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Sample records for earth atoms na

  1. Flattening Earth acceleration in atomic fountains

    SciTech Connect

    Bertoldi, Andrea

    2010-07-15

    A method to compensate for Earth's gravity tide over an extended axial region is reported. Flattening acceleration is important in experiments where the coupling of the dynamics of free-falling probes to the gravity gradient generates stochastic noise on the measurement. Optimized cylindrically symmetric mass distributions lower Earth's tidal effect over 10 cm by a factor 10{sup 3}. A multimass compensation system with comparable performance is devised for tall atom interferometers. Reducing the gravity gradient is essential in terrestrial experiments based on atom fountain configurations being developed to precisely test general relativity or the neutrality of matter.

  2. Laser trapping of {sup 21}Na atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Zheng-Tian

    1994-09-01

    This thesis describes an experiment in which about four thousand radioactive {sup 21}Na (t{sub l/2} = 22 sec) atoms were trapped in a magneto-optical trap with laser beams. Trapped {sup 21}Na atoms can be used as a beta source in a precision measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter of the decay of {sup 21}Na {yields} {sup 21}Ne + {Beta}{sup +} + v{sub e}, which is a promising way to search for an anomalous right-handed current coupling in charged weak interactions. Although the number o trapped atoms that we have achieved is still about two orders of magnitude lower than what is needed to conduct a measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter at 1% of precision level, the result of this experiment proved the feasibility of trapping short-lived radioactive atoms. In this experiment, {sup 21}Na atoms were produced by bombarding {sup 24}Mg with protons of 25 MeV at the 88 in. Cyclotron of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. A few recently developed techniques of laser manipulation of neutral atoms were applied in this experiment. The {sup 21}Na atoms emerging from a heated oven were first transversely cooled. As a result, the on-axis atomic beam intensity was increased by a factor of 16. The atoms in the beam were then slowed down from thermal speed by applying Zeeman-tuned slowing technique, and subsequently loaded into a magneto-optical trap at the end of the slowing path. The last two chapters of this thesis present two studies on the magneto-optical trap of sodium atoms. In particular, the mechanisms of magneto-optical traps at various laser frequencies and the collisional loss mechanisms of these traps were examined.

  3. Atomic Transition Probabilities for Rare Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, J. J.; Anderson, Heidi M.; den Hartog, E. A.; Wickliffe, M. E.; Lawler, J. E.

    1996-10-01

    Accurate absolute atomic transition probabilities for selected neutral and singly ionized rare earth elements including Tm, Dy, and Ho are being measured. The increasing use of rare earths in high intensity discharge lamps provides motivation; the data are needed for diagnosing and modeling the lamps. Radiative lifetimes, measured using time resolved laser induced fluorescence (LIF), are combined with branching fractions, measured using a large Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS), to determine accurate absolute atomic transition probabilities. More than 15,000 LIF decay curves from Tm and Dy atoms and ions in slow beams have been recorded and analyzed. Radiative lifetimes for 298 levels of TmI and TmII and for 450 levels of DyI and DyII are determined. Branching fractions are extracted from spectra recorded using the 1.0 m FTS at the National Solar Observatory. Branching fractions and absolute transition probabilities for 500 of the strongest TmI and TmII lines are complete. Representative lifetime and branching fraction data will be presented and discussed. Supported by Osram Sylvania Inc. and the NSF.

  4. Parity Violation Experiments with Rare Earth Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budker, Dmitry

    1997-10-01

    Since the first suggestions (V. A. Dzuba, V. V. Flambaum, and I. B. Khriplovich, Z. Phys. D1, 243 (1986).), (A. Gongora and P. G. H. Sandars, J. Phys. B 19, L291 (1986).) to search for parity violation in the rare earth atoms, experiments have been carried out by groups in Novosibirsk, Oxford, Hiroshima and Berkeley with Sm, Yb and Dy. The status of these experiments will be reviewed, with some details given on recent Berkeley Dy results ( A.-T. Nguyen, D. Budker, D. DeMille, and M. Zolotorev, Submitted to Phys. Rev. A.). Progress of the Berkeley Yb experiment ( D. DeMille, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 4165 (1995).), ( C.J. Bowers, D. Budker, E.D. Commins, D. DeMille, S.J. Freedman, A.-T. Nguyen, S.-Q. Shang, and M. Zolotorev, Phys. Rev. A 53, 3103-9(1996). ) will be described elsewhere at this meeting by C. J. Bowers et al.

  5. Light-induced drift of Na atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werij, H. G. C.; Woerdman, J. P.

    1988-10-01

    Light can induce a flux of optically absorbing particles immersed in a buffer gas, when these particles have a different mobility in the ground and excited state. This paper presents a study of light-induced drift (LID) of Na atoms in noble gases, which can be regarded as the “canonical” system for experiments in this field. We have experimentally studied the LID effect in the optically thin and the optically thick regimes. Parameters which have been varied are laser frequency, laser intensity, buffer gas pressure and buffer gas species. This work gives the first critical comparison of LID experiments with realistic theory in which the multilevel complications of the Na atom have been incorporated. In the optically thick case (“optical piston”) one can distinguish the open cell and the closed cell regimes. Effects of adsorption and desorption of Na atoms at the surface of the cell wall have been incorporated into the theory. The experimental data are in excellent agreement with the results of a four-level rate-equation model for LID which incorporates the fine and hyperfine structure of the level scheme of the Na absorbers.

  6. Tuning NaYF4 Nanoparticles through Alkaline Earth Doping

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xian; Peng, Dengfeng; Wang, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Phase and size of lanthanide-doped nanoparticles are the most important characteristics that dictate optical properties of these nanoparticles and affect their technological applications. Herein, we present a systematic study to examine the effect of alkaline earth doping on the formation of NaYF4 upconversion nanoparticles. We show that alkaline earth doping has a dual function of tuning particle size of hexagonal phase NaYF4 nanoparticles and stabilizing cubic phase NaYF4 nanoparticles depending on composition and concentration of the dopant ions. The study described here represents a facile and general strategy to tuning the properties of NaYF4 upconversion nanoparticles. PMID:28348353

  7. Theoretical study of Na-atom emission from NaCl (100) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchin, Vladimir; Shluger, Alexander; Nakai, Yasuo; Itoh, Noriaki

    1994-04-01

    Several models for the elementary processes causing the emission of alkali atoms by electronic excitation of NaCl (100) surfaces have been investigated theoretically. First, the desorption of a Na atom neighboring an electronically excited F center on the surface is simulated using a quantum-mechanical embedded-cluster technique. It is shown that emission of a Na atom is energetically favorable. The kinetics of this process is shown to be controlled by the probability of a nonradiative transition between the two states: the excited state of the F center and that corresponding to a Na atom desorbing from the surface. The potential barrier for desorption of an excited Na atom from the excited F-center state is found to be 2.1 eV. It is also found that the energy for emission of a Na atom from a cluster of F centers (the F3 center) is considerably reduced (for a certain configuration of the defect) with respect to the similar energy for a single F center. The energy barrier for emission of a Na atom neighboring an F' center on the surface is calculated to be 1 eV. It is shown that the electronic excitation of kinklike sites, with a Na atom at the edge, can lead to a barrierless emission of a Na atom, leaving a Vk-type defect behind. The results of calculations are discussed critically on the basis of existing experimental data.

  8. Production and detection of atomic hexadecapole at Earth's magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Acosta, V M; Auzinsh, M; Gawlik, W; Grisins, P; Higbie, J M; Jackson Kimball, D F; Krzemien, L; Ledbetter, M P; Pustelny, S; Rochester, S M; Yashchuk, V V; Budker, D

    2008-07-21

    Optical magnetometers measure magnetic fields with extremely high precision and without cryogenics. However, at geomagnetic fields, important for applications from landmine removal to archaeology, they suffer from nonlinear Zeeman splitting, leading to systematic dependence on sensor orientation. We present experimental results on a method of eliminating this systematic error, using the hexadecapole atomic polarization moment. In particular, we demonstrate selective production of the atomic hexadecapole moment at Earth's magnetic field and verify its immunity to nonlinear Zeeman splitting. This technique promises to eliminate directional errors in all-optical atomic magnetometers, potentially improving their measurement accuracy by several orders of magnitude.

  9. Low Earth Orbital Atomic Oxygen Interactions With Spacecraft Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2004-01-01

    Atomic oxygen, formed in Earth s thermosphere, interacts readily with many materials on spacecraft flying in low Earth orbit (LEO). All hydrocarbon based polymers and graphite are easily oxidized upon the impact of approx.4.5 eV atomic oxygen as the spacecraft ram into the residual atmosphere. The resulting interactions can change the morphology and reduce the thickness of these materials. Directed atomic oxygen erosion will result in the development of textured surfaces on all materials with volatile oxidation products. Examples from space flight samples are provided. As a result of the erosive properties of atomic oxygen on polymers and composites, protective coatings have been developed and are used to increase the functional life of polymer films and composites that are exposed to the LEO environment. The atomic oxygen erosion yields for actual and predicted LEO exposure of numerous materials are presented. Results of in-space exposure of vacuum deposited aluminum protective coatings on polyimide Kapton indicate high rates of degradation are associated with aluminum coatings on both surfaces of the Kapton. Computational modeling predictions indicate that less trapping of the atomic oxygen occurs, with less resulting damage, if only the space-exposed surface is coated with vapor deposited aluminum rather than having both surfaces coated.

  10. Low earth orbital atomic oxygen simulation for materials durability evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.

    1989-01-01

    The erosion yields of numerous materials have been evaluated in low earth orbital space tests. There appears to be three classes of materials: materials of high erosion yield which include most of the hydrocarbon organic materials; materials which either do not react with atomic oxygen or form self-protecting oxides which allow the underlying material to appear durable to atomic oxygen, and materials with low but nonnegligeable erosion yields, such as fluoropolymers. A NASA atomic oxygen effects test program has been established to utilize collective data from a multitude of simulation facilities to promote an understanding of mechanism and erosion yield dependencies. Atomic oxygen protective coatings for Kapton polymide solar array blankets, fiberglass-epoxy composite mast structures, and solar dynamic power system concentrator surfaces have been identified and evaluated under atomic oxygen exposure in RF plasma asher laboratory tests. The control of defect density in protective coatings appears to be the key to the assurance of long-term protection of oxidizable materials in low earth orbit.

  11. Laboratory simulation of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) atomic oxygen effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, George E.; Krech, Robert H.; Oakes, David B.

    1994-01-01

    A pulsed fast oxygen atom source has been used extensively over the last 7 years to investigate the effects of ambient oxygen atoms impacting materials placed in low Earth orbit. In this period, we irradiated well over 2000 material samples with 8 km/s oxygen atoms generated in our source. Typical irradiance level is 3 x 10(exp 20) O atoms/sq cm although some materials have been irradiated to fluence levels as high as 6 x 10(exp 21) O atoms/sq cm. The operating principles and characteristics of our source are reviewed along with diagnostic and handling procedures appropriate to material testing. Representative data is presented on the velocity dependence of oxygen atom erosion rates (the PSI source provides oxygen atoms tunable over the velocity range of 5 to 12 km/s) as well as the dependence on material temperature. Specific examples of non-linear oxidative effects related to surface contamination and test duration are also be provided.

  12. Low Earth Orbital Atomic Oxygen Interactions With Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K.; deGroh, Kim K.

    2004-01-01

    Atomic oxygen is formed in the low Earth orbital environment (LEO) by photo dissociation of diatomic oxygen by short wavelength (< 243 nm) solar radiation which has sufficient energy to break the 5.12 eV O2 diatomic bond in an environment where the mean free path is sufficiently long ( 108 meters) that the probability of reassociation or the formation of ozone (O3) is small. As a consequence, between the altitudes of 180 and 650 km, atomic oxygen is the most abundant species. Spacecraft impact the atomic oxygen resident in LEO with sufficient energy to break hydrocarbon polymer bonds, causing oxidation and thinning of the polymers due to loss of volatile oxidation products. Mitigation techniques, such as the development of materials with improved durability to atomic oxygen attack, as well as atomic oxygen protective coatings, have been employed with varying degrees of success to improve durability of polymers in the LEO environment. Atomic oxygen can also oxidize silicones and silicone contamination to produce non-volatile silica deposits. Such contaminants are present on most LEO missions and can be a threat to performance of optical surfaces. The LEO atomic oxygen environment, its interactions with materials, results of space testing, computational modeling, mitigation techniques, and ground laboratory simulation procedures and issues are presented.

  13. Steady-state superradiance with alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Meiser, D.; Holland, M. J.

    2010-03-15

    Alkaline-earth-metal-like atoms with ultranarrow transitions open the door to a new regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics. That regime is characterized by a critical photon number that is many orders of magnitude smaller than what can be achieved in conventional systems. We show that it is possible to achieve superradiance in steady state with such systems. We discuss the basic underlying mechanisms as well as the key experimental requirements.

  14. Enhanced Magnetic Trap Loading for Alkaline-Earth Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reschovsky, Benjamin J.; Barker, Daniel S.; Pisenti, Neal C.; Campbell, Gretchen K.

    2016-05-01

    We report on a technique to improve the continuous loading of atomic strontium into a magnetic trap from a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT). This is achieved by adding a depumping laser addressing the 3P1 level. For the 3P1 -->3S1 (688-nm) transition in strontium, the depumping laser increases atom number in the magnetic trap and subsequent cooling stages by up to 65 % for the bosonic isotopes and up to 30 % for the fermionic isotope. We optimize this trap loading strategy with respect to the 688-nm laser detuning, intensity, and beam size. To understand the results, we develop a one-dimensional rate equation model of the system, which is in good agreement with the data. We discuss the use of other transitions in strontium for accelerated trap loading and the application of the technique to other alkaline-earth-like atoms.

  15. Atomic oxygen effects on POSS polyimides in low earth orbit.

    PubMed

    Minton, Timothy K; Wright, Michael E; Tomczak, Sandra J; Marquez, Sara A; Shen, Linhan; Brunsvold, Amy L; Cooper, Russell; Zhang, Jianming; Vij, Vandana; Guenthner, Andrew J; Petteys, Brian J

    2012-02-01

    Kapton polyimde is extensively used in solar arrays, spacecraft thermal blankets, and space inflatable structures. Upon exposure to atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit (LEO), Kapton is severely eroded. An effective approach to prevent this erosion is to incorporate polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) into the polyimide matrix by copolymerizing POSS monomers with the polyimide precursor. The copolymerization of POSS provides Si and O in the polymer matrix on the nano level. During exposure of POSS polyimide to atomic oxygen, organic material is degraded, and a silica passivation layer is formed. This silica layer protects the underlying polymer from further degradation. Laboratory and space-flight experiments have shown that POSS polyimides are highly resistant to atomic-oxygen attack, with erosion yields that may be as little as 1% those of Kapton. The results of all the studies indicate that POSS polyimide would be a space-survivable replacement for Kapton on spacecraft that operate in the LEO environment.

  16. Behavior of Na atoms in the lunar exosphere during activity of meteor showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhnoy, A. A.; Churyumov, K. I.; Shevchenko, V. V.; Buchachenko, A. A.; Baransky, O. R.; Churyumova, T. K.; Kleshchenok, V. V.; Kozlova, E. A.; Ponomarenko, V. O.; Stolyarov, A. V.; Tvorun, O. V.

    2011-12-01

    The chemical composition of gas-phase species released to the lunar exosphere during meteoroid impacts has been analyzed. Majority of impact-produced metal-containing molecules are destroyed by the solar photons because typical photolysis lifetimes are shorter than ballistic flight times. Energies of metal atoms produced via photolysis of its monoxides are estimated. The column density of impact-produced Na atoms in the exosphere during activity of main meteor shower and quiet periods are estimated. In searching for impact-produced Na atoms in the lunar exosphere, it is better to perform spectral observations during activity of the main meteor showers at altitudes of about 1000-2000 km, lunar eclipses, and during passages of the Moon through the Earth's magnetosphere.

  17. Recent advances in Rydberg physics using alkaline-earth atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunning, F. B.; Killian, T. C.; Yoshida, S.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2016-06-01

    In this brief review, the opportunities that the alkaline-earth elements offer for studying new aspects of Rydberg physics are discussed. For example, the bosonic alkaline-earth isotopes have zero nuclear spin which eliminates many of the complexities present in alkali Rydberg atoms, permitting simpler and more direct comparison between theory and experiment. The presence of two valence electrons allows the production of singlet and triplet Rydberg states that can exhibit a variety of attractive or repulsive interactions. The availability of weak intercombination lines is advantageous for laser cooling and for applications such as Rydberg dressing. Excitation of one electron to a Rydberg state leaves behind an optically active core ion allowing, for high-L states, the optical imaging of Rydberg atoms and their (spatial) manipulation using light scattering. The second valence electron offers the possibility of engineering long-lived doubly excited states such as planetary atoms. Recent advances in both theory and experiment are highlighted together with a number of possible directions for the future.

  18. Neutral Atom Imaging of Near-Earth Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mura, A.; Plainaki, C.; Milillo, A.; Orsini, S.; Barabash, S.; Leoni, R.; Selci, S.; Dandouras, I.; Kallio, E.; Wurz, P.; De Angelis, A.

    2012-04-01

    In many planetary environments of the solar system (Mercury, Moon, icy satellites, and more), direct solar wind precipitation results in neutral particle release via ion-sputtering (IS) process, as well as plasma reflection and neutralization (Backscattering, BS). In particular, solar wind sputtering is one of the most important agents for the surface erosion of a near-Earth asteroid (NEA), acting together with other surface release processes, such as photon stimulated desorption, thermal desorption and micrometeoroid impact vaporization. Detection and analysis of high-energy sputtered atoms gives important information on surface-loss processes as well as on surface elemental composition. RAMON (Released Atoms and Ions MONitor) proposed as payload for the MarcoPolo-R Mission, consists of two neutral atom sensors and an ion monitor: 1) SHEAMON (Sputtered High-Energy Atoms MONitor) will investigate the ion-sputtering and backscattering process by detecting neutral atoms between ~10 eV and ~3 keV and determining their direction and velocity; 2) GASP (GAs SPectrometer) will analyse the mass of the low-energy (below 10 eV) neutral atoms released by different surface processes; 3) MIM (Miniaturized Ion Monitor) will measure the flux and energy spectra of precipitating and backscattered solar wind protons, which originate the Ion Sputtering and Backscattering processes investigated by SHEAMON. By combining the measurements made by all three units, RAMON experiment will investigate on a) the processes happening on the surface of the NEA as a result of its exposure to space environment and collisions, b) the role of the surface release processes in the body evolution, c) the surface mineralogy and chemistry, derived from the composition of the released material, d) the magnitude of the erosion due to space weathering, e) the efficiency of each process as a function of environment conditions, and f) the possible non-uniform over the surface efficiency in particle release

  19. Applications of Atom Trap Trace Analysis in the Earth Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.-T.; Jiang, W.; Bailey, K.; Mueller, P.; O'Connor, T. P.

    2013-05-01

    With the successful development of the Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA) method, radiokrypton dating has become available for the first time to the Earth science community at large. This novel tool is enabling new research opportunities and improved understanding in the Earth sciences, with implications in studying climate change and in water resource management. Examples of applications of ATTA in the Earth sciences are: (1) ATTA measurements of 81Kr in the Nubian Aquifer of Africa, the Great Artesian Basin of Australia, and the Guarani Aquifer of South America have transformed our understanding of the long-term behavior of these large aquifer systems. 81Kr dating with more extensive sampling will be carried out on major aquifer systems around the world. (2) A systematic survey of 39Ar throughout the oceans, particularly when combined with 14C data, will fill major gaps in our knowledge of deep ocean circulation and mixing, and will allow more accurate predictions of oceanic sequestration of atmospheric CO2. (3) The feasibility and accuracy of 81Kr dating of old ice has been tested with the well-dated stratigraphy of Taylor Glacier in Antarctica. For more information, search for ``TANGR2012''. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  20. Applications of Atom Trap Trace Analysis in the Earth Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.-T.; Jiang, W.; Bailey, K.; Mueller, P.; O'Connor, T. P.

    2013-04-01

    With the successful development of the Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA) method, radiokrypton dating has become available for the first time to the Earth science community at large. This novel tool is enabling new research opportunities and improved understanding in the Earth sciences, with implications in studying climate change and in water resource management. Examples of applications of ATTA in the Earth sciences are: (1) ATTA measurements of ^81Kr in the Nubian Aquifer of Africa, the Great Artesian Basin of Australia, and the Guarani Aquifer of South America have transformed our understanding of the long-term behavior of these large aquifer systems. ^81Kr dating with more extensive sampling will be carried out on major aquifer systems around the world. (2) A systematic survey of ^39Ar throughout the oceans, particularly when combined with ^14C data, will fill major gaps in our knowledge of deep ocean circulation and mixing, and will allow more accurate predictions of oceanic sequestration of atmospheric CO2. (3) The feasibility and accuracy of ^81Kr dating of old ice has been tested with the well-dated stratigraphy of Taylor Glacier in Antarctica. For more information, search for ``TANGR2012''.

  1. Low energy neutral atoms in the earth's magnetosphere: Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K.R.; McComas, D.J.; Funsten, H.O.; Thomsen, M.F.

    1992-01-01

    Detection of low energy neutral atoms (LENAs) produced by the interaction of the Earth's geocorona with ambient space plasma has been proposed as a technique to obtain global information about the magnetosphere. Recent instrumentation advances reported previously and in these proceedings provide an opportunity for detecting LENAs in the energy range of <1 keV to {approximately}50 keV. In this paper, we present results from a numerical model which calculates line of sight LENA fluxes expected at a remote orbiting spacecraft for various magnetospheric plasma regimes. This model uses measured charge exchange cross sections, either of two neural hydrogen geocorona models, and various empirical modes of the ring current and plasma sheet to calculate the contribution to the integrated directional flux from each point along the line of sight of the instrument. We discuss implications for LENA imaging of the magnetosphere based on these simulations. 22 refs.

  2. Using Atomic Diffraction of Na from Material Gratings to Measure Atom-Surface Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perreault, John; Cronin, Alex; Savas, Tim

    2004-05-01

    In order to explain atomic diffraction patterns from material transmission gratings one must regard the grating structure as having a complex transmission function. This is a consequence of the van der Waals interaction (V(r)=-C_3r-3) between the atoms and the grating walls which causes a velocity dependent phase shift of the de Broglie waves. We present a measurement of the van der Waals coefficient C3 = 2.7± 0.8 meV nm^3 which is consistent with theoretical predictions for an interaction between atomic sodium and a silicon nitride surface [1]. The measurement is carried out by using a sodium atom beam to illuminate a silicon nitride material grating and observing the relative intensity of the diffraction orders. The velocity dependence of the van der Waals induced phase shift is also verified. Concepts from physical optics are used to gain a more intuitive understanding of exactly how the van der Waals interaction affects atomic diffraction patterns. We are currently in the process of using our atom interferometer to perform a new measurement of C_3. [1] J.D. Perreault, A.D. Cronin, and T.A. Savas "Using Atomic Diffraction of Na from Material Gratings to Measure Atom-Surface Interactions", arXiv:physics/0312123

  3. Structure determination in 55-atom Li-Na and Na-K nanoalloys.

    PubMed

    Aguado, Andrés; López, José M

    2010-09-07

    The structure of 55-atom Li-Na and Na-K nanoalloys is determined through combined empirical potential (EP) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The potential energy surface generated by the EP model is extensively sampled by using the basin hopping technique, and a wide diversity of structural motifs is reoptimized at the DFT level. A composition comparison technique is applied at the DFT level in order to make a final refinement of the global minimum structures. For dilute concentrations of one of the alkali atoms, the structure of the pure metal cluster, namely, a perfect Mackay icosahedron, remains stable, with the minority component atoms entering the host cluster as substitutional impurities. At intermediate concentrations, the nanoalloys adopt instead a core-shell polyicosahedral (p-Ih) packing, where the element with smaller atomic size and larger cohesive energy segregates to the cluster core. The p-Ih structures show a marked prolate deformation, in agreement with the predictions of jelliumlike models. The electronic preference for a prolate cluster shape, which is frustrated in the 55-atom pure clusters due to the icosahedral geometrical shell closing, is therefore realized only in the 55-atom nanoalloys. An analysis of the electronic densities of states suggests that photoelectron spectroscopy would be a sufficiently sensitive technique to assess the structures of nanoalloys with fixed size and varying compositions.

  4. Materials selection for long life in low earth orbit - A critical evaluation of atomic oxygen testing with thermal atom systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, S. L.; Albyn, K.; Leger, L.

    1990-01-01

    The use of thermal atom test methods as a materials selection and screening technique for low-earth orbit (LEO) spacecraft is critically evaluated. The chemistry and physics of thermal atom environments are compared with the LEO environment. The relative reactivities of a number of materials determined in thermal atom environments are compared with those observed in LEO and in high-quality LEO simulations. Reaction efficiencies (cu cm/atom) measured in a new type of thermal atom apparatus are one-thousandth to one ten-thousandth those observed in LEO, and many materials showing nearly identical reactivities in LEO show relative reactivities differing by as much as a factor of eight in thermal atom systems. A simple phenomenological kinetic model for the reaction of oxygen atoms with organic materials can be used to explain the differences in reactivity in different environments. Certain speciic thermal atom test environments can be used as reliable materials screening tools.

  5. Operation of the computer model for direct atomic oxygen exposure of Earth satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourassa, R. J.; Gruenbaum, P. E.; Gillis, J. R.; Hargraves, C. R.

    1995-01-01

    One of the primary causes of material degradation in low Earth orbit (LEO) is exposure to atomic oxygen. When atomic oxygen molecules collide with an orbiting spacecraft, the relative velocity is 7 to 8 km/sec and the collision energy is 4 to 5 eV per atom. Under these conditions, atomic oxygen may initiate a number of chemical and physical reactions with exposed materials. These reactions contribute to material degradation, surface erosion, and contamination. Interpretation of these effects on materials and the design of space hardware to withstand on-orbit conditions requires quantitative knowledge of the atomic oxygen exposure environment. Atomic oxygen flux is a function of orbit altitude, the orientation of the orbit plan to the Sun, solar and geomagnetic activity, and the angle between exposed surfaces and the spacecraft heading. We have developed a computer model to predict the atomic oxygen exposure of spacecraft in low Earth orbit. The application of this computer model is discussed.

  6. Study on earthed atomizing corona discharge enhancing the biodegradability of waste water from oil extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, S.; Xu, J.; Mi, J.; Li, N.

    2012-10-01

    This paper studies the usage of earthed atomizing corona discharge to dispose waste water from oil extraction. The I-V characteristic curves of earthed atomizing positive and negative corona discharge are compared to study the influence of water flux and inter-electrode distance (which refers to the distance between line electrode and plate electrodes) on discharge characteristics, and to measure the turbidity, pH, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and the variation tendency of BOD5/COD in the process of dealing with waste water from oil extraction by earthed atomizing corona discharge. Ultimately, the mechanism of earthed atomizing corona discharge is analyzed. Research results indicate that when using earthed atomizing corona discharge to dispose of waste water from oil extraction, as the processing time grows there is a maximum value of turbidity, the pH level increases gradually then stabilizes, COD appears to descend, and BOD5 as well as BOD5/COD both have minimum values. When the processing time attains 300 min, waste water from oil extraction is suitable for biochemical treatment, foreshadowing that earthed atomizing corona discharge technology demonstrates energy conservation characteristic in improving the biodegradability of waste water from oil extraction and has a brilliant application prospect waiting ahead.

  7. Sensitive Technique Developed Using Atomic Force Microscopy to Measure the Low-Earth-Orbit Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim D.; Banks, Bruce A.; Clark, Gregory W.; Hammerstrom, Anne; Youngstrom, Erica; Kaminski, Carolyn; Fine, Elizabeth; Marx, Laura

    2001-01-01

    A recession measurement technique has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to determine the atomic oxygen durability of polymers exposed to the space environment for short durations. Polymers such as polyimide Kapton and Teflon FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene, DuPont) are commonly used in spacecraft because of their desirable properties, such as flexibility, low density, and in the case of FEP, low solar absorptance and high thermal emittance. Polymers on the exterior of spacecraft in the low- Earth-orbit environment are exposed to energetic atomic oxygen, resulting in erosion and potential structural loss. It is, therefore, important to understand the atomic oxygen erosion yield (E, the volume loss per incident oxygen atom) of polymers being considered in spacecraft design. Because long-term space exposure data are rare and very costly, short-term exposures, such as on the space shuttles, are often relied on for atomic oxygen erosion determination. The most common technique for determining E is through mass-loss measurements. For limited-duration exposure experiments, such as shuttle flight experiments, the atomic oxygen fluence is often so small that mass-loss measurements are not sensitive enough. Therefore, a recession measurement technique has been developed at Glenn to obtain accurate erosion yields of polymers exposed to low atomic oxygen fluences.

  8. Inelastic and reactive collisions with polarized excited Na atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, H.; Hertel, I.V.; Lee, Y.T.

    1985-07-01

    Polarization effects in inelastic collisions of laser state-prepared Na(3/sup 2/P, M/sub J/) with Na/sup +/ leading to Na(3/sup 2/D) or Na(3/sup 2/S) are discussed for the energy range E/sub cm/ = 5-47.5eV. Studies with linearly polarized light can be explained with a simple ''locking'' model of the Na(P)-orbital. The investigations employing circularly polarized light are a very sensitive test of the models describing the nonadiabatic angular momentum coupling between electronic and nuclear motion. The dynamical effects of the electronic spin on the angular momentum transfer are discussed. Recent crossed-beam experiments on the Na + O/sub 2/ -> NaO = O reaction in the energy range E/sub cm/ = 0/3-0.8eV show a pronounced dependence on the electric electronic symmetry of Na. 17 refs., 11 figs.

  9. Cold-Atom Clocks on Earth and in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemonde, Pierre; Laurent, Philippe; Santarelli, Giorgio; Abgrall, Michel; Sortais, Yvan; Bize, Sebastien; Nicolas, Christophe; Zhang, Shougang; Clairon, Andre; Dimarcq, Noel; Petit, Pierre; Mann, Antony G.; Luiten, Andre N.; Chang, Sheng; Salomon, Christophe

    We present recent progress on microwave clocks that make use of laser-cooled atoms. With an ultra-stable cryogenic sapphire oscillator as interrogation oscillator, a cesium fountain operates at the quantum projection noise limit. With 6 x10^5 detected atoms, the relative frequency stability is 4 x10^-14 &1/2circ, where τ is the integration time in seconds. This stability is comparable to that of hydrogen masers. At τ=2 x10^4s, the measured stability reaches 6 x10^-16. A 87Rb fountain has also been constructed and the 87Rb ground-state hyperfine energy has been compared to the Cs primary standard with a relative accuracy of 2.5 x10^-15. The 87Rb collisional shift is found to be at least 30 times below that of cesium. We also describe a transportable cesium fountain, which will be used for frequency comparisons with an accuracy of 10-15 or below. Finally, we present the details of a space mission for a cesium standard which has been selected by the European Space Agency (ESA) to fly on the International Space Station in 2003.

  10. Techniques for Measuring Low Earth Orbital Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Demko, Rikako

    2002-01-01

    Polymers such as polyimide Kapton and Teflon FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene) are commonly used spacecraft materials due to their desirable properties such as flexibility, low density, and in the case of FEP, a low solar absorptance and high thermal emittance. Polymers on the exterior of spacecraft in the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment are exposed to energetic atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen reaction with polymers causes erosion, which is a threat to spacecraft durability. It is therefore important to understand the atomic oxygen erosion yield (E, the volume loss per incident oxygen atom) of polymers being considered in spacecraft design. The most common technique for determining E is through mass loss measurements. For limited duration exposure experiments, such as shuttle experiments, where the atomic oxygen fluence is often so low that mass loss measurements can not produce acceptable uncertainties, recession measurements based on atomic force microscopy analyses can be used. Equally necessary to knowing the mass loss or recession depth for determining the erosion yield of polymers is the knowledge of the atomic oxygen fluence that the polymers were exposed to in space. This paper discusses the procedures and relevant issues for mass loss and recession depth measurements for passive atomic oxygen erosion yield characterization of polymers, along with techniques for active atomic oxygen fluence and erosion characterization. One active atomic oxygen erosion technique discussed is a new technique based on optical measurements. Details including the use of both semi-transparent and opaque polymers for active erosion measurement are reviewed.

  11. Quantum phase transition of alkaline-earth fermionic atoms confined in an optical superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Valencia, J.; Franco, R.; Figueira, M. S.

    2013-03-01

    Using the density matrix renormalization group method, we evaluate the spin and charge gaps of alkaline-earth fermionic atoms in a periodic one-dimensional optical superlattice. The number of delocalized atoms is equal to the lattice size and we consider an antiferromagnetic coupling between delocalized and localized atoms. We found a quantum phase transition from a Kondo insulator spin liquid state without confining potential to a charge-gapped antiferromagnetic state with nonzero potential. For each on-site coupling, there is a critical potential point for which the spin gap vanishes and its value increases linearly with the local interaction.

  12. Single-stage sub-Doppler cooling of alkaline earth atoms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinye; Loftus, Thomas H; Dunn, Josh W; Greene, Chris H; Hall, John L; Gallagher, Alan; Ye, Jun

    2003-05-16

    We report the first experimental study of sub-Doppler cooling in alkaline earth atoms (87Sr) enabled by the presence of nuclear spin-originated magnetic degeneracy in the atomic ground state. Sub-Doppler cooling in a sigma(+)-sigma(-) configuration is achieved despite the presence of multiple, closely spaced excited states. This surprising result is confirmed by an expanded multilevel theory of the radiative cooling force. Detailed investigations of system performance have shed new insights into (sigma(+)-sigma(-)) cooling dynamics and will likely play an important role in the future development of neutral atom-based optical frequency standards.

  13. Low Earth orbital atomic oxygen micrometeoroid, and debris interactions with photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Degroh, Kim K.

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide Kapton solar array blankets can be protected from atomic oxygen in low earth orbit if SiO sub x thin film coatings are applied to their surfaces. The useful lifetime of a blanket protected in this manner strongly depends on the number and size of defects in the protective coatings. Atomic oxygen degradation is dominated by undercutting at defects in protective coatings caused by substrate roughness and processing rather than micrometeoroid or debris impacts. Recent findings from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and ground based studies show that interactions between atomic oxygen and silicones may cause grazing and contamination problems which may lead to solar array degradation.

  14. The Effect of Low Earth Orbit Atomic Oxygen Exposure on Phenylphosphine Oxide-Containing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.

    2000-01-01

    Thin films of phenylphosphine oxide-containing polymers were exposed to low Earth orbit aboard a space shuttle flight (STS-85) as part of flight experiment designated Evaluation of Space Environment and Effects on Materials (ESEM). This flight experiment was a cooperative effort between the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA). The thin film samples described herein were part of an atomic oxygen exposure experiment (AOE) and were exposed to primarily atomic oxygen (1 X 1019 atoms/cm2). The thin film samples consisted of three phosphine oxide containing polymers (arylene ether, benzimidazole and imide). Based on post-flight analyses using atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and weight loss data, it was found that atomic oxygen exposure of these materials efficiently produces a phosphate layer at the surface of the samples. This layer provides a barrier towards further attack by AO. Consequently, these materials do not exhibit linear erosion rates which is in contrast with most organic polymers. Qualitatively, the results obtained from these analyses compare favorably with those obtained from samples exposed to atomic oxygen and or oxygen plasma in ground based exposure experiments. The results of the low Earth orbit atomic oxygen exposure on these materials will be compared with those of ground based exposure to AO.

  15. Atomic hydrogen in. gamma. -irradiated hydroxides of alkaline-earth elements

    SciTech Connect

    Spitsyn, V.I.; Yurik, T.K.; Barsova, L.I.

    1982-04-01

    Atomic hydrogen is an important intermediate product formed in the radiolysis of compounds containing X-H bonds. H atoms have been detected in irradiated matrices of H/sub 2/ and inert gases at 4/sup 0/K, in irradiated ice and frozen solutions of acids in irradiated salts and in other systems. Here results are presented from a study of the ESR spectra of H atoms generated in polycrystalline hydroxides of alkaline-earth elements that have been ..gamma..-irradiated at 77/sup 0/K, after preliminary treatment at various temperatures. For the first time stabilization of atomic hydrogen in ..gamma..-irradiated polycrystalline alkaline-earth element hydroxides has been detected. Depending on the degree of dehydroxylation, several types of hydrogen atoms may be stabilized in the hydroxides, these hydrogen atoms having different radiospectroscopic parameters. In the magnesium-calcium-strontium-barium hydroxide series, a regular decrease has been found in the hfi constants for H atoms with the cations in the immediate surroundings. A direct proportionality has been found between the parameters ..delta..A/A/sub 0/ and the polarizability of the cation.

  16. Durability Issues for the Protection of Materials from Atomic Oxygen Attack in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce; Lenczewski, Mary; Demko, Rikako

    2002-01-01

    Low Earth orbital atomic oxygen is capable of eroding most polymeric materials typically used on spacecraft. Solar array blankets, thermal control polymers, and carbon fiber matrix composites are readily oxidized to become thinner and less capable of supporting the loads imposed upon them. Protective coatings have been developed that are durable to atomic oxygen to prevent oxidative erosion of the underlying polymers. However, the details of the surface roughness, coating defect density, and coating configuration can play a significant role as to whether or not the coating provides long duration atomic oxygen protection. Identical coatings on different surface roughness surfaces can have drastically different durability results. Examples and analysis of the causes of resultant differences in atomic oxygen protection are presented. Implications based on in-space experiences, ground laboratory testing, and computational modeling indicate that thin film vacuum-deposited aluminum protective coatings offer much less atomic oxygen protection than sputter-deposited silicon dioxide coatings.

  17. Low Earth orbit atomic oxygen simulation for durability evaluation of solar reflector surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the performance and durability of solar reflector surfaces in the atomic oxygen environment typical of low Earth orbit (LEO), one must expose the reflector surface either directly to LEO or to ground-laboratory atomic oxygen environments. Although actual LEO exposures are most desired, such opportunities are typically scarce, expensive, and of limited duration. As a result, ground-laboratory exposures must be relied upon as the most practical long-term durability evaluation technique. Plasma ashers are widely used as LEO simulation facilities by producing atomic oxygen environments for durability evaluation of potential spacecraft materials. Atomic oxygen arrival differs between ground and space exposure in that plasma asher exposure produces isotropic arrival and space solar tracking produces sweeping arrival. Differences in initial impact reaction probability occur, dependent upon the energy and species existing in these environments. Due to the variations in ground-laboratory and space atomic oxygen, quantification of in-space performance based on plasma asher testing is not straightforward. The various atomic oxygen interactions that can occur with reflector surfaces, such as undercutting in organic substrates at protective coating defect sites, ground-laboratory techniques recommended for evaluating the atomic oxygen durability of reflectors based on asher exposures, and computational techniques which make use of ground-laboratory atomic oxygen exposure to predict in-space LEO durability are addressed.

  18. Dispersion coefficients for H and He interactions with alkali-metal and alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Mitroy, J.; Bromley, M.W.J.

    2003-12-01

    The van der Waals coefficients C{sub 6}, C{sub 8}, and C{sub 10} for H and He interactions with the alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, and Rb) and alkaline-earth-metal (Be, Mg, Ca, and Sr) atoms are determined from oscillator strength sum rules. The oscillator strengths were computed using a combination of ab initio and semiempirical methods. The dispersion parameters generally agree with close to exact variational calculations for Li-H and Li-He at the 0.1% level of accuracy. For larger systems, there is agreement with relativistic many-body perturbation theory estimates of C{sub 6} at the 1% level. These validations for selected systems attest to the reliability of the present dispersion parameters. About half the present parameters lie within the recommended bounds of the Standard and Certain compilation [J. Chem. Phys. 83, 3002 (1985)].

  19. Issues and Consequences of Atomic Oxygen Undercutting of Protected Polymers in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Snyder, Aaron; Miller, Sharon K.; Demko, Rikako

    2002-01-01

    Hydrocarbon based polymers that are exposed to atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit are slowly oxidized which results in recession of their surface. Atomic oxygen protective coatings have been developed which are both durable to atomic oxygen and effective in protecting underlying polymers. However, scratches, pin window defects, polymer surface roughness and protective coating layer configuration can result in erosion and potential failure of protected thin polymer films even though the coatings are themselves atomic oxygen durable. This paper will present issues that cause protective coatings to become ineffective in some cases yet effective in others due to the details of their specific application. Observed in-space examples of failed and successfully protected materials using identical protective thin films will be discussed and analyzed. Proposed approaches to prevent the failures that have been observed will also be presented.

  20. Atomic oxygen effects on candidate coatings for long-term spacecraft in low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, E. H.; Smith, Charles A.; Cross, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    Candidate atomic oxygen protective coatings for long-term low Earth orbit (LEO) spacecraft were evaluated using the Los Alamos National Laboratory O-atom exposure facility. The coatings studied include Teflon, Al2O3, SiO2, and SWS-V-10, a silicon material. Preliminary results indicate that sputtered PTFE Teflon (0.1 micrometers) has a fluence lifetime of 10 to the 19th power O-atoms/cm (2), and sputtered silicon dioxide (0.1 micrometers), aluminum oxide (0.1 micrometers), and SWS-V-10, a silicone, (4 micrometers) have fluence lifetimes of 10 to the 20th power to 10 to the 21st power O-atoms/cm (2). There are large variations in fluence lifetime data for these coatings.

  1. Issues and Effects of Atomic Oxygen Interactions With Silicone Contamination on Spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce; Rutledge, Sharon; Sechkar, Edward; Stueber, Thomas; Snyder, Aaron; deGroh, Kim; Haytas, Christy; Brinker, David

    2000-01-01

    The continued presence and use of silicones on spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) has been found to cause the deposition of contaminant films on surfaces which are also exposed to atomic oxygen. The composition and optical properties of the resulting SiO(x)- based (where x is near 2) contaminant films may be dependent upon the relative rates of arrival of atomic oxygen, silicone contaminant and hydrocarbons. This paper presents results of in-space silicone contamination tests, ground laboratory simulation tests and analytical modeling to identify controlling processes that affect contaminant characteristics.

  2. A Sensitive Technique Using Atomic Force Microscopy to Measure the Low Earth Orbit Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Clark, Gregory W.; Hammerstrom, Anne M.; Youngstrom, Erica E.; Kaminski, Carolyn; Fine, Elizabeth S.; Marx, Laura M.

    2001-01-01

    Polymers such as polyimide Kapton and Teflon FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene) are commonly used spacecraft materials due to their desirable properties such as flexibility, low density, and in the case of FEP low solar absorptance and high thermal emittance. Polymers on the exterior of spacecraft in the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment are exposed to energetic atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen erosion of polymers occurs in LEO and is a threat to spacecraft durability. It is therefore important to understand the atomic oxygen erosion yield (E, the volume loss per incident oxygen atom) of polymers being considered in spacecraft design. Because long-term space exposure data is rare and very costly, short-term exposures such as on the shuttle are often relied upon for atomic oxygen erosion determination. The most common technique for determining E is through mass loss measurements. For limited duration exposure experiments, such as shuttle experiments, the atomic oxygen fluence is often so small that mass loss measurements can not produce acceptable uncertainties. Therefore, a recession measurement technique has been developed using selective protection of polymer samples, combined with postflight atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis, to obtain accurate erosion yields of polymers exposed to low atomic oxygen fluences. This paper discusses the procedures used for this recession depth technique along with relevant characterization issues. In particular, a polymer is salt-sprayed prior to flight, then the salt is washed off postflight and AFM is used to determine the erosion depth from the protected plateau. A small sample was salt-sprayed for AFM erosion depth analysis and flown as part of the Limited Duration Candidate Exposure (LDCE-4,-5) shuttle flight experiment on STS-51. This sample was used to study issues such as use of contact versus non-contact mode imaging for determining recession depth measurements. Error analyses were conducted and the percent probable

  3. Properties of the triplet metastable states of the alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Mitroy, J.; Bromley, M.W.J.

    2004-11-01

    The static and dynamic properties of the alkaline-earth-metal atoms in their metastable state are computed in a configuration interaction approach with a semiempirical model potential for the core. Among the properties determined are the scalar and tensor polarizabilities, the quadrupole moment, some of the oscillator strengths, and the dispersion coefficients of the van der Waals interaction. A simple method for including the effect of the core on the dispersion parameters is described.

  4. Using atomic diffraction of Na from material gratings to measure atom-surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perreault, John D.; Cronin, Alexander D.; Savas, T. A.

    2005-05-01

    In atom optics a material structure is commonly regarded as an amplitude mask for atom waves. However, atomic diffraction patterns formed using material gratings indicate that material structures also operate as phase masks. In this study a well collimated beam of sodium atoms is used to illuminate a silicon nitride grating with a period of 100 nm. During passage through the grating slots atoms acquire a phase shift due to the van der Waals (vdW) interaction with the grating walls. As a result the relative intensities of the matter-wave diffraction peaks deviate from those expected for a purely absorbing grating. Thus a complex transmission function is required to explain the observed diffraction envelopes. An optics perspective to the theory of atomic diffraction from material gratings is put forth in the hopes of providing a more intuitive picture concerning the influence of the vdW potential. The van der Waals coefficient C3 =2.7±0.8 meV nm3 is determined by fitting a modified Fresnel optical theory to the experimental data. This value of C3 is consistent with a van der Waals interaction between atomic sodium and a silicon nitride surface.

  5. Using atomic diffraction of Na from material gratings to measure atom-surface interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Perreault, John D.; Cronin, Alexander D.; Savas, T.A.

    2005-05-15

    In atom optics a material structure is commonly regarded as an amplitude mask for atom waves. However, atomic diffraction patterns formed using material gratings indicate that material structures also operate as phase masks. In this study a well collimated beam of sodium atoms is used to illuminate a silicon nitride grating with a period of 100 nm. During passage through the grating slots atoms acquire a phase shift due to the van der Waals (vdW) interaction with the grating walls. As a result the relative intensities of the matter-wave diffraction peaks deviate from those expected for a purely absorbing grating. Thus a complex transmission function is required to explain the observed diffraction envelopes. An optics perspective to the theory of atomic diffraction from material gratings is put forth in the hopes of providing a more intuitive picture concerning the influence of the vdW potential. The van der Waals coefficient C{sub 3}=2.7{+-}0.8 meV nm{sup 3} is determined by fitting a modified Fresnel optical theory to the experimental data. This value of C{sub 3} is consistent with a van der Waals interaction between atomic sodium and a silicon nitride surface.

  6. Proceedings of the NASA Workshop on Atomic Oxygen Effects. [low earth orbital environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinza, David E. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    A workshop was held to address the scientific issues concerning the effects of atomic oxygen on materials in the low Earth orbital (LEO) environment. The program included 18 invited speakers plus contributed posters covering topics such as LEO spaceflight experiments, interaction mechanisms, and atomic oxygen source development. Discussion sessions were also held to organize a test program to evaluate atomic oxygen exposure facilities. The key issues raised in the workshop were: (1) the need to develop a reliable predictive model of the effects of long-term exposure of materials to the LEO environment; (2) the ability of ground-based exposure facilities to provide useful data for development of durable materials; and (3) accurate determination of the composition of the LEO environment. These proceedings include the invited papers, the abstracts for the contributed posters, and an account of the test program discussion sessions.

  7. Hydration process of alkaline-earth metal atoms in water clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okai, Nobuhiro; Ishikawa, Haruki; Fuke, Kiyokazu

    2005-10-01

    Ionization potentials (IPs) of water clusters containing alkaline-earth metal atoms are measured by a photoionization threshold method to examine the hydration process of the metal atoms in clusters. IPs of Mg(H 2O) n and Ca(H 2O) n are found to decrease with increasing n and become constant at 3.18 eV for n ⩾ 9 and n ⩾ 8, respectively. The observed constant IP agrees with an estimated photoelectric threshold (3.2 eV) of bulk ice. From the comparison with the results on the theoretical calculations as well as the IPs for alkali atom-water clusters, the anomalous size dependence of IPs is ascribed to the formation of an ion-pair state.

  8. Low Earth orbital atomic oxygen and ultraviolet radiation effects on polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Dever, J.A.

    1991-02-01

    Because atomic oxygen and solar ultraviolet radiation present in the low earth orbital (LEO) environment can alter the chemistry of polymers resulting in degradation, their effects and mechanisms of degradation must be determined in order to determine the long term durability of polymeric surfaces to be exposed on missions such as Space Station Freedom. The effects of atomic oxygen on polymers which contain protective coatings must also be explored, since unique damage mechanisms can occur in areas where the protective coatings has failed. Mechanisms can be determined by utilizing results from previous LEO missions, by performing ground based LEO simulation tests and analysis, and by carrying out focussed space experiments. A survey is presented of the interactions and possible damage mechanisms for environmental atomic oxygen and UV radiation exposure of polymers commonly used in LEO.

  9. Low Earth orbital atomic oxygen and ultraviolet radiation effects on polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.

    1991-01-01

    Because atomic oxygen and solar ultraviolet radiation present in the low earth orbital (LEO) environment can alter the chemistry of polymers resulting in degradation, their effects and mechanisms of degradation must be determined in order to determine the long term durability of polymeric surfaces to be exposed on missions such as Space Station Freedom. The effects of atomic oxygen on polymers which contain protective coatings must also be explored, since unique damage mechanisms can occur in areas where the protective coatings has failed. Mechanisms can be determined by utilizing results from previous LEO missions, by performing ground based LEO simulation tests and analysis, and by carrying out focussed space experiments. A survey is presented of the interactions and possible damage mechanisms for environmental atomic oxygen and UV radiation exposure of polymers commonly used in LEO.

  10. The effect of atomic oxygen on polysiloxane-polyimide for spacecraft applications in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Cooper, Jill M.; Olle, Raymond M.

    1991-01-01

    Polysiloxane-polyimide films are of interest as a replacement for polyimide Kapton in the Space Station Freedom solar array blanket. The blanket provides the structural support for the solar cells as well as providing transport of heat away from the back of the cells. Polyimide Kapton would be an ideal material to use; however, its high rate of degradation due to attack by atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit, at the altitudes Space Station Freedom will fly, is of such magnitude that if left unprotected, the blanket will undergo structural failure in much less than the desired 15 year operating life. Polysiloxane-polyimide is of interest as a replacement material because it should from its own protective silicon dioxide coating upon exposure to atomic oxygen. Mass, optical, and photomicrographic data obtained in the evaluation of the durability of polysiloxane-polyimide to an atomic oxygen environment are presented.

  11. Consequences of Atomic Oxygen Interaction With Silicone and Silicone Contamination on Surfaces in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Haytas, Christy A.

    1999-01-01

    The exposure of silicones to atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit causes oxidation of the surface, resulting in conversion of silicone to silica. This chemical conversion increases the elastic modulus of the surface and initiates the development of a tensile strain. Ultimately, with sufficient exposure, tensile strain leads to cracking of the surface enabling the underlying unexposed silicone to be converted to silica resulting in additional depth and extent of cracking. The use of silicone coatings for the protection of materials from atomic oxygen attack is limited because of the eventual exposure of underlying unprotected polymeric material due to deep tensile stress cracking of the oxidized silicone. The use of moderate to high volatility silicones in low Earth orbit has resulted in a silicone contamination arrival at surfaces which are simultaneously being bombarded with atomic oxygen, thus leading to conversion of the silicone contaminant to silica. As a result of these processes, a gradual accumulation of contamination occurs leading to deposits which at times have been up to several microns thick (as in the case of a Mir solar array after 10 years in space). The contamination species typically consist of silicon, oxygen and carbon. which in the synergistic environment of atomic oxygen and UV radiation leads to increased solar absorptance and reduced solar transmittance. A comparison of the results of atomic oxygen interaction with silicones and silicone contamination will be presented based on the LDEF, EOIM-111, Offeq-3 spacecraft and Mir solar array in-space results. The design of a contamination pin-hole camera space experiment which uses atomic oxygen to produce an image of the sources of silicone contamination will also be presented.

  12. Isomorphous Substitution of Rare-Earth Elements in Lacunary Apatite Pb8Na2(PO4)6.

    PubMed

    Get'man, Evgeni I; Loboda, Stanislav N; Ignatov, Alexey V; Prisedsky, Vadim V; Abdul Jabar, Mohammed A B; Ardanova, Lyudmyla I

    2016-03-07

    The substitution of rare-earth elements (REEs) for Pb in the lacunary apatite Pb8Na2(PO4)6 with void structural channels was studied by means of powder X-ray diffraction (including the Rietveld refinement), scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis, and IR spectroscopy and also measurements of the electrical conductivity. The substitution limits (xmax in Pb8-xLnxNa2(PO4)6Ox/2) at 800 °C were found to decrease with the atomic number of the REE from 1.40 for La to 0.12 for Yb with a rapid drop from light to heavy lanthanides (between Gd and Tb). The REE atoms substitute for Pb predominantly at Pb2 sites of the apatite structure according to the scheme 2Pb(2+) + □ → 2Ln(3+) + O(2-), where □ is a vacancy in the structural channel. The substitution in lacunary apatite produces quite different changes in the structural parameters compared with broadly studied alkaline-earth hydroxyapatites. In spite of the much lower ionic radii of REE than that of Pb(2+), the mean distances ⟨Pb1-O⟩ somewhat increase, whereas the distances ⟨Pb2-Pb2⟩ and ⟨Pb2-O4⟩ do not change considerably with the degree of substitution. This implies control of the substitution by not only spatial and charge accommodation of REE ions but also the availability of a stereochemically active 6s(2) electron pair on Pb(2+). The high-temperature electrical conductivity shows dependence on the degree of substitution with a minimum at x = 0.2 indicative of a possible change of the type of conductivity.

  13. Dispersion coefficients for the interactions of the alkali-metal and alkaline-earth-metal ions and inert-gas atoms with a graphene layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Arora, Bindiya; Sahoo, B. K.

    2015-09-01

    Largely motivated by a number of applications, the van der Waals dispersion coefficients C3 of the alkali-metal ions Li+,Na+,K+, and Rb+, the alkaline-earth-metal ions Ca+,Sr+,Ba+, and Ra+, and the inert-gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, and Kr with a graphene layer are determined precisely within the framework of the Dirac model. For these calculations, we evaluate the dynamic polarizabilities of the above atomic systems very accurately by evaluating the transition matrix elements employing relativistic many-body methods and using the experimental values of the excitation energies. The dispersion coefficients are given as functions of the separation distance of an atomic system from the graphene layer and the ambiance temperature during the interactions. For easy extraction of these coefficients, we give a logistic fit to the functional forms of the dispersion coefficients in terms of the separation distances at room temperature.

  14. Atomic Oxygen Interactions With Silicone Contamination on Spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.

    2001-01-01

    Silicones have been widely used on spacecraft as potting compounds, adhesives, seals, gaskets, hydrophobic surfaces, and atomic oxygen protective coatings. Contamination of optical and thermal control surfaces on spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) has been an ever-present problem as a result of the interaction of atomic oxygen with volatile species from silicones and hydrocarbons onboard spacecraft. These interactions can deposit a contaminant that is a risk to spacecraft performance because it can form an optically absorbing film on the surfaces of Sun sensors, star trackers, or optical components or can increase the solar absorptance of thermal control surfaces. The transmittance, absorptance, and reflectance of such contaminant films seem to vary widely from very transparent SiOx films to much more absorbing SiOx-based films that contain hydrocarbons. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, silicone contamination that was oxidized by atomic oxygen has been examined from LEO spacecraft (including the Long Duration Exposure Facility and the Mir space station solar arrays) and from ground laboratory LEO simulations. The findings resulted in the development of predictive models that may help explain the underlying issues and effects. Atomic oxygen interactions with silicone volatiles and mixtures of silicone and hydrocarbon volatiles produce glassy SiOx-based contaminant coatings. The addition of hydrocarbon volatiles in the presence of silicone volatiles appears to cause much more absorbing (and consequently less transmitting) contaminant films than when no hydrocarbon volatiles are present. On the basis of the LDEF and Mir results, conditions of high atomic oxygen flux relative to low contaminant flux appear to result in more transparent contaminant films than do conditions of low atomic oxygen flux with high contaminant flux. Modeling predictions indicate that the deposition of contaminant films early in a LEO flight should depend much more on atomic oxygen flux than

  15. New Active Optical Technique Developed for Measuring Low-Earth-Orbit Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Demko, Rikako

    2003-01-01

    Polymers such as polyimide Kapton (DuPont) and Teflon FEP (DuPont, fluorinated ethylene propylene) are commonly used spacecraft materials because of desirable properties such as flexibility, low density, and in the case of FEP, a low solar absorptance and high thermal emittance. Polymers on the exterior of spacecraft in the low-Earth-orbit (LEO) environment are exposed to energetic atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen reaction with polymers causes erosion, which is a threat to spacecraft performance and durability. It is, therefore, important to understand the atomic oxygen erosion yield E (the volume loss per incident oxygen atom) of polymers being considered in spacecraft design. The most common technique for determining E is a passive technique based on mass-loss measurements of samples exposed to LEO atomic oxygen during a space flight experiment. There are certain disadvantages to this technique. First, because it is passive, data are not obtained until after the flight is completed. Also, obtaining the preflight and postflight mass measurements is complicated by the fact that many polymers absorb water and, therefore, the mass change due to water absorption can affect the E data. This is particularly true for experiments that receive low atomic oxygen exposures or for samples that have a very low E. An active atomic oxygen erosion technique based on optical measurements has been developed that has certain advantages over the mass-loss technique. This in situ technique can simultaneously provide the erosion yield data on orbit and the atomic oxygen exposure fluence, which is needed for erosion yield determination. In the optical technique, either sunlight or artificial light can be used to measure the erosion of semitransparent or opaque polymers as a result of atomic oxygen attack. The technique is simple and adaptable to a rather wide range of polymers, providing that they have a sufficiently high optical absorption coefficient. If one covers a photodiode with a

  16. Comparison of Hyperthermal Ground Laboratory Atomic Oxygen Erosion Yields With Those in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Dill, Grace C.; Loftus, Ryan J.; deGroh, Kim K.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2013-01-01

    The atomic oxygen erosion yields of 26 materials (all polymers except for pyrolytic graphite) were measured in two directed hyperthermal radio frequency (RF) plasma ashers operating at 30 or 35 kHz with air. The hyperthermal asher results were compared with thermal energy asher results and low Earth orbital (LEO) results from the Materials International Space Station Experiment 2 and 7 (MISSE 2 and 7) flight experiments. The hyperthermal testing was conducted to a significant portion of the atomic oxygen fluence similar polymers were exposed to during the MISSE 2 and 7 missions. Comparison of the hyperthermal asher prediction of LEO erosion yields with thermal energy asher erosion yields indicates that except for the fluorocarbon polymers of PTFE and FEP, the hyperthermal energy ashers are a much more reliable predictor of LEO erosion yield than thermal energy asher testing, by a factor of four.

