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Sample records for earth doped integrated

  1. Novel Fiber Preforms: Rare Earth Doping.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-31

    proposed by the group at Southampton, and future experiments with axial laser heating of terbium metal are planned. As noted, much of the effort during...been doped with terbium , in our learning to control the doping concentration, we have observed bands of undesired microcrystailinity in some terbium ...preforms with terbium (not yet pulled into fibers), and rare earth glasses formed by sol-gel tech- niques. Future efforts will be to prepare fibers

  2. Tuning NaYF4 Nanoparticles through Alkaline Earth Doping

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xian; Peng, Dengfeng; Wang, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Phase and size of lanthanide-doped nanoparticles are the most important characteristics that dictate optical properties of these nanoparticles and affect their technological applications. Herein, we present a systematic study to examine the effect of alkaline earth doping on the formation of NaYF4 upconversion nanoparticles. We show that alkaline earth doping has a dual function of tuning particle size of hexagonal phase NaYF4 nanoparticles and stabilizing cubic phase NaYF4 nanoparticles depending on composition and concentration of the dopant ions. The study described here represents a facile and general strategy to tuning the properties of NaYF4 upconversion nanoparticles. PMID:28348353

  3. Tunable, rare earth-doped solid state lasers

    DOEpatents

    Emmett, John L.; Jacobs, Ralph R.; Krupke, William F.; Weber, Marvin J.

    1980-01-01

    Laser apparatus comprising combinations of an excimer pump laser and a rare earth-doped solid matrix, utilizing the 5d-4f radiative transition in a rare earth ion to produce visible and ultra-violet laser radiation with high overall efficiency in selected cases and relatively long radiative lifetimes.

  4. Novel Fiber Preforms: Rare Earth Doping.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-21

    measurements were made on a Digilab FTS-15B as KBr While there are many complex multicomponent rare pellets from 3800-4(0cm and as low density poivethvene...earth glasses, phosphates hold special interest as binary pellets t50-500cm ). Spectral resolution was 2 cm- cr rare earth glasses of variable composition...SiO- the glasses have compositions in the range x = 0.009 to 0052. w.hich corresponds to 0.9 to 5.2 molo or up to 23 wt% rare earth oxide as determruned

  5. Rare Earth Doped High Temperature Ceramic Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Pal, AnnaMarie; Patton, Martin O.; Jenkins, Phillip P.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of their electron structure, rare earth ions in crystals at high temperature emit radiation in several narrow bands rather than in a continuous blackbody manner. This study develops a spectral emittance model for films of rare earth containing materials. Although there are several possible rare earth doped high temperature materials, this study was confined to rare earth aluminum garnets. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical spectral emittances was found for erbium, thulium and erbium-holmium aluminum garnets. Spectral emittances of these films are sensitive to temperature differences across the film. Emitter efficiency is also a sensitive function of temperature. For thulium aluminum garnet the efficiency is 0.38 at 1700 K but only 0.19 at 1262 K.

  6. Rare earth doped zinc oxide varistors

    DOEpatents

    McMillan, A.D.; Modine, F.A.; Lauf, R.J.; Alim, M.A.; Mahan, G.D.; Bartkowiak, M.

    1998-12-29

    A varistor includes a Bi-free, essentially homogeneous sintered body of a ceramic composition including, expressed as nominal weight %, 0.2--4.0% oxide of at least one rare earth element, 0.5--4.0% Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}, 0.05--0.4% K{sub 2}O, 0.05--0.2% Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--0.2% CaO, 0.00005--0.01% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--2% MnO, 0--0.05% MgO, 0--0.5% TiO{sub 3}, 0--0.2% SnO{sub 2}, 0--0.02% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, balance ZnO. 4 figs.

  7. Rare earth doped zinc oxide varistors

    DOEpatents

    McMillan, April D.; Modine, Frank A.; Lauf, Robert J.; Alim, Mohammad A.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Bartkowiak, Miroslaw

    1998-01-01

    A varistor includes a Bi-free, essentially homogeneous sintered body of a ceramic composition including, expressed as nominal weight %, 0.2-4.0% oxide of at least one rare earth element, 0.5-4.0% Co.sub.3 O.sub.4, 0.05-0.4% K.sub.2 O, 0.05-0.2% Cr.sub.2 O.sub.3, 0-0.2% CaO, 0.00005-0.01% Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, 0-2% MnO, 0-0.05% MgO, 0-0.5% TiO.sub.3, 0-0.2% SnO.sub.2, 0-0.02% B.sub.2 O.sub.3, balance ZnO.

  8. Rare Earth Doped IR Fiber Lasers For Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esterowitz, Leon; Allen, Roger

    1989-06-01

    Trivalent rare earth doped lasers in fluorozirconate glasses and fibers that lase between 2 and 3 μm are reviewed. There have been a large number of laser-fiber optic systems below 2pm developed for clinical microsurgery at a variety of sites. The required flexibility of the fiber optic waveguide varies with the clinical use, such as: intraocular (through a small diameter rigid tube), endoscopically accessible pulmonary and gastric mucosa (through a port of a fiber-optic endoscope of intermediate flexibility), and intra-arterial (as an integral part of a flexible catheter, which in the case of the coronaries must be very flexible so as to negotiate abrupt bends and bifurcations without damage to the vessels). Laser energy absorbed by tissue is capable of coagulation of tissue (denaturation of structural proteins), melting of fatty deposits or other structures (solid or gel to liquid phase transitions), as well as direct breakage of chemical bonds by high energy photons. It is of general interest to develop a pulsed laser system transmitted through flexible fiber optics that is capable of precise ablation of targeted tissue with minimal damage to the remaining tissue. Ideally, the device should be able to ablate any tissue because of the general absorptive properties of tissue, and not a specific chromophore such as melanin or hemoglobin, the concentration of which varies widely among tissues. Two obvious ubiquitous chromophores have been widely discussed: 1) proteins and nucleic acids whose high concentration and absorption coefficients lead to strong tissue absorption in the ultraviolet and 2) water whose strong infrared absorption bands have been widely utilized in CO2 laser surgery. Non-linear absorption occurring at very high power densities (~1 GW/cm2) has been shown to be very effective for non-invasive ocular (an optically transparent field) microsurgery at the image plane of a slit lamp, but this approach appears impractical in fiber optic systems because

  9. Rare earth doped upconverting particles for different photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, Madhab; Gangadharan, Ajith Kumar; Sardar, Dhiraj Kumar

    2013-03-01

    Trivalent rare earth ions especially erbium (Er3+) and ytterbium (Yb3+) co-doped in various host nanoparticles are known for their extraordinary spectroscopic properties. A thorough optical characterization including the absolute upconversion quantum yield (QY) measurement is of critical importance in evaluating their potential for various photonic applications. In this paper, we will be presenting a measured absolute upconversion QYs for Yb3+ and Er3+ doped in La2O2S under 980 and 1550 nm excitation at various power densities. Comparison of absolute QYs for different concentrations of Yb3+ and Er3+ doped in La2O2S will be made for all the upconversion emissions with respect to reported most efficient upconverting phosphor NaYF4 doped with 20% Yb3+ and 2% Er3+. Furthermore, applications of these phosphors in different areas such as bio-imaging, solar cell, security, etc. will be explored depending on the measured absolute upconversion quantum yields. In addition, preliminary results on in vitro imaging using upconverting nanoparticles as a contrast agent will be reported. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation Partnerships for Research and Education in Materials (PREM) Grant No. DMR-0934218.

  10. Orientation of the earth by numerical integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fajemirokun, F. A.; Hotter, F. D.; Mueller, I. I.

    1976-01-01

    A fundamental problem is the determination of the orientation of the earth in the celestial coordinate system. Classical reductions for precession and nutation can be expected to be consistent with the present-day observations, however, corrections to the classical theory are difficult to model because of the large number of coefficients involved. Consequently, a portion of the research has been devoted to numerically integrating the Eulerian equations of motion for a rigid earth and considering the six initial conditions of the integration as unknowns. Comparison of the three adjusted Eulerian angles from the numerical integration over 1000 days indicates agreement with classical theory to within 0.003 seconds of arc.

  11. Rare Earth Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (YAG) Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Pal, AnnaMarie T.; Patton, Martin O.; Jenkins, Phillip P.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of their electron structure, rare earth ions in crystals at high temperature emit radiation in several narrow bands rather than in a continuous blackbody manner. This study presents a spectral emittance model for films and cylinders of rare earth doped yttrium aluminum garnets. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical film spectral emittances was found for erbium and holmium aluminum garnets. Spectral emittances of films are sensitive to temperature differences across the film. For operating conditions of interest, the film emitter experiences a linear temperature variation whereas the cylinder emitter has a more advantageous uniform temperature. Emitter efficiency is also a sensitive function of temperature. For holminum aluminum garnet film the efficiency is 0.35 at 1446K but only 0.27 at 1270 K.

  12. Multicomponent, Rare-Earth-Doped Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Zhu, Dongming

    2005-01-01

    Multicomponent, rare-earth-doped, perovskite-type thermal-barrier coating materials have been developed in an effort to obtain lower thermal conductivity, greater phase stability, and greater high-temperature capability, relative to those of the prior thermal-barrier coating material of choice, which is yttria-partially stabilized zirconia. As used here, "thermal-barrier coatings" (TBCs) denotes thin ceramic layers used to insulate air-cooled metallic components of heat engines (e.g., gas turbines) from hot gases. These layers are generally fabricated by plasma spraying or physical vapor deposition of the TBC materials onto the metal components. A TBC as deposited has some porosity, which is desirable in that it reduces the thermal conductivity below the intrinsic thermal conductivity of the fully dense form of the material. Undesirably, the thermal conductivity gradually increases because the porosity gradually decreases as a consequence of sintering during high-temperature service. Because of these and other considerations such as phase transformations, the maximum allowable service temperature for yttria-partially stabilized zirconia TBCs lies in the range of about 1,200 to 1,300 C. In contrast, the present multicomponent, rare-earth-doped, perovskite-type TBCs can withstand higher temperatures.

  13. 40 CFR 721.10423 - Complex strontium aluminate, rare earth doped (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Complex strontium aluminate, rare... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10423 Complex strontium aluminate, rare earth doped... substances identified generically as complex strontium aluminate, rare earth doped (PMNs P-12-22, P-12-23,...

  14. Rare-earth-doped bifunctional alkaline-earth metal fluoride nanocrystals via a facile microwave-assisted process.

    PubMed

    Pang, Min; Liu, Dapeng; Lei, Yongqian; Song, Shuyan; Feng, Jing; Fan, Weiqiang; Zhang, Hongjie

    2011-06-20

    Rare-earth-doped magnetic-optic bifunctional alkaline-earth metal fluoride nanocrystals have been successfully synthesized via a facile microwave-assisted process. The as-prepared nanocrystals were monodisperse and could form stable colloidal solutions in polar solvents, such as water and ethanol. They show bright-green fluorescence emisson. Furthermore, Gd(3+)-doped ones exhibit paramagnetic behavior at room temperature and superparamagnetic behavior at 2 K.

  15. Tin as reducing agent in ? doped alkali-earth fluorophosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dafinova, R.; Caralampydu, A.

    1998-07-01

    The blue europium band in alkali-earth fluorophosphates, determining the 0953-8984/10/27/017/img2 allowed electric-dipole transitions in the 0953-8984/10/27/017/img3 ion, is studied. The simultaneous doping with 0953-8984/10/27/017/img4 provides a possibility of the realization of 0953-8984/10/27/017/img5 transitions and of formation of 0953-8984/10/27/017/img3 ions as blue emission centres of high intensity. The 0953-8984/10/27/017/img7 position is assumed for the 0953-8984/10/27/017/img3 ions in the apatite structure of the matrix.

  16. Rare earth doped III-nitride semiconductors for spintronic and optoelectronic applications (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palai, Ratnakar

    2016-10-01

    Since last four decades the information and communication technologies are relying on the semiconductor materials. Currently a great deal of attention is being focused on adding spin degree-of-freedom into semiconductor to create a new area of solid-state electronics, called spintronics. In spintronics not only the current but also its spin state is controlled. Such materials need to be good semiconductors for easy integration in typical integrated circuits with high sensitivity to the spin orientation, especially room temperature ferromagnetism being an important desirable property. GaN is considered to be the most important semiconductor after silicon. It is widely used for the production of green, blue, UV, and white LEDs in full color displays, traffic lights, automotive lightings, and general room lighting using white LEDs. GaN-based systems also show promise for microwave and high power electronics intended for radar, satellite, wireless base stations and spintronic applications. Rare earth (Yb, Eu, Er, and Tm) doped GaN shows many interesting optoelectronic and magnetoptic properties e. g. sharp emission from UV through visible to IR, radiation hardness, and ferromagnetism. The talk will be focused on fabrication, optoelectronic (photoluminescence, cathodeluminescence, magnetic, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) properties of some rare earth doped GaN and InGaN semiconductor nanostructures grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and future applications.

  17. Earth System Oxygenation: Toward an Integrated Theory of Earth Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbar, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    considered as possible drivers of surface redox evolution, but typically in isolation. We are tackling the grand challenge of developing an integrated theory of Earth evolution, grounded in the physics of a cooling planet, and motivated by the implications for chemical evolution of the biosphere. The framework of such a theory will be presented.

  18. Physical and electrochemical properties of alkaline earth doped, rare earth vanadates

    SciTech Connect

    Adijanto, Lawrence; Balaji Padmanabhan, Venu; Holmes, Kevin J.; Gorte, Raymond J.; Vohs, John M.

    2012-06-15

    The effect of partial substitution of alkaline earth (AE) ions, Sr{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+}, for the rare earth (RE) ions, La{sup 3+}, Ce{sup 3+}, Pr{sup 3+}, and Sm{sup 3+}, on the physical properties of REVO{sub 4} compounds were investigated. The use of the Pechini method to synthesize the vanadates allowed for high levels of AE substitution to be obtained. Coulometric titration was used to measure redox isotherms for these materials and showed that the addition of the AE ions increased both reducibility and electronic conductivity under typical solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode conditions, through the formation of compounds with mixed vanadium valence. In spite of their high electronic conductivity, REVO{sub 4}-yttira stabilized zirconia (YSZ) composite anodes exhibited only modest performance when used in SOFCs operating with H{sub 2} fuel at 973 K due to their low catalytic activity. High performance was obtained, however, after the addition of a small amount of catalytically active Pd to the anode. - Graphical abstract: Coulometric titration isotherms for ({open_square}) LaVO{sub 4}, ( White-Circle ) PrVO{sub 4}, ( Lozenge ) CeVO{sub 4}, ( Black-Up-Pointing-Triangle ) Ce{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}VO{sub 3.85}, and ( Black-Square ) Ce{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}VO{sub 3.85}, at 973 K. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Infiltration procedures were used to prepare SOFC anodes from various vanadates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doping of Alkaline Earth to Rare Earth Vanadates showed to improve conductivity and chemical stability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alkaline Earth Doped Rare Earth Vanadates-YSZ composites showed conductivities as high as 5 S cm{sup -1} at 973 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As with other ceramic anodes, the addition of a catalyst was required to achieve low anode impedance.

  19. Health Sensing Functions in Thermal Barrier Coatings Incorporating Rare-Earth-Doped Luminescent Sublayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Singh, J.; Wolfe, D. E.

    2004-01-01

    Great effort has been directed towards developing techniques to monitor the health of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) that would detect the approach of safety-threatening conditions. An unconventional approach is presented here where health sensing functionality is integrated into the TBC itself by the incorporation of rare-earth-doped luminescent sublayers to monitor erosion as well as whether the TBC is maintaining the underlying substrate at a sufficiently low temperature. Erosion indication is demonstrated in electron-beam physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) TBCs consisting of 7wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) with europium-doped and terbium-doped sublayers. Multiple ingot deposition produced sharp boundaries between the doped sublayers without interrupting the columnar growth of the TBC. The TBC-coated specimens were subjected to alumina particle jet erosion, and the erosion depth was then indicated under ultraviolet illumination that excited easily visible luminescence characteristic of sublayer that was exposed by erosion. In addition, temperature measurements from a bottom-lying europium-doped sublayer in a TBC produced by multiple ingot EB-PVD were accomplished by measuring the temperature-dependent decay time from the 606 nm wavelength emission excited in that sublayer with a 532 nm wavelength laser that was selected for its close match to one of the europium excitation wavelengths as well as being at a wavelength where the TBC is relatively transparent. It is proposed the low dopant levels and absence of interruption of the TBC columnar growth allow the addition of the erosion and temperature sensing functions with minimal effects on TBC performance.

  20. Energetics of Rare Earth Doped Uranium Oxide Solid Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei

    The physical and chemical properties of UO2 nuclear fuels are affected as fission products accumulate during irradiation. The lanthanides, a main group of fission products, form extensive solid solutions with uranium oxide in the fluorite structure. Thermodynamic studies of such solid solutions had been performed to obtain partial molar free energies of oxygen as a function of dopant concentration and temperature; however, direct measurement of formation enthalpies was hampered by the refractory nature of these oxides. In this work, high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry was utilized to study the thermochemistry of various rare earth doped uranium oxide LnxU 1-xO2-0.5x+y (Ln = La, Y, Nd) over a wide range of dopant concentrations and oxygen contents. The sintered solid solutions were carefully characterized to determine their phase purity, chemical composition, and uranium oxidation state, with most of the materials in the oxygen excess regime. The enthalpies of formation of LnxU1-xO2-0.5x+y were calculated from the calorimetric data. The oxidation enthalpies of these solid solutions are similar to that of UO2. The formation enthalpies from constituent oxides (LnO1.5, UO2, and UO3) become increasingly negative with addition of dopant cations and appear relatively independent of the uranium oxidation state (oxygen content) when the type and concentration of the dopants are the same. This is valid in the oxygen excess regime; thus an estimation of formation enthalpies of LnxU1-xO2 materials can be made. The formation enthalpies from elements of hyperstoichiometric LnxU1-xO 2-0.5x+y materials obtained from calorimetric measurements are in good agreement with those calculated from free energy data. A direct comparison between the formation enthalpies from calorimetric study and computational research using density functional theory was also performed. The experimental and computational energies of LnxU 1-xO2 (Ln = La, Y, Nd) generally agree within 10 k

  1. Integrated Instrument Simulator Suites for Earth Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanelli, Simone; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Matsui, Toshihisa; Hostetler, Chris; Hair, Johnathan; Butler, Carolyn; Kuo, Kwo-Sen; Niamsuwan, Noppasin; Johnson, Michael P.; Jacob, Joseph C.; Tsang, Leung; Shams, Khawaja; Jaruwatanadilok, Sermsak; Oveisgharan, Shadi; Simard, Marc; Turk, Francis J.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Earth Observing System Simulators Suite (NEOS3) is a modular framework of forward simulations tools for remote sensing of Earth's Atmosphere from space. It was initiated as the Instrument Simulator Suite for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (ISSARS) under the NASA Advanced Information Systems Technology (AIST) program of the Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) to enable science users to perform simulations based on advanced atmospheric and simple land surface models, and to rapidly integrate in a broad framework any experimental or innovative tools that they may have developed in this context. The name was changed to NEOS3 when the project was expanded to include more advanced modeling tools for the surface contributions, accounting for scattering and emission properties of layered surface (e.g., soil moisture, vegetation, snow and ice, subsurface layers). NEOS3 relies on a web-based graphic user interface, and a three-stage processing strategy to generate simulated measurements. The user has full control over a wide range of customizations both in terms of a priori assumptions and in terms of specific solvers or models used to calculate the measured signals.This presentation will demonstrate the general architecture, the configuration procedures and illustrate some sample products and the fundamental interface requirements for modules candidate for integration.

  2. Feasibility of Integrated Insulation in Rammed Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, C.; Balintova, M.; Holub, M.

    2015-11-01

    Building Codes in Europe stipulate strict thermal performance criteria which any traditional rammed earth recipe cannot meet. This does not infer that the material itself is inferior; it has many other face saving attributes such as low embodied energy, high workability, sound insulation, fire resistance, aesthetics, high diffusivity and thermal accumulation properties. Integrated insulation is experimented with, to try achieve a 0.22 [W/(m2.K)] overall coefficient of heat transfer for walls required by 2015 Slovak standards, without using external insulation or using technologically complex interstitial insulation. This has the added aesthetic benefit of leaving the earth wall exposed to the external environment. Results evaluate the feasibility of this traditional approach.

  3. Sensing Using Rare-Earth-Doped Upconversion Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Shuwei; Chen, Guanying; Yang, Chunhui

    2013-01-01

    Optical sensing plays an important role in theranostics due to its capability to detect hint biochemical entities or molecular targets as well as to precisely monitor specific fundamental psychological processes. Rare-earth (RE) doped upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) are promising for these endeavors due to their unique frequency converting capability; they emit efficient and sharp visible or ultraviolet (UV) luminescence via use of ladder-like energy levels of RE ions when excited at near infrared (NIR) light that are silent to tissues. These features allow not only a high penetration depth in biological tissues but also a high detection sensitivity. Indeed, the energy transfer between UCNPs and biomolecular or chemical indicators provide opportunities for high-sensitive bio- and chemical-sensing. A temperature-sensitive change of the intensity ratio between two close UC bands promises them for use in temperature mapping of a single living cell. In this work, we review recent investigations on using UCNPs for the detection of biomolecules (avidin, ATP, etc.), ions (cyanide, mecury, etc.), small gas molecules (oxygen, carbon dioxide, ammonia, etc.), as well as for in vitro temperature sensing. We also briefly summarize chemical methods in synthesizing UCNPs of high efficiency that are important for the detection limit. PMID:23650480

  4. Rare Earth Doped Silica Nanoparticles via Thermolysis of a Single Source Metallasilsesquioxane Precursor

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Gemma-Louise; O’Brien, John; Gun’ko, Yurii K.

    2017-01-01

    Rare earth metal doped silica nanoparticles have significant advantages over traditional organic dyes and quantum dots. Silsesquioxanes are promising precursors in the production of silica nanoparticles by thermolysis, due to their structural similarities with silica materials. This manuscript describes the production of a new Eu3+-based metallasilsesquioxane species and its use as a single source precursor in the thermolytic production of luminescent rare earth metal doped silica nanoparticles with characteristic emission in the visible region of the spectrum. PMID:28378754

  5. Multilayer Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Architectures Utilizing Rare Earth Doped YSZ and Rare Earth Pyrochlores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Michael P.; Rai, Amarendra K.; Bhattacharya, Rabi; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    To allow for increased gas turbine efficiencies, new insulating thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) must be developed to protect the underlying metallic components from higher operating temperatures. This work focused on using rare earth doped (Yb and Gd) yttria stabilized zirconia (t' Low-k) and Gd2Zr2O7 pyrochlores (GZO) combined with novel nanolayered and thick layered microstructures to enable operation beyond the 1200 C stability limit of current 7 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) coatings. It was observed that the layered system can reduce the thermal conductivity by approximately 45 percent with respect to YSZ after 20 hr of testing at 1316 C. The erosion rate of GZO is shown to be an order to magnitude higher than YSZ and t' Low-k, but this can be reduced by almost 57 percent when utilizing a nanolayered structure. Lastly, the thermal instability of the layered system is investigated and thought is given to optimization of layer thickness.

  6. Dynamics of dipolar defects in rare earth-doped alkaline-earth fluoride crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnock, Forrest Taylor

    Alkaline-earth fluoride crystals such as SrF2 provide an excellent sample material for investigating the physics of point defects in crystal lattices. High quality crystals are easily grown, and they readily accept many dopant ions into the lattice, particularly rare earth ions. Rare earth dopant ions (typically trivalent) occupy substitutional sites in the lattice by replacing a Sr2+ ion. Due to the extra charge of the rare earth ion, charge compensation is often provided by an extra fluoride ion (F--) located in a nearby interstitial position. If located in the nearest-neighbor (nn) interstitial position, it forms a defect with C4n symmetry; if located in the next-nearest-neighbor (nnn) intersitial position, it forms a defect with C3n symmetry. Given sufficient thermal energy, this interstitial F ion can move to adjacent interstitial sites and hence reorient the defect. The rate w at which the ion moves from one interstitial site to another is well described by a simple Arrhenius expression: w=n0e-E/kT , where n0 is the attack frequency of the F-- and E is the activation energy. This motion can profoundly affect both the electronic polarizability of the material and the polarization of light emitted or absorbed by the rare earth ion. This thesis describes the normal mode motion of interstitial ions which may occupy either nn or nnn interstitial sites. Using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), I observed the relative populations of nn and nnn defects in SrF2 doped with Gd3+ as a function of temperature. These measurements show that dipolar reorientation of the nnn F occurs through the nn interstitial position. Not all interstitial F-- motion is thermally driven. Fluorescence depolarization measurements of SrF2:Pr3+ indicate that optically stimulating a Pr3+ may induce interstitial motion of a nn F--. Such motion was confirmed by showing that nn defects in SrF2:Pr3+ may be polarized at very low temperatures when the sample is illuminated with resonant light. I

  7. Enhanced near-infrared photoacoustic imaging of silica-coated rare-earth doped nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Yang; Liao, Lun-De; Bandla, Aishwarya; Liu, Yu-Hang; Yuan, Jun; Thakor, Nitish; Tan, Mei Chee

    2017-01-01

    Near-infrared photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an emerging diagnostic technology that utilizes the tissue transparent window to achieve improved contrast and spatial resolution for deep tissue imaging. In this study, we investigated the enhancement effect of the SiO2 shell on the PA property of our core/shell rare-earth nanoparticles (REs) consisting of an active rare-earth doped core of NaYF4:Yb,Er (REDNPs) and an undoped NaYF4 shell. We observed that the PA signal amplitude increased with SiO2 shell thickness. Although the SiO2 shell caused an observed decrease in the integrated fluorescence intensity due to the dilution effect, fluorescence quenching of the rare earth emitting ions within the REDNPs cores was successfully prevented by the undoped NaYF4 shell. Therefore, our multilayer structure consisting of an active core with successive functional layers was demonstrated to be an effective design for dual-modal fluorescence and PA imaging probes with improved PA property. The result from this work addresses a critical need for the development of dual-modal contrast agent that advances deep tissue imaging with high resolution and signal-to-noise ratio.

  8. Origin of enhanced magnetization in rare earth doped multiferroic bismuth ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Nayek, C.; Thirmal, Ch.; Murugavel, P.; Tamilselvan, A.; Balakumar, S.

    2014-02-21

    We report structural and magnetic properties of rare earth doped Bi{sub 0.95}R{sub 0.05} FeO{sub 3} (R = Y, Ho, and Er) submicron particles. Rare earth doping enhances the magnetization and the magnetization shows an increasing trend with decreasing dopant ionic radii. In contrast to the x-ray diffraction pattern, we have seen a strong evidence for the presence of rare earth iron garnets R{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} in magnetization measured as a function of temperature, in selected area electron diffraction, and in Raman measurements. Our results emphasised the role of secondary phases in the magnetic property of rare earth doped BiFeO{sub 3} compounds along with the structural distortion favoring spin canting by increase in Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange energy.

  9. [Investigation of the layers doped with rare earth elements in Si substrate and it's key problems].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guo-an

    2005-03-01

    The photoluminescence properties of rare earth doped silicon were investigated with ion beam technique. The photoluminescence spectra in the layers doped with ions of La, Ce and Nd were obtained at room temperature. At the same time, the up-conversion luminescence in the doped layers was observed. The intensities of both the luminescence and the up-conversion luminescence increased with increasing the doping dose and the treatment temperature. However, the intensities of the luminescence decreased with increasing the exciting wavelength between 220 nm and 300 nm; the intensities of the up-conversion luminescence increased with increasing the exciting wavelength between 600 nm and 800 nm. It was indicated that the luminescence and the up-conversion luminescence in the layers doped with ions of La, Ce and Nd depended on the doping dose, the heat treatment temperature and the exciting wavelength.

  10. Upconversion-pumped luminescence efficiency of rare-earth-doped hosts sensitized with trivalent ytterbium

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R.H.; Schaffers, K.I.; Waide, P.A.; Tassano, J.B.; Payne, S.A.; Kruplce, W.F.; Bischel, W.K.

    1997-07-26

    We discuss the upconversion luminescence efficiencies of phosphors that generate red, green, and blue light. The phosphors studied are single crystals and powders co-doped with Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+}, and with Tm{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+}. The Yb ions are pumped near 980 nm; transfers of two or three quanta to the co-doped rare earth ion generate visible luminescence. The main contribution embodied in this work is the quantitative measurement of this upconversion efficiency, based on the use of a calibrated integrating sphere, determination of the fraction of pump light absorbed, and careful control of the pump laser beam profile. The green phosphors are the most efficient, yielding efficiency values as high as 4 %, with the red and blue materials giving 1 - 2 %. Saturation was observed in all cases, suggesting that populations of upconversion steps of the ions are maximized at higher power. Quasi-CW modeling of the intensity- dependent upconversion efficiency was attempted; input data included level lifetimes, transition cross sections, and cross-relaxation rate coefficients. The saturation of the Yb,Er:fluoride media is explained as the pumping of Er{sup 3+} ions into a bottleneck (long-lived state)- the {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} metastable level, making them unavailable for further excitation transfer. 32 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. NIR persistent luminescence of lanthanide ion-doped rare-earth oxycarbonates: the effect of dopants.

    PubMed

    Caratto, Valentina; Locardi, Federico; Costa, Giorgio Andrea; Masini, Roberto; Fasoli, Mauro; Panzeri, Laura; Martini, Marco; Bottinelli, Emanuela; Gianotti, Enrica; Miletto, Ivana

    2014-10-22

    A series of luminescent rare-earth ion-doped hexagonal II-type Gd oxycarbonate phosphors Gd2-xRExO2CO3 (RE = Eu(3+), Yb(3+), Dy(3+)) have been successfully synthesized by thermal decomposition of the corresponding mixed oxalates. The Yb(3+) doped Gd-oxycarbonate has evidenced a high persistent luminescence in the NIR region, that is independent from the temperature and makes this materials particular attractive as optical probes for bioimaging.

  12. Influence of rare earth doping on thermoelectric properties of SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J. Wang, C. L.; Li, Y.; Su, W. B.; Zhu, Y. H.; Li, J. C.; Mei, L. M.

    2013-12-14

    Thermoelectric properties of SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics, doped with different rare earth elements, were investigated in this work. It's found that the ionic radius of doping elements plays an important role on thermoelectric properties: SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics doped with large rare earth ions (such as La, Nd, and Sm) exhibit large power factors, and those doped with small ions (such as Gd, Dy, Er, and Y) exhibit low thermal conductivities. Therefore, a simple approach for enhancing the thermoelectric performance of SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics is proposed: mainly doped with large ions to obtain a large power factor and, simultaneously, slightly co-doped with small ions to obtain a low thermal conductivity. Based on this rule, Sr{sub 0.8}La{sub 0.18}Yb{sub 0.02}TiO{sub 3} ceramics were prepared, whose ZT value at 1 023 K reaches 0.31, increasing by a factor of 19% compared with the single-doped counterpart Sr{sub 0.8}La{sub 0.2}TiO{sub 3} (ZT = 0.26)

  13. Metal enhanced fluorescence in rare earth doped plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Derom, S; Berthelot, A; Pillonnet, A; Benamara, O; Jurdyc, A M; Girard, C; Colas des Francs, G

    2013-12-13

    We theoretically and numerically investigate metal enhanced fluorescence of plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles doped with rare earth (RE) ions. Particle shape and size are engineered to maximize the average enhancement factor (AEF) of the overall doped shell. We show that the highest enhancement (11 in the visible and 7 in the near-infrared) is achieved by tuning either the dipolar or the quadrupolar particle resonance to the rare earth ion's excitation wavelength. Additionally, the calculated AEFs are compared to experimental data reported in the literature, obtained in similar conditions (plasmon mediated enhancement) or when a metal-RE energy transfer mechanism is involved.

  14. Optical Properties of Nd Doped Rare Earth Vanadates (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    common of these is yttrium orthovanadate, other rare earth vanadates such as lutetium vanadate and gadolinium vanadate are being used for their...state laser hosts such as YAG. While the most common of these is yttrium orthovanadate, other rare earth vanadates such as lutetium vanadate and

  15. Electroluminescence spectra of rare-earth-doped ZnS 1-XSe X thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Noboru; Ogawa, Kiyoshi; Kobayashi, Shuko; Matsumoto, Hironaga; Nakano, Ryotaro

    1994-04-01

    Electroluminescence has been measured for ZnS 1- XSe X thin films doped with rare-earth ions. As X increases the band-gap energy of the host decreases. The emission levels of trivalent rare-earth ions are not observed when the band-gap energy is narrower than the excitation levels. This is because of the energy transfer between the host and the emission center.

  16. Infrared spectroscopy of rare-earth-doped CaFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zhen; Huffman, T. J.; Xu, Peng; Qazilbash, M. M.; Saha, S. R.; Drye, Tyler; Paglione, J.

    2014-03-01

    Recently, rare-earth doping in CaFe2As2 has been used to tune its electronic, magnetic, and structural properties. The substitution of rare-earth ions at the alkaline-earth sites leads to the suppression of the spin-density wave (SDW) phase transition in CaFe2As2. For example, Pr substitution results in a paramagnetic metal in the tetragonal phase that is susceptible to a low temperature structural transition to a collapsed tetragonal phase. However, La-doped CaFe2As2 remains in the uncollapsed tetragonal structure down to the lowest measured temperatures. Both the uncollapsed and collapsed tetragonal structures exhibit superconductivity with maximum Tc reaching 47 K, the highest observed in inter-metallics albeit with a small superconducting volume fraction. In this work, we perform ab-plane infrared spectroscopy of rare-earth-doped CaFe2As2 at different cryogenic temperatures. Our aim is to ascertain the contributions of electron doping and chemical pressure to the charge and lattice dynamics of this iron-arsenide system.

  17. Earth System Science: An Integrated Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Details how an understanding of the role played by human activities in global environmental change has emerged. Presents information about the earth system provided by research programs. Speculates about the direction of future research. (DDR)

  18. Visible to infrared low temperature photoluminescence of rare earth doped bismuth germanate crystals.

    PubMed

    Canimoglu, A; Ayvacikli, M; Karabulut, Y; Karali, T; Can, N

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the influence of a series of rare earth (Eu, Tm, Nd) and Cr ion doping on the optical properties of BGO was investigated by means of photoluminescence (PL) from visible to IR region in the 10-300K temperature range using different types of detectors, namely, photomultiplier tube (PMT), InGaAs (IGA), and Si. Several samples were investigated having dopants concentrations of 0.3wt%Nd, 0.4wt%Tm, 0.06wt% Cr and 3ppm Eu. The PL spectra of the samples showed different luminescence behaviour which is assigned to the 4f intra shell transition from rare earth ions. The temperature dependence of the PL from rare earth doped BGO crystals is also examined.

  19. Electrical Relaxation in Rare Earth Doped Cubic Lead Fluoride.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    PAGE (W v,. Data Fleted ) READ INSTRUCTIONSREPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE BEFRE CMPETINGFORSORE OMPLETIN FO M 1. REPORT NUMBER j2. GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3...For the smallest rare earths, however, at least nine .* relaxations are found. The concentration studies indicate multiple relaxations for certain...relaxations are found. The concentration studies indicate multiple relaxations for certain sites. Both simple sites and clusters are observed for

  20. Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide as a novel oxygen storage material

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Qiang; Yin, Shu; Yoshida, Mizuki; Wu, Xiaoyong; Liu, Bin; Miura, Akira; Takei, Takahiro; Kumada, Nobuhiro; Sato, Tsugio

    2015-09-15

    Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) hollow nanospheres with a diameter of 50 nm have been synthesized successfully via a facial solvothermal route in a very simple system composed of only ethanol, acetic acid, SnCl{sub 4}·5H{sub 2}O and A(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·xH{sub 2}O (A = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba). The synthesized undoped SnO{sub 2} and A-doped SnO{sub 2} hollow nanospheres were characterized by the oxygen storage capacity (OSC), X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and the Brunauer–Emmet–Teller (BET) technique. The OSC values of all samples were measured using thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis. The incorporation of alkaline earth metal ion into tin oxide greatly enhanced the thermal stability and OSC. Especially, Ba-doped SnO{sub 2} hollow nanospheres calcined at 1000 °C for 20 h with a BET surface area of 61 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} exhibited the considerably high OSC of 457 μmol-O g{sup −1} and good thermal stability. Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide has the potential to be a novel oxygen storage material.

  1. Radioluminescence and thermoluminescence of rare earth element and phosphorus-doped zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Karali, T.; Can, N.; Townsend, P.D.; Rowlands, A.P.; Hanchar, J.M.

    2000-06-01

    The radioluminescence and thermoluminescence spectra of synthetic zircon crystals doped with individual trivalent rare earth element (REE) ions (Pr, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, and Yb) and P are reported in the temperature range 25 to 673 K. Although there is some intrinsic UV/blue emission from the host lattice, the dominant signals are from the rare-earth sites, with signals characteristic of the REE{sup 3+} states. The shapes of the glow curves are different for each dopant, and there are distinct differences between glow peak temperatures for different rare-earth lines of the same element. Within the overall set of signals there are indications of linear trends in which some glow peak temperatures vary as a function of the ionic size of the rare earth ions. The temperature shifts of the peaks are considerable, up to 200{degree}, and much larger than those cited in other rare-earth-doped crystals of LaF{sub 3} and Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12}. The data clearly suggest that the rare-earth ions are active both in the trapping and luminescence steps, and hence the TL occurs within localized defect complexes that include REE{sup 3+} ions.

  2. Benefit of Rare-Earth "Smart Doping" and Material Nanostructuring for the Next Generation of Er-Doped Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savelii, Inna; Bigot, Laurent; Capoen, Bruno; Gonnet, Cedric; Chanéac, Corinne; Burova, Ekaterina; Pastouret, Alain; El-Hamzaoui, Hicham; Bouazaoui, Mohamed

    2017-03-01

    Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs) for harsh environments require to develop specific fabrication methods of Er 3+-doped fibers (EDFs) so as to limit the impact of radiation-induced absorption. In this context, a compromise has to be found between the concentration of Erbium and the glass composition. On the one hand, high concentration of Er 3+ ions helps to reduce the length of the EDF and hence the cumulated attenuation but generally leads to luminescence quenching mechanisms that limit the performances. On the other hand, so as to avoid such quenching effect, glass modifiers like Al 3+ or P 5+ ions are used in the fabrication of commercial EDFs but are not suitable for applications in harsh environment because these glass modifiers are precursors of radiation-induced structural defects and consequently of optical losses. In this work, we investigate the concept of smart doping via material nanostructuring as a way to fabricate more efficient optical devices. This approach aims at optimizing the glass composition of the fiber core in order to use the minimal content of glass modifiers needed to reach the suited level of performances for EDFA. Er 3+-doped alumina nanoparticles (NPs), as precursor of Er 3+ ions in the preform fabrication process, were used to control the environment of rare-earth ions and their optical properties. Structural and optical characterizations of NP-doped preforms and optical fibers drawn from such preforms demonstrate the interest of this approach for small concentrations of aluminum in comparison to similar glass compositions obtained by a conventional technique.

  3. Benefit of Rare-Earth "Smart Doping" and Material Nanostructuring for the Next Generation of Er-Doped Fibers.

    PubMed

    Savelii, Inna; Bigot, Laurent; Capoen, Bruno; Gonnet, Cedric; Chanéac, Corinne; Burova, Ekaterina; Pastouret, Alain; El-Hamzaoui, Hicham; Bouazaoui, Mohamed

    2017-12-01

    Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs) for harsh environments require to develop specific fabrication methods of Er (3+)-doped fibers (EDFs) so as to limit the impact of radiation-induced absorption. In this context, a compromise has to be found between the concentration of Erbium and the glass composition. On the one hand, high concentration of Er (3+) ions helps to reduce the length of the EDF and hence the cumulated attenuation but generally leads to luminescence quenching mechanisms that limit the performances. On the other hand, so as to avoid such quenching effect, glass modifiers like Al (3+) or P (5+) ions are used in the fabrication of commercial EDFs but are not suitable for applications in harsh environment because these glass modifiers are precursors of radiation-induced structural defects and consequently of optical losses. In this work, we investigate the concept of smart doping via material nanostructuring as a way to fabricate more efficient optical devices. This approach aims at optimizing the glass composition of the fiber core in order to use the minimal content of glass modifiers needed to reach the suited level of performances for EDFA. Er (3+)-doped alumina nanoparticles (NPs), as precursor of Er (3+) ions in the preform fabrication process, were used to control the environment of rare-earth ions and their optical properties. Structural and optical characterizations of NP-doped preforms and optical fibers drawn from such preforms demonstrate the interest of this approach for small concentrations of aluminum in comparison to similar glass compositions obtained by a conventional technique.

  4. Meaningfully Integrating Big Earth Science Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pebesma, E. J.; Stasch, C.

    2014-12-01

    After taking the technical hurdles to deal with big earth observationdata, large challenges remain to avoid that operations are carried out that are not meaningful. Examples of this are summing things that should not be summed, or interpolating phenomena that shouldnot be interpolated. We propose a description of data at the level of their meaning, to allow for notifying data users whenmeaningless operations are being executed. We present a prototypicalimplementation in R.

  5. Integrated Earth System Model (iESM)

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, Peter Edmond; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying

    2016-12-02

    The iESM is a simulation code that represents the physical and biological aspects of Earth's climate system, and also includes the macro-economic and demographic properties of human societies. The human aspect of the simulation code is focused in particular on the effects of human activities on land use and land cover change, but also includes aspects such as energy economies. The time frame for predictions with iESM is approximately 1970 through 2100.

  6. Raman spectral analysis of TiO2 thin films doped with rare-earth samarium.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chang-Hu; Ma, Zhong-Quan

    2012-08-01

    TiO(2) thin films doped with rare-earth samarium were prepared on a quartz plate by the sol-gel/spin-coating technique. The samples were annealed at 700 °C to 1100 °C, and the Raman spectra of the samples were obtained. Analyses of Raman spectra show that samarium doping can inhibit the anatase-rutile phase transition. Samarium doping can refine grains of TiO(2) thin films and increase the internal stress, thereby preventing lattice vibration. Nanocrystalline TiO(2) thin films obviously show the phonon confinement effect, i.e., the blueshift of characteristic Raman peak and full width at half-height increase, and the peak shapes asymmetrically broaden with a decrease in the grain sizes of the samples.

  7. Optical Properties of Rare Earth Doped SrS Phosphor: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Ayush; Mishra, Shubhra; Kshatri, D. S.; Tiwari, Sanjay

    2017-02-01

    Rare earth (RE) doped SrS phosphor has attracted a lot of attention on a wide range of photo-, cathodo-, thermo-, and electroluminescent applications. Upon doping with different RE elements (e.g., Ce, Pr, Eu, Yb), the luminescence from SrS can be varied over the entire visible region by appropriately choosing the composition of the strontium sulfide host. The main applications include flat panel displays and SrS-based powder electroluminescence (EL) for back lights. Sulfide materials known for providing Eu2+ based red emission band and preferred as a color conversion material in white light emitting diodes are discussed. Especially, the applications of RE doped SrS are described in light of their utility as conversion and storage phosphors. The effect of energy level splitting, EL efficiency, post-annealing, milling time, and impurity on luminescence properties for SrS are also discussed.

  8. 3-D rare earth-doped colloidal photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clara Gonçalves, M.; Fortes, Luis M.; Almeida, Rui M.; Chiasera, Alessandro; Chiappini, Andrea; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2009-07-01

    Three-dimensional photonic bandgap structures have been synthesized by a colloidal/sol-gel route, starting with the self-organization of polystyrene microspheres into opal structures by vertical convective self-assembly, followed by sol-gel infiltration of the interstices with silica or titania doped with Er 3+ and Yb 3+ ions and the removal of the polymeric template by heat treatment. The structural and optical properties of the opals and inverse opals prepared by this method have been studied by scanning electron microscopy and near infra-red spectroscopy. The SEM images show that the photonic crystals contain ordered domains up to ˜600 μm 2. Variable incidence reflectivity spectra have been measured for the opals, infiltrated opals and inverse opals. The corresponding effective refractive indices ( neff) were calculated based on effective-medium approaches. Photoluminescence measurements of the emission of Er 3+ ions at ˜1.5 μm from titania inverse opal structures were performed and are compared with those characteristic of the same ions in bulk titania material in the absence of a photonic bandgap structure.

  9. Fabrication of high aluminium containing rare-earth doped fiber without core-clad interface defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, Anirban; Das, Shyamal; Maiti, Himadri Sekhar; Sen, Ranjan

    2010-06-01

    The unwanted core-clad interface defect generation and related scattering loss in rare-earth doped optical fibers containing Al-oxide is up to now an unsolved problem as it cannot be avoided without modifying fiber design or composition. Here a simple technique is proposed to eliminate the problem without affecting fiber parameters. The method comprises addition of fumed silica in appropriate amount under dispersed condition to the soaking solution containing Al and rare-earth salts during the solution impregnation stage. This facilitates the networking between Al 2O 3 and SiO 2 during sintering. The method leads to an improvement in optical properties of the fibers and enables doping of high concentration of Al-oxide even in presence of GeO 2 in the core.

  10. Enhanced Laser Cooling of Rare-Earth-Ion-Doped Composite Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, You-Hua; Zhong, Biao; Ji, Xian-Ming; Yin, Jian-Ping

    2008-10-01

    We predict enhanced laser cooling performance of rare-earth-ions-doped glasses containing nanometre-sized ul-traBne particles, which can be achieved by the enhancement of local Geld around rare earth ions, owing to the surface plasma resonance of small metallic particles. The influence of energy transfer between ions and the particle is theoretically discussed. Depending on the particle size and the ion emission quantum efficiency, the enhancement of the absorption is predicted. It is concluded that the absorption are greatly enhanced in these composite materials, the cooling power is increased as compared to the bulk material.

  11. Microemulsion synthesis, characterization of highly visible light responsive rare earth-doped Bi2O3.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuxing; Fang, Jianzhang; Xu, Xiaoxin; Liu, Zhang; Zhu, Ximiao; Xu, Weicheng

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, Bi(2)O(3) and rare earth (La, Ce)-doped Bi(2)O(3) visible-light-driven photocatalysts were prepared in a Triton X-100/n-hexanol/cyclohexane/water reverse microemulsion. The resulting materials were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, photoluminescence spectra (PLS) and UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The XRD patterns of the as-prepared catalysts calcined at 500 °C exhibited only the characteristic peaks of monoclinic α-Bi(2)O(3). PLS analysis implied that the separation efficiency for electron-hole has been enhanced when Bi(2)O(3) was doped with rare earth. UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy measurements presented an extension of light absorption into the visible region. The photocatalytic activity of the samples was evaluated by degradation of methyl orange (MO) and 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP). The results displayed that the photocatalytic activity of rare earth-doped Bi(2)O(3) was higher than that of dopant-free Bi(2)O(3). The optimal dopant amount of La or Ce was 1.0 mol%. And the mechanisms of influence on the photocatalytic activity of the catalysts were discussed.

  12. Crystal-field interaction and oxygen stoichiometry effects in strontium-doped rare-earth cobaltates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furrer, A.; Podlesnyak, A.; Frontzek, M.; Sashin, I.; Embs, J. P.; Mitberg, E.; Pomjakushina, E.

    2014-08-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering was employed to study the crystal-field interaction in the strontium-doped rare-earth compounds RxSr1-xCoO3-z (R=Pr, Nd, Ho, and Er). Particular emphasis is laid on the effect of oxygen deficiencies that naturally occur in the synthesis of these compounds. The observed energy spectra are found to be the result of a superposition of crystal fields with different nearest-neighbor oxygen coordination at the R sites. The experimental data are interpreted in terms of crystal-field parameters, which behave in a consistent manner through the rare-earth series, thereby allowing a reliable extrapolation for rare-earth ions not considered in the present work.

  13. Dielectric Properties of Rare-Earth-Oxide-Doped BaTiO3 Ceramics Fired in Reducing Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okino, Yoshikazu; Shizuno, Hisamitsu; Kusumi, Shinya; Kishi, Hiroshi

    1994-09-01

    In order to gain an understanding of highly reliable electrical characteristics for the Ho-doped multilayer ceramic capacitors with Ni electrodes, dielectric properties of various rare-earth-oxide-doped BaTiO3 ceramics were studied. The smaller ionic radius rare-earth-oxide (Dy, Ho, Er)-doped samples showed lower resistivity in reducing atmosphere, but higher resistivity in oxidizing atmosphere at the cooling stage, compared with the larger-ion (La, Sm, Gd)-doped samples. Multilayer ceramic capacitors with Ni electrodes using the smaller-ion-doped materials showed smaller aging rate and longer lifetime. We developed Ni-electrode MLCs with X7R specification as 1 µ F in the 2125 type.

  14. Visible and near infrared emitting thin film electroluminescent gallium nitride doped with rare earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joo Han

    Visible and near-infrared (NIR) light-emitting thin-film electroluminescent gallium nitride (GaN) doped with rare earth (RE) elements was studied. The rare-earth-doped GaN thin films were prepared by radio frequency (RF) planar magnetron co-sputtering of separate targets consisting of a GaN compound target and a metallic rare earth target in a pure nitrogen atmosphere. The luminescence of rare-earth-doped GaN was shown to be a strong function of its structure and properties, and growth parameters affected the structure and properties of the GaN host films. A phase transition from the thermodynamically stable wurtzite to the metastable zinc-blende structure at room temperature in GaN host films was observed upon increasing the impact energy of the bombarding species, thereby increasing the compressive stress in the GaN film. The switch from wurtzite to zinc-blende GaN occurred at a compressive internal stress of ˜1 GPa. The internal compressive stress above this threshold value apparently stabilizes the zinc-blende GaN phase at room temperature. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed that the impact by hyperthermal species yielded a highly condensed fibrous GaN microstructure with a smooth surface morphology due to annihilation of porosity by knock-on and bombardment-induced adatom mobility. X-ray diffraction and texture analyses showed that the GaN films deposited at a low pressure had a predominant cubic phase with a preferred crystallographic orientation of the [111] direction perpendicular to the surface of the film. X-ray rocking curve data revealed that cubic GaN films grown with a lower growth rate exhibited a more highly [111]-textured structure. Alternating-current thin-film electroluminescent (ACTFEL) devices were fabricated based on GaN doped with rare earth (RE) elements. Visible electroluminescent light emission peaks at 475 (blue), 530 (green), and 614 nm (red) were demonstrated at room temperature

  15. Physical and electrochemical properties of alkaline earth doped, rare earth vanadates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adijanto, Lawrence; Balaji Padmanabhan, Venu; Holmes, Kevin J.; Gorte, Raymond J.; Vohs, John M.

    2012-06-01

    The effect of partial substitution of alkaline earth (AE) ions, Sr2+ and Ca2+, for the rare earth (RE) ions, La3+, Ce3+, Pr3+, and Sm3+, on the physical properties of REVO4 compounds were investigated. The use of the Pechini method to synthesize the vanadates allowed for high levels of AE substitution to be obtained. Coulometric titration was used to measure redox isotherms for these materials and showed that the addition of the AE ions increased both reducibility and electronic conductivity under typical solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode conditions, through the formation of compounds with mixed vanadium valence. In spite of their high electronic conductivity, REVO4-yttira stabilized zirconia (YSZ) composite anodes exhibited only modest performance when used in SOFCs operating with H2 fuel at 973 K due to their low catalytic activity. High performance was obtained, however, after the addition of a small amount of catalytically active Pd to the anode.

  16. UV and visible Raman studies of oxygen vacancies in rare-earth-doped ceria.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ming; Lu, Jiqing; Wu, Yanni; Wang, Yuejuan; Luo, Mengfei

    2011-04-05

    Surface properties of rare-earth (RE) doped ceria (RE = Sm, Gd, Pr, and Tb) were investigated by UV (325 nm) and visible (514, 633, and 785 nm) Raman spectroscopy, combined with UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectra techniques. It was found that the optical absorption property of samples, the wavelength of detecting laser line, and the inhomogeneous distribution of the dopants significantly affected the obtained surface information, namely, the peak intensity and shape at ca. 460 and 570 cm(-1), as well as the observed oxygen vacancy concentration (A(570)/A(460)). The UV laser line detected the surface information of RE-doped ceria and disclosed the presence of many oxygen vacancies in the samples. The visible laser lines penetrated into the inner layer of the Sm- or Gd-doped CeO(2) and reflected the whole information of samples because of their weak absorptions of the visible laser. However, the Pr- or Tb-doped CeO(2) absorbed visible light strongly; thus, the laser can only determine the outer surface information of the sample.

  17. Multi-color fluorescence in rare earth acetylacetonate hydrate doped poly methyl methacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. Y.; Shen, L. F.; Pun, E. Y. B.; Chen, B. J.; Lin, H.

    2013-01-01

    Europium and terbium acetylacetonate hydrates were doped into poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA). Efficient purplish-red and green fluorescence was obtained from europium acetylacetonate hydrates (EAH) and terbium acetylacetonate hydrates (TAH) doped PMMA respectively. Judd-Ofelt parameters Ω2 (19.73×10-20 cm2) and Ω4 (2.19×10-20 cm2) indicate a high inversion asymmetric and strong covalent environment in PMMA. The maximum stimulated emission cross-sections for the 5D0→7FJ (J=1, 2 and 4) transitions in EAH doped PMMA were calculated to be 0.38×10-21, 4.90×10-21 and 0.36×10-21 cm2, respectively. Variable fluorescence color can be efficiently achieved from the cooperation of three fluorescence colors offered by red (Eu3+), green (Tb3+) and blue (ligand) in EAH/TAH codoped PMMA by adjusting the excitation wavelength. These results indicate that PMMA is an effective photoluminescence co-sensitizer and PMMA doped with rare earth acetylacetonate hydrates is a promising candidate for a series of optoelectronic functional devices.

  18. Defect association mediated ionic conductivity of rare earth doped nanoceria: Dependency on ionic radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anirban, Sk.; Sinha, A.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Dutta, A.

    2016-05-01

    Rare earth doped nanoceria Ce0.9RE0.1O1.95 (RE = Pr, Nd, Eu and Gd) were prepared through citrate auto-ignition method. The single phase cubic fluorite structure with space group Fm3 ¯m of the compositions were confirmed from Rietveld analysis of XRD data. The particle size of the compositions were in the range 49.77 nm to 66.20 nm. An ionic radius dependent lattice parameter variation was found. The DC conductivity of each composition was evaluated using Random Barrier Model. The conductivity decreased and activation energy increased with increasing ionic radius from Gd to Pr doping due to the size mismatch with host ions and formation of stable defect associate. The formation of different defect associates and their correlation with ionic conductivity has been discussed.

  19. Optical properties of rare earth doped strontium aluminate (SAO) phosphors: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kshatri, D. S.; Khare, A.

    2014-11-01

    After the first news on rare earth (RE) doped strontium aluminate (SAO) phosphors in late 1990s, researchers all over the world geared up to develop stable and efficient persistent phosphors. Scientists studied various features of long lasting phosphors (LLP) and tried to earmark appropriate mechanism. However, about two decades after the discovery of SrAl2O4: Eu2+, Dy3+, the number of persistent luminescent materials is not significant. In this review, we present an overview of the optical characteristics of RE doped SAO phosphors in terms of photoluminescence (PL), thermoluminescence (TL) and afterglow spectra. Also, we refresh the work undertaken to study diverse factors like dopant concentration, temperature, surface energy, role of activator, etc. Simultaneously, some of our important findings on SAO are reported and discussed in the end.

  20. Design of rare-earth-ion doped chalcogenide photonic crystals for enhancing the fluorescence emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peiqing; Dai, Shixun; Niu, Xueke; Xu, Yinsheng; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yuehao; Xu, Tiefeng; Nie, Qiuhua

    2014-07-01

    Rare-earth-ion doped chalcogenide glass is a promising material for developing mid-infrared light sources. In this work, Tm3+-doped chalcogenide glass was prepared and photonic crystal structures were designed to enhance its fluorescence emission at approximately 3.8 μm. By employing the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation, the emission characteristics of the luminescent centers in the bulk material and in the photonic crystals were worked out. Utilizing analysis of the photon excitation inside the sample and the photon extraction on the sample surface, it was found that fluorescence emission can be significantly enhanced 260-fold with the designed photonic crystal structure. The results of this work can be used to realize high-efficiency mid-infrared light sources.

  1. Influence of doping with alkaline earth metals on the optical properties of thermochromic VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Marc K.; Kramm, Benedikt G.; Becker, Martin; Meyer, Bruno K.; Polity, Angelika; Klar, Peter J.

    2015-05-01

    Thin films of doped VO2 were deposited, analyzed, and optimized with regard to their solar energy transmittance (Tsol) and visible/luminous light transmittance (Tlum) which are important parameters in the context of smart window applications in buildings. The doping with alkaline earth metals (AEM) like Mg, Ca, Sr, or Ba increased both Tsol and Tlum due to a bandgap widening and an associated absorption edge blue-shift. Thereby, the brown-yellowish color impression of pure VO2 thin films, which is one major hindrance limiting the usage of VO2 as thermochromic window coating, was overcome. Transparent thin films with excellent switching behavior were prepared by sputtering. Highly doped V1-xMexO2 (Me = Ca, Sr, Ba) kept its excellent thermochromic switching behavior up to x(Me) = Me/(Me + V) = 10 at. % doping level, while the optical bandgap energy was increased from 1.64 eV for undoped VO2 to 2.38 eV for x(Mg) = 7.7 at. %, 1.85 eV for x(Ca) = 7.4 at. %, 1.84 eV for x(Sr) = 6.4 at. % and 1.70 eV for x(Ba) = 6.8 at. %, as well as the absorption edge is blue shifted by increasing AEM contents. Also, the critical temperature ϑc, at which the semiconductor-to-metal transition (SMT) occurs, was decreased by AEM doping, which amounted to about -0.5 K/at. % for all AEM on average. The critical temperature was determined by transmittance-temperature hysteresis measurements. Furthermore, Tsol and Tlum were calculated and were found to be significantly enhanced by AEM doping. Tlum increased from 32.0% in undoped VO2 to 43.4% in VO2 doped with 6.4 at. % Sr. Similar improvements were found for other AEM. The modulation of the solar energy transmittance ΔTsol, which is the difference of the Tsol values in the low and high temperature phase, was almost constant or even slightly increased when the doping level was increased up to about 10 at. % Ca, Sr, or Ba.

  2. On-chip quantum storage in a rare-earth-doped photonic nanocavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Tian; Kindem, Jonathan M.; Rochman, Jake; Miyazono, Evan; Faraon, Andrei; Ferrier, Alban; Goldner, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Rare-earth-ion doped crystals are state-of-the-art materials for optical quantum memories and quantum transducers between optical and microwave photons. Here we describe our progress towards a nanophotonic quantum memory based on a rare-earth (Neodymium) doped yttrium orthosilicate (YSO) photonic crystal resonator. The Purcell-enhanced coupling of the 883 nm transitions of Neodymium (Nd3+) ions to the nano-resonator results in increased optical depth, which could in principle facilitate highly efficient photon storage via cavity impedance matching. The atomic frequency comb (AFC) memory protocol can be implemented in the Nd:YSO nano-resonator by efficient optical pumping into the long-lived Zeeman state. Coherent optical signals can be stored and retrieved from the AFC memory. We currently measure a storage efficiency on par with a bulk crystal Nd:YSO memory that is millimeters long. Our results will enable multiplexed on-chip quantum storage and thus quantum repeater devices using rare-earth-ions.

  3. Fabrication and characterization of rare earth doped wide bandgap semiconductors for spectral storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sly, Mohamed Fawzy

    Powder samples of MgS and CaS, singly doped with Eu and doubly doped with Eu and Ce, were synthesized for their usage in spectral storage. Thin films of these materials were fabricated using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. This fast and simple technique is superior to the single crystal growth or molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) as far as the storage material requirements are concerned. High optical quality films of MgS:Eu and CaS:Eu have been grown and tested. Polycrystalline powder samples of MgS and CaS were synthesized using high temperature reduction of commercially available magnesium and calcium sulfates. These materials were singly doped with rare earth lanthanides using high temperature diffusion in powder forms. Rare earth lanthanide impurities in very small concentrations are necessary for optical applications such as spectral storage for which all the materials prepared during the course of this study were made. Thin films of rare earth doped calcium and magnesium sulfides have been produced by using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. Coating of the reactive surfaces of the PLD chamber with SiC has been performed to make them resistant to the corrosive environment and the by products of the deposition process. Solid targets needed for thin films were fabricated from the synthesized polycrystalline powders by high-pressure cold compression technique. Deposition of thin films of CaS and MgS has been performed and to protect these films from the environment, capping layers of aluminum oxide (Al2O 3) or ZnS have been deposited over the CaS and MgS thin films. In magnesium sulfide, oxygen doped magnesium sulfide and calcium sulfides, europium centers occur in different spectral regions. Therefore, multi-layer thin film structures were fabricated to allow for higher density of spectral storage. Various characterization techniques such as optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy have

  4. Fibre Tip Sensors for Localised Temperature Sensing Based on Rare Earth-Doped Glass Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Schartner, Erik P.; Monro, Tanya M.

    2014-01-01

    We report the development of a point temperature sensor, based on monitoring upconversion emission from erbium:ytterbium-doped tellurite coatings on the tips of optical fibres. The dip coating technique allows multiple sensors to be fabricated simultaneously, while confining the temperature-sensitive region to a localised region on the end-face of the fibre. The strong response of the rare earth ions to changing temperature allows a resolution of 0.1–0.3 °C to be recorded over the biologically relevant range of temperatures from 23–39 °C. PMID:25407907

  5. Effects of rare-earth co-doping on the local structure of rare-earth phosphate glasses using high and low energy X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Alisha J; Cole, Jacqueline M; FitzGerald, Vicky; Honkimaki, Veijo; Roberts, Mark A; Brennan, Tessa; Martin, Richard A; Saunders, George A; Newport, Robert J

    2013-06-14

    Rare-earth co-doping in inorganic materials has a long-held tradition of facilitating highly desirable optoelectronic properties for their application to the laser industry. This study concentrates specifically on rare-earth phosphate glasses, (R2O3)x(R'2O3)y(P2O5)(1-(x+y)), where (R, R') denotes (Ce, Er) or (La, Nd) co-doping and the total rare-earth composition corresponds to a range between metaphosphate, RP3O9, and ultraphosphate, RP5O14. Thereupon, the effects of rare-earth co-doping on the local structure are assessed at the atomic level. Pair-distribution function analysis of high-energy X-ray diffraction data (Q(max) = 28 Å(-1)) is employed to make this assessment. Results reveal a stark structural invariance to rare-earth co-doping which bears testament to the open-framework and rigid nature of these glasses. A range of desirable attributes of these glasses unfold from this finding; in particular, a structural simplicity that will enable facile molecular engineering of rare-earth phosphate glasses with 'dial-up' lasing properties. When considered together with other factors, this finding also demonstrates additional prospects for these co-doped rare-earth phosphate glasses in nuclear waste storage applications. This study also reveals, for the first time, the ability to distinguish between P-O and P[double bond, length as m-dash]O bonding in these rare-earth phosphate glasses from X-ray diffraction data in a fully quantitative manner. Complementary analysis of high-energy X-ray diffraction data on single rare-earth phosphate glasses of similar rare-earth composition to the co-doped materials is also presented in this context. In a technical sense, all high-energy X-ray diffraction data on these glasses are compared with analogous low-energy diffraction data; their salient differences reveal distinct advantages of high-energy X-ray diffraction data for the study of amorphous materials.

  6. Rare earth-doped nanocrystalline MgF2: Synthesis, luminescence and thermoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsohn, L. G.; Roy, A. L.; McPherson, C. L.; Kucera, C. J.; Oliveira, L. C.; Yukihara, E. G.; Ballato, J.

    2013-10-01

    The radioluminescence (RL) and thermoluminescence (TL) activation of MgF2 through the incorporation of rare earths is investigated in this work. These materials were obtained by ligand-free solution precipitation and calcination at 500 °C in air, and Ce, Eu and Tb were incorporated at the 1 mol% level. RL results of doped and undoped materials seem to indicate that the incorporation of rare earths creates effective luminescence centers, which is accompanied by an increase in the TL signal intensity in comparison with the undoped material. In particular, RL emission of MgF2:Ce is reported to be centered at 325 nm. The traps associated with the TL signal were found to be unstable under exposure to room light, suggesting potential for applications involving optically stimulated luminescence.

  7. Progress in rare-earth-doped mid-infrared fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Seddon, Angela B; Tang, Zhuoqi; Furniss, David; Sujecki, Slawomir; Benson, Trevor M

    2010-12-06

    The progress, and current challenges, in fabricating rare-earth-doped chalcogenide-glass fibers for developing mid-infrared (IR) fiber lasers are reviewed. For the first time a coherent explanation is forwarded for the failure to date to develop a gallium-lanthanum-sulfide glass mid-IR fiber laser. For the more covalent chalcogenide glasses, the importance of optimizing the glass host and glass processing routes in order to minimize non-radiative decay and to avoid rare earth ion clustering and glass devitrification is discussed. For the first time a new idea is explored to explain an additional method of non-radiative depopulation of the excited state in the mid-IR that has not been properly recognized before: that of impurity multiphonon relaxation. Practical characterization of candidate selenide glasses is presented. Potential applications of mid-infrared fiber lasers are suggested.

  8. Temperature-dependent structures and chemical bonding states of the calcium chlorapatite powders doped with rare-earth-ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Kyong-Soo; Yang, Ho-Soon

    2017-02-01

    Calcium chlorapatite powders doped with rare-earth-ions are synthesized by using the solid-state reaction method and sintering at 1,100 °C and 1,300 °C, respectively. This study focuses on the crystal structures and the chemical bonding states of calcium chlorapatite powders for different sintering temperatures, doping elements, and doping concentrations. The characterized physical properties show that the apatite powders exhibit two phases based on the sintering temperatures: the powders sintered at temperatures below 1,100 °C have a hexagonal structure while those sintered at 1,300 °C have a monoclinic structure. That is, the apatite compounds sintered at higher temperatures show a structure with a lower space symmetry. The chemical bonding states of the synthesized powders remain unchanged regardless of the amount of doped rare-earths and the sintering temperature.

  9. Single-crystal Rare-earth Doped YAG Fiber Lasers Grown by the Laser-heated Pedestal Growth Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-04

    thulium have been successfully doped into single crystal (SC) yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG, Y3Al5O12) fibers by use of the laser heated pedestal growth...holmium and thulium have been successfully doped into single crystal (SC) yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG, Y3Al5O12) fibers by use of the laser heated...Ann Arbor, MI 48109 dSPAWAR System Center, San Diego, CA ABSTRACT High concentrations of the rare-earth elements erbium, holmium and thulium

  10. Rare earth elements in synthetic zircon. 1. synthesis, and rare earth element and phosphorus doping.

    SciTech Connect

    Hanchar, J. M.; Finch, R. J.; Hoskin, W. O.; Watson, E. B.; Cherniak, D. J.; Mariano, A. N.; Chemical Engineering; George Washington Univ.; Univ. of Canterbury; Australian National Univ.; Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst.

    2001-05-01

    Sedimentary mineral assemblages commonly contain detrital zircon crystals as part of the heavy-mineral fraction. Age spectra determined by U-Pb isotopic analysis of single zircon crystals within a sample may directly image the age composition--but not the chemical composition--of the source region. Rare earth element (REE) abundances have been measured for zircons from a range of common crustal igneous rock types from different tectonic environments, as well as kimberlite, carbonatite, and high-grade metamorphic rocks, to assess the potential of using zircon REE characteristics to infer the rock types present in sediment source regions. Except for zircon with probable mantle affinities, zircon REE abundances and normalized patterns show little intersample and intrasample variation. To evaluate the actual variation in detrital zircon REE composition in a true sediment of known mixed provenance, zircons from a sandstone sample from the Statfjord Formation (North Sea) were analyzed. Despite a provenance including high-grade metasediment and granitoids and a range in zircon age of 2.82 b.y., the zircon REEs exhibit a narrow abundance range with no systematic differences in pattern shape. These evidences show zircon REE patterns and abundances are generally not useful as indicators of provenance.

  11. Rare-earth ion doped lead- and cadmium-free bismuthate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H.; Pun, E. Y. B.; Chen, B. J.; Zhang, Y. Y.

    2008-03-01

    Rare-earth ion doped bismuthate (LZBB) glasses without traditional glass formers, lead and cadmium, have been attempted to prepare. In Er3+ doped LKBB glass system, Judd-Ofelt parameters Ω2, Ω4, and Ω6 have been derived to be 3.48×10-20, 9.47×10-21, and 1.01×10-20cm2, respectively, which shows a medium symmetry of the ligand field in the site occupied by Er3+ and a less covalent environment of Er3+. Effective 1.53μm fluorescence was recorded and the peak emission cross section is proved to be more than 9.0×10-21cm2, which is much higher than those in phosphate, silicate, germanate, and tellurite glasses and beneficial to achieving powerful stimulated emission of Er3+ in LZBB glass system. Pr3+, Tm3+, and Ho3+ doped LZBB glasses with the maximum phonon energy of only ˜600 cm-1 are potential candidates for developing O-, S-, and U-band amplifiers and medical lasers.

  12. TOPICAL REVIEW: Ferromagnetic nitride-based semiconductors doped with transition metals and rare earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanni, A.

    2007-09-01

    This review summarizes the state-of-the-art in the search for room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors based on transition-metal- and rare-earth-doped nitrides. The major methods of synthesis are reported, together with an overview of the magnetic, structural, electrical and optical characterization of the materials systems, where available. The controversial experimental results concerning the actual value of the apparent Curie temperature in magnetically doped nitrides are highlighted, the inadequacy of standard characterization methods alone and the necessity of a possibly exhaustive structural investigation of the systems are proven and underlined. Furthermore, the dependence on the fabrication parameters of the magnetic ions incorporation into the semiconductor matrix is discussed, with special attention to the fundamental concepts of solubility limit and spinodal decomposition. It is argued that high-temperature ferromagnetic features in magnetically doped nitrides result from the presence of nanoscale regions containing a high concentration of the magnetic constituents. Various functionalities of these multicomponent systems are listed. Moreover, we give an extensive overview on the properties of single magnetic-impurity states in the nitride host. The understanding of this limit is crucial when considering the most recent suggestions for the control of the magnetic ion distribution—and consequently of the magnetic response—through the Fermi level engineering as well as to indicate roads for achieving high-temperature ferromagnetism in the systems containing a uniform distribution of magnetic ions.

  13. Nanophotonic coherent light–matter interfaces based on rare-earth-doped crystals

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Tian; Kindem, Jonathan M.; Miyazono, Evan; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    Quantum light–matter interfaces connecting stationary qubits to photons will enable optical networks for quantum communications, precise global time keeping, photon switching and studies of fundamental physics. Rare-earth-ion-doped crystals are state-of-the-art materials for optical quantum memories and quantum transducers between optical photons, microwave photons and spin waves. Here we demonstrate coupling of an ensemble of neodymium rare-earth-ions to photonic nanocavities fabricated in the yttrium orthosilicate host crystal. Cavity quantum electrodynamics effects including Purcell enhancement (F=42) and dipole-induced transparency are observed on the highly coherent 4I9/2–4F3/2 optical transition. Fluctuations in the cavity transmission due to statistical fine structure of the atomic density are measured, indicating operation at the quantum level. Coherent optical control of cavity-coupled rare-earth ions is performed via photon echoes. Long optical coherence times (T2∼100 μs) and small inhomogeneous broadening are measured for the cavity-coupled rare-earth ions, thus demonstrating their potential for on-chip scalable quantum light–matter interfaces. PMID:26364586

  14. Synthesis of rare earth doped TiO2 nanorods as photocatalysts for lignin degradation

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Liang; Zhao, Xueyuan; Cao, Lixin; ...

