Science.gov

Sample records for earth 4f yields

  1. Surface shift of the occupied and unoccupied 4f levels of the rare-earth metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldén, M.; Johansson, B.; Skriver, H. L.

    1995-02-01

    The surface energy shifts of the occupied and unoccupied 4f levels for the lanthanide metals have been calculated from first principles by means of a Green's-function technique within the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbitals method. We use the concept of complete screening to identify the occupied and unoccupied 4f energy level shifts as the surface segregation energy of a 4fn-1 and 4fn+1 impurity atom, respectively, in a 4fn host metal. The calculations include both initial- and final-state effects and give values that are considerably lower than those measured on polycrystalline samples as well as those found in previous initial-state model calculations. The present theory agrees well with very recent high-resolution, single-crystal film measurements for Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Lu. We furthermore utilize the unique possibility offered by the lanthanide metals to clarify the roles played by the initial and the different final states of the core-excitation process, permitted by the fact that the so-called initial-state effect is identical upon 4f removal and 4f addition. Surface energy and work function calculations are also reported.

  2. Rare Earth 4f Hybridization with the GaN Valence Band

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    DOS of Ga17GdN18. and Auger-like electrons emitted in a super Coster– Kronig process [52] 4d104fN + hν → [4d94fN+1]∗ → 4d104fN−1 + e−, (2) where...similar, albeit not identical, response for GaN:Er compared to GaN:Gd at the photon energy characteristic for the Er 4d → 4f super Coster– Kronig resonance

  3. Tuning the Origin of Magnetic Relaxation by Substituting the 3d or Rare-Earth Ions into Three Isostructural Cyano-Bridged 3d-4f Heterodinuclear Compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Guo, Zhen; Xie, Shuang; Li, Hui-Li; Zhu, Wen-Hua; Liu, Li; Dong, Xun-Qing; He, Wei-Xun; Ren, Jin-Chao; Liu, Ling-Zhi; Powell, Annie K

    2015-11-02

    Three isostructural cyano-bridged 3d-4f compounds, [YFe(CN)6(hep)2(H2O)4] (1), [DyFe(CN)6(hep)2(H2O)4] (2), and [DyCo(CN)6(hep)2(H2O)4] (3), were successfully assembled by site-targeted substitution of the 3d or rare-earth ions. All compounds have been structurally characterized to display slightly distorted pentagonal-bipyramidal local coordination geometry around the rare-earth ions. Magnetic analyses revealed negligible magnetic coupling in compound 1, antiferromagnetic intradimer interaction in 2, and weak ferromagnetic coupling through dipolar-dipolar interaction in 3. Under an applied direct-current (dc) field, 1 (Hdc = 2.5 kOe, τ0 = 1.3 × 10(-7) s, and Ueff/kB = 23 K) and 3 (Hdc = 2.0 kOe, τ0 = 7.1 × 10(-11) s, and Ueff/kB = 63 K) respectively indicated magnetic relaxation behavior based on a single [Fe(III)]LS ion and a Dy(III) ion; nevertheless, 2 (Hdc = 2.0 kOe, τ0 = 9.7 × 10(-8) s, and Ueff/kB = 23 K) appeared to be a single-molecule magnet based on a cyano-bridged DyFe dimer. Compound 1, which can be regarded as a single-ion magnet of the [Fe(III)]LS ion linked to a diamagnetic Y(III) ion in a cyano-bridged heterodimer, represents one of the rarely investigated examples based on a single Fe(III) ion explored in magnetic relaxation behavior. It demonstrated that the introduction of intradimer magnetic interaction of 2 through a cyano bridge between Dy(III) and [Fe(III)]LS ions negatively affects the energy barrier and χ″(T) peak temperature compared to 3.

  4. Maximized exoEarth candidate yields for starshades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Christopher C.; Shaklan, Stuart; Lisman, Doug; Cady, Eric; Savransky, Dmitry; Roberge, Aki; Mandell, Avi M.

    2016-10-01

    The design and scale of a future mission to directly image and characterize potentially Earth-like planets will be impacted, to some degree, by the expected yield of such planets. Recent efforts to increase the estimated yields, by creating observation plans optimized for the detection and characterization of Earth-twins, have focused solely on coronagraphic instruments; starshade-based missions could benefit from a similar analysis. Here we explore how to prioritize observations for a starshade given the limiting resources of both fuel and time, present analytic expressions to estimate fuel use, and provide efficient numerical techniques for maximizing the yield of starshades. We implemented these techniques to create an approximate design reference mission code for starshades and used this code to investigate how exoEarth candidate yield responds to changes in mission, instrument, and astrophysical parameters for missions with a single starshade. We find that a starshade mission operates most efficiently somewhere between the fuel- and exposuretime-limited regimes and, as a result, is less sensitive to photometric noise sources as well as parameters controlling the photon collection rate in comparison to a coronagraph. We produced optimistic yield curves for starshades, assuming our optimized observation plans are schedulable and future starshades are not thrust-limited. Given these yield curves, detecting and characterizing several dozen exoEarth candidates requires either multiple starshades or an η≳0.3.

  5. Mechanism of the high transition temperature for the 1111-type iron-based superconductors R FeAsO (R =rare earth ): Synergistic effects of local structures and 4 f electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lifang; Meng, Junling; Liu, Xiaojuan; Yao, Fen; Meng, Jian; Zhang, Hongjie

    2017-07-01

    Among the iron-based superconductors, the 1111-type Fe-As-based superconductors REFeAs O1 -xFx (RE = rare earth) exhibit high transition temperatures (Tc) above 40 K. We perform first-principles calculations based on density functional theory with the consideration of both electronic correlations and spin-orbit couplings on rare earths and Fe ions to study the underlying mechanism as the microscopic structural distortions in REFeAsO tuned by both lanthanide contraction and external strain. The electronic structures evolve similarly in both cases. It is found that there exist an optimal structural regime that will not only initialize but also optimize the orbital fluctuations due to the competing Fe-As and Fe-Fe crystal fields. We also find that the key structural features in REFeAsO, such as As-Fe-As bond angle, intrinsically induce the modification of the Fermi surface and dynamic spin fluctuation. These results suggest that the superconductivity is mediated by antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations. Simultaneously, we show that the rare-earth 4 f electrons play important roles on the high transition temperature whose behavior might be analogous to that of the heavy-fermion superconductors. The superconductivity of these 1111-type iron-based superconductors with high-Tc is considered to originate from the synergistic effects of local structures and 4 f electrons.

  6. EarthSat spring wheat yield system test 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The results of an operational test of the EarthSat System during the period 1 June - 30 August 1975 over the spring wheat regions of North Dakota, South Dakota, and Minnesota are presented. The errors associated with each sub-element of the system during the operational test and the sensitivity of the complete system and each major functional sub-element of the system to the observed errors were evaluated. Evaluations and recommendations for future operational users of the system include: (1) changes in various system sub-elements, (2) changes in the yield model to affect improved accuracy, (3) changes in the number of geobased cells needed to develop an accurate aggregated yield estimate, (4) changes associated with the implementation of future operational satellites and data processing systems, and (5) detailed system documentation.

  7. Relevance of 4f-3d exchange to finite-temperature magnetism of rare-earth permanent magnets: An ab-initio-based spin model approach for NdFe{sub 12}N

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Munehisa; Akai, Hisazumi; Doi, Shotaro

    2016-06-07

    A classical spin model derived ab initio for rare-earth-based permanent magnet compounds is presented. Our target compound, NdFe{sub 12}N, is a material that goes beyond today's champion magnet compound Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B in its intrinsic magnetic properties with a simpler crystal structure. Calculated temperature dependence of the magnetization and the anisotropy field agrees with the latest experimental results in the leading order. Having put the realistic observables under our numerical control, we propose that engineering 5d-electron-mediated indirect exchange coupling between 4f-electrons in Nd and 3d-electrons from Fe would most critically help enhance the material's utility over the operation-temperature range.

  8. Production yield of rare-earth ions implanted into an optical crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Kornher, Thomas, E-mail: t.kornher@physik.uni-stuttgart.de; Xia, Kangwei; Kolesov, Roman

    2016-02-01

    Rare-earth (RE) ions doped into desired locations of optical crystals might enable a range of novel integrated photonic devices for quantum applications. With this aim, we have investigated the production yield of cerium and praseodymium by means of ion implantation. As a measure, the collected fluorescence intensity from both implanted samples and single centers was used. With a tailored annealing procedure for cerium, a yield up to 53% was estimated. Praseodymium yield amounts up to 91%. Such high implantation yield indicates a feasibility of creation of nanopatterned rare-earth doping and suggests strong potential of RE species for on-chip photonic devices.

  9. A direct comparison of exoEarth yields for starshades and coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Christopher C.; Cady, Eric J.; Clampin, Mark; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Lisman, Doug; Mandell, Avi M.; McElwain, Michael W.; Roberge, Aki; Robinson, Tyler D.; Savransky, Dmitry; Shaklan, Stuart B.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.

    2016-07-01

    The scale and design of a future mission capable of directly imaging extrasolar planets will be influenced by the detectable number (yield) of potentially Earth-like planets. Currently, coronagraphs and starshades are being considered as instruments for such a mission. We will use a novel code to estimate and compare the yields for starshade- and coronagraph-based missions. We will show yield scaling relationships for each instrument and discuss the impact of astrophysical and instrumental noise on yields. Although the absolute yields are dependent on several yet-unknown parameters, we will present several limiting cases allowing us to bound the yield comparison.

  10. EarthSat spring wheat yield system test 1975, appendix 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A computer system is presented which processes meteorological data from both ground observations and meteorologic satellites to define plant weather aspects on a four time per day basis. Plant growth stages are calculated and soil moisture profiles are defined by the system. The EarthSat system assesses plant stress and prepares forecasts of end-of-year yields. The system was used to forecast spring wheat yields in the upper Great Plains states. Hardware and software documentation is provided.

  11. Comparison of Hyperthermal Ground Laboratory Atomic Oxygen Erosion Yields With Those in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Dill, Grace C.; Loftus, Ryan J.; deGroh, Kim K.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2013-01-01

    The atomic oxygen erosion yields of 26 materials (all polymers except for pyrolytic graphite) were measured in two directed hyperthermal radio frequency (RF) plasma ashers operating at 30 or 35 kHz with air. The hyperthermal asher results were compared with thermal energy asher results and low Earth orbital (LEO) results from the Materials International Space Station Experiment 2 and 7 (MISSE 2 and 7) flight experiments. The hyperthermal testing was conducted to a significant portion of the atomic oxygen fluence similar polymers were exposed to during the MISSE 2 and 7 missions. Comparison of the hyperthermal asher prediction of LEO erosion yields with thermal energy asher erosion yields indicates that except for the fluorocarbon polymers of PTFE and FEP, the hyperthermal energy ashers are a much more reliable predictor of LEO erosion yield than thermal energy asher testing, by a factor of four.

  12. Atomic Oxygen Erosion Yield Prediction for Spacecraft Polymers in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Backus, Jane A.; Manno, Michael V.; Waters, Deborah L.; Cameron, Kevin C.; deGroh, Kim K.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to predict the atomic oxygen erosion yield of polymers based on their chemistry and physical properties has been only partially successful because of a lack of reliable low Earth orbit (LEO) erosion yield data. Unfortunately, many of the early experiments did not utilize dehydrated mass loss measurements for erosion yield determination, and the resulting mass loss due to atomic oxygen exposure may have been compromised because samples were often not in consistent states of dehydration during the pre-flight and post-flight mass measurements. This is a particular problem for short duration mission exposures or low erosion yield materials. However, as a result of the retrieval of the Polymer Erosion and Contamination Experiment (PEACE) flown as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment 2 (MISSE 2), the erosion yields of 38 polymers and pyrolytic graphite were accurately measured. The experiment was exposed to the LEO environment for 3.95 years from August 16, 2001 to July 30, 2005 and was successfully retrieved during a space walk on July 30, 2005 during Discovery s STS-114 Return to Flight mission. The 40 different materials tested (including Kapton H fluence witness samples) were selected specifically to represent a variety of polymers used in space as well as a wide variety of polymer chemical structures. The MISSE 2 PEACE Polymers experiment used carefully dehydrated mass measurements, as well as accurate density measurements to obtain accurate erosion yield data for high-fluence (8.43 1021 atoms/sq cm). The resulting data was used to develop an erosion yield predictive tool with a correlation coefficient of 0.895 and uncertainty of +/-6.3 10(exp -25)cu cm/atom. The predictive tool utilizes the chemical structures and physical properties of polymers to predict in-space atomic oxygen erosion yields. A predictive tool concept (September 2009 version) is presented which represents an improvement over an earlier (December 2008) version.

  13. Atomic Oxygen Erosion Yield Predictive Tool for Spacecraft Polymers in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bank, Bruce A.; de Groh, Kim K.; Backus, Jane A.

    2008-01-01

    A predictive tool was developed to estimate the low Earth orbit (LEO) atomic oxygen erosion yield of polymers based on the results of the Polymer Erosion and Contamination Experiment (PEACE) Polymers experiment flown as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment 2 (MISSE 2). The MISSE 2 PEACE experiment accurately measured the erosion yield of a wide variety of polymers and pyrolytic graphite. The 40 different materials tested were selected specifically to represent a variety of polymers used in space as well as a wide variety of polymer chemical structures. The resulting erosion yield data was used to develop a predictive tool which utilizes chemical structure and physical properties of polymers that can be measured in ground laboratory testing to predict the in-space atomic oxygen erosion yield of a polymer. The properties include chemical structure, bonding information, density and ash content. The resulting predictive tool has a correlation coefficient of 0.914 when compared with actual MISSE 2 space data for 38 polymers and pyrolytic graphite. The intent of the predictive tool is to be able to make estimates of atomic oxygen erosion yields for new polymers without requiring expensive and time consumptive in-space testing.

  14. Towards Better Simulation of US Maize Yield Responses to Climate in the Community Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, B.; Guan, K.; Chen, M.; Lawrence, D. M.; Jin, Z.; Bernacchi, C.; Ainsworth, E. A.; DeLucia, E. H.; Lombardozzi, D. L.; Lu, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Global food security is undergoing continuing pressure from increased population and climate change despites the potential advancement in breeding and management technologies. Earth system models (ESMs) are essential tools to study the impacts of historical and future climate on regional and global food production, as well as to assess the effectiveness of possible adaptations and their potential feedback to climate. Here we developed an improved maize representation within the Community Earth System Model (CESM) by combining the strengths of both the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5) and the Agricultural Production Systems sIMulator (APSIM) models. Specifically, we modified the maize planting scheme, incorporated the phenology scheme adopted from the APSIM model, added a new carbon allocation scheme into CLM4.5, and improved the estimation of canopy structure parameters including leaf area index (LAI) and canopy height. Unique features of the new model (CLM-APSIM) include more detailed phenology stages, an explicit implementation of the impacts of various abiotic environmental stresses (including nitrogen, water, temperature and heat stresses) on maize phenology and carbon allocation, as well as an explicit simulation of grain number and grain size. We conducted a regional simulation of this new model over the US Corn Belt during 1990 to 2010. The simulated maize yield as well as its responses to climate (growing season mean temperature and precipitation) are benchmarked with data from UADA NASS statistics. Our results show that the CLM-APSIM model outperforms the CLM4.5 in simulating county-level maize yield production and reproduces more realistic yield responses to climate variations than CLM4.5. However, some critical processes (such as crop failure due to frost and inundation and suboptimal growth condition due to biotic stresses) are still missing in both CLM-APSIM and CLM4.5, making the simulated yield responses to climate slightly deviate from the

  15. NASA Earth Science Research Results for Improved Regional Crop Yield Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mali, P.; O'Hara, C. G.; Shrestha, B.; Sinclair, T. R.; G de Goncalves, L. G.; Salado Navarro, L. R.

    2007-12-01

    National agencies such as USDA Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS), Production Estimation and Crop Assessment Division (PECAD) work specifically to analyze and generate timely crop yield estimates that help define national as well as global food policies. The USDA/FAS/PECAD utilizes a Decision Support System (DSS) called CADRE (Crop Condition and Data Retrieval Evaluation) mainly through an automated database management system that integrates various meteorological datasets, crop and soil models, and remote sensing data; providing significant contribution to the national and international crop production estimates. The "Sinclair" soybean growth model has been used inside CADRE DSS as one of the crop models. This project uses Sinclair model (a semi-mechanistic crop growth model) for its potential to be effectively used in a geo-processing environment with remote-sensing-based inputs. The main objective of this proposed work is to verify, validate and benchmark current and future NASA earth science research results for the benefit in the operational decision making process of the PECAD/CADRE DSS. For this purpose, the NASA South American Land Data Assimilation System (SALDAS) meteorological dataset is tested for its applicability as a surrogate meteorological input in the Sinclair model meteorological input requirements. Similarly, NASA sensor MODIS products is tested for its applicability in the improvement of the crop yield prediction through improving precision of planting date estimation, plant vigor and growth monitoring. The project also analyzes simulated Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS, a future NASA sensor) vegetation product for its applicability in crop growth prediction to accelerate the process of transition of VIIRS research results for the operational use of USDA/FAS/PECAD DSS. The research results will help in providing improved decision making capacity to the USDA/FAS/PECAD DSS through improved vegetation growth monitoring from high

  16. A generalized approach to wheat yield forecasting using earth observations: Data considerations, application and relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker-Reshef, Inbal

    In recent years there has been a dramatic increase in the demand for timely, comprehensive global agricultural intelligence. The issue of food security has rapidly risen to the top of government agendas around the world as the recent lack of food access led to unprecedented food prices, hunger, poverty, and civil conflict. Timely information on global crop production is indispensable for combating the growing stress on the world's crop production, for stabilizing food prices, developing effective agricultural policies, and for coordinating responses to regional food shortages. Earth Observations (EO) data offer a practical means for generating such information as they provide global, timely, cost-effective, and synoptic information on crop condition and distribution. Their utility for crop production forecasting has long been recognized and demonstrated across a wide range of scales and geographic regions. Nevertheless it is widely acknowledged that EO data could be better utilized within the operational monitoring systems and thus there is a critical need for research focused on developing practical robust methods for agricultural monitoring. Within this context this dissertation focused on advancing EO-based methods for crop yield forecasting and on demonstrating the potential relevance for adopting EO-based crop forecasts for providing timely reliable agricultural intelligence. This thesis made contributions to this field by developing and testing a robust EO-based method for wheat production forecasting at state to national scales using available and easily accessible data. The model was developed in Kansas (KS) using coarse resolution normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) time series data in conjunction with out-of-season wheat masks and was directly applied in Ukraine to assess its transferability. The model estimated yields within 7% in KS and 10% in Ukraine of final estimates 6 weeks prior to harvest. The relevance of adopting such methods to

  17. A Global Data Analysis for Representing Sediment and Particulate Organic Carbon Yield in Earth System Models

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Zeli; Leung, L. Ruby; Li, Hongyi

    Although sediment yield (SY) from water erosion is ubiquitous and its environmental consequences are well recognized, its impacts on the global carbon cycle remain largely uncertain. This knowledge gap is partly due to the lack of soil erosion modeling in Earth System Models (ESMs), which are important tools used to understand the global carbon cycle and explore its changes. This study analyzed sediment and particulate organic carbon yield (CY) data from 1081 and 38 small catchments (0.1-200 km27 ), respectively, in different environments across the globe. Using multiple statistical analysis techniques, we explored environmental factors and hydrological processes important formore » SY and CY modeling in ESMs. Our results show clear correlations of high SY with traditional agriculture, seismicity and heavy storms, as well as strong correlations between SY and annual peak runoff. These highlight the potential limitation of SY models that represent only interrill and rill erosion because shallow overland flow and rill flow have limited transport capacity due to their hydraulic geometry to produce high SY. Further, our results suggest that SY modeling in ESMs should be implemented at the event scale to produce the catastrophic mass transport during episodic events. Several environmental factors such as seismicity and land management that are often not considered in current catchment-scale SY models can be important in controlling global SY. Our analyses show that SY is likely the primary control on CY in small catchments and a statistically significant empirical relationship is established to calculate SY and CY jointly in ESMs.« less

  18. Jahn-Teller effect on the [TiF 4F 4F int] 6-(C 4v) and [NiF 4F 4F int] 7-(C 4v) clusters embedded into SrF 2 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulanov, V. A.; Zhiteitcev, E. R.; Varlamov, A. G.

    2007-07-01

    By means of EPR method the associative [TiF 4F 4F int] 6-(C 4v) and [NiF 4F 4F int] 7-(C 4v) centers were revealed in the fluorite type SrF 2:Ti and SrF 2:Ni crystals grown by Bridgman method in helium atmosphere containing some amount of a fluorine gas. It was found that at low temperatures the local structures of these associative centers were exposed to a static rhombic distortion. The reasons of such distortions were accounted for by the assumption that the E ⊗ ( b1 + b2) vibronic interaction became effective due to that the ground orbital states of the [TiF 4F 4F int] 6-(C 4v) and [NiF 4F 4F int] 7-(C 4v) centers occurred to be doubly degenerated.

  19. What is the Best Model Specification and Earth Observation Product for Predicting Regional Grain Yields in Food Insecure Countries?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, F., IV; Harrison, L.; Shukla, S.; Husak, G. J.; Funk, C. C.

    2017-12-01

    We evaluate the predictive accuracy of an ensemble of empirical model specifications that use earth observation data to predict sub-national grain yields in Mexico and East Africa. Products that are actively used for seasonal drought monitoring are tested as yield predictors. Our research is driven by the fact that East Africa is a region where decisions regarding agricultural production are critical to preventing the loss of economic livelihoods and human life. Regional grain yield forecasts can be used to anticipate availability and prices of key staples, which can turn can inform decisions about targeting humanitarian response such as food aid. Our objective is to identify-for a given region, grain, and time year- what type of model and/or earth observation can most accurately predict end of season yields. We fit a set of models to county level panel data from Mexico, Kenya, Sudan, South Sudan, and Somalia. We then examine out of sample predicative accuracy using various linear and non-linear models that incorporate spatial and time varying coefficients. We compare accuracy within and across models that use predictor variables from remotely sensed measures of precipitation, temperature, soil moisture, and other land surface processes. We also examine at what point in the season a given model or product is most useful for determining predictive accuracy. Finally we compare predictive accuracy across a variety of agricultural regimes including high intensity irrigated commercial agricultural and rain fed subsistence level farms.

  20. Investigations of electron attachment to the perfluorocarbon molecules c-C4F8, 2-C4F8, 1,3 C4F6, and c-C5F8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feil, Stefan; Märk, Tilmann D.; Mauracher, Andreas; Scheier, Paul; Mayhew, Chris A.

    2008-11-01

    Non-dissociative and dissociative electron attachment to a series of gas-phase perfluorocarbons (PFCs), namely octafluorocyclobutane, c-C4F8, octafluorobut-2-ene (perfluoro-2-butene), 2-C4F8, hexafluorobuta-1,3-diene (1,3 perfluorobutadiene), 1,3 C4F6, and octafluorocyclopentene (perfluorocyclopentene), c-C5F8, of importance to technological plasmas, have been investigated using two different, but complimentary, instruments available in Innsbruck over the electron energy range 0-20 eV. Anion yields as a function of electron energy have been recorded, with the positions and intensities of the electron attachment resonances being determined. One of these instruments is a double focusing sector field mass spectrometer (VG-ZAB-2SEQ), which has been used for measurements requiring high sensitivity and for obtaining accurate relative anion yields. It has also been used to determine the electron detachment lifetimes of the parent anions under various accelerating voltages, and these results are also presented. The second instrument (CELIA) is a trochoidal electron monochromator coupled to a quadrupole mass filter with a pulse counting system for detecting product anionic species. This provides a much higher energy resolution than the VG-ZAB, which makes it a better instrument to investigate narrow energy resonances close to 0 eV. The results of anion yields, peak positions and the relative intensities presented in this paper are compared with previous data of electron attachment to the above PFCs, including investigations by Professor Eugen Illenberger.

  1. Manifestation of intra-atomic 5d6s-4f exchange coupling in photoexcited gadolinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G. P.; Jenkins, T.; Bennett, M.; Bai, Y. H.

    2017-12-01

    Intra-atomic exchange couplings (IECs) between 5d6s and 4f electrons are ubiquitous in rare-earth metals and play a critical role in spin dynamics. However, detecting them in real time domain has been difficult. Here we show the direct evidence of IEC between 5d6s and 4f electrons in gadolinium. Upon femtosecond laser excitation, 5d6s electrons are directly excited; their majority bands shift toward the Fermi level while their minority bands do the opposite. For the first time, our first-principles minority shift now agrees with the experiment quantitatively. Excited 5d6s electrons lower the exchange potential barrier for 4f electrons, so the 4f states are also shifted in energy, a prediction that can be tested experimentally. Although a significant number of 5d6s electrons, some several eV below the Fermi level, are excited out of the Fermi sea, there is no change in the 4f states, a clear manifestation of intra-atomic exchange coupling.

  2. 77 FR 321 - Section 4(f) Policy Paper

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-04

    ...] Section 4(f) Policy Paper AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice; Request for comments. SUMMARY: This is a notice and request for comments on a draft Section 4(f) Policy Paper that will... Paper is available for download and public inspection under the docket number noted above at the Federal...

  3. Magnetic x-ray linear dichroism in resonant and non-resonant Gd 4f photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, S.; Gammon, W.J.; Pappas, D.P.

    1997-04-01

    The enhancement of the magnetic linear dichroism in resonant 4f photoemission (MLDRPE) is studied from a 50 monolayer film of Gd/Y(0001). The ALS at beamline 7.0.1 provided the source of linearly polarized x-rays used in this study. The polarized light was incident at an angle of 30 degrees relative to the film plane, and the sample magnetization was perpendicular to the photon polarization. The linear dichroism of the 4f core levels is measured as the photon energy is tuned through the 4d-4f resonance. The authors find that the MLDRPE asymmetry is strongest at the resonance. Near the threshold the asymmetrymore » has several features which are out of phase with the fine structure of the total yield.« less

  4. Electron induced ionization of plasma processing gases: C4F x (x  =  1–8) and the isomers of C4F6 and C4F8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Dhanoj; Choi, Heechol; Kwon, Deuk-Chul; Yoon, Jung-Sik; Song, Mi-Young

    2018-04-01

    The total ionization cross section (Q ion) for C4F x (x  =  1–8) fluorocarbons and the isomers of C4F6 and C4F8 molecules are calculated from ionization threshold to 5 keV using the binary-encounter bethe method. The targets are fully optimized using the Hartree–Fock (HF) method and density function theory (DFT) for their minimum energy structure and orbital parameters. The present Q ion with HF parameters showed good agreement with the experimental data for 1,3-C4F6, 2-C4F6, 2-C4F8 and 1-C4F8. On the other hand, the Q ion with DFT parameters are in good accordance with the recent theoretical results for 1,3-C4F6 and 2-C4F6. The Q ion for c-C4F8 showed much variation among the various results. The isomer effect in Q ion is negligible for the isomers of C4F6 and C4F8 molecules. The calculation of Q ion for C4F, C4F2, C4F3, C4F4, C4F5, c-C4F6, C4F7 and iso-C4F8 is a maiden attempt. The present cross section data are important quantities for low temperature plasma modeling especially related to the fluorocarbon plasmas.

  5. 77 FR 42802 - Section 4(f) Policy Paper

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... Section 4(f) properties. The Q&A 6 now notes that Traditional Cultural Properties may be eligible for the... 23 CFR 774.17 explains that a de minimis impact determination does not require the traditional second...

  6. Case study of 4(f) litigation/rulings.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2004-06-01

    This study addresses issues related to compliance with Section 4(f). By referring to the manual Cabinet employees will be to: 1) Conduct an assessment of proposed alternatives to evaluate prudence and feasibility of a proposed project alternative; 2)...

  7. Role of 4 f electrons in crystallographic and magnetic complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, Arjun K.; Paudyal, Durga; Mudryk, Yaroslav

    2017-08-09

    Here, the functionality of many magnetic materials critically depends on first manipulating and then taking advantage of highly nonlinear changes of properties that occur during phase transformations. Unique to lanthanides, property-defining 4f electrons are highly localized and, as commonly accepted, play little to no role in chemical bonding. Yet here we demonstrate that the competition between 4f-electron energy landscapes of Dy (4f 9) and Er (4f 11) is the key element of the puzzle required to explain complex interplay of magnetic and structural features observed in Er 1–xDy xCo 2, and likely many other mixed lanthanide systems. Unlike the parentmore » binaries—DyCo 2 and ErCo 2—Er 1–xDy xCo 2 exhibits two successive magnetostructural transitions: a first order at TC, followed by a second order in the ferrimagnetically ordered state. Supported by first-principles calculations, our results offer new opportunities for targeted design of magnetic materials with multiple functionalities, and also provide a critical insight into the role of 4f electrons in controlling the magnetism and structure of lanthanide intermetallics.« less

  8. Pou4f1 and Pou4f2 Are Dispensable for the Long-Term Survival of Adult Retinal Ganglion Cells in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Liang; Hu, Fang; Xie, Xiaoling; Harder, Jeffery; Fernandes, Kimberly; Zeng, Xiang-yun; Libby, Richard; Gan, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the role of Pou4f1 and Pou4f2 in the survival of adult retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Methods Conditional alleles of Pou4f1 and Pou4f2 were generated (Pou4f1loxP and Pou4f2loxP respectively) for the removal of Pou4f1 and Pou4f2 in adult retinas. A tamoxifen-inducible Cre was used to delete Pou4f1 and Pou4f2 in adult mice and retinal sections and flat mounts were subjected to immunohistochemistry to confirm the deletion of both alleles and to quantify the changes in the number of RGCs and other retinal neurons. To determine the effect of loss of Pou4f1 and Pou4f2 on RGC survival after axonal injury, controlled optic nerve crush (CONC) was performed and RGC death was assessed. Results Pou4f1 and Pou4f2 were ablated two weeks after tamoxifen treatment. Retinal interneurons and Müller glial cells are not affected by the ablation of Pou4f1 or Pou4f2 or both. Although the deletion of both Pou4f1 and Pou4f2 slightly delays the death of RGCs at 3 days post-CONC in adult mice, it does not affect the cell death progress afterwards. Moreoever, deletion of Pou4f1 or Pou4f2 or both has no impact on the long-term viability of RGCs at up to 6 months post-tamoxifen treatment. Conclusion Pou4f1 and Pou4f2 are involved in the acute response to damage to RGCs but are dispensable for the long-term survival of adult RGC in mice. PMID:24736625

  9. Surface enhanced single-molecule magnetism involving 4f spin

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yachao, E-mail: yachao.zhang@pku.edu.cn

    2016-03-28

    We study the magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) of the isolated and deposited Eu(C{sub 8}H{sub 8}){sub 2} by first-principles calculations considering the van der Waals correction and the strong correlation effects. We find that both the molecular spin moment and the easy-axis magnetic anisotropy are enhanced upon deposition on Cu(111). We propose a mechanism in terms of the weakened spin polarization of the π-2p orbitals and the induced anisotropic occupations of the 4f orbitals. Our findings pave the way for raising the MAE of 4f-element single-molecule magnets by tailoring the molecule–surface contacts.

  10. Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-30

    Behold one of the more detailed images of the Earth yet created. This Blue Marble Earth montage shown above -- created from photographs taken by the Visible/Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument on board the new Suomi NPP satellite -- shows many stunning details of our home planet. The Suomi NPP satellite was launched last October and renamed last week after Verner Suomi, commonly deemed the father of satellite meteorology. The composite was created from the data collected during four orbits of the robotic satellite taken earlier this month and digitally projected onto the globe. Many features of North America and the Western Hemisphere are particularly visible on a high resolution version of the image. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18033

  11. Trigonal bipyramidal 5d-4f molecules with SMM behavior.

    PubMed

    Saber, Mohamed R; Dunbar, Kim R

    2014-02-28

    A family of trigonal bipyramidal (TBP) 5d-4f cyanide bridged aggregates were synthesized that exhibit slow relaxation of the magnetization below 4 K as indicated by a signal in the out-of-phase ac susceptibility data under zero field.

  12. The eIF4F and eIFiso4F Complexes of Plants: An Evolutionary Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Ryan M.; Browning, Karen S.

    2012-01-01

    Translation initiation in eukaryotes requires a number of initiation factors to recruit the assembled ribosome to mRNA. The eIF4F complex plays a key role in initiation and is a common target point for regulation of protein synthesis. Most work on the translation machinery of plants to date has focused on flowering plants, which have both the eIF4F complex (eIF4E and eIF4G) as well as the plant-specific eIFiso4F complex (eIFiso4E and eIFiso4G). The increasing availability of plant genome sequence data has made it possible to trace the evolutionary history of these two complexes in plants, leading to several interesting discoveries. eIFiso4G is conserved throughout plants, while eIFiso4E only appears with the evolution of flowering plants. The eIF4G N-terminus, which has been difficult to annotate, appears to be well conserved throughout the plant lineage and contains two motifs of unknown function. Comparison of eIFiso4G and eIF4G sequence data suggests conserved features unique to eIFiso4G and eIF4G proteins. These findings have answered some questions about the evolutionary history of the two eIF4F complexes of plants, while raising new ones. PMID:22611336

  13. Long-term tropospheric trend of octafluorocyclobutane (c-C4F8 or PFC-318)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oram, D. E.; Mani, F. S.; Laube, J. C.; Newland, M. J.; Reeves, C. E.; Sturges, W. T.; Penkett, S. A.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; Röckmann, T.; Fraser, P. J.

    2012-01-01

    Air samples collected at Cape Grim, Tasmania between 1978 and 2008 and during a series of more recent aircraft sampling programmes have been analysed to determine the atmospheric abundance and trend of octafluorocyclobutane (c-C4F8 or PFC-318). c-C4F8 has an atmospheric lifetime in excess of 3000 yr and a global warming potential (GWP) of 10 300 (100 yr time horizon), making it one of the most potent greenhouse gases detected in the atmosphere to date. The abundance of c-C4F8 in the Southern Hemisphere has risen from 0.35 ppt in 1978 to 1.2 ppt in 2010, and is currently increasing at a rate of around 0.03 ppt yr-1. It is the third most abundant perfluorocarbon (PFC) in the present day atmosphere, behind CF4 (~75 ppt) and C2F6 (~4 ppt). Although a number of potential sources of c-C4F8 have been reported, including the electronics and semi-conductor industries, there remains a large discrepancy in the atmospheric budget. Using a 2-D global model to derive top-down global emissions based on the Cape Grim measurements yields a recent (2007) emission rate of around 1.1 Gg yr-1 and a cumulative emission up to and including 2007 of 38.1 Gg. Emissions reported on the EDGAR emissions database for the period 1986-2005 represent less than 1% of the top-down emissions for the same period, which suggests there is a large unaccounted for source of this compound. It is also apparent that the magnitude of this source has varied considerably over the past 30 yr, declining sharply in the late 1980s before increasing again in the mid-1990s.

  14. Long-term tropospheric trend of octafluorocyclobutane (c-C4F8 or PFC-318)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oram, D. E.; Mani, F. S.; Laube, J. C.; Newland, M. J.; Reeves, C. E.; Sturges, W. T.; Penkett, S. A.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; Röckmann, T.; Fraser, P. J.

    2011-07-01

    Air samples collected at Cape Grim, Tasmania between 1978 and 2008 and during a series of more recent aircraft sampling programmes have been analysed to determine the atmospheric abundance and trend of octafluorocyclobutane (-C4F8 or PFC-318). c-C4F8 has an atmospheric lifetime in excess of 3000 yr and a global warming potential (GWP) of 10 300 (100 yr time horizon), making it one of the most potent greenhouse gases detected in the atmosphere to date. The abundance of c-C4F8 in the Southern Hemisphere has risen from 0.35 ppt in 1978 to 1.2 ppt in 2010, and is currently increasing at a rate of around 0.03 ppt yr-1. It is the third most abundant perfluorocarbon (PFC) in the present day atmosphere, behind CF4 (~75 ppt) and C2F6 (~4 ppt). The origin of c-C4F8 is unclear. Using a 2-D global model to derive top-down global emissions based on the Cape Grim measurements yields a recent (2007) emission rate of around 1.1 Gg yr-1 and a cumulative emission up to and including 2007 of 38.1 Gg. Emissions reported on the EDGAR emissions database for the period 1986-2005 represent less than 1 % of the top-down emissions for the same period, which suggests there is a large unaccounted for source of this compound. It is also apparent that the magnitude of this source has varied considerably over the past 30 yr, declining sharply in the late 1980s before increasing again in the mid-1990s.

  15. Comparison of Ion Chemistries in Octafluoro-2-butene (2-C4F8) and in Octfluorocyclobutane (c-C4F8)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Charles; Dejoseph, Charles; Garscadden, Alan

    2007-10-01

    2-C4F8 is one of the promising candidates to replace c-C4F8 that has been widely used for dielectric etching but is not environmentally friendly. In this study we have investigated electron impact ionization and ion-molecule reactions of 2-C4F8 using Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS), and compared the results with those of c-C4F8 we have studied previously. Electron impact ionization of 2-C4F8 produces 15 ionic species including C4F7,8^+, C3F3,5,6^+, C2F4^+ and CF1-3^+ as the major ions. The total ionization cross section of 2-C4F8 reaches a maximum of 1.8x10-15 cm^2 at 90 eV. The ionization is dominated by the channel forming the parent ion C4F8^+ from 12 to 18 eV, and by the channel forming C3F5^+ from 18 to 70 eV. After 70 eV, CF3^+ becomes the dominant product ion. Among the major ions generated from the electron impact ionization of 2-C4F8, only CF^+, CF2^+ and CF3^+ are found to react with 2-C4F8, via F^- abstraction or charge transfer mechanism. The charge transfer reaction of Ar^++2-C4F8 produces primarily C4F7^+.

  16. A Mercury-like component of early Earth yields uranium in the core and high mantle 142Nd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlers, Anke; Wood, Bernard J.

    2015-04-01

    Recent 142Nd isotope data indicate that the silicate Earth (its crust plus the mantle) has a samarium to neodymium elemental ratio (Sm/Nd) that is greater than that of the supposed chondritic building blocks of the planet. This elevated Sm/Nd has been ascribed either to a `hidden' reservoir in the Earth or to loss of an early-formed terrestrial crust by impact ablation. Since removal of crust by ablation would also remove the heat-producing elements--potassium, uranium and thorium--such removal would make it extremely difficult to balance terrestrial heat production with the observed heat flow. In the `hidden' reservoir alternative, a complementary low-Sm/Nd layer is usually considered to reside unobserved in the silicate lower mantle. We have previously shown, however, that the core is a likely reservoir for some lithophile elements such as niobium. We therefore address the question of whether core formation could have fractionated Nd from Sm and also acted as a sink for heat-producing elements. We show here that addition of a reduced Mercury-like body (or, alternatively, an enstatite-chondrite-like body) rich in sulfur to the early Earth would generate a superchondritic Sm/Nd in the mantle and an 142Nd/144Nd anomaly of approximately +14 parts per million relative to chondrite. In addition, the sulfur-rich core would partition uranium strongly and thorium slightly, supplying a substantial part of the `missing' heat source for the geodynamo.

  17. A Mercury-like component of early Earth yields uranium in the core and high mantle (142)Nd.

    PubMed

    Wohlers, Anke; Wood, Bernard J

    2015-04-16

    Recent (142)Nd isotope data indicate that the silicate Earth (its crust plus the mantle) has a samarium to neodymium elemental ratio (Sm/Nd) that is greater than that of the supposed chondritic building blocks of the planet. This elevated Sm/Nd has been ascribed either to a 'hidden' reservoir in the Earth or to loss of an early-formed terrestrial crust by impact ablation. Since removal of crust by ablation would also remove the heat-producing elements--potassium, uranium and thorium--such removal would make it extremely difficult to balance terrestrial heat production with the observed heat flow. In the 'hidden' reservoir alternative, a complementary low-Sm/Nd layer is usually considered to reside unobserved in the silicate lower mantle. We have previously shown, however, that the core is a likely reservoir for some lithophile elements such as niobium. We therefore address the question of whether core formation could have fractionated Nd from Sm and also acted as a sink for heat-producing elements. We show here that addition of a reduced Mercury-like body (or, alternatively, an enstatite-chondrite-like body) rich in sulfur to the early Earth would generate a superchondritic Sm/Nd in the mantle and an (142)Nd/(144)Nd anomaly of approximately +14 parts per million relative to chondrite. In addition, the sulfur-rich core would partition uranium strongly and thorium slightly, supplying a substantial part of the 'missing' heat source for the geodynamo.

  18. Comparative expression analysis of POU4F1, POU4F2 and ISL1 in developing mouse cochleovestibular ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Min; Yang, Hua; Xie, Xiaoling; Liang, Guoqing; Gan, Lin

    2014-01-01

    POU-homeodomain and LIM-homeodomain transcription factors are expressed in developing projection neurons within retina, inner ear, dorsal root ganglion, and trigeminal ganglion, and play synergistic roles in their differentiation and survival. Here, using immunohistochemistry, we present a comparative analysis of the spatiotemporal expression pattern of POU4F1, POU4F2, and ISL1 during the development of cochleovestibular ganglion (CVG) neurons in mouse inner ear. At early stages, when otic neurons are first detected in the otic epithelium (OE) and migrate into periotic mesenchyme to form the CVG, POU4F1 and ISL1 are co-expressed in a majority of the delaminated CVG neurons, which are marked by NEUROD1 expression, but POU4F1 is absent in the otic epithelium. The onset of POU4F2 expression starts after that of POU4F1 and ISL1, and is observed in the NEUROD1-negative, post-mitotic CVG neurons. When the CVG neurons innervate the vestibular and cochlear sensory organs, the expression of POU4F1, POU4F2, and ISL1 continues in both vestibular and spiral ganglion cells. Later in development, POU4F1 expression becomes down-regulated in a majority of spiral ganglion (SG) neurons and more neurons express POU4F2 expression while ISL1 expression is maintained. The differential as well as overlapping expression of POU4F1, POU4F2, and ISL1 combined with previous studies suggests possible functional interaction and regulatory relationship of these transcription factors in the development of inner ear neurons. PMID:24709358

  19. 4f fine-structure levels as the dominant error in the electronic structures of binary lanthanide oxides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bolong

    2016-04-05

    The ground-state 4f fine-structure levels in the intrinsic optical transition gaps between the 2p and 5d orbitals of lanthanide sesquioxides (Ln2 O3 , Ln = La…Lu) were calculated by a two-way crossover search for the U parameters for DFT + U calculations. The original 4f-shell potential perturbation in the linear response method were reformulated within the constraint volume of the given solids. The band structures were also calculated. This method yields nearly constant optical transition gaps between Ln-5d and O-2p orbitals, with magnitudes of 5.3 to 5.5 eV. This result verifies that the error in the band structure calculations for Ln2 O3 is dominated by the inaccuracies in the predicted 4f levels in the 2p-5d transition gaps, which strongly and non-linearly depend on the on-site Hubbard U. The relationship between the 4f occupancies and Hubbard U is non-monotonic and is entirely different from that for materials with 3d or 4d orbitals, such as transition metal oxides. This new linear response DFT + U method can provide a simpler understanding of the electronic structure of Ln2 O3 and enables a quick examination of the electronic structures of lanthanide solids before hybrid functional or GW calculations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Developing a diagnostic model for estimating terrestrial vegetation gross primary productivity using the photosynthetic quantum yield and Earth Observation data.

    PubMed

    Ogutu, Booker O; Dash, Jadunandan; Dawson, Terence P

    2013-09-01

    This article develops a new carbon exchange diagnostic model [i.e. Southampton CARbon Flux (SCARF) model] for estimating daily gross primary productivity (GPP). The model exploits the maximum quantum yields of two key photosynthetic pathways (i.e. C3 and C4 ) to estimate the conversion of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation into GPP. Furthermore, this is the first model to use only the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by photosynthetic elements of the canopy (i.e. FAPARps ) rather than total canopy, to predict GPP. The GPP predicted by the SCARF model was comparable to in situ GPP measurements (R(2)  > 0.7) in most of the evaluated biomes. Overall, the SCARF model predicted high GPP in regions dominated by forests and croplands, and low GPP in shrublands and dry-grasslands across USA and Europe. The spatial distribution of GPP from the SCARF model over Europe and conterminous USA was comparable to those from the MOD17 GPP product except in regions dominated by croplands. The SCARF model GPP predictions were positively correlated (R(2)  > 0.5) to climatic and biophysical input variables indicating its sensitivity to factors controlling vegetation productivity. The new model has three advantages, first, it prescribes only two quantum yield terms rather than species specific light use efficiency terms; second, it uses only the fraction of PAR absorbed by photosynthetic elements of the canopy (FAPARps ) hence capturing the actual PAR used in photosynthesis; and third, it does not need a detailed land cover map that is a major source of uncertainty in most remote sensing based GPP models. The Sentinel satellites planned for launch in 2014 by the European Space Agency have adequate spectral channels to derive FAPARps at relatively high spatial resolution (20 m). This provides a unique opportunity to produce global GPP operationally using the Southampton CARbon Flux (SCARF) model at high spatial resolution. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons

  1. Soil carbon management in large-scale Earth system modelling: implications for crop yields and nitrogen leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olin, S.; Lindeskog, M.; Pugh, T. A. M.; Schurgers, G.; Wårlind, D.; Mishurov, M.; Zaehle, S.; Stocker, B. D.; Smith, B.; Arneth, A.

    2015-06-01

    We explore cropland management alternatives and the effect these can have on future C and N pools and fluxes using the land use-enabled dynamic vegetation model LPJ-GUESS. Simulated crop production, cropland carbon storage, carbon sequestration and nitrogen leaching from croplands are evaluated and discussed. Compared to the version of LPJ-GUESS that does not include land use dynamics, estimates of soil carbon stocks and nitrogen leaching from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems were improved. We explore trade-offs between important ecosystem services that can be provided from agricultural fields such as crop yields, retention of nitrogen and carbon storage. These trade-offs are evaluated for current land use and climate and further explored for future conditions within the two future climate change scenarios, RCP 2.6 and 8.5. Our results show that the potential for carbon sequestration due to typical cropland management practices such as no-till and cover-crops proposed in literature is not realised, globally or over larger climatic regions. Our results highlight important considerations to be made when modelling C-N interactions in agricultural ecosystems under future environmental change, and the effects these have on terrestrial biogeochemical cycles.

  2. Soil carbon management in large-scale Earth system modelling: implications for crop yields and nitrogen leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olin, S.; Lindeskog, M.; Pugh, T. A. M.; Schurgers, G.; Wårlind, D.; Mishurov, M.; Zaehle, S.; Stocker, B. D.; Smith, B.; Arneth, A.

    2015-11-01

    Croplands are vital ecosystems for human well-being and provide important ecosystem services such as crop yields, retention of nitrogen and carbon storage. On large (regional to global)-scale levels, assessment of how these different services will vary in space and time, especially in response to cropland management, are scarce. We explore cropland management alternatives and the effect these can have on future C and N pools and fluxes using the land-use-enabled dynamic vegetation model LPJ-GUESS (Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator). Simulated crop production, cropland carbon storage, carbon sequestration and nitrogen leaching from croplands are evaluated and discussed. Compared to the version of LPJ-GUESS that does not include land-use dynamics, estimates of soil carbon stocks and nitrogen leaching from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems were improved. Our model experiments allow us to investigate trade-offs between these ecosystem services that can be provided from agricultural fields. These trade-offs are evaluated for current land use and climate and further explored for future conditions within the two future climate change scenarios, RCP (Representative Concentration Pathway) 2.6 and 8.5. Our results show that the potential for carbon sequestration due to typical cropland management practices such as no-till management and cover crops proposed in previous studies is not realised, globally or over larger climatic regions. Our results highlight important considerations to be made when modelling C-N interactions in agricultural ecosystems under future environmental change and the effects these have on terrestrial biogeochemical cycles.

  3. Disruption of Mouse Cytochrome P450 4f14 (Cyp4f14 Gene) Causes Severe Perturbations in Vitamin E Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Bardowell, Sabrina A.; Duan, Faping; Manor, Danny; Swanson, Joy E.; Parker, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin E is a family of naturally occurring and structurally related lipophilic antioxidants, one of which, α-tocopherol (α-TOH), selectively accumulates in vertebrate tissues. The ω-hydroxylase cytochrome P450–4F2 (CYP4F2) is the only human enzyme shown to metabolize vitamin E. Using cDNA cloning, cell culture expression, and activity assays, we identified Cyp4f14 as a functional murine ortholog of CYP4F2. We then investigated the effect of Cyp4f14 deletion on vitamin E metabolism and status in vivo. Cyp4f14-null mice exhibited substrate-specific reductions in liver microsomal vitamin E-ω-hydroxylase activity ranging from 93% (γ-TOH) to 48% (γ-tocotrienol). In vivo data obtained from metabolic cage studies showed whole-body reductions in metabolism of γ-TOH of 90% and of 68% for δ- and α-TOH. This metabolic deficit in Cyp4f14−/− mice was partially offset by increased fecal excretion of nonmetabolized tocopherols and of novel ω-1- and ω-2-hydroxytocopherols. 12′-OH-γ-TOH represented 41% of whole-body production of γ-TOH metabolites in Cyp4f14−/− mice fed a soybean oil diet. Despite these counterbalancing mechanisms, Cyp4f14-null mice fed this diet for 6 weeks hyper-accumulated γ-TOH (2-fold increase over wild-type littermates) in all tissues and appeared normal. We conclude that CYP4F14 is the major but not the only vitamin E-ω-hydroxylase in mice. Its disruption significantly impairs whole-body vitamin E metabolism and alters the widely conserved phenotype of preferential tissue deposition of α-TOH. This model animal and its derivatives will be valuable in determining the biological actions of specific tocopherols and tocotrienols in vivo. PMID:22665481

  4. Copper Causes Regiospecific Formation of C4F8-Containing Six-Membered Rings and their Defluorination/Aromatization to C4F4-Containing Rings in Triphenylene/1,4-C4F8I2 Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Rippy, Kerry C.; Bukovsky, Eric V.; Clikeman, Tyler T.

    The presence of Cu in reactions of triphenylene (TRPH) and 1,4-C4F8I2 at 360 °C led to regiospecific substitution of TRPH ortho C(β) atoms to form C4F8-containing rings, completely suppressing substitution on C(α) atoms. In addition, Cu caused selective reductive-defluorination/aromatization (RD/A) to form C4F4- containing aromatic rings. Without Cu, the reactions of TRPH and 1,4- C4F8I2 were not regiospecific and no RD/A was observed. These results, supported by DFT calculations, are the first examples of Cupromoted (i) regiospecific perfluoroannulation, (ii) preparative C–F activation, and (iii) RD/A. HPLC-purified products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, low-temperature PES, and 1H/19F NMR.

  5. E4F1 deficiency results in oxidative stress–mediated cell death of leukemic cells

    PubMed Central

    Hatchi, Elodie; Rodier, Genevieve; Lacroix, Matthieu; Caramel, Julie; Kirsh, Olivier; Jacquet, Chantal; Schrepfer, Emilie; Lagarrigue, Sylviane; Linares, Laetitia Karine; Lledo, Gwendaline; Tondeur, Sylvie; Dubus, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The multifunctional E4F1 protein was originally discovered as a target of the E1A viral oncoprotein. Growing evidence indicates that E4F1 is involved in key signaling pathways commonly deregulated during cell transformation. In this study, we investigate the influence of E4F1 on tumorigenesis. Wild-type mice injected with fetal liver cells from mice lacking CDKN2A, the gene encoding Ink4a/Arf, developed histiocytic sarcomas (HSs), a tumor originating from the monocytic/macrophagic lineage. Cre-mediated deletion of E4F1 resulted in the death of HS cells and tumor regression in vivo and extended the lifespan of recipient animals. In murine and human HS cell lines, E4F1 inactivation resulted in mitochondrial defects and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that triggered massive cell death. Notably, these defects of E4F1 depletion were observed in HS cells but not healthy primary macrophages. Short hairpin RNA–mediated depletion of E4F1 induced mitochondrial defects and ROS-mediated death in several human myeloid leukemia cell lines. E4F1 protein is overexpressed in a large subset of human acute myeloid leukemia samples. Together, these data reveal a role for E4F1 in the survival of myeloid leukemic cells and support the notion that targeting E4F1 activities might have therapeutic interest. PMID:21708927

  6. Full magnetization process of 3d-4f hard magnetic materials in ultrahigh magnetic fields (an example: RFe11Ti)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuz'min, M. D.; Zvezdin, A. K.

    1998-03-01

    The prospects of using the free-powder high-field magnetization method for a quantitative study of inter-sublattice exchange interaction in 3d-4f hard magnetic materials are analyzed. Such analysis is stimulated by the availability of pulsed magnetic fields ˜103 T generated by implosion. Particular attention is paid to effects due to magnetic anisotropy, essential for these materials. The 3d-4f ferrimagnets where both sublattices contribute positively to the easy-axis anisotropy are shown to be suitable objects of study by the free-powder method, because (i) anomalies in their low-temperature magnetizatization curves are sharp and (ii) anisotropic effects can be allowed for without quantitative knowledge of the anisotropy constants. Moreover, these "good" hard magnetic materials can be brought into metamagnetic regime by diluting the rare earth sublattice with nonmagnetic yttrium; then, regardless of the anisotropy constants, the magnetization curve at low temperatures has just one steplike anomaly, the threshold field being equal exactly to the molecular field acting on the rare earth.

  7. C20H4(C4F8)3: a fluorine-containing annulated corannulene that is a better electron acceptor than C60.

    PubMed

    Kuvychko, Igor V; Dubceac, Cristina; Deng, Shihu H M; Wang, Xue-Bin; Granovsky, Alexander A; Popov, Alexey A; Petrukhina, Marina A; Strauss, Steven H; Boltalina, Olga V

    2013-07-15

    At sixes and sevens: The reaction of corannulene with 35 equivalents of 1,4-C4F8I2 is an efficient and a relatively selective process that yields two main products in which six H atoms are substituted with three C4F8 moieties that form six- and seven-membered rings. Low-temperature photoelectron spectroscopy showed the electron affinity of the major isomer (shown) exceeds that of C60 (2.74±0.02 and 2.689±0.008 eV, respectively). Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Theoretical and experimental studies of the Nd3+ 4f3<-->4f25d transitions in monoclinic Nd:BaY2F8 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collombet, Annabelle; Guyot, Yannick; Joubert, Marie-France; Margerie, Jean; Moncorgé, Richard; Tkachuk, Alexandra

    2004-11-01

    Experimental spectroscopic results related to Nd3+-doped BaY2F8, are presented that include vacuum-ultraviolet ground-state absorption and excitation spectra as well as polarized emission and excited-state absorption spectra recorded in the near-ultraviolet spectral range at room and low temperatures. Calculations were performed to determine the positions of the 4f25d sublevels and the intensities and polarizations of the 4f3<-->4f25d optical transitions of the Nd3+ ions in the C2 symmetry sites of the biaxial host crystal. The simulated spectra agree well with the experimental spectra; in particular, the model that was used successfully reproduced the differences between the polarized spectra on one hand and between the spectra recorded at low and room temperatures on the other hand.

  9. Radial integrals 4f and nephelauxetic effect of Nd3+ in crystals.

    PubMed

    Petrov, D; Angelov, B

    2014-01-24

    The radial expectation values 4f,k=2, 4, 6, for oxygen- or halogen- coordinated Nd(3+) ions in 25 crystals have been obtained from experimental Slater parameter shifts ΔFk=Fk (free ion) - Fk (crystal) by means of the dielectric screening model. The 4f values found by this new approach are compatible with those computed by relativistic 4f wave functions. The nephelauxetic ratios βk in respect to the free ion Nd IV have been also determined and related to covalency and bonding parameters. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterization of the active site properties of CYP4F12.

    PubMed

    Eksterowicz, John; Rock, Dan A; Rock, Brooke M; Wienkers, Larry C; Foti, Robert S

    2014-10-01

    Cytochrome P450 4F12 is a drug-metabolizing enzyme that is primarily expressed in the liver, kidney, colon, small intestine, and heart. The properties of CYP4F12 that may impart an increased catalytic selectivity (decreased promiscuity) were explored through in vitro metabolite elucidation, kinetic isotope effect experiments, and computational modeling of the CYP4F12 active site. By using astemizole as a probe substrate for CYP4F12 and CYP3A4, it was observed that although CYP4F12 favored astemizole O-demethylation as the primary route of metabolism, CYP3A4 was capable of metabolizing astemizole at multiple sites on the molecule. Deuteration of astemizole at the site of O-demethylation resulted in an isotope effect of 7.1 as well as an 8.3-fold decrease in the rate of clearance for astemizole by CYP4F12. Conversely, although an isotope effect of 3.8 was observed for the formation of the O-desmethyl metabolite when deuterated astemizole was metabolized by CYP3A4, there was no decrease in the clearance of astemizole. Development of a homology model of CYP4F12 based on the crystal structure of cytochrome P450 BM3 predicted an active site volume for CYP4F12 that was approximately 76% of the active site volume of CYP3A4. As predicted, multiple favorable binding orientations were available for astemizole docked into the active site of CYP3A4, but only a single binding orientation with the site of O-demethylation oriented toward the heme was identified for CYP4F12. Overall, it appears that although CYP4F12 may be capable of binding similar ligands to other cytochrome P450 enzymes such as CYP3A4, the ability to achieve catalytically favorable orientations may be inherently more difficult because of the increased steric constraints of the CYP4F12 active site. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  11. Targeting the eIF4F translation initiation complex: a critical nexus for cancer development.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Jerry; Graff, Jeremy; Ruggero, Davide; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2015-01-15

    Elevated protein synthesis is an important feature of many cancer cells and often arises as a consequence of increased signaling flux channeled to eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F), the key regulator of the mRNA-ribosome recruitment phase of translation initiation. In many cellular and preclinical models of cancer, eIF4F deregulation results in changes in translational efficiency of specific mRNA classes. Importantly, many of these mRNAs code for proteins that potently regulate critical cellular processes, such as cell growth and proliferation, enhanced cell survival and cell migration that ultimately impinge on several hallmarks of cancer, including increased angiogenesis, deregulated growth control, enhanced cellular survival, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, invasion, and metastasis. By being positioned as the molecular nexus downstream of key oncogenic signaling pathways (e.g., Ras, PI3K/AKT/TOR, and MYC), eIF4F serves as a direct link between important steps in cancer development and translation initiation. Identification of mRNAs particularly responsive to elevated eIF4F activity that typifies tumorigenesis underscores the critical role of eIF4F in cancer and raises the exciting possibility of developing new-in-class small molecules targeting translation initiation as antineoplastic agents. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Pou4f2-GFP knock-in mouse line: A model for studying retinal ganglion cell development.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dongwang; Yang, Xiaoyan; Sheng, Donglai; Yu, Dongliang; Liang, Guoqing; Guo, Luming; Xu, Mei; Hu, Xu; He, Daqiang; Yang, Yang; Wang, Yuying

    2016-10-01

    Pou4f2 acts as a key node in the comprehensive and step-wise gene regulatory network (GRN) and regulates the development of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Accordingly, deletion of Pou4f2 results in RGC axon defects and apoptosis. To investigate the GRN involved in RGC regeneration, we generated a mouse line with a POU4F2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein expressed in RGCs. Co-localization of POU4F2 and GFP in the retina and brain of Pou4f2-GFP/+ heterozygote mice was confirmed using immunofluorescence analysis. Compared with those in wild-type mice, the expression patterns of POU4F2 and POU4F1 and the co-expression patterns of ISL1 and POU4F2 were unaffected in Pou4f2-GFP/GFP homozygote mice. Moreover, the quantification of RGCs showed no significant difference between Pou4f2-GFP/GFP homozygote and wild-type mice. These results demonstrated that the development of RGCs in Pou4f2-GFP/GFP homozygote mice was the same as in wild-type mice. Thus, the present Pou4f2-GFP knock-in mouse line is a useful tool for further studies on the differentiation and regeneration of RGCs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Does the 4f-shell contribute to bonding in tetravalent lanthanide halides?