  17. Effects on optical systems from interactions with oxygen atoms in low earth orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, P. N.; Swann, J. T.; Gregory, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Modifications of material surface properties due to interactions with ambient atomic oxygen have been observed on surfaces facing the orbital direction in low earth orbits. Some effects are very damaging to surface optical properties while some are more subtle and even beneficial. Most combustible materials are heavily etched, and some coatings, such as silver and osmium, are seriously degraded or removed as volatile oxides. The growth of oxide films on metals and semiconductors considered stable in dry air was measured. Material removal, surface roughness, reflectance, and optical densities are reported. Effects of temperature, contamination, and overcoatings are noted.

  18. Neutral atomic oxygen beam produced by ion charge exchange for Low Earth Orbital (LEO) simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce; Rutledge, Sharon; Brdar, Marko; Olen, Carl; Stidham, Curt

    1987-01-01

    A low energy neutral atomic oxygen beam system was designed and is currently being assembled at the Lewis Research Center. The system utilizes a 15 cm diameter Kaufman ion source to produce positive oxygen ions which are charge exchange neutralized to produce low energy (variable from 5 to 150 eV) oxygen atoms at a flux simulating real time low Earth orbital conditions. An electromagnet is used to direct only the singly charged oxygen ions from the ion source into the charge exchange cell. A retarding potential grid is used to slow down the oxygen ions to desired energies prior to their charge exchange. Cryogenically cooled diatomic oxygen gas in the charge exchange cell is then used to transfer charge to the oxygen ions to produce a neutral atomic oxygen beam. Remaining non-charge exchanged oxygen ions are then swept from the beam by electromagnetic or electrostatic deflection depending upon the desired experiment configuration. The resulting neutral oxygen beam of 5 to 10 cm in diameter impinges upon target materials within a sample holder fixture that can also provide for simultaneous heating and UV exposure during the atomic oxygen bombardment.

  19. Lessons Learned From Atomic Oxygen Interaction With Spacecraft Materials in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; deGroh, Kim, K.; Miller, Sharon K.; Waters, Deborah L.

    2008-01-01

    There have been five Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) passive experiment carriers (PECs) (MISSE 1-5) to date that have been launched, exposed in space on the exterior of International Space Station (ISS) and then returned to Earth for analysis. An additional four MISSE PECs (MISSE 6A, 6B, 7A, and 7B) are in various stages of completion. The PECs are two-sided suitcase to size sample carriers that are intended to provide information on the effects of the low Earth orbital environment on a wide variety of materials and components. As a result of post retrieval analyses of the retrieved MISSE 2 experiments and numerous prior space experiments, there have been valuable lessons learned and needs identified that are worthy of being documented so that planning, design, and analysis of future space environment experiments can benefit from the experience in order to maximize the knowledge gained. Some of the lessons learned involve the techniques, concepts, and issues associated with measuring atomic oxygen erosion yields. These are presented along with several issues to be considered when designing experiments, such as the uncertainty in mission duration, scattering and contamination effects on results, and the accuracy of measuring atomic oxygen erosion.

  20. Three-photon process for producing a degenerate gas of metastable alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, D. S.; Pisenti, N. C.; Reschovsky, B. J.; Campbell, G. K.

    2016-05-01

    We present a method for creating a quantum degenerate gas of metastable alkaline-earth-metal atoms. This has yet to be achieved due to inelastic collisions that limit evaporative cooling in the metastable states. Quantum degenerate samples prepared in the 1S0 ground state can be rapidly transferred to either the 3P2 or 3P0 state via a coherent three-photon process. Numerical integration of the density-matrix evolution for the fine structure of bosonic alkaline-earth-metal atoms shows that transfer efficiencies of ≃90 % can be achieved with experimentally feasible laser parameters in both Sr and Yb. Importantly, the three-photon process can be set up such that it imparts no net momentum to the degenerate gas during the excitation, which will allow for studies of metastable samples outside the Lamb-Dicke regime. We discuss several experimental challenges to successfully realizing our scheme, including the minimization of differential ac Stark shifts between the four states connected by the three-photon transition.

  1. A 3-photon process for producing degenerate gases of metastable alkaline-earth atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Daniel S.; Pisenti, Neal C.; Reschovsky, Benjamin J.; Campbell, Gretchen K.

    2016-05-01

    We present a method for creating quantum degenerate gases of metastable alkaline-earth atoms. A degenerate gas in any of the 3 P metastable states has not previously been obtained due to large inelastic collision rates, which are unfavorable for evaporative cooling. Samples prepared in the 1S0 ground state can be rapidly transferred to either the 3P2 or 3P0 state via a coherent 3-photon process. Numerical integration of the density matrix evolution for the fine structure of bosonic alkaline-earth atoms shows that transfer efficiencies of ~= 90 % can be achieved with experimentally feasible laser parameters in both Sr and Yb. Importantly, the 3-photon process does not impart momentum to the degenerate gas during excitation, which allows studies of these metastable samples outside the Lamb-Dicke regime. We discuss several experimental challenges to the successful realization of our scheme, including the minimization of differential AC Stark shifts between the four states connected by the 3-photon transition.

  2. Oligomeric rare-earth metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Simon; Zimmermann, Sina; Brühmann, Matthias; Meyer, Eva; Rustige, Christian; Wolberg, Marike; Daub, Kathrin; Bell, Thomas; Meyer, Gerd

    2014-11-15

    Comproportionation reactions of rare-earth metal trihalides (RX{sub 3}) with the respective rare-earth metals (R) and transition metals (T) led to the formation of 22 oligomeric R cluster halides encapsulating T, in 19 cases for the first time. The structures of these compounds were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and are composed of trimers ((T{sub 3}R{sub 11})X{sub 15}-type, P6{sub 3}/m), tetramers ((T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 28}(R{sub 4}) (P-43m), (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 20} (P4{sub 2}/nnm), (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 24}(RX{sub 3}){sub 4} (I4{sub 1}/a) and (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 23} (C2/m) types of structure) and pentamers ((Ru{sub 5}La{sub 14}){sub 2}Br{sub 39}, Cc) of (TR{sub r}){sub n} (n=2–5) clusters. These oligomers are further enveloped by inner (X{sup i}) as well as outer (X{sup a}) halido ligands, which possess diverse functionalities and interconnect like oligomers through i–i, i–a and/or a–i bridges. The general features of the crystal structures for these new compounds are discussed and compared to literature entries as well as different structure types with oligomeric T centered R clusters. Dimers and tetramers originating from the aggregation of (TR{sub 6}) octahedra via common edges are more frequent than trimers and pentamers, in which the (TR{sub r}) clusters share common faces. - Graphical abstract: Rare earth-metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms (TR{sub 6}) may connect via common edges or faces to form dimers, trimers, tetramers and pentamers of which the tetramers are the most prolific. Packing effects and electron counts play an important role. - Highlights: • Rare-earth metal cluster complexes encapsulate transition metal atoms. • Oligomers are built via connection of octahedral clusters via common edges or faces. • Dimers through pentamers with closed structures are known. • Tetramers including a tetrahedron of endohedral atoms are the most prolific.

  3. Atomic Oxygen Erosion Yield Prediction for Spacecraft Polymers in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Backus, Jane A.; Manno, Michael V.; Waters, Deborah L.; Cameron, Kevin C.; deGroh, Kim K.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to predict the atomic oxygen erosion yield of polymers based on their chemistry and physical properties has been only partially successful because of a lack of reliable low Earth orbit (LEO) erosion yield data. Unfortunately, many of the early experiments did not utilize dehydrated mass loss measurements for erosion yield determination, and the resulting mass loss due to atomic oxygen exposure may have been compromised because samples were often not in consistent states of dehydration during the pre-flight and post-flight mass measurements. This is a particular problem for short duration mission exposures or low erosion yield materials. However, as a result of the retrieval of the Polymer Erosion and Contamination Experiment (PEACE) flown as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment 2 (MISSE 2), the erosion yields of 38 polymers and pyrolytic graphite were accurately measured. The experiment was exposed to the LEO environment for 3.95 years from August 16, 2001 to July 30, 2005 and was successfully retrieved during a space walk on July 30, 2005 during Discovery s STS-114 Return to Flight mission. The 40 different materials tested (including Kapton H fluence witness samples) were selected specifically to represent a variety of polymers used in space as well as a wide variety of polymer chemical structures. The MISSE 2 PEACE Polymers experiment used carefully dehydrated mass measurements, as well as accurate density measurements to obtain accurate erosion yield data for high-fluence (8.43 1021 atoms/sq cm). The resulting data was used to develop an erosion yield predictive tool with a correlation coefficient of 0.895 and uncertainty of +/-6.3 10(exp -25)cu cm/atom. The predictive tool utilizes the chemical structures and physical properties of polymers to predict in-space atomic oxygen erosion yields. A predictive tool concept (September 2009 version) is presented which represents an improvement over an earlier (December 2008) version.

  4. CP(N - 1) quantum field theories with alkaline-earth atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laflamme, C.; Evans, W.; Dalmonte, M.; Gerber, U.; Mejía-Díaz, H.; Bietenholz, W.; Wiese, U.-J.; Zoller, P.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a cold atom implementation to attain the continuum limit of (1 + 1) -d CP(N - 1) quantum field theories. These theories share important features with (3 + 1) -d QCD, such as asymptotic freedom and θ-vacua. Moreover, their continuum limit can be accessed via the mechanism of dimensional reduction. In our scheme, the CP(N - 1) degrees of freedom emerge at low energies from a ladder system of SU(N) quantum spins, where the N spin states are embodied by the nuclear Zeeman states of alkaline-earth atoms, trapped in an optical lattice. Based on Monte Carlo results, we establish that the continuum limit can be demonstrated by an atomic quantum simulation by employing the feature of asymptotic freedom. We discuss a protocol for the adiabatic preparation of the ground state of the system, the real-time evolution of a false θ-vacuum state after a quench, and we propose experiments to unravel the phase diagram at non-zero density.

  5. Atomic Oxygen Erosion Yield Predictive Tool for Spacecraft Polymers in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bank, Bruce A.; de Groh, Kim K.; Backus, Jane A.

    2008-01-01

    A predictive tool was developed to estimate the low Earth orbit (LEO) atomic oxygen erosion yield of polymers based on the results of the Polymer Erosion and Contamination Experiment (PEACE) Polymers experiment flown as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment 2 (MISSE 2). The MISSE 2 PEACE experiment accurately measured the erosion yield of a wide variety of polymers and pyrolytic graphite. The 40 different materials tested were selected specifically to represent a variety of polymers used in space as well as a wide variety of polymer chemical structures. The resulting erosion yield data was used to develop a predictive tool which utilizes chemical structure and physical properties of polymers that can be measured in ground laboratory testing to predict the in-space atomic oxygen erosion yield of a polymer. The properties include chemical structure, bonding information, density and ash content. The resulting predictive tool has a correlation coefficient of 0.914 when compared with actual MISSE 2 space data for 38 polymers and pyrolytic graphite. The intent of the predictive tool is to be able to make estimates of atomic oxygen erosion yields for new polymers without requiring expensive and time consumptive in-space testing.

  6. Simulation of the low earth orbital atomic oxygen interaction with materials by means of an oxygen ion beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Paulsen, Phillip E.; Steuber, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    Atomic oxygen is the predominant species in low-Earth orbit between the altitudes of 180 and 650 km. These highly reactive atoms are a result of photodissociation of diatomic oxygen molecules from solar photons having a wavelength less than or equal to 2430A. Spacecraft in low-Earth orbit collide with atomic oxygen in the 3P ground state at impact energies of approximately 4.2 to 4.5 eV. As a consequence, organic materials previously used for high altitude geosynchronous spacecraft are severely oxidized in the low-Earth orbital environment. The evaluation of materials durability to atomic oxygen requires ground simulation of this environment to cost effectively screen materials for durability. Directed broad beam oxygen sources are necessary to evaluate potential spacecraft materials performance before and after exposure to the simulated low-Earth orbital environment. This paper presents a description of a low energy, broad oxygen ion beam source used to simulate the low-Earth orbital atomic oxygen environment. The results of materials interaction with this beam and comparison with actual in-space tests of the same meterials will be discussed. Resulting surface morphologies appear to closely replicate those observed in space tests.

  7. Synthesis and thermoluminescence properties of rare earth-doped NaMgBO3 phosphor.

    PubMed

    Khan, Z S; Ingale, N B; Omanwar, S K

    2016-05-01

    Rare earth (Dy(3+) and Sm(3+))-doped sodium magnesium borate (NaMgBO3) is synthesized by solution combustion synthesis method keeping their thermoluminescence properties in mind. The reaction produced very stable crystalline NaMgBO3:RE (RE = Dy(3+), Sm(3+)) phosphors. The phosphors are exposed to (60)Co gamma-ray radiations dose of varying rate from 5 to 25 Gy, and their TL characteristics with kinetic parameters are studied. NaMgBO3:Dy(3+) phosphor shows two peaks for lower doping concentration of Dy(3+) while it reduced to single peak for the higher concentrations of activator Dy(3+). NaMgBO3:Dy(3+) shows the major glow peak around 200 °C while NaMgBO3:Sm(3+) phosphors show two well-separated glow peaks at 200 and 332 °C respectively. The thermoluminescence intensity of these phosphors was compare with the commercially available TLD-100 (Harshaw) phosphor. The TL responses for gamma-ray radiations dose were found to be linear from 5 to 25 Gy for both phosphors while the fading in each case is calculated for the tenure of 45 days.

  8. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1997-01-01

    A pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode is described. The goal is to produce a {approximately}10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately}10 ns full width at half-maximum (FWHM), 1.06 {mu}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately}1 {mu}s FWHM dye laser beam tuned to 5890 {Angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the NaI resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated charge-coupled-device camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately}0.1 {Angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5{endash}2 eV. Laser-induced fluorescence from {approximately}1{times}10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3} NaI 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately}{plus_minus}0.06 {Angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1996-06-01

    This work describes a pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II. The goal is to produce a {approximately} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced-fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately} 10 ns fwhm, 1.06 {micro}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately} 1 {micro}sec fwhm dye laser beam tuned to 5,890 {angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the Na I resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated CCD camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately} 0.1 {angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5 to 2 eV. Laser-induced-fluorescence from {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3} Na I 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately} 0.06 {angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment.

  10. Unique atom hyper-kagome order in Na4Ir3O8 and in low-symmetry spinel modifications.

    PubMed

    Talanov, V M; Shirokov, V B; Talanov, M V

    2015-05-01

    Group-theoretical and thermodynamic methods of the Landau theory of phase transitions are used to investigate the hyper-kagome atomic order in structures of ordered spinels and a spinel-like Na4Ir3O8 crystal. The formation of an atom hyper-kagome sublattice in Na4Ir3O8 is described theoretically on the basis of the archetype (hypothetical parent structure/phase) concept. The archetype structure of Na4Ir3O8 has a spinel-like structure (space group Fd\\bar 3m) and composition [Na1/2Ir3/2](16d)[Na3/2](16c)O(32e)4. The critical order parameter which induces hypothetical phase transition has been stated. It is shown that the derived structure of Na4Ir3O8 is formed as a result of the displacements of Na, Ir and O atoms, and ordering of Na, Ir and O atoms, ordering dxy, dxz, dyz orbitals as well. Ordering of all atoms takes place according to the type 1:3. Ir and Na atoms form an intriguing atom order: a network of corner-shared Ir triangles called a hyper-kagome lattice. The Ir atoms form nanoclusters which are named decagons. The existence of hyper-kagome lattices in six types of ordered spinel structures is predicted theoretically. The structure mechanisms of the formation of the predicted hyper-kagome atom order in some ordered spinel phases are established. For a number of cases typical diagrams of possible crystal phase states are built in the framework of the Landau theory of phase transitions. Thermodynamical conditions of hyper-kagome order formation are discussed by means of these diagrams. The proposed theory is in accordance with experimental data.

  11. Sublattice identification in noncontact atomic force microscopy of the NaCl(001) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, R.; Weiner, D.; Schirmeisen, A.; Foster, A. S.

    2009-09-15

    We compare the three-dimensional force field obtained from frequency-distance measurements above the NaCl(001) surface to atomistic calculations using various tip models. In the experiments, long-range forces cause a total attractive force even on the similarly charged site. Taking force differences between two sites minimizes the influence of such long-range forces. The magnitude of the measured force differences are by a factor of 6.5-10 smaller than the calculated forces. This is an indication that for the particular tip used in this experiment several atoms of the tip interact with the surface atoms at close tip-sample distances. The interaction of these additional atoms with the surface is small at the imaging distance, because symmetric images are obtained. The force distance characteristics resemble those of a negative tip apex ion which could be explained, e.g., by a neutral Si tip.

  12. A Comparison of Atomic Oxygen Degradation in Low Earth Orbit and in a Plasma Etcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Park, Gloria

    1997-01-01

    In low Earth orbit (LEO) significant degradation of certain materials occurs from exposure to atomic oxygen (AO). Orbital opportunities to study this degradation for specific materials are limited and expensive. While plasma etchers are commonly used in ground-based studies because of their low cost and convenience, the environment produced in an etcher chamber differs greatly from the LEO environment. Because of the differences in environment, the validity of using etcher data has remained an open question. In this paper, degradation data for 22 materials from the orbital experiment Evaluation of Oxygen Interaction with Materials (EOIM-3) are compared with data from EOIM-3 control specimens exposed in a typical plasma etcher. This comparison indicates that, when carefully considered, plasma etcher results can produce order-of-magnitude estimates of orbital degradation. This allows the etcher to be used to screen unacceptable materials from further, more expensive tests.

  13. Quantum Degenerate Mixtures of Alkali and Alkaline-Earth-Like Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Hideaki; Takasu, Yosuke; Yamaoka, Yoshifumi; Doyle, John M.; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2011-05-20

    We realize simultaneous quantum degeneracy in mixtures consisting of the alkali and alkaline-earth-like atoms Li and Yb. This is accomplished within an optical trap by sympathetic cooling of the fermionic isotope {sup 6}Li with evaporatively cooled bosonic {sup 174}Yb and, separately, fermionic {sup 173}Yb. Using cross-thermalization studies, we also measure the elastic s-wave scattering lengths of both Li-Yb combinations, |a{sub {sup 6}Li-{sup 174}Yb}|=1.0{+-}0.2 nm and |a{sub {sup 6}Li-{sup 173}Yb}|=0.9{+-}0.2 nm. The equality of these lengths is found to be consistent with mass-scaling analysis. The quantum degenerate mixtures of Li and Yb, as realized here, can be the basis for creation of ultracold molecules with electron spin degrees of freedom, studies of novel Efimov trimers, and impurity probes of superfluid systems.

  14. Role of atomic multiplets in the electronic structure of rare-earth semiconductors and semimetals.

    PubMed

    Pourovskii, Leonid V; Delaney, Kris T; Van de Walle, Chris G; Spaldin, Nicola A; Georges, Antoine

    2009-03-06

    We present a study of the effects of strong correlations in rare-earth pnictides, in which localized 4f states simultaneously retain atomiclike character and strongly influence the free-electron-like valence electron states. Using erbium arsenide as our example, we use a modern implementation of dynamical mean-field theory to obtain the atomic multiplet structure of the Er3+ 4f shell, as well as its unusually strong coupling to the electronic Fermi surfaces; these types of behavior are not correctly described within conventional electronic-structure methods. We are then able to explain the long-standing theoretical question of the quasisaturation of magnetization in an applied magnetic field, and to obtain the first quantitative agreement with experimental Shubnikov-de Haas frequencies of the Fermi-surface sheets.

  15. Effect of Irregularities in the Earth's Rotation on Relativistic Shifts in Frequency and Time of Earthbound Atomic Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateev, V. F.; Kopeikin, S. M.; Pasynok, S. L., S. L.

    2015-10-01

    The effect of irregularities in the earth's rotation (precession and nutation of the earth's axis of rotation, oscillations in the modulus of the angular velocity, periodic deviations in the line of the poles, and the angular momentum of the globe) on the frequency and time of high-stability atomic clocks are examined in terms of the theory of relativity. It is shown that the relative shift in frequency and time owing to these effects can exceed 5×10-16.

  16. Collective non-equilibrium spin exchange in cold alkaline-earth atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo, Oscar Leonardo; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-05-01

    Alkaline-earth atomic (AEA) clocks have recently been shown to be reliable simulators of two-orbital SU(N) quantum magnetism. In this work, we study the non-equilibrium spin exchange dynamics during the clock interrogation of AEAs confined in a deep one-dimensional optical lattice and prepared in two nuclear levels. The two clock states act as an orbital degree of freedom. Every site in the lattice can be thought as populated by a frozen set of vibrational modes collectively interacting via predominantly p-wave collisions. Due to the exchange coupling, orbital state transfer between atoms with different nuclear states is expected to happen. At the mean field level, we observe that in addition to the expected suppression of population transfer in the presence of a large magnetic field, that makes the single particle levels off-resonance, there is also an interaction induced suppression for initial orbital population imbalance. This suppression resembles the macroscopic self-trapping mechanism seen in bosonic systems. However, by performing exact numerical solutions and also by using the so-called Truncated Wigner Approximation, we show that quantum correlations can significantly modify the mean field suppression. Our predictions should be testable in optical clock experiments. Project supported by NSF-PHY-1521080, JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844, ARO, AFOSR, and MURI-AFOSR.

  17. Low Earth orbital atomic oxygen environmental simulation facility for space materials evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Stidham, C.R.; Banks, B.A.; Stueber, T.J.; Dever, J.A.; Rutledge, S.K.; Bruckner, E.J.

    1993-05-01

    Simulation of low Earth orbit atomic oxygen for accelerated exposure in ground-based facilities is necessary for the durability evaluation of space power system component materials for Space Station Freedom (SSF) and future missions. A facility developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations's (NASA) Lewis Research Center provides accelerated rates of exposure to a directed or scattered oxygen beam, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation, and offers in-situ optical characterization. The facility utilizes an electron-cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source to generate a low energy oxygen beam. Total hemispherical spectral reflectance of samples can be measured in situ over the wavelength range of 250 to 2500 nm. Deuterium lamps provide VUV radiation intensity levels in the 115 to 200 nm range of three to five equivalent suns. Retarding potential analyses show distributed ion energies below 30 electron volts (eV) for the operating conditions most suited for high flux, low energy testing. Peak ion energies are below the sputter threshold energy (approximately 30 eV) of the protective coatings on polymers that are evaluated in the facility, thus allowing long duration exposure without sputter erosion. Neutral species are expected to be at thermal energies of approximately .04 eV to .1 eV. The maximum effective flux level based on polyimide Kapton mass loss is 4.4 x 10 exp 6 atoms/((sq. cm)*s), thus providing a highly accelerated testing capability.

  18. Low Earth orbital atomic oxygen environmental simulation facility for space materials evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stidham, Curtis R.; Banks, Bruce A.; Stueber, Thomas J.; Dever, Joyce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Bruckner, Eric J.

    1993-01-01

    Simulation of low Earth orbit atomic oxygen for accelerated exposure in ground-based facilities is necessary for the durability evaluation of space power system component materials for Space Station Freedom (SSF) and future missions. A facility developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations's (NASA) Lewis Research Center provides accelerated rates of exposure to a directed or scattered oxygen beam, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation, and offers in-situ optical characterization. The facility utilizes an electron-cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source to generate a low energy oxygen beam. Total hemispherical spectral reflectance of samples can be measured in situ over the wavelength range of 250 to 2500 nm. Deuterium lamps provide VUV radiation intensity levels in the 115 to 200 nm range of three to five equivalent suns. Retarding potential analyses show distributed ion energies below 30 electron volts (eV) for the operating conditions most suited for high flux, low energy testing. Peak ion energies are below the sputter threshold energy (approximately 30 eV) of the protective coatings on polymers that are evaluated in the facility, thus allowing long duration exposure without sputter erosion. Neutral species are expected to be at thermal energies of approximately .04 eV to .1 eV. The maximum effective flux level based on polyimide Kapton mass loss is 4.4 x 10 exp 6 atoms/((sq. cm)*s), thus providing a highly accelerated testing capability.

  19. Optical properties and size distribution of the nanocolloids made of rare-earth ion-doped NaYF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Darayas N.; Lewis, Ashley; Wright, Donald M.; Lewis, Danielle; Valentine, Rueben; Valentine, Maucus; Wessley, Dennis; Sarkisov, Sergey; Darwish, Abdalla M.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we investigate optical properties and size distribution of the nano-colloids made of trivalent rare-earth ion doped fluorides: holmium and ytterbium, thulium and ytterbium, and erbium and ytterbium co-doped NaYF4. These materials were synthesized by using simple co-precipitation synthetic method. The initially prepared micro-crystals had very weak or no visible upconversion fluorescence signals when being pumped with a 980-nm laser. The fluorescence intensity significantly increased after the crystals were annealed at a temperature of 400°C - 600°C undergoing the transition from cubic alpha to hexagonal beta phase of the fluoride host. Nano-colloids of the crystals were made in polar solvents using the laser ablation and ball milling methods. Size analyses of the prepared nano-colloids were conducted using a dynamic light scatterometer and atomic force microscope. The nano-colloids were filled in holey PCFs and their fluorescent properties were studied and the feasibility of new a type of fiber amplifier/laser was evaluated.

  20. Origin of low sodium capacity in graphite and generally weak substrate binding of Na and Mg among alkali and alkaline earth metals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanyue; Merinov, Boris V; Goddard, William A

    2016-04-05

    It is well known that graphite has a low capacity for Na but a high capacity for other alkali metals. The growing interest in alternative cation batteries beyond Li makes it particularly important to elucidate the origin of this behavior, which is not well understood. In examining this question, we find a quite general phenomenon: among the alkali and alkaline earth metals, Na and Mg generally have the weakest chemical binding to a given substrate, compared with the other elements in the same column of the periodic table. We demonstrate this with quantum mechanics calculations for a wide range of substrate materials (not limited to C) covering a variety of structures and chemical compositions. The phenomenon arises from the competition between trends in the ionization energy and the ion-substrate coupling, down the columns of the periodic table. Consequently, the cathodic voltage for Na and Mg is expected to be lower than those for other metals in the same column. This generality provides a basis for analyzing the binding of alkali and alkaline earth metal atoms over a broad range of systems.

  1. Origin of low sodium capacity in graphite and generally weak substrate binding of Na and Mg among alkali and alkaline earth metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanyue; Merinov, Boris V.; Goddard, William A., III

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that graphite has a low capacity for Na but a high capacity for other alkali metals. The growing interest in alternative cation batteries beyond Li makes it particularly important to elucidate the origin of this behavior, which is not well understood. In examining this question, we find a quite general phenomenon: among the alkali and alkaline earth metals, Na and Mg generally have the weakest chemical binding to a given substrate, compared with the other elements in the same column of the periodic table. We demonstrate this with quantum mechanics calculations for a wide range of substrate materials (not limited to C) covering a variety of structures and chemical compositions. The phenomenon arises from the competition between trends in the ionization energy and the ion-substrate coupling, down the columns of the periodic table. Consequently, the cathodic voltage for Na and Mg is expected to be lower than those for other metals in the same column. This generality provides a basis for analyzing the binding of alkali and alkaline earth metal atoms over a broad range of systems.

  2. Towards an atomic realization of the kilogram: The measurements of NA and NAh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, P.

    2008-10-01

    An improved attempt of several national metrology institutes toreplace the present definition of the kilogram with the mass of acertain number of 12C atoms is described. This requires thedetermination of the Avogadro constant, NA, via the silicon routewith a relative uncertainty better than 2.10-8.Previously, the limiting factor is the measurement of the averagemolar mass. Consequently, a world-wide collaboration has been setup, to produce, approximately, 5 kg of ^{28}Si single-crystal withan enrichment factor greater than 99.985% to be used for animproved determination of NA. The first successful tests of alltechnological steps (enrichment of SiF4, purification and synthesisof silane, deposition of polycrystalline ^{28}Si , single crystalgrowth) for the production of high-purity ^{28}Si are described.

  3. Adsorption of water on NaCl (100) surfaces: Role of atomic steps

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Q.; Hu, J.; Salmeron, M. |

    1997-03-13

    Using an atomic force microscope operated in contact and noncontact mode, we have studied the structures formed on the (100) cleavage surface of NaCl when exposed to water vapor. Above approximately 35% relative humidity (RH), a uniform layer of water is formed and the surface steps are observed to evolve slowly. At approximately 73% RH, the step structure becomes unstable and disappears abruptly because of dissolution (deliquescence) of the salt surface. Reversing the process by drying leads to the reappearance of new, more uniform monatomic steps. At humidity levels less than 30%, water adsorbs primarily at the step edges. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  4. High numerical aperture (NA = 092) objective lens for imaging and addressing of cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robens, Carsten; Brakhane, Stefan; Alt, Wolfgang; Kleißler, Felix; Meschede, Dieter; Moon, Geol; Ramola, Gautam; Alberti, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    We have designed, built, and characterized a high-resolution objective lens that is compatible with an ultra-high vacuum environment. The lens system exploits the principle of the Weierstrass-sphere solid immersion lens to reach a numerical aperture (NA) of 0.92. Tailored to the requirements of optical lattice experiments, the objective lens features a relatively long working distance of 150 micrometers. Our two-lens design is remarkably insensitive to mechanical tolerances in spite of the large NA. Additionally, we demonstrate the application of a tapered optical fiber tip, as used in scanning near-field optical microscopy, to measure the point spread function of a high NA optical system. From the point spread function, we infer the wavefront aberration for the entire field of view of about 75 micrometers. Pushing the NA of an optical system to its ultimate limit enables novel applications in quantum technologies such as quantum control of atoms in optical microtraps with an unprecedented spatial resolution and photon collection efficiency.

  5. Loparite, a rare-earth ore (Ce, Na, Sr, Ca)(Ti, Nb, Ta, Fe+3)O3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, J.B.; Sinha, S.P.; Kosynkin, V.D.

    1997-01-01

    The mineral loparite (Ce, NA, Sr, Ca)(Ti, Nb, Ta, Fe+3)O3 is the principal ore of the light-group rare-earth elements (LREE) in Russia. The complex oxide has a perovskite (ABO3) structure with coupled substitutions, polymorphism, defect chemistry and a tendency to become metamict. The A site generally contains weakly bonded, easily exchanged cations of the LREE, Na and Ca. The B site generally contains smaller, highly charged cations of Ti, Nb or Fe+3. Mine production is from Russia's Kola Peninsula. Ore is beneficiated to produce a 95% loparite concentrate containing 30% rare-earth oxides. Loparite concentrate is refined by either a chlorination process or acid decomposition process to recover rare-earths, titanium, niobium and tantalum. Rare-earths are separated by solvent extraction and selective precipitation/dissolution. The concentrate is processed at plants in Russia, Estonia and Kazakstan.

  6. Measurements of the vertical fluxes of atomic Fe and Na at the mesopause: Implications for the velocity of cosmic dust entering the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wentao; Chu, Xinzhao; Gardner, Chester S.; Carrillo-Sánchez, Juan D.; Feng, Wuhu; Plane, John M. C.; Nesvorný, David

    2015-01-01

    downward fluxes of Fe and Na, measured near the mesopause with the University of Colorado lidars near Boulder, and a chemical ablation model developed at the University of Leeds, are used to constrain the velocity/mass distribution of the meteoroids entering the atmosphere and to derive an improved estimate for the global influx of cosmic dust. We find that the particles responsible for injecting a large fraction of the ablated material into the Earth's upper atmosphere enter at relatively slow speeds and originate primarily from the Jupiter Family of Comets. The global mean Na influx is 17,200 ± 2800 atoms/cm2/s, which equals 298 ± 47 kg/d for the global input of Na vapor and 150 ± 38 t/d for the global influx of cosmic dust. The global mean Fe influx is 102,000 ± 18,000 atoms/cm2/s, which equals 4.29 ± 0.75 t/d for the global input of Fe vapor.

  7. NARROW Na AND K ABSORPTION LINES TOWARD T TAURI STARS: TRACING THE ATOMIC ENVELOPE OF MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Pascucci, I.; Simon, M. N.; Edwards, S.; Heyer, M.; Rigliaco, E.; Hillenbrand, L.; Gorti, U.; Hollenbach, D.

    2015-11-20

    We present a detailed analysis of narrow Na i and K i absorption resonance lines toward nearly 40 T Tauri stars in Taurus with the goal of clarifying their origin. The Na i λ5889.95 line is detected toward all but one source, while the weaker K i λ7698.96 line is detected in about two-thirds of the sample. The similarity in their peak centroids and the significant positive correlation between their equivalent widths demonstrate that these transitions trace the same atomic gas. The absorption lines are present toward both disk and diskless young stellar objects, which excludes cold gas within the circumstellar disk as the absorbing material. A comparison of Na i and CO detections and peak centroids demonstrates that the atomic gas and molecular gas are not co-located, the atomic gas being more extended than the molecular gas. The width of the atomic lines corroborates this finding and points to atomic gas about an order of magnitude warmer than the molecular gas. The distribution of Na i radial velocities shows a clear spatial gradient along the length of the Taurus molecular cloud filaments. This suggests that absorption is associated with the Taurus molecular cloud. Assuming that the gradient is due to cloud rotation, the rotation of the atomic gas is consistent with differential galactic rotation, whereas the rotation of the molecular gas, although with the same rotation axis, is retrograde. Our analysis shows that narrow Na i and K i absorption resonance lines are useful tracers of the atomic envelope of molecular clouds. In line with recent findings from giant molecular clouds, our results demonstrate that the velocity fields of the atomic and molecular gas are misaligned. The angular momentum of a molecular cloud is not simply inherited from the rotating Galactic disk from which it formed but may be redistributed by cloud–cloud interactions.

  8. The effect of alkaline earth metal ion dopants on photocatalytic water splitting by NaTaO(3) powder.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Akihide; Kato, Hideki; Kudo, Akihiko

    2009-01-01

    Alkaline earth metal ions (Ca, Sr, and Ba) are doped into a NaTaO(3) photocatalyst, yielding fine particles and surface structures with nanometer-scale "steps." The formation of the surface nanostep structure depends on the amount of doped Sr and Ba. The photocatalytic water splitting over NaTaO(3) is enhanced: NaTaO(3) doped with 0.5 and 1.0 mol % of Sr shows high activities for photocatalytic water splitting without loading of a co-catalyst, and the photocatalytic activity is further improved by loading with a NiO co-catalyst.

  9. Influence of rare earth cation size on the crystal structure in rare earth silicates, Na2RESiO4(OH) (RE = Sc, Yb) and NaRESiO4 (RE = La, Yb)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latshaw, Allison M.; Wilkins, Branford O.; Chance, W. Michael; Smith, Mark D.; zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

    2016-01-01

    Crystals of Na2ScSiO4(OH) and Na2YbSiO4(OH) were synthesized at low temperatures using a sodium hydroxide based hydroflux, while crystals of NaLaSiO4 and NaYbSiO4 were grown at high temperatures using a sodium fluoride/sodium chloride eutectic flux. Both structure types were crystallized under reaction conditions that, when used for medium sized rare earths (RE = Pr, Nd, Sm - Tm) yield the Na5RE4X[SiO4]4 structure type, where X is OH in the hydroflux conditions and F in the eutectic flux conditions. Herein, we report the synthesis, structure, size effect, and magnetic properties of these compositions and introduce the new structure type of Na2RESiO4(OH), which crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pca21, of NaLaSiO4, which crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pna21, and of NaYbSiO4, which crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pnma, where both NaRESiO4 compounds have one silicon structural analog.

  10. Interaction of Rydberg atoms in circular states with the alkaline-earth Ca(4s{sup 2}) and Sr(5s{sup 2}) atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Mironchuk, E. S.; Narits, A. A.; Lebedev, V. S.

    2015-11-15

    The resonant mechanism of interaction of alkaline-earth atoms having a low electron affinity to Rydberg atoms in circular (l = vertical bar m vertical bar = n–1) and near-circular states has been studied. To describe the dynamics of resonant processes accompanied by nonadiabatic transitions between ionic and Rydberg covalent terms of a quasimolecule, an approach based on the integration of coupled equations for the probability amplitudes has been developed taking into account the possibility of the decay of an anion in the Coulomb field of the positive ionic core of a highly excited atom. The approach involves the specific features of the problem associated with the structure of the wavefunction of a Rydberg electron in states with high orbital angular momenta l ∼ n–1. This approach provides a much more accurate description of the dynamics of electronic transitions at collisions between atoms than that within the modified semiclassical Landau–Zener model. In addition, this approach makes it possible to effectively take into account many channels of the problem. The cross sections for resonant quenching of Rydberg states of the Li(nlm) atom with given principal n, orbital l = n–1, and magnetic m quantum numbers at thermal collisions with the Ca(4s{sup 2}) and Sr(5s{sup 2}) atoms have been calculated. The dependences of the results on n, m, and angle α between the relative velocity of the atoms and the normal to the plane of the orbit of the Rydberg electron have been obtained. The influence of orientational effects on the efficiency of the collisional destruction of circular and near-circular states has been studied. The results indicate a higher stability of such states to their perturbations by neutral particles as compared to usually studied nl states with low values of l (l ≪ n)

  11. Spin-Orbit-Coupled Correlated Metal Phase in Kondo Lattices: An Implementation with Alkaline-Earth Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, L.; Schachenmayer, J.; Rey, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    We show that an interplay between quantum effects, strong on-site ferromagnetic exchange interaction, and antiferromagnetic correlations in Kondo lattices can give rise to an exotic spin-orbit coupled metallic state in regimes where classical treatments predict a trivial insulating behavior. This phenomenon can be simulated with ultracold alkaline-earth fermionic atoms subject to a laser-induced magnetic field by observing dynamics of spin-charge excitations in quench experiments.

  12. Atomic-scale imaging of the dissolution of NaCl islands by water at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jinbo; Guo, Jing; Ma, Runze; Meng, Xiangzhi; Jiang, Ying

    2017-03-01

    The dissolution of sodium chloride (NaCl) in water is a frequently encountered process in our daily lives. While the NaCl dissolution process in liquid water has been extensively studied, whether and how the dissolution occurs below the freezing point is still not clear. Using a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM), here we were able to directly visualize the dissolution of Au-supported NaCl (0 0 1) bilayer islands by water at atomic level. We found that the single water molecule on the STM tip can assist the extraction of single Na+ from the NaCl surface even at 5 K, while leaving the Cl‑ intact. When covered with a full water monolayer, the NaCl islands started to dissolve from the step edges and also showed evidence of dissolution inside the terraces as the temperature was raised up to 145 K. At 155 K, the water molecules completely desorbed from the surface, which was accompanied with the decomposition and restructuring of the bilayer NaCl islands. Those results suggest that the dissolution of NaCl may occur well below the freezing point at the ice/NaCl interfaces and is mainly driven by the interaction between the water molecules and the Na+, which is in clear contrast with the NaCl dissolution in liquid water.

  13. Influence of rare-earth ions on SiO{sub 2}-Na{sub 2}O-RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J. A.; Benmore, C. J.; Holland, D.; Du, J.; Beuneu, B.; Mekki, A.

    2011-01-27

    Praseodymium and europium sodium silicate glasses of nominal composition (SiO{sub 2}){sub 0.70-x}(Na{sub 2}O){sub 0.30}(RE{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub x}, where RE is the rare earth and 0 {le} x {le} 0.10, were studied by neutron and high-energy x-ray scattering and classical molecular dynamics simulations. The observation of a significant x-ray intensity in doped as compared to un-doped glasses is indicative of RE-RE correlations at a distance of {approx} 3.7-3.9 {angstrom}, much shorter than would be expected for a homogeneous distribution, suggesting that clustering of the rare-earth cations occurs in both these glass systems at low concentrations. Above x = 0.075 (nominal), minimal changes in this region indicate that the RE atoms are incorporated much more randomly into the glass structure. The molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the rare-earth ions enter the sodium-rich regions in the sodium silicate glasses and act as modifiers. A cluster analysis performed on the model systems indicates that the tendency for clustering is higher in praseodymium-containing glasses than in the europium glasses.

  14. Cyclotron dynamics of a Kondo singlet in a spin-orbit-coupled alkaline-earth-metal atomic gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lv, Hao; Wang, Wen-Li; Du, Juan; Qian, Jun; Wang, Yu-Zhu

    2014-11-01

    We propose a scheme to investigate the interplay between the Kondo-exchange interaction and the quantum spin Hall effect with ultracold fermionic alkaline-earth-metal atoms trapped in two-dimensional optical lattices using ultracold collision and laser-assisted tunneling. In the strong Kondo-coupling regime, although the loop trajectory of the mobile atom disappears, collective dynamics of an atom pair in two clock states can exhibit an unexpected spin-dependent cyclotron orbit in a plaquette, realizing the quantum spin Hall effect of the Kondo singlet. We demonstrate that the collective cyclotron dynamics of the spin-zero Kondo singlet is governed by an effective Harper-Hofstadter model in addition to second-order diagonal tunneling.

  15. Isotropic and anisotropic shear velocity model of the NA upper mantle using EarthScope data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiva, J.; Clouzet, P.; French, S. W.; Yuan, H.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthScope TA deployment has provided dense array coverage across the continental US and with it, the opportunity for high resolution 3D seismic velocity imaging of both lithosphere and asthenosphere in the continent. Building upon our previous work, we present a new 3D isotropic, radially and azimuthally anisotropic shear wave model of the North American (NA) lithospheric mantle, using full waveform tomography and shorter-period (40 s) waveform data. Our isotropic velocity model exhibits pronounced spatial correlation between major tectonic localities of the eastern NA continent, as evidenced in the geology, and seismic anomalies, suggesting recurring episodes of tectonic events not only are well exposed at the surface, but also leave persistent scars in the continental lithosphere mantle, marked by isotropic and radially anisotropic velocity anomalies that reach as deep as 100-150 km. In eastern North America, our Vs images distinguish the fast velocity cratonic NA from the deep rooted large volume high velocity blocks which are east of the continent rift margin and extend 200-300 km offshore into Atlantic. In between is a prominent narrow band of low velocities that roughly follows the south and eastern Laurentia rift margin and extends into New England. The lithosphere associated with this low velocity band is thinned likely due to combined effects of repeated rifting processes along the rift margin and northward extension of the Bermuda low-velocity channel across the New England region. Deep rooted high velocity blocks east of the Laurentia margin are proposed to represent the Proterozoic Gondwanian terranes of pan-African affinity, which were captured during the Rodinia formation but left behind during the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. The anisotropy model takes advantage of the up-to-date SKS compilation in the continent and new splitting results from Greenland. The new joint waveform and SKS splitting data inversion is carried out with a 2

  16. Simulation of the synergistic low Earth orbit effects of vacuum thermal cycling, vacuum UV radiation, and atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Degroh, Kim K.; Stidham, Curtis R.; Stueber, Thomas J.; Dever, Therese M.; Rodriguez, Elvin; Terlep, Judith A.

    1992-01-01

    In order to assess the low Earth orbit (LEO) durability of candidate space materials, it is necessary to use ground laboratory facilities which provide LEO environmental effects. A facility combining vacuum thermal cycling and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation has been designed and constructed at NASA Lewis Research Center for this purpose. This facility can also be operated without the VUV lamps. An additional facility can be used to provide VUV exposure only. By utilizing these facilities, followed by atomic oxygen exposure in an RF plasma asher, the effects of the individual vacuum thermal cycling and VUV environments can be compared to the effect of the combined vacuum thermal cycling/VUV environment on the atomic oxygen durability of materials. The synergistic effects of simulated LEO environmental conditions on materials were evaluated by first exposing materials to vacuum thermal cycling, VUV, and vacuum thermal cycling/VUV environments followed by exposure to atomic oxygen in an RP plasma asher. Candidate space power materials such as atomic oxygen protected polyimides and solar concentrator mirrors were evaluated using these facilities. Characteristics of the Vacuum Thermal Cycling/VUV Exposure Facility which simulates the temperature sequences and solar ultraviolet radiation exposure that would be experienced by a spacecraft surface in LEO are discussed. Results of durability evaluations of some candidate space power materials to the simulated LEO environmental conditions will also be discussed. Such results have indicated that for some materials, atomic oxygen durability is affected by previous exposure to thermal cycling and/or VUV exposure.

  17. Phenylethynyl-butyltellurium inhibits the sulfhydryl enzyme Na+, K+ -ATPase: an effect dependent on the tellurium atom.

    PubMed

    Quines, Caroline B; Rosa, Suzan G; Neto, José S S; Zeni, Gilson; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2013-11-01

    Organotellurium compounds are known for their toxicological effects. These effects may be associated with the chemical structure of these compounds and the oxidation state of the tellurium atom. In this context, 2-phenylethynyl-butyltellurium (PEBT) inhibits the activity of the sulfhydryl enzyme, δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase. The present study investigated on the importance of the tellurium atom in the PEBT ability to oxidize mono- and dithiols of low molecular weight and sulfhydryl enzymes in vitro. PEBT, at high micromolar concentrations, oxidized dithiothreitol (DTT) and inhibited cerebral Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity, but did not alter the lactate dehydrogenase activity. The inhibition of cerebral Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity was completely restored by DTT. By contrast, 2-phenylethynyl-butyl, a molecule without the tellurium atom, neither oxidized DTT nor altered the Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity. In conclusion, the tellurium atom of PEBT is crucial for the catalytic oxidation of sulfhydryl groups from thiols of low molecular weight and from Na(+), K(+)-ATPase.

  18. Cage-to-cage migration rates of Xe atoms in zeolite NaA from magnetization transfer experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, A. Keith; Jameson, Cynthia J.; Gerald, Rex E., II

    1994-08-01

    Xenon trapped in the alpha cages of zeolite NaA exhibits distinct NMR signals for clusters Xe1, Xe2, Xe3,..., up to Xe8. Using multisite magnetization transfer experiments, we have measured the rate constants kmn for the elementary processes that are involved in the cage-to-cage transfer of Xe atoms in the zeolite NaA, that is, for a single Xe atom leaving a cage containing Xen to appear in a neighboring cage containing Xem-1, thereby forming Xem. In a random walk simulation, these rate constants reproduce over a hundred magnetization decay/recovery curves that we have measured in four samples of Xe in zeolite NaA at room temperature, in selective inversion, and complementary experiments for all the significantly populated clusters. The simulations also lead to the correct experimental equilibrium distributions, that is, the fractions of the alpha cages containing Xe1,Xe2,...,Xe8.

  19. [Indirect determination of rare earth elements in Chinese herbal medicines by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chao; Lu, Jian-Ping; Xue, Min-Hua; Tan, Fang-Wei; Wu, Xiao-Yan

    2014-07-01

    Based on their similarity in chemical properties, rare earth elements were able to form stable coordinated compounds with arsenazo III which were extractable into butanol in the presence of diphenylguanidine. The butanol was removed under reduced pressure distillation; the residue was dissolved with diluted hydrochloric acid. As was released with the assistance of KMnO4 and determined by hydrogen generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry in terms of rare earth elements. When cesium sulfate worked as standard solution, extraction conditions, KMnO4 amount, distillation temperature, arsenazo III amount, interfering ions, etc were optimized. The accuracy and precision of the method were validated using national standard certified materials, showing a good agreement. Under optimum condition, the linear relationship located in 0.2-25 microg x mL(-1) and detection limit was 0.44 microg x mL(-1). After the herbal samples were digested with nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide, the rare earth elements were determined by this method, showing satisfactory results with relative standard deviation of 1.3%-2.5%, and recoveries of 94.4%-106.0%. The method showed the merits of convenience and rapidness, simple instrumentation and high accuracy. With the rare earths enriched into organic phase, the separation of analytes from matrix was accomplished, which eliminated the interference. With the residue dissolved by diluted hydrochloric acid after the solvent was removed, aqueous sample introduction eliminated the impact of organic phase on the tubing connected to pneumatic pump.

  20. The Production of Energetic Atomic Beams via Charge Exchange for the Simulation of the Low-Earth Orbit Environment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketsdever, Andrew David

    The interactions of energetic atoms with solid materials and other gases are important to a wide range of engineering disciplines. The interactions between low -Earth orbit (LEO) atomic oxygen and spacecraft surfaces, outgassed molecules, rocket exhaust plume species and other atmospheric gases are of great interest to the aerospace engineering community. The approach taken in this study was to design a facility which can be used to understand the physics of energetic gas-gas and gas-surface collisions. The type of facility needed to accomplish this requires a continuous, high energy (5-100eV) atomic beam with a low energy spread and a moderate flux. The flux of atoms from this facility, although estimated to be several orders of magnitude lower than LEO conditions, is sufficient to gain qualitative and quantitative insight into LEO environmental interactions. In the pilot scale true energy atmospheric simulator (TEAS) developed in this research, ion engine technology is incorporated to produce a beam of energetic ions. Because the ion source discharges can be operated on several gases, simulation of any atmospheric species can be achieved; however, atomic oxygen is the species of interest in this study. The ions are accelerated to the desired energy range and undergo a charge exchange process in molecular hydrogen to produce the energetic atomic beam Molecular hydrogen is chosen as the charge exchange gas because of the relatively large cross section for the reaction and the small scattering angle per collision. An electrostatic energy analyzer, a mass spectrometer and thin silver reaction films are used to diagnose the beams produced by the TEAS.

  1. High intensity 5 eV atomic oxygen source and Low Earth Orbit (LEO) simulation facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. B.; Spangler, L. H.; Hoffbauer, M. A.; Archuleta, F. A.; Leger, Lubert; Visentine, James

    1987-01-01

    An atomic oxygen exposure facility has been developed for studies of material degradation. The goal of these studies is to provide design criteria and information for the manufacture of long life (20 to 30 years) construction materials for use in LEO. The studies that are being undertaken using the facility will provide: absolute reaction cross sections for use in engineering design problems; formulations of reaction mechanisms; and calibration of flight hardware (mass spectrometers, etc.) in order to directly relate experiments performed in LEO to ground based investigations. The facility consists of: (1) a CW laser sustained discharge source of O atoms having a variable energy up to 5 eV and an intensity between 10(15) and 10(17) O atoms s(-1) cm(-2); (2) an atomic beam formation and diagnostics system consisting of various stages of differential pumping, a mass spectrometer detector, and a time of flight analyzer; (3) a spinning rotor viscometer for absolute O atom flux measurements; and (4) provision for using the system for calibration of actual flight instruments. Surface analysis equipment is available for the characterization of material surfaces before and after exposure to O atoms.

  2. Shifts in the ESR Spectra of Alkali-Metal Atoms (Li, Na, K, Rb) on Helium Nanodroplets

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Andreas W; Gruber, Thomas; Filatov, Michael; Ernst, Wolfgang E

    2013-01-01

    He-droplet-induced changes of the hyperfine structure constants of alkali-metal atoms are investigated by a combination of relativistically corrected ab initio methods with a simulation of the helium density distribution based on He density functional theory. Starting from an accurate description of the variation of the hyperfine structure constant in the M–He diatomic systems (M=Li, Na, K, Rb) as a function of the interatomic distance we simulate the shifts induced by droplets of up to 10 000 4He atoms. All theoretical predictions for the relative shifts in the isotropic hyperfine coupling constants of the alkali-metal atoms attached to helium droplets of different size are then tied to a single, experimentally derived parameter of Rb. PMID:23125112

  3. Nonlinear optical and optical limiting properties of polymeric carboxyl phthalocyanine coordinated with rare earth atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Peng; Wang, Zonghua; Chen, Jishi; Zhou, Yu; Zhang, Fushi

    2017-04-01

    The nonlinear optical properties of the polymeric carboxyl phthalocyanine with lanthanum (LaPPc.COOH), holmium (HoPPc.COOH) and ytterbium (YbPPc.COOH) as centric atom, were investigated by the Z-scan method using a picosecond 532 nm laser. The synthesized phthalocyanines had steric polymeric structure and dissolved well in aqueous solution. The nonlinear optical response of them was attributed to the reverse saturable absorption and self-focus refraction. The nonlinear absorption properties decreased with the centric atoms changing from La, Ho to Yb. The largest second-order hyperpolarizability and optical limiting response threshold of LaPPc.COOH were 3.89 × 10-29 esu and 0.32 J/cm2, respectively. The reverse saturable absorption was explained by a three level mode of singlet excited state under the picosecond irradiation. The result indicates the steric structure presented additive stability of these polymeric phthalocyanines for their application as potential optical limiting materials.

  4. Cold Atom Interferometers Used in Space (CAIUS) for Measuring the Earth's Gravity Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraz, Olivier; Siemes, Christian; Massotti, Luca; Haagmans, Roger; Silvestrin, Pierluigi

    2016-08-01

    The scope of the paper is to propose different concepts for future space gravity missions using Cold Atom Interferometers (CAI) for measuring the diagonal elements of the gravity gradient tensor, the spacecraft angular velocity and the spacecraft acceleration. The aim is to achieve better performance than previous space gravity missions due to a very low white noise spectral behaviour of the CAI instrument and a very high common mode rejection, with the ultimate goals of determining the fine structures of the gravity field with higher accuracy than GOCE and detecting time-variable signals in the gravity field.

  5. Oligomeric rare-earth metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Simon; Zimmermann, Sina; Brühmann, Matthias; Meyer, Eva; Rustige, Christian; Wolberg, Marike; Daub, Kathrin; Bell, Thomas; Meyer, Gerd

    2014-11-01

    Comproportionation reactions of rare-earth metal trihalides (RX3) with the respective rare-earth metals (R) and transition metals (T) led to the formation of 22 oligomeric R cluster halides encapsulating T, in 19 cases for the first time. The structures of these compounds were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and are composed of trimers ({T3R11}X15-type, P63/m), tetramers ({T4R16}X28{R4} (P-43m), {T4R16}X20 (P42/nnm), {T4R16}X24(RX3)4 (I41/a) and {T4R16}X23 (C2/m) types of structure) and pentamers ({Ru5La14}2Br39, Cc) of {TRr}n (n=2-5) clusters. These oligomers are further enveloped by inner (Xi) as well as outer (Xa) halido ligands, which possess diverse functionalities and interconnect like oligomers through i-i, i-a and/or a-i bridges. The general features of the crystal structures for these new compounds are discussed and compared to literature entries as well as different structure types with oligomeric T centered R clusters. Dimers and tetramers originating from the aggregation of {TR6} octahedra via common edges are more frequent than trimers and pentamers, in which the {TRr} clusters share common faces.

  6. On the thermal process of atomic hydrogen escape from the earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudovkin, M. I.; Golovchanskaia, I. V.

    1983-10-01

    The authors' approach to the problem of the escape of gases from the planetary gravitational field is close to the consideration by Biutner (1958, 1959) which generalizes results obtained by Jones (1923) for the particular cases of the dense and rarefied atmosphere. The choice of the escape layer, the height distribution of the escape probability as well as escape intensity, have been investigated carefully by Biutner when considering the helium isotope escape from the atmosphere. The objects of the present paper include: (1) to take into account the escape of atomic hydrogen from the bulk atmospheric layer (h approximately 100-1000 km) using present-day data on the composition and temperature distribution in the upper atmosphere (Jacchia, 1977), (2) to find the perturbation of the velocity distribution function in energy space under escape conditions when it is not assumed to be Maxwellian or close to it in the whole dissipation layer and (3) to compare the escape rates obtained under such consideration with the production rates of atomic hydrogen in the atmosphere as well as with local values of the fluxes that are observed. The difference between the results obtained and those of Monte Carlo calculations is attributed to the placing of the lower boundary surface at a lower atmospheric level in the present model.