    2015-09-10

    In this paper, a two-step process is developed to synthesize rare earth doped titania nanorods (RE–TiO2 NRs) as photocatalysts for efficient degradation of lignin under simulated sunlight irradiation. In this approach, protonated titanate nanotubes with layered structures were first prepared by a hydrothermal approach, and rare earth metal ions were subsequently bound to the negatively charged surface of the synthesized titanate via electrostatic incorporation. The as-synthesized RE–TiO2 NRs after calcination generally showed much higher photocatalytic efficiencies than those of undoped TiO2 NRs or the commercial P25 TiO2 photocatalyst. Using methyl orange (MO) as a probing molecule, we demonstrate that Eu–TiO2more » NRs are among the best for degrading MO, with an observed rate constant of 4.2 × 10-3 s-1. The La3+, Sm3+, Eu3+ and Er3+ doped TiO2 NRs also showed higher photocatalytic efficiencies in degrading MO than the commercial P25 TiO2. Finally, we further demonstrate that lignin can be photodegraded effectively and rapidly at room temperature under simulated sunlight through two reaction routes, which could be important in controlling ways of lignin depolymerization or the formation of reaction products.« less

  15. Power scaling estimate of crystalline fiber waveguides with rare earth doped YAG cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Da; Hong, Pengda; Meissner, Stephanie K.; Meissner, Helmuth E.

    2016-03-01

    Power scaling analysis based on the model by Dawson et al. [1,2] for circular core fibers has been applied to estimating power scaling of crystalline fiber waveguides (CFWs) with RE3+ doped single crystalline or ceramic YAG (RE=rare earth: Yb, Er, Tm and Ho). Power scaling limits include stimulated Brillouin scattering, thermal lensing effect, and limits to coupling of pump light into CFWs. The CFW designs we have considered consist, in general, of a square doped RE3+:YAG core, an inner cladding of either undoped or laser-inactive-ion-doped YAG and an outer cladding of sapphire. The presented data have been developed for the structures fabricated using the Adhesive-Free Bonding (AFB®) technique, but the results should be essentially independent of fabrication technique, assuming perfect core/inner cladding/outer cladding interfaces. Hard power scaling limits exist for a specific CFW design and are strongly based on the physical constants of the material and its spectroscopic specifics. For example, power scaling limit was determined as ~16 kW for 2.5% ceramic Yb:YAG/YAG (core material/inner cladding material) at fiber length of 1.7 m and core diameter of 69 μm. Considering the present manufacturing limit for CFW length to be, e.g., 0.5 m, the actual maximum output power will be limited to ~4.4 kW for a Yb:YAG/YAG CFW. Power limit estimates have also been computed for Er3+, Tm3+ and Ho3+doped core based CFWs.

  16. Rare-earth metal oxide doped transparent mesoporous silica plates under non-aqueous condition as a potential UV sensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Joon; Park, Sung Soo; Lee, Sang Hyun; Hong, Sang-Hyun; Ha, Chang-Sik

    2013-11-01

    Transparent mesoporous silica plates doped with rare-earth metal oxide were prepared using solvent-evaporation method based on the self-organization between structure-directing agent and silicate in a non-aqueous solvent. A triblock copolymer, Pluronic (F127 or P123), was used as the structure-directing agent, while tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) was used as a silica source. The pore diameter and the surface area of the mesoporous silica plate prepared with the optimized conditions were ca 40 A and 600 m2 g(-1), respectively, for both structure-directing agent. Rare-earth metal oxides (Eu, Tb, Tm oxide) in mesochannel were formed via one-step synthetic route based on the preparation method of a silica plate. Optical properties of rare-earth metal oxide-doped mesoporous silica plates were investigated by UV irradiation and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Under the exitation wavelength of 254 nm, the doped mesoporous silica plates emitted red, green and blue for Eu, Tb and Tm oxides, respectively. Rare-earth metal oxide-doped mesoporous silica plates showed enhanced PL intensity compared to that of the bulk rare-earth metal oxide.

  17. Structural transition in rare earth doped zirconium oxide: A positron annihilation study

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Keka; Bisoi, Abhijit

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: New microstructural analysis and phase transition of rare earth doped mixed oxide compounds such as: Sm{sub 2−x}Dy{sub x}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} (where x = 0.0 ≤ x ≥ 2.0) that are potentially useful as solid oxide fuels, ionic conductors, optoelectronic materials and most importantly as radiation resistant host for high level rad-waste disposal, structural transition in the system is reported through positron annihilation spectroscopy as there is an indication in the X-ray diffraction analysis. Highlights: ► Zirconium oxide material doped with rare earth ions. ► The method of positron annihilation spectroscopy suggests a phase transition in the system. ► The crystal structure transformation from pure pyrochlore to defect fluorite type of structure is shown by X-ray diffraction results. -- Abstract: A series of compounds with the general composition Sm{sub 2−x}Dy{sub x}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} (where 0 ≤ x ≥ 2.0) were synthesized by chemical route and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The rare earth ion namely Sm{sup +3} in the compound was gradually replaced with another smaller and heavier ion, Dy{sup +3} of the 4f series, there by resulting in order–disorder structural transition, which has been studied by positron annihilation lifetime and Doppler broadening spectroscopy. This study reveals the subtle electronic micro environmental changes in the pyrochlore lattice (prevalent due to the oxygen vacancy in anti-site defect structure of the compound) toward its transformation to defect fluorite structure as found in Dy{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}. A comparison of the changes perceived with PAS as compared to XRD analysis is critically assayed.

  18. The integrated Earth System Model Version 1: formulation and functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, William D.; Craig, Anthony P.; Truesdale, John E.; Di Vittorio, Alan; Jones, Andrew D.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Kim, Son H.; Thomson, Allison M.; Patel, Pralit L.; Zhou, Yuyu; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Thornton, Peter E.; Chini, Louise M.; Hurtt, George C.

    2015-07-23

    The integrated Earth System Model (iESM) has been developed as a new tool for pro- jecting the joint human/climate system. The iESM is based upon coupling an Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) and an Earth System Model (ESM) into a common modeling in- frastructure. IAMs are the primary tool for describing the human–Earth system, including the sources of global greenhouse gases (GHGs) and short-lived species, land use and land cover change, and other resource-related drivers of anthropogenic climate change. ESMs are the primary scientific tools for examining the physical, chemical, and biogeochemical impacts of human-induced changes to the climate system. The iESM project integrates the economic and human dimension modeling of an IAM and a fully coupled ESM within a sin- gle simulation system while maintaining the separability of each model if needed. Both IAM and ESM codes are developed and used by large communities and have been extensively applied in recent national and international climate assessments. By introducing heretofore- omitted feedbacks between natural and societal drivers, we can improve scientific under- standing of the human–Earth system dynamics. Potential applications include studies of the interactions and feedbacks leading to the timing, scale, and geographic distribution of emissions trajectories and other human influences, corresponding climate effects, and the subsequent impacts of a changing climate on human and natural systems. This paper de- scribes the formulation, requirements, implementation, testing, and resulting functionality of the first version of the iESM released to the global climate community.

  19. The integrated Earth system model version 1: formulation and functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, W. D.; Craig, A. P.; Truesdale, J. E.; Di Vittorio, A. V.; Jones, A. D.; Bond-Lamberty, B.; Calvin, K. V.; Edmonds, J. A.; Kim, S. H.; Thomson, A. M.; Patel, P.; Zhou, Y.; Mao, J.; Shi, X.; Thornton, P. E.; Chini, L. P.; Hurtt, G. C.

    2015-07-01

    The integrated Earth system model (iESM) has been developed as a new tool for projecting the joint human/climate system. The iESM is based upon coupling an integrated assessment model (IAM) and an Earth system model (ESM) into a common modeling infrastructure. IAMs are the primary tool for describing the human-Earth system, including the sources of global greenhouse gases (GHGs) and short-lived species (SLS), land use and land cover change (LULCC), and other resource-related drivers of anthropogenic climate change. ESMs are the primary scientific tools for examining the physical, chemical, and biogeochemical impacts of human-induced changes to the climate system. The iESM project integrates the economic and human-dimension modeling of an IAM and a fully coupled ESM within a single simulation system while maintaining the separability of each model if needed. Both IAM and ESM codes are developed and used by large communities and have been extensively applied in recent national and international climate assessments. By introducing heretofore-omitted feedbacks between natural and societal drivers, we can improve scientific understanding of the human-Earth system dynamics. Potential applications include studies of the interactions and feedbacks leading to the timing, scale, and geographic distribution of emissions trajectories and other human influences, corresponding climate effects, and the subsequent impacts of a changing climate on human and natural systems. This paper describes the formulation, requirements, implementation, testing, and resulting functionality of the first version of the iESM released to the global climate community.

  20. The integrated Earth system model version 1: formulation and functionality

    DOE PAGES

    Collins, W. D.; Craig, A. P.; Truesdale, J. E.; ...

    2015-07-23

    The integrated Earth system model (iESM) has been developed as a new tool for projecting the joint human/climate system. The iESM is based upon coupling an integrated assessment model (IAM) and an Earth system model (ESM) into a common modeling infrastructure. IAMs are the primary tool for describing the human–Earth system, including the sources of global greenhouse gases (GHGs) and short-lived species (SLS), land use and land cover change (LULCC), and other resource-related drivers of anthropogenic climate change. ESMs are the primary scientific tools for examining the physical, chemical, and biogeochemical impacts of human-induced changes to the climate system. Themore » iESM project integrates the economic and human-dimension modeling of an IAM and a fully coupled ESM within a single simulation system while maintaining the separability of each model if needed. Both IAM and ESM codes are developed and used by large communities and have been extensively applied in recent national and international climate assessments. By introducing heretofore-omitted feedbacks between natural and societal drivers, we can improve scientific understanding of the human–Earth system dynamics. Potential applications include studies of the interactions and feedbacks leading to the timing, scale, and geographic distribution of emissions trajectories and other human influences, corresponding climate effects, and the subsequent impacts of a changing climate on human and natural systems. This paper describes the formulation, requirements, implementation, testing, and resulting functionality of the first version of the iESM released to the global climate community.« less

  1. The EPOS Architecture: Integrated Services for solid Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocco, Massimo; Consortium, Epos

    2013-04-01

    The European Plate Observing System (EPOS) represents a scientific vision and an IT approach in which innovative multidisciplinary research is made possible for a better understanding of the physical processes controlling earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, unrest episodes and tsunamis as well as those driving tectonics and Earth surface dynamics. EPOS has a long-term plan to facilitate integrated use of data, models and facilities from existing (but also new) distributed research infrastructures, for solid Earth science. One primary purpose of EPOS is to take full advantage of the new e-science opportunities coming available. The aim is to obtain an efficient and comprehensive multidisciplinary research platform for the Earth sciences in Europe. The EPOS preparatory phase (EPOS PP), funded by the European Commission within the Capacities program, started on November 1st 2010 and it has completed its first two years of activity. EPOS is presently mid-way through its preparatory phase and to date it has achieved all the objectives, milestones and deliverables planned in its roadmap towards construction. The EPOS mission is to integrate the existing research infrastructures (RIs) in solid Earth science warranting increased accessibility and usability of multidisciplinary data from monitoring networks, laboratory experiments and computational simulations. This is expected to enhance worldwide interoperability in the Earth Sciences and establish a leading, integrated European infrastructure offering services to researchers and other stakeholders. The Preparatory Phase aims at leveraging the project to the level of maturity required to implement the EPOS construction phase, with a defined legal structure, detailed technical planning and financial plan. We will present the EPOS architecture, which relies on the integration of the main outcomes from legal, governance and financial work following the strategic EPOS roadmap and according to the technical work done during the

  2. Compensation for effects of ambient temperature on rare-earth doped fiber optic thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, G.; Sotomayor, J. L.; Krasowski, M. J.; Eustace, J. G.

    1989-01-01

    Variations in ambient temperature have a negative effect on the performance of any fiber optic sensing system. A change in ambient temperature may alter the design parameters of fiber optic cables, connectors, sources, detectors, and other fiber optic components and eventually the performance of the entire system. The thermal stability of components is especially important in a system which employs intensity modulated sensors. Several referencing schemes have been developed to account for the variable losses that occur within the system. However, none of these conventional compensating techniques can be used to stabilize the thermal drift of the light source in a system based on the spectral properties of the sensor material. The compensation for changes in ambient temperature becomes especially important in fiber optic thermometers doped with rare earths. Different approaches to solving this problem are searched and analyzed.

  3. Compensation for effects of ambient temperature on rare-earth doped fiber optic thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, G.; Sotomayor, J. L.; Krasowski, M. J.; Eustace, J. G.

    1990-01-01

    Variations in ambient temperature have a negative effect on the performance of any fiber optic sensing system. A change in ambient temperature may alter the design parameters of fiber optic cables, connectors, sources, detectors, and other fiber optic components and eventually the performance of the entire system. The thermal stability of components is especially important in a system which employs intensity modulated sensors. Several referencing schemes have been developed to account for the variable losses that occur within the system. However, none of these conventional compensating techniques can be used to stabilize the thermal drift of the light source in a system based on the spectral properties of the sensor material. The compensation for changes in ambient temperature becomes especially important in fiber optic thermometers doped with rare earths. Different approaches to solving this problem are searched and analyzed.

  4. Improving the intensity and efficiency of compressed echo in rare-earth-ion-doped crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiu-Rong, Ma; Yu-Qing, Liang; Song, Wang; Shuang-Gen, Zhang; Yun-Long, Shan

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the intensity and efficiency of a compressed echo, which is important in arbitrary waveform generation (AWG). A new model of compressed echo is proposed based on the optical Bloch equations, which exposes much more detailed parameters than the conventional model, such as the time delay of the chirp lasers, the nature of the rare-earth-ion-doped crystal, etc. According to the novel model of compressed echo, we find that reducing the time delay of the chirp lasers and scanning the lasers around the center frequency of the inhomogeneously broadened spectrum, while utilizing a crystal with larger coherence time and excitation lifetime can improve the compressed echo’s intensity and efficiency. The theoretical analysis is validated by numerical simulations. Project supported by Special Funds for Scientific and Technological Innovation Projects in Tianjin, China (Grant No. 10FDZDGX00400) and the Tianjin Research Program of Application Foundation and Advanced Technology, China (Grant No. 15JCQNJC01100).

  5. Coherent spectroscopy of rare-earth-metal-ion-doped whispering-gallery-mode resonators

    SciTech Connect

    McAuslan, D. L.; Korystov, D.; Longdell, J. J.

    2011-06-15

    We perform an investigation into the properties of Pr{sup 3+}:Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} whispering-gallery-mode resonators as a first step toward achieving the strong coupling regime of cavity QED with rare-earth-metal-ion-doped crystals. Direct measurement of cavity QED parameters are made using photon echoes, giving good agreement with theoretical predictions. By comparing the ions at the surface of the resonator to those in the center, it is determined that the physical process of making the resonator does not negatively affect the properties of the ions. Coupling between the ions and resonator is analyzed through the observation of optical bistability and normal-mode splitting.

  6. An OpenEarth Framework (OEF) for Integrating and Visualizing Earth Science Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreland, J. L.; Nadeau, D. R.; Baru, C.; Crosby, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    The integration of data is essential to make transformative progress in understanding the complex processes operating at the Earth’s surface and within its interior. While our current ability to collect massive amounts of data, develop structural models, and generate high-resolution dynamics models is well developed, our ability to quantitatively integrate these data and models into holistic interpretations of Earth systems is poorly developed. We lack the basic tools to realize a first-order goal in Earth science of developing integrated 4D models of Earth structure and processes using a complete range of available constraints, at a time when the research agenda of major efforts such as EarthScope demand such a capability. Among the challenges to 3D data integration are data that may be in different coordinate spaces, units, value ranges, file formats, and data structures. While several file format standards exist, they are infrequently or incorrectly used. Metadata is often missing, misleading, or relegated to README text files along side the data. This leaves much of the work to integrate data bogged down by simple data management tasks. The OpenEarth Framework (OEF) being developed by GEON addresses these data management difficulties. The software incorporates file format parsers, data interpretation heuristics, user interfaces to prompt for missing information, and visualization techniques to merge data into a common visual model. The OEF’s data access libraries parse formal and de facto standard file formats and map their data into a common data model. The software handles file format quirks, storage details, caching, local and remote file access, and web service protocol handling. Heuristics are used to determine coordinate spaces, units, and other key data features. Where multiple data structure, naming, and file organization conventions exist, those heuristics check for each convention’s use to find a high confidence interpretation of the data. When

  7. New generation high-power rare-earth-doped phosphate glass fiber and fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ruikun; Myers, John D.; Myers, Michael J.

    2001-04-01

    High power, high brightness fiber lasers have numerous potential commercial and military applications. Fiber lasers with cladding pump designs represent a new generation of diode pumped configurations that are extremely efficient, have single mode output and may be operated with or without active cooling. Kigre has invented a new family of Er/Yb/Nd phosphate laser glass materials (designated QX) that promise to facilitate a quantum leap in fiber laser technology of this field. The new phosphate glass Rare-Earth doped fiber exhibit many advantages than Silica or Fluoride base fiber, see table.1. Instead of 30 to 50 meters of fused silica with a 50 mm bend radii; Kigre's phosphate glass fiber amplifiers may be designed to be less than 4 meters long .Laser performance and various design parameters, such as the fiber core diameter, NA, inner cladding shape and doping concentration are evaluated. Laser performances was demonstrated for an experimental QX/Er doubled clading fiber commissioned by MIT having 8 micron core, a 240 X 300 micron rectangle shaped inner cladding with 0.4 NA and 500 micron outer clading.. Kigre obtained approximately 2 dB/cm gain from 15cm long fiber under 940nm pumping The same fiber was evaluated by researcher at MIT. They used 975nm pump source. Maximum 270mW output was demonstrated by 30 cm long fiber with Fresnel reflection resonator mirrors. The slope efficiency of absorbed pump power s 47%.

  8. Sol-gel-derived hybrid materials multi-doped with rare-earth metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelazowska, E.; Rysiakiewicz-Pasek, E.; Borczuch-Laczka, M.; Cholewa-Kowalska, K.

    2012-06-01

    Four different hybrid organic-inorganic materials based on TiO2-SiO2 matrices with organic additives and doped with rare-earth metal ions (III) from the group of europium, cerium, terbium, neodymium, dysprosium and samarium, were synthesized by sol-gel method. Tetraethyl orthosilicate, titanium (IV) isopropoxide and organic compounds, such as butyl acrylate, butyl methacrylate, ethyl acetoacetate, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, ethyl acetate, propylene carbonate, organic solvents and certain inorganic salts were used in the synthesis. The inorganic part of the sols, which were used in the synthesis of all the hybrid materials, was prepared separately and then the organic parts were added. The materials obtained were aged for three weeks at room temperature and then heated in an electric oven for three hours at temperatures of 80 °C-150 °C. Scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX); X-ray diffraction (XRD); Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (KBr technique); 29Si magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance; and fluorescence spectroscopy were used for the examination of morphology, microstructure and luminescence properties, respectively. Photoluminescence properties with relatively intense narrow emission lines of Tb, Eu, Dy, Nd, Sm respectively to the RE-ions doping, were observed for all the hybrid materials.

  9. Synthesis and thermoluminescence properties of rare earth-doped NaMgBO3 phosphor.

    PubMed

    Khan, Z S; Ingale, N B; Omanwar, S K

    2016-05-01

    Rare earth (Dy(3+) and Sm(3+))-doped sodium magnesium borate (NaMgBO3) is synthesized by solution combustion synthesis method keeping their thermoluminescence properties in mind. The reaction produced very stable crystalline NaMgBO3:RE (RE = Dy(3+), Sm(3+)) phosphors. The phosphors are exposed to (60)Co gamma-ray radiations dose of varying rate from 5 to 25 Gy, and their TL characteristics with kinetic parameters are studied. NaMgBO3:Dy(3+) phosphor shows two peaks for lower doping concentration of Dy(3+) while it reduced to single peak for the higher concentrations of activator Dy(3+). NaMgBO3:Dy(3+) shows the major glow peak around 200 °C while NaMgBO3:Sm(3+) phosphors show two well-separated glow peaks at 200 and 332 °C respectively. The thermoluminescence intensity of these phosphors was compare with the commercially available TLD-100 (Harshaw) phosphor. The TL responses for gamma-ray radiations dose were found to be linear from 5 to 25 Gy for both phosphors while the fading in each case is calculated for the tenure of 45 days.

  10. Coherency strain enhanced dielectric-temperature property of rare-earth doped BaTiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Sang-Chae; Kang, Suk-Joong L.

    2013-03-18

    Core/shell-grained BaTiO{sub 3} samples were prepared with addition of rare earth elements. The core/shell interface was semi-coherent, and many misfit dislocations formed in Dy-doped samples. In contrast, a coherent interface and few dislocations were observed in Ho- and Er-doped samples. Dy-doped samples exhibited poor temperature stability, showing a peak with no frequency dispersion. Ho- and Er-doped samples exhibited a broad curve with frequency dispersion. This improved temperature stability is attributed to the coherency strain, which leads to the formation of polar nano-regions in the shell. Coherency at the core/shell interface is critical to improve the temperature stability of core/shell-structured BaTiO{sub 3}.

  11. The OpenEarth Framework (OEF) for the 3D Visualization of Integrated Earth Science Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, David; Moreland, John; Baru, Chaitan; Crosby, Chris

    2010-05-01

    Data integration is increasingly important as we strive to combine data from disparate sources and assemble better models of the complex processes operating at the Earth's surface and within its interior. These data are often large, multi-dimensional, and subject to differing conventions for data structures, file formats, coordinate spaces, and units of measure. When visualized, these data require differing, and sometimes conflicting, conventions for visual representations, dimensionality, symbology, and interaction. All of this makes the visualization of integrated Earth science data particularly difficult. The OpenEarth Framework (OEF) is an open-source data integration and visualization suite of applications and libraries being developed by the GEON project at the University of California, San Diego, USA. Funded by the NSF, the project is leveraging virtual globe technology from NASA's WorldWind to create interactive 3D visualization tools that combine and layer data from a wide variety of sources to create a holistic view of features at, above, and beneath the Earth's surface. The OEF architecture is open, cross-platform, modular, and based upon Java. The OEF's modular approach to software architecture yields an array of mix-and-match software components for assembling custom applications. Available modules support file format handling, web service communications, data management, user interaction, and 3D visualization. File parsers handle a variety of formal and de facto standard file formats used in the field. Each one imports data into a general-purpose common data model supporting multidimensional regular and irregular grids, topography, feature geometry, and more. Data within these data models may be manipulated, combined, reprojected, and visualized. The OEF's visualization features support a variety of conventional and new visualization techniques for looking at topography, tomography, point clouds, imagery, maps, and feature geometry. 3D data such as

  12. Toward an integrative model of doping use: an empirical study with adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Lazuras, Lambros; Barkoukis, Vassileios; Tsorbatzoudis, Haralambos

    2015-02-01

    The present study assessed adolescent athletes' intentions toward doping by using an integrative theoretical model. Overall, 650 adolescent athletes from team and individual sports completed an anonymous structured questionnaire including demographic information, social desirability, achievement goals, motivational regulations, sportspersonship orientations, social cognitive variables, and anticipated regret. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that the integrative model predicted 57.2% of the variance in doping intentions. Social cognitive variables and anticipated regret directly predicted doping intentions. Anticipated regret added 3% incremental variance on top of other predictors. Multiple mediation analyses showed that the effects of achievement goals on intentions were mediated by self-efficacy beliefs, whereas the effects of sportspersonship were mediated by attitudes and anticipated regret. The present study confirmed the dual structure of an integrative model of doping intentions and further highlighted the role of anticipated regret in the study of adolescent doping use.

  13. Dephasing mechanisms of optical transitions in rare-earth-doped transparent ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunkel, Nathalie; Bartholomew, John; Welinski, Sacha; Ferrier, Alban; Ikesue, Akio; Goldner, Philippe

    2016-11-01

    We identify and analyze dephasing mechanisms that broaden the optical transitions of rare-earth ions in randomly oriented transparent ceramics. The study examines the narrow F70↔D50 transition of Eu3 + dopants in a series of Y2O3 ceramic samples prepared under varying conditions. We characterize the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the homogeneous linewidth, as well as long-term spectral diffusion on time scales up to 1 s. The results highlight significant differences between samples with differing thermal treatments and Zr4 + additive concentrations. In particular, several distinct magnetic interactions from defect centers are observed, which are clearly distinguished from the broadening due to interactions with two-level systems and phonons. By minimizing the broadening due to the different defect centers, linewidths of the order of 4 kHz are achieved for all samples. The linewidths are limited by temperature-dependent interactions and by an interaction that is yet to be identified. Although the homogeneous linewidth can be narrowed further in these ceramic samples, the broadening is now comparable to the linewidths achieved in rare-earth-ion-doped single crystals. Thus, this work emphasizes the usefulness of studying ceramics to gain insights into dephasing mechanisms relevant to single crystals and suggests that ceramics may be an interesting alternative for applications in classical and quantum information processing.

  14. An alternative experimental approach to produce rare-earth-doped SiOx films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanatta, A. R.

    2016-04-01

    Rare-earth (RE) doped silicon-oxide (SiOx) films were prepared by sputtering a combined Si + RE2O3 target with argon ions. The study comprised the neodymium (Nd) and samarium (Sm) rare-earth species and the Si + RE2O3 targets were obtained by partially covering a solid disc of Si with area-defined thin layers of Nd2O3 or Sm2O3 powders. The films were investigated by energy-dispersive x-ray, Raman scattering, optical transmission, and photo-luminescence measurements. According to the experimental results, in the as-deposited form, the films were amorphous and presented RE and oxygen concentrations that scaled with the RE2O3 target area. Additional compositional-structural changes were obtained by thermal annealing the films under a flow of oxygen. Within these changes, one can mention: increase of oxygen concentration, optical bandgap widening, partial Si crystallization, and the development of RE-related light emission. The main aspects associated to the production and structural-optical properties of the films, as determined either by the deposition conditions or by the annealing treatments, are presented and discussed in detail.

  15. An Integrated Concept on Earth and Environmental Sciences Postgraduate Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosfeld, Klaus; Lohmann, Gerrit; Ladstätter-Weißenmayer, Annette; Burrows, John; Sprengel, Claudia; Bijma, Jelle

    2010-05-01

    Today's graduate and postgraduate education in the field of Earth System and Environmental Science is a highly interdisciplinary and inter-institutional challenge. The integration of observations, palaeoclimate data, and climate modelling requires networks and collaborations of experts and specialists in order to better understand natural climate variations over a broad range of timescales and disciplines, and to cope with the challenges of recent climate change. The existing research infrastructure at the Alfred-Wegener-Institut Bremerhaven (AWI), University of Bremen, and Jacobs University Bremen offers a unique research environment in north-western Germany to study past, present and future changes of the climate system, with special focus on high latitudinal processes. It covers all kind of disciplines, climate science, geosciences and biosciences, and provides a consistent framework for education and qualification of a new generation of expertly trained, internationally competitive master and PhD students. On postgraduate level, the Postgraduate Programme Environmental Physics (PEP) at the University of Bremen (www.pep.uni-bremen.de) educates the participants on the complex relationship between atmosphere, hydrosphere (ocean), cryosphere (ice region) and solid earth (land). Here, the learning of experimental methods in environmental physics at the most advanced level, numerical data analysis using supercomputers, and data interpretation via sophisticated methods prepare students for a scientific career. Within cooperation with the Ocean University of China (OUC) students are participating one year in the PEP programme during their master studies since 2006, to get finally a double degree of both universities. Based on this successful cooperation a similar programme is in preparation with the Lulea University of Technology, Sweden. The Earth System Science Research School (ESSReS) (www.earth-system-science.org) at the AWI enables PhD students from a variety of

  16. Postgraduate Education in Earth and Environmental Sciences: an Integrated Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosfeld, K.; Lohmann, G.; Ladstätter-Weißenmayer, A.; Burrows, J.; Sprengel, C.; Bijma, J.

    2009-04-01

    Today's graduate and postgraduate education in the field of Earth System and Environmental Science is a highly interdisciplinary and inter-institutional challenge. The integration of observations, palaeoclimate data, and climate modelling requires networks and collaborations of experts and specialists in order to better understand natural climate variations over a broad range of timescales and disciplines, and to cope with the challenges of recent climate change. The existing research infrastructure at the Alfred-Wegener-Institut Bremerhaven (AWI), University of Bremen (Uni-HB), and Jacobs University Bremen offers a unique research environment in north-western Germany to study past, present and future changes of the climate system, with special focus on high latitudinal processes. It covers all kind of disciplines, climate science, geosciences and biosciences, and provides a consistent framework for education and qualification of a new generation of expertly trained, internationally competitive master and PhD students. On postgraduate level, the Postgraduate Programme Environmental Physics (PEP) at University of Bremen (www.pep.uni-bremen.de) educates the participants on the complex relationship between atmosphere, hydrosphere (ocean), cryosphere (ice region) and solid earth (land). Here, the learning of experimental methods in environmental physics at the most advanced level, numerical data analysis using supercomputers, and data interpretation via sophisticated methods prepare students for a scientific career. The foundation of an Earth System Research School (ESSReS) (www.earth-system-science.org) at the AWI enables PhD students from a variety of disciplines to cooperate and exchange views on the common theme of ‘linking data and modelling', leading to a better understanding of local processes within a global context. Computational and conceptual models of the Earth system provide the ability to investigate different scenarios in biogeochemistry, such as the

  17. Progress in rare-earth-doped nanocrystalline glass-ceramics for laser cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkata Krishnaiah, Kummara; Ledemi, Yannick; Soares de Lima Filho, Elton; Loranger, Sebastien; Nemova, Galina; Messaddeq, Younes; Kashyap, Raman

    2016-03-01

    Laser cooling with anti-Stokes fluorescencewas predicted by Pringsheim in 1929, but for solids was only demonstrated in 1995. There are many difficulties which have hindered laser assisted cooling, principally the chemical purity of a sample and the availability of suitable hosts. Recent progress has seen the cooled temperature plummet to 93K in Yb:YLF. One of the challenges for laser cooling to become ubiquitous, is incorporating the rare-earthcooling ion in a more easily engineered material, rather than a pure crystalline host. Rare-earth-doped nanocrystalline glass-ceramics were first developed by Wang and Ohwaki for enhanced luminescence and mechanical properties compared to their parent glasses. Our work has focused on creating a nanocrystalline environment for the cooling ion, in an easy to engineer glass. The glasses with composition 30SiO2-15Al2O3-27CdF2-22PbF2-4YF3-2YbF3 (mol%), have been prepared by the conventional melt-quenching technique. By a simple post fabrication thermal treatment, the rare-earth ions are embedded in the crystalline phase within the glass matrix. Nanocrystals with various sizes and rare-earth concentrations have been fabricated and their photoluminescence properties assessed in detail. These materials show close to unity photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) when pumped above the band. However, they exhibit strong up-conversion into the blue, characteristic of Tm trace impurity whose presence was confirmed. The purification of the starting materials is underway to reduce the background loss to demonstrate laser cooling. Progress in the development of these nano-glass-ceramics and their experimental characterization will be discussed.

  18. Motivational and social cognitive predictors of doping intentions in elite sports: an integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Barkoukis, V; Lazuras, L; Tsorbatzoudis, H; Rodafinos, A

    2013-10-01

    Doping use is an important issue in both competitive and non-competitive sports, and poses potentially irreversible health consequences to users. Scholars increasingly call for theory-driven studies on the psychosocial processes underlying doping use that will inform subsequent policy-making and prevention interventions. The aim of the study was to implement an integrative theoretical model to assess the direct and indirect effects of motivational variables, moral orientations, and social cognitions on doping intentions. A randomly selected and representative sample of 750 elite athletes anonymously completed a battery of questionnaires on motivational and moral constructs, and social cognitions related to doping. Hierarchical linear regression analysis and multiple mediation modeling were used. The effects of achievement goals and moral orientations were significantly mediated by attitudinal, normative, and self-efficacy beliefs, in both lifetime ever and never doping users. Moral orientations indirectly predicted the doping intentions of never users, but did not predict ever users' doping intentions. Achievement goals and sportspersonship orientations influence doping intentions indirectly, through the effects of attitudes and self-efficacy beliefs. Sportspersonship (moral) orientations were relevant to doping intentions among athletes with no prior experiences with doping, while achievement goals and situational temptation were relevant to both lifetime never and ever dopers.

  19. The MCVD synthesis and characterization of water tolerant fiber optic waveguides based on alkaline earth-doped silicas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, Kevin F.

    Optical fibers that transmit throughout the entire telecommunications spectrum (1.2--1.7 mum) are presently manufactured by the removal of hydrogen or OH from the host preform glass. Hydrogen-oxygen torches are utilized in the conventional preform manufacturing process, but result in the formation of hydroxyls in germanium-doped silica fiber. The hydroxyl species generate unacceptably high losses for long haul telecommunications systems. This thesis has explored an alternative strategy for reducing OH-related absorption in silica-based glasses. Alkaline earth modifiers have been introduced via the modified chemical vapor deposition (MCVD) process to successfully damp out and dramatically reduce the extrinsic attenuation associated with both water and hydrogen. Specifically, alkaline earth ions were introduced into alumino-silicate glasses to form MgO-Al2O3-SiO2, CaO-Al 2O3-SiO2, and SrO-Al2O3-SiO 2 compositions. The utilization of halide precursors based on the vapor delivery of rare earths was incorporated into the existing MCVD set-up to fabricate these optical preforms. Both the bulk preforms and fibers drawn from them were characterized to determine relevant optical properties, including the attenuation, index profiles and extinction coefficients arising from OH in each host. The data indicate that modification of the silica glass structure through the additions of modifying ions can significantly reduce OH related absorption. For example, the doping of alkaline earth ions decreased the extinction coefficient measured at the 1.39 mum) OH overtone, to values < 0.2 L/(mol*cm). Prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) measurements conducted at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) found OH concentrations in the glasses in the range from 10 to 27.5 ppm. The alkaline earth-doped fibers exhibited lower OH absorption at 1.39 mum) than germanium and aluminum-doped reference fibers. Fibers doped with either magnesium, calcium or strontium displayed up

  20. Integration of satellite fire products into MPI Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlystova, Iryna G.; Kloster, Silvia

    2013-04-01

    Fires are the ubiquitous phenomenon affecting all natural biomes. Since the beginning of the satellite Era, fires are being continuously observed from satellites. The most interesting satellite parameter retrieved from satellite measurements is the burned area. Combined with information on biomass available for burning the burned area can be translated into climate relevant carbon emissions from fires into the atmosphere. In this study we integrate observed burned area into a global vegetation model to derive global fire emissions. Global continuous burned area dataset is provided by the Global Fire Emissions Dataset (GFED). GFED products were obtained from MODIS (and pre-MODIS) satellites and are available for the time period of 14 years (1997-2011). This dataset is widely used, well documented and supported by periodical updates containing new features. We integrate the global burned area product into the land model JSBACH, a part of the Earth-System model developed at the Max Plank Institute for Meteorology. The land model JSBACH simulates land biomass in terms of carbon content. Fire is an important disturbance process in the Earth's carbon cycle and affects mainly the carbon stored in vegetation. In the standard JSBACH version fire is represented by process based algorithms. Using the satellite data as an alternative we are targeting better comparability of modeled carbon emissions with independent satellite measurements of atmospheric composition. The structure of burned vegetation inside of a biome can be described as the balance between woody and herbaceous vegetation. GFED provides in addition to the burned area satellite derived information of the tree cover distribution within the burned area. Using this dataset, we can attribute the burned area to the respective simulated herbaceous or woody biomass within the vegetation model. By testing several extreme cases we evaluate the quantitative impact of vegetation balance between woody and herbaceous

  1. Fabrication and characterization of rare-earth-doped nanostructures on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Thomas J; Zhang, Ming; Feng, Wei; El-khouri, Rita J; Sun, Ling-Dong; Yan, Chun-Hua; Patten, Timothy E; Liu, Gang-yu

    2011-08-23

    This article presents a simple and practical means to produce rare-earth-based nanostructures, as well as a combined characterization of structure and optical properties in situ. A nanosphere lithography strategy combined with surface chemistry enables the production of arrays of β-NaYF(4):Yb,Er nanorings inlaid in an octadecyltrichlorosilane matrix. These arrays of nanorings are produced over the entire support, such as a 1 cm(2) glass coverslip. The dimension of nanorings can be varied by changing the deposition conditions. A home-constructed, multifunctional microscope integrating atomic force microscopy, near-field scanning optical microscopy, and far-field optical microscopy and spectroscopy is utilized to characterize the nanostructures. This in situ and combined characterization is important for rare-earth-containing nanomaterials in order to correlate local structure with upconversion photoluminescence. Knowledge gained from the investigation should facilitate materials design and optimization, for instance, in the context of photovoltaic devices and biofluorescent probes.

  2. Earth From Space: "Beautiful Earth's" Integration of Media Arts, Earth Science, and Native Wisdom in Informal Learning Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casasanto, V.; Hallowell, R.; Williams, K.; Rock, J.; Markus, T.

    2015-12-01

    "Beautiful Earth: Experiencing and Learning Science in an Engaging Way" was a 3-year project funded by NASA's Competitive Opportunities in Education and Public Outreach for Earth and Space Science. An outgrowth of Kenji Williams' BELLA GAIA performance, Beautiful Earth fostered a new approach to teaching by combining live music, data visualizations and Earth science with indigenous perspectives, and hands-on workshops for K-12 students at 5 science centers. Inspired by the "Overview Effect," described by many astronauts who were awestruck by seeing the Earth from space and their realization of the profound interconnectedness of Earth's life systems, Beautiful Earth leveraged the power of multimedia performance to serve as a springboard to engage K-12 students in hands-on Earth science and Native wisdom workshops. Results will be presented regarding student perceptions of Earth science, environmental issues, and indigenous ways of knowing from 3 years of evaluation data.

  3. The unusually high Tc in rare-earth-doped single crystalline CaFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Fengyan; Lv, Bing; Deng, Liangzi; Meen, James K.; Xue, Yu-Yi; Chu, Ching-Wu

    2014-08-01

    In rare-earth-doped single crystalline CaFe2As2, the mysterious small volume fraction which superconducts up to 49 K, much higher than the bulk Tc ~ 30 s K, has prompted a long search for a hidden variable that could enhance the Tc by more than 30% in iron-based superconductors of the same structure. Here we report a chemical, structural and magnetic study of CaFe2As2 systematically doped with La, Ce, Pr and Nd. Coincident with the high Tc phase, we find extreme magnetic anisotropy, accompanied by an unexpected doping-independent Tc and equally unexpected superparamagnetic clusters associated with As vacancies. These observations lead us to conjecture that the tantalizing Tc enhancement may be associated with naturally occurring chemical interfaces and may thus provide a new paradigm in the search for superconductors with higher Tc.

  4. Modulation of magnetic damping constant of Fe2Co films by heavy doping of rare-earth Yb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kai; Tang, Minghong; Li, Dong; Guo, Xiaobin; Cui, Baoshan; Yun, Jijun; Zuo, Yalu; Xi, L.; Zhang, Z. Z.

    2017-04-01

    The effect of rare-earth element Yb doping on modulating the magnetic properties, especially the damping constant, is investigated in a series of amorphous (Fe2Co)(1‑x)Yb x thin films by the time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect at room temperature. A linear decrease of the saturation magnetization and in-plane uniaxial anisotropy field with the increase of x was observed and explained by the diluted effect of non-magnetic Yb doping. The magnetic damping constant performs a remarkable increase with Yb concentration. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals partial oxidation of Yb, which has large orbital moment and the associated large spin–orbital coupling (SOC) strength and may be responsible for the increased damping constant in contrast with the expected weak SOC and associated low damping constant of metallic Yb doping.

  5. Building thematic and integrated services for solid Earth sciences: the EPOS integrated approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocco, Massimo; Consortium, Epos

    2016-04-01

    EPOS has been designed with the vision of creating a pan-European infrastructure for solid Earth science to support a safe and sustainable society. In accordance with this scientific vision, the EPOS mission is to integrate the diverse and advanced European Research Infrastructures for solid Earth science relying on new e-science opportunities to monitor and unravel the dynamic and complex Earth System. EPOS will enable innovative multidisciplinary research for a better understanding of the Earth's physical and chemical processes that control earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, ground instability and tsunami as well as the processes driving tectonics and Earth's surface dynamics. To accomplish its mission, EPOS is engaging different stakeholders, not limited to scientists, to allow the Earth sciences to open new horizons in our understanding of the planet. EPOS also aims at contributing to prepare society for geo-hazards and to responsibly manage the exploitation of geo-resources. Through integration of data, models and facilities, EPOS will allow the Earth science community to make a step change in developing new concepts and tools for key answers to scientific and socio-economic questions concerning geo-hazards and geo-resources as well as Earth sciences applications to the environment and human welfare. A long-term integration plan is necessary to accomplish the EPOS mission. EPOS is presently in its implementation phase further extending its pan-European dimension. The EPOS Implementation Phase builds on the achievements of the successful EPOS Preparatory Phase project and consists of two key activities: the legal establishment of the EPOS-ERIC and the EPOS IP project. The EPOS implementation phase will last from 2015 to 2019. Key objectives of the project are: implementing Thematic Core Services (TCS), the domain-specific service hubs for coordinating and harmonizing national resources/plans with the European dimension of EPOS; building the Integrated Core

  6. Mars for Earthlings: A Higher Educational Terrestrial Analog Approach for Teaching Integrated Earth and Planetary Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, M. A.; Robinson, J. K.

    2012-03-01

    "Mars for Earthlings" teaching modules use Earth analogs to explore Mars at an introductory college level. This integrated approach increases science literacy and attracts students to STEM disciplines.

  7. An integrated view of data quality in Earth observation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, X.; Blower, J. D.; Bastin, L.; Lush, V.; Zabala, A.; Masó, J.; Cornford, D.; Díaz, P.; Lumsden, J.

    2013-01-01

    Data quality is a difficult notion to define precisely, and different communities have different views and understandings of the subject. This causes confusion, a lack of harmonization of data across communities and omission of vital quality information. For some existing data infrastructures, data quality standards cannot address the problem adequately and cannot fulfil all user needs or cover all concepts of data quality. In this study, we discuss some philosophical issues on data quality. We identify actual user needs on data quality, review existing standards and specifications on data quality, and propose an integrated model for data quality in the field of Earth observation (EO). We also propose a practical mechanism for applying the integrated quality information model to a large number of datasets through metadata inheritance. While our data quality management approach is in the domain of EO, we believe that the ideas and methodologies for data quality management can be applied to wider domains and disciplines to facilitate quality-enabled scientific research. PMID:23230156

  8. Integrated Thermal Response Tool for Earth Entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y.-K.; Milos, F. S.; Partridge, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A system is presented for multi-dimensional, fully-coupled thermal response modeling of hypersonic entry vehicles. The system consists of a two-dimensional implicit thermal response, pyrolysis and ablation program (TITAN), a commercial finite-element thermal and mechanical analysis code (MARC), and a high fidelity Navier-Stokes equation solver (GIANTS). The simulations performed by this integrated system include hypersonic flow-field, fluid and solid interaction, ablation, shape change, pyrolysis gas generation and flow, and thermal response of heatshield and structure. The thermal response of the ablating and charring heatshield material is simulated using TITAN, and that of the underlying structural is simulated using MARC. The ablating heatshield is treated as an outer boundary condition of the structure, and continuity conditions of temperature and heat flux are imposed at the interface between TITAN and MARC. Aerothermal environments with fluid and solid interaction are predicted by coupling TITAN and GIANTS through surface energy balance equations. With this integrated system, the aerothermal environments for an entry vehicle and the thermal response of both the heatshield and the structure can be obtained simultaneously. Representative computations for a proposed blunt body earth entry vehicle are presented and discussed in detail.

  9. An integrated view of data quality in Earth observation.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Blower, J D; Bastin, L; Lush, V; Zabala, A; Masó, J; Cornford, D; Díaz, P; Lumsden, J

    2013-01-28

    Data quality is a difficult notion to define precisely, and different communities have different views and understandings of the subject. This causes confusion, a lack of harmonization of data across communities and omission of vital quality information. For some existing data infrastructures, data quality standards cannot address the problem adequately and cannot fulfil all user needs or cover all concepts of data quality. In this study, we discuss some philosophical issues on data quality. We identify actual user needs on data quality, review existing standards and specifications on data quality, and propose an integrated model for data quality in the field of Earth observation (EO). We also propose a practical mechanism for applying the integrated quality information model to a large number of datasets through metadata inheritance. While our data quality management approach is in the domain of EO, we believe that the ideas and methodologies for data quality management can be applied to wider domains and disciplines to facilitate quality-enabled scientific research.

  10. Direct quantification of rare earth doped titania nanoparticles in individual human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeynes, J. C. G.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V.; Townley, H. E.

    2016-07-01

    There are many possible biomedical applications for titania nanoparticles (NPs) doped with rare earth elements (REEs), from dose enhancement and diagnostic imaging in radiotherapy, to biosensing. However, there are concerns that the NPs could disintegrate in the body thus releasing toxic REE ions to undesired locations. As a first step, we investigate how accurately the Ti/REE ratio from the NPs can be measured inside human cells. A quantitative analysis of whole, unsectioned, individual human cells was performed using proton microprobe elemental microscopy. This method is unique in being able to quantitatively analyse all the elements in an unsectioned individual cell with micron resolution, while also scanning large fields of view. We compared the Ti/REE signal inside cells to NPs that were outside the cells, non-specifically absorbed onto the polypropylene substrate. We show that the REE signal in individual cells co-localises with the titanium signal, indicating that the NPs have remained intact. Within the uncertainty of the measurement, there is no difference between the Ti/REE ratio inside and outside the cells. Interestingly, we also show that there is considerable variation in the uptake of the NPs from cell-to-cell, by a factor of more than 10. We conclude that the NPs enter the cells and remain intact. The large heterogeneity in NP concentrations from cell-to-cell should be considered if they are to be used therapeutically.

  11. Visible WGM emissions from rare earth ion doped ZnO microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    K, Fabitha; Rao, M. S. Ramachandra

    ZnO is known to be an ideal candidate for short wavelength range opto-electronic device applications due to its wide and direct bandgap (3.37 eV) and high excitonic binding energy (60 meV). Apart from the UV emission at ~380 nm (free exciton emission) ZnO also possesses a broad emission band centered at ~530 nm which is expected to be originated from the oxygen vacancy (Vo) defects. In rare earth (RE) ion doped ZnO, emissions originate from the 4f levels of RE ions will be obtained in addition to the characteristic emissions of ZnO. Small micro/nanostructures made of ZnO with high crystalline quality show unique characteristics in light emission, especially in lasing applications. A micro/ nanostructured ZnO crystal generally has a wurtzite structure with a natural hexagonal cross section, which serves as a WGM lasing micro cavity owing to its high reflective index (~2). However, there exists a potential optical loss at corners of hexagons; therefore, an isotropic structure like spheres may be a better candidate to achieve efficient light confinement. In our work, highly smooth micro spheres with different diameters were grown. Raman spectroscopy measurements confirm the hexagonal wurtzite structure of ZnO, SEM and AFM studies shows the smooth surfaced spheres. WGM lasing characteristics of ZnO spheres have been investigated using optical pumping with 488 nm laser in a micro-PL system. Details of the results will be presented.

  12. Synthesis and structure of some nano-sized rare-earth metal ions doped potassium hexacyanoferrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Himanshu; Alemu, Hailemichael; Nketsa, Pusetso F.; Manatha, Toka J.; Madhavi Thakurdesai, And

    2015-05-01

    Rare-earth ions doped potassium hexacyanoferrates (KR-HCF); with the general formula KRFe(CN)6 · 3H2 O [with, R≡Y, Gd and Yb] nanoparticles were synthesized through precipitation. Characterization was done through particle-size analyzer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform infra-red (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). The XRD data was analyzed on FullProf Software Suite program and the unit-cell structure and lattice parameters of KR-HCF samples were determined from scratch and refined further. All the three KR-HCF nanoparticles seem to crystallize in the orthorhombic primitive PMMM space-group. Reasonably good agreement was found with the previously reported lattice constants of KGd-HCF and KYb-HCF orthorhombic single-crystals, except that they assume different space-groups. The observed dissimilarity of space-groups may be attributed to the different time scales involved in the synthesis process. Moreover, the crystal structure of KYFe(CN)6 · 3H2 O nanoparticles is being reported for the very first time.

  13. Structures, Stabilities, and Electronic Properties for Rare-Earth Lanthanum Doped Gold Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ya-Ru

    2015-02-01

    The structures, stabilities, and electronic properties of rare-earth lanthanum doped gold La2Aun (n = 1-9) and pure gold Aun (n ≤ 11) clusters have been investigated by using density functional theory. The optimized geometries show that the lowest energy structures of La2Aun clusters favour the 3D structure at n ≥ 3. The lanthanum atoms can strongly enhance the stabilities of gold clusters and tend to occupy the most highly coordinated position. By analysing the gap, vertical ionization potential, and chemical hardness, it is found that the La2Au6 isomer possesses higher stability for small-sized La2Aun clusters (n = 1-9). The charges in the La2Aun clusters transfer from La atoms to the Aun host. In addition, Wiberg bond indices analysis reveals that the intensity of different bonds of La2Aun clusters exhibits a sequence of La-La bond > La-Au bond > Au-Au bond.

  14. Rare-earth-doped nanophosphors for multicolor cathodoluminescence nanobioimaging using scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Taichi; Fukushima, Shoichiro; Niioka, Hirohiko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Miyake, Jun; Araki, Tsutomu; Hashimoto, Mamoru

    2015-05-01

    We describe rare-earth-doped nanophosphors (RE-NPs) for biological imaging using cathodoluminescence(CL) microscopy based on scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). We report the first demonstration of multicolor CL nanobioimaging using STEM with nanophosphors. The CL spectra of the synthesized nanophosphors (Y2O3∶Eu, Y2O3∶Tb) were sufficiently narrow to be distinguished. From CL images of RE-NPs on an elastic carbon-coated copper grid, the spatial resolution was beyond the diffraction limit of light.Y2O3∶Tb and Y2O3∶Eu RE-NPs showed a remarkable resistance against electron beam exposure even at high acceleration voltage (80 kV) and retained a CL intensity of more than 97% compared with the initial intensity for 1 min. In biological CL imaging with STEM, heavy-metal-stained cell sections containing the RE-NPs were prepared,and both the CL images of RE-NPs and cellular structures, such as mitochondria, were clearly observed from STEM images with high contrast. The cellular CL imaging using RE-NPs also had high spatial resolution even though heavy-metal-stained cells are normally regarded as highly scattering media. Moreover, since theRE-NPs exhibit photoluminescence (PL) excited by UV light, they are useful for multimodal correlative imaging using CL and PL.

  15. Rare Earth Ion-Doped Upconversion Nanocrystals: Synthesis and Surface Modification

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hongjin; Xie, Juan; Zhao, Baozhou; Liu, Botong; Xu, Shuilin; Ren, Na; Xie, Xiaoji; Huang, Ling; Huang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The unique luminescent properties exhibited by rare earth ion-doped upconversion nanocrystals (UCNPs), such as long lifetime, narrow emission line, high color purity, and high resistance to photobleaching, have made them widely used in many areas, including but not limited to high-resolution displays, new-generation information technology, optical communication, bioimaging, and therapy. However, the inherent upconversion luminescent properties of UCNPs are influenced by various parameters, including the size, shape, crystal structure, and chemical composition of the UCNPs, and even the chosen synthesis process and the surfactant molecules used. This review will provide a complete summary on the synthesis methods and the surface modification strategies of UCNPs reported so far. Firstly, we summarize the synthesis methodologies developed in the past decades, such as thermal decomposition, thermal coprecipitation, hydro/solvothermal, sol-gel, combustion, and microwave synthesis. In the second part, five main streams of surface modification strategies for converting hydrophobic UCNPs into hydrophilic ones are elaborated. Finally, we consider the likely directions of the future development and challenges of the synthesis and surface modification, such as the large-scale production and actual applications, stability, and so on, of the UCNPs. PMID:28346995

  16. The Characterization of Eu2+-Doped Mixed Alkaline-Earth Iodide Scintillator Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, John S; Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Wisniewski, D.; Kolopus, James A; Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    The high-performance inorganic scintillator, SrI2:Eu2+, when activated with divalent europium in the concentration range of 3 to 6%, has shown great promise for use in applications that require high-energy-resolution gamma-ray detection. We have recently grown and tested crystals in which other alkaline-earth ions have been partially substituted for Sr ions. Specifically, europium-doped single crystals have been grown in which up to 30 at % of the strontium ions have been substituted for either by barium, magnesium, or calcium ions. In the case of the strontium iodide scintillator host, a material that is characterized by an orthorhombic crystal structure, there are three other column IIA elements that are obvious choices for investigations whose purpose is to realize potential improvements in the performance of SrI2:Eu2+-based scintillators via the replacement of strontium ions with either Mg2+, Ca2+, or Ba2+. Light yields of up to 81,400 photons/MeV with an associated energy resolution of 3.7% (fwhm for 662 keV gamma-rays) have been observed in the case of a partial substitution of Ba2+ for Sr2+. The measured decay times ranged from 1.1 to 2.0 s, while the peak emission wavelengths ranged from 432 to 438 nm.

  17. Processing of Transparent Rare Earth Doped Zirconia for High Temperature Light Emission Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    The high fracture toughness of stabilized zirconia makes it one of the most widely applicable high temperature structural materials. However, it is not typicality considered for optical applications since the microstructure achieved by traditional processing makes it opaque. The aim of this dissertation is to develop processing methods for the introducing new functionalities of light transparency and light emission (photoluminescence) and to understand the nanostructure-property relationships that make these functionalities possible. A processing study of rare-earth (RE) doped Zirconium Oxide (ZrO2, zirconia) via Current Activated Pressure Assisted Densification (CAPAD) is presented. The role of processing temperature and dopant concentration on the crystal structure, microstructure and properties of the RE: ZrO2 is studied. Microstructural shows sub-100 nm grain size and homogeneous dopant distribution. X-ray diffraction and Raman analysis show that with increased dopant concentration the material changes from monoclinic to tetragonal. Structural analysis shows the material shows high hardness and toughness values 30% greater than similarly processed yttria-stabilized zirconia. Despite birefringence in the tetragonal phase, optical characterization is presented showing the samples are both highly transparent and photo-luminescent. Special attention is paid to analyzing structural and photoluminescence development during densification, as well as the role of oxygen vacancies on the optical properties of the densified material. This material is shown to be a promising candidate for a number of applications including luminescence thermometry and high temperature light emission.

  18. Rare-earth doped colour tuneable up-conversion ZBLAN phosphor for enhancing photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez-Ramos, J.; Acosta-Mora, P.; Ruiz-Morales, J. C.; Sierra, M.; Redondas, A.; Ruggiero, E.; Salassa, L.; Borges, M. E.; Esparza, P.

    2015-03-01

    Rare-earth doped ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF (ZBLAN) fluoride glasses have been successfully synthesized showing outstanding UV-VIS up-conversion luminescence of Er3+ and Tm3+, sensitized by Yb3+ ions, under near-infrared excitation at 980 nm. The ratio between blue, green and red up-conversion emission bands can be adjusted by varying the pump power density of the incident infrared radiation, resulting in a controlled tuneability of the overall emitting colour from greenish to yellowish. Additionally, the observed high energy UV intense up-conversion emissions are suitable to enhance photocatalytic activity of main water-splitting semiconductor electrodes (such as TiO2) used in sustainable production of hydrogen. Photocatalysis and photolysis degradation of methylene blue in water under sun-like irradiation using benchmark photocatalyst (TiO2 Degussa P25) have been boosted by 20% and by a factor of 2.5 respectively, due to the enhancement of UV radiation that reaches the TiO2 particles by the addition of ZBLAN powder into a slurry-type photo-reactor. Hence, up-conversion ZBLAN phosphors contribute to demonstrate the possibility of transforming the incoming infrared radiation into the UV region needed to bridge the gap of photocatalytic semiconductors.

  19. Structure-property-composition relationships in doped zinc oxides: enhanced photocatalytic activity with rare earth dopants.

    PubMed

    Goodall, Josephine B M; Illsley, Derek; Lines, Robert; Makwana, Neel M; Darr, Jawwad A

    2015-02-09

    In this paper, we demonstrate the use of continuous hydrothermal flow synthesis (CHFS) technology to rapidly produce a library of 56 crystalline (doped) zinc oxide nanopowders and two undoped samples, each with different particle properties. Each sample was produced in series from the mixing of an aqueous stream of basic zinc nitrate (and dopant ion or modifier) solution with a flow of superheated water (at 450 °C and 24.1 MPa), whereupon a crystalline nanoparticle slurry was rapidly formed. Each composition was collected in series, cleaned, freeze-dried, and then characterized using analytical methods, including powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and UV-vis spectrophotometry. Photocatalytic activity of the samples toward the decolorization of methylene blue dye was assessed, and the results revealed that transition metal dopants tended to reduce the photoactivity while rare earth ions, in general, increased the photocatalytic activity. In general, low dopant concentrations were more beneficial to having greater photodecolorization in all cases.

  20. Improving the Photoelectric Characteristics of MoS2 Thin Films by Doping Rare Earth Element Erbium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Miaofei; Ma, Xiying

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the surface morphologies, crystal structures, and optical characteristics of rare earth element erbium (Er)-doped MoS2 (Er: MoS2) thin films fabricated on Si substrates via chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The surface mopography, crystalline structure, light absorption property, and the photoelectronic characteristics of the Er: MoS2 films were studied. The results indicate that doping makes the crystallinity of MoS2 films better than that of the undoped film. Meanwhile, the electron mobility and conductivity of the Er-doped MoS2 films increase about one order of magnitude, and the current-voltage ( I- V) and the photoelectric response characteristics of the Er:MoS2/Si heterojunction increase significantly. Moreover, Er-doped MoS2 films exhibit strong light absorption and photoluminescence in the visible light range at room temperature; the intensity is enhanced by about twice that of the undoped film. The results indicate that the doping of MoS2 with Er can significantly improve the photoelectric characteristics and can be used to fabricate highly efficient luminescence and optoelectronic devices.

  1. Scintillation properties of rare-earth doped NaPO3-Al(PO3)3 glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuro, Tomoaki; Okada, Go; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Masai, Hirokazu; Yanagida, Takayuki

    2016-12-01

    We systematically investigated photoluminescence (PL), scintillation and dosimeter properties of rare-earth (RE) doped NaPO3-Al(PO3)3 (NAP) glasses. The NAP glasses doped with a series of RE ions (La-Yb, except Pm) with a consistent concentration (0.3 wt%) were prepared by the conventional melt-quenching method. The PL and scintillation decay time profiles showed fast (ns) and slow (μs or ms) components: the fast components from 15 to 100 ns were due to the host or 5d-4f transition emission, and the slow components from 15 μs to 5 ms were due to the 4f-4f transitions of RE. The thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) was evaluated as a dosimeter property, and glow peaks appeared around 400 °C in all the samples. The TSL dose response function was examined in the dose range from 10 mGy to 10 Gy. Among the samples tested, Nd and Tb doped glasses showed higher signal by at least one order of magnitude than those of non-doped and other RE-doped samples. Over the dose range tested, the TSL signals are linearly related with the incident X-ray dose, showing a potential for practical applications.

  2. Improving the Photoelectric Characteristics of MoS2 Thin Films by Doping Rare Earth Element Erbium.

    PubMed

    Meng, Miaofei; Ma, Xiying

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the surface morphologies, crystal structures, and optical characteristics of rare earth element erbium (Er)-doped MoS2 (Er: MoS2) thin films fabricated on Si substrates via chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The surface mopography, crystalline structure, light absorption property, and the photoelectronic characteristics of the Er: MoS2 films were studied. The results indicate that doping makes the crystallinity of MoS2 films better than that of the undoped film. Meanwhile, the electron mobility and conductivity of the Er-doped MoS2 films increase about one order of magnitude, and the current-voltage (I-V) and the photoelectric response characteristics of the Er:MoS2/Si heterojunction increase significantly. Moreover, Er-doped MoS2 films exhibit strong light absorption and photoluminescence in the visible light range at room temperature; the intensity is enhanced by about twice that of the undoped film. The results indicate that the doping of MoS2 with Er can significantly improve the photoelectric characteristics and can be used to fabricate highly efficient luminescence and optoelectronic devices.

  3. Potency of (doped) rare earth oxide particles and their constituent metals to inhibit algal growth and induce direct toxic effects.

    PubMed

    Joonas, Elise; Aruoja, Villem; Olli, Kalle; Syvertsen-Wiig, Guttorm; Vija, Heiki; Kahru, Anne

    2017-03-27

    Use of rare earth elements (REEs) has increased rapidly in recent decades due to technological advances. It has been accompanied by recurring rare earth element anomalies in water bodies. In this work we (i) studied the effects of eight novel doped and one non-doped rare earth oxide (REO) particles (aimed to be used in solid oxide fuel cells and gas separation membranes) on algae, (ii) quantified the individual adverse effects of the elements that constitute the (doped) REO particles and (iii) attempted to find a discernible pattern to relate REO particle physicochemical characteristics to algal growth inhibitory properties. Green algae Raphidocelis subcapitata (formerly Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) were used as a test species in two different formats: a standard OECD201 algal growth inhibition assay and the algal viability assay (a 'spot test') that avoids nutrient removal effects. In the 24h 'spot' test that demonstrated direct toxicity, algae were not viable at REE concentrations above 1mgmetal/L. 72-hour algal growth inhibition EC50 values for four REE salts (Ce, Gd, La, Pr) were between 1.2 and 1.4mg/L, whereas the EC50 for REO particles ranged from 1 to 98mg/L. The growth inhibition of REEs was presumably the result of nutrient sequestration from the algal growth medium. The adverse effects of REO particles were at least in part due to the entrapment of algae within particle agglomerates. Adverse effects due to the dissolution of constituent elements from (doped) REO particles and the size or specific surface area of particles were excluded, except for La2NiO4. However, the structure of the particles and/or the varying effects of oxide composition might have played a role in the observed effects. As the production rates of these REO particles are negligible compared to other forms of REEs, there is presumably no acute risk for aquatic unicellular algae.

  4. Polarization dependence of two-photon transition intensities in rare-earth doped crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Le Nguyen, An-Dien

    1996-05-01

    A polarization dependence technique has been developed as a tool to investigate phonon scattering (PS), electronic Raman scattering (ERS), and two-photon absorption (TPA) transition intensities in vanadate and phosphate crystals. A general theory for the polarization dependence (PD) of two-photon transition intensities has been given. Expressions for the polarization dependent behavior of two-photon transition intensities have been tabulated for the 32 crystallographic point groups. When the wavefunctions for the initial and final states of a rare-earth doped in crystals are known, explicit PD expressions with no unknown parameters can be obtained. A spectroscopic method for measuring and interpreting phonon and ERS intensities has been developed to study PrVO4, NdVO4, ErVO4, and TmVO4 crystals. Relative phonon intensities with the polarization of the incident and scattered light arbitrarily varied were accurately predicted and subsequently used for alignment and calibration in ERS measurements in these systems for the first time. Since ERS and PS intensities generally follow different polarization curves as a function of polar angles, the two can be uniquely identified by comparing their respective polarization behavior. The most crucial application of the technique in ERS spectroscopy is the establishment of a stringent test for the Axe theory. For the first time, the F1/F2 ratio extracted from the experimental fits of the ERS intensities were compared with those predicted by theories which include both the second- and third-order contributions. Relatively good agreement between the fitted values of F1/F2 and the predicted values using the second-order theory has been found.

  5. Use of thulium-sensitized rare earth-doped low phonon energy crystalline hosts for IR sources.

    PubMed

    Ganem, Joseph; Bowman, Steven R

    2013-11-01

    Crystalline hosts with low phonon energies enable novel energy transfer processes when doped with rare earth ions. Two applications of energy transfer for rare earth ions in thulium-sensitized low phonon energy crystals that result in infrared luminescence are discussed. One application is an endothermic, phonon-assisted cross-relaxation process in thulium-doped yttrium chloride that converts lattice phonons to infrared emission, which raises the possibility of a fundamentally new method for achieving solid-state optical cooling. The other application is an optically pumped mid-IR phosphor using thulium-praseodymium-doped potassium lead chloride that converts 805-nm diode light to broadband emission from 4,000 to 5,500 nm. These two applications in chloride crystals are discussed in terms of critical radii calculated from Forster-Dexter energy transfer theory. It is found that the critical radii for electric dipole-dipole interactions in low phonon energy chloride crystals are comparable to those in conventional oxide and fluoride crystals. It is the reduction in multi-phonon relaxation rates in chloride crystals that enable these additional energy transfer processes and infrared luminescence.

  6. Use of thulium-sensitized rare earth-doped low phonon energy crystalline hosts for IR sources

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Crystalline hosts with low phonon energies enable novel energy transfer processes when doped with rare earth ions. Two applications of energy transfer for rare earth ions in thulium-sensitized low phonon energy crystals that result in infrared luminescence are discussed. One application is an endothermic, phonon-assisted cross-relaxation process in thulium-doped yttrium chloride that converts lattice phonons to infrared emission, which raises the possibility of a fundamentally new method for achieving solid-state optical cooling. The other application is an optically pumped mid-IR phosphor using thulium-praseodymium-doped potassium lead chloride that converts 805-nm diode light to broadband emission from 4,000 to 5,500 nm. These two applications in chloride crystals are discussed in terms of critical radii calculated from Forster-Dexter energy transfer theory. It is found that the critical radii for electric dipole-dipole interactions in low phonon energy chloride crystals are comparable to those in conventional oxide and fluoride crystals. It is the reduction in multi-phonon relaxation rates in chloride crystals that enable these additional energy transfer processes and infrared luminescence. PMID:24180684

  7. Evidence for interface superconductivity in rare-earth doped CaFe2As2 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Bing; Deng, L. Z.; Wei, F. Y.; Xue, Y. Y.; Chu, C. W.

    2014-03-01

    To unravel to the mysterious non-bulk superconductivity up to 49K observed in rare-earth (R =La, Ce, Pr and Nd) doped CaFe2As2 single-crystals whose Tc is higher than that of any known compounds consisting of one or more of its constituent elements of R, Ca, Fe, and As at ambient or under pressures, systematic magnetic, compositional and structural have carried out on different rare-earth-doped (Ca1-xRx) Fe2As2 samples. We have detected extremely large magnetic anisotropy, doping-level independent Tc, unexpected superparamagnetic clusters associated with As vacancies and their close correlation with the superconducting volume fraction, the existence of mesoscopic-2D structures and Josephson-junction arrays in this system. These observations lead us to conjecture that the Tc enhancement may be associated with naturally occurring chemical interfaces and thus provided evidence for the possible interface-enhanced Tc in naturally-grown single crystals of Fe-based superconductors.

  8. Use of thulium-sensitized rare earth-doped low phonon energy crystalline hosts for IR sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganem, Joseph; Bowman, Steven R.

    2013-11-01

    Crystalline hosts with low phonon energies enable novel energy transfer processes when doped with rare earth ions. Two applications of energy transfer for rare earth ions in thulium-sensitized low phonon energy crystals that result in infrared luminescence are discussed. One application is an endothermic, phonon-assisted cross-relaxation process in thulium-doped yttrium chloride that converts lattice phonons to infrared emission, which raises the possibility of a fundamentally new method for achieving solid-state optical cooling. The other application is an optically pumped mid-IR phosphor using thulium-praseodymium-doped potassium lead chloride that converts 805-nm diode light to broadband emission from 4,000 to 5,500 nm. These two applications in chloride crystals are discussed in terms of critical radii calculated from Forster-Dexter energy transfer theory. It is found that the critical radii for electric dipole-dipole interactions in low phonon energy chloride crystals are comparable to those in conventional oxide and fluoride crystals. It is the reduction in multi-phonon relaxation rates in chloride crystals that enable these additional energy transfer processes and infrared luminescence.

  9. EarthCube Integration and Test Environment (ECITE) : An environment to verify, validate, integrate and demonstrate EarthCube technology components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fils, D.; Law, E.; Keiser, K.; Middleton, D.; Pearlman, J.; Stults, M.; MacDermaid, C.; Yang, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    NSF EarthCube is building a community-driven cyberinfrastructure that supports standards for interoperability, infuses advanced technologies to improve and facilitate interdisciplinary research, and helps educate scientists in the emerging practices of digital scholarship, data and software stewardship, and open science. A Testbed Working Group (TWG) was formed by the EarthCube's Technology and Architecture Committee, and is working with the EarthCube and user communities to define and design a testbed that will facilitate the integration of separately funded EarthCube components and promote collaborative planning, testing and integration of technologies. Specifically, the testbed seeks to: Serve as a common ground for prototyping, testing,integration and preservation of EarthCube components and products; Facilitate verification and validation of technologies, use cases, architecture design, components, scalability, interface specifications and standards; Provide a platform for demonstration and showcasing of EarthCube technologies for science users, technologists and the broader geosciences community. This talk gives a brief overview of the role, activities and accomplished achieved by the TWG, as well as the requirements and design developed to drive the implementation of a sustainable EarthCube testbed.

  10. Microstructure and properties of in-flight rare-earth doped thermal barrier coatings prepared by suspension plasma spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Stephanie

    Thermal barrier coatings with lower thermal conductivity improve the efficiency of gas turbine engines by allowing higher operating temperatures. Recent studies were shown that coatings containing a pair of rare-earth oxides with equal molar ratio have lower thermal conductivity and improved sintering resistance compared to the undoped 4-4.5 mol.% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ). In the present work, rare-earth doped coatings were fabricated via suspension plasma spray by spraying YSZ powder-ethanol suspensions that contained dissolved rare-earth nitrates. The compositions of the coatings determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy verified that 68 +/- 8% of the rare-earth nitrates added into the suspension was incorporated into the coatings. Two coatings containing different concentrations of the same dopant pair (Nd2O3/Yb2O3), and three coatings having similar concentrations of different dopant pairs (Nd 2O3/Yb2O3, Nd2O3/Gd 2O3, and Gd2O3/Yb2O 3) were produced and compared. The effect of dopant concentration and dopant pair type on the microstructure and properties of the coatings in the as-sprayed and heat treated conditions were investigated using XRD, SEM, TEM, STEM-EDX, and the laser flash method. The cross-sectional morphology of all coatings displayed columnar structure. The porosity content of the coating was found to increase with increasing dopant concentration, but did not significantly change with dopant pairs. Similarly, increasing the Nd2O3/Yb2O 3 concentration lowered the thermal conductivity of the as-sprayed coatings. Although the effect of changing dopant pair type is not as significant as increasing the dopant concentration, the coating that contained Gd2O 3/Yb2O3 exhibited the lowest conductivity compared to coatings that had other dopant pairs. Thermal conductivity measurement performed on the heat treated coatings indicated a larger conductivity increase for the rare-earth doped coatings. A detailed study on the

  11. Comparison of various organic compounds destruction on rare earths doped Ti/Sb-SnO2 electrodes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yu-Hong; Feng, Yu-Jie; Liu, Junfeng; Ren, Nanqi

    2012-11-15

    Ti/Sb-SnO2 and three kinds of rare earths (REs), namely Ce, Gd, and Eu doped Ti/Sb-SnO2 electrodes were prepared and tested for their capacity on electrocatalytic degradation of three kinds of basal aromatic compounds (benzoquinone, hydroquinone and catechol) and six kinds of aliphatic acids (maleic acid, fumaric acid, succinic acid, malonic acid, oxalic acid and acetic acid). The elimination of selected organics as well as their TOC removal with different doped Ti/Sb-SnO2 electrodes was described by first-order kinetics. Compared with Ti/Sb-SnO2, the Gd and Eu doped electrodes show better performance on the degradation of most of the selected organics, while Ce doped electrode shows either closely or lower efficiency on the degradation of these selected organics. Besides electrode material, the molecular structure of organic compound has obvious effect on its degradation in the electrocatalytic process. Catechol is more resistant to the electrophilic attack by hydroxyl radicals than benzoquinone and hydroquinone. The compound with more complicate molecular structure or longer carbon chain is more difficult to be mineralized. The aliphatic acid with higher oxygen content or more double bonds is more readily to be oxidized in the electrocatalytic process.

