Science.gov

Sample records for earth intermetallics bi-monthly

  1. Correlation between valence electronic structure and magnetic properties in RCo5 (R = rare earth) intermetallic compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi-Qin, Xue; Yong-Quan, Guo

    2016-06-01

    The magnetisms of RCo5 (R = rare earth) intermetallics are systematically studied with the empirical electron theory of solids and molecules (EET). The theoretical moments and Curie temperatures agree well with experimental ones. The calculated results show strong correlations between the valence electronic structure and the magnetic properties in RCo5 intermetallic compounds. The moments of RCo5 intermetallics originate mainly from the 3d electrons of Co atoms and 4f electrons of rare earth, and the s electrons also affect the magnetic moments by the hybridization of d and s electrons. It is found that moment of Co atom at 2c site is higher than that at 3g site due to the fact that the bonding effect between R and Co is associated with an electron transformation from 3d electrons into covalence electrons. In the heavy rare-earth-based RCo5 intermetallics, the contribution to magnetic moment originates from the 3d and 4f electrons. The covalence electrons and lattice electrons also affect the Curie temperature, which is proportional to the average moment along the various bonds. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11274110).

  2. The Effects of Grain Refinement and Rare Earth Intermetallics on Mechanical Properties of As-Cast and Wrought Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourbahari, Bita; Mirzadeh, Hamed; Emamy, Massoud

    2018-03-01

    The effects of rare earth intermetallics and grain refinement by alloying and hot extrusion on the mechanical properties of Mg-Gd-Al-Zn alloys have been studied to elucidate some useful ways to enhance the mechanical properties of magnesium alloys. It was revealed that aluminum as an alloying element is a much better grain refining agent compared with gadolinium, but the simultaneous presence of Al and Gd can refine the as-cast grain size more efficiently. The presence of fine and widely dispersed rare earth intermetallics was found to be favorable to achieve finer recrystallized grains during hot deformation by extrusion. The presence of coarse dendritic structure in the GZ61 alloy, grain boundary eutectic containing Mg17Al12 phase in the AZ61 alloy, and rare earth intermetallics with unfavorable morphology in the Mg-4Gd-2Al-1Zn alloy was found to be detrimental to mechanical properties of the alloy in the as-cast condition. As a result, the microstructural refinement induced by hot extrusion process resulted in a significant enhancement in strength and ductility of the alloys. The presence of intermetallic compounds in the extruded Mg-4Gd-2Al-1Zn and Mg-2Gd-4Al-1Zn alloys deteriorated tensile properties, which was related to the fact that such intermetallic compounds act as stress risers and microvoid initiation sites.

  3. A review on the synthesis, crystal growth, structure and physical properties of rare earth based quaternary intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mumbaraddi, Dundappa; Sarkar, Sumanta; Peter, Sebastian C., E-mail: sebastiancp@jncasr.ac.in

    2016-04-15

    This review highlights the synthesis and crystal growth of quaternary intermetallic compounds based on rare earth metals. In the first part of this review, we highlight briefly about intermetallics and their versatile properties in comparison to the constituent elements. In the next part, we have discussed about various synthesis techniques with more focus on the metal flux technique towards the well shaped crystal growth of novel compounds. In the subsequent parts, several disordered quaternary compounds have been reviewed and then outlined most known ordered quaternary compounds with their complex structure. A special attention has been given to the ordered compoundsmore » with structural description and relation to the parent binary and ternary compounds. The importance of electronic and structural feature is highlighted as the key roles in designing these materials for emerging applications. - Graphical abstract: Rare earth based quaternary intermetallic compounds crystallize in complex novel crystal structures. The diversity in the crystal structure may induce unique properties and can be considered them as future materials. - Highlights: • Crystal growth and crystal structure of quaternary rare earth based intermetallics. • Structural complexity of quaternary compounds in comparison to the parent compounds. • Novel quaternary compounds display unique crystal structure.« less

  4. Synthesis of Xenon and Iron-Nickel Intermetallic Compounds at Earth's Core Thermodynamic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavrou, Elissaios; Yao, Yansun; Goncharov, Alexander F.; Lobanov, Sergey S.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Liu, Hanyu; Greenberg, Eran; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2018-03-01

    Using in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in concert with first principles calculations we demonstrate the synthesis of stable Xe (Fe ,Fe /Ni )3 and XeNi3 compounds at thermodynamic conditions representative of Earth's core. Surprisingly, in the case of both the Xe-Fe and Xe-Ni systems Fe and Ni become highly electronegative and can act as oxidants. The results indicate the changing chemical properties of elements under extreme conditions by documenting that electropositive at ambient pressure elements could gain electrons and form anions.

  5. Intermetallic nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Dileep; Yusufoglu, Yusuf; Timofeeva, Elena; Routbort, Jules

    2015-07-14

    A process for preparing intermetallic nanoparticles of two or more metals is provided. In particular, the process includes the steps: a) dispersing nanoparticles of a first metal in a solvent to prepare a first metal solution, b) forming a reaction mixture with the first metal solution and a reducing agent, c) heating the reaction mixture to a reaction temperature; and d) adding a second metal solution containing a salt of a second metal to the reaction mixture. During this process, intermetallic nanoparticles, which contain a compound with the first and second metals are formed. The intermetallic nanoparticles with uniform size and a narrow size distribution is also provided. An electrochemical device such as a battery with the intermetallic nanoparticles is also provided.

  6. Intermetallic nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Dileep; Yusufoglu, Yusuf; Timofeeva, Elena; Routbort, Jules L.

    2015-11-20

    A process for preparing intermetallic nanoparticles of two or more metals is provided. In particular, the process includes the steps: a) dispersing nanoparticles of a first metal in a solvent to prepare a first metal solution, b) forming a reaction mixture with the first metal solution and a reducing agent, c) heating the reaction mixture to a reaction temperature; and d) adding a second metal solution containing a salt of a second metal to the reaction mixture. During this process, intermetallic nanoparticles, which contain a compound with the first and second metals are formed. The intermetallic nanoparticles with uniform size and a narrow size distribution is also provided. An electrochemical device such as a battery with the intermetallic nanoparticles is also provided.

  7. Intermetallic nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Dileep; Yusufoglu, Yusuf; Timofeeva, Elena; Routbort, Jules L.

    2017-01-03

    A process for preparing intermetallic nanoparticles of two or more metals is provided. In particular, the process includes the steps: a) dispersing nanoparticles of a first metal in a solvent to prepare a first metal solution, b) forming a reaction mixture with the first metal solution and a reducing agent, c) heating the reaction mixture to a reaction temperature; and d) adding a second metal solution containing a salt of a second metal to the reaction mixture. During this process, intermetallic nanoparticles, which contain a compound with the first and second metals are formed. The intermetallic nanoparticles with uniform size and a narrow size distribution is also provided. An electrochemical device such as a battery with the intermetallic nanoparticles is also provided.

  8. X-ray structural study of intermetallic alloys RT{sub 2}Si and RTSi{sub 2} (R=rare earth, T=noble metal)

    SciTech Connect

    Gribanov, Alexander, E-mail: avgri@mail.r; Chemistry Department of the Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, GSP-1, 119991 Moscow; Grytsiv, Andriy

    Two series of intermetallic alloys, RT{sub 2}Si and RTSi{sub 2}, have been synthesized from stoichiometric compositions. The crystal structures of EuPt{sub 1+x}Si{sub 2-x} (CeNiSi{sub 2}-type), CeIr{sub 2}Si (new structure type), YbPd{sub 2}Si and YbPt{sub 2}Si (both YPd{sub 2}Si-type) have been elucidated from X-ray single crystal CCD data, which were confirmed by XPD experiments. The crystal structures of LaRh{sub 2}Si and LaIr{sub 2}Si (CeIr{sub 2}Si-type), {l_brace}La,Ce,Pr,Nd{r_brace}AgSi{sub 2} (all TbFeSi{sub 2}-type), and EuPt{sub 2}Si (inverse CeNiSi{sub 2}-type) were characterized by XPD data. RT{sub 2}Si/RTSi{sub 2} compounds were neither detected in as-cast alloys Sc{sub 25}Pt{sub 50}Si{sub 25}, Eu{sub 25}Os{sub 25}Si{sub 50} and Eu{submore » 25}Rh{sub 25}Si{sub 50} nor after annealing at 900 {sup o}C. Instead, X-ray single crystal data prompted Eu{sub 2}Os{sub 3}Si{sub 5} (Sc{sub 2}Fe{sub 3}Si{sub 5}-type) and EuRh{sub 2+x}Si{sub 2-x} (x=0.04, ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type) as well as a new structure type for Sc{sub 2}Pt{sub 3}Si{sub 2} (own type). - Graphical abstract: Two series of the intermetallic compounds, RT{sub 2}Si and RTSi{sub 2}, have been investigated by X-ray diffraction methods. The new tetragonal CeIr{sub 2}Si-type of the crystal structure was described and the interrelation between orthorhombic CeNiSi{sub 2} and tetragonal CeIr{sub 2}Si had been discussed as a similar packing of the BaAl{sub 4} and AlB{sub 2} slabs.« less

  9. Magnetic interactions in equi-atomic rare-earth intermetallic alloys RScGe (R = Ce, Pr, Nd and Gd) studied by time differential perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Mishra, S N

    2009-03-18

    Applying the time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) technique we have measured electric and magnetic hyperfine fields of the (111)Cd impurity in equi-atomic rare-earth intermetallic alloys RScGe (R = Ce, Pr and Gd) showing antiferro- and ferromagnetism with unusually high ordering temperatures. The Cd nuclei occupying the Sc site show high magnetic hyperfine fields with saturation values B(hf)(0) = 21 kG, 45 kG and 189 kG in CeScGe, PrScGe and GdScGe, respectively. By comparing the results with the hyperfine field data of Cd in rare-earth metals and estimations from the RKKY model, we find evidence for the presence of additional spin density at the probe nucleus, possibly due to spin polarization of Sc d band electrons. The principal electric field gradient component V(zz) in CeScGe, PrScGe and GdScGe has been determined to be 5.3 × 10(21) V m(-2), 5.5 × 10(21) V m(-2) and 5.6 × 10(21) V m(-2), respectively. Supplementing the experimental measurements, we have carried out ab initio calculations for pure and Cd-doped RScGe compounds with R = Ce, Pr, Nd and Gd using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method based on density functional theory (DFT). From the total energies calculated with and without spin polarization we find ferrimagnetic ground states for CeScGe and PrScGe while NdScGe and GdScGe are ferromagnetic. In addition, we find a sizable magnetic moment at the Sc site, increasing from ≈0.10 μ(B) in CeScGe to ≈0.3 μ(B) in GdScGe, confirming the spin polarization of Sc d band electrons. The calculated electric field gradient and magnetic hyperfine fields of the Cd impurity closely agree with the experimental values. We believe spin polarization of Sc 3d band electrons, strongly hybridized with spin polarized 5d band electrons of the rare-earth, enables a long range Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction between RE 4f moments which in turn leads to high magnetic ordering temperatures in

  10. Structure and magnetism of new rare-earth-free intermetallic compounds: Fe 3+xCo 3-xTi 2 (0 ≤ x ≤ 3)

    DOE PAGES

    Balasubramanian, Balamurugan; Das, Bhaskar; Nguyen, Manh Cuong; ...

    2016-11-28

    Here, we report the fabrication of a set of new rare-earth-free magnetic compounds, which form the Fe 3Co 3Ti 2-type hexagonal structure with P-6m2 symmetry. Neutron powder diffraction shows a significant Fe/Co anti-site mixing in the Fe 3Co 3Ti 2 structure, which has a strong effect on the magnetocrystalline anisotropy as revealed by first-principle calculations. Increasing substitution of Fe atoms for Co in the Fe 3Co 3Ti 2 lattice leads to the formation of Fe 4Co 2Ti 2, Fe 5CoTi, and Fe 6Ti 2 with significantly improved permanent-magnet properties. A high magnetic anisotropy (13.0 Mergs/cm 3) and saturation magnetic polarizationmore » (11.4 kG) are achieved at 10 K by altering the atomic arrangements and decreasing Fe/Co occupancy disorder.« less

  11. Thermomechanical processing of plasma sprayed intermetallic sheets

    DOEpatents

    Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Scorey, Clive; Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton; German, Randall M.

    2001-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  12. Method for making devices having intermetallic structures and intermetallic devices made thereby

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Brian Kevin; Wilson, Richard Dean; Alman, David Eli

    2004-01-06

    A method and system for making a monolithic intermetallic structure are presented. The structure is made from lamina blanks which comprise multiple layers of metals which are patternable, or intermetallic lamina blanks that are patternable. Lamina blanks are patterned, stacked and registered, and processed to form a monolithic intermetallic structure. The advantages of a patterned monolithic intermetallic structure include physical characteristics such as melting temperature, thermal conductivity, and corrosion resistance. Applications are broad, and include among others, use as a microreactor, heat recycling device, and apparatus for producing superheated steam. Monolithic intermetallic structures may contain one or more catalysts within the internal features.

  13. Suppressors made from intermetallic materials

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W; Muth, Thomas R; Cler, Dan L

    2014-11-04

    Disclosed are several examples of apparatuses for suppressing the blast and flash produced as a projectile is expelled by gases from a firearm. In some examples, gases are diverted away from the central chamber to an expansion chamber by baffles. The gases are absorbed by the expansion chamber and desorbed slowly, thus decreasing pressure and increasing residence time of the gases. In other examples, the gases impinge against a plurality of rods before expanding through passages between the rods to decrease the pressure and increase the residence time of the gases. These and other exemplary suppressors are made from an intermetallic material composition for enhanced strength and oxidation resistance at high operational temperatures.

  14. Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-30

    Behold one of the more detailed images of the Earth yet created. This Blue Marble Earth montage shown above -- created from photographs taken by the Visible/Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument on board the new Suomi NPP satellite -- shows many stunning details of our home planet. The Suomi NPP satellite was launched last October and renamed last week after Verner Suomi, commonly deemed the father of satellite meteorology. The composite was created from the data collected during four orbits of the robotic satellite taken earlier this month and digitally projected onto the globe. Many features of North America and the Western Hemisphere are particularly visible on a high resolution version of the image. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18033

  15. Cerium-based, intermetallic-strengthened aluminum casting alloy: High-volume co-product development

    DOE PAGES

    Sims, Zachary C.; Weiss, David; McCall, S. K.; ...

    2016-05-23

    Here, several rare earth elements are considered by-products to rare earth mining efforts. By using one of these by-product elements in a high-volume application such as aluminum casting alloys, the supply of more valuable rare earths can be globally stabilized. Stabilizing the global rare earth market will decrease the long-term criticality of other rare earth elements. The low demand for Ce, the most abundant rare earth, contributes to the instability of rare earth extraction. In this article, we discuss a series of intermetallic-strengthened Al alloys that exhibit the potential for new high-volume use of Ce. The castability, structure, and mechanicalmore » properties of binary, ternary, and quaternary Al-Ce based alloys are discussed. We have determined Al-Ce based alloys to be highly castable across a broad range of compositions. Nanoscale intermetallics dominate the microstructure and are the theorized source of the high ductility. In addition, room-temperature physical properties appear to be competitive with existing aluminum alloys with extended high-temperature stability of the nanostructured intermetallic.« less

  16. Structure Defect Property Relationships in Binary Intermetallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medasani, Bharat; Ding, Hong; Chen, Wei; Persson, Kristin; Canning, Andrew; Haranczyk, Maciej; Asta, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Ordered intermetallics are light weight materials with technologically useful high temperature properties such as creep resistance. Knowledge of constitutional and thermal defects is required to understand these properties. Vacancies and antisites are the dominant defects in the intermetallics and their concentrations and formation enthalpies could be computed by using first principles density functional theory and thermodynamic formalisms such as dilute solution method. Previously many properties of the intermetallics such as melting temperatures and formation enthalpies were statistically analyzed for large number of intermetallics using structure maps and data mining approaches. We undertook a similar exercise to establish the dependence of the defect properties in binary intermetallics on the underlying structural and chemical composition. For more than 200 binary intermetallics comprising of AB, AB2 and AB3 structures, we computed the concentrations and formation enthalpies of vacancies and antisites in a small range of stoichiometries deviating from ideal stoichiometry. The calculated defect properties were datamined to gain predictive capabilities of defect properties as well as to classify the intermetallics for their suitability in high-T applications. Supported by the US DOE under Contract No. DEAC02-05CH11231 under the Materials Project Center grant (Award No. EDCBEE).

  17. Magnetic properties of Gd intermetallics

    DOE PAGES

    Petit, Leon; Szotek, Zdzislawa; Jackson, Jerome; ...

    2017-04-06

    Here, using first-principles calculations, based on disordered local moment theory, combined with the self-interaction corrected local spin density approximation, we study magnetic interactions in GdX intermetallics for X = Cu, Zn, Ga, Cd, and Mg. Our predicted magnetic orders and ordering temperatures both at zero and other pressures agree well with experiments including the large increase in the Curie temperature of GdCd under pressure that is shown by our own experimental measurements. From our results it emerges that the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interaction on its own can not explain the observed behaviour under pressure, and that the magnetic ordering mechanism is stronglymore » influenced by the occupations of both Gd and anion d-bands.« less

  18. Intermetallics for Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcos, J.

    2009-01-01

    Future Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV's) will require improved Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) to achieve the ambitious goal of reducing the cost of delivering a payload to orbit by, at least, an order of magnitude. In this context, metallic materials are good candidates for their use in TPS and hot structures. Up to date, only two major type of materials have been considered and developed in Europe for such type of applications: Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) and intermetallics (ϒ-TiAl). INASMET, during last years, has been working with the orthorhombic titanium aluminides, whose specific properties are comparable, to those of ODS and ϒ-TiAl materials. The EXPERT mission represents a unique opportunity to test under re-entry conditions this material.

  19. Method of making sintered ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Plucknett, Kevin; Tiegs, Terry N.; Becher, Paul F.

    1999-01-01

    A method of making an intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite involves combining a particulate brittle intermetallic precursor with a particulate reactant metal and a particulate ceramic to form a mixture and heating the mixture in a non-oxidizing atmosphere at a sufficient temperature and for a sufficient time to react the brittle intermetallic precursor and the reactant metal to form a ductile intermetallic and sinter the mixture to form a ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite.

  20. Method of making sintered ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Plucknett, K.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.

    1999-05-18

    A method of making an intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite involves combining a particulate brittle intermetallic precursor with a particulate reactant metal and a particulate ceramic to form a mixture and heating the mixture in a non-oxidizing atmosphere at a sufficient temperature and for a sufficient time to react the brittle intermetallic precursor and the reactant metal to form a ductile intermetallic and sinter the mixture to form a ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite. 2 figs.

  1. Intermetallics as innovative CRM-free materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novák, Pavel; Jaworska, Lucyna; Cabibbo, Marcello

    2018-03-01

    Many of currently used technical materials cannot be imagined without the use of critical raw materials. They require chromium (e.g. in stainless and tool steels), tungsten and cobalt (tool materials, heat resistant alloys), niobium (steels and modern biomaterials). Therefore there is a need to find substitutes to help the European economy. A promising solution can be the application of intermetallics. These materials offer wide variety of interesting properties, such as high hardness and wear resistance or high chemical resistance. In this paper, the overview of possible substitute materials among intermetallics is presented. Intermetallics based on aluminides and silicides are shown as corrosion resistant materials, composites composed of ceramics in intermetallic matrix as possible tool materials. The manufacturing processes are being developed to minimize the disadvantages of these materials, mainly the room-temperature brittleness.

  2. New twisted intermetallic compound superconductor: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, W. D.; Brown, G. V.; Laurence, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Method for processing Nb3Sn and other intermetallic compound superconductors produces a twisted, stabilized wire or tube which can be used to wind electromagnetics, armatures, rotors, and field windings for motors and generators as well as other magnetic devices.

  3. Advanced ordered intermetallic alloy deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; Maziasz, P.J.; Easton, D.S.

    1997-04-01

    The need for high-strength, high-temperature, and light-weight materials for structural applications has generated a great deal of interest in ordered intermetallic alloys, particularly in {gamma}-based titanium aluminides {gamma}-based TiAl alloys offer an attractive mix of low density ({approximately}4g/cm{sup 3}), good creep resistance, and high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance. For rotating or high-speed components. TiAl also has a high damping coefficient which minimizes vibrations and noise. These alloys generally contain two phases. {alpha}{sub 2} (DO{sub 19} structure) and {gamma} (L 1{sub 0}), at temperatures below 1120{degrees}C, the euticoid temperature. The mechanical properties of TiAl-based alloys are sensitive to both alloy compositionsmore » and microstructure. Depending on heat-treatment and thermomechanical processing, microstructures with near equiaxed {gamma}, a duplex structure (a mix of the {gamma} and {alpha}{sub 2} phases) can be developed in TiAl alloys containing 45 to 50 at. % Al. The major concern for structural use of TiAl alloys is their low ductility and poor fracture resistance at ambient temperatures. The purpose of this project is to improve the fracture toughness of TiAl-based alloys by controlling alloy composition, microstructure and thermomechanical treatment. This work is expected to lead to the development of TiAl alloys with significantly improved fracture toughness and tensile ductility for structural use.« less

  4. Chemical effect on diffusion in intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Ting

    With the trend of big data and the Internet of things, we live in a world full of personal electronic devices and small electronic devices. In order to make the devices more powerful, advanced electronic packaging such as wafer level packaging or 3D IC packaging play an important role. Furthermore, ?-bumps, which connect silicon dies together with dimension less than 10 ?m, are crucial parts in advanced packaging. Owing to the dimension of ?-bumps, they transform into intermetallic compound from tin based solder after the liquid state bonding process. Moreover, many new reliability issues will occur in electronic packaging when the bonding materials change; in this case, we no longer have tin based solder joint, instead, we have intermetallic compound ?-bumps. Most of the potential reliability issues in intermetallic compounds are caused by the chemical reactions driven by atomic diffusion in the material; thus, to know the diffusivities of atoms inside a material is significant and can help us to further analyze the reliability issues. However, we are lacking these kinds of data in intermetallic compound because there are some problems if used traditional Darken's analysis. Therefore, we considered Wagner diffusivity in our system to solve the problems and applied the concept of chemical effect on diffusion by taking the advantage that large amount of energy will release when compounds formed. Moreover, by inventing the holes markers made by Focus ion beam (FIB), we can conduct the diffusion experiment and obtain the tracer diffusivities of atoms inside the intermetallic compound. We applied the technique on Ni3Sn4 and Cu3Sn, which are two of the most common materials in electronic packaging, and the tracer diffusivities are measured under several different temperatures; moreover, microstructure of the intermetallic compounds are investigated to ensure the diffusion environment. Additionally, the detail diffusion mechanism was also discussed in aspect of diffusion

  5. Quaternary borocarbides: New class of intermetallic superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagarajan, R.; Gupta, L. C.; Dhar, S. K.; Mazumdar, Chandan; Hossain, Zakir; Godart, C.; Levy-Clement, C.; Padalia, B. D.; Vijayaraghavan, R.

    1995-01-01

    Our recent discovery of superconductivity (SC) in the four-element multiphase Y-Ni-B-C system at an elevated temperature (TC approximately 12 K) has opened up great possibilities of identifying new superconducting materials and generating new physics. Superconductivity with Tc (greater than 20 K) higher than that known so far in bulk intermetallics has been observed in multiphase Y-Pd-B-C and Th-Pd-B-C systems and a family of single phase materials RENi2B2C (RE= Y, rare earth) have been found. Our investigations show YNi2B2C to be a strong coupling hard type-II SC. HC2(T) exhibits an unconventional temperature dependence. Specific heat and magnetization studies reveal coexistence of SC and magnetism in RNi2B2C (R = Ho, Er, Tm) with magnetic ordering temperatures (Tc approximately 8 K, 10.5 K, 11 K and Tm approximately 5 K, approximately 7K, approximately 4 K respectively) that are remarkably higher than those in known magnetic superconductors . Mu-SR studies suggest the possibility of Ni atoms carrying a moment in TmNi2B2C. Resistivity results suggests a double re-entrant transition (SC-normal-SC) in HoNi2B2C. RENi2B2C (RE = Ce, Nd, Gd) do not show SC down to 4.2 K. The Nd- and Gd-compounds order magnetically at approximately 4.5 K and approximately 19.5 K, respectively. Two SC transitions are observed in Y-Pd-B-C (Tc approximately 22 K, approximately 10 K) and in Th-Pd-B-C (Tc approximately 20 K, approximately 14 K) systems, which indicate that there are at least two structures which support SC in these borocarbides. In our multiphase ThNi2B2C we observe SC at approximately 6 K. No SC was seen in multiphase UNi2B2C, UPd2B2C, UOs2Ge2C and UPd5B3C(0.35) down to 4.2 K. Tc in YNi2B2C is depressed by substitutions (Gd, Th and U at Y-sites and Fe, Co at Ni-sites).

  6. Intermediate coupled superconductivity in yttrium intermetallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ramesh; Ahmed, Gulzar; Sharma, Yamini

    2017-09-01

    Non-magnetic YIn3, LaIn3 and LuIn3 with a superconducting transition temperature Tc of 0.78, 0.71 and 0.24 K were investigated for superconductivity. Similarly, rare-earth compound LaSn3 has been reported to exhibit superconductivity around 6.25 K, whereas the non-magnetic YSn3 is a superconductor with Tc of 7 K. The substitution of 13th group In-atoms by 14th group Sn-atoms is seen to enhance Tc by nearly one order, although the lattice parameters increase by ∼1.0% in YSn3 compared to YIn3 compound. It is observed from the ground state properties that the slight difference in the energy band structures of YIn3, YIn2Sn and YSn3 gives rise to various complex Fermi surfaces which are multiply connected and exhibit vast differences. The Fermi level lies on a sharp peak in YSn3 which has a higher density of states N(EF), whereas Fermi level lies on the shoulder of a sharp peak in YIn3. The electron localization function (ELF) and difference charge density maps clearly illustrate the difference in the nature of bonding; the Ysbnd Sn bonds are clearly more ionic (due to larger bond length) than Ysbnd In bonds. These results are consistent with the Bader charges which show loss of charges from Y-atoms and a gain of charges by In/Sn atoms. The dynamical properties also clearly illustrate the difference in the nature of bonds in YX3 intermetallics. A softening of the lowermost acoustic modes is observed in YIn3, whereas all the modes in YSn3 are observed to have positive frequencies which imply its greater stability. Since λel-ph < 1, both YIn3 and YSn3 compounds exhibit type I superconductivity according to BCS theory. However, the smaller N(EF) obtained from the density of states (DOS); the electron-phonon coupling constant λel-ph obtained from the temperature dependent specific heat as well as the instability in phonon modes due to stronger Ysbnd In and Insbnd In bonds in YIn3 may be the cause of lower Tc and filamentary nature of superconductivity. Insertion of Sn

  7. Copper/solder intermetallic growth studies.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, K W; Lucey, G K; Geis, J

    1993-08-01

    Copper samples, hot solder (eutectic) dipped and thermally aged, were cross-sectioned and placed in an environmental scanning electronic microscope (ESEM). While in the ESEM the samples were heated for approximately 2.5 h at 170 degrees C to stimulate the growth of additional Cu/Sn intermetallic compound. The intent of the study was to obtain a continuous real-time videotape record of the diffusion process and compare the observations to static SEM images reported to represent long-term, naturally aged intermetallic growth. The video obtained allows the observation of the diffusion process and relativistic growth phenomena at the Cu, Cu3Sn, Cu6Sn5, and solder interfaces as well as effects on the bulk Cu and solder. Effects contrary to earlier reports were observed; for example, growth rates of Cu3Sn were found to greatly exceed those of Cu6Sn5.

  8. Electromigration in Sn-Cu intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, C. C.; Chen, C. F.; Liu, P. C.; Chen, Chih

    2009-01-01

    As the shrinking in bump size continues, the effect of intermetallic compounds (IMCs) on electromigration becomes more pronounced. Electromigration in Sn-Cu intermetallic compounds was examined using edge displacement method. It was found that Cu6Sn5 compounds are more susceptible to electromigration than Cu3Sn compounds. The lower solidus temperature and higher resistivity of the Cu6Sn5 IMCs are responsible for its higher electromigration rate. Length-dependent electromigration behavior was found in the stripes of various lengths and the critical length was determined to be between 5 and 10 μm at 225 °C, which corresponded to a critical product between 2.5 and 5 A/cm. Furthermore, the Sn-Cu compounds were proven to have better electromigration resistance than eutectic SnAgCu solder.

  9. Electron-Poor Polar Intermetallics: Complex Structures, Novel Clusters, and Intriguing Bonding with Pronounced Electron Delocalization.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qisheng; Miller, Gordon J

    2018-01-16

    complexity can be realized by small amounts of Li replacing Zn atoms in the parent binary compounds CaZn 2 , CaZn 3 , and CaZn 5 ; their phase formation and bonding schemes can be rationalized by Fermi surface-Brillouin zone interactions between nearly free-electron states. "Cation-rich", electron-poor polar intermetallics have emerged using rare earth metals as the electropositive ("cationic") component together metal/metalloid clusters that mimic the backbones of aromatic hydrocarbon molecules, which give evidence of extensive electronic delocalization and multicenter bonding. Thus, we can identify three distinct, valence electron-poor, polar intermetallic systems that have yielded unprecedented phases adopting novel structures containing complex clusters and intriguing bonding characteristics. In this Account, we summarize our recent specific progress in the developments of novel Au-rich BaAl 4 -type related structures, shown in the "gold-rich grid", lithiation-modulated Ca-Li-Zn phases stabilized by different bonding characteristics, and rare earth-rich polar intermetallics containing unprecedented hydrocarbon-like planar Co-Ge metal clusters and pronounced delocalized multicenter bonding. We will focus mainly on novel structural motifs, bonding analyses, and the role of valence electrons for phase stability.

  10. Intermetallic compounds in heterogeneous catalysis—a quickly developing field

    PubMed Central

    Armbrüster, Marc; Schlögl, Robert; Grin, Yuri

    2014-01-01

    The application of intermetallic compounds for understanding in heterogeneous catalysis developed in an excellent way during the last decade. This review provides an overview of concepts and developments revealing the potential of intermetallic compounds in fundamental as well as applied catalysis research. Intermetallic compounds may be considered as platform materials to address current and future catalytic challenges, e.g. in respect to the energy transition. PMID:27877674

  11. Brushing up on the history of intermetallics in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waterstrat, Richard M.

    1990-03-01

    Employing a silver-tin-mercury intermetallic to repair cavities may seem a little unusual, but intermetallics are quite common in dentistry, ranging from gold crowns to braces. Although the human mouth can be unfriendly territory for a brittle intermetallic alloy, dental amalgam has been around since 659 A.D., and its technology has been developed to the point where a filling can be expected to last 30 years or more.

