Science.gov

Sample records for earth information exchange

  1. The Earth Information Exchange: A Portal for Earth Science From the ESIP Federation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertz, R.; Hutchinson, C.; Hardin, D.

    2006-12-01

    The Federation of Earth Science Information Partners is a unique consortium of more than 90 organizations that collect, interpret and develop applications for remotely sensed Earth Observation Information. Included in the ESIP network are NASA, NOAA and USGS data centers, research universities, government research laboratories, supercomputer facilities, education resource providers, information technology innovators, nonprofit organizations and commercial enterprises. The consortium's work is dedicated to providing the most up-to-date, science-based information to researchers and decision-makers who are working to understand and address the environmental, economic and social challenges facing our planet. By increasing the use and usability of Earth observation data and linking it with decision-making tools, the Federation partners leverage the value of these important data resources for the betterment of society and our planet. To further the dissemination of Earth Science data, the Federation is developing the Earth Information Exchange (EIE). The EIE is a portal that will provide access to the vast information holdings of the members' organizations in one web-based location and will provides a robust marketplace in which the products and services needed to use and understand this information can be readily acquired. Since the Federation membership includes the federal government's Earth observing data centers, we believe that the impact of the EIE on Earth science research and education and environmental policy making will be profound. In the EIE, Earth observation data, products and services, are organized by the societal benefits categories defined by the international working group developing the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). The quality of the information is ensured in each of the Exchange's issue areas by maintaining working groups of issue area researchers and practitioners who serve as stewards for their respective communities. The

  2. Indiana Health Information Exchange

    Cancer.gov

    The Indiana Health Information Exchange is comprised of various Indiana health care institutions, established to help improve patient safety and is recognized as a best practice for health information exchange.

  3. Earth Science Information Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1991-01-01

    An ESIC? An Earth Science Information Center. Don't spell it. Say it. ESIC. It rhymes with seasick. You can find information in an information center, of course, and you'll find earth science information in an ESIC. That means information about the land that is the Earth, the land that is below the Earth, and in some instances, the space surrounding the Earth. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates a network of Earth Science Information Centers that sell earth science products and data. There are more than 75 ESIC's. Some are operated by the USGS, but most are in other State or Federal agencies. Each ESIC responds to requests for information received by telephone, letter, or personal visit. Your personal visit.

  4. Solar Wind Earth Exchange Project (SWEEP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-28

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0035 Solar Wind Earth Exchange Project 140200 Steven Sembay UNIVERSITY OF LEICESTER Final Report 10/28/2016 DISTRIBUTION A...To) 01 Sep 2014 to 31 Aug 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Solar Wind Earth Exchange Project (SWEEP) 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-14-1...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The grant received from AFRL/AOFSR/EOARD funded the Solar Wind Earth Exchange Project (SWEEP) at Leicester University. The goal

  5. Thriving Earth Exchange: AGU's new grand challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntee, Chris; Williams, Billy

    2012-11-01

    Imagine a world where scientists are acknowledged and celebrated for their good works. Imagine being able to make a powerful impact, applying your expertise and experience to create real solutions to ensure a sustainable future. Now imagine those two ideas linked: AGU scientists engaged in creating solutions that are recognized and celebrated for their positive impact on our world. The AGU Grand Challenge: Thriving Earth Exchange, a new idea from our member leaders, is about making this dream real.

  6. Health information exchange: 'lex parsimoniae'.

    PubMed

    Overhage, J Marc

    2007-01-01

    The country has identified health information exchange (HIE) as an essential strategy to address our crisis of cost, quality, and safety in health care. The Nationwide Health Information Network (NHIN) will consist of a "network of networks"--interconnected local or regional HIEs. We must create policy and technical interfaces that allow these local exchanges to share data with each other. More importantly, we must create nationwide exchanges that are consistent across the country. The should be parsimonious--not overly constraining how the exchanges operate and maintaining separation between the applications that provide functionality and the network that supports HIE.

  7. A Service Oriented Infrastructure for Earth Science exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, M.; Mitchell, A.

    2008-12-01

    NASA's Earth Science Distributed Information System (ESDIS) program has developed an infrastructure for the exchange of Earth Observation related resources. Fundamentally a platform for Service Oriented Architectures, ECHO provides standards-based interfaces based on the basic interactions for a SOA pattern: Publish, Find and Bind. This infrastructure enables the realization of the benefits of Service Oriented Architectures, namely the reduction of stove-piped systems, the opportunity for reuse and flexibility to meet dynamic business needs, on a global scale. ECHO is the result of the infusion of IT technologies, including those standards of Web Services and Service Oriented Architecture technologies. The infrastructure is based on standards and leverages registries for data, services, clients and applications. As an operational system, ECHO currently representing over 110 million Earth Observation resources from a wide number of provider organizations. These partner organizations each have a primary mission - serving a particular facet of the Earth Observation community. Through ECHO, those partners can serve the needs of not only their target portion of the community, but also enable a wider range of users to discover and leverage their data resources, thereby increasing the value of their offerings. The Earth Observation community benefits from this infrastructure because it provides a set of common mechanisms for the discovery and access to resources from a much wider range of data and service providers. ECHO enables innovative clients to be built for targeted user types and missions. There several examples of those clients already in process. Applications built on this infrastructure can include User-driven, GUI-clients (web-based or thick clients), analysis programs (as intermediate components of larger systems), models or decision support systems. This paper will provide insight into the development of ECHO, as technologies were evaluated for infusion, and

  8. NASA's Earth Observing Data and Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Andrew E.; Behnke, Jeanne; Lowe, Dawn; Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) has been a central component of NASA Earth observation program for over 10 years. It is one of the largest civilian science information system in the US, performing ingest, archive and distribution of over 3 terabytes of data per day much of which is from NASA s flagship missions Terra, Aqua and Aura. The system supports a variety of science disciplines including polar processes, land cover change, radiation budget, and most especially global climate change. The EOSDIS data centers, collocated with centers of science discipline expertise, archive and distribute standard data products produced by science investigator-led processing systems. Key to the success of EOSDIS is the concept of core versus community requirements. EOSDIS supports a core set of services to meet specific NASA needs and relies on community-developed services to meet specific user needs. EOSDIS offers a metadata registry, ECHO (Earth Observing System Clearinghouse), through which the scientific community can easily discover and exchange NASA s Earth science data and services. Users can search, manage, and access the contents of ECHO s registries (data and services) through user-developed and community-tailored interfaces or clients. The ECHO framework has become the primary access point for cross-Data Center search-and-order of EOSDIS and other Earth Science data holdings archived at the EOSDIS data centers. ECHO s Warehouse Inventory Search Tool (WIST) is the primary web-based client for discovering and ordering cross-discipline data from the EOSDIS data centers. The architecture of the EOSDIS provides a platform for the publication, discovery, understanding and access to NASA s Earth Observation resources and allows for easy integration of new datasets. The EOSDIS also has developed several methods for incorporating socioeconomic data into its data collection. Over the years, we have developed several methods for determining

  9. Joint Interdisciplinary Earth Science Information Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kafatos, Menas

    2004-01-01

    The report spans the three year period beginning in June of 2001 and ending June of 2004. Joint Interdisciplinary Earth Science Information Center's (JIESIC) primary purpose has been to carry out research in support of the Global Change Data Center and other Earth science laboratories at Goddard involved in Earth science, remote sensing and applications data and information services. The purpose is to extend the usage of NASA Earth Observing System data, microwave data and other Earth observing data. JIESIC projects fall within the following categories: research and development; STW and WW prototyping; science data, information products and services; and science algorithm support. JIESIC facilitates extending the utility of NASA's Earth System Enterprise (ESE) data, information products and services to better meet the science data and information needs of a number of science and applications user communities, including domain users such as discipline Earth scientists, interdisciplinary Earth scientists, Earth science applications users and educators.

  10. 47 CFR 90.555 - Information exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Information exchange. 90.555 Section 90.555...-805 MHz Bands § 90.555 Information exchange. (a) Prior notification. Public safety licensees... Safety Information Exchange. (1) Upon request by a 746-757, 758-763, 776-787, or 788-793 MHz band...

  11. 77 FR 72813 - Information Collection; Land Exchanges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... Information Collection; Land Exchanges AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice; request for comment... approved information collection, OMB 0596-0105, Land Exchanges. DATES: Comments must be received in writing...: Extension with revision of a currently approved information collection. Abstract: Land exchanges are...

  12. METHOD OF SEPARATING RARE EARTHS BY ION EXCHANGE

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.H.; Powell, J.E.

    1960-10-18

    A process is given for separating yttrium and rare earth values having atomic numbers of from 57 through 60 and 68 through 71 from an aqueous solution whose pH value can range from 1 to 9. All rare earths and yttrium are first adsorbed on a cation exchange resin, and they are then eluted with a solution of N-hydroxyethylethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) in the order of decreasing atomic number, yttrium behaving like element 61; the effluents are collected in fractions. The HEDTA is recovered by elution with ammonia solution and the resin is regenerated with sulfuric acid. Rare earths are precipitated from the various effluents with oxalic acid, and each supernatant is passed over cation exchange resin for adsorption of HEDTA and nonprecipitated rare earths: the oxalic acid is not retained by the resin.

  13. 47 CFR 27.70 - Information exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Information exchange. 27.70 Section 27.70... COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.70 Information exchange. (a) Prior notification. Public safety... information to the public safety licensee at least 10 business days before a new base or fixed station is...

  14. 47 CFR 22.973 - Information exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Information exchange. 22.973 Section 22.973... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.973 Information exchange. (a) Prior notification. Public safety/CII... information to the public safety/CII licensee at least 10 business days before a new cell site is activated or...

  15. 47 CFR 22.880 - Information exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Information exchange. 22.880 Section 22.880...-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.880 Information exchange. (a...-ground system licensee must provide the following information to the public safety/CII licensee at least...

  16. 47 CFR 22.973 - Information exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Information exchange. 22.973 Section 22.973... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.973 Information exchange. (a) Prior notification. Public safety/CII... information to the public safety/CII licensee at least 10 business days before a new cell site is activated or...

  17. 47 CFR 22.880 - Information exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Information exchange. 22.880 Section 22.880...-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.880 Information exchange. (a...-ground system licensee must provide the following information to the public safety/CII licensee at least...

  18. 47 CFR 22.973 - Information exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Information exchange. 22.973 Section 22.973... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.973 Information exchange. (a) Prior notification. Public safety/CII... information to the public safety/CII licensee at least 10 business days before a new cell site is activated or...

  19. 47 CFR 22.973 - Information exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Information exchange. 22.973 Section 22.973... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.973 Information exchange. (a) Prior notification. Public safety/CII... information to the public safety/CII licensee at least 10 business days before a new cell site is activated or...

  20. 47 CFR 27.70 - Information exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Information exchange. 27.70 Section 27.70... COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.70 Information exchange. (a) Prior notification. Public safety... 776-787 MHz band licensee must provide the following information to the public safety licensee at...

  1. 47 CFR 27.70 - Information exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Information exchange. 27.70 Section 27.70... COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.70 Information exchange. (a) Prior notification. Public safety... information to the public safety licensee at least 10 business days before a new base or fixed station is...

  2. 47 CFR 22.880 - Information exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Information exchange. 22.880 Section 22.880...-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.880 Information exchange. (a...-ground system licensee must provide the following information to the public safety/CII licensee at least...

  3. 47 CFR 27.70 - Information exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Information exchange. 27.70 Section 27.70... COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.70 Information exchange. (a) Prior notification. Public safety... information to the public safety licensee at least 10 business days before a new base or fixed station is...

  4. 47 CFR 22.880 - Information exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Information exchange. 22.880 Section 22.880...-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.880 Information exchange. (a...-ground system licensee must provide the following information to the public safety/CII licensee at least...

  5. Knowledge Acquisition and Management for the NASA Earth Exchange (NEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votava, P.; Michaelis, A.; Nemani, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) is a data, computing and knowledge collaboratory that houses NASA satellite, climate and ancillary data where a focused community can come together to share modeling and analysis codes, scientific results, knowledge and expertise on a centralized platform with access to large supercomputing resources. As more and more projects are being executed on NEX, we are increasingly focusing on capturing the knowledge of the NEX users and provide mechanisms for sharing it with the community in order to facilitate reuse and accelerate research. There are many possible knowledge contributions to NEX, it can be a wiki entry on the NEX portal contributed by a developer, information extracted from a publication in an automated way, or a workflow captured during code execution on the supercomputing platform. The goal of the NEX knowledge platform is to capture and organize this information and make it easily accessible to the NEX community and beyond. The knowledge acquisition process consists of three main faucets - data and metadata, workflows and processes, and web-based information. Once the knowledge is acquired, it is processed in a number of ways ranging from custom metadata parsers to entity extraction using natural language processing techniques. The processed information is linked with existing taxonomies and aligned with internal ontology (which heavily reuses number of external ontologies). This forms a knowledge graph that can then be used to improve users' search query results as well as provide additional analytics capabilities to the NEX system. Such a knowledge graph will be an important building block in creating a dynamic knowledge base for the NEX community where knowledge is both generated and easily shared.

  6. Information Theory and the Earth's Density Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    An argument for using the information theory approach as an inference technique in solid earth geophysics. A spherically symmetric density distribution is derived as an example of the method. A simple model of the earth plus knowledge of its mass and moment of inertia lead to a density distribution which was surprisingly close to the optimum distribution. Future directions for the information theory approach in solid earth geophysics as well as its strengths and weaknesses are discussed.

  7. 47 CFR 22.973 - Information exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Information exchange. 22.973 Section 22.973 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.973 Information exchange. (a) Prior notification. Public safety/CII...

  8. Exchange interactions in two-state systems: rare earth pyrochlores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curnoe, S. H.

    2018-06-01

    The general form of the nearest neighbour exchange interaction for rare earth pyrochlores is derived based on symmetry. Generally, the rare earth angular momentum degeneracy is lifted by the crystal electric field (CEF) into singlets and doublets. When the CEF ground state is a doublet that is well-separated from the first excited state the CEF ground state doublet can be treated as a pseudo-spin of some kind. The general form of the nearest neighbour exchange interaction for pseudo-spins on the pyrochlore lattice is derived for three different types of pseudo-spins. The methodology presented in this paper can be applied to other two-state spin systems with a high space group symmetry.

  9. Exchange interactions in two-state systems: rare earth pyrochlores.

    PubMed

    Curnoe, S H

    2018-06-13

    The general form of the nearest neighbour exchange interaction for rare earth pyrochlores is derived based on symmetry. Generally, the rare earth angular momentum degeneracy is lifted by the crystal electric field (CEF) into singlets and doublets. When the CEF ground state is a doublet that is well-separated from the first excited state the CEF ground state doublet can be treated as a pseudo-spin of some kind. The general form of the nearest neighbour exchange interaction for pseudo-spins on the pyrochlore lattice is derived for three different types of pseudo-spins. The methodology presented in this paper can be applied to other two-state spin systems with a high space group symmetry.

  10. C3: A Collaborative Web Framework for NASA Earth Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foughty, E.; Fattarsi, C.; Hardoyo, C.; Kluck, D.; Wang, L.; Matthews, B.; Das, K.; Srivastava, A.; Votava, P.; Nemani, R. R.

    2010-12-01

    The NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) is a new collaboration platform for the Earth science community that provides a mechanism for scientific collaboration and knowledge sharing. NEX combines NASA advanced supercomputing resources, Earth system modeling, workflow management, NASA remote sensing data archives, and a collaborative communication platform to deliver a complete work environment in which users can explore and analyze large datasets, run modeling codes, collaborate on new or existing projects, and quickly share results among the Earth science communities. NEX is designed primarily for use by the NASA Earth science community to address scientific grand challenges. The NEX web portal component provides an on-line collaborative environment for sharing of Eearth science models, data, analysis tools and scientific results by researchers. In addition, the NEX portal also serves as a knowledge network that allows researchers to connect and collaborate based on the research they are involved in, specific geographic area of interest, field of study, etc. Features of the NEX web portal include: Member profiles, resource sharing (data sets, algorithms, models, publications), communication tools (commenting, messaging, social tagging), project tools (wikis, blogs) and more. The NEX web portal is built on the proven technologies and policies of DASHlink.arc.nasa.gov, (one of NASA's first science social media websites). The core component of the web portal is a C3 framework, which was built using Django and which is being deployed as a common framework for a number of collaborative sites throughout NASA.

  11. Multiprocessor shared-memory information exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Santoline, L.L.; Bowers, M.D.; Crew, A.W.

    1989-02-01

    In distributed microprocessor-based instrumentation and control systems, the inter-and intra-subsystem communication requirements ultimately form the basis for the overall system architecture. This paper describes a software protocol which addresses the intra-subsystem communications problem. Specifically the protocol allows for multiple processors to exchange information via a shared-memory interface. The authors primary goal is to provide a reliable means for information to be exchanged between central application processor boards (masters) and dedicated function processor boards (slaves) in a single computer chassis. The resultant Multiprocessor Shared-Memory Information Exchange (MSMIE) protocol, a standard master-slave shared-memory interface suitable for use in nuclear safety systems, ismore » designed to pass unidirectional buffers of information between the processors while providing a minimum, deterministic cycle time for this data exchange.« less

  12. Cosmonauts Solovyev and Dezhurov exchange information on Mir

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-07-10

    STS071-118-007 (27 June - 7 July 1995) --- Onboard the Russia?s Mir Space Station Mir Base Block, cosmonauts Anatoly Y. Solovyev (left) and Vladimir N. Dezhurov, Mir 19 and 18 commanders, respectively, exchange information about their research tasks. The two represent a change of guard aboard Mir, as Dezhurov prepares to come back to Earth with the STS-71 crew aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis. Nikolai M. Budarin and Gennadiy M. Strekalov - cosmonaut/flight engineers making the same exchange -- are out of frame.

  13. Speeding decisions. Social security's information exchange program.

    PubMed

    Winter, Kitt; Hastings, Bob

    2011-05-01

    The Social Security Administration has plenty of reasons to streamline its records request process-more than 15 million reasons each year, in fact. That's why it has been pioneering information exchange projects with the private sector, including use of the Nationwide Health Information Network.

  14. Health Information Exchange: What do patients want?

    PubMed

    Medford-Davis, Laura N; Chang, Lawrence; Rhodes, Karin V

    2017-12-01

    To determine whether emergency department patients want to share their medical records across health systems through Health Information Exchange and if so, whether they prefer to sign consent or share their records automatically, 982 adult patients presenting to an emergency department participated in a questionnaire-based interview. The majority (N = 906; 92.3%) were willing to share their data in a Health Information Exchange. Half (N = 490; 49.9%) reported routinely getting healthcare outside the system and 78.6 percent reported having records in other systems. Of those who were willing to share their data in a Health Information Exchange, 54.3 percent wanted to sign consent but 90 percent of those would waive consent in the case of an emergency. Privacy and security were primary concerns of patients not willing to participate in Health Information Exchange and preferring to sign consent. Improved privacy and security protections could increase participation, and findings support consideration of "break-the-glass" provider access to Health Information Exchange records in an emergent situation.

  15. Health information exchange policy and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Marchibroda, Janet M

    2007-12-01

    Concerns about the quality, safety, and cost of healthcare have driven the nation to increase its focus on this issue. A number of states are moving forward-in parallel with federal efforts-to develop and adopt policies for improving health and healthcare through health information technology and electronic health information exchange. Based on the eHealth Initiative's experience providing technical assistance to more than 20 states, and its work related to its coalition of more than 250 state, regional and community-based health information exchange initiatives and organizations, the most difficult challenges facing these initiatives and organizations today is that related to assessing the value of services that emerge from the health information exchange to various stakeholders groups such as providers, payers, and employers, and converting those value assessments to business plans that promote and assure sustainability for these initiatives. The combination of increased federal and state focus and funding and the pace at which regional and community-based health information networks are developing, along with the identification of value and sustainability as some of the most difficult challenges experienced by these efforts, all point to the significant need for evaluation. The most critical evaluation questions focus on the impact of health information technology and health information exchange on quality, safety, efficiency, the value of such efforts for various stakeholders, and assessment of how grant programs can be designed to support positive impact, value, and a sustainable business model, so that efforts continue when the grant funds are fully expended.

  16. 47 CFR 22.880 - Information exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Air-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.880 Information exchange. (a) Prior notification. Public safety/CII licensees may notify a commercial aviation air-ground system...

  17. 47 CFR 90.675 - Information exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... business days before a new cell site is activated or an existing cell site is modified: (1) Location; (2... believes a proposed cell will generate unacceptable interference; (2) Permit ESMR or part 22 Cellular... cell is activated. (c) Public safety information exchange. (1) Upon request by an ESMR or part 22...

  18. Health information exchange: national and international approaches.

    PubMed

    Vest, Joshua R

    2012-01-01

    Health information exchange (HIE), the process of electronically moving patient-level information between different organizations, is viewed as a solution to the fragmentation of data in health care. This review provides a description of the current state of HIE in seven nations, as well was three international HIE efforts, with a particular focus on the relation of exchange efforts to national health care systems, common challenges, and the implications of cross-border information sharing. National and international efforts highlighted in English language informatics journals, professional associations, and government reports are described. Fully functioning HIE is not yet a common phenomenon worldwide. However, multiple nations see the potential benefits of HIE and that has led to national and international efforts of varying scope, scale, and purview. National efforts continue to work to overcome the challenges of interoperability, record linking, insufficient infrastructures, governance, and interorganizational relationships, but have created architectural strategies, oversight agencies, and incentives to foster exchange. The three international HIE efforts reviewed represent very different approaches to the same problem of ensuring the availability of health information across borders. The potential of HIE to address many cost and quality issues will ensure HIE remains on many national agendas. In many instances, health care executives and leaders have opportunities to work within national programs to help shape local exchange governance and decide technology partners. Furthermore, HIE raises policy questions concerning the role of centralized planning, national identifiers, standards, and types of information exchanged, each of which are vital issues to individual health organizations and worthy of their attention.

  19. Exploiting Untapped Information Resources in Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, R.; Fox, P. A.; Kempler, S.; Maskey, M.

    2015-12-01

    One of the continuing challenges in any Earth science investigation is the amount of time and effort required for data preparation before analysis can begin. Current Earth science data and information systems have their own shortcomings. For example, the current data search systems are designed with the assumption that researchers find data primarily by metadata searches on instrument or geophysical keywords, assuming that users have sufficient knowledge of the domain vocabulary to be able to effectively utilize the search catalogs. These systems lack support for new or interdisciplinary researchers who may be unfamiliar with the domain vocabulary or the breadth of relevant data available. There is clearly a need to innovate and evolve current data and information systems in order to improve data discovery and exploration capabilities to substantially reduce the data preparation time and effort. We assert that Earth science metadata assets are dark resources, information resources that organizations collect, process, and store for regular business or operational activities but fail to utilize for other purposes. The challenge for any organization is to recognize, identify and effectively utilize the dark data stores in their institutional repositories to better serve their stakeholders. NASA Earth science metadata catalogs contain dark resources consisting of structured information, free form descriptions of data and pre-generated images. With the addition of emerging semantic technologies, such catalogs can be fully utilized beyond their original design intent of supporting current search functionality. In this presentation, we will describe our approach of exploiting these information resources to provide novel data discovery and exploration pathways to science and education communities

  20. NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) Supporting Analyses for National Climate Assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemani, R. R.; Thrasher, B. L.; Wang, W.; Lee, T. J.; Melton, F. S.; Dungan, J. L.; Michaelis, A.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) is a collaborative computing platform that has been developed with the objective of bringing scientists together with the software tools, massive global datasets, and supercomputing resources necessary to accelerate research in Earth systems science and global change. NEX supports several research projects that are closely related with the National Climate Assessment including the generation of high-resolution climate projections, identification of trends and extremes in climate variables and the evaluation of their impacts on regional carbon/water cycles and biodiversity, the development of land-use management and adaptation strategies for climate-change scenarios, and even the exploration of climate mitigation through geo-engineering. Scientists also use the large collection of satellite data on NEX to conduct research on quantifying spatial and temporal changes in land surface processes in response to climate and land-cover-land-use changes. Researchers, leveraging NEX's massive compute/storage resources, have used statistical techniques to downscale the coarse-resolution CMIP5 projections to fulfill the demands of the community for a wide range of climate change impact analyses. The DCP-30 (Downscaled Climate Projections at 30 arcsecond) for the conterminous US at monthly, ~1km resolution and the GDDP (Global Daily Downscaled Projections) for the entire world at daily, 25km resolution are now widely used in climate research and applications, as well as for communicating climate change. In order to serve a broader community, the NEX team in collaboration with Amazon, Inc, created the OpenNEX platform. OpenNEX provides ready access to NEX data holdings, including the NEX-DCP30 and GDDP datasets along with a number of pertinent analysis tools and workflows on the AWS infrastructure in the form of publicly available, self contained, fully functional Amazon Machine Images (AMI's) for anyone interested in global climate change.

  1. Health information exchange and healthcare utilization.

    PubMed

    Vest, Joshua R

    2009-06-01

    Health information exchange (HIE) makes previously inaccessible data available to clinicians, resulting in more complete information. This study tested the hypotheses that HIE information access reduced emergency room visits and inpatient hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions among medically indigent adults. HIE access was quantified by how frequently system users' accessed patients' data. Encounter counts were modeled using zero inflated binomial regression. HIE was not accessed for 43% of individuals. Patient factors associated with accessed data included: prior utilization, chronic conditions, and age. Higher levels of information access were significantly associated with increased counts of all encounter types. Results indicate system users were more likely to access HIE for patients for whom the information might be considered most beneficial. Ultimately, these results imply that HIE information access did not transform care in the ways many would expect. Expectations in utilization reductions, however logical, may have to be reevaluated or postponed.

  2. Ontological modeling of electronic health information exchange.

    PubMed

    McMurray, J; Zhu, L; McKillop, I; Chen, H

    2015-08-01

    Investments of resources to purposively improve the movement of information between health system providers are currently made with imperfect information. No inventories of system-level electronic health information flows currently exist, nor do measures of inter-organizational electronic information exchange. Using Protégé 4, an open-source OWL Web ontology language editor and knowledge-based framework, we formalized a model that decomposes inter-organizational electronic health information flow into derivative concepts such as diversity, breadth, volume, structure, standardization and connectivity. The ontology was populated with data from a regional health system and the flows were measured. Individual instance's properties were inferred from their class associations as determined by their data and object property rules. It was also possible to visualize interoperability activity for regional analysis and planning purposes. A property called Impact was created from the total number of patients or clients that a health entity in the region served in a year, and the total number of health service providers or organizations with whom it exchanged information in support of clinical decision-making, diagnosis or treatment. Identifying providers with a high Impact but low Interoperability score could assist planners and policy-makers to optimize technology investments intended to electronically share patient information across the continuum of care. Finally, we demonstrated how linked ontologies were used to identify logical inconsistencies in self-reported data for the study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. 2017 Fire Protection Informational Exchange Meeting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    documents the results of an information exchange meeting held May 1011, 2017 at the US Army Research Laboratory, which brought together interested...parties across the armed services to outline, as a community, the current state of the art in fire protection research and engineering and determine...where future efforts would be most advantageous. The forum provided the opportunity to strengthen old collaborations, begin new partnerships, and serve

  4. Applications of health information exchange information to public health practice.

    PubMed

    Kierkegaard, Patrick; Kaushal, Rainu; Vest, Joshua R

    2014-01-01

    Increased information availability, timeliness, and comprehensiveness through health information exchange (HIE) can support public health practice. The potential benefits to disease monitoring, disaster response, and other public health activities served as an important justification for the US' investments in HIE. After several years of HIE implementation and funding, we sought to determine if any of the anticipated benefits of exchange participation were accruing to state and local public health practitioners participating in five different exchanges. Using qualitative interviews and template analyses, we identified public health efforts and activities that were improved by participation in HIE. HIE supported public health activities consistent with expectations in the literature. However, no single department realized all the potential benefits of HIE identified. These findings suggest ways to improve HIE usage in public health.

  5. Applications of Health Information Exchange Information to Public Health Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kierkegaard, Patrick; Kaushal, Rainu; Vest, Joshua R

    2014-01-01

    Increased information availability, timeliness, and comprehensiveness through health information exchange (HIE) can support public health practice. The potential benefits to disease monitoring, disaster response, and other public health activities served as an important justification for the US’ investments in HIE. After several years of HIE implementation and funding, we sought to determine if any of the anticipated benefits of exchange participation were accruing to state and local public health practitioners participating in five different exchanges. Using qualitative interviews and template analyses, we identified public health efforts and activities that were improved by participation in HIE. HIE supported public health activities consistent with expectations in the literature. However, no single department realized all the potential benefits of HIE identified. These findings suggest ways to improve HIE usage in public health. PMID:25954386

  6. 40 CFR 22.52 - Information exchange and discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Procedure Act § 22.52 Information exchange and discovery. Respondent's information exchange pursuant to § 22.19(a) shall include information on any economic benefit resulting from any activity or failure to act... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information exchange and discovery. 22...

  7. Analysis of the charge exchange between the human body and ground: evaluation of "earthing" from an electrical perspective.

    PubMed

    Chamberlin, Kent; Smith, Wayne; Chirgwin, Christopher; Appasani, Seshank; Rioux, Paul

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate "earthing" from an electrical perspective through measurement and analysis of the naturally occurring electron flow between the human body or a control and ground as this relates to the magnitude of the charge exchange, the relationship between the charge exchange and body functions (respiration and heart rate), and the detection of other information that might be contained in the charge exchange. Sensitive, low-noise instrumentation was designed and fabricated to measure low-level current flow at low frequencies. This instrumentation was used to record current flow between human subjects or a control and ground, and these measurements were performed approximately 40 times under varied circumstances. The results of these measurements were analyzed to determine if information was contained in the current exchange. The currents flowing between the human body and ground were small (nanoamperes), and they correlated with subject motion. There did not appear to be any information contained in this exchange except for information about subject motion. This study showed that currents flow between the environment (earth) and a grounded human body; however, these currents are small (nanoamperes) and do not appear to contain information other than information about subject motion.

  8. Physicians' opinions of a health information exchange

    PubMed Central

    Warholak, Terri L; Murcko, Anita C; Slack, Marion; Malone, Daniel C

    2010-01-01

    Background Arizona Medicaid developed a Health Information Exchange (HIE) system called the Arizona Medical Information Exchange (AMIE). Objective To evaluate physicians' perceptions regarding AMIE's impact on health outcomes and healthcare costs. Measurements A focus-group guide was developed and included five domains: perceived impact of AMIE on (1) quality of care; (2) workflow and efficiency; (3) healthcare costs; (4) system usability; and (5) AMIE data content. Qualitative data were analyzed using analytical coding. Results A total of 29 clinicians participated in the study. The attendance rate was 66% (N=19) for the first and last month of focus-group meetings and 52% (N=15) for the focus group meetings conducted during the second month. The benefits most frequently mentioned during the focus groups included: (1) identification of “doctor shopping”; (2) averting duplicative testing; and (3) increased efficiency of clinical information gathering. The most frequent disadvantage mentioned was the limited availability of data in the AMIE system. Conclusion Respondents reported that AMIE had the potential to improve care, but they felt that AMIE impact was limited due to the data available. PMID:21106994

  9. Physicians' opinions of a health information exchange.

    PubMed

    Hincapie, Ana Lucia; Warholak, Terri L; Murcko, Anita C; Slack, Marion; Malone, Daniel C

    2011-01-01

    Arizona Medicaid developed a Health Information Exchange (HIE) system called the Arizona Medical Information Exchange (AMIE). To evaluate physicians' perceptions regarding AMIE's impact on health outcomes and healthcare costs. A focus-group guide was developed and included five domains: perceived impact of AMIE on (1) quality of care; (2) workflow and efficiency; (3) healthcare costs; (4) system usability; and (5) AMIE data content. Qualitative data were analyzed using analytical coding. A total of 29 clinicians participated in the study. The attendance rate was 66% (N=19) for the first and last month of focus-group meetings and 52% (N=15) for the focus group meetings conducted during the second month. The benefits most frequently mentioned during the focus groups included: (1) identification of "doctor shopping"; (2) averting duplicative testing; and (3) increased efficiency of clinical information gathering. The most frequent disadvantage mentioned was the limited availability of data in the AMIE system. Respondents reported that AMIE had the potential to improve care, but they felt that AMIE impact was limited due to the data available.

  10. Electronic Tools for Health Information Exchange

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As patients experience transitions in care, there is a need to share information between care providers in an accurate and timely manner. With the push towards electronic medical records and other electronic tools (eTools) (and away from paper-based health records) for health information exchange, there remains uncertainty around the impact of eTools as a form of communication. Objective To examine the impact of eTools for health information exchange in the context of care coordination for individuals with chronic disease in the community. Data Sources A literature search was performed on April 26, 2012, using OVID MEDLINE, OVID MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, OVID EMBASE, EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Wiley Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database, for studies published until April 26, 2012 (no start date limit was applied). Review Methods A systematic literature search was conducted, and meta-analysis conducted where appropriate. Outcomes of interest fell into 4 categories: health services utilization, disease-specific clinical outcomes, process-of-care indicators, and measures of efficiency. The quality of the evidence was assessed individually for each outcome. Expert panels were assembled for stakeholder engagement and contextualization. Results Eleven articles were identified (4 randomized controlled trials and 7 observational studies). There was moderate quality evidence of a reduction in hospitalizations, hospital length of stay, and emergency department visits following the implementation of an electronically generated laboratory report with recommendations based on clinical guidelines. The evidence showed no difference in disease-specific outcomes; there was no evidence of a positive impact on process-of-care indicators or measures of efficiency. Limitations A limited body of research specifically examined eTools for health information exchange in

  11. 48 CFR 5.405 - Exchange of acquisition information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exchange of acquisition... ACQUISITION PLANNING PUBLICIZING CONTRACT ACTIONS Release of Information 5.405 Exchange of acquisition... than one contracting activity within an agency, the exchange and coordination of pertinent information...

  12. Learn about the Environmental Information Exchange Network

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    States, territories, and tribes can partner with EPA to exchange standardized data to improve its quality, increase its availability, and integrate it better across different sources using connecting nodes, xml schema, and a data exchange template.

  13. Neighbourhood Book Exchanges: Localising Information Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Tenny; Gollner, Kathleen; Nathan, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Through this paper we report on an exploratory study into the design and use of neighbourhood book exchanges in North America. We identify dominant media framings of these book exchanges in North America, along with claims made concerning the influence of the exchanges. We compare the media claims with insights from interviews with…

  14. Emergency Physicians’ Perceptions of Health Information Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Jason S.; Kannry, Joseph; Kushniruk, Andre W.; Kuperman, Gilad

    2007-01-01

    Background Health information exchange (HIE) is a potentially powerful technology that can improve the quality of care delivered in emergency departments, but little is known about emergency physicians’ current perceptions of HIE. Objectives This study sought to assess emergency physicians’ perceived needs and knowledge of HIE. Methods A questionnaire was developed based on heuristics from the literature and implemented in a Web-based tool. The survey was sent as a hyperlink via e-mail to 371 attending emergency physicians at 12 hospitals in New York City. Results The response rate was 58% (n = 216). Although 63% said more than one quarter of their patients would benefit from external health information, the barriers to obtain it without HIE are too high—85% said it was difficult or very difficult to obtain external data, taking an average of 66 minutes, 72% said that their attempts fail half of the time, and 56% currently attempt to obtain external data less than 10% of the time. When asked to create a rank-order list, electrocardiograms (ECGs) were ranked the highest, followed by discharge summaries. Respondents also chose images over written reports for ECGs and X-rays, but preferred written reports for advanced imaging and cardiac studies. Conclusion There is a strong perceived need for HIE, most respondents were not aware of HIE prior to this study, and there are certain types of data and presentations of data that are preferred by emergency physicians in the New York City region. PMID:17712079

  15. Emergency physicians' perceptions of health information exchange.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Jason S; Kannry, Joseph; Kushniruk, Andre W; Kuperman, Gilad

    2007-01-01

    Health information exchange (HIE) is a potentially powerful technology that can improve the quality of care delivered in emergency departments, but little is known about emergency physicians' current perceptions of HIE. This study sought to assess emergency physicians' perceived needs and knowledge of HIE. A questionnaire was developed based on heuristics from the literature and implemented in a Web-based tool. The survey was sent as a hyperlink via e-mail to 371 attending emergency physicians at 12 hospitals in New York City. The response rate was 58% (n = 216). Although 63% said more than one quarter of their patients would benefit from external health information, the barriers to obtain it without HIE are too high--85% said it was difficult or very difficult to obtain external data, taking an average of 66 minutes, 72% said that their attempts fail half of the time, and 56% currently attempt to obtain external data less than 10% of the time. When asked to create a rank-order list, electrocardiograms (ECGs) were ranked the highest, followed by discharge summaries. Respondents also chose images over written reports for ECGs and X-rays, but preferred written reports for advanced imaging and cardiac studies. There is a strong perceived need for HIE, most respondents were not aware of HIE prior to this study, and there are certain types of data and presentations of data that are preferred by emergency physicians in the New York City region.

  16. Health information exchange reduces repeated diagnostic imaging for back pain.

    PubMed

    Bailey, James E; Pope, Rebecca A; Elliott, Elizabeth C; Wan, Jim Y; Waters, Teresa M; Frisse, Mark E

    2013-07-01

    This study seeks to determine whether health information exchange reduces repeated diagnostic imaging and related costs in emergency back pain evaluation. This was a longitudinal data analysis of health information exchange patient-visit data. All repeated emergency department (ED) patient visits for back pain with previous ED diagnostic imaging to a Memphis metropolitan area ED between August 1, 2007, and July 31, 2009, were included. Use of a regional health information exchange by ED personnel to access the patient's record during the emergency visit was the primary independent variable. Main outcomes included repeated lumbar or thoracic diagnostic imaging (radiograph, computed tomography [CT], or magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) and total patient-visit estimated cost. One hundred seventy-nine (22.4%) of the 800 qualifying repeated back pain visits resulted in repeated diagnostic imaging (radiograph 84.9%, CT 6.1%, and MRI 9.5%). Health information exchange use in the study population was low, at 12.5%, and health care providers as opposed to administrative/nursing staff accounted for 80% of the total health information exchange use. Health information exchange use by any ED personnel was associated with reduced repeated diagnostic imaging (odds ratio 0.36; 95% confidence interval 0.18 to 0.71), as was physician or nurse practitioner health information exchange use (odds ratio 0.47; 95% confidence interval 0.23 to 0.96). No cost savings were associated with health information exchange use because of increased CT imaging when health care providers used health information exchange. Health information exchange use is associated with 64% lower odds of repeated diagnostic imaging in the emergency evaluation of back pain. Health information exchange effect on estimated costs was negligible. More studies are needed to evaluate specific strategies to increase health information exchange use and further decrease potentially unnecessary diagnostic imaging and associated

  17. NASA Earth Science Update with Information Science Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halem, Milton

    2000-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of NASA earth science updates with information science technology. Details are given on NASA/Earth Science Enterprise (ESE)/Goddard Space Flight Center strategic plans, ESE missions and flight programs, roles of information science, ESE goals related to the Minority University-Space Interdisciplinary Network, and future plans.

  18. CATIONIC EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR THE SEPARATION OF RARE EARTHS

    DOEpatents

    Choppin, G.R.; Thompson, S.G.; Harvey, B.G.

    1960-02-16

    A process for separating mixtures of elements in the lanthanum and actinium series of the periodic table is described. The mixture of elements is dissolved in 0.05 M HCI, wherein the elements exist as tripositive ions. The resulting solution is then transferred to a column of cationic exchange resin and the column eluted with 0.1 to 0.6 M aqueous ammonium alpha hydroxy isobutyrate solution of pH 3.8 to 5.0. The use of ammonium alpha hydroxy isobutyrate as an eluting agent results in sharper and more rapid separations than previously obtainable with eluants such as citric, tartaric, glycolic, and lactic acids.

  19. Static magnetic susceptibility, crystal field and exchange interactions in rare earth titanate pyrochlores.

    PubMed

    Malkin, B Z; Lummen, T T A; van Loosdrecht, P H M; Dhalenne, G; Zakirov, A R

    2010-07-14

    The experimental temperature dependence (T = 2-300 K) of single crystal bulk and site susceptibilities of rare earth titanate pyrochlores R(2)Ti(2)O(7) (R = Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb) is analyzed in the framework of crystal field theory and a mean field approximation. Analytical expressions for the site and bulk susceptibilities of the pyrochlore lattice are derived taking into account long range dipole-dipole interactions and anisotropic exchange interactions between the nearest neighbor rare earth ions. The sets of crystal field parameters and anisotropic exchange coupling constants have been determined and their variations along the lanthanide series are discussed.

  20. 41 CFR 60-742.2 - Exchange of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Exchange of information. 60-742.2 Section 60-742.2 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... AGAINST EMPLOYERS HOLDING GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS OR SUBCONTRACTS § 60-742.2 Exchange of information. (a...

  1. 29 CFR 1640.3 - Exchange of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exchange of information. 1640.3 Section 1640.3 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION PROCEDURES FOR COORDINATING... Exchange of information. The EEOC, section 504 agencies, and designated agencies shall share any...

  2. 29 CFR 1640.3 - Exchange of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exchange of information. 1640.3 Section 1640.3 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION PROCEDURES FOR COORDINATING... Exchange of information. The EEOC, section 504 agencies, and designated agencies shall share any...

  3. 29 CFR 1640.3 - Exchange of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exchange of information. 1640.3 Section 1640.3 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION PROCEDURES FOR COORDINATING... Exchange of information. The EEOC, section 504 agencies, and designated agencies shall share any...

  4. 29 CFR 1640.3 - Exchange of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exchange of information. 1640.3 Section 1640.3 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION PROCEDURES FOR COORDINATING... Exchange of information. The EEOC, section 504 agencies, and designated agencies shall share any...

  5. 29 CFR 1640.3 - Exchange of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exchange of information. 1640.3 Section 1640.3 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION PROCEDURES FOR COORDINATING... Exchange of information. The EEOC, section 504 agencies, and designated agencies shall share any...

  6. Physician capability to electronically exchange clinical information, 2011.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vaishali; Swain, Matthew J; King, Jennifer; Furukawa, Michael F

    2013-10-01

    To provide national estimates of physician capability to electronically share clinical information with other providers and to describe variation in exchange capability across states and electronic health record (EHR) vendors using the 2011 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey Electronic Medical Record Supplement. Survey of a nationally representative sample of nonfederal office-based physicians who provide direct patient care. The survey was administered by mail with telephone follow-up and had a 61% weighted response rate. The overall sample consisted of 4326 respondents. We calculated estimates of electronic exchange capability at the national and state levels, and applied multivariate analyses to examine the association between the capability to exchange different types of clinical information and physician and practice characteristics. In 2011, 55% of physicians had computerized capability to send prescriptions electronically; 67% had the capability to view lab results electronically; 42% were able to incorporate lab results into their EHR; 35% were able to send lab orders electronically; and, 31% exchanged patient clinical summaries with other providers. The strongest predictor of exchange capability is adoption of an EHR. However, substantial variation exists across geography and EHR vendors in exchange capability, especially electronic exchange of clinical summaries. In 2011, a majority of office-based physicians could exchange lab and medication data, and approximately one-third could exchange clinical summaries with patients or other providers. EHRs serve as a key mechanism by which physicians can exchange clinical data, though physicians' capability to exchange varies by vendor and by state.

  7. Magnetism and exchange interaction of small rare-earth clusters; Tb as a representative

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Lars; Ghosh, Saurabh; Sanyal, Biplab; van Dijk, Chris; Bowlan, John; de Heer, Walt; Delin, Anna; Di Marco, Igor; Eriksson, Olle; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.; Johansson, Börje; Kirilyuk, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Here we follow, both experimentally and theoretically, the development of magnetism in Tb clusters from the atomic limit, adding one atom at a time. The exchange interaction is, surprisingly, observed to drastically increase compared to that of bulk, and to exhibit irregular oscillations as a function of the interatomic distance. From electronic structure theory we find that the theoretical magnetic moments oscillate with cluster size in exact agreement with experimental data. Unlike the bulk, the oscillation is not caused by the RKKY mechanism. Instead, the inter-atomic exchange is shown to be driven by a competition between wave-function overlap of the 5d shell and the on-site exchange interaction, which leads to a competition between ferromagnetic double-exchange and antiferromagnetic super-exchange. This understanding opens up new ways to tune the magnetic properties of rare-earth based magnets with nano-sized building blocks. PMID:26795239

  8. Earth Observing Data System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klene, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) acquires and distributes an abundance of Earth science data on a daily basis to a diverse user community worldwide. The NASA Big Earth Data Initiative (BEDI) is an effort to make the acquired science data more discoverable, accessible, and usable. This presentation will provide a brief introduction to the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) project and the nature of advances that have been made by BEDI to other Federal Users.

  9. Separation of the rare earths by anion-exchange in the presence of lactic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faris, J. P.

    1969-01-01

    Investigation of adsorption of rare earths and a few other elements to an anion-exchange resin from mixed solvents containing lactic acid shows that the lanthanides are absorbed more strongly than from the alpha-hydroxyisobutryric acid system, but with less separation between adjacent members of the series.

  10. Goddard Earth Science Data and Information Center (GES DISC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempler, Steve

    2016-01-01

    The GES DIS is one of 12 NASA Earth science data centers. The GES DISC vision is to enable researchers and educators maximize knowledge of the Earth by engaging in understanding their goals, and by leading the advancement of remote sensing information services in response to satisfying their goals. This presentation will describe the GES DISC approach, successes, challenges, and best practices.

  11. Is Cancer Information Exchanged on Social Media Scientifically Accurate?

    PubMed

    Gage-Bouchard, Elizabeth A; LaValley, Susan; Warunek, Molli; Beaupin, Lynda Kwon; Mollica, Michelle

    2017-07-19

    Cancer patients and their caregivers are increasingly using social media as a platform to share cancer experiences, connect with support, and exchange cancer-related information. Yet, little is known about the nature and scientific accuracy of cancer-related information exchanged on social media. We conducted a content analysis of 12 months of data from 18 publically available Facebook Pages hosted by parents of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (N = 15,852 posts) and extracted all exchanges of medically-oriented cancer information. We systematically coded for themes in the nature of cancer-related information exchanged on personal Facebook Pages and two oncology experts independently evaluated the scientific accuracy of each post. Of the 15,852 total posts, 171 posts contained medically-oriented cancer information. The most frequent type of cancer information exchanged was information related to treatment protocols and health services use (35%) followed by information related to side effects and late effects (26%), medication (16%), medical caregiving strategies (13%), alternative and complementary therapies (8%), and other (2%). Overall, 67% of all cancer information exchanged was deemed medically/scientifically accurate, 19% was not medically/scientifically accurate, and 14% described unproven treatment modalities. These findings highlight the potential utility of social media as a cancer-related resource, but also indicate that providers should focus on recommending reliable, evidence-based sources to patients and caregivers.

  12. 29 CFR 1691.2 - Exchange of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exchange of information. 1691.2 Section 1691.2 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION PROCEDURES FOR COMPLAINTS OF EMPLOYMENT DISCRIMINATION FILED AGAINST RECIPIENTS OF FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE § 1691.2 Exchange of...

  13. Energetics of alkali and alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Hui; Wu, Di; Liu, Kefeng; ...

    2016-06-30

    Alkali and alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A samples were synthesized in aqueous exchange media. They were thoroughly studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe (EMPA), thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), and high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. The hydration energetics and enthalpies of formation of these zeolite A materials from constituent oxides were determined. Specifically, the hydration level of zeolite A has a linear dependence on the average ionic potential ( Z/r) of the cation, from 0.894 (Rb-A) to 1.317 per TO 2 (Mg-A). The formation enthalpies from oxides (25 °C) range from –93.71 ± 1.77 (K-A)more » to –48.02 ± 1.85 kJ/mol per TO 2 (Li-A) for hydrated alkali ion-exchanged zeolite A, and from –47.99 ± 1.20 (Ba-A) to –26.41 ± 1.71 kJ/mol per TO 2 (Mg-A) for hydrated alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A. As a result, the formation enthalpy from oxides generally becomes less exothermic as Z/r increases, but a distinct difference in slope is observed between the alkali and the alkaline earth series.« less

  14. Connecting Provenance with Semantic Descriptions in the NASA Earth Exchange (NEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votava, P.; Michaelis, A.; Nemani, R. R.

    2012-12-01

    NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) is a data, modeling and knowledge collaboratory that houses NASA satellite data, climate data and ancillary data where a focused community may come together to share modeling and analysis codes, scientific results, knowledge and expertise on a centralized platform. Some of the main goals of NEX are transparency and repeatability and to that extent we have been adding components that enable tracking of provenance of both scientific processes and datasets produced by these processes. As scientific processes become more complex, they are often developed collaboratively and it becomes increasingly important for the research team to be able to track the development of the process and the datasets that are produced along the way. Additionally, we want to be able to link the processes and the datasets developed on NEX to an existing information and knowledge, so that the users can query and compare the provenance of any dataset or process with regard to the component-specific attributes such as data quality, geographic location, related publications, user comments and annotations etc. We have developed several ontologies that describe datasets and workflow components available on NEX using the OWL ontology language as well as a simple ontology that provides linking mechanism to the collected provenance information. The provenance is captured in two ways - we utilize existing provenance infrastructure of VisTrails, which is used as a workflow engine on NEX, and we extend the captured provenance using the PROV data model expressed through the PROV-O ontology. We do this in order to link and query the provenance easier in the context of the existing NEX information and knowledge. The captured provenance graph is processed and stored using RDFlib with MySQL backend that can be queried using either RDFLib or SPARQL. As a concrete example, we show how this information is captured during anomaly detection process in large satellite datasets.

  15. Reproducibility and Knowledge Capture Architecture for the NASA Earth Exchange (NEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votava, P.; Michaelis, A.; Nemani, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) is a data, supercomputing and knowledge collaboratory that houses NASA satellite, climate and ancillary data where a focused community can come together to address large-scale challenges in Earth sciences. As NEX has been growing into a platform for analysis, experiments and production of data on the order of petabytes in volume, it has been increasingly important to enable users to easily retrace their steps, identify what datasets were produced by which process or chain of processes, and give them ability to readily reproduce their results. This can be a tedious and difficult task even for a small project, but is almost impossible on large processing pipelines. For example, the NEX Landsat pipeline is deployed to process hundreds of thousands of Landsat scenes in a non-linear production workflow with many-to-many mappings of files between 40 separate processing stages where over 100 million processes get executed. At this scale it is almost impossible to easily examine the entire provenance of each file, let alone easily reproduce it. We have developed an initial solution for the NEX system - a transparent knowledge capture and reproducibility architecture that does not require any special code instrumentation and other actions on user's part. Users can automatically capture their work through a transparent provenance tracking system and the information can subsequently be queried and/or converted into workflows. The provenance information is streamed to a MongoDB document store and a subset is converted to an RDF format and inserted into our triple-store. The triple-store already contains semantic information about other aspects of the NEX system and adding provenance enhances the ability to relate workflows and data to users, locations, projects and other NEX concepts that can be queried in a standard way. The provenance system has the ability to track data throughout NEX and across number of executions and can recreate and re

  16. 29 CFR 1691.2 - Exchange of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exchange of information. 1691.2 Section 1691.2 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION PROCEDURES FOR COMPLAINTS OF... information. EEOC and agencies shall share any information relating to the employment policies and practices...

  17. 29 CFR 1691.2 - Exchange of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exchange of information. 1691.2 Section 1691.2 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION PROCEDURES FOR COMPLAINTS OF... information. EEOC and agencies shall share any information relating to the employment policies and practices...

  18. 29 CFR 1691.2 - Exchange of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exchange of information. 1691.2 Section 1691.2 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION PROCEDURES FOR COMPLAINTS OF... information. EEOC and agencies shall share any information relating to the employment policies and practices...

  19. 29 CFR 1691.2 - Exchange of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exchange of information. 1691.2 Section 1691.2 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION PROCEDURES FOR COMPLAINTS OF... information. EEOC and agencies shall share any information relating to the employment policies and practices...

  20. Construction Operations Building Information Exchange (COBIE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    10 MIMOSA ...objectives. MIMOSA The goals of the Machinery Information Management Open Systems Alli- ance ( MIMOSA ) organization include the creation of open...information standards for life-cycle asset management [Johnson 2004]. As shown in Table 2-1 [BP 2004], MIMOSA is one of many standards that have been

  1. Implementation of Medical Information Exchange System Based on EHR Standard

    PubMed Central

    Han, Soon Hwa; Kim, Sang Guk; Jeong, Jun Yong; Lee, Bi Na; Choi, Myeong Seon; Kim, Il Kon; Park, Woo Sung; Ha, Kyooseob; Cho, Eunyoung; Kim, Yoon; Bae, Jae Bong

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To develop effective ways of sharing patients' medical information, we developed a new medical information exchange system (MIES) based on a registry server, which enabled us to exchange different types of data generated by various systems. Methods To assure that patient's medical information can be effectively exchanged under different system environments, we adopted the standardized data transfer methods and terminologies suggested by the Center for Interoperable Electronic Healthcare Record (CIEHR) of Korea in order to guarantee interoperability. Regarding information security, MIES followed the security guidelines suggested by the CIEHR of Korea. This study aimed to develop essential security systems for the implementation of online services, such as encryption of communication, server security, database security, protection against hacking, contents, and network security. Results The registry server managed information exchange as well as the registration information of the clinical document architecture (CDA) documents, and the CDA Transfer Server was used to locate and transmit the proper CDA document from the relevant repository. The CDA viewer showed the CDA documents via connection with the information systems of related hospitals. Conclusions This research chooses transfer items and defines document standards that follow CDA standards, such that exchange of CDA documents between different systems became possible through ebXML. The proposed MIES was designed as an independent central registry server model in order to guarantee the essential security of patients' medical information. PMID:21818447

  2. Implementation of Medical Information Exchange System Based on EHR Standard.

    PubMed

    Han, Soon Hwa; Lee, Min Ho; Kim, Sang Guk; Jeong, Jun Yong; Lee, Bi Na; Choi, Myeong Seon; Kim, Il Kon; Park, Woo Sung; Ha, Kyooseob; Cho, Eunyoung; Kim, Yoon; Bae, Jae Bong

    2010-12-01

    To develop effective ways of sharing patients' medical information, we developed a new medical information exchange system (MIES) based on a registry server, which enabled us to exchange different types of data generated by various systems. To assure that patient's medical information can be effectively exchanged under different system environments, we adopted the standardized data transfer methods and terminologies suggested by the Center for Interoperable Electronic Healthcare Record (CIEHR) of Korea in order to guarantee interoperability. Regarding information security, MIES followed the security guidelines suggested by the CIEHR of Korea. This study aimed to develop essential security systems for the implementation of online services, such as encryption of communication, server security, database security, protection against hacking, contents, and network security. The registry server managed information exchange as well as the registration information of the clinical document architecture (CDA) documents, and the CDA Transfer Server was used to locate and transmit the proper CDA document from the relevant repository. The CDA viewer showed the CDA documents via connection with the information systems of related hospitals. This research chooses transfer items and defines document standards that follow CDA standards, such that exchange of CDA documents between different systems became possible through ebXML. The proposed MIES was designed as an independent central registry server model in order to guarantee the essential security of patients' medical information.

  3. Information processing of earth resources data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zobrist, A. L.; Bryant, N. A.

    1982-01-01

    Current trends in the use of remotely sensed data include integration of multiple data sources of various formats and use of complex models. These trends have placed a strain on information processing systems because an enormous number of capabilities are needed to perform a single application. A solution to this problem is to create a general set of capabilities which can perform a wide variety of applications. General capabilities for the Image-Based Information System (IBIS) are outlined in this report. They are then cross-referenced for a set of applications performed at JPL.

  4. Deploying the ODISEES Ontology-guided Search in the NASA Earth Exchange (NEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffer, E.; Gleason, J. L.; Cotnoir, M.; Spaulding, R.; Deardorff, G.

    2016-12-01

    Robust, semantically rich metadata can support data discovery and access, and facilitate machine-to-machine transactions with services such as data subsetting, regridding, and reformatting. Despite this, for users not already familiar with the data in a given archive, most metadata is insufficient to help them find appropriate data for their projects. With this in mind, the Ontology-driven Interactive Search Environment (ODISEES) Data Discovery Portal was developed to enable users to find and download data variables that satisfy precise, parameter-level criteria, even when they know little or nothing about the naming conventions employed by data providers, or where suitable data might be archived. ODISEES relies on an Earth science ontology and metadata repository that provide an ontological framework for describing NASA data holdings with enough detail and fidelity to enable researchers to find, compare and evaluate individual data variables. Users can search for data by indicating the specific parameters desired, and comparing the results in a table that lets them quickly determine which data is most suitable. ODISEES and OLYMPUS, a tool for generating the semantically enhanced metadata used by ODISEES, are being developed in collaboration with the NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) project at the NASA Ames Research Center to prototype a robust data discovery and access service that could be made available to NEX users. NEX is a collaborative platform that provides researchers with access to TB to PB-scale datasets and analysis tools to operate on those data. By integrating ODISEES into the NEX Web Portal we hope to enable NEX users to locate datasets relevant to their research and download them directly into the NAS environment, where they can run applications using those datasets on the NAS supercomputers. This poster will describe the prototype integration of ODISEES into the NEX portal development environment, the mechanism implemented to use NASA APIs to retrieve

  5. Using Analytics to Support Petabyte-Scale Science on the NASA Earth Exchange (NEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votava, P.; Michaelis, A.; Ganguly, S.; Nemani, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) is a data, supercomputing and knowledge collaboratory that houses NASA satellite, climate and ancillary data where a focused community can come together to address large-scale challenges in Earth sciences. Analytics within NEX occurs at several levels - data, workflows, science and knowledge. At the data level, we are focusing on collecting and analyzing any information that is relevant to efficient acquisition, processing and management of data at the smallest granularity, such as files or collections. This includes processing and analyzing all local and many external metadata that are relevant to data quality, size, provenance, usage and other attributes. This then helps us better understand usage patterns and improve efficiency of data handling within NEX. When large-scale workflows are executed on NEX, we capture information that is relevant to processing and that can be analyzed in order to improve efficiencies in job scheduling, resource optimization, or data partitioning that would improve processing throughput. At this point we also collect data provenance as well as basic statistics of intermediate and final products created during the workflow execution. These statistics and metrics form basic process and data QA that, when combined with analytics algorithms, helps us identify issues early in the production process. We have already seen impact in some petabyte-scale projects, such as global Landsat processing, where we were able to reduce processing times from days to hours and enhance process monitoring and QA. While the focus so far has been mostly on support of NEX operations, we are also building a web-based infrastructure that enables users to perform direct analytics on science data - such as climate predictions or satellite data. Finally, as one of the main goals of NEX is knowledge acquisition and sharing, we began gathering and organizing information that associates users and projects with data, publications, locations

  6. NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System - EOSDIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, Hampapuram K.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work of NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS), a petabyte-scale archive of environmental data that supports global climate change research. The Earth Science Data Systems provide end-to-end capabilities to deliver data and information products to users in support of understanding the Earth system. The presentation contains photographs from space of recent events, (i.e., the effects of the tsunami in Japan, and the wildfires in Australia.) It also includes details of the Data Centers that provide the data to EOSDIS and Science Investigator-led Processing Systems. Information about the Land, Atmosphere Near-real-time Capability for EOS (LANCE) and some of the uses that the system has made possible are reviewed. Also included is information about how to access the data, and evolutionary plans for the future of the system.

