Science.gov

Sample records for earth indium compounds

  1. Control banding assessment of workers' exposure to indium and its compounds in 13 Japanese indium plants.

    PubMed

    Higashikubo, Ichiro; Arito, Heihachiro; Ando, Kenji; Araki, Akihiro; Shimizu, Hidesuke; Sakurai, Haruhiko

    2018-05-25

    This study aimed to assess workers' exposure to indium and its compounds in 55 indium-handling operations among 13 Japanese plants. The surveyed plants were selected from indium-manufacturing plants whose annual indium production exceeded 500 kg. The Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Essentials control banding toolkit, which contains simple scales for hazard levels, quantities in daily use, and "dustiness" characteristics, was used to assess generic risks of indium-handling operations. The operations were then classified into one of four Control Approaches (CAs). There were 35 indium-handling operations classified into CA4 (requires expert advice) and 16 grouped into CA3 (requires containment). There were three operations classified into CA2 (requires engineering controls) and only one into CA1 (requires good general ventilation (GV) and working practices). Of the 51 operations classified as CA4 and CA3, 36 were found to be improperly equipped with local exhaust ventilation, and the remaining 15 operations solely relied on GV practices. Respiratory protective equipment (RPE) used in the 13 indium plants was examined with reference to the recommendations of the COSHH Essentials and Japan's Technical Guidelines. Our findings suggest that stringent engineering control measures and respiratory protection from indium dust are needed to improve indium-handling operations. Our results show that the most common control approach for Japanese indium-handling operations is to require expert advice, including worker health checks for respiratory diseases and exposure measurement by air sampling.

  2. Theoretical Study of Indium Compounds of Interest for Organometallic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, B. H.; Moore, C. E.; Cardelino, C. A.; Frazier, D. O.; Backmann, K. J.

    2000-01-01

    The structural. electronic and therinochemical properties of indium compounds which are of interest in halide transport and organometallic chemical vapor deposition processes have been studied by ab initio and statistical mechanics methods. The compounds reported include: indium halides and hydrides (InF, InCl, InCl3, InH, InH2, InH3); indium clusters (In2, In3); methylindium, dimethylindium, and their hydrogen derivatives [In(CH3), In(CH3)H, In(CH3)H2, In(CH3)2, In(CH3)2H]; dimethyl-indium dimer [In2(CH3)4], trimethyl-indium [In(CH3)3]; dehydrogenated methyl, dimethyl and trimethylindium [In(CH3)2CH2, In(CH3)CH2, In(CH2)], trimethylindium adducts with ammonia, trimethylamine and hydrazine [(CH3)3In:NH3, (CH3)3In:N(CH3)3, (CH3)3In:N(H2)N(H2)]; dimethylamino-indium and methylimino-indium [In(CH3)2(NH2), In(CH3)(NH)]; indium nitride and indium nitride dimer (InN, In2N2), indium phosphide, arsenide and antimonide ([InP, InAs, InSb). The predicted electronic properties are based on density functional theory calculations; the calculated thermodynamic properties are reported following the format of the JANAF (Joint Army, Navy, NASA, Air Force) Tables. Equilibrium compositions at two temperatures (298 and 1000 K) have been analyzed for groups of competing simultaneous reactions.

  3. Production method for making rare earth compounds

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R. William; Ellis, Timothy W.; Dennis, Kevin W.; Hofer, Robert J.; Branagan, Daniel J.

    1997-11-25

    A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g. a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g. a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g. Nd.sub.2 Fe.sub.14 B or LaNi.sub.5) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

  4. Production method for making rare earth compounds

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R.W.; Ellis, T.W.; Dennis, K.W.; Hofer, R.J.; Branagan, D.J.

    1997-11-25

    A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g., a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g., a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g., Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B or LaNi{sub 5}) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

  5. GROWTH AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SINGLE CRYSTALS OF RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    SINGLE CRYSTALS, CRYSTAL GROWTH), (*CRYSTAL GROWTH, SINGLE CRYSTALS), (*RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS, SINGLE CRYSTALS), EPITAXIAL GROWTH, SODIUM COMPOUNDS, CHLORIDES, VAPOR PLATING, ELECTROSTATIC FIELDS, ENERGY, ATOMIC PROPERTIES , BONDING

  6. Effect of temperature and rare-earth doping on charge-carrier mobility in indium-monoselenide crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Abdinov, A. Sh., E-mail: abdinov-axmed@yandex.ru; Babayeva, R. F., E-mail: Babaeva-Rena@yandex.ru; Amirova, S. I.

    2013-08-15

    In the temperature range T = 77-600 K, the dependence of the charge-carrier mobility ({mu}) on the initial dark resistivity is experimentally investigated at 77 K ({rho}d{sub 0}), as well as on the temperature and the level (N) of rare-earth doping with such elements as gadolinium (Gd), holmium (Ho), and dysprosium (Dy) in n-type indium-monoselenide (InSe) crystals. It is established that the anomalous behavior of the dependences {mu}(T), {mu}({rho}d{sub 0}), and {mu}(N) found from the viewpoint of the theory of charge-carrier mobility in crystalline semiconductors is related, first of all, to partial disorder in indium-monoselenide crystals and can be attributedmore » to the presence of random drift barriers in the free energy bands.« less

  7. Precursors for formation of copper selenide, indium selenide, copper indium diselenide, and/or copper indium gallium diselenide films

    DOEpatents

    Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alexander; Van Hest, Maikel; Ginley, David S

    2014-11-04

    Liquid-based precursors for formation of Copper Selenide, Indium Selenide, Copper Indium Diselenide, and/or copper Indium Galium Diselenide include copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent. These liquid-based precursors can be deposited in liquid form onto substrates and treated by rapid thermal processing to form crystalline copper selenide and indium selenide films.

  8. Compound formation and melting behavior in the AB compound and rare earth oxide systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z. K.; Yan, D. S.; Yen, T. S.; Tien, T. Y.

    1990-03-01

    Compound formation in the systems of the covalent compounds BeO, AlN, and SiC with R2O 3(rare earth oxides) is described. Tentative phase diagrams of the AlN sbnd Nd 2O 3 and AlN sbnd Eu 2O 3 systems are presented.

  9. Formation of copper-indium-selenide and/or copper-indium-gallium-selenide films from indium selenide and copper selenide precursors

    DOEpatents

    Curtis, Calvin J [Lakewood, CO; Miedaner, Alexander [Boulder, CO; Van Hest, Maikel [Lakewood, CO; Ginley, David S [Evergreen, CO; Nekuda, Jennifer A [Lakewood, CO

    2011-11-15

    Liquid-based indium selenide and copper selenide precursors, including copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent, are used to form crystalline copper-indium-selenide, and/or copper indium gallium selenide films (66) on substrates (52).

  10. Bismuth-Indium-Sodium two-dimensional compounds on Si(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, N. V.; Alekseev, A. A.; Utas, O. A.; Azatyan, S. G.; Zotov, A. V.; Saranin, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    Using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) observations, it has been found that room temperature (RT) deposition of Na onto the (Bi,In)/Si(111) surfaces, namely the 2 × 2 and √7 × √7, induces formation of a joint bismuth-indium-sodium structure without changing of the initial periodicity. For the 2 × 2-(Bi,In), Na atoms ;conceal; defects and domain boundaries, while the √7 × √7-(Bi,In) is reconstructed into the new Si(111)√7 × √7-(Bi,In,Na) structure. The first structure is temperature unstable, but the √7 × √7-(Bi,In,Na) is thermostable and can be formed by ordinary codeposition of the metals onto the Si(111)7 × 7 surface followed by annealing at 350-360 °C. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) has demonstrated that the √7 × √7-(Bi,In,Na) is semiconductor with a ∼0.5 eV energy gap. The structural model of the √7 × √7-(Bi,In,Na) has been proposed on the basis of DFT calculations and comparison of simulated and experimental STM images as well as density of states (DOS) and STS spectra.

  11. A Compound Model for the Origin of Earth's Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izidoro, A.; de Souza Torres, K.; Winter, O. C.; Haghighipour, N.

    2013-04-01

    One of the most important subjects of debate in the formation of the solar system is the origin of Earth's water. Comets have long been considered as the most likely source of the delivery of water to Earth. However, elemental and isotopic arguments suggest a very small contribution from these objects. Other sources have also been proposed, among which local adsorption of water vapor onto dust grains in the primordial nebula and delivery through planetesimals and planetary embryos have become more prominent. However, no sole source of water provides a satisfactory explanation for Earth's water as a whole. In view of that, using numerical simulations, we have developed a compound model incorporating both the principal endogenous and exogenous theories, and investigating their implications for terrestrial planet formation and water delivery. Comets are also considered in the final analysis, as it is likely that at least some of Earth's water has cometary origin. We analyze our results comparing two different water distribution models, and complement our study using the D/H ratio, finding possible relative contributions from each source and focusing on planets formed in the habitable zone. We find that the compound model plays an important role by showing greater advantage in the amount and time of water delivery in Earth-like planets.

  12. A COMPOUND MODEL FOR THE ORIGIN OF EARTH'S WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Izidoro, A.; Winter, O. C.; De Souza Torres, K.

    2013-04-10

    One of the most important subjects of debate in the formation of the solar system is the origin of Earth's water. Comets have long been considered as the most likely source of the delivery of water to Earth. However, elemental and isotopic arguments suggest a very small contribution from these objects. Other sources have also been proposed, among which local adsorption of water vapor onto dust grains in the primordial nebula and delivery through planetesimals and planetary embryos have become more prominent. However, no sole source of water provides a satisfactory explanation for Earth's water as a whole. In viewmore » of that, using numerical simulations, we have developed a compound model incorporating both the principal endogenous and exogenous theories, and investigating their implications for terrestrial planet formation and water delivery. Comets are also considered in the final analysis, as it is likely that at least some of Earth's water has cometary origin. We analyze our results comparing two different water distribution models, and complement our study using the D/H ratio, finding possible relative contributions from each source and focusing on planets formed in the habitable zone. We find that the compound model plays an important role by showing greater advantage in the amount and time of water delivery in Earth-like planets.« less

  13. Biogenic volatile organic compounds in the Earth system.

    PubMed

    Laothawornkitkul, Jullada; Taylor, Jane E; Paul, Nigel D; Hewitt, C Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds produced by plants are involved in plant growth, development, reproduction and defence. They also function as communication media within plant communities, between plants and between plants and insects. Because of the high chemical reactivity of many of these compounds, coupled with their large mass emission rates from vegetation into the atmosphere, they have significant effects on the chemical composition and physical characteristics of the atmosphere. Hence, biogenic volatile organic compounds mediate the relationship between the biosphere and the atmosphere. Alteration of this relationship by anthropogenically driven changes to the environment, including global climate change, may perturb these interactions and may lead to adverse and hard-to-predict consequences for the Earth system.

  14. Yb7Ni4InGe12: a quaternary compound having mixed valent Yb atoms grown from indium flux.

    PubMed

    Subbarao, Udumula; Jana, Rajkumar; Chondroudi, Maria; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Peter, Sebastian C

    2015-03-28

    The new intermetallic compound Yb7Ni4InGe12 was obtained as large silver needle shaped single crystals from reactive indium flux. Single crystal X-ray diffraction suggests that Yb7Ni4InGe12 crystallizes in the Yb7Co4InGe12 structure type, and tetragonal space group P4/m and lattice constants are a = b = 10.291(2) Å and c = 4.1460(8) Å. The crystal structure of Yb7Ni4InGe12 consists of columnar units of three different types of channels filled with the Yb atoms. The crystal structure of Yb7Ni4InGe12 is closely related to Yb5Ni4Ge10. The effective magnetic moment obtained from the magnetic susceptibility measurements in the temperature range 200-300 K is 3.66μB/Yb suggests mixed/intermediate valence behavior of ytterbium atoms. X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) confirms that Yb7Ni4InGe12 exhibits mixed valence.

  15. Magnetostriction of some rare earth-aluminum Laves phase compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pourarian, F.; Wallace, W. E.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of the linear and volume magnetostriction of RAl2 cubic Laves compounds in which R is one of the rare earth elements Gd, Dy, Ho or Er, at temperatures between 4.2 K and the Curie temperature of each compound, are reported. Magnetic fields up to 2.5 Tesla were applied, and magnetostriction was measured using standard strain gage techniques. Saturation magnetostrictions of 17 x 10 to the -6th, -1420 x 10 to the -6th, 60 x 10 to the -6th and -920 x 10 to the -6th are determined at 4.2 K for GdAl2, DyAl2, HoAl2 and ErAl2, respectively. Large forced magnetostriction is observed in GdAl2 above the saturation field and the strain temperature dependence shows a decrease in magnitude below 40 K. A linear dependence of magnetostriction on magnetic field was observed for DyAl2 above 40 K, and the observed temperature dependence is interpreted in terms of the lowest order single-ion magnetoelastic theory. An observed decrease in the magnitude of the strain of HoAl2 below 15 K is associated with a change of the easy direction of magnetization, while in the case of ErAl2, magnetostriction is observed to occur normally up to the Curie temperature. Large volume magnetostriction is obtained for all the compounds with the exception of GdAl2.

  16. Exposure, metabolism, and toxicity of rare earths and related compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, S; Suzuki, K T

    1996-01-01

    For the past three decades, most attention in heavy metal toxicology has been paid to cadmium, mercury, lead, chromium, nickel, vanadium, and tin because these metals widely polluted the environment. However, with the development of new materials in the last decade, the need for toxicological studies on those new materials has been increasing. A group of rare earths (RE) is a good example. Although some RE have been used for superconductors, plastic magnets, and ceramics, few toxicological data are available compared to other heavy metals described above. Because chemical properties of RE are very similar, it is plausible that their binding affinities to biomolecules, metabolism, and toxicity in the living system are also very similar. In this report, we present an overview of the metabolism and health hazards of RE and related compounds, including our recent studies. Images Figure 1. A Figure 1. B Figure 1. C PMID:8722113

  17. Exposure, metabolism, and toxicity of rare earths and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Hirano, S; Suzuki, K T

    1996-03-01

    For the past three decades, most attention in heavy metal toxicology has been paid to cadmium, mercury, lead, chromium, nickel, vanadium, and tin because these metals widely polluted the environment. However, with the development of new materials in the last decade, the need for toxicological studies on those new materials has been increasing. A group of rare earths (RE) is a good example. Although some RE have been used for superconductors, plastic magnets, and ceramics, few toxicological data are available compared to other heavy metals described above. Because chemical properties of RE are very similar, it is plausible that their binding affinities to biomolecules, metabolism, and toxicity in the living system are also very similar. In this report, we present an overview of the metabolism and health hazards of RE and related compounds, including our recent studies.

  18. Indium Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Makiko; Omae, Kazuyuki; Takeuchi, Koichiro; Chonan, Tatsuya; Xiao, Yong-long; Harley, Russell A.; Roggli, Victor L.; Hebisawa, Akira; Tallaksen, Robert J.; Trapnell, Bruce C.; Day, Gregory A.; Saito, Rena; Stanton, Marcia L.; Suarthana, Eva; Kreiss, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Background: Reports of pulmonary fibrosis, emphysema, and, more recently, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) in indium workers suggested that workplace exposure to indium compounds caused several different lung diseases. Methods: To better understand the pathogenesis and natural history of indium lung disease, a detailed, systematic, multidisciplinary analysis of clinical, histopathologic, radiologic, and epidemiologic data for all reported cases and workplaces was undertaken. Results: Ten men (median age, 35 years) who produced, used, or reclaimed indium compounds were diagnosed with interstitial lung disease 4-13 years after first exposure (n = 7) or PAP 1-2 years after first exposure (n = 3). Common pulmonary histopathologic features in these patients included intraalveolar exudate typical of alveolar proteinosis (n = 9), cholesterol clefts and granulomas (n = 10), and fibrosis (n = 9). Two patients with interstitial lung disease had pneumothoraces. Lung disease progressed following cessation of exposure in most patients and was fatal in two. Radiographic data revealed that two patients with PAP subsequently developed fibrosis and one also developed emphysematous changes. Epidemiologic investigations demonstrated the potential for exposure to respirable particles and an excess of lung abnormalities among coworkers. Conclusions: Occupational exposure to indium compounds was associated with PAP, cholesterol ester crystals and granulomas, pulmonary fibrosis, emphysema, and pneumothoraces. The available evidence suggests exposure to indium compounds causes a novel lung disease that may begin with PAP and progress to include fibrosis and emphysema, and, in some cases, premature death. Prospective studies are needed to better define the natural history and prognosis of this emerging lung disease and identify effective prevention strategies. PMID:22207675

  19. Dissolved indium and rare earth elements in three Japanese rivers and Tokyo Bay: Evidence for anthropogenic Gd and In

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Yoshiyuki; Lerche, Dorte; Alibo, Dia Sotto; Tsutsumi, Makoto

    2000-12-01

    New data on the dissolved (<0.04 μm) rare earth elements (REEs) and In in the Japanese Ara, Tama, and Tone river-estuaries and Tokyo Bay are presented. Unique shale-normalized REE patterns with a distinct positive Gd anomalies and a strong heavy-REE enrichment were seen throughout the data. The dissolved Gd anomaly is caused by local anthropogenic input mainly due to recent use of Gado-pentetic acid as a medical agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in hospitals. The heavy-REE enrichment may be attributed to fractionation during weathering and transport in the upstream of the rivers, and only partially to removal of light- and middle-REE enriched river colloids by the use of a new ultrafiltration technique. Dissolved In concentrations in the Japanese rivers are extraordinarily high as compared to those in the pristine Chao Phraya river of Thailand reported elsewhere (Nozaki et al., in press). Like Gd, the high dissolved In in the study area can also be ascribed to recent use of In-containing organic compound, In(DTPA) 2- in medical diagnosis. Thus, in the highly populated and industrialized area, dissolved heavy metal concentrations in rivers and estuaries may be significantly perturbed by human activities and the fate of those anthropogenic soluble substances in the marine environment needs to be investigated further.

  20. An electrically conductive thermal control surface for spacecraft encountering Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) atomic oxygen indium tin oxide-coated thermal blankets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, J. L.

    1987-01-01

    An organic black thermal blanket material was coated with indium tin oxide (ITO) to prevent blanket degradation in the low Earth orbit (LEO) atomic oxygen environment. The blankets were designed for the Galileo spacecraft. Galileo was initially intended for space shuttle launch and would, therefore, have been exposed to atomic oxygen in LEO for between 10 and 25 hours. Two processes for depositing ITO are described. Thermooptical, electrical, and chemical properties of the ITO film are presented as a function of the deposition process. Results of exposure of the ITO film to atomic oxygen (from a shuttle flight) and radiation exposure (simulated Jovian environment) are also presented. It is shown that the ITO-protected thermal blankets would resist the anticipated LEO oxygen and Jovian radiation yet provide adequate thermooptical and electrical resistance. Reference is made to the ESA Ulysses spacecraft, which also used ITO protection on thermal control surfaces.

  1. Self-consistent method for quantifying indium content from X-ray spectra of thick compound semiconductor specimens in a transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Walther, T; Wang, X

    2016-05-01

    Based on Monte Carlo simulations of X-ray generation by fast electrons we calculate curves of effective sensitivity factors for analytical transmission electron microscopy based energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy including absorption and fluorescence effects, as a function of Ga K/L ratio for different indium and gallium containing compound semiconductors. For the case of InGaN alloy thin films we show that experimental spectra can thus be quantified without the need to measure specimen thickness or density, yielding self-consistent values for quantification with Ga K and Ga L lines. The effect of uncertainties in the detector efficiency are also shown to be reduced. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  2. Homoleptic Trivalent Tris(alkyl) Rare Earth Compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Pindwal, Aradhana; Yan, KaKing; Patnaik, Smita; ...

    2017-10-09

    Homoleptic tris(alkyl) rare earth complexes Ln{C(SiHMe 2) 3} 3 (Ln = La, 1a; Ce, 1b; Pr, 1c; Nd, 1d) are synthesized in high yield from LnI 3THF n and 3 equiv of KC(SiHMe 2) 3. X-ray diffraction studies reveal 1a–d are isostructural, pseudo-C 3-symmetric molecules that contain two secondary Ln←HSi interactions per alkyl ligand (six total). Spectroscopic assignments are supported by comparison with Ln{C(SiDMe 2) 3} 3 and DFT calculations. Here, the Ln←HSi and terminal SiH exchange rapidly on the NMR time scale at room temperature, but the two motifs are resolved at low temperature. Variable-temperature NMR studies provide activationmore » parameters for the exchange process in 1a (ΔH ‡ = 8.2(4) kcal·mol –1; ΔS ‡ = –1(2) cal·mol –1K –1) and 1a-d 9 (ΔH ‡ = 7.7(3) kcal·mol –1; ΔS ‡ = –4(2) cal·mol –1K –1). Comparisons of lineshapes, rate constants (kH/kD), and slopes of ln(k/T) vs 1/T plots for 1a and 1a-d 9 reveal that an inverse isotope effect dominates at low temperature. DFT calculations identify four low-energy intermediates containing five β-Si–H→Ln and one γ-C–H→Ln. The calculations also suggest the pathway for Ln←HSi/SiH exchange involves rotation of a single C(SiHMe 2) 3 ligand that is coordinated to the Ln center through the Ln–C bond and one secondary interaction. These robust organometallic compounds persist in solution and in the solid state up to 80 °C, providing potential for their use in a range of synthetic applications. For example, reactions of Ln{C(SiHMe 2) 3} 3 and ancillary proligands, such as bis-1,1-(4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazolinyl)ethane (HMeC(Ox Me2) 2) give {MeC(Ox Me2) 2}Ln{C(SiHMe 2) 3} 2, and reactions with disilazanes provide solvent-free lanthanoid tris(disilazides).« less

  3. Homoleptic Trivalent Tris(alkyl) Rare Earth Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Pindwal, Aradhana; Yan, KaKing; Patnaik, Smita

    Homoleptic tris(alkyl) rare earth complexes Ln{C(SiHMe 2) 3} 3 (Ln = La, 1a; Ce, 1b; Pr, 1c; Nd, 1d) are synthesized in high yield from LnI 3THF n and 3 equiv of KC(SiHMe 2) 3. X-ray diffraction studies reveal 1a–d are isostructural, pseudo-C 3-symmetric molecules that contain two secondary Ln←HSi interactions per alkyl ligand (six total). Spectroscopic assignments are supported by comparison with Ln{C(SiDMe 2) 3} 3 and DFT calculations. Here, the Ln←HSi and terminal SiH exchange rapidly on the NMR time scale at room temperature, but the two motifs are resolved at low temperature. Variable-temperature NMR studies provide activationmore » parameters for the exchange process in 1a (ΔH ‡ = 8.2(4) kcal·mol –1; ΔS ‡ = –1(2) cal·mol –1K –1) and 1a-d 9 (ΔH ‡ = 7.7(3) kcal·mol –1; ΔS ‡ = –4(2) cal·mol –1K –1). Comparisons of lineshapes, rate constants (kH/kD), and slopes of ln(k/T) vs 1/T plots for 1a and 1a-d 9 reveal that an inverse isotope effect dominates at low temperature. DFT calculations identify four low-energy intermediates containing five β-Si–H→Ln and one γ-C–H→Ln. The calculations also suggest the pathway for Ln←HSi/SiH exchange involves rotation of a single C(SiHMe 2) 3 ligand that is coordinated to the Ln center through the Ln–C bond and one secondary interaction. These robust organometallic compounds persist in solution and in the solid state up to 80 °C, providing potential for their use in a range of synthetic applications. For example, reactions of Ln{C(SiHMe 2) 3} 3 and ancillary proligands, such as bis-1,1-(4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazolinyl)ethane (HMeC(Ox Me2) 2) give {MeC(Ox Me2) 2}Ln{C(SiHMe 2) 3} 2, and reactions with disilazanes provide solvent-free lanthanoid tris(disilazides).« less

  4. Indium: bringing liquid-crystal displays into focus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mercer, Celestine N.

    2015-07-30

    Compared to more abundant industrial metals such as lead and zinc, information about the behavior and toxicity of indium in the environment is limited. However, many indium compounds have been proven to be toxic to animals.

  5. Germanium and indium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanks, W.C. Pat; Kimball, Bryn E.; Tolcin, Amy C.; Guberman, David E.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    southeastern Yunnan Province), and the Dabaoshan SEDEX deposit (located in the Nanling region of China) contain indium-enriched sphalerite. Another major potential source of indium occurs in the polymetallic tin-tungsten belt in the Eastern Cordillera of the Andes Mountains of Bolivia. Deposits there occur as dense arrays of narrow, elongate, indium-enriched tin oxide-polymetallic sulfide veins in volcanic rocks and porphyry stocks.Information about the behavior of germanium and indium in the environment is limited. In surface weathering environments, germanium and indium may dissolve from host minerals and form complexes with chloride, fluoride, hydroxide, organic matter, phosphate, or sulfate compounds. The tendency for germanium and indium to be dissolved and transported largely depends upon the pH and temperature of the weathering solutions. Because both elements are commonly concentrated in sulfide minerals, they can be expected to be relatively mobile in acid mine drainage where oxidative dissolution of sulfide minerals releases metals and sulfuric acid, resulting in acidic pH values that allow higher concentrations of metals to be dissolved into solution.

  6. Self-assemblies of luminescent rare earth compounds in capsules and multilayers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Renjie; Shang, Juanjuan; Xin, Jing; Xie, Beibei; Li, Ya; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2014-05-01

    This review addresses luminescent rare earth compounds assembled in microcapsules as well as in planar films fabricated by the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique, the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) method and in self-assembled monolayers. Chemical precipitation, electrostatic, van der Waals interactions and covalent bonds are involved in the assembly of these compounds. Self-organized ring patterns of rare earth complexes in Langmuir monolayers and on planar surfaces with stripe patterns, as well as fluorescence enhancement due to donor-acceptor pairs, microcavities, enrichment of rare earth compounds, and shell protection against water are described. Recent information on the tuning of luminescence intensity and multicolors by the excitation wavelength and the ratio of rare earth ions, respectively, are also reviewed. Potential applications of luminescent rare earth complex assemblies serving as biological probes, temperature and gas sensors are pointed out. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Rare-Earth-compound nanowires, nanotubes, and fullerene-like nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xun; Li, Yadong

    2003-11-21

    Various low-dimensional nanostructures, such as nanowires, nanotubes, nanosheets, and fullerene-like nanoparticles have been selectively synthesized from rare-earth compounds (hydroxides, fluorides) based on a facile hydrothermal method. The subsequent dehydration, sulfidation, and fluoridation processes lead to the formation of rare-earth oxide, oxysulfide, and oxyhalide nanostructures, which can be functionalized further by doping with other rare-earth ions or by coating with metal nanoparticles. Owing to the interesting combination of novel nanostructures and functional compounds, these nanostructures can be expected to bring new opportunities in the vast research areas of and application in biology, catalysts, and optoelectronic devices.

  8. SEPARATION OF TRANSURANIC ELEMENTS FROM RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS

    DOEpatents

    Kohman, T.P.

    1961-11-21

    A process of separating neptunium and plutonium values from rare earths and alkaline earth fission products present on a solid mixed actinide carrier (Th or U(IV) oxalate or fluoride) --fission product carrier (LaF/sub 3/, CeF/sub 3/, SrF/sub 2/, CaF/sub 2/, YF/sub 3/, La oxalate, cerous oxalate, Sr oxalate, Ca oxalate or Y oxalate) by extraction of the actinides at elevated temperature with a solution of ammonium fluoride and/or ammonium oxalate is described. Separation of the fission-product-containing carriers from the actinide solution formed and precipitation of the neptunium and plutonium from the solution with mineral acid are also accomplished. (AEC)

  9. The composition of the primitive atmosphere and the synthesis of organic compounds on the early Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bada, J. L.; Miller, S. L.

    1985-01-01

    The generally accepted theory for the origin of life on the Earth requires that a large variety of organic compounds be present to form the first living organisms and to provide the energy sources for primitive life either directly or through various fermentation reactions. This can provide a strong constraint on discussions of the formation of the Earth and on the composition of the primitive atmosphere. In order for substantial amounts of organic compounds to have been present on the prebiological Earth, certain conditions must have existed. There is a large body of literature on the prebiotic synthesis of organic compounds in various postulated atmospheres. In this mixture of abiotically synthesized organic compounds, the amino acids are of special interest since they are utilized by modern organisms to synthesize structural materials and a large array of catalytic peptides.

  10. Rare Earth Arylsilazido Compounds with Inequivalent Secondary Interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Boteju, Kasuni Chathurika; Wan, Suchen; Venkatesh, Amrit; ...

    2018-06-05

    Here, a new bulky silazido ligand, –N(SiHMe 2)Dipp (Dipp = C 6H 3-2,6- iPr 2) supports planar, three-coordinate homoleptic rare earth complexes Ln{N(SiHMe 2)Dipp} 3 (Ln = Sc, Y, Lu) that each contain three secondary Ln←HSi interactions and one agostic CH bond. Y{N(SiHMe 2)Dipp} 3 and acetophenone react via hydrosilylation, rather than by insertion into the Y–N bond or enolate formation.

  11. Rare Earth Arylsilazido Compounds with Inequivalent Secondary Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Boteju, Kasuni Chathurika; Wan, Suchen; Venkatesh, Amrit

    Here, a new bulky silazido ligand, –N(SiHMe 2)Dipp (Dipp = C 6H 3-2,6- iPr 2) supports planar, three-coordinate homoleptic rare earth complexes Ln{N(SiHMe 2)Dipp} 3 (Ln = Sc, Y, Lu) that each contain three secondary Ln←HSi interactions and one agostic CH bond. Y{N(SiHMe 2)Dipp} 3 and acetophenone react via hydrosilylation, rather than by insertion into the Y–N bond or enolate formation.

  12. MAGNETIC PROPERTIES OF RARE EARTH ALUMINUM COMPOUNDS WITH MgCu$sub 2$ STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, H.J.; Wernick, J.H.; Nesbitt, E.A.

    1962-03-01

    The magnetic moments of some RAl/sub 2/ (R = rare earth element) cubic Laves phase compounds were measured at temperatures from 1.4 to 300 deg K. The measurements indicate that the spin moments of the rare earth ions are coupled ferromagnetically. The Curie points of the RAl/sub 2/ compounds are found to be uniformly higher than the corresponding Laves compounds, ROs/sub 2/, Rlr/sub 2/ and RRu/sub 2/. Solid solutions of some of the compounds were also investigated. For example, in the Gd/sub x/Pr/sub (1-x)/Al/sub 2/ compounds, the magnetic moments of the Gd ions are antiparallel to those of the Prmore » ions because J is antiparallel to S in the ground state of the Pr ion. Compensation points were observed in this system. (auth)« less

  13. Carbonaceous meteorites as a source of sugar-related organic compounds for the early Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, G.; Kimmich, N.; Belisle, W.; Sarinana, J.; Brabham, K.; Garrel, L.

    2001-01-01

    The much-studied Murchison meteorite is generally used as the standard reference for organic compounds in extraterrestrial material. Amino acids and other organic compounds important in contemporary biochemistry are thought to have been delivered to the early Earth by asteroids and comets, where they may have played a role in the origin of life. Polyhydroxylated compounds (polyols) such as sugars, sugar alcohols and sugar acids are vital to all known lifeforms-they are components of nucleic acids (RNA, DNA), cell membranes and also act as energy sources. But there has hitherto been no conclusive evidence for the existence of polyols in meteorites, leaving a gap in our understanding of the origins of biologically important organic compounds on Earth. Here we report that a variety of polyols are present in, and indigenous to, the Murchison and Murray meteorites in amounts comparable to amino acids. Analyses of water extracts indicate that extraterrestrial processes including photolysis and formaldehyde chemistry could account for the observed compounds. We conclude from this that polyols were present on the early Earth and therefore at least available for incorporation into the first forms of life.

  14. Metal Based Synthetic Strategies and the Examination of Structure Determining Factors in Alkaline Earth Metal Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yuriko

    Last decades have witnessed a large expansion of the organometallic heavier alkaline earth metal species. However, continued growth of this promising area of chemistry has been slowed by severe restrictions and limitations in viable synthetic methodologies leading to difficulties in preparing and characterizing the target compounds. There is clearly a need for the further development of synthetic methodologies and detailed structure function analysis that will promote the further advancement of organoalkaline earth metal chemistry in applications as diverse as materials chemistry and catalysis. This thesis work greatly extends the synthetic options currently available towards organoalkaline earth metal species by introducing redox transmetallation protolysis (RTP), a reaction based on the readily available Ph3Bi as a non-toxic transmetallation agent. Based on a straightforward one-pot procedure and work-up, Ph3Bi based RTP presents a powerful synthetic alternative for the facile preparation of a large variety of heavy alkaline earth metal compounds. The second part of the thesis explores the effect of secondary non covalent interactions on the coordination chemistry as well as thermal properties of a series of novel alkali, alkaline earth, rare earth as well as heterobimetallic alkali/alkaline earth fluoroalkoxides. These compounds showcase the significance of non-covalent M···F-C and agostic interactions on metal stabilization and structural features, providing critical input on ligand design for the design of advanced metal organic vapor deposition (MOCVD) precursor materials. This work also showcases the impact of M···F-C interactions over M---co-ligand coordination, a critical precursor design element as well.

  15. Method for preparing high cure temperature rare earth iron compound magnetic material

    DOEpatents

    Huang, Yuhong; Wei, Qiang; Zheng, Haixing

    2002-01-01

    Insertion of light elements such as H,C, or N in the R.sub.2 Fe.sub.17 (R=rare earth metal) series has been found to modify the magnetic properties of these compounds, which thus become prospective candidates for high performance permanent magnets. The most spectacular changes are increases of the Curie temperature, T.sub.c, of the magnetization, M.sub.s, and of coercivity, H.sub.c, upon interstitial insertion. A preliminary product having a component R--Fe--C,N phase is produced by a chemical route. Rare earth metal and iron amides are synthesized followed by pyrolysis and sintering in an inert or reduced atmosphere, as a result of which, the R--Fe--C,N phases are formed. Fabrication of sintered rare earth iron nitride and carbonitride bulk magnet is impossible via conventional process due to the limitation of nitridation method.

  16. The Availability of Indium: The Present, Medium Term, and Long Term

    SciTech Connect

    Lokanc, Martin; Eggert, Roderick; Redlinger, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Demand for indium is likely to increase if the growth in deployment of the copper-indium-gallium-selenide (CIGS) and III-V thin-film photovoltaic technologies accelerates. There are concerns about indium supply constraints since it is relatively rare element in the earth's crust and because it is produced exclusively as a byproduct.

  17. Synthesis of Xenon and Iron-Nickel Intermetallic Compounds at Earth's Core Thermodynamic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavrou, Elissaios; Yao, Yansun; Goncharov, Alexander F.; Lobanov, Sergey S.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Liu, Hanyu; Greenberg, Eran; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2018-03-01

    Using in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in concert with first principles calculations we demonstrate the synthesis of stable Xe (Fe ,Fe /Ni )3 and XeNi3 compounds at thermodynamic conditions representative of Earth's core. Surprisingly, in the case of both the Xe-Fe and Xe-Ni systems Fe and Ni become highly electronegative and can act as oxidants. The results indicate the changing chemical properties of elements under extreme conditions by documenting that electropositive at ambient pressure elements could gain electrons and form anions.

  18. Ferromagnetic superconductors: A vortex phase in ternary rare-earth compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kuper, C.G.; Revzen, M.; Ron, A.

    1980-06-09

    It is shown that the generalized Ginzburg-Landau free-energy functional of Blount and Varma admits self-consistent solutions with quantized-flux vortices, magnetized in a region about the cores. There is a temperature range where the new phase has a lower free energy than either the pure superconducting or ferromagnetic phases; it represents true coexistence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity. The main features of the specific heat and magnetic properties of some rare-earth ternary compounds can be explained qualitatively.

  19. Low Pressure Synthesis of Indium Phosphide,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    UNCLASSIFIED F/G 713 M EEEEEEEEEII MEEMMMME W , 2~ h IW 𔃼 * ).I 2 MICROCOP RESOWI1OW TWS CHAT . . WROmNA RUIEJ MT STHDMS-W3-ALORMO TNDM- m &6.4. MM RO - TMS...pNode . M-V Semiconductor compound ’S.T o a.ek* !cm .. EImd’b lc a ..... . P Pocry sline large g rain .bgot of indiumn phosphide have been synthe- simed...indium temperature of 1003"C. 2. BACKGROUND .r. Indium phosphide is a compound composed of elements from the third and fifth columns of the periodic

  20. Analysis of “Favorable Growth Element” Based on Rare Earth-aluminum Composite Mechanism of Compound Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Baohong; Zeng, Qihui; Zhao, Jin

    2018-01-01

    Under the background that failure resulted in by high temperature once only aluminum oxide is used as the gasoline additive. This paper, with the purpose to solve this problem, is to synthesize AcAl oxide for gasoline additive. In order to get the rare-earth-aluminum oxide, first, a complex model of rare earth oxide based on theories about ion coordination is established. Then, by the complex model, the type of “compound growth unit” when rare earth elements join the hydrothermal conditions and the inclination that “diversification” might probably happen are deduced. Depending on the results got by complex model, this paper introduces the type of compound and its existence conditions of “Compound growth unit” owned by stable rare-earth-aluminum oxide. By adjusting the compositions of modifier, compound materials of rare earth-aluminum oxide used for gasoline additive is made. By XRD test, aperture test, adsorption test and desorption test, the theoretical deduction is proved to be right. From the experiment, it is concluded that: a dense environment is the pre-condition to form rare-earth-aluminum polymer, which is also an essential condition for the polymer to update to a favorable growth unit and produce mesoporous rare-earth-aluminum oxide with high activity.

  1. Correlation between valence electronic structure and magnetic properties in RCo5 (R = rare earth) intermetallic compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi-Qin, Xue; Yong-Quan, Guo

    2016-06-01

    The magnetisms of RCo5 (R = rare earth) intermetallics are systematically studied with the empirical electron theory of solids and molecules (EET). The theoretical moments and Curie temperatures agree well with experimental ones. The calculated results show strong correlations between the valence electronic structure and the magnetic properties in RCo5 intermetallic compounds. The moments of RCo5 intermetallics originate mainly from the 3d electrons of Co atoms and 4f electrons of rare earth, and the s electrons also affect the magnetic moments by the hybridization of d and s electrons. It is found that moment of Co atom at 2c site is higher than that at 3g site due to the fact that the bonding effect between R and Co is associated with an electron transformation from 3d electrons into covalence electrons. In the heavy rare-earth-based RCo5 intermetallics, the contribution to magnetic moment originates from the 3d and 4f electrons. The covalence electrons and lattice electrons also affect the Curie temperature, which is proportional to the average moment along the various bonds. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11274110).

  2. A review on the synthesis, crystal growth, structure and physical properties of rare earth based quaternary intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mumbaraddi, Dundappa; Sarkar, Sumanta; Peter, Sebastian C., E-mail: sebastiancp@jncasr.ac.in

    2016-04-15

    This review highlights the synthesis and crystal growth of quaternary intermetallic compounds based on rare earth metals. In the first part of this review, we highlight briefly about intermetallics and their versatile properties in comparison to the constituent elements. In the next part, we have discussed about various synthesis techniques with more focus on the metal flux technique towards the well shaped crystal growth of novel compounds. In the subsequent parts, several disordered quaternary compounds have been reviewed and then outlined most known ordered quaternary compounds with their complex structure. A special attention has been given to the ordered compoundsmore » with structural description and relation to the parent binary and ternary compounds. The importance of electronic and structural feature is highlighted as the key roles in designing these materials for emerging applications. - Graphical abstract: Rare earth based quaternary intermetallic compounds crystallize in complex novel crystal structures. The diversity in the crystal structure may induce unique properties and can be considered them as future materials. - Highlights: • Crystal growth and crystal structure of quaternary rare earth based intermetallics. • Structural complexity of quaternary compounds in comparison to the parent compounds. • Novel quaternary compounds display unique crystal structure.« less

  3. THE TOXICITY OF INDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Downs, W.L.; Scott, J.K.; Steadman, L.T.

    1959-09-16

    Data are presented on the toxic effects of indium, administered as a chloride (InCl/sub 3/) or as an oxide (In/sub 2/O/sub 3/), in rats, rabbits, and dcgs. Data are included on the tissue distribution and excretion of indium-114. (C.H.)

  4. Survey of the class of isovalent antiperovskite alkaline-earth pnictide compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, Wen Fong; Pickett, Warren E.

    2018-01-01

    The few reported members of the antiperovskite structure class A e3P nAP nB of alkaline-earth (A e =Ca , Sr, Ba) pnictide (P n =N , P, As, Sb, Bi) compounds are all based on the B -site anion P nB=N . All can be categorized as narrow-gap semiconductors, making them of interest for several reasons. Because chemical reasoning suggests that more members of this class may be stable, we provide here a density functional theory (DFT)-based survey of this entire class of 3 ×5 ×5 compounds. We determine first the relative energetic stability of the distribution of pairs of P n ions in the A and B sites of the structure, finding that the B site always favors the small pnictogen anion. The trends of the calculated energy gaps versus the A e cation and P n anions are determined, and we study effects of spin-orbit coupling as well as two types of gap corrections to the conventional DFT electronic spectrum. Because there have been suggestions that this class harbors topological insulating phases, we have given this possibility attention and found that energy gap corrections indicate the cubic structures will provide at most a few topological insulators. Structural instability is addressed by calculating phonon dispersion curves for a few compounds, with one outcome being that distorted structures should be investigated further for thermoelectric and topological character. Examples of the interplay between spin-orbit coupling and strain on the topological nature are provided. A case study of Ca3BiP including the effect of strain illustrates how a topological semimetal can be transformed into a topological insulator and Dirac semimetal.

  5. The atmosphere of the primitive earth and the prebiotic synthesis of organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, S. L.; Schlesinger, G.

    1983-01-01

    The prebiotic synthesis of organic compounds is investigated using a spark discharge on various simulated prebiotic atmospheres at 25 C. It is found that glycine is almost the only amino acid produced from the model atmospheres containing CO and CO2. These results show that the maximum yield is about the same for the three carbon sources (CO, CO2, and CH4) at high H2/carbon ratios, but that CH4 is superior at low H2/carbon ratios. CH4 is found to yield a much greater variety of amino acids than either CO or CO2. If it is assumed that amino acids more complex than glycine were required for the origin of life, then these findings indicate the need for CH4 in the primitive atmosphere. The yields of cyanide and formaldehyde are shown to parallel the amino acid results, with yields of HCN and H2CO as high as 13 percent based on carbon. Ammonia is also found to be produced from N2 in experiments with no added NH3 in yields as high as 4.9 percent. These results indicate that large amounts of NH3 would have been synthesized on the primitive earth by electric discharges.

  6. Alkaline earth lead and tin compounds Ae2Pb, Ae2Sn, Ae = Ca, Sr, Ba, as thermoelectric materials

    PubMed Central

    Parker, David; Singh, David J

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical study of three alkaline earth compounds Ca2Pb, Sr2Pb and Ba2Pb, which have undergone little previous study, calculating electronic band structures and Boltzmann transport and bulk moduli using density functional theory. We also study the corresponding tin compounds Ca2Sn, Sr2Sn and Ba2Sn. We find that these are all narrow band gap semiconductors with an electronic structure favorable for thermoelectric performance, with substantial thermopowers for the lead compounds at temperature ranges from 300 to 800 K. For the lead compounds, we further find very low calculated bulk moduli—roughly half of the values for the lead chalcogenides, suggestive of soft phonons and hence low lattice thermal conductivity. All these facts indicate that these materials merit experimental investigation as potential high performance thermoelectrics. We find good potential for thermoelectric performance in the environmentally friendly stannide materials, particularly at high temperature. PMID:27877610

  7. Microbial cycling of isoprene, the most abundantly produced biological volatile organic compound on Earth.

    PubMed

    McGenity, Terry J; Crombie, Andrew T; Murrell, J Colin

    2018-04-01

    Isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene), the most abundantly produced biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) on Earth, is highly reactive and can have diverse and often detrimental atmospheric effects, which impact on climate and health. Most isoprene is produced by terrestrial plants, but (micro)algal production is important in aquatic environments, and the relative bacterial contribution remains unknown. Soils are a sink for isoprene, and bacteria that can use isoprene as a carbon and energy source have been cultivated and also identified using cultivation-independent methods from soils, leaves and coastal/marine environments. Bacteria belonging to the Actinobacteria are most frequently isolated and identified, and Proteobacteria have also been shown to degrade isoprene. In the freshwater-sediment isolate, Rhodococcus strain AD45, initial oxidation of isoprene to 1,2-epoxy-isoprene is catalyzed by a multicomponent isoprene monooxygenase encoded by the genes isoABCDEF. The resultant epoxide is converted to a glutathione conjugate by a glutathione S-transferase encoded by isoI, and further degraded by enzymes encoded by isoGHJ. Genome sequence analysis of actinobacterial isolates belonging to the genera Rhodococcus, Mycobacterium and Gordonia has revealed that isoABCDEF and isoGHIJ are linked in an operon, either on a plasmid or the chromosome. In Rhodococcus strain AD45 both isoprene and epoxy-isoprene induce a high level of transcription of 22 contiguous genes, including isoABCDEF and isoGHIJ. Sequence analysis of the isoA gene, encoding the large subunit of the oxygenase component of isoprene monooxygenase, from isolates has facilitated the development of PCR primers that are proving valuable in investigating the ecology of uncultivated isoprene-degrading bacteria.

  8. Thiophenic compounds adsorption on Na(I)Y and rare earth exchanged Y zeolites: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xionghou; Geng, Wei; Zhang, Haitao; Zhao, Xuefei; Yao, Xiaojun

    2013-11-01

    We have theoretically investigated the adsorption of thiophene, benzothiophene, dibenzothiophene on Na(I)Y and rare earth exchanged La(III)Y, Ce(III)Y, Pr(III)Y Nd(III)Y zeolites by density functional theory calculations. The calculated results show that except benzothiophene adsorbed on Na(I)Y with a stand configuration, the stable adsorption structures of other thiophenic compounds on zeolites exhibit lying configurations. Adsorption energies of thiophenic compounds on the Na(I)Y are very low, and decrease with the increase of the number of benzene rings in thiophenic compounds. All rare earth exchanged zeolites exhibit strong interaction with thiophene. La(III)Y and Nd(III)Y zeolites are found to show enhanced adsorption energies to benzothiophene and Pr(III)Y zeolites are favorable for dibenzothiophene adsorption. The analysis of the electronic total charge density and electron orbital overlaps show that the thiophenic compounds interact with zeolites by π-electrons of thiophene ring and exchanged metal atom. Mulliken charge populations analysis reveals that adsorption energies are strongly dependent on the charge transfer of thiophenic molecule and exchanged metal atom.

  9. Structure determination and characterization of two rare-earth molybdenum borate compounds: LnMoBO(6) (Ln = La, Ce).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dan; Cheng, Wen-Dan; Zhang, Hao; Hang, Shu-Ping; Fang, Ming

    2008-07-28

    The structural, optical, and electronic properties of two rare-earth molybdenum borate compounds, LnMoBO(6) (Ln = La, Ce), have been investigated by means of single-crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analyses, and spectral measurements, as well as calculations of energy band structures, density of states, and optical response functions by the density functional method. The title compounds, which crystallize in monoclinic space group P2(1)/c, possess a similar network of interconnected [Ce(2)(MoO(4))(2)](2+) chains and [BO(2)](-) wavy chains. Novel 1D molybdenum oxide chains are contained in their three-dimensional (3D) networks. The calculated results of crystal energy band structure by the density functional theory (DFT) method show that the solid-state compound LaMoBO(6) is a semiconductor with indirect band gaps.

  10. Indium sealing techniques.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochuli, U.; Haldemann, P.

    1972-01-01

    Gold films are used as an alloying flux to form 5-micron-thick indium film seals at temperatures below 300 C. Pyrex was sealed to quartz, ULE, CER-VIT, Irtran 2, Ge, GaAs, Invar, Kovar, Al, and Cu. The seals can also be used as current feedthroughs and graded seals.

  11. High Temperature Chemistry of Rare Earth Compounds: Dramatic Examples of Periodicity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cater, E. David

    1978-01-01

    Reports that energy required to promote a 4f electron to the 5d level has a profound and predictable influence on the systematics of reactions involving conversion of rare earth atoms from combined to free states. (Author/MA)

  12. Method of manufacturing tin-doped indium oxide nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Ozcan, Soydan; Naskar, Amit K

    2017-06-06

    A method of making indium tin oxide nanofibers includes the step of mixing indium and tin precursor compounds with a binder polymer to form a nanofiber precursor composition. The nanofiber precursor composition is co-formed with a supporting polymer to form a composite nanofiber having a precursor composition nanofiber completely surrounded by the supporting polymer composition. The supporting polymer composition is removed from the composite nanofiber to expose the precursor composition nanofiber. The precursor composition nanofiber is then heated in the presence of oxygen such as O.sub.2 to form indium tin oxide and to remove the binder polymer to form anmore » indium tin oxide nanofiber. A method of making metal oxide nanofibers is also disclosed.« less

  13. Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-30

    Behold one of the more detailed images of the Earth yet created. This Blue Marble Earth montage shown above -- created from photographs taken by the Visible/Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument on board the new Suomi NPP satellite -- shows many stunning details of our home planet. The Suomi NPP satellite was launched last October and renamed last week after Verner Suomi, commonly deemed the father of satellite meteorology. The composite was created from the data collected during four orbits of the robotic satellite taken earlier this month and digitally projected onto the globe. Many features of North America and the Western Hemisphere are particularly visible on a high resolution version of the image. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18033

  14. Use of and Occupational Exposure to Indium in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Cynthia J.; Roberts, Jennifer L.; Andrews, Ronnee N.; Jackson, Matthew V.; Deddens, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Indium use has increased greatly in the past decade in parallel with the growth of flat-panel displays, touchscreens, optoelectronic devices, and photovoltaic cells. Much of this growth has been in the use of indium tin oxide (ITO). This increased use has resulted in more frequent and intense exposure of workers to indium. Starting with case reports and followed by epidemiological studies, exposure to ITO has been linked to serious and sometimes fatal lung disease in workers. Much of this research was conducted in facilities that process sintered ITO, including manufacture, grinding, and indium reclamation from waste material. Little has been known about indium exposure to workers in downstream applications. In 2009–2011, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) contacted 89 potential indium-using companies; 65 (73%) responded, and 43 of the 65 responders used an indium material. Our objective was to identify current workplace applications of indium materials, tasks with potential indium exposure, and exposure controls being used. Air sampling for indium was either conducted by NIOSH or companies provided their data for a total of 63 air samples (41 personal, 22 area) across 10 companies. Indium exposure exceeded the NIOSH recommended exposure limit (REL) of 0.1 mg/m3 for certain methods of resurfacing ITO sputter targets, cleaning sputter chamber interiors, and in manufacturing some inorganic indium compounds. Indium air concentrations were low in sputter target bonding with indium solder, backside thinning and polishing of fabricated indium phosphide-based semiconductor devices, metal alloy production, and in making indium-based solder pastes. Exposure controls such as containment, local exhaust ventilation (LEV), and tool-mounted LEV can be effective at reducing exposure. In conclusion, occupational hygienists should be aware that the manufacture and use of indium materials can result in indium air concentrations that exceed the NIOSH

  15. [Effects of rare earth compounds on human peripheral mononuclear cell telomerase and apoptosis].

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Dai, Yu-Cheng; Yuan, Zhao-Kang; Li, Jie

    2004-07-01

    To study the effects of rare earth exposure on human telomerase and apoptosis of human peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMNs). Rare earth mine lot in Xunwu county, the biggest ion absorptive rare earth mine lot of China, was selected as the study site. Another village of Xunwu county, with comparable geological structure and social environment was selected as the control site. Thirty healthy adults were randomly selected from the study site as exposure group and another 30 healthy adults randomly selected from the control site as control group. The blood content of 15 rare earth elements, including La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu and Y, were determined by inductive coupled plasma-source mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The total contents of rare earth elements in the blood were calculated. The TRAP and FCM assays were carried out to analyse the telomerase and apoptosis of human PBMNCs respectively. In the exposure group, the concentration of La, Ce, Dy and Y were significantly higher (P<0.001), and Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd and Yb were higher than those in the control group (P<0.05). The total content of rare earth in the blood of exposure group showed significant difference compared with control group (P<0.001). Telomerase activity in PBMNs of the exposure group was higher than that in the control group (P<0.05); there were 11 adults in the exposure group (30 adults) and 5 adults in control group (30 adults) showed positive telomerase activity. The average age of the exposure group was (38.69 +/- 8.02) years-old, while the control group was (40.45 +/- 9.02) years-old (P >0.05). It was found that there was a significant relationship between telomerase activity and the total content of rare earth elements (P <0.01). 3. The proportion of apoptosis was not different between the two groups (P >0.05), but the cells in the S-phase and G2-M phase were increased (P <0.01) in the exposed group. The telomerase activity of PBMNs in the rare earth elements exposed group

  16. Theoretical studies of the nitrogen containing compounds adsorption behavior on Na(I)Y and rare earth exchanged RE(III)Y zeolites.

    PubMed

    Geng, Wei; Zhang, Haitao; Zhao, Xuefei; Zan, Wenyan; Gao, Xionghou; Yao, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the adsorption behavior of nitrogen containing compounds including NH3, pyridine, quinoline, and carbazole on Na(I)Y and rare earth exchanged La(III)Y, Pr(III)Y, Nd(III)Y zeolites was investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The calculation results demonstrate that rare earth exchanged zeolites have stronger adsorption ability for nitrogen containing compounds than Na(I)Y. Rare earth exchanged zeolites exhibit strongest interaction with quinoline while weakest with carbazole. Nd(III)Y zeolites are found to have strongest adsorption to all the studied nitrogen containing compounds. The analysis of the electronic total charge density and electron orbital overlaps show that nitrogen containing compounds interact with zeolites by π-electrons of the compounds and the exchanged metal atom. Mulliken charge population analysis also proves that adsorption energies are strongly dependent on the charge transfer between the nitrogen containing molecules and exchanged metal atom in the zeolites.

  17. Regularly arranged indium islands on glass/molybdenum substrates upon femtosecond laser and physical vapor deposition processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ringleb, F.; Eylers, K.; Teubner, Th.