  12. INTEGRATED EARTH OBSERVATIONS: APPLICATION TO AIR QUALITY AND HUMAN HEALTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    In February 2005, ministers from 60 countries and the European Commission met in Brussels, Belgium to endorse the 10-year plan for a Global Earth Observation System of Systems(GEOSS) prepared by the Group on Earth Observations (GEO), a partnership of nations and international org...

  13. Magnetic properties of rare-earth-doped La0.7Sr0.3MnO3.

    PubMed

    Veverka, Pavel; Kaman, Ondřej; Knížek, Karel; Novák, Pavel; Maryško, Miroslav; Jirák, Zdeněk

    2017-01-25

    Rare-earth-doped ferromagnetic manganites La0.63RE0.07Sr0.30MnO3 (RE  =  Gd, Tb, Dy, and Ho) are synthesized in the form of sintered ceramics and nanocrystalline phases with the mean size of crystallites  ≈30 nm. The electronic states of the dopants are investigated by SQUID magnetometry and theoretically interpreted based on the calculations of the crystal field splitting of rare-earth energy levels. The samples show the orthorhombic perovskite structure of Ibmm symmetry, with a complete FM order of Mn spins in bulk and reduced order in nanoparticles. Non-zero moments are also detected at the perovskite A sites, which can be attributed to magnetic polarization of the rare-earth dopants. The measurements in external field up to 70 kOe show a standard Curie-type contribution of the spin-only moments of Gd(3+) ions, whereas Kramers ions Dy(3+) and non-Kramers ions Ho(3+) contribute by Ising moments due to their doublet ground states. The behaviour of non-Kramers ions Tb(3+) is anomalous, pointing to singlet ground state with giant Van Vleck paramagnetism. The Tb(3+) doping leads also to a notably increased coercivity compared to other La0.63RE0.07Sr0.30MnO3 systems.

  14. Magnetic properties of rare-earth-doped La0.7Sr0.3MnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veverka, Pavel; Kaman, Ondřej; Knížek, Karel; Novák, Pavel; Maryško, Miroslav; Jirák, Zdeněk

    2017-01-01

    Rare-earth-doped ferromagnetic manganites La0.63RE0.07Sr0.30MnO3 (RE  =  Gd, Tb, Dy, and Ho) are synthesized in the form of sintered ceramics and nanocrystalline phases with the mean size of crystallites  ≈30 nm. The electronic states of the dopants are investigated by SQUID magnetometry and theoretically interpreted based on the calculations of the crystal field splitting of rare-earth energy levels. The samples show the orthorhombic perovskite structure of Ibmm symmetry, with a complete FM order of Mn spins in bulk and reduced order in nanoparticles. Non-zero moments are also detected at the perovskite A sites, which can be attributed to magnetic polarization of the rare-earth dopants. The measurements in external field up to 70 kOe show a standard Curie-type contribution of the spin-only moments of Gd3+ ions, whereas Kramers ions Dy3+ and non-Kramers ions Ho3+ contribute by Ising moments due to their doublet ground states. The behaviour of non-Kramers ions Tb3+ is anomalous, pointing to singlet ground state with giant Van Vleck paramagnetism. The Tb3+ doping leads also to a notably increased coercivity compared to other La0.63RE0.07Sr0.30MnO3 systems.

  15. Fiber-optic thermometer application of thermal radiation from rare-earth end-doped SiO{sub 2} fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Katsumata, Toru Morita, Kentaro; Komuro, Shuji; Aizawa, Hiroaki

    2014-08-15

    Visible light thermal radiation from SiO{sub 2} glass doped with Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu were studied for the fiber-optic thermometer application based on the temperature dependence of thermal radiation. Thermal radiations according to Planck's law of radiation are observed from the SiO{sub 2} fibers doped with Y, La, Ce, Pr, Eu, Tb, and Lu at the temperature above 1100 K. Thermal radiations due to f-f transitions of rare-earth ions are observed from the SiO{sub 2} fibers doped with Nd, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb at the temperature above 900 K. Peak intensities of thermal radiations from rare-earth doped SiO{sub 2} fibers increase sensitively with temperature. Thermal activation energies of thermal radiations by f-f transitions seen in Nd, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb doped SiO{sub 2} fibers are smaller than those from SiO{sub 2} fibers doped with Y, La, Ce, Pr, Eu, Tb, and Lu. Thermal radiation due to highly efficient f-f transitions in Nd, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb ions emits more easily than usual thermal radiation process. Thermal radiations from rare-earth doped SiO{sub 2} are potentially applicable for the fiber-optic thermometry above 900 K.

  16. Numerical integration routines for near-earth operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, W. F.

    1973-01-01

    Two general purpose numerical integration schemes were built into the NASA-JSC computer system. The state-of-the-art of numerical integration, the particular integrators built into the JSC computer system, and the use of the new integration packages are described. Background information about numerical integration and the variable-order, variable-stepsize Adams numerical integration technique is discussed. Results concerning the PEACE parameter optimization program are given along with recommendations and conclusions.

  17. Magnetic, dielectric and microwave absorption properties of rare earth doped Ni-Co and Ni-Co-Zn spinel ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stergiou, Charalampos

    2017-03-01

    In this article we analyze the electromagnetic properties of rare earth substituted Ni-Co and Ni-Co-Zn cubic ferrites in the microwave band, along with their performance as microwave absorbing materials. Ceramic samples with compositions Ni0.5Co0.5Fe2-xRxO4 and Ni0.25Co0.5Zn0.25Fe2-xRxO4 (R=Y and La, x=0, 0.02), fabricated with the solid state reaction method, were characterized with regard to the complex permeability μ*(f) and permittivity ε*(f) up to 20 GHz. The rare earth substitutions basically affect the microwave μ*(f) spectra and the dynamic magnetization mechanisms of domain wall motion and magnetization rotation. Key parameters for this effect are the reduced magnetocrystalline anisotropy and the created crystal inhomogeneities. Moreover, permittivity is increased with the Y and La content, due to the enhancement of the dielectric orientation polarization. Regarding the electromagnetic wave attenuation, the prepared ferrites exhibit narrowband return losses (RL) by virtue of the cancellation of multiple reflections, when their thickness equals an odd multiple of quarter-wavelength. Interestingly, the zero-reflection conditions are satisfied in the vicinity of the ferromagnetic resonance. As the rare earth doping shifts this mechanism to lower frequencies, loss peaks with RL>46 dB occur at 4.1 GHz and 5 GHz for Y and La-doped Ni-Co-Zn spinels, whereas peaks with RL>40 dB appear at 18 GHz and 19 GHz for Y and La-doped Ni-Co spinels, respectively. The presented experimental findings underline the potential of cubic ferrites with high Co concentration in the suppression of electromagnetic reflections well above the 1 GHz region.

  18. Effects of varying base glass composition on the optical properties of lead borate glasses doped with rare earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidorn, William D.

    Rare Earth (RE) doped lead borate glasses are expected to exhibit a compositional dependence in their optical properties due to the changes induced by variations in the structure of the base glass with increasing lead oxide content. A series of lead borate glasses with the composition xPbO:(99.5 - x)B2O 3 (x = 29.5 to 69.5 in steps of 10 mol%) doped with 0.5 mol% Sm2O3, Er2O3, and Ho2O3 were prepared using the melt quench technique followed by 3 hours of annealing near the glass transition temperature. Optical absorption and fluorescence spectra of these RE doped lead borate glasses were analyzed using Judd-Ofelt theory. The compositional dependence of Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters, O t (t = 2, 4, 6), were determined and were then used to calculate the radiative transition probability of the excited states, the total radiative transition probability, branching ratios, and radiative lifetime of the glasses. From the fluorescence spectra the stimulated emission cross section, and Stark splitting of the excited states were calculated as a function of glass composition. A fourth set of samples with composition xPbO:(99 - x)B2O 3(x = 29 to 69 in steps of 10 mol%) co-doped with 0.5 mol% Er2 O3 and Ho2O3 were also prepared and the effects of co-doping on the absorption and fluorescence were analyzed. In all the glass systems studied, it was found that the optical properties are strongly influenced by structural changes arising from compositional variation. Er3+ transitions exhibit large stimulated cross section suggesting the possible utilization of these materials in laser applications. Keywords: Lead and bismuth borate glasses, fluorescence, optical absorption, Sm3+, Ho3+, Er3+ ions, Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters, stimulated emission cross section.

  19. Reduction of magnetic damping constant of FeCo films by rare-earth Gd doping

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xiaobin; Xi, Li Li, Yue; Han, Xuemeng; Li, Dong; Wang, Zhen; Zuo, Yalu

    2014-08-18

    Magnetic damping constant (α) is one of the key parameters to determine the critical current density of spin-transfer-torque devices and the switching time of magnetization for ultra-high-frequency devices. In this work, Gd doped FeCo films were fabricated to investigate α based on the ferromagnetic resonance technique. Gd doping not only can efficiently decrease the magnetic inhomogeneity and the extrinsic part of α but also the Landé g-factor and intrinsic part of α. The obtained α was roughly proportional to (g-2){sup 2} and the magnetic anisotropic constant, indicating that the decreased spin-orbit interaction decreases α by Gd doping.

  20. Chalcogenide glasses for infrared applications: New synthesis routes and rare earth doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Mathieu

    shift the optical band gap toward higher wavelengths. A systematic ceramization study emphasizes the difficulty of controlling the crystallization for glasses in the systems GeSe2-Ga2Se3-In2Se 3 and GeSe2-Ga2Se3-PbSe. No crystallization of the In2Se3 and PbSe crystalline phase was obtained. Finally, the possibility of producing rare-earth doped 80GeSe2 -20Ga2Se3 glass-ceramics transparent in the infrared region up to 16 microm is demonstrated. Enhanced photoluminescence intensity and reduced radiative lifetimes are observed with increased crystallinity in these materials.

  1. New Mid-IR Lasers Based on Rare-Earth-Doped Sulfide and Chloride Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nostrand, M

    2000-09-01

    Applications in remote-sensing and military countermeasures have driven a need for compact, solid-state mid-IR lasers. Due to multi-phonon quenching, non-traditional hosts are needed to extend current solid-state, room-temperature lasing capabilities beyond {approx} 4 {micro}m. Traditional oxide and fluoride hosts have effective phonon energies in the neighborhood of 1000 cm{sup -1} and 500 cm{sup -1}, respectively. These phonons can effectively quench radiation above 2 and 4 {micro}m, respectively. Materials with lower effective phonon energies such as sulfides and chlorides are the logical candidates for mid-IR (4-10 {micro}m) operation. In this report, laser action is demonstrated in two such hosts, CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4} and KPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5}. The CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} laser operating at 4.3 {micro}m represents the first sulfide laser operating beyond 2 {micro}m. The KPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5}:Dy{sup 3+} laser operating at 2.4 {micro}m represents the first operation of a chloride-host laser in ambient conditions. Laser action is also reported for CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} at 2.4 {micro}m, CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} at 1.4 {micro}m, and KPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5}:Nd{sup 3+} at 1.06 {micro}m. Both host materials have been fully characterized, including lifetimes, absorption and emission cross sections, radiative branching ratios, and radiative quantum efficiencies. Radiative branching ratios and radiative quantum efficiencies have been determined both by the Judd-Ofelt method (which is based on absorption measurements), and by a novel method described herein which is based on emission measurements. Modeling has been performed to predict laser performance, and a new method to determine emission cross section from slope efficiency and threshold data is developed. With the introduction and laser demonstration of rare-earth-doped CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4} and KPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5}, direct generation of mid-IR laser radiation in a solid-state host has been demonstrated. In

  2. Novel rare earth ions-doped oxyfluoride nano-composite with efficient upconversion white-light emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daqin; Wang, Yuansheng; Yu, Yunlong; Huang, Ping; Weng, Fangyi

    2008-10-01

    Transparent SiO 2-Al 2O 3-NaF-YF 3 bulk nano-composites triply doped with Ho 3+, Tm 3+ and Yb 3+ were fabricated by melt-quenching and subsequent heating. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy measurements demonstrated the homogeneous precipitation of the β-YF 3 crystals with mean size of 20 nm among the glass matrix, and rare earth ions were found to partition into these nano-crystals. Under single 976 nm laser excitation, intense red, green and blue upconversion emissions were simultaneously observed owing to the successive energy transfer from Yb 3+ to Ho 3+ or Tm 3+. Various colors of luminescence, including bright perfect white light, can be easily tuned by adjusting the concentrations of the rare earth ions in the material. The overall energy efficiency of the white-light upconversion was estimated to be about 0.2%.

  3. Information Technology Infusion Case Study: Integrating Google Earth into the A-Train Data Depot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, P. M.; Kempler, S. J.; Leptoukh, G. G.; Chen, A.

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of the NASA funded project, ‘Utilizing 3 Dimensional Data Views to Access Data and Discover Relationships Between Multiple Heterogeneous Data Sets Along the A-Train Tracks’ (Kempler, PI, NASA ROSES NNH07ZDA001N ACCESS Proposal) was to employ the latest 3 dimensional visualization technology to explore and provide direct data access to heterogeneous A-Train datasets, ‘operationally’, along, and on either side of the A-Train tracks. Google Earth (tm) provides the foundation for organizing, visualizing, publishing, and synergizing Earth science data in virtual 3 dimensions, for this project. Successful integration of Google Earth (tm) into the A-Train Data Depot (ATDD), resulted in: a) visualizing two-, three- and four-dimensional Earth science data on Google Earth (tm); b) visualizing and synergizing analyzed results derived from the Giovanni online analysis system; and c) visualizing results derived from other standard web services (e.g. OGC WMS). These implementations produce KMZ files that can be opened and visualized via a Google Earth (tm). Integrating A-Train data on Google Earth (tm) through ATDD (http://disc.gsfc.nasa.gov/atdd) affords users the ability to more efficiently discover, access, manipulate and analyze A-Train atmospheric data. The integration of Google Earth (tm) into the ATDD came with anticipated and unanticipated challenges, and solutions, insulated far beneath the easily obtainable ATDD Google Earth (tm) images and data downloads. In addition, some components of integration went rather smoothly. This presentation will discuss the challenges and non-challenges encountered and innovative solutions implemented to enable displaying NASA vertical and horizontal Earth science data within Google Earth (tm) technology. Findings discussed, include: - Interoperability between ATDD and Google Earth (tm) - Required enhancements to existing systems - Reuse of infused technology - Making the total greater than the some of the parts It is

  4. An Integrated and Collaborative Approach for NASA Earth Science Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, K.; Lowe, D.; Behnke, J.; Ramapriyan, H.; Behnke, J.; Sofinowski, E.

    2012-01-01

    Earth science research requires coordination and collaboration across multiple disparate science domains. Data systems that support this research are often as disparate as the disciplines that they support. These distinctions can create barriers limiting access to measurements, which could otherwise enable cross-discipline Earth science. NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is continuing to bridge the gap between discipline-centric data systems with a coherent and transparent system of systems that offers up to date and engaging science related content, creates an active and immersive science user experience, and encourages the use of EOSDIS earth data and services. The new Earthdata Coherent Web (ECW) project encourages cohesiveness by combining existing websites, data and services into a unified website with a common look and feel, common tools and common processes. It includes cross-linking and cross-referencing across the Earthdata site and NASA's Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAAC), and by leveraging existing EOSDIS Cyber-infrastructure and Web Service technologies to foster re-use and to reduce barriers to discovering Earth science data (http://earthdata.nasa.gov).

  5. Luminescence properties of barium--gadolinium-titanate ceramics doped with rare-earth ions (Eu3+ and Tb3+).

    PubMed

    Hemasundara Raju, S; Muni Sudhakar, B; Sudhakar Reddy, B; Dhoble, S J; Thyagarajan, K; Nageswara Raju, C

    2014-11-01

    Barium-gadolinium-titanate (BaGd2 Ti4 O12) powder ceramics doped with rare-earth ions (Eu(3+) and Tb(3+)) were synthesized by a solid-state reaction method. From the X-ray diffraction spectrum, it was observed that Eu(3+) and Tb(3+):BaGd2 Ti4 O12 powder ceramics are crystallized in the form of an orthorhombic structure. Scanning electron microscopy image shows that the particles are agglomerated and the particle size is about 200 nm. Eu(3+) - and Tb(3+) -doped BaGd2 Ti4 O12 powder ceramics were examined by energy dispersive X-ray analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, photoluminescence and thermoluminescence (TL) spectra. Emission spectra of Eu(3+)-doped BaGd2 Ti4 O12 powder ceramics showed bright red emission at 613 nm ((5)D0 →(7)F2) with an excitation wavelength λ(exci)  = 408 nm ((7)F0 → (5)D3) and Tb(3+):BaGd2 Ti4 O12 ceramic powder has shown green emission at 534 nm ((5)D4 → (7)F5) with an excitation wavelength λ(exci)  = 331 nm (((7)F6 → (5)D1). TL spectra show that Eu(3+) and Tb(3+) ions affect TL sensitivity.

  6. Towards mid-infrared fiber-lasers: rare earth ion doped, indium-containing, selenide bulk glasses and fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakr, H.; Tang, Z.; Furniss, D.; Sojka, L.; Moneim, N. A.; Barney, E.; Sujecki, S.; Benson, T. M.; Seddon, A. B.

    2014-02-01

    Chalcogenide glasses are promising materials for mid-infrared (IR) fiber lasers (i.e. 3 - 25 μm wavelength range). These glasses exhibit low phonon energies, together with large refractive indices, rare earth (RE-) ion solubility and sufficient mechanical and chemical robustness. Optical quality of the fiber is key. Gallium is known to promote RE-ion solubility in chalcogenide glasses, probably forming a [Pr(III)] - Se - [Ga(III)] associated type complex. Here, indium is investigated as an alternative additive to gallium in Pr3+-doped Ge-As-Se chalcogenide glasses. Indium has the same outer electronic structure as gallium. Moreover, indium has the advantage of being heavier than gallium, potentially promoting a lower phonon-energy, local environment of the RE-dopant. Zero to ~2000 ppmw (nominal parts per million by weight) Pr3+- doped Ge-As-In-Se bulk glasses are prepared using the melt-quench method. ~500 ppmw Pr3+- doped Ge-As-In-Se, optically-clad fiber is realized via fiber-drawing of extruded fiberoptic preforms. Fiber absorption and emission spectra are collected and compared with those of the bulk glasses.

  7. Synthesis of rare earth doped TiO2 nanorods as photocatalysts for lignin degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Liang; Zhao, Xueyuan; Cao, Lixin; Moon, Ji-Won; Gu, Baohua; Wang, Wei

    2015-09-10

    In this paper, a two-step process is developed to synthesize rare earth doped titania nanorods (RE–TiO2 NRs) as photocatalysts for efficient degradation of lignin under simulated sunlight irradiation. In this approach, protonated titanate nanotubes with layered structures were first prepared by a hydrothermal approach, and rare earth metal ions were subsequently bound to the negatively charged surface of the synthesized titanate via electrostatic incorporation. The as-synthesized RE–TiO2 NRs after calcination generally showed much higher photocatalytic efficiencies than those of undoped TiO2 NRs or the commercial P25 TiO2 photocatalyst. Using methyl orange (MO) as a probing molecule, we demonstrate that Eu–TiO2 NRs are among the best for degrading MO, with an observed rate constant of 4.2 × 10-3 s-1. The La3+, Sm3+, Eu3+ and Er3+ doped TiO2 NRs also showed higher photocatalytic efficiencies in degrading MO than the commercial P25 TiO2. Finally, we further demonstrate that lignin can be photodegraded effectively and rapidly at room temperature under simulated sunlight through two reaction routes, which could be important in controlling ways of lignin depolymerization or the formation of reaction products.

  8. GeS2-In2S3-CsI Chalcogenide Glasses Doped with Rare Earth Ions for Near- and Mid-IR Luminescence.

    PubMed

    Li, Legang; Bian, Junyi; Jiao, Qing; Liu, Zijun; Dai, Shixun; Lin, Changgui

    2016-11-21

    Chalcogenide glass has been considered as a promising host for the potential laser gain and amplifier media operating in near- and mid-IR spectral region. In this work, the IR luminescence spectra of rare earth ions (Tm(3+), Er(3+), and Dy(3+)) doped 65GeS2-25In2S3-10CsI chalcogenide glasses were measured under the excitation of an 808 nm laser diode. To the best of our knowledge, it firstly provides the luminescence spectra of a full near- and mid-IR spectral range from 1 to 4 μm in rare earth ions doped chalcogenide glasses. The results of absorption spectra, luminescence spectra, and fluorescence decay curves were obtained in these samples with singly-, co- and triply-doping behaviors of Tm(3+), Er(3+), and Dy(3+) ions. In order to search possible efficient IR emissions, the luminescence behavior was investigated specifically with the variation of doping behaviors and dopant ions, especially in the samples co- and triply-doped active ions. The results suggest that favorable near- and mid-IR luminescence of rare earth ions can be further modified in chalcogenide glasses through an elaborated design of doping behavior and optically active ions.

  9. GeS2–In2S3–CsI Chalcogenide Glasses Doped with Rare Earth Ions for Near- and Mid-IR Luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Legang; Bian, Junyi; Jiao, Qing; Liu, Zijun; Dai, Shixun; Lin, Changgui

    2016-11-01

    Chalcogenide glass has been considered as a promising host for the potential laser gain and amplifier media operating in near- and mid-IR spectral region. In this work, the IR luminescence spectra of rare earth ions (Tm3+, Er3+, and Dy3+) doped 65GeS2–25In2S3–10CsI chalcogenide glasses were measured under the excitation of an 808 nm laser diode. To the best of our knowledge, it firstly provides the luminescence spectra of a full near- and mid-IR spectral range from 1 to 4 μm in rare earth ions doped chalcogenide glasses. The results of absorption spectra, luminescence spectra, and fluorescence decay curves were obtained in these samples with singly-, co- and triply-doping behaviors of Tm3+, Er3+, and Dy3+ ions. In order to search possible efficient IR emissions, the luminescence behavior was investigated specifically with the variation of doping behaviors and dopant ions, especially in the samples co- and triply-doped active ions. The results suggest that favorable near- and mid-IR luminescence of rare earth ions can be further modified in chalcogenide glasses through an elaborated design of doping behavior and optically active ions.

  10. GeS2–In2S3–CsI Chalcogenide Glasses Doped with Rare Earth Ions for Near- and Mid-IR Luminescence

    PubMed Central

    Li, Legang; Bian, Junyi; Jiao, Qing; Liu, Zijun; Dai, Shixun; Lin, Changgui

    2016-01-01

    Chalcogenide glass has been considered as a promising host for the potential laser gain and amplifier media operating in near- and mid-IR spectral region. In this work, the IR luminescence spectra of rare earth ions (Tm3+, Er3+, and Dy3+) doped 65GeS2–25In2S3–10CsI chalcogenide glasses were measured under the excitation of an 808 nm laser diode. To the best of our knowledge, it firstly provides the luminescence spectra of a full near- and mid-IR spectral range from 1 to 4 μm in rare earth ions doped chalcogenide glasses. The results of absorption spectra, luminescence spectra, and fluorescence decay curves were obtained in these samples with singly-, co- and triply-doping behaviors of Tm3+, Er3+, and Dy3+ ions. In order to search possible efficient IR emissions, the luminescence behavior was investigated specifically with the variation of doping behaviors and dopant ions, especially in the samples co- and triply-doped active ions. The results suggest that favorable near- and mid-IR luminescence of rare earth ions can be further modified in chalcogenide glasses through an elaborated design of doping behavior and optically active ions. PMID:27869231

  11. Program for integrating multizonal photographs of the Earth, taken by MKF-6 camera, in a computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agapov, A. V.; Mosin, S. T.

    1980-01-01

    An algorithm and program are described, for integrating up to 6 simultaneously exposed photographs in different spectral ranges of the surface of the Earth, taken by MKF-6 cameras aboard Soyuz-22. Three of the reference marks are identified on 1 photograph and then are used to integrate the other photographs with the first. The program was compiled for the ES-1040 computer, as a standard subprogram in a system for computer processing of data of study of the Earth from space.

  12. The influence of different alkaline earth oxides on the structural and optical properties of undoped, Ce-doped, Sm-doped, and Sm/Ce co-doped lithium alumino-phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, H. A.; Arzumanyan, G. M.; Möncke, D.

    2016-12-01

    Undoped, singly Sm doped, Ce doped, and Sm/Ce co-doped lithium alumino-phosphate glasses with different alkaline earth modifiers were prepared by melt quenching. The structure of the prepared glasses was investigated by FT-IR and Raman, as well as by optical spectroscopy. The effect of the optical basicity of the host glass matrix on the added active dopants was studied, as was the effect doping had on the phosphate structural units. The optical edge shifts toward higher wavelengths with an increase in the optical basicity due to the increased polarizability of the glass matrix, but also with increasing CeO2 concentration as a result of Ce3+/Ce4+ inter valence charge transfer (IV-CT) absorption. The optical band gap for direct and indirect allowed transitions was calculated for the undoped glasses. The glass sample containing Mg2+ modifier ions is found to have the highest value (4.16 eV) for the optical band gap while Ba2+ has the lowest value (3.61 eV). The change in the optical band gap arises from the structural changes and the overall polarizability (optical basicity). Refractive index, molar refractivity Rm and molar polarizability αm values increase with increasing optical basicity of the glasses. The characteristic absorption peaks of Sm3+ were also investigated. For Sm/Ce co-doped glasses, especially at high concentration of CeO2, the absorption of Ce3+ hinders the high energy absorption of Sm3+ and this effect becomes more obvious with increasing optical basicity.

  13. Investigation of thermal diffusivity dependence on temperature in a group of optical single crystals doped with rare earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefon-Radziejewska, D.; Bodzenta, J.

    2015-07-01

    The group of YAG, YVO4 and GdCOB single crystals was examined to determine the thermal diffusivity as a function of temperature in range from 30 °C to 300 °C. Further investigations concerned on analysis of the influence of dopants on these dependencies. The experimental setup based on thermal wave method with mirage detection was used. The samples represented different crystallographic systems such as cubic (YAG) tetragonal (YVO4) and monoclinic (GdCOB). The anisotropy of thermal conductivity of investigated samples was taken into account in the investigations. The crystals were doped with calcium ions, rare earth ions such as ytterbium, neodymium, and thulium, and also with transition metal vanadium. The results confirmed that influence of doping on the thermal diffusivity of investigated materials strongly depends on temperature. In general the thermal diffusivity decreases with increasing of sample temperature from 30 °C to 300 °C, however the drop in thermal diffusivity is the highest for pure single crystals. Doping is another factor reducing the heat transport in single crystals. Introduction of dopant ions into a crystal lattice leads to a significant decrease in the thermal diffusivity at lower temperatures in comparison with pure crystals. However, the influence of dopants becomes less pronounced with increasing temperature, and in case of weakly doped crystals it becomes negligible at higher temperatures. The interpretation of thermal diffusivity dependence on temperature for single crystals was based on the Debye model of lattice thermal conductivity of solids. The results allowed to conclude that the decrease of thermal diffusivity with temperature and increasing concentration of impurities is caused by shortening of the phonons mean free path due to phonon-phonon and phonon-point defect scatterings.

  14. Enhancement of thermopower of TAGS-85 high-performance thermoelectric materials by doping with the rare earth Dy

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Evgenii; Budko, Serfuei; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2012-04-10

    Enhancement of thermopower is achieved by doping the narrow-band semiconductor Ag{sub 6.52}Sb{sub 6.52}Ge{sub 36.96}Te{sub 50} (acronym TAGS-85), one of the best p-type thermoelectric materials, with 1 or 2% of the rare earth dysprosium (Dy). Evidence for the incorporation of Dy into the lattice is provided by X-ray diffraction and increased orientation-dependent local fields detected by {sup 125}Te NMR spectroscopy. Since Dy has a stable electronic configuration, the enhancement cannot be attributed to 4f-electron states formed near the Fermi level. It is likely that the enhancement is due to a small reduction in the carrier concentration, detected by {sup 125}Te NMR spectroscopy, but mostly due to energy filtering of the carriers by potential barriers formed in the lattice by Dy, which has large both atomic size and localized magnetic moment. The interplay between the thermopower, the electrical resistivity, and the thermal conductivity of TAGS-85 doped with Dy results in an enhancement of the power factor (PF) and the thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) at 730 K, from PF = 28 μW cm{sup −1} K{sup −2} and ZT ≤ 1.3 in TAGS-85 to PF = 35 μW cm{sup −1} K{sup −2} and ZT ≥ 1.5 in TAGS-85 doped with 1 or 2% Dy for Ge. This makes TAGS-85 doped with Dy a promising material for thermoelectric power generation.

  15. The Role of Defect Complexes in the Magneto-Optical Properties of Rare Earth Doped Gallium Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Brandon

    Wide band gap semiconductors doped with rare earth ions (RE) have shown great potential for applications in optoelectronics, photonics, and spintronics. The 1.54mum Erbium (Er) emission has been extensively utilized in optical fiber communications, and Europium (Eu) is commonly used as a red color component for LEDs and fluorescence lamps. For the realization of spintronic-type devices, a dilutely doped semiconductor that exhibits room temperature ferromagnetic behavior would be desirable. Such behavior has been observed in GaN:Er. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that strain may play an important role in the control of this ferromagnetism; however, this requires further investigation. One motivation of this work is the realization of an all solid state white light source monolithically integrated into III/V nitride semiconductor materials, ideally GaN. For this, the current AlGaAs-based LEDs need to be replaced. One approach for achieving efficient red emission from GaN is dilute doping with fluorescent ions. In this regard, Eu has consistently been the most promising candidate as a dopant in the active layer for a red, GaN based, LED due to the sharp 5D0 to 7F2 transitions that result in red emission around 620nm. The success of GaN:Eu as the active layer for a red LED is based on the ability for the Eu ions to be efficiently excited by electron hole pairs. Thus, the processes by which energy is transferred from the host to the Eu ions has been studied. Complications arise, however, from the fact that Eu ions incorporate into multiple center environments, the structures of which are found to have a profound influence on the excitation pathways and efficiencies of the Eu ion. Therefore the nature of Eu incorporation and the resulting luminescence efficiency in GaN has been extensively investigated. By performing a comparative study on GaN:Eu samples grown under a variety of controlled conditions and using a variety of experimental techniques, the majority site has

  16. Characterizing the Purple Earth: Modeling the Globally Integrated Spectral Variability of the Archean Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanromá, E.; Pallé, E.; Parenteau, M. N.; Kiang, N. Y.; Gutiérrez-Navarro, A. M.; López, R.; Montañés-Rodríguez, P.

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing searches for exoplanetary systems have revealed a wealth of planets with diverse physical properties. Planets even smaller than the Earth have already been detected and the efforts of future missions are aimed at the discovery, and perhaps characterization, of small rocky exoplanets within the habitable zone of their stars. Clearly, what we know about our planet will be our guideline for the characterization of such planets. However, the Earth has been inhabited for at least 3.8 Gyr and its appearance has changed with time. Here, we have studied the Earth during the Archean eon, 3.0 Gyr ago. At that time, one of the more widespread life forms on the planet was purple bacteria. These bacteria are photosynthetic microorganisms and can inhabit both aquatic and terrestrial environments. Here, we use a radiative transfer model to simulate the visible and near-infrared radiation reflected by our planet, taking into account several scenarios regarding the possible distribution of purple bacteria over continents and oceans. We find that purple bacteria have a reflectance spectrum that has a strong reflectivity increase, similar to the red edge of leafy plants, although shifted redward. This feature produces a detectable signal in the disk-averaged spectra of our planet, depending on cloud amount and purple bacteria concentration/distribution. We conclude that by using multi-color photometric observations, it is possible to distinguish between an Archean Earth in which purple bacteria inhabit vast extensions of the planet and a present-day Earth with continents covered by deserts, vegetation, or microbial mats.

  17. Characterizing the Purple Earth: Modeling the globally integrated spectral variability of the Archean Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Sanromá, E.; Pallé, E.; López, R.; Montañés-Rodríguez, P.; Kiang, N. Y.; Gutiérrez-Navarro, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing searches for exoplanetary systems have revealed a wealth of planets with diverse physical properties. Planets even smaller than the Earth have already been detected and the efforts of future missions are aimed at the discovery, and perhaps characterization, of small rocky exoplanets within the habitable zone of their stars. Clearly, what we know about our planet will be our guideline for the characterization of such planets. However, the Earth has been inhabited for at least 3.8 Gyr and its appearance has changed with time. Here, we have studied the Earth during the Archean eon, 3.0 Gyr ago. At that time, one of the more widespread life forms on the planet was purple bacteria. These bacteria are photosynthetic microorganisms and can inhabit both aquatic and terrestrial environments. Here, we use a radiative transfer model to simulate the visible and near-infrared radiation reflected by our planet, taking into account several scenarios regarding the possible distribution of purple bacteria over continents and oceans. We find that purple bacteria have a reflectance spectrum that has a strong reflectivity increase, similar to the red edge of leafy plants, although shifted redward. This feature produces a detectable signal in the disk-averaged spectra of our planet, depending on cloud amount and purple bacteria concentration/distribution. We conclude that by using multi-color photometric observations, it is possible to distinguish between an Archean Earth in which purple bacteria inhabit vast extensions of the planet and a present-day Earth with continents covered by deserts, vegetation, or microbial mats.

  18. An Integrated Rare Earth Elements Supply Chain Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-24

    Disruption in the global supply of rare earths poses a significant concern for America‘s energy security and clean energy objectives, its future defense...World Trade Organization rules by limiting clean energy imports, while incentivizing clean energy exports.54 If accurate, this speculation supports...resource scarcity and secure our supply chains. The NSS further declares the U.S. ―has a window of opportunity to lead in the development of clean energy technology

  19. Transforming Water Management: an Emerging Promise of Integrated Earth Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawford, R. G.

    2011-12-01

    Throughout its history, civilization has relied on technology to facilitate many of its advances. New innovations and technologies have often provided strategic advantages that have led to transformations in institutions, economies and ultimately societies. Observational and information technologies are leading to significant developments in the water sector. After a brief introduction tracing the role of observational technologies in the areas of hydrology and water cycle science, this talk explores the existing and potential contributions of remote sensing data in water resource management around the world. In particular, it outlines the steps being undertaken by the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) and its Water Task to facilitate capacity building efforts in water management using Earth Observations in Asia, Africa and Latin and Caribbean America. Success stories on the benefits of using Earth Observations and applying GEO principles are provided. While GEO and its capacity building efforts are contributing to the transformation of water management through interoperability, data sharing, and capacity building, the full potential of these contributions has not been fully realized because impediments and challenges still remain.

  20. [Effect of bivalent alkaline earth fluorides introduction on thermal stability and spectroscopic properties of Er3+/Tm3+ /Yb3+ co-doped oxyfluorogermanate glasses].

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue-bo; Zhang, Xin-na; Zhou, Da-li; Jiao, Qing; Wang, Rong-fei; Huang, Jin-feng; Long, Xiao-bo; Qiu, Jian-bei

    2012-01-01

    Transparent Er3+/Tm3+ /Yb3+ co-doped oxyfluorogermanate glasses alone containing MgF2, CaF2, SrF2 or BaF2 and nano-glass-ceramics only containing BaF2 were prepared. The thermal stabilities and the up-conversion emission properties of the samples were investigated. Analyses of absorbance spectra reveal that the UV cutoff band moves slightly to shortwave band with the doping bivalent cation mass increasing. The results show that the emission color can be adjusted by changing the alkaline earth cation species in the glass matrixes, especially as Mg2+ is concerned, and the emission intensity can increase notably by heating the glass containing alkaline-earth fluoride into glass ceramic containing alkaline-earth fluoride nanocrystals or increasing the content of bivalent alkaline earth fluorides.

  1. Integrated remote sensing of the earth from low earth orbit in the 1990's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    Trends in the areas of science, data systems, instruments and space technologies and their related infrastructures that will be experienced in earth remote sensing activities from LEO in the 1990s are discussed. Interdisciplinary studies will examine the flow of energy through the earth system, encompassing surveys of atmospheric and ocean circulations, the hydrologic cycle, and biogeochemical cycles. Mainframe computer assimilation of large data inputs will be associated with distributed microcomputer processing and analyses. Single satellite antennas will scan several microwave frequencies simultaneously, e.g., taking data on vegetation, water, and ice. Broadening the range of simultaneous observations will require multiinstrumented free-flying platforms, placed in orbit, repaired and/or retrieved by the Shuttle. Future instrumentation will include visible/IR imagers and the multifrequency microwave sounders with capabilities mainly limited by the availability of sufficient data-handling facilities.

  2. Bridging the Gap between Earth Science and Students: An Integrated Approach using NASA Earth Science Climate Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, Erica J.; Chambers, Lin H.; Phelps, Carrie S.; Oots, Penny C.; Moore, Susan W.; Diones, Dennis D.

    2007-01-01

    Under the auspices of the Department of Education's No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act, beginning in 2007 students will be tested in the science area. There are many techniques that educators can employ to teach students science. The use of authentic materials or in this case authentic data can be an engaging alternative to more traditional methods. An Earth science classroom is a great place for the integration of authentic data and science concepts. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has a wealth of high quality Earth science data available to the general public. For instance, the Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) at NASA s Langley Research Center houses over 800 Earth science data sets related to Earth's radiation budget, clouds, aerosols and tropospheric chemistry. These data sets were produced to increase academic understanding of the natural and anthropogenic factors that influence global climate; however, a major hurdle in using authentic data is the size of the data and data documentation. To facilitate the use of these data sets for educational purposes, the Mentoring and inquirY using NASA Data on Atmospheric and Earth science for Teachers and Amateurs (MY NASA DATA) project has been established to systematically support educational activities at all levels of formal and informal education. The MY NASA DATA project accomplishes this by reducing these large data holdings to microsets that are easily accessible and explored by K-12 educators and students though the project's Web page. MY NASA DATA seeks to ease the difficulty in understanding the jargon-heavy language of Earth science. This manuscript will show how MY NASA DATA provides resources for NCLB implementation in the science area through an overview of the Web site, the different microsets available, the lesson plans and computer tools, and an overview of educational support mechanisms.

  3. Fluorescence enhancement in rare earth doped sol-gel glass by N , N dimethylformamide as a drying control chemical additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyler, A. P.; Boye, D. M.; Hoffman, K. R.; Silversmith, A. J.

    Studies of terbium fluorescence intensity as a function of annealing temperature reveal the cause of increased fluorescence yields observed in rare earth doped sol-gel silicates prepared using N , N-dimethylformamide (DMF) as a drying control chemical additive (DCCA). While gels prepared with DMF actually have lower fluorescence yields than gels prepared without DMF at lower annealing temperatures, DMF gels can be annealed at much higher temperatures while retaining high optical quality. At these higher temperatures, terbium fluorescence yields increase dramatically as the sol-gel network undergoes densification, closing the pores of the network and eliminating the fluorescence quenching silanols on pore surfaces. DMF is therefore found to enhance the fluorescence properties of rare earth sol-gel glasses by reducing micro-fracturing and facilitating network densification. Further investigations are underway to determine the effectiveness of other promising DCCAs, such as glycerol, and to explore the possibility of exploiting the solubility properties of DCCAs to improve rare earth dopant dispersion.

  4. Novel rare earth ions-doped oxyfluoride nano-composite with efficient upconversion white-light emission

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Daqin; Wang Yuansheng Yu Yunlong; Huang Ping; Weng Fangyi

    2008-10-15

    Transparent SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NaF-YF{sub 3} bulk nano-composites triply doped with Ho{sup 3+}, Tm{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} were fabricated by melt-quenching and subsequent heating. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy measurements demonstrated the homogeneous precipitation of the {beta}-YF{sub 3} crystals with mean size of 20 nm among the glass matrix, and rare earth ions were found to partition into these nano-crystals. Under single 976 nm laser excitation, intense red, green and blue upconversion emissions were simultaneously observed owing to the successive energy transfer from Yb{sup 3+} to Ho{sup 3+} or Tm{sup 3+}. Various colors of luminescence, including bright perfect white light, can be easily tuned by adjusting the concentrations of the rare earth ions in the material. The overall energy efficiency of the white-light upconversion was estimated to be about 0.2%. - Graphical abstract: Under single 976 nm laser excitation, intense red, green and blue upconversion emissions were simultaneously observed owing to the successive energy transfer from Yb{sup 3+} to Ho{sup 3+} or Tm{sup 3+}. Various colors of luminescence, including bright perfect white light with CIE-X=0.351 and CIE-Y=0.306, can be easily tuned by adjusting the concentrations of the rare earth ions in the transparent oxyfluoride glass ceramics.

  5. Cyberinfrastructure at IRIS: Challenges and Solutions Providing Integrated Data Access to EarthScope and Other Earth Science Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahern, T. K.; Barga, R.; Casey, R.; Kamb, L.; Parastatidis, S.; Stromme, S.; Weertman, B. T.

    2008-12-01

    While mature methods of accessing seismic data from the IRIS DMC have existed for decades, the demands for improved interdisciplinary data integration call for new approaches. Talented software teams at the IRIS DMC, UNAVCO and the ICDP in Germany, have been developing web services for all EarthScope data including data from USArray, PBO and SAFOD. These web services are based upon SOAP and WSDL. The EarthScope Data Portal was the first external system to access data holdings from the IRIS DMC using Web Services. EarthScope will also draw more heavily upon products to aid in cross-disciplinary data reuse. A Product Management System called SPADE allows archive of and access to heterogeneous data products, presented as XML documents, at the IRIS DMC. Searchable metadata are extracted from the XML and enable powerful searches for products from EarthScope and other data sources. IRIS is teaming with the External Research Group at Microsoft Research to leverage a powerful Scientific Workflow Engine (Trident) and interact with the web services developed at centers such as IRIS to enable access to data services as well as computational services. We believe that this approach will allow web- based control of workflows and the invocation of computational services that transform data. This capability will greatly improve access to data across scientific disciplines. This presentation will review some of the traditional access tools as well as many of the newer approaches that use web services, scientific workflow to improve interdisciplinary data access.

  6. Integration of Earth System Models and Workflow Management under iRODS for the Northeast Regional Earth System Modeling Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengyel, F.; Yang, P.; Rosenzweig, B.; Vorosmarty, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Northeast Regional Earth System Model (NE-RESM, NSF Award #1049181) integrates weather research and forecasting models, terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem models, a water balance/transport model, and mesoscale and energy systems input-out economic models developed by interdisciplinary research team from academia and government with expertise in physics, biogeochemistry, engineering, energy, economics, and policy. NE-RESM is intended to forecast the implications of planning decisions on the region's environment, ecosystem services, energy systems and economy through the 21st century. Integration of model components and the development of cyberinfrastructure for interacting with the system is facilitated with the integrated Rule Oriented Data System (iRODS), a distributed data grid that provides archival storage with metadata facilities and a rule-based workflow engine for automating and auditing scientific workflows.

  7. The optical antenna system design research on earth integrative network laser link in the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianzhu; Fu, Qiang; He, Jingyi

    2014-11-01

    Earth integrated information network can be real-time acquisition, transmission and processing the spatial information with the carrier based on space platforms, such as geostationary satellites or in low-orbit satellites, stratospheric balloons or unmanned and manned aircraft, etc. It is an essential infrastructure for China to constructed earth integrated information network. Earth integrated information network can not only support the highly dynamic and the real-time transmission of broadband down to earth observation, but the reliable transmission of the ultra remote and the large delay up to the deep space exploration, as well as provide services for the significant application of the ocean voyage, emergency rescue, navigation and positioning, air transportation, aerospace measurement or control and other fields.Thus the earth integrated information network can expand the human science, culture and productive activities to the space, ocean and even deep space, so it is the global research focus. The network of the laser communication link is an important component and the mean of communication in the earth integrated information network. Optimize the structure and design the system of the optical antenna is considered one of the difficulty key technologies for the space laser communication link network. Therefore, this paper presents an optical antenna system that it can be used in space laser communication link network.The antenna system was consisted by the plurality mirrors stitched with the rotational paraboloid as a substrate. The optical system structure of the multi-mirror stitched was simulated and emulated by the light tools software. Cassegrain form to be used in a relay optical system. The structural parameters of the relay optical system was optimized and designed by the optical design software of zemax. The results of the optimal design and simulation or emulation indicated that the antenna system had a good optical performance and a certain

  8. Magnetocaloric effect in heavy rare-earth elements doped Fe-based bulk metallic glasses with tunable Curie temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiawei; Huo, Juntao; Law, Jiayan; Chang, Chuntao; Du, Juan; Man, Qikui; Wang, Xinmin; Li, Run-Wei

    2014-08-01

    The effects of heavy rare earth (RE) additions on the Curie temperature (TC) and magnetocaloric effect of the Fe-RE-B-Nb (RE = Gd, Dy and Ho) bulk metallic glasses were studied. The type of dopping RE element and its concentration can easily tune TC in a large temperature range of 120 K without significantly decreasing the magnetic entropy change (ΔSM) and refrigerant capacity (RC) of the alloys. The observed values of ΔSM and RC of these alloys compare favorably with those of recently reported Fe-based metallic glasses with enhanced RC compared to Gd5Ge1.9Si2Fe0.1. The tunable TC and large glass-forming ability of these RE doped Fe-based bulk metallic glasses can be used in a wide temperature range with the final required shapes.

  9. Properties of a Rare-Earth-Ion-Doped Waveguide at Sub-Kelvin Temperatures for Quantum Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, N.; Oblak, D.; Thiel, C. W.; Cone, R. L.; Tittel, W.

    2017-03-01

    We characterize the 795 nm 3H6 to 3H4 transition of Tm3 + in a Ti4 + :Li Nb O3 waveguide at temperatures as low as 800 mK. Coherence and hyperfine population lifetimes—up to 117 μ s and 2.5 h, respectively—exceed those at 3 K at least tenfold, and are equivalent to those observed in a bulk Tm3 + :Li Nb O3 crystal under similar conditions. We also find a transition dipole moment that is equivalent to that of the bulk. Finally, we prepare a 0.5 GHz-bandwidth atomic frequency comb of finesse >2 on a vanishing background. These results demonstrate the suitability of rare-earth-ion-doped waveguides created using industry-standard Ti indiffusion in Li Nb O3 for on-chip quantum applications.

  10. Physical and optical absorption studies of Fe3+ - ions doped lithium borate glasses containing certain alkaline earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhogi, Ashok; Kumar, R. Vijaya; Kistaiah, P.

    2016-05-01

    Iron ion doped lithium borate glasses with the composition 15RO-25Li2O-59B2O3-1Fe2O3 (where R= Ca, Sr and Ba) have been prepared by the conventional melt quenching technique and characterized to investigate the physical and optical properties using XRD, density, molar volume and UV-Visible spectroscopy. The optical absorption spectra exhibit a band at around 460 nm which is assigned to 6A1g(S) → 4Eg (G) of Fe3+ ions with distorted octahedral symmetry. From ultraviolet absorption edges, the optical band gap and Urbach energies have been evaluated. The effect of alkaline earths on these properties is discussed.

  11. Effect of temperature and rare-earth doping on charge-carrier mobility in indium-monoselenide crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Abdinov, A. Sh.; Babayeva, R. F.; Amirova, S. I.; Rzayev, R. M.

    2013-08-15

    In the temperature range T = 77-600 K, the dependence of the charge-carrier mobility ({mu}) on the initial dark resistivity is experimentally investigated at 77 K ({rho}d{sub 0}), as well as on the temperature and the level (N) of rare-earth doping with such elements as gadolinium (Gd), holmium (Ho), and dysprosium (Dy) in n-type indium-monoselenide (InSe) crystals. It is established that the anomalous behavior of the dependences {mu}(T), {mu}({rho}d{sub 0}), and {mu}(N) found from the viewpoint of the theory of charge-carrier mobility in crystalline semiconductors is related, first of all, to partial disorder in indium-monoselenide crystals and can be attributed to the presence of random drift barriers in the free energy bands.

  12. Properties of a Rare-Earth-Ion-Doped Waveguide at Sub-Kelvin Temperatures for Quantum Signal Processing.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, N; Oblak, D; Thiel, C W; Cone, R L; Tittel, W

    2017-03-10

    We characterize the 795 nm ^{3}H_{6} to ^{3}H_{4} transition of Tm^{3+} in a Ti^{4+}:LiNbO_{3} waveguide at temperatures as low as 800 mK. Coherence and hyperfine population lifetimes-up to 117  μs and 2.5 h, respectively-exceed those at 3 K at least tenfold, and are equivalent to those observed in a bulk Tm^{3+}:LiNbO_{3} crystal under similar conditions. We also find a transition dipole moment that is equivalent to that of the bulk. Finally, we prepare a 0.5 GHz-bandwidth atomic frequency comb of finesse >2 on a vanishing background. These results demonstrate the suitability of rare-earth-ion-doped waveguides created using industry-standard Ti indiffusion in LiNbO_{3} for on-chip quantum applications.

  13. Role of vacancies, light elements and rare-earth metals doping in CeO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, H.; Hussain, T.; Ahuja, R.; Kang, T. W.; Luo, W.

    2016-08-01

    The magnetic properties and electronic structures of pure, doped and defective cerium oxide (CeO2) have been studied theoretically by means of ab initio calculations based on the density function theory (DFT) with the hybrid HF/DFT technique named PBE0. Carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), sulphur (S), lanthanum (La) and praseodymium (Pr) doped in CeO2 and CeO2 containing oxygen vacancies (Ov) were considered. Our spin-polarized calculations show that C, N, Pr dopants and Ov defects magnetize the non-magnetic CeO2 in different degree. The optical band gap related to photocatalysis for pure CeO2, corresponding to the ultraviolet region, is reduced obviously by C, N, S, Pr impurities and oxygen vacancies, shifting to the visible region and even further to the infrared range. Especially, N-, S- and Pr-doped CeO2 could be used to photocatalytic water splitting for hydrogen production. As the concentration of Ov increasing up to 5%, the CeO2 exhibits a half-metallic properties.

  14. Role of vacancies, light elements and rare-earth metals doping in CeO2

    PubMed Central

    Shi, H.; Hussain, T.; Ahuja, R.; Kang, T. W.; Luo, W.

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic properties and electronic structures of pure, doped and defective cerium oxide (CeO2) have been studied theoretically by means of ab initio calculations based on the density function theory (DFT) with the hybrid HF/DFT technique named PBE0. Carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), sulphur (S), lanthanum (La) and praseodymium (Pr) doped in CeO2 and CeO2 containing oxygen vacancies (Ov) were considered. Our spin-polarized calculations show that C, N, Pr dopants and Ov defects magnetize the non-magnetic CeO2 in different degree. The optical band gap related to photocatalysis for pure CeO2, corresponding to the ultraviolet region, is reduced obviously by C, N, S, Pr impurities and oxygen vacancies, shifting to the visible region and even further to the infrared range. Especially, N-, S- and Pr-doped CeO2 could be used to photocatalytic water splitting for hydrogen production. As the concentration of Ov increasing up to 5%, the CeO2 exhibits a half-metallic properties. PMID:27554285

  15. Role of vacancies, light elements and rare-earth metals doping in CeO2.

    PubMed

    Shi, H; Hussain, T; Ahuja, R; Kang, T W; Luo, W

    2016-08-24

    The magnetic properties and electronic structures of pure, doped and defective cerium oxide (CeO2) have been studied theoretically by means of ab initio calculations based on the density function theory (DFT) with the hybrid HF/DFT technique named PBE0. Carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), sulphur (S), lanthanum (La) and praseodymium (Pr) doped in CeO2 and CeO2 containing oxygen vacancies (Ov) were considered. Our spin-polarized calculations show that C, N, Pr dopants and Ov defects magnetize the non-magnetic CeO2 in different degree. The optical band gap related to photocatalysis for pure CeO2, corresponding to the ultraviolet region, is reduced obviously by C, N, S, Pr impurities and oxygen vacancies, shifting to the visible region and even further to the infrared range. Especially, N-, S- and Pr-doped CeO2 could be used to photocatalytic water splitting for hydrogen production. As the concentration of Ov increasing up to 5%, the CeO2 exhibits a half-metallic properties.

  16. Optical properties and size distribution of the nanocolloids made of rare-earth ion-doped NaYF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Darayas N.; Lewis, Ashley; Wright, Donald M.; Lewis, Danielle; Valentine, Rueben; Valentine, Maucus; Wessley, Dennis; Sarkisov, Sergey; Darwish, Abdalla M.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we investigate optical properties and size distribution of the nano-colloids made of trivalent rare-earth ion doped fluorides: holmium and ytterbium, thulium and ytterbium, and erbium and ytterbium co-doped NaYF4. These materials were synthesized by using simple co-precipitation synthetic method. The initially prepared micro-crystals had very weak or no visible upconversion fluorescence signals when being pumped with a 980-nm laser. The fluorescence intensity significantly increased after the crystals were annealed at a temperature of 400°C - 600°C undergoing the transition from cubic alpha to hexagonal beta phase of the fluoride host. Nano-colloids of the crystals were made in polar solvents using the laser ablation and ball milling methods. Size analyses of the prepared nano-colloids were conducted using a dynamic light scatterometer and atomic force microscope. The nano-colloids were filled in holey PCFs and their fluorescent properties were studied and the feasibility of new a type of fiber amplifier/laser was evaluated.

  17. Rare-earth-doped materials with application to optical signal processing, quantum information science, and medical imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cone, R. L.; Thiel, C. W.; Sun, Y.; Böttger, Thomas; Macfarlane, R. M.

    2012-02-01

    Unique spectroscopic properties of isolated rare earth ions in solids offer optical linewidths rivaling those of trapped single atoms and enable a variety of recent applications. We design rare-earth-doped crystals, ceramics, and fibers with persistent or transient "spectral hole" recording properties for applications including high-bandwidth optical signal processing where light and our solids replace the high-bandwidth portion of the electronics; quantum cryptography and information science including the goal of storage and recall of single photons; and medical imaging technology for the 700-900 nm therapeutic window. Ease of optically manipulating rare-earth ions in solids enables capturing complex spectral information in 105 to 108 frequency bins. Combining spatial holography and spectral hole burning provides a capability for processing high-bandwidth RF and optical signals with sub-MHz spectral resolution and bandwidths of tens to hundreds of GHz for applications including range-Doppler radar and high bandwidth RF spectral analysis. Simply stated, one can think of these crystals as holographic recording media capable of distinguishing up to 108 different colors. Ultra-narrow spectral holes also serve as a vibration-insensitive sub-kHz frequency reference for laser frequency stabilization to a part in 1013 over tens of milliseconds. The unusual properties and applications of spectral hole burning of rare earth ions in optical materials are reviewed. Experimental results on the promising Tm3+:LiNbO3 material system are presented and discussed for medical imaging applications. Finally, a new application of these materials as dynamic optical filters for laser noise suppression is discussed along with experimental demonstrations and theoretical modeling of the process.

  18. Novel kinds of down/up-conversion luminescent rare earth doped fluoride BaMgF{sub 4}: RE{sup 3+} microcrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Zhi-Yuan; Yan, Bing Jia, Li-Ping

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: We achieve the liquid phase chemical synthesis of rare earth fluoride system BaMgF4: RE{sup 3+} microphosphors, which realize down/up-conversion luminescence. - Highlights: • Doped BaMgF{sub 4} microphosphors are firstly prepared by hydrothermal process. • Doped BaMgF{sub 4} nanosheets are firstly prepared by high temperature solution reaction. • The down-conversion luminescence is realized in the rare earth doped BaMgF{sub 4}. • The upconversion luminescence is realized in the rare earth doped BaMgF{sub 4}. - Abstract: In this paper, we realize the liquid-phase chemical synthesis of high-quality orthorhombic polycrystalline BaMgF{sub 4}: RE{sup 3+} (RE = Eu, Tb, Sm, Dy, Yb–Er/Tm) compounds with hydrothermal and high-temperature solution methods, respectively. The products from hydrothermal technology show the micrometer size while the products from hydrothermal technology present nanosheet morphology. The rare earth ions doped BaMgF{sub 4} from hydrothermal synthesis are discussed in details, which can realize the downconversion luminescence for doped Eu{sup 3+} or Tb{sup 3+} and upconversion luminescence for Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} (Tm{sup 3+}), respectively. To our knowledge, the hydrothermal or high temperature solution synthesis and photoluminescence (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} or Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+}(Tm{sup 3+})) of these fluoride systems are firstly reported.

  19. Room temperature ferromagnetism with large magnetic moment at low field in rare-earth-doped BiFeO₃ thin films.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Young; Hong, Nguyen Hoa; Sugawara, T; Raghavender, A T; Kurisu, M

    2013-05-22

    Thin films of rare earth (RE)-doped BiFeO3 (where RE=Sm, Ho, Pr and Nd) were grown on LaAlO3 substrates by using the pulsed laser deposition technique. All the films show a single phase of rhombohedral structure with space group R3c. The saturated magnetization in the Ho- and Sm-doped films is much larger than the values reported in the literature, and is observed at quite a low field of 0.2 T. For Ho and Sm doping, the magnetization increases as the film becomes thinner, suggesting that the observed magnetism is mostly due to a surface effect. In the case of Nd doping, even though the thin film has a large magnetic moment, the mechanism seems to be different.

  20. Effects of rare earth ionic doping on microstructures and electrical properties of CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Renzhong; Chen, Zhenping; Dai, Haiyang; Liu, Dewei; Li, Tao; Zhao, Gaoyang

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: The dielectric constant decreases monotonically with reduced RE doping ion radius and is more frequency independent compared with that of pure CCTO sample. - Highlights: • The mean grain sizes decrease monotonically with reduced RE doping ionic radius. • Doping gives rise to the monotonic decrease of ϵ{sub r} with reduced RE ionic radius. • The nonlinear coefficient and breakdown field increase with RE ionic doping. • α of all the samples is associated with the potential barrier width rather than Φ{sub b}. - Abstract: Ca{sub 1–x}R{sub x}Cu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12}(R = La, Nd, Eu, Gd, Er; x = 0 and 0.005) ceramics were prepared by the conventional solid-state method. The influences of rare earth (RE) ion doping on the microstructure, dielectric and electrical properties of CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} (CCTO) ceramics were investigated systematically. Single-phase formation is confirmed by XRD analyses. The mean grain size decreases monotonically with reduced RE ion radius. The EDS results reveal that RE ionic doping reduces Cu-rich phase segregation at the grain boundaries (GBs). Doping gives rise to the monotonic decrease of dielectric constant with reduced RE ionic radius but significantly improves stability with frequency. The lower dielectric loss of doped samples is obtained due to the increase of GB resistance. In addition, the nonlinear coefficient and breakdown field increase with RE ionic doping. Both the fine grains and the enhancement of potential barrier at GBs are responsible for the improvement of the nonlinear current–voltage properties in doped CCTO samples.

  1. Integrating Diverse Geophysical and Geological Data to Construct Multi-Dimensional Earth Models: The Open Earth Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baru, C.; Keller, R.; Wallet, B.; Crosby, C.; Moreland, J.; Nadeau, D.

    2008-12-01

    Currently, many large geoscientific efforts (e.g., EarthScope, Continental Dynamics, and GeoSwath) have emphasized that a crucial need in advancing our understanding of the structure and evolution of the continents is high-resolution, 3-D models of lithospheric structure. In addition, the geoscience community recognizes that our ultimate goal is the addition of the dimension of time to make the problem 4-D. Adding the dimension of time is a complex problem that is strongly dependent on the integration of a variety of geological data into our analyses (e.g., geochronology, paleontology, stratigraphy, pressure-time histories, structural geology, paleogeography, etc.). The geoscience community also recognizes that solutions to the scientific and societal questions that they seek to answer require innovative integration of many types of data so that many physical properties (x, y, z, P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, density, electrical conductivity, etc.) are measured and included in 3-D models. The problem is, therefore, truly multidimensional in nature. We are developing an Open Earth Framework (OEF) as an open data model for integration of such multidimensional Earth Sciences data. In our work and interactions with the community on building and visualizing complex earth models, several issues have emerged on which there is consensus. First of all, integration efforts should work from the surface down because we have the most data there (e.g., geologic maps, remote sensing data such as LIDAR and ASTER, digital elevation models, gravity and magnetic measurements, etc.) and because the complex conditions near surface always have a potential to mask deeper features. Secondly since we cannot expect uniform coverage of a variety of high-resolution data in anything but special circumstances, a data integration effort should first establish a regional context using lower resolution (and usually wide coverage) data and then proceed to modeling the data sets with the highest

  2. Monolithic integration of rare-earth oxides and semiconductors for on-silicon technology

    SciTech Connect

    Dargis, Rytis Clark, Andrew; Erdem Arkun, Fevzi; Grinys, Tomas; Tomasiunas, Rolandas; O'Hara, Andy; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2014-07-01

    Several concepts of integration of the epitaxial rare-earth oxides into the emerging advanced semiconductor on silicon technology are presented. Germanium grows epitaxially on gadolinium oxide despite lattice mismatch of more than 4%. Additionally, polymorphism of some of the rare-earth oxides allows engineering of their crystal structure from hexagonal to cubic and formation of buffer layers that can be used for growth of germanium on a lattice matched oxide layer. Molecular beam epitaxy and metal organic chemical vapor deposition of gallium nitride on the rare-earth oxide buffer layers on silicon is discussed.

  3. Integrated Modular Avionics for Spacecraft: Earth Observation Use Case Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deredempt, Marie-Helene; Rossignol, Alain; Hyounet, Philippe

    2013-08-01

    Integrated Modular Avionics (IMA) for Space, as European Space Agency initiative, aimed to make applicable to space domain the time and space partitioning concepts and particularly the ARINC 653 standard [1][2]. Expected benefits of such an approach are development flexibility, capability to provide differential V&V for different criticality level functionalities and to integrate late or In-Orbit delivery. This development flexibility could improve software subcontracting, industrial organization and software reuse. Time and space partitioning technique facilitates integration of software functions as black boxes and integration of decentralized function such as star tracker in On Board Computer to save mass and power by limiting electronics resources. In aeronautical domain, Integrated Modular Avionics architecture is based on a network of LRU (Line Replaceable Unit) interconnected by AFDX (Avionic Full DupleX). Time and Space partitioning concept is applicable to LRU and provides independent partitions which inter communicate using ARINC 653 communication ports. Using End System (LRU component) intercommunication between LRU is managed in the same way than intercommunication between partitions in LRU. In such architecture an application developed using only communication port can be integrated in an LRU or another one without impacting the global architecture. In space domain, a redundant On Board Computer controls (ground monitoring TM) and manages the platform (ground command TC) in terms of power, solar array deployment, attitude, orbit, thermal, maintenance, failure detection and recovery isolation. In addition, Payload units and platform units such as RIU, PCDU, AOCS units (Star tracker, Reaction wheels) are considered in this architecture. Interfaces are mainly realized through MIL-STD-1553B busses and SpaceWire and this could be considered as the main constraint for IMA implementation in space domain. During the first phase of IMA SP project, ARINC653

  4. Integrated planning and scheduling for Earth science data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boddy, Mark; White, Jim; Goldman, Robert; Short, Nick, Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Several current NASA programs such as the EOSDIS Core System (ECS) have data processing and data management requirements that call for an integrated planning and scheduling capability. In this paper, we describe the experience of applying advanced scheduling technology operationally, in terms of what was accomplished, lessons learned, and what remains to be done in order to achieve similar successes in ECS and other programs. We discuss the importance and benefits of advanced scheduling tools, and our progress toward realizing them, through examples and illustrations based on ECS requirements. The first part of the paper focuses on the Data Archive and Distribution (DADS) V0 Scheduler. We then discuss system integration issues ranging from communication with the scheduler to the monitoring of system events and re-scheduling in response to them. The challenge of adapting the scheduler to domain-specific features and scheduling policies is also considered. Extrapolation to the ECS domain raises issues of integrating scheduling with a product-generation planner (such as PlaSTiC), and implementing conditional planning in an operational system. We conclude by briefly noting ongoing technology development and deployment projects being undertaken by HTC and the ISTB.

  5. Rare earth-doped materials with enhanced thermoelectric figure of merit

    DOEpatents

    Venkatasubramanian, Rama; Cook, Bruce Allen; Levin, Evgenii M.; Harringa, Joel Lee

    2016-09-06

    A thermoelectric material and a thermoelectric converter using this material. The thermoelectric material has a first component including a semiconductor material and a second component including a rare earth material included in the first component to thereby increase a figure of merit of a composite of the semiconductor material and the rare earth material relative to a figure of merit of the semiconductor material. The thermoelectric converter has a p-type thermoelectric material and a n-type thermoelectric material. At least one of the p-type thermoelectric material and the n-type thermoelectric material includes a rare earth material in at least one of the p-type thermoelectric material or the n-type thermoelectric material.

  6. Synthesis of rare earth doped yttrium-vanadate nanoparticles encapsulated within apoferritin.

    PubMed

    Harada, Tomoaki; Yoshimura, Hideyuki

    2014-07-28

    Luminescent europium (Eu) and dysprosium (Dy) doped yttrium-vanadate (Y-V) nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized in the cavity of the protein, apoferritin. Y-V NPs were synthesized by incubating a solution of apoferritin with Y(3+) and VO3(-) ions in the presence of ethylene diamine-N-N'-diacetic acid (EDDA). EDDA plays an important role in preventing Y-vanadate precipitation in bulk solution by chelating the Y(3+) ions. Using high resolution electron microscopy, the obtained NPs in the apoferritin cavities were confirmed to be amorphous, and to consist of Y and V. Eu-doped Y-V (Y-V:Eu) NPs were synthesized by the same procedure as Y-V NPs, except that Eu(NO3)3 was added. Y-V:Eu NPs exhibited a strong absorption peak due to the O-V charge transfer transition and remarkable luminescence at 618 nm due to the (5)D0 → (7)F2 transition. The luminescence lifetime of Y:Eu and Y-V:Eu NPs measured in H2O and D2O solution showed reduction of non-radiative transition to the O-H vibration in Y-V:Eu NPs. Accordingly, Y-V NPs showed strong luminescence compared to Y:Eu NPs. Dy-doped Y-V NPs were also synthesized in apoferritin cavities and showed luminescence peaks at 482 nm and 572 nm, corresponding to (4)F9/2 → (6)H15/2 and (4)F9/2 → (6)H13/2 transitions. These NPs stably dispersed in water solution since their aggregation was prevented by the protein shell. NPs encapsulated in the protein are likely to be biocompatible and would have significant potential for biological imaging applications.

  7. Rare Earth Doped GaN Laser Structures Using Metal Modulated Epitaxy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-30

    since defect levels play a big role in the energy transfer. We conclude that phase shift epitaxy has been thus proven effective in the doping...J. Heikenfeld, M. Garter, D. S. Lee, R. Birkhahn, and A. J. Steckl: Appl. Phys. Lett. 75 (1999) 1189. 5 Z. Q. Li, H. J. Bang , G. X. Piao, J...density are believed to be big contributors to the leakage current. As described in the last chapter, the low temperature grown p-n junction is very

  8. Injection Laser Using Rare Earth Doped GaN Thin Films for Visible and Infrared Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    GaN and AlN thin films on sapphire and silicon carbide ( SiC ) substrates. The methyl derivatives of the elements, namely trimethylgallium (TMGa) and...molecular beam epitaxy and electrical characterization of Si-doped zinc blende GaN films deposited on ? SiC coated (001) Si substrates," Appl. Phys. Lett...34InGaN Multi-Quantum-Well-Structure Laser Diodes with Cleaved Mirror Cavity Facets," Jpn. J. Appl. Phy., vol. 35, p. 15, 1996. [32] M. A. Khan, J. N

  9. Effects of rare-earth doping on femtosecond laser waveguide writing in zinc polyphosphate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, Luke B.; Witcher, Jon J.; Troy, Neil; Krol, Denise M.; Reis, Signo T.; Brow, Richard K.

    2012-07-15

    We have investigated waveguide writing in Er-Yb doped zinc polyphosphate glass using a femtosecond laser with a repetition rate of 1 KHz. We find that fabrication of good waveguides requires a glass composition with an O/P ratio of 3.25. The dependence on laser writing parameters including laser fluence, focusing conditions, and scan speed is reported. Waveguide properties together with absorption and emission data indicate that these glasses can be used for the fabrication of compact, high gain amplifying devices.

  10. Advancing radiation balanced lasers (RBLs) in rare-earth (RE)-doped solids

    SciTech Connect

    Hehlen, Markus Peter

    2016-11-21

    These slides cover the following topics: Mid-IR lasers in crystals using two-tone RBL (Single-dopant two-tone RBLs: Tm3+, Er3+, and Co-doped two-tone RBLs: (Yb3+, Nd3+) and (Ho3+, Tm3+); Advanced approaches to RBL crystals (Precursor purification, Micro-pulling-down crystal growth, and Bridgman crystal growth); Advanced approaches to RBL fibers (Materials for RBL glass fibers, Micro-structured fibers for RBL, and Fiber preform synthesis); and finally objectives.

  11. DECADE Web Portal: Integrating MaGa, EarthChem and GVP Will Further Our Knowledge on Earth Degassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardellini, C.; Frigeri, A.; Lehnert, K. A.; Ash, J.; McCormick, B.; Chiodini, G.; Fischer, T. P.; Cottrell, E.