  12. Novel Gold Intermetallics with Unique Properties and Bonding Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celania, Christopher Ranger

    Gold has drawn the fascination of society through its brilliant color, malleability, and chemical resistance (hence its chemical nobility) since its discovery in ancient times. Today, this material is still highly coveted by consumers, but also for research within the scientific realm. The inclusion of gold in intermetallics often leads to notably unique structural and bonding features due to the pronounced relativistic effects on its 5d and 6s orbitals. Examples include quasicrystals and their approximants, unique gold clusters such as isolated Au7 clusters in A4Au7X2 (A = K, Rb, Cs; X = Ge, Sn), one dimensional columns such as Au zig-zag chains through Ca3Au3In, two dimensional slabs, such as in K2 Au3, as well as three dimensional gold networks as observed in the interconnected trigonal bipyramids in KAu5, hexagonal diamond-like frameworks of Au tetrahedra in Au-rich Sr-Au-Al systems; and combinations of tetrahedral and fourfold planar Au atoms in Rb3Au7. In recent years, compounds in the gold-rich region of the R-Au- M system (R = rare earth, M = groups 13-15) have come under increased study. Many compounds within this system produce varied electronic and magnetic properties such as Pauli paramagnetism, superconductivity, thermoelectricity, etc. The shielded 4f electrons of the added rare earth elements provide the unpaired spins that lead to the wealth of interesting magnetic properties in their compounds. Metals and metalloids from groups 13-15 may then be used as a bank of available options useful in tuning the valence electron count of the R-Au system toward the formation of stable compounds. Exploration of the Gd-Au-Sb system by utilizing common solid state synthesis techniques frequently used for the production of intermetallics (such as arc melting and high-temperature furnaces for self-flux reactions with low melting components) has yielded rich outcomes. These results include the discovery of a new R3Au9Pn series of compounds (R = Y, Gd-Ho; Pn = Sb, Bi

  13. High-Pressure Synthesis: A New Frontier in the Search for Next-Generation Intermetallic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Walsh, James P S; Freedman, Danna E

    2018-06-19

    The application of high pressure adds an additional dimension to chemical phase space, opening up an unexplored expanse bearing tremendous potential for discovery. Our continuing mission is to explore this new frontier, to seek out new intermetallic compounds and new solid-state bonding. Simple binary elemental systems, in particular those composed of pairs of elements that do not form compounds under ambient pressures, can yield novel crystalline phases under compression. Thus, high-pressure synthesis can provide access to solid-state compounds that cannot be formed with traditional thermodynamic methods. An emerging approach for the rapid exploration of composition-pressure-temperature phase space is the use of hand-held high-pressure devices known as diamond anvil cells (DACs). These devices were originally developed by geologists as a way to study minerals under conditions relevant to the earth's interior, but they possess a host of capabilities that make them ideal for high-pressure solid-state synthesis. Of particular importance, they offer the capability for in situ spectroscopic and diffraction measurements, thereby enabling continuous reaction monitoring-a powerful capability for solid-state synthesis. In this Account, we provide an overview of this approach in the context of research we have performed in the pursuit of new intermetallic compounds. We start with a discussion of pressure as a fundamental experimental variable that enables the formation of intermetallic compounds that cannot be isolated under ambient conditions. We then introduce the DAC apparatus and explain how it can be repurposed for use as a synthetic vessel with which to explore this phase space, going to extremes of pressure where no chemist has gone before. The remainder of the Account is devoted to discussions of recent experiments we have performed with this approach that have led to the discovery of novel intermetallic compounds in the Fe-Bi, Cu-Bi, and Ni-Bi systems, with a focus

  14. Intermetallic Precipitation in Low-Density Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, S.; Chatterjee, A.; Chakrabarti, D.

    2018-06-01

    Low-density steels (LDS) represent a relatively new class of material that contains a large concentration of aluminum. In the present work, we studied the effect of copper addition to these steels. Microanalysis and electron diffraction study were used to demonstrate that on the contrary to the theoretical expectation, copper formed a variety of intermetallic, instead of metallic, precipitates on reaction with aluminum. The precipitation led to a significant age-hardening response that imparted a special characteristic to this material, which had never been reported previously.

  15. Experimental formation enthalpies for intermetallic phases and other inorganic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Kim, George; Meschel, S. V.; Nash, Philip; Chen, Wei

    2017-01-01

    The standard enthalpy of formation of a compound is the energy associated with the reaction to form the compound from its component elements. The standard enthalpy of formation is a fundamental thermodynamic property that determines its phase stability, which can be coupled with other thermodynamic data to calculate phase diagrams. Calorimetry provides the only direct method by which the standard enthalpy of formation is experimentally measured. However, the measurement is often a time and energy intensive process. We present a dataset of enthalpies of formation measured by high-temperature calorimetry. The phases measured in this dataset include intermetallic compounds with transition metal and rare-earth elements, metal borides, metal carbides, and metallic silicides. These measurements were collected from over 50 years of calorimetric experiments. The dataset contains 1,276 entries on experimental enthalpy of formation values and structural information. Most of the entries are for binary compounds but ternary and quaternary compounds are being added as they become available. The dataset also contains predictions of enthalpy of formation from first-principles calculations for comparison. PMID:29064466

  16. Titanium aluminide intermetallic alloys with improved wear resistance

    DOEpatents

    Qu, Jun; Lin, Hua-Tay; Blau, Peter J.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    2014-07-08

    The invention is directed to a method for producing a titanium aluminide intermetallic alloy composition having an improved wear resistance, the method comprising heating a titanium aluminide intermetallic alloy material in an oxygen-containing environment at a temperature and for a time sufficient to produce a top oxide layer and underlying oxygen-diffused layer, followed by removal of the top oxide layer such that the oxygen-diffused layer is exposed. The invention is also directed to the resulting oxygen-diffused titanium aluminide intermetallic alloy, as well as mechanical components or devices containing the improved alloy composition.

  17. Containerless automated processing of intermetallic compounds and composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. R.; Joslin, S. M.; Reviere, R. D.; Oliver, B. F.; Noebe, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    An automated containerless processing system has been developed to directionally solidify high temperature materials, intermetallic compounds, and intermetallic/metallic composites. The system incorporates a wide range of ultra-high purity chemical processing conditions. The utilization of image processing for automated control negates the need for temperature measurements for process control. The list of recent systems that have been processed includes Cr, Mo, Mn, Nb, Ni, Ti, V, and Zr containing aluminides. Possible uses of the system, process control approaches, and properties and structures of recently processed intermetallics are reviewed.

  18. Clusters, Assemble: Growth of Intermetallic Compounds from Metal Flux Reactions.

    PubMed

    Latturner, Susan E

    2018-01-16

    Metal flux synthesis involves the reaction of metals and metalloids in a large excess of a low-melting metal that acts as a solvent. This technique makes use of an unusual temperature regime (above the temperatures used for solvothermal methods and below the temperatures used in traditional solid state synthesis) and facilitates the growth of products as large crystals. It has proven to be a fruitful method to discover new intermetallic compounds. However, little is known about the chemistry occurring within a molten metal solvent; without an understanding of the nature of precursor formation and assembly, it is difficult to predict product structures and target properties. Organic chemists have a vast toolbox of well-known reagents and reaction mechanisms to use in directing their synthesis toward a desired molecular structure. This is not yet the case for the synthesis of inorganic extended structures. We have carried out extensive explorations of the growth of new magnetic intermetallic compounds from a variety of metal fluxes. This Account presents a review of some of our results and recent reports by other groups; this work indicates that products with common building blocks and homologous series with identical structural motifs are repeatedly seen in metal flux chemistry. For instance, fluorite-type layers comprised of transition metals coordinated by eight main group metal atoms are found in the Th 2 (Au x Si 1-x )[AuAl 2 ] n Si 2 and R[AuAl 2 ] n Al 2 (Au x Si 1-x ) 2 series grown from aluminum flux, the Ce n PdIn 3n+2 series grown from indium flux, and CePdGa 6 and Ce 2 PdGa 10 grown from gallium flux. Similarly, our investigations of reactions of heavy main group metals, M, in rare earth/transition metal eutectic fluxes reveal that the R/T/M/M' products usually feature M-centered rare earth clusters M@R 8-12 , which share faces to form layers and networks that surround transition metal building blocks. These structural trends, temperature dependence of

  19. Hydrogen Ordering in Hexagonal Intermetallic AB5 Type Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, W.; Kuna, A.

    2008-04-01

    Intermetallic compounds AB5 type (A = rare-earth atoms, B = transition metal) are known to store reversibly large amounts of hydrogen and as that are discussed in this work. It was shown that the alloy cycling stability can be significantly improved by employing the so-called non-stoichiometric compounds AB5+x and that is why analysis of change of structure turned out to be interesting. A tendency for ordering of hydrogen atoms is one of the most intriguing problems for the unsaturated hydrides. The symmetry analysis method in the frame of the theory of space group and their representation gives opportunity to find all possible transformations of the parent structure. In this work symmetry analysis method was applied for AB5+x structure type (P6/mmm parent symmetry space group). There were investigated all possible ordering types and accompanying atom displacements in positions 1a, 2c, 3g (fully occupied in stoichiometric compounds AB5), in positions 2e, 6l (where atom B could appear in non-stoichiometric compounds) and also 4h, 6m, 6k, 12n, 12o, which could be partly occupied by hydrogen as a result of hydrides. An analysis was carried out of all possible structures of lower symmetry, following from P6/mmm for we k=(0, 0, 0). Also the way of getting the structure described by the P63mc space group with double cell along the z-axiswe k=(0, 0, 0.5), as it is suggested in the work of Latroche et al. is discussed by the symmetry analysis. The analysis was obtained by computer program MODY. The program calculates the so-called basis vectors of irreducible representations of a given symmetry group, which can be used for calculation of possible ordering modes.

  20. Thermal stress effects in intermetallic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, P. K.; Sensmeier, M. D.; Kupperman, D. S.; Wadley, H. N. G.

    1993-01-01

    Intermetallic matrix composites develop residual stresses from the large thermal expansion mismatch (delta-alpha) between the fibers and matrix. This work was undertaken to: establish improved techniques to measure these thermal stresses in IMC's; determine residual stresses in a variety of IMC systems by experiments and modeling; and, determine the effect of residual stresses on selected mechanical properties of an IMC. X ray diffraction (XRD), neutron diffraction (ND), synchrotron XRD (SXRD), and ultrasonics (US) techniques for measuring thermal stresses in IMC were examined and ND was selected as the most promising technique. ND was demonstrated on a variety of IMC systems encompassing Ti- and Ni-base matrices, SiC, W, and Al2O3 fibers, and different fiber fractions (Vf). Experimental results on these systems agreed with predictions of a concentric cylinder model. In SiC/Ti-base systems, little yielding was found and stresses were controlled primarily by delta-alpha and Vf. In Ni-base matrix systems, yield strength of the matrix and Vf controlled stress levels. The longitudinal residual stresses in SCS-6/Ti-24Al-llNb composite were modified by thermomechanical processing. Increasing residual stress decreased ultimate tensile strength in agreement with model predictions. Fiber pushout strength showed an unexpected inverse correlation with residual stress. In-plane shear yield strength showed no dependence on residual stress. Higher levels of residual tension led to higher fatigue crack growth rates, as suggested by matrix mean stress effects.

  1. Ag–Pt compositional intermetallics made from alloy nanoparticles

    DOE PAGES

    Pan, Yung -Tin; Yan, Yuqi; Shao, Yu -Tsun; ...

    2016-09-07

    Intermetallics are compounds with long-range structural order that often lies in a state of thermodynamic minimum. They are usually considered as favorable structures for catalysis due to their high activity and robust stability. However, formation of intermetallic compounds is often regarded as element specific. For instance, Ag and Pt do not form alloy in bulk phase through the conventional metallurgy approach in almost the entire range of composition. Herein, we demonstrate a bottom-up approach to create a new Ag–Pt compositional intermetallic phase from nanoparticles. By thermally treating the corresponding alloy nanoparticles in inert atmosphere, we obtained an intermetallic material thatmore » has an exceptionally narrow Ag/Pt ratio around 52/48 to 53/47, and a structure of interchangeable closely packed Ag and Pt layers with 85% on tetrahedral and 15% on octahedral sites. This rather unique stacking results in wavy patterns of Ag and Pt planes revealed by scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). Finally, this Ag–Pt compositional intermetallic phase is highly active for electrochemical oxidation of formic acid at low anodic potentials, 5 times higher than its alloy nanoparticles, and 29 times higher than the reference Pt/C at 0.4 V (vs RHE) in current density.« less

  2. Ag–Pt compositional intermetallics made from alloy nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Yung -Tin; Yan, Yuqi; Shao, Yu -Tsun

    Intermetallics are compounds with long-range structural order that often lies in a state of thermodynamic minimum. They are usually considered as favorable structures for catalysis due to their high activity and robust stability. However, formation of intermetallic compounds is often regarded as element specific. For instance, Ag and Pt do not form alloy in bulk phase through the conventional metallurgy approach in almost the entire range of composition. Herein, we demonstrate a bottom-up approach to create a new Ag–Pt compositional intermetallic phase from nanoparticles. By thermally treating the corresponding alloy nanoparticles in inert atmosphere, we obtained an intermetallic material thatmore » has an exceptionally narrow Ag/Pt ratio around 52/48 to 53/47, and a structure of interchangeable closely packed Ag and Pt layers with 85% on tetrahedral and 15% on octahedral sites. This rather unique stacking results in wavy patterns of Ag and Pt planes revealed by scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). Finally, this Ag–Pt compositional intermetallic phase is highly active for electrochemical oxidation of formic acid at low anodic potentials, 5 times higher than its alloy nanoparticles, and 29 times higher than the reference Pt/C at 0.4 V (vs RHE) in current density.« less

  3. Corrosion behavior of binary titanium aluminide intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Saffarian, H.M.; Gan, Q.; Hadkar, R.

    1996-08-01

    The corrosion behavior of arc-melted binary titanium aluminide intermetallics TiAl, Ti{sub 2}Al, and TiAl{sub 3} in aqueous sodium sulfate and sodium chloride solutions was measured and compared to that of pure Ti and Al. Effects of electrolyte composition (e.g., sulfate [0.25 M SO{sub 4}{sup 2}{sup {minus}}], chloride [0.1 to 1.0 M Cl{sup {minus}}], and pH [3 to 10]) were examined. Anodic polarization of titanium aluminides in aqueous SO{sub 4}{sup 2}{sup {minus}} solutions was similar (showing passive behavior), but no pitting or pitting potential (E{sub pit}) was observed. In aqueous NaCl, however, titanium aluminides were susceptible to pitting, and E{sub pit}more » decreased with increasing Al content (i.e., Ti{sub 3}Al had the highest E{sub pit} and, therefore, a greater resistance to pitting, followed by TiAl and TiAl{sub 3}). For TiAl, E{sub pit} was slightly dependent upon pH or Cl{sup {minus}} concentration. Pit morphology and E{sub pit} values were quite different for TiAl compared to Ti{sub 3}Al. TiAl showed numerous small pits, whereas Ti{sub 3}Al exhibited fewer but larger and deeper pits. The larger pit density for TiAl was associated with Al-rich interdendrite regions. One interesting feature of the anodic polarization curves for Ti{sub 3}Al was a small anodic peak frequently observed at {approximately}1.4 V{sub SCE} to 1.8 V{sub SCE}. Results suggested this peak was associated with pit initiation, since pitting initiated concurrently with the peak or immediately afterward.« less

  4. Melt-Spun Fe-Sb Intermetallic Alloy Anode for Performance Enhanced Sodium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Edison, Eldho; Sreejith, Sivaramapanicker; Madhavi, Srinivasan

    2017-11-15

    Owing to the high theoretical sodiation capacities, intermetallic alloy anodes have attracted considerable interest as electrodes for next-generation sodium-ion batteries (SIBs). Here, we demonstrate the fabrication of intermetallic Fe-Sb alloy anode for SIBs via a high-throughput and industrially viable melt-spinning process. The earth-abundant and low-cost Fe-Sb-based alloy anode exhibits excellent cycling stability with nearly 466 mAh g -1 sodiation capacity at a specific current of 50 mA g -1 with 95% capacity retention after 80 cycles. Moreover, the alloy anode displayed outstanding rate performance with ∼300 mAh g -1 sodiation capacity at 1 A g -1 . The crystalline features of the melt-spun fibers aid in the exceptional electrochemical performance of the alloy anode. Further, the feasibility of the alloy anode for real-life applications was demonstrated in a sodium-ion full-cell configuration which could deliver a sodiation capacity of over 300 mAh g -1 (based on anode) at 50 mA g -1 with more than 99% Coulombic efficiency. The results further exhort the prospects of melt-spun alloy anodes to realize fully functional sodium-ion batteries.

  5. Intermetallic alloy welding wires and method for fabricating the same

    DOEpatents

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1996-06-11

    Welding wires for welding together intermetallic alloys of nickel aluminides, nickel-iron aluminides, iron aluminides, or titanium aluminides, and preferably including additional alloying constituents are fabricated as two-component, clad structures in which one component contains the primary alloying constituent(s) except for aluminum and the other component contains the aluminum constituent. This two-component approach for fabricating the welding wire overcomes the difficulties associated with mechanically forming welding wires from intermetallic alloys which possess high strength and limited ductilities at elevated temperatures normally employed in conventional metal working processes. The composition of the clad welding wires is readily tailored so that the welding wire composition when melted will form an alloy defined by the weld deposit which substantially corresponds to the composition of the intermetallic alloy being joined. 4 figs.

  6. Intermetallic alloy welding wires and method for fabricating the same

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1996-01-01

    Welding wires for welding together intermetallic alloys of nickel aluminides, nickel-iron aluminides, iron aluminides, or titanium aluminides, and preferably including additional alloying constituents are fabricated as two-component, clad structures in which one component contains the primary alloying constituent(s) except for aluminum and the other component contains the aluminum constituent. This two-component approach for fabricating the welding wire overcomes the difficulties associated with mechanically forming welding wires from intermetallic alloys which possess high strength and limited ductilities at elevated temperatures normally employed in conventional metal working processes. The composition of the clad welding wires is readily tailored so that the welding wire composition when melted will form an alloy defined by the weld deposit which substantially corresponds to the composition of the intermetallic alloy being joined.

  7. Up-and-coming IMCs. [Intermetallic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Randy; Noebe, Ronald

    1989-01-01

    While the good oxidation and environmental resistance, high melting points, and comparatively low densities of such ordered intermetallics as Ti3Al, NiAl, FeAl, and NbAl3 render them good candidates for advanced aerospace structures, their poor toughness at low temperatures and low strength at elevated temperatures have prompted the development of fiber-reinforced intermetallic-matrix composites (IMCs) with more balanced characteristics. Fabrication methods for continuous-fiber IMCs under development include the P/M 'powder cloth' method, the foil/fiber method, and thermal spraying. The ultimate success of IMCs depends on fibers truly compatible with the matrix materials.

  8. Phase transition of intermetallic TbPt at high temperature and high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Fei; Wu, Xiang; Yang, Ke; Qin, Shan

    2018-04-01

    Here we present synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction experiments combined with diamond anvil cell and laser heating techniques on the intermetallic rare earth compound TbPt (Pnma and Z  =  4) up to 32.5 GPa and ~1800 K. The lattice parameters of TbPt exhibit continuous compression behavior up to 18.2 GPa without any evidence of phase transformation. Pressure-volume data were fitted to a third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state with V 0  =  175.5(2) Å3, {{K}{{T0}}}   =  110(5) GPa and K{{T0}}\\prime   =  3.8(7). TbPt exhibits anisotropic compression with β a   >  β b   >  β c and the ratio of axial compressibility is 2.50:1.26:1.00. A new monoclinic phase of TbPt assigned to the Pc or P2/c space group was observed at 32.5 GPa after laser heating at ~1800 K. This new phase is stable at high pressure and presented a quenchable property on decompression to ambient conditions. The pressure-volume relationship is well described by the second-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state, which yields V 0  =  672(4) Å3, {{K}{{T0}}}   =  123(6) GPa, which is about ~14% more compressible than the orthorhombic TbPt. Our results provide more information on the structure and elastic property view, and thus a better understanding of the physical properties related to magnetic structure in some intermetallic rare earth alloys.

  9. Impact resistance and energies of intermetallic bonded diamond composites and polycrystalline diamond compacts and their comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorla, Sai Prasanth

    Chemistry of intermetallic bonded diamond is studied. The impact resistance and energies of intermetallic bonded diamond is compared to current poly crystalline diamond compacts. IBD's are found to have high standards of hardness and have more impact energies absorbed. Intermetallic bonded diamond composite comprises of diamond particles dispersed in Tungsten carbide using Nickel aluminide (Ni3Al) as binder. In previous research conducted on IBD's, diamonds are successfully dispersed in intermetallic alloy of nickel aluminide and processed at 1350°C such that diamond particles remain intact without forming graphite. Composites are formed by milling, pressing the intermetallic binder and diamond particles and sintering at high temperature conditions.

  10. Unique intermetallic compounds prepared by shock wave synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, G.; Reece, O. Y.; Roy, U.

    1971-01-01

    Technique compresses fine ground metallic powder mixture beyond crystal fusion point. Absence of vapor pressure voids and elimination of incongruous effects permit application of technique to large scale fabrication of intermetallic compounds with specific characteristics, e.g., semiconduction, superconduction, or magnetic properties.

  11. Investigation on thixojoining to produce hybrid components with intermetallic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyboldt, Christoph; Liewald, Mathias

    2018-05-01

    Current research activities at the Institute for Metal Forming Technology of the University of Stuttgart are focusing on the manufacturing of hybrid components using semi-solid forming strategies. One process investigated is the joining of different materials in the semi-solid state and is so called "thixojoining". In this process, metallic inlays are inserted into the semi-solid forming die before the actual forming process and are then joined with a material which was heated up to its semi-solid state. Earlier investigations have shown that using this process a very well-shaped form closure can be produced. Furthermore, it was found that sometimes intermetallic phases are built between the different materials, which decisively influence the part properties of such hybrid components for its future application. Within the framework presented in this paper, inlays made of aluminum, brass and steel were joined with aluminum in the semi-solid state. The aim of the investigations was to create an intermetallic bond between the different materials. For this investigations the liquid phase fraction of the aluminum and the temperature of the inlay were varied in order to determine the influence on the formation of the intermetallic phase. Forming trials were performed using a semi-solid forming die with a disk shaped design. Furthermore, the intermetallic phase built was investigated using microsections.

  12. A review of rapid solidification studies of intermetallic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    A review of rapid solidification studies of high-temperature ordered intermetallic compounds is presented. Emphasis is on the nickel - and iron- aluminides which are of potential interest as structural materials. The nickel-base aluminides which have been rapidly solidified exhibit changes in grain size, compositional segregation, and degree of long range order (as reflected in APB size and distribution) which markedly affect mechanical properties. Some experiments indicate the formation of a metastable L1(2) phase in rapidly solidified Fe-(Ni,Mn)-Al-C alloys, while other work observes only a metastable fcc phase in the same composition range. The metastable phases and/or microstructures in both nickel and iron aluminides are destroyed by annealing at temperatures above 750 K, with subsequent degradation of mechanical properties. Rapid solidification studies of several other intermetallic compounds are briefly noted.

  13. Discontinuously reinforced intermetallic matrix composites via XD synthesis. [exothermal dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K. S.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    A review is given of recent results obtained for discontinuously reinforced intermetallic matrix composites produced using the XD process. Intermetallic matrices investigated include NiAl, multiphase NiAl + Ni2AlTi, CoAl, near-gamma titanium aluminides, and Ll2 trialuminides containing minor amounts of second phase. Such mechanical properties as low and high temperature strength, compressive and tensile creep, elastic modulus, ambient ductility, and fracture toughness are discussed as functions of reinforcement size, shape, and volume fraction. Microstructures before and after deformation are examined and correlated with measured properties. An observation of interest in many of the systems examined is 'dispersion weakening' at high temperatures and high strain rates. This behavior is not specific to the XD process; rather similar observations have been reported in other discontinuous composites. Proposed mechanisms for this behavior are presented.

  14. Multi-component intermetallic electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M; Trahey, Lynn; Vaughey, John T

    2015-03-10

    Multi-component intermetallic negative electrodes prepared by electrochemical deposition for non-aqueous lithium cells and batteries are disclosed. More specifically, the invention relates to composite intermetallic electrodes comprising two or more compounds containing metallic or metaloid elements, at least one element of which can react with lithium to form binary, ternary, quaternary or higher order compounds, these compounds being in combination with one or more other metals that are essentially inactive toward lithium and act predominantly, but not necessarily exclusively, to the electronic conductivity of, and as current collection agent for, the electrode. The invention relates more specifically to negative electrode materials that provide an operating potential between 0.05 and 2.0 V vs. metallic lithium.

  15. Factors determining the average atomic volumes in intermetallic compounds.

    PubMed

    Pauling, L

    1987-07-01

    In formation of an intermetallic compound from the elementary metals there is usually a contraction in volume. Electron transfer leading to the charge states M(+) and M(-) with increase in valence and decrease in volume explains the more than 2-fold range in contraction for different compounds in the same binary system. In a more thorough analysis, the better packing of atoms of different sizes also needs to be considered.

  16. Factors determining the average atomic volumes in intermetallic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Pauling, Linus

    1987-01-01

    In formation of an intermetallic compound from the elementary metals there is usually a contraction in volume. Electron transfer leading to the charge states M+ and M- with increase in valence and decrease in volume explains the more than 2-fold range in contraction for different compounds in the same binary system. In a more thorough analysis, the better packing of atoms of different sizes also needs to be considered. PMID:16578809

  17. An intermetallic forming steel under radiation for nuclear applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, C.; Stergar, E.; Maloy, S. A.; Wang, Y. Q.; Hosemann, P.

    2015-03-01

    In this work we investigated the formation and stability of intermetallics formed in a maraging steel PH 13-8 Mo under proton radiation up to 2 dpa utilizing nanoindentation, microcompression testing and atom probe tomography. A comprehensive discussion analyzing the findings utilizing rate theory is introduced, comparing the aging process to radiation induced diffusion. New findings of radiation induced segregation of undersize solute atoms (Si) towards the precipitates are considered.

  18. Melt Spinning of Intermetallic Alloys: Heat Transfer and Microstructure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-21

    newly emerging mdLerials such as titanium aluminides and other intermetallic alloys[4,5]. These materials must possess good mechanical and corrosion...alloys such as titanium aluminides with the surrounding atmosphere, it utilizes a tilting water-cooled copper hearth and the apparatus is in a 5 psi Argon... titanium aluminide in the form of filament or ribbon break olf into short segments. The solidified ribbons have lengths of 5 - 15 mm, widths of 0.5

  19. Intermetallic structures with atomic precision for selective hydrogenation of nitroarenes

    DOE PAGES

    Pei, Yuchen; Qi, Zhiyuan; Goh, Tian Wei; ...

    2017-11-14

    It is essential to bridge the structure-properties relationship of bimetallic catalysts for the rational design of heterogeneous catalysts. Different from random alloys, intermetallic compounds (IMCs) present atomically-ordered structures, which is advantageous for catalytic mechanism studies. Here, we used Pt-based intermetallic nanoparticles (iNPs), individually encapsulated in mesoporous silica shells, as catalysts for the hydrogenation of nitroarenes to functionalized anilines. With the capping-free nature and ordered atomic structure, PtSn iNPs show >99% selectivity to hydrogenate the nitro group of 3-nitrostyrene albeit with a lower activity, in contrast to Pt 3Sn iNPs and Pt NPs. The geometric structure of PtSn iNPs in eliminatingmore » Pt threefold sites hampers the adsorption/dissociation of molecular H 2 and leads to a non-Horiuti-Polanyi hydrogenation pathway, while Pt 3Sn and Pt surfaces are saturated by atomic H. Calculations using density functional theory (DFT) suggest a preferential adsorption of the nitro group on the intermetallic PtSn surface contributing to its high selectivity.« less

  20. Magnetic ordering in intermetallic La1-xTbxMn2Si2 compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotin, Dm. M.; Streltsov, S. V.; Gerasimov, E. G.; Mushnikov, N. V.; Zhidkov, I. S.; Kukharenko, A. I.; Finkelstein, L. D.; Cholakh, S. O.; Kurmaev, E. Z.

    2018-05-01

    The magnetic structures and magnetic phase transitions in intermetallic layered La1-xTbxMn2Si2 compounds (the ThCr2Si2-type structure) are investigated using the first-principles method and XPS measurements. The experimentally observed transition from ferromagnetic (FM) to antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering of Mn sublattice with increase of terbium concentration is successfully reproduced in calculations for collinear magnetic moments model. The FM →AFM change of interplane magnetic ordering at small x is irrelevant to the number of f-electrons of the rare-earth ion. In contrast it was shown to be related to the Mn-Mn in-plane distance. Calculated Tb critical concentration for this transition x ≈ 0.14 corresponds to the Mn-Mn in-plane distance 0.289 nm, very close to the experimentally observed transition distance 0.287 nm. The crystal cell compression due to substitution increases an overlap between Mndxz,yz and the rare-earth ion d orbitals. Resulting hybridized states manifest themselves as an additional peak in the density of states. We suggest that a corresponding interlayer Mn-R-Mn superexchange interaction stabilizes AFM magnetic ordering in these compounds with Tb doping level x > 0.2 . The results of DFT calculations are in agreement with X-ray photoemission spectra for La1-xTbxMn2Si2 .

  1. Magnetic susceptibilities of actinide 3d-metal intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Muniz, R.B.; d'Albuquerque e Castro, J.; Troper, A.

    1988-04-15

    We have numerically calculated the magnetic susceptibilities which appear in the Hartree--Fock instability criterion for actinide 3d transition-metal intermetallic compounds. This calculation is based on a previous tight-binding description of these actinide-based compounds (A. Troper and A. A. Gomes, Phys. Rev. B 34, 6487 (1986)). The parameters of the calculation, which starts from simple tight-binding d and f bands are (i) occupation numbers, (ii) ratio of d-f hybridization to d bandwidth, and (iii) electron-electron Coulomb-type interactions.

  2. Spark plasma sintering of titanium aluminide intermetallics and its composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldoshan, Abdelhakim Ahmed

    Titanium aluminide intermetallics are a distinct class of engineering materials having unique properties over conventional titanium alloys. gamma-TiAl compound possesses competitive physical and mechanical properties at elevated temperature applications compared to Ni-based superalloys. gamma-TiAl composite materials exhibit high melting point, low density, high strength and excellent corrosion resistance. Spark plasma sintering (SPS) is one of the powder metallurgy techniques where powder mixture undergoes simultaneous application of uniaxial pressure and pulsed direct current. Unlike other sintering techniques such as hot iso-static pressing and hot pressing, SPS compacts the materials in shorter time (< 10 min) with a lower temperature and leads to highly dense products. Reactive synthesis of titanium aluminide intermetallics is carried out using SPS. Reactive sintering takes place between liquid aluminum and solid titanium. In this work, reactive sintering through SPS was used to fabricate fully densified gamma-TiAl and titanium aluminide composites starting from elemental powders at different sintering temperatures. It was observed that sintering temperature played significant role in the densification of titanium aluminide composites. gamma-TiAl was the predominate phase at different temperatures. The effect of increasing sintering temperature on microhardness, microstructure, yield strength and wear behavior of titanium aluminide was studied. Addition of graphene nanoplatelets to titanium aluminide matrix resulted in change in microhardness. In Ti-Al-graphene composites, a noticeable decrease in coefficient of friction was observed due to the influence of self-lubrication caused by graphene.

  3. A diffraction based study of the deformation mechanisms in anomalously ductile B2 intermetallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulay, Rupalee Prashant

    For many decades, the brittle nature of most intermetallic compounds (e.g. NiAl) has been the limiting factor in their practical application. Many B2 (CsCl prototypical structure) intermetallics are known to exhibit slip on the <001>{110} slip mode, which provides only 3 independent slip systems and, hence, is unable to satisfy the von Mises (a.k.a. Taylor) criterion for polycrystalline ductility. As a result, inherent polycrystalline ductility is unexpected. Recent discovery of a number of ductile B2 intermetallics has raised questions about possible violation of the von Mises criterion by these alloys. These ductile intermetallic compounds are MR (metal (M) combined with a rare earth metal or group IV refractory metal (R)) alloys and are stoichiometric, ordered compounds. Single crystal slip trace analyses have only identified the presence of <100>{011} or <100>{010} slip systems. More than 100 other B2 MR compounds are known to exist and many of them have already been shown to be ductile (e.g., CuY, AgY, CuDy, CoZr, CoTi, etc.). Furthermore, these alloys exhibit a large Bauschinger effect. The present work uses several diffraction based techniques including electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and in-situ neutron diffraction; in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), mechanical testing, and crystal plasticity modeling, to elucidate the reason for ductility in select B2 alloys, explore the spread of this ductility over the B2 family, and understand the Bauschinger effect in these alloys. Several possible explanations (e.g., slip of <111> dislocations, strong texture, phase transformations and twinning) for the anomalous ductility were explored. An X-ray diffraction based analysis ruled out texture, phase purity and departure from order as explanations for the anomalous ductility in MR alloys. In-situ neutron diffraction and post deformation SEM, EBSD, and TEM were unable to

  4. Competition between magnetism and superconductivity in Eu-based intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavinoha, Macy; Green, Lance; Chan, Julia; Morosan, Emilia

    Eu-based intermetallic compounds present a path to discover new correlated electronic behavior in quantum materials. Reports of superconductivity, intermediate valence behavior, and heavy fermions indicate that Eu-based compounds are promising routes to study the relationship between crystallography and electronic properties. The present work is focused on EuGa4, an antiferromagnet with TN = 16 K isostructural with the tetragonal RT2M2 (R = rare earth, T = transition metal, M = metal or metalloid) family that exhibits heavy fermion behavior and unconventional superconductivity. Single crystals of the doped series (Eu1-xLax)Ga4, (Eu1-xCax)Ga4, and Eu(Ga1-xAlx)4 have been grown using the self-flux method and tested for change in unit cell volume and magnetic susceptibility. Results show that doping with Ca (isoelectronic doping) and La (hole doping) reduce TN to 12.4 K and 2.3 K, respectively, for Ca doping up to x = 0.11 and La doping up to x = 0.74 without an associated change in unit cell volume. The series Eu(Ga1-xAlx)4 has shown incommensurate-to-commensurate magnetic transitions. Future studies will aim to further decrease TN and the unit cell volume using physical pressure and chemical pressure through doping. ICAM, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

  5. Metal- and intermetallic-matrix composites for aerospace propulsion and power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doychak, J.