    2016-03-14

    A bottom-up approach is presented for the production of arrays of indium islands on a molybdenum layer on glass, which can serve as micro-sized precursors for indium compounds such as copper-indium-gallium-diselenide used in photovoltaics. Femtosecond laser ablation of glass and a subsequent deposition of a molybdenum film or direct laser processing of the molybdenum film both allow the preferential nucleation and growth of indium islands at the predefined locations in a following indium-based physical vapor deposition (PVD) process. A proper choice of laser and deposition parameters ensures the controlled growth of indium islands exclusively at the laser ablated spots. Basedmore » on a statistical analysis, these results are compared to the non-structured molybdenum surface, leading to randomly grown indium islands after PVD.« less

  18. Theoretical Crystal-Field Calculations for Rare-Earth Ions in III-V semiconductor Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    AD-A243 098 TIC HDL-TM-91-16 1 Ii! 1 I!EiIII ’ii F CT F October 1991 aC7 1991J Theoretical Crystal-Field Calculations for Rare-Earth Ions in III-V...0188). Washngton. DC 20503 1 . AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave bia*) 2. REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED October 1991 Summary, from Jan 91 toJul 91...Laboratories HDL-TM-9 1 -16 2800 Powder Mill Road Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 9. SPONSORNG#AONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSORINGMONITORING

  19. Corrosion Protection Mechanisms of Rare-Earth Compounds Based on Cerium and Praseodymium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    Annular Dark Field IMC–Intermetallic compound LA-ICP-MS Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry MPY—Mils per year (a measure of...currently researching CeCCs. ................................. 20   Table 2.   Mass percent losses during various ranges of thermal treatment for Pr6O11...analysis data of corrosion product in an 084 primer series scribe following 500 hours of salt spray exposure as detected by mass spectrometry

  20. Exchange interactions and magnetic properties of hexagonal rare-earth-cobalt compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burzo, E.

    2018-03-01

    The magnetic properties of some GdxY1-xCo4A compounds with A = Co, Si or B are analysed including the pressure effects. Isomorphous structure transitions, parallelly with changes of cobalt moments from high spin states to low spin states, were shown as pressure increases. The magnetic data, obtained from band structures, were compared with those predicted by the mean field model.

  1. Electronic response of rare-earth magnetic-refrigeration compounds GdX2 (X = Fe and Co)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Samir; Ahuja, Ushma; Kumar, Kishor; Heda, N. L.

    2018-05-01

    We present the Compton profiles (CPs) of rare-earth-transition metal compounds GdX2 (X = Fe and Co) using 740 GBq 137Cs Compton spectrometer. To compare the experimental momentum densities, we have also computed the CPs, electronic band structure, density of states (DOS) and Mulliken population (MP) using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method. Local density and generalized gradient approximations within density functional theory (DFT) along with the hybridization of Hartree-Fock and DFT (B3LYP and PBE0) have been considered under the framework of LCAO scheme. It is seen that the LCAO-B3LYP based momentum densities give a better agreement with the experimental data for both the compounds. The energy bands and DOS for both the spin-up and spin-down states show metallic like character of the reported intermetallic compounds. The localization of 3d electrons of Co and Fe has also been discussed in terms of equally normalized CPs and MP data. Discussion on magnetization using LCAO method is also included.

  2. Mineral of the month: indium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, Micheal W.

    2004-01-01

    Indium was discovered in Germany in 1863. Although it is a lustrous silver-white color, the finders named the new material for the “indigo” spectral lines the mineral created on the spectrograph. Indium ranks 61st in abundance in Earth’s crust and is about three times more abundant than silver or mercury.

  3. Organic compounds in fluid inclusions of Archean quartz-Analogues of prebiotic chemistry on early Earth.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Ulrich; Mayer, Christian; Schmitz, Oliver J; Rosendahl, Pia; Bronja, Amela; Greule, Markus; Keppler, Frank; Mulder, Ines; Sattler, Tobias; Schöler, Heinz F

    2017-01-01

    The origin of life is still an unsolved mystery in science. Hypothetically, prebiotic chemistry and the formation of protocells may have evolved in the hydrothermal environment of tectonic fault zones in the upper continental crust, an environment where sensitive molecules are protected against degradation induced e.g. by UV radiation. The composition of fluid inclusions in minerals such as quartz crystals which have grown in this environment during the Archean period might provide important information about the first organic molecules formed by hydrothermal synthesis. Here we present evidence for organic compounds which were preserved in fluid inclusions of Archean quartz minerals from Western Australia. We found a variety of organic compounds such as alkanes, halocarbons, alcohols and aldehydes which unambiguously show that simple and even more complex prebiotic organic molecules have been formed by hydrothermal processes. Stable-isotope analysis confirms that the methane found in the inclusions has most likely been formed from abiotic sources by hydrothermal chemistry. Obviously, the liquid phase in the continental Archean crust provided an interesting choice of functional organic molecules. We conclude that organic substances such as these could have made an important contribution to prebiotic chemistry which might eventually have led to the formation of living cells.

  4. Magnetocaloric effect in textured rare earth intermetallic compound ErNi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar, Aparna; Chelvane, J. Arout; Morozkin, A. V.; Nigam, A. K.; Quezado, S.; Malik, S. K.; Nirmala, R.

    2018-05-01

    Melt-spun ErNi crystallizes in orthorhombic FeB-type structure (Space group Pnma, no. 62) similar to the arc-melted ErNi compound. Room temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments reveal the presence of texture and preferred crystal orientation in the melt-spun ErNi. The XRD data obtained from the free surface of the melt-spun ErNi show large intensity enhancement for (1 0 2) Bragg reflection. The scanning electron microscopy image of the free surface depicts a granular microstructure with grains of ˜1 μm size. The arc-melted and the melt-spun ErNi compounds order ferromagnetically at 11 K and 10 K (TC) respectively. Field dependent magnetization (M-H) at 2 K shows saturation behaviour and the saturation magnetization value is 7.2 μB/f.u. for the arc-melted ErNi and 7.4 μB/f.u. for the melt-spun ErNi. The isothermal magnetic entropy change (ΔSm) close to TC has been calculated from the M-H data. The maximum isothermal magnetic entropy change, -ΔSmmax, is ˜27 Jkg-1K-1 and ˜24 Jkg-1K-1 for the arc-melted and melt-spun ErNi for 50 kOe field change, near TC. The corresponding relative cooling power values are ˜440 J/kg and ˜432 J/kg respectively. Although a part of ΔSm is lost to crystalline electric field (CEF) effects, the magnetocaloric effect is substantially large at 10 K, thus rendering melt-spun ErNi to be useful in low temperature magnetic refrigeration applications such as helium gas liquefaction.

  5. Adsorption characterization of gaseous volatile organic compound on mesoporous silica particles prepared from spent diatomaceous earth.

    PubMed

    Bei, Lei-Lei; Tao, Hong; Ma, Chih-Ming; Shiue, Angus; Chang, Chang-Tang

    2014-04-01

    This study used spent diatomaceous earth (SDE) from drink processing as source of Si and cationic surfactant (CTAB) as a template for the synthesis of mesoporous silica Materials (MSM) through hydrothermal method. The MSM was characterized by Small-angle X-ray Diffraction (SXRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and N2 adsorption-desorption analyzer. The results showed that the surface area, pore volume and pore size was roughly ranged from 880 to 1060 m2 g(-1), 1.05 cm3 g(-1) and 4.0 nm, respectively. The properties of the synthesized MSM were also compared with those prepared from pure silica sources (MCM-41) and got almost the same characteristics. The synthesized MSM was used as adsorbent at 25 degrees C with carrier gas of air. The adsorption equilibrium revealed that adsorption capacity of MSM was 59.6, 65.7, 69.6, 84.9 mg g(-1) while the acetone concentration was 600, 800, 1000 ppm, 1600 ppm respectively. Results showed that breakthrough curves correlate to the challenge vapor concentration, adsorbent loading, and the flow rate. The results obtained in the present work demonstrated that it was feasibility of using the SDE as a potential source of silica to prepare MSM.

  6. How metallic is the binding state of indium hosted by excess-metal chalcogenides in ore deposits?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondina Figueiredo, Maria; Pena Silva, Teresa; Oliveira, Daniel; Rosa, Diogo

    2010-05-01

    Discovered in 1863, indium is nowadays a strategic scarce metal used both in classical technologic fields (like low melting-temperature alloys and solders) and in innovative nano-technologies to produce "high-tech devices" by means of new materials, namely liquid crystal displays (LCDs), organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and the recently introduced transparent flexible thin-films manufactured with ionic amorphous oxide semiconductors (IAOS). Indium is a typical chalcophile element, seldom forming specific minerals and occurring mainly dispersed within polymetallic sulphides, particularly with excess metal ions [1]. The average content of indium in the Earth's crust is very low but a further increase in its demand is still expected in the next years, thus focusing a special interest in uncovering new exploitation sites through promising polymetallic sulphide ores - e.g., the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB) [2] - and in improving recycling technologies. Indium recovery stands mostly on zinc extraction from sphalerite, the natural cubic sulphide which is the prototype of so-called "tetrahedral sulphides" where metal ions fill half of the available tetrahedral sites within the cubic closest packing of sulphur anions where the double of unfilled interstices are available for further in-filling. It is worth remarking that such packing array is particularly suitable for accommodating polymetallic cations by filling closely located interstitial sites [3] as happens in excess-metal tetrahedral sulphides - e.g. bornite, ideally Cu5FeS4, recognized as an In-carrying mineral [4]. Studying the tendency towards In-In interactions able of leading to the formation of polycations would efficiently contribute to understand indium crystal chemistry and the metal binding state in natural chalcogenides. Accordingly, an X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) study at In L3-edge was undertaken using the instrumental set-up of ID21 beamline at the ESRF (European Synchrotron

  7. Early Changes in Clinical, Functional, and Laboratory Biomarkers in Workers at Risk of Indium Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Virji, M. Abbas; Trapnell, Bruce C.; Carey, Brenna; Healey, Terrance; Kreiss, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Occupational exposure to indium compounds, including indium–tin oxide, can result in potentially fatal indium lung disease. However, the early effects of exposure on the lungs are not well understood. Objectives: To determine the relationship between short-term occupational exposures to indium compounds and the development of early lung abnormalities. Methods: Among indium–tin oxide production and reclamation facility workers, we measured plasma indium, respiratory symptoms, pulmonary function, chest computed tomography, and serum biomarkers of lung disease. Relationships between plasma indium concentration and health outcome variables were evaluated using restricted cubic spline and linear regression models. Measurements and Main Results: Eighty-seven (93%) of 94 indium–tin oxide facility workers (median tenure, 2 yr; median plasma indium, 1.0 μg/l) participated in the study. Spirometric abnormalities were not increased compared with the general population, and few subjects had radiographic evidence of alveolar proteinosis (n = 0), fibrosis (n = 2), or emphysema (n = 4). However, in internal comparisons, participants with plasma indium concentrations ≥ 1.0 μg/l had more dyspnea, lower mean FEV1 and FVC, and higher median serum Krebs von den Lungen-6 and surfactant protein-D levels. Spline regression demonstrated nonlinear exposure response, with significant differences occurring at plasma indium concentrations as low as 1.0 μg/l compared with the reference. Associations between health outcomes and the natural log of plasma indium concentration were evident in linear regression models. Associations were not explained by age, smoking status, facility tenure, or prior occupational exposures. Conclusions: In indium–tin oxide facility workers with short-term, low-level exposure, plasma indium concentrations lower than previously reported were associated with lung symptoms, decreased spirometric parameters, and increased serum

  8. Effect of indium addition in U-Zr metallic fuel on lanthanide migration

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Wiencek, T.; O'Hare, E.

    Advanced fast reactor concepts to achieve ultra-high burnup (~50%) require prevention of fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI). Fission product lanthanide accumulation at high burnup is substantial and significantly contributes to FCCI upon migration to the cladding interface. Diffusion barriers are typically used to prevent interaction of the lanthanides with the cladding. A more active method has been proposed which immobilizes the lanthanides through formation of stable compounds with an additive. Theoretical analysis showed that indium, thallium, and antimony are good candidates. Indium was the strongest candidate because of its low reactivity with iron-based cladding alloys. Characterization of the as-fabricated alloys wasmore » performed to determine the effectiveness of the indium addition in forming compounds with lanthanides, represented by cerium. Tests to examine how effectively the dopant prevents lanthanide migration under a thermal gradient were also performed. The results showed that indium effectively prevented cerium migration.« less

  9. Indium oxide based fiber optic SPR sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Sarika; Sharma, Navneet K., E-mail: navneetk.sharma@jiit.ac.in

    2016-05-06

    Surface plasmon resonance based fiber optic sensor using indium oxide layer is presented and theoretically studied. It has been found that with increase in thickness of indium oxide layer beyond 170 nm, the sensitivity of SPR sensor decreases. 170 nm thick indium oxide layer based SPR sensor holds maximum sensitivity.

  10. Application of Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide Photovoltaic Cells to Extend the Endurance and Capabilities of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    Group V element to make them n or p material. Another common group of semiconductors are called III–V compounds , such as gallium arsenide (GaAs), or...these compounds used for photovoltaics are Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), and Copper Indium Gallium DiSelenide, commonly referred to as CIGS [49]. Figure...INDIUM GALLIUM DISELENIDE PHOTOVOLTAIC CELLS TO EXTEND THE ENDURANCE AND CAPABILITIES OF UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES by William R. Hurd

  11. The mobility of indium and gallium in groundwater systems: constraining the role of sorption in sand column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dror, I.; Ringering, K.; Yecheskel, Y.; Berkowitz, B.

    2017-12-01

    The mobility of indium and gallium in groundwater environments was studied via laboratory experiments using quartz sand as a porous medium. Indium and gallium are metals of very low abundance in the Earth's crust and, correspondingly, the biosphere is only adapted to very small concentrations of these elements. However, in modern semiconductor industries, both elements play a central role and are incorporated in devices of mass production such as smartphones and digital cameras. The resulting considerable increase in production, use and discharge of indium and gallium throughout the last two decades, with a continuous and fast increase in the near future, raises questions regarding the fate of both elements in the environment. However, the transport behavior of these two metals in soils and groundwater systems remains poorly understood to date. Because of the low solubility of both elements in aqueous solutions, trisodium citrate was used as a complexation agent to stabilize the solutions, enabling investigation of the transport of these metals at neutral pH. Column experiments showed different binding capacities for indium and gallium, where gallium is much more mobile compared to indium and both metals are substantially retarded in the column. Different affinities were also confirmed by examining sorption isotherms of indium and gallium in equilibrium batch systems. The effect of natural organic matter on the mobility of indium and gallium was also studied, by addition of humic acid. For both metals, the presence of humic acid affects the sorption dynamics: for indium, sorption is strongly inhibited leading to much higher mobility, whereas gallium showed a slightly higher sorption affinity and very similar mobility compared to the same setup without humic acid addition. However, in all cases, the binding capacity of gallium to quartz is much weaker than that of indium. These results are consistent with the assumption that indium and gallium form different types

  12. Prebiotic Synthesis of Methionine and Other Sulfur-Containing Organic Compounds on the Primitive Earth: A Contemporary Reassessment Based on an Unpublished 1958 Stanley Miller Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Eric T.; Cleaves, H. James; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Lazcano, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Original extracts from an unpublished 1958 experiment conducted by the late Stanley L. Miller were recently found and analyzed using modern state-of-the-art analytical methods. The extracts were produced by the action of an electric discharge on a mixture of methane (CH4), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), ammonia (NH3), and carbon dioxide (CO2). Racemic methionine was farmed in significant yields, together with other sulfur-bearing organic compounds. The formation of methionine and other compounds from a model prebiotic atmosphere that contained H2S suggests that this type of synthesis is robust under reducing conditions, which may have existed either in the global primitive atmosphere or in localized volcanic environments on the early Earth. The presence of a wide array of sulfur-containing organic compounds produced by the decomposition of methionine and cysteine indicates that in addition to abiotic synthetic processes, degradation of organic compounds on the primordial Earth could have been important in diversifying the inventory of molecules of biochemical significance not readily formed from other abiotic reactions, or derived from extraterrestrial delivery.

  13. Trigonal Cu2-II-Sn-VI4 (II = Ba, Sr and VI = S, Se) quaternary compounds for earth-abundant photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Hong, Feng; Lin, Wenjun; Meng, Weiwei; Yan, Yanfa

    2016-02-14

    We propose trigonal Cu2-II-Sn-VI4 (II = Ba, Sr and VI = S, Se) quaternary compounds for earth-abundant solar cell applications. Through density functional theory calculations, we show that these compounds exhibit similar electronic and optical properties to kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS): high optical absorption with band gaps suitable for efficient single-junction solar cell applications. However, the trigonal Cu2-II-Sn-VI4 compounds exhibit defect properties more suitable for photovoltaic applications than those of CZTS. In CZTS, the dominant defects are the deep acceptors, Cu substitutions on Zn sites, which cause non-radiative recombination and limit the open-circuit voltages of CZTS solar cells. On the contrary, the dominant defects in trigonal Cu2-II-Sn-VI4 are the shallow acceptors, Cu vacancies, similar to those in CuInSe2. Our results suggest that the trigonal Cu2-II-Sn-VI4 quaternary compounds could be promising candidates for efficient earth-abundant thin-film solar cell and photoeletrochemical water-splitting applications.

  14. Extraction equilibrium of indium(III) from nitric acid solutions by di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid dissolved in kerosene.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hung-Sheng; Tsai, Teh-Hua

    2012-01-04

    The extraction equilibrium of indium(III) from a nitric acid solution using di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) as an acidic extractant of organophosphorus compounds dissolved in kerosene was studied. By graphical and numerical analysis, the compositions of indium-D2EHPA complexes in organic phase and stoichiometry of the extraction reaction were examined. Nitric acid solutions with various indium concentrations at 25 °C were used to obtain the equilibrium constant of InR₃ in the organic phase. The experimental results showed that the extraction distribution ratios of indium(III) between the organic phase and the aqueous solution increased when either the pH value of the aqueous solution and/or the concentration of the organic phase extractant increased. Finally, the recovery efficiency of indium(III) in nitric acid was measured.

  15. Tuning the Origin of Magnetic Relaxation by Substituting the 3d or Rare-Earth Ions into Three Isostructural Cyano-Bridged 3d-4f Heterodinuclear Compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Guo, Zhen; Xie, Shuang; Li, Hui-Li; Zhu, Wen-Hua; Liu, Li; Dong, Xun-Qing; He, Wei-Xun; Ren, Jin-Chao; Liu, Ling-Zhi; Powell, Annie K

    2015-11-02

    Three isostructural cyano-bridged 3d-4f compounds, [YFe(CN)6(hep)2(H2O)4] (1), [DyFe(CN)6(hep)2(H2O)4] (2), and [DyCo(CN)6(hep)2(H2O)4] (3), were successfully assembled by site-targeted substitution of the 3d or rare-earth ions. All compounds have been structurally characterized to display slightly distorted pentagonal-bipyramidal local coordination geometry around the rare-earth ions. Magnetic analyses revealed negligible magnetic coupling in compound 1, antiferromagnetic intradimer interaction in 2, and weak ferromagnetic coupling through dipolar-dipolar interaction in 3. Under an applied direct-current (dc) field, 1 (Hdc = 2.5 kOe, τ0 = 1.3 × 10(-7) s, and Ueff/kB = 23 K) and 3 (Hdc = 2.0 kOe, τ0 = 7.1 × 10(-11) s, and Ueff/kB = 63 K) respectively indicated magnetic relaxation behavior based on a single [Fe(III)]LS ion and a Dy(III) ion; nevertheless, 2 (Hdc = 2.0 kOe, τ0 = 9.7 × 10(-8) s, and Ueff/kB = 23 K) appeared to be a single-molecule magnet based on a cyano-bridged DyFe dimer. Compound 1, which can be regarded as a single-ion magnet of the [Fe(III)]LS ion linked to a diamagnetic Y(III) ion in a cyano-bridged heterodimer, represents one of the rarely investigated examples based on a single Fe(III) ion explored in magnetic relaxation behavior. It demonstrated that the introduction of intradimer magnetic interaction of 2 through a cyano bridge between Dy(III) and [Fe(III)]LS ions negatively affects the energy barrier and χ″(T) peak temperature compared to 3.

  16. DX centers in indium aluminum arsenide heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sari, Huseyin

    DX centers are point defects observed in many n-type doped III-V compound semi conductors. They have unique properties, which include large differences between their optical and thermal ionization energies, and a temperature dependence of the capture cross-sections. As a result of these properties DX centers exhibit a reduction in free carrier concentration and a large persistent photoconductivity (PPC) effect. DX centers also lead to a shift in the threshold voltage of modulation doped field effect transistors (MODFET) structures, at low temperatures. Most of the studies on this defect have been carried out on the Ga xAl1-xAs material system. However, to date there is significantly less work on DX centers in InxAl1-xAs compounds. This is partly due to difficulties associated with the growth of defect free materials other than lattice matched In0.52Al 0.48As on InP and partly because the energy level of the DX center is in resonance with the conduction band in In0.52Al0.48As. The purpose of this dissertation is to extend the DX center investigation to InAlAs compounds, primarily in the indirect portion of the InAlAs bandgap. In this work the indium composition dependence of the DX centers in In xAl1-xAs/InyGa1-yAs-based heterostructure is studied experimentally. Different InxAl 1-xAs epitaxial layers with x = 0.10, x = 0.15, x = 0.20, and x = 0.34 in a MODFET-like heterostructure were grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) on (001) GaAs substrates. In order to compensate the lattice mismatch between epitaxial layers and their substrates, step-graded buffer layers with indium composition increments of x = 0.10, every 2000 A, were used. For the samples grown with different indium contents Hall measurements as a function of both temperature and different cooling biases were performed in order to determine their carrier concentrations. A self consistent Poisson-Schrodinger numerical software is used to model the heterostructures. With the help of this numerical model

  17. Influence of Metallic Indium Concentration on the Properties of Indium Oxide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkan, N.

    2016-10-01

    Current-voltage characteristics of indium-embedded indium oxide thin films (600-850 Å), with Ag electrodes approximately 1000 Å thick, prepared by reactive evaporation of pure metallic indium in partial air pressure have been studied for substrate temperatures between 50 and 125°C. The optical properties of these films have also been investigated as a function of metallic indium concentration and substrate temperature. I-V characteristics of all the samples are non-ohmic, independent of metallic indium concentration. The conductivity of the films increases but the optical transmission decreases with increasing metallic indium concentration. Metallic indium concentration was found to be an important parameter affecting the film properties. Furthermore, two possible conduction mechanisms are proposed.

  18. Magnetic and noncentrosymmetric Weyl fermion semimetals in the R AlGe family of compounds (R =rare earth )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Guoqing; Singh, Bahadur; Xu, Su-Yang; Bian, Guang; Huang, Shin-Ming; Hsu, Chuang-Han; Belopolski, Ilya; Alidoust, Nasser; Sanchez, Daniel S.; Zheng, Hao; Lu, Hong; Zhang, Xiao; Bian, Yi; Chang, Tay-Rong; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Bansil, Arun; Hsu, Han; Jia, Shuang; Neupert, Titus; Lin, Hsin; Hasan, M. Zahid

    2018-01-01

    Weyl semimetals are novel topological conductors that host Weyl fermions as emergent quasiparticles. In this Rapid Communication, we propose a new type of Weyl semimetal state that breaks both time-reversal symmetry and inversion symmetry in the R AlGe (R =rare -earth ) family. Compared to previous predictions of magnetic Weyl semimetal candidates, the prediction of Weyl nodes in R AlGe is more robust and less dependent on the details of the magnetism because the Weyl nodes are generated already by the inversion breaking and the ferromagnetism acts as a simple Zeeman coupling that shifts the Weyl nodes in k space. Moreover, R AlGe offers remarkable tunability, which covers all varieties of Weyl semimetals including type I, type II, inversion breaking, and time-reversal breaking, depending on a suitable choice of the rare-earth elements. Furthermore, the unique noncentrosymmetric and ferromagnetic Weyl semimetal state in R AlGe enables the generation of spin currents.

  19. Indium Phosphide Window Layers for Indium Gallium Arsenide Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.

    2005-01-01

    Window layers help in reducing the surface recombination at the emitter surface of the solar cells resulting in significant improvement in energy conversion efficiency. Indium gallium arsenide (In(x)Ga(1-x)As) and related materials based solar cells are quite promising for photovoltaic and thermophotovoltaic applications. The flexibility of the change in the bandgap energy and the growth of InGaAs on different substrates make this material very attractive for multi-bandgap energy, multi-junction solar cell approaches. The high efficiency and better radiation performance of the solar cell structures based on InGaAs make them suitable for space power applications. This work investigates the suitability of indium phosphide (InP) window layers for lattice-matched In(0.53)Ga(0.47)As (bandgap energy 0.74 eV) solar cells. We present the first data on the effects of the p-type InP window layer on p-on-n lattice-matched InGaAs solar cells. The modeled quantum efficiency results show a significant improvement in the blue region with the InP window. The bare InGaAs solar cell performance suffers due to high surface recombination velocity (10(exp 7) cm/s). The large band discontinuity at the InP/InGaAs heterojunction offers a great potential barrier to minority carriers. The calculated results demonstrate that the InP window layer effectively passivates the solar cell front surface, hence resulting in reduced surface recombination and therefore, significantly improving the performance of the InGaAs solar cell.

  20. Genetic and chemical analyzes of transformations in compost compounds during biodegradation of oiled bleaching earth with waste sludge.

    PubMed

    Piotrowska-Cyplik, Agnieszka; Cyplik, Paweł; Marecik, Roman; Czarny, Jakub; Szymański, Andrzej; Wyrwas, Bogdan; Framski, Grzegorz; Chrzanowski, Lukasz; Materna, Katarzyna

    2012-06-01

    Composting of oiled bleaching earth with waste sludge and corn straw was carried out to investigate the ability of microorganisms to synthesize biosurfactants that might decrease the surface tension of composts. Analytical results and changes in the surface tension suggest that biodegradation of fatty by-products was the consequence of emulsifying properties of higher fatty acids. The surface tension for isolates from all composting phases was between 37 and 43 mN m(-1). No substances synthesized by microorganisms that might be able to decrease the surface tension were detected in composts. Tensammetric, TLC and HPLC-MS results and changes in surface tension suggest that biodegradation of fatty by-products results from the emulsifying properties of higher fatty acids. A decrease in fatty content from 144 to 6 mg g(-1) dry matter was obtained. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Fe-Cluster Compounds of Chalcogenides: Candidates for Rare-Earth-Free Permanent Magnet and Magnetic Nodal-Line Topological Material

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Kim, Minsung

    Here, Fe-cluster-based crystal structures are predicted for chalcogenides Fe 3X 4 (X = S, Se, Te) using an adaptive genetic algorithm. Topologically different from the well-studied layered structures of iron chalcogenides, the newly predicted structures consist of Fe clusters that are either separated by the chalcogen atoms or connected via sharing of the vertex Fe atoms. Additionally, using first-principles calculations, we demonstrate that these structures have competitive or even lower formation energies than the experimentally synthesized Fe 3X 4 compounds and exhibit interesting magnetic and electronic properties. In particular, we show that Fe 3X 4 can be a good candidatemore » as a rare-earth-free permanent magnet and Fe 3X 4 can be a magnetic nodal-line topological material.« less

  2. Fe-Cluster Compounds of Chalcogenides: Candidates for Rare-Earth-Free Permanent Magnet and Magnetic Nodal-Line Topological Material

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Xin; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Kim, Minsung; ...

    2017-11-13

    Here, Fe-cluster-based crystal structures are predicted for chalcogenides Fe 3X 4 (X = S, Se, Te) using an adaptive genetic algorithm. Topologically different from the well-studied layered structures of iron chalcogenides, the newly predicted structures consist of Fe clusters that are either separated by the chalcogen atoms or connected via sharing of the vertex Fe atoms. Additionally, using first-principles calculations, we demonstrate that these structures have competitive or even lower formation energies than the experimentally synthesized Fe 3X 4 compounds and exhibit interesting magnetic and electronic properties. In particular, we show that Fe 3X 4 can be a good candidatemore » as a rare-earth-free permanent magnet and Fe 3X 4 can be a magnetic nodal-line topological material.« less

  3. Fe-Cluster Compounds of Chalcogenides: Candidates for Rare-Earth-Free Permanent Magnet and Magnetic Nodal-Line Topological Material.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Kim, Minsung; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2017-12-04

    Fe-cluster-based crystal structures are predicted for chalcogenides Fe 3 X 4 (X = S, Se, Te) using an adaptive genetic algorithm. Topologically different from the well-studied layered structures of iron chalcogenides, the newly predicted structures consist of Fe clusters that are either separated by the chalcogen atoms or connected via sharing of the vertex Fe atoms. Using first-principles calculations, we demonstrate that these structures have competitive or even lower formation energies than the experimentally synthesized Fe 3 X 4 compounds and exhibit interesting magnetic and electronic properties. In particular, we show that Fe 3 Te 4 can be a good candidate as a rare-earth-free permanent magnet and Fe 3 S 4 can be a magnetic nodal-line topological material.

  4. Structure and magnetism of new rare-earth-free intermetallic compounds: Fe 3+xCo 3-xTi 2 (0 ≤ x ≤ 3)

    DOE PAGES

    Balasubramanian, Balamurugan; Das, Bhaskar; Nguyen, Manh Cuong; ...

    2016-11-28

    Here, we report the fabrication of a set of new rare-earth-free magnetic compounds, which form the Fe 3Co 3Ti 2-type hexagonal structure with P-6m2 symmetry. Neutron powder diffraction shows a significant Fe/Co anti-site mixing in the Fe 3Co 3Ti 2 structure, which has a strong effect on the magnetocrystalline anisotropy as revealed by first-principle calculations. Increasing substitution of Fe atoms for Co in the Fe 3Co 3Ti 2 lattice leads to the formation of Fe 4Co 2Ti 2, Fe 5CoTi, and Fe 6Ti 2 with significantly improved permanent-magnet properties. A high magnetic anisotropy (13.0 Mergs/cm 3) and saturation magnetic polarizationmore » (11.4 kG) are achieved at 10 K by altering the atomic arrangements and decreasing Fe/Co occupancy disorder.« less

  5. Thermodynamic properties of uranium in liquid gallium, indium and their alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkovich, V. A.; Maltsev, D. S.; Yamshchikov, L. F.; Osipenko, A. G.

    2015-09-01

    Activity, activity coefficients and solubility of uranium was determined in gallium, indium and gallium-indium alloys containing 21.8 (eutectic), 40 and 70 wt.% In. Activity was measured at 573-1073 K employing the electromotive force method, and solubility between room temperature (or the alloy melting point) and 1073 K employing direct physical measurements. Activity coefficients were obtained from the difference of experimentally determined temperature dependencies of uranium activity and solubility. Intermetallic compounds formed in the respective alloys were characterized using X-ray diffraction. Partial and excess thermodynamic functions of uranium in the studied alloys were calculated. Liquidus lines in U-Ga and U-In phase diagrams from the side rich in gallium or indium are proposed.

  6. Marine and terrestrial sources of reactive volatile organic compounds and their impact on the tropospheric ozone chemistry of the earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemer, Daniel David

    Two areas integral to the global cycle of tropospheric ozone were studied. The first segment of this investigation involved the study of marine ecosystems to define the sources of nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) in the surface ocean. This included laboratory and field investigations conducted to determine the function and importance of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the abiotic photochemical production of nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) in surface seawater. Concurrently, phytoplankton were investigated as a biogenic source of NMHCs in the surface ocean. Low molecular weight alkenes, compounds observed in the greatest quantities in the surface ocean, are formed almost exclusively as a result of DOM-mediated photochemistry. Isoprene was found to be produced by all phytoplankton species investigated. The primary sink for NMHCs found in surface seawater was gas exchange. The second segment of this study focused on the prevalence of NMHCs and oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) in the rural southeastern United States. To characterize the importance of NMHCs and OVOCs to the process of atmospheric reactivity and tropospheric ozone chemistry, mixing ratios for a number of NMHCs and OVOCs were determined. Isoprene and its primary oxidation products, methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone, were observed to be the dominant hydroxyl radical (OH) sink in the rural atmosphere. Certain OVOCs, namely methanol, acetone and acetaldehyde-although not as important on a reactivity basis-were the most prevalent in terms of mass. Methanol was the dominant OVOC measured in the rural atmosphere and serves as an important source of formaldehyde in the rural atmosphere. On the basis of the mixing ratio patterns exhibited by many of the OVOCs present in the rural atmosphere, considerable biogenic sources are likely.

  7. Multilayer photosensitive structures based on porous silicon and rare-earth-element compounds: Study of spectral characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Kirsanov, N. Yu.; Latukhina, N. V., E-mail: natalat@yandex.ru; Lizunkova, D. A.

    2017-03-15

    The spectral characteristics of the specular reflectance, photosensitivity, and photoluminescence (PL) of multilayer structures based on porous silicon with rare-earth-element (REE) ions are investigated. It is shown that the photosensitivity of these structures in the wavelength range of 0.4–1.0 μm is higher than in structures free of REEs. The structures with Er{sup 3+} ions exhibit a luminescence response at room temperature in the spectral range from 1.1 to 1.7 μm. The PL spectrum of the erbium impurity is characterized by a fine line structure, which is determined by the splitting of the {sup 4}I{sub 15/2} multiplet of the Er{sup 3+}more » ion. It is shown that the structures with a porous layer on the working surface have a much lower reflectance in the entire spectral range under study (0.2–1.0 μm).« less

  8. (Polyfluoroaryl) fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of enhanced utility, uses thereof, and products based thereon

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Chen, You-Xian

    2001-01-01

    The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are novel weakly coordinating anions which are highly fluorinated. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of one such type contain at least one ring substituent other than fluorine. These (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium have greater solubility in organic solvents, or have a coordinative ability essentially equal to or less than that of the corresponding (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, or indium in which the substituent is replaced by fluorine. Another type of new (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, and indium have 1-3 perfluorinated fused ring groups and 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups. When used as a cocatalyst in the formation of novel catalytic complexes with d- or f-block metal compounds having at least one leaving group such as a methyl group, these anions, because of their weak coordination to the metal center, do not interfere in the ethylene polymerization process, while affecting the propylene process favorably, if highly isotactic polypropylene is desired. Thus, the (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of this invention are useful in various polymerization processes such as are described.

  9. (Polyfluoroaryl) fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of enhanced utility, uses thereof, and products based thereon

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Chen, You-Xian

    2002-01-01

    The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are novel weakly coordinating anions which are highly fluorinated. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of one such type contain at least one ring substituent other than fluorine. These (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium have greater solubility in organic solvents, or have a coordinative ability essentially equal to or less than that of the corresponding (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, or indium in which the substituent is replaced by fluorine. Another type of new (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, and indium have 1-3 perfluorinated fused ring groups and 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups. When used as a cocatalyst in the formation of novel catalytic complexes with d- or f-block metal compounds having at least one leaving group such as a methyl group, these anions, because of their weak coordination to the metal center, do not interfere in the ethylene polymerization process, while affecting the propylene process favorably, if highly isotactic polypropylene is desired. Thus, the (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of this invention are useful in various polymerization processes such as are described.

  10. Photochemical studies in low Earth orbit for organic compounds related to small bodies, Titan and Mars. Current and future facilities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottin, H.; Saiagh, K.; Nguyen, D.; Grand, N.; Bénilan, Y.; Cloix, M.; Coll, P.; Gazaux, M.-C.; Fray, N.; Khalaf, D.; Raulin, F.; Stalort, F.; Carrasco, N.; Szopa, C.; Chaput, D.; Bertrand, M.; Westall, F.; Mattioda, A.; Quinn, R.; Ricco, A.; Santos, O.; Baratta, G. A.; Strazzulla, G.; Palumbo, M. E.; Le Postollec, A.; Dobrijevic, M.; Coussot, G.; Vigier, F.; Vandenabeele-Trambouze, O.; Incerti, S.; Berger, T.

    2015-01-01

    The study of the evolution of organic matter subjected to space conditions, and more specifically to solar photons in the vacuum ultraviolet range (120-200 nm) has been undertaken in low Earth Orbit since the 90's, and implemented on various space platforms. The most recent exposure facilities are BIOPAN outside the Russian automatic capsules FOTON, and EXPOSE-E & -R (1&2) outside the International Space Station. They allow the photolysis of many different samples simultaneously, and provide us with valuable data about the formation and evolution of organic matter in the Solar System (meteorites, comets, Titan's atmosphere, the Martian surface...) and in the Interstellar Medium. They have been used by European teams in the recent past(ORGANIC on BIOPAN V-FOTON M2 and UVolution on BIOPAN VI-FOTON M3, PROCESS on EXPOSE-E, AMINO and ORGANICS on EXPOSE-R), and a new EXPOSE set is currently exposed outside the ISS (PSS on EXPOSE-R2). These existing tools are very valuable; however, they have significant limitations that limit their capabilities and scientific return. One of the most critical issues for current studies is the lack of any in-situ analysis of the evolution of the samples as a function of time. Only two measurements are available for the experiment: one before and one after the exposure. A significant step forward has been achieved with the O/OREOS NASA nanosatellite and the OREOcube ESA project with onboard UV-visible measurements. However, for organic samples, following the evolution of the samples would be more informative and provide greater insight with infrared measurements, which display specific patterns characteristic of major organic functionalities in the mid-infrared range (4000-1000 cm-1).

  11. Quantification of indium in steel using PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, A.; Miranda, J.; Rickards, J.; Cheang, J. C.

    1989-04-01

    The quantitative analysis of steel for endodontics tools was carried out using low-energy protons (≤ 700 keV). A computer program for a thick-target analysis which includes enhancement due to secondary fluorescence was used. In this experiment the L-lines of indium are enhanced due to the proximity of other elements' K-lines to the indium absorption edge. The results show that the ionization cross section expression employed to evaluate this magnitude is important.

  12. Indium Single-Ion Frequency Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagourney, Warren

    2001-01-01

    A single laser-cooled indium ion is a promising candidate for an ultimate resolution optical time or frequency standard. It can be shown that single ions from group IIIA of the periodic table (indium, thallium, etc.) can have extremely small systematic errors. In addition to being free from Doppler, transit-time and collisional shifts, these ions are also quite insensitive to perturbations from ambient magnetic and electric fields (mainly due to the use of a J=0-0 transition for spectroscopy). Of all group IIIA ions, indium seems to be the most practical, since it is heavy enough to have a tolerable intercombination cooling transition rate and (unlike thallium) has transitions which are easily accessible with frequency multiplied continuous-wave lasers. A single indium ion standard has a potential inaccuracy of one part in 10(exp 18) for integration times of 10(exp 6) seconds. We have made substantial progress during the grant period in constructing a frequency standard based upon a single indium ion. At the beginning of the grant period, single indium ions were being successfully trapped, but the lasers and optical systems were inadequate to achieve the desired goal. We have considerably improved the stability of the dye laser used to cool the ions and locked it to a molecular resonance line, making it possible to observe stable cooling-line fluorescence from a single indium ion for reasonable periods of time, as required by the demands of precision spectroscopy. We have substantially improved the single-ion fluorescence signal with significant benefits for the detection efficiency of forbidden transitions using the 'shelving' technique. Finally, we have constructed a compact, efficient UV 'clock' laser and observed 'clock' transitions in single indium ions using this laser system. We will elaborate on these accomplishments.

  13. Indium Substitution Effect on the Topological Crystalline Insulator Family (Pb 1$-$xSn x)1 $-$yInyTe: Topological and Superconducting Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Ruidan; Schneeloch, John; Li, Qiang

    Topological crystalline insulators (TCIs) have been of great interest in the area of condensed matter physics. We investigated the effect of indium substitution on the crystal structure and transport properties in the TCI system (Pb 1-xSn x) 1-yIn yTe. For samples with a tin concentration x ≤ 50% , the low-temperature resisitivities show a dramatic variation as a function of indium concentration: with up to ~2% indium doping, the samples show weak-metallic behavior similar to their parent compounds; with `6% indium doping, samples have true bulk-insulating resistivity and present evidence for nontrivial topological surface states; with higher indium doping levels,more » superconductivity was observed, with a transition temperature, T c , positively correlated to the indium concentration and reaching as high as 4.7 K. We address this issue from the view of bulk electronic structure modified by the indium-induced impurity level that pins the Fermi level. The current work summarizes the indium substitution effect on (Pb,Sn)Te, and discusses the topological and superconducting aspects, which can be provide guidance for future studies on this and related systems.« less

  14. Indium Substitution Effect on the Topological Crystalline Insulator Family (Pb 1$-$xSn x)1 $-$yInyTe: Topological and Superconducting Properties

    DOE PAGES

    Zhong, Ruidan; Schneeloch, John; Li, Qiang; ...

    2017-02-16

    Topological crystalline insulators (TCIs) have been of great interest in the area of condensed matter physics. We investigated the effect of indium substitution on the crystal structure and transport properties in the TCI system (Pb 1-xSn x) 1-yIn yTe. For samples with a tin concentration x ≤ 50% , the low-temperature resisitivities show a dramatic variation as a function of indium concentration: with up to ~2% indium doping, the samples show weak-metallic behavior similar to their parent compounds; with `6% indium doping, samples have true bulk-insulating resistivity and present evidence for nontrivial topological surface states; with higher indium doping levels,more » superconductivity was observed, with a transition temperature, T c , positively correlated to the indium concentration and reaching as high as 4.7 K. We address this issue from the view of bulk electronic structure modified by the indium-induced impurity level that pins the Fermi level. The current work summarizes the indium substitution effect on (Pb,Sn)Te, and discusses the topological and superconducting aspects, which can be provide guidance for future studies on this and related systems.« less

  15. Ab initio Thermal Transport in Compound Semiconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-02

    upper bound to the thermal conductivities of cubic aluminum-V, gallium -V, and indium-V compounds as limited by anharmonic phonon scattering. The effects...and GaP [red circles (Ref. 51) and red triangles (Ref. 52)]. B. Gallium -V compounds We previously presented results for κL and P for wurtzite GaN and...data was found. We used this approach to examine κL in aluminum-V, gallium -V, and indium-V compounds as well as the technologically important materials

  16. Recovery of indium ions by nanoscale zero-valent iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen; Su, Yiming; Wen, Zhipan; Zhang, Yalei; Zhou, Xuefei; Dai, Chaomeng

    2017-03-01

    Indium and its compounds have plenty of industrial applications and high demand. Therefore, indium recovery from various industrial effluents is necessary. It was sequestered by nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) whose size mainly ranged from 50 to 70 nm. Adsorption kinetics and isotherm, influence of pH, and ionic strength were thoroughly investigated. The reaction process was well fitted to a pseudo second-order model, and the maximum adsorption capacity of In(III) was 390 mg In(III)/g nZVI similar to 385 mg In(III)/g nZVI at 298 K calculated by Langmuir model. The mole ratio of Fe(II) released to In(III) immobilized was 3:2, which implied a special chemical process of co-precipitation combined Fe(OH)2 with In(OH)3. Transmission electron microscopy with an energy-disperse X-ray (TEM-EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize surface morphology, corrosion products, and valence state of indium precipitate formed on nanoparticles. The structural evolution changed from core-shell structure of iron oxide to sheet structure of co-precipitation, to sphere structure that hydroxide gradually dissolved as the pH decreased, and to cavity structures for the pH continually decreased. Furthermore, below pH 4.7, the In(III) enrichment was inhibited for the limited capacity of co-precipitation. Also, it was found that Ca2+ and HPO4 2- have more negative influence on In(III) recovery compared with Na+, NO3 -, HCO3 -, and SO4 2-. Therefore, the In(III) recovery can be described by a mechanism which consists of adsorption, co-precipitation, and reduction and was over 78% even after 3 cycles. The results confirmed that it was applicable to employ nZVI for In(III) immobilization.

  17. Nanocrystalline semiconductor doped rare earth oxide for the photocatalytic degradation studies on Acid Blue 113: A di-azo compound under UV slurry photoreactor.

    PubMed

    Suganya Josephine, G A; Mary Nisha, U; Meenakshi, G; Sivasamy, A

    2015-11-01

    Preventive measures for the control of environmental pollution and its remediation has received much interest in recent years due to the world-wide increase in the contamination of water bodies. Contributions of these harmful effluents are caused by the leather processing, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, textile, agricultural and other chemical industries. Nowadays, advanced oxidation processes considered to be better option for the complete destruction of organic contaminants in water and wastewater. Acid Blue 113 is a most widely used di-azo compound in leather, textile, dying and food industry as a color rending compound. In the present study, we have reported the photo catalytic degradation of Acid Blue 113 using a nanocrystalline semiconductor doped rare earth oxide as a photo catalyst under UV light irradiation. The photocatalyst was prepared by a simple precipitation technique and were characterized by XRD, FT-IR, UV-DRS and FE-SEM analysis. The experimental results proved that the prepared photo catalyst was nanocrystalline and highly active in the UV region. The UV-DRS results showed the band gap energy was 3.15eV for the prepared photo catalyst. The photodegradation efficiency was analyzed by various experimental parameters such as pH, catalyst dosage, variation of substrate concentration and effect of electrolyte addition. The photo degradation process followed a pseudo first order kinetics and was continuously monitored by UV-visible spectrophotometer. The experimental results proved the efficacy of the nanocrystalline zinc oxide doped dysprosium oxide which are highly active under UV light irradiations. It is also suggested that the prepared material would find wider applications in environmental remediation technologies to remove the carcinogenic and toxic moieties present in the industrial effluents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Tom; Ghosh, Amal K.

    1982-12-28

    A high photo-conversion efficiency indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cell is spray deposited from a solution containing indium trichloride. The solar cell exhibits an Air Mass One solar conversion efficiency in excess of about 10%.

  19. Indium adhesion provides quantitative measure of surface cleanliness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krieger, G. L.; Wilson, G. J.

    1968-01-01

    Indium tipped probe measures hydrophobic and hydrophilic contaminants on rough and smooth surfaces. The force needed to pull the indium tip, which adheres to a clean surface, away from the surface provides a quantitative measure of cleanliness.

  20. Local magnetic moment formation at 119Sn Mössbauer impurity in RFe2 ( R=rare-earth metals) Laves phases compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, A. L.; de Oliveira, N. A.; Troper, A.

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of the present work is to theoretically study the local magnetic moment formation and the systematics of the magnetic hyperfine fields at a non-magnetic s-p Mössbauer 119Sn impurity diluted on R sites ( R=rare-earth metals) of the cubic Laves phases intermetallic compounds RFe2. One considers that the magnetic hyperfine field has two contributions (i) the contribution from R ions, calculated via an extended Daniel-Friedel [J. Phys. Chem. Solids 24 (1963) 1601] model and (ii) the contribution from the induced magnetic moments arising from the Fe neighboring sites. We have in this case a two-center Blandin-Campbell-like [Phys. Rev. Lett. 31 (1973) 51; J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 1 (1975) 1] problem, where a magnetic 3d-element located at a distance from the 119Sn impurity gives an extra magnetization to a polarized electron gas which is strongly charge perturbed at the 119Sn impurity site. We also include in the model, the nearest-neighbor perturbation due to the translational invariance breaking introduced by the impurity. Our self-consistent total magnetic hyperfine field calculations are in a very good agreement with recent experimental data.

  1. Hydrogen and syngas production by catalytic gasification of algal biomass (Cladophora glomerata L.) using alkali and alkaline-earth metals compounds.

    PubMed

    Ebadi, Abdol Ghaffar; Hisoriev, Hikmat; Zarnegar, Mohammad; Ahmadi, Hamed

    2018-01-02

    The steam gasification of algal biomass (Cladophora glomerata L.) in presence of alkali and alkaline-earth metal compounds catalysts was studied to enhance the yield of syngas and reduce its tar content through cracking and reforming of condensable fractions. The commercial catalysts used include NaOH, KHCO 3 , Na 3 PO 4 and MgO. The gasification runs carried out with a research scale, biomass gasification unit, show that the NaOH has a strong potential for production of hydrogen, along with the added advantages of char converting and tar destruction, allowing enhancement of produced syngas caloric value. When the temperature increased from 700°C to 900°C, the tar content in the gas sharply decreased, while the hydrogen yield increased. Increasing steam/biomass ratio significantly increased hydrogen yield and tar destruction; however, the particle size in the range of 0.5-2.5 mm played a minor role in the process.

  2. Macro- and microscopic properties of strontium doped indium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaenko, Y. M.; Kuzovlev, Y. E.; Medvedev, Y. V.; Mezin, N. I.; Fasel, C.; Gurlo, A.; Schlicker, L.; Bayer, T. J. M.; Genenko, Y. A.

    2014-07-01

    Solid state synthesis and physical mechanisms of electrical conductivity variation in polycrystalline, strontium doped indium oxide In2O3:(SrO)x were investigated for materials with different doping levels at different temperatures (T = 20-300 °C) and ambient atmosphere content including humidity and low pressure. Gas sensing ability of these compounds as well as the sample resistance appeared to increase by 4 and 8 orders of the magnitude, respectively, with the doping level increase from zero up to x = 10%. The conductance variation due to doping is explained by two mechanisms: acceptor-like electrical activity of Sr as a point defect and appearance of an additional phase of SrIn2O4. An unusual property of high level (x = 10%) doped samples is a possibility of extraordinarily large and fast oxygen exchange with ambient atmosphere at not very high temperatures (100-200 °C). This peculiarity is explained by friable structure of crystallite surface. Friable structure provides relatively fast transition of samples from high to low resistive state at the expense of high conductance of the near surface layer of the grains. Microscopic study of the electro-diffusion process at the surface of oxygen deficient samples allowed estimation of the diffusion coefficient of oxygen vacancies in the friable surface layer at room temperature as 3 × 10-13 cm2/s, which is by one order of the magnitude smaller than that known for amorphous indium oxide films.

  3. 40 CFR 721.10391 - Copper gallium indium selenide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Copper gallium indium selenide. 721... Substances § 721.10391 Copper gallium indium selenide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as copper gallium indium selenide (PMN P-10...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10391 - Copper gallium indium selenide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Copper gallium indium selenide. 721... Substances § 721.10391 Copper gallium indium selenide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as copper gallium indium selenide (PMN P-10...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10391 - Copper gallium indium selenide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Copper gallium indium selenide. 721... Substances § 721.10391 Copper gallium indium selenide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as copper gallium indium selenide (PMN P-10...

  6. Electroluminescence color tuning between green and red from metal-oxide-semiconductor devices fabricated by spin-coating of rare-earth (terbium + europium) organic compounds on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Toshihiro; Hattori, Fumihiro; Iwata, Hideyuki; Ohzone, Takashi

    2018-04-01

    Color tunable electroluminescence (EL) from metal-oxide-semiconductor devices with the rare-earth elements Tb and Eu is reported. Organic compound liquid sources of (Tb + Ba) and Eu with various Eu/Tb ratios from 0.001 to 0.4 were spin-coated on an n+-Si substrate and annealed to form an oxide insulator layer. The EL spectra had only peaks corresponding to the intrashell Tb3+/Eu3+ transitions in the spectral range from green to red, and the intensity ratio of the peaks was appropriately tuned using the appropriate Eu/Tb ratios in liquid sources. Consequently, the EL emission colors linearly changed from yellowish green to yellowish orange and eventually to reddish orange on the CIE chromaticity diagram. The gate current +I G current also affected the EL colors for the medium-Eu/Tb-ratio device. The structure of the surface insulator films analyzed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has four layers, namely, (Tb4O7 + Eu2O3), [Tb4O7 + Eu2O3 + (Tb/Eu/Ba)SiO x ], (Tb/Eu/Ba)SiO x , and SiO x -rich oxide. The EL mechanism proposed is that electrons injected from the Si substrate into the SiO x -rich oxide and Tb/Eu/Ba-silicate layers become hot electrons accelerated in a high electric field, and then these hot electrons excite Tb3+ and Eu3+ ions in the Tb4O7/Eu2O3 layers resulting in EL emission from Tb3+ and Eu3+ intrashell transitions.

  7. Reliable bonding using indium-based solders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Jongpil; Goyal, Abhijat; Tadigadapa, Srinivas; Rahn, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Low temperature bonding techniques with high bond strengths and reliability are required for the fabrication and packaging of MEMS devices. Indium and indium-tin based bonding processes are explored for the fabrication of a flextensional MEMS actuator, which requires the integration of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) substrate with a silicon micromachined structure at low temperatures. The developed technique can be used either for wafer or chip level bonding. The lithographic steps used for the patterning and delineation of the seed layer limit the resolution of this technique. Using this technique, reliable bonds were achieved at a temperature of 200°C. The bonds yielded an average tensile strength of 5.41 MPa and 7.38 MPa for samples using indium and indium-tin alloy solders as the intermediate bonding layers respectively. The bonds (with line width of 100 microns) showed hermetic sealing capability of better than 10-11 mbar-l/s when tested using a commercial helium leak tester.

  8. Reliable bonding using indium-based solders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Jongpil; Goyal, Abhijat; Tadigadapa, Srinivas; Rahn, Christopher

    2003-12-01

    Low temperature bonding techniques with high bond strengths and reliability are required for the fabrication and packaging of MEMS devices. Indium and indium-tin based bonding processes are explored for the fabrication of a flextensional MEMS actuator, which requires the integration of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) substrate with a silicon micromachined structure at low temperatures. The developed technique can be used either for wafer or chip level bonding. The lithographic steps used for the patterning and delineation of the seed layer limit the resolution of this technique. Using this technique, reliable bonds were achieved at a temperature of 200°C. The bonds yielded an average tensile strength of 5.41 MPa and 7.38 MPa for samples using indium and indium-tin alloy solders as the intermediate bonding layers respectively. The bonds (with line width of 100 microns) showed hermetic sealing capability of better than 10-11 mbar-l/s when tested using a commercial helium leak tester.