    2014-12-01

    The release of gases from the Earth's interior to the exosphere takes place in both volcanic and non-volcanic areas of the planet. Fully understanding this complex process requires the integration of geochemical, petrological and volcanological data. At present, major online data repositories relevant to studies of degassing are not linked and interoperable. We are developing interoperability between three of those, which will support more powerful synoptic studies of degassing. The three data systems that will make their data accessible via the DECADE portal are: (1) the Smithsonian Institution's Global Volcanism Program database (GVP) of volcanic activity data, (2) EarthChem databases for geochemical and geochronological data of rocks and melt inclusions, and (3) the MaGa database (Mapping Gas emissions) which contains compositional and flux data of gases released at volcanic and non-volcanic degassing sites. These databases are developed and maintained by institutions or groups of experts in a specific field, and data are archived in formats specific to these databases. In the framework of the Deep Earth Carbon Degassing (DECADE) initiative of the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO), we are developing a web portal that will create a powerful search engine of these databases from a single entry point. The portal will return comprehensive multi-component datasets, based on the search criteria selected by the user. For example, a single geographic or temporal search will return data relating to compositions of emitted gases and erupted products, the age of the erupted products, and coincident activity at the volcano. The development of this level of capability for the DECADE Portal requires complete synergy between these databases, including availability of standard-based web services (WMS, WFS) at all data systems. Data and metadata can thus be extracted from each system without interfering with each database's local schema or being replicated to achieve integration at

  12. Efficient Nitrogen Doping of Single-Layer Graphene Accompanied by Negligible Defect Generation for Integration into Hybrid Semiconductor Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Sarau, George; Heilmann, Martin; Bashouti, Muhammad; Latzel, Michael; Tessarek, Christian; Christiansen, Silke

    2017-03-22

    While doping enables application-specific tailoring of graphene properties, it can also produce high defect densities that degrade the beneficial features. In this work, we report efficient nitrogen doping of ∼11 atom % without virtually inducing new structural defects in the initial, large-area, low defect, and transferred single-layer graphene. To shed light on this remarkable high-doping-low-disorder relationship, a unique experimental strategy consisting of analyzing the changes in doping, strain, and defect density after each important step during the doping procedure was employed. Complementary micro-Raman mapping, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and optical microscopy revealed that effective cleaning of the graphene surface assists efficient nitrogen incorporation accompanied by mild compressive strain resulting in negligible defect formation in the doped graphene lattice. These original results are achieved by separating the growth of graphene from its doping. Moreover, the high doping level occurred simultaneously with the epitaxial growth of n-GaN micro- and nanorods on top of graphene, leading to the flow of higher currents through the graphene/n-GaN rod interface. Our approach can be extended toward integrating graphene into other technologically relevant hybrid semiconductor heterostructures and obtaining an ohmic contact at their interfaces by adjusting the doping level in graphene.

  13. Magnetic Behaviour Of Some Oxide Glasses Doped With Rare Earth Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, L.; Culea, E.; Bosca, M.

    2007-04-01

    Magnetic susceptibility data from Er3+ and Nd3+ ions embedded in some Bi2O3 - PbO glasses are reported for the 80-300 K temperature range. The temperature dependence of reciprocal magnetic susceptibility permitted to discuss the nature of complex interactions between rare earth ions localized in lead bismuthate glass matrices.

  14. Rare-earth doped transparent ceramics for spectral filtering and quantum information processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kunkel, Nathalie Goldner, Philippe; Ferrier, Alban; Thiel, Charles W.; Cone, Rufus L.; Ramírez, Mariola O.; Bausá, Luisa E.; Ikesue, Akio

    2015-09-01

    Homogeneous linewidths below 10 kHz are reported for the first time in high-quality Eu{sup 3+} doped Y {sub 2}O{sub 3} transparent ceramics. This result is obtained on the {sup 7}F{sub 0}→{sup 5}D{sub 0} transition in Eu{sup 3+} doped Y {sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramics and corresponds to an improvement of nearly one order of magnitude compared to previously reported values in transparent ceramics. Furthermore, we observed spectral hole lifetimes of ∼15 min that are long enough to enable efficient optical pumping of the nuclear hyperfine levels. Additionally, different Eu{sup 3+} concentrations (up to 1.0%) were studied, resulting in an increase of up to a factor of three in the peak absorption coefficient. These results suggest that transparent ceramics can be useful in applications where narrow and deep spectral holes can be burned into highly absorbing lines, such as quantum information processing and spectral filtering.

  15. Low-temperature thermoluminescence spectra of rare-earth-doped lanthanum fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, B.; Townsend, P. D.; Rowlands, A. P.

    1998-01-01

    Lanthanum fluoride consistently shows two strong thermoluminescence glow peaks at low temperature in pure material near 90 and 128 K. A model is proposed in which these thermoluminescence peaks arise from the annealing of halogen defect sites, similar to the H and Vk centers of the alkali halides. Relaxation and decay of these defects in the pure LaF3 lattice results in broad-band intrinsic luminescence. Addition of rare-earth-impurity ions has two effects. First, the broad-band emission is replaced by narrow-band line emission defined by the trivalent rare-earth dopants. Second, it preferentially determines the formation of the halogen defect sites at impurity lattice sites and such sites appear to increase in thermal stability since the glow peak temperature increases from 128 K in the intrinsic material up to 141 K through the sequence of rare-earth dopants from La to Er. The temperature movement directly correlates with the changes in ionic size of the rare-earth ions, when allowance is made for differences in effective coordination number of the impurity ions. The data suggest two alternative lattice sites can be occupied. The model emphasizes that the intense thermoluminescence signals arise from internal charge rearrangements and annealing of defect complexes, rather than through the more conventional model of separated charge traps and recombination centers. At higher temperatures there is a complex array of glow peaks which depend not only on the dopant concentration but also are specific to each rare earth. Such effects imply defect models giving thermoluminescence within localized complexes and possible reasons are mentioned.

  16. Low-temperature thermoluminescence spectra of rare-earth-doped lanthanum fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, B.; Townsend, P.D.; Rowlands, A.P.

    1998-01-01

    Lanthanum fluoride consistently shows two strong thermoluminescence glow peaks at low temperature in pure material near 90 and 128 K. A model is proposed in which these thermoluminescence peaks arise from the annealing of halogen defect sites, similar to the H and V{sub k} centers of the alkali halides. Relaxation and decay of these defects in the pure LaF{sub 3} lattice results in broad-band intrinsic luminescence. Addition of rare-earth-impurity ions has two effects. First, the broad-band emission is replaced by narrow-band line emission defined by the trivalent rare-earth dopants. Second, it preferentially determines the formation of the halogen defect sites at impurity lattice sites and such sites appear to increase in thermal stability since the glow peak temperature increases from 128 K in the intrinsic material up to 141 K through the sequence of rare-earth dopants from La to Er. The temperature movement directly correlates with the changes in ionic size of the rare-earth ions, when allowance is made for differences in effective coordination number of the impurity ions. The data suggest two alternative lattice sites can be occupied. The model emphasizes that the intense thermoluminescence signals arise from internal charge rearrangements and annealing of defect complexes, rather than through the more conventional model of separated charge traps and recombination centers. At higher temperatures there is a complex array of glow peaks which depend not only on the dopant concentration but also are specific to each rare earth. Such effects imply defect models giving thermoluminescence within localized complexes and possible reasons are mentioned. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Rare-Earth Doped Particles as Dual-Modality Contrast Agent for Minimally-Invasive Luminescence and Dual-Wavelength Photoacoustic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Yang; Liao, Lun-De; Thakor, Nitish; Tan, Mei Chee

    2014-10-01

    Multi-modal imaging is an emerging area that integrates multiple imaging modalities to simultaneously capture visual information over many spatial scales. Complementary contrast agents need to be co-developed in order to achieve high resolution and contrast. In this work, we demonstrated that rare-earth doped particles (REDPs) can be employed as dual-modal imaging agents for both luminescence and photoacoustic (PA) imaging to achieve intrinsic high contrast, temporal and spatial resolution, reaching deeper depth. REDPs synthesized with different surfactants (citric acid, polyacrylic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and sodium citrate) exhibit tunable emission properties and PA signal amplitudes. Amongst these samples, sodium citrate-modified REDPs showed the strongest PA signals. Furthermore, since REDPs have multiple absorption peaks, they offer a unique opportunity for multi-wavelength PA imaging (e.g. PA signals were measured using 520 and 975 nm excitations). The in vivo PA images around the cortical superior sagittal sinus (SSS) blood vessel captured with enhanced signal arising from REDPs demonstrated that in addition to be excellent luminescent probes, REDPs can also be used as successful PA contrast agents. Anisotropic polyacrylic acid-modified REDPs were found to be the best candidates for dual-modal luminescence and PA imaging due to their strong luminescence and PA signal intensities.

  18. Rare-Earth doped particles as dual-modality contrast agent for minimally-invasive luminescence and dual-wavelength photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Yang; Liao, Lun-De; Thakor, Nitish; Tan, Mei Chee

    2014-10-09

    Multi-modal imaging is an emerging area that integrates multiple imaging modalities to simultaneously capture visual information over many spatial scales. Complementary contrast agents need to be co-developed in order to achieve high resolution and contrast. In this work, we demonstrated that rare-earth doped particles (REDPs) can be employed as dual-modal imaging agents for both luminescence and photoacoustic (PA) imaging to achieve intrinsic high contrast, temporal and spatial resolution, reaching deeper depth. REDPs synthesized with different surfactants (citric acid, polyacrylic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and sodium citrate) exhibit tunable emission properties and PA signal amplitudes. Amongst these samples, sodium citrate-modified REDPs showed the strongest PA signals. Furthermore, since REDPs have multiple absorption peaks, they offer a unique opportunity for multi-wavelength PA imaging (e.g. PA signals were measured using 520 and 975 nm excitations). The in vivo PA images around the cortical superior sagittal sinus (SSS) blood vessel captured with enhanced signal arising from REDPs demonstrated that in addition to be excellent luminescent probes, REDPs can also be used as successful PA contrast agents. Anisotropic polyacrylic acid-modified REDPs were found to be the best candidates for dual-modal luminescence and PA imaging due to their strong luminescence and PA signal intensities.

  19. Efficient dual-wavelength excitation of Tb3+ emission in rare-earth doped KYF4 cubic nanocrystals dispersed in silica sol-gel matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del-Castillo, J.; Yanes, A. C.; Santana-Alonso, A.; Méndez-Ramos, J.

    2014-11-01

    Energy transfer from Ce3+ to Tb3+ ions under UV excitation, giving rise to visible emissions, is investigated in sol-gel derived transparent nano-glass-ceramics containing cubic KYF4 nanocrystals, for different doping concentrations of rare-earth ions. Moreover, visible emissions of Tb3+ are also obtained under near-infrared excitation through energy transfer from Yb3+ ions by means of cooperative up-conversion processes. Thus, Ce3+-Tb3+-Yb3+ doped nano-glass-ceramics can be activated in a dual-wavelength mode yielding efficient blue-green emissions of particular interest in photovoltaic silicon solar cells and white-light emitting diodes.

  20. Rare earth-doped lead borate glasses and transparent glass-ceramics: structure-property relationship.

    PubMed

    Pisarski, W A; Pisarska, J; Mączka, M; Lisiecki, R; Grobelny, Ł; Goryczka, T; Dominiak-Dzik, G; Ryba-Romanowski, W

    2011-08-15

    Correlation between structure and optical properties of rare earth ions in lead borate glasses and glass-ceramics was evidenced by X-ray-diffraction, Raman, FT-IR and luminescence spectroscopy. The rare earths were limited to Eu(3+) and Er(3+) ions. The observed BO(3)↔BO(4) conversion strongly depends on the relative PbO/B(2)O(3) ratios in glass composition, giving important contribution to the luminescence intensities associated to (5)D(0)-(7)F(2) and (5)D(0)-(7)F(1) transitions of Eu(3+). The near-infrared luminescence and up-conversion spectra for Er(3+) ions in lead borate glasses before and after heat treatment were measured. The more intense and narrowing luminescence lines suggest partial incorporation of Er(3+) ions into the orthorhombic PbF(2) crystalline phase, which was identified using X-ray diffraction analysis.

  1. The EPOS Implementation Phase: building thematic and integrated services for solid Earth sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocco, Massimo; Epos Consortium, the

    2015-04-01

    The European Plate Observing System (EPOS) has a scientific vision and approach aimed at creating a pan-European infrastructure for Earth sciences to support a safe and sustainable society. To follow this vision, the EPOS mission is integrating a suite of diverse and advanced Research Infrastructures (RIs) in Europe relying on new e-science opportunities to monitor and understand the dynamic and complex Earth system. To this goal, the EPOS Preparatory Phase has designed a long-term plan to facilitate integrated use of data and products as well as access to facilities from mainly distributed existing and new research infrastructures for solid Earth Science. EPOS will enable innovative multidisciplinary research for a better understanding of the Earth's physical processes that control earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, ground instability and tsunami as well as the processes driving tectonics and Earth surface dynamics. Through integration of data, models and facilities EPOS will allow the Earth Science community to make a step change in developing new concepts and tools for key answers to scientific and socio-economic questions concerning geo-hazards and geo-resources as well as Earth sciences applications to the environment and to human welfare. Since its conception EPOS has been built as "a single, Pan-European, sustainable and distributed infrastructure". EPOS is, indeed, the sole infrastructure for solid Earth Science in ESFRI and its pan-European dimension is demonstrated by the participation of 23 countries in its preparatory phase. EPOS is presently moving into its implementation phase further extending its pan-European dimension. The EPOS Implementation Phase project (EPOS IP) builds on the achievements of the successful EPOS preparatory phase project. The EPOS IP objectives are synergetic and coherent with the establishment of the new legal subject (the EPOS-ERIC in Italy). EPOS coordinates the existing and new solid Earth RIs within Europe and builds the

  2. Characterization of rare-earth-doped nanophosphors for photodynamic therapy excited by clinical ionizing radiation beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darafsheh, Arash; Najmr, Stan; Paik, Taejong; Tenuto, Michael E.; Murray, Christopher B.; Finlay, Jarod C.; Friedberg, Joseph S.

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the optical properties of novel terbium (Tb3+)-doped nanophosphors with various host compounds irradiated by clinical electron, photon, and proton beams for their potential as optical probes. The emission spectra of nanophosphors embedded in tissue-mimicking phantoms were collected by an optical fiber connected to a CCD-coupled spectrograph while the samples were irradiated with electron and photon beams generated by a medical linear accelerator and proton beams generated by a clinical cyclotron. We characterized the luminescence of such nanophosphors as a function of the beam energy and observed a dose dependency of the luminescence signal. We demonstrated x-ray luminescence, cathodoluminescence, and ionoluminescence of the nanophosphors in clinical ionizing radiation fields, which indicates their potential as downconverters of high-energy radiation into visible light.

  3. Tip enhancement of upconversion photoluminescence from rare earth ion doped nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Mauser, Nina; Piatkowski, Dawid; Mancabelli, Tobia; Nyk, Marcin; Mackowski, Sebastian; Hartschuh, Achim

    2015-04-28

    We present tip-enhanced upconversion photoluminescence (PL) images of Er(3+)- and Yb(3+)-doped NaYF4 nanocrystals on glass substrates with subdiffraction spatial resolution. Tip-sample distance dependent measurements clearly demonstrate the near-field origin of the image contrast. Time-resolved PL measurements show that the tip increases the spontaneous emission rate of the two emission channels of Er(3+) in the visible region. Very efficient enhancement of upconversion PL is discussed in the context of the two-photon nature of the excitation process and homoenergy transfer between the ions within the nanocrystals. Comparison between different nanocrystals and tips shows a strong influence of the tip shape on the image contrast that becomes particularly relevant for the larger dimensions of the investigated nanocrystals.

  4. Blue and white upconversion emissions of rare-earth ions-doped oxyfluoride phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Tao; Cao, Wanghe; Xing, Mingming; Feng, Wei; Xu, Shujing

    2010-05-01

    A blue emitting upconversion phosphor based on Yb 3+ and Tm 3+ codoped oxyfluoride is reported. Under the excitation of a single 980 nm diode laser with the power density of 5.56 W/cm 2, the upconversion luminescence brightness can reaches to 13053 mcd/m 2, which is much stronger than that of commercial Y 2O 2S:Yb, Tm phosphors (8194 mcd/m 2). The research of upconversion mechanism indicates that cooperating sensitization dominates the emissions at 479 and 645 nm, while the emission at 454 nm results from the combination of cooperating sensitization and phonon-assisted energy transfer from Yb 3+ to Tm 3+. Also, bright upconversion white light is obtained by tri-doping of Er 3+, Tm 3+ and Yb 3+. Because the blue (main emission at 479 nm), green and red emissions are two-photon process, the white light is not sensitive to the pumping power.

  5. Rare-earth-doped biological composites as in vivo shortwave infrared reporters

    PubMed Central

    Naczynski, D.J.; Tan, M.C.; Zevon, M.; Wall, B.; Kohl, J.; Kulesa, A.; Chen, S.; Roth, C.M.; Riman, R.E.; Moghe, P.V.

    2013-01-01

    The extension of in vivo optical imaging for disease screening and image-guided surgical interventions requires brightly-emitting, tissue-specific materials that optically transmit through living tissue and can be imaged with portable systems that display data in real-time. Recent work suggests that a new window across the short wavelength infrared region can improve in vivo imaging sensitivity over near infrared light. Here we report on the first evidence of multispectral, real-time short wavelength infrared imaging offering anatomical resolution using brightly-emitting rare-earth nanomaterials and demonstrate their applicability toward disease-targeted imaging. Inorganic-protein nanocomposites of rare-earth nanomaterials with human serum albumin facilitated systemic biodistribution of the rare-earth nanomaterials resulting in the increased accumulation and retention in tumor tissue that was visualized by the localized enhancement of infrared signal intensity. Our findings lay the groundwork for a new generation of versatile, biomedical nanomaterials that can advance disease monitoring based on a pioneering infrared imaging technique. PMID:23873342

  6. Rare-earth-doped biological composites as in vivo shortwave infrared reporters.

    PubMed

    Naczynski, D J; Tan, M C; Zevon, M; Wall, B; Kohl, J; Kulesa, A; Chen, S; Roth, C M; Riman, R E; Moghe, P V

    2013-01-01

    The extension of in vivo optical imaging for disease screening and image-guided surgical interventions requires brightly emitting, tissue-specific materials that optically transmit through living tissue and can be imaged with portable systems that display data in real-time. Recent work suggests that a new window across the short-wavelength infrared region can improve in vivo imaging sensitivity over near infrared light. Here we report on the first evidence of multispectral, real-time short-wavelength infrared imaging offering anatomical resolution using brightly emitting rare-earth nanomaterials and demonstrate their applicability toward disease-targeted imaging. Inorganic-protein nanocomposites of rare-earth nanomaterials with human serum albumin facilitated systemic biodistribution of the rare-earth nanomaterials resulting in the increased accumulation and retention in tumour tissue that was visualized by the localized enhancement of infrared signal intensity. Our findings lay the groundwork for a new generation of versatile, biomedical nanomaterials that can advance disease monitoring based on a pioneering infrared imaging technique.

  7. Integrating Socioeconomic and Earth Science Data Using Geobrowsers and Web Services: A Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, J. A.; Yetman, G. G.

    2007-12-01

    The societal benefit areas identified as the focus for the Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS) 10- year implementation plan are an indicator of the importance of integrating socioeconomic data with earth science data to support decision makers. To aid this integration, CIESIN is delivering its global and U.S. demographic data to commercial and open source Geobrowsers and providing open standards based services for data access. Currently, data on population distribution, poverty, and detailed census data for the U.S. are available for visualization and access in Google Earth, NASA World Wind, and a browser-based 2-dimensional mapping client. The mapping client allows for the creation of web map documents that pull together layers from distributed servers and can be saved and shared. Visualization tools with Geobrowsers, user-driven map creation and sharing via browser-based clients, and a prototype for characterizing populations at risk to predicted precipitation deficits will be demonstrated.

  8. TOPO-EUROPE: An integrated solid earth approach to Continental Topography and Deep Earth - Surface Processes in 4D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloetingh, S.

    2012-04-01

    Topography influences various aspects of society, not only in terms of the slow process of landscape evolution but also through climate (e.g. mountain building). Topographic evolution (changes in land, water and sea level) can seriously affect human life, as well as terrestrial geo-ecosystems. To quantify topography evolution in space and time, understanding of the coupled deep Earth and surface processes is a requisite. The TOPO-EUROPE initiative of the International Lithophere Program (ILP) addresses the 4-D topography of the orogens and intra-plate regions of Europe through a multidisciplinary approach. TOPO-EUROPE initiates a number of novel studies on the quantification of rates of vertical motions, related tectonically controlled river evolution and land subsidence in carefully selected natural laboratories in Europe. From orogen through platform to continental margin, these natural laboratories include the Alps/Carpathians-Pannonian Basin System, the West and Central European Platform, the Apennines-Tyrrhenian-Maghrebian and the Aegean-Anatolian regions, the Iberian Peninsula and the Scandinavian Continental Margin. TOPO-EUROPE integrates European research facilities (e.g. EPOS) and know-how essential to advance the understanding of the role of topography in Earth System Dynamics. The principal objective of the network is twofold. Namely, to integrate national research programs into a common European network and, furthermore, to integrate activities among TOPO-EUROPE institutes and participants. Key objectives are to provide an interdisciplinary forum to share knowledge and information in the field of the neotectonic and topographic evolution of Europe, to promote and encourage multidisciplinary research on a truly European scale, to increase mobility of scientists and to train young scientists.

  9. TOPO-EUROPE: An integrated solid earth approach to Continental Topography and Deep Earth - Surface Processes in 4D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloetingh, S.

    2011-12-01

    Topography influences various aspects of society, not only in terms of the slow process of landscape evolution but also through climate (e.g. mountain building). Topographic evolution (changes in land, water and sea level) can seriously affect human life, as well as terrestrial geo-ecosystems. To quantify topography evolution in space and time, understanding of the coupled deep Earth and surface processes is a requisite. The TOPO-EUROPE initiative of the International Lithophere Program (ILP) addresses the 4-D topography of the orogens and intra-plate regions of Europe through a multidisciplinary approach. TOPO-EUROPE initiates a number of novel studies on the quantification of rates of vertical motions, related tectonically controlled river evolution and land subsidence in carefully selected natural laboratories in Europe. From orogen through platform to continental margin, these natural laboratories include the Alps/Carpathians-Pannonian Basin System, the West and Central European Platform, the Apennines-Tyrrhenian-Maghrebian and the Aegean-Anatolian regions, the Iberian Peninsula and the Scandinavian Continental Margin. TOPO-EUROPE integrates European research facilities (e.g. EPOS) and know-how essential to advance the understanding of the role of topography in Earth System Dynamics. The principal objective of the network is twofold. Namely, to integrate national research programs into a common European network and, furthermore, to integrate activities among TOPO-EUROPE institutes and participants. Key objectives are to provide an interdisciplinary forum to share knowledge and information in the field of the neotectonic and topographic evolution of Europe, to promote and encourage multidisciplinary research on a truly European scale, to increase mobility of scientists and to train young scientists.

  10. A Special Assignment from NASA: Understanding Earth's Atmosphere through the Integration of Science and Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Justine E.; Glen, Nicole J.

    2012-01-01

    Have your students ever wondered what NASA scientists do? Have they asked you what their science and mathematics lessons have to do with the real world? This unit about Earth's atmosphere can help to answer both of those questions. The unit described here showcases "content specific integration" of science and mathematics in that the lessons meet…

  11. Low-power continuous-wave nonlinear optics in doped silica glass integrated waveguide structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrera, M.; Razzari, L.; Duchesne, D.; Morandotti, R.; Yang, Z.; Liscidini, M.; Sipe, J. E.; Chu, S.; Little, B. E.; Moss, D. J.

    2008-12-01

    Photonic integrated circuits are a key component of future telecommunication networks, where demands for greater bandwidth, network flexibility, and low energy consumption and cost must all be met. The quest for all-optical components has naturally targeted materials with extremely large nonlinearity, including chalcogenide glasses and semiconductors, such as silicon and AlGaAs (ref. 4). However, issues such as immature fabrication technology for chalcogenide glass and high linear and nonlinear losses for semiconductors motivate the search for other materials. Here we present the first demonstration of nonlinear optics in integrated silica-based glass waveguides using continuous-wave light. We demonstrate four-wave mixing, with low (5 mW) continuous-wave pump power at λ = 1,550 nm, in high-index, doped silica glass ring resonators. The low loss, design flexibility and manufacturability of our device are important attributes for low-cost, high-performance, nonlinear all-optical photonic integrated circuits.

  12. Dispersive coupling between light and a rare-earth-ion-doped mechanical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mølmer, Klaus; Le Coq, Yann; Seidelin, Signe

    2016-11-01

    By spectrally hole burning an inhomogeneously broadened ensemble of ions while applying a controlled perturbation, one can obtain spectral holes that are functionalized for maximum sensitivity to different perturbations. We propose to use such hole-burned structures for the dispersive optical interaction with rare-earth-ion dopants whose frequencies are sensitive to crystal strain due to the bending motion of a crystal cantilever. A quantitative analysis shows that good optical sensitivity to the bending motion is obtained if a magnetic-field gradient is applied across the crystal during hole burning and that the resulting optomechanical coupling strength is sufficient for observing quantum features such as zero-point vibrations.

  13. Raman Spectroscopic Characterization of Rare Earth Ions Doped Bismuth-Based Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, L.; Culea, E.; Bosca, M.; Culea, M.

    2007-04-01

    The xReO(1-x)[3Bi2O3.PbO] glass systems with diferent rare earth ions (ReO = CeO2, Tb4O7) have been prepared and examined with the aim of determining their structural characteristics. Raman sprectroscopy and density measurements were used to characterize the samples. Raman spectroscopy data permitted to identify some of the structural units that built up the lead bismuthate vitreous network. Density data were used to calculate the Poisson's ratio in terms of the Makishima-Mackenzie model.

  14. Evidence of dilute ferromagnetism in rare-earth doped yttrium aluminium garnet

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, Warrick G.; Goryachev, Maxim; Le Floch, Jean-Michel; Tobar, Michael E.; Bushev, Pavel

    2015-09-21

    This work demonstrates strong coupling regime between an erbium ion spin ensemble and microwave hybrid cavity-whispering gallery modes in a yttrium aluminium garnet dielectric crystal. Coupling strengths of 220 MHz and mode quality factors in excess of 10{sup 6} are demonstrated. Moreover, the magnetic response of high-Q modes demonstrates behaviour which is unusual for paramagnetic systems. This behaviour includes hysteresis and memory effects. Such qualitative change of the system's magnetic field response is interpreted as a phase transition of rare earth ion impurities. This phenomenon is similar to the phenomenon of dilute ferromagnetism in semiconductors. The clear temperature dependence of the phenomenon is demonstrated.

  15. High Temperature Electrical Properties and Defect Structures of Alkaline Earth-Doped Lanthanum Cuprate Superconductors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Li.

    1995-01-01

    Existing oxygen nonstoichiometry data of rm La_{2-x}Ba_{x}CuO _{4-y} and rm La _{2-x}Sr_{x}CuO_ {4-y} have been fitted by defect structure models featuring isolated oxygen vacancies, neutral associates and singly charged associates, respectively. The associate models fit the data acceptably well up to x = 0.4 while the isolated vacancy model does not fit the data as satisfactorily. Therefore, the oxygen deficiency in both systems is attributed to dopant-vacancy associates rather than isolated oxygen vacancies. However, all three models are unable to reproduce the flattening of electrical properties at high doping levels. Jonker plots reveal that the flattening is caused by degeneracy. The oxygen partial pressure dependence of the electrical properties indicates that the associates are not neutral but singly charged. Thermoelectric power and electrical conductivity have been measured in situ for rm La_ {2-x}Ca_{x}CuO_{4 -y} with x = 0-0.16 in P(O_2 ) = 10^{-5} { -1} atm at T = 700-1000^circ C. The results are similar to those of rm La_{2-x}Ba_{x}CuO _{4-y} and rm La _{2-x}Sr_{x}CuO_ {4-y} yet significant magnitudes of oxygen deficiency reportedly occur in rm La_ {2-x}Ca_{x}CuO_{4 -y} at much lower doping levels. Defect structure models involving charged oxygen vacancies cannot simultaneously fit both properties. Neutral oxygen vacancies and their association with dopants were invoked to reconcile both electrical property and oxygen nonstoichiometry data. The proposed defect structure models have been rationalized based on the bond-length mismatch first observed by Goodenough and his coworkers. The Cu-O bonds in the CuO_2 layers are longer than the La-O bonds in the (LaO)_2 layers. Substitution of larger Ba or Sr for La relieves the mismatch by lengthening the La-O bonds. Holes created for charge compensation contribute to the relief by shortening the Cu-O bonds. Once the mismatch is completely relieved, charged oxygen vacancies are formed in the (LaO)_2 layers, to

  16. Multicolor upconversion luminescence of rare-earth doped Y2CaZnO5 nanophosphors for white lighting-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeswari, R.; Surendra Babu, S.; Jayasankar, C. K.

    2014-02-01

    Rare earth doped Y2CaZnO5 nanophosphors were synthesized via the citrate-gel combustion method. Transmission electron microscopy measurements reveal that the particles are distributed uniformly within the size range of 10-30 nm. The Er3+-doped Y2CaZnO5 nanophosphors show strong green upconversion luminescence, which is visible to the naked eye even at 20 mW excitation power of 980 nm diode laser. When these phosphors are codoped with Yb3+ ions, the emission changed to reddish color at higher Yb3+ ion concentrations. Moreover, these phosphors emitted bright white light luminescence when it is triply doped with Er3+/Tm 3+/Yb3+ ions, indicates Y2CaZnO5 nanophosphors are an ideal candidate for phosphor converted white light emitting diodes.

  17. Integrated Optical Pumping of Cr & Ti-Doped Sapphire Substrates With III-V Nitride Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-24

    the Cr in sapphire could also permit the construction of white light LEDs . Ultimately, an integrated III-V Nitride optical pump for Ti:Sapphire could...substrates by MOCVD. 2. Characterization of doped sapphire/ InGaN structures byPL to simulate electrical injection by laser or LED device structures Part 2 1...Cr:sapphire substrate. Solid line is the spectrum of blue and red light emitted by InGaN LED epitaxially grown on Cr:sapphire substrate. The light was collected

  18. Theoretical investigation of the structures, stabilities, and NLO responses of calcium-doped pyridazine: alkaline-earth-based alkaline salt electrides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin-Feng; Huang, Jiangen; Jia, Li; Zhou, Guangpei

    2014-02-01

    Currently, whether alkaline-earth-doped compounds with electride characteristics are novel candidates for high-performance nonlinear optical (NLO) materials is unknown. In this paper, using quantum chemical computations, we show that: when doping calcium atoms into a family of alkaline-substituted pyridazines, alkaline-earth-based alkaline salt electrides M-H₃C₄N₂⋯Ca (M=H, Li, and K) with distended excess electron clouds are formed. Interestingly, from the triplet to the singlet state, the chemical valence of calcium atom changes from +1 to 0, and the dipole moment direction (μ₀) of the molecule reverses for each M-H₃C₄N₂⋯Ca. Changing pyridazine from without (H₄C₄N₂⋯Ca) to with one alkaline substituent (M-H₃C₄N₂⋯Ca, M=Li and K), the ground state changes from the triplet to the singlet state. The alkaline earth metal doping effect (electride effect) and alkaline salt effect on the static first hyperpolarizabilities (β₀) demonstrates that (1) the β₀ value is increased approximately 1371-fold from 2 (pyridazine, H₄C₄N₂) to 2745au (Ca-doped pyridazine, H₄C₄N₂⋯Ca), (2) the β₀ value is increased approximately 1146-fold from 2 in pyridazine (H₄C₄N₂) to 2294au in an Li-substituted pyridazine (Li-H₃C₄N₂), and (3) the β₀ value is increased 324-(M=Li) and 106-(M=K) fold from 826 (MLi) and 2294au (MK) to 268,679 (M=Li) and 245,878au (M=K), respectively, from the alkalized pyridazine (M-H₃C₄N₂) to the Ca-doped pyridazine (M-H₃C₄N₂⋯Ca). These results may provide a new means for designing high-performance NLO materials.

  19. Luminescent rare earth vanadate nanoparticles doped with Eu3+ and Bi3 for sensing and imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, Alberto; Carrillo-Carrión, Carolina; Zyuzin, Mikhail; Hartmann, Raimo; Ashraf, Sumaira; Parak, Wolfgang J.

    2016-03-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are attracting interest in nanomedicine due to their potential medical applications, ranging from optical biolabels and contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging to carriers for drug and gene delivery for disease therapy.[1] Rare earth (RE) based nanophosphors exhibit important advantages compared with other available luminescent materials, such as quantum dots and nanostructures functionalized with organic dyes, due to their lower toxicities, photostabilities, high thermal and chemical stabilities, high luminescence quantum yields, and sharp emission bands.[2] Yttrium orthovanadate NPs doped with Eu3+ and Bi3+, functionalized with poly acryl acid (PAA), and excitable by near-ultraviolet light have been synthesized by homogeneous precipitation at 120 °C from solutions of rare earth precursors (yttrium acetylacetonate and europium nitrate), bismuth nitrate, sodium orthovanadate, and PAA, in an ethylene glycol/water mixture. Quasispheres with sizes from 93 to 51 nm were obtained. The as synthesized NPs were already functionalized with PAA. The NPs showed the typical red luminescence of Eu3+, which can be excited with near-UV light through an energy transfer from the vanadate anion. The presence of Bi3+ shifts the maximum of the broad excitation band from 280 nm to 342 nm. This excitation path is much more efficient than the direct excitation of the Eu3+ electronic levels, and results in a much higher luminescence. The NPs can be uptaken by HeLa cells, and are eventually located in the lysosomes after being internalized. Finally, the functionalization with PAA provides -COOH anchors for adding functional ligands of biomedical interest that can be used for sensing applications.

  20. Multiple doping structures of the rare-earth atoms in β-SiAlON:Ce phosphors and their effects on luminescence properties.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lin; Xu, Fang-Fang; Zeng, Xiong-Hui; Li, Zuo-Sheng; Mao, Zhi-Yong; Lu, Ping; Zhu, Ying-Chun; Liu, Xue-Jian; Zhang, Lin-Lin

    2015-07-14

    The critical doping structures of rare-earth atoms in the promising β-SiAlON phosphors have long been argued owing to the lack of direct evidence. Here, the exact locations and coordination of the Ce rare-earth atoms in the β-SiAlON structure have been examined using an atom-resolved Cs-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. Three different occupation sites for the Ce atoms have been directly observed: two of them are in the structural channel coordinated with six and nine N(O) atoms, respectively; the other one is the unexpected substitution site for Si(Al). The chemical valences and stabilities of the doping Ce ions at the different occupation sites have been evaluated using density functional calculations. Correlation of the different doping structures with the luminescence properties has been investigated by the aid of cathodoluminescence (CL) microanalysis, which verifies the different contribution of the interstitial trivalent Ce ions to the light emission while no luminescence is observed for the substitutional doping of quadrivalent Ce.

  1. Structural/surface characterization and catalytic evaluation of rare-earth (Y, Sm and La) doped ceria composite oxides for CH3SH catalytic decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Dedong; Chen, Dingkai; Hao, Husheng; Yu, Jie; Liu, Jiangping; Lu, Jichang; Liu, Feng; Wan, Gengping; He, Sufang; Luo, Yongming

    2016-12-01

    A series of rare earth (Y, Sm and La) doped ceria composite oxides and pure CeO2 were synthesized and evaluated by conducting CH3SH catalytic decomposition test. Several characterization studies, including XRD, BET, Raman, H2-TPR, XPS, FT-IR, CO2-TPD and CH3SH-TPD, were undertaken to correlate structural and surface properties of the obtained ceria-based catalysts with their catalytic performance for CH3SH decomposition. More oxygen vacancies and increased basic sites exhibited in the rare earth doped ceria catalysts. Y doped ceria sample (Ce0.75Y0.25O2-δ), with a moderate increase in basic sites, contained more oxygen vacancies. More structural defects and active sites could be provided, and a relatively small amount of sulfur would accumulate, which resulted in better catalytic performance. The developed catalyst presented good catalytic behavior with stability very similar to that of typical zeolite-based catalysts reported previously. However, La doped ceria catalyst (Ce0.75La0.25O2-δ) with the highest alkalinity was not the most active one. More sulfur species would be adsorbed and a large amount of cerium sulfide species (Ce2S3) would accumulate, which caused deactivation of the catalysts. The combined effect of increased oxygen vacancies and alkalinity led to the catalytic stability of Ce0.75Sm0.25O2-δ sample was comparable to that of pure CeO2 catalyst.

  2. Absorption and emission spectra of Ga1.7Ge25As8.3S65 glasses doped with rare-earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupan, E. V.; Iaseniuc, O. V.; Ciornea, V. I.; Iovu, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    Excellent optical properties of chalcogenide glasses make them interesting for optoelectronic devices in the visible (VIS) and, especially, in the near- and mid-infrared (NIR and MIR) spectral regions. The rare-earth (RE3+) doped Ga17Ge25As8.3S65 glasses were prepared in evacuated ( 10-5 Pa) silica-glass ampoules which were heated up to 1000 °C at 2-4°C min-1, and then the melt was quenched. The absorption and photoluminescence spectra in the visible and near IR regions for GA1.7Ge25As8.3S65 doped with rare-earth RE+) ions (Sm3+, Nd3+, Pr3+, Dy3+ and co-doped with Ho3++Dy3+) are investigated. The energy transfer of the absorbed light in the broad band Urbach region of the host glass to the RE3+ ions is suggested for increasing the emission efficiency. The investigated Ga17Ge25As8.3S65 glasses doped with RE3+ ions are promising materials for optical amplifiers operating at 1300 and 1500 nm telecommunication windows.

  3. White emission phosphors based on Dy3+-doped into anhydrous rare-earth benzenetricarboxylate complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Ivan G. N.; Kai, Jiang; Felinto, Maria C. F. C.; Brito, Hermi F.

    2013-03-01

    White light emitting rare earth anhydrous complexes RE(TMA):Dy3+ (RE3+ = Y3+ and Lu3+) containing the trimesic acid ligands (TMA) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction patterns, thermogravimetric analysis and infrared spectroscopy. The crystallinity and thermostability of these luminescent materials were determined. Since the first excited triplet state (T1: 24,000 cm-1) of TMA ligand is located at higher energy than the main emitting 4F9/2 level (21,000 cm-1) of the Dy3+ ion, TMA can act as efficient luminescent sensitizer in the intramolecular energy transfer of RE(TMA):Dy3+ material. The near-white emission colour originated from the intraconfigurational transitions of Dy3+ ion 4F9/2→6HJ is discussed.

  4. Observation and integrated Earth-system science: A roadmap for 2016–2025

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Adrian; Fellous, Jean-Louis; Ramaswamy, V.; Trenberth, Kevin; Asrar, Ghassem R.; Balmaseda, M. A.; Burrows, John P.; Cias, Philippe; Drinkwater, Mark; Friedlingstein, P.; Gobron, Nadine; Guilyardi, Eric; Halpern, David; Heimann, Martin; Johannessen, Johnny; Levelt, Pieternel F.; Ernesto, Lopez-Baeza; Penner, Joyce E.; Scholes, Robert; Shepherd, Ted

    2016-04-20

    This report is the response to a request by the Committee on Space Research of the International Council for Science to prepare a roadmap on observation and integrated Earth-system science for the coming ten years. Its focus is on the combined use of observations and modelling to address the functioning, predictability and projected evolution of interacting components of the Earth system on timescales out to a century or so. It discusses how observations support integrated Earth-system science and its applications, and identifies planned enhancements to the contributing observing systems and other requirements for observations and their processing. All types of observation are considered, but emphasis is placed on those made from space. The origins and development of the integrated view of the Earth system are outlined, noting the interactions between the main components that lead to requirements for integrated science and modelling, and for the observations that guide and support them. What constitutes an Earth-system model is discussed. Summaries are given of key cycles within the Earth system. The nature of Earth observation and the arrangements for international coordination essential for effective operation of global observing systems are introduced. Instances are given of present types of observation, what is already on the roadmap for 2016–2025 and some of the issues to be faced. Observations that are organized on a systematic basis and observations that are made for process understanding and model development, or other research or demonstration purposes, are covered. Specific accounts are given for many of the variables of the Earth system. The current status and prospects for Earth-system modelling are summarized. The evolution towards applying Earth-system models for environmental monitoring and prediction as well as for climate simulation and projection is outlined. General aspects of the improvement of models, whether through refining the

  5. Observation and integrated Earth-system science: A roadmap for 2016-2025

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Adrian; Fellous, Jean-Louis; Ramaswamy, Venkatachalam; Trenberth, Kevin; Asrar, Ghassem; Balmaseda, Magdalena; Burrows, John P.; Ciais, Philippe; Drinkwater, Mark; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Gobron, Nadine; Guilyardi, Eric; Halpern, David; Heimann, Martin; Johannessen, Johnny; Levelt, Pieternel F.; Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Penner, Joyce; Scholes, Robert; Shepherd, Ted

    2016-05-01

    This report is the response to a request by the Committee on Space Research of the International Council for Science to prepare a roadmap on observation and integrated Earth-system science for the coming ten years. Its focus is on the combined use of observations and modelling to address the functioning, predictability and projected evolution of interacting components of the Earth system on timescales out to a century or so. It discusses how observations support integrated Earth-system science and its applications, and identifies planned enhancements to the contributing observing systems and other requirements for observations and their processing. All types of observation are considered, but emphasis is placed on those made from space. The origins and development of the integrated view of the Earth system are outlined, noting the interactions between the main components that lead to requirements for integrated science and modelling, and for the observations that guide and support them. What constitutes an Earth-system model is discussed. Summaries are given of key cycles within the Earth system. The nature of Earth observation and the arrangements for international coordination essential for effective operation of global observing systems are introduced. Instances are given of present types of observation, what is already on the roadmap for 2016-2025 and some of the issues to be faced. Observations that are organised on a systematic basis and observations that are made for process understanding and model development, or other research or demonstration purposes, are covered. Specific accounts are given for many of the variables of the Earth system. The current status and prospects for Earth-system modelling are summarized. The evolution towards applying Earth-system models for environmental monitoring and prediction as well as for climate simulation and projection is outlined. General aspects of the improvement of models, whether through refining the

  6. Erbium-doped zinc-oxide waveguide amplifiers for hybrid photonic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neal, Lawrence; Anthony, Deion; Bonner, Carl; Geddis, Demetris

    2016-02-01

    CMOS logic circuits have entered the sub-100nm regime, and research is on-going to investigate the quantum effects that are apparent at this dimension. To avoid some of the constraints imposed by fabrication, entropy, energy, and interference considerations for nano-scale devices, many have begun designing hybrid and/or photonic integrated circuits. These circuits consist of transistors, light emitters, photodetectors, and electrical and optical waveguides. As attenuation is a limiting factor in any communications system, it is advantageous to integrate a signal amplifier. There are numerous examples of electrical amplifiers, but in order to take advantage of the benefits provided by optically integrated systems, optical amplifiers are necessary. The erbium doped fiber amplifier is an example of an optical amplifier which is commercially available now, but the distance between the amplifier and the device benefitting from amplification can be decreased and provide greater functionality by providing local, on-chip amplification. Zinc oxide is an attractive material due to its electrical and optical properties. Its wide bandgap (≍3.4 eV) and high refractive index (≍2) make it an excellent choice for integrated optics systems. Moreover, erbium doped zinc oxide (Er:ZnO) is a suitable candidate for optical waveguide amplifiers because of its compatibility with semiconductor processing technology, 1.54 μm luminescence, transparency, low resistivity, and amplification characteristics. This research presents the characterization of radio frequency magnetron sputtered Er:ZnO, the design and fabrication of integrated waveguide amplifiers, and device analysis.

  7. High pressure effects on the superconductivity in rare-earth-doped CaFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhoya, Walter; Cargill, Daniel; Gofryk, Krzysztof; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Sefat, Athena S.; Weir, S. T.

    2014-01-01

    High pressure superconductivity in a rare-earth-doped Ca0.86Pr0.14Fe2As2 single-crystalline sample has been studied up to 12 GPa and temperatures down to 11 K using the designer diamond anvil cell under a quasi-hydrostatic pressure medium. The electrical resistance measurements were complemented by high pressure and low-temperature X-ray diffraction studies at a synchrotron source. The electrical resistance measurements show an intriguing observation of superconductivity under pressure, with Tc as high as ∼51 K at 1.9 GPa, presenting the highest Tc reported in the intermetallic class of 122 iron-based superconductors. The resistive transition observed suggests a possible existence of two superconducting phases at low pressures of 0.5 GPa: one phase starting at Tc1 ∼ 48 K and the other starts at Tc2 ∼ 16 K. The two superconducting transitions show distinct variations with increasing pressure. High pressure and low-temperature structural studies indicate that the superconducting phase is a collapsed tetragonal ThCr2Si2-type (122) crystal structure.

  8. Energy transfer kinetics in oxy-fluoride glass and glass-ceramics doped with rare-earth ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sontakke, Atul D.; Annapurna, K.

    2012-07-01

    An investigation of donor-acceptor energy transfer kinetics in dual rare earths doped precursor oxy-fluoride glass and its glass-ceramics containing NaYF{sub 4} nano-crystals is reported here, using three different donor-acceptor ion combinations such as Nd-Yb, Yb-Dy, and Nd-Dy. The precipitation of NaYF{sub 4} nano-crystals in host glass matrix under controlled post heat treatment of precursor oxy-fluoride glasses has been confirmed from XRD, FESEM, and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. Further, the incorporation of dopant ions inside fluoride nano-crystals has been established through optical absorption and TEM-EDX analysis. The noticed decreasing trend in donor to acceptor energy transfer efficiency from precursor glass to glass-ceramics in all three combinations have been explained based on the structural rearrangements that occurred during the heat treatment process. The reduced coupling phonon energy for the dopant ions due to fluoride environment and its influence on the overall phonon assisted contribution in energy transfer process has been illustrated. Additionally, realization of a correlated distribution of dopant ions causing clustering inside nano-crystals has also been reported.

  9. Effect of particle size and dopant concentration on photophysical properties of Eu3+-doped rare earth oxysulphide phosphor coatings.

    PubMed

    Chakradhar, R P S; Basu, Bharathibai J; Lakshmi, R V

    2011-02-01

    Europium-doped rare-earth oxysulphides (red phosphors) are often used as reference luminophore in pyrene-based pressure sensor coatings for aerodynamic applications. Different red phosphor samples were characterized for their particle size, chemical composition, photoluminescent properties and temperature sensitivity. The red phosphor samples were characterized using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) for elemental analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for morphology and particle size measurement. The particle size was in the range of 1.5-5.7 μm with morphology of hexagonal or spherical shape. It was found that phosphor with higher europium content exhibited higher luminescent emission intensity. The phosphor coatings were prepared by spraying a dispersion of the material in silicone resin. Smooth coatings were obtained by using phosphor samples with smaller particle size. Upon 334 nm excitation, the coatings showed characteristic luminescence 5D0→7FJ (J=0, 1, 2, 3, 4) of the Eu3+ ions. The electronic transition located at 626 nm (5D0→7F2) of Eu3+ ions was stronger than the magnetic dipole transition located at 595 nm (5D0→7F1). Luminescence decay curves obeyed double exponential behaviour. The phosphor samples showed temperature sensitivity of -0.012 to -0.168%/°C in the temperature range of 25-50 °C.

  10. Magnetocaloric effect in heavy rare-earth elements doped Fe-based bulk metallic glasses with tunable Curie temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jiawei; Huo, Juntao; Chang, Chuntao E-mail: dujun@nimte.ac.cn; Du, Juan E-mail: dujun@nimte.ac.cn; Man, Qikui; Wang, Xinmin; Li, Run-Wei; Law, Jiayan

    2014-08-14

    The effects of heavy rare earth (RE) additions on the Curie temperature (T{sub C}) and magnetocaloric effect of the Fe-RE-B-Nb (RE = Gd, Dy and Ho) bulk metallic glasses were studied. The type of dopping RE element and its concentration can easily tune T{sub C} in a large temperature range of 120 K without significantly decreasing the magnetic entropy change (ΔS{sub M}) and refrigerant capacity (RC) of the alloys. The observed values of ΔS{sub M} and RC of these alloys compare favorably with those of recently reported Fe-based metallic glasses with enhanced RC compared to Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 1.9}Si{sub 2}Fe{sub 0.1}. The tunable T{sub C} and large glass-forming ability of these RE doped Fe-based bulk metallic glasses can be used in a wide temperature range with the final required shapes.

  11. Calcination-free micropatterning of rare-earth-ion-doped nanoparticle films on wettability-patterned surfaces of plastic sheets.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Hamada, Yudai; Hyodo, Hiroshi; Soga, Kohei; Matsumoto, Mutsuyoshi

    2014-05-15

    We demonstrate a patterning technique of rare-earth-ion-doped (RE) nanoparticle films directly on wettability-patterned surfaces fabricated on plastic sheets in one step. Self-assembled monolayers consisting of silane-coupling agent with hydrophobic groups were fabricated on plastic sheets. UV-ozone treatments were performed through a metal mask to selectively remove the self-assembled monolayers in a patterned manner, resulting in the formation of wettability-patterned surfaces on plastic sheets. Using a water dispersion of Er(3+) and Yb(3+)-codoped Y2O3 nanoparticles at a diameter of 100 nm, RE-nanoparticle films were fabricated on the wettability-patterned surfaces by a dip-coating technique. By adjusting the concentration of RE-nanoparticle dispersion, withdrawal speed, and withdrawal angle, amount of RE-nanoparticles, we were able to control the structures of the RE-nanoparticle films. Fluorescence microscope observations demonstrate that visible upconversion luminescence and near-infrared fluorescence were emitted from the RE-nanoparticle films on the wettability-patterned surfaces. This technique allows for the fabrication of flexible emitting devices with long-operating life time with minimized material consumption and few fabrication steps, and for the application to sensors, emitting devices, and displays in electronics, photonics, and bionics in the future.

  12. Synthesis and upconversion emission of rare earth-doped olive-like YF{sub 3} micro-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Hang; Chen, Daqin; Niu, Mutong; Yu, Yunlong; Huang, Ping; Wang, Yuansheng

    2010-01-15

    The olive-like YF{sub 3} micro-particles were fabricated via a two-step route. The precursor NH{sub 4}Y{sub 3}F{sub 10} nano-cages sized 8 nm with hollow interiors were first synthesized in a solid reaction at room temperature. In the course of subsequent hydrothermal treating, the unstable NH{sub 4}Y{sub 3}F{sub 10} nano-cages were decomposed, resulted in the formation of Y(OH){sub 1.63}F{sub 1.37} micro-tubes. Prolonging the hydrothermal reaction induced the further decomposition of Y(OH){sub 1.63}F{sub 1.37} to produce YF{sub 3} nano-crystals, which then aggregated together forming the final olive-like YF{sub 3} micro-particles. For the Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} co-doped olive-like YF{sub 3} micro-particles, intense visible upconversion emissions were measured under 976 nm excitation owing to the partition of rare earth ions in the lattice, indicating this material a promising luminescent host.

  13. Enhancement of single particle rare earth doped NaYF4: Yb, Er emission with a gold shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ling; Green, Kory; Hallen, Hans; Lim, Shuang Fang

    2015-01-01

    Upconversion of infrared light to visible light has important implications for bioimaging. However, the small absorption cross-section of rare earth dopants has limited the efficiency of these anti-Stokes nanomaterials. We present enhanced excitation absorption and single particle fluorescent emission of sodium yttrium fluoride, NaYF4: Yb, Er based upconverting nanoparticles coated with a gold nanoshell through surface plasmon resonance. The single gold-shell coated nanoparticles show enhanced absorption in the near infrared, enhanced total emission intensity, and increased green relative to red emission. We also show differences in enhancement between single and aggregated gold shell nanoparticles. The surface plasmon resonance of the gold-shell coated nanoparticle is shown to be dependent on the shell thickness. In contrast to other reported results, our single particle experimental observations are corroborated by finite element calculations that show where the green/red emission enhancement occurs, and what portion of the enhancement is due to electromagnetic effects. We find that the excitation enhancement and green/red emission ratio enhancement occurs at the corners and edges of the doped emissive core.

  14. Thermochemistry of rare earth doped uranium oxides LnxU1-xO2-0.5x+y (Ln = La, Y, Nd)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-10-01

    Lanthanum, yttrium, and neodymium doped uranium dioxide samples in the fluorite structure have been synthesized, characterized in terms of metal ratio and oxygen content, and their enthalpies of formation measured by high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. For oxides doped with 10-50 mol % rare earth (Ln) cations, the formation enthalpies from constituent oxides (LnO1.5, UO2 and UO3 in a reaction not involving oxidation or reduction) become increasingly exothermic with increasing rare earth content, while showing no significant dependence on the varying uranium oxidation state. The oxidation enthalpy of LnxU1-xO2-0.5x+y is similar to that of UO2 to UO3 for all three rare earth doped systems. Though this may suggest that the oxidized uranium in these systems is energetically similar to that in the hexavalent state, thermochemical data alone can not constrain whether the uranium is present as U5+, U6+, or a mixture of oxidation states. The formation enthalpies from elements calculated from the calorimetric data are generally consistent with those from free energy measurements.

  15. Rare earth ion (La, Ce, and Eu) doped ZnO nanoparticles synthesized via sol-gel method: Application in dye sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Padmini; Kurchania, Rajnish; Haque, Fozia Z.

    2015-10-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were fabricated by using ZnO nanoparticles as working electrode material synthesized via simple and cost effective sol-gel method. Crystallography and morphology was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. Among various rare earth ions, 1.0 mol % La, Ce, and Eu doped ZnO nanoparticles based photoanodes were used to test DSSC performance. Lower efficiency (η = 1.14%) for La ion doped ZnO nanoparticles based cell was observed. A much lower photocurrent J sc = 2.52 mA/cm2 with 0.60% efficiency ( η) for the Ce ion doped ZnO nanoparticles based prototype was observed as compared to that ( J sc = 3.86 mA/cm2 with η = 1.24%) of the undoped one which may be due to the formation of opposite internal electric potential difference in the cell. Furthermore, the improvement in efficiency (η = 1.36%) and J sc = 3.99 mA/cm2 for Eu ion doped ZnO can be attributed to enhanced electron injection and transport abilities. This indicates that 1.0 mol % Eu ion doped ZnO film possesses better electrical conductivity probably due to the existence of high-valance Eu ions in the ZnO matrix which might be promising in ZnO-based dye sensitized solar cell.

  16. Using the Earth as an Effective Model for Integrating Space Science Into Education Outreach Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, P. A.; Allen, J.; Galindo, C.; McKay, G.; Obot, V.; Reiff, P.

    2005-05-01

    Our methods of teaching Earth and space science as two disciplines do not represent the spirit of earlier scientists such as Aristotle, da Vinci, and Galileo. We need to re-evaluate these methods and take advantage of the excitement created in the general public over the recent space science exploration programs. The information that we are obtaining from both the Mars missions and Cassini-Huygens focuses on interpreting geomorphology, mineral compositions and gas identification based on Earth as a baseline for data evaluation. This type of evaluation is an extension of Hutton's 18th century principle of Uniformitarianism, the present is the key to the past, or Earth is the key for understanding extraterrestrial bodies. Geomorphological examples are volcanic activity, meteoritic impacts, and evidence of water altering surface features. The Hawaiian, or shield, type volcanoes are analogues for Olympus Mons and the other volcanoes on Mars. Other examples include comparing sand dunes on Earth with possible Martian dunes, known stream patterns on Earth with potential stream patterns on Mars, and even comparing meteoritic impact features on Mars, the Earth, Moon and Mercury. All of these comparisons have been developed into inquiry-based activities and are available through NASA publications. Each of these activities is easily adapted to emphasize either Earth science or space science or both. Beyond geomorphology, solar storms are an excellent topic for integrating Earth and space science. Solar storms are traditionally part of space science studies, but most students do not understand their effect on Earth or the intense effects they could have on humans, whether traveling through space or exploring the surfaces of the Moon or Mars. Effects are not only limited to space travel and other planetary surfaces but also include Earth's magnetosphere, which in turn, affect radio transmission and potentially climate. Like geomorphology courses, there are extensive NASA

  17. Extruded channel waveguides in a neodymium-doped lead-silicate glass for integrated optic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mairaj, Arshad K.; Feng, Xian; Hewak, Daniel W.

    2003-10-01

    We report on the development of channel waveguides in a lead-silicate glass through the extrusion technique. An extruded glass slab with four imbedded fibers each with core size of 8 by 2.5 μm in the horizontal and vertical directions was manufactured. These neodymium-doped channel waveguides were in single-mode operation at 808 nm and had attenuation of 0.1 dB cm-1 at 1.06 μm. The measured 4F3/2 lifetime of 488 μs and emission cross section of 2.5×10-20 cm2 were in good agreement with reported values. The integration of multiple glass variants into a single compact platform is presented as a manufacturing route for complex integrated optical waveguides.

  18. The European Plate Observing System (EPOS): Integrating Thematic Services for Solid Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atakan, Kuvvet; Bailo, Daniele; Consortium, Epos

    2016-04-01

    The mission of EPOS is to monitor and understand the dynamic and complex Earth system by relying on new e-science opportunities and integrating diverse and advanced Research Infrastructures in Europe for solid Earth Science. EPOS will enable innovative multidisciplinary research for a better understanding of the Earth's physical and chemical processes that control earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, ground instability and tsunami as well as the processes driving tectonics and Earth's surface dynamics. Through integration of data, models and facilities EPOS will allow the Earth Science community to make a step change in developing new concepts and tools for key answers to scientific and socio-economic questions concerning geo-hazards and geo-resources as well as Earth sciences applications to the environment and to human welfare. EPOS, during its Implementation Phase (EPOS-IP), will integrate multidisciplinary data into a single e-infrastructure. Multidisciplinary data are organized and governed by the Thematic Core Services (TCS) and are driven by various scientific communities encompassing a wide spectrum of Earth science disciplines. These include Data, Data-products, Services and Software (DDSS), from seismology, near fault observatories, geodetic observations, volcano observations, satellite observations, geomagnetic observations, as well as data from various anthropogenic hazard episodes, geological information and modelling. In addition, transnational access to multi-scale laboratories and geo-energy test-beds for low-carbon energy will be provided. TCS DDSS will be integrated into Integrated Core Services (ICS), a platform that will ensure their interoperability and access to these services by the scientific community as well as other users within the society. This requires dedicated tasks for interactions with the various TCS-WPs, as well as the various distributed ICS (ICS-Ds), such as High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities, large scale data storage

  19. Morphological, Raman, electrical and dielectric properties of rare earth doped X-type hexagonal ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeed, Abdul; Khan, Muhammad Azhar; ur Raheem, Faseeh; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Akhtar, Majid Niaz; Warsi, Muhammad Farooq

    2016-12-01

    The influence of rare-earth metals (La, Nd, Gd, Tb, Dy) on morphology, Raman, electrical and dielectric properties of Ba2NiCoRExFe28-xO46 ferrites were studied. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) exhibited the platelet like structure of these hexagonal ferrites. The surface morphology indicated the formation of ferrite grains in the nano-regime scale. The bands obtained at lower wave number may be attributed to the metal-oxygen vibration at octahedral site which confirm the development of hexagonal phase of these ferrites. The resonance peaks were observed in dielectric constant, dielectric loss factor and quality factor versus frequency graphs. These dielectric parameters indicate that these ferrites nano-materials are potential candidates in the high frequency applications. The enhancement in DC electric resistivity from 2.48×108 to 1.20×109 Ω cm indicates that the prepared materials are beneficial for decreasing the eddy current losses at high frequencies and for the fabrication of multilayer chip inductor (MLCI) devices.

  20. Theoretical Study on Interactions between Oxygen Vacancy and Doped Rare-Earth Elements in Barium Titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Atsushi; Higai, Shin'ichi; Motoyoshi, Yasuhiro; Wada, Nobuyuki; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2011-09-01

    We performed first-principles theoretical calculations to examine the interactions between oxygen vacancy (VO) and rare-earth (RE) elements in barium titanate (BaTiO3), in order to clarify the mechanism of VO trapping by RE dopants, which affects the insulating reliability of BaTiO3-based multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCC). It was found that VO is stabilized at the first and second nearest O sites of RE at Ba site (REBa), and at the second nearest O site of RE at Ti site (RETi). The structural relaxations on bond lengths of REBa-O and RETi-O in BaTiO3, which are brought about by the existence of VO at the above sites, decrease the total energy, and thus VO is stabilized. Furthermore, we revealed that the stability of VO increases with decreasing solution stability of RE dopants in BaTiO3. Accordingly, we concluded that RE dopants with higher solution energy in BaTiO3 efficiently trap VO, and thus the insulation reliability of MLCC is improved.

  1. Alpha-particle-induced luminescence of rare-earth-doped Y 2O 3 nanophosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cress, Cory D.; Redino, Christopher S.; Landi, Brian J.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2008-08-01

    The feasibility of utilizing Y 2O 3:Tb 3+ and Y 2O 3:Eu 3+ as radioluminescent nanophosphors under alpha-particle excitation is investigated. Materials synthesized by the urea homogeneous precipitation method were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The XRD analysis of as-produced precipitates and nanophosphors fired at temperatures ranging from 950 to 1100 °C indicated the presence of highly crystalline cubic Y 2O 3 with crystallite sizes of ˜40 nm. SEM and TEM analysis revealed that particles with average diameters of ˜200 nm and comprised of ˜40 nm grains were obtained. High-resolution radioluminescence and photoluminescence spectra were used to investigate the unwanted radioluminescence saturation effects associated with the high ionization rate of alpha-particles. Additionally, the radioluminescence intensity as a function of rare-earth ion dopant concentration is investigated for these materials under alpha-particle excitation. The prospect for utilizing these materials as intermediate absorbers in indirect-conversion radioisotope batteries is discussed.

  2. A path-integral Langevin equation treatment of low-temperature doped helium clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ing, Christopher; Hinsen, Konrad; Yang, Jing; Zeng, Toby; Li, Hui; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2012-06-01

    We present an implementation of path integral molecular dynamics for sampling low temperature properties of doped helium clusters using Langevin dynamics. The robustness of the path integral Langevin equation and white-noise Langevin equation [M. Ceriotti, M. Parrinello, T. E. Markland, and D. E. Manolopoulos, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 124104 (2010)], 10.1063/1.3489925 sampling methods are considered for those weakly bound systems with comparison to path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) in terms of efficiency and accuracy. Using these techniques, convergence studies are performed to confirm the systematic error reduction introduced by increasing the number of discretization steps of the path integral. We comment on the structural and energetic evolution of HeN-CO2 clusters from N = 1 to 20. To quantify the importance of both rotations and exchange in our simulations, we present a chemical potential and calculated band origin shifts as a function of cluster size utilizing PIMC sampling that includes these effects. This work also serves to showcase the implementation of path integral simulation techniques within the molecular modelling toolkit [K. Hinsen, J. Comp. Chem. 21, 79 (2000)], 10.1002/(SICI)1096-987X(20000130)21:2<79::AID-JCC1>3.0.CO;2-B, an open-source molecular simulation package.

  3. Data sharing: A critical foundation to advance global integrated Earth system science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, David; Doldirina, Catherine; Withee, Gregory

    A critical foundation for a successful Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) is the exchange of observations recorded from in-situ, aircraft, and satellite networks in a full and open manner with minimum time delay and minimum cost, recognizing relevant international instruments and national policies and legislation. This is, in its simplest form, the GEOSS Data Sharing Principles, which initially were adopted at the First Earth Observation Summit on 31 July 2003 in Washington, United States. It was restated in the 2006-2015 GEOSS Implementation Plan, which is adopted by Group on Earth Observation (GEO) Members and Participating Organizations. Currently, there are 90 Members and 77 Participating Organizations. This paper will describe the evolution of data sharing within the GEO since announcing a principle, creating an action plan, establishing mechanisms, and witnessing progress. Topics include highlights from the 2009 Implementation Guidelines, 2010 GEOSS Data Sharing Action Plan, and GEO infrastructure activities such as the GEO Data Sharing Working Group, GEOSS Data-CORE, GEOSS Data Quality Guidelines, and others. The paper will conclude with audience suggestions on how to improve sharing of Earth observations to enhance understanding of the global integrated Earth system.

  4. Structural elucidation and magnetic behavior evaluation of rare earth (La, Nd, Gd, Tb, Dy) doped BaCoNi-X hexagonal nano-sized ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeed, Abdul; Khan, Muhammad Azhar; Raheem, Faseeh ur; Hussain, Altaf; Iqbal, F.; Murtaza, Ghulam; Akhtar, Majid Niaz; Shakir, Imran; Warsi, Muhammad Farooq

    2016-06-01

    Rare-earth (RE=La3+, Nd3+, Gd3+, Tb3+, Dy3+) doped Ba2NiCoRExFe28-xO46 (x=0.25) hexagonal ferrites were synthesized for the first time via micro-emulsion route, which is a fast chemistry route for obtaining nano-sized ferrite powders. These nanomaterials were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), as well as vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The XRD analysis exhibited that all the samples crystallized into single X-type hexagonal phase. The crystalline size calculated by Scherrer's formula was found in the range 7-19 nm. The variations in lattice parameters elucidated the incorporation of rare-earth cations in these nanomaterials. FTIR absorption spectra of these X-type ferrites were investigated in the wave number range 500-2400 cm-1. Each spectrum exhibited absorption bands in the low wave number range, thereby confirming the X-type hexagonal structure. The enhancement in the coercivity was observed with the doping of rare-earth cations. The saturation magnetization was lowered owing to the redistribution of rare-earth cations on the octahedral site (3bVI). The higher values of coercivity (664-926 Oe) of these nanomaterials suggest their use in longitudinal recording media.

  5. Eigensensitivity in integrated design. [of earth-pointing satellite's control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Sean P.; Hou, Gene J.; Belvin, W. K.

    1990-01-01

    An application of eigensensitivity analysis to the control-structure integrated design process is presented with an emphasis placed on computational efficiency improvement of the overall design optimization process. The computational efficiency of eigenvalue/vector sensitivity analysis is demonstrated using the Earth Pointing Satellite in the context of a control-structure integrated design program. Results for a 2 percent design variable perturbation with and without the effects of the actuator mass show a 42 and 52 percent reduction in CPU time, respectively.

  6. Structural, morphological and spectroscopic properties of Eu{sup 3+}-doped rare earth fluorides synthesized by the hydrothermalmethod

    SciTech Connect

    Grzyb, Tomasz; Runowski, Marcin; Szczeszak, Agata; Lis, Stefan

    2013-04-15

    Rare earth fluorides (REF{sub 3}, RE=Y, La, Gd or Yb) doped with 5% of Eu{sup 3+} ions were synthesized via the hydrothermal method and their physicochemical properties were compared. The synthesis was carried out in an aqueous medium at elevated pressure and temperature. The reaction was performed in situ, with use of NaBF{sub 4} as a source of fluoride ions. Structural and morphological properties of obtained nanophosphors were characterized with the use of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. Synthesized products were nanocrystalline with hexagonal or orthorhombic crystal structures. They showed different morphology, from nanoplates to nanorings, depending on the used REF{sub 3} fluoride as the host for the Eu{sup 3+} ions. The elemental composition was confirmed by the energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) results. Spectroscopic properties were investigated by measuring the excitation and emission spectra. Also luminescence lifetimes were determined. The synthesized materials showed bright red luminescence, due to the presence of Eu{sup 3+} ions in their structure. - Graphical abstract: Luminescence spectra of the REF{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} (RE=Y, La, Gd and Yb) fluorides and their TEM images as background. Highlights: ► Nanocrystalline fluorides were synthesized using modified hydrothermal method. ► Structural and morphological properties of in situ prepared nanomaterials were studied. ► Luminescence properties of REF{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} (RE=Y, La, Gd, Yb) were compared and investigated.

  7. Astro-Venture: An Integrated Earth and Space Science Curriculum Supplement Focused on Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Guinn, C. M.; Wilmoth, K. L.; Coe, L. K.

    2005-05-01

    Astro-Venture is an example of a NASA educational product that successfully integrates Earth and space science by engaging students in grades 5-8 in the search for and design of a planet with the necessary characteristics for human habitation. Students study the Earth to understand how it meets human needs for survival in the areas of astronomy, geology, biology and atmospheric sciences. They then extend these ideas in simulated searches and analyses of stellar and planetary data sets to determine whether other planets or moons might be habitable. Astro-Venture uses online multimedia activities and off-line inquiry explorations to engage students in guided inquiry aligned with the 5 E inquiry model. For each core science area, students engage in an online training module in which they isolate variables and observe the affects on Earth. They then draw conclusions about which characteristics allow Earth to remain habitable. Following this experience, students engage in classroom, hands-on activities that teach them core standards-based concepts and focus on why the identified characteristics are vital to human habitability. These concepts include: states of matter, flow of energy, chemical properties, planetary geology, plate tectonics, human health and systems theory. With an understanding of the "whats" and the "whys" students then engage in a mission module in which they simulate the methods scientists would use to go about finding a planet with these characteristics. This helps them to understand the "hows". By meeting education standards, teachers can easily integrate this product into their classroom curriculum. Students apply all that they've learned to design a planet that meets the requirements for human habitability in all areas. Through this process, they learn about the Earth within the context of the solar system and how all parts work as a system in meeting our needs.

  8. Information Requirements for Integrating Spatially Discrete, Feature-Based Earth Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsburgh, J. S.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Lehnert, K. A.; Mayorga, E.; Hsu, L.; Song, L.; Zaslavsky, I.; Valentine, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Several cyberinfrastructures have emerged for sharing observational data collected at densely sampled and/or highly instrumented field sites. These include the CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System (HIS), the Critical Zone Observatory Integrated Data Management System (CZOData), the Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA) and EarthChem system, and the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS). These systems rely on standard data encodings and, in some cases, standard semantics for classes of geoscience data. Their focus is on sharing data on the Internet via web services in domain specific encodings or markup languages. While they have made progress in making data available, it still takes investigators significant effort to discover and access datasets from multiple repositories because of inconsistencies in the way domain systems describe, encode, and share data. Yet, there are many scenarios that require efficient integration of these data types across different domains. For example, understanding a soil profile's geochemical response to extreme weather events requires integration of hydrologic and atmospheric time series with geochemical data from soil samples collected over various depth intervals from soil cores or pits at different positions on a landscape. Integrated access to and analysis of data for such studies are hindered because common characteristics of data, including time, location, provenance, methods, and units are described differently within different systems. Integration requires syntactic and semantic translations that can be manual, error-prone, and lossy. We report information requirements identified as part of our work to define an information model for a broad class of earth science data - i.e., spatially-discrete, feature-based earth observations resulting from in-situ sensors and environmental samples. We sought to answer the question: "What information must accompany observational data for them to be archivable and discoverable within

  9. VARIABILITY OF WATER AND OXYGEN ABSORPTION BANDS IN THE DISK-INTEGRATED SPECTRA OF EARTH

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Yuka; Suto, Yasushi; Turner, Edwin L.

    2013-03-10

    We study the variability of major atmospheric absorption features in the disk-integrated spectra of Earth with future application to Earth-analogs in mind, concentrating on the diurnal timescale. We first analyze observations of Earth provided by the EPOXI mission, and find 5%-20% fractional variation of the absorption depths of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} bands, two molecules that have major signatures in the observed range. From a correlation analysis with the cloud map data from the Earth Observing Satellite (EOS), we find that their variation pattern is primarily due to the uneven cloud cover distribution. In order to account for the observed variation quantitatively, we consider a simple opaque cloud model, which assumes that the clouds totally block the spectral influence of the atmosphere below the cloud layer, equivalent to assuming that the incident light is completely scattered at the cloud top level. The model is reasonably successful, and reproduces the EPOXI data from the pixel-level EOS cloud/water vapor data. A difference in the diurnal variability patterns of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} bands is ascribed to the differing vertical and horizontal distribution of those molecular species in the atmosphere. On Earth, the inhomogeneous distribution of atmospheric water vapor is due to the existence of its exchange with liquid and solid phases of H{sub 2}O on the planet's surface on a timescale short compared with atmospheric mixing times. If such differences in variability patterns were detected in spectra of Earth-analogs, it would provide the information on the inhomogeneous composition of their atmospheres.