    1992-01-01

    The requirements for high specific strength refractory materials of prospective military, civil, and space propulsion systems are presently addressed in the context of emerging capabilities in metal- and intermetallic-matrix composites. The candidate systems encompass composite matrix compositions of superalloy, Nb-Zr refractory alloy, Cu-base, and Ti-base alloy types, as well as such intermetallics as TiAl, Ti3Al, NiAl, and MoSi2. The brittleness of intermetallic matrices remains a major consideration, as does their general difficulty of fabrication.

  6. Formation of intermetallics at the interface of explosively welded Ni-Al multilayered composites during annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogneva, T. S.; Lazurenko, D. V.; Bataev, I. A.; Mali, V. I.; Esikov, M. A.; Bataev, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    The Ni-Al multilayer composite was fabricated using explosive welding. The zones of mixing of Ni and Al are observed at the composite interfaces after the welding. The composition of these zones is inhomogeneous. Continuous homogeneous intermetallic layers are formed at the interface after heat treatment at 620 °C during 5 h These intermetallic layers consist of NiAl3 and Ni2Al3 phases. The presence of mixed zones significantly accelerates the growth rate of intermetallic phases at the initial stages of heating.

  7. Electron-Poor Polar Intermetallics: Complex Structures, Novel Clusters, and Intriguing Bonding with Pronounced Electron Delocalization

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Qisheng; Miller, Gordon J.

    Intermetallic compounds represent an extensive pool of candidates for energy related applications stemming from magnetic, electric, optic, caloric, and catalytic properties. The discovery of novel intermetallic compounds can enhance understanding of the chemical principles that govern structural stability and chemical bonding as well as finding new applications. Valence electron-poor polar intermetallics with valence electron concentrations (VECs) between 2.0 and 3.0 e –/atom show a plethora of unprecedented and fascinating structural motifs and bonding features. Furthermore, establishing simple structure-bonding-property relationships is especially challenging for this compound class because commonly accepted valence electron counting rules are inappropriate.

  8. Electron-Poor Polar Intermetallics: Complex Structures, Novel Clusters, and Intriguing Bonding with Pronounced Electron Delocalization

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Qisheng; Miller, Gordon J.

    2017-12-18

    Intermetallic compounds represent an extensive pool of candidates for energy related applications stemming from magnetic, electric, optic, caloric, and catalytic properties. The discovery of novel intermetallic compounds can enhance understanding of the chemical principles that govern structural stability and chemical bonding as well as finding new applications. Valence electron-poor polar intermetallics with valence electron concentrations (VECs) between 2.0 and 3.0 e –/atom show a plethora of unprecedented and fascinating structural motifs and bonding features. Furthermore, establishing simple structure-bonding-property relationships is especially challenging for this compound class because commonly accepted valence electron counting rules are inappropriate.

  9. Electronic Structure of GdCuGe Intermetallic Compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukoyanov, A. V.; Knyazev, Yu. V.; Kuz'min, Yu. I.

    2018-04-01

    The electronic structure of GdCuGe intermetallic compound has been studied. Spin-polarized energy spectrum calculations have been performed by the band method with allowance for strong electron correlations in the 4 f-shell of gadolinium ions. Antiferromagnetic ordering of GdCuGe at low temperatures has been obtained in a theoretical calculation, with the value of the effective magnetic moment of gadolinium ions reproduced in fair agreement with experimental data. The electronic density of states has been analyzed. An optical conductivity spectrum has been calculated for GdCuGe; it reveals specific features that are analogous to the ones discovered previously in the GdCuSi compound with a similar hexagonal structure.

  10. The oxidation of Ni-rich Ni-Al intermetallics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doychak, Joseph; Smialek, James L.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1988-01-01

    The oxidation of Ni-Al intermetallic alloys in the beta-NiAl phase field and in the two phase beta-NiAl/gamma'-Ni3Al phase field has been studied between 1000 and 1400 C. The stoichiometric beta-NiAl alloy doped with Zr was superior to other alloy compositions under cyclic and isothermal oxidation. The isothermal growth rates did not increase monotonically as the alloy Al content was decreased. The characteristically ridged alpha-Al2O3 scale morphology, consisting of cells of thin, textured oxide with thick growth ridges at cell boundaries, forms on oxidized beta-NiAl alloys. The correlation of scale features with isothermal growth rates indicates a predominant grain boundary diffusion growth mechanism. The 1200 C cyclic oxidation resistance decreases near the lower end of the beta-NiAl phase field.

  11. Studies of magnetostriction and spin polarized band structures of rare earth intermetallics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, W. E.

    1979-01-01

    Anisotropic magnetostriction measurements of R6Fe23, R = (Tb, Dy, Ho, and Er) were carried out from 77 K to room temperature. Magnetic fields up to 2.1 Tesla were applied. All the compounds exhibited large magnetostrictions at 77 K, the largest effect being obtained for Tb6Fe23. Saturation magnetostriction values for the compounds were also determined for 77 K and room temperature. Results of the temperature dependence of magnetostriction for Er6Fe23 are in good agreement with Callen and Callen's single ion theory. Therefore, the main sources of magnetostriction in this compound is the Er ion. The spin-up and spin-down electronic energy bands, the density of states and the magnetic moments of YCo5, SmCo5, and GdCo5 were calculated by the spin polarized augmented plane wave technique. The calculations obtained show the origin of the moment, provide good estimates of its magnitude and variation, and the reasons for those variations. They also show the important role of partial charge transfer and of d-d electronic coupling. Calculations for LaNi5 and GdNi5 systems are discussed.

  12. Magnetocaloric effect in textured rare earth intermetallic compound ErNi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar, Aparna; Chelvane, J. Arout; Morozkin, A. V.; Nigam, A. K.; Quezado, S.; Malik, S. K.; Nirmala, R.

    2018-05-01

    Melt-spun ErNi crystallizes in orthorhombic FeB-type structure (Space group Pnma, no. 62) similar to the arc-melted ErNi compound. Room temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments reveal the presence of texture and preferred crystal orientation in the melt-spun ErNi. The XRD data obtained from the free surface of the melt-spun ErNi show large intensity enhancement for (1 0 2) Bragg reflection. The scanning electron microscopy image of the free surface depicts a granular microstructure with grains of ˜1 μm size. The arc-melted and the melt-spun ErNi compounds order ferromagnetically at 11 K and 10 K (TC) respectively. Field dependent magnetization (M-H) at 2 K shows saturation behaviour and the saturation magnetization value is 7.2 μB/f.u. for the arc-melted ErNi and 7.4 μB/f.u. for the melt-spun ErNi. The isothermal magnetic entropy change (ΔSm) close to TC has been calculated from the M-H data. The maximum isothermal magnetic entropy change, -ΔSmmax, is ˜27 Jkg-1K-1 and ˜24 Jkg-1K-1 for the arc-melted and melt-spun ErNi for 50 kOe field change, near TC. The corresponding relative cooling power values are ˜440 J/kg and ˜432 J/kg respectively. Although a part of ΔSm is lost to crystalline electric field (CEF) effects, the magnetocaloric effect is substantially large at 10 K, thus rendering melt-spun ErNi to be useful in low temperature magnetic refrigeration applications such as helium gas liquefaction.

  13. Formation of intermetallic compound coating on magnesium AZ91 cast alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Tianping; Gao, Wei

    2009-08-01

    This study describes an intermetallic compound coating formed on AZ91 Mg cast alloy. The Al sputtered on AZ91 cast alloy reacted with substrate during a short period of heat treatment at 435°C, resulting in the formation of a continuous intermetallic compound layer. The short period treatment has the advantage of minimizing the negative effect on the microstructure of substrate and the mechanical properties, comparing with the reported diffusion coatings. DSC measurement and examination on the cross-section of Al sputtered samples show that local melting occurred along the Al/substrate interface at the temperature range between 430~435°C. The formation mechanism of intermetallic compound coating is proposed in terms of the local melting at Al/substrate interface. The salt water immersion test showed significant improvement in corrosion resistance of the intermetallic compound coated AZ91 cast alloy compared with the as-cast alloys.

  14. 3D study of intermetallics and their effect on the corrosion morphology of rheocast aluminium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mingo, B.; Arrabal, R., E-mail: rarrabal@ucm.es; Pardo, A.

    In the present study, the effect of heat treatment T6.1 on the microstructure and corrosion behaviour of rheocast aluminium alloy A356 is investigated on the basis of 2D/3D characterization techniques and electrochemical and SKPFM measurements. Heat treatment strengthens the α-Al matrix, modifies the intermetallic particles and spheroidizes eutectic Si. These changes do not modify significantly the corrosion behaviour of the alloy. 3D SEM-Tomography clearly shows that the corrosion advances in the shape of narrow paths between closely spaced intermetallics without a major influence of eutectic Si. - Highlights: • T6.1 spheroidizes Si, strengthens the matrix and modifies the intermetallics. •more » Electrochemical behaviour of untreated and heat-treated alloys is similar. • 3D SEM-Tomography provides additional information on the corrosion morphology. • Corrosion advances as paths between intermetallics with little influence of Si.« less

  15. Microstructure and tribological properties of TiCu2Al intermetallic compound coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chun; Zhou, Jiansong; Zhao, Jierong; Wang, Linqian; Yu, Youjun; Chen, Jianmin; Zhou, Huidi

    2011-04-01

    TiCu2Al ternary intermetallic compound coating has been in situ synthesized successfully on pure Ti substrate by laser cladding. Tribological properties of the prepared TiCu2Al intermetallic compound coating were systematically evaluated. It was found that the friction coefficient and wear rate was closely related to the normal load and sliding speed, i.e., the friction coefficient of the prepared TiCu2Al intermetallic compound coating decreased with increasing normal load and sliding speed. The wear rate of the TiCu2Al intermetallic compound coating decreased rapidly with increasing sliding speed, while the wear rate first increased and then decreased at normal load from 5 to 15 N.

  16. Characterization of Impact Initiation of Aluminum-Based Intermetallic-Forming Reactive Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    compressed intermetallic-forming aluminum-based reactive materials upon impact initiation, consisting of equi-volumetric tantalum-aluminum, tungsten-aluminum...18 2.3.4 Dynamic Energy Release Characterization using Pig Test . . . . . . 21 2.3.5 Shock Compression of Reactive Powder Mixtures...is to evaluate the reaction initiation characteristics of quasi-statically compressed intermetallic-forming aluminum-based reactive materials upon

  17. Codeformation processing of mechanically-dissimilar metal/intermetallic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marte, Judson Sloan

    A systematic and scientific approach has been applied to the study of codeformation processing. A series of composites having mechanically-dissimilar phases were developed in which the high temperature flow behavior of the reinforcement material could be varied independent of the matrix. This was accomplished through the use of a series of intermetallic matrix composites (IMCs) as discontinuous reinforcements in an otherwise conventional metal matrix composite. The IMCs are produced using an in-situ reaction synthesis technique, called the XD(TM) process. The temperature of the exothermic synthesis reaction, called the adiabatic temperature, has been calculated and shown to increase with increasing volume percentage of TiB2 reinforcement. Further, this temperature has been shown to effect the size and spacing of the TiB2, microstructural features which are often used in discontinuous composite strength models. Study of the high temperature flow behavior of the components of the metal/IMC composite is critical to the development of an understanding of codeformation. A series of compression tests performed at 1000° to 1200°C and strain-rates of 10-3 and 10-4 sec-1. Peak flow stresses were used to evaluate the influence of material properties and process conditions. These data were incorporated into phenomenologically-based constitutive equations that have been used to predict the flow behavior. It has been determined that plastic deformation of the IMCs occurs readily, and is largely TiB2 independent, at temperatures approaching the melting point of the intermetallic matrices. Ti-6Al-4V/IMC powder blends were extruded at high temperatures to achieve commensurately deformed microstructures. The results of codeformation processing were analyzed in terms of the plastic strain of the IMC particulates. IMC particle deformation was shown to increase with increasing IMC particle size, volume percentage of IMC, extrusion temperature, homologous temperature, extrusion

  18. Synthesis, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of novel intermetallic compounds R2Co2SiC (R = Pr, Nd).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Sixuan; Mishra, Trinath; Wang, Man; Shatruk, Michael; Cao, Huibo; Latturner, Susan E

    2014-06-16

    The intermetallic compounds R2Co2SiC (R = Pr, Nd) were prepared from the reaction of silicon and carbon in either Pr/Co or Nd/Co eutectic flux. These phases crystallize with a new stuffed variant of the W2CoB2 structure type in orthorhombic space group Immm with unit cell parameters a = 3.978(4) Å, b = 6.094(5) Å, c = 8.903(8) Å (Z = 2; R1 = 0.0302) for Nd2Co2SiC. Silicon, cobalt, and carbon atoms form two-dimensional flat sheets, which are separated by puckered layers of rare-earth cations. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate that the rare earth cations in both analogues order ferromagnetically at low temperature (TC ≈ 12 K for Nd2Co2SiC and TC ≈ 20 K for Pr2Co2SiC). Single-crystal neutron diffraction data for Nd2Co2SiC indicate that Nd moments initially align ferromagnetically along the c axis around ∼12 K, but below 11 K, they tilt slightly away from the c axis, in the ac plane. Electronic structure calculations confirm the lack of spin polarization for Co 3d moments.

  19. Ultra-high vacuum compatible preparation chain for intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, A.; Benka, G.; Regnat, A.; Franz, C.; Pfleiderer, C.

    2016-11-01

    We report the development of a versatile material preparation chain for intermetallic compounds, which focuses on the realization of a high-purity growth environment. The preparation chain comprises an argon glovebox, an inductively heated horizontal cold boat furnace, an arc melting furnace, an inductively heated rod casting furnace, an optically heated floating-zone furnace, a resistively heated annealing furnace, and an inductively heated annealing furnace. The cold boat furnace and the arc melting furnace may be loaded from the glovebox by means of a load-lock permitting to synthesize compounds starting with air-sensitive elements while handling the constituents exclusively in an inert gas atmosphere. All furnaces are all-metal sealed, bakeable, and may be pumped to ultra-high vacuum. We find that the latter represents an important prerequisite for handling compounds with high vapor pressure under high-purity argon atmosphere. We illustrate the operational aspects of the preparation chain in terms of the single-crystal growth of the heavy-fermion compound CeNi2Ge2.

  20. Computer simulations of disordering kinetics in irradiated intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Spaczer, M.; Caro, A.; Victoria, M.

    1994-11-01

    Molecular-dynamics computer simulations of collision cascades in intermetallic Cu[sub 3]Au, Ni[sub 3]Al, and NiAl have been performed to study the nature of the disordering processes in the collision cascade. The choice of these systems was suggested by the quite accurate description of the thermodynamic properties obtained using embedded-atom-type potentials. Since melting occurs in the core of the cascades, interesting effects appear as a result of the superposition of the loss (and subsequent recovery) of the crystalline order and the evolution of the chemical order, both processes being developed on different time scales. In our previous simulations on Ni[sub 3]Al andmore » Cu[sub 3]Au [T. Diaz de la Rubia, A. Caro, and M. Spaczer, Phys. Rev. B 47, 11 483 (1993)] we found a significant difference between the time evolution of the chemical short-range order (SRO) and the crystalline order in the cascade core for both alloys, namely the complete loss of the crystalline structure but only partial chemical disordering. Recent computer simulations in NiAl show the same phenomena. To understand these features we study the liquid phase of these three alloys and present simulation results concerning the dynamical melting of small samples, examining the atomic mobility, the relaxation time, and the saturation value of the chemical short-range order. An analytic model for the time evolution of the SRO is given.« less

  1. Structural building principles of complex face-centered cubic intermetallics.

    PubMed

    Dshemuchadse, Julia; Jung, Daniel Y; Steurer, Walter

    2011-08-01

    Fundamental structural building principles are discussed for all 56 known intermetallic phases with approximately 400 or more atoms per unit cell and space-group symmetry F43m, Fd3m, Fd3, Fm3m or Fm3c. Despite fundamental differences in chemical composition, bonding and electronic band structure, their complex crystal structures show striking similarities indicating common building principles. We demonstrate that the structure-determining elements are flat and puckered atomic {110} layers stacked with periodicities 2p. The atoms on this set of layers, which intersect each other, form pentagon face-sharing endohedral fullerene-like clusters arranged in a face-centered cubic packing (f.c.c.). Due to their topological layer structure, all these crystal structures can be described as (p × p × p) = p(3)-fold superstructures of a common basic structure of the double-diamond type. The parameter p, with p = 3, 4, 7 or 11, is determined by the number of layers per repeat unit and the type of cluster packing, which in turn are controlled by chemical composition.

  2. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-01

    ISS040-E-006327 (1 June 2014) --- A portion of International Space Station solar array panels and Earth?s horizon are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the space station.

  3. AA6082 to DX56-Steel Laser Brazing: Process Parameter-Intermetallic Formation Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narsimhachary, D.; Pal, S.; Shariff, S. M.; Padmanabham, G.; Basu, A.

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, laser-brazed AA6082 to DX56-galvanized steel joints were investigated to understand the influence of process parameters on joint strength in terms of intermetallic layer formation. 1.5-mm-thick sheet of aluminum alloy (AA6082-T6) and galvanized steel (DX56) sheet of 0.7 mm thickness were laser-brazed with 1.5-mm-diameter Al-12% Si solid filler wire. During laser brazing, laser power (4.6 kW) and wire feed rate (3.4 m/min) were kept constant with a varying laser scan speed of 3.5, 3, 2.5, 2, 1.5, and 1 m/min. Microstructure of brazed joint reveals epitaxial growth at the aluminum side and intermetallic layer formation at steel interface. Intermetallic layer formation was confirmed by EDS analysis and XRD study. Hardness profile showed hardness drop in filler region, and failure during tensile testing was initiated through the filler region near the steel interface. As per both experimental study and numerical analysis, it was observed that intermetallic layer thickness decreases with increasing brazing speed. Zn vaporization from galvanized steel interface also affected the joint strength. It was found that high laser scan speed or faster cooling rate can be chosen for suppressing intermetallic layer formation or at least decreasing the layer thickness which results in improved mechanical properties.

  4. Intermetallic layers in temperature controlled Friction Stir Welding of dissimilar Al-Cu-joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marstatt, R.; Krutzlinger, M.; Luderschmid, J.; Constanzi, G.; Mueller, J. F. J.; Haider, F.; Zaeh, M. F.

    2018-06-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) can be performed to join dissimilar metal combinations like aluminium and copper, which is of high interest in modern production of electrical applications. The amount of intermetallic phases in the weld seam is significantly reduced compared to traditional fusion welding technologies. Because the solidus temperature is typically not reached during FSW, the growth of intermetallic phases is impeded and the intermetallic layer thicknesses typically remains on the scale of a few hundred nanometres. These layers provide a substance-to-substance bond, which is the main joining mechanism. Latest research confirms that the layer formation is most likely driven by the heat input during processing. Hence, the welding temperature is the key to achieve high quality joints. In this study, aluminium and copper sheets were welded in lap joint configuration using temperature-controlled FSW. An advanced in-tool measurement set-up was used to determine precise temperature data. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to analyse metallurgical aspects (e.g. structure and composition of the intermetallic phases) of the joints. The results show a correlation between the welding temperature and the thickness of the intermetallic layer and its structure. The temperature control significantly improved the correlation compared to previous studies. This leads to an enhanced understanding of the dominating joining mechanisms.

  5. Microstructure and tribological properties of TiAg intermetallic compound coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chun; Chen, Jianmin; Zhou, Jiansong; Zhao, Jierong; Wang, Linqian; Yu, Youjun; Zhou, Huidi

    2011-10-01

    TiAg intermetallic compound coating has been in situ synthesized successfully on pure Ti substrate by laser cladding using Ag powder as the precursor. It has been found that the prepared coating mainly comprised TiAg and Ti phases. The high resolution transmission electron microscopy results further conform the existence of TiAg intermetallic compound in the prepared coating. The magnified high resolution transmission electron microscopy images shown that the laser cladding coating contains TiAg nanocrystalline with the size of about 4 nm. Tribological properties of the prepared TiAg intermetallic compound coating were systematically evaluated. It was found that the friction coefficient and wear rate was closely related to the normal load and sliding speed, i.e., the friction coefficient of the prepared TiAg intermetallic compound coating decreased with increasing normal load and sliding speed. The wear rate of the TiAg intermetallic compound coating decreased rapidly with increasing sliding speed, while the wear rate increased as the normal load increased.

  6. Modeling of Substitutional Site Preference in Ordered Intermetallic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Noebe, Ronald D.; Honecy, Frank

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the site substitution scheme of specific alloying elements in ordered compounds and the dependence of site occupancy on compound stoichiometry, alloy concentration. This basic knowledge, and the interactions with other alloying additions are necessary in order to predict and understand the effect of various alloying schemes on the physical properties of a material, its response to various temperature treatments, and the resulting mechanical properties. Many theoretical methods can provide useful but limited insight in this area, since most techniques suffer from constraints in the type of elements and the crystallographic structures that can be modeled. With this in mind, the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method for alloys was designed to overcome these limitations, with the intent of providing an useful tool for the theoretical prediction of fundamental properties and structure of complex systems. After a brief description of the BFS method, its use for the determination of site substitution schemes for individual as well as collective alloying additions to intermetallic systems is described, including results for the concentration dependence of the lattice parameter. Focusing on B2 NiAl, FeAl and CoAl alloys, the energetics of Si, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zr, Nb, Mo, Ru, Hf, Ta and W alloying additions are surveyed. The effect of single additions as well as the result of two simultaneous additions, discussing the interaction between additions and their influence on site preference schemes is considered. Finally, the BFS analysis is extended to ternary L1(sub 2) (Heusler phase) alloys. A comparison between experimental and theoretical results for the limited number of cases for which experimental data is available is also included.

  7. Polar Intermetallics Pr 5Co 2Ge 3 and Pr 7Co 2Ge 4 With Planar Hydrocarbon-Like Metal Clusters

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Qisheng; Aguirre, Kaiser; Saunders, Scott M.; ...

    2017-06-19

    Planar hydrocarbon-like metal clusters may foster new insights linking organic molecules with conjugated π-π bonding interactions and inorganic structures in terms of their bonding characteristics. However, such clusters are uncommon in polar intermetallics. Herein, we report two polar intermetallic phases, Pr 5Co 2Ge 3 and Pr 7Co 2Ge 4, both of which feature such planar metal clusters, viz., ethylene-like [Co 2Ge 4] clusters plus the concatenated forms and polyacene-like [Co 2Ge 2] n ribbons in Pr 5Co 2Ge 3, and 1,2,4,5-tetramethylbenzene-like [Co4Ge6] cluster in Pr 7Co 2Ge 4. Just as in the related planar organic structures, these metal-metalloid species aremore » dominated by covalent bonding interactions. Both compounds magnetically order at low temperature with net ferromagnetic components: Pr 5Co 2Ge 3 via a series of transitions below 150 K; and Pr 7Co 2Ge 4 via a single ferromagnetic transition at 19 K. Spin-polarized electronic structure calculations for Pr 7Co 2Ge 4 reveal strong spin-orbit coupling within Pr and considerable magnetic contributions from Co atoms. This work suggests that similar structural chemistry can emerge for other rare earth-late transition metal-main group systems.« less

  8. Intermetallic negative electrodes for non-aqueous lithium cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Vaughey, John T.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Fransson, Linda M.; Edstrom, Ester Kristina; Henriksen, Gary

    2004-05-04

    A method of operating an electrochemical cell is disclosed. The cell has an intermetallic negative electrode of Cu.sub.6-x M.sub.x Sn.sub.5, wherein x is .ltoreq.3 and M is one or more metals including Si and a positive electrode containing Li in which Li is shuttled between the positive electrode and the negative electrode during charge and discharge to form a lithiated intermetallic negative electrode during charge. The voltage of the electrochemical cell is controlled during the charge portion of the charge-discharge cycles so that the potential of the lithiated intermetallic negative electrode in the fully charged electrochemical cell is less than 0.2 V but greater than 0 V versus metallic lithium.

  9. Effect of intermetallic phases on the anodic oxidation and corrosion of 5A06 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Song-mei; Li, Ying-dong; Zhang, You; Liu, Jian-hua; Yu, Mei

    2015-02-01

    Intermetallic phases were found to influence the anodic oxidation and corrosion behavior of 5A06 aluminum alloy. Scattered intermetallic particles were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) after pretreatment. The anodic film was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and its corrosion resistance was analyzed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Tafel polarization in NaCl solution. The results show that the size of Al-Fe-Mg-Mn particles gradually decreases with the iron content. During anodizing, these intermetallic particles are gradually dissolved, leading to the complex porosity in the anodic film beneath the particles. After anodizing, the residual particles are mainly silicon-containing phases, which are embedded in the anodic film. Electrochemical measurements indicate that the porous anodic film layer is easily penetrated, and the barrier plays a dominant role in the overall protection. Meanwhile, self-healing behavior is observed during the long immersion time.

  10. Microstructure and Tribological Properties of Mo-40Ni-13Si Multiphase Intermetallic Alloy.

    PubMed

    Song, Chunyan; Wang, Shuhuan; Gui, Yongliang; Cheng, Zihao; Ni, Guolong

    2016-12-06

    Intermetallic compounds are increasingly being expected to be utilized in tribological environments, but to date their implementation is hindered by insufficient ductility at low and medium temperatures. This paper presents a novel multiphase intermetallic alloy with the chemical composition of Mo-40Ni-13Si (at %). Microstructure characterization reveals that a certain amount of ductile Mo phases formed during the solidification process of a ternary Mo-Ni-Si molten alloy, which is beneficial to the improvement of ductility of intermetallic alloys. Tribological properties of the designed alloy-including wear resistance, friction coefficient, and metallic tribological compatibility-were evaluated under dry sliding wear test conditions at room temperature. Results suggest that the multiphase alloy possesses an excellent tribological property, which is attributed to unique microstructural features and thereby a good combination in hardness and ductility. The corresponding wear mechanism is explained by observing the worn surface, subsurface, and wear debris of the alloy, which was found to be soft abrasive wear.

  11. Method of treating intermetallic alloy hydrogenation/oxidation catalysts for improved impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration and increased activity

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Randy B.

    1992-01-01

    Alternate, successive high temperature oxidation and reduction treatments, in either order, of intermetallic alloy hydrogenation and intermetallic alloy oxidation catalysts unexpectedly improves the impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration capacity and/or activity of the catalysts. The particular alloy, and the final high temperature treatment given alloy (oxidation or reduction) will be chosen to correspond to the function of the catalyst (oxidation or hydrogenation).

  12. Massive spalling of intermetallic compounds in solder-substrate reactions due to limited supply of the active element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. C.; Ho, C. E.; Chang, C. W.; Kao, C. R.

    2007-04-01

    Massive spalling of intermetallic compounds has been reported in the literature for several solder/substrate systems, including SnAgCu soldered on Ni substrate, SnZn on Cu, high-Pb PbSn on Cu, and high-Pb PbSn on Ni. In this work, a unified thermodynamic argument is proposed to explain this rather unusual phenomenon. According to this argument, two necessary conditions must be met. The number one condition is that at least one of the reactive constituents of the solder must be present in a limited amount, and the second condition is that the soldering reaction has to be very sensitive to its concentration. With the growth of intermetallic, more and more atoms of this constituent are extracted out of the solder and incorporated into the intermetallic. As the concentration of this constituent decreases, the original intermetallic at the interface becomes a nonequilibrium phase, and the spalling of the original intermetallic occurs.

  13. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Colleen

    1998-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-sponsored project for teachers of grades 5-12, designed to: (1) enhance understanding of the Earth as an integrated system; (2) enhance the interdisciplinary approach to science instruction; and (3) provide classroom materials that focus on those goals. Discover Earth is conducted by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies in collaboration with Dr. Eric Barron, Director, Earth System Science Center, The Pennsylvania State University; and Dr. Robert Hudson, Chair, the Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland at College Park. The enclosed materials: (1) represent only part of the Discover Earth materials; (2) were developed by classroom teachers who are participating in the Discover Earth project; (3) utilize an investigative approach and on-line data; and (4) can be effectively adjusted to classrooms with greater/without technology access. The Discover Earth classroom materials focus on the Earth system and key issues of global climate change including topics such as the greenhouse effect, clouds and Earth's radiation balance, surface hydrology and land cover, and volcanoes and climate change. All the materials developed to date are available on line at (http://www.strategies.org) You are encouraged to submit comments and recommendations about these materials to the Discover Earth project manager, contact information is listed below. You are welcome to duplicate all these materials.

  14. A Self-Propagating Foaming Process of Porous Al-Ni Intermetallics Assisted by Combustion Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Kobashi, Makoto; Kanetake, Naoyuki

    2009-01-01

    The self-propagating foaming process of porous Al-Ni intermetallics was investigated. Aluminum and nickel powders were blended, and titanium and boron carbide powders were added as reactive exothermic agents. The blended powder was extruded to make a rod-shape precursor. Only one end of the rod precursor was heated to ignite the reaction. The reaction propagated spontaneously throughout the precursor. Pore formation took place at the same time as the reaction occurred. Adding the exothermic agent was effective to increase the porosity. Preheating the precursor before the ignition was also very effective to produce porous Al-Ni intermetallics with high porosity.

  15. Large positive magnetoresistance in intermetallic compound NdCo2Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Chowdhury, R.; Dhara, S.; Das, I.; Bandyopadhyay, B.; Rawat, R.

    2018-04-01

    The magnetic, magneto-transport and magnetocaloric properties of antiferromagnetic intermetallic compound NdCo2Si2 (TN = 32K) have been studied. The compound yields a positive magnetoresistance (MR) of about ∼ 123 % at ∼ 5K in 8 T magnetic field. The MR value is significantly large vis - a - vis earlier reports of large MR in intermetallic compounds, and possibly associated with the changes in magnetic structure of the compound. The large MR value can be explained in terms of field induced pseudo-gaps on Fermi surface.

  16. Metal- and intermetallic-matrix composites for aerospace propulsion and power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doychak, J.

    1992-06-01

    Successful development and deployment of metal-matrix composites and intermetallic- matrix composites are critical to reaching the goals of many advanced aerospace propulsion and power development programs. The material requirements are based on the aerospace propulsion and power system requirements, economics, and other factors. Advanced military and civilian aircraft engines will require higher specific strength materials that operate at higher temperatures, and the civilian engines will also require long lifetimes. The specific space propulsion and power applications require hightemperature, high-thermal-conductivity, and high-strength materials. Metal-matrix composites and intermetallic-matrix composites either fulfill or have the potential of fulfilling these requirements.

  17. TEM study of the martensitic phases in the ductile DyCu and YCu intermetallic compounds [The martensitic phase transformation in ductile DyCu and YCu intermetallic compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Cao, G. H.; Oertel, C. -G.; Schaarschuch, R.; ...