  9. An investigation of the use of cerium and polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes for the protection of polymeric epoxy compounds in the low Earth orbit environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piness, Jessica Miriam

    Low Earth orbit presents many hazards for composites including atomic oxygen, UV radiation, thermal cycling, micrometeoroids, and high energy protons. Atomic oxygen and vacuum ultraviolet radiation are of concern for space-bound polymeric materials as they degrade the polymers used as matrices for carbon fiber composites, which are used in satellites and space vehicles due to their high strength to weight ratios. Epoxy-amine thermosets comprise a common class of matrix due to processability and good thermal attributes. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) have shown the ability to reduce erosion in polyimides, polyurethanes, and other polymers when exposed to atomic oxygen. The POSS particle is composed of a SiO1.5 cage from which up to eight organic pendant groups are attached at the silicon corners of the cage. POSS reduced atomic oxygen impact on polymers by a process known as glassification wherein the organic pendants are removed from the cage upon atomic oxygen exposure and then the cage rearranges to a passive silica network. In addition, POSS shows good UV absorbance in the UVb and UVc ranges and POSS can aid dispersion of titanium dioxide in a nanocomposite. In this work, Chapter I focuses on hazards in low Earth orbit, strategies for protecting organic material in orbit, and the capabilities of POSS. Chapter II details the experimental practices used in this work. Chapter III focuses on work to induce POSS phase separation and layering at the surface of an epoxy-amine thermoset. Generally, POSS is dispersed throughout a nanocomposite, and in the process of erosion by atomic oxygen, some polymer mass loss is lost before enough POSS is exposed to begin glassification. Locating POSS at a surface of composite could possibly reduce this mass loss and the objective of this research was to investigate the formation of POSS-rich surfaces. Three POSS derivatives with different pendant groups were chosen. The POSS derivatives had a range of miscibilities

  10. Macrophage Solubilization and Cytotoxicity of Indium-Containing Particles as in vitro Correlates to Pulmonary Toxicity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gwinn, William M.; Qu, Wei; Bousquet, Ronald W.; Price, Herman; Shines, Cassandra J.; Taylor, Genie J.; Waalkes, Michael P.; Morgan, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage-solubilized indium-containing particles (ICPs) were previously shown in vitro to be cytotoxic. In this study, we compared macrophage solubilization and cytotoxicity of indium phosphide (InP) and indium-tin oxide (ITO) with similar particle diameters (∼1.5 µm) and then determined if relative differences in these in vitro parameters correlated with pulmonary toxicity in vivo. RAW 264.7 macrophages were treated with InP or ITO particles and cytotoxicity was assayed at 24 h. Ionic indium was measured in 24 h culture supernatants. Macrophage cytotoxicity and particle solubilization in vitro were much greater for InP compared with ITO. To correlate changes in vivo, B6C3F1 mice were treated with InP or ITO by oropharyngeal aspiration. On Days 14 and 28, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and pleural lavage (PL) fluids were collected and assayed for total leukocytes. Cell differentials, lactate dehydrogenase activity, and protein levels were also measured in BAL. All lavage parameters were greatly increased in mice treated with InP compared with ITO. These data suggest that macrophage solubilization and cytotoxicity of some ICPs in vitro are capable of predicting pulmonary toxicity in vivo. In addition, these differences in toxicity were observed despite the two particulate compounds containing similar amounts of indium suggesting that solubilization, not total indium content, better reflects the toxic potential of some ICPs. Soluble InCl3 was shown to be more cytotoxic than InP to macrophages and lung epithelial cells in vitro further suggesting that ionic indium is the primary cytotoxic component of InP. PMID:25527823

  11. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of enhanced utility, uses thereof, and products based thereon

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Chen, You-Xian

    2001-01-01

    The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are novel weakly coordinating anions which are are highly fluorinated. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of one such type contain at least one ring substituent other than fluorine. These (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium have greater solubility in organic solvents, or have a coordinative ability essentially equal to or less than that of the corresponding (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, or indium in which the substituent is replaced by fluorine. Another type of new (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, and indium have 1-3 perfluorinated fused ring groups and 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups. When used as a cocatalyst in the formation of novel catalytic complexes with d- or f-block metal compounds having at least one leaving group such as a methyl group, these anions, because of their weak coordination to the metal center, do not interefere in the ethylene polymerization process, while affecting the the propylene process favorably, if highly isotactic polypropylene is desired. Thus, the (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of this invention are useful in various polymerization processes such as are described.

  12. Thin film metrology and microwave loss characterization of indium and aluminum/indium superconducting planar resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McRae, C. R. H.; Béjanin, J. H.; Earnest, C. T.; McConkey, T. G.; Rinehart, J. R.; Deimert, C.; Thomas, J. P.; Wasilewski, Z. R.; Mariantoni, M.

    2018-05-01

    Scalable architectures characterized by quantum bits (qubits) with low error rates are essential to the development of a practical quantum computer. In the superconducting quantum computing implementation, understanding and minimizing material losses are crucial to the improvement of qubit performance. A new material that has recently received particular attention is indium, a low-temperature superconductor that can be used to bond pairs of chips containing standard aluminum-based qubit circuitry. In this work, we characterize microwave loss in indium and aluminum/indium thin films on silicon substrates by measuring superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators and estimating the main loss parameters at powers down to the sub-photon regime and at temperatures between 10 and 450 mK. We compare films deposited by thermal evaporation, sputtering, and molecular beam epitaxy. We study the effects of heating in a vacuum and ambient atmospheric pressure as well as the effects of pre-deposition wafer cleaning using hydrofluoric acid. The microwave measurements are supported by thin film metrology including secondary-ion mass spectrometry. For thermally evaporated and sputtered films, we find that two-level state are the dominant loss mechanism at low photon number and temperature, with a loss tangent due to native indium oxide of ˜ 5 × 10 - 5 . The molecular beam epitaxial films show evidence of the formation of a substantial indium-silicon eutectic layer, which leads to a drastic degradation in resonator performance.

  13. Indium nanowires at the silicon surface

    SciTech Connect

    Kozhukhov, A. S., E-mail: antonkozhukhov@yandex.ru; Sheglov, D. V.; Latyshev, A. V.

    2016-07-15

    Conductive indium nanowires up to 50 nm in width and up to 10 μm in length are fabricated on the surface of silicon by local resputtering from the probe of an atomic-force microscope. The transfer of indium from the probe of the atomic-force microscope onto the silicon surface is initiated by applying a potential between the probe and the surface as they approach each other to spacings, at which the mutual repulsive force is ~10{sup –7} N. The conductivity of the nanowires ranges from 7 × 10{sup –3} to 4 × 10{sup –2} Ω cm, which is several orders ofmore » magnitude lower than that in the case of the alternative technique of heat transfer.« less

  14. 40 CFR 421.190 - Applicability: Description of the secondary indium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE... subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the production of indium at secondary indium facilities processing spent electrolyte solutions and scrap indium metal raw...

  15. InP (Indium Phosphide): Into the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Major industry is beginning to be devoted to indium phosphide and its potential applications. Key to these applications are high speed and radiation tolerance; however the high cost of indium phosphide may be an inhibitor to progress. The broad applicability of indium phosphide to many devices will be discussed with an emphasis on photovoltaics. Major attention is devoted to radiation tolerance and means of reducing cost of devices. Some of the approaches applicable to solar cells may also be relevant to other devices. The intent is to display the impact of visionary leadership in the field and enable the directions and broad applicability of indium phosphide.

  16. Method to Improve Indium Bump Bonding via Indium Oxide Removal Using a Multi-Step Plasma Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickie, Matthew R. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Greer, H. Frank (Inventor); Jones, Todd J. (Inventor); Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael E. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A process for removing indium oxide from indium bumps in a flip-chip structure to reduce contact resistance, by a multi-step plasma treatment. A first plasma treatment of the indium bumps with an argon, methane and hydrogen plasma reduces indium oxide, and a second plasma treatment with an argon and hydrogen plasma removes residual organics. The multi-step plasma process for removing indium oxide from the indium bumps is more effective in reducing the oxide, and yet does not require the use of halogens, does not change the bump morphology, does not attack the bond pad material or under-bump metallization layers, and creates no new mechanisms for open circuits.

  17. Experiments with the low melting indium-bismuth alloy system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krepski, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    The following is a laboratory experiment designed to create an interest in and to further understanding of materials science. The primary audience for this material is the junior high school or middle school science student having no previous familiarity with the material, other than some knowledge of temperature and the concepts of atoms, elements, compounds, and chemical reactions. The objective of the experiment is to investigate the indium-bismuth alloy system. Near the eutectic composition, the liquidus is well below the boiling point of water, allowing simple, minimal hazard casting experiments. Such phenomena as metal oxidation, formation of intermetallic compound crystals, and an unusual volume increase during solidification could all be directly observed. A key concept for students to absorb is that properties of an alloy (melting point, mechanical behavior) may not correlate with simple interpolation of properties of the pure components. Discussion of other low melting metals and alloys leads to consideration of environmental and toxicity issues, as well as providing some historical context. Wetting behavior can also be explored.

  18. The influence of random indium alloy fluctuations in indium gallium nitride quantum wells on the device behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tsung-Jui; Wu, Yuh-Renn, E-mail: yrwu@ntu.edu.tw; Shivaraman, Ravi

    2014-09-21

    In this paper, we describe the influence of the intrinsic indium fluctuation in the InGaN quantum wells on the carrier transport, efficiency droop, and emission spectrum in GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). Both real and randomly generated indium fluctuations were used in 3D simulations and compared to quantum wells with a uniform indium distribution. We found that without further hypothesis the simulations of electrical and optical properties in LEDs such as carrier transport, radiative and Auger recombination, and efficiency droop are greatly improved by considering natural nanoscale indium fluctuations.

  19. Sodium enhances indium-gallium interdiffusion in copper indium gallium diselenide photovoltaic absorbers.

    PubMed

    Colombara, Diego; Werner, Florian; Schwarz, Torsten; Cañero Infante, Ingrid; Fleming, Yves; Valle, Nathalie; Spindler, Conrad; Vacchieri, Erica; Rey, Germain; Guennou, Mael; Bouttemy, Muriel; Manjón, Alba Garzón; Peral Alonso, Inmaculada; Melchiorre, Michele; El Adib, Brahime; Gault, Baptiste; Raabe, Dierk; Dale, Phillip J; Siebentritt, Susanne

    2018-02-26

    Copper indium gallium diselenide-based technology provides the most efficient solar energy conversion among all thin-film photovoltaic devices. This is possible due to engineered gallium depth gradients and alkali extrinsic doping. Sodium is well known to impede interdiffusion of indium and gallium in polycrystalline Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 films, thus influencing the gallium depth distribution. Here, however, sodium is shown to have the opposite effect in monocrystalline gallium-free CuInSe 2 grown on GaAs substrates. Gallium in-diffusion from the substrates is enhanced when sodium is incorporated into the film, leading to Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 and Cu(In,Ga) 3 Se 5 phase formation. These results show that sodium does not decrease per se indium and gallium interdiffusion. Instead, it is suggested that sodium promotes indium and gallium intragrain diffusion, while it hinders intergrain diffusion by segregating at grain boundaries. The deeper understanding of dopant-mediated atomic diffusion mechanisms should lead to more effective chemical and electrical passivation strategies, and more efficient solar cells.

  20. Superconductivity by rare earth doping in the 1038-type compounds (Ca1-xREx) 10(FeAs)10(Pt3As8) with RE=Y, La-Nd, Sm-Lu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stürzer, Tobias; Derondeau, Gerald; Bertschler, Eva-Maria; Johrendt, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    We report superconductivity in polycrystalline samples of the 1038-type compounds (Ca1-xREx) 10(FeAs)10(Pt3As8) up to Tc=35 K with RE=Y, La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Lu. The critical temperatures are nearly independent of the trivalent rare earth element used, yielding a common Tc(xRE) phase diagram for electron doping in all these systems. The absence of superconductivity in Eu2+ doped samples, as well as the close resemblance of (Ca1-xREx) 10(FeAs)10(Pt3As8) to the 1048 compound substantiate that the electron doping scenario in the RE-1038 and 1048 phases is analogous to other iron-based superconductors with simpler crystal structures.

  1. Two-Step Plasma Process for Cleaning Indium Bonding Bumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Harold F.; Vasquez, Richard P.; Jones, Todd J.; Hoenk, Michael E.; Dickie, Matthew R.; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2009-01-01

    A two-step plasma process has been developed as a means of removing surface oxide layers from indium bumps used in flip-chip hybridization (bump bonding) of integrated circuits. The two-step plasma process makes it possible to remove surface indium oxide, without incurring the adverse effects of the acid etching process.

  2. Using Indium Tin Oxide To Mitigate Dust on Viewing Ports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    NASA plans to use a number of onboard viewing ports to measure lunar regolith in situ and to monitor robotic and human activities on the lunar or Martian surface. Because of the size and abundance of dust particles on these bodies, the potential for dust to occlude viewing ports and windows is high enough to threaten system lifetime and reliability, especially when activities rely on relaying video to either a habitat module or controllers on Earth. This project uses a technology being developed by KSC's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory to remove dust from windowlike surfaces. The technology applies an alternating electric potential to interlaced electrodes. In this application, we use indium tin oxide (ITO) to create various electrode patterns in order to determine the most reliable pattern for dust removal. This technology has application to systems where optical clarity is important. Specifically, this project considers the in situ resource utilization (ISRU) application of a viewing port for Raman spectroscopy, where the electrode pattern on glass would be coated with a scratch-resistant sapphire film (Al2O3).

  3. Superconductivity up to 114 K in the Bi-Al-Ca-Sr-Cu-O compound system without rare-earth elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, C. W.; Bechtold, J.; Gao, L.; Hor, P. H.; Huang, Z. J.

    1988-01-01

    Stable superconductivity up to 114 K has been reproducibly detected in Bi-Al-Ca-Sr-Cu-O multiphase systems without any rare-earth elements. Pressure has only a slight positive effect on T(c). These observations provide an extra material base for the study of the mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity and also the prospect of reduced material cost for future applications of superconductivity.

  4. Patterning of Indium Tin Oxide Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immer, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    A relatively rapid, economical process has been devised for patterning a thin film of indium tin oxide (ITO) that has been deposited on a polyester film. ITO is a transparent, electrically conductive substance made from a mixture of indium oxide and tin oxide that is commonly used in touch panels, liquid-crystal and plasma display devices, gas sensors, and solar photovoltaic panels. In a typical application, the ITO film must be patterned to form electrodes, current collectors, and the like. Heretofore it has been common practice to pattern an ITO film by means of either a laser ablation process or a photolithography/etching process. The laser ablation process includes the use of expensive equipment to precisely position and focus a laser. The photolithography/etching process is time-consuming. The present process is a variant of the direct toner process an inexpensive but often highly effective process for patterning conductors for printed circuits. Relative to a conventional photolithography/ etching process, this process is simpler, takes less time, and is less expensive. This process involves equipment that costs less than $500 (at 2005 prices) and enables patterning of an ITO film in a process time of less than about a half hour.

  5. Indium antimonide large-format detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Mike; Greiner, Mark

    2011-06-01

    Large format infrared imaging sensors are required to achieve simultaneously high resolution and wide field of view image data. Infrared sensors are generally required to be cooled from room temperature to cryogenic temperatures in less than 10 min thousands of times during their lifetime. The challenge is to remove mechanical stress, which is due to different materials with different coefficients of expansion, over a very wide temperature range and at the same time, provide a high sensitivity and high resolution image data. These challenges are met by developing a hybrid where the indium antimonide detector elements (pixels) are unconnected islands that essentially float on a silicon substrate and form a near perfect match to the silicon read-out circuit. Since the pixels are unconnected and isolated from each other, the array is reticulated. This paper shows that the front side illuminated and reticulated element indium antimonide focal plane developed at L-3 Cincinnati Electronics are robust, approach background limited sensitivity limit, and provide the resolution expected of the reticulated pixel array.

  6. Solubility of indium-tin oxide in simulated lung and gastric fluids: Pathways for human intake.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jens Christian Østergård; Cropp, Alastair; Paradise, Diane Caroline

    2017-02-01

    From being a metal with very limited natural distribution, indium (In) has recently become disseminated throughout the human society. Little is known of how In compounds behave in the natural environment, but recent medical studies link exposure to In compounds to elevated risk of respiratory disorders. Animal tests suggest that exposure may lead to more widespread damage in the body, notably the liver, kidneys and spleen. In this paper, we investigate the solubility of the most widely used In compound, indium-tin oxide (ITO) in simulated lung and gastric fluids in order to better understand the potential pathways for metals to be introduced into the bloodstream. Our results show significant potential for release of In and tin (Sn) in the deep parts of the lungs (artificial lysosomal fluid) and digestive tract, while the solubility in the upper parts of the lungs (the respiratory tract or tracheobronchial tree) is very low. Our study confirms that ITO is likely to remain as solid particles in the upper parts of the lungs, but that particles are likely to slowly dissolve in the deep lungs. Considering the prolonged residence time of inhaled particles in the deep lung, this environment is likely to provide the major route for uptake of In and Sn from inhaled ITO nano- and microparticles. Although dissolution through digestion may also lead to some uptake, the much shorter residence time is likely to lead to much lower risk of uptake. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Looking Down Under for a Circular Economy of Indium.

    PubMed

    Werner, Tim T; Ciacci, Luca; Mudd, Gavin Mark; Reck, Barbara K; Northey, Stephen Alan

    2018-02-20

    Indium is a specialty metal crucial for modern technology, yet it is potentially critical due to its byproduct status in mining. Measures to reduce its criticality typically focus on improving its recycling efficiency at end-of-life. This study quantifies primary and secondary indium resources ("stocks") for Australia through a dynamic material-flow analysis. It is based on detailed assessments of indium mineral resources hosted in lead-zinc and copper deposits, respective mining activities from 1844 to 2013, and the trade of indium-containing products from 1988 to 2015. The results show that Australia's indium stocks are substantial, estimated at 46.2 kt in mineral resources and an additional 14.7 kt in mine wastes. Australian mineral resources alone could meet global demand (∼0.8 kt/year) for more than five decades. Discarded material from post-consumer products, instead, is negligible (43 t). This suggests that the resilience of Australia's indium supply can best be increased through efficiency gains in mining (such as introducing domestic indium refining capacity) rather than at the end of the product life. These findings likely also apply to other specialty metals, such as gallium or germanium, and other resource-dominated countries. Finally, the results illustrate that national circular economy strategies can differ substantially.

  8. High-efficiency indium tin oxide/indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, X.; Wanlass, M. W.; Gessert, T. A.; Emery, K. A.; Coutts, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    Improvements in the performance of indium tin oxide (ITO)/indium phosphide solar cells have been realized by the dc magnetron sputter deposition of n-ITO onto an epitaxial p/p(+) structure grown on commercial p(+) bulk substrates. The highest efficiency cells were achieved when the surface of the epilayer was exposed to an Ar/H2 plasma before depositing the bulk of the ITO in a more typical Ar/O2 plasma. With H2 processing, global efficiencies of 18.9 percent were achieved. It is suggested that the excellent performance of these solar cells results from the optimization of the doping, thickness, transport, and surface properties of the p-type base, as well as from better control over the ITO deposition procedure.

  9. Junction characteristics of indium tin oxide/indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, P.; Ahrenkiel, R. K.; Hayes, R. E.; Russell, P. E.; Nottenburg, R. N.; Kazmerski, L. L.

    Efficient indium tin oxide (ITO)/p-InP solar cells have been fabricated. Typical uncorrected efficiencies range from 9-12 percent at AM1 intensities. It is shown that deposition of ITO causes a semi-insulating layer at the InP surface as determined by C-V measurements. The thickness of this layer is approximately 750 A. We believe that this high resistivity region is due to surface accumulation of Fe at the ITO/InP interface.

  10. 3D Printing of Polymer-Bonded Rare-Earth Magnets With a Variable Magnetic Compound Fraction for a Predefined Stray Field.

    PubMed

    Huber, Christian; Abert, Claas; Bruckner, Florian; Groenefeld, Martin; Schuschnigg, Stephan; Teliban, Iulian; Vogler, Christoph; Wautischer, Gregor; Windl, Roman; Suess, Dieter

    2017-08-25

    Additive manufacturing of polymer-bonded magnets is a recently developed technique, for single-unit production, and for structures that have been impossible to manufacture previously. Also, new possibilities to create a specific stray field around the magnet are triggered. The current work presents a method to 3D print polymer-bonded magnets with a variable magnetic compound fraction distribution. This means the saturation magnetization can be adjusted during the printing process to obtain a required external field of the manufactured magnets. A low-cost, end-user 3D printer with a mixing extruder is used to mix permanent magnetic filaments with pure polyamide (PA12) filaments. The magnetic filaments are compounded, extruded, and characterized for the printing process. To deduce the quality of the manufactured magnets with a variable magnetic compound fraction, an inverse stray field framework is developed. The effectiveness of the printing process and the simulation method is shown. It can also be used to manufacture magnets that produce a predefined stray field in a given region. This opens new possibilities for magnetic sensor applications. This setup and simulation framework allows the design and manufacturing of polymer-bonded permanent magnets, which are impossible to create with conventional methods.

  11. Reflectance of metallic indium for solar energy applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.; Hasegawa, T.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in order to compile quantitative data on the reflective properties of metallic indium. The fabricated samples were of sufficiently high quality that differences from similar second-surface silvered mirrors were not apparent to the human eye. Three second-surface mirror samples were prepared by means of vacuum deposition techniques, yielding indium thicknesses of approximately 1000 A. Both hemispherical and specular measurements were made. It is concluded that metallic indium possesses a sufficiently high specular reflectance to be potentially useful in many solar energy applications.

  12. Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Tris(dimethyldithicarbamate)Indium(III), In[S2CN(CH3)2]3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Eric B.; Breen, Marc L.; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Duraj, Stan A.

    1998-01-01

    The synthesis and structure of the indium dithiocarbamate, In[S2CN(CH3)2]30 central dot 1/2 4- mepy (4-mepy = 4-methylpyridine), is described. Indium metal was oxidized by tetramethylthiuramdisulfide in 4-methylpyridine at 25 C to form a new, homoleptic indium(III) dithiocarbamate in yields exceeding 60%. In[S2CN(CH3)2]3 exists as a discrete molecule with a distorted-octahedral geometry. The compound crystallizes in the P 1-bar (No. 2) space group with a = 9.282(l) A, b = 10.081 (1) A, c, c = 12.502 A, alpha = 73.91 (1)(sup 0), beta = 70.21(1)(sup 0), gamma = 85.84(1)(sup 0), Z = 2, V (A(sup 3) = 1057.3(3), R = 0.046, and R(sub w) = 0.061.

  13. Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Tris(dimethyldithiocarbamate)Indium(III), In[S2CN(CH3)2]3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Eric B.; Breen, Marc L.; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Duraj, Stan A.

    1998-01-01

    The synthesis and structure of the indium dithiocarbamate, In[SCN(CH3)2]3*1/2 4-mepy (4-mepy = 4-methylpyridine), is described. Indium metal was oxidized by tetramethylthiuramdisulfide in 4-methylpyridine at 25C to form a new, homoleptic indium(HI) dithiocarbamate in yields exceeding 60%. In[S2CN(CH3)213 exists as a discrete molecule with a distorted-octahedral geometry. The compound crystallizes in the P 1-bar (No. 2) space group with a = 9.282(l)A, b = 10.081(1)A, c = 12.502 A, alpha= 73.91 (1) degrees, beta = 70.21(1) degrees, gamma = 85.84(1) degrees, Z = 2,v(A(exp 3)) =1057.3(3), R = 0.046, and R(sub w) = 0.061.

  14. Negative Magnetoresistance in Amorphous Indium Oxide Wires

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Sreemanta; Tewari, Girish C; Mahalu, Diana; Shahar, Dan

    2016-01-01

    We study magneto-transport properties of several amorphous Indium oxide nanowires of different widths. The wires show superconducting transition at zero magnetic field, but, there exist a finite resistance at the lowest temperature. The R(T) broadening was explained by available phase slip models. At low field, and far below the superconducting critical temperature, the wires with diameter equal to or less than 100 nm, show negative magnetoresistance (nMR). The magnitude of nMR and the crossover field are found to be dependent on both temperature and the cross-sectional area. We find that this intriguing behavior originates from the interplay between two field dependent contributions. PMID:27876859

  15. High quality factor indium oxide mechanical microresonators

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolomé, Javier, E-mail: j.bartolome@fis.ucm.es; Cremades, Ana; Piqueras, Javier

    2015-11-09

    The mechanical resonance behavior of as-grown In{sub 2}O{sub 3} microrods has been studied in this work by in-situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) electrically induced mechanical oscillations. Indium oxide microrods grown by a vapor–solid method are naturally clamped to an aluminum oxide ceramic substrate, showing a high quality factor due to reduced energy losses during mechanical vibrations. Quality factors of more than 10{sup 5} and minimum detectable forces of the order of 10{sup −16} N/Hz{sup 1/2} demonstrate their potential as mechanical microresonators for real applications. Measurements at low-vacuum using the SEM environmental operation mode were performed to study the effect ofmore » extrinsic damping on the resonators behavior. The damping coefficient has been determined as a function of pressure.« less

  16. Band structure dynamics in indium wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chávez-Cervantes, M.; Krause, R.; Aeschlimann, S.; Gierz, I.

    2018-05-01

    One-dimensional indium wires grown on Si(111) substrates, which are metallic at high temperatures, become insulating below ˜100 K due to the formation of a charge density wave (CDW). The physics of this transition is not conventional and involves a multiband Peierls instability with strong interband coupling. This CDW ground state is readily destroyed with femtosecond laser pulses resulting in a light-induced insulator-to-metal phase transition. The current understanding of this transition remains incomplete, requiring measurements of the transient electronic structure to complement previous investigations of the lattice dynamics. Time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with extreme ultraviolet radiation is applied to this end. We find that the transition from the insulating to the metallic band structure occurs within ˜660 fs, which is a fraction of the amplitude mode period. The long lifetime of the transient state (>100 ps) is attributed to trapping in a metastable state in accordance with previous work.

  17. Template synthesis of indium nanowires using anodic aluminum oxide membranes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Kitai, Adrian H

    2008-09-01

    Indium nanowires with diameters approximately 300 nm have been synthesized by a hydraulic pressure technique using anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates. The indium melt is injected into the AAO template and solidified to form nanostructures. The nanowires are dense, continuous and uniformly run through the entire approximately 60 microm thickness of the AAO template. X-ray diffraction (XRD) reveals that the nanowires are polycrystalline with a preferred orientation. SEM is performed to characterize the morphology of the nanowires.

  18. Status of indium phosphide solar cell development at Spire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, M. B.; Keavney, C. J.; Vernon, S. M.

    1987-01-01

    On-going development of indium phosphide solar cells for space applications is presented. The development is being carried out with a view towards both high conversion efficiency and simplicity of manufacture. The cell designs comprise the ion-implanted cell, the indium tin oxide top contact cell, and the epitaxial cell grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. Modelling data on the limit to the efficiency are presented and comparison is made to measured performance data.

  19. Synthesis of Two New Group 13 Benzoato-Chloro Complexes: A Structural Study of Gallium and Indium Chelating Carboxylates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duraj, Stan A.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Woloszynek, Robert; Protasiewicz, John D.; Dequeant, Michael; Ren, Tong

    2010-01-01

    Two new heteroleptic chelated-benzoato gallium (III) and indium (III) complexes have been prepared and structurally characterized. The molecular structures of [GaCl2(4-Mepy)2(O2CPh)]4-Mepy (1) and [InCl(4-Mepy)2(O2CPh)2]4-Mepy (2) have been determined by single-crystal x-ray diffraction. The gallium compound (1) is a distorted octahedron with cis-chloride ligands co-planar with the chelating benzoate and the 4-methylpyridines trans to each other. This is the first example of a Ga(III) structure with a chelating benzoate. The indium compound (2) is a distorted pentagonal bipyramid with two chelating benzoates, one 4-methylpyridine in the plane and a chloride trans to the other 4-methylpyridine. The indium bis-benzoate is an unusual example of a seven-coordinate structure with classical ligands. Both complexes, which due to the chelates, could also be described as pseudo-trigonal bipyramidal, include a three-bladed motif with three roughly parallel aromatic rings that along with a solvent of crystallization and electron-withdrawing chloride ligand(s) stabilize the solid-state structures.

  20. Life on Earth: From Chemicals in Space?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Discusses experimental evidence for the existence of organic material in the solar system prior to the earth's formation. Indicates that the earth could have received much of its organic compounds from meteors falling on its primitive surface. (CC)

  1. Large magnetocaloric effect and near-zero thermal hysteresis in the rare earth intermetallic Tb1-x Dy x Co2 compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yuyang; Tian, Fanghua; Chang, Tieyan; Chen, Kaiyun; Yang, Sen; Cao, Kaiyan; Zhou, Chao; Song, Xiaoping

    2017-02-01

    We report the magnetocaloric effect in a Tb1-x Dy x Co2 compound which exhibits a wide working temperature window around the Curie temperature (T C) and delivers a large refrigerant capacity (RC) with near-zero thermal hysteresis. Specifically, the wide full width at half maxima ({δ\\text{WFHM}} ) can reach up to 62 K and the RC value changes from 216.5 to 274.3 J Kg-1 when the external magnetic field increases to 5 T. Such magnetocaloric effects are attributed to a magnetic and structural transition from a paramagnetic and cubic phase to a ferromagnetic (M S along [1 1 1] direction) and rhombohedral phase or ferromagnetic (M S along [0 0 1] direction) and tetragonal phase.

  2. A novel 3D framework indium phosphite-oxalate based on a pcu-type topology

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Mengmeng; Zhou, Mingdong; Hu, Dianwen

    2016-05-15

    A new inorganic–organic hybrid indium phosphite-oxalate, formulated as H[In{sub 5}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 6}(H{sub 2}PO{sub 3}){sub 2}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}]·(C{sub 4}N{sub 2}H{sub 11}){sub 2}·H{sub 2}O 1 has been hydrothermally synthesized in the presence of piperazine acting as a structure directing agent (SDA). The single crystal X-ray diffraction reveals that compound 1 shows three-dimensional open-framework with intersecting 12-ring channels along the [010] and [001] directions, which is constructed from strictly alternating double 6-ring units (D6Rs), [C{sub 2}O{sub 4}]{sup 2−} groups and [H{sub 2}PO{sub 3}]{sup −} pseudo-pyramids. It is noted that the classical D6R SBU is firstly reported in main metal phosphite/phosphite-oxalate. By regardingmore » D6R as the 6-connected nodes, the inorganic–organic hybrid framework is based on a pcu-type topology. The as-synthesized product was characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, powder X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), ICP-AES and elemental analyses. - Graphical abstract: A 3D open-framework indium phosphite-oxalate has been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. A classical SBU, D6R, is present in the structure. By regarding D6R as the 6-connected nodes, the inorganic–organic hybrid framework is based on a pcu-type topology. - Highlights: • A new indium phosphite-oxalate based on a pcu-type topology has been synthesized. • A classical SBU, D6R, is present in the structure. • The classical SBU is firstly reported in main metal phosphite/phosphite-oxalate.« less

  3. Vertically Emitting Indium Phosphide Nanowire Lasers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei-Zong; Ren, Fang-Fang; Jevtics, Dimitars; Hurtado, Antonio; Li, Li; Gao, Qian; Ye, Jiandong; Wang, Fan; Guilhabert, Benoit; Fu, Lan; Lu, Hai; Zhang, Rong; Tan, Hark Hoe; Dawson, Martin D; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2018-06-13

    Semiconductor nanowire (NW) lasers have attracted considerable research effort given their excellent promise for nanoscale photonic sources. However, NW lasers currently exhibit poor directionality and high threshold gain, issues critically limiting their prospects for on-chip light sources with extremely reduced footprint and efficient power consumption. Here, we propose a new design and experimentally demonstrate a vertically emitting indium phosphide (InP) NW laser structure showing high emission directionality and reduced energy requirements for operation. The structure of the laser combines an InP NW integrated in a cat's eye (CE) antenna. Thanks to the antenna guidance with broken asymmetry, strong focusing ability, and high Q-factor, the designed InP CE-NW lasers exhibit a higher degree of polarization, narrower emission angle, enhanced internal quantum efficiency, and reduced lasing threshold. Hence, this NW laser-antenna system provides a very promising approach toward the achievement of high-performance nanoscale lasers, with excellent prospects for use as highly localized light sources in present and future integrated nanophotonics systems for applications in advanced sensing, high-resolution imaging, and quantum communications.

  4. Biosignatures of early earths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilcher, Carl B.

    2003-01-01

    A major goal of NASA's Origins Program is to find habitable planets around other stars and determine which might harbor life. Determining whether or not an extrasolar planet harbors life requires an understanding of what spectral features (i.e., biosignatures) might result from life's presence. Consideration of potential biosignatures has tended to focus on spectral features of gases in Earth's modern atmosphere, particularly ozone, the photolytic product of biogenically produced molecular oxygen. But life existed on Earth for about 1(1/2) billion years before the buildup of atmospheric oxygen. Inferred characteristics of Earth's earliest biosphere and studies of modern microbial ecosystems that share some of those characteristics suggest that organosulfur compounds, particularly methanethiol (CH(3)SH, the sulfur analog of methanol), may have been biogenic products on early Earth. Similar production could take place on extrasolar Earth-like planets whose biota share functional chemical characteristics with Earth life. Since methanethiol and related organosulfur compounds (as well as carbon dioxide) absorb at wavelengths near or overlapping the 9.6-microm band of ozone, there is potential ambiguity in interpreting a feature around this wavelength in an extrasolar planet spectrum.

  5. Biosignatures of early earths.

    PubMed

    Pilcher, Carl B

    2003-01-01

    A major goal of NASA's Origins Program is to find habitable planets around other stars and determine which might harbor life. Determining whether or not an extrasolar planet harbors life requires an understanding of what spectral features (i.e., biosignatures) might result from life's presence. Consideration of potential biosignatures has tended to focus on spectral features of gases in Earth's modern atmosphere, particularly ozone, the photolytic product of biogenically produced molecular oxygen. But life existed on Earth for about 1(1/2) billion years before the buildup of atmospheric oxygen. Inferred characteristics of Earth's earliest biosphere and studies of modern microbial ecosystems that share some of those characteristics suggest that organosulfur compounds, particularly methanethiol (CH(3)SH, the sulfur analog of methanol), may have been biogenic products on early Earth. Similar production could take place on extrasolar Earth-like planets whose biota share functional chemical characteristics with Earth life. Since methanethiol and related organosulfur compounds (as well as carbon dioxide) absorb at wavelengths near or overlapping the 9.6-microm band of ozone, there is potential ambiguity in interpreting a feature around this wavelength in an extrasolar planet spectrum.

  6. Method for forming indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Tom; Ghosh, Amal K.

    1984-03-13

    A high photo-conversion efficiency indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cell is spray deposited from a solution containing indium trichloride. The solar cell exhibits an Air Mass One solar conversion efficiency in excess of about 10%.

  7. Chemical Potential Tuning and Enhancement of Thermoelectric Properties in Indium Selenides.

    PubMed

    Rhyee, Jong-Soo; Kim, Jin Hee

    2015-03-20

    Researchers have long been searching for the materials to enhance thermoelectric performance in terms of nano scale approach in order to realize phonon-glass-electron-crystal and quantum confinement effects. Peierls distortion can be a pathway to enhance thermoelectric figure-of-merit ZT by employing natural nano-wire-like electronic and thermal transport. The phonon-softening known as Kohn anomaly, and Peierls lattice distortion decrease phonon energy and increase phonon scattering, respectively, and, as a result, they lower thermal conductivity. The quasi-one-dimensional electrical transport from anisotropic band structure ensures high Seebeck coefficient in Indium Selenide. The routes for high ZT materials development of In₄Se₃ - δ are discussed from quasi-one-dimensional property and electronic band structure calculation to materials synthesis, crystal growth, and their thermoelectric properties investigations. The thermoelectric properties of In₄Se₃ - δ can be enhanced by electron doping, as suggested from the Boltzmann transport calculation. Regarding the enhancement of chemical potential, the chlorine doped In₄Se₃ - δ Cl 0.03 compound exhibits high ZT over a wide temperature range and shows state-of-the-art thermoelectric performance of ZT = 1.53 at 450 °C as an n -type material. It was proven that multiple elements doping can enhance chemical potential further. Here, we discuss the recent progress on the enhancement of thermoelectric properties in Indium Selenides by increasing chemical potential.

  8. Chemical Potential Tuning and Enhancement of Thermoelectric Properties in Indium Selenides

    PubMed Central

    Rhyee, Jong-Soo; Kim, Jin Hee

    2015-01-01

    Researchers have long been searching for the materials to enhance thermoelectric performance in terms of nano scale approach in order to realize phonon-glass-electron-crystal and quantum confinement effects. Peierls distortion can be a pathway to enhance thermoelectric figure-of-merit ZT by employing natural nano-wire-like electronic and thermal transport. The phonon-softening known as Kohn anomaly, and Peierls lattice distortion decrease phonon energy and increase phonon scattering, respectively, and, as a result, they lower thermal conductivity. The quasi-one-dimensional electrical transport from anisotropic band structure ensures high Seebeck coefficient in Indium Selenide. The routes for high ZT materials development of In4Se3−δ are discussed from quasi-one-dimensional property and electronic band structure calculation to materials synthesis, crystal growth, and their thermoelectric properties investigations. The thermoelectric properties of In4Se3−δ can be enhanced by electron doping, as suggested from the Boltzmann transport calculation. Regarding the enhancement of chemical potential, the chlorine doped In4Se3−δCl0.03 compound exhibits high ZT over a wide temperature range and shows state-of-the-art thermoelectric performance of ZT = 1.53 at 450 °C as an n-type material. It was proven that multiple elements doping can enhance chemical potential further. Here, we discuss the recent progress on the enhancement of thermoelectric properties in Indium Selenides by increasing chemical potential. PMID:28788002

  9. Materials flow of indium in the United States in 2008 and 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goonan, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Indium is a material that has many applications. It is used by anyone who watches television or views a computer screen. It is found in solar energy arrays and in soldering applications that are required to be lead free. In 2009, about 550 metric tons (t) of indium metal was produced from primary sources world-wide; it was estimated that the United States consumed about 110 t of indium metal (20 percent of world primary production). However, when imports of consumer products that contain indium are considered, the United States consumed about 200 t of indium (36 percent of world primary production). When one considers the recovery from the low-efficiency sputtering process that coats indium-tin oxide onto glass and other surfaces, the recycling rate (within the manufacturing process that uses indium-tin oxide in flat panel displays approaches 36 percent. However, indium recovery from old scrap generated from end-of-life consumer products is not sufficiently economic to add significantly to secondary production. Between 1988 and 2010, indium prices averaged $381 per kilogram (in constant 2000 dollars). However, prices have been quite volatile (deviating from the average of $381 per kilogram by ±$199 per kilogram, a 52 percent difference from the average), reflecting short-term disequilibrium of supply and demand but also responsiveness of supply to demand. The dynamics of zinc smelting govern the primary supply of indium because indium is a byproduct of zinc smelting. Secondary indium supply, which accounts for about one-half of total indium supply, is governed by indium prices and technological advances in recovery. Indium demand is expected to grow because the number and volume of cutting edge technology applications that depend on indium are expected to grow.

  10. Indium Doped Zinc Oxide Thin Films Deposited by Ultrasonic Chemical Spray Technique, Starting from Zinc Acetylacetonate and Indium Chloride

    PubMed Central

    Biswal, Rajesh; Maldonado, Arturo; Vega-Pérez, Jaime; Acosta, Dwight Roberto; Olvera, María De La Luz

    2014-01-01

    The physical characteristics of ultrasonically sprayed indium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:In) thin films, with electrical resistivity as low as 3.42 × 10−3 Ω·cm and high optical transmittance, in the visible range, of 50%–70% is presented. Zinc acetylacetonate and indium chloride were used as the organometallic zinc precursor and the doping source, respectively, achieving ZnO:In thin films with growth rate in the order of 100 nm/min. The effects of both indium concentration and the substrate temperature on the structural, morphological, optical, and electrical characteristics were measured. All the films were polycrystalline, fitting well with hexagonal wurtzite type ZnO. A switching in preferential growth, from (002) to (101) planes for indium doped samples were observed. The surface morphology of the films showed a change from hexagonal slices to triangle shaped grains as the indium concentration increases. Potential applications as transparent conductive electrodes based on the resulting low electrical resistance and high optical transparency of the studied samples are considered. PMID:28788118

  11. Indium Doped Zinc Oxide Thin Films Deposited by Ultrasonic Chemical Spray Technique, Starting from Zinc Acetylacetonate and Indium Chloride.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Rajesh; Maldonado, Arturo; Vega-Pérez, Jaime; Acosta, Dwight Roberto; De La Luz Olvera, María

    2014-07-04

    The physical characteristics of ultrasonically sprayed indium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:In) thin films, with electrical resistivity as low as 3.42 × 10 -3 Ω·cm and high optical transmittance, in the visible range, of 50%-70% is presented. Zinc acetylacetonate and indium chloride were used as the organometallic zinc precursor and the doping source, respectively, achieving ZnO:In thin films with growth rate in the order of 100 nm/min. The effects of both indium concentration and the substrate temperature on the structural, morphological, optical, and electrical characteristics were measured. All the films were polycrystalline, fitting well with hexagonal wurtzite type ZnO. A switching in preferential growth, from (002) to (101) planes for indium doped samples were observed. The surface morphology of the films showed a change from hexagonal slices to triangle shaped grains as the indium concentration increases. Potential applications as transparent conductive electrodes based on the resulting low electrical resistance and high optical transparency of the studied samples are considered.

  12. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-01

    ISS040-E-006327 (1 June 2014) --- A portion of International Space Station solar array panels and Earth?s horizon are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the space station.

  13. Influence of nitrogen on magnetic properties of indium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashok, Vishal Dev; De, S. K.

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic properties of indium oxide (In2O3) prepared by the decomposition of indium nitrate/indium hydroxide in the presence of ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) has been investigated. Structural and optical characterizations confirm that nitrogen is incorporated into In2O3. Magnetization has been convoluted to individual diamagnetic paramagnetic and ferromagnetic contributions with varying concentration of NH4Cl. Spin wave with diverging thermal exponent dominates in both field cool and zero field cool magnetizations. Uniaxial anisotropy plays an important role in magnetization as a function of magnetic field at higher concentration of NH4Cl. Avrami analysis indicates the absence of pinning effect in the magnetization process. Ferromagnetism has been interpreted in terms of local moments induced by anion dopant and strong hybridization with host cation.

  14. Occult purulent pericarditis detected by indium-111 leukocyte imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, M.L.; Niebulski, H.I.; Uretsky, B.F.

    1984-05-01

    Leukocyte imaging with indium-111 is a relatively new technique which, to this point in time, has been discussed almost exclusively in the radiologic literature. Although this procedure has been used mainly to detect intra-abdominal infection, the thorax is routinely imaged along with the abdomen, and therefore detection of cardiac disease may be feasible. This case report is of a young woman after liver transplantation who developed occult purulent pericarditis initially detected by a leukocyte scan with indium-111. This case demonstrates that striking pericardial uptake on a whole-body indium-111 leukocyte scan can occur with purulent pericarditis, and it reemphasizes how insidiouslymore » purulent pericarditis may present in an immunosuppressed patient.« less

  15. Recalibration of indium foil for personnel screening in criticality accidents.

    PubMed

    Takada, C; Tsujimura, N; Mikami, S

    2011-03-01

    At the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), small pieces of indium foil incorporated into personal dosemeters have been used for personnel screening in criticality accidents. Irradiation tests of the badges were performed using the SILENE reactor to verify the calibration of the indium activation that had been made in the 1980s and to recalibrate them for simulated criticalities that would be the most likely to occur in the solution process line. In addition, Monte Carlo calculations of the indium activation using the badge model were also made to complement the spectral dependence. The results lead to a screening level of 15 kcpm being determined that corresponds to a total dose of 0.25 Gy, which is also applicable in posterior-anterior exposure. The recalibration based on the latest study will provide a sounder basis for the screening procedure in the event of a criticality accident.

  16. Mobility of indium on the ZnO(0001) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Heinhold, R.; Reeves, R. J.; Allen, M. W.

    2015-02-02

    The mobility of indium on the Zn-polar (0001) surface of single crystal ZnO wafers was investigated using real-time x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A sudden transition in the wettability of the ZnO(0001) surface was observed at ∼520 °C, with indium migrating from the (0001{sup ¯}) underside of the wafer, around the non-polar (11{sup ¯}00) and (112{sup ¯}0) sidewalls, to form a uniform self-organized (∼20 Å) adlayer. The In adlayer was oxidized, in agreement with the first principles calculations of Northrup and Neugebauer that In{sub 2}O{sub 3} precipitation can only be avoided under a combination of In-rich and Zn-rich conditions. These findings suggest that unintentionalmore » In adlayers may form during the epitaxial growth of ZnO on indium-bonded substrates.« less

  17. Indium oxide inverse opal films synthesized by structure replication method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrehn, Sabrina; Berghoff, Daniel; Nikitin, Andreas; Reichelt, Matthias; Wu, Xia; Meier, Torsten; Wagner, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    We present the synthesis of indium oxide (In2O3) inverse opal films with photonic stop bands in the visible range by a structure replication method. Artificial opal films made of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) spheres are utilized as template. The opal films are deposited via sedimentation facilitated by ultrasonication, and then impregnated by indium nitrate solution, which is thermally converted to In2O3 after drying. The quality of the resulting inverse opal film depends on many parameters; in this study the water content of the indium nitrate/PMMA composite after drying is investigated. Comparison of the reflectance spectra recorded by vis-spectroscopy with simulated data shows a good agreement between the peak position and calculated stop band positions for the inverse opals. This synthesis is less complex and highly efficient compared to most other techniques and is suitable for use in many applications.

  18. Optical and Electrical Characterization of Bulk Grown Indium-Gallium-Arsenide Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    OPTICAL AND ELECTRICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF BULK GROWN INDIUM- GALLIUM -ARSENIDE ALLOYS THESIS...Government. AFIT/GAP/ENP/10-M02 OPTICAL AND ELECTRICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF BULK GROWN INDIUM- GALLIUM -ARSENIDE ALLOYS THESIS Presented to...ELECTRICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF BULK GROWN INDIUM- GALLIUM -ARSENIDE ALLOYS Austin C Bergstrom, BS 2 nd Lieutenant, USAF

  19. [Risk analysis and assessment of occupational hazard fromindiumand its compounds in manufacture of liquid crystal display panel].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Haili; Zhou, Wei; Li, Zhimin; Tian, Dongchao; Weng, Shaofan; He, Juntao

    2015-08-01

    To understand the exposed positions and levels of indium and its compounds in manufacture of liquid crystal displays, and to evaluate the degree of occupational hazard from indium and its compounds. On-site investigation of occupational health, occupational hazard monitoring, and occupational health examination were used to evaluate the degree of occupational hazard from indium and its compounds in three manufacturers of liquid crystal display panel in Shenzhen, Guangdong, China. The time-weighted average (TWA) and short-term exposure limit (STEL) concentrations of indium and its compounds to which sputtering machine operating positions were exposed were less than 0.002~0.004 mg/m³ and 0.006~0.007 mg/m³, respectively, both of which complied with the National Hygienic Standard (PC-TWA = 0.1 mg/m³; PC-STEL = 0.3 mg/m³); the TWA and STEL concentrations of indium and its compounds to which grinding positions were exposed were 0.114~2.98 mg/m³ and 0.31~10.02 mg/m³, respectively, both of which exceeded the National Hygienic Standard with the highest concentration 33-fold higher than the standard. No significant health damages were found in exposed workers according to the results of occupational health examination. The grinding positions are the key to the control of occupational hazard from indium and its compounds in manufacture of liquid crystal display panel. The workers should be equipped with the anti-particulate full-face respirator, which is an effective way to prevent occupational hazard from indium and its compounds.

  20. Dry etching method for compound semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Shul, Randy J.; Constantine, Christopher

    1997-01-01

    A dry etching method. According to the present invention, a gaseous plasma comprising, at least in part, boron trichloride, methane, and hydrogen may be used for dry etching of a compound semiconductor material containing layers including aluminum, or indium, or both. Material layers of a compound semiconductor alloy such as AlGaInP or the like may be anisotropically etched for forming electronic devices including field-effect transistors and heterojunction bipolar transistors and for forming photonic devices including vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, edge-emitting lasers, and reflectance modulators.

  1. Dry etching method for compound semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Shul, R.J.; Constantine, C.

    1997-04-29

    A dry etching method is disclosed. According to the present invention, a gaseous plasma comprising, at least in part, boron trichloride, methane, and hydrogen may be used for dry etching of a compound semiconductor material containing layers including aluminum, or indium, or both. Material layers of a compound semiconductor alloy such as AlGaInP or the like may be anisotropically etched for forming electronic devices including field-effect transistors and heterojunction bipolar transistors and for forming photonic devices including vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, edge-emitting lasers, and reflectance modulators. 1 fig.

  2. Ternary rare earth-lanthanide sulfides

    DOEpatents

    Takeshita, Takuo; Gschneidner JR., Karl A.; Beaudry, Bernard J.

    1987-01-06

    A new ternary rare earth sulfur compound having the formula: where M is a rare earth element selected from the group europium, samarium and ytterbium and x=0.15 to 0.8. The compound has good high-temperature thermoelectric properties and exhibits long-term structural stability up to 1000.degree. C.

  3. Rare earths, the lanthanides, yttrium and scandium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, rare earths were not mined in the United States. The major supplier, Molycorp, continued to maintain a large stockpile of rare-earth concentrates and compounds. Consumption decreased of refined rare-earth products. The United States remained a major importer and exporter of rare earths in 2005. During the same period, yttrium was not mined or refined in the US. Hence, supply of yttrium compounds for refined yttrium products came from China, France and Japan. Scandium was not also mined. World production was primarily in China, Russia and Ukraine. Demand for rare earths in 2006 is expected to be closely tied to economic conditions in the US.

  4. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Colleen

    1998-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-sponsored project for teachers of grades 5-12, designed to: (1) enhance understanding of the Earth as an integrated system; (2) enhance the interdisciplinary approach to science instruction; and (3) provide classroom materials that focus on those goals. Discover Earth is conducted by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies in collaboration with Dr. Eric Barron, Director, Earth System Science Center, The Pennsylvania State University; and Dr. Robert Hudson, Chair, the Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland at College Park. The enclosed materials: (1) represent only part of the Discover Earth materials; (2) were developed by classroom teachers who are participating in the Discover Earth project; (3) utilize an investigative approach and on-line data; and (4) can be effectively adjusted to classrooms with greater/without technology access. The Discover Earth classroom materials focus on the Earth system and key issues of global climate change including topics such as the greenhouse effect, clouds and Earth's radiation balance, surface hydrology and land cover, and volcanoes and climate change. All the materials developed to date are available on line at (http://www.strategies.org) You are encouraged to submit comments and recommendations about these materials to the Discover Earth project manager, contact information is listed below. You are welcome to duplicate all these materials.

  5. Indium-111 labeled anti-melanoma monoclonal antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Ferrone, S.

    1984-04-30

    A monoclonal antibody to a high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen was chelated and radiolabeled with indium-111. This material shows high affinity for melanoma and thus can be used in the detection, localization and imaging of melanoma. 1 figure.

  6. Visible light electroluminescent diodes of indium-gallium phosphide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clough, R.; Richman, D.; Tietjen, J.

    1970-01-01

    Vapor deposition and acceptor impurity diffusion techniques are used to prepare indium-gallium phosphide junctions. Certain problems in preparation are overcome by altering gas flow conditions and by increasing the concentration of phosphine in the gas. A general formula is given for the alloy's composition.

  7. MOCVD growth of gallium nitride with indium surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Dong Jin

    In this thesis research, the effect of indium surfactant on Ga-polar and N-polar GaN films grown at 950 °C by MOCVD on various substrates such as Si-face SiC, bulk GaN, Si(111), and C-face SiC was studied to investigate the stress relaxation mechanism, structural, and optical properties of GaN films which were modified by the indium surfactant. The effect of indium surfactant on GaN films grown on SiC was studied first. In the 1.8 microm thick Ga-polar GaN films grown on lattice-mismatched Si-face SiC substrates utilizing indium surfactant at 950 °C, inverted hexagonal pyramid surface defects, so-called V-defects which consist of six (1011) planes, formed at threading dislocations on the GaN surface, which gave rise to the relaxation of compressive misfit stress in an elastic way. Simultaneously, enhanced surface mobility of Ga and N adatoms with indium surfactant lead to improved 2D growth, which may be contradictory to the formation of surface defects like V-defects. In order to find the driving force for V-defect formation in the presence of indium, a nucleation and growth model was developed, taking into consideration the strain, surface, and dislocation energies modified by indium surfactant. This model found that the V-defect formation can be energetically preferred since indium reduces the surface energy of the (1011) plane, which gives rise to the V-defect formation and growth that can overcome the energy barrier at the critical radius of the V-defect. These Ga-polar GaN films were found to be unintentionally doped with Si. Thus, an investigation into the effect of intentional Si doping at a constant TMIn flow rate on GaN films was also performed. Si turned out to be another important factor in the generation of V-defects because Si may be captured at the threading dislocation cores by forming Si -- N bonds, acting as a mask to locally prevent GaN growth. This behavior appeared to assist the initiation of the V-defect which enables V-defects to easily

  8. Cross-current leaching of indium from end-of-life LCD panels.

    PubMed

    Rocchetti, Laura; Amato, Alessia; Fonti, Viviana; Ubaldini, Stefano; De Michelis, Ida; Kopacek, Bernd; Vegliò, Francesco; Beolchini, Francesca

    2015-08-01

    Indium is a critical element mainly produced as a by-product of zinc mining, and it is largely used in the production process of liquid crystal display (LCD) panels. End-of-life LCDs represent a possible source of indium in the field of urban mining. In the present paper, we apply, for the first time, cross-current leaching to mobilize indium from end-of-life LCD panels. We carried out a series of treatments to leach indium. The best leaching conditions for indium were 2M sulfuric acid at 80°C for 10min, which allowed us to completely mobilize indium. Taking into account the low content of indium in end-of-life LCDs, of about 100ppm, a single step of leaching is not cost-effective. We tested 6 steps of cross-current leaching: in the first step indium leaching was complete, whereas in the second step it was in the range of 85-90%, and with 6 steps it was about 50-55%. Indium concentration in the leachate was about 35mg/L after the first step of leaching, almost 2-fold at the second step and about 3-fold at the fifth step. Then, we hypothesized to scale up the process of cross-current leaching up to 10 steps, followed by cementation with zinc to recover indium. In this simulation, the process of indium recovery was advantageous from an economic and environmental point of view. Indeed, cross-current leaching allowed to concentrate indium, save reagents, and reduce the emission of CO2 (with 10 steps we assessed that the emission of about 90kg CO2-Eq. could be avoided) thanks to the recovery of indium. This new strategy represents a useful approach for secondary production of indium from waste LCD panels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Indium nanoparticles for ultraviolet surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Rupali; Soni, R. K.