  7. Earth Sciences Requirements for the Information Sciences Experiment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowker, David E. (Editor); Katzberg, Steve J. (Editor); Wilson, R. Gale (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to further explore and define the earth sciences requirements for the Information Sciences Experiment System (ISES), a proposed onboard data processor with real-time communications capability intended to support the Earth Observing System (Eos). A review of representative Eos instrument types is given and a preliminary set of real-time data needs has been established. An executive summary is included.

  8. DEFENSE ENVIRONMENTAL NETWORK AND INFORMATION EXCHANGE (DENIX)

    EPA Science Inventory

    DENIX serves as a central platform for the dissemination of environment, safety and occupational health (ESOH) news, policy, and guidance within Department of Defense (DoD) activities worldwide, in support of the national defense mission. DENIX informs ESOH professionals of salie...

  9. Information Exchange: The Impact of Scholarly Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, D. Linda

    1990-01-01

    Discusses issues relating to intellectual property rights that are being affected by information technologies. A 1986 study by the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) is discussed; intellectual property law is described, including copyright, patents, and trade secrets; and the involvement of the university community in considering intellectual…

  10. On the management and processing of earth resources information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, C. W.; Gonzalez, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    The basic concepts of a recently completed large-scale earth resources information system plan are reported. Attention is focused throughout the paper on the information management and processing requirements. After the development of the principal system concepts, a model system for implementation at the state level is discussed.

  11. National Information Exchange Model (NIEM): DoD Adoption and Implications for C2 (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-18

    Application Data Consumers Information Exchange Package ( IEP ) the data exchanged at runtime Data Producers IES defines Information Exchange...Specification (IES) build-time description of the data to be exchanged Developers System / Application System / Application IEP | 9 | Data...Exchange Package ( IEP ) the data exchanged at runtime Data Producers System / Application System / Application IEP Consumer’s Understanding

  12. Quantum secret information equal exchange protocol based on dense coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ying-Hua; Zhang, Shi-Bin; Dai, Jin-Qiao; Shi, Zhi-Ping

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we design a novel quantum secret information equal exchange protocol, which implements the equal exchange of secret information between the two parties with the help of semi-trusted third party (TP). In the protocol, EPR pairs prepared by the TP are, respectively, distributed to both the communication parties. Then, the two parties perform Pauli operation on each particle and return the new particles to TP, respectively. TP measures each new pair with Bell basis and announces the measurement results. Both parties deduce the secret information of each other according to the result of announcement by TP. Finally, the security analysis shows that this protocol solves the problem about equal exchange of secret information between two parties and verifies the security of semi-trusted TPs. It proves that the protocol can effectively resist glitch attacks, intercept retransmission attacks and entanglement attack.

  13. Agile Information Exchange in Autonomous Air Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    proportional to the information the pilot has on the target. Figure 5: Modified Procerus Unicorn UAV D. Equipment The UAV used in this experiment is...a modified Procerus Unicorn (Figure 5). Unicorns are electrically powered, Styrofoam flying wings with a 72” wingspan. Stock Unicorns are...controlled by a Kestrel autopilot, which communicates to a ground-station over a 900MHz radio link. Through the ground-station, the Unicorn operator can

  14. Mobile Agents for Battlespace Information Exchange

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    autonomously gather information and coordinate activities (e.g. meetings, e - commerce transactions) on behalf of their owners. Sometime in the...operations where consumer -level infrastructure is not available. The report provides an overview of MA characteristics and follows with a description of...detection for security, telecommunications and the military. With the advent of broadband communication (fixed and wireless) a typical consumer is now

  15. Information Exchange Procedures. Outcomes Study Procedures. Technical Report No. 66.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Maureen

    The Information Exchange Procedures (IEP) developed by the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS) are a set of standard definitions and procedures for collecting information about disciplines and student degree programs, outcomes of instructional programs, and general institutional characteristics. A fundamental purpose…

  16. Exchanging Medical Information with Eastern Europe through the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Julie K.; Cronje, Ruth J.; Sokolowski, Beth C.

    1998-01-01

    Interviews foreign Information Coordinators who facilitate exchange of medical information over the Internet between healthcare providers in America and eastern Europe to learn how Internet technologies are being introduced, disseminated, and adopted in their institutions. Applies diffusion of innovations theory for interpretation. Shows technical…

  17. 29 CFR 1641.2 - Exchange of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION PROCEDURES FOR COMPLAINTS... CONTRACTS OR SUBCONTRACTS § 1641.2 Exchange of information. (a) EEOC and OFCCP shall share any information... not applicable to requests for data in EEOC files made by any State or local agency designated as a...

  18. 29 CFR 1641.2 - Exchange of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION PROCEDURES FOR COMPLAINTS... CONTRACTS OR SUBCONTRACTS § 1641.2 Exchange of information. (a) EEOC and OFCCP shall share any information... not applicable to requests for data in EEOC files made by any State or local agency designated as a...

  19. 29 CFR 1641.2 - Exchange of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION PROCEDURES FOR COMPLAINTS... CONTRACTS OR SUBCONTRACTS § 1641.2 Exchange of information. (a) EEOC and OFCCP shall share any information... not applicable to requests for data in EEOC files made by any State or local agency designated as a...

  20. 29 CFR 1641.2 - Exchange of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION PROCEDURES FOR COMPLAINTS... CONTRACTS OR SUBCONTRACTS § 1641.2 Exchange of information. (a) EEOC and OFCCP shall share any information... not applicable to requests for data in EEOC files made by any State or local agency designated as a...

  1. 29 CFR 1641.2 - Exchange of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION PROCEDURES FOR COMPLAINTS... CONTRACTS OR SUBCONTRACTS § 1641.2 Exchange of information. (a) EEOC and OFCCP shall share any information... not applicable to requests for data in EEOC files made by any State or local agency designated as a...

  2. Overcoming obstacles to the exchange of information between risk tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, Martin S.; Cornford, Steven L.; Meshkat, Leila; Voss, Luke

    2005-01-01

    Our work to date in connecting risk tools hs had successes, but also has revealed there to be significant impediments to information exchange between them. These impediments stem from the well-known phenomenon of 'semantic dissonance' - mismatch between conceptual assumptions made by the separately developed tools. This issue represents a fundamental challenge that arises regardless of the mechanism of information exchange. This paper explains the issue and illustrates it with reference to our experiences to date connecting several risk tools. We motivate this work, present and discuss the solutions we have adopted to surmount these impediments, and the implications this work has for future efforts to integrate risk tools.

  3. Maximizing information exchange between complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Bruce J.; Geneston, Elvis L.; Grigolini, Paolo

    2008-10-01

    modern research overarching all of the traditional scientific disciplines. The transportation networks of planes, highways and railroads; the economic networks of global finance and stock markets; the social networks of terrorism, governments, businesses and churches; the physical networks of telephones, the Internet, earthquakes and global warming and the biological networks of gene regulation, the human body, clusters of neurons and food webs, share a number of apparently universal properties as the networks become increasingly complex. Ubiquitous aspects of such complex networks are the appearance of non-stationary and non-ergodic statistical processes and inverse power-law statistical distributions. Herein we review the traditional dynamical and phase-space methods for modeling such networks as their complexity increases and focus on the limitations of these procedures in explaining complex networks. Of course we will not be able to review the entire nascent field of network science, so we limit ourselves to a review of how certain complexity barriers have been surmounted using newly applied theoretical concepts such as aging, renewal, non-ergodic statistics and the fractional calculus. One emphasis of this review is information transport between complex networks, which requires a fundamental change in perception that we express as a transition from the familiar stochastic resonance to the new concept of complexity matching.

  4. Pull vs. Push: How OmniEarth Delivers Better Earth Observation Information to Subscribers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fish, C.; Slagowski, S.; Dyrud, L.; Fentzke, J.; Hargis, B.; Steerman, M.

    2015-04-01

    Until very recently, the commercialization of Earth observation systems has largely occurred in two ways: either through the detuning of government satellites or the repurposing of NASA (or other science) data for commercial use. However, the convergence of cloud computing and low-cost satellites is enabling Earth observation companies to tailor observation data to specific markets. Now, underserved constituencies, such as agriculture and energy, can tap into Earth observation data that is provided at a cadence, resolution and cost that can have a real impact to their bottom line. To connect with these markets, OmniEarth fuses data from a variety of sources, synthesizes it into useful and valuable business information, and delivers it to customers via web or mobile interfaces. The "secret sauce" is no longer about having the highest resolution imagery, but rather it is about using that imagery - in conjunction with a number of other sources - to solve complex problems that require timely and contextual information about our dynamic and changing planet. OmniEarth improves subscribers' ability to visualize the world around them by enhancing their ability to see, analyze, and react to change in real time through a solutions-as-a-service platform.

  5. NASDA's earth observation satellite data archive policy for the earth observation data and information system (EOIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobue, Shin-ichi; Yoshida, Fumiyoshi; Ochiai, Osamu

    1996-01-01

    NASDA's new Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS) is scheduled for launch in August, 1996. ADEOS carries 8 sensors to observe earth environmental phenomena and sends their data to NASDA, NASA, and other foreign ground stations around the world. The downlink data bit rate for ADEOS is 126 MB/s and the total volume of data is about 100 GB per day. To archive and manage such a large quantity of data with high reliability and easy accessibility it was necessary to develop a new mass storage system with a catalogue information database using advanced database management technology. The data will be archived and maintained in the Master Data Storage Subsystem (MDSS) which is one subsystem in NASDA's new Earth Observation data and Information System (EOIS). The MDSS is based on a SONY ID1 digital tape robotics system. This paper provides an overview of the EOIS system, with a focus on the Master Data Storage Subsystem and the NASDA Earth Observation Center (EOC) archive policy for earth observation satellite data.

  6. Why relevant chemical information cannot be exchanged without disclosing structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonov, Dmitry; Poroikov, Vladimir

    2005-09-01

    Both society and industry are interested in increasing the safety of pharmaceuticals. Potentially dangerous compounds could be filtered out at early stages of R&D by computer prediction of biological activity and ADMET characteristics. Accuracy of such predictions strongly depends on the quality & quantity of information contained in a training set. Suggestion that some relevant chemical information can be added to such training sets without disclosing chemical structures was generated at the recent ACS Symposium. We presented arguments that such safety exchange of relevant chemical information is impossible. Any relevant information about chemical structures can be used for search of either a particular compound itself or its close analogues. Risk of identifying such structures is enough to prevent pharma industry from relevant chemical information exchange.

  7. The Federation of Earth Science Information Partners ESIP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilmes, Curt

    2013-01-01

    A broad-based, distributed community of science, data and information technology practitioners. With over 150 member organizations, the ESIP Federation brings together public, academic, commercial, and nongovernmental organizations to share knowledge, expertise, technology and best practices to improve opportunities for increasing access, discovery, integration and usability of Earth science data.

  8. Impact of Health Disclosure Laws on Health Information Exchanges

    PubMed Central

    Adjerid, Idris; Padman, Rema

    2011-01-01

    Health information exchanges (HIEs) are expected to facilitate data sharing between healthcare entities, thereby improving the efficiency and quality of care. Privacy concerns have been consistently cited as one of the primary challenges to HIE formation and success. Currently, it is unclear how privacy laws – in particular, legislation restricting the disclosure of health records – have shaped the development of HIEs. This preliminary study explores the landscape of state-level health privacy legislation and examines the impact of variations in such privacy and confidentiality laws on the progress of HIEs. We found that states with stronger privacy laws, limiting the disclosure of health information, had significantly more HIEs exchanging data and had fewer failed HIEs. We suggest that this counterintuitive finding may be explained by the more subtle benefits of such laws, such as increased confidence and trust of participants in an exchange. Other key contributors to this work are Alessandro Acquisti, Rahul Telang, and Julia Adler-Milstein PMID:22195054

  9. ERISTAR: Earth Resources Information Storage, Transformation, Analysis, and Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) have sponsored faculty fellowship programs in systems engineering design for the past several years. During the summer of 1972 four such programs were conducted by NASA, with Auburn University cooperating with Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The subject for the Auburn-MSFC design group was ERISTAR, an acronym for Earth Resources Information Storage, Transformation, Analysis and Retrieval, which represents an earth resources information management network of state information centers administered by the respective states and linked to federally administered regional centers and a national center. The considerations for serving the users and the considerations that must be given to processing data from a variety of sources are described. The combination of these elements into a national network is discussed and an implementation plan is proposed for a prototype state information center. The compatibility of the proposed plan with the Department of Interior plan, RALI, is indicated.

  10. Database & information tools for transportation research management : Connecticut transportation research peer exchange report of a thematic peer exchange.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2006-05-01

    Specific objectives of the Peer Exchange were: : Discuss and exchange information about databases and other software : used to support the program-cycles managed by state transportation : research offices. Elements of the program cycle include: :...

  11. 28 CFR 42.602 - Exchange of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exchange of information. 42.602 Section 42.602 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE NONDISCRIMINATION; EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY; POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Procedures for Complaints of Employment Discrimination Filed Against Recipients of Federal Financial Assistance § 42.602...

  12. 28 CFR 42.602 - Exchange of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exchange of information. 42.602 Section 42.602 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE NONDISCRIMINATION; EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY; POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Procedures for Complaints of Employment Discrimination Filed Against Recipients of...

  13. An Introduction to the Federal Information Exchange System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Santi, Vincent; Scheele, D. Sam

    This publication offers a basic introduction to the Federal Information Exchange System (FIXS), a set of procedures for periodically collecting, processing, and publishing data on federal and state expenditures for each program listed in the "Catalog of Federal Assistance Programs." FIXS is designed for use in conjunction with the…

  14. A Global Information Exchange (GIE) Project in a Graduate Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thirunarayanan, M. O.; Coccaro-Pons, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Graduate students who were enrolled in an introductory educational technology course that met face-to-face completed a Global Information Exchange (GIE) project. The goal of the project was to promote global awareness among the graduate students who were also classroom teachers, and by extension their K-12 students. The graduate students, who also…

  15. 21 CFR 26.71 - Exchange of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exchange of information. 26.71 Section 26.71 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE REPORTS, MEDICAL DEVICE QUALITY SYSTEM AUDIT REPORTS...

  16. MIX. The McGraw-Hill Information Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laliberte, Stephen M.

    1986-01-01

    "MIX" is an online publishing service and information exchange from the Educational Management Services Division of McGraw-Hill. Through computer conferencing and electronic mail, MIX provides access to a network of people across the country who are seeking ways to put computers to use to improve the quality of education. MIX is an…

  17. "Practice Story Exchanges" and Their Creative Invitation to Informal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This is a study of how members of a collaborative group interested in promoting convivial civilisation in human society took up exchanging practice stories--stories of doing something or seeing something done as examples of convivial backyard civilisation--in order tacitly to create an informal learning environment where practices of such a…

  18. Health information exchange: persistent challenges and new strategies

    PubMed Central

    Gamm, Larry D

    2010-01-01

    Recent federal policies and actions support the adoption of health information exchange (HIE) in order to improve healthcare by addressing fragmented personal health information. However, concerted efforts at facilitating HIE have existed for over two decades in this country. The lessons of these experiences include a recurrence of barriers and challenges beyond those associated with technology. Without new strategies, the current support and methods of facilitating HIE may not address these barriers. PMID:20442146

  19. Experimental temperature analysis of simple & hybrid earth air tunnel heat exchanger in series connection at Bikaner Rajasthan India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakhar, O. P.; Sharma, Chandra Shekhar; Kukana, Rajendra

    2018-05-01

    The Earth Air Tunnel Heat Exchanger System is a passive air-conditioning system which has no side effect on earth climate and produces better cooling effect and heating effect comfortable to human body. It produces heating effect in winter and cooling effect in summer with the minimum power consumption of energy as compare to other air-conditioning devices. In this research paper Temperature Analysis was done on the two systems of Earth Air Tunnel Heat Exchanger experimentally for summer cooling purpose. Both the system was installed at Mechanical Engineering Department Government Engineering College Bikaner Rajasthan India. Experimental results concludes that the Average Air Temperature Difference was found as 11.00° C and 16.27° C for the Simple and Hybrid Earth Air Tunnel Heat Exchanger in Series Connection System respectively. The Maximum Air Temperature Difference was found as 18.10° C and 23.70° C for the Simple and Hybrid Earth Air Tunnel Heat Exchanger in Series Connection System respectively. The Minimum Air Temperature Difference was found as 5.20° C and 11.70° C for the Simple and Hybrid Earth Air Tunnel Heat Exchanger in Series Connection System respectively.

  20. Smart health community: the hidden value of health information exchange.

    PubMed

    Ciriello, James N; Kulatilaka, Nalin

    2010-12-01

    Investments in health information technology are accelerating the digitization of medicine. The value from these investments, however, can grow beyond efficiencies by filling the information gaps between the various stakeholders. New work processes, governance structures, and relationships are needed for the coevolution of healthcare markets and business models. But coevolution is slow, hindered by the scarcity of incentives for legacy delivery systems and constrained by the prevailing patient-healthcare paradigm. The greater opportunity lies in wellness for individuals, families, communities, and society at large: a consumer-community paradigm. Capturing new value from this opportunity can start with investment in health information exchange and the creation of Smart Health Communities. By shifting the focus of exchange from public servant to value-added service provider, these communities can serve as a platform for a wider array of wellness services from consumer care, traditional healthcare, and research.

  1. Keeping up appearances: Strategic information exchange by disidentified group members

    PubMed Central

    Matschke, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Information exchange is a crucial process in groups, but to date, no one has systematically examined how a group member’s relationship with a group can undermine this process. The current research examined whether disidentified group members (i.e., members who have a negative relationship with their group) strategically undermine the group outcome in information exchange. Disidentification has been found to predict negative group-directed behaviour, but at the same time disidentified members run the risk of being punished or excluded from the group when displaying destructive behaviour. In three studies we expected and found that disidentified group members subtly act against the interest of the group by withholding important private information, while at the same time they keep up appearances by sharing important information that is already known by the other group members. These findings stress the importance of taking a group member’s relationship with a group into account when considering the process of information exchange. PMID:28384322

  2. Barriers and facilitators to exchanging health information: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Eden, Karen B; Totten, Annette M; Kassakian, Steven Z; Gorman, Paul N; McDonagh, Marian S; Devine, Beth; Pappas, Miranda; Daeges, Monica; Woods, Susan; Hersh, William R

    2016-04-01

    We conducted a systematic review of studies assessing facilitators and barriers to use of health information exchange (HIE). We searched MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library databases between January 1990 and February 2015 using terms related to HIE. English-language studies that identified barriers and facilitators of actual HIE were included. Data on study design, risk of bias, setting, geographic location, characteristics of the HIE, perceived barriers and facilitators to use were extracted and confirmed. Ten cross-sectional, seven multiple-site case studies, and two before-after studies that included data from several sources (surveys, interviews, focus groups, and observations of users) evaluated perceived barriers and facilitators to HIE use. The most commonly cited barriers to HIE use were incomplete information, inefficient workflow, and reports that the exchanged information that did not meet the needs of users. The review identified several facilitators to use. Incomplete patient information was consistently mentioned in the studies conducted in the US but not mentioned in the few studies conducted outside of the US that take a collective approach toward healthcare. Individual patients and practices in the US may exercise the right to participate (or not) in HIE which effects the completeness of patient information available to be exchanged. Workflow structure and user roles are key but understudied. We identified several facilitators in the studies that showed promise in promoting electronic health data exchange: obtaining more complete patient information; thoughtful workflow that folds in HIE; and inclusion of users early in implementation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Working parameters affecting earth-air heat exchanger (EAHE) system performance for passive cooling: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darius, D.; Misaran, M. S.; Rahman, Md. M.; Ismail, M. A.; Amaludin, A.

    2017-07-01

    The study on the effect of the working parameters such as pipe material, pipe length, pipe diameter, depth of burial of the pipe, air flow rate and different types of soils on the thermal performance of earth-air heat exchanger (EAHE) systems is very crucial to ensure that thermal comfort can be achieved. In the past decade, researchers have performed studies to develop numerical models for analysis of EAHE systems. Until recently, two-dimensional models replaced the numerical models in the 1990s and in recent times, more advanced analysis using three-dimensional models, specifically the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation in the analysis of EAHE system. This paper reviews previous models used to analyse the EAHE system and working parameters that affects the earth-air heat exchanger (EAHE) thermal performance as of February 2017. Recent findings on the parameters affecting EAHE performance are also presented and discussed. As a conclusion, with the advent of CFD methods, investigational work have geared up to modelling and simulation work as it saves time and cost. Comprehension of the EAHE working parameters and its effect on system performance is largely established. However, the study on type of soil and its characteristics on the performance of EAHEs systems are surprisingly barren. Therefore, future studies should focus on the effect of soil characteristics such as moisture content, density of soil, and type of soil on the thermal performance of EAHEs system.

  4. A Systematic Search for Solar Wind Charge Exchange Emission from the Earth's Exosphere with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishi, D.; Ishikawa, K.; Ezoe, Y.; Ohashi, T.; Miyoshi, Y.; Terada, N.

    2017-10-01

    We report on a systematic search of all the Suzaku archival data covering from 2005 August to 2015 May for geocoronal Solar Wind Charge eXchange (SWCX). In the vicinity of Earth, solar wind ions strip an electron from Earth's exospheric neutrals, emitting X-ray photons (e.g., Snowden et al. 1997). The X-ray flux of this geocoronal SWCX can change depending on solar wind condition and line of sight direction. Although it is an immediate background for all the X-ray astronomy observations, the X-ray flux prediction and the dependence on the observational conditions are not clear. Using the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer onboard Suzaku which has one of the highest sensitivities to the geocoronal SWCX, we searched the data for time variation of soft X-ray background. We then checked the solar wind proton flux taken with the WIND satellite and compared it with X-ray light curve. We also analyzed X-ray spectra and fitted them with a charge exchange emission line model constructed by Bodewits et al. (2007). Among 3055 data sets, 90 data showed SWCX features. The event rate seems to correlate with solar activity, while the distribution of SWCX events plotted in the solar magnetic coordinate system was relatively uniform.

  5. The ARAC-RODOS-WSPEEDI Information Exchange Project

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T J

    1999-09-01

    Under the auspices of a US DOE-JAPAN Memorandum of Understanding JAERI and LLNL agreed to develop and evaluate a prototype information exchange protocol for nuclear accident emergency situations. This project received some interest from the US DOS and FEMA as it fits nicely under the umbrella of the G-7's GEMINI (Global Emergency Management Information Network Initiative) project. Because of LLNL/ARAC and JAERV WSPEEDI interest in nuclear accident consequence assessment and hazard prediction on all scales, to include global, we were happy to participate. Subsequent to the Spring 1997 RODOS-ARAC Workshop a Memorandum of Agreement was developed to enhance mutual collaborationmore » on matters of emergency systems development. In the summer of 1998 the project leaders of RODOS, WSPEEDI and ARAC met at FZK and agreed to join in a triangular collaboration on the development and demonstration of an emergency information exchange protocol. JAERI and FZK are engaged in developing a formal cooperation agreement. The purpose of this project is to evaluate the prototype information protocol application for technical feasibility and mutual benefit through simulated (real) event; quick exchange of atmospheric modeling products and environmental data during emergencies, distribution of predicted results to other countries having no prediction capabilities, and utilization of the link for collaborative studies.« less

  6. Facilitating the Information Exchange Using a Modular Electronic Discharge Summary.

    PubMed

    Denecke, Kerstin; Dittli, Pascal A; Kanagarasa, Niveadha; Nüssli, Stephan

    2018-01-01

    Discharge summaries are a standard communication tool delivering important clinical information from inpatient to ambulatory care. To ensure a high quality, correctness and completeness, the generation process is time consuming. It requires also contributions of multiple persons. This is problematic since the primary care provider needs the information from the discharge summary for continuing the intended treatment. To address this challenge, we developed a concept for exchanging a modular electronic discharge summary. Through a literature review and interviews with multiple stakeholders, we analysed existing processes and derived requirements for an improved communication of the discharge summary. In this paper, we suggest a concept of a modular electronic discharge summary that is exchanged through the electronic patient dossier in CDA CH level 2 documents. Until 2020, all Swiss hospitals are obliged to connect to the electronic patient dossier. Our concept allows to access already completed modules of the discharge summary from the primary care side, before the entire report is entirely finalised. The data is automatically merged with the local patient record on the physician side and prepared for data integration into the practice information system. Our concept offers the opportunity not only to improve the information exchange between hospital and primary care, but it also provides a potential use case and demonstrates a benefit of the electronic patient dossier for primary care providers who are so far not obliged to connect to the patient dossier in Switzerland.

  7. Helium escape from the Earth's atmosphere - The charge exchange mechanism revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lie-Svendsen, O.; Rees, M. H.; Stamnes, K.

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the escape of neutral helium from the terrestrial atmosphere through exothermic charge exchange reactions between He(+) ions and the major atmospheric constituents N2, O2 and O. Elastic collisions with the neutral background particles were treated quantitatively using a recently developed kinetic theory approach. An interhemispheric plasma transport model was employed to provide a global distribution of He(+) ions as a function of altitude, latitude and local solar time and for different levels of solar ionization. Combining these ion densities with neutral densities from an MSIS model and best estimates for the reaction rate coefficients of the charge exchange reactions, we computed the global distribution of the neutral He escape flux. The escape rates show large diurnal and latitudinal variations, while the global average does not vary by more than a factor of three over a solar cycle. We find that this escape mechanism is potentially important for the overall balance of helium in the Earth's atmosphere. However, more accurate values for the reaction rate coefficients of the charge exchange reactions are required to make a definitive assessment of its importance.

  8. Leader-member exchange relationships in health information management.

    PubMed

    Hunt, T J

    2014-01-01

    This article seeks to raise awareness of the leader-member exchange (LMX) theory of leadership and its potential benefit to the health information management (HIM) profession. A literature review that was conducted identified a leadership challenge for HIM practitioners. The review also provides examples of leadership definitions, and potential benefits of LMX to HIM professionals in leading people and influencing leaders in their organizations. The LMX concept may be an avenue to investigate in preparing future and current HIM professionals for leadership.

  9. Extension of analog network coding in wireless information exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng; Huang, Jiaqing

    2012-01-01

    Ever since the concept of analog network coding(ANC) was put forward by S.Katti, much attention has been focused on how to utilize analog network coding to take advantage of wireless interference, which used to be considered generally harmful, to improve throughput performance. Previously, only the case of two nodes that need to exchange information has been fully discussed while the issue of extending analog network coding to more than three nodes remains undeveloped. In this paper, we propose a practical transmission scheme to extend analog network coding to more than two nodes that need to exchange information among themselves. We start with the case of three nodes that need to exchange information and demonstrate that through utilizing our algorithm, the throughput can achieve 33% and 20% increase compared with that of traditional transmission scheduling and digital network coding, respectively. Then, we generalize the algorithm so that it can fit for occasions with any number of nodes. We also discuss some technical issues and throughput analysis as well as the bit error rate.

  10. Earth Science Data Analytics: Preparing for Extracting Knowledge from Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempler, Steven; Barbieri, Lindsay

    2016-01-01

    Data analytics is the process of examining large amounts of data of a variety of types to uncover hidden patterns, unknown correlations and other useful information. Data analytics is a broad term that includes data analysis, as well as an understanding of the cognitive processes an analyst uses to understand problems and explore data in meaningful ways. Analytics also include data extraction, transformation, and reduction, utilizing specific tools, techniques, and methods. Turning to data science, definitions of data science sound very similar to those of data analytics (which leads to a lot of the confusion between the two). But the skills needed for both, co-analyzing large amounts of heterogeneous data, understanding and utilizing relevant tools and techniques, and subject matter expertise, although similar, serve different purposes. Data Analytics takes on a practitioners approach to applying expertise and skills to solve issues and gain subject knowledge. Data Science, is more theoretical (research in itself) in nature, providing strategic actionable insights and new innovative methodologies. Earth Science Data Analytics (ESDA) is the process of examining, preparing, reducing, and analyzing large amounts of spatial (multi-dimensional), temporal, or spectral data using a variety of data types to uncover patterns, correlations and other information, to better understand our Earth. The large variety of datasets (temporal spatial differences, data types, formats, etc.) invite the need for data analytics skills that understand the science domain, and data preparation, reduction, and analysis techniques, from a practitioners point of view. The application of these skills to ESDA is the focus of this presentation. The Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) Federation Earth Science Data Analytics (ESDA) Cluster was created in recognition of the practical need to facilitate the co-analysis of large amounts of data and information for Earth science. Thus, from a to

  11. The Path from Large Earth Science Datasets to Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicente, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data (GES) and Information Services Center (DISC) is one of the major Science Mission Directorate (SMD) for archiving and distribution of Earth Science remote sensing data, products and services. This virtual portal provides convenient access to Atmospheric Composition and Dynamics, Hydrology, Precipitation, Ozone, and model derived datasets (generated by GSFC's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office), the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) and the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) data products (both generated by GSFC's Hydrological Sciences Branch). This presentation demonstrates various tools and computational technologies developed in the GES DISC to manage the huge volume of data and products acquired from various missions and programs over the years. It explores approaches to archive, document, distribute, access and analyze Earth Science data and information as well as addresses the technical and scientific issues, governance and user support problem faced by scientists in need of multi-disciplinary datasets. It also discusses data and product metrics, user distribution profiles and lessons learned through interactions with the science communities around the world. Finally it demonstrates some of the most used data and product visualization and analyses tools developed and maintained by the GES DISC.

  12. Factors motivating and affecting health information exchange usage

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongwei; Jaspserson, 'Jon; Gamm, Larry D; Ohsfeldt, Robert L

    2011-01-01

    Objective Health information exchange (HIE) is the process of electronically sharing patient-level information between providers. However, where implemented, reports indicate HIE system usage is low. The aim of this study was to determine the factors associated with different types of HIE usage. Design Cross-sectional analysis of clinical data from emergency room encounters included in an operational HIE effort linked to system user logs using crossed random-intercept logistic regression. Measurements Independent variables included factors indicative of information needs. System usage was measured as none, basic usage, or a novel pattern of usage. Results The system was accessed for 2.3% of all encounters (6142 out of 271 305). Novel usage patterns were more likely for more complex patients. The odds of HIE usage were lower in the face of time constraints. In contrast to expectations, system usage was lower when the patient was unfamiliar to the facility. Limitations Because of differences between HIE efforts and the fact that not all types of HIE usage (ie, public health) could be included in the analysis, results are limited in terms of generalizablity. Conclusions This study of actual HIE system usage identifies patients and circumstances in which HIE is more likely to be used and factors that are likely to discourage usage. The paper explores the implications of the findings for system redesign, information integration across exchange partners, and for meaningful usage criteria emerging from provisions of the Health Information Technology for Economic & Clinical Health Act. PMID:21262919

  13. Observation of Solar Wind Charge Exchange Emission from Exospheric Material in and Outside Earth's Magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lepri, S. T.; Robertson, I.; Tomas, L.

    2008-01-01

    A long XMM-Newton exposure is used to observe solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission from exospheric material in and outside Earth s magnetosheath. The light curve of the O VII (0.5-0.62 keV) band is compared with a model for the expected emission, and while the emission is faint and the light curve has considerable scatter, the correlation is significant to better than 99.9%. This result demonstrates the validity of the geocoronal SWCX emission model for predicting a contribution to astrophysical observations to a scale factor of order unity (1.36). The results also demonstrate the potential utility of using X-ray observations to study global phenomena of the magnetosheath which currently are only investigated using in situ measurements.

  14. New Center Links Earth, Space, and Information Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aswathanarayana, U.

    2004-05-01

    Broad-based geoscience instruction melding the Earth, space, and information technology sciences has been identified as an effective way to take advantage of the new jobs created by technological innovations in natural resources management. Based on this paradigm, the University of Hyderabad in India is developing a Centre of Earth and Space Sciences that will be linked to the university's super-computing facility. The proposed center will provide the basic science underpinnings for the Earth, space, and information technology sciences; develop new methodologies for the utilization of natural resources such as water, soils, sediments, minerals, and biota; mitigate the adverse consequences of natural hazards; and design innovative ways of incorporating scientific information into the legislative and administrative processes. For these reasons, the ethos and the innovatively designed management structure of the center would be of particular relevance to the developing countries. India holds 17% of the world's human population, and 30% of its farm animals, but only about 2% of the planet's water resources. Water will hence constitute the core concern of the center, because ecologically sustainable, socially equitable, and economically viable management of water resources of the country holds the key to the quality of life (drinking water, sanitation, and health), food security, and industrial development of the country. The center will be focused on interdisciplinary basic and pure applied research that is relevant to the practical needs of India as a developing country. These include, for example, climate prediction, since India is heavily dependent on the monsoon system, and satellite remote sensing of soil moisture, since agriculture is still a principal source of livelihood in India. The center will perform research and development in areas such as data assimilation and validation, and identification of new sensors to be mounted on the Indian meteorological

  15. Scientific Research for Integrated Solutions to Community Challenges: The Thriving Earth Exchange (TEX) Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udu-gama, N.; Pandya, R.

    2015-12-01

    There is tremendous unmet and sometimes unrealized need for Earth and space science (ESS) expertise as part of civic decisions and local planning for climate change, natural hazards and natural resources. The Thriving Earth Exchange (TEX) helps AGU contribute that expertise to humanity in respectful, integrated ways. TEX brings ESS scientists together with local communities tackling issues of climate change, natural hazards and natural resources to co-design solutions that equitably integrate both scientific and community knowledge. To achieve this ambitious goal, TEX is partnering with organizations that are respected by and knowledgeable about communities both in the United States and internationally. Such partnerships include Rockefeller's 100 Resilient Cities Initiative, ICLEI USA, MIT's Climate Colab, among others. TEX works with these partners to approach communities who are ready to or already addressing ESS related issues. With partners, we help the communities define their goals, develop specific projects, and connect with relevant and helpful ESS scientists. We will also show how we help scientists and community leaders work productively together, and the tools we bring to support their innovation. It will highlight international examples, such as in the Pamir Mountains of Afghanistan-Tajikistan, Sri Lanka, and Ethiopia, and provide concrete examples of how these initiatives are helping TEX further expand the frontiers of collaborative research.

  16. GENESIS: GPS Environmental and Earth Science Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajj, George

    1999-01-01

    This presentation reviews the GPS ENvironmental and Earth Science Information System (GENESIS). The objectives of GENESIS are outlined (1) Data Archiving, searching and distribution for science data products derived from Space borne TurboRogue Space Receivers for GPS science and other ground based GPS receivers, (2) Data browsing using integrated visualization tools, (3) Interactive web/java-based data search and retrieval, (4) Data subscription service, (5) Data migration from existing GPS archived data, (6) On-line help and documentation, and (7) participation in the WP-ESIP federation. The presentation reviews the products and services of Genesis, and the technology behind the system.

  17. Earth From Space: "Beautiful Earth's" Integration of Media Arts, Earth Science, and Native Wisdom in Informal Learning Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casasanto, V.; Hallowell, R.; Williams, K.; Rock, J.; Markus, T.

    2015-12-01

    "Beautiful Earth: Experiencing and Learning Science in an Engaging Way" was a 3-year project funded by NASA's Competitive Opportunities in Education and Public Outreach for Earth and Space Science. An outgrowth of Kenji Williams' BELLA GAIA performance, Beautiful Earth fostered a new approach to teaching by combining live music, data visualizations and Earth science with indigenous perspectives, and hands-on workshops for K-12 students at 5 science centers. Inspired by the "Overview Effect," described by many astronauts who were awestruck by seeing the Earth from space and their realization of the profound interconnectedness of Earth's life systems, Beautiful Earth leveraged the power of multimedia performance to serve as a springboard to engage K-12 students in hands-on Earth science and Native wisdom workshops. Results will be presented regarding student perceptions of Earth science, environmental issues, and indigenous ways of knowing from 3 years of evaluation data.

  18. Information Exchange of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan with Nuclear Societies Worldwide

    SciTech Connect

    Masao Hori; Yasushi Tomita

    2000-06-04

    This paper describes committees of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) related to information exchange, AESJ publications, AESJ Internet applications, and means for future information exchange between nuclear societies.

  19. Open NASA Earth Exchange (OpenNEX): A Public-Private Partnership for Climate Change Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemani, R. R.; Lee, T. J.; Michaelis, A.; Ganguly, S.; Votava, P.

    2014-12-01

    NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) is a data, computing and knowledge collaborative that houses satellite, climate and ancillary data where a community of researchers can come together to share modeling and analysis codes, scientific results, knowledge and expertise on a centralized platform with access to large supercomputing resources. As a part of broadening the community beyond NASA-funded researchers, NASA through an agreement with Amazon Inc. made available to the public a large collection of Climate and Earth Sciences satellite data. The data, available through the Open NASA Earth Exchange (OpenNEX) platform hosted by Amazon Web Services (AWS) public cloud, consists of large amounts of global land surface imaging, vegetation conditions, climate observations and climate projections. In addition to the data, users of OpenNEX platform can also watch lectures from leading experts, learn basic access and use of the available data sets. In order to advance White House initiatives such as Open Data, Big Data and Climate Data and the Climate Action Plan, NASA over the past six months conducted the OpenNEX Challenge. The two-part challenge was designed to engage the public in creating innovative ways to use NASA data and address climate change impacts on economic growth, health and livelihood. Our intention was that the challenges allow citizen scientists to realize the value of NASA data assets and offers NASA new ideas on how to share and use that data. The first "ideation" challenge, closed on July 31st attracted over 450 participants consisting of climate scientists, hobbyists, citizen scientists, IT experts and App developers. Winning ideas from the first challenge will be incorporated into the second "builder" challenge currently targeted to launch mid-August and close by mid-November. The winner(s) will be formally announced at AGU in December of 2014. We will share our experiences and lessons learned over the past year from OpenNEX, a public-private partnership for

  20. Information Exchange and Information Disclosure in Social Networking Web Sites: Mediating Role of Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mital, Monika; Israel, D.; Agarwal, Shailja

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating effect of trust on the relationship between the type of information exchange (IE) and information disclosure (ID) on social networking web sites (SNWs). Design/methodology/approach: Constructs were developed for type of IE and trust. To understand the mediating role of trust a…

  1. What should we measure? Conceptualizing usage in health information exchange

    PubMed Central

    Jasperson, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Under the provisions of the Health Information Technology for Economic & Clinical Health act providers need to demonstrate their ‘meaningful use’ of electronic health record systems' health information exchange (HIE) capability. HIE usage is not a simple construct, but the choice of its measurement must attend to the users, context, and objectives of the system being examined. This review examined how usage is reported in the existing literature and also what conceptualizations of usage might best reflect the nature and objectives of HIE. While existing literature on HIE usage included a diverse set of measures, most were theoretically weak, did not attend to the interplay of measure, level of analysis and architectural strategy, and did not reflect how HIE usage affected the actual process of care. Attention to these issues will provide greater insight into the effects of previously inaccessible information on medical decision-making and the process of care. PMID:20442148

  2. Earth science information: Planning for the integration and use of global change information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lousma, Jack R.

    1992-01-01

    The Consortium for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN) was founded in 1989 as a non-profit corporation dedicated to facilitating access to, use and understanding of global change information worldwide. The Consortium was created to cooperate and coordinate with organizations and researchers throughout the global change community to further access the most advanced technology, the latest scientific research, and the best information available for critical environmental decision making. CIESIN study efforts are guided by Congressional mandates to 'convene key present and potential users to assess the need for investment in integration of earth science information,' to 'outline the desirable pattern of interaction with the scientific and policy community,' and to 'develop recommendations and draft plans to achieve the appropriate level of effort in the use of earth science data for research and public policy purposes.' In addition, CIESIN is tasked by NASA to develop a data center that would extend the benefits of Earth Observing System (EOS) to the users of global change information related to human dimensions issues. For FY 1991, CIESIN focused on two main objectives. The first addressed the identification of information needs of global change research and non-research user groups worldwide. The second focused on an evaluation of the most efficient mechanisms for making this information available in usable forms.

  3. Consumer-mediated health information exchanges: the 2012 ACMI debate.

    PubMed

    Cimino, James J; Frisse, Mark E; Halamka, John; Sweeney, Latanya; Yasnoff, William

    2014-04-01

    The American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI) sponsors periodic debates during the American Medical Informatics Fall Symposium to highlight important informatics issues of broad interest. In 2012, a panel debated the following topic: "Resolved: Health Information Exchange Organizations Should Shift Their Principal Focus to Consumer-Mediated Exchange in Order to Facilitate the Rapid Development of Effective, Scalable, and Sustainable Health Information Infrastructure." Those supporting the proposition emphasized the need for consumer-controlled community repositories of electronic health records (health record banks) to address privacy, stakeholder cooperation, scalability, and sustainability. Those opposing the proposition emphasized that the current healthcare environment is so complex that development of consumer control will take time and that even then, consumers may not be able to mediate their information effectively. While privately each discussant recognizes that there are many sides to this complex issue, each followed the debater's tradition of taking an extreme position in order emphasize some of the polarizing aspects in the short time allotted them. In preparing this summary, we sought to convey the substance and spirit of the debate in printed form. Transcripts of the actual debate were edited for clarity, and appropriate supporting citations were added for the further edification of the reader. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Consumer-Mediated Health Information Exchanges: The 2012 ACMI Debate

    PubMed Central

    Cimino, James J.; Frisse, Mark; Halamka, John; Sweeney, Latanya; Yasnoff, William

    2017-01-01

    The American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI) sponsors periodic debates during the American Medical Informatics Fall Symposium to highlight important informatics issues of broad interest. In 2012, a panel debated the following topic: “Resolved: Health Information Exchange Organizations Should Shift Their Principal Focus to Consumer-Mediated Exchange in Order to Facilitate the Rapid Development of Effective, Scalable, and Sustainable Health Information Infrastructure.” Those supporting the proposition emphasized the need for consumer-controlled community repositories of electronic health records (health record banks) to address privacy, stakeholder cooperation, scalability, and sustainability. Those opposing the proposition emphasized that the current healthcare environment is so complex that development of consumer control will take time and that even then, consumers may not be able to mediate their information effectively. While privately, each discussant recognizes that there are many sides to this complex issue, each followed the debater’s tradition of taking an extreme position in order emphasize some of the polarizing aspects in the short time allotted them. In preparing this summary, we sought to convey the substance and spirit of the debate in printed form. Transcripts of the actual debate were edited for clarity, and appropriate supporting citations were added for the further edification of the reader. PMID:24561078

  5. The value of health care information exchange and interoperability.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jan; Pan, Eric; Johnston, Douglas; Adler-Milstein, Julia; Bates, David W; Middleton, Blackford

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we assess the value of electronic health care information exchange and interoperability (HIEI) between providers (hospitals and medical group practices) and independent laboratories, radiology centers, pharmacies, payers, public health departments, and other providers. We have created an HIEI taxonomy and combined published evidence with expert opinion in a cost-benefit model. Fully standardized HIEI could yield a net value of dollar 77.8 billion per year once fully implemented. Nonstandardized HIEI offers smaller positive financial returns. The clinical impact of HIEI for which quantitative estimates cannot yet be made would likely add further value. A compelling business case exists for national implementation of fully standardized HIEI.

  6. Leader-Member Exchange Relationships in Health Information Management

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, T.J.

    2014-01-01

    This article seeks to raise awareness of the leader-member exchange (LMX) theory of leadership and its potential benefit to the health information management (HIM) profession. A literature review that was conducted identified a leadership challenge for HIM practitioners. The review also provides examples of leadership definitions, and potential benefits of LMX to HIM professionals in leading people and influencing leaders in their organizations. The LMX concept may be an avenue to investigate in preparing future and current HIM professionals for leadership. PMID:24808805

  7. The NASA earth resources spectral information system: A data compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leeman, V.; Earing, D.; Vincent, R. K.; Ladd, S.

    1971-01-01

    The NASA Earth Resources Spectral Information System and the information contained therein are described. It contains an ordered, indexed compilation of natural targets in the optical region from 0.3 to 45.0 microns. The data compilation includes approximately 100 rock and mineral, 2600 vegetation, 1000 soil, and 60 water spectral reflectance, transmittance, and emittance curves. Most of the data have been categorized by subject, and the curves in those subject areas have been plotted on a single graph. Those categories with too few curves and miscellaneous categories have been plotted as single-curve graphs. Each graph, composite of single, is fully titled to indicate curve source and is indexed by subject to facilitate user retrieval.

  8. Differing Strategies to Meet Information-Sharing Needs: Publicly Supported Community Health Information Exchanges Versus Health Systems' Enterprise Health Information Exchanges.

    PubMed

    Vest, Joshua R; Kash, Bita A

    2016-03-01

    Community health information exchanges have the characteristics of a public good, and they support population health initiatives at the state and national levels. However, current policy equally incentivizes health systems to create their own information exchanges covering more narrowly defined populations. Noninteroperable electronic health records and vendors' expensive custom interfaces are hindering health information exchanges. Moreover, vendors are imposing the costs of interoperability on health systems and community health information exchanges. Health systems are creating networks of targeted physicians and facilities by funding connections to their own enterprise health information exchanges. These private networks may change referral patterns and foster more integration with outpatient providers. The United States has invested billions of dollars to encourage the adoption of and implement the information technologies necessary for health information exchange (HIE), enabling providers to efficiently and effectively share patient information with other providers. Health care providers now have multiple options for obtaining and sharing patient information. Community HIEs facilitate information sharing for a broad group of providers within a region. Enterprise HIEs are operated by health systems and share information among affiliated hospitals and providers. We sought to identify why hospitals and health systems choose either to participate in community HIEs or to establish enterprise HIEs. We conducted semistructured interviews with 40 policymakers, community and enterprise HIE leaders, and health care executives from 19 different organizations. Our qualitative analysis used a general inductive and comparative approach to identify factors influencing participation in, and the success of, each approach to HIE. Enterprise HIEs support health systems' strategic goals through the control of an information technology network consisting of desired trading

  9. A strategic gaming model for health information exchange markets.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Diego A; Feijoo, Felipe; Zayas-Castro, Jose L; Levin, Scott; Das, Tapas K

    2018-03-01

    Current market conditions create incentives for some providers to exercise control over patient data in ways that unreasonably limit its availability and use. Here we develop a game theoretic model for estimating the willingness of healthcare organizations to join a health information exchange (HIE) network and demonstrate its use in HIE policy design. We formulated the model as a bi-level integer program. A quasi-Newton method is proposed to obtain a strategy Nash equilibrium. We applied our modeling and solution technique to 1,093,177 encounters for exchanging information over a 7.5-year period in 9 hospitals located within a three-county region in Florida. Under a set of assumptions, we found that a proposed federal penalty of up to $2,000,000 has a higher impact on increasing HIE adoption than current federal monetary incentives. Medium-sized hospitals were more reticent to adopt HIE than large-sized hospitals. In the presence of collusion among multiple hospitals to not adopt HIE, neither federal incentives nor proposed penalties increase hospitals' willingness to adopt. Hospitals' apathy toward HIE adoption may threaten the value of inter-connectivity even with federal incentives in place. Competition among hospitals, coupled with volume-based payment systems, creates no incentives for smaller hospitals to exchange data with competitors. Medium-sized hospitals need targeted actions (e.g., outside technological assistance, group purchasing arrangements) to mitigate market incentives to not adopt HIE. Strategic game theoretic models help to clarify HIE adoption decisions under market conditions at play in an extremely complex technology environment.

  10. Uncertainty information in climate data records from Earth observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merchant, Christopher J.; Paul, Frank; Popp, Thomas; Ablain, Michael; Bontemps, Sophie; Defourny, Pierre; Hollmann, Rainer; Lavergne, Thomas; Laeng, Alexandra; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Mittaz, Jonathan; Poulsen, Caroline; Povey, Adam C.; Reuter, Max; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Sandven, Stein; Sofieva, Viktoria F.; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2017-07-01

    The question of how to derive and present uncertainty information in climate data records (CDRs) has received sustained attention within the European Space Agency Climate Change Initiative (CCI), a programme to generate CDRs addressing a range of essential climate variables (ECVs) from satellite data. Here, we review the nature, mathematics, practicalities, and communication of uncertainty information in CDRs from Earth observations. This review paper argues that CDRs derived from satellite-based Earth observation (EO) should include rigorous uncertainty information to support the application of the data in contexts such as policy, climate modelling, and numerical weather prediction reanalysis. Uncertainty, error, and quality are distinct concepts, and the case is made that CDR products should follow international metrological norms for presenting quantified uncertainty. As a baseline for good practice, total standard uncertainty should be quantified per datum in a CDR, meaning that uncertainty estimates should clearly discriminate more and less certain data. In this case, flags for data quality should not duplicate uncertainty information, but instead describe complementary information (such as the confidence in the uncertainty estimate provided or indicators of conditions violating the retrieval assumptions). The paper discusses the many sources of error in CDRs, noting that different errors may be correlated across a wide range of timescales and space scales. Error effects that contribute negligibly to the total uncertainty in a single-satellite measurement can be the dominant sources of uncertainty in a CDR on the large space scales and long timescales that are highly relevant for some climate applications. For this reason, identifying and characterizing the relevant sources of uncertainty for CDRs is particularly challenging. The characterization of uncertainty caused by a given error effect involves assessing the magnitude of the effect, the shape of the

  11. 43 CFR 2203.2 - Submission of information concerning proposed exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: GENERAL PROCEDURES Exchanges Involving Fee Federal Coal Deposits § 2203.2 Submission of information concerning proposed exchange. (a) Any person submitting a proposal for a fee exchange of Federal coal... proposed exchange. 2203.2 Section 2203.2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands...

  12. 43 CFR 2203.2 - Submission of information concerning proposed exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: GENERAL PROCEDURES Exchanges Involving Fee Federal Coal Deposits § 2203.2 Submission of information concerning proposed exchange. (a) Any person submitting a proposal for a fee exchange of Federal coal... proposed exchange. 2203.2 Section 2203.2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands...

  13. 43 CFR 2203.2 - Submission of information concerning proposed exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: GENERAL PROCEDURES Exchanges Involving Fee Federal Coal Deposits § 2203.2 Submission of information concerning proposed exchange. (a) Any person submitting a proposal for a fee exchange of Federal coal... proposed exchange. 2203.2 Section 2203.2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands...

  14. 43 CFR 2203.2 - Submission of information concerning proposed exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: GENERAL PROCEDURES Exchanges Involving Fee Federal Coal Deposits § 2203.2 Submission of information concerning proposed exchange. (a) Any person submitting a proposal for a fee exchange of Federal coal... proposed exchange. 2203.2 Section 2203.2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands...

  15. [Information exchange via internet--possibilities, limits, future].

    PubMed

    Schmiedl, S; Geishauser, M; Klöppel, M; Biemer, E

    1998-01-01

    Today, the exchange of information in the Internet is dominated by the WWW and e-mail. Discussion groups like mailing lists and newsgroups also permit communication in groups. Information retrieval becomes a crucial challenge in using the Internet. In the field of medicine, three more aspects are of special importance: privacy, legal requirements, and the necessity of transferring large amounts of data. For these problems, today's Internet doesn't provide a sufficient solution yet. Future developments will not only improve the existing services, but also lead to fundamental changes in the transfer technologies: Safer data transfer is to be ensured by new encrypting software together with the planned transfer protocol IPv6. Introducing the new transfer mode ATM will lead to better and resource saving transmission. Computer, telephone and TV networks will grow together, resulting in convergence of media.

  16. CALINX (California Information Exchange): a multi-stakeholder statewide initiative to improve healthcare information flows.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, D S; Oswald, N; McCaffrey, K; Bressler, S; Davidson, N; Vela, L

    2000-01-01

    Given the diffusion of responsibilities for gathering and reporting healthcare information in a managed care environment, California stakeholders are taking concrete steps to break the deadlock on data and information flows that has characterized the industry for some time. The California Information Exchange (CALINX) was established to facilitate the implementation of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) standards in California and to create trust for data exchange between trading partners, without which data exchange still will not occur. Strategic directions are set by the chief executives of key associations and organizations representing purchasers, plans, providers, and consumers. Multi-stakeholder workgroups have produced detailed data guidelines for the HIPAA standards along with rules for exchange of key data sets between trading partners. These rules address frequency, timeliness, and accuracy of data submission. Both the data guidelines and the rules have been tested in live demonstration projects, and the results of these projects have been reported to substantiate the business case for implementation. Further incentives are being built into contracts between purchasers and plans, and between plans and providers. CALINX is currently promoting widespread adoption of the data guidelines and rules for exchange with all members of the industry.

  17. [No exchange of information without technology : modern infrastructure in radiology].

    PubMed

    Hupperts, H; Hermann, K-G A

    2014-01-01

    Modern radiology cannot accomplish the daily numbers of examinations without supportive technology. Even though technology seems to be becoming increasingly more indispensable, business continuity should be ensured at any time and if necessary even with a limited technical infrastructure by business continuity management. An efficient information security management system forms the basis. The early radiology information systems were islands of information processing. A modern radiology department must be able to be modularly integrated into an informational network of a bigger organization. The secondary use of stored data for clinical decision-making support poses new challenges for the integrity of the data or systems because medical knowledge is displayed and provided in a context of treatment. In terms of imaging the creation and distribution radiology services work in a fully digital manner which is often different for radiology reports. Legally secure electronic diagnostic reports require a complex technical infrastructure; therefore, diagnostic findings still need to be filed as a paper document. The internal exchange and an improved dose management can be simplified by systems which continuously and automatically record the doses and thus provide the possibility of permanent analysis and reporting. Communication between patient and radiologist will gain ongoing importance. Intelligent use of technology will convey this to the radiologist and it will facilitate the understanding of the information by the patient.

  18. Agents Based e-Commerce and Securing Exchanged Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Jaljouli, Raja; Abawajy, Jemal

    Mobile agents have been implemented in e-Commerce to search and filter information of interest from electronic markets. When the information is very sensitive and critical, it is important to develop a novel security protocol that can efficiently protect the information from malicious tampering as well as unauthorized disclosure or at least detect any malicious act of intruders. In this chapter, we describe robust security techniques that ensure a sound security of information gathered throughout agent’s itinerary against various security attacks, as well as truncation attacks. A sound security protocol is described, which implements the various security techniques that would jointly prevent or at least detect any malicious act of intruders. We reason about the soundness of the protocol usingSymbolic Trace Analyzer (STA), a formal verification tool that is based on symbolic techniques. We analyze the protocol in key configurations and show that it is free of flaws. We also show that the protocol fulfils the various security requirements of exchanged information in MAS, including data-integrity, data-confidentiality, data-authenticity, origin confidentiality and data non-repudiability.

  19. Cartographic analyses of geographic information available on Google Earth Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, J. C.; Ramos, J. R.; Epiphanio, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    The propose was to evaluate planimetric accuracy of satellite images available on database of Google Earth. These images are referents to the vicinities of the Federal Univertisity of Viçosa, Minas Gerais - Brazil. The methodology developed evaluated the geographical information of three groups of images which were in accordance to the level of detail presented in the screen images (zoom). These groups of images were labeled to Zoom 1000 (a single image for the entire study area), Zoom 100 (formed by a mosaic of 73 images) and Zoom 100 with geometric correction (this mosaic is like before, however, it was applied a geometric correction through control points). In each group of image was measured the Cartographic Accuracy based on statistical analyses and brazilian's law parameters about planimetric mapping. For this evaluation were identified 22 points in each group of image, where the coordinates of each point were compared to the coordinates of the field obtained by GPS (Global Positioning System). The Table 1 show results related to accuracy (based on a threshold equal to 0.5 mm * mapping scale) and tendency (abscissa and ordinate) between the coordinates of the image and the coordinates of field. Table 1 The geometric correction applied to the Group Zoom 100 reduced the trends identified earlier, and the statistical tests pointed a usefulness of the data for a mapping at a scale of 1/5000 with error minor than 0.5 mm * scale. The analyses proved the quality of cartographic data provided by Google, as well as the possibility of reduce the divergences of positioning present on the data. It can be concluded that it is possible to obtain geographic information database available on Google Earth, however, the level of detail (zoom) used at the time of viewing and capturing information on the screen influences the quality cartographic of the mapping. Although cartographic and thematic potential present in the database, it is important to note that both the software

  20. Exploring Business Strategy in Health Information Exchange Organizations.

    PubMed

    Langabeer, James R; Champagne, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Unlike consumer goods industries, healthcare has been slow to implement technolo gies that support exchange of data in patients' health records. This results in avoid able medication errors, avoidable hospital readmissions, unnecessary duplicate testing, and other inefficient or wasteful practices. Community-based regional health information exchange (HIE) organizations have evolved in response to federal aims to encourage interoperability, yet little is known about their strategic approach. We use the lens of institutional and strategic management theories to empirically explore the differences in business strategies deployed in HIEs that are, to date, financially sustainable versus those that are not. We developed a 20-question survey targeted to CEOs to assess HIE business strategies. Our sample consisted of 60 community-based exchanges distributed throughout the United States, and we achieved a 58% response rate. Questions centered on competitive strategy and financial sustainability. We relied on logistic regression methods to explore relationships between variables. Our regression identified characteristics common to sustainable organizations. We defined sustainability as revenues exceeding operational costs. Seventeen of the 35 organizations (49%) defined themselves as currently sustainable. Focus and cost leadership strategies were significantly associated with sustainability. Growth strate gies, which were much more common than other strategies, were not associated with sustainability. We saw little evidence of a differentiation strategy (i.e., the basis of competition whereby the attributes of a product or service are unmatched by rivals). Most CEOs had a relatively optimistic outlook, with 60% stating they were confident of surviving over the next 5 years; however, nearly 9% of the organizations were in some phase of divestiture or exit from the market. HIEs are evolving differently based on local leadership decisions, yet their strategic approach is

  1. A distributed framework for health information exchange using smartphone technologies.

    PubMed

    Abdulnabi, Mohamed; Al-Haiqi, Ahmed; Kiah, M L M; Zaidan, A A; Zaidan, B B; Hussain, Muzammil

    2017-05-01

    Nationwide health information exchange (NHIE) continues to be a persistent concern for government agencies, despite the many efforts and the conceived benefits of sharing patient data among healthcare providers. Difficulties in ensuring global connectivity, interoperability, and concerns on security have always hampered the government from successfully deploying NHIE. By looking at NHIE from a fresh perspective and bearing in mind the pervasiveness and power of modern mobile platforms, this paper proposes a new approach to NHIE that builds on the notion of consumer-mediated HIE, albeit without the focus on central health record banks. With the growing acceptance of smartphones as reliable, indispensable, and most personal devices, we suggest to leverage the concept of mobile personal health records (PHRs installed on smartphones) to the next level. We envision mPHRs that take the form of distributed storage units for health information, under the full control and direct possession of patients, who can have ready access to their personal data whenever needed. However, for the actual exchange of data with health information systems managed by healthcare providers, the latter have to be interoperable with patient-carried mPHRs. Computer industry has long ago solved a similar problem of interoperability between peripheral devices and operating systems. We borrow from that solution the idea of providing special interfaces between mPHRs and provider systems. This interface enables the two entities to communicate with no change to either end. The design and operation of the proposed approach is explained. Additional pointers on potential implementations are provided, and issues that pertain to any solution to implement NHIE are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. An information theory approach to the density of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graber, M. A.