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Wen-Xin; School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Ningxia University, 750015 Yinchuan; Xu, Wei

    2014-12-28

    Lanthanide tetrahalide molecules LnX{sub 4} (Ln = Ce, Pr, Tb; X = F, Cl, Br, I) have been investigated by density functional theory at the levels of the relativistic Zero Order Regular Approximation and the relativistic energy-consistent pseudopotentials, using frozen small- and medium-cores. The calculated bond lengths and vibrational frequencies are close to the experimental data. Our calculations indicate 4f shell contributions to bonding in LnX{sub 4}, in particular for the early lanthanides, which show significant overlap between the Ln 4f-shell and the halogen np-shells. The 4f shells contribute to Ln-X bonding in LnX{sub 4} about one third more thanmore » in LnX{sub 3}.« less

  14. The role of LANP and ataxin 1 in E4F-mediated transcriptional repression

    PubMed Central

    Cvetanovic, Marija; Rooney, Robert J; Garcia, Jesus J; Toporovskaya, Nataliya; Zoghbi, Huda Y; Opal, Puneet

    2007-01-01

    The leucine-rich acidic nuclear protein (LANP) belongs to the INHAT family of corepressors that inhibits histone acetyltransferases. The mechanism by which LANP restricts its repression to specific genes is unknown. Here, we report that LANP forms a complex with transcriptional repressor E4F and modulates its activity. As LANP interacts with ataxin 1—a protein mutated in the neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1)—we tested whether ataxin 1 can alter the E4F–LANP interaction. We show that ataxin 1 relieves the transcriptional repression induced by the LANP–E4F complex by competing with E4F for LANP. These results provide the first functional link, to our knowledge, between LANP and ataxin 1, and indicate a potential mechanism for the transcriptional aberrations observed in SCA1. PMID:17557114

  15. Substituting mouse transcription factor Pou4f2 with a sea urchin orthologue restores retinal ganglion cell development.

    PubMed

    Mao, Chai-An; Agca, Cavit; Mocko-Strand, Julie A; Wang, Jing; Ullrich-Lüter, Esther; Pan, Ping; Wang, Steven W; Arnone, Maria Ina; Frishman, Laura J; Klein, William H

    2016-03-16

    Pou domain transcription factor Pou4f2 is essential for the development of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the vertebrate retina. A distant orthologue of Pou4f2 exists in the genome of the sea urchin (class Echinoidea) Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (SpPou4f1/2), yet the photosensory structure of sea urchins is strikingly different from that of the mammalian retina. Sea urchins have no obvious eyes, but have photoreceptors clustered around their tube feet disc. The mechanisms that are associated with the development and function of photoreception in sea urchins are largely unexplored. As an initial approach to better understand the sea urchin photosensory structure and relate it to the mammalian retina, we asked whether SpPou4f1/2 could support RGC development in the absence of Pou4f2. To answer this question, we replaced genomic Pou4f2 with an SpPou4f1/2 cDNA. In Pou4f2-null mice, retinas expressing SpPou4f1/2 were outwardly identical to those of wild-type mice. SpPou4f1/2 retinas exhibited dark-adapted electroretinogram scotopic threshold responses, indicating functionally active RGCs. During retinal development, SpPou4f1/2 activated RGC-specific genes and in S. purpuratus, SpPou4f2 was expressed in photoreceptor cells of tube feet in a pattern distinct from Opsin4 and Pax6. Our results suggest that SpPou4f1/2 and Pou4f2 share conserved components of a gene network for photosensory development and they maintain their conserved intrinsic functions despite vast morphological differences in mouse and sea urchin photosensory structures. © 2016 The Authors.

  16. 48 CFR 47.303-4 - F.o.b. origin, freight prepaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false F.o.b. origin, freight... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.303-4 F.o.b. origin, freight prepaid. (a) Explanation of delivery term. F.o.b. origin, freight prepaid means— (1) Free of expense to...

  17. 48 CFR 47.305-4 - F.o.b. destination solicitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false F.o.b. destination... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.305-4 F.o.b. destination solicitations. (a) When preparing f.o.b destination solicitations, the contracting officer shall refer to 47.303...

  18. Bulk plasma fragmentation in a C4F8 inductively coupled plasma: A hybrid modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shu-Xia; Zhang, Yu-Ru; Gao, Fei; Wang, You-Nian; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2015-06-01

    A hybrid model is used to investigate the fragmentation of C4F8 inductive discharges. Indeed, the resulting reactive species are crucial for the optimization of the Si-based etching process, since they determine the mechanisms of fluorination, polymerization, and sputtering. In this paper, we present the dissociation degree, the density ratio of F vs. CxFy (i.e., fluorocarbon (fc) neutrals), the neutral vs. positive ion density ratio, details on the neutral and ion components, and fractions of various fc neutrals (or ions) in the total fc neutral (or ion) density in a C4F8 inductively coupled plasma source, as well as the effect of pressure and power on these results. To analyze the fragmentation behavior, the electron density and temperature and electron energy probability function (EEPF) are investigated. Moreover, the main electron-impact generation sources for all considered neutrals and ions are determined from the complicated C4F8 reaction set used in the model. The C4F8 plasma fragmentation is explained, taking into account many factors, such as the EEPF characteristics, the dominance of primary and secondary processes, and the thresholds of dissociation and ionization. The simulation results are compared with experiments from literature, and reasonable agreement is obtained. Some discrepancies are observed, which can probably be attributed to the simplified polymer surface kinetics assumed in the model.

  19. 28 CFR 55.8 - Relationship between section 4(f)(4) and section 203(c).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the 1975 Amendments to the Act. (c) Although the coverage formulas applicable to section 4(f)(4) and section 203(c) are different, a political subdivision may be included within both of the coverage formulas. Under these circumstances, a judgment terminating coverage of the jurisdiction under one provision would...

  20. 28 CFR 55.8 - Relationship between section 4(f)(4) and section 203(c).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the 1975 Amendments to the Act. (c) Although the coverage formulas applicable to section 4(f)(4) and section 203(c) are different, a political subdivision may be included within both of the coverage formulas. Under these circumstances, a judgment terminating coverage of the jurisdiction under one provision would...

  1. 48 CFR 47.303-4 - F.o.b. origin, freight prepaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false F.o.b. origin, freight... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.303-4 F.o.b. origin, freight prepaid. (a) Explanation of delivery term. F.o.b. origin, freight prepaid means— (1) Free of expense to...

  2. 48 CFR 47.303-4 - F.o.b. origin, freight prepaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false F.o.b. origin, freight... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.303-4 F.o.b. origin, freight prepaid. (a) Explanation of delivery term. F.o.b. origin, freight prepaid means— (1) Free of expense to...

  3. 48 CFR 47.303-4 - F.o.b. origin, freight prepaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false F.o.b. origin, freight... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.303-4 F.o.b. origin, freight prepaid. (a) Explanation of delivery term. F.o.b. origin, freight prepaid means— (1) Free of expense to...

  4. 48 CFR 47.303-4 - F.o.b. origin, freight prepaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false F.o.b. origin, freight... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.303-4 F.o.b. origin, freight prepaid. (a) Explanation of delivery term. F.o.b. origin, freight prepaid means— (1) Free of expense to...

  5. 48 CFR 47.305-4 - F.o.b. destination solicitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.305-4 F.o.b. destination solicitations. (a) When preparing f.o.b destination solicitations, the contracting officer shall refer to 47.303... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false F.o.b. destination...

  6. The laser-diode-excited 5 d-4 f luminescence of Ce3+ and Pr3+ ions embedded into a BaR2F8 matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkar', A. A.; Uvarova, T. V.; Kozlova, N. S.; Kuznetsov, S. Yu.; Uvarova, A. G.

    2013-06-01

    We show the possibility of obtaining UV luminescence from 5 d-4 f transitions of rare-earth ions in the BaY2F8: (Yb3+, Pr3+, Ce3+) crystal under upconversion excitation by standard laser diodes with lasing wavelengths of 960, 808, and 840 nm. Various upconversion mechanisms of pumping for populating the higher-lying energy levels of the active ions, as well as methods of adaptation of the active medium BaY2F8: (Yb3+, Pr3+, Ce3+) to these mechanisms, are considered.

  7. Transintestinal transport of the anti-inflammatory drug 4F and the modulation of transintestinal cholesterol efflux[S

    PubMed Central

    Meriwether, David; Sulaiman, Dawoud; Wagner, Alan; Grijalva, Victor; Kaji, Izumi; Williams, Kevin J.; Yu, Liqing; Fogelman, Spencer; Volpe, Carmen; Bensinger, Steven J.; Anantharamaiah, G. M.; Shechter, Ishaiahu; Fogelman, Alan M.; Reddy, Srinivasa T.

    2016-01-01

    The site and mechanism of action of the apoA-I mimetic peptide 4F are incompletely understood. Transintestinal cholesterol efflux (TICE) is a process involved in the clearance of excess cholesterol from the body. While TICE is responsible for at least 30% of the clearance of neutral sterols from the circulation into the intestinal lumen, few pharmacological agents have been identified that modulate this pathway. We show first that circulating 4F selectively targets the small intestine (SI) and that it is predominantly transported into the intestinal lumen. This transport of 4F into the SI lumen is transintestinal in nature, and it is modulated by TICE. We also show that circulating 4F increases reverse cholesterol transport from macrophages and cholesterol efflux from lipoproteins via the TICE pathway. We identify the cause of this modulation of TICE either as 4F being a cholesterol acceptor with respect to enterocytes, from which 4F enhances cholesterol efflux, or as 4F being an intestinal chaperone with respect to TICE. Our results assign a novel role for 4F as a modulator of the TICE pathway and suggest that the anti-inflammatory functions of 4F may be a partial consequence of the codependent intestinal transport of both 4F and cholesterol. PMID:27199144

  8. High-pressure synthesis and characterization of the first cerium fluoride borate CeB{sub 2}O{sub 4}F

    SciTech Connect

    Hinteregger, Ernst; Wurst, Klaus; Tribus, Martina

    2013-08-15

    CeB{sub 2}O{sub 4}F is the first cerium fluoride borate, which is exclusively built up of one-dimensional, infinite chains of condensed trigonal-planar [BO{sub 3}]{sup 3−} groups. This new cerium fluoride borate was synthesized under high-pressure/high-temperature conditions of 0.9 GPa and 1450 °C in a Walker-type multianvil apparatus. The compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pbca (No. 61) with eight formula units and the lattice parameters a=821.63(5), b=1257.50(9), c=726.71(6) pm, V=750.84(9) Å{sup 3}, R{sub 1}=0.0698, and wR{sub 2}=0.0682 (all data). The structure exhibits a 9+1 coordinated cerium ion, one three-fold coordinated fluoride ion and a one-dimensional chain of [BO{sub 3}]{sup 3−}more » groups. Furthermore, IR spectroscopy, Electron Micro Probe Analysis and temperature-dependent X-ray powder diffraction measurements were performed. - Graphical abstract: A new rare-earth fluoride borate CeB{sub 2}O{sub 4}F could be synthesized under high-pressure/high-temperature conditions of 0.9 °GPa and 1450 °Cin a Walker-type multianvil apparatus. The crystal structure represents a new structure type in the class of rare-earth fluoride borates. The structure exhibits a 9+1 coordinated cerium ion, one three-fold coordinated fluoride ion and a one-dimensional chain of [BO{sub 3}]{sup 3−} groups. A closer view on the ac-plane shows an interesting wave-like modulation of the borate chains. Highlights: • CeB{sub 2}O{sub 4}F is the first fluoride borate exclusively built up of one-dimensional, infinite chains of condensed trigonal-planar [BO{sub 3}]{sup 3−} groups. • CeB{sub 2}O{sub 4}F is the first cerium fluoride borate. • High-pressure conditions were necessary to synthesize CeB{sub 2}O{sub 4}F.« less

  9. Macrocyclic {3d-4f} SMMs as building blocks for 1D-polymers: selective bridging of 4f ions by use of an O-donor ligand.

    PubMed

    Dhers, Sébastien; Feltham, Humphrey L C; Rouzières, Mathieu; Clérac, Rodolphe; Brooker, Sally

    2016-11-15

    Crystallisation of the tetranuclear 3d-4f Single-Molecule Magnet (SMM) [CuTb III (L Et )(NO 3 ) 3 (MeOH)]·MeOH (1) with Na 2 [tpa] (tpa = terephthalate and H 6 L Et is the [3 + 3] imine macrocycle derived from 1,4-diformyl-2,3-dihydroxybenzene and 1,2-diaminoethane) gives a structurally characterised one-dimensional cationic polymer {[CuTb III (L Et )(tpa)(H 2 O) 3 ](NO 3 )·0.5H 2 O·0.25MeOH} n (2). A comparative study of the static and dynamic magnetic properties of 2 and its precursor, 1, is reported.

  10. Essential but partially redundant roles for POU4F1/Brn-3a and POU4F2/Brn-3b transcription factors in the developing heart

    PubMed Central

    Maskell, Lauren J; Qamar, Kashif; Babakr, Aram A; Hawkins, Thomas A; Heads, Richard J; Budhram-Mahadeo, Vishwanie S

    2017-01-01

    Congenital heart defects contribute to embryonic or neonatal lethality but due to the complexity of cardiac development, the molecular changes associated with such defects are not fully understood. Here, we report that transcription factors (TFs) Brn-3a (POU4F1) and Brn-3b (POU4F2) are important for normal cardiac development. Brn-3a directly represses Brn-3b promoter in cardiomyocytes and consequently Brn-3a knockout (KO) mutant hearts express increased Brn-3b mRNA during mid-gestation, which is linked to hyperplastic growth associated with elevated cyclin D1, a known Brn-3b target gene. However, during late gestation, Brn-3b can cooperate with p53 to enhance transcription of pro-apoptotic genes e.g. Bax, thereby increasing apoptosis and contribute to morphological defects such as non-compaction, ventricular wall/septal thinning and increased crypts/fissures, which may cause lethality of Brn-3a KO mutants soon after birth. Despite this, early embryonic lethality in e9.5 double KO (Brn-3a−/− : Brn-3b−/−) mutants indicate essential functions with partial redundancy during early embryogenesis. High conservation between mammals and zebrafish (ZF) Brn-3b (87%) or Brn-3a (76%) facilitated use of ZF embryos to study potential roles in developing heart. Double morphant embryos targeted with morpholino oligonucleotides to both TFs develop significant cardiac defects (looping abnormalities and valve defects) suggesting essential roles for Brn-3a and Brn-3b in developing hearts. PMID:28594399

  11. Visible light-induced magnetization change of the cyano-bridged 3 d-4 f heterobimetallic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guangming; Sato, Osamu; Akitsu, Takashiro; Einaga, Yasuaki

    2004-10-01

    A visible light-induced magnetization change of the 3d-4f heterometallic, [Nd(DMF)4(H2O)3(μ-NC)Co(CN)5]·H2O (DMF=N,N-dimethylformamide), is observed and described. The plots of χMT versus T of the complex showed that the χMT values, after visible light illumination, were enhanced by about 25% as compared to before irradiation in the temperature range of 5-40 K.

  12. Extended analysis of the 5g. -->. 4f emissions in H/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, E.S.; Pulchtopek, S.; Eyler, E.E.

    1984-01-15

    An analysis starting from Hund's case d has been used to extend the work of Herzberg and Jungen on the 5g..-->..4f emissions in H/sub 2/. A simple analytical expression for the line intensities is presented that agrees with their calculations is about 1%. All of the experimentally observed lines have been accounted for by including higher vibrational levels in our calculations.

  13. Comparative absorption spectroscopy involving 4f-4f transitions to explore the kinetics of simultaneous coordination of uracil with Nd(III) and Zn(II) and its associated thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victory Devi, Ch.; Rajmuhon Singh, N.

    2011-10-01

    The interaction of uracil with Nd(III) has been explored in presence and absence of Zn(II) using the comparative absorption spectroscopy involving the 4f-4f transitions in different solvents. The complexation of uracil with Nd(III) is indicated by the change in intensity of 4f-4f bands expressing in terms of significant change in oscillator strength and Judd-Ofelt parameters. Intensification of this bands became more prominent in presence of Zn(II) suggesting the stimulative effect of Zn(II) towards the complexation of Nd(III) with uracil. Other spectral parameters namely Slator-Condon ( Fk's), nephelauxetic effect ( β), bonding ( b1/2) and percent covalency ( δ) parameters are computed to correlate their simultaneous binding of metal ions with uracil. The sensitivities of the observed 4f-4f transitions towards the minor coordination changes around Nd(III) has been used to monitor the simultaneous coordination of uracil with Nd(III) and Zn(II). The variation of intensities (oscillator strengths and Judd-Ofelt parameters) of 4f-4f bands during the complexation has helped in following the heterobimetallic complexation of uracil. Rate of complexation with respect to hypersensitive transition was evaluated. Energy of activation and thermodynamic parameters for the complexation reaction were also determined.

  14. Red nucleus and rubrospinal tract disorganization in the absence of Pou4f1

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Lopez, Jesus E.; Moreno-Bravo, Juan A.; Madrigal, M. Pilar; Martinez, Salvador; Puelles, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The red nucleus (RN) is a neuronal population that plays an important role in forelimb motor control and locomotion. Histologically it is subdivided into two subpopulations, the parvocellular RN (pRN) located in the diencephalon and the magnocellular RN (mRN) in the mesencephalon. The RN integrates signals from motor cortex and cerebellum and projects to spinal cord interneurons and motor neurons through the rubrospinal tract (RST). Pou4f1 is a transcription factor highly expressed in this nucleus that has been related to its specification. Here we profoundly analyzed consequences of Pou4f1 loss-of-function in development, maturation and axonal projection of the RN. Surprisingly, RN neurons are specified and maintained in the mutant, no cell death was detected. Nevertheless, the nucleus appeared disorganized with a strong delay in radial migration and with a wider neuronal distribution; the neurons did not form a compacted population as they do in controls, Robo1 and Slit2 were miss-expressed. Cplx1 and Npas1, expressed in the RN, are transcription factors involved in neurotransmitter release, neuronal maturation and motor function processes among others. In our mutant mice, both transcription factors are lost, suggesting an abnormal maturation of the RN. The resulting altered nucleus occupied a wider territory. Finally, we examined RST development and found that the RN neurons were able to project to the spinal cord but their axons appeared defasciculated. These data suggest that Pou4f1 is necessary for the maturation of RN neurons but not for their specification and maintenance. PMID:25698939

  15. Flow Sorting and Sequencing Meadow Fescue Chromosome 4F1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Kopecký, David; Martis, Mihaela; Číhalíková, Jarmila; Hřibová, Eva; Vrána, Jan; Bartoš, Jan; Kopecká, Jitka; Cattonaro, Federica; Stočes, Štěpán; Novák, Petr; Neumann, Pavel; Macas, Jiří; Šimková, Hana; Studer, Bruno; Asp, Torben; Baird, James H.; Navrátil, Petr; Karafiátová, Miroslava; Kubaláková, Marie; Šafář, Jan; Mayer, Klaus; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of large genomes is hampered by a high proportion of repetitive DNA, which makes the assembly of short sequence reads difficult. This is also the case in meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis), which is known for good abiotic stress resistance and has been used in intergeneric hybridization with ryegrasses (Lolium spp.) to produce Festulolium cultivars. In this work, we describe a new approach to analyze the large genome of meadow fescue, which involves the reduction of sample complexity without compromising information content. This is achieved by dissecting the genome to smaller parts: individual chromosomes and groups of chromosomes. As the first step, we flow sorted chromosome 4F and sequenced it by Illumina with approximately 50× coverage. This provided, to our knowledge, the first insight into the composition of the fescue genome, enabled the construction of the virtual gene order of the chromosome, and facilitated detailed comparative analysis with the sequenced genomes of rice (Oryza sativa), Brachypodium distachyon, sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), and barley (Hordeum vulgare). Using GenomeZipper, we were able to confirm the collinearity of chromosome 4F with barley chromosome 4H and the long arm of chromosome 5H. Several new tandem repeats were identified and physically mapped using fluorescence in situ hybridization. They were found as robust cytogenetic markers for karyotyping of meadow fescue and ryegrass species and their hybrids. The ability to purify chromosome 4F opens the way for more efficient analysis of genomic loci on this chromosome underlying important traits, including freezing tolerance. Our results confirm that next-generation sequencing of flow-sorted chromosomes enables an overview of chromosome structure and evolution at a resolution never achieved before. PMID:24096412

  16. XeCl laser pumped iodine laser using t-C4F9I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, In Heon; Han, Kwang S.

    1989-01-01

    An iodine photodissociation laser using t-C4F9I as the active material was pumped by an XeCl laser. An iodine laser output energy of 3 mJ with pulse duration of 25 ns was obtained when the pumping pulse energy was 80 mJ, the iodide pressure was 70 torr, and the reflectance of the output mirror was 85 percent. The high pumping efficiency and low threshold pump power achieved in this experiment are attributable to the high absorption cross section at the pump laser wavelength (308 nm) of the iodide used.

  17. Electronic transport properties of 4f shell elements of liquid metal using hard sphere Yukawa system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, H. P.; Sonvane, Y. A.; Thakor, P. B.

    2018-04-01

    The electronic transport properties are analyzed for 4f shell elements of liquid metals. To examine the electronic transport properties like electrical resistivity (ρ), thermal conductivity (σ) and thermo electrical power (Q), we used our own parameter free model potential with the Hard Sphere Yukawa (HSY) reference system. The screening effect on aforesaid properties has been examined by using different screening functions like Hartree (H), Taylor (T) and Sarkar (S). The correlations of our resultsand other data with available experimental values are intensely promising. Also, we conclude that our newly constructed parameter free model potential is capable of explaining the above mentioned electronic transport properties.

  18. Lead-free/rare earth-free Green-light-emitting crystal based on organic-inorganic hybrid [(C10H16N)2][MnBr4] with high emissive quantum yields and large crystal size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xing-Wei; Zhao, Yu-Yuan; Li, Hong; Huang, Cui-Ping; Zhou, Zhen

    2018-06-01

    With the flourishing development of emitting materials, tremendous technological progress has been accomplished. However, they still face great challenges in convenient economical environmental-friendly large-scale commercial production. Herein we designed this organic-inorganic hybrid lead-free compound, an emerging class of high-efficiency emitting materials, [(C10H16N)2][MnBr4] (1), which emits intense greenish photoluminescence with a high emissive quantum yields of 72.26%, was prepared through the convenient economical solution method. What's more, compared with rare earth fluorescent materials (especially green-emitting Tb), Mn material is rich in natural resources and low commercial cost, which would possess an increasingly predominant advantage in the preparation of luminescent materials. Additionally, the exceptional thermal stability as well as the low-cost/convenient preparation process makes crystal 1 with the large size of more than 1 cm to be an ideal technologically important green-emitting material and it would open up a new route towards the commercialization process of lead-free/rare earth-free hybrid emitting materials in display and sensing.

  19. Sub-molecular modulation of a 4f driven Kondo resonance by surface-induced asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Ben; El Hallak, Fadi; Atodiresei, Nicolae; Seibt, Philipp; Prüser, Henning; Caciuc, Vasile; Waters, Michael; Fisher, Andrew J.; Blügel, Stefan; van Slageren, Joris; Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F.

    2016-09-01

    Coupling between a magnetic impurity and an external bath can give rise to many-body quantum phenomena, including Kondo and Hund's impurity states in metals, and Yu-Shiba-Rusinov states in superconductors. While advances have been made in probing the magnetic properties of d-shell impurities on surfaces, the confinement of f orbitals makes them difficult to access directly. Here we show that a 4f driven Kondo resonance can be modulated spatially by asymmetric coupling between a metallic surface and a molecule containing a 4f-like moment. Strong hybridization of dysprosium double-decker phthalocyanine with Cu(001) induces Kondo screening of the central magnetic moment. Misalignment between the symmetry axes of the molecule and the surface induces asymmetry in the molecule's electronic structure, spatially mediating electronic access to the magnetic moment through the Kondo resonance. This work demonstrates the important role that molecular ligands have in mediating electronic and magnetic coupling and in accessing many-body quantum states.

  20. Polymorphs of LiFeSO4F as cathode materials for lithium ion batteries - a first principle computational study.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sai Cheong; Barpanda, Prabeer; Nishimura, Shin-Ichi; Yamada, Yuki; Yamada, Atsuo

    2012-06-28

    We have investigated polymorphs of LiFeSO4F, tavorite and triplite, which have been reported as cathode materials for lithium ion batteries. The predicted voltages are 3.64 and 3.90 V for tavorite and triplite, respectively, which agreed excellently with experimental data. It is found that the lithiated states (LiFeSO4F) of the polymorphs are almost degenerate in energy. The difference in voltage is mainly due to the difference in the stabilities of the delithiated states (FeSO4F). This is rationalized by the Fe(3+)-Fe(3+) repulsion in the edge sharing geometry of the triplite structure.

  1. Evolution of the orbitals Dy-4f in the DyB2 compound using the LDA, PBE approximations, and the PBE0 hybrid functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasero Causil, Diego; Ortega López, César; Espitia Rico, Miguel

    2018-04-01

    Computational calculations of total energy based on density functional theory were used to investigate the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of the DyB2 compounds in the hexagonal structure. The calculations were carried out by means of the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method, employing the computational Wien2k package. The local density approximation (LDA) and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) were used for the electron-electron interactions. Additionally, we used the functional hybrid PBE0 for a better description the electronic and magnetic properties, because the DyB2 compound is a strongly-correlated system. We found that the calculated lattice constant agrees well with the values reported theoretically and experimentally. The density of states (DOS) calculation shows that the compound exhibits a metallic behavior and has magnetic properties, with a total magnetic moment of 5.47 μ0/cell determined mainly by the 4f states of the rare earth elements. The functional PBE0 shows a strong localization of the Dy-4f orbitals.

  2. Series of chiral interpenetrating 3d-4f heterometallic MOFs: Luminescent sensors and magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolei; Chen, Chen; Liu, Xiaoli; Gao, Peng; Hu, Ming

    2017-09-01

    Series of chiral 3d-4f heterometallic MOFs based on a multidentate terpyridyl carboxylic acid ligand have been synthesized under the solvothermal conditions, namely, [LnZnL(CO3)2(H2O)]n (Ln = Eu (1), Gd (2), Dy (3), Ho (4), Er (5), Tm (6), Yb (7), Lu (8)) (HL = 4‧-(4-carboxyphenyl)-2,2‧:6‧,2″-terpyridine). Compounds 1-8 were structurally characterized by the elemental analyses, infrared spectra, and single crystal X-ray diffractions. Compounds 1-8 exhibit the chiral interpenetrating 3D frameworks. Interestingly, 1 can serve as the luminescent sensor to detect nitrobenzene molecules with high sensitivity. The investigations on CD spectra of single crystals clearly assigned the Cotton effect, indicating that there exist two chiral enantiomers of 1-8 in the course of crystallization. The magnetic properties of 2 and 7 were exploited, respectively.

  3. Observation of orbital order in the half-filled 4 f Gd compound

    DOE PAGES

    Jang, H.; Kang, B. Y.; Cho, B. K.; ...

    2016-11-18

    Half-filled electron systems, even with the maximized spin angular moment, have been given little attention because of their zero-orbital angular moment according to Hund’s rule. Nevertheless, there are several measurements that show evidence of a nonzero orbital moment as well as spin-orbit coupling. Here we report for the first time the orbital order in a half-filled 4f-electron system GdB 4, using the resonant soft x-ray scattering at Gd M 4,5-edges. Furthermore, we discovered that the development of this orbital order is strongly coupled with the antiferromagnetic spin order. Lastly, these results clearly demonstrate that even in half-filled electron systems themore » orbital angular moment can be an important parameter to describe material properties, and may provide significant opportunities for tailoring new correlated electron systems.« less

  4. Observation of orbital order in the half-filled 4 f Gd compound

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, H.; Kang, B. Y.; Cho, B. K.

    Half-filled electron systems, even with the maximized spin angular moment, have been given little attention because of their zero-orbital angular moment according to Hund’s rule. Nevertheless, there are several measurements that show evidence of a nonzero orbital moment as well as spin-orbit coupling. Here we report for the first time the orbital order in a half-filled 4f-electron system GdB 4, using the resonant soft x-ray scattering at Gd M 4,5-edges. Furthermore, we discovered that the development of this orbital order is strongly coupled with the antiferromagnetic spin order. Lastly, these results clearly demonstrate that even in half-filled electron systems themore » orbital angular moment can be an important parameter to describe material properties, and may provide significant opportunities for tailoring new correlated electron systems.« less

  5. 4F2 monoclonal antibody recognizes a surface antigen on spread human fibroblasts of embryonic but not of adult origin

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The 4F2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) has been shown to recognize a 120- kilodalton glycoprotein expressed on the cell surface of human peripheral blood monocytes, activated (but not resting) T or B cells, and T and B lymphoblastoid cell lines. In this report we show that 4F2 mAb specifically binds to the surface of adherent human embryonic fibroblasts but fails to bind to normal adult fibroblasts. Moreover, 4F2 antigen was expressed on sarcoma-derived or SV40-transformed adult fibroblastic cells. Finally, addition of 4F2 mAb inhibited the growth of cultured HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cell line, but had no inhibitory effect on various embryonic and adult normal or transformed fibroblasts. PMID:6538202

  6. 3d-4f magnetic interaction with density functional theory plus u approach: local Coulomb correlation and exchange pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yachao; Yang, Yang; Jiang, Hong

    2013-12-12

    The 3d-4f exchange interaction plays an important role in many lanthanide based molecular magnetic materials such as single-molecule magnets and magnetic refrigerants. In this work, we study the 3d-4f magnetic exchange interactions in a series of Cu(II)-Gd(III) (3d(9)-4f(7)) dinuclear complexes based on the numerical atomic basis-norm-conserving pseudopotential method and density functional theory plus the Hubbard U correction approach (DFT+U). We obtain improved description of the 4f electrons by including the semicore 5s5p states in the valence part of the Gd-pseudopotential. The Hubbard U correction is employed to treat the strongly correlated Cu-3d and Gd-4f electrons, which significantly improve the agreement of the predicted exchange constants, J, with experiment, indicating the importance of accurate description of the local Coulomb correlation. The high efficiency of the DFT+U approach enables us to perform calculations with molecular crystals, which in general improve the agreement between theory and experiment, achieving a mean absolute error smaller than 2 cm(-1). In addition, through analyzing the physical effects of U, we identify two magnetic exchange pathways. One is ferromagnetic and involves an interaction between the Cu-3d, O-2p (bridge ligand), and the majority-spin Gd-5d orbitals. The other one is antiferromagnetic and involves Cu-3d, O-2p, and the empty minority-spin Gd-4f orbitals, which is suppressed by the planar Cu-O-O-Gd structure. This study demonstrates the accuracy of the DFT+U method for evaluating the 3d-4f exchange interactions, provides a better understanding of the exchange mechanism in the Cu(II)-Gd(III) complexes, and paves the way for exploiting the magnetic properties of the 3d-4f compounds containing lanthanides other than Gd.

  7. An Experimental and Theoretical Study of the Variation of 4f Hybridization Across the La1-xCexIn3 Series

    SciTech Connect

    Gout, Delphine J; Gourdon, Olivier; Bauer, E. D.

    2008-01-01

    Crystal structures of a series of La1−xCexIn3 (x = 0.02, 0.2, 0.5, or 0.8) intermetallic compounds have been investigated by both neutron and X-ray diffraction, and their physical properties have been characterized by magnetic susceptibility and specific heat measurements. Our results emphasize atypical atomic displacement parameters (ADP) for the In and the rare-earth sites. Depending on the x value, the In ADP presents either an ellipsoidal elongation (La-rich compounds) or a butterfly-like distortion (Ce-rich compounds). These deformations have been understood by theoretical techniques based on the band theory and are the result of hybridization between conduction electrons and 4f-electrons.

  8. Properties of C4F7N–CO2 thermal plasmas: thermodynamic properties, transport coefficients and emission coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yi; Wang, Chunlin; Sun, Hao; Murphy, Anthony B.; Rong, Mingzhe; Yang, Fei; Chen, Zhexin; Niu, Chunpin; Wang, Xiaohua

    2018-04-01

    The thermophysical properties, including composition, thermodynamic properties, transport coefficients and net emission coefficients, of thermal plasmas formed from pure iso-C4 perfluoronitrile C4F7N and C4F7N–CO2 mixtures are calculated for temperatures from 300 to 30 000 K and pressures from 0.1 to 20 atm. These gases have received much attention as alternatives to SF6 for use in circuit breakers, due to the low global warming potential and good dielectric properties of C4F7N. Since the parameters of the large molecules formed in the dissociation of C4F7N are unavailable, the partition function and enthalpy of formation were calculated using computational chemistry methods. From the equilibrium composition calculations, it was found that when C4F7N is mixed with CO2, CO2 can capture C atoms from C4F7N, producing CO, since the system consisting of small molecules such as CF4 and CO has lower energy at room temperature. This is in agreement with previous experimental results, which show that CO dominates the decomposition products of C4F7N–CO2 mixtures; it could limit the repeated breaking performance of C4F7N. From the point of view of chemical stability, the mixing ratio of CO2 should therefore be chosen carefully. Through comparison with common arc quenching gases (including SF6, CF3I and C5F10O), it is found that for the temperature range for which electrical conductivity remains low, pure C4F7N has similar ρC p (product of mass density and specific heat) properties to SF6, and higher radiative emission coefficient, properties that are correlated with good arc extinguishing capability. For C4F7N–CO2 mixtures, the electrical conductivity is very close to that of SF6 while the ρC p peak at 7000 K caused by decomposition of CO implies inferior interruption capability to that of SF6. The calculated properties will be useful in arc simulations.

  9. Comparative 4f-4f absorption spectral study for the interactions of Nd(III) with some amino acids: Preliminary thermodynamics and kinetic studies of interaction of Nd(III):glycine with Ca(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moaienla, T.; Bendangsenla, N.; David Singh, Th.; Sumitra, Ch.; Rajmuhon Singh, N.; Indira Devi, M.

    2012-02-01

    Spectral analysis of Nd(III) complexes with some amino acids viz.; glycine, L-alanine, L-phenylalanine and L-aspartic acid in the presence and absence of Ca 2+ was carried out in some organic solvents; CH 3OH, CH 3CN, DMF and dioxane using comparative absorption spectra of 4f-4f transitions. The study was carried out by evaluating various energy interaction parameters like Slator-Condon ( Fk), Lande factor ( ξ4f), nephelauxetic ratio ( β), bonding parameter ( b1/2), percent-covalency ( δ) by applying partial and multiple regression analysis. The values of oscillator strength ( Pobs) and Judd-Ofelt electric dipole intensity parameter Tλ ( λ = 2, 4, 6) for different 4f-4f transitions have been calculated. On analysis of the variation of the various energy interaction parameters as well as the changes in the oscillator strength ( Pobs) and Tλ values, reveal the mode of binding with the different ligands. Kinetic studies for the complexation of Nd(III):glycine:Ca(II) have also been discussed at different temperatures in DMF medium and from it the values of activation energy ( Ea) and thermodynamic parameters like Δ H°, Δ S° and Δ G° for the complexation are evaluated.

  10. Tunable, rare earth-doped solid state lasers

    DOEpatents

    Emmett, John L.; Jacobs, Ralph R.; Krupke, William F.; Weber, Marvin J.

    1980-01-01

    Laser apparatus comprising combinations of an excimer pump laser and a rare earth-doped solid matrix, utilizing the 5d-4f radiative transition in a rare earth ion to produce visible and ultra-violet laser radiation with high overall efficiency in selected cases and relatively long radiative lifetimes.

  11. Local Symmetry Effects in Actinide 4f X-ray Absorption in Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Butorin, Sergei M.; Modin, Anders; Vegelius, Johan R.

    2016-03-23

    A systematic X-ray absorption study at actinide N 6,7 (4f → 6d transitions) edges was performed for light-actinide oxides including data obtained for the first time for NpO 2, PuO 2, and UO 3. The measurements were supported by ab initio calculations based on local-density-approximation with added 5f-5f Coulomb interaction (LDA+U). Improved energy resolution compared to common experiments at actinide L 2,3 (2p → 6d transitions) edges allowed us to resolve the major structures of the unoccupied 6d density of states (DOS) and estimate the crystal-field splittings in the 6d shell directly from the spectra of light-actinide dioxides. The measurementsmore » demonstrated an enhanced sensitivity of the N 6,7 spectral shape to changes in the compound crystal structure. Finally, for nonstoichiometric NpO 2-x, the filling of the entire band gap with Np 6d states was observed thus supporting a phase coexistence of Np metal and stoichiometric NpO 2 which is in agreement with the tentative Np-O phase diagram.« less

  12. A Search for EUV Emission from the O4f Star Zeta Puppis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldron, Wayne L.; Vallerga, John

    1996-01-01

    We obtained a 140 ks EUVE observation of the O4f star, zeta Puppis. Because of its low ISM column density and highly ionized stellar wind, a unique EUV window is accessible for viewing between 128 to 140 A, suggesting that this star may he the only O star observable with the EUVE. Although no SW spectrometer wavelength bin had a signal to noise greater than 3, a bin at 136 A had a signal to noise of 2.4. This bin is where models predict the brightest line due to OV emission should occur. We present several EUV line emission models. These models were constrained by fitting the ROSAT PSPC X-ray data and our EUVE data. If the OV emission is real, the best fits to the data suggest that there are discrepancies in our current understanding of EUV/X-ray production mechanisms. In particular, the emission measure of the EUV source is found to be much greater than the total wind emission measure, suggesting that the EUV shock must produce a very large density enhancement. In addition, the location of the EUV and X-ray shocks are found to be separated by approx. 0.3 stellar radii, but the EUV emission region is found to be approx. 400 times larger than the X-ray emission region. We also discuss the implications of a null detection and present relevant upper limits.

  13. Pressure-enhanced superconductivity in Eu 3 Bi 2 S 4 F 4

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Yongkang; Zhai, Hui -Fei; Zhang, Pan; ...

    2014-12-17

    The pressure effect on the newly discovered charge-transferred BiS 2-based superconductor, Eu 3Bi 2S 4F 4, with a T c of 1.5 K at ambient pressure, is investigated by transport and magnetic measurements. Accompanied with the enhancement of metallicity under pressures, the onset superconducting transition temperature increases abruptly around 1.0 GPa, reaching ~10.0 K at 2.26 GPa. Alternating current magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate that a new superconducting phase with a higher T c emerges and dominates at high pressures. In the broad pressure window of 0.68GPa≤p≤2.00 GPa, the high-T c phase coexists with the low-T c phase. Hall effect measurementsmore » reveal a significant difference in electronic structures between the two superconducting phases. As a result, our work devotes the effort to establish the commonality of pressure effect on the BiS 2-based superconductors, and also uncovers the importance of electron carrier density in the high-T c phase.« less

  14. The Ba 4d-4f giant dipole resonance in complex Ba/Si compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sahle, Ch. J.; Sternemann, C.; Sternemann, H.

    2014-08-06

    The shape of the Ba 4d–4f giant dipole resonance is studied for Ba atoms embedded inside complex Si networks covering structures consisting of Si nanocages and nanotubes, i.e. the clathrate Ba 8Si 46, the complex compound BaSi 6, and the semiconducting BaSi 2. Here, non-resonant x-ray Raman scattering is used to investigate confinement effects on the shape of the giant resonance in the vicinity of the Ba NIV, V-edge. The distinct momentum transfer dependence of the spectra is analyzed and discussed. The measurements are compared to calculations of the giant resonance within time-dependent local density approximation in the dipole limit.more » No modulation of the giant resonance's shape for Ba atoms confined in different local environments was observed, in contrast to the calculations. The absence of such shape modulation for complex Ba/Si compounds is discussed providing important implications for further studies of giant resonance phenomena utilizing both theory and experiment.« less

  15. The Ba 4d-4f giant dipole resonance in complex Ba/Si compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahle, Ch J.; Sternemann, C.; Sternemann, H.; Tse, J. S.; Gordon, R. A.; Desgreniers, S.; Maekawa, S.; Yamanaka, S.; Lehmkühler, F.; Wieland, D. C. F.; Mende, K.; Huotari, S.; Tolan, M.

    2014-02-01

    The shape of the Ba 4d-4f giant dipole resonance is studied for Ba atoms embedded inside complex Si networks covering structures consisting of Si nanocages and nanotubes, i.e. the clathrate Ba8Si46, the complex compound BaSi6, and the semiconducting BaSi2. Here, non-resonant x-ray Raman scattering is used to investigate confinement effects on the shape of the giant resonance in the vicinity of the Ba NIV, V-edge. The distinct momentum transfer dependence of the spectra is analyzed and discussed. The measurements are compared to calculations of the giant resonance within time-dependent local density approximation in the dipole limit. No modulation of the giant resonance’s shape for Ba atoms confined in different local environments was observed, in contrast to the calculations. The absence of such shape modulation for complex Ba/Si compounds is discussed providing important implications for further studies of giant resonance phenomena utilizing both theory and experiment.

  16. Inhomogenous Broadening, Charge Compensation, and Luminescence Quenching in Ce 3+-Doped Sr 3AlO 4F Phosphors

    DOE PAGES

    Setlur, A. A.; Porob, D. G.; Happek, U.; ...

    2015-09-24

    The local coordination around luminescent ions in phosphors can affect the properties of these materials. Here, we analyze the Ce 3+ luminescence for the various Ce 3+ centers in Sr 3AlO 4F-based phosphors and use the excitation, emission, and quenching of these phosphors to infer aspects of the local coordination. It is shown that Ce 3+ centers with lower energy 4f 1→5d 1 absorption bands are likely from charge compensation effects by the replacement of F - by O 2-. In addition, at higher RE 3+ concentrations, additional Ce 3+ centers with even lower energy 4f 1→5d 1 absorption bandsmore » are present, presumably due to Ce 3+-RE 3+ pair formation and O 2- charge compensation. These Ce 3+ centers with lower energy 4f 1→5d 1 absorption bands have their luminescence strongly quenched at room temperature. The relationships between composition and Ce 3+ luminescence quenching for Sr 3AlO 4F-based phosphors are also discussed, giving evidence that Ce 3+(5d 1) ionization is the main cause for luminescence quenching in these materials.« less

  17. Identification of a Kinase in Wheat Germ that Phosphorylates the Large Subunit of Initiation Factor 4F 1

    PubMed Central

    Humphreys, Jean; Browning, Karen S.; Ravel, Joanne M.

    1988-01-01

    A kinase has been isolated from wheat (Triticum aestivum) germ that phosphorylates the 220 kilodaltons (kD) subunit of wheat germ initiation factor (eIF) 4F, the 80 kD subunit of eIF-4B (an isozyme form of eIF-4F) and eIF-4G (the functional equivalent to mammalian eIF-4B). The kinase elutes from Sephacryl S-200 slightly in front of ovalbumin. The kinase phosphorylates casein and histone IIA to a small extent, but does not phosphorylate phosvitin. Of the wheat germ initiation factors, elongation factors, and small and large ribosomal subunits, only eIF-4F, eIF-4B, and eIF-4G are phosphorylated to a significant extent. The kinase phosphorylates eIF-4F to the extent of two phosphates per mole of the 220 kD subunit and phosphorylates eIF-4B to the extent of one phosphate per mole of the 80 kD subunit. The 26 kD subunit of eIF-4F and the 28 kD subunit of eIF-4B are not phosphorylated by the kinase. The kinase phosphorylates the 59 kD component of eIF-4G to the extent of 0.25 phosphate per mole of eIF-4G. Phosphorylation of eIF-4F and eIF-4B does not affect their ability to support the binding of mRNA to small ribosomal subunits in vitro. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:16666331

  18. The structure of human 4F2hc ectodomain provides a model for homodimerization and electrostatic interaction with plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Fort, Joana; de la Ballina, Laura R; Burghardt, Hans E; Ferrer-Costa, Carles; Turnay, Javier; Ferrer-Orta, Cristina; Usón, Isabel; Zorzano, Antonio; Fernández-Recio, Juan; Orozco, Modesto; Lizarbe, María Antonia; Fita, Ignacio; Palacín, Manuel

    2007-10-26

    4F2hc (CD98hc) is a multifunctional type II membrane glycoprotein involved in amino acid transport and cell fusion, adhesion, and transformation. The structure of the ectodomain of human 4F2hc has been solved using monoclinic (Protein Data Bank code 2DH2) and orthorhombic (Protein Data Bank code 2DH3) crystal forms at 2.1 and 2.8 A, respectively. It is composed of a (betaalpha)(8) barrel and an antiparallel beta(8) sandwich related to bacterial alpha-glycosidases, although lacking key catalytic residues and consequently catalytic activity. 2DH3 is a dimer with Zn(2+) coordination at the interface. Human 4F2hc expressed in several cell types resulted in cell surface and Cys(109) disulfide bridge-linked homodimers with major architectural features of the crystal dimer, as demonstrated by cross-linking experiments. 4F2hc has no significant hydrophobic patches at the surface. Monomer and homodimer have a polarized charged surface. The N terminus of the solved structure, including the position of Cys(109) residue located four residues apart from the transmembrane domain, is adjacent to the positive face of the ectodomain. This location of the N terminus and the Cys(109)-intervening disulfide bridge imposes space restrictions sufficient to support a model for electrostatic interaction of the 4F2hc ectodomain with membrane phospholipids. These results provide the first crystal structure of heteromeric amino acid transporters and suggest a dynamic interaction of the 4F2hc ectodomain with the plasma membrane.

  19. Cyclo-octafluorobutane (PFC-318, c-C4F8) in the global atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhle, J.; Vollmer, M. K.; Ivy, D. J.; Fraser, P.; Arnold, T.; Harth, C. M.; Salameh, P.; O'Doherty, S.; Young, D.; Steele, P.; Krummel, P. B.; Leist, M.; Rhee, T. S.; Schmidbauer, N.; Lunder, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Reimann, S.; Simmonds, P.; Prinn, R. G.; Weiss, R. F.

    2011-12-01

    The perfluorocarbon (PFC) cyclo-octafluorobutane (PFC-318, c-C4F8) is a very long-lived (up to 3,200 years) and potent greenhouse gas (100-year global warming potential up to 10,300) with a wide range of industrial uses. We present an update of our PFC-318 archived air and in situ measurements from remote and urban AGAGE (Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment) sites and affiliated stations in both hemispheres. Most importantly, we have significantly improved our Southern Hemisphere (SH) data density by measuring the Cape Grim Air Archive (1970s-2010). Combined with our previously presented measurements of archived Northern Hemisphere (NH) flasks (1973-2009), we provide thirty year spanning records for both hemispheres. We have also further extended our in situ records by continuing our measurements at all remote stations, with the longest hemispheric records starting in November 2007 at Jungfraujoch (NH) and in June 2010 at Cape Grim (SH). We compare our data with those of Oram (1999) and Oram et al. (2011), who focus on SH data alone, and with other previous data sets. From our measurements, we derive emission estimates using a chemical transport model and inverse method, and compare our results to previous measurement based emission estimates (top-down) and to the EDGAR emission database (bottom-up). As stated previously (Mühle et al., 2010), we find emissions of ~1 Gg/yr in recent years while EDGAR estimates only 0.02 Gg/yr for 2005, similar to what Oram et al. (2011) find. We conclude that PFC-318 is the third most important PFC in terms of abundance and CO2-equivalent emissions. We continue to observe mostly baseline concentrations at remote AGAGE stations and urban sites in the USA, Europe, and Australia, in contrast to frequent pollution episodes measured at sites in East Asia, indicating significant regional emissions in East Asia, as found by Saito et al. (2010). EDGAR, Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research, release version 4.1. http

  20. Electron impact elastic and excitation cross-sections of the isomers of C4F6 molecule for plasma modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Dhanoj; Song, Mi-Young; Baluja, K. L.; Choi, Heechol; Yoon, Jung-Sik

    2018-06-01

    We report the calculations of elastic (along with its symmetry components) and electronic excitation cross sections by electron impact of the three isomers of C4F6, namely, hexafluoro-1,3-butadiene (1,3-C4F6), hexafluoro-2-butyne (2-C4F6), and hexafluorocyclobutene (c-C4F6) belonging to the point groups C2, D3d, and C2v, respectively, using the R-matrix approach. The electron energy range is from 0.01 eV to 12 eV. We have employed the cc-pVTZ basis set for C and F atoms to generate self-consistent field molecular orbitals to construct the target states for all the isomers included in our calculations. All the target states are constructed by including correlation effects in a configuration interaction (CI) approach. The target properties such as vertical excitation energies and dipole moment of all the isomers are in reasonable agreement with the literature values. Differences in the cross sections of these isomers are strongly influenced by the effect of correlation and polarization effects and their geometrical extent. We have included the ground state and many excited states of each isomer in the trial wave function of the entire scattering system. The resulting elastic cross sections are compared with the available experimental results. The agreement is reasonably good for energies above 5 eV. The shape resonances detected at 2.57, 2.95, and 3.20 eV for c-C4F6, 1,3-C4F6, and 2-C4F6 isomers are associated with the negative anion formation of C3F3- as observed in the mass spectrometry experiments. We have also performed 1-state CI calculation for all the isomers that include only the correlated ground state. The position of resonances shifts to lower energies as the number of target states is increased compared to 1-state calculation for all the isomers. The elastic cross section for 2-C4F6 isomer is larger than the other isomers because of its larger spatial extent. The present cross section data are important for plasma simulation and modeling, especially

  1. High Temperature Chemistry of Rare Earth Compounds: Dramatic Examples of Periodicity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cater, E. David

    1978-01-01

    Reports that energy required to promote a 4f electron to the 5d level has a profound and predictable influence on the systematics of reactions involving conversion of rare earth atoms from combined to free states. (Author/MA)

  2. Parametrization of free ion levels of four isoelectronic 4f2 systems: Insights into configuration interaction parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, Yau Yuen; Tanner, Peter A.

    2013-12-01

    The experimental free ion 4f2 energy level data sets comprising 12 or 13 J-multiplets of La+, Ce2+, Pr3+ and Nd4+ have been fitted by a semiempirical atomic Hamiltonian comprising 8, 10, or 12 freely-varying parameters. The root mean square errors were 16.1, 1.3, 0.3 and 0.3 cm-1, respectively for fits with 10 parameters. The fitted inter-electronic repulsion and magnetic parameters vary linearly with ionic charge, i, but better linear fits are obtained with (4-i)2, although the reason is unclear at present. The two-body configuration interaction parameters α and β exhibit a linear relation with [ΔE(bc)]-1, where ΔE(bc) is the energy difference between the 4f2 barycentre and that of the interacting configuration, namely 4f6p for La+, Ce2+, and Pr3+, and 5p54f3 for Nd4+. The linear fit provides the rationale for the negative value of α for the case of La+, where the interacting configuration is located below 4f2.

  3. mTORC1 and CK2 coordinate ternary and eIF4F complex assembly

    PubMed Central

    Gandin, Valentina; Masvidal, Laia; Cargnello, Marie; Gyenis, Laszlo; McLaughlan, Shannon; Cai, Yutian; Tenkerian, Clara; Morita, Masahiro; Balanathan, Preetika; Jean-Jean, Olivier; Stambolic, Vuk; Trost, Matthias; Furic, Luc; Larose, Louise; Koromilas, Antonis E.; Asano, Katsura; Litchfield, David; Larsson, Ola; Topisirovic, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Ternary complex (TC) and eIF4F complex assembly are the two major rate-limiting steps in translation initiation regulated by eIF2α phosphorylation and the mTOR/4E-BP pathway, respectively. How TC and eIF4F assembly are coordinated, however, remains largely unknown. We show that mTOR suppresses translation of mRNAs activated under short-term stress wherein TC recycling is attenuated by eIF2α phosphorylation. During acute nutrient or growth factor stimulation, mTORC1 induces eIF2β phosphorylation and recruitment of NCK1 to eIF2, decreases eIF2α phosphorylation and bolsters TC recycling. Accordingly, eIF2β mediates the effect of mTORC1 on protein synthesis and proliferation. In addition, we demonstrate a formerly undocumented role for CK2 in regulation of translation initiation, whereby CK2 stimulates phosphorylation of eIF2β and simultaneously bolsters eIF4F complex assembly via the mTORC1/4E-BP pathway. These findings imply a previously unrecognized mode of translation regulation, whereby mTORC1 and CK2 coordinate TC and eIF4F complex assembly to stimulate cell proliferation. PMID:27040916

  4. Attacking a Nexus of the Oncogenic Circuitry by Reversing Aberrant eIF4F-Mediated Translation

    PubMed Central

    Bitterman, Peter B.; Polunovsky, Vitaly A.

    2012-01-01

    Notwithstanding their genetic complexity, different cancers share a core group of perturbed pathways converging upon a few regulatory nodes that link the intracellular signaling network with the basic metabolic machinery. The clear implication of this view for cancer therapy is that instead of targeting individual genetic alterations one-by-one, the next generation of cancer therapeutics will target critical hubs in the cancer network. One such hub is the translation initiation complex eIF4F, which integrates several cancer-related pathways into a self-amplifying signaling system. When hyperactivated by apical oncogenic signals, the eIF4F-driven translational apparatus selectively switches the translational repertoire of a cell towards malignancy. This central integrative role of pathologically activated eIF4F has motivated the development of small molecule inhibitors to correct its function. A genome-wide, systems-level means to objectively evaluate the pharmacological response to therapeutics targeting eIF4F remains an unmet challenge. PMID:22572598

  5. Safety of 4-factor prothrombin complex concentrate (4F-PCC) for emergent reversal of factor Xa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jing; Bukanova, Elena N; Akhtar, Shamsuddin

    2018-01-01

    Although factor Xa inhibitors have become a popular choice for chronic oral anticoagulation, effective drug reversal remains difficult due to a lack of specific antidote. Currently, 4-factor prothrombin complex concentrate (4F-PCC) is considered the treatment of choice for factor Xa inhibitor-related major bleeding. However, safety of 4F-PCC and its risk of thrombosis when used for this off-label purpose remain unclear. The purpose of this retrospective study is to determine the rate of thromboembolism when 4F-PCC is used for the emergent reversal of factor Xa inhibitors. We conducted a single-center retrospective review of medical records between 2013 and 2017. Patients were included if they received 4F-PCC to reverse rivaroxaban, apixaban, or edoxaban for emergent invasive procedures or during episodes of major bleeding defined as bleeding with hemodynamic instability, fall in hemoglobin of 2 g/dL, or bleeding requiring blood transfusion. Thrombotic events including myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, deep vein thrombosis, cerebral vascular accident, and arterial thrombosis of the limb or mesentery were recorded if they occurred within 14 days of 4F-PCC administration. Data was analyzed using point and interval estimation to approximate the rate and confidence interval of thromboembolic events. Forty-three patients were identified in our review. Doses of 4F-PCC were determined by the treating physician and mainly ranged from 25 to 50 IU/kg. Twenty-two patients (51.2%) received both sequential compression devices (SCDs) and subcutaneous heparin for DVT prophylaxis. Twenty-one patients (48.8%) were placed on SCDs only. Three patients received concomitant FFP. Thrombotic events within 14 days of 4F-PCC administration occurred in 1 out of 43 patients (2.1%, 95% CI [0.1-12.3]). This thrombotic event was an upper extremity DVT which occurred 1 day after the patient received 1325 IU (25 IU/kg) of 4F-PCC to reverse rivaroxaban for traumatic intracranial

  6. RNA editing and regulation of Drosophila 4f-rnp expression by sas-10 antisense readthrough mRNA transcripts

    PubMed Central

    PETERS, NICK T.; ROHRBACH, JUSTIN A.; ZALEWSKI, BRIAN A.; BYRKETT, COLLEEN M.; VAUGHN, JACK C.

    2003-01-01

    We have previously described an example of extensively A-to-G edited cDNA derived from adult heads of the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. In that study, the source of the predicted antisense RNA pairing strand for template recognition by dADAR editase was not identified, and the biological significance of the observed hyperediting was not known. Here, we address each of these questions. 4f-rnp and sas-10 are closely adjacent X-linked genes located on opposite DNA strands that produce convergent transcripts. We show that developmentally regulated antisense sas-10 readthrough mRNA arises by activation of an upstream promoter P2 during the late embryo stage of fly development. The sas-10 readthrough transcripts pair with 4f-rnp mRNA to form double-stranded molecules, as indicated by A-to-G editing observed in both RNA strands. It would be predicted that perfect RNA duplexes would be targeted for modification/degradation by enzyme pathways that recognize double-stranded RNAs, leading to decline in 4f-rnp mRNA levels, and this is what we observe. The observation using quantitative RT-PCR that sas-10 readthrough and 4f-rnp transcript levels are inversely related suggests a role for the antisense RNA in posttranscriptional regulation of 4f-rnp gene expression during development. Potential molecular mechanisms that could lead to this result are discussed, one of which is targeted transcript degradation via the RNAi pathway. Insofar as the dADAR editase and RNAi pathways are known to be constitutive in this system, it is likely that control of antisense RNA transcription is the rate-limiting factor. The results provide insight into roles of naturally occurring antisense RNAs in regulation of eukaryotic gene expression. PMID:12756328

  7. Synthesis and structural characterization of the hexagonal anti-perovskite Na{sub 2}CaVO{sub 4}F

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Robert L., E-mail: rgreen@flpoly.org; Avdeev, Maxim; School of Chemistry, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006

    The structural details of the ordered hexagonal oxyfluoride Na{sub 2}CaVO{sub 4}F prepared by solid-state synthesis using stoichiometric amounts of V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, CaCO{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and NaF were characterized using high-resolution neutron powder diffraction. The structural changes between 25 °C and 750 °C revealed that the two structural subunits in this material behave different when heated: there is an expansion of the face-shared FNa{sub 4}Ca{sub 2} octahedra while the VO{sub 4} tetrahedra due to increased thermal disorder reveal marginal bond contractions. Bond valences and the global instability index point to significant structural disorder at 750 °C. - Graphicalmore » abstract: The structure of the novel oxyfluoride Na{sub 2}CaVO{sub 4}F is studied at room temperature and high-temperatures. The structure can be viewed as layers of compression and elongation of polyhedral subunits, which change as a function of temperature. - Highlights: • The novel oxyfluoride, Na{sub 2}CaVO{sub 4}F, is synthesized via solid-state method. • High-resolution neutron diffraction data is used to analyze the structure of Na{sub 2}CaVO{sub 4}F. • Structural subunits exhibit expansion and contraction with increasing temperature. • Higher temperatures increase instability within the structure of Na{sub 2}CaVO{sub 4}F.« less

  8. Synthesis and characterization of magnetic solids featuring 3d-4f heterometallic oxides comprised of spin chains and 3d-6p noncentrosymmetric oxides templated by acentric salt units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Jennings Palmer

    The studies and syntheses presented in this dissertation were primarily aimed at exploring new magnetic solids comprised of special framework oxides with novel magnetic properties. Low-dimensional magnetic behavior has been of great interest, especially pertaining to molecular solids having single magnetic domains where slow relaxation and quantum properties of magnetization are evident. In attempts to mimic molecular magnets and achieve reduced dimensionality of, in this case 3d-4f magnetic sublattices, diamagnetic oxyanions, XOmn-, and A-site cations (A = alkali and alkaline-earth metals) were used as nonmagnetic spacers in hopes of disrupting or confining magnetic interactions in certain dimensions. The general system type explored throughout these studies was of the form: A-R-M-X-O, where A = alkali and alkaline-earth metals, R = Bi3+ or lanthanide metals (4f), M = first row transition metals (3d), and X = P, As, or Ge. The scope of this research consisted of, first, finding new low-dimensional magnetic systems of the A-R-M-X-O type through exploratory molten-salt synthetic approaches, and upon characterizing these new systems, attempts were made to chemically modify these materials in order to understand and gain insight into how the structures of these materials dictate properties through structure and property correlations. Due to the refractory nature and low solubility of the covalent metal oxides, namely the lanthanide and transition metal oxides, excess amounts of eutectic halide flux mixtures (alkali and alkaline-earth halides) were employed to assist the reaction and promote crystal growth. One can think of these halide fluxes as a high-temperature solvent, in the molten state, that helps speed up the otherwise slow diffusion processes typically associated with traditional solid state synthetic approaches via unconventional dissolution (decomposition) and reprecipitation processes. Also advantageous in using alkali and alkaline-earth metal halides as

  9. The roles of 4f- and 5f-orbitals in bonding: A magnetochemical, crystal field, density functional theory, and multi-reference wavefunction study

    DOE PAGES

    Lukens, Wayne W.; Speldrich, Manfred; Yang, Ping; ...