    2018-05-01

    Ultraviolet Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (UVSERS) has emerged as an efficient molecular spectroscopy technique for ultra-sensitive and ultra-low detection of analyte concentration. The generic SERS substrates based on gold and silver nanostructures have been extensively explored for high local electric field enhancement only in visible-NIR region of the electromagnetic spectrum. The template synthesis of controlled nanoscale size metallic nanostructures supporting localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in the UV region have been recently explored due to their ease of synthesis and potential applications in optoelectronic, catalysis and magnetism. Indium (In0) nanoparticles exhibit active surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in ultraviolet (UV) and deep-ultaviolet (DUV) region with optimal absorption losses. This extended accessibility makes indium a promising material for UV plasmonic, chemical sensing and more recently in UV-SERS. In this work, spherical indium nanoparticles (In NPs) were synthesized by modified polyol reduction method using NaBH4 having local surface plasmon resonance near 280 nm. The as-synthesized spherical In0 nanoparticles were then coated with thin silica shells of thickness ˜ 5nm by a modified Stober method protecting the nanoparticles from agglomeration, direct contact with the probed molecules as well as prevent oxidation of the nanoparticles. Morphological evolution of In0 nanoparticles and SiO2 coating were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM). An enhanced near resonant shell-isolated SERS activity from thin film of tryptophan (Tryp) molecules deposited on indium coated substrates under 325nm UV excitation was observed. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is employed to comprehend the experimental results and simulate the electric field contours which showed amplified electromagnetic field localized around the nanostructures. The comprehensive analysis indicates that indium is a promising alternate

  10. Optimization of Indium Bump Morphology for Improved Flip Chip Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Todd J.; Nikzad, Shouleh; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Blazejewski, Edward; Dickie, Matthew R.; Hoenk, Michael E.; Greer, Harold F.

    2011-01-01

    Flip-chip hybridization, also known as bump bonding, is a packaging technique for microelectronic devices that directly connects an active element or detector to a substrate readout face-to-face, eliminating the need for wire bonding. In order to make conductive links between the two parts, a solder material is used between the bond pads on each side. Solder bumps, composed of indium metal, are typically deposited by thermal evaporation onto the active regions of the device and substrate. While indium bump technology has been a part of the electronic interconnect process field for many years and has been extensively employed in the infrared imager industry, obtaining a reliable, high-yield process for high-density patterns of bumps can be quite difficult. Under the right conditions, a moderate hydrogen plasma exposure can raise the temperature of the indium bump to the point where it can flow. This flow can result in a desirable shape where indium will efficiently wet the metal contact pad to provide good electrical contact to the underlying readout or imager circuit. However, it is extremely important to carefully control this process as the intensity of the hydrogen plasma treatment dramatically affects the indium bump morphology. To ensure the fine-tuning of this reflow process, it is necessary to have realtime feedback on the status of the bumps. With an appropriately placed viewport in a plasma chamber, one can image a small field (a square of approximately 5 millimeters on each side) of the bumps (10-20 microns in size) during the hydrogen plasma reflow process. By monitoring the shape of the bumps in real time using a video camera mounted to a telescoping 12 magnifying zoom lens and associated optical elements, an engineer can precisely determine when the reflow of the bumps has occurred, and can shut off the plasma before evaporation or de-wetting takes place.

  11. Plasma Treatment to Remove Carbon from Indium UV Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Harold F.; Nikzad, Shouleh; Beasley, Matthew; Gantner, Brennan

    2012-01-01

    The sounding rocket experiment FIRE (Far-ultraviolet Imaging Rocket Experiment) will improve the science community fs ability to image a spectral region hitherto unexplored astronomically. The imaging band of FIRE (.900 to 1,100 Angstroms) will help fill the current wavelength imaging observation hole existing from approximately equal to 620 Angstroms to the GALEX band near 1,350 Angstroms. FIRE is a single-optic prime focus telescope with a 1.75-m focal length. The bandpass of 900 to 1100 Angstroms is set by a combination of the mirror coating, the indium filter in front of the detector, and the salt coating on the front of the detector fs microchannel plates. Critical to this is the indium filter that must reduce the flux from Lymanalpha at 1,216 Angstroms by a minimum factor of 10(exp -4). The cost of this Lyman-alpha removal is that the filter is not fully transparent at the desired wavelengths of 900 to 1,100 Angstroms. Recently, in a project to improve the performance of optical and solar blind detectors, JPL developed a plasma process capable of removing carbon contamination from indium metal. In this work, a low-power, low-temperature hydrogen plasma reacts with the carbon contaminants in the indium to form methane, but leaves the indium metal surface undisturbed. This process was recently tested in a proof-of-concept experiment with a filter provided by the University of Colorado. This initial test on a test filter showed improvement in transmission from 7 to 9 percent near 900 with no process optimization applied. Further improvements in this performance were readily achieved to bring the total transmission to 12% with optimization to JPL's existing process.

  12. Emission beyond 4  μm and mid-infrared lasing in a dysprosium-doped indium fluoride (InF3) fiber.

    PubMed

    Majewski, Matthew R; Woodward, Robert I; Carreé, Jean-Yves; Poulain, Samuel; Poulain, Marcel; Jackson, Stuart D

    2018-04-15

    Optical emission from rare-earth-doped fluoride fibers has thus far been limited to less than 4 μm. We extend emission beyond this limit by employing an indium fluoride (InF 3 ) glass fiber as the host, which exhibits an increased infrared transparency over commonly used zirconium fluoride (ZBLAN). Near-infrared pumping of a dysprosium-doped InF 3 fiber results in broad emission centered around 4.3 μm, representing the longest emission yet achieved from a fluoride fiber. The first laser emission in an InF 3 fiber is also demonstrated from the 3 μm dysprosium transition. Finally, a frequency domain excited state lifetime measurement comparison between fluoride hosts suggests that multiphonon effects are significantly reduced in indium fluoride fiber, paving the way to more efficient, longer wavelength lasers compared to ZBLAN fibers.

  13. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of indium nitride and indium gallium nitride materials for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trybus, Elaissa

    The objective of the proposed research is to establish the technology for material growth by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and fabrication of indium gallium nitride/gallium nitride (InxGa1-xN/GaN) heterojunction solar cells. InxGa1-xN solar cells have the potential to span 90% of the solar spectrum, however there has been no success with high indium (In) incorporation and only limited success with low In incorporation InxGa1-xN. Therefore, this present work focuses on 15--30% In incorporation leading to a bandgap value of 2.3--2.8 eV. This work will exploit the revision of the indium nitride (InN) bandgap value of 0.68 eV, which expands the range of the optical emission of nitride-based devices from ultraviolet to near infrared regions, by developing transparent In xGa1-xN solar cells outside the visible spectrum. Photovoltaic devices with a bandgap greater than 2.0 eV are attractive because over half the available power in the solar spectrum is above the photon energy of 2.0 eV. The ability of InxGa1-xN materials to optimally span the solar spectrum offers a tantalizing solution for high-efficiency photovoltaics. This work presents results confirming the revised bandgap of InN grown on germanium (Ge) substrates and the effects of oxygen contamination on the bandgap. This research adds to the historical discussion of the bandgap value of InN. Using the metal modulated epitaxy (MME) technique in a new, ultra-clean refurbished MBE system, an innovative growth regime is established where In and Ga phase separation is diminished by increasing the growth rate for In xGa1-xN. The MME technique modulates the metal shutters with a fixed duty cycle while maintaining a constant nitrogen flux and proves effective for improving crystal quality and p-type doping. InxGa 1-xN/GaN heterojunction solar cells require p-type doping to create the p-n subcell collecting junction, which facilitates current collection through the electrostatic field created by spatially separated ionized

  14. Earth Wisdom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Matre, Steve

    1985-01-01

    In our human-centered ignorance and arrogance we are rapidly destroying the earth. We must start helping people understand the big picture of ecological concepts. What these concepts mean for our own lives and how we must begin to change our lifestyles in order to live more harmoniously with the earth. (JHZ)

  15. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1976-01-01

    The LAGEOS I (Laser Geodynamics Satellite) was developed and launched by the Marshall Space Flight Center on May 4, 1976 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California . The two-foot diameter satellite orbited the Earth from pole to pole and measured the movements of the Earth's surface.

  16. Organic Compounds in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Grorge

    2001-01-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are relatively enriched in soluble organic compounds. To date, these compounds provide the only record available to study a range of organic chemical processes in the early Solar System chemistry. The Murchison meteorite is the best-characterized carbonaceous meteorite with respect to organic chemistry. The study of its organic compounds has related principally to aqueous meteorite parent body chemistry and compounds of potential importance for the origin of life. Among the classes of organic compounds found in Murchison are amino acids, amides, carboxylic acids, hydroxy acids, sulfonic acids, phosphonic acids, purines and pyrimidines (Table 1). Compounds such as these were quite likely delivered to the early Earth in asteroids and comets. Until now, polyhydroxylated compounds (polyols), including sugars (polyhydroxy aldehydes or ketones), sugar alcohols, sugar acids, etc., had not been identified in Murchison. Ribose and deoxyribose, five-carbon sugars, are central to the role of contemporary nucleic acids, DNA and RNA. Glycerol, a three-carbon sugar alcohol, is a constituent of all known biological membranes. Due to the relative lability of sugars, some researchers have questioned the lifetime of sugars under the presumed conditions on the early Earth and postulated other (more stable) compounds as constituents of the first replicating molecules. The identification of potential sources and/or formation mechanisms of pre-biotic polyols would add to the understanding of what organic compounds were available, and for what length of time, on the ancient Earth.

  17. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-20

    Panelists pose for a group photo at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and highlighted how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  18. Preparation Of Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide Films For Solar Cells

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N.; Contreras, Miguel A.; Keane, James; Tennant, Andrew L. , Tuttle, John R.; Ramanathan, Kannan; Noufi, Rommel

    1998-08-08

    High quality thin films of copper-indium-gallium-diselenide useful in the production of solar cells are prepared by electrodepositing at least one of the constituent metals onto a glass/Mo substrate, followed by physical vapor deposition of copper and selenium or indium and selenium to adjust the final stoichiometry of the thin film to approximately Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2. Using an AC voltage of 1-100 KHz in combination with a DC voltage for electrodeposition improves the morphology and growth rate of the deposited thin film. An electrodeposition solution comprising at least in part an organic solvent may be used in conjunction with an increased cathodic potential to increase the gallium content of the electrodeposited thin film.

  19. Equation of state of liquid Indium under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huaming, E-mail: huamingli@gatech.edu, E-mail: mo.li@gatech.edu; Li, Mo, E-mail: huamingli@gatech.edu, E-mail: mo.li@gatech.edu; School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332

    2015-09-15

    We apply an equation of state of a power law form to liquid Indium to study its thermodynamic properties under high temperature and high pressure. Molar volume of molten indium is calculated along the isothermal line at 710K within good precision as compared with the experimental data in an externally heated diamond anvil cell. Bulk modulus, thermal expansion and internal pressure are obtained for isothermal compression. Other thermodynamic properties are also calculated along the fitted high pressure melting line. While our results suggest that the power law form may be a better choice for the equation of state of liquids,more » these detailed predictions are yet to be confirmed by further experiment.« less

  20. Oxygen-free atomic layer deposition of indium sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Martinson, Alex B.; Hock, Adam S.; McCarthy, Robert; Weimer, Matthew S.

    2016-07-05

    A method for synthesizing an In(III) N,N'-diisopropylacetamidinate precursor including cooling a mixture comprised of diisopropylcarbodiimide and diethyl ether to approximately -30.degree. C., adding methyllithium drop-wise into the mixture, allowing the mixture to warm to room temperature, adding indium(III) chloride as a solid to the mixture to produce a white solid, dissolving the white solid in pentane to form a clear and colorless solution, filtering the mixture over a celite plug, and evaporating the solution under reduced pressure to obtain a solid In(III) N,N'-diisopropylacetamidinate precursor. This precursor has been further used to develop a novel atomic layer deposition technique for indium sulfide by dosing a reactor with the precursor, purging with nitrogen, dosing with dilute hydrogen sulfide, purging again with nitrogen, and repeating these steps to increase growth.

  1. Site occupation of indium and jump frequencies of cadmium in FeGa 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newhouse, Randal; Collins, Gary S.; Zacate, Matthew O.

    2016-12-01

    Perturbed angular correlation (PAC) measurements using the In-111 probe were carried out on FeGa3 as part of a broader investigation of indium site occupation and cadmium diffusion in intermetallic compounds. One PAC signal was observed with hyperfine parameters ω 1= 513.8(1) Mrad/s and η= 0.939(2) at room temperature. By comparison with quadrupole frequencies observed in PAC measurements on isostructural RuIn3, it was determined that indium occupies only the 8j site in the FeGa3 structure, denoted Ga(2) below because two out of the three Ga sites have this point symmetry. PAC spectra at elevated temperature exhibited damping characteristic of electric field gradients (EFGs) that fluctuate as Cd probes jump among Ga(2) sites within the lifetime of the excited PAC level. A stochastic model for the EFG fluctuations based on four conceivable, single-step jump-pathways connecting one Ga(2) site to neighboring Ga(2) sites was developed and used to fit PAC spectra. The four pathways lead to two observable EFG reorientation rates, and these reorientation rates were found to be strongly dependent on EFG orientation. Calculations using density functional theory were used to reduce the number of unknowns in the model with respect to EFG orientation. This made it possible to determine with reasonable precision the total jump rate of Cd among Ga(2) sites that correspond to a change in mirror plane orientation of site-symmetry. This total jump rate was found to be thermally activated with an activation enthalpy of 1.8 ±0.1 eV.

  2. Immune stimulation following dermal exposure to unsintered indium tin oxide

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Kristie; Anderson, Stacey E.; Lukomska, Ewa; Long, Carrie; Anderson, Katie; Marshall, Nikki; Meade, B. Jean

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several types of pulmonary pathology, including alveolar proteinosis, fibrosis, and emphysema, have been reported in workers in the indium industry. To date, there remains no clear understanding of the underlying mechanism(s). Pulmonary toxicity studies in rats and mice have demonstrated the development of mediastinal lymph node hyperplasia and granulomas of mediastinal lymph nodes and bronchus-associated lymphoid tissues following exposure to indium tin oxide. Given the association between exposure to other metals and the development of immune-mediated diseases, these studies were undertaken to begin to investigate the immuno-modulatory potential of unsintered indium tin oxide (uITO) in a mouse model. Using modifications of the local lymph node assay, BALB/c mice (five animals/group) were exposed topically via intact or breached skin or injected intradermally at the base of the ear pinnae with either vehicle or increasing concentrations 2.5–10% uITO (90:10 indium oxide/tin oxide, particle size <50 nm). Dose-responsive increases in lymphocyte proliferation were observed with a calculated EC3 of 4.7% for the intact skin study. Phenotypic analysis of draining lymph node cells following intradermal injection with 5% uITO yielded a profile consistent with a T-cell-mediated response. These studies demonstrate the potential for uITO to induce sensitization and using lymphocyte proliferation as a biomarker of exposure, and demonstrate the potential for uITO to penetrate both intact and breached skin. PMID:24164313

  3. The role of water in the synthesis of indium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dreyfuss, Sébastien; Pradel, Christian; Vendier, Laure; Mallet-Ladeira, Sonia; Mézailles, Nicolas

    2016-12-06

    We report the water-assisted synthesis of indium nanoparticles (In NPs). We found that a precise amount of water was necessary to allow the formation of the desired 7 nm In NPs: the oxidation of the In surface by water inhibits the growth of NPs as well as subsequent reactivity with white phosphorus (P 4 ). A novel surface activation method based on the use of organosilanes is presented.

  4. Stopping characteristics of boron and indium ions in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Veselov, D. S., E-mail: DSVeselov@mephi.ru; Voronov, Yu. A.

    2016-12-15

    The mean range and its standard deviation are calculated for boron ions implanted into silicon with energies below 10 keV. Similar characteristics are calculated for indium ions with energies below 200 keV. The obtained results are presented in tabular and graphical forms. These results may help in the assessment of conditions of production of integrated circuits with nanometer-sized elements.

  5. Indium-111 leukocyte scintigraphy in Wegener's granulomatosis involving the spleen

    SciTech Connect

    Morayati, S.J.; Fink-Bennett, D.

    1986-12-01

    Indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy was performed on a 44-yr-old man to exclude an occult abscess. Four- and twenty-four-hour images of the abdomen revealed splenic photopenia except for a rim of activity medially. A subsequent computed tomography (CT) study demonstrated necrosis or hemorrhage of the spleen except for a medial rim. Exploratory laparotomy demonstrated necrotizing vasculitis with granuloma formation consistent with Wegener's granulomatosis and a rim of viable splenic tissue corresponding to the radionuclide and CT studies.

  6. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-20

    Earth observation taken during day pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message: Looking southwest over northern Africa. Libya, Algeria, Niger.

  7. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-01

    Earth Observation taken during a night pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: New Zealand Aurora night pass. On crewmember's Flickr page - Look straight down into an aurora.

  8. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-07

    ISS040-E-008174 (7 June 2014) --- Layers of Earth's atmosphere, brightly colored as the sun rises, are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the International Space Station.

  9. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-02

    ISS040-E-006817 (2 June 2014) --- Intersecting the thin line of Earth's atmosphere, International Space Station solar array wings are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the International Space Station.

  10. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-07-18

    Workers at Launch Complex 17 Pad A, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) encapsulate the Geomagnetic Tail (GEOTAIL) spacecraft (upper) and attached payload Assist Module-D upper stage (lower) in the protective payload fairing. GEOTAIL project was designed to study the effects of Earth's magnetic field. The solar wind draws the Earth's magnetic field into a long tail on the night side of the Earth and stores energy in the stretched field lines of the magnetotail. During active periods, the tail couples with the near-Earth magnetosphere, sometimes releasing energy stored in the tail and activating auroras in the polar ionosphere. GEOTAIL measures the flow of energy and its transformation in the magnetotail and will help clarify the mechanisms that control the imput, transport, storage, release, and conversion of mass, momentum, and energy in the magnetotail.

  11. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-funded project for teachers of grades 5-12 who want to expand their knowledge of the Earth system, and prepare to become master teachers who promote Earth system science in their own schools, counties, and throughout their state. Participants from the following states are invited to apply: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington, DC. Teachers selected for the project participate in a two-week summer workshop conducted at the University of Maryland, College Park; develop classroom-ready materials during the workshop for broad dissemination; conduct a minimum of two peer training activities during the coming school year; and participate in other enrichment/education opportunities as available and desired. Discover Earth is a team effort that utilizes expertise from a range of contributors, and balances science content with hands-on classroom applications.

  12. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-31

    Earth Observation taken during a day pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: CEO - Arena de Sao Paolo. View used for Twitter message: Cloudy skies over São Paulo Brazil

  13. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-26

    Earth observation taken during day pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message: Never tire of finding shapes in the clouds! These look very botanical to me. Simply perfect.

  14. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-12

    Earth Observation taken during a day pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: Moon, Japan, Kamchatka with a wild cloud. Part of a solar array is also visible.

  15. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1990-10-24

    Solar Vector Magnetograph is used to predict solar flares, and other activities associated with sun spots. This research provides new understanding about weather on the Earth, and solar-related conditions in orbit.

  16. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-03

    Earth observation taken during day pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message: Perhaps a dandelion losing its seeds in the wind? Love clouds!

  17. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-27

    Earth Observation taken during a day pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Part of Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) is visible. Folder lists this as: the Middle East, Israel.

  18. Polycrystalline indium phosphide on silicon by indium assisted growth in hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Metaferia, Wondwosen; Sun, Yan-Ting, E-mail: yasun@kth.se; Lourdudoss, Sebastian

    2014-07-21

    Polycrystalline InP was grown on Si(001) and Si(111) substrates by using indium (In) metal as a starting material in hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) reactor. In metal was deposited on silicon substrates by thermal evaporation technique. The deposited In resulted in islands of different size and was found to be polycrystalline in nature. Different growth experiments of growing InP were performed, and the growth mechanism was investigated. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy for morphological investigation, Scanning Auger microscopy for surface and compositional analyses, powder X-ray diffraction for crystallinity, and micro photoluminescence for optical quality assessment were conducted. Itmore » is shown that the growth starts first by phosphidisation of the In islands to InP followed by subsequent selective deposition of InP in HVPE regardless of the Si substrate orientation. Polycrystalline InP of large grain size is achieved and the growth rate as high as 21 μm/h is obtained on both substrates. Sulfur doping of the polycrystalline InP was investigated by growing alternating layers of sulfur doped and unintentionally doped InP for equal interval of time. These layers could be delineated by stain etching showing that enough amount of sulfur can be incorporated. Grains of large lateral dimension up to 3 μm polycrystalline InP on Si with good morphological and optical quality is obtained. The process is generic and it can also be applied for the growth of other polycrystalline III–V semiconductor layers on low cost and flexible substrates for solar cell applications.« less

  19. Earth Observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-06-16

    ISS024-E-006136 (16 June 2010) --- Polar mesospheric clouds, illuminated by an orbital sunrise, are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 24 crew member on the International Space Station. Polar mesospheric, or noctilucent (?night shining?), clouds are observed from both Earth?s surface and in orbit by crew members aboard the space station. They are called night-shining clouds as they are usually seen at twilight. Following the setting of the sun below the horizon and darkening of Earth?s surface, these high clouds are still briefly illuminated by sunlight. Occasionally the ISS orbital track becomes nearly parallel to Earth?s day/night terminator for a time, allowing polar mesospheric clouds to be visible to the crew at times other than the usual twilight due to the space station altitude. This unusual photograph shows polar mesospheric clouds illuminated by the rising, rather than setting, sun at center right. Low clouds on the horizon appear yellow and orange, while higher clouds and aerosols are illuminated a brilliant white. Polar mesospheric clouds appear as light blue ribbons extending across the top of the image. These clouds typically occur at high latitudes of both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, and at fairly high altitudes of 76?85 kilometers (near the boundary between the mesosphere and thermosphere atmospheric layers). The ISS was located over the Greek island of Kos in the Aegean Sea (near the southwestern coastline of Turkey) when the image was taken at approximately midnight local time. The orbital complex was tracking northeastward, nearly parallel to the terminator, making it possible to observe an apparent ?sunrise? located almost due north. A similar unusual alignment of the ISS orbit track, terminator position, and seasonal position of Earth?s orbit around the sun allowed for striking imagery of polar mesospheric clouds over the Southern Hemisphere earlier this year.

  20. Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  1. Research on the effect of alkali roasting of copper dross on leaching rate of indium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dafang, Liu; Fan, Xingxiang; Shi, Yifeng; Yang, Kunbin

    2017-11-01

    The byproduct copper dross produced during refining crude lead was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and fluorescence spectrometer (XRF), which showed that copper dross mainly contained lead, copper, zinc, arsenic, antimony, bismuth, sulfur and a small amount of indium and silver etc. The mineralogical phase change of oxidation roasting of copper dross by adding sodium hydroxide was analyzed with the help of XRD and SEM. The effects of water leaching, ratio of sodium hydroxide, roasting time, and roasting temperature on leaching rate of indium were investigated mainly. The experimental results showed that phase of lead metal and sulfides of lead, copper and zinc disappeared after oxidation roasting of copper dross by adding sodium hydroxide, new phase of oxides of lead, copper, zinc and sodium salt of arsenic and antimony appeared. Water leaching could remove arsenic, and acid leaching residue obtained was then leached with acid. The leaching rate of indium was higher 6.98% compared with alkali roasting of copper dross-acid leaching. It showed that removing arsenic by water leaching and acid leaching could increase the leaching rate of indium and be beneficial to reducing subsequent acid consumption of extracting indium by acid leaching. The roasting temperature had a significant effect on the leaching rate of indium, and leaching rate of indium increased with the rise of roasting temperature. When roasting temperature ranged from 450°C to 600°C, leaching rate of indium increased significantly with the rise of roasting temperature. When roasting temperature rose from 450°C to 600°C, leaching rate of indium increased by 60.29%. The amount of sodium hydroxide had an significant effect on the leaching rate of indium, and the leaching of indium increased with the increase of the amount of sodium hydroxide, and the leaching rate of indium was obviously higher than that of copper dross blank roasting and acid leaching.

  2. Indium Gallium Nitride/Gallium Nitride (InGaN/GaN) Nanorods Superlattice (SL)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-29

    Final Report (Technical) 3. DATES COVERED 29-03-2005 to 29-05-2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Indium Gallium Nitride/ Gallium Nitride (InGaN/GaN...Institution: Quantum functional Semiconductor Research Center (QSRC), Dongguk University - Title of project: Indium Gallium Nitride/ Gallium Nitride...Accepted with minor revision Indium Gallium Nitride / Gallium Nitride (InGaN/ GaN) Nanorods Superlattice (SL) Abstract The growth condition, electrical

  3. Crystal growth of compound semiconductors in a low-gravity environment (InGaAs crystals) (M-22)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatsumi, Masami

    1993-01-01

    Compound semiconductor crystals, such as gallium arsenide and indium phosphide crystals, have many interesting properties that silicon crystals lack, and they are expected to be used as materials for optic and/or electro-optic integrated devices. Generally speaking, alloy semiconductors, which consist of more than three elements, demonstrate new functions. For example, values of important parameters, such as lattice constant and emission wavelength, can be chosen independently. However, as it is easy for macroscopic and/or microscopic fluctuations of composition to occur in alloy semiconductor crystals, it is difficult to obtain crystals having homogeneous properties. Macroscopic change of composition in a crystal is caused by the segregation phenomenon. This phenomenon is due to a continuous change in the concentration of constituent elements at the solid-liquid interfacing during solidification. On Earth, attempts were made to obtain a crystal with homogeneous composition by maintaining a constant melt composition near the solid-liquid interface, through suppression of the convection flow of the melt by applying a magnetic field. However, the attempt was not completely successful. Convective flow does not occur in microgravity because the gravity in space is from four to six orders of magnitude less than that on Earth. In such a case, mass transfer in the melt is dominated by the diffusion phenomenon. So, if crystal growth is carried out at a rate that is higher than the rate of mass transfer due to this phenomenon, it is expected that crystals having a homogeneous composition will be obtained. In addition, it is also possible that microscopic composition fluctuations (striation) may disappear because microscopic fluctuations diminish in the absence of convection. We are going to grow a bulk-indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) crystal using the gradient heating furnace (GHF) in the first material processing test (FMPT). The structure of the sample is shown where In

  4. Rethinking early Earth phosphorus geochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Pasek, Matthew A.

    2008-01-01

    Phosphorus is a key biologic element, and a prebiotic pathway leading to its incorporation into biomolecules has been difficult to ascertain. Most potentially prebiotic phosphorylation reactions have relied on orthophosphate as the source of phosphorus. It is suggested here that the geochemistry of phosphorus on the early Earth was instead controlled by reduced oxidation state phosphorus compounds such as phosphite (HPO32−), which are more soluble and reactive than orthophosphates. This reduced oxidation state phosphorus originated from extraterrestrial material that fell during the heavy bombardment period or was produced during impacts, and persisted in the mildly reducing atmosphere. This alternate view of early Earth phosphorus geochemistry provides an unexplored route to the formation of pertinent prebiotic phosphorus compounds, suggests a facile reaction pathway to condensed phosphates, and is consistent with the biochemical usage of reduced oxidation state phosphorus compounds in life today. Possible studies are suggested that may detect reduced oxidation state phosphorus compounds in ancient Archean rocks. PMID:18195373

  5. Rethinking early Earth phosphorus geochemistry.

    PubMed

    Pasek, Matthew A

    2008-01-22

    Phosphorus is a key biologic element, and a prebiotic pathway leading to its incorporation into biomolecules has been difficult to ascertain. Most potentially prebiotic phosphorylation reactions have relied on orthophosphate as the source of phosphorus. It is suggested here that the geochemistry of phosphorus on the early Earth was instead controlled by reduced oxidation state phosphorus compounds such as phosphite (HPO(3)(2-)), which are more soluble and reactive than orthophosphates. This reduced oxidation state phosphorus originated from extraterrestrial material that fell during the heavy bombardment period or was produced during impacts, and persisted in the mildly reducing atmosphere. This alternate view of early Earth phosphorus geochemistry provides an unexplored route to the formation of pertinent prebiotic phosphorus compounds, suggests a facile reaction pathway to condensed phosphates, and is consistent with the biochemical usage of reduced oxidation state phosphorus compounds in life today. Possible studies are suggested that may detect reduced oxidation state phosphorus compounds in ancient Archean rocks.

  6. Electronic structure of indium-tungsten-oxide alloys and their energy band alignment at the heterojunction to crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, Dorothee; Mews, Mathias; Rech, Bernd; Korte, Lars

    2018-01-01

    The electronic structure of thermally co-evaporated indium-tungsten-oxide films is investigated. The stoichiometry is varied from pure tungsten oxide to pure indium oxide, and the band alignment at the indium-tungsten-oxide/crystalline silicon heterointerface is monitored. Using in-system photoelectron spectroscopy, optical spectroscopy, and surface photovoltage measurements, we show that the work function of indium-tungsten-oxide continuously decreases from 6.3 eV for tungsten oxide to 4.3 eV for indium oxide, with a concomitant decrease in the band bending at the hetero interface to crystalline silicon than indium oxide.

  7. Plasma vapor deposited n-indium tin oxide/p-copper indium oxide heterojunctions for optoelectronic device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaya, T. P.; Pradyumnan, P. P.

    2017-12-01

    Transparent crystalline n-indium tin oxide/p-copper indium oxide diode structures were fabricated on quartz substrates by plasma vapor deposition using radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering. The p-n heterojunction diodes were highly transparent in the visible region and exhibited rectifying current-voltage (I-V) characteristics with a good ideality factor. The sputter power during fabrication of the p-layer was found to have a profound effect on I-V characteristics, and the diode with the p-type layer deposited at a maximum power of 200 W exhibited the highest value of the diode ideality factor (η value) of 2.162, which suggests its potential use in optoelectronic applications. The ratio of forward current to reverse current exceeded 80 within the range of applied voltages of -1.5 to +1.5 V in all cases. The diode structure possessed an optical transmission of 60-70% in the visible region.

  8. Method for enhancing the solubility of boron and indium in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadigh, Babak; Lenosky, Thomas J.; Diaz de la Rubia, Tomas; Giles, Martin; Caturla, Maria-Jose; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Asta, Mark; Theiss, Silva; Foad, Majeed; Quong, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    A method for enhancing the equilibrium solubility of boron and indium in silicon. The method involves first-principles quantum mechanical calculations to determine the temperature dependence of the equilibrium solubility of two important p-type dopants in silicon, namely boron and indium, under various strain conditions. The equilibrium thermodynamic solubility of size-mismatched impurities, such as boron and indium in silicon, can be raised significantly if the silicon substrate is strained appropriately. For example, for boron, a 1% compressive strain raises the equilibrium solubility by 100% at 1100.degree. C.; and for indium, a 1% tensile strain at 1100.degree. C., corresponds to an enhancement of the solubility by 200%.

  9. Earth: Earth Science and Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2001-01-01

    A major new NASA initiative on environmental change and health has been established to promote the application of Earth science remote sensing data, information, observations, and technologies to issues of human health. NASA's Earth Sciences suite of Earth observing instruments are now providing improved observations science, data, and advanced technologies about the Earth's land, atmosphere, and oceans. These new space-based resources are being combined with other agency and university resources, data integration and fusion technologies, geographic information systems (GIS), and the spectrum of tools available from the public health community, making it possible to better understand how the environment and climate are linked to specific diseases, to improve outbreak prediction, and to minimize disease risk. This presentation is an overview of NASA's tools, capabilities, and research advances in this initiative.

  10. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-20

    Panelists discuss how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  11. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-20

    Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist, Planetary Science Institute, moderates a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and highlighted how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  12. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-20

    An audience member asks the panelists a question at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  13. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-03-08

    Workers at the Astrotech processing facility in Titusville prepared for a news media showing of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-1 (GOES-1). GOES-1 was the first in a new generation of weather satellites deployed above Earth. It was the first 3-axis, body-stabilized meteorological satellite to be used by the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NASA. These features allowed GOES-1 to continuously monitor the Earth, rather than viewing it just five percent of the time as was the case with spin-stabilized meteorological satellites. GOES-1 also has independent imaging and sounding instruments which can operate simultaneously yet independently. As a result, observations provided by each instrument will not be interrupted. The imager produces visual and infrared images of the Earth's surface, oceans, cloud cover and severe storm development, while the prime sounding products include vertical temperature and moisture profiles, and layer mean moisture.

  14. Compound matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravvaritis, Christos; Mitrouli, Marilena

    2009-02-01

    This paper studies the possibility to calculate efficiently compounds of real matrices which have a special form or structure. The usefulness of such an effort lies in the fact that the computation of compound matrices, which is generally noneffective due to its high complexity, is encountered in several applications. A new approach for computing the Singular Value Decompositions (SVD's) of the compounds of a matrix is proposed by establishing the equality (up to a permutation) between the compounds of the SVD of a matrix and the SVD's of the compounds of the matrix. The superiority of the new idea over the standard method is demonstrated. Similar approaches with some limitations can be adopted for other matrix factorizations, too. Furthermore, formulas for the n - 1 compounds of Hadamard matrices are derived, which dodge the strenuous computations of the respective numerous large determinants. Finally, a combinatorial counting technique for finding the compounds of diagonal matrices is illustrated.

  15. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-09-02

    This image depicts a full view of the Earth, taken by the Geostationary Operational Environment Satellite (GOES-8). The red and green charnels represent visible data, while the blue channel represents inverted 11 micron infrared data. The north and south poles were not actually observed by GOES-8. To produce this image, poles were taken from a GOES-7 image. Owned and operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES satellites provide the kind of continuous monitoring necessary for intensive data analysis. They circle the Earth in a geosynchronous orbit, which means they orbit the equatorial plane of the Earth at a speed matching the Earth's rotation. This allows them to hover continuously over one position on the surface. The geosynchronous plane is about 35,800 km (22,300 miles) above the Earth, high enough to allow the satellites a full-disc view of the Earth. Because they stay above a fixed spot on the surface, they provide a constant vigil for the atmospheric triggers for severe weather conditions such as tornadoes, flash floods, hail storms, and hurricanes. When these conditions develop, the GOES satellites are able to monitor storm development and track their movements. NASA manages the design and launch of the spacecraft. NASA launched the first GOES for NOAA in 1975 and followed it with another in 1977. Currently, the United States is operating GOES-8, positioned at 75 west longitude and the equator, and GOES-10, which is positioned at 135 west longitude and the equator. (GOES-9, which malfunctioned in 1998, is being stored in orbit as an emergency backup should either GOES-8 or GOES-10 fail. GOES-11 was launched on May 3, 2000 and GOES-12 on July 23, 2001. Both are being stored in orbit as a fully functioning replacement for GOES-8 or GOES-10 on failure.

  16. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-23

    ISS024-E-016042 (23 Aug. 2010) --- This night time view captured by one of the Expedition 24 crew members aboard the International Space Station some 220 miles above Earth is looking southward from central Romania over the Aegean Sea toward Greece and it includes Thessaloniki (near center), the larger bright mass of Athens (left center), and the Macedonian capital of Skopje (lower right). Center point coordinates of the area pictured are 46.4 degrees north latitude and 25.5 degrees east longitude. The picture was taken in August and was physically brought back to Earth on a disk with the return of the Expedition 25 crew in November 2010.

  17. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-19

    ISS040-E-070412 (19 July 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station recorded this July 19 panorama featuring wildfires which are plaguing the Northwest and causing widespread destruction. (Note: south is at the top of the frame). The orbital outpost was flying 223 nautical miles above Earth at the time of the photo. Parts of Oregon and Washington are included in the scene. Mt. Jefferson, Three Sisters and Mt. St. Helens are all snow-capped and visible in the photo, and the Columbia River can also be delineated.

  18. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-19

    ISS040-E-070424 (19 July 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station recorded this July 19 image of wildfires which are plaguing the Northwest and causing widespread destruction. The orbital outpost was flying 223 nautical miles above Earth at the time of the photo. Lightning has been given as the cause of the Ochoco Complex fires in the Ochoco National Forest in central Oregon. The complex has gotten larger since this photo was taken.

  19. Earth observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-04

    ISS040-E-129950 (4 Sept. 2014) --- In this photograph. taken by one of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, the orange spot located in the very center is the sun, which appears to be sitting on Earth's limb. At far right, a small bright spot is believed to be a reflection from somewhere in the camera system or something on the orbital outpost. When the photographed was exposed, the orbital outpost was flying at an altutude of 226 nautical miles above a point near French Polynesia in the Pacific Ocean.

  20. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-08-13

    This panoramic view of Hurricane Charley was photographed by the Expedition 9 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS) on August 13, 2004, at a vantage point just north of Tampa, Florida. The small eye was not visible in this view, but the raised cloud tops near the center coincide roughly with the time that the storm began to rapidly strengthen. The category 2 hurricane was moving north-northwest at 18 mph packing winds of 105 mph. Crew Earth Observations record Earth surface changes over time, as well as more fleeting events such as storms, floods, fires, and volcanic eruptions.

  1. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-09-11

    This image hosts a look at the eye of Hurricane Ivan, one of the strongest hurricanes on record, as the storm topped the western Caribbean Sea on Saturday, September 11, 2004. The hurricane was photographed by astronaut Edward M. (Mike) Fincke from aboard the International Space Station (ISS) at an altitude of approximately 230 miles. At the time, the category 5 storm sustained winds in the eye of the wall that were reported at about 160 mph. Crew Earth Observations record Earth surface changes over time, as well as more fleeting events such as storms, floods, fires, and volcanic eruptions.

  2. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-09-15

    Except for a small portion of the International Space Station (ISS) in the foreground, Hurricane Ivan, one of the strongest hurricanes on record, fills this image over the northern Gulf of Mexico. As the downgraded category 4 storm approached landfall on the Alabama coast Wednesday afternoon on September 15, 2004, sustained winds in the eye of the wall were reported at about 135 mph. The hurricane was photographed by astronaut Edward M. (Mike) Fincke from aboard the ISS at an altitude of approximately 230 miles. Crew Earth Observations record Earth surface changes over time, as well as more fleeting events such as storms, floods, fires, and volcanic eruptions.

  3. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-09-15

    This image hosts a look into the eye of Hurricane Ivan, one of the strongest hurricanes on record, as the storm approached landfall on the central Gulf coast Wednesday afternoon on September 15, 2004. The hurricane was photographed by astronaut Edward M. (Mike) Fincke from aboard the International Space Station (ISS) at an altitude of approximately 230 miles. At the time, sustained winds in the eye of the wall were reported at about 135 mph as the downgraded category 4 storm approached the Alabama coast. Crew Earth Observations record Earth surface changes over time, as well as more fleeting events such as storms, floods, fires, and volcanic eruptions.

  4. Digital Earth - A sustainable Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahavir

    2014-02-01

    All life, particularly human, cannot be sustainable, unless complimented with shelter, poverty reduction, provision of basic infrastructure and services, equal opportunities and social justice. Yet, in the context of cities, it is believed that they can accommodate more and more people, endlessly, regardless to their carrying capacity and increasing ecological footprint. The 'inclusion', for bringing more and more people in the purview of development is often limited to social and economic inclusion rather than spatial and ecological inclusion. Economic investment decisions are also not always supported with spatial planning decisions. Most planning for a sustainable Earth, be at a level of rural settlement, city, region, national or Global, fail on the capacity and capability fronts. In India, for example, out of some 8,000 towns and cities, Master Plans exist for only about 1,800. A chapter on sustainability or environment is neither statutorily compulsory nor a norm for these Master Plans. Geospatial technologies including Remote Sensing, GIS, Indian National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI), Indian National Urban Information Systems (NUIS), Indian Environmental Information System (ENVIS), and Indian National GIS (NGIS), etc. have potential to map, analyse, visualize and take sustainable developmental decisions based on participatory social, economic and social inclusion. Sustainable Earth, at all scales, is a logical and natural outcome of a digitally mapped, conceived and planned Earth. Digital Earth, in fact, itself offers a platform to dovetail the ecological, social and economic considerations in transforming it into a sustainable Earth.

  5. Ternary rare earth-lanthanide sulfides

    DOEpatents

    Takeshita, Takuo; Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.; Beaudry, Bernard J.

    1987-01-06

    A new ternary rare earth sulfur compound having the formula: La.sub.3-x M.sub.x S.sub.4 where M is a rare earth element selected from the group europium, samarium and ytterbium and x=0.15 to 0.8. The compound has good high-temperature thermoelectric properties and exhibits long-term structural stability up to 1000.degree. C.

  6. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-10

    ISS040-E-091158 (10 Aug. 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members 225 nautical miles above Earth onboard the International Space Station used a 200mm lens to record this image of Hawke's Bay, New Zealand on Aug. 10, 2014. Napier and the bay area's most populous area are at bottom center of the frame.

  7. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-13

    ISS036-E-007619 (13 June 2013) --- To a crew member aboard the International Space Station, the home planet is seen from many different angles and perspectives, as evdenced by this Expedition 36 image of Earth's atmophere partially obscured by one of the orbital outpost's solar panels.

  8. Think Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niedermeyer, Fred; Ice, Kay

    1992-01-01

    Describes a series of environmental education instructional units for grades K-6 developed by the Think Earth Consortium that cover topics such as conservation, pollution control, and waste reduction. Provides testimony from one sixth-grade teacher that field tested the second-grade unit. (MDH)

  9. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-01

    Earth Observation taken during a night pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: New Zealand Aurora night pass. Docked Soyuz and Progress spacecraft are visible. On crewmember's Flickr page - The Moon, about to dive into a glowing ocean of green᥿9.

  10. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-21

    Earth observation taken during night pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message this is labeled as : Tehran, Iran. Lights along the coast of the Caspian Sea visible through clouds. July 21.

  11. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-05-19

    ISS036-E-002224 (21 May 2013) --- The sun is captured in a "starburst" mode over Earth's horizon by one of the Expedition 36 crew members as the orbital outpost was above a point in southwestern Minnesota on May 21, 2013.

  12. Earth Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaufele, Christopher; Zumoff, Nancy

    Earth Algebra is an entry level college algebra course that incorporates the spirit of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Curriculum and Evaluation Standards for School Mathematics at the college level. The context of the course places mathematics at the center of one of the major current concerns of the world. Through…

  13. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-03-29

    Small Expendable Deployer System (SEDS) is a tethered date collecting satellite and is intended to demonstrate a versatile and economical way of delivering smaller payloads to higher orbits or downward toward Earth's atmosphere. 19th Navstar Global Positioning System Satellite mission joined with previously launched satellites used for navigational purposes and geodite studies. These satellites are used commercially as well as by the military.

  14. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-14

    ISS040-E-011868 (14 June 2014) --- The dark waters of the Salton Sea stand out against neighboring cultivation and desert sands in the middle of the Southern California desert, as photographed by one of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station on June 14, 2014.

  15. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-03

    Earth observation taken during day pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message: From southernmost point of orbit over the South Pacific- all clouds seemed to be leading to the South Pole.

  16. Earth Sky

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-16

    S65-63282 (16 Dec. 1965) --- Area of Indian Ocean, just east of the island of Madagascar, as seen from the Gemini-6 spacecraft during its 15th revolution of Earth. Land mass at top of picture is the Malagasy Republic (Madagascar). Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  17. Rare earths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gambogi, J.

    2013-01-01

    Global mine production of rare earths was estimated to have declined slightly in 2012 relative to 2011 (Fig. 1). Production in China was estimated to have decreased to 95 from 105 kt (104,700 from 115,700 st) in 2011, while new mine production in the United States and Australia increased.

  18. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-04

    ISS036-E-015354 (4 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires near the Manicouagan Reservoir (seen at lower left) were recorded as part of a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station.

  19. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-04

    ISS036-E-015355 (4 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires near the Manicouagan Reservoir (seen at bottom center) were recorded in a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station.

  20. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-03

    ISS036-E-015292 (3 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires southeast of James Bay were recorded as part of a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 3-4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station. This image was recorded on July 3.

  1. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-04

    ISS036-E-015342 (4 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires southeast of James Bay were recorded as part of a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station.

  2. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-04

    ISS036-E-015335 (4 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires southeast of James Bay were recorded as part of a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station.

  3. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-12

    Earth Observation taken during a day pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: Moon, Japan, Kamchatka with a wild cloud. Part of the U.S. Lab and PMM are also visible.

  4. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-29

    ISS036-E-038117 (29 Aug. 2013) --- One of the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station photographed massive smoke plumes from the California wildfires. When this image was exposed on Aug. 29, the orbital outpost was approximately 220 miles above a point located at 38.6 degrees north latitude and 123.2 degrees west longitude.

  5. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-29

    ISS036-E-038114 (29 Aug. 2013) --- One of the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station photographed massive smoke plumes from the California wildfires. When this image was exposed on Aug. 29, the orbital outpost was approximately 220 miles above a point located at 38.6 degrees north latitude and 123.3 degrees west longitude.

  6. Earth Observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-18

    ISS042E006751 (11/08/2014) --- Earth observation taken from the International Space Station of the coastline of the United Arab Emirates. The large wheel along the coast center left is "Jumeirah" Palm Island, with a conference center, hotels, recreation areas and a large marine zoo.

  7. Earth Moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-06-08

    NASA Galileo spacecraft took this image of Earth moon on December 7, 1992 on its way to explore the Jupiter system in 1995-97. The distinct bright ray crater at the bottom of the image is the Tycho impact basin. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00405

  8. Earth's horizon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-07-30

    S114-E-6076 (30 July 2005) --- The blackness of space and Earth’s horizon form the backdrop for this view of the extended Space Shuttle Discovery’s remote manipulator system (RMS) robotic arm while docked to the International Space Station during the STS-114 mission.

  9. Ion implantation of indium gallium arsenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almonte, Marlene Isabel

    The ternary compound In0.53Ga0.47As, lattice-matched to Inp, is a semiconductor alloy of technological importance for numerous electronic and optoelectronic device applications. One of these applications includes photodiodes to be developed for the 1.3--1.55 mum wavelength range where silica fibers have their lowest optical loss. With a rapid increase in its use there is an essential need to understand the effects of ion implantation of this alloy semiconductor for implant isolation purposes in which highly resistive layers are required. Due to the small band gap (0.75 eV at 300K) of In0.53Ga0.47As, the estimated maximum resistivity is of the order of 1000 O-cm. Implant isolation can be achieved by the implantation of either inert noble gas ions or electrically active ions. Ion bombardment with inert species introduces defects which trap charge carriers. In the case of implant isolation by electrically active ions, the implanted impurities form an electronic level located close to the middle of the bandgap. Studies of the effects of implantation in In0.53Ga0.47 As due to damage by implantation of Ne+ ions and to compensation by implantation of Fe+ ions are reported in this thesis. The former only involves lattice damage related effects while the latter leads to damage and dopant induced compensation. From the Ne+ implantation results it appears that the damage related energy levels in In0.53 Ga0.47M produced by ion bombardment of chemically inactive species, are not sufficiently deep to lead to effective isolation. A higher resistivity of the order of 770 O-cm is achieved with Fe+ implantation, indicating that Fe introduces an energy level deep in the bandgap. The changes in the electrical properties of the layers are correlated to the lattice damage (damage induced effects) and/or the diffusion of the compensating dopants (dopant induced compensation). Structural characterization of the layers is performed with channeling Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry

  10. Indium phosphide space solar cell research: Where we are and where we are going

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Flood, D. J.; Weinberg, Irving

    1995-01-01

    Indium phosphide is considered to be a strong contender for many photovoltaic space applications because of its radiation resistance and its potential for high efficiency. An overview of recent progress is presented, and possible future research directions for indium phosphide space solar cells are discussed. The topics considered include radiation damage studies and space flight experiments.

  11. Enantioselective and Regioselective Indium(III)-Catalyzed Addition of Pyrroles to Isatins

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Elisa G.; Wong, Casey J.; Sahin, Aziza H.

    2011-01-01

    The indium(III)-catalyzed enantioselective and regioselective addition of pyrroles to isatins is described. The effects of metal and solvent on the reactivity and selectivity are compared and discussed, demonstrating that the indium(III)-indapybox complex provides the most effective catalyst. A case of divergent reactivity between pyrroles and indoles is presented. PMID:21992567

  12. Synthesis and use of (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium and indium

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Chen, You-Xian

    2000-01-01

    Salts of (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are described. The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions have the formula [ER'R"R'"F].sup..crclbar. wherein E is aluminum, gallium, or indium, wherein F is fluorine, and wherein R', R", and R'" is each a fluorinated phenyl, fluorinated biphenyl, or fluorinated polycyclic group.

  13. Indium Tin Oxide-Magnesium Fluoride Co-Deposited Films for Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joycer A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Hambourger, Paul D.; Bruckner, Eric; Ferrante, Rhea; Pal, Anna Marie; Mayer, Karen; Pietromica, Anthony J.

    1998-01-01

    Highly transparent coatings with a maximum sheet resistivity between 10(exp 8) and 10(exp 9) ohms/square are desired to prevent charging of solar arrays for low Earth polar orbit and geosynchronous orbit missions. Indium tin oxide (ITO) and magnesium fluoride (MgF2) were ion beam sputter co-deposited onto fused silica substrates and were evaluated for transmittance, sheet resistivity and the effects of simulated space environments including atomic oxygen (AO) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation. Optical properties and sheet resistivity as a function of MgF2 content in the films will be presented. Films containing 8.4 wt.% MgF2 were found to be highly transparent and provided sheet resistivity in the required range. These films maintained a high transmittance upon exposure to AO and to VUV radiation, although exposure to AO in the presence of charged species and intense electromagnetic radiation caused significant degradation in film transmittance. Sheet resistivity of the as-fabricated films increased with time in ambient conditions. Vacuum beat treatment following film deposition caused a reduction in sheet resistivity. However, following vacuum heat treatment, sheet resistivity values remained stable during storage in ambient conditions.

  14. Earth Observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-09

    ISS024-E-014071 (9 Sept. 2010) --- This striking panoramic view of the southwestern USA and Pacific Ocean is an oblique image photographed by an Expedition 24 crew member looking outwards at an angle from the International Space Station (ISS). While most unmanned orbital satellites view Earth from a nadir perspective?in other words, collecting data with a ?straight down? viewing geometry?crew members onboard the space station can acquire imagery at a wide range of viewing angles using handheld digital cameras. The ISS nadir point (the point on Earth?s surface directly below the spacecraft) was located in northwestern Arizona, approximately 260 kilometers to the east-southeast, when this image was taken. The image includes parts of the States of Arizona, Nevada, Utah, and California together with a small segment of the Baja California, Mexico coastline at center left. Several landmarks and physiographic features are readily visible. The Las Vegas, NV metropolitan area appears as a gray region adjacent to the Spring Mountains and Sheep Range (both covered by white clouds). The Grand Canyon, located on the Colorado Plateau in Arizona, is visible (lower left) to the east of Las Vegas with the blue waters of Lake Mead in between. The image also includes the Mojave Desert, stretching north from the Salton Sea (left) to the Sierra Nevada mountain range. The Sierra Nevada range is roughly 640 kilometers long (north-south) and forms the boundary between the Central Valley of California and the adjacent Basin and Range. The Basin and Range is so called due to the pattern of long linear valleys separated by parallel linear mountain ranges ? this landscape, formed by extension and thinning of Earth?s crust, is particularly visible at right.

  15. Rare earths, the lanthanides, yttrium and scandium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedinger, G.; Bleiwas, D.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, rare earths were recovered from bastnasite concentrates at the Mountain Pass Mine in California. Consumption of refined rare-earth products decreased in 2011 from 2010. U.S. rare-earth imports originated primarily from China, with lesser amounts from Austria, Estonia, France and Japan. The United States imported all of its demand for yttrium metal and yttrium compounds, with most of it originating from China. Scandium was imported in various forms and processed domestically.

  16. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-20

    Dr. Shawn Domagal-Goldman, Research Space Scientist, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, speaks on a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  17. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-20

    Dr. Phoebe Cohen, Professor of Geosciences, Williams College, speaks on a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  18. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-20

    Dr. Christopher House, Professor of Geosciences, Pennsylvania State University, speaks on a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  19. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-20

    Dr. Dawn Sumner, Professor of Geology, UC Davis, speaks on a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  20. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-20

    Dr. Timothy Lyons, Professor of Biogeochemistry, UC Riverside, speaks on a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  1. Earth meandering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadiyan, H.; Zamani, A.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we try to put away current Global Tectonic Model to look the tectonic evolution of the earth from new point of view. Our new dynamic model is based on study of river meandering (RM) which infer new concept as Earth meandering(EM). In a universal gravitational field if we consider a clockwise spiral galaxy model rotate above Ninety East Ridge (geotectonic axis GA), this system with applying torsion field (likes geomagnetic field) in side direction from Rocky Mt. (west geotectonic pole WGP) to Tibetan plateau TP (east geotectonic pole EGP),it seems that pulled mass from WGP and pushed it in EGP due to it's rolling dynamics. According to this idea we see in topographic map that North America and Green land like a tongue pulled from Pacific mouth toward TP. Actually this system rolled or meander the earth over itself fractaly from small scale to big scale and what we see in the river meandering and Earth meandering are two faces of one coin. River transport water and sediments from high elevation to lower elevation and also in EM, mass transport from high altitude-Rocky Mt. to lower altitude Himalaya Mt. along 'S' shape geodetic line-optimum path which connect points from high altitude to lower altitude as kind of Euler Elastica(EE). These curves are responsible for mass spreading (source) and mass concentration (sink). In this regard, tiltness of earth spin axis plays an important role, 'S' are part of sigmoidal shape which formed due to intersection of Earth rolling with the Earth glob and actual feature of transform fault and river meandering. Longitudinal profile in mature rivers as a part of 'S' curve also is a kind of EE. 'S' which bound the whole earth is named S-1(S order 1) and cube corresponding to this which represent Earth fracturing in global scale named C-1(cube order 1 or side vergence cube SVC), C-1 is a biggest cycle of spiral polygon, so it is not completely closed and it has separation about diameter of C-7. Inside SVC we introduce cone

  2. Thermoelectric Properties and Thermal Tolerance of Indium Tin Oxide Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Jose A; Carpena Nunez, Jennifer; Fonseca, Luis F; Pettes, Michael Thompson; Yacaman, Miguel Jose; Benitez, Alfredo

    2018-06-14

    Single-crystalline indium tin oxide (ITO) nanowires were grown via a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) method, with thermal tolerance up to ~1300°C. We report the electric and thermoelectric properties of the ITO nanowires before and after heat treatments and draw conclusions about their applicability as thermoelectric building blocks in nanodevices that can operate in high temperature conditions. The Seebeck coefficient and the thermal and electrical conductivities were measured in each individual nanowire by means of specialized micro-bridge thermometry devices. Measured data was analyzed and explained in terms of changes in charge carrier density, impurities and vacancies due to the thermal treatments. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  3. Study of indium tin oxide films exposed to atomic axygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Paul G.; De, Bhola N.; Woollam, John A.; Coutts, T. J.; Li, X.