    1977-01-01

    Information theory can develop a technique which takes experimentally determined numbers and produces a uniquely specified best density model satisfying those numbers. A model was generated using five numerical parameters: the mass of the earth, its moment of inertia, three zero-node torsional normal modes (L = 2, 8, 26). In order to determine the stability of the solution, six additional densities were generated, in each of which the period of one of the three normal modes was increased or decreased by one standard deviation. The superposition of the seven models is shown. It indicates that current knowledge of the torsional modes is sufficient to specify the density in the upper mantle but that the lower mantle and core will require smaller standard deviations before they can be accurately specified.

  3. The benefits of health information exchange: an updated systematic review.

    PubMed

    Menachemi, Nir; Rahurkar, Saurabh; Harle, Christopher A; Vest, Joshua R

    2018-04-28

    Widespread health information exchange (HIE) is a national objective motivated by the promise of improved care and a reduction in costs. Previous reviews have found little rigorous evidence that HIE positively affects these anticipated benefits. However, early studies of HIE were methodologically limited. The purpose of the current study is to review the recent literature on the impact of HIE. We used the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines to conduct our systematic review. PubMed and Scopus databases were used to identify empirical articles that evaluated HIE in the context of a health care outcome. Our search strategy identified 24 articles that included 63 individual analyses. The majority of the studies were from the United States representing 9 states; and about 40% of the included analyses occurred in a handful of HIEs from the state of New York. Seven of the 24 studies used designs suitable for causal inference and all reported some beneficial effect from HIE; none reported adverse effects. The current systematic review found that studies with more rigorous designs all reported benefits from HIE. Such benefits include fewer duplicated procedures, reduced imaging, lower costs, and improved patient safety. We also found that studies evaluating community HIEs were more likely to find benefits than studies that evaluated enterprise HIEs or vendor-mediated exchanges. Overall, these finding bode well for the HIEs ability to deliver on anticipated improvements in care delivery and reduction in costs.

  4. 78 FR 76187 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Exchange Programs Alumni Web Site Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ...: Exchange Programs Alumni Web Site Registration ACTION: Notice of request for public comment and submission... Information Collection: Exchange Programs Alumni Web site Registration. OMB Control Number: 1405-0192. Type of... proposed collection: The International Exchange Alumni Web site requires information to process users...

  5. Patient Privacy, Consent, and Identity Management in Health Information Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Hosek, Susan D.; Straus, Susan G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The Military Health System (MHS) and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) have been among the nation's leaders in health information technology (IT), including the development of health IT systems and electronic health records that summarize patients' care from multiple providers. Health IT interoperability within MHS and across MHS partners, including VHA, is one of ten goals in the current MHS Strategic Plan. As a step toward achieving improved interoperability, the MHS is seeking to develop a research roadmap to better coordinate health IT research efforts, address IT capability gaps, and reduce programmatic risk for its enterprise projects. This article contributes to that effort by identifying gaps in research, policy, and practice involving patient privacy, consent, and identity management that need to be addressed to bring about improved quality and efficiency of care through health information exchange. Major challenges include (1) designing a meaningful patient consent procedure, (2) recording patients' consent preferences and designing procedures to implement restrictions on disclosures of protected health information, and (3) advancing knowledge regarding the best technical approaches to performing patient identity matches and how best to monitor results over time. Using a sociotechnical framework, this article suggests steps for overcoming these challenges and topics for future research. PMID:28083296

  6. Critical properties of unlimited gliding: Unexpected flocking behavior driven by the exchange of information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigus-Kwiatkowska, Marta; Fronczak, Agata; Fronczak, Piotr

    2018-03-01

    Inspired by albatrosses that use thermal lifts to fly across oceans we develop a simple model of gliders that serves us to study theoretical limitations of unlimited exploration of the Earth. Our studies, grounded in physical theory of continuous percolation and biased random walks, allow us to identify a variety of percolation transitions, which are understood as providing potentially unlimited movement through a space in a specified direction. We discover an unexpected phenomenon of self-organization of gliders in clusters, which resembles the flock organization of birds. This self-organization is intriguing, as it occurs thanks to exchange of information only and without any particular rules that could favor the clustering of the gliders (in contrast to the causes well known in literature, like, for example, attractive forces used in the Vicsek-type models or fitness functions used in evolutionary computation).

  7. Informal Geoscience Education partnerships via the EarthScope Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillie, R. J.; Trehu, A. M.; Goddard, C.; Braunmiller, J.

    2008-05-01

    EarthScope is a National Science Foundation (NSF)-supported program to explore the structure and evolution of the North American continent and understand the processes controlling earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. It consists of three observatories, funded through NSF's Major Research Equipment and Facilities Construction program. 1) The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) consists of GPS and other geodetic instruments to measure deformation of the active plate boundary that characterizes the western United States. 2) The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) is a hole drilled to sample and instrument an active strand of an earthquake fault. 3) USArray is a network of seismometers and other geophysical instruments to record earthquakes and image the velocity and electrical conductivity structure from the Pacific to the Atlantic oceans. This nationwide recording effort and large-scale scientific objective provides a unique opportunity to partner with the U. S. National Park Service and other state, federal and private organizations that inform the public about the natural world. In particular, the EarthScope National Office (ESNO) is developing thematic displays to link multiple parks through their common geodynamic origin. These displays are being tested and refined through a series of workshops during which park and museum personnel, K-12 teachers, and active research scientists work together to develop programs to introduce the public to the forces that shape our continent. The first of these workshops, held in April, 2008, at the Mount Rainier National Park Education Center in Washington State, focused on earthquake, volcanic, and other tectonic processes that form the dynamic landscape of the Pacific Northwest.

  8. Health information exchange policies of 11 diverse health systems and the associated impact on volume of exchange.

    PubMed

    Downing, N Lance; Adler-Milstein, Julia; Palma, Jonathan P; Lane, Steven; Eisenberg, Matthew; Sharp, Christopher; Longhurst, Christopher A

    2017-01-01

    Provider organizations increasingly have the ability to exchange patient health information electronically. Organizational health information exchange (HIE) policy decisions can impact the extent to which external information is readily available to providers, but this relationship has not been well studied. Our objective was to examine the relationship between electronic exchange of patient health information across organizations and organizational HIE policy decisions. We focused on 2 key decisions: whether to automatically search for information from other organizations and whether to require HIE-specific patient consent. We conducted a retrospective time series analysis of the effect of automatic querying and the patient consent requirement on the monthly volume of clinical summaries exchanged. We could not assess degree of use or usefulness of summaries, organizational decision-making processes, or generalizability to other vendors. Between 2013 and 2015, clinical summary exchange volume increased by 1349% across 11 organizations. Nine of the 11 systems were set up to enable auto-querying, and auto-querying was associated with a significant increase in the monthly rate of exchange (P = .006 for change in trend). Seven of the 11 organizations did not require patient consent specifically for HIE, and these organizations experienced a greater increase in volume of exchange over time compared to organizations that required consent. Automatic querying and limited consent requirements are organizational HIE policy decisions that impact the volume of exchange, and ultimately the information available to providers to support optimal care. Future efforts to ensure effective HIE may need to explicitly address these factors. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association.

  9. Using Docker Containers to Extend Reproducibility Architecture for the NASA Earth Exchange (NEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votava, P.; Michaelis, A.; Spaulding, R.; Becker, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) is a data, supercomputing and knowledge collaboratory that houses NASA satellite, climate and ancillary data where a focused community can come together to address large-scale challenges in Earth sciences. As NEX has been growing into a petabyte-size platform for analysis, experiments and data production, it has been increasingly important to enable users to easily retrace their steps, identify what datasets were produced by which process chains, and give them ability to readily reproduce their results. This can be a tedious and difficult task even for a small project, but is almost impossible on large processing pipelines. We have developed an initial reproducibility and knowledge capture solution for the NEX, however, if users want to move the code to another system, whether it is their home institution cluster, laptop or the cloud, they have to find, build and install all the required dependencies that would run their code. This can be a very tedious and tricky process and is a big impediment to moving code to data and reproducibility outside the original system. The NEX team has tried to assist users who wanted to move their code into OpenNEX on Amazon cloud by creating custom virtual machines with all the software and dependencies installed, but this, while solving some of the issues, creates a new bottleneck that requires the NEX team to be involved with any new request, updates to virtual machines and general maintenance support. In this presentation, we will describe a solution that integrates NEX and Docker to bridge the gap in code-to-data migration. The core of the solution is saemi-automatic conversion of science codes, tools and services that are already tracked and described in the NEX provenance system, to Docker - an open-source Linux container software. Docker is available on most computer platforms, easy to install and capable of seamlessly creating and/or executing any application packaged in the appropriate format. We

  10. Using Docker Containers to Extend Reproducibility Architecture for the NASA Earth Exchange (NEX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Votava, Petr; Michaelis, Andrew; Spaulding, Ryan; Becker, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) is a data, supercomputing and knowledge collaboratory that houses NASA satellite, climate and ancillary data where a focused community can come together to address large-scale challenges in Earth sciences. As NEX has been growing into a petabyte-size platform for analysis, experiments and data production, it has been increasingly important to enable users to easily retrace their steps, identify what datasets were produced by which process chains, and give them ability to readily reproduce their results. This can be a tedious and difficult task even for a small project, but is almost impossible on large processing pipelines. We have developed an initial reproducibility and knowledge capture solution for the NEX, however, if users want to move the code to another system, whether it is their home institution cluster, laptop or the cloud, they have to find, build and install all the required dependencies that would run their code. This can be a very tedious and tricky process and is a big impediment to moving code to data and reproducibility outside the original system. The NEX team has tried to assist users who wanted to move their code into OpenNEX on Amazon cloud by creating custom virtual machines with all the software and dependencies installed, but this, while solving some of the issues, creates a new bottleneck that requires the NEX team to be involved with any new request, updates to virtual machines and general maintenance support. In this presentation, we will describe a solution that integrates NEX and Docker to bridge the gap in code-to-data migration. The core of the solution is saemi-automatic conversion of science codes, tools and services that are already tracked and described in the NEX provenance system, to Docker - an open-source Linux container software. Docker is available on most computer platforms, easy to install and capable of seamlessly creating and/or executing any application packaged in the appropriate format. We

  11. Success in health information exchange projects: solving the implementation puzzle.

    PubMed

    Sicotte, Claude; Paré, Guy

    2010-04-01

    Interest in health information exchange (HIE), defined as the use of information technology to support the electronic transfer of clinical information across health care organizations, continues to grow among those pursuing greater patient safety and health care accessibility and efficiency. In this paper, we present the results of a longitudinal multiple-case study of two large-scale HIE implementation projects carried out in real time over 3-year and 2-year periods in Québec, Canada. Data were primarily collected through semi-structured interviews (n=52) with key informants, namely implementation team members and targeted users. These were supplemented with non-participants observation of team meetings and by the analysis of organizational documents. The cross-case comparison was particularly relevant given that project circumstances led to contrasting outcomes: while one project failed, the other was a success. A risk management analysis was performed taking a process view in order to capture the complexity of project implementations as evolving phenomena that are affected by interdependent pre-existing and emergent risks that tend to change over time. The longitudinal case analysis clearly demonstrates that the risk factors were closely intertwined. Systematic ripple effects from one risk factor to another were observed. This risk interdependence evolved dynamically over time, with a snowball effect that rendered a change of path progressively more difficult as time passed. The results of the cross-case analysis demonstrate a direct relationship between the quality of an implementation strategy and project outcomes. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. e-Government for Development Information Exchange (DIE): Zambia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Bwalya Kelvin

    In most parts of the world, political systems which utilize authoritative rule and mostly employ top-down decision-making processes are slowly transcending towards democratic norms. Information Technology Systems have been identified and adopted as one of the most efficient vehicles for appropriate, transparent and inclusive / participatory decision making. Zambia has shown a higher propensity to indigenous knowledge systems which are full of inefficiencies, a lot of red tape in public service delivery, and prone to corrupt practices. Despite that being the case, it is slowly trying to implement e-government. The adoption of e-government promises a sharp paradigm shift where public institutions will be more responsive and transparent, promote efficient PPP (Public Private Partnerships), and empower citizens by making knowledge and other resources more directly accessible. This paper examines three cases from Zambia where ICT in support of e-government has been implemented for Development Information Exchange (DIE) - knowledge-based decision making. The paper also assesses the challenges, opportunities, and issues together with e-government adoption criteria regarding successful encapsulation of e-government into the Zambian contextual environment. I propose a conceptual model which offers balanced e-government adoption criteria involving a combination of electronic and participatory services. This conceptual e-government adoption model can later be replicated to be used at the Southern African Development Community (SADC) level given the similarity in the contextual environment.

  13. Uncertainty Assessment of the NASA Earth Exchange Global Daily Downscaled Climate Projections (NEX-GDDP) Dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Weile; Nemani, Ramakrishna R.; Michaelis, Andrew; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Dungan, Jennifer L.; Thrasher, Bridget L.; Dixon, Keith W.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Earth Exchange Global Daily Downscaled Projections (NEX-GDDP) dataset is comprised of downscaled climate projections that are derived from 21 General Circulation Model (GCM) runs conducted under the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) and across two of the four greenhouse gas emissions scenarios (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5). Each of the climate projections includes daily maximum temperature, minimum temperature, and precipitation for the periods from 1950 through 2100 and the spatial resolution is 0.25 degrees (approximately 25 km x 25 km). The GDDP dataset has received warm welcome from the science community in conducting studies of climate change impacts at local to regional scales, but a comprehensive evaluation of its uncertainties is still missing. In this study, we apply the Perfect Model Experiment framework (Dixon et al. 2016) to quantify the key sources of uncertainties from the observational baseline dataset, the downscaling algorithm, and some intrinsic assumptions (e.g., the stationary assumption) inherent to the statistical downscaling techniques. We developed a set of metrics to evaluate downscaling errors resulted from bias-correction ("quantile-mapping"), spatial disaggregation, as well as the temporal-spatial non-stationarity of climate variability. Our results highlight the spatial disaggregation (or interpolation) errors, which dominate the overall uncertainties of the GDDP dataset, especially over heterogeneous and complex terrains (e.g., mountains and coastal area). In comparison, the temporal errors in the GDDP dataset tend to be more constrained. Our results also indicate that the downscaled daily precipitation also has relatively larger uncertainties than the temperature fields, reflecting the rather stochastic nature of precipitation in space. Therefore, our results provide insights in improving statistical downscaling algorithms and products in the future.

  14. Improving performance in the ED through laboratory information exchange systems.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Louis; Paré, Guy; Maillet, Éric; Ortiz de Guinea, Ana; Trudel, Marie-Claude; Marsan, Josianne

    2018-03-12

    The accessibility of laboratory test results is crucial to the performance of emergency departments and to the safety of patients. This study aims to develop a better understanding of which laboratory information exchange (LIE) systems emergency care physicians (ECPs) are using to consult their patients' laboratory test results and which benefits they derive from such use. A survey of 163 (36%) ECPs in Quebec was conducted in collaboration with the Quebec's Department of Health and Social Services. Descriptive statistics, chi-square tests, cluster analyses, and ANOVAs were conducted. The great majority of respondents indicated that they use several LIE systems including interoperable electronic health record (iEHR) systems, laboratory results viewers (LRVs), and emergency department information systems (EDIS) to consult their patients' laboratory results. Three distinct profiles of LIE users were observed. The extent of LIE usage was found to be primarily determined by the functional design differences between LIE systems available in the EDs. Our findings also indicate that the more widespread LIE usage, the higher the perceived benefits. More specifically, physicians who make extensive use of iEHR systems and LRVs obtain the widest range of benefits in terms of efficiency, quality, and safety of emergency care. Extensive use of LIE systems allows ECPs to better determine and monitor the health status of their patients, verify their diagnostic assumptions, and apply evidence-based practices in laboratory medicine. But for such benefits to be possible, ECPs must be provided with LIE systems that produce accurate, up-to-date, complete, and easy-to-interpret information.

  15. NASA Earth Observations Informing Energy Management Decision Making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckman, Richard; Stackhouse, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The Energy Sector is experiencing increasing impacts from severe weather and shifting climatic trends, as well as facing a changing political climate, adding uncertainty for stakeholders as they make short- and long-term planning investments. Climate changes such as prolonged extreme heat and drought (leading to wildfire spread, for example), sea level rise, and extreme storms are changing the ways that utilities operate. Energy infrastructure located in coastal or flood-prone areas faces inundation risks, such as damage to energy facilities. The use of renewable energy resources is increasing, requiring more information about their intermittency and spatial patterns. In light of these challenges, public and private stakeholders have collaborated to identify potential data sources, tools, and programmatic ideas. For example, utilities across the country are using cutting-edge technology and data to plan for and adapt to these changes. In the Federal Government, NASA has invested in preliminary work to identify needs and opportunities for satellite data in energy sector application, and the Department of Energy has similarly brought together stakeholders to understand the landscape of climate vulnerability and resilience for utilities and others. However, have these efforts improved community-scale resilience and adaptation efforts? Further, some communities are more vulnerable to climate change and infrastructure impacts than others. This session has two goals. First, panelists seek to share existing and ongoing efforts related to energy management. Second, the session seeks to engage with attendees via group knowledge exchange to connect national energy management efforts to local practice for increased community resilience.

  16. Thiophenic compounds adsorption on Na(I)Y and rare earth exchanged Y zeolites: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xionghou; Geng, Wei; Zhang, Haitao; Zhao, Xuefei; Yao, Xiaojun

    2013-11-01

    We have theoretically investigated the adsorption of thiophene, benzothiophene, dibenzothiophene on Na(I)Y and rare earth exchanged La(III)Y, Ce(III)Y, Pr(III)Y Nd(III)Y zeolites by density functional theory calculations. The calculated results show that except benzothiophene adsorbed on Na(I)Y with a stand configuration, the stable adsorption structures of other thiophenic compounds on zeolites exhibit lying configurations. Adsorption energies of thiophenic compounds on the Na(I)Y are very low, and decrease with the increase of the number of benzene rings in thiophenic compounds. All rare earth exchanged zeolites exhibit strong interaction with thiophene. La(III)Y and Nd(III)Y zeolites are found to show enhanced adsorption energies to benzothiophene and Pr(III)Y zeolites are favorable for dibenzothiophene adsorption. The analysis of the electronic total charge density and electron orbital overlaps show that the thiophenic compounds interact with zeolites by π-electrons of thiophene ring and exchanged metal atom. Mulliken charge populations analysis reveals that adsorption energies are strongly dependent on the charge transfer of thiophenic molecule and exchanged metal atom.

  17. Earth science information: Planning for the integration and use of global change information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lousma, Jack R.

    1992-01-01

    Activities and accomplishments of the first six months of the Consortium for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN's) 1992 technical program have focused on four main missions: (1) the development and implementation of plans for initiation of the Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center (SEDAC) as part of the EOSDIS Program; (2) the pursuit and development of a broad-based global change information cooperative by providing systems analysis and integration between natural science and social science data bases held by numerous federal agencies and other sources; (3) the fostering of scientific research into the human dimensions of global change and providing integration between natural science and social science data and information; and (4) the serving of CIESIN as a gateway for global change data and information distribution through development of the Global Change Research Information Office and other comprehensive knowledge sharing systems.

  18. Uncertainty information in climate data records from Earth observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merchant, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    How to derive and present uncertainty in climate data records (CDRs) has been debated within the European Space Agency Climate Change Initiative, in search of common principles applicable across a range of essential climate variables. Various points of consensus have been reached, including the importance of improving provision of uncertainty information and the benefit of adopting international norms of metrology for language around the distinct concepts of uncertainty and error. Providing an estimate of standard uncertainty per datum (or the means to readily calculate it) emerged as baseline good practice, and should be highly relevant to users of CDRs when the uncertainty in data is variable (the usual case). Given this baseline, the role of quality flags is clarified as being complementary to and not repetitive of uncertainty information. Data with high uncertainty are not poor quality if a valid estimate of the uncertainty is available. For CDRs and their applications, the error correlation properties across spatio-temporal scales present important challenges that are not fully solved. Error effects that are negligible in the uncertainty of a single pixel may dominate uncertainty in the large-scale and long-term. A further principle is that uncertainty estimates should themselves be validated. The concepts of estimating and propagating uncertainty are generally acknowledged in geophysical sciences, but less widely practised in Earth observation and development of CDRs. Uncertainty in a CDR depends in part (and usually significantly) on the error covariance of the radiances and auxiliary data used in the retrieval. Typically, error covariance information is not available in the fundamental CDR (FCDR) (i.e., with the level-1 radiances), since provision of adequate level-1 uncertainty information is not yet standard practice. Those deriving CDRs thus cannot propagate the radiance uncertainty to their geophysical products. The FIDUCEO project (www.fiduceo.eu) is

  19. Information Exchange Between Resilient and High-Threat Networks: Techniques for Threat Mitigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-01

    Information Exchange between Resilient and High-Threat Networks : Techniques for Threat Mitigation Tim Dean and Graham Wyatt QinetiQ...SUMMARY High resilience military networks frequently have requirements for exchange of information with networks of low assurance, including networks of...assured, two-way, information flow between high resilience networks and other networks of unknown threat. The techniques include conventional and

  20. Public attitudes toward health information exchange: perceived benefits and concerns.

    PubMed

    Dimitropoulos, Linda; Patel, Vaishali; Scheffler, Scott A; Posnack, Steve

    2011-12-01

    To characterize consumers' attitudes regarding the perceived benefits of electronic health information exchange (HIE), potential HIE privacy and security concerns, and to analyze the intersection of these concerns with perceived benefits. A cross-sectional study. A random-digit-dial telephone survey of English-speaking adults was conducted in 2010. Multivariate logistic regression models examined the association between consumer characteristics and concerns related to the security of electronic health records (EHRs) and HIE. A majority of the 1847 respondents reported they were either "very" or "somewhat" concerned about privacy of HIE (70%), security of HIE (75%), or security of EHRs (82%). Concerns were significantly higher (P <.05) among employed individuals 40 to 64 years old and minorities. Many believed that HIE would confer benefits such as improved coordination of care (89%). Overall, 75% agreed that the benefits of EHRs outweighed risks to privacy and security, and 60% would permit HIE for treatment purposes even if the physician might not be able to protect their privacy all of the time. Over half (52%) wanted to choose which providers access and share their data. Greater participation by consumers in determining how HIE takes place could engender a higher degree of trust among all demographic groups, regardless of their varying levels of privacy and security concerns. Addressing the specific privacy and security concerns of minorities, individuals 40 to 64 years old, and employed individuals will be critical to ensuring widespread consumer participation in HIE.

  1. Which veterans enroll in a VA health information exchange program?

    PubMed

    Dixon, Brian E; Ofner, Susan; Perkins, Susan M; Myers, Laura J; Rosenman, Marc B; Zillich, Alan J; French, Dustin D; Weiner, Michael; Haggstrom, David A

    2017-01-01

    To characterize patients who voluntarily enrolled in an electronic health information exchange (HIE) program designed to share data between Veterans Health Administration (VHA) and non-VHA institutions. Patients who agreed to participate in the HIE program were compared to those who did not. Patient characteristics associated with HIE enrollment were examined using a multivariable logistic regression model. Variables selected for inclusion were guided by a health care utilization model adapted to explain HIE enrollment. Data about patients' sociodemographics (age, gender), comorbidity (Charlson index score), utilization (primary and specialty care visits), and access (distance to VHA medical center, insurance, VHA benefits) were obtained from VHA and HIE electronic health records. Among 57 072 patients, 6627 (12%) enrolled in the HIE program during its first year. The likelihood of HIE enrollment increased among patients ages 50-64, of female gender, with higher comorbidity, and with increasing utilization. Living in a rural area and being unmarried were associated with decreased likelihood of enrollment. Enrollment in HIE is complex, with several factors involved in a patient's decision to enroll. To broaden HIE participation, populations less likely to enroll should be targeted with tailored recruitment and educational strategies. Moreover, inclusion of special populations, such as patients with higher comorbidity or high utilizers, may help refine the definition of success with respect to HIE implementation. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the United States.

  2. Effects of health information exchange adoption on ambulatory testing rates

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Stephen E; Radcliff, Tiffany A; LeBlanc, William G; Dickinson, L Miriam; Libby, Anne M; Nease, Donald E

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of the adoption of ambulatory electronic health information exchange (HIE) on rates of laboratory and radiology testing and allowable charges. Design Claims data from the dominant health plan in Mesa County, Colorado, from 1 April 2005 to 31 December 2010 were matched to HIE adoption data on the provider level. Using mixed effects regression models with the quarter as the unit of analysis, the effect of HIE adoption on testing rates and associated charges was assessed. Results Claims submitted by 306 providers in 69 practices for 34 818 patients were analyzed. The rate of testing per provider was expressed as tests per 1000 patients per quarter. For primary care providers, the rate of laboratory testing increased over the time span (baseline 1041 tests/1000 patients/quarter, increasing by 13.9 each quarter) and shifted downward with HIE adoption (downward shift of 83, p<0.01). A similar effect was found for specialist providers (baseline 718 tests/1000 patients/quarter, increasing by 19.1 each quarter, with HIE adoption associated with a downward shift of 119, p<0.01). Even so, imputed charges for laboratory tests did not shift downward significantly in either provider group, possibly due to the skewed nature of these data. For radiology testing, HIE adoption was not associated with significant changes in rates or imputed charges in either provider group. Conclusions Ambulatory HIE adoption is unlikely to produce significant direct savings through reductions in rates of testing. The economic benefits of HIE may reside instead in other downstream outcomes of better informed, higher quality care. PMID:23698257

  3. Semantic Web Data Discovery of Earth Science Data at NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegde, Mahabaleshwara; Strub, Richard F.; Lynnes, Christopher S.; Fang, Hongliang; Teng, William

    2008-01-01

    Mirador is a web interface for searching Earth Science data archived at the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC). Mirador provides keyword-based search and guided navigation for providing efficient search and access to Earth Science data. Mirador employs the power of Google's universal search technology for fast metadata keyword searches, augmented by additional capabilities such as event searches (e.g., hurricanes), searches based on location gazetteer, and data services like format converters and data sub-setters. The objective of guided data navigation is to present users with multiple guided navigation in Mirador is an ontology based on the Global Change Master directory (GCMD) Directory Interchange Format (DIF). Current implementation includes the project ontology covering various instruments and model data. Additional capabilities in the pipeline include Earth Science parameter and applications ontologies.

  4. Google Earth and Geo Applications: A Toolset for Viewing Earth's Geospatial Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuxen-Bettman, K.

    2016-12-01

    Earth scientists measure and derive fundamental data that can be of broad general interest to the public and policy makers. Yet, one of the challenges that has always faced the Earth science community is how to present their data and findings in an easy-to-use and compelling manner. Google's Geo Tools offer an efficient and dynamic way for scientists, educators, journalists and others to both access data and view or tell stories in a dynamic three-dimensional geospatial context. Google Earth in particular provides a dense canvas of satellite imagery on which can be viewed rich vector and raster datasets using the medium of Keyhole Markup Language (KML). Through KML, Google Earth can combine the analytical capabilities of Earth Engine, collaborative mapping of My Maps, and storytelling of Tour Builder and more to make Google's Geo Applications a coherent suite of tools for exploring our planet.https://earth.google.com/https://earthengine.google.com/https://mymaps.google.com/https://tourbuilder.withgoogle.com/https://www.google.com/streetview/

  5. Data and Information in the International Year of Planet Earth (2007-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mulder, E.; Jackson, I.

    2007-05-01

    After its inception in 2001, the International Year of Planet Earth was proclaimed for 2008 by the UN General Assembly in December 2005. The UN Year is in the core of a triennium that started in January 2007 and will be closing by the end of 2009. Through UN proclamation, it has gained the political support by 191 UN nations. The International Year of Planet Earth (IYPE) was initiated by the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) and UNESCO and was actively supported by all Earth science Unions in ICSU and by almost all major Earth Scientific bodies in the world. In this presentation special emphasis will be given to the OneGeology/Transparent Earth project, whose goal is to deliver interoperable digital geological map data for the world at a target scale of 1:1 M. The OneGeology project is an initiative being undertaken by more than 50 Geological Surveys (the numbers continue to grow weekly) and is being backed by six global geoscience bodies (ICOGS, IUGS, IYPE, CGMW, UNESCO and ISCGM). The project will be inclusive and is ensuring all countries may participate - thus depending on their capability and capacity nations will provide access to the geological map data they hold in different ways. For some coverage will at first be raster images; others with more developed systems will dynamically 'serve' geological map data for their territories as a WMS, WFS. For the more sophisticated attributed vector data the project will work in tandem with the IUGS Commission for the Management and Application of Geoscience Information (CGI) and use the global geoscience data model and exchange language (GeoSciML) which a CGI Working Group has been developing. The partnership is a powerful one: in effect the OneGeology Project is providing the wheels and GeoSciML the engine for the roll-out and take-up of a global geoscience standard through the vehicle of a geological map - something all geologists understand. But the OneGeology project has other goals too - by

  6. Evaluation Of Ion Exchange For Fabrication Of Rare-Earth Doped Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Brian P.; Beerling, Timothy

    1987-01-01

    Rare earth ions are frequently incorporated into lasers by doping common glasses with the ions in the glass melt. This paper describes the potential of using diffusion of the rare earth ion from molten salt baths to incorporate it in the glass. The paper discusses the molten salts, the rare earths as a group, the diffusion phenomena, the glasses, and finally the interaction of all these to produce the process. General predictions of the waveguide profile and potential problems are presented.

  7. Contribution of thermal infrared images on the understanding of the subsurface/atmosphere exchanges on Earth.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Teodolina; Antoine, Raphaël; Baratoux, David; Rabinowicz, Michel

    2017-04-01

    High temporal resolution of space-based thermal infrared images (METEOSAT, MODIS) and the development of field thermal cameras have permitted the development of thermal remote sensing in Earth Sciences. Thermal images are influenced by many factors such as atmosphere, solar radiation, topography and physico-chemical properties of the surface. However, considering these limitations, we have discovered that thermal images can be used in order to better understand subsurface hydrology. In order to reduce as much as possible the impact of these perturbing factors, our approach combine 1) field observations and 2) numerical modelling of surface/subsurface thermal processes. Thermal images of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano (Réunion Island), acquired by hand, show that the Formica Leo inactive scoria cone and some fractures close to the Bory-Dolomieu caldera are always warmer, inducing a thermal difference with the surrounding of at least 5°C and a Self-Potential anomaly [1, 2]. Topography cannot explain this thermal behaviour, but Piton de la Fournaise is known as highly permeable. This fact allows the development of an air convection within the whole permeable structure volcanic edifice [2]. Cold air enters the base of the volcano, and exits warmer upslope, as the air is warmed by the geothermal flow [1,2]. Then, we have decided to understand the interaction between subsurface hydrogeological flows and the humidity in the atmosphere. In the Lake Chad basin, regions on both sides of Lake Chad present a different thermal behaviour during the diurnal cycle and between seasons [3]. We propose that this thermal behaviour can only be explained by lateral variations of the surface permeability that directly impact the process of evaporation/condensation cycle. These studies bring new highlights on the understanding of the exchanges between subsurface and the atmosphere, as the presence of a very permeable media and/or variations of the surface permeability may enhance or

  8. Theoretical studies of the nitrogen containing compounds adsorption behavior on Na(I)Y and rare earth exchanged RE(III)Y zeolites.

    PubMed

    Geng, Wei; Zhang, Haitao; Zhao, Xuefei; Zan, Wenyan; Gao, Xionghou; Yao, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the adsorption behavior of nitrogen containing compounds including NH3, pyridine, quinoline, and carbazole on Na(I)Y and rare earth exchanged La(III)Y, Pr(III)Y, Nd(III)Y zeolites was investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The calculation results demonstrate that rare earth exchanged zeolites have stronger adsorption ability for nitrogen containing compounds than Na(I)Y. Rare earth exchanged zeolites exhibit strongest interaction with quinoline while weakest with carbazole. Nd(III)Y zeolites are found to have strongest adsorption to all the studied nitrogen containing compounds. The analysis of the electronic total charge density and electron orbital overlaps show that nitrogen containing compounds interact with zeolites by π-electrons of the compounds and the exchanged metal atom. Mulliken charge population analysis also proves that adsorption energies are strongly dependent on the charge transfer between the nitrogen containing molecules and exchanged metal atom in the zeolites.

  9. NJDOT research peer exchange, October 2001 : information package.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2001-10-01

    Summary of the Peer Exchange Take Home Ideas: : Be proactive in regularly meeting with key stakeholder managers to identify their : strategic needs in moving their program responsibilities forward. : Incorporate discussion of strategic ...

  10. Greater Patient Health Information Control to Improve the Sustainability of Health Information Exchanges.

    PubMed

    Abdelhamid, Mohamed

    2018-06-09

    Health information exchanges (HIEs) are multisided platforms that facilitate the sharing of patient health information (PHI) between providers and payers across organizations within a region, community or hospital system. The benefits of HIEs to payers and providers include lower cost, faster services, and better health outcome. However, most HIEs have configured the patient healthcare consent process to give all providers who sign up with the exchange access to PHI for all consenting patients, leaving no control to patients in customized what information to share and with who. This research investigates the impact of granting greater control to patients in sharing their personal health information on consent rates and making them active participants in the HIEs system. This research utilizes a randomized experimental survey design study. The study uses responses from 388 participants and structural equation modeling (SEM) to test the conceptual model. The main findings of this research include that patients consent rate increases significantly when greater control in sharing PHI is offered to the patient. In addition, greater control reduces the negative impact of privacy concern on the intention to consent. Similarly, trust in healthcare professionals leads to higher consent when greater control is offered to the patient. Thus, greater control empowers the role of trust in engaging patients and sustaining HIEs. The paper makes a theoretical contribution to research by extending the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) model. The findings impact practice by providing insights that will help sustain HIEs. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Information retrieval pathways for health information exchange in multiple care settings.

    PubMed

    Kierkegaard, Patrick; Kaushal, Rainu; Vest, Joshua R

    2014-11-01

    To determine which health information exchange (HIE) technologies and information retrieval pathways healthcare professionals relied on to meet their information needs in the context of laboratory test results, radiological images and reports, and medication histories. Primary data was collected over a 2-month period across 3 emergency departments, 7 primary care practices, and 2 public health clinics in New York state. Qualitative research methods were used to collect and analyze data from semi-structured interviews and participant observation. The study reveals that healthcare professionals used a complex combination of information retrieval pathways for HIE to obtain clinical information from external organizations. The choice for each approach was setting- and information-specific, but was also highly dynamic across users and their information needs. Our findings about the complex nature of information sharing in healthcare provide insights for informatics professionals about the usage of information; indicate the need for managerial support within each organization; and suggest approaches to improve systems for organizations and agencies working to expand HIE adoption.

  12. The function of the earth observing system - Data information system Distributed Active Archive Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapenta, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    The functionality of the Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) which are significant elements of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is discussed. Each DAAC encompasses the information management system, the data archival and distribution system, and the product generation system. The EOSDIS DAACs are expected to improve the access to earth science data set needed for global change research.

  13. 40 CFR 22.19 - Prehearing information exchange; prehearing conference; other discovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... method of discovery sought, provide the proposed discovery instruments, and describe in detail the nature... finding that: (i) The information sought cannot reasonably be obtained by alternative methods of discovery... promptly supplement or correct the exchange when the party learns that the information exchanged or...

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF A SYSTEM FOR AN EDUCATIONAL PRODUCTS INFORMATION EXCHANGE. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KOMOSKI, P. KENNETH

    THIS STUDY WAS UNDERTAKEN TO DESIGN AN EASILY ACCESSIBLE NATIONWIDE SYSTEM FOR EXCHANGING DESCRIPTIVE, EVALUATIVE PRODUCT INFORMATION AMONG ALL SECTORS OF THE EDUCATIONAL COMMUNITY ON A COOPERATIVE COST-SHARING BASIS. THE FEASIBILITY OF SUCH A COLLECTION AND EXCHANGE OF DESCRIPTIVE AND EVALUATIVE INFORMATION ABOUT INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS SYSTEMS…

  15. 75 FR 66413 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Exchange Programs Alumni Web Site Registration...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-28

    ...: Exchange Programs Alumni Web Site Registration, DS-7006 ACTION: Notice of request for public comment and... Collection The Exchange Programs Alumni Web site requires information to process users' voluntary requests for participation in the Web site. Other than contact information, which is required for website...

  16. Tweeting the Friendly Skies: Investigating Information Exchange among Twitter Users about Airlines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sreenivasan, Nirupama Dharmavaram; Lee, Chei Sian; Goh, Dion Hoe-Lian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate airline users' microblog postings pertaining to their travel-related information exchange so as to assess their wants, preferences and feedback about airline products and services. Examining such real-time information exchange is important as users rely on this for various purposes such as…

  17. A Study of Interlibrary Loan Transactions in the Texas Information Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Information Exchange, Austin.

    A questionnaire was designed and circulated to all member libraries of the Texas Information Exchange to gather data associated with the costs and volume of interlibrary loan activity from September 1, 1975 to February 28, 1976. Forty of the forty-five members of the Exchange participated in the study. In the area of costs, information was…

  18. U.S.-U.S.S.R. Rail Inspection Information Exchange

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1977-06-01

    This trip report describes the results and conclusions of the U.S. delegation resulting from the U.S.-U.S.S.R. Rail Inspection Information exchange tour of the Soviet Union, August 24 through September 1, 1975. This information exchange was conducted...

  19. Models of information exchange between radio interfaces of Wi-Fi group of standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinskaya, O. S.

    2018-05-01

    This paper offers models of information exchange between radio interfaces of the Wi-Fi group of standards by the example of a real facility management system for the oil and gas industry. Interaction between the MU-MIMO and MIMO technologies is analyzed. An optimal variant of information exchange is proposed.

  20. From the Office of the National Coordinator: the strategy for advancing the exchange of health information.

    PubMed

    Williams, Claudia; Mostashari, Farzad; Mertz, Kory; Hogin, Emily; Atwal, Parmeeth

    2012-03-01

    Electronic health information exchange addresses a critical need in the US health care system to have information follow patients to support patient care. Today little information is shared electronically, leaving doctors without the information they need to provide the best care. With payment reforms providing a strong business driver, the demand for health information exchange is poised to grow. The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, Department of Health and Human Services, has led the process of establishing the essential building blocks that will support health information exchange. Over the coming year, this office will develop additional policies and standards that will make information exchange easier and cheaper and facilitate its use on a broader scale.

  1. Willingness to Exchange Health Information via Mobile Devices: Findings From a Population-Based Survey

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Katrina J.; Yu, Mandi; Riley, William T.; Patel, Vaishali; Hughes, Penelope; Marchesini, Kathryn; Atienza, Audie A.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The rapid proliferation of mobile devices offers unprecedented opportunities for patients and health care professionals to exchange health information electronically, but little is known about patients’ willingness to exchange various types of health information using these devices. We examined willingness to exchange different types of health information via mobile devices, and assessed whether sociodemographic characteristics and trust in clinicians were associated with willingness in a nationally representative sample. METHODS We analyzed data for 3,165 patients captured in the 2013 Health Information National Trends Survey. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was conducted to test differences in willingness. Ordinal logistic regression analysis assessed correlates of willingness to exchange 9 types of information separately. RESULTS Participants were very willing to exchange appointment reminders (odds ratio [OR] = 6.66; 95% CI, 5.68–7.81), general health tips (OR = 2.03; 95% CI, 1.74–2.38), medication reminders (OR = 2.73; 95% CI, 2.35–3.19), laboratory/test results (OR = 1.76; 95% CI, 1.62–1.92), vital signs (OR = 1.63; 95% CI, 1.48–1.80), lifestyle behaviors (OR = 1.40; 95% CI, 1.24–1.58), and symptoms (OR = 1.62; 95% CI, 1.46–1.79) as compared with diagnostic information. Older adults had lower odds of being more willing to exchange any type of information. Education, income, and trust in health care professional information correlated with willingness to exchange certain types of information. CONCLUSIONS Respondents were less willing to exchange via mobile devices information that may be considered sensitive or complex. Age, socioeconomic factors, and trust in professional information were associated with willingness to engage in mobile health information exchange. Both information type and demographic group should be considered when developing and tailoring mobile technologies for patient-clinician communication. PMID:26755781

  2. Willingness to Exchange Health Information via Mobile Devices: Findings From a Population-Based Survey.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Katrina J; Yu, Mandi; Riley, William T; Patel, Vaishali; Hughes, Penelope; Marchesini, Kathryn; Atienza, Audie A

    2016-01-01

    The rapid proliferation of mobile devices offers unprecedented opportunities for patients and health care professionals to exchange health information electronically, but little is known about patients' willingness to exchange various types of health information using these devices. We examined willingness to exchange different types of health information via mobile devices, and assessed whether sociodemographic characteristics and trust in clinicians were associated with willingness in a nationally representative sample. We analyzed data for 3,165 patients captured in the 2013 Health Information National Trends Survey. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was conducted to test differences in willingness. Ordinal logistic regression analysis assessed correlates of willingness to exchange 9 types of information separately. Participants were very willing to exchange appointment reminders (odds ratio [OR] = 6.66; 95% CI, 5.68-7.81), general health tips (OR = 2.03; 95% CI, 1.74-2.38), medication reminders (OR = 2.73; 95% CI, 2.35-3.19), laboratory/test results (OR = 1.76; 95% CI, 1.62-1.92), vital signs (OR = 1.63; 95% CI, 1.48-1.80), lifestyle behaviors (OR = 1.40; 95% CI, 1.24-1.58), and symptoms (OR = 1.62; 95% CI, 1.46-1.79) as compared with diagnostic information. Older adults had lower odds of being more willing to exchange any type of information. Education, income, and trust in health care professional information correlated with willingness to exchange certain types of information. Respondents were less willing to exchange via mobile devices information that may be considered sensitive or complex. Age, socioeconomic factors, and trust in professional information were associated with willingness to engage in mobile health information exchange. Both information type and demographic group should be considered when developing and tailoring mobile technologies for patient-clinician communication. © 2016 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  3. NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behnke, Jeanne

    2017-01-01

    EOSDIS is a data system created by NASA to manage its collection of Earth Science data. This presentation is a brief description of the data system provided to the general user community. The presentation reviews the data types, management and software development techniques in use to organize the system.

  4. BioEarth: Envisioning and developing a new regional earth system model to inform natural and agricultural resource management

    DOE PAGES

    Adam, Jennifer C.; Stephens, Jennie C.; Chung, Serena H.; ...

    2014-04-24

    Uncertainties in global change impacts, the complexities associated with the interconnected cycling of nitrogen, carbon, and water present daunting management challenges. Existing models provide detailed information on specific sub-systems (e.g., land, air, water, and economics). An increasing awareness of the unintended consequences of management decisions resulting from interconnectedness of these sub-systems, however, necessitates coupled regional earth system models (EaSMs). Decision makers’ needs and priorities can be integrated into the model design and development processes to enhance decision-making relevance and “usability” of EaSMs. BioEarth is a research initiative currently under development with a focus on the U.S. Pacific Northwest region thatmore » explores the coupling of multiple stand-alone EaSMs to generate usable information for resource decision-making. Direct engagement between model developers and non-academic stakeholders involved in resource and environmental management decisions throughout the model development process is a critical component of this effort. BioEarth utilizes a bottom-up approach for its land surface model that preserves fine spatial-scale sensitivities and lateral hydrologic connectivity, which makes it unique among many regional EaSMs. Here, we describe the BioEarth initiative and highlights opportunities and challenges associated with coupling multiple stand-alone models to generate usable information for agricultural and natural resource decision-making.« less

  5. 78 FR 39644 - Information Reporting for Affordable Insurance Exchanges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... Exchange-- (i) The name, address, and taxpayer identification number (TIN), or date of birth if a TIN is... advance credit payments (taxpayer), and the name and TIN of the individual's spouse, if applicable; (ii) The name, address, and TIN, or date of birth if a TIN is not available, of an adult enrolling in...

  6. Differing Strategies to Meet Information‐Sharing Needs: Publicly Supported Community Health Information Exchanges Versus Health Systems’ Enterprise Health Information Exchanges

    PubMed Central

    KASH, BITA A.

    2016-01-01

    Policy Points: Community health information exchanges have the characteristics of a public good, and they support population health initiatives at the state and national levels. However, current policy equally incentivizes health systems to create their own information exchanges covering more narrowly defined populations.Noninteroperable electronic health records and vendors’ expensive custom interfaces are hindering health information exchanges. Moreover, vendors are imposing the costs of interoperability on health systems and community health information exchanges.Health systems are creating networks of targeted physicians and facilities by funding connections to their own enterprise health information exchanges. These private networks may change referral patterns and foster more integration with outpatient providers. Context The United States has invested billions of dollars to encourage the adoption of and implement the information technologies necessary for health information exchange (HIE), enabling providers to efficiently and effectively share patient information with other providers. Health care providers now have multiple options for obtaining and sharing patient information. Community HIEs facilitate information sharing for a broad group of providers within a region. Enterprise HIEs are operated by health systems and share information among affiliated hospitals and providers. We sought to identify why hospitals and health systems choose either to participate in community HIEs or to establish enterprise HIEs. Methods We conducted semistructured interviews with 40 policymakers, community and enterprise HIE leaders, and health care executives from 19 different organizations. Our qualitative analysis used a general inductive and comparative approach to identify factors influencing participation in, and the success of, each approach to HIE. Findings Enterprise HIEs support health systems' strategic goals through the control of an information technology

  7. Scalable and Resilient Middleware to Handle Information Exchange during Environment Crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, R.; Poslad, S.; Moßgraber, J.; Middleton, S.; Hammitzsch, M.

    2012-04-01

    The EU FP7 TRIDEC project focuses on enabling real-time, intelligent, information management of collaborative, complex, critical decision processes for earth management. A key challenge is to promote a communication infrastructure to facilitate interoperable environment information services during environment events and crises such as tsunamis and drilling, during which increasing volumes and dimensionality of disparate information sources, including sensor-based and human-based ones, can result, and need to be managed. Such a system needs to support: scalable, distributed messaging; asynchronous messaging; open messaging to handling changing clients such as new and retired automated system and human information sources becoming online or offline; flexible data filtering, and heterogeneous access networks (e.g., GSM, WLAN and LAN). In addition, the system needs to be resilient to handle the ICT system failures, e.g. failure, degradation and overloads, during environment events. There are several system middleware choices for TRIDEC based upon a Service-oriented-architecture (SOA), Event-driven-Architecture (EDA), Cloud Computing, and Enterprise Service Bus (ESB). In an SOA, everything is a service (e.g. data access, processing and exchange); clients can request on demand or subscribe to services registered by providers; more often interaction is synchronous. In an EDA system, events that represent significant changes in state can be processed simply, or as streams or more complexly. Cloud computing is a virtualization, interoperable and elastic resource allocation model. An ESB, a fundamental component for enterprise messaging, supports synchronous and asynchronous message exchange models and has inbuilt resilience against ICT failure. Our middleware proposal is an ESB based hybrid architecture model: an SOA extension supports more synchronous workflows; EDA assists the ESB to handle more complex event processing; Cloud computing can be used to increase and

  8. 49 CFR 388.4 - Exchange of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... information to State. Information that comes to the attention of an employee of the Federal Motor Carrier... Motor Carrier Safety Administration. Information that comes to the attention of a duly authorized agent...

  9. NASA Earth Resources Survey Symposium. Volume 1-B: Geology, Information Systems and Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A symposium was conducted on the practical applications of earth resources survey technology including utilization and results of data from programs involving LANDSAT, the Skylab earth resources experiment package, and aircraft. Topics discussed include geological structure, landform surveys, energy and extractive resources, and information systems and services.

  10. The effect of the charge exchange source on the velocity and 'temperature' distributions and their anisotropies in the earth's exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Rohrbaugh, R. P.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1981-01-01

    The velocity distribution of atomic hydrogen in the earth's exosphere is calculated as a function of altitude and direction taking into account both the classic exobase source and the higher-altitude plasmaspheric charge exchange source. Calculations are performed on the basis of a Monte Carlo technique in which random ballistic trajectories of individual atoms are traced through a three-dimensional grid of audit zones, at which relative concentrations and momentum or energy fluxes are obtained. In the case of the classical exobase source alone, the slope of the velocity distribution is constant only for the upward radial velocity component and increases dramatically with altitude for the incoming radial and transverse velocity components, resulting in a temperature decrease. The charge exchange source, which produces the satellite hydrogen component and the hot ballistic and escape components of the exosphere, is found to enhance the wings of the velocity distributions, however this effect is not sufficient to overcome the temperature decreases at altitudes above one earth radius. The resulting global model of the hydrogen exosphere may be used as a realistic basis for radiative transfer calculations.

  11. 78 FR 15800 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Exchange Student Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... Collection. Originating Office: Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA/ PE/C/PY). Form Number: SV2012-0007... automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Please note that comments... provisions of the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act, as amended, and the Exchange Visitor Program...

  12. 75 FR 25025 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Exchange Programs Alumni Web Site Registration...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-06

    ...: Exchange Programs Alumni Web Site Registration, DS-7006 ACTION: Notice of request for public comments... the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. Title of Information Collection: Exchange Programs Alumni Web... techniques or other forms of technology. Abstract of proposed collection: The State Alumni Web site requires...

  13. 78 FR 13141 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Exchange Visitor Program Participant Survey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ...: Exchange Visitor Program Participant Survey--Summer Work Travel ACTION: Notice of request for public... of Information Collection: Exchange Visitor Program Participant Survey--Summer Work Travel Program... participants in the Summer Work Travel category. Estimated Number of Respondents: 109,000. Estimated Number of...

  14. The Development of Community-Based Health Information Exchanges: A Comparative Assessment of Organizational Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champagne, Tiffany

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation research was to critically examine the development of community-based health information exchanges (HIEs) and to comparatively analyze the various models of exchanges in operation today nationally. Specifically this research sought to better understand several aspects of HIE: policy influences, organizational…

  15. 76 FR 24956 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Certificate of Eligibility for Exchange Visitor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ...: Certificate of Eligibility for Exchange Visitor (J-1) Status; Form DS-2019, OMB No. 1405-0119. ACTION: Notice... Management and Budget (OMB) for approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. Title of Information Collection: Certificate of Eligibility for Exchange Visitor (J-1) Status OMB Control Number: 1405...

  16. Creating sustainable local health information exchanges: can barriers to stakeholder participation be overcome?

    PubMed

    Grossman, Joy M; Kushner, Kathryn L; November, Elizabeth A

    2008-02-01

    Local health information exchanges (HIEs) hold the promise of collecting patient clinical data across sites of care to provide more complete and timely information for treatment, as well as supporting quality improvement and reporting, public health activities, and clinical research. Findings from a study of stakeholder perspectives on participation in four HIEs by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC) and the National Institute for Health Care Management (NIHCM) Foundation suggest, however, that barriers to achieving data exchange remain high. Concerns about loss of competitive advantage and data misuse impede provider and health plan willingness to contribute patient data. Additionally, uncertainty about who benefits from HIEs is affecting stakeholder willingness to fund the exchanges. The more mature exchanges--Cincinnati-based HealthBridge and the Indiana Health Information Exchange (IHIE)--have achieved some viability by meeting a specific business need--more efficient delivery of hospital test results to physicians. The newer exchanges--CareSpark, serving northeast Tennessee and southwest Virginia, and the Tampa Bay Regional Health Information Organization (RHIO)--have struggled to identify and finance initial services without a similar critical mass of hospital participation. While narrow data exchange efforts that improve transaction efficiency may be a pragmatic first step to overcome barriers to stakeholder participation, expanding HIEs to achieve the broad-based data exchange necessary for quality reporting and pay-for-performance (P4P) activities raises more challenges.

  17. Ensuring and Improving Information Quality for Earth Science Data and Products Role of the ESIP Information Quality Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K. (Rama); Peng, Ge; Moroni, David; Shie, Chung-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Quality of products is always of concern to users regardless of the type of products. The focus of this paper is on the quality of Earth science data products. There are four different aspects of quality scientific, product, stewardship and service. All these aspects taken together constitute Information Quality. With increasing requirement on ensuring and improving information quality, there has been considerable work related to information quality during the last several years. Given this rich background of prior work, the Information Quality Cluster (IQC), established within the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) has been active with membership from multiple organizations. Its objectives and activities, aimed at ensuring and improving information quality for Earth science data and products, are discussed briefly.

  18. Ensuring and Improving Information Quality for Earth Science Data and Products: Role of the ESIP Information Quality Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, Hampapuram; Peng, Ge; Moroni, David; Shie, Chung-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Quality of products is always of concern to users regardless of the type of products. The focus of this paper is on the quality of Earth science data products. There are four different aspects of quality - scientific, product, stewardship and service. All these aspects taken together constitute Information Quality. With increasing requirement on ensuring and improving information quality, there has been considerable work related to information quality during the last several years. Given this rich background of prior work, the Information Quality Cluster (IQC), established within the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) has been active with membership from multiple organizations. Its objectives and activities, aimed at ensuring and improving information quality for Earth science data and products, are discussed briefly.

  19. NASA's experience in the international exchange of scientific and technical information in the aerospace field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thibideau, Philip A.

    1990-01-01

    The early NASA international scientific and technical information exchange arrangements were usually detailed in correspondence with the librarians of the institutions involved. While this type of exchange grew to include some 200 organizations in 43 countries, NASA's main focus shifted to the relationship with the European Space Agency (ESA), which began in 1964. The NASA/ESA Tripartite Exchange Program provides more than 4000 technical reports from the NASA-produced Aerospace Database. The experience in the evolving cooperation between NASA and ESA has established the model for more recent exchange agreements with Israel, Australia, and Canada. The results of these agreements are made available to participating European organizations through the NASA File.

  20. Experimental investigation and CFD simulation of multi-pipe earth-to-air heat exchangers (EAHEs) flow performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amanowicz, Łukasz; Wojtkowiak, Janusz

    2017-11-01

    In this paper the experimentally obtained flow characteristics of multi-pipe earth-to-air heat exchangers (EAHEs) were used to validate the EAHE flow performance numerical model prepared by means of CFD software Ansys Fluent. The cut-cell meshing and the k-ɛ realizable turbulence model with default coefficients values and enhanced wall treatment was used. The total pressure losses and airflow in each pipe of multi-pipe exchangers was investigated both experimentally and numerically. The results show that airflow in each pipe of multi-pipe EAHE structures is not equal. The validated numerical model can be used for a proper designing of multi-pipe EAHEs from the flow characteristics point of view. The influence of EAHEs geometrical parameters on the total pressure losses and airflow division between the exchanger pipes can be also analysed. Usage of CFD for designing the EAHEs can be helpful for HVAC engineers (Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning) for optimizing the geometrical structure of multi-pipe EAHEs in order to save the energy and decrease operational costs of low-energy buildings.

  1. Analytics and Visualization Pipelines for Big ­Data on the NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) and OpenNEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, A.; Votava, P.; Nemani, R. R.; Michaelis, A.; Kotfila, C.

    2016-12-01

    We are developing capabilities for an integrated petabyte-scale Earth science collaborative analysis and visualization environment. The ultimate goal is to deploy this environment within the NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) and OpenNEX in order to enhance existing science data production pipelines in both high-performance computing (HPC) and cloud environments. Bridging of HPC and cloud is a fairly new concept under active research and this system significantly enhances the ability of the scientific community to accelerate analysis and visualization of Earth science data from NASA missions, model outputs and other sources. We have developed a web-based system that seamlessly interfaces with both high-performance computing (HPC) and cloud environments, providing tools that enable science teams to develop and deploy large-scale analysis, visualization and QA pipelines of both the production process and the data products, and enable sharing results with the community. Our project is developed in several stages each addressing separate challenge - workflow integration, parallel execution in either cloud or HPC environments and big-data analytics or visualization. This work benefits a number of existing and upcoming projects supported by NEX, such as the Web Enabled Landsat Data (WELD), where we are developing a new QA pipeline for the 25PB system.