    2016-05-31

    The electronic structures of 4f 3/5f 3 Cp" 3M and Cp" 3M·alkylisocyanide complexes, where Cp" is 1,3-bis-(trimethylsilyl)cyclopentadienyl, are explored with a focus on the splitting of the f-orbitals, which provides information about the strengths of the metal–ligand interactions. While the f-orbital splitting in many lanthanide complexes has been reported in detail, experimental determination of the f-orbital splitting in actinide complexes remains rare in systems other than halide and oxide compounds, since the experimental approach, crystal field analysis, is generally significantly more difficult for actinide complexes than for lanthanide complexes. In this study, a set of analogous neodymium(III) and uranium(III) tris-cyclopentadienylmore » complexes and their isocyanide adducts was characterized by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility. The crystal field model was parameterized by combined fitting of EPR and susceptibility data, yielding an accurate description of f-orbital splitting. The isocyanide derivatives were also studied using density functional theory, resulting in f-orbital splitting that is consistent with crystal field fitting, and by multi-reference wavefunction calculations that support the electronic structure analysis derived from the crystal-field calculations. The results highlight that the 5f-orbitals, but not the 4f-orbitals, are significantly involved in bonding to the isocyanide ligands. The main interaction between isocyanide ligand and the metal center is a σ-bond, with additional 5f to π* donation for the uranium complexes. As a result, while interaction with the isocyanide π*-orbitals lowers the energies of the 5f xz2 and 5f yz2-orbitals, spin–orbit coupling greatly reduces the population of 5f xz2 and 5f yz2 in the ground state.« less

  10. CLEC4F Is an Inducible C-Type Lectin in F4/80-Positive Cells and Is Involved in Alpha-Galactosylceramide Presentation in Liver

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chih-Ya; Chen, Jiun-Bo; Tsai, Ting-Fen; Tsai, Yi-Chen; Tsai, Ching-Yen; Liang, Pi-Hui; Hsu, Tsui-Ling; Wu, Chung-Yi; Netea, Mihai G.; Wong, Chi-Huey; Hsieh, Shie-Liang

    2013-01-01

    CLEC4F, a member of C-type lectin, was first purified from rat liver extract with high binding affinity to fucose, galactose (Gal), N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), and un-sialylated glucosphingolipids with GalNAc or Gal terminus. However, the biological functions of CLEC4F have not been elucidated. To address this question, we examined the expression and distribution of murine CLEC4F, determined its binding specificity by glycan array, and investigated its function using CLEC4F knockout (Clec4f−/−) mice. We found that CLEC4F is a heavily glycosylated membrane protein co-expressed with F4/80 on Kupffer cells. In contrast to F4/80, CLEC4F is detectable in fetal livers at embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5) but not in yolk sac, suggesting the expression of CLEC4F is induced as cells migrate from yolk cells to the liver. Even though CLEC4F is not detectable in tissues outside liver, both residential Kupffer cells and infiltrating mononuclear cells surrounding liver abscesses are CLEC4F-positive upon Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) infection. While CLEC4F has strong binding to Gal and GalNAc, terminal fucosylation inhibits CLEC4F recognition to several glycans such as Fucosyl GM1, Globo H, Bb3∼4 and other fucosyl-glycans. Moreover, CLEC4F interacts with alpha-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) in a calcium-dependent manner and participates in the presentation of α-GalCer to natural killer T (NKT) cells. This suggests that CLEC4F is a C-type lectin with diverse binding specificity expressed on residential Kupffer cells and infiltrating monocytes in the liver, and may play an important role to modulate glycolipids presentation on Kupffer cells. PMID:23762286

  11. Disordered Nd:LuYSiO5 crystal lasers operating on the 4F3/2 → 4I11/2 and 4F3/2 → 4I13/2 transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Zhiyong; Huang, Xiaoxu; Xu, Bin; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping; Xu, Xiaodong; Xu, Jun

    2017-11-01

    We report on diode-pumped disordered Nd:LuYSiO5 (Nd:LYSO) crystal lasers operating on the 4F3/2 → 4I11/2 and 4F3/2 → 4I 13/2 transitions. Simultaneous laser operation at 1074 and 1078 nm is achieved with maximum output power of 4.46 W and slope efficiency of 39.6%. Single wavelength laser at 1358 nm with maximum output power of 1.15 W and slope efficiency of 11.8% is also obtained. Moreover, four single-wavelength lasers at 1058, 1107, 1330 and 1386 nm with relatively low gains are achieved with maximum output powers of 2.72, 1.22, 0.52 and 0.42 W, respectively, for the first time to our knowledge. Lasing at non-traditional emission lines was obtained by using output couplers with dielectric coatings for specific wavelength ranges.

  12. Comparison of energy interaction parameters for the complexation of Pr(III) with glutathione reduced (GSH) in absence and presence of Zn(II) in aqueous and aquated organic solvents using 4f?4f transition spectra as PROBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Th. David; Sumitra, Ch.; Yaiphaba, N.; Devi, H. Debecca; Devi, M. Indira; Singh, N. Rajmuhon

    2005-04-01

    The coordination chemistry of glutathione reduced (GSH) is of great importance as it acts as excellent model system for the binding of metal ions. The GSH complexation with metal ions is involved in the toxicology of different metal ions. Its coordination behaviour for soft metal ions and hard metal ions is found different because of the structure of GSH and its different potential binding sites. In our work we have studied two chemically dissimilar metal ions viz. Pr(III), which prefer hard donor site like carboxylic groups and Zn(II) the soft metal ion which prefer peptide-NH and sulphydryl groups. The absorption difference and comparative absorption spectroscopy involving 4f-4f transitions of the heterobimetallic Complexation of GSH with Pr(III) and Zn(II) has been explored in aqueous and aquated organic solvents. The variation in the energy parameters like Slater-Condon ( F K), Racah ( E K) and Lande ( ξ4f), Nephelauxetic parameter ( β) and bonding parameter ( b1/2) are computed to explain the nature of complexation.

  13. Absorption spectral analysis of 4f-4f transitions for the complexation of Pr(III) and Nd(III) with thiosemicarbazide in absence and presence of Zn(II) in aqueous and organic solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anita, K.; Rajmuhon Singh, N.

    2011-10-01

    The complexation of thiosemicarbazide with Pr(III) and Nd(III) in absence and presence of Zn(II), a soft metal ion in aqueous and organic solvents like CH 3OH,CH 3CN, dioxane (C 4H 8O 2) and DMF (C 3H 7NO) and their equimolar mixtures are discussed by employing absorption difference and comparative absorption spectrophotometry. Complexation of thiosemicarbazide with Pr(III) and Nd(III) is indicated by the changes in the absorption intensity following the subsequent changes in the oscillator strength of different 4f-4f bands and Judd-Ofelt intensity ( Tλ) parameters. The other spectral parameters like energy interaction parameters namely Slater-Condon ( Fk), Racah ( Ek), Lande ( ξ4f), Nephelauxetic ratio ( β) and bonding parameters ( b1/2) are further computed to explain the nature of complexation. The difference in the energy parameters with respect to donor atoms and solvents reveal that the chemical environment around the lanthanide ions has great impact on f-f transition and any change in the environment result in modification of the spectra. Various solvents and their equimolar mixtures are also used to discuss the participation of solvents in the complexation.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance of Al-27 in topaz, Al2SiO4/F, OH/2.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Ghose, S.

    1972-01-01

    The Al-27 nuclear quadrupolar coupling constant and asymmetry parameter (eta) in topaz have been determined to be 1.67 (plus or minus 0.03) MHz and 0.38 plus or minus 0.05, respectively. These values and the orientations of the principal axes are consistent with the Fe(3+) paramagnetic resonance data and with the symmetry of the AlO4F2 octahedron.

  15. Single-ion 4f element magnetism: an ab-initio look at Ln(COT)2(-).

    PubMed

    Gendron, Frédéric; Pritchard, Benjamin; Bolvin, Hélène; Autschbach, Jochen

    2015-12-14

    The electron densities associated with the Ln 4f shell, and spin and orbital magnetizations ('magnetic moment densities'), are investigated for the Ln(COT)2(-) series. The densities are obtained from ab-initio calculations including spin-orbit coupling. For Ln = Ce, Pr the magnetizations are also derived from crystal field models and shown to agree with the ab-initio results. Analysis of magnetizations from ab-initio calculations may be useful in assisting research on single molecule magnets.

  16. Enhanced supercapacitive behaviour of Fe3O4/fMWCNT nanoassemblies synthesized by PEG-600 assisted solvothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparna, M. L.; Sathyanarayanan, P.; Sahu, Niroj Kumar

    2018-04-01

    We report a simple PEG-600 assisted solvothermal method for the synthesis iron ferrite with functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube (Fe3O4/fMWCNT) composite nanoassemblies. The results show that the composite deliver excellent electrochemical activity because of the synergistic effect of each component. The fMWCNT act as a conductive network with high surface area promoting fast movement of electrons which enhances the charge storing nature and stability of Fe3O4 nanoassemblies.

  17. High-resolution electron spectroscopy of lanthanide (Ce, Pr, and Nd) complexes of cyclooctatetraene: the role of 4f electrons.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Sudesh; Roudjane, Mourad; Hewage, Dilrukshi; Liu, Yang; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2013-04-28

    Cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium complexes of 1,3,5,7-cyclooctatetraene (COT) complexes were produced in a laser-vaporization metal cluster source and studied by pulsed-field ionization zero electron kinetic energy spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. The computations included the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, the coupled cluster method with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations, and the state-average complete active space self-consistent field method. The spectrum of each complex exhibits multiple band systems and is assigned to ionization of several low-energy electronic states of the neutral complex. This observation is different from previous studies of M(COT) (M = Sc, Y, La, and Gd), for which a single band system was observed. The presence of the multiple low-energy electronic states is caused by the splitting of the partially filled lanthanide 4f orbitals in the ligand field, and the number of the low-energy states increases rapidly with increasing number of the metal 4f electrons. On the other hand, the 4f electrons have a small effect on the geometries and vibrational frequencies of these lanthanide complexes.

  18. Absorption spectra of 4f electron transitions of neodymium and erbium with 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulphonic acid and diethylamine systems and its analytical application

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Naixing; Qi Ping

    1992-06-01

    In this paper the absorption spectra of 4f electron transitions of the systems of neodymium and erbium with 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulphonic acid and diethylamine have been studied by normal and third-derivative spectrophotometry. Their molar absorptivities are 80 1.mol{sup {minus}1}.cm{sup {minus}1} for neodymium and 65 1.mol{sup {minus}1}.cm{sup {minus}1} for erbium. Use of the third-derivative spectra, eliminates the interference by other rare earths and increases the sensitivity for Nd and Er. The derivative molar absorptivities are 390 1.mol{sup {minus}1}.cm{sup {minus}1} for Nd and 367 1.mol{sup {minus}1}.cm{sup {minus}1} for Er. The calibration graphs were linear up to 11.8 {mu}g/ml of Nd and 12.3 {mu}g/ml ofmore » Er, respectively. The relative standard deviations evaluated from eleven independent determinations of 7.2 {mu}g/ml (for Nd) and 8.3 {mu}g/ml (for Er) are 1.3% and 1.4%, respectively. The detection limits are 0.2 {mu}g/ml for Nd and 0.3 {mu}g/ml for Er. The method has been developed for determining those two elements in mixture of lanthanides by means of the third-derivative spectra and the analytical results obtained are satisfactory.« less

  19. Characterizing Fluorocarbon Assisted Atomic Layer Etching of Si Using Cyclic Ar/C 4F 8 and Ar/CHF 3 Plasma

    DOE PAGES

    Metzler, Dominik; Li, Chen; Engelmann, Sebastian; ...

    2016-09-08

    With the increasing interest in establishing directional etching methods capable of atomic scale resolution for fabricating highly scaled electronic devices, the need for development and characterization of atomic layer etching (ALE) processes, or generally etch processes with atomic layer precision, is growing. In this work, a flux-controlled cyclic plasma process is used for etching of SiO 2 and Si at the Angstrom-level. This is based on steady-state Ar plasma, with periodic, precise injection of a fluorocarbon (FC) precursor (C 4F 8 and CHF 3), and synchronized, plasma-based Ar+ ion bombardment [D. Metzler et al., J Vac Sci Technol A 32,more » 020603 (2014), and D. Metzler et al., J Vac Sci Technol A 34, 01B101 (2016)]. For low energy Ar+ ion bombardment conditions, physical sputter rates are minimized, whereas material can be etched when FC reactants are present at the surface. This cyclic approach offers a large parameter space for process optimization. Etch depth per cycle, removal rates, and self-limitation of removal, along with material dependence of these aspects, were examined as a function of FC surface coverage, ion energy, and etch step length using in situ real time ellipsometry. The deposited FC thickness per cycle is found to have a strong impact on etch depth per cycle of SiO 2 and Si, but is limited with regard to control over material etching selectivity. Ion energy over the 20 to 30 eV range strongly impacts material selectivity. The choice of precursor can have a significant impact on the surface chemistry and chemically enhanced etching. CHF 3 has a lower FC deposition yield for both SiO 2 and Si, and also exhibits a strong substrate dependence of FC deposition yield, in contrast to C4F 8. The thickness of deposited FC layers using CHF 3 is found to be greater for Si than for SiO 2. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to study surface chemistry. When thicker FC films of 11 Å are employed, strong changes of FC film chemistry during a

  20. Characterizing fluorocarbon assisted atomic layer etching of Si using cyclic Ar/C4F8 and Ar/CHF3 plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler, Dominik; Li, Chen; Engelmann, Sebastian; Bruce, Robert L.; Joseph, Eric A.; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.

    2017-02-01

    With the increasing interest in establishing directional etching methods capable of atomic scale resolution for fabricating highly scaled electronic devices, the need for development and characterization of atomic layer etching processes, or generally etch processes with atomic layer precision, is growing. In this work, a flux-controlled cyclic plasma process is used for etching of SiO2 and Si at the Angstrom-level. This is based on steady-state Ar plasma, with periodic, precise injection of a fluorocarbon (FC) precursor (C4F8 and CHF3) and synchronized, plasma-based Ar+ ion bombardment [D. Metzler et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol., A 32, 020603 (2014) and D. Metzler et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol., A 34, 01B101 (2016)]. For low energy Ar+ ion bombardment conditions, physical sputter rates are minimized, whereas material can be etched when FC reactants are present at the surface. This cyclic approach offers a large parameter space for process optimization. Etch depth per cycle, removal rates, and self-limitation of removal, along with material dependence of these aspects, were examined as a function of FC surface coverage, ion energy, and etch step length using in situ real time ellipsometry. The deposited FC thickness per cycle is found to have a strong impact on etch depth per cycle of SiO2 and Si but is limited with regard to control over material etching selectivity. Ion energy over the 20-30 eV range strongly impacts material selectivity. The choice of precursor can have a significant impact on the surface chemistry and chemically enhanced etching. CHF3 has a lower FC deposition yield for both SiO2 and Si and also exhibits a strong substrate dependence of FC deposition yield, in contrast to C4F8. The thickness of deposited FC layers using CHF3 is found to be greater for Si than for SiO2. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to study surface chemistry. When thicker FC films of 11 Å are employed, strong changes of FC film chemistry during a cycle are seen

  1. Thermophysical and radiation properties of high-temperature C4F8-CO2 mixtures to replace SF6 in high-voltage circuit breakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Linlin; Cressault, Yann; Teulet, Philippe

    2018-03-01

    C4F8-CO2 mixtures are one of the potential substitutes to SF6 in high-voltage circuit breakers. However, the arc quenching ability of C4F8-CO2 mixtures is still unknown. In order to provide the necessary basic data for the further investigation of arc quenching performance, the compositions, thermodynamic properties, transport coefficients, and net emission coefficients (NEC) of various C4F8-CO2 mixtures are calculated at temperatures of 300-30 000 K in this work. The thermodynamic properties are presented as the product of mass density and specific heat, i.e., ρCp. The transport coefficients include electrical conductivity, viscosity, and thermal conductivity. The atomic and molecular radiation are both taken into account in the calculation of NEC. The comparison of the properties between SF6 and C4F8-CO2 mixtures is also discussed to find their differences. The results of compositions show that C4F8-CO2 mixtures have a distinctive advantage over other alternative gases e.g., CF3I and C3F8, because the dissociative product (i.e., C4F6) of C4F8 at low temperatures has a very high dielectric strength. This is good for an arc quenching medium to endure the arc recovery phase. Compared with SF6, C4F8-CO2 mixtures present lower ρCp at temperatures below 2800 K and larger thermal conductivity above 2800 K. Based on the position of peaks in thermal conductivity, we predict that the cooling of C4F8-CO2 arc will be slowed down at higher temperatures than that of SF6 arc. It is also found that the mixing of CO2 shows slight effects on the electrical conductivity and NEC of C4F8-CO2 mixtures.

  2. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-01

    ISS040-E-006327 (1 June 2014) --- A portion of International Space Station solar array panels and Earth?s horizon are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the space station.

  3. Kinetics and its accompanying thermodynamics studies on simultaneous complexation of heterobimetallic neodymium (III) with zinc (II) and L-tryptophan in aquated DMF using 4f-4f absorption spectra.

    PubMed

    Huidrom, Bimola; Singh, N Rajmuhon

    2014-01-24

    The 4f-4f absorption spectra of the simultaneous heterobimetallic complexation of trivalent neodymium ion with l-tryptophan and divalent zinc ion in aquated DMF (50%, v/v) at pH 6.0 was recorded at the time interval of 1h. From the observed absorption spectra, the values of intensity parameters such as oscillator strength (P) and Judd-Ofelt intensity (Tλ) parameters, kinetics and thermodynamics parameters were evaluated. The rate constant increases with an increase in the temperature along with the oscillator strengths and Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters. The positive values of the change in the standard enthalpy (ΔH°) and entropy (ΔS°) indicate that the complexation is endothermic. The negative values of the change in the standard free energy (ΔG°) in the range from 293.15 K to 308.15 K, indicate that the reaction occurs spontaneously and hence the formation of heterobimetallic complex in the solution is favored kinetically and thermodynamically. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Kinetics and its accompanying thermodynamics studies on simultaneous complexation of heterobimetallic neodymium (III) with zinc (II) and L-tryptophan in aquated DMF using 4f-4f absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huidrom, Bimola; Rajmuhon Singh, N.

    2014-01-01

    The 4f-4f absorption spectra of the simultaneous heterobimetallic complexation of trivalent neodymium ion with L-tryptophan and divalent zinc ion in aquated DMF (50%, v/v) at pH 6.0 was recorded at the time interval of 1 h. From the observed absorption spectra, the values of intensity parameters such as oscillator strength (P) and Judd-Ofelt intensity (Tλ) parameters, kinetics and thermodynamics parameters were evaluated. The rate constant increases with an increase in the temperature along with the oscillator strengths and Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters. The positive values of the change in the standard enthalpy (ΔH°) and entropy (ΔS°) indicate that the complexation is endothermic. The negative values of the change in the standard free energy (ΔG°) in the range from 293.15 K to 308.15 K, indicate that the reaction occurs spontaneously and hence the formation of heterobimetallic complex in the solution is favored kinetically and thermodynamically.

  5. [Selective arteriography of the supra-aortic trunks by right humeral approach with a 4F catheter].

    PubMed

    Rodde, A; Bazin, C; Blum, A; Boccaccini, H; Boyer, B; Claudon, M; Regent, D

    1993-12-01

    Three hundred and sixty seven patients were studied for cerebrovascular disease with intra-arterial digital subtraction. Examination were performed using a right transbrachial approach with a 4F catheter. Selective catheterization of the carotid arteries was possible in 98% for the left and 99% for the right. Image quality was consistently good or excellent. There was 2 neurologic complications and 1 local complication (hematoma) requiring surgery few weeks later. Selective carotid and vertebral catheterizations by the brachial route is safe, simple, accurate and rapid (15 mn) and can be employed in outpatients.

  6. Specific yield: compilation of specific yields for various materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, A.I.

    1967-01-01

    Specific yield is defined as the ratio of (1) the volume of water that a saturated rock or soil will yield by gravity to (2) the total volume of the rock or soft. Specific yield is usually expressed as a percentage. The value is not definitive, because the quantity of water that will drain by gravity depends on variables such as duration of drainage, temperature, mineral composition of the water, and various physical characteristics of the rock or soil under consideration. Values of specific yields nevertheless offer a convenient means by which hydrologists can estimate the water-yielding capacities of earth materials and, as such, are very useful in hydrologic studies. The present report consists mostly of direct or modified quotations from many selected reports that present and evaluate methods for determining specific yield, limitations of those methods, and results of the determinations made on a wide variety of rock and soil materials. Although no particular values are recommended in this report, a table summarizes values of specific yield, and their averages, determined for 10 rock textures. The following is an abstract of the table. [Table

  7. Density Functional Study of Structures and Electron Affinities of BrO4F/BrO4F−

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Liangfa; Xiong, Jieming; Wu, Xinmin; Qi, Chuansong; Li, Wei; Guo, Wenli

    2009-01-01

    The structures, electron affinities and bond dissociation energies of BrO4F/BrO4F− species have been investigated with five density functional theory (DFT) methods with DZP++ basis sets. The planar F-Br…O2…O2 complexes possess 3A′ electronic state for neutral molecule and 4A′ state for the corresponding anion. Three types of the neutral-anion energy separations are the adiabatic electron affinity (EAad), the vertical electron affinity (EAvert), and the vertical detachment energy (VDE). The EAad value predicted by B3LYP method is 4.52 eV. The bond dissociation energies De (BrO4F → BrO4-mF + Om) (m = 1–4) and De− (BrO4F− → BrO4-mF− + Om and BrO4F− → BrO4-mF + Om−) are predicted. The adiabatic electron affinities (EAad) were predicted to be 4.52 eV for F-Br…O2…O2 (3A′←4A′) (B3LYP method). PMID:19742128

  8. Study of rare earth local moment magnetism and strongly correlated phenomena in various crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Tai

    Benefiting from unique properties of 4f electrons, rare earth based compounds are known for offering a versatile playground for condensed matter physics research as well as industrial applications. This thesis focuses on three specific examples that further explore the rare earth local moment magnetism and strongly correlated phenomena in various crystal structures.

  9. Treatment of patients with cardiovascular disease with L-4F, an apo-A1 mimetic, did not improve select biomarkers of HDL function[S

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Catherine E.; Weissbach, Nicole; Kjems, Lise; Ayalasomayajula, Surya; Zhang, Yiming; Chang, Ih; Navab, Mohamad; Hama, Susan; Hough, Greg; Reddy, Srinivasa T.; Soffer, Daniel; Rader, Daniel J.; Fogelman, Alan M.; Schecter, Alison

    2011-01-01

    L-4F, an apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) mimetic peptide (also known as APL180), was administered daily by either intravenous (IV) infusion for 7 days or by subcutaneous (SC) injection for 28 days in patients with coronary heart disease in two distinct clinical studies. L-4F was well tolerated at all doses tested. Despite achieving plasma levels (mean maximal plasma concentration of 2,907 ng/ml and 395 ng/ml, following IV infusion and SC injection, respectively), that were effective in previously published animal models, treatment with L-4F, as assessed by biomarkers of HDL function such as HDL-inflammatory index (HII), and paraoxonase activity, did not improve. Paradoxically, there was a 49% increase in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels after seven IV infusions of 30 mg L-4F (P < 0.05; compared with placebo) and a trend for hs-CRP increase in subjects receiving 30 mg SC injection for 28 days. In a subsequent, ex vivo study, addition of L-4F at concentrations of 150, 375, or 1,000 ng/ml to plasma from subjects prior to L-4F treatment resulted in significant dose-dependent HII improvement. In conclusion, in vivo L-4F treatment, delivered by either SC injection or IV infusion, did not improve HDL functional biomarkers despite achieving plasma levels that improved identical biomarkers ex vivo and in animal models. PMID:21068008

  10. Eukaryotic Initiation Factor (eIF) 4F Binding to Barley Yellow Dwarf Virus (BYDV) 3′-Untranslated Region Correlates with Translation Efficiency*

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Bidisha; Goss, Dixie J.

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4F binding to mRNA is the first committed step in cap-dependent protein synthesis. Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV) employs a cap-independent mechanism of translation initiation that is mediated by a structural BYDV translation element (BTE) located in the 3′-UTR of its mRNA. eIF4F bound the BTE and a translationally inactive mutant with high affinity, thus questioning the role of eIF4F in translation of BYDV. To examine the effects of eIF4F in BYDV translation initiation, BTE mutants with widely different in vitro translation efficiencies ranging from 5 to 164% compared with WT were studied. Using fluorescence anisotropy to obtain quantitative data, we show 1) the equilibrium binding affinity (complex stability) correlated well with translation efficiency, whereas the “on” rate of binding did not; 2) other unidentified proteins or small molecules in wheat germ extract prevented eIF4F binding to mutant BTE but not WT BTE; 3) BTE mutant-eIF4F interactions were found to be both enthalpically and entropically favorable with an enthalpic contribution of 52–90% to ΔG° at 25 °C, suggesting that hydrogen bonding contributes to stability; and 4) in contrast to cap-dependent and tobacco etch virus internal ribosome entry site interaction with eIF4F, poly(A)-binding protein did not increase eIF4F binding. Further, the eIF4F bound to the 3′ BTE with higher affinity than for either m7G cap or tobacco etch virus internal ribosome entry site, suggesting that the 3′ BTE may play a role in sequestering host cell initiation factors and possibly regulating the switch from replication to translation. PMID:24379412

  11. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Colleen

    1998-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-sponsored project for teachers of grades 5-12, designed to: (1) enhance understanding of the Earth as an integrated system; (2) enhance the interdisciplinary approach to science instruction; and (3) provide classroom materials that focus on those goals. Discover Earth is conducted by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies in collaboration with Dr. Eric Barron, Director, Earth System Science Center, The Pennsylvania State University; and Dr. Robert Hudson, Chair, the Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland at College Park. The enclosed materials: (1) represent only part of the Discover Earth materials; (2) were developed by classroom teachers who are participating in the Discover Earth project; (3) utilize an investigative approach and on-line data; and (4) can be effectively adjusted to classrooms with greater/without technology access. The Discover Earth classroom materials focus on the Earth system and key issues of global climate change including topics such as the greenhouse effect, clouds and Earth's radiation balance, surface hydrology and land cover, and volcanoes and climate change. All the materials developed to date are available on line at (http://www.strategies.org) You are encouraged to submit comments and recommendations about these materials to the Discover Earth project manager, contact information is listed below. You are welcome to duplicate all these materials.

  12. Unconventional iron-based superconductor CsCa2Fe4As4F2: A first-principle study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Birender; Kumar, Pradeep

    2018-05-01

    In the present work, we have investigated the structural and electronic properties of newly discovered iron based superconductor CsCa2Fe4As4F2 using first principles calculations. Analysis of the density of states at the Fermi level suggests that Fe-3d states have dominating contribution, and within these 3d states contribution of eg states is significant suggesting multi-band nature of this superconductor. The upper bound of superconducting transition temperature, estimated using electron-phonon coupling constant is found to be ˜2.6 K. To produce the experimental value of transition temperature (28.2 K), a 4-5 times increase in the electron-phonon constant is necessary, hinting that conventional electron-phonon coupling is not enough to explain the origin of superconductivity.

  13. Syntheses, crystal structures and properties of series of 4d-4f ln(III)-Ag(I) heterometallic coordination polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Xing-Rui; Wang, Ning; Xie, Wei-Ping; Xiong, Yan-Ju; Cheng, Qian; Long, Yi; Yue, Shan-Tang; Liu, Ying-Liang

    2015-05-01

    By control of the experimental parameters such as ligands, pH value and reacting temperature, series of three-dimensional (3D) 4d-4f Ln(III)-Ag(I) porous coordination polymers (PCPs) with interesting chain-layer construction, namely, {[LnIIIAgI(na)(ina)(ox)]·2(H2O)}n [Ln=Sm(1), Eu(2), Gd(3), Tb(4), Dy(5), Ho(6), Y(7), Yb(8)], have been successfully synthesized under hydrothermal conditions and structurally characterized. All the complexes are characterized by elemental analyses, FT-IR spectroscopy, Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and thermogravimetric analyses (TGA). Furthermore, the luminescence properties of compounds 2 and 4 and the magsnetic properties of complexes 3 and 5 were also investigated in detail.

  14. Fabrication of controlled hierarchical wrinkle structures on polydimethylsiloxane via one-step C4F8 plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Liming; Cheng, Xiaoliang; Chen, Haotian; Song, Yu; Guo, Hang; Zhang, Jinxin; Chen, Xuexian; Zhang, Haixia

    2018-01-01

    We report a simple method for fabricating two-dimensional and nested hierarchical wrinkle structures on polydimethylsiloxane surfaces via one-step C4F8 plasma treatment that innovatively combines two approaches to monolayer wrinkle structure fabrication. The wavelengths of the two dimensions of the wrinkle structures can be controlled by plasma treatment (radio frequency (RF) power and plasma treatment time) and stretching (stretching strain and axial stretching), respectively. We also analyze the different interactions between the two dimensions of wrinkle structures with different wavelengths and explain the phenomenon using Fourier waveform superposition. The character of the two dimensions and hierarchy is obvious when the wavelengths of the two wrinkles are different. In surface wetting tests, the hierarchical wrinkle shows great hydrophobicity and keeps the stretching property under 25%.

  15. Reverse-D-4F Increases the Number of Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Improves Endothelial Progenitor Cell Dysfunctions in High Fat Diet Mice.

    PubMed

    Nana, Yang; Peng, Jiao; Jianlin, Zhang; Xiangjian, Zhang; Shutong, Yao; Enxin, Zhan; Bin, Li; Chuanlong, Zong; Hua, Tian; Yanhong, Si; Yunsai, Du; Shucun, Qin; Hui, Wang

    2015-01-01

    Although high density lipoprotein (HDL) improves the functions of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), the effect of HDL ApoAI mimetic peptide reverse-D-4F (Rev-D4F) on EPC mobilization and repair of EPC dysfunctions remains to be studied. In this study, we investigated the effects of Rev-D4F on peripheral blood cell subpopulations in C57 mice treated with a high fat diet and the mechanism of Rev-D4F in improving the function of EPCs impaired by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The high fat diet significantly decreased the number of EPCs, EPC migratory functions, and the percentage of lymphocytes in the white blood cells. However, it significantly increased the number of white blood cells, the percentage of monocytes in the white blood cells, and the level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and TNF-α in the plasma. Rev-D4F clearly inhibited the effect of the high fat diet on the quantification of peripheral blood cell subpopulations and cytokine levels, and increased stromal cell derived factor 1α (SDF-1α) in the plasma. We provided in vitro evidence that TNF-α impaired EPC proliferation, migration, and tube formation through inactive AKT and eNOS, which was restored by Rev-D4F treatment. In contrast, both the PI3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor (LY294002) and AKT inhibitor (perifosine) obviously inhibited the restoration of Rev-4F on EPCs impaired by TNF-α. Our results suggested that Rev-D4F increases the quantity of endothelial progenitor cells through increasing the SDF-1α levels and decreasing the TNF-α level of peripheral blood in high fat diet-induced C57BL/6J mice, and restores TNF-α induced dysfunctions of EPCs partly through stimulating the PI3K/AKT signal pathway.

  16. Resonance electronic Raman scattering in rare earth crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G.M.

    1988-11-10

    The intensities of Raman scattering transitions between electronic energy levels of trivalent rare earth ions doped into transparent crystals were measured and compared to theory. A particle emphasis was placed on the examination of the effect of intermediate state resonances on the Raman scattering intensities. Two specific systems were studied: Ce/sup 3 +/(4f/sup 1/) in single crystals of LuPO/sub 4/ and Er/sup 3 +/(4f/sup 11/) in single crystals of ErPO/sub 4/. 134 refs., 92 figs., 33 tabs.

  17. Internal photopumping of Nd3+ (2H9/2, 4F5/2) states in yttrium aluminum garnet by excitation transfer from oxygen deficiency centers and Fe3+ continuum emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, J. D.; Spinka, T. M.; Senin, A. A.; Eden, J. G.

    2011-07-01

    Photoexcitation of Nd3+ (2H9/2, 4F5/2) states by the broad (˜70 nm FWHM), near-infrared continuum provided by Fe3+ has been observed at 300 K in bulk yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) crystals doped with trace concentrations (<50 ppm) of Fe, Cr, and Eu. Irradiation of YAG at 248 nm with a KrF laser, which excites the oxygen deficiency center (ODC) in YAG having peak absorption at ˜240 nm, culminates in ODC→Fe3+ excitation transfer and subsequent Fe3+ emission. This internal optical pumping mechanism for rare earth ions is unencumbered by the requirement for donor-acceptor proximity that constrains conventional Förster-Dexter excitation transfer in co-doped crystals.

  18. Caprin-1 is a target of the deafness gene Pou4f3 and is recruited to stress granules in cochlear hair cells in response to ototoxic damage

    PubMed Central

    Towers, Emily R.; Kelly, John J.; Sud, Richa; Gale, Jonathan E.; Dawson, Sally J.

    2011-01-01

    The POU4 family of transcription factors are required for survival of specific cell types in different sensory systems. Pou4f3 is essential for the survival of auditory sensory hair cells and several mutations in human POU4F3 cause hearing loss. Thus, genes regulated by Pou4f3 are likely to be essential for hair cell survival. We performed a subtractive hybridisation screen in an inner-ear-derived cell line to find genes with differential expression in response to changes in Pou4f3 levels. The screen identified the stress-granule-associated protein Caprin-1 as being downregulated by Pou4f3. We demonstrated that this regulation occurs through the direct interaction of Pou4f3 with binding sites in the Caprin-1 5′ flanking sequence, and describe the expression pattern of Caprin-1 mRNA and protein in the cochlea. Moreover, we found Caprin-1-containing stress granules are induced in cochlear hair cells following aminoglycoside-induced damage. This is the first report of stress granule formation in mammalian hair cells and suggests that the formation of Caprin-1-containing stress granules is a key damage response to a clinically relevant ototoxic agent. Our results have implications for the understanding of aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss and provide further evidence that stress granule formation is a fundamental cellular stress response. PMID:21402877

  19. Earth Wisdom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Matre, Steve

    1985-01-01

    In our human-centered ignorance and arrogance we are rapidly destroying the earth. We must start helping people understand the big picture of ecological concepts. What these concepts mean for our own lives and how we must begin to change our lifestyles in order to live more harmoniously with the earth. (JHZ)

  20. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1976-01-01

    The LAGEOS I (Laser Geodynamics Satellite) was developed and launched by the Marshall Space Flight Center on May 4, 1976 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California . The two-foot diameter satellite orbited the Earth from pole to pole and measured the movements of the Earth's surface.

  1. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-20

    Panelists pose for a group photo at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and highlighted how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  2. Signature of chaos in the 4 f -core-excited states for highly-charged tungsten ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, Ulyana; Safronova, Alla

    2014-05-01

    We evaluate radiative and autoionizing transition rates in highly charged W ions in search for the signature of chaos. In particularly, previously published results for Ag-like W27+, Tm-like W5+, and Yb-like W4+ ions as well as newly obtained for I-like W21+, Xe-like W20+, Cs-like W19+, and La-like W17+ ions (with ground configuration [Kr] 4d10 4fk with k = 7, 8, 9, and 11, respectively) are considered that were calculated using the multiconfiguration relativistic Hebrew University Lawrence Livermore Atomic Code (HULLAC code) and the Hartree-Fock-Relativistic method (COWAN code). The main emphasis was on verification of Gaussian statistics of rates as a function of transition energy. There was no evidence of such statistics for above mentioned previously published results as well as for the transitions between the excited and autoionizing states for newly calculated results. However, we did find the Gaussian profile for the transitions between excited states such as the [Kr] 4d10 4fk - [Kr] 4d10 4f k - 1 5 d transitions , for newly calculated W ions. This work is supported in part by DOE under NNSA Cooperative Agreement DE-NA0001984.

  3. WATEQ4F - a personal computer Fortran translation of the geochemical model WATEQ2 with revised data base

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, J.W.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Zachmann, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    A FORTRAN 77 version of the PL/1 computer program for the geochemical model WATEQ2, which computes major and trace element speciation and mineral saturation for natural waters has been developed. The code (WATEQ4F) has been adapted to execute on an IBM PC or compatible microcomputer. Two versions of the code are available, one operating with IBM Professional FORTRAN and an 8087 or 89287 numeric coprocessor, and one which operates without a numeric coprocessor using Microsoft FORTRAN 77. The calculation procedure is identical to WATEQ2, which has been installed on many mainframes and minicomputers. Limited data base revisions include the addition of the following ions: AlHS04(++), BaS04, CaHS04(++), FeHS04(++), NaF, SrC03, and SrHCO3(+). This report provides the reactions and references for the data base revisions, instructions for program operation, and an explanation of the input and output files. Attachments contain sample output from three water analyses used as test cases and the complete FORTRAN source listing. U.S. Geological Survey geochemical simulation program PHREEQE and mass balance program BALANCE also have been adapted to execute on an IBM PC or compatible microcomputer with a numeric coprocessor and the IBM Professional FORTRAN compiler. (Author 's abstract)

  4. 3d-4f {Co(II)3Ln(OR)4} Cubanes as Bio-Inspired Water Oxidation Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Evangelisti, Fabio; Moré, René; Hodel, Florian; Luber, Sandra; Patzke, Greta Ricarda

    2015-09-02

    Although the {CaMn4O5} oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II is a major paradigm for water oxidation catalyst (WOC) development, the comprehensive translation of its key features into active molecular WOCs remains challenging. The [Co(II)3Ln(hmp)4(OAc)5H2O] ({Co(II)3Ln(OR)4}; Ln = Ho-Yb, hmp = 2-(hydroxymethyl)pyridine) cubane WOC series is introduced as a new springboard to address crucial design parameters, ranging from nuclearity and redox-inactive promoters to operational stability and ligand exchange properties. The {Co(II)3Ln(OR)4} cubanes promote bioinspired WOC design by newly combining Ln(3+) centers as redox-inactive Ca(2+) analogues with flexible aqua-/acetate ligands into active and stable WOCs (max. TON/TOF values of 211/9 s(-1)). Furthermore, they open up the important family of 3d-4f complexes for photocatalytic applications. The stability of the {Co(II)3Ln(OR)4} WOCs under photocatalytic conditions is demonstrated with a comprehensive analytical strategy including trace metal analyses and solution-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) investigations. The productive influence of the Ln(3+) centers is linked to favorable ligand mobility, and the experimental trends are substantiated with Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics studies.

  5. Superspace description of wagnerite-group minerals (Mg,Fe,Mn)2(PO4)(F,OH)

    PubMed Central

    Lazic, Biljana; Armbruster, Thomas; Chopin, Christian; Grew, Edward S.; Baronnet, Alain; Palatinus, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Reinvestigation of more than 40 samples of minerals belonging to the wagnerite group (Mg, Fe, Mn)2(PO4)(F,OH) from diverse geological environments worldwide, using single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, showed that most crystals have incommensurate structures and, as such, are not adequately described with known polytype models (2b), (3b), (5b), (7b) and (9b). Therefore, we present here a unified superspace model for the structural description of periodically and aperiodically modulated wagnerite with the (3+1)-dimensional superspace group C2/c(0β0)s0 based on the average triplite structure with cell parameters a ≃ 12.8, b ≃ 6.4, c ≃ 9.6 Å, β ≃ 117° and the modulation vectors q = β b*. The superspace approach provides a way of simple modelling of the positional and occupational modulation of Mg/Fe and F/OH in wagnerite. This allows direct comparison of crystal properties. PMID:24675594

  6. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-20

    Earth observation taken during day pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message: Looking southwest over northern Africa. Libya, Algeria, Niger.

  7. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-01

    Earth Observation taken during a night pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: New Zealand Aurora night pass. On crewmember's Flickr page - Look straight down into an aurora.

  8. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-07

    ISS040-E-008174 (7 June 2014) --- Layers of Earth's atmosphere, brightly colored as the sun rises, are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the International Space Station.

  9. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-02

    ISS040-E-006817 (2 June 2014) --- Intersecting the thin line of Earth's atmosphere, International Space Station solar array wings are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the International Space Station.

  10. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-07-18

    Workers at Launch Complex 17 Pad A, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) encapsulate the Geomagnetic Tail (GEOTAIL) spacecraft (upper) and attached payload Assist Module-D upper stage (lower) in the protective payload fairing. GEOTAIL project was designed to study the effects of Earth's magnetic field. The solar wind draws the Earth's magnetic field into a long tail on the night side of the Earth and stores energy in the stretched field lines of the magnetotail. During active periods, the tail couples with the near-Earth magnetosphere, sometimes releasing energy stored in the tail and activating auroras in the polar ionosphere. GEOTAIL measures the flow of energy and its transformation in the magnetotail and will help clarify the mechanisms that control the imput, transport, storage, release, and conversion of mass, momentum, and energy in the magnetotail.

  11. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-funded project for teachers of grades 5-12 who want to expand their knowledge of the Earth system, and prepare to become master teachers who promote Earth system science in their own schools, counties, and throughout their state. Participants from the following states are invited to apply: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington, DC. Teachers selected for the project participate in a two-week summer workshop conducted at the University of Maryland, College Park; develop classroom-ready materials during the workshop for broad dissemination; conduct a minimum of two peer training activities during the coming school year; and participate in other enrichment/education opportunities as available and desired. Discover Earth is a team effort that utilizes expertise from a range of contributors, and balances science content with hands-on classroom applications.

  12. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-31

    Earth Observation taken during a day pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: CEO - Arena de Sao Paolo. View used for Twitter message: Cloudy skies over São Paulo Brazil

  13. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-26

    Earth observation taken during day pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message: Never tire of finding shapes in the clouds! These look very botanical to me. Simply perfect.

  14. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-12

    Earth Observation taken during a day pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: Moon, Japan, Kamchatka with a wild cloud. Part of a solar array is also visible.

  15. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1990-10-24

    Solar Vector Magnetograph is used to predict solar flares, and other activities associated with sun spots. This research provides new understanding about weather on the Earth, and solar-related conditions in orbit.

  16. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-03

    Earth observation taken during day pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message: Perhaps a dandelion losing its seeds in the wind? Love clouds!

  17. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-27

    Earth Observation taken during a day pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Part of Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) is visible. Folder lists this as: the Middle East, Israel.

  18. Effect of NQO1 and CYP4F2 genotypes on warfarin dose requirements in Hispanic-Americans and African-Americans.

    PubMed

    Bress, Adam; Patel, Shitalben R; Perera, Minoli A; Campbell, Richard T; Kittles, Rick A; Cavallari, Larisa H

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the additional contribution of NQO1 and CYP4F2 genotypes to warfarin dose requirements across two racial groups after accounting for known clinical and genetic predictors. The following were assessed in a cohort of 260 African-Americans and 53 Hispanic-Americans: clinical data; NQO1 p.P187S (*1/*2); CYP2C9*2, *3, *5, *6, *8 and *11; CYP4F2 p.V433M; and VKORC1 c.-1639G>A genotypes. Both the CYP4F2 433M (0.23 vs 0.06; p < 0.05) and NQO1*2 (0.27 vs 0.18; p < 0.05) allele frequencies were higher in Hispanic-Americans compared with African-Americans. Multiple regression analysis in the Hispanic-American cohort revealed that each CYP4F2 433M allele was associated with a 22% increase in warfarin maintenance dose (p = 0.019). Possession of the NQO1*2 allele was associated with a 34% increase in warfarin maintenance dose (p = 0.004), while adjusting for associated genetic (CYP2C9, CYP4F2 and VKORC1) and clinical factors. In this population, the inclusion of CYP4F2 and NQO1*2 genotypes improved the dose variability explained by the model from 0.58 to 0.68 (p = 0.001), a 17% relative improvement. By contrast, there was no association between CYP4F2 or NQO1*2 genotype and therapeutic warfarin dose in African-Americans after adjusting for known genetic and clinical predictors. In our cohort of inner-city Hispanic-Americans, the CYP4F2 and NQO1*2 genotypes significantly contributed to warfarin dose requirements. If our findings are confirmed, they would suggest that inclusion of the CYP4F2 and NQO1*2 genotypes in warfarin dose prediction algorithms may improve the predictive ability of such algorithms in Hispanic-Americans.

  19. Effect of NQO1 and CYP4F2 genotypes on warfarin dose requirements in Hispanic–Americans and African–Americans

    PubMed Central

    Bress, Adam; Patel, Shitalben R; Perera, Minoli A; Campbell, Richard T; Kittles, Rick A; Cavallari, Larisa H

    2013-01-01

    Aim The objective of this study was to determine the additional contribution of NQO1 and CYP4F2 genotypes to warfarin dose requirements across two racial groups after accounting for known clinical and genetic predictors. Patients & methods The following were assessed in a cohort of 260 African–Americans and 53 Hispanic–Americans: clinical data; NQO1 p.P187S (*1/*2); CYP2C9*2, *3, *5, *6, *8 and *11; CYP4F2 p.V433M; and VKORC1 c.-1639G>A genotypes. Results Both the CYP4F2 433M (0.23 vs 0.06; p < 0.05) and NQO1*2 (0.27 vs. 0.18; p < 0.05) allele frequencies were higher in Hispanic–Americans compared with African–Americans. Multiple regression analysis in the Hispanic–American cohort revealed that each CYP4F2 433M allele was associated with a 22% increase in warfarin maintenance dose (p = 0.019). Possession of the NQO1*2 allele was associated with a 34% increase in warfarin maintenance dose (p = 0.004), while adjusting for associated genetic (CYP2C9, CYP4F2 and VKORC1) and clinical factors. In this population, the inclusion of CYP4F2 and NQO1*2 genotypes improved the dose variability explained by the model from 0.58 to 0.68 (p = 0.001), a 17% relative improvement. By contrast, there was no association between CYP4F2 or NQO1*2 genotype and therapeutic warfarin dose in African–Americans after adjusting for known genetic and clinical predictors. Conclusion In our cohort of inner-city Hispanic–Americans, the CYP4F2 and NQO1*2 genotypes significantly contributed to warfarin dose requirements. If our findings are confirmed, they would suggest that inclusion of the CYP4F2 and NQO1*2 genotypes in warfarin dose prediction algorithms may improve the predictive ability of such algorithms in Hispanic–Americans. PMID:23215885

  20. Earth Observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-06-16

    ISS024-E-006136 (16 June 2010) --- Polar mesospheric clouds, illuminated by an orbital sunrise, are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 24 crew member on the International Space Station. Polar mesospheric, or noctilucent (?night shining?), clouds are observed from both Earth?s surface and in orbit by crew members aboard the space station. They are called night-shining clouds as they are usually seen at twilight. Following the setting of the sun below the horizon and darkening of Earth?s surface, these high clouds are still briefly illuminated by sunlight. Occasionally the ISS orbital track becomes nearly parallel to Earth?s day/night terminator for a time, allowing polar mesospheric clouds to be visible to the crew at times other than the usual twilight due to the space station altitude. This unusual photograph shows polar mesospheric clouds illuminated by the rising, rather than setting, sun at center right. Low clouds on the horizon appear yellow and orange, while higher clouds and aerosols are illuminated a brilliant white. Polar mesospheric clouds appear as light blue ribbons extending across the top of the image. These clouds typically occur at high latitudes of both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, and at fairly high altitudes of 76?85 kilometers (near the boundary between the mesosphere and thermosphere atmospheric layers). The ISS was located over the Greek island of Kos in the Aegean Sea (near the southwestern coastline of Turkey) when the image was taken at approximately midnight local time. The orbital complex was tracking northeastward, nearly parallel to the terminator, making it possible to observe an apparent ?sunrise? located almost due north. A similar unusual alignment of the ISS orbit track, terminator position, and seasonal position of Earth?s orbit around the sun allowed for striking imagery of polar mesospheric clouds over the Southern Hemisphere earlier this year.

  1. Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  2. Activation of translation complex eIF4F is essential for the genesis and maintenance of the malignant phenotype in human mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Avdulov, Svetlana; Li, Shunan; Michalek, Van; Burrichter, David; Peterson, Mark; Perlman, David M; Manivel, J Carlos; Sonenberg, Nahum; Yee, Douglas; Bitterman, Peter B; Polunovsky, Vitaly A

    2004-06-01

    Common human malignancies acquire derangements of the translation initiation complex, eIF4F, but their functional significance is unknown. Hypophosphorylated 4E-BP proteins negatively regulate eIF4F assembly by sequestering its mRNA cap binding component eIF4E, whereas hyperphosphorylation abrogates this function. We found that breast carcinoma cells harbor increases in the eIF4F constituent eIF4GI and hyperphosphorylation of 4E-BP1 which are two alterations that activate eIF4F assembly. Ectopic expression of eIF4E in human mammary epithelial cells enabled clonal expansion and anchorage-independent growth. Transfer of 4E-BP1 phosphorylation site mutants into breast carcinoma cells suppressed their tumorigenicity, whereas loss of these 4E-BP1 phosphorylation site mutants accompanied spontaneous reversion to a malignant phenotype. Thus, eIF4F activation is an essential component of the malignant phenotype in breast carcinoma.

  3. Targeted partial surface modification with nano-SiO2@Li2CoPO4F as high-voltage cathode material for LIBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Caiyun; Huang, Zhipeng; Tian, Runsai; Jiang, Xinyu; Li, Chunsheng; Feng, Jijun

    2017-10-01

    Tuning whole/partial surface modification on cathode material with oxide material is a sought-after method to enhance the electrochemical performance in power storage field. Herein, nano-SiO2 targeted partial surface modified high voltage cathode material Li2CoPO4F has been successfully fabricated via a facile self-assembly process in silica dispersion at ambient temperature. With the aid of polar -OH groups attracted on the surface of SiO2 micelles, the nano-SiO2 preferentially nestle up along the borders and boundaries of Li2CoPO4F particles, where protection should be deployed with emphasis against the undesirable interactions between materials and electrolytes. Compared with pristine Li2CoPO4F, the SiO2 selectively modified Li2CoPO4F cathode materials, especially LCPF-3S, exhibit desirable electrochemical performances with higher discharge capacity, more outstanding cycle stability and favorable rate capability without any additional carbon involved. The greatly enhanced electrochemical properties can be attributed to the improved lithium-ion diffusion kinetics and structure tolerance during repeated lithiation/delithiation process. Such findings reveal a great potential of nano-SiO2 modified Li2CoPO4F as high energy cathode material for lithium ion batteries.

  4. Essential role of the cytochrome P450 CYP4F22 in the production of acylceramide, the key lipid for skin permeability barrier formation

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yusuke; Nakamichi, Shota; Ohkuni, Aya; Kamiyama, Nozomi; Naoe, Ayano; Tsujimura, Hisashi; Yokose, Urara; Sugiura, Kazumitsu; Ishikawa, Junko; Akiyama, Masashi; Kihara, Akio

    2015-01-01

    A skin permeability barrier is essential for terrestrial animals, and its impairment causes several cutaneous disorders such as ichthyosis and atopic dermatitis. Although acylceramide is an important lipid for the skin permeability barrier, details of its production have yet to be determined, leaving the molecular mechanism of skin permeability barrier formation unclear. Here we identified the cytochrome P450 gene CYP4F22 (cytochrome P450, family 4, subfamily F, polypeptide 22) as the long-sought fatty acid ω-hydroxylase gene required for acylceramide production. CYP4F22 has been identified as one of the autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis-causative genes. Ichthyosis-mutant proteins exhibited reduced enzyme activity, indicating correlation between activity and pathology. Furthermore, lipid analysis of a patient with ichthyosis showed a drastic decrease in acylceramide production. We determined that CYP4F22 was a type I membrane protein that locates in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), suggesting that the ω-hydroxylation occurs on the cytoplasmic side of the ER. The preferred substrate of the CYP4F22 was fatty acids with a carbon chain length of 28 or more (≥C28). In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that CYP4F22 is an ultra-long-chain fatty acid ω-hydroxylase responsible for acylceramide production and provide important insights into the molecular mechanisms of skin permeability barrier formation. Furthermore, based on the results obtained here, we proposed a detailed reaction series for acylceramide production. PMID:26056268

  5. Involvement of CYP4F2 in the Metabolism of a Novel Monophosphate Ester Prodrug of Gemcitabine and Its Interaction Potential In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yedong; Li, Yuan; Lu, Jia; Qi, Huixin; Cheng, Isabel; Zhang, Hongjian

    2018-05-16

    Compound- 3 is an oral monophosphate prodrug of gemcitabine. Previous data showed that Compound- 3 was more potent than gemcitabine and it was orally active in a tumor xenograft model. In the present study, the metabolism of Compound- 3 was investigated in several well-known in vitro matrices. While relatively stable in human and rat plasma, Compound- 3 demonstrated noticeable metabolism in liver and intestinal microsomes in the presence of NADPH and human hepatocytes. Compound- 3 could also be hydrolyzed by alkaline phosphatase, leading to gemcitabine formation. Metabolite identification using accurate mass- and information-based scan techniques revealed that Compound- 3 was subjected to sequential metabolism, forming alcohol, aldehyde and carboxylic acid metabolites, respectively. Results from reaction phenotyping studies indicated that cytochrome P450 4F2 (CYP4F2) was a key CYP isozyme involved in Compound- 3 metabolism. Interaction assays suggested that CYP4F2 activity could be inhibited by Compound- 3 or an antiparasitic prodrug pafuramidine. Because CYP4F2 is a key CYP isozyme involved in the metabolism of eicosanoids and therapeutic drugs, clinical relevance of drug-drug interactions mediated via CYP4F2 inhibition warrants further investigation.

  6. Hyperfine induced transition probabilities from 4{f}^{14}5s5p{}^{3}{{\\rm{P}}}_{0,2}^{o} states in Sm-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fuyang; Li, Jiguang; Qu, Yizhi; Wang, Jianguo

    2017-11-01

    The hyperfine induced 4{f}145s5p{}3{{{P}}}0,2o-4{f}145{s}2{}1{{{S}}}0 transition probabilities for highly charged Sm-like ions are calculated within the framework of the multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock method. Electron correlation, the Breit interaction and quantum electrodynamical effects are taken into account. For ions ranging from Z = 79 to Z=94,4{f}145s5p{}3{{{P}}}0o is the first excited state, and the hyperfine induced transition (HIT) is a dominant decay channel. For the 4{f}145s5p{}3{{{P}}}2o state, the HIT rates of Sm-like ions with Z=82-94 are reported as well as the magnetic dipole (M1) {}3{{{P}}}2o-{}3{{{P}}}1o, the electric quadrupole (E2) {}3{{{P}}}2o-{}3{{{P}}}0,1o, and the magnetic quadrupole (M2) {}3{{{P}}}2o-{}1{{{S}}}0 transition probabilities. It is found that M1 transition from the 4{f}145s5p{}3{{{P}}}2o state is the most important decay channel in this range on Z≥slant 82.

  7. Intervalence charge transfer luminescence: Interplay between anomalous and 5d − 4f emissions in Yb-doped fluorite-type crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Barandiarán, Zoila, E-mail: zoila.barandiaran@uam.es; Seijo, Luis; Instituto Universitario de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolás Cabrera, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid

    2014-12-21

    In this paper, we report the existence of intervalence charge transfer (IVCT) luminescence in Yb-doped fluorite-type crystals associated with Yb{sup 2+}–Yb{sup 3+} mixed valence pairs. By means of embedded cluster, wave function theory ab initio calculations, we show that the widely studied, very broad band, anomalous emission of Yb{sup 2+}-doped CaF{sub 2} and SrF{sub 2}, usually associated with impurity-trapped excitons, is, rather, an IVCT luminescence associated with Yb{sup 2+}–Yb{sup 3+} mixed valence pairs. The IVCT luminescence is very efficiently excited by a two-photon upconversion mechanism where each photon provokes the same strong 4f{sup 14}–1A{sub 1g}→ 4f{sup 13}({sup 2}F{sub 7/2})5de{sub g}–1T{submore » 1u} absorption in the Yb{sup 2+} part of the pair: the first one, from the pair ground state; the second one, from an excited state of the pair whose Yb{sup 3+} moiety is in the higher 4f{sup 13}({sup 2}F{sub 5/2}) multiplet. The Yb{sup 2+}–Yb{sup 3+} → Yb{sup 3+}–Yb{sup 2+} IVCT emission consists of an Yb{sup 2+} 5de{sub g} → Yb{sup 3+} 4f{sub 7/2} charge transfer accompanied by a 4f{sub 7/2} → 4f{sub 5/2} deexcitation within the Yb{sup 2+} 4f{sup 13} subshell: [{sup 2}F{sub 5/2}5de{sub g},{sup 2}F{sub 7/2}] → [{sup 2}F{sub 7/2},4f{sup 14}]. The IVCT vertical transition leaves the oxidized and reduced moieties of the pair after electron transfer very far from their equilibrium structures; this explains the unexpectedly large band width of the emission band and its low peak energy, because the large reorganization energies are subtracted from the normal emission. The IVCT energy diagrams resulting from the quantum mechanical calculations explain the different luminescent properties of Yb-doped CaF{sub 2}, SrF{sub 2}, BaF{sub 2}, and SrCl{sub 2}: the presence of IVCT luminescence in Yb-doped CaF{sub 2} and SrF{sub 2}; its coexistence with regular 5d-4f emission in SrF{sub 2}; its absence in BaF{sub 2} and SrCl{sub 2}; the

  8. Self-organized and uniform TiO2 nanotube arrays with optimized NH4F concentration in electrolyte by high voltage electrochemical anodization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamanzadeh, Z.; Noormohammadi, M.; Zahedifar, M.