    1989-01-01

    A qualitative simulation of the effects of atomic oxygen has been conducted on indium tin oxide (ITO) films prepared by dc sputtering onto room-temperature substrates, by exposing them to an RF-excited oxygen plasma and characterizing the resulting changes in optical, electrical, and structural properties as functions of exposure time with ellipsometry, spectrophotometry, resistivity, and X-ray measurements. While the films thus exposed exhibit reduced resistivity and optical transmission; both of these effects, as well as partial crystallization of the films, may be due to sample heating by the plasma. Film resistivity is found to stabilize after a period of exposure.

  4. Effect of doping of tin on optoelectronic properties of indium oxide: DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Madhvendra Nath

    2015-06-01

    Indium tin oxide is widely used transparent conductor. Experimentally observed that 6% tin doping in indium oxide is suitable for optoelectronic applications and more doping beyond this limit degrades the optoelectronic property. The stoichiometry (In32-xSnxO48+x/2; x=0-6) is taken to understand the change in lattice parameter, electronic structure, and optical property of ITO. It is observed that lattice parameter increases and becomes constant after 6% tin doping that is in good agreement of the experimental observation. The electronic structure calculation shows that the high tin doping in indium oxide adversely affects the dispersive nature of the bottom of conduction band of pure indium oxide and decreases the carrier mobility. Optical calculations show that transmittance goes down upto 60% for the tin concentration more than 6%. The present paper shows that how more than 6% tin doping in indium oxide adversely affects the optoelectronic property of ITO.

  5. Effects of a powered air-purifying respirator intervention on indium exposure reduction and indium related biomarkers among ITO sputter target manufacturing workers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hung-Hsin; Chen, Chang-Yuh; Lan, Cheng-Hang; Chang, Cheng-Ping; Peng, Chiung-Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs) worn by the workers, and to investigate the effect of this application on exposure and preclinical effects in terms of workplace measuring and biomarker monitoring in ITO sputter target manufacturing plants and workers, respectively. Fifty-four workers were recruited and investigated from 2010-2012, during which PAPRs were provided to on-site workers in September 2011. Each worker completed questionnaires and provided blood and urine samples for analysis of biomarkers of indium exposure and preclinical effects. Area and personal indium air samples were randomly collected from selected worksites and from participants. The penetration percentage of the respirator (concentration inside respirator divided by concentration outside respirator) was 6.6%. Some biomarkers, such as S-In, SOD, GPx, GST, MDA, and TMOM, reflected the decrease in exposure and showed lower levels, after implementation of PAPRs. This study is the first to investigate the efficacy of PAPRs for reducing indium exposure. The measurement results clearly showed that the implementation of PAPRs reduces levels of indium-related biomarkers. These findings have practical applications for minimizing occupational exposure to indium and for managing the health of workers exposed to indium.

  6. Strategies to indium nitride and gallium nitride nanoparticles: Low-temperature, solution-phase and precursor routes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingman, Sean Douglas

    I present new strategies to low-temperature solution-phase synthesis of indium and gallium nitride (InN and GaN) ceramic materials. The strategies include: direct conversion of precursor molecules to InN by pyrolysis, solution-phase synthesis of nanostructured InN fibers via molecular precursors and co-reactants, and synthesis of powders through reactions derived from molten-salt chemistry. Indium nitride powders are prepared by pyrolysis of the precursors R 2InN3 (R = t-Bu (1), i-Amyl(2), Et(3), i-Pr( 4)). The precursors are synthesized via azide-alkoxide exchange of R2InOMe with Me3SiN3. The precursors are coordination polymers containing five-coordinate indium centers. Pyrolysis of 1 and 2 under N2 at 400°C yields powders consisting primarily of InN with average crystal sizes of 15--35 nm. 1 yields nanocrystalline InN with average particle sizes of 7 nm at 250°C. 3 and 4 yield primarily In metal from pyrolysis. Refluxing 1 in diisopropylbenzene (203°C) in the presence of primary amines yields InN nanofibers 10--100 nm in length. InN nanofibers of up to 1 mum can be synthesized by treating 1 with 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (DMHy) The DMHy appears to control the fiber length by acting as a secondary source of active nitrogen in order to sustain fiber growth. The resulting fibers are attached to droplets of indium metal implying a solution-liquid-solid growth mechanism. Precursor 4 yields crystalline InN whiskers when reacted with DMHy. Reactions of 4 with reducing agents such as HSnBu3, yield InN nanoparticles with an average crystallite size of 16 nm. Gallium precursors R2GaN3 (R = t-Bu( 5), Me3SiCH2(6) and i-Pr( 7)), synthesized by azide-alkoxide exchange, are found to be inert toward solution decomposition and do not yield GaN. These compounds are molecular dimers and trimers unlike the indium analogs. Compound 6 displays a monomer-dimer equilibrium in benzene solution, but exists as a solid-state trimer. InN powders are also synthesized by reactions of InCl3 and

  7. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-19

    ISS040-E-070439 (19 July 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station recorded this July 19 image of wildfires which are plaguing the Northwest and causing widespread destruction. The orbital outpost was flying 223 nautical miles above a point on Earth located at 48.0 degrees north latitude and 116.9 degrees west longitude when the image was exposed. The state of Washington is especially affected by the fires, many of which have been blamed on lightning. This particular fire was part of the Carlton Complex Fire, located near the city of Brewster in north central Washington. The reservoir visible near the center of the image is Banks Lake.

  8. Transparent indium-tin oxide/indium-gallium-zinc oxide Schottky diodes formed by gradient oxygen doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Szuheng; Yu, Hyeonggeun; So, Franky

    2017-11-01

    Amorphous InGaZnO (a-IGZO) is promising for transparent electronics due to its high carrier mobility and optical transparency. However, most metal/a-IGZO junctions are ohmic due to the Fermi-level pinning at the interface, restricting their device applications. Here, we report that indium-tin oxide/a-IGZO Schottky diodes can be formed by gradient oxygen doping in the a-IGZO layer that would otherwise form an ohmic contact. Making use of back-to-back a-IGZO Schottky junctions, a transparent IGZO permeable metal-base transistor is also demonstrated with a high common-base gain.

  9. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-25

    ISS040-E-081008 (25 July 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the International Space Station, flying 225 nautical miles above Earth, photographed this image of the Tifernine dunes and the Tassili Najjer Mountains in Algeria. The area is about 800 miles south, southeast of Algiers, the capital of Algeria. The dunes are in excess of 1,000 feet in height.

  10. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-15

    ISS040-E-063578 (15 July 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, flying some 225 nautical miles above the Caribbean Sea in the early morning hours of July 15, photographed this north-looking panorama that includes parts of Cuba, the Bahamas and Florida, and even runs into several other areas in the southeastern U.S. The long stretch of lights to the left of center frame gives the shape of Miami.

  11. Earth Observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-28

    ISS028-E-006059 (28 May 2011) --- One of the Expedition 28 crew members, photographing Earth images onboard the International Space Station while docked with the space shuttle Endeavour and flying at an altitude of just under 220 miles, captured this frame of the Salton Sea. The body of water, easily identifiable from low orbit spacecraft, is a saline, endorheic rift lake located directly on the San Andreas Fault. The agricultural area is within the Coachella Valley.

  12. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-01-01

    In July 1990, the Marshall Space Flight Center, in a joint project with the Department of Defense/Air Force Space Test Program, launched the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) using an Atlas I launch vehicle. The mission was designed to study the effects of artificial ion clouds produced by chemical releases on the Earth's ionosphere and magnetosphere, and to monitor the effects of space radiation environment on sophisticated electronics.

  13. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-27

    ISS028-E-009979 (27 June 2011) --- The Massachusetts coastline is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 28 crew member on the International Space Station. The Crew Earth Observations team at NASA Johnson Space Center sends specific ground targets for photography up to the station crew on a daily basis, but sometimes the crew takes imagery on their own of striking displays visible from orbit. One such display, often visible to the ISS crew due to their ability to look outwards at angles between 0 and 90 degrees, is sunglint on the waters of Earth. Sunglint is caused by sunlight reflecting off of a water surface?much as light reflects from a mirror?directly towards the observer. Roughness variations of the water surface scatter the light, blurring the reflection and producing the typical silvery sheen of the sunglint area. The point of maximum sunglint is centered within Cape Cod Bay, the body of water partially enclosed by the ?hook? of Cape Cod in Massachusetts (bottom). Cape Cod was formally designated a National Seashore in 1966. Sunglint off the water provides sharp contrast with the coastline and the nearby islands of Martha?s Vineyard and Nantucket (lower left), both popular destinations for tourists and summer residents. To the north, rocky Cape Ann extends out into the Atlantic Ocean; the border with New Hampshire is located approximately 30 kilometers up the coast. Further to the west, the eastern half of Long Island, New York is visible emerging from extensive cloud cover over the mid-Atlantic and Midwestern States. Persistent storm tracks had been contributing to record flooding along rivers in the Midwest at the time this image was taken in late June 2011. Thin blue layers of the atmosphere, contrasted against the darkness of space, are visible extending along the Earth?s curvature at top.

  14. Cloudy Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-05-08

    Decades of satellite observations and astronaut photographs show that clouds dominate space-based views of Earth. One study based on nearly a decade of satellite data estimated that about 67 percent of Earth’s surface is typically covered by clouds. This is especially the case over the oceans, where other research shows less than 10 percent of the sky is completely clear of clouds at any one time. Over land, 30 percent of skies are completely cloud free. Earth’s cloudy nature is unmistakable in this global cloud fraction map, based on data collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite. While MODIS collects enough data to make a new global map of cloudiness every day, this version of the map shows an average of all of the satellite’s cloud observations between July 2002 and April 2015. Colors range from dark blue (no clouds) to light blue (some clouds) to white (frequent clouds). Read more here: 1.usa.gov/1P6lbMU Credit: NASA Earth Observatory NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  15. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-02

    ISS028-E-020276 (2 Aug. 2011) --- This photograph of polar mesospheric clouds was acquired at an altitude of just over 202 nautical miles (about 322 kilometers) in the evening hours (03:19:54 Greenwich Mean Time) on Aug. 2, 2011, as the International Space Station was passing over the English Channel. The nadir coordinates of the station were 49.1 degrees north latitude and 5.5 degrees west longitude. Polar mesospheric clouds (also known as noctilucent, or ?night-shining? clouds) are transient, upper atmospheric phenomena that are usually observed in the summer months at high latitudes (greater than 50 degrees) of both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. They appear bright and cloudlike while in deep twilight. They are illuminated by sunlight when the lower layers of the atmosphere are in the darkness of Earth?s shadow. The horizon of Earth appears at the bottom of the image, with some layers of the lower atmosphere already illuminated by the rising sun. The higher, bluish-colored clouds look much like wispy cirrus clouds, which can be found as high as 60,000 feet (18 kilometers) in the atmosphere. However noctilucent clouds, as seen here, are observed in the mesosphere at altitudes of 250,000 to 280,000 feet (about 76 to 85 kilometers). Astronaut observations of polar mesospheric clouds over northern Europe in the summer are not uncommon.

  16. Recent developments in indium phosphide space solar cell research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinker, David J.; Weinberg, Irving

    1987-01-01

    Recent developments and progress in indium phosphide solar cell research for space application are reviewed. Indium phosphide homojunction cells were fabricated in both the n+p and p+n configurations with total area efficiencies of 17.9 and 15.9% (air mass 0 and 25 C) respectively. Organometallic chemical vapor deposition, liquid phase epitaxy, ion implantation and diffusion techniques were employed in InP cell fabrication. A theoretical model of a radiation tolerant, high efficiency homojunction cell was developed. A realistically attainable AMO efficiency of 20.5% was calculated using this model with emitter and base doping of 6 x 10 to the 17th power and 5 x 10 the the 16th power/cu cm respectively. Cells of both configurations were irradiated with 1 MeV electrons and 37 MeV protons. For both proton and electron irradiation, the n+p cells are more radiation resistant at higher fluences than the p+n cells. The first flight module of four InP cells was assembled for the Living Plume Shield III satellite.

  17. Chemical nature of silicon nitride-indium phosphide interface and rapid thermal annealing for InP MISFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedenbender, M. D.; Kapoor, V. J.

    1990-01-01

    A rapid thermal annealing (RTA) process in pure N2 or pure H2 was developed for ion-implanted and encapsulated indium phosphide compound semiconductors, and the chemical nature at the silicon nitride-InP interface before and after RTA was examined using XPS. Results obtained from SIMS on the atomic concentration profiles of the implanted silicon in InP before and after RTA are presented, together with electrical characteristics of the annealed implants. Using the RTA process developed, InP metal-insulator semiconductor FETs (MISFETS) were fabricated. The MISFETS prepared had threshold voltages of +1 V, transconductance of 27 mS/mm, peak channel mobility of 1200 sq cm/V per sec, and drain current drift of only 7 percent.

  18. Surface oxidation and thermoelectric properties of indium-doped tin telluride nanowires.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Xu, Enzhi; Losovyj, Yaroslav; Li, Nan; Chen, Aiping; Swartzentruber, Brian; Sinitsyn, Nikolai; Yoo, Jinkyoung; Jia, Quanxi; Zhang, Shixiong

    2017-09-14

    The recent discovery of excellent thermoelectric properties and topological surface states in SnTe-based compounds has attracted extensive attention in various research areas. Indium doped SnTe is of particular interest because, depending on the doping level, it can either generate resonant states in the bulk valence band leading to enhanced thermoelectric properties, or induce superconductivity that coexists with topological states. Here we report on the vapor deposition of In-doped SnTe nanowires and the study of their surface oxidation and thermoelectric properties. The nanowire growth is assisted by Au catalysts, and their morphologies vary as a function of substrate position and temperature. Transmission electron microscopy characterization reveals the formation of an amorphous surface in single crystalline nanowires. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies suggest that the nanowire surface is composed of In 2 O 3 , SnO 2 , Te and TeO 2 which can be readily removed by argon ion sputtering. Exposure of the cleaned nanowires to atmosphere leads to rapid oxidation of the surface within only one minute. Characterization of electrical conductivity σ, thermopower S, and thermal conductivity κ was performed on the same In-doped nanowire which shows suppressed σ and κ but enhanced S yielding an improved thermoelectric figure of merit ZT compared to the undoped SnTe.

  19. POLAROGRAPHIC BEHAVIOUR OF INDIUM IN THE PRESENCE OF TRIHYDROXYGLUTARIC ACID (in Russian)

    SciTech Connect

    Vinogradova, E.N.; An, C.

    1961-09-01

    The polarographic behavtor ot indium in the presence of trihydroxyglutaric acid in acid, nautral, and alkalino media was studied. The vaIue of the half-wave potental of a simple indium ion was determined in HClO/sub 4/ by the half-peak: potential during the anodic dissolutaon of and indium from an amalgam. The half-wave potential is eqia; tp 0.488 v. The effect of the concentration of trihydroxyglutaric acido on the E/sub 1/2/ of indium was studied. It was found that the regular shift of E/sub 1/2/ on changing the concentration of trihydroxyglutaric acid is observed only at pH 4 and pH ll. Themore » coordination number p = 2 and the unstability constant for the indium-trihydroxyglutaric aeid eonnplex at pH 4 were found. K (mean) is (9.73 plus or minus 0.82) x 10/sup - 11/. It was established that the process of indium reduction at pH 11 is irreversible. A method was suggested for the polarographic determination of indium and cadmium, when present together, in trihydroxyglutaric acid at pH 3 and pH 9. (auth)« less

  20. Earth Observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-11

    ISS024-E-014233 (11 Sept. 2010) --- A smoke plume near the northern Caspian Sea, Kazakhstan is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 24 crew member on the International Space Station. This broad view of the north coast of the Caspian Sea shows a smoke plume (left) and two river deltas (bottom and lower right). The larger delta is that of the Volga River which appears prominently here in sunglint (light reflected off a water surface back towards the observer), and the smaller less prominent delta is that of the Ural River. Wide angle, oblique views ? taken looking outward at an angle, rather than straight down towards Earth ? such as this give an excellent impression of how crew members onboard the space station view Earth. For a sense of scale, the Caucasus Mts. (across the Caspian, top right) are approximately 1,100 kilometers to the southwest of the International Space Station?s nadir point location ? the point on Earth directly underneath the spacecraft ? at the time this image was taken. The smoke plume appears to be sourced in the dark-toned coastal marsh vegetation along the outer fringe of the Ural River delta, rather than in a city or at some oil storage facility. Although even small fires produce plumes that are long and bright and thus easily visible from space, the density of the smoke in this plume, and its 350-kilometer length across the entire north lobe of the Caspian Sea, suggest it was a significant fire. The smoke was thick enough nearer the source to cast shadows on the sea surface below. Lines mark three separate pulses of smoke, the most recent, nearest the source, extending directly south away from the coastline (lower left). With time, plumes become progressively more diffuse. The oldest pulse appears to be the thinnest, casting no obvious shadows (center left).

  1. Synthesis, Characterization, and Processing of Copper, Indium, and Gallium Dithiocarbamates for Energy Conversion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duraj, S. A.; Duffy, N. V.; Hepp, A. F.; Cowen, J. E.; Hoops, M. D.; Brothrs, S. M.; Baird, M. J.; Fanwick, P. E.; Harris, J. D.; Jin, M. H.-C.

    2009-01-01

    Ten dithiocarbamate complexes of indium(III) and gallium(III) have been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectra and melting point. Each complex was decomposed thermally and its decomposition products separated and identified with the combination of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Their potential utility as photovoltaic materials precursors was assessed. Bis(dibenzyldithiocarbamato)- and bis(diethyldithiocarbamato)copper(II), Cu(S2CN(CH2C6H5)2)2 and Cu(S2CN(C2H5)2)2 respectively, have also been examined for their suitability as precursors for copper sulfides for the fabrication of photovoltaic materials. Each complex was decomposed thermally and the products analyzed by GC/MS, TGA and FTIR. The dibenzyl derivative complex decomposed at a lower temperature (225-320 C) to yield CuS as the product. The diethyl derivative complex decomposed at a higher temperature (260-325 C) to yield Cu2S. No Cu containing fragments were noted in the mass spectra. Unusual recombination fragments were observed in the mass spectra of the diethyl derivative. Tris(bis(phenylmethyl)carbamodithioato-S,S'), commonly referred to as tris(N,N-dibenzyldithiocarbamato)indium(III), In(S2CNBz2)3, was synthesized and characterized by single crystal X-ray crystallography. The compound crystallizes in the triclinic space group P1(bar) with two molecules per unit cell. The material was further characterized using a novel analytical system employing the combined powers of thermogravimetric analysis, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy to investigate its potential use as a precursor for the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of thin film materials for photovoltaic applications. Upon heating, the material thermally decomposes to release CS2 and benzyl moieties in to the gas phase, resulting in bulk In2S3. Preliminary spray CVD experiments indicate that In(S2CNBz2)3 decomposed on a Cu substrate reacts to produce

  2. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-04-20

    ISS047e069406 (04/20/2016) ---Earth observation image taken by the Expedition 47 crew aboard the International Space Station. This is an oblique south-looking view of the main Bahama island chain. Cuba is across the entire top of the image, the Florida Peninsula on the right margin. In the Bahamas, the main Andros island is just distinguishable under cloud upper left of center. Under less cloud is the Abaco Islands in the foreground (middle of pic nearest camera left of center.)

  3. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-24

    ISS040-E-018729 (24 June 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station photographed this image featuring the peninsular portion of the state of Florida. Lake Okeechobee stands out in the south central part of the state. The heavily-populated area of Miami can be traced along the Atlantic Coast near the bottom of the scene. Cape Canaveral and the Kennedy Space Center are just below center frame on the Atlantic Coast. The Florida Keys are at the south (left) portion of the scene and the Gulf Coast, including the Tampa-St. Petersburg area, is near frame center.

  4. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-29

    ISS040-E-005979 (29 May 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the International Space Station used a 200mm lens to photograph this image from 222 nautical miles above Earth showing Harris County and Galveston County, Texas plus several other surrounding counties, including a long stretch along the Gulf of Mexico (bottom left). The entirety of Galveston Bay is visible at bottom center. Just below center lies the 1625-acre site of NASA's Johnson Space Center, one of the training venues for all space station crew members and the nearby long-time area of residence for NASA astronauts.

  5. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-31

    ISS036-E-027014 (31 July 2013) --- One of the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, as it was passing over Eastern Europe on July 31, 2013, took this night picture looking toward the Mediterranean Sea, which almost blends into the horizon. Also visible are the Aegean Sea, Adriatic Sea and Mediterranean Sea. Parts of the following countries are among those visible as well: Greece, Italy, Sicily, Bulgaria, Serbia, Croatia and Albania. The high oblique 50mm lens shot includes a number of stars in the late July sky. A solar array panel is visible in the darkness on the right side of the frame.

  6. Earth Explorer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Earth Explorer Web site provides access to millions of land-related products, including the following: Satellite images from Landsat, advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR), and Corona data sets. Aerial photographs from the National Aerial Photography Program, NASA, and USGS data sets.  Digital cartographic data from digital elevation models, digital line graphs, digital raster graphics, and digital orthophoto quadrangles. USGS paper maps Digital, film, and paper products are available, and many products can be previewed before ordering.

  7. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-07-24

    A Delta II rocket carrying the Geomagnetic Tail Lab (GEOTAIL) spacecraft lifts off at Launch Complex 17, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) into a cloud-dappled sky. This liftoff marks the first Delta launch under the medium expendable launch vehicle services contract between NASA and McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Co. The GEOTAIL mission, a joint US/Japanese project, is the first in a series of five satellites to study the interactions between the Sun, the Earth's magnetic field, and the Van Allen radiation belts.

  8. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-01-31

    The Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft embarks on a journey that will culminate in a close encounter with an asteroid. The launch of NEAR inaugurates NASA's irnovative Discovery program of small-scale planetary missions with rapid, lower-cost development cycles and focused science objectives. NEAR will rendezvous in 1999 with the asteroid 433 Eros to begin the first long-term, close-up look at an asteroid's surface composition and physical properties. NEAR's science payload includes an x-ray/gamma ray spectrometer, an near-infrared spectrograph, a laser rangefinder, a magnetometer, a radio science experiment and a multi-spectral imager.

  9. Polybenzimidazole compounds

    DOEpatents

    Klaehn, John R [Idaho Falls, ID; Peterson, Eric S [Idaho Falls, ID; Orme, Christopher J [Shelley, ID; Jones, Michael G [Chubbuck, ID; Wertsching, Alan K [Idaho Falls, ID; Luther, Thomas A [Idaho Falls, ID; Trowbridge, Tammy L [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-11-22

    A PBI compound includes imidazole nitrogens at least a portion of which are substituted with a moiety containing a carbonyl group, the substituted imidazole nitrogens being bonded to carbon of the carbonyl group. At least 85% of the nitrogens may be substituted. The carbonyl-containing moiety may include RCO--, where R is alkoxy or haloalkyl. The PBI compound may exhibit a first temperature marking an onset of weight loss corresponding to reversion of the substituted PBI that is less than a second temperature marking an onset of decomposition of an otherwise identical PBI compound without the substituted moiety. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may use more than 5 equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted.

  10. Polybenzimidazole compounds

    DOEpatents

    Klaehn, John R.; Peterson, Eric S.; Wertsching, Alan K.; Orme, Christopher J.; Luther, Thomas A.; Jones, Michael G.

    2010-08-10

    A PBI compound that includes imidazole nitrogens, at least a portion of which are substituted with an organic-inorganic hybrid moiety. At least 85% of the imidazole nitrogens may be substituted. The organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be an organosilane moiety, for example, (R)Me.sub.2SiCH.sub.2--, where R is selected from among methyl, phenyl, vinyl, and allyl. The PBI compound may exhibit similar thermal properties in comparison to the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may exhibit a solubility in an organic solvent greater than the solubility of the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may occur at about room temperature and/or at about atmospheric pressure. Substituting may use at least five equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted or, preferably, about fifteen equivalents.

  11. Mineral resource of the month: rare earths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, James B.

    2004-01-01

    As if classified as a top-secret project, the rare earths have been shrouded in secrecy. The principal ore mineral of the group, bastnäsite, rarely appears in the leading mineralogy texts. The long names of the rare-earth elements and some unusual arrangements of letters, many Scandinavian in origin, may have intimidated even those skilled in phonics. Somewhat obscurely labeled, the rare earths are neither rare nor earths (the historical term for oxides). They are a relatively abundant group of metallic elements that occur in nature as nonmetallic compounds and have hundreds of commercial applications.

  12. Herbal Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Subtle vegetation changes are visible in this year-long visualization. Large-scale patterns vary with seasons, but the local variations in green are also sensitive precipitation, drought and fire. High values of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, or NDVI, represent dense green functioning vegetation and low NDVI values represent sparse green vegetation or vegetation under stress from limiting conditions, such as drought. The visualization was created from a year’s worth of data from April 2012 to April 2013. The information was sent back to Earth from the Visible-Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership or Suomi NPP satellite, a partnership between NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA. Credit: NASA/NOAA To read more go to: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/NPP/news/vegetation.html NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  13. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-17

    ISS036-E-009405 (17 June 2013) --- One of the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station, some 240 miles above Earth, used a 50mm lens to record this oblique nighttime image of a large part of the nation’s second largest state in area, including the four largest metropolitan areas in population. The extent of the metropolitan areas is easily visible at night due to city and highway lights. The largest metro area, Dallas-Fort Worth, often referred to informally as the Metroplex, is the heavily cloud-covered area at the top center of the photo. Neighboring Oklahoma, on the north side of the Red River, less than 100 miles to the north of the Metroplex, appears to be experiencing thunderstorms. The Houston metropolitan area, including the coastal city of Galveston, is at lower right. To the east near the Texas border with Louisiana, the metropolitan area of Beaumont-Port Arthur appears as a smaller blotch of light, also hugging the coast of the Texas Gulf. Moving inland to the left side of the picture one can delineate the San Antonio metro area. The capital city of Austin can be seen to the northeast of San Antonio. This and hundreds of thousands of other Earth photos taken by astronauts and cosmonauts over the past 50 years are available on http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov

  14. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-06

    ISS028-E-014782 (6 July 2011) --- The Shoemaker (formerly Teague) Impact Structure, located in Western Australia in a drainage basin south of the Waldburg Range, presents an other-worldly appearance in this detailed photograph recorded from onboard the International Space Station on July 6. The Shoemaker impact site is approximately 30 kilometers in diameter, and is clearly defined by concentric ring structures formed in sedimentary rocks (brown to dark brown, image center) that were deformed by the impact event approximately 1630 million years ago, according to the Earth Impact Database. Several saline and ephemeral lakes?Nabberu, Teague, Shoemaker, and numerous smaller ponds?occupy the land surface between the concentric ring structures. Differences in color result from both water depth and suspended sediments, with some bright salt crusts visible around the edges of smaller ponds (image center The Teague Impact Structure was renamed Shoemaker in honor of the late Dr. Eugene M. Shoemaker, a pioneer in the field of impact crater studies and planetary geology, and founder of the Astrogeology Branch of the United States Geological Survey. The image was recorded with a digital still camera using a 200 mm lens, and is provided by the ISS Crew Earth Observations experiment and Image Science & Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center.

  15. Highly conductive indium nanowires deposited on silicon by dip-pen nanolithography

    SciTech Connect

    Kozhukhov, Anton; Volodin, Vladimir; Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090

    2015-04-14

    In this paper, we developed a new dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) method. Using this method, we fabricated conductive nanowires with diameters of 30–50 nm on silicon substrates. To accomplish this, indium was transferred from an atomic force microscopy tip to the surface by applying a potential difference between the tip and substrate. The fabricated indium nanowires were several micrometers in length. Unlike thermal DPN, our DPN method hardly oxidized the indium, producing nanowires with conductivities from 5.7 × 10{sup −3} to 4 × 10{sup −2} Ω cm.

  16. Method for restoring the resistance of indium oxide semiconductors after heating while in sealed structures

    DOEpatents

    Seager, C.H.; Evans, J.T. Jr.

    1998-11-24

    A method is described for counteracting increases in resistivity encountered when Indium Oxide resistive layers are subjected to high temperature annealing steps during semiconductor device fabrication. The method utilizes a recovery annealing step which returns the Indium Oxide layer to its original resistivity after a high temperature annealing step has caused the resistivity to increase. The recovery anneal comprises heating the resistive layer to a temperature between 100 C and 300 C for a period of time that depends on the annealing temperature. The recovery is observed even when the Indium Oxide layer is sealed under a dielectric layer. 1 fig.

  17. Method for restoring the resistance of indium oxide semiconductors after heating while in sealed structures

    DOEpatents

    Seager, Carleton H.; Evans, Jr., Joseph Tate

    1998-01-01

    A method for counteracting increases in resistivity encountered when Indium Oxide resistive layers are subjected to high temperature annealing steps during semiconductor device fabrication. The method utilizes a recovery annealing step which returns the Indium Oxide layer to its original resistivity after a high temperature annealing step has caused the resistivity to increase. The recovery anneal comprises heating the resistive layer to a temperature between 100.degree. C. and 300.degree. C. for a period of time that depends on the annealing temperature. The recovery is observed even when the Indium Oxide layer is sealed under a dielectric layer.

  18. Chemical synthesis of hexagonal indium nitride nanocrystallines at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liangbiao; Shen, Qianli; Zhao, Dejian; Lu, Juanjuan; Liu, Weiqiao; Zhang, Junhao; Bao, Keyan; Zhou, Quanfa

    2017-08-01

    In this study, hexagonal indium nitride nanocystallines with high crystallinity have been prepared by the reaction of InCl3·4H2O, sulfur and NaNH2 in an autoclave at 160 °C. The crystal structures and morphologies of the obtained InN sample are characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope. As InCl3·4H2O is substituted by In(NO3)3·4.5H2O, InN nanocrystallines could also be obtained by using the similar method. The photoluminescence spectrum shows that the InN emits a broad peak positioned at 2.3 eV.

  19. Optoelectric biosensor using indium-tin-oxide electrodes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang Kyoung; Kihm, Kenneth D; English, Anthony E

    2007-06-01

    The use of an optically thin indium-tin-oxide (ITO) electrode is presented for an optoelectric biosensor simultaneously recording optical images and microimpedance to examine time-dependent cellular growth. The transmittance of a 100 nm thick ITO electrode layer is approximately the same as the transmittance of a clean glass substrate, whereas the industry-standard Au(47.5 nm)/Ti(2.5 nm) electrode layer drops the transmittance to less than 10% of that of the glass substrate. The simultaneous optoelectric measurements permit determining the correlation of the cell-covered area increase with the microimpedance increase, and the example results obtained for live porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cells delineate the quantitative and comprehensive nature of cellular attachment and spreading to the substrate, which has not been clearly perceived before.

  20. In Vivo Defection of Thrombi with Indium-111-Labeled Platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, David C.; Lipton, Martin J.; Lusby, Robert J.; Engelstad, Barry L.; Stoney, Ronald J.; Prager, Robert J.; Hartmeyer, James A.; Holly, Anne S.

    1982-06-01

    The use of Indium-111-oxine labeled autologous platelets has been explored in a dog-catheter model, as well as in a variety of clinical disorders in man. Newly forming experimental thrombi in dogs label well during the first 45-90 minutes, then lose both label and thrombus mass in a manner consistent with fibrinolysis. Thrombus weight is linearly related to In-111 activity, so that in vivo scintigraphy will be a practical method to evaluate various thrombotic stimuli and anti-thrombotic interventions experimentally. Preformed thrombus, however, labels poorly and cannot be detected by imaging in this dog model. Initial clinical experience with a variety of arterial, venous and cardiac thrombotic states is reviewed, indicating some of the strengths and same of the potential weaknesses of this new scintigraphic technique.

  1. Efficient photovoltaic heterojunctions of indium tin oxides on silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubow, J. B.; Sites, J. R.; Burk, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Heterojunction diodes of indium tin oxide films sputtered on to p-silicon using ion-beam techniques display significant photovoltaic effects when exposed to sunlight. Galvanomagnetic and optical measurements confirm that the oxide films are highly degenerate transparent semiconductors. At a tin oxide concentration of 10%, an open-circuit voltage of 0.51 V was observed along with a short-circuit current of 32 mA/sq cm, a fill factor of 0.70, and a conversion efficiency of 12%. As the concentration was raised to 70%, the voltage remained steady, the current fell to 27 mA/sq cm, and the fill factor fell to 0.60

  2. Temperature dependent structural and vibrational properties of liquid indium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, A. B.; Bhatt, N. K.

    2018-05-01

    The influence of the temperature effect on both the structure factor and the phonon dispersion relation of liquid indium have been investigated by means of pseudopotential theory. The Percus-Yevick Hard Sphere reference system is applied to describe the structural calculation. The effective electron-ion interaction is explained by using modified empty core potential due to Hasegawa et al. along with a local field correction function due to Ichimaru-Utsumi (IU). The temperature dependence of pair potential needed at higher temperatures was achieved by multiplying the damping factor exp(- π/kBT2k F r ) in the pair potential. Very close agreement of static structure factor, particularly, at elevated temperatures confirms the validity of the local potential. A positive dispersion is found in low-q region and the correct trend of phonon dispersion branches like the experimental; shows all broad features of collective excitations in liquid metals.

  3. Sulfur Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, B. H.

    2007-12-01

    Variations in surface tension affect the buoyancy of objects floating in a liquid. Thus an object floating in water will sink deeper in the presence of dishwater fluid. This is a very minor but measurable effect. It causes for instance ducks to drown in aqueous solutions with added surfactant. The surface tension of liquid iron is very strongly affected by the presence of sulfur which acts as a surfactant in this system varying between 1.9 and 0.4 N/m at 10 mass percent Sulfur (Lee & Morita (2002), This last value is inferred to be the maximum value for Sulfur inferred to be present in the liquid outer core. Venting of Sulfur from the liquid core manifests itself on the Earth surface by the 105 to 106 ton of sulfur vented into the atmosphere annually (Wedepohl, 1984). Inspection of surface Sulfur emission indicates that venting is non-homogeneously distributed over the Earth's surface. The implication of such large variation in surface tension in the liquid outer core are that at locally low Sulfur concentration, the liquid outer core does not wet the predominantly MgSiO3 matrix with which it is in contact. However at a local high in Sulfur, the liquid outer core wets this matrix which in the fluid state has a surface tension of 0.4 N/m (Bansal & Doremus, 1986), couples with it, and causes it to sink. This differential and diapiric movement is transmitted through the essentially brittle mantle (1024 Pa.s, Lambeck & Johnson, 1998; the maximum value for ice being about 1030 Pa.s at 0 K, in all likely hood representing an upper bound of viscosity for all materials) and manifests itself on the surface by the roughly 20 km differentiation, about 0.1 % of the total mantle thickness, between topographical heights and lows with concomitant lateral movement in the crust and upper mantle resulting in thin skin tectonics. The brittle nature of the medium though which this movement is transmitted suggests that the extremes in topography of the D" layer are similar in range to

  4. Photoconductivity in reactively evaporated copper indium selenide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urmila, K. S.; Asokan, T. Namitha; Pradeep, B.; Jacob, Rajani; Philip, Rachel Reena

    2014-01-01

    Copper indium selenide thin films of composition CuInSe2 with thickness of the order of 130 nm are deposited on glass substrate at a temperature of 423 ±5 K and pressure of 10-5 mbar using reactive evaporation, a variant of Gunther's three temperature method with high purity Copper (99.999%), Indium (99.999%) and Selenium (99.99%) as the elemental starting materials. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies shows that the films are polycrystalline in nature having preferred orientation of grains along the (112) plane. The structural type of the film is found to be tetragonal with particle size of the order of 32 nm. The structural parameters such as lattice constant, particle size, dislocation density, number of crystallites per unit area and strain in the film are also evaluated. The surface morphology of CuInSe2 films are studied using 2D and 3D atomic force microscopy to estimate the grain size and surface roughness respectively. Analysis of the absorption spectrum of the film recorded using UV-Vis-NIR Spectrophotometer in the wavelength range from 2500 nm to cutoff revealed that the film possess a direct allowed transition with a band gap of 1.05 eV and a high value of absorption coefficient (α) of 106 cm-1 at 570 nm. Photoconductivity at room temperature is measured after illuminating the film with an FSH lamp (82 V, 300 W). Optical absorption studies in conjunction with the good photoconductivity of the prepared p-type CuInSe2 thin films indicate its suitability in photovoltaic applications.

  5. Cloudy Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-05-08

    Decades of satellite observations and astronaut photographs show that clouds dominate space-based views of Earth. One study based on nearly a decade of satellite data estimated that about 67 percent of Earth’s surface is typically covered by clouds. This is especially the case over the oceans, where other research shows less than 10 percent of the sky is completely clear of clouds at any one time. Over land, 30 percent of skies are completely cloud free. Earth’s cloudy nature is unmistakable in this global cloud fraction map, based on data collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite. While MODIS collects enough data to make a new global map of cloudiness every day, this version of the map shows an average of all of the satellite’s cloud observations between July 2002 and April 2015. Colors range from dark blue (no clouds) to light blue (some clouds) to white (frequent clouds).

  6. Earth observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-31

    ISS040-E-113700 (31 Aug. 2014) --- This panorama view, photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the International Space Station, shows tan-colored dust of a major dust storm obscuring the Persian Gulf and the its northern shoreline. Strong north winds often blow in summer, churning up dust from the entire length of the desert surfaces of the Tigris and Euphrates valleys (top left). Dust partly obscures the hundreds of kilometers of Iraq’s light-green agricultural lands along these rivers (left). A line of thunderstorms is being set off by the Zagros Mountains of Iran (right), with the setting sun casting long shadows from the thunderheads. Space station crews see sixteen sunrises and sunsets every day from low Earth orbit. Here the crew captured dusk in a darkening Iranian landscape (right).

  7. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-24

    ISS040-E-018725 (24 June 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station photographed this image featuring most of the peninsular portion of the state of Florida. Lake Okeechobee stands out in the south central part of the state. The heavily-populated area of Miami can be traced along the Atlantic Coast near the bottom of the scene. Cape Canaveral and the Kennedy Space Center are in lower right portion of the image on the Atlantic Coast. The Florida Keys are at the south (left) portion of the scene and the Gulf Coast, including the Tampa-St. Petersburg area, is near frame center.

  8. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-29

    ISS036-E-025908 (29 July 2013) --- One of the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, as it was passing over Africa, took this night picture of Sicily (center frame) and much of Italy (frame left to frame center) on July 29, 2013. The Stretto de Messina, which separates Sicily from Italy, is near frame center. The high oblique 50mm lens shot includes a scenic horizon with a number of stars in the late July sky. Barely visible in the darkness, part of the long arm of the Space Station Remote Manipulator System or Canadarm2 runs diagonally through the right one-third of the image.

  9. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-15

    ISS028-E-017123 (16 July 2011) --- Separate atmospheric optical phenomena were captured in this electronic still photograph from the Inernational Space Station. The thin greenish band stretching along the Earth's horizon is airglow; light emitted by the atmosphere from a layer about 30 kilometers thick and about 100 kilometers in altitude. The predominant emission in airglow is the green 5577 Angstrom wavelength light from atomic oxygen atoms. Airglow is always and everywhere present in the atmosphere; it results from the recombination of molecules that have been broken apart by solar radiation during the day. But airglow is so faint that it can only be seen at night by looking "edge on" at the emission layer, such as the view astronauts and cosmonauts have in orbit. The second phenomenon is the appearnce of Aurora Australis.

  10. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-22

    ISS042E007131 (11/22/2014) — Astronauts aboard the International Space Station captured this image of a huge crater in Africa on Nov. 22, 2014. This is the Richat Structure in northwestern Mauritania, otherwise known as the “Eye of the Sahara.” Scientists are still deciding whether this was formed by a subterranean volcano or impact from a large meteor. Deep in the Sahara Desert it is nearly a perfect circle, it is 1.2 miles (1.9 kilometers) wide, and sports a rim 330 feet (100 meters) tall. The crater sits in a vast plain of rocks so ancient they were deposited hundreds of millions of years before the first dinosaurs walked the Earth.

  11. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-01-13

    The Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft undergoing preflight preparation in the Spacecraft Assembly Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). NEAR will perform two critical mission events - Mathilde flyby and the Deep-Space maneuver. NEAR will fly-by Mathilde, a 38-mile (61-km) diameter C-type asteroid, making use of its imaging system to obtain useful optical navigation images. The primary science instrument will be the camera, but measurements of magnetic fields and mass also will be made. The Deep-Space Maneuver (DSM) will be executed about a week after the Mathilde fly-by. The DSM represents the first of two major burns during the NEAR mission of the 100-pound bi-propellant (Hydrazine/nitrogen tetroxide) thruster. This maneuver is necessary to lower the perihelion distance of NEAR's trajectory. The DSM will be conducted in two segments to minimize the possibility of an overburn situation.

  12. SEPARATION PROCESS FOR ZIRCONIUM AND COMPOUNDS THEREOF

    DOEpatents

    Crandall, H.W.; Thomas, J.R.

    1959-06-30

    The separation of zirconium from columbium, rare earths, yttrium and the alkaline earth metals, such mixtures of elements occurring in zirconium ores or neutron irradiated uranium is described. According to the invention a suitable separation of zirconium from a one normal acidic aqueous solution containing salts, nitrates for example, of tetravalent zirconium, pentavalent columbium, yttrium, rare earths in the trivalent state and alkaline earths can be obtained by contacting the aqueous solution with a fluorinated beta diketonc alone or in an organic solvent solution, such as benzene, to form a zirconium chelate compound. When the organic solvent is present the zirconium chelate compound is directly extracted; otherwise it is separated by filtration. The zirconium may be recovered from contacting the organic solvent solution containing the chelated compound by back extraction with either an aqueous hydrofluoric acid or an oxalic acid solution.

  13. An evaluation of the potential yield of indium recycled from end-of-life LCDs: A case study in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hengguang; Gu, Yifan; Wu, Yufeng; Zhang, Yi-Nan; Wang, Wei

    2015-12-01

    With the advances in electronics and information technology, China has gradually become the largest consumer of household appliances (HAs). Increasingly, end-of-life (EOL) HAs are generated in China. EOL recycling is a promising strategy to reduce dependence on virgin production, and indium is one of the recycled substances. The potential yield of indium recycling has not been systematically evaluated in China thus far. This paper estimates the potential yield of recycled indium from waste liquid crystal displays (LCDs) in China during the period from 2015 to 2030. The quantities of indium that will be used to produce LCDs are also predicted. The estimates focus on the following three key LCD waste sources: LCD TVs, desktop computers and portable computers. The results show that the demand for indium will be increasing in the near future. It is expected that 350 tonnes of indium will be needed to produce LCDs in China in 2035. The indium recycled from EOL LCDs, however, is much less than the demand and only accounts for approximately 48% of the indium demand. The sustainable index of indium is always less than 0.5. Therefore, future indium recycling efforts should focus on the development of recycling technology and the improvement of the relevant policy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Multipurpose Compound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Specially formulated derivatives of an unusual basic compound known as Alcide may be the answer to effective treatment and prevention of the disease bovine mastitis, a bacterial inflammation of a cow's mammary gland that results in loss of milk production and in extreme cases, death. Manufactured by Alcide Corporation the Alcide compound has killed all tested bacteria, virus and fungi, shortly after contact, with minimal toxic effects on humans or animals. Alcide Corporation credits the existence of the mastitis treatment/prevention products to assistance provided the company by NERAC, Inc.

  15. Optimal design study of high efficiency indium phosphide space solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Flood, Dennis J.

    1990-01-01

    Recently indium phosphide solar cells have achieved beginning of life AMO efficiencies in excess of 19 pct. at 25 C. The high efficiency prospects along with superb radiation tolerance make indium phosphide a leading material for space power requirements. To achieve cost effectiveness, practical cell efficiencies have to be raised to near theoretical limits and thin film indium phosphide cells need to be developed. The optimal design study is described of high efficiency indium phosphide solar cells for space power applications using the PC-1D computer program. It is shown that cells with efficiencies over 22 pct. AMO at 25 C could be fabricated by achieving proper material and process parameters. It is observed that further improvements in cell material and process parameters could lead to experimental cell efficiencies near theoretical limits. The effect of various emitter and base parameters on cell performance was studied.

  16. Investigation of buried homojunctions in p-InP formed during sputter deposition of both indium tin oxide and indium oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gessert, T. A.; Li, X.; Wanlass, M. W.; Nelson, A. J.; Coutts, T. J.

    1990-01-01

    While dc magnetron sputter deposition of indium tin oxide leads to the formation of a buried homojunction in single crystal p-type InP, the mechanism of type conversion of the InP surface is not apparent. In view of the recent achievement of nearly 17-percent global efficiencies for cells fabricated solely by sputter deposition of In2O3, it is presently surmised that tin may not be an essential element in type conversion. A variety of electrical and optical techniques are presently used to evaluate the changes at both indium tin oxide/InP and indium oxide/InP interfaces. Such mechanisms as the passivation of acceptors by hydrogen, and sputter damage, are found to occur simultaneously.

  17. Macrophage Solubilization and Cytotoxicity of Indium-Containing Particles In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    Indium-containing particles (ICPs) are used extensively in the microelectronics industry. Pulmonary toxicity is observed after inhalation exposure to ICPs; however, the mechanism(s) of pathogenesis is unclear. ICPs are insoluble at physiological pH and are initially engulfed by alveolar macrophages (and likely airway epithelial cells). We hypothesized that uptake of ICPs by macrophages followed by phagolysosomal acidification results in the solubilization of ICPs into cytotoxic indium ions. To address this, we characterized the in vitro cytotoxicity of indium phosphide (InP) or indium tin oxide (ITO) particles with macrophages (RAW cells) and lung-derived epithelial (LA-4) cells at 24h using metabolic (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) and membrane integrity (lactate dehydrogenase) assays. InP and ITO were readily phagocytosed by RAW and LA-4 cells; however, the particles were much more cytotoxic to RAW cells and cytotoxicity was dose dependent. Treatment of RAW cells with cytochalasin D (CytoD) blocked particle phagocytosis and reduced cytotoxicity. Treatment of RAW cells with bafilomycin A1, a specific inhibitor of phagolysosomal acidification, also reduced cytotoxicity but did not block particle uptake. Based on direct indium measurements, the concentration of ionic indium was increased in culture medium from RAW but not LA-4 cells following 24-h treatment with particles. Ionic indium derived from RAW cells was significantly reduced by treatment with CytoD. These data implicate macrophage uptake and solubilization of InP and ITO via phagolysosomal acidification as requisite for particle-induced cytotoxicity and the release of indium ions. This may apply to other ICPs and strongly supports the notion that ICPs require solubilization in order to be toxic. PMID:23872580

  18. Perfluorinated Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorinated compounds such as the perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) and their derivatives are important man-made chemicals that have wide consumer and industrial applications. They are relatively contemporary chemicals, being in use only since the 1950s, and until recently, have be...

  19. Enhanced optical properties due to indium incorporation in zinc oxide nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Farid, S.; Mukherjee, S.; Sarkar, K.

    Indium-doped zinc oxide nanowires grown by vapor-liquid-solid technique with 1.6 at. % indium content show intense room temperature photoluminescence (PL) that is red shifted to 20 meV from band edge. We report on a combination of nanowires and nanobelts-like structures with enhanced optical properties after indium doping. The near band edge emission shift gives an estimate for the carrier density as high as 5.5 × 10{sup 19 }cm{sup −3} for doped nanowires according to Mott's critical density theory. Quenching of the visible green peak is seen for doped nanostructures indicating lesser oxygen vacancies and improved quality. PL and transmission electron microscopy measurementsmore » confirm indium doping into the ZnO lattice, whereas temperature dependent PL data give an estimation of the donor and acceptor binding energies that agrees well with indium doped nanowires. This provides a non-destructive technique to estimate doping for 1D structures as compared to the traditional FET approach. Furthermore, these indium doped nanowires can be a potential candidate for transparent conducting oxides applications and spintronic devices with controlled growth mechanism.« less

  20. Rare Earth Polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Boskovic, Colette

    2017-09-19

    Longstanding and important applications make use of the chemical and physical properties of both rare earth metals and polyoxometalates of early transition metals. The catalytic, optical, and magnetic features of rare earth metal ions are well-known, as are the reversible multielectron redox and photoredox capabilities of polyoxomolybdates and polyoxotungstates. The combination of rare earth ions and polyoxometalates in discrete molecules and coordination polymers is of interest for the unique combination of chemical and physical properties that can arise. This Account surveys our efforts to synthesize and investigate compounds with rare earth ions and polyoxometalates (RE-POMs), sometimes with carboxylate-based organic coligands. Our general synthetic approach is "bottom-up", which affords well-defined nanoscale molecules, typically in crystalline form and amenable to single-crystal X-ray diffraction for structure determination. Our particular focus is on elucidation of the physical properties conferred by the different structural components with a view to ultimately being able to tune these properties chemically. For this purpose, we employ a variety of spectroscopic, magnetochemical, electrochemical, and scattering techniques in concert with theoretical modeling and computation. Studies of RE-POM single-molecule magnets (SMMs) have utilized magnetic susceptibility, inelastic neutron scattering, and ab initio calculations. These investigations have allowed characterization of the crystal field splitting of the rare earth(III) ions that is responsible for the SMM properties of slow magnetic relaxation and magnetization quantum tunneling. Such SMMs are promising for applications in quantum computing and molecular spintronics. Photophysical measurements of a family of hybrid RE-POMs with organic ligands have afforded insights into sensitization of Tb(III) and Eu(III) emission through both organic and polyoxometalate chromophores in the same molecule. Detailed

  1. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-30

    ISS040E112662 (08/30/2014) ---- Cancún, Mexico. A long lens was used by astronauts aboard the International Space Station to take this image, and it highlights many natural and built features. The street pattern of Mexico’s tourist mecca, Cancún, contrasts with the waterways of the marinas that open into the bay and the lagoons. Brilliant blue water over coral reefs contrast with the dark waters of inland lagoons. The reefs are the second largest reef system on Earth, and draw tourists from all over the world. The wide, well developed beach on the gulf coast (image upper right) is the result of vigorous wave energy; the white sand makes the beach easily visible from space. But wave energy is reduced along Cancún’s protected shoreline (image center) and the beaches are thin or non-existant. Fair-weather cumulus clouds are scattered across the image top left. To shoot crisp mages with long lenses, astronaut photographers must learn to brace themselves against the ISS bulkhead to prevent any slight shaking that would blur or “smear” the picture. Counterintuitively, they then need to move the camera carefully retaining the target at the same point in the viewfinder (the landscape moves across the viewfinder quickly with long lenses). This is called tracking the target and requires good coordination by the photographer—again, to prevent blurring. Shorter lenses do not require this skill because the image appears to pass more slowly across the viewfinder.

  2. Earth Observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-20

    ISS024-E-015121 (20 Sept. 2010) --- Twitchell Canyon Fire in central Utah is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 24 crew member on the International Space Station (ISS). The Twitchell Canyon Fire near central Utah?s Fishlake National Forest is reported to have an area of approximately 13,383 hectares (approximately 134 square kilometers, or 33,071 acres). This detailed image shows smoke plumes generated by several fire spots close to the southwestern edge of the burned area. The fire was started by a lightning strike on July 20, 2010. Whereas many of the space station images of Earth are looking straight down (nadir), this photograph was exposed at an angle. The space station was located over a point approximately 509 kilometers (316 miles) to the northeast, near the Colorado/Wyoming border, at the time the image was taken on Sept. 20. Southwesterly winds were continuing to extend smoke plumes from the fire to the northeast. While the Twitchell Canyon region is sparsely populated, Interstate Highway 15 is visible at upper left.

  3. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-05

    ISS040-E-088891 (5 Aug. 2014) --- Thunderheads near Borneo, Indonesia are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the International Space Station. Late afternoon sun casts long shadows from high thunderhead anvils over southern Borneo. Crews aboard the space station have recently concentrated on panoramic views of clouds?taken with lenses similar to the focal length of the human eye. These images reveal the kinds of views crews see -- huge areas of the planet, with a strong three-dimensional sense of what it is like to fly 350 kilometers above Earth. Winds usually blow in different directions at different altitudes. High-altitude winds are clearly sweeping the tops off the many tallest thunderclouds, generating long anvils of diffuse cirrus plumes that trail south. At low levels, ?streets? of white dots -- fair-weather cumulus clouds -- are aligned with west-moving winds (lower left). Small smoke plumes from forest fires onshore are also aligned west. Storm formation near the horizon -- more than 1,000 kilometers away (center) -- is assisted by air currents rising over the central mountains of Borneo.

  4. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-14

    ISS037-E-011470 (14 Oct. 2013) --- Man-made archipelagos near Dubai, United Arab Emirates, are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 37 crew member on the International Space Station, flying at approximately 220 miles above Earth. The municipality of Dubai is the largest city of the Persian Gulf emirate of the same name, and has built a global reputation for large-scale developments and architectural works. Among the most visible of these developments -- particularly from the perspective of astronauts onboard the space station -- are three man-made archipelagos. The two Palm Islands -- Palm Jumeirah (right) and Palm Jebel Ali (out of frame further to the right) -- appear as stylized palm trees when viewed from above. The World Islands (center frame) evoke a rough map of the world from an air- or space-borne perspective. The Palm Jumeirah project began in 2001 and required more than 50 million cubic meters of dredged sand to raise the islands above the Persian Gulf sea level. Construction of the Palm Jumeirah islands was completed in 2006; for several years now they have been developed for residential and commercial housing and infrastructure. Creation of the World Islands was begun in 2003 and completed in 2008, using 320 million cubic meters of sand and 37 million tons of rock for the surrounding 27 kilometer-long protective breakwater.