  10. Fostering Earth Observation Regional Networks - Integrative and iterative approaches to capacity building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habtezion, S.

    2015-12-01

    Fostering Earth Observation Regional Networks - Integrative and iterative approaches to capacity building Fostering Earth Observation Regional Networks - Integrative and iterative approaches to capacity building Senay Habtezion (shabtezion@start.org) / Hassan Virji (hvirji@start.org)Global Change SySTem for Analysis, Training and Research (START) (www.start.org) 2000 Florida Avenue NW, Suite 200 Washington, DC 20009 USA As part of the Global Observation of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD) project partnership effort to promote use of earth observations in advancing scientific knowledge, START works to bridge capacity needs related to earth observations (EOs) and their applications in the developing world. GOFC-GOLD regional networks, fostered through the support of regional and thematic workshops, have been successful in (1) enabling participation of scientists for developing countries and from the US to collaborate on key GOFC-GOLD and Land Cover and Land Use Change (LCLUC) issues, including NASA Global Data Set validation and (2) training young developing country scientists to gain key skills in EOs data management and analysis. Members of the regional networks are also engaged and reengaged in other EOs programs (e.g. visiting scientists program; data initiative fellowship programs at the USGS EROS Center and Boston University), which has helped strengthen these networks. The presentation draws from these experiences in advocating for integrative and iterative approaches to capacity building through the lens of the GOFC-GOLD partnership effort. Specifically, this presentation describes the role of the GODC-GOLD partnership in nurturing organic networks of scientists and EOs practitioners in Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe and Latin America.

  11. PHOTOMETRIC VARIABILITY OF THE DISK-INTEGRATED THERMAL EMISSION OF THE EARTH

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Leal, I.; Selsis, F.; Palle, E. E-mail: selsis@obs.u-bordeaux1.fr

    2012-06-10

    Here we present an analysis of the global-integrated mid-infrared emission flux of the Earth based on data derived from satellite measurements. We have studied the photometric annual, seasonal, and rotational variability of the thermal emission of the Earth to determine which properties can be inferred from the point-like signal. We find that the analysis of the time series allows us to determine the 24 hr rotational period of the planet for most observing geometries, due to large warm and cold areas, identified with geographic features, which appear consecutively in the observer's planetary view. However, the effects of global-scale meteorology can effectively mask the rotation for several days at a time. We also find that orbital time series exhibit a seasonal modulation, whose amplitude depends strongly on the latitude of the observer but weakly on its ecliptic longitude. As no systematic difference of brightness temperature is found between the dayside and the nightside, the phase variations of the Earth in the infrared range are negligible. Finally, we also conclude that the phase variation of a spatially unresolved Earth-Moon system is dominated by the lunar signal.

  12. Earth science information: Planning for the integration and use of global change information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lousma, Jack R.

    1992-01-01

    The Consortium for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN) was founded in 1989 as a non-profit corporation dedicated to facilitating access to, use and understanding of global change information worldwide. The Consortium was created to cooperate and coordinate with organizations and researchers throughout the global change community to further access the most advanced technology, the latest scientific research, and the best information available for critical environmental decision making. CIESIN study efforts are guided by Congressional mandates to 'convene key present and potential users to assess the need for investment in integration of earth science information,' to 'outline the desirable pattern of interaction with the scientific and policy community,' and to 'develop recommendations and draft plans to achieve the appropriate level of effort in the use of earth science data for research and public policy purposes.' In addition, CIESIN is tasked by NASA to develop a data center that would extend the benefits of Earth Observing System (EOS) to the users of global change information related to human dimensions issues. For FY 1991, CIESIN focused on two main objectives. The first addressed the identification of information needs of global change research and non-research user groups worldwide. The second focused on an evaluation of the most efficient mechanisms for making this information available in usable forms.

  13. Practices of Integrating the Earth Charter into Education Activities in German Federal States of Hessen and Rheinland-Pfalz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathar, Reiner

    2010-01-01

    The integration of Earth Charter into everyday practice of schools in Germany has to be combined with the curriculum development in different subjects. Two states of Germany started this process by organizing inservice training for primary and secondary teachers. Additionally they translated and adopted the Earth Charter Teachers Guidebook to…

  14. From the Earth Summit to Rio+20: integration of health and sustainable development.

    PubMed

    Haines, Andy; Alleyne, George; Kickbusch, Ilona; Dora, Carlos

    2012-06-09

    In 2012, world leaders will meet at the Rio+20 conference to advance sustainable development--20 years after the Earth Summit that resulted in agreement on important principles but insufficient action. Many of the development goals have not been achieved partly because social (including health), economic, and environmental priorities have not been addressed in an integrated manner. Adverse trends have been reported in many key environmental indicators that have worsened since the Earth Summit. Substantial economic growth has occurred in many regions but nevertheless has not benefited many populations of low income and those that have been marginalised, and has resulted in growing inequities. Variable progress in health has been made, and inequities are persistent. Improved health contributes to development and is underpinned by ecosystem stability and equitable economic progress. Implementation of policies that both improve health and promote sustainable development is urgently needed.

  15. Advancing Coupled Human-Earth System Models: The Integrated Ecosystem Demography Model (iED) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurtt, G. C.; Chini, L. P.; Clarke, L.; Calvin, K. V.; Chambers, J. Q.; Dubayah, R.; Dolan, K.; Edmonds, J. A.; Fisk, J. P.; Flanagan, S.; Frolking, S.; Janetos, A. C.; LePage, Y.; Morton, D. C.; Patel, P.; Rourke, O.; Sahajpal, R.; Thomson, A. M.; Wise, M.; Ying, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies with integrated assessment models, models linking human and natural systems at a global scale, highlight the importance of terrestrial systems in climate stabilization efforts. Here we introduce a new modeling framework iED, designed to link advanced remote sensing data (active and passive.), height-structured terrestrial ecosystem dynamics (ED), gridded land-use change projections (GLM), and integrated assessment modeling (GCAM) into a single coupled modeling framework with unprecedented spatial resolution and process-level detail. Our research aims to reduce uncertainties associated with forest modeling within integrated assessments, and to quantify the impacts of climate change on forest growth, mortality, and productivity for integrated assessments of terrestrial carbon management. iED is being used to address key science questions including: (1) What are the opportunities for land-use strategies such as afforestation or woody bioenergy crop production to contribute to stabilization of atmospheric CO2 concentrations? (2) How could potentially altered disturbance rates from tropical cyclones and Amazonian fires affect vegetation, carbon stocks and fluxes, and the development of climate change mitigation strategies? (3) What are the linked remote sensing/ecosystem modeling requirements for improving integrated assessments of climate mitigation strategies? With its strong connections to data and conceptual linkages to other models in development, iED is also designed to inform the next generation of remote sensing and integrated Earth system modeling efforts.

  16. Intramolecular energy transfer and co-luminescence effect in rare earth ions (La, Y, Gd and Tb) doped with Eu3+ beta-diketone complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Zhao, Yongliang

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, Eu3+ beta-diketone Complexes with the two ligands 1-(2-naphthoyl)-3, 3, 3-trifluoroacetonate (TFNB) and 2'2-bipyridine (bpy) have been synthesized. Furthermore, we reported a systematical study of the co-fluorescence effect of Eu(TFNB)3bpy doped with inert rare earth ions (La3+, Gd3+ and Y3+) and luminescence ion Tb3+. The co-luminescence effect can be found by studying the luminescence spectra of the doped complexes, which means that the existence of the other rare earth ions (La3+, Y3+, Gd3+ and Tb3+) can enhance the luminescence intensity of the central Eu3+, which may be due to the intramolecular energy transfer between rare earth ions and Eu3+. The efficient intramolecular energy transfer in all the complexes mainly occurs between the ligand TFNB and the central Eu3+. Full characterization and detail studies of luminescence properties of all these synthesized materials were investigated in relation to co-fluorescence effect between the central Eu3+ and other inert ions. Further investigation into the luminescence properties of all the complexes show that the characteristic luminescence of the corresponding Eu3+ through the intramolecular energy transfers from the ligand to the central Eu3+. Meantime, the differences in luminescence intensity of the 5D0-->7F2 transition, in the 5D0 lifetimes and in the 5D0 luminescence quantum efficiency among all the synthesized materials confirm that the doped complex Eu(0.5)Tb(0.5)(TFNB)3bpy exhibits higher 5D0 luminescence quantum efficiency and longer lifetime than the pure Eu(TFNB)3bpy complex and other materials.

  17. Earth Systems Science in an Integrated Science Content and Methods Course for Elementary Education Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, J. A.; Allen, D. E.; Donham, R. S.; Fifield, S. J.; Shipman, H. L.; Ford, D. J.; Dagher, Z. R.

    2004-12-01

    With funding from the National Science Foundation, we have designed an integrated science content and methods course for sophomore-level elementary teacher education (ETE) majors. This course, the Science Semester, is a 15-credit sequence that consists of three science content courses (Earth, Life, and Physical Science) and a science teaching methods course. The goal of this integrated science and education methods curriculum is to foster holistic understandings of science and pedagogy that future elementary teachers need to effectively use inquiry-based approaches in teaching science in their classrooms. During the Science Semester, traditional subject matter boundaries are crossed to stress shared themes that teachers must understand to teach standards-based elementary science. Exemplary approaches that support both learning science and learning how to teach science are used. In the science courses, students work collaboratively on multidisciplinary problem-based learning (PBL) activities that place science concepts in authentic contexts and build learning skills. In the methods course, students critically explore the theory and practice of elementary science teaching, drawing on their shared experiences of inquiry learning in the science courses. An earth system science approach is ideally adapted for the integrated, inquiry-based learning that takes place during the Science Semester. The PBL investigations that are the hallmark of the Science Semester provide the backdrop through which fundamental earth system interactions can be studied. For example in the PBL investigation that focuses on energy, the carbon cycle is examined as it relates to fossil fuels. In another PBL investigation centered on kids, cancer, and the environment, the hydrologic cycle with emphasis on surface runoff and ground water contamination is studied. In a PBL investigation that has students learning about the Delaware Bay ecosystem through the story of the horseshoe crab and the biome

  18. Semi-analytical integration of the Earth's precession-nutation based on the GCRS coordinates of the CIP unit vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitaine, N.; Folgueira, M.

    2012-12-01

    In a previous paper (Capitaine et al. 2006), referred here as Paper I, we demonstrated the possibility of integrating the Earth's rotational motion in terms of the coordinates (X, Y ) of the celestial intermediate pole (CIP) unit vector in the Geocentric celestial reference system (GCRS). Here, we report on the approach that has been followed for solving the equations in the case of an axially symmetric rigid Earth and the semi-analytical (X, Y ) solution obtained from the expression of the external torque acting on the Earth derived from the most complete semi-analytical solutions for the Earth, Moon and planets.

  19. ESTREAMS and EarthScapes: Integrating Teacher Professional Development Into a Science and Technology Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, K.; Dalbotten, D.

    2004-12-01

    The National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics (NCED) has developed three inter-locking programs to integrate Teacher Professional Development into the Center. These programs address teachers at two stages of professional development: post-baccalaureate pre-service teachers enrolled in masters programs and in-service teachers. Formal and informal methods are used to involve teachers in NCED research and in NCED's informal public education programs, exhibits and outdoor park at the Science Museum of Minnesota. This session will present the methods we are developing and our results to date. It will also introduce materials we currently make available through our online Education Portal.

  20. Facile fabrication and photoluminescence properties of rare-earth-doped Gd₂O₃ hollow spheres via a sacrificial template method.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu; Zhao, Qian; Fang, Qinghong; Xu, Zhenhe

    2013-08-21

    Rare-earth-doped gadolinium oxide (Gd₂O₃) hollow spheres were successfully fabricated on a large scale by using PS spheres as sacrificed templates and urea as a precipitating agent, which involved the deposition of an inorganic coating Gd(OH)CO3 on the surface of PS spheres and subsequent calcination in the air. Various approaches including X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), as well as photoluminescence spectroscopies were used to characterize the samples. The results indicate that the sample is composed of uniform hollow Gd₂O₃ spheres with a mean particle size of about 2.3 μm and these hollow spheres have the mesoporous shell that are composed of a large amount of nanoparticles. The possible mechanism of evolution from PS spheres to the amorphous precursor and to the final hollow Gd₂O₃ spheres have been proposed. The as-obtained samples show strong light emission with different colors corresponding to different Ln³⁺ ions under ultraviolet-visible light and electron-beam excitation. Under 980 nm NIR irradiation, Gd₂O₃:Ln³⁺ (Ln³⁺ = Yb³⁺/Er³⁺, Yb³⁺/Tm³⁺ and Yb³⁺/Ho³⁺) exhibit characteristic up-conversion (UC) emissions of red (Er³⁺, ²H11/2, ⁴S3/2, ⁴F9/2 → ⁴I15/2), blue (Tm³⁺, ¹G₄ → ³H₆) and green (Ho³⁺, ⁵F₄, ⁵S₂ → ⁵I₈), respectively. These merits of multicolor emissions in the visible region endow these kinds of materials with potential applications in the field of light display systems, lasers, optoelectronic devices, and MRI contrast agents.

  1. Materials Integration and Doping of Carbon Nanotube-based Logic Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, Michael

    symmetric threshold voltages. Additionally, a novel n-type doping procedure for SWCNT TFTs was also developed utilizing a solution-processed organometallic small molecule to demonstrate the first network top-gated n-type SWCNT TFTs. Lastly, new doping and encapsulation layers were incorporated to stabilize both p-type and n-type SWCNT TFT electronic properties, which enabled the fabrication of large-scale memory circuits. Employing these materials and processing advances has addressed many application specific barriers to commercialization. For instance, the first thin-film SWCNT complementary metal-oxide-semi-conductor (CMOS) logic devices are demonstrated with sub-nanowatt static power consumption and full rail-to-rail voltage transfer characteristics. With the introduction of a new n-type Rh-based molecular dopant, the first SWCNT TFTs are fabricated in top-gate geometries over large areas with high yield. Then by utilizing robust encapsulation methods, stable and uniform electronic performance of both p-type and n-type SWCNT TFTs has been achieved. Based on these complementary SWCNT TFTs, it is possible to simulate, design, and fabricate arrays of low-power static random access memory (SRAM) circuits, achieving large-scale integration for the first time based on solution-processed semiconductors. Together, this work provides a direct pathway for solution processable, large scale, power-efficient advanced integrated logic circuits and systems.

  2. Microfluidic device integrated with FBG in Co2+-doped fiber to measure flow rate with nL/s sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengyong; Zhang, A. Ping; Tam, Hwa-Yaw

    2014-05-01

    Microfluidic device with integrated flow rate sensor is demonstrated. Two glass capillaries and a short length of high light-absorption, Co2+-doped fiber were stacked inside another capillary and drawn into a taper, containing two ~40μm diameter microchannels. An FBG was inscribed in the Co2+-doped fiber. 1480 nm light was used to heat the Co2+-doped fiber and its temperature was measured using an FBG-interrogator operating around 1550nm. The flow rate of the liquid inside in the microchannel can be determined by the temperature and cooling rate of the microchannel. Sensitivity of 0.304nm/(μL/s) and minimum detectable flow rate ~16nL/s were demonstrated.

  3. Integrating emerging earth science technologies into disaster risk management: an enterprise architecture approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. D.; Hao, W.; Chettri, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Disaster risk management has grown to rely on earth observations, multi-source data analysis, numerical modeling, and interagency information sharing. The practice and outcomes of disaster risk management will likely undergo further change as several emerging earth science technologies come of age: mobile devices; location-based services; ubiquitous sensors; drones; small satellites; satellite direct readout; Big Data analytics; cloud computing; Web services for predictive modeling, semantic reconciliation, and collaboration; and many others. Integrating these new technologies well requires developing and adapting them to meet current needs; but also rethinking current practice to draw on new capabilities to reach additional objectives. This requires a holistic view of the disaster risk management enterprise and of the analytical or operational capabilities afforded by these technologies. One helpful tool for this assessment, the GEOSS Architecture for the Use of Remote Sensing Products in Disaster Management and Risk Assessment (Evans & Moe, 2013), considers all phases of the disaster risk management lifecycle for a comprehensive set of natural hazard types, and outlines common clusters of activities and their use of information and computation resources. We are using these architectural views, together with insights from current practice, to highlight effective, interrelated roles for emerging earth science technologies in disaster risk management. These roles may be helpful in creating roadmaps for research and development investment at national and international levels.

  4. Contributions to global earth sciences integration. A special issue on the 3rd Young Earth Scientists Congress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cónsole-Gonella, Carlos; Yidana, Sandow Mark

    2016-10-01

    The Young Earth Scientists (YES) Network is an association of early-career geoscientists who are primarily under the age of 35 years from universities, geoscience organizations and companies from across the world (http://www.networkyes.org)

  5. Earth science information: Planning for the integration and use of global change information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lousma, Jack R.

    1992-01-01

    Activities and accomplishments of the first six months of the Consortium for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN's) 1992 technical program have focused on four main missions: (1) the development and implementation of plans for initiation of the Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center (SEDAC) as part of the EOSDIS Program; (2) the pursuit and development of a broad-based global change information cooperative by providing systems analysis and integration between natural science and social science data bases held by numerous federal agencies and other sources; (3) the fostering of scientific research into the human dimensions of global change and providing integration between natural science and social science data and information; and (4) the serving of CIESIN as a gateway for global change data and information distribution through development of the Global Change Research Information Office and other comprehensive knowledge sharing systems.

  6. Spherical-earth gravity and magnetic anomaly modeling by Gauss-Legendre quadrature integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Frese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.; Luca, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Gauss-Legendre quadrature integration is used to calculate the anomalous potential of gravity and magnetic fields and their spatial derivatives on a spherical earth. The procedure involves representation of the anomalous source as a distribution of equivalent point gravity poles or point magnetic dipoles. The distribution of equivalent point sources is determined directly from the volume limits of the anomalous body. The variable limits of integration for an arbitrarily shaped body are obtained from interpolations performed on a set of body points which approximate the body's surface envelope. The versatility of the method is shown by its ability to treat physical property variations within the source volume as well as variable magnetic fields over the source and observation surface. Examples are provided which illustrate the capabilities of the technique, including a preliminary modeling of potential field signatures for the Mississippi embayment crustal structure at 450 km.

  7. Integrating Authentic Earth Science Data in Online Visualization Tools and Social Media Networking to Promote Earth Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, B. L.; Campbell, B.; Chambers, L.; Davis, A.; Riebeek, H.; Ward, K.

    2008-12-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is one of the largest Earth Science research-based institutions in the nation. Along with the research comes a dedicated group of people who are tasked with developing Earth science research-based education and public outreach materials to reach the broadest possible range of audiences. The GSFC Earth science education community makes use of a wide variety of platforms in order to reach their goals of communicating science. These platforms include using social media networking such as Twitter and Facebook, as well as geo-spatial tools such as MY NASA DATA, NASA World Wind, NEO, and Google Earth. Using a wide variety of platforms serves the dual purposes of promoting NASA Earth Science research and making authentic data available to educational communities that otherwise might not otherwise be granted access. Making data available to education communities promotes scientific literacy through the investigation of scientific phenomena using the same data that is used by the scientific community. Data from several NASA missions will be used to demonstrate the ways in which Earth science data are made available for the education community.

  8. Towards a comprehensive model of Earth's disk-integrated Stokes vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Muñoz, A.

    2015-07-01

    A significant body of work on simulating the remote appearance of Earth-like exoplanets has been done over the last decade. The research is driven by the prospect of characterizing habitable planets beyond the Solar System in the near future. In this work, I present a method to produce the disk-integrated signature of planets that are described in their three-dimensional complexity, i.e. with both horizontal and vertical variations in the optical properties of their envelopes. The approach is based on Pre-conditioned Backward Monte Carlo integration of the vector Radiative Transport Equation and yields the full Stokes vector for outgoing reflected radiation. The method is demonstrated through selected examples inspired by published work at wavelengths from the visible to the near infrared and terrestrial prescriptions of both cloud and surface albedo maps. I explore the performance of the method in terms of computational time and accuracy. A clear strength of this approach is that its computational cost does not appear to be significantly affected by non-uniformities in the planet optical properties. Earth's simulated appearance is strongly dependent on wavelength; both brightness and polarization undergo diurnal variations arising from changes in the planet cover, but polarization yields a better insight into variations with phase angle. There is partial cancellation of the polarized signal from the northern and southern hemispheres so that the outgoing polarization vector lies preferentially either in the plane parallel or perpendicular to the planet scattering plane, also for non-uniform cloud and albedo properties and various levels of absorption within the atmosphere. The evaluation of circular polarization is challenging; a number of one-photon experiments of 109 or more is needed to resolve hemispherically integrated degrees of circular polarization of a few times 10-5. Last, I introduce brightness curves of Earth obtained with one of the Messenger cameras

  9. Dynamics of global vegetation biomass simulated by the integrated Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.; Shi, X.; Di Vittorio, A. V.; Thornton, P. E.; Piao, S.; Yang, X.; Truesdale, J. E.; Bond-Lamberty, B. P.; Chini, L. P.; Thomson, A. M.; Hurtt, G. C.; Collins, W.; Edmonds, J.

    2014-12-01

    The global vegetation biomass stores huge amounts of carbon and is thus important to the global carbon budget (Pan et al., 2010). For the past few decades, different observation-based estimates and modeling of biomass in the above- and below-ground vegetation compartments have been comprehensively conducted (Saatchi et al., 2011; Baccini et al., 2012). However, uncertainties still exist, in particular for the simulation of biomass magnitude, tendency, and the response of biomass to climatic conditions and natural and human disturbances. The recently successful coupling of the integrated Earth System Model (iESM) (Di Vittorio et al., 2014; Bond-Lamberty et al., 2014), which links the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), Global Land-use Model (GLM), and Community Earth System Model (CESM), offers a great opportunity to understand the biomass-related dynamics in a fully-coupled natural and human modeling system. In this study, we focus on the systematic analysis and evaluation of the iESM simulated historical (1850-2005) and future (2006-2100) biomass changes and the response of the biomass dynamics to various impact factors, in particular the human-induced Land Use/Land Cover Change (LULCC). By analyzing the iESM simulations with and without the interactive LULCC feedbacks, we further study how and where the climate feedbacks affect socioeconomic decisions and LULCC, such as to alter vegetation carbon storage. References Pan Y et. al: A large and persistent carbon sink in the World's forests. Science 2011, 333:988-993. Saatchi SS et al: Benchmark map of forest carbon stocks in tropical regions across three continents. Proc Natl Acad Sci 2011, 108:9899-9904. Baccini A et al: Estimated carbon dioxide emissions from tropical deforestation improved by carbon-density maps. Nature Clim Change 2012, 2:182-185. Di Vittorio AV et al: From land use to land cover: restoring the afforestation signal in a coupled integrated assessment-earth system model and the implications for

  10. Comparing morphologies of drainage basins on Mars and Earth using integral-geometry and neural maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Coradetti, S.

    2004-01-01

    We compare morphologies of drainage basins on Mars and Earth in order to confine the formation process of Martian valley networks. Basins on both planets are computationally extracted from digital topography. Integral-geometry methods are used to represent each basin by a circularity function that encapsulates its internal structure. The shape of such a function is an indicator of the style of fluvial erosion. We use the self-organizing map technique to construct a similarity graph for all basins. The graph reveals systematic differences between morphologies of basins on the two planets. This dichotomy indicates that terrestrial and Martian surfaces were eroded differently. We argue that morphologies of Martian basins are incompatible with runoff from sustained, homogeneous rainfall. Fluvial environments compatible with observed morphologies are discussed. We also construct a similarity graph based on the comparison of basins hypsometric curves to demonstrate that hypsometry is incapable of discriminating between terrestrial and Martian basins. INDEX TERMS: 1824 Hydrology: Geomorphology (1625); 1886 Hydrology: Weathering (1625); 5415 Planetology: Solid Surface Planets: Erosion and weathering; 6225 Planetology: Solar System Objects Mars. Citation: Stepinski, T. F., and S. Coradetti (2004), Comparing morphologies of drainage basins on Mars and Earth using integral-ge

  11. Scientific Research for Integrated Solutions to Community Challenges: The Thriving Earth Exchange (TEX) Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udu-gama, N.; Pandya, R.

    2015-12-01

    There is tremendous unmet and sometimes unrealized need for Earth and space science (ESS) expertise as part of civic decisions and local planning for climate change, natural hazards and natural resources. The Thriving Earth Exchange (TEX) helps AGU contribute that expertise to humanity in respectful, integrated ways. TEX brings ESS scientists together with local communities tackling issues of climate change, natural hazards and natural resources to co-design solutions that equitably integrate both scientific and community knowledge. To achieve this ambitious goal, TEX is partnering with organizations that are respected by and knowledgeable about communities both in the United States and internationally. Such partnerships include Rockefeller's 100 Resilient Cities Initiative, ICLEI USA, MIT's Climate Colab, among others. TEX works with these partners to approach communities who are ready to or already addressing ESS related issues. With partners, we help the communities define their goals, develop specific projects, and connect with relevant and helpful ESS scientists. We will also show how we help scientists and community leaders work productively together, and the tools we bring to support their innovation. It will highlight international examples, such as in the Pamir Mountains of Afghanistan-Tajikistan, Sri Lanka, and Ethiopia, and provide concrete examples of how these initiatives are helping TEX further expand the frontiers of collaborative research.

  12. Integration of Google Maps/Earth with microscale meteorology models and data visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yansen; Huynh, Giap; Williamson, Chatt

    2013-12-01

    The Google Maps/Earth GIS has been integrated with a microscale meteorological model to improve the system's functionality and ease of use. Almost all the components of the model system, including the terrain data processing, morphological data generation, meteorological data gathering and initialization, and displaying/visualizing the model results, have been improved by using this approach. Different from the traditional stand-along model system, this novel system takes advantages of enormous resources in map and image data retrieving/handling, four-dimensional (space and time) data visualization, overlaying, and many other advanced GIS features that the Google Maps/Earth platform has to offer. We have developed modular components for all of the model system controls and data processing programs which are glued together with the JavaScript language and KML/XML data. We have also developed small modular software using the Google application program interface to convert the model results and intermediate data for visualizations and animations. Capabilities such as high-resolution image, street view, and 3D buildings in the Google Earth/Map are also used to quickly generate small-scale vegetation and building morphology data that are required for the microscale meteorological models. This system has also been applied to visualize the data from other instruments such as Doppler wind lidars. Because of the tight integration of the internet based GIS and a microscale meteorology model, the model system is more versatile, intuitive, and user-friendly than a stand-along system we had developed before. This kind of system will enhance the user experience and also help researchers to explore new phenomena in fine-scale meteorology.

  13. Visible light responsive sulfated rare earth doped TiO(2)@fumed SiO(2) composites with mesoporosity: enhanced photocatalytic activity for methyl orange degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Changchao; Chen, Feng; Yang, Jintao; Dai, Daoxing; Cao, Xiaohua; Zhong, Mingqiang

    2014-02-28

    Visible light (VL) responsive mesoporous sulfated rare earth ions (Nd(3+), La(3+), Y(3+)) incorporated TiO2@fumed SiO2 photocatalysts were prepared by sol-gel method with P123 (EO20PO70EO20) as a template. The resultant samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), N2 adsorption-desorption measurements (BET), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL) spectra, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermal analyses (TG-DTA). In comparison with nondoped sample, RE-doped samples showed not only an increase in the surface areas and pore volumes, but also an inhibition of titania phase transition from anatase to rutile. Photo-degradation results revealed that RE-doped samples could greatly improve the photocatalytic activity, and the experimental degradation rates of methyl orange (MO) were higher than that catalyzed by undoped samples and Degussa P-25, obeyed the order of Nd(3+)>La(3+)>Y(3+). Nd-doped sample expressed the highest photoactivity and the optimal dosage was 0.25mol%, which resulted in MO degradation rates of 99.8% and 90.05% irradiation under UV for 60min and VL (λ>400nm) for 40h, respectively. The enhanced photocatalytic activity could be attributed to the higher specific area, good crystallinity, strong VL absorption and effective separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs in the catalyst.

  14. Effect of Rare-Earth Doping on Free-Volume Nanostructure of Ga-Codoped Glassy (As/Sb)2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpotyuk, Yaroslav

    2017-03-01

    Subsequent stages of atomic-deficient nanostructurization finalizing rare-earth functionality under Pr3+-doping in Ga2(As0.28Sb0.12Se0.60)98 glass are studied employing method of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Genesis of free-volume positron trapping sites, composed of atomic-accessible geometrical holes (void cores) arrested by surrounding atomic-inaccessible Se-based bond-free solid angles (void shells), are disclosed for parent As2Se3, Ga-codoped Ga2(As0.40Se0.60)98, as well as Ga-codoped and Sb-modified Ga2(As0.28Sb0.12Se0.60)98 glasses. The finalizing nanostructurization due to Pr3+-doping (500 wppm) in glassy Ga2(As0.28Sb0.12Se0.60)98 is explained in terms of competitive contribution of changed occupancy sites available for both rare-earth ions and positrons.

  15. Department of Energy's Virtual Lab Infrastructure for Integrated Earth System Science Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D. N.; Palanisamy, G.; Shipman, G.; Boden, T.; Voyles, J.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) produces a diversity of data, information, software, and model codes across its research and informatics programs and facilities. This information includes raw and reduced observational and instrumentation data, model codes, model-generated results, and integrated data products. Currently, most of this data and information are prepared and shared for program specific activities, corresponding to CESD organization research. A major challenge facing BER CESD is how best to inventory, integrate, and deliver these vast and diverse resources for the purpose of accelerating Earth system science research. This talk provides a concept for a CESD Integrated Data Ecosystem and an initial roadmap for its implementation to address this integration challenge in the "Big Data" domain. Towards this end, a new BER Virtual Laboratory Infrastructure will be presented, which will include services and software connecting the heterogeneous CESD data holdings, and constructed with open source software based on industry standards, protocols, and state-of-the-art technology.

  16. The EPOS e-Infrastructure: Integrating Solid Earth Science in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trani, L.; Bailo, D.; Jeffery, K. G.

    2014-12-01

    The European Plate Observing System (EPOS) is an ambitious long term integration plan addressing the major solid-earth research infrastructures in Europe. For its large scale and extent it is a unique initiative which will foster new scientific discoveries and enable scientists to investigate the solid earth system in unprecedented ways. A key aspect of EPOS is to provide end-users with homogeneous access to services and multidisciplinary data collected by monitoring infrastructures and experimental facilities as well as access to processing and visualization tools. Such a complex system requires a solid, scalable and reliable architecture in order to accommodate innovative features and to meet the evolving expectations of the heterogeneous communities involved. Within the FP7 EU project EPOS PP1 (Preparatory Phase), which is approaching its completion in October 2014, the goal of the infrastructure and virtual community working group (WG7) was to design and test a preliminary architecture. The EPOS e-infrastructure architecture has been systematically developed based on collected primary (user) and secondary (interoperation with other systems) requirements and through three distinct design refinement phases (Strawman, Woodman and Ironman). The EPOS architecture is constituted of Integrated Core Services (ICS), which provide access to thematic (domain-specific) services (Thematic Core Services - TCS) integrating national research infrastructures. The key component of the architecture is the metadata catalogue, which utilizes the CERIF2(Common European Research Information Format) standard. The metadata catalogue is conceived to effectively capture all the information needed and to make large (re-)use of existing domain specific standards. In this contribution we will present the lessons learned and the technical achievements of the EPOS Preparatory Phase. 1www.epos-eu.org 2www.eurocris.org

  17. Luminescence quenching versus enhancement in WO3-NaPO3 glasses doped with trivalent rare earth ions and containing silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dousti, M. Reza; Poirier, Gael Y.; Amjad, Raja J.; de Camargo, Andrea S. S.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the influence of silver nanoparticles (NPs) on the luminescence behavior of trivalent rare earth (RE) ion doped tungsten-phosphate glasses. In order to induce the growth of NPs, the as-prepared glass samples containing silver atoms, are exposed to heat-treatment above the glass transition temperature. The surface plasmon resonance band of the Ag NPs is observed in the visible range around 420 and 537 nm in the glasses with low and high tungsten content, respectively. Such difference in spectral shift of the plasmon band is attributed to the difference in the refractive index of the two studied glass compositions. Heat-treatment results in the general increase in number of NPs, while in the case of glasses with low tungsten content, it also imposes a shift to the Ag plasmon band. The NPs size distribution (4-10 nm) was determined in good agreement with the values obtained by using Mie theory and by transmission electron microscopy. The observed quenching in the visible luminescence of glasses doped with Eu3+, Tb3+ or Er3+is attributed to energy transfer from the RE ions to Ag species, while an enhanced near-infrared emission in Er3+ doped glasses is discussed in terms of the chemical contribution of silver, rather than the most commonly claimed enhancement of localized field or energy transfer from silver species to Er3+. The results are supported by the lifetime measurements. We believe that this study gives further insight and in-depth exploration of the somewhat controversial discussions on the influence of metallic NPs plasmonic effects in RE-doped glasses.

  18. Hydrogels dispersed by doped rare earth fluoride nanocrystals: ionic liquid dispersion and down/up-conversion luminescence.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhi-Yuan; Jia, Li-Ping; Yan, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Two typical kinds of rare earth fluoride nanocrystals codoped with rare earth ions (Eu(3+) and Tm(3+)/Er(3+),Yb(3+)) are synthesized and dispersed in ionic liquid compound (1-chlorohexane-3-methylimidazolium chloride, abbreviated as [C6mim][Cl]). Assisted by agarose, the luminescent hydrogels are prepared homogeneously. The down/up-conversion luminescence of these hydrogels can be realized for the dispersed rare earth fluoride nanocrystals. The results provide a strategy to prepare luminescent (especially up-conversion luminescent) hydrogels with ionic liquid to disperse rare earth fluoride nanocrystals.

  19. Self-Guided Field Explorations: Integrating Earth Science into Students' Lives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby, K. C.; Kirkby, S.

    2013-12-01

    Self-guided field explorations are a simple way to transform an earth science class into a more pedagogically effective experience. Previous experience demonstrated that self-guided student explorations of museum and aquarium exhibits were both extremely popular and remarkably effective. That success led our program to test an expansion of the concept to include self-guided student explorations in outdoor field settings. Preliminary assessment indicates these self-guided field explorations are nearly as popular with students as the museum and aquarium explorations and are as pedagogically effective. Student gains on post-instruction assessment match or exceed those seen in instructor-assisted, hands-on, small group laboratory activities and completely eclipse gains achieved by traditional lecture instruction. As importantly, self-guided field explorations provide a way to integrate field experiences into large enrollment courses where the sheer scale of class trips makes them logistically impossible. This expands course breadth, integrating new topics that could not be as effectively covered by the original class structure. Our introductory program assessed two models of self-guided field explorations. A walking/cycling exploration of the Saint Anthony Falls area, a mile from campus, focuses on the intersections of geological processes with human history. Students explore the geology behind the waterfalls' evolution as well as its subsequent social and economic impacts on human history. A second exploration focuses on the campus area geology, including its building stones as well as its landscape evolution. In both explorations, the goal was to integrate geology with the students' broader understanding of the world they live in. Although the explorations' creation requires a significant commitment, once developed, self-guided explorations are surprisingly low maintenance. These explorations provide a model of a simple, highly effective pedagogical tool that is

  20. Integration of external metadata into the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Katharina; Levavasseur, Guillaume; Stockhause, Martina; Lautenschlager, Michael

    2015-04-01

    International projects with high volume data usually disseminate their data in a federated data infrastructure, e.g.~the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF). The ESGF aims to make the geographically distributed data seamlessly discoverable and accessible. Additional data-related information is currently collected and stored in separate repositories by each data provider. This scattered and useful information is not or only partly available for ESGF users. Examples for such additional information systems are ES-DOC/metafor for model and simulation information, IPSL's versioning information, CHARMe for user annotations, DKRZ's quality information and data citation information. The ESGF Quality Control working team (esgf-qcwt) aims to integrate these valuable pieces of additional information into the ESGF in order to make them available to users and data archive managers by (i) integrating external information into ESGF portal, (ii) integrating links to external information objects into the ESGF metadata index, e.g. by the use of PIDs (Persistent IDentifiers), and (iii) automating the collection of external information during the ESGF data publication process. For the sixth phase of CMIP (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project), the ESGF metadata index is to be enriched by additional information on data citation, file version, etc. This information will support users directly and can be automatically exploited by higher level services (human and machine readability).

  1. Effect of knowledge integration activities on students' perception of the earth's crust as a cyclic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kali, Yael; Orion, Nir; Eylon, Bat-Sheva

    2003-08-01

    Systems thinking is regarded as a high-order thinking skill required in scientific, technological, and everyday domains. However, little is known about systems thinking in the context of science education. In the current research, students' understanding of the rock cycle system after a learning program was characterized, and the effect of a concluding knowledge integration activity on their systems thinking was studied. Answers to an open-ended test were interpreted using a systems thinking continuum, ranging from a completely static view of the system to an understanding of the system's cyclic nature. A meaningful improvement in students' views of the rock cycle toward the higher side of the systems thinking continuum was found after the knowledge integration activity. Students became more aware of the dynamic and cyclic nature of the rock cycle, and their ability to construct sequences of processes representing material transformation in relatively large chunks significantly improved. Success of the knowledge integration activity stresses the importance of postknowledge acquisition activities, which engage students in a dual process of differentiation of their knowledge and reintegration in a systems context. We suggest including such activities in curricula involving systems-based contents, particularly in earth science, in which systems thinking can bring about environmental literacy.

  2. Release of AGAP Aerogeophysical Data through the Integrated Earth Data Applications Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'hara, S. H.; Abdi, A.; Bonczkowski, J.; Bell, R. E.; Frearson, N.; Ferraccioli, F.; Corr, H.; Jordan, T. A.; Rose, K. C.; Studinger, M.; Gogineni, P. S.; Braaten, D. A.; Damaske, D.

    2011-12-01

    During the International Polar Year 2007 - 2009, scientists from six nations collaborated on a multi-disciplinary investigation of the Gamburtsevs, the least explored mountain range on Earth buried beneath the East Antarctic Ice Sheet, as part of the Antarctic Gamburtsev Province (AGAP) project. The AGAP project collected more than 120,000 line km of new aerogeophysical data using two Twin Otter aircraft. Data included ice penetrating radar, magnetometer, gravimeter and laser altimeter measurements. The main AGAP survey grid included north-south lines spaced 5 km apart, with crossing lines every 33 km and transects over the Vostok Subglacial Highlands, South Pole and southern Recovery lakes region. 150-MHz ice penetrating radars with bandwidths of 15 to 20 MHz measured ice thickness, bedrock topography, sub-ice hydrology, and produced high-resolution images of the internal structure of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. Magnetic data map geologic structures across the mountain range, while gravity data provide new insights into the tectonic evolution and crustal thickness of the region. A swath-scanning laser altimeter with a spatial resolution of 2 meters measured elevation and details of the ice surface. Complete AGAP datasets are now in the process of becoming publicly available and freely accessible through the Java-based data visualization tool GeoMapApp (http://www.geomapapp.org), and the Antarctic & Southern Ocean Data Portal (http://www.marine-geo.org/tools/search/entry.php?id=AGAP_GAMBIT), both part of the Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA) Data Facility (http://www.iedadata.org) based at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. AGAP data will also be accessible through the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Polar Data Center, based at the British Antarctic Survey (http://www.antarctica.ac.uk/bas_research/data/index.php) and at the Center for the Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (https://www.cresis.ku.edu/research/gambit).

  3. Integrating Earth System Science Data Into Tribal College and University Curricula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilgner, P. J.; Perkey, D. J.

    2007-12-01

    , surface energy budgets, climate and climate change, impacts, etc. GIS and remote sensing training has focused on importing, converting and displaying data sets related to drought and fires. The Integrated Science courses at SGU, designed primarily for pre-service elementary teachers, have incorporated physical science concepts and teaching approaches presented at the TRESTE annual workshops. The content of the courses follows the PBL teaching approach and is organized around a relevant, local problem such as prairie dog control and prairie management. Concepts from Earth, life and physical sciences are included in the course design. The fall course is introduced using recent news articles on legislation to control prairie dogs. After expressing their ideas based solely on experience and emotion, students determine what knowledge they will need to write an informed opinion on the issue. One of the instructional units for the course includes instruction and practice in interpreting satellite images of the local reservation to determine impact of prairie dog towns on vegetation. Students also conduct soil studies in the disturbed areas and nearby undisturbed areas. Data is gathered on soil chemistry, soil temperatures, and surface temperatures, measured with an infrared sensor provided by the TRESTE grant. Additional topics covered in the course that contain information from the annual workshops, include prairie fires, climate and climate change, and effects of the drought on local bodies of water.

  4. Documenting the NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center Oblate Earth Simulation Equations of Motion and Integration Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, R.; Lintereur, L.; Bahm, C.

    2016-01-01

    A desire for more complete documentation of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC), Edwards, California legacy code used in the core simulation has led to this e ort to fully document the oblate Earth six-degree-of-freedom equations of motion and integration algorithm. The authors of this report have taken much of the earlier work of the simulation engineering group and used it as a jumping-o point for this report. The largest addition this report makes is that each element of the equations of motion is traced back to first principles and at no point is the reader forced to take an equation on faith alone. There are no discoveries of previously unknown principles contained in this report; this report is a collection and presentation of textbook principles. The value of this report is that those textbook principles are herein documented in standard nomenclature that matches the form of the computer code DERIVC. Previous handwritten notes are much of the backbone of this work, however, in almost every area, derivations are explicitly shown to assure the reader that the equations which make up the oblate Earth version of the computer routine, DERIVC, are correct.

  5. CIM-EARTH: Community integrated model of economic and resource trajectories for humankind.

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, J.; Foster, I.; Judd, K.; Moyer, E.; Munson, T.; Univ. of Chicago; Hoover Inst.

    2010-01-01

    Climate change is a global problem with local climatic and economic impacts. Mitigation policies can be applied on large geographic scales, such as a carbon cap-and-trade program for the entire U.S., on medium geographic scales, such as the NOx program for the northeastern U.S., or on smaller scales, such as statewide renewable portfolio standards and local gasoline taxes. To enable study of the environmental benefits, transition costs, capitalization effects, and other consequences of mitigation policies, we are developing dynamic general equilibrium models capable of incorporating important climate impacts. This report describes the economic framework we have developed and the current Community Integrated Model of Economic and Resource Trajectories for Humankind (CIM-EARTH) instance.

  6. Spherical-earth Gravity and Magnetic Anomaly Modeling by Gauss-legendre Quadrature Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.; Luca, A. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The anomalous potential of gravity and magnetic fields and their spatial derivatives on a spherical Earth for an arbitrary body represented by an equivalent point source distribution of gravity poles or magnetic dipoles were calculated. The distribution of equivalent point sources was determined directly from the coordinate limits of the source volume. Variable integration limits for an arbitrarily shaped body are derived from interpolation of points which approximate the body's surface envelope. The versatility of the method is enhanced by the ability to treat physical property variations within the source volume and to consider variable magnetic fields over the source and observation surface. A number of examples verify and illustrate the capabilities of the technique, including preliminary modeling of potential field signatures for Mississippi embayment crustal structure at satellite elevations.

  7. Dual function of rare earth doped nano Bi2O3: white light emission and photocatalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Dimple P; Roy, Mainak; Tyagi, A K

    2012-09-14

    Undoped Bi(2)O(3) and single and double doped Bi(2)O(3) : M (where M = Tb(3+) and Eu(3+)) nanophosphors were synthesized through a simple sonochemical process and characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), EDS, diffuse reflectance (DRS) and photoluminescence (PL) spectrophotometry. The TEM micrographs show that resultant nanoparticles have a rod-like shape. Energy transfer was observed from host to the dopant ions. Characteristic green emissions from Tb(3+) ions and red emissions from Eu(3+) ions were observed. Interestingly, the Commission International de l'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of the double doped Bi(2)O(3) : Eu(3+)(0.8%) : Tb(3+)(1.2%) nanorods lie in the white light region of the chromaticity diagram and it has a quantum efficiency of 51%. The undoped Bi(2)O(3) showed a band gap of 3.98 eV which is red shifted to 3.81eV in the case of double doped Bi(2)O(3) : Eu(3+)(0.8%) : Tb(3+)(1.2%) nanorods. The photocatalytic activities of undoped nano Bi(2)O(3) and double doped nano Bi(2)O(3) : Eu(3+)(0.8%) : Tb(3+)(1.2%) were evaluated for the degradation of Rhodamine B under UV irradiation of 310 nm. The results showed that Bi(2)O(3) : Eu(3+)(0.8%) : Tb(3+)(1.2%) had better photocatalytic activity compared to undoped nano Bi(2)O(3). The evolution of CO(2) was realized and these results indicated the continuous mineralization of rhodamine B during the photocatalytic process. Thus double doped Bi(2)O(3) : Eu(3+)(0.8%) : Tb(3+)(1.2%) nanorods can be termed as a bifunctional material exhibiting both photocatalytic properties and white light emission.

  8. Defect Clustering and Nano-Phase Structure Characterization of Multi-Component Rare Earth Oxide Doped Zirconia-Yttria Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Chen, Yuan L.; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Advanced oxide thermal barrier coatings have been developed by incorporating multi-component rare earth oxide dopants into zirconia-yttria to effectively promote the creation of the thermodynamically stable, immobile oxide defect clusters and/or nano-scale phases within the coating systems. The presence of these nano-sized defect clusters has found to significantly reduce the coating intrinsic thermal conductivity, improve sintering resistance, and maintain long-term high temperature stability. In this paper, the defect clusters and nano-structured phases, which were created by the addition of multi-component rare earth dopants to the plasma-sprayed and electron-beam physical vapor deposited thermal barrier coatings, were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The defect cluster size, distribution, crystallographic and compositional information were investigated using high-resolution TEM lattice imaging, selected area diffraction (SAD), electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis techniques. The results showed that substantial defect clusters were formed in the advanced multi-component rare earth oxide doped zirconia- yttria systems. The size of the oxide defect clusters and the cluster dopant segregation was typically ranging from 5 to 50 nm. These multi-component dopant induced defect clusters are an important factor for the coating long-term high temperature stability and excellent performance.

  9. Defect Clustering and Nano-Phase Structure Characterization of Multi-Component Rare Earth Oxide Doped Zirconia-Yttria Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Chen, Yuan L.; Miller, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    Advanced oxide thermal barrier coatings have been developed by incorporating multi- component rare earth oxide dopants into zirconia-yttria to effectively promote the creation of the thermodynamically stable, immobile oxide defect clusters and/or nano-scale phases within the coating systems. The presence of these nano-sized defect clusters has found to significantly reduce the coating intrinsic thermal conductivity, improve sintering resistance, and maintain long-term high temperature stability. In this paper, the defect clusters and nano-structured phases, which were created by the addition of multi-component rare earth dopants to the plasma- sprayed and electron-beam physical vapor deposited thermal barrier coatings, were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The defect cluster size, distribution, crystallographic and compositional information were investigated using high-resolution TEM lattice imaging, selected area diffraction (SAD), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis techniques. The results showed that substantial defect clusters were formed in the advanced multi-component rare earth oxide doped zirconia-yttria systems. The size of the oxide defect clusters and the cluster dopant segregation was typically ranging fiom 5 to 50 nm. These multi-component dopant induced defect clusters are an important factor for the coating long-term high temperature stability and excellent performance.

  10. DECADE web portal: toward the integration of MaGa, EarthChem and VOTW data systems to further the knowledge on Earth degassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardellini, Carlo; Frigeri, Alessandro; Lehnert, Kerstin; Ash, Jason; McCormick, Brendan; Chiodini, Giovanni; Fischer, Tobias; Cottrell, Elizabeth

    2015-04-01

    The release of volatiles from the Earth's interior takes place in both volcanic and non-volcanic areas of the planet. The comprehension of such complex process and the improvement of the current estimates of global carbon emissions, will greatly benefit from the integration of geochemical, petrological and volcanological data. At present, major online data repositories relevant to studies of degassing are not linked and interoperable. In the framework of the Deep Earth Carbon Degassing (DECADE) initiative of the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO), we are developing interoperability between three data systems that will make their data accessible via the DECADE portal: (1) the Smithsonian Institutionian's Global Volcanism Program database (VOTW) of volcanic activity data, (2) EarthChem databases for geochemical and geochronological data of rocks and melt inclusions, and (3) the MaGa database (Mapping Gas emissions) which contains compositional and flux data of gases released at volcanic and non-volcanic degassing sites. The DECADE web portal will create a powerful search engine of these databases from a single entry point and will return comprehensive multi-component datasets. A user will be able, for example, to obtain data relating to compositions of emitted gases, compositions and age of the erupted products and coincident activity, of a specific volcano. This level of capability requires a complete synergy between the databases, including availability of standard-based web services (WMS, WFS) at all data systems. Data and metadata can thus be extracted from each system without interfering with each database's local schema or being replicated to achieve integration at the DECADE web portal. The DECADE portal will enable new synoptic perspectives on the Earth degassing process allowing to explore Earth degassing related datasets over previously unexplored spatial or temporal ranges.

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of Alkaline-Earth Metal (Ca, Sr, and Ba) Doped Nanodimensional LaMnO3 Rare-Earth Manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asma, Khalid; Saadat, Anwar Siddiqi; Affia, Aslam

    2013-07-01

    The substitution of divalent cations of alkaline-earth elements in nanodimensional structures of rare-earth manganites produces advanced materials with potential electrical and magnetic functionalities. A systematic investigation of La0.65A0.35MnO3 (A = Ca, Sr, Ba) materials synthesized with a modified citrate route adopting ethanol dehydration has been undertaken. The structural and morphological analyses are carried out by using x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Resistivity measurements are performed in variation with temperature to study the electrical transport properties which are found to vary with the size of the A-site cationic radius. Room temperature magnetic measurements are carried out to investigate the type of magnetic phase present in materials. The stability of the magnetic phase and coercivity are found to be dependent on the size of nanocrystallites.

  12. Integrated earth system dynamic modeling for life cycle impact assessment of ecosystem services.

    PubMed

    Arbault, Damien; Rivière, Mylène; Rugani, Benedetto; Benetto, Enrico; Tiruta-Barna, Ligia

    2014-02-15

    Despite the increasing awareness of our dependence on Ecosystem Services (ES), Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) does not explicitly and fully assess the damages caused by human activities on ES generation. Recent improvements in LCIA focus on specific cause-effect chains, mainly related to land use changes, leading to Characterization Factors (CFs) at the midpoint assessment level. However, despite the complexity and temporal dynamics of ES, current LCIA approaches consider the environmental mechanisms underneath ES to be independent from each other and devoid of dynamic character, leading to constant CFs whose representativeness is debatable. This paper takes a step forward and is aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of using an integrated earth system dynamic modeling perspective to retrieve time- and scenario-dependent CFs that consider the complex interlinkages between natural processes delivering ES. The GUMBO (Global Unified Metamodel of the Biosphere) model is used to quantify changes in ES production in physical terms - leading to midpoint CFs - and changes in human welfare indicators, which are considered here as endpoint CFs. The interpretation of the obtained results highlights the key methodological challenges to be solved to consider this approach as a robust alternative to the mainstream rationale currently adopted in LCIA. Further research should focus on increasing the granularity of environmental interventions in the modeling tools to match current standards in LCA and on adapting the conceptual approach to a spatially-explicit integrated model.

  13. A comprehensive view on climate change: coupling of earth system and integrated assessment models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Vuuren, Detlef P.; Batlle Bayer, Laura; Chuwah, Clifford; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Hazeleger, Wilco; van den Hurk, Bart; van Noije, Twan; O'Neill, Brian; Strengers, Bart J.

    2012-06-01

    There are several reasons to strengthen the cooperation between the integrated assessment (IA) and earth system (ES) modeling teams in order to better understand the joint development of environmental and human systems. This cooperation can take many different forms, ranging from information exchange between research communities to fully coupled modeling approaches. Here, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches and try to establish some guidelines for their applicability, based mainly on the type of interaction between the model components (including the role of feedback), possibilities for simplification and the importance of uncertainty. We also discuss several important areas of joint IA-ES research, such as land use/land cover dynamics and the interaction between climate change and air pollution, and indicate the type of collaboration that seems to be most appropriate in each case. We find that full coupling of IA-ES models might not always be the most desirable form of cooperation, since in some cases the direct feedbacks between IA and ES may be too weak or subject to considerable process or scenario uncertainty. However, when local processes are important, it could be important to consider full integration. By encouraging cooperation between the IA and ES communities in the future more consistent insights can be developed.

  14. Microemulsion synthesis of nanosized TiO(2) particles doping with rare-earth and their photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Jian, Zicong; Pu, Yuying; Fang, Jianzhang; Ye, Zhiping

    2010-01-01

    Microemulsion is the easiest and cleanest of the popular methods of synthesizing nanomaterial. This work synthesized the nanosized La-TiO(2) and Ce-TiO(2) particles through the hydrolyzation of tetrabutyl titanate in a Triton X-100/n-hexanol/cyclohexane/water reverse microemulsion. The particles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermogravimetry (TG). The photocatalytic activity was evaluated by photocatalytic degradation of methyl orange (MO) under ultraviolet light and visible light irradiation. The results showed that reverse microemulsion produced the nanosized and well-separated particles, which are obviously in degrading MO. Comparing the pure TiO(2) with doping TiO(2) , the doping ones are smaller and have better photocatalytic activity, which was best at the molar content of 0.1% for La, whereas for Ce it was 0.5%.

  15. Silver doping of silica-hafnia waveguides containing Tb3+/Yb3+ rare earths for downconversion in PV solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enrichi, F.; Armellini, C.; Battaglin, G.; Belluomo, F.; Belmokhtar, S.; Bouajaj, A.; Cattaruzza, E.; Ferrari, M.; Gonella, F.; Lukowiak, A.; Mardegan, M.; Polizzi, S.; Pontoglio, E.; Righini, G. C.; Sada, C.; Trave, E.; Zur, L.

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the possibility to obtain an efficient downconverting waveguide which combines the quantum cutting properties of Tb3+/Yb3+ codoped materials with the optical sensitizing effects provided by silver doping. The preparation of 70SiO2-30HfO2 glass and glass-ceramic waveguides by sol-gel route, followed by Ag doping by immersion in molten salt bath is reported. The films were subsequently annealed in air to induce the migration and/or aggregation of the metal ions. Results of compositional and optical characterization are given, providing evidence for the successful introduction of Ag in the films, while the photoluminescence emission is strongly dependent on the annealing conditions. These films could find potential applications as downshifting layers to increase the efficiency of PV solar cells.

  16. Application of doped rare-earth oxide TiO2:(Tm3+, Yb3+) in dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Guixiang; Wei, Yuelin; Fan, Leqing; Wu, Jihuai

    2012-01-01

    Tm3+ and Yb3+ are codoped into TiO2 film in a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). The emission and excitation spectra of TiO2:(Tm3+, Yb3+) power shows that the rare-earth ions possess up-conversion luminescence function, which results in harvesting more incident light and increasing photocurrent for the DSSC. On the other hand, owing to the p-type doping effect by Tm3+ and Yb3+, the photovoltage of the DSSC is enhanced. Under a simulated solar light irradiation of 100 mW·cm-2, a DSSC containing Tm3+/Yb3+ achieves a conversion efficiency of 7.05 %, which is increased by 10.0% compared with a DSSC lacking Tm3+/Yb3+.

  17. Time-integrated photoluminescence and pump-probe reflection spectroscopy of Si doped InN thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanta, Antaryami; Jang, Der-Jun Wang, Ming-Sung; Tu, L. W.

    2014-01-28

    Temperature and excitation power dependent time-integrated photoluminescence of Si doped InN thin films are investigated. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra at low temperatures are described by single emission peak ensued due to “free-to-bound” recombination; whereas PL spectra at higher temperatures above 150 K are characterized by both “band-to-band” and “free-to-bound” transition. Carrier dynamics of Si doped InN thin films is studied using pump-probe reflection spectroscopy at room temperature. The hot electron cooling process is well described by electron-electron scattering. The dependence of the hot electron cooling rate on total electron density shows sublinear to linear behavior with increase of background electron density. The variation of the carrier recombination lifetime with total electron density implicates the dominance of the defect-related nonradiative recombination channel over other recombination processes.

  18. Photoluminescence of rare earth3+ doped uniaxially aligned HfO2 nanotubes prepared by sputtering with electrospun polyvinylpyrolidone nanofibers as templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L. X.; Ma, Z. W.; Xie, Y. Z.; Su, Y. R.; Zhao, H. T.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, J. Y.; Li, J.; Xie, E. Q.

    2010-01-01

    Rare earth (RE) ions (Eu3+,Tb3+) doped uniaxially aligned HfO2 nanotubes were prepared by radio frequency sputtering with electrospun polyvinylpyrolidone (PVP) nanofiber templates. The as-sputtered samples were annealed at different temperatures (500-1000 °C) in O2 ambient in order to remove their PVP cores and make the HfO2 shells well crystallized. Morphologies and crystal configuration of the samples were investigated by optical microscope, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. The nanotubes have uniform intact structure with an average diameter of 200 nm and a wall thickness of about 25 nm. Photoluminescence (PL) properties of the RE doped nanotubes have been studied in detail. The emission peaks of the aligned HfO2:Eu and HfO2:Tb nanotubes could correspond to the D50→F7J (J =0-2) transitions of Eu3+ and the D54→F7J (J =3-6) transitions of Tb3+, respectively. The PL intensities of the HfO2:RE3+ nanotubes were higher by several orders of magnitude than that of the films. This enhancement in the PL could be ascribed to the high density of surface states of HfO2:RE3+ nanotubes.

  19. Efficient Dual-Modal NIR-to-NIR Emission of Rare Earth Ions Co-doped Nanocrystals for Biological Fluorescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiajia; Shirahata, Naoto; Sun, Hong-Tao; Ghosh, Batu; Ogawara, Makoto; Teng, Yu; Zhou, Shifeng; Sa Chu, Rong Gui; Fujii, Minoru; Qiu, Jianrong

    2013-02-07

    A novel approach has been developed for the realization of efficient near-infrared to near-infrared (NIR-to-NIR) upconversion and down-shifting emission in nanophosphors. The efficient dual-modal NIR-to-NIR emission is realized in a β-NaGdF4/Nd(3+)@NaGdF4/Tm(3+)-Yb(3+) core-shell nanocrystal by careful control of the identity and concentration of the doped rare earth (RE) ion species and by manipulation of the spatial distributions of these RE ions. The photoluminescence results reveal that the emission efficiency increases at least 2-fold when comparing the materials synthesized in this study with those synthesized through traditional approaches. Hence, these core-shell structured nanocrystals with novel excitation and emission behaviors enable us to obtain tissue fluorescence imaging by detecting the upconverted and down-shifted photoluminescence from Tm(3+) and Nd(3+) ions, respectively. The reported approach thus provides a new route for the realization of high-yield emission from RE ion doped nanocrystals, which could prove to be useful for the design of optical materials containing other optically active centers.

  20. RIMS: An Integrated Mapping and Analysis System with Applications to Earth Sciences and Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proussevitch, A. A.; Glidden, S.; Shiklomanov, A. I.; Lammers, R. B.

    2011-12-01

    A web-based information and computational system for analysis of spatially distributed Earth system, climate, and hydrologic data have been developed. The System allows visualization, data exploration, querying, manipulation and arbitrary calculations with any loaded gridded or vector polygon dataset. The system's acronym, RIMS, stands for its core functionality as a Rapid Integrated Mapping System. The system can be deployed for a Global scale projects as well as for regional hydrology and climatology studies. In particular, the Water Systems Analysis Group of the University of New Hampshire developed the global and regional (Northern Eurasia, pan-Arctic) versions of the system with different map projections and specific data. The system has demonstrated its potential for applications in other fields of Earth sciences and education. The key Web server/client components of the framework include (a) a visualization engine built on Open Source libraries (GDAL, PROJ.4, etc.) that are utilized in a MapServer; (b) multi-level data querying tools built on XML server-client communication protocols that allow downloading map data on-the-fly to a client web browser; and (c) data manipulation and grid cell level calculation tools that mimic desktop GIS software functionality via a web interface. Server side data management of the system is designed around a simple database of dataset metadata facilitating mounting of new data to the system and maintaining existing data in an easy manner. RIMS contains "built-in" river network data that allows for query of upstream areas on-demand which can be used for spatial data aggregation and analysis of sub-basin areas. RIMS is an ongoing effort and currently being used to serve a number of websites hosting a suite of hydrologic, environmental and other GIS data.

  1. Integration of Earth Remote Sensing into the NOAA/NWS Damage Assessment Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molthan, A.; Burks, J. E.; Camp, P.; McGrath, K.; Bell, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Following the occurrence of severe weather, NOAA/NWS meteorologists are tasked with performing a storm damage survey to assess the type and severity of the weather event, primarily focused with the confirmation and assessment of tornadoes. This labor-intensive process requires meteorologists to venture into the affected area, acquire damage indicators through photos, eyewitness accounts, and other documentation, then aggregation of data in order to make a final determination of the tornado path length, width, maximum intensity, and other characteristics. Earth remote sensing from operational, polar-orbiting satellites can support the damage assessment process by helping to identify portions of damage tracks that are difficult to access due to road limitations or time constraints by applying change detection techniques. In addition, higher resolution commercial imagery can corroborate ground-based surveys by examining higher-resolution commercial imagery. As part of an ongoing collaboration, NASA and NOAA are working to integrate near real-time Earth remote sensing observations into the NOAA/NWS Damage Assessment Toolkit (DAT), a suite of applications used by meteorologists in the survey process. The DAT includes a handheld application used by meteorologists in the survey process. The team has recently developed a more streamlined approach for delivering data via a web mapping service and menu interface, allowing for caching of imagery before field deployment. Near real-time products have been developed using MODIS and VIIRS imagery and change detection for preliminary track identification, along with conduits for higher-resolution Landsat, ASTER, and commercial imagery as they become available. In addition to tornado damage assessments, the team is also investigating the use of near real-time imagery for identifying hail damage to vegetation, which also results in large swaths of damage, particularly in the central United States during the peak growing season

  2. Integration and Exposure of Large Scale Computational Resources Across the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, D.; Maxwell, T. P.; Doutriaux, C.; Williams, D. N.; Chaudhary, A.; Ames, S.

    2015-12-01

    As the size of remote sensing observations and model output data grows, the volume of the data has become overwhelming, even to many scientific experts. As societies are forced to better understand, mitigate, and adapt to climate changes, the combination of Earth observation data and global climate model projects is crucial to not only scientists but to policy makers, downstream applications, and even the public. Scientific progress on understanding climate is critically dependent on the availability of a reliable infrastructure that promotes data access, management, and provenance. The Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) has created such an environment for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). ESGF provides a federated global cyber infrastructure for data access and management of model outputs generated for the IPCC Assessment Reports (AR). The current generation of the ESGF federated grid allows consumers of the data to find and download data with limited capabilities for server-side processing. Since the amount of data for future AR is expected to grow dramatically, ESGF is working on integrating server-side analytics throughout the federation. The ESGF Compute Working Team (CWT) has created a Web Processing Service (WPS) Application Programming Interface (API) to enable access scalable computational resources. The API is the exposure point to high performance computing resources across the federation. Specifically, the API allows users to execute simple operations, such as maximum, minimum, average, and anomalies, on ESGF data without having to download the data. These operations are executed at the ESGF data node site with access to large amounts of parallel computing capabilities. This presentation will highlight the WPS API, its capabilities, provide implementation details, and discuss future developments.

  3. CIM-EARTH: Community Integrated Model of Economic and Resource Trajectories for Humankind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, I.; Elliott, J.; Munson, T.; Judd, K.; Moyer, E. J.; Sanstad, A. H.

    2010-12-01

    We report here on the development of an open source software framework termed CIM-EARTH that is intended to aid decision-making in climate and energy policy. Numerical modeling in support of evaluating policies to address climate change is difficult not only because of inherent uncertainties but because of the differences in scale and modeling approach required for various subcomponents of the system. Economic and climate models are structured quite differently, and while climate forcing can be assumed to be roughly global, climate impacts and the human response to them occur on small spatial scales. Mitigation policies likewise can be applied on scales ranging from the better part of a continent (e.g. a carbon cap-and-trade program for the entire U.S.) to a few hundred km (e.g. statewide renewable portfolio standards and local gasoline taxes). Both spatial and time resolution requirements can be challenging for global economic models. CIM-EARTH is a modular framework based around dynamic general equilibrium models. It is designed as a community tool that will enable study of the environmental benefits, transition costs, capitalization effects, and other consequences of both mitigation policies and unchecked climate change. Modularity enables both integration of highly resolved component sub-models for energy and other key systems and also user-directed choice of tradeoffs between e.g. spatial, sectoral, and time resolution. This poster describes the framework architecture, the current realized version, and plans for future releases. As with other open-source models familiar to the climate community (e.g. CCSM), deliverables will be made publicly available on a regular schedule, and community input is solicited for development of new features and modules.

  4. Integration of Earth Remote Sensing into the NOAA/NWS Damage Assessment Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew; Burks, Jason; Camp, Parks; McGrath, Kevin; Bell, Jordan

    2014-01-01

    Following the occurrence of severe weather, NOAA/NWS meteorologists are tasked with performing a storm damage survey to assess the type and severity of the weather event, primarily focused with the confirmation and assessment of tornadoes. This labor-intensive process requires meteorologists to venture into the affected area, acquire damage indicators through photos, eyewitness accounts, and other documentation, then aggregation of data in order to make a final determination of the tornado path length, width, maximum intensity, and other characteristics. Earth remote sensing from operational, polar-orbiting satellites can support the damage assessment process by helping to identify portions of damage tracks that are difficult to access due to road limitations or time constraints by applying change detection techniques. In addition, higher resolution commercial imagery can corroborate ground-based surveys by examining higher-resolution commercial imagery. As part of an ongoing collaboration, NASA and NOAA are working to integrate near real-time Earth remote sensing observations into the NOAA/NWS Damage Assessment Toolkit, a handheld application used by meteorologists in the survey process. The team has recently developed a more streamlined approach for delivering data via a web mapping service and menu interface, allowing for caching of imagery before field deployment. Near real-time products have been developed using MODIS and VIIRS imagery and change detection for preliminary track identification, along with conduits for higher-resolution Landsat, ASTER, and commercial imagery as they become available. In addition to tornado damage assessments, the team is also investigating the use of near real-time imagery for identifying hail damage to vegetation, which also results in large swaths of damage, particularly in the central United States during the peak growing season months of June, July, and August. This presentation will present an overview of recent activities

  5. Integration of lessons from recent research for “Earth to Mars” life support systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, M.; Dempster, W. F.; Allen, J. P.

    adequate diet in space. This paper explores some of the challenges of small bioregenerative life support: air-sealing and facility architecture/design, balance of short-term variations of carbon dioxide and oxygen through staggered plantings, options for additional atmospheric buffers and sinks, lighting/energy efficiency engineering, crop and waste product recycling approaches, and human factor considerations in the design and operation of a Mars base. An "Earth to Mars" project, forging the ability to live sustainably in space (as on Earth) requires continued research and testing of these components and integrated subsystems; and developing a step-by-step learning process.

  6. Charge Compensation in RE3+ (RE = Eu, Gd) and M+ (M = Li, Na, K) Co-Doped Alkaline Earth Nanofluorides Obtained by Microwave Reaction with Reactive Ionic Liquids Leading to Improved Optical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lorbeer, C; Behrends, F; Cybinska, J; Eckert, H; Mudring, Anja -V

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline earth fluorides are extraordinarily promising host matrices for phosphor materials with regard to rare earth doping. In particular, quantum cutting materials, which might considerably enhance the efficiency of mercury-free fluorescent lamps or SC solar cells, are often based on rare earth containing crystalline fluorides such as NaGdF4, GdF3 or LaF3. Substituting most of the precious rare earth ions and simultaneously retaining the efficiency of the phosphor is a major goal. Alkaline earth fluoride nanoparticles doped with trivalent lanthanide ions (which are required for the quantum cutting phenomenon) were prepared via a microwave assisted method in ionic liquids. As doping trivalent ions into a host with divalent cations requires charge compensation, this effect was thoroughly studied by powder X-ray and electron diffraction, luminescence spectroscopy and 23Na, 139La and 19F solid state NMR spectroscopy. Monovalent alkali ions were codoped with the trivalent lanthanide ions to relieve stress and achieve a better crystallinity and higher quantum cutting abilities of the prepared material. 19F-magic angle spinning (MAS)-NMR-spectra, assisted by 19F{23Na} rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) studies, reveal distinct local fluoride environments, the populations of which are discussed in relation to spatial distribution and clustering models. In the co-doped samples, fluoride species having both Na+ and La3+ ions within their coordination sphere can be identified and quantified. This interplay of mono- and trivalent ions in the CaF2 lattice appears to be an efficient charge compensation mechanism that allows for improved performance characteristics of such co-doped phosphor materials.

  7. Effective Integration of the World-Wide Web in Earth Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, Bruce; Bednarz, Sarah; Boyd, Tom; Blake, Sally; Harder, Vicki; Sutter, Marilyn

    The earth sciences is an evolving set of disciplines encompassing more than 30 specialties; however, earth scientists continue to be trained within the traditional disciplinary structure. Earth science education should focus not only on student acquisition and retention of factual knowledge, but also on the development of higher-order skills…

  8. The COSPAR roadmap on Space-based observation and Integrated Earth System Science for 2016-2025

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellous, Jean-Louis

    2016-07-01

    The Committee on Space Research of the International Council for Science recently commissioned a study group to prepare a roadmap on observation and integrated Earth-system science for the coming ten years. Its focus is on the combined use of observations and modelling to address the functioning, predictability and projected evolution of the Earth system on timescales out to a century or so. It discusses how observations support integrated Earth-system science and its applications, and identifies planned enhancements to the contributing observing systems and other requirements for observations and their processing. The paper will provide an overview of the content of the roadmap. All types of observation are considered in the roadmap, but emphasis is placed on those made from space. The origins and development of the integrated view of the Earth system are outlined, noting the interactions between the main components that lead to requirements for integrated science and modelling, and for the observations that guide and support them. What constitutes an Earth-system model is discussed. Summaries are given of key cycles within the Earth system. The nature of Earth observation and the arrangements for international coordination essential for effective operation of global observing systems are introduced in the roadmap. Instances are given of present types of observation, what is already on the roadmap for 2016-2025 and some of the issues to be faced. The current status and prospects for Earth-system modelling are summarized. Data assimilation is discussed not only because it uses observations and models to generate datasets for monitoring the Earth system and for initiating and evaluating predictions, in particular through reanalysis, but also because of the feedback it provides on the quality of both the observations and the models employed. Finally the roadmap offers a set of concluding discussions covering general developmental needs, requirements for continuity of

  9. Rare earth doped LiYbF{sub 4} phosphors with controlled morphologies: Hydrothermal synthesis and luminescent properties

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wenjuan; Lu, Chunhua; Jiang, Chenfei; Jin, Junyang; Ding, Mingye; Ni, Yaru; Xu, Zhongzi

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ► LiYbF{sub 4} microparticles as an excellent upconverting materials. ► High temperature and long time can favor high crystalline LiYbF{sub 4} microparticles. ► The shape of LiYbF{sub 4} microparticles can be tuned by the molar ratio of EDTA to Yb{sup 3+}. ► Bright green emission can be obtained by changing the doping concentration of Er{sup 3+}. -- Abstract: High quality monodisperse LiYbF{sub 4} microparticles with shape of octahedron had been prepared via a facile hydrothermal route. The crystalline phase, size, morphology and luminescence properties were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), photoluminescence (PL) spectra and Commission Internationale de L’Eclairage (CIE 1931) chromaticity coordinates, respectively. The influences of reaction temperature, reaction time and the molar ratio of EDTA to Yb{sup 3+} on the crystal phases and shapes of as-prepared products had been investigated in detail. The upconversion (UC) luminescence properties of LiYb{sub 1−x}F{sub 4}:xEr{sup 3+} (x =0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 5 and 10 mol%) particles with octahedral microstructures were studied under 976 nm excitation. The results showed that the luminescence colors of the corresponding products could be tuned to bright green by changing the doping concentration of Er{sup 3+} ion. The luminescence mechanisms for the doped Er{sup 3+} ion were thoroughly analyzed, showing great potential in applications such as biolabels, displays and other optical technologies.