    2018-05-01

    Large diameter and ordered TiO2 nanotubes (NTs) were fast fabricated in an electrolyte containing lactic acid and ethylene glycol with different amount of NH4F at various high anodization voltages up to 220 V. In this work, we could optimize F‑ ionic concentration in the electrolyte at each anodization voltage and the uniform films without any oxide breakdown were successfully achieved. The optimum NH4F concentration at which NTs can be formed homogeneously, decreases with the increment of anodization voltage. As a result, the fastest mean growth rate of 2.45 μm min‑1 was attained in 0.075 M NH4F at 150 V. Growth rate of TiO2 nanotubes is explained taking into account the role of F‑ ions and their limited diffusion through TiO2 nanotubes from bulk electrolyte. The interpore distance of the nanotubes is increased with enhanced anodization voltage.

  9. Earth: Earth Science and Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2001-01-01

    A major new NASA initiative on environmental change and health has been established to promote the application of Earth science remote sensing data, information, observations, and technologies to issues of human health. NASA's Earth Sciences suite of Earth observing instruments are now providing improved observations science, data, and advanced technologies about the Earth's land, atmosphere, and oceans. These new space-based resources are being combined with other agency and university resources, data integration and fusion technologies, geographic information systems (GIS), and the spectrum of tools available from the public health community, making it possible to better understand how the environment and climate are linked to specific diseases, to improve outbreak prediction, and to minimize disease risk. This presentation is an overview of NASA's tools, capabilities, and research advances in this initiative.

  10. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-20

    Panelists discuss how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  11. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-20

    Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist, Planetary Science Institute, moderates a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and highlighted how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  12. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-20

    An audience member asks the panelists a question at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  13. Rapid kinetics of iron responsive element (IRE) RNA/iron regulatory protein 1 and IRE-RNA/eIF4F complexes respond differently to metal ions.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mateen A; Ma, Jia; Walden, William E; Merrick, William C; Theil, Elizabeth C; Goss, Dixie J

    2014-06-01

    Metal ion binding was previously shown to destabilize IRE-RNA/IRP1 equilibria and enhanced IRE-RNA/eIF4F equilibria. In order to understand the relative importance of kinetics and stability, we now report rapid rates of protein/RNA complex assembly and dissociation for two IRE-RNAs with IRP1, and quantitatively different metal ion response kinetics that coincide with the different iron responses in vivo. kon, for FRT IRE-RNA binding to IRP1 was eight times faster than ACO2 IRE-RNA. Mn(2+) decreased kon and increased koff for IRP1 binding to both FRT and ACO2 IRE-RNA, with a larger effect for FRT IRE-RNA. In order to further understand IRE-mRNA regulation in terms of kinetics and stability, eIF4F kinetics with FRT IRE-RNA were determined. kon for eIF4F binding to FRT IRE-RNA in the absence of metal ions was 5-times slower than the IRP1 binding to FRT IRE-RNA. Mn(2+) increased the association rate for eIF4F binding to FRT IRE-RNA, so that at 50 µM Mn(2+) eIF4F bound more than 3-times faster than IRP1. IRP1/IRE-RNA complex has a much shorter life-time than the eIF4F/IRE-RNA complex, which suggests that both rate of assembly and stability of the complexes are important, and that allows this regulatory system to respond rapidly to change in cellular iron. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Yield Advances in Peanut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Average yields of peanut in the U.S. set an all time record of 4,695 kg ha-1 in 2012. This far exceeded the previous record yield of 3,837 kg ha-1 in 2008. Favorable weather conditions undoubtedly contributed to the record yields in 2012; however, these record yields would not have been achievable...

  15. Seven 3d-4f coordination polymers of macrocyclic oxamide with polycarboxylates: Syntheses, crystal structures and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, Na; Key Laboratory of Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Functional Material Chemistry, Ministry of Education; Tianjin Key Laboratory of Structure and Performance for Functional Molecules

    2016-11-15

    Seven new 3d–4f heterometallic coordination polymers, [Ln(CuL){sub 2}(Hbtca)(btca)(H{sub 2}O)]·2H{sub 2}O (Ln = Tb{sup III}1, Pr{sup III}2, Sm{sup III}3, Eu{sup III}4, Yb{sup III}5), [Nd(NiL)(nip)(Rnip)]·0·25H{sub 2}O·0.25CH{sub 3}OH (R= 0.6CH{sub 3}, 0.4H) 6 and [Nd{sub 2}(NiL)(nip){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O)]·2H{sub 2}O 7(CuL or NiL, H{sub 2}L = 2, 3-dioxo-5, 6, 14, 15-dibenzo-1, 4, 8, 12-tetraazacyclo-pentadeca-7, 13-dien; H{sub 2}btca = benzotriazole-5-carboxylic acid; H{sub 2}nip = 5-nitroisophthalic acid) have been synthesized by a solvothermal method and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Complexes 1–5 exhibit a double-strand meso-helical chain structures formed by [Ln{sup III}Cu{sup II}{sub 2}] units via the oxamide and benzotriazole-5-carboxylate bridges, while complex 6 exhibits amore » four-strand meso-helical chain formed by NdNi unit via the oxamide and 5-nitroisophthalate bridges. Complex 7 consists of a 2D layer framework formed by four-strand meso-helical chain via the nip{sup 2−} bridges. Moreover, the magnetic properties of them were investigated, and the best-fit analysis of χ{sub M}T versus T show that the anisotropic contribution of Ln(III) ions (arising from the spin-orbit coupling or the crystal field perturbation) dominates (weak exchange limit) in these complexes(for 3, λ = 214.6 cm{sup −1}, zj’ = −0.33 cm{sup −1}, g{sub av} = 1.94; for 5, Δ = 6.98 cm{sup −1}, zj’ = 1.53 cm{sup −1}, g{sub av} = 1.85). - Graphical-abstract: Seven novel oxamido-bridged 3d-4f heterometallic coordination polymers with benzotriazole-5-carboxylate or 5-nitroisophthalate co-ligands under solvothermal reaction conditions. Polymers 1–7 hold 1D or 2D framework structure, viz., double-strand meso-helical chain of 1–5, four-strand meso-helical chain of 6, and 2D net of 7 consisting of four-strand meso-helical chain. Moreover, the temperature dependences of magnetic susceptibilities of compounds 1–7 were also studied.« less

  16. Theoretical modeling of the uranium 4f XPS for U(VI) and U(IV) oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagus, Paul S.; Nelin, Connie J.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2013-12-01

    A rigorous study is presented of the physical processes related to X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS, in the 4f level of U oxides, which, as well as being of physical interest in themselves, are representative of XPS in heavy metal oxides. In particular, we present compelling evidence for a new view of the screening of core-holes that extends prior understandings. Our analysis of the screening focuses on the covalent mixing of high lying U and O orbitals as opposed to the, more common, use of orbitals that are nominally pure U or pure O. It is shown that this covalent mixing is quite different for the initial and final, core-hole, configurations and that this difference is directly related to the XPS satellite intensity. Furthermore, we show that the high-lying U d orbitals as well as the U(5f) orbital may both contribute to the core-hole screening, in contrast with previous work that has only considered screening through the U(5f) shell. The role of modifying the U-O interaction by changing the U-O distance has been investigated and an unexpected correlation between U-O distance and XPS satellite intensity has been discovered. The role of flourite and octahedral crystal structures for U(IV) oxides has been examined and relationships established between XPS features and the covalent interactions in the different structures. The physical views of XPS satellites as arising from shake processes or as arising from ligand to metal charge transfers are contrasted; our analysis provides strong support that shake processes give a more fundamental physical understanding than charge transfer. Our theoretical studies are based on rigorous, strictly ab initio determinations of the electronic structure of embedded cluster models of U oxides with formal U(VI) and U(IV) oxidation states. Our results provide a foundation that makes it possible to establish quantitative relationships between features of the XPS spectra and materials properties.

  17. Synthesis, structure and electrochemical properties of LiNaCo{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}PO{sub 4}F fluoride-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, Stanislav S.; Skoltech Center for Electrochemical Energy Storage, Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, 143026 Moscow; Kuzovchikov, Sergey M.

    2016-10-15

    LiNaCo{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}PO{sub 4}F fluoride-phosphate was synthesized via conventional solid-state and novel freeze-drying routes. The crystal structure was refined based on neutron powder diffraction (NPD) data and validated by electron diffraction (ED) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The alkali ions are ordered in LiNaCo{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}PO{sub 4}F and the transition metals jointly occupy the same crystallographic sites. The oxidation state and oxygen coordination environment of the Fe atoms were verified by {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. Electrochemical tests of the LiNaCo{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}PO{sub 4}F cathode material demonstrated a reversible activity of the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} redox couple at the electrodemore » potential near 3.4 V and minor activity of the Co{sup 3+}/Co{sup 2+} redox couple over 5 V vs Li/Li{sup +}. The material exhibited the discharge capacity of more than 82% (theo.) regarding Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} in the 2.4÷4.6 V vs Li/Li{sup +} potential range. - Graphical abstract: The ball-polyhedral representation of the LiNaCo{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}PO{sub 4}F crystal structure. The MO{sub 4}F{sub 2} units are depicted as blue octahedra, PO{sub 4} units as orange tetrahedra, sodium atoms are designated as yellow (Na1), lithium – red and brown (Li2, Li3 resp.), fluorine – green, oxygen – violet spheres. - Highlights: • Freeze-drying method was successfully applied to the synthesis of LiNaCo{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}PO{sub 4}F. • The crystal structure of LiNaCo{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}PO{sub 4}F was refined based on NPD and validated by ED and HRTEM. • LiNaCo{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}PO{sub 4}F demonstrated a reversible Li de/intercalation in the 2.5÷4.6 V vs Li/Li{sup +} range.« less

  18. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-03-08

    Workers at the Astrotech processing facility in Titusville prepared for a news media showing of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-1 (GOES-1). GOES-1 was the first in a new generation of weather satellites deployed above Earth. It was the first 3-axis, body-stabilized meteorological satellite to be used by the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NASA. These features allowed GOES-1 to continuously monitor the Earth, rather than viewing it just five percent of the time as was the case with spin-stabilized meteorological satellites. GOES-1 also has independent imaging and sounding instruments which can operate simultaneously yet independently. As a result, observations provided by each instrument will not be interrupted. The imager produces visual and infrared images of the Earth's surface, oceans, cloud cover and severe storm development, while the prime sounding products include vertical temperature and moisture profiles, and layer mean moisture.

  19. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-09-02

    This image depicts a full view of the Earth, taken by the Geostationary Operational Environment Satellite (GOES-8). The red and green charnels represent visible data, while the blue channel represents inverted 11 micron infrared data. The north and south poles were not actually observed by GOES-8. To produce this image, poles were taken from a GOES-7 image. Owned and operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES satellites provide the kind of continuous monitoring necessary for intensive data analysis. They circle the Earth in a geosynchronous orbit, which means they orbit the equatorial plane of the Earth at a speed matching the Earth's rotation. This allows them to hover continuously over one position on the surface. The geosynchronous plane is about 35,800 km (22,300 miles) above the Earth, high enough to allow the satellites a full-disc view of the Earth. Because they stay above a fixed spot on the surface, they provide a constant vigil for the atmospheric triggers for severe weather conditions such as tornadoes, flash floods, hail storms, and hurricanes. When these conditions develop, the GOES satellites are able to monitor storm development and track their movements. NASA manages the design and launch of the spacecraft. NASA launched the first GOES for NOAA in 1975 and followed it with another in 1977. Currently, the United States is operating GOES-8, positioned at 75 west longitude and the equator, and GOES-10, which is positioned at 135 west longitude and the equator. (GOES-9, which malfunctioned in 1998, is being stored in orbit as an emergency backup should either GOES-8 or GOES-10 fail. GOES-11 was launched on May 3, 2000 and GOES-12 on July 23, 2001. Both are being stored in orbit as a fully functioning replacement for GOES-8 or GOES-10 on failure.

  20. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-23

    ISS024-E-016042 (23 Aug. 2010) --- This night time view captured by one of the Expedition 24 crew members aboard the International Space Station some 220 miles above Earth is looking southward from central Romania over the Aegean Sea toward Greece and it includes Thessaloniki (near center), the larger bright mass of Athens (left center), and the Macedonian capital of Skopje (lower right). Center point coordinates of the area pictured are 46.4 degrees north latitude and 25.5 degrees east longitude. The picture was taken in August and was physically brought back to Earth on a disk with the return of the Expedition 25 crew in November 2010.

  1. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-19

    ISS040-E-070412 (19 July 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station recorded this July 19 panorama featuring wildfires which are plaguing the Northwest and causing widespread destruction. (Note: south is at the top of the frame). The orbital outpost was flying 223 nautical miles above Earth at the time of the photo. Parts of Oregon and Washington are included in the scene. Mt. Jefferson, Three Sisters and Mt. St. Helens are all snow-capped and visible in the photo, and the Columbia River can also be delineated.

  2. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-19

    ISS040-E-070424 (19 July 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station recorded this July 19 image of wildfires which are plaguing the Northwest and causing widespread destruction. The orbital outpost was flying 223 nautical miles above Earth at the time of the photo. Lightning has been given as the cause of the Ochoco Complex fires in the Ochoco National Forest in central Oregon. The complex has gotten larger since this photo was taken.

  3. Earth observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-04

    ISS040-E-129950 (4 Sept. 2014) --- In this photograph. taken by one of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, the orange spot located in the very center is the sun, which appears to be sitting on Earth's limb. At far right, a small bright spot is believed to be a reflection from somewhere in the camera system or something on the orbital outpost. When the photographed was exposed, the orbital outpost was flying at an altutude of 226 nautical miles above a point near French Polynesia in the Pacific Ocean.

  4. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-08-13

    This panoramic view of Hurricane Charley was photographed by the Expedition 9 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS) on August 13, 2004, at a vantage point just north of Tampa, Florida. The small eye was not visible in this view, but the raised cloud tops near the center coincide roughly with the time that the storm began to rapidly strengthen. The category 2 hurricane was moving north-northwest at 18 mph packing winds of 105 mph. Crew Earth Observations record Earth surface changes over time, as well as more fleeting events such as storms, floods, fires, and volcanic eruptions.

  5. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-09-11

    This image hosts a look at the eye of Hurricane Ivan, one of the strongest hurricanes on record, as the storm topped the western Caribbean Sea on Saturday, September 11, 2004. The hurricane was photographed by astronaut Edward M. (Mike) Fincke from aboard the International Space Station (ISS) at an altitude of approximately 230 miles. At the time, the category 5 storm sustained winds in the eye of the wall that were reported at about 160 mph. Crew Earth Observations record Earth surface changes over time, as well as more fleeting events such as storms, floods, fires, and volcanic eruptions.

  6. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-09-15

    Except for a small portion of the International Space Station (ISS) in the foreground, Hurricane Ivan, one of the strongest hurricanes on record, fills this image over the northern Gulf of Mexico. As the downgraded category 4 storm approached landfall on the Alabama coast Wednesday afternoon on September 15, 2004, sustained winds in the eye of the wall were reported at about 135 mph. The hurricane was photographed by astronaut Edward M. (Mike) Fincke from aboard the ISS at an altitude of approximately 230 miles. Crew Earth Observations record Earth surface changes over time, as well as more fleeting events such as storms, floods, fires, and volcanic eruptions.

  7. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-09-15

    This image hosts a look into the eye of Hurricane Ivan, one of the strongest hurricanes on record, as the storm approached landfall on the central Gulf coast Wednesday afternoon on September 15, 2004. The hurricane was photographed by astronaut Edward M. (Mike) Fincke from aboard the International Space Station (ISS) at an altitude of approximately 230 miles. At the time, sustained winds in the eye of the wall were reported at about 135 mph as the downgraded category 4 storm approached the Alabama coast. Crew Earth Observations record Earth surface changes over time, as well as more fleeting events such as storms, floods, fires, and volcanic eruptions.

  8. Digital Earth - A sustainable Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahavir

    2014-02-01

    All life, particularly human, cannot be sustainable, unless complimented with shelter, poverty reduction, provision of basic infrastructure and services, equal opportunities and social justice. Yet, in the context of cities, it is believed that they can accommodate more and more people, endlessly, regardless to their carrying capacity and increasing ecological footprint. The 'inclusion', for bringing more and more people in the purview of development is often limited to social and economic inclusion rather than spatial and ecological inclusion. Economic investment decisions are also not always supported with spatial planning decisions. Most planning for a sustainable Earth, be at a level of rural settlement, city, region, national or Global, fail on the capacity and capability fronts. In India, for example, out of some 8,000 towns and cities, Master Plans exist for only about 1,800. A chapter on sustainability or environment is neither statutorily compulsory nor a norm for these Master Plans. Geospatial technologies including Remote Sensing, GIS, Indian National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI), Indian National Urban Information Systems (NUIS), Indian Environmental Information System (ENVIS), and Indian National GIS (NGIS), etc. have potential to map, analyse, visualize and take sustainable developmental decisions based on participatory social, economic and social inclusion. Sustainable Earth, at all scales, is a logical and natural outcome of a digitally mapped, conceived and planned Earth. Digital Earth, in fact, itself offers a platform to dovetail the ecological, social and economic considerations in transforming it into a sustainable Earth.

  9. Energies of rare-earth ion states relative to host bands in optical materials from electron photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, Charles Warren

    There are a vast number of applications for rare-earth-activated materials and much of today's cutting-edge optical technology and emerging innovations are enabled by their unique properties. In many of these applications, interactions between the rare-earth ion and the host material's electronic states can enhance or inhibit performance and provide mechanisms for manipulating the optical properties. Continued advances in these technologies require knowledge of the relative energies of rare-earth and crystal band states so that properties of available materials may be fully understood and new materials may be logically developed. Conventional and resonant electron photoemission techniques were used to measure 4f electron and valence band binding energies in important optical materials, including YAG, YAlO3, and LiYF4. The photoemission spectra were theoretically modeled and analyzed to accurately determine relative energies. By combining these energies with ultraviolet spectroscopy, binding energies of excited 4fN-15d and 4fN+1 states were determined. While the 4fN ground-state energies vary considerably between different trivalent ions and lie near or below the top of the valence band in optical materials, the lowest 4f N-15d states have similar energies and are near the bottom of the conduction band. As an example for YAG, the Tb3+ 4f N ground state is in the band gap at 0.7 eV above the valence band while the Lu3+ ground state is 4.7 eV below the valence band maximum; however, the lowest 4fN-15d states are 2.2 eV below the conduction band for both ions. We found that a simple model accurately describes the binding energies of the 4fN, 4fN-1 5d, and 4fN+1 states. The model's success across the entire rare-earth series indicates that measurements on two different ions in a host are sufficient to predict the energies of all rare-earth ions in that host. This information provides new insight into electron transfer transitions, luminescence quenching, and valence

  10. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-10

    ISS040-E-091158 (10 Aug. 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members 225 nautical miles above Earth onboard the International Space Station used a 200mm lens to record this image of Hawke's Bay, New Zealand on Aug. 10, 2014. Napier and the bay area's most populous area are at bottom center of the frame.

  11. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-13

    ISS036-E-007619 (13 June 2013) --- To a crew member aboard the International Space Station, the home planet is seen from many different angles and perspectives, as evdenced by this Expedition 36 image of Earth's atmophere partially obscured by one of the orbital outpost's solar panels.

  12. Think Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niedermeyer, Fred; Ice, Kay

    1992-01-01

    Describes a series of environmental education instructional units for grades K-6 developed by the Think Earth Consortium that cover topics such as conservation, pollution control, and waste reduction. Provides testimony from one sixth-grade teacher that field tested the second-grade unit. (MDH)

  13. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-01

    Earth Observation taken during a night pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: New Zealand Aurora night pass. Docked Soyuz and Progress spacecraft are visible. On crewmember's Flickr page - The Moon, about to dive into a glowing ocean of green᥿9.

  14. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-21

    Earth observation taken during night pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message this is labeled as : Tehran, Iran. Lights along the coast of the Caspian Sea visible through clouds. July 21.

  15. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-05-19

    ISS036-E-002224 (21 May 2013) --- The sun is captured in a "starburst" mode over Earth's horizon by one of the Expedition 36 crew members as the orbital outpost was above a point in southwestern Minnesota on May 21, 2013.

  16. Earth Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaufele, Christopher; Zumoff, Nancy

    Earth Algebra is an entry level college algebra course that incorporates the spirit of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Curriculum and Evaluation Standards for School Mathematics at the college level. The context of the course places mathematics at the center of one of the major current concerns of the world. Through…

  17. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-03-29

    Small Expendable Deployer System (SEDS) is a tethered date collecting satellite and is intended to demonstrate a versatile and economical way of delivering smaller payloads to higher orbits or downward toward Earth's atmosphere. 19th Navstar Global Positioning System Satellite mission joined with previously launched satellites used for navigational purposes and geodite studies. These satellites are used commercially as well as by the military.

  18. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-14

    ISS040-E-011868 (14 June 2014) --- The dark waters of the Salton Sea stand out against neighboring cultivation and desert sands in the middle of the Southern California desert, as photographed by one of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station on June 14, 2014.

  19. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-03

    Earth observation taken during day pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message: From southernmost point of orbit over the South Pacific- all clouds seemed to be leading to the South Pole.

  20. Earth Sky

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-16

    S65-63282 (16 Dec. 1965) --- Area of Indian Ocean, just east of the island of Madagascar, as seen from the Gemini-6 spacecraft during its 15th revolution of Earth. Land mass at top of picture is the Malagasy Republic (Madagascar). Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  1. Rare earths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gambogi, J.

    2013-01-01

    Global mine production of rare earths was estimated to have declined slightly in 2012 relative to 2011 (Fig. 1). Production in China was estimated to have decreased to 95 from 105 kt (104,700 from 115,700 st) in 2011, while new mine production in the United States and Australia increased.

  2. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-04

    ISS036-E-015354 (4 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires near the Manicouagan Reservoir (seen at lower left) were recorded as part of a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station.

  3. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-04

    ISS036-E-015355 (4 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires near the Manicouagan Reservoir (seen at bottom center) were recorded in a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station.

  4. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-03

    ISS036-E-015292 (3 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires southeast of James Bay were recorded as part of a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 3-4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station. This image was recorded on July 3.

  5. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-04

    ISS036-E-015342 (4 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires southeast of James Bay were recorded as part of a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station.

  6. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-04

    ISS036-E-015335 (4 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires southeast of James Bay were recorded as part of a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station.

  7. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-12

    Earth Observation taken during a day pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: Moon, Japan, Kamchatka with a wild cloud. Part of the U.S. Lab and PMM are also visible.

  8. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-29

    ISS036-E-038117 (29 Aug. 2013) --- One of the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station photographed massive smoke plumes from the California wildfires. When this image was exposed on Aug. 29, the orbital outpost was approximately 220 miles above a point located at 38.6 degrees north latitude and 123.2 degrees west longitude.

  9. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-29

    ISS036-E-038114 (29 Aug. 2013) --- One of the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station photographed massive smoke plumes from the California wildfires. When this image was exposed on Aug. 29, the orbital outpost was approximately 220 miles above a point located at 38.6 degrees north latitude and 123.3 degrees west longitude.

  10. Earth Observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-18

    ISS042E006751 (11/08/2014) --- Earth observation taken from the International Space Station of the coastline of the United Arab Emirates. The large wheel along the coast center left is "Jumeirah" Palm Island, with a conference center, hotels, recreation areas and a large marine zoo.

  11. Earth Moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-06-08

    NASA Galileo spacecraft took this image of Earth moon on December 7, 1992 on its way to explore the Jupiter system in 1995-97. The distinct bright ray crater at the bottom of the image is the Tycho impact basin. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00405

  12. Earth's horizon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-07-30

    S114-E-6076 (30 July 2005) --- The blackness of space and Earth’s horizon form the backdrop for this view of the extended Space Shuttle Discovery’s remote manipulator system (RMS) robotic arm while docked to the International Space Station during the STS-114 mission.

  13. 28 CFR Appendix to Part 55 - Jurisdictions Covered Under Sections 4(f)(4) and 203(c) of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, as Amended

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...)(4) and 203(c) of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, as Amended Appendix to Part 55 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PROVISIONS OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT...)(4) and 203(c) of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, as Amended Jurisdictions Covered Under Sections 4(f...

  14. The roles of 4f- and 5f-orbitals in bonding: a magnetochemical, crystal field, density functional theory, and multi-reference wavefunction study

    DOE PAGES

    Lukens, W. W.; Speldrich, M.; Yang, P.; ...

    2016-01-01

    The electronic structures of 4f 3/5f 3Cp" 3M and Cp"sub>3M·alkylisocyanide complexes, where Cp" is 1,3-bis-(trimethylsilyl)cyclopentadienyl, are explored with a focus on the splitting of the f-orbitals, which provides information about the strengths of the metal–ligand interactions.

  15. Synthesis of carbon-coated Na2MnPO4F hollow spheres as a potential cathode material for Na-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ling; Hu, Yong; Zhang, Xiaoping; Liu, Jiequn; Zhu, Xing; Zhong, Shengkui

    2018-01-01

    Hollow sphere structure Na2MnPO4F/C composite is synthesized through spray drying, following in-situ pyrolytic carbon coating process. XRD results indicate that the well crystallized composite can be successfully synthesized, and no other impurity phases are detected. SEM and TEM results reveal that the Na2MnPO4F/C samples show intact hollow spherical architecture, and the hollow spherical shells with an average thickness of 150 nm-250 nm are composed of nanosized primary particles. Furthermore, the amorphous carbon layer is uniformly coated on the surface of the hollow sphere, and the nanosized Na2MnPO4F particles are well embedded in the carbon networks. Consequently, the hollow sphere structure Na2MnPO4F/C shows enhanced electrochemical performance. Especially, it is the first time that the obvious potential platforms (∼3.6 V) are observed during the charge and discharge process at room temperature.

  16. Earth Observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-09

    ISS024-E-014071 (9 Sept. 2010) --- This striking panoramic view of the southwestern USA and Pacific Ocean is an oblique image photographed by an Expedition 24 crew member looking outwards at an angle from the International Space Station (ISS). While most unmanned orbital satellites view Earth from a nadir perspective?in other words, collecting data with a ?straight down? viewing geometry?crew members onboard the space station can acquire imagery at a wide range of viewing angles using handheld digital cameras. The ISS nadir point (the point on Earth?s surface directly below the spacecraft) was located in northwestern Arizona, approximately 260 kilometers to the east-southeast, when this image was taken. The image includes parts of the States of Arizona, Nevada, Utah, and California together with a small segment of the Baja California, Mexico coastline at center left. Several landmarks and physiographic features are readily visible. The Las Vegas, NV metropolitan area appears as a gray region adjacent to the Spring Mountains and Sheep Range (both covered by white clouds). The Grand Canyon, located on the Colorado Plateau in Arizona, is visible (lower left) to the east of Las Vegas with the blue waters of Lake Mead in between. The image also includes the Mojave Desert, stretching north from the Salton Sea (left) to the Sierra Nevada mountain range. The Sierra Nevada range is roughly 640 kilometers long (north-south) and forms the boundary between the Central Valley of California and the adjacent Basin and Range. The Basin and Range is so called due to the pattern of long linear valleys separated by parallel linear mountain ranges ? this landscape, formed by extension and thinning of Earth?s crust, is particularly visible at right.

  17. Effects of CYP4F2 polymorphism on response to warfarin during induction phase: a prospective, open-label, observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Bejarano-Achache, Idit; Levy, Liran; Mlynarsky, Liat; Bialer, Meir; Muszkat, Mordechai; Caraco, Yoseph

    2012-04-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4F2 isozyme has been reported to metabolize vitamin K(1) in vitro, and the V433M polymorphism in the CYP4F2 gene has been associated with reduced vitamin K(1) metabolism and the need for a higher maintenance dosage in patients receiving warfarin. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of V433M polymorphism on warfarin response during the induction phase. Warfarin-naive white patients in whom warfarin was scheduled to be initiated with a target INR of 2 to 3 were enrolled into the study. On enrollment, a single blood sample for the genotyping of CYP4F2, CYP2C9, and VKORC1 was drawn. The international normalized ratio (INR) was followed daily during induction and twice weekly until stable anticoagulation was reached. The relationships between several markers of warfarin response during induction and CYP4F2 polymorphism were determined. The cohort consisted of 241 patients (115 men; mean [SD] age, 55.2 [19.4] years; weight, 79.5 [18.3] kg). Most of the patients were carriers of the CYP4F2 CC genotype (112 patients) or the CT genotype (104 patients). In carriers of the TT genotype (25 patients), INR >3 was >4-fold lower compared with that in carriers of the CC or CT genotype, suggesting that patients with the TT genotype were less sensitive to warfarin during induction. Also in TT carriers, the extent of excessive anticoagulation was >10-fold lower than in the other carriers. Both of these findings had a nominal P value of <0.05. After adjustment for false discovery rate, none of the findings remained significant at a threshold q value of <0.05. Among CC carriers, the concurrent use of a statin was associated with a 1-mg/d reduction in warfarin maintenance dosage. No similar effect was noted in the CT or TT carriers, suggesting a possible genetic influence on warfarin-statin interaction. These preliminary findings suggest that among white patients treated with warfarin, CYP4F2 polymorphism had a measurable effect on

  18. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-20

    Dr. Shawn Domagal-Goldman, Research Space Scientist, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, speaks on a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  19. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-20

    Dr. Phoebe Cohen, Professor of Geosciences, Williams College, speaks on a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  20. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-20

    Dr. Christopher House, Professor of Geosciences, Pennsylvania State University, speaks on a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  1. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-20

    Dr. Dawn Sumner, Professor of Geology, UC Davis, speaks on a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  2. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-20

    Dr. Timothy Lyons, Professor of Biogeochemistry, UC Riverside, speaks on a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  3. Electronic behaviour of Au-Pt alloys and the 4f binding energy shift anomaly in Au bimetallics- X-ray spectroscopy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongniu; Cui, Xiaoyu; Xiao, Qunfeng; Hu, Yongfeng; Wang, Zhiqiang; Yiu, Y. M.; Sham, T. K.

    2018-06-01

    The electronic structure and charge redistribution of 6s conduction charge and 5d charge in Au and Pt alloys, Au9Pt and AuPt9 have been investigated using a charge compensation model. It is found that, both the Au and Pt 4f binding energy (BE) exhibits a negative shift in the alloys relatively to the pure metal in apparent disagreement with electroneutrality considerations (Au is the most electronegative metallic element); more interestingly, the negative Au 4f BE shift in Au-Pt alloy is in contrast to previous observations for a large number of Au bimetallic systems with more electropositive hosts in which the more electropositive the host„ the more positive the Au 4f BE shift. This anomaly is counter intuitive to electronegativity considerations. This dilemma was resolved by the charge compensation model in which both electronegativity and charge neutrality can be satisfied and the overall charge flow δ, onto Au is small and positive and δ arises from charge flow of 6s conduction charge, Δnc onto Au site, which is partially compensated by the depletion of 6d charge Δnd at the Au site (δ = Δnc+ Δnd ˜0.1 >0). The much larger Coulomb interaction between 4f and 5d than that between 4f and 6s results in positive 4f BE shifts. The Au 4f BE shift in Au-Pt alloys together with 193Au Mössbauer data were used in the charge compensation model analysis which shows that the model is still valid in that the Au 4f shift in Au-Pt alloy arises from mainly conduction charge gain with little depletion of d charge at the Au site. The model also works for Pt. The Au and Pt 5d character in the alloys have been examined with valence band spectra which show both maintain their d characteristic in dilute alloys with Pt d piling up at the Fermi level, and the top of the Au valence band being pushed toward the Fermi level; this is confirmed with DFT densities of state calculations. When Pt is diluted in Au, it gains d charge as evident from the reduction in whiteline intensity

  4. Earth meandering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadiyan, H.; Zamani, A.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we try to put away current Global Tectonic Model to look the tectonic evolution of the earth from new point of view. Our new dynamic model is based on study of river meandering (RM) which infer new concept as Earth meandering(EM). In a universal gravitational field if we consider a clockwise spiral galaxy model rotate above Ninety East Ridge (geotectonic axis GA), this system with applying torsion field (likes geomagnetic field) in side direction from Rocky Mt. (west geotectonic pole WGP) to Tibetan plateau TP (east geotectonic pole EGP),it seems that pulled mass from WGP and pushed it in EGP due to it's rolling dynamics. According to this idea we see in topographic map that North America and Green land like a tongue pulled from Pacific mouth toward TP. Actually this system rolled or meander the earth over itself fractaly from small scale to big scale and what we see in the river meandering and Earth meandering are two faces of one coin. River transport water and sediments from high elevation to lower elevation and also in EM, mass transport from high altitude-Rocky Mt. to lower altitude Himalaya Mt. along 'S' shape geodetic line-optimum path which connect points from high altitude to lower altitude as kind of Euler Elastica(EE). These curves are responsible for mass spreading (source) and mass concentration (sink). In this regard, tiltness of earth spin axis plays an important role, 'S' are part of sigmoidal shape which formed due to intersection of Earth rolling with the Earth glob and actual feature of transform fault and river meandering. Longitudinal profile in mature rivers as a part of 'S' curve also is a kind of EE. 'S' which bound the whole earth is named S-1(S order 1) and cube corresponding to this which represent Earth fracturing in global scale named C-1(cube order 1 or side vergence cube SVC), C-1 is a biggest cycle of spiral polygon, so it is not completely closed and it has separation about diameter of C-7. Inside SVC we introduce cone

  5. D4F alleviates macrophage-derived foam cell apoptosis by inhibiting the NF-κB-dependent Fas/FasL pathway.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hua; Yao, Shu-Tong; Yang, Na-Na; Ren, Jie; Jiao, Peng; Zhang, Xiangjian; Li, Dong-Xuan; Zhang, Gong-An; Xia, Zhen-Fang; Qin, Shu-Cun

    2017-08-04

    This study was designed to explore the protective effect of D4F, an apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptide, on nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-dependent Fas/Fas ligand (FasL) pathway-mediated apoptosis in macrophages induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL). Our results showed that ox-LDL induced apoptosis, NF-κB P65 nuclear translocation and the upregulation of Fas/FasL pathway-related proteins, including Fas, FasL, Fas-associated death domain proteins (FADD), caspase-8 and caspase-3 in RAW264.7 macrophages, whereas silencing of Fas blocked ox-LDL-induced macrophage apoptosis. Furthermore, silencing of P65 attenuated macrophage apoptosis and the upregulation of Fas caused by ox-LDL, whereas P65 expression was not significantly affected by treatment with Fas siRNA. D4F attenuated the reduction of cell viability and the increase in lactate dehydrogenase leakage and apoptosis. Additionally, D4F inhibited ox-LDL-induced P65 nuclear translocation and upregulation of Fas/FasL pathway-related proteins in RAW264.7 cells and in atherosclerotic lesions of apoE -/- mice. However, Jo2, a Fas-activating monoclonal antibody, reversed the inhibitory effect of D4F on ox-LDL-induced cell apoptosis and upregulation of Fas, FasL and FADD. These data indicate that NF-κB mediates Fas/FasL pathway activation and apoptosis in macrophages induced by ox-LDL and that D4F protects macrophages from ox-LDL-induced apoptosis by suppressing the activation of NF-κB and the Fas/FasL pathway.

  6. Effects of feedstock availability on the negative ion behavior in a C{sub 4}F{sub 8} inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Shu-Xia; Research group PLASMANT, Dept. Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Antwerp; Gao, Fei

    2015-07-21

    In this paper, the negative ion behavior in a C{sub 4}F{sub 8} inductively coupled plasma (ICP) is investigated using a hybrid model. The model predicts a non-monotonic variation of the total negative ion density with power at low pressure (10–30 mTorr), and this trend agrees well with experiments that were carried out in many fluorocarbon (fc) ICP sources, like C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, CHF{sub 3}, and C{sub 4}F{sub 8}. This behavior is explained by the availability of feedstock C{sub 4}F{sub 8} gas as a source of the negative ions, as well as by the presence of low energy electrons due tomore » vibrational excitation at low power. The maximum of the negative ion density shifts to low power values upon decreasing pressure, because of the more pronounced depletion of C{sub 4}F{sub 8} molecules, and at high pressure (∼50 mTorr), the anion density continuously increases with power, which is similar to fc CCP sources. Furthermore, the negative ion composition is identified in this paper. Our work demonstrates that for a clear understanding of the negative ion behavior in radio frequency C{sub 4}F{sub 8} plasma sources, one needs to take into account many factors, like the attachment characteristics, the anion composition, the spatial profiles, and the reactor configuration. Finally, a detailed comparison of our simulation results with experiments is conducted.« less

  7. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-19

    ISS040-E-070439 (19 July 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station recorded this July 19 image of wildfires which are plaguing the Northwest and causing widespread destruction. The orbital outpost was flying 223 nautical miles above a point on Earth located at 48.0 degrees north latitude and 116.9 degrees west longitude when the image was exposed. The state of Washington is especially affected by the fires, many of which have been blamed on lightning. This particular fire was part of the Carlton Complex Fire, located near the city of Brewster in north central Washington. The reservoir visible near the center of the image is Banks Lake.

  8. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-25

    ISS040-E-081008 (25 July 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the International Space Station, flying 225 nautical miles above Earth, photographed this image of the Tifernine dunes and the Tassili Najjer Mountains in Algeria. The area is about 800 miles south, southeast of Algiers, the capital of Algeria. The dunes are in excess of 1,000 feet in height.

  9. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-15

    ISS040-E-063578 (15 July 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, flying some 225 nautical miles above the Caribbean Sea in the early morning hours of July 15, photographed this north-looking panorama that includes parts of Cuba, the Bahamas and Florida, and even runs into several other areas in the southeastern U.S. The long stretch of lights to the left of center frame gives the shape of Miami.

  10. Earth Observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-28

    ISS028-E-006059 (28 May 2011) --- One of the Expedition 28 crew members, photographing Earth images onboard the International Space Station while docked with the space shuttle Endeavour and flying at an altitude of just under 220 miles, captured this frame of the Salton Sea. The body of water, easily identifiable from low orbit spacecraft, is a saline, endorheic rift lake located directly on the San Andreas Fault. The agricultural area is within the Coachella Valley.

  11. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-01-01

    In July 1990, the Marshall Space Flight Center, in a joint project with the Department of Defense/Air Force Space Test Program, launched the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) using an Atlas I launch vehicle. The mission was designed to study the effects of artificial ion clouds produced by chemical releases on the Earth's ionosphere and magnetosphere, and to monitor the effects of space radiation environment on sophisticated electronics.

  12. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-27

    ISS028-E-009979 (27 June 2011) --- The Massachusetts coastline is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 28 crew member on the International Space Station. The Crew Earth Observations team at NASA Johnson Space Center sends specific ground targets for photography up to the station crew on a daily basis, but sometimes the crew takes imagery on their own of striking displays visible from orbit. One such display, often visible to the ISS crew due to their ability to look outwards at angles between 0 and 90 degrees, is sunglint on the waters of Earth. Sunglint is caused by sunlight reflecting off of a water surface?much as light reflects from a mirror?directly towards the observer. Roughness variations of the water surface scatter the light, blurring the reflection and producing the typical silvery sheen of the sunglint area. The point of maximum sunglint is centered within Cape Cod Bay, the body of water partially enclosed by the ?hook? of Cape Cod in Massachusetts (bottom). Cape Cod was formally designated a National Seashore in 1966. Sunglint off the water provides sharp contrast with the coastline and the nearby islands of Martha?s Vineyard and Nantucket (lower left), both popular destinations for tourists and summer residents. To the north, rocky Cape Ann extends out into the Atlantic Ocean; the border with New Hampshire is located approximately 30 kilometers up the coast. Further to the west, the eastern half of Long Island, New York is visible emerging from extensive cloud cover over the mid-Atlantic and Midwestern States. Persistent storm tracks had been contributing to record flooding along rivers in the Midwest at the time this image was taken in late June 2011. Thin blue layers of the atmosphere, contrasted against the darkness of space, are visible extending along the Earth?s curvature at top.

  13. NASA's Current Earth Science Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, Leslie Bermann

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Earth science program is a scientific endeavor whose goal is to provide long-term understanding of the Earth as an integrated system of land, water, air and life. A highly developed scientific knowledge of the Earth system is necessary to understand how the environment affects humanity, and how humanity may be affecting the environment. The remote sensing technologies used to gather the global environmental data used in such research also have numerous practical applications. Current applications of remote sensing data demonstrate their practical benefits in areas such as the monitoring of crop conditions and yields, natural disasters and forest fires; hazardous waste clean up; and tracking of vector-borne diseases. The long-term availability of environmental data is essential for the continuity of important research and applications efforts. NASA's Earth observation program has undergone many changes in the recent past.

  14. Cloudy Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-05-08

    Decades of satellite observations and astronaut photographs show that clouds dominate space-based views of Earth. One study based on nearly a decade of satellite data estimated that about 67 percent of Earth’s surface is typically covered by clouds. This is especially the case over the oceans, where other research shows less than 10 percent of the sky is completely clear of clouds at any one time. Over land, 30 percent of skies are completely cloud free. Earth’s cloudy nature is unmistakable in this global cloud fraction map, based on data collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite. While MODIS collects enough data to make a new global map of cloudiness every day, this version of the map shows an average of all of the satellite’s cloud observations between July 2002 and April 2015. Colors range from dark blue (no clouds) to light blue (some clouds) to white (frequent clouds). Read more here: 1.usa.gov/1P6lbMU Credit: NASA Earth Observatory NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  15. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-02

    ISS028-E-020276 (2 Aug. 2011) --- This photograph of polar mesospheric clouds was acquired at an altitude of just over 202 nautical miles (about 322 kilometers) in the evening hours (03:19:54 Greenwich Mean Time) on Aug. 2, 2011, as the International Space Station was passing over the English Channel. The nadir coordinates of the station were 49.1 degrees north latitude and 5.5 degrees west longitude. Polar mesospheric clouds (also known as noctilucent, or ?night-shining? clouds) are transient, upper atmospheric phenomena that are usually observed in the summer months at high latitudes (greater than 50 degrees) of both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. They appear bright and cloudlike while in deep twilight. They are illuminated by sunlight when the lower layers of the atmosphere are in the darkness of Earth?s shadow. The horizon of Earth appears at the bottom of the image, with some layers of the lower atmosphere already illuminated by the rising sun. The higher, bluish-colored clouds look much like wispy cirrus clouds, which can be found as high as 60,000 feet (18 kilometers) in the atmosphere. However noctilucent clouds, as seen here, are observed in the mesosphere at altitudes of 250,000 to 280,000 feet (about 76 to 85 kilometers). Astronaut observations of polar mesospheric clouds over northern Europe in the summer are not uncommon.

  16. Quantum Theory of Rare-Earth Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Takashi; Akai, Hisazumi

    2018-04-01

    Strong permanent magnets mainly consist of rare earths (R) and transition metals (T). The main phase of the neodymium magnet, which is the strongest magnet, is Nd2Fe14B. Sm2Fe17N3 is another magnet compound having excellent magnetic properties comparable to those of Nd2Fe14B. Their large saturation magnetization, strong magnetocrystalline anisotropy, and high Curie temperature originate from the interaction between the T-3d electrons and R-4f electrons. This article discusses the magnetism of rare-earth magnet compounds. The basic theory and first-principles calculation approaches for quantitative description of the magnetic properties are presented, together with applications to typical compounds such as Nd2Fe14B, Sm2Fe17N3, and the recently synthesized NdFe12N.

  17. Voltage Control of Rare-Earth Magnetic Moments at the Magnetic-Insulator-Metal Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, Alejandro O.; Cahaya, Adam B.; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2018-01-01

    The large spin-orbit interaction in the lanthanides implies a strong coupling between their internal charge and spin degrees of freedom. We formulate the coupling between the voltage and the local magnetic moments of rare-earth atoms with a partially filled 4 f shell at the interface between an insulator and a metal. The rare-earth-mediated torques allow the power-efficient control of spintronic devices by electric-field-induced ferromagnetic resonance and magnetization switching.

  18. Rate coefficients for the reaction of O(1D) with the atmospherically long-lived greenhouse gases NF3, SF5CF3, CHF3, C2F6, c-C4F8, n-C5F12, and n-C6F14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baasandorj, M.; Hall, B. D.; Burkholder, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    The contribution of atmospherically persistent (long-lived) greenhouse gases to the radiative forcing of Earth has increased over the past several decades. The impact of highly fluorinated, saturated compounds, in particular perfluorinated compounds, on climate change is a concern because of their long atmospheric lifetimes, which are primarily determined by stratospheric loss processes, as well as their strong absorption in the infrared "window" region. A potentially key stratospheric loss process for these compounds is their gas-phase reaction with electronically excited oxygen atoms, O(1D). Therefore, accurate reaction rate coefficient data is desired for input to climate change models. In this work, rate coefficients, k, were measured for the reaction of O(1D) with several key long-lived greenhouse gases, namely NF3, SF5CF3, CHF3 (HFC-23), C2F6, c-C4F8, n-C5F12, and n-C6F14. Room temperature rate coefficients for the total reaction, kTot, corresponding to loss of O(1D), and reactive channel, kR, corresponding to the loss of the reactant compound, were measured for NF3 and SF5CF3 using competitive reaction and relative rate methods, respectively. kR was measured for the CHF3 reaction and improved upper-limits were determined for the perfluorinated compounds included in this study. For NF3, kTot was determined to be (2.55 ± 0.38) × 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 and kR, which was measured using CF3Cl, N2O, CF2ClCF2Cl (CFC-114), and CF3CFCl2 (CFC-114a) as reference compounds, was determined to be (2.21 ± 0.33) × 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. For SF5CF3, kTot = (3.24 ± 0.50) × 10-13 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 and kR < 5.8 × 10×14 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 were measured, where kR is a factor of three lower than the current recommendation of kTot for use in atmospheric modeling. For CHF3 kR was determined to be (2.35 ± 0.35) × 10-12 cm3 molecule-1 s-1, which corresponds to a reactive channel yield of 0.26 ± 0.04, and resolves a large discrepancy among previously reported values

  19. Rare earth elements and permanent magnets (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dent, Peter C.

    2012-04-01

    Rare earth (RE) magnets have become virtually indispensible in a wide variety of industries such as aerospace, automotive, electronics, medical, and military. RE elements are essential ingredients in these high performance magnets based on intermetallic compounds RECo5, RE2TM17 (TM: transition metal), and RE2TM14B. Rare earth magnets are known for their superior magnetic properties—high induction, and coercive force. These properties arise due to the extremely high magnetocrystalline anisotropy made possible by unique 3d-4f interactions between transition metals and rare earths. For more than 40 years, these magnets remain the number one choice in applications that require high magnetic fields in extreme operating conditions—high demagnetization forces and high temperature. EEC produces and specializes in RECo5 and RE2TM17 type sintered magnets. Samarium and gadolinium are key RE ingredients in the powder metallurgical magnet production processes which include melting, crushing, jet milling, pressing, sintering, and heat treating. The magnetic properties and applications of these magnets will be discussed. We will also briefly discuss the past, current, and future of the permanent magnet business. Currently, over 95% of all pure rare earth oxides are sourced from China, which currently controls the market. We will provide insights regarding current and potential new magnet technologies and designer choices, which may mitigate rare earth supply chain issues now and into the future.

  20. Earth as an Extrasolar Planet: Earth Model Validation Using EPOXI Earth Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Meadows, Victoria S.; Crisp, David; Deming, Drake; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Charbonneau, David; Livengood, Timothy A.; Seager, Sara; Barry, Richard K.; Hearty, Thomas; Hewagama, Tilak; Lisse, Carey M.; McFadden, Lucy A.; Wellnitz, Dennis D.

    2011-06-01

    The EPOXI Discovery Mission of Opportunity reused the Deep Impact flyby spacecraft to obtain spatially and temporally resolved visible photometric and moderate resolution near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic observations of Earth. These remote observations provide a rigorous validation of whole-disk Earth model simulations used to better understand remotely detectable extrasolar planet characteristics. We have used these data to upgrade, correct, and validate the NASA Astrobiology Institute's Virtual Planetary Laboratory three-dimensional line-by-line, multiple-scattering spectral Earth model. This comprehensive model now includes specular reflectance from the ocean and explicitly includes atmospheric effects such as Rayleigh scattering, gas absorption, and temperature structure. We have used this model to generate spatially and temporally resolved synthetic spectra and images of Earth for the dates of EPOXI observation. Model parameters were varied to yield an optimum fit to the data. We found that a minimum spatial resolution of ∼100 pixels on the visible disk, and four categories of water clouds, which were defined by using observed cloud positions and optical thicknesses, were needed to yield acceptable fits. The validated model provides a simultaneous fit to Earth's lightcurve, absolute brightness, and spectral data, with a root-mean-square (RMS) error of typically less than 3% for the multiwavelength lightcurves and residuals of ∼10% for the absolute brightness throughout the visible and NIR spectral range. We have extended our validation into the mid-infrared by comparing the model to high spectral resolution observations of Earth from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, obtaining a fit with residuals of ∼7% and brightness temperature errors of less than 1 K in the atmospheric window. For the purpose of understanding the observable characteristics of the distant Earth at arbitrary viewing geometry and observing cadence, our validated forward model can be

  1. Earth as an Extrasolar Planet: Earth Model Validation Using EPOXI Earth Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Meadows, Victoria S.; Crisp, David; Deming, Drake; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Charbonneau, David; Livengood, Timothy A.; Seager, Sara; Barry, Richard; Hearty, Thomas; hide

    2011-01-01

    The EPOXI Discovery Mission of Opportunity reused the Deep Impact flyby spacecraft to obtain spatially and temporally resolved visible photometric and moderate resolution near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic observations of Earth. These remote observations provide a rigorous validation of whole disk Earth model simulations used to better under- stand remotely detectable extrasolar planet characteristics. We have used these data to upgrade, correct, and validate the NASA Astrobiology Institute s Virtual Planetary Laboratory three-dimensional line-by-line, multiple-scattering spectral Earth model (Tinetti et al., 2006a,b). This comprehensive model now includes specular reflectance from the ocean and explicitly includes atmospheric effects such as Rayleigh scattering, gas absorption, and temperature structure. We have used this model to generate spatially and temporally resolved synthetic spectra and images of Earth for the dates of EPOXI observation. Model parameters were varied to yield an optimum fit to the data. We found that a minimum spatial resolution of approx.100 pixels on the visible disk, and four categories of water clouds, which were defined using observed cloud positions and optical thicknesses, were needed to yield acceptable fits. The validated model provides a simultaneous fit to the Earth s lightcurve, absolute brightness, and spectral data, with a root-mean-square error of typically less than 3% for the multiwavelength lightcurves, and residuals of approx.10% for the absolute brightness throughout the visible and NIR spectral range. We extend our validation into the mid-infrared by comparing the model to high spectral resolution observations of Earth from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, obtaining a fit with residuals of approx.7%, and temperature errors of less than 1K in the atmospheric window. For the purpose of understanding the observable characteristics of the distant Earth at arbitrary viewing geometry and observing cadence, our validated

  2. Earth Observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-11

    ISS024-E-014233 (11 Sept. 2010) --- A smoke plume near the northern Caspian Sea, Kazakhstan is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 24 crew member on the International Space Station. This broad view of the north coast of the Caspian Sea shows a smoke plume (left) and two river deltas (bottom and lower right). The larger delta is that of the Volga River which appears prominently here in sunglint (light reflected off a water surface back towards the observer), and the smaller less prominent delta is that of the Ural River. Wide angle, oblique views ? taken looking outward at an angle, rather than straight down towards Earth ? such as this give an excellent impression of how crew members onboard the space station view Earth. For a sense of scale, the Caucasus Mts. (across the Caspian, top right) are approximately 1,100 kilometers to the southwest of the International Space Station?s nadir point location ? the point on Earth directly underneath the spacecraft ? at the time this image was taken. The smoke plume appears to be sourced in the dark-toned coastal marsh vegetation along the outer fringe of the Ural River delta, rather than in a city or at some oil storage facility. Although even small fires produce plumes that are long and bright and thus easily visible from space, the density of the smoke in this plume, and its 350-kilometer length across the entire north lobe of the Caspian Sea, suggest it was a significant fire. The smoke was thick enough nearer the source to cast shadows on the sea surface below. Lines mark three separate pulses of smoke, the most recent, nearest the source, extending directly south away from the coastline (lower left). With time, plumes become progressively more diffuse. The oldest pulse appears to be the thinnest, casting no obvious shadows (center left).

  3. s-wave threshold in electron attachment - Results in 2-C4F6 and CFCl3 at ultra-low electron energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Alajajian, S. H.; Ajello, J. M.; Orient, O. J.

    1984-01-01

    Electron attachment lineshapes and cross sections are reported for the processes 2-C4F6(-)/2-C4F6 and Cl(-)/CFCl3 at electron energies of 0-120 and 0-140 meV, and at resolutions of 6 and 7 meV (FWHM), respectively. As in previous measurements in CCl4 and SF6, the results show resolution-limited narrow structure in the cross section at electron energies below 15 meV. This structure arises from the divergence of the s-wave cross section in the limit of zero electron energy. Comparisons are given with swarm-measured results, and with collisional ionization (high-Rydberg attachment) data in this energy range.

  4. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-04-20

    ISS047e069406 (04/20/2016) ---Earth observation image taken by the Expedition 47 crew aboard the International Space Station. This is an oblique south-looking view of the main Bahama island chain. Cuba is across the entire top of the image, the Florida Peninsula on the right margin. In the Bahamas, the main Andros island is just distinguishable under cloud upper left of center. Under less cloud is the Abaco Islands in the foreground (middle of pic nearest camera left of center.)

  5. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-24

    ISS040-E-018729 (24 June 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station photographed this image featuring the peninsular portion of the state of Florida. Lake Okeechobee stands out in the south central part of the state. The heavily-populated area of Miami can be traced along the Atlantic Coast near the bottom of the scene. Cape Canaveral and the Kennedy Space Center are just below center frame on the Atlantic Coast. The Florida Keys are at the south (left) portion of the scene and the Gulf Coast, including the Tampa-St. Petersburg area, is near frame center.

  6. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-29

    ISS040-E-005979 (29 May 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the International Space Station used a 200mm lens to photograph this image from 222 nautical miles above Earth showing Harris County and Galveston County, Texas plus several other surrounding counties, including a long stretch along the Gulf of Mexico (bottom left). The entirety of Galveston Bay is visible at bottom center. Just below center lies the 1625-acre site of NASA's Johnson Space Center, one of the training venues for all space station crew members and the nearby long-time area of residence for NASA astronauts.

  7. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-31

    ISS036-E-027014 (31 July 2013) --- One of the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, as it was passing over Eastern Europe on July 31, 2013, took this night picture looking toward the Mediterranean Sea, which almost blends into the horizon. Also visible are the Aegean Sea, Adriatic Sea and Mediterranean Sea. Parts of the following countries are among those visible as well: Greece, Italy, Sicily, Bulgaria, Serbia, Croatia and Albania. The high oblique 50mm lens shot includes a number of stars in the late July sky. A solar array panel is visible in the darkness on the right side of the frame.

  8. Earth Explorer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Earth Explorer Web site provides access to millions of land-related products, including the following: Satellite images from Landsat, advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR), and Corona data sets. Aerial photographs from the National Aerial Photography Program, NASA, and USGS data sets.  Digital cartographic data from digital elevation models, digital line graphs, digital raster graphics, and digital orthophoto quadrangles. USGS paper maps Digital, film, and paper products are available, and many products can be previewed before ordering.

  9. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-07-24

    A Delta II rocket carrying the Geomagnetic Tail Lab (GEOTAIL) spacecraft lifts off at Launch Complex 17, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) into a cloud-dappled sky. This liftoff marks the first Delta launch under the medium expendable launch vehicle services contract between NASA and McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Co. The GEOTAIL mission, a joint US/Japanese project, is the first in a series of five satellites to study the interactions between the Sun, the Earth's magnetic field, and the Van Allen radiation belts.

  10. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-01-31

    The Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft embarks on a journey that will culminate in a close encounter with an asteroid. The launch of NEAR inaugurates NASA's irnovative Discovery program of small-scale planetary missions with rapid, lower-cost development cycles and focused science objectives. NEAR will rendezvous in 1999 with the asteroid 433 Eros to begin the first long-term, close-up look at an asteroid's surface composition and physical properties. NEAR's science payload includes an x-ray/gamma ray spectrometer, an near-infrared spectrograph, a laser rangefinder, a magnetometer, a radio science experiment and a multi-spectral imager.

  11. Detergent-Induced Stabilization and Improved 3D Map of the Human Heteromeric Amino Acid Transporter 4F2hc-LAT2

    PubMed Central

    Harder, Daniel; Stauffer, Mirko; Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Brühlmann, Béla; Rosell, Albert; Ilgü, Hüseyin; Kovar, Karin; Palacín, Manuel; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2014-01-01

    Human heteromeric amino acid transporters (HATs) are membrane protein complexes that facilitate the transport of specific amino acids across cell membranes. Loss of function or overexpression of these transporters is implicated in several human diseases such as renal aminoacidurias and cancer. HATs are composed of two subunits, a heavy and a light subunit, that are covalently connected by a disulphide bridge. Light subunits catalyse amino acid transport and consist of twelve transmembrane α-helix domains. Heavy subunits are type II membrane N-glycoproteins with a large extracellular domain and are involved in the trafficking of the complex to the plasma membrane. Structural information on HATs is scarce because of the difficulty in heterologous overexpression. Recently, we had a major breakthrough with the overexpression of a recombinant HAT, 4F2hc-LAT2, in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. Microgram amounts of purified protein made possible the reconstruction of the first 3D map of a human HAT by negative-stain transmission electron microscopy. Here we report the important stabilization of purified human 4F2hc-LAT2 using a combination of two detergents, i.e., n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside and lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol, and cholesteryl hemisuccinate. The superior quality and stability of purified 4F2hc-LAT2 allowed the measurement of substrate binding by scintillation proximity assay. In addition, an improved 3D map of this HAT could be obtained. The detergent-induced stabilization of the purified human 4F2hc-LAT2 complex presented here paves the way towards its crystallization and structure determination at high-resolution, and thus the elucidation of the working mechanism of this important protein complex at the molecular level. PMID:25299125

  12. Detergent-induced stabilization and improved 3D map of the human heteromeric amino acid transporter 4F2hc-LAT2.

    PubMed

    Meury, Marcel; Costa, Meritxell; Harder, Daniel; Stauffer, Mirko; Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Brühlmann, Béla; Rosell, Albert; Ilgü, Hüseyin; Kovar, Karin; Palacín, Manuel; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2014-01-01

    Human heteromeric amino acid transporters (HATs) are membrane protein complexes that facilitate the transport of specific amino acids across cell membranes. Loss of function or overexpression of these transporters is implicated in several human diseases such as renal aminoacidurias and cancer. HATs are composed of two subunits, a heavy and a light subunit, that are covalently connected by a disulphide bridge. Light subunits catalyse amino acid transport and consist of twelve transmembrane α-helix domains. Heavy subunits are type II membrane N-glycoproteins with a large extracellular domain and are involved in the trafficking of the complex to the plasma membrane. Structural information on HATs is scarce because of the difficulty in heterologous overexpression. Recently, we had a major breakthrough with the overexpression of a recombinant HAT, 4F2hc-LAT2, in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. Microgram amounts of purified protein made possible the reconstruction of the first 3D map of a human HAT by negative-stain transmission electron microscopy. Here we report the important stabilization of purified human 4F2hc-LAT2 using a combination of two detergents, i.e., n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside and lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol, and cholesteryl hemisuccinate. The superior quality and stability of purified 4F2hc-LAT2 allowed the measurement of substrate binding by scintillation proximity assay. In addition, an improved 3D map of this HAT could be obtained. The detergent-induced stabilization of the purified human 4F2hc-LAT2 complex presented here paves the way towards its crystallization and structure determination at high-resolution, and thus the elucidation of the working mechanism of this important protein complex at the molecular level.