  5. Investigation on the negative bias illumination stress-induced instability of amorphous indium-tin-zinc-oxide thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jaeman; Kim, Dae Geun; Kim, Dong Myong; Choi, Sung-Jin; Lim, Jun-Hyung; Lee, Je-Hun; Kim, Yong-Sung; Ahn, Byung Du; Kim, Dae Hwan

    2014-10-01

    The quantitative analysis of mechanism on negative bias illumination stress (NBIS)-induced instability of amorphous indium-tin-zinc-oxide thin-film transistor (TFT) was suggested along with the effect of equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) of gate insulator. The analysis was implemented through combining the experimentally extracted density of subgap states and the device simulation. During NBIS, it was observed that the thicker EOT causes increase in both the shift of threshold voltage and the variation of subthreshold swing as well as the hump-like feature in a transfer curve. We found that the EOT-dependence of NBIS instability can be clearly explicated with the donor creation model, in which a larger amount of valence band tail states is transformed into either the ionized oxygen vacancy VO2+ or peroxide O22- with the increase of EOT. It was also found that the VO2+-related extrinsic factor accounts for 80%-92% of the total donor creation taking place in the valence band tail states while the rest is taken by the O22- related intrinsic factor. The ratio of extrinsic factor compared to the total donor creation also increased with the increase of EOT, which could be explained by more prominent oxygen deficiency. The key founding of our work certainly represents that the established model should be considered very effective for analyzing the instability of the post-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) ZnO-based compound semiconductor TFTs with the mobility, which is much higher than those of a-IGZO TFTs.

  6. Preparation and Single-Crystal X-Ray Structures of Four Related Mixed-Ligand 4-Methylpyridine Indium Halide Complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Clark, Eric B.; Schupp, John D.; Williams, Jennifer N.; Duraj, Stan A.; Fanwick, Philip E.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the structures of four related indium complexes obtained during synthesis of solid-state materials precursors. Indium adducts of halides and 4-methylpyridine, InX3(pic)3 (X = Cl, Br; pic = 4-methylpyridine) consist of octahedral molecules with meridional (mer) geometry. Crystals of mer-InCl3(pic)3 (1) are triclinic, space group P1(bar) (No. 2), with a = 9.3240(3), b = 13.9580(6), c = 16.7268 (7) A, alpha = 84.323(2), beta = 80.938(2), gamma = 78.274(3)Z = 4, R = 0.035 for 8820 unique reflections. Crystals of mer-InBr3(pic)3 (2) are monoclinic, space group P21/n (No. 14), with a = 15.010(2), b = 19.938(2), c = 16.593(3), beta = 116.44(1)Z = 8, R = 0.053 for 4174 unique reflections. The synthesis and structures of related compounds with phenylsulfide (chloride) (3) and a dimeric complex with bridging hydroxide (bromide) (4) coordination is also described. Crystals of trans-In(SC6H5)Cl2(pic)3 (3) are monoclinic, space group P21/n (No. 14), with a = 9.5265(2), b = 17.8729(6), c = 13.8296(4), beta = 99.7640(15)Z = 4, R = 0.048 for 5511 unique reflections. Crystals of [In(mu-OH)Br2(pic)22 (4) are tetragonal, space group = I41cd (No. 110) with a = 19.8560(4), b = 19.8560(4), c = 25.9528(6), Z = 8, R = 0.039 for 5982 unique reflections.

  7. Exposure Potential and Health Impacts of Indium and Gallium, Metals Critical to Emerging Electronics and Energy Technologies.

    PubMed

    White, Sarah Jane O; Shine, James P

    2016-12-01

    The rapid growth of new electronics and energy technologies requires the use of rare elements of the periodic table. For many of these elements, little is known about their environmental behavior or human health impacts. This is true for indium and gallium, two technology critical elements. Increased environmental concentrations of both indium and gallium create the potential for increased environmental exposure, though little is known about the extent of this exposure. Evidence is mounting that indium and gallium can have substantial toxicity, including in occupational settings where indium lung disease has been recognized as a potentially fatal disease caused by the inhalation of indium particles. This paper aims to review the basic chemistry, changing environmental concentrations, potential for human exposure, and known health effects of indium and gallium.

  8. Suitability of the rare-earth compounds Dy2Ti2O7 and Gd3Al5O12 for low temperature (4K-20K) magnetic refrigeration cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements were made of the magnetic entropy and magnetization of powered samples of the compounds Dy2Ti2O7 and Gd3Al5O12. The magnetization was measured for temperatures at and below 4.2 K, in applied fields ranging to 7.0 tesla. Isothermal changes in magnetic entropy were measured for temperatures from 1.2 to 20 K, in applied fields up to 10 tesla. The results of the measurements are consistent with a doublet ground state for Dy2Ti2O7, and an eight-fold degenerate ground state for Gd3Al5O12. Absolute values of magnetic entropy have been obtained at the lower temperatures, permitting the isotherms to be properly located in the S-H plane with the use of adiabatic magnetization data. The iso-field lines in the S-T plane were determined. The results indicate that Dy2Ti2O7 can absorb a maximum of 71 + or - 4 joules/kg of heat at 4.2 K, while Gd3Al5O12 can absorb 233 + or - joules/kg at the same temperature. The large difference between the two is most likely a result of crystal field interactions in the dysoprosium compound. Both materials can be cycled adiabatically between 4.2 and 20 K.

  9. Earth Observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-21

    ISS036-E-011034 (21 June 2013) --- The Salton Trough is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 36 crew member on the International Space Station. The Imperial and Coachella Valleys of southern California – and the corresponding Mexicali Valley and Colorado River Delta in Mexico – are part of the Salton Trough, a large geologic structure known to geologists as a graben or rift valley that extends into the Gulf of California. The trough is a geologically complex zone formed by interaction of the San Andreas transform fault system that is, broadly speaking, moving southern California towards Alaska; and the northward motion of the Gulf of California segment of the East Pacific Rise that continues to widen the Gulf of California by sea-floor spreading. According to scientists, sediments deposited by the Colorado River have been filling the northern rift valley (the Salton Trough) for the past several million years, excluding the waters of the Gulf of California and providing a fertile environment – together with irrigation—for the development of extensive agriculture in the region (visible as green and yellow-brown fields at center). The Salton Sea, a favorite landmark of astronauts in low Earth orbit, was formed by an irrigation canal rupture in 1905, and today is sustained by agricultural runoff water. A wide array of varying landforms and land uses in the Salton Trough are visible from space. In addition to the agricultural fields and Salton Sea, easily visible metropolitan areas include Yuma, AZ (lower left); Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico (center); and the San Diego-Tijuana conurbation on the Pacific Coast (right). The approximately 72-kilometer-long Algodones Dunefield is visible at lower left.

  10. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-07-10

    ISS032-E-006129 (10 July 2012) --- Flooding in Krymsk in the Krasnodar region of southern Russia is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 32 crew member on the International Space Station. On the night of July 7, 2012 a major storm dumped more than a foot of water on the southern Russian area of Krasnodar, near the Black Sea. The resulting flood was likened to a tsunami, and to date, more than 170 people died, most from the city of Krymsk. The Moscow times reports that more than 19,000 people lost everything. This image taken by cosmonauts aboard the space station shows the city of Krymsk. The tan-colored areas indicate some of the regions that were flooded; the color is probably due to the mud and debris that were left by the floodwaters. Krymsk is located in the western foothills on the northern slope of the Caucasus Mountains?a range that stretches between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea. The vast amount of rain quickly overwhelmed the small river channels that flow northward from the mountains to the Russian lowlands and the Kuban River; Krymsk, located on one of those tributaries, was directly in the pathway of the flash flood. As part of the international partner agreement to use the International Space Station to benefit humanity, crew members and other Earth observing instruments provide best-effort support to the International Disaster Charter (IDC) when it is activated by collecting imagery of areas on the ground impacted by natural events such as the flooding in Krymsk. This image was acquired July 10, 2012 in response to the IDC activation.

  11. Earth Observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-02

    ISS028-E-006687 (2 June 2011) --- Estuaries on the northwestern coast of Madagascar are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 28 crew member on the International Space Station. Regions where fresh water flowing in rivers and salt water from the seas and oceans mix are called estuaries, and they are among the most biologically productive ecosystems on Earth. This photograph highlights two estuaries located along the northwestern coastline of the island of Madagascar. The Mozambique Channel (top) separates Madagascar from the southeastern coast of Africa. Bombetoka Bay (upper left) is fed by the Betsiboka River and is a frequent subject of astronaut photography due to its striking red floodplain sediments. Mahajamba Bay (right) is fed by several rivers including the Mahajamba and Sofia Rivers; like the Betsiboka, the floodplains of these rivers also contain reddish sediments eroded from their basins upstream. The brackish (mix of fresh and salty water) conditions found in most estuaries host unique plant and animal species adapted to live in such environments. Mangroves in particular are a common plant species found in and around Madagascar estuaries, and Bombetoka Bay contains some of the largest remaining stands. Estuaries also host abundant fish and shellfish species ? many of which need access to freshwater for a portion of their life cycles ? and these in turn support local and migratory bird species that prey on them. However, human activities such as urban development, overfishing, and increased sediment loading from erosion of upriver highlands threaten the ecosystem health of the estuaries. In particular, the silt deposits in Bombetoka Bay at the mouth of the Betsiboka River have been filling in the bay.

  12. Earth Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    For pipeline companies, mapping, facilities inventory, pipe inspections, environmental reporting, etc. is a monumental task. An Automated Mapping/Facilities Management/Geographic Information Systems (AM/FM/GIS) is the solution. However, this is costly and time consuming. James W. Sewall Company, an AM/FM/GIS consulting firm proposed an EOCAP project to Stennis Space Center (SSC) to develop a computerized system for storage and retrieval of digital aerial photography. This would provide its customer, Algonquin Gas Transmission Company, with an accurate inventory of rights-of-way locations and pipeline surroundings. The project took four years to complete and an important byproduct was SSC's Digital Aerial Rights-of-Way Monitoring System (DARMS). DARMS saves substantial time and money. EOCAP enabled Sewall to develop new products and expand its customer base. Algonquin now manages regulatory requirements more efficiently and accurately. EOCAP provides government co-funding to encourage private investment in and broader use of NASA remote sensing technology. Because changes on Earth's surface are accelerating, planners and resource managers must assess the consequences of change as quickly and accurately as possible. Pacific Meridian Resources and NASA's Stennis Space Center (SSC) developed a system for monitoring changes in land cover and use, which incorporated the latest change detection technologies. The goal of this EOCAP project was to tailor existing technologies to a system that could be commercialized. Landsat imagery enabled Pacific Meridian to identify areas that had sustained substantial vegetation loss. The project was successful and Pacific Meridian's annual revenues have substantially increased. EOCAP provides government co-funding to encourage private investment in and broader use of NASA remote sensing technology.

  13. Low-temperature mechanical dissipation of thermally evaporated indium film for use in interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Peter G.; Martin, Iain W.; Cunningham, Liam; Craig, Kieran; Hammond, Giles D.; Hofmann, Gerd; Hough, James; Nawrodt, Ronny; Reifert, David; Rowan, Sheila

    2015-06-01

    Indium bonding is under consideration for use in the construction of cryogenic mirror suspensions in future gravitational wave detectors. This paper presents measurements of the mechanical loss of a thermally evaporated indium film over a broad range of frequencies and temperatures. It provides an estimate of the resulting thermal noise at 20 K for a typical test mass geometry for a cryogenic interferometric gravitational wave detector from an indium layer between suspension elements.

  14. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, seawater and natural brines accounted for 51% of US magnesium compounds production. World magnesia production was estimated to be 14.5 Mt. Most of the production came from China, North Korea, Russia and Turkey. Although no specific production figures are available, Japan and the United States are estimated to account for almost one-half of the world's capacity from seawater and brines.

  15. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 60 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production during 2002. Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida. They were also recovered from well brines in Michigan by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties and Rohm & Haas. And they were recovered from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals.

  16. Apparatus for Precise Indium-Bump Bonding of Microchips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wild, Larry; Mulder, Jerry; Alvarado, Nicholas

    2005-01-01

    An improved apparatus has been designed and built for use in precise positioning and pressing of a microchip onto a substrate (which could, optionally, be another microchip) for the purpose of indium-bump bonding. The apparatus (see figure) includes the following: A stereomicroscope, A stage for precise positioning of the microchip in rotation angle (theta) about the nominally vertical pressing axis and in translation along two nominally horizontal coordinate axes (x and y), and An actuator system that causes a bonding tip to press the microchip against the substrate with a precisely controlled force. In operation, the microscope and the stage are used to position the microchip under the bonding tip and to align the indium bumps on the chip and the substrate, then the actuator system is used to apply a prescribed bonding force for a prescribed time. The improved apparatus supplants a partly similar prior apparatus that operated with less precision and repeatability, producing inconsistent and unreliable bonds. Results of the use of the prior apparatus included broken microchips, uneven bonds, and bonds characterized, variously, by overcompression or undercompression. In that apparatus, the bonding force was generated and controlled by use of a micrometer head positioned over the center of a spring-loaded scale, and the force was applied to the microchip via the scale, which was equipped for digital readout of the force. The inconsistency of results was attributed to the following causes: It was not possible to control the bonding force with sufficient precision or repeatability. Particularly troublesome was the inability to control the force at levels less than the weight of 150 g. Excessive compliance in the spring-loaded scale, combined with deviations from parallelarity of the substrate and bonding-tip surfaces, gave rise to nonuniformity in the pressure applied to the microchip, thereby generating excessive stresses and deformations in the microchip. In the

  17. Effect of rare-earth substitution at La-site on structural, electrical and thermoelectric properties of La0.7-xRExSr0.3MnO3 compounds (x = 0, 0.2, 0.3; RE = Eu, Gd, Y)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Y. R. S.; Mangavati, Suraj; Patil, Siddanagouda; Rao, Ashok; Nagaraja, B. S.; Thomas, Riya; Okram, G. S.; Kini, Savitha G.

    2018-04-01

    In the present communication, we present results on the effect of rare-earth (RE) substitution at La-site on the structural, electrical and thermoelectric properties of La0.7-xRExSr0.3MnO3 compounds. The lattice parameters are observed to decrease with RE-doping which is attributed to the fact that the substituted RE ions (RE = Eu, Gd and Y) are smaller than that of La ion. In high temperature semiconducting regime, small polaron hopping (SPH) model is valid, whereas, variable hopping model is valid in low temperature metallic region. The resistivity in the entire temperature range follows percolation model. All the samples exhibit sign reversal in thermopower, S. From temperature dependent S data, it is seen that SPH model is applicable in high temperature regime.

  18. A 3D porous indium(III) coordination polymer involving in-situ ligand synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Han Zhengbo, E-mail: ceshzb@lnu.edu.c; Song Yongjuan; Ji Jianwei

    2009-11-15

    The hydrothermal reaction of In{sup 3+} and 1,2,4-benzenetricarboxylic acid with the presence of piperazine leads to the generation of a novel 3D porous coordination polymer, [H{sub 3}O][In{sub 2}(btc)(bdc)(OH){sub 2}].5.5H{sub 2}O (1), (btc=1,2,4-benzenetricarboxylate, bdc=1,4-benzenedicarboxylate). Compound 1 crystallizes in orthorhombic space group Pbca with a=16.216(7) A, b=13.437(6) A, c=31.277(14) A, and Z=8. It is interesting to find that the in-situ decarboxylation reaction of 1,2,4-benzenetricarboxylate (btc) partially transformed into 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate (bdc) occurs. The 16 indium(III) centers were linked by four btc, four bdc and two mu{sub 2}-OH ligands to form a box-girder. The adjacent box-girders are further connected by the bdc and btcmore » ligands to generate a novel porous metal-organic framework containing nanotubular open channel with a cross-section of approximately 11.5x11.3 A{sup 2}. The micropores are occupied by lattice water molecules, and the solvent-accessible volume of the unit cell was estimated to be 3658.6 A{sup 3}, which is approximately 53.7% of the unit-cell volume (6815.4 A{sup 3}). - Graphical Abstract: The hydrothermal reaction of In{sup 3+} and 1,2,4-benzenetricarboxylic acid with the presence of piperazine leads to the generation of a novel 3D porous coordination polymer, [H{sub 3}O][In{sub 2}(btc)(bdc)(OH){sub 2}].5.5H{sub 2}O, (btc=1,2,4-benzenetricarboxylate, bdc=1,4-benzenedicarboxylate).« less

  19. Investigation of an Electrochemical Method for Separation of Copper, Indium, and Gallium from Pretreated CIGS Solar Cell Waste Materials

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Anna M. K.; Björefors, Fredrik; Steenari, Britt-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Recycling of the semiconductor material copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) is important to ensure a future supply of indium and gallium, which are relatively rare and therefore expensive elements. As a continuation of our previous work, where we recycled high purity selenium from CIGS waste materials, we now show that copper and indium can be recycled by electrodeposition from hydrochloric acid solutions of dissolved selenium-depleted material. Suitable potentials for the reduction of copper and indium were determined to be −0.5 V and −0.9 V (versus the Ag/AgCl reference electrode), respectively, using cyclic voltammetry. Electrodeposition of first copper and then indium from a solution containing the dissolved residue from the selenium separation and ammonium chloride in 1 M HCl gave a copper yield of 100.1 ± 0.5% and an indium yield of 98.1 ± 2.5%. The separated copper and indium fractions contained no significant contamination of the other elements. Gallium remained in solution together with a small amount of indium after the separation of copper and indium and has to be recovered by an alternative method since electrowinning from the chloride-rich acid solution was not effective. PMID:26347901

  20. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011843 (24 June 2013) --- Gravity waves and sunglint on Lake Superior are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 36 crew member on the International Space Station. From the vantage point of the space station, crew members frequently observe Earth atmospheric and surface phenomena in ways impossible to view from the ground. Two such phenomena?gravity waves and sunglint?are illustrated in this photograph of northeastern Lake Superior. The Canadian Shield of southern Ontario (bottom) is covered with extensive green forest canopy typical of early summer. Offshore, and to the west and southwest of Pukaskwa National Park several distinct sets of parallel cloud bands are visible. Gravity waves are produced when moisture-laden air encounters imbalances in air density, such as might be expected when cool air flows over warmer air; this can cause the flowing air to oscillate up and down as it moves, causing clouds to condense as the air rises (cools) and evaporate away as the air sinks (warms). This produces parallel bands of clouds oriented perpendicular to the wind direction. The orientation of the cloud bands visible in this image, parallel to the coastlines, suggests that air flowing off of the land surfaces to the north is interacting with moist, stable air over the lake surface, creating gravity waves. The second phenomenon?sunglint?effects the water surface around and to the northeast of Isle Royale (upper right). Sunglint is caused by light reflection off a water surface; some of the reflected light travels directly back towards the observer, resulting in a bright mirror-like appearance over large expanses of water. Water currents and changes in surface tension (typically caused by presence of oils or surfactants) alter the reflective properties of the water, and can be highlighted by sunglint. For example, surface water currents are visible to the east of Isle Royale that are oriented similarly to the gravity waves ? suggesting that they too

  1. Synthesis and characterization of indium doped La{sub 3}Co{sub 4}Sn{sub 13} skutterudite superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Neha, P.; Srivastava, P.; Shruti,

    2016-05-06

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a novel superconductor La{sub 3}Co{sub 4}Sn{sub 12.35}In{sub 0.65} by Indium doping at Tin site in parent compound La{sub 3}Co{sub 4}Sn{sub 13}. We observe enhanced T{sub c} along with improved superconducting properties as onset compared to parent compound. By transport measurements we get superconducting transition with T{sub c}{sup onset} = 4.7 K and T{sub c}{sup zero} = 3.2 K. In magnetization measurements (ZFC-FC) superconducting transition is observed at 5.1 K. Upper critical field (H{sub c2}) and lower critical field (H{sub c1}) calculated by magneto resistance and M-H loop measurement are found to be 1.65more » T and 0.0026 T respectively. Hall measurement shows the majority charge carrier as electrons with carrier density of the order of 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3}. TEP measurement also support the Hall data as the Seebeck coefficient is negative over whole temperature range of measurement.« less

  2. Structural variations in indium tin tellurides and their thermoelectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neudert, Lukas; Schwarzmüller, Stefan; Schmitzer, Silvia; Schnick, Wolfgang; Oeckler, Oliver

    2018-02-01

    Indium-doped tin tellurides are promising and thoroughly investigated thermoelectric materials. Due to the low solubility of In2Te3 in SnTe and vice versa, samples with the nominal composition (SnTe)3-3x(In2Te3)x with 0.136 ≤ x ≤ 0.75 consist of a defect-rocksalt-type Sn-rich and a defect-sphalerite-type In-rich phase which are endotaxially intergrown and form nanoscale heterostructures. Such nanostructures are kinetically inert and become more pronounced with increasing overall In content. The vacancies often show short-range ordering. These phenomena are investigated by temperature-dependent X-ray diffraction and HRTEM as well as STEM with element mapping by X-ray spectroscopy. The combination of real-structure effects leads to very low lattice thermal conductivity from room temperature up to 500 °C. Thermoelectric figures of merit ZT of heterostructured materials with x = 0.136 reach ZT values up to 0.55 at 400 °C.

  3. A Conductometric Indium Oxide Semiconducting Nanoparticle Enzymatic Biosensor Array

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dongjin; Ondrake, Janet; Cui, Tianhong

    2011-01-01

    We report a conductometric nanoparticle biosensor array to address the significant variation of electrical property in nanomaterial biosensors due to the random network nature of nanoparticle thin-film. Indium oxide and silica nanoparticles (SNP) are assembled selectively on the multi-site channel area of the resistors using layer-by-layer self-assembly. To demonstrate enzymatic biosensing capability, glucose oxidase is immobilized on the SNP layer for glucose detection. The packaged sensor chip onto a ceramic pin grid array is tested using syringe pump driven feed and multi-channel I–V measurement system. It is successfully demonstrated that glucose is detected in many different sensing sites within a chip, leading to concentration dependent currents. The sensitivity has been found to be dependent on the channel length of the resistor, 4–12 nA/mM for channel lengths of 5–20 μm, while the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant is 20 mM. By using sensor array, analytical data could be obtained with a single step of sample solution feeding. This work sheds light on the applicability of the developed nanoparticle microsensor array to multi-analyte sensors, novel bioassay platforms, and sensing components in a lab-on-a-chip. PMID:22163696

  4. Indium phosphide nanowires and their applications in optoelectronic devices

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, Fateen

    2016-01-01

    Group IIIA phosphide nanocrystalline semiconductors are of great interest among the important inorganic materials because of their large direct band gaps and fundamental physical properties. Their physical properties are exploited for various potential applications in high-speed digital circuits, microwave and optoelectronic devices. Compared to II–VI and I–VII semiconductors, the IIIA phosphides have a high degree of covalent bonding, a less ionic character and larger exciton diameters. In the present review, the work done on synthesis of III–V indium phosphide (InP) nanowires (NWs) using vapour- and solution-phase approaches has been discussed. Doping and core–shell structure formation of InP NWs and their sensitization using higher band gap semiconductor quantum dots is also reported. In the later section of this review, InP NW-polymer hybrid material is highlighted in view of its application as photodiodes. Lastly, a summary and several different perspectives on the use of InP NWs are discussed. PMID:27118920

  5. X-ray characterization of indium during melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondi, P.; Montanari, R.; Costanza, G.

    During melting of Indium the structure of solid and liquid phases have been investigated by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) in 1-g conditions. At the melting point T M a re-orientation of crystalline grains occurs in the solid phase. The texture change, unusually rapid for a thermally activated process, is attributed to an abnormal increase of vacancy concentration. This explanation is in agreement with the observed shifts of XRD peaks towards lower angles. As a consequence of the texture change, the lattice planes facing the first formed liquid are (002) and (101) planes, i.e. those planes allocating 1st and 2nd neighbours around a given atom with shell radii very close to the mean distance of nearest neighbours in liquid as obtained from the radial distribution function (RDF). Convective motions in the liquid can be eliminated by repeating the same XRD measurements in μ-g. To get the best experimental conditions it is discussed the possibility to use thin oxide films grown on the external surface of samples as containers during melting. This technique was already successfully tested by present investigators in the experiment ES 311 A-B carried out during the mission SPACELAB-1.

  6. Sputtered boron indium oxide thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Kevin A.; Gouliouk, Vasily; Keszler, Douglas A.; Wager, John F.

    2017-11-01

    Boron indium oxide (BIO) is studied for thin-film transistor (TFT) channel layer applications. Sputtered BIO thin films exhibit an amorphous phase over a wide range of B2O3/In2O3 ratios and remain amorphous up to 500 °C. The band gap decreases linearly with decreasing boron content, whereas device performance generally improves with decreasing boron content. The best amorphous BIO TFT exhibits a field-effect mobility of 10 cm2 V-1 s-1, turn-on voltage of 2.5 V, and sub-threshold swing of 0.72 V/dec. Decreasing the boron content to 12.5% leads to a polycrystalline phase, but further increases the mobility up to 20-40 cm2 V-1 s-1. TCAD simulation results suggest that the reason for higher performance after increasing the anneal temperature from 200 to 400 °C is due to a lower defect density in the sub-bandgap region of the BIO channel layer.

  7. Indium phosphide nanowires and their applications in optoelectronic devices.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Fateen; Iqbal, Azhar

    2016-03-01

    Group IIIA phosphide nanocrystalline semiconductors are of great interest among the important inorganic materials because of their large direct band gaps and fundamental physical properties. Their physical properties are exploited for various potential applications in high-speed digital circuits, microwave and optoelectronic devices. Compared to II-VI and I-VII semiconductors, the IIIA phosphides have a high degree of covalent bonding, a less ionic character and larger exciton diameters. In the present review, the work done on synthesis of III-V indium phosphide (InP) nanowires (NWs) using vapour- and solution-phase approaches has been discussed. Doping and core-shell structure formation of InP NWs and their sensitization using higher band gap semiconductor quantum dots is also reported. In the later section of this review, InP NW-polymer hybrid material is highlighted in view of its application as photodiodes. Lastly, a summary and several different perspectives on the use of InP NWs are discussed.

  8. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 40 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2009. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover, and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its operation mentioned above.

  9. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 54 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2010. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its operation mentioned above.

  10. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 52 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2006. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from sea-water by Premier Chemicals in Florida; from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas; and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from brucite by Applied Chemical Magnesias in Texas, from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas from their operations mentioned above. About 59 percent of the magnesium compounds consumed in the United States was used for refractories that are used mainly to line steelmaking furnaces. The remaining 41 percent was consumed in agricultural, chemical, construction, environmental and industrial applications.

  11. The precipitation of indium at elevated pH in a stream influenced by acid mine drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Sarah Jane O.; Hussain, Fatima A.; Hemond, Harold F.; Sacco, Sarah A.; Shine, James P.; Runkel, Robert L.; Walton-Day, Katherine; Kimball, Briant A.

    2017-01-01

    Indium is an increasingly important metal in semiconductors and electronics and has uses in important energy technologies such as photovoltaic cells and light-emitting diodes (LEDs). One significant flux of indium to the environment is from lead, zinc, copper, and tin mining and smelting, but little is known about its aqueous behavior after it is mobilized. In this study, we use Mineral Creek, a headwater stream in southwestern Colorado severely affected by heavy metal contamination as a result of acid mine drainage, as a natural laboratory to study the aqueous behavior of indium. At the existing pH of ~ 3, indium concentrations are 6–29 μg/L (10,000 × those found in natural rivers), and are completely filterable through a 0.45 μm filter. During a pH modification experiment, the pH of the system was raised to > 8, and > 99% of the indium became associated with the suspended solid phase (i.e. does not pass through a 0.45 μm filter). To determine the mechanism of removal of indium from the filterable and likely primarily dissolved phase, we conducted laboratory experiments to determine an upper bound for a sorption constant to iron oxides, and used this, along with other published thermodynamic constants, to model the partitioning of indium in Mineral Creek. Modeling results suggest that the removal of indium from the filterable phase is consistent with precipitation of indium hydroxide from a dissolved phase. This work demonstrates that nonferrous mining processes can be a significant source of indium to the environment, and provides critical information about the aqueous behavior of indium.

  12. Characterization of Gallium Indium Phosphide and Progress of Aluminum Gallium Indium Phosphide System Quantum-Well Laser Diode

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Hiroki

    2017-01-01

    Highly ordered gallium indium phosphide layers with the low bandgap have been successfully grown on the (100) GaAs substrates, the misorientation toward [01−1] direction, using the low-pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition method. It is found that the optical properties of the layers are same as those of the disordered ones, essentially different from the ordered ones having two orientations towards [1−11] and [11−1] directions grown on (100) gallium arsenide substrates, which were previously reported. The bandgap at 300 K is 1.791 eV. The value is the smallest ever reported, to our knowledge. The high performance transverse stabilized AlGaInP laser diodes with strain compensated quantum well structure, which is developed in 1992, have been successfully obtained by controlling the misorientation angle and directions of GaAs substrates. The structure is applied to quantum dots laser diodes. This paper also describes the development history of the quantum well and the quantum dots laser diodes, and their future prospects. PMID:28773227

  13. Characterization of Gallium Indium Phosphide and Progress of Aluminum Gallium Indium Phosphide System Quantum-Well Laser Diode.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Hiroki

    2017-07-28

    Highly ordered gallium indium phosphide layers with the low bandgap have been successfully grown on the (100) GaAs substrates, the misorientation toward [01-1] direction, using the low-pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition method. It is found that the optical properties of the layers are same as those of the disordered ones, essentially different from the ordered ones having two orientations towards [1-11] and [11-1] directions grown on (100) gallium arsenide substrates, which were previously reported. The bandgap at 300 K is 1.791 eV. The value is the smallest ever reported, to our knowledge. The high performance transverse stabilized AlGaInP laser diodes with strain compensated quantum well structure, which is developed in 1992, have been successfully obtained by controlling the misorientation angle and directions of GaAs substrates. The structure is applied to quantum dots laser diodes. This paper also describes the development history of the quantum well and the quantum dots laser diodes, and their future prospects.

  14. Scalable Indium Phosphide Thin-Film Nanophotonics Platform for Photovoltaic and Photoelectrochemical Devices.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qingfeng; Sarkar, Debarghya; Lin, Yuanjing; Yeung, Matthew; Blankemeier, Louis; Hazra, Jubin; Wang, Wei; Niu, Shanyuan; Ravichandran, Jayakanth; Fan, Zhiyong; Kapadia, Rehan

    2017-05-23

    Recent developments in nanophotonics have provided a clear roadmap for improving the efficiency of photonic devices through control over absorption and emission of devices. These advances could prove transformative for a wide variety of devices, such as photovoltaics, photoelectrochemical devices, photodetectors, and light-emitting diodes. However, it is often challenging to physically create the nanophotonic designs required to engineer the optical properties of devices. Here, we present a platform based on crystalline indium phosphide that enables thin-film nanophotonic structures with physical morphologies that are impossible to achieve through conventional state-of-the-art material growth techniques. Here, nanostructured InP thin films have been demonstrated on non-epitaxial alumina inverted nanocone (i-cone) substrates via a low-cost and scalable thin-film vapor-liquid-solid growth technique. In this process, indium films are first evaporated onto the i-cone structures in the desired morphology, followed by a high-temperature step that causes a phase transformation of the indium into indium phosphide, preserving the original morphology of the deposited indium. Through this approach, a wide variety of nanostructured film morphologies are accessible using only control over evaporation process variables. Critically, the as-grown nanotextured InP thin films demonstrate excellent optoelectronic properties, suggesting this platform is promising for future high-performance nanophotonic devices.

  15. Adsorption of collagen to indium oxide nanoparticles and infrared emissivity study thereon

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Yuming; Shan Yun; Sun Yanqing

    Adsorption of collagen to indium oxide nanoparticles was carried out in water-acetone solution at volumetric ratio of 1:1 with pH value varying from 3.2 to 9.3. As indicated by TGA, maximum collagen adsorption to indium oxide nanoparticles occurred at pH of 3.2. It was proposed that noncovalent interactions such as hydrogen bonding, hydrophilic and electrostatic interactions made main contributions to collagen adsorption. The IR emissivity values (8-14 {mu}m) of collagen-adsorbed indium oxide nanoparticles decreased significantly compared to either pure collagen or indium oxide nanoparticles possibly due to the interfacial interactions between collagen and indium oxide nanoparticles. And the lowest infraredmore » emissivity value of 0.587 was obtained at collagen adsorption of 1.94 g/100 g In{sub 2}O{sub 3}. On the chance of improved compatibility with organic adhesives, the chemical activity of adsorbed collagen was further confirmed by grafting copolymerization with methyl methacrylate by formation of polymer shell outside, as evidenced by IR spectrum and transmission electron microscopy.« less

  16. Effect of doping of tin on optoelectronic properties of indium oxide: DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, Madhvendra Nath, E-mail: ommadhav27@gmail.com

    2015-06-24

    Indium tin oxide is widely used transparent conductor. Experimentally observed that 6% tin doping in indium oxide is suitable for optoelectronic applications and more doping beyond this limit degrades the optoelectronic property. The stoichiometry (In{sub 32-x}Sn{sub x}O{sub 48+x/2}; x=0-6) is taken to understand the change in lattice parameter, electronic structure, and optical property of ITO. It is observed that lattice parameter increases and becomes constant after 6% tin doping that is in good agreement of the experimental observation. The electronic structure calculation shows that the high tin doping in indium oxide adversely affects the dispersive nature of the bottom ofmore » conduction band of pure indium oxide and decreases the carrier mobility. Optical calculations show that transmittance goes down upto 60% for the tin concentration more than 6%. The present paper shows that how more than 6% tin doping in indium oxide adversely affects the optoelectronic property of ITO.« less

  17. On the impact of indium distribution on the electronic properties in InGaN nanodisks

    SciTech Connect

    Benaissa, M., E-mail: benaissa.um5@gmail.com, E-mail: benaissa@fsr.ac.ma; Sigle, W.; Aken, P. A. van

    2015-03-09

    We analyze an epitaxially grown heterostructure composed of InGaN nanodisks inserted in GaN nanowires in order to relate indium concentration to the electronic properties. This study was achieved with spatially resolved low-loss electron energy-loss spectroscopy using monochromated electrons to probe optical excitations—plasmons—at nanometer scale. Our findings show that each nanowire has its own indium fluctuation and therefore its own average composition. Due to this indium distribution, a scatter is obtained in plasmon energies, and therefore in the optical dielectric function, of the nanowire ensemble. We suppose that these inhomogeneous electronic properties significantly alter band-to-band transitions and consequently induce emission broadening.more » In addition, the observation of tailing indium composition into the GaN barrier suggests a graded well-barrier interface leading to further inhomogeneous broadening of the electro-optical properties. An improvement in the indium incorporation during growth is therefore needed to narrow the emission linewidth of the presently studied heterostructures.« less

  18. Effect of impurity on high pressure behavior of nano indium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Chitnis, Abhishek, E-mail: abhishekchitnis87@gmail.com; Garg, Nandini; Mishra, A. K.

    2015-06-24

    Angle dispersive x-ray diffraction studies were carried out on a mixture of nano particles of indium titanate, indium oxide, and disordered TiO{sub 2} upto pressures of ∼ 45 GPa. Our studies show that indium titanate undergoes a partial decomposition to its constituent high pressure oxides. However, concomitantly a very small fraction of indium titanate transforms to a denser phase at ∼ 27.5 GPa. This transformation to new phase was found to be irreversible. At this pressure even cubic In{sub 2}O{sub 3} transformed to the In{sub 2}O{sub 3} (II) (iso-structural to Rh{sub 2}O{sub 3} (II)) phase, without any signature of themore » intermediate corundum phase. The high pressure In{sub 2}O{sub 3} (II) phase transforms to the corundum structure on release of pressure. These studies indicate that the presence of a large fraction of seed impurities could have facilitated the decomposition of indium titanate into its constituent oxides at the cost of its incomplete transformation to the high pressure denser phase.« less

  19. Synthesis and decomposition of a novel carboxylate precursor to indium oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Andras, Maria T.; Duraj, Stan A.; Clark, Eric B.; Hehemann, David G.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Fanwick, Phillip E.

    1994-01-01

    Reaction of metallic indium with benzoyl peroxide in 4-1 methylpyridine (4-Mepy) at 25 C produces an eight-coordinate mononuclear indium(III) benzoate, In(eta(sup 2)-O2CC6H5)3(4-Mepy)2 4H2O (I), in yields of up to 60 percent. The indium(III) benzoate was fully characterized by elemental analysis, spectroscopy, and X-ray crystallography; (I) exists in the crystalline state as discrete eight-coordinate molecules; the coordination sphere around the central indium atom is best described as pseudo-square pyramidal. Thermogravimetric analysis of (I) and X-ray diffraction powder studies on the resulting pyrolysate demonstrate that this new benzoate is an inorganic precursor to indium oxide. Decomposition of (I) occurs first by loss of 4-methylpyridine ligands (100 deg-200 deg C), then loss of benzoates with formation of In2O3 at 450 C. We discuss both use of carboxylates as precursors and our approach to their preparation.

  20. Synthesis, structure, and bonding of two lanthanum indium germanides with novel structures and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Guloy, A.M.; Corbett, J.D.

    1996-04-24

    The new tetragonal phases La{sub 3}In{sub 4}Ge and La{sub 3}InGe are obtained from high-temperature reactions of the elements in welded Ta followed by annealing. The structures of both were established by single-crystal X-ray diffraction in tetragonal space group I4/mcm (Z = 4 and 16, {alpha} = 8.5165(3) and 12.3083(2) {Angstrom}, c = 11.9024(4) and 16.0776(4) {Angstrom}, respectively). La{sub 3}In{sub 4}Ge contains layers or slabs of three-connected indium built of puckered 8-rings and 4-rings, or of squashed tetrahedra ({open_quotes}butterflies{close_quotes}) interlinked at all vertices, and these are separated by layers of La and isolated Ge. The phase is deficient of being amore » Zintl phase by three electrons per formula unit and is better described in terms of an alternate optimized and delocalized bonding picture and an open-shell metallic better described in terms of an alternate optimized and delocalized bonding picture and an open-shell metallic behavior for the In slabs. The more complex La{sub 3}InGe, isostructural with Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}, is also layered. This phase contains pairs of mixed-occupancy (0.75 In, 0.25 Ge) sites separated by 3.020 {Angstrom}, as well as isolated In and Ge atoms. The former appear to be fully reduced closed-shell atoms (relative to the bonded Ga dimers in Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 2}) that are held in somewhat close proximity by cation matrix effects. The compound appears to be semiconducting and thus is a classical Zintl phase, (La{sup +3}){sub 3}In{sup {minus}5}Ge{sup {minus}4} in the simplest oxidation state notation. High Coulomb energies are presumably important for the nature of the bonding and the stabilities of both compounds.« less

  1. Crew Earth Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runco, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Crew Earth Observations (CEO) takes advantage of the crew in space to observe and photograph natural and human-made changes on Earth. The photographs record the Earth's surface changes over time, along with dynamic events such as storms, floods, fires and volcanic eruptions. These images provide researchers on Earth with key data to better understand the planet.

  2. Why Earth Science?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    This article briefly describes Earth science. The study of Earth science provides the foundation for an understanding of the Earth, its processes, its resources, and its environment. Earth science is the study of the planet in its entirety, how its lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere work together as systems and how they affect…

  3. NASA Earth Day 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-22

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden speaks to students who attended the NASA sponsored Earth Day event April 22, 2014 at Union Station in Washington, DC. NASA sponsored the Earth Day event as part of its "Earth Right Now" campaign, celebrating the launch of five Earth-observing missions in 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  4. Indium antimonide crystal growth experiment M562. [Skylab weightless conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Witt, A. F.

    1974-01-01

    It was established that ideal diffusion controlled steady state conditions, never accomplished on earth, were achieved during the growth of Te-doped InSb crystals in Skylab. Surface tension effects led to nonwetting conditions under which free surface solidification took place in confined geometry. It was further found that, under forced contact conditions, surface tension effects led to the formation of surface ridges (not previously observed on earth) which isolated the growth system from its container. In addition, it was possible, for the first time, to identify unambiguously: the origin of segregation discontinuities associated with facet growth, the mode of nucleation and propagation of rotational twin boundaries, and the specific effect of mechanical-shock perturbations on segregation. The results obtained prove the advantageous conditions provided by outer space. Thus, fundamental data on solidification thought to be unattainable because of gravity-induced interference on earth are now within reach.

  5. Bismaleimide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Johnnie E.; Jamieson, Donald R.

    1986-01-14

    Bismaleimides of the formula ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 each independently is H, C.sub.1-4 -alkyl, C.sub.1-4 -alkoxy, C1 or Br, or R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1-3; and the alkylene bridging group, optionally, is substituted by 1-3 methyl groups or by fluorine, form polybismaleimide resins which have valuable physical properties. Uniquely, these compounds permit extended cure times, i.e., they remain fluid for a time sufficient to permit the formation of a homogeneous melt prior to curing.

  6. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 57 percent of magnesium compounds produced in the United States in 2011. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties LLC from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia LLC in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash Wendover LLC and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma Inc. in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its brine operation in Michigan.

  7. Bismaleimide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Adams, J.E.; Jamieson, D.R.

    1986-01-14

    Bismaleimides of the formula shown in the diagram wherein R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] each independently is H, C[sub 1-4]-alkyl, C[sub 1-4]-alkoxy, Cl or Br, or R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1--3; and the alkylene bridging group, optionally, is substituted by 1--3 methyl groups or by fluorine, form polybismaleimide resins which have valuable physical properties. Uniquely, these compounds permit extended cure times, i.e., they remain fluid for a time sufficient to permit the formation of a homogeneous melt prior to curing.

  8. Low-threshold indium gallium nitride quantum dot microcavity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Alexander J.

    Gallium nitride (GaN) microcavities with embedded optical emitters have long been sought after as visible light sources as well as platforms for cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) experiments. Specifically, materials containing indium gallium nitride (InGaN) quantum dots (QDs) offer an outstanding platform to study light matter interactions and realize practical devices, such as on-chip light emitting diodes and nanolasers. Inherent advantages of nitride-based microcavities include low surface recombination velocities, enhanced room-temperature performance (due to their high exciton binding energy, as high as 67 meV for InGaN QDs), and emission wavelengths in the blue region of the visible spectrum. In spite of these advantages, several challenges must be overcome in order to capitalize on the potential of this material system. Such diffculties include the processing of GaN into high-quality devices due to the chemical inertness of the material, low material quality as a result of strain-induced defects, reduced carrier recombination effciencies due to internal fields, and a lack of characterization of the InGaN QDs themselves due to the diffculty of their growth and therefore lack of development relative to other semiconductor QDs. In this thesis we seek to understand and address such issues by investigating the interaction of light coupled to InGaN QDs via a GaN microcavity resonator. Such coupling led us to the demonstration of the first InGaN QD microcavity laser, whose performance offers insights into the properties and current limitations of the nitride materials and their emitters. This work is organized into three main sections. Part I outlines the key advantages and challenges regarding indium gallium nitride (InGaN) emitters embedded within gallium nitride (GaN) optical microcavities. Previous work is also discussed which establishes context for the work presented here. Part II includes the fundamentals related to laser operation, including the

  9. Indium Tin Oxide Resistor-Based Nitric Oxide Microsensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Jennifer C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Gonzalez, Jose M., III; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2012-01-01

    A sensitive resistor-based NO microsensor, with a wide detection range and a low detection limit, has been developed. Semiconductor microfabrication techniques were used to create a sensor that has a simple, robust structure with a sensing area of 1.10 0.99 mm. A Pt interdigitated structure was used for the electrodes to maximize the sensor signal output. N-type semiconductor indium tin oxide (ITO) thin film was sputter-deposited as a sensing material on the electrode surface, and between the electrode fingers. Alumina substrate (250 m in thickness) was sequentially used for sensor fabrication. The resulting sensor was tested by applying a voltage across the two electrodes and measuring the resulting current. The sensor was tested at different concentrations of NO-containing gas at a range of temperatures. Preliminary results showed that the sensor had a relatively high sensitivity to NO at 450 C and 1 V. NO concentrations from ppm to ppb ranges were detected with the low limit of near 159 ppb. Lower NO concentrations are being tested. Two sensing mechanisms were involved in the NO gas detection at ppm level: adsorption and oxidation reactions, whereas at ppb level of NO, only one sensing mechanism of adsorption was involved. The NO microsensor has the advantages of high sensitivity, small size, simple batch fabrication, high sensor yield, low cost, and low power consumption due to its microsize. The resistor-based thin-film sensor is meant for detection of low concentrations of NO gas, mainly in the ppb or lower range, and is being developed concurrently with other sensor technology for multispecies detection. This development demonstrates that ITO is a sensitive sensing material for NO detection. It also provides crucial information for future selection of nanostructured and nanosized NO sensing materials, which are expected to be more sensitive and to consume less power.

  10. Lithium indium diselenide: A new scintillator for neutron imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Lukosi, Eric; Herrera, Elan; Hamm, Daniel; ...

    2016-05-20

    Lithium indium diselenide, 6LiInSe 2 or LISe, is a newly developed neutron detection material that shows both semiconducting and scintillating properties. The 24% atomic density of 6Li yields a thermal neutron mean free path of only 920 μm. This paper reports on the performance of LISe crystals in scintillation mode for its potential use as a converter screen for thermal/cold neutron imaging. The spatial resolution of LISe, determined using a 10% value of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), was found to not scale linearly with thickness. Crystals having a thickness of 450 μm or larger resulted in an average spatialmore » resolution of 67 μm, and the thinner crystals exhibited an increase in spatial resolution down to the Nyquist frequency of the CCD. The highest measured spatial resolution of 198 μm thick LISe (27 μm) outperforms a commercial 50 μm thick ZnS(Cu): 6LiF scintillation screen (100 μm) by more than a factor of three. For the thicknesses considered in this study, it has been found that the light yield of LISe did not scale with its thickness, suggesting the need for optimizing the synthesis to enhance the scintillation mechanism. Absorption measurements indicate that the 6Li concentration is uniform throughout the samples and its absorption efficiency as a function of thickness follows general nuclear theory, indicating that the variation in apparent brightness is likely due to a combination of particle escape, light transport, and activation of the scintillation mechanisms. As a result, the presence of 115In and its long-lived 116In activation product did not result in ghosting (memory of past neutron exposure), demonstrating potential for using LISe for imaging transient systems.« less

  11. Compositional analysis of dilute nitride doped indium antimonide bulk crystal by VDS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Manisha; Maske, Dilip; Choudhari, Rashmi; Arora, Brij Mohan; Gadkari, Dattatray

    2016-05-01

    Dilute nitrides are suitable materials for fabrication of devices in detection of long wavelength infrared region. Dilute nitride doped Indium antimonide bulk crystals were grown using vertical directional solidification technique. The compositional characteristics of the crystals were carried out using EDS. The analysis was simulated and compared with observations using DTSA II software for accuracy. The ingots have uniform composition of Indium and Antimony. The actual nitrogen composition measured using EDS was 0.136% for doped nitrogen composition 0.1% except near conical end where it was 0.1%. The study of bonding between nitrogen, Indium and antimony was carried out using SIMS. The analysis shows strong presence of In-N bonding along with In-Sb bonds which indicates nitrogen has replaced antimony atoms in crystal lattice.

  12. Evaluation of musculoskeletal sepsis with indium-111 white blood cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ouzounian, T.J.; Thompson, L.; Grogan, T.J.

    The detection of musculoskeletal sepsis, especially following joint replacement, continues to be a challenging problem. Often, even with invasive diagnostic evaluation, the diagnosis of infection remains uncertain. This is a report on the first 55 Indium-111 white blood cell (WBC) images performed in 39 patients for the evaluation of musculoskeletal sepsis. There were 40 negative and 15 positive Indium-111 WBC images. These were correlated with operative culture and tissue pathology, aspiration culture, and clinical findings. Thirty-eight images were performed for the evaluation of possible total joint sepsis (8 positive and 30 negative images); 17 for the evaluation of nonarthroplasty-related musculoskeletalmore » sepsis (7 positive and 10 negative images). Overall, there were 13 true-positive, 39 true-negative, two false-positive, and one false-negative images. Indium-111 WBC imaging is a sensitive and specific means of evaluating musculoskeletal sepsis, especially following total joint replacement.« less

  13. False positive indium-111 white blood cell scan in a closed clavicle fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, R.J.; Gordon, L.

    1988-01-01

    Aggressive treatment of the multiply injured patient often requires early fixation of many fractures, some of which may be open. Often, patients develop postoperative fevers requiring a thorough workup to rule out infection. Recently, indium-111 white blood cell (WBC) imaging has become a valuable adjunct in the diagnosis of acute infection. The patient described had a simple, closed clavicle fracture with markedly increased activity on an indium-111 WBC scan obtained for fever workup. This subsequently proved to be a normal, healing, noninfected fracture by other diagnostic techniques. Noninfected, simple closed fractures should be added to the list of causes formore » a false-positive indium-111 WBC scan.« less

  14. Growth of indium gallium arsenide thin film on silicon substrate by MOCVD technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Sisir; Das, Anish; Banerji, Pallab

    2018-05-01

    Indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) thin film with indium phosphide (InP) buffer has been grown on p-type silicon (100) by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) technique. To get a lattice matched substrate an Indium Phosphide buffer thin film is deposited onto Si substrate prior to InGaAs growth. The grown films have been investigated by UV-Vis-NIR reflectance spectroscopy. The band gap energy of the grown InGaAs thin films determined to be 0.82 eV from reflectance spectrum and the films are found to have same thickness for growth between 600 °C and 650 °C. Crystalline quality of the grown films has been studied by grazing incidence X-ray diffractometry (GIXRD).

  15. Compositional analysis of dilute nitride doped indium antimonide bulk crystal by VDS technique

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, Manisha, E-mail: manishauj@gmail.com; Department of Physics, Mithibai College, Vile Parle; Maske, Dilip

    2016-05-06

    Dilute nitrides are suitable materials for fabrication of devices in detection of long wavelength infrared region. Dilute nitride doped Indium antimonide bulk crystals were grown using vertical directional solidification technique. The compositional characteristics of the crystals were carried out using EDS. The analysis was simulated and compared with observations using DTSA II software for accuracy. The ingots have uniform composition of Indium and Antimony. The actual nitrogen composition measured using EDS was 0.136% for doped nitrogen composition 0.1% except near conical end where it was 0.1%. The study of bonding between nitrogen, Indium and antimony was carried out using SIMS.more » The analysis shows strong presence of In-N bonding along with In-Sb bonds which indicates nitrogen has replaced antimony atoms in crystal lattice.« less

  16. Atmospheric Chemistry of Micrometeoritic Organic Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kress, M. E.; Belle, C. L.; Pevyhouse, A. R.; Iraci, L. T.

    2011-01-01

    Micrometeorites approx.100 m in diameter deliver most of the Earth s annual accumulation of extraterrestrial material. These small particles are so strongly heated upon atmospheric entry that most of their volatile content is vaporized. Here we present preliminary results from two sets of experiments to investigate the fate of the organic fraction of micrometeorites. In the first set of experiments, 300 m particles of a CM carbonaceous chondrite were subject to flash pyrolysis, simulating atmospheric entry. In addition to CO and CO2, many organic compounds were released, including functionalized benzenes, hydrocarbons, and small polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In the second set of experiments, we subjected two of these compounds to conditions that simulate the heterogeneous chemistry of Earth s upper atmosphere. We find evidence that meteor-derived compounds can follow reaction pathways leading to the formation of more complex organic compounds.

  17. Clusters, Assemble: Growth of Intermetallic Compounds from Metal Flux Reactions.

    PubMed

    Latturner, Susan E

    2018-01-16

    Metal flux synthesis involves the reaction of metals and metalloids in a large excess of a low-melting metal that acts as a solvent. This technique makes use of an unusual temperature regime (above the temperatures used for solvothermal methods and below the temperatures used in traditional solid state synthesis) and facilitates the growth of products as large crystals. It has proven to be a fruitful method to discover new intermetallic compounds. However, little is known about the chemistry occurring within a molten metal solvent; without an understanding of the nature of precursor formation and assembly, it is difficult to predict product structures and target properties. Organic chemists have a vast toolbox of well-known reagents and reaction mechanisms to use in directing their synthesis toward a desired molecular structure. This is not yet the case for the synthesis of inorganic extended structures. We have carried out extensive explorations of the growth of new magnetic intermetallic compounds from a variety of metal fluxes. This Account presents a review of some of our results and recent reports by other groups; this work indicates that products with common building blocks and homologous series with identical structural motifs are repeatedly seen in metal flux chemistry. For instance, fluorite-type layers comprised of transition metals coordinated by eight main group metal atoms are found in the Th 2 (Au x Si 1-x )[AuAl 2 ] n Si 2 and R[AuAl 2 ] n Al 2 (Au x Si 1-x ) 2 series grown from aluminum flux, the Ce n PdIn 3n+2 series grown from indium flux, and CePdGa 6 and Ce 2 PdGa 10 grown from gallium flux. Similarly, our investigations of reactions of heavy main group metals, M, in rare earth/transition metal eutectic fluxes reveal that the R/T/M/M' products usually feature M-centered rare earth clusters M@R 8-12 , which share faces to form layers and networks that surround transition metal building blocks. These structural trends, temperature dependence of

  18. Vapor phase tri-methyl-indium seeding system suitable for high temperature spectroscopy and thermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Whiddon, R.; Zhou, B.; Borggren, J.

    2015-09-15

    Tri-methyl-indium (TMI) is used as an indium transport molecule to introduce indium atoms to reactive hot gas flows/combustion environments for spectroscopic diagnostics. A seeding system was constructed to allow the addition of an inert TMI laden carrier gas into an air/fuel mixture burning consequently on a burner. The amount of the seeded TMI in the carrier gas can be readily varied by controlling the vapor pressure through the temperature of the container. The seeding process was calibrated using the fluorescent emission intensity from the indium 6{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} → 5{sup 2}P{sub 1/2} and 6{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} → 5{sup 2}P{sub 3/2}more » transitions as a function of the calculated TMI seeding concentration over a range of 2–45 ppm. The response was found to be linear over the range 3–22.5 ppm; at concentrations above 25 ppm there is a loss of linearity attributable to self-absorption or loss of saturation of TMI vapor pressure in the carrier gas flow. When TMI was introduced into a post-combustion environment via an inert carrier gas, molecular transition from InH and InOH radicals were observed in the flame emission spectrum. Combined laser-induced fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy were applied to detect indium atoms in the TMI seeded flame and the measured atomic indium concentration was found to be at the ppm level. This method of seeding organometallic vapor like TMI to a reactive gas flow demonstrates the feasibility for quantitative spectroscopic investigations that may be applicable in various fields, e.g., chemical vapor deposition applications or temperature measurement in flames with two-line atomic fluorescence.« less

  19. Fabrication and Investigation of Indium Nitride Possessing Ferromagnetic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khludkov, S. S.; Prudaev, I. A.; Tolbanov, O. P.

    2018-04-01

    An overview of the scientific literature since 2000 on InN doping with impurities giving it ferromagnetic properties and on the magnetic properties of InN is presented. According to theoretical and experimental studies, InN doped with transition metals and rare earth elements possesses ferromagnetic properties at temperatures above room temperature and is a material promising for spintronics.

  20. Nanostructured antistatic and antireflective thin films made of indium tin oxide and silica over-coat layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young-Sang; Hong, Jeong-Jin; Yang, Seung-Man; Choi, Chul-Jin

    2010-08-01

    Stable dispersion of colloidal indium tin oxide nanoparticles was prepared by using indium tin oxide nanopowder, organic solvent, and suitable dispersants through attrition process. Various comminution parameters during the attrition step were studied to optimize the process for the stable dispersion of indium tin oxide sol. The transparent and conductive films were fabricated on glass substrate using the indium tin oxide sol by spin coating process. To obtain antireflective function, partially hydrolyzed alkyl silicate was deposited as over-coat layer on the pre-fabricated indium tin oxide film by spin coating technique. This double-layered structure of the nanostructured film was characterized by measuring the surface resistance and reflectance spectrum in the visible wavelength region. The final film structure was enough to satisfy the TCO regulations for EMI shielding purposes.

  1. Control of indium tin oxide anode work function modified using Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer for high-efficiency organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokokura, Yuya; Dogase, Tomomichi; Shinbo, Tatsuki; Nakayashiki, Yuya; Takagi, Yusuke; Ueda, Kazuyoshi; Sarangerel, Khayankhyarvaa; Delgertsetseg, Byambasuren; Ganzorig, Chimed; Sakomura, Masaru

    2017-08-01

    The use of Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayers to modify the indium tin oxide (ITO) work function and thus improve the performance of zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc)/fullerene (C60)-based and boron subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc)/C60-based small molecule organic photovoltaic devices (OPVs) was examined. In general, LB precursor compounds contain one or more long alkyl chain substituents that can act as spacers to prevent electrical contact with adjoining electrode surfaces. As one example of such a compound, arachidic acid (CH3(CH2)18COOH) was inserted in the forms of one-layer, three-layer or five-layer LB films between the anode ITO layer and the p-type layer in ZnPc-C60-based OPVs to investigate the effects of the long alkyl chain group when it acts as an electrically insulating spacer. The short-circuit current density (Jsc) values of the OPVs with the three- and five-layer inserts (1.78 mA.cm-2 and 0.61 mA.cm-2, respectively) were reduced dramatically, whereas the Jsc value for the OPV with the single-layer insertion (2.88 mA.cm-2) was comparable to that of the OPV without any insert (3.14 mA.cm-2). The ITO work function was shifted positively by LB deposition of a surfactant compound, C9F19C2H4-O-C2H4-COOH (PFECA), which contained a fluorinated head group. This positive effect was maintained even after formation of an upper p-type organic layer. The Jsc and open-circuit voltage (Voc) of the SubPc-C60-based OPV with the LB-modified ITO layers were effectively enhanced. As a result, a 42% increase in device efficiency was achieved.

  2. Indium Hybridization of Large Format TES Bolometer Arrays to Readout Multiplexers for Far-Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy M.; Costen, Nick; Allen, Christine

    2007-01-01

    This conference poster reviews the Indium hybridization of the large format TES bolometer arrays. We are developing a key technology to enable the next generation of detectors. That is the Hybridization of Large Format Arrays using Indium bonded detector arrays containing 32x40 elements which conforms to the NIST multiplexer readout architecture of 1135 micron pitch. We have fabricated and hybridized mechanical models with the detector chips bonded after being fully back-etched. The mechanical support consists of 30 micron walls between elements Demonstrated electrical continuity for each element. The goal is to hybridize fully functional array of TES detectors to NIST readout.

  3. Pulmonary uptake in Indium-111 leukocyte imaging: clinical significance in patients with suspected occult infections

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, P.S.; Datz, F.L.; Disbro, M.A.

    1984-02-01

    A retrospective review was undertaken to evaluate the frequency and significance of pulmonary activity noted on 306 indium-111 leukocyte studies involving 232 patients with suspected occult infections. Forty-eight studies showed pulmonary activity in one of two patterns of uptake, focal or diffuse. Fourteen of 27 studies (52%) with focal uptake and two of 21 studies (10%) with diffuse uptake were associated with infectious processes. Lung uptake of indium-111-labeled leukocytes was a poor predictor of pulmonary infection in patients studied for occult infection, although the focal pattern was more likely than the diffuse pattern to be associated with infection.

  4. Atomic layer epitaxy of hematite on indium tin oxide for application in solar energy conversion

    DOEpatents

    Martinson, Alex B.; Riha, Shannon; Guo, Peijun; Emery, Jonathan D.

    2016-07-12

    A method to provide an article of manufacture of iron oxide on indium tin oxide for solar energy conversion. An atomic layer epitaxy method is used to deposit an uncommon bixbytite-phase iron (III) oxide (.beta.-Fe.sub.2O.sub.3) which is deposited at low temperatures to provide 99% phase pure .beta.-Fe.sub.2O.sub.3 thin films on indium tin oxide. Subsequent annealing produces pure .alpha.-Fe.sub.2O.sub.3 with well-defined epitaxy via a topotactic transition. These highly crystalline films in the ultra thin film limit enable high efficiency photoelectrochemical chemical water splitting.

  5. Diode laser-based thermometry using two-line atomic fluorescence of indium and gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borggren, Jesper; Weng, Wubin; Hosseinnia, Ali; Bengtsson, Per-Erik; Aldén, Marcus; Li, Zhongshan

    2017-12-01

    A robust and relatively compact calibration-free thermometric technique using diode lasers two-line atomic fluorescence (TLAF) for reactive flows at atmospheric pressures is investigated. TLAF temperature measurements were conducted using indium and, for the first time, gallium atoms as temperature markers. The temperature was measured in a multi-jet burner running methane/air flames providing variable temperatures ranging from 1600 to 2000 K. Indium and gallium were found to provide a similar accuracy of 2.7% and precision of 1% over the measured temperature range. The reliability of the TLAF thermometry was further tested by performing simultaneous rotational CARS measurements in the same experiments.

  6. Reference correlations for the thermal conductivity of liquid copper, gallium, indium, iron, lead, nickel and tin**

    PubMed Central

    Assael, Marc J.; Chatzimichailidis, Arsenios; Antoniadis, Konstantinos D.; Wakeham, William A.; Huber, Marcia L.; Fukuyama, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    The available experimental data for the thermal conductivity of liquid copper, gallium, indium, iron, lead, nickel, and tin has been critically examined with the intention of establishing thermal conductivity reference correlations. All experimental data have been categorized into primary and secondary data according to the quality of measurement specified by a series of criteria. The proposed standard reference correlations for the thermal conductivity of liquid copper, gallium, indium, iron, lead, nickel, and tin are respectively characterized by uncertainties of 9.8, 15.9, 9.7, 13.7, 16.9, 7.7, and 12.6% at the 95% confidence level. PMID:29353915

  7. The Lifeworld Earth and a Modelled Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juuti, Kalle

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to study the question of whether a phenomenological view of the Earth could be empirically endorsed. The phenomenological way of thinking considers the Earth as a material entity, but not as an object as viewed in science. In the learning science tradition, tracking the process of the conceptual change of the shape of the…

  8. Quantum Theory of Rare-Earth Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Takashi; Akai, Hisazumi

    2018-04-01

    Strong permanent magnets mainly consist of rare earths (R) and transition metals (T). The main phase of the neodymium magnet, which is the strongest magnet, is Nd2Fe14B. Sm2Fe17N3 is another magnet compound having excellent magnetic properties comparable to those of Nd2Fe14B. Their large saturation magnetization, strong magnetocrystalline anisotropy, and high Curie temperature originate from the interaction between the T-3d electrons and R-4f electrons. This article discusses the magnetism of rare-earth magnet compounds. The basic theory and first-principles calculation approaches for quantitative description of the magnetic properties are presented, together with applications to typical compounds such as Nd2Fe14B, Sm2Fe17N3, and the recently synthesized NdFe12N.

  9. High Affinity Binding of Indium and Ruthenium Ions by Gastrins

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Graham S.; George, Graham N.; Pushie, M. Jake

    2015-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin binds two ferric ions with high affinity, and iron binding is essential for the biological activity of non-amidated forms of the hormone. Since gastrins act as growth factors in gastrointestinal cancers, and as peptides labelled with Ga and In isotopes are increasingly used for cancer diagnosis, the ability of gastrins to bind other metal ions was investigated systematically by absorption spectroscopy. The coordination structures of the complexes were characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Changes in the absorption of gastrin in the presence of increasing concentrations of Ga3+ were fitted by a 2 site model with dissociation constants (Kd) of 3.3 x 10−7 and 1.1 x 10−6 M. Although the absorption of gastrin did not change upon the addition of In3+ ions, the changes in absorbance on Fe3+ ion binding in the presence of indium ions were fitted by a 2 site model with Kd values for In3+ of 6.5 x 10−15 and 1.7 x 10−7 M. Similar results were obtained with Ru3+ ions, although the Kd values for Ru3+ of 2.6 x 10−13 and 1.2 x 10−5 M were slightly larger than observed for In3+. The structures determined by EXAFS all had metal:gastrin stoichiometries of 2:1 but, while the metal ions in the Fe, Ga and In complexes were bridged by a carboxylate and an oxygen with a metal-metal separation of 3.0–3.3 Å, the Ru complex clearly demonstrated a short range Ru—Ru separation, which was significantly shorter, at 2.4 Å, indicative of a metal-metal bond. We conclude that gastrin selectively binds two In3+ or Ru3+ ions, and that the affinity of the first site for In3+ or Ru3+ ions is higher than for ferric ions. Some of the metal ion-gastrin complexes may be useful for cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26457677

  10. Hydrothermal fluoride and chloride complexation of indium: an EXAFS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loges, Anselm; Testemale, Denis; Huotari, Simo; Honkanen, Ari-Pekka; Potapkin, Vasily; Wagner, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Indium (In) is one of the geochemically lesser studied ore metals, and the factors that control the hydrothermal transport and deposition are largely unknown. It has no ore deposits of its own and is commonly mined as a by-product of Zn ores, and there are very few minerals that contain In as an essential structural component. Recently, industrial application of In in touch screen devices has drastically increased demand, which is projected to exceed supply from the current sources in the near future. Since the most relevant In sources are hydrothermal sphalerite ores and to a lesser extent hydrothermal greisen-type deposits in evolved granitic plutons, the aqueous geochemistry of In is of particular interest for understanding its ore forming processes. As a first step towards a comprehensive model for hydrothermal In solubility and speciation, we have studied In speciation in fluoride and chloride bearing solutions at 30-400˚ C and 500 bar using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. The experiments were conducted in a unique hydrothermal autoclave setup at beamline BM30B-FAME at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, France. Our results show that the complexation of In changes dramatically between 30 and 400˚ C. Below ca. 200˚ C, fluoride complexes are the most stable ones, but they break down at higher temperatures. Chloride complexes on the other hand become increasingly stable with increasing temperature. This behavior has interesting consequences for natural ore forming systems. In Cl-rich systems (e.g. massive sulfide ores formed in sea floor environments), cooling can be an effective precipitating mechanism. In F-rich systems, fluoride complexation can extend In mobility to low temperatures and In will only precipitate when F is effectively removed from the fluid, e.g. by mixing with a Ca-rich fluid and precipitation of fluorite (CaF2) as is commonly observed in skarn or greisen-type deposits. Due to In complexing with

  11. Integration of Indium Phosphide Based Devices with Flexible Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wayne Huai

    2011-12-01

    Flexible substrates have many advantages in applications where bendability, space, or weight play important roles or where rigid circuits are undesirable. However, conventional flexible thin film transistors are typically characterized as having low carrier mobility as compared to devices used in the electronics industry. This is in part due to the limited temperature tolerance of plastic flexible substrates, which commonly reduces the highest processing temperature to below 200°C. Common approaches of implementation include low temperature deposition of organic, amorphous, or polycrystalline semiconductors, all of which result in carrier mobility well below 100 cm2V -1s-1. High quality, single crystalline III-V semiconductors such as indium phosphide (InP), on the other hand, have carrier mobility well over 1000 cm 2V-1s-1 at room temperature, depending on carrier concentration. Recently, the ion-cut process has been used in conjunction with wafer bonding to integrate thin layers of III-V material onto silicon for optoelectronic applications. This approach has the advantage of high scalability, reusability of the initial III-V substrate, and the ability to tailor the location (depth) of the layer splitting. However, the transferred substrate usually suffers from hydrogen implantation damage. This dissertation demonstrates a new approach to enable integration of InP with various substrates, called the double-flip transfer process. The process combines ion-cutting with adhesive bonding. The problem of hydrogen implantation was overcome by patterned ion-cut transfer. In this type of transfer, areas of interest are shielded from implantation but still transferred by surrounding implanted regions. We found that patterned ion-cut transfer is strongly dependent upon crystal orientation and that using cleavage-plane oriented donors can be beneficial in transferring large areas of high quality semiconductor material. InP-based devices were fabricated to demonstrate the

  12. Continuum modelling of silicon diffusion in indium gallium arsenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldridge, Henry Lee, Jr.

    A possible method to overcome the physical limitations experienced by continued transistor scaling and continue improvements in performance and power consumption is integration of III-V semiconductors as alternative channel materials for logic devices. Indium Gallium Arsenide (InGaAs) is such a material from the III-V semiconductor family, which exhibit superior electron mobilities and injection velocities than that of silicon. In order for InGaAs integration to be realized, contact resistances must be minimized through maximizing activation of dopants in this material. Additionally, redistribution of dopants during processing must be clearly understood and ultimately controlled at the nanometer-scale. In this work, the activation and diffusion behavior of silicon, a prominent n-type dopant in InGaAs, has been characterized and subsequently modelled using the Florida Object Oriented Process and Device Simulator (FLOOPS). In contrast to previous reports, silicon exhibits non-negligible diffusion in InGaAs, even for smaller thermal budget rapid thermal anneals (RTAs). Its diffusion is heavily concentration-dependent, with broadening "shoulder-like" profiles when doping levels exceed 1-3x1019cm -3, for both ion-implanted and Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE)-grown cases. Likewise a max net-activation value of ˜1.7x1019cm -3 is consistently reached with enough thermal processing, regardless of doping method. In line with experimental results and several ab-initio calculation results, rapid concentration-dependent diffusion of Si in InGaAs and the upper limits of its activation is believed to be governed by cation vacancies that serve as compensating defects in heavily n-type regions of InGaAs. These results are ultimately in line with an amphoteric defect model, where the activation limits of dopants are an intrinsic limitation of the material, rather than governed by individual dopant species or their methods of incorporation. As a result a Fermi level dependent point

  13. The Biogeochemistry of Indium, Gallium, and Germanium in Mine Wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. J.; Schaider, L. A.; Shine, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    Indium (In), gallium (Ga), and germanium (Ge) are metals important in new energy technologies, and use of these metals is expanding dramatically. Humans are significantly impacting their natural cycling. Mining and smelting appear to be currently the largest sources of these metals to the environment, primarily because In, Ga, and Ge are byproducts of lead and zinc mining. The life cycle of these metals is poorly understood, including partitioning and speciation during mining processes, environmental behavior, and toxicity. The Tar Creek Superfund Site in Oklahoma, USA, is an abandoned Mississippi Valley-type lead and zinc mining area, containing sphalerite (ZnS) and galena (PbS). 30 major tailings piles remain in the area; elevated concentrations of lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), and cadmium (Cd) in these wastes have caused human health concerns. In order to better understand the biogeochemical cycling of In, Ga, and Ge associated with mining processes, we conducted geochemical and biological extractions of size-fractionated mine tailings from the Tar Creek site. Small tailings particles (<2.5 μm) contain higher concentrations of In, Ga, and Ge than large particles (>0.5 mm); a similar enrichment has been shown previously for Pb, Zn, and Cd. Ge is highly elevated in the mine wastes at this site; small particles contain up to 40x crustal concentrations. Ga and In are not significantly higher than crustal. (Crustal concentrations: Ge 1.4 mg/kg; Ga 14 mg/kg; In 100 mg/kg) While Pb, Zn, and Cd have been shown previously to be highly labile, and thus significantly re-worked from the original sulfide ore, sequential extractions suggest that In, Ga, and Ge are in less labile forms. In and Ga are liberated primarily from solutions that target semi-labile amorphous sulfides, Fe- and Mn-oxyhydroxides, and crystalline sulfide phases. By contrast, over 85% of the Ge in mine wastes from this site is bound in a residual mineral fraction (e.g. silicates) that is not liberated by a hot

  14. Synthesis, Characterization and Decomposition Studies of Tris(N,N-dibenzyldithiocarbamato) Indium(III): Chemical Spray Deposition of Polycrystalline CuInS2 on Copper Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hehemann, David G.; Lau, J. Eva; Harris, Jerry D.; Hoops, Michael D.; Duffy, Norman V.; Fanwick, Philip E.; Khan, Osman; Jin, Michael H.-C.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2005-01-01

    Tris(bis(phenylmethyl)carbamodithioato-S,S ), commonly referred to as tris(N,Ndibenzyldithiocarbamato) indium(III), In(S2CNBz2)3, was synthesized and characterized by single crystal X-ray crystallography. The compound crystallizes in the triclinic space group P1 bar with two molecules per unit cell. The material was further characterized using a novel analytical system employing the combined powers of thermogravimetric analysis, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and Fourier-Transform infrared spectroscopy to investigate its potential use as a precursor for the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of thin film materials for photovoltaic applications. Upon heating, the material thermally decomposes to release CS2 and benzyl moieties in to the gas phase, resulting in bulk In2S3. Preliminary spray CVD experiments indicate that In(S2CNBz2)3 decomposed on a Cu substrate reacts to produce stoichiometric CuInS2 films.

  15. Nonsymmetrical 3,4-dithienylmaleimides by cross-coupling reactions with indium organometallics: synthesis and photochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Angeles; Férnandez, M Isabel; Canle Lopez, Moisés; Pérez Sestelo, José; Sarandeses, Luis A

    2014-10-27

    The synthesis and photochemical study of novel nonsymmetrical 1,2-dithienylethenes (DTEs) with a maleimide bridge have been carried out. The synthetic approach to the DTEs was based on successive selective palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions of 5-susbtituted-2-methyl-3-thiophenyl indium reagents with 3,4-dichloromaleimides. The required organoindium reagents were prepared from 2-methyl-3,5-dibromothiophene by a selective (C-5) coupling reaction with triorganoindium compounds (R3 In) and subsequent metal-halogen exchange. The coupling reactions usually gave good yields and have a high atom economy with substoichiometric amounts of R3 In. The results of photochemical studies show that these novel dithienylmaleimides undergo a photocyclization reaction upon irradiation in the UV region and a photocycloreversion after excitation in the visible region, thus they can be used as photochemical switches. ON-OFF operations can be repeated in successive cycles without appreciable loss of effectiveness in the process. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Low-Temperature Photochemically Activated Amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc Oxide for Highly Stable Room-Temperature Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Jaisutti, Rawat; Kim, Jaeyoung; Park, Sung Kyu; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2016-08-10

    We report on highly stable amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) gas sensors for ultraviolet (UV)-activated room-temperature detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The IGZO sensors fabricated by a low-temperature photochemical activation process and exhibiting two orders higher photocurrent compared to conventional zinc oxide sensors, allowed high gas sensitivity against various VOCs even at room temperature. From a systematic analysis, it was found that by increasing the UV intensity, the gas sensitivity, response time, and recovery behavior of an IGZO sensor were strongly enhanced. In particular, under an UV intensity of 30 mW cm(-2), the IGZO sensor exhibited gas sensitivity, response time and recovery time of 37%, 37 and 53 s, respectively, against 750 ppm concentration of acetone gas. Moreover, the IGZO gas sensor had an excellent long-term stability showing around 6% variation in gas sensitivity over 70 days. These results strongly support a conclusion that a low-temperature solution-processed amorphous IGZO film can serve as a good candidate for room-temperature VOCs sensors for emerging wearable electronics.

  17. Room Temperature Ferromagnetism of Fe Doped Indium Tin Oxide Based on Dispersed Fe3O4 Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Koichi; Kohiki, Shigemi; Nishi, Sachio; Shimooka, Hirokazu; Deguchi, Hiroyuki; Mitome, Masanori; Bando, Yoshio; Shishido, Toetsu

    2007-09-01

    Transmission electron microscopy revealed that Fe3O4 nanoparticles with diameter of ≈200 nm dispersed in Fe doped indium tin oxide (Fe@ITO) powders exhibiting co-occurrence of room temperature ferromagnetism and superparamagnetism. Although we observed no X-ray diffraction peak from Fe related compounds for Fe0.19@ITO (ITO: In1.9Sn0.1O3) powders, the powders showed both hysteresis loop in field dependent magnetization at 300 K and divergence of zero-field-cooled magnetization from field-cooled magnetization. Scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy demonstrated that the nanoparticle with diameter of ≈200 nm consists of Fe and oxygen. Transmission electron diffraction revealed that crystal structure of the nanoparticle is inverse spinel type Fe3O4. The Fe3O4 crystalline phase by electron diffraction is consistent with the saturation magnetization of 1.3 μB/Fe and magnetic anomaly at ≈110 K observed for the powders.

  18. Optical Detection of Ketoprofen by Its Electropolymerization on an Indium Tin Oxide-Coated Optical Fiber Probe.

    PubMed

    Bogdanowicz, Robert; Niedziałkowski, Paweł; Sobaszek, Michał; Burnat, Dariusz; Białobrzeska, Wioleta; Cebula, Zofia; Sezemsky, Petr; Koba, Marcin; Stranak, Vitezslav; Ossowski, Tadeusz; Śmietana, Mateusz

    2018-04-27

    In this work an application of optical fiber sensors for real-time optical monitoring of electrochemical deposition of ketoprofen during its anodic oxidation is discussed. The sensors were fabricated by reactive magnetron sputtering of indium tin oxide (ITO) on a 2.5 cm-long core of polymer-clad silica fibers. ITO tuned in optical properties and thickness allows for achieving a lossy-mode resonance (LMR) phenomenon and it can be simultaneously applied as an electrode in an electrochemical setup. The ITO-LMR electrode allows for optical monitoring of changes occurring at the electrode during electrochemical processing. The studies have shown that the ITO-LMR sensor’s spectral response strongly depends on electrochemical modification of its surface by ketoprofen. The effect can be applied for real-time detection of ketoprofen. The obtained sensitivities reached over 1400 nm/M (nm·mg −1 ·L) and 16,400 a.u./M (a.u.·mg −1 ·L) for resonance wavelength and transmission shifts, respectively. The proposed method is a valuable alternative for the analysis of ketoprofen within the concentration range of 0.25⁻250 μg mL −1 , and allows for its determination at therapeutic and toxic levels. The proposed novel sensing approach provides a promising strategy for both optical and electrochemical detection of electrochemical modifications of ITO or its surface by various compounds.

  19. Earth on the Move.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides background information on the layers of the earth, the relationship between changes on the surface of the earth and its insides, and plate tectonics. Teaching activities are included, with some containing reproducible worksheets and handouts to accompany them. (TW)

  20. Earth - Pacific Ocean

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-01-29

    This color image of the Earth was obtained by NASA’s Galileo spacecraft early Dec. 12, 1990, when the spacecraft was about 1.6 million miles from the Earth. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00123

  1. The Earth & Moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-06-04

    During its flight, NASA’s Galileo spacecraft returned images of the Earth and Moon. Separate images of the Earth and Moon were combined to generate this view. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00342

  2. Oblique Shot of Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-09-05

    This highly oblique image shot over northwestern part of the African continent captures the curvature of the Earth and shows its atmosphere as seen by NASA EarthKAM. You can see clouds and even the occasional thunderhead.

  3. Exploring Spaceship Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInnis, Noel F.

    1973-01-01

    Describes various activities to understand the nature of the earth as a spaceship and its impact on human life. A figure depicting a holocoenotic environmental complex is given which can be used to illustrate various interacting forces on earth. (PS)

  4. NASA Earth Day 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-22

    Students listen intently while NASA's Director, Earth Science Division, Mike Freilich, speaks at NASA's Earth Day event. The event took place at Union Station in Washington, DC on April 22, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  5. Earth - India and Australia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-02-08

    This color image of the Earth was obtained by NASA’s Galileo spacecraft on Dec. 11, 1990, when the spacecraft was about 1.5 million miles from the Earth. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00122

  6. Indium tin oxide with zwitterionic interfacial design for biosensing applications in complex matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwish, Nadia T.; Alias, Yatimah; Khor, Sook Mei

    2015-01-01

    Biosensing interfaces consisting of linker molecules (COOH or NH2) and charged, antifouling moieties ((sbnd SO3- and N+(Me)3) for biosensing applications were prepared for the first time by the in situ deposition of mixtures of aryl diazonium cations on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes. A linker molecule is required for the attachment of biorecognition molecules (e.g., antibodies, enzymes, DNA chains, and aptamers) close to the transducer surface. The attached molecules improve the biosensing sensitivity and also provide a short response time for analyte detection. Thus, the incorporation of a linker and antifouling molecules is an important interfacial design for both affinity and enzymatic biosensors. The reductive adsorption behavior and electrochemical measurement were studied for (1) an individual compound and (2) a mixture of antifouling zwitterionic molecules together with linker molecules [combination 1: 4-sulfophenyl (SP), 4-trimethylammoniophenyl (TMAP), and 1,4-phenylenediamine (PPD); combination 2: 4-sulfophenyl (SP), 4-trimethylammoniophenyl (TMAP), and 4-aminobenzoic acid (PABA)] of aryl diazonium cations grafted onto an ITO electrode. The mixture ratios of SP:TMAP:PPD and SP:TMAP:PABA that provided the greatest resistance to non-specific protein adsorptions of bovine serum albumin labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (BSA-FITC) and cytochrome c labeled with rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RBITC-Cyt c) were determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). For the surface antifouling study, we used 2-[2-(2-methoxyethoxy) ethoxy]acetic acid (OEG) as a standard control because of its prominent antifouling properties. Surface compositions of combinations 1 and 2 were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was used to characterize the morphology of the grafted films to confirm the even distribution between linker and antifouling molecules grafted onto the ITO surfaces

  7. NASA Earth Day 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-22

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden poses for a quick selfie with students who attended the NASA sponsored Earth Day event April 22, 2014 at Union Station in Washington, DC. NASA announced the "Global Selfie" event as part of its "Earth Right Now" campaign, celebrating the launch of five Earth-observing missions in 2014. All selfies posted to social media with the hashtag "GlobalSelfie" will be included in a mosaic image of Earth. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  8. Indium diffusion through high-k dielectrics in high-k/InP stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, H.; Cabrera, W.; Galatage, R. V.; Santosh KC, Brennan, B.; Qin, X.; McDonnell, S.; Zhernokletov, D.; Hinkle, C. L.; Cho, K.; Chabal, Y. J.; Wallace, R. M.

    2013-08-01

    Evidence of indium diffusion through high-k dielectric (Al2O3 and HfO2) films grown on InP (100) by atomic layer deposition is observed by angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy ion scattering spectroscopy. The analysis establishes that In-out diffusion occurs and results in the formation of a POx rich interface.

  9. First-principles analysis of structural and opto-electronic properties of indium tin oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Madhvendra Nath; Shida, Kazuhito; Sahara, Ryoji; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2012-05-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) and DFT + U (DFT with on-site Coulomb repulsion corrections) calculations have been carried out to study the structural and opto-electronic properties of indium tin oxide (ITO) for both the oxidized and reduced environment conditions. Some of the results obtained by DFT calculations differ from the experimental observations, such as uncertain indication for the site preference of tin atom to replace indium atom at b-site or d-site, underestimation of local inward relaxation in the first oxygen polyhedra around tin atom, and also the improper estimation of electronic density of states and hence resulting in an inappropriate optical spectra of ITO. These discrepancies of theoretical outcomes with experimental observations in ITO arise mainly due to the underestimation of the cationic 4d levels within standard DFT calculations. Henceforth, the inclusion of on-site corrections within DFT + U framework significantly modifies the theoretical results in better agreement to the experimental observations. Within this framework, our calculations show that the indium b-site is preferential site over d-site for tin atom substitution in indium oxide under both the oxidized and reduced conditions. Moreover, the calculated average inward relaxation value of 0.16 Å around tin atom is in good agreement with the experimental value of 0.18 Å. Furthermore, DFT + U significantly modify the electronic structure and consequently induce modifications in the calculated optical spectra of ITO.

  10. Apker Award Talk: Atomic Beam Measurement of the Indium 6p1 / 2 Scalar Polarizability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augenbraun, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    We report on the first measurement of the scalar polarizability of the indium 6p1 / 2 -excited state using two-step laser spectroscopy in an atomic beam. This is one in a series of precise atomic structure measurements by the Majumder lab at Williams College, which serve as stringent tests of abinitio calculation methods for three-valence-electron systems. We stabilize a laser to the indium 5p1 / 2 --> 6s1 / 2 410 nm transition and scan a second laser across the 6s1 / 2 --> 6p1 / 2 1343 nm transition. The two laser beams are overlapped and interact transversely with a collimated atomic beam of indium. Two-tone FM spectroscopy allows us to observe the small (< 1 part in 103) IR absorption, and characteristic sideband features in the RF-demodulated lineshape provide built-in frequency calibration. Application of DC electric fields up to 20 kV/cm give rise to Stark shifts of order 100 MHz. Because our group has previously measured the difference in polarizabilities within the 410 nm transition, we can determine the 6p1 / 2 polarizability with no loss of precision. Preliminary results are in excellent agreement with recent theoretical calculations and can be used to infer accurate values for the indium 6 p - 5 d matrix elements.

  11. Liquid precursor for deposition of indium selenide and method of preparing the same

    DOEpatents

    Curtis, Calvin J.; Miedaner, Alexander; van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria; Ginley, David S.; Hersh, Peter A.; Eldada, Louay; Stanbery, Billy J.

    2015-09-22

    Liquid precursors containing indium and selenium suitable for deposition on a substrate to form thin films suitable for semiconductor applications are disclosed. Methods of preparing such liquid precursors and method of depositing a liquid precursor on a substrate are also disclosed.

  12. Two rare indium-based porous metal-metalloporphyrin frameworks exhibiting interesting CO 2 uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Wen-Yang; Zhang, Zhuxiu; Cash, Lindsay

    2014-01-13

    Two rare indium-based porous metal–metalloporphyrin frameworks (MMPFs), MMPF-7 and MMPF-8, were constructed by self-assembly of In(III) and two custom-designed porphyrin–tetracarboxylate ligands. MMPF-7 and MMPF-8 possess the pts topology and exhibit interesting CO 2 adsorption properties.

  13. Atmospheric Deposition of Indium in the Northeastern United States: Flux and Historical Trends.

    PubMed

    White, Sarah Jane O; Keach, Carrie; Hemond, Harold F

    2015-11-03

    The metal indium is an example of an increasingly important material used in electronics and new energy technologies, whose environmental behavior and toxicity are poorly understood despite increasing evidence of detrimental health impacts and human-induced releases to the environment. In the present work, the history of indium deposition from the atmosphere is reconstructed from its depositional record in an ombrotrophic bog in Massachusetts. A novel freeze-coring technique is used to overcome coring difficulties posed by woody roots and peat compressibility, enabling retrieval of relatively undisturbed peat cores dating back more than a century. Results indicate that long-range atmospheric transport is a significant pathway for the transport of indium, with peak concentrations of 69 ppb and peak fluxes of 1.9 ng/cm2/yr. Atmospheric deposition to the bog began increasing in the late 1800s/early 1900s, and peaked in the early 1970s. A comparison of deposition data with industrial production and emissions estimates suggests that both coal combustion and the smelting of lead, zinc, copper, and tin sulfides are sources of indium to the atmosphere in this region. Deposition appears to have decreased considerably since the 1970s, potentially a visible effect of particulate emissions controls instated in North America during that decade.

  14. INDIUM AND ZINC MEDIATED ONE-ATOM CARBOCYCLE ENLARGEMENT IN WATER. (R822668)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Six-, seven-, eight-membered rings are enlarged by one carbon-atom into seven-, eight- and nine-membered ring derivatives respectively, via indium or zinc mediated reactions in aqueous medium.

  15. The Dynamic Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siever, Raymond

    1983-01-01

    Discusses how the earth is a dynamic system that maintains itself in a steady state. Areas considered include large/small-scale earth motions, geologic time, rock and hydrologic cycles, and other aspects dealing with the changing face of the earth. (JN)

  16. Defects, strain relaxation, and compositional grading in high indium content InGaN epilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Bazioti, C.; Kehagias, Th.; Pavlidou, E.

    2015-10-21

    We investigate the structural properties of a series of high alloy content InGaN epilayers grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, employing the deposition temperature as variable under invariant element fluxes. Using transmission electron microscopy methods, distinct strain relaxation modes were observed, depending on the indium content attained through temperature adjustment. At lower indium contents, strain relaxation by V-pit formation dominated, with concurrent formation of an indium-rich interfacial zone. With increasing indium content, this mechanism was gradually substituted by the introduction of a self-formed strained interfacial InGaN layer of lower indium content, as well as multiple intrinsic basal stacking faults andmore » threading dislocations in the rest of the film. We show that this interfacial layer is not chemically abrupt and that major plastic strain relaxation through defect introduction commences upon reaching a critical indium concentration as a result of compositional pulling. Upon further increase of the indium content, this relaxation mode was again gradually succeeded by the increase in the density of misfit dislocations at the InGaN/GaN interface, leading eventually to the suppression of the strained InGaN layer and basal stacking faults.« less

  17. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of indium substituted nanocrystalline Mobil Five (MFI) zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Kishor Kr.; Nandi, Mithun; Talukdar, Anup K., E-mail: anup_t@sify.com

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • In situ modification of the MFI zeolite by incorporation of indium. • The samples were characterized by XRD, FTIR, TGA, UV–vis (DRS), SAA, EDX and SEM. • The incorporation of indium was confirmed by XRD, FT-IR, UV–vis (DRS), EDX and TGA. • Hydroxylation of phenol reaction was studied on the synthesized catalysts. - Abstract: A series of indium doped Mobil Five (MFI) zeolite were synthesized hydrothermally with silicon to aluminium and indium molar ratio of 100 and with aluminium to indium molar ratios of 1:1, 2:1 and 3:1. The MFI zeolite phase was identified by XRD and FT-IRmore » analysis. In XRD analysis the prominent peaks were observed at 2θ values of around 6.5° and 23° with a few additional shoulder peaks in case of all the indium incorporated samples suggesting formation of pure phase of the MFI zeolite. All the samples under the present investigation were found to exhibit high crystallinity (∼92%). The crystallite sizes of the samples were found to vary from about 49 to 55 nm. IR results confirmed the formation of MFI zeolite in all cases showing distinct absorbance bands near 1080, 790, 540, 450 and 990 cm{sup −1}. TG analysis of In-MFI zeolites showed mass losses in three different steps which are attributed to the loss due to adsorbed water molecules and the two types TPA{sup +} cations. Further, the UV–vis (DRS) studies reflected the position of the indium metal in the zeolite framework. Surface area analysis of the synthesized samples was carried out to characterize the synthesized samples The analysis showed that the specific surface area ranged from ∼357 to ∼361 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and the pore volume of the synthesized samples ranged from 0.177 to 0.182 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1}. The scanning electron microscopy studies showed the structure of the samples to be rectangular and twinned rectangular shaped. The EDX analysis was carried out for confirmation of Si, Al and In in zeolite frame work. The catalytic

  18. Rare earth niobate coordination polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Muniz, Collin N.; Patel, Hiral; Fast, Dylan B.

    Rare-earth (RE) coordination polymers are infinitely tailorable to yield luminescent materials for various applications. In this paper we described the synthesis of a heterometallic rare-earth coordination compound ((CH 3) 2SO) 3(RE)NbO(C 2O 4) 3 ((CH 3) 2SO) = dimethylsulfoxide, DMSO, (C 2O 2 = oxalate), (RE=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb). The structure was obtained from single crystal X-ray diffraction of the La analogue. The Nb =O and DMSO terminal-bonding character guides assembly of an open framework structure with noncentrosymmetric RE-coordination geometry, and large spacing between the RE centers. A second structure was observed by PXRD for themore » smaller rare earths (Dy, Ho, Er, Yb); this structure has not yet been determined. The materials were further characterized using FTIR, and photoluminescence measurements. Characteristic excitation and emission transitions were observed for RE = Nd, Sm, Eu, and Tb. Quantum yield (QY) measurements were performed by exciting Eu and Tb analoges at 394 nm (QY 66%) and 464 nm (QY 71%) for Eu; and 370 nm (QY=40%) for Tb. Finally, we attribute the high QY and bright luminescence to two main structure-function properties of the system; namely the absence of water in the structure, and absence of concentration quenching.« less

  19. Rare earth niobate coordination polymers

    DOE PAGES

    Muniz, Collin N.; Patel, Hiral; Fast, Dylan B.; ...

    2018-01-03

    Rare-earth (RE) coordination polymers are infinitely tailorable to yield luminescent materials for various applications. In this paper we described the synthesis of a heterometallic rare-earth coordination compound ((CH 3) 2SO) 3(RE)NbO(C 2O 4) 3 ((CH 3) 2SO) = dimethylsulfoxide, DMSO, (C 2O 2 = oxalate), (RE=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb). The structure was obtained from single crystal X-ray diffraction of the La analogue. The Nb =O and DMSO terminal-bonding character guides assembly of an open framework structure with noncentrosymmetric RE-coordination geometry, and large spacing between the RE centers. A second structure was observed by PXRD for themore » smaller rare earths (Dy, Ho, Er, Yb); this structure has not yet been determined. The materials were further characterized using FTIR, and photoluminescence measurements. Characteristic excitation and emission transitions were observed for RE = Nd, Sm, Eu, and Tb. Quantum yield (QY) measurements were performed by exciting Eu and Tb analoges at 394 nm (QY 66%) and 464 nm (QY 71%) for Eu; and 370 nm (QY=40%) for Tb. Finally, we attribute the high QY and bright luminescence to two main structure-function properties of the system; namely the absence of water in the structure, and absence of concentration quenching.« less

  20. Rare earth niobate coordination polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muniz, Collin N.; Patel, Hiral; Fast, Dylan B.; Rohwer, Lauren E. S.; Reinheimer, Eric W.; Dolgos, Michelle; Graham, Matt W.; Nyman, May

    2018-03-01

    Rare-earth (RE) coordination polymers are infinitely tailorable to yield luminescent materials for various applications. Here we described the synthesis of a heterometallic rare-earth coordination compound ((CH3)2SO)3(RE)NbO(C2O4)3((CH3)2SO) = dimethylsulfoxide, DMSO, (C2O2= oxalate), (RE=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb). The structure was obtained from single crystal X-ray diffraction of the La analogue. The Nb˭O and DMSO terminal-bonding character guides assembly of an open framework structure with noncentrosymmetric RE-coordination geometry, and large spacing between the RE centers. A second structure was observed by PXRD for the smaller rare earths (Dy, Ho, Er, Yb); this structure has not yet been determined. The materials were further characterized using FTIR, and photoluminescence measurements. Characteristic excitation and emission transitions were observed for RE = Nd, Sm, Eu, and Tb. Quantum yield (QY) measurements were performed by exciting Eu and Tb analoges at 394 nm (QY 66%) and 464 nm (QY 71%) for Eu; and 370 nm (QY=40%) for Tb. We attribute the high QY and bright luminescence to two main structure-function properties of the system; namely the absence of water in the structure, and absence of concentration quenching.

  1. [Mechanism of renal elimination of 2 elements of group IIIA of the periodic table : aluminum and indium].

    PubMed

    Galle, P

    1981-01-05

    Aluminium and indium, two elements of group IIIA of the periodic table, are concentrated by the kidney inside lysosomes of proximal tubule cell. In these lysosomes, aluminium and indium are precipitated as non-soluble phosphate salts and these precipitates are then expelled in the tubular lumen and eliminated with the urinary flow. These data have been visualized by analytical microscopy (ion microscopy and X ray microanalysis). Local acid phosphatases are assumed to permit the concentration of aluminium and indium salts inside the lysosomes.

  2. Possible complex organic compounds on Mars.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Sato, T; Kajishima, S; Kaneko, T; Ishikawa, Y; Saito, T

    1997-01-01

    It is suggested that primitive Mars had somehow similar environments as primitive Earth. If life was born on the primitive earth using organic compounds which were produced from the early Earth environment, the same types of organic compounds were also formed on primitive Mars. Such organic compounds might have been preserved on Mars still now. We are studying possible organic formation on primitive and present Mars. A gaseous mixture of CO2, CO, N2 and H2O with various mixing ratios were irradiated with high energy protons (major components of cosmic rays). Hydrogen cyanide and formaldehyde were detected among volatile products, and yellow-brown-colored water-soluble non-volatile substances were produced, which gave amino acids after acid-hydrolysis. Major part of "amino acid precursors" were not simple molecules like aminonitriles, but complex compounds which eluted earlier than free amino acids in cation-exchange HPLC. These organic compounds should be major targets in the future Mars mission. Strategy for the detection of the complex organics on Mars will be discussed.

  3. Indium telluride nanotubes: Solvothermal synthesis, growth mechanism, and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Liyan; Yan, Shancheng, E-mail: yansc@njupt.edu.cn; School of Geography and Biological Information, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210046

    2014-03-15

    and hydrogen storage, compared with the nanowires. The nanotube device also has a broad light detection range from 300 nm to 1100 nm, covering the UV–visible–NIR region. This good performance of In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanotubes may enable significant advancements of new photodetection and photosensing applications. Highlights: • The In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanotube device also has a broad light detection range from 300 nm to 1100 nm. • The nanotube is 137.85 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}, which makes it suitable for gas sensing and hydrogen storage. • A possible growth mechanism of the indium telluride nanotubes was proposed. • In addition, no In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanotubes have been reported until now.« less

  4. Earth Science Information Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1991-01-01

    An ESIC? An Earth Science Information Center. Don't spell it. Say it. ESIC. It rhymes with seasick. You can find information in an information center, of course, and you'll find earth science information in an ESIC. That means information about the land that is the Earth, the land that is below the Earth, and in some instances, the space surrounding the Earth. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates a network of Earth Science Information Centers that sell earth science products and data. There are more than 75 ESIC's. Some are operated by the USGS, but most are in other State or Federal agencies. Each ESIC responds to requests for information received by telephone, letter, or personal visit. Your personal visit.

  5. A hydrogen-rich early Earth atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Tian, Feng; Toon, Owen B; Pavlov, Alexander A; De Sterck, H

    2005-05-13

    We show that the escape of hydrogen from early Earth's atmosphere likely occurred at rates slower by two orders of magnitude than previously thought. The balance between slow hydrogen escape and volcanic outgassing could have maintained a hydrogen mixing ratio of more than 30%. The production of prebiotic organic compounds in such an atmosphere would have been more efficient than either exogenous delivery or synthesis in hydrothermal systems. The organic soup in the oceans and ponds on early Earth would have been a more favorable place for the origin of life than previously thought.

  6. Climatic effects due to halogenated compounds in the earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.-C.; Pinto, J. P.; Yung, Y. L.

    1980-01-01

    Using a one-dimensional radiative-convective model, a sensitivity study is performed of the effect of ozone depletion in the stratosphere on the surface temperature. There could be a cooling of the surface temperature by approximately 0.2 K due to chlorofluoromethane-induced ozone depletion at steady state (assuming 1973 release rates). This cooling reduces significantly the greenhouse effect due to the presence of chlorofluoromethanes. Carbon tetrafluoride has a strong nu sub 3 band at 7.8 microns, and the atmospheric greenhouse effect is shown to be 0.07 and 0.12 K/ppbv with and without taking into account overlap with CH4 and N2O bands. At concentrations higher than 1 ppbv, absorption by the nu sub 3 band starts to saturate and the greenhouse effect becomes less efficient.

  7. Determination of indium in geological materials by electrothermal-atomization atomic absorption spectrometry with a tungsten-impregnated graphite furance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhou, L.; Chao, T.T.; Meier, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    The sample is fused with lithium metaborate and the melt is dissolved in 15% (v/v) hydrobromic acid. Iron(III) is reduced with ascorbic acid to avoid its coextraction with indium as the bromide into methyl isobutyl ketone. Impregnation of the graphite furnace with sodium tungstate, and the presence of lithium metaborate and ascorbic acid in the reaction medium improve the sensitivity and precision. The limits of determination are 0.025-16 mg kg-1 indium in the sample. For 22 geological reference samples containing more than 0.1 mg kg-1 indium, relative standard deviations ranged from 3.0 to 8.5% (average 5.7%). Recoveries of indium added to various samples ranged from 96.7 to 105.6% (average 100.2%). ?? 1984.

  8. Influence of dislocations on indium diffusion in semi-polar InGaN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Yao; National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044; Sun, Huabin

    2015-05-15

    The spatial distribution of indium composition in InGaN/GaN heterostructure is a critical topic for modulating the wavelength of light emitting diodes. In this letter, semi-polar InGaN/GaN heterostructure stripes were fabricated on patterned GaN/Sapphire substrates by epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO), and the spatial distribution of indium composition in the InGaN layer was characterized by using cathodoluminescence. It is found that the indium composition is mainly controlled by the diffusion behaviors of metal atoms (In and Ga) on the surface. The diffusivity of metal atoms decreases sharply as migrating to the region with a high density of dislocations and other defects, whichmore » influences the distribution of indium composition evidently. Our work is beneficial for the understanding of ELO process and the further development of InGaN/GaN heterostructure based devices.« less

  9. Evaluation of hydrogen radical treatment for indium surface oxide removal and analysis of re-oxidation behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuyama, Kohta; Yamanaka, Kazuyuki; Higurashi, Eiji; Suga, Tadatomo

    2018-02-01

    Indium is a commonly used metal for sealing, bonding, and soldering due to its good malleability and ductility even at cryogenic temperatures. The effects of hydrogen radical treatment on indium surface oxide removal were evaluated by the spreading ratio test of indium balls (diameter, 300 µm purity, 99.99%). It was found that hydrogen radical treatment longer than 20 s at temperatures higher than 170 °C results in successful surface oxide removal. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis was carried out to study the re-oxidation behavior after treatment, and it was found that hydrogen radical treatment slows down the re-oxidation of indium compared with surface oxide removal realized by physical bombardment with an argon fast atom beam.

  10. A Novel Fabrication Method of Bi₂Te₃-Based Thermoelectric Modules by Indium Electroplating and Thermocompression Bonding.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jongchan; Bae, Sung Hwa; Sohn, Ho-Sang; Son, Injoon; Kim, Kyung Tae; Ju, Young-Wan

    2018-09-01

    In this study, we devised a method to bond thermoelectric elements directly to copper electrodes by plating indium with a relatively low melting point. A coating of indium, ~30 μm in thickness, was fabricated by electroplating the surface of a Bi2Te3-based thermoelectric element with a nickel diffusion barrier layer. They were then subjected to direct thermocompression bonding at 453 K on a hotplate for 10 min at a pressure of 1.1 kPa. Scanning electron microscopy images confirmed that a uniform bond was formed at the copper electrode/thermoelectric element interface, and the melted/solidified indium layer was defect free. Thus, the proposed novel method of fabricating a thermoelectric module by electroplating indium on the surface of the thermoelectric element and directly bonding with the copper electrode can be used to obtain a uniformly bonded interface even at a relatively low temperature without the use of solder pastes.

  11. People and the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, John James William; Feiss, P. Geoffrey

    1998-03-01

    People and the Earth examines the numerous ways in which this planet enhances and limits our lifestyles. Written with wit and remarkable insight, and illustrated with numerous case histories, it provides a balanced view of the complex environmental issues facing our civilization. The authors look at the geologic restrictions on our ability to withdraw resources--food, water, energy, and minerals--from the earth, the effect human activity has on the earth, and the lingering damage caused by natural disasters. People and the Earth examines the basic components of our interaction with this planet, provides a lucid, scientific discussion of each issue, and speculates on what the future may hold. It provides the fundamental concepts that will enable us to make wise and conscientious choices on how to live our day-to-day lives. People and the Earth is an ideal introductory textbook and will also appeal to anyone concerned with our evolving relationship to the earth.

  12. SULFUR COMPOUNDS IN MORPHOGENESIS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CHICKENS, GROWTH(PHYSIOLOGY), MITOSIS, BACTERIA, ALGAE, LIPOIC ACID , THIOLS, BELGIUM...ORGANIC SULFUR COMPOUNDS, METABOLISM), (*MORPHOLOGY(BIOLOGY), ORGANIC SULFUR COMPOUNDS), (*NUCLEIC ACIDS , BIOSYNTHESIS), EGGS, EMBRYOS, AMPHIBIANS

  13. Energy level alignment at the interfaces between typical electrodes and nucleobases: Al/adenine/indium-tin-oxide and Al/thymine/indium-tin-oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Younjoo; Lee, Hyunbok; Park, Soohyung; Yi, Yeonjin

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the interfacial electronic structures of Al/adenine/indium-tin-oxide (ITO) and Al/thymine/ITO using in situ ultraviolet and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. Adenine shows both an interface dipole and level bending, whereas thymine shows only an interface dipole in contact with ITO. In addition, thymine possesses a larger ionization energy than adenine. These are understood with delocalized π states confirmed with theoretical calculations. For the interface between nucleobases and Al, both nucleobases show a prominent reduction of the electron injection barrier from Al to each base in accordance with a downward level shift.

  14. EarthExplorer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houska, Treva

    2012-01-01

    The EarthExplorer trifold provides basic information for on-line access to remotely-sensed data from the U.S. Geological Survey Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center archive. The EarthExplorer (http://earthexplorer.usgs.gov/) client/server interface allows users to search and download aerial photography, satellite data, elevation data, land-cover products, and digitized maps. Minimum computer system requirements and customer service contact information also are included in the brochure.

  15. Mission to Planet Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Gregory S.; Huntress, Wesley T.

    1990-01-01

    The rationale behind Mission to Planet Earth is presented, and the program plan is described in detail. NASA and its interagency and international partners will place satellites carrying advanced sensors in strategic earth orbits to collect muultidisciplinary data. A sophisticated data system will process and archive an unprecedented large amount of information about the earth and how it functions as a system. Attention is given to the space observatories, the data and information systems, and the interdisciplinary research.

  16. Uderstanding Snowball Earth Deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbot, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    Earth, a normally clement planet comfortably in its star's habitable zone, suffered global or nearly global glaciation at least twice during the Neoproterozoic era (at about 635 and 710 million years ago). Viewed in the context of planetary evolution, these pan-global glaciations (Snowball Earth events) were extremely rapid, lasting only a few million years. The dramatic effect of the Snowball Earth events on the development of the planet can be seen through their link to rises in atmospheric oxygen and evolutionary innovations. These potential catastrophes on an otherwise clement planet can be used to gain insight into planetary habitability more generally. Since Earth is not currently a Snowball, a sound deglaciation mechanism is crucial for the viability of the Snowball Earth hypothesis. The traditional deglaciation mechanism is a massive build up of CO2 due to reduced weathering during Snowball Earth events until tropical surface temperatures reach the melting point. Once initiated, such a deglaciation might happen on a timescale of only dozens of thousands of years and would thrust Earth from the coldest climate in its history to the warmest. Therefore embedded in Snowball Earth events is an even more rapid and dramatic environmental change. Early global climate model simulations raised doubt about whether Snowball Earth deglaciation could be achieved at a CO2 concentration low enough to be consistent with geochemical data, which represented a potential challenge to the Snowball Earth hypothesis. Over the past few years dust and clouds have emerged as the essential missing additional processes that would allow Snowball Earth deglaciation at a low enough CO2 concentration. I will discuss the dust and cloud mechanisms and the modeling behind these ideas. This effort is critical for the broader implications of Snowball Earth events because understanding the specific deglaciation mechanism determines whether similar processes could happen on other planets.

  17. Indium Growth and Island Height Control on Si Submonolayer Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jizhou

    2009-01-01

    oscillations in the g(s) curve as the In on Pb-α phase. This may be due to the extra mobility of In atoms, which causes the In bct islands to grow too fast to be observed in diffraction or STM (Ch.5). From these experiments we can see the importance of Pb-α phase in growth of In islands. It is the best interface to grow In islands in the phases we have experimented. Recent experiments show that the Existence of Pb will decrease the diffusion speed of In. In Ch.6 we have shown that In atoms diffusion is so fast that the bct spots are not visible in diffraction. But when we put some Pb onto the In surface, we can see the bct spots, although very weak. So Pb should play an role in slowing down the indium atoms diffusion. The interaction of Pb and In may play a role, but it is still not fully understood. So the general conclusion of this thesis is that In/Pb interface has extraordinary properties and may have potential in self-assembling growth.« less

  18. Earth on the Horizon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-13

    This is the first image ever taken of Earth from the surface of a planet beyond the Moon. It was taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit one hour before sunrise on the 63rd martian day, or sol, of its mission. Earth is the tiny white dot in the center. The image is a mosaic of images taken by the rover's navigation camera showing a broad view of the sky, and an image taken by the rover's panoramic camera of Earth. The contrast in the panoramic camera image was increased two times to make Earth easier to see. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA05560

  19. NASA Earth Day 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-22

    NASA Astronaut John Mace Grunsfeld takes a quick selfie with astronauts at the International Space Station at the NASA sponsored Earth Day event April 22, 2014 at Union Station in Washington, DC. NASA announced the "Global Selfie" event as part of its "Earth Right Now" campaign, celebrating the launch of five Earth-observing missions in 2014. All selfies posted to social media with the hashtag "GlobalSelfie" will be included in a mosaic image of Earth. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  20. Indium droplet formation in InGaN thin films with single and double heterojunctions prepared by MOCVD

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Indium gallium nitride (InGaN) samples with single heterojunction (SH) and double heterojunction (DH) were prepared using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. SH has a layer of InGaN thin film (thicknesses, 25, 50, 100, and 200 nm) grown on an uGaN film (thickness, 2 μm). The DH samples are distinguished by DH uGaN film (thickness, 120 nm) grown on the InGaN layer. Reciprocal space mapping measurements reveal that the DH samples are fully strained with different thicknesses, whereas the strain in the SH samples are significantly relaxed with the increasing thickness of the InGaN film. Scanning electron microscopy results show that the surface roughness of the sample increases when the sample is relaxed. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images of the structure of indium droplets in the DH sample indicate that the thickness of the InGaN layer decreases with the density of indium droplets. The formation of these droplets is attributed to the insufficient kinetic energy of indium atom to react with the elements of group V, resulting to aggregation. The gallium atoms in the GaN thin film will not be uniformly replaced by indium atoms; the InGaN thin film has an uneven distribution of indium atoms and the quality of the epitaxial layer is degraded. PMID:25024692

  1. High indium content homogenous InAlN layers grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyle, Erin C. H.; Kaun, Stephen W.; Wu, Feng; Bonef, Bastien; Speck, James S.

    2016-11-01

    InAlN grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy often contains a honeycomb microstructure. The honeycomb microstructure consists of 5-10 nm diameter aluminum-rich regions which are surrounded by indium-rich regions. Layers without this microstructure were previously developed for nominally lattice-matched InAlN and have been developed here for higher indium content InAlN. In this study, InAlN was grown in a nitrogen-rich environment with high indium to aluminum flux ratios at low growth temperatures. Samples were characterized by high-resolution x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy, and atom probe tomography. Atomic force microscopy showed InAlN layers grown at temperatures below 450 °C under nitrogen-rich conditions were free of droplets. InAlN films with indium contents up to 81% were grown at temperatures between 410 and 440 °C. High-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography showed no evidence of honeycomb microstructure for samples with indium contents of 34% and 62%. These layers are homogeneous and follow a random alloy distribution. A growth diagram for InAlN of all indium contents is reported.

  2. Recycling of indium from waste LCD: A promising non-crushing leaching with the aid of ultrasonic wave.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kaihua; Li, Bin; Wu, Yufeng; Wang, Wei; Li, Rubing; Zhang, Yi-Nan; Zuo, Tieyong

    2017-06-01

    The tremendous amount of end-of-life liquid crystal displays (LCDs) has become one of the prominent sources of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) in recent years. Despite the necessity of safe treatment, recycling indium is also a focus of waste LCD treatment because of the scarcity of indium. Based on the analyses of the structure of Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) glass, crushing is demonstrated to be not required. In the present research, a complete non-crushing leaching method was firstly adopted to recycle indium from waste LCDs, and the ultrasonic waves was applied in the leaching process. The results demonstrated that indium can be leached efficiently with even a low concentration of chloride acid (HCl) without extra heating. About 96.80% can be recovered in 60mins, when the ITO glass was leached by 0.8MHCl with an enhancement of 300W ultrasonic waves. The indium leaching process is abridged free from crushing, and proves to be of higher efficiency. In addition, the ultrasonic wave influence on leaching process was also explained combing with micron-scale structure of ITO glass. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mass measurements of neutron-rich indium isotopes toward the N =82 shell closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babcock, C.; Klawitter, R.; Leistenschneider, E.; Lascar, D.; Barquest, B. R.; Finlay, A.; Foster, M.; Gallant, A. T.; Hunt, P.; Kootte, B.; Lan, Y.; Paul, S. F.; Phan, M. L.; Reiter, M. P.; Schultz, B.; Short, D.; Andreoiu, C.; Brodeur, M.; Dillmann, I.; Gwinner, G.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Leach, K. G.; Dilling, J.

    2018-02-01

    Precise mass measurements of the neutron-rich In-130125 isotopes have been performed with the TITAN Penning trap mass spectrometer. TITAN's electron beam ion trap was used to charge breed the ions to charge state q =13 + thus providing the necessary resolving power to measure not only the ground states but also isomeric states at each mass number. In this paper, the properties of the ground states are investigated through a series of mass differentials, highlighting trends in the indium isotopic chain as compared to its proton-magic neighbor, tin (Z =50 ). In addition, the energies of the indium isomers are presented. The (8-) level in 128In is found to be 78 keV lower than previously thought and the (21 /2- ) isomer in 127In is shown to be lower than the literature value by more than 150 keV.

  4. Stable indium oxide thin-film transistors with fast threshold voltage recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vygranenko, Yuriy; Wang, Kai; Nathan, Arokia

    2007-12-01

    Stable thin-film transistors (TFTs) with semiconducting indium oxide channel and silicon dioxide gate dielectric were fabricated by reactive ion beam assisted evaporation and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The field-effect mobility is 3.3cm2/Vs, along with an on/off current ratio of 106, and subthreshold slope of 0.5V/decade. When subject to long-term gate bias stress, the TFTs show fast recovery of the threshold voltage (VT) when relaxed without annealing, suggesting that charge trapping at the interface and/or in the bulk gate dielectric to be the dominant mechanism underlying VT instability. Device performance and stability make indium oxide TFTs promising for display applications.

  5. Diagnostics of RF magnetron sputtering plasma for synthesizing transparent conductive Indium-Zinc-Oxide film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Takayuki; Inoue, Mari; Takota, Naoki; Ito, Masafumi; Higashijima, Yasuhiro; Kano, Hiroyuki; den, Shoji; Yamakawa, Koji; Hori, Masaru

    2009-10-01

    Transparent conductive Oxide film has been used as transparent conducting electrodes of optoelectronic devices such as flat panel display, solar cells, and so on. Indium-Zinc-Oxide (IZO) has been investigated as one of promising alternatives Indium Tin Oxide film, due to amorphous, no nodule and so on. In order to control a sputtering process with highly precise, RF magnetron sputtering plasma using IZO composite target was diagnosed by absorption and emission spectroscopy. We have developed a multi-micro hollow cathode lamp which can emit simultaneous multi-atomic lines for monitoring Zn and In densities simultaneously. Zn and In densities were measured to be 10^9 from 10^10 cm-3 at RF power from 40 to 100 W, pressure of 5Pa, and Ar flow rate of 300 sccm. The emission intensities of Zn, In, InO, and Ar were also observed.

  6. The Advent of Indium Selenide: Synthesis, Electronic Properties, Ambient Stability and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Boukhvalov, Danil W.; Gürbulak, Bekir; Duman, Songül; Wang, Lin; Caputi, Lorenzo S.; Chiarello, Gennaro; Cupolillo, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Among the various two-dimensional semiconductors, indium selenide has recently triggered the interest of scientific community, due to its band gap matching the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum, with subsequent potential applications in optoelectronics and especially in photodetection. In this feature article, we discuss the main issues in the synthesis, the ambient stability and the application capabilities of this novel class of two-dimensional semiconductors, by evidencing open challenges and pitfalls. In particular, we evidence how the growth of single crystals with reduced amount of Se vacancies is crucial in the road map for the exploitation of indium selenide in technology through ambient-stable nanodevices with outstanding values of both mobility of charge carriers and ON/OFF ratio. The surface chemical reactivity of the InSe surface, as well as applications in the fields of broadband photodetection, flexible electronics and solar energy conversion are also discussed. PMID:29113090

  7. Effect of Temperature on Nucleation of Nanocrystalline Indium Tin Oxide Synthesized by Electron-Beam Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yan; Zhao, Yujun; Shen, Jianxing; Xu, Xiangang

    2017-07-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) has been widely applied as a transparent conductive layer and optical window in light-emitting diodes, solar cells, and touch screens. In this paper, crystalline nano-sized ITO dendrites are obtained using an electron-beam evaporation technique. The surface morphology of the obtained ITO was studied for substrate temperatures of 25°C, 130°C, 180°C, and 300°C. Nano-sized crystalline dendrites were synthesized only at a substrate temperature of 300°C. The dendrites had a cubic structure, confirmed by the results of x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The growth mechanism of the nano-crystalline dendrites could be explained by a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth model. The catalysts of the VLS process were indium and tin droplets, confirmed by varying the substrate temperature, which further influenced the nucleation of the ITO dendrites.

  8. Work in progress: radionuclide imaging of indium-111-labeled eosinophils in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, V.M.; Rand, T.H.; Clanton, J.A.

    1983-05-01

    Eosinophils isolated from peritoneal exudates were labeled with indium-111-oxine and injected intravenously into sensitized mice. They became localized at sites of inflammation produced by intradermal injections of schistosomal antigen or Toxocara canis larvae, whereas labeled neutrophils did not. Intense uptake of eosinophils by normal spleen, liver, and bone marrow was noted, with tracer distribution effectively complete by 5 hours after injection. Indium-111-eosinophil studies appear to be quite sensitive to parasitic inflammatory reactions; in contrast, nonspecific inflammation such as that induced by turpentine causes localization of eosinophils, but to a lesser extent. This technique may be useful in the study ofmore » parasitic and allergic disease.« less

  9. Optoelectronic and magnetic properties of Mn-doped indium tin oxide: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath Tripathi, Madhvendra; Saeed Bahramy, Mohammad; Shida, Kazuhito; Sahara, Ryoji; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2012-10-01

    The manganese doped indium tin oxide (ITO) has integrated magnetics, electronics, and optical properties for next generation multifunctional devices. Our first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that the manganese atom replaces b-site indium atom, located at the second coordination shell of the interstitial oxygen in ITO. It is also found that both anti-ferromagnetic and ferromagnetic behaviors are realizable. The calculated magnetic moment of 3.95μB/Mn as well as the high transmittance of ˜80% for a 150 nm thin film of Mn doped ITO is in good agreement with the experimental data. The inclusion of on-site Coulomb repulsion corrections via DFT + U methods turns out to improve the optical behavior of the system. The optical behaviors of this system reveal its suitability for the magneto-opto-electronic applications.

  10. Superconducting thin films of (100) and (111) oriented indium doped topological crystalline insulator SnTe

    DOE PAGES

    Si, W.; Zhang, C.; Wu, L.; ...

    2015-09-01

    Recent discovery of the topological crystalline insulator SnTe has triggered a search for topological superconductors, which have potential application to topological quantum computing. The present work reports on the superconducting properties of indium doped SnTe thin films. The (100) and (111) oriented thin films were epitaxially grown by pulsed-laser deposition on (100) and (111) BaF2 crystalline substrates respectively. The onset superconducting transition temperatures are about 3.8 K for (100) and 3.6 K for (111) orientations, slightly lower than that of the bulk. Magneto-resistive measurements indicate that these thin films may have upper critical fields higher than that of the bulk.more » With large surface-to-bulk ratio, superconducting indium doped SnTe thin films provide a rich platform for the study of topological superconductivity and potential device applications based on topological superconductors.« less

  11. Temperature sensibility of the birefringence properties in side-hole photonic crystal fiber filled with Indium

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes-Vera, Erick, E-mail: erickreyes@itm.edu.co; Gómez-Cardona, Nelson D.; Facultad de Ingeniería, Instituto Tecnológico Metropolitano, A.A. 54954 Medellín

    2014-11-17

    We report on the temperature sensitivity of the birefringence properties of a special kind of photonic crystal fiber containing two side holes filled with Indium metal. The modulation of the fiber birefringence is accomplished through the stress field induced by the expansion of the metal. Although the fiber was made at low gas pressures during the indium infiltration process, the birefringence showed anomalous property at a relatively low temperature value, which is completely different from those reported in conventional-like fibers with two holes filled with metal. By modeling the anisotropic changes induced by the metal expansion to the refractive indexmore » within the fiber, we are able to reproduce the experimental results. Our results have practical relevance for the design of devices based on this technology.« less

  12. Reactive ion etching of indium-tin oxide films by CCl4-based Inductivity Coupled Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juneja, Sucheta; Poletayev, Sergey D.; Fomchenkov, Sergey; Khonina, Svetlana N.; Skidanov, Roman V.; Kazanskiy, Nikolay L.

    2016-08-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) films have been a subject of extensive studies in fabrication of micro-electronic devices for opto-electronic applications ranging from anti-reflection coatings to transparent contacts in photovoltaic devices. In this paper, a new and effective way of reactive ion etching of a conducting indium-tin oxide (ITO) film with Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) has been investigated. CCl4 plasma containing an addition of gases mixture of dissociated argon and oxygen were used. Oxygen is added to increase the etchant percentage whereas argon was used for stabilization of plasma. The etching characteristics obtained with these gaseous mixtures were explained based on plasma etch chemistry and etching regime of ITO films. An etch rate as high as ∼20 nm/min can be achieved with a controlled process parameter such as power density, total flow rate, composition of reactive gases gas and pressure. Our Investigation represents some of the extensive work in this area.

  13. Indium-oxide nanoparticles for RRAM devices compatible with CMOS back-end-off-line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León Pérez, Edgar A. A.; Guenery, Pierre-Vincent; Abouzaid, Oumaïma; Ayadi, Khaled; Brottet, Solène; Moeyaert, Jérémy; Labau, Sébastien; Baron, Thierry; Blanchard, Nicholas; Baboux, Nicolas; Militaru, Liviu; Souifi, Abdelkader

    2018-05-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of Resistive Random Access Memory (RRAM) devices based on nanoparticles in MIM structures. Our approach is based on the use of indium oxide (In2O3) nanoparticles embedded in a dielectric matrix using CMOS-full-compatible fabrication processes in view of back-end-off-line integration for non-volatile memory (NVM) applications. A bipolar switching behavior has been observed using current-voltage measurements (I-V) for all devices. Very high ION/IOFF ratios have been obtained up to 108. Our results provide insights for further integration of In2O3 nanoparticles-based devices for NVM applications. He is currently a Postdoctoral Researcher in the Institute of Nanotechnologies of Lyon (INL), INSA de Lyon, France, in the Electronics Department. His current research include indium oxide nanoparticles for non-volatile memory applications, and the integrations of these devices in CMOS BEOL.

  14. Optical properties of an indium doped CdSe nanocrystal: A density functional approach

    SciTech Connect

    Salini, K.; Mathew, Vincent, E-mail: vincent@cukerala.ac.in; Mathew, Thomas

    2016-05-06

    We have studied the electronic and optical properties of a CdSe nanocrystal doped with n-type impurity atom. First principle calculations of the CdSe nanocrystal based on the density functional theory (DFT), as implemented in the Vienna Ab Initio Simulation Package (VASP) was used in the calculations. We have introduced a single Indium impurity atom into CdSe nanocrystal with 1.3 nm diameter. Nanocrystal surface dangling bonds are passivated with hydrogen atom. The band-structure, density of states and absorption spectra of the doped and undopted nanocrystals were discussed. Inclusion of the n-type impurity atom introduces an additional electron in conduction band, and significantlymore » alters the electronic and optical properties of undoped CdSe nanocrystal. Indium doped CdSe nannocrystal have potential applications in optoelectronic devices.« less

  15. Superconducting thin films of (100) and (111) oriented indium doped topological crystalline insulator SnTe

    SciTech Connect

    Si, Weidong, E-mail: wds@bnl.gov, E-mail: qiangli@bnl.gov; Zhang, Cheng; Wu, Lijun

    2015-08-31

    Recent discovery of the topological crystalline insulator SnTe has triggered a search for topological superconductors, which have potential application to topological quantum computing. The present work reports on the superconducting properties of indium doped SnTe thin films. The (100) and (111) oriented thin films were epitaxially grown by pulsed-laser deposition on (100) and (111) BaF{sub 2} crystalline substrates, respectively. The onset superconducting transition temperatures are about 3.8 K for (100) and 3.6 K for (111) orientations, slightly lower than that of the bulk. Magneto-resistive measurements indicate that these thin films may have upper critical fields higher than that of the bulk. Withmore » large surface-to-bulk ratio, superconducting indium doped SnTe thin films provide a rich platform for the study of topological superconductivity and potential device applications based on topological superconductors.« less

  16. Endocytosis of indium-tin-oxide nanoparticles by macrophages provokes pyroptosis requiring NLRP3-ASC-Caspase1 axis that can be prevented by mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Naji, Abderrahim; Muzembo, Basilua André; Yagyu, Ken-ichi; Baba, Nobuyasu; Deschaseaux, Frédéric; Sensebé, Luc; Suganuma, Narufumi

    2016-01-01

    The biological effects of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) are of considerable importance because workers exposed to indium compounds have been diagnosed with interstitial lung disease or pulmonary alveolar proteinosis; however, the pathophysiology of these diseases is undefined. Here, mice intraperitoneally inoculated with ITO-nanoparticles (ITO-NPs) resulted in peritonitis dependent in NLRP3 inflammasome, with neutrophils recruitment and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production. Withal peritoneal macrophages exposed ex vivo to ITO-NPs caused IL-1β secretion and cytolysis. Further, alveolar macrophages exposed to ITO-NPs in vitro showed ITO-NP endocytosis and production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and IL-1β, ensued cell death by cytolysis. This cell death was RIPK1-independent but caspase1-dependent, and thus identified as pyroptosis. Endocytosis of ITO-NPs by activated THP-1 cells induced pyroptosis with IL-1β/TNF-α production and cytolysis, but not in activated THP-1 cells with knockdown of NLRP3, ASC, or caspase1. However, exposing activated THP-1 cells with NLRP3 or ASC knockdown to ITO-NPs resulted in cell death but without cytolysis, with deficiency in IL-1β/TNF-α, and revealing features of apoptosis. While, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) co-cultured with macrophages impaired both inflammation and cell death induced by ITO-NPs. Together, our findings provide crucial insights to the pathophysiology of respiratory diseases caused by ITO particles, and identify MSCs as a potent therapeutic. PMID:27194621

  17. Oxidation catalysts on alkaline earth supports

    DOEpatents

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2017-03-21

    An oxidation catalyst includes a support including particles of an alkaline earth salt, and first particles including a palladium compound on the support. The oxidation catalyst can also include precious metal group (PMG) metal particles in addition to the first particles intermixed together on the support. A gas permeable polymer that provides a continuous phase can completely encapsulate the particles and the support. The oxidation catalyst may be used as a gas sensor, where the first particles are chemochromic particles.

  18. Characterization and Modeling of Indium Gallium Antimonide Avalanche Photodiode and of Indium Gallium Arsenide Two-band Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    A model of the optical properties of Al(x)Ga(1-x)As(y)Sb(1-y) and In(x)Ga(1-x)As(y)Sb(1-y) is presented, including the refractive, extinction, absorption and reflection coefficients in terms of the optical dielectric function of the materials. Energy levels and model parameters for each binary compound are interpolated to obtain the needed ternaries and quaternaries for various compositions. Bowing parameters are considered in the interpolation scheme to take into account the deviation of the calculated ternary and quaternary values from experimental data due to lattice disorders. The inclusion of temperature effects is currently being considered.

  19. Humidity-induced room-temperature decomposition of Au contacted indium phosphide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatemi, Navid S.; Weizer, Victor G.

    1990-01-01

    It has been found that Au-contacted InP is chemically unstable at room temperature in a humid ambient due to the leaching action of indium nitrate islands that continually remove In from the contact metallization and thus, in effect, from the Inp substrate. While similar appearing islands form on Au-contacted GaAs, that system appears to be stable since leaching of the group III element does not take place.

  20. Optical second harmonic generation phase measurement at interfaces of some organic layers with indium tin oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngah Demon, Siti Zulaikha; Miyauchi, Yoshihiro; Mizutani, Goro; Matsushima, Toshinori; Murata, Hideyuki

    2014-08-01

    We observed phase shift in optical second harmonic generation (SHG) from interfaces of indium tin oxide (ITO)/copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and ITO/pentacene. Phase correction due to Fresnel factors of the sample was taken into account. The phase of SHG electric field at the ITO/pentacene interface, ϕinterface with respect to the phase of SHG of bare substrate ITO was 160°, while the interface of ITO/CuPc had a phase of 140°.

  1. Surface smoothing of indium tin oxide film by laser-induced photochemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, JoonHyun; Kim, Young-Hwan; Kwon, Seok Joon; Park, Joon-Suh; Park, Kyoung Wan; Park, Jae-Gwan; Han, Il Ki

    2017-12-01

    Surface smoothing of indium tin oxide (ITO) film by laser irradiation was demonstrated. The ITO surface was etched by choline radicals, which were activated by laser irradiation at a wavelength of 532 nm. The RMS surface roughness was improved from 5.6 to 4.6 nm after 10 min of laser irradiation. We also showed the changes in the surface morphology of the ITO film with various irradiation powers and times.

  2. Novel solar light driven photocatalyst, zinc indium vanadate for photodegradation of aqueous phenol

    SciTech Connect

    Mahapure, Sonali A.; Rane, Vilas H.; Ambekar, Jalindar D.

    2011-05-15

    Graphical abstract: Novel photocatalyst, zinc indium vanadate (ZnIn{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 9}) demonstrated and showed an excellent photocatalytic activity for phenol degradation under visible light. Research highlights: {yields} Designing and identification of a photocatalyst having prospective potential application to be used in visible light (400-800 nm). {yields} Successful synthesis of novel ZnIn{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 9} by solid state route. {yields} Confirmation of the designed product using characterization techniques. {yields} Application study comprising photodegradation of aqueous phenol at visible light despite of UV radiations. -- Abstract: In the present investigation, we have demonstrated the synthesis of novel photocatalyst, zinc indium vanadate (ZIV)more » by solid-solid state route using respective oxides of zinc, indium and vanadium. This novel photocatalyst was characterized using XRD, FESEM, UV-DRS and FTIR in order to investigate its structural, morphological and optical properties. XRD clearly shows the formation of phase pure ZIV of triclinic crystal structure with good crystallinity. FESEM micrographs showed the clustered morphology having particle size between 0.5 and 1 {mu}m. Since, optical study showed the band gap around 2.8 eV, i.e. in visible region, we have performed the photocatalytic activity of phenol degradation under visible light irradiation. The photodecomposition of phenol by ZIV is studied for the first time and an excellent photocatalytic activity was obtained using this novel photocatalyst. Considering the band gap of zinc indium vanadate in visible region, it will also be the potential candidate for water splitting.« less

  3. Surface modifications on InAs decrease indium and arsenic leaching under physiological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewett, Scott A.; Yoder, Jeffrey A.; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2012-11-01

    Devices containing III-V semiconductors such as InAs are increasingly being used in the electronic industry for a variety of optoelectronic applications. Furthermore, the attractive chemical, material, electronic properties make such materials appealing for use in devices designed for biological applications, such as biosensors. However, in biological applications the leaching of toxic materials from these devices could cause harm to cells or tissue. Additionally, after disposal, toxic inorganic materials can leach from devices and buildup in the environment, causing long-term ecological harm. Therefore, the toxicity of these materials along with their stability in physiological conditions are important factors to consider. Surface modifications are one common method of stabilizing semiconductor materials in order to chemically and electronically passivate them. Such surface modifications could also prevent the leaching of toxic materials by preventing the regrowth of the unstable surface oxide layer and by creating an effective barrier between the semiconductor surface and the surrounding environment. In this study, various surface modifications on InAs are developed with the goal of decreasing the leaching of indium and arsenic. The leaching of indium and arsenic from modified substrates was assessed in physiological conditions using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Substrates modified with 11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MU) and graft polymerized with poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) were most effective at preventing indium and arsenic leaching. These surfaces were characterized using contact angle analysis, ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Substrates modified with collagen and synthetic polyelectrolytes were least effective, due to the destructive nature of acidic environments on InAs. The toxicity of modified and unmodified InAs, along with raw indium, arsenic, and PEG components was assessed

  4. SU-E-I-14: Comparison of Iodine-Labeled and Indium-Labeled Antibody Biodistributions

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is often assumed that animal biodistributions of novel proteins are not dependent upon the radiolabel used in their determination. In units of percent injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g), organ uptake results (u) may be obtained using either iodine or metal as radioactive labels. Iodination is preferred as it is a one-step process whereas metal labeling requires two chemical procedures and therefore more protein material. It is important to test whether the radioactive tag leads to variation in the uptake value. Methods: Uptakes of 3antibodies to Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) were evaluated in a nude mouse model bearingmore » 150 to 300 mg LS174T human colon cancer xenografts. Antibodies included diabody (56 kDa), minibody (80kDa) and intact M5A (150 kDa) anti-CEA cognates. Both radioiodine and indium-111 labels were used with uptakes evaluated at 7 time(t) points out to 96 h. Ratios (R) of u(iodine-label)/u(indium-label) were determined for liver, spleen, kidneys, lung and tumor. Results: Hepatic loss was rapid for diabody and minibody; by 24 h their R values were only 2%; i.e., uptake of iodine was 2% of that of indium for these 2 antibodies. By contrast, R for the intact cognate was 50% at that time point. Splenic results were similar. Tumor uptake ratios did not depend upon the antibody type and were 50% at 24 h. Conclusions: Relatively rapid loss of iodine relative to indium in liver and spleen was observed in lower mass antibodies. Tumor ratios were larger and independent of antibody type. Aside from tumor, the R ratio of uptakes depended on the antibody type. R values decreased monotonically with time in all tissues and for all cognates. Using this ratio, one can possibly correct iodine-based u (t) results so that they resemble radiometal-derived biodistributions.« less

  5. Compounding in Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Zdoryk, Oleksandr A; Georgiyants, Victoriya A; Gryzodub, Oleksandr I; Schnatz, Rick

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical compounding in modern Ukraine has a rich history and goes back to ancient times. Today in the Ukraine, there is a revival of compounding practice, the opening of private compounding pharmacies, updating of legislative framework and requirements of the State Pharmacopeia of Ukraine for compounding preparations, and the introduction of Good Pharmaceutical Practice.

  6. Earth System Science Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford, Sandra; Coffman, Margaret

    2004-01-01

    For several decades, science teachers have used bottles for classroom projects designed to teach students about biology. Bottle projects do not have to just focus on biology, however. These projects can also be used to engage students in Earth science topics. This article describes the Earth System Science Project, which was adapted and developed…

  7. Crescent Earth and Moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-08-29

    This picture of a crescent-shaped Earth and Moon, the first of its kind ever taken by a spacecraft, was recorded Sept. 18, 1977, by NASA Voyager 1 when it was 7.25 million miles 11.66 million kilometers from Earth. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00013

  8. Introducing Earth's Orbital Eccentricity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Most students know that planetary orbits, including Earth's, are elliptical; that is Kepler's first law, and it is found in many science textbooks. But quite a few are mistaken about the details, thinking that the orbit is very eccentric, or that this effect is somehow responsible for the seasons. In fact, the Earth's orbital eccentricity is…

  9. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-17

    During the annual Earth Day celebration at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, Shari Blissett-Clark of the Florida Bat Conservancy displays one of the mammals. The event took place during the annual Earth Day celebration at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, guests have an opportunity to learn more about energy awareness, the environment and sustainability.

  10. Spaceship Earth Curriculum Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInnis, Noel; And Others

    Three separate papers from the Project are included in this document. One of these, by the Center staff, is entitled "Potentials of the Spaceship Earth Metaphor". It discusses static, dynamic, and analogic representations of spaceship earth and their educational value. A second paper, "Some Resources for Introducing Environmental…

  11. The Earth's Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeanloz, Raymond

    1983-01-01

    The nature of the earth's core is described. Indirect evidence (such as that determined from seismological data) indicates that it is an iron alloy, solid toward its center but otherwise liquid. Evidence also suggests that it is the turbulent flow of the liquid that generates the earth's magnetic field. (JN)

  12. NASA Earth Day 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-22

    An attendee of NASA's Earth Day event observes the glow from a bracelet that is part of an exhibit at the event. The Earth Day event took place at Union Station in Washington, DC on April 22, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  13. Cool Earth Solar

    ScienceCinema

    Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan,

    2018-05-30

    In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

  14. Hands On Earth Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisgarber, Sherry L.; Van Doren, Lisa; Hackathorn, Merrianne; Hannibal, Joseph T.; Hansgen, Richard

    This publication is a collection of 13 hands-on activities that focus on earth science-related activities and involve students in learning about growing crystals, tectonics, fossils, rock and minerals, modeling Ohio geology, geologic time, determining true north, and constructing scale-models of the Earth-moon system. Each activity contains…

  15. The Earth Charter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Education for Sustainable Development, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Humanity is part of a vast evolving universe. Earth is alive with a unique community of life. The forces of nature make existence a demanding and uncertain adventure, but Earth has provided the conditions essential to life's evolution. The resilience of the community of life and the well-being of humanity depend upon preserving a healthy biosphere…

  16. Skylab Explores the Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This book describes the Skylab 4 Earth Explorations Project. Photographs of the earth taken by the Skylab astronauts are reproduced here and accompanied by an analytical and explanatory text. Some of the geological and geographical topics covered are: (1) global tectonics - some geological analyses of observations and photographs from Skylab; (2)…

  17. Earth and ocean modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knezovich, F. M.

    1976-01-01

    A modular structured system of computer programs is presented utilizing earth and ocean dynamical data keyed to finitely defined parameters. The model is an assemblage of mathematical algorithms with an inherent capability of maturation with progressive improvements in observational data frequencies, accuracies and scopes. The Eom in its present state is a first-order approach to a geophysical model of the earth's dynamics.

  18. The Earth Needs You!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Celebrated annually on April 22, schools and communities organize numerous activities during Earth Day to promote awareness. To help teachers plan their own initiatives and to learn more about what is happening around the world, they can join the Earth Day Network at: http://network.earthday.net/. Once they have joined, they can create a webpage…

  19. Interfacial reactions of nano-structured Cu-doped indium oxide/indium tin oxide ohmic contacts to p-GaN.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Young Joon; Chae, S W; Kim, B K; Park, Min Joo; Kwak, Joon Seop

    2010-05-01

    Interfacial microstructure and elemental diffusion of Cu-doped indium oxide (CIO)/indium tin oxide (ITO) ohmic contacts to p-type GaN for light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were investigated using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray diffraction. The CIO/ITO contacts gave specific contact resistances of approximately 10(-4) omegacm2 and transmittance greater than 95% at a wavelength of 405 nm when annealed at 630 degrees C for 1 min in air. After annealing at 630 degrees C, multi-component oxides composed of Ga2O3-In2O3, Ga2O3-CuO, and In2O3-CuO formed at the interface between p-GaN and ITO. Formation of multi-component oxides reduced the barrier height between p-GaN and ITO due to their higher work functions than that of ITO, and caused Ga in the GaN to diffuse into the CIO/ITO layer, followed by generation of acceptor-like Ga vacancies near the GaN surface, which lowered contact resistivity of the CIO/ITO contacts to p-GaN after the annealing.

  20. Structure and Internal Stress of Tin-Doped Indium Oxide and Indium-Zinc Oxide Films Deposited by DC Magnetron Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Eriko; Sasabayashi, Tomoko; Ito, Norihiro; Sato, Yasushi; Utsumi, Kentaro; Yano, Koki; Kaijo, Akira; Inoue, Kazuyoshi; Shigesato, Yuzo

    2007-12-01

    Representative transparent conductive oxide films, such as tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) and indium-zinc oxide (IZO) films, were deposited by dc magnetron sputtering using corresponding oxide targets under various total gas pressures (Ptot) ranging from 0.3 to 3.0 Pa. The ITO films deposited at a Ptot lower than 0.7 Pa were polycrystalline and were found to have a large compressive stress of about 1.5 × 109 Pa, whereas the ITO films deposited at 1.5-3.0 Pa were amorphous and had a low tensile stress. In contrast, all the IZO films deposited at a Ptot range of 0.3-3.0 Pa showed an entirely amorphous structure, where the compressive stress in the IZO films deposited at a Ptot lower than 1.5 Pa was lower than that in the ITO films. Such compressive stress was considered to be generated by the atomic peening effect of high-energy neutrals (Ar0) recoiled from the target or high-energy negative ions (O-) accelerated in the cathode sheath toward the film surface.

  1. Indium-saving effect and physical properties of transparent conductive multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, M.; Kiba, T.; Abe, Y.; Kim, K. H.

    2018-03-01

    Indium-free transparent conductive multilayer structures consisting of top and bottom MoO3 layers and an Ag interlayer (MoO3/Ag/MoO3; MAM) are deposited onto glass substrates by vacuum evaporation. The transmittance and sheet resistance of the structures are evaluated, and the optimum structure is determined to be MAM (20/14/30 nm) as it shows the best figure of merit (FOM), which is used as the index for transparent conductive films, with a value of 6.2 × 10-3 Ω-1. To further improve the performance of the films, we attempt to fabricate a multilayer consisting of MoO3 and indium zinc oxide (IZO), based on previous results. The obtained IAM (30/14/50 nm) multilayer shows an FOM higher than that of the MAM, with a value of 32 × 10-3 Ω-1. Moreover, it reduces the amount of required indium as compared with the IZO/Ag/IZO multilayer.

  2. Influence of disorder on the superconducting critical temperature in indium-opal nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharchuk, I.; Januzaj, A.; Mikhailin, N. Yu.; Traito, K. B.; Chernyaev, A. V.; Romanov, S. G.; Safonchik, M.; Shamshur, D. V.; Lähderanta, E.

    2018-06-01

    Transport properties of bulk indium-opal and indium-porous glass superconducting nanocomposites possessing moderate and strong disorder are investigated. A strongly nonmonotonous dependence of the global critical temperature Tc versus normal state conductivity of samples is found. The maximum, which is observed at moderate disorder, has Tc higher than that of clean bulk indium. The increasing part can be explained by the Eliashberg equations with disorder and an additional mechanism of interaction between superconducting and dielectric granules. The descending part of the maximum at higher disorder can be explained by the increasing of long-range Coulomb repulsion due to diffusion of charges. Negative slope in magnetic field dependence of resistivity and a peak in the temperature dependence of resistivity, observed in the sample near the proximity to the disorder-induced superconductor-insulator transition (SIT). A large difference between the onset temperature of superconducting fluctuations, Tcon , and global critical temperature Tc is found and considered in the framework of the weak multifractal theory. Slow time-logarithmic relaxation of the resistivity between Tc and Tcon is observed, which assumes existence of the precursor state near the SIT. This unusual state is discussed in the scope of the many-body localization theory.

  3. High indium non-polar InGaN clusters with infrared sensitivity grown by PAMBE

    SciTech Connect

    Mukundan, Shruti; Mohan, Lokesh; Chandan, Greeshma

    2015-03-15

    Studies on the optical properties of InGaN alloy of relatively higher indium content are of potential interest to understand the effect of indium content on the optical band gap of epitaxial InGaN. We report the growth of self assembled non-polar high indium clusters of In{sub 0.55}Ga{sub 0.45}N over non-polar (11-20) a-plane In{sub 0.17}Ga{sub 0.83}N epilayer grown on a-plane (11-20)GaN/(1-102) r-plane sapphire substrate using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE). Such structures are potential candidates for high brightness LEDs emitting in longer wavelengths. The high resolution X-ray diffraction studies revealed the formation of two distinct compositions of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N alloys,more » which were further confirmed by photoluminescence studies. A possible mechanism for the formation of such structure was postulated which was supported with the results obtained by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The structure hence grown when investigated for photo-detecting properties, showed sensitivity to both infrared and ultraviolet radiations due to the different composition of InGaN region.« less

  4. A novel precursor system and its application to produce tin doped indium oxide.

    PubMed

    Veith, M; Bubel, C; Zimmer, M

    2011-06-14

    A new type of precursor has been developed by molecular design and synthesised to produce tin doped indium oxide (ITO). The precursor consists of a newly developed bimetallic indium tin alkoxide, Me(2)In(O(t)Bu)(3)Sn (Me = CH(3), O(t)Bu = OC(CH(3))(3)), which is in equilibrium with an excess of Me(2)In(O(t)Bu). This quasi single-source precursor is applied in a sol-gel process to produce powders and coatings of ITO using a one-step heat treatment process under an inert atmosphere. The main advantage of this system is the simple heat treatment that leads to the disproportionation of the bivalent Sn(II) precursor into Sn(IV) and metallic tin, resulting in an overall reduced state of the metal in the final tin doped indium oxide (ITO) material, hence avoiding the usually necessary reduction step. Solid state (119)Sn-NMR measurements of powder samples confirm the appearance of Sn(II) in an amorphous gel state and of metallic tin after annealing under nitrogen. The corresponding preparation of ITO coatings by spin coating on glass leads to transparent conductive layers with a high transmittance of visible light and a low electrical resistivity without the necessity of a reduction step.

  5. Earth Science Informatics - Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 10-15 years, significant advances have been made in information management, there are an increasing number of individuals entering the field of information management as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing data, and the field of informatics has come to its own. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of science data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also includes the use of computers and computational methods to support decision making and applications. Earth Science Informatics (ESI, a.k.a. geoinformatics) is the application of informatics in the Earth science domain. ESI is a rapidly developing discipline integrating computer science, information science, and Earth science. Major national and international research and infrastructure projects in ESI have been carried out or are on-going. Notable among these are: the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), the European Commissions INSPIRE, the U.S. NSDI and Geospatial One-Stop, the NASA EOSDIS, and the NSF DataONE, EarthCube and Cyberinfrastructure for Geoinformatics. More than 18 departments and agencies in the U.S. federal government have been active in Earth science informatics. All major space agencies in the world, have been involved in ESI research and application activities. In the United States, the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP), whose membership includes nearly 150 organizations (government, academic and commercial) dedicated to managing, delivering and applying Earth science data, has been working on many ESI topics since 1998. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)s Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) has been actively coordinating the ESI activities among the space agencies. Remote Sensing; Earth Science Informatics, Data Systems; Data Services; Metadata

  6. New quaternary thallium indium germanium selenide TlInGe2Se6: Crystal and electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khyzhun, O. Y.; Parasyuk, O. V.; Tsisar, O. V.; Piskach, L. V.; Myronchuk, G. L.; Levytskyy, V. O.; Babizhetskyy, V. S.

    2017-10-01

    Crystal structure of a novel quaternary thallium indium germanium selenide TlInGe2Se6 was investigated by means of powder X-ray diffraction method. It was determined that the compound crystallizes in the trigonal space group R3 with the unit cell parameters a = 10.1798(2) Å, c = 9.2872(3) Å. The relationship with similar structures was discussed. The as-synthesized TlInGe2Se6 ingot was tested with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES). In particular, the XPS valence-band and core-level spectra were recorded for initial and Ar+ ion-bombarded surfaces of the sample under consideration. The XPS data allow for statement that the TlInGe2Se6 surface is rigid with respect to Ar+ ion-bombardment. Particularly, Ar+ ion-bombardment (3.0 keV, 5 min duration, ion current density fixed at 14 μA/cm2) did not cause substantial modifications of stoichiometry in topmost surface layers. Furthermore, comparison on a common energy scale of the XES Se Kβ2 and Ge Kβ2 bands and the XPS valence-band spectrum reveals that the principal contributions of the Se 4p and Ge 4p states occur in the upper and central portions of the valence band of TlInGe2Se6, respectively, with also their substantial contributions in other portions of the band. The bandgap energy of TlInGe2Se6 at the level of αg=103 cm-1 is equal to 2.38 eV at room temperature.

  7. Routes to ultra-pure alkyls of indium and gallium and their adducts with ethers, phosphines and amines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Anthony C.; Holliday, A. Kenneth; Cole-Hamilton, David J.; Ahmad, M. Munir; Gerrard, Neil D.

    1984-09-01

    Electrolysis of tetrahydrofuran (thf) solutions of dimethylmagnesium containing tetraethylammonium percholrate using a gallium anode gives [Me 3Ga·thf], but higher yields of both [Me 3Ga·thf] and [Me 3In·thf] are obtained on electrolysis of thf solutions of Grignard reagents with sacrificial metal anodes in the absence of a carrying electrolyte. The thf adducts can be converted into adducts with other Lewis bases, [ Me3M· L], M = Ga or In, L = PMe 3, PEt 3, NEt 3, by simple base exchange reactions. Base-free trimethylgallium can be prepared from: (i) reaction of methyl iodide with the intermetallic compound [Mg 5Ga 2] in a high boiling ether; (ii) electrolysis of Grignard reagents in high boiling ethers using sacrificial gallium anodes; (iii) reactions of GaCl 3 with Grignard reagents in high boiling ethers or (iv) ether exchange reaction between [Me 3Ga·OEt 2] and high boiling ethers. All of these reactions lead to adducts between trimethylgallium and the high boiling ether which, on heating, decompose to give base-free trimethylgallium. [Me 3Ga·OEt 2] can be prepared from reaction of Grignard reagents with gallium trichloride in diethylether or from electrolysis of Grignard reagents in diethyl ether using a sacrificial gallium anode. Similar reactions using an indium anode lead to [Me 3In·OEt 2] from which base-free trimethylindium can be liberated using known chemistry. The use of alkyls prepared in this way for vapour phase epitaxy as well as the purity of the alkyls are discussed.

  8. Structural, optical and electronic properties of indium sulfide compositions under influence of copper impurity produced by chemical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaili, Parisa; Kangarlou, Haleh; Savaloni, Hadi; Ghorannevis, Mahmood

    Aqueous solutions with 70 °C and pH = 2.5 constant values were prepared from convenient chemical compounds to produce In2S3: Cu crystals and thin films. Crystal compositions were grown in this solution under special conditions. Micrographs showed amorphous In2S3 orange powder and transparent vitreous pieces of CuInS2 crystals. Indium sulfide films were produced using the same solution in CBD method, on the glass substrates at different [Cu/In] molar ratio concentrations. Cu+ ions by different concentration doped from copper chloride source into In2S3 films. The produced films were post-annealed at 400 °C for about 1 h. Their crystallography, phase transitions, element analysis and nanostructures were investigated by X-ray diffraction, SEM, EDAX and AFM analyses. β-In2S3 phase was dominant and by doping copper impurity, XRD results suggested the formation of CuInS2 compositions. Morphology of the films, nano-structures, grain shapes and hardness was changed. Optical reflectance was measured in the UV-VIS wavelength range by a spectrophotometer. Other optical properties and optical band gaps were calculated using Kramers-Kronig relations on reflectivity curves. Electronic properties were calculated by full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method within density functional theory (DFT). In this approach, generalized gradient approximation (GGA) was used for the exchange-correlation potential calculation. Band gap structures, density of states and imaginary parts of dielectric function were calculated for In2S3: Cu compositions.

  9. Reflectance spectroscopy of organic compounds: 1. Alkanes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, R.N.; Curchin, J.M.; Hoefen, T.M.; Swayze, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    Reflectance spectra of the organic compounds comprising the alkane series are presented from the ultraviolet to midinfrared, 0.35 to 15.5 /??m. Alkanes are hydrocarbon molecules containing only single carbon-carbon bonds, and are found naturally on the Earth and in the atmospheres of the giant planets and Saturn's moon, Titan. This paper presents the spectral properties of the alkanes as the first in a series of papers to build a spectral database of organic compounds for use in remote sensing studies. Applications range from mapping the environment on the Earth, to the search for organic molecules and life in the solar system and throughout the. universe. We show that the spectral reflectance properties of organic compounds are rich, with major diagnostic spectral features throughout the spectral range studied. Little to no spectral change was observed as a function of temperature and only small shifts and changes in the width of absorption bands were observed between liquids and solids, making remote detection of spectral properties throughout the solar system simpler. Some high molecular weight organic compounds contain single-bonded carbon chains and have spectra similar to alkanes even ' when they fall into other families. Small spectral differences are often present allowing discrimination among some compounds, further illustrating the need to catalog spectral properties for accurate remote sensing identification with spectroscopy.

  10. Reflectance spectroscopy of organic compounds: 1. Alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Roger N.; Curchin, John M.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Swayze, Gregg A.

    2009-03-01

    Reflectance spectra of the organic compounds comprising the alkane series are presented from the ultraviolet to midinfrared, 0.35 to 15.5 μm. Alkanes are hydrocarbon molecules containing only single carbon-carbon bonds, and are found naturally on the Earth and in the atmospheres of the giant planets and Saturn's moon, Titan. This paper presents the spectral properties of the alkanes as the first in a series of papers to build a spectral database of organic compounds for use in remote sensing studies. Applications range from mapping the environment on the Earth, to the search for organic molecules and life in the solar system and throughout the universe. We show that the spectral reflectance properties of organic compounds are rich, with major diagnostic spectral features throughout the spectral range studied. Little to no spectral change was observed as a function of temperature and only small shifts and changes in the width of absorption bands were observed between liquids and solids, making remote detection of spectral properties throughout the solar system simpler. Some high molecular weight organic compounds contain single-bonded carbon chains and have spectra similar to alkanes even when they fall into other families. Small spectral differences are often present allowing discrimination among some compounds, further illustrating the need to catalog spectral properties for accurate remote sensing identification with spectroscopy.

  11. Effect of Indium nano-sandwiching on the structural and optical performance of ZnSe films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Garni, S. E.; Qasrawi, A. F.

    In the current study, we attempted to explore the effects of the Indium nanosandwiching on the mechanical and optical properties of the physically evaporated ZnSe thin films by means of X-ray diffractions and ultraviolet spectrophotometry techniques. While the thickness of each layer of ZnSe was fixed at 1.0 μm, the thickness of the nanosandwiched Indium thin films was varied in the range of 25-100 nm. It was observed that the as grown ZnSe films exhibits cubic and hexagonal nature of crystallization as those of the ZnSe powders before the film deposition. The cubic phases weighs ∼70% of the structure. The analysis of this phases revealed that there is a systematic variation process presented by the decreasing of; the lattice constant, compressing strain, stress, stacking faults and dislocation intensity and increasing grain size resulted from increasing the Indium layer thickness in the range of 50-100 nm. In addition, the nanosandwiching of Indium between two layers of ZnSe is observed to enhance the absorbability of the ZnSe. Particularly, at incident photon energy of 2.38 eV the absorbability of the ZnSe films which are sandwiched with 100 nm Indium is increased by 13.8 times. Moreover, increasing the thickness of the Indium layer shrinks the optical energy band gap. These systematic variations in mechanical and optical properties are assigned to the better recrystallization process that is associated with Indium insertion which in turn allows total internal energy redistribution in the ZnSe films through the enlargement of grains.

  12. Earth as art three

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2010-01-01

    For most of us, deserts, mountains, river valleys, coastlines even dry lakebeds are relatively familiar features of the Earth's terrestrial environment. For earth scientists, they are the focus of considerable scientific research. Viewed from a unique and unconventional perspective, Earth's geographic attributes can also be a surprising source of awe-inspiring art. That unique perspective is space. The artists for the Earth as Art Three exhibit are the Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 satellites, which orbit approximately 705 kilometers (438 miles) above the Earth's surface. While studying the images these satellites beam down daily, researchers are often struck by the sheer beauty of the scenes. Such images inspire the imagination and go beyond scientific value to remind us how stunning, intricate, and simply amazing our planet's features can be. Instead of paint, the medium for these works of art is light. But Landsat satellite sensors don't see light as human eyes do; instead, they see radiant energy reflected from Earth's surface in certain wavelengths, or bands, of red, green, blue, and infrared light. When these different bands are combined into a single image, remarkable patterns, colors, and shapes emerge. The Earth as Art Three exhibit provides fresh and inspiring glimpses of different parts of our planet's complex surface. The images in this collection were chosen solely based on their aesthetic appeal. Many of the images have been manipulated to enhance color variations or details. They are not intended for scientific interpretation only for your viewing pleasure. Enjoy!

  13. Early Earth slab stagnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrusta, R.; Van Hunen, J.

    2016-12-01

    At present day, the Earth's mantle exhibits a combination of stagnant and penetrating slabs within the transition zone, indicating a intermittent convection mode between layered and whole-mantle convection. Isoviscous thermal convection calculations show that in a hotter Earth, the natural mode of convection was dominated by double-layered convection, which may imply that slabs were more prone to stagnate in the transition zone. Today, slab penetration is to a large extent controlled by trench mobility for a plausible range of lower mantle viscosity and Clapeyron slope of the mantle phase transitions. Trench mobility is, in turn, governed by slab strength and density and upper plate forcing. In this study, we systematically investigate the slab-transition zone internation in the Early Earth, using 2D self-consistent numerical subduction models. Early Earth's higher mantle temperature facilitates decoupling between the plates and the underlying asthenosphere, and may result in slab sinking almost without trench retreat. Such behaviour together with a low resistance of a weak lower mantle may allow slabs to penetrate. The ability of slab to sink into the lower mantle throughout Earth's history may have important implications for Earth's evolution: it would provide efficient mass and heat flux through the transition zone therefore provide an efficient way to cool and mix the Earth's mantle.

  14. Accretion of the Earth.

    PubMed

    Canup, Robin M

    2008-11-28

    The origin of the Earth and its Moon has been the focus of an enormous body of research. In this paper I review some of the current models of terrestrial planet accretion, and discuss assumptions common to most works that may require re-examination. Density-wave interactions between growing planets and the gas nebula may help to explain the current near-circular orbits of the Earth and Venus, and may result in large-scale radial migration of proto-planetary embryos. Migration would weaken the link between the present locations of the planets and the original provenance of the material that formed them. Fragmentation can potentially lead to faster accretion and could also damp final planet orbital eccentricities. The Moon-forming impact is believed to be the final major event in the Earth's accretion. Successful simulations of lunar-forming impacts involve a differentiated impactor containing between 0.1 and 0.2 Earth masses, an impact angle near 45 degrees and an impact speed within 10 per cent of the Earth's escape velocity. All successful impacts-with or without pre-impact rotation-imply that the Moon formed primarily from material originating from the impactor rather than from the proto-Earth. This must ultimately be reconciled with compositional similarities between the Earth and the Moon.

  15. Silver indium diphosphate, AgInP(2)O(7).

    PubMed

    Zouihri, Hafid; Saadi, Mohamed; Jaber, Boujemaa; El Ammari, Lehcen

    2010-12-18

    Polycrystalline material of the title compound, AgInP(2)O(7), was synthesized by traditional high-temperature solid-state methods and single crystals were grown from the melt of a mixture of AgInP(2)O(7) and B(2)O(3) as flux in a platinium crucible. The structure consists of InO(6) octa-hedra, which are corner-shared to PO(4) tetra-hedra into a three-dimensional network with hexa-gonal channels running parallel to the c axis. The silver cation, located in the channel, is bonded to seven O atoms of the [InP(2)O(7)] framework with Ag-O distances ranging from 2.370 (2) to 3.015 (2) Å. The P(2)O(7) diphosphate anion is characterized by a P-O-P angle of 137.27 (9) and a nearly eclipsed conformation. AgInP(2)O(7) is isotypic with the M(I)FeP(2)O(7) (M(I) = Na, K, Rb, Cs and Ag) diphosphate family.

  16. Rare earth elements and permanent magnets (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dent, Peter C.

    2012-04-01

    Rare earth (RE) magnets have become virtually indispensible in a wide variety of industries such as aerospace, automotive, electronics, medical, and military. RE elements are essential ingredients in these high performance magnets based on intermetallic compounds RECo5, RE2TM17 (TM: transition metal), and RE2TM14B. Rare earth magnets are known for their superior magnetic properties—high induction, and coercive force. These properties arise due to the extremely high magnetocrystalline anisotropy made possible by unique 3d-4f interactions between transition metals and rare earths. For more than 40 years, these magnets remain the number one choice in applications that require high magnetic fields in extreme operating conditions—high demagnetization forces and high temperature. EEC produces and specializes in RECo5 and RE2TM17 type sintered magnets. Samarium and gadolinium are key RE ingredients in the powder metallurgical magnet production processes which include melting, crushing, jet milling, pressing, sintering, and heat treating. The magnetic properties and applications of these magnets will be discussed. We will also briefly discuss the past, current, and future of the permanent magnet business. Currently, over 95% of all pure rare earth oxides are sourced from China, which currently controls the market. We will provide insights regarding current and potential new magnet technologies and designer choices, which may mitigate rare earth supply chain issues now and into the future.

  17. Earth Science Informatics - Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 10-15 years, significant advances have been made in information management, there are an increasing number of individuals entering the field of information management as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing data, and the field of informatics has come to its own. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of science data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also includes the use of computers and computational methods to support decision making and applications. Earth Science Informatics (ESI, a.k.a. geoinformatics) is the application of informatics in the Earth science domain. ESI is a rapidly developing discipline integrating computer science, information science, and Earth science. Major national and international research and infrastructure projects in ESI have been carried out or are on-going. Notable among these are: the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), the European Commissions INSPIRE, the U.S. NSDI and Geospatial One-Stop, the NASA EOSDIS, and the NSF DataONE, EarthCube and Cyberinfrastructure for Geoinformatics. More than 18 departments and agencies in the U.S. federal government have been active in Earth science informatics. All major space agencies in the world, have been involved in ESI research and application activities. In the United States, the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP), whose membership includes over 180 organizations (government, academic and commercial) dedicated to managing, delivering and applying Earth science data, has been working on many ESI topics since 1998. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)s Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) has been actively coordinating the ESI activities among the space agencies.

  18. Earth Science Informatics - Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 10-15 years, significant advances have been made in information management, there are an increasing number of individuals entering the field of information management as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing data, and the field of informatics has come to its own. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of science data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also includes the use of computers and computational methods to support decision making and applications. Earth Science Informatics (ESI, a.k.a. geoinformatics) is the application of informatics in the Earth science domain. ESI is a rapidly developing discipline integrating computer science, information science, and Earth science. Major national and international research and infrastructure projects in ESI have been carried out or are on-going. Notable among these are: the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), the European Commissions INSPIRE, the U.S. NSDI and Geospatial One-Stop, the NASA EOSDIS, and the NSF DataONE, EarthCube and Cyberinfrastructure for Geoinformatics. More than 18 departments and agencies in the U.S. federal government have been active in Earth science informatics. All major space agencies in the world, have been involved in ESI research and application activities. In the United States, the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP), whose membership includes over 180 organizations (government, academic and commercial) dedicated to managing, delivering and applying Earth science data, has been working on many ESI topics since 1998. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)s Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) has been actively coordinating the ESI activities among the space agencies.The talk will present an overview of current efforts in ESI, the role members of IEEE GRSS play, and discuss

  19. Charge modulation in two-dimensional compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monceau, Pierre

    2015-03-01

    Although the first measurements demonstrating charge modulation were performed forty years ago, many open questions are now the matter of intense research. In the first part of this short review, some recent results obtained on transition metal dichalcogenides (MX2) compounds will be presented such as: mechanism of the Peierls transition, effect of strong electron-phonon coupling, soft mode in the phonon dispersion, chirality effects,....Charge order, ferroelectricity, frustration, glassiness in organic 2D systems will be the subject of the second part. The third part will be devoted to describe the properties of a new family of 2D compounds, namely rare earth tritellurides, in which the size of the rare earth determine the charge density wave transition temperature.

  20. Rare earth gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, W.F.

    1975-10-31

    A high energy gas laser with light output in the infrared or visible region of the spectrum is described. Laser action is obtained by generating vapors of rare earth halides, particularly neodymium iodide or, to a lesser extent, neodymium bromide, and disposing the rare earth vapor medium in a resonant cavity at elevated temperatures; e.g., approximately 1200/sup 0/ to 1400/sup 0/K. A particularly preferred gaseous medium is one involving a complex of aluminum chloride and neodymium chloride, which exhibits tremendously enhanced vapor pressure compared to the rare earth halides per se, and provides comparable increases in stored energy densities.