  7. Mental models or methodological artefacts? Adults' 'naïve' responses to a test of children's conceptions of the earth.

    PubMed

    Nobes, Gavin; Panagiotaki, Georgia

    2009-05-01

    Vosniadou and Brewer (1992) claim that children's drawings and answers to questions show that they have naive, theory-like 'mental models' of the earth; for example, they believe it to be flat, or hollow with people inside. However, recent studies that have used different methods have found little or no evidence of these misconceptions. The contrasting accounts, and possible reasons for the inconsistent findings, were tested by giving adults (N = 484) either the original task (designed for 5-year olds) or a new version in which the same drawing instructions and questions were rephrased and clarified. Many adults' responses to the original version were identical to children's 'naïve' drawings and answers. The new version elicited substantially fewer non-scientific responses. These findings indicate that even adults find the original instructions and questions ambiguous and confusing, and that this is the principal reason for their non-scientific drawings and answers. Since children must find the task even more confusing than adults, this explanation very probably applies to many of their non-scientific responses, too, and therefore accounts for the discrepant findings of previous research. 'Naïve' responses result largely from misinterpretation of Vosniadou and Brewer's apparently simple task, rather than from mental models of the earth.

  8. An Experiment to Study Sporadic Atom Layers in the Earth's Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (SAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Michael C.

    1999-01-01

    The Sudden Atom Layer (SAL) Rocket was successfully launched in February 1998. All instruments worked well except those supplied by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. (A dummy weight was launched for the neutral mass spectrometer and the ion version died shortly after lift-off.) A paper has already been published in GRL concerning the dust layer detected by an on board instrument and compared to ground-based observations made at the Arecibo Observatory by Cornell graduate student S. Collins (lidar) and Q. Zhou (radar). Collins presented a comparison of the sodium lidar data and onboard observations with a theoretical model by Plane and Cox at the Fan AGU Meeting. In addition Gelinas and Kelley presented a review paper dealing with the entire SAL instrument complement at the same meeting. An unexpected new explanation for the outer scale of E region plasma irregularities has come out of the data set. We anticipate at least a total of four papers will be published within a year of launch.

  9. Rare earth doped glass-ceramics containing NaLaF4 nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsts, E.; Krieke, G.; Rogulis, U.; Smits, K.; Zolotarjovs, A.; Jansons, J.; Sarakovskis, A.; Kundzins, K.

    2016-09-01

    Oxyfluoride glasses 16Na2O-9NaF-5LaF3-7Al2O3-63SiO2 (mol%) activated with 3% terbium, dysprosium, praseodymium and neodymium fluorides have been prepared and studied by differential thermal analysis, cathodoluminescence, X-ray induced luminescence, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. We found out that the presence of crystalline phase enhances the X-ray induced luminescence intensity. X-ray induced luminescence is the most intense for the sample activated with terbium and treated at 700 °C, whereas the praseodymium and neodymium activated samples have the fastest decay times.

  10. Investigations of the ground-state hyperfine atomic structure and beta decay measurement prospects of 21Na with improved laser trapping techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Mary Anderson

    1999-05-01

    This thesis describes an experiment in which a neutral atom laser trap loaded with radioactive 21Na was improved and then used for measurements. The sodium isotope (half-life=22 sec) is produced on line at the 88 in. cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The author developed an effective magnesium oxide target system which is crucial to deliver a substantive beam of 21Na to the experiment. Efficient manipulation of the 21Na beam with lasers allowed 30,000 atoms to be contained in a magneto-optical trap. Using the cold trapped atoms, the author measured to high precision the hyperfine splitting of the atomic ground state of 21Na. She measured the 3S1/2(F=1,m=0)-3S1/2(F=2,m=0) atomic level splitting of 21Na to be 1,906,471,870±200 Hz. Additionally, she achieved initial detection of beta decay from the trap and evaluated the prospects of precision beta decay correlation studies with trapped atoms.

  11. Electronic absorption spectra of rare earth (III) species in NaCl-2CsCl eutectic based melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkovich, V. A.; Ivanov, A. B.; Yakimov, S. M.; Tsarevskii, D. V.; Golovanova, O. A.; Sukhikh, V. V.; Griffiths, T. R.

    2016-09-01

    Electronic absorption spectra of ions of trivalent rare earth elements were measured in the melts based on NaCl-2CsCl eutectic in the wavelength ranges of 190-1350 and 1450-1700 nm. The measurements were performed at 550-850 °C. The EAS of Y, La, Ce and Lu containing melts have no absorption bands in the studied regions. For the remaining REEs (Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb) the absorption bands in the EAS were assigned to the corresponding f-f electron transitions. The Stark effect was observed for Yb(III) F5/2 excited state. Increasing temperature leads to decreasing intensity of the absorption bands, except for the bands resulting from hypersensitive transitions. Beer's law was confirmed up to 0.4 M solutions of REE.

  12. A valence-bond diatomics-in-molecules model for the formation of Na + and Na 2+ ions from the interaction of excited sodium atoms with a tungsten surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntz, Philip J.

    1985-04-01

    Potential energy surfaces for Na( 2S, 2P) interacting with a partially covered tungsten surface are computed within the framework of the method of diatomics-in-molecules (DIM). Only two sodium atoms are considered explicitly but the effect of all of the adsorbed sodium is taken into account through its influence on the fragment matrix elements in the DIM formulation. Na 2+ wavefunctions are approximated by valence-bond calculations for the 2Σ g+ and 2Σ u+ manifolds. The three lowest potential energy surfaces of the polyatomic system suggest plausible pathways for the production of Na + and Na 2+ ions from the interaction of Na( 2P) atoms with the metal surface as observed by Auschwitz and Lacmann.

  13. The long-range non-additive three-body dispersion interactions for the rare gases, alkali, and alkaline-earth atoms.

    PubMed

    Tang, Li-Yan; Yan, Zong-Chao; Shi, Ting-Yun; Babb, James F; Mitroy, J

    2012-03-14

    The long-range non-additive three-body dispersion interaction coefficients Z(111), Z(112), Z(113), and Z(122) are computed for many atomic combinations using standard expressions. The atoms considered include hydrogen, the rare gases, the alkali atoms (up to Rb), and the alkaline-earth atoms (up to Sr). The term Z(111) arising from three mutual dipole interactions is known as the Axilrod-Teller-Muto coefficient or the DDD (dipole-dipole-dipole) coefficient. Similarly, the terms Z(112), Z(113), and Z(122) arise from the mutual combinations of dipole (1), quadrupole (2), and octupole (3) interactions between atoms and they are sometimes known, respectively, as dipole-dipole-quadrupole, dipole-dipole-octupole, and dipole-quadrupole-quadrupole coefficients. Results for the four Z coefficients are given for the homonuclear trimers, for the trimers involving two like-rare-gas atoms, and for the trimers with all combinations of the H, He, and Li atoms. An exhaustive compilation of all coefficients between all possible atomic combinations is presented as supplementary data.

  14. Synthesis of uniform rare earth fluoride (NaMF4) nanotubes by in situ ion exchange from their hydroxide [M(OH)3] parents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2009-01-27

    In this article, we demonstrate the production of uniform hexagonal sodium rare earth fluoride (beta-NaMF(4)) nanotubes through a hydrothermal in situ ion-exchange reaction by using rare earth hydroxides [M(OH)(3)] as a parent. The trivalent rare earth hydroxides were hydrothermally prepared at 120 degrees C and possessed a quasi-layered structure, which could be formed to be nanotubal morphology through a rolling up process from 2-D sheets. Moreover, the hexagonal structure of rare earth hydroxides [M(OH)(3)] displays a noticeable similarity with beta-NaMF(4). This similarity makes the formation of beta-NaMF(4) with nonlayered structure possible through in situ chemical transformation from M(OH)(3) with a layered structure. The single-crystal beta-NaMF(4) nanotubes were synthesized with well-controlled diameter (80-500 nm), aspect ratio (6-30), wall thickness (25-80 nm), and contents (such as M = Pr, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Er, as well as lanthanide-doped rare earth NaMF(4)). The multicolor upconversion fluorescence has also been successfully realized in the Yb(3+)/Er(3+) (green) and Yb(3+)/Tm(3+) (blue) co-doped beta-NaMF(4) nanotubes by UC excitation in the NIR region. The various UC emission ratios of the samples were investigated as a function of hydrothermal reaction time to research the UC properties of the products and to further demonstrate the hydrothermal in situ ion-exchange process.

  15. Multiple doping structures of the rare-earth atoms in β-SiAlON:Ce phosphors and their effects on luminescence properties.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lin; Xu, Fang-Fang; Zeng, Xiong-Hui; Li, Zuo-Sheng; Mao, Zhi-Yong; Lu, Ping; Zhu, Ying-Chun; Liu, Xue-Jian; Zhang, Lin-Lin

    2015-07-14

    The critical doping structures of rare-earth atoms in the promising β-SiAlON phosphors have long been argued owing to the lack of direct evidence. Here, the exact locations and coordination of the Ce rare-earth atoms in the β-SiAlON structure have been examined using an atom-resolved Cs-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. Three different occupation sites for the Ce atoms have been directly observed: two of them are in the structural channel coordinated with six and nine N(O) atoms, respectively; the other one is the unexpected substitution site for Si(Al). The chemical valences and stabilities of the doping Ce ions at the different occupation sites have been evaluated using density functional calculations. Correlation of the different doping structures with the luminescence properties has been investigated by the aid of cathodoluminescence (CL) microanalysis, which verifies the different contribution of the interstitial trivalent Ce ions to the light emission while no luminescence is observed for the substitutional doping of quadrivalent Ce.

  16. The Correlation of the NA Measurements by Counting 28Si Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mana, G.; Massa, E.; Sasso, C. P.; Stock, M.; Fujii, K.; Kuramoto, N.; Mizushima, S.; Narukawa, T.; Borys, M.; Busch, I.; Nicolaus, A.; Pramann, A.

    2015-09-01

    An additional value of the Avogadro constant was obtained by counting the atoms in isotopically enriched Si spheres. With respect to the previous determination, the spheres were etched and repolished to eliminate metal contaminations and to improve the roundness. In addition, all the input quantities—molar mass, lattice parameter, mass, and volume—were remeasured aiming at a smaller uncertainty. In order to make the values given in Andreas et al. [Metrologia 48, S1 (2011)] and Azuma et al. [Metrologia 52, 360 (2015)] usable for a least squares adjustment, we report about the estimate of their correlation.

  17. Reactions of silver atoms and clusters in Ag-NaA zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waşowicz, Tomasz; Michalik, Jacek

    The agglomeration of silver in hydrated and dehydrated Ag-NaA zeolites gamma irradiated at 77 K has been studied by ESR. The agglomeration process is radiation-induced in hydrated samples whereas in dehydrated ones is initiated by thermal autoreduction. In the result different silver clusters are stabilized at room temperature, Ag 2+3…Ag + becomes stabilized in hydrated zeolites and Ag n+ 6 in dehydrated ones. Silver hexamers have been reacted with various molecular adsorbates. The reaction rate depends on molecular size and nucleophilic character of adsorbate. In the presence of water and small alcohols silver hexamers are transformed to the elongated tetramers.

  18. Visualization of the atomic structure of solid solutions with the NaCl structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babanov, Yu. A.; Ponomarev, D. A.; Ustinov, V. V.

    2015-04-01

    It has been shown how an atomic cluster for a solid solution with a rock salt structure can be constructed using the Pauling model. Simulation has been performed for 343000 ions of Ni x Zn1 - x O3 ( x = 0, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0) oxide substitutional solid solutions. Coordinates of all cluster ions are obtained and distribution functions of ion pairs (Ni-O, Ni-Ni, Ni-Zn, Zn-Zn, Zn-O, O-O) are constructed as functions of distance. The shape of the normal distribution indicates the existence of bounded chaos in the system of oxide solid solutions. The width of the Gaussian distribution function is determined by the difference of metal ionic radii. The results are in agreement with both X-ray diffraction and EXAFS spectroscopy data.

  19. Spin exchange in the excitation of spin-polarized Na atoms by Ne/sup +/-ion impact

    SciTech Connect

    Jitschin, W.; Osimitsch, S.; Reihl, H.; Mueller, D.W.; Kleinpoppen, H.; Lutz, H.O.

    1986-11-01

    The 3s-3p excitation of spin-polarized Na atoms by Ne/sup +/ ions has been studied for impact energies E/sub lab/ = 200 eV to 6 keV, i.e., in the adiabatic regime. The total excitation cross section and the three Stokes polarization parameters of the fluorescence light have been measured. The linear polarization of the light shows a preferential excitation of the chemically bondm/sub l/chemically bond = 1 magnetic substates. The circular polarization probes the spin orientation of the excited 3p state. At the highest impact energies investigated the experimental data are compatible with conservation of spin orientation during the collision. With decreasing impact energy, the spin polarization of the final 3p state becomes smaller than the spin polarization of the initial 3s state. This apparent spin depolarization is attributed to the exchange interaction between the Na valence electron and the unfilled Ne/sup +/ 2p/sup 5/ core in the quasimolecule formed during the collision.

  20. An electrically conductive thermal control surface for spacecraft encountering Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) atomic oxygen indium tin oxide-coated thermal blankets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, J. L.

    1987-01-01

    An organic black thermal blanket material was coated with indium tin oxide (ITO) to prevent blanket degradation in the low Earth orbit (LEO) atomic oxygen environment. The blankets were designed for the Galileo spacecraft. Galileo was initially intended for space shuttle launch and would, therefore, have been exposed to atomic oxygen in LEO for between 10 and 25 hours. Two processes for depositing ITO are described. Thermooptical, electrical, and chemical properties of the ITO film are presented as a function of the deposition process. Results of exposure of the ITO film to atomic oxygen (from a shuttle flight) and radiation exposure (simulated Jovian environment) are also presented. It is shown that the ITO-protected thermal blankets would resist the anticipated LEO oxygen and Jovian radiation yet provide adequate thermooptical and electrical resistance. Reference is made to the ESA Ulysses spacecraft, which also used ITO protection on thermal control surfaces.

  1. Adsorption of alkali, alkaline-earth, simple and 3d transition metal, and nonmetal atoms on monolayer MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X. D.; Fang, Y. M.; Wu, S. Q. E-mail: wsq@xmu.edu.cn; Zhu, Z. Z. E-mail: wsq@xmu.edu.cn

    2015-05-15

    Single adsorption of different atoms on pristine two-dimensional monolayer MoS{sub 2} have been systematically investigated by using density functional calculations with van der Waals correction. The adatoms cover alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, main group metal, 3d-transition metals, coinage metal and nonmetal atoms. Depending on the adatom type, metallic, semimetallic or semiconducting behavior can be found in direct bandgap monolayer MoS{sub 2}. Additionally, local or long-range magnetic moments of two-dimensional MoS{sub 2} sheet can also attained through the adsorption. The detailed atomic-scale knowledge of single adsorption on MoS{sub 2} monolayer is important not only for the sake of a theoretical understanding, but also device level deposition technological application.

  2. Enhancement of single particle rare earth doped NaYF4: Yb, Er emission with a gold shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ling; Green, Kory; Hallen, Hans; Lim, Shuang Fang

    2015-01-01

    Upconversion of infrared light to visible light has important implications for bioimaging. However, the small absorption cross-section of rare earth dopants has limited the efficiency of these anti-Stokes nanomaterials. We present enhanced excitation absorption and single particle fluorescent emission of sodium yttrium fluoride, NaYF4: Yb, Er based upconverting nanoparticles coated with a gold nanoshell through surface plasmon resonance. The single gold-shell coated nanoparticles show enhanced absorption in the near infrared, enhanced total emission intensity, and increased green relative to red emission. We also show differences in enhancement between single and aggregated gold shell nanoparticles. The surface plasmon resonance of the gold-shell coated nanoparticle is shown to be dependent on the shell thickness. In contrast to other reported results, our single particle experimental observations are corroborated by finite element calculations that show where the green/red emission enhancement occurs, and what portion of the enhancement is due to electromagnetic effects. We find that the excitation enhancement and green/red emission ratio enhancement occurs at the corners and edges of the doped emissive core.

  3. Scintillation properties of rare-earth doped NaPO3-Al(PO3)3 glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuro, Tomoaki; Okada, Go; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Masai, Hirokazu; Yanagida, Takayuki

    2016-12-01

    We systematically investigated photoluminescence (PL), scintillation and dosimeter properties of rare-earth (RE) doped NaPO3-Al(PO3)3 (NAP) glasses. The NAP glasses doped with a series of RE ions (La-Yb, except Pm) with a consistent concentration (0.3 wt%) were prepared by the conventional melt-quenching method. The PL and scintillation decay time profiles showed fast (ns) and slow (μs or ms) components: the fast components from 15 to 100 ns were due to the host or 5d-4f transition emission, and the slow components from 15 μs to 5 ms were due to the 4f-4f transitions of RE. The thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) was evaluated as a dosimeter property, and glow peaks appeared around 400 °C in all the samples. The TSL dose response function was examined in the dose range from 10 mGy to 10 Gy. Among the samples tested, Nd and Tb doped glasses showed higher signal by at least one order of magnitude than those of non-doped and other RE-doped samples. Over the dose range tested, the TSL signals are linearly related with the incident X-ray dose, showing a potential for practical applications.

  4. Atomic layer deposited cobalt oxide: An efficient catalyst for NaBH{sub 4} hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nandi, Dip K.; Manna, Joydev; Dhara, Arpan; Sharma, Pratibha; Sarkar, Shaibal K.

    2016-01-15

    Thin films of cobalt oxide are deposited by atomic layer deposition using dicobalt octacarbonyl [Co{sub 2}(CO){sub 8}] and ozone (O{sub 3}) at 50 °C on microscope glass substrates and polished Si(111) wafers. Self-saturated growth mechanism is verified by x-ray reflectivity measurements. As-deposited films consist of both the crystalline phases; CoO and Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} that gets converted to pure cubic-Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase upon annealing at 500 °C under ambient condition. Elemental composition and uniformity of the films is examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion-mass spectroscopy. Both as-deposited and the annealed films have been successfully tested as a catalyst for hydrogen evolution from sodium borohydride hydrolysis. The activation energy of the hydrolysis reaction in the presence of the as-grown catalyst is found to be ca. 38 kJ mol{sup −1}. Further implementation of multiwalled carbon nanotube, as a scaffold layer, improves the hydrogen generation rate by providing higher surface area of the deposited catalyst.

  5. A facility to produce an energetic, ground state atomic oxygen beam for the simulation of the Low-Earth Orbit environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ketsdever, Andrew D.; Weaver, David P.; Muntz, E. P.

    1994-01-01

    Because of the continuing commitment to activity in low-Earth orbit (LEO), a facility is under development to produce energetic atmospheric species, particularly atomic oxygen, with energies ranging from 5 to 80 eV. This relatively high flux facility incorporates an ion engine to produce the corresponding specie ion which is charge exchanged to produce a neutral atomic beam. Ion fluxes of around 10(exp 15) sec(exp -1) with energies of 20-70 eV have been achieved. A geometrically augmented inertially tethered charge exchanger (GAITCE) was designed to provide a large column depth of charge exchange gas while reducing the gas load to the low pressure portion of the atomic beam facility. This is accomplished using opposed containment jets which act as collisional barriers to the escape of the dense gas region formed between the jets. Leak rate gains to the pumping system on the order of 10 were achieved for moderate jet mass flows. This system provides an attractive means for the charge exchange of atomic ions with a variety of gases to produce energetic atomic beams.

  6. Optical properties of NaLuF4: Yb3+: Tm3+/Ho3+ rare earth nanocrystals in microstructure hollow fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yundong; Li, Hui; Li, Hanyang; Wu, Yongfeng; Yu, Changqiu; Zhang, Tuo; Yuan, Ping

    2016-11-01

    In the present paper, we first demonstrate NaLuF4: Yb3+: Tm3+/Ho3+ rare earth nanocrystals in microstructure hollow fiber. An analysis of the intense blue upconversion emission at 450 and 475 nm in Tm3+/Yb3+ codoped NaLuF4 under excitation power 0.65W available from solid laser emitting at 980nm, has been undertaken. Fluorescence intensity ratio (FIR) variation of temperature-sensitive blue upconversion emission at 450and 475 nm in this material was recorded in the temperature range from 300 to 345 K. The maximum sensitivity derived from the FIR technique of the blue upconversion emission is approximately 0.005 K-1. The results imply that Tm3+/Yb3+ codoped NaLuF4 is a potential candidate for the optical temperature sensor.

  7. First-principles study of ternary graphite compounds cointercalated with alkali atoms (Li, Na, and K) and alkylamines towards alkali ion battery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ri, Gum-Chol; Yu, Chol-Jun; Kim, Jin-Song; Hong, Song-Nam; Jong, Un-Gi; Ri, Mun-Hyok

    2016-08-01

    First-principles calculations were carried out to investigate the structural, energetic, and electronic properties of ternary graphite compounds cointercalated with alkali atoms (AM = Li, Na, and K) and normal alkylamine molecules (nCx; x = 1, 2, 3, 4), denoted as AM-nCx-GICs. From the optimization of the orthorhombic unit cells for the crystalline compounds, it was found that, with the increase in the atomic number of alkali atoms, the layer separations decrease in contrast to AM-GICs, while the bond lengths between alkali atoms and graphene layer, and nitrogen atom of alkylamine increase. The calculated formation energies and interlayer binding energies of AM-nC3-GICs indicate that the compounds is increasingly stabilized from Li to K, and the energy barriers for migration of alkali atoms suggest that alkali cation with larger ionic radius diffuses more smoothly in graphite, being similar to AM-GICs. Through the analysis of electronic properties, it was established that more extent of electronic charge is transferred from more electropositive alkali atom to the carbon ring of graphene layer, and the hybridization of valence electron orbitals between alkylamine molecules and graphene layer is occurred.

  8. Determination of yttrium and rare-earth elements in rocks by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gupta, J G

    1981-01-01

    With use of synthetic solutions and several international standard reference materials a method has been developed for determining traces of Y, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu in rocks by electrothermal atomization in a pyrolytically-coated graphite furnace. Depending on the element, the sensitivity is of the order of 10(-9)-10(-12) g at 2500 degrees . To avoid matrix interferences the lanthanides are separated from the common elements by co-precipitation with calcium and iron as carriers. The data for Canadian reference rock SY-2 (syenite), U.S.G.S. reference rocks W-2 (diabase), DNC-1 (diabase) and BIR-1 (basalt), and South African reference rock NIM-18/69 (carbonatite) obtained by graphite-furnace atomization are compared with the values obtained by flame atomic-absorption. The results are in good agreement with literature values.

  9. Possibility of formation of rare-earth negative ions by attachment of [ital f] electrons to the atomic ground state

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, D.; Beck, D.R. )

    1993-06-01

    Some recent experiments indicate that certain rare-earth negative ions exist. Some local-density calculations indicate that attachment of [ital f] electrons is most favorable for Tm and Md. Here we investigate by means of relativistic configuration-interaction methods whether Tm[sup [minus

  10. Neutron diffraction study of the atomic structure of cubic sodium-tungsten bronze (Na{sub 0.69}WO{sub 3}) single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Isakov, I. V. Kalyukanov, A. I.; Volkov, V. L.; Ozerov, R. P.; Fykin, L. E.

    2011-05-15

    The atomic structure of a single crystal of one of four Na{sub 0.69}WO{sub 3} phases, which exist below 293 K, has been refined from neutron diffraction data (WWR-c reactor at the Karpov Institute of Physical Chemistry, Obninsk Branch; {lambda} = 1.168 Angstrom-Sign ; {lambda}/2 contribution < 0.8%; sin{theta}/{lambda} {<=} 0.810; T = 288 K; crystal sphere Empty-Set = 4.4 mm; cubic unit cell with a = 7.672 Angstrom-Sign , sp. gr. Im3, z = 8, {mu} = 1.9 mm{sup -1}). The Na{sub 0.69}WO{sub 3} atomic structure has been refined (198 independent reflections) taking into account the anisotropy of thermal vibrations (R{sub w} = 4.0%). The stoichiometric coefficient Na(0.69) is also refined. A structural distortion is revealed, which is characterized by the displacement of oxygen atoms (0, 0.2609(2), 0.2391(2)) from the ideal perovskite positions (0, 1/4, 1/4); this displacement doubles the ideal perovskite lattice period. The oxygen displacements can be described as rotations of oxygen octahedra by 3.58 Degree-Sign around the [111] direction. The structure remains cubic because the octahedra rotations with respect to all three perovskite cubic axes are identical.

  11. High-pressure synthesis and structural characterization of the type II clathrate compound Na(30.5)Si(136) encapsulating two sodium atoms in the same silicon polyhedral cages.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Shoji; Komatsu, Masaya; Tanaka, Masashi; Sawa, Hiroshi; Inumaru, Kei

    2014-05-28

    Single crystals of sodium containing silicon clathrate compounds Na8Si46 (type I) and NaxSi136 (type II) were prepared from the mixtures of NaSi and Si under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions of 5 GPa at 600-1000 °C. The type II crystals were obtained at relatively low-temperature conditions of 700-800 °C, which were found to have a Na excess composition Na30.5Si136 in comparison with the compounds NaxSi136 (x ≤ 24) obtained by a thermal decomposition of NaSi under vacuum. The single crystal study revealed that the Na excess type II compound crystallizes in space group Fd3̅m with a lattice parameter of a = 14.796(1) Å, slightly larger than that of the ambient phase (Na24Si136), and the large silicon hexakaidecahedral cages (@Si28) are occupied by two sodium atoms disordered in the two 32e sites around the center of the @Si28 cages. At temperatures <90 K, the crystal symmetry of the compound changes from the face-centered to the primitive cell with space group P213, and the Na atoms in the @Si28 cages are aligned as Na2 pairs. The temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility of Na30.5Si136 suggests that the two Na ions (2 Na(+)) in the cage are changed to a Na2 molecule. The Na atoms of Na30.5Si136 can be deintercalated from the cages topochemically by evacuation at elevated temperatures. The single crystal study of the deintercalated phases NaxSi136 (x = 25.5 and 5.5) revealed that only excess Na atoms have disordered arrangements.

  12. Prediction of Setschenow constants of N-heteroaromatics in NaCl solutions based on the partial charge on the heterocyclic nitrogen atom.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Li, Zhongjian; Lei, Lecheng; Sun, Feifei; Zhu, Jingke

    2016-02-01

    The solubilities of 19 different kinds of N-heteroaromatic compounds in aqueous solutions with different concentrations of NaCl were determined at 298.15 K with a UV-vis spectrophotometry and titration method, respectively. Setschenow constants, Ks, were employed to describe the solubility behavior, and it is found that the higher ring numbers of N-heteroaromatics gave rise to the lower values of Ks. Moreover, Ks showed a good linear relationship with the partial charge on the nitrogen atom (QN) for either QN > 0 or QN < 0 N-heteroaromatics. It further revealed that QN was well-matched in the prediction of salting-out effect for N-heteroaromatics compared to the conventional descriptors such as molar volume (VH) and the octanol-water partition coefficient (Kow). The heterocyclic N in N-heteroaromatics may interact with Na(+) ions in NaCl solution for QN < 0 and with Cl(-) for QN > 0.

  13. Interactions of atomic oxygen with material surfaces in low Earth orbit: Preliminary results from experiment A0114

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.; Christl, L.; Raikar, G. N.; Weimer, J. J.; Wiser, R.; Peters, P. N.

    1991-01-01

    The University of Alabama at Huntsville atomic oxygen experiment consisted of two trays of 64 one inch diameter solid samples. One tray was placed on the leading edge and one on the trailing edge of the spacecraft. Half of each sample was covered to provide a control. Thus it was intended that the effects of atomic oxygen and solar ultraviolet radiation on the surface properties of each material could be distinguised from each other and from the effects of aging. Sixteen of the samples were placed on a thermally isolated plate of highly polished aluminum, while the main plate was coated with the thermal control coating S13-GLO. Though the experiment was entirely passive, it was hoped that the effects of thermal activation might be observed, if present. The plates were expected to stabilize at temperatures differing by 20 to 30 C. The experiment also carried a device to measure the spacecraft altitude and several oxygen atom reflectometers which have not been analyzed to date. The samples included thin films of metals Os, Ir, Pt, Ni, W, Mo, and Al coated onto fused silica optical flats; metal carbides (WC, SiC), solid carbons of various types, eight polymers and some other coatings of various types.

  14. Absorption spectroscopy of heavy alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in rare gas matrices—CCSD(T) calculations and atomic site occupancies

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Barry M.; McCaffrey, John G.

    2016-01-28

    Isolation of the heavier alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in the solid rare gases (RGs) Ar, Kr, and Xe is analysed with absorption spectroscopy and interpreted partly with the assistance of ab initio calculations of the diatomic M ⋅ RG ground state interaction potentials. The y{sup 1}P←a{sup 1}S resonance transitions in the visible spectral region are used to compare the isolation conditions of these two metal atom systems and calcium. Complex absorption bands were recorded in all three metal atom systems even after extensive sample annealing. Coupled cluster calculations conducted on the ground states of the nine M ⋅ RG diatomics (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba; RG = Ar, Kr, and Xe) at the coupled cluster single, double, and non-iterative triple level of theory revealed long bond lengths (>5 Å) and shallow bound regions (<130 cm{sup −1}). All of the M ⋅ RG diatomics have bond lengths considerably longer than those of the rare gas dimers, with the consequence that isolation of these metal atoms in a single substitutional site of the solid rare gas is unlikely, with the possible exception of Ca/Xe. The luminescence of metal dimer bands has been recorded for Ba and Sr revealing very different behaviours. Resonance fluorescence with a lifetime of 15 ns is observed for the lowest energy transition of Sr{sub 2} while this transition is quenched in Ba{sub 2}. This behaviour is consistent with the absence of vibrational structure on the dimer absorption band in Ba{sub 2} indicating lifetime broadening arising from efficient relaxation to low-lying molecular states. More extensive 2D excitation-emission data recorded for the complex site structures present on the absorption bands of the atomic Ba and Sr systems will be presented in future publications.

  15. Absorption spectroscopy of heavy alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in rare gas matrices--CCSD(T) calculations and atomic site occupancies.

    PubMed

    Davis, Barry M; McCaffrey, John G

    2016-01-28

    Isolation of the heavier alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in the solid rare gases (RGs) Ar, Kr, and Xe is analysed with absorption spectroscopy and interpreted partly with the assistance of ab initio calculations of the diatomic M ⋅ RG ground state interaction potentials. The y(1)P ← a(1)S resonance transitions in the visible spectral region are used to compare the isolation conditions of these two metal atom systems and calcium. Complex absorption bands were recorded in all three metal atom systems even after extensive sample annealing. Coupled cluster calculations conducted on the ground states of the nine M ⋅ RG diatomics (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba; RG = Ar, Kr, and Xe) at the coupled cluster single, double, and non-iterative triple level of theory revealed long bond lengths (>5 Å) and shallow bound regions (<130 cm(-1)). All of the M ⋅ RG diatomics have bond lengths considerably longer than those of the rare gas dimers, with the consequence that isolation of these metal atoms in a single substitutional site of the solid rare gas is unlikely, with the possible exception of Ca/Xe. The luminescence of metal dimer bands has been recorded for Ba and Sr revealing very different behaviours. Resonance fluorescence with a lifetime of 15 ns is observed for the lowest energy transition of Sr2 while this transition is quenched in Ba2. This behaviour is consistent with the absence of vibrational structure on the dimer absorption band in Ba2 indicating lifetime broadening arising from efficient relaxation to low-lying molecular states. More extensive 2D excitation-emission data recorded for the complex site structures present on the absorption bands of the atomic Ba and Sr systems will be presented in future publications.

  16. Stability of the MgSiO[supscript 3] analog NaMgF[subscript 3] and its implication for mantle structure in super-Earths

    SciTech Connect

    Grocholski, B.; Shim, S.-H.; Prakapenka, V.B.

    2010-08-27

    First-principles calculations on MgSiO{sub 3} suggested a breakdown into MgO + SiO{sub 2} at pressure above 1000 GPa with an extremely large negative Clapeyron slope, isolating the lowermost mantles of larger super-Earths ({approx}10M{direct_sum}) from convection. Similar calculations predicted the same type of breakdown in NaMgF{sub 3} to NaF + MgF{sub 2} at 40 GPa, allowing for experimental examination. We found that NaMgF{sub 3} is stable to at least 70 GPa and 2500 K. In our measurements on MgF{sub 2} (an SiO{sub 2} analog), we found a previously unidentified phase ('phase X') between the stability fields of pyrite-type and cotunnite-type (49-53 GPa and 1500-2500 K). A very small density increase (1%) at the pyrite-type {yields} phase X transition would extend the stability of NaMgF{sub 3} relative to the breakdown products. Furthermore, because phase X appears to have a cation coordination number intermediate between pyrite-type (6) and cotunnite-type (9), entropy change ({Delta}S) would be smaller at the breakdown boundary, making the Clapeyron slope (dP/dT = {Delta}S/{Delta}V) much smaller than the prediction. If similar trend occurs in MgSiO{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2}, the breakdown of MgSiO{sub 3} may occur at higher pressure and have much smaller negative Clapeyron slope than the prediction, allowing for large-scale convection in the mantles of super-Earth exoplanets.

  17. Interactions of atomic oxygen with material surfaces in low Earth orbit: Preliminary results from experiment A0114

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.; Christl, Ligia C.; Raikar, Ganesh N.; Weimer, J. J.; Wiser, R.; Peters, Palmer N.

    1992-01-01

    The atomic oxygen experiment consisted of two trays (one-sixth of a Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) tray each) of 64 one inch diameter solid samples. It was intended that the effects of atomic oxygen and solar ultraviolet irradiation on the surface properties of each material could be distinguished from each other and from the effects of aging. Sixteen of the samples were placed on a thermally isolated plate of highly polished aluminum, while the main plate was coated with the thermal control coating S13-GLO. Though the experiment was entirely passive, it was hoped that the effects of thermal activation might be observed, if present. The plates were expected to stabilize at temperatures differing by 20-30 C. The samples included thin films of metals Os, Ir, Pt, Ni, Mo, and Al coated onto silica optical flats, metal carbides (WC, SiC), solid carbons of various types, eight polymers, and some other coatings of various types. Analysis is essentially complete using stylus profilometry with high sensitivity Talystep and lower sensitivity Talysurf machines. Though the integrated fluence of O atoms on the LDEF was 30 times that of previous missions, etch depths of the polymers such as the polyimide Kapton show excellent agreement with extrapolations from previous flight data. However, some new effects were observed. We demonstrated on a previous experiment on STS-8 that profilometry of this kind can show steps of 50 A (for example those due to oxide film growth on metals) and this is now the preferred method for estimating etch depth (or mass loss) of erodible substances.

  18. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopic determination of rare earth elements in geological samples after preconcentration by countercurrent chromatography—I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pukhovskaya, V. M.; Maryutina, T. A.; Grebneva, O. N.; Kuz'min, N. M.; Spivakov, B. Ya.

    1993-09-01

    Countercurrent chromatography (CCC) was applied to group pre-separation of rare earth elements (REE) in rocks. A 0.5 mol/l solution of di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid (D2EHPA) in n-decane as stationary phase, and aqueous HC1 solution as mobile phase were used. Experimental conditions were found for quantitative separation of REE from the rock constituents that interfere with their inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) determination. The complete preseparation procedure takes 40 min at a mobile phase pumping rate of 2 ml/min. Interelement and off-peak background corrections were applied to compensate for the contributions of mutual spectral interferences to the analyte line and background intensities. Standard reference rock materials and samples of different composition with well known REE contents were analysed. The data obtained are in good agreement with certified and previously determined values, except for "heavy" REE such as Tm, Yb and Lu.

  19. Following electron impact excitation of single (N, O, F, Ne, Na, Mg, Al, Si) atom L subshells ionization cross section calculations by using Lotz's equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydinol, Mahmut

    2017-02-01

    L shell and L subshells ionization cross sections σL and σLi (i = 1, 2, 3) following electron impact on (N,O, F, Ne, Na, Mg, Al, Si) atoms calculated. By using Lotz' equation for nonrelativistic cases in Matlab σL and σLi cross section values obtained for ten electron impact(Eo) values in the range of ELiNa 8ELi) for each atom. Starting from Eo=ELi(each subshell ionization threshold energy), σL and σLi are increasing rapidly with Eo. For a fixed Eo value(≈3.ELi), while Z value increases from 7≤Z≤14 σL and σLi decrease. Results show that for smaller values of Eo(close to ELi), x-ray yields formation of Li(i=1,2,3) subshells decreases while competing other yields are increase. Results may help to understand similar findings which obtained from other electron impact excitation of L shell σL and subshells σLi studies for single atoms.

  20. Local atomic structure of K{sub x}Na{sub (1−x)}NbO{sub 3} by total x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Shashaank; Priya, Shashank; Petkov, Valeri

    2014-12-08

    Local atomic structure of K{sub x}Na{sub (1−x)}NbO{sub 3} with 0.0 ≤ x ≤ 1.0 was studied using atomic Pair Distribution Function analysis based on x-ray diffraction. Powdered crystals were found to exhibit a re-entrant behavior by being orthorhombic (Amm2) for x < 0.42, monoclinic (Pm) for 0.42 ≤ x ≤ 0.63 and again orthorhombic (Amm2) for x > 0.63. Non-centrosymmetric structure of NaNbO{sub 3} (Amm2) was also evident in the piezoresponse force microscopy analysis revealing the presence of the ferroelectric domains and switching behavior. Lowering of the crystallographic symmetry for 0.42 ≤ x ≤ 0.63 is discussed in terms of differences in the sizes of Na{sup +} and K{sup +} ions and Na–O and K–O bond lengths. Besides being a bridging phase, as suggested by the previous studies on lead-based compositions, present study suggests that lower symmetry monoclinic phase of compositionally disordered perovskite solid solutions could also be a manifestation of the difference in the sizes of constituent ions and bond lengths.

  1. Evolution of the atomic order and valence state of rare-earth atoms and uranium in a new carbon-metal composite—diphthalocyanine pyrolysate C64H32N16 Me ( Me = Y, La, Ce, Eu, and U)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sovestnov, A. E.; Kapustin, V. K.; Tikhonov, V. I.; Fomin, E. V.; Chernenkov, Yu. P.

    2014-08-01

    The structure of a metal-carbon composite formed by the pyrolysis of diphthalocyanine of some rare-earth elements (Y, La, Ce, Eu) and uranium in the temperature range T ann = 800-1700°C has been investigated for the first time by the methods of X-ray diffraction analysis and X-ray line shift. It has been shown that, in the general case, the studied pyrolysates consist of three phases. One phase corresponds to the structure of graphite. The second phase corresponds to nitrides, carbides, and oxides of basic metal elements with a crystallite size ranging from 5 to 100 nm. The third phase is amorphous or consisting of crystallites with a size of ˜1 nm. It has been found that all the basic elements (Y, La, Ce, Eu, U) and incorporated iodine atoms in the third phase are in a chemically bound state. The previously unobserved electronic configurations have been revealed for europium. The possibility of including not only atoms of elements forming diphthalocyanine but also other elements (for example, iodine) in the composite structure is of interest, in particular, for the creation of a thermally, chemically, and radiation resistant metal-carbon matrix for the radioactive waste storage.

  2. Determination of rare earth elements in geological materials by inductively coupled argon plasma/atomic emission spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crock, J.G.; Lichte, F.E.

    1982-01-01

    Inductively coupled argon plasma/optical emission spectrometery (ICAP/OES) is useful as a simultaneous, multielement analytical technique for the determination of trace elements in geological materials. A method for the determination of trace-level rare earth elements (REE) in geological materials using an ICAP 63-channel emission spectrometer is described. Separation and preconcentration of the REE and yttrium from a sample digest are achieved by a nitric acid gradient cation exchange and hydrochloric acid anion exchange. Precision of 1-4% relative standard deviation and comparable accuracy are demonstrated by the triplicate analysis of three splits of BCR-1 and BHVO-1. Analyses of other geological materials including coals, soils, and rocks show comparable precision and accuracy.

  3. The use of plasma ashers and Monte Carlo modeling for the projection of atomic oxygen durability of protected polymers in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Auer, Bruce M.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Degroh, Kim K.; Gebauer, Linda

    1992-01-01

    The results of ground laboratory and in-space exposure of polymeric materials to atomic oxygen has enabled the development of a Monte Carlo computational model which simulates the oxidation processes of both environments. The cost effective projection of long-term low-Earth-orbital durability of protected polymeric materials such as SiO(x)-coated polyimide Kapton photovoltaic array blankets will require ground-based testing to assure power system reliability. Although silicon dioxide thin film protective coatings can greatly extend the useful life of polymeric materials in ground-based testing, the projection of in-space durability based on these results can be made more reliable through the use of modeling which simulates the mechanistic properties of atomic oxygen interaction, and replicates test results in both environments. Techniques to project long-term performance of protected materials, such as the Space Station Freedom solar array blankets, are developed based on ground laboratory experiments, in-space experiments, and computational modeling.

  4. Microstructual investigation of mixed rar earth iron boron processed vis melt-spinning and high-pressure gas-atomization for isotrophic bonded permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Buelow, Nicholas Lee

    2005-01-01

    A solid solution of three rare earths (RE) in the RE2Fe14B structure have been combined to create the novel mixed rare earth iron boron (MRE2Fe14B) alloy family. MRE2Fe14B exhibits reduced temperature dependent magnetic properties; remanence and coercivity. The desired form of MRE2Fe14B is a powder that can be blended with a polymer binder and compression or injection molded to form an isotropic polymer bonded permanent magnet (PBM). Commercially, Nd2Fe14B is the alloy of choice for PBMs. Powders of Nd2Fe14B are made via melt-spinning as can be MRE2Fe14B which allows for direct comparisons. MRE2Fe14B made using melt-spinning at high wheel speeds is overquenched and must be annealed to an optimal hard magnetic state. Due to the rare earth content in the MRE2Fe14B powders, they must be protected from the environment in which they operate. This protection is accomplished by using a modified fluidized bed process to grow a protective fluoride coating nominally 15nm thick, to reduce air oxidation. MRE2Fe14B has demonstrated reduced temperature dependent magnetic properties in ribbon and PBM form. The real challenge has been modifying alloy designs that were successfully melt-spun to be compatible with high-pressure gas-atomization (HPGA). The cooling rates in HPGA are lower than melt-spinning, as the powders are quenched via convective cooling, compared to melt-spinning, which quenches initially by conductive cooling. Early alloy designs, in gas atomized and melt-spun form, did not have similar phase compositions or microstructures. Alloy additions, such as the addition of zirconium as a nucleation catalyst, were successful in creating similar phases and microstructures in the HPGA powders and melt-spun ribbon of the same MRE2Fe14

  5. Vibronic transitions in the alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, Rb) - alkaline-earth-metal (Ca, Sr) series: A systematic analysis of de-excitation mechanisms based on the graphical mapping of Frank-Condon integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pototschnig, Johann V.; Meyer, Ralf; Hauser, Andreas W.; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2017-02-01

    Research on ultracold molecules has seen a growing interest recently in the context of high-resolution spectroscopy and quantum computation. After forming weakly bound molecules from atoms in cold collisions, the preparation of molecules in low vibrational levels of the ground state is experimentally challenging, and typically achieved by population transfer using excited electronic states. Accurate potential energy surfaces are needed for a correct description of processes such as the coherent de-excitation from the highest and therefore weakly bound vibrational levels in the electronic ground state via couplings to electronically excited states. This paper is dedicated to the vibrational analysis of potentially relevant electronically excited states in the alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, Rb)- alkaline-earth metal (Ca,Sr) diatomic series. Graphical maps of Frank-Condon overlap integrals are presented for all molecules of the group. By comparison to overlap graphics produced for idealized potential surfaces, we judge the usability of the selected states for future experiments on laser-enhanced molecular formation from mixtures of quantum degenerate gases.

  6. Reversible uptake of water on NaCl nanoparticles at relative humidity below deliquescence point observed by noncontact environmental atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bruzewicz, Derek A; Checco, Antonio; Ocko, Benjamin M; Lewis, Ernie R; McGraw, Robert L; Schwartz, Stephen E

    2011-01-28

    The behavior of NaCl nanoparticles as a function of relative humidity (RH) has been characterized using non-contact environmental atomic force microscopy (e-AFM) to measure the heights of particles deposited on a prepared hydrophobic surface. Cubic NaCl nanoparticles with sides of 35 and 80 nm were found to take up water reversibly with increasing RH well below the bulk deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) of 75% at 23(∘)C, and to form a liquid-like surface layer of thickness 2 to 5 nm, with measurable uptake (>2 nm increase in particle height) beginning at 70% RH. The maximum thickness of the layer increased with increasing RH and increasing particle size over the range studied. The liquid-like behavior of the layer was indicated by a reversible rounding at the upper surface of the particles, fit to a parabolic cross-section, where the ratio of particle height to maximum radius of curvature increases from zero (flat top) at 68% RH to 0.7 ± 0.3 at 74% RH. These observations, which are consistent with a reorganization of mass on the solid NaCl nanocrystal at RH below the DRH, suggest that the deliquescence of NaCl nanoparticles is more complex than an abrupt first-order phase transition. The height measurements are consistent with a phenomenological model that assumes favorable contributions to the free energy of formation of a liquid layer on solid NaCl due both to van der Waals interactions, which depend partly upon the Hamaker constant, A(film), of the interaction between the thin liquid film and the solid NaCl, and to a longer-range electrostatic interaction over a characteristic length of persistence, ξ; the best fit to the data corresponded to A(film)= 1 kT and ξ = 2.33 nm.

  7. Atomic resolution for non-equilibrium structures in the steady state and for structural transformations at the interface between NaCl(c) and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Kazuhiko; Yamada, Masanori

    1996-07-01

    Observations of both nanoscale and microscale images were carried out on a NaCl(001) surface in water using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The observed higher density of steps and the observed convex and concave steps in water result from the forward motion of monatomic steps and crystal growth of the so-called step-flow mode. The non-equilibrium structure having a unit cell of 0953-8984/8/27/003/img1 structure has been observed for the first time on terraces. Since every 0953-8984/8/27/003/img2 on terraces is located at the same height as 0953-8984/8/27/003/img3, each 0953-8984/8/27/003/img2 as well as each 0953-8984/8/27/003/img3 have been observed as protrusions by AFM. The metastable configuration at the interface between the NaCl(001) surface and water was transformed, at steps, into the equilibrium structure of NaCl(c), about 3 h after the NaCl(001) surface had been covered with its own saturated water. After about 30 min, however, 0953-8984/8/27/003/img2 still remains at the same height as 0953-8984/8/27/003/img3 at steps, or sodium ions leave the surface at steps. The reason why the forward motion of monatomic steps takes place at the interface between the NaCl(001) surface and water is the decrease of about 0.05 nm in the distance of like nearest neighbours in the non-equilibrium structure having a unit cell of 0953-8984/8/27/003/img1 structure on terraces after its structural transformation to the equilibrium structure of NaCl(c) with the aid of water molecules.

  8. Controlled synthesis of racemic indenyl rare-earth metal complexes via the cooperation between the intramolecular coordination of donor atoms and a bridge.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuangliu; Wu, Zhangshuan; Zhou, Lingmin; Wang, Shaowu; Zhang, Lijun; Zhu, Xiancui; Wei, Yun; Zhai, Jinhua; Wu, Jie

    2013-06-03

    The reactions of Me2Si(C9H6CH2CH2-DG)2 (DG = NMe2 (1), CH2NMe2 (2), OMe (3), and N(CH2CH2)2O (4)) with [(Me3Si)2N]3RE(μ-Cl)Li(THF)3 in toluene afforded a series of racemic divalent rare-earth metal complexes: {η(5):η(1):η(5):η(1)-Me2Si(C9H5CH2CH2-DG)2}RE (DG = NMe2, RE = Yb (6) and Eu (7); DG = CH2NMe2, RE = Yb (8), Eu (9), and Sm (10); DG = OMe, RE = Yb (11) and Eu (12); DG = N(CH2CH2)2O, RE = Yb (13) and Eu (14)). Similarly, the racemic divalent rare-earth metal complexes {η(5):η(1):η(5):η(1)-Me2Si(C9H5CH2CH2CH2NMe2)(C9H5CH2CH2OMe)}RE (RE = Yb (15) and Eu (16)) were also obtained. The reaction of Me2Si(C9H5CH2CH2OMe)2Li2 with NdCl3 gave a racemic dimeric neodymium chloride {η(5):η(1):η(5)-Me2Si(C9H5CH2CH2OMe)2NdCl}2 (17), whereas the reaction of Me2Si(C9H5CH2CH2NMe2)2Li2 with SmCl3 afforded a racemic dinuclear samarium chloride bridged by lithium chloride {η(5):η(1):η(5):η(1)-Me2Si(C9H5CH2CH2NMe2)2SmCl}2(μ-LiCl) (18). Further reaction of complex 18 with LiCH2SiMe3 provided an unexpected rare-earth metal alkyl complex {η(5):η(1):η(5):η(1):σ-Me2Si(C9H5CH2CH2NMe2)[(C9H5CH2CH2N(CH2)Me]}Sm (19) through the activation of an sp(3) C-H bond α-adjacent to the nitrogen atom. Complexes 19 and {η(5):η(1):η(5):η(1):σ-Me2Si(C9H5CH2CH2NMe2)[(C9H5CH2CH2N(CH2)Me]}Y (20) were also obtained by one-pot reactions of Me2Si(C9H5CH2CH2NMe2)2Li2 with RECl3 followed by treatment with LiCH2SiMe3. All compounds were fully characterized by spectroscopic methods and elemental analysis. Complexes 6-10 and 14-20 were further characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. All of the prepared rare-earth metal complexes were racemic, suggesting that racemic organo rare-earth metal complexes could be controllably synthesized by the cooperation between a bridge and the intramolecular coordination of donor atoms.

  9. Rare-earth free yellow-green emitting NaZnPO4:Mn phosphor for lighting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haranath, D.; Mishra, S.; Yadav, S.; Sharma, R. K.; Kandpal, L. M.; Vijayan, N.; Dalai, M. K.; Sehgal, G.; Shanker, V.

    2012-11-01

    Manganese-doped sodium zinc phosphate (NaZnPO4:Mn) phosphor with exceptional features having ultra-violet (UV) to visible absorption (300-470 nm), yellow-green (˜543 nm) broad-band photoluminescence (PL), and appreciable color co-ordinates (x = 0.39, y = 0.58) is reported. It has a crystal structure consisting of discrete PO4 tetrahedra linked by ZnO4 and NaO4 distorted tetrahedral such that three tetrahedra, one of each kind, share one corner. The presence of UV sensitive Zn-O-Zn bonds and their efficient energy transfer to Mn2+ ions resulted in brightest PL and external quantum yield of 63% at 418 nm. Our experiment demonstrated the possibility of producing inexpensive white-light emitting devices for future.

  10. Luminescence properties of Eu-activated alkaline and alkaline-earth silicate Na{sub 2}Ca{sub 3}Si{sub 6}O{sub 16}

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Huang, Yanlin; Wang, Xigang; Qin, Lin; Seo, Hyo Jin

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • A novel yellow-emitting alkaline and alkaline-earth silicate Na{sub 2}Ca{sub 3}Si{sub 6}O{sub 16}:Eu{sup 2+} was first developed. • Under excitation with UV or near UV light the silicate presents broad emission band centered at 580 nm. - Abstract: Yellow-emitting phosphors of Na{sub 2}Ca{sub 3}Si{sub 6}O{sub 16}:Eu{sup 2+} was prepared by wet chemistry sol–gel method. X-ray powder diffraction and SEM measurements were applied to characterize the structure and morphology, respectively. The luminescence properties were investigated by the photoluminescence excitation and emission spectra, decay curve (lifetimes), CIE coordinates and the internal quantum efficiencies. The excitation spectra can match well with the emission light of near UV-LED chips (360–400 nm). Na{sub 2}Ca{sub 3}Si{sub 6}O{sub 16}:Eu{sup 2+} presents a symmetric emission band from 4f{sup 6}5d{sup 1} ⟶ 4f{sup 7}({sup 8}S{sub 7/2}) transitions of Eu{sup 2+} ions on doping below 3.0 mol%. On increasing Eu-doping levels, the sample contains two kinds of emission centers, i.e., Eu{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 3+} ions, which present the characteristic broad band (5d ⟶ 4f) and narrower (4f ⟶ 4f) luminescence lines, respectively. The energy transfer, the luminescence thermal stability (activation energy ΔE for thermal quenching) and luminescence mechanism of Na{sub 2}Ca{sub 3}Si{sub 6}O{sub 16}:Eu{sup 2+} phosphors were discussed by analyzing the relationship between the luminescence characteristics and the crystal structure.

  11. Melting depths and mantle heterogeneity beneath Hawaii and the East Pacific Rise: Constraints from Na/Ti and rare earth element ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Putirka, K.

    1999-02-01

    Mantle melting calculations are presented that place constraints on the mineralogy of the basalt source region and partial melting depths for oceanic basalts. Melting depths are obtained from pressure-sensitive mineral-melt partition coefficients for Na, Ti, Hf, and the rare earth elements (REE). Melting depths are estimated by comparing model aggregate melt compositions to natural basalts from Hawaii and the East Pacific Rise (EPR). Variations in melting depths in a peridotite mantle are sufficient to yield observed differences in Na/Ti, Lu/Hf, and Sm/Yb between Hawaii and the EPR. Initial melting depths of 95{endash}120 km are calculated for EPR basalts, while melting depths of 200{endash}400 km are calculated for Hawaii, indicating a mantle that is 300&hthinsp;{degree}C hotter at Hawaii. Some isotope ratios at Hawaii are correlated with Na/Ti, indicating vertical stratification to isotopic heterogeneity in the mantle; similar comparisons involving EPR lavas support a layered mantle model. Abundances of Na, Ti, and REE indicate that garnet pyroxenite and eclogite are unlikely source components at Hawaii and may be unnecessary at the EPR. The result that some geochemical features of oceanic lavas appear to require only minor variations in mantle mineral proportions (2{percent} or less) may have important implications regarding the efficiency of mantle mixing. Heterogeneity required by isotopic studies might be accompanied by only subtle differences in bulk composition, and material that is recycled at subduction zones might not persist as mineralogically distinct mantle components. {copyright} 1999 American Geophysical Union

  12. Comparison between Earth-based Na observations of Mercury's exosphere by THEMIS and in-situ magnetic field measurements by MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangano, Valeria; Massetti, Stefano; Milillo, Anna; Plainaki, Christina; Orsini, Stefano; Rispoli, Rosanna; Leblanc, Francois

    2015-04-01

    The Na exosphere of Mercury is being studied since its discovery in mid '80s from Earth-based telescopes, and it has revealed a high dynamicity and variability. Though the processes and inter-relations at the basis of the Hermean exosphere dynamics are not still clearly understood, there is no doubt that a connection exists among the surface, the exosphere, the intrinsic magnetic field of the body and the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF), which drives the Solar Wind ions into the Mercury's magnetosphere and surface, via the magnetic reconnection. In this work we analyze our dataset of images of the exospheric Na emission, collected from 2009 to 2013 by the THEMIS ground-based telescope, to perform a comprehensive statistical study of the recurrent patterns, and their relationship with the variability of the IMF. For this purpose, we take advantage of a subset (years 2011-2013) of contemporary in situ measurements of the IMF obtained by the MAG instrument onboard the MESSENGER spacecraft. We found that the mid-high latitude double peaks is the most common Na emission pattern, supporting the view that the solar wind ion precipitation through the polar cusps has an important role in the generation of the observed Na exospheric emission. Moreover, the lack of a statistically significant North-South asymmetry seems to disfavour the idea of an asymmetric and/or shifted magnetic dipole. By analysing a subset of quasi-full disk images, we found that most of the Na emission patterns seems to occur in the pre-noon sector (53%), about 1/3 is roughly aligned along the noon meridian (36%), while only 11% takes place in the post-noon sector. Finally, the comparison with the IMF data indicates that the contribution of the IMF Bx component to the magnetic reconnection is generally weak, even if we found a noticeable correlation between positive IMB Bx and symmetric double peaks pattern. Negative IMF Bz values are usually connected with double peaks emission (likely by widening

  13. Determination of Ca, Mg, Na, Cd, Cu, Fe, K, Li and Zn in acid mine and reference water samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzolone, R.F.; Meier, A.L.