  10. Photon management properties of rare-earth (Nd,Yb,Sm)-doped CeO2 films prepared by pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Balestrieri, Matteo; Colis, Silviu; Gallart, Mathieu; Schmerber, Guy; Bazylewski, Paul; Chang, Gap Soo; Ziegler, Marc; Gilliot, Pierre; Slaoui, Abdelilah; Dinia, Aziz

    2016-01-28

    CeO2 is a promising material for applications in optoelectronics and photovoltaics due to its large band gap and values of the refractive index and lattice parameters, which are suitable for silicon-based devices. In this study, we show that trivalent Sm, Nd and Yb ions can be successfully inserted and optically activated in CeO2 films grown at a relatively low deposition temperature (400 °C), which is compatible with inorganic photovoltaics. CeO2 thin films can therefore be efficiently functionalized with photon-management properties by doping with trivalent rare earth (RE) ions. Structural and optical analyses provide details of the electronic level structure of the films and of their energy transfer mechanisms. In particular, we give evidence of the existence of an absorption band centered at 350 nm from which energy transfer to rare earth ions occurs. The transfer mechanisms can be completely explained only by considering the spontaneous migration of Ce(3+) ions in CeO2 at a short distance from the RE(3+) ions. The strong absorption cross section of the f-d transitions in Ce(3+) ions efficiently intercepts the UV photons of the solar spectrum and therefore strongly increases the potential of these layers as downshifters and downconverters.

  11. Magnetoelectric emission in rare-earth doped ferroelectric crystals La2Ti2O7:R3+ ( R=Er , Eu, and Nd)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Y.; Kiyama, H.; Tokura, Y.

    2007-06-01

    The optical magnetoelectric (OME) effect, i.e., the change of optical response on the reversal of light propagation vector (k) , has been investigated for the emission of rare earth R3+ ion ( R=Nd , Eu, Er) doped in a ferroelectric La2Ti2O7 single crystal under magnetic field (H) . The symmetry condition for the appearance of the OME effect for H⊥k was confirmed by varying the relative angle between the electric polarization and magnetic field. Another tensor component of the second-order magnetolectric tensor βijk for H∥k , i.e., the magnetochiral effect, is allowed in the Faraday configuration but found to be small compared with the OME effect in the Voigt configuration. The importance of the spin-orbit coupling, the magnetic dipole transition, and the noncentrosymmetric crystal structure is discussed as the origin of the OME effect on the basis of the observed signal magnitude depending on the species of the rare-earth ion and its optical transition moment.

  12. CEOS WGISS Integrated Catalog, A Catalog for Earth Observation Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enloe, Y.; Yapur, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) was formed in 1984 to coordinate the world's civil space-borne observations of the Earth. More recently, CEOS and its member agencies have committed to provide the implementation of the space-based component of the Group on Earth Observation (GEO) Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) Common Infrastructure (GCI). In the case of CEOS, there are a number of challenges in directly connecting the components and services of its member agencies to the GCI. In many cases, the existing catalog systems of the member agencies do not support the OGC Catalog Service for the Web (CSW) that has been selected as the standard for the GCI. Another challenge is related to the fact that collections of satellite data products are extremely large and constantly growing with millions of individual products. Harvesting the associated metadata into the clearinghouse of the GCI is not a practical alternative. In addition, the collection/granule hierarchy and unique spatial/temporal characteristics of satellite data and the user registration and asynchronous access requirements of the agency systems pose additional challenges. The CEOS approach has been to design and implement a CEOS WGISS Integrated Catalog (CWIC) that will serve as a community catalog of the products and services that are offered through its member's systems. CWIC will be based on a distributed search architecture and serve as a gateway between the GEO portal or community portals and clients and the CEOS agency systems. CWIC will receive standard search queries from these portals or clients all using the GEO supported catalog standard, the OGC CSW 2.0.2 and the WGISS Search Criteria for granule search and translate them into the native protocols of the underlying catalogs. Likewise, the result sets from the CEOS agency catalogs will be converted to the form that will be compatible with the portals and clients. The CWIC data provider partners include NOAA

  13. Integrated solution for the complete remote sensing process - Earth Observation Mission Control Centre (EOMC2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapski, Paweł

    2016-07-01

    We are going to show the latest achievements of the Remote Sensing Division of the Institute of Aviation in the area of remote sensing, i.e. the project of the integrated solution for the whole remote sensing process ranging from acquiring to providing the end user with required information. Currently, these tasks are partially performed by several centers in Poland, however there is no leader providing an integrated solution. Motivated by this fact, the Earth Observation Mission Control Centre (EOMC2) was established in the Remote Sensing Division of the Institute of Aviation that will provide such a comprehensive approach. Establishing of EOMC2 can be compared with creating Data Center Aerial and Satellite Data Centre (OPOLIS) in the Institute of Geodesy and Cartography in the mid-70s in Poland. OPOLIS was responsible for broadly defined data processing, it was a breakthrough innovation that initiated the use of aerial image analysis in Poland. Operation center is a part of the project that will be created, which in comparison with the competitors will provide better solutions, i.e.: • Centralization of the acquiring, processing, publishing and archiving of data, • Implementing elements of the INSPIRE directive recommendations on spatial data management, • Providing the end-user with information in the near real-time, • Ability of supplying the system with images of various origin (aerial, satellite, e.g. EUMETCast, Sentinel, Landsat) and diversity of telemetry data, data aggregation and using the same algorithms to images obtained from different sources, • System reconfiguration and batch processing of large data sets at any time, • A wide range of potential applications: precision agriculture, environmental protection, crisis management and national security, aerial, small satellite and sounding rocket missions monitoring.

  14. MEOS Microsatellite Earth Observation using Miniature Integrated-Optic IR Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruzelecky, Roman

    Our planetary atmosphere helps to regulate the Earth's thermal budget and the resulting global climate by controlling the energy balance between the incident solar radiation and the thermal emission to space from the Earth's atmosphere and surface. Certain atmospheric gases, most importantly H2 O vapour and CO2 , can absorb some of the Earth's emitted IR radiation and trap it in the atmosphere to provide an atmospheric greenhouse effect that currently adds about 38 K to the Earth's mean surface temperature. The associated greenhouse gas (GHG) and water cycles are a complex balance of interactions among surface ecosystems and atmospheric processes. The natural water and carbon cycles are being measurably disrupted by anthropogenic activities. Since the industrial revolution, significant anthropogenic sources of greenhouse gases and aerosols have evolved, while natural sinks, such as forests and wetlands, are being destroyed. Changes in the land cover affect the balance of GHG sources and sinks, as well as the Albedo and resultant surface temperature. Water vapour, the most abundant GHG, is affected indirectly though the influence of aerosols on cloud formation and precipitation patterns, and directly through the influence of surface temperatures on the water evaporation rates. There is also positive feedback between the water and carbon cycles. For example, drought can result in desertification with subsequent release of stored carbon. It is clear that the common thread in all of these climate-related effects is the interaction between the surface ecosystems and the carbonand nitrogen-containing gases in the lower troposphere. Uptake of CO2 by growing vegetation, release of CH4 and N2 O by soil processes, and the effects of carbon and water cycle chemistry all interact strongly in a system that is both ex-tremely complex and poorly understood at the present time. In order to quantify these processes and provide a clearer prediction of their likely effects in the

  15. An Integrated Approach to Modeling Solar Electric Propulsion Vehicles During Long Duration, Near-Earth Orbit Transfers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David A.; Hojnicki, Jeffrey S.; Sjauw, Waldy K.

    2014-01-01

    Recent NASA interest in utilizing solar electronic propulsion (SEP) technology to transfer payloads, e.g. from low-Earth orbit (LEO) to higher energy geostationary-Earth orbit (GEO) or to Earth escape, has necessitated the development of high fidelity SEP vehicle models and simulations. These models and simulations need to be capable of capturing vehicle dynamics and sub-system interactions experienced during the transfer trajectories which are typically accomplished with continuous-burn (potentially interrupted by solar eclipse), long duration "spiral out" maneuvers taking several months or more to complete. This paper presents details of an integrated simulation approach achieved by combining a high fidelity vehicle simulation code with a detailed solar array model. The combined simulation tool gives researchers the functionality to study the integrated effects of various vehicle sub-systems (e.g. vehicle guidance, navigation and control (GN&C), electric propulsion system (EP)) with time varying power production. Results from a simulation model of a vehicle with a 50 kW class SEP system using the integrated tool are presented and compared to the results from another simulation model employing a 50 kW end-of-life (EOL) fixed power level assumption. These models simulate a vehicle under three degree of freedom dynamics (i.e. translational dynamics only) and include the effects of a targeting guidance algorithm (providing a "near optimal" transfer) during a LEO to near Earth escape (C (sub 3) = -2.0 km (sup 2) / sec (sup -2) spiral trajectory. The presented results include the impact of the fully integrated, time-varying solar array model (e.g. cumulative array degradation from traversing the Van Allen belts, impact of solar eclipses on the vehicle and the related temperature responses in the solar arrays due to operating in the Earth's thermal environment, high fidelity array power module, etc.); these are used to assess the impact on vehicle performance (i

  16. Minute doping with deleterious rare earths in YBa2Cu3O7-δ films for flux pinning enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, P. N.; Kell, J. W.; Harrison, B. C.; Haugan, T. J.; Varanasi, C. V.; Rane, M.; Ramos, F.

    2006-07-01

    To enhance the critical current density of YBa2Cu3O7-δ films, flux pinning centers are intentionally added to inhibit flux flow in applied magnetic fields. Here we provide an initial demonstration that the incorporation of very minor additions (⩽1% of Y as opposed to the 10%-40% in standard substitutions) of typically deleterious rare earths into high quality YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin films provides significant improvement of the film's in-field current density. This is accomplished without reoptimization of the deposition parameters. Instead of site substitution for Y as might be expected, the deleterious rare earths potentially result in the formation of nanoparticulates.

  17. A mini-review on rare earth metal-doped TiO2 for photocatalytic remediation of wastewater.

    PubMed

    Saqib, Najm Us; Adnan, Rohana; Shah, Irfan

    2016-08-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been considered a useful material for the treatment of wastewater due to its non-toxic character, chemical stability and excellent electrical and optical properties which contribute in its wide range of applications, particularly in environmental remediation technology. However, the wide band gap of TiO2 photocatalyst (anatase phase, 3.20 eV) limits its photocatalytic activity to the ultraviolet region of light. Besides that, the electron-hole pair recombination has been found to reduce the efficiency of the photocatalyst. To overcome these problems, tailoring of TiO2 surface with rare earth metals to improve its surface, optical and photocatalytic properties has been investigated by many researchers. The surface modifications with rare earth metals proved to enhance the efficiency of TiO2 photocatalyts by way of reducing the band gap by shifting the working wavelength to the visible region and inhibiting the anatase-to-rutile phase transformations. This review paper summarises the attempts on modification of TiO2 using rare earth metals describing their effect on the photocatalytic activities of the modified TiO2 photocatalyst.

  18. Nanocrystalline semiconductor doped rare earth oxide for the photocatalytic degradation studies on Acid Blue 113: A di-azo compound under UV slurry photoreactor.

    PubMed

    Suganya Josephine, G A; Mary Nisha, U; Meenakshi, G; Sivasamy, A

    2015-11-01

    Preventive measures for the control of environmental pollution and its remediation has received much interest in recent years due to the world-wide increase in the contamination of water bodies. Contributions of these harmful effluents are caused by the leather processing, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, textile, agricultural and other chemical industries. Nowadays, advanced oxidation processes considered to be better option for the complete destruction of organic contaminants in water and wastewater. Acid Blue 113 is a most widely used di-azo compound in leather, textile, dying and food industry as a color rending compound. In the present study, we have reported the photo catalytic degradation of Acid Blue 113 using a nanocrystalline semiconductor doped rare earth oxide as a photo catalyst under UV light irradiation. The photocatalyst was prepared by a simple precipitation technique and were characterized by XRD, FT-IR, UV-DRS and FE-SEM analysis. The experimental results proved that the prepared photo catalyst was nanocrystalline and highly active in the UV region. The UV-DRS results showed the band gap energy was 3.15eV for the prepared photo catalyst. The photodegradation efficiency was analyzed by various experimental parameters such as pH, catalyst dosage, variation of substrate concentration and effect of electrolyte addition. The photo degradation process followed a pseudo first order kinetics and was continuously monitored by UV-visible spectrophotometer. The experimental results proved the efficacy of the nanocrystalline zinc oxide doped dysprosium oxide which are highly active under UV light irradiations. It is also suggested that the prepared material would find wider applications in environmental remediation technologies to remove the carcinogenic and toxic moieties present in the industrial effluents.

  19. Tunable optical properties of some rare earth elements-doped mayenite Ca12Al14O33 nanopowders elaborated by oxalate precursor route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashad, Mohamed M.; Mostafa, Ahmed G.; Mwakikunga, Bonex W.; Rayan, Diaa A.

    2017-01-01

    Rare earth (RE) ions-doped mayenite Ca12Al14- x RE x O33 nanopowders (where RE = La and Gd and x = 0-1.0) were synthesized using the oxalate precursor technique. The as-prepared precursors were calcined at 800 °C for 2 h. Obviously, all RE-doped Ca12Al14- x RE x O33 possessed a well-crystalline cubic mayenite phase till RE content of 0.8. The crystallo-chemical aspects including crystallite size, lattice parameters, theoretical X-ray density and bulk density were robustly on RE nature and ratio. The microstructure and the average grain size were significantly influenced by the RE kind and content. The high transparency of Ca12Al14- x RE x O33 over 80% was found to be evinced in the visible wavelength range of 400-800 nm. Besides, the incorporation of RE cation minimized the direct band gap energy from 4.42 eV for pure mayenite to 3.85 and 3.59 eV with x value 1.0 of La3+ and Gd3+ ions. The photoluminescence spectra of pure mayenite nanoparticles showed that the band edge emission ( λ exc = 248 nm) with an intense visible emission band at 360 nm was detected. Otherwise, the band edge emission showed a slight shift toward short wavelength due to the substitution Al3+ by RE3+ ions. Such results open a new avenue for application of mayenite as a good candidate for transparent low-temperature electron conductor for optoelectronics applications.

  20. Incorporating Stakeholder Decision Support Needs into an Integrated Regional Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, Jennie S.; Moss, Richard H.; Runci, Paul J.; Anderson, K. L.; Malone, Elizabeth L.

    2012-03-21

    A new modeling effort exploring the opportunities, constraints, and interactions between mitigation and adaptation at regional scale is utilizing stakeholder engagement in an innovative approach to guide model development and demonstration, including uncertainty characterization, to effectively inform regional decision making. This project, the integrated Regional Earth System Model (iRESM), employs structured stakeholder interactions and literature reviews to identify the most relevant adaptation and mitigation alternatives and decision criteria for each regional application of the framework. The information is used to identify important model capabilities and to provide a focus for numerical experiments. This paper presents the stakeholder research results from the first iRESM pilot region. The pilot region includes the Great Lakes Basin in the Midwest portion of the United States as well as other contiguous states. This geographic area (14 states in total) permits cohesive modeling of hydrologic systems while also providing gradients in climate, demography, land cover/land use, and energy supply and demand. The results from the stakeholder research indicate that iRESM should prioritize addressing adaptation alternatives in the water resources, urban infrastructure, and agriculture sectors, such as water conservation, expanded water quality monitoring, altered reservoir releases, lowered water intakes, urban infrastructure upgrades, increased electric power reserves in urban areas, and land use management/crop selection changes. Regarding mitigation alternatives, the stakeholder research shows a need for iRESM to focus on policies affecting the penetration of renewable energy technologies, and the costs and effectiveness of energy efficiency, bioenergy production, wind energy, and carbon capture and sequestration.

  1. Carbon Observations from Geostationary Earth Orbit as Part of an Integrated Observing System for Atmospheric Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation describes proposed satellite carbon measurements from the CHRONOS mission. The primary goal of this experiment is to measure the atmospheric pollutants carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4) from geostationary orbit, with hourly observations of North America at high spatial resolution. CHRONOS observations would provide measurements not currently available or planned as part of a surface, suborbital and satellite integrated observing system for atmospheric composition over North America. Carbon monoxide is produced by combustion processes such as urban activity and wildfires, and serves as a proxy for other combustion pollutants that are not easily measured. Methane has diverse anthropogenic sources ranging from fossil fuel production, animal husbandry, agriculture and waste management. The impact of gas exploration in the Western States of the USA and oil extraction from the Canadian tar sands will be particular foci of the mission, as will the poorly-quantified natural CH4 emissions from wetlands and thawing permafrost. In addition to characterizing pollutant sources, improved understanding of the domestic CH4 budget is a priority for policy decisions related to short-lived climate forcers. A primary motivation for targeting CO is its value as a tracer of atmospheric pollution, and CHRONOS measurements will provide insight into local and long-range transport across the North American continent, as well as the processes governing the entrainment and venting of pollution in and out of the planetary boundary layer. As a result of significantly improved characterization of diurnal changes in atmospheric composition, CHRONOS observations will find direct societal applications for air quality regulation and forecasting. We present a quantification of this expected improvement in the prediction of near-surface concentrations when CHRONOS measurements are used in Observation System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs). If CHRONOS and the planned NASA Earth

  2. Integrating NASA Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) Data Into Global Agricultural Decision Support Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, W.; Kempler, S.; Chiu, L.; Doraiswamy, P.; Liu, Z.; Milich, L.; Tetrault, R.

    2003-12-01

    Monitoring global agricultural crop conditions during the growing season and estimating potential seasonal production are critically important for market development of U.S. agricultural products and for global food security. Two major operational users of satellite remote sensing for global crop monitoring are the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) and the U.N. World Food Programme (WFP). The primary goal of FAS is to improve foreign market access for U.S. agricultural products. The WFP uses food to meet emergency needs and to support economic and social development. Both use global agricultural decision support systems that can integrate and synthesize a variety of data sources to provide accurate and timely information on global crop conditions. The Goddard Space Flight Center Earth Sciences Distributed Active Archive Center (GES DAAC) has begun a project to provide operational solutions to FAS and WFP, by fully leveraging results from previous work, as well as from existing capabilities of the users. The GES DAAC has effectively used its recently developed prototype TRMM Online Visualization and Analysis System (TOVAS) to provide ESE data and information to the WFP for its agricultural drought monitoring efforts. This prototype system will be evolved into an Agricultural Information System (AIS), which will operationally provide ESE and other data products (e.g., rainfall, land productivity) and services, to be integrated into and thus enhance the existing GIS-based, decision support systems of FAS and WFP. Agriculture-oriented, ESE data products (e.g., MODIS-based, crop condition assessment product; TRMM derived, drought index product) will be input to a crop growth model in collaboration with the USDA Agricultural Research Service, to generate crop condition and yield prediction maps. The AIS will have the capability for remotely accessing distributed data, by being compliant with community-based interoperability standards, enabling easy access to

  3. An integrated study of earth resources in the state of California using remote sensing techniques. [water and forest management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, R. N.

    1974-01-01

    Progress and results of an integrated study of California's water resources are discussed. The investigation concerns itself primarily with the usefulness of remote sensing of relation to two categories of problems: (1) water supply; and (2) water demand. Also considered are its applicability to forest management and timber inventory. The cost effectiveness and utility of remote sensors such as the Earth Resources Technology Satellite for water and timber management are presented.

  4. Superconductivity by rare earth doping in the 1038-type compounds (Ca1-xREx) 10(FeAs)10(Pt3As8) with RE=Y, La-Nd, Sm-Lu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stürzer, Tobias; Derondeau, Gerald; Bertschler, Eva-Maria; Johrendt, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    We report superconductivity in polycrystalline samples of the 1038-type compounds (Ca1-xREx) 10(FeAs)10(Pt3As8) up to Tc=35 K with RE=Y, La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Lu. The critical temperatures are nearly independent of the trivalent rare earth element used, yielding a common Tc(xRE) phase diagram for electron doping in all these systems. The absence of superconductivity in Eu2+ doped samples, as well as the close resemblance of (Ca1-xREx) 10(FeAs)10(Pt3As8) to the 1048 compound substantiate that the electron doping scenario in the RE-1038 and 1048 phases is analogous to other iron-based superconductors with simpler crystal structures.

  5. Electromechanical properties of lanthanum-doped lead hafnate titanate thin films for integrated piezoelectric MEMS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kügeler, C.; Böttger, U.; Schneller, T.

    2009-03-01

    This paper focuses on the deposition and electromechanical characterization of lanthanum-doped lead hafnate titanate (PLHT) thin films as key material in piezoelectric microelectromechanical systems (pMEMS). PLHT ( x/30/70) and PLHT( x/45/55) films with a thickness between 150 nm and 250 nm were deposited by chemical solution deposition (CSD). Thereby x varies between 0 and 10% La content. The electrical characterization shows that undoped ( x=0) PLHT exhibit ferroelectric behavior similar to PZT of the same composition. La doping results in reduced ferroelectric properties and also affects the electromechanical properties. Measurements using a double beam laser interferometer yield a piezoelectric coefficient d 33 of 60 pm/V, which stays constant with an increasing electric field. This leads to a linear displacement compared to undoped PLHT or conventional PZT films used for MEMS applications.

  6. Integrated oxygen-doping and dye sensitization of graphitic carbon nitride for enhanced visible light photodegradation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shizhen; Sun, Hongqi; Ang, H M; Tade, Moses O; Wang, Shaobin

    2016-08-15

    Graphitic carbon nitride (GCN) is a promising metal-free photocatalyst while suffering from low charge mobility induced inefficient photocatalysis. In this work, oxygen doping was employed to enhance the photodegradation of organic pollutants in water on graphitic carbon nitride (GCNO) under visible light. For further absorption extension, four organic dyes (Eosin-Y, Perylene, Nile-red and Coumarin) were adopted to dye-sensitize the GCNO photocatalyst. It was found that O-doping can promote dye sensitization, which was dependent on the type of dyes and influenced the photodegradation efficiencies of methylene blue (MB) and phenol. Nile-red sensitized GCNO presented the best activity in MB degradation under λ>480nm irradiations while Eosin-Y showed the best sensitization performance for phenol degradation under λ>420nm light source. However, dye sensitization was not effective for enhanced pollutant degradation on GCN without O-doping. UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-vis DRS), photoluminescence (PL) spectra, and photocurrent analyses were applied to investigate the mechanism of carriers' transfer, which indicated that dye molecules could inject extra electrons into GCNO energy band and the energy dislocation could suppress electron/hole recombination, enhancing photocatalytic performances.

  7. An integrative 'omics' solution to the detection of recombinant human erythropoietin and blood doping.

    PubMed

    Pitsiladis, Yannis P; Durussel, Jérôme; Rabin, Olivier

    2014-05-01

    Administration of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHumanEPO) improves sporting performance and hence is frequently subject to abuse by athletes, although rHumanEPO is prohibited by the WADA. Approaches to detect rHumanEPO doping have improved significantly in recent years but remain imperfect. A new transcriptomic-based longitudinal screening approach is being developed that has the potential to improve the analytical performance of current detection methods. In particular, studies are being funded by WADA to identify a 'molecular signature' of rHumanEPO doping and preliminary results are promising. In the first systematic study to be conducted, the expression of hundreds of genes were found to be altered by rHumanEPO with numerous gene transcripts being differentially expressed after the first injection and further transcripts profoundly upregulated during and subsequently downregulated up to 4 weeks postadministration of the drug; with the same transcriptomic pattern observed in all participants. The identification of a blood 'molecular signature' of rHumanEPO administration is the strongest evidence to date that gene biomarkers have the potential to substantially improve the analytical performance of current antidoping methods such as the Athlete Biological Passport for rHumanEPO detection. Given the early promise of transcriptomics, research using an 'omics'-based approach involving genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics should be intensified in order to achieve improved detection of rHumanEPO and other doping substances and methods difficult to detect such a recombinant human growth hormone and blood transfusions.

  8. Gamma ray spectroscopy employing divalent europium-doped alkaline earth halides and digital readout for accurate histogramming

    DOEpatents

    Cherepy, Nerine Jane; Payne, Stephen Anthony; Drury, Owen B.; Sturm, Benjamin W.

    2016-02-09

    According to one embodiment, a scintillator radiation detector system includes a scintillator, and a processing device for processing pulse traces corresponding to light pulses from the scintillator, where the processing device is configured to: process each pulse trace over at least two temporal windows and to use pulse digitization to improve energy resolution of the system. According to another embodiment, a scintillator radiation detector system includes a processing device configured to: fit digitized scintillation waveforms to an algorithm, perform a direct integration of fit parameters, process multiple integration windows for each digitized scintillation waveform to determine a correction factor, and apply the correction factor to each digitized scintillation waveform.

  9. Effect of surface related organic vibrational modes in luminescent upconversion dynamics of rare earth ions doped nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Smolarek, Szymon; Kong, Xianggui; Buma, Wybren Jan; Brouwer, Albert Manfred; Zhang, Hong

    2010-11-01

    Physical and chemical properties of nanoparticles are known to be subject to the surface factors. For their biological/biomedical applications, typically, surface of the nanoparticles has to be modified which inevitably affects their performance. In this work we have studied the interaction between the surface related organic vibrational modes and the luminescent centers--rare earth ions--in one of the most efficient luminescence upconversion nanosystems--NaYF4. Specifically, the surface quenching centers, the surface related luminescent centers, as well as the role of shell properties, are investigated spectroscopically. Our results demonstrate that the surface related high-frequency vibrational modes can be critical to the spectral properties of the nanosystems once the surface is not well separated from the discrete luminescent centers.

  10. Multicolor and near-infrared electroluminescence from the light-emitting devices with rare-earth doped TiO{sub 2} films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Chen; Gao, Zhifei; Wang, Canxing; Li, Dongsheng; Ma, Xiangyang Yang, Deren; Lv, Chunyan

    2015-09-28

    We report on multicolor and near-infrared electroluminescence (EL) from the devices using rare-earth doped TiO{sub 2} (TiO{sub 2}:RE) films as light-emitting layers, which are ascribed to the impact excitation of RE{sup 3+} ions, with the EL onset voltages below 10 V. The devices are in the structure of ITO/TiO{sub 2}:RE/SiO{sub 2}/Si, in which the SiO{sub 2} layer is ∼10 nm thick and RE includes Eu, Er, Tm, Nd, and so on. With sufficiently high positive voltage applied on the ITO electrode, the conduction electrons in Si can tunnel into the conduction band of SiO{sub 2} layer via the trap-assisted tunneling mechanism, gaining the potential energy ∼4 eV higher than the conduction band edge of TiO{sub 2}. Therefore, as the electrons in the SiO{sub 2} layer drift into the TiO{sub 2}:RE layer, they become hot electrons. Such hot electrons impact-excite the RE{sup 3+} ions incorporated into the TiO{sub 2} host, leading to the characteristic emissions.

  11. Furnace Cyclic Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Zirconia-Yttria and Multi-Component Rare Earth Oxide Doped Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Nesbitt, James A.; McCue, Terry R.; Barrett, Charles A.; Miller, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings will play an increasingly important role in advanced gas turbine engines because of their ability to enable further increases in engine temperatures. However, the coating performance and durability become a major concern under the increasingly harsh thermal cycling conditions. Advanced zirconia- and hafnia-based cluster oxide thermal barrier coatings with lower thermal conductivity and improved thermal stability are being developed using a high-heat-flux laser-rig based test approach. Although the new composition coatings were not yet optimized for cyclic durability, an initial durability screening of numerous candidate coating materials was carried out using conventional furnace cyclic tests. In this paper, furnace thermal cyclic behavior of the advanced plasma-sprayed zirconia-yttria-based thermal barrier coatings that were co-doped with multi-component rare earth oxides was investigated at 1163 C using 45 min hot cycles. The ceramic coating failure mechanisms were studied by using scanning electron microscopy combined with X-ray diffraction phase analysis after the furnace tests. The coating cyclic lifetime will be discussed in relation to coating phase structures, total dopant concentrations, and other properties.

  12. Superconductivity of metal nitride chloride β-MNCl (M = Zr, Hf) with rare-earth metal RE (RE = Eu, Yb) doped by intercalation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuai; Tanaka, Masashi; Onimaru, Takahiro; Takabatake, Toshiro; Isikawa, Yosikazu; Yamanaka, Shoji

    2013-04-01

    Electrons were doped into the β-form layered metal nitride chloride MNCl (M = Zr, Hf) by intercalation of rare-earth metals RE (RE = Eu, Yb) using liquid ammonia solutions. The intercalated compounds REx(NH3)yMNCl show superconductivity with transition temperatures Tc of ˜13 and 24.3 K for M = Zr and Hf, respectively, quite similar to the alkali metal intercalated analogs. The paramagnetic characteristics for Eu2+ and Yb3+ can coexist with superconductivity. The magnetic resistance measured on the uniaxially oriented Eu0.08(NH3)yHfNCl with the magnetic field parallel to the ab plane (‖ ab) and the c axis (‖ c) shows a strong anisotropic effect on the upper critical field Hc2; a large anisotropic parameter \\gamma ={H}_{{c}2}^{\\parallel a b}/{H}_{{c}2}^{\\parallel c}\\sim 4 suggests a pseudo-two-dimensional superconductivity. The Tc of Eu0.13(THF)yHfNCl is shifted toward a higher value of 25.8 K upon expansion of the interlayer spacing from 11.9 to 17.5 Å by co-intercalation of voluminous organic molecules such as tetrahydrofuran.

  13. Magnetization dynamics in rare earth Gd3+ doped Mn(0.5)Zn(0.5)Fe2O4 magnetic fluid: electron spin resonance study.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Kinnari; Upadhyay, R V

    2012-12-01

    The electron spin resonance (ESR) technique has been applied to study the spin dynamics in broad temperature range for rare earth doped Mn(0.5)Zn(0.5)Fe(1.9)Gd(0.1)O(4) (MZG5) magnetic fluid. Zero field cooled (ZFC) ESR spectra of MZG5 fluid exhibit an isotropic shift in the resonance field below 40 K, while the field cooled (FC) ESR spectra show a deviation from sin(2)θ behavior and an angle dependent hysteresis, this unambiguously points to the dominating unidirectional freezing of surface spins below 40 K. Above 60 K, the resonance field exhibits sin(2)θ behavior, indicating the uniaxial anisotropy contribution of core spin. This indicates that surface spin freezing temperature is around 40 K. The presence of surface spin freezing and the coupling between core and surface spins are further supported by cycle dependent FC ESR spectra measured at 20 K, which show the systematic increase in resonance field (H(res)) and intensity. The double peak behavior of blocking temperature distribution retrieved from ZFC-FC magnetization measurement is an additional corroboration of the existence of surface spin glass like layer.

  14. Empowering Rural Appalachian Youth Through Integrated Inquiry-based Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, T. J.; Hogsett, M.

    2009-05-01

    Science education must be relevant and inspiring to keep students engaged and receptive to learning. Reports suggest that science education reform can be advanced by involving students in active research (NSF 1996). Through a 2-year Geoscience Education award from the National Science Foundation, a program called IDGE (Integrated Design for Geoscience Education) has targeted low-income, under-represented, and minority high school students in rural Appalachia in inquiry-based projects, international collaboration, and an international environmental expedition incorporating the GLOBE program protocols. This program targeted Upward Bound students at Marshall University in Huntington, West Virginia. The Upward Bound is a federally-supported program targeting low-income, under-represented, and minority students for inclusion in a summer academic- enrichment program. IDGE builds on the mission of Upward Bound by encouraging underprivileged students to investigate science and scientific careers. This outreach has proven to be successful in enhancing positive attitudes and understanding about science and increasing the number of students considering science careers. IDGE has found that students must be challenged to observe the world around them and to consider how their decisions affect the future of our planet, thus making geoscience relevant and interesting to the students. By making the geoscience course inquiry-based and incorporating field research that is relevant to local environmental issues, it becomes possible for students to bridge the gap between science in theory and science in practice while remaining engaged. Participants were able to broaden environmental connections through an ecological expedition experience to Costa Rica, serving as an opportunity to broaden the vision of students as members of an international community of learners and scientists through their experiences with a diverse natural environment. This trip, in coordination with the inclusion

  15. Space-Based Sensor Web for Earth Science Applications: An Integrated Architecture for Providing Societal Benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habib, Shahid; Talabac, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    There is a significant interest in the Earth Science research and user remote sensing community to substantially increase the number of useful observations relative to the current frequency of collection. The obvious reason for such a push is to improve the temporal, spectral, and spatial coverage of the area(s) under investigation. However, there is little analysis available in terms of the benefits, costs and the optimal set of sensors needed to make the necessary observations. Classic observing system solutions may no longer be applicable because of their point design philosophy. Instead, a new intelligent data collection system paradigm employing both reactive and proactive measurement strategies with adaptability to the dynamics of the phenomena should be developed. This is a complex problem that should be carefully studied and balanced across various boundaries including: science, modeling, applications, and technology. Modeling plays a crucial role in making useful predictions about naturally occurring or human-induced phenomena In particular, modeling can serve to mitigate the potentially deleterious impacts a phenomenon may have on human life, property, and the economy. This is especially significant when one is interested in learning about the dynamics of, for example, the spread of forest fires, regional to large-scale air quality issues, the spread of the harmful invasive species, or the atmospheric transport of volcanic plumes and ash. This paper identifies and examines these challenging issues and presents architectural alternatives for an integrated sensor web to provide observing scenarios driving the requisite dynamic spatial, spectral, and temporal characteristics to address these key application areas. A special emphasis is placed on the observing systems and its operational aspects in serving the multiple users and stakeholders in providing societal benefits. We also address how such systems will take advantage of technological advancement in

  16. Laboratory Earth Under the Lens: Diachronic Evaluation of an Integrated Graduate-Level On-Line Earth System Science Course Series for K-12 Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, R.; Gosselin, D. C.; Haney, C.; Larson-Miller, C.; Bonnstetter, R.; Mandryk, C.

    2012-12-01

    Educational research strives to identify the pedagogies that promote student learning. However, the body of research identifying the characteristics of effective teacher preparation is "least strong for science," and is largely based on studies of the effectiveness of individual courses or workshops (NRC 2010). The National Research Council's "Preparing Teachers: Building Evidence for Strong Policy," (2010) provides a mandate for teacher education providers to conduct research on program-scale effectiveness. The high priority research agenda identified by the NRC is expected to elicit understanding of the aspects of teacher preparation that critically impact classroom student learning outcomes. The Laboratory Lens project is designed to identify effective practices in a teacher education program, with specific reference to the content domain of Earth science. Now in its fifth year, the Masters of Applied Science (MAS) program at UNL offers a variety of science courses, ranging from entomology to food science. The six-course Lab Earth series serves as the backbone of the Specialization for Science Educators within the MAS program, and provides comprehensive content coverage of all Earth science topics identified in the AAAS Benchmarks. "How People Learn," (NRC 2009) emphasizes that expert knowledge includes not only factual knowledge, but also the well-developed conceptual framework critical to the ability to, "remember, reason, and solve problems." A focus of our research is to document the process by which the transition from novice to expert takes place in Lab Earth's on-line teacher participants. A feature of our research design is the standardization of evaluation instruments across the six courses. We have used data derived from implementation of the Community of Inquiry Survey (COI) in pilot offerings to ensure that the course sequence is effective in developing a community of learners, while developing their content knowledge. A pre- and post- course

  17. Integrated cladding-pumped multicore few-mode erbium-doped fibre amplifier for space-division-multiplexed communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Jin, C.; Huang, B.; Fontaine, N. K.; Ryf, R.; Shang, K.; Grégoire, N.; Morency, S.; Essiambre, R.-J.; Li, G.; Messaddeq, Y.; Larochelle, S.

    2016-08-01

    Space-division multiplexing (SDM), whereby multiple spatial channels in multimode and multicore optical fibres are used to increase the total transmission capacity per fibre, is being investigated to avert a data capacity crunch and reduce the cost per transmitted bit. With the number of channels employed in SDM transmission experiments continuing to rise, there is a requirement for integrated SDM components that are scalable. Here, we demonstrate a cladding-pumped SDM erbium-doped fibre amplifier (EDFA) that consists of six uncoupled multimode erbium-doped cores. Each core supports three spatial modes, which enables the EDFA to amplify a total of 18 spatial channels (six cores × three modes) simultaneously with a single pump diode and a complexity similar to a single-mode EDFA. The amplifier delivers >20 dBm total output power per core and <7 dB noise figure over the C-band. This cladding-pumped EDFA enables combined space-division and wavelength-division multiplexed transmission over multiple multimode fibre spans.

  18. Modeling Earth's Disk-Integrated, Time-Dependent Spectrum: Applications to Directly Imaged Habitable Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustig-Yaeger, Jacob; Schwieterman, Edward; Meadows, Victoria; Fujii, Yuka; NAI Virtual Planetary Laboratory, ISSI 'The Exo-Cartography Inverse Problem'

    2016-10-01

    Earth is our only example of a habitable world and is a critical reference point for potentially habitable exoplanets. While disk-averaged views of Earth that mimic exoplanet data can be obtained by interplanetary spacecraft, these datasets are often restricted in wavelength range, and are limited to the Earth phases and viewing geometries that the spacecraft can feasibly access. We can overcome these observational limitations using a sophisticated UV-MIR spectral model of Earth that has been validated against spacecraft observations in wavelength-dependent brightness and phase (Robinson et al., 2011; 2014). This model can be used to understand the information content - and the optimal means for extraction of that information - for multi-wavelength, time-dependent, disk-averaged observations of the Earth. In this work, we explore key telescope parameters and observing strategies that offer the greatest insight into the wavelength-, phase-, and rotationally-dependent variability of Earth as if it were an exoplanet. Using a generalized coronagraph instrument simulator (Robinson et al., 2016), we synthesize multi-band, time-series observations of the Earth that are consistent with large space-based telescope mission concepts, such as the Large UV/Optical/IR (LUVOIR) Surveyor. We present fits to this dataset that leverage the rotationally-induced variability to infer the number of large-scale planetary surface types, as well as their respective longitudinal distributions and broadband albedo spectra. Finally, we discuss the feasibility of using such methods to identify and map terrestrial exoplanets surfaces with the next generation of space-based telescopes.

  19. Gamma ray spectroscopy employing divalent europium-doped alkaline earth halides and digital readout for accurate histogramming

    DOEpatents

    Cherepy, Nerine Jane; Payne, Stephen Anthony; Drury, Owen B; Sturm, Benjamin W

    2014-11-11

    A scintillator radiation detector system according to one embodiment includes a scintillator; and a processing device for processing pulse traces corresponding to light pulses from the scintillator, wherein pulse digitization is used to improve energy resolution of the system. A scintillator radiation detector system according to another embodiment includes a processing device for fitting digitized scintillation waveforms to an algorithm based on identifying rise and decay times and performing a direct integration of fit parameters. A method according to yet another embodiment includes processing pulse traces corresponding to light pulses from a scintillator, wherein pulse digitization is used to improve energy resolution of the system. A method in a further embodiment includes fitting digitized scintillation waveforms to an algorithm based on identifying rise and decay times; and performing a direct integration of fit parameters. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  20. Doping management for high-power fiber lasers: 100 W, few-picosecond pulse generation from an all-fiber-integrated amplifier.

    PubMed

    Elahi, P; Yılmaz, S; Akçaalan, O; Kalaycıoğlu, H; Oktem, B; Senel, C; Ilday, F Ö; Eken, K

    2012-08-01

    Thermal effects, which limit the average power, can be minimized by using low-doped, longer gain fibers, whereas the presence of nonlinear effects requires use of high-doped, shorter fibers to maximize the peak power. We propose the use of varying doping levels along the gain fiber to circumvent these opposing requirements. By analogy to dispersion management and nonlinearity management, we refer to this scheme as doping management. As a practical first implementation, we report on the development of a fiber laser-amplifier system, the last stage of which has a hybrid gain fiber composed of high-doped and low-doped Yb fibers. The amplifier generates 100 W at 100 MHz with pulse energy of 1 μJ. The seed source is a passively mode-locked fiber oscillator operating in the all-normal-dispersion regime. The amplifier comprises three stages, which are all-fiber-integrated, delivering 13 ps pulses at full power. By optionally placing a grating compressor after the first stage amplifier, chirp of the seed pulses can be controlled, which allows an extra degree of freedom in the interplay between dispersion and self-phase modulation. This way, the laser delivers 4.5 ps pulses with ~200 kW peak power directly from fiber, without using external pulse compression.

  1. A Synergy Framework for the integration of Earth Observation technologies into Disaster Risk Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaetani, Francesco; Petiteville, Ivan; Pisano, Francesco; Rudari, Roberto; St Pierre, Luc

    2015-04-01

    Earth observations and space-based applications have seen a considerable advance in the last decade, and such advances should find their way in applications related to DRR, climate change and sustainable development, including in the indicators to monitor advances in these areas. The post-2015 framework for disaster risk reduction, as adopted by the 3rd WCDRR is a action-oriented framework for disaster risk reduction that builds on modalities of cooperation linking local, national, regional and global efforts. Earth observations from ground and space platforms and related applications will play a key role in facilitating the implementation of the HFA2 and represent a unique platform to observe and assess how risks have changed in recent years, as well as to track the reduction in the level of exposure of communities. The proposed white paper focuses mainly on Earth Observation from space but it also addresses the use of other sources of data ( airborne, marine, in-situ, socio-economic and model outputs) in combination to remote sensing data. Earth observations (EO) and Space-based technologies can play a crucial role in contributing to the generation of relevant information to support informed decision-making regarding risk and vulnerability reduction and to address the underlying factors of disaster risk. For example, long series of Earth observation data collected over more than 30 years already contribute to track changes in the environment and in particular, environmental degradation around the world. Earth observation data is key to the work of the scientific community. Whether due to inadequate land-use policies, lack of awareness or understanding regarding such degradation, or inadequate use of natural resources including water and the oceans; Earth observation technologies are now routinely employed by many Ministries of Environment and Natural Resources worldwide to monitor the extent of degradation and a basis to design and enact new environmental

  2. Integrated photooxidative extractive deep desulfurization using metal doped TiO2 and eutectic based ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaid, Hayyiratul Fatimah Mohd; Kait, Chong Fai; Mutalib, Mohamed Ibrahim Abdul

    2016-11-01

    A series of metal doped TiO2 namely Fe/TiO2, Cu/TiO2 and Cu-Fe/TiO2 were synthesized and characterized, to be used as a photocatalyst in the integrated photooxidative extractive deep desulfurization for model oil (dodecane) and diesel fuel. The order of the photocatalytic activity was Cu-Fe/TiO2 followed by Cu/TiO2 and then Fe/TiO2. Cu-Fe/TiO2 was an effective photocatalyst for sulfur conversion at ambient atmospheric pressure. Hydrogen peroxide was used as the source of oxidant and eutectic-based ionic liquid as the extractant. Sulfur conversion in model oil reached 100%. Removal of sulfur from model oil was done by two times extraction with a removal of 97.06% in the first run and 2.94% in the second run.

  3. Zero Rare-Earth Magnet Integrated Starter-Generator Development for Military Vehicle Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-14

    generation is expected to reach and exceed 100kW. • Many electric machines capable of (≥ 100kW) output power rely on rare-earth elements such Nd, Sm , Dy...Steel • 1940’s – Alnico • 1950’s – Ferrite • 1960’s – Alnico 9 • 1960’s – SmCo − First RE PM’s • 1980’s – NdFeB • 2007 – LaCo Ferrite ...LaCo Ferrite Developmental Materials Zero Rare-Earth Ferrite Alnico Developmental Materials UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Permanent Magnet

  4. The EPOS e-Infrastructure: metadata driven integration of data products and services in solid Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailo, Daniele; Jeffery, Keith

    2015-04-01

    The European Plate Observing System (EPOS) is an ambitious long term integration plan addressing the major solid-earth research infrastructures in Europe. For its large scale and extent it is an unique initiative which will foster new scientific discoveries and enable scientists to investigate the solid earth system with unprecedented ways. A key aspect of EPOS is to provide end-users with homogeneous access to services and multidisciplinary data collected by monitoring infrastructures and experimental facilities as well as access to software, processing and visualization tools. Such a complex system requires a solid, scalable and reliable architecture in order to accommodate innovative features and to meet the evolving expectations of the heterogeneous communities involved.

  5. Continuous monitoring of a large active earth flow using an integrated GPS - automatic total station approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsini, A.

    2009-04-01

    Landslide monitoring has evolved as a crucial tool in civil protection to mitigate and prevent disasters. The research presents an approach to continuous monitoring of a large-scale active earth flow using a system that integrates surface measurements obtained by a GPS and an automatic total station. With the data obtained from the system the landslide can be monitored in near-real-time and surface displacements can be directly utilized to provide early warning of slope movements and to study the behavior of the landslide, e.g. to predict timing and mechanisms of future failure. The Valoria landslide located in the northern Apennines of Italy was reactivated in 2001, 2005 and 2007 damaging roads and endangering houses. A monitoring system was installed in 2007-2008 in the frame of a civil protection plan aimed at risk mitigation. The system consists of an automatic total station measuring about 40 prisms located in the landslide to a maximum distance of 1.800 km; one double-frequency GPS receiver connects in streaming by wireless communication with 4 single-frequency GPS in side the flow. Until December 2007 the monitoring network was operated with periodic static surveying followed by the data post-processing. From September 2007 until March 2008 the landslide deformation was evaluated by periodic surveys with the total station and the GPS system. This first measure showed that the displacements were influenced by the rainfall events and by the snow melting. The total displacements measured vary from centimeter scale in the crown zone, where retrogressive movements were in progress, to over 50 m in the flow track zone. Starting in March 2008 data acquisition by the total station system and GPS were automated in order to allow continuous and near-real-time data processing. The displacement data collected in one and a half year of continuous operation show different acceleration and deceleration phases as a result of the pore water pressure distribution inside the

  6. Observations from Integrated Ground Motion Using EarthScope's USArray Transportable Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, J. D.; Fouch, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Integrated Ground Motion (IGM) is a new method for visualizing and investigating long-term changes in seismic background levels. These new time series present an opportunity to evaluate variations in background seismic levels on intermediate time scales longer than those usually considered in processing seismic event data, but shorter than the time scales typically utilized when measuring the power spectral density (PSD) function of a seismic channel or instrument. Example uses for this new method include determining relationships between weather and seismic noise, detection of uncataloged small seismic and slow slip events, detection and characterization of remotely triggered seismicity, detection and monitoring of induced seismicity and detection of non-seismic signals. Here we apply the IGM processing method to broadband seismic data from the EarthScope USArray Transportable Array (TA) [www.usarray.org], and present some preliminary observations of the observed patterns in seismicity. We generate IGM time series from raw broadband seismic data by filtering and evaluating the envelope of a sliding time window. We further process the resulting IGM time series to remove peaks from short-duration seismic events by clipping the series at the 95th percentile value and normalizing each resulting series on a 0-1 scale. For this initial evaluation, we process IGM from overlapping 15-minute windows sampled every 5 minutes from four weeks of TA data for the western US in early 2008, bandpass filtering over four different ranges: 7-19 Hz, 1-8 Hz, 1-20 sec, and 20-100 sec. We create a series of animations overlaying the IGM values on a map of the western US and compressing the time scale to 2 hours/second. We observe that IGM in the 7-19 Hz and 1-8 Hz bands is primarily influenced by diurnal variations in background seismic levels, which generally overwhelm the signals from small (M<1.5) local earthquakes. Small earthquakes are somewhat more visible in the 1-8 Hz band. In

  7. CVT/GPL phase 2 integrated testing. [in earth observations, space physics, and material sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shurney, R. E.; Maybee, G.; Schmitt, S.

    1974-01-01

    Experiments representing earth observations, space physics, and material sciences disciplines were installed in the General Purpose Laboratory (GPL). The experiments and the GPL are described. The experiments interfaces the GPL and GPL support systems are assessed. The experiments were cloud physics, ionospheric disturbances, material sciences, high energy astronomy, and superfluid helium.

  8. "Space on Earth:" A Learning Community Integrating English, Math, and Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortna, Joanna; Sullivan, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Imagine a mathematics instructor and English instructor sharing an office; scribbled equations litter one desk, snatches of poetry the other. Our learning community, "Space on Earth," grew from conversations in just such an office where we bridged our own disciplinary gap and discovered a shared passion for helping students apply the concepts and…

  9. Learning in the Middle School Earth Science Classroom: Students Conceptually Integrate New Knowledge Using Intelligent Laserdiscs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freitag, Patricia K.; Abegg, Gerald L.

    A study was designed to describe how middle school students select, link, and determine relationships between textual and visual information. Fourteen authoring groups were formed from both eighth-grade earth science classes of one veteran teacher in one school. Each group was challenged to produce an informative interactive laservideodisc project…

  10. Evaluating Depth-Integrated Steric Contributions to Sea-Level Trends and Variability in Earth System Model Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, E.; Sriver, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    Earth system model ensembles exhibit considerable uncertainties surrounding trends and magnitude of steric sea-level variations, due in part to structural model differences, internal model variability, and parameterizations that influence ocean heat uptake. Here we analyze depth-integrated steric sea-level changes using the CMIP5 models and a new CESM ensemble that samples internal variability of the coupled Earth system. The CESM ensemble contains 50 members, with historical and future projections (1850-2100) initialized from unique model states sampled from a ~10,000 year fully coupled unforced equilibrium simulation. The CESM ensemble enables us to examine how initial conditions uncertainty (internal variability) within the full-ocean can influence depth-integrated steric sea-level variability. The second ensemble is comprised of runs from 32 different CMIP5 models. We performed grid-level drift correction for each model using the pre-industrial control simulations, which enables us to examine depth-integrated variability and trends due to different model structures. We compare and contrast our results with published observational datasets, and we analyze the effect of different sources of uncertainty on simulated sea-level variability and trends for different ocean depths. Results point to the importance of the deep ocean in attempting to attribute and predict temporal patterns of steric sea-level on a global scale.

  11. Use of Persistent Identifiers to link Heterogeneous Data Systems in the Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA) Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, L.; Lehnert, K. A.; Carbotte, S. M.; Arko, R. A.; Ferrini, V.; O'hara, S. H.; Walker, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA) facility maintains multiple data systems with a wide range of solid earth data types from the marine, terrestrial, and polar environments. Examples of the different data types include syntheses of ultra-high resolution seafloor bathymetry collected on large collaborative cruises and analytical geochemistry measurements collected by single investigators in small, unique projects. These different data types have historically been channeled into separate, discipline-specific databases with search and retrieval tailored for the specific data type. However, a current major goal is to integrate data from different systems to allow interdisciplinary data discovery and scientific analysis. To increase discovery and access across these heterogeneous systems, IEDA employs several unique IDs, including sample IDs (International Geo Sample Number, IGSN), person IDs (GeoPass ID), funding award IDs (NSF Award Number), cruise IDs (from the Marine Geoscience Data System Expedition Metadata Catalog), dataset IDs (DOIs), and publication IDs (DOIs). These IDs allow linking of a sample registry (System for Earth SAmple Registration), data libraries and repositories (e.g. Geochemical Research Library, Marine Geoscience Data System), integrated synthesis databases (e.g. EarthChem Portal, PetDB), and investigator services (IEDA Data Compliance Tool). The linked systems allow efficient discovery of related data across different levels of granularity. In addition, IEDA data systems maintain links with several external data systems, including digital journal publishers. Links have been established between the EarthChem Portal and ScienceDirect through publication DOIs, returning sample-level objects and geochemical analyses for a particular publication. Linking IEDA-hosted data to digital publications with IGSNs at the sample level and with IEDA-allocated dataset DOIs are under development. As an example, an individual investigator could sign up

  12. Core-Shell Co/CoO Integrated on 3D Nitrogen Doped Reduced Graphene Oxide Aerogel as an Enhanced Electrocatalyst for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Hou, Yuyang; Slade, Robert C. T.; Wang, Jiazhao; Shi, Dongqi; Wexler, David; Liu, Huakun; Chen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate that Cobalt/cobalt oxide core-shell nanoparticles integrated on nitrogen-doped (N-doped) three-dimensional reduced graphene oxide aerogel-based architecture (Co/CoO-NGA) were synthesized through a facile hydrothermal method followed by annealing treatment. The unique endurable porous structure could provide sufficient mass transfer channels and ample active sites on Co/CoO-NGA to facilitate the catalytic reaction. The synthesized Co/CoO-NGA was explored as an electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction, showing comparable oxygen reduction performance with excellent methanol resistance and better durability compared with Pt/C. PMID:27597939

  13. Modeling the globally-integrated spectral variability of the Archean Earth: The purple planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palle, E.; Sanroma, E.; Parenteau, M. N.; Kiang, N. Y.; Gutierrez-Navarro, A. M.; Lopez, R.; Montañes-Rodríguez, P.

    2014-03-01

    Ongoing searches for exoplanetary systems have revealed a wealth of planets with diverse physical properties. Planets even smaller than the Earth have already been detected and the efforts of future missions are aimed at the discovery, and perhaps characterization, of small rocky exoplanets within the habitable zone of their stars. Clearly, what we know about our planet will be our guideline for the characterization of such planets. But the Earth has been inhabited for at least 3.8 Gyr and its appearance has changed with time. Here, we have studied the Earth during the Archean eon, 3 Gyr ago. At that time, one of the more widespread life forms on the planet were purple bacteria. These bacteria are photosynthetic microorganisms and can inhabit both aquatic and terrestrial environments. Here, we use a radiative transfer model to simulate the visible and near-infrared radiation reflected by our planet, taking into account several scenarios regarding the possible distribution of purple bacteria over continents and oceans. We find that purple bacteria have a reflectance spectrum that has a strong reflectivity increase, similar to the red edge of leafy plants, although shifted redward. This feature produces a detectable signal in the disk-averaged spectra of our planet, depending on cloud amount and bacteria concentration/ distribution. We conclude that by using multi-color photometric observations, it is possible to distinguish between an Archean Earth in which purple bacteria inhabit vast extensions of the planet and a present-day Earth with continents covered by deserts, vegetation, or microbial mats.

  14. Observation and Integrated Earth System Science: A roadmap for 2015-2025

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Adrian

    COSPAR has commissioned a study group to develop a roadmap intended to foster interdisciplinary research making combined use of modelling and the diverse observations provided by the various systems that contribute to the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). The focus is on the period to 2025 covered by the recently renewed mandate of the Group on Earth Observations. The study group has scoped its activities, building on the charge given to it by COSPAR. It envisages first summarising how Earth observation has developed and what is already planned for the next decade. It will then review the development and current status of Earth-system modelling, including its application for prediction from the daily to the decadal time scale and for longer-term scenario-based projection. The use of data assimilation to combine diverse observations with comprehensive models will be covered, not only for its role in estimating the state of the Earth system for the purposes of initialising predictions and establishing long-term records through reanalysis, but also for its role in estimating quantities such as boundary-flux corrections and observational biases. The ways observations and models are used, and the needs and prospects for enhancing their quality and breadth, will be discussed for the areas of monitoring and understanding, model evaluation and development, and prediction and projection. The core of the study should be undertaken between the time of writing this abstract and the time of the COSPAR Scientific Assembly. The presentation to the Assembly will report the outcome.

  15. Effects of oxidization and deoxidization on charge-propagation dynamics in rare-earth-doped titanium dioxide with room-temperature luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Masashi; Towlson, Brian; Poolton, Nigel; Harako, Susumu; Zhao, Xinwei; Komuro, Shuji; Hamilton, Bruce

    2012-03-01

    Anatase titanium dioxide (A-TiO2) with a wide band-gap energy of 3.2 eV can be used as a host semiconductor of rare-earth dopants for optical devices. However, the chemical activity of A-TiO2 strongly affects the luminescence properties of the devices. In this study, we analyzed oxidized and deoxidized samarium (Sm)-doped A-TiO2 (TiO2:Sm) by impedance spectroscopy and microscopic photoluminescence. Charge propagation analyses using dielectric relaxation (DR) revealed that different kinds of charge-trapping centers were formed by the oxidization and deoxidization. For oxidization, Sm-oxygen complexes incorporated in the A-TiO2 formed a trapping level that contributed to Sm excitation, while defective complexes at the A-TiO2 boundary formed other levels that dissipated the charges. For deoxidization using thermal treatment in a hydrogen (H) atmosphere, the number of profitable trapping centers in A-TiO2 was reduced but the remainder maintained the property of Sm excitation. It was also found that H adsorption on the A-TiO2 boundary delocalized the electrons. Photoexcited dielectric relaxation (PEDR) studies confirmed the charge recombination at the profitable traps, and the peak height of the spectra corresponded to the luminescence intensity. Microscopic photoluminescence studies provided results consistent with DR and PEDR measurements and also revealed another quenching factor, i.e., Ti2O3 microcrystal formation on the TiO2:Sm surface.

  16. Alkaline Earth Metal Zirconate Perovskites MZrO3 (M=Ba(2+), Sr(2+), Ca(2+)) Derived from Molecular Precursors and Doped with Eu(3+) Ions.

    PubMed

    Drąg-Jarząbek, Anna; John, Łukasz; Petrus, Rafał; Kosińska-Klähn, Magdalena; Sobota, Piotr

    2016-03-24

    The effect of alkaline earth metal alkoxides on the protonation of zirconocene dichloride was investigated. This approach enabled the design of compounds with preset molecular structures for generating high-purity binary metal oxide perovskites MZrO3 (M=Ba(2+), Sr(2+), Ca(2+)). Single-source molecular precursors [Ba4 Zr2 (μ6 -O)(μ3 ,η(2)-OR)8 (OR)2(η(2) -HOR)2 (HOR)2 Cl4], [Sr4 Zr2 (μ6 -O)(μ3 ,η(2)-OR)8 (OR)2 (HOR)4 Cl4], [Ca4 Zr2 (μ6-O)(μ3 ,η(2)-OR)8 (OR)2 Cl4], and [Ca6 Zr2 (μ2 ,η(2)-OR)12 (μ-Cl)2 (η(2) -HOR)4 Cl6 ]⋅8 CH2 Cl2 were prepared via elimination of the cyclopentadienyl ring from Cp2 ZrCl2 as CpH in the presence of M(OR)2 and alcohol ROH (ROH=CH3OCH2 CH2OH) as a source of protons. The resulting complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR and NMR spectroscopy, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The compounds were then thermally decomposed to MCl2 /MZrO3 mixtures. Leaching of MCl2 from the raw powder with deionized water produced highly pure perovskite-like oxide particles of 40-80 nm in size. Luminescence studies on Eu(3+)-doped MZrO3 revealed that the perovskites are attractive host lattices for potential applications in display technology.

  17. Integration of multi-discipline data processing for earth observing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph; Chase, Robert

    1987-01-01

    The first steps taken to ensure the controlled evolution of existing facilities toward greater interoperability and sharing of resources among NASA-supported earth science and applications data systems (ESADS) are described. Recommendations made by the various panels during the 1987 ESADS Workshop are presented. The panels were concerned with directories and catalogs, data archives, data manipulation software, computational facilities, data storage media, database management, and networking. Consideration was also given to the tracking and tuning of overall development and management coordination issues.

  18. Monolithic integration of erbium-doped amplifiers with silicon-on-insulator waveguides.

    PubMed

    Agazzi, Laura; Bradley, Jonathan D B; Dijkstra, Meindert; Ay, Feridun; Roelkens, Gunther; Baets, Roel; Wörhoff, Kerstin; Pollnau, Markus

    2010-12-20

    Monolithic integration of Al2O3:Er3+ amplifier technology with passive silicon-on-insulator waveguides is demonstrated. A signal enhancement of >7 dB at 1533 nm wavelength is obtained. The straightforward wafer-scale fabrication process, which includes reactive co-sputtering and subsequent reactive ion etching, allows for parallel integration of multiple amplifier and laser sections with silicon or other photonic circuits on a chip.

  19. Semantic Data Integration and Ontology Use within the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) Global Water Cycle Data Integration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, W.; Fekete, B.; Piasecki, M.; McGuinness, D.; Fox, P.; Lawford, R.; Vorosmarty, C.; Houser, P.; Imam, B.

    2008-12-01

    The inadequacies of water cycle observations for monitoring long-term changes in the global water system, as well as their feedback into the climate system, poses a major constraint on sustainable development of water resources and improvement of water management practices. Hence, The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) has established Task WA-08-01, "Integration of in situ and satellite data for water cycle monitoring," an integrative initiative combining different types of satellite and in situ observations related to key variables of the water cycle with model outputs for improved accuracy and global coverage. This presentation proposes development of the Rapid, Integrated Monitoring System for the Water Cycle (Global-RIMS)--already employed by the GEO Global Terrestrial Network for Hydrology (GTN-H)--as either one of the main components or linked with the Asian system to constitute the modeling system of GEOSS for water cycle monitoring. We further propose expanded, augmented capability to run multiple grids to embrace some of the heterogeneous methods and formats of the Earth Science, Hydrology, and Hydraulic Engineering communities. Different methodologies are employed by the Earth Science (land surface modeling), the Hydrological (GIS), and the Hydraulic Engineering Communities; with each community employing models that require different input data. Data will be routed as input variables to the models through web services, allowing satellite and in situ data to be integrated together within the modeling framework. Semantic data integration will provide the automation to enable this system to operate in near-real-time. Multiple data collections for ground water, precipitation, soil moisture satellite data, such as SMAP, and lake data will require multiple low level ontologies, and an upper level ontology will permit user-friendly water management knowledge to be synthesized. These ontologies will have to have overlapping terms mapped and linked together. so

  20. Integrated Earth Science Research in Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. S.; Hazen, T. C.; Conrad, M. E.; Johnson, L. R.; Salve, R.

    2004-12-01

    There are three types of sites being considered for deep-underground earth science and physics experiments: (1) abandoned mines (e.g., the Homestake Gold Mine, South Dakota; the Soudan Iron Mine, Minnesota), (2) active mines/facilities (e.g., the Henderson Molybdenum Mine, Colorado; the Kimballton Limestone Mine, Virginia; the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant [in salt], New Mexico), and (3) new tunnels (e.g., Icicle Creek in the Cascades, Washington; Mt. San Jacinto, California). Additional sites have been considered in the geologically unique region of southeastern California and southwestern Nevada, which has both very high mountain peaks and the lowest point in the United States (Death Valley). Telescope Peak (along the western border of Death Valley), Boundary Peak (along the California-Nevada border), Mt. Charleston (outside Las Vegas), and Mt. Tom (along the Pine Creek Valley) all have favorable characteristics for consideration. Telescope Peak can site the deepest laboratory in the United States. The Mt. Charleston tunnel can be a highway extension connecting Las Vegas to Pahrump. The Pine Creek Mine next to Mt. Tom is an abandoned tungsten mine. The lowest levels of the mine are accessible by nearly horizontal tunnels from portals in the mining base camp. Drainage (most noticeable in the springs resulting from snow melt) flows (from the mountain top through upper tunnel complex) out of the access tunnel without the need for pumping. While the underground drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, have not yet been considered (since they are relatively shallow for physics experiments), they have undergone extensive earth science research for nearly 10 years, as the site for future storage of nation's spent nuclear fuels. All these underground sites could accommodate different earth science and physics experiments. Most underground physics experiments require depth to reduce the cosmic-ray-induced muon flux from atmospheric sources. Earth science experiments can be

  1. Integrating Real-time, Real-world Geoscience Experiences into Classroom Instruction with EarthLabs and the JOIDES Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mote, A. S.; Lockwood, J.; Ellins, K. K.; Haddad, N.; Cooper, S. K.; Ledley, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    Inspiring the next generation of geoscientists and preparing students for the 21st century workforce requires lifting science outside of the classroom and giving learners the opportunity to think critically about real-world geoscience problems. The EarthLabs suite of climate science modules challenges students with a variety of learning experiences including current scientific data analysis, computer visualizations, satellite imagery, and engaging videos. Each module includes a series of hands-on activities to allow students to explore Earth's complex and dynamic climate history, leading to a deeper understanding of present and future changes to our planet. A new EarthLabs module in development 'Climate Detectives: An Expedition on board the JOIDES Resolution," focuses on Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 341 to Southern Alaska. The module is structured to allow students to work collaboratively, mimicking scientific research groups on the JOIDES Resolution. As students assume the role of a scientist, learn about data collection methods, and analyze authentic data, they learn about the climate history and tectonic processes of the Southern Alaska continental margin, as well as explore the relationship between climate, sedimentation, and tectonics. The Project Based Learning (PBL) approach used in the module teaches students how to analyze data and solve problems like scientists, strengthening the development of higher order thinking skills and preparing them for college coursework. The 'Climate Detectives' Module also provides students with opportunities to interact with scientists through live video conferencing and pre-recorded video presentations by scientists. In this presentation, Expedition 341 Education Officer, Alison Mote, describes the new module, which takes students on an educational journey as they learn about the scientific objectives, methods, and data collection tools scientists use to conduct research on sediment cores retrieved

  2. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Colleen

    1998-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-sponsored project for teachers of grades 5-12, designed to: (1) enhance understanding of the Earth as an integrated system; (2) enhance the interdisciplinary approach to science instruction; and (3) provide classroom materials that focus on those goals. Discover Earth is conducted by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies in collaboration with Dr. Eric Barron, Director, Earth System Science Center, The Pennsylvania State University; and Dr. Robert Hudson, Chair, the Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland at College Park. The enclosed materials: (1) represent only part of the Discover Earth materials; (2) were developed by classroom teachers who are participating in the Discover Earth project; (3) utilize an investigative approach and on-line data; and (4) can be effectively adjusted to classrooms with greater/without technology access. The Discover Earth classroom materials focus on the Earth system and key issues of global climate change including topics such as the greenhouse effect, clouds and Earth's radiation balance, surface hydrology and land cover, and volcanoes and climate change. All the materials developed to date are available on line at (http://www.strategies.org) You are encouraged to submit comments and recommendations about these materials to the Discover Earth project manager, contact information is listed below. You are welcome to duplicate all these materials.

  3. Becoming Earth Independent: Human-Automation-Robotics Integration Challenges for Future Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marquez, Jessica J.

    2016-01-01

    Future exploration missions will require NASA to integrate more automation and robotics in order to accomplish mission objectives. This presentation will describe on the future challenges facing the human operator (astronaut, ground controllers) as we increase the amount of automation and robotics in spaceflight operations. It will describe how future exploration missions will have to adapt and evolve in order to deal with more complex missions and communication latencies. This presentation will outline future human-automation-robotic integration challenges.

  4. Integrated Solid Earth Science: the right place and time to discover the unexpected? (Arthur Holmes Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloetingh, Sierd

    2013-04-01

    -level. Those cycles were detected as a result of the pioneering work on the stratigraphic record of sedimentary basins and continental margins from all over the world by Peter Vail, Bilal Haq and others from Exxon. It was at this time, that sedimentary basins became a frontier in the integration of quantitative geology and geophysics. Sedimentary basins do not only provide a powerful source of information on the evolution of the underlying lithosphere and climate fluctuations, but also contain mankind's main reservoirs of geo-energy and geo-resources. It was Peter Ziegler, head of global geology at Shell International, who was the prime mentor in my somewhat unexpected scientific journey in sedimentary basins. These became the main research target of the Tectonics research group I established in 1988 in Amsterdam. In these years it became increasingly evident that the rheology of the lithosphere exerts a crucial control on the evolution of basins, but also on continental topography. It is on this topic that the cooperation over more than two decades with Evgenii Burov, addressing issues like the rheological structure of Europe's lithosphere, rift shoulder uplift and the interplay of lithospheric folding and mantle-lithosphere interactions, has, been very fruitful. Another unexpected milestone has been the opportunity to build up, parallel to the research efforts in field studies and numerical modeling, an analogue tectonic laboratory in our group. This brings me to another issue, also completely unforeseen: the integration of earth science in Europe, particularly taking off after the disappearance of the Iron Curtain. For my group, the latter marked the beginning of a very fruitful cooperation in particular with the groups of Frank Horvath in Budapest and Cornel Dinu in Bucharest, addressing the fascinating solid Earth dynamics of the Carpathians and Pannonian basin. Over the last few years, it has been become evident that integration in the solid earth science is the way to

  5. On an improved sub-regional water resources management representation for integration into earth system models

    SciTech Connect

    Voisin, Nathalie; Li, Hongyi; Ward, Duane L.; Huang, Maoyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-09-30

    Human influence on the hydrologic cycle includes regulation and storage, consumptive use and overall redistribution of water resources in space and time. Representing these processes is essential for applications of earth system models in hydrologic and climate predictions, as well as impact studies at regional to global scales. Emerging large-scale research reservoir models use generic operating rules that are flexible for coupling with earth system models. Those generic operating rules have been successful in reproducing the overall regulated flow at large basin scales. This study investigates the uncertainties of the reservoir models from different implementations of the generic operating rules using the complex multi-objective Columbia River Regulation System in northwestern United States as an example to understand their effects on not only regulated flow but also reservoir storage and fraction of the demand that is met. Numerical experiments are designed to test new generic operating rules that combine storage and releases targets for multi-purpose reservoirs and to compare the use of reservoir usage priorities, withdrawals vs. consumptive demand, as well as natural vs. regulated mean flow for calibrating operating rules. Overall the best performing implementation is the use of the combined priorities (flood control storage targets and irrigation release targets) operating rules calibrated with mean annual natural flow and mean monthly withdrawals. The challenge of not accounting for groundwater withdrawals, or on the contrary, assuming that all remaining demand is met through groundwater extractions, is discussed.