  2. Multi-Instrument Tools and Services to Access NASA Earth Science Data from the GSFC Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempler, Steve; Leptoukh, Greg; Lynnes, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The presentation purpose is to describe multi-instrument tools and services that facilitate access and usability of NASA Earth science data at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). NASA's Earth observing system includes 14 satellites. Topics include EOSDIS facilities and system architecture, and overview of GSFC Earth Science Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) mission, Mirador data search, Giovanni, multi-instrument data exploration, Google Earth[TM], data merging, and applications.

  3. EARTH SYSTEM ATLAS: A Platform for Access to Peer-Reviewed Information about process and change in the Earth System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahagian, D.; Prentice, C.

    2004-12-01

    A great deal of time, effort and resources have been expended on global change research to date, but dissemination and visualization of the key pertinent data sets has been problematical. Toward that end, we are constructing an Earth System Atlas which will serve as a single compendium describing the state of the art in our understanding of the Earth system and how it has responded to and is likely to respond to natural and anthropogenic perturbations. The Atlas is an interactive web-based system of data bases and data manipulation tools and so is much more than a collection of pre-made maps posted on the web. It represents a tool for assembling, manipulating, and displaying specific data as selected and customized by the user. Maps are created "on the fly" according to user-specified instructions. The information contained in the Atlas represents the growing body of data assembled by the broader Earth system research community, and can be displayed in the form of maps and time series of the various relevant parameters that drive and are driven by changes in the Earth system at various time scales. The Atlas is designed to display the information assembled by the global change research community in the form of maps and time series of all the relevant parameters that drive or are driven by changes in the Earth System at various time scales. This will serve to provide existing data to the community, but also will help to highlight data gaps that may hinder our understanding of critical components of the Earth system. This new approach to handling Earth system data is unique in several ways. First and foremost, data must be peer-reviewed. Further, it is designed to draw on the expertise and products of extensive international research networks rather than on a limited number of projects or institutions. It provides explanatory explanations targeted to the user's needs, and the display of maps and time series can be customize by the user. In general, the Atlas is

  4. The role of Facilities in Engaging and Informing the Public of EarthScope Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlevoix, D. J.; Taber, J. J.; Berg, M.; Dorr, P. M.; McQuillan, P.; Olds, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    The IRIS and UNAVCO facilities play an important role in support of EarthScope through joint and independent education and outreach activities. These activities are focused on providing data and data products to a wide range of audiences, disseminating EarthScope science results through formal and informal venues, and informing the public of the broader impacts of EarthScope. The facilities are particularly well-suited for sustained engagement of multiple audiences over the decade-long course of EarthScope. One such example of a long-term effort was the Transportable Array student siting program, where over an 8 year period, students from about 55 institutions across the US and Canada conducted site reconnaissance and talked to landowners about EarthScope. Another activity focused on students was the development of a student intern program to support field engineering efforts during the construction of the Plate Boundary Observatory. Other ongoing activities include developing and maintaining relationships with media representatives and annual training of National Parks staff throughout the western U.S. The UNAVCO-IRIS partnership has been particularly valuable for EarthScope-related activities, where UNAVCO and IRIS work closely with the EarthScope National Office (ESNO) to bring EarthScope science to national, regional and local audiences within the EarthScope footprint. Collaborations have ranged across each group's products and services, including: EarthScope-focused teacher workshops, participation in EarthScope interpretive workshops for informal educators (led by ESNO), development of content for the IRIS Active Earth Monitor, preparing PBO-, USArray- and EarthScope-focused materials on topics such as Episodic Tremor and Slip for wider distribution through print, web, and mobile information technologies, and organizing research experiences for undergraduates on EarthScope-related topics. Other collaborations have focused on social media, and the development

  5. Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-30

    Behold one of the more detailed images of the Earth yet created. This Blue Marble Earth montage shown above -- created from photographs taken by the Visible/Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument on board the new Suomi NPP satellite -- shows many stunning details of our home planet. The Suomi NPP satellite was launched last October and renamed last week after Verner Suomi, commonly deemed the father of satellite meteorology. The composite was created from the data collected during four orbits of the robotic satellite taken earlier this month and digitally projected onto the globe. Many features of North America and the Western Hemisphere are particularly visible on a high resolution version of the image. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18033

  6. Auscope: Australian Earth Science Information Infrastructure using Free and Open Source Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodcock, R.; Cox, S. J.; Fraser, R.; Wyborn, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    Since 2005 the Australian Government has supported a series of initiatives providing researchers with access to major research facilities and information networks necessary for world-class research. Starting with the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS) the Australian earth science community established an integrated national geoscience infrastructure system called AuScope. AuScope is now in operation, providing a number of components to assist in understanding the structure and evolution of the Australian continent. These include the acquisition of subsurface imaging , earth composition and age analysis, a virtual drill core library, geological process simulation, and a high resolution geospatial reference framework. To draw together information from across the earth science community in academia, industry and government, AuScope includes a nationally distributed information infrastructure. Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) has been a significant enabler in building the AuScope community and providing a range of interoperable services for accessing data and scientific software. A number of FOSS components have been created, adopted or upgraded to create a coherent, OGC compliant Spatial Information Services Stack (SISS). SISS is now deployed at all Australian Geological Surveys, many Universities and the CSIRO. Comprising a set of OGC catalogue and data services, and augmented with new vocabulary and identifier services, the SISS provides a comprehensive package for organisations to contribute their data to the AuScope network. This packaging and a variety of software testing and documentation activities enabled greater trust and notably reduced barriers to adoption. FOSS selection was important, not only for technical capability and robustness, but also for appropriate licensing and community models to ensure sustainability of the infrastructure in the long term. Government agencies were sensitive to these issues and Au

  7. An Early Model for Value and Sustainability in Health Information Exchanges: Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Background The primary value relative to health information exchange has been seen in terms of cost savings relative to laboratory and radiology testing, emergency department expenditures, and admissions. However, models are needed to statistically quantify value and sustainability and better understand the dependent and mediating factors that contribute to value and sustainability. Objective The purpose of this study was to provide a basis for early model development for health information exchange value and sustainability. Methods A qualitative study was conducted with 21 interviews of eHealth Exchange participants across 10 organizations. Using a grounded theory approach and 3.0 as a relative frequency threshold, 5 main categories and 16 subcategories emerged. Results This study identifies 3 core current perceived value factors and 5 potential perceived value factors—how interviewees predict health information exchanges may evolve as there are more participants. These value factors were used as the foundation for early model development for sustainability of health information exchange. Conclusions Using the value factors from the interviews, the study provides the basis for early model development for health information exchange value and sustainability. This basis includes factors from the research: fostering consumer engagement; establishing a provider directory; quantifying use, cost, and clinical outcomes; ensuring data integrity through patient matching; and increasing awareness, usefulness, interoperability, and sustainability of eHealth Exchange. PMID:29712623

  8. An Early Model for Value and Sustainability in Health Information Exchanges: Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Sue S

    2018-04-30

    The primary value relative to health information exchange has been seen in terms of cost savings relative to laboratory and radiology testing, emergency department expenditures, and admissions. However, models are needed to statistically quantify value and sustainability and better understand the dependent and mediating factors that contribute to value and sustainability. The purpose of this study was to provide a basis for early model development for health information exchange value and sustainability. A qualitative study was conducted with 21 interviews of eHealth Exchange participants across 10 organizations. Using a grounded theory approach and 3.0 as a relative frequency threshold, 5 main categories and 16 subcategories emerged. This study identifies 3 core current perceived value factors and 5 potential perceived value factors-how interviewees predict health information exchanges may evolve as there are more participants. These value factors were used as the foundation for early model development for sustainability of health information exchange. Using the value factors from the interviews, the study provides the basis for early model development for health information exchange value and sustainability. This basis includes factors from the research: fostering consumer engagement; establishing a provider directory; quantifying use, cost, and clinical outcomes; ensuring data integrity through patient matching; and increasing awareness, usefulness, interoperability, and sustainability of eHealth Exchange. ©Sue S Feldman. Originally published in JMIR Medical Informatics (http://medinform.jmir.org), 30.04.2018.

  9. Open for business: private networks create a marketplace for health information exchange.

    PubMed

    Dimick, Chris

    2012-05-01

    Large health systems and their IT vendors are creating private information exchange networks at a time when federally funded state operations are gearing up for launch, Is there room for private and public offerings in the new HIE marketplace?

  10. Satisfying patient-consumer principles for health information exchange: evidence from California case studies.

    PubMed

    Miller, Robert H

    2012-03-01

    In June 2010 sixteen organizations representing California patients and consumers adopted nine principles for electronically exchanging health information among and within provider organizations. The principles were formulated with the goal of improving patient and population health care by increasing the availability and use of patient data while protecting patients' privacy. This study assesses to what extent five health care organizations-all in different stages of increasing their capacity for health information exchange-conformed to the principles in early 2011. Although an increasing amount of electronic data has been exchanged among organizations and with patients, progress has been modest, and patients still have little control over their data. For organizations to comply with all nine patient and consumer principles, clear "rules of the road" for information sharing must be defined, and patient education in health information exchange and control over personal data must be increased.

  11. Information exchange of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan with nuclear societies worldwide

    SciTech Connect

    Hori, Masao; Tomita, Yasushi

    2000-07-01

    The Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) exchanges information with nuclear societies worldwide by intersocietal communication through international councils of nuclear societies and through bilateral agreements between foreign societies and by such media as international meetings, publications, and Internet applications.

  12. Best management practices to exchange information between the TOC and district offices.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this study was to develop best management practices for exchange information between the Transportation Operation Center (TOC) and the district offices and regional traffic management centers. Data collected for this study included: ...

  13. Practices, technologies, and usage of incident management and traveler information exchange and sharing in Texas

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2001-12-01

    In this report, researchers present a review of the practices and technologies being used in Texas for incident management and traveler information exchange and sharing. Through interviews and site visits, researchers assimilated data from the Dallas...

  14. Solid Phase Luminescence of Several Rare Earth Ions on Ion-Exchange Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, Stephen P.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The development and characterization of a novel ion-exchange film for solid-phase fluorometry and phosphorimetry is reported. This new cation-exchange material is suitable for spectroscopic applications in the ultraviolet and visible regions. It is advantageous because it, as a single entity, is easily recovered from solution and mounted in the spectrofluorometers. After preconcentration on the film, the luminescence intensity of lanthanide ions is several orders of magnitude greater than that of the corresponding solution, depending on the volume of solution and the amount of film. This procedure allows emission spectral measurements and determination of lanthanide ions at solution concentrations of < 5 (micro)g/L. The film may be stored for subsequent reuse or as a permanent record of the analysis. The major drawback to the use of the film is slow uptake of analyte due to diffusion limitations.

  15. Towards a theory of tropical/midlatitude mass exchange from the earth's surface through the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Dana

    1995-01-01

    The main focus of this work is to understand the dynamics of mass exchange between the tropics and the midlatitudes and to determine any links between tropospheric exchange and that in the stratosphere. We have approached this problem from two different perspectives. The first is aimed towards understanding the troposphere's role in inducing lower stratospheric tropical/midlatitude exchange. For this project we focus on observational analysis of the lower stratosphere to assess the key regions of transport in/out of the tropics and to what extent this transport is driven by tropospheric processes. The second approach is to determine the extent to which stratospheric processes influence the troposphere. In this project we are performing potential vorticity (PV) inversions to assess the winds induced near the tropopause when the stratospheric polar vortex is displaced equatorward. These are each discussed in more detail in the subsections below. Also, we have organized a session on Tropical/Midlatitude Interaction and Transport at the Fall AGU where we will be showing our latest results.

  16. Simulation Suggests that medical group mergers won't undermine the potential utility of health information exchanges.

    PubMed

    Rudin, Robert S; Schneider, Eric C; Volk, Lynn A; Szolovits, Peter; Salzberg, Claudia A; Simon, Steven R; Bates, David W

    2012-03-01

    Federal and state agencies are investing substantial resources in the creation of community health information exchanges, which are consortia that enable independent health care organizations to exchange clinical data. However, under pressure to form accountable care organizations, medical groups may merge and support private health information exchanges. Such activity could reduce the potential utility of community exchanges-that is, the exchanges' capacity to share patient data across hospitals and physician practices that are independent. Simulations of care transitions based on data from ten Massachusetts communities suggest that there would have to be many such mergers to undermine the potential utility of health information exchanges. At the same time, because hospitals and the largest medical groups account for only 10-20 percent of care transitions in a community, information exchanges will still need to recruit a large proportion of the medical groups in a given community for the exchanges to maintain their usefulness in fostering information exchange across independent providers.

  17. Enabling Health Reform through Regional Health Information Exchange: A Model Study from China

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Dong; Meng, Qun

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To investigate and share the major challenges and experiences of building a regional health information exchange system in China in the context of health reform. Methods. This study used interviews, focus groups, a field study, and a literature review to collect insights and analyze data. The study examined Xinjin's approach to developing and implementing a health information exchange project, using exchange usage data for analysis. Results. Within three years and after spending approximately $2.4 million (15 million RMB), Xinjin County was able to build a complete, unified, and shared information system and many electronic health record components to integrate and manage health resources for 198 health institutions in its jurisdiction, thus becoming a model of regional health information exchange for facilitating health reform. Discussion. Costs, benefits, experiences, and lessons were discussed, and the unique characteristics of the Xinjin case and a comparison with US cases were analyzed. Conclusion. The Xinjin regional health information exchange system is different from most of the others due to its government-led, government-financed approach. Centralized and coordinated efforts played an important role in its operation. Regional health information exchange systems have been proven critical for meeting the global challenges of health reform. PMID:29065565

  18. Associations between perceived crisis mode work climate and poor information exchange within hospitals.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Mark E; Bogart, Miller S; Starr, Kathleen R

    2015-03-01

    Because hospital units operating in crisis mode could create unsafe transitions of care due to miscommunication, our objective was to estimate associations between perceived crisis mode work climate and patient information exchange problems within hospitals. Self-reported data from 247,140 hospital staff members across 884 hospitals were obtained from the 2010 Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. Presence of a crisis mode work climate was defined as respondents agreeing that the hospital unit in which they work tries to do too much too quickly. Presence of patient information exchange problems was defined as respondents agreeing that problems often occur in exchanging patient information across hospital units. Multivariable ordinal regressions estimated the likelihood of perceived problems in exchanging patient information across hospital units, controlling for perceived levels of crisis mode work climate, skill levels, work climate, and hospital infrastructure. Compared to those disagreeing, hospital staff members agreeing that the hospital unit in which they work tries to do too much too quickly were 1.6 times more likely to perceive problems in exchanging patient information across hospital units (odds ratio: 1.6, 95% confidence interval: 1.58-1.65). Hospital staff members perceiving crisis mode work climates within their hospital unit are more likely to perceive problems in exchanging patient information across units, underscoring the need to improve communication during transitions of care. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  19. Affording to exchange: social capital and online information sharing.

    PubMed

    Maksl, Adam; Young, Rachel

    2013-08-01

    The potential harm and benefit associated with sharing personal information online is a topic of debate and discussion. Using survey methods (n=872), we explore whether attainment of social capital online relates to greater comfort with sharing personal information. We found that perceptions of bridging and bonding social capital earned from using Facebook are significant predictors of overall comfort levels with sharing personal information. This research raises timely questions about how the perceived benefits of social networking sites influence how personal information is shared online.

  20. 47 CFR 36.612 - Updating information submitted to the National Exchange Carrier Association.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., may update the information submitted to the National Exchange Carrier Association (NECA) on July 31st... must update the information submitted to NECA on July 31st pursuant to § 36.611(h) according to the schedule. Every non-rural telephone company must update the information submitted to NECA on July 31st...

  1. 47 CFR 36.612 - Updating information submitted to the National Exchange Carrier Association.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., may update the information submitted to the National Exchange Carrier Association (NECA) on July 31st... must update the information submitted to NECA on July 31st pursuant to § 36.611(h) according to the schedule. Every non-rural telephone company must update the information submitted to NECA on July 31st...

  2. Earth observing system. Data and information system. Volume 2A: Report of the EOS Data Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide NASA with a rationale and recommendations for planning, implementing, and operating an Earth Observing System data and information system that can evolve to meet the Earth Observing System's needs in the 1990s. The Earth Observing System (Eos), defined by the Eos Science and Mission Requirements Working Group, consists of a suite of instruments in low Earth orbit acquiring measurements of the Earth's atmosphere, surface, and interior; an information system to support scientific research; and a vigorous program of scientific research, stressing study of global-scale processes that shape and influence the Earth as a system. The Eos data and information system is conceived as a complete research information system that would transcend the traditional mission data system, and include additional capabilties such as maintaining long-term, time-series data bases and providing access by Eos researchers to relevant non-Eos data. The Working Group recommends that the Eos data and information system be initiated now, with existing data, and that the system evolve into one that can meet the intensive research and data needs that will exist when Eos spacecraft are returning data in the 1990s.

  3. Information services platforms at geosynchronous earth orbit: A requirements analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The potential user requirements for Information Services Platforms at geosynchronous orbits were investigated. A rationale for identifying the corollary system requirements and supporting research and technology needs was provided.

  4. eHealth Networking Information Systems - The New Quality of Information Exchange.

    PubMed

    Messer-Misak, Karin; Reiter, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    The development and introduction of platforms that enable interdisciplinary exchange on current developments and projects in the area of eHealth have been stimulated by different authorities. The aim of this project was to develop a repository of eHealth projects that will make the wealth of eHealth projects visible and enable mutual learning through the sharing of experiences and good practice. The content of the database and search criteria as well as their categories were determined in close co-ordination and cooperation with stakeholders from the specialist areas. Technically, we used Java Server Faces (JSF) for the implementation of the frontend of the web application. Access to structured information on projects can support stakeholders to combining skills and knowledge residing in different places to create new solutions and approaches within a network of evolving competencies and opportunities. A regional database is the beginning of a structured collection and presentation of projects, which can then be incorporated into a broader context. The next step will be to unify this information transparently.

  5. The Effect of Thermal Convection on Earth-Atmosphere CO2 Gas Exchange in Aggregated Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganot, Y.; Weisbrod, N.; Dragila, M. I.

    2011-12-01

    Gas transport in soils and surface-atmosphere gas exchange are important processes that affect different aspects of soil science such as soil aeration, nutrient bio-availability, sorption kinetics, soil and groundwater pollution and soil remediation. Diffusion and convection are the two main mechanisms that affect gas transport, fate and emissions in the soils and in the upper vadose zone. In this work we studied CO2 soil-atmosphere gas exchange under both day-time and night-time conditions, focusing on the impact of thermal convection (TCV) during the night. Experiments were performed in a climate-controlled laboratory. One meter long columns were packed with matrix of different grain size (sand, gravel and soil aggregates). Air with 2000 ppm CO2 was injected into the bottom of the columns and CO2 concentration within the columns was continuously monitored by an Infra Red Gas Analyzer. Two scenarios were compared for each soil: (1) isothermal conditions, representing day time conditions; and (2) thermal gradient conditions, i.e., atmosphere colder than the soil, representing night time conditions. Our results show that under isothermal conditions, diffusion is the major mechanism for surface-atmosphere gas exchange for all grain sizes; while under night time conditions the prevailing mechanism is dependent on the air permeability of the matrix: for sand and gravel it is diffusion, and for soil aggregates it is TCV. Calculated CO2 flux for the soil aggregates column shows that the TCV flux was three orders of magnitude higher than the diffusive flux.

  6. Six University Canada/US/Mexico exchange program in Earth Hazards (EHaz)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stix, J.; Rose, W. I.

    2005-12-01

    This program is a consortium of six research-based universities in Canada, Mexico, and the U.S (Michigan Tech, Buffalo, McGill, Waterloo, UNAM and Colima) funded by the Department of education in the US and equivalent organizations in Canada and Mexico as part of the NAFTA agreement. The focus area for the mobility program is mitigation of geological natural hazards in North America. The consortium universities will exchange students and faculty in several engineering and science disciplines (e.g. environmental engineering, civil engineering, geological engineering, social sciences and geology) involved in the study of natural geological hazards. Students in the social sciences also will be exchanged, recognizing that the solution of natural hazards problems involves critical political, social, and economic aspects. Students will be mobilized among the participating universities through one- to two-semester visits and up to 60 more students will be mobilized via short-term, intensive courses. Student activities will consist of three stages: intensive language training, natural hazards coursework, and professional or research internships with local industries, agencies or at the host university. In each of the next three years there will be a joint advanced volcanology class run via videoconferencing and a three week field trip to areas of volcanological interest in Canada, US and Mexico. The course and field trip foci for the next three years are: 2006: Megaeruptions/ LongValley and Yellowstone; 2007: Volcanic edifice failure/ Cascades and Western Canada 2008: Convergent plate Boundary Volcanism/ Mexican Volcanic Belt Although the six universities will have first access to the exchange we are constructing ways for other volcanology programs to share the teleconference courses and field trips.

  7. Observation of Solar Wind Charge Exchange Emission From Exospheric Material in and Outside Earth's Magnetosheath 2008 September 25

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lepri, S. T.; Robertson, I.; Tomas, L.

    2009-01-01

    A long XMM-Newton exposure is used to observe solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission from exospheric material in and outside Earth's magnetosheath. The light curve of the O vii (0.5-0.62 keV) band is compared with a model for the expected emission, and while the emission is faint and the light curve has considerable scatter, the correlation is significant to better than 99.9%. This result demonstrates the validity of the geocoronal SWCX emission model for predicting a contribution to astrophysical observations to a scale factor of order unity (1.5). In addition, an average value of the SWCX O vii emission from the magnetosheath over the observation of 2.6 +/- 0.5 LU is derived. The results also demonstrate the potential utility of using X-ray observations to study global phenomena of the magnetosheath which currently are only investigated using in situ measurements.

  8. Facilitators on networks reveal optimal interplay between information exchange and reciprocity.

    PubMed

    Szolnoki, Attila; Perc, Matjaž; Mobilia, Mauro

    2014-04-01

    Reciprocity is firmly established as an important mechanism that promotes cooperation. An efficient information exchange is likewise important, especially on structured populations, where interactions between players are limited. Motivated by these two facts, we explore the role of facilitators in social dilemmas on networks. Facilitators are here mirrors to their neighbors-they cooperate with cooperators and defect with defectors-but they do not participate in the exchange of strategies. As such, in addition to introducing direct reciprocity, they also obstruct information exchange. In well-mixed populations, facilitators favor the replacement and invasion of defection by cooperation as long as their number exceeds a critical value. In structured populations, on the other hand, there exists a delicate balance between the benefits of reciprocity and the deterioration of information exchange. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations of social dilemmas on various interaction networks reveal that there exists an optimal interplay between reciprocity and information exchange, which sets in only when a small number of facilitators occupy the main hubs of the scale-free network. The drawbacks of missing cooperative hubs are more than compensated for by reciprocity and, at the same time, the compromised information exchange is routed via the auxiliary hubs with only marginal losses in effectivity. These results indicate that it is not always optimal for the main hubs to become leaders of the masses, but rather to exploit their highly connected state to promote tit-for-tat-like behavior.

  9. Facilitators on networks reveal optimal interplay between information exchange and reciprocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szolnoki, Attila; Perc, Matjaž; Mobilia, Mauro

    2014-04-01

    Reciprocity is firmly established as an important mechanism that promotes cooperation. An efficient information exchange is likewise important, especially on structured populations, where interactions between players are limited. Motivated by these two facts, we explore the role of facilitators in social dilemmas on networks. Facilitators are here mirrors to their neighbors—they cooperate with cooperators and defect with defectors—but they do not participate in the exchange of strategies. As such, in addition to introducing direct reciprocity, they also obstruct information exchange. In well-mixed populations, facilitators favor the replacement and invasion of defection by cooperation as long as their number exceeds a critical value. In structured populations, on the other hand, there exists a delicate balance between the benefits of reciprocity and the deterioration of information exchange. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations of social dilemmas on various interaction networks reveal that there exists an optimal interplay between reciprocity and information exchange, which sets in only when a small number of facilitators occupy the main hubs of the scale-free network. The drawbacks of missing cooperative hubs are more than compensated for by reciprocity and, at the same time, the compromised information exchange is routed via the auxiliary hubs with only marginal losses in effectivity. These results indicate that it is not always optimal for the main hubs to become leaders of the masses, but rather to exploit their highly connected state to promote tit-for-tat-like behavior.

  10. 28 CFR 37.3 - Exchange of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....3 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PROCEDURES FOR COORDINATING THE INVESTIGATION OF... the extent permissible by law. Such information shall include, but is not limited to, complaints, charges, investigative files, compliance review reports and files, affirmative action programs, and annual...

  11. Company and Below Command and Control Information Exchange Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-22

    between text and graphical forms of visual communication as well. With limited exceptions, verbal/auditory communication remains the best choice...Text and graphics. At the squad level and above visual communication system is best for complex information and/or less time critical information...Battalion o 13.2.2 Request Casualty Evacuation (CASEVAC) from Battalion Best: A mixed auditory/ visual communication would be ideal for a CASEVAC

  12. Interactional Features of Repair Negotiation in NS-NNS Interaction on Two Task Types: Information Gap and Personal Information Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitajima, Ryu

    2013-01-01

    The studies in task-based approaches in second language acquisition claim that controlled and goal convergent tasks such as information gap tasks surpass open-ended conversations such as personal information exchange tasks for the development of the learner's interlanguage, in that the formers promote more repair negotiation. And yet, few studies…

  13. Strontium-free rare earth perovskite ferrites with fast oxygen exchange kinetics: Experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Christian; Bucher, Edith; Windischbacher, Andreas; Boese, A. Daniel; Sitte, Werner

    2018-03-01

    The Sr-free mixed ionic electronic conducting perovskites La0.8Ca0.2FeO3-δ (LCF82) and Pr0.8Ca0.2FeO3-δ (PCF82) were synthesized via a glycine-nitrate process. Crystal structure, phase purity, and lattice constants were determined by XRD and Rietveld analysis. The oxygen exchange kinetics and the electronic conductivity were obtained from in-situ dc-conductivity relaxation experiments at 600-800 °C and 1×10-3≤pO2/bar≤0.1. Both LCF82 and PCF82 show exceptionally fast chemical surface exchange coefficients and chemical diffusion coefficients of oxygen. The oxygen nonstochiometry of LCF82 and PCF82 was determined by precision thermogravimetry. A point defect model was used to calculate the thermodynamic factors of oxygen and to estimate self-diffusion coefficients and ionic conductivities. Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations on the crystal structure, oxygen vacancy formation as well as oxygen migration energies are in excellent agreement with the experimental values. Due to their favourable properties both LCF82 and PCF82 are of interest for applications in solid oxide fuel cell cathodes, solid oxide electrolyser cell anodes, oxygen separation membranes, catalysts, or electrochemical sensors.

  14. Use of MCIDAS as an earth science information systems tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, H. Michael; Karitani, Shogo; Parker, Karen G.; Stooksbury, Laura M.; Wilson, Gregory S.

    1988-01-01

    The application of the man computer interactive data access system (MCIDAS) to information processing is examined. The computer systems that interface with the MCIDAS are discussed. Consideration is given to the computer networking of MCIDAS, data base archival, and the collection and distribution of real-time special sensor microwave/imager data.

  15. Earth resources shuttle imaging radar. [systems analysis and design analysis of pulse radar for earth resources information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A report is presented on a preliminary design of a Synthetic Array Radar (SAR) intended for experimental use with the space shuttle program. The radar is called Earth Resources Shuttle Imaging Radar (ERSIR). Its primary purpose is to determine the usefulness of SAR in monitoring and managing earth resources. The design of the ERSIR, along with tradeoffs made during its evolution is discussed. The ERSIR consists of a flight sensor for collecting the raw radar data and a ground sensor used both for reducing these radar data to images and for extracting earth resources information from the data. The flight sensor consists of two high powered coherent, pulse radars, one that operates at L and the other at X-band. Radar data, recorded on tape can be either transmitted via a digital data link to a ground terminal or the tape can be delivered to the ground station after the shuttle lands. A description of data processing equipment and display devices is given.

  16. Joint Atomic Information Exchange Group information management project. Briefing outlining functions and specifications of JAIEG automated information management system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.G.

    1983-07-20

    The Joint Atomic Information Exchange Group (JAIEG) was formed in 1959. JAIEG's charter was to be the agent to determine the transmissibility of atomic information to foreign governments or regional defense organizations. JAIEG, operating from the joint policy direction of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Military Application under the Department of Energy and of the Assistant to the Secretary of Defense for Atomic Energy under the Department of Defense, determines in a uniform and consistent manner the transmissibility of Restricted Data (RD) and Formerly Restricted Data (FRD). JAIEG also maintains records of all transmittal of such data, and maintains recordmore » copies of all information reviewed. This information exists only on paper and must be processed manually. JAIEG's work load has grown continuously with the size of its filing system. This has prompted an investigation of the potential benefits of automating JAIEG activities. Science Applications, Inc. (SAI) has studied JAIEG procedures and has identified several areas where JAIEG information processing activities can be automated to achieve greater system efficiency.« less

  17. Progress in counterfeit deterrence: the contribution of information exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Ian M.; Kontnik, Lewis T.

    1996-03-01

    In this paper we establish the need for communication between organizations involved in the fight against counterfeiting crime. We also examine the paradox in providing information that could serve the criminal as well as those attempting to protect themselves from criminal activity. Counterfeiting is estimated to account for over 5% of world trade. It is a global operation with no respect for international borders. It is increasingly sophisticated and increasingly the province of organized crime, which applies the techniques developed for drug distribution to the production and distribution of counterfeit articles. To fight this crime there is an increasing plethora of authenticating features and technologies available. Many companies do not recognize the problem and the number of anticounterfeit technologies can be confusing for potential users. There is therefore a need for information about them, their comparative characteristics, to be easily available. At present there is inadequate communication between those who develop and produce anti-counterfeiting devices and those who use them, notwithstanding the marketing efforts of the former. Communication which stimulates and encourages the spread of information between those engaged in the fight against counterfeit crime can only help in that fight. But what we term 'the communication paradox' requires circumspection and care in the content and the distribution of such information. The communication paradox is that the better the channels of communication, the easier it is for criminals to get hold of that information. The challenge is to institute communications which are effective but restrictive. More communication of information between those engaged in counterfeit deterrence will enhance individual companies' and organizations' anticounterfeit efforts and thus contribute to an overall improvement in the fight against counterfeit crime.

  18. Advanced Earth-to-orbit propulsion technology information, dissemination and research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1995-01-01

    In this period of performance a conference (The 1994 Conference on Advanced Earth-to-Orbit Propulsion Technology) was organized and implemented by the University of Alabama in Huntsville and held May 15-17 to assemble and disseminate the current information on Advanced Earth-to-Orbit Propulsion Technology. The results were assembled for publication as NASA-CP-3282, Volume 1 and 2 and NASA-CP-3287.

  19. The NASA earth resources spectral information system: A data compilation, second supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, R. K.

    1973-01-01

    The NASA Earth Resources Spectral Information System (ERSIS) and the information contained therein are described. It is intended for use as a second supplement to the NASA Earth Resources Spectral Information System: A Data Compilation, NASA CR-31650-24-T, May 1971. The current supplement includes approximately 100 rock and mineral, and 375 vegetation directional reflectance spectral curves in the optical region from 0.2 to 22.0 microns. The data were categorized by subject and each curve plotted on a single graph. Each graph is fully titled to indicate curve source and indexed by subject to facilitate user retrieval from ERSIS magnetic tape records.

  20. Estimated financial savings associated with health information exchange and ambulatory care referral.

    PubMed

    Frisse, Mark E; Holmes, Rodney L

    2007-12-01

    Data and financial models based on an operational health information exchange suggest that health care delivery costs can be reduced by making clinical data available at the time of care in urban emergency departments. Reductions are the result of decreases in laboratory and radiographic tests, fewer admissions for observation, and lower overall emergency department costs. The likelihood of reducing these costs depends on the extent to which clinicians alter their workflow and take into account information available through the exchange from other institutions prior to initiating a treatment plan. Far greater savings can be realized in theory by identifying individuals presenting to emergency departments whose acute and long-term care needs are more suitably addressed at lower costs in ambulatory settings or medical homes. These alternative ambulatory settings can more effectively address the chronic care needs of those who receive most of their care in emergency departments. To support a shift from emergency room care to clinic care, health care information available through the health information exchange must be made available in both emergency department and ambulatory care settings. If practice workflow and patient behavior can be changed, a more effective and efficient care delivery system will be made possible through the secure exchange of clinical information across regional settings. These projections support the case for the financial viability of regional health information exchanges and motivate participation of hospitals and ambulatory care organizations-particularly in urban settings.

  1. Community Based Rehabilitation: Information Accumulation & Exchange. South Asian Research Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, M.

    This paper reviews research and evaluates information gathered on disabilities and service development in South Asia, especially India and Pakistan. The concept of "community-based rehabilitation" (CBR), which stresses the need for rehabilitation efforts rooted in the context of local cultural concepts, is discussed. The paper emphasizes…

  2. 78 FR 14793 - Advancing Interoperability and Health Information Exchange

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-07

    ...: Designing Data Stewardship Entities and Advancing Data Access,'' Health Services Research 2010 45:5, Part II... business information that could be considered to be proprietary. We will post all comments received before... office-based physicians as well as hospitals. 5 6 For example, physician adoption of five core Meaningful...

  3. Advanced Information Technology Investments at the NASA Earth Science Technology Office

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clune, T.; Seablom, M. S.; Moe, K.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) regularly makes investments for nurturing advanced concepts in information technology to enable rapid, low-cost acquisition, processing and visualization of Earth science data in support of future NASA missions and climate change research. In 2012, the National Research Council published a mid-term assessment of the 2007 decadal survey for future spacemissions supporting Earth science and applications [1]. The report stated, "Earth sciences have advanced significantly because of existing observational capabilities and the fruit of past investments, along with advances in data and information systems, computer science, and enabling technologies." The report found that NASA had responded favorably and aggressively to the decadal survey and noted the role of the recent ESTO solicitation for information systems technologies that partnered with the NASA Applied Sciences Program to support the transition into operations. NASA's future missions are key stakeholders for the ESTO technology investments. Also driving these investments is the need for the Agency to properly address questions regarding the prediction, adaptation, and eventual mitigation of climate change. The Earth Science Division has championed interdisciplinary research, recognizing that the Earth must be studied as a complete system in order toaddress key science questions [2]. Information technology investments in the low-mid technology readiness level (TRL) range play a key role in meeting these challenges. ESTO's Advanced Information Systems Technology (AIST) program invests in higher risk / higher reward technologies that solve the most challenging problems of the information processing chain. This includes the space segment, where the information pipeline begins, to the end user, where knowledge is ultimatelyadvanced. The objectives of the program are to reduce the risk, cost, size, and development time of Earth Science space-based and ground

  4. Incorporating Informal Learning Environments and Local Fossil Specimens in Earth Science Classrooms: A Recipe for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Renee M.; Wandersee, James H.

    2009-01-01

    In an online graduate paleontology course taken by practicing Earth Science teachers, we designed an investigation using teachers' local informal educational environments. Teachers (N = 28) were responsible for photographing, describing, and integrating fossil specimens from two informal sites into a paleoenvironmental analysis of the landscape in…

  5. Information exchange networks for chronic illness care in primary care practices: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Information exchange networks for chronic illness care may influence the uptake of innovations in patient care. Valid and feasible methods are needed to document and analyse information exchange networks in healthcare settings. This observational study aimed to examine the usefulness of methods to study information exchange networks in primary care practices, related to chronic heart failure, diabetes and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Methods The study was linked to a quality improvement project in the Netherlands. All health professionals in the practices were asked to complete a short questionnaire that documented their information exchange relations. Feasibility was determined in terms of response rates and reliability in terms of reciprocity of reports of receiving and providing information. For each practice, a number of network characteristics were derived for each of the chronic conditions. Results Ten of the 21 practices in the quality improvement project agreed to participate in this network study. The response rates were high in all but one of the participating practices. For the analysis, we used data from 67 health professionals from eight practices. The agreement between receiving and providing information was, on average, 65.6%. The values for density, centralization, hierarchy, and overlap of the information exchange networks showed substantial variation between the practices as well as between the chronic conditions. The most central individual in the information exchange network could be a nurse or a physician. Conclusions Further research is needed to refine the measure of information networks and to test the impact of network characteristics on the uptake of innovations. PMID:20205758

  6. Information infrastructure for consumer health: a health information exchange stakeholder study.

    PubMed

    Thornewill, Judah; Dowling, Alan F; Cox, Barbara A; Esterhay, Robert J

    2011-05-01

    An enabling infrastructure for population-wide health information capture and transfer is beginning to emerge in the U.S. However, the essential infrastructure component that is still missing is effective health information exchange (HIE). Health record banks (HRBs) are one of several possible approaches to achieving HIE. Is the approach viable? If so, what requirements must be satisfied in order for it to succeed? The research, conducted in 2007-2008, explored HRB-related interests, concerns, benefits, payment preferences, design requirements, value propositions, and challenges for 12 healthcare stakeholder groups and the consumers they serve in a U.S. metropolitan area of 1.3 million people. A mixed-methods design was developed in a community action research context. Data were gathered and analyzed through 23 focus groups, 13 web surveys, a consumer phone survey (nonstratified random sample) and follow-up meetings. Recruiting goals for leaders representing targeted groups were achieved using a multi-channel communications strategy. Key themes were identified through data triangulation. Then, requirements, value propositions and challenges were developed through iterative processes of interaction with community members. Results include key themes, design requirements, value propositions, and challenges for 12 stakeholder groups and consumers. The research provides a framework for developing a consumer permission-driven, financially sustainable, community HRB model. However, for such a model to flourish, it will need to be part of a nationwide network of HIEs with compatible HRB approaches able to overcome a number of challenges. Copyright © 2011 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Retrospective: lessons learned from the Santa Barbara project and their implications for health information exchange.

    PubMed

    Frohlich, Jonah; Karp, Sam; Smith, Mark D; Sujansky, Walter

    2007-01-01

    Despite its closure in December 2006, the Santa Barbara County Care Data Exchange helped focus national attention on the value of health information exchange (HIE). This in turn led to the federal government's plan to establish regional health information organizations (RHIOs). During its existence, the project pioneered innovative approaches, including certification of health information technology vendors, a community-wide governance model, and deployment of a peer-to-peer technical model now in wider use. RHIO efforts will benefit from the project's lessons about the need for an incremental development approach, rigorous implementation processes, early attention to privacy and liability concerns, and planning for a sustainable business model.

  8. Benefits and problems of electronic information exchange as perceived by health care professionals: an interview study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Various countries are currently implementing a national electronic patient record (n-EPR). Despite the assumed positive effects of n-EPRs, their overall adoption remains low and meets resistance from health care providers. This study aims to increase our understanding of health care providers' attitude towards the n-EPR, by investigating their perceptions of the benefits and problems of electronic information exchange in health care and the n-EPR in particular. Methods The study was conducted in three Dutch health care settings: acute care, diabetes care, and ambulatory mental health care. Two health care organisations were included per setting. Between January and June 2010, interviews were conducted with 17 stakeholders working in these organisations. Relevant themes were deduced by means of thematic qualitative analysis. Results Health care providers perceived electronic information exchange to promote the efficiency and quality of care. The problems they perceived in electronic information exchange mainly concerned the confidentiality and safety of information exchange and the reliability and quality of patient data. Many problems perceived by health care providers did not specifically apply to the n-EPR, but to electronic information exchange in general. Conclusions The implementation of the Dutch n-EPR has mainly followed a top-down approach, thereby neglecting the fact that the perceptions and preferences of its users (health care providers) need to be addressed in order to achieve successful implementation. The results of this study provide valuable suggestions about how to promote health care providers' willingness to adopt electronic information exchange, which can be useful for other countries currently implementing an n-EPR. Apart from providing information about the benefits and usefulness of electronic information exchange, efforts should be focused on minimising the problems as perceived by health care providers. The safety and

  9. Benefits and problems of electronic information exchange as perceived by health care professionals: an interview study.

    PubMed

    Zwaanswijk, Marieke; Verheij, Robert A; Wiesman, Floris J; Friele, Roland D

    2011-10-07

    Various countries are currently implementing a national electronic patient record (n-EPR). Despite the assumed positive effects of n-EPRs, their overall adoption remains low and meets resistance from health care providers. This study aims to increase our understanding of health care providers' attitude towards the n-EPR, by investigating their perceptions of the benefits and problems of electronic information exchange in health care and the n-EPR in particular. The study was conducted in three Dutch health care settings: acute care, diabetes care, and ambulatory mental health care. Two health care organisations were included per setting. Between January and June 2010, interviews were conducted with 17 stakeholders working in these organisations. Relevant themes were deduced by means of thematic qualitative analysis. Health care providers perceived electronic information exchange to promote the efficiency and quality of care. The problems they perceived in electronic information exchange mainly concerned the confidentiality and safety of information exchange and the reliability and quality of patient data. Many problems perceived by health care providers did not specifically apply to the n-EPR, but to electronic information exchange in general. The implementation of the Dutch n-EPR has mainly followed a top-down approach, thereby neglecting the fact that the perceptions and preferences of its users (health care providers) need to be addressed in order to achieve successful implementation. The results of this study provide valuable suggestions about how to promote health care providers' willingness to adopt electronic information exchange, which can be useful for other countries currently implementing an n-EPR. Apart from providing information about the benefits and usefulness of electronic information exchange, efforts should be focused on minimising the problems as perceived by health care providers. The safety and confidentiality of electronic information exchange

  10. 47 CFR 36.612 - Updating information submitted to the National Exchange Carrier Association.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... update the information submitted to the National Exchange Carrier Association (NECA) on July 31st... non-rural telephone company must update the information submitted to NECA on July 31st pursuant to § 36.611 (h) according to the schedule. (1) Submit data covering the last nine months of the previous...

  11. 47 CFR 36.612 - Updating information submitted to the National Exchange Carrier Association.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... update the information submitted to the National Exchange Carrier Association (NECA) on July 31st... non-rural telephone company must update the information submitted to NECA on July 31st pursuant to § 36.611 (h) according to the schedule. (1) Submit data covering the last nine months of the previous...

  12. Information Exchange Procedures for Major Research Universities; Technical Diary of the Major Research Universities' Pilot Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topping, Jim

    The applicability and validity of NCHEMS' Information Exchange Procedures (IEP) to major research universities are examined. IEP enables peer institutions to compare information about their resources. Evaluation of the IEP costing methods are examined in this document, which is intended as an appendix to "Evaluation of the IEP Costing…

  13. Health Information Exchange: The Determinants of Usage and the Impact on Utilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vest, Joshua Ryan

    2010-01-01

    Health information exchange (HIE) is the process of electronically sharing patient-level information among different organizations with the objectives of quality and cost improvements. The adoption of HIE in the United States is not widespread, but numerous efforts at facilitating HIE exist and the incentives for electronic health record system…

  14. Factors Influencing Electronic Clinical Information Exchange in Small Medical Group Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kralewski, John E.; Zink, Therese; Boyle, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify the organizational factors that influence electronic health information exchange (HIE) by medical group practices in rural areas. Methods: A purposive sample of 8 small medical group practices in 3 experimental HIE regions were interviewed to determine the extent of clinical information exchange…

  15. Understanding information exchange during disaster response: Methodological insights from infocentric analysis

    Treesearch

    Toddi A. Steelman; Branda Nowell; Deena Bayoumi; Sarah McCaffrey

    2014-01-01

    We leverage economic theory, network theory, and social network analytical techniques to bring greater conceptual and methodological rigor to understand how information is exchanged during disasters. We ask, "How can information relationships be evaluated more systematically during a disaster response?" "Infocentric analysis"—a term and...

  16. Medication errors in residential aged care facilities: a distributed cognition analysis of the information exchange process.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Amina; Georgiou, Andrew; Westbrook, Johanna

    2013-05-01

    Medication safety is a pressing concern for residential aged care facilities (RACFs). Retrospective studies in RACF settings identify inadequate communication between RACFs, doctors, hospitals and community pharmacies as the major cause of medication errors. Existing literature offers limited insight about the gaps in the existing information exchange process that may lead to medication errors. The aim of this research was to explicate the cognitive distribution that underlies RACF medication ordering and delivery to identify gaps in medication-related information exchange which lead to medication errors in RACFs. The study was undertaken in three RACFs in Sydney, Australia. Data were generated through ethnographic field work over a period of five months (May-September 2011). Triangulated analysis of data primarily focused on examining the transformation and exchange of information between different media across the process. The findings of this study highlight the extensive scope and intense nature of information exchange in RACF medication ordering and delivery. Rather than attributing error to individual care providers, the explication of distributed cognition processes enabled the identification of gaps in three information exchange dimensions which potentially contribute to the occurrence of medication errors namely: (1) design of medication charts which complicates order processing and record keeping (2) lack of coordination mechanisms between participants which results in misalignment of local practices (3) reliance on restricted communication bandwidth channels mainly telephone and fax which complicates the information processing requirements. The study demonstrates how the identification of these gaps enhances understanding of medication errors in RACFs. Application of the theoretical lens of distributed cognition can assist in enhancing our understanding of medication errors in RACFs through identification of gaps in information exchange. Understanding

  17. Geography of community health information organization activity in the United States: Implications for the effectiveness of health information exchange.

    PubMed

    Vest, Joshua R

    The United States has invested nearly a billion dollars in creating community health information organizations (HIOs) to foster health information exchange. Community HIOs provide exchange services to health care organizations within a distinct geographic area. While geography is a key organizing principle for community HIOs, it is unclear if geography is an effective method for organization or what challenges are created by a geography-based approach to health information exchange. This study describes the extent of reported community HIO coverage in the United States and explores the practical and policy implications of overlaps and gaps in HIO service areas. Furthermore, because self-reported service areas may not accurately reflect the true extent of HIOs activities, this study maps the actual markets for health services included in each HIO. An inventory of operational community HIOs that included self-reported geographic markets and participating organizations was face-validated using a crowd-sourcing approach. Aggregation of the participating hospitals' individual health care markets provided the total geographic market served by each community HIO. Mapping and overlay analyses using geographic information system methods described the extent of community HIO activity in the United States. Evidence suggests that community HIOs may be inefficiently distributed. Parts of the United States have multiple, overlapping HIOs, while others do not have any providing health information exchange services. In markets served by multiple community HIOs, 45% of hospitals were participants of only one HIO. The current geography of community HIO activity does not provide comprehensive patient information to providers, nor community-wide information for public health agencies. The discord between the self-reported and market geography of community HIOs raises concerns about the potential effectiveness of health information exchange, illustrates the limitations of geography as

  18. CEOS Contributions to Informing Energy Management and Policy Decision Making Using Space-Based Earth Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckman, Richard S.

    2009-01-01

    Earth observations are playing an increasingly significant role in informing decision making in the energy sector. In renewable energy applications, space-based observations now routinely augment sparse ground-based observations used as input for renewable energy resource assessment applications. As one of the nine Group on Earth Observations (GEO) societal benefit areas, the enhancement of management and policy decision making in the energy sector is receiving attention in activities conducted by the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS). CEOS has become the "space arm" for the implementation of the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) vision. It is directly supporting the space-based, near-term tasks articulated in the GEO three-year work plan. This paper describes a coordinated program of demonstration projects conducted by CEOS member agencies and partners to utilize Earth observations to enhance energy management end-user decision support systems. I discuss the importance of engagement with stakeholders and understanding their decision support needs in successfully increasing the uptake of Earth observation products for societal benefit. Several case studies are presented, demonstrating the importance of providing data sets in formats and units familiar and immediately usable by decision makers. These projects show the utility of Earth observations to enhance renewable energy resource assessment in the developing world, forecast space-weather impacts on the power grid, and improve energy efficiency in the built environment.

  19. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-18

    Organizers and volunteers for Kennedy Space Center’s Earth Day celebration gather for a photo at the NASA Exchange raffle booth. From left to right are Jeanne Ryba, Environmental Sustainability program specialist; Robert Smith, Earth Day volunteer; and Natasha Darre, Cultural Resources Specialist. The two-day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  20. Thermodynamics of information exchange between two coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutvonen, Aki; Sagawa, Takahiro; Ala-Nissila, Tapio

    2016-03-01

    We propose a setup based on two coupled quantum dots where thermodynamics of a measurement can be quantitatively characterized. The information obtained in the measurement can be utilized by performing feedback in a manner apparently breaking the second law of thermodynamics. In this way the setup can be operated as a Maxwell's demon, where both the measurement and feedback are performed separately by controlling an external parameter. This is analogous to the case of the original Szilard engine. Since the setup contains both the microscopic demon and the engine itself, the operation of the whole measurement-feedback cycle can be explained in detail at the level of single realizations. In addition, we derive integral fluctuation relations for both the bare and coarse-grained entropy productions in the setup.

  1. EduGeoPark: international students exchanges for promoting Earth Science knowledge and Geoheritage awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardino, Marco; Magagna, Alessandra; Dellarole, Edoardo; Kiuttu, Mikko

    2015-04-01

    Geoparks are the ideal destination for international study tours based on the sustainable tourism concept, in which the travel is conceived as an opportunity for sharing both scientific knowledge and intangible and tangible culture. Equally, they are the appropriate places for testing and practicing innovative educational strategies, shareable in an international context. The innovative idea of EduGeoPark project is to involve students and teachers in research activities in Geoparks, including sampling and digital mapping: practical field and laboratory activities for stimulating the geological interpretation of an unknown territory. An approach devoted to improve teamwork and problem solving competences. By means of a partnerships between the Rokua (Finland) and the Sesia-Val Grande (Italy) Geoparks, an exchange program for Secondary School's students started during 2014 (Vaala High School; I.I.S. Luigi Cobianchi High School in Verbania). The study and the visit of both territories was an opportunity for students to observe some relevant geological elements and processes that do not exist in their own country. Moreover, the hosting in families allowed them to feel the culture of the area. Teachers and staff of the Geoparks led field trips to the main geological and cultural attractions of both areas. During the activities, students used mobile devices (smartphone and tablet) and GPS to track field trips, to catch and gather georeferenced data and pictures. They acted as researchers, by using both digital and traditional tools: they observed, asked questions, gathered data, and made hypothesis. By sharing ideas, together with the local guides, they reconstructed the cultural and geological history of the area. Students appreciated the experience: not only they had the opportunity of visiting a different country, but also of deepening the geological awareness on their own territory. EduGeoPark project is opening the participation to other Geoparks, in order to

  2. Harmonised information exchange between decentralised food composition database systems.

    PubMed

    Pakkala, H; Christensen, T; de Victoria, I Martínez; Presser, K; Kadvan, A

    2010-11-01

    The main aim of the European Food Information Resource (EuroFIR) project is to develop and disseminate a comprehensive, coherent and validated data bank for the distribution of food composition data (FCD). This can only be accomplished by harmonising food description and data documentation and by the use of standardised thesauri. The data bank is implemented through a network of local FCD storages (usually national) under the control and responsibility of the local (national) EuroFIR partner. The implementation of the system based on the EuroFIR specifications is under development. The data interchange happens through the EuroFIR Web Services interface, allowing the partners to implement their system using methods and software suitable for the local computer environment. The implementation uses common international standards, such as Simple Object Access Protocol, Web Service Description Language and Extensible Markup Language (XML). A specifically constructed EuroFIR search facility (eSearch) was designed for end users. The EuroFIR eSearch facility compiles queries using a specifically designed Food Data Query Language and sends a request to those network nodes linked to the EuroFIR Web Services that will most likely have the requested information. The retrieved FCD are compiled into a specifically designed data interchange format (the EuroFIR Food Data Transport Package) in XML, which is sent back to the EuroFIR eSearch facility as the query response. The same request-response operation happens in all the nodes that have been selected in the EuroFIR eSearch facility for a certain task. Finally, the FCD are combined by the EuroFIR eSearch facility and delivered to the food compiler. The implementation of FCD interchange using decentralised computer systems instead of traditional data-centre models has several advantages. First of all, the local partners have more control over their FCD, which will increase commitment and improve quality. Second, a multicentred

  3. Evolution of Information Management at the GSFC Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC): 2006-2007

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempler, Steven; Lynnes, Christopher; Vollmer, Bruce; Alcott, Gary; Berrick, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Increasingly sophisticated National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth science missions have driven their associated data and data management systems from providing simple point-to-point archiving and retrieval to performing user-responsive distributed multisensor information extraction. To fully maximize the use of remote-sensor-generated Earth science data, NASA recognized the need for data systems that provide data access and manipulation capabilities responsive to research brought forth by advancing scientific analysis and the need to maximize the use and usability of the data. The decision by NASA to purposely evolve the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC) and other information management facilities was timely and appropriate. The GES DISC evolution was focused on replacing the EOSDIS Core System (ECS) by reusing the In-house developed disk-based Simple, Scalable, Script-based Science Product Archive (S4PA) data management system and migrating data to the disk archives. Transition was completed in December 2007

  4. Model Development for EHR Interdisciplinary Information Exchange of ICU Common Goals

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Sarah A.; Bakken, Suzanne; Vawdrey, David K.; Coiera, Enrico; Currie, Leanne

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Effective interdisciplinary exchange of patient information is an essential component of safe, efficient, and patient–centered care in the intensive care unit (ICU). Frequent handoffs of patient care, high acuity of patient illness, and the increasing amount of available data complicate information exchange. Verbal communication can be affected by interruptions and time limitations. To supplement verbal communication, many ICUs rely on documentation in electronic health records (EHRs) to reduce errors of omission and information loss. The purpose of this study was to develop a model of EHR interdisciplinary information exchange of ICU common goals. Methods The theoretical frameworks of distributed cognition and the clinical communication space were integrated and a previously published categorization of verbal information exchange was used. 59.5 hours of interdisciplinary rounds in a Neurovascular ICU were observed and five interviews and one focus group with ICU nurses and physicians were conducted. Results Current documentation tools in the ICU were not sufficient to capture the nurses' and physicians' collaborative decision-making and verbal communication of goal-directed actions and interactions. Clinicians perceived the EHR to be inefficient for information retrieval, leading to a further reliance on verbal information exchange. Conclusion The model suggests that EHRs should support: 1) Information tools for the explicit documentation of goals, interventions, and assessments with synthesized and summarized information outputs of events and updates; and 2) Messaging tools that support collaborative decision-making and patient safety double checks that currently occur between nurses and physicians in the absence of EHR support. PMID:20974549

  5. Health information exchange usage in emergency departments and clinics: the who, what, and why.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kevin B; Unertl, Kim M; Chen, Qingxia; Lorenzi, Nancy M; Nian, Hui; Bailey, James; Frisse, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Health information exchange (HIE) systems are being developed across the nation. Understanding approaches taken by existing successful exchanges can help new exchange efforts determine goals and plan implementations. The goal of this study was to explore characteristics of use and users of a successful regional HIE. We used a mixed-method analysis, consisting of cross-sectional audit log data, semi-structured interviews, and direct observation in a sample of emergency departments and ambulatory safety net clinics actively using HIE. For each site, we measured overall usage trends, user logon statistics, and data types accessed by users. We also assessed reasons for use and outcomes of use. Overall, users accessed HIE for 6.8% of all encounters, with higher rates of access for repeat visits, for patients with comorbidities, for patients known to have data in the exchange, and at sites providing HIE access to both nurses and physicians. Discharge summaries and test reports were the most frequently accessed data in the exchange. Providers consistently noted retrieving additional history, preventing repeat tests, comparing new results to retrieved results, and avoiding hospitalizations as a consequence of HIE access. HIE use in emergency departments and ambulatory clinics was focused on patients where missing information was believed to be present in the exchange and was related to factors including the roles of people with access, the setting, and other site-specific issues that impacted the overall breadth of routine system use. These data should form an important foundation as other sites embark upon HIE implementation.

  6. An exchange format for use-cases of hospital information systems.

    PubMed

    Masuda, G; Sakamoto, N; Sakai, R; Yamamoto, R

    2001-01-01

    Object-oriented software development is a powerful methodology for development of large hospital information systems. We think use-case driven approach is particularly useful for the development. In the use-cases driven approach, use-cases are documented at the first stage in the software development process and they are used through the whole steps in a variety of ways. Therefore, it is important to exchange and share the use-cases and make effective use of them through the overall lifecycle of a development process. In this paper, we propose a method of sharing and exchanging use-case models between applications, developers, and projects. We design an XML based exchange format for use-cases. We then discuss an application of the exchange format to support several software development activities. We preliminarily implemented a support system for object-oriented analysis based on the exchange format. The result shows that using the structural and semantic information in the exchange format enables the support system to assist the object-oriented analysis successfully.

  7. An Information Architect's View of Earth Observations for Disaster Risk Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moe, K.; Evans, J. D.; Cappelaere, P. G.; Frye, S. W.; Mandl, D.; Dobbs, K. E.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite observations play a significant role in supporting disaster response and risk management, however data complexity is a barrier to broader use especially by the public. In December 2013 the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites Working Group on Information Systems and Services documented a high-level reference model for the use of Earth observation satellites and associated products to support disaster risk management within the Global Earth Observation System of Systems context. The enterprise architecture identified the important role of user access to all key functions supporting situational awareness and decision-making. This paper focuses on the need to develop actionable information products from these Earth observations to simplify the discovery, access and use of tailored products. To this end, our team has developed an Open GeoSocial API proof-of-concept for GEOSS. We envision public access to mobile apps available on smart phones using common browsers where users can set up a profile and specify a region of interest for monitoring events such as floods and landslides. Information about susceptibility and weather forecasts about flood risks can be accessed. Users can generate geo-located information and photos of local events, and these can be shared on social media. The information architecture can address usability challenges to transform sensor data into actionable information, based on the terminology of the emergency management community responsible for informing the public. This paper describes the approach to collecting relevant material from the disasters and risk management community to address the end user needs for information. The resulting information architecture addresses the structural design of the shared information in the disasters and risk management enterprise. Key challenges are organizing and labeling information to support both online user communities and machine-to-machine processing for automated product generation.

  8. The group separation of the rare-earth elements and yttrium from geologic materials by cation-exchange chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crock, J.G.; Lichte, F.E.; Wildeman, T.R.

    1984-01-01

    Demand is increasing for the determination of the rare-earth elements (REE) and yttrium in geologic materials. Due to their low natural abundance in many materials and the interferences that occur in many methods of determination, a separation procedure utilizing gradient strong-acid cation-exchange chromatography is often used to preconcentrate and isolate these elements from the host-rock matrix. Two separate gradient strong-acid cation-exchange procedures were characterized and the major elements as well as those elements thought to provide the greatest interference for the determination of the REE in geologic materials were tested for separation from the REE. Simultaneous inductively coupled argon plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICAP-AES) measurements were used to construct the chromatograms for the elution studies, allowing the elution patterns of all the elements of interest to be determined in a single fraction of eluent. As a rock matrix, U.S. Geological Survey standard reference BCR-1 basalt was digested using both an acid decomposition procedure and a lithium metaborate fusion. Hydrochloric and nitric acids were tested as eluents and chromatograms were plotted using the ICAP-AES data; and we observed substantial differences in the elution patterns of the REE and as well as in the solution patterns of Ba, Ca, Fe and Sr. The nitric acid elution required substantially less eluent to elute the REE and Y as a group when compared to the hydrochloric acid elution, and provided a clearer separation of the REE from interfering and matrix elements. ?? 1984.

  9. Extending Value of Information Methods to Include the Co-Net Benefits of Earth Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macauley, M.

    2015-12-01

    The widening relevance of Earth observations information across the spectrum of natural and environmental resources markedly enhances the value of these observations. An example is observations of forest extent, species composition, health, and change; this information can help in assessing carbon sequestration, biodiversity and habitat, watershed management, fuelwood potential, and other ecosystem services as well as inform the opportunity cost of forest removal for alternative land use such as agriculture, pasture, or development. These "stacked" indicators or co- net benefits add significant value to Earth observations. In part because of reliance on case studies, much previous research about the value of information from Earth observations has assessed individual applications rather than aggregate across applications, thus tending to undervalue the observations. Aggregating across applications is difficult, however, because it requires common units of measurement: controlling for spatial, spectral, and temporal attributes of the observations; and consistent application of value of information techniques. This paper will discuss general principles of co-net benefit aggregation and illustrate its application to attributing value to Earth observations.

  10. Improving newborn screening laboratory test ordering and result reporting using health information exchange

    PubMed Central

    van Dyck, Peter C; Rinaldo, Piero; McDonald, Clement; Howell, R Rodrey; Zuckerman, Alan; Downing, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Capture, coding and communication of newborn screening (NBS) information represent a challenge for public health laboratories, health departments, hospitals, and ambulatory care practices. An increasing number of conditions targeted for screening and the complexity of interpretation contribute to a growing need for integrated information-management strategies. This makes NBS an important test of tools and architecture for electronic health information exchange (HIE) in this convergence of individual patient care and population health activities. For this reason, the American Health Information Community undertook three tasks described in this paper. First, a newborn screening use case was established to facilitate standards harmonization for common terminology and interoperability specifications guiding HIE. Second, newborn screening coding and terminology were developed for integration into electronic HIE activities. Finally, clarification of privacy, security, and clinical laboratory regulatory requirements governing information exchange was provided, serving as a framework to establish pathways for improving screening program timeliness, effectiveness, and efficiency of quality patient care services. PMID:20064796

  11. Finnish physicians' experiences with computer-supported patient information exchange and communication in clinical work.

    PubMed

    Viitanen, Johanna; Nieminen, Marko; Hypponen, Hannele; Laaveri, Tinja

    2011-01-01

    Several researchers share the concern of healthcare information systems failing to support communication and collaboration in clinical practices. The objective of this paper is to investigate the current state of computer-supported patient information exchange and associated communication between clinicians. We report findings from a national survey on Finnish physicians? experiences with their currently used clinical information systems with regard to patient information documentation, retrieval, management and exchange-related tasks. The questionnaire study with 3929 physicians indicated the main concern being cross-organisational patient information delivery. In addition, physicians argued computer usage increasingly steals time and attention from caring activities and even disturbs physician?nurse collaboration. Problems in information management were particularly emphasised among those physicians working in hospitals and wards. The survey findings indicated that collaborative applications and mobile or wireless solutions have not been widely adapted in Finnish healthcare and suggested an urgent need for adopting appropriate information and communication technology applications to support information exchange and communication between physicians, and physicians and nurses.

  12. Information Quality as a Foundation for User Trustworthiness of Earth Science Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y.; Moroni, D. F.; Ramapriyan, H.; Peng, G.

    2017-12-01

    Information quality is multidimensional. Four different aspects of information quality can be defined based on the lifecycle stages of Earth Science data products: science, product, stewardship and services. With increasing requirements on ensuring and improving information quality coming from multiple government agencies and throughout industry, there have been considerable efforts toward improving information quality during the last decade, much of which has not been well vetted in a collective sense until recently. Given this rich background of prior work, the Information Quality Cluster (IQC), established within the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) in 2011, and reactivated in the summer of 2014, has been active with membership from multiple organizations. The IQC's objectives and activities, aimed at ensuring and improving information quality for Earth science data and products, are also considered vital toward improving the trustworthiness of Earth science data to a vast and interdisciplinary community of data users. During 2016, several members of the IQC have led the development and assessment of four use cases. This was followed up in 2017 with multiple panel sessions at the 2017 Winter and Summer ESIP Meetings to survey the challenges posed in the various aspects of information quality. What was discovered to be most lacking is the transparency of data lineage (i.e., provenance and maturity), uniform methods for uncertainty characterization, and uniform quality assurance data and metadata. While solutions to these types of issues exist, most data producers have little time to investigate and collaborate to arrive at and conform to a consensus approach. The IQC has positioned itself as a community platform to bring together all relevant stakeholders from data producers, repositories, program managers, and the end users. A combination of both well-vetted and "trailblazing" solutions are presented to address how data trustworthiness can

  13. 78 FR 67418 - National Plan for Civil Earth Observations; Request for Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY National Plan for Civil Earth Observations; Request for... response to this Notice will inform the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) as it works with...-6071. Mail: Office of Science and Technology Policy, 1650 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Washington, DC...

  14. GLOBAL EARTH OBSERVATION SYSTEM OF SYSTEMS (GEOSS) REMOTE SENSING INFORMATION GATEWAY DEMONSTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    How do forest fires in a state or country impact the health of residents, living thousands of miles away? How do we better track the effects of heavy urban rain runoff into nearby lakes to provide unprecedented access to and use of global Earth observation information to track, ...

  15. Technical Information Resource on Rare Earth Elements Now Available to Public and Private Sector Stakeholders

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new EPA technical information resource, “Rare Earth Elements: A Review of Production, Processing, Recycling, and Associated Environmental Issues” has been produced as an introductory resource for those interested in learning more about REE mining and alternatives to meet demand...

  16. NASA's Earth Observing Data and Information System - Near-Term Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behnke, Jeanne; Mitchell, Andrew; Ramapriyan, Hampapuram

    2018-01-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) has been a central component of the NASA Earth observation program since the 1990's. EOSDIS manages data covering a wide range of Earth science disciplines including cryosphere, land cover change, polar processes, field campaigns, ocean surface, digital elevation, atmosphere dynamics and composition, and inter-disciplinary research, and many others. One of the key components of EOSDIS is a set of twelve discipline-based Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) distributed across the United States. Managed by NASA's Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project at Goddard Space Flight Center, these DAACs serve over 3 million users globally. The ESDIS Project provides the infrastructure support for EOSDIS, which includes other components such as the Science Investigator-led Processing systems (SIPS), common metadata and metrics management systems, specialized network systems, standards management, and centralized support for use of commercial cloud capabilities. Given the long-term requirements, and the rapid pace of information technology and changing expectations of the user community, EOSDIS has evolved continually over the past three decades. However, many challenges remain. Challenges addressed in this paper include: growing volume and variety, achieving consistency across a diverse set of data producers, managing information about a large number of datasets, migration to a cloud computing environment, optimizing data discovery and access, incorporating user feedback from a diverse community, keeping metadata updated as data collections grow and age, and ensuring that all the content needed for understanding datasets by future users is identified and preserved.

  17. U.S. Foundation Funding for Change in South Africa: An Update. South African Information Exchange Working Paper Number 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micou, Ann M.

    The South African Information Exchange (SAIE) has published an update of 35 existing organizations who are engaged in funding initiatives for specific areas of South African and United States educational exchange programs. One list is alphabetical by such program categories as: academic exchange, academic support, adult education, advocacy,…

  18. Information exchange.

    PubMed

    Bandara, K R

    1991-11-20

    I am a student nurse looking into research on nurses and theft. I would like to hear (in confidence) from any nurses or students who have been convicted in court of theft and, after their employer's intervention, been allowed to continue their career. I require only brief details.

  19. Sharing Service Resource Information for Application Integration in a Virtual Enterprise - Modeling the Communication Protocol for Exchanging Service Resource Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Akira

    Grid computing and web service technologies enable us to use networked resources in a coordinated manner. An integrated service is made of individual services running on coordinated resources. In order to achieve such coordinated services autonomously, the initiator of a coordinated service needs to know detailed service resource information. This information ranges from static attributes like the IP address of the application server to highly dynamic ones like the CPU load. The most famous wide-area service discovery mechanism based on names is DNS. Its hierarchical tree organization and caching methods take advantage of the static information managed. However, in order to integrate business applications in a virtual enterprise, we need a discovery mechanism to search for the optimal resources based on the given a set of criteria (search keys). In this paper, we propose a communication protocol for exchanging service resource information among wide-area systems. We introduce the concept of the service domain that consists of service providers managed under the same management policy. This concept of the service domain is similar to that for autonomous systems (ASs). In each service domain, the service information provider manages the service resource information of service providers that exist in this service domain. The service resource information provider exchanges this information with other service resource information providers that belong to the different service domains. We also verified the protocol's behavior and effectiveness using a simulation model developed for proposed protocol.

  20. 77 FR 28543 - Nationwide Health Information Network: Conditions for Trusted Exchange

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-15

    ... expansion, electronic exchange has been governed by a patchwork of contractual relationships, procurement.... Consequently, this ad-hoc governance approach has led to asymmetries in the policies and technical standards... This request for information (RFI) reflects ONC's current thinking regarding the approach ONC should...

  1. Development of an Exchange Format for the European Environmental Chemical Data and Information Network (ECDIN).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Proctor, David, J.

    1978-01-01

    Uses collection and storage of data in an environmental chemicals data bank to develop an exchange format of hierarchical tree structure between network partners. Rules identify and process the nodes in the tree in such a way that information is neither lost nor degraded upon transfer between network partners. (CWM)

  2. 77 FR 50757 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Exchange Visitor Program Participant Survey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    .... Type of Request: New Collection. Originating Office: Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, ECA/EC... of technology. Abstract of proposed collection: This collection of information is under the provisions of the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act, as amended, and its implementing regulations...

  3. 47 CFR 54.1306 - Updating Information Submitted to the National Exchange Carrier Association.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... incumbent local exchange carrier subject to § 54.1301(a) may update the information submitted to the... on a rolling year basis according to the schedule. (1) Submit data covering the last nine months of... September 30th of the existing year; (2) Submit data covering the last six months of the previous calendar...

  4. 47 CFR 1.731 - Confidentiality of information produced or exchanged by the parties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the party believes in good faith that the materials fall within an exemption to disclosure contained... Complaints § 1.731 Confidentiality of information produced or exchanged by the parties. (a) Any materials... confidentiality for such materials shall so indicate by clearly marking each page, or portion thereof, for which a...

  5. Use of Computer-Based Reference Services in Texas Information Exchange Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menges, Gary L.

    The Texas Information Exchange (TIE) is a state-wide library network organized in 1967 for the purpose of sharing resources among Texas libraries. Its membership includes 37 college and university libraries, the Texas State Library, and ten public libraries that serve as Major Resource Centers in the Texas State Library Communications Network. In…

  6. Proceedings of the Southern Regional Information Exchange Group Biennial Symposium on Forest Genetics

    Treesearch

    G. Sam Foster; Alex M. Diner; [Editors

    1994-01-01

    This volume is the proceedings of the 1992 Southern Regional Information Exchange Group (SRIEG) Biennial Symposium on Forest Genetics. The meeting was held in Huntsville, Alabama, USA on July 8-10, 1992 and was entitled, "Applications of Vegetative Propagation in Forestry." The nine papers were divided into three sets under the headings: "Tissue Culture...

  7. 77 FR 70786 - Request for Information Regarding Health Care Quality for Exchanges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-27

    ...] Request for Information Regarding Health Care Quality for Exchanges AGENCY: Centers for Medicare... Quality Improvement in Health Care (National Quality Strategy) to create national aims and priorities that would guide local, state, and national efforts to improve the quality of health care in the United...

  8. 47 CFR 14.48 - Confidentiality of information produced or exchanged by the parties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Confidentiality of information produced or exchanged by the parties. 14.48 Section 14.48 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL ACCESS TO ADVANCED COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES AND EQUIPMENT BY PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES Recordkeeping...

  9. 47 CFR 14.48 - Confidentiality of information produced or exchanged by the parties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Confidentiality of information produced or exchanged by the parties. 14.48 Section 14.48 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL ACCESS TO ADVANCED COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES AND EQUIPMENT BY PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES Recordkeeping...

  10. 47 CFR 14.48 - Confidentiality of information produced or exchanged by the parties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Confidentiality of information produced or exchanged by the parties. 14.48 Section 14.48 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL ACCESS TO ADVANCED COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES AND EQUIPMENT BY PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES Recordkeeping...

  11. 77 FR 20687 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Form DS-3097, Exchange Visitor Program Annual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... the proposed information collection and supporting documents from Robin J. Lerner, Deputy Assistant.... Robin J. Lerner, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Private Sector Exchange, Bureau of Educational and...

  12. Investigation of the Impact of Extracting and Exchanging Health Information by Using Internet and Social Networks.

    PubMed

    Pistolis, John; Zimeras, Stelios; Chardalias, Kostas; Roupa, Zoe; Fildisis, George; Diomidous, Marianna

    2016-06-01

    Social networks (1) have been embedded in our daily life for a long time. They constitute a powerful tool used nowadays for both searching and exchanging information on different issues by using Internet searching engines (Google, Bing, etc.) and Social Networks (Facebook, Twitter etc.). In this paper, are presented the results of a research based on the frequency and the type of the usage of the Internet and the Social Networks by the general public and the health professionals. The objectives of the research were focused on the investigation of the frequency of seeking and meticulously searching for health information in the social media by both individuals and health practitioners. The exchanging of information is a procedure that involves the issues of reliability and quality of information. In this research, by using advanced statistical techniques an effort is made to investigate the participant's profile in using social networks for searching and exchanging information on health issues. Based on the answers 93 % of the people, use the Internet to find information on health-subjects. Considering principal component analysis, the most important health subjects were nutrition (0.719 %), respiratory issues (0.79 %), cardiological issues (0.777%), psychological issues (0.667%) and total (73.8%). The research results, based on different statistical techniques revealed that the 61.2% of the males and 56.4% of the females intended to use the social networks for searching medical information. Based on the principal components analysis, the most important sources that the participants mentioned, were the use of the Internet and social networks for exchanging information on health issues. These sources proved to be of paramount importance to the participants of the study. The same holds for nursing, medical and administrative staff in hospitals.

  13. The Nasa earth resources spectral information system: A data compilation, first supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leeman, V.

    1972-01-01

    The NASA Earth Resources Spectral Information System and the information contained therein are described. It is intended to be used as a supplement to the NASA Earth Resources Spectral Information System: A Data Compilation, N72-28366. This supplement includes approximately 500 rock and mineral, 100 soil, and 30 vegetation bidirectional and directional reflectance, transmittance, emittance, and degree-of-polarization curves in the optical region from 0.2 to 22.0 microns. The data have been categorized by subject and each curve plotted on a single graph. For some rocks and minerals, all curves of the same type, differing only in particle size, have been plotted on one grid as a composite plot. Each graph, composite or single, is fully titled to indicate curve source and is indexed by subject to facilitate user retrieval.

  14. Impact of Health Information Exchange on Emergency Medicine Clinical Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Bradley D; Bernard, Kyle; Salzman, Josh; Whitebird, Robin R

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the study was to understand the immediate utility of health information exchange (HIE) on emergency department (ED) providers by interviewing them shortly after the information was retrieved. Prior studies of physician perceptions regarding HIE have only been performed outside of the care environment. Trained research assistants interviewed resident physicians, physician assistants and attending physicians using a semi-structured questionnaire within two hours of making a HIE request. The responses were recorded, then transcribed for qualitative analysis. The transcribed interviews were analyzed for emerging qualitative themes. We analyzed 40 interviews obtained from 29 providers. Primary qualitative themes discovered included the following: drivers for requests for outside information; the importance of unexpected information; historical lab values as reference points; providing context when determining whether to admit or discharge a patient; the importance of information in refining disposition; improved confidence of provider; and changes in decisions for diagnostic imaging. ED providers are driven to use HIE when they're missing a known piece of information. This study finds two additional impacts not previously reported. First, providers sometimes find additional unanticipated useful information, supporting a workflow that lowers the threshold to request external information. Second, providers sometimes report utility when no changes to their existing plan are made as their confidence is increased based on external records. Our findings are concordant with previous studies in finding exchanged information is useful to provide context for interpreting lab results, making admission decisions, and prevents repeat diagnostic imaging.

  15. [Problems encountered by hospital pharmacists with information systems: Analysis of exchanges within social networks].

    PubMed

    Charpiat, B; Mille, F; Fombeur, P; Machon, J; Zawadzki, E; Bobay-Madic, A

    2018-05-21

    The development of information systems in French hospitals is mandatory. The aim of this work was to analyze the content of exchanges carried out within social networks, dealing with problems encountered with hospital pharmacies information systems. Messages exchanged via the mailing list of the Association pour le Digital et l'Information en Pharmacie and abstracts of communications presented at hospital pharmacists trade union congresses were analyzed. Those referring to information systems used in hospital pharmacies were selected. From March 2015 to June 2016, 122 e-mails sent by 80 pharmacists concerned information systems. From 2002 to 2016, 45 abstracts dealt with this topic. Problems most often addressed in these 167 documents were "parameterization and/or functionalities" (n=116), interfaces and complexity of the hospital information systems (n=52), relationship with health information technologies vendors and poor reactivity (n=32), additional workload (n=32), ergonomics (n=30), insufficient user training (n=22). These problems are interdependent, lead to errors and in order to mitigate their consequences, they compel pharmacy professionals to divert a significant amount of working hours to the detriment of pharmaceutical care and dispensing and preparing drugs. Hospital pharmacists are faced with many problems of insecurity and inefficiency generated by information systems. Researches are warranted to determine their cost, specify their deleterious effects on care and identify the safest information systems. Copyright © 2018 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Uncovering Hospitalists' Information Needs from Outside Healthcare Facilities in the Context of Health Information Exchange Using Association Rule Learning.

    PubMed

    Martinez, D A; Mora, E; Gemmani, M; Zayas-Castro, J

    2015-01-01

    Important barriers to health information exchange (HIE) adoption are clinical workflow disruptions and troubles with the system interface. Prior research suggests that HIE interfaces providing faster access to useful information may stimulate use and reduce barriers for adoption; however, little is known about informational needs of hospitalists. To study the association between patient health problems and the type of information requested from outside healthcare providers by hospitalists of a tertiary care hospital. We searched operational data associated with fax-based exchange of patient information (previous HIE implementation) between hospitalists of an internal medicine department in a large urban tertiary care hospital in Florida, and any other affiliated and unaffiliated healthcare provider. All hospitalizations from October 2011 to March 2014 were included in the search. Strong association rules between health problems and types of information requested during each hospitalization were discovered using Apriori algorithm, which were then validated by a team of hospitalists of the same department. Only 13.7% (2 089 out of 15 230) of the hospitalizations generated at least one request of patient information to other providers. The transactional data showed 20 strong association rules between specific health problems and types of information exist. Among the 20 rules, for example, abdominal pain, chest pain, and anaemia patients are highly likely to have medical records and outside imaging results requested. Other health conditions, prone to have records requested, were lower urinary tract infection and back pain patients. The presented list of strong co-occurrence of health problems and types of information requested by hospitalists from outside healthcare providers not only informs the implementation and design of HIE, but also helps to target future research on the impact of having access to outside information for specific patient cohorts. Our data

  17. NASA's experience in the international exchange of scientific and technical information in the aerospace field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thibideau, Philip A.

    1989-01-01

    The early NASA international scientific and technical information (STI) exchange arrangements were usually detailed in correspondence with the librarians of the institutions involved. While this type of exchange, which involved only hardcopy (paper) products, grew to include some 220 organization in 43 countries, NASA's main focus shifted substantially to the STI relationship with the European Space Agency (ESA) which began in 1964. The NASA/ESA Tripartite Exchange Program, which now has more than 500 participants, provides more than 4,000 highly-relevant technical reports, fully processed, for the NASA produced 'Aerospace Database'. In turn, NASA provides an updated copy of this Database, known in Europe as the 'NASA File', for access, through ESA's Information Retrieval Service, by participating European organizations. Our experience in the evolving cooperation with ESA has established the 'model' for our more recent exchange agreements with Israel, Australia, Canada, and one under negotiation with Japan. The results of these agreements are made available to participating European organizations through the NASA File.

  18. 76 FR 8804 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Form DS-3097, Exchange Visitor Program Annual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... DS-3097, Exchange Visitor Program Annual Report, OMB Control Number 1405-0151 ACTION: Notice of... Department of State has submitted the following information collection request to the Office of Management... Information Collection: Exchange Visitor Program Annual Report. OMB Control Number: 1405-0151. Type of Request...

  19. NASA's Earth Observing Data and Information System - Supporting Interoperability through a Scalable Architecture (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, A. E.; Lowe, D. R.; Murphy, K. J.; Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2011-12-01

    Initiated in 1990, NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is currently a petabyte-scale archive of data designed to receive, process, distribute and archive several terabytes of science data per day from NASA's Earth science missions. Comprised of 12 discipline specific data centers collocated with centers of science discipline expertise, EOSDIS manages over 6800 data products from many science disciplines and sources. NASA supports global climate change research by providing scalable open application layers to the EOSDIS distributed information framework. This allows many other value-added services to access NASA's vast Earth Science Collection and allows EOSDIS to interoperate with data archives from other domestic and international organizations. EOSDIS is committed to NASA's Data Policy of full and open sharing of Earth science data. As metadata is used in all aspects of NASA's Earth science data lifecycle, EOSDIS provides a spatial and temporal metadata registry and order broker called the EOS Clearing House (ECHO) that allows efficient search and access of cross domain data and services through the Reverb Client and Application Programmer Interfaces (APIs). Another core metadata component of EOSDIS is NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) which represents more than 25,000 Earth science data set and service descriptions from all over the world, covering subject areas within the Earth and environmental sciences. With inputs from the ECHO, GCMD and Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission metadata models, EOSDIS is developing a NASA ISO 19115 Best Practices Convention. Adoption of an international metadata standard enables a far greater level of interoperability among national and international data products. NASA recently concluded a 'Metadata Harmony Study' of EOSDIS metadata capabilities/processes of ECHO and NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD), to evaluate opportunities for improved data access and use, reduce

  20. NASA's Earth Observing Data and Information System - Supporting Interoperability through a Scalable Architecture (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, A. E.; Lowe, D. R.; Murphy, K. J.; Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2013-12-01

    Initiated in 1990, NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is currently a petabyte-scale archive of data designed to receive, process, distribute and archive several terabytes of science data per day from NASA's Earth science missions. Comprised of 12 discipline specific data centers collocated with centers of science discipline expertise, EOSDIS manages over 6800 data products from many science disciplines and sources. NASA supports global climate change research by providing scalable open application layers to the EOSDIS distributed information framework. This allows many other value-added services to access NASA's vast Earth Science Collection and allows EOSDIS to interoperate with data archives from other domestic and international organizations. EOSDIS is committed to NASA's Data Policy of full and open sharing of Earth science data. As metadata is used in all aspects of NASA's Earth science data lifecycle, EOSDIS provides a spatial and temporal metadata registry and order broker called the EOS Clearing House (ECHO) that allows efficient search and access of cross domain data and services through the Reverb Client and Application Programmer Interfaces (APIs). Another core metadata component of EOSDIS is NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) which represents more than 25,000 Earth science data set and service descriptions from all over the world, covering subject areas within the Earth and environmental sciences. With inputs from the ECHO, GCMD and Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission metadata models, EOSDIS is developing a NASA ISO 19115 Best Practices Convention. Adoption of an international metadata standard enables a far greater level of interoperability among national and international data products. NASA recently concluded a 'Metadata Harmony Study' of EOSDIS metadata capabilities/processes of ECHO and NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD), to evaluate opportunities for improved data access and use, reduce

  1. Developing the foundation for syndromic surveillance and health information exchange for yolo county, california.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Osama

    2012-01-01

    This report delineates Yolo County Health Department's process to ascertain its optimal methods of participation in syndromic surveillance and health information exchange. As a health department serving a county of just 200,000 residents, Yolo County Health Department needed to operate within strict financial constraints. Meaningful Use legislation enabled it to pursue both syndromic surveillance and health information exchange participation whilst complying with its budgetary restrictions. The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH), a segment of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, has incentivized the 'Meaningful Use' of electronic health records (EHRs) by providing incentive reimbursements and non-compliance penalties. The Meaningful Use of EHRs is to take place over 3 Stages: Stage 1 has begun, Stage 2 is imminent, and Stage 3 is currently being discussed. Having been solicited by both health information exchange and syndromic surveillance options which were cost-prohibitive, Yolo County Health Department focused attention on BioSense 2.0, a Meaningul Use-ready and virtually free syndromic surveillance program developed by the Federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In collaboration with Sacramento County Department of Health and Human Services, and with support from several other area counties, Yolo County Health Department submitted a Funding Opportunity application for BioSense 2.0 regional implementation. Through this collaboration, Yolo County Health Department has begun participating in the formative stages of the Sacramento Area Center for Advanced Biosurveillance (SAC-B). Via SAC-B, Yolo County Health Department will be able to participate in syndromic surveillance in the BioSense 2.0 program, and simultaneously expand its electronic health data sharing towards a more comprehensive health information exchange. LASTLY, OVER THE COURSE OF THESE PROJECTS, THREE OTHER METHODS OF PARTICIPATING IN

  2. Analysis research for earth resource information systems - Where do we stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landgrebe, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Discussion of the state of the technology of earth resources information systems relative to future operational implementation. The importance of recognizing the difference between systems with image orientation and systems with numerical orientation is illustrated in an example concerning the effect of noise on multiband multispectral data obtained in an agricultural experiment. It is suggested that the data system hardware portion of the total earth resources information system be designed in terms of a numerical orientation; it is argued, however, that this choise is entirely compatible with image-oriented analysis tasks. Some aspects of interfacing such an advanced technology with an operational user community in such a way as to accommodate the user's need for flexibility and yet provide the services needed on a cost-effective basis are discussed.

  3. Health information exchange implementation: lessons learned and critical success factors from a case study.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Sue S; Schooley, Benjamin L; Bhavsar, Grishma P

    2014-08-15

    Much attention has been given to the proposition that the exchange of health information as an act, and health information exchange (HIE), as an entity, are critical components of a framework for health care change, yet little has been studied to understand the value proposition of implementing HIE with a statewide HIE. Such an organization facilitates the exchange of health information across disparate systems, thus following patients as they move across different care settings and encounters, whether or not they share an organizational affiliation. A sociotechnical systems approach and an interorganizational systems framework were used to examine implementation of a health system electronic medical record (EMR) system onto a statewide HIE, under a cooperative agreement with the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, and its collaborating organizations. The objective of the study was to focus on the implementation of a health system onto a statewide HIE; provide insight into the technical, organizational, and governance aspects of a large private health system and the Virginia statewide HIE (organizations with the shared goal of exchanging health information); and to understand the organizational motivations and value propositions apparent during HIE implementation. We used a formative evaluation methodology to investigate the first implementation of a health system onto the statewide HIE. Qualitative methods (direct observation, 36 hours), informal information gathering, semistructured interviews (N=12), and document analysis were used to gather data between August 12, 2012 and June 24, 2013. Derived from sociotechnical concepts, a Blended Value Collaboration Enactment Framework guided the data gathering and analysis to understand organizational stakeholders' perspectives across technical, organizational, and governance dimensions. Several challenges, successes, and lessons learned during the implementation of a health system to the

  4. Health Information Exchange Implementation: Lessons Learned and Critical Success Factors From a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Much attention has been given to the proposition that the exchange of health information as an act, and health information exchange (HIE), as an entity, are critical components of a framework for health care change, yet little has been studied to understand the value proposition of implementing HIE with a statewide HIE. Such an organization facilitates the exchange of health information across disparate systems, thus following patients as they move across different care settings and encounters, whether or not they share an organizational affiliation. A sociotechnical systems approach and an interorganizational systems framework were used to examine implementation of a health system electronic medical record (EMR) system onto a statewide HIE, under a cooperative agreement with the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, and its collaborating organizations. Objective The objective of the study was to focus on the implementation of a health system onto a statewide HIE; provide insight into the technical, organizational, and governance aspects of a large private health system and the Virginia statewide HIE (organizations with the shared goal of exchanging health information); and to understand the organizational motivations and value propositions apparent during HIE implementation. Methods We used a formative evaluation methodology to investigate the first implementation of a health system onto the statewide HIE. Qualitative methods (direct observation, 36 hours), informal information gathering, semistructured interviews (N=12), and document analysis were used to gather data between August 12, 2012 and June 24, 2013. Derived from sociotechnical concepts, a Blended Value Collaboration Enactment Framework guided the data gathering and analysis to understand organizational stakeholders’ perspectives across technical, organizational, and governance dimensions. Results Several challenges, successes, and lessons learned during the

  5. Big Data in the Earth Observing System Data and Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, Chris; Baynes, Katie; McInerney, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Approaches that are being pursued for the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) data system to address the challenges of Big Data were presented to the NASA Big Data Task Force. Cloud prototypes are underway to tackle the volume challenge of Big Data. However, advances in computer hardware or cloud won't help (much) with variety. Rather, interoperability standards, conventions, and community engagement are the key to addressing variety.

  6. Advanced Earth-to-orbit propulsion technology information, dissemination and research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1993-01-01

    A conference was held at MSFC in May 1992 describing the research achievements of the NASA-wide research and technology programs dealing with advanced oxygen/hydrogen and oxygen/hydrocarbon earth-to-orbit propulsion. The purpose of this conference was to provide a forum for the timely dissemination to the propulsion community of the results emerging from this program with particular emphasis on the transfer of information from the scientific/research to the designer.

  7. The Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP Federation): Facilitating Partnerships that Work to Bring Earth Science Data into Educational Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freuder, R.; Ledley, T. S.; Dahlman, L.

    2004-12-01

    The Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP Federation, http://www.esipfed.org) formed seven years ago and now with 77 member organizations is working to "increase the quality and value of Earth science products and services .for the benefit of the ESIP Federation's stakeholder communities." Education (both formal and informal) is a huge audience that we serve. Partnerships formed by members within the ESIP Federation have created bridges that close the gap between Earth science data collection and research and the effective use of that Earth science data to explore concepts in Earth system science by the educational community. The Earth Exploration Toolbook is one of those successful collaborations. The Earth Exploration Toolbook (EET, http://serc.carleton.edu/eet) grew out of a need of the educational community (articulated by the Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE) community) to have better access to Earth science data and data analysis tools and help in effectively using them with students. It is a collection of web-accessible chapters, each featuring step-by-step instructions on how to use an Earth science dataset and data analysis tool to investigate an issue or concept in Earth system science. Each chapter also provides the teacher information on the outcome of the activity, grade level, standards addressed, learning goals, time required, and ideas for exploring further. The individual ESIP Federation partners alone could not create the EET. However, the ESIP Federation facilitated the partnering of members, drawing from data providers, researchers and education tool developers, to create the EET. Interest in the EET has grown since it went live with five chapters in July 2003. There are currently seven chapters with another six soon to be released. Monthly online seminars in which over a hundred educators have participated have given very positive feedback. Post workshop surveys from our telecon-online workshops indicate that

  8. Information theory lateral density distribution for Earth inferred from global gravity field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Information Theory Inference, better known as the Maximum Entropy Method, was used to infer the lateral density distribution inside the Earth. The approach assumed that the Earth consists of indistinguishable Maxwell-Boltzmann particles populating infinitesimal volume elements, and followed the standard methods of statistical mechanics (maximizing the entropy function). The GEM 10B spherical harmonic gravity field coefficients, complete to degree and order 36, were used as constraints on the lateral density distribution. The spherically symmetric part of the density distribution was assumed to be known. The lateral density variation was assumed to be small compared to the spherically symmetric part. The resulting information theory density distribution for the cases of no crust removed, 30 km of compensated crust removed, and 30 km of uncompensated crust removed all gave broad density anomalies extending deep into the mantle, but with the density contrasts being the greatest towards the surface (typically + or 0.004 g cm 3 in the first two cases and + or - 0.04 g cm 3 in the third). None of the density distributions resemble classical organized convection cells. The information theory approach may have use in choosing Standard Earth Models, but, the inclusion of seismic data into the approach appears difficult.

  9. HTML5 microdata as a semantic container for medical information exchange.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Eizen; Kobayashi, Shinji; Ishihara, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Achieving interoperability between clinical electronic medical records (EMR) systems and cloud computing systems is challenging because of the lack of a universal reference method as a standard for information exchange with a secure connection. Here we describe an information exchange scheme using HTML5 microdata, where the standard semantic container is an HTML document. We embed HL7 messages describing laboratory test results in the microdata. We also annotate items in the clinical research report with the microdata. We mapped the laboratory test result data into the clinical research report using an HL7 selector specified in the microdata. This scheme can provide secure cooperation between the cloud-based service and the EMR system.

  10. Repeated Diagnostic Imaging Studies in Ontario and the Impact of Health Information Exchange Systems.

    PubMed

    Welk, Blayne; Liu, Kuan; Al-Jaishi, Ahmed; McArthur, Eric; Jain, Arsh K; Ordon, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Health information exchange systems can link the results of diagnostic imaging tests across hospitals and geographic areas. One of the potential benefits of these systems is a reduction in imaging studies ordered by physicians who do not know about or have access to the previous imaging results. We used administrative data from Ontario, Canada (from the year 2013), to measure how frequently the same cross-sectional imaging study is repeated in a patient. Overall, 12.8% of the specified imaging tests were repeated within 90 days. An area of Southwestern Ontario with a health information exchange system for diagnostic imaging tests had a 13% lower rate of repeat cross-sectional imaging compared with the rest of the province (11.2 vs 12.8%, p < 0.01). The use of linked radiology systems may be able to reduce the number of repeated imaging tests and improve patient safety and hospital efficiency.

  11. Data Preservation -Progress in NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2013-12-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) has been operational since August 1994, processing, archiving and distributing data from a variety of Earth science missions. The data sources include instruments on-board satellites and aircraft and field campaigns. In addition, EOSDIS manages socio-economic data. The satellite missions whose data are managed by EOSDIS range from the Nimbus series of the 1960s and 1970s to the EOS series launched during 1997 through 2004 to the Suomi National Polar Partnership (SNPP) launched in October 2011. Data from future satellite missions such as the Decadal Survey missions will also be archived and distributed by EOSDIS. NASA is not legislatively mandated to preserve data permanently as are other agencies such as USGS, NOAA and NARA. However, NASA must preserve all the data and associated content beyond the lives of NASA's missions to meet NASA's near-term objective of supporting active scientific research. Also, NASA must ensure that the data and associated content are preserved for transition to permanent archival agencies. The term preservation implies ensuring long-term protection of bits, readability, understandability, usability and reproducibility of results. To ensure preservation of bits, EOSDIS makes sure that data are backed-up adequately. Periodically, the risk of data loss is assessed and corrective action is taken as needed. Data are copied to more modern media on a routine basis to ensure readability. For some of the oldest data within EOSDIS, we have had to go through special data rescue efforts. Data from very old media have been restored and film data have been scanned and digitized. For example, restored data from the Nimbus missions are available for ftp access at the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC). The Earth Science Data and Information System Project, which is responsible for EOSDIS, has been active within the Data Stewardship and Preservation

  12. Stable target opinion through power-law bias in information exchange.

    PubMed

    Datta, Amitava

    2018-04-01

    We study a model of binary decision making when a certain population of agents is initially seeded with two different opinions, "+" and "-," with fractions p_{1} and p_{2}, respectively, p_{1}+p_{2}=1. Individuals can reverse their initial opinion only once based on this information exchange. We study this model on a completely connected network, where any pair of agents can exchange information, and a two-dimensional square lattice with periodic boundary conditions, where information exchange is possible only between the nearest neighbors. We propose a model in which each agent maintains two counters of opposite opinions and accepts opinions of other agents with a power-law bias until a threshold is reached, when they fix their final opinion. Our model is inspired by the study of negativity bias and positive-negative asymmetry, which has been known in the psychology literature for a long time. Our model can achieve a stable intermediate mix of positive and negative opinions in a population. In particular, we show that it is possible to achieve close to any fraction p_{3}, 0≤p_{3}≤1, of "-" opinion starting from an initial fraction p_{1} of "-" opinion by applying a bias through adjusting the power-law exponent of p_{3}.

  13. Stable target opinion through power-law bias in information exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Amitava

    2018-04-01

    We study a model of binary decision making when a certain population of agents is initially seeded with two different opinions, "+" and "-," with fractions p1 and p2, respectively, p1+p2=1 . Individuals can reverse their initial opinion only once based on this information exchange. We study this model on a completely connected network, where any pair of agents can exchange information, and a two-dimensional square lattice with periodic boundary conditions, where information exchange is possible only between the nearest neighbors. We propose a model in which each agent maintains two counters of opposite opinions and accepts opinions of other agents with a power-law bias until a threshold is reached, when they fix their final opinion. Our model is inspired by the study of negativity bias and positive-negative asymmetry, which has been known in the psychology literature for a long time. Our model can achieve a stable intermediate mix of positive and negative opinions in a population. In particular, we show that it is possible to achieve close to any fraction p3, 0 ≤p3≤1 , of "-" opinion starting from an initial fraction p1 of "-" opinion by applying a bias through adjusting the power-law exponent of p3.

  14. Earth Sciences Data and Information System (ESDIS) program planning and evaluation methodology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, William B.

    1995-01-01

    An Earth Sciences Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project Management Plan (PMP) is prepared. An ESDIS Project Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) consistent with the developed PMP is also prepared. ESDIS and related EOS program requirements developments, management and analysis processes are evaluated. Opportunities to improve the effectiveness of these processes and program/project responsiveness to requirements are identified. Overall ESDIS cost estimation processes are evaluated, and recommendations to improve cost estimating and modeling techniques are developed. ESDIS schedules and scheduling tools are evaluated. Risk assessment, risk mitigation strategies and approaches, and use of risk information in management decision-making are addressed.

  15. The essential role of reconfiguration capabilities in the implementation of HIV-related health information exchanges.

    PubMed

    Steward, Wayne T; Koester, Kimberly A; Collins, Shane P; Maiorana, Andre; Myers, Janet J

    2012-10-01

    To understand the dynamic capabilities that enabled the six demonstration projects of the Information Technology Networks of Care Initiative to implement health information exchanges (HIEs) tailored to their local HIV epidemics and regional care systems. We conducted 111 semi-structured interviews with project staff and information technology (IT) specialists associated with the demonstration projects, staff from community-based organizations and public health agencies collaborating in the design and implementation of the HIEs, and providers who used each HIE. The dynamic capability framework guided analyses. In the context of a HIE, the framework's components include information systems (the actual technological exchange systems and capacity to update them), absorptive capacity (the ability to implement an operating HIE), reconfiguration capacity (the ability to adapt workflows and clinical practices in response to a HIE), and organizational size and human resources (characteristics likely to affect a clinic's ability to respond). Across the projects, we found evidence for the importance of three dynamic capabilities: information systems, reconfiguration capacity, and organizational size and human resources. However, of these three, reconfiguration capacity was the most salient. Implementation outcomes at all six of the projects were shaped substantially by the degree of attention dedicated to reworking procedures and practices so that HIE usage became routine. Electronic information exchange offers the promise of improved coordination of care. However, implementation of HIEs goes beyond programing and hardware installation challenges, and requires close attention to the needs of the HIEs end-users. Providers need to discern value from a HIE because their active participation is essential to ensuring that clinic and agency practices and procedures are reconfigured to incorporate new systems into daily work processes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All

  16. Highlights of the White House Conference on Library and Information Services: Preconference on International Information Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chartrand, Robert Lee; Bortnick, Jane

    This report on a preconference symposium held July 31, 1979 presents recommendations developed to interpret the conference theme of library and information services for increasing international understanding. Five discussion groups were organized to consider (1) the current status of international information flow, (2) overcoming barriers to…

  17. WaterML, an Information Standard for the Exchange of in-situ hydrological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, D.; Taylor, P.; Zaslavsky, I.

    2012-04-01

    The WaterML 2.0 Standards Working Group (SWG), working within the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) and in cooperation with the joint OGC-World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Hydrology Domain Working Group (HDWG), has developed an open standard for the exchange of water observation data; WaterML 2.0. The focus of the standard is time-series data, commonly generated from in-situ style monitoring. This is high value data for hydrological applications such as flood forecasting, environmental reporting and supporting hydrological infrastructure (e.g. dams, supply systems), which is commonly exchanged, but a lack of standards inhibits efficient reuse and automation. The process of developing WaterML required doing a harmonization analysis of existing standards to identify overlapping concepts and come to agreement on a harmonized definition. Generally the formats captured similar requirements, all with subtle differences, such as how time-series point metadata was handled. The in-progress standard WaterML 2.0 incorporates the semantics of the hydrologic information: location, procedure, and observations, and is implemented as an application schema of the Geography Markup Language version 3.2.1, making use of the OGC Observations & Measurements standards. WaterML2.0 is designed as an extensible schema to allow encoding of data to be used in a variety of exchange scenarios. Example areas of usage are: exchange of data for operational hydrological monitoring programs; supporting operation of infrastructure (e.g. dams, supply systems); cross-border exchange of observational data; release of data for public dissemination; enhancing disaster management through data exchange; and exchange in support of national reporting The first phase of WaterML2.0 focused on structural definitions allowing for the transfer of time-series, with less work on harmonization of vocabulary items such as quality codes. Vocabularies from various organizations tend to be specific and take time to

  18. Building Partnerships to Address Community Geoscience Priorities: A Brief History of the Thriving Earth Exchange (TEX) Model and its Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, C.; Udu-gama, N.; Pandya, R.; Leshin, L. A.; McEntee, C.; Williams, B. M.; Goodwin, M.

    2016-12-01

    Increasingly, communities around the world are being challenged by extremes in climatic change and natural hazards and a lack of key natural resources. In many cases, such communities do not have access to the experts and resources they need to address these changes. While partnerships are being developed to address these challenges, there is a need to bring communities and scientists together equitably. Thriving Earth Exchange (TEX), a program powered by the American Geophysical Union (AGU), seeks to connect communities by offering them scientists that can work with them on developing effective solutions for their real-life climate change, natural hazards and/or natural resources challenges. TEX advocates community science - the notion that scientists and communities equitably work together to identify how science can advance local priorities such that it produces local impact, guides future research and generates solutions that can be shared. The concept for TEX evolved from 2011 AGU Council discussions on potential options for impacting AGU's upcoming Centennial. The concept started as a single "Grand Challenge" concept, but evolved through several trails and iterations to today's vibrant TEX program and model. The TEX process is not for every community or scientist. In order to ensure that a community can proceed through a project with a scientist, TEX has found that they often must have a mandate to work on the issue at hand. For instance, if a planning department is tasked with doing a climate vulnerability assessment, a project looking at how heat extremes affect the elderly could probably proceed without interruption from other internal community processes. In some cases, available funds acts as an impetus for a community to seek action. Yet at other times, an individual's passion to address a community challenge may be the spark required to turn ideas into action. This presentation will provide an overview of the TEX genesis within AGU, and its growth and

  19. Privacy as an enabler, not an impediment: building trust into health information exchange.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Deven; Dempsey, James X; Harris, Leslie; Goldman, Janlori

    2009-01-01

    Building privacy and security protections into health information technology systems will bolster trust in such systems and promote their adoption. The privacy issue, too long seen as a barrier to electronic health information exchange, can be resolved through a comprehensive framework that implements core privacy principles, adopts trusted network design characteristics, and establishes oversight and accountability mechanisms. The public policy challenges of implementing this framework in a complex and evolving environment will require improvements to existing law, new rules for entities outside the traditional health care sector, a more nuanced approach to the role of consent, and stronger enforcement mechanisms.

  20. Aeronautical Satellite-Assisted Process for Information Exchange Through Network Technologies (Aero-SAPIENT) Conducted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zernic, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    Broadband satellite communications for aeronautics marries communication and network technologies to address NASA's goals in information technology base research and development, thereby serving the safety and capacity needs of the National Airspace System. This marriage of technology increases the interactivity between airborne vehicles and ground systems. It improves decision-making and efficiency, reduces operation costs, and improves the safety and capacity of the National Airspace System. To this end, a collaborative project called the Aeronautical Satellite Assisted Process for Information Exchange through Network Technologies, or Aero-SAPIENT, was conducted out of Tinker AFB, Oklahoma, during November and December 2000.

  1. Text Mining to inform construction of Earth and Environmental Science Ontologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schildhauer, M.; Adams, B.; Rebich Hespanha, S.

    2013-12-01

    There is a clear need for better semantic representation of Earth and environmental concepts, to facilitate more effective discovery and re-use of information resources relevant to scientists doing integrative research. In order to develop general-purpose Earth and environmental science ontologies, however, it is necessary to represent concepts and relationships that span usage across multiple disciplines and scientific specialties. Traditional knowledge modeling through ontologies utilizes expert knowledge but inevitably favors the particular perspectives of the ontology engineers, as well as the domain experts who interacted with them. This often leads to ontologies that lack robust coverage of synonymy, while also missing important relationships among concepts that can be extremely useful for working scientists to be aware of. In this presentation we will discuss methods we have developed that utilize statistical topic modeling on a large corpus of Earth and environmental science articles, to expand coverage and disclose relationships among concepts in the Earth sciences. For our work we collected a corpus of over 121,000 abstracts from many of the top Earth and environmental science journals. We performed latent Dirichlet allocation topic modeling on this corpus to discover a set of latent topics, which consist of terms that commonly co-occur in abstracts. We match terms in the topics to concept labels in existing ontologies to reveal gaps, and we examine which terms are commonly associated in natural language discourse, to identify relationships that are important to formally model in ontologies. Our text mining methodology uncovers significant gaps in the content of some popular existing ontologies, and we show how, through a workflow involving human interpretation of topic models, we can bootstrap ontologies to have much better coverage and richer semantics. Because we base our methods directly on what working scientists are communicating about their

  2. The strategic use of standardized information exchange technology in a university health system.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Po-Hsun; Chen, Heng-Shuen; Lai, Feipei; Lai, Jin-Shin

    2010-04-01

    This article illustrates a Web-based health information system that is comprised of specific information exchange standards related to health information for healthcare services in National Taiwan University Health System. Through multidisciplinary teamwork, medical and informatics experts collaborated and studied on system scope definition, standard selection challenges, system implementation barriers, system management outcomes, and further expandability of other systems. After user requirement analysis and prototyping, from 2005 to 2008, an online clinical decision support system with multiple functions of reminding and information push was implemented. It was to replace its original legacy systems and serve among the main hospital and three branches of 180-200 clinics and 7,500-8,000 patient visits per day. To evaluate the effectiveness of this system, user surveys were performed, which revealed that the average score of user satisfaction increased from 2.80 to 3.18 on a 4-point scale. Among the items, especially e-learning for training service, courtesy communications for system requests, and courtesy communications for system operations showed statistically significant improvement. From this study, the authors concluded that standardized information exchange technologies can be used to create a brand new enterprise value and steadily obtain more competitive advantages for a prestige healthcare system.

  3. Real time alert system: a disease management system leveraging health information exchange.

    PubMed

    Anand, Vibha; Sheley, Meena E; Xu, Shawn; Downs, Stephen M

    2012-01-01

    Rates of preventive and disease management services can be improved by providing automated alerts and reminders to primary care providers (PCPs) using of health information technology (HIT) tools. Using Adaptive Turnaround Documents (ATAD), an existing Health Information Exchange (HIE) infrastructure and office fax machines, we developed a Real Time Alert (RTA) system. RTA is a computerized decision support system (CDSS) that is able to deliver alerts to PCPs statewide for recommended services around the time of the patient visit. RTA is also able to capture structured clinical data from providers using existing fax technology. In this study, we evaluate RTA's performance for alerting PCPs when their patients with asthma have an emergency room visit anywhere in the state. Our results show that RTA was successfully able to deliver "just in time" patient-relevant alerts to PCPs across the state. Furthermore, of those ATADs faxed back and automatically interpreted by the RTA system, 35% reported finding the provided information helpful. The PCPs who reported finding information helpful also reported making a phone call, sending a letter or seeing the patient for follow up care. We have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of electronically exchanging important patient related information with the PCPs statewide. This is despite a lack of a link with their electronic health records. We have shown that using our ATAD technology, a PCP can be notified quickly of an important event such as a patient's asthma related emergency room admission so further follow up can happen in near real time.

  4. Management of laboratory data and information exchange in the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Wilkerson, Myra L; Henricks, Walter H; Castellani, William J; Whitsitt, Mark S; Sinard, John H

    2015-03-01

    In the era of the electronic health record, the success of laboratories and pathologists will depend on effective presentation and management of laboratory information, including test orders and results, and effective exchange of data between the laboratory information system and the electronic health record. In this third paper of a series that explores empowerment of pathology in the era of the electronic health record, we review key elements of managing laboratory information within the electronic health record and examine functional issues pertinent to pathologists and laboratories in the exchange of laboratory information between electronic health records and both anatomic and clinical pathology laboratory information systems. Issues with electronic order-entry and results-reporting interfaces are described, and considerations for setting up these interfaces are detailed in tables. The role of the laboratory medical director as mandated by the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 and the impacts of discordance between laboratory results and their display in the electronic health record are also discussed.

  5. Health Information Exchange as a Complex and Adaptive Construct: Scoping Review.

    PubMed

    Akhlaq, Ather; Sheikh, Aziz; Pagliari, Claudia

    2017-01-25

    To understand how the concept of Health Information Exchange (HIE) has evolved over time.  Supplementary analysis of data from a systematic scoping review of definitions of HIE from 1900 to 2014, involving temporal analysis of underpinning themes. The search identified 268 unique definitions of HIE dating from 1957 onwards; 103 in scientific databases and 165 in Google. These contained consistent themes, representing the core concept of exchanging health information electronically, as well as fluid themes, reflecting the evolving policy, business, organisational and technological context of HIE (including the emergence of HIE as an organisational 'entity'). These are summarised graphically to show how the concept has evolved around the world with the passage of time.  The term HIE emerged in 1957 with the establishment of Occupational HIE, evolving through the 1990s with concepts such as electronic data interchange and mobile computing technology; then from 2006-10 largely aligning with the US Government's health information technology strategy and the creation of HIEs as organisational entities, alongside the broader interoperability imperative, and continuing to evolve today as part of a broader international agenda for sustainable, information-driven health systems. The concept of HIE is an evolving and adaptive one, reflecting the ongoing quest for integrated and interoperable information to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of health systems, in a changing technological and policy environment.

  6. Legal Barriers to the Growth of Health Information Exchange-Boulders or Pebbles?

    PubMed

    Mello, Michelle M; Adler-Milstein, Julia; Ding, Karen L; Savage, Lucia

    2018-03-01

    Policy Points: Historically, in addition to economic and technical hurdles, state and federal health information privacy laws have been cited as a significant obstacle to expanding electronic health information exchange (HIE) in the United States. Our review finds that over the past decade, several helpful developments have ameliorated the legal barriers to HIE, although variation in states' patient consent requirements remains a challenge. Today, health care providers' complaints about legal obstacles to HIE may be better understood as reflecting concerns about the economic and competitive risks of information sharing. Although the clinical benefits of exchanging patients' health information electronically across providers have long been recognized, participation in health information exchange (HIE) has lagged behind adoption of electronic health records. Barriers erected by federal and state health information privacy law have been cited as a leading reason for the slow progress. A comprehensive assessment of these issues has not been undertaken for nearly a decade, despite a number of salient legal developments. Analysis of federal and state health information privacy statutes and regulations and secondary materials. Although some legal barriers to HIE persist, many have been ameliorated-in some cases, simply through improved understanding of what the law actually requires. It is now clear that the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act presents no obstacles to electronically sharing protected health information for treatment purposes and does not hold providers who properly disclose information liable for privacy breaches by recipients. The failure of federal efforts to establish a unique patient identifier number does slow HIE by inhibiting optimal matching of patient records, but other action to facilitate matching will be taken under the 21st Century Cures Act. The Cures Act also creates the legal architecture to begin to combat "information

  7. Hospital to Post-Acute Care Facility Transfers: Identifying Targets for Information Exchange Quality Improvement.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christine D; Cumbler, Ethan; Honigman, Benjamin; Burke, Robert E; Boxer, Rebecca S; Levy, Cari; Coleman, Eric A; Wald, Heidi L

    2017-01-01

    Information exchange is critical to high-quality care transitions from hospitals to post-acute care (PAC) facilities. We conducted a survey to evaluate the completeness and timeliness of information transfer and communication between a tertiary-care academic hospital and its related PAC facilities. This was a cross-sectional Web-based 36-question survey of 110 PAC clinicians and staff representing 31 PAC facilities conducted between October and December 2013. We received responses from 71 of 110 individuals representing 29 of 31 facilities (65% and 94% response rates). We collapsed 4-point Likert responses into dichotomous variables to reflect completeness (sufficient vs insufficient) and timeliness (timely vs not timely) for information transfer and communication. Among respondents, 32% reported insufficient information about discharge medical conditions and management plan, and 83% reported at least occasionally encountering problems directly related to inadequate information from the hospital. Hospital clinician contact information was the most common insufficient domain. With respect to timeliness, 86% of respondents desired receipt of a discharge summary on or before the day of discharge, but only 58% reported receiving the summary within this time frame. Through free-text responses, several participants expressed the need for paper prescriptions for controlled pain medications to be sent with patients at the time of transfer. Staff and clinicians at PAC facilities perceive substantial deficits in content and timeliness of information exchange between the hospital and facilities. Such deficits are particularly relevant in the context of the increasing prevalence of bundled payments for care across settings as well as forthcoming readmissions penalties for PAC facilities. Targets identified for quality improvement include structuring discharge summary information to include information identified as deficient by respondents, completion of discharge summaries

  8. Improving Information Exchange in the Chicken Processing Sector Using Standardised Data Lists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Kathryn Anne-Marie; van der Roest, Joop; Höskuldsson, Stefán Torfi; Olsen, Petter; Karlsen, Kine Mari

    Research has shown that to improve electronic communication between companies, universal standardised data lists are necessary. In food supply chains in particular there is an increased need to exchange data in the wake of food safety incidents. Food supply chain companies already record numerous measurements, properties and parameters. These records are necessary for legal reasons, labelling, traceability, profiling desirable characteristics, showing compliance and for meeting customer requirements. Universal standards for name and content of each of these data elements would improve information exchange between buyers, sellers, authorities, consumers and other interested parties. A case study, carried out for the chicken sector, attempted to identify the most relevant parameters including which of these were already communicated to external bodies.

  9. A security framework for nationwide health information exchange based on telehealth strategy.

    PubMed

    Zaidan, B B; Haiqi, Ahmed; Zaidan, A A; Abdulnabi, Mohamed; Kiah, M L Mat; Muzamel, Hussaen

    2015-05-01

    This study focuses on the situation of health information exchange (HIE) in the context of a nationwide network. It aims to create a security framework that can be implemented to ensure the safe transmission of health information across the boundaries of care providers in Malaysia and other countries. First, a critique of the major elements of nationwide health information networks is presented from the perspective of security, along with such topics as the importance of HIE, issues, and main approaches. Second, a systematic evaluation is conducted on the security solutions that can be utilized in the proposed nationwide network. Finally, a secure framework for health information transmission is proposed within a central cloud-based model, which is compatible with the Malaysian telehealth strategy. The outcome of this analysis indicates that a complete security framework for a global structure of HIE is yet to be defined and implemented. Our proposed framework represents such an endeavor and suggests specific techniques to achieve this goal.

  10. Sun-Earth Day: Reaching the Education Audience by Informal Means

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, J.; Lewis, E.; Cline, T.

    2010-01-01

    For ten years the Sun-Earth Day program has promoted Heliophysics education to ever larger audiences through events centered on attractive annual themes. What originally started out as a one day event quickly evolved into a series of programs and events that occur throughout the year culminating with a celebration on or near the Spring Equinox. The events are often formal broadcasts or webcasts seeking to convey the science behind the latest solar-terrestrial mission discoveries. This has been quite successful, but it is clear that the younger generation increasingly depends on social networking approaches and informal news transmission for learning what is happening in the world around them. For 2010, the Sun-Earth Day team put emphasis on using informal approaches to bring the theme to the audience. The main event, a webcast from the NASA booth at the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) annual meeting by the NASA EDGE group, took a lighthearted and offbeat approach to interviewing scientists and educators about Heliophysics news. NASA EDGE programs are unscripted and unpredictable, and that represents a different approach to getting the message across. The webcast was supplemented by a number of social networking avenues. The Sun-Earth Day program explored a wide range of social media applications including Facebook, Twitter, NING, podcasting, iPhone apps, etc. Each of these offers unique and effective methods to promote Heliophysics content and mission related highlights. The facebook site was quite popular and message posting there told the Sun-Earth Day story piece by piece. The same could be said of twittering and the tweetup held at the NSTA site. Has all of this been effective? Results are still being gathered, but anecdotal responses from the world seem very positive. What other methods might be used in the future to bring the science to a personal hands-on, interactive experience? Outcomes: Participants will: (1) Be introduced to the Sun-Earth

  11. The Effects of Public Concern for Information Privacy on the Adoption of Health Information Exchanges (HIEs) by Healthcare Entities.

    PubMed

    Esmaeilzadeh, Pouyan

    2018-05-08

    The implementation of Health Information Exchanges (HIEs) by healthcare organizations may not achieve the desired outcomes as consumers may request that their health information remains unshared because of information privacy concerns. Drawing on the insights of concern for information privacy (CFIP) literature, this work extends the application of CFIP to the HIE domain. This study attempts to develop and test a model centered on the four dimensions of CFIP construct (collection, errors, unauthorized access, and secondary use) and their antecedents to predict consumers' opt-in behavioral intention toward HIE in the presence of the perceived health status' effects. We conducted an online survey in the United States using 826 samples. The results demonstrate that the perceived health information sensitivity and computer anxiety meaningfully contribute to information privacy concerns and CFIP construct significantly impedes consumers' opt-in decision to HIEs. Interestingly, contrary to our expectation, perceived poor health status considerably attenuates the negative effects exerted by CFIP on opt-in intention. The model proposed by this study can be used as a useful conceptual tool by both further studies and practitioners to examine the complex nature of patients' reactions to information privacy threats associated with the use of HIE technology in the healthcare industry.

  12. Bridging Organizational Divides in Health Care: An Ecological View of Health Information Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kevin B; Gadd, Cynthia S; Lorenzi, Nancy M

    2013-01-01

    Background The fragmented nature of health care delivery in the United States leads to fragmented health information and impedes patient care continuity and safety. Technologies to support interorganizational health information exchange (HIE) are becoming more available. Understanding how HIE technology changes health care delivery and affects people and organizations is crucial to long-term successful implementation. Objective Our study investigated the impacts of HIE technology on organizations, health care providers, and patients through a new, context-aware perspective, the Regional Health Information Ecology. Methods We conducted more than 180 hours of direct observation, informal interviews during observation, and 9 formal semi-structured interviews. Data collection focused on workflow and information flow among health care team members and patients and on health care provider use of HIE technology. Results We structured the data analysis around five primary information ecology components: system, locality, diversity, keystone species, and coevolution. Our study identified three main roles, or keystone species, involved in HIE: information consumers, information exchange facilitators, and information repositories. The HIE technology impacted patient care by allowing providers direct access to health information, reducing time to obtain health information, and increasing provider awareness of patient interactions with the health care system. Developing the infrastructure needed to support HIE technology also improved connections among information technology support groups at different health care organizations. Despite the potential of this type of technology to improve continuity of patient care, HIE technology adoption by health care providers was limited. Conclusions To successfully build a HIE network, organizations had to shift perspectives from an ownership view of health data to a continuity of care perspective. To successfully integrate external health

  13. Information Requirements for Integrating Spatially Discrete, Feature-Based Earth Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsburgh, J. S.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Lehnert, K. A.; Mayorga, E.; Hsu, L.; Song, L.; Zaslavsky, I.; Valentine, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Several cyberinfrastructures have emerged for sharing observational data collected at densely sampled and/or highly instrumented field sites. These include the CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System (HIS), the Critical Zone Observatory Integrated Data Management System (CZOData), the Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA) and EarthChem system, and the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS). These systems rely on standard data encodings and, in some cases, standard semantics for classes of geoscience data. Their focus is on sharing data on the Internet via web services in domain specific encodings or markup languages. While they have made progress in making data available, it still takes investigators significant effort to discover and access datasets from multiple repositories because of inconsistencies in the way domain systems describe, encode, and share data. Yet, there are many scenarios that require efficient integration of these data types across different domains. For example, understanding a soil profile's geochemical response to extreme weather events requires integration of hydrologic and atmospheric time series with geochemical data from soil samples collected over various depth intervals from soil cores or pits at different positions on a landscape. Integrated access to and analysis of data for such studies are hindered because common characteristics of data, including time, location, provenance, methods, and units are described differently within different systems. Integration requires syntactic and semantic translations that can be manual, error-prone, and lossy. We report information requirements identified as part of our work to define an information model for a broad class of earth science data - i.e., spatially-discrete, feature-based earth observations resulting from in-situ sensors and environmental samples. We sought to answer the question: "What information must accompany observational data for them to be archivable and discoverable within

  14. Meaningful use: a roadmap for the advancement of health information exchange

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Frankel and colleagues have compared Israel and the U.S.’s experiences with health information exchange (HIE). They highlight the importance of institutional factors in fostering HIE development, notably the influence of local structures, experience and incentives. Historically, information infrastructure in the U.S. has been limited due to lack of standards, fragmented institutions and competition. The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of 2009 authorized billions of dollars for the adoption and “Meaningful Use” of electronic health records. HITECH programs and Meaningful Use incentives target the advancement of HIE through 1) building blocks, 2) local support and 3) payment incentives. Meaningful Use requirements create a roadmap to broader electronic exchange of health information among providers and with patients. Ultimately, successful HIE in the U.S. will depend on whether Meaningful Use can address institutional needs within local markets. This is a commentary on http://www.ijhpr.org/content/2/1/722 PMID:23880399

  15. Geographical distribution of patients visiting a health information exchange in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Onyile, Arit; Vaidya, Sandip R; Kuperman, Gilad; Shapiro, Jason S

    2013-01-01

    Objective For a health information exchange (HIE) organization to succeed in any given region, it is important to understand the optimal catchment area for the patient population it is serving. The objective of this analysis was to understand the geographical distribution of the patients being served by one HIE organization in New York City (NYC). Materials and Methods Patient demographic data were obtained from the New York Clinical Information Exchange (NYCLIX), a regional health information organization (RHIO) representing most of the major medical centers in the borough of Manhattan in NYC. Patients’ home address zip codes were used to create a research dataset with aggregate counts of patients by US county and international standards organization country. Times Square was designated as the geographical center point of the RHIO for distance calculations. Results Most patients (87.7%) live within a 30 mile radius from Times Square and there was a precipitous drop off of patients visiting RHIO-affiliated facilities at distances greater than 100 miles. 43.6% of patients visiting NYCLIX facilities were from the other NYC boroughs rather than from Manhattan itself (31.9%). Discussion Most patients who seek care at members of NYCLIX live within a well-defined area and a clear decrease in patients visiting NYCLIX sites with distance was identified. Understanding the geographical distribution of patients visiting the large medical centers in the RHIO can inform the RHIO's planning as it looks to add new participant organizations in the surrounding geographical area. PMID:23104049

  16. The Influence of Organizational Systems on Information Exchange in Long-Term Care Facilities: An Institutional Ethnography.

    PubMed

    Caspar, Sienna; Ratner, Pamela A; Phinney, Alison; MacKinnon, Karen

    2016-06-01

    Person-centered care is heavily dependent on effective information exchange among health care team members. We explored the organizational systems that influence resident care attendants' (RCAs) access to care information in long-term care (LTC) settings. We conducted an institutional ethnography in three LTC facilities. Investigative methods included naturalistic observations, in-depth interviews, and textual analysis. Practical access to texts containing individualized care-related information (e.g., care plans) was dependent on job classification. Regulated health care professionals accessed these texts daily. RCAs lacked practical access to these texts and primarily received and shared information orally. Microsystems of care, based on information exchange formats, emerged. Organizational systems mandated written exchange of information and did not formally support an oral exchange. Thus, oral information exchanges were largely dependent on the quality of workplace relationships. Formal systems are needed to support structured oral information exchange within and between the microsystems of care found in LTC. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Linking Earth Observations and Models to Societal Information Needs: The Case of Coastal Flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzanga, B. A.; Plag, H. P.

    2016-12-01

    Coastal flooding is expected to increase in many areas due to sea level rise (SLR). Many societal applications such as emergency planning and designing public services depend on information on how the flooding spectrum may change as a result of SLR. To identify the societal information needs a conceptual model is needed that identifies the key stakeholders, applications, and information and observation needs. In the context of the development of the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), which is implemented by the Group on Earth Observations (GEO), the Socio-Economic and Environmental Information Needs Knowledge Base (SEE-IN KB) is developed as part of the GEOSS Knowledge Base. A core function of the SEE-IN KB is to facilitate the linkage of societal information needs to observations, models, information and knowledge. To achieve this, the SEE-IN KB collects information on objects such as user types, observational requirements, societal goals, models, and datasets. Comprehensive information concerning the interconnections between instances of these objects is used to capture the connectivity and to establish a conceptual model as a network of networks. The captured connectivity can be used in searches to allow users to discover products and services for their information needs, and providers to search for users and applications benefiting from their products. It also allows to answer "What if?" questions and supports knowledge creation. We have used the SEE-IN KB to develop a conceptual model capturing the stakeholders in coastal flooding and their information needs, and to link these elements to objects. We show how the knowledge base enables the transition of scientific data to useable information by connecting individuals such as city managers to flood maps. Within the knowledge base, these same users can request information that improves their ability to make specific planning decisions. These needs are linked to entities within research

  18. Accessing Earth science data from the EOS data and information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Kenneth R.; Calvo, Sherri

    1993-01-01

    An overview of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is presented, concentrating on the users' interactions with the system and highlighting those features that are driven by the unique requirements of the Global Change Research Program and the supported science community. However, a basic premise of the EOSDIS is that the system must evolve to meet changes in user needs and to incorporate advances in data system technology. Therefore, the development process which is being used to accommodate these changes and some of the potential areas of change are also addressed.

  19. Radiation Information for Designing and Interpreting Biological Experiments Onboard Missions Beyond Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straume, T.; Slaba, T.; Bhattacharya, S.; Braby, L. A.

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest in flying biological experiments beyond low-Earth orbit (LEO) to measure biological responses potentially relevant to those expected during a human mission to Mars. Such experiments could be payloads onboard precursor missions, including unmanned private-public partnerships, as well as small low-cost spacecraft (satellites) designed specifically for biosentinel type missions. Designing such experiments requires knowledge of the radiation environment and its interactions with both the spacecraft and the experimental payload. Information is provided here that is useful for designing such experiments.

  20. Taming Big Data Variety in the Earth Observing System Data and Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, Christopher; Walter, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Although the volume of the remote sensing data managed by the Earth Observing System Data and Information System is formidable, an oft-overlooked challenge is the variety of data. The diversity in satellite instruments, science disciplines and user communities drives cost as much or more as the data volume. Several strategies are used to tame this variety: data allocation to distinct centers of expertise; a common metadata repository for discovery, data format standards and conventions; and services that further abstract the variations in data.

  1. Evolution of the Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Information System (EOSDIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, Hampapuram K.; Behnke, Jeanne; Sofinowski, Edwin; Lowe, Dawn; Esfandiari, Mary Ann

    2008-01-01

    One of the strategic goals of the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is to "Develop a balanced overall program of science, exploration, and aeronautics consistent with the redirection of the human spaceflight program to focus on exploration". An important sub-goal of this goal is to "Study Earth from space to advance scientific understanding and meet societal needs." NASA meets this subgoal in partnership with other U.S. agencies and international organizations through its Earth science program. A major component of NASA s Earth science program is the Earth Observing System (EOS). The EOS program was started in 1990 with the primary purpose of modeling global climate change. This program consists of a set of space-borne instruments, science teams, and a data system. The instruments are designed to obtain highly accurate, frequent and global measurements of geophysical properties of land, oceans and atmosphere. The science teams are responsible for designing the instruments as well as scientific algorithms to derive information from the instrument measurements. The data system, called the EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS), produces data products using those algorithms as well as archives and distributes such products. The first of the EOS instruments were launched in November 1997 on the Japanese satellite called the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and the last, on the U.S. satellite Aura, were launched in July 2004. The instrument science teams have been active since the inception of the program in 1990 and have participation from Brazil, Canada, France, Japan, Netherlands, United Kingdom and U.S. The development of EOSDIS was initiated in 1990, and this data system has been serving the user community since 1994. The purpose of this chapter is to discuss the history and evolution of EOSDIS since its beginnings to the present and indicate how it continues to evolve into the future. this chapter is organized as follows. Sect

  2. Identifying climate risk perceptions, information needs, and barriers to information exchange among public land managers.

    PubMed

    Peters, Casey B; Schwartz, Mark W; Lubell, Mark N

    2018-03-01

    Meeting ecosystem management challenges posed by climate change requires building effective communication channels among researchers, planners and practitioners to focus research on management issues requiring new knowledge. We surveyed resource managers within two regions of the western United States regions to better understand perceived risks and vulnerabilities associated with climate change and barriers to obtaining and using relevant climate science information in making ecosystem management decisions. We sought to understand what types of climate science information resource managers find most valuable, and the formats in which they prefer to receive climate science information. We found broad concern among natural resource managers in federal agencies that climate change will make it more difficult for them to achieve their management goals. Primary barriers to incorporating climate science into planning are distributed among challenges identifying, receiving, and interpreting appropriate science and a lack of direction provided by agency leadership needed to meaningfully use this emerging science in resource planning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Fiscal Year 2018 National Environmental Information Exchange Network Grant Solicitation Notice

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Exchange Network Grant Program provides funding for projects that are in line with Exchange Network priorities. The primary outcome expected from EN assistance agreements is improved access to, and exchange of, high quality environmental data.

  4. Health information exchange associated with improved emergency department care through faster accessing of patient information from outside organizations.

    PubMed

    Everson, Jordan; Kocher, Keith E; Adler-Milstein, Julia

    2017-04-01

    To assess whether electronic health information exchange (HIE) is associated with improved emergency department (ED) care processes and utilization through more timely clinician viewing of information from outside organizations. Our data included 2163 patients seen in the ED of a large academic medical center for whom clinicians requested and viewed outside information from February 14, 2014, to February 13, 2015. Outside information requests w.ere fulfilled via HIE (Epic's Care Everywhere) or fax/scan to the electronic health record (EHR). We used EHR audit data to capture the time between the information request and when a clinician accessed the data. We assessed whether the relationship between method of information return and ED outcomes (length of visit, odds of imaging [computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), radiographs] and hospitalization, and total charges) was mediated by request-to-access time, controlling for patient demographics, case mix, and acuity. In multivariate analysis, there was no direct association between return of information via HIE vs fax/scan and ED outcomes. HIE was associated with faster outside information access (58.5 minutes on average), and faster access was associated with changes in ED care. For each 1-hour reduction in access time, visit length was 52.9 minutes shorter, the likelihood of imaging was lower (by 2.5, 1.6, and 2.4 percentage points for CT, MRI, and radiographs, respectively), the likelihood of admission was 2.4 percentage points lower, and average charges were $1187 lower ( P  ≤ .001 for all). The relationship between HIE and improved care processes and reduced utilization in the ED is mediated by faster accessing of information from outside organizations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  5. Observability and Estimation of Distributed Space Systems via Local Information-Exchange Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmani, Amirreza; Mesbahi, Mehran; Fathpour, Nanaz; Hadaegh, Fred Y.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we develop an approach to formation estimation by explicitly characterizing formation's system-theoretic attributes in terms of the underlying inter-spacecraft information-exchange network. In particular, we approach the formation observer/estimator design by relaxing the accessibility to the global state information by a centralized observer/estimator- and in turn- providing an analysis and synthesis framework for formation observers/estimators that rely on local measurements. The noveltyof our approach hinges upon the explicit examination of the underlying distributed spacecraft network in the realm of guidance, navigation, and control algorithmic analysis and design. The overarching goal of our general research program, some of whose results are reported in this paper, is the development of distributed spacecraft estimation algorithms that are scalable, modular, and robust to variations inthe topology and link characteristics of the formation information exchange network. In this work, we consider the observability of a spacecraft formation from a single observation node and utilize the agreement protocol as a mechanism for observing formation states from local measurements. Specifically, we show how the symmetry structure of the network, characterized in terms of its automorphism group, directly relates to the observability of the corresponding multi-agent system The ramification of this notion of observability over networks is then explored in the context of distributed formation estimation.

  6. Sociotechnical challenges to developing technologies for patient access to health information exchange data

    PubMed Central

    Ancker, Jessica S; Miller, Melissa C; Patel, Vaishali; Kaushal, Rainu

    2014-01-01

    Background Providing patients with access to their medical data is widely expected to help educate and empower them to manage their own health. Health information exchange (HIE) infrastructures could potentially help patients access records across multiple healthcare providers. We studied three HIE organizations as they developed portals to give consumers access to HIE data previously exchanged only among healthcare organizations. Objective To follow the development of new consumer portal technologies, and to identify barriers and facilitators to patient access to HIE data. Methods Semistructured interviews of 15 key informants over a 2-year period spanning the development and early implementation of three new projects, coded according to a sociotechnical framework. Results As the organizations tried to develop functionality that fully served the needs of both providers and patients, plans were altered by technical barriers (primarily related to data standardization) and cultural and legal issues surrounding data access. Organizational changes also played an important role in altering project plans. In all three cases, patient access to data was significantly scaled back from initial plans. Conclusions This prospective study revealed how sociotechnical factors previously identified as important in health information technology success and failure helped to shape the evolution of three novel consumer informatics projects. Barriers to providing patients with seamless access to their HIE data were multifactorial. Remedies will have to address technical, organizational, cultural, and other factors. PMID:24064443

  7. A case report in health information exchange for inter-organizational patient transfers.

    PubMed

    Richardson, J E; Malhotra, S; Kaushal, R

    2014-01-01

    To provide a case report of barriers and promoters to implementing a health information exchange (HIE) tool that supports patient transfers between hospitals and skilled nursing facilities. A multi-disciplinary team conducted semi-structured telephone and in-person interviews in a purposive sample of HIE organizational informants and providers in New York City who implemented HIE to share patient transfer information. The researchers conducted grounded theory analysis to identify themes of barriers and promoters and took steps to improve the trustworthiness of the results including vetting from a knowledgeable study participant. Between May and October 2011, researchers recruited 18 participants: informaticians, healthcare administrators, software engineers, and providers from a skilled nursing facility. Subjects perceived the HIE tool's development a success in that it brought together stakeholders who had traditionally not partnered for informatics work, and that they could successfully share patient transfer information between a hospital and a skilled nursing facility. Perceived barriers included lack of hospital stakeholder buy-in and misalignment with clinical workflows that inhibited use of HIE-based patient transfer data. Participants described barriers and promoters in themes related to organizational, technical, and user-oriented issues. The investigation revealed that stakeholders could develop and implement health information technology that technically enables clinicians in both hospitals and skilled nursing facilities to exchange real-time information in support of patient transfers. User level barriers, particularly in the emergency department, should give pause to developers and implementers who plan to use HIE in support of patient transfers. Participants' experiences demonstrate how stakeholders may succeed in developing and piloting an electronic transfer form that relies on HIE to aggregate, communicate, and display relevant patient transfer

  8. The Role of Cooperation and Information Exchange in Transnational River Basins: the Zambezi River case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelletti, A.; Giuliani, M.; Soncini-Sessa, R.

    2012-12-01

    The presence of multiple, institutionally independent but physically interconnected decision-makers is a distinctive features of many water resources systems, especially of transnational river basins. The adoption of a centralized approach to study the optimal operation of these systems, as mostly done in the water resources literature, is conceptually interesting to quantify the best achievable performance, but of little practical impact given the real political and institutional setting. Centralized management indeed assumes a cooperative attitude and full information exchange by the involved parties. However, when decision-makers belong to different countries or institutions, it is very likely that they act considering only their local objectives, producing global externalities that negatively impact on other objectives. In this work we adopt a Multi-Agent Systems framework, which naturally allows to represent a set of self-interested agents (decision-makers and/or stakeholders) acting in a distributed decision-making process. According to this agent-based approach, each agent represents a decision-maker, whose decisions are defined by an explicit optimization problem considering only the agent's local interests. In particular, this work assesses the role of information exchange and increasing level of cooperation among originally non-cooperative agents. The Zambezi River basin is used to illustrate the methodology: the four largest reservoirs in the basin (Ithezhithezhi, Kafue-Gorge, Kariba and Cahora Bassa) are mainly operated for maximizing the economic revenue from hydropower energy production with considerably negative effects on the aquatic ecosystem in the Zambezi delta due to the alteration of the natural flow regime. We comparatively analyse the ideal centralized solution and the current situation where all the decision-makers act independently and non-cooperatively. Indeed, although a new basin-level institution called Zambezi Watercourse Commission

  9. Feasibility of 30-day hospital readmission prediction modeling based on health information exchange data.

    PubMed

    Swain, Matthew J; Kharrazi, Hadi

    2015-12-01

    Unplanned 30-day hospital readmission account for roughly $17 billion in annual Medicare spending. Many factors contribute to unplanned hospital readmissions and multiple models have been developed over the years to predict them. Most researchers have used insurance claims or administrative data to train and operationalize their Readmission Risk Prediction Models (RRPMs). Some RRPM developers have also used electronic health records data; however, using health informatics exchange data has been uncommon among such predictive models and can be beneficial in its ability to provide real-time alerts to providers at the point of care. We conducted a semi-systematic review of readmission predictive factors published prior to March 2013. Then, we extracted and merged all significant variables listed in those articles for RRPMs. Finally, we matched these variables with common HL7 messages transmitted by a sample of health information exchange organizations (HIO). The semi-systematic review resulted in identification of 32 articles and 297 predictive variables. The mapping of these variables with common HL7 segments resulted in an 89.2% total coverage, with the DG1 (diagnosis) segment having the highest coverage of 39.4%. The PID (patient identification) and OBX (observation results) segments cover 13.9% and 9.1% of the variables. Evaluating the same coverage in three sample HIOs showed data incompleteness. HIOs can utilize HL7 messages to develop unique RRPMs for their stakeholders; however, data completeness of exchanged messages should meet certain thresholds. If data quality standards are met by stakeholders, HIOs would be able to provide real-time RRPMs that not only predict intra-hospital readmissions but also inter-hospital cases. A RRPM derived using HIO data exchanged through may prove to be a useful method to prevent unplanned hospital readmissions. In order for the RRPM derived from HIO data to be effective, hospitals must actively exchange clinical information

  10. Are there differences in health information exchange by health system type?

    PubMed

    Opoku-Agyeman, William; Menachemi, Nir

    2016-01-01

    Despite the potential of health information exchange (HIE) to improve safety and reduce cost, hospitals have been slow to adopt HIE with only 30% of U.S. hospitals doing so in 2012. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between different health system types and how they engage in HIE. Data on health system types and engagement in HIE activity were combined with secondary hospital characteristics. Ordinal logistic regression analyses were used to examine the relationship between a scale measuring the level of HIE engagement and health system type controlling for hospital and market characteristics. Data from 1552 hospitals were available for analyses. Overall, hospital in a health system of any kind exchanged more patient data elements (e.g., patient demographics, clinical summaries, laboratory results, medication history, and radiology report) compared with stand-alone hospitals (3.82 vs. 1.80, p < .001). Overall, 62.2% of hospitals were part of a health system, and among system hospitals, 125 (8.0%) were in centralized health systems, 75 (4.8%) were in centralized physician/insurance health system, 284 (18.3%) were in moderately centralized health system, 391 (25.2%) were in decentralized health system, and 91 (5.9%) were in independent health system. In regression analyses, hospitals belonging to a health system were more likely to exchange patient health data with other hospitals in the same system (OR = 3.94, p < .001) but not with hospitals outside their system (OR = 1.89, p = .445). Across health system types, there was no significant difference in the exchange of patient health data. Hospital engagement in HIE is associated with health system membership. These findings will assist hospital leaders and managers to better understand how the structure and nature of their system may influence what their individual hospital can and cannot do in their decision to engage in HIE and other decisions that support the overall system objectives.

  11. NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System - Many Mechanisms for On-Going Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2012-12-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System has been serving a broad user community since August 1994. As a long-lived multi-mission system serving multiple scientific disciplines and a diverse user community, EOSDIS has been evolving continuously. It has had and continues to have many forms of community input to help with this evolution. Early in its history, it had inputs from the EOSDIS Advisory Panel, benefited from the reviews by various external committees and evolved into the present distributed architecture with discipline-based Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs), Science Investigator-led Processing Systems and a cross-DAAC search and data access capability. EOSDIS evolution has been helped by advances in computer technology, moving from an initially planned supercomputing environment to SGI workstations to Linux Clusters for computation and from near-line archives of robotic silos with tape cassettes to RAID-disk-based on-line archives for storage. The network capacities have increased steadily over the years making delivery of data on media almost obsolete. The advances in information systems technologies have been having an even greater impact on the evolution of EOSDIS. In the early days, the advent of the World Wide Web came as a game-changer in the operation of EOSDIS. The metadata model developed for the EOSDIS Core System for representing metadata from EOS standard data products has had an influence on the Federal Geographic Data Committee's metadata content standard and the ISO metadata standards. The influence works both ways. As ISO 19115 metadata standard has developed in recent years, EOSDIS is reviewing its metadata to ensure compliance with the standard. Improvements have been made in the cross-DAAC search and access of data using the centralized metadata clearing house (EOS Clearing House - ECHO) and the client Reverb. Given the diversity of the Earth science disciplines served by the DAACs, the DAACs have developed a

  12. The Media as an Invaluable Tool for Informal Earth System Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, E.; Gautier, C.

    2001-12-01

    One of the most widely utilized avenues for educating the general public about the Earth's environment is the media, be it print, radio or broadcast. Accurate and effective communication of issues in Earth System Science (ESS), however, is significantly hindered by the public's relative scientific illiteracy. Discussion of ESS concepts requires the laying down of a foundation of complex scientific information, which must first be conveyed to an incognizant audience before any strata of sophisticated social context can be appropriately considered. Despite such a substantial obstacle to be negotiated, the environmental journalist is afforded the unique opportunity of providing a broad-reaching informal scientific education to a largely scientifically uninformed population base. This paper will review the tools used by various environmental journalists to address ESS issues and consider how successful each of these approaches has been at conveying complex scientific messages to a general audience lacking sufficient scientific sophistication. Different kinds of media materials used to this effect will be analyzed for their ideas and concepts conveyed, as well as their effectiveness in reaching the public at large.

  13. Real Time Alert System: A Disease Management System Leveraging Health Information Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Vibha; Sheley, Meena E.; Xu, Shawn; Downs, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Rates of preventive and disease management services can be improved by providing automated alerts and reminders to primary care providers (PCPs) using of health information technology (HIT) tools. Methods: Using Adaptive Turnaround Documents (ATAD), an existing Health Information Exchange (HIE) infrastructure and office fax machines, we developed a Real Time Alert (RTA) system. RTA is a computerized decision support system (CDSS) that is able to deliver alerts to PCPs statewide for recommended services around the time of the patient visit. RTA is also able to capture structured clinical data from providers using existing fax technology. In this study, we evaluate RTA’s performance for alerting PCPs when their patients with asthma have an emergency room visit anywhere in the state. Results: Our results show that RTA was successfully able to deliver “just in time” patient-relevant alerts to PCPs across the state. Furthermore, of those ATADs faxed back and automatically interpreted by the RTA system, 35% reported finding the provided information helpful. The PCPs who reported finding information helpful also reported making a phone call, sending a letter or seeing the patient for follow up care. Conclusions: We have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of electronically exchanging important patient related information with the PCPs statewide. This is despite a lack of a link with their electronic health records. We have shown that using our ATAD technology, a PCP can be notified quickly of an important event such as a patient’s asthma related emergency room admission so further follow up can happen in near real time. PMID:23569648

  14. Adoption of health information exchange by emergency physicians at three urban academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Genes, N; Shapiro, J; Vaidya, S; Kuperman, G

    2011-01-01

    Emergency physicians are trained to make decisions quickly and with limited patient information. Health Information Exchange (HIE) has the potential to improve emergency care by bringing relevant patient data from non-affiliated organizations to the bedside. NYCLIX (New York CLinical Information eXchange) offers HIE functionality among multiple New York metropolitan area provider organizations and has pilot users in several member emergency departments (EDs). We conducted semi-structured interviews at three participating EDs with emergency physicians trained to use NYCLIX. Among "users" with > 1 login, responses to questions regarding typical usage scenarios, successful retrieval of data, and areas for improving the interface were recorded. Among "non-users" with ≤1 login, questions about NYCLIX accessibility and utility were asked. Both groups were asked to recall items from prior training regarding data sources and availability. Eighteen NYCLIX pilot users, all board certified emergency physicians, were interviewed. Of the 14 physicians with more than one login ,half estimated successful retrieval of HIE data affecting patient care. Four non-users (one login or less) cited forgotten login information as a major reason for non-use. Though both groups made errors, users were more likely to recall true NYCLIX member sites and data elements than non-users. Improvements suggested as likely to facilitate usage included a single automated login to both the ED information system (EDIS) and HIE, and automatic notification of HIE data availability in the EDIS All respondents reported satisfaction with their training. Integrating HIE into existing ED workflows remains a challenge, though a substantial fraction of users report changes in management based on HIE data. Though interviewees believed their training was adequate, significant errors in their understanding of available NYCLIX data elements and participating sites persist.

  15. Physicians' Perceptions and Use of a Health Information Exchange: A Pilot Program in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-il; Kim, Jeong-Whun; Hwang, Hee; Cho, Eun-Young; Kim, Yoon; Ha, Kyooseob

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective: We examined physicians' perceived needs, benefits, and concerns regarding health information exchange (HIE) technology prior to experiencing it and their actual usage of exchanged information in care processes during an HIE pilot program in South Korea. Materials and Methods: We conducted a survey through a structured questionnaire to collect data on physician perceptions about an HIE prior to implementation. We analyzed responses using descriptive statistics and one-way analyses of variance. We also conducted a post-implementation survey through a computerized tool designed to collect data on physician assessment of HIE item usefulness. We defined two indices to measure the volume of information flow and usefulness for individual HIE items and analyzed the indices with Fisher's exact test. Results: Physicians' overall perceptions about the need for an HIE and benefits of the technology were positive despite their concerns about information safety and security, system costs, and disputes between care providers in cases of malpractice. We found that physician practice settings significantly influenced the details of their perceptions. In the both pre- and post-implementation studies, the most needed and valued information were pathology and lab results, diagnostic imaging, medication, and working diagnosis. Physicians most agreed with the benefit potentials in the quality domain, least agreed with those in time and cost savings of healthcare delivery, and least worried about the decrease in revenues resulting from the technology. Conclusions: The overall physician acceptance of the HIE technology in South Korea is promising, but the adoption and diffusion strategy needs to be tailored to the type of physician practice. Concerted efforts may be needed to realize the much-anticipated potential of healthcare cost savings. PMID:22352898

  16. ERISTAR: Earth Resources Information Storage, Transformation, Analysis, and Retrieval administrative report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vachon, R. I.; Obrien, J. F., Jr.; Lueg, R. E.; Cox, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    The 1972 Systems Engineering program at Marshall Space Flight Center where 15 participants representing 15 U.S. universities, 1 NASA/MSFC employee, and another specially assigned faculty member, participated in an 11-week program is discussed. The Fellows became acquainted with the philosophy of systems engineering, and as a training exercise, used this approach to produce a conceptional design for an Earth Resources Information Storage, Transformation, Analysis, and Retrieval System. The program was conducted in three phases; approximately 3 weeks were devoted to seminars, tours, and other presentations to subject the participants to technical and other aspects of the information management problem. The second phase, 5 weeks in length, consisted of evaluating alternative solutions to problems, effecting initial trade-offs and performing preliminary design studies and analyses. The last 3 weeks were occupied with final trade-off sessions, final design analyses and preparation of a final report and oral presentation.

  17. Observability and Estimation of Distributed Space Systems via Local Information-Exchange Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathpour, Nanaz; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Mesbahi, Mehran; Rahmani, Amirreza

    2011-01-01

    Spacecraft formation flying involves the coordination of states among multiple spacecraft through relative sensing, inter-spacecraft communication, and control. Most existing formation-flying estimation algorithms can only be supported via highly centralized, all-to-all, static relative sensing. New algorithms are proposed that are scalable, modular, and robust to variations in the topology and link characteristics of the formation exchange network. These distributed algorithms rely on a local information exchange network, relaxing the assumptions on existing algorithms. Distributed space systems rely on a signal transmission network among multiple spacecraft for their operation. Control and coordination among multiple spacecraft in a formation is facilitated via a network of relative sensing and interspacecraft communications. Guidance, navigation, and control rely on the sensing network. This network becomes more complex the more spacecraft are added, or as mission requirements become more complex. The observability of a formation state was observed by a set of local observations from a particular node in the formation. Formation observability can be parameterized in terms of the matrices appearing in the formation dynamics and observation matrices. An agreement protocol was used as a mechanism for observing formation states from local measurements. An agreement protocol is essentially an unforced dynamic system whose trajectory is governed by the interconnection geometry and initial condition of each node, with a goal of reaching a common value of interest. The observability of the interconnected system depends on the geometry of the network, as well as the position of the observer relative to the topology. For the first time, critical GN&C (guidance, navigation, and control estimation) subsystems are synthesized by bringing the contribution of the spacecraft information-exchange network to the forefront of algorithmic analysis and design. The result is a

  18. The NASA Scientific and Technical Information (STI) Program's Implementation of Open Archives Initiative (OAI) for Data Interoperability and Data Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rocker, JoAnne; Roncaglia, George J.; Heimerl, Lynn N.; Nelson, Michael L.

    Interoperability and data-exchange are critical for the survival of government information management programs. E-government initiatives are transforming the way the government interacts with the public. More information is to be made available through Web-enabled technologies. Programs such as the NASA's Scientific and Technical Information (STI)…

  19. Learning from health information exchange technical architecture and implementation in seven beacon communities.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Douglas B; Propp, Karen; Cohen, Alexander; Sabharwal, Raj; Schachter, Abigail A; Rein, Alison L

    2014-01-01

    As health care providers adopt and make "meaningful use" of health information technology (health IT), communities and delivery systems must set up the infrastructure to facilitate health information exchange (HIE) between providers and numerous other stakeholders who have a role in supporting health and care. By facilitating better communication and coordination between providers, HIE has the potential to improve clinical decision-making and continuity of care, while reducing unnecessary use of services. When implemented as part of a broader strategy for health care delivery system and payment reform, HIE capability also can enable the use of analytic tools needed for population health management, patient engagement in care, and continuous learning and improvement. The diverse experiences of seven communities that participated in the three-year federal Beacon Community Program offer practical insight into factors influencing the technical architecture of exchange infrastructure and its role in supporting improved care, reduced cost, and a healthier population. The case studies also document challenges faced by the communities, such as significant time and resources required to harmonize variations in the interpretation of data standards. Findings indicate that their progress developing community-based HIE strategies, while driven by local needs and objectives, is also influenced by broader legal, policy, and market conditions.

  20. Learning from Health Information Exchange Technical Architecture and Implementation in Seven Beacon Communities

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Douglas B.; Propp, Karen; Cohen, Alexander; Sabharwal, Raj; Schachter, Abigail A.; Rein, Alison L.

    2014-01-01

    As health care providers adopt and make “meaningful use” of health information technology (health IT), communities and delivery systems must set up the infrastructure to facilitate health information exchange (HIE) between providers and numerous other stakeholders who have a role in supporting health and care. By facilitating better communication and coordination between providers, HIE has the potential to improve clinical decision-making and continuity of care, while reducing unnecessary use of services. When implemented as part of a broader strategy for health care delivery system and payment reform, HIE capability also can enable the use of analytic tools needed for population health management, patient engagement in care, and continuous learning and improvement. The diverse experiences of seven communities that participated in the three-year federal Beacon Community Program offer practical insight into factors influencing the technical architecture of exchange infrastructure and its role in supporting improved care, reduced cost, and a healthier population. The case studies also document challenges faced by the communities, such as significant time and resources required to harmonize variations in the interpretation of data standards. Findings indicate that their progress developing community-based HIE strategies, while driven by local needs and objectives, is also influenced by broader legal, policy, and market conditions. PMID:25848591

  1. Geo-reCAPTCHA: Crowdsourcing large amounts of geographic information from earth observation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillen, Florian; Höfle, Bernhard

    2015-08-01

    The reCAPTCHA concept provides a large amount of valuable information for various applications. First, it provides security, e.g., for a form on a website, by means of a test that only a human could solve. Second, the effort of the user for this test is used to generate additional information, e.g., digitization of books or identification of house numbers. In this work, we present a concept for adapting the reCAPTCHA idea to create user-generated geographic information from earth observation data, and the requirements during the conception and implementation are depicted in detail. Furthermore, the essential parts of a Geo-reCAPTCHA system are described, and afterwards transferred, to a prototype implementation. An empirical user study is conducted to investigate the Geo-reCAPTCHA approach, assessing time and quality of the resulting geographic information. Our results show that a Geo-reCAPTCHA can be solved by the users of our study on building digitization in a short amount of time (19.2 s on average) with an overall average accuracy of the digitizations of 82.2%. In conclusion, Geo-reCAPTCHA has the potential to be a reasonable alternative to the typical reCAPTCHA, and to become a new data-rich channel of crowdsourced geographic information.

  2. Sociotechnical Analysis of Health Information Exchange Consent Processes in an HIV Clinic.

    PubMed

    Ramos, S Raquel; Gordon, Peter; Bakken, Suzanne; Schnall, Rebecca

    Federal regulations have encouraged the electronic sharing of protected health information (PHI). As an opt-in state, New York abides by an affirmative consent model where PHI is electronically shared only after written consent is obtained. The purpose of our study was to describe sociotechnical factors that influence health information exchange (HIE) consent for persons living with HIV (PLWH) at one clinic in New York City. We employed mixed methods to gather perceptions of facilitators and barriers to HIE consent. Study participants included PLWH, staff, and clinicians. The mixed-methods approach revealed multiple interruptions in clinical workflow, staff and providers' time constraints, and lack of dedicated personnel focused on HIE consent as the major barriers to HIE consent. Although there is no one strategy to resolve barriers to HIE consent, having a dedicated person was identified as the most salient factor for facilitating HIE consent. Copyright © 2016 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Integration of IEEE 1451 and HL7 exchanging information for patients' sensor data.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wooshik; Lim, Suyoung; Ahn, Jinsoo; Nah, Jiyoung; Kim, Namhyun

    2010-12-01

    HL7 (Health Level 7) is a standard developed for exchanging incompatible healthcare information generated from programs or devices among heterogenous medical information systems. At present, HL7 is growing as a global standard. However, the HL7 standard does not support effective methods for treating data from various medical sensors, especially from mobile sensors. As ubiquitous systems are growing, HL7 must communicate with various medical transducers. In the area of sensor fields, IEEE 1451 is a group of standards for controlling transducers and for communicating data from/to various transducers. In this paper, we present the possibility of interoperability between the two standards, i.e., HL7 and IEEE 1451. After we present a method to integrate them and show the preliminary results of this approach.

  4. Transport, charge exchange and loss of energetic heavy ions in the earth's radiation belts - Applicability and limitations of theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.

    1981-01-01

    Computer simulations of processes which control the relative abundances of ions in the trapping regions of geospace are compared with observations from discriminating ion detectors. Energy losses due to Coulomb collisions between ions and exospheric neutrals are considered, along with charge exchange losses and internal charge exchanges. The time evolution of energetic ion fluxes of equatorially mirroring ions under radial diffusion is modelled to include geomagnetic and geoelectric fluctutations. Limits to the validity of diffusion transport theory are discussed, and the simulation is noted to contain provisions for six ionic charge states and the source effect on the radiation belt oxygen ion distributions. Comparisons are made with ion flux data gathered on Explorer 45 and ISEE-1 spacecraft and results indicate that internal charge exchanges cause the radiation belt ion charge state to be independent of source charge rate characteristics, and relative charge state distribution is independent of the radially diffusive transport rate below the charge state redistribution zone.

  5. Open exchange of scientific knowledge and European copyright: The case of biodiversity information

    PubMed Central

    Egloff, Willi; Patterson, David J.; Agosti, Donat; Hagedorn, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background. The 7th Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development is helping the European Union to prepare for an integrative system for intelligent management of biodiversity knowledge. The infrastructure that is envisaged and that will be further developed within the Programme “Horizon 2020” aims to provide open and free access to taxonomic information to anyone with a requirement for biodiversity data, without the need for individual consent of other persons or institutions. Open and free access to information will foster the re-use and improve the quality of data, will accelerate research, and will promote new types of research. Progress towards the goal of free and open access to content is hampered by numerous technical, economic, sociological, legal, and other factors. The present article addresses barriers to the open exchange of biodiversity knowledge that arise from European laws, in particular European legislation on copyright and database protection rights. We present a legal point of view as to what will be needed to bring distributed information together and facilitate its re-use by data mining, integration into semantic knowledge systems, and similar techniques. We address exceptions and limitations of copyright or database protection within Europe, and we point to the importance of data use agreements. We illustrate how exceptions and limitations have been transformed into national legislations within some European states to create inconsistencies that impede access to biodiversity information. Conclusions. The legal situation within the EU is unsatisfactory because there are inconsistencies among states that hamper the deployment of an open biodiversity knowledge management system. Scientists within the EU who work with copyright protected works or with protected databases have to be aware of regulations that vary from country to country. This is a major stumbling block to international collaboration and is an

  6. Health information exchange technology on the front lines of healthcare: workflow factors and patterns of use

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kevin B; Lorenzi, Nancy M

    2011-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to develop an in-depth understanding of how a health information exchange (HIE) fits into clinical workflow at multiple clinical sites. Materials and Methods The ethnographic qualitative study was conducted over a 9-month period in six emergency departments (ED) and eight ambulatory clinics in Memphis, Tennessee, USA. Data were collected using direct observation, informal interviews during observation, and formal semi-structured interviews. The authors observed for over 180 h, during which providers used the exchange 130 times. Results HIE-related workflow was modeled for each ED site and ambulatory clinic group and substantial site-to-site workflow differences were identified. Common patterns in HIE-related workflow were also identified across all sites, leading to the development of two role-based workflow models: nurse based and physician based. The workflow elements framework was applied to the two role-based patterns. An in-depth description was developed of how providers integrated HIE into existing clinical workflow, including prompts for HIE use. Discussion Workflow differed substantially among sites, but two general role-based HIE usage models were identified. Although providers used HIE to improve continuity of patient care, patient–provider trust played a significant role. Types of information retrieved related to roles, with nurses seeking to retrieve recent hospitalization data and more open-ended usage by nurse practitioners and physicians. User and role-specific customization to accommodate differences in workflow and information needs may increase the adoption and use of HIE. Conclusion Understanding end users' perspectives towards HIE technology is crucial to the long-term success of HIE. By applying qualitative methods, an in-depth understanding of HIE usage was developed. PMID:22003156

  7. How could health information exchange better meet the needs of care practitioners?

    PubMed

    Kierkegaard, P; Kaushal, R; Vest, J R

    2014-01-01

    Health information exchange (HIE) has the potential to improve the quality of healthcare by enabling providers with better access to patient information from multiple sources at the point of care. However, HIE efforts have historically been difficult to establish in the US and the failure rates of organizations created to foster HIE have been high. We sought to better understand how RHIO-based HIE systems were used in practice and the challenges care practitioners face using them. The objective of our study were to so investigate how HIE can better meet the needs of care practitioners. We performed a multiple-case study using qualitative methods in three communities in New York State. We conducted interviews onsite and by telephone with HIE users and non-users and observed the workflows of healthcare professionals at multiple healthcare organizations participating in a local HIE effort in New York State. The empirical data analysis suggests that challenges still remain in increasing provider usage, optimizing HIE implementations and connecting HIE systems across geographic regions. Important determinants of system usage and perceived value includes users experienced level of available information and the fit of use for physician workflows. Challenges still remain in increasing provider adoption, optimizing HIE implementations, and demonstrating value. The inability to find information reduced usage of HIE. Healthcare organizations, HIE facilitating organizations, and states can help support HIE adoption by ensuring patient information is accessible to providers through increasing patient consents, fostering broader participation, and by ensuring systems are usable.

  8. A system dynamics evaluation model: implementation of health information exchange for public health reporting.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jacqueline A; Deegan, Michael; Wilson, Rosalind V; Kaushal, Rainu; Fredericks, Kimberly

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the complex dynamics involved in implementing electronic health information exchange (HIE) for public health reporting at a state health department, and to identify policy implications to inform similar implementations. Qualitative data were collected over 8 months from seven experts at New York State Department of Health who implemented web services and protocols for querying, receipt, and validation of electronic data supplied by regional health information organizations. Extensive project documentation was also collected. During group meetings experts described the implementation process and created reference modes and causal diagrams that the evaluation team used to build a preliminary model. System dynamics modeling techniques were applied iteratively to build causal loop diagrams representing the implementation. The diagrams were validated iteratively by individual experts followed by group review online, and through confirmatory review of documents and artifacts. Three casual loop diagrams captured well-recognized system dynamics: Sliding Goals, Project Rework, and Maturity of Resources. The findings were associated with specific policies that address funding, leadership, ensuring expertise, planning for rework, communication, and timeline management. This evaluation illustrates the value of a qualitative approach to system dynamics modeling. As a tool for strategic thinking on complicated and intense processes, qualitative models can be produced with fewer resources than a full simulation, yet still provide insights that are timely and relevant. System dynamics techniques clarified endogenous and exogenous factors at play in a highly complex technology implementation, which may inform other states engaged in implementing HIE supported by federal Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) legislation.

  9. Pairing Essential Climate Science with Sustainable Energy Information: the "EARTH-The Operators' Manual" experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akuginow, E.; Alley, R. B.; Haines-Stiles, G.

    2010-12-01

    Social science research on the effective communication of climate science suggests that today's audiences may be effectively engaged by presenting information about Earth's climate in the context of individual and community actions that can be taken to increase energy efficiency and to reduce carbon emissions. "EARTH-The Operators' Manual" (ETOM) is an informal science education and outreach project supported by NSF, comprising three related components: a 3-part broadcast television mini-series; on-site outreach at 5 major science centers and natural history museums strategically located across the USA; and a website with innovative social networking tools. A companion tradebook, written by series presenter and Penn State glaciologist Richard Alley, is to be published by W. W. Norton in spring 2011. Program 1, THE BURNING QUESTION, shows how throughout human history our need for energy has been met by burning wood, whale oil and fossil fuels, but notes that fossil fuels produce carbon dioxide which inevitably change the composition of Earth's atmosphere. The program uses little known stories (such as US Air Force atmospheric research immediately after WW2, looking at the effect of CO2 levels on heat-seeking missiles, and Abraham Lincoln's role in the founding of the National Academy of Sciences and the Academy's role in solving navigation problems during the Civil War) to offer fresh perspectives on essential but sometimes disputed aspects of climate science: that today's levels of CO2 are unprecedented in the last 400,000 and more years; that human burning of fossil fuel is the scientifically-proven source, and that multiple lines of evidence show Earth is warming. Program 2, TEN WAYS TO KEEP TEN BILLION SMILING, offers a list of appealing strategies (such as "Get Rich and Save the World": Texas & wind energy, and "Do More with Less": how glow worms make cool light without waste heat, suggesting a role for organic LEDs) to motivate positive responses to the

  10. AMCP Partnership Forum: Enabling the Exchange of Clinical and Economic Information Pre-FDA Approval.

    PubMed

    2017-01-01

    Current federal laws and FDA regulations have significantly restricted the sharing of clinical and health economic information on biopharmaceuticals that have yet to receive FDA approval. Over the past several years, organizations that make health care coverage decisions, including those that set copayments, premiums, and formulary placement, have expressed a need for receiving this information before approval, as long as appropriate safeguards exist to prevent this information from reaching unintended entities. Population health decision makers have indicated that waiting until FDA approval is often too late for the critical planning, budgeting, and forecasting associated with health benefit design, especially given the recent influx of high-cost medications and scrutiny for better evaluation and preparation. Recognizing that securities laws restrict the disclosure of nonpublic information and may need to be amended, permissible early dissemination would allow population health decision makers to incorporate clinical and economic information for pipeline drugs or expanded indications into financial forecasting for the following year's plan. Access to this information is needed 12-18 months before FDA approval when organizations are deciding on terms of coverage and budgetary assumptions for state health insurance rate filings, Medicare and Medicaid bids, contracts with health care purchasers, and other financial arrangements. The need for exchange of clinical economic information before FDA approval was first introduced at a previous Academy of Managed Care (AMCP) forum in March 2016, which addressed section 114 of the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act and the communication of such information after FDA approval. To address preapproval information specifically, AMCP convened a Partnership Forum on September 13-14, 2016. This forum included a diverse group of stakeholders representing managed care, the biopharmaceutical industry, providers, patients

  11. Scoliosis and the Social Media: Facebook as a Means of Information Exchange.

    PubMed

    Ng, Jonathan P; Tarazi, Nadim; Byrne, Damien P; Baker, Joseph F; McCabe, John P

    2017-03-01

    Over the last decade, the emergence of social networking websites such as Facebook have revolutionized information dissemination and broadened opportunities to engage in discussions. In particular, having been widely adopted in the younger generation, the use of this medium has become more prevalent in health disorders such as scoliosis in the adolescent population. However, the quality of information on Facebook is unregulated and variable, which may mislead patients in their decision making. To document the various types of information available and assess the quality of information on Facebook discussion boards using recognized scoring systems. To evaluate the quality of information on the social network. A search for the keyword "scoliosis" on Facebook was performed and the first 100 pages generated were reviewed. SCSS and DISCERN score. Content analysis was performed on discussion boards and personal blogs. Two independent examiners evaluated each site according to scoliosis-specific content score (SCSS) and the DISCERN criteria, both previously used instruments to judge the quality of information on the Internet pertaining to scoliosis. The SCSS range from 0 to 32 (higher score better) and the DISCERN 16 to 80 (higher score better). Of the 100 sites reviewed, 33 were discussion boards and personal blogs. Of these, the overall average SCSS was 5.7 (SD 5.8, range 0-20) and the DISCERN was 22.5 (SD 7.6, range 16-45), indicating that using general scoring systems the quality of information provided was overall poor. Using recognized scoring systems to analyze Facebook pages used as discussion forums or blogs, we showed that the quality in general was poor. For modern practices to adapt to an era of information exchange via the social network, the orthopedic community should develop ways to incorporate the social media in future patient education. Copyright © 2016 Scoliosis Research Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Consumer Opinions of Health Information Exchange, e-Prescribing, and Personal Health Records.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Gary L; Lander, Lina; Morien, Marsha; Lomelin, Daniel E; Brittin, Jeri; Reker, Celeste; Klepser, Donald G

    2015-01-01

    Consumer satisfaction is a crucial component of health information technology (HIT) utilization, as high satisfaction is expected to increase HIT utilization among providers and to allow consumers to become full participants in their own healthcare management. The primary objective of this pilot study was to identify consumer perspectives on health information technologies including health information exchange (HIE), e-prescribing (e-Rx), and personal health records (PHRs). Eight focus groups were conducted in seven towns and cities across Nebraska in 2013. Each group consisted of 10-12 participants. Discussions were organized topically in the following categories: HIE, e-Rx, and PHR. The qualitative analysis consisted of immersion and crystallization to develop a coding scheme that included both preconceived and emergent themes. Common themes across focus groups were identified and compiled for each discussion category. The study had 67 participants, of which 18 (27 percent) were male. Focus group findings revealed both perceived barriers and benefits to the adoption of HIT. Common HIT concerns expressed across focus groups included privacy and security of medical information, decreases in quality of care, inconsistent provider participation, and the potential cost of implementation. Positive expectations regarding HIT included better accuracy and completeness of information, and improved communication and coordination between healthcare providers. Improvements in patient care were expected as a result of easy physician access to consolidated information across providers as well as the speed of sharing and availability of information in an emergency. In addition, participants were optimistic about patient empowerment and convenient access to and control of personal health data. Consumer concerns focused on privacy and security of the health information, as well as the cost of implementing the technologies and the possibility of an unintended negative impact on the

  13. Consumer Opinions of Health Information Exchange, e-Prescribing, and Personal Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Cochran, Gary L.; Lander, Lina; Morien, Marsha; Lomelin, Daniel E.; Brittin, Jeri; Reker, Celeste; Klepser, Donald G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Consumer satisfaction is a crucial component of health information technology (HIT) utilization, as high satisfaction is expected to increase HIT utilization among providers and to allow consumers to become full participants in their own healthcare management. Objective The primary objective of this pilot study was to identify consumer perspectives on health information technologies including health information exchange (HIE), e-prescribing (e-Rx), and personal health records (PHRs). Methods Eight focus groups were conducted in seven towns and cities across Nebraska in 2013. Each group consisted of 10–12 participants. Discussions were organized topically in the following categories: HIE, e-Rx, and PHR. The qualitative analysis consisted of immersion and crystallization to develop a coding scheme that included both preconceived and emergent themes. Common themes across focus groups were identified and compiled for each discussion category. Results The study had 67 participants, of which 18 (27 percent) were male. Focus group findings revealed both perceived barriers and benefits to the adoption of HIT. Common HIT concerns expressed across focus groups included privacy and security of medical information, decreases in quality of care, inconsistent provider participation, and the potential cost of implementation. Positive expectations regarding HIT included better accuracy and completeness of information, and improved communication and coordination between healthcare providers. Improvements in patient care were expected as a result of easy physician access to consolidated information across providers as well as the speed of sharing and availability of information in an emergency. In addition, participants were optimistic about patient empowerment and convenient access to and control of personal health data. Conclusion Consumer concerns focused on privacy and security of the health information, as well as the cost of implementing the technologies and the

  14. 77 FR 5865 - In the Matter of Blue Earth Refineries, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [File No. 500-1] In the Matter of Blue Earth Refineries, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading February 2, 2012. It appears to the Securities and Exchange Commission that there is a lack of current and accurate information concerning the securities of Blue Earth...

  15. NASA Earth Observations (NEO): Data Access for Informal Education and Outreach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Kevin; Herring, David

    2005-01-01

    The NEO (NASA Earth Observations) web space is currently under development with the goal of significantly increasing the demand for NASA remote sensing data while dramatically simplifying public access to georeferenced images. NEO will target the unsophisticated, nontraditional data users who are currently underserved by the existing data ordering systems. These users will include formal and informal educators, museum and science center personnel, professional communicators, and citizen scientists and amateur Earth observers. Users will be able to view and manipulate georeferenced browse imagery and, if they desire, download directly or order the source HDF data from the data provider (e.g., NASA DAAC or science team) via a single, integrated interface. NE0 will accomplish this goal by anticipating users expectations and knowledge level, thus providing an interface that presents material to users in a more simplified manner, without relying upon the jargon/technical terminology that make even the identification of the appropriate data set a significant hurdle. NEO will also act as a gateway that manages users expectations by providing specific details about images and data formats, developing tutorials regarding the manipulation of georeferenced imagery and raw data, links to software tools and ensuring that users are able to get the image they want in the format they want as easily as possible.

  16. The Sky on Earth project: a synergy between formal and informal astronomy education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Sabrina; Giordano, Enrica; Lanciano, Nicoletta

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we present the Sky on Earth project funded in 2008 by the Italian Ministry of Instruction, Research and University, inside its annual public outreach education program. The project’s goal was to realise a stable and open-access astronomical garden, where children, teachers and citizens could be engaged in investigations about day and night sky phenomena. The project was designed taking into account our prior researches in formal and informal astronomy education. It was realised in the garden of GiocheriaLaboratori, an out-of-school K-6 educational structure of Sesto San Giovanni municipality (near Milan, Italy). Setting and tools were designed with the help of some students of the ‘Altiero Spinelli’ vocational school and their science and technology teachers. Since its installation, the astronomical garden has been used in workshops and open-days, teachers’ preparation courses and research experiences. We might conclude that the Sky on Earth project represents an example of a positive and constructive collaboration between researchers, educators, high school students and teachers. It may also be considered as a potential attempt to face on the well-known gap between research in science education and school practices.

  17. A product lifecycle management framework to support the exchange of prototyping and testing information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toche Fumchum, Luc Boris

    2011-12-01

    The modern perspective on product life cycle and the rapid evolution of Information and Communication Technologies in general have opened a new era in product representation and product information sharing between participants, both inside and outside the enterprise and throughout the product life. In particular, the Product Development Process relies on cross-functional activities involving different domains of expertise that each have their own dedicated tools. This has generated new challenges in terms of collaboration and dissemination of information at large between companies or even within the same organization. Within this context, the work reported herein focuses on a specific stakeholder within product development activities - the prototyping and testing department. Its business is typically related to the planning and building of prototypes in order to perform specific tests on the future product or one of its sub-assemblies. The research project aims at investigating an appropriate framework that leverages configured engineering product information, based on complementary information structures, to share and exchange prototyping and testing information in a Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) perspective. As a first step, a case study based on the retrofit of an aircraft engine is deployed to implement a scenario demonstrating the functionalities to be available within the intended framework. For this purpose, complementary and configurable structures are simulated within the project's PLM system. In a second step are considered the software interoperability issues that don't only affect Design -- Testing interactions, but many other interfaces within either the company -- due to the silo-arrangement -- or the consortiums with partners, in which case the whole PLM platforms could simply be incompatible. A study based on an open source initiative and relying on an improved model of communication is described to show how two natively disparate PLM tools can

  18. Local Health Departments' Partners and Challenges in Electronic Exchange of Health Information

    PubMed Central

    Vest, Joshua R.; Lovelace, Kay; McCullough, J. Mac

    2016-01-01

    Background: Unprecedented amounts of data are produced by the health care and other sectors, presenting opportunities for local health departments (LHDs) to access these data. LHDs will need to participate in health information exchange (HIE) with a number of partners in order to benefit from these data resources. LHDs' participation in HIEs with specific partners has not been studied. Objectives: To describe the level of and challenges in LHD participation in HIE with other partners, and variation by LHD population size and governance type. Data and Methods: This research uses data from the 2015 Informatics Capacity and Needs Assessment Survey, with a target population of all LHDs in the United States. A representative sample of 650 LHDs was drawn using a stratified random sampling design. A total of 324 completed responses were received with a 50% response rate. Survey data were cleaned, and bivariate comparisons were conducted using χ2 and Somer's D. Results: Substantial variation existed in LHDs' participation in HIE by type of exchange partner. Although 71% participated in HIE with the state departments of health, only 12% with jail/correctional health, 14% with health or county-based purchasing plans, and 15% with home health agencies. Compared with large LHDs (jurisdiction populations of ≥500 000), smaller LHDs were more likely to participate in HIE with state departments of health, but less likely with other exchange partners. The challenges to HIE participation were technological, and organizational/interorganizational in nature and variation existed by LHDs' population size and governance structure with respect to state authority. Conclusions: Local public health agencies more commonly participate in HIE with some partners, but may need to improve HIE with many others. National strategies targeting an increase in HIE of LHDs may use our findings to focus those initiatives. PMID:27684617

  19. IN13B-1660: Analytics and Visualization Pipelines for Big Data on the NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) and OpenNEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhary, Aashish; Votava, Petr; Nemani, Ramakrishna R.; Michaelis, Andrew; Kotfila, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We are developing capabilities for an integrated petabyte-scale Earth science collaborative analysis and visualization environment. The ultimate goal is to deploy this environment within the NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) and OpenNEX in order to enhance existing science data production pipelines in both high-performance computing (HPC) and cloud environments. Bridging of HPC and cloud is a fairly new concept under active research and this system significantly enhances the ability of the scientific community to accelerate analysis and visualization of Earth science data from NASA missions, model outputs and other sources. We have developed a web-based system that seamlessly interfaces with both high-performance computing (HPC) and cloud environments, providing tools that enable science teams to develop and deploy large-scale analysis, visualization and QA pipelines of both the production process and the data products, and enable sharing results with the community. Our project is developed in several stages each addressing separate challenge - workflow integration, parallel execution in either cloud or HPC environments and big-data analytics or visualization. This work benefits a number of existing and upcoming projects supported by NEX, such as the Web Enabled Landsat Data (WELD), where we are developing a new QA pipeline for the 25PB system.

  20. Patients' support for health information exchange: a literature review and classification of key factors.

    PubMed

    Esmaeilzadeh, Pouyan; Sambasivan, Murali

    2017-04-04

    Literature indicates that one of the most important factors affecting the widespread adoption of Health Information Exchange (HIE) is patient support and endorsement. In order to reap all the expected benefits of HIE, patients' acceptance of technology is a challenge that is not fully studied. There are a few studies which have focused on requirements of electronic medical information exchange from consumers' views and expectations. This study is aimed at reviewing the literature to articulate factors that affect patients to support HIE efforts. A literature review of current studies addressing patients' views on HIE from 2005 was undertaken. Five electronic research databases (Science Direct, PubMed, Web of Science, CINAHL, and Academic Search Premiere) were searched to retrieve articles reporting pros and cons of HIE from patients' opinion. One hundred and ninety six articles were initially retrieved from the databases. Out of 196, 36 studies met the inclusion criteria and were fully reviewed. Our findings indicate that patient's attitude toward HIE is affected by seven main factors: perceived benefits, perceived concerns, patient characteristics, patient participation level in HIE, type of health information, identity of recipients, and patient preferences regarding consent and features. The findings provide useful theoretical implications for research by developing a classification of significant factors and a framework based on the lessons learned from the literature to help guide HIE efforts. Our results also have fundamental practical implications for policy makers, current and potential organizers of HIEs by highlighting the role of patients in the widespread implementation of HIE. The study indicates that new approaches should be applied to completely underline HIE benefits for patients and also address their concerns.

  1. Newly available technologies present expanding opportunities for scientific and technical information exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolzman, Jean M.

    1993-01-01

    The potential for expanded communication among researchers, scholars, and students is supported by growth in the capabilities for electronic communication as well as expanding access to various forms of electronic interchange and computing capabilities. Increased possibilities for information exchange, collegial dialogue, collaboration, and access to remote resources exist as high-speed networks, increasingly powerful workstations, and large, multi-user computational facilities are more frequently linked and more commonly available. Numerous writers speak of the telecommunications revolution and its impact on the development and dissemination of knowledge and learning. One author offers the phrase 'Scholarly skywriting' to represent a new form of scientific communication that he envisions using electronic networks. In the United States (U.S.), researchers associated with the National Science Foundation (NSF) are exploring 'nationwide collaboratories' and 'digital collaboration.' Research supported by the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) points to a future where workstations with built-in audio, video monitors, and screen sharing protocols are used to support collaborations with colleagues located throughout the world. Instruments and sensors located worldwide will produce data streams that will be brought together, analyzed, and distributed as new findings. Researchers will have access to machines that can supply domain-specific information in addition to locator and directory assistance. New forms of electronic journals will emerge and provide opportunities for researchers and scientists to exchange information electronically and interactively in a range of structures and formats. Ultimately, the wide-scale use of these technologies in the dissemination of research results and the stimulation of collegial dialogue will change the way we represent and express our knowledge of the world. A new paradigm will evolve--perhaps a truly worldwide

  2. Exchanging environmental information and decision making: developing the local Pilot Environmental Virtual Observatory with stakeholder communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, E.; Beven, K.; Brewer, P.; M, Haygarth, P.; Macklin, M.; Marshall, K.; Quinn, P.; Stutter, M.; Thomas, N.; Wilkinson, M.

    2012-04-01

    Public participation in the development of flood risk management and river basin management plans are explicit components of both the Water Framework and Floods Directives. At the local level, involving communities in land and water management has been found to (i) aid better environmental decision making, (ii) enhance social, economic and environmental benefits, and (iii) increase a sense of ownership. Facilitating the access and exchange of information on the local environment is an important part of this new approach to the land and water management process, which also includes local community stakeholders in decisions about the design and content of the information provided. As part of the Natural Environment Research Council's pilot Environment Virtual Observatory (EVO), the Local Level group are engaging with local community stakeholders in three different catchments in the UK (the rivers Eden, Tarland and Dyfi) to start the process of developing prototype visualisation tools to address the specific land and water management issues identified in each area. Through this local collaboration, we will provide novel visualisation tools through which to communicate complex catchment science outcomes and bring together different sources of environmental data in ways that better meet end-user needs as well as facilitate a far broader participatory approach in environmental decision making. The Local Landscape Visualisation Tools are being evolved iteratively during the project to reflect the needs, interests and capabilities of a wide range of stakeholders. The tools will use the latest concepts and technologies to communicate with and provide opportunities for the provision and exchange of information between the public, government agencies and scientists. This local toolkit will reside within a wider EVO platform that will include national datasets, models and state of the art cloud computer systems. As such, local stakeholder groups are assisting the EVO

  3. The measurement of the earth's radiation budget as a problem in information theory - A tool for the rational design of earth observing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkstrom, B. R.

    1983-01-01

    The measurement of the earth's radiation budget has been chosen to illustrate the technique of objective system design. The measurement process is an approximately linear transformation of the original field of radiant exitances, so that linear statistical techniques may be employed. The combination of variability, measurement strategy, and error propagation is presently made with the help of information theory, as suggested by Kondratyev et al. (1975) and Peckham (1974). Covariance matrices furnish the quantitative statement of field variability.

  4. Is this what you need? Direct feedback help climate change information exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachelet, D. M.; Brown, M.; Gough, M.; Basin, D.

    2015-12-01

    The combination of projected climate change and land use adds uncertainty to the long-term effectiveness of current management strategies. Managers need reliable information to adjust their strategies as population density increases. However they are currently overwhelmed by the diversity of available information and the multiplicity of sources. CBI's goal is to centralize and package effectively the usable information for land managers and for the general public in order to increase awareness and promote preparation for the challenges ahead. We are designing conservation planning atlases in Data Basin for a number of landscape conservation cooperatives to address this need. We are adding some user-friendly tools to specifically serve the available climate projections and land use data in a meaningful way. By working closely with a group of managers, our goal is to understand how consideration of these projections figures into the decision-making process and refine the ways we can deliver relevant metrics. We have been holding interviews to gather information and critical feedback on existing climate-related web pages and tools, providing us with benchmarks for improvement. As it turned out, the student-manager dialogue added a component of climate change education and awareness of available tools to the project. Through an iterative process we plan to continue this exchange and address the variety of issues managers continually have to face to maintain healthy ecosystems.

  5. Information model for digital exchange of soil-related data - potential modifications on ISO 28258

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Sina; Eberhardt, Einar; Reznik, Tomas

    2017-04-01

    ABSTRACT The International Standard ISO 28258 "Digital exchange of soil-related data" provides an information model that describes the organization of soil data to facilitate data transfer between data producers, holders and users. The data model contains a fixed set of "core" soil feature types, data types and properties, whereas its customization is on the data provider level, e.g. by adding user-specific properties. Rules for encoding these information are given by a customized XML-based format (called "SoilML"). Some technical shortcomings are currently under consideration in the ISO working group. Directly after publication of ISO 28258 in 2013, also several conceptual and implementation issues concerning the information model had been identified, such as renaming of feature types, modification of data types, and enhancement of definitions or addition of super-classes are part of the current revision process. Conceptual changes for the current ISO data model that are compatible with the Australian/New Zealand soil data model ANZSoilML and the EU INSPIRE Data Specifications Soil are also discussed. The concept of a model with a limited set of properties that can be extended by the data provider should remain unaffected. This presentation aims to introduce and comment on the current ISO soil information model and the proposed modifications. Moreover, we want to discuss these adjustments with respect to enhanced applicability of this International Standard.

  6. 22 CFR Appendix C to Part 62 - Update of Information on Exchange-Visitor Program Sponsor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... assigned to ________ as follows: (Name of institution/organization) 1. Change the name of the Program... Cultural Exchange. 9. ( ) Cancel the above named Exchange Visitor Program. (Signature of Responsible or...

  7. Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange in Atlanta (HELIX-Atlanta): A Pilot Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug; Shire, J.; Qualters, J.; Mitchell, K.; Pollard, S.; Rao, R.; Kajumba, N.; Quattrochi, D.; Estes, M., Jr.; Meyer, P.; hide

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. To provide an overview of four environmental public health surveillance projects developed by CDC and its partners for the Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange, Atlanta (HELIX-Atlanta) and to illustrate common issues and challenges encountered in developing an environmental public health tracking system. Methods. HELIX-Atlanta, initiated in October 2003 to develop data linkage and analysis methods that can be used by the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (Tracking Network), conducted four projects. We highlight the projects' work, assess attainment of the HELIX-Atlanta goals and discuss three surveillance attributes. Results. Among the major challenges was the complexity of analytic issues which required multidiscipline teams with technical expertise. This expertise and the data resided across multiple organizations. Conclusions:Establishing formal procedures for sharing data, defining data analysis standards and automating analyses, and committing staff with appropriate expertise is needed to support wide implementation of environmental public health tracking.

  8. Software for storage and processing coded messages for the international exchange of meteorological information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, V. N.; Botygin, I. A.; Kolochev, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    The approach allows representing data of international codes for exchange of meteorological information using metadescription as the formalism associated with certain categories of resources. Development of metadata components was based on an analysis of the data of surface meteorological observations, atmosphere vertical sounding, atmosphere wind sounding, weather radar observing, observations from satellites and others. A common set of metadata components was formed including classes, divisions and groups for a generalized description of the meteorological data. The structure and content of the main components of a generalized metadescription are presented in detail by the example of representation of meteorological observations from land and sea stations. The functional structure of a distributed computing system is described. It allows organizing the storage of large volumes of meteorological data for their further processing in the solution of problems of the analysis and forecasting of climatic processes.

  9. Potential value of health information exchange for people with epilepsy: crossover patterns and missing clinical data.

    PubMed

    Grinspan, Zachary M; Abramson, Erika L; Banerjee, Samprit; Kern, Lisa M; Kaushal, Rainu; Shapiro, Jason S

    2013-01-01

    For people with epilepsy, the potential value of health information exchange (HIE) is unknown. We reviewed two years of clinical encounters for 8055 people with epilepsy from seven Manhattan hospitals. We created network graphs illustrating crossover among these hospitals for multiple encounter types, and calculated a novel metric of care fragmentation: "encounters at risk for missing clinical data." Given two hospitals, a median of 109 [range 46 - 588] patients with epilepsy had visited both. Due to this crossover, recent, relevant clinical data may be missing at the time of care frequently (44.8% of ED encounters, 34.5% inpatient, 24.9% outpatient, and 23.2% radiology). Though a smaller percentage of outpatient encounters were at risk for missing data than ED encounters, the absolute number of outpatient encounters at risk was three times higher (14,579 vs. 5041). People with epilepsy may benefit from HIE. Future HIE initiatives should prioritize outpatient access.

  10. Outcomes assessment of the regional health information exchange: a five-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Mäenpää, T; Asikainen, P; Gissler, M; Siponen, K; Maass, M; Saranto, K; Suominen, T

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of a technology such as health information exchange (HIE) through a Regional Health Information System (RHIS) may improve the mobilization of health care information electronically across organizations. There is a need to coordinate care and bring together regional and local stakeholders. To describe how HIE had influenced health care delivery in one hospital district area in Finland. Trend analysis was used to evaluate the influence of a regional HIE. We conducted a retrospective, longitudinal study for the period 2004-2008 for the eleven federations of municipalities in the study area. We reviewed statistical health data from the time of implementation of an RHIS. The t-test was used to determine statistical significance. The selected outcomes were the data obtained from the regional database on total appointments, emergency department visits, laboratory tests and radiology examinations, and selected laboratory tests and radiology examinations carried out in both primary care and special health care. Access to HIE may have influenced health care delivery in the study area. There are indications that there is a connection between access to regional HIE and the number of laboratory tests and radiology examinations performed in both primary care and specialized health care, as observed in the decreased frequency in outcomes such as radiology examinations, number of appointments, and emergency department visits in the study environment. The decreased frequencies of the latter suggest an increased efficiency of outpatient care, but we were not able to estimate to what extent the readily available comprehensive clinical information contributed to these trends. Outcome assessment of HIE through an RHIS is essential for the success of health information technology (HIT) and as evidence to use in the decision-making process. As health care information becomes more digital, it increases the potential for a strong HIE effect on health care delivery.

  11. Communities' readiness for health information exchange: the National Landscape in 2004.

    PubMed

    Overhage, J Marc; Evans, Lori; Marchibroda, Janet

    2005-01-01

    The Secretary of Health and Human Services recently released a report calling for the nation to create a national health information network (NHIN) that would interconnect Regional Health Information Organizations (RHIOs). These RHIOs, which others have called Local or Regional Health Information Infrastructures (LHII), would in turn interconnect local as well as national health information resources. Little data exist about the activities taking place in communities to create LHIIs. The authors analyzed data that communities submitted in response to a request for capabilities issued by the Foundation for eHealth as part of their Connecting Communities for Better Health program using descriptive statistics and subjective evaluation. The authors analyzed data from 134 responses from communities in 42 states and the District of Columbia. Communities are enthusiastic about moving forward with health information exchange to create LHIIs to improve the efficiency, quality, and safety of care. They have identified significant local sources of investment and plan to use some clinical data standards but not as broadly as was expected. The communities have not yet developed the specific technical approaches or the sustainable business models that will be required. Many communities are interested in creating an LHII and are developing the leadership commitment needed to translate that interest into an operational reality. Clinical information standards can be incorporated into a community's plans as often as they need to be. Communities have to overcome funding issues, develop deeper understanding of the technical and organizational issues, and aggressively share their learning to succeed within their community and to help other communities succeed.

  12. Association between use of a health information exchange system and hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Vest, J R; Kern, L M; Campion, T R; Silver, M D; Kaushal, R

    2014-01-01

    Relevant patient information is frequently difficult to obtain in emergency department (ED) visits. Improved provider access to previously inaccessible patient information may improve the quality of care and reduce hospital admissions. Health information exchange (HIE) systems enable access to longitudinal, community-wide patient information at the point of care. However, the ability of HIE to avert admissions is not well demonstrated. We sought to determine if HIE system usage is correlated with a reduction in admissions via the ED. We identified 15,645 adults from New York State with an ED visit during a 6-month period, all of whom consented to have their information accessible in the HIE system, and were continuously enrolled in two area health plans. Using claims we determined if the ED encounter resulted in an admission. We used the HIE's system log files to determine usage during the encounter. We determined the association between HIE system use and the likelihood of admission to the hospital from the ED and potential cost savings. The HIE system was accessed during 2.4% of encounters. The odds of an admission were 30% lower when the system was accessed after controlling for confounding (odds ratio = 0.70; 95%C I= 0.52, 0.95). The annual savings in the sample was $357,000. These findings suggest that the use of an HIE system may reduce hospitalizations from the ED with resultant cost savings. This is an important outcome given the substantial financial investment in interventions designed to improve provider access to patient information in the US.

  13. Association Between Use of a Health Information Exchange System and Hospital Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Vest, J.R.; Kern, L.M.; Campion, T.R.; Silver, M.D.; Kaushal, R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective Relevant patient information is frequently difficult to obtain in emergency department (ED) visits. Improved provider access to previously inaccessible patient information may improve the quality of care and reduce hospital admissions. Health information exchange (HIE) systems enable access to longitudinal, community-wide patient information at the point of care. However, the ability of HIE to avert admissions is not well demonstrated. We sought to determine if HIE system usage is correlated with a reduction in admissions via the ED. Methods We identified 15,645 adults from New York State with an ED visit during a 6-month period, all of whom consented to have their information accessible in the HIE system, and were continuously enrolled in two area health plans. Using claims we determined if the ED encounter resulted in an admission. We used the HIE’s system log files to determine usage during the encounter. We determined the association between HIE system use and the likelihood of admission to the hospital from the ED and potential cost savings. Results The HIE system was accessed during 2.4% of encounters. The odds of an admission were 30% lower when the system was accessed after controlling for confounding (odds ratio = 0.70; 95%C I= 0.52, 0.95). The annual savings in the sample was $357,000. Conclusion These findings suggest that the use of an HIE system may reduce hospitalizations from the ED with resultant cost savings. This is an important outcome given the substantial financial investment in interventions designed to improve provider access to patient information in the US. PMID:24734135

  14. Emphasizing Public Health Within a Health Information Exchange: An Evaluation of the District of Columbia’s Health Information Exchange Program

    PubMed Central

    Goldwater, Jason; Jardim, Juliette; Khan, Tasnuva; Chan, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Clinovations Government Solutions (CGS) was contracted in 2013 to conduct a mixed-methods evaluation of the District of Columbia (D.C.) Health Information Exchange (HIE) program as part of their Cooperative Agreement Grant funded by the Office of the National Coordinator in 2010. The evaluation was to focus on the progress of the HIE, how many providers and hospitals were participating in the program, and what benefits were being realized through the use of the HIE. During the course of the evaluation, the CGS team found that the use of the HIE to support public health reporting was one of its core elements. Background: The D.C. HIE is one of 56 HIE that were funded out of the Cooperative Agreement program. The HIE program was managed by the District of Columbia Department of Health Care Finance (DHCF), which also manages the District of Columbia Medicaid Program. The program was initially designed to accomplish the following: developing state-level directories and enabling technical services for HIE within and across states; ensuring an effective model for governance and accountability; coordinating an integrated approach with Medicaid and public health; and developing or updating privacy and security requirements for HIE within and across state borders. As the evaluation progressed, the CGS team discovered that the relationship between the DHCF and the District of Columbia Department of Health (DOH) had become a cornerstone of the D.C. HIE program. Methods: The CGS team used a mixed-methods approach for the evaluation, including a review of documents developed by the DHCF in its HIE program, including its original application. We also conducted 10 key informant interviews and moderated two small-group discussions using a semistructured protocol; and we developed a survey that measured the use, satisfaction, and future sustainability of the HIE for over 200 providers within the District of Columbia. Findings: While the evaluation focused on the D

  15. Geographic Information System Incorporated into Earth Science Classrooms to Enhance Individual Learning Development with Interconnected Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garifo, Mary Anna

    2017-04-01

    Geographic Information System, GIS, is a powerful tool and when incorporated into Earth Science classrooms, can enhance and empower students' engagement in their learning. Through utilization of GIS, students can process what they are learning in a spatially orientated method, which allows them to make connections among different related concepts. For example, if students are given a map in a GIS software with multiple layers of data on earthquakes, plate technics, and volcanoes then they can manipulate this information to come up with their own patterns. Through allowing students to develop their spatial recognition of where the Earth's plate boundaries are and where earthquakes have occurred, students can see how these two concepts are connected. In a guided but exploratory activity, students would be given multiple different websites that they could explore to research what different type of plates there are while they are working simultaneously with the GIS software. Using a plate technics layer, including data on type of boundary, students can explore and estimate which direction the plates are moving. When they look up convergent boundaries and see that the oceanic plates submerge under continental plates they can see where volcanic chains might be. Once they understand this in a spatial way, students can predict where they think volcanoes could be, based on where convergent boundaries are. When they manipulate the volcanic layer and see abnormalities to what they just learned, it will cause them to have cognitive dissonance, which will force them into seeking further understanding. The concept of a hot spot can then be introduced to resolve the cognitive dissonance and emphasis the idea that plates we live on are moving. Concepts can further be developed through GIS by showing how the strength and frequency of earthquakes are related to the level of activity at the plate boundary. This can be done by manipulating the map layer that represents earthquakes so

  16. South Africans Speak: Discussion Forum Presentations 1987-1989. South African Information Exchange Working Paper Number 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micou, Ann M., Ed.

    Ten informal papers given at Discussion Forums to U.S. groups are provided which address current South African related issues as they touch upon the South African Information Exchange (SAIE) initiative. Papers have the following titles and authors: "Is There Space for American Involvement in South African Education?" (Merlyn C. Mehl);…

  17. Establishing and Enriching School-Community Ties in Small Schools. Small Schools Network Information Exchange Number 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Laboratory for Educational Improvement of the Northeast & Islands, Andover, MA.

    This information packet contains 14 articles reprinted from various books and journals. Establishing and enriching school-community ties in small schools is the theme for this "Information Exchange Packet," the sixth in a series developed for Small Schools Network members. The articles and their authors are: "Skills in Building Support for…

  18. On-Line Learning Technologies: Networking in the Classroom. Rural, Small Schools Network Information Exchange No. 16, Summer 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Laboratory for Educational Improvement of the Northeast & Islands, Andover, MA.

    This packet includes reprints of articles and other information concerning the use of computer networks in small, rural schools. Computer networks can minimize isolation; develop stronger links to the community; access reference information from remote sources; and create professional and academic exchanges for teachers, administrators, and…

  19. Zhamanshin astrobleme provides evidence for carbonaceous chondrite and post-impact exchange between ejecta and Earth's atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Magna, Tomáš; Žák, Karel; Pack, Andreas; Moynier, Frédéric; Mougel, Bérengère; Peters, Stefan; Skála, Roman; Jonášová, Šárka; Mizera, Jiří; Řanda, Zdeněk

    2017-08-09

    Chemical fingerprints of impacts are usually compromised by extreme conditions in the impact plume, and the contribution of projectile matter to impactites does not often exceed a fraction of per cent. Here we use chromium and oxygen isotopes to identify the impactor and impact-plume processes for Zhamanshin astrobleme, Kazakhstan. ε 54 Cr values up to 1.54 in irghizites, part of the fallback ejecta, represent the 54 Cr-rich extremity of the Solar System range and suggest a CI-like chondrite impactor. Δ 17 O values as low as -0.22‰ in irghizites, however, are incompatible with a CI-like impactor. We suggest that the observed 17 O depletion in irghizites relative to the terrestrial range is caused by partial isotope exchange with atmospheric oxygen (Δ 17 O = -0.47‰) following material ejection. In contrast, combined Δ 17 O-ε 54 Cr data for central European tektites (distal ejecta) fall into the terrestrial range and neither impactor fingerprint nor oxygen isotope exchange with the atmosphere are indicated.Identifying the original impactor from craters remains challenging. Here, the authors use chromium and oxygen isotopes to indicate that the Zhamanshin astrobleme impactor was a carbonaceous chrondrite by demonstrating that depleted 17O values are due to exchange with atmospheric oxygen.

  20. A service for the application of data quality information to NASA earth science satellite records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, E. M.; Xing, Z.; Fry, C.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Huang, T.; Chen, G.; Chin, T. M.; Alarcon, C.

    2016-12-01

    A recurring demand in working with satellite-based earth science data records is the need to apply data quality information. Such quality information is often contained within the data files as an array of "flags", but can also be represented by more complex quality descriptions such as combinations of bit flags, or even other ancillary variables that can be applied as thresholds to the geophysical variable of interest. For example, with Level 2 granules from the Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) project up to 6 independent variables could be used to screen the sea surface temperature measurements on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Quality screening of Level 3 data from the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) instrument can be become even more complex, involving 161 unique bit states or conditions a user can screen for. The application of quality information is often a laborious process for the user until they understand the implications of all the flags and bit conditions, and requires iterative approaches using custom software. The Virtual Quality Screening Service, a NASA ACCESS project, is addressing these issues and concerns. The project has developed an infrastructure to expose, apply, and extract quality screening information building off known and proven NASA components for data extraction and subset-by-value, data discovery, and exposure to the user of granule-based quality information. Further sharing of results through well-defined URLs and web service specifications has also been implemented. The presentation will focus on overall description of the technologies and informatics principals employed by the project. Examples of implementations of the end-to-end web service for quality screening with GHRSST and SMAP granules will be demonstrated.

  1. Measuring the Value of Earth Observation Information with the Gravity Research and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernknopf, R.; Kuwayama, Y.; Brookshire, D.; Macauley, M.; Zaitchik, B.; Pesko, S.; Vail, P.

    2014-12-01

    Determining how much to invest in earth observation technology depends in part on the value of information (VOI) that can be derived from the observations. We design a framework and then evaluate the value-in-use of the NASA Gravity Research and Climate Experiment (GRACE) for regional water use and reliability in the presence of drought. As a technology that allows measurement of water storage, the GRACE Data Assimilation System (DAS) provides information that is qualitatively different from that generated by other water data sources. It provides a global, reproducible grid of changes in surface and subsurface water resources on a frequent and regular basis. Major damages from recent events such as the 2012 Midwest drought and the ongoing drought in California motivate the need to understand the VOI from remotely sensed data such as that derived from GRACE DAS. Our conceptual framework models a dynamic risk management problem in agriculture. We base the framework on information from stakeholders and subject experts. The economic case for GRACE DAS involves providing better water availability information. In the model, individuals have a "willingness to pay" (wtp) for GRACE DAS - essentially, wtp is an expression of savings in reduced agricultural input costs and for costs that are influenced by regional policy decisions. Our hypothesis is that improvements in decision making can be achieved with GRACE DAS measurements of water storage relative to data collected from groundwater monitoring wells and soil moisture monitors that would be relied on in the absence of GRACE DAS. The VOI is estimated as a comparison of outcomes. The California wine grape industry has features that allow it to be a good case study and a basis for extrapolation to other economic sectors. We model water use in this sector as a sequential decision highlighting the attributes of GRACE DAS input as information for within-season production decisions as well as for longer-term water reliability.

  2. Technology and Policy Challenges in the Adoption and Operation of Health Information Exchange Systems.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hyerim; Yoo, Sooyoung; Heo, Eun-Young; Hwang, Hee; Kim, Jeong-Whun

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to identify problems and issues that arise with the implementation of online health information exchange (HIE) systems in a medical environment and to identify solutions to facilitate the successful operation of future HIE systems in primary care clinics and hospitals. In this study, the issues that arose during the establishment and operation of an HIE system in a hospital were identified so that they could be addressed to enable the successful establishment and operation of a standard-based HIE system. After the issues were identified, they were reviewed and categorized by a group of experts that included medical information system experts, doctors, medical information standard experts, and HIE researchers. Then, solutions for the identified problems were derived based on the system development, operation, and improvement carried out during this work. Twenty-one issues were identified during the implementation and operation of an online HIE system. These issues were then divided into four categories: system architecture and standards, documents and data items, consent of HIE, and usability. We offer technical and policy recommendations for various stakeholders based on the experiences of operating and improving the online HIE system in the medical field. The issues and solutions identified in this study regarding the implementation and operate of an online HIE system can provide valuable insight for planners to enable them to successfully design and operate such systems at a national level in the future. In addition, policy support from governments is needed.

  3. Use patterns of health information exchange through a multidimensional lens: conceptual framework and empirical validation.

    PubMed

    Politi, Liran; Codish, Shlomi; Sagy, Iftach; Fink, Lior

    2014-12-01

    Insights about patterns of system use are often gained through the analysis of system log files, which record the actual behavior of users. In a clinical context, however, few attempts have been made to typify system use through log file analysis. The present study offers a framework for identifying, describing, and discerning among patterns of use of a clinical information retrieval system. We use the session attributes of volume, diversity, granularity, duration, and content to define a multidimensional space in which each specific session can be positioned. We also describe an analytical method for identifying the common archetypes of system use in this multidimensional space. We demonstrate the value of the proposed framework with a log file of the use of a health information exchange (HIE) system by physicians in an emergency department (ED) of a large Israeli hospital. The analysis reveals five distinct patterns of system use, which have yet to be described in the relevant literature. The results of this study have the potential to inform the design of HIE systems for efficient and effective use, thus increasing their contribution to the clinical decision-making process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Patient Privacy, Consent, and Identity Management in Health Information Exchange: Issues for the Military Health System.

    PubMed

    Hosek, Susan D; Straus, Susan G

    2013-01-01

    The Military Health System (MHS) and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) have been among the nation's leaders in health information technology (IT), including the development of health IT systems and electronic health records that summarize patients' care from multiple providers. Health IT interoperability within MHS and across MHS partners, including VHA, is one of ten goals in the current MHS Strategic Plan. As a step toward achieving improved interoperability, the MHS is seeking to develop a research roadmap to better coordinate health IT research efforts, address IT capability gaps, and reduce programmatic risk for its enterprise projects. This article contributes to that effort by identifying gaps in research, policy, and practice involving patient privacy, consent, and identity management that need to be addressed to bring about improved quality and efficiency of care through health information exchange. Major challenges include (1) designing a meaningful patient consent procedure, (2) recording patients' consent preferences and designing procedures to implement restrictions on disclosures of protected health information, and (3) advancing knowledge regarding the best technical approaches to performing patient identity matches and how best to monitor results over time. Using a sociotechnical framework, this article suggests steps for overcoming these challenges and topics for future research.

  5. Exploring Health Information Exchange Implementation Using Qualitative Assessments of Nursing Home Leaders

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Gregory L.; Popejoy, Lori; Lyons, Vanessa; Shumate, Sue; Mueller, Jessica; Galambos, Colleen; Vogelsmeier, Amy; Rantz, Marilyn; Flesner, Marcia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Limited research exists on nursing home information technologies, such as health information exchange (HIE) systems. Capturing the experiences of early HIE adopters provides vital information about how these systems are used. In this study, we conduct a secondary analysis of qualitative data captured during interviews with 15 nursing home leaders representing 14 nursing homes in the midwestern United States that are part of the Missouri Quality Improvement Initiative (MOQI) national demonstration project. Methods The interviews were conducted as part of an external evaluation of the HIE vendor contracting with the MOQI initiative with the purpose of understanding the challenges and successes of HIE implementation, with a particular focus on Direct HIE services. Results Emerging themes included (1) incorporating HIE into existing work processes, (2) participation inside and outside the facility, (3) appropriate training and retraining, (4) getting others to use the HIE, (5) getting the HIE operational, and 6) putting policies for technology into place. Discussion Three essential areas should be considered for nursing homes considering HIE adoption: readiness to adopt technology, availability of technology resources, and matching of new clinical workflows. PMID:27843423

  6. Towards an optimal flow: Density-of-states-informed replica-exchange simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Vogel, Thomas; Perez, Danny

    2015-11-05

    Here we learn that replica exchange (RE) is one of the most popular enhanced-sampling simulations technique in use today. Despite widespread successes, RE simulations can sometimes fail to converge in practical amounts of time, e.g., when sampling around phase transitions, or when a few hard-to-find configurations dominate the statistical averages. We introduce a generalized RE scheme, density-of-states-informed RE, that addresses some of these challenges. The key feature of our approach is to inform the simulation with readily available, but commonly unused, information on the density of states of the system as the RE simulation proceeds. This enables two improvements, namely,more » the introduction of resampling moves that actively move the system towards equilibrium and the continual adaptation of the optimal temperature set. As a consequence of these two innovations, we show that the configuration flow in temperature space is optimized and that the overall convergence of RE simulations can be dramatically accelerated.« less

  7. The Role of the United States Book Exchange in the Nationwide Library and Information Services Network. National Program for Libraries and Information Services Related Paper No. 27.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Alice Dulany

    The National Commission on Libraries and Information Science's (NCLIS) nationwide information program is based in part on the sharing of resources. The United States Book Exchange (USBE) and its existing services may have a role in this program, since the USBE's major function is the preservation and maximum utilization of publications through…

  8. A system dynamics evaluation model: implementation of health information exchange for public health reporting

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Jacqueline A; Deegan, Michael; Wilson, Rosalind V; Kaushal, Rainu; Fredericks, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the complex dynamics involved in implementing electronic health information exchange (HIE) for public health reporting at a state health department, and to identify policy implications to inform similar implementations. Materials and methods Qualitative data were collected over 8 months from seven experts at New York State Department of Health who implemented web services and protocols for querying, receipt, and validation of electronic data supplied by regional health information organizations. Extensive project documentation was also collected. During group meetings experts described the implementation process and created reference modes and causal diagrams that the evaluation team used to build a preliminary model. System dynamics modeling techniques were applied iteratively to build causal loop diagrams representing the implementation. The diagrams were validated iteratively by individual experts followed by group review online, and through confirmatory review of documents and artifacts. Results Three casual loop diagrams captured well-recognized system dynamics: Sliding Goals, Project Rework, and Maturity of Resources. The findings were associated with specific policies that address funding, leadership, ensuring expertise, planning for rework, communication, and timeline management. Discussion This evaluation illustrates the value of a qualitative approach to system dynamics modeling. As a tool for strategic thinking on complicated and intense processes, qualitative models can be produced with fewer resources than a full simulation, yet still provide insights that are timely and relevant. Conclusions System dynamics techniques clarified endogenous and exogenous factors at play in a highly complex technology implementation, which may inform other states engaged in implementing HIE supported by federal Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) legislation. PMID:23292910

  9. How could Health Information Exchange Better Meet the Needs of Care Practitioners?

    PubMed Central

    Kaushal, R.; Vest, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Health information exchange (HIE) has the potential to improve the quality of healthcare by enabling providers with better access to patient information from multiple sources at the point of care. However, HIE efforts have historically been difficult to establish in the US and the failure rates of organizations created to foster HIE have been high. Objectives We sought to better understand how RHIO-based HIE systems were used in practice and the challenges care practitioners face using them. The objective of our study were to so investigate how HIE can better meet the needs of care practitioners. Methods We performed a multiple-case study using qualitative methods in three communities in New York State. We conducted interviews onsite and by telephone with HIE users and non-users and observed the workflows of healthcare professionals at multiple healthcare organizations participating in a local HIE effort in New York State. Results The empirical data analysis suggests that challenges still remain in increasing provider usage, optimizing HIE implementations and connecting HIE systems across geographic regions. Important determinants of system usage and perceived value includes users experienced level of available information and the fit of use for physician workflows. Conclusions Challenges still remain in increasing provider adoption, optimizing HIE implementations, and demonstrating value. The inability to find information reduced usage of HIE. Healthcare organizations, HIE facilitating organizations, and states can help support HIE adoption by ensuring patient information is accessible to providers through increasing patient consents, fostering broader participation, and by ensuring systems are usable. PMID:25589903

  10. Leveraging public health's participation in a Health Information Exchange to improve communicable disease reporting.

    PubMed

    Painter, Ian; Revere, Debra; Gibson, P Joseph; Baseman, Janet

    2017-01-01

    Infectious diseases can appear and spread rapidly. Timely information about disease patterns and trends allows public health agencies to quickly investigate and efficiently contain those diseases. But disease case reporting to public health has traditionally been paper-based, resulting in somewhat slow, burdensome processes. Fortunately, the expanding use of electronic health records and health information exchanges has created opportunities for more rapid, complete, and easily managed case reporting and investigation. To assess how this new service might impact the efficiency and quality of a public health agency's case investigations, we compared the timeliness of usual case investigation to that of case investigations based on case report forms that were partially pre-populated with electronic data. Between September 2013-March 2014, chlamydia disease report forms for certain clinics in Indianapolis were electronically pre-populated with clinical, lab and patient data available through the Indiana Health Information Exchange, then provided to the patient’s doctor. Doctors could then sign the form and deliver it to public health for investigation and population-level disease tracking. Methods: We utilized a novel matched case analysis of timeliness changes in receipt and processing of communicable disease report forms. Each Chlamydia cases reported with the pre-populated form were matched to cases reported in usual ways. We assessed the time from receipt of the case at the public health agency: 1) inclusion of the case into the public health surveillance system and 2) to close to case. A hierarchical random effects model was used to compare mean difference in each outcome between the target cases and the matched cases, with random intercepts for case. Twenty-one Chlamydia cases were reported to the public health agency using the pre-populated form. Sixteen of these pre-populated form cases were matched to at least one other case, with a mean of 23 matches

  11. Value-added Data Services at the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leptoukh, Gregory G.; Alcott, Gary T.; Kempler, Steven J.; Lynnes, Christopher S.; Vollmer, Bruce E.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC), in addition to serving the Earth Science community as one of the major Distributed Active Archives Centers (DAACs), provides much more than just data. Among the value-added services available to general users are subsetting data spatially and/or by parameter, online analysis (to avoid downloading unnecessarily all the data), and assistance in obtaining data from other centers. Services available to data producers and high-volume users include consulting on building new products with standard formats and metadata and construction of data management systems. A particularly useful service is data processing at the DISC (i.e., close to the input data) with the users algorithm. This can take a number of different forms: as a configuration-managed algorithm within the main processing stream; as a stand-alone program next to the on-line data storage; as build-it-yourself code within the Near-Archive Data Mining (NADM) system; or as an on-the-fly analysis with simple algorithms embedded into the web-based tools. Partnerships between the GES DISC and scientists, both producers and users, allow the scientists to concentrate on science, while the GES DISC handles the data management, e.g., formats, integration, and data processing. The existing data management infrastructure at the GES DISC supports a wide spectrum of options: from simple data support to sophisticated on-line analysis tools, producing economies of scale and rapid time-to-deploy. At the same time, such partnerships allow the GES DISC to serve the user community more efficiently and to better prioritize on-line holdings. Several examples of successful partnerships are described in the presentation.

  12. The Pilgram's Progress: Reflections on the journey building Australia's solid earth information infrastructure (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodcock, R.

    2013-12-01

    Australia's AuScope provides world class research infrastructure as a framework for understanding the structure and evolution of the Australian continent. Since it conception in 2005, Data Scientists have led the Grid and Interoperability component of AuScope. The AuScope Grid is responsible for the effective management, curation, preservation and analysis of earth science data across the many organisations collaborating in AuScope. During this journey much was learned about technology and architectures but even more about organisations and people, and the role of Data Scientists in the science ecosystem. With the AuScope Grid now in operation and resulting techniques and technologies now underpinning Australian Government initiatives in solid earth and environmental information, it is beneficial to reflect upon the journey and observe what has been learned in order to make data science routine. The role of the Data Scientist is a hybrid one, of not quite belonging and yet highly valued. With the skills to support domain scientists with data and computational needs and communicate across domains, yet not quite able to do the domain science itself. A bridge between two worlds, there is tremendous satisfaction from a job well done, but paradoxically it is also best when it is unnoticeable. In the years since AuScope started much has changed for the Data Scientist. Initially misunderstood, Data Scientists are now a recognisable part of the science landscape in Australia. Whilst the rewards and incentives are still catching up, there is wealth of knowledge on the technical and soft skills required and recognition of the need for Data Scientists. These will be shared from the AuScope journey so other pilgrims may progress well.

  13. Visual field information in Nap-of-the-Earth flight by teleoperated Helmet-Mounted displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunwald, Arthur J.; Kohn, S.; Merhav, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    The human ability to derive Control-Oriented Visual Field Information from teleoperated Helmet-Mounted displays in Nap-of-the-Earth flight, is investigated. The visual field with these types of displays originates from a Forward Looking Infrared Radiation Camera, gimbal-mounted at the front of the aircraft and slaved to the pilot's line-of-sight, to obtain wide-angle visual coverage. Although these displays are proved to be effective in Apache and Cobra helicopter night operations, they demand very high pilot proficiency and work load. Experimental work presented in the paper has shown that part of the difficulties encountered in vehicular control by means of these displays can be attributed to the narrow viewing aperture and head/camera slaving system phase lags. Both these shortcomings will impair visuo-vestibular coordination, when voluntary head rotation is present. This might result in errors in estimating the Control-Oriented Visual Field Information vital in vehicular control, such as the vehicle yaw rate or the anticipated flight path, or might even lead to visuo-vestibular conflicts (motion sickness). Since, under these conditions, the pilot will tend to minimize head rotation, the full wide-angle coverage of the Helmet-Mounted Display, provided by the line-of-sight slaving system, is not always fully utilized.

  14. Separation and preconcentration of the rare-earth elements and yttrium from geological materials by ion-exchange and sequential acid elution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crock, J.G.; Lichte, F.E.; Riddle, G.O.; Beech, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    The abundance of rare-earth elements (REE) and yttrium in geological materials is generally low, and most samples contain elements that interfere in the determination of the REE and Y, so a separation and/or preconcentration step is often necessary. This is often achieved by ion-exchange chromatography with either nitric or hydrochloric acid. It is advantageous, however, to use both acids sequentially. The final solution thus obtained contains only the REE and Y, with minor amounts of Al, Ba, Ca, Sc, Sr and Ti. Elements that potentially interfere, such as Be, Co, Cr, Fe, Mn, Th, U, V and Zr, are virtually eliminated. Inductively-coupled argon plasma atomic-emission spectroscopy can then be used for a final precise and accurate measurement. The method can also be used with other instrumental methods of analysis. ?? 1986.

  15. Using the International Directory Network and connected information systems for research in the Earth and space sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    Many researchers are becoming aware of the International Directory Network (IDN), an interconnected federation of international directories to Earth and space science data. Are you aware, however, of the many Earth-science-relevant information systems which can be accessed automatically from the directories? After determining potentially useful data sets in various disciplines through directories such as the Global Change Master Directory, it is becoming increasingly possible to get detailed information about the correlative possibilities of these data sets through the connected guide/catalog and inventory systems. Such capabilities as data set browse, subsetting, analysis, etc. are available now and will be improving in the future.

  16. Testing the Value of Information of Climate Change Indicators that use Earth Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenney, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Indicators are usually thought of as measurements or calculations that represent important features of the status, trend, or performance of a system of interest (e.g. the economy, agriculture, air quality). They are often used for the most practical of reasons - one cannot measure everything important about systems of interest, so there is a practical need to identify major features that can be reported periodically and used to guide both research and decisions (National Research Council (NRC). 2000. Ecological Indicators for the Nation. National Academy Press. Washington, DC). The use of indicators to track the status and trends of many features of environmental or economic performance, quality of life, and a host of other social concerns is embedded in the fabric of our everyday lives. Businesses, governments, and consumers regularly use the common economic indices - e.g. the unemployment index or consumer price index - as guides for decision-making on investments and hiring. There is an analogous demand for indicators of environmental conditions and performance - everything from agricultural yields to air and water quality to weather and climate - that are currently less publicly visible than the common economic indicators, but that can have critically important uses in such areas as natural resource management, improvement of environmental quality, emergency planning, and infrastructure development. A number of these environmental indicators, be it physical or ecological, use a range of data sources including earth observations. Despite the extensive development and use of indicators, there is little testing of these indicators to assure that they indeed provide the assumed positive information benefit. This is particularly concerning because if these indicators are systematically misunderstood by the intended audience or a sub-group of that audience, such individuals could make decisions that are consistent with their incorrect understanding of the indicator

  17. Balancing volume and duration of information consumption by physicians: The case of health information exchange in critical care.

    PubMed

    Politi, Liran; Codish, Shlomi; Sagy, Iftach; Fink, Lior

    2017-07-01

    The realization of the potential benefits of health information exchange systems (HIEs) for emergency departments (EDs) depends on the way these systems are actually used. The attributes of volume of information and duration of information processing are important for the study of HIE use patterns in the ED, as cognitive load and time constraints may result in a trade-off between these attributes. Experts and non-experts often use different problem-solving strategies, which may be consequential for their system use patterns. Little previous research focuses on the trade-off between volume and duration of system use or on the factors that affect it, including user expertise. This study aims at exploring the trade-off of volume and duration of use, examining whether this relationship differs between experts and non-experts, and identifying factors that are associated with use patterns characterized by volume and duration. The research objectives are pursued in the context of critically-ill patients, treated at a busy ED in the period 2010-2012. The primary source of internal and external data is an HIE linked to 14 hospitals, over 1300 clinics, and other clinical facilities. We define four use profiles based on the attributes of duration and volume: quick and basic, quick and deep, slow and basic, and slow and deep. The volume and duration of use are computed using HIE log files as the number of screens and the time per screen, respectively. Each session is then classified into a specific profile based on distances from predefined profile centroids. Experts are physicians that are board-certified in emergency medicine. We test the distribution of use profiles and their associations with multiple variables that describe the patient, physician, situation, information available in the HIE system, and use dynamics within the encounter. The quick and basic profile is the most prevalent. While available admission summaries are associated with quick and basic use, lab and

  18. Technology, Incentives, or Both? Factors Related to Level of Hospital Health Information Exchange.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sunny C; Everson, Jordan; Adler-Milstein, Julia

    2018-02-28

    To assess whether the level of health information exchange (HIE) in U.S. hospitals is related to technology capabilities, incentives to exchange, or both. A total of 1,812 hospitals attesting to stage 2 of Medicare's Meaningful Use Incentive Program through April 2016. Hospital-level, multivariate OLS regression with state fixed effects was used to analyze the relationship between technology capability and incentives measures, and percent of care transitions with summary of care records (SCRs) sent electronically to subsequent providers. Stage 2 hospitals reported sending SCRs electronically for an average of 41 percent (median = 33 percent) of transitions. HIE level is related to four capability measures, one incentive measure, and one measure that is related to both capability and incentive. Percent of transitions with SCRs sent electronically was 3 percentage points higher (95 percent CI: 0.1-5.1) for hospitals with a third-party HIE vendor, 3 percentage points higher (95 percent CI: 0.5-5.4) for hospitals with an EHR vendor as their HIE vendor, and 3 percentage points higher (95 percent CI: 0.4-5.4) for hospitals that automatically alert primary care providers. The direction and statistical significance of the relationships between specific EHR vendor and electronic SCR transmission level varied by vendor. Nonprofits and government hospitals performed 5 percentage points higher (95 percent CI: 1.5-9.1) and 8 percentage points higher (95 percent CI: 3.4-12.3) than for-profits. Hospitals in systems performed 3 percentage points higher (95 percent CI: 0.8-6.1). The overall level of HIE is low, with hospitals sending an SCR electronically for less than half of patient transitions. Specific hospital characteristics related to both technology capabilities and incentives were associated with higher levels of HIE. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  19. Short-Term Medical Costs of a VHA Health Information Exchange: A CHEERS-Compliant Article

    PubMed Central

    French, Dustin D.; Dixon, Brian E.; Perkins, Susan M.; Myers, Laura J.; Weiner, Michael; Zillich, Allan J.; Haggstrom, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Virtual Lifetime Electronic Record (VLER) Health program provides the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) a framework whereby VHA providers can access the veterans’ electronic health record information to coordinate healthcare across multiple sites of care. As an early adopter of VLER, the Indianapolis VHA and Regenstrief Institute implemented a regional demonstration program involving bi-directional health information exchange (HIE) between VHA and non-VHA providers. The aim of the study is to determine whether implementation of VLER HIE reduces 1 year VHA medical costs. A cohort evaluation with a concurrent control group compared VHA healthcare costs using propensity score adjustment. A CHEERs compliant checklist was used to conduct the cost evaluation. Patients were enrolled in the VLER program onsite at the Indianapolis VHA in outpatient clinics or through the release-of-information office. VHA cost data (in 2014 dollars) were obtained for both enrolled and nonenrolled (control) patients for 1 year prior to, and 1 year after, the index date of patient enrollment. There were 6104 patients enrolled in VLER and 45,700 patients in the control group. The annual adjusted total cost difference per patient was associated with a higher cost for VLER enrollees $1152 (95% CI: $807–1433) (P < 0.01) (in 2014 dollars) than VLER nonenrollees. Short-term evaluation of this demonstration project did not show immediate reductions in healthcare cost as might be expected if HIE decreased redundant medical tests and treatments. Cost reductions from shared health information may be realized with longer time horizons. PMID:26765453

  20. An Anesthesia Preinduction Checklist to Improve Information Exchange, Knowledge of Critical Information, Perception of Safety, and Possibly Perception of Teamwork in Anesthesia Teams.

    PubMed

    Tscholl, David W; Weiss, Mona; Kolbe, Michaela; Staender, Sven; Seifert, Burkhardt; Landert, Daniel; Grande, Bastian; Spahn, Donat R; Noethiger, Christoph B

    2015-10-01

    An anesthesia preinduction checklist (APIC) to be performed before anesthesia induction was introduced and evaluated with respect to 5 team-level outcomes, each being a surrogate end point for patient safety: information exchange (the percentage of checklist items exchanged by a team, out of 12 total items); knowledge of critical information (the percentage of critical information items out of 5 total items such as allergies, reported as known by the members of a team); team members' perceptions of safety (the median scores given by the members of a team on a continuous rating scale); their perception of teamwork (the median scores given by the members of a team on a continuous rating scale); and clinical performance (the percentage of completed items out of 14 required tasks, e.g., suction device checked). A prospective interventional study comparing anesthesia teams using the APIC with a control group not using the APIC was performed using a multimethod design. Trained observers rated information exchange and clinical performance during on-site observations of anesthesia inductions. After the observations, each team member indicated the critical information items they knew and their perceptions of safety and teamwork. One hundred five teams using the APIC were compared with 100 teams not doing so. The medians of the team-level outcome scores in the APIC group versus the control group were as follows: information exchange: 100% vs 33% (P < 0.001), knowledge of critical information: 100% vs 90% (P < 0.001), perception of safety: 91% vs 84% (P < 0.001), perception of teamwork: 90% vs 86% (P = 0.028), and clinical performance: 93% vs 93% (P = 0.60). This study provides empirical evidence that the use of a preinduction checklist significantly improves information exchange, knowledge of critical information, and perception of safety in anesthesia teams-all parameters contributing to patient safety. There was a trend indicating improved perception of teamwork.

  1. NASA Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS): A U.S. Network of Data Centers Serving Earth Science Data: A Network Member of ICSU WDS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behnke, Jeanne; Ramapriyan, H. K. " Rama"

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) has been in operation since August 1994, and serving a diverse user community around the world with Earth science data from satellites, aircraft, field campaigns and research investigations. The ESDIS Project, responsible for EOSDIS is a Network Member of the International Council for Sciences (ICSU) World Data System (WDS). Nine of the 12 Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs), which are part of EOSDIS, are Regular Members of the ICSUWDS. This poster presents the EOSDIS mission objectives, key characteristics of the DAACs that make them world class Earth science data centers, successes, challenges and best practices of EOSDIS focusing on the years 2014-2016, and illustrates some highlights of accomplishments of EOSDIS. The highlights include: high customer satisfaction, growing archive and distribution volumes, exponential growth in number of products distributed to users around the world, unified metadata model and common metadata repository, flexibility provided to uses by supporting data transformations to suit their applications, near-real-time capabilities to support various operational and research applications, and full resolution image browse capabilities to help users select data of interest. The poster also illustrates how the ESDIS Project is actively involved in several US and international data system organizations.

  2. How can knowledge exchange portals assist in knowledge management for evidence-informed decision making in public health?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Knowledge exchange portals are emerging as web tools that can help facilitate knowledge management in public health. We conducted a review to better understand the nature of these portals and their contribution to knowledge management in public health, with the aim of informing future development of portals in this field. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted of the peer-reviewed and grey literature to identify articles that described the design, development or evaluation of Knowledge Exchange Portals KEPs in the public health field. The content of the articles was analysed, interpreted and synthesised in light of the objectives of the review. Results The systematic search yielded 2223 articles, of which fifteen were deemed eligible for review, including eight case studies, six evaluation studies and one commentary article. Knowledge exchange portals mainly included design features to support knowledge access and creation, but formative evaluation studies examining user needs suggested collaborative features supporting knowledge exchange would also be useful. Overall web usage statistics revealed increasing use of some of these portals over time; however difficulties remain in retaining users. There is some evidence to suggest that the use of a knowledge exchange portal in combination with tailored and targeted messaging can increase the use of evidence in policy and program decision making at the organisational level. Conclusions Knowledge exchange portals can be a platform for providing integrated access to relevant content and resources in one location, for sharing and distributing information and for bringing people together for knowledge exchange. However more performance evaluation studies are needed to determine how they can best support evidence-informed decision making in public health. PMID:24884530

  3. How can knowledge exchange portals assist in knowledge management for evidence-informed decision making in public health?

    PubMed

    Quinn, Emma; Huckel-Schneider, Carmen; Campbell, Danielle; Seale, Holly; Milat, Andrew J

    2014-05-12

    Knowledge exchange portals are emerging as web tools that can help facilitate knowledge management in public health. We conducted a review to better understand the nature of these portals and their contribution to knowledge management in public health, with the aim of informing future development of portals in this field. A systematic literature search was conducted of the peer-reviewed and grey literature to identify articles that described the design, development or evaluation of Knowledge Exchange Portals KEPs in the public health field. The content of the articles was analysed, interpreted and synthesised in light of the objectives of the review. The systematic search yielded 2223 articles, of which fifteen were deemed eligible for review, including eight case studies, six evaluation studies and one commentary article. Knowledge exchange portals mainly included design features to support knowledge access and creation, but formative evaluation studies examining user needs suggested collaborative features supporting knowledge exchange would also be useful. Overall web usage statistics revealed increasing use of some of these portals over time; however difficulties remain in retaining users. There is some evidence to suggest that the use of a knowledge exchange portal in combination with tailored and targeted messaging can increase the use of evidence in policy and program decision making at the organisational level. Knowledge exchange portals can be a platform for providing integrated access to relevant content and resources in one location, for sharing and distributing information and for bringing people together for knowledge exchange. However more performance evaluation studies are needed to determine how they can best support evidence-informed decision making in public health.

  4. International School Health Network: an informal network for advocacy and knowledge exchange.

    PubMed

    McCall, Douglas S; Rootman, Irving; Bayley, Dale

    2005-01-01

    mechanism with a focus on school health that brings together the following stakeholders: educational organisations with public health organisations; researchers with government officials and practitioners; those who work in Spanish, English, French and other languages; issue-specific networks with health generalists. An invitation is given to government officials, researchers and national school health associations to join an informal International School Health Network (ISHN) (soon available at: www.internationalschoolhealt.org). Discussions about the formation of the ISHN have been held with a number of participants at several international meetings and have culminated in a fledgling network that will focus on electronic and web-based exchanges of information, developing a global school health research agenda, exchanging effective materials and tools, informing policy-makers about effective practices, policies and programs. This network would build on and not duplicate the work of existing networks and include participation from WHO, OECD, UNESCO, the IUHPE and the World Bank. The next large meeting of the ISHN will occur at the IUHPE 2007 Conference in Vancouver, Canada (www.iuhpe conference.org). Before then the ISHN will organise several on-line projects and teleconferences. For more information, contact dmccall@jcsh-cces.ca.

  5. Software Prototyping: A Case Report of Refining User Requirements for a Health Information Exchange Dashboard.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Scott D; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Hanseler, Haley; Crouch, Barbara Insley; Cummins, Mollie R

    2016-01-01

    Health information exchange (HIE) between Poison Control Centers (PCCs) and Emergency Departments (EDs) could improve care of poisoned patients. However, PCC information systems are not designed to facilitate HIE with EDs; therefore, we are developing specialized software to support HIE within the normal workflow of the PCC using user-centered design and rapid prototyping. To describe the design of an HIE dashboard and the refinement of user requirements through rapid prototyping. Using previously elicited user requirements, we designed low-fidelity sketches of designs on paper with iterative refinement. Next, we designed an interactive high-fidelity prototype and conducted scenario-based usability tests with end users. Users were asked to think aloud while accomplishing tasks related to a case vignette. After testing, the users provided feedback and evaluated the prototype using the System Usability Scale (SUS). Survey results from three users provided useful feedback that was then incorporated into the design. After achieving a stable design, we used the prototype itself as the specification for development of the actual software. Benefits of prototyping included having 1) subject-matter experts heavily involved with the design; 2) flexibility to make rapid changes, 3) the ability to minimize software development efforts early in the design stage; 4) rapid finalization of requirements; 5) early visualization of designs; 6) and a powerful vehicle for communication of the design to the programmers. Challenges included 1) time and effort to develop the prototypes and case scenarios; 2) no simulation of system performance; 3) not having all proposed functionality available in the final product; and 4) missing needed data elements in the PCC information system.

  6. Health Information Exchange Readiness for Demonstrating Return on Investment and Quality of Care.

    PubMed

    Khurshid, Anjum; Diana, Mark L; Jain, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    To study the extent to which community health information exchanges (HIEs) deliver and measure return on investment (ROI) and improvements in the quality of care. We surveyed operational HIEs for their characteristics, information domains, impact on quality of care, and ROI. A 60 percent response rate was achieved. Two-thirds of respondents agreed that community HIEs demonstrated a positive ROI, while one-third had no opinion or disagreed. One-fourth or fewer respondents reported using various metrics to calculate ROI. Most respondents agreed that HIEs improve the quality of care, though several were not sure and were awaiting further evidence. Most respondents indicated that they did not deliver reports on quality measures (76 percent) and that data were not being used to measure quality performance of participating providers (73 percent). Respondents from most HIEs believe that the HIEs are demonstrating a positive ROI; however, a minority of them indicated they had used or will use specific metrics to calculate ROI. HIE representatives overwhelmingly reported that they believe the HIE activities improve the quality of healthcare delivered, but only a few are using data to evaluate provider performance or generate reports on quality measures. This study demonstrates the challenge faced by policy makers and healthcare organizations that are investing millions of dollars in HIEs that are believed to improve health outcomes and increase efficiency, but still need more time to develop the evidence to confirm that belief. Our study shows that calculating ROI for HIEs or their impact on quality of care remains a secondary priority for most HIEs. This finding raises serious questions for the sustained support of HIEs, both financially and as a policy lever, given the end of Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act funding.

  7. TRUST: A Successful Formal-Informal Teacher Education Partnership Designed to Improve and Promote Urban Earth Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, H.; Drantch, K.; Steenhuis, J.

    2006-12-01

    We present an NSF-funded collaborative formal-informal partnership for urban Earth science teacher preparation and professional development. This model brings together The American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) and Brooklyn and Lehman College of the City University of New York (CUNY) to address science-impoverished classrooms that lack highly qualified teachers by focusing on Earth science teacher certification. Project design was based on identified needs in the local communities and schools, careful analysis of content knowledge mastery required for Earth science teacher certification, and existing impediments to certification. The problem-based approach required partners to push policy envelopes and to invent new ways of articulating content and pedagogy at both intra- and inter-institutional levels. One key element of the project is involvement of the local board of education, teachers, and administrators in initial design and ongoing assessment. Project components include formal Earth systems science courses, a summer institute primarily led and delivered by AMNH scientists through an informal series of lectures coupled to workshops led by AMNH educators, a mechanism for assigning course credit for informal experiences, development of new teaching approaches that include teacher action plans and an external program of evaluation. The principal research strand of this project focuses on the resulting model for formal-informal teacher education partnership, the project's impact on participating teachers, policy issues surrounding the model and the changes required for its development and implementation, and its potential for Earth science education reform. As the grant funded portion of the project draws to a close we begin to analyze data collected over the past 3 years. Third-year findings of the project's external evaluation indicate that the problem-based approach has been highly successful, particularly its impact on participating teachers. In addition

  8. User experiences with different regional health information exchange systems in Finland.

    PubMed

    Hyppönen, Hannele; Reponen, Jarmo; Lääveri, Tinja; Kaipio, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    The interest in cross-organizational Health Information Exchange (HIE) is increasing at regional, national and cross-European levels. The purpose of our study was to compare user experiences (usability) of different regional health information exchange system (RHIE) types as well as the factors related to the experienced level of success of different RHIE system types. A web-based questionnaire was sent to 95% of Finnish physicians aged between 25 and 65 years of age. RHIE systems were mainly available in the public sector and only in certain regions. Those 1693 physicians were selected from the 3929 respondents of the original study, who met these criteria. The preferred means (paper/fax vs. electronic) of cross-organizational HIE, and replies to the 11 questions measuring RHIE success were used as the main dependent variables. Two thirds (73%) of the primary care physicians and one third (33%) of the specialized care physicians replied using an electronic RHIE system rather than paper or fax as a primary means of cross-organizational HIE. Respondents from regions where a regional virtual EHR (type 3) RHIE system was employed had used electronic means rather than paper HIE to a larger extend compared to their colleagues in regions where a master patient index-type (type 1) or web distribution model (type 2) RHIE system was used. Users of three local EHR systems preferred electronic HIE to paper to a larger extend than users of other EHR systems. Experiences with an integrated RHIE system (type 3) were more positive than those with other types or RHIE systems. The study revealed User preferences for the integrated virtual RHIE-system (type 3) over the master index model (type 1) or web distribution model (type 2). Success of individual HIE tasks of writing, sending and reading were impacted by the way these functionalities were realized in the EHR systems. To meet the expectations of increased efficiency, continuity, safety and quality of care, designers of HIE

  9. Study and prototype of data system interactions for the Earth Observing System Data and Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmitt, G. D.; Wood, S. A.; Morris, M.

    1990-01-01

    A crucial part of the Earth Observing System (EOS) is its Data and Information System (EOSDIS). The success of EOS depends not only on its instruments and science studies, but also on its ability to help scientists integrate data sets of geophysical and biological measurements taken by various instruments and investigators. NASA contractors have completed Phase B studies of EOSDIS, in particular its architecture, functionality, and user interfacing. At this point in time, it may seem impossible to exercise the EOSDIS or any of its components since they do not exist; i.e., if the EOSDIS is accepted as a totally new system, distinct from any existing DIS. However, if EOSDIS is seen as evolving from existing data systems, then some limited prototyping studies can be conducted by using currently functioning systems. In support of both the EOSDIS Science Advisory Panel and the EOSDIS Project, a prototyping activity was carried out by a cross section of interdisciplinary scientists. That prototyping activity is summarized and some conclusions are drawn that can be used by NASA-Goddard to evaluate and modify the specifications soon to be released in an RFP to build EOSDIS.

  10. Trends in Interactive Information Systems for Earth Observation from Space: Towards a Global, Digital Image Library Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingwell, Jeff

    1996-01-01

    Data management systems for earth science information gathered from space are being affected by two related trends: (1) a move from ad hoc systems established for particular projects to a longer lasting national and global infrastructure; and (2) an emphasis on efficient service delivery in an era of diminishing resources for national space…

  11. 47 CFR 36.611 - Submission of information to the National Exchange Carrier Association (NECA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (CO) Circuit Equipment Category 4.13. This amount shall be calculated as of December 31st of the... deferred federal income taxes, attributable to Exchange Line C&WF Subcategory 1.3 investment, and Exchange Line CO Circuit Equipment Category 4.13 investment. These amounts shall be calculated as of December...

  12. 47 CFR 36.611 - Submission of information to the National Exchange Carrier Association (NECA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (CO) Circuit Equipment Category 4.13. This amount shall be calculated as of December 31st of the... deferred federal income taxes, attributable to Exchange Line C&WF Subcategory 1.3 investment, and Exchange Line CO Circuit Equipment Category 4.13 investment. These amounts shall be calculated as of December...

  13. 47 CFR 54.1305 - Submission of information to the National Exchange Carrier Association (NECA)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (CO) Circuit Equipment Category 4.13. This amount shall be calculated as of December 31st of the... deferred federal income taxes, attributable to Exchange Line C&WF Subcategory 1.3 investment, and Exchange Line CO Circuit Equipment Category 4.13 investment. These amounts shall be calculated as of December...

  14. Newly available technologies present expanding opportunities for scientific and technical information exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolzman, Jean M.

    1993-03-01

    The potential for expanded communication among researchers, scholars, and students is supported by growth in the capabilities for electronic communication as well as expanding access to various forms of electronic interchange and computing capabilities. Research supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration points to a future where workstations with audio and video monitors and screen-sharing protocols are used to support collaborations with colleagues located throughout the world. Instruments and sensors all over the world will produce data streams that will be brought together and analyzed to produce new findings, which in turn can be distributed electronically. New forms of electronic journals will emerge and provide opportunities for researchers and scientists to electronically and interactively exchange information in a wide range of structures and formats. Ultimately, the wide-scale use of these technologies in the dissemination of research results and the stimulation of collegial dialogue will change the way we represent and express our knowledge of the world. A new paradigm will evolve-perhaps a truly worldwide 'invisible college'.

  15. Tandem anchoring: informational and politeness effects of range offers in social exchange.

    PubMed

    Ames, Daniel R; Mason, Malia F

    2015-02-01

    We examined whether and why range offers (e.g., "I want $7,200 to $7,600 for my car") matter in negotiations. A selective-attention account predicts that motivated and skeptical offer-recipients focus overwhelmingly on the attractive endpoint (i.e., a buyer would hear, in effect, "I want $7,200"). In contrast, we propose a tandem anchoring account, arguing that offer-recipients are often influenced by both endpoints as they judge the offer-maker's reservation price (i.e., bottom line) as well as how polite they believe an extreme (nonaccommodating) counteroffer would be. In 5 studies, featuring scripted negotiation scenarios and live dyadic negotiations, we find that certain range offers yield improved settlement terms for offer-makers without relational costs, whereas others may yield relationship benefits without deal costs. We clarify the types of range offers that evoke these benefits and identify boundaries to their impact, including range width and extremity. In addition, our studies reveal evidence consistent with 2 proposed mechanisms, one involving an informational effect (both endpoints of range offers can be taken as signals of an offer-maker's reservation price) and another involving a politeness effect (range offers can make extreme counteroffers seem less polite). Our results have implications for models of negotiation behavior and outcomes and, more broadly, for the nature of social exchange. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved). PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. Engagement In Hospital Health Information Exchange Is Associated With Vendor Marketplace Dominance.

    PubMed

    Everson, Jordan; Adler-Milstein, Julia

    2016-07-01

    Health information exchange (HIE) is intended to enable better, more efficient health care by electronically transferring patient data across provider organizations. Many policy makers, including members of Congress, are concerned that some electronic health record (EHR) vendors may be impeding this effort by making cross-vendor HIE difficult. We used national data to assess how market dominance by EHR vendors was related to hospitals' engagement in HIE in 2012 and 2013. Across all levels of vendor market dominance, hospitals using EHR systems supplied by the dominant vendor engaged in an average of 45 percent more HIE activities than hospitals not using the dominant vendor. However, when the dominant vendor controlled a small proportion-20 percent-of the market, hospitals using the dominant vendor engaged in 59 percent more HIE activities than hospitals using a different vendor. Conversely, when the dominant vendor controlled 80 percent of the market, hospitals using that vendor engaged in only 25 percent more HIE activities than hospitals using a different vendor. In markets with low vendor dominance, hospitals may engage in less HIE with hospitals using other vendors' systems, compared to markets with high vendor dominance, because of high costs and competitive barriers. Policies designed to promote cross-vendor HIE may need to take local market competition into account. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  17. Newly available technologies present expanding opportunities for scientific and technical information exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolzman, Jean M.

    1993-01-01

    The potential for expanded communication among researchers, scholars, and students is supported by growth in the capabilities for electronic communication as well as expanding access to various forms of electronic interchange and computing capabilities. Research supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration points to a future where workstations with audio and video monitors and screen-sharing protocols are used to support collaborations with colleagues located throughout the world. Instruments and sensors all over the world will produce data streams that will be brought together and analyzed to produce new findings, which in turn can be distributed electronically. New forms of electronic journals will emerge and provide opportunities for researchers and scientists to electronically and interactively exchange information in a wide range of structures and formats. Ultimately, the wide-scale use of these technologies in the dissemination of research results and the stimulation of collegial dialogue will change the way we represent and express our knowledge of the world. A new paradigm will evolve-perhaps a truly worldwide 'invisible college'.

  18. 8 CFR 214.12 - Preliminary enrollment of schools in the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of schools in the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS). (a) Private elementary and private secondary schools, public high schools, post-secondary schools, language schools, and vocational... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preliminary enrollment of schools in the...

  19. Barriers Over Time to Full Implementation of Health Information Exchange in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although health information exchanges (HIE) have existed since their introduction by President Bush in his 2004 State of the Union Address, and despite monetary incentives earmarked in 2009 by the health information technology for economic and clinical health (HITECH) Act, adoption of HIE has been sparse in the United States. Research has been conducted to explore the concept of HIE and its benefit to patients, but viable business plans for their existence are rare, and so far, no research has been conducted on the dynamic nature of barriers over time. Objective The aim of this study is to map the barriers mentioned in the literature to illustrate the effect, if any, of barriers discussed with respect to the HITECH Act from 2009 to the early months of 2014. Methods We conducted a systematic literature review from CINAHL, PubMed, and Google Scholar. The search criteria primarily focused on studies. Each article was read by at least two of the authors, and a final set was established for evaluation (n=28). Results The 28 articles identified 16 barriers. Cost and efficiency/workflow were identified 15% and 13% of all instances of barriers mentioned in literature, respectively. The years 2010 and 2011 were the most plentiful years when barriers were discussed, with 75% and 69% of all barriers listed, respectively. Conclusions The frequency of barriers mentioned in literature demonstrates the mindfulness of users, developers, and both local and national government. The broad conclusion is that public policy masks the effects of some barriers, while revealing others. However, a deleterious effect can be inferred when the public funds are exhausted. Public policy will need to lever incentives to overcome many of the barriers such as cost and impediments to competition. Process improvement managers need to optimize the efficiency of current practices at the point of care. Developers will need to work with users to ensure tools that use HIE resources work into

  20. Health information exchange between jails and their communities: a bridge that is needed under healthcare reform.

    PubMed

    Butler, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Jails have often been compared to islands because they are thought to be cut off from the community both physically and perceptually. Few people understand that besides being places of confinement, jails function as health care providers. The separation of jails from community results in disjointed health care services and treatment for individuals cycling in and out of jail. Healthcare providers in the community have little knowledge of the care their patients have received in jail; the same can be said of jail health providers about care provided in the community. With the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH), the federal government took the lead respectively in expanding health insurance coverage and in spurring the adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) and the development of health information exchanges (HIEs). Taken together, these initiatives place a strong emphasis on promoting continuity of care. With the expansion of Medicaid under the ACA, many of the individuals leaving jail will have access to health insurance for the first time. Community-based providers to the newly insured will want to know about the care that was provided in the jail. The developing technological infrastructure would seem to offer the best way to access this information. However linking the community and jail information systems is not just a technological issue, but requires the cooperation of all stakeholders. one in which a single champion made the decision to link the jail health care system to the local HIE and the other where all stakeholders were included in the process. In the first case study, the jail healthcare system reverted to its "island" status when the HIE was abandoned without protest from community stakeholders. In the second case study, the multiple stakeholder approach, while not necessarily a complete guarantee of long-term success, ensured that the jail healthcare

  1. Health Information Exchange between Jails and Their Communities: A Bridge That Is Needed under Healthcare Reform

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Jails have often been compared to islands because they are thought to be cut off from the community both physically and perceptually. Few people understand that besides being places of confinement, jails function as health care providers. The separation of jails from community results in disjointed health care services and treatment for individuals cycling in and out of jail. Healthcare providers in the community have little knowledge of the care their patients have received in jail; the same can be said of jail health providers about care provided in the community. With the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH), the federal government took the lead respectively in expanding health insurance coverage and in spurring the adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) and the development of health information exchanges (HIEs). Taken together, these initiatives place a strong emphasis on promoting continuity of care. With the expansion of Medicaid under the ACA, many of the individuals leaving jail will have access to health insurance for the first time. Community-based providers to the newly insured will want to know about the care that was provided in the jail. The developing technological infrastructure would seem to offer the best way to access this information. However linking the community and jail information systems is not just a technological issue, but requires the cooperation of all stakeholders. This paper presents two case studies: one in which a single champion made the decision to link the jail health care system to the local HIE and the other where all stakeholders were included in the process. In the first case study, the jail healthcare system reverted to its “island” status when the HIE was abandoned without protest from community stakeholders. In the second case study, the multiple stakeholder approach, while not necessarily a complete guarantee of long

  2. Supporting multi-state collaboration on privacy and security to foster health IT and health information exchange.

    PubMed

    Banger, Alison K; Alakoye, Amoke O; Rizk, Stephanie C

    2008-11-06

    As part of the HHS funded contract, Health Information Security and Privacy Collaboration, 41 states and territories have proposed collaborative projects to address cross-state privacy and security challenges related to health IT and health information exchange. Multi-state collaboration on privacy and security issues remains complicated, and resources to support collaboration around these topics are essential to the success of such collaboration. The resources outlined here offer an example of how to support multi-stakeholder, multi-state projects.

  3. Assessment of Life Cycle Information Exchanges (LCie): Understanding the Value-Added Benefit of a COBie Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    exchange (COBie), Building Information Modeling ( BIM ), value-added analysis, business processes, project management 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...equipment. The innovative aspect of Building In- formation Modeling ( BIM ) is that it creates a computable building descrip- tion. The ability to use a...interoperability. In order for the building information to be interoperable, it must also con- form to a common data model , or schema, that defines the class

  4. Operation of the power information center: Performance of secretariat functions and information exchange activities in the advanced power field of the interagency advanced power group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Highlights of activities conducted during the reporting period to facilitate the exchange of technical information among scientists and engineers both within the federal government and within industry are cited. Interagency Advanced Power Group meetings and special efforts, project briefs, and organization development are considered.

  5. Exchange Network

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Environmental Information Exchange Network (EN) is an Internet-based system used by state, tribal and territorial partners to securely share environmental and health information with one another and EPA.

  6. MATLAB® and Design Recipes for Earth Sciences: How to Collect, Process and Present Geoscientific Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauth, M.; Sillmann, E.

    2012-04-01

    The overall aim of the class was to introduce undergraduate students to the typical course of a project. The project starts with searching of the relevant literature, reviewing and ranking of the published books and journal articles, extracting the relevant information as text, data or graphs from the literature, searching, processing and visualizing data, and compiling and presenting the results as posters, abstracts and oral presentations. In the first lecture, an unexpectedly-large number (ca. 65) of students subscribed to the course urging us to teach the course in a lecture hall with a projector, microphone and speaker system, a table for the teacher's laptop and equipment, private laptops of the students and wireless Internet. We used a MOODLE eLearning environment to handle the large number of participants in a highly interactive, tutorial-style course environment. Moreover, the students were organized in five GOOGLE groups not accessed by the course instructor, but led by elected student group leaders and their deputies. During the course, the instructor defined three principle topics for each of the groups within the overall theme Past Climate Changes. After having defined sub-themes within the groups for each student, the course culminated in the presentation of the project work as conference-style posters, 200-word abstracts and one-hour sessions with 10-15 two-minute presentations, chaired by the project leaders and their deputies. The course inspired a new textbook that will appear later this year, using a similar concept as its sister book MATLAB Recipes for Earth Sciences-3rd Edition (Trauth, Springer 2010).

  7. Soft X-ray study of solar wind charge exchange from the Earth's magnetosphere : Suzaku observations and a future X-ray imaging mission concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezoe, Y.; Ishisaki, Y.; Ohashi, T.; Ishikawa, K.; Miyoshi, Y.; Fujimoto, R.; Terada, N.; Kasahara, S.; Fujimoto, M.; Mitsuda, K.; Nishijo, K.; Noda, A.

    2013-12-01

    Soft X-ray observations of solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission from the Earth's magnetosphere using the Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite Suzaku are shown, together with our X-ray imaging mission concept to characterize the solar wind interaction with the magnetosphere. In recent years, the SWCX emission from the Earth's magnetosphere, originally discovered as unexplained noise during the soft X-ray all sky survey (Snowden et al. 1994), is receiving increased attention on studying geospace. The SWCX is a reaction between neutrals in exosphere and highly charged ions in the magnetosphere originated from solar wind. Robertson et al. (2005) modeled the SWCX emission as seen from an observation point 50 Re from Earth. In the resulting X-ray intensities, the magnetopause, bow shock and cusp were clearly visible. High sensitivity soft X-ray observation with CCDs onboard recent X-ray astronomy satellites enables us to resolve SWCX emission lines and investigate time correlation with solar wind as observed with ACE and WIND more accurately. Suzaku is the 5th Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite launched in 2005. The line of sight direction through cusp is observable, while constraints on Earth limb avoidance angle of other satellites often limits observable regions. Suzaku firstly detected the SWCX emission while pointing in the direction of the north ecliptic pole (Fujimoto et al. 2007). Using the Tsyganenko 1996 magnetic field model, the distance to the nearest SWCX region was estimated as 2-8 Re, implying that the line of sight direction can be through magnetospheric cusp. Ezoe et al. (2010) reported SWCX events toward the sub-solar side of the magnetosheath. These cusp and sub-solar side magnetosheath regions are predicted to show high SWCX fluxes by Robertson et al. (2005). On the other hand, Ishikawa et al. (2013) discovered a similarly strong SWCX event when the line of sight direction did not transverse these two regions. Motivated by these detections

  8. Integrating a health information exchange into a community pharmacy transitions of care service.

    PubMed

    Fanizza, Frank A; Ruisinger, Janelle F; Prohaska, Emily S; Melton, Brittany L

    2018-04-03

    To describe the incorporation of a state health information exchange (HIE) into a community pharmacy transitions of care (TOC) service and to assess its impact on 30-day readmission rates. Three suburban community pharmacies in Olathe, Kansas. Balls Food Stores is a grocery store chain which operates 21 supermarket community pharmacies in the Kansas City metropolitan area. Balls Food Stores launched a pharmacist-led self-referral TOC study in which a state HIE was utilized to collect discharge information from patients' electronic medical records (EMRs) to facilitate TOC comprehensive medication reviews (CMRs). Descriptive statistics were used to assess types and outcomes of identified drug therapy problems and the ability to access Kansas Health Information Network EMRs. A chi-square test was used to assess 30-day readmissions between patients who accepted and declined the service. Forty patients were identified for inclusion and 18 elected to participate in the service. The majority of participants were white females with a median age of 64.5 years. Out of 40 study patients, 85% had an EMR available; 12.5% of patients had a medication list included in their EMR hospitalization documentation. Participants who underwent the service had a statistically significantly lower rate of overall 30-day hospital readmission than those who declined (11.1% vs 36.4%, P = 0.032). Among the 18 TOC CMRs performed, 90 drug therapy problems were identified and 77 were resolved in collaboration with a patient, caregiver, or physician. Incorporation of a state HIE into a community pharmacist-led TOC service is a novel strategy for collecting patient data. During the study, no TOC participants were readmitted within 30 days. However, pharmacists found HIE data alone was insufficient to perform TOC CMRs for the majority of participants. In order to expand state HIE utilization, more health systems will need to upload a minimum standard data set to help facilitate care. Copyright © 2018

  9. Investing in International Information Exchange Activities to Improve the Safety, Cost Effectiveness and Schedule of Cleanup - 13281

    SciTech Connect

    Seed, Ian; James, Paula; Mathieson, John

    2013-07-01

    With decreasing budgets and increasing pressure on completing cleanup missions as quickly, safely and cost-effectively as possible, there is significant benefit to be gained from collaboration and joint efforts between organizations facing similar issues. With this in mind, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) have formally agreed to share information on lessons learned on the development and application of new technologies and approaches to improve the safety, cost effectiveness and schedule of the cleanup legacy wastes. To facilitate information exchange a range of tools and methodologies were established. These included tacit knowledge exchangemore » through facilitated meetings, conference calls and Site visits as well as explicit knowledge exchange through document sharing and newsletters. A DOE web-based portal has been established to capture these exchanges and add to them via discussion boards. The information exchange is operating at the Government-to-Government strategic level as well as at the Site Contractor level to address both technical and managerial topic areas. This effort has resulted in opening a dialogue and building working relationships. In some areas joint programs of work have been initiated thus saving resource and enabling the parties to leverage off one another activities. The potential benefits of high quality information exchange are significant, ranging from cost avoidance through identification of an approach to a problem that has been proven elsewhere to cost sharing and joint development of a new technology to address a common problem. The benefits in outcomes significantly outweigh the costs of the process. The applicability of the tools and methods along with the lessons learned regarding some key issues is of use to any organization that wants to improve value for money. In the waste management marketplace, there are a multitude of challenges being addressed by multiple

  10. Obtaining providers' 'buy-in' and establishing effective means of information exchange will be critical to HITECH's success.

    PubMed

    Gold, Marsha R; McLaughlin, Catherine G; Devers, Kelly J; Berenson, Robert A; Bovbjerg, Randall R

    2012-03-01

    In enacting the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, Congress set ambitious goals for the nation to integrate information technology into health care delivery. The provisions called for the electronic exchange of health information and the adoption and meaningful use of health information technology in health care practices and hospitals. We examined the marketplace and regulatory forces that influence HITECH's success and identify outstanding challenges, some beyond the provisions' control. To reach HITECH's goals, providers and patients must be persuaded of the value of health information exchange and support its implementation. Privacy concerns and remaining technical challenges must also be overcome. Achieving HITECH's goals will require well-aligned incentives, both visionary and practical pursuit of exchange infrastructure, and realistic assumptions about how quickly such wholesale change can be accomplished. The use of metrics to show adoption proceeding at a reasonable pace, increased flow of data across parties, and evidence that care is improving, at least in areas with robust systems, will be essential to persuade stakeholders that the initiative is progressing well and warrants continued investment.

  11. Falling short: how state laws can address health information exchange barriers and enablers.

    PubMed

    Schmit, Cason D; Wetter, Sarah A; Kash, Bita A

    2018-06-01

    Research on the implementation of health information exchange (HIE) organizations has identified both positive and negative effects of laws relating to governance, incentives, mandates, sustainability, stakeholder participation, patient engagement, privacy, confidentiality, and security. We fill a substantial research gap by describing whether comprehensive state and territorial HIE legal frameworks address identified legal facilitators and barriers. We used the Westlaw database to identify state and territorial laws relating to HIEs in effect on June 7, 2016 (53 jurisdictions). We blind-coded all laws and addressed coding discrepancies in peer-review meetings. We recorded a consensus code for each law in a master database. We compared 20 HIE legal attributes with identified barriers to and enablers of HIE activity in the literature. Forty-two states, the District of Columbia, and 2 territories have laws relating to HIEs. On average, jurisdictions address 8.32 of the 20 criteria selected in statutes and regulations. Twenty jurisdictions unambiguously address ≤5 criteria in statutes and regulations. None of the significant legal criteria are unambiguously addressed in >60% of the 53 jurisdictions. Laws can be barriers to or enablers of HIEs. However, jurisdictions are not addressing many significant issues identified by researchers. Consequently, there is a substantial risk that existing legal frameworks are not adequately supporting HIEs. The current evidence base is insufficient for comparative assessments or impact rankings of the various factors. However, the detailed Centers for Disease Control and Prevention dataset of HIE laws could enable investigations into the types of laws that promote or impede HIEs.

  12. Structural analysis of health-relevant policy-making information exchange networks in Canada.

    PubMed

    Contandriopoulos, Damien; Benoît, François; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Carrier, Annie; Carter, Nancy; Deber, Raisa; Duhoux, Arnaud; Greenhalgh, Trisha; Larouche, Catherine; Leclerc, Bernard-Simon; Levy, Adrian; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Maximova, Katerina; McGrail, Kimberlyn; Nykiforuk, Candace; Roos, Noralou; Schwartz, Robert; Valente, Thomas W; Wong, Sabrina; Lindquist, Evert; Pullen, Carolyn; Lardeux, Anne; Perroux, Melanie

    2017-09-20

    Health systems worldwide struggle to identify, adopt, and implement in a timely and system-wide manner the best-evidence-informed-policy-level practices. Yet, there is still only limited evidence about individual and institutional best practices for fostering the use of scientific evidence in policy-making processes The present project is the first national-level attempt to (1) map and structurally analyze-quantitatively-health-relevant policy-making networks that connect evidence production, synthesis, interpretation, and use; (2) qualitatively investigate the interaction patterns of a subsample of actors with high centrality metrics within these networks to develop an in-depth understanding of evidence circulation processes; and (3) combine these findings in order to assess a policy network's "absorptive capacity" regarding scientific evidence and integrate them into a conceptually sound and empirically grounded framework. The project is divided into two research components. The first component is based on quantitative analysis of ties (relationships) that link nodes (participants) in a network. Network data will be collected through a multi-step snowball sampling strategy. Data will be analyzed structurally using social network mapping and analysis methods. The second component is based on qualitative interviews with a subsample of the Web survey participants having central, bridging, or atypical positions in the network. Interviews will focus on the process through which evidence circulates and enters practice. Results from both components will then be integrated through an assessment of the network's and subnetwork's effectiveness in identifying, capturing, interpreting, sharing, reframing, and recodifying scientific evidence in policy-making processes. Knowledge developed from this project has the potential both to strengthen the scientific understanding of how policy-level knowledge transfer and exchange functions and to provide significantly improved advice

  13. The financial impact of health information exchange on emergency department care.

    PubMed

    Frisse, Mark E; Johnson, Kevin B; Nian, Hui; Davison, Coda L; Gadd, Cynthia S; Unertl, Kim M; Turri, Pat A; Chen, Qingxia

    2012-01-01

    To examine the financial impact health information exchange (HIE) in emergency departments (EDs). We studied all ED encounters over a 13-month period in which HIE data were accessed in all major emergency departments Memphis, Tennessee. HIE access encounter records were matched with similar encounter records without HIE access. Outcomes studied were ED-originated hospital admissions, admissions for observation, laboratory testing, head CT, body CT, ankle radiographs, chest radiographs, and echocardiograms. Our estimates employed generalized estimating equations for logistic regression models adjusted for admission type, length of stay, and Charlson co-morbidity index. Marginal probabilities were used to calculate changes in outcome variables and their financial consequences. HIE data were accessed in approximately 6.8% of ED visits across 12 EDs studied. In 11 EDs directly accessing HIE data only through a secure Web browser, access was associated with a decrease in hospital admissions (adjusted odds ratio (OR)=0.27; p<0001). In a 12th ED relying more on print summaries, HIE access was associated with a decrease in hospital admissions (OR=0.48; p<0001) and statistically significant decreases in head CT use, body CT use, and laboratory test ordering. Applied only to the study population, HIE access was associated with an annual cost savings of $1.9 million. Net of annual operating costs, HIE access reduced overall costs by $1.07 million. Hospital admission reductions accounted for 97.6% of total cost reductions. Access to additional clinical data through HIE in emergency department settings is associated with net societal saving.

  14. User perspectives on the usability of a regional health information exchange

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yun-Xian; Cala, Cather Marie; Blakemore, Dana; Chen, Qingxia; Frisse, Mark E; Johnson, Kevin B

    2011-01-01

    Objective We assessed the usability of a health information exchange (HIE) in a densely populated metropolitan region. This grant-funded HIE had been deployed rapidly to address the imminent needs of the patient population and the need to draw wider participation from regional entities. Design We conducted a cross-sectional survey of individuals given access to the HIE at participating organizations and examined some of the usability and usage factors related to the technology acceptance model. Measurements We probed user perceptions using the Questionnaire for User Interaction Satisfaction, an author-generated Trust scale, and user characteristic questions (eg, age, weekly system usage time). Results Overall, users viewed the system favorably (ratings for all usability items were greater than neutral (one-sample Wilcoxon test, p<0.0014, Bonferroni-corrected for 35 tests). System usage was regressed on usability, trust, and demographic and user characteristic factors. Three usability factors were positively predictive of system usage: overall reactions (p<0 0.01), learning (p<0.05), and system functionality (p<0.01). Although trust is an important component in collaborative relationships, we did not find that user trust of other participating healthcare entities was significantly predictive of usage. An analysis of respondents' comments revealed ways to improve the HIE. Conclusion We used a rapid deployment model to develop an HIE and found that perceptions of system usability were positive. We also found that system usage was predicted well by some aspects of usability. Results from this study suggest that a rapid development approach may serve as a viable model for developing usable HIEs serving communities with limited resources. PMID:21622933

  15. Hospital readiness for health information exchange: development of metrics associated with successful collaboration for quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Korst, Lisa M; Aydin, Carolyn E; Signer, Jordana M K; Fink, Arlene

    2011-08-01

    The development of readiness metrics for organizational participation in health information exchange is critical for monitoring progress toward, and achievement of, successful inter-organizational collaboration. In preparation for the development of a tool to measure readiness for data-sharing, we tested whether organizational capacities known to be related to readiness were associated with successful participation in an American data-sharing collaborative for quality improvement. Cross-sectional design, using an on-line survey of hospitals in a large, mature data-sharing collaborative organized for benchmarking and improvement in nursing care quality. Factor analysis was used to identify salient constructs, and identified factors were analyzed with respect to "successful" participation. "Success" was defined as the incorporation of comparative performance data into the hospital dashboard. The most important factor in predicting success included survey items measuring the strength of organizational leadership in fostering a culture of quality improvement (QI Leadership): (1) presence of a supportive hospital executive; (2) the extent to which a hospital values data; (3) the presence of leaders' vision for how the collaborative advances the hospital's strategic goals; (4) hospital use of the collaborative data to track quality outcomes; and (5) staff recognition of a strong mandate for collaborative participation (α=0.84, correlation with Success 0.68 [P<0.0001]). The data emphasize the importance of hospital QI Leadership in collaboratives that aim to share data for QI or safety purposes. Such metrics should prove useful in the planning and development of this complex form of inter-organizational collaboration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Hospital readiness for health information exchange: development of metrics associated with successful collaboration for quality improvement

    PubMed Central

    Korst, Lisa M.; Aydin, Carolyn E.; Signer, Jordana M. K.; Fink, Arlene

    2011-01-01

    Objective The development of readiness metrics for organizational participation in health information exchange is critical for monitoring progress toward, and achievement of, successful inter-organizational collaboration. In preparation for the development of a tool to measure readiness for data-sharing, we tested whether organizational capacities known to be related to readiness were associated with successful participation in an American data-sharing collaborative for quality improvement. Design Cross-sectional design, using an on-line survey of hospitals in a large, mature data-sharing collaborative organized for benchmarking and improvement in nursing care quality. Measurements Factor analysis was used to identify salient constructs, and identified factors were analyzed with respect to “successful” participation. “Success” was defined as the incorporation of comparative performance data into the hospital dashboard. Results The most important factor in predicting success included survey items measuring the strength of organizational leadership in fostering a culture of quality improvement (QI Leadership): 1) presence of a supportive hospital executive; 2) the extent to which a hospital values data; 3) the presence of leaders’ vision for how the collaborative advances the hospital’s strategic goals; 4) hospital use of the collaborative data to track quality outcomes; and 5) staff recognition of a strong mandate for collaborative participation (α = 0.84, correlation with Success 0.68 [P < 0.0001]). Conclusion The data emphasize the importance of hospital QI Leadership in collaboratives that aim to share data for QI or safety purposes. Such metrics should prove useful in the planning and development of this complex form of inter-organizational collaboration. PMID:21330191

  17. Evaluation of immunization data completeness within a large community health care system exchanging data with a state immunization information system.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Bryan K; Panchanathan, Sarada S; Petitti, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Information systems are used by most states to maintain registries of immunization data both for monitoring population-level adherence and for use in clinical practice and research. Direct data exchange between such systems and electronic health record systems presents an opportunity to improve the completeness and quality of information available. Our goals were to describe and compare the completeness of the Arizona State Immunization System, the electronic health record at a large community health provider in Arizona exchanging electronic data with the Arizona system, and personal immunization records in an effort to contribute to the discussion on the completeness of state-run immunization registries and data exchange with these registries. Immunization histories from these sources were collected and reviewed sequentially. Unique dates of vaccination administrations were counted for each patient and tagged on the basis of comparisons across sources. We quantified completeness by combining information from all 3 sources and comparing each source with the complete set. We determined that the state registry was 71.8% complete, the hospital electronic health record was 81.9% complete, and personal records were 87.8% complete. Of the 2017 unique vaccination administrations, 65% were present in all 3 sources, 24.6% in 2 of the 3 sources, and 10.4% in only 1 source. Only 11% of patients had records in complete agreement across the 3 sources. This study highlights issues related to data completeness, exchange, and reporting of immunization information to state registries and suggests that there is some degree of deficiency in completeness of immunization registries and other sources. This study indicates that there is a need to strengthen links between electronic data sources with immunization information and describes potential improvements in completeness that such efforts could provide, enabling providers to better rely on state immunization registries and to

  18. The Role of Advanced Information System Technology in Remote Sensing for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise in the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prescott, Glenn; Komar, George (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Future NASA Earth observing satellites will carry high-precision instruments capable of producing large amounts of scientific data. The strategy will be to network these instrument-laden satellites into a web-like array of sensors to facilitate the collection, processing, transmission, storage, and distribution of data and data products - the essential elements of what we refer to as "Information Technology." Many of these Information Technologies will enable the satellite and ground information systems to function effectively in real-time, providing scientists with the capability of customizing data collection activities on a satellite or group of satellites directly from the ground. In future systems, extremely large quantities of data collected by scientific instruments will require the fastest processors, the highest communication channel transfer rates, and the largest data storage capacity to insure that data flows smoothly from the satellite-based instrument to the ground-based archive. Autonomous systems will control all essential processes and play a key role in coordinating the data flow through space-based communication networks. In this paper, we will discuss those critical information technologies for Earth observing satellites that will support the next generation of space-based scientific measurements of planet Earth, and insure that data and data products provided by these systems will be accessible to scientists and the user community in general.

  19. Health information exchanges--Unfulfilled promise as a data source for clinical research.

    PubMed

    Parker, Carol; Weiner, Michael; Reeves, Mathew

    2016-03-01

    To determine the use of health information exchange organizations (HIEs) to support and conduct clinical research. This scoping review included US-based studies published between January 2003 and March 2014 that used data from an HIE to address at least one of three categories of research: clinical or epidemiological research, financial evaluation, or utilization of health services. Eligibility was not restricted to research on HIEs. Studies with research questions outside of the evaluation of HIEs themselves were sought. Eighteen articles met final study inclusion criteria from an initial list of 847 hits. Fifteen studies addressed a clinical or epidemiological research question, 6 addressed a financial consideration, and 8 addressed a utilization issue. Considerable overlap was found among the research categories: 13 articles addressed more than one category. Of the eighteen included studies, only two used HIE data to answer a research objective that was NOT specific to HIE use. Research designs were varied and ranged from observational studies, such as cohort and cross-sectional studies, to randomized trials. The 18 articles represent the involvement of a small number of HIEs; 7 of the studies were from a single HIE. This review demonstrates that HIE-provided information is available and used to answer clinical or epidemiological, financial, or utilization-based research questions; however, the majority of the studies using HIE data are done with the primary goal of evaluating the use and impact of HIEs on health care delivery and outcomes. As HIEs mature and become integrated parts of the health care industry, the authors anticipate that fewer studies will be published that describe or validate the role of HIEs, and more will use HIEs as multi-institutional data sources for conducting clinical research and improving health services and clinical outcomes. Articles identified in this review indicate the limited extent that HIE data are being used for clinical

  20. An Assessment of Information Exchange Practices, Challenges, and Opportunities to Support US Disease Surveillance in 3 States.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Macarena C; Garrett, Nedra Y; Singletary, Vivian; Brown, Sheereen; Hennessy-Burt, Tamara; Haney, Gillian; Link, Kimberly; Tripp, Jennifer; Mac Kenzie, William R; Yoon, Paula

    2017-12-07

    State and local public health agencies collect and use surveillance data to identify outbreaks, track cases, investigate causes, and implement measures to protect the public-s health through various surveillance systems and data exchange practices. The purpose of this assessment was to better understand current practices at state and local public health agencies for collecting, managing, processing, reporting, and exchanging notifiable disease surveillance information. Over an 18-month period (January 2014-June 2015), we evaluated the process of data exchange between surveillance systems, reporting burdens, and challenges within 3 states (California, Idaho, and Massachusetts) that were using 3 different reporting systems. All 3 states use a combination of paper-based and electronic information systems for managing and exchanging data on reportable conditions within the state. The flow of data from local jurisdictions to the state health departments varies considerably. When state and local information systems are not interoperable, manual duplicative data entry and other work-arounds are often required. The results of the assessment show the complexity of disease reporting at the state and local levels and the multiple systems, processes, and resources engaged in preparing, processing, and transmitting data that limit interoperability and decrease efficiency. Through this structured assessment, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has a better understanding of the complexities for surveillance of using commercial off-the-shelf data systems (California and Massachusetts), and CDC-developed National Electronic Disease Surveillance System Base System. More efficient data exchange and use of data will help facilitate interoperability between National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance Systems.

  1. Corporate Characteristics and Internal Control Information Disclosure- Evidence from Annual Reports in 2009 of Listed Companies in Shenzhen Stock Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaowen, Song

    Under the research framework of internal control disclosure and combined the current economic situation, the paper empirically analyzes the relationship between corporate characteristics and internal control information disclosure. The paper selects 647 A share companies listed in Shenzhen Stock Exchanges in 2009 as a sample. The results show: (1) the companies with excellent performance and high liquidity tend to disclose more internal control information; (2) the companies with the high leverage and also issued B shares are not willing to disclosure internal control information; (3) the companies sizes and companies which have hired Four-big accounting firms have no significant effects on internal control disclosure.

  2. An observational study of the relationship between meaningful use-based electronic health information exchange, interoperability, and medication reconciliation capabilities.

    PubMed

    Elysee, Gerald; Herrin, Jeph; Horwitz, Leora I

    2017-10-01

    Stagnation in hospitals' adoption of data integration functionalities coupled with reduction in the number of operational health information exchanges could become a significant impediment to hospitals' adoption of 3 critical capabilities: electronic health information exchange, interoperability, and medication reconciliation, in which electronic systems are used to assist with resolving medication discrepancies and improving patient safety. Against this backdrop, we assessed the relationships between the 3 capabilities.We conducted an observational study applying partial least squares-structural equation modeling technique to 27 variables obtained from the 2013 American Hospital Association annual survey Information Technology (IT) supplement, which describes health IT capabilities.We included 1330 hospitals. In confirmatory factor analysis, out of the 27 variables, 15 achieved loading values greater than 0.548 at P < .001, as such were validated as the building blocks of the 3 capabilities. Subsequent path analysis showed a significant, positive, and cyclic relationship between the capabilities, in that decreases in the hospitals' adoption of one would lead to decreases in the adoption of the others.These results show that capability for high quality medication reconciliation may be impeded by lagging adoption of interoperability and health information exchange capabilities. Policies focused on improving one or more of these capabilities may have ancillary benefits.

  3. Techniques of the environmental observer: India's earth remote sensing program in the age of global information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denicola, Lane A.

    This research examines the emergence in India of earth remote sensing (ERS), a principal medium for environmental analysis, communication, and policy-making. ERS---the science and "craft" of analyzing images of terrestrial phenomena collected by aircraft or satellite---constitutes an information technology whose predominance in environmental discourse has grown continuously since first proposed for such applications by American researchers in 1962. Raising many thorny issues in information access and control, the use and popularization of ERS has intensified dramatically since the mid-1980s. In Westernized discourse (both popular and expert), space research and industry are often depicted at a double-remove from the so-called "developing world," where exotic technologies and esoteric goals are overshadowed by patent human needs and a lack of basic infrastructure. Yet advocates hail the utility of ERS in socially relevant applications, and India has amassed upwards of five decades of experience in space, with systems and products rivaled today only by those of the United States and China. A multi-sited ethnography of a nascent visual medium, the dissertation triangulates on its topic by tracing three analytical threads: (1) a diachronic analysis of Indian ERS satellites as an allegory of statehood and participation in the global present, (2) a synchronic analysis of ERS imagery as a discursive artifact and global information commodity, and (3) an analysis of interpretive practice as observed through a single class of Indian and foreign students at the Indian Institute of Remote Sensing (IIRS), considered here as an "interpretive community" of environmental experts. The dissertation is the result of four years of research with ERS students, faculty, researchers, users and administrators in the U.S., the U.K., Turkey and India. In particular, I conducted nine months of ethnographic fieldwork in India in 2002 and 2005, the latter half of which was spent in participant

  4. Notifiable condition reporting practices: implications for public health agency participation in a health information exchange.

    PubMed

    Revere, Debra; Hills, Rebecca H; Dixon, Brian E; Gibson, P Joseph; Grannis, Shaun J

    2017-03-11

    The future of notifiable condition reporting in the United States is undergoing a transformation with the increasing development of Health Information Exchanges which support electronic data-sharing and -transfer networks and the wider adoption of electronic laboratory reporting. Communicable disease report forms originating in clinics are an important source of surveillance data for public health agencies. However, problems of poor data quality and delayed submission of reports to public health agencies are common. In addition, studies of barriers and facilitators to reporting have assumed that the primary reporter is the treating physician, although the extent to which a provider is involved in the reporting workflow is unclear. We sought to better understand the barriers to and burden of notifiable condition reporting from the perspectives of the three primary groups involved in reporting workflow: providers, clinic staff who bear the principal responsibility for reporting, and the public health workers who receive and process reports from clinics. In addition, we sought to situate these findings within the context of the future of notifiable disease reporting and the potential impacts of electronic lab and medical records on the surveillance system. Seven ambulatory care clinics and 3 public health agencies that are part of a Health Information Exchange in the state of Indiana, USA, participated in the study. Data were obtained from a survey of clinic physicians (N = 29), interviews with clinic reporters (N = 11), and interviews with public health workers (N = 9). Survey data were summarized descriptively and interview transcripts underwent qualitative analysis. In both clinics and public health agencies, the laboratory report initiates reporting workflow. Provider involvement with reporting primarily revolves around ordering medications to treat a condition confirmed by the lab result. In clinics, reporting is typically the responsibility of clinic

  5. Information Control in the Virtual Office: Preparing Intermediaries To Facilitate Information Exchange in the Home Work Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulton, Crystal

    2002-01-01

    Discusses work done by information professionals and the increase in teleworking, using telecommunications technology; considers teleworkers' information needs; examines ways in which library and information science professionals can facilitate teleworkers' information access; and investigates information environments of 20 teleworkers and 20…

  6. Assessments of the Veteran Medication Allergy Knowledge Gap and Potential Safety Improvements with the Veteran Health Information Exchange (VHIE)

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Eric; Botts, Nathan; Jordan, Harmon; Olinger, Lois; Donahue, Margaret; Hsing, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Veteran Health Information Exchange (VHIE, formerly Virtual Lifetime Electronic Record, or VLER) had been deployed at all VA sites and used to exchange clinical information with private sector healthcare partners nationally. This paper examined VHIE’s effect on allergy documentation. Review of all inbound VHIE transactions in FY14 showed that VHIE use was associated with a nearly eight-fold increase in allergy documentation rate. Preliminary manual document review further showed that VA and partners had shared knowledge of only 38% ofpatient allergies, while VA had exclusive knowledge of another 58% ofpatient allergies, and partners had exclusive knowledge of the last 5% of patient allergies. To our knowledge, this is the first study that examined the effect of HIE on allergy documentation. PMID:28269897

  7. Assessments of the Veteran Medication Allergy Knowledge Gap and Potential Safety Improvements with the Veteran Health Information Exchange (VHIE).

    PubMed

    Pan, Eric; Botts, Nathan; Jordan, Harmon; Olinger, Lois; Donahue, Margaret; Hsing, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Veteran Health Information Exchange (VHIE, formerly Virtual Lifetime Electronic Record, or VLER) had been deployed at all VA sites and used to exchange clinical information with private sector healthcare partners nationally. This paper examined VHIE's effect on allergy documentation. Review of all inbound VHIE transactions in FY14 showed that VHIE use was associated with a nearly eight-fold increase in allergy documentation rate. Preliminary manual document review further showed that VA and partners had shared knowledge of only 38% ofpatient allergies, while VA had exclusive knowledge of another 58% ofpatient allergies, and partners had exclusive knowledge of the last 5% of patient allergies. To our knowledge, this is the first study that examined the effect of HIE on allergy documentation.

  8. Personal, Informal and Relatable: Engaging Wide Audiences in Climate Science with Nasa's Earth Right Now Blog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenenbaum, L. F.; Shaftel, H.; Jackson, R.

    2014-12-01

    There is no such thing as a non-scientist, but there are some who have yet to acknowledge their inner science spark. Aiming to ignite and fan the flame of curiosity, promote dialogue and attempt to make climate science personal and relevant to everyday life, NASA's Global Climate Change website http://climate.nasa.gov/ and Earth Right Now campaign http://www.nasa.gov/content/earth-right-now/ partnered together this year to launch the Earth Right Now blog http://climate.nasa.gov/blog. It quickly became one of the most popular blogs in all of NASA social media, receiving thousands of likes per week, and frequent comments as well as thoughtful and respectful discussions about climate change. Social media platforms such as blogs have become popular vehicles for engaging large swaths of the public in new exciting ways. NASA's Earth Right Now blog has become a powerful platform for engaging both scientists and the science-curious in constructive, fruitful conversations about the complex topic of climate science. We continue to interact and have ongoing dialogue with our readers by making the scientific content both accessible and engaging for diverse populations.

  9. The "Sky on Earth" Project: A Synergy between Formal and Informal Astronomy Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossi, Sabrina; Giordano, Enrica; Lanciano, Nicoletta

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present the "Sky on Earth" project funded in 2008 by the Italian Ministry of Instruction, Research and University, inside its annual public outreach education program. The project's goal was to realise a stable and open-access astronomical garden, where children, teachers and citizens could be engaged in investigations…

  10. Data governance and data sharing agreements for community-wide health information exchange: lessons from the beacon communities.

    PubMed

    Allen, Claudia; Des Jardins, Terrisca R; Heider, Arvela; Lyman, Kristin A; McWilliams, Lee; Rein, Alison L; Schachter, Abigail A; Singh, Ranjit; Sorondo, Barbara; Topper, Joan; Turske, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    Unprecedented efforts are underway across the United States to electronically capture and exchange health information to improve health care and population health, and reduce costs. This increased collection and sharing of electronic patient data raises several governance issues, including privacy, security, liability, and market competition. Those engaged in such efforts have had to develop data sharing agreements (DSAs) among entities involved in information exchange, many of whom are "nontraditional" health care entities and/or new partners. This paper shares lessons learned based on the experiences of six federally funded communities participating in the Beacon Community Cooperative Agreement Program, and offers guidance for navigating data governance issues and developing DSAs to facilitate community-wide health information exchange. While all entities involved in electronic data sharing must address governance issues and create DSAs accordingly, until recently little formal guidance existed for doing so - particularly for community-based initiatives. Despite this lack of guidance, together the Beacon Communities' experiences highlight promising strategies for navigating complex governance issues, which may be useful to other entities or communities initiating information exchange efforts to support delivery system transformation. For the past three years, AcademyHealth has provided technical assistance to most of the 17 Beacon Communities, 6 of whom contributed to this collaborative writing effort. Though these communities varied widely in terms of their demographics, resources, and Beacon-driven priorities, common themes emerged as they described their approaches to data governance and DSA development. The 6 Beacon Communities confirmed that DSAs are necessary to satisfy legal and market-based concerns, and they identified several specific issues, many of which have been noted by others involved in network data sharing initiatives. More importantly, these

  11. Predicting adolescents' disclosure of personal information in exchange for commercial incentives: an application of an extended theory of planned behavior.

    PubMed

    Heirman, Wannes; Walrave, Michel; Ponnet, Koen

    2013-02-01

    This study adopts a global theoretical framework to predict adolescents' disclosure of personal information in exchange for incentives offered by commercial Websites. The study postulates and tests the validity of a model based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB), including antecedent factors of attitude and perceived behavioral control (PBC). A survey was conducted among 1,042 respondents. Results from SEM analyses show that the hypothesized model fits the empirical data well. The model accounts for 61.9 percent of the variance in adolescents' intention to disclose and 43.7 percent of the variance in self-reported disclosure. Perceived social pressure exerted by significant others (subjective norm) is the most important TPB factor in predicting intention to disclose personal information in exchange for incentives. This finding suggests that in discussions of adolescents' information privacy, the importance of social factors outweighs the individually oriented TPB factors of attitude and PBC. Moreover, privacy concern and trust propensity are significant predictors of respondents' attitudes toward online disclosure in exchange for commercial incentives, whereas the frequency of Internet use significantly affects their level of PBC.

  12. Verifier-based three-party authentication schemes using extended chaotic maps for data exchange in telecare medicine information systems.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tian-Fu

    2014-12-01

    Telecare medicine information systems provide a communicating platform for accessing remote medical resources through public networks, and help health care workers and medical personnel to rapidly making correct clinical decisions and treatments. An authentication scheme for data exchange in telecare medicine information systems enables legal users in hospitals and medical institutes to establish a secure channel and exchange electronic medical records or electronic health records securely and efficiently. This investigation develops an efficient and secure verified-based three-party authentication scheme by using extended chaotic maps for data exchange in telecare medicine information systems. The proposed scheme does not require server's public keys and avoids time-consuming modular exponential computations and scalar multiplications on elliptic curve used in previous related approaches. Additionally, the proposed scheme is proven secure in the random oracle model, and realizes the lower bounds of messages and rounds in communications. Compared to related verified-based approaches, the proposed scheme not only possesses higher security, but also has lower computational cost and fewer transmissions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The TRUST Project: A Formal-Informal Teacher Education Partnership for the Promotion of Earth Science Teacher Certification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, H.; Miele, E.; Powell, W.; MacDonald, M.

    2004-12-01

    The American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) in partnership with Lehman and Brooklyn Colleges of the City University of New York (CUNY) has initiated The Teacher Renewal for Urban Science Teaching (TRUST) project. TRUST combines informal and formal teacher education in a four-year initiative to enhance professional development and masters of science education programs, grades K-8 at Brooklyn College and 7-12 at Lehman College. This NSF-funded partnership brings together the resources of AMNH, CUNY, New York City school districts, New York City Department of Education-Museum Partnerships, and the expertise of scientists and teachers with research experiences. Following an initial planning year, TRUST will recruit and sustain 90 teachers over a period of 3 years as well as engage 30 school administrators in support of Earth science instruction. Program components include two new formal Earth systems science courses, intensive informal summer institutes, and a lecture and workshop series during which participants gain new Earth science content knowledge, develop action plans, and present their work on the local and national level. In addition, participants have access to ongoing resource and material support to enhance their learning and instruction. Continuous documentation and data collection by project investigators are being used to address questions regarding the impact various aspects of the TRUST participant experience on classroom instruction and learning, the acquisition of scientific knowledge in the new courses and institutes, and to examine the nature of the Museum experience in meeting certification goals. External formative and summative evaluation of the project is addressing issues surrounding the value of the program as a model for formal-informal partnership in urban Earth science teacher education and certification, analysis of policies that facilitate partnership arrangements, and how socialization of novices with experts affects retention and

  14. A space weather information service based upon remote and in-situ measurements of coronal mass ejections heading for Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartkorn, O. A.; Ritter, B.; Meskers, A. J. H.; Miles, O.; Russwurm, M.; Scully, S.; Roldan, A.; Juestel, P.; Reville, V.; Lupu, S.; Ruffenach, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Earth's magnetosphere is formed as a consequence of the interaction between the planet's magnetic field and the solar wind, a continuous plasma stream from the Sun. A number of different solar wind phenomena have been studied over the past forty years with the intention of understandingand forcasting solar behavior and space weather. In particular, Earth-bound interplanetary coronal mass ejections (CMEs) can significantly disturb the Earth's magnetosphere for a short time and cause geomagnetic storms. We present a mission concept consisting of six spacecraft that are equally spaced in a heliocentric orbit at 0.72 AU. These spacecraft will monitor the plasma properties, the magnetic field's orientation and magnitude, and the 3D-propagation trajectory of CMEs heading for Earth. The primary objective of this mission is to increase space weather forecasting time by means of a near real-time information service, that is based upon in-situ and remote measurements of the CME properties. The mission secondary objective is the improvement of scientific space weather models. In-situ measurements are performed using a Solar Wind Analyzer instrumentation package and flux gate magnetometers. For remote measurements, coronagraphs are employed. The proposed instruments originate from other space missions with the intention to reduce mission costs and to streamline the mission design process. Communication with the six identical spacecraft is realized via a deep space network consisting of six ground stations. This network provides an information service that is in uninterrupted contact with the spacecraft, allowing for continuos space weather monitoring. A dedicated data processing center will handle all the data, and forward the processed data to the SSA Space Weather Coordination Center. This organization will inform the general public through a space weather forecast. The data processing center will additionally archive the data for the scientific community. This concept

  15. Gaps, disconnections, and discontinuities--the role of information exchange in the delivery of quality long-term care.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Andrew; Marks, Anne; Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Westbrook, Johanna Irene

    2013-10-01

    The smart use of information and communication technologies (ICT) is widely seen as a means of enhancing the quality of aged care services. One of the barriers to ICT diffusion in aged care is the failure to cater for the complex and interdisciplinary requirements of the aged care environment. The aim of this qualitative study was to identify the layers of information exchange and communication and produce a conceptual model that can help to inform decisions related to the design, implementation, and sustainability of ICT. A qualitative study conducted in 2010 within seven Australian residential aged care facilities. It included 11 focus groups involving 47 staff and 54 individual interviews and observation sessions. The analysis of work processes identified key information exchange components related to the type of information (residential, clinical, and administrative) that is collected, stored, and communicated. This information relies on a diverse number of internal and external communication channels that are important for the organization of care. The findings highlight potential areas of communication dysfunction as a consequence of structural holes, fragmentation, or disconnections that can adversely affect the continuity and coordination of care, its safety, and quality.

  16. A snapshot of health information exchange across five nations: an investigation of frontline clinician experiences in emergency care.

    PubMed

    Klapman, Seth; Sher, Emily; Adler-Milstein, Julia

    2018-06-01

    Ensuring the ability to exchange patient information among disparate electronic health records systems is a top priority and a domain of substantial public investment across countries. However, we know little about the extent to which current capabilities meet the needs of frontline clinicians. We conducted in-person, semistructured interviews with emergency care physicians and nurses in select hospitals in Canada, Denmark, Finland, Germany, and the USA. We characterized the state of health information exchange (HIE) by country and used thematic analysis to identify the perceived benefits of access to complete past medical history (PMH), the conditions under which PMH is sought, and the challenges to accessing and using HIE capabilities. HIE approaches, and the information electronically accessible to clinicians, differed by country. Benefits of access to PMH included safer care, reduced patient length of stay, and fewer lab and imaging orders. Conditions under which PMH was sought included moderate-acuity patients, patients with chronic conditions, and instances where accessing PMH was convenient. Challenges to HIE access and use included difficulty knowing where information is located, delay in receiving information, and difficulty finding information within documents. Even with different HIE approaches across countries, all clinicians reported shortcomings in their country's approach. Notably, challenges were similar and shaped the conditions under which PMH was sought. As countries continue to pursue broad-based HIE, they appear to be facing similar challenges in realizing HIE value and therefore have an opportunity to learn from one another.

  17. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Colleen

    1998-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-sponsored project for teachers of grades 5-12, designed to: (1) enhance understanding of the Earth as an integrated system; (2) enhance the interdisciplinary approach to science instruction; and (3) provide classroom materials that focus on those goals. Discover Earth is conducted by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies in collaboration with Dr. Eric Barron, Director, Earth System Science Center, The Pennsylvania State University; and Dr. Robert Hudson, Chair, the Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland at College Park. The enclosed materials: (1) represent only part of the Discover Earth materials; (2) were developed by classroom teachers who are participating in the Discover Earth project; (3) utilize an investigative approach and on-line data; and (4) can be effectively adjusted to classrooms with greater/without technology access. The Discover Earth classroom materials focus on the Earth system and key issues of global climate change including topics such as the greenhouse effect, clouds and Earth's radiation balance, surface hydrology and land cover, and volcanoes and climate change. All the materials developed to date are available on line at (http://www.strategies.org) You are encouraged to submit comments and recommendations about these materials to the Discover Earth project manager, contact information is listed below. You are welcome to duplicate all these materials.

  18. UAV Data Exchange Test Bed for At-Sea and Ashore Information Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-02

    29 3.2 Visualization using NASA World Wind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 3.3 Visualization using Quantum GIS...Data Server and the Global Positioning Warehouse 37 4.1 Naval Position Repository Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 4.2...4.4 Data Exchange between CSD and NPR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 5 Maritime Tactical Command and Control 43 5.1 Global Command

  19. 78 FR 40820 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Exchange Programs Alumni Web Site Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-08

    ...: Exchange Programs Alumni Web Site Registration ACTION: Notice of request for public comment. SUMMARY: The... following methods: Web: Persons with access to the Internet may use the Federal Docket Management System... Programs Alumni Web site Registration OMB Control Number: 1405-0192 Type of Request: Extension of an...

  20. Traveling Uncharted Waters: The Exchange of Government Information between the United States and China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Rui

    1998-01-01

    Describes a program established between the United States and China for exchange of government publications through their national libraries, the Library of Congress and the National Library of China. Challenges to the program, including the shift to electronic formats in the United States and government Internet censorship in China, are…