    1986-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma atomic fluorescence spectrometric (ICP-AFS) method was used for the determination of nine elements in natural water. Reference and acid mine water samples were analysed by this method to demonstrate its usefulness for hydrogeochemical exploration. The elements were determined in two groups based on the compatibility of operating conditions and consideration of element abundance levels in natural water. Ca, Mg and Na were determined as a group using one set of instrumental conditions and a 1 + 99 dilution of the sample, and Cd, Cu, Fe, K, Li and Zn were determined using another set of conditions and the undiluted sample. The detection limits for the elements are as follows: Ca, 1.4; Mg, 1.7; Na, 2.0; Cd, 1.8; Cu, 6.2; Fe, 15.8; K, 3.5; Li, 0.3; and Zn, 1.2 ng m1-1. Each element has a linear range spanning about four orders of magnitude. The method has good precision and accuracy, as shown by statistics on replicate analyses and by the agreement between values obtained and those recommended for the reference water samples, and also those obtained by atomic absorption spectrometry for the acid mine water samples.

  14. Atomically thin Co3O4 nanosheet-coated stainless steel mesh with enhanced capacitive Na+ storage for high-performance sodium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Yuhai; Wang, Yunxiao; Tian, Dongliang; Xu, Jiantie; Zhang, Zhijia; Liu, Qiannan; Ruan, Boyang; Ma, Jianmin; Sun, Ziqi; Xue Dou, Shi

    2017-03-01

    Capacitive storage (e.g., double layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance) with Na+ stored mainly at the surface or interface of the active materials rather than inserted into the bulk crystal is an effective approach to achieve high rate capability and long cycle life in sodium-ion batteries (SIBs). Herein, atomically thin Co3O4 nanosheets are successfully synthesized and grown directly on the stainless steel mesh as an anode material for SIBs. This anode delivers a high average capacity of 509.2 mAh g-1 for the initial 20 cycles (excluding the first cycle) at 50 mA g-1, presents excellent rate capability with an average capacity of 427.0 mAh g-1 at 500 mA g-1, and exhibits high cycling stability, which significantly outperforms the electrode prepared from conventional Co3O4 nanostructures, the electrode prepared by conventional casting method, and previously reported Co3O4 electrodes. The superior electrochemical performance is mainly attributable to the atomic thickness of the Co3O4 nanosheets and the direct growth method in electrode processing, which lead to remarkably enhanced surface redox pseudocapacitance and interfacial double layer capacitance. This Na+ capacitive storage mechanism provides a promising strategy for the development of electrode materials with high energy and power densities and ultralong cycle life for SIBs.

  15. Reflectance spectroscopy of low atomic weight and Na-rich minerals: Borates, hydroxides, nitrates, nitrites, and peroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloutis, E.; Berg, B.; Mann, P.; Applin, D.

    2016-01-01

    We have measured reflectance spectra (0.35-20 μm) of a suite of minerals and synthetic compounds that contain low-Z (⩽Na) elements as the major cation and/or the major anion in oxides/oxyhydroxides, and are relevant to planetary geology and astrobiology. The suite comprises Na-borates, Na-, K-, Ca-hydroxides, nitrates, nitrites, and peroxides. Na-borate spectra exhibit B-O fundamental vibrations between 7 and 14 μm, and overtones/combinations of these bands in the 1.55, 1.75, 2.15, and 2.25 μm regions. Na-, K-, and Ca-hydroxide reflectance spectra are characterized by OH and metal-OH fundamental vibrations near 3, 8, and 18 μm, and a number of overtone and combination absorption bands at shorter wavelengths, and a characteristic metal-OH band near 2.35 μm. The nitrate and nitrite spectra exhibit fundamental N-O vibrations in the 7-14 μm region and numerous combinations and overtones that are still detectable to as low as ∼1.8 μm. Na-peroxide is largely spectrally featureless below 24 μm, making its detection problematic, while H-peroxide has many OH-related absorption features below 2.5 μm that differ in position from those of H2O ice and liquid. The results of this study indicate that the borates, hydroxides, nitrates, nitrite, and hydrogen peroxide can all be uniquely identified using characteristic absorption features that are present below 2.5 μm. However, some of these features are weak, and their detectability will depend on the types and abundances of any accessory phases that may be present.

  16. Synergism of Rare Earth Ce(III) Ion with Cysteine against Corrosion of P110 Carbon Steel in 3% NaCl Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xia; Yang, Jianshu; Liu, Yongping; Ji, Xiangyun; Lu, Ying; Yuan, Yizhi

    The synergism of CeCl3 (Ce) with cysteine (Cys) on the corrosion of P110 carbon steel in 3% NaCl solutions was investigated by electrochemical methods and surface analysis. The results showed that CeCl3 and cysteine do little to inhibit the corrosion of carbon steel, but the combination of CeCl3 with cysteine has obvious synergistic effect on the corrosion of carbon steel and the corrosion inhibition efficiency was improved significantly. The potentiodynamic polarization curves indicated that the mixture of CeCl3 and cysteine acts as a cathodic inhibitor. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Infrared (IR) reflection spectra showed the synergistic inhibition effect was formed by the complexes between rare earth Ce(III) ion and amino acid.

  17. A technique coupling the analyte electrodeposition followed by in-situ stripping with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for analysis of samples with high NaCl contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čánský, Zdeněk; Rychlovský, Petr; Petrová, Zuzana; Matousek, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    A technique coupling the analyte electrodeposition followed by in-situ stripping with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry has been developed for determination of lead and cadmium in samples with high salt contents. To separate the analyte from the sample matrix, the analyte was in-situ quantitatively electrodeposited on a platinum sampling capillary serving as the cathode (sample volume, 20 μL). The spent electrolyte containing the sample matrix was then withdrawn, the capillary with the analyte deposited was washed with deionized water and the analyte was stripped into a chemically simple electrolyte (5 g/L NH 4H 2PO 4) by reversing the polarity of the electrodeposition circuit. Electrothermal atomization using a suitable optimized temperature program followed. A fully automated manifold was designed for this coupled technique and the appropriate control software was developed. The operating conditions for determination of Pb and Cd in samples with high contents of inorganic salts were optimized, the determination was characterized by principal analytical parameters and its applicability was verified on analyses of urine reference samples. The absolute limits of detection for lead and cadmium (3 σ criterion) in a sample containing 30 g/L NaCl were 8.5 pg and 2.3 pg, respectively (peak absorbance) and the RSD values amounted to 1.6% and 1.9% for lead (at the 40 ng mL - 1 level) and cadmium (at the 4.0 ng mL - 1 level), respectively. These values (and also the measuring sensitivity) are superior to the results attained in conventional electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of Pb and Cd in pure solutions (5 g/L NH 4H 2PO 4). The sensitivity of the Pb and Cd determination is not affected by the NaCl concentration up to a value of 100 g/L, demonstrating an efficient matrix removal during the electrodeposition step.

  18. Determination of rare earth elements in geological samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry with flow injection liquid-liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhifang; Liu, Congqiang; Zhang, Hongxiang; Ma, Yingjun; Lin, Soulin

    2003-12-01

    A direct sampling with organic solvent extracts for simultaneous multi-element determination implemented with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) associated with a flow injection liquid-liquid extraction (FI-LLE) sample preconcentration method was studied. The "robustness" of the plasma discharge with tributyl phosphate (TBP) loading was diagnosed by using the Mg II 279.55 nm and Mg I 285.21 nm lines intensity ratio. A FI-LLE preconcentration system for rare earth elements (REEs)-nitrate-TBP was established by using a laboratory-designed phase separator. For these elements, an average sensitivity enhancement factor of 64 was obtained with respect to ICP-AES sampling with aqueous solutions. The precision of the method was characterized by a relative standard deviation (%RSD) of 1.8 - 5.2%. A throughput of 27 samples per hour can be achieved with an organic solvent consumption of less than 200 microl per determination. Good results were obtained for the analysis of standard reference materials.

  19. Size resolved infrared spectroscopy of Na(CH3OH)n (n = 4-7) clusters in the OH stretching region: unravelling the interaction of methanol clusters with a sodium atom and the emergence of the solvated electron.

    PubMed

    Forck, Richard M; Pradzynski, Christoph C; Wolff, Sabine; Ončák, Milan; Slavíček, Petr; Zeuch, Thomas

    2012-03-07

    Size resolved IR action spectra of neutral sodium doped methanol clusters have been measured using IR excitation modulated photoionisation mass spectroscopy. The Na(CH(3)OH)(n) clusters were generated in a supersonic He seeded expansion of methanol by subsequent Na doping in a pick-up cell. A combined analysis of IR action spectra, IP evolutions and harmonic predictions of IR spectra (using density functional theory) of the most stable structures revealed that for n = 4, 5 structures with an exterior Na atom showing high ionisation potentials (IPs) of ~4 eV dominate, while for n = 6, 7 clusters with lower IPs (~3.2 eV) featuring fully solvated Na atoms and solvated electrons emerge and dominate the IR action spectra. For n = 4 simulations of photoionisation spectra using an ab initio MD approach confirm the dominance of exterior structures and explain the previously reported appearance IP of 3.48 eV by small fractions of clusters with partly solvated Na atoms. Only for this cluster size a shift in the isomer composition with cluster temperature has been observed, which may be related to kinetic stabilisation of less Na solvated clusters at low temperatures. Features of slow fragmentation dynamics of cationic Na(+)(CH(3)OH)(6) clusters have been observed for the photoionisation near the adiabatic limit. This finding points to the relevance of previously proposed non-vertical photoionisation dynamics of this system.

  20. Measuring Cation Transport by Na,K- and H,K-ATPase in Xenopus Oocytes by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry: An Alternative to Radioisotope Assays

    PubMed Central

    Dürr, Katharina L.; Tavraz, Neslihan N.; Spiller, Susan; Friedrich, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Whereas cation transport by the electrogenic membrane transporter Na+,K+-ATPase can be measured by electrophysiology, the electroneutrally operating gastric H+,K+-ATPase is more difficult to investigate. Many transport assays utilize radioisotopes to achieve a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio, however, the necessary security measures impose severe restrictions regarding human exposure or assay design. Furthermore, ion transport across cell membranes is critically influenced by the membrane potential, which is not straightforwardly controlled in cell culture or in proteoliposome preparations. Here, we make use of the outstanding sensitivity of atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) towards trace amounts of chemical elements to measure Rb+ or Li+ transport by Na+,K+- or gastric H+,K+-ATPase in single cells. Using Xenopus oocytes as expression system, we determine the amount of Rb+ (Li+) transported into the cells by measuring samples of single-oocyte homogenates in an AAS device equipped with a transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA) furnace, which is loaded from an autosampler. Since the background of unspecific Rb+ uptake into control oocytes or during application of ATPase-specific inhibitors is very small, it is possible to implement complex kinetic assay schemes involving a large number of experimental conditions simultaneously, or to compare the transport capacity and kinetics of site-specifically mutated transporters with high precision. Furthermore, since cation uptake is determined on single cells, the flux experiments can be carried out in combination with two-electrode voltage-clamping (TEVC) to achieve accurate control of the membrane potential and current. This allowed e.g. to quantitatively determine the 3Na+/2K+ transport stoichiometry of the Na+,K+-ATPase and enabled for the first time to investigate the voltage dependence of cation transport by the electroneutrally operating gastric H+,K+-ATPase. In principle, the assay is not limited to K

  1. Reviews Opera: Doctor Atomic DVD: Doctor Atomic Equipment: Digital stopclock with external trigger Book: I Cyborg Book: Flat Earth: The History of an Infamous Idea Book: Mere Thermodynamics Book: CGP revision guides Book: Hiding the Elephant: How Magicians Invented the Impossible Book: Back of the Envelope Physics Web Watch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-07-01

    WE RECOMMEND Doctor Atomic The new Doctor Atomic opera provkes discussion on ethics I Cyborg The world's first human cyborg shares his life story in I Cyborg Flat Earth: The History of an Infamous Idea Flat Earth gives us a different perspective on creationism Mere Thermodynamics An introductory text on the three laws CGP revision guides This revision guide suits all courses and every pocket Hiding the Elephant: How Magicians Invented the Impossible The mystery of many illusions are solved in this book Back of the Envelope Physics This reference deserves a place on your bookshelf WORTH A LOOK Doctor Atomic The DVD doesn't do justice to the live performance Digital stopclock with external trigger Use these stopclocks when you need an external trigger WEB WATCH Webcasts reach out to an online audience

  2. Benchmarking a modified version of the civ3 nonrelativistic atomic-structure code within Na-like-tungsten R -matrix calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkington, M. D.; Ballance, C. P.; Hibbert, A.; Ramsbottom, C. A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work we explore the validity of employing a modified version of the nonrelativistic structure code civ3 for heavy, highly charged systems, using Na-like tungsten as a simple benchmark. Consequently, we present radiative and subsequent collisional atomic data compared with corresponding results from a fully relativistic structure and collisional model. Our motivation for this line of study is to benchmark civ3 against the relativistic grasp0 structure code. This is an important study as civ3 wave functions in nonrelativistic R -matrix calculations are computationally less expensive than their Dirac counterparts. There are very few existing data for the W LXIV ion in the literature with which we can compare except for an incomplete set of energy levels available from the NIST database. The overall accuracy of the present results is thus determined by the comparison between the civ3 and grasp0 structure codes alongside collisional atomic data computed by the R -matrix Breit-Pauli and Dirac codes. It is found that the electron-impact collision strengths and effective collision strengths computed by these differing methods are in good general agreement for the majority of the transitions considered, across a broad range of electron temperatures.

  3. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  4. Atomic research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Connatser, Robert; Cothren, Bobby; Johnson, R. B.

    1993-01-01

    Work performed by the University of Alabama in Huntsville's (UAH) Center for Applied Optics (CAO) entitled Atomic Research is documented. Atomic oxygen (AO) effects on materials have long been a critical concern in designing spacecraft to withstand exposure to the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. The objective of this research effort was to provide technical expertise in the design of instrumentation and experimental techniques for analyzing materials exposed to atomic oxygen in accelerated testing at NASA/MSFC. Such testing was required to answer fundamental questions concerning Space Station Freedom (SSF) candidate materials and materials exposed to atomic oxygen aboard the Long-Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The primary UAH task was to provide technical design, review, and analysis to MSFC in the development of a state-of-the-art 5eV atomic oxygen beam facility required to simulate the RAM-induced low earth orbit (LEO) AO environment. This development was to be accomplished primarily at NASA/MSFC. In support of this task, contamination effects and ultraviolet (UV) simulation testing was also to be carried out using NASA/MSFC facilities. Any materials analysis of LDEF samples was to be accomplished at UAH.

  5. P2-type Nax[Fe1/2Mn1/2]O2 made from earth-abundant elements for rechargeable Na batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabuuchi, Naoaki; Kajiyama, Masataka; Iwatate, Junichi; Nishikawa, Heisuke; Hitomi, Shuji; Okuyama, Ryoichi; Usui, Ryo; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Komaba, Shinichi

    2012-06-01

    Rechargeable lithium batteries have risen to prominence as key devices for green and sustainable energy development. Electric vehicles, which are not equipped with an internal combustion engine, have been launched in the market. Manganese- and iron-based positive-electrode materials, such as LiMn2O4 and LiFePO4, are used in large-scale batteries for electric vehicles. Manganese and iron are abundant elements in the Earth’s crust, but lithium is not. In contrast to lithium, sodium is an attractive charge carrier on the basis of elemental abundance. Recently, some layered materials, where sodium can be electrochemically and reversibly extracted/inserted, have been reported. However, their reversible capacity is typically limited to 100 mAh g-1. Herein, we report a new electrode material, P2-Na2/3[Fe1/2Mn1/2]O2, that delivers 190 mAh g-1 of reversible capacity in the sodium cells with the electrochemically active Fe3+/Fe4+ redox. These results will contribute to the development of rechargeable batteries from the earth-abundant elements operable at room temperature.

  6. Charge Compensation in RE3+ (RE = Eu, Gd) and M+ (M = Li, Na, K) Co-Doped Alkaline Earth Nanofluorides Obtained by Microwave Reaction with Reactive Ionic Liquids Leading to Improved Optical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lorbeer, C; Behrends, F; Cybinska, J; Eckert, H; Mudring, Anja -V

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline earth fluorides are extraordinarily promising host matrices for phosphor materials with regard to rare earth doping. In particular, quantum cutting materials, which might considerably enhance the efficiency of mercury-free fluorescent lamps or SC solar cells, are often based on rare earth containing crystalline fluorides such as NaGdF4, GdF3 or LaF3. Substituting most of the precious rare earth ions and simultaneously retaining the efficiency of the phosphor is a major goal. Alkaline earth fluoride nanoparticles doped with trivalent lanthanide ions (which are required for the quantum cutting phenomenon) were prepared via a microwave assisted method in ionic liquids. As doping trivalent ions into a host with divalent cations requires charge compensation, this effect was thoroughly studied by powder X-ray and electron diffraction, luminescence spectroscopy and 23Na, 139La and 19F solid state NMR spectroscopy. Monovalent alkali ions were codoped with the trivalent lanthanide ions to relieve stress and achieve a better crystallinity and higher quantum cutting abilities of the prepared material. 19F-magic angle spinning (MAS)-NMR-spectra, assisted by 19F{23Na} rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) studies, reveal distinct local fluoride environments, the populations of which are discussed in relation to spatial distribution and clustering models. In the co-doped samples, fluoride species having both Na+ and La3+ ions within their coordination sphere can be identified and quantified. This interplay of mono- and trivalent ions in the CaF2 lattice appears to be an efficient charge compensation mechanism that allows for improved performance characteristics of such co-doped phosphor materials.

  7. Atomizing nozzle and process

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, I.E.; Figliola, R.S.; Molnar, H.M.

    1993-07-20

    High pressure atomizing nozzle includes a high pressure gas manifold having a divergent expansion chamber between a gas inlet and arcuate manifold segment to minimize standing shock wave patterns in the manifold and thereby improve filling of the manifold with high pressure gas for improved melt atomization. The atomizing nozzle is especially useful in atomizing rare earth-transition metal alloys to form fine powder particles wherein a majority of the powder particles exhibit particle sizes having near-optimum magnetic properties.

  8. Atomizing nozzle and process

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Figliola, Richard S.; Molnar, Holly M.

    1992-06-30

    High pressure atomizing nozzle includes a high pressure gas manifold having a divergent expansion chamber between a gas inlet and arcuate manifold segment to minimize standing shock wave patterns in the manifold and thereby improve filling of the manifold with high pressure gas for improved melt atomization. The atomizing nozzle is especially useful in atomizing rare earth-transition metal alloys to form fine powder particles wherein a majority of the powder particles exhibit particle sizes having near-optimum magnetic properties.

  9. Luminescence quenching versus enhancement in WO3-NaPO3 glasses doped with trivalent rare earth ions and containing silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dousti, M. Reza; Poirier, Gael Y.; Amjad, Raja J.; de Camargo, Andrea S. S.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the influence of silver nanoparticles (NPs) on the luminescence behavior of trivalent rare earth (RE) ion doped tungsten-phosphate glasses. In order to induce the growth of NPs, the as-prepared glass samples containing silver atoms, are exposed to heat-treatment above the glass transition temperature. The surface plasmon resonance band of the Ag NPs is observed in the visible range around 420 and 537 nm in the glasses with low and high tungsten content, respectively. Such difference in spectral shift of the plasmon band is attributed to the difference in the refractive index of the two studied glass compositions. Heat-treatment results in the general increase in number of NPs, while in the case of glasses with low tungsten content, it also imposes a shift to the Ag plasmon band. The NPs size distribution (4-10 nm) was determined in good agreement with the values obtained by using Mie theory and by transmission electron microscopy. The observed quenching in the visible luminescence of glasses doped with Eu3+, Tb3+ or Er3+is attributed to energy transfer from the RE ions to Ag species, while an enhanced near-infrared emission in Er3+ doped glasses is discussed in terms of the chemical contribution of silver, rather than the most commonly claimed enhancement of localized field or energy transfer from silver species to Er3+. The results are supported by the lifetime measurements. We believe that this study gives further insight and in-depth exploration of the somewhat controversial discussions on the influence of metallic NPs plasmonic effects in RE-doped glasses.

  10. Structural and electronic properties of AB- and AA-stacking bilayer-graphene intercalated by Li, Na, Ca, B, Al, Si, Ge, Ag, and Au atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayran, Ceren; Aydin, Sezgin; Çakmak, Mehmet; Ellialtıoğlu, Şinasi

    2016-04-01

    The structural and electronic properties of X (=Li, Na, Ca, B, Al, Si, Ge, Ag, and Au)-intercalated AB- and AA-stacking bilayer-graphene have been investigated by using ab initio density functional theory. It is shown that Boron (Lithium)-intercalated system is energetically more stable than the others for the AB (AA) stacking bilayer-graphene systems. The structural parameters, electronic band structures, and orbital nature of actual interactions are studied for the relaxed stable geometries. It is seen that the higher the binding energy, the smaller is the distance between the layers, in these systems. The electronic band structures for these systems show that different intercalated atoms can change the properties of bilayer-graphene differently. For qualitative description of the electronic properties, the metallicities of the systems are also calculated and compared with each other. The Mulliken analysis and electron density maps clearly indicate that the interactions inside a single layer (intralayer interactions) are strong and highly covalent, while the interactions between the two layers (interlayer interactions) are much weaker.

  11. Effects of weakly coupled and dense quantum plasmas environments on charge exchange and ionization processes in Na+ + Rb(5s) atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Mukesh Kumar; Lin, Yen-Chang; Ho, Yew Kam

    2017-02-01

    The effects of weakly coupled or classical and dense quantum plasmas environment on charge exchange and ionization processes in Na+ + Rb(5s) atom collision at keV energy range have been investigated using classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method. The interaction of three charged particles are described by the Debye-Hückel screen potential for weakly coupled plasma, whereas exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potential have been used for dense quantum plasma environment and the effects of both conditions on the cross sections are compared. It is found that screening effects on cross sections in high Debye length condition is quite small in both plasma environments. However, enhanced screening effects on cross sections are observed in dense quantum plasmas for low Debye length condition, which becomes more effective while decreasing the Debye length. Also, we have found that our calculated results for plasma-free case are comparable with the available theoretical results. These results are analyzed in light of available theoretical data with the choice of model potentials.

  12. Rapid leaching of Cr(VI) in soil with Na3PO4 in the determination of hexavalent chromium by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mandiwana, Khakhathi L

    2008-01-15

    A method has been developed that leaches Cr(VI) selectively from soil samples. Hexavalent chromium was leached completely from soil with 0.01molL(-1) Na(3)PO(4). This was achieved by boiling the soil-reagent solution mixture for a period of 5min. The leached Cr(VI) was then quantified by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS) after filtration of the sample solutions through Hydrophilic Millipore PVDF 0.45microm filter. Statistical evaluations indicated that the new developed method is reliable since neither its comparison with the established method nor the comparison of the sum of the concentrations of chromium species to that of the total concentration of chromium show any difference at 95% level of confidence. The spiking of soil samples with Cr(III) standards before pretreatment show that Cr(III) was not oxidized to Cr(VI) during leaching as the Cr(VI) content never increased. The detection limit established was 0.07microg g(-1), which is an improvement to that of the US EPA method 3060A by a factor of more than 500. The maximum concentrations of Cr(VI) found in soil samples collected around the new chromium mine was 8.0microg g(-1) and falls within acceptable level of 15microg g(-1) in accordance with the Italian Guidelines.

  13. Development of a high flow source of energetic oxygen atoms for material degradation studies. [of Space Shuttles in low earth orbit environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, G. E.; Krech, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    A technique for the generation, in the laboratory, of thermally 'cold', high flux of energetic oxygen atoms is presented. The flux of nearly mono-energetic oxygen atoms is obtained after a laser-induced breakdown of oxygen molecules followed by a rapid expansion of the recombining plasma. The experimental apparatus, the optical and spectral measurements, the O-atom source characterization, and the material degradation studies are discussed. Average oxygen atom velocities of about 5 to 13 km/s are measured with an estimated flux of 10 to the 18th per pulse, over pulse durations of several microseconds. The flow of the O2 gas for about 200 microseconds before applying the laser pulse is found to give best results. It is also found that the energetic O-atom irradiation of sample targets such as Al, Fe, and polyethylene, induces mass removal. In addition, spectral scans of the radiation reveals the existence of two main spectral subsets.

  14. A novel methodology for rapid digestion of rare earth element ores and determination by microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry and dynamic reaction cell-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Helmeczi, Erick; Wang, Yong; Brindle, Ian D

    2016-11-01

    Short-wavelength infrared radiation has been successfully applied to accelerate the acid digestion of refractory rare-earth ore samples. Determinations were achieved with microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MP-AES) and dynamic reaction cell - inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (DRC-ICP-MS). The digestion method developed was able to tackle high iron-oxide and silicate matrices using only phosphoric acid in a time frame of only 8min, and did not require perchloric or hydrofluoric acid. Additionally, excellent recoveries and reproducibilities of the rare earth elements, as well as uranium and thorium, were achieved. Digestions of the certified reference materials OREAS-465 and REE-1, with radically different mineralogies, delivered results that mirror those obtained by fusion processes. For the rare-earth CRM OKA-2, whose REE data are provisional, experimental data for the rare-earth elements were generally higher than the provisional values, often exceeding z-values of +2. Determined values for Th and U in this reference material, for which certified values are available, were in excellent agreement.

  15. (Super)alkali atoms interacting with the σ electron cloud: a novel interaction mode triggers large nonlinear optical response of M@P₄ and M@C₃H₆ (M=Li, Na, K and Li₃O).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xingang; Yu, Guangtao; Huang, Xuri; Chen, Wei; Niu, Min

    2013-12-01

    Under high-level ab initio calculations, the geometrical structures and nonlinear optical properties of M@P₄ (M=Li, Na, K and Li₃O) and M@C₃H₆ (M=Li and Li₃O) were investigated; all were found to exhibit considerable first hyperpolarizabilities (18110, 1440, 22490, 50487, 2757 and 31776 au, respectively). The computational results revealed that when doping the (super)alkali atom M into the tetrahedral P₄ molecule, the original dual spherical aromaticity of the P₄ moiety is broken and new σ electron cloud is formed on the face of P₄ part interacting with the M atom. It was found that interaction of the (super)alkali atom with the σ electron cloud is a novel mode to produce diffuse excess electrons effectively to achieve a considerable β₀ value. Further, beyond the alkali atom, employing the superalkali unit can be a more effective approach to significantly enhance the first hyperpolarizability of the systems, due to the much lower vertical ionization potential. These results were further supported by the case of the (super)alkali atom interacting with the cyclopropane C₃H₆ molecule with its typical σ aromatic electron cloud. Moreover, the β₀ values of the M@P₄ series are nonmonotonic dependent on alkali atomic number, namely, 1440 au (M = Na) < 18110 au (Li) < 22490 au (K), inferring that the distance between the alkali atom and the interacting surface with the σ electron cloud in P4 is a crucial geometrical factor in determining their first hyperpolarizabilities. These intriguing findings will be advantageous for promoting the design of novel high-performance nonlinear optical materials.

  16. Free Energetics of Carbon Nanotube Association in Aqueous Inorganic NaI Salt Solutions: Temperature Effects using All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Shu-Ching; Cui, Di; Wezowicz, Matthew; Taufer, Michela; Patel, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    In this study we examine the temperature dependence of free energetics of nanotube association by using GPU-enabled all-atom molecular dynamics simulations (FEN ZI) with two (10,10) single-walled carbon nanotubes in 3 m NaI aqueous salt solution. Results suggest that the free energy, enthalpy and entropy changes for the association process are all reduced at the high temperature, in agreement with previous investigations using other hydrophobes. Via the decomposition of free energy into individual components, we found that solvent contribution (including water, anion and cation contributions) is correlated with the spatial distribution of the corresponding species and is influenced distinctly by the temperature. We studied the spatial distribution and the structure of the solvent in different regions: intertube, intra-tube and the bulk solvent. By calculating the fluctuation of coarse-grained tube-solvent surfaces, we found that tube-water interfacial fluctuation exhibits the strongest temperature dependence. By taking ions to be a solvent-like medium in the absence of water, tube-anion interfacial fluctuation also shows similar but weaker dependence on temperature, while tube-cation interfacial fluctuation shows no dependence in general. These characteristics are discussed via the malleability of their corresponding solvation shells relative to the nanotube surface. Hydrogen bonding profiles and tetrahedrality of water arrangement are also computed to compare the structure of solvent in the solvent bulk and intertube region. The hydrophobic confinement induces a relatively lower concentration environment in the intertube region, therefore causing different intertube solvent structures which depend on the tube separation. This study is relevant in the continuing discourse on hydrophobic interactions (as they impact generally a broad class of phenomena in biology, biochemistry, and materials science and soft condensed matter research), and interpretations of

  17. A Comparison of Atomic Oxygen Erosion Yields of Carbon and Selected Polymers Exposed in Ground Based Facilities and in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Cales, Michael

    1994-01-01

    A comparison of the relative erosion yields (volume of material removed per oxygen atom arriving) for FEP Teflon, polyethylene, and pyrolytic graphite with respect to Kapton HN was performed in an atomic oxygen directed beam system, in a plasma asher, and in space on the EOIM-III (Evaluation of Oxygen Interaction with Materials-III) flight experiment. This comparison was performed to determine the sensitivity of material reaction to atomic oxygen flux, atomic oxygen fluence, and vacuum ultraviolet radiation for enabling accurate estimates of durability in ground based facilities. The relative erosion yield of pyrolytic graphite was found not to be sensitive to these factors, that for FEP was sensitive slightly to fluence and possibly ions, and that for polyethylene was found to be partially VUV and flux sensitive but more sensitive to an unknown factor. Results indicate that the ability to use these facilities for material relative durability prediction is great as long as the sensitivity of particular materials to conditions such as VUV, and atomic oxygen flux and fluence are taken into account. When testing materials of a particular group such as teflon, it may be best to use a witness sample made of a similar material that has some available space data on it. This would enable one to predict an equivalent exposure in the ground based facility.

  18. On-line collection/concentration and determination of transition and rare-earth metals in water samples using Multi-Auto-Pret system coupled with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Katarina, Rosi Ketrin; Oshima, Mitsuko; Motomizu, Shoji

    2009-05-15

    On-line preconcentration and determination of transition and rare-earth metals in water samples was performed using a Multi-Auto-Pret system coupled with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The Multi-Auto-Pret AES system proposed here consists of three Auto-Pret systems with mini-columns that can be used for the preconcentration of trace metals sequentially or simultaneously, and can reduce analysis time to one-third and running cost of argon gas and labor. A newly synthesized chelating resin, ethylenediamine-N,N,N'-triacetate-type chitosan (EDTriA-type chitosan), was employed in the Multi-Auto-Pret system for the collection of trace metals prior to their measurement by ICP-AES. The proposed resin showed very good adsorption ability for transition and rare-earth metal ions without any interference from alkali and alkaline-earth metal ions in an acidic media. For the best result, pH 5 was adopted for the collection of metal ions. Only 5 mL of samples could be used for the determination of transition metals, while 20 mL of samples was necessary for the determination of rare-earth metals. Metal ions adsorbed on the resin were eluted using 1.5 M nitric acid, and were measured by ICP-AES. The proposed method was evaluated by the analysis of SLRS-4 river water reference materials for trace metals. Good agreement with certified and reference values was obtained for most of the metals examined; it indicates that the proposed method using the newly synthesized resin could be favorably used for the determination of transition and rare-earth metals in water samples by ICP-AES.

  19. Atomic Oxygen Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sharon K. R.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic oxygen, which is the most predominant species in low Earth orbit, is highly reactive and can break chemical bonds on the surface of a wide variety of materials leading to volatilization or surface oxidation which can result in failure of spacecraft materials and components. This presentation will give an overview of how atomic oxygen reacts with spacecraft materials, results of space exposure testing of a variety of materials, and examples of failures caused by atomic oxygen.

  20. Photoluminescence properties of rare earths (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+}) activated NaInW{sub 2}O{sub 8} wolframite host lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Asiri Naidu, S.; Boudin, S.; Varadaraju, U.V.; Raveau, B.

    2012-01-15

    The photoluminescence (PL) studies on NaIn{sub 1-x}RE{sub x}W{sub 2}O{sub 8}, with RE=Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+} phases have shown that the relative contribution of the host lattice and of the intra-f-f emission of the activators to the PL varies with the nature of the rare earth cation. In the case of Dy{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+} activators, with yellow and blue emission, respectively, the energy transfer from host to the activator plays a major role. In contrast for Eu{sup 3+}, with intense red emission, the host absorption is less pronounced and the intra-f-f transitions of the Eu{sup 3+} ions play a major role, whereas for Tb{sup 3+} intra-f-f transitions are only observed, giving rise to green emission. - Graphical abstract: NaInW{sub 2}O{sub 8} double tungstate doped with Eu{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}and Tm{sup 3+} shows characteristic emission of intense red for Eu{sup 3+}, yellow for Dy{sup 3+}, green for Tb{sup 3+} and blue for Tm{sup 3+}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characteristic emissions of rare earths (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+}) are observed NaInW{sub 2}O{sub 8} wolframite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy transfer from host to the activators (Eu{sup 3+} Dy{sup 3+} Tm{sup 3+} is observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PL properties of rare earth ions depend on minor structural variations in the host lattice.

  1. Vapor-liquid partitioning of alkaline earth and transition metals in NaCl-dominated hydrothermal fluids: An experimental study from 360 to 465 °C, near-critical to halite saturated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pester, Nicholas J.; Ding, Kang; Seyfried, William E.

    2015-11-01

    Multi-phase fluid flow is a common occurrence in magmatic hydrothermal systems; and extensive modeling efforts using currently established P-V-T-x properties of the NaCl-H2O system are impending. We have therefore performed hydrothermal flow experiments (360-465 °C) to observe vapor-liquid partitioning of alkaline earth and first row transition metals in NaCl-dominated source solutions. The data allow extraction of partition coefficients related to the intrinsic changes in both chlorinity and density along the two-phase solvus. The coefficients yield an overall decrease in vapor affinity in the order Cu(I) > Na > Fe(II) > Zn > Ni(II) ⩾ Mg ⩾ Mn(II) > Co(II) > Ca > Sr > Ba, distinguished with 95% confidence for vapor densities greater than ∼0.2 g/cm3. The alkaline earth metals are limited to purely electrostatic interactions with Cl ligands, resulting in an excellent linear correlation (R2 > 0.99) between their partition coefficients and respective ionic radii. Though broadly consistent with this relationship, relative behavior of the transition metals is not well resolved, being likely obscured by complex bonding processes and the potential participation of Na in the formation of tetra-chloro species. At lower densities (at/near halite saturation) partitioning behavior of all metals becomes highly non-linear, where M/Cl ratios in the vapor begin to increase despite continued decreases in chlorinity and density. We refer to this phenomenon as "volatility", which is broadly associated with substantial increases in the HCl/NaCl ratio (eventually to >1) due to hydrolysis of NaCl. Some transition metals (e.g., Fe, Zn) exhibit volatility prior to halite stability, suggesting a potential shift in vapor speciation relative to nearer critical regions of the vapor-liquid solvus. The chemistry of deep-sea hydrothermal fluids appears affected by this process during magmatic events, however, our results do not support suggestions of subseafloor halite precipitation

  2. Atomic Oxygen Fluence Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    This innovation enables a means for actively measuring atomic oxygen fluence (accumulated atoms of atomic oxygen per area) that has impinged upon spacecraft surfaces. Telemetered data from the device provides spacecraft designers, researchers, and mission managers with real-time measurement of atomic oxygen fluence, which is useful for prediction of the durability of spacecraft materials and components. The innovation is a compact fluence measuring device that allows in-space measurement and transmittance of measured atomic oxygen fluence as a function of time based on atomic oxygen erosion yields (the erosion yield of a material is the volume of material that is oxidized per incident oxygen atom) of materials that have been measured in low Earth orbit. It has a linear electrical response to atomic oxygen fluence, and is capable of measuring high atomic oxygen fluences (up to >10(exp 22) atoms/sq cm), which are representative of multi-year low-Earth orbital missions (such as the International Space Station). The durability or remaining structural lifetime of solar arrays that consist of polymer blankets on which the solar cells are attached can be predicted if one knows the atomic oxygen fluence that the solar array blanket has been exposed to. In addition, numerous organizations that launch space experiments into low-Earth orbit want to know the accumulated atomic oxygen fluence that their materials or components have been exposed to. The device is based on the erosion yield of pyrolytic graphite. It uses two 12deg inclined wedges of graphite that are over a grit-blasted fused silica window covering a photodiode. As the wedges erode, a greater area of solar illumination reaches the photodiode. A reference photodiode is also used that receives unobstructed solar illumination and is oriented in the same direction as the pyrolytic graphite covered photodiode. The short-circuit current from the photodiodes is measured and either sent to an onboard data logger, or

  3. Studies on some ternary oxyborates of the Na 2O- Me2O 3-B 2O 3 ( Me=rare earth or aluminum) systems: Synthesis, structure and crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshev, P.; Pechev, S.; Nikolov, V.; Gravereau, P.; Chaminade, J.-P.; Binev, D.; Ivanova, D.

    2006-09-01

    Sodium rare-earth oxyborates Na 2RE2O(BO 3) 2 ( RE=Y, Nd, Er) were prepared for the first time in the present study. They were found to be isostructural with phases of the same composition containing Sm, Eu or Gd and reported by Corbel et al. [J. Solid State Chem.144 (1999) 35-44]. It was shown that the yttrium and erbium compounds could be synthesized at 900-1000 °C by a solid-state reaction between oxides in an equimolecular ratio. With both oxyborates melting led to decomposition into a mixture of Y(Er)BO 3, Y 2(Er 2)O 3 and Na 2B 4O 7. Just the opposite was observed during thermal treatment of the oxide mixture containing Nd 2O 3, from which a practically pure phase of Na 2Nd 2O(BO 3) 2 was only obtained after melting. The attempts to synthesize the oxyborate Na 2La 2O(BO 3) 2 showed it to be unstable, this leading to the formation of a mixture containing, in addition to Na 2La 2O(BO 3) 2, also other already known stable phases of the system Na 2O-La 2O 3-B 2O 3 along with an unknown ternary oxide phase. This phase was found to represent a new oxyborate of sodium and lanthanum with the formula Na 3La 9O 3(BO 3) 8, whose single crystals were obtained by flux growth. It was established that synthesis of a polycrystalline material with the same composition was also possible using solid-state interaction between Na 2CO 3, La 2O 3 and H 3BO 3 at 1000-1100 °C. X-ray diffraction experiments on single crystals were used to solve the structure of Na 3La 9O 3(BO 3) 8. The unit cell was found to be hexagonal, space group P62 m (No. 189) with Z=1. The compound can be regarded as the forefather of a second group of oxyborates representing a new family of isostructural compounds, Na 3RE9O 3(BO 3) 8. Such phases were obtained with RE=Nd, Sm and Eu whereas with RE=Y and Gd, the synthesis experiments failed. The concentration and temperature regions of crystallization of the double-oxyborate Na 2Al 2O(BO 3) 2 in the ternary system Na 2O-Al 2O 3-B 2O 3 were determined. This

  4. Studies on some ternary oxyborates of the Na{sub 2}O-Me{sub 2}O{sub 3}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (Me=rare earth or aluminum) systems: Synthesis, structure and crystal growth

    SciTech Connect

    Peshev, P. . E-mail: ppeshev@svr.igic.bas.bg; Pechev, S.; Nikolov, V.; Gravereau, P.; Chaminade, J.-P.; Binev, D.; Ivanova, D.

    2006-09-15

    Sodium rare-earth oxyborates Na{sub 2}RE{sub 2}O(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} (RE=Y, Nd, Er) were prepared for the first time in the present study. They were found to be isostructural with phases of the same composition containing Sm, Eu or Gd and reported by Corbel et al. [J. Solid State Chem.144 (1999) 35-44]. It was shown that the yttrium and erbium compounds could be synthesized at 900-1000deg. C by a solid-state reaction between oxides in an equimolecular ratio. With both oxyborates melting led to decomposition into a mixture of Y(Er)BO{sub 3}, Y{sub 2}(Er{sub 2})O{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}. Just the opposite was observed during thermal treatment of the oxide mixture containing Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, from which a practically pure phase of Na{sub 2}Nd{sub 2}O(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} was only obtained after melting. The attempts to synthesize the oxyborate Na{sub 2}La{sub 2}O(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} showed it to be unstable, this leading to the formation of a mixture containing, in addition to Na{sub 2}La{sub 2}O(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}, also other already known stable phases of the system Na{sub 2}O-La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} along with an unknown ternary oxide phase. This phase was found to represent a new oxyborate of sodium and lanthanum with the formula Na{sub 3}La{sub 9}O{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 8}, whose single crystals were obtained by flux growth. It was established that synthesis of a polycrystalline material with the same composition was also possible using solid-state interaction between Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} at 1000-1100 deg. C. X-ray diffraction experiments on single crystals were used to solve the structure of Na{sub 3}La{sub 9}O{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 8}. The unit cell was found to be hexagonal, space group P62m (No. 189) with Z=1. The compound can be regarded as the forefather of a second group of oxyborates representing a new family of isostructural compounds, Na{sub 3}RE{sub 9}O{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 8}. Such phases were

  5. Search of the Na in the Region of the Sublimation of the Near-Sun Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delone, A. B.; Divlekeev, M. I.; Suchanov, E. A.; Gulyaev, R. A.; Yakunina, G. V.; Porfir'eva, G. A.

    An evaluation of the Na number in the sublimation zone of the near-Sun interplanetary dust, based on a comparison with the intensity of the radiation of the Na in the Earth atmosphere, has been obtained. The abundance of the Na in the column along the line of sight is less than 2 x 108atom cm-2. This result is compared with the values, determined on the base of the brightness of the zodiacal light, F-corona and by direct measurements of the dust density with space experiments.

  6. {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO{sub 2} selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Arevalo-Hidalgo, Ana G.; Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang; Hernandez-Maldonado, Arturo J.

    2012-07-15

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO{sub 2} adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium. - Graphical abstract: MAS NMR was used to elucidate the position the cationic species in alkaline earth metal exchanged silicoaluminophosphates. These species played a significant role during the ion exchange process and, therefore, the materials ultimate CO{sub 2} adsorption performance. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Location of extraframework Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} cations was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Level of Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion exchanged SAPOs are outstanding CO{sub 2} adsorbents.

  7. Crystal structure of sodium rare earth oxyborates Na{sub 2}Ln{sub 2}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}O (Ln = Sm, Eu, and Gd) and optical analysis of Na{sub 2}Gd{sub 2}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}O:Eu{sup 3+}

    SciTech Connect

    Corbel, G.; Leblanc, M.; Antic-Fidancev, E.; Lemaitre-Blaise, M.

    1999-04-01

    A new structural family of rare earth oxyborates Na{sub 2}Ln{sub 2}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}O (Ln = Sm, Eu and Gd) is evidenced. The structure, determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction, is monoclinic, space group P2{sub 1}/c, Z = 4, with a = 10.695(6) {angstrom}, b = 6.320(4) {angstrom}, c = 10.3228(6) {angstrom}, {beta} = 117.80(4){degree}, V = 617.5(9) {angstrom}{sup 3}, R{sub 1} = 0.039, wR{sub 2} = 0.101 for Na{sub 2}Gd{sub 2}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}O. The three-dimensional network is built up from infinite sheets of LnO{sub 8} polyhedra in the (b,c) plane, which are separated by sodium ions. The luminescence of trivalent europium in polycrystalline Na{sub 2}Gd{sub 2}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}O:Eu{sup 3+} is analyzed at 77K. The low symmetry of the rare earth sites, deduced from the X-ray diffraction study, is confirmed. The crystal field strength is high for both europium sites.

  8. Density matrices of the excited atomic states produced in He{sup 2+} -Na(3s) collisions at 2-50 keV/amu in the coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, A.; Winter, T.G.

    1996-05-01

    The authors have determined full density matrices of excited He{sup +} (2 and 3) and Na (3p and 3d) atoms produced in He{sup 2+} - Na(3s) collisions at 2-50 keV/amu. A two-center coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach is employed to determine the corresponding amplitudes for the electron transfer and target excitation channels. Various cross sections for charge transfer and target excitation compare very well with experimental data. From the on- and off-diagonal density matrix elements, several physical parameters, corresponding to s-p and p coherences, have been determined and compared with available experimental data and recent theoretical calculations. In particular, the authors have studied the behavior of dipole moment, velocity vector, orientation, and alignment quantities with respect to the projectile velocity and impact parameter.

  9. Early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M.

    2015-05-01

    Earth has continents, subduction and mobile lid plate tectonics, but details of the early evolution are poorly understood. Here I summarize the Hadean-Archean record, review evidence for a hotter Earth and consider geodynamic models for early Earth.

  10. Binding to Redox-Inactive Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metal Ions Strongly Deactivates the C-H Bonds of Tertiary Amides toward Hydrogen Atom Transfer to Reactive Oxygen Centered Radicals.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Michela; Carboni, Giulia; Mangiacapra, Livia; Bietti, Massimo

    2015-09-18

    The effect of alkali and alkaline earth metal ions on the reactions of the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) with N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA) was studied by laser flash photolysis. In acetonitrile, a >2 order of magnitude decrease in the rate constant for hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) from the C-H bonds of these substrates (kH) was measured after addition of Li(+). This behavior was explained in terms of a strong interaction between Li(+) and the oxygen atom of both DMF and DMA that increases the extent of positive charge on the amide, leading to C-H bond deactivation toward HAT to the electrophilic radical CumO(•). Similar effects were observed after addition of Ca(2+), which was shown to strongly bind up to four equivalents of the amide substrates. With Mg(2+), weak C-H deactivation was observed for the first two substrate equivalents followed by stronger deactivation for two additional equivalents. No C-H deactivation was observed in DMSO after addition of Li(+) and Mg(2+). These results point toward the important role played by metal ion Lewis acidity and solvent Lewis basicity, indicating that C-H deactivation can be modulated by varying the nature of the metal cation and solvent and allowing for careful control over the HAT reactivity of amide substrates.

  11. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopic determination of rare earth elements in geological samples after preconcentration by countercurrent chromatography—Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pukhovskaya, V. M.; Grebneva, O. N.; Maryutina, T. A.; Kuz'min, N. M.; Spivakov, B. Ya.

    1995-01-01

    This paper directly links up with Part I [ Spectrochim. Acta48B, 1365 (1993)] which treats the first application of countercurrent chromatography (CCC) for pre-separation of rare earth elements (REE) in rocks. The rapid and reliable separation and pre-concentration of "light" REE and Y can be achieved using a system of 0.5 mol/l di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid (D2EHPA) in n-decane-hydrochloric acid of different concentrations and a planetary centrifuge as a CCC device. However, Tm, Yb and Lu are partially retained in the stationary phase. Comparative data is presented on three other two-phase liquid systems containing trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO); D2EHPA and TOPO mixtures and diphenyl(dibutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine)oxide (Ph 2-Bu 2) as extractants in terms of their ability for whole REE group complete isolation from the rock constituents. The partial losses of "light" REE (La and Ce) occurred in the system of 0.1 mol/l solution of TOPO in isobutylmethylketone (IBMK) (stationary phase)-1 mol/l NH 4NO 3-6 mol/l HCl aqueous solutions (mobile phase). Complete isolution of the entire REE group can be reached in two systems: 0.3 mol/l D2EHPA + 0.02 ml/l TOPO in the solvents mixture (3:1) of n-decane + IBMK, respectively (stationary phase)-1 mol/l NH 4NO 3-6 mol/l HCl aqueous solution (mobile phase), and 1.0 mol/l Ph 2-Bu 2 solution in chloroform (stationary phase)-3 mol/l HNO 3 aqueous solution (mobile phase). The D2EHPA + TOPO mixture is recommended as more economic and accessible.

  12. Experimental response function of a 3 in×3 in NaI(Tl) detector by inverse matrix method and effective atomic number of composite materials by gamma backscattering technique.

    PubMed

    Kiran, K U; Ravindraswami, K; Eshwarappa, K M; Somashekarappa, H M

    2016-05-01

    Response function of a widely used 3in×3in NaI(Tl) detector is constructed to correct the observed pulse height distribution. A 10×10 inverse matrix is constructed using 7 mono-energetic gamma sources ((57)Co, (203)Hg, (133)Ba, (22)Na, (137)Cs, (54)Mn and (65)Zn) which are evenly spaced in energy scale to unscramble the observed pulse height distribution. Bin widths (E)(1/2) of 0.01 (MeV)(1/2) are used to construct the matrix. Backscattered photons for an angle of 110° are obtained from a well-collimated 0.2146GBq (5.8mCi) (137)Cs gamma source for carbon, aluminium, iron, copper, granite and Portland cement. For each observed spectrum, single scattered spectrum is constructed analytically using detector parameters like FWHM, photo-peak efficiency and peak counts. Response corrected multiple scattered photons are extracted from the observed pulse height distribution by dividing the spectrum into a 10 ×1 matrix. Saturation thicknesses of carbon, aluminium, iron, copper, granite and Portland cement are found out. Variation of multiple scattered photons as a function of target thickness are simulated using MCNP code. A relationship between experimental and simulated saturation thicknesses of carbon, aluminium, iron and copper is obtained as a function of atomic number. Using this relation, effective atomic numbers of granite and Portland cement are obtained from interpolation method. Effective atomic numbers of granite and Portland cement are also obtained by theoretical equation using their elemental composition and comparing with the experimental and simulated results.

  13. China's rare-earth industry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tse, Pui-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Introduction China's dominant position as the producer of over 95 percent of the world output of rare-earth minerals and rapid increases in the consumption of rare earths owing to the emergence of new clean-energy and defense-related technologies, combined with China's decisions to restrict exports of rare earths, have resulted in heightened concerns about the future availability of rare earths. As a result, industrial countries such as Japan, the United States, and countries of the European Union face tighter supplies and higher prices for rare earths. This paper briefly reviews China's rare-earth production, consumption, and reserves and the important policies and regulations regarding the production and trade of rare earths, including recently announced export quotas. The 15 lanthanide elements-lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium, promethium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, ytterbium, and lutetium (atomic numbers 57-71)-were originally known as the rare earths from their occurrence in oxides mixtures. Recently, some researchers have included two other elements-scandium and yttrium-in their discussion of rare earths. Yttrium (atomic number 39), which lies above lanthanum in transition group III of the periodic table and has a similar 3+ ion with a noble gas core, has both atomic and ionic radii similar in size to those of terbium and dysprosium and is generally found in nature with lanthanides. Scandium (atomic number 21) has a smaller ionic radius than yttrium and the lanthanides, and its chemical behavior is intermediate between that of aluminum and the lanthanides. It is found in nature with the lanthanides and yttrium. Rare earths are used widely in high-technology and clean-energy products because they impart special properties of magnetism, luminescence, and strength. Rare earths are also used in weapon systems to obtain the same properties.

  14. Electronic structure of alkali-metal/alkaline-earth-metal fluorine beryllium borate NaSr3Be3B3O9F4 single crystal: DFT approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshak, A. H.; Kamarudin, H.; Auluck, S.

    2015-10-01

    The electronic band structure, total and angular momentum resolved projected density of states for NaSr3Be3B3O9F4 are calculated using the all-electron full potential linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbitals (FP-LAPW + lo) method. The calculations are performed within four exchange correlations namely; local density approximation (LDA), general gradient approximation (PBE-GGA), Engel-Vosko generalized gradient approximation (EVGGA) and the recently modified Becke-Johnson potential (mBJ). Calculations suggest that NaSr3Be3B3O9F4 is a direct wide band gap semiconductor. The exchange correlations potentials exhibit significant influence on the value of the energy gap being about 4.82 eV (LDA), 5.16 eV (GGA), 6.20 (EVGGA) and 7.20 eV (mBJ). The mBJ approach succeed by large amount in bringing the calculated energy gap closer to the experimental one (7.28 eV). The angular momentum resolved projected density of states shows the existence of a strong hybridization between the various orbitals. In additional we have calculated the electronic charge density distribution in two crystallographic planes namely (1 0 1) and (0 0 -1) to visualized the chemical bonding characters.

  15. Spin-Spin Interactions in the Oxides A(3)M'MO(6) (M = Rh, Ir; A = Ca, Sr; M' = Alkaline Earth, Zn, Cd, Na) of the K(4)CdCl(6) Structure Type Examined by Electronic Structure Calculations.

    PubMed

    Lee, K.-S.; Koo, H.-J.; Whangbo, M.-H.

    1999-05-03

    The oxides A(3)M'MO(6) (M = Rh, Ir; A = Ca, Sr; M' = alkaline earth, Zn, Cd) of the K(4)CdCl(6) structure type consist of isolated (MO(6))(8)(-) octahedral anions and exhibit an antiferromagnetic ordering at low temperatures. The spin-spin interactions in these oxides, Ca(3)NaMO(6) (M = Ir, Ru), and Sr(3)NaRuO(6) were examined by calculating how strongly the t(2g)-block levels of adjacent (MO(6))((6+)(n)()())(-) (n = 1, 2) anions interact in the presence and absence of the intervening cations A(2+) and M' (n)()(+) (n = 1, 2). Our calculations show that the spin-spin interactions in these oxides are three-dimensional, and the superexchange interactions occur mainly through the short intrachain and interchain M-O.O-M linkages. When the M(n)()(+) cation is very small compared with the A(2+) cation, the intrachain interaction is substantially stronger than the interchain interaction. The opposite is found when the sizes of the M(n)()(+) and A(2+) cations become similar.

  16. Atoms in Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Paul A.

    This booklet is part of an American Astronomical Society curriculum project designed to provide teaching materials to teachers of secondary school chemistry, physics, and earth science. A Basic Topics section discusses atomic structure, emphasizing states of matter at high temperature and spectroscopic analysis of light from the stars. A section…

  17. Collisions of excited Na atoms with H2 molecules. I. Ab initio potential energy surfaces and qualitative discussion of the quenching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botschwina, Peter; Meyer, Wilfried; Hertel, Ingolf V.; Reiland, W.

    1981-12-01

    Potential energy surfaces have been calculated for the four lowest electronic states of Na (3 2S, 3 2P)+H2(1Σ+g) by means of the RHF-SCF and PNO-CEPA methods. For the so-called quenching process of Na (3 2P) by H2 at low initial translational energies (E-VRT energy transfer) the energetically most favorable path occurs in C2v symmetry, since—at intermediate Na-H2 separation—the ? 2B2 potential energy surface is attractive. From the CEPA calculations, the crossing point of minimal energy between the ? 2A1 and ? 2B2 surfaces is obtained at Rc = 3.57 a.u. and rc = 2.17 a.u. with an energy difference to the asymptotic limit (R = ∞, r = re) of -0.06 eV. It is thus classically accessible without any initial translational energy, but at low initial translational energies (˜0.1 eV) quenching will be efficient only for arrangements of collision partners close to C2v symmetry. There is little indication of an avoiding crossing with an ionic intermediate correlating asymptotically with Na+ and H2- as was assumed in previous discussions of the quenching process. The dependence of the total quenching cross sections on the initial translational energy is discussed by means of the ''absorbing sphere'' model, taking the initial zero-point vibrational energy of the hydrogen molecule into account. New experimental data of the product channel distribution in H2 for center-of-mass forward scattering are presented. The final vibrational states v' = 3, 2, 1, and 0 of H2 are populated to about 26%, 61%, 13%, and 0%, respectively. The observed distributions in H2 (and D2) may be rationalized by simple dynamic considerations on the basis of the calculated surfaces.

  18. Earth Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Tom

    1970-01-01

    Reviews some of the more concerted, large-scale efforts in the earth resources areas" in order to help the computer community obtain insights into the activities it can jointly particpate in withthe earth resources community." (Author)

  19. The monomer-to-dimer transition and bimodal growth of Co-salen on NaCl(001): a high resolution atomic force microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Fremy, S; Schwarz, A; Lämmle, K; Prosenc, M; Wiesendanger, R

    2009-10-07

    Molecules of Co-salen, a paramagnetic metal-organic Schiff base complex, self-assemble into two different well ordered morphologies on a NaCl(001) substrate: nanowires, which form networks, and compact nanocrystallites. Their growth can be controlled by adjusting the deposition parameters. It turns out that the nanowires are metastable. Molecular resolution images suggest that the packing in both morphologies is the same as in bulk Co-salen single crystals. Only the orientation of the c-axis with respect to the substrate is different. The origin of this intriguing bimodal growth is associated with a monomer-to-dimer transition, which probably takes place during initial nucleation at step edges.

  20. Applications to particle transport in the Earth`s aurora

    SciTech Connect

    Jasperse, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    The visual display of light called the aurora borealis occurs when energetic (1 to 100-keV) electrons, protons, and hydrogen atoms from the Earth`s magnetosphere enter the Earth`s upper atmosphere and collide with the ambient neutral particles. Two kinds of auroras occur in nature: those excited by incident electrons and those excited by incident protons and hydrogen atoms. In this paper, we consider only the latter. The proton-hydrogen aurora may be divided into two altitude regions: high altitudes ({approximately}250 to {approximately}600 km) where charge-changing collisions dominate and energy-loss collisions may be neglected and low altitudes ({approximately}100 to {approximately}250 km) where energy-loss collisions also become important and cause rapid energy degradation. The focus of this review is on the high-altitude region where the one-group approximation is valid.