  6. Er-doped light emitting slot waveguides monolithically integrated in a silicon photonic chip.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, J M; Ferrarese Lupi, F; Berencén, Y; Anopchenko, A; Colonna, J P; Jambois, O; Fedeli, J M; Pavesi, L; Prtljaga, N; Rivallin, P; Tengattini, A; Navarro-Urrios, D; Garrido, B

    2013-03-22

    An integrated erbium-based light emitting diode has been realized in a waveguide configuration allowing 1.54 μm light signal routing in silicon photonic circuits. This injection device is based on an asymmetric horizontal slot waveguide where the active slot material is Er(3+) in SiO2 or Er(3+) in Si-rich oxide. The active horizontal slot waveguide allows optical confinement, guiding and lateral extraction of the light for on-chip distribution. Light is then coupled through a taper section to a passive Si waveguide terminated by a grating which extracts (or inserts) the light signal for measuring purposes. We measured an optical power density in the range of tens of μW/cm(2) which follows a super-linear dependence on injected current density. When the device is biased at high current density, upon a voltage pulse (pump signal), free-carrier and space charge absorption losses become large, attenuating a probe signal by more than 60 dB/cm and thus behaving conceptually as an electro-optical modulator. The integrated device reported here is the first example, still to be optimized, of a fundamental block to realize an integrated silicon photonic circuit with monolithic integration of the light emitter.

  7. Production yield of rare-earth ions implanted into an optical crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Kornher, Thomas Xia, Kangwei; Kolesov, Roman; Reuter, Rolf; Villa, Bruno; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Kukharchyk, Nadezhda; Wieck, Andreas D.; Siyushev, Petr; Stöhr, Rainer; Schreck, Matthias; Becker, Hans-Werner

    2016-02-01

    Rare-earth (RE) ions doped into desired locations of optical crystals might enable a range of novel integrated photonic devices for quantum applications. With this aim, we have investigated the production yield of cerium and praseodymium by means of ion implantation. As a measure, the collected fluorescence intensity from both implanted samples and single centers was used. With a tailored annealing procedure for cerium, a yield up to 53% was estimated. Praseodymium yield amounts up to 91%. Such high implantation yield indicates a feasibility of creation of nanopatterned rare-earth doping and suggests strong potential of RE species for on-chip photonic devices.

  8. Structural and optical properties of rare earth-doped (Ba{sub 0.77}Ca{sub 0.23}){sub 1-x}(Sm, Nd, Pr, Yb){sub x}TiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Moraes, A. P. A.; Filho, A. G. Souza; Freire, P. T. C.; Filho, J. Mendes; M'Peko, J. C.; Hernandes, A. C.; Antonelli, E.; Blair, Michael W.; Muenchausen, Ross E.; Jacobsohn, Luiz G.; Paraguassu, W.

    2011-06-15

    The structural, dielectric, and vibrational properties of pure and rare earth (RE)-doped Ba{sub 0.77}Ca{sub 0.23}TiO{sub 3} (BCT23; RE = Nd, Sm, Pr, Yb) ceramics obtained via solid-state reaction were investigated. The pure and RE-doped BCT23 ceramics sintered at 1450 deg. C in air for 4 h showed a dense microstructure in all ceramics. The use of RE ions as dopants introduced lattice-parameter changes that manifested in the reduction of the volume of the unit cell. RE-doped BCT23 samples exhibit a more homogenous microstructure due to the absence of a Ti-rich phase in the grain boundaries as demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy imaging. The incorporation of REs led to perturbations of the local symmetry of TiO{sub 6} octahedra and the creation of a new Raman mode. The results of Raman scattering measurements indicated that the Curie temperature of the ferroelectric phase transition depends on the RE ion and ion content, with the Curie temperature shifting toward lower values as the RE content increases, with the exception of Yb{sup 3+} doping, which did not affect the ferroelectric phase transition temperature. The phase transition behavior is explained using the standard soft mode model. Electronic paramagnetic resonance measurements showed the existence of Ti vacancies in the structure of RE-doped BCT23. Defects are created via charge compensation mechanisms due to the incorporation of elements with a different valence state relative to the ions of the pure BCT23 host. It is concluded that the Ti vacancies are responsible for the activation of the Raman mode at 840 cm{sup -1}, which is in agreement with lattice dynamics calculations.

  9. Native American Science Education: A Compelling Opportunity for the Integration of Earth and Space Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, C. A.; Maryboy, N.; Begay, D.

    2005-05-01

    The strong relationships between Earth and sky in the worldviews of Native American people presents a wonderful opportunity for collaborations that can co-create compelling educational opportunities for both Native and non-Native learners. This paper will discuss the relationship among successful science education for Native Americans, standards-based science education, and informal science education. It will address some strategies for combining best practice in education with a deep cultural authenticity. Presenting astronomy in a culturally relevant and correct way is not only of value to the Native learner, but it is also of value to the non-Native learner because cultural relevance for Native people demands that science be presented via different learning modalities (e.g. visual, kinesthetic, tactile) and in a way that is more interconnected with other science and non-science disciplines. This kind of multi-modal and interdisciplinary approach is valuable and progressive for Non-native learners as well.

  10. Integration and High-Temperature Characterization of Ferroelectric Vanadium-Doped Bismuth Titanate Thin Films on Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekström, Mattias; Khartsev, Sergiy; Östling, Mikael; Zetterling, Carl-Mikael

    2017-03-01

    4H-SiC electronics can operate at high temperature (HT), e.g., 300°C to 500°C, for extended times. Systems using sensors and amplifiers that operate at HT would benefit from microcontrollers which can also operate at HT. Microcontrollers require nonvolatile memory (NVM) for computer programs. In this work, we demonstrate the possibility of integrating ferroelectric vanadium-doped bismuth titanate (BiTV) thin films on 4H-SiC for HT memory applications, with BiTV ferroelectric capacitors providing memory functionality. Film deposition was achieved by laser ablation on Pt (111)/TiO2/4H-SiC substrates, with magnetron-sputtered Pt used as bottom electrode and thermally evaporated Au as upper contacts. Film characterization by x-ray diffraction analysis revealed predominately (117) orientation. P-E hysteresis loops measured at room temperature showed maximum 2P r of 48 μC/cm2, large enough for wide read margins. P-E loops were measurable up to 450°C, with losses limiting measurements above 450°C. The phase-transition temperature was determined to be about 660°C from the discontinuity in dielectric permittivity, close to what is achieved for ceramics. These BiTV ferroelectric capacitors demonstrate potential for use in HT NVM applications for SiC digital electronics.

  11. Path Integral Monte Carlo Study Confirms a Highly Ordered Snowball in 4He Nanodroplets Doped with an Ar+ Ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramonto, F.; Salvestrini, P.; Nava, M.; Galli, D. E.

    2015-07-01

    By means of the Path Integral Monte Carlo method, we have performed a detailed microscopic study of 4He nanodroplets doped with an argon ion, Ar, at K. We have computed density profiles, energies, dissociation energies, and characterized the local order around the ion for nanodroplets with a number of 4He atoms ranging from 10 to 64 and also 128. We have found the formation of a stable solid structure around the ion, a "snowball", consisting of three concentric shells in which the 4He atoms are placed at the vertices of platonic solids: the first inner shell is an icosahedron (12 atoms); the second one is a dodecahedron with 20 atoms placed on the faces of the icosahedron of the first shell; the third shell is again an icosahedron composed of 12 atoms placed on the faces of the dodecahedron of the second shell. The "magic numbers" implied by this structure, 12, 32, and 44 helium atoms, have been observed in a recent experimental study (Bartl et al., J Phys Chem A 118:8050, 2014) of these complexes; the dissociation energy curve computed in the present work shows jumps in correspondence with those found in the nanodroplets abundance distribution measured in that experiment, strengthening the agreement between theory and experiment. The same structures were predicted in Galli et al. (J Phys Chem A 115:7300, 2011) in a study regarding Na+@4He when ; a comparison between Ar+@4He and Na+@4He complexes is also presented.

  12. Moving NASA Beyond Low Earth Orbit: Future Human-Automation-Robotic Integration Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marquez, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of current human spaceflight operations. It will also describe how future exploration missions will have to adapt and evolve in order to deal with more complex missions and communication latencies. Additionally, there are many implications regarding advanced automation and robotics, and this presentation will outline future human-automation-robotic integration challenges.

  13. Effect of Knowledge Integration Activities on Students' Perception of the Earth's Crust as a Cyclic System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kali, Yael; Orion, Nir; Eylon, Bat-Sheva

    2003-01-01

    Characterizes students' understanding of the rock cycle system. Examines effects of a knowledge integration activity on their system thinking. Interprets answers to an open-ended test using a systems thinking continuum ranging from a completely static view of the system to an understanding of the system's cyclic nature. Reports meaningful…

  14. Thermal neutron imaging with rare-earth-ion-doped LiCaAlF 6 scintillators and a sealed 252Cf source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Yanagida, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Yokota, Yuui; Kamada, Kei; Fukuda, Kentaro; Suyama, Toshihisa; Watanabe, Kenichi; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Chani, Valery; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2011-10-01

    Thermal neutron imaging with Ce-doped LiCaAlF 6 crystals has been performed. The prototype of the neutron imager using a Ce-doped LiCaAlF 6 scintillating crystal and a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT) which had 64 multi-channel anode was developed. The Ce-doped LiCaAlF 6 single crystal was grown by the Czochralski method. A plate with dimensions of a diameter of 50×2 mm 2 was cut from the grown crystal, polished, and optically coupled to PSPMT by silicone grease. The 252Cf source (<1 MBq) was sealed with 43 mm of polyethylene for neutron thermalization. Alphabet-shaped Cd pieces with a thickness of 2 mm were used as a mask for the thermal neutrons. After corrections for the pedestals and gain of each pixel, we successfully obtained two-dimensional neutron images using Ce-doped LiCaAlF 6.

  15. Impact: an Integrated Approach (Space and Ground) for Monitoring the Threat of Earth Orbit Corssing Celestial Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussolino, L.; Somma, R.

    The threat of possible collision of asteroids and comets with our planet has reached an international stage since 1990 when U.S.A. Congress set up a dedicated committee for the analysis and the assessment of this problem.The U.N. organized a congress later on to summarize the current knowledge on this subject as well as the Europea Council recommended its member states to conduct studies to further deepen the understanding in terms of tackling and solving this kind of problem interesting the entire world. IMPACT is the acronym for " International Monitoring Program for Asteroids and Comets Threats " coming out as proposal from a study funded by the italian region PIEMONTE throughout the Civil Protection Bureau and performed by the Planetology Group of the Astronomical Observatory of Torino ( Italy ) and Alenia Spazio for the engineering part. They have carried out a series of analyses aimed at contributing in subsequent steps to the solution of the two fundamental problems associated to the potential impact threat : the assessment of the numbers of killers/terminators and the impact rates from one side and the development of the idea of considering space segments for supporting activities of discovery as well as the physical and mineralogical characterization using satellites in orbit around the Earth. other additional studies also funded by the European Space Agency where the space technology appears to offer a great contribution if conveniently integrated with the Earth networks for Potentially Hazardous Asteroids ( PHA ) detection. An international approach for monitoring this threat for the Earth is then proposed.

  16. 2D Layered Materials of Rare-Earth Er-Doped MoS2 with NIR-to-NIR Down- and Up-Conversion Photoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Bai, Gongxun; Yuan, Shuoguo; Zhao, Yuda; Yang, Zhibin; Choi, Sin Yuk; Chai, Yang; Yu, Siu Fung; Lau, Shu Ping; Hao, Jianhua

    2016-09-01

    A 2D system of Er-doped MoS2 layered nanosheets is developed. Structural studies indicate that the Er atoms can be substitutionally introduced into MoS2 to form stable doping. Density functional theory calculation implies that the system remains stable. Both NIR-to-NIR up-conversion and down-conversion light-emissions are observed in 2D transition metal dichalcogenides, ascribed to the energy transition from Er(3+) dopants.

  17. Challenges of agricultural monitoring: integration of the Open Farm Management Information System into GEOSS and Digital Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Řezník, T.; Kepka, M.; Charvát, K.; Charvát, K., Jr.; Horáková, S.; Lukas, V.

    2016-04-01

    From a global perspective, agriculture is the single largest user of freshwater resources, each country using an average of 70% of all its surface water supplies. An essential proportion of agricultural water is recycled back to surface water and/or groundwater. Agriculture and water pollution is therefore the subject of (inter)national legislation, such as the Clean Water Act in the United States of America, the European Water Framework Directive, and the Law of the People's Republic of China on the Prevention and Control of Water Pollution. Regular monitoring by means of sensor networks is needed in order to provide evidence of water pollution in agriculture. This paper describes the benefits of, and open issues stemming from, regular sensor monitoring provided by an Open Farm Management Information System. Emphasis is placed on descriptions of the processes and functionalities available to users, the underlying open data model, and definitions of open and lightweight application programming interfaces for the efficient management of collected (spatial) data. The presented Open Farm Management Information System has already been successfully registered under Phase 8 of the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) Architecture Implementation Pilot in order to support the wide variety of demands that are primarily aimed at agriculture pollution monitoring. The final part of the paper deals with the integration of the Open Farm Management Information System into the Digital Earth framework.

  18. An integrated study of earth resources in the state of California based on ERTS-1 and supporting aircraft data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, R. N.; Thorley, G. A.; Burgy, R. H.; Schubert, G.; Estes, J. E.; Bowden, L. W.; Algazi, V. R.; Wildman, W. E.; Huntington, G. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. Results of an integrated study of earth resources in the state of California using ERTS-1 and supporting aircraft data are presented. Areas of investigation cover (1) regional agricultural surveys; (2) solving water resource management problems; (3) resource management in Northern California using ERTS-1 data; (4) analysis of river meanders; (5) assessment and monitoring change in west side of the San Joaquin Valley and central coastal zone of state; (6) assessment and monitoring of changes in Southern California environment; (7) digital handling and processing of ERTS-1 data; (8) use of ERTS-1 data in educational and applied research programs of the Agricultural Extension Service; and (9) identification, classification, and mapping of salt affected soils.

  19. Combining sky and earth: desert ants (Melophorus bagoti) show weighted integration of celestial and terrestrial cues.

    PubMed

    Legge, Eric L G; Wystrach, Antoine; Spetch, Marcia L; Cheng, Ken

    2014-12-01

    Insects typically use celestial sources of directional information for path integration, and terrestrial panoramic information for view-based navigation. Here we set celestial and terrestrial sources of directional information in conflict for homing desert ants (Melophorus bagoti). In the first experiment, ants learned to navigate out of a round experimental arena with a distinctive artificial panorama. On crucial tests, we rotated the arena to create a conflict between the artificial panorama and celestial information. In a second experiment, ants at a feeder in their natural visually-cluttered habitat were displaced prior to their homing journey so that the dictates of path integration (feeder to nest direction) based on a celestial compass conflicted with the dictates of view-based navigation (release point to nest direction) based on the natural terrestrial panorama. In both experiments, ants generally headed in a direction intermediate to the dictates of celestial and terrestrial information. In the second experiment, the ants put more weight on the terrestrial cues when they provided better directional information. We conclude that desert ants weight and integrate the dictates of celestial and terrestrial information in determining their initial heading, even when the two directional cues are highly discrepant.

  20. Towards Designing an Integrated Earth Observation System for the Provision of Solar Energy Resource and Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackouse, Paul W., Jr.; Renne, D.; Beyer, H.-G.; Wald, L.; Meyers, R.; Perez, R.; Suri, M.

    2006-01-01

    The GEOSS strategic plan specifically targets the area of improved energy resource management due to the importance of these to the economic and social viability of every nation of the world. With the world s increasing demand for energy resources, the need for new alternative energy resources grows. This paper overviews a new initiative within the International Energy Agency that addresses needs to better manage and develop solar energy resources worldwide. The goal is to provide the solar energy industry, the electricity sector, governments, and renewable energy organizations and institutions with the most suitable and accurate information of the solar radiation resources at the Earth's surface in easily-accessible formats and understandable quality metrics. The scope of solar resource assessment information includes historic data sets and currently derived data products using satellite imagery and other means. Thus, this new task will address the needs of the solar energy sector while at the same time will serve as a model that satisfies GEOSS objectives and goals.

  1. Integration of lessons from recent research for "Earth to Mars" life support systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, M.; Allen, J. P.; Alling, A.; Dempster, W. F.; Silverstone, S.; van Thillo, M.

    Development of reliable and robust strategies for long-term life support for mbox planetary exploration needs to be built on real-time experimentation to verify and improve system components Also critical is the incorporation of a range of viable options to handle potential short-term life system imbalances This paper revisits some of the conceptual framework for a Mars base prototype previously advanced Mars on Earth in the light of three years of experimentation by the authors in the Laboratory Biosphere further investigation of system alternatives and the advent of other innovative engineering and agri-ecosystem approaches Several experiments with candidate space agriculture crops have demonstrated the higher productivity possible with elevated light levels and improved environmental controls For example crops of sweet potatoes exceeded original Mars base prototype projections by 83 ultradwarf Apogee wheat by 27 pinto bean by 240 and cowpeas slightly exceeded anticipated dry bean yield These production levels although they may be increased with further optimization of lighting regimes environmental parameters crop density etc offer evidence that a soil-based system can be as productive as the hydroponic systems which have dominated space life support scenarios and research Soil also offers several distinct advantages the capability to be created using in-situ space resources reducing reliance on consumables and imported resources and more easily recycling and

  2. Towards an Integrated Model of Earth's Thermo-Chemical Evolution and Plate Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackley, P. J.; Xie, S.

    2001-05-01

    It has long been a challenge for geodynamicists, who have typically modeled homogeneous mantles, to explain the geochemical evidence for the existence of several distinct chemical reservoirs, in terms of a dynamically and chemically self-consistent model. While the mixing behavior of generalized tracers has received much attention in the modeling community, a recent trend has been towards mantle convection models that track the evolution of specific chemical species, both major and minor, and can thus be related to geochemical observations. However, obtaining realistic chemical evolution in such models is dependent on their having a reasonable representation of plate tectonic behavior since the recycling of oceanic crust and complementary depleted residuum is a key process in Earth that other terrestrial planets may lack. In general, this has required inserting plate motions by hand in models. In recent years, however, we have learned how to perform numerical simulations of mantle convection in which plate tectonic behavior is introduced self-consistently through plastic yielding of the lithosphere. In this presentation, models of mantle convection that combine a treatment of geochemical evolution with self-consistently generated plate tectonics, will be presented. Preliminary results indicate that the system can self-consistently evolve regions which have a HIMU-like signature as well as regions with a high He3/He4 ratio.

  3. Entrainment of bed material by Earth-surface mass flows: review and reformulation of depth-integrated theory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Richard M.; Chaojun Ouyang,

    2015-01-01

    Earth-surface mass flows such as debris flows, rock avalanches, and dam-break floods can grow greatly in size and destructive potential by entraining bed material they encounter. Increasing use of depth-integrated mass- and momentum-conservation equations to model these erosive flows motivates a review of the underlying theory. Our review indicates that many existing models apply depth-integrated conservation principles incorrectly, leading to spurious inferences about the role of mass and momentum exchanges at flow-bed boundaries. Model discrepancies can be rectified by analyzing conservation of mass and momentum in a two-layer system consisting of a moving upper layer and static lower layer. Our analysis shows that erosion or deposition rates at the interface between layers must in general satisfy three jump conditions. These conditions impose constraints on valid erosion formulas, and they help determine the correct forms of depth-integrated conservation equations. Two of the three jump conditions are closely analogous to Rankine-Hugoniot conditions that describe the behavior of shocks in compressible gasses, and the third jump condition describes shear traction discontinuities that necessarily exist across eroding boundaries. Grain-fluid mixtures commonly behave as compressible materials as they undergo entrainment, because changes in bulk density occur as the mixtures mobilize and merge with an overriding flow. If no bulk density change occurs, then only the shear-traction jump condition applies. Even for this special case, however, accurate formulation of depth-integrated momentum equations requires a clear distinction between boundary shear tractions that exist in the presence or absence of bed erosion.

  4. Visual-vestibular integration as a function of adaptation to space flight and return to Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, Millard R.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Harm, Deborah L.; Huebner, William P.; Krnavek, Jody M.; Paloski, William H.; Berthoz, Alan

    1999-01-01

    Research on perception and control of self-orientation and self-motion addresses interactions between action and perception . Self-orientation and self-motion, and the perception of that orientation and motion are required for and modified by goal-directed action. Detailed Supplementary Objective (DSO) 604 Operational Investigation-3 (OI-3) was designed to investigate the integrated coordination of head and eye movements within a structured environment where perception could modify responses and where response could be compensatory for perception. A full understanding of this coordination required definition of spatial orientation models for the microgravity environment encountered during spaceflight.

  5. Earth tides

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Nineteen papers on gravity, tilt, and strain tides are compiled into this volume. Detailed chapters cover the calculation of the tidal forces and of the Earth's response to them, as well as actual observations of earth tides. Partial Contents: On Earth tides. The tidal forces: Tidal Forces. New Computations of the Tide-Generating Potential. Corrected Tables of Tidal Harmonics. The Theory of Tidal Deformations. Body Tides on an Elliptical, Rotating, Elastic and Oceanless Earth, Deformation of the Earth by Surface Loads. Gravimetric Tidal Loading Computed from Integrated Green's Functions. Tidal Friction in the Solid Earth. Loading Tides Versus Body Tides. Lunar Tidal Acceleration from Earth Satellite Orbit Analysis. Observations: gravity. Tidal Gravity in Britain: Tidal Loading and the Spatial Distribution of the Marine Tide. Tidal Loading along a Profile Europe-East Africa-South Asia-Australia and the Pacific Ocean. Detailed Gravity-Tide Spectrum between One and Four Cycles per Day. Observations: tilt and strain. Cavity and Topographic Effects in Tilt and Strain Measurement. Observations of Local Elastic Effects on Earth Tide Tilts and Strains.

  6. Integrated propulsion for near-Earth space missions. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dailey, C. L.; Meissinger, H. F.; Lovberg, R. H.; Zafran, S.

    1981-01-01

    Tradeoffs between electric propulsion system mass ratio and transfer time from LEO to GEO were conducted parametrically for various thruster efficiency, specific impulse, and other propulsion parameters. A computer model was developed for performing orbit transfer calculations which included the effects of aerodynamic drag, radiation degradation, and occultation. The tradeoff results showed that thruster technology areas for integrated propulsion should be directed towards improving primary thruster efficiency in the range from 1500 to 2500 seconds, and be continued towards reducing specific mass. Comparison of auxiliary propulsion systems showed large total propellant mass savings with integrated electric auxiliary propulsion. Stationkeeping is the most demanding on orbit propulsion requirement. At area densities above 0.5 sq m/kg, East-West stationkeeping requirements from solar pressure exceed North-South stationkeeping requirements from gravitational forces. A solar array pointing strategy was developed to minimize the effects of atmospheric drag at low altitude, enabling electric propulsion to initiate orbit transfer at Shuttle's maximum cargo carrying altitude. Gravity gradient torques are used during ascent to sustain the spacecraft roll motion required for optimum solar array illumination. A near optimum cover glass thickness of 6 mils was established for LEO to GEO transfer.

  7. Durability of glasses from the Hg-doped Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1992-08-30

    The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) for the vitrification of high-level radioactive wastes is designed and constructed to be a 1/9th scale prototype of the full scale Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter. The IDMS facility is the first engineering scale melter system capable of processing mercury, and flowsheet levels of halides and noble metals. In order to determine the effects of mercury on the feed preparation process, the off-gas chemistry, glass melting behavior, and glass durability, a three-run mercury (Hg) campaign was conducted. The glasses produced during the Hg campaign were composed of Batch 1 sludge, simulated precipitate hydrolysis aqueous product (PHA) from the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF), and Frit 202. The glasses were produced using the DWPF process/product models for glass durability, viscosity, and liquidus. The durability model indicated that the glasses would all be more durable than the glass qualified in the DWPF Environmental Assessment (EA). The glass quality was verified by performing the Product Consistency Test (PCT) which was designed for glass durability testing in the DWPF.

  8. A technique for modelling p- n junction depletion capacitance of multiple doping regions in integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkham, Raymond; Anderson, Daniel F.

    1986-08-01

    The continuing advancements in integrated circuit technology have placed new burdons on the circuit design engineer, who must rely extensively upon computer simulation to correctly predict circuit behavior. One challenge is to develop better modelling techniques to more accurately deal with complex p- n junction structures often used in modern VLSI designs. This paper presents an easily implemented method for deriving parameters which accurately model the behavior of MOS VLSI structures containing complex p- n junction capacitance components. The methodology is applicable to both planar and laterally diffused junctions, whether formed by direct ion implantation or by diffusion from a finite or infinite source. The theories behind the equations used and results of the application of this new technique are discussed. A flow chart for a fitter program based on the new method is presented and described. The corresponding program written for the TI-59 scientific programmable calculator is available. Final model parameters are given and are shown to produce a numerical capacitance model which is accurate to within 2%.

  9. Integrated optics in the mid-infrared: application to nulling interferometry for the detection of earth-like planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labadie, L.

    Nulling interferometry, a coronographic technique used in astronomy, is the core of the ESA Darwin mission dedicated to the direct detection of extrasolar earth-like planets. This technique requires a very stable optical system for the combination of multiple beams. Moreover, the scientific objectives require the use of modal filtering of the incoming beams. This thesis focuses on the development of mid-infrared integrated optics (IO) that can perform both combination and modal filtering functions. The initial context is thus the extension of single-mode IO from the near-infrared to the mid-infrared range, which corresponds to an important spectral domain for planet searches. After a description of nulling interferometry requirements, I present the fundamental guided-optics notions used to study the dielectric waveguides and the hollow metallic waveguides solutions. Moreover, I discuss the issue of coupling light into the waveguide. The lab characterization work at 10 microns has involved the implementation of dedicated methods and breadboards in the mid-infrared, which permitted me to demonstrate the waveguide and the single-mode behavior of the first manufactured structures. The preliminary measurements of the signal extinction have also shown the importance of pursuing this technological research for purposes of modal filtering. Mid-infrared integrated optics has now reached a new and important step and will contribute, on a mid-term basis, to the implemetation of nulling interferometry.

  10. Crystal surface integrity and diffusion measurements on Earth and planetary materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, E. B.; Cherniak, D. J.; Thomas, J. B.; Hanchar, J. M.; Wirth, R.

    2016-09-01

    Characterization of diffusion behavior in minerals is key to providing quantitative constraints on the ages and thermal histories of Earth and planetary materials. Laboratory experiments are a vital source of the needed diffusion measurements, but these can pose challenges because the length scales of diffusion achievable in a laboratory time are commonly less than 1 μm. An effective strategy for dealing with this challenge is to conduct experiments involving inward diffusion of the element of interest from a surface source, followed by quantification of the resulting diffusive-uptake profile using a high-resolution depth-profiling technique such as Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), nuclear reaction analysis (NRA), or ion microprobe (SIMS). The value of data from such experiments is crucially dependent on the assumption that diffusion in the near-surface of the sample is representative of diffusion in the bulk material. Historical arguments suggest that the very process of preparing a polished surface for diffusion studies introduces defects-in the form of dislocations and cracks-in the outermost micrometer of the sample that make this region fundamentally different from the bulk crystal in terms of its diffusion properties. Extensive indirect evidence suggests that, in fact, the near-surface region of carefully prepared samples is no different from the bulk crystal in terms of its diffusion properties. A direct confirmation of this conclusion is nevertheless clearly important. Here we use transmission electron microscopy to confirm that the near-surface regions of olivine, quartz and feldspar crystals prepared using careful polishing protocols contain no features that could plausibly affect diffusion. This finding does not preclude damage to the mineral structure from other techniques used in diffusion studies (e.g., ion implantation), but even in this case the role of possible structural damage can be objectively assessed and controlled. While all

  11. Multidisciplinary integrated field campaign to an acidic Martian Earth analogue with astrobiological interest: Rio Tinto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, F.; Walter, N.; Amils, R.; Rull, F.; Klingelhöfer, A. K.; Kviderova, J.; Sarrazin, P.; Foing, B.; Behar, A.; Fleischer, I.; Parro, V.; Garcia-Villadangos, M.; Blake, D.; Martin Ramos, J. D.; Direito, S.; Mahapatra, P.; Stam, C.; Venkateswaran, K.; Voytek, M.

    2011-07-01

    Recently reported results from latest Mars Orbiters and Rovers missions are transforming our opinion about the red planet. That dry and inhospitable planet reported in the past is becoming a wetter planet with high probabilities of water existence in the past. Nowadays, some results seem to indicate the presence of water beneath the Mars surface. But also mineralogy studies by NASA Opportunity Rover report iron oxides and hydroxides precipitates on Endurance Crater. Sedimentary deposits have been identified at Meridiani Planum. These deposits must have generated in a dune aqueous acidic and oxidizing environment. Similarities appear when we study Rio Tinto, and acidic river under the control of iron. The discovery of extremophiles on Earth widened the window of possibilities for life to develop in the Universe, and as a consequence on Mars and other planetary bodies with astrobiological interest. The compilation of data produced by the ongoing missions offers an interested view for life possibilities to exist: signs of an early wet Mars and rather recent volcanic activity as well as ground morphological characteristics that seem to be promoted by liquid water. The discovery of important accumulations of sulfates and the existence of iron minerals such as jarosite in rocks of sedimentary origin has allowed specific terrestrial models to come into focus. Río Tinto (Southwestern Spain, Iberian Pyritic Belt) is an extreme acidic environment, product of the chemolithotrophic activity of micro-organisms that thrive in the massive pyrite-rich deposits of the Iberian Pyritic Belt. Some particular protective environments should house the organic molecules and bacterial life forms in harsh environments such as Mars surface supporting microniches inside precipitated minerals or inside rocks. Terrestrial analogues could help us to afford the comprehension of habitability (on other planetary bodies). We are reporting here the multidisciplinary study of some endolithic niches

  12. Synthesis and characterization of doped and undoped ZnO nanostructures.

    PubMed

    McBean, Katie E; Phillips, Matthew R; Goldys, Ewa M

    2006-08-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles have been produced using precipitation methods from ethanolic solution. Rare-earth metal doping was performed, and the effect of lithium codoping on the luminescence properties of the rare-earth doped products was assessed. The resulting particles were characterized using cathodoluminescence and scanning electron microscopy. It was found that lithium significantly enhanced the cathodoluminescence signal from the rare-earth ions, which has been attributed to the increased integration of the rare-earth ions into the ZnO structure. The nanophase ZnO products were also annealed in argon, hydrogen, and oxygen, with hydrogen being the most successful for removing the broad defect emission present in as-grown samples and enhancing the ZnO near band edge emission.

  13. The effect of Ce3+ ions on the spectral and decay characteristics of luminescence phosphate-borate glasses doped with rare-earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiev, D. T.; Polisadova, E. F.; Belikov, K. N.; Egorova, N. L.

    2014-05-01

    The luminescent characteristics of Li2O-B2O3-P2O5-CaF2 (LBPC) glasses doped with Gd3+ and Tb3+ ions and codoped with Ce3+ are studied by pulsed optical spectrometry under electron beam excitation. It is found that in glass with Ce3+ and Gd3+ ions a decrease in the decay time of gadolinium luminescence in the 312-nm band (6 P J → 8 S 7/2) was observed. It is shown that in the glass LBPC: Tb, Ce, an increase in the emission intensity in the main radiative transitions in terbium ion was observed. In the kinetics of luminescence band 545 nm of LBPC: Tb, Ce glasses, is present stage of buildup, the character of which changes with the doped of Ce3+ ions. The mechanism of energy transfer in LBP glasses doped with rare elements is discussed.

  14. Deposition of Ge-doped silica thin films for an integrated optic application using a matrix distributed electron cyclotron resonance PECVD reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botha, Roelene; Bulkin, Pavel V.; Swart, Pieter L.

    2007-10-01

    Optical quality Ge-doped SiO2 thin films, suitable for an integrated optic version of a gain equalizer for erbium-doped fibre amplifiers (EDFAs), have been deposited using a matrix distributed electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (MDECR-PECVD) system. Using spectroscopic ellipsometry and infrared transmission spectroscopy, the optical constants and hydroxyl content of the films were calculated. Losses due to the hydroxyl overtone at 1.37 μm are found to be approximately 0.251 dB/cm. An RBS analysis determined the germanium content of the films to be in the vicinity of 4 at.%. A comparison of the atomic percentage of germanium in the films and their corresponding refractive indices with values obtained using other deposition methods is also discussed.

  15. Geo-Semantic Framework for Integrating Long-Tail Data and Model Resources for Advancing Earth System Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elag, M.; Kumar, P.

    2014-12-01

    Often, scientists and small research groups collect data, which target to address issues and have limited geographic or temporal range. A large number of such collections together constitute a large database that is of immense value to Earth Science studies. Complexity of integrating these data include heterogeneity in dimensions, coordinate systems, scales, variables, providers, users and contexts. They have been defined as long-tail data. Similarly, we use "long-tail models" to characterize a heterogeneous collection of models and/or modules developed for targeted problems by individuals and small groups, which together provide a large valuable collection. Complexity of integrating across these models include differing variable names and units for the same concept, model runs at different time steps and spatial resolution, use of differing naming and reference conventions, etc. Ability to "integrate long-tail models and data" will provide an opportunity for the interoperability and reusability of communities' resources, where not only models can be combined in a workflow, but each model will be able to discover and (re)use data in application specific context of space, time and questions. This capability is essential to represent, understand, predict, and manage heterogeneous and interconnected processes and activities by harnessing the complex, heterogeneous, and extensive set of distributed resources. Because of the staggering production rate of long-tail models and data resulting from the advances in computational, sensing, and information technologies, an important challenge arises: how can geoinformatics bring together these resources seamlessly, given the inherent complexity among model and data resources that span across various domains. We will present a semantic-based framework to support integration of "long-tail" models and data. This builds on existing technologies including: (i) SEAD (Sustainable Environmental Actionable Data) which supports curation

  16. Svalbard Integrated Arctic Earth Observing System (sios): Facilitating Easy Access to Multidisciplinary Arctic Data Through the Brokering Approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bye, B. L.; Godøy, Ø.

    2014-12-01

    Environmental and climate changes are important elements of our global challenges. They are observed at a global scale and in particular in the Arctic. In order to give better estimates of the future changes, the Arctic has to be monitored and analyzed by a multi-disciplinary observation system that will improve Earth System Models. The best chance to achieve significant results within a relatively short time frame is found in regions with a large natural climate gradient, and where processes sensitive to the expected changes are particularly important. Svalbard and the surrounding ocean areas fulfil all these criteria. The vision for SIOS is to be a regional observational system for long term acquisition and proliferation of fundamental knowledge on global environmental change within an Earth System Science perspective in and around Svalbard. SIOS will systematically develop and implement methods for how observational networks are to be construed. The distributed SIOS data management system (SDMS) will be implemented through a combination of technologies tailored to the multi-disciplinary nature of the Arctic data. One of these technologies is The Brokering approach or "Framework". The Brokering approach provides a series of services such as discovery, access, transformation and semantics support to enable translation from one discipline/culture to another. This is exactly the challenges the SDMS will have to handle and thus the Brokering approach is integrated in the design of the system. A description of the design strategy for the SDMS that includes The Brokering approach will be presented. The design and implementation plans for the SDMS are based on research done in the EU funded ESFRI project SIOS and examples of solutions for interoperable systems producing Arctic datasets and products coordinated through SIOS will be showcased. The reported experience from SIOS brokering approach will feed into the process of developing a sustainable brokering governance

  17. Expedition Earth and Beyond: Using NASA data resources and integrated educational strategies to promote authentic research in the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graff, P. V.; Stefanov, W.; Willis, K.; Runco, S.

    2009-12-01

    Teachers in today’s classrooms are bound by state required skills, education standards, and high stakes testing. How can they gain skills and confidence to replace units or individual activities with curriculum that incorporates project and inquiry-based learning and promotes authentic research in the classroom? The key to promoting classroom authentic research experiences lies in educator professional development that is structured around teacher needs. The Expedition Earth and Beyond Program is a new geosciences program based at the NASA Johnson Space Center designed to engage, inspire and educate teachers and students in grades 5-14. The program promotes authentic research experiences for classrooms and uses strategies that will help NASA reach its education goals while still allowing educators to teach required standards. Teachers will have access to experts in terrestrial and planetary remote sensing and geoscience; this will enhance their use of content, structure, and relevant experiences to gain the confidence and skills they need to actively engage students in authentic research experiences. Integrated and powerful educational strategies are used to build skills and confidence in teachers. The strategies are as follows: 1) creating Standards-aligned, inquiry-based curricular resources as ready-to-use materials that can be modified by teachers to fit their unique classroom situation; 2) providing ongoing professional development opportunities that focus on active experiences using curricular materials, inquiry-based techniques and expanding content knowledge; 3) connecting science experts to classrooms to deepen content knowledge and provide relevance to classroom activities and real world applications; 4) facilitating students sharing research with their peers and scientists reinforcing their active participation and contributions to research. These components of the Expedition Earth and Beyond Education Program will be enhanced by providing exciting and

  18. Expedition Earth and Beyond: Using NASA Data Resources and Integrated Educational Strategies to Promote Authentic Research in the Classroom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graffi, Paige Valderrama; Stefanov, William; Willis, Kim; Runco, Sue

    2009-01-01

    Teachers in today s classrooms are bound by state required skills, education standards, and high stakes testing. How can they gain skills and confidence to replace units or individual activities with curriculum that incorporates project and inquiry-based learning and promotes authentic research in the classroom? The key to promoting classroom authentic research experiences lies in educator professional development that is structured around teacher needs. The Expedition Earth and Beyond Program is a new geosciences program based at the NASA Johnson Space Center designed to engage, inspire and educate teachers and students in grades 5-14. The program promotes authentic research experiences for classrooms and uses strategies that will help NASA reach its education goals while still allowing educators to teach required standards. Teachers will have access to experts in terrestrial and planetary remote sensing and geoscience; this will enhance their use of content, structure, and relevant experiences to gain the confidence and skills they need to actively engage students in authentic research experiences. Integrated and powerful educational strategies are used to build skills and confidence in teachers. The strategies are as follows: 1) creating Standards-aligned, inquiry-based curricular resources as ready-to-use materials that can be modified by teachers to fit their unique classroom situation; 2) providing ongoing professional development opportunities that focus on active experiences using curricular materials, inquiry-based techniques and expanding content knowledge; 3) connecting science experts to classrooms to deepen content knowledge and provide relevance to classroom activities and real world applications; 4) facilitating students sharing research with their peers and scientists reinforcing their active participation and contributions to research. These components of the Expedition Earth and Beyond Education Program will be enhanced by providing exciting and

  19. Selective Emitter Pumped Rare Earth Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L. (Inventor); Patton, Martin O. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A selective emitter pumped rare earth laser provides an additional type of laser for use in many laser applications. Rare earth doped lasers exist which are pumped with flashtubes or laser diodes. The invention uses a rare earth emitter to transform thermal energy input to a spectral band matching the absorption band of a rare earth in the laser in order to produce lasing.

  20. A Critical Path for Data Integration in the U.S. Earth Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, K. T.; Allison, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Development efforts for the U.S. Geoscience Information Network (US GIN) have crystallized around the Community for Data Integration (CDI) at the USGS, and the 50-state AASG State Geothermal Data project. The next step in developing a USGS-AASG community is to bring these two efforts into closer alignment through greater participation in CDI activities by geoinformatics practitioners from state geological surveys, and implementation of test bed activities by the USGIN partners. Test bed activities in the geological survey community will define a scope and provide a foundation to promote the use of specifications developed by the larger geoinformatics community. Adoption of some of these specifications as 'standards' by USGS and AASG for use by those organizations will lend authority and motivate wider adoption. The arc from use case to test bed to production deployments to agreement on 'standard' specifications for data discovery and access must be propelled by active interest from the user communities who have a stake in the outcome. The specifications developed will benefit the organizations involved in development, testing and deployment, which motivates participation -- a model that has worked successfully for standards organizations such as OGC, ISO and OASIS. The governance structure to support such a community process should promote grass root nucleation of interest groups that are the core of development efforts. Some mechanism for community agreement on priorities is desirable because geological survey agencies will need to allocate resources to support development. Loosely knit organizations such as ESIP and the current CDI provide models for this kind of structure. Because many geological surveys have data archive and dissemination functions as part of their portfolio, some support for the system can be built into the operating expenses and overhead. Sharing of resources and reuse of components can reduce the cost. Wide adoption of similar software

  1. MODELING THE DYNAMICS OF THE INTEGRATED EARTH SYSTEM AND THE VALUE OF GLOBAL ECOSYSTEM SERVICES USING THE GUMBO MODEL. (R827169)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A global unified metamodel of the biosphere (GUMBO) was developed to simulate the integrated earth system and assess the dynamics and values of ecosystem services. It is a `metamodel' in that it represents a synthesis and a simplification of several existing dynamic gl...

  2. Rare-Earth Doped Gallium Nitride (GaN)- An Innovative Path Toward Area-scalable Solid-state High Energy Lasers Without Thermal Distortion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    emission from GaN doped with europium (Eu), Er, praseodymium (Pr), thulium (Tm), ytterbium (Yb), Nd, and dysprosium (Dy) has been demonstrated by... thulium 12 TO transverse optical VSL variable stripe length XRC x-ray rocking curve XRD x-ray diffraction YAG yttrium aluminum garnet Yb

  3. Rare-earth Doped GaN - An Innovative Path Toward Area-scalable Solid-state High Energy Lasers Without Thermal Distortion (2nd year)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    substitutional occupation of the Ga site. Light emission from GaN doped with europium (Eu), Er, praseodymium (Pr), thulium (Tm), ytterbium (Yb), Nd, and...room temperature SES shifting excitation spot SIMS secondary ion mass spectrometry Tm thulium TO transverse optical VSL variable stripe

  4. An integrated, open-source set of tools for urban vulnerability monitoring from Earth observation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vecchi, Daniele; Harb, Mostapha; Dell'Acqua, Fabio; Aurelio Galeazzo, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Aim: The paper introduces an integrated set of open-source tools designed to process medium and high-resolution imagery with the aim to extract vulnerability indicators [1]. Problem: In the context of risk monitoring [2], a series of vulnerability proxies can be defined, such as the extension of a built-up area or buildings regularity [3]. Different open-source C and Python libraries are already available for image processing and geospatial information (e.g. OrfeoToolbox, OpenCV and GDAL). They include basic processing tools but not vulnerability-oriented workflows. Therefore, it is of significant importance to provide end-users with a set of tools capable to return information at a higher level. Solution: The proposed set of python algorithms is a combination of low-level image processing and geospatial information handling tools along with high-level workflows. In particular, two main products are released under the GPL license: source code, developers-oriented, and a QGIS plugin. These tools were produced within the SENSUM project framework (ended December 2014) where the main focus was on earthquake and landslide risk. Further development and maintenance is guaranteed by the decision to include them in the platform designed within the FP 7 RASOR project . Conclusion: With the lack of a unified software suite for vulnerability indicators extraction, the proposed solution can provide inputs for already available models like the Global Earthquake Model. The inclusion of the proposed set of algorithms within the RASOR platforms can guarantee support and enlarge the community of end-users. Keywords: Vulnerability monitoring, remote sensing, optical imagery, open-source software tools References [1] M. Harb, D. De Vecchi, F. Dell'Acqua, "Remote sensing-based vulnerability proxies in the EU FP7 project SENSUM", Symposium on earthquake and landslide risk in Central Asia and Caucasus: exploiting remote sensing and geo-spatial information management, 29-30th January 2014

  5. Synthesis and characterization of rare-earth doped SrBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} phase in lithium borate based nanocrystallized glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Harihara Venkataraman, B.; Fujiwara, Takumi; Komatsu, Takayuki

    2009-06-15

    Glass composites comprising of un-doped and samarium-doped SrBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} nanocrystallites are fabricated in the glass system 16.66SrO-16.66[(1-x)Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}-xSm{sub 2}O{sub 3}]-16.66Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-50Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} (0<=x<=0.5, in mol%) via the melt quenching technique. The glassy nature of the as-quenched samples is established by differential thermal analyses. Transmission electron microscopic studies reveal the presence of about 15 nm sized spherical crystallites of the fluorite-like SrBi{sub 1.9}Sm{sub 0.1}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} phase in the samples heat treated at 530 deg. C. The formation of layered perovskite-type un-doped and samarium-doped SrBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} nanocrystallites with an orthorhombic structure through the intermediate fluorite phase is confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction and micro-Raman spectroscopic studies. The influence of samarium doping on the lattice parameters, lattice distortions, and the Raman peak positions of SrBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} perovskite phase is clarified. The dielectric constants of the perovskite SrBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} and SrBi{sub 1.9}Sm{sub 0.1}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} nanocrystals are relatively larger than those of the corresponding fluorite-like phase and the precursor glass. - Graphical Abstract: This figure shows the XRD patterns at room temperature for the as-quenched and heat treated samples in Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped (x=0.1) glass. Based on these results, it is concluded that the formation of samarium-doped perovskite SBN phase takes place via an intermediate fluorite-like phase in the crystallization of this glass.

  6. Earth: Earth Science and Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2001-01-01

    A major new NASA initiative on environmental change and health has been established to promote the application of Earth science remote sensing data, information, observations, and technologies to issues of human health. NASA's Earth Sciences suite of Earth observing instruments are now providing improved observations science, data, and advanced technologies about the Earth's land, atmosphere, and oceans. These new space-based resources are being combined with other agency and university resources, data integration and fusion technologies, geographic information systems (GIS), and the spectrum of tools available from the public health community, making it possible to better understand how the environment and climate are linked to specific diseases, to improve outbreak prediction, and to minimize disease risk. This presentation is an overview of NASA's tools, capabilities, and research advances in this initiative.

  7. Earth materials and earth dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, K; Shankland, T.

    2000-11-01

    In the project ''Earth Materials and Earth Dynamics'' we linked fundamental and exploratory, experimental, theoretical, and computational research programs to shed light on the current and past states of the dynamic Earth. Our objective was to combine different geological, geochemical, geophysical, and materials science analyses with numerical techniques to illuminate active processes in the Earth. These processes include fluid-rock interactions that form and modify the lithosphere, non-linear wave attenuations in rocks that drive plate tectonics and perturb the earth's surface, dynamic recrystallization of olivine that deforms the upper mantle, development of texture in high-pressure olivine polymorphs that create anisotropic velocity regions in the convecting upper mantle and transition zone, and the intense chemical reactions between the mantle and core. We measured physical properties such as texture and nonlinear elasticity, equation of states at simultaneous pressures and temperatures, magnetic spins and bonding, chemical permeability, and thermal-chemical feedback to better characterize earth materials. We artificially generated seismic waves, numerically modeled fluid flow and transport in rock systems and modified polycrystal plasticity theory to interpret measured physical properties and integrate them into our understanding of the Earth. This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  8. On purpose in science, conservation and government. The functional integrity of the earth is at issue not biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Woodwell, George M

    2002-08-01

    of the integrity of function of landscapes (and waterbodies). Emphasis falls on forests in the normally naturally forested parts of the earth because forests are so large in area globally and have such a large influence on virtually every aspect of environment. Functional integrity requires structural integrity over 85% or more of the naturally forested zone in most areas. It also requires objective measurement and definition by the scientific community. Suddenly, conservation has become, not the preservation of biodiversity, honorable as that may be, but the preservation of the functional integrity of the human environment. That purpose is the central purpose that we assign to the governments that we establish in democracies to define and defend the public interest. It is past time for the scientific and conservation communities to recognize the urgency of this transition, join in defining competent new objectives for conservation, and to convey to the public the urgency of the need for governmental responsibility in protecting the public interest in a habitable biosphere.

  9. Gene doping.

    PubMed

    Azzazy, Hassan M E

    2010-01-01

    Gene doping abuses the legitimate approach of gene therapy. While gene therapy aims to correct genetic disorders by introducing a foreign gene to replace an existing faulty one or by manipulating existing gene(s) to achieve a therapeutic benefit, gene doping employs the same concepts to bestow performance advantages on athletes over their competitors. Recent developments in genetic engineering have contributed significantly to the progress of gene therapy research and currently numerous clinical trials are underway. Some athletes and their staff are probably watching this progress closely. Any gene that plays a role in muscle development, oxygen delivery to tissues, neuromuscular coordination, or even pain control is considered a candidate for gene dopers. Unfortunately, detecting gene doping is technically very difficult because the transgenic proteins expressed by the introduced genes are similar to their endogenous counterparts. Researchers today are racing the clock because assuring the continued integrity of sports competition depends on their ability to develop effective detection strategies in preparation for the 2012 Olympics, which may mark the appearance of genetically modified athletes.

  10. The key role of Satellite Laser Ranging towards the integrated estimation of geometry, rotation and gravitational field of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blossfeld, Mathis

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) was installed as a full component of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG). One primary goal of GGOS is the integration of geometric and gravimetric observation techniques to estimate consistent geodetic-geophysical parameters. Thereby, GGOS is based on the data and services of the IAG. Besides the combination of different geodetic techniques, also the common estimation of the station coordinates (TRF), Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP) and coefficients of the Earth's gravitational field (Stokes coefficients) is necessary in order to reach this goal. However, the combination of all geometric and gravimetric observation techniques is not yet fully realized. A major step towards the GGOS idea of parameter integration would be the understanding of the existing correlations between the above mentioned fundamental geodetic parameter groups. This topic is the major objective of this thesis. One possibility to study the interactions is the use of Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) in an intertechnique combination with Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) or the intra-technique combination of multiple SLR-tracked satellites. SLR plays a key role in this thesis since it is the unique technique which is sensitive to all parameter groups and allows an integrated parameter estimation with very high accuracy. The present work is based on five first-author publications which are supplemented by four co-author publications. In this framework, for the first time an extensive discussion of a refined global Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF) estimation procedure, the estimation of so-called Epoch Reference Frames (ERFs) is presented. In contrast to the conventional linear station motion model, the ERFs provide frequently estimated station coordinates and Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP) which allow to approximate not modeled non-linear station motions very accurately

  11. Path integral molecular dynamics simulation of quasi-free rotational motion of CO doped in a large para-hydrogen cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizumoto, Yoshihiko; Ohtsuki, Yukiyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Path integral molecular dynamics simulation is used to study the rotational motion of a CO molecule doped in a large para-hydrogen (p-H2) cluster. The quasi-free rotational motion of CO in a p-H2 cluster with a reduced rotational constant is derived from the imaginary-time orientational correlation functions, and is in good agreement with recent experimental observations. We attribute the reduced rotational constant to the low-viscous fluid-like behavior of the host p-H2 cluster.

  12. Space-Based Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifier Transmitters for Coherent, Ranging, 3D-Imaging, Altimetry, Topology, and Carbon Dioxide Lidar and Earth and Planetary Optical Laser Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, Mark; Engin, Doruk; Mathason, Brian; Utano, Rich; Gupta, Shantanu

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes Fibertek, Inc.'s progress in developing space-qualified Erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) transmitters for laser communications and ranging/topology, and CO2 integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar. High peak power (1 kW) and 6 W of average power supporting multiple communications formats has been demonstrated with 17% efficiency in a compact 3 kg package. The unit has been tested to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6 standards. A 20 W EDFA suitable for CO2 lidar has been demonstrated with ~14% efficiency (electrical to optical [e-o]) and its performance optimized for 1571 nm operation.

  13. Rare earth ions doped polyaniline/cobalt ferrite nanocomposites via a novel coordination-oxidative polymerization-hydrothermal route: Preparation and microwave-absorbing properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chunming; Jiang, Junjun; Liu, Xiaohua; Yin, Chengjie; Deng, Cuifen

    2016-04-01

    Polyaniline/CoRExFe2-xO4 (RE=La, Ce, Y, x=0.05-0.25) nanocomposites were successfully synthesized by a novel coordination-oxidative polymerization-hydrothermal method, and doped by sulfosalicylic acid. The resultant nanocomposites were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and electromagnetic measurements. The composites mainly showed nanofibers with a diameter of ca. 70 nm and a length longer than 2 μm. The surface of composites was uniformly covered with numerous nanoparticles with an average size of ca. 10-20 nm. Microwave absorption properties of polyaniline/CoRExFe2-xO4 nanocomposites doped with La ion were found to be better than those doped with Ce and Y ions. For the polyaniline/CoLaxFe2-xO4 nanocomposite, the optimal microwave absorption performance is at x=0.15, that is, the mass ratio of La in CoLaxFe2-xO4 is 7.5%, with the conductivity of the composite about 0.833 S/cm. Furthermore, when the layer thickness is 2 mm, the maximum reflection loss achieves the maximum number of -42.65 dB at 15.91 GHz with a bandwidth of 6.14 GHz above -10 dB loss, suggesting that these nanocomposites are excellent in microwave absorbing capacity.

  14. Effects of some rare earth and carbonate-based co-dopants on structural and electrical properties of samarium doped ceria (SDC) electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Mustafa; Khan, Zuhair S.; Mustafa, Kamal; Rana, Akmal

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, samarium doped ceria (SDC) and SDC-based composite with the addition of K2CO3 were prepared by co-precipitation route and effects of pH of the solution and calcination temperature on microstructure of SDC and SDC-K2CO3, respectively, were investigated. Furthermore, experimentation was performed to investigate into the ionic conductivity of pure SDC by co-doping with yttrium i.e., YSDC, XRD and SEM studies show that the crystallite size and particle size of SDC increases with the increase in pH. The SEM images of all the samples of SDC synthesized at different pH values showed the irregular shaped and dispersed particles. SDC-K2CO3 was calcined at 600∘C, 700∘C and 800∘C for 4 h and XRD results showed that crystallite size increases while lattice strain, decreases with the increase in calcination temperature and no peaks were detected for K2CO3 as it is present in an amorphous form. The ionic conductivity of the electrolytes increases with the increase in temperature and SDC-K2CO3 shows the highest value of ionic conductivity as compared to SDC and YSDC. Chemical compatibility tests were performed between the co-doped electrolyte and lithiated NiO cathode at high temperature. It revealed that the couple could be used up to the temperature of 700∘C.

  15. The EOS Aqua/Aura Experience: Lessons Learned on Design, Integration, and Test of Earth-Observing Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nosek, Thomas P.

    2004-01-01

    NASA and NOAA earth observing satellite programs are flying a number of sophisticated scientific instruments which collect data on many phenomena and parameters of the earth's environment. The NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Program originated the EOS Common Bus approach, which featured two spacecraft (Aqua and Aura) of virtually identical design but with completely different instruments. Significant savings were obtained by the Common Bus approach and these lessons learned are presented as information for future program requiring multiple busses for new diversified instruments with increased capabilities for acquiring earth environmental data volume, accuracy, and type.

  16. Information Technology Infusion Case Study: Integrating Google Earth(Trademark) into the A-Train Data Depot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Peter; Kempler, Steven; Leptoukh, Gregory; Chen, Aijun

    2010-01-01

    This poster paper represents the NASA funded project that was to employ the latest three dimensional visualization technology to explore and provide direct data access to heterogeneous A-Train datasets. Google Earth (tm) provides foundation for organizing, visualizing, publishing and synergizing Earth science data .

  17. The Use of the Integrated Medical Model for Forecasting and Mitigating Medical Risks for a Near-Earth Asteroid Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerstman, Eric; Saile, Lynn; Freire de Carvalho, Mary; Myers, Jerry; Walton, Marlei; Butler, Douglas; Lopez, Vilma

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) is a decision support tool that is useful to space flight mission managers and medical system designers in assessing risks and optimizing medical systems. The IMM employs an evidence-based, probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) approach within the operational constraints of space flight. Methods Stochastic computational methods are used to forecast probability distributions of medical events, crew health metrics, medical resource utilization, and probability estimates of medical evacuation and loss of crew life. The IMM can also optimize medical kits within the constraints of mass and volume for specified missions. The IMM was used to forecast medical evacuation and loss of crew life probabilities, as well as crew health metrics for a near-earth asteroid (NEA) mission. An optimized medical kit for this mission was proposed based on the IMM simulation. Discussion The IMM can provide information to the space program regarding medical risks, including crew medical impairment, medical evacuation and loss of crew life. This information is valuable to mission managers and the space medicine community in assessing risk and developing mitigation strategies. Exploration missions such as NEA missions will have significant mass and volume constraints applied to the medical system. Appropriate allocation of medical resources will be critical to mission success. The IMM capability of optimizing medical systems based on specific crew and mission profiles will be advantageous to medical system designers. Conclusion The IMM is a decision support tool that can provide estimates of the impact of medical events on human space flight missions, such as crew impairment, evacuation, and loss of crew life. It can be used to support the development of mitigation strategies and to propose optimized medical systems for specified space flight missions. Learning Objectives The audience will learn how an evidence-based decision support tool can be

  18. On the formulation of gravitational potential difference between the GRACE satellites based on energy integral in Earth fixed frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Y. Y.; Guo, J. Y.; Shang, K.; Shum, C. K.; Yu, J. H.

    2015-09-01

    Two methods for computing gravitational potential difference (GPD) between the GRACE satellites using orbit data have been formulated based on energy integral; one in geocentric inertial frame (GIF) and another in Earth fixed frame (EFF). Here we present a rigorous theoretical formulation in EFF with particular emphasis on necessary approximations, provide a computational approach to mitigate the approximations to negligible level, and verify our approach using simulations. We conclude that a term neglected or ignored in all former work without verification should be retained. In our simulations, 2 cycle per revolution (CPR) errors are present in the GPD computed using our formulation, and empirical removal of the 2 CPR and lower frequency errors can improve the precisions of Stokes coefficients (SCs) of degree 3 and above by 1-2 orders of magnitudes. This is despite of the fact that the result without removing these errors is already accurate enough. Furthermore, the relation between data errors and their influences on GPD is analysed, and a formal examination is made on the possible precision that real GRACE data may attain. The result of removing 2 CPR errors may imply that, if not taken care of properly, the values of SCs computed by means of the energy integral method using real GRACE data may be seriously corrupted by aliasing errors from possibly very large 2 CPR errors based on two facts: (1) errors of bar C_{2,0} manifest as 2 CPR errors in GPD and (2) errors of bar C_{2,0} in GRACE data-the differences between the CSR monthly values of bar C_{2,0} independently determined using GRACE and SLR are a reasonable measure of their magnitude-are very large. Our simulations show that, if 2 CPR errors in GPD vary from day to day as much as those corresponding to errors of bar C_{2,0} from month to month, the aliasing errors of degree 15 and above SCs computed using a month's GPD data may attain a level comparable to the magnitude of gravitational potential

  19. Geometries and electronic properties of the neutral and charged rare earth Yb-doped Si(n) (n = 1-6) clusters: a relativistic density functional investigation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Run-Ning; Ren, Zhao-Yu; Guo, Ping; Bai, Jin-Tao; Zhang, Chong-Hui; Han, Ju-Guang

    2006-03-23

    The neutral and charged YbSi(n) (n = 1-6) clusters considering different spin configurations have been systematically investigated by using the relativistic density functional theory with generalized gradient approximation. The total bonding energies, equilibrium geometries, Mulliken populations (MP), Hirshfeld charges (HC), fragmentation energies, and highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (HOMO-LUMO) gaps are calculated and discussed. The optimized geometries indicate that the most stable YbSi(n) (n = 1-6) clusters keep basically the analogous frameworks as the low-lying Si(n)(+1) clusters, while the charged species deviate from their neutral counterparts, and that the doped Yb tends to occupy the substitutional site of the neutral and charged YbSi(n) isomers. The relative stabilities are investigated in terms of the calculated fragmentation energies, exhibiting enhanced stabilities for the remarkably stable neutral and charged YbSi2 and YbSi5 clusters. Furthermore, the calculated MP and HC values show that the charges of the neutral and charged YbSi(n) clusters transfer from the Yb atom to Si(n) atoms and the Yb atom acts as an electron donor, and that the f orbitals of the Yb atom in the neutral and charged YbSi(n) clusters behave as core without involvement in chemical bonding. The calculated HOMO-LUMO gaps indicate that the YbSi2 and YbSi4+ clusters have stronger chemical stabilities. Comparisons of the Yb-doped Si(n) (n = 1-6) with available theoretical results of transition-metal-doped silicon clusters are made. The growth pattern is investigated also.

  20. Maximizing integrated optical and electrical properties of a single ZnO nanowire through native interfacial doping.

    PubMed

    Ding, Huaiyi; Pan, Nan; Ma, Chao; Wu, Yukun; Li, Junwen; Cai, Hongbing; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Guanghui; Ren, Wenzhen; Li, Jianqi; Luo, Yi; Wang, Xiaoping; Hou, J G

    2014-05-21

    A native interfacial doping layer introduced in core-shell type ZnO nano-wires by a simple vapor phase re-growth procedure endows the produced nano-wires with both excellent electrical and optical performances compared to conventional homogeneous ZnO nanowires. The unique Zn-rich interfacial structure in the core-shell nanowires plays a crucial role in the outstanding performances.

  1. Large research infrastructure for Earth-Ocean Science: Challenges of multidisciplinary integration across hardware, software, and people networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, M.; Barnes, C. R.; Johnson, F.; Pautet, L.; Pirenne, B.; Founding Scientists Of Neptune Canada

    2010-12-01

    NEPTUNE Canada is operating a regional cabled ocean observatory across the northern Juan de Fuca Plate in the northeastern Pacific. Installation of the first suite of instruments and connectivity equipment was completed in 2009, so this system now provides the continuous power and bandwidth to collect integrated data on physical, chemical, geological, and biological gradients at temporal resolutions relevant to the dynamics of the earth-ocean system. The building of this facility integrates hardware, software, and people networks. Hardware progress to date includes: installation of the 800km powered fiber-optic backbone in the Fall of 2007; development of Nodes and Junction Boxes; acquisition/development and testing of Instruments; development of mobile instrument platforms such as a) a Vertical Profiler and b) a Crawler (University of Bremmen); and integration of over a thousand components into an operating subsea sensor system. Nodes, extension cables, junction boxes, and instruments were installed at 4 out of 5 locations in 2009; the fifth Node is instrumented in September 2010. In parallel, software and hardware systems are acquiring, archiving, and delivering the continuous real-time data through the internet to the world - already many terabytes of data. A web environment (Oceans 2.0) to combine this data access with analysis and visualization, collaborative tools, interoperability, and instrument control is being released. Finally, a network of scientists and technicians are contributing to the process in every phase, and data users already number in the thousands. Initial experiments were planned through a series of workshops and international proposal competitions. At inshore Folger Passage, Barkley Sound, understanding controls on biological productivity help evaluate the effects that marine processes have on fish and marine mammals. Experiments around Barkley Canyon allow quantification of changes in biological and chemical activity associated with

  2. Defect Clustering and Nano-phase Structure Characterization of Multicomponent Rare Earth-Oxide-Doped Zirconia-Yttria Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Chen, Yuan L.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have been developed by incorporating multicomponent rare earth oxide dopants into zirconia-based thermal barrier coatings to promote the creation of the thermodynamically stable, immobile oxide defect clusters and/or nanophases within the coating systems. In this paper, the defect clusters, induced by Nd, Gd, and Yb rare earth dopants in the zirconia-yttria thermal barrier coatings, were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TEM lattice imaging, selected area diffraction (SAD), and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) analyses demonstrated that the extensive nanoscale rare earth dopant segregation exists in the plasma-sprayed and electron-physical-vapor-deposited (EB PVD) thermal barrier coatings. The nanoscale concentration heterogeneity and the resulting large lattice distortion promoted the formation of parallel and rotational defective lattice clusters in the coating systems. The presence of the 5-to 100-nm-sized defect clusters and nanophases is believed to be responsible for the significant reduction of thermal conductivity, improved sintering resistance, and long-term high temperature stability of the advanced thermal barrier coating systems.

  3. Recent Progresses in Incorporating Human Land-Water Management into Global Land Surface Models Toward Their Integration into Earth System Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pokhrel, Yadu N.; Hanasaki, Naota; Wada, Yoshihide; Kim, Hyungjun

    2016-01-01

    The global water cycle has been profoundly affected by human land-water management. As the changes in the water cycle on land can affect the functioning of a wide range of biophysical and biogeochemical processes of the Earth system, it is essential to represent human land-water management in Earth system models (ESMs). During the recent past, noteworthy progress has been made in large-scale modeling of human impacts on the water cycle but sufficient advancements have not yet been made in integrating the newly developed schemes into ESMs. This study reviews the progresses made in incorporating human factors in large-scale hydrological models and their integration into ESMs. The study focuses primarily on the recent advancements and existing challenges in incorporating human impacts in global land surface models (LSMs) as a way forward to the development of ESMs with humans as integral components, but a brief review of global hydrological models (GHMs) is also provided. The study begins with the general overview of human impacts on the water cycle. Then, the algorithms currently employed to represent irrigation, reservoir operation, and groundwater pumping are discussed. Next, methodological deficiencies in current modeling approaches and existing challenges are identified. Furthermore, light is shed on the sources of uncertainties associated with model parameterizations, grid resolution, and datasets used for forcing and validation. Finally, representing human land-water management in LSMs is highlighted as an important research direction toward developing integrated models using ESM frameworks for the holistic study of human-water interactions within the Earths system.

  4. Simultaneous pulse amplification and compression in all-fiber-integrated pre-chirped large-mode-area Er-doped fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gong-Ru; Lin, Ying-Tsung; Lee, Chao-Kuei

    2007-03-19

    A large-mode-area Erbium-doped fiber amplifier (LMA-EDFA) based all-fiber-integrated amplified compressor with ultrashort length of 5.37 m and ultralow pumping power (260 mW) is proposed. The LMAEDFA suppresses nonlinear soliton-self-frequency-shift effect happened during femtosecond pulse amplification, in which the fiber laser pulse is reshaped to a low-pedestal hyperbolic-second shape with nearly 100% energy confinement. The pre-chirped amplification from 0.96 to 104 mW and the simultaneous compression of a passively mode-locked fiber laser pulse from 300 to 56 fs is demonstrated. The input pulse energy of 24 pJ is amplified up to 2.6 nJ with shortened pulsewidth of 56 fs and peak power as high as 46 kW.

  5. Electron thermalization and trapping rates in pure and doped alkali and alkaline-earth iodide crystals studied by picosecond optical absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucer, K. B.; Bizarri, G.; Burger, A.; Gektin, A.; Trefilova, L.; Williams, R. T.

    2014-04-01

    Although light continues to be emitted from insulating crystals used as scintillators over a period of nanoseconds to microseconds after stopping of an energetic particle, much of what determines the nonlinearity of response goes on in the first picoseconds. On this time scale, free carriers and excitons are at high density near the track core and thus are subject to nonlinear quenching. The hot (free) electrons eventually cool to low enough energy that trapping on holes, dopants, or defects can commence. In the track environment, spatial distributions of trapped carriers determined on the picosecond time scale can influence the proportionality between light yield and the initial particle energy throughout the whole light pulse. Picosecond spectroscopy of optical absorption induced by a short pulse of above-gap excitation provides a useful window on what occurs during the crucial early evolution of excited populations. The laser excitation can be tuned to excite carriers that are initially very hot (˜3 eV) relative to the band edges, or that are almost thermalized (˜0.1 eV excess energy) at the outset. Undoped and doped samples of NaI:Tl(0%, 0.1%), CsI:Tl(0%, 0.01%, 0.04%, 0.3%), and SrI2:Eu(0%, 0.2%, 0.5%, 3%) are studied in this work.

  6. Stabilisation of Fe2O3-rich Perovskite Nanophase in Epitaxial Rare-earth Doped BiFeO3 Films

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huairuo; Reaney, Ian M.; Marincel, Daniel M.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Ramasse, Quentin M.; MacLaren, Ian; Findlay, Scott D.; Fraleigh, Robert D.; Ross, Ian M.; Hu, Shunbo; Ren, Wei; Mark Rainforth, W.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers have demonstrated that BiFeO3 exhibits ferroelectric hysteresis but none have shown a strong ferromagnetic response in either bulk or thin film without significant structural or compositional modification. When remanent magnetisations are observed in BiFeO3 based thin films, iron oxide second phases are often detected. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, atomic resolution electron energy loss spectrum-mapping and quantitative energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis, we reveal the existence of a new Fe2O3-rich perovskite nanophase, with an approximate formula (Fe0.6Bi0.25Nd0.15)3+ Fe3+O3, formed within epitaxial Ti and Nd doped BiFeO3 perovskite films grown by pulsed laser deposition. The incorporation of Nd and Bi ions on the A-site and coherent growth with the matrix stabilise the Fe2O3-rich perovskite phase and preliminary density functional theory calculations suggest that it should have a ferrimagnetic response. Perovskite-structured Fe2O3 has been reported previously but never conclusively proven when fabricated at high-pressure high-temperature. This work suggests the incorporation of large A-site species may help stabilise perovskite-structured Fe2O3. This finding is therefore significant not only to the thin film but also to the high-pressure community. PMID:26272264

  7. Stabilisation of Fe2O3-rich Perovskite Nanophase in Epitaxial Rare-earth Doped BiFeO3 Films.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huairuo; Reaney, Ian M; Marincel, Daniel M; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Ramasse, Quentin M; MacLaren, Ian; Findlay, Scott D; Fraleigh, Robert D; Ross, Ian M; Hu, Shunbo; Ren, Wei; Rainforth, W Mark

    2015-08-14

    Researchers have demonstrated that BiFeO3 exhibits ferroelectric hysteresis but none have shown a strong ferromagnetic response in either bulk or thin film without significant structural or compositional modification. When remanent magnetisations are observed in BiFeO3 based thin films, iron oxide second phases are often detected. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, atomic resolution electron energy loss spectrum-mapping and quantitative energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis, we reveal the existence of a new Fe2O3-rich perovskite nanophase, with an approximate formula (Fe0.6Bi0.25Nd0.15)(3+) Fe(3+)O3, formed within epitaxial Ti and Nd doped BiFeO3 perovskite films grown by pulsed laser deposition. The incorporation of Nd and Bi ions on the A-site and coherent growth with the matrix stabilise the Fe2O3-rich perovskite phase and preliminary density functional theory calculations suggest that it should have a ferrimagnetic response. Perovskite-structured Fe2O3 has been reported previously but never conclusively proven when fabricated at high-pressure high-temperature. This work suggests the incorporation of large A-site species may help stabilise perovskite-structured Fe2O3. This finding is therefore significant not only to the thin film but also to the high-pressure community.