  13. Transfer of Magnetic Order and Anisotropy through Epitaxial Integration of 3d and 4f Spin Systems.

    PubMed

    Bluschke, M; Frano, A; Schierle, E; Minola, M; Hepting, M; Christiani, G; Logvenov, G; Weschke, E; Benckiser, E; Keimer, B

    2017-05-19

    Resonant x-ray scattering at the Dy M_{5} and Ni L_{3} absorption edges was used to probe the temperature and magnetic field dependence of magnetic order in epitaxial LaNiO_{3}-DyScO_{3} superlattices. For superlattices with 2 unit cell thick LaNiO_{3} layers, a commensurate spiral state develops in the Ni spin system below 100 K. Upon cooling below T_{ind}=18  K, Dy-Ni exchange interactions across the LaNiO_{3}-DyScO_{3} interfaces induce collinear magnetic order of interfacial Dy moments as well as a reorientation of the Ni spins to a direction dictated by the strong magnetocrystalline anisotropy of Dy. This transition is reversible by an external magnetic field of 3 T. Tailored exchange interactions between rare-earth and transition-metal ions thus open up new perspectives for the manipulation of spin structures in metal-oxide heterostructures and devices.

  14. Unraveling Pr3+ 5d-4f emission in LiLa9(SiO4)6O2 crystals doped with Pr3+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanovskikh, Konstantin V.; Shi, Qiufeng; Bettinelli, Marco; Pustovarov, Vladimir A.

    2018-05-01

    LiLa9(SiO4)6O2 (LLSO) crystals doped with Pr3+ ions were grown using the slow cooling flux method. The crystals were characterized by means of luminescence and optical spectroscopy and luminescence decay measurements upon excitation in UV, VUV and X-ray range including using synchrotron radiation sources. The spectroscopic data revealed the presence Pr3+ 5d↔4f emission and excitation bands related to Pr3+ ions replacing La3+ in two nonequivalent positions, and features related Pr3+ 4f→4f emission. The photon cascade emission is not observed in LLSO:Pr3+, since Pr3+1S0 state is above the bottom of 4fn-15d mixed-states band. Apart from the emission features related to Pr3+, a defect-related emission was observed upon UV, VUV, and ionizing radiation excitation. Presence of the defects was shown with thermoluminescence measurements and suggested to be the main reason for suppression the 5d→4f emission. Peculiarities of host-to-impurity energy transfer are analyzed and discussed.

  15. The liquid-vapor equilibria of TIP4P/2005 and BLYPSP-4F water models determined through direct simulations of the liquid-vapor interface.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongyi; Wang, Feng

    2015-06-07

    In this paper, the surface tension and critical properties for the TIP4P/2005 and BLYPSP-4F models are reported. A clear dependence of surface tension on the van der Waals cutoff radius (rvdw) is shown when van der Waals interactions are modeled with a simple cutoff scheme. A linear extrapolation formula is proposed that can be used to determine the infinite rvdw surface tension through a few simulations with finite rvdw. A procedure for determining liquid and vapor densities is proposed that does not require fitting to a profile function. Although the critical temperature of water is also found to depend on the choice of rvdw, the dependence is weaker. We argue that a rvdw of 1.75 nm is a good compromise for water simulations when long-range van der Waals correction is not applied. Since the majority of computational programs do not support rigorous treatment of long-range dispersion, the establishment of a minimal acceptable rvdw is important for the simulation of a variety of inhomogeneous systems, such as water bubbles, and water in confined environments. The BLYPSP-4F model predicts room temperature surface tension marginally better than TIP4P/2005 but overestimates the critical temperature. This is expected since only liquid configurations were fit during the development of the BLYPSP-4F potential. The potential is expected to underestimate the stability of vapor and thus overestimate the region of stability for the liquid.

  16. Inhibition of VEGF-dependent angiogenesis by the anti-CD82 monoclonal antibody 4F9 through regulation of lipid raft microdomains

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Sayaka; Iwata, Satoshi; Hatano, Ryo

    CD82 (also known as KAI1) belongs to the tetraspanin superfamily of type III transmembrane proteins, and is involved in regulating cell adhesion, migration and proliferation. In contrast to these well-established roles of CD82 in tumor biology, its function in endothelial cell (EC) activity and tumor angiogenesis is yet to be determined. In this study, we show that suppression of CD82 negatively regulates vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis. Moreover, we demonstrate that the anti-CD82 mAb 4F9 effectively inhibits phosphorylation of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), which is the principal mediator of the VEGF-induced angiogenic signaling process in tumor angiogenesis, by regulatingmore » the organization of the lipid raft microdomain signaling platform in human EC. Our present work therefore suggests that CD82 on EC is a potential target for anti-angiogenic therapy in VEGFR2-dependent tumor angiogenesis. -- Highlights: •Knockdown of CD82 decreases EC migration, proliferation and angiogenesis. •Anti-CD82 mAb 4F9 inhibits EC migration, proliferation and angiogenesis. •4F9 inhibits VEGFR2 phosphorylation via control of CD82 distribution in lipid rafts.« less

  17. Fluorocarbon assisted atomic layer etching of SiO 2 and Si using cyclic Ar/C 4F 8 and Ar/CHF 3 plasma

    DOE PAGES

    Metzler, Dominik; Li, Chen; Engelmann, Sebastian; ...

    2015-11-11

    The need for atomic layer etching (ALE) is steadily increasing as smaller critical dimensions and pitches are required in device patterning. A flux-control based cyclic Ar/C 4F 8 ALE based on steady-state Ar plasma in conjunction with periodic, precise C 4F 8 injection and synchronized plasma-based low energy Ar + ion bombardment has been established for SiO 2. 1 In this work, the cyclic process is further characterized and extended to ALE of silicon under similar process conditions. The use of CHF 3 as a precursor is examined and compared to C 4F 8. CHF 3 is shown to enablemore » selective SiO 2/Si etching using a fluorocarbon (FC) film build up. Other critical process parameters investigated are the FC film thickness deposited per cycle, the ion energy, and the etch step length. Etching behavior and mechanisms are studied using in situ real time ellipsometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Silicon ALE shows less self-limitation than silicon oxide due to higher physical sputtering rates for the maximum ion energies used in this work, ranged from 20 to 30 eV. The surface chemistry is found to contain fluorinated silicon oxide during the etching of silicon. As a result, plasma parameters during ALE are studied using a Langmuir probe and establish the impact of precursor addition on plasma properties.« less

  18. Effect of the chamber wall on fluorocarbon-assisted atomic layer etching of SiO2 using cyclic Ar/C4F8 plasma

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Masatoshi; Metzler, Dominik; Li, Chen; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.

    2016-01-01

    The authors studied the effect of the temperature and chemical state of the chamber wall on process performance for atomic layer etching of SiO2 using a steady-state Ar plasma, periodic injection of a defined number of C4F8 molecules, and synchronized plasma-based Ar+ ion bombardment. To evaluate these effects, the authors measured the quartz coupling window temperature. The plasma gas phase chemistry was characterized using optical emission spectroscopy. It was found that although the thickness of the polymer film deposited in each cycle is constant, the etching behavior changed, which is likely related to a change in the plasma gas phase chemistry. The authors found that the main gas phase changes occur after C4F8 injection. The C4F8 and the quartz window react and generate SiF and CO. The emission intensity changes with wall surface state and temperature. Therefore, changes in the plasma gas species generation can lead to a shift in etching performance during processing. During initial cycles, minimal etching is observed, while etching gradually increases with cycle number. PMID:27375342

  19. Herbal Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Subtle vegetation changes are visible in this year-long visualization. Large-scale patterns vary with seasons, but the local variations in green are also sensitive precipitation, drought and fire. High values of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, or NDVI, represent dense green functioning vegetation and low NDVI values represent sparse green vegetation or vegetation under stress from limiting conditions, such as drought. The visualization was created from a year’s worth of data from April 2012 to April 2013. The information was sent back to Earth from the Visible-Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership or Suomi NPP satellite, a partnership between NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA. Credit: NASA/NOAA To read more go to: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/NPP/news/vegetation.html NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  20. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-17

    ISS036-E-009405 (17 June 2013) --- One of the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station, some 240 miles above Earth, used a 50mm lens to record this oblique nighttime image of a large part of the nation’s second largest state in area, including the four largest metropolitan areas in population. The extent of the metropolitan areas is easily visible at night due to city and highway lights. The largest metro area, Dallas-Fort Worth, often referred to informally as the Metroplex, is the heavily cloud-covered area at the top center of the photo. Neighboring Oklahoma, on the north side of the Red River, less than 100 miles to the north of the Metroplex, appears to be experiencing thunderstorms. The Houston metropolitan area, including the coastal city of Galveston, is at lower right. To the east near the Texas border with Louisiana, the metropolitan area of Beaumont-Port Arthur appears as a smaller blotch of light, also hugging the coast of the Texas Gulf. Moving inland to the left side of the picture one can delineate the San Antonio metro area. The capital city of Austin can be seen to the northeast of San Antonio. This and hundreds of thousands of other Earth photos taken by astronauts and cosmonauts over the past 50 years are available on http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov

  1. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-06

    ISS028-E-014782 (6 July 2011) --- The Shoemaker (formerly Teague) Impact Structure, located in Western Australia in a drainage basin south of the Waldburg Range, presents an other-worldly appearance in this detailed photograph recorded from onboard the International Space Station on July 6. The Shoemaker impact site is approximately 30 kilometers in diameter, and is clearly defined by concentric ring structures formed in sedimentary rocks (brown to dark brown, image center) that were deformed by the impact event approximately 1630 million years ago, according to the Earth Impact Database. Several saline and ephemeral lakes?Nabberu, Teague, Shoemaker, and numerous smaller ponds?occupy the land surface between the concentric ring structures. Differences in color result from both water depth and suspended sediments, with some bright salt crusts visible around the edges of smaller ponds (image center The Teague Impact Structure was renamed Shoemaker in honor of the late Dr. Eugene M. Shoemaker, a pioneer in the field of impact crater studies and planetary geology, and founder of the Astrogeology Branch of the United States Geological Survey. The image was recorded with a digital still camera using a 200 mm lens, and is provided by the ISS Crew Earth Observations experiment and Image Science & Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center.

  2. Reed canarygrass yield improvement

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Reed canarygrass is well adapted to the northern USA. Eight cultivars and 72 accessions collected in rural landscapes from Iowa to New Hampshire were evaluated for yield. Accessions produced on average 7% higher biomass yield compared to existing cultivars. Naturalized populations of reed canarygras...

  3. Combining electronic structure and many-body theory with large databases: A method for predicting the nature of 4 f states in Ce compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herper, H. C.; Ahmed, T.; Wills, J. M.; Di Marco, I.; Björkman, T.; Iuşan, D.; Balatsky, A. V.; Eriksson, O.

    2017-08-01

    Recent progress in materials informatics has opened up the possibility of a new approach to accessing properties of materials in which one assays the aggregate properties of a large set of materials within the same class in addition to a detailed investigation of each compound in that class. Here we present a large scale investigation of electronic properties and correlated magnetism in Ce-based compounds accompanied by a systematic study of the electronic structure and 4 f -hybridization function of a large body of Ce compounds. We systematically study the electronic structure and 4 f -hybridization function of a large body of Ce compounds with the goal of elucidating the nature of the 4 f states and their interrelation with the measured Kondo energy in these compounds. The hybridization function has been analyzed for more than 350 data sets (being part of the IMS database) of cubic Ce compounds using electronic structure theory that relies on a full-potential approach. We demonstrate that the strength of the hybridization function, evaluated in this way, allows us to draw precise conclusions about the degree of localization of the 4 f states in these compounds. The theoretical results are entirely consistent with all experimental information, relevant to the degree of 4 f localization for all investigated materials. Furthermore, a more detailed analysis of the electronic structure and the hybridization function allows us to make precise statements about Kondo correlations in these systems. The calculated hybridization functions, together with the corresponding density of states, reproduce the expected exponential behavior of the observed Kondo temperatures and prove a consistent trend in real materials. This trend allows us to predict which systems may be correctly identified as Kondo systems. A strong anticorrelation between the size of the hybridization function and the volume of the systems has been observed. The information entropy for this set of systems is

  4. Sulfur Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, B. H.

    2007-12-01

    Variations in surface tension affect the buoyancy of objects floating in a liquid. Thus an object floating in water will sink deeper in the presence of dishwater fluid. This is a very minor but measurable effect. It causes for instance ducks to drown in aqueous solutions with added surfactant. The surface tension of liquid iron is very strongly affected by the presence of sulfur which acts as a surfactant in this system varying between 1.9 and 0.4 N/m at 10 mass percent Sulfur (Lee & Morita (2002), This last value is inferred to be the maximum value for Sulfur inferred to be present in the liquid outer core. Venting of Sulfur from the liquid core manifests itself on the Earth surface by the 105 to 106 ton of sulfur vented into the atmosphere annually (Wedepohl, 1984). Inspection of surface Sulfur emission indicates that venting is non-homogeneously distributed over the Earth's surface. The implication of such large variation in surface tension in the liquid outer core are that at locally low Sulfur concentration, the liquid outer core does not wet the predominantly MgSiO3 matrix with which it is in contact. However at a local high in Sulfur, the liquid outer core wets this matrix which in the fluid state has a surface tension of 0.4 N/m (Bansal & Doremus, 1986), couples with it, and causes it to sink. This differential and diapiric movement is transmitted through the essentially brittle mantle (1024 Pa.s, Lambeck & Johnson, 1998; the maximum value for ice being about 1030 Pa.s at 0 K, in all likely hood representing an upper bound of viscosity for all materials) and manifests itself on the surface by the roughly 20 km differentiation, about 0.1 % of the total mantle thickness, between topographical heights and lows with concomitant lateral movement in the crust and upper mantle resulting in thin skin tectonics. The brittle nature of the medium though which this movement is transmitted suggests that the extremes in topography of the D" layer are similar in range to

  5. Cloudy Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-05-08

    Decades of satellite observations and astronaut photographs show that clouds dominate space-based views of Earth. One study based on nearly a decade of satellite data estimated that about 67 percent of Earth’s surface is typically covered by clouds. This is especially the case over the oceans, where other research shows less than 10 percent of the sky is completely clear of clouds at any one time. Over land, 30 percent of skies are completely cloud free. Earth’s cloudy nature is unmistakable in this global cloud fraction map, based on data collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite. While MODIS collects enough data to make a new global map of cloudiness every day, this version of the map shows an average of all of the satellite’s cloud observations between July 2002 and April 2015. Colors range from dark blue (no clouds) to light blue (some clouds) to white (frequent clouds).

  6. Earth observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-31

    ISS040-E-113700 (31 Aug. 2014) --- This panorama view, photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the International Space Station, shows tan-colored dust of a major dust storm obscuring the Persian Gulf and the its northern shoreline. Strong north winds often blow in summer, churning up dust from the entire length of the desert surfaces of the Tigris and Euphrates valleys (top left). Dust partly obscures the hundreds of kilometers of Iraq’s light-green agricultural lands along these rivers (left). A line of thunderstorms is being set off by the Zagros Mountains of Iran (right), with the setting sun casting long shadows from the thunderheads. Space station crews see sixteen sunrises and sunsets every day from low Earth orbit. Here the crew captured dusk in a darkening Iranian landscape (right).

  7. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-24

    ISS040-E-018725 (24 June 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station photographed this image featuring most of the peninsular portion of the state of Florida. Lake Okeechobee stands out in the south central part of the state. The heavily-populated area of Miami can be traced along the Atlantic Coast near the bottom of the scene. Cape Canaveral and the Kennedy Space Center are in lower right portion of the image on the Atlantic Coast. The Florida Keys are at the south (left) portion of the scene and the Gulf Coast, including the Tampa-St. Petersburg area, is near frame center.

  8. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-29

    ISS036-E-025908 (29 July 2013) --- One of the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, as it was passing over Africa, took this night picture of Sicily (center frame) and much of Italy (frame left to frame center) on July 29, 2013. The Stretto de Messina, which separates Sicily from Italy, is near frame center. The high oblique 50mm lens shot includes a scenic horizon with a number of stars in the late July sky. Barely visible in the darkness, part of the long arm of the Space Station Remote Manipulator System or Canadarm2 runs diagonally through the right one-third of the image.

  9. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-15

    ISS028-E-017123 (16 July 2011) --- Separate atmospheric optical phenomena were captured in this electronic still photograph from the Inernational Space Station. The thin greenish band stretching along the Earth's horizon is airglow; light emitted by the atmosphere from a layer about 30 kilometers thick and about 100 kilometers in altitude. The predominant emission in airglow is the green 5577 Angstrom wavelength light from atomic oxygen atoms. Airglow is always and everywhere present in the atmosphere; it results from the recombination of molecules that have been broken apart by solar radiation during the day. But airglow is so faint that it can only be seen at night by looking "edge on" at the emission layer, such as the view astronauts and cosmonauts have in orbit. The second phenomenon is the appearnce of Aurora Australis.

  10. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-22

    ISS042E007131 (11/22/2014) — Astronauts aboard the International Space Station captured this image of a huge crater in Africa on Nov. 22, 2014. This is the Richat Structure in northwestern Mauritania, otherwise known as the “Eye of the Sahara.” Scientists are still deciding whether this was formed by a subterranean volcano or impact from a large meteor. Deep in the Sahara Desert it is nearly a perfect circle, it is 1.2 miles (1.9 kilometers) wide, and sports a rim 330 feet (100 meters) tall. The crater sits in a vast plain of rocks so ancient they were deposited hundreds of millions of years before the first dinosaurs walked the Earth.

  11. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-01-13

    The Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft undergoing preflight preparation in the Spacecraft Assembly Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). NEAR will perform two critical mission events - Mathilde flyby and the Deep-Space maneuver. NEAR will fly-by Mathilde, a 38-mile (61-km) diameter C-type asteroid, making use of its imaging system to obtain useful optical navigation images. The primary science instrument will be the camera, but measurements of magnetic fields and mass also will be made. The Deep-Space Maneuver (DSM) will be executed about a week after the Mathilde fly-by. The DSM represents the first of two major burns during the NEAR mission of the 100-pound bi-propellant (Hydrazine/nitrogen tetroxide) thruster. This maneuver is necessary to lower the perihelion distance of NEAR's trajectory. The DSM will be conducted in two segments to minimize the possibility of an overburn situation.

  12. Yield prediction by analysis of multispectral scanner data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, J. E.; Suits, G. H.

    1975-01-01

    A preliminary model describing the growth and grain yield of wheat was developed. The modeled growth characteristics of the wheat crop were used to compute wheat canopy reflectance using a model of vegetation canopy reflectance. The modeled reflectance characteristics were compared with the corresponding growth characteristics and grain yield in order to infer their relationships. It appears that periodic wheat canopy reflectance characteristics potentially derivable from earth satellites will be useful in forecasting wheat grain yield.

  13. An easy access to nanocrystalline alkaline earth metal fluorides - just by shaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreger, M.; Scholz, G.; Kemnitz, E.

    2012-04-01

    High energy ball milling as fast, direct and solvent free method allows an easy access to nanocrystalline alkaline earth metal fluorides MF2 (M: Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba). Comparable metal sources (acetates, carbonates, hydroxides, alkoxides) were used for the reaction with NH4F as fluorinating agent. Even very simple manual shaking experiments between NH4F and the corresponding hydroxides in the stoichiometric ratio (M:F = 1:2, M: Ca, Sr, Ba) give phase pure fluorides. Moreover, comparable classical thermal reactions in closed crucibles at higher temperatures provide phase pure crystalline fluorides in nearly all cases as well.

  14. Insights into stability, electronic properties, defect properties and Li ions migration of Na, Mg and Al-doped LiVPO4F for cathode materials of lithium ion batteries: A first-principles investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Xiaojun; Xu, Zhenming; Li, Jie; Chen, Jiangan; Liu, Qingsheng

    2016-07-01

    The effects of Na, Mg and Al doping on the structure, electronic property, defect property and Li ions migration of LiVPO4F were investigated by the first-principles method. Calculations show that the processes of forming Li0.875Na0.125VPO4F, α- and β-LiMg0.375V0.75PO4F, α- and β-LiAl0.125V0.875PO4F are all feasible. Na, Mg and Al doping significantly improve the electrical conductivity of LiVPO4F and simultaneously maintain their structural stability attributing to the reduction of band gaps through variations of V-3d spin up orbitals. Li vacancy defects of LiVPO4F are not ignorable, and vacancy defects with a lower activation energy for Li atom are far more likely to occur than Frenkel defects for Li and vacancy defects for other atoms. For pristine LiVPO4F, path D along [0.012 0 . 17 ̅ 0.572] direction is found to have the lowest activation energy of 0.418 eV, suggesting that anisotropic nature of Li ion conduction and LiVPO4F is a one-dimensional (1D)-ion conductor. The corresponding diffusion coefficient was estimated to be 2.82×10-9 cm2/s, which is in good agreement with those experimental values.

  15. Soviet test yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergino, Eileen S.

    Soviet seismologists have published descriptions of 96 nuclear explosions conducted from 1961 through 1972 at the Semipalatinsk test site, in Kazakhstan, central Asia [Bocharov et al., 1989]. With the exception of releasing news about some of their peaceful nuclear explosions (PNEs) the Soviets have never before published such a body of information.To estimate the seismic yield of a nuclear explosion it is necessary to obtain a calibrated magnitude-yield relationship based on events with known yields and with a consistent set of seismic magnitudes. U.S. estimation of Soviet test yields has been done through application of relationships to the Soviet sites based on the U.S. experience at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), making some correction for differences due to attenuation and near-source coupling of seismic waves.

  16. Evolution Projects Yield Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2010-01-01

    When a federal court in 2005 rejected an attempt by the Dover, Pennsylvania, school board to introduce intelligent design as an alternative to evolution to explain the development of life on Earth, it sparked a renaissance in involvement among scientists in K-12 science instruction. Now, some of those teaching programs, studies, and research…

  17. Argentina wheat yield model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callis, S. L.; Sakamoto, C.

    1984-01-01

    Five models based on multiple regression were developed to estimate wheat yields for the five wheat growing provinces of Argentina. Meteorological data sets were obtained for each province by averaging data for stations within each province. Predictor variables for the models were derived from monthly total precipitation, average monthly mean temperature, and average monthly maximum temperature. Buenos Aires was the only province for which a trend variable was included because of increasing trend in yield due to technology from 1950 to 1963.

  18. Argentina corn yield model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callis, S. L.; Sakamoto, C.

    1984-01-01

    A model based on multiple regression was developed to estimate corn yields for the country of Argentina. A meteorological data set was obtained for the country by averaging data for stations within the corn-growing area. Predictor variables for the model were derived from monthly total precipitation, average monthly mean temperature, and average monthly maximum temperature. A trend variable was included for the years 1965 to 1980 since an increasing trend in yields due to technology was observed between these years.

  19. Argentina soybean yield model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callis, S. L.; Sakamoto, C.

    1984-01-01

    A model based on multiple regression was developed to estimate soybean yields for the country of Argentina. A meteorological data set was obtained for the country by averaging data for stations within the soybean growing area. Predictor variables for the model were derived from monthly total precipitation and monthly average temperature. A trend variable was included for the years 1969 to 1978 since an increasing trend in yields due to technology was observed between these years.

  20. Association between CYP4F2 genotype and circulating plasma vitamin K concentration in children on chronic warfarin therapy: Possible long-term implications for bone development and vascular health.

    PubMed

    Kampouraki, Emmanouela; Avery, Peter J; Biss, Tina; Kamali, Farhad

    2017-12-01

    Vitamin K is essential, for the activation of clotting proteins, as well as the biosynthesis of osteocalcin in bones and the activation of matrix-Gla protein needed in maintaining vasculature health. Cytochrome p450 4F2 (CYP4F2) enzyme is involved in vitamin K catabolism. Genetic polymorphism in CYP4F2 is thus likely to affect vitamin K systemic availability. We show that children on chronic warfarin therapy have low levels of vitamin K and vitamin K levels are linked to CYP4F2 genotype. Long-term low levels of vitamin K, influenced by CYP4F2 genotype, might affect bone development and vascular health in children on chronic warfarin therapy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Study of Kα2 /Kα1 RYIED in closed and open shell Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, P. C.; Tribolet, A. D.; Reis, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Relative Yield Ion Energy Dependence (RYIED) was observed, named and reported as phenomenological evidence in 2005 (Reis et al., 2005). Since then, it was observed in transitions to the same subshell, and plausible explanations for the physics behind the phenomena have been proposed. In this work we present experimental evidence of the RYIED effect on the most inner transition possible in two Rare Earth Elements (REE), namely variations in the intensity ratio of Kα2 /Kα1 X-rays from Tm and Yb irradiated under different conditions. These REE are particularly interesting to start with since Yb has an electronic configuration where all the subshells are completely filled, whilst Tm misses one electron in the 4f subshell. Ultrapure oxides of each element were irradiated using proton beams having energies in the range of 0.9-3.6 MeV, in steps of 100 keV. Spectra were collected using the CdTe detector of the HRHE-PIXE set-up of C2TN and analysed using the DT2 code. Finally, the vanishing of the effect upon charging up of the target has been observed and will be discussed.

  2. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-30

    ISS040E112662 (08/30/2014) ---- Cancún, Mexico. A long lens was used by astronauts aboard the International Space Station to take this image, and it highlights many natural and built features. The street pattern of Mexico’s tourist mecca, Cancún, contrasts with the waterways of the marinas that open into the bay and the lagoons. Brilliant blue water over coral reefs contrast with the dark waters of inland lagoons. The reefs are the second largest reef system on Earth, and draw tourists from all over the world. The wide, well developed beach on the gulf coast (image upper right) is the result of vigorous wave energy; the white sand makes the beach easily visible from space. But wave energy is reduced along Cancún’s protected shoreline (image center) and the beaches are thin or non-existant. Fair-weather cumulus clouds are scattered across the image top left. To shoot crisp mages with long lenses, astronaut photographers must learn to brace themselves against the ISS bulkhead to prevent any slight shaking that would blur or “smear” the picture. Counterintuitively, they then need to move the camera carefully retaining the target at the same point in the viewfinder (the landscape moves across the viewfinder quickly with long lenses). This is called tracking the target and requires good coordination by the photographer—again, to prevent blurring. Shorter lenses do not require this skill because the image appears to pass more slowly across the viewfinder.

  3. Earth Observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-20

    ISS024-E-015121 (20 Sept. 2010) --- Twitchell Canyon Fire in central Utah is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 24 crew member on the International Space Station (ISS). The Twitchell Canyon Fire near central Utah?s Fishlake National Forest is reported to have an area of approximately 13,383 hectares (approximately 134 square kilometers, or 33,071 acres). This detailed image shows smoke plumes generated by several fire spots close to the southwestern edge of the burned area. The fire was started by a lightning strike on July 20, 2010. Whereas many of the space station images of Earth are looking straight down (nadir), this photograph was exposed at an angle. The space station was located over a point approximately 509 kilometers (316 miles) to the northeast, near the Colorado/Wyoming border, at the time the image was taken on Sept. 20. Southwesterly winds were continuing to extend smoke plumes from the fire to the northeast. While the Twitchell Canyon region is sparsely populated, Interstate Highway 15 is visible at upper left.

  4. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-05

    ISS040-E-088891 (5 Aug. 2014) --- Thunderheads near Borneo, Indonesia are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the International Space Station. Late afternoon sun casts long shadows from high thunderhead anvils over southern Borneo. Crews aboard the space station have recently concentrated on panoramic views of clouds?taken with lenses similar to the focal length of the human eye. These images reveal the kinds of views crews see -- huge areas of the planet, with a strong three-dimensional sense of what it is like to fly 350 kilometers above Earth. Winds usually blow in different directions at different altitudes. High-altitude winds are clearly sweeping the tops off the many tallest thunderclouds, generating long anvils of diffuse cirrus plumes that trail south. At low levels, ?streets? of white dots -- fair-weather cumulus clouds -- are aligned with west-moving winds (lower left). Small smoke plumes from forest fires onshore are also aligned west. Storm formation near the horizon -- more than 1,000 kilometers away (center) -- is assisted by air currents rising over the central mountains of Borneo.

  5. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-14

    ISS037-E-011470 (14 Oct. 2013) --- Man-made archipelagos near Dubai, United Arab Emirates, are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 37 crew member on the International Space Station, flying at approximately 220 miles above Earth. The municipality of Dubai is the largest city of the Persian Gulf emirate of the same name, and has built a global reputation for large-scale developments and architectural works. Among the most visible of these developments -- particularly from the perspective of astronauts onboard the space station -- are three man-made archipelagos. The two Palm Islands -- Palm Jumeirah (right) and Palm Jebel Ali (out of frame further to the right) -- appear as stylized palm trees when viewed from above. The World Islands (center frame) evoke a rough map of the world from an air- or space-borne perspective. The Palm Jumeirah project began in 2001 and required more than 50 million cubic meters of dredged sand to raise the islands above the Persian Gulf sea level. Construction of the Palm Jumeirah islands was completed in 2006; for several years now they have been developed for residential and commercial housing and infrastructure. Creation of the World Islands was begun in 2003 and completed in 2008, using 320 million cubic meters of sand and 37 million tons of rock for the surrounding 27 kilometer-long protective breakwater.

  6. Impact of genetic factors (VKORC1, CYP2C9, CYP4F2 and EPHX1) on the anticoagulation response to fluindione

    PubMed Central

    Lacut, Karine; Ayme-Dietrich, Estelle; Gourhant, Lenaick; Poulhazan, Elise; Andro, Marion; Becquemont, Laurent; Mottier, Dominique; Le Gal, Gregoire; Verstuyft, Celine

    2012-01-01

    AIM Genetic variants of the enzyme that metabolizes warfarin, cytochrome P-450 2C9 (CYP2C9) and of a key pharmacologic target of vitamin K antagonists, vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKORC1), contribute to differences in patients' responses to coumarin derivatives. The role of these variants in fluindione response is unknown. Our aim was to assess whether genetic factors contribute to the variability in the response to fluindione. METHODS Four hundred sixty-five patients with a venous thromboembolic event treated by fluindione for at least 3 months with a target international normalized ratio (INR) of 2.0 to 3.0 were studied. VKORC1, CYP2C9, CYP4F2 and EPHX1 genotypes were assessed. INR checks, fluindione doses and bleeding events were collected. RESULTS VKORC1 genotype had a significant impact on early anticoagulation (INR value ≥2 after the first two intakes) (P < 0.0001), on the time required to reach a first INR within the therapeutic range (P < 0.0001) and on the time to obtain a first INR value > 4 (P = 0.0002). The average daily dose of fluindione during the first period of stability was significantly associated with the VKORC1 genotype: 19.8 mg (±5.5) for VKORC1 CC, 14.7 mg (±6.2) for VKORC1 CT and 8.2 mg (±2.5) for VKORC1 TT (P < 0.0001). CYP2C9, CYP4F2 and EPHX1 genotypes did not significantly influence the response to fluindione. CONCLUSIONS VKORC1 genotype strongly affected anticoagulation induced by fluindione whereas CYP2C9, CYP4F2 and EPHX1 genotypes seemed less determining. PMID:21883387

  7. Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium in the Mixture 1,1-Difluoroethane C2H4F2 + C4H8 2-Methylpropene (EVLM1131, LB5730_E)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibulka, I.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Sosnkowska-Kehiaian, K.; Kehiaian, H. V.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Binary Liquid Systems of Nonelectrolytes I' of Volume 26 'Heats of Mixing, Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium, and Volumetric Properties of Mixtures and Solutions' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV 'Physical Chemistry'. It contains the Chapter 'Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium in the Mixture 1,1-Difluoroethane C2H4F2 + C4H8 2-Methylpropene (EVLM1131, LB5730_E)' providing data from direct measurement of pressure and mole fraction in vapor phase at variable mole fraction in liquid phase and constant temperature.

  8. Electronic structure and microscopic model of V(2)GeO(4)F(2)-a quantum spin system with S = 1.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Badiur; Saha-Dasgupta, T

    2007-07-25

    We present first-principles density functional calculations and downfolding studies of the electronic and magnetic properties of the oxide-fluoride quantum spin system V(2)GeO(4)F(2). We discuss explicitly the nature of the exchange paths and provide quantitative estimates of magnetic exchange couplings. A microscopic modelling based on analysis of the electronic structure of this systems puts it in the interesting class of weakly coupled alternating chain S = 1 systems. Based on the microscopic model, we make inferrences about its spin excitation spectra, which needs to be tested by rigorous experimental study.

  9. Genetic determinants of acenocoumarol and warfarin maintenance dose requirements in Slavic population: a potential role of CYP4F2 and GGCX polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Wypasek, Ewa; Branicka, Agnieszka; Awsiuk, Magdalena; Sadowski, Jerzy; Undas, Anetta

    2014-09-01

    VKORC1 and cytochrome CYP2C9 genetic variants contribute largely to inter-individual variations in vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) dose requirements. Cytochrome P450 4F2 isoform (CYP4F2), gamma-glutamyl carboxylase (GGCX) and apolipoprotein E (APOE) polymorphisms have been suggested to be of minor significance. We sought to assess the impact of those polymorphisms on dose requirements in Central-Eastern European cohort of 479 patients receiving acenocoumarol (n=260) or warfarin (n=219). There were no differences between the acenocoumarol and warfarin groups with regard to the gender, age, body mass index and international normalized ratio. The VKORC1 c.-1639A allele carriers required a lower dose of acenocoumarol and warfarin than the non-carriers (28.0 [21.0-35.0] vs. 42.0 [28.0-56.0] mg/week, p<0.0001; 35.0 [28.0-52.0] vs. 52.0 [35.0-70.0] mg/week, p=0.0001, respectively). Carriers of 2 and/or 3 variant alleles for CYP2C9 also required a lower dose of warfarin as compared with 1 1 carriers (35.0 [31.5-52.5] vs. 43.8 [35.0-60.2] mg/week, p=0.02; 35.0 [23.5-35.0] vs. 43.8 [35.0-60.2] mg/week, p<0.0001, respectively). Similarly, possession of G allele of GGCX c.2084+45 polymorphism was associated with lower warfarin dose (35.0 [26.3-39.2] vs. 45.5 [35.0-65.1] mg/week, p=0.03). No effect of CYP2C9*2,-*3 and GGCX c.2084+45G>C polymorphisms on acenocoumarol dosage was observed. Interestingly, carriers of CYP4F2 c.1297A variant required a higher dose of acenocoumarol and warfarin than non-carriers (43.8 [35.0-60.2] vs. 35.0 [35.0-52.5] mg/week, p=0.01; 35.0 [28.0-52.5] vs. 28.0 [28.0-42.0] mg/week, p=0.05). We have shown for the first time, that besides VKORC1 and CYP2C9 genetic variants, the CYP4F2 c.1297A and GGCX c.2084+45G have a moderate effect on VKAs dose requirements in Slavic population from Central-Eastern Europe. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Unusual reaction paths of SN2 nucleophile substitution reactions CH4 + H- → CH4 + H- and CH4 + F- → CH3F + H-: Quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minyaev, Ruslan M.; Quapp, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Benjamin; Getmanskii, Ilya V.; Koval, Vitaliy V.

    2013-11-01

    Quantum chemical (CCSD(full)/6-311++G(3df,3pd), CCSD(T)(full)/6-311++G(3df,3pd)) and density function theory (B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,3pd)) calculations were performed for the SN2 nucleophile substitution reactions CH4 + H- → CH4 + H- and CH4 + F- → CH3F + H-. The calculated gradient reaction pathways for both reactions have an unusual behavior. An unusual stationary point of index 2 lies on the gradient reaction path. Using Newton trajectories for the reaction path, we can detect VRI point at which the reaction path branches.

  11. Earth Observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-21

    ISS036-E-011034 (21 June 2013) --- The Salton Trough is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 36 crew member on the International Space Station. The Imperial and Coachella Valleys of southern California – and the corresponding Mexicali Valley and Colorado River Delta in Mexico – are part of the Salton Trough, a large geologic structure known to geologists as a graben or rift valley that extends into the Gulf of California. The trough is a geologically complex zone formed by interaction of the San Andreas transform fault system that is, broadly speaking, moving southern California towards Alaska; and the northward motion of the Gulf of California segment of the East Pacific Rise that continues to widen the Gulf of California by sea-floor spreading. According to scientists, sediments deposited by the Colorado River have been filling the northern rift valley (the Salton Trough) for the past several million years, excluding the waters of the Gulf of California and providing a fertile environment – together with irrigation—for the development of extensive agriculture in the region (visible as green and yellow-brown fields at center). The Salton Sea, a favorite landmark of astronauts in low Earth orbit, was formed by an irrigation canal rupture in 1905, and today is sustained by agricultural runoff water. A wide array of varying landforms and land uses in the Salton Trough are visible from space. In addition to the agricultural fields and Salton Sea, easily visible metropolitan areas include Yuma, AZ (lower left); Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico (center); and the San Diego-Tijuana conurbation on the Pacific Coast (right). The approximately 72-kilometer-long Algodones Dunefield is visible at lower left.

  12. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-07-10

    ISS032-E-006129 (10 July 2012) --- Flooding in Krymsk in the Krasnodar region of southern Russia is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 32 crew member on the International Space Station. On the night of July 7, 2012 a major storm dumped more than a foot of water on the southern Russian area of Krasnodar, near the Black Sea. The resulting flood was likened to a tsunami, and to date, more than 170 people died, most from the city of Krymsk. The Moscow times reports that more than 19,000 people lost everything. This image taken by cosmonauts aboard the space station shows the city of Krymsk. The tan-colored areas indicate some of the regions that were flooded; the color is probably due to the mud and debris that were left by the floodwaters. Krymsk is located in the western foothills on the northern slope of the Caucasus Mountains?a range that stretches between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea. The vast amount of rain quickly overwhelmed the small river channels that flow northward from the mountains to the Russian lowlands and the Kuban River; Krymsk, located on one of those tributaries, was directly in the pathway of the flash flood. As part of the international partner agreement to use the International Space Station to benefit humanity, crew members and other Earth observing instruments provide best-effort support to the International Disaster Charter (IDC) when it is activated by collecting imagery of areas on the ground impacted by natural events such as the flooding in Krymsk. This image was acquired July 10, 2012 in response to the IDC activation.

  13. Earth Observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-02

    ISS028-E-006687 (2 June 2011) --- Estuaries on the northwestern coast of Madagascar are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 28 crew member on the International Space Station. Regions where fresh water flowing in rivers and salt water from the seas and oceans mix are called estuaries, and they are among the most biologically productive ecosystems on Earth. This photograph highlights two estuaries located along the northwestern coastline of the island of Madagascar. The Mozambique Channel (top) separates Madagascar from the southeastern coast of Africa. Bombetoka Bay (upper left) is fed by the Betsiboka River and is a frequent subject of astronaut photography due to its striking red floodplain sediments. Mahajamba Bay (right) is fed by several rivers including the Mahajamba and Sofia Rivers; like the Betsiboka, the floodplains of these rivers also contain reddish sediments eroded from their basins upstream. The brackish (mix of fresh and salty water) conditions found in most estuaries host unique plant and animal species adapted to live in such environments. Mangroves in particular are a common plant species found in and around Madagascar estuaries, and Bombetoka Bay contains some of the largest remaining stands. Estuaries also host abundant fish and shellfish species ? many of which need access to freshwater for a portion of their life cycles ? and these in turn support local and migratory bird species that prey on them. However, human activities such as urban development, overfishing, and increased sediment loading from erosion of upriver highlands threaten the ecosystem health of the estuaries. In particular, the silt deposits in Bombetoka Bay at the mouth of the Betsiboka River have been filling in the bay.

  14. Earth Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    For pipeline companies, mapping, facilities inventory, pipe inspections, environmental reporting, etc. is a monumental task. An Automated Mapping/Facilities Management/Geographic Information Systems (AM/FM/GIS) is the solution. However, this is costly and time consuming. James W. Sewall Company, an AM/FM/GIS consulting firm proposed an EOCAP project to Stennis Space Center (SSC) to develop a computerized system for storage and retrieval of digital aerial photography. This would provide its customer, Algonquin Gas Transmission Company, with an accurate inventory of rights-of-way locations and pipeline surroundings. The project took four years to complete and an important byproduct was SSC's Digital Aerial Rights-of-Way Monitoring System (DARMS). DARMS saves substantial time and money. EOCAP enabled Sewall to develop new products and expand its customer base. Algonquin now manages regulatory requirements more efficiently and accurately. EOCAP provides government co-funding to encourage private investment in and broader use of NASA remote sensing technology. Because changes on Earth's surface are accelerating, planners and resource managers must assess the consequences of change as quickly and accurately as possible. Pacific Meridian Resources and NASA's Stennis Space Center (SSC) developed a system for monitoring changes in land cover and use, which incorporated the latest change detection technologies. The goal of this EOCAP project was to tailor existing technologies to a system that could be commercialized. Landsat imagery enabled Pacific Meridian to identify areas that had sustained substantial vegetation loss. The project was successful and Pacific Meridian's annual revenues have substantially increased. EOCAP provides government co-funding to encourage private investment in and broader use of NASA remote sensing technology.

  15. LAPTM4b recruits the LAT1-4F2hc Leu transporter to lysosomes and promotes mTORC1 activation.

    PubMed

    Milkereit, Ruth; Persaud, Avinash; Vanoaica, Liviu; Guetg, Adriano; Verrey, Francois; Rotin, Daniela

    2015-05-22

    Mammalian target of rapamycin 1 (mTORC1), a master regulator of cellular growth, is activated downstream of growth factors, energy signalling and intracellular essential amino acids (EAAs) such as Leu. mTORC1 activation occurs at the lysosomal membrane, and involves V-ATPase stimulation by intra-lysosomal EAA (inside-out activation), leading to activation of the Ragulator, RagA/B-GTP and mTORC1 via Rheb-GTP. How Leu enters the lysosomes is unknown. Here we identified the lysosomal protein LAPTM4b as a binding partner for the Leu transporter, LAT1-4F2hc (SLC7A5-SLAC3A2). We show that LAPTM4b recruits LAT1-4F2hc to lysosomes, leading to uptake of Leu into lysosomes, and is required for mTORC1 activation via V-ATPase following EAA or Leu stimulation. These results demonstrate a functional Leu transporter at the lysosome, and help explain the inside-out lysosomal activation of mTORC1 by Leu/EAA.

  16. Precision calculations for h → WW/ZZ → 4 fermions in a singlet extension of the Standard Model with P rophecy4 f

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenkamp, Lukas; Boggia, Michele; Dittmaier, Stefan

    2018-04-01

    We consider an extension of the Standard Model by a real singlet scalar field with a ℤ2-symmetric Lagrangian and spontaneous symmetry breaking with vacuum expectation value for the singlet. Considering the lighter of the two scalars of the theory to be the 125 GeV Higgs particle, we parametrize the scalar sector by the mass of the heavy Higgs boson, a mixing angle α, and a scalar Higgs self-coupling λ 12. Taking into account theoretical constraints from perturbativity and vacuum stability, we compute next-to-leading-order electroweak and QCD corrections to the decays h → WW/ZZ → 4 fermions of the light Higgs boson for some scenarios proposed in the literature. We formulate two renormalization schemes and investigate the conversion of the input parameters between the schemes, finding sizeable effects. Solving the renormalization-group equations for the \\overline{MS} parameters α and λ 12, we observe a significantly reduced scale and scheme dependence in the next-to-leading-order results. For some scenarios suggested in the literature, the total decay width for the process h → 4 f is computed as a function of the mixing angle and compared to the width of a corresponding Standard Model Higgs boson, revealing deviations below 10%. Differential distributions do not show significant distortions by effects beyond the Standard Model. The calculations are implemented in the Monte Carlo generator P rophecy4 f, which is ready for applications in data analyses in the framework of the singlet extension.

  17. Effects of disorder on the intrinsically hole-doped iron-based superconductor KC a2F e4A s4F2 by cobalt substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Junichi; Iimura, Soshi; Hosono, Hideo

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, the effects of cobalt substitution on the transport and electronic properties of the recently discovered iron-based superconductor KC a2F e4A s4F2 , with Tc=33 K , are reported. This material is an unusual superconductor showing intrinsic hole conduction (0.25 holes /F e2 + ). Upon doping of Co, the Tc of KC a2(Fe1-xC ox) 4A s4F2 gradually decreased, and bulk superconductivity disappeared when x ≥0.25 . Conversion of the primary carrier from p type to n type upon Co-doping was clearly confirmed by Hall measurements, and our results are consistent with the change in the calculated Fermi surface. Nevertheless, neither spin density wave (SDW) nor an orthorhombic phase, which are commonly observed for nondoped iron-based superconductors, was observed in the nondoped or electron-doped samples. The electron count in the 3 d orbitals and structural parameters were compared with those of other iron-based superconductors to show that the physical properties can be primarily ascribed to the effects of disorder.

  18. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011843 (24 June 2013) --- Gravity waves and sunglint on Lake Superior are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 36 crew member on the International Space Station. From the vantage point of the space station, crew members frequently observe Earth atmospheric and surface phenomena in ways impossible to view from the ground. Two such phenomena?gravity waves and sunglint?are illustrated in this photograph of northeastern Lake Superior. The Canadian Shield of southern Ontario (bottom) is covered with extensive green forest canopy typical of early summer. Offshore, and to the west and southwest of Pukaskwa National Park several distinct sets of parallel cloud bands are visible. Gravity waves are produced when moisture-laden air encounters imbalances in air density, such as might be expected when cool air flows over warmer air; this can cause the flowing air to oscillate up and down as it moves, causing clouds to condense as the air rises (cools) and evaporate away as the air sinks (warms). This produces parallel bands of clouds oriented perpendicular to the wind direction. The orientation of the cloud bands visible in this image, parallel to the coastlines, suggests that air flowing off of the land surfaces to the north is interacting with moist, stable air over the lake surface, creating gravity waves. The second phenomenon?sunglint?effects the water surface around and to the northeast of Isle Royale (upper right). Sunglint is caused by light reflection off a water surface; some of the reflected light travels directly back towards the observer, resulting in a bright mirror-like appearance over large expanses of water. Water currents and changes in surface tension (typically caused by presence of oils or surfactants) alter the reflective properties of the water, and can be highlighted by sunglint. For example, surface water currents are visible to the east of Isle Royale that are oriented similarly to the gravity waves ? suggesting that they too

  19. Yield gaps and yield relationships in US soybean production systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The magnitude of yield gaps (YG) (potential yield – farmer yield) provides some indication of the prospects for increasing crop yield to meet the food demands of future populations. Quantile regression analysis was applied to county soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] yields (1971 – 2011) from Kentuc...

  20. Comparative timber-yields

    Treesearch

    I. T. Haig

    1932-01-01

    During the last decade the U. S. Forest Service and several of the forest schools have completed rather comprehensive studies of the growth and yield of a number of commercially important native conifers. As the majority of these studies show the volumes obtainable in fully-stocked stands to very similar standards of utilization, they furnish an excellent opportunity...

  1. Water yield and hydrology

    Treesearch

    Pamela J. Edwards; Charles A. Troendle

    2012-01-01

    Investigations of hydrologic responses resulting from reducing vegetation density are fairly common throughout the Eastern United States. Although most studies have focused on the potential for increasing water yields or documenting effects from intensive practices that far exceed what would be done for fuel-reduction objectives, data from some less-intensive...

  2. EarthLabs - Investigating Hurricanes: Earth's Meteorological Monsters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaris, J. R.; Dahlman, L.; Barstow, D.

    2007-12-01

    Earth science is one of the most important tools that the global community needs to address the pressing environmental, social, and economic issues of our time. While, at times considered a second-rate science at the high school level, it is currently undergoing a major revolution in the depth of content and pedagogical vitality. As part of this revolution, labs in Earth science courses need to shift their focus from cookbook-like activities with known outcomes to open-ended investigations that challenge students to think, explore and apply their learning. We need to establish a new model for Earth science as a rigorous lab science in policy, perception, and reality. As a concerted response to this need, five states, a coalition of scientists and educators, and an experienced curriculum team are creating a national model for a lab-based high school Earth science course named EarthLabs. This lab course will comply with the National Science Education Standards as well as the states' curriculum frameworks. The content will focus on Earth system science and environmental literacy. The lab experiences will feature a combination of field work, classroom experiments, and computer access to data and visualizations, and demonstrate the rigor and depth of a true lab course. The effort is being funded by NOAA's Environmental Literacy program. One of the prototype units of the course is Investigating Hurricanes. Hurricanes are phenomena which have tremendous impact on humanity and the resources we use. They are also the result of complex interacting Earth systems, making them perfect objects for rigorous investigation of many concepts commonly covered in Earth science courses, such as meteorology, climate, and global wind circulation. Students are able to use the same data sets, analysis tools, and research techniques that scientists employ in their research, yielding truly authentic learning opportunities. This month-long integrated unit uses hurricanes as the story line by

  3. Earth as an extrasolar planet: Earth model validation using EPOXI earth observations.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Tyler D; Meadows, Victoria S; Crisp, David; Deming, Drake; A'hearn, Michael F; Charbonneau, David; Livengood, Timothy A; Seager, Sara; Barry, Richard K; Hearty, Thomas; Hewagama, Tilak; Lisse, Carey M; McFadden, Lucy A; Wellnitz, Dennis D

    2011-06-01

    The EPOXI Discovery Mission of Opportunity reused the Deep Impact flyby spacecraft to obtain spatially and temporally resolved visible photometric and moderate resolution near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic observations of Earth. These remote observations provide a rigorous validation of whole-disk Earth model simulations used to better understand remotely detectable extrasolar planet characteristics. We have used these data to upgrade, correct, and validate the NASA Astrobiology Institute's Virtual Planetary Laboratory three-dimensional line-by-line, multiple-scattering spectral Earth model. This comprehensive model now includes specular reflectance from the ocean and explicitly includes atmospheric effects such as Rayleigh scattering, gas absorption, and temperature structure. We have used this model to generate spatially and temporally resolved synthetic spectra and images of Earth for the dates of EPOXI observation. Model parameters were varied to yield an optimum fit to the data. We found that a minimum spatial resolution of ∼100 pixels on the visible disk, and four categories of water clouds, which were defined by using observed cloud positions and optical thicknesses, were needed to yield acceptable fits. The validated model provides a simultaneous fit to Earth's lightcurve, absolute brightness, and spectral data, with a root-mean-square (RMS) error of typically less than 3% for the multiwavelength lightcurves and residuals of ∼10% for the absolute brightness throughout the visible and NIR spectral range. We have extended our validation into the mid-infrared by comparing the model to high spectral resolution observations of Earth from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, obtaining a fit with residuals of ∼7% and brightness temperature errors of less than 1 K in the atmospheric window. For the purpose of understanding the observable characteristics of the distant Earth at arbitrary viewing geometry and observing cadence, our validated forward model can be

  4. Earth as an Extrasolar Planet: Earth Model Validation Using EPOXI Earth Observations

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Victoria S.; Crisp, David; Deming, Drake; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Charbonneau, David; Livengood, Timothy A.; Seager, Sara; Barry, Richard K.; Hearty, Thomas; Hewagama, Tilak; Lisse, Carey M.; McFadden, Lucy A.; Wellnitz, Dennis D.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The EPOXI Discovery Mission of Opportunity reused the Deep Impact flyby spacecraft to obtain spatially and temporally resolved visible photometric and moderate resolution near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic observations of Earth. These remote observations provide a rigorous validation of whole-disk Earth model simulations used to better understand remotely detectable extrasolar planet characteristics. We have used these data to upgrade, correct, and validate the NASA Astrobiology Institute's Virtual Planetary Laboratory three-dimensional line-by-line, multiple-scattering spectral Earth model. This comprehensive model now includes specular reflectance from the ocean and explicitly includes atmospheric effects such as Rayleigh scattering, gas absorption, and temperature structure. We have used this model to generate spatially and temporally resolved synthetic spectra and images of Earth for the dates of EPOXI observation. Model parameters were varied to yield an optimum fit to the data. We found that a minimum spatial resolution of ∼100 pixels on the visible disk, and four categories of water clouds, which were defined by using observed cloud positions and optical thicknesses, were needed to yield acceptable fits. The validated model provides a simultaneous fit to Earth's lightcurve, absolute brightness, and spectral data, with a root-mean-square (RMS) error of typically less than 3% for the multiwavelength lightcurves and residuals of ∼10% for the absolute brightness throughout the visible and NIR spectral range. We have extended our validation into the mid-infrared by comparing the model to high spectral resolution observations of Earth from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, obtaining a fit with residuals of ∼7% and brightness temperature errors of less than 1 K in the atmospheric window. For the purpose of understanding the observable characteristics of the distant Earth at arbitrary viewing geometry and observing cadence, our validated forward

  5. Heteropentanuclear Oxalato-Bridged nd–4f (n=4, 5) Metal Complexes with NO Ligand: Synthesis, Crystal Structures, Aqueous Stability and Antiproliferative Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Paul-Steffen; Cremer, Laura; Gavriluta, Anatolie; Jovanović, Katarina K; Filipović, Lana; Hummer, Alfred A; Büchel, Gabriel E; Dojčinović, Biljana P; Meier, Samuel M; Rompel, Annette; Radulović, Siniša; Tommasino, Jean Bernard; Luneau, Dominique; Arion, Vladimir B

    2015-01-01

    A series of heteropentanuclear oxalate-bridged Ru(NO)-Ln (4d–4f) metal complexes of the general formula (nBu4N)5[Ln{RuCl3(μ-ox)(NO)}4], where Ln=Y (2), Gd (3), Tb (4), Dy (5) and ox=oxalate anion, were obtained by treatment of (nBu4N)2[RuCl3(ox)(NO)] (1) with the respective lanthanide salt in 4:1 molar ratio. The compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry, while 1, 2, and 5 were in addition analyzed by X-ray crystallography, 1 by Ru K-edge XAS and 1 and 2 by 13C NMR spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction showed that in 2 and 5 four complex anions [RuCl3(ox)(NO)]2− are coordinated to YIII and DyIII, respectively, with formation of [Ln{RuCl3(μ-ox)(NO)}4]5− (Ln=Y, Dy). While YIII is eight-coordinate in 2, DyIII is nine-coordinate in 5, with an additional coordination of an EtOH molecule. The negative charge is counterbalanced by five nBu4N+ ions present in the crystal structure. The stability of complexes 2 and 5 in aqueous medium was monitored by UV/Vis spectroscopy. The antiproliferative activity of ruthenium-lanthanide complexes 2–5 were assayed in two human cancer cell lines (HeLa and A549) and in a noncancerous cell line (MRC-5) and compared with those obtained for the previously reported Os(NO)-Ln (5d–4f) analogues (nBu4N)5[Ln{OsCl3(ox)(NO)}4] (Ln=Y (6), Gd (7), Tb (8), Dy (9)). Complexes 2–5 were found to be slightly more active than 1 in inhibiting the proliferation of HeLa and A549 cells, and significantly more cytotoxic than 5d–4f metal complexes 6–9 in terms of IC50 values. The highest antiproliferative activity with IC50 values of 20.0 and 22.4 μM was found for 4 in HeLa and A549 cell lines, respectively. These cytotoxicity results are in accord with the presented ICP-MS data, indicating five- to eightfold greater accumulation of ruthenium versus osmium in human A549 cancer cells. PMID:26260662

  6. Genetic epidemiology of pharmacogenetic variations in CYP2C9, CYP4F2 and VKORC1 genes associated with warfarin dosage in the Indian population.

    PubMed

    Giri, Anil K; Khan, Nazir M; Grover, Sandeep; Kaur, Ismeet; Basu, Analabha; Tandon, Nikhil; Scaria, Vinod; Kukreti, Ritushree; Brahmachari, Samir K; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan

    2014-07-01

    Warfarin, a widely used anticoagulant, exhibits large interindividual variability in dose requirements. CYP2C9 and VKORC1 polymorphisms in various ethnic groups have been extensively studied as genetic markers associated with variable drug response. However, allele frequencies of these variants have not been assessed in major ethnic groups in the Indian population. To study the functional variants known to affect warfarin dosing, we reanalyzed genotype microarray datasets generated as a part of genome-wide association studies as well as data from the Indian Genome Variation database. We examined data from 2680 individuals across 24 ethnically diverse Indian subpopulations. Allelic distribution of VKORC1 (-1639G>A) showed a greater degree of variation across Indian subpopulations, with frequencies as low as 6.5% in an out-group subpopulation to >70% in Tibeto-Burmans. Risk allele frequency of CYP4F2*3 (V433M) was higher in north Indians (0.30-0.44), as compared with other world populations, such as African-American (0.12), Caucasian (0.34) and Hispanic (0.23). TheVKORC1 variant (-1639A) was shown to be prevalent amongst Tibeto-Burmans, whereas CYP2C9 (R144C, I359L) and CYP4F2 (V433M) variants were observed in considerable variability amongst Indo-Europeans. The frequency of CYP2C9*3 (I359L) in north Indians was found to be higher than in most Asian populations. Furthermore, geographical distribution patterns of these variants in north India showed an increased trend of warfarin extensive metabolizers from the Himalayan to Gangetic region. Combined allele frequency (CYP2C9*3 and CYP4F2*3) data suggest that poor metabolizers varied in the range of 0.38-1.85% in Indo-Europeans. Based on genotypic distribution, the majority of the Indian subpopulation might require higher doses for stable anticoagulation, whereas careful assessment is required for Tibeto-Burmans who are expected to have intermediate dose requirement. This is the largest global genetic epidemiological

  7. Brazilian Soybean Yields and Yield Gaps Vary with Farm Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffries, G. R.; Cohn, A.; Griffin, T. S.; Bragança, A.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the farm size-specific characteristics of crop yields and yield gaps may help to improve yields by enabling better targeting of technical assistance and agricultural development programs. Linking remote sensing-based yield estimates with property boundaries provides a novel view of the relationship between farm size and yield structure (yield magnitude, gaps, and stability over time). A growing literature documents variations in yield gaps, but largely ignores the role of farm size as a factor shaping yield structure. Research on the inverse farm size-productivity relationship (IR) theory - that small farms are more productive than large ones all else equal - has documented that yield magnitude may vary by farm size, but has not considered other yield structure characteristics. We examined farm size - yield structure relationships for soybeans in Brazil for years 2001-2015. Using out-of-sample soybean yield predictions from a statistical model, we documented 1) gaps between the 95th percentile of attained yields and mean yields within counties and individual fields, and 2) yield stability defined as the standard deviation of time-detrended yields at given locations. We found a direct relationship between soy yields and farm size at the national level, while the strength and the sign of the relationship varied by region. Soybean yield gaps were found to be inversely related to farm size metrics, even when yields were only compared to farms of similar size. The relationship between farm size and yield stability was nonlinear, with mid-sized farms having the most stable yields. The work suggests that farm size is an important factor in understanding yield structure and that opportunities for improving soy yields in Brazil are greatest among smaller farms.

  8. Crew Earth Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runco, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Crew Earth Observations (CEO) takes advantage of the crew in space to observe and photograph natural and human-made changes on Earth. The photographs record the Earth's surface changes over time, along with dynamic events such as storms, floods, fires and volcanic eruptions. These images provide researchers on Earth with key data to better understand the planet.

  9. Why Earth Science?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    This article briefly describes Earth science. The study of Earth science provides the foundation for an understanding of the Earth, its processes, its resources, and its environment. Earth science is the study of the planet in its entirety, how its lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere work together as systems and how they affect…

  10. NASA Earth Day 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-22

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden speaks to students who attended the NASA sponsored Earth Day event April 22, 2014 at Union Station in Washington, DC. NASA sponsored the Earth Day event as part of its "Earth Right Now" campaign, celebrating the launch of five Earth-observing missions in 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  11. Atmospheric Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K.; Sokolsky, P.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric fluorescence from these showers. Accurate knowledge of the conversion from atmospheric fluorescence to energy loss by ionizing particles in the atmosphere is key to this technique. In this paper we discuss a small balloon-borne instrument to make the first in situ measurements versus altitude of the atmospheric fluorescence yield. The instrument can also be used in the lab to investigate the dependence of the fluorescence yield in air on temperature, pressure and the concentrations of other gases that present in the atmosphere. The results can be used to explore environmental effects on and improve the accuracy of cosmic ray energy measurements for existing ground-based experiments and future space-based experiments.

  12. Rare earth niobate coordination polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Muniz, Collin N.; Patel, Hiral; Fast, Dylan B.

    Rare-earth (RE) coordination polymers are infinitely tailorable to yield luminescent materials for various applications. In this paper we described the synthesis of a heterometallic rare-earth coordination compound ((CH 3) 2SO) 3(RE)NbO(C 2O 4) 3 ((CH 3) 2SO) = dimethylsulfoxide, DMSO, (C 2O 2 = oxalate), (RE=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb). The structure was obtained from single crystal X-ray diffraction of the La analogue. The Nb =O and DMSO terminal-bonding character guides assembly of an open framework structure with noncentrosymmetric RE-coordination geometry, and large spacing between the RE centers. A second structure was observed by PXRD for themore » smaller rare earths (Dy, Ho, Er, Yb); this structure has not yet been determined. The materials were further characterized using FTIR, and photoluminescence measurements. Characteristic excitation and emission transitions were observed for RE = Nd, Sm, Eu, and Tb. Quantum yield (QY) measurements were performed by exciting Eu and Tb analoges at 394 nm (QY 66%) and 464 nm (QY 71%) for Eu; and 370 nm (QY=40%) for Tb. Finally, we attribute the high QY and bright luminescence to two main structure-function properties of the system; namely the absence of water in the structure, and absence of concentration quenching.« less

  13. Rare earth niobate coordination polymers

    DOE PAGES

    Muniz, Collin N.; Patel, Hiral; Fast, Dylan B.; ...

    2018-01-03

    Rare-earth (RE) coordination polymers are infinitely tailorable to yield luminescent materials for various applications. In this paper we described the synthesis of a heterometallic rare-earth coordination compound ((CH 3) 2SO) 3(RE)NbO(C 2O 4) 3 ((CH 3) 2SO) = dimethylsulfoxide, DMSO, (C 2O 2 = oxalate), (RE=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb). The structure was obtained from single crystal X-ray diffraction of the La analogue. The Nb =O and DMSO terminal-bonding character guides assembly of an open framework structure with noncentrosymmetric RE-coordination geometry, and large spacing between the RE centers. A second structure was observed by PXRD for themore » smaller rare earths (Dy, Ho, Er, Yb); this structure has not yet been determined. The materials were further characterized using FTIR, and photoluminescence measurements. Characteristic excitation and emission transitions were observed for RE = Nd, Sm, Eu, and Tb. Quantum yield (QY) measurements were performed by exciting Eu and Tb analoges at 394 nm (QY 66%) and 464 nm (QY 71%) for Eu; and 370 nm (QY=40%) for Tb. Finally, we attribute the high QY and bright luminescence to two main structure-function properties of the system; namely the absence of water in the structure, and absence of concentration quenching.« less

  14. Rare earth niobate coordination polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muniz, Collin N.; Patel, Hiral; Fast, Dylan B.; Rohwer, Lauren E. S.; Reinheimer, Eric W.; Dolgos, Michelle; Graham, Matt W.; Nyman, May

    2018-03-01

    Rare-earth (RE) coordination polymers are infinitely tailorable to yield luminescent materials for various applications. Here we described the synthesis of a heterometallic rare-earth coordination compound ((CH3)2SO)3(RE)NbO(C2O4)3((CH3)2SO) = dimethylsulfoxide, DMSO, (C2O2= oxalate), (RE=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb). The structure was obtained from single crystal X-ray diffraction of the La analogue. The Nb˭O and DMSO terminal-bonding character guides assembly of an open framework structure with noncentrosymmetric RE-coordination geometry, and large spacing between the RE centers. A second structure was observed by PXRD for the smaller rare earths (Dy, Ho, Er, Yb); this structure has not yet been determined. The materials were further characterized using FTIR, and photoluminescence measurements. Characteristic excitation and emission transitions were observed for RE = Nd, Sm, Eu, and Tb. Quantum yield (QY) measurements were performed by exciting Eu and Tb analoges at 394 nm (QY 66%) and 464 nm (QY 71%) for Eu; and 370 nm (QY=40%) for Tb. We attribute the high QY and bright luminescence to two main structure-function properties of the system; namely the absence of water in the structure, and absence of concentration quenching.

  15. A Monte Carlo Sensitivity Analysis of CF2 and CF Radical Densities in a c-C4F8 Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; Rauf, Shahid; Hash, D. B.; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    A Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis is used to build a plasma chemistry model for octacyclofluorobutane (c-C4F8) which is commonly used in dielectric etch. Experimental data are used both quantitatively and quantitatively to analyze the gas phase and gas surface reactions for neutral radical chemistry. The sensitivity data of the resulting model identifies a few critical gas phase and surface aided reactions that account for most of the uncertainty in the CF2 and CF radical densities. Electron impact dissociation of small radicals (CF2 and CF) and their surface recombination reactions are found to be the rate-limiting steps in the neutral radical chemistry. The relative rates for these electron impact dissociation and surface recombination reactions are also suggested. The resulting mechanism is able to explain the measurements of CF2 and CF densities available in the literature and also their hollow spatial density profiles.

  16. Influence of the Size and Structural Factors on the Magnetism of Multilayer Films Based on 3 d and 4 f Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svalov, A. V.; Vas'kovskiy, V. O.; Kurlyandskaya, G. V.

    2017-12-01

    This work has presented some data on the layer structuring of films of 3 d and 4 f metals and their alloys, which have potential for practical use in magnetic sensors. The decrease in the thickness of magnetic layers with this structuring entails natural worsening of the crystallinity and leads to a degradation of magnetic ordering. However, the manifestation of these tendencies depends to a great extent on the conditions of preparation, the composition, and the sequence of the deposition of the contacting layers in the multilayer structures. The combination of these factors makes it possible to realize an optimum composition and optimum structural states of the films, which in a number of cases lead to the appearance of new combinations of functional properties.

  17. XMCD for monitoring exchange interactions. The role of the Gd 4f and 5d orbitals in metal-nitronyl nitroxide magnetic chains.

    PubMed

    Champion, Guillaume; Lalioti, Nikolia; Tangoulis, Vassilis; Arrio, Marie-Anne; Sainctavit, Philippe; Villain, Françoise; Caneschi, Andrea; Gatteschi, Dante; Giorgetti, Christine; Baudelet, François; Verdaguer, Michel; Cartier dit Moulin, Christophe

    2003-07-09

    We report here the X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) study at the Gd M(4,5)- and L(2,3)-edges of two linear magnetic chains involving Gd(III) cations bridged by nitronyl nitroxide radicals. This spectroscopy directly probes the magnetic moments of the 4f and 5d orbitals of the gadolinium ions. We compare macroscopic magnetic measurements and local XMCD signals. The M(4,5)-edges results are in agreement with the J values extracted from the fits of the SQUID magnetic measurements. The L(2,3)-edges signals show that the electronic density in the Gd 5d orbitals depends on the neighbors of the gadolinium cations. Nevertheless, the 5d orbitals do not seem to play any role in the superexchange pathway between radicals through the metal ion proposed to explain the particular magnetic exchange interactions between the radicals in these chains.

  18. Double-walled structure of anodic TiO2 nanotubes in H3PO4/NH4F mixed electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Siyu; Chen, Ying; Li, Chengyuan; Ouyang, Huijun; Qin, Shuai; Song, Ye

    2018-04-01

    Normally, the well-ordered anodic TiO2 nanotubes (ATNTs) are obtained in NH4F electrolyte, after annealing, the double-walled structure of nanotubes will appear. Here, after adding H3PO4 into NHF4 electrolyte, we got the double-walled structure of nanotubes by anodizing without annealing, which means the direct existence of anion-contaminated layer in ATNTs. Influence of H3PO4 content on anodizing voltage and morphology of ATNTs were compared in detail. The XRD pattern illustrated that the crystallinity decreases with increasing H3PO4 concentration, and the anion-contaminated layer thickens with the increase of H3PO4 concentration. Meanwhile, the existence of the anion-contaminated layer also proved the limitations of the filed-assisted dissolution theory, while the double-walled structure can be explained by oxygen bubble model and plastic flow model.

  19. Linear Dichroism in Angle-Resolved Core-Level Photoemission Spectra Reflecting 4f Ground-State Symmetry of Strongly Correlated Cubic Pr Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, Satoru; Fujioka, Shuhei; Kanai, Yuina; Yamagami, Kohei; Nakatani, Yasuhiro; Nakagawa, Koya; Fujiwara, Hidenori; Kiss, Takayuki; Higashiya, Atsushi; Yamasaki, Atsushi; Kadono, Toshiharu; Imada, Shin; Tanaka, Arata; Tamasaku, Kenji; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Matsumoto, Keisuke T.; Onimaru, Takahiro; Takabatake, Toshiro; Sekiyama, Akira

    2017-12-01

    We report experimentally observed linear dichroism in angle-resolved core-level photoemission spectra of PrIr2Zn20 and PrB6 with cubic symmetry. The different anisotropic 4f charge distributions between the compounds due to the crystalline-electric-field splitting are responsible for the difference in the linear dichroism, which has been verified by spectral simulations with the full multiplet theory for a single-site Pr3+ ion with cubic symmetry. The observed linear dichroism and polarization-dependent spectra in two different photoelectron directions for PrIr2Zn20 are reproduced by theoretical analysis for the Γ3 ground state, whereas those of the Pr 3d and 4d core levels indicate the Γ5 ground state for PrB6.

  20. An unusual 2p-3d-4f heterometallic coordination polymer featuring Ln8Na and Cu8I clusters as nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mingjuan; Chen, Shimin; Huang, Yutian; Dan, Youmeng

    2017-01-01

    A new cluster-based three-dimensional 2p-3d-4f heterometallic framework {[Ho8Na(OH)6Cu16I2(CPT)24](NO3)9(H2O)6(CH3CN)18}n (1, HCPT = 4-(4-carboxyphenyl)-1,2,4 triazole) has been prepared under solvothermal condition by using a custom-designed bifunctional organic ligand. The single-crystal structure analysis reveals that this framework features novel Ln8Na and Cu8I clusters as nodes, these nodes are further connected by the CPT ligands to give rise to a (6,14)-connected network. The magnetic property of this framework has also been investigated.

  1. 926 nm laser operation in Nd:GdNbO4 crystal based on 4F3/2 → 4I9/2 transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Renpeng; Li, Xudong; Yao, Wenming; Shen, Yingjie; Zhou, Zhongxiang; Peng, Fang; Zhang, Qingli; Dou, Renqing; Gao, Jing

    2018-05-01

    926 nm laser operation in a Nd:GdNbO4 crystal based on quasi-three-level 4F3/2 → 4I9/2 transition is reported, for the first time to our best knowledge. An average output power of 393 mW at 926 nm under 879 nm LD pumping is obtained with a slope efficiency of 33.3% and an optical-to-optical efficiency of 26.0%. The slope efficiency with respect to absorbed pump power is estimated to be 47.7%. Comparison between output characters of 926 nm laser under direct and indirect pumping is conducted. The average output power at 926 nm under 808 nm LD pumping reaches 305 mW with an optical-to-optical efficiency of 16.1%.

  2. Syntheses, crystal structures and properties of series of 4d–4f ln(III)–Ag(I) heterometallic coordination polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Ran, Xing-Rui; Wang, Ning; Xie, Wei-Ping

    2015-05-15

    By control of the experimental parameters such as ligands, pH value and reacting temperature, series of three-dimensional (3D) 4d–4f Ln(III)–Ag(I) porous coordination polymers (PCPs) with interesting chain-layer construction, namely, ([Ln{sup III}Ag{sup I}(na)(ina)(ox)]·2(H{sub 2}O)){sub n} [Ln=Sm(1), Eu(2), Gd(3), Tb(4), Dy(5), Ho(6), Y(7), Yb(8)], have been successfully synthesized under hydrothermal conditions and structurally characterized. All the complexes are characterized by elemental analyses, FT-IR spectroscopy, Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and thermogravimetric analyses (TGA). Furthermore, the luminescence properties of compounds 2 and 4 and the magsnetic properties of complexes 3 and 5 were also investigated in detail. - Graphical abstract: Series of three-dimensional (3D)more » 4d–4f Ln(III)–Ag(I) porous coordination polymers (PCPs) with interesting chain-layer construction which are featured by tetranuclear Ln{sub 2}Ag{sub 2} and ‘non-linear’ N–Ag–N linkages. - Highlights: • Complexes 1–8 are first built by three kinds of organic ligands based on nicotinic acid and isonicotinic acid. • PCPs 1–8 are featured by tetranuclear Ln{sub 2}Ag{sub 2} and ‘non-linear’ N–Ag–N linkages. • The total solvent-accessible volume of PCP 2 comprises 11.6% of the crystal volume after dislodging the free water molecules. • Complexes 2 and 4 exhibit characteristic lanthanide-centered luminescence, while compounds 3 and 5 show antiferromagnetic behaviors.« less

  3. de Haas–van Alphen study of role of 4 f electrons in antiferromagnetic CeZn 11 as compared to its nonmagnetic analog LaZn 11

    DOE PAGES

    Blake, S. F.; Hodovanets, H.; McCollam, A.; ...

    2016-12-02

    Here we present a de Haas–van Alphen study of the Fermi surface of the low-temperature antiferromagnet CeZn 11 and its nonmagnetic analog LaZn 11, measured by torque magnetometry up to fields of 33T and at temperatures down to 320 mK . Both systems possess similar de Haas–van Alphen frequencies, with three clear sets of features—ranging from 50 T to 4 kT —corresponding to three bands of a complex Fermi surface, with an expected fourth band also seen weakly in CeZn 11 . The effective masses of the charge carriers are very light (<1 m e) in LaZn 11 but amore » factor of 2–4 larger in CeZn 11, indicative of stronger electronic correlations. We perform detailed density functional theory (DFT) calculations for CeZn 11 and find that only DFT+ U calculations with U = 1.5 eV , which localize the 4 f states, provide a good match to the measured de Haas–van Alphen frequencies, once the presence of magnetic breakdown orbits is also considered. Finally, our study suggests that the Fermi surface of CeZn 11 is very close to that of LaZn 11 being dominated by Zn 3d , as the Ce 4 f states are localized and have little influence on its electronic structure, however, they are responsible for its magnetic order and contribute to enhance electronic correlations.« less

  4. de Haas–van Alphen study of role of 4 f electrons in antiferromagnetic CeZn 11 as compared to its nonmagnetic analog LaZn 11

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, S. F.; Hodovanets, H.; McCollam, A.

    Here we present a de Haas–van Alphen study of the Fermi surface of the low-temperature antiferromagnet CeZn 11 and its nonmagnetic analog LaZn 11, measured by torque magnetometry up to fields of 33T and at temperatures down to 320 mK . Both systems possess similar de Haas–van Alphen frequencies, with three clear sets of features—ranging from 50 T to 4 kT —corresponding to three bands of a complex Fermi surface, with an expected fourth band also seen weakly in CeZn 11 . The effective masses of the charge carriers are very light (<1 m e) in LaZn 11 but amore » factor of 2–4 larger in CeZn 11, indicative of stronger electronic correlations. We perform detailed density functional theory (DFT) calculations for CeZn 11 and find that only DFT+ U calculations with U = 1.5 eV , which localize the 4 f states, provide a good match to the measured de Haas–van Alphen frequencies, once the presence of magnetic breakdown orbits is also considered. Finally, our study suggests that the Fermi surface of CeZn 11 is very close to that of LaZn 11 being dominated by Zn 3d , as the Ce 4 f states are localized and have little influence on its electronic structure, however, they are responsible for its magnetic order and contribute to enhance electronic correlations.« less

  5. Precision calculations for h → WW/ZZ → 4 fermions in the Two-Higgs-Doublet Model with Prophecy4f

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenkamp, Lukas; Dittmaier, Stefan; Rzehak, Heidi

    2018-03-01

    We have calculated the next-to-leading-order electroweak and QCD corrections to the decay processes h → WW/ZZ → 4 fermions of the light CP-even Higgs boson h of various types of Two-Higgs-Doublet Models (Types I and II, "lepton-specific" and "flipped" models). The input parameters are defined in four different renormalization schemes, where parameters that are not directly accessible by experiments are defined in the \\overline{MS} scheme. Numerical results are presented for the corrections to partial decay widths for various benchmark scenarios previously motivated in the literature, where we investigate the dependence on the \\overline{MS} renormalization scale and on the choice of the renormalization scheme in detail. We find that it is crucial to be precise with these issues in parameter analyses, since parameter conversions between different schemes can involve sizeable or large corrections, especially in scenarios that are close to experimental exclusion limits or theoretical bounds. It even turns out that some renormalization schemes are not applicable in specific regions of parameter space. Our investigation of differential distributions shows that corrections beyond the Standard Model are mostly constant offsets induced by the mixing between the light and heavy CP-even Higgs bosons, so that differential analyses of h→4 f decay observables do not help to identify Two-Higgs-Doublet Models. Moreover, the decay widths do not significantly depend on the specific type of those models. The calculations are implemented in the public Monte Carlo generator Prophecy4f and ready for application.

  6. A novel mechanism for Bcr-Abl action: Bcr-Abl-mediated induction of the eIF4F translation initiation complex and mRNA translation.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, S; Saadat, D; Zhang, M; Halbur, L; Fruehauf, J P; Ong, S T

    2007-02-22

    The oncogenic kinase Bcr-Abl is thought to cause chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) by altering the transcription of specific genes with growth- and survival-promoting functions. Recently, Bcr-Abl has also been shown to activate an important regulator of protein synthesis, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which suggests that dysregulated translation may also contribute to CML pathogenesis. In this study, we found that both Bcr-Abl and the rapamycin-sensitive mTORC1 complex contribute to the phosphorylation (inactivation) of 4E-BP1, an inhibitor of the eIF4E translation initiation factor. Experiments with rapamycin and the Bcr-Abl inhibitor, imatinib mesylate, in Bcr-Abl-expressing cell lines and primary CML cells indicated that Bcr-Abl and mTORC1 induced formation of the translation initiation complex, eIF4F. This was characterized by reduced 4E-BP1 binding and increased eIF4G binding to eIF4E, two events that lead to the assembly of eIF4F. One target transcript is cyclin D3, which is regulated in Bcr-Abl-expressing cells by both Bcr-Abl and mTORC1 in a translational manner. In addition, the combination of imatinib and rapamycin was found to act synergistically against committed CML progenitors from chronic and blast phase patients. These experiments establish a novel mechanism of action for Bcr-Abl, and they provide insights into the modes of action of imatinib mesylate and rapamycin in treatment of CML. They also suggest that aberrant cap-dependent mRNA translation may be a therapeutic target in Bcr-Abl-driven malignancies.

  7. Angular dependence of etch rates in the etching of poly-Si and fluorocarbon polymer using SF6, C4F8, and O2 plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Jae-Ho; Lee, Gyeo-Re; Lee, Jin-Kwan; Moon, Sang Heup; Kim, Chang-Koo

    2004-05-01

    The dependences of etch rates on the angle of ions incident on the substrate surface in four plasma/substrate systems that constitute the advanced Bosch process were investigated using a Faraday cage designed for the accurate control of the ion-incident angle. The four systems, established by combining discharge gases and substrates, were a SF6/poly-Si, a SF6/fluorocarbon polymer, an O2/fluorocarbon polymer, and a C4F8/Si. In the case of SF6/poly-Si, the normalized etch rates (NERs), defined as the etch rates normalized by the rate on the horizontal surface, were higher at all angles than values predicted from the cosine of the ion-incident angle. This characteristic curve shape was independent of changes in process variables including the source power and bias voltage. Contrary to the earlier case, the NERs for the O2/polymer decreased and eventually reached much lower values than the cosine values at angles between 30° and 70° when the source power was increased and the bias voltage was decreased. On the other hand, the NERs for the SF6/polymer showed a weak dependence on the process variables. In the case of C4F8/Si, which is used in the Bosch process for depositing a fluorocarbon layer on the substrate surface, the deposition rate varied with the ion incident angle, showing an S-shaped curve. These characteristic deposition rate curves, which were highly dependent on the process conditions, could be divided into four distinct regions: a Si sputtering region, an ion-suppressed polymer deposition region, an ion-enhanced polymer deposition region, and an ion-free polymer deposition region. Based on the earlier characteristic angular dependences of the etch (or deposition) rates in the individual systems, ideal process conditions for obtaining an anisotropic etch profile in the advanced Bosch process are proposed. .

  8. Brn3a/Pou4f1 Regulates Dorsal Root Ganglion Sensory Neuron Specification and Axonal Projection into the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Min; Li, Shengguo; Klein, William H.; Xiang, Mengqing

    2012-01-01

    The sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) must project accurately to their central targets to convey proprioceptive, nociceptive and mechanoreceptive information to the spinal cord. How these different sensory modalities and central connectivities are specified and coordinated still remains unclear. Given the expression of the POU homeodomain transcription factors Brn3a/Pou4f1 and Brn3b/Pou4f2 in DRG and spinal cord sensory neurons, we determined the subtype specification of DRG and spinal cord sensory neurons as well as DRG central projections in Brn3a and Brn3b single and double mutant mice. Inactivation of either or both genes causes no gross abnormalities in early spinal cord neurogenesis; however, in Brn3a single and Brn3a;Brn3b double mutant mice, sensory afferent axons from the DRG fail to form normal trajectories in the spinal cord. The TrkA+ afferents remain outside the dorsal horn and fail to extend into the spinal cord, while the projections of TrkC+ proprioceptive afferents into the ventral horn are also impaired. Moreover, Brn3a mutant DRGs are defective in sensory neuron specification, as marked by the excessive generation of TrkB+ and TrkC+ neurons as well as TrkA+/TrkB+ and TrkA+/TrkC+ double positive cells at early embryonic stages. At later stages in the mutant, TrkB+, TrkC+ and parvalbumin+ neurons diminish while there is a significant increase of CGRP+ and c-ret+ neurons. In addition, Brn3a mutant DRGs display a dramatic down-regulation of Runx1 expression, suggesting that the regulation of DRG sensory neuron specification by Brn3a is mediated in part by Runx1. Our results together demonstrate a critical role for Brn3a in generating DRG sensory neuron diversity and regulating sensory afferent projections to the central targets. PMID:22326227

  9. Squeezing clathrate cages to host trivalent rare-earth guests

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian; He, Yuping; Mordvinova, Natalia E.

    Strike difference of the trivalent rare-earth cations from their alkali and alkaline-earth peers is in the presence of localized 4f-electrons and strong spin-orbit coupling. Placing trivalent rare-earth cations inside the fullerene molecules or in between the blocks of itinerant magnetic intermetallics gave rise to plethora of fascinating properties and materials. A long-time missing but hardly desired piece is the semiconducting or metallic compound where rare-earth cations are situated inside the oversized polyhedral cages of three-dimensional framework. In this work we present a synthesis of such compounds, rare-earth containing clathrates Ba 8-xR xCu 16P 30. The unambiguous proofs of their compositionmore » and crystal structure were achieved by a combination of synchrotron powder diffraction, time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction, scanning-transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Our quantum-mechanical calculations and experimental characterizations show that the incorporation of the rare-earth cations significantly enhances the hole mobility and concentration which results in the drastic increase in the thermoelectric performance.« less

  10. Deep drilling; Probing beneath the earth's surface

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, J.250

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports on boreholes from 4.5 to greater than 10 kilometers deep that are pushing back the boundaries of earth science as they yield information that is used to refine seismic surveys, chart the evolution of sedimentary basins and shield volcanos, and uncover important clues on the origin and migration of mantle-derived water and gas.

  11. Structure, stability, and photoluminescence in the anti-perovskites Na{sub 3}W{sub 1−x}Mo{sub x}O{sub 4}F (0≤x≤1)

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Eirin, E-mail: esulliv@ilstu.edu; Avdeev, Maxim; Blom, Douglas A.

    2015-10-15

    Single-phase ordered oxyfluorides Na{sub 3}WO{sub 4}F, Na{sub 3}MoO{sub 4}F and their mixed members Na{sub 3}W{sub 1−x}Mo{sub x}O{sub 4}F can be prepared via facile solid state reaction of Na{sub 2}MO{sub 4}·2H{sub 2}O (M=W, Mo) and NaF. Phases produced from incongruent melts are metastable, but lower temperatures allow for a facile one-step synthesis. In polycrystalline samples of Na{sub 3}W{sub 1−x}Mo{sub x}O{sub 4}F, the presence of Mo stabilizes the structure against decomposition to spinel phases. Photoluminescence studies show that upon excitation with λ=254 nm and λ=365 nm, Na{sub 3}WO{sub 4}F and Na{sub 3}MoO{sub 4}F exhibit broad emission maxima centered around 485 nm. Thesemore » materials constitute new members of the family of self-activating ordered oxyfluoride phosphors with anti-perovskite structures which are amenable to doping with emitters such as Eu{sup 3+}. - Graphical abstract: Directed synthesis of the ordered oxyfluorides Na{sub 3}W{sub 1−x}Mo{sub x}O{sub 4}F (0≤x≤1) has shown that a complete solid solution is attainable and provides the first example of photoluminescence in these materials. - Highlights: • Na{sub 3}W{sub 1−x}Mo{sub x}O{sub 4}F is a complete solid solution with hexagonal anti-perovskite structure. • The presence of even small amounts of Mo stabilizes the structure against decomposition. • Na{sub 3}W{sub 1−x}Mo{sub x}O{sub 4}F has broad emissions centered ≈485 nm (λ{sub ex}=254 nm and λ{sub ex}=365 nm). • These materials constitute a new family of self-activated oxyfluoride phosphors. • Na{sub 3}W{sub 1−x}Mo{sub x}O{sub 4}F materials are amenable to doping with emitters such as Eu{sup 3+}.« less

  12. The Lifeworld Earth and a Modelled Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juuti, Kalle

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to study the question of whether a phenomenological view of the Earth could be empirically endorsed. The phenomenological way of thinking considers the Earth as a material entity, but not as an object as viewed in science. In the learning science tradition, tracking the process of the conceptual change of the shape of the…

  13. Analysis of QTLs for yield-related traits in Yuanjiang common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.).

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Zhang, Peijiang; Tan, Lubin; Zhu, Zuofeng; Ma, Dan; Fu, Yongcai; Zhan, Xinchun; Cai, Hongwei; Sun, Chuanqing

    2010-02-01

    Using an accession of common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.) collected from Yuanjiang County, Yunnan Province, China, as the donor and an elite cultivar 93-11, widely used in two-line indica hybrid rice production in China, as the recurrent parent, an advanced backcross populations were developed. Through genotyping of 187 SSR markers and investigation of six yield-related traits of two generations (BC(4)F(2) and BC(4)F(4)), a total of 26 QTLs were detected by employing single point analysis and interval mapping in both generations. Of the 26 QTLs, the alleles of 10 (38.5%) QTLs originating from O. rufipogon had shown a beneficial effect for yield-related traits in the 93-11 genetic background. In addition, five QTLs controlling yield and its components were newly identified, indicating that there are potentially novel alleles in Yuanjiang common wild rice. Three regions underling significant QTLs for several yield-related traits were detected on chromosome 1, 7 and 12. The QTL clusters were founded and corresponding agronomic traits of those QTLs showed highly significant correlation, suggesting the pleiotropism or tight linkage. Fine-mapping and cloning of these yield-related QTLs from wild rice would be helpful to elucidating molecular mechanism of rice domestication and rice breeding in the future. Copyright 2010 Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology and the Genetics Society of China. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Heteropentanuclear Oxalato-Bridged nd-4f (n=4, 5) Metal Complexes with NO Ligand: Synthesis, Crystal Structures, Aqueous Stability and Antiproliferative Activity.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Paul-Steffen; Cremer, Laura; Gavriluta, Anatolie; Jovanović, Katarina K; Filipović, Lana; Hummer, Alfred A; Büchel, Gabriel E; Dojčinović, Biljana P; Meier, Samuel M; Rompel, Annette; Radulović, Siniša; Tommasino, Jean Bernard; Luneau, Dominique; Arion, Vladimir B

    2015-09-21

    A series of heteropentanuclear oxalate-bridged Ru(NO)-Ln (4d-4f) metal complexes of the general formula (nBu4N)5[Ln{RuCl3(μ-ox)(NO)}4], where Ln=Y (2), Gd (3), Tb (4), Dy (5) and ox=oxalate anion, were obtained by treatment of (nBu4N)2[RuCl3(ox)(NO)] (1) with the respective lanthanide salt in 4:1 molar ratio. The compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry, while 1, 2, and 5 were in addition analyzed by X-ray crystallography, 1 by Ru K-edge XAS and 1 and 2 by (13)C NMR spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction showed that in 2 and 5 four complex anions [RuCl3(ox)(NO)](2-) are coordinated to Y(III) and Dy(III), respectively, with formation of [Ln{RuCl3(μ-ox)(NO)}4](5-) (Ln=Y, Dy). While Y(III) is eight-coordinate in 2, Dy(III) is nine-coordinate in 5, with an additional coordination of an EtOH molecule. The negative charge is counterbalanced by five nBu4N(+) ions present in the crystal structure. The stability of complexes 2 and 5 in aqueous medium was monitored by UV/Vis spectroscopy. The antiproliferative activity of ruthenium-lanthanide complexes 2-5 were assayed in two human cancer cell lines (HeLa and A549) and in a noncancerous cell line (MRC-5) and compared with those obtained for the previously reported Os(NO)-Ln (5d-4f) analogues (nBu4N)5[Ln{OsCl3(ox)(NO)}4] (Ln=Y (6), Gd (7), Tb (8), Dy (9)). Complexes 2-5 were found to be slightly more active than 1 in inhibiting the proliferation of HeLa and A549 cells, and significantly more cytotoxic than 5d-4f metal complexes 6-9 in terms of IC50 values. The highest antiproliferative activity with IC50 values of 20.0 and 22.4 μM was found for 4 in HeLa and A549 cell lines, respectively. These cytotoxicity results are in accord with the presented ICP-MS data, indicating five- to eightfold greater accumulation of ruthenium versus osmium in human A549 cancer cells. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open

  15. Toward a W4-F12 approach: Can explicitly correlated and orbital-based ab initio CCSD(T) limits be reconciled?

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvetsky, Nitai, E-mail: gershom@weizmann.ac.il; Martin, Jan M. L., E-mail: gershom@weizmann.ac.il; Peterson, Kirk A., E-mail: kipeters@wsu.edu

    2016-06-07

    In the context of high-accuracy computational thermochemistry, the valence coupled cluster with all singles and doubles (CCSD) correlation component of molecular atomization energies presents the most severe basis set convergence problem, followed by the (T) component. In the present paper, we make a detailed comparison, for an expanded version of the W4-11 thermochemistry benchmark, between, on the one hand, orbital-based CCSD/AV{5,6}Z + d and CCSD/ACV{5,6}Z extrapolation, and on the other hand CCSD-F12b calculations with cc-pVQZ-F12 and cc-pV5Z-F12 basis sets. This latter basis set, now available for H–He, B–Ne, and Al–Ar, is shown to be very close to the basis setmore » limit. Apparent differences (which can reach 0.35 kcal/mol for systems like CCl{sub 4}) between orbital-based and CCSD-F12b basis set limits disappear if basis sets with additional radial flexibility, such as ACV{5,6}Z, are used for the orbital calculation. Counterpoise calculations reveal that, while total atomization energies with V5Z-F12 basis sets are nearly free of BSSE, orbital calculations have significant BSSE even with AV(6 + d)Z basis sets, leading to non-negligible differences between raw and counterpoise-corrected extrapolated limits. This latter problem is greatly reduced by switching to ACV{5,6}Z core-valence basis sets, or simply adding an additional zeta to just the valence orbitals. Previous reports that all-electron approaches like HEAT (high-accuracy extrapolated ab-initio thermochemistry) lead to different CCSD(T) limits than “valence limit + CV correction” approaches like Feller-Peterson-Dixon and Weizmann-4 (W4) theory can be rationalized in terms of the greater radial flexibility of core-valence basis sets. For (T) corrections, conventional CCSD(T)/AV{Q,5}Z + d calculations are found to be superior to scaled or extrapolated CCSD(T)-F12b calculations of similar cost. For a W4-F12 protocol, we recommend obtaining the Hartree-Fock and valence CCSD components from

  16. Multiplex pyrosequencing method to determine CYP2C9*3, VKORC1*2, and CYP4F2*3 polymorphisms simultaneously: its application to a Korean population and comparisons with other ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Ah; Song, Wan-Geun; Lee, Hae-Mi; Joo, Hyun-Jin; Park, Ji-Young

    2014-11-01

    Warfarin is an anticoagulant that is difficult to administer because of the wide variation in dose requirements to achieve a therapeutic effect. CYP2C9, VKROC1, and CYP4F2 play important roles in warfarin metabolism, and their genetic polymorphisms are related to the variability in dose determination. In this study we describe a new multiplex pyrosequencing method to identify CYP2C9*3 (rs1057910), VKORC1*2 (rs9923231), and CYP4F2*3 (rs2108661) simultaneously. A multiplex pyrosequencing method to simultaneously detect CYP2C9*3, VKORC1*2, and CYP4F2*3 alleles was designed. We assessed the allele frequencies of the polymorphisms in 250 Korean subjects using the multiplex pyrosequencing method. The results showed 100 % concordance between single and multiplex pyrosequencing methods, and the polymorphisms identified by pyrosequencing were also validated with the direct sequencing method. The allele frequencies of these polymorphisms in this population were as follows: 0.040 for CYP2C9*3, 0.918 for VKORC1*2, and 0.416 for CYP4F2*3. Although the allele frequencies of the CYP2C9*3 and VKROC1*2 were comparable to those in Japanese and Chinese populations, their frequencies in this Korean population differed from those in other ethnic groups; the CYP4F2*3 frequency was the highest among other ethnic populations including Chinese and Japanese populations. The pyrosequencing methods developed were rapid and reliable for detecting CYP2C9*3, VKORC1*2, and CYP4F2*3. Large ethnic differences in the frequency of these genetic polymorphisms were noted among ethnic groups. CYP4F2*3 exhibited its highest allele frequency among other ethnic populations compared to that in a Korean population.

  17. Structural features and properties of the laser-deposited nickel alloy layer on a KhV4F tool steel after heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, V. S.; Dikova, Ts. D.; Stavrev, D. S.

    2017-07-01

    The study and application of the materials that are stable in the temperature range up to 1000°C are necessary to repair forming dies operating in this range. Nickel-based alloys can be used for this purpose. The structural state of a nickel alloy layer deposited onto a KhV4F tool steel and then heat treated is investigated. KhV4F tool steel (RF GOST) samples are subjected to laser deposition using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. A nickel-based material (0.02C-73.8Ni-2.5Nb-19.5Cr-1.9Fe-2.8Mn) is employed for laser deposition. After laser deposition, the samples are subjected to heat treatment at 400°C for 5 h, 600°C for 1 h, 800°C for 1 h, and 1000°C for 1 h. The microstructure, the phase composition, and the microhardness of the deposited layer are studied. The structure of the initial deposited layer has relatively large grains (20-40 μm in size). The morphology is characterized by a cellular-dendritic structure in the transition zone. The following two structural constituents with a characteristic dendritic structure are revealed: a supersaturated nickel-based γ solid solution and a chromium-based bcc α solid solution. In the initial state and after heat treatment, the hardness of the deposited material (210-240 HV 0.1) is lower than the hardness of the base material (400-440 HV 0.1). Only after heat treatment at 600°C for 1 h, the hardness increases to 240-250 HV0.1. Structure heredity in the form of a dendritic morphology is observed at temperatures of 400, 600, and 800°C. The following sharp change in the structural state is detected upon heat treatment at 1000°C for 1 h: the dendritic morphology changes into a typical α + γ crystalline structure. The hardness of the base material decreases significantly to 160-180 HV 0.1. The low hardness of the deposited layer implies the use of the layer material in limited volume to repair the forming surfaces of dies and molds for die casting. However, the high ductility of the deposited layer of the nickel

  18. Electric Field and Current Density Performance Analysis of Sf6, C4f8 and CO2 Gases As An Insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazli, Ahmad Danial Ahmad; Jamail, Nor Akmal Mohd; Azlin Othman, Nordiana

    2017-08-01

    SF6 gases are not only widely used as an insulating component in electric power industry but also as an arc extinguishing performance in high voltage (HV) gas-insulated circuit breaker (GCB). SF6 gases is generally used in the production of semiconductor materials and devices. Though these gasses is widely used in many application, the presences of temperature hotspot in the insulations may affect the insulation characteristics particularly electric field and current density. Therefore, it is important to determine the relationship between electric field and current density of gasses used in the insulator in the presence of hotspot. In this paper, three types of gases in particular Sulphur Hexafluoride (SF6), Octafluorocylobutane (C4F8), and Carbon Dioxide (CO2) was used in the insulator for gas insulation with the presence of two hotspots. These two hotspost were detected by referring the rising temperature in the insulator which are 1000 and 2000 Kelvin temperature for hotspot 1 and hotspot 2, respectively. From the simulation results, it can be concluded that Sulphur Hexafluoride (SF6) is the best choice for gas insulation since it had the lowest current density and electric field compared to Octafluorocylobutane (C4F8), and Carbon Dioxide (CO2). It is observed that the maximum current density and electric field for SF6 during normal condition are 358.94 × 103 V/m and 0.643 × 109 A/m2, respectively. Meanwhile, during temperature rising at hotspot 1 and hotspot 2, SF6 also had lowest current density and electric field compared to the other gasses where the results for Emax and Jmax at hotspot 1 are 322.34 × 103 V/m and 1.934 × 109 A/m2, respectively; While, Emax and Jmax at hotspot 2 are 259.77× 103 V/m and 2.824 × 109 A/m2. The results of this analysis can be used to find the best choices of gas that can be used in the insulator.

  19. Investigation of solid particles in the mainstream aerosol of the Tobacco Heating System THS2.2 and mainstream smoke of a 3R4F reference cigarette.

    PubMed

    Pratte, P; Cosandey, S; Goujon Ginglinger, C

    2017-11-01

    Combustion of biomass produces solid carbon particles, whereas their generation is highly unlikely when a biomass is heated instead of being burnt. For instance, in the Tobacco Heating System (THS2.2), the tobacco is heated below 350°C and no combustion takes place. Consequently, at this relatively low temperature, released compounds should form an aerosol consisting of suspended liquid droplets via a homogeneous nucleation process. To verify this assumption, mainstream aerosol generated by the heat-not-burn product, THS2.2, was assessed in comparison with mainstream smoke produced from the 3R4F reference cigarette for which solid particles are likely present. For this purpose, a methodology was developed based on the use of a commercial Dekati thermodenuder operating at 300°C coupled with a two-stage impactor to trap solid particles. If any particles were collected, they were subsequently analyzed by a scanning electron microscope and an electron dispersive X-ray. The setup was first assessed using glycerine-based aerosol as a model system. The removal efficiency of glycerin was determined to be 86 ± 2% using a Trust Science Innovation (TSI) scanning mobility particle sizer, meaning that quantification of solid particles can be achieved as long as their fraction is larger than 14% in number. From experiments conducted using the 3R4F reference cigarette, the methodology showed that approximately 80% in number of the total particulate matter was neither evaporated nor removed by the thermodenuder. This 80% in number was attributed to the presence of solid particles and/or low volatile liquid droplets. The particles collected on the impactor were mainly carbon based. Oxygen, potassium, and chloride traces were also noted. In comparison, solid particles were not detected in the aerosol of THS2.2 after passing through the thermodenuder operated at 300°C. This result is consistent with the fact that no combustion process takes place in THS2.2 and no formation and

  20. Earth on the Move.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides background information on the layers of the earth, the relationship between changes on the surface of the earth and its insides, and plate tectonics. Teaching activities are included, with some containing reproducible worksheets and handouts to accompany them. (TW)

  1. Earth - Pacific Ocean

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-01-29

    This color image of the Earth was obtained by NASA’s Galileo spacecraft early Dec. 12, 1990, when the spacecraft was about 1.6 million miles from the Earth. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00123

  2. The Earth & Moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-06-04

    During its flight, NASA’s Galileo spacecraft returned images of the Earth and Moon. Separate images of the Earth and Moon were combined to generate this view. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00342

  3. Oblique Shot of Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-09-05

    This highly oblique image shot over northwestern part of the African continent captures the curvature of the Earth and shows its atmosphere as seen by NASA EarthKAM. You can see clouds and even the occasional thunderhead.

  4. Exploring Spaceship Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInnis, Noel F.

    1973-01-01

    Describes various activities to understand the nature of the earth as a spaceship and its impact on human life. A figure depicting a holocoenotic environmental complex is given which can be used to illustrate various interacting forces on earth. (PS)

  5. NASA Earth Day 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-22

    Students listen intently while NASA's Director, Earth Science Division, Mike Freilich, speaks at NASA's Earth Day event. The event took place at Union Station in Washington, DC on April 22, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  6. Earth - India and Australia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-02-08

    This color image of the Earth was obtained by NASA’s Galileo spacecraft on Dec. 11, 1990, when the spacecraft was about 1.5 million miles from the Earth. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00122

  7. NASA Earth Day 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-22

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden poses for a quick selfie with students who attended the NASA sponsored Earth Day event April 22, 2014 at Union Station in Washington, DC. NASA announced the "Global Selfie" event as part of its "Earth Right Now" campaign, celebrating the launch of five Earth-observing missions in 2014. All selfies posted to social media with the hashtag "GlobalSelfie" will be included in a mosaic image of Earth. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  8. The Dynamic Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siever, Raymond

    1983-01-01

    Discusses how the earth is a dynamic system that maintains itself in a steady state. Areas considered include large/small-scale earth motions, geologic time, rock and hydrologic cycles, and other aspects dealing with the changing face of the earth. (JN)

  9. Synthesis, crystal structures and luminescent properties of two 4 d-4 f Ln-Ag heterometallic coordination polymers based on anion template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Le-Qing; Chen, Yuan; Wu, Ji-Huai; Huang, Yun-Fang

    2011-04-01

    Two new 4 d-4 f Ln-Ag heterometallic coordination polymers, {[ Ln3Ag 5(IN) 10(H 2O) 7]·4(ClO 4)·4(H 2O)} n ( Ln=Eu ( 1) and Sm ( 2), HIN=isonicotinic acid), have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions by reactions of Ln2O 3, AgNO 3, HIN and HClO 4, and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, thermal analysis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. It is proved that HClO 4 not only adjusts the pH value of the reaction mixture, but also acts as anion template. The structure determination reveals that 1 and 2 are isostructural and feature a novel two-dimensional (2D) layered hetrometallic structure constructed from one-dimensional Ln-carboxylate chains and pillared Ag(IN) 2 units. The 2D layers are further interlinked through Ag⋯Ag and Ag⋯O(ClO 4-) multiple weak interactions, which form a rare Ag-ClO 4 ribbon in lanthanide-transition metal coordination polymers, to give rise to a three-dimensional supramolecular architecture. Moreover, the luminescent properties of these two compounds have also been investigated at room temperature.

  10. Photocatalytic performance of freestanding tetragonal zirconia nanotubes formed in H2O2/NH4F/ethylene glycol electrolyte by anodisation of zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozana, Monna; Izza Soaid, Nurul; Kian, Tan Wai; Kawamura, Go; Matsuda, Atsunori; Lockman, Zainovia

    2017-04-01

    ZrO2 nanotubes (ZrNTs) were produced by anodisation of zirconium foil in H2O2/NH4F/ethylene glycol electrolyte. The as-anodised foils were then soaked in the anodising electrolyte for 12 h. Soaking weakens the adherence of the anodic layer from the substrate resulting in freestanding ZrNTs (FS-ZrNTs). Moreover, the presence of H2O2 in the electrolyte also aids in weakening the adhesion of the film from the foil, as foil anodised in electrolyte without H2O2 has good film adherence. The as-anodised FS-ZrNTs film was amorphous and crystallised to predominantly tetragonal phase upon annealing at >300 °C. Annealing must, however, be done at <500 °C to avoid monoclinic ZrO2 formation and nanotubes disintegration. FS-ZrNTs annealed at 450 °C exhibited the highest photocatalytic ability to degrade methyl orange (MO), whereby 82% MO degradation was observed after 5 h, whereas FS-ZrNTs with a mixture of monoclinic and tetragonal degraded 70% of MO after 5 h.

  11. Laser-induced fluorescence studies of excited Sr reactions: II. Sr(3P1)+CH3F, C2H5F, C2H4F2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teule, J. M.; Janssen, M. H. M.; Bulthuis, J.; Stolte, S.

    1999-06-01

    The vibrational and rotational energy distributions of ground state SrF(X 2Σ) formed in the reactions of electronically excited Sr(3P1) with methylfluoride, ethylfluoride, and 1,1-difluoroethane have been studied by laser-induced fluorescence. Although the reactions of ground state Sr with these reactants are exothermic, no SrF products are observed for those reactions in this study. The fraction of available energy disposed into the sum of rotational and vibrational energy of the SrF(X 2Σ) product is approximately the same for all three reactions, i.e., 40%. The reaction of Sr(3P1) with CH3F results in very low vibrational excitation in the SrF reaction product. The product vibration increases in going to C2H5F and C2H4F2. It is concluded that the alkyl group influences the energy disposal mechanism in these reactions, and some suggestions are given for a partial explanation of the observations.

  12. La-related protein 1 (LARP1) binds the mRNA cap, blocking eIF4F assembly on TOP mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Lahr, Roni M; Fonseca, Bruno D; Ciotti, Gabrielle E; Al-Ashtal, Hiba A; Jia, Jian-Jun; Niklaus, Marius R; Blagden, Sarah P; Alain, Tommy; Berman, Andrea J

    2017-04-07

    The 5'terminal oligopyrimidine (5'TOP) motif is a cis -regulatory RNA element located immediately downstream of the 7-methylguanosine [m 7 G] cap of TOP mRNAs, which encode ribosomal proteins and translation factors. In eukaryotes, this motif coordinates the synchronous and stoichiometric expression of the protein components of the translation machinery. La-related protein 1 (LARP1) binds TOP mRNAs, regulating their stability and translation. We present crystal structures of the human LARP1 DM15 region in complex with a 5'TOP motif, a cap analog (m 7 GTP), and a capped cytidine (m 7 GpppC), resolved to 2.6, 1.8 and 1.7 Å, respectively. Our binding, competition, and immunoprecipitation data corroborate and elaborate on the mechanism of 5'TOP motif binding by LARP1. We show that LARP1 directly binds the cap and adjacent 5'TOP motif of TOP mRNAs, effectively impeding access of eIF4E to the cap and preventing eIF4F assembly. Thus, LARP1 is a specialized TOP mRNA cap-binding protein that controls ribosome biogenesis.

  13. Stark-assisted population control of coherent CS(2) 4f and 5p Rydberg wave packets studied by femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Knappenberger, Kenneth L; Lerch, Eliza-Beth W; Wen, Patrick; Leone, Stephen R

    2007-09-28

    A two-color (3+1(')) pump-probe scheme is employed to investigate Rydberg wave packet dynamics in carbon disulfide (CS(2) (*)). The state superpositions are created within the 4f and 5p Rydberg manifolds by three photons of the 400 nm pump pulse, and their temporal evolution is monitored with femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using an 800 nm ionizing probe pulse. The coherent behavior of the non-stationary superpositions are observed through wavepacket revivals upon ionization to either the upper (12) or lower (32) spin-orbit components of CS(2) (+). The results show clearly that the composition of the wavepacket can be efficiently controlled by the power density of the excitation pulse over a range from 500 GWcm(2) to 10 TWcm(2). The results are consistent with the anticipated ac-Stark shift for 400 nm light and demonstrate an effective method for population control in molecular systems. Moreover, it is shown that Rydberg wavepackets can be formed in CS(2) with excitation power densities up to 10 TWcm(2) without significant fragmentation. The exponential 1e population decay (T(1)) of specific excited Rydberg states are recovered by analysis of the coherent part of the signal. The dissociation lifetimes of these states are typically 1.5 ps. However, a region exhibiting a more rapid decay ( approximately 800 fs) is observed for states residing in the energy range of 74 450-74 550 cm(-1), suggestive of an enhanced surface crossing in this region.

  14. Analytical characterization of three cathinone derivatives, 4-MPD, 4F-PHP and bk-EPDP, purchased as bulk powder from online vendors.

    PubMed

    Apirakkan, Orapan; Frinculescu, Anca; Shine, Trevor; Parkin, Mark C; Cilibrizzi, Agostino; Frascione, Nunzianda; Abbate, Vincenzo

    2018-02-01

    Novel emerging drugs of abuse, also referred as new psychoactive substances, constitute an ever-changing mixture of chemical compounds designed to circumvent legislative controls by means of chemical modifications of previously banned recreational drugs. One such class, synthetic cathinones, namely β-keto derivatives of amphetamines, has been largely abused over the past decade. A number of new synthetic cathinones are detected each year, either in bulk powders/crystals or in biological matrices. It is therefore important to continuously monitor the supply of new synthetic derivatives and promptly report them. By using complementary analytical techniques (i.e. one- and two-dimensional NMR, FT-IR, GC-MS, HRMS and HPLC-UV), this study investigates the detection, identification and full characterization of 1-(4-methylphenyl)-2-(methylamino)pentanone (4-methylpentedrone, 4-MPD), 1-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)hexanone (4F-PHP) and 1-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-2-(ethylamino)-1-pentanone (bk-EPDP), three emerging cathinone derivatives. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Hydrothermal synthesis of (C6N2H14)2(UVI2UIVO4F12), a mixed-valent one-dimensional uranium oxyfluoride.

    PubMed

    Allen, S; Barlow, S; Halasyamani, P S; Mosselmans, J F; O'Hare, D; Walker, S M; Walton, R I

    2000-08-21

    A new hybrid organic-inorganic mixed-valent uranium oxyfluoride, (C6N2H14)2(U3O4F12), UFO-17, has been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions using uranium dioxide as the uranium source, hydrofluoric acid as mineralizer, and 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane as template. The single-crystal X-ray structure was determined. Crystals of UFO-17 belonged to the orthorhombic space group Cmcm (no. 63), with a = 14.2660(15) A, b = 24.5130(10) A, c = 7.201(2) A, and Z = 4. The structure reveals parallel uranium-containing chains of two types: one type is composed of edge-sharing UO2F5 units; the other has a backbone of edge-sharing UF8 units, each sharing an edge with a pendant UO2F5 unit. Bond-valence calculations suggest the UF8 groups contain UIV, while the UO2F5 groups contain UVI. EXAFS data give results consistent with the single-crystal X-ray structure determination, while comparison of the uranium LIII-edge XANES of UFO-17 with that of related UIV and UVI compounds supports the oxidation-state assignment. Variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements on UFO-17 and a range of related hybrid organic-inorganic uranium(IV) and uranium(VI) fluorides and oxyfluorides further support the formulation of UFO-17 as a mixed-valent UIV/UVI compound.

  16. Mixed-Spin Diamond Chain Cu2FePO4F4(H2O)4 with a Noncollinear Spin Order and Possible Successive Phase Transitions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongcheng; Hayashi, Naoaki; Matsumoto, Yuki; Takatsu, Hiroshi; Kageyama, Hiroshi

    2017-08-07

    A diamond spin chain system, one of the one-dimensional frustrated lattices, is known to exhibit novel properties, but experimental studies have been exclusively confined to materials with a single spin component. Here, we report on the synthesis, structure, and magnetic properties of a new diamond chain compound Cu 2 FePO 4 F 4 (H 2 O) 4 1 composed of mixed-spins of Cu 2+ (S = 1/2 × 2) and Fe 3+ (S = 5/2). Compound 1 crystallizes in the space group C2/c of the monoclinic crystal system with a = 7.7546(4) Å, b = 12.1290(6) Å, c = 9.9209(6) Å, β = 105.29(1)°, and Z = 4. DC magnetization, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and heat capacity measurements revealed an antiferromagnetic order at 11.3 K with a small ferromagnetic component. It is suggested that ferrimagnetic diamond chains are arranged in an antiferromagnetic fashion (i.e., [...Fe(↑)-2Cu(↓↓)-Fe(↑)...] and [...Fe(↓)-2Cu(↑↑)-Fe(↓)...]) within the ab plane to cancel net magnetization, and the spin orientation of the diamond chains changes alternately along the c axis due to the magnetic anisotropy, leading to a noncollinear spin order. Furthermore, another anomaly is observed in the heat capacity at around 3 K, suggesting a successive magnetic transition or crossover due to competing magnetic interactions.

  17. La-related protein 1 (LARP1) binds the mRNA cap, blocking eIF4F assembly on TOP mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Lahr, Roni M; Fonseca, Bruno D; Ciotti, Gabrielle E; Al-Ashtal, Hiba A; Jia, Jian-Jun; Niklaus, Marius R; Blagden, Sarah P; Alain, Tommy; Berman, Andrea J

    2017-01-01

    The 5’terminal oligopyrimidine (5’TOP) motif is a cis-regulatory RNA element located immediately downstream of the 7-methylguanosine [m7G] cap of TOP mRNAs, which encode ribosomal proteins and translation factors. In eukaryotes, this motif coordinates the synchronous and stoichiometric expression of the protein components of the translation machinery. La-related protein 1 (LARP1) binds TOP mRNAs, regulating their stability and translation. We present crystal structures of the human LARP1 DM15 region in complex with a 5’TOP motif, a cap analog (m7GTP), and a capped cytidine (m7GpppC), resolved to 2.6, 1.8 and 1.7 Å, respectively. Our binding, competition, and immunoprecipitation data corroborate and elaborate on the mechanism of 5’TOP motif binding by LARP1. We show that LARP1 directly binds the cap and adjacent 5’TOP motif of TOP mRNAs, effectively impeding access of eIF4E to the cap and preventing eIF4F assembly. Thus, LARP1 is a specialized TOP mRNA cap-binding protein that controls ribosome biogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24146.001 PMID:28379136

  18. Single crystal growth and physical properties of BiS2-layered compound Eu3Bi2S4F4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashinaka, Ryuji; Endo, Hideaki; Kajitani, Joe; Matsuda, Tatsuma D.; Aoki, Yuji

    2018-05-01

    We have for the first time succeeded in growing single crystals of Eu3Bi2S4F4 by CsCl-flux method and performed magnetic property measurements. Magnetization measurements ascertained that the antiferromagnetic transition appears at TN = 2.2 K. The effective moment estimated from a Curie-Weiss (CW) fitting above 150 K is smaller than the free ion value for Eu2+, indicating that the average valence of Eu ions deviates from divalent. Weak magnetic anisotropy develops below 20 K. From CW fitting at low temperatures, we found the difference in Curie Weiss temperature between H∥ [001] and H ⊥ [ 100 ] , indicating the anisotropy of magnetic interaction between Eu ions. In the magnetization curve at 2 K (below TN), a metamagnetic anomaly appears only for the [001] direction around 0.7 T. Since this anomaly disappears above TN, this transition originates from the spin flip of Eu magnetic moments by applying magnetic field. This finding indicates that the ordered moments in the antiferromagnetic state are parallel to the [001] direction, being consistent with the anisotropic Weiss temperature, which is 20% larger for this direction.

  19. Early Earth differentiation [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Michael J.; Trønnes, Reidar G.

    2004-09-01

    consistent with isotopic constraints for time-integrated Sm/Nd and Lu/Hf ratios in the modern upper mantle and might account for the characteristics of some mantle isotope reservoirs. Although much remains to be learned about the earliest formative period in the Earth's development, a convergence of theoretical, physical, isotopic and geochemical arguments is beginning to yield a self-consistent portrait of the infant Earth.

  20. Secondary Electron Emission Yields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, I.; Lundin, W.; Gordon, W. L.; Hoffman, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    The secondary electron emission (SEE) characteristics for a variety of spacecraft materials were determined under UHV conditions using a commercial double pass CMA which permits sequential Auger electron electron spectroscopic analysis of the surface. The transparent conductive coating indium tin oxide (ITO) was examined on Kapton and borosilicate glass and indium oxide on FED Teflon. The total SEE coefficient ranges from 2.5 to 2.6 on as-received surfaces and from 1.5 to 1.6 on Ar(+) sputtered surfaces with 5 nm removed. A cylindrical sample carousel provides normal incidence of the primary beam as well as a multiple Faraday cup measurement of the approximately nA beam currents. Total and true secondary yields are obtained from target current measurements with biasing of the carousel. A primary beam pulsed mode to reduce electron beam dosage and minimize charging of insulating coatings was applied to Mg/F2 coated solar cell covers. Electron beam effects on ITO were found quite important at the current densities necessary to do Auger studies.

  1. Yield enhancement with DFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paek, Seung Weon; Kang, Jae Hyun; Ha, Naya; Kim, Byung-Moo; Jang, Dae-Hyun; Jeon, Junsu; Kim, DaeWook; Chung, Kun Young; Yu, Sung-eun; Park, Joo Hyun; Bae, SangMin; Song, DongSup; Noh, WooYoung; Kim, YoungDuck; Song, HyunSeok; Choi, HungBok; Kim, Kee Sup; Choi, Kyu-Myung; Choi, Woonhyuk; Jeon, JoongWon; Lee, JinWoo; Kim, Ki-Su; Park, SeongHo; Chung, No-Young; Lee, KangDuck; Hong, YoungKi; Kim, BongSeok

    2012-03-01

    A set of design for manufacturing (DFM) techniques have been developed and applied to 45nm, 32nm and 28nm logic process technologies. A noble technology combined a number of potential confliction of DFM techniques into a comprehensive solution. These techniques work in three phases for design optimization and one phase for silicon diagnostics. In the DFM prevention phase, foundation IP such as standard cells, IO, and memory and P&R tech file are optimized. In the DFM solution phase, which happens during ECO step, auto fixing of process weak patterns and advanced RC extraction are performed. In the DFM polishing phase, post-layout tuning is done to improve manufacturability. DFM analysis enables prioritization of random and systematic failures. The DFM technique presented in this paper has been silicon-proven with three successful tape-outs in Samsung 32nm processes; about 5% improvement in yield was achieved without any notable side effects. Visual inspection of silicon also confirmed the positive effect of the DFM techniques.

  2. Predicted Exoplanet Yields for the HabEx Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Christopher; Mennesson, Bertrand; HabEx STDT

    2018-01-01

    The Habitable Exoplanet Imaging Mission (HabEx) is a concept for a flagship mission to directly image and characterize extrasolar planets around nearby stars and to enable a broad range of general astrophysics. The HabEx Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT) is currently studying two architectures for HabEx. Here we summarize the exoplanet science yield of Architecture A, a 4 m monolithic off-axis telescope that uses a vortex coronagraph and a 72m external starshade occulter. We summarize the instruments' capabilities, present science goals and observation strategies, and discuss astrophysical assumptions. Using a yield optimization code, we predict the yield of potentially Earth-like extrasolar planets that could be detected, characterized, and searched for signs of habitability and/or life by HabEx. We demonstrate that HabEx could also detect and characterize a wide variety of exoplanets while searching for potentially Earth-like planets.

  3. Estimating oak growth and yield

    Treesearch

    Martin E. Dale; Donald E. Hilt

    1989-01-01

    Yields from upland oak stands vary widely from stand to stand due to differences in age, site quality, species composition, and stand structure. Cutting history and other past disturbances such as grazing or fire also affect yields.

  4. Earth Science Information Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1991-01-01

    An ESIC? An Earth Science Information Center. Don't spell it. Say it. ESIC. It rhymes with seasick. You can find information in an information center, of course, and you'll find earth science information in an ESIC. That means information about the land that is the Earth, the land that is below the Earth, and in some instances, the space surrounding the Earth. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates a network of Earth Science Information Centers that sell earth science products and data. There are more than 75 ESIC's. Some are operated by the USGS, but most are in other State or Federal agencies. Each ESIC responds to requests for information received by telephone, letter, or personal visit. Your personal visit.

  5. Electronic structure of rare-earth chromium antimonides RECrSb{sub 3} (RE=La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Dy, Yb) by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Crerar, Shane J.; Mar, Arthur, E-mail: arthur.mar@ualberta.ca; Grosvenor, Andrew P.

    The electronic structure of the ternary rare-earth chromium antimonides RECrSb{sub 3} (RE=La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Dy, Yb) has been examined by high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for the first time. The RE 3d or 4d core-line spectra are substantially complicated by the presence of satellite peaks but their general resemblance to those of RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} tends to support the presence of trivalent RE atoms in RECrSb{sub 3}. However, the Yb 4d spectrum of YbCrSb{sub 3} also shows peaks that are characteristic of divalent ytterbium. The Cr 2p core-line spectra exhibit asymmetric lineshapes and little change in binding energy (BE) relative tomore » Cr metal, providing strong evidence for electronic delocalization. The Sb 3d core-line spectra reveal slightly negative BE shifts relative to elemental antimony, supporting the presence of anionic Sb species in RECrSb{sub 3}. The experimental valence band spectrum of LaCrSb{sub 3} matches well with the calculated density of states, and it can be fitted to component peaks belonging to individual atoms to yield an average formulation that agrees well with expectations ('La{sup 3+}Cr{sup 3+}(Sb{sup 2-}){sub 3}'). On progressing from LaCrSb{sub 3} to NdCrSb{sub 3}, the 4f-band in the valence band spectra grows in intensity and shifts to higher BE. The valence band spectrum for YbCrSb{sub 3} also supports the presence of divalent ytterbium. - Graphical Abstract: In their valence band spectra, the 4f-band intensifies and shifts to higher BE on progressing from LaCrSb{sub 3} to NdCrSb{sub 3}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-resolution core-line and valence band XPS spectra were measured for RECrSb{sub 3}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Divalent Yb is present in YbCrSb{sub 3}, in contrast to trivalent RE in other members. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Asymmetric Cr 2p spectral lineshape confirms delocalization of Cr valence electrons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Small negative Sb 3d BE shifts support

  6. Effects of gas flow rate on the etch characteristics of a low- k sicoh film with an amorphous carbon mask in dual-frequency CF4/C4F8/Ar capacitively-coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Bong-Soo; Lee, Hea-Lim; Lee, Nae-Eung; Kim, Chang-Young; Choi, Chi Kyu

    2013-01-01

    Highly selective nanoscale etching of a low-dielectric constant (low- k) organosilicate (SiCOH) layer using a mask pattern of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) amorphous carbon layer (ACL) was carried out in CF4/C4F8/Ar dual-frequency superimposed capacitively-coupled plasmas. The etching characteristics of the SiCOH layers, such as the etch rate, etch selectivity, critical dimension (CD), and line edge roughness (LER) during the plasma etching, were investigated by varying the C4F8 flow rate. The C4F8 gas flow rate primarily was found to control the degree of polymerization and to cause variations in the selectivity, CD and LER of the patterned SiCOH layer. Process windows for ultra-high etch selectivity of the SiCOH layer to the CVD ACL are formed due to the disproportionate degrees of polymerization on the SiCOH and the ACL surfaces.

  7. Informatics-Aided Density Functional Theory Study on the Li Ion Transport of Tavorite-Type LiMTO4F (M(3+)-T(5+), M(2+)-T(6+)).

    PubMed

    Jalem, Randy; Kimura, Mayumi; Nakayama, Masanobu; Kasuga, Toshihiro

    2015-06-22

    The ongoing search for fast Li-ion conducting solid electrolytes has driven the deployment surge on density functional theory (DFT) computation and materials informatics for exploring novel chemistries before actual experimental testing. Existing structure prototypes can now be readily evaluated beforehand not only to map out trends on target properties or for candidate composition selection but also for gaining insights on structure-property relationships. Recently, the tavorite structure has been determined to be capable of a fast Li ion insertion rate for battery cathode applications. Taking this inspiration, we surveyed the LiMTO4F tavorite system (M(3+)-T(5+) and M(2+)-T(6+) pairs; M is nontransition metals) for solid electrolyte use, identifying promising compositions with enormously low Li migration energy (ME) and understanding how structure parameters affect or modulate ME. We employed a combination of DFT computation, variable interaction analysis, graph theory, and a neural network for building a crystal structure-based ME prediction model. Candidate compositions that were predicted include LiGaPO4F (0.25 eV), LiGdPO4F (0.30 eV), LiDyPO4F (0.30 eV), LiMgSO4F (0.21 eV), and LiMgSeO4F (0.11 eV). With chemical substitutions at M and T sites, competing effects among Li pathway bottleneck size, polyanion covalency, and local lattice distortion were determined to be crucial for controlling ME. A way to predict ME for multiple structure types within the neural network framework was also explored.

  8. Novel phosphate halides BaMn{sup III}[PO{sub 4}]FCl and BaMn{sup III}[PO{sub 4}]F{sub 2}: Effects of mixed halides on crystal structures and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Da-Ting, E-mail: pdtcug@gmail.com; Sun, Wei, E-mail: 421221789@qq.com; Department of Geological Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, 114 Science Place, Saskatoon, Canada SK S7N 5E2

    2016-02-15

    Two new phosphate halides BaMn{sup III}[PO{sub 4}]FCl (1) and BaMn{sup III}[PO{sub 4}]F{sub 2} (2), have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. Structural characterizations show that both new compounds adopt layered structures but with different polyhedral linkages. Introduction of Cl into Compound (1) results in isolated hemimorphic [MnO{sub 4}FCl] octahedra, different from the chain of [MnO{sub 4}F{sub 2}]/[MnO{sub 2}F{sub 4}] octahedra in Compound (2). These compounds have significantly different molecular vibration modes and thermal stabilities. Magnetic measurements reveal that Compound (2) has larger antiferromagnetic interactions than Compound (1), because the former has strong interactions between Mn{sup 3+}-Mn{sup 3+} ions within corner-shared Mn{supmore » 3+}-octahedral chains whereas the latter only possesses isolated Mn{sup 3+}-octahedra. Both compounds transform to a new orthorhombic compound BaMn{sup II}(PO{sub 4})F (3) after thermal decomposition. - Graphical abstract: The large radius of Cl{sup -} ions makesBaMn{sup III}[PO{sub 4}]FCl to adopt isolated [MnO{sub 4}FCl] rather than corner-sharing octahedra as observed in BaMn{sup III}[PO{sub 4}]F{sub 2}. - Highlights: • Two novel phosphate halides BaMn[PO{sub 4}]FCl and BaMn[PO{sub 4}]F{sub 2} have been prepared. • These new compounds adopt different types of layered structures. • They have different molecular vibration modes and thermal stabilities. • BaMn[PO{sub 4}]FCl has weaker antiferromagnetic interactions than BaMn[PO{sub 4}]F{sub 2}. • The former adopts isolated octahedra whereas the latter adopts octahedral chains.« less

  9. Description and crystal structure of albrechtschraufite, MgCa4F2[UO2(CO3)3]2ṡ17-18H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mereiter, Kurt

    2013-04-01

    Albrechtschraufite, MgCa4F2[UO2(CO3)3]2ṡ17-18H2O, triclinic, space group Pī, a = 13.569(2), b = 13.419(2), c = 11.622(2) Å, α = 115.82(1), β = 107.61(1), γ = 92.84(1)° (structural unit cell, not reduced), V = 1774.6(5) Å3, Z = 2, D c = 2.69 g/cm3 (for 17.5 H2O), is a mineral that was found in small amounts with schröckingerite, NaCa3F[UO2(CO3)3](SO4)ṡ10H2O, on a museum specimen of uranium ore from Joachimsthal (Jáchymov), Czech Republic. The mineral forms small grain-like subhedral crystals (≤ 0.2 mm) that resemble in appearance liebigite, Ca2[UO2(CO3)3]ṡ ~ 11H2O. Colour pale yellow-green, luster vitreous, transparent, pale bluish green fluorescence under ultraviolet light. Optical data: Biaxial negative, nX = 1.511(2), nY = 1.550(2), nZ = 1.566(2), 2 V = 65(1)° ( λ = 589 nm), r < v weak. After qualitative tests had shown the presence of Ca, U, Mg, CO2 and H2O, the chemical formula was determined by a crystal structure analysis based on X-ray four-circle diffractometer data. The structure was later on refined with data from a CCD diffractometer to R1 = 0.0206 and wR2 = 0.0429 for 9,236 independent observed reflections. The crystal structure contains two independent [UO2(CO3)3]4- anions of which one is bonded to two Mg and six Ca while the second is bonded to only one Mg and three Ca. Magnesium forms a MgF2(Ocarbonate)3(H2O) octahedron that is linked via the F atoms with three Ca atoms so as to provide each F atom with a flat pyramidal coordination by one Mg and two Ca. Calcium is 7- and 8-coordinate forming CaFO6, CaF2O2(H2O)4, CaFO3(H2O)4 and CaO2(H2O)6 coordination polyhedra. The crystal structure is built up from MgCa3F2[UO2(CO3)3]ṡ8H2O layers parallel to (001) which are linked by Ca[UO2(CO3)3]ṡ5H2O moieties into a framework of the composition MgCa4F2[UO2(CO3)3]ṡ13H2O. Five additional water molecules are located in voids of the framework and show large displacement parameters. One of the water positions is partly vacant, leading to a

  10. Amino Acid Availability and Age Affect the Leucine Stimulation of Protein Synthesis and eIF4F Formation in Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Jeffery; Frank, Jason W.; Suryawan, Agus; Nguyen, Hanh V.; Davis, Teresa A.

    2009-01-01

    We have previously shown that a physiological increase in plasma leucine for 60- and 120-min increases translation initiation factor activation in muscle of neonatal pigs. Although muscle protein synthesis is increased by leucine at 60 min, it is not maintained at 120 min, perhaps due to the decrease in plasma amino acids (AA). In the current study, 7- and 26-day-old pigs were fasted overnight and infused with leucine (0 or 400 µmol· kg−1· h−1) for 120 min to raise leucine within the postprandial range. The leucine was infused in the presence or absence of a replacement AA mixture (without leucine) to maintain baseline plasma AA levels. AA administration prevented the leucine-induced reduction in plasma AA in both age groups. At 7 days, leucine infusion alone increased eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E binding protein-1 (4E-BP1) phosphorylation, decreased inactive 4E-BP1·eIF4E complex abundance, and increased active eIF4G·eIF4E complex formation in skeletal muscle; leucine infusion with replacement AA also stimulated these, as well as S6K1, rpS6, and eIF4G phosphorylation. At 26 days, leucine infusion alone increased 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and decreased the inactive 4E-BP1·eIF4E complex only; leucine with AA also stimulated these, as well as S6K1 and rpS6 phosphorylation. Muscle protein synthesis was increased in 7-day-old (+60%) and 26-day-old (+40%) pigs infused with leucine and replacement AA, but not with leucine alone. Thus, the ability of leucine to stimulate eIF4F formation and protein synthesis in skeletal muscle is dependent on AA availability and age. PMID:17878223

  11. Genetic Polymorphism of Cytochrome P450 4F2, Vitamin E Level and Histological Response in Adults and Children with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Who Participated in PIVENS and TONIC Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Athinarayanan, Shaminie; Wei, Rongrong; Zhang, Min; Bai, Shaochun; Traber, Maret G.; Yates, Katherine; Cummings, Oscar W.; Molleston, Jean; Liu, Wanqing; Chalasani, Naga

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin E improved liver histology in children and adults with NAFLD who participated in TONIC and PIVENS clinical trials, but with significant inter-individual variability in its efficacy. Cytochrome P450 4F2 (CYP4F2) is the major enzyme metabolizing Vit E, with two common genetic variants (V433M, rs2108622 and W12G, rs3093105) found to alter its activity. We investigated the relationship between CYP4F2 genotypes, α-tocopherol levels and histological improvement in these two trials. V433M and W12G variants were genotyped in TONIC (n = 155) and PIVENS (n = 213) DNA samples. The relationships between CYP4F2 genotypes, plasma α-tocopherol levels at baseline and weeks 48 (w48) and 96 (w96) and histological end points (overall improvement in liver histology and resolution of NASH) were investigated. As a result, the V433M genotype was significantly associated with baseline plasma α-tocopherol in the TONIC trial (p = 0.004), but not in PIVENS. Among those receiving Vit E treatment, CYP4F2 V433M genotype was associated with significantly decreased plasma α-tocopherol levels at w48 (p = 0.003 for PIVENS and p = 0.026 for TONIC) but not at w96. The w96 α-tocopherol level was significantly associated with resolution of NASH (p = 0.006) and overall histology improvement (p = 0.021)in the PIVENS, but not in the TONIC trial. There was no significant association between CYP4F2 genotypes and histological end points in either trial. Our study suggested the a moderate role of CYP4F2 polymorphisms in affecting the pharmacokinetics of Vit E as a therapeutic agent. In addition, there may be age-dependent relationship between CYP4F2 genetic variability and Vit E pharmacokinetics in NAFLD. PMID:24759732

  12. High quantum-yield phosphors via quantum splitting and upconversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Joayoung

    The Gd3+ ion has been used to induce quantum splitting in luminescent materials by using cross-relaxation energy transfer (CRET). In Nd:LiGdF4, quantum splitting results from a two-step CRET between Gd3+ and Nd3+, first involving a transition 6G→6I on Gd3+ and an excitation within the 4f3 configuration of Nd3+ followed by a second CRET that brings Gd3+ to 6P7/2. The excited Nd3+ ion rapidly relaxes nonradiatively to the emitting 4F3/2. The excited Gd3+ ion then transfers its energy back to Nd3+, which gives rise to the second photon. The result is a quantum yield of 1.05 +/- 0.35 with emission in the NIR following excitation at 175 nm. GdF3:Pr3+, Eu 3+ also exhibits quantum splitting, but only at very low concentration of Pr3+ (0.3%) and Eu3+ (0.2%), resulting in a quantum yield of approximately 20% under 160-nm excitation. Host intrinsic emission via a self-trapped exciton (STE) was also examined as a means to sensitize Gd3+ emission. The material ScPO4:Gd 3+ exhibits a high absolute quantum yield of 0.9 +/- 0.2 under 170-nm excitation, demonstrating a potentially new and efficient pathway for exciting quantum splitting phosphors. Single crystals of the material GdZrF7 were grown, and its structure was established via single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods. Doped samples of GdZrF7:Yb3+, Er3+ exhibit bright up-conversion luminescence with light output that is up to twice that of a commercial material based on the host Gd2O2S. When doped with Eu3+, the fluoride also emits a nearly white color under vacuum ultraviolet excitation with an absolute quantum yield near 0.9. The new compound Gd4.67(SiO4)3S was synthesized and studied. The structure was established via single-crystal X-ray methods, and the luminescence of Tb3+ samples was investigated.

  13. Effects of geoengineering on crop yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pongratz, J.; Lobell, D. B.; Cao, L.; Caldeira, K.

    2011-12-01

    The potential of "solar radiation management" (SRM) to reduce future climate change and associated risks has been receiving significant attention in scientific and policy circles. SRM schemes aim to reduce global warming despite increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations by diminishing the amount of solar insolation absorbed by the Earth, for example, by injecting scattering aerosols into the atmosphere. Climate models predict that SRM could fully compensate warming at the global mean in a high-CO2 world. While reduction of global warming may offset a part of the predicted negative effects of future climate change on crop yields, SRM schemes are expected to alter regional climate and to have substantial effects on climate variables other than temperature, such as precipitation. It has therefore been warned that, overall, SRM may pose a risk to food security. Assessments of benefits and risks of geoengineering are imperative, yet such assessments are only beginning to emerge; in particular, effects on global food security have not previously been assessed. Here, for the first time, we combine climate model simulations with models of crop yield responses to climate to assess large-scale changes in yields and food production under SRM. In most crop-growing regions, we find that yield losses caused by climate changes are substantially reduced under SRM as compared with a non-geoengineered doubling of atmospheric CO2. Substantial yield losses with SRM are only found for rice in high latitudes, where the limits of low temperatures are no longer alleviated. At the same time, the beneficial effect of CO2-fertilization on plant productivity remains active. Overall therefore, SRM in our models causes global crop yields to increase. We estimate the direct effects of climate and CO2 changes on crop production, and do not quantify effects of market dynamics and management changes. We note, however, that an SRM deployment would be unlikely to maintain the economic status quo, as

  14. People and the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, John James William; Feiss, P. Geoffrey

    1998-03-01

    People and the Earth examines the numerous ways in which this planet enhances and limits our lifestyles. Written with wit and remarkable insight, and illustrated with numerous case histories, it provides a balanced view of the complex environmental issues facing our civilization. The authors look at the geologic restrictions on our ability to withdraw resources--food, water, energy, and minerals--from the earth, the effect human activity has on the earth, and the lingering damage caused by natural disasters. People and the Earth examines the basic components of our interaction with this planet, provides a lucid, scientific discussion of each issue, and speculates on what the future may hold. It provides the fundamental concepts that will enable us to make wise and conscientious choices on how to live our day-to-day lives. People and the Earth is an ideal introductory textbook and will also appeal to anyone concerned with our evolving relationship to the earth.

  15. Yield: it's now an entitlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Bill

    1994-09-01

    Only a few years ago, the primary method of cost reduction and productivity improvement in the semiconductor industry was increasing manufacturing yields throughout the process. Many of the remarkable reliability improvements realized over the past decade have come about as a result of actions that were originally taken primarily to improve device yields. Obviously, the practice of productivity improvement through yield enhancement is limited to the attainment of 100% yield, at which point some other mechanism must be employed. Traditionally, new products have been introduced to manufacturing at a point of relative immaturity, and semiconductor producers have relied on the traditional `learning curve' method of yield improvement to attain profitable levels of manufacturing yield. Recently, results of a survey of several fabs by a group of University of California at Berkeley researchers in the Competitive Semiconductor Manufacturing Program indicate that most factories learn at about the same rate after startup, in terms of both line yield and defectivity. If this is indeed generally true, then the most competitive factor is the one that starts with the highest yield, and it is difficult to displace a leader once his lead has been established. The two observations made above carry enormous implications for the semiconductor development or manufacturing professional. First, one must achieve very high yields in order to even play the game. Second, the achievement of competitive yields over time in the life of a factory is determined even before the factory is opened, in the planning and development phase. Third, and perhaps most uncomfortable for those of us who have relied on yield improvement as a cost driver, the winners of the nineties will find new levers to drive costs down, having already gotten the benefit of very high yield. This paper looks at the question of how the winners will achieve the critical measures of success, high initial yield and utilization

  16. EarthExplorer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houska, Treva

    2012-01-01

    The EarthExplorer trifold provides basic information for on-line access to remotely-sensed data from the U.S. Geological Survey Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center archive. The EarthExplorer (http://earthexplorer.usgs.gov/) client/server interface allows users to search and download aerial photography, satellite data, elevation data, land-cover products, and digitized maps. Minimum computer system requirements and customer service contact information also are included in the brochure.

  17. Mission to Planet Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Gregory S.; Huntress, Wesley T.

    1990-01-01

    The rationale behind Mission to Planet Earth is presented, and the program plan is described in detail. NASA and its interagency and international partners will place satellites carrying advanced sensors in strategic earth orbits to collect muultidisciplinary data. A sophisticated data system will process and archive an unprecedented large amount of information about the earth and how it functions as a system. Attention is given to the space observatories, the data and information systems, and the interdisciplinary research.

  18. Uderstanding Snowball Earth Deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbot, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    Earth, a normally clement planet comfortably in its star's habitable zone, suffered global or nearly global glaciation at least twice during the Neoproterozoic era (at about 635 and 710 million years ago). Viewed in the context of planetary evolution, these pan-global glaciations (Snowball Earth events) were extremely rapid, lasting only a few million years. The dramatic effect of the Snowball Earth events on the development of the planet can be seen through their link to rises in atmospheric oxygen and evolutionary innovations. These potential catastrophes on an otherwise clement planet can be used to gain insight into planetary habitability more generally. Since Earth is not currently a Snowball, a sound deglaciation mechanism is crucial for the viability of the Snowball Earth hypothesis. The traditional deglaciation mechanism is a massive build up of CO2 due to reduced weathering during Snowball Earth events until tropical surface temperatures reach the melting point. Once initiated, such a deglaciation might happen on a timescale of only dozens of thousands of years and would thrust Earth from the coldest climate in its history to the warmest. Therefore embedded in Snowball Earth events is an even more rapid and dramatic environmental change. Early global climate model simulations raised doubt about whether Snowball Earth deglaciation could be achieved at a CO2 concentration low enough to be consistent with geochemical data, which represented a potential challenge to the Snowball Earth hypothesis. Over the past few years dust and clouds have emerged as the essential missing additional processes that would allow Snowball Earth deglaciation at a low enough CO2 concentration. I will discuss the dust and cloud mechanisms and the modeling behind these ideas. This effort is critical for the broader implications of Snowball Earth events because understanding the specific deglaciation mechanism determines whether similar processes could happen on other planets.

  19. Earth on the Horizon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-13

    This is the first image ever taken of Earth from the surface of a planet beyond the Moon. It was taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit one hour before sunrise on the 63rd martian day, or sol, of its mission. Earth is the tiny white dot in the center. The image is a mosaic of images taken by the rover's navigation camera showing a broad view of the sky, and an image taken by the rover's panoramic camera of Earth. The contrast in the panoramic camera image was increased two times to make Earth easier to see. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA05560

  20. NASA Earth Day 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-22

    NASA Astronaut John Mace Grunsfeld takes a quick selfie with astronauts at the International Space Station at the NASA sponsored Earth Day event April 22, 2014 at Union Station in Washington, DC. NASA announced the "Global Selfie" event as part of its "Earth Right Now" campaign, celebrating the launch of five Earth-observing missions in 2014. All selfies posted to social media with the hashtag "GlobalSelfie" will be included in a mosaic image of Earth. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  1. On the Yield Strength of Oceanic Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Chhavi; Korenaga, Jun; Karato, Shun-ichiro

    2017-10-01

    The yield strength of oceanic lithosphere determines the mode of mantle convection in a terrestrial planet, and low-temperature plasticity in olivine aggregates is generally believed to govern the plastic rheology of the stiffest part of lithosphere. Because, so far, proposed flow laws for this mechanism exhibit nontrivial discrepancies, we revisit the recent high-pressure deformation data of Mei et al. (2010) with a comprehensive inversion approach based on Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. Our inversion results indicate that the uncertainty of the relevant flow law parameters is considerably greater than previously thought. Depending on the choice of flow law parameters, the strength of oceanic lithosphere would vary substantially, carrying different implications for the origin of plate tectonics on Earth. To reduce the flow law ambiguity, we suggest that it is important to establish a theoretical basis for estimating macroscopic stress in high-pressure experiments and also to better utilize marine geophysical observations.

  2. Ammonium iron(III) phosphate(V) fluoride, (NH4)0.5[(NH4)0.375K0.125]FePO4F, with ammonium partially substituted by potassium

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Zhou, Yan; Huang, Ya-Xi; Mi, Jin-Xiao

    2009-01-01

    The title compound, ammonium potassium iron(III) phosphate fluoride, (NH4)0.875K0.125FePO4F, is built from zigzag chains ∞ 1{[FeO4F2]7−}, with Fe3+ in a distorted octahedral coordination, extending along both the [011] and [01] directions. These chains are made up of alternating trans-[FeO4F2] and cis-[FeO4F2] octa­hedra via shared F-atom corners, and are linked by PO4 tetra­hedra, resulting in an open-framework structure with channels along the [010] and [100] directions. There are two crystallographically independent ammonium sites: one in the [010] channels and the other, partially substituted by K+ ions, in the [100] channels. The ammonium in the [010] channels is fixed to the framework via eight hydrogen bonds (six N—H⋯O and two N—H⋯F). PMID:21581466

  3. Fast‐Rate Capable Electrode Material with Higher Energy Density than LiFePO4: 4.2V LiVPO4F Synthesized by Scalable Single‐Step Solid‐State Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minkyung; Lee, Seongsu

    2015-01-01

    Use of compounds that contain fluorine (F) as electrode materials in lithium ion batteries has been considered, but synthesizing single‐phase samples of these compounds is a difficult task. Here, it is demonstrated that a simple scalable single‐step solid‐state process with additional fluorine source can obtain highly pure LiVPO4F. The resulting material with submicron particles achieves very high rate capability ≈100 mAh g−1 at 60 C‐rate (1‐min discharge) and even at 200 C‐rate (18 s discharge). It retains superior capacity, ≈120 mAh g−1 at 10 C charge/10 C discharge rate (6‐min) for 500 cycles with >95% retention efficiency. Furthermore, LiVPO4F shows low polarization even at high rates leading to higher operating potential >3.45 V (≈3.6 V at 60 C‐rate), so it achieves high energy density. It is demonstrated for the first time that highly pure LiVPO4F can achieve high power capability comparable to LiFePO4 and much higher energy density (≈521 Wh g−1 at 20 C‐rate) than LiFePO4 even without nanostructured particles. LiVPO4F can be a real substitute of LiFePO4. PMID:27774395

  4. Fast-Rate Capable Electrode Material with Higher Energy Density than LiFePO4: 4.2V LiVPO4F Synthesized by Scalable Single-Step Solid-State Reaction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minkyung; Lee, Seongsu; Kang, Byoungwoo

    2016-03-01

    Use of compounds that contain fluorine (F) as electrode materials in lithium ion batteries has been considered, but synthesizing single-phase samples of these compounds is a difficult task. Here, it is demonstrated that a simple scalable single-step solid-state process with additional fluorine source can obtain highly pure LiVPO 4 F. The resulting material with submicron particles achieves very high rate capability ≈100 mAh g -1 at 60 C-rate (1-min discharge) and even at 200 C-rate (18 s discharge). It retains superior capacity, ≈120 mAh g -1 at 10 C charge/10 C discharge rate (6-min) for 500 cycles with >95% retention efficiency. Furthermore, LiVPO 4 F shows low polarization even at high rates leading to higher operating potential >3.45 V (≈3.6 V at 60 C-rate), so it achieves high energy density. It is demonstrated for the first time that highly pure LiVPO 4 F can achieve high power capability comparable to LiFePO 4 and much higher energy density (≈521 Wh g -1 at 20 C-rate) than LiFePO 4 even without nanostructured particles. LiVPO 4 F can be a real substitute of LiFePO 4.

  5. Optimization of reprogramming culture conditions for the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from Col1a1 4F2A-Oct4-GFP mice with high efficiency.

    PubMed

    Lin, Po-Ying; Hsu, Sheng-Chieh; Chen, Hung-Chi; Len, Wen-Bin; Hsiao, Fang-Chi; Liu, Mei-Chun; Pan, Pei-Ling; Lin, Tsai-Chen; Lee, Ying-Hsuan; Meir, Yaa-Jyuhn James

    2018-05-01

    A reprogrammable transgenic mouse strain, called Col1a1 4F2A-Oct4-GFP, was bred for the present study. Because the somatic cells of this mouse strain contain only two copies of each Yamanaka factor, these animals are inefficient at producing induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs; approx. 0.005%) under traditional culture conditions. With an optimized culture condition, the iPSC production rate of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) of Col1a1 4F2A-Oct4-GFP mice (MEF C ol1a1 4F2A-Oct4- GFP ) was increased to approximately 8%. Further, promotion of cell proliferation by serum supplementation did not enhance iPSC production. Inhibition of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) in the serum by SB431542 neither affected the growth rate of MEF C ol1a1 4F2A-Oct4- GFP nor promoted iPSC production. However, the use of the gamma-irradiated STO-NEO-LIF (γSNL) cells to serve as feeders for iPSC production resulted in a 5-fold higher rate of iPSC production than the use of γMEF ICR feeders. Interestingly, the use of SB431542 with the γMEF ICR -adopted system could eliminate this difference. RT-PCR-based comparative analysis further demonstrated that TGF-β expression was 10-fold higher in γMEF ICR than in γSNL cells. Consistent with previous reports, mesenchymal to epithelial transition was found to participate in the initial steps of reprogramming in the specific context of MEF C ol1a1 4F2A-Oct4- GFP . Moreover, we found that the initial seeding density is one of the pivotal factors for determining a high efficiency of iPSC generation. The iPSCs efficiently generated from our MEF C ol1a1 4F2A-Oct4- GFP resembled mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) in aspects of teratoma formation and germline transmission. Depending on the culture conditions, our Col1a1 4F2A-Oct4-GFP mouse system can generate bona fide iPSCs with variable efficiencies, which can serve as a tool for interrogating the route taken by cells during somatic reprogramming. © 2018 Federation of European Biochemical

  6. Phase equilibria in the NaF-CdO-NaPO{sub 3} system at 873 K and crystal structure and physico-chemical characterizations of the new Na{sub 2}CdPO{sub 4}F fluorophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Aboussatar, Mohamed; Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie de l’État Solide, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, Université de Sfax, BP 1171, 3000 Sfax; Mbarek, Aïcha

    Isothermal sections of the diagram representing phase relationships in the NaF-CdO-NaPO{sub 3} system have been investigated by solid state reactions and powder X-ray diffraction. This phase diagram investigation confirms the polymorphism of the NaCdPO{sub 4} side component and the structure of the ß high temperature polymorph (orthorhombic, space group Pnma and unit cell parameters a=9.3118(2), b=7.0459(1), c=5.1849(1) Å has been refined. A new fluorophosphate, Na{sub 2}CdPO{sub 4}F, has been discovered and its crystal structure determined and refined from powder X-ray diffraction data. It exhibits a new 3D structure with orthorhombic symmetry, space group Pnma and unit cell parameters a=5.3731(1), b=6.8530(1),more » c=12.2691(2) Å. The structure is closely related to those of the high temperature polymorph of the nacaphite Na{sub 2}CaPO{sub 4}F and the fluorosilicate Ca{sub 2}NaSiO{sub 4}F but differs essentially in the cationic repartition since the structure is fully ordered with one Na site (8d) and one Cd site (4c). Relationships with other Na{sub 2}M{sup II}PO{sub 4}F (M{sup II}=Mg, Ca, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni) have been examined and the crystal-chemical and topographical analysis of these fluorophosphates is briefly reviewed. IR, Raman, optical and {sup 19}F, {sup 23}Na, {sup 31}P MAS NMR characterizations of Na{sub 2}CdPO{sub 4}F have been investigated. - Graphical abstract: The structure of the compound Na{sub 2}CdPO{sub 4}F, discovered during the study of the phase relationships in the NaF-CdO-NaPO{sub 3} system, has been determined and compared with other Na{sub 2}M{sup II}PO{sub 4}F fluorophosphates. - Highlights: • XRD analysis of the isothermal section of the NaF-CdO-NaPO{sub 3} system at 923 K. • Rietveld refinement of the high temperature polymorph β-NaCdPO{sub 4}. • Crystal structure of the new Na{sub 2}CdPO{sub 4}F fluorophosphate determined from powder XRD. • Crystal structure - composition relationships of Na{sub 2}M{sup II}PO{sub 4}F

  7. Enhanced pinning in mixed rare earth-123 films

    DOEpatents

    Driscoll, Judith L [Los Alamos, NM; Foltyn, Stephen R [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-06-16

    An superconductive article and method of forming such an article is disclosed, the article including a substrate and a layer of a rare earth barium cuprate film upon the substrate, the rare earth barium cuprate film including two or more rare earth metals capable of yielding a superconductive composition where ion size variance between the two or more rare earth metals is characterized as greater than zero and less than about 10.times.10.sup.-4, and the rare earth barium cuprate film including two or more rare earth metals is further characterized as having an enhanced critical current density in comparison to a standard YBa.sub.2Cu.sub.3O.sub.y composition under identical testing conditions.

  8. Phase equilibria in the NaF-CdO-NaPO3 system at 873 K and crystal structure and physico-chemical characterizations of the new Na2CdPO4F fluorophosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboussatar, Mohamed; Mbarek, Aïcha; Naili, Houcine; El-Ghozzi, Malika; Chadeyron, Geneviève; Avignant, Daniel; Zambon, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Isothermal sections of the diagram representing phase relationships in the NaF-CdO-NaPO3 system have been investigated by solid state reactions and powder X-ray diffraction. This phase diagram investigation confirms the polymorphism of the NaCdPO4 side component and the structure of the ß high temperature polymorph (orthorhombic, space group Pnma and unit cell parameters a=9.3118(2), b=7.0459(1), c=5.1849(1) Å has been refined. A new fluorophosphate, Na2CdPO4F, has been discovered and its crystal structure determined and refined from powder X-ray diffraction data. It exhibits a new 3D structure with orthorhombic symmetry, space group Pnma and unit cell parameters a=5.3731(1), b=6.8530(1), c=12.2691(2) Å. The structure is closely related to those of the high temperature polymorph of the nacaphite Na2CaPO4F and the fluorosilicate Ca2NaSiO4F but differs essentially in the cationic repartition since the structure is fully ordered with one Na site (8d) and one Cd site (4c). Relationships with other Na2MIIPO4F (MII=Mg, Ca, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni) have been examined and the crystal-chemical and topographical analysis of these fluorophosphates is briefly reviewed. IR, Raman, optical and 19F, 23Na, 31P MAS NMR characterizations of Na2CdPO4F have been investigated.

  9. Earth System Science Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford, Sandra; Coffman, Margaret

    2004-01-01

    For several decades, science teachers have used bottles for classroom projects designed to teach students about biology. Bottle projects do not have to just focus on biology, however. These projects can also be used to engage students in Earth science topics. This article describes the Earth System Science Project, which was adapted and developed…

  10. Crescent Earth and Moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-08-29

    This picture of a crescent-shaped Earth and Moon, the first of its kind ever taken by a spacecraft, was recorded Sept. 18, 1977, by NASA Voyager 1 when it was 7.25 million miles 11.66 million kilometers from Earth. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00013

  11. Introducing Earth's Orbital Eccentricity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Most students know that planetary orbits, including Earth's, are elliptical; that is Kepler's first law, and it is found in many science textbooks. But quite a few are mistaken about the details, thinking that the orbit is very eccentric, or that this effect is somehow responsible for the seasons. In fact, the Earth's orbital eccentricity is…

  12. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-17

    During the annual Earth Day celebration at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, Shari Blissett-Clark of the Florida Bat Conservancy displays one of the mammals. The event took place during the annual Earth Day celebration at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, guests have an opportunity to learn more about energy awareness, the environment and sustainability.

  13. Spaceship Earth Curriculum Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInnis, Noel; And Others

    Three separate papers from the Project are included in this document. One of these, by the Center staff, is entitled "Potentials of the Spaceship Earth Metaphor". It discusses static, dynamic, and analogic representations of spaceship earth and their educational value. A second paper, "Some Resources for Introducing Environmental…

  14. The Earth's Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeanloz, Raymond

    1983-01-01

    The nature of the earth's core is described. Indirect evidence (such as that determined from seismological data) indicates that it is an iron alloy, solid toward its center but otherwise liquid. Evidence also suggests that it is the turbulent flow of the liquid that generates the earth's magnetic field. (JN)

  15. NASA Earth Day 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-22

    An attendee of NASA's Earth Day event observes the glow from a bracelet that is part of an exhibit at the event. The Earth Day event took place at Union Station in Washington, DC on April 22, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  16. Cool Earth Solar

    ScienceCinema

    Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan,

    2018-05-30

    In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

  17. Hands On Earth Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisgarber, Sherry L.; Van Doren, Lisa; Hackathorn, Merrianne; Hannibal, Joseph T.; Hansgen, Richard

    This publication is a collection of 13 hands-on activities that focus on earth science-related activities and involve students in learning about growing crystals, tectonics, fossils, rock and minerals, modeling Ohio geology, geologic time, determining true north, and constructing scale-models of the Earth-moon system. Each activity contains…

  18. The Earth Charter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Education for Sustainable Development, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Humanity is part of a vast evolving universe. Earth is alive with a unique community of life. The forces of nature make existence a demanding and uncertain adventure, but Earth has provided the conditions essential to life's evolution. The resilience of the community of life and the well-being of humanity depend upon preserving a healthy biosphere…

  19. Skylab Explores the Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This book describes the Skylab 4 Earth Explorations Project. Photographs of the earth taken by the Skylab astronauts are reproduced here and accompanied by an analytical and explanatory text. Some of the geological and geographical topics covered are: (1) global tectonics - some geological analyses of observations and photographs from Skylab; (2)…

  20. Earth and ocean modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knezovich, F. M.

    1976-01-01

    A modular structured system of computer programs is presented utilizing earth and ocean dynamical data keyed to finitely defined parameters. The model is an assemblage of mathematical algorithms with an inherent capability of maturation with progressive improvements in observational data frequencies, accuracies and scopes. The Eom in its present state is a first-order approach to a geophysical model of the earth's dynamics.

  1. The Earth Needs You!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Celebrated annually on April 22, schools and communities organize numerous activities during Earth Day to promote awareness. To help teachers plan their own initiatives and to learn more about what is happening around the world, they can join the Earth Day Network at: http://network.earthday.net/. Once they have joined, they can create a webpage…

  2. NMR parameters in alkali, alkaline earth and rare earth fluorides from first principle calculations.

    PubMed

    Sadoc, Aymeric; Body, Monique; Legein, Christophe; Biswal, Mamata; Fayon, Franck; Rocquefelte, Xavier; Boucher, Florent

    2011-11-07

    (19)F isotropic chemical shifts for alkali, alkaline earth and rare earth of column 3 basic fluorides are measured and the corresponding isotropic chemical shieldings are calculated using the GIPAW method. When using the PBE exchange-correlation functional for the treatment of the cationic localized empty orbitals of Ca(2+), Sc(3+) (3d) and La(3+) (4f), a correction is needed to accurately calculate (19)F chemical shieldings. We show that the correlation between experimental isotropic chemical shifts and calculated isotropic chemical shieldings established for the studied compounds allows us to predict (19)F NMR spectra of crystalline compounds with a relatively good accuracy. In addition, we experimentally determine the quadrupolar parameters of (25)Mg in MgF(2) and calculate the electric field gradients of (25)Mg in MgF(2) and (139)La in LaF(3) using both PAW and LAPW methods. The orientation of the EFG components in the crystallographic frame, provided by DFT calculations, is analysed in terms of electron densities. It is shown that consideration of the quadrupolar charge deformation is essential for the analysis of slightly distorted environments or highly irregular polyhedra. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  3. Magnetic interactions and magnetic anisotropy in exchange coupled 4f-3d systems: a case study of a heterodinuclear Ce3+-Fe3+ cyanide-bridged complex.

    PubMed

    Sorace, Lorenzo; Sangregorio, Claudio; Figuerola, Albert; Benelli, Cristiano; Gatteschi, Dante

    2009-01-01

    We report here a detailed single-crystal EPR and magnetic study of a homologous series of complexes of the type Ln-M (Ln = La(III), Ce(III); M = Fe(III), Co(III)). We were able to obtain a detailed picture of the low-lying levels of Ce(III) and Fe(III) centres through the combined use of single-crystal EPR and magnetic susceptibility data. We show that classical ligand field theory can be of great help in rationalising the energies of the low-lying levels of both the transition-metal and rare-earth ions. The combined analysis of single-crystal EPR and magnetic data of the coupled system Ce-Fe confirmed the great complexity of the interactions involving rare-earth elements. With little uncertainty, it turned out clearly that the description of the interaction involving the lowest lying spin levels requires the introduction of the isotropic, anisotropic and antisymmetric terms.

  4. Crystal-field splittings in rare-earth-based hard magnets: An ab initio approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delange, Pascal; Biermann, Silke; Miyake, Takashi; Pourovskii, Leonid

    2017-10-01

    We apply the first-principles density functional theory + dynamical mean-field theory framework to evaluate the crystal-field splitting on rare-earth sites in hard magnetic intermetallics. An atomic (Hubbard-I) approximation is employed for local correlations on the rare-earth 4 f shell and self-consistency in the charge density is implemented. We reduce the density functional theory self-interaction contribution to the crystal-field splitting by properly averaging the 4 f charge density before recalculating the one-electron Kohn-Sham potential. Our approach is shown to reproduce the experimental crystal-field splitting in the prototypical rare-earth hard magnet SmCo5. Applying it to R Fe12 and R Fe12X hard magnets (R =Nd , Sm and X =N , Li), we obtain in particular a large positive value of the crystal-field parameter A20〈r2〉 in NdFe12N resulting in a strong out-of-plane anisotropy observed experimentally. The sign of A20〈r2〉 is predicted to be reversed by substituting N with Li, leading to a strong out-of-plane anisotropy in SmFe12Li . We discuss the origin of this strong impact of N and Li interstitials on the crystal-field splitting on rare-earth sites.

  5. Ground-state properties of rare-earth metals: an evaluation of density-functional theory.

    PubMed

    Söderlind, Per; Turchi, P E A; Landa, A; Lordi, V

    2014-10-15

    The rare-earth metals have important technological applications due to their magnetic properties, but are scarce and expensive. Development of high-performance magnetic materials with less rare-earth content is desired, but theoretical modeling is hampered by complexities of the rare earths electronic structure. The existence of correlated (atomic-like) 4f electrons in the vicinity of the valence band makes any first-principles theory challenging. Here, we apply and evaluate the efficacy of density-functional theory for the series of lanthanides (rare earths), investigating the influence of the electron exchange and correlation functional, spin-orbit interaction, and orbital polarization. As a reference, the results are compared with those of the so-called 'standard model' of the lanthanides in which electrons are constrained to occupy 4f core states with no hybridization with the valence electrons. Some comparisons are also made with models designed for strong electron correlations. Our results suggest that spin-orbit coupling and orbital polarization are important, particularly for the magnitude of the magnetic moments, and that calculated equilibrium volumes, bulk moduli, and magnetic moments show correct trends overall. However, the precision of the calculated properties is not at the level of that found for simpler metals in the Periodic Table of Elements, and the electronic structures do not accurately reproduce x-ray photoemission spectra.

  6. Measurement of fission yields and isomeric yield ratios at IGISOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomp, Stephan; Mattera, Andrea; Rakopoulos, Vasileios; Al-Adili, Ali; Lantz, Mattias; Solders, Andreas; Jansson, Kaj; Prokofiev, Alexander V.; Eronen, Tommi; Gorelov, Dimitri; Jokinen, Ari; Kankainen, Anu; Moore, Iain D.; Penttilä, Heikki; Rinta-Antila, Sami

    2018-03-01

    Data on fission yields and isomeric yield ratios (IYR) are tools to study the fission process, in particular the generation of angular momentum. We use the IGISOL facility with the Penning trap JYFLTRAP in Jyväskylä, Finland, for such measurements on 232Th and natU targets. Previously published fission yield data from IGISOL concern the 232Th(p,f) and 238U(p,f) reactions at 25 and 50 MeV. Recently, a neutron source, using the Be(p,n) reaction, has been developed, installed and tested. We summarize the results for (p,f) focusing on the first measurement of IYR by direct ion counting. We also present first results for IYR and relative yields for Sn and Sb isotopes in the 128-133 mass range from natU(n,f) based on γ-spectrometry. We find a staggering behaviour in the cumulative yields for Sn and a shift in the independent fission yields for Sb as compared to current evaluations. Plans for the future experimental program on fission yields and IYR measurements are discussed.

  7. Rx for low cash yields.

    PubMed

    Tobe, Chris

    2003-10-01

    Certain strategies can offer not-for-profit hospitals potentially greater investment yields while maintaining stability and principal safety. Treasury inflation-indexed securities can offer good returns, low volatility, and inflation protection. "Enhanced cash" strategies offer liquidity and help to preserve capital. Stable value "wrappers" allow hospitals to pursue higher-yielding fixed-income securities without an increase in volatility.

  8. Brazil soybean yield covariance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callis, S. L.; Sakamoto, C.

    1984-01-01

    A model based on multiple regression was developed to estimate soybean yields for the seven soybean-growing states of Brazil. The meteorological data of these seven states were pooled and the years 1975 to 1980 were used to model since there was no technological trend in the yields during these years. Predictor variables were derived from monthly total precipitation and monthly average temperature.

  9. Breeding cassava for higher yield

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cassava is a root crop grown for food and for starch production. Breeding progress is slowed by asexual production and high levels of heterozygosity. Germplasm resources are rich and accessible to breeders through genebanks worldwide. Breeding objectives include high root yield, yield stability, dis...

  10. Earth Science Informatics - Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 10-15 years, significant advances have been made in information management, there are an increasing number of individuals entering the field of information management as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing data, and the field of informatics has come to its own. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of science data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also includes the use of computers and computational methods to support decision making and applications. Earth Science Informatics (ESI, a.k.a. geoinformatics) is the application of informatics in the Earth science domain. ESI is a rapidly developing discipline integrating computer science, information science, and Earth science. Major national and international research and infrastructure projects in ESI have been carried out or are on-going. Notable among these are: the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), the European Commissions INSPIRE, the U.S. NSDI and Geospatial One-Stop, the NASA EOSDIS, and the NSF DataONE, EarthCube and Cyberinfrastructure for Geoinformatics. More than 18 departments and agencies in the U.S. federal government have been active in Earth science informatics. All major space agencies in the world, have been involved in ESI research and application activities. In the United States, the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP), whose membership includes nearly 150 organizations (government, academic and commercial) dedicated to managing, delivering and applying Earth science data, has been working on many ESI topics since 1998. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)s Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) has been actively coordinating the ESI activities among the space agencies. Remote Sensing; Earth Science Informatics, Data Systems; Data Services; Metadata

  11. On the Yield Strength of Oceanic Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, C.; Korenaga, J.; Karato, S. I.

    2017-12-01

    The origin of plate tectonic convection on Earth is intrinsically linked to the reduction in the strength of oceanic lithosphere at plate boundaries. A few mechanisms, such as deep thermal cracking [Korenaga, 2007] and strain localization due to grain-size reduction [e.g., Ricard and Bercovici, 2009], have been proposed to explain this reduction in lithospheric strength, but the significance of these mechanisms can be assessed only if we have accurate estimates on the strength of the undamaged oceanic lithosphere. The Peierls mechanism is likely to govern the rheology of old oceanic lithosphere [Kohlstedt et al., 1995], but the flow-law parameters for the Peierls mechanism suggested by previous studies do not agree with each other. We thus reanalyze the relevant experimental deformation data of olivine aggregates using Markov chain Monte Carlo inversion, which can handle the highly nonlinear constitutive equation of the Peierls mechanism [Korenaga and Karato, 2008; Mullet et al., 2015]. Our inversion results indicate nontrivial nonuniqueness in every flow-law parameter for the Peierls mechanism. Moreover, the resultant flow laws, all of which are consistent with the same experimental data, predict substantially different yield stresses under lithospheric conditions and could therefore have different implications for the origin of plate tectonics. We discuss some future directions to improve our constraints on lithospheric yield strength.

  12. Low Earth orbit communications satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moroney, D.; Lashbrook, D.; Mckibben, B.; Gardener, N.; Rivers, T.; Nottingham, G.; Golden, B.; Barfield, B.; Bruening, J.; Wood, D.

    1992-01-01

    A current thrust in satellite communication systems considers a low-Earth orbiting constellations of satellites for continuous global coverage. Conceptual design studies have been done at the time of this design project by LORAL Aerospace Corporation under the program name GLOBALSTAR and by Motorola under their IRIDIUM program. This design project concentrates on the spacecraft design of the GLOBALSTAR low-Earth orbiting communication system. Overview information on the program was gained through the Federal Communications Commission licensing request. The GLOBALSTAR system consists of 48 operational satellites positioned in a Walker Delta pattern providing global coverage and redundancy. The operational orbit is 1389 km (750 nmi) altitude with eight planes of six satellites each. The orbital planes are spaced 45 deg., and the spacecraft are separated by 60 deg. within the plane. A Delta 2 launch vehicle is used to carry six spacecraft for orbit establishment. Once in orbit, the spacecraft will utilize code-division multiple access (spread spectrum modulation) for digital relay, voice, and radio determination satellite services (RDSS) yielding position determination with accuracy up to 200 meters.

  13. Asteroid and comet flux in the neighborhood of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, Eugene M.; Shoemaker, Carolyn S.; Wolfe, Ruth F.

    1988-01-01

    Significant advances in the knowledge and understanding of the flux of large solid objects in the neighborhood of Earth have occurred. The best estimates of the collision rates with Earth of asteroids and comets and the corresponding production of impact craters are presented. Approximately 80 Earth-crossing asteroids were discovered through May 1988. Among 42 new Earth-crossing asteroids found in the last decade, two-thirds were discovered from observations at Palomar Observatory and 15 were discovered or independently detected in dedicated surveys with the Palomar Observatory and 15 were discovered or independently detected in dedicated surveys with the Palomar 46 cm Schmidt. Probabilities of collision with Earth have been calculated for about two-thirds of the known Earth-crossing asteroids. When multiplied by the estimated population of Earth-crossers, this yields an estimated present rate of collision about 65 pct higher than that previously reported. Spectrophotometric data obtained chiefly in the last decade show that the large majority of obvserved Earth-crossers are similar to asteroids found in the inner part of the main belt. The number of discovered Earth-crossing comets is more than 4 times greater than the number of known Earth-crossing asteroids, but reliable data on the sizes of comet nuclei are sparse. The flux of comets almost certainly was highly variable over late geologic time, owing to the random perturbation of the Oort comet cloud by stars in the solar neighborhood.

  14. Earth as art three

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2010-01-01

    For most of us, deserts, mountains, river valleys, coastlines even dry lakebeds are relatively familiar features of the Earth's terrestrial environment. For earth scientists, they are the focus of considerable scientific research. Viewed from a unique and unconventional perspective, Earth's geographic attributes can also be a surprising source of awe-inspiring art. That unique perspective is space. The artists for the Earth as Art Three exhibit are the Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 satellites, which orbit approximately 705 kilometers (438 miles) above the Earth's surface. While studying the images these satellites beam down daily, researchers are often struck by the sheer beauty of the scenes. Such images inspire the imagination and go beyond scientific value to remind us how stunning, intricate, and simply amazing our planet's features can be. Instead of paint, the medium for these works of art is light. But Landsat satellite sensors don't see light as human eyes do; instead, they see radiant energy reflected from Earth's surface in certain wavelengths, or bands, of red, green, blue, and infrared light. When these different bands are combined into a single image, remarkable patterns, colors, and shapes emerge. The Earth as Art Three exhibit provides fresh and inspiring glimpses of different parts of our planet's complex surface. The images in this collection were chosen solely based on their aesthetic appeal. Many of the images have been manipulated to enhance color variations or details. They are not intended for scientific interpretation only for your viewing pleasure. Enjoy!

  15. Early Earth slab stagnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrusta, R.; Van Hunen, J.

    2016-12-01

    At present day, the Earth's mantle exhibits a combination of stagnant and penetrating slabs within the transition zone, indicating a intermittent convection mode between layered and whole-mantle convection. Isoviscous thermal convection calculations show that in a hotter Earth, the natural mode of convection was dominated by double-layered convection, which may imply that slabs were more prone to stagnate in the transition zone. Today, slab penetration is to a large extent controlled by trench mobility for a plausible range of lower mantle viscosity and Clapeyron slope of the mantle phase transitions. Trench mobility is, in turn, governed by slab strength and density and upper plate forcing. In this study, we systematically investigate the slab-transition zone internation in the Early Earth, using 2D self-consistent numerical subduction models. Early Earth's higher mantle temperature facilitates decoupling between the plates and the underlying asthenosphere, and may result in slab sinking almost without trench retreat. Such behaviour together with a low resistance of a weak lower mantle may allow slabs to penetrate. The ability of slab to sink into the lower mantle throughout Earth's history may have important implications for Earth's evolution: it would provide efficient mass and heat flux through the transition zone therefore provide an efficient way to cool and mix the Earth's mantle.

  16. Accretion of the Earth.

    PubMed

    Canup, Robin M

    2008-11-28

    The origin of the Earth and its Moon has been the focus of an enormous body of research. In this paper I review some of the current models of terrestrial planet accretion, and discuss assumptions common to most works that may require re-examination. Density-wave interactions between growing planets and the gas nebula may help to explain the current near-circular orbits of the Earth and Venus, and may result in large-scale radial migration of proto-planetary embryos. Migration would weaken the link between the present locations of the planets and the original provenance of the material that formed them. Fragmentation can potentially lead to faster accretion and could also damp final planet orbital eccentricities. The Moon-forming impact is believed to be the final major event in the Earth's accretion. Successful simulations of lunar-forming impacts involve a differentiated impactor containing between 0.1 and 0.2 Earth masses, an impact angle near 45 degrees and an impact speed within 10 per cent of the Earth's escape velocity. All successful impacts-with or without pre-impact rotation-imply that the Moon formed primarily from material originating from the impactor rather than from the proto-Earth. This must ultimately be reconciled with compositional similarities between the Earth and the Moon.

  17. Earth Science Informatics - Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 10-15 years, significant advances have been made in information management, there are an increasing number of individuals entering the field of information management as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing data, and the field of informatics has come to its own. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of science data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also includes the use of computers and computational methods to support decision making and applications. Earth Science Informatics (ESI, a.k.a. geoinformatics) is the application of informatics in the Earth science domain. ESI is a rapidly developing discipline integrating computer science, information science, and Earth science. Major national and international research and infrastructure projects in ESI have been carried out or are on-going. Notable among these are: the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), the European Commissions INSPIRE, the U.S. NSDI and Geospatial One-Stop, the NASA EOSDIS, and the NSF DataONE, EarthCube and Cyberinfrastructure for Geoinformatics. More than 18 departments and agencies in the U.S. federal government have been active in Earth science informatics. All major space agencies in the world, have been involved in ESI research and application activities. In the United States, the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP), whose membership includes over 180 organizations (government, academic and commercial) dedicated to managing, delivering and applying Earth science data, has been working on many ESI topics since 1998. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)s Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) has been actively coordinating the ESI activities among the space agencies.

  18. Earth Science Informatics - Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 10-15 years, significant advances have been made in information management, there are an increasing number of individuals entering the field of information management as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing data, and the field of informatics has come to its own. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of science data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also includes the use of computers and computational methods to support decision making and applications. Earth Science Informatics (ESI, a.k.a. geoinformatics) is the application of informatics in the Earth science domain. ESI is a rapidly developing discipline integrating computer science, information science, and Earth science. Major national and international research and infrastructure projects in ESI have been carried out or are on-going. Notable among these are: the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), the European Commissions INSPIRE, the U.S. NSDI and Geospatial One-Stop, the NASA EOSDIS, and the NSF DataONE, EarthCube and Cyberinfrastructure for Geoinformatics. More than 18 departments and agencies in the U.S. federal government have been active in Earth science informatics. All major space agencies in the world, have been involved in ESI research and application activities. In the United States, the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP), whose membership includes over 180 organizations (government, academic and commercial) dedicated to managing, delivering and applying Earth science data, has been working on many ESI topics since 1998. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)s Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) has been actively coordinating the ESI activities among the space agencies.The talk will present an overview of current efforts in ESI, the role members of IEEE GRSS play, and discuss

  19. Rare earth gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, W.F.

    1975-10-31

    A high energy gas laser with light output in the infrared or visible region of the spectrum is described. Laser action is obtained by generating vapors of rare earth halides, particularly neodymium iodide or, to a lesser extent, neodymium bromide, and disposing the rare earth vapor medium in a resonant cavity at elevated temperatures; e.g., approximately 1200/sup 0/ to 1400/sup 0/K. A particularly preferred gaseous medium is one involving a complex of aluminum chloride and neodymium chloride, which exhibits tremendously enhanced vapor pressure compared to the rare earth halides per se, and provides comparable increases in stored energy densities.

  20. Earth before life.

    PubMed

    Marzban, Caren; Viswanathan, Raju; Yurtsever, Ulvi

    2014-01-09

    A recent study argued, based on data on functional genome size of major phyla, that there is evidence life may have originated significantly prior to the formation of the Earth. Here a more refined regression analysis is performed in which 1) measurement error is systematically taken into account, and 2) interval estimates (e.g., confidence or prediction intervals) are produced. It is shown that such models for which the interval estimate for the time origin of the genome includes the age of the Earth are consistent with observed data. The appearance of life after the formation of the Earth is consistent with the data set under examination.

  1. Earth Science Applications Showcase

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-05

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden speaks with young professionals about their project during the annual DEVELOP Earth Science Application Showcase at NASA headquarters Tuesday, August 5, 2014. The Earth Science Applications Showcase highlights the work of over 150 participants in the 10-week DEVELOP program that started in June. The DEVELOP Program bridges the gap between NASA Earth science and society, building capacity in both its participants and partner organizations, to better prepare them to handle the challenges that face our society and future generations. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  2. Earth Science Applications Showcase

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-05

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden poses for a selfie after a quick rap performance by some young professionals during the annual DEVELOP Earth Science Application Showcase at NASA headquarters Tuesday, August 5, 2014. The Earth Science Applications Showcase highlights the work of over 150 participants in the 10-week DEVELOP program that started in June. The DEVELOP Program bridges the gap between NASA Earth science and society, building capacity in both its participants and partner organizations, to better prepare them to handle the challenges that face our society and future generations. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  3. Earth Science Applications Showcase

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-05

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden speaks with young professionals about their project on New England water resources during the annual DEVELOP Earth Science Application Showcase at NASA headquarters Tuesday, August 5, 2014. The Earth Science Applications Showcase highlights the work of over 150 participants in the 10-week DEVELOP program that started in June. The DEVELOP Program bridges the gap between NASA Earth science and society, building capacity in both its participants and partner organizations, to better prepare them to handle the challenges that face our society and future generations. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  4. Earth Science Applications Showcase

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-05

    Lisa Waldron and Justin Roberts-Pierel present their project on Texas health and air quality during the annual DEVELOP Earth Science Application Showcase at NASA headquarters Tuesday, August 5, 2014. The Earth Science Applications Showcase highlights the work of over 150 participants in the 10-week DEVELOP program that started in June. The DEVELOP Program bridges the gap between NASA Earth science and society, building capacity in both its participants and partner organizations, to better prepare them to handle the challenges that face our society and future generations. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  5. Earth Science Applications Showcase

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-05

    Michael Gao presents his project on Southeast Asian disasters during the annual DEVELOP Earth Science Application Showcase at NASA headquarters Tuesday, August 5, 2014. The Earth Science Applications Showcase highlights the work of over 150 participants in the 10-week DEVELOP program that started in June. The DEVELOP Program bridges the gap between NASA Earth science and society, building capacity in both its participants and partner organizations, to better prepare them to handle the challenges that face our society and future generations. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  6. Earth Science Applications Showcase

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-05

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden asks young professionals about their projects after posing for a group photo during the annual DEVELOP Earth Science Application Showcase at NASA headquarters Tuesday, August 5, 2014. The Earth Science Applications Showcase highlights the work of over 150 participants in the 10-week DEVELOP program that started in June. The DEVELOP Program bridges the gap between NASA Earth science and society, building capacity in both its participants and partner organizations, to better prepare them to handle the challenges that face our society and future generations. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  7. Earth Day 2017

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Happy Earth Day! Explore the diverse colors, unique shapes and striking patterns of our very favorite planet, Earth - as only NASA can see it. Credit: NASA/Goddard #nasagoddard NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  8. Earth Eclipses the Sun

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-21

    Several times a day for a few days the Earth completely blocked the Sun for about an hour due to NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory's orbital path (Feb. 15, 2017). The edge of the Earth is not crisp, but kind of fuzzy due to Earth's atmosphere. This frame from a video shows the ending of one such eclipse over -- just seven minutes. The sun is shown in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. These eclipses re-occur about every six months. The Moon blocks SDO's view of the sun on occasion as well. Movies are available at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21461

  9. Grapevine canopy reflectance and yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minden, K. A.; Philipson, W. R.

    1982-01-01

    Field spectroradiometric and airborne multispectral scanner data were applied in a study of Concord grapevines. Spectroradiometric measurements of 18 experimental vines were collected on three dates during one growing season. Spectral reflectance, determined at 30 intervals from 0.4 to 1.1 microns, was correlated with vine yield, pruning weight, clusters/vine, and nitrogen input. One date of airborne multispectral scanner data (11 channels) was collected over commercial vineyards, and the average radiance values for eight vineyard sections were correlated with the corresponding average yields. Although some correlations were significant, they were inadequate for developing a reliable yield prediction model.

  10. The Redox Dynamics of Iron in a Seasonally Waterlogged Forest Soil (Chaux Forest, Eastern France) Traced with Rare Earth Element Distribution Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmann, M.; Floch, A. L.; Lucot, E.; Badot, P. M.

    2014-12-01

    The oxyhydroxides of iron are common soil minerals and known to control the availability of various major and trace elements essential for biogeochemical processes. We present a study from acidic natural forest soils, where reducing redox conditions due to seasonal waterlogging lead to the dissolution of Fe-oxyhydroxides, and to the release of Fe to soil water. In order to study in detail the mechanism of redox cycling of Fe, we used Rare Earth Element (REE) distribution patterns, because an earlier study has shown that they are a suitable tool to identify trace metal sources during soil reduction in wetland soils (Davranche et al., 2011). The REE patterns of soil leachates obtained with the modified 3-step BCR extraction scheme of Rauret et al., (1999) were compared with those of natural soil water. The adsorbed fractions (F1 leach), the reducible fraction of the deepest soil horizon H4 (F2 leach, 50-120 cm), and the oxidizable fractions of horizons H2 to H4 (F3 leachs, 24-120 cm) yielded REE patterns almost identical to soil water (see figure), showing that the REE and trace metal content of soil water was mainly derived from the F1 pool, and from the F2 and F3 pools of the clay mineral-rich deep soil horizons. In contrast, the F2 leach mobilized mainly Fe-oxyhydroxides associated with organic matter of the surface soil and yielded REE patterns significantly different from those of soil water. These results suggest that the trace metal content of soil water in hydromorphic soils is primarily controlled by the clay fraction of the deeper soil horizons and not by organic matter and related Fe-oxyhydroxides of the surface soil. Additional analyses are in progress in order to verify whether the REE and trace metals of the deeper soil horizons were directly derived from clay minerals or from associated Fe-oxyhydroxide coatings. Refs cited: Davranche et al. (2011), Chem. Geol. 284; Rauret et al. (1999), J. Environ. Monit. 1.

  11. Down to earth relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, I. I.

    1978-01-01

    The basic concepts of the special and general theories of relativity are described. Simple examples are given to illustrate the effect of relativity on measurements of time and frequency in the near-earth environment.

  12. The Earth Tides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Judah

    1982-01-01

    In addition to oceans, the earth is subjected to tidal stresses and undergoes tidal deformations. Discusses origin of tides, tidal stresses, and methods of determining tidal deformations (including gravity, tilt, and strain meters). (JN)

  13. Earth study from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidorenko, A. V.

    1981-01-01

    The significance that space studies are making to all Earth sciences in the areas of geography, geodesy, cartography, geology, meteorology, oceanology, agronomy, and ecology is discussed. It is predicted that cosmonautics will result in a revolution in science and technology.

  14. NASA Earth Day 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-22

    NASA's Administrator, Charles Bolden, conducts an experiment using circuits at NASA's Earth Day event. The event took place at Union Station in Washington, DC on April 22, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  15. NASA Earth Day 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-22

    NASA's Administrator, Charles Bolden watches as some students conduct an experiment with a balloon at NASA's Earth Day event. The event took place at Union Station in Washington, DC on April 22, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  16. NASA Earth Day 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-22

    Students listen intently while an exhibitor conducts an experiment at NASA's Earth Day event. The event took place at Union Station in Washington, DC on April 22, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  17. NASA Earth Day 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-22

    Students listen intently while Astronaut John Mace Grunsfeld speaks at NASA's Earth Day event. The event took place at Union Station in Washington, DC on April 22, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  18. LANL Studies Earth's Magnetosphere

    ScienceCinema

    Daughton, Bill

    2018-02-13

    A new 3-D supercomputer model presents a new theory of how magnetic reconnection works in high-temperature plasmas. This Los Alamos National Laboratory research supports an upcoming NASA mission to study Earth's magnetosphere in greater detail than ever.

  19. Earth Radiation Measurement Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. Louis

    2000-01-01

    This document is the final report for NASA Grant NAG1-1959, 'Earth Radiation Measurement Science'. The purpose of this grant was to perform research in this area for the needs of the Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES) project and for the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), which are bing conducted by the Radiation and Aerosols Branch of the Atmospheric Sciences Division of Langley Research Center. Earth Radiation Measurement Science investigates the processes by which measurements are converted into data products. Under this grant, research was to be conducted for five tasks: (1) Point Response Function Measurements; (2) Temporal Sampling of Outgoing Longwave Radiation; (3) Spatial Averaging of Radiation Budget Data; (4) CERES Data Validation and Applications; and (5) ScaRaB Data Validation and Application.

  20. Observing earth from Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Skylab technology and observations of earth resources are discussed. Special attention was given to application of Skylab data to mapmaking, geology/geodesy, water resources, oceanography, meteorology, and geography/ecology.

  1. Olivine on Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-30

    The semi-precious gem peridot is a variety of olivine. NASA Curiosity rover shows the diffraction signature, or fingerprint, of the mineral olivine, shown here on Earth in the form of tumbled crystals.

  2. Earth science: Extraordinary world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, James M. D.

    2016-09-01

    The isotopic compositions of objects that formed early in the evolution of the Solar System have been found to be similar to Earth's composition -- overturning notions of our planet's chemical distinctiveness. See Letters p.394 & p.399

  3. Earth retaining structures manual

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-10-29

    The objectives of this policy are to obtain statewide uniformity, establish standard : procedures and delineate responsibility for the preparation and review of plans, : design and construction control of earth retaining structures. In addition, it i...

  4. Brazil wheat yield covariance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callis, S. L.; Sakamoto, C.

    1984-01-01

    A model based on multiple regression was developed to estimate wheat yields for the wheat growing states of Rio Grande do Sul, Parana, and Santa Catarina in Brazil. The meteorological data of these three states were pooled and the years 1972 to 1979 were used to develop the model since there was no technological trend in the yields during these years. Predictor variables were derived from monthly total precipitation, average monthly mean temperature, and average monthly maximum temperature.

  5. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-18

    Students from Rockledge High School in Rockledge, Fla., make “plarn” – plastic yarn -- out of used plastic bags during Kennedy Space Center’s annual Earth Day celebration. The plarn was donated to be woven into mats for homeless veterans. The two-day Earth Day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  6. Earth and Space Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeson, Blanche W.

    1999-01-01

    Workshop for middle and high school teachers to enhance their knowledge of the Earth as a system. NASA data and materials developed by teachers (all available via the Internet) will be used to engage participants in hands-on, investigative approaches to the Earth system. All materials are ready to be applied in pre-college classrooms. Remotely-sensed data will be used in combination with familiar resources, such as maps, to examine global climate change.

  7. Fuller's earth (montmorillonite) pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, A R; Pooley, F D

    1994-01-01

    A fuller's earth worker developed signs of pneumoconiosis. Pathological examination of the lung tissues showed interstitial collections of dust laden macrophages associated with mild fibrosis. Mineralogical analysis showed a high content of montmorillonite. This study shows that a pneumoconiosis can result from prolonged heavy exposure to calcium montmorillonite (fuller's earth) in the absence of quartz. The disease is relatively mild and associated with little clinical disability. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7951799

  8. Skylab explores the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Data from visual observations are integrated with results of analyses of approxmately 600 of the nearly 2000 photographs taken of Earth during the 84-day Skylab 4 mission to provide additional information on (1) Earth features and processes; (2) operational procedures and constraints in observing and photographing the planet; and (3) the use of man in real-time analysis of oceanic and atmospheric phenomena.

  9. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-18

    Organizers and volunteers for Kennedy Space Center’s Earth Day celebration gather for a photo at the NASA Exchange raffle booth. From left to right are Jeanne Ryba, Environmental Sustainability program specialist; Robert Smith, Earth Day volunteer; and Natasha Darre, Cultural Resources Specialist. The two-day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  10. Fission yield measurements at IGISOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, M.; Al-Adili, A.; Gorelov, D.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Mattera, A.; Moore, I.; Penttilä, H.; Pomp, S.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Rakopoulos, V.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Simutkin, V.; Solders, A.

    2016-06-01

    The fission product yields are an important characteristic of the fission process. In fundamental physics, knowledge of the yield distributions is needed to better understand the fission process. For nuclear energy applications good knowledge of neutroninduced fission-product yields is important for the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants. With the Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) technique, products of nuclear reactions are stopped in a buffer gas and then extracted and separated by mass. Thanks to the high resolving power of the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, at University of Jyväskylä, fission products can be isobarically separated, making it possible to measure relative independent fission yields. In some cases it is even possible to resolve isomeric states from the ground state, permitting measurements of isomeric yield ratios. So far the reactions U(p,f) and Th(p,f) have been studied using the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP facility. Recently, a neutron converter target has been developed utilizing the Be(p,xn) reaction. We here present the IGISOL-technique for fission yield measurements and some of the results from the measurements on proton induced fission. We also present the development of the neutron converter target, the characterization of the neutron field and the first tests with neutron-induced fission.

  11. Biosignatures of early earths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilcher, Carl B.

    2003-01-01

    A major goal of NASA's Origins Program is to find habitable planets around other stars and determine which might harbor life. Determining whether or not an extrasolar planet harbors life requires an understanding of what spectral features (i.e., biosignatures) might result from life's presence. Consideration of potential biosignatures has tended to focus on spectral features of gases in Earth's modern atmosphere, particularly ozone, the photolytic product of biogenically produced molecular oxygen. But life existed on Earth for about 1(1/2) billion years before the buildup of atmospheric oxygen. Inferred characteristics of Earth's earliest biosphere and studies of modern microbial ecosystems that share some of those characteristics suggest that organosulfur compounds, particularly methanethiol (CH(3)SH, the sulfur analog of methanol), may have been biogenic products on early Earth. Similar production could take place on extrasolar Earth-like planets whose biota share functional chemical characteristics with Earth life. Since methanethiol and related organosulfur compounds (as well as carbon dioxide) absorb at wavelengths near or overlapping the 9.6-microm band of ozone, there is potential ambiguity in interpreting a feature around this wavelength in an extrasolar planet spectrum.

  12. Guided earth boring tool

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Donald, W.J.; Pittard, G.T.; Maurer, W.C.

    A controllable tool for drilling holes in the earth is described comprising a hollow elongated rigid supporting drill pipe having a forward end for entering the earth, means supporting the drill pipe for earth boring or piercing movement, including means for moving the drill pipe longitudinally for penetrating the earth, the drill pipe moving means being constructed to permit addition and removal of supporting drill pipe during earth penetrating operation, a boring mole supported on the forward end of the hollow low drill pipe comprising a cylindrical housing supported on and open to the forward end of the drill pipe,more » a first means on the front end for applying a boring force to the soil comprising an anvil having a striking surface inside the housing and a boring surface outside the housing, a second means comprising a reciprocally movable hammer positioned in the housing to apply a percussive force to the anvil striking surface for transmitting a percussive force to the boring force applying means, and means permitting introduction of air pressure supplied through the hollow pipe into the housing for operating the hammer and for discharging spent air from the housing to the hole being bored, and the tool being operable to penetrate the earth upon longitudinal movement of the drill rod by the longitudinal rod moving means and operation of the mole by reciprocal movement of the hammer.« less

  13. Biosignatures of early earths.

    PubMed

    Pilcher, Carl B

    2003-01-01

    A major goal of NASA's Origins Program is to find habitable planets around other stars and determine which might harbor life. Determining whether or not an extrasolar planet harbors life requires an understanding of what spectral features (i.e., biosignatures) might result from life's presence. Consideration of potential biosignatures has tended to focus on spectral features of gases in Earth's modern atmosphere, particularly ozone, the photolytic product of biogenically produced molecular oxygen. But life existed on Earth for about 1(1/2) billion years before the buildup of atmospheric oxygen. Inferred characteristics of Earth's earliest biosphere and studies of modern microbial ecosystems that share some of those characteristics suggest that organosulfur compounds, particularly methanethiol (CH(3)SH, the sulfur analog of methanol), may have been biogenic products on early Earth. Similar production could take place on extrasolar Earth-like planets whose biota share functional chemical characteristics with Earth life. Since methanethiol and related organosulfur compounds (as well as carbon dioxide) absorb at wavelengths near or overlapping the 9.6-microm band of ozone, there is potential ambiguity in interpreting a feature around this wavelength in an extrasolar planet spectrum.

  14. Calculations of total electron-impact ionization cross sections for Fluoroketone C5F10O and Fluoronitrile C4F7N using modified Deutsch-Märk formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Jiayu; Li, Xingwen; Wu, Jian; Guo, Xiaoxue; Zhao, Hu

    2017-11-01

    Both fluoroketone C5F10O and fluoronitrile C4F7N are promising substitute gases for SF6. The electron-impact ionization cross sections for these two gases are calculated using the Deutsch-Märk (DM) formula and its modified method. The necessary molecular geometry optimization and electron population were determined by ab initio calculation, which was performed with quantum chemistry code. The level of calculation, including the theoretical method and basis-set, are carefully determined. To eliminate the drawbacks of the DM formula, a modified DM formula is set in this paper. The modified DM formula, of which the weighting factors are changed, has a better agreement with the experimental data on both the peak and shape of the cross-section curves. The results calculated by DM formula and modified DM formula are given as references to fill in gaps in further research into C5F10O and C4F7N.

  15. Analysis of the 3d(sup 6)4s((sup 6)D)4f-5g supermultiplet of Fe I in laboratory and solar infrared spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansson, S.; Nave, G.; Geller, M.; Sauval, A. J.; Grevesse, N.; Schoenfeld, W. G.; Change, E. S.; Farmer, C. B.

    1994-01-01

    The combined laboratory and solar analysis of the highly excited subconfigurations 3d(sup 6)4s((sup 6)D)4f and 3d(sup 6)4s((sup 6)D)5g of Fe I has allowed us to classify 87 lines of the 4f-5g supermultiplet in the spectral region 2545-2585 per cm. The level structure of these JK-coupled configurations is predicted by semiempirical calculations and the quardrupolic approximation. Semiempirical gf-values have been calculated and are compared to gf-values derived from the solar spectrum. The solar analysis has shown that these lines, which should be much less sensitive than lower excitation lines to departures from Local Thermal Equilibrium (LTE) and to temperature uncertanties, lead to a solar abundance of iron which is consistent with the meteoritic value (A(sub Fe) = 7.51).

  16. Acid soil infertility effects on peanut yields and yield components

    SciTech Connect

    Blamey, F.P.C.

    1983-01-01

    The interpretation of soil amelioration experiments with peanuts is made difficult by the unpredictibility of the crop and by the many factors altered when ameliorating acid soils. The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of lime and gypsum applications on peanut kernel yield via the three first order yield components, pods per ha, kernels per pod, and kernel mass. On an acid medium sandy loam soil (typic Plinthustult), liming resulted in a highly significant kernel yield increase of 117% whereas gypsum applications were of no significant benefit. As indicated by path coefficient analysis, an increase in the numbermore » of pods per ha was markedly more important in increasing yield than an increase in either the number of kernels per pod or kernel mass. Furthermore, exch. Al was found to be particularly detrimental to pod number. It was postulated that poor peanut yields resulting from acid soil infertility were mainly due to the depressive effect of exch. Al on pod number. Exch. Ca appeared to play a secondary role by ameliorating the adverse effects of exch. Al.« less

  17. Predicting the Earth encounters of (99942) Apophis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giorgini, Jon D.; Benner, Lance A. M.; Ostro, Steven J.; Nolan, Michael C.; Busch, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    . Planetary ephemeris uncertainties are the next greatest source of systematic error, causing up to 23 Earth-radii of uncertainty. The SDM Earth point-mass assumption introduces an additional 2.9 Earth-radii of prediction error by 2036. Unmodeled asteroid perturbations produce as much as 2.3 Earth-radii of error. We find no future small-body encounters likely to yield an Apophis mass determination prior to 2029. However, asteroid (144898) 2004 VD17, itself having a statistical Earth impact in 2102, will probably encounter Apophis at 6.7 lunar distances in 2034, their uncertainty regions coming as close as 1.6 lunar distances near the center of both SDM probability distributions.

  18. Cumulative Brain Injury from Motor Vehicle-Induced Whole-Body Vibration and Prevention by Human Apolipoprotein A-I Molecule Mimetic (4F) Peptide (an Apo A-I Mimetic)

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ji-Geng; Zhang, Lin-ling; Agresti, Michael; Yan, Yuhui; LoGiudice, John; Sanger, James R.; Matloub, Hani S.; Pritchard, Kirkwood A.; Jaradeh, Safwan S.; Havlik, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Background Insidious cumulative brain injury from motor vehicle-induced whole-body vibration (MV-WBV) has not yet been studied. The objective of the present study is to validate whether whole-body vibration for long periods causes cumulative brain injury and impairment of the cerebral function. We also explored a preventive method for MV-WBV injury. Methods A study simulating whole-body vibration was conducted in 72 male Sprague-Dawley rats divided into 9 groups (N = 8): (1) 2-week normal control; (2) 2-week sham control (in the tube without vibration); (3) 2-week vibration (exposed to whole-body vibration at 30 Hz and .5 G acceleration for 4 hours/day, 5 days/week for 2 weeks; vibration parameters in the present study are similar to the most common driving conditions); (4) 4-week sham control; (5) 4-week vibration; (6) 4-week vibration with human apolipoprotein A-I molecule mimetic (4F)-preconditioning; (7) 8-week sham control; (8) 8-week vibration; and (9) 8-week 4F-preconditioning group. All the rats were evaluated by behavioral, physiological, and histological studies of the brain. Results Brain injury from vibration is a cumulative process starting with cerebral vasoconstriction, squeezing of the endothelial cells, increased free radicals, decreased nitric oxide, insufficient blood supply to the brain, and repeated reperfusion injury to brain neurons. In the 8-week vibration group, which indicated chronic brain edema, shrunken neuron numbers increased and whole neurons atrophied, which strongly correlated with neural functional impairment. There was no prominent brain neuronal injury in the 4F groups. Conclusions The present study demonstrated cumulative brain injury from MV-WBV and validated the preventive effects of 4F preconditioning. PMID:26433438

  19. Cumulative Brain Injury from Motor Vehicle-Induced Whole-Body Vibration and Prevention by Human Apolipoprotein A-I Molecule Mimetic (4F) Peptide (an Apo A-I Mimetic).

    PubMed

    Yan, Ji-Geng; Zhang, Lin-ling; Agresti, Michael; Yan, Yuhui; LoGiudice, John; Sanger, James R; Matloub, Hani S; Pritchard, Kirkwood A; Jaradeh, Safwan S; Havlik, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Insidious cumulative brain injury from motor vehicle-induced whole-body vibration (MV-WBV) has not yet been studied. The objective of the present study is to validate whether whole-body vibration for long periods causes cumulative brain injury and impairment of the cerebral function. We also explored a preventive method for MV-WBV injury. A study simulating whole-body vibration was conducted in 72 male Sprague-Dawley rats divided into 9 groups (N = 8): (1) 2-week normal control; (2) 2-week sham control (in the tube without vibration); (3) 2-week vibration (exposed to whole-body vibration at 30 Hz and .5 G acceleration for 4 hours/day, 5 days/week for 2 weeks; vibration parameters in the present study are similar to the most common driving conditions); (4) 4-week sham control; (5) 4-week vibration; (6) 4-week vibration with human apolipoprotein A-I molecule mimetic (4F)-preconditioning; (7) 8-week sham control; (8) 8-week vibration; and (9) 8-week 4F-preconditioning group. All the rats were evaluated by behavioral, physiological, and histological studies of the brain. Brain injury from vibration is a cumulative process starting with cerebral vasoconstriction, squeezing of the endothelial cells, increased free radicals, decreased nitric oxide, insufficient blood supply to the brain, and repeated reperfusion injury to brain neurons. In the 8-week vibration group, which indicated chronic brain edema, shrunken neuron numbers increased and whole neurons atrophied, which strongly correlated with neural functional impairment. There was no prominent brain neuronal injury in the 4F groups. The present study demonstrated cumulative brain injury from MV-WBV and validated the preventive effects of 4F preconditioning. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. All rights reserved.

  20. Full-Scale Hydrodynamic Evaluation of a Modified Navy J4F-2 Amphibian with a 0.425-Scale XP5M-1 Hull Bottom. TED No. NACA DE325

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Land, Norman S.; Elliott, John M.; Christopher, Kenneth W.

    1949-01-01

    An investigation was made to evaluate the hydrodynamic qualities of a 0.425-scale model of the Navy XP5M-1 hull, which was installed on a modified Navy J4F-2 amphibian. Longitudinal and directional stability during take-off and landing, low-speed maneuverability, spray characteristics, and take-off performance were investigated. The behavior of the airplane in moderately rough water was also observed. The opinions of three pilots have been correlated with the data.

  1. Exoplanet Yield Estimation for Decadal Study Concepts using EXOSIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Rhonda; Lowrance, Patrick; Savransky, Dmitry; Garrett, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The anticipated upcoming large mission study concepts for the direct imaging of exo-earths present an exciting opportunity for exoplanet discovery and characterization. While these telescope concepts would also be capable of conducting a broad range of astrophysical investigations, the most difficult technology challenges are driven by the requirements for imaging exo-earths. The exoplanet science yield for these mission concepts will drive design trades and mission concept comparisons.To assist in these trade studies, the Exoplanet Exploration Program Office (ExEP) is developing a yield estimation tool that emphasizes transparency and consistent comparison of various design concepts. The tool will provide a parametric estimate of science yield of various mission concepts using contrast curves from physics-based model codes and Monte Carlo simulations of design reference missions using realistic constraints, such as solar avoidance angles, the observatory orbit, propulsion limitations of star shades, the accessibility of candidate targets, local and background zodiacal light levels, and background confusion by stars and galaxies. The python tool utilizes Dmitry Savransky's EXOSIMS (Exoplanet Open-Source Imaging Mission Simulator) design reference mission simulator that is being developed for the WFIRST Preliminary Science program. ExEP is extending and validating the tool for future mission concepts under consideration for the upcoming 2020 decadal review. We present a validation plan and preliminary yield results for a point design.

  2. In Vivo Interplay between p27Kip1, GATA3, ATOH1, and POU4F3 Converts Non-sensory Cells to Hair Cells in Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Walters, Bradley J; Coak, Emily; Dearman, Jennifer; Bailey, Grace; Yamashita, Tetsuji; Kuo, Bryan; Zuo, Jian

    2017-04-11

    Hearing loss is widespread and persistent because mature mammalian auditory hair cells (HCs) are nonregenerative. In mice, the ability to regenerate HCs from surrounding supporting cells (SCs) declines abruptly after postnatal maturation. We find that combining p27 Kip1 deletion with ectopic ATOH1 expression surmounts this age-related decline, leading to conversion of SCs to HCs in mature mouse cochleae and after noise damage. p27 Kip1 deletion, independent of canonical effects on Rb-family proteins, upregulated GATA3, a co-factor for ATOH1 that is lost from SCs with age. Co-activation of GATA3 or POU4F3 and ATOH1 promoted conversion of SCs to HCs in adult mice. Activation of POU4F3 alone also converted mature SCs to HCs in vivo. These data illuminate a genetic pathway that initiates auditory HC regeneration and suggest p27 Kip1 , GATA3, and POU4F3 as additional therapeutic targets for ATOH1-mediated HC regeneration. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of the chamber wall on fluorocarbon-assisted atomic layer etching of SiO{sub 2} using cyclic Ar/C{sub 4}F{sub 8} plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakami, Masatoshi; Metzler, Dominik; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S., E-mail: oehrlein@umd.edu

    2016-07-15

    The authors studied the effect of the temperature and chemical state of the chamber wall on process performance for atomic layer etching of SiO{sub 2} using a steady-state Ar plasma, periodic injection of a defined number of C{sub 4}F{sub 8} molecules, and synchronized plasma-based Ar{sup +} ion bombardment. To evaluate these effects, the authors measured the quartz coupling window temperature. The plasma gas phase chemistry was characterized using optical emission spectroscopy. It was found that although the thickness of the polymer film deposited in each cycle is constant, the etching behavior changed, which is likely related to a change inmore » the plasma gas phase chemistry. The authors found that the main gas phase changes occur after C{sub 4}F{sub 8} injection. The C{sub 4}F{sub 8} and the quartz window react and generate SiF and CO. The emission intensity changes with wall surface state and temperature. Therefore, changes in the plasma gas species generation can lead to a shift in etching performance during processing. During initial cycles, minimal etching is observed, while etching gradually increases with cycle number.« less

  4. Long-Term Obliquity Variations of a Moonless Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Jason W.; Lissauer, J. J.; Chambers, J. E.

    2012-05-01

    Earth's present-day obliquity varies by +/-1.2 degrees over 100,000-year timescales. Without the Moon's gravity increasing the rotation axis precession rate, prior theory predicted that a moonless Earth's obliquity would be allowed to vary between 0 and 85 degrees -- moreso even than present-day Mars (0 - 60 degrees). We use a modified version of the symplectic orbital integrator `mercury' to numerically investigate the obliquity evolution of hypothetical moonless Earths. Contrary to the large theoretically allowed range, we find that moonless Earths more typically experience obliquity variations of just +/- 10 degrees over Gyr timescales. Some initial conditions for the moonless Earth's rotation rate and obliquity yield slightly greater variations, but the majority have smaller variations. In particular, retrograde rotators are quite stable and should constitute 50% of the population if initial terrestrial planet rotation is isotropic. Our results have important implications for the prospects of long-term habitability of moonless planets in extrasolar systems.

  5. Radio interference in the near-earth environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. C.

    1988-01-01

    Natural and man-made radio frequency interference (RFI) are potentially serious obstacles to the successful operation of an array of spacecraft used for low frequency (1 to 30 MHz) radio interferometry in the near-earth environment. Several satellites and planetary probes have carried radio astronomy experiments, and the moderate data base that they provide are examined to help understand the near-earth RFI environment. The general conclusion is that the region of space within 100 earth-radii of the earth is a hostile environment for any radio astronomy experiment. If a low frequency array in earth orbit is to yield useful astronomical results, severe interference problems must be anticipated and overcome. A number of recommendations are made to further examine the feasibility of such an array.

  6. Earth's earliest atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Zahnle, Kevin; Schaefer, Laura; Fegley, Bruce

    2010-10-01

    Earth is the one known example of an inhabited planet and to current knowledge the likeliest site of the one known origin of life. Here we discuss the origin of Earth's atmosphere and ocean and some of the environmental conditions of the early Earth as they may relate to the origin of life. A key punctuating event in the narrative is the Moon-forming impact, partly because it made Earth for a short time absolutely uninhabitable, and partly because it sets the boundary conditions for Earth's subsequent evolution. If life began on Earth, as opposed to having migrated here, it would have done so after the Moon-forming impact. What took place before the Moon formed determined the bulk properties of the Earth and probably determined the overall compositions and sizes of its atmospheres and oceans. What took place afterward animated these materials. One interesting consequence of the Moon-forming impact is that the mantle is devolatized, so that the volatiles subsequently fell out in a kind of condensation sequence. This ensures that the volatiles were concentrated toward the surface so that, for example, the oceans were likely salty from the start. We also point out that an atmosphere generated by impact degassing would tend to have a composition reflective of the impacting bodies (rather than the mantle), and these are almost without exception strongly reducing and volatile-rich. A consequence is that, although CO- or methane-rich atmospheres are not necessarily stable as steady states, they are quite likely to have existed as long-lived transients, many times. With CO comes abundant chemical energy in a metastable package, and with methane comes hydrogen cyanide and ammonia as important albeit less abundant gases.

  7. The Earth: A Changing Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribas, Núria; Màrquez, Conxita

    2013-04-01

    text: We describe a didactic unit that rises from our own living impression about our experience on the planet. Most of us feel the Earth to be a very static place. Rocks don't easily move and most landscapes always look the same over time. Anyone would say (the same way most scientists believed until the beginning of the last century) that our planet has always remained unchanged, never transformed. But then, all of a sudden, as a misfortune for so many humans, natural hazards appear on the scene: an earthquake causing so many disasters, a tsunami carrying away everything in its path, an eruption that can destroy huge surrounding areas but also bring new geographical relief. Science cannot remain oblivious to these events, we must wonder beyond. What does an earthquake mean? Why does it happen? What about an eruption? If it comes from the inside, what can we guess from it? Researching about all of these events, scientists have been able to arrive to some important knowledge of the planet itself: It has been possible to theorize about Earth's interior. It has also been confirmed that the planet has not always been the quiet and stable place we once thought. Continents, as Wegener supposed, do move about and the Tectonic Plates Theory, thanks to the information obtained through earthquakes and eruption, can provide some interesting explanations. But how do we know about our planet's past? How can we prove that the Earth has always been moving and that its surface changes? The Earth's rocks yield the answer. Rocks have been the only witnesses throughout millions of years, since the planet first came to existence. Let's learn how to read them… Shouldn't we realize that rocks are to Geology what books are to History? This discursive process has been distributed in four learning sequences: 1. Land is not as solid nor firm as it would seem, 2. The Earth planet: a puzzle, 3. The rocks also recycle , 4. Field trip to "Sant Miquel del Fai". The subjects take about 30

  8. Earth views and an illuminated earth limb

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-11-20

    STS047-54-016 (12 - 20 Sept 1992) --- The colors in this photograph provide insight into the relative density of the atmosphere. The crew members had many opportunities to witness sunrises and sunsets, considering they orbit the Earth every 90 minutes, but few, they said, compared to this scene. It captures the silhouette of several mature thunderstorms with their cirrus anvil tops spreading out against the tropopause (the top of the lowest layer of Earth's atmosphere) at sunset. The lowest layer (troposphere) is the densest and refracts light at the red end of the visible spectrum (7,400 Angstroms), while the blues (4,000 Angstroms) are separated in the least dense portion of the atmosphere (middle and upper atmosphere, or stratosphere and mesosphere). Several layers of blue can be seen. NASA scientists studying the photos believe this stratification to be caused by the scattering of light by particulate trapped in the stratosphere and mesosphere particulate that generally originate from volcanic eruptions, such as those of Mt. Pinatubo in the Philippines and, most recently, Mt. Spurr in Alaska.

  9. Antiferromagnetic Spin Coupling between Rare Earth Adatoms and Iron Islands Probed by Spin-Polarized Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, David; Diez-Ferrer, José Luis; Serrate, David; Ciria, Miguel; Fuente, César de la; Arnaudas, José Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    High-density magnetic storage or quantum computing could be achieved using small magnets with large magnetic anisotropy, a requirement that rare-earth iron alloys fulfill in bulk. This compelling property demands a thorough investigation of the magnetism in low dimensional rare-earth iron structures. Here, we report on the magnetic coupling between 4f single atoms and a 3d magnetic nanoisland. Thulium and lutetium adatoms deposited on iron monolayer islands pseudomorphically grown on W(110) have been investigated at low temperature with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The spin-polarized current indicates that both kind of adatoms have in-plane magnetic moments, which couple antiferromagnetically with their underlying iron islands. Our first-principles calculations explain the observed behavior, predicting an antiparallel coupling of the induced 5d electrons magnetic moment of the lanthanides with the 3d magnetic moment of iron, as well as their in-plane orientation, and pointing to a non-contribution of 4f electrons to the spin-polarized tunneling processes in rare earths. PMID:26333417

  10. Correlation between valence electronic structure and magnetic properties in RCo5 (R = rare earth) intermetallic compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi-Qin, Xue; Yong-Quan, Guo

    2016-06-01

    The magnetisms of RCo5 (R = rare earth) intermetallics are systematically studied with the empirical electron theory of solids and molecules (EET). The theoretical moments and Curie temperatures agree well with experimental ones. The calculated results show strong correlations between the valence electronic structure and the magnetic properties in RCo5 intermetallic compounds. The moments of RCo5 intermetallics originate mainly from the 3d electrons of Co atoms and 4f electrons of rare earth, and the s electrons also affect the magnetic moments by the hybridization of d and s electrons. It is found that moment of Co atom at 2c site is higher than that at 3g site due to the fact that the bonding effect between R and Co is associated with an electron transformation from 3d electrons into covalence electrons. In the heavy rare-earth-based RCo5 intermetallics, the contribution to magnetic moment originates from the 3d and 4f electrons. The covalence electrons and lattice electrons also affect the Curie temperature, which is proportional to the average moment along the various bonds. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11274110).

  11. Venus, Earth, Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahnle, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    Xenon has been regarded as an important goal of many proposed missions to Venus. This talk is intended to explain why. Despite its being the heaviest gas found in natural planetary atmospheres, there is more evidence that Xe escaped from Earth than for any element apart from helium: (i) Atmospheric Xe is very strongly mass fractionated (at about 4% per amu) from any known solar system source. This suggests fractionating escape that preferentially left the heavy Xe isotopes behind. (ii) Xe is underabundant compared to Kr, a lighter noble gas that is not strongly mass fractionated in air. (iii) Radiogenic Xe is strongly depleted by factors of several to ~100 compared to the quantities expected from radioactive decay of primordial solar system materials. In these respects Xe on Mars is similar to Xe on Earth, but with one key difference: Xe on Mars is readily explained by a simple process like hydrodynamic escape that acts on an initially solar or meteoritic Xe. This is not so for Earth. Earth's Xe cannot be derived by an uncontrived mass fractionating process acting on any known type of Solar System Xe. Earth is a stranger, made from different stuff than any known meteorite or Mars or even the Sun. Who else is in Earth's family? Comets? We know nothing. Father Zeus? Data from Jupiter are good enough to show that jovian Xe is not strongly mass-fractionated but not good enough to determine whether Jupiter resembles the Earth or the Sun. Sister Venus? Noble gas data from Venus are incomplete, with Kr uncertain and Xe unmeasured. Krypton was measured by several instruments on several spacecraft. The reported Kr abundances are discrepant and were once highly controversial. These discrepancies appear to have been not so much resolved as forgotten. Xenon was not detected on Venus. Upper limits were reported for the two most abundant xenon isotopes 129Xe and 132Xe. From the limited data it is not possible to tell whether Venus's affinities lie with the solar wind, or with

  12. Earth Orientation - Naval Oceanography Portal

    Science.gov Websites

    section Advanced Search... Sections Home Time Earth Orientation Astronomy Meteorology Oceanography Ice You are here: Home › USNO › Earth Orientation USNO Logo USNO Navigation Earth Orientation Products GPS -based Products VLBI-based Products EO Information Center Publications about Products Software Info Earth

  13. The Earth System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark; Rood, Richard B.; Hildebrand, Peter; Raymond, Carol

    2003-01-01

    The Earth System Model is the natural evolution of current climate models and will be the ultimate embodiment of our geophysical understanding of the planet. These models are constructed from components - atmosphere, ocean, ice, land, chemistry, solid earth, etc. models and merged together through a coupling program which is responsible for the exchange of data from the components. Climate models and future earth system models will have standardized modules, and these standards are now being developed by the ESMF project funded by NASA. The Earth System Model will have a variety of uses beyond climate prediction. The model can be used to build climate data records making it the core of an assimilation system, and it can be used in OSSE experiments to evaluate. The computing and storage requirements for the ESM appear to be daunting. However, the Japanese ES theoretical computing capability is already within 20% of the minimum requirements needed for some 2010 climate model applications. Thus it seems very possible that a focused effort to build an Earth System Model will achieve succcss.

  14. Earth - Moon Conjunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    On December 16, 1992, 8 days after its encounter with Earth, the Galileo spacecraft looked back from a distance of about 6.2 million kilometers (3.9 million miles) to capture this remarkable view of the Moon in orbit about Earth. The composite photograph was constructed from images taken through visible (violet, red) and near-infrared (1.0-micron) filters. The Moon is in the foreground; its orbital path is from left to right. Brightly colored Earth contrasts strongly with the Moon, which reacts only about one-third as much sunlight as our world. To improve the visibility of both bodies, contrast and color have been computer enhanced. At the bottom of Earth's disk, Antarctica is visible through clouds. The Moon's far side can also be seen. The shadowy indentation in the Moon's dawn terminator--the boundary between its dark and lit sides--is the South Pole-Aitken Basin, one of the largest and oldest lunar impact features. This feature was studied extensively by Galileo during the first Earth flyby in December 1990.

  15. Crescent Earth and Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    This picture of a crescent-shaped Earth and Moon -- the first of its kind ever taken by a spacecraft -- was recorded Sept. 18, 1977, by NASA's Voyager 1 when it was 7.25 million miles (11.66 million kilometers) from Earth. The Moon is at the top of the picture and beyond the Earth as viewed by Voyager. In the picture are eastern Asia, the western Pacific Ocean and part of the Arctic. Voyager 1 was directly above Mt. Everest (on the night side of the planet at 25 degrees north latitude) when the picture was taken. The photo was made from three images taken through color filters, then processed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Image Processing Lab. Because the Earth is many times brighter than the Moon, the Moon was artificially brightened by a factor of three relative to the Earth by computer enhancement so that both bodies would show clearly in the print. Voyager 2 was launched Aug. 20, 1977, followed by Voyager 1 on Sept. 5, 1977, en route to encounters at Jupiter in 1979 and Saturn in 1980 and 1981. JPL manages the Voyager mission for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  16. The Sun and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

    2012-01-01

    Thus the Sun forms the basis for life on Earth via the black body radiation it emits. The Sun also emits mass in the form of the solar wind and the coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Mass emission also occurs in the form of solar energetic particles (SEPs), which happens during CMEs and solar flares. Both the mass and electromagnetic energy output of the Sun vary over a wide range of time scales, thus introducing disturbances on the space environment that extends from the Sun through the entire heliosphere including the magnetospheres and ionospheres of planets and moons of the solar system. Although our habitat is located in the neutral atmosphere of Earth, we are intimately connected to the non-neutral space environment starting from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere and to the vast interplanetary space. The variability of the solar mass emissions results in the interaction between the solar wind plasma and the magnetospheric plasma leading to huge disturbances in the geospace. The Sun ionizes our atmosphere and creates the ionosphere. The ionosphere can be severely disturbed by the transient energy input from solar flares and the solar wind during geomagnetic storms. The complex interplay between Earth's magnetic field and the solar magnetic field carried by the solar wind presents varying conditions that are both beneficial and hazardous to life on earth. This seminar presents some of the key aspects of this Sun-Earth connection that we have learned since the birth of space science as a scientific discipline some half a century ago.

  17. NASA Sun Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    CME blast and subsequent impact at Earth -- This illustration shows a CME blasting off the Sun’s surface in the direction of Ea CME blast and subsequent impact at Earth -- This illustration shows a CME blasting off the Sun’s surface in the direction of Earth. This left portion is composed of an EIT 304 image superimposed on a LASCO C2 coronagraph. Two to four days later, the CME cloud is shown striking and beginning to be mostly deflected around the Earth’s magnetosphere. The blue paths emanating from the Earth’s poles represent some of its magnetic field lines. The magnetic cloud of plasma can extend to 30 million miles wide by the time it reaches earth. These storms, which occur frequently, can disrupt communications and navigational equipment, damage satellites, and even cause blackouts. (Objects in the illustration are not drawn to scale.) Credit: NASA/GSFC/SOHO/ESA To learn more go to the SOHO website: sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/home.html To learn more about NASA's Sun Earth Day go here: sunearthday.nasa.gov/2010/index.php

  18. Flash heating on the early Earth.

    PubMed

    Lyons, J R; Vasavada, A R

    1999-03-01

    It has been suggested that very large impact events (approximately 500 km diameter impactors) sterilized the surface of the young Earth by producing enough rock vapor to boil the oceans. Here, we consider surface heating due to smaller impactors, and demonstrate that surface temperatures conductive to organic synthesis resulted. In particular, we focus on the synthesis of thermal peptides. Previously, laboratory experiments have demonstrated that dry heating a mixture of amino acids containing excess Asp, Glu, or Lys to temperatures approximately 170 degrees C for approximately 2 hours yields polypeptides. It has been argued that such temperature conditions would not have been available on the early Earth. Here we demonstrate, by analogy with the K/T impact, that the requisite temperatures are achieved on sand surfaces during the atmospheric reentry of fine ejecta particles produced by impacts of bolides approximately 10-20 km in diameter, assuming approximately 1-100 PAL CO2. Impactors of this size struck the Earth with a frequency of approximately 1 per 10(4)-10(5) y at 4.2 Ga. Smaller bolides produced negligible global surface heating, whereas bolides > 30 km in diameter yielded solid surface temperatures > 1000 K, high enough to pyrolyze amino acids and other organic compounds. Thus, peptide formation would have occurred globally for a relatively narrow range of bolide sizes.

  19. Particle yields from numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homor, Marietta M.; Jakovác, Antal

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we use numerical field theoretical simulations to calculate particle yields. We demonstrate that in the model of local particle creation the deviation from the pure exponential distribution is natural even in equilibrium, and an approximate Tsallis-Pareto-like distribution function can be well fitted to the calculated yields, in accordance with the experimental observations. We present numerical simulations in the classical Φ4 model as well as in the SU(3) quantum Yang-Mills theory to clarify this issue.

  20. Better Than Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, René

    2015-01-01

    Do we inhabit the best of all possible worlds? German mathematician Gottfried Leibniz thought so, writing in 1710 that our planet, warts and all, must be the most optimal one imaginable. Leibniz's idea was roundly scorned as unscientific wishful thinking, most notably by French author Voltaire in his magnum opus, Candide. Yet Leibniz might find sympathy from at least one group of scientists - the astronomers who have for decades treated Earth as a golden standard as they search for worlds beyond our own solar system. Because earthlings still know of just one living world - our own - it makes some sense to use Earth as a template in the search for life elsewhere, such as in the most Earth-like regions of Mars or Jupiter's watery moon Europa. Now, however, discoveries of potentially habitable planets orbiting stars other than our sun - exoplanets, that is - are challenging that geocentric approach.

  1. An Analog Earth Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varekamp, J. C.

    2010-12-01

    The earth climate is broadly governed by the radiative power of the sun as well as the heat retention and convective cooling of the atmosphere. I have constructed an analog earth model for an undergraduate climate class that simulates mean climate using these three parameters. The ‘earth’ is a hollow, black, bronze sphere (4 cm diameter) mounted on a thin insulated rod, and illuminated by two opposite optic fibers, with light focused on the sphere by a set of lenses. The sphere is encased in a large double-walled aluminum cylinder (34 cm diameter by 26 cm high) with separate water cooling jackets at the top, bottom, and sides. The cylinder can be filled with a gas of choice at a variety of pressures or can be run in vacuum. The exterior is cladded with insulation, and the temperature of the sphere, atmosphere and walls is monitored with thermocouples. The temperature and waterflow of the three cooling jackets can be monitored to establish the energy output of the whole system; the energy input is the energy yield of the two optic fibers. A small IR transmissive lens at the top provides the opportunity to hook up the fiber of a hyper spectrometer to monitor the emission spectrum of the black ‘earth’ sphere. A pressure gauge and gas inlet-outlet system for flushing of the cell completes it. The heat yield of the cooling water at the top is the sum of the radiative and convective components, whereas the bottom jacket only carries off the radiative heat of the sphere. Undergraduate E&ES students at Wesleyan University have run experiments with dry air, pure CO2, N2 and Ar at 1 atmosphere, and a low vacuum run was accomplished to calibrate the energy input. For each experiment, the lights are flipped on, the temperature acquisition routine is activated, and the sphere starts to warm up until an equilibrium temperature has been reached. The lights are then flipped off and the cooling sequence towards ambient is registered. The energy input is constant for a given

  2. Google Earth Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelick, Noel

    2013-04-01

    The Google Earth Engine platform is a system designed to enable petabyte-scale, scientific analysis and visualization of geospatial datasets. Earth Engine provides a consolidated environment including a massive data catalog co-located with thousands of computers for analysis. The user-friendly front-end provides a workbench environment to allow interactive data and algorithm development and exploration and provides a convenient mechanism for scientists to share data, visualizations and analytic algorithms via URLs. The Earth Engine data catalog contains a wide variety of popular, curated datasets, including the world's largest online collection of Landsat scenes (> 2.0M), numerous MODIS collections, and many vector-based data sets. The platform provides a uniform access mechanism to a variety of data types, independent of their bands, projection, bit-depth, resolution, etc..., facilitating easy multi-sensor analysis. Additionally, a user is able to add and curate their own data and collections. Using a just-in-time, distributed computation model, Earth Engine can rapidly process enormous quantities of geo-spatial data. All computation is performed lazily; nothing is computed until it's required either for output or as input to another step. This model allows real-time feedback and preview during algorithm development, supporting a rapid algorithm development, test, and improvement cycle that scales seamlessly to large-scale production data processing. Through integration with a variety of other services, Earth Engine is able to bring to bear considerable analytic and technical firepower in a transparent fashion, including: AI-based classification via integration with Google's machine learning infrastructure, publishing and distribution at Google scale through integration with the Google Maps API, Maps Engine and Google Earth, and support for in-the-field activities such as validation, ground-truthing, crowd-sourcing and citizen science though the Android Open Data

  3. Google Earth Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelick, N.

    2012-12-01

    The Google Earth Engine platform is a system designed to enable petabyte-scale, scientific analysis and visualization of geospatial datasets. Earth Engine provides a consolidated environment including a massive data catalog co-located with thousands of computers for analysis. The user-friendly front-end provides a workbench environment to allow interactive data and algorithm development and exploration and provides a convenient mechanism for scientists to share data, visualizations and analytic algorithms via URLs. The Earth Engine data catalog contains a wide variety of popular, curated datasets, including the world's largest online collection of Landsat scenes (> 2.0M), numerous MODIS collections, and many vector-based data sets. The platform provides a uniform access mechanism to a variety of data types, independent of their bands, projection, bit-depth, resolution, etc..., facilitating easy multi-sensor analysis. Additionally, a user is able to add and curate their own data and collections. Using a just-in-time, distributed computation model, Earth Engine can rapidly process enormous quantities of geo-spatial data. All computation is performed lazily; nothing is computed until it's required either for output or as input to another step. This model allows real-time feedback and preview during algorithm development, supporting a rapid algorithm development, test, and improvement cycle that scales seamlessly to large-scale production data processing. Through integration with a variety of other services, Earth Engine is able to bring to bear considerable analytic and technical firepower in a transparent fashion, including: AI-based classification via integration with Google's machine learning infrastructure, publishing and distribution at Google scale through integration with the Google Maps API, Maps Engine and Google Earth, and support for in-the-field activities such as validation, ground-truthing, crowd-sourcing and citizen science though the Android Open Data

  4. How Big is Earth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Bonnie B.

    2015-08-01

    How Big is Earth celebrates the Year of Light. Using only the sunlight striking the Earth and a wooden dowel, students meet each other and then measure the circumference of the earth. Eratosthenes did it over 2,000 years ago. In Cosmos, Carl Sagan shared the process by which Eratosthenes measured the angle of the shadow cast at local noon when sunlight strikes a stick positioned perpendicular to the ground. By comparing his measurement to another made a distance away, Eratosthenes was able to calculate the circumference of the earth. How Big is Earth provides an online learning environment where students do science the same way Eratosthenes did. A notable project in which this was done was The Eratosthenes Project, conducted in 2005 as part of the World Year of Physics; in fact, we will be drawing on the teacher's guide developed by that project.How Big Is Earth? expands on the Eratosthenes project by providing an online learning environment provided by the iCollaboratory, www.icollaboratory.org, where teachers and students from Sweden, China, Nepal, Russia, Morocco, and the United States collaborate, share data, and reflect on their learning of science and astronomy. They are sharing their information and discussing their ideas/brainstorming the solutions in a discussion forum. There is an ongoing database of student measurements and another database to collect data on both teacher and student learning from surveys, discussions, and self-reflection done online.We will share our research about the kinds of learning that takes place only in global collaborations.The entrance address for the iCollaboratory is http://www.icollaboratory.org.

  5. Our Impact on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, A.

    This paper discusses the problem of understanding the causes of changes in the Earth's environments. It reviews very briefly the role of the atmosphere, because it is an important element of the total picture. It discusses even more briefly the oceans, and then the land, moving from the wetter parts to the drier ones, these last being the writer's speciality as a desert geomorphologist. No apology is made for concentrating on the terrestrial deserts, for Mars is more like our deserts than any other part of Earth.

  6. STS-34 earth observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1989-10-20

    STS034-44-023 (20 Oct. 1989) --- The Southern Lights or Aurora Australis were photographed by the STS-34 crewmembers aboard the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Atlantis. From the Shuttle astronauts can photograph expanses of auroras, an advantage over scientists on Earth who can only get small sections at a time in a frame of photography. The space position allows for large-scale changes. This scene was one of 26 shown to the press by the five STS-34 crewmembers at their post-flight press conference.

  7. Coronal Hole Facing Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-05-08

    An extensive equatorial coronal hole has rotated so that it is now facing Earth (May 2-4, 2018). The dark coronal hole extends about halfway across the solar disk. It was observed in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. This magnetically open area is streaming solar wind (i.e., a stream of charged particles released from the sun) into space. When Earth enters a solar wind stream and the stream interacts with our magnetosphere, we often experience nice displays of aurora. Videos are available at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00624

  8. Coronal Hole Facing Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-05-15

    An extensive equatorial coronal hole has rotated so that it is now facing Earth (May 2-4, 2018). The dark coronal hole extends about halfway across the solar disk. It was observed in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. This magnetically open area is streaming solar wind (i.e., a stream of charged particles released from the sun) into space. When Earth enters a solar wind stream and the stream interacts with our magnetosphere, we often experience nice displays of aurora. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00577

  9. Teaching earth science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alpha, Tau Rho; Diggles, Michael F.

    1998-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains 17 teaching tools: 16 interactive HyperCard 'stacks' and a printable model. They are separated into the following categories: Geologic Processes, Earthquakes and Faulting, and Map Projections and Globes. A 'navigation' stack, Earth Science, is provided as a 'launching' place from which to access all of the other stacks. You can also open the HyperCard Stacks folder and launch any of the 16 stacks yourself. In addition, a 17th tool, Earth and Tectonic Globes, is provided as a printable document. Each of the tools can be copied onto a 1.4-MB floppy disk and distributed freely.

  10. Nimbus earth resources observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabatini, R. R.; Rabchevsky, G. A.; Sissala, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    The potential for utilizing data gathered by Nimbus satellites to study the earth surface and its physical properties is illustrated. The Nimbus data applicable to investigations of the earth and its resources, and to the problems of resolution and cloud cover are described. Geological, hydrological, and oceanographic applications are discussed. Applications of the data to other fields, such as cartography, agriculture, forestry, and urban analysis are presented. Relevant information is also given on the Nimbus orbit and experiments; surface and atmospheric effects on HRIR and THIR radiation measurements; and noise problems in the AVCS, IDCS, HRIR, and THIR data.

  11. Penobscot woodlands yield annual cuts

    Treesearch

    A. C. Hart

    1958-01-01

    Two small woodlands, put under management at the Penobscot Experimental Forest in the early 1950's, have yielded continuous annual cuts. The two woodlands, in the spruce-fir type, were selected to be representative of small forest properties in that region.

  12. Assessing potential sustainable wood yield

    Treesearch

    Robert F. Powers

    2001-01-01

    Society is making unprecedented demands on world forests to produce and sustain many values. Chief among them is wood supply, and concerns are rising globally about the ability of forests to meet increasing needs. Assessing this is not easy. It requires a basic understanding of the principles governing forest productivity: how wood yield varies with tree and stand...

  13. Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, Christian; Verbeke, Jerome; Vogt, Ramona

    FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm) is a code that simulated the decay of a fissionable nucleus at specified excitation energy. In its present form, FREYA models spontaneous fission and neutron-induced fission up to 20 MeV. It includes the possibility of neutron emission from the nuclear prior to its fussion (nth chance fission).

  14. The Earth's Plasmasphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's plasmasphere is an inner part of the magneteosphere. It is located just outside the upper ionosphere located in Earth's atmosphere. It is a region of dense, cold plasma that surrounds the Earth. Although plasma is found throughout the magnetosphere, the plasmasphere usually contains the coldest plasma. Here's how it works: The upper reaches of our planet's atmosphere are exposed to ultraviolet light from the Sun, and they are ionized with electrons that are freed from neutral atmospheric particles. The results are electrically charged negative and positive particles. The negative particles are electrons, and the positive particles are now called ions (formerly atoms and molecules). If the density of these particles is low enough, this electrically charged gas behaves differently than it would if it were neutral. Now this gas is called plasma. The atmospheric gas density becomes low enough to support the conditions for a plasma around earth at about 90 kilometers above Earth's surface. The electrons in plasma gain more energy, and they are very low in mass. They move along Earth's magnetic field lines and their increased energy is enough to escape Earth's gravity. Because electrons are very light, they don't have to gain too much kinetic energy from the Sun's ultraviolet light before gravity loses its grip on them. Gravity is not all that holds them back, however. As more and more electrons begin to escape outward, they leave behind a growing net positive electric charge in the ionosphere and create a growing net negative electric charge above the ionosphere; an electric field begins to develop (the Pannekoek-Rosseland E-field). Thus, these different interacting charges result in a positively charged ionosphere and negatively charged region of space above it. Very quickly this resulting electric field opposed upward movement of the electrons out of the ionosphere. The electrons still have this increased energy, however, so the electric field doesn't just

  15. Chemical composition of Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, S.

    2017-12-01

    Many planetary scientists accept that the condensed planetesimals in the solar nebula eventually led to accretion of the earth. The details of the process have not been worked out. From the metallurgical experience, it is assumed that Earth's core may have formed by density differentiation with iron sinking to the core and the slag forming the mantle. This would be a post-accretionary process with temperature developing with self-compression. The problem with this hypothesis was recognized some time ago in that the seismic density profile of the core does not match the density of iron and requires the addition of a light element. Many elements such as Si, O, C and s have been proposed as diluents to decrease the density of a purely iron core. How and when this will be accomplished is still under discussion. Since the planetesimals (or condensates) formed in a well stirred nebula, it may be argued that a variety of condensed solids and fluids may have accreted and compressed without differentiation and the core does not necessarily contain mainly the differentiated iron. It is a matter of accumulating the condensate composition that would result in a density of 12 to 13 g/cm3 in the inner core. Therefore, we need a thermodynamic database that extends to 6000 K over the pressure range of ambient to 360 GPa. The development of such a database is currently in progress. It is a database with multicomponent solutions (C-Fe-Ni-S-Si) and all the major elements in the solar gas. Thermodynamic calculations using a preliminary dataset reveal that the solid species condensed at a temperature of 650 K and a pressure of 0.001 bar pressure, when self-compressed to various pressures and temperatures, yield densities that are appropriate for the mantle and core. Depending on H2/O of the escaping fluid, the formation of hydrous minerals, carbides, carbonates and iron melts with significant other elements have been found. Earth's core may have formed from solar condensate materials

  16. Valley Fever: Earth Observations for Risk Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprigg, W. A.

    2012-12-01

    Advances in satellite Earth observation systems, numerical weather prediction, and dust storm modeling yield new tools for public health warnings, advisories and epidemiology of illnesses associated with airborne desert dust. Valley Fever, endemic from California through the US/Mexico border region into Central and South America, is triggered by inhalation of soil-dwelling fungal spores. The path from fungal growth to airborne threat depends on environmental conditions observable from satellite. And space-based sensors provide initial conditions for dust storm forecasts and baselines for the epidemiology of Valley Fever and other dust-borne aggravation of respiratory and cardiovascular disease. A new Pan-American Center for the World Meteorological Organization Sand and Dust Storm Warning Advisory and Assessment System creates an opportunity to advance Earth science applications in public health.

  17. Radiative and Nonradiative Transitions of the Rare-Earth Ions Tm(3+) and Ho(3+) in Y3AI5O12 and LiYF4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Brian M.; Armagan, Guzin; Dibartolo, Baldassare; Modlin, Edward A.

    1995-01-01

    The optical spectra of rare earth ions in solids arise primarily from electric and magnetic dipole transitions between stark split multiplets of the 4f(sup N) electronic configuration. Electric dipole transitions are parity forbidden between levels of the 4f(sup N) configuration, while those of magnetic dipole origin are allowed. It is known from experiment, however, that the significant contributions to the intensities of most transitions are electric dipole in nature. Judd and Ofelt developed the theory of forced electric dipole transitions of rare-earth ions. This study is devoted to determining electric dipole transition probabilities and branching ratios for Tm(3+) and Ho(3+) ions in Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (YAG) and Yttrium Lithium Fluoride (YLF) using the theory of Judd and Ofelt. The radiative rates determined from the Judd-Ofelt analysis are used with measured lifetimes to find nonradiative rates of relaxation.

  18. Exploring the Earth's Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindaman, Arnold D.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    Describes three approaches to a study of the earth's past: (1) development of a time line of the ages; (2) a study of rocks and how each was formed; and (3) a study of fossils as found in certain kinds of stone. (Editor)

  19. Bones of the Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correa, Jose Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The film "Bones of the Earth" (Riglin, Cunninham & Correa, 2014) is an experience in collective inquiry and visual creation based on arts-based research. Starting from the meeting of different subjectivities and through dialogue, planning, shooting and editing, an audiovisual text that reconstructs a reflexive process of collective…

  20. The Island Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mead, Margaret

    1970-01-01

    Dr. Mead, the world-renowned anthropologist and expert behavioral scientist, is associated with the American Museum of Natural History, which acts as her headquarters as she documents her observations on Man, society and technology. She discusses the need to develop specialists with concern for saving the endangered planet earth. (Editor/GR)