  1. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Colleen

    1998-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-sponsored project for teachers of grades 5-12, designed to: (1) enhance understanding of the Earth as an integrated system; (2) enhance the interdisciplinary approach to science instruction; and (3) provide classroom materials that focus on those goals. Discover Earth is conducted by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies in collaboration with Dr. Eric Barron, Director, Earth System Science Center, The Pennsylvania State University; and Dr. Robert Hudson, Chair, the Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland at College Park. The enclosed materials: (1) represent only part of the Discover Earth materials; (2) were developed by classroom teachers who are participating in the Discover Earth project; (3) utilize an investigative approach and on-line data; and (4) can be effectively adjusted to classrooms with greater/without technology access. The Discover Earth classroom materials focus on the Earth system and key issues of global climate change including topics such as the greenhouse effect, clouds and Earth's radiation balance, surface hydrology and land cover, and volcanoes and climate change. All the materials developed to date are available on line at (http://www.strategies.org) You are encouraged to submit comments and recommendations about these materials to the Discover Earth project manager, contact information is listed below. You are welcome to duplicate all these materials.

  2. Alkali-metal/alkaline-earth-metal fluorine beryllium borate NaSr3Be3B3O9F4 with large nonlinear optical properties in the deep-ultraviolet region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshak, A. H.; Huang, Hongwei; Kamarudin, H.; Auluck, S.

    2015-02-01

    The linear optical response and second harmonic generation (SHG) in alkali-metal/alkaline-earth-metal fluorine beryllium borate NaSr3Be3B3O9F4 are investigated by means of density functional theory. Calculations are performed using four types of exchange correlations: Ceperley-Alder local density approximation, Perdew Burke and Ernzerhof general gradient approximation, Engel-Vosko generalized gradient approximation, and the recently modified Becke-Johnson potential (mBJ). The mBJ approach brings the calculated band gap (7.20 eV) in excellent agreement with the experimental one (7.28 eV). The calculated values of the uniaxial anisotropy δɛ=-0.076 and the birefringence Δn (0 ) =0.052 indicate considerable anisotropy in the linear optical properties, which makes it favorable for the second harmonic generation. The dominant component of the second harmonic generation is χ111(2)(ω) . The value of |χ111(2)(ω) | is about 1.2 pm/V at λ = 1064 nm in agreement with previous calculations. To analyze the origin of the high SHG of NaSr3Be3B3O9F4 single crystals, we have correlated the features of |χ111(2)(ω) | spectra with the features of ɛ2(ω) spectra as a function of ω/2 and ω. From the calculated dominant component |χ111(2)(ω) | , we find that the microscopic first hyperpolarizability, β111 , the vector components along the dipole moment direction is 0.5 × 10-30 esu at static limit and 0.6 × 10-30 esu at λ = 1064 nm.

  3. The equilibrium of atmospheric sodium. [in atmospheres of Earth, Io, Mercury and Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunten, Donald M.

    1992-01-01

    We now have four examples of planetary objects with detectable sodium (and potassium) in their atmospheres: Earth, Io, Mercury and the moon. After a summary of the observational data, this survey discusses proposed sources and sinks. It appears that Io's surface material is rich in frozen SO2, but with around 1 percent of some sodium compound. The Io plasma torus contains ions of S, O and Na, also with at least one molecular ion containing Na. In turn, impact by these ions probably sustains the torus, as well as an extended neutral corona. A primary source for the Earth, Mercury and the moon is meteoroidal bombardment; at Mercury and perhaps the moon it may be supplemented by degassing of atoms from the regolith. Photoionization is important everywhere, although hot electrons are dominant at Io.

  4. Pulsed Source Of Energetic Oxygen Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, George; Krech, Robert; Green, David; Pirri, Anthony

    1988-01-01

    Apparatus developed that generates high-flux pulses of oxygen atoms to bombard specimens in experiments on aging and degradation of materials in low Earth-orbit environment. Preliminary studies of specimens irradiated with atomic oxygen provided spectral evidence of erosion, in addition to measurable mass loss. Intense atomic oxygen pulses also useful in studies of microfabrication techniques.

  5. Trapped-atom interferometer with ultracold Sr atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xian; del Aguila, Ruben Pablo; Mazzoni, Tommaso; Poli, Nicola; Tino, Guglielmo M.

    2016-10-01

    We report on a trapped atom interferometer based on Bragg diffraction and Bloch oscillations with alkaline-earth-metal atoms. We use a Ramsey-Bordé Bragg interferometer with 88Sr atoms combined with Bloch oscillations to extend the interferometer time. Thanks to a long coherence time for Bloch oscillations of 88Sr atoms, we observed interference up to 1 s evolution time in the lattice. A detailed study of decoherence sources during the Bloch phase is also presented. While still limited in sensitivity by lattice lifetime and beam inhomogeneity this result opens the way to high contrast trapped interferometers with extended interrogation time.

  6. First hyperpolarizability of cyclooctatetraene modulated by alkali and alkaline earth metals.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ria Sinha; Mondal, Avijit; Nandi, Prasanta K

    2017-03-01

    In the present investigation, the first hyperpolarizability of alkali and alkaline earth metal derivatives of cyclooctatetraene (COT) has been calculated using BHHLYP and CAM-B3LYP functional for 6-311++G(d,p), 6-311++G(3df,3pd), and aug-pc 2 basis sets. Introduction of Na/K atoms at the axial position of COT and Li, Na, K/Be, Mg, Ca metal atoms and cyanide groups at the equatorial sites leads to lager enhancement of first hyperpolarizability. The ring charge density can account for the variation of first hyperpolarizability. The two state model has been invoked to explain the variation of first hyperpolarizability.

  7. Electron- and Photon-stimulated Desorption of Alkali Atoms from Lunar Sample and a Model Mineral Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakshinskiy, B. V.; Madey, T. E.

    2003-01-01

    We report recent results on an investigation of source mechanisms for the origin of alkali atoms in the tenuous planetary atmospheres, with focus on non-thermal processes (photon stimulated desorption (PSD), electron stimulated desorption (ESD), and ion sputtering). Whereas alkaline earth oxides (MgO, CaO) are far more abundant in lunar samples than alkali oxides (Na2O, K2O), the atmosphere of the Moon contains easily measurable concentrations of Na and K, while Ca and Mg are undetected there; traces of Ca have recently been seen in the Moon's atmosphere (10-3 of Na). The experiments have included ESD, PSD and ion sputtering of alkali atoms from model mineral surface (amorphous SiO2) and from a lunar basalt sample obtained from NASA. The comparison is made between ESD and PSD efficiency of monovalent alkalis (Na, K) and divalent alkaline earths (Ba, Ca).The ultrahigh vacuum measurement scheme for ESD and PSD of Na atoms includes a highly sensitive alkali metal detector based on surface ionization, and a time-of-flight technique. For PSD measurements, a mercury arc light source (filtered and chopped) is used. We find that bombardment of the alkali covered surfaces by ultraviolet photons or by low energy electrons (E>4 eV) causes desorption of hot alkali atoms. This results are consistent with the model developed to explain our previous measurements of sodium desorption from a silica surface and from water ice: electron- or photon-induced charge transfer from the substrate to the ionic adsorbate causes formation of a neutral alkali atom in a repulsive configuration, from which desorption occurs. The two-electron charge transfer to cause desorption of divalent alkaline eath ions is a less likely process.The data support the suggestion that PSD by UV solar photons is a dominant source process for alkalis in the tenuous lunar atmosphere.

  8. Rainbow Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Library and Archives, Phoenix.

    The environment is a great concern in the 1990s, and everyone needs to work at maintaining our planet. The 1992 Arizona State Library Reading Program, "Rainbow Earth," provides children with many techniques they can use to help the Earth. This reading program guide provides information on the following: goals, objectives, and evaluation;…

  9. Earth tides

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Nineteen papers on gravity, tilt, and strain tides are compiled into this volume. Detailed chapters cover the calculation of the tidal forces and of the Earth's response to them, as well as actual observations of earth tides. Partial Contents: On Earth tides. The tidal forces: Tidal Forces. New Computations of the Tide-Generating Potential. Corrected Tables of Tidal Harmonics. The Theory of Tidal Deformations. Body Tides on an Elliptical, Rotating, Elastic and Oceanless Earth, Deformation of the Earth by Surface Loads. Gravimetric Tidal Loading Computed from Integrated Green's Functions. Tidal Friction in the Solid Earth. Loading Tides Versus Body Tides. Lunar Tidal Acceleration from Earth Satellite Orbit Analysis. Observations: gravity. Tidal Gravity in Britain: Tidal Loading and the Spatial Distribution of the Marine Tide. Tidal Loading along a Profile Europe-East Africa-South Asia-Australia and the Pacific Ocean. Detailed Gravity-Tide Spectrum between One and Four Cycles per Day. Observations: tilt and strain. Cavity and Topographic Effects in Tilt and Strain Measurement. Observations of Local Elastic Effects on Earth Tide Tilts and Strains.

  10. Atom Recombination on Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Chai

    Upon high speed re-entry of the Space Shuttle Orbiter (SSO) through the earth's atmosphere, oxygen and nitrogen atoms produced in the shock wave in front of the SSO recombine on the surface of the SSO, releasing heat. To minimize the rise of surface temperature due to the reaction, surface material of the SSO should have a low recombination probability, gamma, of atoms impinging on it. To design such material, it is necessary to understand the mechanism of atom recombination. With this in mind, gamma values were measured for recombination of O, N, and H atoms in a diffusion tube reactor between 700 and 1250 K (HT), 300 and 700 K (MT), and at 194 K (LT) on silica. The rate of recombination was first order with respect to the atom concentration from LT to HT. The Arrhenius plots, gamma vs. 1/T, were very complex. All observations are explained by assuming a surface with a small fraction of active sites that irreversibly bind chemisorbed atoms. Everything happens as if the active sites were surrounded by collection zones within which all atoms striking the surface are adsorbed reversibly with an assumed sticking probability of unity. These atoms then diffuse on the surface. Some of them reach the active sites where they can recombine with the chemisorbed atoms. At LT, all atoms striking the surface reach the active sites. As a result of desorption at MT, the collection zones shrink with increasing temperature. At HT, only atoms striking active sites directly from the gas phase lead to recombination. An analytical solution of the diffusion-reaction problem obtained for a model where the active sites are distributed uniformly fits with the experimental data from LT to HT. The two novel features of this work are the identification of the active sites on silica for recombination of H on silica at HT as surface OH groups and the suggestion that another kind of active site is responsible for recombination of O and N atoms at HT as well as for H atoms at LT and MT. Although

  11. Esperanzaite, NaCa2Al2(As5+O4)2F4(OH)*2H2O, a new mineral species from the La Esperanza mine, Mexico: descriptive mineralogy and atomic arrangement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foord, E.E.; Hughes, J.M.; Cureton, F.; Maxwell, C.H.; Falster, A.U.; Sommer, A.J.; Hlava, P.F.

    1999-01-01

    Esperanzaite, ideally NaCa2Al2(As5+O4)2F4(OH)??2H2O, Z = 2, is a new mineral species from the La Esperanza mine, Durango State, Mexico. The mineral occurs as blue-green botryoidal crystalline masses on rhyolite, with separate spheres up to 1.5 mm in diameter. The Mohs hardness is 4 1/2 , and the specific gravity, 3.24 (obs.) and 3.36(3) (calc.). Optical properties were measured in 589 nm light. Esperanzaite is biaxial (-), X = Y = Z = colorless, ?? 1.580(1), ?? 1.588(1), and ?? 1.593(1); 2V(obs) is 74(1)??and 2V(calc) is 76.3??. The dispersion is medium, r < v, and the optic axes are oriented according to a ?? Z = +50.5??, b = Y, c ?? X = +35??. The strongest five X-ray-diffraction maxima in the powder pattern [d in A??(I)(hkl)] are: 2.966(100)(131, 311, 031), 3.527(90)(220), 2.700(90)(221,002,040), 5.364(80)(001,020) and 4.796(80)(011). Esperanzaite is monoclinic, a 9.687(5), b 10.7379(6), c 5.5523(7) A??, ?? 105.32(1)??, space group P21/m. The atomic arrangement of esperanzaite was solved by direct methods and Fourier analysis (R = 0.032). The Fundamental Building Block (FBB) is formed of [001] stacks of heteropolyhedral tetramers; the tetramers are formed of two arsenate tetrahedra and two Al octahedra, corner-linked in four-member rings. The FBBs are linked by irregular Na??5 and Ca??8 polyhedra.

  12. Highly stable Na2/3 (Mn0.54 Ni0.13 Co0.13 )O2 cathode modified by atomic layer deposition for sodium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Kaliyappan, Karthikeyan; Liu, Jian; Lushington, Andrew; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang

    2015-08-10

    For the first time, atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al2 O3 was adopted to enhance the cyclic stability of layered P2-type Na2/3 (Mn0.54 Ni0.13 Co0.13 )O2 (MNC) cathodes for use in sodium-ion batteries (SIBs). Discharge capacities of approximately 120, 123, 113, and 105 mA h g(-1) were obtained for the pristine electrode and electrodes coated with 2, 5, and 10 ALD cycles, respectively. All electrodes were cycled at the 1C discharge current rate for voltages between 2 and 4.5 V in 1 M NaClO4 electrolyte. Among the electrodes tested, the Al2 O3 coating from 2 ALD cycles (MNC-2) exhibited the best electrochemical stability and rate capability, whereas the electrode coated by 10 ALD cycles (MNC-10) displayed the highest columbic efficiency (CE), which exceeded 97 % after 100 cycles. The enhanced electrochemical stability observed for ALD-coated electrodes could be a result of the protection effects and high band-gap energy (Eg =9.00 eV) of the Al2 O3 coating layer. Additionally, the metal-oxide coating provides structural stability against mechanical stresses occurring during the cycling process. The capacity, cyclic stability, and rate performance achieved for the MNC electrode coated with 2 ALD cycles of Al2 O3 reveal the best results for SIBs. This study provides a promising route toward increasing the stability and CE of electrode materials for SIB application.

  13. Cold Light from Hot Atoms and Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, Graeme; Curry, John J.

    2011-05-11

    The introduction of rare earth atoms and molecules into lighting discharges led to great advances in efficacy of these lamps. Atoms such as Dy, Ho and Ce provide excellent radiation sources for lighting applications, with rich visible spectra, such that a suitable combination of these elements can provide high quality white light. Rare earth molecules have also proved important in enhancing the radiation spectrum from phosphors in fluorescent lamps. This paper reviews some of the current aspects of lighting research, particularly rare earth chemistry and radiation, and the associated fundamental atomic and molecular data.

  14. Can atom-surface potential measurements test atomic structure models?

    PubMed

    Lonij, Vincent P A; Klauss, Catherine E; Holmgren, William F; Cronin, Alexander D

    2011-06-30

    van der Waals (vdW) atom-surface potentials can be excellent benchmarks for atomic structure calculations. This is especially true if measurements are made with two different types of atoms interacting with the same surface sample. Here we show theoretically how ratios of vdW potential strengths (e.g., C₃(K)/C₃(Na)) depend sensitively on the properties of each atom, yet these ratios are relatively insensitive to properties of the surface. We discuss how C₃ ratios depend on atomic core electrons by using a two-oscillator model to represent the contribution from atomic valence electrons and core electrons separately. We explain why certain pairs of atoms are preferable to study for future experimental tests of atomic structure calculations. A well chosen pair of atoms (e.g., K and Na) will have a C₃ ratio that is insensitive to the permittivity of the surface, whereas a poorly chosen pair (e.g., K and He) will have a ratio of C₃ values that depends more strongly on the permittivity of the surface.

  15. Solidification of NaCl-NaF eutectic in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, A. S.; Yu, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    Continuous and discontinuous NaF fibers, embedded in a NaCl matrix, have been produced in space and on earth, respectively. The production of continuous fibers in a eutectic mixture was attributed to the absence of convection current in the liquid during solidification in space. Image transmission and optical transmittance measurements of transverse sections of the space-grown and earth-grown ingots were made with a light microscope and a spectrometer. It was found that better optical properties were obtained from samples grown in space. This was attributed to a better alignment of NaF fibers along the ingot axis.

  16. Primary Atomic Clock Reference System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    An artist's concept of the Primary Atomic Clock Reference System (PARCS) plarned to fly on the International Space Station (ISS). PARCS will make even more accurate atomic time available to everyone, from physicists testing Einstein's Theory of Relativity, to hikers using the Global Positioning System to find their way. In ground-based atomic clocks, lasers are used to cool and nearly stop atoms of cesium whose vibrations are used as the time base. The microgravity of space will allow the atoms to be suspended in the clock rather than circulated in an atomic fountain, as required on Earth. PARCS is being developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with principal investigators at the National Institutes of Standards and Technology and the University of Colorado, Boulder. See also No. 0103191

  17. Primary Atomic Clock Reference System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    An artist's concept of the Primary Atomic Clock Reference System (PARCS) plarned to fly on the International Space Station (ISS). PARCS will make even more accurate atomic time available to everyone, from physicists testing Einstein's Theory of Relativity, to hikers using the Global Positioning System to find their way. In ground-based atomic clocks, lasers are used to cool and nearly stop atoms of cesium whose vibrations are used as the time base. The microgravity of space will allow the atoms to be suspended in the clock rather than circulated in an atomic fountain, as required on Earth. PARCS is being developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with principal investigators at the National Institutes of Standards and Technology and the University of Colorado, Boulder. See also No. 0100120.

  18. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-funded project for teachers of grades 5-12 who want to expand their knowledge of the Earth system, and prepare to become master teachers who promote Earth system science in their own schools, counties, and throughout their state. Participants from the following states are invited to apply: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington, DC. Teachers selected for the project participate in a two-week summer workshop conducted at the University of Maryland, College Park; develop classroom-ready materials during the workshop for broad dissemination; conduct a minimum of two peer training activities during the coming school year; and participate in other enrichment/education opportunities as available and desired. Discover Earth is a team effort that utilizes expertise from a range of contributors, and balances science content with hands-on classroom applications.

  19. Atomic Resolution Interfacial Structure of Lead-free Ferroelectric K0.5Na0.5NbO3 Thin films Deposited on SrTiO3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Wang, Lingyan; Wang, Zhao; Yang, Yaodong; Ren, Wei; Yang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Oxide interface engineering has attracted considerable attention since the discovery of its exotic properties induced by lattice strain, dislocation and composition change at the interface. In this paper, the atomic resolution structure and composition of the interface between the lead-free piezoelectric (K0.5Na0.5)NbO3 (KNN) thin films and single-crystalline SrTiO3 substrate were investigated by means of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combining with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). A sharp epitaxial interface was observed to be a monolayer composed of Nb and Ti cations with a ratio of 3/1. The First-Principles Calculations indicated the interface monolayer showed different electronic structure and played the vital role in the asymmetric charge distribution of KNN thin films near the interface. We also observed the gradual relaxation process for the relatively large lattice strains near the KNN/STO interface, which remarks a good structure modulation behavior of KNN thin films via strain engineering. PMID:27886259

  20. Atomic Resolution Interfacial Structure of Lead-free Ferroelectric K0.5Na0.5NbO3 Thin films Deposited on SrTiO3.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Wang, Lingyan; Wang, Zhao; Yang, Yaodong; Ren, Wei; Yang, Guang

    2016-11-25

    Oxide interface engineering has attracted considerable attention since the discovery of its exotic properties induced by lattice strain, dislocation and composition change at the interface. In this paper, the atomic resolution structure and composition of the interface between the lead-free piezoelectric (K0.5Na0.5)NbO3 (KNN) thin films and single-crystalline SrTiO3 substrate were investigated by means of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combining with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). A sharp epitaxial interface was observed to be a monolayer composed of Nb and Ti cations with a ratio of 3/1. The First-Principles Calculations indicated the interface monolayer showed different electronic structure and played the vital role in the asymmetric charge distribution of KNN thin films near the interface. We also observed the gradual relaxation process for the relatively large lattice strains near the KNN/STO interface, which remarks a good structure modulation behavior of KNN thin films via strain engineering.

  1. Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  2. Earth materials and earth dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, K; Shankland, T.

    2000-11-01

    In the project ''Earth Materials and Earth Dynamics'' we linked fundamental and exploratory, experimental, theoretical, and computational research programs to shed light on the current and past states of the dynamic Earth. Our objective was to combine different geological, geochemical, geophysical, and materials science analyses with numerical techniques to illuminate active processes in the Earth. These processes include fluid-rock interactions that form and modify the lithosphere, non-linear wave attenuations in rocks that drive plate tectonics and perturb the earth's surface, dynamic recrystallization of olivine that deforms the upper mantle, development of texture in high-pressure olivine polymorphs that create anisotropic velocity regions in the convecting upper mantle and transition zone, and the intense chemical reactions between the mantle and core. We measured physical properties such as texture and nonlinear elasticity, equation of states at simultaneous pressures and temperatures, magnetic spins and bonding, chemical permeability, and thermal-chemical feedback to better characterize earth materials. We artificially generated seismic waves, numerically modeled fluid flow and transport in rock systems and modified polycrystal plasticity theory to interpret measured physical properties and integrate them into our understanding of the Earth. This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  3. Atomic polarizabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, M. S.; Mitroy, J.; Clark, Charles W.; Kozlov, M. G.

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  4. Digital Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Beaujardiere, J.

    2001-05-01

    Digital Earth (DE) seeks to make geospatial information broadly and easily available. Vast amounts of natural and cultural information are gathered about the Earth, but it is often difficult to find needed data, to share knowledge across disciplines, and to combine information from several sources. DE defines a framework for interoperability by selecting relevant open standards from the information technology community. These standards specify the technical means by which publishers can provide or sell their data, and by which client applications can find and access data in an automated fashion. The standardized DE framework enables many types of clients--from web browsers to museum kiosks to research-grade virtual environments--to use a common geospatial information infrastructure. Digital Earth can benefit Earth system education in general, and DLESE in particular, in several ways. First, educators, students and creators of instructional material will benefit from standardized access to georeferenced data. Secondly, educational lesson plans that focus on a region or aspect of the Earth can themselves be considered geospatial information resources that could be cataloged and retrieved through DE. Finally, general public knowledge about our planet will by increased by Digital Earth.

  5. NASA Benefits Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Julie A.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews several ways in which NASA research has benefited Earth and made life on Earth better. These innovations include: solar panels, recycled pavement, thermometer pill, invisible braces for straightening teeth, LASIK, aerodynamic helmets and tires for bicycles, cataract detection, technology that was used to remove Anthrax spores from mail handling facilities, study of atomic oxygen erosion of materials has informed the restoration of artwork, macroencapsulation (a potential mechanism to deliver anti cancer drugs to specific sites), and research on a salmonella vaccine. With research on the International Space Station just beginning, there will be opportunities for entrepreneurs and other government agencies to access space for their research and development. As well as NASA continuing its own research on human health and technology development.

  6. Rare earth thermoelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, G.D.

    1997-09-01

    The author reviews the thermoelectric properties of metallic compounds which contain rare-earth atoms. They are the group of metals with the largest value ever reported of the Seebeck coefficient. An increase by 50% of the Seebeck would make these compounds useful for thermoelectric devices. The largest Seebeck coefficient is found for compounds of cerium (e.g., CePd{sub 3}) and ytterbium (e.g., YbAl{sub 3}). Theoretical predictions are in agreement with the maximum observed Seebeck. The author discusses the theoretical model which has been used to calculate the Seebeck coefficient. He is solving this model for other configurations (4f){sup n} of rare-earth ground states.

  7. Venus - Lessons for earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunten, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    The old idea that Venus might possess surface conditions to those of an overcast earth has been thoroughly refuted by space-age measurements. Instead, the two planets may have started out similar, but diverged because of the greater solar flux at Venus. This cannot be proved, but is consistent with everything known. A runaway greenhouse effect could have evaporated an 'ocean'. The hydrogen would escape, and most of the oxygen would be incorporated into the crust. Without liquid water, CO2 would remain in the atmosphere. Chlorine atoms would catalyze the recombination of any free oxygen back to CO2. The same theories apply to the future of the earth, and to the explanation of the polar ozone holes; the analogies are striking. There is no likelihood that the earth will actually come to resemble Venus, but Venus serves both as a warning that major environmental effects can flow from seemingly small causes, and as a testbed for the predictive models of the earth.

  8. Communication: Angular momentum alignment and fluorescence polarization of alkali atoms photodetached from helium nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernando, Alberto; Beswick, J. Alberto; Halberstadt, Nadine

    2013-12-01

    The theory of photofragments angular momentum polarization is applied to the photodetachment of an electronically excited alkali atom from a helium nanocluster (N = 200). The alignment of the electronic angular momentum of the bare excited alkali atoms produced is calculated quantum mechanically by solving the excited states coupled equations with potentials determined by density functional theory (DFT). Pronounced oscillations as a function of excitation energy are predicted for the case of Na@(He)200, in marked contrast with the absorption cross-section and angular distribution of the ejected atoms which are smooth functions of the energy. These oscillations are due to quantum interference between different coherently excited photodetachment pathways. Experimentally, these oscillations should be reflected in the fluorescence polarization and polarization-resolved photoelectron yield of the ejected atoms, which are proportional to the electronic angular momentum alignment. In addition, this result is much more general than the test case of NaHe200 studied here. It should be observable for larger droplets, for higher excited electronic states, and for other alkali as well as for alkali-earth atoms. Detection of these oscillations would show that the widely used pseudo-diatomic model can be valid beyond the prediction of absorption spectra and could help in interpreting parts of the dynamics, as already hinted by some experimental results on angular anisotropy of bare alkali fragments.

  9. Communication: Angular momentum alignment and fluorescence polarization of alkali atoms photodetached from helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Hernando, Alberto; Beswick, J. Alberto; Halberstadt, Nadine

    2013-12-14

    The theory of photofragments angular momentum polarization is applied to the photodetachment of an electronically excited alkali atom from a helium nanocluster (N = 200). The alignment of the electronic angular momentum of the bare excited alkali atoms produced is calculated quantum mechanically by solving the excited states coupled equations with potentials determined by density functional theory (DFT). Pronounced oscillations as a function of excitation energy are predicted for the case of Na@(He){sub 200}, in marked contrast with the absorption cross-section and angular distribution of the ejected atoms which are smooth functions of the energy. These oscillations are due to quantum interference between different coherently excited photodetachment pathways. Experimentally, these oscillations should be reflected in the fluorescence polarization and polarization-resolved photoelectron yield of the ejected atoms, which are proportional to the electronic angular momentum alignment. In addition, this result is much more general than the test case of NaHe{sub 200} studied here. It should be observable for larger droplets, for higher excited electronic states, and for other alkali as well as for alkali-earth atoms. Detection of these oscillations would show that the widely used pseudo-diatomic model can be valid beyond the prediction of absorption spectra and could help in interpreting parts of the dynamics, as already hinted by some experimental results on angular anisotropy of bare alkali fragments.

  10. Structure and ionic diffusion of alkaline-earth ions in mixed cation glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinou, Konstantinos; Sushko, Petr; Duffy, Dorothy M.

    2015-08-15

    A series of mixed cation silicate glasses of the composition A2O – 2MO – 4SiO2, with A=Li,Na,K and M=Ca,Sr,Ba has been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations in order to understand the effect of the nature of the cations on the mobility of the alkaline-earth ions within the glass network. The size of the alkaline-earth cation was found to affect the inter-atomic distances, the coordination number distributions and the bond angle distributions , whereas the medium-range order was almost unaffected by the type of the cation. All the alkaline-earth cations contribute to lower vibrational frequencies but it is observed that that there is a shift to smaller frequencies and the vibrational density of states distribution gets narrower as the size of the alkaline-earth increases. The results from our modeling for the ionic diffusion of the alkaline-earth cations are in a qualitative agreement with the experimental observations in that there is a distinct correlation between the activation energy for diffusion of alkaline earth-ions and the cation radii ratio. An asymmetrical linear behavior in the diffusion activation energy with increasing size difference is observed. The results can be described on the basis of a theoretical model that relates the diffusion activation energy to the electrostatic interactions of the cations with the oxygens and the elastic deformation of the silicate network.

  11. Earth: Earth Science and Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2001-01-01

    A major new NASA initiative on environmental change and health has been established to promote the application of Earth science remote sensing data, information, observations, and technologies to issues of human health. NASA's Earth Sciences suite of Earth observing instruments are now providing improved observations science, data, and advanced technologies about the Earth's land, atmosphere, and oceans. These new space-based resources are being combined with other agency and university resources, data integration and fusion technologies, geographic information systems (GIS), and the spectrum of tools available from the public health community, making it possible to better understand how the environment and climate are linked to specific diseases, to improve outbreak prediction, and to minimize disease risk. This presentation is an overview of NASA's tools, capabilities, and research advances in this initiative.

  12. O-atom degradation mechanisms of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulter, Daniel R.; Liang, Ranty H.; Chung, Shirley Y.; Smith, Keri Oda; Gupta, Amitava

    1987-01-01

    The low Earth orbit environment is described and the critical issues relating to oxygen atom degradation are discussed. Some analytic techniques for studying the problem and preliminary results on the underlying degradation mechanisms are presented.

  13. Digital Earth - A sustainable Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahavir

    2014-02-01

    All life, particularly human, cannot be sustainable, unless complimented with shelter, poverty reduction, provision of basic infrastructure and services, equal opportunities and social justice. Yet, in the context of cities, it is believed that they can accommodate more and more people, endlessly, regardless to their carrying capacity and increasing ecological footprint. The 'inclusion', for bringing more and more people in the purview of development is often limited to social and economic inclusion rather than spatial and ecological inclusion. Economic investment decisions are also not always supported with spatial planning decisions. Most planning for a sustainable Earth, be at a level of rural settlement, city, region, national or Global, fail on the capacity and capability fronts. In India, for example, out of some 8,000 towns and cities, Master Plans exist for only about 1,800. A chapter on sustainability or environment is neither statutorily compulsory nor a norm for these Master Plans. Geospatial technologies including Remote Sensing, GIS, Indian National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI), Indian National Urban Information Systems (NUIS), Indian Environmental Information System (ENVIS), and Indian National GIS (NGIS), etc. have potential to map, analyse, visualize and take sustainable developmental decisions based on participatory social, economic and social inclusion. Sustainable Earth, at all scales, is a logical and natural outcome of a digitally mapped, conceived and planned Earth. Digital Earth, in fact, itself offers a platform to dovetail the ecological, social and economic considerations in transforming it into a sustainable Earth.

  14. Esperanzaite, NaCa(2)Al(2)(As(5+)O(4))[As(5+)O(3)(OH)](OH)(2)F(4)(H(2)O), A New Mineral From Mina La Esperanza, Mexico: Descriptive Mineralogy and Atomic Arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Cureton, F.; Falster, A.U.; Foord, E.E.; Hlava, P.F.; Hughes, J.M.; Maxwell, C.H.

    1998-11-09

    Esperanzaite, ideally NaCazA12(As5+0.i)[As5+03 (OH)] (OH)2FJH20), Z =2, is a new mineral from the Mina h Esperarq Durango State, Mexico. The mineral occurs as blue-green botryoidal crystalline masses on rhyolite, with separate spheres up to 1.5 mm Y Deceased in diameter. Mobs hardness is 4.5, specific gravity 3.240h, and 3.36( 3)C.IC. Optical properties were measured in 589 nm light. Esperanzaite is biaxial (-), .Y= Y = Z= colorless, a 1.580(1), ~ 1.588( 1), and y 1.593(1 ); 2V0hs is 74(1 ~ and 2 }'CUIC is 76.3". Dispersion is medium, r < v, and optic axes are oriented as a A Z = +50.5o, b = Y, c P. X = +35". The five strongest X-ray diffraction maxima in the powder pattern are (~ /, hk~: 2.966,100, 13 i, 31 i, 031 ; 3.527,90, 220; 2.700,90,221,002, 040; 5.364>80, 001, 020; 4.796,80,011. Esperanzaite is monoclinic, u 9.687(5), b 10.7379(6), c 5.5523(7)& ~ 105.32( 1 )", space group P21/nz. The atomic arrangement of esperanzaite was solved by Direct Methods and Fourier analysis (R= 0.03 1). The Fundamental Building Block is formed of stacks of heteropolyhedral tetramers; the tetramers are formed of two arsenate tetrahedral and two Al octahedra, comer-linked in 4-member rings. The Fundamental Building Blocks are linked by irregular lda~j and Ca@ polyhedra.

  15. Think Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niedermeyer, Fred; Ice, Kay

    1992-01-01

    Describes a series of environmental education instructional units for grades K-6 developed by the Think Earth Consortium that cover topics such as conservation, pollution control, and waste reduction. Provides testimony from one sixth-grade teacher that field tested the second-grade unit. (MDH)

  16. Rare earths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gambogi, J.

    2013-01-01

    Global mine production of rare earths was estimated to have declined slightly in 2012 relative to 2011 (Fig. 1). Production in China was estimated to have decreased to 95 from 105 kt (104,700 from 115,700 st) in 2011, while new mine production in the United States and Australia increased.

  17. Atomic supersymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostelecky, V. Alan

    1993-01-01

    Atomic supersymmetry is a quantum-mechanical supersymmetry connecting the properties of different atoms and ions. A short description of some established results in the subject are provided and a few recent developments are discussed including the extension to parabolic coordinates and the calculation of Stark maps using supersymmetry-based models.

  18. Earth meandering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadiyan, H.; Zamani, A.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we try to put away current Global Tectonic Model to look the tectonic evolution of the earth from new point of view. Our new dynamic model is based on study of river meandering (RM) which infer new concept as Earth meandering(EM). In a universal gravitational field if we consider a clockwise spiral galaxy model rotate above Ninety East Ridge (geotectonic axis GA), this system with applying torsion field (likes geomagnetic field) in side direction from Rocky Mt. (west geotectonic pole WGP) to Tibetan plateau TP (east geotectonic pole EGP),it seems that pulled mass from WGP and pushed it in EGP due to it's rolling dynamics. According to this idea we see in topographic map that North America and Green land like a tongue pulled from Pacific mouth toward TP. Actually this system rolled or meander the earth over itself fractaly from small scale to big scale and what we see in the river meandering and Earth meandering are two faces of one coin. River transport water and sediments from high elevation to lower elevation and also in EM, mass transport from high altitude-Rocky Mt. to lower altitude Himalaya Mt. along 'S' shape geodetic line-optimum path which connect points from high altitude to lower altitude as kind of Euler Elastica(EE). These curves are responsible for mass spreading (source) and mass concentration (sink). In this regard, tiltness of earth spin axis plays an important role, 'S' are part of sigmoidal shape which formed due to intersection of Earth rolling with the Earth glob and actual feature of transform fault and river meandering. Longitudinal profile in mature rivers as a part of 'S' curve also is a kind of EE. 'S' which bound the whole earth is named S-1(S order 1) and cube corresponding to this which represent Earth fracturing in global scale named C-1(cube order 1 or side vergence cube SVC), C-1 is a biggest cycle of spiral polygon, so it is not completely closed and it has separation about diameter of C-7. Inside SVC we introduce cone

  19. Pulsed source of energetic atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, George E.; Krech, Robert H.

    1989-01-01

    A large area, high flux beam of energetic oxygen atoms, E about 5 eV, has been developed to study the interaction of atomic oxygen with materials appropriate for spacecraft in low earth orbit. A description of the operating conditions and characteristics of the beam along with typical sample irradiation results are provided.

  20. The Earth's Plamasphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's plasmasphere is an inner part of the magneteosphere. It is located just outside the upper ionosphere located in Earth's atmosphere. It is a region of dense, cold plasma that surrounds the Earth. Although plasma is found throughout the magnetosphere, the plasmasphere usually contains the coldest plasma. Here's how it works: The upper reaches of our planet's atmosphere are exposed to ultraviolet light from the Sun, and they are ionized with electrons that are freed from neutral atmospheric particles. The results are electrically charged negative and positive particles. The negative particles are electrons, and the positive particles are now called ions (formerly atoms and molecules). If the density of these particles is low enough, this electrically charged gas behaves differently than it would if it were neutral. Now this gas is called plasma. The atmospheric gas density becomes low enough to support the conditions for a plasma around earth at about 90 kilometers above Earth's surface. The electrons in plasma gain more energy, and they are very low in mass. They move along Earth's magnetic field lines and their increased energy is enough to escape Earth's gravity. Because electrons are very light, they don't have to gain too much kinetic energy from the Sun's ultraviolet light before gravity loses its grip on them. Gravity is not all that holds them back, however. As more and more electrons begin to escape outward, they leave behind a growing net positive electric charge in the ionosphere and create a growing net negative electric charge above the ionosphere; an electric field begins to develop (the Pannekoek-Rosseland E-field). Thus, these different interacting charges result in a positively charged ionosphere and negatively charged region of space above it. Very quickly this resulting electric field opposed upward movement of the electrons out of the ionosphere. The electrons still have this increased energy, however, so the electric field doesn't just

  1. Competition Effect in Atomic-Molecular System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jia, Suotang; Qin, Lijuan; Qian, Zuliang; Wang, Zugeng; Wang, Gang; Zhou, Guosheng

    1996-01-01

    The competition effects among the processes of atomic ionization, optical pumped stimulated radiation (OPSR), four-wave frequency mixing (FWFM) and molecular stimulated diffuse band radiation at the atomic two-photon resonance of 3S approaches 4D in Na2 - Na mixture were observed. The dip at the two-photon resonance in the excitation spectrum for the diffuse-band radiation was interpreted as suppression of population in 4D state.

  2. Atomic Oxygen Task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.

    1997-01-01

    This report details work performed by the Center for Applied Optics (CAO) at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) on the contract entitled 'Atomic Oxygen Task' for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (contract NAS8-38609, Delivery Order 109, modification number 1). Atomic oxygen effects on exposed materials remain a critical concern in designing spacecraft to withstand exposure in the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. The basic objective of atomic oxygen research in NASA's Materials & Processes (M&P) Laboratory is to provide the solutions to material problems facing present and future space missions. The objective of this work was to provide the necessary research for the design of specialized experimental test configurations and development of techniques for evaluating in-situ space environmental effects, including the effects of atomic oxygen and electromagnetic radiation on candidate materials. Specific tasks were performed to address materials issues concerning accelerated environmental testing as well as specifically addressing materials issues of particular concern for LDEF analysis and Space Station materials selection.

  3. Fabrication and characterization of rare-earth-doped nanostructures on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Thomas J; Zhang, Ming; Feng, Wei; El-khouri, Rita J; Sun, Ling-Dong; Yan, Chun-Hua; Patten, Timothy E; Liu, Gang-yu

    2011-08-23

    This article presents a simple and practical means to produce rare-earth-based nanostructures, as well as a combined characterization of structure and optical properties in situ. A nanosphere lithography strategy combined with surface chemistry enables the production of arrays of β-NaYF(4):Yb,Er nanorings inlaid in an octadecyltrichlorosilane matrix. These arrays of nanorings are produced over the entire support, such as a 1 cm(2) glass coverslip. The dimension of nanorings can be varied by changing the deposition conditions. A home-constructed, multifunctional microscope integrating atomic force microscopy, near-field scanning optical microscopy, and far-field optical microscopy and spectroscopy is utilized to characterize the nanostructures. This in situ and combined characterization is important for rare-earth-containing nanomaterials in order to correlate local structure with upconversion photoluminescence. Knowledge gained from the investigation should facilitate materials design and optimization, for instance, in the context of photovoltaic devices and biofluorescent probes.

  4. Acting Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Susan Archie

    1997-01-01

    Describes a fun game in which students act as electrons, protons, and neutrons. This activity is designed to help students develop a concrete understanding of the abstract concept of atomic structure. (DKM)

  5. Kinetic Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David B.

    1981-01-01

    Surveys the research of scientists like Joule, Kelvin, Maxwell, Clausius, and Boltzmann as it comments on the basic conceptual issues involved in the development of a more precise kinetic theory and the idea of a kinetic atom. (Author/SK)

  6. Hydrogen storage of a novel combined system of LiNH2-NaMgH3: synergistic effects of in situ formed alkali and alkaline-earth metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongtao; Fang, Fang; Song, Yun; Li, Yuesheng; Sun, Dalin; Zheng, Shiyou; Bendersky, Leonid A; Zhang, Qingan; Ouyang, Liuzhang; Zhu, Min

    2013-02-07

    Bimetallic hydride NaMgH(3) is used for the first time as a vehicle to enhance hydrogen release and uptake from LiNH(2). The combination of NaMgH(3) with LiNH(2) at a molar ratio of 1 : 2 can release about 4.0 wt% of hydrogen without detectable NH(3) emission in the temperature range of 45 °C to 325 °C and exhibiting superior dehydrogenation as compared to individual NaH and/or MgH(2) combined with LiNH(2). A high capacity retention of about 75% resulting from the introduction of NaMgH(3) is also achieved in LiNH(2) as well as re-hydrogenation under milder conditions of 180 °C and 5 MPa H(2) pressure. These significant improvements are attributed to synergistic effects of in situ formed NaH and MgH(2)via the decomposition of NaMgH(3) where a succession of competing reactions from the cyclic consumption/recovery of NaH are involved and serve as a "carrier" for the ultra-rapid conveyance of the N-containing species between the [NH(2)](-) amide and the resulting [NH](2-) imide complexes.

  7. Systematic variation of rare-earth elements in cerium-earth minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murata, K.J.; Rose, H.J.; Carron, M.K.; Glass, J.J.

    1957-01-01

    In a continuation of a study reported previously, rare-earth elements and thorium have been determined in monazite, allanite, cerite, bastnaesite, and a number of miscellaneous cerium-earth minerals. A quantity called sigma (???), which is the sum of the atomic percentages of La, Ce, and Pr, is proposed as an index of composition of all cerium-earth minerals with respect to the rare-earth elements. The value of ??? for all of the minerals analysed falls between 58 and 92 atomic per cent. Monazites, allanites, and cerites cover the entire observed range, whereas bastnaesites are sharply restricted to the range between 80 and 92 atomic per cent. The minimum value of ??? for a cerium-earth mineral corresponds to the smallest possible unit-cell size of the mineral. In monazite, this structurally controlled minimum value of ??? is estimated to be around 30 atomic per cent. Neodymium, because of its abundance, and yttrium, because of its small size, have dominant roles in contraction of the structure. In the other direction, the limit of variation in composition will be reached when lanthanum becomes the sole rare-earth element in a cerium-earth mineral. Cerium-earth minerals from alkalic rocks are all characterized by values of ??? greater than 80 atomic per cent, indicating that the processes that formed these rocks were unusually efficient in fractionating the rare-earth elements-efficient in the sense that a highly selected assemblage is produced without eliminating the bulk of these elements. Analyses of inner and outer parts of two large crystals of monazite from different deposits show no difference in ??? in one crystal and a slightly smaller value of ??? in the outer part of the other crystal compared to the inner part. The ??? of monazites from pegmatites that intrude genetically related granitic rocks in North Carolina is found to be either higher or lower than the ??? of monazites in the intruded host rock. These results indicate that the fractionation of the

  8. Coherent Transient Effect Studies of Rydberg Atoms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    occurs in a Rydberg gas at the densities requil for transient experiments (NA1.2 atoms/cmut). The-decay process was studied using ion collection and...rather than in the visible. Although experiments with (visible) tunable dye lasers are therefore not possible, one can use powerful, stable cw...construction of atomic Rydberg lasers, the use of Rydberg atoms as high-sensitivity microwave detectors (already demonstrated by Figger et al), 14 and

  9. High-capacity chitosan-based chelating resin for on-line collection of transition and rare-earth metals prior to inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry measurement.

    PubMed

    Katarina, Rosi Ketrin; Oshima, Mitsuko; Motomizu, Shoji

    2009-10-15

    High-capacity chitosan-based chelating resin, N-(2-hydroxyethyl)glycine-type chitosan, was synthesized using chloromethyloxirane (CMO) as a cross-linker and a coupling arms and hydroxylethylamine and bromoacetic acid as a synthesizer for the N-(2-hydroxyethyl)glycine chelating moiety. The CMO could bind with both of hydroxyl and amino group of the chitosan resin, and then couple with the chelating moiety. Increasing the amounts of chelating moiety could increase the capacity of the resin toward metal ions. Most transition and rare-earth metals could adsorb quantitatively on the resin at wide pH ranges and could be separated from alkaline and alkaline-earth metals. The resin was packed in a mini-column (40 mm length x 2 mm i.d.) which was installed in a Multi-Auto-Pret system. The Multi-Auto-Pret system coupled with ICP-AES was successfully applied to the determination of transition and rare-earth metals in river water samples.

  10. Effective oscillator strength distributions of spherically symmetric atoms for calculating polarizabilities and long-range atom–atom interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Jun; Mitroy, J.; Cheng, Yongjun; Bromley, M.W.J.

    2015-01-15

    Effective oscillator strength distributions are systematically generated and tabulated for the alkali atoms, the alkaline-earth atoms, the alkaline-earth ions, the rare gases and some miscellaneous atoms. These effective distributions are used to compute the dipole, quadrupole and octupole static polarizabilities, and are then applied to the calculation of the dynamic polarizabilities at imaginary frequencies. These polarizabilities can be used to determine the long-range C{sub 6}, C{sub 8} and C{sub 10} atom–atom interactions for the dimers formed from any of these atoms and ions, and we present tables covering all of these combinations.

  11. Atom Interferometry

    ScienceCinema

    Mark Kasevich

    2016-07-12

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton’s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  12. Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kasevich, Mark

    2008-05-08

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton's constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gyroscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be used to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  13. Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Kasevich

    2008-05-07

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton’s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  14. Sulfur Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, B. H.

    2007-12-01

    Variations in surface tension affect the buoyancy of objects floating in a liquid. Thus an object floating in water will sink deeper in the presence of dishwater fluid. This is a very minor but measurable effect. It causes for instance ducks to drown in aqueous solutions with added surfactant. The surface tension of liquid iron is very strongly affected by the presence of sulfur which acts as a surfactant in this system varying between 1.9 and 0.4 N/m at 10 mass percent Sulfur (Lee & Morita (2002), This last value is inferred to be the maximum value for Sulfur inferred to be present in the liquid outer core. Venting of Sulfur from the liquid core manifests itself on the Earth surface by the 105 to 106 ton of sulfur vented into the atmosphere annually (Wedepohl, 1984). Inspection of surface Sulfur emission indicates that venting is non-homogeneously distributed over the Earth's surface. The implication of such large variation in surface tension in the liquid outer core are that at locally low Sulfur concentration, the liquid outer core does not wet the predominantly MgSiO3 matrix with which it is in contact. However at a local high in Sulfur, the liquid outer core wets this matrix which in the fluid state has a surface tension of 0.4 N/m (Bansal & Doremus, 1986), couples with it, and causes it to sink. This differential and diapiric movement is transmitted through the essentially brittle mantle (1024 Pa.s, Lambeck & Johnson, 1998; the maximum value for ice being about 1030 Pa.s at 0 K, in all likely hood representing an upper bound of viscosity for all materials) and manifests itself on the surface by the roughly 20 km differentiation, about 0.1 % of the total mantle thickness, between topographical heights and lows with concomitant lateral movement in the crust and upper mantle resulting in thin skin tectonics. The brittle nature of the medium though which this movement is transmitted suggests that the extremes in topography of the D" layer are similar in range to

  15. Atomic oxygen effects on materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Brady, Joyce A.; Merrow, James E.

    1989-01-01

    Understanding of the basic processes of atomic oxygen interaction is currently at a very elementary level. However, measurement of erosion yields, surface morphology, and optical properties for low fluences have brought about much progress in the past decade. Understanding the mechanisms and those factors that are important for proper simulation of low Earth orbit is at a much lower level of understanding. The ability to use laboratory simulations with confidence to quantifiably address the functional performance and durability of materials in low Earth orbit will be necessary to assure long-term survivability to the natural space environment.

  16. Asymmetric Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doglioni, Carlo; Carminati, Eugenio; Crespi, Mattia; Cuffaro, Marco; Ismail-Zadeh, Alik; Levshin, Anatoli; Panza, Giuliano F.; Riguzzi, Federica

    2010-05-01

    The net rotation, or so-called W-ward drift of the lithosphere, implies a decoupling of the plates relative to the underlying asthenosphere, and a relative "E-ward" mantle flow. This polarized flow can account for a number of asymmetries. When comparing the W-directed versus the E- to NE-directed subduction zones, as a general observation, they have the subduction hinge diverging versus converging relative to the upper plate; low versus high topography and structural elevation respectively; deep versus shallow trenches and foreland basins; shallow versus deep decollement; low versus high basement involvement; high versus low heat flow and gravity anomaly; shallow versus deep asthenosphere; etc. The western limbs of rift zones show S-waves faster in the lithosphere and slower in the asthenosphere with respect to the eastern limb. The asymmetry can be recognized when moving along the "tectonic equator", which describes the fastest flow of plates relative to the mantle, and it undulates relative to the geographic equator. In our reconstructions, the best fit for the tectonic equator has a pole of rotation at latitude -56.4° and longitude 136.7°, with an angular velocity of 1.2036°/Ma. Shear-wave splitting alignments tend to parallel the tectonic flow, apart along the subduction zones where they become orthogonal, as a flow encountering an obstacle. The tectonic equator lies close to the revolution plane of the Moon about the Earth. All these data and interpretations point for an asymmetric Earth, whose nature appears to be related to the rotation and its tidal despinning, combined with the thermal cooling of the planet. However, this model has been questioned on the basis of the high viscosity so far inferred in the asthenosphere. Preliminary modelling shows that the tidal oscillation can generate gravitational wave propagation in the lithosphere, and the wave velocity can increase with the decrease of the asthenospheric viscosity.

  17. Effect of energetic oxygen atoms on neutral density models.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohrbaugh, R. P.; Nisbet, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    The dissociative recombination of O2(+) and NO(+) in the F region results in the production of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen with substantially greater kinetic energy than the ambient atoms. In the exosphere these energetic atoms have long free paths. They can ascend to altitudes of several thousand kilometers and can travel horizontally to distances of the order of the earth's radius. The distribution of energetic oxygen atoms is derived by means of models of the ion and neutral densities for quiet and disturbed solar conditions. A distribution technique is used to study the motion of the atoms in the collision-dominated region. Ballistic trajectories are calculated in the spherical gravitational field of the earth. The present calculations show that the number densities of energetic oxygen atoms predominate over the ambient atomic oxygen densities above 1000 km under quiet solar conditions and above 1600 km under disturbed solar conditions.

  18. Tetrahedral-Atom 3-Ring Groupings in One-Dimensional Inorganic Chains: Be2AsO4OH-4H2O and Na2ZnPO4OH-7H2O

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-15

    connections. Adjacent stacks are interconnected vio a complex arrangement of sodium cations and water molecules. I&. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES...rings which include Zn-(OH)-Zn connections. Adjacent stacks are interconnected via a complex arrangement of sodium cations and water molecules. MTrC...above paragraph, we describe the preparations, structures and properties of two new phases; a zincophosphate , Na2ZnPO 4OH-7H 20 (NaZnPO), and a

  19. Atomic arias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    The American composer John Adams uses opera to dramatize controversial current events. His 1987 work Nixon in China was about the landmark meeting in 1972 between US President Richard Nixon and Chairman Mao Zedong of China; The Death of Klinghoffer (1991) was a musical re-enactment of an incident in 1985 when Palestinian terrorists kidnapped and murdered a wheelchair-bound Jewish tourist on a cruise ship. Adams's latest opera, Doctor Atomic, is also tied to a controversial event: the first atomic-bomb test in Alamogordo, New Mexico, on 16 June 1945. The opera premièred in San Francisco in 2005, had a highly publicized debut at the Metropolitan Opera in New York in 2008, and will have another debut on 25 February - with essentially the same cast - at the English National Opera in London.

  20. Atomic rivals

    SciTech Connect

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a memoir of rivalries among the Allies over the bomb, by a participant and observer. Nuclear proliferation began in the uneasy wartime collaboration of the United States, England, Canada, and Free France to produce the atom bomb. Through the changes of history, a young French chemist had a role in almost every act of this international drama. This memoir is based on Goldschmidt's own recollections, interviews with other leading figures, and 3,000 pages of newly declassified documents in Allied archives. From his own start as Marie Curie's lab assistant, Goldschmidt's career was closely intertwined with Frances complicated rise to membership in the nuclear club. As a refugee from the Nazis, he became part of the wartime nuclear energy project in Canada and found himself the only French scientist to work (although briefly) on the American atom bomb project.

  1. Atomic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, A.E.; Kukla, K.; Cheng, S.

    1995-08-01

    In a collaboration with the Atomic Physics group at Argonne and the University of Toledo, the Atomic Physics group at the University of Notre Dame is measuring the fine structure transition energies in highly-charged lithium-like and helium-like ions using beam-foil spectroscopy. Precise measurements of 2s-2p transition energies in simple (few-electron) atomic systems provide stringent tests of several classes of current atomic- structure calculations. Analyses of measurements in helium-like Ar{sup 16+} have been completed, and the results submitted for publication. A current goal is to measure the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} - 1s2p{sup 3}P{sub 0} transition wavelength in helium-like Ni{sup 26+}. Measurements of the 1s2s{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} - 1s2p{sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2} transition wavelengths in lithium-like Kr{sup 33+} is planned. Wavelength and lifetime measurements in copper-like U{sup 63+} are also expected to be initiated. The group is also participating in measurements of forbidden transitions in helium-like ions. A measurement of the lifetime of the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} state in Kr{sup 34+} was published recently. In a collaboration including P. Mokler of GSI, Darmstadt, measurements have been made of the spectral distribution of the 2E1 decay continuum in helium-like Kr{sup 34+}. Initial results have been reported and further measurements are planned.

  2. Atomic Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Claudio

    2000-10-01

    Atomic and molecular data are required in a variety of fields ranging from the traditional astronomy, atmospherics and fusion research to fast growing technologies such as lasers, lighting, low-temperature plasmas, plasma assisted etching and radiotherapy. In this context, there are some research groups, both theoretical and experimental, scattered round the world that attend to most of this data demand, but the implementation of atomic databases has grown independently out of sheer necessity. In some cases the latter has been associated with the data production process or with data centers involved in data collection and evaluation; but sometimes it has been the result of individual initiatives that have been quite successful. In any case, the development and maintenance of atomic databases call for a number of skills and an entrepreneurial spirit that are not usually associated with most physics researchers. In the present report we present some of the highlights in this area in the past five years and discuss what we think are some of the main issues that have to be addressed.

  3. Earth Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    For pipeline companies, mapping, facilities inventory, pipe inspections, environmental reporting, etc. is a monumental task. An Automated Mapping/Facilities Management/Geographic Information Systems (AM/FM/GIS) is the solution. However, this is costly and time consuming. James W. Sewall Company, an AM/FM/GIS consulting firm proposed an EOCAP project to Stennis Space Center (SSC) to develop a computerized system for storage and retrieval of digital aerial photography. This would provide its customer, Algonquin Gas Transmission Company, with an accurate inventory of rights-of-way locations and pipeline surroundings. The project took four years to complete and an important byproduct was SSC's Digital Aerial Rights-of-Way Monitoring System (DARMS). DARMS saves substantial time and money. EOCAP enabled Sewall to develop new products and expand its customer base. Algonquin now manages regulatory requirements more efficiently and accurately. EOCAP provides government co-funding to encourage private investment in and broader use of NASA remote sensing technology. Because changes on Earth's surface are accelerating, planners and resource managers must assess the consequences of change as quickly and accurately as possible. Pacific Meridian Resources and NASA's Stennis Space Center (SSC) developed a system for monitoring changes in land cover and use, which incorporated the latest change detection technologies. The goal of this EOCAP project was to tailor existing technologies to a system that could be commercialized. Landsat imagery enabled Pacific Meridian to identify areas that had sustained substantial vegetation loss. The project was successful and Pacific Meridian's annual revenues have substantially increased. EOCAP provides government co-funding to encourage private investment in and broader use of NASA remote sensing technology.

  4. Clouds Composition in Super-Earth Atmospheres: Chemical Equilibrium Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempton, Eliza M.-R.; Mbarek, Rostom

    2015-12-01

    Attempts to determine the composition of super-Earth atmospheres have so far been plagued by the presence of clouds. Yet the theoretical framework to understand these clouds is still in its infancy. For the super-Earth archetype GJ 1214b, KCl, Na2S, and ZnS have been proposed as condensates that would form under the condition of chemical equilibrium, if the planet’s atmosphere has a bulk composition near solar. Condensation chemistry calculations have not been presented for a wider range of atmospheric bulk composition that is to be expected for super-Earth exoplanets. Here we provide a theoretical context for the formation of super-Earth clouds in atmospheres of varied composition by determining which condensates are likely to form, under the assumption of chemical equilibrium. We model super-Earth atmospheres assuming they are formed by degassing of volatiles from a solid planetary core of chondritic material. Given the atomic makeup of these atmospheres, we minimize the global Gibbs free energy of over 550 gases and condensates to obtain the molecular composition of the atmospheres over a temperature range of 350-3,000 K. Clouds should form along the temperature-pressure boundaries where the condensed species appear in our calculations. The super-Earth atmospheres that we study range from highly reducing to oxidizing and have carbon to oxygen (C:O) ratios that are both sub-solar and super-solar, thereby spanning a diverse range of atmospheric composition that is appropriate for low-mass exoplanets. Some condensates appear across all of our models. However, the majority of condensed species appear only over specific ranges of H:O and C:O ratios. We find that for GJ 1214b, KCl is the primary cloud-forming condensate at solar composition, in agreement with previous work. However, for oxidizing atmospheres, where H:O is less than unity, K2SO4 clouds form instead. For carbon-rich atmospheres with super-solar C:O ratios, graphite clouds additionally appear. At

  5. Attenuation of Scattered Thermal Energy Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce a.; Seroka, Katelyn T.; McPhate, Jason B.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2011-01-01

    The attenuation of scattered thermal energy atomic oxygen is relevant to the potential damage that can occur within a spacecraft which sweeps through atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit (LEO). Although there can be significant oxidation and resulting degradation of polymers and some metals on the external surfaces of spacecraft, there are often openings on a spacecraft such as telescope apertures, vents, and microwave cavities that can allow atomic oxygen to enter and scatter internally to the spacecraft. Atomic oxygen that enters a spacecraft can thermally accommodate and scatter to ultimately react or recombine on surfaces. The atomic oxygen that does enter a spacecraft can be scavenged by use of high erosion yield polymers to reduce its reaction on critical surfaces and materials. Polyoxymethylene and polyethylene can be used as effective atomic oxygen scavenging polymers.

  6. Absolute Geodetic Rotation Measurement Using Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Stockton, J. K.; Takase, K.; Kasevich, M. A.

    2011-09-23

    We demonstrate a cold-atom interferometer gyroscope which overcomes accuracy and dynamic range limitations of previous atom interferometer gyroscopes. We show how the instrument can be used for precise determination of latitude, azimuth (true north), and Earth's rotation rate. Spurious noise terms related to multiple-path interferences are suppressed by employing a novel time-skewed pulse sequence. Extended versions of this instrument appear capable of meeting the stringent requirements for inertial navigation, geodetic applications of Earth's rotation rate determination, and tests of general relativity.

  7. Atoms in astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    Aspects of electromagnetic radiation and atomic physics needed for an understanding of astronomical applications are explored. Although intended primarily for teachers, this brochure is written so that it can be distributed to students if desired. The first section, Basic Topics, is suitable for a ninth-grade general science class; the style is simple and repetitive, and no mathematics or physics background is required. The second section, Intermediate and Advanced Topics, requires a knowledge of the material in the first section and assumes a generally higher level of achievement and motivation on the part of the student. These latter topics might fit well into junior-level physics, chemistry, or earth-science courses. Also included are a glossary, a list of references and teaching aids, class exercises, and a question and answer section.

  8. Positron-alkali atom scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceachran, R. P.; Horbatsch, M.; Stauffer, A. D.; Ward, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron-alkali atom scattering was recently investigated both theoretically and experimentally in the energy range from a few eV up to 100 eV. On the theoretical side calculations of the integrated elastic and excitation cross sections as well as total cross sections for Li, Na and K were based upon either the close-coupling method or the modified Glauber approximation. These theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the total cross section for both Na and K. Resonance structures were also found in the L = 0, 1 and 2 partial waves for positron scattering from the alkalis. The structure of these resonances appears to be quite complex and, as expected, they occur in conjunction with the atomic excitation thresholds. Currently both theoretical and experimental work is in progress on positron-Rb scattering in the same energy range.

  9. Phase transition and conduction mechanism in Pb2Na0.8R0.2Nb4.8Fe0.2O15 material (R=rare earth)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouziane, M.; Taibi, M.; Boukhari, A.

    2013-11-01

    Electrical properties of Pb2Na0.8Eu0.2Nb4.8Fe0.2O15 tungsten bronze compound were investigated. Ferroelectric phase transition of diffuse type is observed at 395 °C. Conductivity study as a function of temperature (RT-600 °C) and at three different frequencies (10, 100 and 1000 kHz) suggests the existence of dominant ionic conduction. The rise of ac conductivity on increasing temperature supports the NTCR (negative temperature coefficient of resistance) behaviour of the material. The activation energies have been evaluated from ac conductivity using Arrhenius equation and discussed. Different conduction mechanisms were identified. For comparison, the conducting properties of Pb2Na0.8R0.2Nb4.8Fe0.2O15 (R=Dy, Nd, La) were also investigated.

  10. Interactions between Rydberg atoms and ultracold polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaseelan, Maitreyi; Haruza, Marek; Bigelow, Nicholas P.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate dipolar interactions arising in a hybrid system containing both ultracold polar molecules and atomic Rydberg states. Ultracold NaCs molecules are produced by photoassociation from laser cooled mixtures of sodium and cesium atoms and detected through resonant multi-photon ionization (REMPI). Rydberg atoms with large dipole moments are excited in the atomic cloud using a multi-photon process and detected via field-ionization. We look for evidence of the interactions in the observed spectra.

  11. Earth environment and Closed Ecology Experiment Facilities.

    PubMed

    Nitta, K

    1994-07-01

    The Closed Ecology Experiment Facilities, CEEF, one of the Environmental Time Machine, is now planning to be constructed in the northern part of Japan with an eye to study the effect of atomic power industries on the local environment. This CEEF can be used not only for investigating the environmental problems related with atomic power industries but also for various environmental problems such as the habitation in lunar & Mars bases and the development of mathematical model to predict the change and change rate of earth parameters. Researches on earth environment and earth system science are discussed with use of CEEF. Preliminary experiments using a small growth chamber showed different results from those estimated by Simple Biosphere Model being used in the climate estimation.

  12. Revolutions in the earth sciences

    PubMed Central

    Allègre, C.

    1999-01-01

    The 20th century has been a century of scientific revolutions for many disciplines: quantum mechanics in physics, the atomic approach in chemistry, the nonlinear revolution in mathematics, the introduction of statistical physics. The major breakthroughs in these disciplines had all occurred by about 1930. In contrast, the revolutions in the so-called natural sciences, that is in the earth sciences and in biology, waited until the last half of the century. These revolutions were indeed late, but they were no less deep and drastic, and they occurred quite suddenly. Actually, one can say that not one but three revolutions occurred in the earth sciences: in plate tectonics, planetology and the environment. They occurred essentially independently from each other, but as time passed, their effects developed, amplified and started interacting. These effects continue strongly to this day.

  13. Laser Trapping of Radioactive Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zheng-Tian

    2013-04-01

    Stuart Freedman conceived the idea of laser trapping radioactive atoms for the purpose of studying beta correlation effects. ``This is really the theorist's view of a radioactive source,'' as he fondly claimed. It is ideal because the atoms form a point source, compressed in both position and momentum space, with no material walls nearby. The Berkeley group succeeded in trapping ^21Na (half-life = 22 s) atoms [Lu et al., PRL 72, 3791 (1994)], and determined its beta-neutrino correlation coefficient a=0.5502(60) to be in agreement with the Standard Model [Vetter et al., PRC 77, 035502 (2008)]. Other groups have joined this effort with searches for scalar or tensor couplings in the weak interaction. Moreover, the technique has been extended to trap very short lived ^8He (0.1 s) to study its halo structure or the very long lived ^81Kr (230,000 yr) to map the movement of groundwater.

  14. Rare earth element scavenging in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Robert H.; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    1990-10-01

    Examinations of rare earth element (REE) adsorption in seawater, using a variety of surface-types, indicated that, for most surfaces, light rare earth elements (LREEs) are preferentially adsorbed compared to the heavy rare earths (HREEs). Exceptions to this behavior were observed only for silica phases (glass surfaces, acid-cleaned diatomaceous earth, and synthetic SiO 2). The affinity of the rare earths for surfaces can be strongly affected by thin organic coatings. Glass surfaces which acquired an organic coating through immersion in Tampa Bay exhibited adsorptive behavior typical of organic-rich, rather than glass, surfaces. Models of rare earth distributions between seawater and carboxylate-rich surfaces indicate that scavenging processes which involve such surfaces should exhibit a strong dependence on pH and carbonate complexation. Scavenging models involving carboxylate surfaces produce relative REE abundance patterns in good general agreement with observed shale-normalized REE abundances in seawater. Scavenging by carboxylate-rich surfaces should produce HREE enrichments in seawater relative to the LREEs and may produce enrichments of lanthanum relative to its immediate trivalent neighbors. Due to the origin of distribution coefficients as a difference between REE solution complexation (which increases strongly with atomic number) and surface complexation (which apparently also increases with atomic number) the relative solution abundance patterns of the REEs produced by scavenging reactions can be quite complex.

  15. High Atom Number in Microsized Atom Traps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-14

    cooling of some atoms in atomic beam. We have reconfigured the apparatus for applying bichromatic forces transverse to the atomic beam, as it will be...apparatus for applying bichromatic forces transverse to the atomic beam, as it will be easier to extend this to two dimensions. Research to develop

  16. Collisions of sodium atoms with liquid glycerol: insights into solvation and ionization.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Justin P; Nathanson, Gilbert M; Alexander, William A; Minton, Timothy K; Lakshmi, Sankaran; Schatz, George C

    2014-02-26

    The reactive uptake and ionization of sodium atoms in glycerol were investigated by gas-liquid scattering experiments and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. A nearly effusive beam of Na atoms at 670 K was directed at liquid glycerol in vacuum, and the scattered Na atoms were detected by a rotatable mass spectrometer. The Na velocity and angular distributions imply that all impinging Na atoms that thermally equilibrate on the surface remain behind, likely ionizing to e(-) and Na(+). The reactive uptake of Na atoms into glycerol was determined to be greater than 75%. Complementary AIMD simulations of Na striking a 17-molecule glycerol cluster indicate that the glycerol hydroxyl groups reorient around the Na atom as it makes contact with the cluster and begins to ionize. Although complete ionization did not occur during the 10 ps simulation, distinct correlations among the extent of ionization, separation between Na(+) and e(-), solvent coordination, and binding energies of the Na atom and electron were observed. The combination of experiments and simulations indicates that Na-atom deposition provides a low-energy pathway for generating solvated electrons in the near-interfacial region of protic liquids.

  17. Crew Earth Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runco, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Crew Earth Observations (CEO) takes advantage of the crew in space to observe and photograph natural and human-made changes on Earth. The photographs record the Earth's surface changes over time, along with dynamic events such as storms, floods, fires and volcanic eruptions. These images provide researchers on Earth with key data to better understand the planet.

  18. Why Earth Science?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    This article briefly describes Earth science. The study of Earth science provides the foundation for an understanding of the Earth, its processes, its resources, and its environment. Earth science is the study of the planet in its entirety, how its lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere work together as systems and how they affect…

  19. Atomic magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Schwindt, Peter [Albuquerque, NM; Johnson, Cort N [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-07-03

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which uses a pump light beam at a D1 or D2 transition of an alkali metal vapor to magnetically polarize the vapor in a heated cell, and a probe light beam at a different D2 or D1 transition to sense the magnetic field via a polarization rotation of the probe light beam. The pump and probe light beams are both directed along substantially the same optical path through an optical waveplate and through the heated cell to an optical filter which blocks the pump light beam while transmitting the probe light beam to one or more photodetectors which generate electrical signals to sense the magnetic field. The optical waveplate functions as a quarter waveplate to circularly polarize the pump light beam, and as a half waveplate to maintain the probe light beam linearly polarized.

  20. Multifunctional nanocomposites of superparamagnetic (Fe3O4) and NIR-responsive rare earth-doped up-conversion fluorescent (NaYF4 : Yb,Er) nanoparticles and their applications in biolabeling and fluorescent imaging of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Congcong; Zhang, Jingpu; Gao, Huanyu; Wu, Xianlong; Wang, Meng; Wu, Yingfan; Di, Yueqin; Xu, Zhangrun; Mao, Chuanbin; Xu, Shukun

    2011-01-01

    A new kind of magnetic/luminescent multifunctional nanoparticles was synthesized by covalently linking multiple carboxyl-functionalized superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles and individual amino-functionalized silica-coated fluorescent NaYF4 : Yb,Er up-conversion nanoparticles (UCNPs). The resultant nanocomposites bear active carboxylic and amino groups on the surface that were proved to be chemically active and useful for further facile bioconjugation with biomolecules. The UCNPs in the nanocomposite particles can emit visible light in response to the irradiation by near infrared (NIR) light, enabling the application of the nanocomposites in bioimaging. X-Ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, luminescence spectroscopy, and magnetometry were applied to characterize the multifunctional nanocomposites. The nanocomposites exhibited good superparamagnetic and excellent green up-conversion photoluminescent properties that can be exploited in magnetic separation and guiding as well as bioimaging. Due to the presence of active functional groups on the nanocomposite surface, the Fe3O4/NaYF4 : Yb,Er magnetic/luminescent nanocomposites were successfully conjugated with a protein called transferrin, which specifically recognizes the transferrin receptors overexpressed on HeLa cells, and can be employed for biolabeling and fluorescent imaging of HeLa cells. Because NIR light can penetrate biological samples with good depth without damaging them and can avoid autofluorescence from them, the presence of both NIR-responsive UCNPs and superparamagnetic nanoparticles in the nanocomposite particles will enable the practical application of the nanocomposites in bioimaging and separation. PMID:20648340

  1. Local Atomic Structure Deviation from Average Structure of Na0.5Bi0.5TiO3: Combined X-ray and Neutron Total Scattering Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-27

    calcination of the particles, and after sintering and densification of polycrystalline materials) to examine the possible influences of strain, grain...and Na2CO3 (99.5% purity, Alfa Aesar) were first calcined at 800 ◦C for 2 h and some powder was retained for structural characterization after this...synthesis step (hereafter referred to as “ calcined ”). Samples were then also sintered and densified into pellets at 1100 ◦C for 1 h. The sintered pellets

  2. Sagnac Interferometry with a Single Atomic Clock.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, R; Hush, M R; Bishop, T; Lesanovsky, I; Fernholz, T

    2015-10-16

    The Sagnac effect enables interferometric measurements of rotation with high precision. Using matter waves instead of light promises resolution enhancement by orders of magnitude that scales with particle mass. So far, the paradigm for matter wave Sagnac interferometry relies on de Broglie waves and thus on free propagation of atoms either in free fall or within waveguides. However, the Sagnac effect can be expressed as a proper time difference experienced by two observers moving in opposite directions along closed paths and has indeed been measured with atomic clocks flown around Earth. Inspired by this, we investigate an interferometer comprised of a single atomic clock. The Sagnac effect manifests as a phase shift between trapped atoms in different internal states after transportation along closed paths in opposite directions, without any free propagation. With analytic models, we quantify limitations of the scheme arising from atomic dynamics and finite temperature. Furthermore, we suggest an implementation with previously demonstrated technology.

  3. EDITORIAL: Atomic layer deposition Atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godlewski, Marek

    2012-07-01

    The growth method of atomic layer deposition (ALD) was introduced in Finland by Suntola under the name of atomic layer epitaxy (ALE). The method was originally used for deposition of thin films of sulphides (ZnS, CaS, SrS) activated with manganese or rare-earth ions. Such films were grown for applications in thin-film electroluminescence (TFEL) displays. The ALE mode of growth was also tested in the case of molecular beam epitaxy. Films grown by ALD are commonly polycrystalline or even amorphous. Thus, the name ALE has been replaced by ALD. In the 80s ALD was developed mostly in Finland and neighboring Baltic countries. Deposition of a range of different materials was demonstrated at that time, including II-VI semiconductors (e.g. CdTe, CdS) and III-V (e.g. GaAs, GaN), with possible applications in e.g. photovoltaics. The number of publications on ALD was slowly increasing, approaching about 100 each year. A real boom in interest came with the development of deposition methods of thin films of high-k dielectrics. This research was motivated by a high leakage current in field-effect transistors with SiO2-based gate dielectrics. In 2007 Intel introduced a new generation of integrated circuits (ICs) with thin films of HfO2 used as gate isolating layers. In these and subsequent ICs, films of HfO2 are deposited by the ALD method. This is due to their unique properties. The introduction of ALD to the electronics industry led to a booming interest in the ALD growth method, with the number of publications increasing rapidly to well above 1000 each year. A number of new applications were proposed, as reflected in this special issue of Semiconductor Science and Technology. The included articles cover a wide range of possible applications—in microelectronics, transparent electronics, optoelectronics, photovoltaics and spintronics. Research papers and reviews on the basics of ALD growth are also included, reflecting a growing interest in precursor chemistry and growth

  4. Painful Na-channelopathies: an expanding universe.

    PubMed

    Waxman, Stephen G

    2013-07-01

    The universe of painful Na-channelopathies--human disorders caused by mutations in voltage-gated sodium channels--has recently expanded in three dimensions. We now know that mutations of sodium channels cause not only rare genetic 'model disorders' such as inherited erythromelalgia and channelopathy-associated insensitivity to pain but also common painful neuropathies. We have learned that mutations of NaV1.8, as well as mutations of NaV1.7, can cause painful Na-channelopathies. Moreover, recent studies combining atomic level structural models and pharmacogenomics suggest that the goal of genomically guided pain therapy may not be unrealistic.

  5. Influence of rare-earth ions on SiO₂-Na₂O-RE₂O₃ glass structure.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J A; Benmore, C J; Holland, D; Du, J; Beuneu, B; Mekki, A

    2011-02-16

    Praseodymium and europium sodium silicate glasses of nominal composition (SiO(2))(0.70 - x)(Na(2)O)(0.30)(RE(2)O(3))(x), where RE is the rare earth and 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.10, were studied by neutron and high-energy x-ray scattering and classical molecular dynamics simulations. The observation of a significant x-ray intensity in doped as compared to un-doped glasses is indicative of RE-RE correlations at a distance of ∼ 3.7-3.9 Å, much shorter than would be expected for a homogeneous distribution, suggesting that clustering of the rare-earth cations occurs in both these glass systems at low concentrations. Above x = 0.075 (nominal), minimal changes in this region indicate that the RE atoms are incorporated much more randomly into the glass structure. The molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the rare-earth ions enter the sodium-rich regions in the sodium silicate glasses and act as modifiers. A cluster analysis performed on the model systems indicates that the tendency for clustering is higher in praseodymium-containing glasses than in the europium glasses.

  6. Color enhancement of ten-minute far ultraviolet exposure of Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    An artifically reproduced color enhancement of a ten-minute far-ultraviolet exposure of the Earth, taken with a filter which blocks the glow cause by atomic hydrogen but which transmits the glow caused by atomic oxygen and molecular nitrogen. Note that airglow emission bands are visible on the night side of the Earth, one roughly centered between the two polar auroral zones and one at an angle to this extending northward toward the sunlit side of the Earth.

  7. The Lifeworld Earth and a Modelled Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juuti, Kalle

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to study the question of whether a phenomenological view of the Earth could be empirically endorsed. The phenomenological way of thinking considers the Earth as a material entity, but not as an object as viewed in science. In the learning science tradition, tracking the process of the conceptual change of the shape of the…

  8. The atomic orbitals of the topological atom.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Cordoba, Eloy; Salvador, Pedro; Mayer, István

    2013-06-07

    The effective atomic orbitals have been realized in the framework of Bader's atoms in molecules theory for a general wavefunction. This formalism can be used to retrieve from any type of calculation a proper set of orthonormalized numerical atomic orbitals, with occupation numbers that sum up to the respective Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) atomic populations. Experience shows that only a limited number of effective atomic orbitals exhibit significant occupation numbers. These correspond to atomic hybrids that closely resemble the core and valence shells of the atom. The occupation numbers of the remaining effective orbitals are almost negligible, except for atoms with hypervalent character. In addition, the molecular orbitals of a calculation can be exactly expressed as a linear combination of this orthonormalized set of numerical atomic orbitals, and the Mulliken population analysis carried out on this basis set exactly reproduces the original QTAIM atomic populations of the atoms. Approximate expansion of the molecular orbitals over a much reduced set of orthogonal atomic basis functions can also be accomplished to a very good accuracy with a singular value decomposition procedure.

  9. "Bohr's Atomic Model."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willden, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    "Bohr's Atomic Model" is a small interactive multimedia program that introduces the viewer to a simplified model of the atom. This interactive simulation lets students build an atom using an atomic construction set. The underlying design methodology for "Bohr's Atomic Model" is model-centered instruction, which means the central model of the…

  10. Flame-in-gas-shield and miniature diffusion flame hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: optimization and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschner, Karel; Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiří

    2015-07-01

    A detailed optimization of relevant experimental parameters of two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: flame-in-gas-shield atomizer with a two-channel shielding unit and a standard atomizer for atomic fluorescence spectrometry, miniature diffusion flame, was performed. Arsine, generated by the reaction with NaBH4 in a flow injection arrangement, was chosen as the model hydride. Analytical characteristics of both the atomizers (sensitivity, noise, limits of detection) were compared. Under optimum conditions sensitivity obtained with flame-in-gas-shield atomizer was approximately twice higher than with miniature diffusion flame. The additional advantage of flame-in-gas-shield atomizer is significantly lower flame emission resulting in a better signal to noise ratio. The resulting arsenic limits of detection for miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were 3.8 ng l- 1 and 1.0 ng l- 1, respectively.

  11. Polymeric Materials Resistant to Erosion by Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Richard L.; Thibeault, Sheila A.

    2004-01-01

    Polymer-matrix composites are ideally suited for space vehicles because of high strength to weight ratios. The principal component of the low earth orbit (LEO) is atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen causes surface erosion to polymeric materials. Polymer films with an organometallic additive showed greater resistance to atomic oxygen than the pure polymer in laboratory experiments and in the OPM/MIR experiment. In MISSE, the film with the organometallic additive was still intact after the pure film had completely eroded.

  12. Simulation study of Na-majorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymshits, A.; Vinograd, V.; Paulsen, N.; Winkler, B.; Perchuk, L.; Bobrov, A.

    2009-04-01

    Garnets, which are found as inclusions in diamonds, often have the excess of Na2O and SiO2 [Stachel, 2001]. Experimental studies suggest that Na is incorporated in pyrope-rich garnet via the coupled substitution Mg+Al=Na+Si [Bobrov et al., 2008]. This study is concerned with the determination of the structure and the thermodynamic properties of NaGrt (Na2MgSi5O12), which is assumed to be the end-member of pyrope-rich garnets with the excess of Na2O and SiO2. Static lattice energy calculations were performed with the program GULP [Gale & Rohl, 2003] using the force-field model [Vinograd et al., 2007] for 200 structures of Na2MgSi5O12 composition. These structures were prepared from Ia3-d pyrope Mg3Al2Si3O12 by replacing all octahedral Al atoms with Si and 2/3 of Mg atoms with Na. The distribution of Mg and Na was varied randomly. The static energies of these structures were cluster expanded using 8 pairwise effective cluster interactions (ECI). The ECIs were used to constrain Monte Carlo simulations within a 4×4×4 supercell (NNN exchangeable sites). The annealing experiments have shown that the lowest energy structure has the space group I4

  13. Alkaline earth filled nickel skutterudite antimonide thermoelectrics

    DOEpatents

    Singh, David Joseph

    2013-07-16

    A thermoelectric material including a body centered cubic filled skutterudite having the formula A.sub.xFe.sub.yNi.sub.zSb.sub.12, where A is an alkaline earth element, x is no more than approximately 1.0, and the sum of y and z is approximately equal to 4.0. The alkaline earth element includes guest atoms selected from the group consisting of Be, Mb, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra and combinations thereof. The filled skutterudite is shown to have properties suitable for a wide variety of thermoelectric applications.

  14. Bond-length distributions for ions bonded to oxygen: alkali and alkaline-earth metals

    PubMed Central

    Gagné, Olivier Charles; Hawthorne, Frank Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Bond-length distributions have been examined for 55 configurations of alkali-metal ions and 29 configurations of alkaline-earth-metal ions bonded to oxygen, for 4859 coordination polyhedra and 38 594 bond distances (alkali metals), and for 3038 coordination polyhedra and 24 487 bond distances (alkaline-earth metals). Bond lengths generally show a positively skewed Gaussian distribution that originates from the variation in Born repulsion and Coulomb attraction as a function of interatomic distance. The skewness and kurtosis of these distributions generally decrease with increasing coordination number of the central cation, a result of decreasing Born repulsion with increasing coordination number. We confirm the following minimum coordination numbers: [3]Li+, [3]Na+, [4]K+, [4]Rb+, [6]Cs+, [3]Be2+, [4]Mg2+, [6]Ca2+, [6]Sr2+ and [6]Ba2+, but note that some reported examples are the result of extensive dynamic and/or positional short-range disorder and are not ordered arrangements. Some distributions of bond lengths are distinctly multi-modal. This is commonly due to the occurrence of large numbers of structure refinements of a particular structure type in which a particular cation is always present, leading to an over-representation of a specific range of bond lengths. Outliers in the distributions of mean bond lengths are often associated with anomalous values of atomic displacement of the constituent cations and/or anions. For a sample of [6]Na+, the ratio U eq(Na)/U eq(bonded anions) is partially correlated with 〈[6]Na+—O2−〉 (R 2 = 0.57), suggesting that the mean bond length is correlated with vibrational/displacement characteristics of the constituent ions for a fixed coordination number. Mean bond lengths also show a weak correlation with bond-length distortion from the mean value in general, although some coordination numbers show the widest variation in mean bond length for zero distortion, e.g. Li+ in [4]- and [6]-coordination, Na+ in [4]- and [6

  15. Earth on the Move.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides background information on the layers of the earth, the relationship between changes on the surface of the earth and its insides, and plate tectonics. Teaching activities are included, with some containing reproducible worksheets and handouts to accompany them. (TW)

  16. Earth's changeable atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-06-01

    Billions of years ago, high atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations were vital to life's tenuous foothold on Earth. Despite new constraints, the composition and evolution of Earth's early atmosphere remains hazy.

  17. Atomic Energy Basics, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atomic Energy Commission, Oak Ridge, TN. Div. of Technical Information.

    This booklet is part of the "Understanding the Atom Series," though it is a later edition and not included in the original set of 51 booklets. A basic survey of the principles of nuclear energy and most important applications are provided. These major topics are examined: matter has molecules and atoms, the atom has electrons, the nucleus,…

  18. Probing nanoconfined water in zeolite cages: H atom dynamics and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemerisov, S. D.; Trifunac, A. D.

    2001-10-01

    Time-resolved and CW EPR were used to study radiolytically generated H atoms in water/ice nanoclusters in NaA, NaX, NaY, and HY zeolites. H atoms dynamic properties and spectroscopy parameters are sensitive to the structural changes of water due to the nanoconfinement. Transient H atoms in HY and NaY zeolites segregate into two different domains: sodalite and super cages. In NaX zeolite only H atoms from super cages were observed. H atoms are created in both silica phase and adsorbed water by radiolytic processes. The decay of H atoms occurs predominantly via reaction with the radiation-induced defects in silica.

  19. Advances in atomic oxygen simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froechtenigt, Joseph F.; Bareiss, Lyle E.

    1990-01-01

    Atomic oxygen (AO) present in the atmosphere at orbital altitudes of 200 to 700 km has been shown to degrade various exposed materials on Shuttle flights. The relative velocity of the AO with the spacecraft, together with the AO density, combine to yield an environment consisting of a 5 eV beam energy with a flux of 10(exp 14) to 10(exp 15) oxygen atoms/sq cm/s. An AO ion beam apparatus that produces flux levels and energy similar to that encountered by spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) has been in existence since 1987. Test data was obtained from the interaction of the AO ion beam with materials used in space applications (carbon, silver, kapton) and with several special coatings of interest deposited on various surfaces. The ultimate design goal of the AO beam simulation device is to produce neutral AO at sufficient flux levels to replicate on-orbit conditions. A newly acquired mass spectrometer with energy discrimination has allowed 5 eV neutral oxygen atoms to be separated and detected from the background of thermal oxygen atoms of approx 0.2 eV. Neutralization of the AO ion beam at 5 eV was shown at the Martin Marietta AO facility.

  20. Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation (ENAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinsley, B. A.

    1988-01-01

    The Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation experiment is scheduled to be flown on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) NASA mission. The objective of this experiment is to measure very faint emissions at nighttime arising from fluxes of energetic neutral atoms in the thermosphere. These energetic atoms have energies ranging up to about 50 keV, and arise from ions of hydrogen, helium, and oxygen trapped in the inner magnetosphere. Some of these ions become neutralized in charge exchange reactions with neutral hydrogen in the hydrogen geocorona that extends through the region. The ions are trapped on magnetic field lines which cross the equatorial plane at 2 to 6 earth radii distance, and they mirror at a range of heights on these field lines, extending down to the thermosphere at 500 km altitude. The ATLAS 1 measurements will not be of the neutral atoms themselves but of the optical emission produced by those on trajectories that intersect the thermosphere. The ENAP measurements are to be made using the Imaging Spectrometric Observatory (ISO) which is being flown on the ATLAS mission primarily for daytime spectral observations, and the ENAP measurements will all be nighttime measurements because of the faintness of the emissions and the relatively low level of magnetic activity expected.

  1. The Dynamic Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siever, Raymond

    1983-01-01

    Discusses how the earth is a dynamic system that maintains itself in a steady state. Areas considered include large/small-scale earth motions, geologic time, rock and hydrologic cycles, and other aspects dealing with the changing face of the earth. (JN)

  2. Earth Science, K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finson, Kevin D.; Enochs, Larry G.

    1987-01-01

    Argues that the teaching of earth science is largely neglected in the elementary science curriculum. Provides examples of how more instruction in the earth sciences at all levels can enhance decision-making skills. Discusses the relationship between various learning theories and certain instructional strategies in earth science. (TW)

  3. A compact atomic beam based system for Doppler-free laser spectroscopy of strontium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Gunjan; Vishwakarma, Chetan; Dharmadhikari, C. V.; Rapol, Umakant D.

    2017-03-01

    We report the construction of a simple, light weight, and compact atomic beam spectroscopy cell for strontium atoms. The cell is built using glass blowing technique and includes a simple titanium sublimation pump for the active pumping of residual and background gases to maintain ultra-high vacuum. A commercially available and electrically heated dispenser source is used to generate the beam of Sr atoms. We perform spectroscopy on the 5 s2S10 →5 s 5 pP11 transition to obtain a well resolved Doppler free spectroscopic signal for frequency stabilization of the laser source. This design can be easily extended to other alkali and alkaline earth metals.

  4. Rydberg States of Na-doped Helium Nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drabbels, Marcel

    2008-03-01

    The dynamics of excited states of Na atoms deposited on the surface of helium nanodroplets has been investigated with velocity map ion imaging, photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight mass-spectroscopy. For the first time, the excitation spectra of Na-doped helium nanodroplets corresponding to Rydberg states of Na atoms have been measured from the lowest excited 3p state up to the ionization threshold. All lines in the excitation spectra are shifted and broadened with respect to the corresponding atomic lines. In addition to bare Na* atoms also Na*HeN (N = 1-6) exciplexes are detected upon excitation. Photoelectron spectroscopy reveals the desorption of Na* not only in the initially excited states but also in lower lying states, indicating that relaxation plays an important role. The recorded velocity distributions show interesting characteristics: for the lowest states the mean kinetic energy of Na* increases linearly with excitation energy. The velocity distributions of Na*HeN exciplexes do not manifest such remarkable properties. The observations can be largely explained by assuming that the interaction of Na* with the helium nanodroplet can be described by the sum of Na*-He pair potentials.

  5. Mission to Planet Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilford, Shelby G.; Asrar, Ghassem; Backlund, Peter W.

    1994-01-01

    Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE) is NASA's concept for an international science program to produce the understanding needed to predict changes in the Earth's environment. NASA and its interagency and international partners will place satellites carrying advanced sensors in strategic Earth orbits to gather multidisciplinary data. A sophisticated data system will process and archive an unprecedented amount of information about the Earth and how it works as a system. Increased understanding of the Earth system is a basic human responsibility, a prerequisite to informed management of the planet's resources and to the preservation of the global environment.

  6. Mission to Planet Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Gregory S.; Backlund, Peter W.

    1992-01-01

    Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE) is NASA's concept for an international science program to produce the understanding needed to predict changes in the earth's environment. NASA and its interagency and international partners will place satellites carrying advanced sensors in strategic earth orbits to gather multidisciplinary data. A sophisticated data system will process and archive an unprecedented amount of information about the earth and how it works as a system. Increased understanding of the earth system is a basic human responsibility, a prerequisite to informed management of the planet's resources and to the preservation of the global environment.

  7. The Na4(+3) Clusters in Sodium Sodalite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-15

    ATES COVOIN0i-15-92 Technical 06-01-91 to 05-31-92 4. TITLE ANA SUGTITLE S. RNORNG NUMBER The Na4+ 3 Clusters in Sodium Sodalite NN l14-e0-J-se59a 𔄀...3 [AlSiO 4]3 sodalite prepared by high vacuum deposition of sodium atoms. The samples with a Na 43 +:Na33+ cluster ratio up to 1:10 show a single...absorption feature with -m. = 628 nm (1.99 eV). The absorption originates from the individual sodalite cages containing Na 43+ cluster. For the Na 43+:Na

  8. Earth Science Information Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1991-01-01

    An ESIC? An Earth Science Information Center. Don't spell it. Say it. ESIC. It rhymes with seasick. You can find information in an information center, of course, and you'll find earth science information in an ESIC. That means information about the land that is the Earth, the land that is below the Earth, and in some instances, the space surrounding the Earth. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates a network of Earth Science Information Centers that sell earth science products and data. There are more than 75 ESIC's. Some are operated by the USGS, but most are in other State or Federal agencies. Each ESIC responds to requests for information received by telephone, letter, or personal visit. Your personal visit.

  9. Systematic variation of rare earths in monazite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murata, K.J.; Rose, H.J.; Carron, M.K.

    1953-01-01

    Ten monazites from widely scattered localities have been analyzed for La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Y and Th by means of a combined chemical and emission spectrographic method. The analytical results, calculated to atomic percent of total rare earths (thorium excluded), show a considerable variation in the proportions of every element except praseodymium, which is relatively constant. The general variation trends of the elements may be calculated by assuming that the monazites represent different stages in a fractional precipitation process, and by assuming that there is a gradational increase in the precipitability of rare earth elements with decreasing ionic radius. Fractional precipitation brings about an increase in lanthanum and cerium, little change in praseodymium, and a decrease in neodymium, samarium, gadolinium, and yttrium. Deviations from the calculated lines of variation consist of a simultaneous, abnormal increase or decrease in the proportions of cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium with antipathetic decrease or increase in the proportions of the other elements. These deviations are ascribed to abnormally high or low temperatures that affect the precipitability of the central trio of elements (Ce, Pr, Nd) relatively more than that of the other elements. The following semiquantitative rules have been found useful in describing the composition of rare earths from monazite: 1. 1. The sum of lanthanum and neodymium is very nearly a constant at 42 ?? 2 atomic percent. 2. 2. Praseodymium is very nearly constant at 5 ?? 1 atomic percent. 3. 3. The sum of Ce, Sm, Gd, and Y is very nearly a constant at 53 ?? 3 atomic percent. No correlation could be established between the content of Th and that of any of the rare earth elements. ?? 1953.

  10. SEPARATION OF RARE EARTHS BY SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    Peppard, D.F.; Mason, G.W.

    1960-10-11

    A process is given for separating lanthanide rare earths from each other from an aqueous mineral acid solution, e.g., hydrochloric or nitric acid of a concentration of above 3 M, preferably 12 to 16 M, by extraction with a water- immiscible alkyl phosphate, such as tributyl phosphate or a mixture of mono-, di- and tributyl phosphate, and fractional back-extraction with mineral acid whereby the lanthanides are taken up by the acid in the order of increasing atomic number.

  11. Measurements of atomic beam velocities with phase choppers and precision measurements of alkali atomic polarizabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hromada, Ivan, Jr.

    Atom interferometers, in which de Broglie waves are coherently split and recombined to make interference fringes, now serve as precision measurement tools for several quantities in physics. Examples include measurements of Newton's constant, the fine structure constant, van der Waals potentials, and atomic polarizabilities. To make next-generation measurements of static electric dipole atomic polarizabilities with an atom beam interferometer, I worked on new methods to precisely measure the velocity distribution for atom beams. I will explain how I developed and used phase choppers to measure lithium, sodium, potassium, and cesium atomic beam velocities with 0.07% accuracy. I also present new measurements of polarizability for these atoms. I classify systematic errors into two broad categories: (1) fractional errors that are similar for all different types of atoms in our experiments, and (2), errors that scale with de Broglie wavelength or inverse atomic momentum in our experiments. This distinction is important for estimating the uncertainty in our measurements of ratios of atomic polarizabilities, e.g., alpha Cs/alphaNa = 2.488(12).

  12. Assembling Ultracold Polar Molecules From Single Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lee R.; Hutzler, Nicholas R.; Yu, Yichao; Zhang, Jessie T.; Ni, Kang-Kuen

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold polar molecules are promising candidates for studying quantum many-body phenomena and building quantum information systems, due to their long-range, anisotropic, and tunable interactions. This calls for a technique to create low entropy samples of ultracold polar molecules with a large dipole moment. The lowest entropy molecular gas to date was created from atomic quantum gases in bulk or in optical lattices. The entropy is limited by that of the constituent atomic gases. We propose a method that addresses this limitation by assembling sodium cesium (NaCs) molecules from individually manipulated atoms. First, we load single Na and Cs atoms in separate optical tweezers from MOTs. We will cool them to their motional ground state using Raman sideband cooling and then merge them into a single tweezer. The tweezer confinement provides enhanced wavefunction overlap between the atom pair and molecule states. Using coherent two-photon techniques, we will then transfer the atom pair into a molecule. Our method offers reduced apparatus complexity and cycle time, single-site manipulation and imaging resolution, and should be readily extended to different species.

  13. Chemistry and Structure of Super-Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, S. B.; Valencia, D.; Petaev, M. I.; Sasselov, D. D.; Remo, J. L.; O'Connell, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    The chemical composition and structure of super-Earths can be understood from data and models for the chemical evolution of our galaxy, our solar system and models of formation and interiors of planets. Because the relative proportions of most rock-forming elements in stars of our galaxy are rather constant the mineralogy of solid grains that formed in the proto-planetary disks can be estimated from a calculation of condensation of a solar composition gas. Such a calculation shows that the minerals forsterite (Fo) and FeNi metal are the two most abundant solids from which Earth-like planets accrete, and therefore studying the behavior of Fo-metal mixtures at ultrahigh pressures (5-10 TPa) and temperatures is essential for modeling the internal structures of the largest super-Earths. The most critical parameter is the metal/silicate ratio of the planet. What determines the metal to silicate ratio is not well established, but it is most likely related to the amount of metal oxidized by water in planetesimals. Earth-like planets are, by definition, volatile depleted, but do have variable patterns of intermediate to highly volatile elements that are of secondary importance for understanding the chemistry of super-Earths. The deep interiors of the largest super-Earths may be in a WDM (warm dense matter) state which is an atomic fluid that may dissolve most components normally residing in the silicate mantle. We are trying to characterize this state using the high energy density lasers (ZBL and Z-Petawatt) at Sandia National Laboratories. Models of such planets with atomic fluid cores may be substantially different from the standard super-Earth models that have been discussed up to now. In anticipation of the measurement of radii (R) and masses (M) of super-Earths in the coming years (e.g., with NASA's Kepler mission) the standard super-Earth models yielded a scaling law of R ∝ M0.262 - 0.274 for Super-Earths. This law may have to be modified for planets with WDM cores.

  14. Antibacterial, Antifungal and Nematicidal Activities of Rare Earth Ions.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Tokumitsu; Ymamoto, Ayumi; Kazaana, Akira; Nakano, Yuta; Nojiri, Yui; Kashiwazaki, Moeko

    2016-12-01

    Despite the name, rare earth elements are relatively abundant in soil. Therefore, these elements might interact with biosphere during the history of life. In this study, we have examined the effect of rare earth ions on the growth of bacteria, fungi and soil nematode. All rare earth ions, except radioactive promethium that we have not tested, showed antibacterial and antifungal activities comparable to that of copper ions, which is widely used as antibacterial metals in our daily life. Rare earth ions also have nematicidal activities as they strongly perturb the embryonic development of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. Interestingly, the nematicidal activity increased with increasing atomic number of lanthanide ions. Since the rare earth ions did not show high toxicity to the human lymphoblastoid cell line or even stimulate the growth of the cultured cells at 1 mM, it raised the possibility that we can substitute rare earth elements for the antibacterial metals usually used because of their safety.

  15. Energetic neutral atoms: Imaging the magnetospheric ring current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelof, Edmond C.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetospheric imaging is a new discipline whose goal is to make pictures of the energetic particle populations trapped in the magnetic field of Earth (or any other planet). This project demonstrated the technical feasibility and scientific validity of magnetospheric imaging using energetic neutral atoms (ENA) with the publication and quantitative analysis of the first ENA images ever obtained from space. ENA's are produced when singly-charged energetic (approximately 100 keV) trapped ions make an atomic collision with the neutral hydrogen atoms which boil of the top of the Earth's atmosphere. These hydrogen atoms suffuse the entire trapping volume of the magnetosphere. The energetic ion steals the electron from the atmospheric hydrogen, so the energetic ion is transformed into an energetic neutral atom with a velocity of several thousands of kilometers/second. Moreover, the new-born ENA preserves the velocity that the trapped ion had at the time of the collision. Consequently, any population of energetic ions emits ENA's.

  16. First-Principles Study of the Electronic Structure and Bonding Properties of X8C46 and X8B6C40 (X: Li, Na, Mg, Ca) Carbon Clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KoleŻyński, Andrzej; Szczypka, Wojciech

    2016-03-01

    Results from theoretical analysis of the crystal structure, electronic structure, and bonding properties of C46 and B6C40 carbon clathrates doped with selected alkali and alkaline earth metals cations (Li, Na, Mg, Ca) are presented. The ab initio calculations were performed by means of the WIEN2k package (full potential linearized augmented plane wave method (FP-LAPW) within density functional theory (DFT)) with PBESol and modified Becke-Johnson exchange-correlation potentials used in geometry optimization and electronic structure calculations, respectively. The bonding properties were analyzed by applying Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules formalism to the topological properties of total electron density obtained from ab initio calculations. Analysis of the results obtained (i.a. equilibrium geometry, equation of state, cohesive energy, band structure, density of states—both total and projected on to particular atoms, and topological properties of bond critical points and net charges of topological atoms) is presented in detail.

  17. Neutral atom traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  18. Containerless high temperature property measurements by atomic fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordine, P. C.; Schiffman, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence techniques were developed for the containerless study of high temperature processes, material properties, levitation, and heating techniques for containerless earth-based experimentation. Experiments were performed in which fluorescence of atomic aluminum, mercury, or tungsten were studied. These experiments include measurements of: (1) Al atom evaporation from CW CO2 laser heated and aerodynamically levitated sapphire and alumina spheres, and self-supported sapphire filaments, (2) Al atom reaction with ambient oxygen in the wake of a levitated specimen, (3) Hg atom concentrations in the wake of levitated alumina and sapphire spheres, relative to the ambient Hg atom concentration, (4) Hg atom concentrations in supersonic levitation jets, and (5) metastable, electronically excited W atom concentrations produced by evaporation of an electrically heated tungsten filament.

  19. Monte Carlo simulations of electron thermalization in alkali iodide and alkaline-earth fluoride scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiguo; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Gao, Fei; Kerisit, Sebastien

    2012-07-01

    A Monte Carlo model of electron thermalization in inorganic scintillators, which was developed and applied to CsI in a previous publication [Wang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 064903 (2011)], is extended to another material of the alkali halide class, NaI, and to two materials from the alkaline-earth halide class, CaF2 and BaF2. This model includes electron scattering with both longitudinal optical (LO) and acoustic phonons as well as the effects of internal electric fields. For the four pure materials, a significant fraction of the electrons recombine with self-trapped holes and the thermalization distance distributions of the electrons that do not recombine peak between approximately 25 and 50 nm and extend up to a few hundreds of nanometers. The thermalization time distributions of CaF2, BaF2, NaI, and CsI extend to approximately 0.5, 1, 2, and 7 ps, respectively. The simulations show that the LO phonon energy is a key factor that affects the electron thermalization process. Indeed, the higher the LO phonon energy is, the shorter the thermalization time and distance are. The thermalization time and distance distributions show no dependence on the incident γ-ray energy. The four materials also show different extents of electron-hole pair recombination due mostly to differences in their electron mean free paths (MFPs), LO phonon energies, initial densities of electron-hole pairs, and static dielectric constants. The effect of thallium doping is also investigated for CsI and NaI as these materials are often doped with activators. Comparison between CsI and NaI shows that both the larger size of Cs+ relative to Na+, i.e., the greater atomic density of NaI, and the longer electron mean free path in NaI compared to CsI contribute to an increased probability for electron trapping at Tl sites in NaI versus CsI.

  20. Monte Carlo simulations of electron thermalization in alkali iodide and alkaline-earth fluoride scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhiguo; Gao Fei; Kerisit, Sebastien; Xie Yulong; Campbell, Luke W.

    2012-07-01

    A Monte Carlo model of electron thermalization in inorganic scintillators, which was developed and applied to CsI in a previous publication [Wang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 064903 (2011)], is extended to another material of the alkali halide class, NaI, and to two materials from the alkaline-earth halide class, CaF{sub 2} and BaF{sub 2}. This model includes electron scattering with both longitudinal optical (LO) and acoustic phonons as well as the effects of internal electric fields. For the four pure materials, a significant fraction of the electrons recombine with self-trapped holes and the thermalization distance distributions of the electrons that do not recombine peak between approximately 25 and 50 nm and extend up to a few hundreds of nanometers. The thermalization time distributions of CaF{sub 2}, BaF{sub 2}, NaI, and CsI extend to approximately 0.5, 1, 2, and 7 ps, respectively. The simulations show that the LO phonon energy is a key factor that affects the electron thermalization process. Indeed, the higher the LO phonon energy is, the shorter the thermalization time and distance are. The thermalization time and distance distributions show no dependence on the incident {gamma}-ray energy. The four materials also show different extents of electron-hole pair recombination due mostly to differences in their electron mean free paths (MFPs), LO phonon energies, initial densities of electron-hole pairs, and static dielectric constants. The effect of thallium doping is also investigated for CsI and NaI as these materials are often doped with activators. Comparison between CsI and NaI shows that both the larger size of Cs{sup +} relative to Na{sup +}, i.e., the greater atomic density of NaI, and the longer electron mean free path in NaI compared to CsI contribute to an increased probability for electron trapping at Tl sites in NaI versus CsI.

  1. Laser Cooled Atomic Clocks in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. J.; Kohel, J.; Klipstein, W. M.; Seidel, D. J.; Maleki, L.

    2000-01-01

    The goals of the Glovebox Laser-cooled Atomic Clock Experiment (GLACE) are: (1) first utilization of tunable, frequency-stabilized lasers in space, (2) demonstrate laser cooling and trapping in microgravity, (3) demonstrate longest 'perturbation-free' interaction time for a precision measurement on neutral atoms, (4) Resolve Ramsey fringes 2-10 times narrower than achievable on Earth. The approach taken is: the use of COTS components, and the utilization of prototype hardware from LCAP flight definition experiments. The launch date is scheduled for Oct. 2002. The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) specifications are reviewed, and a picture of the MSG is shown.

  2. Atomic Oxygen Used to Restore Artworks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2004-01-01

    Techniques developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to produce atomic oxygen in order to simulate the low-Earth-orbit environment for spacecraft materials testing can also be applied in the field of art restoration. Defaced or fire-damaged artwork can be treated with atomic oxygen to remove the damage and enable restoration that could not be accomplished with conventional methods. The process has been patented (U.S. Patents 5,560,781 and 5,693,241) and has been used to restore several works of art.

  3. People and the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, John James William; Feiss, P. Geoffrey

    1998-03-01

    People and the Earth examines the numerous ways in which this planet enhances and limits our lifestyles. Written with wit and remarkable insight, and illustrated with numerous case histories, it provides a balanced view of the complex environmental issues facing our civilization. The authors look at the geologic restrictions on our ability to withdraw resources--food, water, energy, and minerals--from the earth, the effect human activity has on the earth, and the lingering damage caused by natural disasters. People and the Earth examines the basic components of our interaction with this planet, provides a lucid, scientific discussion of each issue, and speculates on what the future may hold. It provides the fundamental concepts that will enable us to make wise and conscientious choices on how to live our day-to-day lives. People and the Earth is an ideal introductory textbook and will also appeal to anyone concerned with our evolving relationship to the earth.

  4. METHOD OF SEPARATING RARE EARTHS BY ION EXCHANGE

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.H.; Powell, J.E.

    1960-10-18

    A process is given for separating yttrium and rare earth values having atomic numbers of from 57 through 60 and 68 through 71 from an aqueous solution whose pH value can range from 1 to 9. All rare earths and yttrium are first adsorbed on a cation exchange resin, and they are then eluted with a solution of N-hydroxyethylethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) in the order of decreasing atomic number, yttrium behaving like element 61; the effluents are collected in fractions. The HEDTA is recovered by elution with ammonia solution and the resin is regenerated with sulfuric acid. Rare earths are precipitated from the various effluents with oxalic acid, and each supernatant is passed over cation exchange resin for adsorption of HEDTA and nonprecipitated rare earths: the oxalic acid is not retained by the resin.

  5. Reversible Bergman cyclization by atomic manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuler, Bruno; Fatayer, Shadi; Mohn, Fabian; Moll, Nikolaj; Pavliček, Niko; Meyer, Gerhard; Peña, Diego; Gross, Leo

    2016-03-01

    The Bergman cyclization is one of the most fascinating rearrangements in chemistry, with important implications in organic synthesis and pharmacology. Here we demonstrate a reversible Bergman cyclization for the first time. We induced the on-surface transformation of an individual aromatic diradical into a highly strained ten-membered diyne using atomic manipulation and verified the products by non-contact atomic force microscopy with atomic resolution. The diyne and diradical were stabilized by using an ultrathin NaCl film as the substrate, and the diyne could be transformed back into the diradical. Importantly, the diradical and the diyne exhibit different reactivity, electronic, magnetic and optical properties associated with the changes in the bond topology, and spin multiplicity. With this reversible, triggered Bergman cyclization we demonstrated switching on demand between the two reactive intermediates by means of selective C-C bond formation or cleavage, which opens up the field of radical chemistry for on-surface reactions by atomic manipulation.

  6. Reversible Bergman cyclization by atomic manipulation.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Bruno; Fatayer, Shadi; Mohn, Fabian; Moll, Nikolaj; Pavliček, Niko; Meyer, Gerhard; Peña, Diego; Gross, Leo

    2016-03-01

    The Bergman cyclization is one of the most fascinating rearrangements in chemistry, with important implications in organic synthesis and pharmacology. Here we demonstrate a reversible Bergman cyclization for the first time. We induced the on-surface transformation of an individual aromatic diradical into a highly strained ten-membered diyne using atomic manipulation and verified the products by non-contact atomic force microscopy with atomic resolution. The diyne and diradical were stabilized by using an ultrathin NaCl film as the substrate, and the diyne could be transformed back into the diradical. Importantly, the diradical and the diyne exhibit different reactivity, electronic, magnetic and optical properties associated with the changes in the bond topology, and spin multiplicity. With this reversible, triggered Bergman cyclization we demonstrated switching on demand between the two reactive intermediates by means of selective C-C bond formation or cleavage, which opens up the field of radical chemistry for on-surface reactions by atomic manipulation.

  7. EarthExplorer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houska, Treva

    2012-01-01

    The EarthExplorer trifold provides basic information for on-line access to remotely-sensed data from the U.S. Geological Survey Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center archive. The EarthExplorer (http://earthexplorer.usgs.gov/) client/server interface allows users to search and download aerial photography, satellite data, elevation data, land-cover products, and digitized maps. Minimum computer system requirements and customer service contact information also are included in the brochure.

  8. Uderstanding Snowball Earth Deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbot, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    Earth, a normally clement planet comfortably in its star's habitable zone, suffered global or nearly global glaciation at least twice during the Neoproterozoic era (at about 635 and 710 million years ago). Viewed in the context of planetary evolution, these pan-global glaciations (Snowball Earth events) were extremely rapid, lasting only a few million years. The dramatic effect of the Snowball Earth events on the development of the planet can be seen through their link to rises in atmospheric oxygen and evolutionary innovations. These potential catastrophes on an otherwise clement planet can be used to gain insight into planetary habitability more generally. Since Earth is not currently a Snowball, a sound deglaciation mechanism is crucial for the viability of the Snowball Earth hypothesis. The traditional deglaciation mechanism is a massive build up of CO2 due to reduced weathering during Snowball Earth events until tropical surface temperatures reach the melting point. Once initiated, such a deglaciation might happen on a timescale of only dozens of thousands of years and would thrust Earth from the coldest climate in its history to the warmest. Therefore embedded in Snowball Earth events is an even more rapid and dramatic environmental change. Early global climate model simulations raised doubt about whether Snowball Earth deglaciation could be achieved at a CO2 concentration low enough to be consistent with geochemical data, which represented a potential challenge to the Snowball Earth hypothesis. Over the past few years dust and clouds have emerged as the essential missing additional processes that would allow Snowball Earth deglaciation at a low enough CO2 concentration. I will discuss the dust and cloud mechanisms and the modeling behind these ideas. This effort is critical for the broader implications of Snowball Earth events because understanding the specific deglaciation mechanism determines whether similar processes could happen on other planets.

  9. Alkali element constraints on Earth-Moon relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, M. D.; Drake, M. J.; Jones, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    Given their range of volatilities, alkali elements are potential tracers of temperature-dependent processes during planetary accretion and formation of the Earth-Moon system. Under the giant impact hypothesis, no direct connection between the composition of the Moon and the Earth is required, and proto-lunar material does not necessarily experience high temperatures. Models calling for multiple collisions with smaller planetesimals derive proto-lunar materials mainly from the Earth's mantle and explicitly invoke vaporization, shock melting and volatility-related fractionation. Na/K, K/Rb, and Rb/Cs should all increase in response to thermal volatization, so theories which derive the Moon substantially from Earth's mantle predict these ratios will be higher in the Moon than in the primitive mantle of the Earth. Despite the overall depletion of volatile elements in the Moon, its Na/K and K/Rb are equal to or less than those of Earth. A new model presented here for the composition of Earth's continental crust, a major repository of the alkali elements, suggests the Rb/Cs of the Moon is also less than that of Earth. Fractionation of the alkali elements between Earth and Moon are in the opposite sense to predictions based on the relative volatilities of these elements, if the Moon formed by high-T processing of Earth's mantle. Earth, rather than the Moon, appears to carry a signature of volatility-related fractionation in the alkali elements. This may reflect an early episode of intense heating on Earth with the Moon's alkali budget accreting from cooler material.

  10. Earth on the Horizon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is the first image ever taken of Earth from the surface of a planet beyond the Moon. It was taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit one hour before sunrise on the 63rd martian day, or sol, of its mission. Earth is the tiny white dot in the center. The image is a mosaic of images taken by the rover's navigation camera showing a broad view of the sky, and an image taken by the rover's panoramic camera of Earth. The contrast in the panoramic camera image was increased two times to make Earth easier to see.

  11. The influence of earth tides on earth's coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincente, R. O.

    1978-01-01

    The importance of the Earth's tides on Earth coordinates were examined for the following reasons: (1) the precision for obtaining the Earth's coordinates shows that the effects of Earth tides appear on the values obtained for the coordinates; (2) the possibility of determining the values of the Earth tides; and (3) the consideration of theoretical models that can compute the values of Earth tides. The astronomical and geodetic coordinates of a point at the Earth's surface are described.

  12. Atomic Particle Detection, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the booklets in the "Understanding the Atom Series" published by the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission for high school science teachers and their students. The instruments used to detect both particles and electromagnetic radiation that emerge from the nucleus are described. The counters reviewed include ionization chambers,…

  13. Atomic Fuel, Understanding the Atom Series. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogerton, John F.

    This publication is part of the "Understanding the Atom" series. Complete sets of the series are available free to teachers, schools, and public librarians who can make them available for reference or use by groups. Among the topics discussed are: What Atomic Fuel Is; The Odyssey of Uranium; Production of Uranium; Fabrication of Reactor…

  14. Atomic scale chemical tomography of human bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langelier, Brian; Wang, Xiaoyue; Grandfield, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Human bone is a complex hierarchical material. Understanding bone structure and its corresponding composition at the nanometer scale is critical for elucidating mechanisms of biomineralization under healthy and pathological states. However, the three-dimensional structure and chemical nature of bone remains largely unexplored at the nanometer scale due to the challenges associated with characterizing both the structural and chemical integrity of bone simultaneously. Here, we use correlative transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography for the first time, to our knowledge, to reveal structures in human bone at the atomic level. This approach provides an overlaying chemical map of the organic and inorganic constituents of bone on its structure. This first use of atom probe tomography on human bone reveals local gradients, trace element detection of Mg, and the co-localization of Na with the inorganic-organic interface of bone mineral and collagen fibrils, suggesting the important role of Na-rich organics in the structural connection between mineral and collagen. Our findings provide the first insights into the hierarchical organization and chemical heterogeneity in human bone in three-dimensions at its smallest length scale – the atomic level. We demonstrate that atom probe tomography shows potential for new insights in biomineralization research on bone.

  15. Atomic scale chemical tomography of human bone

    PubMed Central

    Langelier, Brian; Wang, Xiaoyue; Grandfield, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Human bone is a complex hierarchical material. Understanding bone structure and its corresponding composition at the nanometer scale is critical for elucidating mechanisms of biomineralization under healthy and pathological states. However, the three-dimensional structure and chemical nature of bone remains largely unexplored at the nanometer scale due to the challenges associated with characterizing both the structural and chemical integrity of bone simultaneously. Here, we use correlative transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography for the first time, to our knowledge, to reveal structures in human bone at the atomic level. This approach provides an overlaying chemical map of the organic and inorganic constituents of bone on its structure. This first use of atom probe tomography on human bone reveals local gradients, trace element detection of Mg, and the co-localization of Na with the inorganic-organic interface of bone mineral and collagen fibrils, suggesting the important role of Na-rich organics in the structural connection between mineral and collagen. Our findings provide the first insights into the hierarchical organization and chemical heterogeneity in human bone in three-dimensions at its smallest length scale – the atomic level. We demonstrate that atom probe tomography shows potential for new insights in biomineralization research on bone. PMID:28054636

  16. Cool Earth Solar

    SciTech Connect

    Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

    2013-04-22

    In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

  17. Hands On Earth Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisgarber, Sherry L.; Van Doren, Lisa; Hackathorn, Merrianne; Hannibal, Joseph T.; Hansgen, Richard

    This publication is a collection of 13 hands-on activities that focus on earth science-related activities and involve students in learning about growing crystals, tectonics, fossils, rock and minerals, modeling Ohio geology, geologic time, determining true north, and constructing scale-models of the Earth-moon system. Each activity contains…

  18. Guided earth boring tool

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, W.J.; Pittard, G.T.; Maurer, W.C.; Wasson, M.R.; Herben, W.C.

    1989-08-22

    This patent describes a controllable tool for drilling holes in soft earth. The tool comprising an elongated rigid supporting drill rod or pipe, means supporting the drill rod or pipe for earth boring or piercing movement, including means for moving the drill rod or pipe longitudinally for penetrating the earth, means for rotating the drill rod or pipe while penetrating the earth, and means for controlling the direction of movement of the drill rod or pipe along a straight or curved path. The drill rod or pipe moving and rotating means being constructed to permit addition and removal of supporting drill rod or pipe during earth penetrating operation, an earth piercing member of substantially cylindrical shape. The tool being operable to penetrate the earth upon longitudinal movement of the drill rod or pipe by the longitudinal rod or pipe moving means, and the direction controlling means comprising means causing drill rod or pipe movement in a curved path through the earth when the rod or pipe is not rotated and causing drill rod or pipe straight line movement when the rod or pipe is rotated.

  19. The Earth Charter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Education for Sustainable Development, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Humanity is part of a vast evolving universe. Earth is alive with a unique community of life. The forces of nature make existence a demanding and uncertain adventure, but Earth has provided the conditions essential to life's evolution. The resilience of the community of life and the well-being of humanity depend upon preserving a healthy biosphere…

  20. Introducing Earth's Orbital Eccentricity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Most students know that planetary orbits, including Earth's, are elliptical; that is Kepler's first law, and it is found in many science textbooks. But quite a few are mistaken about the details, thinking that the orbit is very eccentric, or that this effect is somehow responsible for the seasons. In fact, the Earth's orbital eccentricity is…

  1. Earth physics, overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonbun, F. O.

    1973-01-01

    Satellite applications in earth and ocean dynamic studies are considered for: earthquake hazard assessment and alleviation; prediction of general ocean circulation, surface currents, and heat transport; monitoring of transient phenomena of the ocean surface, such as sea state and wave conditions, wind-surface interactions and storm searches; and refinement of the global geoid, the gravity and magnetic fields of the earth.

  2. The Earth's Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeanloz, Raymond

    1983-01-01

    The nature of the earth's core is described. Indirect evidence (such as that determined from seismological data) indicates that it is an iron alloy, solid toward its center but otherwise liquid. Evidence also suggests that it is the turbulent flow of the liquid that generates the earth's magnetic field. (JN)

  3. Cool Earth Solar

    ScienceCinema

    Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

    2016-07-12

    In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

  4. The Earth Needs You!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Celebrated annually on April 22, schools and communities organize numerous activities during Earth Day to promote awareness. To help teachers plan their own initiatives and to learn more about what is happening around the world, they can join the Earth Day Network at: http://network.earthday.net/. Once they have joined, they can create a webpage…

  5. Earth System Science Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford, Sandra; Coffman, Margaret

    2004-01-01

    For several decades, science teachers have used bottles for classroom projects designed to teach students about biology. Bottle projects do not have to just focus on biology, however. These projects can also be used to engage students in Earth science topics. This article describes the Earth System Science Project, which was adapted and developed…

  6. Earth and ocean modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knezovich, F. M.

    1976-01-01

    A modular structured system of computer programs is presented utilizing earth and ocean dynamical data keyed to finitely defined parameters. The model is an assemblage of mathematical algorithms with an inherent capability of maturation with progressive improvements in observational data frequencies, accuracies and scopes. The Eom in its present state is a first-order approach to a geophysical model of the earth's dynamics.

  7. Skylab Explores the Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This book describes the Skylab 4 Earth Explorations Project. Photographs of the earth taken by the Skylab astronauts are reproduced here and accompanied by an analytical and explanatory text. Some of the geological and geographical topics covered are: (1) global tectonics - some geological analyses of observations and photographs from Skylab; (2)…

  8. Earth Science Week evolves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earth Science Week, October 7-13, is an annual grassroots effort sponsored by the American Geological Institute (AGI) and its member societies, of which AGU is the largest. This year, for the first time, Earth Science Week has a general theme, evolution in Earth history. The Earth Science Week information kit for 2001, available from AGI, includes a variety of posters, bookmarks, and other materials that illustrate this concept. The kit contains a new 32-page “Ideas and Activities” booklet that emphasizes evolution in Earth history through an array of activities about rocks, fossils, and geologic time. It also has information on the upcoming Public Broadcasting Service series, “Evolution,” which is to be aired in late September.

  9. Solid Earth: Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rummel, R.

    1991-10-01

    The principles of the solid Earth program are introduced. When considering the study of solid Earth from space, satellites are used as beacons, inertial references, free fall probes and carrying platforms. The phenomenon measured by these satellites and the processes which can be studied as a result of these measurements are tabulated. The NASA solid Earth program focusses on research into surface kinematics, Earth rotation, land, ice, and ocean monitoring. The ESA solid Earth program identifies as its priority the Aristoteles mission for determining the gravity and magnetic field globally, with high spatial resolution and high accuracy. The Aristoteles mission characteristics and goals are listed. The benefits of the improved gravity information that will be provided by this mission are highlighted. This information will help in the following research: geodesy, orbit mechanics, geodynamics, oceanography, climate sea level, and the atmosphere.

  10. Mission to Planet Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Gregory S.; Backlund, Peter W.

    1992-01-01

    Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE) is NASA's concept for an international science program to produce the understanding needed to predict changes in the Earth's environment. NASA and its interagency and international partners will place satellites carrying advanced sensors in strategic Earth orbits to gather multidisciplinary data. A sophisticated data system will process and archive an unprecedented amount of information about the Earth and how it works as a system. Increased understanding of the Earth system is a basic human responsibility, a prerequisite to informed management of the planet's resources and to the preservation of the global environment. An overview of the MTPE, flight programs, data and information systems, interdisciplinary research efforts, and international coordination, is presented.

  11. Reactive scattering of electronically excited alkali atoms with molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Mestdagh, J.M.; Balko, B.A.; Covinsky, M.H.; Weiss, P.S.; Vernon, M.F.; Schmidt, H.; Lee, Y.T.

    1987-06-01

    Representative families of excited alkali atom reactions have been studied using a crossed beam apparatus. For those alkali-molecule systems in which reactions are also known for ground state alkali and involve an early electron transfer step, no large differences are observed in the reactivity as Na is excited. More interesting are the reactions with hydrogen halides (HCl): it was found that adding electronic energy into Na changes the reaction mechanism. Early electron transfer is responsible of Na(5S, 4D) reactions, but not of Na(3P) reactions. Moreover, the NaCl product scattering is dominated by the HCl/sup -/ repulsion in Na(5S, 4D) reactions, and by the NaCl-H repulsion in the case of Na(3P). The reaction of Na with O/sub 2/ is of particular interest since it was found to be state specific. Only Na(4D) reacts, and the reaction requires restrictive constraints on the impact parameter and the reactants' relative orientation. The reaction with NO/sub 2/ is even more complex since Na(4D) leads to the formation of NaO by two different pathways. It must be mentioned however, that the identification of NaO as product in these reactions has yet to be confirmed.

  12. Presenting the Bohr Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haendler, Blanca L.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the importance of teaching the Bohr atom at both freshman and advanced levels. Focuses on the development of Bohr's ideas, derivation of the energies of the stationary states, and the Bohr atom in the chemistry curriculum. (SK)

  13. Earth Science Informatics - Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 10-15 years, significant advances have been made in information management, there are an increasing number of individuals entering the field of information management as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing data, and the field of informatics has come to its own. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of science data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also includes the use of computers and computational methods to support decision making and applications. Earth Science Informatics (ESI, a.k.a. geoinformatics) is the application of informatics in the Earth science domain. ESI is a rapidly developing discipline integrating computer science, information science, and Earth science. Major national and international research and infrastructure projects in ESI have been carried out or are on-going. Notable among these are: the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), the European Commissions INSPIRE, the U.S. NSDI and Geospatial One-Stop, the NASA EOSDIS, and the NSF DataONE, EarthCube and Cyberinfrastructure for Geoinformatics. More than 18 departments and agencies in the U.S. federal government have been active in Earth science informatics. All major space agencies in the world, have been involved in ESI research and application activities. In the United States, the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP), whose membership includes nearly 150 organizations (government, academic and commercial) dedicated to managing, delivering and applying Earth science data, has been working on many ESI topics since 1998. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)s Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) has been actively coordinating the ESI activities among the space agencies. Remote Sensing; Earth Science Informatics, Data Systems; Data Services; Metadata

  14. A comparative analysis of microgravity and earth grown thermostable T1 lipase crystals using HDPCG apparatus.

    PubMed

    Abd Rahman, Raja N Z R; Ali, Mohd S Mohamad; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Leow, Adam T C; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Basri, Mahiran; Salleh, Abu B; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Geobacillus zalihae sp. nov., which produces a putative thermostable lipase, represents a novel species, with type strain T1. The characterisation of this intrinsically thermostable T1 lipase either physicochemically or structurally is an important task. The crystallisation of T1lipase in space was carried out using a High-Density Protein Crystal Growth (HDPCG) apparatus with the vapour diffusion method, and X-ray diffraction data were collected. The microgravity environment has improved the size and quality of the crystals as compared to earth grown crystal. The effect of microgravity on the crystallisation of T1 lipase was clearly evidenced by the finer atomic details at 1.35 A resolution. Better electron densities were observed overall compared with the Earth-grown crystals, and comparison shows the subtle but distinct conformations around Na(+) ion binding site stabilized via cation-π interactions. This approach could be useful for solving structure and function of lipases towards exploiting its potentials to various industrial applications.

  15. Atoms in Action

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    This movie produced with Berkeley Lab's TEAM 0.5 microscope shows the growth of a hole and the atomic edge reconstruction in a graphene sheet. An electron beam focused to a spot on the sheet blows out the exposed carbon atoms to make the hole. The carbon atoms then reposition themselves to find a stable configuration. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2009/03/26/atoms-in-action/

  16. HYDROGEN ATOM THERMAL PARAMETERS.

    PubMed

    JENSEN, L H; SUNDARALINGAM, M

    1964-09-11

    Isotropic hydrogen atom thermal parameters for N,N'- hexamethylenebispropionamide have been determined. They show a definite trend and vary from approximately the same as the mean thermal parameters for atoms other than hydrogen near the center of the molecule to appreciably greater for atoms near the end. The indicated trend for this compound, along with other results, provides the basis for a possible explanation of the anomolous values that have been obtained for hydrogen atom thermal parameters.

  17. Alkali-metal/alkaline-earth-metal fluorine beryllium borate NaSr{sub 3}Be{sub 3}B{sub 3}O{sub 9}F{sub 4} with large nonlinear optical properties in the deep-ultraviolet region

    SciTech Connect

    Reshak, A. H.; Huang, Hongwei; Kamarudin, H.; Auluck, S.

    2015-02-28

    The linear optical response and second harmonic generation (SHG) in alkali-metal/alkaline-earth-metal fluorine beryllium borate NaSr{sub 3}Be{sub 3}B{sub 3}O{sub 9}F{sub 4} are investigated by means of density functional theory. Calculations are performed using four types of exchange correlations: Ceperley-Alder local density approximation, Perdew Burke and Ernzerhof general gradient approximation, Engel-Vosko generalized gradient approximation, and the recently modified Becke-Johnson potential (mBJ). The mBJ approach brings the calculated band gap (7.20 eV) in excellent agreement with the experimental one (7.28 eV). The calculated values of the uniaxial anisotropy δε=−0.076 and the birefringence Δn(0)=0.052 indicate considerable anisotropy in the linear optical properties, which makes it favorable for the second harmonic generation. The dominant component of the second harmonic generation is χ{sub 111}{sup (2)}(ω). The value of |χ{sub 111}{sup (2)}(ω)| is about 1.2 pm/V at λ = 1064 nm in agreement with previous calculations. To analyze the origin of the high SHG of NaSr{sub 3}Be{sub 3}B{sub 3}O{sub 9}F{sub 4} single crystals, we have correlated the features of |χ{sub 111}{sup (2)}(ω)| spectra with the features of ε{sub 2}(ω) spectra as a function of ω/2 and ω. From the calculated dominant component |χ{sub 111}{sup (2)}(ω)|, we find that the microscopic first hyperpolarizability, β{sub 111}, the vector components along the dipole moment direction is 0.5 × 10{sup −30} esu at static limit and 0.6 × 10{sup −30} esu at λ = 1064 nm.

  18. The Nature of Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Alan

    This monograph was written for the purpose of presenting physics to college students who are not preparing for careers in physics. It deals with the nature of atoms, and treats the following topics: (1) the atomic hypothesis, (2) the chemical elements, (3) models of an atom, (4) a particle in a one-dimensional well, (5) a particle in a central…

  19. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  20. Images of Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Tony

    2003-01-01

    Recommends using a simple image, such as the fuzzy atom ball to help students develop a useful understanding of the molecular world. Explains that the image helps students easily grasp ideas about atoms and molecules and leads naturally to more advanced ideas of atomic structure, chemical bonding, and quantum physics. (Author/NB)

  1. Pulsed source of energetic atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, George E.; Krech, Robert H.

    1987-01-01

    A pulsed high flux source of nearly monoenergetic atomic oxygen was designed, built, and successfully demonstrated. Molecular oxygen at several atmospheres pressure is introduced into an evacuated supersonic expansion nozzle through a pulsed molecular beam valve. An 18 J pulsed CO2 TEA laser is focused to intensities greater than 10(9) W/sq cm in the nozzle throat to generate a laser-induced breakdown. The resulting plasma is heated in excess of 20,000 K by a laser supported detonation wave, and then rapidly expands and cools. Nozzle geometry confines the expansion to provide rapid electron-ion recombination into atomic oxygen. Average O atom beam velocities from 5 to 13 km/s were measured at estimated fluxes to 10(18) atoms per pulse. Preliminary materials testing has produced the same surface oxygen enrichment in polyethylene samples as obtained on the STS-8 mission. Scanning electron microscope examinations of irradiated polymer surfaces reveal an erosion morphology similar to that obtained in low Earth orbit, with an estimated mass removal rate of approx. 10(-24) cu cm/atom. The characteristics of the O atom source and the results of some preliminary materials testing studies are reviewed.

  2. High Temperature Chemistry of Rare Earth Compounds: Dramatic Examples of Periodicity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cater, E. David

    1978-01-01

    Reports that energy required to promote a 4f electron to the 5d level has a profound and predictable influence on the systematics of reactions involving conversion of rare earth atoms from combined to free states. (Author/MA)

  3. Astronomy at School: Measurements of the Earth-Moon Distance. (Spanish Title: Astronomía en la Escuela: Medición de la Distancia Tierra-Luna.) Astronomia na Escola: Medida da Distância Terra-Lua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolantonio, Santiago; Pintado, Olga I.

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this project is to approach High School students to Science. We propose to measure the Earth-Moon distance using the parallax. The observation and measurements techniques and all the calculations needed are described in this paper. The results obtained in a test experience realized during 2003 are presented. This test shows that this is a feasible project and also shows which things needed to be improved. Se plantea la propuesta de un proyecto educativo dirigido al Nivel Medio de enseñanza, consistente en la determinación de la distancia Tierra - Luna por paralaje. Se describen las técnicas de observación, mediciones y cálculos. Se proporcionan a continuación los resultados obtenidos en la experiencia piloto realizada en el 2003, la que permitió comprobar la factibilidad de llevar a cabo la propuesta, así como perfeccionar los diferentes aspectos involucrados en la misma. Propomos neste trabalho um projeto educativo dirigido ao Ensino Médio que consiste na determinação da distância Terra-Lua pelo efeito da paralaxe. As técnicas de observação, medidas e cálculos auxiliares são descritos, e os resultados obtidos numa experiência-teste realizada no ano de 2003 apresentados. Este último teste permitiu comprovar a viabilidade de execução da proposta e aperfeiçoar diversos aspectos da mesma.

  4. Enhanced magnetic trap loading for atomic strontium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, D. S.; Reschovsky, B. J.; Pisenti, N. C.; Campbell, G. K.

    2015-10-01

    We report on a technique to improve the continuous loading of atomic strontium into a magnetic trap from a magneto-optical trap. This is achieved by adding a depumping laser tuned to the P31→S31 (688-nm) transition. The depumping laser increases atom number in the magnetic trap and subsequent cooling stages by up to 65% for the bosonic isotopes and up to 30% for the fermionic isotope of strontium. We optimize this trap loading strategy with respect to the 688-nm laser detuning, intensity, and beam size. To understand the results, we develop a one-dimensional rate equation model of the system, which is in good agreement with the data. We discuss the use of other transitions in strontium for accelerated trap loading and the application of the technique to other alkaline-earth-like atoms.

  5. Atomic frequency standard relativistic Doppler shift experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.; Reinhardt, V. S.

    1974-01-01

    An experiment has been performed to measure possible space anisotropy as it would effect the frequency of a cesium atomic beam standard clock in a laboratory on earth due to motion relative to external coordinate frames. The cesium frequency was measured as a function of orientation with respect to an atomic hydrogen maser standard. Over a period of 34 days 101 measurements were made. The results are consistent with a conclusion that no general orientation dependance attributable to spacial anisotropy was observed. It is shown that both the airplane clock results, and the null results for the atomic beam clock, are consistent with Einstein general or special relativity, or with the Lorentz transformations alone.

  6. Accretion of the Earth.

    PubMed

    Canup, Robin M

    2008-11-28

    The origin of the Earth and its Moon has been the focus of an enormous body of research. In this paper I review some of the current models of terrestrial planet accretion, and discuss assumptions common to most works that may require re-examination. Density-wave interactions between growing planets and the gas nebula may help to explain the current near-circular orbits of the Earth and Venus, and may result in large-scale radial migration of proto-planetary embryos. Migration would weaken the link between the present locations of the planets and the original provenance of the material that formed them. Fragmentation can potentially lead to faster accretion and could also damp final planet orbital eccentricities. The Moon-forming impact is believed to be the final major event in the Earth's accretion. Successful simulations of lunar-forming impacts involve a differentiated impactor containing between 0.1 and 0.2 Earth masses, an impact angle near 45 degrees and an impact speed within 10 per cent of the Earth's escape velocity. All successful impacts-with or without pre-impact rotation-imply that the Moon formed primarily from material originating from the impactor rather than from the proto-Earth. This must ultimately be reconciled with compositional similarities between the Earth and the Moon.

  7. Earth as art three

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2010-01-01

    For most of us, deserts, mountains, river valleys, coastlines even dry lakebeds are relatively familiar features of the Earth's terrestrial environment. For earth scientists, they are the focus of considerable scientific research. Viewed from a unique and unconventional perspective, Earth's geographic attributes can also be a surprising source of awe-inspiring art. That unique perspective is space. The artists for the Earth as Art Three exhibit are the Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 satellites, which orbit approximately 705 kilometers (438 miles) above the Earth's surface. While studying the images these satellites beam down daily, researchers are often struck by the sheer beauty of the scenes. Such images inspire the imagination and go beyond scientific value to remind us how stunning, intricate, and simply amazing our planet's features can be. Instead of paint, the medium for these works of art is light. But Landsat satellite sensors don't see light as human eyes do; instead, they see radiant energy reflected from Earth's surface in certain wavelengths, or bands, of red, green, blue, and infrared light. When these different bands are combined into a single image, remarkable patterns, colors, and shapes emerge. The Earth as Art Three exhibit provides fresh and inspiring glimpses of different parts of our planet's complex surface. The images in this collection were chosen solely based on their aesthetic appeal. Many of the images have been manipulated to enhance color variations or details. They are not intended for scientific interpretation only for your viewing pleasure. Enjoy!

  8. Sun-Earth Days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieman, J.; Ng, C.; Lewis, E.; Cline, T.

    2010-08-01

    Sun-Earth Day is a well-coordinated series of programs, resources and events under a unique yearly theme highlighting the fundamentals of heliophysics research and missions. A menu of activities, conducted throughout the year, inspire and educate participants. Sun-Earth Day itself can vary in date, but usually is identified by a celebration on or near the spring equinox. Through the Sun-Earth Day framework we have been able to offer a series of coordinated events that promote and highlight the Sun, its connection to Earth and the other planets. Sun-Earth Day events are hosted by educators, museums, amateur astronomers and scientists and occur at schools, community groups, parks, planetaria and science centers around the globe. Sun-Earth Day raises the awareness and knowledge of formal and informal education audiences concerning space weather and heliophysics. By building on the success of Sun-Earth Day yearly celebrations, we seek to affect people of all backgrounds and ages with the wonders of heliophysics science, discovery, and exploration in ways that are both tangible and meaningful to their lives.

  9. Earths, Super-Earths, and Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Eugene; Lee, Eve J.

    2015-12-01

    We review and add to the theory of how planets acquire atmospheres from parent circumstellar disks. We derive (in real time) a simple and general analytic expression for how a planet's atmosphere grows with time, as a function of the underlying core mass and nebular conditions, including the gas metallicity. Planets accrete as much gas as can cool: an atmosphere's doubling time is given by its Kelvin-Helmholtz time. The theory can be applied in any number of settings --- gas-rich vs. gas-poor nebulae; dusty vs. dust-free atmospheres; close-in vs. far-out distances --- and is confirmed against detailed numerical models for objects ranging in mass from Mars (0.1 Mearth) to the most extreme super Earths (10--20 Mearth). We explain why heating from planetesimal accretion, commonly invoked in models of core accretion, is irrelevant. This talk sets the stage for another presentation, "Breeding Super-Earths and Birthing Super-Puffs".

  10. Anisotropy of the energetic neutral atom flux in the heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruntman, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    Characteristics of the energetic neutral atoms born at the heliospheric interface are considered for plasma flow structure resulting from a two-shock model of the interaction between the solar wind and the interstellar medium. The energy distributions of heliospheric energetic neutral atoms (HELENAs) are calculated and it is shown that the HELENA flux is highly anisotropic at the earth's orbit. The characteristics of the HELENA flux are highly sensitive to the size of the heliosphere. This supports the conclusion that measurements of HELENAs from the earth's orbit would provide an efficient tool to remotely study the heliosphere.

  11. Earth Limb Radiance Transformation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-02

    AD-A097 523 AEROSPACE CORP EL SEGUNDO CA CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS LAB F/G 4/1 EARTH LIMB RADIANCE TRANSFORMATION (U) MAR AI S 4 YOUNG F0701-80 -C-0081... Earth Limb Radiance Trafisformation Prepared by S. J. YOUNG Chemistr and Physics Laboratory Laboratory Operations The Aerospace Corporation S.El...ITLEK (and Subtitle) TYPE OF REPORT & P53100 COVERED Earth Limb Radiance Transformation. ( Interim ./ / /TR-OJ081(697j7-g4)-l-- i7.Step hen J. Young

  12. Rare earth gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, W.F.

    1975-10-31

    A high energy gas laser with light output in the infrared or visible region of the spectrum is described. Laser action is obtained by generating vapors of rare earth halides, particularly neodymium iodide or, to a lesser extent, neodymium bromide, and disposing the rare earth vapor medium in a resonant cavity at elevated temperatures; e.g., approximately 1200/sup 0/ to 1400/sup 0/K. A particularly preferred gaseous medium is one involving a complex of aluminum chloride and neodymium chloride, which exhibits tremendously enhanced vapor pressure compared to the rare earth halides per se, and provides comparable increases in stored energy densities.

  13. Introducing Earth's Orbital Eccentricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    Most students know that planetary orbits, including Earth's, are elliptical; that is Kepler's first law, and it is found in many science textbooks. But quite a few are mistaken about the details, thinking that the orbit is very eccentric, or that this effect is somehow responsible for the seasons. In fact, the Earth's orbital eccentricity is small, and its only effect on the seasons is their unequal durations. Here I show a pleasant way to guide students to the actual value of Earth's orbital eccentricity, starting from the durations of the four seasons. The date of perihelion is also found.

  14. Single atom electrochemical and atomic analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Rama

    In the past decade, advances in electron and scanning-probe based microscopies have led to a wealth of imaging and spectroscopic data with atomic resolution, yielding substantial insight into local physics and chemistry in a diverse range of systems such as oxide catalysts, multiferroics, manganites, and 2D materials. However, typical analysis of atomically resolved images is limited, despite the fact that image intensities and distortions of the atoms from their idealized positions contain unique information on the physical and chemical properties inherent to the system. Here, we present approaches to data mine atomically resolved images in oxides, specifically in the hole-doped manganite La5/8Ca3/8MnO3, on epitaxial films studied by in-situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). Through application of bias to the STM tip, atomic-scale electrochemistry is demonstrated on the manganite surface. STM images are then further analyzed through a suite of algorithms including 2D autocorrelations, sliding window Fourier transforms, and others, and can be combined with basic thermodynamic modelling to reveal relevant physical and chemical descriptors including segregation energies, existence and strength of atomic-scale diffusion barriers, surface energies and sub-surface chemical species identification. These approaches promise to provide tremendous insights from atomically resolved functional imaging, can provide relevant thermodynamic parameters, and auger well for use with first-principles calculations to yield quantitative atomic-level chemical identification and structure-property relations. This research was sponsored by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, BES, DOE. Research was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which also provided support and is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  15. Multilevel Atomic Coherent States and Atomic Holomorphic Representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Chang-Qi; Haake, Fritz

    1996-01-01

    The notion of atomic coherent states is extended to the case of multilevel atom collective. Based on atomic coherent states, a holomorphic representation for atom collective states and operators is defined. An example is given to illustrate its application.

  16. Sulfide bonded atomic radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, G. V.; Ross, N. L.; Cox, D. F.

    2017-03-01

    The bonded radius, r b(S), of the S atom, calculated for first- and second-row non-transition metal sulfide crystals and third-row transition metal sulfide molecules and crystals indicates that the radius of the sulfur atom is not fixed as traditionally assumed, but that it decreases systematically along the bond paths of the bonded atoms with decreasing bond length as observed in an earlier study of the bonded radius of the oxygen atom. When bonded to non-transition metal atoms, r b(S) decreases systematically with decreasing bond length from 1.68 Å when the S atom is bonded to the electropositive VINa atom to 1.25 Å when bonded to the more electronegative IVP atom. In the case of transition metal atoms, rb(S) likewise decreases with decreasing bond length from 1.82 Å when bonded to Cu and to 1.12 Å when bonded to Fe. As r b(S) is not fixed at a given value but varies substantially depending on the bond length and the field strength of the bonded atoms, it is apparent that sets of crystal and atomic sulfide atomic radii based on an assumed fixed radius for the sulfur atom are satisfactory in that they reproduce bond lengths, on the one hand, whereas on the other, they are unsatisfactory in that they fail to define the actual sizes of the bonded atoms determined in terms of the minima in the electron density between the atoms. As such, we urge that the crystal chemistry and the properties of sulfides be studied in terms of the bond lengths determined by adding the radii of either the atomic and crystal radii of the atoms but not in terms of existing sets of crystal and atomic radii. After all, the bond lengths were used to determine the radii that were experimentally determined, whereas the individual radii were determined on the basis of an assumed radius for the sulfur atom.

  17. Beautiful Earth with GPM

    NASA Video Gallery

    This is a musical and visual tour of Earth from space followed by a discussion with scientists from NASA's new rain and snow satellite. During this one-hour event, students and teachers from across...

  18. Earth Reconnect -- July 2012

    NASA Video Gallery

    A visualization of Earth's magnetosphere on July 15-16, 2012, shows how constant magnetic reconnection caused by an arriving coronal mass ejection, or CME, from the sun disrupted the magnetosphere,...

  19. LANL Studies Earth's Magnetosphere

    ScienceCinema

    Daughton, Bill

    2016-07-12

    A new 3-D supercomputer model presents a new theory of how magnetic reconnection works in high-temperature plasmas. This Los Alamos National Laboratory research supports an upcoming NASA mission to study Earth's magnetosphere in greater detail than ever.

  20. Observing earth from Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Skylab technology and observations of earth resources are discussed. Special attention was given to application of Skylab data to mapmaking, geology/geodesy, water resources, oceanography, meteorology, and geography/ecology.

  1. Earth study from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidorenko, A. V.

    1981-01-01

    The significance that space studies are making to all Earth sciences in the areas of geography, geodesy, cartography, geology, meteorology, oceanology, agronomy, and ecology is discussed. It is predicted that cosmonautics will result in a revolution in science and technology.

  2. Analyzing earth's surface data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, D. J.; Elifrits, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    Manual discusses simple inexpensive image analysis technique used to interpret photographs and scanner of data of Earth's surface. Manual is designed for those who have no need for sophisticated computer-automated analysis procedures.

  3. The Earth Tides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Judah

    1982-01-01

    In addition to oceans, the earth is subjected to tidal stresses and undergoes tidal deformations. Discusses origin of tides, tidal stresses, and methods of determining tidal deformations (including gravity, tilt, and strain meters). (JN)

  4. Down to earth relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, I. I.

    1978-01-01

    The basic concepts of the special and general theories of relativity are described. Simple examples are given to illustrate the effect of relativity on measurements of time and frequency in the near-earth environment.

  5. NASA 2014: Earth

    NASA Video Gallery

    For the first time in more than a decade, five NASA Earth science missions will be launched into space in the same year, opening new and improved remote eyes to monitor our changing planet. The lau...

  6. Welcome Back to Earth

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA astronaut Scott Kelly is interviewed by public affairs officer Rob Navias just after returning to Earth aboard a Soyuz spacecraft on March 1, 2016 (March 2, local Kazakh time) following a 340 ...

  7. Earth Radiation Measurement Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. Louis

    2000-01-01

    This document is the final report for NASA Grant NAG1-1959, 'Earth Radiation Measurement Science'. The purpose of this grant was to perform research in this area for the needs of the Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES) project and for the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), which are bing conducted by the Radiation and Aerosols Branch of the Atmospheric Sciences Division of Langley Research Center. Earth Radiation Measurement Science investigates the processes by which measurements are converted into data products. Under this grant, research was to be conducted for five tasks: (1) Point Response Function Measurements; (2) Temporal Sampling of Outgoing Longwave Radiation; (3) Spatial Averaging of Radiation Budget Data; (4) CERES Data Validation and Applications; and (5) ScaRaB Data Validation and Application.

  8. LANL Studies Earth's Magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Daughton, Bill

    2011-04-15

    A new 3-D supercomputer model presents a new theory of how magnetic reconnection works in high-temperature plasmas. This Los Alamos National Laboratory research supports an upcoming NASA mission to study Earth's magnetosphere in greater detail than ever.

  9. Astronomy: Earth's seven sisters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snellen, Ignas A. G.

    2017-02-01

    Seven small planets whose surfaces could harbour liquid water have been spotted around a nearby dwarf star. If such a configuration is common in planetary systems, our Galaxy could be teeming with Earth-like planets. See Letter p.456

  10. Managing Planet Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, William C.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the human use of the planet earth. Describes the global patterns and the regional aspects of change. Four requirements for the cultivation of leadership and institutional competence are suggested. Lists five references for further reading. (YP)

  11. Skylab Earth Observation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This concept illustrates Skylab Earth observation studies, an Earth Resources Experiment Package (EREP). EREP was designed to explore the use of the widest possible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum for Earth resource investigations with sensors that recorded data in the visible, infrared, and microwave spectral regions. Resources subject to this study included a capability of mapping Earth resources and land uses, crop and forestry cover, health of vegetation, types of soil, water storage in snow pack, surface or near-surface mineral deposits, sea surface temperature, and the location of likely feeding areas for fish, etc. A significant feature of EREP was the ability of man to operate the sensors in a laboratory fashion.

  12. Na2MoO2As2O7

    PubMed Central

    Jouini, Raja; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi; Driss, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Disodium molybdenum dioxide diarsenate, Na2MoO2As2O7, has been synthesized by a solid-state reaction. The structure is built up from MoAs2O12 linear units sharing corners to form a three-dimensional framework containing tunnels running along the a-axis direction in which the Na+ cations are located. In this framework, the AsV atoms are tetra­hedrally coordinated and form an As2O7 group. The MoVI atom is displaced from the center of an octa­hedron of O atoms. Two Na+ cations are disordered about inversion centres. Structural relationships between different compounds: A 2MoO2As2O7 (A = K, Rb), AMOP2O7 (A = Na, K, Rb; M = Mo, Nb) and MoP2O7 are discussed. PMID:23468669

  13. Revealing the hidden atom in graphite by low-temperature atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hembacher, Stefan; Giessibl, Franz J; Mannhart, Jochen; Quate, Calvin F

    2003-10-28

    Carbon, the backbone material of life on Earth, comes in three modifications: diamond, graphite, and fullerenes. Diamond develops tetrahedral sp3 bonds, forming a cubic crystal structure, whereas graphite and fullerenes are characterized by planar sp2 bonds. Polycrystalline graphite is the basis for many products of everyday life: pencils, lubricants, batteries, arc lamps, and brushes for electric motors. In crystalline form, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite is used as a diffracting element in monochromators for x-ray and neutron scattering and as a calibration standard for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The graphite surface is easily prepared as a clean atomically flat surface by cleavage. This feature is attractive and is used in many laboratories as the surface of choice for "seeing atoms." Despite the proverbial ease of imaging graphite by STM with atomic resolution, every second atom in the hexagonal surface unit cell remains hidden, and STM images show only a single atom in the unit cell. Here we present measurements with a low-temperature atomic force microscope with pico-Newton force sensitivity that reveal the hidden surface atom.

  14. Skylab explores the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Data from visual observations are integrated with results of analyses of approxmately 600 of the nearly 2000 photographs taken of Earth during the 84-day Skylab 4 mission to provide additional information on (1) Earth features and processes; (2) operational procedures and constraints in observing and photographing the planet; and (3) the use of man in real-time analysis of oceanic and atmospheric phenomena.

  15. Earth and Space Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeson, Blanche W.

    1999-01-01

    Workshop for middle and high school teachers to enhance their knowledge of the Earth as a system. NASA data and materials developed by teachers (all available via the Internet) will be used to engage participants in hands-on, investigative approaches to the Earth system. All materials are ready to be applied in pre-college classrooms. Remotely-sensed data will be used in combination with familiar resources, such as maps, to examine global climate change.

  16. Biosignatures of early earths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilcher, Carl B.

    2003-01-01

    A major goal of NASA's Origins Program is to find habitable planets around other stars and determine which might harbor life. Determining whether or not an extrasolar planet harbors life requires an understanding of what spectral features (i.e., biosignatures) might result from life's presence. Consideration of potential biosignatures has tended to focus on spectral features of gases in Earth's modern atmosphere, particularly ozone, the photolytic product of biogenically produced molecular oxygen. But life existed on Earth for about 1(1/2) billion years before the buildup of atmospheric oxygen. Inferred characteristics of Earth's earliest biosphere and studies of modern microbial ecosystems that share some of those characteristics suggest that organosulfur compounds, particularly methanethiol (CH(3)SH, the sulfur analog of methanol), may have been biogenic products on early Earth. Similar production could take place on extrasolar Earth-like planets whose biota share functional chemical characteristics with Earth life. Since methanethiol and related organosulfur compounds (as well as carbon dioxide) absorb at wavelengths near or overlapping the 9.6-microm band of ozone, there is potential ambiguity in interpreting a feature around this wavelength in an extrasolar planet spectrum.

  17. Biosignatures of early earths.

    PubMed

    Pilcher, Carl B

    2003-01-01

    A major goal of NASA's Origins Program is to find habitable planets around other stars and determine which might harbor life. Determining whether or not an extrasolar planet harbors life requires an understanding of what spectral features (i.e., biosignatures) might result from life's presence. Consideration of potential biosignatures has tended to focus on spectral features of gases in Earth's modern atmosphere, particularly ozone, the photolytic product of biogenically produced molecular oxygen. But life existed on Earth for about 1(1/2) billion years before the buildup of atmospheric oxygen. Inferred characteristics of Earth's earliest biosphere and studies of modern microbial ecosystems that share some of those characteristics suggest that organosulfur compounds, particularly methanethiol (CH(3)SH, the sulfur analog of methanol), may have been biogenic products on early Earth. Similar production could take place on extrasolar Earth-like planets whose biota share functional chemical characteristics with Earth life. Since methanethiol and related organosulfur compounds (as well as carbon dioxide) absorb at wavelengths near or overlapping the 9.6-microm band of ozone, there is potential ambiguity in interpreting a feature around this wavelength in an extrasolar planet spectrum.

  18. Toward other Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzes, Artie P.

    2016-04-01

    How common are habitable Earth-like planets? This is a key question that drives much of current research in exoplanets. To date, we have discovered over one thousand exoplanets, mostly through the transit method. Among these are Earth-size planets, but these orbit very close to the star (semi-major axis approximately 0.01 Astronomical Units). Potentially rocky planets have also been discovered in a star's habitable zone, but these have approximately twice the radius of the Earth. These certainly do not qualify as Earth "twins". Several hundreds of multi-planet systems have also been discovered, but these are mostly ultra-compact systems with up to seven planets all with orbital distances less than that of Mercury in our solar system. The detection of a planetary system that is the direct analog of our solar system still eludes us. After an overview of the current status of exoplanet discoveries I will discuss the prospects and challenges of finding such Earth analogs from the ground and from future space missions like PLATO. After over two decades of searching, we may well be on the brink of finding other Earths.

  19. The albedo of Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Graeme L.; O'Brien, Denis; Webster, Peter J.; Pilewski, Peter; Kato, Seiji; Li, Jui-lin

    2015-03-01

    The fraction of the incoming solar energy scattered by Earth back to space is referred to as the planetary albedo. This reflected energy is a fundamental component of the Earth's energy balance, and the processes that govern its magnitude, distribution, and variability shape Earth's climate and climate change. We review our understanding of Earth's albedo as it has progressed to the current time and provide a global perspective of our understanding of the processes that define it. Joint analyses of surface solar flux data that are a complicated mix of measurements and model calculations with top-of-atmosphere (TOA) flux measurements from current orbiting satellites yield a number of surprising results including (i) the Northern and Southern Hemispheres (NH, SH) reflect the same amount of sunlight within ~ 0.2 W m-2. This symmetry is achieved by increased reflection from SH clouds offsetting precisely the greater reflection from the NH land masses. (ii) The albedo of Earth appears to be highly buffered on hemispheric and global scales as highlighted by both the hemispheric symmetry and a remarkably small interannual variability of reflected solar flux (~0.2% of the annual mean flux). We show how clouds provide the necessary degrees of freedom to modulate the Earth's albedo setting the hemispheric symmetry. We also show that current climate models lack this same degree of hemispheric symmetry and regulation by clouds. The relevance of this hemispheric symmetry to the heat transport across the equator is discussed.

  20. Biosignatures of Early Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilcher, Carl B.

    2003-11-01

    A major goal of NASA's Origins Program is to find habitable planets around other stars and determine which might harbor life. Determining whether or not an extrasolar planet harbors life requires an understanding of what spectral features (i.e., biosignatures) might result from life's presence. Consideration of potential biosignatures has tended to focus on spectral features of gases in Earth's modern atmosphere, particularly ozone, the photolytic product of biogenically produced molecular oxygen. But life existed on Earth for about 1½ billion years before the buildup of atmospheric oxygen. Inferred characteristics of Earth's earliest biosphere and studies of modern microbial ecosystems that share some of those characteristics suggest that organosulfur compounds, particularly methanethiol (CH3SH, the sulfur analog of methanol), may have been biogenic products on early Earth. Similar production could take place on extrasolar Earth-like planets whose biota share functional chemical characteristics with Earth life. Since methanethiol and related organosulfur compounds (as well as carbon dioxide) absorb at wavelengths near or overlapping the 9.6-μm band of ozone, there is potential ambiguity in interpreting a feature around this wavelength in an extrasolar planet spectrum.

  1. Charge-separated and molecular heterobimetallic rare earth-rare earth and alkaline earth-rare earth aryloxo complexes featuring intramolecular metal-pi-arene interactions.

    PubMed

    Deacon, Glen B; Junk, Peter C; Moxey, Graeme J; Ruhlandt-Senge, Karin; St Prix, Courtney; Zuniga, Maria F

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of a rare earth metal (Ln) and a potential divalent rare earth metal (Ln') or an alkaline earth metal (Ae) with 2,6-diphenylphenol (HOdpp) at elevated temperatures (200-250 degrees C) afforded heterobimetallic aryloxo complexes, which were structurally characterised. A charge-separated species [(Ln'/Ae)(2)(Odpp)(3)][Ln(Odpp)(4)] was obtained for a range of metals, demonstrating the similarities between the chemistry of the divalent rare earth metals and the alkaline earth metals. The [(Ln'/Ae)(2)(Odpp)(3)](+) cation in the heterobimetallic structures is unusual in that it consists solely of bridging aryloxide ligands. A molecular heterobimetallic species [AeEu(Odpp)(4)] (Ae = Ca, Sr, Ba) was obtained by treating an alkaline earth metal and Eu metal with HOdpp at elevated temperatures. Similarly, [BaSr(Odpp)(4)] was prepared by treating Ba metal and Sr metal with HOdpp. Treatment of [Ba(2)(Odpp)(4)] with [Mg(Odpp)(2)(thf)(2)] in toluene afforded [Ba(2)(Odpp)(3)][Mg(Odpp)(3)(thf)]. Analogous solution-based syntheses were not possible for [(Ln'/Ae)(2)(Odpp)(3)][Ln(Odpp)(4)] complexes, for which the free-metal route was essential. As a result of the absence of additional donor ligands, the crystal structures of the heterobimetallic complexes feature extensive pi-Ph-metal interactions involving the pendant phenyl groups of the Odpp ligands, thus enabling the large electropositive metal atoms to attain coordination saturation. The charge-separated heterobimetallic species were purified by extraction with toluene/thf mixtures at ambient temperature (Ba-containing compounds) or by extraction with toluene under pressure above the boiling point of the solvent (other products). In donor solvents, heterobimetallic complexes other than those containing barium were found to fragment into homometallic species.

  2. Primary mass standard based on atomic masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Peter; Gläser, Michael

    2006-04-01

    The paper summarises the activities of several national and international Metrology Institutes in replacing the kilogram artefact, the unit of mass, by the mass of a certain number of atoms, in particular the atomic masses of silicon or bismuth. This task is based on two different experiments: a very accurate determination of the Avogadro constant, NA, measuring the density and lattice parameter of an enriched silicon-28 crystal, and the accumulation of decelerated bismuth-209 ions by using a mass separator. The relative measurement uncertainties reached so far are in the first case 2 parts in 107, and in the latter several part in 104. The bismuth experiment is still in an early state of the work. The ratios between the masses of 28Si or 209Bi, respectively, and the present atomic mass standard, the mass of 12C, can be determined with an accuracy now approaching 10-10 using high precision Penning traps mass spectrometers.

  3. 77 FR 70487 - Southern California Edison Company; Establishment of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... Licensing Board Panel that portion of Friends of the Earth's June 18, 2012 intervention petition challenging..., Maryland, this 19th day of November 2012. E. Roy Hawkens, Chief Administrative Judge, Atomic Safety...

  4. Global ENA Imaging of Earth's Dynamic Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Pontus

    2015-04-01

    The interaction between singly charged ions of Earth's magnetosphere and its neutral exosphere and upper atmosphere gives rise to Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs). This has enabled several missions to remotely image the global injection dynamics of the ring current and plasma sheet, the outflow of ions from Earth's polar regions, and the location of the sub-solar magnetopause. In this presentation we review ENA observations by the Astrid, IMAGE, TWINS and IBEX missions. We focus on results from the IMAGE/HENA Camera including observations of proton and oxygen ion injections in to the ring current and their impact on the force-balance and ionospheric coupling in the inner magnetosphere. We report also on the status of inversion techniques for retrieving the ion spatial and pitch-angle distributions from ENA images. The presentation concludes with a discussion of future next steps in ENA instrumentation and analysis capabilities required to deliver the science as recommended by the Heliophysics Decadal Survey.

  5. JPRS Report: Science and Technology, Central Eurasia: Earth Sciences

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-11

    F. Dotsenko ; IZVESTIYA AKADEMII NA UK: FIZIKA ATMOSFER Y I OKEANA, Vol 29 No 1, Feb 93] 5 Fractal Structure of Ozonometric Network [ A . N. Gruzdev...Earth Sciences JPRS- UES-93-002 CONTENTS 11 MAY 1993 ARCTIC, ANTARCTIC RESEARCH Antarctic Monitoring [ A . N. Rogovtsev; IZVESTIYA RUSSKOGO...GEOGRAFICHESKOGO OBSHCHESTVA, Vol 124 No 4, Jul- A ug 92

  6. Global Images of Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Global images of Earth from Galileo. In each frame, the continent of Antarctica is visible at the bottom of the globe. South America may be seen in the first frame (top left), the great Pacific Ocean in the second (bottom left), India at the top and Australia to the right in the third (top right), and Africa in the fourth (bottom right). Taken at six-hour intervals on December 11, 1990, at a range of between 2 and 2.7 million kilometers (1.2 to 1.7 million miles). P-37630

    These images were taken during Galileo's first Earth flyby. This gravity assist increased Galileo's speed around the Sun by about 5.2 kilometers per second (or 11,600 miles per hour) and substantially redirected Galileo as required for its flybys of the asteroid Gaspra in October 1991 and Earth in 1992. Galileo's closest approach (960 kilometers, or 597 miles, above the Earth's surface) to the Earth was on December 8, 1990, 3 days before these pictures were taken.

    Each of these images is a color composite, made up using images taken through red, green, and violet filters. The four images are part of the Galileo Earth spin movie, a 256-frame time-lapse motion picture that shows a 25-hour period of Earth's rotation and atmospheric dynamics. The movie gives scientists a unique overall view of global weather patterns, as opposed to the limited view of weather satellite images.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA'is Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  7. Earth's earliest atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Zahnle, Kevin; Schaefer, Laura; Fegley, Bruce

    2010-10-01

    Earth is the one known example of an inhabited planet and to current knowledge the likeliest site of the one known origin of life. Here we discuss the origin of Earth's atmosphere and ocean and some of the environmental conditions of the early Earth as they may relate to the origin of life. A key punctuating event in the narrative is the Moon-forming impact, partly because it made Earth for a short time absolutely uninhabitable, and partly because it sets the boundary conditions for Earth's subsequent evolution. If life began on Earth, as opposed to having migrated here, it would have done so after the Moon-forming impact. What took place before the Moon formed determined the bulk properties of the Earth and probably determined the overall compositions and sizes of its atmospheres and oceans. What took place afterward animated these materials. One interesting consequence of the Moon-forming impact is that the mantle is devolatized, so that the volatiles subsequently fell out in a kind of condensation sequence. This ensures that the volatiles were concentrated toward the surface so that, for example, the oceans were likely salty from the start. We also point out that an atmosphere generated by impact degassing would tend to have a composition reflective of the impacting bodies (rather than the mantle), and these are almost without exception strongly reducing and volatile-rich. A consequence is that, although CO- or methane-rich atmospheres are not necessarily stable as steady states, they are quite likely to have existed as long-lived transients, many times. With CO comes abundant chemical energy in a metastable package, and with methane comes hydrogen cyanide and ammonia as important albeit less abundant gases.

  8. Raman Investigations of Rare-Earth Orthovanadates

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, C. C.; Silva, E. N.; Ayala, A. P.; Guedes, I.; Pizani, P. S.; Loong, C. K.; Boatner, Lynn A

    2007-01-01

    Polarized Raman spectroscopy has been used to obtain the room-temperature phonon spectra of the series of rare earth orthovanadate single crystals: SmVO4, HoVO4, YbVO4 and LuVO4. The observed Raman frequencies follow the overall mode distribution expected for RVO4 compounds with the tetragonal zircon structure. The variation of the mode frequency with atomic number across the lanthanide orthovanadate series was investigated, and the trend exhibited by the internal modes was explained by considering the force constants of VO4 tetrahedron.

  9. Modeling of atomic systems for atomic clocks and quantum information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Bindiya

    /2 state in Na, K, Rb, and Cs atoms and evaluate the uncertainties of these values. Both scalar and tensor part of the p state polarizability were calculated. This made the calculations complicated owing to the contributions from p--d transitions. The static polarizability values are found to be in excellent agreement with previous experimental and theoretical results. We used our calculations to identify the "magic" wavelengths at which the ac polarizabilities of the alkali-metal atoms in the ground state are equal to the ac polarizabilities in the excited npj states facilitating state-insensitive cooling and trapping. We list the results for the np 1/2 and np3/2 states separately. Depending on the mj sub levels, the total polarizability of the np3/2 state was calculated either as the sum or as the difference of scalar and tensor contributions. We pointed out the complications involved in the magic wavelength calculations for the mj = +/-3/2 sub levels. We also study the magic wavelengths for transitions between particular np3/2 F'M' and nsFM hyperfine sub levels. We have proposed a scheme for state-insensitive trapping of neutral atoms by using two-color light at convenient wavelengths. In this scheme, we predict the values of trap and control wavelengths for which the 5s and 5p3/2 levels in Rb atom have same ac Stark shifts in the presence of two laser fields. We also list the trap and control wavelength combinations where one of the laser wavelengths is double the other. The results were listed at same and different trap and control laser intensities. This scheme allows to select convenient and easily available laser wavelength for experiments where it is essential to precisely localize and control neutral atoms with minimum decoherence. Motivated by the prospect of an optical frequency standard based on 43Ca+, we calculate the blackbody radiation (BBR) shift of the 4s1/2-3d5/2 clock transition of an optical frequency standard based on 43Ca+. We describe the study of

  10. Graphite filter atomizer in atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katskov, Dmitri A.

    2007-09-01

    Graphite filter atomizers (GFA) for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) show substantial advantages over commonly employed electrothermal vaporizers and atomizers, tube and platform furnaces, for direct determination of high and medium volatility elements in matrices associated with strong spectral and chemical interferences. Two factors provide lower limits of detection and shorter determination cycles with the GFA: the vaporization area in the GFA is separated from the absorption volume by a porous graphite partition; the sample is distributed over a large surface of a collector in the vaporization area. These factors convert the GFA into an efficient chemical reactor. The research concerning the GFA concept, technique and analytical methodology, carried out mainly in the author's laboratory in Russia and South Africa, is reviewed. Examples of analytical applications of the GFA in AAS for analysis of organic liquids and slurries, bio-samples and food products are given. Future prospects for the GFA are discussed in connection with analyses by fast multi-element AAS.

  11. Metal atom oxidation laser

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides. (auth)

  12. Metal atom oxidation laser

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides.

  13. Electrochemical Atomic Layer Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-25

    where an atomic layer of an element is deposited , or removed, in a surface limited reaction. The potentials used are referred to as underpotentials in...the electrochemical literature. The atomic layer deposition process is referred to as underpotential deposition (UPD). 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15, NUMBER OF...reaction. The potentials used are referred to as underpotentials in the electrochemical literature. The atomic layer deposition process is referred to as

  14. The Software Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javanainen, Juha

    2017-03-01

    By putting together an abstract view on quantum mechanics and a quantum-optics picture of the interactions of an atom with light, we develop a corresponding set of C++ classes that set up the numerical analysis of an atom with an arbitrary set of angular-momentum degenerate energy levels, arbitrary light fields, and an applied magnetic field. As an example, we develop and implement perturbation theory to compute the polarizability of an atom in an experimentally relevant situation.

  15. Atomicity in Electronic Commerce,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    tremendous demand for the ability to electronically buy and sell goods over networks. Electronic commerce has inspired a large variety of work... commerce . It then briefly surveys some major types of electronic commerce pointing out flaws in atomicity. We pay special attention to the atomicity...problems of proposals for digital cash. The paper presents two examples of highly atomic electronic commerce systems: NetBill and Cryptographic Postage Indicia.

  16. Advances in atomic physics

    PubMed Central

    El-Sherbini, Tharwat M.

    2013-01-01

    In this review article, important developments in the field of atomic physics are highlighted and linked to research works the author was involved in himself as a leader of the Cairo University – Atomic Physics Group. Starting from the late 1960s – when the author first engaged in research – an overview is provided of the milestones in the fascinating landscape of atomic physics. PMID:26425356

  17. Atomic arrangement of alkali adatoms on the Si(001)-2 × 1 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Blügel, S.; Ishida, H.; Terakura, K.

    1991-02-01

    Adsorption sites of Na and Li on the Si(001)-2 × 1 surface at the saturation coverage are determined theoretically by using the simulated annealing method proposed by Williams and Soler. For Na, the most stable configuration is the combination of the hollow site along the dimer chain and the trough site on top of the third layer Si atom in contradiction to an earlier calculation. The substrate relaxation is a crucial factor for stabilizing this configuration. On the other hand Li atoms are adsorbed at low symmetry positions. For both of Na and Li, we observe a significant movement of the substrate atoms towards the ideal surface configuration.

  18. Atomic oxygen beam source for erosion simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuthbertson, J. W.; Langer, W. D.; Motley, R. W.; Vaughn, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    A device for the production of low energy (3 to 10 eV) neutral atomic beams for surface modification studies is described that reproduces the flux of atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit. The beam is produced by the acceleration of plasma ions onto a negatively biased plate of high-Z metal; the ions are neutralized and reflected by the surface, retaining some fraction of their incident kinetic energy, forming a beam of atoms. The plasma is generated by a coaxial RF exciter which produces a magnetically-confined (4 kG) plasma column. At the end of the column, ions fall through the sheath to the plate, whose bias relative to the plasma can be varied to adjust the beam energy. The source provides a neutral flux approximately equal to 5 x 10(exp 16)/sq cm at a distance of 9 cm and a fluence approximately equal to 10(exp 20)/sq cm in five hours. The composition and energy of inert gas beams was diagnosed using a mass spectometer/energy analyzer. The energy spectra of the beams demonstrate energies in the range 5 to 15 eV, and qualitatively show expected dependences upon incident and reflecting atom species and potential drop. Samples of carbon film, carbon-based paint, Kapton, mylar, and teflon exposed to atomic O beams show erosion quite similar to that observed in orbit on the space shuttle.

  19. An atomic clock with 10(-18) instability.

    PubMed

    Hinkley, N; Sherman, J A; Phillips, N B; Schioppo, M; Lemke, N D; Beloy, K; Pizzocaro, M; Oates, C W; Ludlow, A D

    2013-09-13

    Atomic clocks have been instrumental in science and technology, leading to innovations such as global positioning, advanced communications, and tests of fundamental constant variation. Timekeeping precision at 1 part in 10(18) enables new timing applications in relativistic geodesy, enhanced Earth- and space-based navigation and telescopy, and new tests of physics beyond the standard model. Here, we describe the development and operation of two optical lattice clocks, both using spin-polarized, ultracold atomic ytterbium. A measurement comparing these systems demonstrates an unprecedented atomic clock instability of 1.6 × 10(-18) after only 7 hours of averaging.

  20. Comments on the interaction of materials with atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torre, Larry P.; Pippin, H. Gary

    1987-01-01

    An explanation of the relative resistance of various materials to attack by atomic oxygen is presented. Data from both ground based and on-orbit experiments is interpreted. The results indicate the importance of bond strengths, size and structure of pendant groups, and fluorination to the resistance of certain polymers to atomic oxygen. A theory which provides a partial explanation of the degradation of materials in low Earth orbit due to surface recombination of oxygen atoms is also included. Finally, a section commenting on mechanisms of material degradation is provided.

  1. A review on recent upper atmosphere atomic oxygen measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Martin; Ern, Manfred; Riese, Martin; Zhu, Yajun

    2016-07-01

    Atomic oxygen is a key player in the upper mesosphere lower and thermosphere chemistry, energy balance, and dynamics. In recent years, a few new global datasets of this species have been presented. They are based on airglow measurements from low earth satellites. Surprisingly, the atomic oxygen abundance differs by 30-50% for similar atmospheric conditions. This paper gives an overview on the various atomic oxygen datasets available so far and presents most recent results obtained from measurements of the SCIAMACHY instrument on Envisat. Differences between the datasets are discussed.

  2. Two-dimensional superconductors with atomic-scale thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchihashi, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress in two-dimensional superconductors with atomic-scale thickness is reviewed mainly from the experimental point of view. The superconducting systems treated here involve a variety of materials and forms: elemental metal ultrathin films and atomic layers on semiconductor surfaces; interfaces and superlattices of heterostructures made of cuprates, perovskite oxides, and rare-earth metal heavy-fermion compounds; interfaces of electric-double-layer transistors; graphene and atomic sheets of transition metal dichalcogenide; iron selenide and organic conductors on oxide and metal surfaces, respectively. Unique phenomena arising from the ultimate two dimensionality of the system and the physics behind them are discussed.

  3. Resolved Atomic Interaction Sidebands in an Optical Clock Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Bishof, M.; Lin, Y.; Swallows, M. D.; Ye, J.; Rey, A. M.; Gorshkov, A. V.

    2011-06-24

    We report the observation of resolved atomic interaction sidebands (ISB) in the {sup 87}Sr optical clock transition when atoms at microkelvin temperatures are confined in a two-dimensional optical lattice. The ISB are a manifestation of the strong interactions that occur between atoms confined in a quasi-one-dimensional geometry and disappear when the confinement is relaxed along one dimension. The emergence of ISB is linked to the recently observed suppression of collisional frequency shifts. At the current temperatures, the ISB can be resolved but are broad. At lower temperatures, ISB are predicted to be substantially narrower and useful spectroscopic tools in strongly interacting alkaline-earth gases.

  4. Improved graphite furnace atomizer

    DOEpatents

    Siemer, D.D.

    1983-05-18

    A graphite furnace atomizer for use in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy is described wherein the heating elements are affixed near the optical path and away from the point of sample deposition, so that when the sample is volatilized the spectroscopic temperature at the optical path is at least that of the volatilization temperature, whereby analyteconcomitant complex formation is advantageously reduced. The atomizer may be elongated along its axis to increase the distance between the optical path and the sample deposition point. Also, the atomizer may be elongated along the axis of the optical path, whereby its analytical sensitivity is greatly increased.

  5. Trisodium citrate, Na3(C6H5O7)

    PubMed Central

    Rammohan, Alagappa; Kaduk, James A.

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structure of anhydrous tris­odium citrate, Na3(C6H5O7), has been solved and refined using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data, and optimized using density functional theory (DFT). There are two independent five-coordinate Na+ and one six-coordinate Na+ cations in the asymmetric unit. The [NaO5] and [NaO6] polyhedra share edges and corners to form a three-dimensional framework. There are channels parallel to the a and b axes in which the remainder of the citrate anions reside. The only hydrogen bonds are an intra­molecular one between the hy­droxy group and one of the terminal carboxyl­ate O atoms and an intermolecular one between a methylene group and the hydroxyl O atom. PMID:27308044

  6. Venus, Earth, Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahnle, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    Xenon has been regarded as an important goal of many proposed missions to Venus. This talk is intended to explain why. Despite its being the heaviest gas found in natural planetary atmospheres, there is more evidence that Xe escaped from Earth than for any element apart from helium: (i) Atmospheric Xe is very strongly mass fractionated (at about 4% per amu) from any known solar system source. This suggests fractionating escape that preferentially left the heavy Xe isotopes behind. (ii) Xe is underabundant compared to Kr, a lighter noble gas that is not strongly mass fractionated in air. (iii) Radiogenic Xe is strongly depleted by factors of several to ~100 compared to the quantities expected from radioactive decay of primordial solar system materials. In these respects Xe on Mars is similar to Xe on Earth, but with one key difference: Xe on Mars is readily explained by a simple process like hydrodynamic escape that acts on an initially solar or meteoritic Xe. This is not so for Earth. Earth's Xe cannot be derived by an uncontrived mass fractionating process acting on any known type of Solar System Xe. Earth is a stranger, made from different stuff than any known meteorite or Mars or even the Sun. Who else is in Earth's family? Comets? We know nothing. Father Zeus? Data from Jupiter are good enough to show that jovian Xe is not strongly mass-fractionated but not good enough to determine whether Jupiter resembles the Earth or the Sun. Sister Venus? Noble gas data from Venus are incomplete, with Kr uncertain and Xe unmeasured. Krypton was measured by several instruments on several spacecraft. The reported Kr abundances are discrepant and were once highly controversial. These discrepancies appear to have been not so much resolved as forgotten. Xenon was not detected on Venus. Upper limits were reported for the two most abundant xenon isotopes 129Xe and 132Xe. From the limited data it is not possible to tell whether Venus's affinities lie with the solar wind, or with

  7. The Sun and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

    2012-01-01

    Thus the Sun forms the basis for life on Earth via the black body radiation it emits. The Sun also emits mass in the form of the solar wind and the coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Mass emission also occurs in the form of solar energetic particles (SEPs), which happens during CMEs and solar flares. Both the mass and electromagnetic energy output of the Sun vary over a wide range of time scales, thus introducing disturbances on the space environment that extends from the Sun through the entire heliosphere including the magnetospheres and ionospheres of planets and moons of the solar system. Although our habitat is located in the neutral atmosphere of Earth, we are intimately connected to the non-neutral space environment starting from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere and to the vast interplanetary space. The variability of the solar mass emissions results in the interaction between the solar wind plasma and the magnetospheric plasma leading to huge disturbances in the geospace. The Sun ionizes our atmosphere and creates the ionosphere. The ionosphere can be severely disturbed by the transient energy input from solar flares and the solar wind during geomagnetic storms. The complex interplay between Earth's magnetic field and the solar magnetic field carried by the solar wind presents varying conditions that are both beneficial and hazardous to life on earth. This seminar presents some of the key aspects of this Sun-Earth connection that we have learned since the birth of space science as a scientific discipline some half a century ago.

  8. Modeling the earth system

    SciTech Connect

    Ojima, D.

    1992-12-31

    The 1990 Global Change Institute (GCI) on Earth System Modeling is the third of a series organized by the Office for Interdisciplinary Earth Studies to look in depth at particular issues critical to developing a better understanding of the earth system. The 1990 GCI on Earth System Modeling was organized around three themes: defining critical gaps in the knowledge of the earth system, developing simplified working models, and validating comprehensive system models. This book is divided into three sections that reflect these themes. Each section begins with a set of background papers offering a brief tutorial on the subject, followed by working group reports developed during the institute. These reports summarize the joint ideas and recommendations of the participants and bring to bear the interdisciplinary perspective that imbued the institute. Since the conclusion of the 1990 Global Change Institute, research programs, nationally and internationally, have moved forward to implement a number of the recommendations made at the institute, and many of the participants have maintained collegial interactions to develop research projects addressing the needs identified during the two weeks in Snowmass.

  9. Earth boring machine

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, M. E.

    1985-11-19

    An earth boring machine for boring straight and level elongated holes through rock-laden earth. The machine includes a stationary elongated frame upon which a first slide is carried. A second slide is carried on the first slide. An elongated auger guiding sleeve is carried adjacent one end of the first slide and has a cutting edge on a remote end thereof. A power-driven auger assembly is carried on the second slide and includes an auger which extends within the guiding sleeve. A cutting tool is carried on the end of the auger adjacent a remote end of the guiding sleeve. An hydraulic cylinder is provided for advancing the first sleeve for driving the cutting edge of the guiding sleeve into the earth while the power driven auger removes the earth as the guiding sleeve is advanced. Another set of hydraulic cylinders are provided for advancing the second slide on the first slide causing the cutting tool to extend out beyond the remote end of the guiding sleeve for cutting through obstructions in the earth when the cutting edge of the guiding sleeve is prevented from moving forward.

  10. The Earth System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark; Rood, Richard B.; Hildebrand, Peter; Raymond, Carol

    2003-01-01

    The Earth System Model is the natural evolution of current climate models and will be the ultimate embodiment of our geophysical understanding of the planet. These models are constructed from components - atmosphere, ocean, ice, land, chemistry, solid earth, etc. models and merged together through a coupling program which is responsible for the exchange of data from the components. Climate models and future earth system models will have standardized modules, and these standards are now being developed by the ESMF project funded by NASA. The Earth System Model will have a variety of uses beyond climate prediction. The model can be used to build climate data records making it the core of an assimilation system, and it can be used in OSSE experiments to evaluate. The computing and storage requirements for the ESM appear to be daunting. However, the Japanese ES theoretical computing capability is already within 20% of the minimum requirements needed for some 2010 climate model applications. Thus it seems very possible that a focused effort to build an Earth System Model will achieve succcss.

  11. Crescent Earth and Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    This picture of a crescent-shaped Earth and Moon -- the first of its kind ever taken by a spacecraft -- was recorded Sept. 18, 1977, by NASA's Voyager 1 when it was 7.25 million miles (11.66 million kilometers) from Earth. The Moon is at the top of the picture and beyond the Earth as viewed by Voyager. In the picture are eastern Asia, the western Pacific Ocean and part of the Arctic. Voyager 1 was directly above Mt. Everest (on the night side of the planet at 25 degrees north latitude) when the picture was taken. The photo was made from three images taken through color filters, then processed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Image Processing Lab. Because the Earth is many times brighter than the Moon, the Moon was artificially brightened by a factor of three relative to the Earth by computer enhancement so that both bodies would show clearly in the print. Voyager 2 was launched Aug. 20, 1977, followed by Voyager 1 on Sept. 5, 1977, en route to encounters at Jupiter in 1979 and Saturn in 1980 and 1981. JPL manages the Voyager mission for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  12. Neutron diffraction studies of the Na-ion battery electrode materials NaCoCr2(PO4)3, NaNiCr2(PO4)3, and Na2Ni2Cr(PO4)3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahia, H. Ben; Essehli, R.; Avdeev, M.; Park, J.-B.; Sun, Y.-K.; Al-Maadeed, M. A.; Belharouak, I.

    2016-06-01

    The new compounds NaCoCr2(PO4)3, NaNiCr2(PO4)3, and Na2Ni2Cr(PO4)3 were synthesized by sol-gel method and their crystal structures were determined by using neutron powder diffraction data. These compounds were characterized by galvanometric cycling and cyclic voltammetry. NaCoCr2(PO4)3, NaNiCr2(PO4)3, and Na2Ni2Cr(PO4)3 crystallize with a stuffed α-CrPO4-type structure. The structure consists of a 3D-framework made of octahedra and tetrahedra that are sharing corners and/or edges generating channels along [100] and [010], in which the sodium atoms are located. Of significance, in the structures of NaNiCr2(PO4)3, and Na2Ni2Cr(PO4)3 a statistical disorder Ni2+/Cr3+ was observed on both the 8g and 4a atomic positions, whereas in NaCoCr2(PO4)3 the statistical disorder Co2+/Cr3+ was only observed on the 8g atomic position. When tested as negative electrode materials, NaCoCr2(PO4)3, NaNiCr2(PO4)3, and Na2Ni2Cr(PO4)3 delivered specific capacities of 352, 385, and 368 mA h g-1, respectively, which attests to the electrochemical activity of sodium in these compounds.

  13. Atom interferometer as a selective sensor of rotation or gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dubetsky, B.; Kasevich, M. A.

    2006-08-15

    In the presence of Earth gravity and gravity-gradient forces, centrifugal and Coriolis forces caused by the Earth rotation, the phase of the time-domain atom interferometers is calculated with accuracy up to the terms proportional to the fourth degree of the time separation between pulses. We considered double-loop atom interferometers and found appropriate condition to eliminate their sensitivity to acceleration to get atomic gyroscope, or to eliminate the sensitivity to rotation to increase accuracy of the atomic gravimeter. Consequent use of these interferometers allows one to measure all components of the acceleration and rotation frequency projection on the plane perpendicular to gravity acceleration. Atom interference on the Raman transition driving by noncounterpropagating optical fields is proposed to exclude stimulated echo processes which can affect the accuracy of the atomic gyroscopes. Using noncounterpropagating optical fields allows one to get a new type of the Ramsey fringes arising in the unidirectional Raman pulses and therefore centered at the two-quantum line center. Density matrix in the Wigner representation is used to perform calculations. It is shown that in the time between pulses, in the noninertial frame, for atoms with fully quantized spatial degrees of freedom, this density matrix obeys classical Liouville equations.

  14. Giant-laser-pulse-induced Rabi sideband of a multilevel dressed atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tian-Jie; Duan, Shao-Guang

    1993-03-01

    Rabi sidebands of the Na atomic vapor excited by a resonant-pulsed-laser beam were observed in the forward-direction radiation. While the laser power scans over a factor of 10, the change of Rabi shift is much less than what is expected by the two-level dressed-atom model. Therefore a multilevel dressed-atom model is developed to calculate the levels of the dressed Na atom, and the influence of the time evolution of the laser power is also taken into account in counting the real observable spectrum. After considering all these factors, the final calculated data fit the experimental results satisfactorily.

  15. Evanescent Wave Atomic Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezali, S.; Taleb, A.

    2008-09-01

    A research project at the "Laboratoire d'électronique quantique" consists in a theoretical study of the reflection and diffraction phenomena via an atomic mirror. This poster presents the principle of an atomic mirror. Many groups in the world have constructed this type of atom optics experiments such as in Paris-Orsay-Villetaneuse (France), Stanford-Gaithersburg (USA), Munich-Heidelberg (Germany), etc. A laser beam goes into a prism with an incidence bigger than the critical incidence. It undergoes a total reflection on the plane face of the prism and then exits. The transmitted resulting wave out of the prism is evanescent and repulsive as the frequency detuning of the laser beam compared to the atomic transition δ = ωL-ω0 is positive. The cold atomic sample interacts with this evanescent wave and undergoes one or more elastic bounces by passing into backward points in its trajectory because the atoms' kinetic energy (of the order of the μeV) is less than the maximum of the dipolar potential barrier ℏΩ2/Δ where Ω is the Rabi frequency [1]. In fact, the atoms are cooled and captured in a magneto-optical trap placed at a distance of the order of the cm above the prism surface. The dipolar potential with which interact the slow atoms is obtained for a two level atom in a case of a dipolar electric transition (D2 Rubidium transition at a wavelength of 780nm delivered by a Titane-Saphir laser between a fundamental state Jf = l/2 and an excited state Je = 3/2). This potential is corrected by an attractive Van der Waals term which varies as 1/z3 in the Lennard-Jones approximation (typical atomic distance of the order of λ0/2π where λ0 is the laser wavelength) and in 1/z4 if the distance between the atom and its image in the dielectric is big in front of λ0/2π. This last case is obtained in a quantum electrodynamic calculation by taking into account an orthornormal base [2]. We'll examine the role of spontaneous emission for which the rate is inversely

  16. Electron - Atom Bremsstrahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Longhuan

    In this work we study the features of bremsstrahlung radiation from neutral atoms and atoms in hot dense plasmas. Predictions for the distributions of electron-atom bremsstrahlung radiation for both the point Coulomb potential and screened potentials are obtained using a classical numerical method. The results agree with exact quantum mechanical partial wave results for low incident electron energies in both the point Coulomb and screened potentials. In the screened potential the asymmetry parameter of a spectrum is reduced from the Coulomb values. The difference increases with decreasing energy and begins to oscillate at very low energies. We also studied the scaling properties of bremsstrahlung spectra and energy losses. It is found that the ratio of the radiative energy loss for positrons to that for electrons obeys a simple scaling law, being expressible fairly accurately as a function only of the quantity T(,1)/Z('2). This scaling is exact in the case of the point Coulomb potential, both for classical bremsstrahlung and for the nonrelativistic dipole Sommerfeld formula. We also studied bremsstrahlung from atoms in hot dense plasmas, describing the atomic potentials by the temperature-and-density dependent Thomas - Fermi model. Gaunt factors are obtained with the relativistic partial wave method for atoms in plasmas of various densities and temperatures. Features of the bremsstrahlung from atoms in such environments are discussed. The dependence of predicted bremsstrahlung spectra on the choice of potential from various average atom potential models for strongly coupled plasmas are also studied. For the energy range and plasma densities were considered, the choice of potential model among the elaborate atomic potentials is less important than the choice of the method of calculation. The use of a detailed configuration accounting method for bremsstrahlung processes in dense plasmas is less important than for some other atomic processes. We justify the usefulness

  17. CHEMISTRY OF SILICATE ATMOSPHERES OF EVAPORATING SUPER-EARTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Laura; Fegley, Bruce E-mail: bfegley@levee.wustl.ed

    2009-10-01

    We model the formation of silicate atmospheres on hot volatile-free super-Earths. Our calculations assume that all volatile elements such as H, C, N, S, and Cl have been lost from the planet. We find that the atmospheres are composed primarily of Na, O{sub 2}, O, and SiO gas, in order of decreasing abundance. The atmospheric composition may be altered by fractional vaporization, cloud condensation, photoionization, and reaction with any residual volatile elements remaining in the atmosphere. Cloud condensation reduces the abundance of all elements in the atmosphere except Na and K. We speculate that large Na and K clouds such as those observed around Mercury and Io may surround hot super-Earths. These clouds would occult much larger fractions of the parent star than a closely bound atmosphere, and may be observable through currently available methods.

  18. Earth's Trojan asteroid.

    PubMed

    Connors, Martin; Wiegert, Paul; Veillet, Christian

    2011-07-27

    It was realized in 1772 that small bodies can stably share the same orbit as a planet if they remain near 'triangular points' 60° ahead of or behind it in the orbit. Such 'Trojan asteroids' have been found co-orbiting with Jupiter, Mars and Neptune. They have not hitherto been found associated with Earth, where the viewing geometry poses difficulties for their detection, although other kinds of co-orbital asteroid (horseshoe orbiters and quasi-satellites) have been observed. Here we report an archival search of infrared data for possible Earth Trojans, producing the candidate 2010 TK(7). We subsequently made optical observations which established that 2010 TK(7) is a Trojan companion of Earth, librating around the leading Lagrange triangular point, L(4). Its orbit is stable over at least ten thousand years.

  19. Better Than Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, René

    2015-01-01

    Do we inhabit the best of all possible worlds? German mathematician Gottfried Leibniz thought so, writing in 1710 that our planet, warts and all, must be the most optimal one imaginable. Leibniz's idea was roundly scorned as unscientific wishful thinking, most notably by French author Voltaire in his magnum opus, Candide. Yet Leibniz might find sympathy from at least one group of scientists - the astronomers who have for decades treated Earth as a golden standard as they search for worlds beyond our own solar system. Because earthlings still know of just one living world - our own - it makes some sense to use Earth as a template in the search for life elsewhere, such as in the most Earth-like regions of Mars or Jupiter's watery moon Europa. Now, however, discoveries of potentially habitable planets orbiting stars other than our sun - exoplanets, that is - are challenging that geocentric approach.

  20. Dagik Earth and IUGONET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebisawa, K.; Koyama, Y.; Saito, A.; Sakamoto, S.; Ishii, M.; Kumano, Y.; Hazumi, Y.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we introduce two independent projects in progress in Japan. Dagik Earth is a visualization project of the Earth and planets on a spherical screen using only a standard PC and a projector. Surface images of the Earth or planets (or whatever having spherical shape) in the equirectangular (plate carre) projection are projected on a spherical screen in the orthographic projection. As a result, the spherical screen becomes a virtual digital globe, which can be rotated using mouse or remote controller. Inter-university Upper atmosphere Global Observation NETwork (IUGONET) is a collaboration of five Japanese institutes to build a comprehensive database system for the metadata of the upper-atmospheric data taken by these institutes. We explain the IUGONET metadata database and iUgonet Data Analysis Software (UDAS) for upper atmospheric research.

  1. Mission to planet earth

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.J.

    1988-07-01

    Plans for environmental monitoring using remote-sensing satellites in the era of the International Space Station are reviewed. The role of international cooperation is stressed, considering the present Landsat, SPOT, and Marine Observation Satellite programs; ERS-1 and Topex/Poseidon; and plans for the Italian Lageos-2, the Indian Remote Sensing Satellite, and the Japanese Advanced Earth Observation Satellite. The NASA Mission to Planet Earth proposal calls for four polar-orbit and five GEO platforms (five NASA, two ESA, and two NASDA), to be in place by the year 2000, as well as dedicated spacecraft of the Earth System Explorer series in the 1990s. Payloads will monitor the geomagnetic field, atmospheric temperature and water vapor, O3 and aerosols, outgoing radiation, precipitation, sea-surface temperature, sea ice, ocean chlorophyll, surface winds, wave height, ocean circulation, snow cover, land use, vegetation, crops, volcanic activity, and the hydrologic cycle.

  2. How Big is Earth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Bonnie B.

    2015-08-01

    How Big is Earth celebrates the Year of Light. Using only the sunlight striking the Earth and a wooden dowel, students meet each other and then measure the circumference of the earth. Eratosthenes did it over 2,000 years ago. In Cosmos, Carl Sagan shared the process by which Eratosthenes measured the angle of the shadow cast at local noon when sunlight strikes a stick positioned perpendicular to the ground. By comparing his measurement to another made a distance away, Eratosthenes was able to calculate the circumference of the earth. How Big is Earth provides an online learning environment where students do science the same way Eratosthenes did. A notable project in which this was done was The Eratosthenes Project, conducted in 2005 as part of the World Year of Physics; in fact, we will be drawing on the teacher's guide developed by that project.How Big Is Earth? expands on the Eratosthenes project by providing an online learning environment provided by the iCollaboratory, www.icollaboratory.org, where teachers and students from Sweden, China, Nepal, Russia, Morocco, and the United States collaborate, share data, and reflect on their learning of science and astronomy. They are sharing their information and discussing their ideas/brainstorming the solutions in a discussion forum. There is an ongoing database of student measurements and another database to collect data on both teacher and student learning from surveys, discussions, and self-reflection done online.We will share our research about the kinds of learning that takes place only in global collaborations.The entrance address for the iCollaboratory is http://www.icollaboratory.org.

  3. Google Earth Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelick, N.

    2012-12-01

    The Google Earth Engine platform is a system designed to enable petabyte-scale, scientific analysis and visualization of geospatial datasets. Earth Engine provides a consolidated environment including a massive data catalog co-located with thousands of computers for analysis. The user-friendly front-end provides a workbench environment to allow interactive data and algorithm development and exploration and provides a convenient mechanism for scientists to share data, visualizations and analytic algorithms via URLs. The Earth Engine data catalog contains a wide variety of popular, curated datasets, including the world's largest online collection of Landsat scenes (> 2.0M), numerous MODIS collections, and many vector-based data sets. The platform provides a uniform access mechanism to a variety of data types, independent of their bands, projection, bit-depth, resolution, etc..., facilitating easy multi-sensor analysis. Additionally, a user is able to add and curate their own data and collections. Using a just-in-time, distributed computation model, Earth Engine can rapidly process enormous quantities of geo-spatial data. All computation is performed lazily; nothing is computed until it's required either for output or as input to another step. This model allows real-time feedback and preview during algorithm development, supporting a rapid algorithm development, test, and improvement cycle that scales seamlessly to large-scale production data processing. Through integration with a variety of other services, Earth Engine is able to bring to bear considerable analytic and technical firepower in a transparent fashion, including: AI-based classification via integration with Google's machine learning infrastructure, publishing and distribution at Google scale through integration with the Google Maps API, Maps Engine and Google Earth, and support for in-the-field activities such as validation, ground-truthing, crowd-sourcing and citizen science though the Android Open Data

  4. Google Earth Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelick, Noel

    2013-04-01

    The Google Earth Engine platform is a system designed to enable petabyte-scale, scientific analysis and visualization of geospatial datasets. Earth Engine provides a consolidated environment including a massive data catalog co-located with thousands of computers for analysis. The user-friendly front-end provides a workbench environment to allow interactive data and algorithm development and exploration and provides a convenient mechanism for scientists to share data, visualizations and analytic algorithms via URLs. The Earth Engine data catalog contains a wide variety of popular, curated datasets, including the world's largest online collection of Landsat scenes (> 2.0M), numerous MODIS collections, and many vector-based data sets. The platform provides a uniform access mechanism to a variety of data types, independent of their bands, projection, bit-depth, resolution, etc..., facilitating easy multi-sensor analysis. Additionally, a user is able to add and curate their own data and collections. Using a just-in-time, distributed computation model, Earth Engine can rapidly process enormous quantities of geo-spatial data. All computation is performed lazily; nothing is computed until it's required either for output or as input to another step. This model allows real-time feedback and preview during algorithm development, supporting a rapid algorithm development, test, and improvement cycle that scales seamlessly to large-scale production data processing. Through integration with a variety of other services, Earth Engine is able to bring to bear considerable analytic and technical firepower in a transparent fashion, including: AI-based classification via integration with Google's machine learning infrastructure, publishing and distribution at Google scale through integration with the Google Maps API, Maps Engine and Google Earth, and support for in-the-field activities such as validation, ground-truthing, crowd-sourcing and citizen science though the Android Open Data

  5. Nature's Invisible Rays, World of the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastner, Jacob

    This booklet is one in the "World of the Atom Series" for junior high school students and their teachers. It describes the sources, methods for detection, and useful applications of the invisible radiation that occurs naturally on earth. Numerous photographs are included throughout the text. (PR)

  6. Penning and associative ionization in crossed-beam Na/Na collisions assisted by strong resonant laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, J.; Polak-Dingels, P.

    1981-01-01

    We observe the production of Na/sub 2//sup +/ and Na/sup +/ arising from single collisions between crossed beams of sodium atoms when a laser field is tuned near the Na(3p /sup 2/P/sub 3/2/) and Na(3p /sup 2/P/sub 1/2/) transitions. Measurements of ion intensity vs laser intensity show that at moderately high power true laser-induced processes dominate over purely collisional effects. Relative intensity of mass-selected ions produced at either member of the Na resonance doublet shows conclusively that Na/sup +/ does not arise simply from photodissociation of Na/sub 2//sup +/ but must result from a direct, laser-induced collisional ionization.

  7. Laser-induced ionization of Na vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, R.C.Y.; Judge, D.L.; Roussel, F.; Carre, B.; Breger, P.; Spiess, G.

    1982-01-01

    The production of Na/sub 2//sup +/ ions by off-resonant laser excitation in the 5800-6200A region mainly results from two-photon absorption by the Na/sub 2/ molecule to highly excited gerade states followed by (a) direct ionization by absorbing a third photon or (b) coupling to the molecular Na/sub 2/ D/sup 1/PI..mu.. Rydberg state which is subsequently ionized by absorbing a third photon. This mechanism, i.e., a two-photon resonance three photon ionization process, explains a recent experimental observation of Roussel et al. It is suggested that the very same mechanism is also responsible for a similar observation reported by Polak-Dingels et al in their work using two crossed Na beams. In the latter two studies the laser-induced associative ionization processes were reported to be responsible for producing the Na/sub 2//sup +/ ion. From the ratio of molecular to atomic concentration in the crossed beam experiment of Polak-Dingels et al we estimate that the cross section for producing Na/sub 2//sup +/ through laser-induced associative ionization is at least four orders of magnitude smaller than ionization through the two-photon resonance three photon ionization process in Na/sub 2/ molecules.

  8. Laser-induced ionization of Na vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. Y. Robert; Judge, D. L.; Roussel, F.; Carré, B.; Breger, P.; Spiess, G.

    1982-09-01

    The production of Na2+ ions by off-resonant laser excitation in the 5800-6200Å region mainly results from two-photon absorption by the Na2 molecule to highly excited gerade states followed by (a) direct ionization by absorbing a third photon or (b) coupling to the molecular Na2 D1Πu Rydberg state which is subsequently ionized by absorbing a third photon. This mechanism, i.e., a two-photon resonance three photon ionization process, explains a recent experimental observation of Roussel et al. It is suggested that the very same mechanism is also responsible for a similar observation reported by Polak-Dingels et al in their work using two crossed Na beams. In the latter two studies the laser-induced associative ionization processes were reported to be responsible for producing the Na2+ ion. From the ratio of molecular to atomic concentration in the crossed beam experiment of Polak-Dingels et al. we estimate that the cross section for producing Na2+ through laser-induced associative ionization is at least four orders of magnitude smaller than ionization through the two-photon resonance three photon ionization process in Na2 molecules.

  9. Teaching earth science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alpha, Tau Rho; Diggles, M.F.

    1998-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains 17 teaching tools: 16 interactive HyperCard 'stacks' and a printable model. They are separated into the following categories: Geologic Processes, Earthquakes and Faulting, and Map Projections and Globes. A 'navigation' stack, Earth Science, is provided as a 'launching' place from which to access all of the other stacks. You can also open the HyperCard Stacks folder and launch any of the 16 stacks yourself. In addition, a 17th tool, Earth and Tectonic Globes, is provided as a printable document. Each of the tools can be copied onto a 1.4-MB floppy disk and distributed freely.

  10. Blowing up the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benge, Raymond

    2006-10-01

    An occasional theme in science fiction involves blowing up a planet. In ``Star Wars,'' the Death Star blows up Alderan. In ``The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy,'' a Vorgon destructor fleet blows up Earth to make room for a cosmic bypass. So, as an exercise for upper division students, or the more advance first year calculus based physics students, the energy needed to disassemble Earth can be computed. Assuming that advanced scifi aliens get their energy from matter-antimatter interactions, students can then compute the amount of antimatter needed to accomplish the task.

  11. The wooing of earth

    SciTech Connect

    Dubos, R.

    1981-02-01

    Reckless use of energy by industrial nations has begun to alter the global climate. Each year more arable land is lost to desertification and erosion due to anthropogenic activities. Air pollutants carried by winds contaminate ecosystems in many parts of the globe. Various kinds of wilderness are being spoiled by overexploitation or permanent occupation. However, human interventions into nature have often revealed potentialities of the earth that would have remained unexpressed in the state of wilderness. With knowledge and a sense of responsibility for the welfare of the earth, human intervention into nature can be ecologically sound, aesthetically satisfying, and economically rewarding.

  12. Atomic Power Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogerton, John F.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by The United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: What is Atomic Power?; What Does Safety Depend On?; Control of Radioactive Material During Operation; Accident Prevention; Containment in the Event of an Accident; Licensing and…

  13. When Atoms Want

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry students and teachers often explain the chemical reactivity of atoms, molecules, and chemical substances in terms of purposes or needs (e.g., atoms want or need to gain, lose, or share electrons in order to become more stable). These teleological explanations seem to have pedagogical value as they help students understand and use…

  14. Neutrino-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouzakov, Konstantin A.; Studenikin, Alexander I.

    2016-05-01

    Neutrino-atom scattering provides a sensitive tool for probing nonstandard interactions of massive neutrinos in laboratory measurements. The ionization channel of this collision process plays an important role in experiments searching for neutrino magnetic moments. We discuss some theoretical aspects of atomic ionization by massive neutrinos. We also outline possible manifestations of neutrino electromagnetic properties in coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  15. Atom Interferometer Modeling Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-08

    a specific value at each timestep . LiveAtom will reflect the specified current sources in the visualization through a plot that is brighter at 6...Carlo (DSMC) modeling feature, users can simulate the behavior of cold, thermal atoms in a dynamic magnetic potential. This could be used, for example

  16. Greek Atomic Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roller, Duane H. D.

    1981-01-01

    Focusing on history of physics, which began about 600 B.C. with the Ionian Greeks and reaching full development within three centuries, suggests that the creation of the concept of the atom is understandable within the context of Greek physical theory; so is the rejection of the atomic theory by the Greek physicists. (Author/SK)

  17. Atomic Scale Plasmonic Switch.

    PubMed

    Emboras, Alexandros; Niegemann, Jens; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Pedersen, Andreas; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2016-01-13

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moore's law in the electronics industry. While electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling, similar to electronics, is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled plasmonic switch operating at the atomic scale. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or, at most, a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ratio of 9.2 dB and operation at room temperature up to MHz with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of an integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the atomic level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully integrated and highly scalable chip platform, a platform where optics, electronics, and memory may be controlled at the single-atom level.

  18. Modified Embedded Atom Method

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, R. E.

    2012-08-01

    Interatomic force and energy calculation subroutine to be used with the molecular dynamics simulation code LAMMPS (Ref a.). The code evaluated the total energy and atomic forces (energy gradient) according to a cubic spline-based variant (Ref b.) of the Modified Embedded Atom Method (MEAM) with a additional Stillinger-Weber (SW) contribution.

  19. Implementing quantum electrodynamics with ultracold atomic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, V.; Hebenstreit, F.; Jendrzejewski, F.; Oberthaler, M. K.; Berges, J.

    2017-02-01

    We discuss the experimental engineering of model systems for the description of quantum electrodynamics (QED) in one spatial dimension via a mixture of bosonic 23Na and fermionic 6Li atoms. The local gauge symmetry is realized in an optical superlattice, using heteronuclear boson–fermion spin-changing interactions which preserve the total spin in every local collision. We consider a large number of bosons residing in the coherent state of a Bose–Einstein condensate on each link between the fermion lattice sites, such that the behavior of lattice QED in the continuum limit can be recovered. The discussion about the range of possible experimental parameters builds, in particular, upon experiences with related setups of fermions interacting with coherent samples of bosonic atoms. We determine the atomic system’s parameters required for the description of fundamental QED processes, such as Schwinger pair production and string breaking. This is achieved by benchmark calculations of the atomic system and of QED itself using functional integral techniques. Our results demonstrate that the dynamics of one-dimensional QED may be realized with ultracold atoms using state-of-the-art experimental resources. The experimental setup proposed may provide a unique access to longstanding open questions for which classical computational methods are no longer applicable.

  20. Coaxial airblast atomizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardalupas, Y.; Whitelaw, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to quantify the characteristics of the sprays of coaxial injectors with particular emphasis on those aspects relevant to the performance of rocket engines. Measurements for coaxial air blast atomizers were obtained using air to represent the gaseous stream and water to represent the liquid stream. A wide range of flow conditions were examined for sprays with and without swirl for gaseous streams. The parameters varied include Weber number, gas flow rate, liquid flow rate, swirl, and nozzle geometry. Measurements were made with a phase Doppler velocimeter. Major conclusions of the study focused upon droplet size as a function of Weber number, effect of gas flow rate on atomization and spray spread, effect of nozzle geometry on atomization and spread, effect of swirl on atomization, spread, jet recirculation and breakup, and secondary atomization.

  1. Atomic Oxygen Textured Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Hunt, Jason D.; Drobotij, Erin; Cales, Michael R.; Cantrell, Gidget

    1995-01-01

    Atomic oxygen can be used to microscopically alter the surface morphology of polymeric materials in space or in ground laboratory facilities. For polymeric materials whose sole oxidation products are volatile species, directed atomic oxygen reactions produce surfaces of microscopic cones. However, isotropic atomic oxygen exposure results in polymer surfaces covered with lower aspect ratio sharp-edged craters. Isotropic atomic oxygen plasma exposure of polymers typically causes a significant decrease in water contact angle as well as altered coefficient of static friction. Such surface alterations may be of benefit for industrial and biomedical applications. The results of atomic oxygen plasma exposure of thirty-three (33) different polymers are presented, including typical morphology changes, effects on water contact angle, and coefficient of static friction.

  2. Spectroscopy and Dynamics of K Atoms on Argon Clusters.

    PubMed

    Douady, J; Awali, S; Poisson, L; Soep, B; Mestdagh, J M; Gervais, B

    2015-06-11

    We present a combined experimental and simulation study of the 4s → 4p photoexcitation of the K atom trapped at the surface of ArN clusters made of a few hundred Ar atoms. Our experimental method based on photoelectron spectroscopy allows us to firmly establish that one single K atom is trapped at the surface of the cluster. The absorption spectrum is characterized by the splitting of the atomic absorption line into two broad bands, a Π band associated with p orbitals parallel to the cluster surface and a Σ band associated with the perpendicular orientation. The spectrum is consistent with observations reported for K atoms trapped on lighter inert gas clusters, but the splitting between the Π and Σ bands is significantly larger. We show that a large amount of K atoms are transiently stuck and eventually lost by the Ar cluster, in contrast with previous observations reported for alkaline earth metal systems. The excitation in the Σ band leads systematically to the ejection of the K atom from the Ar cluster. On the contrary, excitation in the Π band leads to the formation of a bound state. In this case, the analysis of the experimental photoelectron spectrum by means of nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulation shows that the relaxation drives the system toward a basin where the coordination of the K atom is 2.2 Ar atoms on the average, in a poorly structured surface.

  3. Earth's City Lights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image of Earth's city lights was created with data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS). Originally designed to view clouds by moonlight, the OLS is also used to map the locations of permanent lights on the Earth's surface. The brightest areas of the Earth are the most urbanized, but not necessarily the most populated. (Compare western Europe with China and India.) Cities tend to grow along coastlines and transportation networks. Even without the underlying map, the outlines of many continents would still be visible. The United States interstate highway system appears as a lattice connecting the brighter dots of city centers. In Russia, the Trans-Siberian railroad is a thin line stretching from Moscow through the center of Asia to Vladivostok. The Nile River, from the Aswan Dam to the Mediterranean Sea, is another bright thread through an otherwise dark region. Even more than 100 years after the invention of the electric light, some regions remain thinly populated and unlit. Antarctica is entirely dark. The interior jungles of Africa and South America are mostly dark, but lights are beginning to appear there. Deserts in Africa, Arabia, Australia, Mongolia, and the United States are poorly lit as well (except along the coast), along with the boreal forests of Canada and Russia, and the great mountains of the Himalaya. The Earth Observatory article Bright Lights, Big City describes how NASA scientists use city light data to map urbanization. Image by Craig Mayhew and Robert Simmon, NASA GSFC, based on DMSP data

  4. The Earth's Mantle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    The nature and dynamics of the earth's mantle is discussed. Research indicates that the silicate mantle is heated by the decay of radioactive isotopes and that the heat energizes massive convention currents in the upper 700 kilometers of the ductile rock. These currents and their consequences are considered. (JN)

  5. Bones of the Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correa, Jose Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The film "Bones of the Earth" (Riglin, Cunninham & Correa, 2014) is an experience in collective inquiry and visual creation based on arts-based research. Starting from the meeting of different subjectivities and through dialogue, planning, shooting and editing, an audiovisual text that reconstructs a reflexive process of collective…

  6. Earth Science Misconceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philips, William C.

    1991-01-01

    Presented is a list of over 50 commonly held misconceptions based on a literature review found in students and adults. The list covers earth science topics such as space, the lithosphere, the biosphere, the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, and the cryosphere. (KR)

  7. Exploring the Earth's Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindaman, Arnold D.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    Describes three approaches to a study of the earth's past: (1) development of a time line of the ages; (2) a study of rocks and how each was formed; and (3) a study of fossils as found in certain kinds of stone. (Editor)

  8. Meteorology: Project Earth Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, P. Sean; Ford, Brent A.

    This document on meteorology is one of a four-volume series of Project Earth Science that includes exemplary hands-on science and reading materials for use in the classroom. This book is divided into three sections: activities, readings, and appendix. The activities are constructed around three basic concept divisions. First, students investigate…

  9. Trees for Mother Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Sandy

    1993-01-01

    Describes Trees for Mother Earth, a program in which secondary students raise funds to buy fruit trees to plant during visits to the Navajo Reservation. Benefits include developing feelings of self-worth among participants, promoting cultural exchange and understanding, and encouraging self-sufficiency among the Navajo. (LP)

  10. Rates of Earth degassing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onions, R. K.

    1994-01-01

    The degassing of the Earth during accretion is constrained by Pu-U-I-Xe systematics. Degassing was much more efficient during the first 100-200 Ma than subsequently, and it was more complete for Xe than for the lighter gases. More than 90 percent of the degassed Xe escaped from the atmosphere during this period. The combination of fractional degassing of melts and rare gas escape from the atmosphere is able to explain the deficit of terrestrial Xe as a simple consequence of this early degassing history. By the time Xe was quantitatively retained in the atmosphere, the abundances of Kr and the lighter gases in the Earth's interior were similar to or higher than the present-day atmospheric abundances. Subsequent transfer of these lighter rare gases into the atmosphere requires a high rate of post-accretion degassing and melt production. Considerations of Pu-U-Xe systematics suggest that relatively rapid post-accretion degassing was continued to ca. 4.1-4.2 Ga. The present-day degassing history of the Earth is investigated through consideration of rare gas isotope abundances. Although the Earth is a highly degassed body, depleted in rare gases by many orders of magnitude relative to their solar abundances, it is at the present-day losing primordial rare gases which were trapped at the time of accretion.

  11. Earth's Reflection: Albedo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillette, Brandon; Hamilton, Cheri

    2011-01-01

    When viewing objects of different colors, you might notice that some appear brighter than others. This is because light is reflected differently from various surfaces, depending on their physical properties. The word "albedo" is used to describe how reflective a surface is. The Earth-atmosphere has a combined albedo of about 30%, a number that is…

  12. How life shaped Earth.

    PubMed

    Gross, Michael

    2015-10-05

    Earth is much more complex than all the other solar system objects that we know. Thanks to its rich and diverse geology, our planet can offer habitats to a wide range of living species. Emerging insights suggest that this is not just a happy coincidence, but that life itself has in many ways helped to shape the planet.

  13. Google Earth Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, William H.; Padgett, Clifford W.; Secrest, Jeffery A.

    2015-01-01

    Google Earth has made a wealth of aerial imagery available online at no cost to users. We examine some of the potential uses of that data in illustrating basic physics and astronomy, such as finding the local magnetic declination, using landmarks such as the Washington Monument and Luxor Obelisk as gnomons, and showing how airport runways get…

  14. Earth science data study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Sara J.; Hardin, Danny M.; Conover, Helen

    1992-01-01

    The research proposed in this contract concerning investigations of existing and planned Earth Science and Applications Division (ESAD) data management systems and research into utilities for the access and display of scientific data products was completed. A summary of this work is provided.

  15. Earth as art 4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2016-03-29

    Landsat 8 is the latest addition to the long-running series of Earth-observing satellites in the Landsat program that began in 1972. The images featured in this fourth installment of the Earth As Art collection were all acquired by Landsat 8. They show our planet’s diverse landscapes with remarkable clarity.Landsat satellites see the Earth as no human can. Not only do they acquire images from the vantage point of space, but their sensors record infrared as well as visible wavelengths of light. The resulting images often reveal “hidden” details of the Earth’s land surface, making them invaluable for scientific research.As with previous Earth As Art exhibits, these Landsat images were selected solely for their aesthetic appeal. Many of the images have been manipulated to enhance color variations or details. They are not intended for scientific interpretation—only for your viewing pleasure. What do you see in these unique glimpses of the Earth’s continents, islands, and coastlines?

  16. Earth flyby anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Nieto, Michael Martin; Anderson, John D

    2009-01-01

    In the planet-centric system, a spacecraft should have the same initial and final energies, even though its energy and angular momentum will change in the barycenter of the solar system. However, without explanation, a number of earth flybys have yielded small energy changes.

  17. The Island Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mead, Margaret

    1970-01-01

    Dr. Mead, the world-renowned anthropologist and expert behavioral scientist, is associated with the American Museum of Natural History, which acts as her headquarters as she documents her observations on Man, society and technology. She discusses the need to develop specialists with concern for saving the endangered planet earth. (Editor/GR)

  18. The Earth & Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    During its flight, the Galileo spacecraft returned images of the Earth and Moon. Separate images of the Earth and Moon were combined to generate this view. The Galileo spacecraft took the images in 1992 on its way to explore the Jupiter system in 1995-97. The image shows a partial view of the Earth centered on the Pacific Ocean about latitude 20 degrees south. The west coast of South America can be observed as well as the Caribbean; swirling white cloud patterns indicate storms in the southeast Pacific. The distinct bright ray crater at the bottom of the Moon is the Tycho impact basin. The lunar dark areas are lava rock filled impact basins. This picture contains same scale and relative color/albedo images of the Earth and Moon. False colors via use of the 1-micron filter as red, 727-nm filter as green, and violet filter as blue. The Galileo project is managed for NASA's Office of Space Science by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  19. The Earth and Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    During its flight, the Galileo spacecraft returned images of the Earth and Moon. Separate images of the Earth and Moon were combined to generate this view. The Galileo spacecraft took the images in 1992 on its way to explore the Jupiter system in 1995-97. The image shows a partial view of the Earth centered on the Pacific Ocean about latitude 20 degrees south. The west coast of South America can be observed as well as the Caribbean; swirling white cloud patterns indicate storms in the southeast Pacific. The distinct bright ray crater at the bottom of the Moon is the Tycho impact basin. The lunar dark areas are lava rock filled impact basins. This picture contains same scale and relative color/albedo images of the Earth and Moon. False colors via use of the 1-micron filter as red, 727-nm filter as green, and violet filter as blue. The Galileo project is managed for NASA's Office of Space Science by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  20. Earth Science in 1970

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geotimes, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Reviews advancements in earth science during 1970 in each of these areas: economic geology (fuels), economic geology (metals), economic geology (nonmetals), environmental geology, geochemistry, manpower, hydrology, mapping, marine geology, mineralogy, paleontology, plate tectonics, politics and geology, remote sensing, and seismology. (PR)

  1. Geology: The Active Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Geology: The Active Earth." Contents are organized into the…

  2. Earth Science, Grade 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buffalo Public Schools, NY.

    GRADES OR AGES: Grade 7. SUBJECT MATTER: Earth science. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The introductory material suggests a time schedule for the major units and gives details of the reference materials referred to in the text. The main text is presented in four columns: topical outline, basic understandings, suggested activities and…

  3. Modeling Earth's Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pallant, Amy; Lee, Hee-Sun; Pryputniewicz, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Systems thinking suggests that one can best understand a complex system by studying the interrelationships of its component parts rather than looking at the individual parts in isolation. With ongoing concern about the effects of climate change, using innovative materials to help students understand how Earth's systems connect with each other is…

  4. DIORAMA Earth Terrain Model

    SciTech Connect

    Werley, Kenneth Alan

    2015-03-10

    When simulating near-surface nuclear detonations, the terrain of the Earth can have an effect on the observed outputs. The critical parameter is called the “height of burst”. In order to model the effect of terrain on the simulations we have incorporated data from multiple sources to give 9 km resolution data with global coverage.

  5. Beyond Earth's Boundaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Kennedy Space Center, FL. John F. Kennedy Space Center.

    This resource for teachers of elementary age students provides a foundation for building a life-long interest in the U.S. space program. It begins with a basic understanding of man's attempt to conquer the air, then moves on to how we expanded into near-Earth space for our benefit. Students learn, through hands-on experiences, from projects…

  6. Sun-Earth Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Michael Sandras, a member of the Pontchartrain Astronomical Society, explains his solar telescope to students of Second Street in Bay St. Louis, Hancock County and Nicholson elementary schools in StenniSphere's Millennium Hall on April 10. The students participated in several hands-on activities at Stennis Space Center's Sun-Earth Day celebration.

  7. An Earth Day Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, Don, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presents what the author believes to be some of the most important environmental books published since Earth Day 1970. Discusses each selection and how it provides the historical background, basic information, and appreciation necessary to understand the character of our environmental dilemma and our need to address it. (MCO)

  8. Earth's magnetic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzerotti, L.J.; Uberoi, C.

    1988-10-01

    The nature of the earth's magnetosphere is outlined. The magnetosphere is illustrated and its regions and features are discussed, including solar wind, bow shock, and the magnetopause. The formation process and characteristics of the magnetotail are presented. The plasmasphere, Van Allen belts, auroras, whistlers, and micropulsations are examined. Effects of the magnetosphere, including problems for communications lines, spacecraft electronics, and communication satellites are considered.

  9. Understanding Earth's Albedo Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidler, Chuck

    2012-01-01

    Earth and space science in the middle school classroom are composed of intricately intertwined sets of conceptual systems (AAAS 1993; NRC 1996). Some systems of study, such as the water and rock cycles, are quite explicit and often found as stand-alone middle school science units. Other phenomena are not so apparent, yet they play an extremely…

  10. Is the Earth special?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltham, Dave; Dartnell, Lewis

    2012-08-01

    MEETING REPORT Earth is the only inhabited planet we know of - so far - but is that the only distinguishing feature of our planet? Dave Waltham and Lewis Dartnell report from an RAS meeting that considered how and why our home planet is unusual.

  11. Mission: New Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, David

    1997-01-01

    Describes an interdisciplinary unit on the environment and space travel in which students plan a fictional departure from Earth which is on the brink of destruction from environmental waste and neglect. Students travel through concepts in environmental education, math, art, English, and astronomy before reaching their destination with a clearer…

  12. Trapped Atoms in One-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-09

    Guided mode resonances 13 Appendix E. Effective area and mode volume for probe 14 References 14 1. Introduction New opportunities in atomic, molecular...largely insensitive to the particular atomic Zeeman sublevel owing to negligible vector shifts due to the high degree of linear polarization of the...surrounded by NA ‘mirror’ atoms along a 1D-lattice [16], the ratio of the coherent coupling rate g1 = √ NAγ1D/2 to the effective dissipative rate γ ′ would

  13. Alkali elements in the Earth's core: Evidence from enstatite meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lodders, K.

    1995-01-01

    The abundances of alkali elements in the Earth's core are predicted by assuming that accretion of the Earth started from material similar in composition to enstatite chondrites and that enstatite achondrites (aubrites) provide a natural laboratory to study core-mantle differentiation under extremely reducing conditions. If core formation on the aubrite parent body is comparable with core formation on the early Earth, it is found that 2600 (+/- 1000) ppm Na, 550 (+/- 260) ppm K, 3.4 (+/- 2.1) ppm Rb, and 0.31 (+/- 0.24) ppm Cs can reside in the Earth's core. The alkali-element abundances are consistent with those predicted by independent estimates based on nebula condensation calculations and heat flow data.

  14. Cosmochemical fractionation by collisional erosion during the Earth's accretion

    PubMed Central

    Boujibar, Asmaa; Andrault, Denis; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Bouhifd, Mohamed Ali; Monteux, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Early in the Solar System's history, energetic collisions of differentiated bodies affected the final composition of the terrestrial planets through partial destruction. Enstatite chondrites (EC) are the best candidates to represent the primordial terrestrial precursors as they present the most similar isotopic compositions to Earth. Here we report that collisional erosion of >15% of the early Earth's mass can reconcile the remaining compositional differences between EC and the Earth. We base our demonstration on experimental melting of an EC composition at pressures between 1 bar and 25 GPa. At low pressures, the first silicate melts are highly enriched in incompatible elements Si, Al and Na, and depleted in Mg. Loss of proto-crusts through impacts raises the Earth's Mg/Si ratio to its present value. To match all major element compositions, our model implies preferential loss of volatile lithophile elements and re-condensation of refractory lithophile elements after the impacts. PMID:26395157

  15. The Earth's Biosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In the last five years, scientists have been able to monitor our changing planet in ways never before possible. The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS), aboard the OrbView-2 satellite, has given researchers an unprecedented view of the biological engine that drives life on Earth-the countless forms of plants that cover the land and fill the oceans. 'There is no question the Earth is changing. SeaWiFS has enabled us, for the first time, to monitor the biological consequences of that change-to see how the things we do, as well as natural variability, affect the Earth's ability to support life,' said Gene Carl Feldman, SeaWiFS project manager at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. SeaWiFS data, based on continuous daily global observations, have helped scientists make a more accurate assessment of the oceans' role in the global carbon cycle. The data provide a key parameter in a number of ecological and environmental studies as well as global climate-change modeling. The images of the Earth's changing land, ocean and atmosphere from SeaWiFS have documented many previously unrecognized phenomena. The image above shows the global biosphere from June 2002 measured by SeaWiFS. Data in the oceans is chlorophyll concentration, a measure of the amount of phytoplankton (microscopic plants) living in the ocean. On land SeaWiFS measures Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, an indication of the density of plant growth. For more information and images, read: SeaWiFS Sensor Marks Five Years Documenting Earth'S Dynamic Biosphere Image courtesy SeaWiFS project and copyright Orbimage.

  16. 78 FR 58571 - Maine Yankee Atomic Power Company, Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, and The Yankee Atomic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... Atomic Power Company, Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, and The Yankee Atomic Electric Company... Power Company (Maine Yankee), Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company (Connecticut Yankee), and the Yankee Atomic Electric Company (Yankee Atomic) (together, ``licensees'' or ``the Yankee Companies'')...

  17. Atomic Collision Theory.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    important in the upper atmosphere of the earth and in laser development , respectively. The major thrust of work involved calculations on rotational-vibrational excitation of molecules D2, H2, and HCl.

  18. Quasi-solid state rechargeable Na-CO2 batteries with reduced graphene oxide Na anodes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaofei; Li, Zifan; Zhao, Yaran; Sun, Jianchao; Zhao, Qing; Wang, Jianbin; Tao, Zhanliang; Chen, Jun

    2017-02-01

    Na-CO2 batteries using earth-abundant Na and greenhouse gas CO2 are promising tools for mobile and stationary energy storage, but they still pose safety risks from leakage of liquid electrolyte and instability of the Na metal anode. These issues result in extremely harsh operating conditions of Na-CO2 batteries and increase the difficulty of scaling up this technology. We report the development of quasi-solid state Na-CO2 batteries with high safety using composite polymer electrolyte (CPE) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) Na anodes. The CPE of PVDF-HFP [poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene)]-4% SiO2/NaClO4-TEGDME (tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether) has high ion conductivity (1.0 mS cm(-1)), robust toughness, a nonflammable matrix, and strong electrolyte-locking ability. In addition, the rGO-Na anode presents fast and nondendritic Na(+) plating/stripping (5.7 to 16.5 mA cm(-2)). The improved kinetics and safety enable the constructed rGO-Na/CPE/CO2 batteries to successfully cycle in wide CO2 partial pressure window (5 to 100%, simulated car exhaust) and especially to run for 400 cycles at 500 mA g(-1) with a fixed capacity of 1000 mA·hour g(-1) in pure CO2. Furthermore, we scaled up the reversible capacity to 1.1 A·hour in pouch-type batteries (20 × 20 cm, 10 g, 232 Wh kg(-1)). This study makes quasi-solid state Na-CO2 batteries an attractive prospect.

  19. Quasi–solid state rechargeable Na-CO2 batteries with reduced graphene oxide Na anodes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaofei; Li, Zifan; Zhao, Yaran; Sun, Jianchao; Zhao, Qing; Wang, Jianbin; Tao, Zhanliang; Chen, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Na-CO2 batteries using earth-abundant Na and greenhouse gas CO2 are promising tools for mobile and stationary energy storage, but they still pose safety risks from leakage of liquid electrolyte and instability of the Na metal anode. These issues result in extremely harsh operating conditions of Na-CO2 batteries and increase the difficulty of scaling up this technology. We report the development of quasi–solid state Na-CO2 batteries with high safety using composite polymer electrolyte (CPE) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) Na anodes. The CPE of PVDF-HFP [poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene)]–4% SiO2/NaClO4–TEGDME (tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether) has high ion conductivity (1.0 mS cm−1), robust toughness, a nonflammable matrix, and strong electrolyte-locking ability. In addition, the rGO-Na anode presents fast and nondendritic Na+ plating/stripping (5.7 to 16.5 mA cm−2). The improved kinetics and safety enable the constructed rGO-Na/CPE/CO2 batteries to successfully cycle in wide CO2 partial pressure window (5 to 100%, simulated car exhaust) and especially to run for 400 cycles at 500 mA g−1 with a fixed capacity of 1000 mA·hour g−1 in pure CO2. Furthermore, we scaled up the reversible capacity to 1.1 A·hour in pouch-type batteries (20 × 20 cm, 10 g, 232 Wh kg−1). This study makes quasi–solid state Na-CO2 batteries an attractive prospect. PMID:28164158

  20. Analysis of glycolipids by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bosch, M P; Parra, J L; Manresa, M A; Ventura, F; Rivera, J

    1989-12-01

    The positive and negative ion fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectra of four glycolipids obtained from microbial cultures are reported. The spectra of the glycolipids in the positive ion mode are characterized by abundant [M + Na]+, [M + Na + matrix]+ and [M + 2Na - H]+ species. In negative FAB conditions the molecules yield [M - H]-. Our understanding of the FAB behaviour of glycolipids in both positive and negative modes has been considerably aided in the structure elucidation, without any derivatization or degradation reaction of the compounds studied. The technique allows unambiguous molecular weight determination of low-microgram amounts of these glycolipids purified from biological sources and provides useful fragmentation information.