  8. High-Tc Superconductivity and Raman Scattering Study of the phonon properties of electron doped (transition metal, rare-earth) - Oxygen-Free CaFeAsF and compared with RFeAsO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasmal, Kalyan; Hadjiev, Viktor; Chu, C. W.(Paul)

    Quaternary CaFeAsF has ZrCuSiAs-type structure,(RO)δ+ layer in RFeAsO replaced by (CaF)δ+ layer,with tetragonal (P4/nmm)-orthorhombic (Cmma) phase transition at 134K,while magnetic order,SDW sets in at 114K. Partial replacement of Fe with Co/Ni is direct electron doping to (FeAs)δ+ layer.Tc ~15K in CaFe0.9Ni0.1AsF.Substitution of rare earth metal for alkaline earth metal suppresses anomaly in resistivity & induces superconductivity.Tc ~52K in Ca0.5Pr0.5FeAsF.Characterized by resistivity, susceptibility,XRD & EDX-SEM.Upper critical field estimated from magneto resistance.Bulk superconductivity proved by DC magnetization. Hall coefficient RH revealed hole-like charge carriers in parent compound CaFeAsF, while electron-type (RH in normal state is -Ve) for Ca0.5Pr0.5FeAsF.Evolution of Raman active phonons of Ca1-xPrxFeAsF measured with polarized Raman spectroscopy at room temperature from absurfaces of impurity-free microcrystals.Spectra exhibit sharp phonon lines on very weak electronic scattering background.Frequency and symmetry of Raman phonons involving out-of-plane atomic vibrations are found at 162.5 cm-1 (A1 g, Pr), 201 cm-1 (A1 g, As), 215.5 cm-1 (B1 g, Fe), 265 cm-1 (Eg, Fe) and 334 cm-1 (B1 g, F) for Ca0.5Pr0.5FeAsF.Observations are compared with RFeAsO unconventional superconductors also possibly related to magnetic fluctuations

  9. Practicing ESD at School: Integration of Formal and Nonformal Education Methods Based on the Earth Charter (Belarusian Experience)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savelava, Sofia; Savelau, Dmitry; Cary, Marina Bakhnova

    2010-01-01

    The Earth Charter represents the philosophy and ethics necessary to create a new period of human civilization. Understanding and adoption of this new vision is the most important mission of education for sustainable development (ESD). This article argues that for successful implementation of ESD principles at school, the school education system…

  10. Chemical environment of rare earth ions in Ge{sub 28.125}Ga{sub 6.25}S{sub 65.625} glass-ceramics doped with Dy{sup 3+}

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Rongping Yan, Kunlun; Luther-Davies, Barry; Zhang, Mingjie; Yang, Anping; Zhang, Bin; Shen, Xiang; Dai, Shixun; Yang, Xinyu; Yang, Zhiyong

    2015-10-19

    We have annealed Ge{sub 28.125}Ga{sub 6.25}S{sub 65.625} glasses doped with 0.5% Dy to create glass-ceramics in order to examine the local chemical environment of the rare earth ions (REI). More than 12 times enhancement of the emission at 2.9 and 3.5 μm was achieved in glass-ceramics produced using prolonged annealing time. Elemental mapping showed clear evidence that Ga{sub 2}S{sub 3} crystalline grains with a size of 50 nm were dispersed in a Ge-S glass matrix in the glass-ceramics, and the REI could only be found near the Ga{sub 2}S{sub 3} crystalline grains. From the unchanged lineshape of the emissions at 2.9 and 3.5 μm and lack of splitting of the absorption peaks, we concluded that the REI were bonded to Ga on the surface of the Ga{sub 2}S{sub 3} crystals.

  11. Integrating Science Content and Pedagogy in the Earth, Life, and Physical Sciences: A K-8 Pre-Service Teacher Preparation Continuum at the University of Delaware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, J.; Allen, D.; Donham, R.; Fifield, S.; Ford, D.; Shipman, H.; Dagher, Z.

    2007-12-01

    University of Delaware faculty in the geological sciences, biological sciences, and the physics and astronomy departments have partnered with faculty and researchers from the school of education to form a continuum for K- 8 pre-service teacher preparation in science. The goal of the continuum is to develop integrated understandings of content and pedagogy so that these future teachers can effectively use inquiry-based approaches in teaching science in their classrooms. Throughout the continuum where earth science content appears an earth system science approach, with emphasis on inquiry-based activities, is employed. The continuum for K-8 pre-service teachers includes a gateway content course in the earth, life, or physical sciences taken during the freshman year followed by integrated science content and methods courses taken during the sophomore year. These integrated courses, called the Science Semester, were designed and implemented with funding from the National Science Foundation. During the Science Semester, traditional content and pedagogy subject matter boundaries are crossed to stress shared themes that teachers must understand to teach standards-based science. Students work collaboratively on multidisciplinary problem-based learning (PBL) activities that place science concepts in authentic contexts and build learning skills. They also critically explore the theory and practice of elementary science teaching, drawing on their shared experiences of inquiry learning during the Science Semester. The PBL activities that are the hallmark of the Science Semester provide the backdrop through which fundamental earth system interactions can be studied. For example in a PBL investigation that focuses on kids, cancer, and the environment, the hydrologic cycle with emphasis on surface runoff and ground water contamination is studied. Those students seeking secondary certification in science will enroll, as a bridge toward their student teaching experience, in an

  12. Magnetic and microwave absorption properties of rare earth ions (Sm3+, Er3+) doped strontium ferrite and its nanocomposites with polypyrrole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Juhua; Xu, Yang; Mao, Hongkai

    2015-05-01

    M-type strontium ferrite substituted by RE (RE=Sm3+, Er3+) were prepared via a sol-gel method. Polypyrrole (PPy)/ferrite nanocomposites (with 20 wt% ferrite) were prepared by in situ polymerization method in the presence of ammonium persulfate. Effect of the substituted RE ions on structure, magnetic properties and microwave absorption properties were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and vector network analyzer. All XRD patterns show the single phase of strontium hexaferrite without other intermediate phases. The crystallite size of synthesized particle is within the range of 22.2-38.1 nm. The structural in character of the composites were investigated with FT-IR analysis. It shows that the ferrite successfully packed by PPy. TEM photographs show that the particle size had grown up to 50-100 nm after coating with PPy. In the magnetization for the PPy/SrSm0.3Fe11.7O19 (SrEr0.3Fe11.7O19) composites, the coercivity (Hc) of the composites both increased compared with the undoped composite while the saturation magnetization (Ms) appeared opposite change with different RE ions. Considering the electromagnetic loss and impedance matching comprehensively, the Er-doped ferrite/PPy composite got the better microwave absorption performance with the maximum RL value of -24.01 dB in 13.8 GHz at 3.0 mm. And its width (<-10 dB) has reached 7.2 GHz which has covered the whole Ku band.

  13. Study the structural and magnetic properties of rare-earth ions (La and Gd) doped Ba0.9575Ca0.0025Ti0.80685Mn0.002475Nb0.002475Zr0.1782O3 (BCTMNZ) ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Radheshyam; Kumari, Poonam; Valente, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we investigated the influence of rare earth (RE=La and Gd) doped Ba0.9575RE0.04Ca0.0025Ti0.80685 Mn0.002475Nb0.002475Zr0.1782O3 (BCTMNZ) ceramics were fabricated by using a conventional solid-state reaction method. The doping effects of La and Gd on the structural and magnetic properties were studied. The structural pattern of the ceramic samples were investigated by X-ray diffraction and the results indicated that both samples shows an orthorhombic structure with pure phase. Strain and crystalline size values for Gd and La doped were 0.31-0.33% and 0.154-0.181μm, respectively. The room temperature hysteresis loops were obtained by using a vibrating sample magnetometer. La doped ceramic showed the higher value of magnetization i.e., 0.369μB/f.u. as compared to Gd doped BLTMNZ ceramics.

  14. Application of an integrated biomarker response index to assess ground water contamination in the vicinity of a rare earth mine tailings site.

    PubMed

    Si, Wantong; He, Xiaoying; Li, Ailing; Liu, Li; Li, Jisheng; Gong, Donghui; Liu, Juan; Liu, Jumei; Shen, Weishou; Zhang, Xuefeng

    2016-09-01

    We utilized a multi-biomarker approach (Integrated Biomarker Response version 2, IBRv2) to investigate the scope and dispersion of groundwater contamination surrounding a rare earth mine tailings impoundment. Parameters of SD rat included in our IBRv2 analyses were glutathione levels, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities, total anti-oxidative capacity, chromosome aberration, and micronucleus formation. The concentration of 20 pollutants including Cl(-), SO4 (2-), Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), TH, CODMn, As, Se, TDS, Be, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mo, Cd, and Pb in the groundwater were also analyzed. The results of this study indicated that groundwater polluted by tailings impoundment leakage exhibited significant ecotoxicological effects. The selected biomarkers responded sensitively to groundwater pollution. Analyses showed a significant relationship between IBRv2 values and the Nemerow composite index. IBRv2 could serve as a sensitive ecotoxicological diagnosis method for assessing groundwater contamination in the vicinity of rare earth mine tailings. According to the trend of IBRv2 value and Nemerow composite index, the maximum diffusion distance of groundwater pollutants from rare earth mine tailings was approximately 5.7 km.

  15. Incubational domain characterization in lightly doped ceria

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhipeng; Mori, Toshiyuki; John Auchterlonie, Graeme; Zou Jin; Drennan, John

    2012-08-15

    Microstructures of both Gd- and Y-doped ceria with different doping level (i.e., 10 at% and 25 at%) have been comprehensively characterized by means of high resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. Coherent nano-sized domains can be widely observed in heavily doped ceria. Nevertheless, it was found that a large amount of dislocations actually exist in lightly doped ceria instead of heavily doped ones. Furthermore, incubational domains can be detected in lightly doped ceria, with dislocations located at the interfaces. The interactions between such linear dislocations and dopant defects have been simulated accordingly. As a consequence, the formation mechanism of incubational domains is rationalized in terms of the interaction between intrinsic dislocations of doped ceria and dopant defects. This study offers the insights into the initial state and related mechanism of the formation of nano-sized domains, which have been widely observed in heavily rare-earth-doped ceria in recent years. - Graphical abstract: Interactions between dislocations and dopants lead to incubational domain formation in lightly doped ceria. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructures were characterized in both heavily and light Gd-/Y-doped ceria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dislocations are existed in lightly doped ceria rather than heavily doped one. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interactions between dislocations and dopant defects were simulated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of dislocation associated incubational domain is rationalized.

  16. EarthScope's Plate Boundary Observatory in Alaska: Building on Existing Infrastructure to Provide a Platform for Integrated Research and Hazard-monitoring Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, E. S.; Bierma, R. M.; Willoughby, H.; Feaux, K.; Mattioli, G. S.; Enders, M.; Busby, R. W.

    2014-12-01

    EarthScope's geodetic component in Alaska, the UNAVCO-operated Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) network, includes 139 continuous GPS sites and 41 supporting telemetry relays. These are spread across a vast area, from northern AK to the Aleutians. Forty-five of these stations were installed or have been upgraded in cooperation with various partner agencies and currently provide data collection and transmission for more than one group. Leveraging existing infrastructure normally has multiple benefits, such as easier permitting requirements and costs savings through reduced overall construction and maintenance expenses. At some sites, PBO-AK power and communications systems have additional capacity beyond that which is needed for reliable acquisition of GPS data. Where permits allow, such stations could serve as platforms for additional instrumentation or real-time observing needs. With the expansion of the Transportable Array (TA) into Alaska, there is increased interest to leverage existing EarthScope resources for station co-location and telemetry integration. Because of the complexity and difficulty of long-term O&M at PBO sites, however, actual integration of GPS and seismic equipment must be considered on a case-by-case basis. UNAVCO currently operates two integrated GPS/seismic stations in collaboration with the Alaska Earthquake Center, and three with the Alaska Volcano Observatory. By the end of 2014, PBO and TA plan to install another four integrated and/or co-located geodetic and seismic systems. While three of these are designed around existing PBO stations, one will be a completely new TA installation, providing PBO with an opportunity to expand geodetic data collection in Alaska within the limited operations and maintenance phase of the project. We will present some of the design considerations, outcomes, and lessons learned from past and ongoing projects to integrate seismometers and other instrumentation at PBO-Alaska stations. Developing the PBO

  17. Multimodal bioimaging using rare earth doped Gd2O2S: Yb/Er phosphor with upconversion luminescence and magnetic resonance properties

    PubMed Central

    Ajithkumar, G.; Yoo, Benjamin; Goral, Dara E.; Hornsby, Peter J.; Lin, Ai-Ling; Ladiwala, Uma; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Sardar, Dhiraj K

    2013-01-01

    While infrared upconversion imaging using halide nanoparticles are so common the search for a very efficient halide free upconverting phosphors is still lacking. In this article we report Gd2O2S:Yb/Er,YbHo,YbTm systems as a very efficient alternative phosphors that show upconversion efficiency comparable or even higher than existing halide phosphors. While the majority of rare earth dopants provide the necessary features for optical imaging, the paramagnetic Gd ion also contributes to the magnetic imaging,thereby resulting in a system with bimodal imaging features. Results from imaging of the nanoparticles together with aggregates of cultured cells have suggested that imaging of the particles in living animals may be possible. In vitro tests revealed no signficant toxicity because no cell death was observed when the nanoparticles were in the presence of growing cells in culture. Measurement of the magnetization of the phosphor shows that the particles are strongly magnetic, thus making them suitable as an MRI agent. PMID:25191618

  18. Mitochondrial potential (ΔΨm) changes in single rat hepatocytes: the effect of orthovanadate nanoparticles doped with rare-earth elements.

    PubMed

    Kavok, Nataliya S; Averchenko, Katherine A; Klochkov, Vladimir K; Yefimova, Svetlana L; Malyukin, Yuri V

    2014-12-01

    Rare-earth-based nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used as fluorescent probes for imaging in vitro and in vivo. One of the challenges that restrain NPs applications in biomedical research is their effect on subcellular structures. In this paper, the ability of lanthanide NPs to affect the cellular oxidative balance and alter the mitochondrial function was analyzed. Since size and shape mutually affect the cellular internalization and intracellular distribution of NPs, the investigations were performed with NPs of spherical (GdYVO4:Eu(3+), spindle-(GdVO4: Eu(3+) and rod-like (LaVO4: Eu(3+) shapes. Quantitative microfluorimetry with JC-1 (5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolocarbocyanine iodide) as a mitochondrial probe was used for monitoring of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨ m) in single living cells. Changes in the ratio of the JC-1 probe fluorescence were used to analyze the NPs effect on ΔΨ(m). The fastest suppressive effect (within 1 hour) was found for spherical NPs. Gradual lowering of ΔΨ(m) was observed at the exposure of cells within 24 hours for all types of NPs. Exogenous thiols were required for ΔΨ(m) protection. The protective role of exogenous glutathione (GSH) proves that the increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation with depletion of GSH can mediate NPs toxicity. The dynamics of the shape-dependent effect can be explained by the features of NPs transportation into cells.

  19. Multimodal bioimaging using rare earth doped Gd2O2S: Yb/Er phosphor with upconversion luminescence and magnetic resonance properties.

    PubMed

    Ajithkumar, G; Yoo, Benjamin; Goral, Dara E; Hornsby, Peter J; Lin, Ai-Ling; Ladiwala, Uma; Dravid, Vinayak P; Sardar, Dhiraj K

    2013-03-21

    While infrared upconversion imaging using halide nanoparticles are so common the search for a very efficient halide free upconverting phosphors is still lacking. In this article we report Gd2O2S:Yb/Er,YbHo,YbTm systems as a very efficient alternative phosphors that show upconversion efficiency comparable or even higher than existing halide phosphors. While the majority of rare earth dopants provide the necessary features for optical imaging, the paramagnetic Gd ion also contributes to the magnetic imaging,thereby resulting in a system with bimodal imaging features. Results from imaging of the nanoparticles together with aggregates of cultured cells have suggested that imaging of the particles in living animals may be possible. In vitro tests revealed no signficant toxicity because no cell death was observed when the nanoparticles were in the presence of growing cells in culture. Measurement of the magnetization of the phosphor shows that the particles are strongly magnetic, thus making them suitable as an MRI agent.

  20. Local Observability Analysis of Star Sensor Installation Errors in a SINS/CNS Integration System for Near-Earth Flight Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanqiang; Zhang, Chunxi; Lu, Jiazhen

    2017-01-01

    Strapdown inertial navigation system/celestial navigation system (SINS/CNS) integrated navigation is a fully autonomous and high precision method, which has been widely used to improve the hitting accuracy and quick reaction capability of near-Earth flight vehicles. The installation errors between SINS and star sensors have been one of the main factors that restrict the actual accuracy of SINS/CNS. In this paper, an integration algorithm based on the star vector observations is derived considering the star sensor installation error. Then, the star sensor installation error is accurately estimated based on Kalman Filtering (KF). Meanwhile, a local observability analysis is performed on the rank of observability matrix obtained via linearization observation equation, and the observable conditions are presented and validated. The number of star vectors should be greater than or equal to 2, and the times of posture adjustment also should be greater than or equal to 2. Simulations indicate that the star sensor installation error could be readily observable based on the maneuvering condition; moreover, the attitude errors of SINS are less than 7 arc-seconds. This analysis method and conclusion are useful in the ballistic trajectory design of near-Earth flight vehicles. PMID:28275211

  1. Local Observability Analysis of Star Sensor Installation Errors in a SINS/CNS Integration System for Near-Earth Flight Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanqiang; Zhang, Chunxi; Lu, Jiazhen

    2017-01-16

    Strapdown inertial navigation system/celestial navigation system (SINS/CNS) integrated navigation is a fully autonomous and high precision method, which has been widely used to improve the hitting accuracy and quick reaction capability of near-Earth flight vehicles. The installation errors between SINS and star sensors have been one of the main factors that restrict the actual accuracy of SINS/CNS. In this paper, an integration algorithm based on the star vector observations is derived considering the star sensor installation error. Then, the star sensor installation error is accurately estimated based on Kalman Filtering (KF). Meanwhile, a local observability analysis is performed on the rank of observability matrix obtained via linearization observation equation, and the observable conditions are presented and validated. The number of star vectors should be greater than or equal to 2, and the times of posture adjustment also should be greater than or equal to 2. Simulations indicate that the star sensor installation error could be readily observable based on the maneuvering condition; moreover, the attitude errors of SINS are less than 7 arc-seconds. This analysis method and conclusion are useful in the ballistic trajectory design of near-Earth flight vehicles.

  2. Temperature-dependent structure of Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, Katherine P.; Russek, Stephen E. Shaw, Justin M.; Usselman, Robert J.; Evarts, Eric R.; Silva, Thomas J.; Nembach, Hans T.; Geiss, Roy H.; Arenholz, Elke; Idzerda, Yves U.

    2015-02-09

    High quality 5 nm cubic Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized by a wet-chemical method to investigate tailoring of magnetic properties for imaging and biomedical applications. We show that the Tb is incorporated into the octahedral 3+ sites. High-angle annular dark-field microscopy shows that the dopant is well-distributed throughout the particle, and x-ray diffraction measurements show a small lattice parameter shift with the inclusion of a rare-earth dopant. Magnetization and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism data indicate that the Tb spins are unpolarized and weakly coupled to the iron spin lattice at room temperature, and begin to polarize and couple to the iron oxide lattice at temperatures below 50 K. Broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurements show no increase in magnetic damping at room temperature for Tb-doped nanoparticles relative to undoped nanoparticles, further confirming weak coupling between Fe and Tb spins at room temperature. The Gilbert damping constant, α, is remarkably low for the Tb-doped nanoparticles, with α = 0.024 ± 0.003. These nanoparticles, which have a large fixed moment, a large fluctuating moment and optically active rare-earth elements, are potential high-relaxivity T1 and T2 MRI agents with integrated optical signatures.

  3. Temperature-dependent structure of Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Katherine P.; Russek, Stephen E.; Geiss, Roy H.; Shaw, Justin M.; Usselman, Robert J.; Evarts, Eric R.; Silva, Thomas J.; Nembach, Hans T.; Arenholz, Elke; Idzerda, Yves U.

    2015-02-01

    High quality 5 nm cubic Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized by a wet-chemical method to investigate tailoring of magnetic properties for imaging and biomedical applications. We show that the Tb is incorporated into the octahedral 3+ sites. High-angle annular dark-field microscopy shows that the dopant is well-distributed throughout the particle, and x-ray diffraction measurements show a small lattice parameter shift with the inclusion of a rare-earth dopant. Magnetization and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism data indicate that the Tb spins are unpolarized and weakly coupled to the iron spin lattice at room temperature, and begin to polarize and couple to the iron oxide lattice at temperatures below 50 K. Broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurements show no increase in magnetic damping at room temperature for Tb-doped nanoparticles relative to undoped nanoparticles, further confirming weak coupling between Fe and Tb spins at room temperature. The Gilbert damping constant, α, is remarkably low for the Tb-doped nanoparticles, with α = 0.024 ± 0.003. These nanoparticles, which have a large fixed moment, a large fluctuating moment and optically active rare-earth elements, are potential high-relaxivity T1 and T2 MRI agents with integrated optical signatures.

  4. Airplane dopes and doping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W H

    1919-01-01

    Cellulose acetate and cellulose nitrate are the important constituents of airplane dopes in use at the present time, but planes were treated with other materials in the experimental stages of flying. The above compounds belong to the class of colloids and are of value because they produce a shrinking action on the fabric when drying out of solution, rendering it drum tight. Other colloids possessing the same property have been proposed and tried. In the first stages of the development of dope, however, shrinkage was not considered. The fabric was treated merely to render it waterproof. The first airplanes constructed were covered with cotton fabric stretched as tightly as possible over the winds, fuselage, etc., and flying was possible only in fine weather. The necessity of an airplane which would fly under all weather conditions at once became apparent. Then followed experiments with rubberized fabrics, fabrics treated with glue rendered insoluble by formaldehyde or bichromate, fabrics treated with drying and nondrying oils, shellac, casein, etc. It was found that fabrics treated as above lost their tension in damp weather, and the oil from the motor penetrated the proofing material and weakened the fabric. For the most part the film of material lacked durability. Cellulose nitrate lacquers, however were found to be more satisfactory under varying weather conditions, added less weight to the planes, and were easily applied. On the other hand, they were highly inflammable, and oil from the motor penetrated the film of cellulose nitrate, causing the tension of the fabric to be relaxed.

  5. Synthesis, Consolidation, and Processing of Bulk Polycrystalline Transparent YAG, Ruby, and Over-Equilibrium Rare-Earth Doped Alumina for Photonic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penilla, Elias Hank

    The past decade has seen significant advances in the development and improvements to high-energy laser technologies, with improvements coming from all directions, i.e. pumping technology, cavity design, cooling methods, and improved gain media quality, etc. Regardless, the continued development of high-energy lasers and the supporting technologies remains intense. From a materials development perspective, the need for gain media with superior optical, thermal, and mechanical properties is alluring because improvements in the materials properties often translate directly to increases in device performance. Advances in powder processing and sintering/consolidation techniques, in the past two decades have produced polycrystalline ceramics with the requisite densities, transparencies, and photoluminescence properties to be viable laser gain materials. In fact, the performance of some cubic (optically isotropic) ceramics now rival and even surpass their single-crystal counterparts. In the first portion of this dissertation Current Activated Pressure Assisted Densification (CAPAD) is implemented to process and consolidate transparent bulk polycrystalline YAG and Ce:YAG ceramics via a simultaneous solid-state synthesis and densification route. The simultaneous reaction/densification during CAPAD processing results in improved densification rates and with reaction kinetics that are about 2 orders of magnitude higher when compared to traditional solid-state reaction pressureless sintering and that the higher reaction kinetics occurring during CAPAD result at much lower temperatures, ( 600°C) compared to conventional reaction sintering. In the second portion of this dissertation, the increased consolidation and reaction kinetics are leveraged to develop transparent bulk polycrystalline Cr:Alumina (ruby) and rare-earth (RE), RE:Alumina into viable laser gain materials. The advantages of alumina as an optical gain media over state of the art gain materials such as YAG and

  6. Fullerene-C60 and crown ether doped on C60 sensors for high sensitive detection of alkali and alkaline earth cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghmarzi, Fatemeh Alipour; Zahedi, Mansour; Mola, Adeleh; Abedini, Saboora; Arshadi, Sattar; Ahmadzadeh, Saeed; Etminan, Nazanin; Younesi, Omran; Rahmanifar, Elham; Yoosefian, Mehdi

    2017-03-01

    Fullerenes are effective acceptor components with high electron affinity for charge transfer. The significant influences of chemical adsorption of the cations on the electrical sensitivity of pristine C60 and 15-(C2H4O)5/C60 nanocages could be the basis of new generation of electronic sensor design. The density functional theory calculation for alkali and alkaline earth cations detection by pristine C60 and 15-(C2H4O)5/C60 nanocages are considered at B3LYP level of theory with 6-31 G(d) basis set. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules analysis have been performed to understand the nature of intermolecular interactions between the cations and nanocages. Also, the natural bond orbital analysis have been performed to assess the intermolecular interactions in detail. Furthermore, the frontier molecular orbital, energy gap, work function, electronegativity, number of transferred electron (∆N), dipole moment as well as the related chemical hardness and softness are investigated and calculated in this study. The results show that the adsorption of cations (M=Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+) are exothermic and the binding energy in pristine C60 nanocage and 15-(C2H4O)5/C60 increases with respect to the cations charge. The results also denote a decrease in the energy gap and an increase in the electrical conductivity upon the adsorption process. In order to validate the obtained results, the density of state calculations are employed and presented in the end as well.

  7. Early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M.

    2015-05-01

    Earth has continents, subduction and mobile lid plate tectonics, but details of the early evolution are poorly understood. Here I summarize the Hadean-Archean record, review evidence for a hotter Earth and consider geodynamic models for early Earth.

  8. Investigation of InP/InGaAs metamorphic co-integrated complementary doping-channel field-effect transistors for logic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Jung-Hui

    2014-01-01

    DC performance of InP/InGaAs metamorphic co-integrated complementary doping-channel field-effect transistors (DCFETs) grown on a low-cost GaAs substrate is first demonstrated. In the complementary DCFETs, the n-channel device was fabricated on the InxGa1-xP metamorphic linearly graded buffer layer and the p-channel field-effect transistor was stacked on the top of the n-channel device. Particularly, the saturation voltage of the n-channel device is substantially reduced to decrease the VOL and VIH values attributed that two-dimensional electron gas is formed and could be modulated in the n-InGaAs channel. Experimentally, a maximum extrinsic transconductance of 215 (17) mS/mm and a maximum saturation current density of 43 (-27) mA/mm are obtained in the n-channel (p-channel) device. Furthermore, the noise margins NMH and NML are up to 0.842 and 0.330 V at a supply voltage of 1.5 V in the complementary logic inverter application.

  9. Dynamic nuclear polarisation via the integrated solid effect II: experiments on naphthalene-h8 doped with pentacene-d14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhorn, T. R.; van den Brandt, B.; Hautle, P.; Henstra, A.; Wenckebach, W. Th.

    2014-07-01

    In dynamic nuclear polarisation (DNP), also called hyperpolarisation, a small amount of unpaired electron spins is added to the sample containing the nuclear spins, and the polarisation of these unpaired electron spins is transferred to the nuclear spins by means of a microwave field. Traditional DNP polarises the electron spin of stable paramagnetic centres by cooling down to low temperature and applying a strong magnetic field. Then weak continuous wave microwave fields are used to induce the polarisation transfer. Complicated cryogenic equipment and strong magnets can be avoided using short-lived photo-excited triplet states that are strongly aligned in the optical excitation process. However, a much faster transfer of the electron spin polarisation is needed and pulsed DNP methods like nuclear orientation via electron spin locking (NOVEL) and the integrated solid effect (ISE) are used. To describe the polarisation transfer with the strong microwave fields in NOVEL and ISE, the usual perturbation methods cannot be used anymore. In the previous paper, we presented a theoretical approach to calculate the polarisation transfer in ISE. In the present paper, the theory is applied to the system naphthalene-h8 doped with pentacene-d14 yielding the photo-excited triplet states and compared with experimental results.

  10. The fractionation and geochemical characteristics of rare earth elements measured in ambient size-resolved PM in an integrated iron and steelmaking industry zone.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qili; Li, Liwei; Yang, Jiamei; Liu, Baoshuang; Bi, Xiaohui; Wu, Jianhui; Zhang, YuFen; Yao, Lin; Feng, Yinchang

    2016-09-01

    Improved understanding of the fractionation and geochemical characteristic of rare earth elements (REEs) from steel plant emissions is important due to the unclear atmospheric signature of these elements and their adverse impact on human health and the environment. In this study, ambient particulate matter of different sizes was collected from one site in an integrated iron and steelmaking industrial zone (HG) and one urban background site with no direct industrial emissions (ZWY) during a 1-year sampling campaign in China. The total concentrations of REEs for TSP, PM10, and PM2.5 were 27.248, 14.989, 3.542 ng/m(3) in HG and 6.326, 5.274, 1.731 ng/m(3), respectively, in ZWY, which revealed the local influence of the steelmaking activities to the air quality. With respect to ZWY, the REEs in HG site are obviously fractionated in the coarser fraction, and LREEs account for more than 80 % of the total REE burden in all of the samples. Additionally, the REEs in HG and ZWY show a homogeneous trend with successively increased LREE/HREE ratios from the coarse particles to the fine particles. In our samples, La, Ce, Nd, and Sm are the most enriched rare earth elements, especially in the HG site. Moreover, ternary diagrams of LaCeSm indicate that the REEs in HG are potentially contributed by steelworks, carrier vehicles, coal combustion, and road dust re-suspension.

  11. Expedition Earth and Beyond: Engaging Classrooms in Student-Led Research Using NASA Data, Access to Scientists, and Integrated Educational Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, P. V.; Stefanov, W. L.; Willis, K. J.; Runco, S.; McCollum, T.; Baker, M.; Lindgren, C.; Mailhot, M.

    2011-01-01

    Classroom teachers are challenged with engaging and preparing today s students for the future. Activities are driven by state required skills, education standards, and high-stakes testing. Providing educators with standards-aligned, inquiry-based activities that will help them engage their students in student-led research in the classroom will help them teach required standards, essential skills, and help inspire their students to become motivated learners. The Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Education Program, classroom educators, and ARES scientists at the NASA Johnson Space Center created the Expedition Earth and Beyond education program to help teachers promote student-led research in their classrooms (grades 5-14) by using NASA data, providing access to scientists, and using integrated educational strategies.

  12. Peru Water Resources: Integrating NASA Earth Observations into Water Resource Planning and Management in Perus La Libertad Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padgett-Vasquez, Steve; Steentofte, Catherine; Holbrook, Abigail

    2014-01-01

    Developing countries often struggle with providing water security and sanitation services to their populations. An important aspect of improving security and sanitation is developing a comprehensive understanding of the country's water budget. Water For People, a non-profit organization dedicated to providing clean drinking water, is working with the Peruvian government to develop a water budget for the La Libertad region of Peru which includes the creation of an extensive watershed management plan. Currently, the data archive of the necessary variables to create the water management plan is extremely limited. Implementing NASA Earth observations has bolstered the dataset being used by Water For People, and the METRIC (Mapping EvapoTranspiration at High Resolution and Internalized Calibration) model has allowed for the estimation of the evapotranspiration values for the region. Landsat 8 imagery and the DEM (Digital Elevation Model) from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) sensor onboard Terra were used to derive the land cover information, and were used in conjunction with local weather data of Cascas from Peru's National Meteorological and Hydrological Service (SENAMHI). Python was used to combine input variables and METRIC model calculations to approximate the evapotranspiration values for the Ochape sub-basin of the Chicama River watershed. Once calculated, the evapotranspiration values and methodology were shared Water For People to help supplement their decision support tools in the La Libertad region of Peru and potentially apply the methodology in other areas of need.

  13. An Integrated Modeling System for Estimating Glacier and Snow Melt Driven Streamflow from Remote Sensing and Earth System Data Products in the Himalayas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, M. E.; Racoviteanu, A. E.; Tarboton, D. G.; Sen Gupta, A.; Nigro, J.; Policelli, F.; Habib, S.; Tokay, M.; Shrestha, M. S.; Bajracharya, S.

    2014-01-01

    Quantification of the contribution of the hydrologic components (snow, ice and rain) to river discharge in the Hindu Kush Himalayan (HKH) region is important for decision-making in water sensitive sectors, and for water resources management and flood risk reduction. In this area, access to and monitoring of the glaciers and their melt outflow is challenging due to difficult access, thus modeling based on remote sensing offers the potential for providing information to improve water resources management and decision making. This paper describes an integrated modeling system developed using downscaled NASA satellite based and earth system data products coupled with in-situ hydrologic data to assess the contribution of snow and glaciers to the flows of the rivers in the HKH region. Snow and glacier melt was estimated using the Utah Energy Balance (UEB) model, further enhanced to accommodate glacier ice melt over clean and debris-covered tongues, then meltwater was input into the USGS Geospatial Stream Flow Model (Geo- SFM). The two model components were integrated into Better Assessment Science Integrating point and Nonpoint Sources modeling framework (BASINS) as a user-friendly open source system and was made available to countries in high Asia. Here we present a case study from the Langtang Khola watershed in the monsoon-influenced Nepal Himalaya, used to validate our energy balance approach and to test the applicability of our modeling system. The snow and glacier melt model predicts that for the eight years used for model evaluation (October 2003-September 2010), the total surface water input over the basin was 9.43 m, originating as 62% from glacier melt, 30% from snowmelt and 8% from rainfall. Measured streamflow for those years were 5.02 m, reflecting a runoff coefficient of 0.53. GeoSFM simulated streamflow was 5.31 m indicating reasonable correspondence between measured and model confirming the capability of the integrated system to provide a quantification

  14. An Impact of Zirconium Doping of Zn-Al Braze on the Aluminum-Stainless Steel Joints Integrity During Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinlong; Xue, Songbai; Sekulic, Dusan P.

    2016-11-01

    This work offers an analysis of the microstructure and the growth rate of an intermetallic compound within the aged AA 6061 aluminum alloy-304 stainless steel joint brazed with Zn-15Al and Zn-15Al-0.2Zr filler metals. The effect of zirconium addition on mechanical integrity of the brazed joint was studied. The experimental results confirm that the thickness of the Fe-Al intermetallic layer formed at the brazed seam/stainless steel interface increases with the increase of the aging time. Furthermore, it is established that the growth rate of the intermetallic layer for the Zn-15Al-0.2Zr brazed joint was lower than that for Zn-15Al. The results also indicate that the shear strength of both Zn-15Al and Zn-15Al-0.2Zr brazed joints decreases monotonously during aging. The value of the strength after aging lasting for 800 h for Zn-15Al and Zn-15Al-0.2Zr has decreased by 20 and 17%, respectively. The fracture of joints occurred at the interface between the brazed seam and the Fe4Al13 intermetallic layer. The morphology of the surfaces exhibits a cleavage fracture.

  15. An Impact of Zirconium Doping of Zn-Al Braze on the Aluminum-Stainless Steel Joints Integrity During Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinlong; Xue, Songbai; Sekulic, Dusan P.

    2017-01-01

    This work offers an analysis of the microstructure and the growth rate of an intermetallic compound within the aged AA 6061 aluminum alloy-304 stainless steel joint brazed with Zn-15Al and Zn-15Al-0.2Zr filler metals. The effect of zirconium addition on mechanical integrity of the brazed joint was studied. The experimental results confirm that the thickness of the Fe-Al intermetallic layer formed at the brazed seam/stainless steel interface increases with the increase of the aging time. Furthermore, it is established that the growth rate of the intermetallic layer for the Zn-15Al-0.2Zr brazed joint was lower than that for Zn-15Al. The results also indicate that the shear strength of both Zn-15Al and Zn-15Al-0.2Zr brazed joints decreases monotonously during aging. The value of the strength after aging lasting for 800 h for Zn-15Al and Zn-15Al-0.2Zr has decreased by 20 and 17%, respectively. The fracture of joints occurred at the interface between the brazed seam and the Fe4Al13 intermetallic layer. The morphology of the surfaces exhibits a cleavage fracture.

  16. Path integral Monte Carlo simulations of H2 adsorbed to lithium-doped benzene: A model for hydrogen storage materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindoy, Lachlan P.; Kolmann, Stephen J.; D'Arcy, Jordan H.; Crittenden, Deborah L.; Jordan, Meredith J. T.

    2015-11-01

    Finite temperature quantum and anharmonic effects are studied in H2-Li+-benzene, a model hydrogen storage material, using path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) simulations on an interpolated potential energy surface refined over the eight intermolecular degrees of freedom based upon M05-2X/6-311+G(2df,p) density functional theory calculations. Rigid-body PIMC simulations are performed at temperatures ranging from 77 K to 150 K, producing both quantum and classical probability density histograms describing the adsorbed H2. Quantum effects broaden the histograms with respect to their classical analogues and increase the expectation values of the radial and angular polar coordinates describing the location of the center-of-mass of the H2 molecule. The rigid-body PIMC simulations also provide estimates of the change in internal energy, ΔUads, and enthalpy, ΔHads, for H2 adsorption onto Li+-benzene, as a function of temperature. These estimates indicate that quantum effects are important even at room temperature and classical results should be interpreted with caution. Our results also show that anharmonicity is more important in the calculation of U and H than coupling—coupling between the intermolecular degrees of freedom becomes less important as temperature increases whereas anharmonicity becomes more important. The most anharmonic motions in H2-Li+-benzene are the "helicopter" and "ferris wheel" H2 rotations. Treating these motions as one-dimensional free and hindered rotors, respectively, provides simple corrections to standard harmonic oscillator, rigid rotor thermochemical expressions for internal energy and enthalpy that encapsulate the majority of the anharmonicity. At 150 K, our best rigid-body PIMC estimates for ΔUads and ΔHads are -13.3 ± 0.1 and -14.5 ± 0.1 kJ mol-1, respectively.

  17. From land use to land cover: Restoring the afforestation signal in a coupled integrated assessment - earth system model and the implications for CMIP5 RCP simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Di Vittorio, Alan V.; Chini, Louise M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Truesdale, John E.; Craig, Anthony P.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Hurtt, George; Thornton, Peter E.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-11-27

    Climate projections depend on scenarios of fossil fuel emissions and land use change, and the IPCC AR5 parallel process assumes consistent climate scenarios across Integrated Assessment and Earth System Models (IAMs and ESMs). To facilitate consistency, CMIP5 used a novel land use harmonization to provide ESMs with seamless, 1500-2100 land use trajectories generated by historical data and four IAMs. However, we have identified and partially addressed a major gap in the CMIP5 land coupling design. The CMIP5 Community ESM (CESM) global afforestation is only 22% of RCP4.5 afforestation from 2005 to 2100. Likewise, only 17% of the Global Change Assessment Model’s (GCAM’s) 2040 RCP4.5 afforestation signal, and none of the pasture loss, were transmitted to CESM within a newly integrated model. This is a critical problem because afforestation is necessary for achieving the RCP4.5 climate stabilization. We attempted to rectify this problem by modifying only the ESM component of the integrated model, enabling CESM to simulate 66% of GCAM’s afforestation in 2040, and 94% of GCAM’s pasture loss as grassland and shrubland losses. This additional afforestation increases vegetation carbon gain by 19 PgC and decreases atmospheric CO2 gain by 8 ppmv from 2005 to 2040, implying different climate scenarios between CMIP5 GCAM and CESM. Similar inconsistencies likely exist in other CMIP5 model results, primarily because land cover information is not shared between models, with possible contributions from afforestation exceeding model-specific, potentially viable forest area. Further work to harmonize land cover among models will be required to adequately rectify this problem.

  18. The Quickest, Lowest-cost Lunar Resource Assessment Program: Integrated High-tech Earth-based Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieters, Carle M.

    1992-01-01

    Science and technology applications for the Moon have not fully kept pace with technical advancements in sensor development and analytical information extraction capabilities. Appropriate unanswered questions for the Moon abound, but until recently there has been little motivation to link sophisticated technical capabilities with specific measurement and analysis projects. Over the last decade enormous technical progress has been made in the development of (1) CCD photometric array detectors; (2) visible to near-infrared imaging spectrometers; (3)infrared spectroscopy; (4) high-resolution dual-polarization radar imaging at 3.5, 12, and 70 cm; and equally important (5) data analysis and information extraction techniques using compact powerful computers. Parts of each of these have been tested separately, but there has been no programmatic effort to develop and optimize instruments to meet lunar science and resource assessment needs (e.g., specific wavelength range, resolution, etc.) nor to coordinate activities so that the symbiotic relation between different kinds of data can be fully realized. No single type of remotely acquired data completely characterizes the lunar environment, but there has been little opportunity for integration of diverse advanced sensor data for the Moon. Two examples of technology concepts for lunar measurements are given. Using VIS/near-IR spectroscopy, the mineral composition of surface material can be derived from visible and near-infrared radiation reflected from the surface. The surface and subsurface scattering properties of the Moon can be analyzed using radar backscattering imaging.

  19. Integration of Multiple OGC Standards for Delivery of Earth Science Information - Presentation of Time-Enabled WMS Through KML as Implemented by the PHAiRS Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudspeth, W. B.; Benedict, K. K.

    2008-12-01

    Since 2004 the Earth Data Analysis Center has, in collaboration with researchers from the University of Arizona and George Mason University, with funding from NASA, developed a services oriented architecture (SOA) designed for the delivery of historic and current dust forecast data products to the public health user community. This system has generated nearly three years of daily 48-hour dust forecasts, ultimately representing over 289,000 individual hourly forecast rasters for ground surface dust concentrations in four model particle size classes and PM 2.5 and PM 10 size classes. This large collection of model outputs is published as a time-enabled Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) that allows for the efficient retrieval of a single hourly forecast map image for each of these particle size classes, for the entire collection of model outputs. While this WMS service has proven effective in meeting the specific project goals of providing services that support the integration of project products into existing public health decision support systems, the development of an alternative visualization capability that takes advantage of virtual globe technologies was also seen as a valuable complementary capability for making these model outputs accessible to a greater audience of environmental public health users. This paper presents the results of a development effort that produced a system that automatically generates time-enabled KML that enables sequential acquisition of hourly model outputs (via time-enabled WMS) in time-enabled virtual globe applications (e.g. Google Earth). While this effort has proven very successful, it has also highlighted areas where support for time-enabled WMS could be improved, both within the KML standard, and within clients that implement time-enabled viewers.

  20. From land use to land cover: restoring the afforestation signal in a coupled integrated assessment-earth system model and the implications for CMIP5 RCP simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Vittorio, A. V.; Chini, L. P.; Bond-Lamberty, B.; Mao, J.; Shi, X.; Truesdale, J.; Craig, A.; Calvin, K.; Jones, A.; Collins, W. D.; Edmonds, J.; Hurtt, G. C.; Thornton, P.; Thomson, A.

    2014-11-01

    Climate projections depend on scenarios of fossil fuel emissions and land use change, and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) AR5 parallel process assumes consistent climate scenarios across integrated assessment and earth system models (IAMs and ESMs). The CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5) project used a novel "land use harmonization" based on the Global Land use Model (GLM) to provide ESMs with consistent 1500-2100 land use trajectories generated by historical data and four IAMs. A direct coupling of the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), GLM, and the Community ESM (CESM) has allowed us to characterize and partially address a major gap in the CMIP5 land coupling design: the lack of a corresponding land cover harmonization. For RCP4.5, CESM global afforestation is only 22% of GCAM's 2005 to 2100 afforestation. Likewise, only 17% of GCAM's 2040 afforestation, and zero pasture loss, were transmitted to CESM within the directly coupled model. This is a problem because GCAM relied on afforestation to achieve RCP4.5 climate stabilization. GLM modifications and sharing forest area between GCAM and GLM within the directly coupled model did not increase CESM afforestation. Modifying the land use translator in addition to GLM, however, enabled CESM to include 66% of GCAM's afforestation in 2040, and 94% of GCAM's pasture loss as grassland and shrubland losses. This additional afforestation increases CESM vegetation carbon gain by 19 PgC and decreases atmospheric CO2 gain by 8 ppmv from 2005 to 2040, which demonstrates that CESM without additional afforestation simulates a different RCP4.5 scenario than prescribed by GCAM. Similar land cover inconsistencies exist in other CMIP5 model results, primarily because land cover information is not shared between models. Further work to harmonize land cover among models will be required to increase fidelity between IAM scenarios and ESM simulations and realize the full potential of scenario

  1. From land use to land cover: Restoring the afforestation signal in a coupled integrated assessment - earth system model and the implications for CMIP5 RCP simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Vittorio, Alan; Chini, Louise; Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Truesdale, John; Craig, Anthony; Calvin, Kate; Jones, Andrew; Collins, William; Edmonds, Jae; Hurtt, George; Thornton, Peter; Thomson, Allison

    2015-04-01

    Climate projections depend on scenarios of fossil fuel emissions and land use change, and the IPCC AR5 parallel process assumes consistent climate scenarios across Integrated Assessment and Earth System Models (IAMs and ESMs). The CMIP5 project used a novel "land use harmonization" based on the Global Land use Model (GLM) to provide ESMs with consistent 1500-2100 land use trajectories generated by historical data and four IAMs. A direct coupling of the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), GLM, and the Community ESM (CESM) has allowed us to characterize and partially address a major gap in the CMIP5 land coupling design: the lack of a corresponding land cover harmonization. For RCP4.5, CESM global afforestation is only 22% of GCAM's 2005 to 2100 afforestation. Likewise, only 17% of GCAM's 2040 afforestation, and zero pasture loss, were transmitted to CESM within the directly coupled model. This is a problem because GCAM relied on afforestation to achieve RCP4.5 climate stabilization. GLM modifications and sharing forest area between GCAM and GLM within the directly coupled model did not increase CESM afforestation. Modifying the land use translator in addition to GLM, however, enabled CESM to include 66% of GCAM's afforestation in 2040, and 94% of GCAM's pasture loss as grassland and shrubland losses. This additional afforestation increases CESM vegetation carbon gain by 19 PgC and decreases atmospheric CO2 gain by 8 ppmv from 2005 to 2040, which demonstrates that CESM without additional afforestation simulates a different RCP4.5 scenario than prescribed by GCAM. Similar land cover inconsistencies exist in other CMIP5 model results, primarily because land cover information is not shared between models. Further work to harmonize land cover among models will be required to increase fidelity between IAM scenarios and ESM simulations and realize the full potential of scenario-based earth system simulations.

  2. Assessing environmental drivers of vegetation greenness by integrating multiple earth observation data in the LPJmL dynamic global vegetation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forkel, Matthias; Carvalhais, Nuno; Schaphoff, Sibyll; von Bloh, Werner; Thurner, Martin; Thonicke, Kirsten

    2014-05-01

    Recently produced satellite datasets of vegetation greenness demonstrate a widespread greening of the earth in the last three decades. These positive trends in vegetation greenness are related to changes in leaf area, vegetation cover and photosynthetic activity. Climatic changes, CO2 fertilization, disturbances and other land cover changes are potential drivers of these greening trends. Nevertheless, different satellite datasets show different magnitudes and trends in vegetation greenness. This fact raises the question about the reliability of these datasets. On the other hand, global vegetation models can be potentially used to assess the effects of environmental drivers on vegetation greenness and thus to explore the environmental reliability of these datasets. Unfortunately, current vegetation models have several weaknesses in reproducing observed temporal dynamics in vegetation greenness. Our aim is to integrate multiple earth observation data sets in a dynamic global vegetation model in order to 1) improve the model's capability to reproduce observed dynamics and spatial patterns of vegetation greenness and 2) to assess the spatial and temporal importance of environmental drivers for the seasonal to decadal variability of vegetation greenness. For this purpose, we developed a data integration system for the LPJmL dynamic global vegetation model (LPJmL-DIS). We implemented a new phenology scheme in LPJmL to better represent observed temporal dynamics of FAPAR (fraction of absorbed photosynthetic active radiation). Model parameters were globally optimized using a genetic optimization algorithm. The model optimization was performed globally against 30 year FAPAR time series (GIMMS3g dataset), against 10 year albedo time series (MODIS) and global patterns of gross primary production as up-scaled from FLUXNET eddy covariance measurements. Additionally, we directly prescribed satellite observations of land and tree cover in LPJmL to better represent global

  3. Skylab explores the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Data from visual observations are integrated with results of analyses of approxmately 600 of the nearly 2000 photographs taken of Earth during the 84-day Skylab 4 mission to provide additional information on (1) Earth features and processes; (2) operational procedures and constraints in observing and photographing the planet; and (3) the use of man in real-time analysis of oceanic and atmospheric phenomena.

  4. Earth Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Tom

    1970-01-01

    Reviews some of the more concerted, large-scale efforts in the earth resources areas" in order to help the computer community obtain insights into the activities it can jointly particpate in withthe earth resources community." (Author)

  5. Integrating Ideas for International Data Collaborations Through The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) International Directory Network (IDN)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Lola M.

    2006-01-01

    The capabilities of the International Directory Network's (IDN) version MD9.5, along with a new version of the metadata authoring tool, "docBUILDER", will be presented during the Technology and Services Subgroup session of the Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS). Feedback provided through the international community has proven instrumental in positively influencing the direction of the IDN s development. The international community was instrumental in encouraging support for using the IS0 international character set that is now available through the directory. Supporting metadata descriptions in additional languages encourages extended use of the IDN. Temporal and spatial attributes often prove pivotal in the search for data. Prior to the new software release, the IDN s geospatial and temporal searches suffered from browser incompatibilities and often resulted in unreliable performance for users attempting to initiate a spatial search using a map based on aging Java applet technology. The IDN now offers an integrated Google map and date search that replaces that technology. In addition, one of the most defining characteristics in the search for data relates to the temporal and spatial resolution of the data. The ability to refine the search for data sets meeting defined resolution requirements is now possible. Data set authors are encouraged to indicate the precise resolution values for their data sets and subsequently bin these into one of the pre-selected resolution ranges. New metadata authoring tools have been well received. In response to requests for a standalone metadata authoring tool, a new shareable software package called "docBUILDER solo" will soon be released to the public. This tool permits researchers to document their data during experiments and observational periods in the field. interoperability has been enhanced through the use of the Open Archives Initiative s (OAI) Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (PMH). Harvesting of XML

  6. Reducing Loss of Life and Property from Disasters: A Societal Benefit Area of the Strategic Plan for U.S. Integrated Earth Observation System (IEOS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helz, Rosalind L.; Gaynor, John E.

    2007-01-01

    Natural and technological disasters, such as hurricanes and other extreme weather events, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides and debris flows, wildland and urban-interface fires, floods, oil spills, and space-weather storms, impose a significant burden on society. Throughout the United States, disasters inflict many injuries and deaths, and cost the nation $20 billion each year (SDR, 2003). Disasters in other countries can affect U.S. assets and interests overseas (e.g. the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in the Philippines, which effectively destroyed Clark Air Force Base). Also, because they have a disproportionate impact on developing countries, disasters are major barriers to sustainable development. Improving our ability to assess, predict, monitor, and respond to hazardous events is a key factor in reducing the occurrence and severity of disasters, and relies heavily on the use of information from well-designed and integrated Earth observation systems. To fully realize the benefits gained from the observation systems, the information derived must be disseminated through effective warning systems and networks, with products tailored to the needs of the end users and the general public.

  7. The Concept Mastery in the Perspective of Gender of Junior High School Students on Eclipse Theme in Multiple Intelligences-based of Integrated Earth and Space Science Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liliawati, W.; Utama, J. A.; Mursydah, L. S.

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify gender-based concept mastery differences of junior high school students after the implementation of multiple intelligences-based integrated earth and space science learning. Pretest-posttest group design was employed to two different classes at one of junior high school on eclipse theme in Tasikmalaya West Java: one class for boys (14 students) and one class of girls (18 students). The two-class received same treatment. The instrument of concepts mastery used in this study was open-ended eight essay questions. Reliability test result of this instrument was 0.9 (category: high) while for validity test results were high and very high category. We used instruments of multiple intelligences identification and learning activity observation sheet for our analysis. The results showed that normalized N-gain of concept mastery for boys and girls were improved, respectively 0.39 and 0.65. Concept mastery for both classes differs significantly. The dominant multiple intelligences for boys were in kinesthetic while girls dominated in the rest of multiple intelligences. Therefor we concluded that the concept mastery was influenced by gender and student’s multiple intelligences. Based on this finding we suggested to considering the factor of gender and students’ multiple intelligences given in the learning activity.

  8. First steps of integrated spatial modeling of titanium, zirconium, and rare earth element resources within the Coastal Plain sediments of the southeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellefsen, Karl J.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Fey, David L.; Budahn, James R.; Smith, Steven M.; Shah, Anjana K.

    2015-01-01

    The Coastal Plain of the southeastern United States has extensive, unconsolidated sedimentary deposits that are enriched in heavy minerals containing titanium, zirconium, and rare earth element resources. Areas favorable for exploration and development of these resources are being identified by geochemical data, which are supplemented with geological, geophysical, hydrological, and geographical data. The first steps of this analysis have been completed. The concentrations of lanthanum, yttrium, and titanium tend to decrease as distance from the Piedmont (which is the likely source of these resources) increases and are moderately correlated with airborne measurements of equivalent thorium concentration. The concentrations of lanthanum, yttrium, and titanium are relatively high in those watersheds that adjoin the Piedmont, south of the Cape Fear Arch. Although this relation suggests that the concentrations are related to the watersheds, it may be simply an independent regional trend. The concentration of zirconium is unrelated to the distance from the Piedmont, the equivalent thorium concentration, and the watershed. These findings establish a foundation for more sophisticated analyses using integrated spatial modeling.

  9. Multi-kilowatt, all-fiber integrated chirped-pulse amplification system yielding 40x pulse compression using air-core fiber and conventional erbium-doped fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    de Matos, C; Taylor, J

    2004-02-09

    We present a totally fiber integrated chirped-pulse amplification system using air-core photonic bandgap fiber and a conventional erbium-doped fiber amplifier. ~40-ps input pulses, generated in a Mach-Zehnder modulator, were stretched and spectrally broadened in a dispersion-shifted fiber before being amplified and subsequently compressed in 10 m of anomalously-dispersive photonic bandgap fiber to yield ~960 fs pulses. The system gives multi-kilowatt peak powers while the amplifier nonlinearity threshold is as low as ~150 W. Higher peak powers could be obtained by the use of an amplifier with higher nonlinearity threshold.

  10. Observation of frequency doubling in tantalum doped silica fibres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, T. J.; Lawandy, N. M.; Killian, A.; Rienhart, L.; Morse, T. F.

    1991-01-01

    Second harmonic conversion efficients of 3 x 0,0001 in tantalum-doped silica fibers prepared by the seeding technique are reported. A series of experiments were conducted to characterize the frequency doubling in this fiber and to compare the results to the behavior observed in germanosilicate and rare earth-doped aluminosilicate fibers.

  11. Gamma-Radiation-Induced Degradation of Actively Pumped Single-Mode Ytterbium-Doped Optical Laser - Postprint

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    discussed. Keywords: Radiation effects, radiation-induced absorption, gamma irradiation, rare- earth doped fibers, rare- earth doped fiber amplifiers...passive optical fibers have identified that the major mechanism of performance degradation is the creation of absorbing species in the fiber, which in...turn inhibit the transmission of light at certain wavelengths1,2,3,4. In recent years, the use of rare- earth (RE) doped optical fibers has expanded

  12. Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalyn, Brenda

    2006-01-01

    Integrated learning is an exciting adventure for both teachers and students. It is not uncommon to observe the integration of academic subjects such as math, science, and language arts. However, educators need to recognize that movement experiences in physical education also can be linked to academic curricula and, may even lead the…

  13. Enhancing photovoltaic performance of dye-sensitized solar cells by rare-earth doped oxide of SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+}

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lijun; Guo, Weihua; Hao, Hongshun; Su, Qing; Jin, Shanshan; Li, Hong; Hu, Xiaofei; Qin, Lei; Gao, Wenyuan; Liu, Guishan

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: Current–voltage characteristics of DSSCs based on the photoanodes doping different SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} and doping 3% SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}. - Highlights: • A down-conversion (DC) nanocrystal (SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+}) was synthesized. • The effect of SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} doped in photoanode in DSSCs was investigated. • SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} doped in photoanode appeared the better photovoltaic performances. • The dual function of DC and p-type doping effect were explained. - Abstract: SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} down-conversion (DC) nanocrystals were synthesized by a sol–gel method and then doped in TiO{sub 2} as a photoanode in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Differential thermal analysis, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Brunauer–Emmet–Teller analysis confirmed the formation of SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} nanocrystals with diameters of ∼47 nm, pore size of ∼25 nm, sintering temperature of 1300 °C. The photoluminescence and UV–vis absorption spectra of the SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} revealed a DC from ultraviolet light to visible light which matched the strong absorbing region of the N719 dye. The photoelectric conversion efficiency of the DSSCs with a TiO{sub 2} photoanode doped with 3 wt% SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} was 20% higher than that with a pure TiO{sub 2} photoanode. This phenomenon could be mainly explained by SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} nanocrystals’ ability of DC and increased the short-circuit current density. It could be minorly due to the p-type doping effect and slightly improved the open-circuit voltage.

  14. Earth Science Informatics - Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 10-15 years, significant advances have been made in information management, there are an increasing number of individuals entering the field of information management as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing data, and the field of informatics has come to its own. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of science data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also includes the use of computers and computational methods to support decision making and applications. Earth Science Informatics (ESI, a.k.a. geoinformatics) is the application of informatics in the Earth science domain. ESI is a rapidly developing discipline integrating computer science, information science, and Earth science. Major national and international research and infrastructure projects in ESI have been carried out or are on-going. Notable among these are: the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), the European Commissions INSPIRE, the U.S. NSDI and Geospatial One-Stop, the NASA EOSDIS, and the NSF DataONE, EarthCube and Cyberinfrastructure for Geoinformatics. More than 18 departments and agencies in the U.S. federal government have been active in Earth science informatics. All major space agencies in the world, have been involved in ESI research and application activities. In the United States, the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP), whose membership includes nearly 150 organizations (government, academic and commercial) dedicated to managing, delivering and applying Earth science data, has been working on many ESI topics since 1998. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)s Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) has been actively coordinating the ESI activities among the space agencies. Remote Sensing; Earth Science Informatics, Data Systems; Data Services; Metadata

  15. An integrated study of earth resources in the state of California using remote sensing techniques. [planning and management of water resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, R. N.; Churchman, C. W.; Burgy, R. H.; Schubert, G.; Estes, J. E.; Bowden, L. W.; Algazi, R.; Coulson, K. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The University of California has been conducting an investigation which seeks to determine the usefulness of modern remote sensing techniques for studying various components of California's earth resources complex. Most of the work has concentrated on California's water resources, but with some attention being given to other earth resources as well and to the interplay between them and California's water resources.

  16. Rainbow Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Library and Archives, Phoenix.

    The environment is a great concern in the 1990s, and everyone needs to work at maintaining our planet. The 1992 Arizona State Library Reading Program, "Rainbow Earth," provides children with many techniques they can use to help the Earth. This reading program guide provides information on the following: goals, objectives, and evaluation;…

  17. Polar Misunderstandings: Earth's Dynamic Dynamo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiSpezio, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the movement of Earth's north and south poles. The Earth's poles may be a bit more complex and dynamic than what many students and teachers believe. With better understanding, offer them up as a rich landscape for higher-level critical analysis and subject integration. Possible curriculum tie-ins include magnets, Earth…

  18. Highly doped silicon nanowires by monolayer doping.

    PubMed

    Veerbeek, Janneke; Ye, Liang; Vijselaar, Wouter; Kudernac, Tibor; van der Wiel, Wilfred G; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2017-02-23

    Controlling the doping concentration of silicon nanostructures is challenging. Here, we investigated three different monolayer doping techniques to obtain silicon nanowires with a high doping dose. These routes were based on conventional monolayer doping, starting from covalently bound dopant-containing molecules, or on monolayer contact doping, in which a source substrate coated with a monolayer of a carborane silane was the dopant source. As a third route, both techniques were combined to retain the benefits of conformal monolayer formation and the use of an external capping layer. These routes were used for doping fragile porous nanowires fabricated by metal-assisted chemical etching. Differences in porosity were used to tune the total doping dose inside the nanowires, as measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements. The higher the porosity, the higher was the surface available for dopant-containing molecules, which in turn led to a higher doping dose. Slightly porous nanowires could be doped via all three routes, which resulted in highly doped nanowires with (projected areal) doping doses of 10(14)-10(15) boron atoms per cm(2) compared to 10(12) atoms per cm(2) for a non-porous planar sample. Highly porous nanowires were not compatible with the conventional monolayer doping technique, but monolayer contact doping and the combined route resulted for these highly porous nanowires in tremendously high doping doses up to 10(17) boron atoms per cm(2).

  19. Strategy for earth explorers in global earth sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the current NASA Earth System Science initiative is to obtain a comprehensive scientific understanding of the Earth as an integrated, dynamic system. The centerpiece of the Earth System Science initiative will be a set of instruments carried on polar orbiting platforms under the Earth Observing System program. An Earth Explorer program can open new vistas in the earth sciences, encourage innovation, and solve critical scientific problems. Specific missions must be rigorously shaped by the demands and opportunities of high quality science and must complement the Earth Observing System and the Mission to Planet Earth. The committee believes that the proposed Earth Explorer program provides a substantial opportunity for progress in the earth sciences, both through independent missions and through missions designed to complement the large scale platforms and international research programs that represent important national commitments. The strategy presented is intended to help ensure the success of the Earth Explorer program as a vital stimulant to the study of the planet.

  20. Highly fluorescent Zn-doped carbon dots as Fenton reaction-based bio-sensors: an integrative experimental-theoretical consideration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Quan; Liu, Yao; Su, Rigu; Cai, Lulu; Li, Bofan; Zhang, Yingyuan; Zhang, Linzhou; Wang, Yajun; Wang, Yan; Li, Neng; Gong, Xiao; Gu, Zhipeng; Chen, Yusheng; Tan, Yanglan; Dong, Chenbo; Sreeprasad, Theruvakkattil Sreenivasan

    2016-10-20

    Heteroatom doped carbon dots (CDs), with high photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY), are of keen interest in various applications such as chemical sensors, bio-imaging, electronics, and photovoltaics. Zinc, an important element assisting the electron-transfer process and an essential trace element for cells, is a promising metal dopant for CDs, which could potentially lead to multifunctional CDs. In this contribution, we report a single-step, high efficiency, hydrothermal method to synthesize Zn-doped carbon dots (Zn-CDs) with a superior PLQY. The PLQY and luminescence characteristic of Zn-CDs can be tuned by controlling the precursor ratio, and the surface oxidation in the CDs. Though a few studies have reported metal doped CDs with good PLQY, the as prepared Zn-Cds in the present method exhibited a PLQY up to 32.3%. To the best of our knowledge, there is no report regarding the facile preparation of single metal-doped CDs with a QY more than 30%. Another unique attribute of the Zn-CDs is the high monodispersity and the resultant highly robust excitation-independent luminescence that is stable over a broad range of pH values. Spectroscopic investigations indicated that the superior PLQY and luminescence of Zn-CDs are due to the heteroatom directed, oxidized carbon-based surface passivation. Furthermore, we developed a novel and sensitive biosensor for the detection of hydrogen peroxide and glucose leveraging the robust fluorescence properties of Zn-CDs. Under optimal conditions, Zn-CDs demonstrated high sensitivity and response to hydrogen peroxide and glucose over a wide range of concentrations, with a linear range of 10-80 μM and 5-100 μM, respectively, indicating their great potential as a fluorescent probe for chemical sensing.

  1. Integration of nickel doping with loading on graphene for enhanced adsorptive and catalytic properties of CdS nanoparticles towards visible light degradation of some antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Maher; Mohammadi, Ali; Assi, Navid

    2016-12-15

    Water dispersible, highly efficient nickel doped CdS nanoparticles anchored on graphene nanosheets as a photocatalyst for cephalexin and sulfamethoxazole photodegradation have been prepared in a facile microwave-furnace assisted method. Each one of the two modifications has played a critical role in nanocomposite functioning. Defects originated by dopant boosted the lifetime of carriers and thereupon graphene matrix transferred them to contribute effectively the photocatalytic process. Characterization results revealed the formation of monocrystalline hexagonal phase of all products and that both doping and loading on graphene have red-shifted the absorption edge of CdS towards the visible light region. Furthermore, FTIR confirmed the successful reduction of graphene oxide by the subsequent preparation steps. Adsorption isotherms revealed the role of graphene in enhancing substrate adsorption. Nevertheless, dissimilar pathways of catalytic degradation were observed on the doped composite as cephalexin oxidation was principally mediated by the hole-hydroxyl radical mechanism, sulfamethoxazole oxidation favored the superoxide radical mechanism. This composite has shown, however, a high photostability and minimized ions release of the composite.

  2. Google Earth Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelick, N.

    2012-12-01

    The Google Earth Engine platform is a system designed to enable petabyte-scale, scientific analysis and visualization of geospatial datasets. Earth Engine provides a consolidated environment including a massive data catalog co-located with thousands of computers for analysis. The user-friendly front-end provides a workbench environment to allow interactive data and algorithm development and exploration and provides a convenient mechanism for scientists to share data, visualizations and analytic algorithms via URLs. The Earth Engine data catalog contains a wide variety of popular, curated datasets, including the world's largest online collection of Landsat scenes (> 2.0M), numerous MODIS collections, and many vector-based data sets. The platform provides a uniform access mechanism to a variety of data types, independent of their bands, projection, bit-depth, resolution, etc..., facilitating easy multi-sensor analysis. Additionally, a user is able to add and curate their own data and collections. Using a just-in-time, distributed computation model, Earth Engine can rapidly process enormous quantities of geo-spatial data. All computation is performed lazily; nothing is computed until it's required either for output or as input to another step. This model allows real-time feedback and preview during algorithm development, supporting a rapid algorithm development, test, and improvement cycle that scales seamlessly to large-scale production data processing. Through integration with a variety of other services, Earth Engine is able to bring to bear considerable analytic and technical firepower in a transparent fashion, including: AI-based classification via integration with Google's machine learning infrastructure, publishing and distribution at Google scale through integration with the Google Maps API, Maps Engine and Google Earth, and support for in-the-field activities such as validation, ground-truthing, crowd-sourcing and citizen science though the Android Open Data

  3. Google Earth Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelick, Noel

    2013-04-01

    The Google Earth Engine platform is a system designed to enable petabyte-scale, scientific analysis and visualization of geospatial datasets. Earth Engine provides a consolidated environment including a massive data catalog co-located with thousands of computers for analysis. The user-friendly front-end provides a workbench environment to allow interactive data and algorithm development and exploration and provides a convenient mechanism for scientists to share data, visualizations and analytic algorithms via URLs. The Earth Engine data catalog contains a wide variety of popular, curated datasets, including the world's largest online collection of Landsat scenes (> 2.0M), numerous MODIS collections, and many vector-based data sets. The platform provides a uniform access mechanism to a variety of data types, independent of their bands, projection, bit-depth, resolution, etc..., facilitating easy multi-sensor analysis. Additionally, a user is able to add and curate their own data and collections. Using a just-in-time, distributed computation model, Earth Engine can rapidly process enormous quantities of geo-spatial data. All computation is performed lazily; nothing is computed until it's required either for output or as input to another step. This model allows real-time feedback and preview during algorithm development, supporting a rapid algorithm development, test, and improvement cycle that scales seamlessly to large-scale production data processing. Through integration with a variety of other services, Earth Engine is able to bring to bear considerable analytic and technical firepower in a transparent fashion, including: AI-based classification via integration with Google's machine learning infrastructure, publishing and distribution at Google scale through integration with the Google Maps API, Maps Engine and Google Earth, and support for in-the-field activities such as validation, ground-truthing, crowd-sourcing and citizen science though the Android Open Data

  4. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-funded project for teachers of grades 5-12 who want to expand their knowledge of the Earth system, and prepare to become master teachers who promote Earth system science in their own schools, counties, and throughout their state. Participants from the following states are invited to apply: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington, DC. Teachers selected for the project participate in a two-week summer workshop conducted at the University of Maryland, College Park; develop classroom-ready materials during the workshop for broad dissemination; conduct a minimum of two peer training activities during the coming school year; and participate in other enrichment/education opportunities as available and desired. Discover Earth is a team effort that utilizes expertise from a range of contributors, and balances science content with hands-on classroom applications.

  5. From land use to land cover: restoring the afforestation signal in a coupled integrated assessment - earth system model and the implications for CMIP5 RCP simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Vittorio, A. V.; Chini, L. P.; Bond-Lamberty, B.; Mao, J.; Shi, X.; Truesdale, J.; Craig, A.; Calvin, K.; Jones, A.; Collins, W. D.; Edmonds, J.; Hurtt, G. C.; Thornton, P.; Thomson, A.

    2014-05-01

    Climate projections depend on scenarios of fossil fuel emissions and land use change, and the IPCC AR5 parallel process assumes consistent climate scenarios across Integrated Assessment and Earth System Models (IAMs and ESMs). The CMIP5 project used a novel "land use harmonization" based on the Global Land use Model (GLM) to provide ESMs with consistent 1500-2100 land use trajectories generated by historical data and four IAM projections. A direct coupling of the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), GLM, and the Community ESM (CESM) has allowed us to characterize and partially address a major gap in the CMIP5 land coupling design: the lack of a corresponding land cover harmonization. The CMIP5 CESM global afforestation is only 22% of GCAM's 2005 to 2100 RCP4.5 afforestation. Likewise, only 17% of GCAM's 2040 RCP4.5 afforestation, and zero pasture loss, were transmitted to CESM within the directly coupled model. This is a problem because afforestation was relied upon to achieve RCP4.5 climate stabilization. GLM modifications within the directly coupled model did not increase CESM afforestation. Modifying the land use translator in addition to GLM, however, enabled CESM to simulate 66% of GCAM's afforestation in 2040, and 94% of GCAM's pasture loss as grassland and shrubland losses. This additional afforestation increases vegetation carbon gain by 19 PgC and decreases atmospheric CO2 gain by 8 ppmv from 2005 to 2040, implying different RCP4.5 climate scenarios between CMIP5 GCAM and CESM. Although the IAMs and ESMs were not expected to have exactly the same climate forcing, due in part to different terrestrial carbon cycles and atmospheric radiation algorithms, the ESMs were expected to project climates representative of the RCP scenarios. Similar land cover inconsistencies exist in other CMIP5 model results, primarily because land cover information is not shared between models. High RCP4.5 afforestation might also contribute to inconsistencies as some ESMs might

  6. From Land Use to Land Cover: Restoring the Afforestation Signal in a Coupled Integrated Assessment - Earth System Model and the Implications for CMIP5 RCP Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Vittorio, A. V.; Chini, L. P.; Bond-Lamberty, B. P.; Mao, J.; Shi, X.; Truesdale, J. E.; Craig, A.; Calvin, K. V.; Jones, A. D.; Collins, W.; Edmonds, J.; Hurtt, G. C.; Thornton, P. E.; Thomson, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Climate projections depend on scenarios of fossil fuel emissions and land use change, and the IPCC AR5 parallel process assumes consistent climate scenarios across Integrated Assessment and Earth System Models (IAMs and ESMs). The CMIP5 project used a novel "land use harmonization" based on the Global Land use Model (GLM) to provide ESMs with consistent 1500-2100 land use trajectories generated by historical data and four IAM projections. A direct coupling of the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), GLM, and the Community ESM (CESM) has allowed us to characterize and partially address a major gap in the CMIP5 land coupling design: the lack of a corresponding land cover harmonization. The CMIP5 CESM global afforestation is only 22% of GCAM's 2005 to 2100 RCP4.5 afforestation. Likewise, only 17% of GCAM's 2040 RCP4.5 afforestation, and zero pasture loss, were transmitted to CESM within the directly coupled model. This is a problem because afforestation was relied upon to achieve RCP4.5 climate stabilization. GLM modifications within the directly coupled model did not increase CESM afforestation. Modifying the CESM land use translator in addition to GLM, however, enabled CESM to simulate 66% of GCAM's afforestation in 2040, and 94% of GCAM's pasture loss as grassland and shrubland losses. This additional afforestation increases vegetation carbon gain by 19 PgC and decreases atmospheric CO2 gain by 8 ppmv from 2005 to 2040, implying different RCP4.5 climate scenarios between CMIP5 GCAM and CESM. Although the IAMs and ESMs were not expected to have exactly the same climate forcing, due in part to different terrestrial carbon cycles and atmospheric radiation algorithms, the ESMs were expected to project climates representative of the RCP scenarios. Similar land cover inconsistencies exist in other CMIP5 model results, primarily because land cover information is not shared between IAM and ESM models. High RCP4.5 afforestation might also contribute to inconsistencies as

  7. Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights in