disentangling age and metallicity in old stellar populations. By looking to the broad emission feature left by dust enshrouded asymptotic giant branch stars above 9.7 microns, Spitzer IRS can provide direct evidence that the colour- magnitude relation of Virgo ellipticals is mainly driven by metallicity. However, with the IRS spectrograph we can only probe the bright tail of the colour-magnitude relation, and only in the nearest cluster. We propose to use IRS Blue Peak-Up, the only Spitzer band that looks directly in the core of that spectral feature, to reach fainter galaxies. We will perform a thorough investigation of early type galaxies along the colour-magnitude relation in Virgo and in Coma clusters. These observations, when coupled with already existing IRAC and Optical-NIR observations, will allow a) an unbiased census of the stellar populations in cluster early type galaxies; b) an estimate of the AGB material recycled into the ISM in these systems; c) a direct check of the universality of the colour- magnitude relation on a wide range of magnitudes; d) a spatial study of the stellar populations within the galaxies, e.g. investigating differences between bulge and disk populations within S0; e) the most secure reference frame with which to compare the evolution of early type galaxies in other environments (groups and field).

  5. The Ellipticities of Cluster Early-type Galaxies from z ~ 1 to z ~ 0: No Evolution in the Overall Distribution of Bulge-to-Disk Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, B. P.; Franx, M.; Illingworth, G. D.; Postman, M.; van der Wel, A.; Kelson, D. D.; Blakeslee, J. P.; Ford, H.; Demarco, R.; Mei, S.

    2009-03-01

    We have compiled a sample of early-type cluster galaxies from 0 < z < 1.3 and measured the evolution of their ellipticity distributions. Our sample contains 487 galaxies in 17 z>0.3 clusters with high-quality space-based imaging and a comparable sample of 210 galaxies in 10 clusters at z < 0.05. We select early-type galaxies (elliptical and S0 galaxies) that fall within the cluster R 200, and which lie on the red-sequence in the magnitude range -19.3>MB > - 21, after correcting for luminosity evolution as measured by the fundamental plane. Our ellipticity measurements are made in a consistent manner over our whole sample. We perform extensive simulations to quantify the systematic and statistical errors, and find that it is crucial to use point-spread function (PSF)-corrected model fits; determinations of the ellipticity from Hubble Space Telescope image data that do not account for the PSF "blurring" are systematically and significantly biased to rounder ellipticities at redshifts z>0.3. We find that neither the median ellipticity, nor the shape of the ellipticity distribution of cluster early-type galaxies evolves with redshift from z ~ 0 to z>1 (i.e., over the last ~8 Gyr). The median ellipticity at z>0.3 is statistically identical with that at z < 0.05, being higher by only 0.01 ± 0.02 or 3 ± 6%, while the distribution of ellipticities at z>0.3 agrees with the shape of the z < 0.05 distribution at the 1-2% level (i.e., the probability that they are drawn from the same distribution is 98-99%). These results are strongly suggestive of an unchanging overall bulge-to-disk ratio distribution for cluster early-type galaxies over the last ~8 Gyr from z ~ 1 to z ~ 0. This result contrasts with that from visual classifications which show that the fraction of morphologically-selected disk-dominated early-type galaxies, or S0s, is significantly lower at z>0.4 than at z ~ 0. We find that the median disk-dominated early-type, or S0, galaxy has a somewhat higher

  6. The ATLAS3D project - IX. The merger origin of a fast- and a slow-rotating early-type galaxy revealed with deep optical imaging: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Pierre-Alain; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Serra, Paolo; Michel-Dansac, Leo; Ferriere, Etienne; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; Lablanche, Pierre-Yves; McDermid, Richard M.; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M.

    2011-10-01

    The mass assembly of galaxies leaves imprints in their outskirts, such as shells and tidal tails. The frequency and properties of such fine structures depend on the main acting mechanisms - secular evolution, minor or major mergers - and on the age of the last substantial accretion event. We use this to constrain the mass assembly history of two apparently relaxed nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs) selected from the ATLAS3D sample, NGC 680 and 5557. Our ultra-deep optical images obtained with MegaCam on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope reach 29 mag arcsec-2 in the g band. They reveal very low surface brightness (LSB) filamentary structures around these ellipticals. Among them, a gigantic 160 kpc long, narrow, tail east of NGC 5557 hosts three gas-rich star-forming objects, previously detected in H I with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and in UV with GALEX. NGC 680 exhibits two major diffuse plumes apparently connected to extended H I tails, as well as a series of arcs and shells. Comparing the outer stellar and gaseous morphology of the two ellipticals with that predicted from models of colliding galaxies, we argue that the LSB features are tidal debris and that each of these two ETGs was assembled during a relatively recent, major wet merger, which most likely occurred after the redshift z ≃ 0.5 epoch. Had these mergers been older, the tidal features should have already fallen back or be destroyed by more recent accretion events. However, the absence of molecular gas and of a prominent young stellar population in the core region of the galaxies indicates that the merger is at least 1-2 Gyr old: the memory of any merger-triggered nuclear starburst has indeed been lost. The star-forming objects found towards the collisional debris of NGC 5557 are then likely tidal dwarf galaxies. Such recycled galaxies here appear to be long-lived and continue to form stars while any star formation activity has stopped in their parent galaxy. The inner kinematics of NGC

  7. SDSS-IV MaNGA: global stellar population and gradients for about 2000 early-type and spiral galaxies on the mass-size plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongyu; Mao, Shude; Cappellari, Michele; Ge, Junqiang; Long, R. J.; Li, Ran; Mo, H. J.; Li, Cheng; Zheng, Zheng; Bundy, Kevin; Thomas, Daniel; Brownstein, Joel R.; Roman Lopes, Alexandre; Law, David R.; Drory, Niv

    2018-05-01

    We perform full spectrum fitting stellar population analysis and Jeans Anisotropic modelling of the stellar kinematics for about 2000 early-type galaxies (ETGs) and spiral galaxies from the MaNGA DR14 sample. Galaxies with different morphologies are found to be located on a remarkably tight mass plane which is close to the prediction of the virial theorem, extending previous results for ETGs. By examining an inclined projection (`the mass-size' plane), we find that spiral and early-type galaxies occupy different regions on the plane, and their stellar population properties (i.e. age, metallicity, and stellar mass-to-light ratio) vary systematically along roughly the direction of velocity dispersion, which is a proxy for the bulge fraction. Galaxies with higher velocity dispersions have typically older ages, larger stellar mass-to-light ratios and are more metal rich, which indicates that galaxies increase their bulge fractions as their stellar populations age and become enriched chemically. The age and stellar mass-to-light ratio gradients for low-mass galaxies in our sample tend to be positive (centre < outer), while the gradients for most massive galaxies are negative. The metallicity gradients show a clear peak around velocity dispersion log10 σe ≈ 2.0, which corresponds to the critical mass ˜3 × 1010 M⊙ of the break in the mass-size relation. Spiral galaxies with large mass and size have the steepest gradients, while the most massive ETGs, especially above the critical mass Mcrit ≳ 2 × 1011 M⊙, where slow rotator ETGs start dominating, have much flatter gradients. This may be due to differences in their evolution histories, e.g. mergers.

  8. SPIDER. V. MEASURING SYSTEMATIC EFFECTS IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXY STELLAR MASSES FROM PHOTOMETRIC SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION FITTING

    SciTech Connect

    Swindle, R.; Gal, R. R.; La Barbera, F.

    2011-10-15

    We present robust statistical estimates of the accuracy of early-type galaxy stellar masses derived from spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting as functions of various empirical and theoretical assumptions. Using large samples consisting of {approx}40,000 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS; ugriz), of which {approx}5000 are also in the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (YJHK), with spectroscopic redshifts in the range 0.05 {<=} z {<=} 0.095, we test the reliability of some commonly used stellar population models and extinction laws for computing stellar masses. Spectroscopic ages (t), metallicities (Z), and extinctions (A{sub V} ) are also computed from fitsmore » to SDSS spectra using various population models. These external constraints are used in additional tests to estimate the systematic errors in the stellar masses derived from SED fitting, where t, Z, and A{sub V} are typically left as free parameters. We find reasonable agreement in mass estimates among stellar population models, with variation of the initial mass function and extinction law yielding systematic biases on the mass of nearly a factor of two, in agreement with other studies. Removing the near-infrared bands changes the statistical bias in mass by only {approx}0.06 dex, adding uncertainties of {approx}0.1 dex at the 95% CL. In contrast, we find that removing an ultraviolet band is more critical, introducing 2{sigma} uncertainties of {approx}0.15 dex. Finally, we find that the stellar masses are less affected by the absence of metallicity and/or dust extinction knowledge. However, there is a definite systematic offset in the mass estimate when the stellar population age is unknown, up to a factor of 2.5 for very old (12 Gyr) stellar populations. We present the stellar masses for our sample, corrected for the measured systematic biases due to photometrically determined ages, finding that age errors produce lower stellar masses by {approx}0.15 dex, with errors of {approx}0.02 dex

  9. STELLAR POPULATIONS AND EVOLUTION OF EARLY-TYPE CLUSTER GALAXIES: CONSTRAINTS FROM OPTICAL IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY OF z = 0.5-0.9 GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, Inger; Chiboucas, Kristin, E-mail: ijorgensen@gemini.edu, E-mail: kchiboucas@gemini.edu

    2013-03-15

    indices and recent stellar population models from Thomas et al., we find that MS0451.6-0305 has a mean metallicity [M/H] approximately 0.2 dex below that of the other clusters and our low-redshift sample. We confirm our previous result that RXJ0152.7-1357 has a mean abundance ratio [{alpha}/Fe] approximately 0.3 dex higher than that of the other clusters. The differences in [M/H] and [{alpha}/Fe] between the high-redshift clusters and the low-redshift sample are inconsistent with a passive evolution scenario for early-type cluster galaxies over the redshift interval studied. Low-level star formation may be able to bring the metallicity of MS0451.6-0305 in agreement with the low-redshift sample, while we speculate whether galaxy mergers can lead to sufficiently large changes in the abundance ratios for the RXJ0152.7-1357 galaxies to allow them to reach the low-redshift sample values in the time available.« less

  10. Purely Dry Mergers do not Explain the Observed Evolution of Massive Early-type Galaxies since z ~ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Nipoti, Carlo; Treu, Tommaso

    2014-05-01

    Several studies have suggested that the observed size evolution of massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) can be explained as a combination of dry mergers and progenitor bias, at least since z ~ 1. In this paper we carry out a new test of the dry-merger scenario based on recent lensing measurements of the evolution of the mass density profile of ETGs. We construct a theoretical model for the joint evolution of the size and mass density profile slope γ' driven by dry mergers occurring at rates given by cosmological simulations. Such dry-merger model predicts a strong decrease of γ' with cosmic time, inconsistent with the almost constant γ' inferred from observations in the redshift range 0 < z < 1. We then show with a simple toy model that a modest amount of cold gas in the mergers—consistent with the upper limits on recent star formation in ETGs—is sufficient to reconcile the model with measurements of γ'. By fitting for the amount of gas accreted during mergers, we find that models with dissipation are consistent with observations of the evolution in both size and density slope, if ~4% of the total final stellar mass arises from the gas accreted since z ~ 1. Purely dry merger models are ruled out at >99% CL. We thus suggest a scenario where the outer regions of massive ETGs grow by accretion of stars and dark matter, while small amounts of dissipation and nuclear star formation conspire to keep the mass density profile constant and approximately isothermal.

  11. New radio detections of early-type pre-main-sequence stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Brown, Alexander; Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    1990-01-01

    Results of VLA radio continuum observations of 13 early-type pre-main-sequence stars selected from the 1984 catalog of Finkenzeller and Mundt are presented. The stars HD 259431 and MWC 1080 were detected at 3.6 cm, while HD 200775 and TY CrA were detected at both 3.6 and 6 cm. The flux density of HD 200775 has a frequency dependence consistent with the behavior expected for free-free emission originating in a fully ionized wind. However, an observation in A configuration suggests that the source geometry may not be spherically symmetric. In contrast, the spectral index of TY CrA is negative with a flux behavior implying nonthermal emission. The physical mechanism responsible for the nonthermal emission has not yet been identified, although gyrosynchrotron and synchrotron processes cannot be ruled out.

  12. SPIDER. IV. OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED COLOR GRADIENTS IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES: NEW INSIGHT INTO CORRELATIONS WITH GALAXY PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    La Barbera, F.; De Carvalho, R. R.; De La Rosa, I. G.

    2010-11-15

    We present an analysis of stellar population gradients in 4546 early-type galaxies (ETGs) with photometry in grizYHJK along with optical spectroscopy. ETGs were selected as bulge-dominated systems, displaying passive spectra within the SDSS fibers. A new approach is described which utilizes color information to constrain age and metallicity gradients. Defining an effective color gradient, {nabla}{sub *}, which incorporates all of the available color indices, we investigate how {nabla}{sub *} varies with galaxy mass proxies, i.e., velocity dispersion, stellar (M{sub *}) and dynamical (M{sub dyn}) masses, as well as age, metallicity, and [{alpha}/Fe]. ETGs with M{sub dyn} larger than 8.5 xmore » 10{sup 10} M{sub sun} have increasing age gradients and decreasing metallicity gradients with respect to mass, metallicity, and enhancement. We find that velocity dispersion and [{alpha}/Fe] are the main drivers of these correlations. ETGs with 2.5 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun} {<=} M{sub dyn} {<=} 8.5 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun} show no correlation of age, metallicity, and color gradients with respect to mass, although color gradients still correlate with stellar population parameters, and these correlations are independent of each other. In both mass regimes, the striking anti-correlation between color gradient and {alpha}-enhancement is significant at {approx}5{sigma} and results from the fact that metallicity gradient decreases with [{alpha}/Fe]. This anti-correlation may reflect the fact that star formation and metallicity enrichment are regulated by the interplay between the energy input from supernovae, and the temperature and pressure of the hot X-ray gas in ETGs. For all mass ranges, positive age gradients are associated with old galaxies (>5-7 Gyr). For galaxies younger than {approx}5 Gyr, mostly at low mass, the age gradient tends to be anti-correlated with the Age parameter, with more positive gradients at younger ages.« less

  13. The SLUGGS survey: a comparison of total-mass profiles of early-type galaxies from observations and cosmological simulations, to ˜4 effective radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellstedt, Sabine; Forbes, Duncan A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Remus, Rhea-Silvia; Stevens, Adam R. H.; Brodie, Jean P.; Poci, Adriano; McDermid, Richard; Alabi, Adebusola; Chevalier, Leonie; Adams, Caitlin; Ferré-Mateu, Anna; Wasserman, Asher; Pandya, Viraj

    2018-06-01

    We apply the Jeans Anisotropic Multi-Gaussian Expansion dynamical modelling method to SAGES Legacy Unifying Globulars and GalaxieS (SLUGGS) survey data of early-type galaxies in the stellar mass range 1010 < M*/M⊙ < 1011.6 that cover a large radial range of 0.1-4.0 effective radii. We combine SLUGGS and ATLAS3D data sets to model the total-mass profiles of a sample of 21 fast-rotator galaxies, utilizing a hyperparameter method to combine the two independent data sets. The total-mass density profile slope values derived for these galaxies are consistent with those measured in the inner regions of galaxies by other studies. Furthermore, the total-mass density slopes (γtot) appear to be universal over this broad stellar mass range, with an average value of γtot = -2.24 ± 0.05 , i.e. slightly steeper than isothermal. We compare our results to model galaxies from the Magneticum and EAGLE cosmological hydrodynamic simulations, in order to probe the mechanisms that are responsible for varying total-mass density profile slopes. The simulated-galaxy slopes are shallower than the observed values by ˜0.3-0.5, indicating that the physical processes shaping the mass distributions of galaxies in cosmological simulations are still incomplete. For galaxies with M* > 1010.7 M⊙ in the Magneticum simulations, we identify a significant anticorrelation between total-mass density profile slopes and the fraction of stellar mass formed ex situ (i.e. accreted), whereas this anticorrelation is weaker for lower stellar masses, implying that the measured total-mass density slopes for low-mass galaxies are less likely to be determined by merger activity.

  14. The MASSIVE Survey - V. Spatially resolved stellar angular momentum, velocity dispersion, and higher moments of the 41 most massive local early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veale, Melanie; Ma, Chung-Pei; Thomas, Jens; Greene, Jenny E.; McConnell, Nicholas J.; Walsh, Jonelle; Ito, Jennifer; Blakeslee, John P.; Janish, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    We present spatially resolved two-dimensional stellar kinematics for the 41 most massive early-type galaxies (ETGs; MK ≲ -25.7 mag, stellar mass M* ≳ 1011.8 M⊙) of the volume-limited (D < 108 Mpc) MASSIVE survey. For each galaxy, we obtain high-quality spectra in the wavelength range of 3650-5850 Å from the 246-fibre Mitchell integral-field spectrograph at McDonald Observatory, covering a 107 arcsec × 107 arcsec field of view (often reaching 2 to 3 effective radii). We measure the 2D spatial distribution of each galaxy's angular momentum (λ and fast or slow rotator status), velocity dispersion (σ), and higher order non-Gaussian velocity features (Gauss-Hermite moments h3 to h6). Our sample contains a high fraction (˜80 per cent) of slow and non-rotators with λ ≲ 0.2. When combined with the lower mass ETGs in the ATLAS3D survey, we find the fraction of slow rotators to increase dramatically with galaxy mass, reaching ˜50 per cent at MK ˜ -25.5 mag and ˜90 per cent at MK ≲ -26 mag. All of our fast rotators show a clear anticorrelation between h3 and V/σ, and the slope of the anticorrelation is steeper in more round galaxies. The radial profiles of σ show a clear luminosity and environmental dependence: the 12 most luminous galaxies in our sample (MK ≲ -26 mag) are all brightest cluster/group galaxies (except NGC 4874) and all have rising or nearly flat σ profiles, whereas five of the seven `isolated' galaxies are all fainter than MK = -25.8 mag and have falling σ. All of our galaxies have positive average h4; the most luminous galaxies have average h4 ˜ 0.05, while less luminous galaxies have a range of values between 0 and 0.05. Most of our galaxies show positive radial gradients in h4, and those galaxies also tend to have rising σ profiles. We discuss the implications for the relationship among dynamical mass, σ, h4, and velocity anisotropy for these massive galaxies.

  15. The X-Shooter Lens Survey - I. Dark matter domination and a Salpeter-type initial mass function in a massive early-type galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiniello, C.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Trager, S. C.; Czoske, O.; Treu, T.

    2011-11-01

    We present the first results from the X-Shooter Lens Survey: an analysis of the massive early-type galaxy SDSS J1148+1930 at redshift z= 0.444. We combine its extended kinematic profile - derived from spectra obtained with X-Shooter on the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope - with strong gravitational lensing and multicolour information derived from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images. Our main results are as follows. (i) The luminosity-weighted stellar velocity dispersion is <σ*>(≲Reff) = 352 ± 10 ± 16 km s-1, extracted from a rectangular aperture of 1.8 × 1.6 arcsec2 centred on the galaxy, more accurate and considerably lower than a previously published value of ˜450 km s-1. (ii) A single-component (stellar plus dark) mass model of the lens galaxy yields a logarithmic total-density slope of γ'= 1.72+0.05- 0.06 (68 per cent confidence level, CL; ?) within a projected radius of ˜2.16 arcsec. (iii) The projected stellar mass fraction, derived solely from the lensing and dynamical data, is f*(galaxies. Dwarf-rich IMFs in the lower mass range of 0.1-0.7 M⊙, with α≥ 3 (with dN/dM∝M-α) - such as that recently suggested for massive early-type galaxies with α= 3 in the mass range 0.1-1 M⊙- are excluded at the >90 per cent CL and in some cases violate the total lensing

  16. The stellar initial mass function of early-type galaxies from low to high stellar velocity dispersion: homogeneous analysis of ATLAS3D and Sloan Lens ACS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posacki, Silvia; Cappellari, Michele; Treu, Tommaso; Pellegrini, Silvia; Ciotti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We present an investigation about the shape of the initial mass function (IMF) of early-type galaxies (ETGs), based on a joint lensing and dynamical analysis, and on stellar population synthesis models, for a sample of 55 lens ETGs identified by the Sloan Lens Advanced Camera for Surveys (SLACS). We construct axisymmetric dynamical models based on the Jeans equations which allow for orbital anisotropy and include a dark matter halo. The models reproduce in detail the observed Hubble Space Telescope photometry and are constrained by the total projected mass within the Einstein radius and the stellar velocity dispersion (σ) within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey fibres. Comparing the dynamically-derived stellar mass-to-light ratios (M*/L)dyn, obtained for an assumed halo slope ρh ∝ r-1, to the stellar population ones (M*/L)Salp, derived from full-spectrum fitting and assuming a Salpeter IMF, we infer the mass normalization of the IMF. Our results confirm the previous analysis by the SLACS team that the mass normalization of the IMF of high-σ galaxies is consistent on average with a Salpeter slope. Our study allows for a fully consistent study of the trend between IMF and σ for both the SLACS and atlas3D samples, which explore quite different σ ranges. The two samples are highly complementary, the first being essentially σ selected, and the latter volume-limited and nearly mass selected. We find that the two samples merge smoothly into a single trend of the form log α = (0.38 ± 0.04) × log (σe/200 km s-1) + ( - 0.06 ± 0.01), where α = (M*/L)dyn/(M*/L)Salp and σe is the luminosity averaged σ within one effective radius Re. This is consistent with a systematic variation of the IMF normalization from Kroupa to Salpeter in the interval σe ≈ 90-270 km s-1.

  17. The ionized gas in the CALIFA early-type galaxies. I. Mapping two representative cases: NGC 6762 and NGC 5966

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehrig, C.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; Papaderos, P.; Vílchez, J. M.; Gomes, J. M.; Masegosa, J.; Sánchez, S. F.; Lehnert, M. D.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bomans, D. J.; Marquez, I.; Mast, D.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Marino, R. A.; Pasquali, A.; Perez, I.; Roth, M. M.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Ziegler, B.

    2012-04-01

    As part of the ongoing CALIFA survey, we have conducted a thorough bidimensional analysis of the ionized gas in two E/S0 galaxies, NGC 6762 and NGC 5966, aiming to shed light on the nature of their warm ionized ISM. Specifically, we present optical (3745-7300 Å) integral field spectroscopy obtained with the PMAS/PPAK integral field spectrophotometer. Its wide field-of-view (1' × 1') covers the entire optical extent of each galaxy down to faint continuum surface brightnesses. To recover the nebular lines, we modeled and subtracted the underlying stellar continuum from the observed spectra using the STARLIGHT spectral synthesis code. The pure emission-line spectra were used to investigate the gas properties and determine the possible sources of ionization. We show the advantages of IFU data in interpreting the complex nature of the ionized gas in NGC 6762 and NGC 5966. In NGC 6762, the ionized gas and stellar emission display similar morphologies, while the emission line morphology is elongated in NGC 5966, spanning ~6 kpc, and is oriented roughly orthogonal to the major axis of the stellar continuum ellipsoid. Whereas gas and stars are kinematically aligned in NGC 6762, the gas is kinematically decoupled from the stars in NGC 5966. A decoupled rotating disk or an "ionization cone" are two possible interpretations of the elongated ionized gas structure in NGC 5966. The latter would be the first "ionization cone" of such a dimension detected within a weak emission-line galaxy. Both galaxies have weak emission-lines relative to the continuum[EW(Hα) ≲ 3 Å] and have very low excitation, log([Oiii]λ5007/Hβ) ≲ 0.5. Based on optical diagnostic ratios ([Oiii]λ5007/Hβ, [Nii]λ6584/Hα, [Sii]λ6717, 6731/Hα, [Oi]λ6300/Hα), both objects contain a LINER nucleus and an extended LINER-like gas emission. The emission line ratios do not vary significantly with radius or aperture, which indicates that the nebular properties are spatially homogeneous. The gas emission

  18. VARIATIONS OF MID- AND FAR-INFRARED LUMINOSITIES AMONG EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES: RELATION TO STELLAR METALLICITY AND COLD DUST

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, William G.; Brighenti, Fabrizio; Temi, Pasquale

    The Hubble morphological sequence from early to late galaxies corresponds to an increasing rate of specific star formation. The Hubble sequence also follows a banana-shaped correlation between 24 and 70 {mu}m luminosities, both normalized with the K-band luminosity. We show that this correlation is significantly tightened if galaxies with central active galactic nucleus (AGN) emission are removed, but the cosmic scatter of elliptical galaxies in both 24 and 70 {mu}m luminosities remains significant along the correlation. We find that the 24 {mu}m variation among ellipticals correlates with stellar metallicity, reflecting emission from hot dust in winds from asymptotic giant branchmore » stars of varying metallicity. Infrared surface brightness variations in elliptical galaxies indicate that the K - 24 color profile is U-shaped for reasons that are unclear. In some elliptical galaxies, cold interstellar dust emitting at 70 and 160 {mu}m may arise from recent gas-rich mergers. However, we argue that most of the large range of 70 {mu}m luminosity in elliptical galaxies is due to dust transported from galactic cores by feedback events in (currently IR-quiet) AGNs. Cooler dusty gas naturally accumulates in the cores of elliptical galaxies due to dust-cooled local stellar mass loss and may accrete onto the central black hole, releasing energy. AGN-heated gas can transport dust in cores 5-10 kpc out into the hot gas atmospheres where it radiates extended 70 {mu}m emission but is eventually destroyed by sputtering. This, and some modest star formation, defines a cycle of dust creation and destruction. Elliptical galaxies evidently undergo large transient excursions in the banana plot in times comparable to the sputtering time or AGN duty cycle, 10 Myr. Normally regarded as passive, elliptical galaxies are the most active galaxies in the IR color-color correlation.« less

  19. AGN feedback and the origin of the α enhancement in early-type galaxies - insights from the GAEA model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucia, Gabriella; Fontanot, Fabio; Hirschmann, Michaela

    2017-03-01

    We take advantage of our recently published model for GAlaxy Evolution and Assembly (GAEA) to study the origin of the observed correlation between [α/Fe] and galaxy stellar mass. In particular, we analyse the role of radio-mode active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback, which recent work has identified as a crucial ingredient to reproduce observations. In GAEA, this process introduces the observed trend of star formation histories extending over shorter time-scales for more massive galaxies, but does not provide a sufficient condition to reproduce the observed α enhancements of massive galaxies. In the framework of our model, this is possible only by assuming that any residual star formation is truncated for galaxies more massive than 1010.5 M⊙. This results, however, in even shorter star formation time-scales for the most massive galaxies, which translate in total stellar metallicities significantly lower than observed. Our results demonstrate that (I) trends of [α/Fe] ratios cannot be simply converted into relative time-scale indicators; and (II) AGN feedback cannot explain alone the positive correlation between [α/Fe] and galaxy mass/velocity dispersion. Reproducing simultaneously the mass-metallicity relation and the α enhancements observed pose a challenge for hierarchical models, unless more exotic solutions are adopted such as metal-rich winds or a variable initial mass function.

  20. HYDROSTATIC GAS CONSTRAINTS ON SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE MASSES: IMPLICATIONS FOR HYDROSTATIC EQUILIBRIUM AND DYNAMICAL MODELING IN A SAMPLE OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, Philip J.; Buote, David A.; Brighenti, Fabrizio

    2009-10-01

    We present new mass measurements for the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in the centers of three early-type galaxies. The gas pressure in the surrounding, hot interstellar medium (ISM) is measured through spatially resolved spectroscopy with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, allowing the SMBH mass (M {sub BH}) to be inferred directly under the hydrostatic approximation. This technique does not require calibration against other SMBH measurement methods and its accuracy depends only on the ISM being close to hydrostatic, which is supported by the smooth X-ray isophotes of the galaxies. Combined with results from our recent study of the elliptical galaxy NGCmore » 4649, this brings the number of galaxies with SMBHs measured in this way to four. Of these, three already have mass determinations from the kinematics of either the stars or a central gas disk, and hence join only a handful of galaxies with M {sub BH} measured by more than one technique. We find good agreement between the different methods, providing support for the assumptions implicit in both the hydrostatic and the dynamical models. The stellar mass-to-light ratios for each galaxy inferred by our technique are in agreement with the predictions of stellar population synthesis models assuming a Kroupa initial mass function (IMF). This concurrence implies that no more than {approx}10%-20% of the ISM pressure is nonthermal, unless there is a conspiracy between the shape of the IMF and nonthermal pressure. Finally, we compute Bondi accretion rates (M-dot{sub bondi}), finding that the two galaxies with the highest M-dot{sub bondi} exhibit little evidence of X-ray cavities, suggesting that the correlation with the active galactic nuclei jet power takes time to be established.« less

  1. The ALHAMBRA survey: 2D analysis of the stellar populations in massive early-type galaxies at z < 0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Roman, I.; Cenarro, A. J.; Díaz-García, L. A.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Varela, J.; González Delgado, R. M.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Alfaro, E. J.; Ascaso, B.; Bonoli, S.; Borlaff, A.; Castander, F. J.; Cerviño, M.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Muniesa, D.; Pović, M.; Viironen, K.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Benítez, N.; Broadhurst, T.; Cabrera-Caño, J.; Cepa, J.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; Infante, L.; Martínez, V. J.; Moles, M.; del Olmo, A.; Perea, J.; Prada, F.; Quintana, J. M.

    2018-01-01

    We present a technique that permits the analysis of stellar population gradients in a relatively low-cost way compared to integral field unit (IFU) surveys. We developed a technique to analyze unresolved stellar populations of spatially resolved galaxies based on photometric multi-filter surveys. This technique allows the analysis of vastly larger samples and out to larger galactic radii. We derived spatially resolved stellar population properties and radial gradients by applying a centroidal Voronoi tessellation and performing a multicolor photometry spectral energy distribution fitting. This technique has been successfully applied to a sample of 29 massive (M⋆ > 1010.5M⊙) early-type galaxies at z < 0.3 from the ALHAMBRA survey. We produced detailed 2D maps of stellar population properties (age, metallicity, and extinction), which allow us to identify galactic features. Radial structures were studied, and luminosity-weighted and mass-weighted gradients were derived out to 2-3.5 Reff. We find that the spatially resolved stellar population mass, age, and metallicity are well represented by their integrated values. We find the gradients of early-type galaxies to be on average flat in age (∇log AgeL = 0.02 ± 0.06 dex/Reff) and negative in metallicity (∇[Fe/H]L = -0.09 ± 0.06 dex/Reff). Overall,the extinction gradients are flat (∇Av = -0.03 ± 0.09 mag/Reff ) with a wide spread. These results are in agreement with previous studies that used standard long-slit spectroscopy, and with the most recent IFU studies. According to recent simulations, these results are consistent with a scenario where early-type galaxies were formed through major mergers and where their final gradients are driven by the older ages and higher metallicity of the accreted systems. We demonstrate the scientific potential of multi-filter photometry to explore the spatially resolved stellar populations of local galaxies and confirm previous spectroscopic trends from a complementary

  2. Galaxies Detected by the Dwingeloo Obscured Galaxies Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivers, A. J.; Henning, P. A.; Kraan-Korteweg, R. C.

    1999-04-01

    The Dwingeloo Obscured Galaxies Survey (DOGS) is a 21-cm blind survey for galaxies hidden in the northern `Zone of Avoidance' (ZOA): the portion of the optical extragalactic sky which is obscured by dust in the Milky Way. Like the Parkes southern hemisphere ZOA survey, the DOGS project is designed to reveal hidden dynamically important nearby galaxies and to help `fill in the blanks' in the local large scale structure. To date, 36 galaxies have been detected by the Dwingeloo survey; 23 of these were previously unknown [no corresponding sources recorded in the NASA Extragalactic Database (NED)]. Among the interesting detections are three nearby galaxies in the vicinity of NGC 6946 and 11 detections in the Supergalactic plane crossing region. VLA follow-up observations have been conducted for several of the DOGS detections.

  3. Evidence of a Bottom-heavy Initial Mass Function in Massive Early-type Galaxies from Near-infrared Metal Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagattuta, David J.; Mould, Jeremy R.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Monson, Andrew J.; Pastorello, Nicola; Persson, S. Eric

    2017-09-01

    We present new evidence for a variable stellar initial mass function (IMF) in massive early-type galaxies, using high-resolution, near-infrared spectroscopy from the Folded-port InfraRed Echellette spectrograph (FIRE) on the Magellan Baade Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. In this pilot study, we observe several gravity-sensitive metal lines between 1.1 and 1.3 μm in eight highly luminous (L˜ 10{L}* ) nearby galaxies. Thanks to the broad wavelength coverage of FIRE, we are also able to observe the Ca II triplet feature, which helps with our analysis. After measuring the equivalent widths (EWs) of these lines, we notice mild to moderate trends between EW and central velocity dispersion (σ), with some species (K I, Na I, Mn I) showing a positive EW-σ correlation and others (Mg I, Ca II, Fe I) a negative one. To minimize the effects of metallicity, we measure the ratio R = [EW(K I)/EW(Mg I)], finding a significant systematic increase in this ratio with respect to σ. We then probe for variations in the IMF by comparing the measured line ratios to the values expected in several IMF models. Overall, we find that low-mass galaxies (σ ˜ 100 km s-1) favor a Chabrier IMF, while high-mass galaxies (σ ˜ 350 km s-1) are better described with a steeper (dwarf-rich) IMF slope. While we note that our galaxy sample is small and may suffer from selection effects, these initial results are still promising. A larger sample of galaxies will therefore provide an even clearer picture of IMF trends in this regime. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  4. Astrophysics. Multiple images of a highly magnified supernova formed by an early-type cluster galaxy lens.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Patrick L; Rodney, Steven A; Treu, Tommaso; Foley, Ryan J; Brammer, Gabriel; Schmidt, Kasper B; Zitrin, Adi; Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Graur, Or; Filippenko, Alexei V; Jha, Saurabh W; Riess, Adam G; Bradac, Marusa; Weiner, Benjamin J; Scolnic, Daniel; Malkan, Matthew A; von der Linden, Anja; Trenti, Michele; Hjorth, Jens; Gavazzi, Raphael; Fontana, Adriano; Merten, Julian C; McCully, Curtis; Jones, Tucker; Postman, Marc; Dressler, Alan; Patel, Brandon; Cenko, S Bradley; Graham, Melissa L; Tucker, Bradley E

    2015-03-06

    In 1964, Refsdal hypothesized that a supernova whose light traversed multiple paths around a strong gravitational lens could be used to measure the rate of cosmic expansion. We report the discovery of such a system. In Hubble Space Telescope imaging, we have found four images of a single supernova forming an Einstein cross configuration around a redshift z = 0.54 elliptical galaxy in the MACS J1149.6+2223 cluster. The cluster's gravitational potential also creates multiple images of the z = 1.49 spiral supernova host galaxy, and a future appearance of the supernova elsewhere in the cluster field is expected. The magnifications and staggered arrivals of the supernova images probe the cosmic expansion rate, as well as the distribution of matter in the galaxy and cluster lenses. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. THE EFFECT OF SECOND-GENERATION POPULATIONS ON THE INTEGRATED COLORS OF METAL-RICH GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Chul; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Yoon, Suk-Jin

    2013-05-20

    The mean color of globular clusters (GCs) in early-type galaxies is in general bluer than the integrated color of halo field stars in host galaxies. Metal-rich GCs often appear more associated with field stars than metal-poor GCs, yet show bluer colors than their host galaxy light. Motivated by the discovery of multiple stellar populations in Milky Way GCs, we present a new scenario in which the presence of second-generation (SG) stars in GCs is responsible for the color discrepancy between metal-rich GCs and field stars. The model assumes that the SG populations have an enhanced helium abundance as evidenced bymore » observations, and it gives a good explanation of the bluer optical colors of metal-rich GCs than field stars as well as strong Balmer lines and blue UV colors of metal-rich GCs. Ours may be complementary to the recent scenario suggesting the difference in stellar mass functions (MFs) as an origin for the GC-to-star color offset. A quantitative comparison is given between the SG and MF models.« less

  6. Deep Chandra Observations of NGC 1404: Cluster Plasma Physics Revealed by an Infalling Early-type Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yuanyuan; Kraft, Ralph P.; Roediger, Elke; Nulsen, Paul; Forman, William R.; Churazov, Eugene; Randall, Scott W.; Jones, Christine; Machacek, Marie E.

    2017-01-01

    The intracluster medium (ICM), as a magnetized and highly ionized fluid, provides an ideal laboratory to study plasma physics under extreme conditions that cannot be achieved on Earth. NGC 1404 is a bright elliptical galaxy that is being gas stripped as it falls through the ICM of the Fornax Cluster. We use the new Chandra X-ray observations of NGC 1404 to study ICM microphysics. The interstellar medium of NGC 1404 is characterized by a sharp leading edge, 8 kpc from the Galaxy center, and a short downstream gaseous tail. Contact discontinuities are resolved on unprecedented spatial scales (0.″5 = 45 pc) due to the combination of the proximity of NGC 1404, the superb spatial resolution of Chandra, and the very deep (670 ks) exposure. At the leading edge, we observe sub-kiloparsec-scale eddies generated by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) and put an upper limit of 5% Spitzer on the isotropic viscosity of the hot cluster plasma. We also observe mixing between the hot cluster gas and the cooler galaxy gas in the downstream stripped tail, which provides further evidence of a low viscosity plasma. The assumed ordered magnetic fields in the ICM ought to be smaller than 5 μG to allow KHI to develop. The lack of an evident magnetic draping layer just outside the contact edge is consistent with such an upper limit.

  7. DEEP CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF NGC 1404: CLUSTER PLASMA PHYSICS REVEALED BY AN INFALLING EARLY-TYPE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Yuanyuan; Kraft, Ralph P.; Nulsen, Paul

    The intracluster medium (ICM), as a magnetized and highly ionized fluid, provides an ideal laboratory to study plasma physics under extreme conditions that cannot be achieved on Earth. NGC 1404 is a bright elliptical galaxy that is being gas stripped as it falls through the ICM of the Fornax Cluster. We use the new Chandra X-ray observations of NGC 1404 to study ICM microphysics. The interstellar medium of NGC 1404 is characterized by a sharp leading edge, 8 kpc from the Galaxy center, and a short downstream gaseous tail. Contact discontinuities are resolved on unprecedented spatial scales (0.″5 = 45 pc)more » due to the combination of the proximity of NGC 1404, the superb spatial resolution of Chandra , and the very deep (670 ks) exposure. At the leading edge, we observe sub-kiloparsec-scale eddies generated by Kelvin–Helmholtz instability (KHI) and put an upper limit of 5% Spitzer on the isotropic viscosity of the hot cluster plasma. We also observe mixing between the hot cluster gas and the cooler galaxy gas in the downstream stripped tail, which provides further evidence of a low viscosity plasma. The assumed ordered magnetic fields in the ICM ought to be smaller than 5 μ G to allow KHI to develop. The lack of an evident magnetic draping layer just outside the contact edge is consistent with such an upper limit.« less

  8. The ATLAS3D project - I. A volume-limited sample of 260 nearby early-type galaxies: science goals and selection criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellari, Michele; Emsellem, Eric; Krajnović, Davor; McDermid, Richard M.; Scott, Nicholas; Verdoes Kleijn, G. A.; Young, Lisa M.; Alatalo, Katherine; Bacon, R.; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, M.; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Khochfar, Sadegh; Kuntschner, Harald; Lablanche, Pierre-Yves; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie

    2011-05-01

    The ATLAS3D project is a multiwavelength survey combined with a theoretical modelling effort. The observations span from the radio to the millimetre and optical, and provide multicolour imaging, two-dimensional kinematics of the atomic (H I), molecular (CO) and ionized gas (Hβ, [O III] and [N I]), together with the kinematics and population of the stars (Hβ, Fe5015 and Mg b), for a carefully selected, volume-limited (1.16 × 105 Mpc3) sample of 260 early-type (elliptical E and lenticular S0) galaxies (ETGs). The models include semi-analytic, N-body binary mergers and cosmological simulations of galaxy formation. Here we present the science goals for the project and introduce the galaxy sample and the selection criteria. The sample consists of nearby (D < 42 Mpc, |δ- 29°| < 35°, |b| > 15°) morphologically selected ETGs extracted from a parent sample of 871 galaxies (8 per cent E, 22 per cent S0 and 70 per cent spirals) brighter than MK < -21.5 mag (stellar mass M★≳ 6 ×109 M⊙). We analyse possible selection biases and we conclude that the parent sample is essentially complete and statistically representative of the nearby galaxy population. We present the size-luminosity relation for the spirals and ETGs and show that the ETGs in the ATLAS3D sample define a tight red sequence in a colour-magnitude diagram, with few objects in the transition from the blue cloud. We describe the strategy of the SAURON integral field observations and the extraction of the stellar kinematics with the pPXF method. We find typical 1σ errors of ΔV≈ 6 km s-1, Δσ≈ 7 km s-1, Δh3≈Δh4≈ 0.03 in the mean velocity, the velocity dispersion and Gauss-Hermite (GH) moments for galaxies with effective dispersion σe≳ 120 km s-1. For galaxies with lower σe (≈40 per cent of the sample) the GH moments are gradually penalized by pPXF towards zero to suppress the noise produced by the spectral undersampling and only V and σ can be measured. We give an overview of the

  9. Detection and Characterization of Galaxy Systems at Intermediate Redshift.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrena, Rafael

    2004-11-01

    This thesis is divided into two very related parts. In the first part we implement and apply a galaxy cluster detection method, based on multiband observations in visible. For this purpose, we use a new algorithm, the Voronoi Galaxy Cluster Finder, which identifies overdensities over a Poissonian field of objects. By applying this algorithm over four photometric bands (B, V, R and I) we reduce the possibility of detecting galaxy projection effects and spurious detections instead of real galaxy clusters. The B, V, R and I photometry allows a good characterization of galaxy systems. Therefore, we analyze the colour and early-type sequences in the colour-magnitude diagrams of the detected clusters. This analysis helps us to confirm the selected candidates as actual galaxy systems. In addition, by comparing observational early-type sequences with a semiempirical model we can estimate a photometric redshift for the detected clusters. We will apply this detection method on four 0.5x0.5 square degrees areas, that partially overlap the Postman Distant Cluster Survey (PDCS). The observations were performed as part of the International Time Programme 1999-B using the Wide Field Camera mounted at Isaac Newton Telescope (Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, La Palma island, Spain). The B and R data obtained were completed with V and I photometry performed by Marc Postman. The comparison of our cluster catalogue with that of PDCS reveals that our work is a clear improvement in the cluster detection techniques. Our method efficiently selects galaxy clusters, in particular low mass galaxy systems, even at relative high redshift, and estimate a precise photometric redshift. The validation of our method comes by observing spectroscopically several selected candidates. By comparing photometric and spectroscopic redshifts we conclude: 1) our photometric estimation method gives an precision lower than 0.1; 2) our detection technique is even able to detect galaxy systems at z~0.7 using

  10. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey. XII. Stellar Populations and Kinematics of Compact, Low-mass Early-type Galaxies from Gemini GMOS-IFU Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guérou, Adrien; Emsellem, Eric; McDermid, Richard M.; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Blakeslee, John P.; Durrell, Patrick R.; MacArthur, Lauren A.; Peng, Eric W.; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Gwyn, Stephen

    2015-05-01

    We present Gemini Multi Object Spectrograph integral-field unit (GMOS-IFU) data of eight compact, low-mass early-type galaxies (ETGs) in the Virgo cluster. We analyze their stellar kinematics and stellar population and present two-dimensional maps of these properties covering the central 5″ × 7″ region. We find a large variety of kinematics, from nonrotating to highly rotating objects, often associated with underlying disky isophotes revealed by deep images from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey. In half of our objects, we find a centrally concentrated younger and more metal-rich stellar population. We analyze the specific stellar angular momentum through the λR parameter and find six fast rotators and two slow rotators, one having a thin counterrotating disk. We compare the local galaxy density and stellar populations of our objects with those of 39 more extended low-mass Virgo ETGs from the SMAKCED survey and 260 massive (M > 1010 {{M}⊙ }) ETGs from the ATLAS3D sample. The compact low-mass ETGs in our sample are located in high-density regions, often close to a massive galaxy, and have, on average, older and more metal-rich stellar populations than less compact low-mass galaxies. We find that the stellar population parameters follow lines of constant velocity dispersion in the mass-size plane, smoothly extending the comparable trends found for massive ETGs. Our study supports a scenario where low-mass compact ETGs have experienced long-lived interactions with their environment, including ram-pressure stripping and gravitational tidal forces, that may be responsible for their compact nature.

  11. Dissolved Massive Metal-rich Globular Clusters Can Cause the Range of UV Upturn Strengths Found among Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudfrooij, Paul

    2018-04-01

    I discuss a scenario in which the ultraviolet (UV) upturn of giant early-type galaxies (ETGs) is primarily due to helium-rich stellar populations that formed in massive metal-rich globular clusters (GCs), which subsequently dissolved in the strong tidal field in the central regions of the massive host galaxy. These massive GCs are assumed to show UV upturns similar to those observed recently in M87, the central giant elliptical galaxy in the Virgo cluster of galaxies. Data taken from the literature reveal a strong correlation between the strength of the UV upturn and the specific frequency of metal-rich GCs in ETGs. Adopting a Schechter function parameterization of GC mass functions, simulations of long-term dynamical evolution of GC systems show that the observed correlation between UV upturn strength and GC specific frequency can be explained by variations in the characteristic truncation mass {{ \\mathcal M }}{{c}} such that {{ \\mathcal M }}{{c}} increases with ETG luminosity in a way that is consistent with observed GC luminosity functions in ETGs. These findings suggest that the nature of the UV upturn in ETGs and the variation of its strength among ETGs are causally related to that of helium-rich populations in massive GCs, rather than intrinsic properties of field stars in massive galactic spheroids. With this in mind, I predict that future studies will find that [N/Fe] decreases with increasing galactocentric radius in massive ETGs, and that such gradients have the largest amplitudes in ETGs with the strongest UV upturns.

  12. STELLAR KINEMATICS AND STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF VIRGO CLUSTER DWARF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES FROM THE SMAKCED PROJECT. III. ANGULAR MOMENTUM AND CONSTRAINTS ON FORMATION SCENARIOS

    SciTech Connect

    Toloba, E.; Guhathakurta, P.; Boselli, A.

    2015-02-01

    We analyze the stellar kinematics of 39 dwarf early-type galaxies (dEs) in the Virgo Cluster. Based on the specific stellar angular momentum λ{sub Re} and the ellipticity, we find 11 slow rotators and 28 fast rotators. The fast rotators in the outer parts of the Virgo Cluster rotate significantly faster than fast rotators in the inner parts of the cluster. Moreover, 10 out of the 11 slow rotators are located in the inner 3° (D < 1 Mpc) of the cluster. The fast rotators contain subtle disk-like structures that are visible in high-pass filtered optical images, while the slow rotatorsmore » do not exhibit these structures. In addition, two of the dEs have kinematically decoupled cores and four more have emission partially filling in the Balmer absorption lines. These properties suggest that Virgo Cluster dEs may have originated from late-type star-forming galaxies that were transformed by the environment after their infall into the cluster. The correlation between λ{sub Re} and the clustercentric distance can be explained by a scenario where low luminosity star-forming galaxies fall into the cluster, their gas is rapidly removed by ram-pressure stripping, although some of it can be retained in their core, their star formation is quenched but their stellar kinematics are preserved. After a long time in the cluster and several passes through its center, the galaxies are heated up and transformed into slow rotating dEs.« less

  13. Understanding the formation and evolution of early-type galaxies based on newly developed single-burst stellar population synthesis models in the infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeck, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    whole optical and infrared wavelength range between 3500 and 50000Å which are almost completely based on spectra of observed stars (apart from two gaps which were fitted with theoretical stellar spectra) . We analyze the behaviour of the near-infrared (J - K) and the Spitzer ([3.6]-[4.5]) colour calculated from our models. For ages older than 3 Gyr, both colours depend only slightly on age and metallicity. However, for younger ages, both colours become redder which is caused by the asymptotic giant branch stars contributing significantly to the light in the infrared at ages between 0.1 and 3 Gyr. Furthermore, we find a satisfactory agreement between the optical and near-infrared colours measured from our models and the colours observed from various samples of globular clusters and early-type x galaxies. However, our model predictions are only able to reproduce correctly the Spitzer ([3.6]-[4.5]) colours of older, more massive galaxies that resemble a single-burst population. Younger, less massive and more metal-poor galaxies show redder colours than our models. This mismatch can be explained by a more extended star formation history of these galaxies which includes a metal-poor or/and young population. The Spitzer ([3.6]-[4.5]) colours derived from our models also agree very well with those from most other models available in this wavelength range as long as they also correctly take into account a strong CO absorption band situated at 4.5 μm. The model predictions for colours in the near-infrared, such as (J - K), differ more between the different sets of models, depending on the underlying prescriptions for the asymptotic giant branch stellar evolutionary phase. Compared to other authors, we adopt only a moderate contribution of asymptotic giant branch stars to our models. Our stellar population models allow us also to determine mass-to-light ratios in different infrared bands. Consequently, we can confirm that the massto- light ratio determined in the Spitzer [3

  14. Surface Brightness Profiles and Energetics of Intracluster Gas in Cool Galaxy Clusters and ROSAT Observations of Bright, Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Raymond E., III

    1994-01-01

    Preliminary results on the elliptical galaxy NGC 1407 were published in the proceedings of the first ROSAT symposium. NGC 1407 is embedded in diffuse X-ray-emitting gas which is extensive enough that it is likely to be related to the surrounding group of galaxies, rather than just NGC 1407. Spectral data for NGC 1407 (AO2) and IC 1459 (AO3) are also included in a complete sample of elliptical galaxies I compiled in collaboration with David Davis. This allowed us to construct the first complete X-ray sample of optically-selected elliptical galaxies. The complete sample allows us to apply Malmquist bias corrections to the observed correlation between X-ray and optical luminosities. I continue to work on the implications of this first complete X-ray sample of elliptical galaxies. Paul Eskridge Dave Davis and I also analyzed three long ROSAT PSPC observations of the small (but not dwarf) elliptical galaxy M32. We found the X-ray spectra and variability to be consistent with either a Low Mass X-Ray Binary (LMXRB) or a putative 'micro"-AGN.

  15. Distance indicators based on the luminosity-profile shapes of early-type galaxies-a reply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Christopher Ke-Shih; Currie, Malcolm J.

    1998-05-01

    In a recent paper, Binggeli & Jerjen (1998) question the value of the extragalactic distance indicators presented by Young & Currie (1994 & 1995) and state that they have refuted `the claim that the Virgo dEs [dwarf-elliptical galaxies]...are distributed in a prolate structure stretching from 8 to 20 Mpc distance (Young & Currie 1995).' even though no such claim was ever made. In this paper, we examine Binggeli & Jerjen's claims that intrinsic scatter rather than spatial depth must be the main cause of the large scatters observed in the relevant scaling relationships for Virgo galaxies. We investigate the accuracy of Binggeli & Jerjen's photometric parameters and find that while their profile curvature and scalelength measurements are probably useful, their total magnitude and central surface-brightness measurements are not useful for the purpose of investigating scaling laws because they suffer from serious systematic and random errors. We also investigate Binggeli & Jerjen's criticisms of our (1995) analysis. We demonstrate that their test for strong mutual dependence between distance estimates based on the two different scaling laws is invalid because of its prior assumption of negligible cluster depth. We further demonstrate that the [relative] distance estimates on which their kinematical arguments are based cannot be meaningful, not only because of the seriousness of the photometric errors, but also because they are undermined by the prior assumption that depth effects can again be neglected. Interestingly, we also find that Binggeli & Jerjen's own dataset does itself contain evidence for large depth. Using the observed correlation between scale-length and profile-curvature, (the only correlation that can be investigated meaningfully using their dataset), we find that the frequency distribution of residuals with respect to the best fitting curve deviates significantly from that expected from a uni-modal Gaussian distribution. Clearly, if as Binggeli & Jerjen

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: ATLAS3D Hα imaging of early-type galaxies (Gavazzi+, 2018)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavazzi, G.; Consolandi, G.; Pedraglio, S.; Fossati, M.; Fumagalli, M.; Boselli, A.

    2017-09-01

    The sample of ETGs analyzed in this work was extracted from the ATLAS3D whole-sky catalog of 260 ETGs. Narrow-band imaging of the Hα line emission (rest frame λ=6562.8Å) of 118 galaxies in the main program (+ 20 filler targets) was obtained using the 2.1m telescope at the SPM, belonging to the Mexican Observatorio Astronomico Nacional (OAN). The Hα measurements of the remaining 29 targets included in the present investigation are taken from the literature. The observations were scheduled in two observing runs of eight nights each in 2015 (March 17-24) and 2016 (April 7-14), both including new-moon periods. (6 data files).

  17. A 30 kpc Chain of "Beads on a String" Star Formation between Two Merging Early Type Galaxies in the Core of a Strong-lensing Galaxy Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Grant R.; Gladders, Michael D.; Baum, Stefi A.; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Bayliss, Matthew B.; Cooke, Kevin C.; Dahle, Håkon; Davis, Timothy A.; Florian, Michael; Rigby, Jane R.; Sharon, Keren; Soto, Emmaris; Wuyts, Eva

    2014-08-01

    New Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet and optical imaging of the strong-lensing galaxy cluster SDSS J1531+3414 (z = 0.335) reveals two centrally dominant elliptical galaxies participating in an ongoing major merger. The interaction is at least somewhat rich in cool gas, as the merger is associated with a complex network of 19 massive superclusters of young stars (or small tidal dwarf galaxies) separated by ~1 kpc in projection from one another, combining to an estimated total star formation rate of ~5 M ⊙ yr-1. The resolved young stellar superclusters are threaded by narrow Hα, [O II], and blue excess filaments arranged in a network spanning ~27 kpc across the two merging galaxies. This morphology is strongly reminiscent of the well-known "beads on a string" mode of star formation observed on kiloparsec scales in the arms of spiral galaxies, resonance rings, and in tidal tails between interacting galaxies. Nevertheless, the arrangement of this star formation relative to the nuclei of the two galaxies is difficult to interpret in a dynamical sense, as no known "beads on a string" systems associated with kiloparsec-scale tidal interactions exhibit such lopsided morphology relative to the merger participants. In this Letter, we present the images and follow-up spectroscopy and discuss possible physical interpretations for the unique arrangement of the young stellar clusters. While we suggest that this morphology is likely to be dynamically short-lived, a more quantitative understanding awaits necessary multiwavelength follow-up, including optical integral field spectroscopy, ALMA submillimeter interferometry, and Chandra X-ray imaging.

  18. Nature vs. nurture in the low-density environment: structure and evolution of early-type dwarf galaxies in poor groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annibali, F.; Grützbauch, R.; Rampazzo, R.; Bressan, A.; Zeilinger, W. W.

    2011-04-01

    We present the stellar population properties of 13 dwarf galaxies residing in poor groups (low-density environment, LDE) observed with VIMOS at VLT. Ages, metallicities, and [α/Fe] ratios were derived within an r < re/2 aperture from the Lick indices Hβ, Mgb, Fe5270, and Fe5335 through comparison with our simple stellar population (SSP) models that account for variable [α/Fe] ratios. For a fiducial subsample of 10 early-type dwarfs, we derived median values and scatters around the medians of 5.7 ± 4.4 Gyr, -0.26 ± 0.28, and -0.04 ± 0.33 for age, log Z/Z⊙, and [α/Fe] , respectively. For a selection of bright early-type galaxies (ETGs) from an earlier sample residing in a comparable environment, we derive median values of 9.8 ± 4.1 Gyr, 0.06 ± 0.16, and 0.18 ± 0.13 for the same stellar population parameters. It follows that dwarfs are on average younger, less metal rich, and less enhanced in the α-elements than giants, in agreement with the extrapolation to the low-mass regime of the scaling relations derived for giant ETGs. From the total (dwarf + giant) sample, we find that age ∝ σ0.39 ± 0.22, Z ∝ σ0.80 ± 0.16, and α/Fe ∝ σ0.42 ± 0.22. We also find correlations with morphology, in the sense that the metallicity and the [α/Fe] ratio increase with the Sersic index n or with the bulge-to-total light fraction B/T. The presence of a strong morphology-[α/Fe] relation appears to contradict the possible evolution along the Hubble sequence from low B/T (low n) to high B/T (high n) galaxies. We also investigate the role played by environment by comparing the properties of our LDE dwarfs with those of Coma red passive dwarfs from the literature. We find possible evidence that LDE dwarfs experienced more prolonged star formations than Coma dwarfs, however larger data samples are needed to draw firmer conclusions. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile.

  19. VEGAS-SSS. A VST early-type galaxy survey: analysis of small stellar systems. Testing the methodology on the globular cluster system in NGC 3115

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantiello, Michele; Capaccioli, Massimo; Napolitano, Nicola; Grado, Aniello; Limatola, Luca; Paolillo, Maurizio; Iodice, Enrica; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Raimondo, Gabriella; Spavone, Marilena; La Barbera, Francesco; Puzia, Thomas H.; Schipani, Pietro

    2015-03-01

    to study SSSs in the field of bright early-type galaxies; and ii) the great potential of the VEGAS survey to produce original results on SSSs science, mainly thanks to the wide-field imaging adopted. Full Table 3 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/576/A14

  20. Inferring the star-formation histories of the most massive and passive early-type galaxies at z < 0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citro, Annalisa; Pozzetti, Lucia; Moresco, Michele; Cimatti, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    Context. In the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmological framework, massive galaxies are the end-points of the hierarchical evolution and are therefore key probes for understanding how the baryonic matter evolves within the dark matter halos. Aims: The aim of this work is to use the archaeological approach in order to infer the stellar population properties and star formation histories of the most massive (M > 1010.75 M⊙) and passive early-type galaxies (ETGs) at 0 < z < 0.3 (corresponding to a cosmic time interval of ~3.3 Gyr) based on stacked, high signal-to-noise (S/N), spectra extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Our study is focused on the most passive ETGs in order to avoid the contamination of galaxies with residual star formation activity and extract the evolutionary information on the oldest envelope of the global galaxy population. Methods: Unlike most previous studies in this field, we did not rely on individual absorption features such as the Lick indices, but we used the information present in the full spectrum with the STARLIGHT public code, adopting different stellar population synthesis models. Successful tests have been performed to assess the reliability of STARLIGHT to retrieve the evolutionary properties of the ETG stellar populations such as the age, metallicity and star formation history. The results indicate that these properties can be derived with accuracy better than 10% at S/N ≳ 10-20, and also that the procedure of stacking galaxy spectra does not introduce significant biases into their retrieval. Results: Based on our spectral analysis, we found that the ETGs of our sample are very old systems - the most massive ones are almost as old as the Universe. The stellar metallicities are slightly supersolar, with a mean of Z ~ 0.027 ± 0.002 and Z ~ 0.029 ± 0.0015 (depending on the spectral synthesis models used for the fit) and do not depend on redshift. Dust extinction is very low, with a mean of AV ~ 0.08 ± 0.030 mag

  1. Detection of CO (J=1-0) in the dwarf elliptical galaxy NGC 185

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiklind, Tommy; Rydbeck, Gustaf

    1987-01-01

    The detection of CO (J = 1-0) emission in the dwarf elliptical galaxy NGC 185 is reported. The presence of massive molecular clouds in this early-type galaxy supports the idea of recent or ongoing stellar formation indicated by the population of blue stars in the center. The CO was detected in two positions in the galaxy, the center, and a prominent dustcloud. The emission profile has two peaks, roughly centered around the systemic velocity. It is found that NGC 185 is overluminous in blue light for its CO luminosity compared with Sc galaxies. This might indicate a higher star-formation efficiency for NGC 185 than for the late-type galaxies.

  2. The Structure and Dynamics of Luminous and Dark Matter in the Early-Type Lens Galaxy of 0047-281 at z = 0.485

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopmans, Léon V. E.; Treu, Tommaso

    2003-02-01

    We have measured the kinematic profile of the early-type (E/S0) lens galaxy in the system 0047-281 (z=0.485) with the Echelle Spectrograph and Imager (ESI) on the W. M. Keck II Telescope, as part of the Lenses Structure and Dynamics (LSD) Survey. The central velocity dispersion is σ=229+/-15 km s-1, and the dispersion profile is nearly flat to beyond one effective radius (Re). No significant streaming motion is found. Surface photometry of the lens galaxy is measured from Hubble Space Telescope images. From the offset from the local fundamental plane (FP), we measure an evolution of the effective mass-to-light ratio (M/L) of Δlog(M/LB)=-0.37+/-0.06 between z=0 and 0.485, consistent with the observed evolution of field E/S0 galaxies. (We assume h65=1, Ωm=0.3, and ΩΛ=0.7 throughout.) Gravitational lens models provide a mass of ME=(4.06+/-0.20)×1011h- 165 Msolar inside the Einstein radius of RE=(8.70+/-0.07)h-165 kpc. This allows us to break the degeneracy between velocity anisotropy and density profile typical of dynamical models for E/S0 galaxies. We find that constant-M/L models, even with strongly tangential anisotropy of the stellar velocity ellipsoid, are excluded at more than 99.9% CL. The total mass distribution inside RE can be described by a single power-law density profile, ρt~r-γ', with an effective slope γ'=1.90+0.05-0.23 (68% CL; +/-0.1 systematic error). Two-component models yield an upper limit (68% CL) of γ<=1.55(1.12) on the power-law slope of the dark matter density profile and a projected dark matter mass fraction of 0.41(0.54)+0.15-0.05(+0.09- 0.06) (68% CL) inside RE, for Osipkov-Merritt models with anisotropy radius ri=∞(Re). The stellar M*/L values derived from the FP agree well with the maximum allowed value from the isotropic dynamical models (i.e., the ``maximum-bulge solution''). The fact that both lens systems 0047-281 (z=0.485) and MG 2016+112 (z=1.004) are well described inside their Einstein radii by a constant-M*/L stellar

  3. Does the linear conversion between calcium infrared triplet and metallicity of globular clusters in early-type galaxies hold in the whole range of metallicity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Chul; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Lee, Young-Wook; Lee, Sang-Yoon

    2015-01-01

    The calcium infrared triplet (CaT) is one of the prominent absorption features in the infrared wavelength regime. Recently, these absorption features have been getting attention in the prediction of metallicity of globular clusters (GCs) in early-type galaxies (ETGs) because of its strong sensitivity to the metallicity and calcium abundance of a star. However, based on our population synthesis model for CaT, we find that measuring metallicity directly from CaT is inaccurate because the formation mechanism of Ca II ionised line is very inefficient in the cool stars which are abundant in metal-rich stellar populations. This characteristics of Ca II ionised line make the CaT-metallicity relation to converge around 8 angstrom in the metal-rich regime. This is why the metallicity of simple stellar populations, such as GCs, greater than [Fe/H]~-0.5 is unreliable when the linear conversion between CaT and metallicity is applied to derive metallicity. In addition, we have successfully simulated the metal-rich CaT peaks found in GCs in ETGs by using the nonlinear CaT-metallicity relation in the metal-rich regime. This can also explain the difference between color and CaT distributions of GCs in various ETGs. Based on these results, we suggest that CaT is not a good metallicity indicator for the metal-rich stellar populations.

  4. Implications for the Origin of Early-type Dwarf Galaxies: A Detailed Look at the Isolated Rotating Early-type Dwarf Galaxy LEDA 2108986 (CG 611), Ramifications for the Fundamental Plane’s {S}_{K}^{2} Kinematic Scaling, and the Spin-Ellipticity Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Alister W.; Janz, Joachim; Penny, Samantha J.; Chilingarian, Igor V.; Ciambur, Bogdan C.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Davies, Roger L.

    2017-05-01

    Selected from a sample of nine, isolated, dwarf early-type galaxies (ETGs) with the same range of kinematic properties as dwarf ETGs in clusters, we use LEDA 2108986 (CG 611) to address the nature versus nurture debate regarding the formation of dwarf ETGs. The presence of faint disk structures and rotation within some cluster dwarf ETGs has often been heralded as evidence that they were once late-type spiral or dwarf irregular galaxies prior to experiencing a cluster-induced transformation into an ETG. However, CG 611 also contains significant stellar rotation (≈20 km s-1) over its inner half-light radius ({R}{{e},{maj}}=0.71 kpc), and its stellar structure and kinematics resemble those of cluster ETGs. In addition to hosting a faint young nuclear spiral within a possible intermediate-scale stellar disk, CG 611 has accreted an intermediate-scale, counter-rotating gas disk. It is therefore apparent that dwarf ETGs can be built by accretion events, as opposed to disk-stripping scenarios. We go on to discuss how both dwarf and ordinary ETGs with intermediate-scale disks, whether under (de)construction or not, are not fully represented by the kinematic scaling {S}0.5=\\sqrt{0.5 {V}{rot}2+{σ }2}, and we also introduce a modified spin-ellipticity diagram λ (R)-ɛ (R) with the potential to track galaxies with such disks.

  5. H-ATLAS/GAMA: the nature and characteristics of optically red galaxies detected at submillimetre wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dariush, A.; Dib, S.; Hony, S.; Smith, D. J. B.; Zhukovska, S.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; Andrae, E.; Baes, M.; Baldry, I.; Bauer, A.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Bourne, N.; Cava, A.; Clements, D.; Cluver, M.; Cooray, A.; De Zotti, G.; Driver, S.; Grootes, M. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Hopwood, R.; Kaviraj, S.; Kelvin, L.; Lara-Lopez, M. A.; Liske, J.; Loveday, J.; Maddox, S.; Madore, B.; Michałowski, M. J.; Pearson, C.; Popescu, C.; Robotham, A.; Rowlands, K.; Seibert, M.; Shabani, F.; Smith, M. W. L.; Taylor, E. N.; Tuffs, R.; Valiante, E.; Virdee, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    We combine Herschel/SPIRE submillimetre (submm) observations with existing multiwavelength data to investigate the characteristics of low-redshift, optically red galaxies detected in submm bands. We select a sample of galaxies in the redshift range 0.01 ≤ z ≤ 0.2, having >5σ detections in the SPIRE 250 μm submm waveband. Sources are then divided into two sub-samples of red and blue galaxies, based on their UV-optical colours. Galaxies in the red sample account for ≈4.2 per cent of the total number of sources with stellar masses M* ≳ 1010 M⊙. Following visual classification of the red galaxies, we find that ≳30 per cent of them are early-type galaxies and ≳40 per cent are spirals. The colour of the red-spiral galaxies could be the result of their highly inclined orientation and/or a strong contribution of the old stellar population. It is found that irrespective of their morphological types, red and blue sources occupy environments with more or less similar densities (I.e. the Σ5 parameter). From the analysis of the spectral energy distributions of galaxies in our samples based on MAGPHYS, we find that galaxies in the red sample (of any morphological type) have dust masses similar to those in the blue sample (I.e. normal spiral/star-forming systems). However, in comparison to the red-spirals and in particular blue systems, red-ellipticals have lower mean dust-to-stellar mass ratios. Besides galaxies in the red-elliptical sample have much lower mean star formation/specific star formation rates in contrast to their counterparts in the blue sample. Our results support a scenario where dust in early-type systems is likely to be of an external origin.

  6. Semi-empirical catalog of early-type galaxy-halo systems: dark matter density profiles, halo contraction and dark matter annihilation strength

    SciTech Connect

    Chae, Kyu-Hyun; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Frieman, Joshua A.

    With Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxy data and halo data from up-to-date N-body simulations within the ΛCDM framework we construct a semi-empirical catalog (SEC) of early-type galaxy-halo systems by making a self-consistent bivariate statistical match of stellar mass (M{sub *}) and velocity dispersion (σ) with halo virial mass (M{sub vir}) as demonstrated here for the first time. We then assign stellar mass profile and velocity dispersion profile parameters to each system in the SEC using their observed correlations with M{sub *} and σ. Simultaneously, we solve for dark matter density profile of each halo using the spherical Jeans equation. Themore » resulting dark matter density profiles deviate in general from the dissipationless profile of Navarro-Frenk-White or Einasto and their mean inner density slope and concentration vary systematically with M{sub vir}. Statistical tests of the distribution of profiles at fixed M{sub vir} rule out the null hypothesis that it follows the distribution predicted by dissipationless N-body simulations for M{sub vir}∼<10{sup 13.5} {sup –} {sup 14.5} M{sub s}un. These dark matter profiles imply that dark matter density is, on average, enhanced significantly in the inner region of halos with M{sub vir}∼<10{sup 13.5} {sup –} {sup 14.5} M{sub s}un supporting halo contraction. The main characteristics of halo contraction are: (1) the mean dark matter density within the effective radius has increased by a factor varying systematically up to ≈ 3–4 at M{sub vir} = 10{sup 12} M{sub s}un, and (2) the inner density slope has a mean of (α) ≈ 1.3 with ρ{sub dm}(r)∝r{sup −α} and a halo-to-halo rms scatter of rms(α) ∼ 0.4–0.5 for 10{sup 12} M{sub s}un∼« less

  7. Gravitational detection of a low-mass dark satellite galaxy at cosmological distance.

    PubMed

    Vegetti, S; Lagattuta, D J; McKean, J P; Auger, M W; Fassnacht, C D; Koopmans, L V E

    2012-01-18

    The mass function of dwarf satellite galaxies that are observed around Local Group galaxies differs substantially from simulations based on cold dark matter: the simulations predict many more dwarf galaxies than are seen. The Local Group, however, may be anomalous in this regard. A massive dark satellite in an early-type lens galaxy at a redshift of 0.222 was recently found using a method based on gravitational lensing, suggesting that the mass fraction contained in substructure could be higher than is predicted from simulations. The lack of very low-mass detections, however, prohibited any constraint on their mass function. Here we report the presence of a (1.9 ± 0.1) × 10(8) M dark satellite galaxy in the Einstein ring system JVAS B1938+666 (ref. 11) at a redshift of 0.881, where M denotes the solar mass. This satellite galaxy has a mass similar to that of the Sagittarius galaxy, which is a satellite of the Milky Way. We determine the logarithmic slope of the mass function for substructure beyond the local Universe to be 1.1(+0.6)(-0.4), with an average mass fraction of 3.3(+3.6)(-1.8) per cent, by combining data on both of these recently discovered galaxies. Our results are consistent with the predictions from cold dark matter simulations at the 95 per cent confidence level, and therefore agree with the view that galaxies formed hierarchically in a Universe composed of cold dark matter.

  8. History and destiny of an emerging early-type galaxy. New IFU insights on the major-merger remnant NGC 7252

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, J.; Husemann, B.; Kuntschner, H.; Martín-Navarro, I.; Bournaud, F.; Duc, P.-A.; Emsellem, E.; Krajnović, D.; Lyubenova, M.; McDermid, R. M.

    2018-06-01

    Context. The merging of galaxies is one key aspect in our favourite hierarchical ΛCDM Universe and is an important channel leading to massive quiescent elliptical galaxies. Understanding this complex transformational process is ongoing. Aims: We aim to study NGC 7252, which is one of the nearest major-merger galaxy remnants, observed 1 Gyr after the collision of presumably two gas-rich disc galaxies. It is therefore an ideal laboratory to study the processes inherent to the transformation of disc galaxies to ellipticals. Methods: We obtained wide-field IFU spectroscopy with the VLT-VIMOS integral-field spectrograph covering the central 50'' × 50'' of NGC 7252 to map the stellar and ionised gas kinematics, and the distribution and conditions of the ionised gas, revealing the extent of ongoing star formation and recent star formation history. Results: Contrary to previous studies, we find the inner gas disc not to be counter-rotating with respect to the stars. In addition, the stellar kinematics appear complex with a clear indication of a prolate-like rotation component which suggests a polar merger configuration. The ongoing star formation rate is 2.2 ± 0.6 M⊙ yr-1 and implies a typical depletion time of 2 Gyr given the molecular gas content. Furthermore, the spatially resolved star formation history suggests a slight radial dependence, moving outwards at later times. We confirm a large AGN-ionised gas cloud previously discovered 5 kpc south of the nucleus, and find a higher ionisation state of the ionised gas at the galaxy centre relative to the surrounding gas disc. Although the higher ionisation towards the centre is potentially degenerate within the central star forming ring, it may be associated with a low-luminosity AGN. Conclusions: Although NGC 7252 has been classified as post-starburst galaxy at the centre, the elliptical-like major-merger remnant still appears very active. A central kpc-scale gas disc has presumably re-formed quickly within the last

  9. The Tolman Surface Brightness Test for the Reality of the Expansion. III. Hubble Space Telescope Profile and Surface Brightness Data for Early-Type Galaxies in Three High-Redshift Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, Lori M.; Sandage, Allan

    2001-09-01

    Photometric data for 34 early-type galaxies in the three high-redshift clusters Cl 1324+3011 (z=0.76), Cl 1604+4304 (z=0.90), and Cl 1604+4321 (z=0.92), observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and with the Keck 10 m telescopes by Oke, Postman, & Lubin, are analyzed to obtain the photometric parameters of mean surface brightness, magnitudes for the growth curves, and angular radii at various Petrosian η radii. The angular radii at η=1.3 mag for the program galaxies are all larger than 0.24". All the galaxies are well resolved at this angular size using HST, whose point-spread function is 0.05", half-width at half-maximum. The data for each of the program galaxies are listed at η=1.0, 1.3, 1.5, 1.7, and 2.0 mag. They are corrected by color equations and K-terms for the effects of redshift to the rest-frame Cape/Cousins I for Cl 1324+3011 and Cl 1604+4304 and R for Cl 1604+4321. The K-corrections are calculated from synthetic spectral energy distributions derived from evolving stellar population models of Bruzual & Charlot, that have been fitted to the observed broadband (BVRI) AB magnitudes of each program galaxy. The listed photometric data are independent of all cosmological parameters. They are the source data for the Tolman surface brightness test made in Paper IV.

  10. An optical/NIR survey of globular clusters in early-type galaxies. III. On the colour bimodality of globular cluster systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chies-Santos, A. L.; Larsen, S. S.; Cantiello, M.; Strader, J.; Kuntschner, H.; Wehner, E. M.; Brodie, J. P.

    2012-03-01

    Context. The interpretation that bimodal colour distributions of globular clusters (GCs) reflect bimodal metallicity distributions has been challenged. Non-linearities in the colour to metallicity conversions caused for example by the horizontal branch (HB) stars may be responsible for transforming a unimodal metallicity distribution into a bimodal (optical) colour distribution. Aims: We study optical/near-infrared (NIR) colour distributions of the GC systems in 14 E/S0 galaxies. Methods: We test whether the bimodal feature, generally present in optical colour distributions, remains in the optical/NIR ones. The latter colour combination is a better metallicity proxy than the former. We use KMM and GMM tests to quantify the probability that different colour distributions are better described by a bimodal, as opposed to a unimodal distribution. Results: We find that double-peaked colour distributions are more commonly seen in optical than in optical/NIR colours. For some of the galaxies where the optical (g - z) distribution is clearly bimodal, a bimodal distribution is not preferred over a unimodal one at a statistically significant level for the (g - K) and (z - K) distributions. The two most cluster-rich galaxies in our sample, NGC 4486 and NGC 4649, show some interesting differences. The (g - K) distribution of NGC 4649 is better described by a bimodal distribution, while this is true for the (g - K) distribution of NGC 4486 GCs only if restricted to a brighter sub-sample with small K-band errors (<0.05 mag). Formally, the K-band photometric errors cannot be responsible for blurring bimodal metallicity distributions to unimodal (g - K) colour distributions. However, simulations including the extra scatter in the colour-colour diagrams (not fully accounted for in the photometric errors) show that such scatter may contribute to the disappearance of bimodality in (g - K) for the full NGC 4486 sample. For the less cluster-rich galaxies results are inconclusive due to

  11. Using transfer learning to detect galaxy mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, Sandro; Schawinksi, Kevin; Zhang, Ce; Weigel, Anna K.; Turp, M. Dennis

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the use of deep convolutional neural networks (deep CNNs) for automatic visual detection of galaxy mergers. Moreover, we investigate the use of transfer learning in conjunction with CNNs, by retraining networks first trained on pictures of everyday objects. We test the hypothesis that transfer learning is useful for improving classification performance for small training sets. This would make transfer learning useful for finding rare objects in astronomical imaging datasets. We find that these deep learning methods perform significantly better than current state-of-the-art merger detection methods based on nonparametric systems like CAS and GM20. Our method is end-to-end and robust to image noise and distortions; it can be applied directly without image preprocessing. We also find that transfer learning can act as a regulariser in some cases, leading to better overall classification accuracy (p = 0.02). Transfer learning on our full training set leads to a lowered error rate from 0.0381 down to 0.0321, a relative improvement of 15%. Finally, we perform a basic sanity-check by creating a merger sample with our method, and comparing with an already existing, manually created merger catalogue in terms of colour-mass distribution and stellar mass function.

  12. Detection of CO emission in Hydra 1 cluster galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huchtmeier, W. K.

    1990-01-01

    A survey of bright Hydra cluster spiral galaxies for the CO(1-0) transition at 115 GHz was performed with the 15m Swedish-ESO submillimeter telescope (SEST). Five out of 15 galaxies observed have been detected in the CO(1-0) line. The largest spiral galaxy in the cluster, NGC 3312, got more CO than any spiral of the Virgo cluster. This Sa-type galaxy is optically largely distorted and disrupted on one side. It is a good candidate for ram pressure stripping while passing through the cluster's central region. A comparison with global CO properties of Virgo cluster spirals shows a relatively good agreement with the detected Hydra cluster galaxies.

  13. Automatic Detection of Galaxy Type From Datasets of Galaxies Image Based on Image Retrieval Approach.

    PubMed

    Abd El Aziz, Mohamed; Selim, I M; Xiong, Shengwu

    2017-06-30

    This paper presents a new approach for the automatic detection of galaxy morphology from datasets based on an image-retrieval approach. Currently, there are several classification methods proposed to detect galaxy types within an image. However, in some situations, the aim is not only to determine the type of galaxy within the queried image, but also to determine the most similar images for query image. Therefore, this paper proposes an image-retrieval method to detect the type of galaxies within an image and return with the most similar image. The proposed method consists of two stages, in the first stage, a set of features is extracted based on shape, color and texture descriptors, then a binary sine cosine algorithm selects the most relevant features. In the second stage, the similarity between the features of the queried galaxy image and the features of other galaxy images is computed. Our experiments were performed using the EFIGI catalogue, which contains about 5000 galaxies images with different types (edge-on spiral, spiral, elliptical and irregular). We demonstrate that our proposed approach has better performance compared with the particle swarm optimization (PSO) and genetic algorithm (GA) methods.

  14. A 30 kpc CHAIN OF ''BEADS ON A STRING'' STAR FORMATION BETWEEN TWO MERGING EARLY TYPE GALAXIES IN THE CORE OF A STRONG-LENSING GALAXY CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, Grant R.; Davis, Timothy A.; Gladders, Michael D.

    2014-08-01

    New Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet and optical imaging of the strong-lensing galaxy cluster SDSS J1531+3414 (z = 0.335) reveals two centrally dominant elliptical galaxies participating in an ongoing major merger. The interaction is at least somewhat rich in cool gas, as the merger is associated with a complex network of 19 massive superclusters of young stars (or small tidal dwarf galaxies) separated by ∼1 kpc in projection from one another, combining to an estimated total star formation rate of ∼5 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. The resolved young stellar superclusters are threaded by narrow Hα, [O II], and blue excess filaments arrangedmore » in a network spanning ∼27 kpc across the two merging galaxies. This morphology is strongly reminiscent of the well-known ''beads on a string'' mode of star formation observed on kiloparsec scales in the arms of spiral galaxies, resonance rings, and in tidal tails between interacting galaxies. Nevertheless, the arrangement of this star formation relative to the nuclei of the two galaxies is difficult to interpret in a dynamical sense, as no known ''beads on a string'' systems associated with kiloparsec-scale tidal interactions exhibit such lopsided morphology relative to the merger participants. In this Letter, we present the images and follow-up spectroscopy and discuss possible physical interpretations for the unique arrangement of the young stellar clusters. While we suggest that this morphology is likely to be dynamically short-lived, a more quantitative understanding awaits necessary multiwavelength follow-up, including optical integral field spectroscopy, ALMA submillimeter interferometry, and Chandra X-ray imaging.« less

  15. Anomaly detection for machine learning redshifts applied to SDSS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, Ben; Rau, Markus Michael; Paech, Kerstin; Bonnett, Christopher; Seitz, Stella; Weller, Jochen

    2015-10-01

    We present an analysis of anomaly detection for machine learning redshift estimation. Anomaly detection allows the removal of poor training examples, which can adversely influence redshift estimates. Anomalous training examples may be photometric galaxies with incorrect spectroscopic redshifts, or galaxies with one or more poorly measured photometric quantity. We select 2.5 million `clean' SDSS DR12 galaxies with reliable spectroscopic redshifts, and 6730 `anomalous' galaxies with spectroscopic redshift measurements which are flagged as unreliable. We contaminate the clean base galaxy sample with galaxies with unreliable redshifts and attempt to recover the contaminating galaxies using the Elliptical Envelope technique. We then train four machine learning architectures for redshift analysis on both the contaminated sample and on the preprocessed `anomaly-removed' sample and measure redshift statistics on a clean validation sample generated without any preprocessing. We find an improvement on all measured statistics of up to 80 per cent when training on the anomaly removed sample as compared with training on the contaminated sample for each of the machine learning routines explored. We further describe a method to estimate the contamination fraction of a base data sample.

  16. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): detection of low-surface-brightness galaxies from SDSS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Richard P.; Baldry, I. K.; Kelvin, L. S.; James, P. A.; Driver, S. P.; Prescott, M.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Davies, L. J. M.; Holwerda, B. W.; Liske, J.; Norberg, P.; Moffett, A. J.; Wright, A. H.

    2016-12-01

    We report on a search for new low-surface-brightness galaxies (LSBGs) using Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data within the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) equatorial fields. The search method consisted of masking objects detected with SDSS PHOTO, combining gri images weighted to maximize the expected signal-to-noise ratio, and smoothing the images. The processed images were then run through a detection algorithm that finds all pixels above a set threshold and groups them based on their proximity to one another. The list of detections was cleaned of contaminants such as diffraction spikes and the faint wings of masked objects. From these, selecting potentially the brightest in terms of total flux, a list of 343 LSBGs was produced having been confirmed using VISTA Kilo-degree Infrared Galaxy Survey (VIKING) imaging. The photometry of this sample was refined using the deeper VIKING Z band as the aperture-defining band. Measuring their g - I and J - K colours shows that most are consistent with being at redshifts less than 0.2. The photometry is carried out using an AUTO aperture for each detection giving surface brightnesses of μr ≳ 25 mag arcsec-2 and magnitudes of r > 19.8 mag. None of these galaxies are bright enough to be within the GAMA main survey limit but could be part of future deeper surveys to measure the low-mass end of the galaxy stellar mass function.

  17. The ATLAS3D project - XX. Mass-size and mass-σ distributions of early-type galaxies: bulge fraction drives kinematics, mass-to-light ratio, molecular gas fraction and stellar initial mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellari, Michele; McDermid, Richard M.; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, M.; Crocker, Alison F.; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M.

    2013-07-01

    In the companion Paper XV of this series, we derive accurate total mass-to-light ratios (M/L)_JAM≈ (M/L)({r}= {R_e}) within a sphere of radius r= {R_e} centred on the galaxy, as well as stellar (M/L)stars (with the dark matter removed) for the volume-limited and nearly mass-selected (stellar mass M_star ≳ 6× 10^9 { M_{⊙}}) ATLAS3D sample of 260 early-type galaxies (ETGs, ellipticals Es and lenticulars S0s). Here, we use those parameters to study the two orthogonal projections ({M_JAM}, {σ _e}) and ({M_JAM}, {R_e^maj}) of the thin Mass Plane (MP) ({M_JAM}, {σ _e}, {R_e^maj}) which describes the distribution of the galaxy population, where {M_JAM}≡ L× (M/L)_JAM≈ M_star. The distribution of galaxy properties on both projections of the MP is characterized by: (i) the same zone of exclusion (ZOE), which can be transformed from one projection to the other using the scalar virial equation. The ZOE is roughly described by two power laws, joined by a break at a characteristic mass {M_JAM}≈ 3× 10^{10} { M_{⊙}}, which corresponds to the minimum Re and maximum stellar density. This results in a break in the mean {M_JAM}-{σ _e} relation with trends {M_JAM}∝ σ _e^{2.3} and {M_JAM}∝ σ _e^{4.7} at small and large σe, respectively; (ii) a characteristic mass {M_JAM}≈ 2× 10^{11} { M_{⊙}} which separates a population dominated by flat fast rotator with discs and spiral galaxies at lower masses, from one dominated by quite round slow rotators at larger masses; (iii) below that mass the distribution of ETGs' properties on the two projections of the MP tends to be constant along lines of roughly constant σe, or equivalently along lines with {R_e^maj}∝ {M_JAM}, respectively (or even better parallel to the ZOE: {R_e^maj}∝ M_JAM^{0.75}); (iv) it forms a continuous and parallel sequence with the distribution of spiral galaxies; (v) at even lower masses, the distribution of fast-rotator ETGs and late spirals naturally extends to that of dwarf ETGs (Sph

  18. A population of compact elliptical galaxies detected with the Virtual Observatory.

    PubMed

    Chilingarian, Igor; Cayatte, Véronique; Revaz, Yves; Dodonov, Serguei; Durand, Daniel; Durret, Florence; Micol, Alberto; Slezak, Eric

    2009-12-04

    Compact elliptical galaxies are characterized by small sizes and high stellar densities. They are thought to form through tidal stripping of massive progenitors. However, only a handful of them were known, preventing us from understanding the role played by this mechanism in galaxy evolution. We present a population of 21 compact elliptical galaxies gathered with the Virtual Observatory. Follow-up spectroscopy and data mining, using high-resolution images and large databases, show that all the galaxies exhibit old metal-rich stellar populations different from those of dwarf elliptical galaxies of similar masses but similar to those of more massive early-type galaxies, supporting the tidal stripping scenario. Their internal properties are reproduced by numerical simulations, which result in compact, dynamically hot remnants resembling the galaxies in our sample.

  19. A detection of wobbling brightest cluster galaxies within massive galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, David; Courbin, F.; Kneib, J. P.; McCarthy, Ian G.

    2017-12-01

    A striking signal of dark matter beyond the standard model is the existence of cores in the centre of galaxy clusters. Recent simulations predict that a brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) inside a cored galaxy cluster will exhibit residual wobbling due to previous major mergers, long after the relaxation of the overall cluster. This phenomenon is absent with standard cold dark matter where a cuspy density profile keeps a BCG tightly bound at the centre. We test this hypothesis using cosmological simulations and deep observations of 10 galaxy clusters acting as strong gravitational lenses. Modelling the BCG wobble as a simple harmonic oscillator, we measure the wobble amplitude, Aw, in the BAHAMAS suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, finding an upper limit for the cold dark matter paradigm of Aw < 2 kpc at the 95 per cent confidence limit. We carry out the same test on the data finding a non-zero amplitude of A_w=11.82^{+7.3}_{-3.0} kpc, with the observations dis-favouring Aw = 0 at the 3σ confidence level. This detection of BCG wobbling is evidence for a dark matter core at the heart of galaxy clusters. It also shows that strong lensing models of clusters cannot assume that the BCG is exactly coincident with the large-scale halo. While our small sample of galaxy clusters already indicates a non-zero Aw, with larger surveys, e.g. Euclid, we will be able to not only confirm the effect but also to use it to determine whether or not the wobbling finds its origin in new fundamental physics or astrophysical process.

  20. Detection of enhancement in number densities of background galaxies due to magnification by massive galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, I.; Dietrich, J. P.; Mohr, J.

    2016-02-18

    We present a detection of the enhancement in the number densities of background galaxies induced from lensing magnification and use it to test the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE-) inferred masses in a sample of 19 galaxy clusters with median redshift z similar or equal to 0.42 selected from the South Pole Telescope SPT-SZ survey. These clusters are observed by the Megacam on the Magellan Clay Telescope though gri filters. Two background galaxy populations are selected for this study through their photometric colours; they have median redshifts zmedian similar or equal to 0.9 (low-z background) and z(median) similar or equal to 1.8more » (high-z background). Stacking these populations, we detect the magnification bias effect at 3.3 sigma and 1.3 sigma for the low-and high-z backgrounds, respectively. We fit Navarro, Frenk and White models simultaneously to all observed magnification bias profiles to estimate the multiplicative factor. that describes the ratio of the weak lensing mass to the mass inferred from the SZE observable-mass relation. We further quantify systematic uncertainties in. resulting from the photometric noise and bias, the cluster galaxy contamination and the estimations of the background properties. The resulting. for the combined background populations with 1 sigma uncertainties is 0.83 +/- 0.24(stat) +/- 0.074(sys), indicating good consistency between the lensing and the SZE-inferred masses. We use our best-fitting eta to predict the weak lensing shear profiles and compare these predictions with observations, showing agreement between the magnification and shear mass constraints. This work demonstrates the promise of using the magnification as a complementary method to estimate cluster masses in large surveys.« less

  1. Detection of enhancement in number densities of background galaxies due to magnification by massive galaxy clusters

    DOE PAGES

    Chiu, I.; Dietrich, J. P.; Mohr, J.; ...

    2016-02-18

    We present a detection of the enhancement in the number densities of background galaxies induced from lensing magnification and use it to test the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) inferred masses in a sample of 19 galaxy clusters with median redshift z≃0.42 selected from the South Pole Telescope SPT-SZ survey. Two background galaxy populations are selected for this study through their photometric colours; they have median redshifts z median≃0.9 (low-z background) and z median≃1.8 (high-z background). Stacking these populations, we detect the magnification bias effect at 3.3σ and 1.3σ for the low- and high-z backgrounds, respectively. We fit NFW models simultaneously tomore » all observed magnification bias profiles to estimate the multiplicative factor η that describes the ratio of the weak lensing mass to the mass inferred from the SZE observable-mass relation. We further quantify systematic uncertainties in η resulting from the photometric noise and bias, the cluster galaxy contamination and the estimations of the background properties. The resulting η for the combined background populations with 1σ uncertainties is 0.83 ± 0.24(stat) ± 0.074(sys), indicating good consistency between the lensing and the SZE-inferred masses. We also use our best-fit η to predict the weak lensing shear profiles and compare these predictions with observations, showing agreement between the magnification and shear mass constraints. Our work demonstrates the promise of using the magnification as a complementary method to estimate cluster masses in large surveys.« less

  2. AMICO: optimized detection of galaxy clusters in photometric surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellagamba, Fabio; Roncarelli, Mauro; Maturi, Matteo; Moscardini, Lauro

    2018-02-01

    We present Adaptive Matched Identifier of Clustered Objects (AMICO), a new algorithm for the detection of galaxy clusters in photometric surveys. AMICO is based on the Optimal Filtering technique, which allows to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the clusters. In this work, we focus on the new iterative approach to the extraction of cluster candidates from the map produced by the filter. In particular, we provide a definition of membership probability for the galaxies close to any cluster candidate, which allows us to remove its imprint from the map, allowing the detection of smaller structures. As demonstrated in our tests, this method allows the deblending of close-by and aligned structures in more than 50 per cent of the cases for objects at radial distance equal to 0.5 × R200 or redshift distance equal to 2 × σz, being σz the typical uncertainty of photometric redshifts. Running AMICO on mocks derived from N-body simulations and semi-analytical modelling of the galaxy evolution, we obtain a consistent mass-amplitude relation through the redshift range of 0.3 < z < 1, with a logarithmic slope of ∼0.55 and a logarithmic scatter of ∼0.14. The fraction of false detections is steeply decreasing with S/N and negligible at S/N > 5.

  3. Can we detect antimatter from other galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlen, S. P.; Price, P. B.; Salamon, M. H.; Tarle, G.

    1982-01-01

    A novel particle detection technique employing well established principles of high order quantum electrodynamics for searching for antimatter in cosmic rays is described, and shown to have both collecting power and resolution superior to conventional alternatives. By taking into account various estimates of the metagalactic cosmic-ray energy density, and the possible modulation of metagalactic cosmic rays by a galactic wind within the framework of the dynamical halo model, it is shown that the experiment proposed would be the first to be sensitive to the presence of extragalactic antimatter.

  4. Joint XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of the NGC 1407/1400 complex: A tail of an early-type galaxy and a tale of a nearby merging group

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Yuanyuan; Gu, Liyi; White III, Raymond E.

    2014-05-10

    The nearby group centered on its bright central galaxy NGC 1407 has been suggested by previous kinematic studies to be an unusually dark system. It is also known for hosting a bright galaxy, NGC 1400, with a large radial velocity (1200 km s{sup –1}) with respect to the group center. Previous ROSAT X-ray observations revealed an extended region of enhanced surface brightness just eastward of NGC 1400. We investigate the NGC 1407/1400 complex with XMM-Newton and Chandra observations. We find that the temperature and metallicity of the enhanced region are different (cooler and more metal rich) than those of themore » surrounding group gas but are consistent with those of the interstellar medium (ISM) in NGC 1400. The relative velocity of NGC 1400 is large enough that much of its ISM could have been ram pressure stripped while plunging through the group atmosphere. We conclude that the enhanced region is likely to be hot gas stripped from the ISM of NGC 1400. We constrain the motion of NGC 1400 using the pressure jump at its associated stagnation front and the total mass profile of the NGC 1407 group. We conclude that NGC 1400 is moving within ∼30° of the line of sight with Mach number M≲3. We do not detect any obvious shock features in this complex, perhaps because of the high line-of-sight motion of NGC 1400. With an XMM-Newton pointing on the relatively relaxed eastern side of NGC 1407, we derive a hydrostatic mass for this group of ∼1 × 10{sup 13} M {sub ☉} within 100 kpc. The total mass extrapolated to the virial radius (681 kpc) is 3.8 × 10{sup 13} M {sub ☉}, which puts an upper limit of ∼300 M{sub ⊙}/L{sub B{sub ⊙}} on the mass-to-light ratio of this group. This suggests that the NGC 1407 group is not an unusually dark group.« less

  5. Hot Gas Halos in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulchaey, John

    Most galaxy formation models predict that massive low-redshift disk galaxies are embedded in extended hot halos of externally accreted gas. Such gas appears necessary to maintain ongoing star formation in isolated spirals like the Milky Way. To explain the large population of red galaxies in rich groups and clusters, most galaxy evolution models assume that these hot gas halos are stripped completely when a galaxy enters a denser environment. This simple model has been remarkably successful at reproducing many observed properties of galaxies. Although theoretical arguments suggest hot gas halos are an important component in galaxies, we know very little about this gas from an observational standpoint. In fact, previous observations have failed to detect soft X-ray emission from such halos in disk galaxies. Furthermore, the assumption that hot gas halos are stripped completely when a galaxy enters a group or cluster has not been verified. We propose to combine proprietary and archival XMM-Newton observations of galaxies in the field, groups and clusters to study how hot gas halos are impacted by environment. Our proposed program has three components: 1) The deepest search to date for a hot gas halo in a quiescent spiral galaxy. A detection will confirm a basic tenet of disk galaxy formation models, whereas a non-detection will seriously challenge these models and impose new constraints on the growth mode and feedback history of disk galaxies. 2) A detailed study of the hot gas halos properties of field early-type galaxies. As environmental processes such as stripping are not expected to be important in the field, a study of hot gas halos in this environment will allow us to better understand how feedback and other internal processes impact hot gas halos. 3) A study of hot gas halos in the outskirts of groups and clusters. By comparing observations with our suite of simulations we can begin to understand what role the stripping of hot gas halos plays in galaxy

  6. The Structure and Kinematics of Little Blue Spheroid Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffett, Amanda J.; Phillipps, Steven; Robotham, Aaron; Driver, Simon; Bremer, Malcolm; GAMA survey team, SAMI survey team

    2018-01-01

    A population of blue, morphologically early-type galaxies, dubbed "Little Blue Spheroids" (LBSs), has been identified as a significant contributor to the low redshift galaxy population in the GAMA survey. Using deep, high-resolution optical imaging from KiDS and the new Bayesian, two-dimensional galaxy profile modelling code PROFIT, we examine the detailed structural characteristics of LBSs, including low surface brightness components not detected in previous SDSS imaging. We find that these LBS galaxies combine features typical of early-type and late-type populations, with structural properties similar to other low-mass early types and star formation rates similar to low-mass late types. We further consider the environments and SAMI-derived IFU kinematics of LBSs in order to investigate the conditions of their formation and the current state of their dynamical evolution.

  7. A {sup 13}CO Detection in a Brightest Cluster Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Vantyghem, A. N.; McNamara, B. R.; Hogan, M. T.

    We present ALMA Cycle 4 observations of CO(1-0), CO(3-2), and {sup 13}CO(3-2) line emission in the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) of RXJ0821+0752. This is one of the first detections of {sup 13}CO line emission in a galaxy cluster. Half of the CO(3-2) line emission originates from two clumps of molecular gas that are spatially offset from the galactic center. These clumps are surrounded by diffuse emission that extends 8 kpc in length. The detected {sup 13}CO emission is confined entirely to the two bright clumps, with any emission outside of this region lying below our detection threshold. Two distinct velocitymore » components with similar integrated fluxes are detected in the {sup 12}CO spectra. The narrower component (60 km s{sup −1} FWHM) is consistent in both velocity centroid and linewidth with {sup 13}CO(3-2) emission, while the broader (130–160 km s{sup −1}), slightly blueshifted wing has no associated {sup 13}CO(3-2) emission. A simple local thermodynamic model indicates that the {sup 13}CO emission traces 2.1 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ⊙} of molecular gas. Isolating the {sup 12}CO velocity component that accompanies the {sup 13}CO emission yields a CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor of α {sub CO} = 2.3 M {sub ⊙} (K km s{sup −1}){sup −1}, which is a factor of two lower than the Galactic value. Adopting the Galactic CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor in BCGs may therefore overestimate their molecular gas masses by a factor of two. This is within the object-to-object scatter from extragalactic sources, so calibrations in a larger sample of clusters are necessary in order to confirm a sub-Galactic conversion factor.« less

  8. The detectability of baryonic acoustic oscillations in future galaxy surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo, R. E.; Baugh, C. M.; Frenk, C. S.; Lacey, C. G.

    2008-01-01

    We assess the detectability of baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) in the power spectrum of galaxies using ultralarge volume N-body simulations of the hierarchical clustering of dark matter and semi-analytical modelling of galaxy formation. A step-by-step illustration is given of the various effects (non-linear fluctuation growth, peculiar motions, non-linear and scale-dependent bias) which systematically change the form of the galaxy power spectrum on large scales from the simple prediction of linear perturbation theory. Using a new method to extract the scale of the oscillations, we nevertheless find that the BAO approach gives an unbiased estimate of the sound horizon scale. Sampling variance remains the dominant source of error despite the huge volume of our simulation box (=2.41h-3Gpc3). We use our results to forecast the accuracy with which forthcoming surveys will be able to measure the sound horizon scale, s, and, hence constrain the dark energy equation of state parameter, w (with simplifying assumptions and without marginalizing over the other cosmological parameters). Pan-STARRS could potentially yield a measurement with an accuracy of Δs/s = 0.5-0.7 per cent (corresponding to Δw ~ 2-3 per cent), which is competitive with the proposed WFMOS survey (Δs/s = 1 per cent Δw ~ 4 per cent). Achieving Δw <= 1 per cent using BAO alone is beyond any currently commissioned project and will require an all-sky spectroscopic survey, such as would be undertaken by the SPACE mission concept under proposal to ESA.

  9. Shape asymmetry: a morphological indicator for automatic detection of galaxies in the post-coalescence merger stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlik, M. M.; Wild, V.; Walcher, C. J.; Johansson, P. H.; Villforth, C.; Rowlands, K.; Mendez-Abreu, J.; Hewlett, T.

    2016-03-01

    We present a new morphological indicator designed for automated recognition of galaxies with faint asymmetric tidal features suggestive of an ongoing or past merger. We use the new indicator, together with pre-existing diagnostics of galaxy structure to study the role of galaxy mergers in inducing (post-) starburst spectral signatures in local galaxies, and investigate whether (post-) starburst galaxies play a role in the build-up of the `red sequence'. Our morphological and structural analysis of an evolutionary sample of 335 (post-) starburst galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 with starburst ages 0 < tSB < 0.6 Gyr, shows that 45 per cent of galaxies with young starbursts (tSB < 0.1 Gyr) show signatures of an ongoing or past merger. This fraction declines with starburst age, and we find a good agreement between automated and visual classifications. The majority of the oldest (post-) starburst galaxies in our sample (tSB ˜ 0.6 Gyr) have structural properties characteristic of early-type discs and are not as highly concentrated as the fully quenched galaxies commonly found on the `red sequence' in the present day Universe. This suggests that, if (post-) starburst galaxies are a transition phase between active star-formation and quiescence, they do not attain the structure of presently quenched galaxies within the first 0.6 Gyr after the starburst.

  10. UV-BRIGHT NEARBY EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES OBSERVED IN THE MID-INFRARED: EVIDENCE FOR A MULTI-STAGE FORMATION HISTORY BY WAY OF WISE AND GALEX IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, S. M.; Farrah, D. G.; Neill, J. D.

    2013-10-01

    In the local universe, 10% of massive elliptical galaxies are observed to exhibit a peculiar property: a substantial excess of ultraviolet emission than what is expected from their old, red stellar populations. Several origins for this ultraviolet excess (UVX) have been proposed including a population of hot young stars and a population of old, blue horizontal branch or extended horizontal branch (BHB or EHB) stars that have undergone substantial mass loss from their outer atmospheres. We explore the radial distribution of UVX in a selection of 49 nearby E/S0-type galaxies by measuring their extended photometry in the UV through mid-infraredmore » (mid-IR) with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). We compare UV/optical and UV/mid-IR colors with the Flexible Stellar Population Synthesis models, which allow for the inclusion of EHB stars. We find that combined WISE mid-IR and GALEX UV colors are more effective in distinguishing models than optical colors, and that the UV/mid-IR combination is sensitive to the EHB fraction. There are strong color gradients, with the outer radii bluer than the inner half-light radii by {approx}1 mag. This color difference is easily accounted for with an increase in the BHB fraction of 0.25 with radius. We estimated that the average ages for the inner and outer radii are 7.0 {+-} 0.3 Gyr, and 6.2 {+-} 0.2 Gyr, respectively, with the implication that the outer regions are likely to have formed {approx}1 Gyr after the inner regions. Additionally, we find that metallicity gradients are likely not a significant factor in the color difference. The separation of color between the inner and outer regions, which agrees with a specific stellar population difference (e.g., higher EHB populations), and the {approx}0.5-2 Gyr age difference suggests multi-stage formation. Our results are best explained by inside-out formation: rapid star formation within the core

  11. Uv-bright Nearby Early-type Galaxies Observed in the Mid-infrared: Eidence for a Multi-stage Formation History by Way of WISE and GALEX Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petty, S. M.; Neill, J. D.; Jarrett, T. H.; Blain, A. W.; Farrah, D. G.; Rich, R. M.; Tsai, C.-W.; Benford, D. J.; Bridge, C. R.; Lake, S. E.; hide

    2013-01-01

    In the local universe, 10% of massive elliptical galaxies are observed to exhibit a peculiar property: a substantial excess of ultraviolet emission than what is expected from their old, red stellar populations. Several origins for this ultraviolet excess (UVX) have been proposed including a population of hot young stars and a population of old, blue horizontal branch or extended horizontal branch (BHB or EHB) stars that have undergone substantial mass loss from their outer atmospheres. We explore the radial distribution of UVX in a selection of 49 nearby E/S0-type galaxies by measuring their extended photometry in the UV through mid-infrared (mid-IR) with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). We compare UV/optical and UV/mid-IR colors with the Flexible Stellar Population Synthesis models, which allow for the inclusion of EHB stars. We find that combined WISE mid-IR and GALEX UV colors are more effective in distinguishing models than optical colors, and that the UV/mid-IR combination is sensitive to the EHB fraction. There are strong color gradients, with the outer radii bluer than the inner half-light radii by approx.1 mag. This color difference is easily accounted for with an increase in the BHB fraction of 0.25 with radius. We estimated that the average ages for the inner and outer radii are 7.0 +/- 0.3 Gyr, and 6.2 +/- 0.2 Gyr, respectively, with the implication that the outer regions are likely to have formed approx. 1 Gyr after the inner regions. Additionally, we find that metallicity gradients are likely not a significant factor in the color difference. The separation of color between the inner and outer regions, which agrees with a specific stellar population difference (e.g., higher EHB populations), and the approx. 0.5-2 Gyr age difference suggests multi-stage formation. Our results are best explained by inside-out formation: rapid star formation within the core at early

  12. Detection of an oxygen emission line from a high-redshift galaxy in the reionization epoch.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Akio K; Tamura, Yoichi; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Mawatari, Ken; Shimizu, Ikkoh; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Ota, Kazuaki; Yoshida, Naoki; Zackrisson, Erik; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Kohno, Kotaro; Umehata, Hideki; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Iye, Masanori; Matsuda, Yuichi; Okamoto, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Yuki

    2016-06-24

    The physical properties and elemental abundances of the interstellar medium in galaxies during cosmic reionization are important for understanding the role of galaxies in this process. We report the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array detection of an oxygen emission line at a wavelength of 88 micrometers from a galaxy at an epoch about 700 million years after the Big Bang. The oxygen abundance of this galaxy is estimated at about one-tenth that of the Sun. The nondetection of far-infrared continuum emission indicates a deficiency of interstellar dust in the galaxy. A carbon emission line at a wavelength of 158 micrometers is also not detected, implying an unusually small amount of neutral gas. These properties might allow ionizing photons to escape into the intergalactic medium. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Detection of high Lyman continuum leakage from four low-redshift compact star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izotov, Y. I.; Schaerer, D.; Thuan, T. X.; Worseck, G.; Guseva, N. G.; Orlitová, I.; Verhamme, A.

    2016-10-01

    Following our first detection reported in Izotov et al., we present the detection of Lyman continuum (LyC) radiation of four other compact star-forming galaxies observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. These galaxies, at redshifts of z ˜ 0.3, are characterized by high emission-line flux ratios [O III] λ5007/[O II] λ3727 ≳ 5. The escape fractions of the LyC radiation fesc(LyC) in these galaxies are in the range of ˜6-13 per cent, the highest values found so far in low-redshift star-forming galaxies. Narrow double-peaked Ly α emission lines are detected in the spectra of all four galaxies, compatible with predictions for LyC leakers. We find escape fractions of Ly α, fesc(Ly α) ˜ 20-40 per cent, among the highest known for Ly α emitting galaxies. Surface brightness profiles produced from the COS acquisition images reveal bright star-forming regions in the centre and exponential discs in the outskirts with disc scalelengths α in the range ˜0.6-1.4 kpc. Our galaxies are characterized by low metallicity, ˜1/8-1/5 solar, low stellar mass ˜(0.2-4) × 109 M⊙, high star formation rates, SFR ˜ 14-36 M⊙ yr-1, and high SFR densities, Σ ˜ 2-35 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. These properties are comparable to those of high-redshift star-forming galaxies. Finally, our observations, combined with our first detection reported in Izotov et al., reveal that a selection for compact star-forming galaxies showing high [O III] λ5007/[O II] λ3727 ratios appears to pick up very efficiently sources with escaping LyC radiation: all five of our selected galaxies are LyC leakers.

  14. Simultaneous Multi-band Detection of Low Surface Brightness Galaxies with Markovian Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, B.; Perret, B.; Petremand, M.; Lavigne, F.; Collet, Ch.; van Driel, W.; Bonnarel, F.; Louys, M.; Sabatini, S.; MacArthur, L. A.

    2013-02-01

    We present to the astronomical community an algorithm for the detection of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies in images, called MARSIAA (MARkovian Software for Image Analysis in Astronomy), which is based on multi-scale Markovian modeling. MARSIAA can be applied simultaneously to different bands. It segments an image into a user-defined number of classes, according to their surface brightness and surroundings—typically, one or two classes contain the LSB structures. We have developed an algorithm, called DetectLSB, which allows the efficient identification of LSB galaxies from among the candidate sources selected by MARSIAA. The application of the method to two and three bands simultaneously was tested on simulated images. Based on our tests, we are confident that we can detect LSB galaxies down to a central surface brightness level of only 1.5 times the standard deviation from the mean pixel value in the image background. To assess the robustness of our method, the method was applied to a set of 18 B- and I-band images (covering 1.3 deg2 in total) of the Virgo Cluster to which Sabatini et al. previously applied a matched-filter dwarf LSB galaxy search algorithm. We have detected all 20 objects from the Sabatini et al. catalog which we could classify by eye as bona fide LSB galaxies. Our method has also detected four additional Virgo Cluster LSB galaxy candidates undetected by Sabatini et al. To further assess the completeness of the results of our method, both MARSIAA, SExtractor, and DetectLSB were applied to search for (1) mock Virgo LSB galaxies inserted into a set of deep Next Generation Virgo Survey (NGVS) gri-band subimages and (2) Virgo LSB galaxies identified by eye in a full set of NGVS square degree gri images. MARSIAA/DetectLSB recovered ~20% more mock LSB galaxies and ~40% more LSB galaxies identified by eye than SExtractor/DetectLSB. With a 90% fraction of false positives from an entirely unsupervised pipeline, a completeness of 90% is reached

  15. ASSESSING ASTROPHYSICAL UNCERTAINTIES IN DIRECT DETECTION WITH GALAXY SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sloane, Jonathan D.; Buckley, Matthew R.; Brooks, Alyson M.

    2016-11-01

    We study the local dark matter velocity distribution in simulated Milky Way-mass galaxies, generated at high resolution with both dark matter and baryons. We find that the dark matter in the solar neighborhood is influenced appreciably by the inclusion of baryons, increasing the speed of dark matter particles compared to dark matter-only simulations. The gravitational potential due to the presence of a baryonic disk increases the amount of high velocity dark matter, resulting in velocity distributions that are more similar to the Maxwellian Standard Halo Model than predicted from dark matter-only simulations. Furthermore, the velocity structures present in baryonic simulationsmore » possess a greater diversity than expected from dark matter-only simulations. We show that the impact on the direct detection experiments LUX, DAMA/Libra, and CoGeNT using our simulated velocity distributions, and explore how resolution and halo mass within the Milky Way’s estimated mass range impact the results. A Maxwellian fit to the velocity distribution tends to overpredict the amount of dark matter in the high velocity tail, even with baryons, and thus leads to overly optimistic direct detection bounds on models that are dependent on this region of phase space for an experimental signal. Our work further demonstrates that it is critical to transform simulated velocity distributions to the lab frame of reference, due to the fact that velocity structure in the solar neighborhood appears when baryons are included. There is more velocity structure present when baryons are included than in dark matter-only simulations. Even when baryons are included, the importance of the velocity structure is not as apparent in the Galactic frame of reference as in the Earth frame.« less

  16. Interactions of galaxies outside clusters and massive groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Jaswant K.; Chen, Xuelei

    2018-06-01

    We investigate the dependence of physical properties of galaxies on small- and large-scale density environment. The galaxy population consists of mainly passively evolving galaxies in comparatively low-density regions of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We adopt (i) local density, ρ _{20}, derived using adaptive smoothing kernel, (ii) projected distance, r_p, to the nearest neighbor galaxy and (iii) the morphology of the nearest neighbor galaxy as various definitions of environment parameters of every galaxy in our sample. In order to detect long-range interaction effects, we group galaxy interactions into four cases depending on morphology of the target and neighbor galaxies. This study builds upon an earlier study by Park and Choi (2009) by including improved definitions of target and neighbor galaxies, thus enabling us to better understand the effect of "the nearest neighbor" interaction on the galaxy. We report that the impact of interaction on galaxy properties is detectable at least up to the pair separation corresponding to the virial radius of (the neighbor) galaxies. This turns out to be mostly between 210 and 360 h^{-1}kpc for galaxies included in our study. We report that early type fraction for isolated galaxies with r_p > r_{vir,nei} is almost ignorant of the background density and has a very weak density dependence for closed pairs. Star formation activity of a galaxy is found to be crucially dependent on neighbor galaxy morphology. We find star formation activity parameters and structure parameters of galaxies to be independent of the large-scale background density. We also exhibit that changing the absolute magnitude of the neighbor galaxies does not affect significantly the star formation activity of those target galaxies whose morphology and luminosities are fixed.

  17. Detecting Galaxy Formation with He II Cooling Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yujin; Zabludoff, Ann; Davé, Romeel; Eisenstein, Daniel

    2006-08-01

    Galaxies obtain material to form their stars from the intergalactic medium, but direct observations of such accretion do not yet exist. Motivated by our theoretical work, we propose the first direct search for gravitational cooling radiation arising from the infall of gas into forming galaxies at z=3. While ``Lyα blobs'' are the best candidates for gas-accreting galaxies at high redshift, and are therefore the focus of our proposed study, their nature remains unknown due to intrinsic difficulties in interpreting their Lyα emission. Here, we propose to survey 10 of the Lyα blobs from the Matsuda et al. sample for He II. Compared to Lyα, Heha is optically thin, less sensitive to the UV background, and less contaminated by the recombination lines from star-forming galaxies, making it an ideal diagnostic line to uncover the processes by which galaxies acquire their baryons. This proposal is a resubmission in which we have explicitly addressed the concerns raised by the TAC last year. This project represents a new approach, which has the potential to revolutionize studies of galaxy formation.

  18. Direct Detection of The Lyman Continuum of Star-forming Galaxies at z~3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasei, Kaveh; Siana, Brian; Shapley, Alice; Alavi, Anahita; Rafelski, Marc

    2018-01-01

    Star-forming galaxies are widely believed to be responsible for the reionization of the Universe and much of the ionizing background at z>3. Therefore, there has been much interest in quantifying the escape fraction of the Lyman continuum (LyC) radiation of the star-forming galaxies. Yet direct detection of LyC has proven to be exceptionally challenging. Despite numerous efforts only 7 galaxies at z<2 (all with escape fractions less than 0.04) and 3 galaxies at z>2 have been robustly confirmed as LyC leakers. To avoid these challenges many studies use indirect methods to infer the LyC escape fraction. We tested these indirect methods by attempting to detect escaping LyC with a 10-orbit Hubble near-UV (F275W) image that is just below the Lyman limit at the redshift of the Cosmic Horseshoe (a lensed galaxy at z=2.4). We concluded that the measured escape fraction is lower, by more than a factor of five, than the expected escape fraction based on the indirect methods. This emphasizes that indirect determinations should only be interpreted as upper-limits. We also investigated the deepest near-UV Hubble images of the SSA22 field to detect LyC leakage from a large sample of candidate star-forming galaxies at z~3.1, whose redshift was obtained by deep Keck/LRIS spectroscopy and for which Keck narrow-band imaging was showing possible LyC leakage. The high spatial resolution of Hubble images is crucial to confirm our detections are clean from foreground contaminating galaxies, and also to ascertain the escape fraction of our final candidates. We identify five clean LyC emitting star-forming galaxies. The follow up investigation of these galaxies will significantly increase our knowledge of the LyC escape fraction and the mechanisms allowing for LyC escape.

  19. Detection of Galaxy Cluster Motions with the Kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hand, Nick; Addison, Graeme E.; Aubourg, Eric; Battaglia, Nick; Battistelli, Elia S.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bond, J. Richard; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, Jon; Brown, Benjamin R.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Using high-resolution microwave sky maps made by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, we for the first time detect motions of galaxy clusters and groups via microwave background .temperature distortions due to the kinematic Sunyaev.Zel'dovich effect. Galaxy clusters are identified by their constituent luminous galaxies observed by the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. The mean pairwise momentum of clusters is measured. at a statistical. significance of 3.8 sigma, and the signal is consistent with the growth of cosmic structure in the standard model of cosmology

  20. The ESO Nearby Abell Cluster Survey. VI. Spatial distribution and kinematics of early- and late-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Theije, P. A. M.; Katgert, P.

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of the data obtained in the ESO Nearby Abell Cluster Survey (ENACS) has shown that the space distribution and kinematics of galaxies with detectable emission lines in their spectra differ significantly from those of galaxies without emission lines. This result, and details of the kinematics, were considered as support for the idea that at least the spirals with emission lines are on orbits that are not isotropic. This might indicate that this subset of late-type galaxies either has `first approach'-orbits towards the dense core of their respective clusters, or has orbits that `avoid' the core. The galaxies with emission lines are essentially all late-type galaxies. On the other hand, the emission-line galaxies represent only about a third of the late-type galaxies, the majority of which do not show detectable emission lines. The galaxies without emission lines are therefore a mix of early- and late-type galaxies. In this paper we attempt to separate early- and late-type galaxies, and we study possible differences in distribution and kinematics of the two galaxy classes. For only about 10% of the galaxies in the ENACS, the morphology is known from imaging. Here, we describe our classification on the basis of the ENACS spectrum. The significant information in each spectrum is compressed into 15 Principal Components, which are used as input for an Artificial Neural Network. The latter is `trained' with 150 of the 270 galaxies for which a morphological type is available from Dressler, and subsequently used to classify each galaxy. This yields a classification for two-thirds of the ENACS galaxies. The Artificial Neural Network has two output classes: early-type (E+S0) and late-type (S+I) galaxies. We do not distinguish E and S0 galaxies, because these cannot be separated very robustly on the basis of the spectrum. The success rate of the classification is estimated from the sample of 120 galaxies with Dressler morphologies which were not used to train the ANN

  1. RADIO DETECTION OF GREEN PEAS: IMPLICATIONS FOR MAGNETIC FIELDS IN YOUNG GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborti, Sayan; Yadav, Naveen; Ray, Alak

    Green Peas are a new class of young, emission line galaxies that were discovered by citizen volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their low stellar mass, low metallicity, and very high star formation rates make Green Peas the nearby (z {approx} 0.2) analogs of the Lyman break galaxies which account for the bulk of the star formation in the early universe (z {approx} 2-5). They thus provide accessible laboratories in the nearby universe for understanding star formation, supernova feedback, particle acceleration, and magnetic field amplification in early galaxies. We report the first direct radio detection of Green Peas with lowmore » frequency Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations and our stacking detection with archival Very Large Array FIRST data. We show that the radio emission implies that these extremely young galaxies already have magnetic fields ({approx}> 30 {mu}G) even larger than that of the Milky Way. This is at odds with the present understanding of magnetic field growth based on amplification of seed fields by dynamo action over a galaxy's lifetime. Our observations strongly favor models with pregalactic magnetic fields at {mu}G levels.« less

  2. Galaxy cluster center detection methods with weak lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simet, Melanie

    The precise location of galaxy cluster centers is a persistent problem in weak lensing mass estimates and in interpretations of clusters in a cosmological context. In this work, we test methods of centroid determination from weak lensing data and examine the effects of such self-calibration on the measured masses. Drawing on lensing data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82, a 275 square degree region of coadded data in the Southern Galactic Cap, together with a catalog of MaxBCG clusters, we show that halo substructure as well as shape noise and stochasticity in galaxy positions limit the precision of such a self-calibration (in the context of Stripe 82, to ˜ 500 h-1 kpc or larger) and bias the mass estimates around these points to a level that is likely unacceptable for the purposes of making cosmological measurements. We also project the usefulness of this technique in future surveys.

  3. Automated detection of very Low Surface Brightness galaxies in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prole, D. J.; Davies, J. I.; Keenan, O. C.; Davies, L. J. M.

    2018-04-01

    We report the automatic detection of a new sample of very low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies, likely members of the Virgo cluster. We introduce our new software, DeepScan, that has been designed specifically to detect extended LSB features automatically using the DBSCAN algorithm. We demonstrate the technique by applying it over a 5 degree2 portion of the Next-Generation Virgo Survey (NGVS) data to reveal 53 low surface brightness galaxies that are candidate cluster members based on their sizes and colours. 30 of these sources are new detections despite the region being searched specifically for LSB galaxies previously. Our final sample contains galaxies with 26.0 ≤ ⟨μe⟩ ≤ 28.5 and 19 ≤ mg ≤ 21, making them some of the faintest known in Virgo. The majority of them have colours consistent with the red sequence, and have a mean stellar mass of 106.3 ± 0.5M⊙ assuming cluster membership. After using ProFit to fit Sérsic profiles to our detections, none of the new sources have effective radii larger than 1.5 Kpc and do not meet the criteria for ultra-diffuse galaxy (UDG) classification, so we classify them as ultra-faint dwarfs.

  4. Chandra Detects Halo Of Hot Gas Around Milky Way-Like Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-07-01

    The first unambiguous evidence for a giant halo of hot gas around a nearby, spiral galaxy much like our own Milky Way was found by astronomers using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This discovery may lead to a better understanding of our own Galaxy, as well the structure and evolution of galaxies in general. A team of astronomers, led by Professor Daniel Wang of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, observed NGC 4631, a spiral galaxy approximately 25 million light years from Earth with both Chandra and NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. While previous X-ray satellites have detected extended X-ray emission from this and other spiral galaxies, because of Chandra's exceptional resolution this is the first time that astronomers were able to separate the individual X-ray sources from the diffuse halo. Chandra found the diffuse halo of X-ray gas to be radiating at a temperature of almost 3 million degrees and extending some 25,000 light years from the galactic plane. "Scientists have debated for over 40 years whether the Milky Way has an extended corona, or halo, of hot gas," said Wang, lead author of the paper which appeared this month in The Astrophysical Journal Letters. "Of course since we are within the Milky Way, we can't get outside and take a picture. However, by studying similar galaxies like NGC 4631, we can get an idea of what's going on within our own Galaxy." The Chandra image reveals a halo of hot gas that extends for approximately 25,000 light years above the disk of the galaxy. One important feature of the X-ray emission from NGC 4631 is that it closely resembles the overall size and shape seen in the radio emission from the galaxy. This indicates that there may be a close connection between the outflows of hot gas, seen in X-rays, and the galaxy's magnetic field, revealed by radio emission. The Hubble image of NGC 4631 shows filamentary, loop-like structures enclosing enhanced X-ray-emitting gas and emanating from regions of recent star formation in

  5. Galaxy clusters in the cosmic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acebrón, A.; Durret, F.; Martinet, N.; Adami, C.; Guennou, L.

    2014-12-01

    Simulations of large scale structure formation in the universe predict that matter is essentially distributed along filaments at the intersection of which lie galaxy clusters. We have analysed 9 clusters in the redshift range 0.4detect filaments and/or structures around these clusters. Based on colour-magnitude diagrams, we have selected the galaxies likely to be in the cluster redshift range and studied their spatial distribution. We detect a number of structures and filaments around several clusters, proving that colour-magnitude diagrams are a reliable method to detect filaments around galaxy clusters. Since this method excludes blue (spiral) galaxies at the cluster redshift, we also apply the LePhare software to compute photometric redshifts from BVRIZ images to select galaxy cluster members and study their spatial distribution. We then find that, if only galaxies classified as early-type by LePhare are considered, we obtain the same distribution than with a red sequence selection, while taking into account late-type galaxies just pollutes the background level and deteriorates our detections. The photometric redshift based method therefore does not provide any additional information.

  6. XMM-NEWTON DETECTS A HOT GASEOUS HALO IN THE FASTEST ROTATING SPIRAL GALAXY UGC 12591

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Xinyu; Anderson, Michael E.; Bregman, Joel N.

    2012-08-20

    We present our XMM-Newton observation of the fastest rotating spiral galaxy UGC 12591. We detect hot gas halo emission out to 80 kpc from the galaxy center, and constrain the halo gas mass to be smaller than 4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }. We also measure the temperature of the hot gas as T = 0.64 {+-} 0.03 keV. Combining our x-ray constraints and the near-infrared and radio measurements in the literature, we find a baryon mass fraction of 0.03-0.05 in UGC 12591, suggesting a missing baryon mass of 70% compared with the cosmological mean value. Combined with anothermore » recent measurement in NGC 1961, the result strongly argues that the majority of missing baryons in spiral galaxies do not reside in their hot halos. We also find that UGC 12591 lies significantly below the baryonic Tully-Fisher relationship. Finally, we find that the baryon fractions of massive spiral galaxies are similar to those of galaxy groups with similar masses, indicating that the baryon loss is ultimately controlled by the gravitational potential well. The cooling radius of this gas halo is small, similar to NGC 1961, which argues that the majority of the stellar mass of this galaxy is not assembled as a result of cooling of this gas halo.« less

  7. DETECTION OF A HOT GASEOUS HALO AROUND THE GIANT SPIRAL GALAXY NGC 1961

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael E.; Bregman, Joel N., E-mail: michevan@umich.edu, E-mail: jbregman@umich.edu

    2011-08-10

    Hot gaseous halos are predicted around all large galaxies and are critically important for our understanding of galaxy formation, but they have never been detected at distances beyond a few kpc around a spiral galaxy. We used the ACIS-I instrument on board Chandra to search for diffuse X-ray emission around an ideal candidate galaxy: the isolated giant spiral NGC 1961. We observed four quadrants around the galaxy for 30 ks each, carefully subtracting background and point-source emission, and found diffuse emission that appears to extend to 40-50 kpc. We fit {beta}-models to the emission and estimate a hot halo massmore » within 50 kpc of 5 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}. When this profile is extrapolated to 500 kpc (the approximate virial radius), the implied hot halo mass is 1-3 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}. These mass estimates assume a gas metallicity of Z = 0.5 Z{sub sun}. This galaxy's hot halo is a large reservoir of gas, but falls significantly below observational upper limits set by pervious searches, and suggests that NGC 1961 is missing 75% of its baryons relative to the cosmic mean, which would tentatively place it below an extrapolation of the baryon Tully-Fisher relationship of less massive galaxies. The cooling rate of the gas is no more than 0.4 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, more than an order of magnitude below the gas consumption rate through star formation. We discuss the implications of this halo for galaxy formation models.« less

  8. DETECTION OF H i IN EMISSION IN THE LY α EMITTING GALAXY HARO 11

    SciTech Connect

    Pardy, Stephen A.; Cannon, John M.; Östlin, Göran

    We present the first robust detection of H i 21 cm emission in the blue compact galaxy Haro 11 using the 100 m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Haro 11 is a luminous blue compact galaxy with emission in both Ly α and the Lyman continuum. We detect (5.1 ± 0.7 × 10{sup 8}) M {sub ⊙} of H i gas at an assumed distance of 88 Mpc, making this galaxy H i deficient compared to other local galaxies with similar optical properties. Given this small H i mass, Haro 11 has an elevated M{sub H2}/ M{sub Hi} ratio and a verymore » low gas fraction compared to most local galaxies, and contains twice as much mass in ionized hydrogen as in neutral hydrogen. The H i emission has a linewidth of 71 km s{sup −}1 and is offset 60 km s{sup −1} redward of the optical line center. It is undergoing a starburst after a recent merger that has elevated the star formation rate, and will deplete the gas supply in <0.2 Gyr. Although this starburst has elevated the star formation rate (SFR) compared to galaxies with similar H i masses and line widths, Haro 11 matches a trend of lower gas fractions toward higher SFRs and is below the general trend of increasing H i mass with increasing luminosity. Taken together, our results paint Haro 11 as a standard low-mass galaxy that is undergoing an unusually efficient star formation episode.« less

  9. Galactic satellite systems: radial distribution and environment dependence of galaxy morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ann, H. B.; Park, Changbom; Choi, Yun-Young

    2008-09-01

    We have studied the radial distribution of the early (E/S0) and late (S/Irr) types of satellites around bright host galaxies. We made a volume-limited sample of 4986 satellites brighter than Mr = -18.0 associated with 2254 hosts brighter than Mr = -19.0 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 sample. The morphology of satellites is determined by an automated morphology classifier, but the host galaxies are visually classified. We found segregation of satellite morphology as a function of the projected distance from the host galaxy. The amplitude and shape of the early-type satellite fraction profile are found to depend on the host luminosity. This is the morphology-radius/density relation at the galactic scale. There is a strong tendency for morphology conformity between the host galaxy and its satellites. The early-type fraction of satellites hosted by early-type galaxies is systematically larger than that of late-type hosts, and is a strong function of the distance from the host galaxies. Fainter satellites are more vulnerable to the morphology transformation effects of hosts. Dependence of satellite morphology on the large-scale background density was detected. The fraction of early-type satellites increases in high-density regions for both early- and late-type hosts. It is argued that the conformity in morphology of galactic satellite system is mainly originated by the hydrodynamical and radiative effects of hosts on satellites.

  10. Detectability of cold streams into high-redshift galaxies by absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goerdt, Tobias; Dekel, Avishai; Sternberg, Amiel; Gnat, Orly; Ceverino, Daniel

    2012-08-01

    Cold gas streaming along the dark matter filaments of the cosmic web is predicted to be the major source of fuel for disc buildup, violent disc instability and star formation in massive galaxies at high redshift. We investigate to what extent such cold gas is detectable in the extended circumgalactic environment of galaxies via Lyα absorption and selected low-ionization metal absorption lines. We model the expected absorption signatures using high-resolution zoom-in adaptive mesh refinement cosmological simulations. In the post-processing, we distinguish between self-shielded gas and unshielded gas. In the self-shielded gas, which is optically thick to Lyman continuum radiation, we assume pure collisional ionization for species with an ionization potential greater than 13.6 eV. In the optically-thin, unshielded gas, these species are also photoionized by the metagalactic radiation. In addition to absorption of radiation from background quasars, we compute the absorption line profiles of radiation emitted by the galaxy at the centre of the same halo. We predict the strength of the absorption signal for individual galaxies without stacking. We find that the Lyα absorption profiles produced by the streams are consistent with observations of absorption and emission Lyα profiles in high-redshift galaxies. Due to the low metallicities in the streams, and their low covering factors, the metal absorption features are weak and difficult to detect.

  11. A gravitationally lensed starburst galaxy at z=1.03 detected by SOFIA/HAWC+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Arianna; Ma, Jingzhe; Cooray, Asantha; Nayyeri, Hooshang; Timmons, Nicholas

    2018-01-01

    We present a high S/N~20 detection at 89 micron (in 15 mins) of the Herschel-selected gravitationally lensed starburst galaxy HATLASJ1429-0028 with the High-resolution Airborne Wideband Camera-plus (HAWC+) onboard the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). The spectacular lensing system consists of an edge-on foreground disk galaxy at z=0.22 and a nearly complete Einstein ring of an intrinsic ultra-luminous infrared galaxy at z=1.03. Is this high luminosity powered by pure star formation (SF) or an active galactic nucleus (AGN)? Previous nebular line diagnostics indicate that it is star-formation dominated. SOFIA/HAWC+ allows the broad-band spectral energy distribution of the galaxy to be studied between 20 - 100 micron, which is an important wavelength range for further constraining the fractional AGN contribution to the total IR luminosity. Multi-wavelength SED modeling constrains the AGN fraction to be < 1%. The detection of a source at z of 1 shows the potential of utilizing SOFIA/HAWC+ for distant galaxy studies and the potential to decompose SF/AGN that cannot be obtained with other current facilities.

  12. The Detection and Photometric Redshift Determination of Distant Galaxies using SIRTF's Infrared Array Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, C.; Eisenhardt, P.

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the ability of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility's Infrared Array Camera to detect distant (z3) galaxies and measure their photometric redshifts. Our analysis shows that changing the original long wavelength filter specifications provides significant improvements in performance in this and other areas.

  13. Detection of bars in galaxies using a deep convolutional neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Sheelu; Aniyan, A. K.; Kembhavi, Ajit K.; Philip, N. S.; Vaghmare, Kaustubh

    2018-06-01

    We present an automated method for the detection of bar structure in optical images of galaxies using a deep convolutional neural network that is easy to use and provides good accuracy. In our study, we use a sample of 9346 galaxies in the redshift range of 0.009-0.2 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), which has 3864 barred galaxies, the rest being unbarred. We reach a top precision of 94 per cent in identifying bars in galaxies using the trained network. This accuracy matches the accuracy reached by human experts on the same data without additional information about the images. Since deep convolutional neural networks can be scaled to handle large volumes of data, the method is expected to have great relevance in an era where astronomy data is rapidly increasing in terms of volume, variety, volatility, and velocity along with other V's that characterize big data. With the trained model, we have constructed a catalogue of barred galaxies from SDSS and made it available online.

  14. Detection of H I absorption in the dwarf galaxy Haro 11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacHattie, Jeremy A.; Irwin, Judith A.; Madden, Suzanne C.; Cormier, Diane; Rémy-Ruyer, Aurélie

    2014-02-01

    We present the results of an analysis of archival 21 cm (H I) data of the blue compact dwarf galaxy Haro 11 (ESO 350-IG038). Observations were obtained at the Very Large Array, and the presence of a compact absorption feature near the optical centre of the galaxy has been detected. The central location of the absorption feature coincides with the centre of the continuum background of the galaxy, as well as with the location of knot B. The absorption feature yields an H I mass in the range of 3-10 × 108 M⊙, corresponding to spin temperatures from 91 K to 200 K, respectively. The absence of H I seen in emission places an upper limit of 1.7 × 109 M⊙ on the mass. To our knowledge this is the first example of a dwarf galaxy that shows H I absorption from its own background continuum. The continuum emission from the galaxy is also used to determine star formation rates, namely 6.85 ± 0.05 M⊙ yr-1 (for a stellar mass range of 5 M⊙ < M < 100 M⊙), or 32.8 ± 0.2 M⊙ yr-1 (for an extended range of 0.1 M⊙ < M < 100 M⊙).

  15. Deep IR imaging of Submillimeter Galaxies detected by SMA: Unambiguously Identifying SMGs at High Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jiasheng; Aretxaga, Itziar; Ashby, Mat; Fazio, Giovanni; Hughes, David; Ilbert, Olivier; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Lowenthal, James; Sanders, David; Scoville, Nick; Webb, Tracy; Wilner, David; Wilson, Grant; Yan, Lin; Younger, Joshua; Yun, Min

    2007-05-01

    In 2007 January, we detected no fewer than five AzTEC 1.1 mm galaxies via high-resolution interferometric imaging with the Sub-Millimeter Array (SMA) atop Mauna Kea at 890 microns. Despite the fact that these sources are all radio-quiet SMGs, with the high S/N SMA detections in the narrow SMA beam we unambiguously determine the position of the AzTEC galaxies with subarcsecond accuracy. All the counterparts, which lie in the SCOSMOS survey, are detected by IRAC at 3.6 and 4.5 microns in the existing SCOSMOS mosaics. Only two are detected at the longer IRAC wavelengths, however, and none are detected in the existing 24 micron data. Furthermore, only two are detected at optical wavelengths. These sources thus present (incomplete) SEDs that appear consistent with their being either 1. deeply dust-enshrouded galaxies at z=2, or 2. a distant z=4 population of very luminous objects. Because they are so optically faint, only broadband imaging such as Spitzer can provide will permit construction of their rest-frame optical-near-IR SEDs. This appears to be the only way to discriminate between the two possibilities for the origin of SMGs that are radio-quiet. Accordingly, we ask for 37.4 h to carry out a very deep imaging program utilizing all three Spitzer instruments to construct the SEDs for the four SMGs in our sample.

  16. Does the IMF vary with galaxy mass? The X-ray binary population of a key galaxy, NGC7457

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, Mark

    2014-09-01

    We propose a 100ksec observation of NGC7457. The primary goal of this observation is to test for variations in the initial mass function (IMF). Many recent studies have proposed that the IMF varies systematically as a function of early-type galaxy mass. This has potentially dramatic consequences and must to be confirmed. The number of LMXBs in a galaxy (per stellar luminosity) can be used to provide an independent test of this hypothesis (see Peacock et al. 2014). Unfortunately, only galaxies with intermediate to high masses currently have the data needed to perform this test. The proposed observation of the elliptical galaxy NGC7457 will detect an order of magnitude more LMXBs in a low mass galaxy - hence providing the crucial constraint needed to significantly test for a variable IMF.

  17. Modelling high-resolution ALMA observations of strongly lensed highly star-forming galaxies detected by Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dye, S.; Furlanetto, C.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S. A.; Negrello, M.; Nayyeri, H.; van der Werf, P. P.; Serjeant, S.; Farrah, D.; Michałowski, M. J.; Baes, M.; Marchetti, L.; Cooray, A.; Riechers, D. A.; Amvrosiadis, A.

    2018-06-01

    We have modelled ˜0.1 arcsec resolution Atacama Large Millimetre/submillimeter Array imaging of six strong gravitationally lensed galaxies detected by the Herschel Space Observatory. Our modelling recovers mass properties of the lensing galaxies and, by determining magnification factors, intrinsic properties of the lensed submillimetre sources. We find that the lensed galaxies all have high ratios of star formation rate to dust mass, consistent with or higher than the mean ratio for high-redshift submillimetre galaxies and low-redshift ultra-luminous infrared galaxies. Source reconstruction reveals that most galaxies exhibit disturbed morphologies. Both the cleaned image plane data and the directly observed interferometric visibilities have been modelled, enabling comparison of both approaches. In the majority of cases, the recovered lens models are consistent between methods, all six having mass density profiles that are close to isothermal. However, one system with poor signal to noise shows mildly significant differences.

  18. An X-Ray Atlas of Groups of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulchaey, John S.; Davis, David S.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Burnstein, David

    2003-01-01

    A search was conducted for a hot intragroup medium in 10(exp 9) low-redshift galaxy groups observed with the ROSAT PSPC. Evidence for diffuse, extended X-ray emission is found in at least 61 groups. Approximately one-third of these detections have not been previously reported in the literature. Most of the groups are detected out to less than half of the virial radius with ROSAT. Although some spiral-rich groups do contain an intragroup medium, diffuse emission is restricted to groups that contain at least one early-type galaxy.

  19. Nearby Early-type Galactic Nuclei at High Resolution: Dynamical Black Hole and Nuclear Star Cluster Mass Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Dieu D.; Seth, Anil C.; Neumayer, Nadine; Kamann, Sebastian; Voggel, Karina T.; Cappellari, Michele; Picotti, Arianna; Nguyen, Phuong M.; Böker, Torsten; Debattista, Victor; Caldwell, Nelson; McDermid, Richard; Bastian, Nathan; Ahn, Christopher C.; Pechetti, Renuka

    2018-05-01

    We present a detailed study of the nuclear star clusters (NSCs) and massive black holes (BHs) of four of the nearest low-mass early-type galaxies: M32, NGC 205, NGC 5102, and NGC 5206. We measure the dynamical masses of both the BHs and NSCs in these galaxies using Gemini/NIFS or VLT/SINFONI stellar kinematics, Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging, and Jeans anisotropic models. We detect massive BHs in M32, NGC 5102, and NGC 5206, while in NGC 205, we find only an upper limit. These BH mass estimates are consistent with previous measurements in M32 and NGC 205, while those in NGC 5102 and NGC 5206 are estimated for the first time and both found to be <106 M ⊙. This adds to just a handful of galaxies with dynamically measured sub-million M ⊙ central BHs. Combining these BH detections with our recent work on NGC 404's BH, we find that 80% (4/5) of nearby, low-mass ({10}9{--}{10}10 M ⊙ {σ }\\star ∼ 20{--}70 km s‑1) early-type galaxies host BHs. Such a high occupation fraction suggests that the BH seeds formed in the early epoch of cosmic assembly likely resulted in abundant seeds, favoring a low-mass seed mechanism of the remnants, most likely from the first generation of massive stars. We find dynamical masses of the NSCs ranging from 2 to 73 × 106 M ⊙ and compare these masses to scaling relations for NSCs based primarily on photometric mass estimates. Color gradients suggest that younger stellar populations lie at the centers of the NSCs in three of the four galaxies (NGC 205, NGC 5102, and NGC 5206), while the morphology of two are complex and best fit with multiple morphological components (NGC 5102 and NGC 5206). The NSC kinematics show they are rotating, especially in M32 and NGC 5102 (V/{σ }\\star ∼ 0.7).

  20. Dark Galaxies and Lost Baryons (IAU S244)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Jonathan I.; Disney, Michael J.

    2008-05-01

    ; Numerical simulation of the dwarf companions of giant galaxies A. Nelson and P. Williams; Delayed galaxies C. Struck, M. Hancock, B. Smith, P. Appleton, V. Charmandaris and M. Giroux; Probe of dark galaxies via disturbed/lopsided isolated galaxies I. Karachentsev, V. Karachentseva, W. Huchtmeier, D. Makarov and S. Kaisin; Star formation thresholds J. Schaye; Scaling relations of dwarf galaxies without supernova-driven winds K. Tassis, A. Kravtsov and N. Gnedin; Star formation in massive low surface brightness galaxies K. O'Neil; Linking clustering properties and the evolution of low surface brightness galaxies D. Bomans and S. Rosenbaum; Too small to form a galaxy: how the UV background determines the baryon fraction M. Hoeft, G. Yepes and S. Gottlober; Star formation in damped Lyman selected galaxies L. Christensen; Dark-matter content of early-type galaxies with planetary nebulae N. Napolitano et al.; Hunting for ghosts: low surface brightnesses from pixels R. Scaramella and S. Sabatini; Baryonic properties of the darkest galaxies E. Grebel; The dwarf low surface brightness population in different environments of the local universe S. Sabatini, J. Davies, S. Roberts and R. Scaramella; Mass modelling of dwarf spheroidal galaxies J. Klimentowski et al.; Evolution of dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus A Group L. Makarova and D. Makarov; A flat faint end of the Fornax cluster galaxy luminosity function S. Mieske, M. Hilker, L. Infante and C. Mendes de Oliveira; Can massive dark halos destroy the discs of dwarf galaxies? B. Fuchs and O. Esquivel; 'Dark galaxies' and local very metal-poor gas-rich galaxies: possible interrelations S. Pustilnik; Morphology and environment of dwarf galaxies in the local universe H. Ann; Arecibo survey of HI emission from disk galaxies at redshift z 0.2 B. Catinella, M. Haynes, J. Gardner, A. Connolly and R. Giovanelli; AGES observations of

  1. Santilli’s detection of antimatter galaxies: An introduction and experimental confirmation

    SciTech Connect

    Bhujbal, P. M.

    2015-03-10

    Studies accompanied over the past few decades on the generalization of quantum mechanics known as hadronic mechanics, initiated in 1978 by the Italian-American physicist Ruggero Maria Santilli and its application for detection of light from antimatter galaxy is reported in this paper. The isodual (antimatter) light has negative energy E{sup d} =-E with negative unit, experiences a negative curvature tensor R{sup d}=-R (gravitational repulsion) when in a matter gravitational field, and possesses a negative index of refraction n{sup d}=-n when propagating within a transparent matter medium. Detection of antimatter galaxies is possible by the refractive telescope with concave lenses constructedmore » by Santilli which follow the concept of negative energy and negative index of refraction for antimatter.« less

  2. APEX Detection of Molecular Gas in Ram-Pressure Stripped Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, Alessia

    2017-11-01

    I will report on our recent study aimed at detecting molecular gas in the main body and in the tails of a sample of 5 jellyfish galaxies that have been observed within our ongoing MUSE Large Program (GASP). The analyzed sample is constituted by the most extreme jellyfish galaxies, for which the analysis of the ionized gas has already demonstrated that the mechanism at play in regulating 5the gas outflow is the ram pressure stripping. The detection of molecular gas in the tails and the broad characterization that we have been able to extract with APEX data is one of the key ingredients to understand if and how the molecular gas is subject to the same physical process.

  3. THE SPECTRAL EVOLUTION OF THE FIRST GALAXIES. I. JAMES WEBB SPACE TELESCOPE DETECTION LIMITS AND COLOR CRITERIA FOR POPULATION III GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zackrisson, Erik; Rydberg, Claes-Erik; Oestlin, Goeran

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is expected to revolutionize our understanding of the high-redshift universe, and may be able to test the prediction that the first, chemically pristine (Population III) stars are formed with very high characteristic masses. Since isolated Population III stars are likely to be beyond the reach of JWST, small Population III galaxies may offer the best prospects of directly probing the properties of metal-free stars. Here, we present Yggdrasil, a new spectral synthesis code geared toward the first galaxies. Using this model, we explore the JWST imaging detection limits for Population III galaxies and investigatemore » to what extent such objects may be identified based on their JWST colors. We predict that JWST should be able to detect Population III galaxies with stellar population masses as low as {approx}10{sup 5} M{sub sun} at z {approx} 10 in ultra deep exposures. Over limited redshift intervals, it may also be possible to use color criteria to select Population III galaxy candidates for follow-up spectroscopy. The colors of young Population III galaxies dominated by direct starlight can be used to probe the stellar initial mass function (IMF), but this requires almost complete leakage of ionizing photons into the intergalactic medium. The colors of objects dominated by nebular emission show no corresponding IMF sensitivity. We also note that a clean selection of Population III galaxies at z {approx} 7-8 can be achieved by adding two JWST/MIRI filters to the JWST/NIRCam filter sets usually discussed in the context of JWST ultra deep fields.« less

  4. ESO Astronomers Detect a Galaxy at the Edge of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-09-01

    Starlight from the Depths of Time Four European astronomers [1] have taken advantage of the superb imaging quality of the ESO 3.5-metre New Technology Telescope (NTT) at the La Silla observatory, to detect a galaxy at an extremely large distance. They conclude that its redshift [2] is z = 4.4; thus, this galaxy is by far the most remote ever detected. In fact, it has taken its light about 90 percent of the age of the Universe to reach us, and we now observe this early object as it appeared, only 1 - 2 billion years [3] after the Universe was created in the Big Bang. Still, the galaxy contains a considerable amount of elements that must have been produced in stars. This proves that stars were formed in normal galaxies, already before this very early epoch. Galaxies in the Very Early Universe Astronomical observations during the past decade indicate that the age of the Universe is probably somewhere between 13 and 17 billion years. It is expected that further studies at the limit of available telescopes during the next years will make it possible to determine this fundamental parameter more accurately. But whatever the actual age, one of the central questions which must answered in order to understand the evolution of the Universe is the time of formation of the first stars and galaxies; its determination is accordingly a prime goal of current cosmological observations. This early process was crucial for the distribution of matter now observed, but how long after the Big Bang did it actually happen? We do not know yet. In order to cast more light on this important question, we must look back to this very early epoch by detecting and measuring objects at the largest possible distances, i.e. at the highest redshifts. However, this is extremely difficult because of the faintness of such objects and so far, progress in this fundamental research field has been slow. An Enriched Hydrogen Cloud at z = 4.4 In 1994, the ESO team obtained a high-resolution, detailed spectrum

  5. COLA. III. Radio Detection of Active Galactic Nucleus in Compact Moderate Luminosity Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, R.; Conway, J. E.; Aalto, S.; Appleton, P. N.; Norris, R. P.; Pihlström, Y. M.; Kewley, L. J.

    2010-09-01

    We present results from 4.8 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) and global very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of the northern half of the moderate FIR luminosity (median L IR = 1011.01 L sun) COLA sample of star-forming galaxies. VLBI sources are detected in a high fraction (20/90) of the galaxies observed. The radio luminosities of these cores (~1021 W Hz-1) are too large to be explained by radio supernovae or supernova remnants and we argue that they are instead powered by active galactic nuclei (AGNs). These sub-parsec scale radio cores are preferentially detected toward galaxies whose VLA maps show bright 100-500 parsec scale nuclear radio components. Since these latter structures tightly follow the FIR to radio-continuum correlation for star formation, we conclude that the AGN-powered VLBI sources are associated with compact nuclear starburst environments. The implications for possible starburst-AGN connections are discussed. The detected VLBI sources have a relatively narrow range of radio luminosity consistent with models in which intense compact Eddington-limited starbursts regulate the gas supply onto a central supermassive black hole. The high incidence of AGN radio cores in compact starbursts suggests little or no delay between the starburst phase and the onset of AGN activity.

  6. COLA. III. RADIO DETECTION OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS IN COMPACT MODERATE LUMINOSITY INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, R.; Conway, J. E.; Aalto, S.

    2010-09-01

    We present results from 4.8 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) and global very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of the northern half of the moderate FIR luminosity (median L{sub IR} = 10{sup 11.01} L{sub sun}) COLA sample of star-forming galaxies. VLBI sources are detected in a high fraction (20/90) of the galaxies observed. The radio luminosities of these cores ({approx}10{sup 21} W Hz{sup -1}) are too large to be explained by radio supernovae or supernova remnants and we argue that they are instead powered by active galactic nuclei (AGNs). These sub-parsec scale radio cores are preferentially detected toward galaxies whosemore » VLA maps show bright 100-500 parsec scale nuclear radio components. Since these latter structures tightly follow the FIR to radio-continuum correlation for star formation, we conclude that the AGN-powered VLBI sources are associated with compact nuclear starburst environments. The implications for possible starburst-AGN connections are discussed. The detected VLBI sources have a relatively narrow range of radio luminosity consistent with models in which intense compact Eddington-limited starbursts regulate the gas supply onto a central supermassive black hole. The high incidence of AGN radio cores in compact starbursts suggests little or no delay between the starburst phase and the onset of AGN activity.« less

  7. The Black Hole Safari: Big Game Hunting in 30+ Massive Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Nicholas J.; Ma, Chung-Pei; Janish, Ryan; Gebhardt, Karl; Lauer, Tod R.; Graham, James R.

    2015-01-01

    The current census of the most massive black holes in the local universe turns up an odd variety of galaxy hosts: central galaxies in rich clusters, second- or lower-ranked cluster members, and compact relics from the early universe. More extensive campaigns are required to explore the number density and environmental distribution of these monsters. Over the past three years we have collected a large set of stellar kinematic data with sufficient resolution to detect the gravitational signatures of supermassive black holes with MBH > 109 MSun. This Black Hole Safari targets enormous galaxies at the centers of nearby galaxy clusters, as well as their similarly luminous counterparts in weaker galaxy groups. To date we have observed more than 30 early-type galaxies with integral-field spectrographs on the Keck, Gemini North, and Gemini South telescopes. Here I present preliminary stellar kinematics from 10 objects.

  8. Statistics of the detection rates for tensor and scalar gravitational waves from the Local Galaxy universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshev, Yu. V.; Paturel, G.

    2001-05-01

    We use data on the local 3-dimensional galaxy distribution for studying the statistics of the detection rates of gravitational waves (GW) coming from supernova explosions. We consider both tensor and scalar gravitational waves which are possible in a wide range of relativistic and quantum gravity theories. We show that statistics of GW events as a function of sidereal time can be used for distinction between scalar and tensor gravitational waves because of the anisotropy of spatial galaxy distribution. For calculation of the expected amplitudes of GW signals we use the values of the released GW energy, frequency and duration of GW pulse which are consistent with existing scenarios of SN core collapse. The amplitudes of the signals produced by Virgo and the Great Attractor clusters of galaxies is expressed as a function of the sidereal time for resonant bar detectors operating now (IGEC) and for forthcoming laser interferometric detectors (VIRGO). Then, we calculate the expected number of GW events as a function of sidereal time produced by all the galaxies within 100 Mpc. In the case of axisymmetric rotational core collapse which radiates a GW energy of 10-9Msunc2, only the closest explosions can be detected. However, in the case of nonaxisymmetric supernova explosion, due to such phenomena as centrifugal hangup, bar and lump formation, the GW radiation could be as strong as that from a coalescing neutron-star binary. For radiated GW energy higher than 10-6Msunc2 and sensitivity of detectors at the level h ~ 10-23 it is possible to detect Virgo cluster and Great Attractor, and hence to use the statistics of GW events for testing gravity theories.

  9. Polar ring galaxies in the Galaxy Zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelman, Ido; Funes, José G.; Brosch, Noah

    2012-05-01

    We report observations of 16 candidate polar-ring galaxies (PRGs) identified by the Galaxy Zoo project in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data base. Deep images of five galaxies are available in the SDSS Stripe82 data base, while to reach similar depth we observed the remaining galaxies with the 1.8-m Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope. We derive integrated magnitudes and u-r colours for the host and ring components and show continuum-subtracted Hα+[N II] images for seven objects. We present a basic morphological and environmental analysis of the galaxies and discuss their properties in comparison with other types of early-type galaxies. Follow-up photometric and spectroscopic observations will allow a kinematic confirmation of the nature of these systems and a more detailed analysis of their stellar populations.

  10. Detection of H I, OH, CO, and optical imaging of the distant galaxy IRAS 12112 + 0305

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirabel, I. F.; Kazes, I.; Sanders, D. B.

    1988-01-01

    The detection of H I absorption and OH and CO emission from the galaxy IRAS 12112 + 0305, which is receding from the sun at about 7 percent of the speed of light is reported. This galaxy, which appears to be an ongoing merger, radiates about 2 x 10 to the 12th solar luminosities in the infrared. The H I, OH, and CO spectra are indicative of large turbulent motions. From the millimeter wave CO observations, a total mass of molecular gas of 4 x 10 to the 10th solar masses is inferred. The OH emission in the 1667 MHz line is the most luminous extragalactic OH maser reported so far, with an isotropic luminosity of 1800 solar luminosities.

  11. The Herschel Perspective on Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents an investigation of local galaxies using new data from the Herschel Space Observatory. Herschel observes the entire far-infrared peak of galaxies, at higher sensitivities and angular resolution than previously possible, and can observe large samples of galaxies or areas of sky. I developed data reduction routines to optimise the data processing of SPIRE extragalactic fields, and found the best methods of flux extraction for galaxies and for fitting of spectral energy distributions. For all the objects I investigated, a single-temperature modified blackbody was a good fit to the global fluxes between 100–500 μm. Within an individual galaxy (i.e., M31, NGC4501 and NGC4567/8) the dust temperature varies between 15–30K. In M31 the dust emissivity index varies between 1.2–2.5 suggesting a change in the physical properties of the grains. The dust and gas are highly correlated in M31, with the gas-to-dust ratio varying from ˜20 in the centre to ˜200 at 18 kpc as expected from the metallicity gradient of the galaxy. By averaging the radial profiles of the late-type objects in the Herschel Reference Survey (HRS), I have shown that dust emission can be traced to at least twice the optical radius (R25) of the galaxy. Within the HRS, dust is detected in 24% of Ellipticals and 62% of S0s and has a mean temperature of 23.9 ± 0.8K for early-type galaxies, warmer than that found for other Herschel studies of late-type galaxies. The mean dust mass for the entire detected early-type sample is logMd = 6.1 ± 0.1M⊙ with a mean dust-to-stellar-mass ratio of log(Md/M∗) = ‑4.3 ± 0.1, a factor of ˜50 lower dust-to-stellar-mass ratio than for the spiral galaxies in the HRS. The wide range in the dust-to-stellar-mass ratio for ETGs and the lack of a correlation between dust mass and optical luminosity suggest that much of the dust in the ETGs detected by Herschel has been acquired as the result of interactions, although these are unlikely to have had a

  12. What if LIGO's gravitational wave detections are strongly lensed by massive galaxy clusters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Graham P.; Jauzac, Mathilde; Veitch, John; Farr, Will M.; Massey, Richard; Richard, Johan

    2018-04-01

    Motivated by the preponderance of so-called `heavy black holes' in the binary black hole (BBH) gravitational wave (GW) detections to date, and the role that gravitational lensing continues to play in discovering new galaxy populations, we explore the possibility that the GWs are strongly lensed by massive galaxy clusters. For example, if one of the GW sources were actually located at z = 1, then the rest-frame mass of the associated BHs would be reduced by a factor of ˜2. Based on the known populations of BBH GW sources and strong-lensing clusters, we estimate a conservative lower limit on the number of BBH mergers detected per detector year at LIGO/Virgo's current sensitivity that are multiply-imaged, of Rdetect ≃ 10-5 yr-1. This is equivalent to rejecting the hypothesis that one of the BBH GWs detected to date was multiply-imaged at ≲4σ. It is therefore unlikely, but not impossible, that one of the GWs is multiply-imaged. We identify three spectroscopically confirmed strong-lensing clusters with well-constrained mass models within the 90 per cent credible sky localizations of the BBH GWs from LIGO's first observing run. In the event that one of these clusters multiply-imaged one of the BBH GWs, we predict that 20-60 per cent of the putative next appearances of the GWs would be detectable by LIGO, and that they would arrive at Earth within 3yr of first detection.

  13. The HI Content of Galaxies as a Function of Local Density and Large-Scale Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoreen, Henry; Cantwell, Kelly; Maloney, Erin; Cane, Thomas; Brough Morris, Theodore; Flory, Oscar; Raskin, Mark; Crone-Odekon, Mary; ALFALFA Team

    2017-01-01

    We examine the HI content of galaxies as a function of environment, based on a catalogue of 41527 galaxies that are part of the 70% complete Arecibo Legacy Fast-ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. We use nearest-neighbor methods to characterize local environment, and a modified version of the algorithm developed for the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey to classify large-scale environment as group, filament, tendril, or void. We compare the HI content in these environments using statistics that include both HI detections and the upper limits on detections from ALFALFA. The large size of the sample allows to statistically compare the HI content in different environments for early-type galaxies as well as late-type galaxies. This work is supported by NSF grants AST-1211005 and AST-1637339, the Skidmore Faculty-Student Summer Research program, and the Schupf Scholars program.

  14. Dark Galaxy Candidates at Redshift ∼3.5 Detected with MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Raffaella Anna; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Lilly, Simon J.; Gallego, Sofia G.; Straka, Lorrie A.; Borisova, Elena; Pezzulli, Gabriele; Bacon, Roland; Brinchmann, Jarle; Carollo, C. Marcella; Caruana, Joseph; Conseil, Simon; Contini, Thierry; Diener, Catrina; Finley, Hayley; Inami, Hanae; Leclercq, Floriane; Muzahid, Sowgat; Richard, Johan; Schaye, Joop; Wendt, Martin; Wisotzki, Lutz

    2018-05-01

    Recent theoretical models suggest that the early phase of galaxy formation could involve an epoch when galaxies are gas rich but inefficient at forming stars: a “dark galaxy” phase. Here, we report the results of our Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) survey for dark galaxies fluorescently illuminated by quasars at z > 3. Compared to previous studies which are based on deep narrowband (NB) imaging, our integral field survey provides a nearly uniform sensitivity coverage over a large volume in redshift space around the quasars as well as full spectral information at each location. Thanks to these unique features, we are able to build control samples at large redshift distances from the quasars using the same data taken under the same conditions. By comparing the rest-frame equivalent width (EW0) distributions of the Lyα sources detected in proximity to the quasars and in control samples, we detect a clear correlation between the locations of high-EW0 objects and the quasars. This correlation is not seen in other properties, such as Lyα luminosities or volume overdensities, suggesting the possible fluorescent nature of at least some of these objects. Among these, we find six sources without continuum counterparts and EW0 limits larger than 240 Å that are the best candidates for dark galaxies in our survey at z > 3.5. The volume densities and properties, including inferred gas masses and star formation efficiencies, of these dark galaxy candidates are similar to those of previously detected candidates at z ≈ 2.4 in NB surveys. Moreover, if the most distant of these are fluorescently illuminated by the quasar, our results also provide a lower limit of t = 60 Myr on the quasar lifetime. Based on observations obtained at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) of the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO Programme IDs 094.A-0396, 095.A-0708, 096.A-0345, 097.A-0251, 098.A-0678, 094.A-0131, 095.A-0200, 096.A-0222, 097.A-0089, 098.A-0216).

  15. ROSAT detection of diffuse hot gas in the edge-on galaxy NGC 4631

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Q. David; Walterbos, Rene A. M.; Steakley, Michael F.; Norman, Colin A.; Braun, Robert

    1994-01-01

    ROSAT observation is presented of the edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 4631, a nearby Sc/SBd galaxy best known for its extended radio halo. Because of the low foreground Galactic X-ray-absorbing gas column density, N(sub H) approximately 1.4 x 10(exp 20)cm(exp -2), this observation is sensitive to gas of temperature greater than or equal to a few times 10(exp 5) K. A soft (approximately 0.25 keV) X-ray radiation out to more than 8 kpc above the midplane of the galaxy was detected. The strongest X-ray emission in the halo is above the central disk, a region of about 3 kpc radius which shows high star formation activity. The X-ray emission in the halo is bordered by two extended filaments of radio continuum emission. Diffuse X-ray emission from hot gas in the galaxy's disk was found. The spectrum of the radiation can be characterized by a thermal plasma with a temperature of 3 x 10(exp 6) K and a radiative cooling rate of approximately 8 x 10(exp 39) ergs s(exp -1). This rate is only a few percent of the estimated supernova energy release in the interstellar medium of the galaxy. Analysis of the X-ray spectrum shows evidence for the presence of a cooler (several times 10(exp 5) K) halo gas component that could consume a much larger fraction of the supernova energy. Strong evidence was found for disk/halo interaction. Hot gas apparently blows out from supershells in the galaxy's disk at a rate of approximately 1 solar mass yr(exp -1). This outflow of hot gas drags magnetic field lines up in the halo and forms a magnetized gaseous halo. If the magnetic field lines are still anchored to the disk gas at large disk radii, the outflowing gas may be confined high above the disk by magnetic pressure. A strong X-ray source which coincides spatially with an H I supershell has been identified. However, the source is likely an extremely luminous X-ray binary with L(sub chi)(0.1 - 2 keV) approximately 5 x 10(exp 39) ergs s(exp -1), which makes it a stellar mass black hole candidate.

  16. THE ARECIBO LEGACY FAST ALFA SURVEY: THE GALAXY POPULATION DETECTED BY ALFALFA

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shan; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo

    Making use of H I 21 cm line measurements from the ALFALFA survey ({alpha}.40) and photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), we investigate the global scaling relations and fundamental planes linking stars and gas for a sample of 9417 common galaxies: the {alpha}.40-SDSS-GALEX sample. In addition to their H I properties derived from the ALFALFA data set, stellar masses (M{sub *}) and star formation rates (SFRs) are derived from fitting the UV-optical spectral energy distributions. 96% of the {alpha}.40-SDSS-GALEX galaxies belong to the blue cloud, with the average gas fraction f{sub HI} {identical_to}more » M{sub HI}/M{sub *} {approx} 1.5. A transition in star formation (SF) properties is found whereby below M{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 9.5} M{sub Sun }, the slope of the star-forming sequence changes, the dispersion in the specific star formation rate (SSFR) distribution increases, and the star formation efficiency (SFE) mildly increases with M{sub *}. The evolutionary track in the SSFR-M{sub *} diagram, as well as that in the color-magnitude diagram, is linked to the H I content; below this transition mass, the SF is regulated strongly by the H I. Comparison of H I and optically selected samples over the same restricted volume shows that the H I-selected population is less evolved and has overall higher SFR and SSFR at a given stellar mass, but lower SFE and extinction, suggesting either that a bottleneck exists in the H I-to-H{sub 2} conversion or that the process of SF in the very H I-dominated galaxies obeys an unusual, low-efficiency SF law. A trend is found that, for a given stellar mass, high gas fraction galaxies reside preferentially in dark matter halos with high spin parameters. Because it represents a full census of H I-bearing galaxies at z {approx} 0, the scaling relations and fundamental planes derived for the ALFALFA population can be used to assess the H I detection rate by future blind H I surveys and

  17. Detecting Massive, High-Redshift Galaxy Clusters Using the Thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Carson; Steinhardt, Charles L.; Loeb, Abraham; Karim, Alexander; Staguhn, Johannes; Erler, Jens; Capak, Peter L.

    2017-01-01

    We develop the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect as a direct astrophysical measure of the mass distribution of dark matter halos. The SZ effect increases with cosmological distance, a unique astronomical property, and is highly sensitive to halo mass. We find that this presents a powerful methodology for distinguishing between competing models of the halo mass function distribution, particularly in the high-redshift domain just a few hundred million years after the Big Bang. Recent surveys designed to probe this epoch of initial galaxy formation such as CANDELS and SPLASH report an over-abundance of highly massive halos as inferred from stellar ultraviolet (UV) luminosities and the stellar mass to halo mass ratio estimated from nearby galaxies. If these UV luminosity to halo mass relations hold to high-redshift, observations estimate several orders of magnitude more highly massive halos than predicted by hierarchical merging and the standard cosmological paradigm. Strong constraints on the masses of these galaxy clusters are essential to resolving the current tension between observation and theory. We conclude that detections of thermal SZ sources are plausible at high-redshift only for the halo masses inferred from observation. Therefore, future SZ surveys will provide a robust determination between theoretical and observational predictions.

  18. Detection of X-ray emission from distant clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, J. P.; Branduardi, G.; Fabricant, D.; Feigelson, E.; Murray, S.; Tananbaum, H.; Briel, U.; Soltan, A.

    1979-01-01

    The paper reports the first extensive detection of X-ray emission from clusters of galaxies at cosmological distances. The properties of these objects are similar to those observed in objects at low redshifts. The 0.5-4.5 keV luminosities are in the range of less than 1 x 10 to the 43rd to 2 x 10 to the 45th ergs/s; the core radii are on the order of 0.5 Mpc; and Bautz-Morgan type I clusters are more luminous than types II or III. The observations are consistent with models assuming an evolving cluster potential and moderately efficient galaxy formation, but do not require them when observational selection is considered. X-ray observations of the 3C 295 cluster indicate that there is sufficient intergalactic medium to cause stripping of the cluster spirals, but the colors of these galaxies imply that they have not been stripped. A possible explanation of this discrepancy is discussed.

  19. Understanding the physical processes driving galaxy evolution in clusters : a case study of two z~0.5 galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Sean M.

    for Cl 0024 early types. Near the Virial radius of Cl 0024, we observe a number of compact, intermediate-mass ellipticals undergoing a burst of star formation or weak AGN activity, indicated by strong [O II] emission; their locations may mark the minimum radius at which merging is effective in each cluster.While E+S0 galaxies do prove to be sensitive indicators of environmental interaction, it is the spiral galaxies that, of course, host the bulk of star formation within and around these clusters. We therefore probe for kinematic disturbances in spiral disks by measuring resolved rotation curves from optical emission lines, and constructing the Tully-Fisher relation for spirals across Cl 0024 and MS 0451. We find that the cluster Tully-Fisher relation exhibits significantly higher scatter than the field relation. In probing for the origin of this difference, we find that the central mass densities of star-forming spirals exhibit a sharp break near the cluster Virial radius, with spirals in the cluster outskirts exhibiting significantly lower densities. We argue that these results considered together demonstrate that cluster spirals are kinematically disturbed by their environment, likely due to galaxy-galaxy interactions (harassment).We then discuss our most powerful method of tracking galaxy evolution across Cl 0024 and MS 0451: identifying and studying "transition galaxies"-galaxies whose stellar populations or dynamical states indicate a recent or ongoing change in morphology or star formation rate. Such galaxies are often revealed by star formation histories that seem to be at odds with the galaxy morphologies: for example, spiral galaxies with no signs of star formation, or elliptical galaxies that do show signs of star formation.We identify and study one such class of objects, the "passive spirals" in Cl 0024. These objects exhibit no emission lines in their spectra, suggesting a lack of star formation, yet are surprisingly detected in the UV, revealing the

  20. Emission-Line Galaxies from the PEARS Hubble Ultra Deep Field: A 2-D Detection Method and First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. P.; Straughn, Amber N.; Meurer, Gerhardt R.; Pirzkal, Norbert; Cohen, Seth H.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, james; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Hathi, Nimish P.; hide

    2007-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) grism PEARS (Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically) survey provides a large dataset of low-resolution spectra from thousands of galaxies in the GOODS North and South fields. One important subset of objects in these data are emission-line galaxies (ELGs), and we have investigated several different methods aimed at systematically selecting these galaxies. Here we present a new methodology and results of a search for these ELGs in the PEARS observations of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) using a 2D detection method that utilizes the observation that many emission lines originate from clumpy knots within galaxies. This 2D line-finding method proves to be useful in detecting emission lines from compact knots within galaxies that might not otherwise be detected using more traditional 1D line-finding techniques. We find in total 96 emission lines in the HUDF, originating from 81 distinct "knots" within 63 individual galaxies. We find in general that [0 1111 emitters are the most common, comprising 44% of the sample, and on average have high equivalent widths (70% of [0 1111 emitters having rest-frame EW> 100A). There are 12 galaxies with multiple emitting knots; several show evidence of variations in H-alpha flux in the knots, suggesting that the differing star formation properties across a single galaxy can in general be probed at redshifts approximately greater than 0.2 - 0.4. The most prevalent morphologies are large face-on spirals and clumpy interacting systems, many being unique detections owing to the 2D method described here, thus highlighting the strength of this technique.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Chandra ACIS survey in nearby galaxies. II (Wang+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Qiu, Y.; Liu, J.; Bregman, J. N.

    2018-03-01

    Based on the recently completed Chandra/ACIS survey of X-ray point sources in nearby galaxies, we study the X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) for X-ray point sources in different types of galaxies and the statistical properties of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs). Uniform procedures are developed to compute the detection threshold, to estimate the foreground/background contamination, and to calculate the XLFs for individual galaxies and groups of galaxies, resulting in an XLF library of 343 galaxies of different types. With the large number of surveyed galaxies, we have studied the XLFs and ULX properties across different host galaxy types, and confirm with good statistics that the XLF slope flattens from lenticular (α{\\sim}1.50{\\pm}0.07) to elliptical ({\\sim}1.21{\\pm}0.02), to spirals ({\\sim}0.80{\\pm}0.02), to peculiars ({\\sim}0.55{\\pm}0.30), and to irregulars ({\\sim}0.26{\\pm}0.10). The XLF break dividing the neutron star and black hole binaries is also confirmed, albeit at quite different break luminosities for different types of galaxies. A radial dependency is found for ellipticals, with a flatter XLF slope for sources located between D25 and 2D25, suggesting the XLF slopes in the outer region of early-type galaxies are dominated by low-mass X-ray binaries in globular clusters. This study shows that the ULX rate in early-type galaxies is 0.24{\\pm}0.05 ULXs per surveyed galaxy, on a 5σ confidence level. The XLF for ULXs in late-type galaxies extends smoothly until it drops abruptly around 4x1040erg/s, and this break may suggest a mild boundary between the stellar black hole population possibly including 30M{\\sun} black holes with super-Eddington radiation and intermediate mass black holes. (1 data file).

  2. SDSS-IV MaNGA: stellar population gradients as a function of galaxy environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, D.; Thomas, D.; Maraston, C.; Westfall, K.; Etherington, J.; Riffel, R.; Mallmann, N. D.; Zheng, Z.; Argudo-Fernández, M.; Bershady, M.; Bundy, K.; Drory, N.; Law, D.; Yan, R.; Wake, D.; Weijmans, A.; Bizyaev, D.; Brownstein, J.; Lane, R. R.; Maiolino, R.; Masters, K.; Merrifield, M.; Nitschelm, C.; Pan, K.; Roman-Lopes, A.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.

    2017-02-01

    We study the internal radial gradients of stellar population properties within 1.5 Re and analyse the impact of galaxy environment. We use a representative sample of 721 galaxies with masses ranging between 109 M⊙ and 1011.5 M⊙ from the SDSS-IV survey MaNGA. We split this sample by morphology into early-type and late-type galaxies. Using the full spectral fitting code FIREFLY, we derive the light and mass-weighted stellar population properties, age and metallicity, and calculate the gradients of these properties. We use three independent methods to quantify galaxy environment, namely the Nth nearest neighbour, the tidal strength parameter Q and distinguish between central and satellite galaxies. In our analysis, we find that early-type galaxies generally exhibit shallow light-weighted age gradients in agreement with the literature and mass-weighted median age gradients tend to be slightly positive. Late-type galaxies, instead, have negative light-weighted age gradients. We detect negative metallicity gradients in both early- and late-type galaxies that correlate with galaxy mass, with the gradients being steeper and the correlation with mass being stronger in late-types. We find, however, that stellar population gradients, for both morphological classifications, have no significant correlation with galaxy environment for all three characterizations of environment. Our results suggest that galaxy mass is the main driver of stellar population gradients in both early and late-type galaxies, and any environmental dependence, if present at all, must be very subtle.

  3. The detection of a population of submillimeter-bright, strongly lensed galaxies.

    PubMed

    Negrello, Mattia; Hopwood, R; De Zotti, G; Cooray, A; Verma, A; Bock, J; Frayer, D T; Gurwell, M A; Omont, A; Neri, R; Dannerbauer, H; Leeuw, L L; Barton, E; Cooke, J; Kim, S; da Cunha, E; Rodighiero, G; Cox, P; Bonfield, D G; Jarvis, M J; Serjeant, S; Ivison, R J; Dye, S; Aretxaga, I; Hughes, D H; Ibar, E; Bertoldi, F; Valtchanov, I; Eales, S; Dunne, L; Driver, S P; Auld, R; Buttiglione, S; Cava, A; Grady, C A; Clements, D L; Dariush, A; Fritz, J; Hill, D; Hornbeck, J B; Kelvin, L; Lagache, G; Lopez-Caniego, M; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J; Maddox, S; Pascale, E; Pohlen, M; Rigby, E E; Robotham, A; Simpson, C; Smith, D J B; Temi, P; Thompson, M A; Woodgate, B E; York, D G; Aguirre, J E; Beelen, A; Blain, A; Baker, A J; Birkinshaw, M; Blundell, R; Bradford, C M; Burgarella, D; Danese, L; Dunlop, J S; Fleuren, S; Glenn, J; Harris, A I; Kamenetzky, J; Lupu, R E; Maddalena, R J; Madore, B F; Maloney, P R; Matsuhara, H; Michaowski, M J; Murphy, E J; Naylor, B J; Nguyen, H; Popescu, C; Rawlings, S; Rigopoulou, D; Scott, D; Scott, K S; Seibert, M; Smail, I; Tuffs, R J; Vieira, J D; van der Werf, P P; Zmuidzinas, J

    2010-11-05

    Gravitational lensing is a powerful astrophysical and cosmological probe and is particularly valuable at submillimeter wavelengths for the study of the statistical and individual properties of dusty star-forming galaxies. However, the identification of gravitational lenses is often time-intensive, involving the sifting of large volumes of imaging or spectroscopic data to find few candidates. We used early data from the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey to demonstrate that wide-area submillimeter surveys can simply and easily detect strong gravitational lensing events, with close to 100% efficiency.

  4. Detecting effects of filaments on galaxy properties in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yen-Chi; Ho, Shirley; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Bahcall, Neta A.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Freeman, Peter E.; Genovese, Christopher R.; Schneider, Donald P.; Wasserman, Larry

    2017-04-01

    We study the effects of filaments on galaxy properties in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 12 using filaments from the 'Cosmic Web Reconstruction' catalogue, a publicly available filament catalogue for SDSS. Since filaments are tracers of medium- to high-density regions, we expect that galaxy properties associated with the environment are dependent on the distance to the nearest filament. Our analysis demonstrates that a red galaxy or a high-mass galaxy tends to reside closer to filaments than a blue or low-mass galaxy. After adjusting the effect from stellar mass, on average, early-forming galaxies or large galaxies have a shorter distance to filaments than late-forming galaxies or small galaxies. For the main galaxy sample, all signals are very significant (>6σ). For the LOWZ and CMASS sample, the stellar mass and size are significant (>2σ). The filament effects we observe persist until z = 0.7 (the edge of the CMASS sample). Comparing our results to those using the galaxy distances from redMaPPer galaxy clusters as a reference, we find a similar result between filaments and clusters. Moreover, we find that the effect of clusters on the stellar mass of nearby galaxies depends on the galaxy's filamentary environment. Our findings illustrate the strong correlation of galaxy properties with proximity to density ridges, strongly supporting the claim that density ridges are good tracers of filaments.

  5. Cosmological study with galaxy clusters detected by the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, Suet-Ying

    In this work, we present various studies to forecast the power of the galaxy clusters detected by the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in constraining cosmological models. The SZ effect is regarded as one of the new and promising technique to identify and study cluster physics. With the latest data being released in recent years from the SZ telescopes, it is essential to explore their potentials in providing cosmological information and investigate their relative strengths with respect to galaxy cluster data from X-ray and optical, as well as other cosmological probes such as Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). One of the topics regard resolving the debate on the existence of an anomalous large scale bulk flow as measured from the kinetic SZ signal of galaxy clusters in the WMAP CMB data. We predict that if such measurement is done with the latest CMB data from the Planck satellite, the sensitivity will be improved by a factor of >5 and thus be able to provide an independent view of its existence. As it turns out, the Planck data, when using the technique developed in this work, find that the observed bulk flow amplitude is consistent with those expected from the LambdaCDM, which is in clear contradiction to the previous claim of a significant bulk flow detection in the WMAP data. We also forecast on the capability of the ongoing and future cluster surveys identified through thermal SZ (tSZ) in constraining three extended models to the LambdaCDM model: modified gravity f( R) model, primordial non-Gaussianity of density perturbation, and the presence of massive neutrinos. We do so by employing their effects on the cluster number count and power spectrum and using Fisher Matrix analysis to estimate the errors on the model parameters. We find that SZ cluster surveys can provide vital complementary information to those expected from non-cluster probes. Our results therefore give the confidence for pursuing these extended cosmological models with SZ clusters.

  6. DETECTION OF LENSING SUBSTRUCTURE USING ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF THE DUSTY GALAXY SDP.81

    SciTech Connect

    Hezaveh, Yashar D.; Mao, Yao-Yuan; Morningstar, Warren

    2016-05-20

    We study the abundance of substructure in the matter density near galaxies using ALMA Science Verification observations of the strong lensing system SDP.81. We present a method to measure the abundance of subhalos around galaxies using interferometric observations of gravitational lenses. Using simulated ALMA observations we explore the effects of various systematics, including antenna phase errors and source priors, and show how such errors may be measured or marginalized. We apply our formalism to ALMA observations of SDP.81. We find evidence for the presence of a M = 10{sup 8.96±0.12} M {sub ⊙} subhalo near one of the images, withmore » a significance of 6.9 σ in a joint fit to data from bands 6 and 7; the effect of the subhalo is also detected in both bands individually. We also derive constraints on the abundance of dark matter (DM) subhalos down to M ∼ 2 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ⊙}, pushing down to the mass regime of the smallest detected satellites in the Local Group, where there are significant discrepancies between the observed population of luminous galaxies and predicted DM subhalos. We find hints of additional substructure, warranting further study using the full SDP.81 data set (including, for example, the spectroscopic imaging of the lensed carbon monoxide emission). We compare the results of this search to the predictions of ΛCDM halos, and find that given current uncertainties in the host halo properties of SDP.81, our measurements of substructure are consistent with theoretical expectations. Observations of larger samples of gravitational lenses with ALMA should be able to improve the constraints on the abundance of galactic substructure.« less

  7. Detection of Lensing Substructure Using Alma Observations of the Dusty Galaxy SDP.81

    DOE PAGES

    Hezaveh, Yashar D.; Dalal, Neal; Marrone, Daniel P.; ...

    2016-05-19

    We study the abundance of substructure in the matter density near galaxies using ALMA Science Verification observations of the strong lensing system SDP.81. We present a method to measure the abundance of subhalos around galaxies using interferometric observations of gravitational lenses. Using simulated ALMA observations we explore the effects of various systematics, including antenna phase errors and source priors, and show how such errors may be measured or marginalized. We apply our formalism to ALMA observations of SDP.81. We find evidence for the presence of a M = 10 8.96±0.12 M ⊙ subhalo near one of the images, with amore » significance of 6.9σ in a joint fit to data from bands 6 and 7; the effect of the subhalo is also detected in both bands individually. We also derive constraints on the abundance of dark matter (DM) subhalos down to M ~ 2 × 10 7 M ⊙, pushing down to the mass regime of the smallest detected satellites in the Local Group, where there are significant discrepancies between the observed population of luminous galaxies and predicted DM subhalos. We find hints of additional substructure, warranting further study using the full SDP.81 data set (including, for example, the spectroscopic imaging of the lensed carbon monoxide emission). We compare the results of this search to the predictions of ΛCDM halos, and find that given current uncertainties in the host halo properties of SDP.81, our measurements of substructure are consistent with theoretical expectations. Finally, observations of larger samples of gravitational lenses with ALMA should be able to improve the constraints on the abundance of galactic substructure.« less

  8. SDSS-IV MaNGA: Spatially resolved star formation histories in galaxies as a function of galaxy mass and type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, D.; Thomas, D.; Maraston, C.; Westfall, K.; Etherington, J.; Riffel, R.; Mallmann, N. D.; Zheng, Z.; Argudo-Fernández, M.; Lian, J.; Bershady, M.; Bundy, K.; Drory, N.; Law, D.; Yan, R.; Wake, D.; Weijmans, A.; Bizyaev, D.; Brownstein, J.; Lane, R. R.; Maiolino, R.; Masters, K.; Merrifield, M.; Nitschelm, C.; Pan, K.; Roman-Lopes, A.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Schneider, D. P.

    2017-04-01

    We study the internal gradients of stellar population properties within 1.5 Re for a representative sample of 721 galaxies, with stellar masses ranging between 109 M⊙ and 1011.5 M⊙ from the SDSS-IV MaNGA Integral-Field-Unit survey. Through the use of our full spectral fitting code firefly, we derive light- and mass-weighted stellar population properties and their radial gradients, as well as full star formation and metal enrichment histories. We also quantify the impact that different stellar population models and full spectral fitting routines have on the derived stellar population properties and the radial gradient measurements. In our analysis, we find that age gradients tend to be shallow for both early-type and late-type galaxies. Mass-weighted age gradients of early-types arepositive (˜0.09 dex/Re) pointing to 'outside-in' progression of star formation, while late-type galaxies have negative light-weighted age gradients (˜-0.11 dex/Re), suggesting an 'inside-out' formation of discs. We detect negative metallicity gradients in both early- and late-type galaxies, but these are significantly steeper in late-types, suggesting that the radial dependence of chemical enrichment processes and the effect of gas inflow and metal transport are far more pronounced in discs. Metallicity gradients of both morphological classes correlate with galaxy mass, with negative metallicity gradients becoming steeper with increasing galaxy mass. The correlation with mass is stronger for late-type galaxies, with a slope of d(∇[Z/H])/d(log M) ˜ -0.2 ± 0.05 , compared to d(∇[Z/H])/d(log M) ˜ -0.05 ± 0.05 for early-types. This result suggests that the merger history plays a relatively small role in shaping metallicity gradients of galaxies.

  9. Rest-Frame Mid-Infrared Detection of an Extremely Luminous Lyman Break Galaxy with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teplitz, H. I.; Charmandaris, V.; Armus, L.; Appleton, P. N.; Houck, J. R.; Soifer, B. T.; Weedman, D.; Brandl, B. R.; vanCleve, J.; Grillmair, C.; hide

    2004-01-01

    We present the first rest-frame of approximately 4 microns detection of a Lyman break galaxy. The data were obtained using the 16 microns imaging capability of the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph. The target object, J134026.44+634433.2, is an extremely luminous Lyman break galaxy at z=2.79, first identified in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra (as reported by Bentz et al.). The source is strongly detected with a flux of 0.94 +/- 0.02 mJy. Combining Spitzer and SDSS photometry with supporting ground-based J- and K-band data, we show that the spectral energy distribution is consistent with an actively star-forming galaxy. We also detect other objects in the Spitzer field of view, including a very red mid-infrared source. We find no evidence of a strong lens among the mid-infrared sources.

  10. Starburst galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weedman, Daniel W.

    1987-01-01

    The infrared properties of star-forming galaxies, primarily as determined by the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), are compared to X-ray, optical, and radio properties. Luminosity functions are reviewed and combined with those derived from optically discovered samples using 487 Markarian galaxies with redshifts and published IRAS 60 micron fluxes, and 1074 such galaxies in the Center for Astrophysics redshift survey. It is found that the majority of infrared galaxies which could be detected are low luminosity sources already known from the optical samples, but non-infrared surveys have found only a very small fraction of the highest luminosity sources. Distributions of infrared to optical fluxes and available spectra indicate that the majority of IRAS-selected galaxies are starburst galaxies. Having a census of starburst galaxies and associated dust allow severl important global calculations. The source counts are predicted as a function of flux limits for both infrared and radio fluxes. These galaxies are found to be important radio sources at faint flux limits. Taking the integrated flux to z = 3 indicates that such galaxies are a significant component of the diffuse X-ray background, and could be the the dominant component depending on the nature of the X-ray spectra and source evolution.

  11. Wide field imaging - I. Applications of neural networks to object detection and star/galaxy classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreon, S.; Gargiulo, G.; Longo, G.; Tagliaferri, R.; Capuano, N.

    2000-12-01

    Astronomical wide-field imaging performed with new large-format CCD detectors poses data reduction problems of unprecedented scale, which are difficult to deal with using traditional interactive tools. We present here NExt (Neural Extractor), a new neural network (NN) based package capable of detecting objects and performing both deblending and star/galaxy classification in an automatic way. Traditionally, in astronomical images, objects are first distinguished from the noisy background by searching for sets of connected pixels having brightnesses above a given threshold; they are then classified as stars or as galaxies through diagnostic diagrams having variables chosen according to the astronomer's taste and experience. In the extraction step, assuming that images are well sampled, NExt requires only the simplest a priori definition of `what an object is' (i.e. it keeps all structures composed of more than one pixel) and performs the detection via an unsupervised NN, approaching detection as a clustering problem that has been thoroughly studied in the artificial intelligence literature. The first part of the NExt procedure consists of an optimal compression of the redundant information contained in the pixels via a mapping from pixel intensities to a subspace individualized through principal component analysis. At magnitudes fainter than the completeness limit, stars are usually almost indistinguishable from galaxies, and therefore the parameters characterizing the two classes do not lie in disconnected subspaces, thus preventing the use of unsupervised methods. We therefore adopted a supervised NN (i.e. a NN that first finds the rules to classify objects from examples and then applies them to the whole data set). In practice, each object is classified depending on its membership of the regions mapping the input feature space in the training set. In order to obtain an objective and reliable classification, instead of using an arbitrarily defined set of features

  12. Galaxy Detection in 2MASS: Global Expectations and Results from Several Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chester, T.; Jarrett, T.

    1995-01-01

    An alogorithm has been developed and used to find galaxies in the 2MASS data. It uses the central surface brightness and measured size to discriminate galaxies from the much larger stellar population.

  13. HIGHEST REDSHIFT IMAGE OF NEUTRAL HYDROGEN IN EMISSION: A CHILES DETECTION OF A STARBURSTING GALAXY AT z = 0.376

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández, Ximena; Gim, Hansung B.; Yun, Min S.

    2016-06-10

    Our current understanding of galaxy evolution still has many uncertainties associated with the details of the accretion, processing, and removal of gas across cosmic time. The next generation of radio telescopes will image the neutral hydrogen (H i) in galaxies over large volumes at high redshifts, which will provide key insights into these processes. We are conducting the COSMOS H i Large Extragalactic Survey (CHILES) with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, which is the first survey to simultaneously observe H i from z = 0 to z ∼ 0.5. Here, we report the highest redshift H i 21more » cm detection in emission to date of the luminous infrared galaxy COSMOS J100054.83+023126.2 at z = 0.376 with the first 178 hr of CHILES data. The total H i mass is (2.9 ± 1.0) × 10{sup 10} M {sub ⊙} and the spatial distribution is asymmetric and extends beyond the galaxy. While optically the galaxy looks undisturbed, the H i distribution suggests an interaction with a candidate companion. In addition, we present follow-up Large Millimeter Telescope CO observations that show it is rich in molecular hydrogen, with a range of possible masses of (1.8–9.9) × 10{sup 10} M {sub ⊙}. This is the first study of the H i and CO in emission for a single galaxy beyond z ∼ 0.2.« less

  14. Detectability of large-scale power suppression in the galaxy distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibelyou, Cameron; Huterer, Dragan; Fang, Wenjuan

    2010-12-01

    Suppression in primordial power on the Universe’s largest observable scales has been invoked as a possible explanation for large-angle observations in the cosmic microwave background, and is allowed or predicted by some inflationary models. Here we investigate the extent to which such a suppression could be confirmed by the upcoming large-volume redshift surveys. For definiteness, we study a simple parametric model of suppression that improves the fit of the vanilla ΛCDM model to the angular correlation function measured by WMAP in cut-sky maps, and at the same time improves the fit to the angular power spectrum inferred from the maximum likelihood analysis presented by the WMAP team. We find that the missing power at large scales, favored by WMAP observations within the context of this model, will be difficult but not impossible to rule out with a galaxy redshift survey with large-volume (˜100Gpc3). A key requirement for success in ruling out power suppression will be having redshifts of most galaxies detected in the imaging survey.

  15. Detection of weak gravitational lensing distortions of distant galaxies by cosmic dark matter at large scales

    PubMed

    Wittman; Tyson; Kirkman; Dell'Antonio; Bernstein

    2000-05-11

    Most of the matter in the Universe is not luminous, and can be observed only through its gravitational influence on the appearance of luminous matter. Weak gravitational lensing is a technique that uses the distortions of the images of distant galaxies as a tracer of dark matter: such distortions are induced as the light passes through large-scale distributions of dark matter in the foreground. The patterns of the induced distortions reflect the density of mass along the line of sight and its distribution, and the resulting 'cosmic shear' can be used to distinguish between alternative cosmologies. But previous attempts to measure this effect have been inconclusive. Here we report the detection of cosmic shear on angular scales of up to half a degree using 145,000 galaxies and along three separate lines of sight. We find that the dark matter is distributed in a manner consistent with either an open universe, or a flat universe that is dominated by a cosmological constant. Our results are inconsistent with the standard cold-dark-matter model.

  16. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey. XX. RedGOLD Background Galaxy Cluster Detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licitra, Rossella; Mei, Simona; Raichoor, Anand; Erben, Thomas; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Muñoz, Roberto P.; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Côté, Patrick; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Ferrarese, Laura; Gwyn, Stephen D. J.; Huertas-Company, Marc; Lançon, Ariane; Parroni, Carolina; Puzia, Thomas H.

    2016-09-01

    We build a background cluster candidate catalog from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) using our detection algorithm RedGOLD. The NGVS covers 104 deg2 of the Virgo cluster in the {u}* ,g,r,I,z-bandpasses to a depth of g ˜ 25.7 mag (5σ). Part of the survey was not covered or has shallow observations in the r band. We build two cluster catalogs: one using all bandpasses, for the fields with deep r-band observations (˜20 deg2), and the other using four bandpasses ({u}* ,g,I,z) for the entire NGVS area. Based on our previous Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey W1 studies, we estimate that both of our catalogs are ˜100% (˜70%) complete and ˜80% pure, at z ≤ 0.6 (z ≲ 1), for galaxy clusters with masses of M ≳ 1014 M ⊙. We show that when using four bandpasses, though the photometric redshift accuracy is lower, RedGOLD detects massive galaxy clusters up to z ˜ 1 with completeness and purity similar to the five-band case. This is achieved when taking into account the bias in the richness estimation, which is ˜40% lower at 0.5 ≤ z < 0.6 and ˜20% higher at 0.6 < z < 0.8, with respect to the five-band case. RedGOLD recovers all the X-ray clusters in the area with mass M 500 > 1.4 × 1014 M ⊙ and 0.08 < z < 0.5. Because of our different cluster richness limits and the NGVS depth, our catalogs reach lower masses than the published redMaPPer cluster catalog over the area, and we recover ˜90%-100% of its detections.

  17. X-ray detectability of accreting isolated black holes in our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuna, Daichi; Kawanaka, Norita; Totani, Tomonori

    2018-06-01

    Detectability of isolated black holes (IBHs) without a companion star but emitting X-rays by accretion from dense interstellar medium (ISM) or molecular cloud gas is investigated. We calculate orbits of IBHs in the Galaxy to derive a realistic spatial distribution of IBHs for various mean values of kick velocity at their birth υavg. X-ray luminosities of these IBHs are then calculated considering various phases of ISM and molecular clouds for a wide range of the accretion efficiency λ (a ratio of the actual accretion rate to the Bondi rate) that is rather uncertain. It is found that detectable IBHs mostly reside near the Galactic Centre (GC), and hence taking the Galactic structure into account is essential. In the hard X-ray band, where identification of IBHs from other contaminating X-ray sources may be easier, the expected number of IBHs detectable by the past survey by NuSTAR towards GC is at most order unity. However, 30-100 IBHs may be detected by the future survey by FORCE with an optimistic parameter set of υavg = 50 km s-1 and λ = 0.1, implying that it may be possible to detect IBHs or constrain the model parameters.

  18. Galaxy NGC 55

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-10

    This image of the nearby edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 55 was taken by Galaxy Evolution Explorer on September 14, 2003, during 2 orbits. This galaxy lies 5.4 million light years from our Milky Way galaxy and is a member of the "local group" of galaxies that also includes the Andromeda galaxy (M31), the Magellanic clouds, and 40 other galaxies. The spiral disk of NGC 55 is inclined to our line of sight by approximately 80 degrees and so this galaxy looks cigar-shaped. This picture is a combination of Galaxy Evolution Explorer images taken with the far ultraviolet (colored blue) and near ultraviolet detectors, (colored red). The bright blue regions in this image are areas of active star formation detected in the ultraviolet by Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The red stars in this image are foreground stars in our own Milky Way galaxy. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04923

  19. Galaxy NGC 55

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This image of the nearby edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 55 was taken by Galaxy Evolution Explorer on September 14, 2003, during 2 orbits. This galaxy lies 5.4 million light years from our Milky Way galaxy and is a member of the 'local group' of galaxies that also includes the Andromeda galaxy (M31), the Magellanic clouds, and 40 other galaxies. The spiral disk of NGC 55 is inclined to our line of sight by approximately 80 degrees and so this galaxy looks cigar-shaped. This picture is a combination of Galaxy Evolution Explorer images taken with the far ultraviolet (colored blue) and near ultraviolet detectors, (colored red). The bright blue regions in this image are areas of active star formation detected in the ultraviolet by Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The red stars in this image are foreground stars in our own Milky Way galaxy.

  20. Evidence for a Multiphase ISM in Early Type Galaxies and Elliptical Galaxies with Strong Radio Continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Dong Woo

    1997-01-01

    We have observed NGC 1316 (Fornax A) with the ROSAT HRI. In this paper, we present the results of these observations and we complement them with the spectral analysis of the archival PSPC data. The spectral properties suggest the presence of a significant component of thermal X-ray emission (greater than 60%), amounting to approx. 10(exp 9) solar mass of hot ISM. Within 3 feet from the nucleus of NGC 1316, the HRI X-ray surface brightness falls as r(exp -2) following the stellar light. In the inner approx. 30 inch., however, the X-ray surface brightness is significantly elongated, contrary to the distribution of stellar light, which is significantly rounder within 10 inch. This again argues for a non-stellar origin of the X-ray emission. This flattened X-ray feature is suggestive of either the disk-like geometry of a rotating cooling flow and/or the presence of extended, elongated dark matter. By comparing the morphology of the X-ray emission with the distribution of optical dust patches, we find that the X-ray emission is significantly reduced at the locations where the dust patches are more pronounced, indicating that at least some of the X-ray photons are absorbed by the cold ISM. We also compare the distribution of the hot and cold ISM with that of the ionized gas, using recently obtained H(sub alpha) CCD data. We find that the ionized gas is distributed roughly along the dust patches and follows the large scale X-ray distribution at r greater than 1 foot from the nucleus. However, there is no one-to-one correspondence between ionized gas and hot gas. Both morphological relations and kinematics suggest different origins for hot and cold ISM. The radio jets in projection appear to pass perpendicularly through the central X-ray ellipsoid. Comparison of thermal and radio pressures suggests that the radio jets are confined by the surrounding hot gaseous medium.

  1. The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey - VI. The Virgo cluster (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, R.; Davies, J. I.; Auld, R.; Minchin, R. F.; Smith, R.

    2013-01-01

    We present 21-cm observations of a 5 × 1 deg2 region in the Virgo cluster, obtained as part of the Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey. 13 cluster members are detected, together with 36 objects in the background. We compare and contrast the results from this area with a larger 10 × 2 deg2 region. We combine the two data sets to produce an H i mass function, which shows a higher detection rate at low masses (but finds fewer massive galaxies) than less sensitive wider area surveys, such as ALFALFA. We find that the H i-detected galaxies are distributed differently to the non-detections, both spatially and in velocity, providing further evidence that the cluster is still assembling. We use the Tully-Fisher relation to examine the possibility of morphological evolution. We find that highly deficient galaxies, as well as some early-type galaxies, have much lower velocity widths than the Tully-Fisher relation predicts, indicating gas loss via ram-pressure stripping. We also find that H i detections without optical counterparts do not fit the predictions of the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation, implying that they are not primordial objects.

  2. FERMI Large Area Telescope Gamma-Ray Detection of the Radio Galaxy M87

    DOE PAGES

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; ...

    2009-11-17

    Here, we report the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) discovery of high-energy (MeV/GeV) γ-ray emission positionally consistent with the center of the radio galaxy M87, at a source significance of over 10σ in 10 months of all-sky survey data. Following the detections of Cen A and Per A, this makes M87 the third radio galaxy seen with the LAT. The faint point-like γ-ray source has a >100 MeV flux of 2.45 (±0.63) × 10 –8 photons cm –2 s –1 (photon index = 2.26 ± 0.13) with no significant variability detected within the LAT observation. This flux is comparable withmore » the previous EGRET upper limit (<2.18 × 10 –8 photons cm –2 s –1, 2σ), thus there is no evidence for a significant MeV/GeV flare on decade timescales. Contemporaneous Chandra and Very Long Baseline Array data indicate low activity in the unresolved X-ray and radio core relative to previous observations, suggesting M87 is in a quiescent overall level over the first year of Fermi-LAT observations. The LAT γ-ray spectrum is modeled as synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) emission from the electron population producing the radio-to-X-ray emission in the core. The resultant SSC spectrum extrapolates smoothly from the LAT band to the historical-minimum TeV emission. Lastly, alternative models for the core and possible contributions from the kiloparsec-scale jet in M87 are considered, and cannot be excluded.« less

  3. Ram pressure stripping of hot coronal gas from group and cluster galaxies and the detectability of surviving X-ray coronae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayaraghavan, Rukmani; Ricker, Paul M.

    2015-05-01

    Ram pressure stripping can remove hot and cold gas from galaxies in the intracluster medium, as shown by observations of X-ray and H I galaxy wakes in nearby clusters of galaxies. However, ram pressure stripping, including pre-processing in group environments, does not remove all the hot coronal gas from cluster galaxies. Recent high-resolution Chandra observations have shown that ˜1-4 kpc extended, hot galactic coronae are ubiquitous in group and cluster galaxies. To better understand this result, we simulate ram pressure stripping of a cosmologically motivated population of galaxies in isolated group and cluster environments. The galaxies and the host group and cluster are composed of collisionless dark matter and hot gas initially in hydrostatic equilibrium with the galaxy and host potentials. We show that the rate at which gas is lost depends on the galactic and host halo mass. Using synthetic X-ray observations, we evaluate the detectability of stripped galactic coronae in real observations by stacking images on the known galaxy centres. We find that coronal emission should be detected within ˜10 arcsec, or ˜5 kpc up to ˜2.3 Gyr in the lowest (0.1-1.2 keV) energy band. Thus, the presence of observed coronae in cluster galaxies significantly smaller than the hot X-ray haloes of field galaxies indicates that at least some gas removal occurs within cluster environments for recently accreted galaxies. Finally, we evaluate the possibility that existing and future X-ray cluster catalogues can be used in combination with optical galaxy positions to detect galactic coronal emission via stacking analysis. We briefly discuss the effects of additional physical processes on coronal survival, and will address them in detail in future papers in this series.

  4. The Detection of Circumnuclear X-Ray Emission from the Seyfert Galaxy NGC 3516

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, I. M.; Turner, T. J.; Netzer, H.; Kraemer, S. B.; Ruiz, J.; Chelouche, D.; Crenshaw, D. M.; Yaqoob, T.; Nandra, K.; Mushotzky, R. F.; hide

    2001-01-01

    We present the first high-resolution, X-ray image of the circumnuclear regions of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3516, using the Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO). All three of the CXO observations reported were performed with one of the two grating assemblies in place, and here we restrict our analysis to undispersed photons (i.e. those detected in the zeroth-order). A previously-unknown X-ray source is detected approximately 6 arcsec (1.1h(sub 75)(exp -1) kpc) NNE of the nucleus (position angle approximately 29 degrees) which we designate CXOU 110648.1 + 723412. Its spectrum can be characterized as a power law with a photon index (Gamma) approximately 1.8 - 2.6, or as thermal emission with a temperature kT approximately 0.7 - 3 keV. Assuming a location within NGC 3516, isotropic emission implies a luminosity L approximately 2 - 8 x 10(exp 39)h(sub 75)(exp-2) erg s(exp -1) in the 0.4 - 2 keV band. If due to a single point source, the object is super-Eddington for a 1.4 solar mass neutron star. However, multiple sources or a small, extended source cannot be excluded using the current data. Large-scale extended S-ray emission is also detected out to approximately 10 arcsec (approximately 2h(sub 75)(exp -1) kpc) from the nucleus to the NE and SW, and is approximately aligned with the morphologies of the radio emission and extended narrow emission line region (ENLR). The mean luminosity of this emission is 1 - 5 x 10(exp 37)h(sub 75)(exp -2) erg s(exp -1) arcsec(exp -2), in the 0.4 - 2 keV band. Unfortunately the current data cannot usefully constrain its spectrum. These results are consistent with earlier suggestions of circumnuclear X-ray emissi in NGC 3516 based on ROSAT observations, and thus provide the first clear detection of extended X-ray emission in a Seyfert 1.0 galaxy. If the extended emission is due to scattering of the nuclear X-ray continuum, then the pressure in the X-ray emitting gas is at least two orders of magnitude too small to provide the confining

  5. The population of submillimeter galaxies and its impact on the detection of the Sunyaev-Zel'Dovich Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downes, Thomas Patrick

    The population of submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) informs models of the formation of structure in the universe. It is likely that SMGs are the progenitors of systems like the Milky Way because their spectra imply the high star formation rates necessary to form the requisite number of stars. Until recently millimeter/submillimeter experiments did not have the sensitivity to image both wide and deep to distinguish between competing models of galaxy evolution. AzTEC is an array instrument operating at 1.1mm that has the necessary sensitivity and dedicated telescope time and has begun making groundbreaking contributions to the field. Furthermore, SMGs are an expected foreground to the detection of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) in clusters of galaxies. In particular, at wavelengths longer than 1.4mm the positive flux of SMGs below an instrument's sensitivity threshold will counteract the decrement expected from the SZE. The detection of galaxy clusters is a promising approach to understanding the expansion history of the universe and putting constraints on s 8 as well as on the properties the dark energy. We present below the results of an analysis of AzTEC surveys for SMGs in galaxy cluster environments as well as "blank" fields far away from clusters. We compare the two results and those of previous surveys and estimate their implications for the ability of a blind survey at 2mm to detect the SZE in clusters. We find that the noise contributions of SMGs to SZE detection are small compared to the sensitivity of existing surveys, such as that of the South Pole Telescope.

  6. SDSS-IV MaNGA: stellar angular momentum of about 2300 galaxies: unveiling the bimodality of massive galaxy properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Mark T.; Cappellari, Michele; Li, Hongyu; Mao, Shude; Bershady, Matthew A.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Drory, Niv; Law, David R.; Pan, Kaike; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David A.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Westfall, Kyle B.; Yan, Renbin

    2018-07-01

    We measure λ _{R_e}, a proxy for galaxy specific stellar angular momentum within one effective radius, and the ellipticity, ɛ, for about 2300 galaxies of all morphological types observed with integral field spectroscopy as part of the Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory survey, the largest such sample to date. We use the (λ _{R_e}, ɛ ) diagram to separate early-type galaxies into fast and slow rotators. We also visually classify each galaxy according to its optical morphology and two-dimensional stellar velocity field. Comparing these classifications to quantitative λ _{R_e} measurements reveals tight relationships between angular momentum and galaxy structure. In order to account for atmospheric seeing, we use realistic models of galaxy kinematics to derive a general approximate analytic correction for λ _{R_e}. Thanks to the size of the sample and the large number of massive galaxies, we unambiguously detect a clear bimodality in the (λ _{R_e}, ɛ ) diagram which may result from fundamental differences in galaxy assembly history. There is a sharp secondary density peak inside the region of the diagram with low λ _{R_e} and ɛ < 0.4, previously suggested as the definition for slow rotators. Most of these galaxies are visually classified as non-regular rotators and have high velocity dispersion. The intrinsic bimodality must be stronger, as it tends to be smoothed by noise and inclination. The large sample of slow rotators allows us for the first time to unveil a secondary peak at ±90° in their distribution of the misalignments between the photometric and kinematic position angles. We confirm that genuine slow rotators start appearing above M ≥ 2 × 1011 M⊙ where a significant number of high-mass fast rotators also exist.

  7. Galaxy clusters in the SDSS Stripe 82 based on photometric redshifts

    SciTech Connect

    Durret, F.; Adami, C.; Bertin, E.

    Based on a recent photometric redshift galaxy catalogue, we have searched for galaxy clusters in the Stripe ~82 region of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey by applying the Adami & MAzure Cluster FInder (AMACFI). Extensive tests were made to fine-tune the AMACFI parameters and make the cluster detection as reliable as possible. The same method was applied to the Millennium simulation to estimate our detection efficiency and the approximate masses of the detected clusters. Considering all the cluster galaxies (i.e. within a 1 Mpc radius of the cluster to which they belong and with a photoz differing by less thanmore » 0.05 from that of the cluster), we stacked clusters in various redshift bins to derive colour-magnitude diagrams and galaxy luminosity functions (GLFs). For each galaxy with absolute magnitude brighter than -19.0 in the r band, we computed the disk and spheroid components by applying SExtractor, and by stacking clusters we determined how the disk-to-spheroid flux ratio varies with cluster redshift and mass. We also detected 3663 clusters in the redshift range 0.1513 and a few 10 14 solar masses. Furthermore, by stacking the cluster galaxies in various redshift bins, we find a clear red sequence in the (g'-r') versus r' colour-magnitude diagrams, and the GLFs are typical of clusters, though with a possible contamination from field galaxies. The morphological analysis of the cluster galaxies shows that the fraction of late-type to early-type galaxies shows an increase with redshift (particularly in high mass clusters) and a decrease with detection level, i.e. cluster mass. From the properties of the cluster galaxies, the majority of the candidate clusters detected here seem to be real clusters with typical cluster properties.« less

  8. Galaxy clusters in the SDSS Stripe 82 based on photometric redshifts

    DOE PAGES

    Durret, F.; Adami, C.; Bertin, E.; ...

    2015-06-10

    Based on a recent photometric redshift galaxy catalogue, we have searched for galaxy clusters in the Stripe ~82 region of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey by applying the Adami & MAzure Cluster FInder (AMACFI). Extensive tests were made to fine-tune the AMACFI parameters and make the cluster detection as reliable as possible. The same method was applied to the Millennium simulation to estimate our detection efficiency and the approximate masses of the detected clusters. Considering all the cluster galaxies (i.e. within a 1 Mpc radius of the cluster to which they belong and with a photoz differing by less thanmore » 0.05 from that of the cluster), we stacked clusters in various redshift bins to derive colour-magnitude diagrams and galaxy luminosity functions (GLFs). For each galaxy with absolute magnitude brighter than -19.0 in the r band, we computed the disk and spheroid components by applying SExtractor, and by stacking clusters we determined how the disk-to-spheroid flux ratio varies with cluster redshift and mass. We also detected 3663 clusters in the redshift range 0.1513 and a few 10 14 solar masses. Furthermore, by stacking the cluster galaxies in various redshift bins, we find a clear red sequence in the (g'-r') versus r' colour-magnitude diagrams, and the GLFs are typical of clusters, though with a possible contamination from field galaxies. The morphological analysis of the cluster galaxies shows that the fraction of late-type to early-type galaxies shows an increase with redshift (particularly in high mass clusters) and a decrease with detection level, i.e. cluster mass. From the properties of the cluster galaxies, the majority of the candidate clusters detected here seem to be real clusters with typical cluster properties.« less

  9. Frankenstein Galaxy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-07-11

    The galaxy UGC 1382 has been revealed to be far larger and stranger than previously thought. Astronomers relied on a combination of ground-based and space telescopes to uncover the true nature of this "Frankenstein galaxy." The composite image shows the same galaxy as viewed with different instruments. The component images are also available. In the image at left, UGC 1382 appears to be a simple elliptical galaxy, based on optical data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). But spiral arms emerged when astronomers incorporated ultraviolet data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) and deep optical data from SDSS, as seen in the middle image. Combining that with a view of low-density hydrogen gas (shown in green), detected at radio wavelengths by the Very Large Array, scientists discovered that UGC 1382 is a giant, and one of the largest isolated galaxies known. GALEX in particular was able detect very faint features because it operated from space, which is necessary for UV observations because ultraviolet light is absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere. Astronomers also used Stripe 82 of SDSS, a small region of sky where SDSS imaged the sky 80 times longer than the original standard SDSS survey. This enabled optical detection of much fainter features as well. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20695

  10. Detecting Reddening by Dust for Star Clusters in the Andromeda Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, Amy; Dorman, C.; Guhathakurta, P.; PHAT Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a technique to detect reddening by interstellar dust of star clusters in the Andromeda Galaxy, using Hubble Space Telescope ACS/WFC imaging in B and I and spectroscopic data from Keck II DEIMOS spectrograph. These data are from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) and Spectroscopic and Panchromatic Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo (SPLASH) surveys. We compared the observed color indices from the PHAT data to the intrinsic color indices quantitatively inferred from a chi-squared goodness of fit comparison between the SPLASH data and a library of template spectra, to detect reddening. The spectral comparison utilizes the strength of the titanium oxide bands. This technique will be applied to an additional 150 star clusters, in Andromeda, to determine the amount of reddening they have experienced. It will also be used as part of the process of correcting for the reddening, developing a reddening law, and learning more about the physical properties of the dust. This research was carried out under the auspices of UCSC's Science Internship Program. We thank the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the National Science Foundation for funding support.

  11. Detecting sub-lunar mass compact objects toward the Local Group galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Kaiki Taro

    2018-01-01

    By monitoring a large number of stars in the Local Group galaxies, we can detect nanolensing events by sub-lunar mass compact objects (SULCOs) such as primordial black holes (PBHs) and rogue (free-floating) dwarf planets in the Milky Way halo. In contarst to microlensing by stellar-mass objects, the finite-source size effect becomes important and the lensing time duration becomes shorter (∼10 1 - 4s). Using stars with V < 26 in M33 as sources, for one-night observation, we would be able to detect 10 3 - 4 nanolensing events caused by SULCOs in the Milky Way halo with a mass of 10-9M⊙ to 10-7M⊙ for sources with S/N > 5 if SULCOs constitute all the dark matter components. Moreover, we expect 10 1 - 2 events in which bright blue stars with S/N > 100 are weakly amplified due to lensing by SULCOs with a mass range of 10-11M⊙ to 10-9M⊙ . Thus the method would open a new window on SULCOs in the Milky Way halo that would otherwise not be observable.

  12. Detecting higher spin fields through statistical anisotropy in the CMB and galaxy power spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolo, Nicola; Kehagias, Alex; Liguori, Michele; Riotto, Antonio; Shiraishi, Maresuke; Tansella, Vittorio

    2018-01-01

    Primordial inflation may represent the most powerful collider to test high-energy physics models. In this paper we study the impact on the inflationary power spectrum of the comoving curvature perturbation in the specific model where massive higher spin fields are rendered effectively massless during a de Sitter epoch through suitable couplings to the inflaton field. In particular, we show that such fields with spin s induce a distinctive statistical anisotropic signal on the power spectrum, in such a way that not only the usual g2 M-statistical anisotropy coefficients, but also higher-order ones (i.e., g4 M,g6 M,…,g(2 s -2 )M and g(2 s )M) are nonvanishing. We examine their imprints in the cosmic microwave background and galaxy power spectra. Our Fisher matrix forecasts indicate that the detectability of gL M depends very weakly on L : all coefficients could be detected in near future if their magnitudes are bigger than about 10-3.

  13. DETECTION OF AN ULTRA-BRIGHT SUBMILLIMETER GALAXY BEHIND THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Takekoshi, Tatsuya; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Sorai, Kazuo

    2013-09-10

    We report the discovery of a new ultra-bright submillimeter galaxy (SMG) behind the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). This SMG is detected as a 43.3 {+-} 8.4 mJy point source (MM J01071-7302, hereafter MMJ0107) in the 1.1 mm continuum survey of the SMC by AzTEC on the ASTE telescope. MMJ0107 is also detected in the radio (843 MHz), Herschel/SPIRE, Spitzer MIPS 24 {mu}m, all IRAC bands, Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, and near-infrared (J, H, K{sub S} ). We find an optical (U, B, V) source, which might be the lensing object, at a distance of 1.''4 from near-infrared and IRAC sources.more » Photometric redshift estimates for the SMG using representative spectral energy distribution templates show the redshifts of 1.4-3.9. We estimate total far-infrared luminosity of (0.3-2.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} {mu}{sup -1} L{sub Sun} and a star formation rate of 5600-39, 000 {mu}{sup -1} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, where {mu} is the gravitational magnification factor. This apparent extreme star formation activity is likely explained by a highly magnified gravitational lens system.« less

  14. Shocks and cold fronts in merging and massive galaxy clusters: new detections with Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botteon, A.; Gastaldello, F.; Brunetti, G.

    2018-06-01

    A number of merging galaxy clusters show the presence of shocks and cold fronts, i.e. sharp discontinuities in surface brightness and temperature. The observation of these features requires an X-ray telescope with high spatial resolution like Chandra, and allows to study important aspects concerning the physics of the intracluster medium (ICM), such as its thermal conduction and viscosity, as well as to provide information on the physical conditions leading to the acceleration of cosmic rays and magnetic field amplification in the cluster environment. In this work we search for new discontinuities in 15 merging and massive clusters observed with Chandra by using different imaging and spectral techniques of X-ray observations. Our analysis led to the discovery of 22 edges: six shocks, eight cold fronts, and eight with uncertain origin. All the six shocks detected have M< 2 derived from density and temperature jumps. This work contributed to increase the number of discontinuities detected in clusters and shows the potential of combining diverse approaches aimed to identify edges in the ICM. A radio follow-up of the shocks discovered in this paper will be useful to study the connection between weak shocks and radio relics.

  15. SpArcFiRe: Scalable automated detection of spiral galaxy arm segments

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Darren R.; Hayes, Wayne B., E-mail: drdavis@uci.edu, E-mail: whayes@uci.edu

    Given an approximately centered image of a spiral galaxy, we describe an entirely automated method that finds, centers, and sizes the galaxy (possibly masking nearby stars and other objects if necessary in order to isolate the galaxy itself) and then automatically extracts structural information about the spiral arms. For each arm segment found, we list the pixels in that segment, allowing image analysis on a per-arm-segment basis. We also perform a least-squares fit of a logarithmic spiral arc to the pixels in that segment, giving per-arc parameters, such as the pitch angle, arm segment length, location, etc. The algorithm takesmore » about one minute per galaxies, and can easily be scaled using parallelism. We have run it on all ∼644,000 Sloan objects that are larger than 40 pixels across and classified as 'galaxies'. We find a very good correlation between our quantitative description of a spiral structure and the qualitative description provided by Galaxy Zoo humans. Our objective, quantitative measures of structure demonstrate the difficulty in defining exactly what constitutes a spiral 'arm', leading us to prefer the term 'arm segment'. We find that pitch angle often varies significantly segment-to-segment in a single spiral galaxy, making it difficult to define the pitch angle for a single galaxy. We demonstrate how our new database of arm segments can be queried to find galaxies satisfying specific quantitative visual criteria. For example, even though our code does not explicitly find rings, a good surrogate is to look for galaxies having one long, low-pitch-angle arm—which is how our code views ring galaxies. SpArcFiRe is available at http://sparcfire.ics.uci.edu.« less

  16. Optimal galaxy survey for detecting the dipole in the cross-correlation with 21 cm Intensity Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepori, Francesca; Di Dio, Enea; Villa, Eleonora; Viel, Matteo

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the future perspectives of the detection of the relativistic dipole by cross-correlating the 21 cm emission in Intensity Mapping (IM) and galaxy surveys at low redshift. We model the neutral hydrogen (HI) and the galaxy population by means of the halo model to relate the parameters that affect the dipole signal such as the biases of the two tracers and the Poissonian noise. We investigate the behavior of the signal-to-noise as a function of the galaxy and magnification biases, for two fixed models of the neutral hydrogen. In both cases we found that the signal-to-noise does not grow by increasing the difference between the biases of the two tracers, due to the larger shot-noise yields by highly biased tracers. We also study and provide an optimal luminosity-threshold galaxy catalogue to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the relativistic dipole. Interestingly, we show that the maximum magnitude provided by the survey does not lead to the maximum signal-to-noise for detecting relativistic effects and we predict the optimal value for the limiting magnitude. Our work suggests that an optimal analysis could increase the signal-to-noise ratio up to a factor five compared to a standard one.

  17. Detection of the 158 Micrometers[CII] Transition at z=1.3: Evidence for a Galaxy-Wide Starburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Nikola, T.; Oberst, T. E.; Parshley, S. C.; Benford, D. J.; Staguhn, J. G.; Tucker, C. E.

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of 158 micron [C II] fine-structure line emission from MIPS J142824.0+352619, a hyperluminous ( L(sub IR) approximates 10(exp 13) L (sub solar)) starburst galaxy at z = 1.3. The line is bright, corresponding to a fraction L(sub [Cu II] L(sub Fir) approximates 2 x 10(exp -3) of the far-IR (FIR) continuum. The [C II], CO, and FIR continuum emission may be modeled as arising from photodissociation regions (PDRs) that have a characteristic gas density of n approximates 10(exp 4.2) /cm(exp 3) , and that are illuminated by a far-UV radiation field approximately 10(exp 3.2) times more intense than the local interstellar radiation field. The mass in these PDRs accounts for approximately half of the molecular gas mass in this galaxy. The L(sub [CII])/L(sub FIR) ratio is higher than observed in local ultralummous infrared galaxies or in the few high-redshift QSOs detected in [C II], but the L(sub [CII])/L(sub FIR) and L(sub CO)/L(sub FIR) ratios are similar to the values seen in nearby starburst galaxies. This suggests that MIPS J142824.0+352619 is a scaled-up version of a starburst nucleus, with the burst extended over several kiloparsecs.

  18. Detection of the 158 Micrometers[CII] Transition at z=1.3: Evidence for a Galaxy-Wide Starburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Nikola, T.; Stacey, G. J.; Oberst, T. E.; Parshley, S. C.; Benford, D. J.; Staguhn, J. G.; Tucker, C. E.

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of 158 micrometer [C II] fine-structure line emission from MIPS J 142824.0+3526l9, a hyperluminous (L(sub IR) approx. 10(exp 13) Solar Luminosity starburst galaxy at z = 1.3. The line is bright, corresponding to a fraction L[C II]/L(sub FIR) approx. equals 2 x l0(exp -3) of the far-IR(FIR) continuum. The [C II], CO, and FIR continuum emission may be modeled as arising from photodissociation regions (PDRs) that have a characteristic gas density of n approx. 10(exp 4.2)/cu cm., and that are illuminated by a far-UV radiation field approx. 10(exp 3.2) times more intense than the local interstellar radiation field. The mass in these PDRs accounts for approximately half of the molecular gas mass in this galaxy. The L[C II]/L(sub F1R) ratio is higher than observed in local ultraluminous infrared galaxies or in the few high-redshift QSOs detected in [C II], but the L[CII]/L(sub FIR) and L(sub CO)/L(sub FIR) ratios are similar to the values seen in nearby starburst galaxies

  19. Detection of an unidentified emission line in the stacked X-ray spectrum of galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Bulbul, Esra; Foster, Adam; Smith, Randall K.

    2014-07-01

    We detect a weak unidentified emission line at E = (3.55-3.57) ± 0.03 keV in a stacked XMM-Newton spectrum of 73 galaxy clusters spanning a redshift range 0.01-0.35. When the full sample is divided into three subsamples (Perseus, Centaurus+Ophiuchus+Coma, and all others), the line is seen at >3σ statistical significance in all three independent MOS spectra and the PN 'all others' spectrum. It is also detected in the Chandra spectra of the Perseus Cluster. However, it is very weak and located within 50-110 eV of several known lines. The detection is at the limit of the current instrument capabilities. Wemore » argue that there should be no atomic transitions in thermal plasma at this energy. An intriguing possibility is the decay of sterile neutrino, a long-sought dark matter particle candidate. Assuming that all dark matter is in sterile neutrinos with m{sub s} = 2E = 7.1 keV, our detection corresponds to a neutrino decay rate consistent with previous upper limits. However, based on the cluster masses and distances, the line in Perseus is much brighter than expected in this model, significantly deviating from other subsamples. This appears to be because of an anomalously bright line at E = 3.62 keV in Perseus, which could be an Ar XVII dielectronic recombination line, although its emissivity would have to be 30 times the expected value and physically difficult to understand. Another alternative is the above anomaly in the Ar line combined with the nearby 3.51 keV K line also exceeding expectation by a factor of 10-20. Confirmation with Astro-H will be critical to determine the nature of this new line.« less

  20. Galaxy Zoo: Major Galaxy Mergers Are Not a Significant Quenching Pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, Anna K.; Schawinski, Kevin; Caplar, Neven; Carpineti, Alfredo; Hart, Ross E.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Keel, William C.; Kruk, Sandor J.; Lintott, Chris J.; Nichol, Robert C.; Simmons, Brooke D.; Smethurst, Rebecca J.

    2017-08-01

    We use stellar mass functions to study the properties and the significance of quenching through major galaxy mergers. In addition to SDSS DR7 and Galaxy Zoo 1 data, we use samples of visually selected major galaxy mergers and post-merger galaxies. We determine the stellar mass functions of the stages that we would expect major-merger-quenched galaxies to pass through on their way from the blue cloud to the red sequence: (1) major merger, (2) post-merger, (3) blue early type, (4) green early type, and (5) red early type. Based on their similar mass function shapes, we conclude that major mergers are likely to form an evolutionary sequence from star formation to quiescence via quenching. Relative to all blue galaxies, the major-merger fraction increases as a function of stellar mass. Major-merger quenching is inconsistent with the mass and environment quenching model. At z˜ 0, major-merger-quenched galaxies are unlikely to constitute the majority of galaxies that transition through the green valley. Furthermore, between z˜ 0-0.5, major-merger-quenched galaxies account for 1%-5% of all quenched galaxies at a given stellar mass. Major galaxy mergers are therefore not a significant quenching pathway, neither at z˜ 0 nor within the last 5 Gyr. The majority of red galaxies must have been quenched through an alternative quenching mechanism that causes a slow blue to red evolution. .

  1. X-ray detections of submillimetre galaxies: active galactic nuclei versus starburst contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. P.; Wilson, G. W.; Wang, Q. D.; Williams, C. C.; Scott, K. S.; Yun, M. S.; Pope, A.; Lowenthal, J.; Aretxaga, I.; Hughes, D.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S.; Tamura, Y.; Kohno, K.; Ezawa, H.; Kawabe, R.; Oshima, T.

    2013-05-01

    We present a large-scale study of the X-ray properties and near-IR-to-radio spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) detected at 1.1 mm with the AzTEC instrument across a ˜1.2 square degree area of the sky. Combining deep 2-4 Ms Chandra data with Spitzer IRAC/MIPS and Very Large Array data within the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey North (GOODS-N), GOODS-S and COSMOS fields, we find evidence for active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in ˜14 per cent of 271 AzTEC SMGs, ˜28 per cent considering only the two GOODS fields. Through X-ray spectral modelling and multiwavelength SED fitting using Monte Carlo Markov chain techniques to Siebenmorgen et al. (AGN) and Efstathiou, Rowan-Robinson & Siebenmorgen (starburst) templates, we find that while star formation dominates the IR emission, with star formation rates (SFRs) ˜100-1000 M⊙ yr-1, the X-ray emission for most sources is almost exclusively from obscured AGNs, with column densities in excess of 1023 cm-2. Only for ˜6 per cent of our sources do we find an X-ray-derived SFR consistent with NIR-to-radio SED derived SFRs. Inclusion of the X-ray luminosities as a prior to the NIR-to-radio SED effectively sets the AGN luminosity and SFR, preventing significant contribution from the AGN template. Our SED modelling further shows that the AGN and starburst templates typically lack the required 1.1 mm emission necessary to match observations, arguing for an extended, cool dust component. The cross-correlation function between the full samples of X-ray sources and SMGs in these fields does not indicate a strong correlation between the two populations at large scales, suggesting that SMGs and AGNs do not necessarily trace the same underlying large-scale structure. Combined with the remaining X-ray-dim SMGs, this suggests that sub-mm-bright sources may evolve along multiple tracks, with X-ray-detected SMGs representing transitionary objects between periods of high star formation and AGN

  2. Detectability of [C II] 158 μm Emission from High-Redshift Galaxies: Predictions for ALMA and SPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamine, Kentaro; Wolfe, Arthur M.; Hernquist, Lars

    2006-08-01

    We discuss the detectability of high-redshift galaxies via [C II] 158 μm line emission by coupling an analytic model with cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations that are based on the concordance Λ cold dark matter (CDM) model. Our analytic model describes a multiphase interstellar medium (ISM) irradiated by the far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation from local star-forming regions, and it calculates thermal and ionization equilibrium between cooling and heating. The model allows us to predict the mass fraction of a cold neutral medium (CNM) embedded in a warm neutral medium (WNM). Our cosmological SPH simulations include a treatment of radiative cooling/heating, star formation, and feedback effects from supernovae and galactic winds. Using our method, we make predictions for the [C II] luminosity from high-redshift galaxies that can be directly compared with upcoming observations by the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) and the Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA). We find that the number density of high-redshift galaxies detectable by ALMA and SPICA via [C II] emission depends significantly on the amount of neutral gas, which is highly uncertain. Our calculations suggest that, in a CDM universe, most [C II] sources at z=3 are faint objects with Sν<0.01 mJy. Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) brighter than RAB=23.5 mag are expected to have flux densities Sν=1-3 mJy depending on the strength of galactic wind feedback. The recommended observing strategy for ALMA and SPICA is to aim at very bright LBGs or star-forming DRG/BzK galaxies.

  3. Detection of a Substantial Molecular Gas Reservoir in a Brightest Cluster Galaxy at z = 1.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Tracy M. A.; Lowenthal, James; Yun, Min; Noble, Allison G.; Muzzin, Adam; Wilson, Gillian; Yee, H. K. C.; Cybulski, Ryan; Aretxaga, I.; Hughes, D. H.

    2017-08-01

    We report the detection of CO(2-1) emission coincident with the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) of the high-redshift galaxy cluster SpARCS1049+56, with the Redshift Search Receiver (RSR) on the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT). We confirm a spectroscopic redshift for the gas of z = 1.7091 ± 0.0004, which is consistent with the systemic redshift of the cluster galaxies of z = 1.709. The line is well fit by a single-component Gaussian with an RSR-resolution-corrected FWHM of 569 ± 63 km s-1. We see no evidence for multiple velocity components in the gas, as might be expected from the multiple image components seen in near-infrared imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope. We measure the integrated flux of the line to be 3.6 ± 0.3 Jy km s-1, and using {α }{CO} = 0.8 M ⊙ (K km s-1 pc2)-1, we estimate a total molecular gas mass of 1.1 ± 0.1 × 1011 M ⊙ and a M H2/M ⋆ ˜ 0.4. This is the largest gas reservoir detected in a BCG above z > 1 to date. Given the infrared-estimated star formation rate of 860 ± 130 M ⊙ yr-1, this corresponds to a gas depletion timescale of ˜0.1 Gyr. We discuss several possible mechanisms for depositing such a large gas reservoir to the cluster center—e.g., a cooling flow, a major galaxy-galaxy merger, or the stripping of gas from several galaxies—but conclude that these LMT data are not sufficient to differentiate between them.

  4. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Detection or Sunyaev-Zel'Dovich Decrement in Groups and Clusters Associated with Luminous Red Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hand, Nick; Appel, John William; Battaglia, Nick; Bond, J. Richard; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Dunner, Rolando; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fowler, Joseph W.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We present a detection of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) decrement associated with the Luminous Red Galaxy (LRG) sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The SZ data come from 148 GHz maps of the equatorial region made by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). The LRG sample is divided by luminosity into four bins, and estimates for the central Sunyaev-Zel'dovich temperature decrement are calculated through a stacking process. We detect and account for a bias of the SZ signal due to weak radio sources. We use numerical simulations to relate the observed decrement to Y(sub 200) and clustering properties to relate the galaxy luminosity bins to mass. We also use a relation between BCG luminosity and cluster mass based on stacked gravitational lensing measurements to estimate the characteristic halo masses. The masses are found to be in the range approx.10(exp 13) - 10(exp 14)/h Stellar Mass, a lower range than has been previously probed.

  5. Photodiode radiation hardness, lyman-alpha emitting galaxies and photon detection in liquid argon neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, Brian

    2013-12-01

    My dissertation is comprised of three projects: 1) studies of Lyman-alpha Emitting galaxies (LAEs), 2) radiation hardness studies of InGaAs photodiodes (PDs), and 3) scintillation photon detection in liquid argon (LAr) neutrino detectors. I began work on the project that has now become WFIRST, developing a science case that would use WFIRST after launch for the observation of LAEs. The radiation hardness of PDs was as an effort to support the WFIRST calibration team. When WFIRST was significantly delayed, I joined an R&D effort that applied my skills to work on photon detection in LAr neutrino detectors. I report results on a broadband selection method developed to detect high equivalent width (EW) LAEs. Using photometry from the CFHT-Legacy Survey Deep 2 and 3 fields, I have spectroscopically confirmed 63 z=2.5-3.5 LAEs using the WIYN/Hydra spectrograph. Using UV continuum-fitting techniques I computed properties such as EWs, internal reddening and star formation rates. 62 of my LAEs show evidence to be normal dust-free LAEs. Second, I present an investigation into the effects of ionizing proton radiation on commercial off-the-shelf InGaAs PDs. I developed a monochromator-based test apparatus that utilized NIST-calibrated reference PDs. I tested the PDs for changes to their dark current, relative responsivity as a function of wavelength, and absolute responsivity. I irradiated the test PDs using 30, 52, and 98 MeV protons at the IU Cyclotron Facility. I found the InGaAs PDs showed increased dark current as the fluence increased with no evidence of broadband response degradation at the fluences expected at an L2 orbit and a 10-year mission lifetime. Finally, I detail my efforts on technology development of both optical detector technologies and waveshifting light guide construction for LAr vacuum UV scintillation light. Cryogenic neutrino detectors use photon detection for both accelerator based science and for SNe neutrino detection and proton decay. I have

  6. SDSS-IV MaNGA: Stellar angular momentum of about 2300 galaxies: unveiling the bimodality of massive galaxy properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Mark T.; Cappellari, Michele; Li, Hongyu; Mao, Shude; Bershady, Matthew; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Drory, Niv; Law, David R.; Pan, Kaike; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David A.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Westfall, Kyle B.; Yan, Renbin

    2018-03-01

    We measure λ _{R_e}, a proxy for galaxy specific stellar angular momentum within one effective radius, and the ellipticity, ɛ, for about 2300 galaxies of all morphological types observed with integral field spectroscopy as part of the MaNGA survey, the largest such sample to date. We use the (λ _{R_e}, ɛ ) diagram to separate early-type galaxies into fast and slow rotators. We also visually classify each galaxy according to its optical morphology and two-dimensional stellar velocity field. Comparing these classifications to quantitative λ _{R_e} measurements reveals tight relationships between angular momentum and galaxy structure. In order to account for atmospheric seeing, we use realistic models of galaxy kinematics to derive a general approximate analytic correction for λ _{R_e}. Thanks to the size of the sample and the large number of massive galaxies, we unambiguously detect a clear bimodality in the (λ _{R_e}, ɛ ) diagram which may result from fundamental differences in galaxy assembly history. There is a sharp secondary density peak inside the region of the diagram with low λ _{R_e} and ɛ < 0.4, previously suggested as the definition for slow rotators. Most of these galaxies are visually classified as non-regular rotators and have high velocity dispersion. The intrinsic bimodality must be stronger, as it tends to be smoothed by noise and inclination. The large sample of slow rotators allows us for the first time to unveil a secondary peak at ±90○ in their distribution of the misalignments between the photometric and kinematic position angles. We confirm that genuine slow rotators start appearing above M ≥ 2 × 1011M⊙ where a significant number of high-mass fast rotators also exist.

  7. Color Separation of Galaxy Types in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Imaging Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strateva, Iskra; Ivezić, Željko; Knapp, Gillian R.; Narayanan, Vijay K.; Strauss, Michael A.; Gunn, James E.; Lupton, Robert H.; Schlegel, David; Bahcall, Neta A.; Brinkmann, Jon; Brunner, Robert J.; Budavári, Tamás; Csabai, István; Castander, Francisco Javier; Doi, Mamoru; Fukugita, Masataka; Győry, Zsuzsanna; Hamabe, Masaru; Hennessy, Greg; Ichikawa, Takashi; Kunszt, Peter Z.; Lamb, Don Q.; McKay, Timothy A.; Okamura, Sadanori; Racusin, Judith; Sekiguchi, Maki; Schneider, Donald P.; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; York, Donald

    2001-10-01

    We study the optical colors of 147,920 galaxies brighter than g*=21, observed in five bands by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) over ~100 deg2 of high Galactic latitude sky along the celestial equator. The distribution of galaxies in the g*-r* versus u*-g* color-color diagram is strongly bimodal, with an optimal color separator of u*-r*=2.22. We use visual morphology and spectral classification of subsamples of 287 and 500 galaxies, respectively, to show that the two peaks correspond roughly to early- (E, S0, and Sa) and late-type (Sb, Sc, and Irr) galaxies, as expected from their different stellar populations. We also find that the colors of galaxies are correlated with their radial profiles, as measured by the concentration index and by the likelihoods of exponential and de Vaucouleurs' profile fits. While it is well known that late-type galaxies are bluer than early-type galaxies, this is the first detection of a local minimum in their color distribution. In all SDSS bands, the counts versus apparent magnitude relations for the two color types are significantly different and demonstrate that the fraction of blue galaxies increases toward the faint end.

  8. The Correlation Function of Galaxy Clusters and Detection of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, T.; Han, J. L.; Wen, Z. L.; Sun, L.; Zhan, H.

    2012-04-01

    We calculate the correlation function of 13,904 galaxy clusters of z <= 0.4 selected from the cluster catalog of Wen et al. The correlation function can be fitted with a power-law model ξ(r) = (r/R 0)-γ on the scales of 10 h -1 Mpc <= r <= 50 h -1 Mpc, with a larger correlation length of R 0 = 18.84 ± 0.27 h -1 Mpc for clusters with a richness of R >= 15 and a smaller length of R 0 = 16.15 ± 0.13 h -1 Mpc for clusters with a richness of R >= 5. The power-law index of γ = 2.1 is found to be almost the same for all cluster subsamples. A pronounced baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) peak is detected at r ~ 110 h -1 Mpc with a significance of ~1.9σ. By analyzing the correlation function in the range of 20 h -1 Mpc <= r <= 200 h -1 Mpc, we find that the constraints on distance parameters are Dv (zm = 0.276) = 1077 ± 55(1σ) Mpc and h = 0.73 ± 0.039(1σ), which are consistent with the cosmology derived from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) seven-year data. However, the BAO signal from the cluster sample is stronger than expected and leads to a rather low matter density Ω m h 2 = 0.093 ± 0.0077(1σ), which deviates from the WMAP7 result by more than 3σ. The correlation function of the GMBCG cluster sample is also calculated and our detection of the BAO feature is confirmed.

  9. Morphology of Dwarf Galaxies in Isolated Satellite Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ann, Hong Bae

    2017-08-01

    The environmental dependence of the morphology of dwarf galaxies in isolated satellite systems is analyzed to understand the origin of the dwarf galaxy morphology using the visually classified morphological types of 5836 local galaxies with z ≲ 0.01. We consider six sub-types of dwarf galaxies, dS0, dE, dE_{bc}, dSph, dE_{blue}, and dI, of which the first four sub-types are considered as early-type and the last two as late-type. The environmental parameters we consider are the projected distance from the host galaxy (r_{p}), local and global background densities, and the host morphology. The spatial distributions of dwarf satellites of early-type galaxies are much different from those of dwarf satellites of late-type galaxies, suggesting the host morphology combined with r_{p} plays a decisive role on the morphology of the dwarf satellite galaxies. The local and global background densities play no significant role on the morphology of dwarfs in the satellite systems hosted by early-type galaxies. However, in the satellite system hosted by late-type galaxies, the global background densities of dE and dSph satellites are significantly different from those of dE_{bc}, dE_{blue}, and dI satellites. The blue-cored dwarf satellites (dE_{bc}) of early-type galaxies are likely to be located at r_{p} > 0.3 Mpc to keep their cold gas from the ram pressure stripping by the hot corona of early-type galaxies. The spatial distribution of dE_{bc} satellites of early-type galaxies and their global background densities suggest that their cold gas is intergalactic material accreted before they fall into the satellite systems.

  10. Stellar systems in the direction of the Hickson Compact Group 44. I. Low surface brightness galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith Castelli, A. V.; Faifer, F. R.; Escudero, C. G.

    2016-11-01

    Context. In spite of the numerous studies of low-luminosity galaxies in different environments, there is still no consensus about their formation scenario. In particular, a large number of galaxies displaying extremely low-surface brightnesses have been detected in the last year, and the nature of these objects is under discussion. Aims: In this paper we report the detection of two extended low-surface brightness (LSB) objects (μeffg' ≃ 27 mag) found, in projection, next to NGC 3193 and in the zone of the Hickson Compact Group (HCG) 44, respectively. Methods: We analyzed deep, high-quality, GEMINI-GMOS images with ELLIPSE within IRAF in order to obtain their brightness profiles and structural parameters. We also searched for the presence of globular clusters (GC) in these fields. Results: We have found that, if these LSB galaxies were at the distances of NGC 3193 and HCG 44, they would show sizes and luminosities similar to those of the ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) found in the Coma cluster and other associations. In that case, their sizes would be rather larger than those displayed by the Local Group dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. We have detected a few unresolved sources in the sky zone occupied by these galaxies showing colors and brightnesses typical of blue globular clusters. Conclusions: From the comparison of the properties of the galaxies presented in this work with those of similar objects reported in the literature, we have found that LSB galaxies display sizes covering a quite extended continous range (reff 0.3-4.5 kpc), in contrast to "normal" early-type galaxies, which show reff 1.0 kpc with a low dispersion. This fact might point to different formation processes for both types of galaxies.

  11. CO detections and IRAS observations of bright radio spiral galaxies at cz equal or less than 9000 kilometers per second

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, D. B.; Mirabel, I. F.

    1985-01-01

    CO emission has been detected from 20 of 21 bright radio spirals with strong extended nuclear sources, including the most distant (NGC 7674) and the most luminous (IC 4553 = Arp 220, NGC 6240) galaxies yet detected in CO. All of these galaxies are rich in molecular gas, with M total(H2) = 3 x 10 to the 8th - 2 x 10 to the 10th solar masses. IRAS observations show that they have a strong far-infrared (FIR) excess, with L(FIR)/L(B) approximately equal to 1-35 and L(FIR) (40-400 microns) approximately equal to 10 to the 10th - 10 to the 12th L solar masses. The primary luminosity source for these radio cores appears to be star formation in molecular clouds. A strong correlation is found between the FIR and extended 21 cm continuum flux, implying that the fraction of massive stars formed is independent of the star formation rate. The ratio L(FIR)/M(H2) provides a measure of the current rate of star formation, which is found to be a factor 3-20 larger in these galaxies than for the ensemble of molecular clouds in the Milky Way. At these rates their molecular gas will be depleted in about 10 to the 8th yr.

  12. The early-type multiple system QZ Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, P.; Lorenz, R.; Drechsel, H.; Abseim, A.

    2001-02-01

    We present an analysis of the early-type quadruple system QZ Car, consisting of an eclipsing and a non-eclipsing binary. The spectroscopic investigation is based on new high dispersion echelle and CAT/CES spectra of H and He lines. The elements for the orbit of the non-eclipsing pair could be refined. Lines of the brighter component of the eclipsing binary were detected in near-quadrature spectra, while signatures of the fainter component could be identified in only few spectra. Lines of the primary component of the non-eclipsing pair and of both components of the eclipsing pair were found to be variable in position and strength; in particular, the He ii 4686 emission line of the brighter eclipsing component is strongly variable. An ephemeris for the eclipsing binary QZ Car valid at present was derived Prim. Min. = hel. JD 2448687.16 + 5fd9991 * E. The relative orbit of the two binary constituents of the multiple system is discussed. In contrast to earlier investigations we found radial velocity changes of the systemic velocities of both binaries, which were used - together with an O-C analysis of the expected light-time effect - to derive approximate parameters of the mutual orbit of the two pairs. It is shown that this orbit and the distance to QZ Car can be further refined by minima timing and interferometry. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile.

  13. High-redshift Galaxies and Black Holes Detectable with the JWST: A Population Synthesis Model from Infrared to X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volonteri, Marta; Reines, Amy E.; Atek, Hakim; Stark, Daniel P.; Trebitsch, Maxime

    2017-11-01

    The first billion years of the Universe has been a pivotal time: stars, black holes (BHs), and galaxies formed and assembled, sowing the seeds of galaxies as we know them today. Detecting, identifying, and understanding the first galaxies and BHs is one of the current observational and theoretical challenges in galaxy formation. In this paper we present a population synthesis model aimed at galaxies, BHs, and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at high redshift. The model builds a population based on empirical relations. The spectral energy distribution of galaxies is determined by age and metallicity, and that of AGNs by BH mass and accretion rate. We validate the model against observations, and predict properties of galaxies and AGN in other wavelength and/or luminosity ranges, estimating the contamination of stellar populations (normal stars and high-mass X-ray binaries) for AGN searches from the infrared to X-rays, and vice versa for galaxy searches. For high-redshift galaxies with stellar ages < 1 {Gyr}, we find that disentangling stellar and AGN emission is challenging at restframe UV/optical wavelengths, while high-mass X-ray binaries become more important sources of confusion in X-rays. We propose a color-color selection in the James Webb Space Telescope bands to separate AGN versus star-dominated galaxies in photometric observations. We also estimate the AGN contribution, with respect to massive, hot, and metal-poor stars, at driving high-ionization lines, such as C IV and He II. Finally, we test the influence of the minimum BH mass and occupation fraction of BHs in low-mass galaxies on the restframe UV/near-IR and X-ray AGN luminosity function.

  14. Metavisitor, a Suite of Galaxy Tools for Simple and Rapid Detection and Discovery of Viruses in Deep Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Vernick, Kenneth D.

    2017-01-01

    Metavisitor is a software package that allows biologists and clinicians without specialized bioinformatics expertise to detect and assemble viral genomes from deep sequence datasets. The package is composed of a set of modular bioinformatic tools and workflows that are implemented in the Galaxy framework. Using the graphical Galaxy workflow editor, users with minimal computational skills can use existing Metavisitor workflows or adapt them to suit specific needs by adding or modifying analysis modules. Metavisitor works with DNA, RNA or small RNA sequencing data over a range of read lengths and can use a combination of de novo and guided approaches to assemble genomes from sequencing reads. We show that the software has the potential for quick diagnosis as well as discovery of viruses from a vast array of organisms. Importantly, we provide here executable Metavisitor use cases, which increase the accessibility and transparency of the software, ultimately enabling biologists or clinicians to focus on biological or medical questions. PMID:28045932

  15. A Detection of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Features in the SDSS BOSS DR12 Galaxy Bispectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, David W.; Samushia, Lado

    2018-05-01

    We present the first high significance detection (4.1σ) of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) feature in the galaxy bispectrum of the twelfth data release (DR12) of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) CMASS sample (0.43 ≤ z ≤ 0.7). We measured the scale dilation parameter, α, using the power spectrum, bispectrum, and both simultaneously for DR12, plus 2048 MultiDark-PATCHY mocks in the North and South Galactic Caps (NGC and SGC, respectively), and the volume weighted averages of those two samples (N+SGC). The fitting to the mocks validated our analysis pipeline, yielding values consistent with the mock cosmology. By fitting to the power spectrum and bispectrum separately, we tested the robustness of our results, finding consistent values from the NGC, SGC and N+SGC in all cases. We found DV = 2032 ± 24(stat.) ± 15(sys.) Mpc, DV = 2038 ± 55(stat.) ± 15(sys.) Mpc, and DV = 2031 ± 22(stat.) ± 10(sys.) Mpc from the N+SGC power spectrum, bispectrum and simultaneous fitting, respectively. Our bispectrum measurement precision was mainly limited by the size of the covariance matrix. Based on the fits to the mocks, we showed that if a less noisy estimator of the covariance were available, from either a theoretical computation or a larger suite of mocks, the constraints from the bispectrum and simultaneous fits would improve to 1.1 per cent (1.3 per cent with systematics) and 0.7 per cent (0.9 per cent with systematics), respectively, with the latter being slightly more precise than the power spectrum only constraints from the reconstructed field.

  16. New Detections of Radio Minihalos in Cool Cores of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacintucci, Simona; Markevitch, Maxim; Venturi, Tiziana; Clarke, Tracy E.; Cassano, Rossella; Mazzotta, Pasquale

    2013-01-01

    Cool cores of some galaxy clusters exhibit faint radio minihalos. Their origin is unclear, and their study has been limited by their small number. We undertook a systematic search for minihalos in a large sample of X-ray luminous clusters with high-quality radio data. In this article, we report four new minihalos (A 478, ZwCl 3146,RXJ 1532.9+3021, and A 2204) and five candidates found in the reanalyzed archival Very Large Array observations.The radio luminosities of our minihalos and candidates are in the range of 102325 W Hz1 at 1.4 GHz, which is consistent with these types of radio sources. Their sizes (40160 kpc in radius) are somewhat smaller than those of previously known minihalos. We combine our new detections with previously known minihalos, obtaining a total sample of 21 objects, and briefly compare the cluster radio properties to the average X-ray temperature and the total masses estimated from Planck.We find that nearly all clusters hosting minihalos are hot and massive. Beyond that, there is no clear correlation between the minihalo radio power and cluster temperature or mass (in contrast with the giant radio halos found in cluster mergers, whose radio luminosity correlates with the cluster mass). Chandra X-ray images indicate gas sloshing in the cool cores of most of our clusters, with minihalos contained within the sloshing regions in many of them. This supports the hypothesis that radio-emitting electrons are reaccelerated by sloshing. Advection of relativistic electrons by the sloshing gas may also play a role in the formation of the less extended minihalos.

  17. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Cosmology from Galaxy Clusters Detected Via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sehgal, Neelima; Trac, Hy; Acquaviva, Viviana; Ade, Peter A. R.; Aguirre, Paula; Amiri, Mandana; Appel, John W.; Barrientos, L. Felipe; Battistelli, Elia S.; Bond, J. Richard; hide

    2010-01-01

    We present constraints on cosmological parameters based on a sample of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich-selected galaxy clusters detected in a millimeter-wave survey by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. The cluster sample used in this analysis consists of 9 optically-confirmed high-mass clusters comprising the high-significance end of the total cluster sample identified in 455 square degrees of sky surveyed during 2008 at 148 GHz. We focus on the most massive systems to reduce the degeneracy between unknown cluster astrophysics and cosmology derived from SZ surveys. We describe the scaling relation between cluster mass and SZ signal with a 4-parameter fit. Marginalizing over the values of the parameters in this fit with conservative priors gives (sigma)8 = 0.851 +/- 0.115 and w = -1.14 +/- 0.35 for a spatially-flat wCDM cosmological model with WMAP 7-year priors on cosmological parameters. This gives a modest improvement in statistical uncertainty over WMAP 7-year constraints alone. Fixing the scaling relation between cluster mass and SZ signal to a fiducial relation obtained from numerical simulations and calibrated by X-ray observations, we find (sigma)8 + 0.821 +/- 0.044 and w = -1.05 +/- 0.20. These results are consistent with constraints from WMAP 7 plus baryon acoustic oscillations plus type Ia supernova which give (sigma)8 = 0.802 +/- 0.038 and w = -0.98 +/- 0.053. A stacking analysis of the clusters in this sample compared to clusters simulated assuming the fiducial model also shows good agreement. These results suggest that, given the sample of clusters used here, both the astrophysics of massive clusters and the cosmological parameters derived from them are broadly consistent with current models.

  18. A study of star formation by Hα emission of galaxies in the galaxy group NGC 4213

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maungkorn, Sakdawoot; Kriwattanawong, Wichean

    2017-09-01

    This research aims to study hydrogen alpha emission, corresponding to star formation of galaxies in the NGC 4213 group that has an average recession velocity of 6,821 km/s. The imaging observations with broad-band filters (B, V and RC) and narrow-band filters ([S II] and Red-continuum) were carried out from the 2.4-m reflecting telescope at Thai National Observatory (TNO). There are 11 sample galaxies in this study, consisting of 2 elliptical, 2 lenticular and 7 spiral galaxies. It was found that the late-type galaxies tend to be bluer than early-type galaxies, due to these galaxies consist of relatively high proportion of blue stars. Furthermore, the equivalent width of hydrogen alpha (EW(Hα)) tends to increase as a function of morphological type. This indicates that star formation in late-type galaxies taking place more than the early-type galaxies. Furthermore, a ratio of the star formation rate to galaxy mass also increases slightly with the galaxy type. This could be due to the interaction between galaxy-galaxy or tidal interaction occurring within the galaxy group.

  19. Shocked POststarbust Galaxy Survey. I. Candidate Post-starbust Galaxies with Emission Line Ratios Consistent with Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatalo, Katherine; Cales, Sabrina L.; Rich, Jeffrey A.; Appleton, Philip N.; Kewley, Lisa J.; Lacy, Mark; Lanz, Lauranne; Medling, Anne M.; Nyland, Kristina

    2016-06-01

    There are many mechanisms by which galaxies can transform from blue, star-forming spirals, to red, quiescent early-type galaxies, but our current census of them does not form a complete picture. Recent observations of nearby case studies have identified a population of galaxies that quench “quietly.” Traditional poststarburst searches seem to catch galaxies only after they have quenched and transformed, and thus miss any objects with additional ionization mechanisms exciting the remaining gas. The Shocked POststarburst Galaxy Survey (SPOGS) aims to identify transforming galaxies, in which the nebular lines are excited via shocks instead of through star formation processes. Utilizing the Oh-Sarzi-Schawinski-Yi (OSSY) measurements on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 catalog, we applied Balmer absorption and shock boundary criteria to identify 1067 SPOG candidates (SPOGs*) within z = 0.2. SPOGs* represent 0.2% of the OSSY sample galaxies that exceed the continuum signal-to-noise cut (and 0.7% of the emission line galaxy sample). SPOGs* colors suggest that they are in an earlier phase of transition than OSSY galaxies that meet an “E+A” selection. SPOGs* have a 13% 1.4 GHz detection rate from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters Survey, higher than most other subsamples, and comparable only to low-ionization nuclear emission line region hosts, suggestive of the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). SPOGs* also have stronger Na I D absorption than predicted from the stellar population, suggestive of cool gas being driven out in galactic winds. It appears that SPOGs* represent an earlier phase in galaxy transformation than traditionally selected poststarburst galaxies, and that a large proportion of SPOGs* also have properties consistent with disruption of their interstellar media, a key component to galaxy transformation. It is likely that many of the known pathways to transformation undergo a SPOG phase. Studying this sample of

  20. Herschel observations of Hickson compact groups of galaxies: Unveiling the properties of cold dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitsakis, T.; Charmandaris, V.; Appleton, P. N.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Le Floc'h, E.; da Cunha, E.; Alatalo, K.; Cluver, M.

    2014-05-01

    We present a Herschel far-infrared and sub-millimetre (sub-mm) study of a sample of 120 galaxies in 28 Hickson compact groups (HCGs). Fitting their UV to sub-mm spectral energy distributions with the model of da Cunha et al. (2008), we accurately estimate the dust masses, luminosities, and temperatures of the individual galaxies. We find that nearly half of the late-type galaxies in dynamically "old" groups, those with more than 25% of early-type members and redder UV-optical colours, also have significantly lower dust-to-stellar mass ratios compared to those of actively star-forming galaxies of the same mass found both in HCGs and in the field. Examining their dust-to-gas mass ratios, we conclude that dust was stripped out of these systems as a result of the gravitational and hydrodynamic interactions, experienced owing to previous encounters with other group members. About 40% of the early-type galaxies (mostly lenticulars), in dynamically "old" groups, display dust properties similar to those of the UV-optical red late-type galaxies. Given their stellar masses, star formation rates, and UV-optical colours, we suggest that red late-type and dusty lenticular galaxies represent transition populations between blue star-forming disk galaxies and quiescent early-type ellipticals. On the other hand, both the complete absence of any correlation between the dust and stellar masses of the dusty ellipticals and their enhanced star formation activity, suggest the increase in their gas and dust content due to accretion and merging. Our deep Herschel observations also allow us to detect the presence of diffuse cold intragroup dust in 4 HCGs. We also find that the fraction of 250 μm emission that is located outside of the main bodies of both the red late-type galaxies and the dusty lenticulars is 15-20% of their integrated emission at this band. All these findings are consistent with an evolutionary scenario in which gas dissipation, shocks, and turbulence, in addition to

  1. BUDHIES II: a phase-space view of H I gas stripping and star formation quenching in cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffé, Yara L.; Smith, Rory; Candlish, Graeme N.; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Verheijen, Marc A. W.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the effect of ram-pressure from the intracluster medium on the stripping of H I gas in galaxies in a massive, relaxed, X-ray bright, galaxy cluster at z = 0.2 from the Blind Ultra Deep H I Environmental Survey (BUDHIES). We use cosmological simulations, and velocity versus position phase-space diagrams to infer the orbital histories of the cluster galaxies. In particular, we embed a simple analytical description of ram-pressure stripping in the simulations to identify the regions in phase-space where galaxies are more likely to have been sufficiently stripped of their H I gas to fall below the detection limit of our survey. We find a striking agreement between the model predictions and the observed location of H I-detected and non-detected blue (late-type) galaxies in phase-space, strongly implying that ram-pressure plays a key role in the gas removal from galaxies, and that this can happen during their first infall into the cluster. However, we also find a significant number of gas-poor, red (early-type) galaxies in the infall region of the cluster that cannot easily be explained with our model of ram-pressure stripping alone. We discuss different possible additional mechanisms that could be at play, including the pre-processing of galaxies in their previous environment. Our results are strengthened by the distribution of galaxy colours (optical and UV) in phase-space, that suggests that after a (gas-rich) field galaxy falls into the cluster, it will lose its gas via ram-pressure stripping, and as it settles into the cluster, its star formation will decay until it is completely quenched. Finally, this work demonstrates the utility of phase-space diagrams to analyse the physical processes driving the evolution of cluster galaxies, in particular H I gas stripping.

  2. CANDELS/GOODS-S, CDFS, and ECDFS: photometric redshifts for normal and X-ray-detected galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Li-Ting; Salvato, Mara; Nandra, Kirpal

    2014-11-20

    We present photometric redshifts and associated probability distributions for all detected sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS). This work makes use of the most up-to-date data from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and the Taiwan ECDFS Near-Infrared Survey (TENIS) in addition to other data. We also revisit multi-wavelength counterparts for published X-ray sources from the 4 Ms CDFS and 250 ks ECDFS surveys, finding reliable counterparts for 1207 out of 1259 sources (∼96%). Data used for photometric redshifts include intermediate-band photometry deblended using the TFIT method, which is used for the first time inmore » this work. Photometric redshifts for X-ray source counterparts are based on a new library of active galactic nuclei/galaxy hybrid templates appropriate for the faint X-ray population in the CDFS. Photometric redshift accuracy for normal galaxies is 0.010 and for X-ray sources is 0.014 and outlier fractions are 4% and 5.2%, respectively. The results within the CANDELS coverage area are even better, as demonstrated both by spectroscopic comparison and by galaxy-pair statistics. Intermediate-band photometry, even if shallow, is valuable when combined with deep broadband photometry. For best accuracy, templates must include emission lines.« less

  3. Molecular gas in elliptical galaxies with dust lanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhong; Kenney, Jeffrey D. P.; Ishizuki, Sumio

    1992-01-01

    We have searched for CO(1-0) line emission in eight dust lane elliptical and lenticular galaxies using the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. Five of the eight galaxies, including the well-studied elliptical NGC 1052, have CO emission at above the 5-sigma level, with inferred molecular gas masses ranging from 10 exp 8 to a few times 10 exp 9 solar masses. Our selection criterion differs from previous surveys in that it does not depend on the FIR fluxes, and thus is less sensitive to the sizes and distances of the host galaxies or to the degree to which dust is heated. The relatively high detection rate of CO in these ellipticals suggests a close correlation between molecular mass and cold dust. Compared with previously studied samples of FIR selected early-type galaxies, our sample has on average four times more CO emission per unit FIR (40-120 microns) luminosity. If the intrinsic gas-to-dust ratio of these galaxies as similar to that of the Milky Way, then only about 5 percent of the dust mass in dust lane ellipticals radiates substantially at 60 and 100 microns, and the remaining dust must be colder than about 30 K.

  4. Photometric properties of galaxies in the SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, D. W.; Blanton, M.; SDSS Collaboration

    2001-12-01

    We analyze the number density distribution of galaxy properties in a sample of 8x 104 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, in the redshift range 0.02galaxy's 5-band SDSS photometry has been k-corrected to a common rest-frame photometric system. A number-density contribution 1/V {max} has been calculated for each galaxy. The photometry is of excellent quality; every galaxy has CCD imaging with signal-to-noise for the flux well above 100. The distribution of galaxies in the (six-dimensional) space spanned by four colors, central surface-brightness, and radial concentration is described and analyzed, with the following results: \\textsl{(1)} The galaxies occupy only a small part of the six-dimensional space. \\textsl{(2)} The distribution of galaxy number density in the space is a strong function of intrinsic galaxy luminosity. \\textsl{(3)} Elliptical (or early type) and spiral (or late type) galaxies are clearly separated in the space. The ratio of early-type to late-type galaxy contributions to the luminosity density of the Universe is computed, as a function of wavelength. At 1 {μm }, early-type galaxies dominate the luminosity density. \\textsl{(4)} Outliers in color tend to be lower surface-brightness galaxies. Funding for the SDSS has been provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the SDSS member institutions, NASA, NSF, DOE, the Japanese Monbukagakusho, and the Max Planck Society. This research has been supported by the NYU Faculty of Arts and Sciences.

  5. Detection of [O III] at z ∼ 3: A Galaxy Above the Main Sequence, Rapidly Assembling Its Stellar Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwas, Amit; Ferkinhoff, Carl; Nikola, Thomas; Parshley, Stephen C.; Schoenwald, Justin P.; Stacey, Gordon J.; Higdon, Sarah J. U.; Higdon, James L.; Weiss, Axel; Güsten, Rolf; Menten, Karl M.

    2018-04-01

    We detect bright emission in the far-infrared (far-IR) fine structure [O III] 88 μm line from a strong lensing candidate galaxy, H-ATLAS J113526.3-014605, hereafter G12v2.43, at z = 3.127, using the second-generation Redshift (z) and Early Universe Spectrometer (ZEUS-2) at the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment Telescope (APEX). This is only the fifth detection of this far-IR line from a submillimeter galaxy at the epoch of galaxy assembly. The observed [O III] luminosity of 7.1 × 109 ≤ft(\\tfrac{10}{μ }\\right) L ⊙ likely arises from H II regions around massive stars, and the amount of Lyman continuum photons required to support the ionization indicate the presence of (1.2–5.2) × 106 ≤ft(\\tfrac{10}{μ }\\right) equivalent O5.5 or higher stars, where μ would be the lensing magnification factor. The observed line luminosity also requires a minimum mass of ∼2 × 108 ≤ft(\\tfrac{10}{μ }\\right) M ⊙ in ionized gas, that is 0.33% of the estimated total molecular gas mass of 6 × 1010 ≤ft(\\tfrac{10}{μ }\\right) M ⊙. We compile multi-band photometry tracing rest-frame ultraviolet to millimeter continuum emission to further constrain the properties of this dusty high-redshift, star-forming galaxy. Via SED modeling we find G12v2.43 is forming stars at a rate of 916 ≤ft(\\tfrac{10}{μ }\\right) M ⊙ yr‑1 and already has a stellar mass of 8 × 1010 ≤ft(\\tfrac{10}{μ }\\right) M ⊙. We also constrain the age of the current starburst to be ≤slant 5 Myr, making G12v2.43 a gas-rich galaxy lying above the star-forming main sequence at z ∼ 3, undergoing a growth spurt, and it could be on the main sequence within the derived gas depletion timescale of ∼66 Myr.

  6. Obscured Activity and Stellar Mass in z~0.7 Post-starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke, George; Diamond-Stanic, Aleks; Moustakas, John; Tremonti, Christy

    2008-03-01

    We are proposing 3.6-24 micron imaging of a sample of z~0.7 post-starburst galaxies. These galaxies are presumed to be late-stage mergers that have evolved past their ULIRG/quasar phase and are in transition to becoming early-type galaxies. We have detected outflowing winds with velocities ranging from 500-2200 km/s for 2/3 of the sample, so it is tempting to conclude that these spectacular outflows are the result of feedback from an AGN that has expelled cold gas quenched star formation. However, it is not clear that the existing near-UV and optical data are telling the full story. With Spitzer, we can verify whether or not these 'post-starburst' galaxies are truly quiescent by measuring the amount obscured star formation and black hole activity. We will also be able to determine how significant the recent starburst event was by accurately measuring stellar mass using the red end of the stellar SED. If these galaxies do have non-negligible dust emission, we will be able to use broad-band colors as blunt tools to measure spectral features and compare to known star-forming galaxies, AGNs, and LIRGs. If not, we will have strong evidence that the feedback event has been able to halt galaxy-wide star formation.

  7. A Photometrically Detected Forming Cluster of Galaxies at Redshift 1.6 in the GOODS Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, M.; Salimbeni, S.; Trevese, D.; Grazian, A.; Pentericci, L.; Fiore, F.; Fontana, A.; Giallongo, E.; Santini, P.; Cristiani, S.; Nonino, M.; Vanzella, E.

    2007-12-01

    We report the discovery of a localized overdensity at z~1.6 in the GOODS-South field, presumably a poor cluster in the process of formation. The three-dimensional galaxy density has been estimated on the basis of well-calibrated photometric redshifts from the multiband photometric GOODS-MUSIC catalog using the (2+1)-dimensional technique. The density peak is embedded in the larger scale overdensity of galaxies known to exist at z=1.61 in the area. The properties of the member galaxies are compared to those of the surrounding field, and we find that the two populations are significantly different, supporting the reality of the structure. The reddest galaxies, once evolved according to their best-fit models, have colors consistent with the red sequence of lower redshift clusters. The estimated M200 total mass of the cluster is in the range 1.3×1014-5.7×1014 Msolar, depending on the assumed bias factor b. An upper limit for the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity, based on the 1 Ms Chandra observations, is LX=0.5×1043 erg s-1, suggesting that the cluster has not yet reached the virial equilibrium.

  8. Andromeda Galaxy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-10

    This image is from NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer is an observation of the large galaxy in Andromeda, Messier 31. The Andromeda galaxy is the most massive in the local group of galaxies that includes our Milky Way.

  9. Creating lenticular galaxies with mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querejeta, Miguel; Eliche-Moral, M. Carmen; Tapia, Trinidad; Borlaff, Alejandro; van de Ven, Glenn; Lyubenova, Mariya; Martig, Marie; Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; Méndez-Abreu, Jairo; Zamorano, Jaime; Gallego, Jesús

    2017-03-01

    Lenticular galaxies (S0s) represent the majority of early-type galaxies in the local Universe, but their formation channels are still poorly understood. While galaxy mergers are obvious pathways to suppress star formation and increase bulge sizes, the marked parallelism between spiral and lenticular galaxies (e.g. photometric bulge-disc coupling) seemed to rule out a potential merger origin. Here, we summarise our recent work in which we have shown, through N-body numerical simulations, that disc-dominated lenticulars can emerge from major mergers of spiral galaxies, in good agreement with observational photometric scaling relations. Moreover, we show that mergers simultaneously increase the light concentration and reduce the angular momentum relative to their spiral progenitors. This explains the mismatch in angular momentum and concentration between spirals and lenticulars recently revealed by CALIFA observations, which is hard to reconcile with simple fading mechanisms (e.g. ram-pressure stripping).

  10. Morphological Perspectives on Galaxy Evolution since z~1.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutkowski, Michael

    Galaxies represent a fundamental catalyst in the "lifecycle'' of matter in the Universe, and the study of galaxy assembly and evolution provides unique insight into the physical processes governing the transformation of matter from atoms to gas to stars. With the Hubble Space Telescope, the astrophysical community is able to study the formation and evolution of galaxies, at an unrivaled spatial resolution, over more than 90% of cosmic time. Here, I present results from two complementary studies of galaxy evolution in the local and intermediate redshift Universe which used new and archival HST images. First, I use archival broad-band HST WFPC2 optical images of local (d < 63 Mpc) Seyfert-type galaxies to test the observed correlation between visually-classified host galaxy dust morphology and AGN class. Using quantitative parameters for classifying galaxy morphology, I do not measure a strong correlation between the galaxy morphology and AGN class. This result could imply that the Unified Model of AGN provides a sufficient model for the observed diversity of AGN, but this result could also indicate the quantitative techniques are insufficient for characterizing the dust morphology of local galaxies. To address the latter, I develop a new automated method using an inverse unsharp masking technique coupled to Source Extractor to detect and measure dust morphology. I measure no strong trends with dust-morphology and AGN class using this method, and conclude that the Unified Model remains sufficient to explain the diversity of AGN. Second, I use new UV-optical-near IR broad-band images obtained with the HST WFC3 in the Early Release Science (ERS) program to study the evolution of massive, early-type galaxies. These galaxies were once considered to be "red and dead'', as a class uniformly devoid of recent star formation, but observations of these galaxies in the local Universe at UV wavelengths have revealed a significant fraction (30%) of ETGs to have recently formed a

  11. Detection of the earth with the SETI microwave observing system assumed to be operating out in the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billingham, John; Tarter, Jill

    1989-01-01

    The maximum range is calculated at which radar signals from the earth could be detected by a search system similar to the NASA SETI Microwave Observing Project (SETI MOP) assumed to be operating out in the Galaxy. Figures are calculated for the Targeted Search and for the Sky Survey parts of the MOP, both planned to be operating in the 1990s. The probability of detection is calculated for the two most powerful transmitters, the planetary radar at Arecibo (Puerto Rico) and the ballistic missile early warning systems (BMEWSs), assuming that the terrestrial radars are only in the eavesdropping mode. It was found that, for the case of a single transmitter within the maximum range, the highest probability is for the sky survey detecting BMEWSs; this is directly proportional to BMEWS sky coverage and is therefore 0.25.

  12. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  13. Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of Local Group galaxies: detection of M 31 and search for M 33

    DOE PAGES

    Abdo, A. A.

    2010-11-01

    Context. Cosmic rays (CRs) can be studied through the galaxy-wide gamma-ray emission that they generate when propagating in the interstellar medium. The comparison of the diffuse signals from different systems may inform us about the key parameters in CR acceleration and transport. Aims. We aim to determine and compare the properties of the cosmic-ray-induced gamma-ray emission of several Local Group galaxies. Methods. We use 2 years of nearly continuous sky-survey observations obtained with the Large Area Telescope aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope to search for gamma-ray emission from M 31 and M 33. We compare the results with thosemore » for the Large Magellanic Cloud, the Small Magellanic Cloud, the Milky Way, and the starburst galaxies M 82 and NGC 253. Results. We detect a gamma-ray signal at 5σ significance in the energy range 200 MeV–20 GeV that is consistent with originating from M 31. The integral photon flux above 100 MeV amounts to (9.1 ± 1.9stat ± 1.0sys) × 10 -9 ph cm-2 s -1. We find no evidence for emission from M 33 and derive an upper limit on the photon flux >100 MeV of 5.1 × 10 -9 ph cm -2 s -1 (2σ). Comparing these results to the properties of other Local Group galaxies, we find indications of a correlation between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity that also holds for the starburst galaxies. Conclusions. The gamma-ray luminosity of M 31 is about half that of the Milky Way, which implies that the ratio between the average CR densities in M 31 and the Milky Way amounts to ξ = 0.35 ± 0.25. The observed correlation between gamma-ray luminosity and star formation rate suggests that the flux of M 33 is not far below the current upper limit from the LAT observations.« less

  14. H I absorption in nearby compact radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glowacki, M.; Allison, J. R.; Sadler, E. M.; Moss, V. A.; Curran, S. J.; Musaeva, A.; Deng, C.; Parry, R.; Sligo, M. C.

    2017-05-01

    H I absorption studies yield information on both active galactic nucleus (AGN) feeding and feedback processes. This AGN activity interacts with the neutral gas in compact radio sources, which are believed to represent the young or recently re-triggered AGN population. We present the results of a survey for H I absorption in a sample of 66 compact radio sources at 0.040 < z < 0.096 with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. In total, we obtained seven detections, five of which are new, with a large range of peak optical depths (3-87 per cent). Of the detections, 71 per cent exhibit asymmetric, broad (ΔvFWHM > 100 km s-1) features, indicative of disturbed gas kinematics. Such broad, shallow and offset features are also found within low-excitation radio galaxies which is attributed to disturbed circumnuclear gas, consistent with early-type galaxies typically devoid of a gas-rich disc. Comparing mid-infrared colours of our galaxies with H I detections indicates that narrow and deep absorption features are preferentially found in late-type and high-excitation radio galaxies in our sample. These features are attributed to gas in galactic discs. By combining XMM-Newton archival data with 21-cm data, we find support that absorbed X-ray sources may be good tracers of H I content within the host galaxy. This sample extends previous H I surveys in compact radio galaxies to lower radio luminosities and provides a basis for future work exploring the higher redshift universe.

  15. Spiral Arm Morphology of Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ann, Hong Bae; Lee, Hyun-Rok

    2013-06-01

    We analyze the spiral structure of 1725 nearby spiral galaxies with redshift less than 0.02. We use the color images provided by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We determine the arm classes (grand design, multiple-arm, flocculent) and the broad Hubble types (early, intermediate, late) as well as the bar types (SA, SAB, SB) by visual inspection. We find that flocculent galaxies are mostly of late Hubble type while multiple-arm galaxies are likely to be of early Hubble type. The fractional distribution of grand design galaxies is nearly constant along the Hubble type. The dependence of arm class on bar type is not as strong as that of the Hubble type. However, there is about a three times larger fraction of grand design spirals in SB galaxies than in SA galaxies, with nearly constant fractions of multiple-arm galaxies. However, if we consider the Hubble type and bar type together, grand design spirals are more frequent in early types than in late types for SA and SAB galaxies, while they are almost constant along the Hubble type for SB galaxies. There are clear correlations between spiral structures and the local background density: strongly barred, early-type, grand design spirals favor high-density regions, while non-barred, late-type, flocculent galaxies are likely to be found in low-density regions.

  16. Chemical Evidence for Evolution of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutil, Yvan

    I have compiled the very best data published on abundance gradients. From this sample of 29 galaxies, some information can be gained on the mecanism of morphological evolution in disk galaxies. From this sample, I find that early-type galaxies show an identical trend in the behavior of extrapolated central abundance versus morphological type to that shown by late-type galaxies with strong bars, even in the absence of bar! On a a diagram showing extrapolated central abundance versus morphological type, two sequences appear: late-type barred galaxies and early-type galaxies (barred or not barred) fall on sequence 0.5 dex below that of normal late-type galaxies. This behavior is consistent with a scenario of morphological evolution of disk galaxies by formation and dissolution of a bar over a period of a few 10^^9 yr, where later type galaxies (Sd,Sc,Sbc, evolve into earlier-type disk galaxies trough transitory SBc and SBb phases.

  17. Near Infrared Maps of Elliptical and so Galaxies Detected by IRAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Gonzalez, L.; Recillas-Cruz, E.; Carrasco, L.

    1987-05-01

    Lw surface brightness maps at 2.2 and 1.25 µm are presented for an IRAS selected sample composed of 3 elliptical and 7 S0 galaxies. In most cases we have found smooth structures which apparently follow the stellar distribution as inferred from the optical images and that the IR emission is more extended. Elongated structures, reminiscent of "jets", are present in a number of galaxies. These 11jets" do not have optical counterparts in the PoSS. This fact suggests a rather steep spectral index between the visible and infrared wavelengths. Fran data at other wavelengths taken from the literature, we have derived spectral energy distributions from .3 to 100 µm. All objects in our sample show a steep α60-l00 µm -l to -2, while in the near IR the energy distributions are characteristic and hence dominated by the presence of a stellar bulge.

  18. Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher J. Miller

    2012-03-01

    There are many examples of clustering in astronomy. Stars in our own galaxy are often seen as being gravitationally bound into tight globular or open clusters. The Solar System's Trojan asteroids cluster at the gravitational Langrangian in front of Jupiter’s orbit. On the largest of scales, we find gravitationally bound clusters of galaxies, the Virgo cluster (in the constellation of Virgo at a distance of ˜50 million light years) being a prime nearby example. The Virgo cluster subtends an angle of nearly 8◦ on the sky and is known to contain over a thousand member galaxies. Galaxy clusters play an important role in our understanding of theUniverse. Clusters exist at peaks in the three-dimensional large-scale matter density field. Their sky (2D) locations are easy to detect in astronomical imaging data and their mean galaxy redshifts (redshift is related to the third spatial dimension: distance) are often better (spectroscopically) and cheaper (photometrically) when compared with the entire galaxy population in large sky surveys. Photometric redshift (z) [Photometric techniques use the broad band filter magnitudes of a galaxy to estimate the redshift. Spectroscopic techniques use the galaxy spectra and emission/absorption line features to measure the redshift] determinations of galaxies within clusters are accurate to better than delta_z = 0.05 [7] and when studied as a cluster population, the central galaxies form a line in color-magnitude space (called the the E/S0 ridgeline and visible in Figure 16.3) that contains galaxies with similar stellar populations [15]. The shape of this E/S0 ridgeline enables astronomers to measure the cluster redshift to within delta_z = 0.01 [23]. The most accurate cluster redshift determinations come from spectroscopy of the member galaxies, where only a fraction of the members need to be spectroscopically observed [25,42] to get an accurate redshift to the whole system. If light traces mass in the Universe, then the locations

  19. Early Science with the Large Millimeter Telescope: Detection of Dust Emission in Multiple Images of a Normal Galaxy at z > 4 Lensed by a Frontier Fields Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, Alexandra; Battisti, Andrew; Wilson, Grant W.

    We directly detect dust emission in an optically detected, multiply imaged galaxy lensed by the Frontier Fields cluster MACSJ0717.5+3745. We detect two images of the same galaxy at 1.1 mm with the AzTEC camera on the Large Millimeter Telescope leaving no ambiguity in the counterpart identification. This galaxy, MACS0717-Az9, is at z > 4 and the strong lensing model ( μ = 7.5) allows us to calculate an intrinsic IR luminosity of 9.7 × 10{sup 10} L {sub ⊙} and an obscured star formation rate of 14.6 ± 4.5 M {sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. The unobscured star formation rate frommore » the UV is only 4.1 ± 0.3 M {sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}, which means the total star formation rate (18.7 ± 4.5 M {sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}) is dominated (75%–80%) by the obscured component. With an intrinsic stellar mass of only 6.9 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ⊙}, MACS0717-Az9 is one of only a handful of z > 4 galaxies at these lower masses that is detected in dust emission. This galaxy lies close to the estimated star formation sequence at this epoch. However, it does not lie on the dust obscuration relation (IRX- β ) for local starburst galaxies and is instead consistent with the Small Magellanic Cloud attenuation law. This remarkable lower mass galaxy, showing signs of both low metallicity and high dust content, may challenge our picture of dust production in the early universe.« less

  20. ALMA-SZ Detection of a Galaxy Cluster Merger Shock at Half the Age of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, K.; Sommer, M.; Erler, J.; Eckert, D.; Vazza, F.; Magnelli, B.; Bertoldi, F.; Tozzi, P.

    2016-10-01

    We present ALMA measurements of a merger shock using the thermal Sunyaev-Zel’dovich (SZ) effect signal, at the location of a radio relic in the famous El Gordo galaxy cluster at z≈ 0.9. Multi-wavelength analysis in combination with the archival Chandra data and a high-resolution radio image provides a consistent picture of the thermal and non-thermal signal variation across the shock front and helps to put robust constraints on the shock Mach number as well as the relic magnetic field. We employ a Bayesian analysis technique for modeling the SZ and X-ray data self-consistently, illustrating respective parameter degeneracies. Combined results indicate a shock with Mach number { M }={2.4}-0.6+1.3, which in turn suggests a high value of the magnetic field (of the order of 4-10 μ {{G}}) to account for the observed relic width at 2 GHz. At roughly half the current age of the universe, this is the highest-redshift direct detection of a cluster shock to date, and one of the first instances of an ALMA-SZ observation in a galaxy cluster. It shows the tremendous potential for future ALMA-SZ observations to detect merger shocks and other cluster substructures out to the highest redshifts.

  1. Detection of Lyman-alpha Emission from a Triply Imaged z = 6.85 Galaxy behind MACS J2129.4-0741

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuang-Han; Lemaux, Brian C.; Schmidt, Kasper B.; Hoag, Austin; Bradač, Maruša; Treu, Tommaso; Dijkstra, Mark; Fontana, Adriano; Henry, Alaina; Malkan, Matthew; Mason, Charlotte; Morishita, Takahiro; Pentericci, Laura; Ryan, Russell E., Jr.; Trenti, Michele; Wang, Xin

    2016-05-01

    We report the detection of Lyα emission at ˜9538 Å in the Keck/DEIMOS and Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 G102 grism data from a triply imaged galaxy at z=6.846+/- 0.001 behind galaxy cluster MACS J2129.4-0741. Combining the emission line wavelength with broadband photometry, line ratio upper limits, and lens modeling, we rule out the scenario that this emission line is [O II] at z = 1.57. After accounting for magnification, we calculate the weighted average of the intrinsic Lyα luminosity to be ˜ 1.3× {10}42 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 and Lyα equivalent width to be 74 ± 15 Å. Its intrinsic UV absolute magnitude at 1600 Å is -18.6 ± 0.2 mag and stellar mass (1.5+/- 0.3)× {10}7\\quad {M}⊙ , making it one of the faintest (intrinsic {L}{UV}˜ 0.14 {L}{UV}\\ast ) galaxies with Lyα detection at z˜ 7 to date. Its stellar mass is in the typical range for the galaxies thought to dominate the reionization photon budget at z≳ 7; the inferred Lyα escape fraction is high (≳ 10%), which could be common for sub-L* z≳ 7 galaxies with Lyα emission. This galaxy offers a glimpse of the galaxy population that is thought to drive reionization, and it shows that gravitational lensing is an important avenue for probing the sub-L* galaxy population.

  2. Bright Galaxies at Hubble’s Redshift Detection Frontier: Preliminary Results and Design from the Redshift z ~ 9-10 BoRG Pure-Parallel HST Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvi, V.; Trenti, M.; Stiavelli, M.; Oesch, P.; Bradley, L. D.; Schmidt, K. B.; Coe, D.; Brammer, G.; Bernard, S.; Bouwens, R. J.; Carrasco, D.; Carollo, C. M.; Holwerda, B. W.; MacKenty, J. W.; Mason, C. A.; Shull, J. M.; Treu, T.

    2016-02-01

    We present the first results and design from the redshift z ˜ 9-10 Brightest of the Reionizing Galaxies Hubble Space Telescope survey BoRG[z9-10], aimed at searching for intrinsically luminous unlensed galaxies during the first 700 Myr after the Big Bang. BoRG[z9-10] is the continuation of a multi-year pure-parallel near-IR and optical imaging campaign with the Wide Field Camera 3. The ongoing survey uses five filters, optimized for detecting the most distant objects and offering continuous wavelength coverage from λ = 0.35 μm to λ = 1.7 μm. We analyze the initial ˜130 arcmin2 of area over 28 independent lines of sight (˜25% of the total planned) to search for z\\gt 7 galaxies using a combination of Lyman-break and photometric redshift selections. From an effective comoving volume of (5-25) × 105 Mpc3 for magnitudes brighter than {m}{AB}=26.5{{{--}}}24.0 in the {H}{{160}}-band respectively, we find five galaxy candidates at z\\quad ˜ 8.3-10 detected at high confidence ({{S}}/{{N}}\\gt 8), including a source at z\\quad ˜ 8.4 with {m}{AB}=24.5 ({{S}}/{{N}} ˜ 22), which, if confirmed, would be the brightest galaxy identified at such early times (z\\gt 8). In addition, BoRG[z9-10] data yield four galaxies with 7.3≲ z≲ 8. These new Lyman-break galaxies with m≲ 26.5 are ideal targets for follow-up observations from ground and space-based observatories to help investigate the complex interplay between dark matter growth, galaxy assembly, and reionization.

  3. Spectroscopic detections of C III] λ1909 Å at z ≃ 6-7: a new probe of early star-forming galaxies and cosmic reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Daniel P.; Richard, Johan; Charlot, Stéphane; Clément, Benjamin; Ellis, Richard; Siana, Brian; Robertson, Brant; Schenker, Matthew; Gutkin, Julia; Wofford, Aida

    2015-06-01

    Deep spectroscopic observations of z ≳ 6.5 galaxies have revealed a marked decline with increasing redshift in the detectability of Ly α emission. While this may offer valuable insight into the end of the reionization process, it presents a challenge to the detailed spectroscopic study of bright photometrically-selected distant sources now being found via deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging, and particularly those highly magnified sources viewed through foreground lensing clusters. In this paper, we demonstrate the validity of a new way forward via the detection of an alternative diagnostic line, C III] λ1909 Å, seen in spectroscopic exposures of a star-forming galaxy at zLyα = 6.029. We also report tentative detection of C III] λ1909 Å in a galaxy at zLyα = 7.213. The former 3.3σ detection is based on a 3.5 h XShooter spectrum of a bright (J125 = 25.2) gravitationally-lensed galaxy behind the cluster Abell 383. The latter 2.8σ detection is based on a 4.2 h MOSFIRE spectra of one of the most distant spectroscopically confirmed galaxies, GN-108036, with J140 = 25.2. Both targets were chosen for their continuum brightness and previously-known redshift (based on Ly α), ensuring that any C III] emission would be located in a favourable portion of the near-infrared sky spectrum. Since the availability of secure Ly α redshifts significantly narrows the wavelength range where C III] is sought, this increases confidence in these, otherwise, low-signal-to-noise ratio detections. We compare our C III] and Ly α equivalent widths in the context of those found at z ≃ 2 from earlier work and discuss the motivation for using lines other than Ly α to study galaxies in the reionization era.

  4. Faint blue galaxies revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Henry C.

    If dwarf-elliptical galaxies formed their stars very rapdily (on timescales of less than 1 Gyr), they may in principle be detectable out to high redshift. Prior to the discovery of cosmic acceleration, it appeared that rapid and late formation dwarf elliptical galaxies might be required to explain the number counts of faint galaxies. A plausible hypothesis emerged: that photoionization by the UV background prevents gas cooling in low-mass halos until z ≲ 1.5. The discovery of cosmic acceleration eased the tension between predicted galaxy number counts and galaxy-evolution models. Nevertheless, there is some evidence for relatively late star formation in nearby dE's, and the photoionization delay mechanism still appears to have some merit. It is thus of interest to look back in time to see if we can find starbursting dwarf galaxies at moderate redshift. We review the connection between faint-blue galaxies and bursting-dwarf galaxies and discuss some attempts to identify progenitors to dE galaxies in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) observations. We find roughly 85 galaxies in the HUDF with redshifts 0.6 that appear to have formed most of their stars at z. Of these, 70% have half-light radii less than 1.5 kpc. These are thus "smoking gun" candidates for dwarf galaxies that are either collapsing for the first time at moderate redshifts or have otherwise been unable to form stars for more than 1/3 of a Hubble time.

  5. Detection of a Population of Carbon-enhanced Metal-poor Stars in the Sculptor Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiti, Anirudh; Simon, Joshua D.; Frebel, Anna; Thompson, Ian B.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Mateo, Mario; Bailey, John I., III; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Walker, Matthew

    2018-04-01

    The study of the chemical abundances of metal-poor stars in dwarf galaxies provides a venue to constrain paradigms of chemical enrichment and galaxy formation. Here we present metallicity and carbon abundance measurements of 100 stars in Sculptor from medium-resolution (R ∼ 2000) spectra taken with the Magellan/Michigan Fiber System mounted on the Magellan-Clay 6.5 m telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. We identify 24 extremely metal-poor star candidates ([Fe/H] < ‑3.0) and 21 carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) star candidates. Eight carbon-enhanced stars are classified with at least 2σ confidence, and five are confirmed as such with follow-up R ∼ 6000 observations using the Magellan Echellette Spectrograph on the Magellan-Baade 6.5 m telescope. We measure a CEMP fraction of 36% for stars below [Fe/H] = ‑3.0, indicating that the prevalence of carbon-enhanced stars in Sculptor is similar to that of the halo (∼43%) after excluding likely CEMP-s and CEMP-r/s stars from our sample. However, we do not detect that any CEMP stars are strongly enhanced in carbon ([C/Fe] > 1.0). The existence of a large number of CEMP stars both in the halo and in Sculptor suggests that some halo CEMP stars may have originated from accreted early analogs of dwarf galaxies. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  6. Exploring the galaxy cluster-group transition regime at high redshifts. Physical properties of two newly detected z > 1 systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šuhada, R.; Fassbender, R.; Nastasi, A.; Böhringer, H.; de Hoon, A.; Pierini, D.; Santos, J. S.; Rosati, P.; Mühlegger, M.; Quintana, H.; Schwope, A. D.; Lamer, G.; Kohnert, J.; Pratt, G. W.

    2011-06-01

    Context. Multi-wavelength surveys for clusters of galaxies are opening a window on the elusive high-redshift (z > 1) cluster population. Well controlled statistical samples of distant clusters will enable us to answer questions about their cosmological context, early assembly phases and the thermodynamical evolution of the intracluster medium. Aims: We report on the detection of two z > 1 systems, XMMU J0302.2-0001 and XMMU J1532.2-0836, as part of the XMM-Newton Distant Cluster Project (XDCP) sample. We investigate the nature of the sources, measure their spectroscopic redshift and determine their basic physical parameters. Methods: The results of the present paper are based on the analysis of XMM-Newton archival data, optical/near-infrared imaging and deep optical follow-up spectroscopy of the clusters. Results: We confirm the X-ray source XMMU J0302.2-0001 as a gravitationally bound, bona fide cluster of galaxies at spectroscopic redshift z = 1.185. We estimate its M500 mass to (1.6 ± 0.3) × 1014 M⊙ from its measured X-ray luminosity. This ranks the cluster among intermediate mass system. In the case of XMMU J1532.2-0836 we find the X-ray detection to be coincident with a dynamically bound system of galaxies at z = 1.358. Optical spectroscopy reveals the presence of a central active galactic nucleus, which can be a dominant source of the detected X-ray emission from this system. We provide upper limits of X-ray parameters for the system and discuss cluster identification challenges in the high-redshift low-mass cluster regime. A third, intermediate redshift (z = 0.647) cluster, XMMU J0302.1-0000, is serendipitously detected in the same field as XMMU J0302.2-0001. We provide its analysis as well. Based on observations obtained with ESO Telescopes at the Paranal Observatory under program ID 080.A-0659 and 081.A-0312, observations collected at the Centro Astrnómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, Spain operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut f

  7. Towards accurate radial velocities from early type spectra in the framework of an ESO key programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschueren, Werner; David, M.; Hensberge, Herman

    In order to elucidate the internal kinematics in very young stellar groups, a dedicated machinery was set up, which made it possible to proceed from actual observations to reductions and correlation analysis to the ultimate derivation of early-type stellar radial velocities (RVs) with the requisite precision. The following ingredients are found to be essential to obtain RVs of early-type stars at the 1-km/s level of precision: high-resolution, high-S/N spectra covering a large wavelength range; maximal reduction of observational errors and the use of optimal reduction procedures; the intelligent use of a versatile cross-correlation package; and comparison of velocities derived from different regions of the spectrum in order to detect systematic mismatches between object and template spectrum in some of the lines.

  8. Chandra-SDSS Normal and Star-Forming Galaxies. I. X-Ray Source Properties of Galaxies Detected by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory in SDSS DR2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornschemeier, A. E.; Heckman, T. M.; Ptak, A. F.; Tremonti, C. A.; Colbert, E. J. M.

    2005-01-01

    We have cross-correlated X-ray catalogs derived from archival Chandra X-Ray Observatory ACIS observations with a Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 2 (DR2) galaxy catalog to form a sample of 42 serendipitously X-ray-detected galaxies over the redshift interval 0.03galaxies and those in the deepest X-ray surveys. Our chief purpose is to compare optical spectroscopic diagnostics of activity (both star formation and accretion) with X-ray properties of galaxies. Our work supports a normalization value of the X-ray-star formation rate correlation consistent with the lower values published in the literature. The difference is in the allocation of X-ray emission to high-mass X-ray binaries relative to other components, such as hot gas, low-mass X-ray binaries, and/or active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We are able to quantify a few pitfalls in the use of lower resolution, lower signal-to-noise ratio optical spectroscopy to identify X-ray sources (as has necessarily been employed for many X-ray surveys). Notably, we find a few AGNs that likely would have been misidentified as non-AGN sources in higher redshift studies. However, we do not find any X-ray-hard, highly X-ray-luminous galaxies lacking optical spectroscopic diagnostics of AGN activity. Such sources are members of the ``X-ray-bright, optically normal galaxy'' (XBONG) class of AGNs.

  9. Detection of possible intervening Mg X associated with A hot gaseous galaxy halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhijie; Bregman, Joel N.

    2017-08-01

    Galaxies may store a significant fraction of baryonic material in their hot halos, which can be traced by high ionization absorption systems in spectra of background QSOs. A hot halo of an L* galaxy has a virial temperature ~ 10^6 K, corresponding to the peak ionization fraction for Mg X. We discovered a Mg X absorption system, in the sightline towards LBQS 1435-0134, which also contains Ne VIII, Ne VI, O VI, Ne V, O V, Ne IV, O IV, N IV, O III, and H I. Further modeling shows that the highest ionization state ions, Mg X and Ne VIII, cannot be produced by the photoionization model. A collisional ionization model can reproduce the observations, and all of the ions can be accommodated in a three- temperature plasma or one gas with a power-law temperature distribution, dN / dT = 10^(4.4 +- 2.2 - [Z/X]) T^(1.55 +- 0.41) (for 10^(4.39 +- 0.13) K < T < 10^(6.04+-0.05) K). In the power-law temperature model, the total hydrogen column density is 8.2 * 10^19(0.3 Zsun/Z), and most of the gaseous mass is in the hot phase with the postive power index. The modeling results show that the gas is consistent with a hot volume-filled gaseous galaxy halo (N(H) <~ 10^20 cm^-2 and T ~ 10^6 K), which contains a baryonic mass that may be comparable or greater than the stellar mass (~10^11Msun assuming n200).

  10. Synchrotron Emission from Dark Matter Annihilation: Predictions for Constraints from Non-detections of Galaxy Clusters with New Radio Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, Emma; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Splettstoesser, Megan; Profumo, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    The annihilation of dark matter particles is expected to yield a broad radiation spectrum via the production of Standard Model particles in astrophysical environments. In particular, electrons and positrons from dark matter annihilation produce synchrotron radiation in the presence of magnetic fields. Galaxy clusters are the most massive collapsed structures in the universe, and are known to host ˜μG-scale magnetic fields. They are therefore ideal targets to search for, or to constrain the synchrotron signal from dark matter annihilation. In this work, we use the expected sensitivities of several planned surveys from the next generation of radio telescopes to predict the constraints on dark matter annihilation models which will be achieved in the case of non-detections of diffuse radio emission from galaxy clusters. Specifically, we consider the Tier 1 survey planned for the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) at 120 MHz, the Evolutionary Map of the Universe (EMU) survey planned for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) at 1.4 GHz, and planned surveys for Aperture Tile in Focus (APERTIF) at 1.4 GHz. We find that, for massive clusters and dark matter masses ≲ 100 {GeV}, the predicted limits on the annihilation cross section would rule out vanilla thermal relic models for even the shallow LOFAR Tier 1, ASKAP, and APERTIF surveys.

  11. Detection of the Earth with the SETI microwave observing system assumed to be operating out in the galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billingham, J.; Tarter, J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper estimates the maximum range at which radar signals from the Earth could be detected by a search system similar to the NASA Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence Microwave Observing Project (SETI MOP) assumed to be operating out in the galaxy. Figures are calculated for the Targeted Search, and for the Sky Survey parts of the MOP, both operating, as currently planned, in the second half of the decade of the 1990s. Only the most powerful terrestrial transmitters are considered, namely, the planetary radar at Arecibo in Puerto Rico, and the ballistic missile early warning systems (BMEWS). In each case the probabilities of detection over the life of the MOP are also calculated. The calculation assumes that we are only in the eavesdropping mode. Transmissions intended to be detected by SETI systems are likely to be much stronger and would of course be found with higher probability to a greater range. Also, it is assumed that the transmitting civilization is at the same level of technological evolution as ours on Earth. This is very improbable. If we were to detect another technological civilization, it would, on statistical grounds, be much older than we are and might well have much more powerful transmitters. Both factors would make detection by the NASA MOP a much more likely outcome.

  12. Detection of the Earth with the SETI microwave observing system assumed to be operating out in the galaxy.

    PubMed

    Billingham, J; Tarter, J

    1992-01-01

    This paper estimates the maximum range at which radar signals from the Earth could be detected by a search system similar to the NASA Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence Microwave Observing Project (SETI MOP) assumed to be operating out in the galaxy. Figures are calculated for the Targeted Search, and for the Sky Survey parts of the MOP, both operating, as currently planned, in the second half of the decade of the 1990s. Only the most powerful terrestrial transmitters are considered, namely, the planetary radar at Arecibo in Puerto Rico, and the ballistic missile early warning systems (BMEWS). In each case the probabilities of detection over the life of the MOP are also calculated. The calculation assumes that we are only in the eavesdropping mode. Transmissions intended to be detected by SETI systems are likely to be much stronger and would of course be found with higher probability to a greater range. Also, it is assumed that the transmitting civilization is at the same level of technological evolution as ours on Earth. This is very improbable. If we were to detect another technological civilization, it would, on statistical grounds, be much older than we are and might well have much more powerful transmitters. Both factors would make detection by the NASA MOP a much more likely outcome.

  13. Globular cluster systems as tracers of environmental effects on Virgo early-type dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Janssen, R.; Aguerri, J. A. L.

    2012-08-01

    Early-type dwarfs (dEs) are by far the most abundant galaxy population in nearby clusters. Whether these objects are primordial, or the recent end products of the different physical mechanisms that can transform galaxies once they enter these high-density environments, is still a matter of debate. Here we present a novel approach to test these scenarios by comparing the properties of the globular cluster systems (GCSs) of Virgo dEs and their potential progenitors with simple predictions from gravitational and hydrodynamical interaction models. We show that low-mass (M★ ≲ 2 × 108 M⊙) dEs have GCSs consistent with the descendants of gas-stripped late-type dwarfs. On the other hand, higher mass dEs have properties - including the high mass specific frequencies of their GCSs and their concentrated spatial distribution within Virgo - incompatible with a recent, environmentally driven evolution. They mostly comprise nucleated systems, but also dEs with recent star formation and/or disc features. Bright, nucleated dEs appear to be a population that has long resided within the cluster potential well, but have surprisingly managed to retain very rich and spatially extended GCSs - possibly an indication of high total masses. Our analysis does not favour violent evolutionary mechanisms that result in significant stellar mass-losses, but more gentle processes involving gas removal by a combination of internal and external factors, and highlights the relevant role of initial conditions. Additionally, we briefly comment on the origin of luminous cluster S0 galaxies.

  14. The Swift Burst Alert Telescope Detected Seyfert 1 Galaxies: X-Ray Broadband Properties and Warm Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Lisa M.; Veilleux, Sylvain; McKernan, Barry; Kallman, T.

    2012-01-01

    We present results from an analysis of the broadband, 0.3-195 keV, X-ray spectra of 48 Seyfert 1-1.5 sources detected in the very hard X-rays with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). This sample is selected in an all-sky survey conducted in the 14-195 keV band. Therefore, our sources are largely unbiased toward both obscuration and host galaxy properties. Our detailed and uniform model fits to Suzaku/BAT and XMM-Newton/BAT spectra include the neutral absorption, direct power-law, reflected emission, soft excess, warm absorption, and narrow Fe I K[alpha] emission properties for the entire sample. We significantly detect O VII and O VIII edges in 52% of our sample. The strength of these detections is strongly correlated with the neutral column density measured in the spectrum. Among the strongest detections, X-ray grating and UV observations, where available, indicate outflowing material. The ionized column densities of sources with O VII and O VIII detections are clustered in a narrow range with Nwarm [approx] 1021 cm-2, while sources without strong detections have column densities of ionized gas an order of magnitude lower. Therefore, we note that sources without strong detections likely have warm ionized outflows present but at low column densities that are not easily probed with current X-ray observations. Sources with strong complex absorption have a strong soft excess, which may or may not be due to difficulties in modeling the complex spectra of these sources. Still, the detection of a flat [Gamma] [approx] 1 and a strong soft excess may allow us to infer the presence of strong absorption in low signal-to-noise active galactic nucleus spectra. Additionally, we include a useful correction from the Swift BAT luminosity to bolometric luminosity, based on a comparison of our spectral fitting results with published spectral energy distribution fits from 33 of our sources.

  15. Hard X-ray tests of the unified model for an ultraviolet-detected sample of Seyfert 2 galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulchaey, John S.; Myshotzky, Richard F.; Weaver, Kimberly A.

    1992-01-01

    An ultraviolet-detected sample of Seyfert 2 galaxies shows heavy photoelectric absorption in the hard X-ray band. The presence of UV emission combined with hard X-ray absorption argues strongly for a special geometry which must have the general properties of the Antonucci and Miller unified model. The observations of this sample are consistent with the picture in which the hard X-ray photons are viewed directly through the obscuring matter (molecular torus?) and the optical, UV, and soft X-ray continuum are seen in scattered light. The large range in X-ray column densities implies that there must be a large variation in intrinsic thicknesses of molecular tori, an assumption not found in the simplest of unified models. Furthermore, constraints based on the cosmic X-ray background suggest that some of the underlying assumptions of the unified model are wrong.

  16. DEMOGRAPHICS OF THE GALAXIES HOSTING SHORT-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, W.; Berger, E.; Chornock, R.

    We present observations of the afterglows and host galaxies of three short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs): 100625A, 101219A, and 110112A. We find that GRB 100625A occurred in a z = 0.452 early-type galaxy with a stellar mass of Almost-Equal-To 4.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} and a stellar population age of Almost-Equal-To 0.7 Gyr, and GRB 101219A originated in a star-forming galaxy at z = 0.718 with a stellar mass of Almost-Equal-To 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }, a star formation rate of Almost-Equal-To 16 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, and a stellar population age of Almost-Equal-To 50 Myr. We alsomore » report the discovery of the optical afterglow of GRB 110112A, which lacks a coincident host galaxy to i {approx}> 26 mag, and we cannot conclusively identify any field galaxy as a possible host. From afterglow modeling, the bursts have inferred circumburst densities of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -4}-1 cm{sup -3} and isotropic-equivalent gamma-ray and kinetic energies of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 50}-10{sup 51} erg. These three events highlight the diversity of galactic environments that host short GRBs. To quantify this diversity, we use the sample of 36 Swift short GRBs with robust associations to an environment ({approx}1/2 of 68 short bursts detected by Swift to 2012 May) and classify bursts originating from four types of environments: late-type ( Almost-Equal-To 50%), early-type ( Almost-Equal-To 15%), inconclusive ( Almost-Equal-To 20%), and ''host-less'' (lacking a coincident host galaxy to limits of {approx}> 26 mag; Almost-Equal-To 15%). To find likely ranges for the true late- and early-type fractions, we assign each of the host-less bursts to either the late- or early-type category using probabilistic arguments and consider the scenario that all hosts in the inconclusive category are early-type galaxies to set an upper bound on the early-type fraction. We calculate most likely ranges for the late- and early-type fractions of Almost

  17. Fermi large area telescope detection of extended gamma-ray emission from the radio galaxy fornax A

    DOE PAGES

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; ...

    2016-07-14

    Here, we report the Fermi Large Area Telescope detection of extended γ-ray emission from the lobes of the radio galaxy Fornax A using 6.1 years of Pass 8 data. After Centaurus A, this is now the second example of an extended γ-ray source attributed to a radio galaxy. Both an extended flat disk morphology and a morphology following the extended radio lobes were preferred over a point-source description, and the core contribution was constrained to bemore » $$\\lt 14$$% of the total γ-ray flux. We also demonstrated a preferred alignment of the γ-ray elongation with the radio lobes by rotating the radio lobes template. We found no significant evidence for variability on ~0.5 year timescales. Taken together, these results strongly suggest a lobe origin for the γ-rays. Furthermore, with the extended nature of the $$\\gt 100\\;{\\rm{MeV}}$$ γ-ray emission established, we model the source broadband emission considering currently available total lobe radio and millimeter flux measurements, as well as X-ray detections attributed to inverse Compton (IC) emission off the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Unlike the Centaurus A case, we find that a leptonic model involving IC scattering of CMB and extragalactic background light (EBL) photons underpredicts the γ-ray fluxes by factors of about ~2–3, depending on the EBL model adopted. An additional γ-ray spectral component is thus required, and could be due to hadronic emission arising from proton–proton collisions of cosmic rays with thermal plasma within the radio lobes.« less

  18. Fermi Large Area Telescope Detection of Extended Gamma-Ray Emission from the Radio Galaxy Fornax A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen, J. M.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Costanza, F.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; Davis, D. S.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Georganopoulos, M.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Godfrey, G.; Green, D.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kensei, S.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J. D.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Schmid, J.; Sgrò, C.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stawarz, Ł.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zimmer, S.; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    We report the Fermi Large Area Telescope detection of extended γ-ray emission from the lobes of the radio galaxy Fornax A using 6.1 years of Pass 8 data. After Centaurus A, this is now the second example of an extended γ-ray source attributed to a radio galaxy. Both an extended flat disk morphology and a morphology following the extended radio lobes were preferred over a point-source description, and the core contribution was constrained to be < 14% of the total γ-ray flux. A preferred alignment of the γ-ray elongation with the radio lobes was demonstrated by rotating the radio lobes template. We found no significant evidence for variability on ˜0.5 year timescales. Taken together, these results strongly suggest a lobe origin for the γ-rays. With the extended nature of the > 100 MeV γ-ray emission established, we model the source broadband emission considering currently available total lobe radio and millimeter flux measurements, as well as X-ray detections attributed to inverse Compton (IC) emission off the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Unlike the Centaurus A case, we find that a leptonic model involving IC scattering of CMB and extragalactic background light (EBL) photons underpredicts the γ-ray fluxes by factors of about ˜2-3, depending on the EBL model adopted. An additional γ-ray spectral component is thus required, and could be due to hadronic emission arising from proton-proton collisions of cosmic rays with thermal plasma within the radio lobes.

  19. Environment of Submillimeter Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, K.-c.; Chen, L.-w.

    2013-10-01

    To study the environment of high-redshift star-forming galaxies — submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) — and their role during large-scale structure formation, we have estimated the galaxy number density fluctuations around SMGs, and analyzed their cross correlation functions with Lyman alpha emitters (LAEs), and optical-selected galaxies with photometric redshift in the COSMOS and ECDFS fields. Only a marginal cross-correlation between SMGs and optical-selected galaxies at most redshifts intervals is found in our results, except a relatively strong correlation detected in the cases of AzTEC-detected SMGs with galaxies at z ˜2.6 and 3.6. The density fluctuations around SMGs with redshift estimated show most SMGs located in a high-density region. There is no correlation signal between LAEs and SMGs, and the galaxy density fluctuations indicate a slightly anti-correlation on a scale smaller than 2 Mpc. Furthermore, we also investigate the density fluctuations of passive and starforming galaxies selected by optical and near infrared colors at similar redshift around SMGs. Finally the implication from our results to the interconnection between high-redshift galaxy populations is discussed.

  20. Dark matter in dwarf spheroidal galaxies and indirect detection: a review.

    PubMed

    Strigari, Louis E

    2018-05-01

    Indirect dark matter searches targeting dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) have matured rapidly during the past decade. This has been because of the substantial increase in kinematic data sets from the dSphs, the new dSphs that have been discovered, and the operation of the Fermi-LAT and many ground-based gamma-ray experiments. Here we review the analysis methods that have been used to determine the dSph dark matter distributions, in particular the 'J-factors', comparing and contrasting them, and detailing the underlying systematics that still affect the analysis. We discuss prospects for improving measurements of dark matter distributions, and how these interplay with future indirect dark matter searches.

  1. Dark matter in dwarf spheroidal galaxies and indirect detection: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strigari, Louis E.

    2018-05-01

    Indirect dark matter searches targeting dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) have matured rapidly during the past decade. This has been because of the substantial increase in kinematic data sets from the dSphs, the new dSphs that have been discovered, and the operation of the Fermi-LAT and many ground-based gamma-ray experiments. Here we review the analysis methods that have been used to determine the dSph dark matter distributions, in particular the ‘J-factors’, comparing and contrasting them, and detailing the underlying systematics that still affect the analysis. We discuss prospects for improving measurements of dark matter distributions, and how these interplay with future indirect dark matter searches.

  2. A matched filter approach for blind joint detection of galaxy clusters in X-ray and SZ surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarrío, P.; Melin, J.-B.; Arnaud, M.

    2018-06-01

    The combination of X-ray and Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) observations can potentially improve the cluster detection efficiency, when compared to using only one of these probes, since both probe the same medium, the hot ionized gas of the intra-cluster medium. We present a method based on matched multifrequency filters (MMF) for detecting galaxy clusters from SZ and X-ray surveys. This method builds on a previously proposed joint X-ray-SZ extraction method and allows the blind detection of clusters, that is finding new clusters without knowing their position, size, or redshift, by searching on SZ and X-ray maps simultaneously. The proposed method is tested using data from the ROSAT all-sky survey and from the Planck survey. The evaluation is done by comparison with existing cluster catalogues in the area of the sky covered by the deep SPT survey. Thanks to the addition of the X-ray information, the joint detection method is able to achieve simultaneously better purity, better detection efficiency, and better position accuracy than its predecessor Planck MMF, which is based on SZ maps alone. For a purity of 85%, the X-ray-SZ method detects 141 confirmed clusters in the SPT region; to detect the same number of confirmed clusters with Planck MMF, we would need to decrease its purity to 70%. We provide a catalogue of 225 sources selected by the proposed method in the SPT footprint, with masses ranging between 0.7 and 14.5 ×1014 M⊙ and redshifts between 0.01 and 1.2.

  3. Finding the First Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2009-01-01

    Astronomers study distant galaxies by taking long exposures in deep survey fields. They choose fields that are empty of known sources, so that they are statistically representative of the Universe as a whole. Astronomers can compare the distribution of the detected galaxies in brightness, color, morphology and redshift to theoretical models, in order to puzzle out the processes of galaxy evolution. In 2004, the Hubble Space Telescope was pointed at a small, deep-survey field in the southern constellation Fornax for more than 500 hours of exposure time. The resulting Hubble Ultra-Deep Field could see the faintest and most distant galaxies that the telescope is capable of viewing. These galaxies emitted their light less than 1 billion years after the Big Bang. From the Ultra Deep Field and other galaxy surveys, astronomers have built up a history of star formation in the universe. the peak occurred about7 billion years ago, about half of the age of the current universe, then the number of stars that were forming was about 15 time the rate today. Going backward in time to when the very first starts and galaxies formed, the average star-formation rate should drop to zero. but when looking at the most distant galaxies in the Ultra Deep field, the star formation rate is still higher than it is today. The faintest galaxies seen by Hubble are not the first galaxies that formed in the early universe. To detect these galaxies NASA is planning the James Webb Space Telescope for launch in 2013. Webb will have a 6.5-meter diameter primary mirror, much bigger than Hubble's 2.4-meter primary, and will be optimized for infrared observations to see the highly redshifted galaxies.

  4. A Novel Approach to Constrain the Mass Ratio of Minor Mergers in Elliptical Galaxies: Application to NGC 4889, the Brightest Cluster Galaxy in Coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Meng; Ho, Luis C.; Peng, Chien Y.; Huang, Song

    2013-08-01

    Minor mergers are thought to be important for the buildup and structural evolution of massive elliptical galaxies. In this work, we report the discovery of a system of four shell features in NGC 4889, one of the brightest members of the Coma cluster, using optical images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The shells are well aligned with the major axis of the host and are likely to have been formed by the accretion of a small satellite galaxy. We have performed a detailed two-dimensional photometric decomposition of NGC 4889 and of the many overlapping nearby galaxies in its vicinity. This comprehensive model allows us not only to firmly detect the low-surface brightness shells, but, crucially, also to accurately measure their luminosities and colors. The shells are bluer than the underlying stars at the same radius in the main galaxy. We make use of the colors of the shells and the color-magnitude relation of the Coma cluster to infer the luminosity (or mass) of the progenitor galaxy. The shells in NGC 4889 appear to have been produced by the minor merger of a moderate-luminosity (MI ≈ -18.7 mag) disk (S0 or spiral) galaxy with a luminosity (mass) ratio of ~90:1 with respect to the primary galaxy. The novel methodology presented in this work can be exploited to decode the fossil record imprinted in the photometric substructure of other nearby early-type galaxies. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  5. Panchromatic properties of 99000 galaxies detected by SDSS, and (some by) ROSAT, GALEX, 2MASS, IRAS, GB6, FIRST, NVSS and WENSS surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrić, M.; Ivezić, Ž.; Best, P. N.; Lupton, R. H.; Tremonti, C.; Brinchmann, J.; Agüeros, M. A.; Knapp, G. R.; Gunn, J. E.; Rockosi, C. M.; Schlegel, D.; Finkbeiner, D.; Gaćeša, M.; Smolčić, V.; Anderson, S. F.; Voges, W.; Jurić, M.; Siverd, R. J.; Steinhardt, W.; Jagoda, A. S.; Blanton, M. R.; Schneider, D. P.

    2006-08-01

    We discuss the panchromatic properties of 99088 galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 1 `main' spectroscopic sample (a flux-limited sample for 1360deg2). These galaxies are positionally matched to sources detected by ROSAT, Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), two-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS), Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS), Green Bank GB6 survey (GB6), Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-centimetres (FIRST), NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) and Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS). The matching fraction varies from <1 per cent for ROSAT and GB6 to ~40 per cent for GALEX and 2MASS. In addition to its size, the advantages of this sample are well-controlled selection effects, faint flux limits and the wealth of measured parameters, including accurate X-ray to radio photometry, angular sizes and optical spectra. We find strong correlations between the detection fraction at other wavelengths and optical properties such as flux, colours and emission-line strengths. For example, ~2/3 of SDSS `main' galaxies classified as active galactic nucleus (AGN) using emission-line strengths are detected by 2MASS, while the corresponding fraction for star-forming galaxies (SFs) is only ~1/10. Similarly, over 90 per cent of galaxies detected by IRAS display strong emission lines in their optical spectra, compared to ~50 per cent for the whole SDSS sample. Using GALEX, SDSS and 2MASS data, we construct the ultraviolet-infrared (UV-IR) broad-band spectral energy distributions for various types of galaxies, and find that they form a nearly one-parameter family. For example, the SDSS u- and r-band data, supplemented with redshift, can be used to `predict' K-band magnitudes measured by 2MASS with an rms scatter of only 0.2mag. When a dust content estimate determined from SDSS spectra with the aid of models is also utilized, this scatter decreases to 0.1mag and can be fully accounted for by measurement uncertainties. We demonstrate that this

  6. The Mass Distribution in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courteau, Stéphane; Dutton, Aaron A.

    We present the relative fraction of baryons and dark matter at various radii in galaxies. For spiral galaxies, this fraction measured in a galaxy's inner parts is typically baryon-dominated (maximal) and dark-matter dominated (sub-maximal) in the outskirts. The transition from maximal to sub-maximal baryons occurs within the inner parts of low-mass disk galaxies (with V tot <= 200 km s-1) and in the outer disk for more massive systems. The mean mass fractions for late- and early-type galaxies vary significantly at the same fiducial radius and circular velocity, suggesting a range of galaxy formation mechanisms. A more detailed discussion, and resolution of the so-called ``maximal disk problem'', is presented in Courteau & Dutton, ApJL, 801, 20.

  7. Galaxy collisions and shocks in compact groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, Ewan

    2017-09-01

    Evidence from IR, X-ray and HI studies suggests that low mass compact groups represent a key evolutionary stage in which shocks caused by galaxy interactions drive both the transformation of gas-rich spirals into early-type galaxies, and the build-up of the hot IGM. We have selected five groups where extensive multi-wavelength data shows violent ongoing galaxy interactions. We now propose to observe them with Chandra and XMM, searching for or confirming the presence of shocks in the X-ray IGM, measuring their strength and ability to heat cold gas, and examining the impact of galaxy/IGM interactions on galaxy transformation. Combined with our IR, CO, HI and optical IFU data, these observations will provide an exceptionally detailed view of this critical stage of galaxy and group evolution.

  8. ECO and RESOLVE: Galaxy Disk Growth in Environmental Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffett, Amanda J.; Kannappan, Sheila J.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Stark, David V.; Hendel, David; Norris, Mark A.; Grogin, Norman A.

    2015-10-01

    We study the relationships between galaxy environments and galaxy properties related to disk (re)growth, considering two highly complete samples that are approximately baryonic mass limited into the high-mass dwarf galaxy regime, the Environmental COntext catalog (data release herein) and the B-semester region of the REsolved Spectroscopy Of a Local VolumE survey. We quantify galaxy environments using both group identification and smoothed galaxy density field methods. We use by-eye and quantitative morphological classifications plus atomic gas content measurements and estimates. We find that blue early-type (E/S0) galaxies, gas-dominated galaxies, and UV-bright disk host galaxies all become distinctly more common below group halo mass ˜ {10}11.5 {M}⊙ , implying that this low group halo mass regime may be a preferred regime for significant disk growth activity. We also find that blue early-type and blue late-type galaxies inhabit environments of similar group halo mass at fixed baryonic mass, consistent with a scenario in which blue early-types can regrow late-type disks. In fact, we find that the only significant difference in the typical group halo mass inhabited by different galaxy classes is for satellite galaxies with different colors, where at fixed baryonic mass red early- and late-types have higher typical group halo masses than blue early- and late-types. More generally, we argue that the traditional morphology-environment relation (i.e., that denser environments tend to have more early-types) can be largely attributed to the morphology-galaxy mass relation for centrals and the color-environment relation for satellites.

  9. Spatially-resolved star formation histories of CALIFA galaxies. Implications for galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, R. M.; Pérez, E.; Cid Fernandes, R.; García-Benito, R.; López Fernández, R.; Vale Asari, N.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; de Amorim, A. L.; Lacerda, E. A. D.; Sánchez, S. F.; Lehnert, M. D.; Walcher, C. J.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents the spatially resolved star formation history (SFH) of nearby galaxies with the aim of furthering our understanding of the different processes involved in the formation and evolution of galaxies. To this end, we apply the fossil record method of stellar population synthesis to a rich and diverse data set of 436 galaxies observed with integral field spectroscopy in the CALIFA survey. The sample covers a wide range of Hubble types, with stellar masses ranging from M⋆ 109 to 7 × 1011 M⊙. Spectral synthesis techniques are applied to the datacubes to retrieve the spatially resolved time evolution of the star formation rate (SFR), its intensity (ΣSFR), and other descriptors of the 2D SFH in seven bins of galaxy morphology (E, S0, Sa, Sb, Sbc, Sc, and Sd) and five bins of stellar mass. Our main results are that (a) galaxies form very fast independently of their current stellar mass, with the peak of star formation at high redshift (z > 2). Subsequent star formation is driven by M⋆ and morphology, with less massive and later type spirals showing more prolonged periods of star formation. (b) At any epoch in the past, the SFR is proportional to M⋆, with most massive galaxies having the highest absolute (but lowest specific) SFRs. (c) While today, the ΣSFR is similar for all spirals and significantly lower in early-type galaxies (ETG), in the past, the ΣSFR scales well with morphology. The central regions of today's ETGs are where the ΣSFR reached the highest values (> 103 M⊙ Gyr-1 pc-2), similar to those measured in high-redshift star-forming galaxies. (d) The evolution of ΣSFR in Sbc systems matches that of models for Milky Way-like galaxies, suggesting that the formation of a thick disk may be a common phase in spirals at early epochs. (e) The SFR and ΣSFR in outer regions of E and S0 galaxies show that they have undergone an extended phase of growth in mass between z = 2 and 0.4. The mass assembled in this phase is in agreement with

  10. A study of environmental effects on galaxy spin using MaNGA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong Chul; Hwang, Ho Seong; Chung, Haeun

    2018-06-01

    We investigate environmental effects on galaxy spin using the recent public data of Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA) integral field spectroscopic survey containing ˜2800 galaxies. We measure the spin parameter of 1830 galaxies through the analysis of two-dimensional stellar kinematic maps within the effective radii, and obtain their large-scale (background mass density from 20 nearby galaxies) and small-scale (distance to and morphology of the nearest neighbour galaxy) environmental parameters for 1529 and 1767 galaxies, respectively. We first examine the mass dependence of galaxy spin, and find that the spin parameter of early-type galaxies decreases with stellar mass at log (M*/M⊙) ≳ 10, consistent with the results from previous studies. We then divide the galaxies into three subsamples using their stellar masses to minimize the mass effects on galaxy spin. The spin parameters of galaxies in each subsample do not change with background mass density, but do change with distance to and morphology of the nearest neighbour. In particular, the spin parameter of late-type galaxies decreases as early-type neighbours approach within the virial radius. These results suggest that the large-scale environments hardly affect the galaxy spin, but the small-scale environments such as hydrodynamic galaxy-galaxy interactions can play a substantial role in determining galaxy spin.

  11. DETECTION OF A COMPANION LENS GALAXY USING THE MID-INFRARED FLUX RATIOS OF THE GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED QUASAR H1413+117

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Agol, Eric; Kochanek, Christopher S.

    2009-07-10

    We present the first resolved mid-infrared (IR) (11 {mu}m) observations of the four-image quasar lens H1413+117 using the Michelle camera on Gemini North. All previous observations (optical, near-IR, and radio) of this lens show a 'flux anomaly', where the image flux ratios cannot be explained by a simple, central lens galaxy. We attempt to reproduce the mid-IR flux ratios, which are insensitive to extinction and microlensing, by modeling the main lens as a singular isothermal ellipsoid. This model fails to reproduce the flux ratios. However, we can explain the flux ratios simply by adding to the model a nearby galaxymore » detected in the H band by the Hubble Space Telescope. This perturbing galaxy lies 4.''0 from the main lens and it has a critical radius of 0.''63 {+-} 0.''02 which is similar to that of the main lens, as expected from their similar H-band fluxes. More remarkably, this galaxy is not required to obtain a good fit to the system astrometry, so this represents the first clear detection of an object through its effect on the image fluxes of a gravitational lens. This is a parallel to the detections of visible satellites from astrometric anomalies, and provides a proof of the concept of searching for substructure in galaxies using anomalous flux ratios.« less

  12. The dwarf galaxy population of nearby galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisker, Thorsten; Wittmann, Carolin; Pak, Mina; Janz, Joachim; Bialas, Daniel; Peletier, Reynier; Grebel, Eva; Falcon Barroso, Jesus; Toloba, Elisa; Smakced Collaboration, Focus Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Fornax, Virgo, Ursa Major and Perseus galaxy clusters all have very different characteristics, in terms of their density, mass, and large-scale environment. We can regard these clusters as laboratories for studying environmental influence on galaxy evolution, using the sensitive low-mass galaxies as probes for external mechanisms. Here we report on recent and ongoing observational studies of the said clusters with imaging and spectroscopy, as well as on the interpretation of present-day cluster galaxy populations with the aid of cosmological simulations.Multicolor imaging data allow us to identify residual star formation in otherwise red early-type dwarf galaxies, which hold clues to the strength of gas stripping processes. Major-axis spectra and 2D kinematical maps provide insight regarding the amount of rotational support and how much dynamical heating a dwarf galaxy may have experienced. To this end, dedicated N-body simulations that follow the evolution of galaxies since early epochs reveal their path through parameter space, and can be compared to observations in order to understand the time-integrated effect of environmental influence.

  13. Hα Monitoring of Early-Type Emission Line Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Steven P.; Boettcher, E.; Wilson, S.; Hosek, M.

    2011-05-01

    We have begun a narrowband imaging program to monitor Hα emission in early-type stars in young open clusters and associations. A minority of early-type stars, particularly Be stars, show Hα in emission due to extended atmospheres and non-equilibrium conditions. Emission features commonly vary irregularly over a range of timescales (Porter, J.M. & Rivinus, T., P.A.S.P. 115:1153-1170, 2003). Some of the brightest such stars, e.g. γ Cas, have been spectroscopically monitored for Hα variability to help constrain models of the unstable disk, but there is relatively little ongoing monitoring in samples including fainter stars (Peters, G., Be Star Newsletter 39:3, 2009). Our program uses matched 5nm-wide on-band (656nm) and off-band (645nm) filters, in conjunction with the Hopkins Observatory 0.6-m telescope and CCD camera. Aperture photometry is done on all early-type stars in each frame, and results expressed as on-band to off-band ratios. Though wavelength-dependent information is lost compared with spectroscopy, imaging allows us to observe much fainter (and therefore many more) objects. Observing young clusters, rather than individual target stars, allows us to record multiple known and candidate emission line stars per frame, and provides multiple "normal" reference stars of similar spectral type. Observations began in the summer of 2010. This project has the potential to produce significant amounts of raw data, so a semi-automated data reduction process has been developed, including astrometric and photometric tasks. Early results, including some preliminary light curves and recovery of known Be stars at least as faint as R=13.9, are presented. We gratefully acknowledge support for student research through an REU grant to the Keck Northeast Astronomy Consortium from the National Science Foundation, and from the Division III Research Funding Committee of Williams College.

  14. Carbon monoxide emission from small galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, Harley A., Jr.; Bally, John

    1987-01-01

    A search was conducted for J = 1 yields 0 CO emission from 22 galaxies, detecting half, as part of a survey to study star formation in small to medium size galaxies. Although substantial variation was found in the star formation efficiencies of the sample galaxies, there is no apparent systematic trend with galaxy size.

  15. Going beyond the Kaiser redshift-space distortion formula: A full general relativistic account of the effects and their detectability in galaxy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jaiyul; Hamaus, Nico; Seljak, Uroš; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2012-09-01

    Kaiser redshift-space distortion formula describes well the clustering of galaxies in redshift surveys on small scales, but there are numerous additional terms that arise on la