    2017-05-03

    DyCu and YCu are representatives of the family of CsCl-type B2 rare earth intermetallic compounds that exhibit high room temperature ductility. Structure, orientation relationship, and morphology of the martensites in the equiatomic compounds DyCu and YCu are examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM studies show that the martensite structures in DyCu and YCu alloys are virtually identical. The martensite is of orthorhombic CrB-type B33 structure with lattice parameters a = 0.38 nm, b = 1.22 nm, and c = 0.40 nm. (021¯) twins were observed in the B33 DyCu and YCu martensites. The orientation relationship of B33 and B2more » phases is (111¯)[112]B33 || (110)[001]B2. The simulated electron diffraction patterns of the B33 phase are consistent with those of experimental observations. TEM investigations also reveal that a dominant orthorhombic FeB-type B27 martensite with lattice parameters a = 0.71 nm, b = 0.45 nm, and c = 0.54 nm exists in YCu alloy. (11¯ 1) twins were observed in the B27 YCu martensite. As a result, the formation mechanism of B2 to B33 and B2 to B27 phase transformation is discussed.« less

  18. Surface integrity on grinding of gamma titanium aluminide intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtagian, Gregorio Roberto

    Gamma-TiAl is an ordered intermetallic compound characterized by high strength to density ratio, good oxidation resistance, and good creep properties at elevated temperatures. However, it is intrinsically brittle at room temperature. This thesis investigates the potential for the use of grinding to process TiAl into useful shapes. Grinding is far from completely understood, and many aspects of the individual mechanical interactions of the abrasive grit with the material and their effect on surface integrity are unknown. The development of new synthetic diamond superabrasives in which shape and size can be controlled raises the question of the influence of those variables on the surface integrity. The goal of this work is to better understand the fundamentals of the abrasive grit/material interaction in grinding operations. Experimental, analytical, and numerical work was done to characterize and predict the resultant deformation and surface integrity on ground lamellar gamma-TiAl. Grinding tests were carried out, by analyzing the effects of grit size and shape, workpiece speed, wheel depth of cut, and wear on the subsurface plastic deformation depth (PDD). A practical method to assess the PDD is introduced based on the measurement of the lateral material flow by 3D non-contact surface profilometry. This method combines the quantitative capabilities of the microhardness measurement with the sensitivity of Nomarski microscopy. The scope and limitations of this technique are analyzed. Mechanical properties were obtained by quasi-static and split Hopkinson bar compression tests. Residual stress plots were obtained by x-ray, and surface roughness and cracking were evaluated. The abrasive grit/material interaction was accounted by modeling the force per abrasive grit for different grinding conditions, and studying its correlation to the PDD. Numerical models of this interaction were used to analyze boundary conditions, and abrasive size effects on the PDD. An explicit 2D

  19. Intermetallic Strengthened Alumina-Forming Austenitic Steels for Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Bin; Baker, Ian

    2016-03-31

    In order to achieve energy conversion efficiencies of >50 % for steam turbines/boilers in power generation systems, the materials required must be strong, corrosion-resistant at high temperatures (>700°C), and economically viable. Austenitic steels strengthened with Laves phase and L1 2 precipitates, and alloyed with aluminum to improve oxidation resistance, are potential candidate materials for these applications. The creep resistance of these alloys is significantly improved through intermetallic strengthening (Laves-Fe 2Nb + L1 2-Ni 3Al precipitates) without harmful effects on oxidation resistance. Microstructural and microchemical analyses of the recently developed alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) steels (Fe-14Cr-32Ni-3Nb-3Al-2Ti-based) indicated they are strengthened by Nimore » 3Al(Ti) L1 2, NiAl B 2, Fe 2Nb Laves phase and MC carbide precipitates. Different thermomechanical treatments (TMTs) were performed on these stainless steels in an attempt to further improve their mechanical properties. The thermo-mechanical processing produced nanocrystalline grains in AFA alloys and dramatically increased their yield strength at room temperature. Unfortunately, the TMTs didn’t increase the yield strengths of AFA alloys at ≥700ºC. At these temperatures, dislocation climb is the dominant mechanism for deformation of TMT alloys according to strain rate jump tests. After the characterization of aged AFA alloys, we found that the largest strengthening effect from L1 2 precipitates can be obtained by aging for less than 24 h. The coarsening behavior of the L1 2 precipitates was not influenced by carbon and boron additions. Failure analysis and post-mortem TEM analysis were performed to study the creep failure mechanisms of these AFA steels after creep tests. Though the Laves and B2-NiAl phase precipitated along the boundaries can improve the creep properties, cracks were still initiated and propagated along the boundaries, which suggests that the boundaries are

  20. Rare earth elements and permanent magnets (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dent, Peter C.

    2012-04-01

    Rare earth (RE) magnets have become virtually indispensible in a wide variety of industries such as aerospace, automotive, electronics, medical, and military. RE elements are essential ingredients in these high performance magnets based on intermetallic compounds RECo5, RE2TM17 (TM: transition metal), and RE2TM14B. Rare earth magnets are known for their superior magnetic properties—high induction, and coercive force. These properties arise due to the extremely high magnetocrystalline anisotropy made possible by unique 3d-4f interactions between transition metals and rare earths. For more than 40 years, these magnets remain the number one choice in applications that require high magnetic fields in extreme operating conditions—high demagnetization forces and high temperature. EEC produces and specializes in RECo5 and RE2TM17 type sintered magnets. Samarium and gadolinium are key RE ingredients in the powder metallurgical magnet production processes which include melting, crushing, jet milling, pressing, sintering, and heat treating. The magnetic properties and applications of these magnets will be discussed. We will also briefly discuss the past, current, and future of the permanent magnet business. Currently, over 95% of all pure rare earth oxides are sourced from China, which currently controls the market. We will provide insights regarding current and potential new magnet technologies and designer choices, which may mitigate rare earth supply chain issues now and into the future.

  1. Earth Wisdom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Matre, Steve

    1985-01-01

    In our human-centered ignorance and arrogance we are rapidly destroying the earth. We must start helping people understand the big picture of ecological concepts. What these concepts mean for our own lives and how we must begin to change our lifestyles in order to live more harmoniously with the earth. (JHZ)

  2. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1976-01-01

    The LAGEOS I (Laser Geodynamics Satellite) was developed and launched by the Marshall Space Flight Center on May 4, 1976 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California . The two-foot diameter satellite orbited the Earth from pole to pole and measured the movements of the Earth's surface.

  3. Properties of TiNi intermetallic compound industrially produced by combustion synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kaieda, Yoshinari

    Most TiNi shape memory intermetallic compounds are conventionally produced by the process including high frequency induction vacuum melting and casting. A gravity segregation occurs in a cast TiNi ingot because of the big difference in the specific gravity between Ti and Ni. It is difficult to control accurately the phase transformation temperature of TiNi shape memory intermetallic compound produced by the conventional process, because the martensitic transformation temperature shifts by 10K due to the change in 0.1 % of Ni content. Homogeneous TiNi intermetallic compound is produced by the industrial process including combustion synthesis method, which is a newly developedmore » manufacturing process. In the new process, phase transformation temperatures of TiNi can be controlled accurately by controlling the ratio of Ti and Ni elemental starting powders. The chemical component, the impurities and the phase transformation temperatures of the TiNi products industrially produced by the process are revealed. These properties are vitally important when combustion synthesis method is applied to an industrial mass production process for producing TiNi shape memory intermetallic compounds. TiNi shape memory products are industrially and commercially produced today the industrial process including combustion synthesis. The total production weight in a year is 30 tins in 1994.« less

  4. The role of zinc on the chemistry of complex intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Weiwei

    2014-01-01

    Combining experiments and electronic structure theory provides the framework to design and discover new families of complex intermetallic phases and to understand factors that stabilize both new and known phases. Using solid state synthesis and multiple structural determinations, ferromagnetic β-Mn type Co 8+xZn 12–x was analyzed for their crystal and electronic structures.

  5. Preparation of Ti3Al intermetallic compound by spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Tsutomu; Fukui, Takahiro

    2018-04-01

    Sintered compacts of single phase Ti3Al intermetallic compound, which have excellent potential as refractory materials, were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS). A raw powder of Ti3Al intermetallic compound with an average powder diameter of 176 ± 56 μm was used in this study; this large powder diameter is disadvantageous for sintering because of the small surface area. The samples were prepared at sintering temperatures (Ts) of 1088, 1203, and 1323 K, sintering stresses (σs) of 16, 32, and 48 MPa, and a sintering time (ts) of 10 min. The calculated relative densities based on the apparent density of Ti3Al provided by the supplier were approximately 100% under all sintering conditions. From the experimental results, it was evident that SPS is an effective technique for dense sintering of Ti3Al intermetallic compounds in a short time interval. In this report, the sintering characteristics of Ti3Al intermetallic compacts are briefly discussed and compared with those of pure titanium compacts.

  6. X-Ray Diffraction of Intermetallic Compounds: A Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varberg, Thomas D.; Skakuj, Kacper

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe an experiment for the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory in which students synthesize the intermetallic compounds AlNi and AlNi3 and study them by X-ray diffractometry. The compounds are synthesized in a simple one-step reaction occurring in the solid state. Powder X-ray diffractograms are recorded for the two compounds…

  7. Investigation of Laser Generation and Detection of Ultrasound in Ceramic Matrix Composites and Intermetallics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrlich, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this program is to assess the feasibility of using laser based ultrasonic techniques for inspecting and characterizing materials of interest to NASA, specifically those used in propulsion and turbomachinery applications, such as ceramic composites, metal matrix composites, and intermetallics.

  8. Ni.sub.3 Al-based intermetallic alloys having improved strength above 850.degree. C.

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chain T.

    2000-01-01

    Intermetallic alloys composed essentially of: 15.5% to 17.0% Al, 3.5% to 5.5% Mo, 4% to 8% Cr, 0.04% to 0.2% Zr, 0.04% to 1.5% B, balance Ni, are characterized by melting points above 1200.degree. C. and superior strengths at temperatures above 1000.degree. C.

  9. The chemical phenol extraction of intermetallic particles from casting AlSi5Cu1Mg alloy.

    PubMed

    Mrówka-Nowotnik, G; Sieniawski, J; Nowotnik, A

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a chemical extraction technique for determination of intermetallic phases formed in the casting AlSi5Cu1Mg aluminium alloy. Commercial aluminium alloys contain a wide range of intermetallic particles that are formed during casting, homogenization and thermomechanical processing. During solidification, particles of intermetallics are dispersed in interdendritic spaces as fine primary phases. Coarse intermetallic compounds that are formed in this aluminium alloy are characterized by unique atomic arrangement (crystallographic structure), morphology, stability, physical and mechanical properties. The volume fraction, chemistry and morphology of the intermetallics significantly affect properties and material behaviour during thermomechanical processing. Therefore, accurate determination of intermetallics is essential to understand and control microstructural evolution in Al alloys. Thus, in this paper it is shown that chemical phenol extraction method can be applied for precise qualitative evaluation. The results of optical light microscopy LOM, scanning electron microscopy SEM and X-ray diffraction XRD analysis reveal that as-cast AlSi5Cu1Mg alloy contains a wide range of intermetallic phases such as Al(4)Fe, gamma- Al(3)FeSi, alpha-Al(8)Fe(2)Si, beta-Al(5)FeSi, Al(12)FeMnSi.

  10. Micromechanisms of intergranular brittle ftacture in intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitek, V.

    1991-06-01

    Grain boundaries in intermetallic compounds such as Ni3A1 are inherently brittle. The reason is usually sought in grain boundary cohesion but in metals even brittle fracture is accompanied by some local plasticity and thus not only cohesion but also dislocation mobility in the boundary region need to be studied. We first discuss here the role of an irreversible shear deformation at the crack tip during microcrack propagation assuming that these two processes are concomitant. It is shown that a pre-existing crack cannot propagate in a brittle manner once the dislocation emission occurs. However, if a microcrack nucleates during loading it can propagate concurrently with the development of the irreversible shear deformation at the crack tip. The latter is then the major energy dissipating process. In the second part of this paper we present results of atomistic studies of grain boundaries in Ni3A1 and CU3Au which suggest that substantial structural differences exist between strongly and weakly ordered L12 alloys. We discuss then the consequence of these differences for intergranular brittleness in the framework of the above model for microcrack propagation. On this basis we propose an explanation for the intrinsic intergranular brittleness in some L12 alloys and relate it directly to the strength of ordering. Les joints de grains dans les composés intermétalliques de type Ni3AI sont de nature fragile. L'origine de cette fragilité est habituellement dans la cohésion des joints de grains. Dans les métaux, cependant, même la rupture fragile est accompagnée d'une certaine déformation plastique locale, de telle sorte que non seulement la cohésion mais aussi la mobilité des dislocations près des joints doit être étudiée. Nous discutons d'abord le rôle d'une déformation en cisaillement irréversible en tête de fissure pendant la propagation de cette fissure, en supposant que les deux processus sont concomitants. Nous montrons qu'une fissure préexistante ne

  11. The μ3 model of acids and bases: extending the Lewis theory to intermetallics.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Timothy E; Fredrickson, Daniel C

    2012-04-02

    A central challenge in the design of new metallic materials is the elucidation of the chemical factors underlying the structures of intermetallic compounds. Analogies to molecular bonding phenomena, such as the Zintl concept, have proven very productive in approaching this goal. In this Article, we extend a foundational concept of molecular chemistry to intermetallics: the Lewis theory of acids and bases. The connection is developed through the method of moments, as applied to DFT-calibrated Hückel calculations. We begin by illustrating that the third and fourth moments (μ(3) and μ(4)) of the electronic density of states (DOS) distribution tune the properties of a pseudogap. μ(3) controls the balance of states above and below the DOS minimum, with μ(4) then determining the minimum's depth. In this way, μ(3) predicts an ideal occupancy for the DOS distribution. The μ(3)-ideal electron count is used to forge a link between the reactivity of transition metals toward intermetallic phase formation, and that of Lewis acids and bases toward adduct formation. This is accomplished through a moments-based definition of acidity which classifies systems that are electron-poor relative to the μ(3)-ideal as μ(3)-acidic, and those that are electron-rich as μ(3)-basic. The reaction of μ(3) acids and bases, whether in the formation of a Lewis acid/base adduct or an intermetallic phase, tends to neutralize the μ(3) acidity or basicity of the reactants. This μ(3)-neutralization is traced to the influence of electronegativity differences at heteroatomic contacts on the projected DOS curves of the atoms involved. The role of μ(3)-acid/base interactions in intermetallic phases is demonstrated through the examination of 23 binary phases forming between 3d metals, the stability range of the CsCl type, and structural trends within the Ti-Ni system.

  12. Smart Solution Chemistry to Sn-Containing Intermetallic Compounds through a Self-Disproportionation Process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuelan; Li, Liping; Li, Qi; Fan, Jianming; Zheng, Jing; Li, Guangshe

    2016-09-26

    Developing new methods to synthesize intermetallics is one of the most critical issues for the discovery and application of multifunctional metal materials; however, the synthesis of Sn-containing intermetallics is challenging. In this work, we demonstrated for the first time that a self-disproportionation-induced in situ process produces cavernous Sn-Cu intermetallics (Cu3 Sn and Cu6 Sn5 ). The successful synthesis is realized by introducing inorganic metal salts (SnCl2 ⋅2 H2 O) to NaOH aqueous solution to form an intermediate product of reductant (Na2 SnO2 ) and by employing steam pressures that enhance the reduction ability. Distinct from the traditional in situ reduction, the current reduction process avoided the uncontrolled phase composition and excessive use of organic regents. An insight into the mechanism was revealed for the Sn-Cu case. Moreover, this method could be extended to other Sn-containing materials (Sn-Co, Sn-Ni). All these intermetallics were attempted in the catalytic effect on thermal decompositions of ammonium perchlorate. It is demonstrated that Cu3 Sn showed an outstanding catalytic performance. The superior property might be primarily originated from the intrinsic chemical compositions and cavernous morphology as well. We supposed that this smart solution reduction methodology reported here would provide a new recognition for the reduction reaction, and its modified strategy may be applied to the synthesis of other metals, intermetallics as well as some unknown materials. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-20

    Panelists pose for a group photo at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and highlighted how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  14. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-20

    Earth observation taken during day pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message: Looking southwest over northern Africa. Libya, Algeria, Niger.

  15. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-01

    Earth Observation taken during a night pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: New Zealand Aurora night pass. On crewmember's Flickr page - Look straight down into an aurora.

  16. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-07

    ISS040-E-008174 (7 June 2014) --- Layers of Earth's atmosphere, brightly colored as the sun rises, are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the International Space Station.

  17. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-02

    ISS040-E-006817 (2 June 2014) --- Intersecting the thin line of Earth's atmosphere, International Space Station solar array wings are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the International Space Station.

  18. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-07-18

    Workers at Launch Complex 17 Pad A, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) encapsulate the Geomagnetic Tail (GEOTAIL) spacecraft (upper) and attached payload Assist Module-D upper stage (lower) in the protective payload fairing. GEOTAIL project was designed to study the effects of Earth's magnetic field. The solar wind draws the Earth's magnetic field into a long tail on the night side of the Earth and stores energy in the stretched field lines of the magnetotail. During active periods, the tail couples with the near-Earth magnetosphere, sometimes releasing energy stored in the tail and activating auroras in the polar ionosphere. GEOTAIL measures the flow of energy and its transformation in the magnetotail and will help clarify the mechanisms that control the imput, transport, storage, release, and conversion of mass, momentum, and energy in the magnetotail.

  19. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-funded project for teachers of grades 5-12 who want to expand their knowledge of the Earth system, and prepare to become master teachers who promote Earth system science in their own schools, counties, and throughout their state. Participants from the following states are invited to apply: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington, DC. Teachers selected for the project participate in a two-week summer workshop conducted at the University of Maryland, College Park; develop classroom-ready materials during the workshop for broad dissemination; conduct a minimum of two peer training activities during the coming school year; and participate in other enrichment/education opportunities as available and desired. Discover Earth is a team effort that utilizes expertise from a range of contributors, and balances science content with hands-on classroom applications.

  20. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-31

    Earth Observation taken during a day pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: CEO - Arena de Sao Paolo. View used for Twitter message: Cloudy skies over São Paulo Brazil

  1. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-26

    Earth observation taken during day pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message: Never tire of finding shapes in the clouds! These look very botanical to me. Simply perfect.

  2. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-12

    Earth Observation taken during a day pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: Moon, Japan, Kamchatka with a wild cloud. Part of a solar array is also visible.

  3. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1990-10-24

    Solar Vector Magnetograph is used to predict solar flares, and other activities associated with sun spots. This research provides new understanding about weather on the Earth, and solar-related conditions in orbit.

  4. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-03

    Earth observation taken during day pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message: Perhaps a dandelion losing its seeds in the wind? Love clouds!

  5. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-27

    Earth Observation taken during a day pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Part of Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) is visible. Folder lists this as: the Middle East, Israel.

  6. Earth Observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-06-16

    ISS024-E-006136 (16 June 2010) --- Polar mesospheric clouds, illuminated by an orbital sunrise, are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 24 crew member on the International Space Station. Polar mesospheric, or noctilucent (?night shining?), clouds are observed from both Earth?s surface and in orbit by crew members aboard the space station. They are called night-shining clouds as they are usually seen at twilight. Following the setting of the sun below the horizon and darkening of Earth?s surface, these high clouds are still briefly illuminated by sunlight. Occasionally the ISS orbital track becomes nearly parallel to Earth?s day/night terminator for a time, allowing polar mesospheric clouds to be visible to the crew at times other than the usual twilight due to the space station altitude. This unusual photograph shows polar mesospheric clouds illuminated by the rising, rather than setting, sun at center right. Low clouds on the horizon appear yellow and orange, while higher clouds and aerosols are illuminated a brilliant white. Polar mesospheric clouds appear as light blue ribbons extending across the top of the image. These clouds typically occur at high latitudes of both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, and at fairly high altitudes of 76?85 kilometers (near the boundary between the mesosphere and thermosphere atmospheric layers). The ISS was located over the Greek island of Kos in the Aegean Sea (near the southwestern coastline of Turkey) when the image was taken at approximately midnight local time. The orbital complex was tracking northeastward, nearly parallel to the terminator, making it possible to observe an apparent ?sunrise? located almost due north. A similar unusual alignment of the ISS orbit track, terminator position, and seasonal position of Earth?s orbit around the sun allowed for striking imagery of polar mesospheric clouds over the Southern Hemisphere earlier this year.

  7. Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  8. Electron density determination and bonding in tetragonal binary intermetallics by convergent beam electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Xiahan

    Intermetallics offer unique property combinations often superior to those of more conventional solid solution alloys of identical composition. Understanding of bonding in intermetallics would greatly accelerate development of intermetallics for advanced and high performance engineering applications. Tetragonal intermetallics L10 ordered TiAl, FePd and FePt are used as model systems to experimentally measure their electron densities using quantitative convergent beam electron diffraction (QCBED) method and then compare details of the 3d-4d (FePd) and 3d-5d (FePt) electron interactions to elucidate their role on properties of the respective ferromagnetic L10-ordered intermetallics FePd and FePt. A new multi-beam off-zone axis condition QCBED method has been developed to increase sensitivity of CBED patterns to change of structure factors and the anisotropic Debye-Waller (DW) factors. Unprecedented accuracy and precision in structure and DW factor measurements has been achieved by acquiring CBED patterns using beam-sample geometry that ensures strong dynamical interaction between the fast electrons and the periodic potential in the crystalline samples. This experimental method has been successfully applied to diamond cubic Si, and chemically ordered B2 cubic NiAl, tetragonal L10 ordered TiAl and FePd. The accurate and precise experimental DW and structure factors for L10 TiAl and FePd allow direct evaluation of computer calculations using the current state of the art density functional theory (DFT) based electron structure modeling. The experimental electron density difference map of L1 0 TiAl shows that the DFT calculations describe bonding to a sufficient accuracy for s- and p- electrons interaction, e. g., the Al-layer. However, it indicate significant quantitative differences to the experimental measurements for the 3d-3d interactions of the Ti atoms, e.g. in the Ti layers. The DFT calculations for L10 FePd also show that the current DFT approximations

  9. Chemical Frustration. A Design Principle for the Discovery of New Complex Alloy and Intermetallic Phases, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, Daniel C

    2015-06-23

    Final technical report for "Chemical Frustration: A Design Principle for the Discovery of New Complex Alloy and Intermetallic Phases" funded by the Office of Science through the Materials Chemistry Program of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  10. Atomic interaction of the MEAM type for the study of intermetallics in the Al-U alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascuet, M. I.; Fernández, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Interaction for both pure Al and Al-U alloys of the MEAM type are developed. The obtained Al interatomic potential assures its compatibility with the details of the framework presently adopted. The Al-U interaction fits various properties of the Al2U, Al3U and Al4U intermetallics. The potential verifies the stability of the intermetallic structures in a temperature range compatible with that observed in the phase diagram, and also takes into account the greater stability of these structures relative to others that are competitive in energy. The intermetallics are characterized by calculating elastic and thermal properties and point defect parameters. Molecular dynamics simulations show a growth of the Al3U intermetallic in the Al/U interface in agreement with experimental evidence.

  11. Earth: Earth Science and Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2001-01-01

    A major new NASA initiative on environmental change and health has been established to promote the application of Earth science remote sensing data, information, observations, and technologies to issues of human health. NASA's Earth Sciences suite of Earth observing instruments are now providing improved observations science, data, and advanced technologies about the Earth's land, atmosphere, and oceans. These new space-based resources are being combined with other agency and university resources, data integration and fusion technologies, geographic information systems (GIS), and the spectrum of tools available from the public health community, making it possible to better understand how the environment and climate are linked to specific diseases, to improve outbreak prediction, and to minimize disease risk. This presentation is an overview of NASA's tools, capabilities, and research advances in this initiative.

  12. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-20

    Panelists discuss how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  13. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-20

    Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist, Planetary Science Institute, moderates a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and highlighted how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  14. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-20

    An audience member asks the panelists a question at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  15. Method of treating intermetallic alloy hydrogenation/oxidation catalysts for improved impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration and increased activity

    DOEpatents

    Wright, R.B.

    1992-01-14

    Alternate, successive high temperature oxidation and reduction treatments, in either order, of intermetallic alloy hydrogenation and intermetallic alloy oxidation catalysts unexpectedly improves the impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration capacity and/or activity of the catalysts. The particular alloy, and the final high temperature treatment given alloy (oxidation or reduction) will be chosen to correspond to the function of the catalyst (oxidation or hydrogenation). 23 figs.

  16. Forming metal-intermetallic or metal-ceramic composites by self-propagating high-temperature reactions

    DOEpatents

    Rawers, James C.; Alman, David E.; Petty, Jr., Arthur V.

    1996-01-01

    Industrial applications of composites often require that the final product have a complex shape. In this invention intermetallic or ceramic phases are formed from sheets of unreacted elemental metals. The process described in this invention allows the final product shape be formed prior to the formation of the composite. This saves energy and allows formation of shaped articles of metal-intermetallic composites composed of brittle materials that cannot be deformed without breaking.

  17. An Investigation of the Microstructure of an Intermetallic Layer in Welding Aluminum Alloys to Steel by MIG Process.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Quoc Manh; Huang, Shyh-Chour

    2015-12-02

    Butt joints of A5052 aluminum alloy and SS400 steel, with a new type of chamfered edge, are welded by means of metal inert gas welding and ER4043 Al-Si filler metal. The microhardness and microstructure of the joint are investigated. An intermetallic layer is found on the surface of the welding seam and SS400 steel sheet. The hardness of the intermetallic layer is examined using the Vickers hardness test. The average hardness values at the Intermetallic (IMC) layer zone and without the IMC layer zone were higher than that of the welding wire ER4043. The tensile strength test showed a fracture at the intermetallic layer when the tensile strength is 225.9 MPa. The tensile value test indicated the average of welds was equivalent to the 85% tensile strength of the A5052 aluminum alloy. The thickness of the intermetallic layers is non-uniform at different positions with the ranges from 1.95 to 5 μm. The quality of the butt joint is better if the intermetallic layer is minimized. The Si crystals which appeared at the welding seam, indicating that this element participated actively during the welding process, also contributed to the IMC layer's formation.

  18. Microstructure Characterization and Wear-Resistant Properties Evaluation of an Intermetallic Composite in Ni-Mo-Si System.

    PubMed

    Huang, Boyuan; Song, Chunyan; Liu, Yang; Gui, Yongliang

    2017-02-04

    Intermetallic compounds have been studied for their potential application as structural wear materials or coatings on engineering steels. In the present work, a newly designed intermetallic composite in a Ni-Mo-Si system was fabricated by arc-melting process with commercially pure metal powders as starting materials. The chemical composition of this intermetallic composite is 45Ni-40Mo-15Si (at %), selected according to the ternary alloy diagram. The microstructure was characterized using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and the wear-resistant properties at room temperature were evaluated under different wear test conditions. Microstructure characterization showed that the composite has a dense and uniform microstructure. XRD results showed that the intermetallic composite is constituted by a binary intermetallic compound NiMo and a ternary Mo₂Ni₃Si metal silicide phase. Wear test results indicated that the intermetallic composite has an excellent wear-resistance at room-temperature, which is attributed to the high hardness and strong atomic bonding of constituent phases NiMo and Mo₂Ni₃Si.

  19. An Investigation of the Microstructure of an Intermetallic Layer in Welding Aluminum Alloys to Steel by MIG Process

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quoc Manh; Huang, Shyh-Chour

    2015-01-01

    Butt joints of A5052 aluminum alloy and SS400 steel, with a new type of chamfered edge, are welded by means of metal inert gas welding and ER4043 Al-Si filler metal. The microhardness and microstructure of the joint are investigated. An intermetallic layer is found on the surface of the welding seam and SS400 steel sheet. The hardness of the intermetallic layer is examined using the Vickers hardness test. The average hardness values at the Intermetallic (IMC) layer zone and without the IMC layer zone were higher than that of the welding wire ER4043. The tensile strength test showed a fracture at the intermetallic layer when the tensile strength is 225.9 MPa. The tensile value test indicated the average of welds was equivalent to the 85% tensile strength of the A5052 aluminum alloy. The thickness of the intermetallic layers is non-uniform at different positions with the ranges from 1.95 to 5 μm. The quality of the butt joint is better if the intermetallic layer is minimized. The Si crystals which appeared at the welding seam, indicating that this element participated actively during the welding process, also contributed to the IMC layer’s formation. PMID:28793708

  20. Water vapor effect on high-temperature oxidation behavior of Fe3Al intermetallics

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Sebastian; Juzon, Pitor; Przybylski, Kazimierz; Larpin, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Fe3Al intermetallics (Fe3Al, Fe3Al-Zr, Fe3Al-Zr,Mo and Fe3Al-Zr, Mo, Nb) were oxidized at 950 °C in dry and humid (11 vol% water) synthetic air. Thermogravimetric measurements showed that the oxidation rates of the tested intermetallics were lower in humid air than in dry air (especially for Fe3Al-Zr, Mo and Fe3Al-Zr, Mo, Nb). The addition of small amounts of Zr, Mo or Nb improved the kinetics compared with that of the undoped Fe3Al. Fe3Al showed massive spallation, whereas Fe3Al-Zr, Fe3Al-Zr, Mo and Fe3Al-Zr, Mo, Nb produced a flat, adherent oxide layer. The rapid transformation of transient alumina into alpha alumina may explain the decrease in the oxidation rate in humid air. PMID:27877306

  1. Microstructures and mechanical properties of nanocrystalline NiTi intermetallics formed by mechanosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunkumar, S.; Kumaravel, P.; Velmurugan, C.; Senthilkumar, V.

    2018-01-01

    The formulation of nanocrystalline NiTi shape memory alloys has potential effects in mechanical stimulation and medical implantology. The present work elucidates the effect of milling time on the product's structural characteristics, chemical composition, and microhardness for NiTi synthesized by mechanical alloying for different milling durations. Increasing the milling duration led to the formation of a nanocrystalline NiTi intermetallic at a higher level. The formation of nanocrystalline materials was directed through cold fusion, fracturing, and the development of a steady state, which were influenced by the accumulation of strain energy. In the morphological study, uninterrupted cold diffusion and fracturing were visualized using transmission electron microscopy. Particle size analysis revealed that the mean particle size was reduced to 93 μm after 20 h of milling. The mechanical strength was enhanced by the formation of a nanocrystalline intermetallic phase at longer milling time, which was confirmed by the results of Vickers hardness analyses.

  2. Increasing strength and conductivity of Cu alloy through abnormal plastic deformation of an intermetallic compound

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seung Zeon; Lim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Sangshik; Lee, Jehyun; Goto, Masahiro; Kim, Hyung Giun; Han, Byungchan; Kim, Kwang Ho

    2016-01-01

    The precipitation strengthening of Cu alloys inevitably accompanies lowering of their electric conductivity and ductility. We produced bulk Cu alloys arrayed with nanofibers of stiff intermetallic compound through a precipitation mechanism using conventional casting and heat treatment processes. We then successfully elongated these arrays of nanofibers in the bulk Cu alloys to 400% of original length without breakage at room temperature using conventional rolling process. By inducing such an one-directional array of nanofibers of intermetallic compound from the uniform distribution of fine precipitates in the bulk Cu alloys, the trade-off between strength and conductivity and between strength and ductility could be significantly reduced. We observed a simultaneous increase in electrical conductivity by 1.3 times and also tensile strength by 1.3 times in this Cu alloy bulk compared to the conventional Cu alloys. PMID:27488621

  3. Unexpected Ground-State Structure and Mechanical Properties of Ir₂Zr Intermetallic Compound.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meiguang; Cao, Rui; Zhao, Meijie; Du, Juan; Cheng, Ke

    2018-01-10

    Using an unbiased structure searching method, a new orthorhombic Cmmm structure consisting of ZrIr 12 polyhedron building blocks is predicted to be the thermodynamic ground-state of stoichiometric intermetallic Ir₂Zr in Ir-Zr systems. The formation enthalpy of the Cmmm structure is considerably lower than that of the previously synthesized Cu₂Mg-type phase, by ~107 meV/atom, as demonstrated by the calculation of formation enthalpy. Meanwhile, the phonon dispersion calculations further confirmed the dynamical stability of Cmmm phase under ambient conditions. The mechanical properties, including elastic stability, rigidity, and incompressibility, as well as the elastic anisotropy of Cmmm -Ir₂Zr intermetallic, have thus been fully determined. It is found that the predicted Cmmm phase exhibits nearly elastic isotropic and great resistance to shear deformations within the (100) crystal plane. Evidence of atomic bonding related to the structural stability for Ir₂Zr were manifested by calculations of the electronic structures.

  4. Discovery of a Superconducting Cu-Bi Intermetallic Compound by High-Pressure Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Samantha M.; Walsh, James P. S.; Amsler, Maximilian

    A new intermetallic compound, the first to be structurally identified in the Cu-Bi binary system, is reported. This compound is accessed by high-pressure reaction of the elements. Its detailed characterization, physical property measurements, and ab initio calculations are described. The commensurate crystal structure of Cu 11Bi 7 is a unique variation of the NiAs structure type. Temperature-dependent electrical resistivity and heat capacity measurements reveal a bulk superconducting transition at T c=1.36 K. Density functional theory calculations further demonstrate that Cu 11Bi 7 can be stabilized (relative to decomposition into the elements) at high pressure and temperature. These results highlight themore » ability of high-pressure syntheses to allow for inroads into heretofore-undiscovered intermetallic systems for which no thermodynamically stable binaries are known.« less

  5. Electrically reversible cracks in an intermetallic film controlled by an electric field

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Z. Q.; Liu, J. H.; Biegalski, M. D.; ...

    2018-01-03

    Cracks in solid-state materials are typically irreversible. We report electrically reversible opening and closing of nanoscale cracks in an intermetallic thin film grown on a ferroelectric substrate driven by a small electric field (~0.83 kV/cm). Accordingly, a nonvolatile colossal electroresistance on-off ratio of more than 10 8 is measured across the cracks in the intermetallic film at room temperature. Cracks are easily formed with low-frequency voltage cycling and remain stable when the device is operated at high frequency, which offers intriguing potential for next-generation high-frequency memory applications. Moreover, endurance testing demonstrates that the opening and closing of such cracks canmore » reach over 10 7 cycles under 10-μs pulses, without catastrophic failure of the film.« less

  6. Electrically reversible cracks in an intermetallic film controlled by an electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z. Q.; Liu, J. H.; Biegalski, M. D.

    Cracks in solid-state materials are typically irreversible. We report electrically reversible opening and closing of nanoscale cracks in an intermetallic thin film grown on a ferroelectric substrate driven by a small electric field (~0.83 kV/cm). Accordingly, a nonvolatile colossal electroresistance on-off ratio of more than 10 8 is measured across the cracks in the intermetallic film at room temperature. Cracks are easily formed with low-frequency voltage cycling and remain stable when the device is operated at high frequency, which offers intriguing potential for next-generation high-frequency memory applications. Moreover, endurance testing demonstrates that the opening and closing of such cracks canmore » reach over 10 7 cycles under 10-μs pulses, without catastrophic failure of the film.« less

  7. Gold-promoted structurally ordered intermetallic palladium cobalt nanoparticles for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Kuttiyiel, Kurian A; Sasaki, Kotaro; Su, Dong; Wu, Lijun; Zhu, Yimei; Adzic, Radoslav R

    2014-11-06

    Considerable efforts to make palladium and palladium alloys active catalysts and a possible replacement for platinum have had a marginal success. Here we report on a structurally ordered Au10Pd₄₀Co₅₀ catalyst that exhibits comparable activity to conventional platinum catalysts in both acid and alkaline media. Electron microscopic techniques demonstrate that, at elevated temperatures, palladium cobalt nanoparticles undergo an atomic structural transition from core-shell to a rare intermetallic ordered structure with twin boundaries forming stable {111}, {110} and {100} facets via addition of gold atoms. The superior stability of this catalyst compared with platinum after 10,000 potential cycles in alkaline media is attributed to the atomic structural order of PdCo nanoparticles along with protective effect of clusters of gold atoms on the surface. This strategy of making ordered palladium intermetallic alloy nanoparticles can be used in diverse heterogeneous catalysis where particle size and structural stability matter.

  8. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-03-08

    Workers at the Astrotech processing facility in Titusville prepared for a news media showing of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-1 (GOES-1). GOES-1 was the first in a new generation of weather satellites deployed above Earth. It was the first 3-axis, body-stabilized meteorological satellite to be used by the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NASA. These features allowed GOES-1 to continuously monitor the Earth, rather than viewing it just five percent of the time as was the case with spin-stabilized meteorological satellites. GOES-1 also has independent imaging and sounding instruments which can operate simultaneously yet independently. As a result, observations provided by each instrument will not be interrupted. The imager produces visual and infrared images of the Earth's surface, oceans, cloud cover and severe storm development, while the prime sounding products include vertical temperature and moisture profiles, and layer mean moisture.

  9. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-09-02

    This image depicts a full view of the Earth, taken by the Geostationary Operational Environment Satellite (GOES-8). The red and green charnels represent visible data, while the blue channel represents inverted 11 micron infrared data. The north and south poles were not actually observed by GOES-8. To produce this image, poles were taken from a GOES-7 image. Owned and operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES satellites provide the kind of continuous monitoring necessary for intensive data analysis. They circle the Earth in a geosynchronous orbit, which means they orbit the equatorial plane of the Earth at a speed matching the Earth's rotation. This allows them to hover continuously over one position on the surface. The geosynchronous plane is about 35,800 km (22,300 miles) above the Earth, high enough to allow the satellites a full-disc view of the Earth. Because they stay above a fixed spot on the surface, they provide a constant vigil for the atmospheric triggers for severe weather conditions such as tornadoes, flash floods, hail storms, and hurricanes. When these conditions develop, the GOES satellites are able to monitor storm development and track their movements. NASA manages the design and launch of the spacecraft. NASA launched the first GOES for NOAA in 1975 and followed it with another in 1977. Currently, the United States is operating GOES-8, positioned at 75 west longitude and the equator, and GOES-10, which is positioned at 135 west longitude and the equator. (GOES-9, which malfunctioned in 1998, is being stored in orbit as an emergency backup should either GOES-8 or GOES-10 fail. GOES-11 was launched on May 3, 2000 and GOES-12 on July 23, 2001. Both are being stored in orbit as a fully functioning replacement for GOES-8 or GOES-10 on failure.

  10. In situ XPS study of methanol reforming on PdGa near-surface intermetallic phases

    PubMed Central

    Rameshan, Christoph; Stadlmayr, Werner; Penner, Simon; Lorenz, Harald; Mayr, Lukas; Hävecker, Michael; Blume, Raoul; Rocha, Tulio; Teschner, Detre; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Schlögl, Robert; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Memmel, Norbert; Klötzer, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    In situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low-energy ion scattering were used to study the preparation, (thermo)chemical and catalytic properties of 1:1 PdGa intermetallic near-surface phases. Deposition of several multilayers of Ga metal and subsequent annealing to 503–523 K led to the formation of a multi-layered 1:1 PdGa near-surface state without desorption of excess Ga to the gas phase. In general, the composition of the PdGa model system is much more variable than that of its PdZn counterpart, which results in gradual changes of the near-surface composition with increasing annealing or reaction temperature. In contrast to near-surface PdZn, in methanol steam reforming, no temperature region with pronounced CO2 selectivity was observed, which is due to the inability of purely intermetallic PdGa to efficiently activate water. This allows to pinpoint the water-activating role of the intermetallic/support interface and/or of the oxide support in the related supported PdxGa/Ga2O3 systems, which exhibit high CO2 selectivity in a broad temperature range. In contrast, corresponding experiments starting on the purely bimetallic model surface in oxidative methanol reforming yielded high CO2 selectivity already at low temperatures (∼460 K), which is due to efficient O2 activation on PdGa. In situ detected partial and reversible oxidative Ga segregation on intermetallic PdGa is associated with total oxidation of intermediate C1 oxygenates to CO2. PMID:22875996

  11. The Effect of Sn Orientation on Intermetallic Compound Growth in Idealized Sn-Cu-Ag Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, Chris; Linares, Xioranny; Lee, Kyu-Oh; Morris, J. W.

    2013-04-01

    The work reported here explores the influence of crystal orientation on the growth of the interfacial intermetallic layer during electromigration in Cu||Sn||Cu solder joints. The samples were thin, planar Sn-Ag-Cu (SAC) solder layers between Cu bars subject to a uniaxial current. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used to characterize the microstructure before and after testing. The most useful representation of the EBSD data identifies the Sn grain orientation by the angle between the Sn c-axis and the current direction. The tested samples included single-crystal joints with c-axis nearly parallel to the current ("green" samples) and with c-axis perpendicular to the current ("red" samples). At current density of 104 A/cm2 (steady-state temperature of ~150°C), an intermetallic layer grew at an observable rate in the "green" samples, but not in the "red" ones. A current density of 1.15 × 104 A/cm2 (temperature ~160°C) led to measurable intermetallic growth in both samples. The growth fronts were nearly planar and the growth rates constant (after an initial incubation period); the growth rates in the "green" samples were about 10× those in the "red" samples. The Cu concentrations were constant within the joints, showing that the intermetallic growth is dominated by the electromigration flux. The measured growth rates and literature values for the diffusion of Cu in Sn were used to extract values for the effective charge, z *, that governs the electromigration of Cu. The calculated value of z * is significantly larger for current perpendicular to the c-axis than along it.

  12. Plasma sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coating for NiAl-based intermetallic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A. (Inventor); Doychak, Joseph (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating system consists of two layers of a zirconia-yttria ceramic. The first layer is applied by low pressure plasma spraying. The second layer is applied by conventional atmospheric pressure plasma spraying. This facilitates the attachment of a durable thermally insulating ceramic coating directly to the surface of a highly oxidation resistant NiAl-based intermetallic alloy after the alloy has been preoxidized to promote the formation of a desirable Al2O3 scale.

  13. The development of Nb-based advanced intermetallic alloys for structural applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, P. R.; Mendiratta, M. G.; Dimiduk, D. M.

    1996-01-01

    A new generation of refractory material systems with significant increases in temperature capability is required to meet the demands of future aerospace applications. Such materials require a balance of properties such as low-temperature damage tolerance, high-temperature strength, creep resistance, and superior environmental stability for implementation in advanced aerospace systems. Systems incorporating niobium-based beta alloys and intermetallic compounds have the potential for meeting these requirements.

  14. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-23

    ISS024-E-016042 (23 Aug. 2010) --- This night time view captured by one of the Expedition 24 crew members aboard the International Space Station some 220 miles above Earth is looking southward from central Romania over the Aegean Sea toward Greece and it includes Thessaloniki (near center), the larger bright mass of Athens (left center), and the Macedonian capital of Skopje (lower right). Center point coordinates of the area pictured are 46.4 degrees north latitude and 25.5 degrees east longitude. The picture was taken in August and was physically brought back to Earth on a disk with the return of the Expedition 25 crew in November 2010.

  15. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-19

    ISS040-E-070412 (19 July 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station recorded this July 19 panorama featuring wildfires which are plaguing the Northwest and causing widespread destruction. (Note: south is at the top of the frame). The orbital outpost was flying 223 nautical miles above Earth at the time of the photo. Parts of Oregon and Washington are included in the scene. Mt. Jefferson, Three Sisters and Mt. St. Helens are all snow-capped and visible in the photo, and the Columbia River can also be delineated.

  16. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-19

    ISS040-E-070424 (19 July 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station recorded this July 19 image of wildfires which are plaguing the Northwest and causing widespread destruction. The orbital outpost was flying 223 nautical miles above Earth at the time of the photo. Lightning has been given as the cause of the Ochoco Complex fires in the Ochoco National Forest in central Oregon. The complex has gotten larger since this photo was taken.

  17. Earth observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-04

    ISS040-E-129950 (4 Sept. 2014) --- In this photograph. taken by one of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, the orange spot located in the very center is the sun, which appears to be sitting on Earth's limb. At far right, a small bright spot is believed to be a reflection from somewhere in the camera system or something on the orbital outpost. When the photographed was exposed, the orbital outpost was flying at an altutude of 226 nautical miles above a point near French Polynesia in the Pacific Ocean.

  18. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-08-13

    This panoramic view of Hurricane Charley was photographed by the Expedition 9 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS) on August 13, 2004, at a vantage point just north of Tampa, Florida. The small eye was not visible in this view, but the raised cloud tops near the center coincide roughly with the time that the storm began to rapidly strengthen. The category 2 hurricane was moving north-northwest at 18 mph packing winds of 105 mph. Crew Earth Observations record Earth surface changes over time, as well as more fleeting events such as storms, floods, fires, and volcanic eruptions.

  19. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-09-11

    This image hosts a look at the eye of Hurricane Ivan, one of the strongest hurricanes on record, as the storm topped the western Caribbean Sea on Saturday, September 11, 2004. The hurricane was photographed by astronaut Edward M. (Mike) Fincke from aboard the International Space Station (ISS) at an altitude of approximately 230 miles. At the time, the category 5 storm sustained winds in the eye of the wall that were reported at about 160 mph. Crew Earth Observations record Earth surface changes over time, as well as more fleeting events such as storms, floods, fires, and volcanic eruptions.

  20. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-09-15

    Except for a small portion of the International Space Station (ISS) in the foreground, Hurricane Ivan, one of the strongest hurricanes on record, fills this image over the northern Gulf of Mexico. As the downgraded category 4 storm approached landfall on the Alabama coast Wednesday afternoon on September 15, 2004, sustained winds in the eye of the wall were reported at about 135 mph. The hurricane was photographed by astronaut Edward M. (Mike) Fincke from aboard the ISS at an altitude of approximately 230 miles. Crew Earth Observations record Earth surface changes over time, as well as more fleeting events such as storms, floods, fires, and volcanic eruptions.

  1. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-09-15

    This image hosts a look into the eye of Hurricane Ivan, one of the strongest hurricanes on record, as the storm approached landfall on the central Gulf coast Wednesday afternoon on September 15, 2004. The hurricane was photographed by astronaut Edward M. (Mike) Fincke from aboard the International Space Station (ISS) at an altitude of approximately 230 miles. At the time, sustained winds in the eye of the wall were reported at about 135 mph as the downgraded category 4 storm approached the Alabama coast. Crew Earth Observations record Earth surface changes over time, as well as more fleeting events such as storms, floods, fires, and volcanic eruptions.

  2. Intermetallic Growth and Interfacial Properties of the Grain Refiners in Al Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunmei; Cheng, Nanpu; Chen, Zhiqian; Xie, Zhongjing; Hui, Liangliang

    2018-01-01

    Al3TM(TM = Ti, Zr, Hf, Sc) particles acting as effective grain refiners for Al alloys have been receiving extensive attention these days. In order to judge their nucleation behaviors, first-principles calculations are used to investigate their intermetallic and interfacial properties. Based on energy analysis, Al3Zr and Al3Sc are more suitable for use as grain refiners than the other two intermetallic compounds. Interfacial properties show that Al/Al3TM(TM = Ti, Zr, Hf, Sc) interfaces in I-ter interfacial mode exhibit better interface wetting effects due to larger Griffith rupture work and a smaller interface energy. Among these, Al/Al3Sc achieves the lowest interfacial energy, which shows that Sc atoms should get priority for occupying interfacial sites. Additionally, Sc-doped Al/Al3(Zr, Sc) interfacial properties show that Sc can effectively improve the Al/Al3(Zr, Sc) binding strength with the Al matrix. By combining the characteristics of interfaces with the properties of intermetallics, the core-shell structure with Al3Zr-core or Al3Zr(Sc1-1)-core encircled with an Sc-rich shell forms. PMID:29677155

  3. Strong, ductile, and thermally stable Cu-based metal-intermetallic nanostructured composites.

    PubMed

    Dusoe, Keith J; Vijayan, Sriram; Bissell, Thomas R; Chen, Jie; Morley, Jack E; Valencia, Leopolodo; Dongare, Avinash M; Aindow, Mark; Lee, Seok-Woo

    2017-01-09

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) and nanocrystalline metals (NMs) have been extensively investigated due to their superior strengths and elastic limits. Despite these excellent mechanical properties, low ductility at room temperature and poor microstructural stability at elevated temperatures often limit their practical applications. Thus, there is a need for a metallic material system that can overcome these performance limits of BMGs and NMs. Here, we present novel Cu-based metal-intermetallic nanostructured composites (MINCs), which exhibit high ultimate compressive strengths (over 2 GPa), high compressive failure strain (over 20%), and superior microstructural stability even at temperatures above the glass transition temperature of Cu-based BMGs. Rapid solidification produces a unique ultra-fine microstructure that contains a large volume fraction of Cu 5 Zr superlattice intermetallic compound; this contributes to the high strength and superior thermal stability. Mechanical and microstructural characterizations reveal that substantial accumulation of phase boundary sliding at metal/intermetallic interfaces accounts for the extensive ductility observed.

  4. Microstructure and Tribological Properties of Mo–40Ni–13Si Multiphase Intermetallic Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chunyan; Wang, Shuhuan; Gui, Yongliang; Cheng, Zihao; Ni, Guolong

    2016-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds are increasingly being expected to be utilized in tribological environments, but to date their implementation is hindered by insufficient ductility at low and medium temperatures. This paper presents a novel multiphase intermetallic alloy with the chemical composition of Mo–40Ni–13Si (at %). Microstructure characterization reveals that a certain amount of ductile Mo phases formed during the solidification process of a ternary Mo–Ni–Si molten alloy, which is beneficial to the improvement of ductility of intermetallic alloys. Tribological properties of the designed alloy—including wear resistance, friction coefficient, and metallic tribological compatibility—were evaluated under dry sliding wear test conditions at room temperature. Results suggest that the multiphase alloy possesses an excellent tribological property, which is attributed to unique microstructural features and thereby a good combination in hardness and ductility. The corresponding wear mechanism is explained by observing the worn surface, subsurface, and wear debris of the alloy, which was found to be soft abrasive wear. PMID:28774106

  5. Facet-Dependent Deposition of Highly Strained Alloyed Shells on Intermetallic Nanoparticles for Enhanced Electrocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chenyu; Sang, Xiahan; Gamler, Jocelyn T. L.

    Compressive surface strains can enhance the performance of platinum-based core@shell electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Bimetallic core@shell nanoparticles (NPs) are widely studied nanocatalysts but often have limited lattice mismatch and surface compositions; investigations of core@shell NPs with greater compositional complexity and lattice misfit are in their infancy. Here, a new class of multimetallic NPs composed of intermetallic cores and random alloy shells is reported. Specifically, face-centered cubic (fcc) Pt- Cu random alloy shells were deposited non-epitaxially on PdCu B2 intermetallic seeds, giving rise to faceted core@shell NPs with highly strained surfaces. In fact, high resolution transmission electron microscopymore » (HRTEM) revealed orientation-dependent surface strains, where the compressive strains were minimal on Pt-Cu {111} facets but greater on {200} facets. These core@shell NPs provide higher specific and mass activities for the ORR when compared to conventional Pt-Cu NPs. Moreover, these intermetallic@random alloy NPs displayed high endurance, undergoing 10,000 cycles with only a slight decay in activity and no apparent structural changes.« less

  6. Facet-Dependent Deposition of Highly Strained Alloyed Shells on Intermetallic Nanoparticles for Enhanced Electrocatalysis

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Chenyu; Sang, Xiahan; Gamler, Jocelyn T. L.; ...

    2017-08-25

    Compressive surface strains can enhance the performance of platinum-based core@shell electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Bimetallic core@shell nanoparticles (NPs) are widely studied nanocatalysts but often have limited lattice mismatch and surface compositions; investigations of core@shell NPs with greater compositional complexity and lattice misfit are in their infancy. Here, a new class of multimetallic NPs composed of intermetallic cores and random alloy shells is reported. Specifically, face-centered cubic (fcc) Pt- Cu random alloy shells were deposited non-epitaxially on PdCu B2 intermetallic seeds, giving rise to faceted core@shell NPs with highly strained surfaces. In fact, high resolution transmission electron microscopymore » (HRTEM) revealed orientation-dependent surface strains, where the compressive strains were minimal on Pt-Cu {111} facets but greater on {200} facets. These core@shell NPs provide higher specific and mass activities for the ORR when compared to conventional Pt-Cu NPs. Moreover, these intermetallic@random alloy NPs displayed high endurance, undergoing 10,000 cycles with only a slight decay in activity and no apparent structural changes.« less

  7. First principles electronic and thermal properties of some AlRE intermetallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Vipul; Sanyal, Sankar P.; Rajagopalan, M.

    2008-10-01

    A study on structural and electronic properties of non-magnetic cubic B 2-type AlRE (RE=Sc, Y, La, Ce, Pr and Lu) intermetallics has been done theoretically. The self-consistent tight binding linear muffin tin orbital method is used to describe the electronic properties of these intermetallics at ambient and at high pressure. These compounds show metallic behavior under ambient conditions. The variation of density of states under compression indicates some possibility of structural phase transformation in AlLa, AlCe and AlPr. Thermal properties like Debye temperature and Grüneisen constant are calculated at T=0 K and at ambient pressure within the Debye-Grüneisen model and compared with the others’ theoretical results. Our results are in good agreement. We have also performed a pressure-induced variation of Debye temperature and have found a decrease in Debye temperature around 40 kbar in AlRE (RE=La, Ce, Pr) intermetallics.

  8. Intermetallic Growth and Interfacial Properties of the Grain Refiners in Al Alloys.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunmei; Cheng, Nanpu; Chen, Zhiqian; Xie, Zhongjing; Hui, Liangliang

    2018-04-20

    Al₃TM(TM = Ti, Zr, Hf, Sc) particles acting as effective grain refiners for Al alloys have been receiving extensive attention these days. In order to judge their nucleation behaviors, first-principles calculations are used to investigate their intermetallic and interfacial properties. Based on energy analysis, Al₃Zr and Al₃Sc are more suitable for use as grain refiners than the other two intermetallic compounds. Interfacial properties show that Al/Al₃TM(TM = Ti, Zr, Hf, Sc) interfaces in I-ter interfacial mode exhibit better interface wetting effects due to larger Griffith rupture work and a smaller interface energy. Among these, Al/Al₃Sc achieves the lowest interfacial energy, which shows that Sc atoms should get priority for occupying interfacial sites. Additionally, Sc-doped Al/Al₃(Zr, Sc) interfacial properties show that Sc can effectively improve the Al/Al₃(Zr, Sc) binding strength with the Al matrix. By combining the characteristics of interfaces with the properties of intermetallics, the core-shell structure with Al₃Zr-core or Al₃Zr(Sc1-1)-core encircled with an Sc-rich shell forms.

  9. Digital Earth - A sustainable Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahavir

    2014-02-01

    All life, particularly human, cannot be sustainable, unless complimented with shelter, poverty reduction, provision of basic infrastructure and services, equal opportunities and social justice. Yet, in the context of cities, it is believed that they can accommodate more and more people, endlessly, regardless to their carrying capacity and increasing ecological footprint. The 'inclusion', for bringing more and more people in the purview of development is often limited to social and economic inclusion rather than spatial and ecological inclusion. Economic investment decisions are also not always supported with spatial planning decisions. Most planning for a sustainable Earth, be at a level of rural settlement, city, region, national or Global, fail on the capacity and capability fronts. In India, for example, out of some 8,000 towns and cities, Master Plans exist for only about 1,800. A chapter on sustainability or environment is neither statutorily compulsory nor a norm for these Master Plans. Geospatial technologies including Remote Sensing, GIS, Indian National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI), Indian National Urban Information Systems (NUIS), Indian Environmental Information System (ENVIS), and Indian National GIS (NGIS), etc. have potential to map, analyse, visualize and take sustainable developmental decisions based on participatory social, economic and social inclusion. Sustainable Earth, at all scales, is a logical and natural outcome of a digitally mapped, conceived and planned Earth. Digital Earth, in fact, itself offers a platform to dovetail the ecological, social and economic considerations in transforming it into a sustainable Earth.

  10. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-10

    ISS040-E-091158 (10 Aug. 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members 225 nautical miles above Earth onboard the International Space Station used a 200mm lens to record this image of Hawke's Bay, New Zealand on Aug. 10, 2014. Napier and the bay area's most populous area are at bottom center of the frame.

  11. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-13

    ISS036-E-007619 (13 June 2013) --- To a crew member aboard the International Space Station, the home planet is seen from many different angles and perspectives, as evdenced by this Expedition 36 image of Earth's atmophere partially obscured by one of the orbital outpost's solar panels.

  12. Think Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niedermeyer, Fred; Ice, Kay

    1992-01-01

    Describes a series of environmental education instructional units for grades K-6 developed by the Think Earth Consortium that cover topics such as conservation, pollution control, and waste reduction. Provides testimony from one sixth-grade teacher that field tested the second-grade unit. (MDH)

  13. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-01

    Earth Observation taken during a night pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: New Zealand Aurora night pass. Docked Soyuz and Progress spacecraft are visible. On crewmember's Flickr page - The Moon, about to dive into a glowing ocean of green᥿9.

  14. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-21

    Earth observation taken during night pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message this is labeled as : Tehran, Iran. Lights along the coast of the Caspian Sea visible through clouds. July 21.

  15. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-05-19

    ISS036-E-002224 (21 May 2013) --- The sun is captured in a "starburst" mode over Earth's horizon by one of the Expedition 36 crew members as the orbital outpost was above a point in southwestern Minnesota on May 21, 2013.

  16. Earth Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaufele, Christopher; Zumoff, Nancy

    Earth Algebra is an entry level college algebra course that incorporates the spirit of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Curriculum and Evaluation Standards for School Mathematics at the college level. The context of the course places mathematics at the center of one of the major current concerns of the world. Through…

  17. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-03-29

    Small Expendable Deployer System (SEDS) is a tethered date collecting satellite and is intended to demonstrate a versatile and economical way of delivering smaller payloads to higher orbits or downward toward Earth's atmosphere. 19th Navstar Global Positioning System Satellite mission joined with previously launched satellites used for navigational purposes and geodite studies. These satellites are used commercially as well as by the military.

  18. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-14

    ISS040-E-011868 (14 June 2014) --- The dark waters of the Salton Sea stand out against neighboring cultivation and desert sands in the middle of the Southern California desert, as photographed by one of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station on June 14, 2014.

  19. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-03

    Earth observation taken during day pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message: From southernmost point of orbit over the South Pacific- all clouds seemed to be leading to the South Pole.

  20. Earth Sky

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-16

    S65-63282 (16 Dec. 1965) --- Area of Indian Ocean, just east of the island of Madagascar, as seen from the Gemini-6 spacecraft during its 15th revolution of Earth. Land mass at top of picture is the Malagasy Republic (Madagascar). Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  1. Rare earths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gambogi, J.

    2013-01-01

    Global mine production of rare earths was estimated to have declined slightly in 2012 relative to 2011 (Fig. 1). Production in China was estimated to have decreased to 95 from 105 kt (104,700 from 115,700 st) in 2011, while new mine production in the United States and Australia increased.

  2. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-04

    ISS036-E-015354 (4 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires near the Manicouagan Reservoir (seen at lower left) were recorded as part of a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station.

  3. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-04

    ISS036-E-015355 (4 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires near the Manicouagan Reservoir (seen at bottom center) were recorded in a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station.

  4. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-03

    ISS036-E-015292 (3 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires southeast of James Bay were recorded as part of a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 3-4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station. This image was recorded on July 3.

  5. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-04

    ISS036-E-015342 (4 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires southeast of James Bay were recorded as part of a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station.

  6. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-04

    ISS036-E-015335 (4 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires southeast of James Bay were recorded as part of a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station.

  7. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-12

    Earth Observation taken during a day pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: Moon, Japan, Kamchatka with a wild cloud. Part of the U.S. Lab and PMM are also visible.

  8. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-29

    ISS036-E-038117 (29 Aug. 2013) --- One of the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station photographed massive smoke plumes from the California wildfires. When this image was exposed on Aug. 29, the orbital outpost was approximately 220 miles above a point located at 38.6 degrees north latitude and 123.2 degrees west longitude.

  9. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-29

    ISS036-E-038114 (29 Aug. 2013) --- One of the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station photographed massive smoke plumes from the California wildfires. When this image was exposed on Aug. 29, the orbital outpost was approximately 220 miles above a point located at 38.6 degrees north latitude and 123.3 degrees west longitude.

  10. Earth Observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-18

    ISS042E006751 (11/08/2014) --- Earth observation taken from the International Space Station of the coastline of the United Arab Emirates. The large wheel along the coast center left is "Jumeirah" Palm Island, with a conference center, hotels, recreation areas and a large marine zoo.

  11. Earth Moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-06-08

    NASA Galileo spacecraft took this image of Earth moon on December 7, 1992 on its way to explore the Jupiter system in 1995-97. The distinct bright ray crater at the bottom of the image is the Tycho impact basin. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00405

  12. Earth's horizon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-07-30

    S114-E-6076 (30 July 2005) --- The blackness of space and Earth’s horizon form the backdrop for this view of the extended Space Shuttle Discovery’s remote manipulator system (RMS) robotic arm while docked to the International Space Station during the STS-114 mission.

  13. Earth Observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-09

    ISS024-E-014071 (9 Sept. 2010) --- This striking panoramic view of the southwestern USA and Pacific Ocean is an oblique image photographed by an Expedition 24 crew member looking outwards at an angle from the International Space Station (ISS). While most unmanned orbital satellites view Earth from a nadir perspective?in other words, collecting data with a ?straight down? viewing geometry?crew members onboard the space station can acquire imagery at a wide range of viewing angles using handheld digital cameras. The ISS nadir point (the point on Earth?s surface directly below the spacecraft) was located in northwestern Arizona, approximately 260 kilometers to the east-southeast, when this image was taken. The image includes parts of the States of Arizona, Nevada, Utah, and California together with a small segment of the Baja California, Mexico coastline at center left. Several landmarks and physiographic features are readily visible. The Las Vegas, NV metropolitan area appears as a gray region adjacent to the Spring Mountains and Sheep Range (both covered by white clouds). The Grand Canyon, located on the Colorado Plateau in Arizona, is visible (lower left) to the east of Las Vegas with the blue waters of Lake Mead in between. The image also includes the Mojave Desert, stretching north from the Salton Sea (left) to the Sierra Nevada mountain range. The Sierra Nevada range is roughly 640 kilometers long (north-south) and forms the boundary between the Central Valley of California and the adjacent Basin and Range. The Basin and Range is so called due to the pattern of long linear valleys separated by parallel linear mountain ranges ? this landscape, formed by extension and thinning of Earth?s crust, is particularly visible at right.

  14. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-20

    Dr. Shawn Domagal-Goldman, Research Space Scientist, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, speaks on a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  15. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-20

    Dr. Phoebe Cohen, Professor of Geosciences, Williams College, speaks on a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  16. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-20

    Dr. Christopher House, Professor of Geosciences, Pennsylvania State University, speaks on a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  17. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-20

    Dr. Dawn Sumner, Professor of Geology, UC Davis, speaks on a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  18. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-20

    Dr. Timothy Lyons, Professor of Biogeochemistry, UC Riverside, speaks on a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  19. Earth meandering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadiyan, H.; Zamani, A.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we try to put away current Global Tectonic Model to look the tectonic evolution of the earth from new point of view. Our new dynamic model is based on study of river meandering (RM) which infer new concept as Earth meandering(EM). In a universal gravitational field if we consider a clockwise spiral galaxy model rotate above Ninety East Ridge (geotectonic axis GA), this system with applying torsion field (likes geomagnetic field) in side direction from Rocky Mt. (west geotectonic pole WGP) to Tibetan plateau TP (east geotectonic pole EGP),it seems that pulled mass from WGP and pushed it in EGP due to it's rolling dynamics. According to this idea we see in topographic map that North America and Green land like a tongue pulled from Pacific mouth toward TP. Actually this system rolled or meander the earth over itself fractaly from small scale to big scale and what we see in the river meandering and Earth meandering are two faces of one coin. River transport water and sediments from high elevation to lower elevation and also in EM, mass transport from high altitude-Rocky Mt. to lower altitude Himalaya Mt. along 'S' shape geodetic line-optimum path which connect points from high altitude to lower altitude as kind of Euler Elastica(EE). These curves are responsible for mass spreading (source) and mass concentration (sink). In this regard, tiltness of earth spin axis plays an important role, 'S' are part of sigmoidal shape which formed due to intersection of Earth rolling with the Earth glob and actual feature of transform fault and river meandering. Longitudinal profile in mature rivers as a part of 'S' curve also is a kind of EE. 'S' which bound the whole earth is named S-1(S order 1) and cube corresponding to this which represent Earth fracturing in global scale named C-1(cube order 1 or side vergence cube SVC), C-1 is a biggest cycle of spiral polygon, so it is not completely closed and it has separation about diameter of C-7. Inside SVC we introduce cone

  20. Effect of Mn and Fe on the Formation of Fe- and Mn-Rich Intermetallics in Al-5Mg-Mn Alloys Solidified Under Near-Rapid Cooling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yulin; Huang, Gaoren; Sun, Yimeng; Zhang, Li; Huang, Zhenwei; Wang, Jijie; Liu, Chunzhong

    2016-01-29

    Mn was an important alloying element used in Al-Mg-Mn alloys. However, it had to be limited to a low level (<1.0 wt %) to avoid the formation of coarse intermetallics. In order to take full advantage of the benefits of Mn, research was carried out to investigate the possibility of increasing the content of Mn by studying the effect of cooling rate on the formation of Fe- and Mn-rich intermetallics at different content levels of Mn and Fe. The results indicated that in Al-5Mg-Mn alloy with low Fe content (<0.1 wt %), intermetallic Al₆(Fe,Mn) was small in size and amount. With increasing Mn content, intermetallic Al₆(Fe,Mn) increased, but in limited amount. In high-Fe-containing Al-5Mg-Mn alloys (0.5 wt % Fe), intermetallic Al₆(Fe,Mn) became the dominant phase, even in the alloy with low Mn content (0.39 wt %). Cooling rate played a critical role in the refinement of the intermetallics. Under near-rapid cooling, intermetallic Al₆(Fe,Mn) was extremely refined. Even in the high Mn and/or high-Fe-containing alloys, it still demonstrated fine Chinese script structures. However, once the alloy composition passed beyond the eutectic point, the primary intermetallic Al₆(Fe,Mn) phase displayed extremely coarse platelet-like morphology. Increasing the content of Fe caused intermetallic Al₆(Fe,Mn) to become the primary phase at a lower Mn content.

  1. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-19

    ISS040-E-070439 (19 July 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station recorded this July 19 image of wildfires which are plaguing the Northwest and causing widespread destruction. The orbital outpost was flying 223 nautical miles above a point on Earth located at 48.0 degrees north latitude and 116.9 degrees west longitude when the image was exposed. The state of Washington is especially affected by the fires, many of which have been blamed on lightning. This particular fire was part of the Carlton Complex Fire, located near the city of Brewster in north central Washington. The reservoir visible near the center of the image is Banks Lake.

  2. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-25

    ISS040-E-081008 (25 July 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the International Space Station, flying 225 nautical miles above Earth, photographed this image of the Tifernine dunes and the Tassili Najjer Mountains in Algeria. The area is about 800 miles south, southeast of Algiers, the capital of Algeria. The dunes are in excess of 1,000 feet in height.

  3. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-15

    ISS040-E-063578 (15 July 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, flying some 225 nautical miles above the Caribbean Sea in the early morning hours of July 15, photographed this north-looking panorama that includes parts of Cuba, the Bahamas and Florida, and even runs into several other areas in the southeastern U.S. The long stretch of lights to the left of center frame gives the shape of Miami.

  4. Earth Observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-28

    ISS028-E-006059 (28 May 2011) --- One of the Expedition 28 crew members, photographing Earth images onboard the International Space Station while docked with the space shuttle Endeavour and flying at an altitude of just under 220 miles, captured this frame of the Salton Sea. The body of water, easily identifiable from low orbit spacecraft, is a saline, endorheic rift lake located directly on the San Andreas Fault. The agricultural area is within the Coachella Valley.

  5. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-01-01

    In July 1990, the Marshall Space Flight Center, in a joint project with the Department of Defense/Air Force Space Test Program, launched the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) using an Atlas I launch vehicle. The mission was designed to study the effects of artificial ion clouds produced by chemical releases on the Earth's ionosphere and magnetosphere, and to monitor the effects of space radiation environment on sophisticated electronics.

  6. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-27

    ISS028-E-009979 (27 June 2011) --- The Massachusetts coastline is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 28 crew member on the International Space Station. The Crew Earth Observations team at NASA Johnson Space Center sends specific ground targets for photography up to the station crew on a daily basis, but sometimes the crew takes imagery on their own of striking displays visible from orbit. One such display, often visible to the ISS crew due to their ability to look outwards at angles between 0 and 90 degrees, is sunglint on the waters of Earth. Sunglint is caused by sunlight reflecting off of a water surface?much as light reflects from a mirror?directly towards the observer. Roughness variations of the water surface scatter the light, blurring the reflection and producing the typical silvery sheen of the sunglint area. The point of maximum sunglint is centered within Cape Cod Bay, the body of water partially enclosed by the ?hook? of Cape Cod in Massachusetts (bottom). Cape Cod was formally designated a National Seashore in 1966. Sunglint off the water provides sharp contrast with the coastline and the nearby islands of Martha?s Vineyard and Nantucket (lower left), both popular destinations for tourists and summer residents. To the north, rocky Cape Ann extends out into the Atlantic Ocean; the border with New Hampshire is located approximately 30 kilometers up the coast. Further to the west, the eastern half of Long Island, New York is visible emerging from extensive cloud cover over the mid-Atlantic and Midwestern States. Persistent storm tracks had been contributing to record flooding along rivers in the Midwest at the time this image was taken in late June 2011. Thin blue layers of the atmosphere, contrasted against the darkness of space, are visible extending along the Earth?s curvature at top.

  7. Cloudy Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-05-08

    Decades of satellite observations and astronaut photographs show that clouds dominate space-based views of Earth. One study based on nearly a decade of satellite data estimated that about 67 percent of Earth’s surface is typically covered by clouds. This is especially the case over the oceans, where other research shows less than 10 percent of the sky is completely clear of clouds at any one time. Over land, 30 percent of skies are completely cloud free. Earth’s cloudy nature is unmistakable in this global cloud fraction map, based on data collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite. While MODIS collects enough data to make a new global map of cloudiness every day, this version of the map shows an average of all of the satellite’s cloud observations between July 2002 and April 2015. Colors range from dark blue (no clouds) to light blue (some clouds) to white (frequent clouds). Read more here: 1.usa.gov/1P6lbMU Credit: NASA Earth Observatory NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  8. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-02

    ISS028-E-020276 (2 Aug. 2011) --- This photograph of polar mesospheric clouds was acquired at an altitude of just over 202 nautical miles (about 322 kilometers) in the evening hours (03:19:54 Greenwich Mean Time) on Aug. 2, 2011, as the International Space Station was passing over the English Channel. The nadir coordinates of the station were 49.1 degrees north latitude and 5.5 degrees west longitude. Polar mesospheric clouds (also known as noctilucent, or ?night-shining? clouds) are transient, upper atmospheric phenomena that are usually observed in the summer months at high latitudes (greater than 50 degrees) of both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. They appear bright and cloudlike while in deep twilight. They are illuminated by sunlight when the lower layers of the atmosphere are in the darkness of Earth?s shadow. The horizon of Earth appears at the bottom of the image, with some layers of the lower atmosphere already illuminated by the rising sun. The higher, bluish-colored clouds look much like wispy cirrus clouds, which can be found as high as 60,000 feet (18 kilometers) in the atmosphere. However noctilucent clouds, as seen here, are observed in the mesosphere at altitudes of 250,000 to 280,000 feet (about 76 to 85 kilometers). Astronaut observations of polar mesospheric clouds over northern Europe in the summer are not uncommon.

  9. Squeezing clathrate cages to host trivalent rare-earth guests

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian; He, Yuping; Mordvinova, Natalia E.

    Strike difference of the trivalent rare-earth cations from their alkali and alkaline-earth peers is in the presence of localized 4f-electrons and strong spin-orbit coupling. Placing trivalent rare-earth cations inside the fullerene molecules or in between the blocks of itinerant magnetic intermetallics gave rise to plethora of fascinating properties and materials. A long-time missing but hardly desired piece is the semiconducting or metallic compound where rare-earth cations are situated inside the oversized polyhedral cages of three-dimensional framework. In this work we present a synthesis of such compounds, rare-earth containing clathrates Ba 8-xR xCu 16P 30. The unambiguous proofs of their compositionmore » and crystal structure were achieved by a combination of synchrotron powder diffraction, time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction, scanning-transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Our quantum-mechanical calculations and experimental characterizations show that the incorporation of the rare-earth cations significantly enhances the hole mobility and concentration which results in the drastic increase in the thermoelectric performance.« less

  10. Magneto-structural correlations in rare-earth cobalt pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Corey Mitchell

    Magnetic materials are used in many applications such as credit cards, hard drives, electric motors, sensors, etc. Although a vast range of magnetic solids is available for these purposes, our ability to improve their efficiency and discover new materials remains paramount to the sustainable progress and economic profitability in many technological areas. The search for magnetic solids with improved performance requires fundamental understanding of correlations between the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of existing materials, as well as active exploratory synthesis that targets the development of new magnets. Some of the strongest permanent magnets, Nd 2Fe14B, SmCo5, and Sm2Co17, combine transition and rare-earth metals, benefiting from the strong exchange between the 4f and 3d magnetic sublattices. Although these materials have been studied in great detail, the development of novel magnets requires thorough investigation of other 3d-4 f intermetallics, in order to gain further insights into correlations between their crystal structures and magnetic properties. Among many types of intermetallic materials, ternary pnictides RCo 2Pn2 (R = La, Ce, Pr, Nd; Pn = P, As) are of interest because, despite their simple crystal structures, they contain two magnetic sublattices, exchange interactions between which may lead to rich and unprecedented magnetic behavior. Nevertheless, magnetism of these materials was studied only to a limited extent, especially as compared to the extensive studies of their silicide and germanide analogues. The ThCr2Si2 structure type, to which these ternary pnictides belong, is one of the most ubiquitous atomic arrangements encountered among intermetallic compounds. It accounts for over 1000 known intermetallics and has received increased attention due to the recently discovered FeAs-based superconductors. This dissertation is devoted to the investigation of

  11. Atom probe tomography of intermetallic phases and interfaces formed in dissimilar joining between Al alloys and steel

    SciTech Connect

    Lemmens, B.

    While Si additions to Al are widely used to reduce the thickness of the brittle intermetallic seam formed at the interface during joining of Al alloys to steel, the underlying mechanisms are not clarified yet. The developed approach for the site specific atom probe tomography analysis revealed Si enrichments at grain and phase boundaries between the θ (Fe{sub 4}Al{sub 13}) and η (Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5}) phase, up to about ten times that of the concentration in Al. The increase in Si concentration could play an important role for the growth kinetics of the intermetallic phases formed for example in hot-dipmore » aluminizing of steel. - Highlights: •Si additions to Al reduce thickness of intermetallic seam in joining with steel. •Approach developed for the site specific APT analysis of the intermetallic seam •Si enrichment at grain and phase boundaries possibly affects growth of intermetallics.« less

  12. Intermetallic Compounds Formed in Sn-20In-2.8Ag Solder BGA Packages with Ag/Cu Pads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, C. C.; Wang, S. S.; Huang, K. W.; Chuang, T. H.

    2009-03-01

    The interfacial reactions in a Sn-20In-2.8Ag solder ball grid array (BGA) package with immersion Ag surface finish are investigated. After reflow, the Ag thin film dissolves quickly into the solder matrix, and scallop-shaped intermetallic layers, with compositions of (Cu0.98Ag0.02)6(In0.59Sn0.41)5, appear at the interfaces between Sn-20In-2.8Ag solder ball and Cu pad. No evident growth of the (Cu0.98Ag0.02)6(Sn0.59In0.41)5 intermetallic compounds was observed after prolonged aging at 100 °C. However, the growth accelerated at 150 °C, with more intermetallic scallops floating into the solder matrix. The intermetallic thickness versus the square root of reaction time ( t 1/2) shows a linear relation, indicating that the growth of intermetallic compounds is diffusion-controlled. Ball shear tests show that the strength of Sn-20In-2.8Ag solder joints after reflow is 4.4 N, which increases to 5.18 N and 5.14 N after aging at 100 and 150 °C, respectively.

  13. Massive spalling of intermetallic compounds in solder-substrate reactions due to limited supply of the active element

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S. C.; Ho, C. E.; Chang, C. W.

    2007-04-15

    Massive spalling of intermetallic compounds has been reported in the literature for several solder/substrate systems, including SnAgCu soldered on Ni substrate, SnZn on Cu, high-Pb PbSn on Cu, and high-Pb PbSn on Ni. In this work, a unified thermodynamic argument is proposed to explain this rather unusual phenomenon. According to this argument, two necessary conditions must be met. The number one condition is that at least one of the reactive constituents of the solder must be present in a limited amount, and the second condition is that the soldering reaction has to be very sensitive to its concentration. With themore » growth of intermetallic, more and more atoms of this constituent are extracted out of the solder and incorporated into the intermetallic. As the concentration of this constituent decreases, the original intermetallic at the interface becomes a nonequilibrium phase, and the spalling of the original intermetallic occurs.« less

  14. Earth Observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-11

    ISS024-E-014233 (11 Sept. 2010) --- A smoke plume near the northern Caspian Sea, Kazakhstan is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 24 crew member on the International Space Station. This broad view of the north coast of the Caspian Sea shows a smoke plume (left) and two river deltas (bottom and lower right). The larger delta is that of the Volga River which appears prominently here in sunglint (light reflected off a water surface back towards the observer), and the smaller less prominent delta is that of the Ural River. Wide angle, oblique views ? taken looking outward at an angle, rather than straight down towards Earth ? such as this give an excellent impression of how crew members onboard the space station view Earth. For a sense of scale, the Caucasus Mts. (across the Caspian, top right) are approximately 1,100 kilometers to the southwest of the International Space Station?s nadir point location ? the point on Earth directly underneath the spacecraft ? at the time this image was taken. The smoke plume appears to be sourced in the dark-toned coastal marsh vegetation along the outer fringe of the Ural River delta, rather than in a city or at some oil storage facility. Although even small fires produce plumes that are long and bright and thus easily visible from space, the density of the smoke in this plume, and its 350-kilometer length across the entire north lobe of the Caspian Sea, suggest it was a significant fire. The smoke was thick enough nearer the source to cast shadows on the sea surface below. Lines mark three separate pulses of smoke, the most recent, nearest the source, extending directly south away from the coastline (lower left). With time, plumes become progressively more diffuse. The oldest pulse appears to be the thinnest, casting no obvious shadows (center left).

  15. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-04-20

    ISS047e069406 (04/20/2016) ---Earth observation image taken by the Expedition 47 crew aboard the International Space Station. This is an oblique south-looking view of the main Bahama island chain. Cuba is across the entire top of the image, the Florida Peninsula on the right margin. In the Bahamas, the main Andros island is just distinguishable under cloud upper left of center. Under less cloud is the Abaco Islands in the foreground (middle of pic nearest camera left of center.)

  16. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-24

    ISS040-E-018729 (24 June 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station photographed this image featuring the peninsular portion of the state of Florida. Lake Okeechobee stands out in the south central part of the state. The heavily-populated area of Miami can be traced along the Atlantic Coast near the bottom of the scene. Cape Canaveral and the Kennedy Space Center are just below center frame on the Atlantic Coast. The Florida Keys are at the south (left) portion of the scene and the Gulf Coast, including the Tampa-St. Petersburg area, is near frame center.

  17. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-29

    ISS040-E-005979 (29 May 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the International Space Station used a 200mm lens to photograph this image from 222 nautical miles above Earth showing Harris County and Galveston County, Texas plus several other surrounding counties, including a long stretch along the Gulf of Mexico (bottom left). The entirety of Galveston Bay is visible at bottom center. Just below center lies the 1625-acre site of NASA's Johnson Space Center, one of the training venues for all space station crew members and the nearby long-time area of residence for NASA astronauts.

  18. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-31

    ISS036-E-027014 (31 July 2013) --- One of the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, as it was passing over Eastern Europe on July 31, 2013, took this night picture looking toward the Mediterranean Sea, which almost blends into the horizon. Also visible are the Aegean Sea, Adriatic Sea and Mediterranean Sea. Parts of the following countries are among those visible as well: Greece, Italy, Sicily, Bulgaria, Serbia, Croatia and Albania. The high oblique 50mm lens shot includes a number of stars in the late July sky. A solar array panel is visible in the darkness on the right side of the frame.

  19. Earth Explorer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Earth Explorer Web site provides access to millions of land-related products, including the following: Satellite images from Landsat, advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR), and Corona data sets. Aerial photographs from the National Aerial Photography Program, NASA, and USGS data sets.  Digital cartographic data from digital elevation models, digital line graphs, digital raster graphics, and digital orthophoto quadrangles. USGS paper maps Digital, film, and paper products are available, and many products can be previewed before ordering.

  20. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-07-24

    A Delta II rocket carrying the Geomagnetic Tail Lab (GEOTAIL) spacecraft lifts off at Launch Complex 17, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) into a cloud-dappled sky. This liftoff marks the first Delta launch under the medium expendable launch vehicle services contract between NASA and McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Co. The GEOTAIL mission, a joint US/Japanese project, is the first in a series of five satellites to study the interactions between the Sun, the Earth's magnetic field, and the Van Allen radiation belts.

  1. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-01-31

    The Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft embarks on a journey that will culminate in a close encounter with an asteroid. The launch of NEAR inaugurates NASA's irnovative Discovery program of small-scale planetary missions with rapid, lower-cost development cycles and focused science objectives. NEAR will rendezvous in 1999 with the asteroid 433 Eros to begin the first long-term, close-up look at an asteroid's surface composition and physical properties. NEAR's science payload includes an x-ray/gamma ray spectrometer, an near-infrared spectrograph, a laser rangefinder, a magnetometer, a radio science experiment and a multi-spectral imager.

  2. Ordered Pt 3Co Intermetallic Nanoparticles Derived from Metal–Organic Frameworks for Oxygen Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiao Xia; Hwang, Sooyeon; Pan, Yung-Tin

    Highly ordered Pt alloy structures are proved effective to improve their catalytic activity and stability for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Here, we report a new approach to preparing ordered Pt 3Co intermetallic nanoparticles through a facile thermal treatment of Pt nanoparticles supported on Co-doped metal-organic framework (MOF)-derived carbon. In particular, the atomically dispersed Co sites, which are originally embedded into MOF-derived carbon, diffuse into Pt nanocrystals and form ordered Pt 3Co structures. It is very crucial for the formation of the ordered Pt 3Co to carefully control the doping content of Co intomore » the MOFs and the heating temperatures for Co diffusion. The optimal Pt 3Co nanoparticle catalyst has achieved significantly enhanced activity and stability, exhibiting a half-wave potential up to 0.92 V vs. RHE and only losing 12 mV after 30,000 potential cycling between 0.6 and 1.0 V. The highly ordered intermetallic structure was retained after the accelerated stress tests evidenced by atomic-scale elemental mapping. Fuel cell tests further verified the high intrinsic activity of the ordered Pt 3Co catalysts. Unlike the direct use of MOF-derived carbon supports for depositing Pt, we utilized MOF-derived carbon containing atomically dispersed Co sites as Co sources to prepare ordered Pt 3Co intermetallic catalysts. Finally, the new synthesis approach provides an effective strategy to develop active and stable Pt alloy catalysts by leveraging the unique properties of MOFs such as 3D structures, high surface areas, and controlled nitrogen doping.« less

  3. Ordered Pt 3Co Intermetallic Nanoparticles Derived from Metal–Organic Frameworks for Oxygen Reduction

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Xiao Xia; Hwang, Sooyeon; Pan, Yung-Tin; ...

    2018-06-06

    Highly ordered Pt alloy structures are proved effective to improve their catalytic activity and stability for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Here, we report a new approach to preparing ordered Pt 3Co intermetallic nanoparticles through a facile thermal treatment of Pt nanoparticles supported on Co-doped metal-organic framework (MOF)-derived carbon. In particular, the atomically dispersed Co sites, which are originally embedded into MOF-derived carbon, diffuse into Pt nanocrystals and form ordered Pt 3Co structures. It is very crucial for the formation of the ordered Pt 3Co to carefully control the doping content of Co intomore » the MOFs and the heating temperatures for Co diffusion. The optimal Pt 3Co nanoparticle catalyst has achieved significantly enhanced activity and stability, exhibiting a half-wave potential up to 0.92 V vs. RHE and only losing 12 mV after 30,000 potential cycling between 0.6 and 1.0 V. The highly ordered intermetallic structure was retained after the accelerated stress tests evidenced by atomic-scale elemental mapping. Fuel cell tests further verified the high intrinsic activity of the ordered Pt 3Co catalysts. Unlike the direct use of MOF-derived carbon supports for depositing Pt, we utilized MOF-derived carbon containing atomically dispersed Co sites as Co sources to prepare ordered Pt 3Co intermetallic catalysts. Finally, the new synthesis approach provides an effective strategy to develop active and stable Pt alloy catalysts by leveraging the unique properties of MOFs such as 3D structures, high surface areas, and controlled nitrogen doping.« less

  4. Brittle intermetallic compound makes ultrastrong low-density steel with large ductility.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Heon; Kim, Hansoo; Kim, Nack J

    2015-02-05

    Although steel has been the workhorse of the automotive industry since the 1920s, the share by weight of steel and iron in an average light vehicle is now gradually decreasing, from 68.1 per cent in 1995 to 60.1 per cent in 2011 (refs 1, 2). This has been driven by the low strength-to-weight ratio (specific strength) of iron and steel, and the desire to improve such mechanical properties with other materials. Recently, high-aluminium low-density steels have been actively studied as a means of increasing the specific strength of an alloy by reducing its density. But with increasing aluminium content a problem is encountered: brittle intermetallic compounds can form in the resulting alloys, leading to poor ductility. Here we show that an FeAl-type brittle but hard intermetallic compound (B2) can be effectively used as a strengthening second phase in high-aluminium low-density steel, while alleviating its harmful effect on ductility by controlling its morphology and dispersion. The specific tensile strength and ductility of the developed steel improve on those of the lightest and strongest metallic materials known, titanium alloys. We found that alloying of nickel catalyses the precipitation of nanometre-sized B2 particles in the face-centred cubic matrix of high-aluminium low-density steel during heat treatment of cold-rolled sheet steel. Our results demonstrate how intermetallic compounds can be harnessed in the alloy design of lightweight steels for structural applications and others.

  5. Method of fabricating a homogeneous wire of inter-metallic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Ohriner, Evan Keith; Blue, Craig Alan

    2001-01-01

    A method for fabricating a homogeneous wire of inter-metallic alloy comprising the steps of providing a base-metal wire bundle comprising a metal, an alloy or a combination thereof; working the wire bundle through at least one die to obtain a desired dimension and to form a precursor wire; and, controllably heating the precursor wire such that a portion of the wire will become liquid while simultaneously maintaining its desired shape, whereby substantial homogenization of the wire occurs in the liquid state and additional homogenization occurs in the solid state resulting in a homogenous alloy product.

  6. Cu-Sn Intermetallic Compound Joints for High-Temperature Power Electronics Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byung-Suk; Yoon, Jeong-Won

    2018-01-01

    Cu-Sn solid-liquid interdiffusion (SLID) bonded joints were fabricated using a Sn-Cu solder paste and Cu for high-temperature power electronics applications. The interfacial reaction behaviors and the mechanical properties of Cu6Sn5 and Cu3Sn SLID-bonded joints were compared. The intermetallic compounds formed at the interfaces in the Cu-Sn SLID-bonded joints significantly affected the die shear strength of the joint. In terms of thermal and mechanical properties, the Cu3Sn SLID-bonded joint was superior to the conventional solder and the Cu6Sn5 SLID-bonded joints.

  7. Intermetallic M--Sn.sub.5 (M=Fe, Cu, Co, Ni) compound and a method of synthesis thereof

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Xiao-Liang; Han, Weiqiang

    2017-09-05

    Novel intermetallic materials are provided that are composed of tin and one or more additional metal(s) having a formula M.sub.(1-x)-Sn.sub.5, where -0.1.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5, with 0.01.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.4 being more preferred and the second metallic element (M) is selected from iron (Fe), copper (Cu), cobalt (Co), nickel (Ni), and a combination of two or more of those metals. Due to low concentration of the second metallic element, the intermetallic compound affords an enhanced capacity applicable for electrochemical cells and may serve as an intermediate phase between Sn and MSn.sub.2. A method of synthesizing these intermetallic materials is also disclosed.

  8. Herbal Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Subtle vegetation changes are visible in this year-long visualization. Large-scale patterns vary with seasons, but the local variations in green are also sensitive precipitation, drought and fire. High values of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, or NDVI, represent dense green functioning vegetation and low NDVI values represent sparse green vegetation or vegetation under stress from limiting conditions, such as drought. The visualization was created from a year’s worth of data from April 2012 to April 2013. The information was sent back to Earth from the Visible-Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership or Suomi NPP satellite, a partnership between NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA. Credit: NASA/NOAA To read more go to: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/NPP/news/vegetation.html NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  9. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-17

    ISS036-E-009405 (17 June 2013) --- One of the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station, some 240 miles above Earth, used a 50mm lens to record this oblique nighttime image of a large part of the nation’s second largest state in area, including the four largest metropolitan areas in population. The extent of the metropolitan areas is easily visible at night due to city and highway lights. The largest metro area, Dallas-Fort Worth, often referred to informally as the Metroplex, is the heavily cloud-covered area at the top center of the photo. Neighboring Oklahoma, on the north side of the Red River, less than 100 miles to the north of the Metroplex, appears to be experiencing thunderstorms. The Houston metropolitan area, including the coastal city of Galveston, is at lower right. To the east near the Texas border with Louisiana, the metropolitan area of Beaumont-Port Arthur appears as a smaller blotch of light, also hugging the coast of the Texas Gulf. Moving inland to the left side of the picture one can delineate the San Antonio metro area. The capital city of Austin can be seen to the northeast of San Antonio. This and hundreds of thousands of other Earth photos taken by astronauts and cosmonauts over the past 50 years are available on http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov

  10. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-06

    ISS028-E-014782 (6 July 2011) --- The Shoemaker (formerly Teague) Impact Structure, located in Western Australia in a drainage basin south of the Waldburg Range, presents an other-worldly appearance in this detailed photograph recorded from onboard the International Space Station on July 6. The Shoemaker impact site is approximately 30 kilometers in diameter, and is clearly defined by concentric ring structures formed in sedimentary rocks (brown to dark brown, image center) that were deformed by the impact event approximately 1630 million years ago, according to the Earth Impact Database. Several saline and ephemeral lakes?Nabberu, Teague, Shoemaker, and numerous smaller ponds?occupy the land surface between the concentric ring structures. Differences in color result from both water depth and suspended sediments, with some bright salt crusts visible around the edges of smaller ponds (image center The Teague Impact Structure was renamed Shoemaker in honor of the late Dr. Eugene M. Shoemaker, a pioneer in the field of impact crater studies and planetary geology, and founder of the Astrogeology Branch of the United States Geological Survey. The image was recorded with a digital still camera using a 200 mm lens, and is provided by the ISS Crew Earth Observations experiment and Image Science & Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center.

  11. Synthesis of Au-induced structurally ordered AuPdCo intermetallic core-shell nanoparticles and their use as oxygen reduction catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kuttiyiel, Kurian A.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    Embodiments of the disclosure relate to intermetallic nanoparticles. Embodiments include nanoparticles having an intermetallic core including a first metal and a second metal. The first metal may be palladium and the second metal may be at least one of cobalt, iron, nickel, or a combination thereof. The nanoparticles may further have a shell that includes palladium and gold.

  12. Joining thick section aluminum to steel with suppressed FeAl intermetallic formation via friction stir dovetailing

    SciTech Connect

    Reza-E-Rabby, Md.; Ross, Kenneth; Overman, Nicole R.

    A new solid-phase technique called friction stir dovetailing (FSD) has been developed for joining thick section aluminum to steel. In FSD, mechanical interlocks are formed at the aluminum-steel interface and are reinforced by metallurgical bonds where intermetallic growth has been uniquely suppressed. Lap shear testing shows superior strength and extension at failure compared to popular friction stir approaches where metallurgical bonding is the only joining mechanism. High resolution microscopy revealed the presence of a 40-70 nm interlayer having a composition of 76.4 at% Al, 18.4 at% Fe, and 5.2 at% Si, suggestive of limited FeAl3 intermetallic formation.

  13. The corrosion behavior of the T1 (Al2CuLi) intermetallic compound in aqueous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchheit, R. G.; Stoner, G. E.

    1989-01-01

    The intermetallic compound T1 (Al2CuLi) is suspected to play an important role in the localized corrosion at subgrain boundaries in Al-Li-Cu alloys. The intermetallic was synthesized for characterization of its corrosion behavior. Experiments performed included open circuit potential measurements, potentiodynamic polarization, and corrosion rate vs. pH in solutions whose pH was varied over the range of 3 to 11. Subgrain boundary pitting and continuous subgrain boundary corrosion are discussed in terms of the data obtained. Evidence suggesting the dealloying of copper from this compound is also presented.

  14. Sulfur Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, B. H.

    2007-12-01

    Variations in surface tension affect the buoyancy of objects floating in a liquid. Thus an object floating in water will sink deeper in the presence of dishwater fluid. This is a very minor but measurable effect. It causes for instance ducks to drown in aqueous solutions with added surfactant. The surface tension of liquid iron is very strongly affected by the presence of sulfur which acts as a surfactant in this system varying between 1.9 and 0.4 N/m at 10 mass percent Sulfur (Lee & Morita (2002), This last value is inferred to be the maximum value for Sulfur inferred to be present in the liquid outer core. Venting of Sulfur from the liquid core manifests itself on the Earth surface by the 105 to 106 ton of sulfur vented into the atmosphere annually (Wedepohl, 1984). Inspection of surface Sulfur emission indicates that venting is non-homogeneously distributed over the Earth's surface. The implication of such large variation in surface tension in the liquid outer core are that at locally low Sulfur concentration, the liquid outer core does not wet the predominantly MgSiO3 matrix with which it is in contact. However at a local high in Sulfur, the liquid outer core wets this matrix which in the fluid state has a surface tension of 0.4 N/m (Bansal & Doremus, 1986), couples with it, and causes it to sink. This differential and diapiric movement is transmitted through the essentially brittle mantle (1024 Pa.s, Lambeck & Johnson, 1998; the maximum value for ice being about 1030 Pa.s at 0 K, in all likely hood representing an upper bound of viscosity for all materials) and manifests itself on the surface by the roughly 20 km differentiation, about 0.1 % of the total mantle thickness, between topographical heights and lows with concomitant lateral movement in the crust and upper mantle resulting in thin skin tectonics. The brittle nature of the medium though which this movement is transmitted suggests that the extremes in topography of the D" layer are similar in range to

  15. Cloudy Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-05-08

    Decades of satellite observations and astronaut photographs show that clouds dominate space-based views of Earth. One study based on nearly a decade of satellite data estimated that about 67 percent of Earth’s surface is typically covered by clouds. This is especially the case over the oceans, where other research shows less than 10 percent of the sky is completely clear of clouds at any one time. Over land, 30 percent of skies are completely cloud free. Earth’s cloudy nature is unmistakable in this global cloud fraction map, based on data collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite. While MODIS collects enough data to make a new global map of cloudiness every day, this version of the map shows an average of all of the satellite’s cloud observations between July 2002 and April 2015. Colors range from dark blue (no clouds) to light blue (some clouds) to white (frequent clouds).

  16. Earth observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-31

    ISS040-E-113700 (31 Aug. 2014) --- This panorama view, photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the International Space Station, shows tan-colored dust of a major dust storm obscuring the Persian Gulf and the its northern shoreline. Strong north winds often blow in summer, churning up dust from the entire length of the desert surfaces of the Tigris and Euphrates valleys (top left). Dust partly obscures the hundreds of kilometers of Iraq’s light-green agricultural lands along these rivers (left). A line of thunderstorms is being set off by the Zagros Mountains of Iran (right), with the setting sun casting long shadows from the thunderheads. Space station crews see sixteen sunrises and sunsets every day from low Earth orbit. Here the crew captured dusk in a darkening Iranian landscape (right).

  17. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-24

    ISS040-E-018725 (24 June 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station photographed this image featuring most of the peninsular portion of the state of Florida. Lake Okeechobee stands out in the south central part of the state. The heavily-populated area of Miami can be traced along the Atlantic Coast near the bottom of the scene. Cape Canaveral and the Kennedy Space Center are in lower right portion of the image on the Atlantic Coast. The Florida Keys are at the south (left) portion of the scene and the Gulf Coast, including the Tampa-St. Petersburg area, is near frame center.

  18. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-29

    ISS036-E-025908 (29 July 2013) --- One of the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, as it was passing over Africa, took this night picture of Sicily (center frame) and much of Italy (frame left to frame center) on July 29, 2013. The Stretto de Messina, which separates Sicily from Italy, is near frame center. The high oblique 50mm lens shot includes a scenic horizon with a number of stars in the late July sky. Barely visible in the darkness, part of the long arm of the Space Station Remote Manipulator System or Canadarm2 runs diagonally through the right one-third of the image.

  19. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-15

    ISS028-E-017123 (16 July 2011) --- Separate atmospheric optical phenomena were captured in this electronic still photograph from the Inernational Space Station. The thin greenish band stretching along the Earth's horizon is airglow; light emitted by the atmosphere from a layer about 30 kilometers thick and about 100 kilometers in altitude. The predominant emission in airglow is the green 5577 Angstrom wavelength light from atomic oxygen atoms. Airglow is always and everywhere present in the atmosphere; it results from the recombination of molecules that have been broken apart by solar radiation during the day. But airglow is so faint that it can only be seen at night by looking "edge on" at the emission layer, such as the view astronauts and cosmonauts have in orbit. The second phenomenon is the appearnce of Aurora Australis.

  20. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-22

    ISS042E007131 (11/22/2014) — Astronauts aboard the International Space Station captured this image of a huge crater in Africa on Nov. 22, 2014. This is the Richat Structure in northwestern Mauritania, otherwise known as the “Eye of the Sahara.” Scientists are still deciding whether this was formed by a subterranean volcano or impact from a large meteor. Deep in the Sahara Desert it is nearly a perfect circle, it is 1.2 miles (1.9 kilometers) wide, and sports a rim 330 feet (100 meters) tall. The crater sits in a vast plain of rocks so ancient they were deposited hundreds of millions of years before the first dinosaurs walked the Earth.

  1. Earth Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-01-13

    The Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft undergoing preflight preparation in the Spacecraft Assembly Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). NEAR will perform two critical mission events - Mathilde flyby and the Deep-Space maneuver. NEAR will fly-by Mathilde, a 38-mile (61-km) diameter C-type asteroid, making use of its imaging system to obtain useful optical navigation images. The primary science instrument will be the camera, but measurements of magnetic fields and mass also will be made. The Deep-Space Maneuver (DSM) will be executed about a week after the Mathilde fly-by. The DSM represents the first of two major burns during the NEAR mission of the 100-pound bi-propellant (Hydrazine/nitrogen tetroxide) thruster. This maneuver is necessary to lower the perihelion distance of NEAR's trajectory. The DSM will be conducted in two segments to minimize the possibility of an overburn situation.

  2. Microstructural and Material Quality Effects on Rolling Contact Fatigue of Highly Elastic Intermetallic Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Howard, S. Adam; Thomas, Fransua; Stanford, Malcolm K.

    2016-01-01

    Rolling element bearings made from highly-elastic intermetallic materials (HIM)s, such as 60NiTi, are under development for applications that require superior corrosion and shock resistance. Compared to steel, intermetallics have been shown to have much lower rolling contact fatigue (RCF) stress capability in simplified 3-ball on rod (ASTM STP 771) fatigue tests. In the 3-ball tests, poor material quality and microstructural flaws negatively affect fatigue life but such relationships have not been established for full-scale 60NiTi bearings. In this paper, 3-ball-on-rod fatigue behavior of two quality grades of 60NiTi are compared to the fatigue life of full-scale 50mm bore ball bearings made from the same materials. 60NiTi RCF rods with material or microstructural flaws suffered from infant mortality failures at all tested stress levels while high quality 60NiTi rods exhibited no failures at lower stress levels. Similarly, tests of full-scale bearings made from flawed materials exhibited early surface fatigue and through crack type failures while bearings made from high quality material did not fail even in long-term tests. Though the full-scale bearing test data is yet preliminary, the results suggest that the simplified RCF test is a good qualitative predictor of bearing performance. These results provide guidance for materials development and to establish minimum quality levels required for successful bearing operation and life.

  3. Ab Initio Studies of Shock-Induced Chemical Reactions of Inter-Metallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaharieva, Roussislava; Hanagud, Sathya

    2009-06-01

    Shock-induced and shock assisted chemical reactions of intermetallic mixtures are studied by many researchers, using both experimental and theoretical techniques. The theoretical studies are primarily at continuum scales. The model frameworks include mixture theories and meso-scale models of grains of porous mixtures. The reaction models vary from equilibrium thermodynamic model to several non-equilibrium thermodynamic models. The shock-effects are primarily studied using appropriate conservation equations and numerical techniques to integrate the equations. All these models require material constants from experiments and estimates of transition states. Thus, the objective of this paper is to present studies based on ab initio techniques. The ab inito studies, to date, use ab inito molecular dynamics. This paper presents a study that uses shock pressures, and associated temperatures as starting variables. Then intermetallic mixtures are modeled as slabs. The required shock stresses are created by straining the lattice. Then, ab initio binding energy calculations are used to examine the stability of the reactions. Binding energies are obtained for different strain components super imposed on uniform compression and finite temperatures. Then, vibrational frequencies and nudge elastic band techniques are used to study reactivity and transition states. Examples include Ni and Al.

  4. Ultrafast and Highly Reversible Sodium Storage in Zinc-Antimony Intermetallic Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, Anmin; Gan, Li-yong; Cheng, Yingchun

    2015-12-17

    The progress on sodium-ion battery technology faces many grand challenges, one of which is the considerably lower rate of sodium insertion/deinsertion in electrode materials due to the larger size of sodium (Na) ions and complicated redox reactions compared to the lithium-ion systems. Here, it is demonstrated that sodium ions can be reversibly stored in Zn-Sb intermetallic nanowires at speeds that can exceed 295 nm s -1. Remarkably, these values are one to three orders of magnitude higher than the sodiation rate of other nanowires electrochemically tested with in situ transmission electron micro­scopy. It is found that the nanowires display aboutmore » 161% volume expansion after the first sodiation and then cycle with an 83% reversible volume expansion. Despite their massive expansion, the nanowires can be cycled without any cracking or facture during the ultrafast sodiation/desodiation process. Additionally, most of the phases involved in the sodiation/desodiation process possess high electrical conductivity. More specifically, the NaZnSb exhibits a layered structure, which provides channels for fast Na + diffusion. This observation indicates that Zn-Sb intermetallic nanomaterials offer great promise as high rate and good cycling stability anodic materials for the next generation of sodium-ion batteries.« less

  5. Gold–promoted structurally ordered intermetallic palladium cobalt nanoparticles for the oxygen reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kuttiyiel, Kurian A.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Su, Dong

    2014-11-06

    Considerable efforts to make palladium and palladium alloys active catalysts and a possible replacement for platinum have had a marginal success. Here, we report on a structurally ordered Au₁₀Pd₄₀Co₅₀ catalyst that exhibits comparable activity to conventional platinum catalysts in both acid and alkaline media. Electron microscopic techniques demonstrate that via addition of gold atoms PdCo nanoparticles undergo at elevated temperatures an atomic structural transition from core-shell to a rare intermetallic ordered structure with twin boundaries forming stable {111}, {110} and {100} facets. The superior stability of this catalyst compared to platinum after 10,000 potential cycles in alkaline media is attributedmore » to the atomic structural order of PdCo nanoparticles along with protective effect of clusters of gold atoms on the surface. This strategy of making ordered palladium intermetallic alloy nanoparticles can be used in diverse heterogeneous catalysis where particle size and structural stability matters.« less

  6. Derivation of mechanical characteristics for Ni/Au intermetallic surface with SAC305 solder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-Min; Lee, Hyun-Boo; Chang, Yoon-Suk; Choi, Jae-Boong

    2013-03-01

    Many surface finish methods are used to connect a substrate with the electric components of IT products in the micro-packaging process, and various types of lead-free solder have been developed as alternative materials to lead-based solder to reduce environmental contamination. However, there has been little research on the mechanical properties of the inter-metallic surface which is generated in the bumping process between the lead-free solder and surface films such as Ni/Au. The present work is to derive the material properties of a Ni/Au inter-metallic surface with SAC305 solder. A series of indentation tests were carried out by changing four nano-scale indentation depths and two strain rates. Also, a reverse algorithm method was adopted to determine the elastic-plastic stress-strain curve based on the load-displacement curve from the indentation test data. As a result of the material characterization effort, the mean elastic modulus, yield strength and strain hardening exponent of IMC with Ni/Au finish were determined.

  7. Self-irradiation damage to the local structure of plutonium and plutonium intermetallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, C. H.; Jiang, Yu; Medling, S. A.; Wang, D. L.; Costello, A. L.; Schwartz, D. S.; Mitchell, J. N.; Tobash, P. H.; Bauer, E. D.; McCall, S. K.; Wall, M. A.; Allen, P. G.

    2013-03-01

    The effect of self-irradiation damage on the local structure of δ-Pu, PuAl2, PuGa3, and other Pu intermetallics has been determined for samples stored at room temperature using the extended x-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) technique. These measurements indicate that the intermetallic samples damage at a similar rate as indicated in previous studies of PuCoGa5. In contrast, δ-Pu data indicate a much slower damage accumulation rate. To explore the effect of storage temperature and possible room temperature annealing effects, we also collected EXAFS data on a δ-Pu sample that was held at less than 32 K for a two month period. This sample damaged much more quickly. In addition, the measurable damage was annealed out at above only 135 K. Data from samples of δ-Pu with different Ga concentrations and results on all samples collected from different absorption edges are also reported. These results are discussed in terms of the vibrational properties of the materials and the role of Ga in δ-Pu as a network former.

  8. Femtosecond laser ablation and nanoparticle formation in intermetallic NiAl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, David J.; Titus, Michael S.; Pollock, Tresa M.

    2015-10-01

    The ablation behavior of a stoichiometric intermetallic compound β-NiAl subjected to femtosecond laser pulsing in air has been investigated. The single-pulse ablation threshold for NiAl was determined to be 83 ± 4 mJ/cm2 and the transition to the high-fluence ablation regime occurred at 2.8 ± 0.3 J/cm2. Two sizes of nanoparticles consisting of Al, NiAl, Ni3Al and NiO were formed and ejected from the target during high-fluence ablation. Chemical analysis revealed that smaller nanoparticles (1-30 nm) tended to be rich in Al while larger nanoparticles (>100 nm) were lean in Al. Ablation in the low-fluence regime maintained this trend. Redeposited material and nanoparticles remaining on the surface after a single 3.7 J/cm2 pulse, one hundred 1.7 J/cm2 pulses, or one thousand 250 mJ/cm2 pulses were enriched in Al relative to the bulk target composition. Further, the surface of the irradiated high-fluence region was depleted in Al indicating that the fs laser ablation removal rate of the intermetallic constituents in this regime does not scale with the individual pure element ablation thresholds.

  9. Site preference, magnetism and lattice vibrations of intermetallics Lu₂Fe 17–xT x (T=Cr, Mn, Ru)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jin-Chun; Qian, Ping, E-mail: qianpinghu@sohu.com; Zhang, Zhen-Feng

    We present an atomistic study on the phase stability, site preference and lattice constants of the rare earth intermetallics Lu₂Fe 17–xT x (T=Cr, Mn, Ru). The calculated preferential occupation site of ternary element T is found to be the 4f site. The order of site preference is given as 4f, 12k, 12j and 6g for Lu₂Fe 17–xT x. The calculated lattice parameters are corresponding to the experimental results. We have calculated the magnetic moments of Lu₂Fe 17–xT x compounds. Results show that the calculated total magnetic moment of Lu₂Fe₁₇ compound is M=37.34 μ B/f.u. In addition, the total and partialmore » phonon densities of states are evaluated first for these complicated structures. - Graphical abstract: The vibrational modes are mostly excited by Fe atoms, Lu contributes to the lower frequencies modes, and the contribution of Ru atoms is the same as Fe atoms. Highlights: • There are no reports on lattice vibrations of Lu₂(Fe, T) 17–x (T=Cr, Mn, Ru) compounds. • The phase stability and site preference are evaluated first for the complex structures of Lu₂(Fe, T) 17–x (T=Cr, Mn, Ru) compounds. • The lattice inversion method to obtain the interatomic pair potential is the unique one.« less

  10. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-30

    ISS040E112662 (08/30/2014) ---- Cancún, Mexico. A long lens was used by astronauts aboard the International Space Station to take this image, and it highlights many natural and built features. The street pattern of Mexico’s tourist mecca, Cancún, contrasts with the waterways of the marinas that open into the bay and the lagoons. Brilliant blue water over coral reefs contrast with the dark waters of inland lagoons. The reefs are the second largest reef system on Earth, and draw tourists from all over the world. The wide, well developed beach on the gulf coast (image upper right) is the result of vigorous wave energy; the white sand makes the beach easily visible from space. But wave energy is reduced along Cancún’s protected shoreline (image center) and the beaches are thin or non-existant. Fair-weather cumulus clouds are scattered across the image top left. To shoot crisp mages with long lenses, astronaut photographers must learn to brace themselves against the ISS bulkhead to prevent any slight shaking that would blur or “smear” the picture. Counterintuitively, they then need to move the camera carefully retaining the target at the same point in the viewfinder (the landscape moves across the viewfinder quickly with long lenses). This is called tracking the target and requires good coordination by the photographer—again, to prevent blurring. Shorter lenses do not require this skill because the image appears to pass more slowly across the viewfinder.

  11. Earth Observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-20

    ISS024-E-015121 (20 Sept. 2010) --- Twitchell Canyon Fire in central Utah is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 24 crew member on the International Space Station (ISS). The Twitchell Canyon Fire near central Utah?s Fishlake National Forest is reported to have an area of approximately 13,383 hectares (approximately 134 square kilometers, or 33,071 acres). This detailed image shows smoke plumes generated by several fire spots close to the southwestern edge of the burned area. The fire was started by a lightning strike on July 20, 2010. Whereas many of the space station images of Earth are looking straight down (nadir), this photograph was exposed at an angle. The space station was located over a point approximately 509 kilometers (316 miles) to the northeast, near the Colorado/Wyoming border, at the time the image was taken on Sept. 20. Southwesterly winds were continuing to extend smoke plumes from the fire to the northeast. While the Twitchell Canyon region is sparsely populated, Interstate Highway 15 is visible at upper left.

  12. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-05

    ISS040-E-088891 (5 Aug. 2014) --- Thunderheads near Borneo, Indonesia are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the International Space Station. Late afternoon sun casts long shadows from high thunderhead anvils over southern Borneo. Crews aboard the space station have recently concentrated on panoramic views of clouds?taken with lenses similar to the focal length of the human eye. These images reveal the kinds of views crews see -- huge areas of the planet, with a strong three-dimensional sense of what it is like to fly 350 kilometers above Earth. Winds usually blow in different directions at different altitudes. High-altitude winds are clearly sweeping the tops off the many tallest thunderclouds, generating long anvils of diffuse cirrus plumes that trail south. At low levels, ?streets? of white dots -- fair-weather cumulus clouds -- are aligned with west-moving winds (lower left). Small smoke plumes from forest fires onshore are also aligned west. Storm formation near the horizon -- more than 1,000 kilometers away (center) -- is assisted by air currents rising over the central mountains of Borneo.

  13. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-14

    ISS037-E-011470 (14 Oct. 2013) --- Man-made archipelagos near Dubai, United Arab Emirates, are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 37 crew member on the International Space Station, flying at approximately 220 miles above Earth. The municipality of Dubai is the largest city of the Persian Gulf emirate of the same name, and has built a global reputation for large-scale developments and architectural works. Among the most visible of these developments -- particularly from the perspective of astronauts onboard the space station -- are three man-made archipelagos. The two Palm Islands -- Palm Jumeirah (right) and Palm Jebel Ali (out of frame further to the right) -- appear as stylized palm trees when viewed from above. The World Islands (center frame) evoke a rough map of the world from an air- or space-borne perspective. The Palm Jumeirah project began in 2001 and required more than 50 million cubic meters of dredged sand to raise the islands above the Persian Gulf sea level. Construction of the Palm Jumeirah islands was completed in 2006; for several years now they have been developed for residential and commercial housing and infrastructure. Creation of the World Islands was begun in 2003 and completed in 2008, using 320 million cubic meters of sand and 37 million tons of rock for the surrounding 27 kilometer-long protective breakwater.

  14. A ship-in-a-bottle strategy to synthesize encapsulated intermetallic nanoparticle catalysts: Exemplified for furfural hydrogenation

    DOE PAGES

    Maligal-Ganesh, Raghu V.; Xiao, Chaoxian; Goh, Tian Wei; ...

    2016-01-28

    In this paper, intermetallic compounds are garnering increasing attention as efficient catalysts for improved selectivity in chemical processes. Here, using a ship-in-a-bottle strategy, we synthesize single-phase platinum-based intermetallic nanoparticles (NPs) protected by a mesoporous silica (mSiO 2) shell by heterogeneous reduction and nucleation of Sn, Pb, or Zn in mSiO 2-encapsulated Pt NPs. For selective hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol, a dramatic increase in activity and selectivity is observed when intermetallic NPs catalysts are used in comparison to Pt@mSiO 2. Among the intermetallic NPs, PtSn@mSiO 2 exhibits the best performance, requiring only one-tenth of the quantity of Pt usedmore » in Pt@mSiO 2 for similar activity and near 100% selectivity to furfuryl alcohol. A high-temperature oxidation–reduction treatment easily reverses any carbon deposition-induced catalyst deactivation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows the importance of surface composition to the activity, whereas density functional theory calculations reveal that the enhanced selectivity on PtSn compared to Pt is due to the different furfural adsorption configurations on the two surfaces.« less

  15. Self-Supported Mesostructured Pt-Based Bimetallic Nanospheres Containing an Intermetallic Phase as Ultrastable Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho Young; Cho, Seonghun; Sa, Young Jin; Hwang, Sun-Mi; Park, Gu-Gon; Shin, Tae Joo; Jeong, Hu Young; Yim, Sung-Dae; Joo, Sang Hoon

    2016-10-01

    Developing highly active and stable cathode catalysts is of pivotal importance for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). While carbon-supported nanostructured Pt-based catalysts have so far been the most active cathode catalysts, their durability and single-cell performance are yet to be improved. Herein, self-supported mesostructured Pt-based bimetallic (Meso-PtM; M = Ni, Fe, Co, Cu) nanospheres containing an intermetallic phase are reported, which can combine the beneficial effects of transition metals (M), an intermetallic phase, a 3D interconnected framework, and a mesoporous structure. Meso-PtM nanospheres show enhanced oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity, compared to Pt black and Pt/C catalysts. Notably, Meso-PtNi containing an intermetallic phase exhibits ultrahigh stability, showing enhanced ORR activity even after 50 000 potential cycles, whereas Pt black and Pt/C undergo dramatic degradation. Importantly, Meso-PtNi with an intermetallic phase also demonstrated superior activity and durability when used in a PEMFC single-cell, with record-high initial mass and specific activities. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Microstructure and properties of Ti-Al intermetallic/Al2O3 layers produced on Ti6Al2Mo2Cr titanium alloy by PACVD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitek, R.; Bolek, T.; Mizera, J.

    2018-04-01

    The paper presents investigation of microstructure and corrosion resistance of the multi-component surface layers built of intermetallic phases of the Ti-Al system and an outer Al2O3 ceramic sub-layer. The layers were produced on a two phase (α + β) Ti6Al2Mo2Cr titanium alloy using the PACVD method with the participation of trimethylaluminum vapors. The layers are characterized by a high surface hardness and good corrosion, better than that of these materials in the starting state. In order to find the correlation between their structure and properties, the layers were subjected to examinations using optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), surface analysis by XPS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and analyses of the chemical composition (EDS). The properties examined included: the corrosion resistance and the hydrogen absorptiveness. Moreover growth of the Al2O3 ceramic layer and its influence on the residual stress distribution was simulated using finite element method [FEM]. The results showed that the produced layer has amorphous-nano-crystalline structure, improved corrosion resistance and reduces the permeability of hydrogen as compared with the base material of Ti6Al2Mo2Cr -titanium alloy.

  17. Effects of filling material and laser power on the formation of intermetallic compounds during laser-assisted friction stir butt welding of steel and aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Xinjiang; Jin, Xiangzhong; Peng, Nanxiang; Ye, Ying; Wu, Sigen; Dai, Houfu

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, two kinds of materials, Ni and Zn, are selected as filling material during laser-assisted friction stir butt welding of Q235 steel and 6061-T6 aluminum alloy, and their influences on the formation of intermetallic compounds on the steel/aluminum interface of the joints were first studied. SEM was used to analyze the profile of the intermetallic compound layer and the fractography of tensile fracture surfaces. In addition, EDS was applied to investigate the types of the intermetallic compounds. The results indicate that a thin iron-abundant intermetallic compound layer forms and ductile fracture mode occurs when Ni is added, but a thick aluminum-abundant intermetallic compound layer generates and brittle fracture mode occurs when Zn is added. So the tensile strength of the welds with Ni as filling material is greater than that with Zn as filling material. Besides, the effect of laser power on the formation of intermetallic compound layer when Ni is added was investigated. The preheated temperature field produced by laser beam in the cross section of workpiece was calculated, and the tensile strength of the joints at different laser powers was tested. Results show that only when suitable laser power is adopted, can suitable preheating temperature of the steel reach, then can thin intermetallic compound layer form and high tensile strength of the joints reach. Either excessive or insufficient laser power will reduce the tensile strength of the joints.

  18. Earth Observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-21

    ISS036-E-011034 (21 June 2013) --- The Salton Trough is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 36 crew member on the International Space Station. The Imperial and Coachella Valleys of southern California – and the corresponding Mexicali Valley and Colorado River Delta in Mexico – are part of the Salton Trough, a large geologic structure known to geologists as a graben or rift valley that extends into the Gulf of California. The trough is a geologically complex zone formed by interaction of the San Andreas transform fault system that is, broadly speaking, moving southern California towards Alaska; and the northward motion of the Gulf of California segment of the East Pacific Rise that continues to widen the Gulf of California by sea-floor spreading. According to scientists, sediments deposited by the Colorado River have been filling the northern rift valley (the Salton Trough) for the past several million years, excluding the waters of the Gulf of California and providing a fertile environment – together with irrigation—for the development of extensive agriculture in the region (visible as green and yellow-brown fields at center). The Salton Sea, a favorite landmark of astronauts in low Earth orbit, was formed by an irrigation canal rupture in 1905, and today is sustained by agricultural runoff water. A wide array of varying landforms and land uses in the Salton Trough are visible from space. In addition to the agricultural fields and Salton Sea, easily visible metropolitan areas include Yuma, AZ (lower left); Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico (center); and the San Diego-Tijuana conurbation on the Pacific Coast (right). The approximately 72-kilometer-long Algodones Dunefield is visible at lower left.

  19. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-07-10

    ISS032-E-006129 (10 July 2012) --- Flooding in Krymsk in the Krasnodar region of southern Russia is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 32 crew member on the International Space Station. On the night of July 7, 2012 a major storm dumped more than a foot of water on the southern Russian area of Krasnodar, near the Black Sea. The resulting flood was likened to a tsunami, and to date, more than 170 people died, most from the city of Krymsk. The Moscow times reports that more than 19,000 people lost everything. This image taken by cosmonauts aboard the space station shows the city of Krymsk. The tan-colored areas indicate some of the regions that were flooded; the color is probably due to the mud and debris that were left by the floodwaters. Krymsk is located in the western foothills on the northern slope of the Caucasus Mountains?a range that stretches between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea. The vast amount of rain quickly overwhelmed the small river channels that flow northward from the mountains to the Russian lowlands and the Kuban River; Krymsk, located on one of those tributaries, was directly in the pathway of the flash flood. As part of the international partner agreement to use the International Space Station to benefit humanity, crew members and other Earth observing instruments provide best-effort support to the International Disaster Charter (IDC) when it is activated by collecting imagery of areas on the ground impacted by natural events such as the flooding in Krymsk. This image was acquired July 10, 2012 in response to the IDC activation.

  20. Earth Observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-02

    ISS028-E-006687 (2 June 2011) --- Estuaries on the northwestern coast of Madagascar are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 28 crew member on the International Space Station. Regions where fresh water flowing in rivers and salt water from the seas and oceans mix are called estuaries, and they are among the most biologically productive ecosystems on Earth. This photograph highlights two estuaries located along the northwestern coastline of the island of Madagascar. The Mozambique Channel (top) separates Madagascar from the southeastern coast of Africa. Bombetoka Bay (upper left) is fed by the Betsiboka River and is a frequent subject of astronaut photography due to its striking red floodplain sediments. Mahajamba Bay (right) is fed by several rivers including the Mahajamba and Sofia Rivers; like the Betsiboka, the floodplains of these rivers also contain reddish sediments eroded from their basins upstream. The brackish (mix of fresh and salty water) conditions found in most estuaries host unique plant and animal species adapted to live in such environments. Mangroves in particular are a common plant species found in and around Madagascar estuaries, and Bombetoka Bay contains some of the largest remaining stands. Estuaries also host abundant fish and shellfish species ? many of which need access to freshwater for a portion of their life cycles ? and these in turn support local and migratory bird species that prey on them. However, human activities such as urban development, overfishing, and increased sediment loading from erosion of upriver highlands threaten the ecosystem health of the estuaries. In particular, the silt deposits in Bombetoka Bay at the mouth of the Betsiboka River have been filling in the bay.

  1. Earth Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    For pipeline companies, mapping, facilities inventory, pipe inspections, environmental reporting, etc. is a monumental task. An Automated Mapping/Facilities Management/Geographic Information Systems (AM/FM/GIS) is the solution. However, this is costly and time consuming. James W. Sewall Company, an AM/FM/GIS consulting firm proposed an EOCAP project to Stennis Space Center (SSC) to develop a computerized system for storage and retrieval of digital aerial photography. This would provide its customer, Algonquin Gas Transmission Company, with an accurate inventory of rights-of-way locations and pipeline surroundings. The project took four years to complete and an important byproduct was SSC's Digital Aerial Rights-of-Way Monitoring System (DARMS). DARMS saves substantial time and money. EOCAP enabled Sewall to develop new products and expand its customer base. Algonquin now manages regulatory requirements more efficiently and accurately. EOCAP provides government co-funding to encourage private investment in and broader use of NASA remote sensing technology. Because changes on Earth's surface are accelerating, planners and resource managers must assess the consequences of change as quickly and accurately as possible. Pacific Meridian Resources and NASA's Stennis Space Center (SSC) developed a system for monitoring changes in land cover and use, which incorporated the latest change detection technologies. The goal of this EOCAP project was to tailor existing technologies to a system that could be commercialized. Landsat imagery enabled Pacific Meridian to identify areas that had sustained substantial vegetation loss. The project was successful and Pacific Meridian's annual revenues have substantially increased. EOCAP provides government co-funding to encourage private investment in and broader use of NASA remote sensing technology.

  2. Dendrite segregation in Ni3Al-based intermetallic single crystals alloyed with Cr, Mo, W, Ti, Co, and Re

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, A. A.; Povarova, K. B.; Morozov, A. E.; Antonova, A. V.; Bulakhtina, M. A.; Alad'ev, N. A.

    2015-07-01

    The character of dendrite segregation in Ni3Al-based intermetallic VKNA-type alloy single crystals with a dendritic-cellular structure is studied. Distribution coefficient k d of an alloying element (AE) in the alloy during solidification k d = c d.a.I/ c 0 ( c 0 is the AE content in the alloy (liquid phase composition), c d.a.I is the AE content in primary dendrite arms of the alloy (in the solid phase)) and segregation coefficient k s = c d.a.I/ c i.d ( c i.d is the AE content in the interdendritic space) have been found. A comparative study of the dendrite segregation parameters in VKNA-nype Ni3Al-based intermetallic alloys and the well-known ZhS36-type nickel superalloy shows that the intermetallic alloys satisfy to the rule deduced for two- and three-component nickel-based superalloys: if an introduced AE increases the melting temperature of the basic metal, we have k d > 1 (Co, W, Re); if it decreases the melting temperature, we have k d < 1 (Al, Ti, Cr, Mo). Dendrite segregation coefficients k s are dependent on the proportion of the AE contents in the alloys. In nickel superalloys, the dendrite segregation of aluminum, tungsten, and rhenium is higher than that in the intermetallic alloys. The dendrite segregation coefficients of tungsten and rhenium is higher by a factor of 1.5-2 than that in the VKNA-type intermetallic alloys with a low content of refractory metals. This can be due to the retardation of diffusion of refractory metals in the solid phase of a nickel superalloy highly alloyed with these elements.

  3. Effect of Mn and Fe on the Formation of Fe- and Mn-Rich Intermetallics in Al–5Mg–Mn Alloys Solidified Under Near-Rapid Cooling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yulin; Huang, Gaoren; Sun, Yimeng; Zhang, Li; Huang, Zhenwei; Wang, Jijie; Liu, Chunzhong

    2016-01-01

    Mn was an important alloying element used in Al–Mg–Mn alloys. However, it had to be limited to a low level (<1.0 wt %) to avoid the formation of coarse intermetallics. In order to take full advantage of the benefits of Mn, research was carried out to investigate the possibility of increasing the content of Mn by studying the effect of cooling rate on the formation of Fe- and Mn-rich intermetallics at different content levels of Mn and Fe. The results indicated that in Al–5Mg–Mn alloy with low Fe content (<0.1 wt %), intermetallic Al6(Fe,Mn) was small in size and amount. With increasing Mn content, intermetallic Al6(Fe,Mn) increased, but in limited amount. In high-Fe-containing Al–5Mg–Mn alloys (0.5 wt % Fe), intermetallic Al6(Fe,Mn) became the dominant phase, even in the alloy with low Mn content (0.39 wt %). Cooling rate played a critical role in the refinement of the intermetallics. Under near-rapid cooling, intermetallic Al6(Fe,Mn) was extremely refined. Even in the high Mn and/or high-Fe-containing alloys, it still demonstrated fine Chinese script structures. However, once the alloy composition passed beyond the eutectic point, the primary intermetallic Al6(Fe,Mn) phase displayed extremely coarse platelet-like morphology. Increasing the content of Fe caused intermetallic Al6(Fe,Mn) to become the primary phase at a lower Mn content. PMID:28787888

  4. Earth Observation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-24

    ISS036-E-011843 (24 June 2013) --- Gravity waves and sunglint on Lake Superior are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 36 crew member on the International Space Station. From the vantage point of the space station, crew members frequently observe Earth atmospheric and surface phenomena in ways impossible to view from the ground. Two such phenomena?gravity waves and sunglint?are illustrated in this photograph of northeastern Lake Superior. The Canadian Shield of southern Ontario (bottom) is covered with extensive green forest canopy typical of early summer. Offshore, and to the west and southwest of Pukaskwa National Park several distinct sets of parallel cloud bands are visible. Gravity waves are produced when moisture-laden air encounters imbalances in air density, such as might be expected when cool air flows over warmer air; this can cause the flowing air to oscillate up and down as it moves, causing clouds to condense as the air rises (cools) and evaporate away as the air sinks (warms). This produces parallel bands of clouds oriented perpendicular to the wind direction. The orientation of the cloud bands visible in this image, parallel to the coastlines, suggests that air flowing off of the land surfaces to the north is interacting with moist, stable air over the lake surface, creating gravity waves. The second phenomenon?sunglint?effects the water surface around and to the northeast of Isle Royale (upper right). Sunglint is caused by light reflection off a water surface; some of the reflected light travels directly back towards the observer, resulting in a bright mirror-like appearance over large expanses of water. Water currents and changes in surface tension (typically caused by presence of oils or surfactants) alter the reflective properties of the water, and can be highlighted by sunglint. For example, surface water currents are visible to the east of Isle Royale that are oriented similarly to the gravity waves ? suggesting that they too

  5. High hardness in the biocompatible intermetallic compound β-Ti3Au

    PubMed Central

    Svanidze, Eteri; Besara, Tiglet; Ozaydin, M. Fevsi; Tiwary, Chandra Sekhar; Wang, Jiakui K.; Radhakrishnan, Sruthi; Mani, Sendurai; Xin, Yan; Han, Ke; Liang, Hong; Siegrist, Theo; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Morosan, E.

    2016-01-01

    The search for new hard materials is often challenging, but strongly motivated by the vast application potential such materials hold. Ti3Au exhibits high hardness values (about four times those of pure Ti and most steel alloys), reduced coefficient of friction and wear rates, and biocompatibility, all of which are optimal traits for orthopedic, dental, and prosthetic applications. In addition, the ability of this compound to adhere to ceramic parts can reduce both the weight and the cost of medical components. The fourfold increase in the hardness of Ti3Au compared to other Ti–Au alloys and compounds can be attributed to the elevated valence electron density, the reduced bond length, and the pseudogap formation. Understanding the origin of hardness in this intermetallic compound provides an avenue toward designing superior biocompatible, hard materials. PMID:27453942

  6. Advances in processing of NiAl intermetallic alloys and composites for high temperature aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochenek, Kamil; Basista, Michal

    2015-11-01

    Over the last few decades intermetallic compounds such as NiAl have been considered as potential high temperature structural materials for aerospace industry. A large number of investigations have been reported describing complex fabrication routes, introducing various reinforcing/alloying elements along with theoretical analyses. These research works were mainly focused on the overcoming of main disadvantage of nickel aluminides that still restricts their application range, i.e. brittleness at room temperature. In this paper we present an overview of research on NiAl processing and indicate methods that are promising in solving the low fracture toughness issue at room temperature. Other material properties relevant for high temperature applications are also addressed. The analysis is primarily done from the perspective of NiAl application in aero engines in temperature regimes from room up to the operating temperature (over 1150 °C) of turbine blades.

  7. Interface-related deformation phenomena in intermetallic γ-titanium aluminides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, F.; Wagner, R.

    1993-01-01

    The development of titanium aluminides towards higher ductility concentrates on Ti-rich alloys which are composed of the intermetallic phases γ(TiAl) and α2(Ti3Al). The two phases form a lamellar microstructure with various types of interfaces. The deformation behaviour of these materials was investigated by compression tests, which were performed for different orientations of the interfacial boundaries with respect to the sample axis. With regard to the mechanical properties the structure of the interfaces and the micromechanisms of deformation were studied by conventional and high resolution electron microscopy. Accordingly, the interfacial boundaries impede the propagation of slip across the lamellae, leading to an athermal contribution to the flow stress.

  8. Predicting the stability of ternary intermetallics with density functional theory and machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Jonathan; Chen, Liming; Botti, Silvana; Marques, Miguel A. L.

    2018-06-01

    We use a combination of machine learning techniques and high-throughput density-functional theory calculations to explore ternary compounds with the AB2C2 composition. We chose the two most common intermetallic prototypes for this composition, namely, the tI10-CeAl2Ga2 and the tP10-FeMo2B2 structures. Our results suggest that there may be ˜10 times more stable compounds in these phases than previously known. These are mostly metallic and non-magnetic. While the use of machine learning reduces the overall calculation cost by around 75%, some limitations of its predictive power still exist, in particular, for compounds involving the second-row of the periodic table or magnetic elements.

  9. Chemical route for formation of intermetallic Zn 4Sb 3 phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denoix, A.; Solaiappan, A.; Ayral, R. M.; Rouessac, F.; Tedenac, J. C.

    2010-05-01

    Synthesis of intermetallic zinc antimonide phases via low temperature solution route was investigated. Trial experiments were carried out under inert atmosphere at 70 °C using metallic Zn, SbCl 3 and NaBH 4 as reactants and tetrahydrofuran (THF), dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) as organic media. Powder X-ray analysis confirmed the nucleation and growth of ZnSb phases in presence of excess Zn. SEM analysis revealed the existence of core-shell structure comprising of Zn core and Sb shell. Such particles get transformed into Zn 4Sb 3 crystalline phases upon thermal treatment at 300 °C/6 h in a silica tube closed under high secondary vacuum.

  10. Intermetallic compounds in 3D integrated circuits technology: a brief review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annuar, Syahira; Mahmoodian, Reza; Hamdi, Mohd; Tu, King-Ning

    2017-12-01

    The high performance and downsizing technology of three-dimensional integrated circuits (3D-ICs) for mobile consumer electronic products have gained much attention in the microelectronics industry. This has been driven by the utilization of chip stacking by through-Si-via and solder microbumps. Pb-free solder microbumps are intended to replace conventional Pb-containing solder joints due to the rising awareness of environmental preservation. The use of low-volume solder microbumps has led to crucial constraints that cause several reliability issues, including excessive intermetallic compounds (IMCs) formation and solder microbump embrittlement due to IMCs growth. This article reviews technologies related to 3D-ICs, IMCs formation mechanisms and reliability issues concerning IMCs with Pb-free solder microbumps. Finally, future outlook on the potential growth of research in this area is discussed.

  11. Intermetallic compounds in 3D integrated circuits technology: a brief review

    PubMed Central

    Annuar, Syahira; Mahmoodian, Reza; Hamdi, Mohd; Tu, King-Ning

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The high performance and downsizing technology of three-dimensional integrated circuits (3D-ICs) for mobile consumer electronic products have gained much attention in the microelectronics industry. This has been driven by the utilization of chip stacking by through-Si-via and solder microbumps. Pb-free solder microbumps are intended to replace conventional Pb-containing solder joints due to the rising awareness of environmental preservation. The use of low-volume solder microbumps has led to crucial constraints that cause several reliability issues, including excessive intermetallic compounds (IMCs) formation and solder microbump embrittlement due to IMCs growth. This article reviews technologies related to 3D-ICs, IMCs formation mechanisms and reliability issues concerning IMCs with Pb-free solder microbumps. Finally, future outlook on the potential growth of research in this area is discussed. PMID:29057024

  12. Intermetallic compounds in 3D integrated circuits technology: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Annuar, Syahira; Mahmoodian, Reza; Hamdi, Mohd; Tu, King-Ning

    2017-01-01

    The high performance and downsizing technology of three-dimensional integrated circuits (3D-ICs) for mobile consumer electronic products have gained much attention in the microelectronics industry. This has been driven by the utilization of chip stacking by through-Si-via and solder microbumps. Pb-free solder microbumps are intended to replace conventional Pb-containing solder joints due to the rising awareness of environmental preservation. The use of low-volume solder microbumps has led to crucial constraints that cause several reliability issues, including excessive intermetallic compounds (IMCs) formation and solder microbump embrittlement due to IMCs growth. This article reviews technologies related to 3D-ICs, IMCs formation mechanisms and reliability issues concerning IMCs with Pb-free solder microbumps. Finally, future outlook on the potential growth of research in this area is discussed.

  13. Gas atomization synthesis of refractory or intermetallic compounds and supersaturated solid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Lograsso, Barbara K.; Ellis, Timothy W.

    1994-01-01

    A metallic melt is atomized using a high pressure atomizing gas wherein the temperature of the melt and the composition of the atomizing gas are selected such that the gas and melt react in the atomization spray zone to form a refractory or intermetallic compound in the as-atomized powder particles. A metallic melt is also atomized using a high pressure atomizing gas mixture gas wherein the temperature of the melt and the ratio of a reactive gas to a carrier gas are selected to form powder particles comprising a supersaturated solid solution of the atomic species of the reactive gas in the particles. The powder particles are then heat treated to precipitate dispersoids in-situ therein to form a dispersion strengthened material.

  14. Oxidation of high-temperature intermetallics; Proceedings of the Workshop, Cleveland, OH, Sept. 22, 23, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobstein, Toni (Editor); Doychak, Joseph (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The present conference on the high-temperature oxidation behavior of aerospace structures-applicable intermetallic compounds discusses the influence of reactive-element additions on the oxidation of Ni3Al base alloys, the effect of Ni3Al oxidation below 850 C on fracture behavior, the oxidation of FeAl + Hf, Zr, and B, the synergistic effect of Al and Si on the oxidation resistance of Fe alloys, and pack cementation coatings of Cr-Al on Fe, Ni, and Co alloys. Also discussed are the formation of alumina on Nb- and Ti-base alloys, the oxidation behavior of titanium aluminide alloys, silicide coatings for refractory metals, the oxidation of chromium disilicide, and the oxidation behavior of nickel beryllides.

  15. High hardness in the biocompatible intermetallic compound β-Ti3Au.

    PubMed

    Svanidze, Eteri; Besara, Tiglet; Ozaydin, M Fevsi; Tiwary, Chandra Sekhar; Wang, Jiakui K; Radhakrishnan, Sruthi; Mani, Sendurai; Xin, Yan; Han, Ke; Liang, Hong; Siegrist, Theo; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Morosan, E

    2016-07-01

    The search for new hard materials is often challenging, but strongly motivated by the vast application potential such materials hold. Ti3Au exhibits high hardness values (about four times those of pure Ti and most steel alloys), reduced coefficient of friction and wear rates, and biocompatibility, all of which are optimal traits for orthopedic, dental, and prosthetic applications. In addition, the ability of this compound to adhere to ceramic parts can reduce both the weight and the cost of medical components. The fourfold increase in the hardness of Ti3Au compared to other Ti-Au alloys and compounds can be attributed to the elevated valence electron density, the reduced bond length, and the pseudogap formation. Understanding the origin of hardness in this intermetallic compound provides an avenue toward designing superior biocompatible, hard materials.

  16. Slow plastic strain rate compressive flow in binary CoAl intermetallics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Constant-velocity elevated temperature compression tests have been conducted on a series of binary CoAl intermetallics produced by hot extrusion of blended prealloyed powders. The as-extruded materials were polycrystalline, and they retained their nominal 10-micron grain size after being tested between 1100 and 1400 K at strain rates ranging from 2 x 10 to the -4th to 2 x 10 to the -7th per sec. Significant plastic flow was obtained in all cases; while cracking was observed, much of this could be due to failure at matrix-oxide interfaces along extrusion stringers rather than to solely intergranular fracture. A maximum in flow strength occurs at an aluminum-to-cobalt ratio of 0.975, and the stress exponent appears to be constant for aluminum-to-cobalt ratios of 0.85 or more. It is likely that very aluminum-deficient materials deform by a different mechanism than do other compositions.

  17. Single crystal growth of the Er2PdSi3 intermetallic compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazilu, I.; Frontzek, M.; Löser, W.; Behr, G.; Teresiak, A.; Schultz, L.

    2005-02-01

    Single crystals of the Er2PdSi3 intermetallic compound melting congruently at 1648 ∘C, were grown by a floating zone method with radiation heating. The control of oxygen content was the key factor to avoid oxide precipitates, which can affect effective grain selection in the crystal growth process. Crystals grown at velocities of 5 mm/h with a preferred direction close to (1 0 0) with inclination angles of about 12 ∘ against the rod axis show very distinct facets at the rod surface. The crystals are Pd-depleted and Si-rich with respect to the nominal Er2PdSi3 stoichiometry, but exhibit inferior element segregation. Measurements on oriented single crystalline samples revealed antiferromagnetic ordering below 7 K, a magnetic easy axis parallel to the (0 0 1) axis of the AlB2-type hexagonal unit cell, and anisotropic electric properties.

  18. Highly stable carbon coated Mg2Si intermetallic nanoparticles for lithium-ion battery anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamirat, Andebet Gedamu; Hou, Mengyan; Liu, Yao; Bin, Duan; Sun, Yunhe; Fan, Long; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2018-04-01

    Silicon is an ideal candidate anode material for Li-ion batteries (LIBs). However, it suffers from rapid capacity fading due to large volume expansion upon lithium insertion. Herein, we design and fabricate highly stable carbon coated porous Mg2Si intermetallic anode material using facile mechano-thermal technique followed by carbon coating using thermal vapour deposition (TVD), toluene as carbon source. The electrode exhibits an excellent first reversible capacity of 726 mAh g-1 at a rate of 100 mA g-1. More importantly, the electrode demonstrates high rate capability (380 mAh g-1 at high rate of 2 A g-1) as well as high cycle stability, with capacity retentions of 65% over 500 cycles. These improvements are attributable to both Mg supporting medium and the uniform carbon coating, which can effectively increase the conductivity and electronic contact of the active material and protects large volume alterations during the electrochemical cycling process.

  19. Multiconfigurational nature of 5f orbitals in uranium and plutonium intermetallics

    PubMed Central

    Booth, C.H.; Jiang, Yu; Wang, D.L.; Mitchell, J.N.; Tobash, P.H.; Bauer, E.D.; Wall, M.A.; Allen, P.G.; Sokaras, D.; Nordlund, D.; Weng, T.-C.; Torrez, M.A.; Sarrao, J.L.

    2012-01-01

    Uranium and plutonium’s 5f electrons are tenuously poised between strongly bonding with ligand spd-states and residing close to the nucleus. The unusual properties of these elements and their compounds (e.g., the six different allotropes of elemental plutonium) are widely believed to depend on the related attributes of f-orbital occupancy and delocalization for which a quantitative measure is lacking. By employing resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and making comparisons to specific heat measurements, we demonstrate the presence of multiconfigurational f-orbital states in the actinide elements U and Pu and in a wide range of uranium and plutonium intermetallic compounds. These results provide a robust experimental basis for a new framework toward understanding the strongly-correlated behavior of actinide materials. PMID:22706643

  20. Discovery of Intermetallic Compounds from Traditional to Machine-Learning Approaches.

    PubMed

    Oliynyk, Anton O; Mar, Arthur

    2018-01-16

    Intermetallic compounds are bestowed by diverse compositions, complex structures, and useful properties for many materials applications. How metallic elements react to form these compounds and what structures they adopt remain challenging questions that defy predictability. Traditional approaches offer some rational strategies to prepare specific classes of intermetallics, such as targeting members within a modular homologous series, manipulating building blocks to assemble new structures, and filling interstitial sites to create stuffed variants. Because these strategies rely on precedent, they cannot foresee surprising results, by definition. Exploratory synthesis, whether through systematic phase diagram investigations or serendipity, is still essential for expanding our knowledge base. Eventually, the relationships may become too complex for the pattern recognition skills to be reliably or practically performed by humans. Complementing these traditional approaches, new machine-learning approaches may be a viable alternative for materials discovery, not only among intermetallics but also more generally to other chemical compounds. In this Account, we survey our own efforts to discover new intermetallic compounds, encompassing gallides, germanides, phosphides, arsenides, and others. We apply various machine-learning methods (such as support vector machine and random forest algorithms) to confront two significant questions in solid state chemistry. First, what crystal structures are adopted by a compound given an arbitrary composition? Initial efforts have focused on binary equiatomic phases AB, ternary equiatomic phases ABC, and full Heusler phases AB 2 C. Our analysis emphasizes the use of real experimental data and places special value on confirming predictions through experiment. Chemical descriptors are carefully chosen through a rigorous procedure called cluster resolution feature selection. Predictions for crystal structures are quantified by evaluating

  1. AN ATTEMPT TO LOCATE INTERMETALLIC PARTICLES IN ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS USING A BITTER FIGURE TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.; Harder, B.R.

    1961-10-01

    The compound ZrFe/sub 2/ is known to be ferromagnetic, and an attempt to locate particles of magnetic material in zircaloy-2 and dilute Zr- Fe alloys by a Bitter figure technlque is described. An Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/ sol in water-soluble plastic was used to prepare Bitter figures of the alloy surfaces in the form of replicas, which were then examined in an electron microscope. No magnetic particles were located in either zircaloy-2 or a Zr-O.3% Fe alloy. Subsequent work on specimens of ZrFe/sub 2/ showed that the failure to detect it in the dilute alloys arose because the size of themore » intermetallic particles in the latter was smaller than the size of the magnetic domains. (auth)« less

  2. Gas atomization synthesis of refractory or intermetallic compounds and supersaturated solid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, I.E.; Lograsso, B.K.; Ellis, T.W.

    1994-11-29

    A metallic melt is atomized using a high pressure atomizing gas wherein the temperature of the melt and the composition of the atomizing gas are selected such that the gas and melt react in the atomization spray zone to form a refractory or intermetallic compound in the as-atomized powder particles. A metallic melt is also atomized using a high pressure atomizing gas mixture gas wherein the temperature of the melt and the ratio of a reactive gas to a carrier gas are selected to form powder particles comprising a supersaturated solid solution of the atomic species of the reactive gas in the particles. The powder particles are then heat treated to precipitate dispersoids in-situ therein to form a dispersion strengthened material. 9 figures.

  3. Comparison of the Thermal Expansion Behavior of Several Intermetallic Silicide Alloys Between 293 and 1523 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, Sai V.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal expansion measurements were conducted on hot-pressed CrSi(sub 2), TiSi(sub 2), W Si(sub 2) and a two-phase Cr-Mo-Si intermetallic alloy between 293 and 1523 K during three heat-cool cycles. The corrected thermal expansion, (L/L(sub 0)(sub thermal), varied with the absolute temperature, T, as (deltaL/L(sub 0)(sub thermal) = A(T-293)(sup 3) + B(T-293)(sup 2) + C(T-293) + D, where A, B, C and D are regression constants. Excellent reproducibility was observed for most of the materials after the first heat-up cycle. In some cases, the data from the first heatup cycle deviated from those determined in the subsequent cycles. This deviation was attributed to the presence of residual stresses developed during processing, which are relieved after the first heat-up cycle.

  4. Interaction of intermetallic compound formation in Cu/SnAgCu/NiAu sandwich solder joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yanghua; Lu, Chuanyan; Chang, Junling; Xie, Xiaoming

    2006-05-01

    The interaction between Cu/solder interface and solder/Ni interface at a Cu/SnAgCu/NiAu sandwich solder joint with various surface finishes and solder heights was investigated. The interfacial microstructure and composition of intermetallic compounds (IMCs) were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The phase structure of IMC was identified by x-ray diffraction (XRD). It is found that ternary (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 IMCs form at both interfaces. The composition, thickness, and morphology of the ternary IMCs depend not only on the interface itself, but also on the opposite interface. That is to say, strong coupling effects exist between the two interfaces. Lattice parameters of (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 shrink with increasing Ni content, in agreement with Vegard’s law. The mechanism of ternary IMC formation and interface coupling effects are discussed in this paper.

  5. Epitaxial growth of Al9Ir2 intermetallic compound on Al(100): Mechanism and interface structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadok, J.; Pussi, K.; Šturm, S.; Ambrožič, B.; Gaudry, É.; de Weerd, M.-C.; Fournée, V.; Ledieu, J.

    2018-04-01

    The adsorption of Ir adatoms on Al(100) has been investigated under various exposures and temperature conditions. The experimental and theoretical results reveal a diffusion of Ir adatoms within the Al(100) surface selvedge already at 300 K. Above 593 K, two domains of a (√{5 }×√{5 }) R 26 .6∘ phase are identified by low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy measurements. This phase corresponds to the initial growth of an Al9Ir2 compound at the Al(100) surface. The Al9Ir2 intermetallic domains are terminated by bulklike pure Al layers. The structural stability of Al9Ir2 (001) grown on Al(100) has been analyzed by density functional theory based calculations. Dynamical LEED analysis is consistent with an Ir adsorption leading to the growth of an Al9Ir2 intermetallic compound. We propose that the epitaxial relationship Al9Ir2(001 ) ∥Al (100) and Al9Ir2[100 ] ∥Al [031 ]/[013 ] originates from a matching of Al atomic arrangements present both on Al(100) and on pure Al(001) layers present in the Al9Ir2 compound. Finally, the interface between Al9Ir2 precipitates and the Al matrix has been characterized by transmission electron microscopy measurements. The cross-sectional observations are consistent with the formation of Al9Ir2 (001) compounds. These measurements indicate an important Ir diffusion within Al(100) near the surface region. The coherent interface between Al9Ir2 and the Al matrix is sharp.

  6. Equilibrium distribution of rare earth elements between molten KCl-LiCl eutectic salt and liquid cadmium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Masahiro; Kurata, Masaki; Hijikata, Takatoshi; Inoue, Tadashi

    1991-11-01

    Distribution experiments for several rare earth elements (La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Y) between molten KCl-LiCl eutectic salt and liquid Cd were carried out at 450, 500 and 600°C. The material balance of rare earth elements after reaching the equilibrium and their distribution and chemical states in a Cd sample frozen after the experiment were examined. The results suggested the formation of solid intermetallic compounds at the lower concentrations of rare earth metals dissolved in liquid Cd than those solubilities measured in the binary alloy system. The distribution coefficients of rare earth elements between two phases (mole fraction in the Cd phase divided by mole fraction in the salt phase) were determined at each temperature. These distribution coefficients were explained satisfactorily by using the activity coefficients of chlorides and metals in salt and Cd. Both the activity coefficients of metal and chloride caused a much smaller distribution coefficient of Y relative to those of other elements.

  7. Crew Earth Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runco, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Crew Earth Observations (CEO) takes advantage of the crew in space to observe and photograph natural and human-made changes on Earth. The photographs record the Earth's surface changes over time, along with dynamic events such as storms, floods, fires and volcanic eruptions. These images provide researchers on Earth with key data to better understand the planet.

  8. Why Earth Science?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    This article briefly describes Earth science. The study of Earth science provides the foundation for an understanding of the Earth, its processes, its resources, and its environment. Earth science is the study of the planet in its entirety, how its lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere work together as systems and how they affect…

  9. NASA Earth Day 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-22

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden speaks to students who attended the NASA sponsored Earth Day event April 22, 2014 at Union Station in Washington, DC. NASA sponsored the Earth Day event as part of its "Earth Right Now" campaign, celebrating the launch of five Earth-observing missions in 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  10. Intermetallic and ceramic matrix composites for 815 to 1370 C (1500 to 2500 F) gas turbine engine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Joseph R.

    1989-01-01

    Light weight and potential high temperature capability of intermetallic compounds, such as the aluminides, and structural ceramics, such as the carbides and nitrides, make these materials attractive for gas turbine engine applications. In terms of specific fuel consumption and specific thrust, revolutionary improvements over current technology are being sought by realizing the potential of these materials through their use as matrices combined with high strength, high temperature fibers. The U.S. along with other countries throughout the world have major research and development programs underway to characterize these composites materials; improve their reliability; identify and develop new processing techniques, new matrix compositions, and new fiber compositions; and to predict their life and failure mechanisms under engine operating conditions. The status is summarized of NASA's Advanced High Temperature Engine Materials Technology Program (HITEMP) and the potential benefits are described to be gained in 21st century transport aircraft by utilizing intermetallic and ceramic matrix composite materials.

  11. Microstructure and wear properties of laser clad Ti2Ni3Si/Ni3Ti multiphase intermetallic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. M.; Tang, H. B.; Cai, L. X.; Cao, F.; Zhang, L. Y.; Yu, R. L.

    2005-05-01

    Wear resistant Ti2Ni3Si/Ni3Ti multiphase intermetallic coatings with a microstructure consisting of Ti2Ni3Si primary dendrites and interdendritic Ti2Ni3Si/Ni3Ti eutectic were fabricated on a substrate of 0.2% C plain carbon steel by a laser cladding process with Ti-Ni-Si alloy powders. The Ti2Ni3Si/Ni3Ti coatings have excellent wear resistance and a low coefficient of friction under metallic dry sliding wear test conditions with hardened 0.45% C carbon steel as the silide-mating counterpart. The excellent tribological properties of the coating are attributed to the high hardness, strong covalent-dominant atomic bonds of the ternary metal silicide Ti2Ni3Si and to the high yield strength and strong yield anomaly of the intermetallic compound Ni3Ti.

  12. Influence of the Heterogeneous Nucleation Sites on the Kinetics of Intermetallic Phase Formation in Aged Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, Elis Almeida; Magnabosco, Rodrigo

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this work is to study the influence of the heterogeneous nucleation site quantity, observed in different ferrite and austenite grain size samples, on the phase transformations that result in intermetallic phases in a UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel (DSS). Solution treatment was conducted for 1, 24, 96, or 192 hours at 1373 K (1100 °C) to obtain different ferrite and austenite grain sizes. After solution treatment, isothermal aging treatments for 5, 8, 10, 20, 30, or 60 minutes at 1123 K (850 °C) were performed to verify the influence of different amounts of heterogeneous nucleation sites in the kinetics of intermetallic phase formation. The sample solution treated for 1 hour, with the highest surface area between matrix phases, was the one that presented, after 60 minutes at 1123 K (850 °C), the smaller volume fraction of ferrite (indicative of greater intermetallic phase formation), higher volume of sigma (that was present in coral-like and compact morphologies), and chi phase. It was not possible to identify which was the first nucleated phase, sigma or chi. It was also observed that the phase formation kinetics is higher for the sample solution treated for 1 hour. It was evidenced that, from a certain moment on, the chi phase begins to be consumed due to the sigma phase formation, and the austenite/ferrite interface presents higher S V for all solution treatment times. It was also observed that intermetallic phases form preferably in austenite-ferrite interfaces, although the higher occupation rate occurs at triple junction ferrite-ferrite-ferrite. It was verified that there was no saturation of nucleation sites in any interface type nor triple junction, and the equilibrium after 1 hour of aging at 1123 K (850 °C) was not achieved. It was then concluded that sigma phase formation is possibly controlled by diffusional processes, without saturation of nucleation sites.

  13. Structural plasticity: how intermetallics deform themselves in response to chemical pressure, and the complex structures that result.

    PubMed

    Berns, Veronica M; Fredrickson, Daniel C

    2014-10-06

    Interfaces between periodic domains play a crucial role in the properties of metallic materials, as is vividly illustrated by the way in which the familiar malleability of many metals arises from the formation and migration of dislocations. In complex intermetallics, such interfaces can occur as an integral part of the ground-state crystal structure, rather than as defects, resulting in such marvels as the NaCd2 structure (whose giant cubic unit cell contains more than 1000 atoms). However, the sources of the periodic interfaces in intermetallics remain mysterious, unlike the dislocations in simple metals, which can be associated with the exertion of physical stresses. In this Article, we propose and explore the concept of structural plasticity, the hypothesis that interfaces in complex intermetallic structures similarly result from stresses, but ones that are inherent in a defect-free parent structure, rather than being externally applied. Using DFT-chemical pressure analysis, we show how the complex structures of Ca2Ag7 (Yb2Ag7 type), Ca14Cd51 (Gd14Ag51 type), and the 1/1 Tsai-type quasicrystal approximant CaCd6 (YCd6 type) can all be traced to large negative pressures around the Ca atoms of a common progenitor structure, the CaCu5 type with its simple hexagonal 6-atom unit cell. Two structural paths are found by which the compounds provide relief to the Ca atoms' negative pressures: a Ca-rich pathway, where lower coordination numbers are achieved through defects eliminating transition metal (TM) atoms from the structure; and a TM-rich path, along which the addition of spacer Cd atoms provides the Ca coordination environments greater independence from each other as they contract. The common origins of these structures in the presence of stresses within a single parent structure highlights the diverse paths by which intermetallics can cope with competing interactions, and the role that structural plasticity may play in navigating this diversity.

  14. Influence of intermetallic coatings of system Ti-Al on durability of slotting tool from high speed steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardanyan, E. L.; Budilov, V. V.; Ramazanov, K. N.; Khusnimardanov, R. N.; Nagimov, R. Sh

    2017-05-01

    The operation conditions and mechanism of wear of slotting tools from high-speed steel was researched. The analysis of methods increasing durability was carried out. The effect of intermetallic coatings deposited from vacuum-arc discharge plasma on the physical-mechanical high-speed steel EP657MP was discovered. The pilot batch of the slotting tool and production tests were carried out.

  15. Synthesis of Pt 3Y and Other Early–Late Intermetallic Nanoparticles by Way of a Molten Reducing Agent

    SciTech Connect

    Kanady, Jacob S.; Leidinger, Peter; Haas, Andreas

    Early–late intermetallic phases have garnered increased attention recently for their catalytic properties. To achieve the high surface areas needed for industrially relevant applications, these phases must be synthesized as nanoparticles in a scalable fashion. Herein, Pt 3Y—targeted as a prototypical example of an early–late intermetallic—has been synthesized as nanoparticles approximately 5–20 nm in diameter via a solution process and characterized by XRD, TEM, EDS, and XPS. The key development is the use of a molten borohydride (MEt 3BH, M = Na, K) as both the reducing agent and reaction medium. Readily available halide precursors of the two metals are used.more » Accordingly, no organic ligands are necessary, as the resulting halide salt byproduct prevents sintering, which further permits dispersion of the nanoscale intermetallic onto a support. The versatility of this approach was validated by the synthesis of other intermetallic phases such as Pt 3Sc, Pt 3Lu, Pt 2Na, and Au 2Y.« less

  16. Synthesis of Pt 3Y and Other Early–Late Intermetallic Nanoparticles by Way of a Molten Reducing Agent

    DOE PAGES

    Kanady, Jacob S.; Leidinger, Peter; Haas, Andreas; ...

    2017-03-29

    Early–late intermetallic phases have garnered increased attention recently for their catalytic properties. To achieve the high surface areas needed for industrially relevant applications, these phases must be synthesized as nanoparticles in a scalable fashion. Herein, Pt 3Y—targeted as a prototypical example of an early–late intermetallic—has been synthesized as nanoparticles approximately 5–20 nm in diameter via a solution process and characterized by XRD, TEM, EDS, and XPS. The key development is the use of a molten borohydride (MEt 3BH, M = Na, K) as both the reducing agent and reaction medium. Readily available halide precursors of the two metals are used.more » Accordingly, no organic ligands are necessary, as the resulting halide salt byproduct prevents sintering, which further permits dispersion of the nanoscale intermetallic onto a support. The versatility of this approach was validated by the synthesis of other intermetallic phases such as Pt 3Sc, Pt 3Lu, Pt 2Na, and Au 2Y.« less

  17. Size-dependent disorder-order transformation in the synthesis of monodisperse intermetallic PdCu nanocatalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Chenyu; Chen, Dennis P.; Unocic, Raymond R.; ...

    2016-05-23

    The high performance of Pd-based intermetallic nanocatalysts has the potential to replace Pt-containing catalysts for fuel-cell reactions. Conventionally, intermetallic particles are obtained through the annealing of nanoparticles of a random alloy distribution. However, this method inevitably leads to sintering of the nanoparticles and generates polydisperse samples. Here, monodisperse PdCu nanoparticles with the ordered B2 phase were synthesized by seed-mediated co-reduction using PdCu nanoparticle seeds with a random alloy distribution (A1 phase). A time-evolution study suggests that the particles must overcome a size-dependent activation barrier for the ordering process to occur. Characterization of the as-prepared PdCu B2 nanoparticles by electron microscopymore » techniques revealed surface segregation of Pd as a thin shell over the PdCu core. The ordered nanoparticles exhibit superior activity and durability for the oxygen reduction reaction in comparison with PdCu A1 nanoparticles. This seed-mediated co-reduction strategy produced monodisperse nanoparticles ideally suited for structure–activity studies. Furthermore, the study of their growth mechanism provides insights into the size dependence of disorder–order transformations of bimetallic alloys at the nanoscale, which should enable the design of synthetic strategies toward other intermetallic systems.« less

  18. First principle study on generalized-stacking-fault energy surfaces of B2-AlRE intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaorong; Wang, Shaofeng; Wang, Rui

    2011-12-01

    First-principles calculations are used to predict the generalized-stacking-fault energy (GSFE) surfaces of AlRE intermetallics. The calculations employ the projector augmented-wave (PAW) method within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) using the density functional theory (DFT). GSFE curves along <1 1 1> {1 1 0} direction, <1 1 0> {1 1 0} direction and <1 0 0> {1 1 0} direction have been calculated. The fitted GSFE surfaces have been obtained from the Fourier series based on the translational symmetry. In order to illuminate the reasonable of our computational accuracy, we have compared our theoretical results of B2 intermetallics YCu with the previous calculated results. The unstable-stacking-fault energy (γus) on the {1 1 0} plane has the laws of AlPr, <1 1 0> and <1 1 1> directions. For the antiphase boundary (APB) energy, that of AlSc is the lowest in the calculated AlRE intermetallics. So the superdislocation with the Burgers vector along <1 1 1> direction of AlSc will easily split into two superpartials.

  19. The Lifeworld Earth and a Modelled Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juuti, Kalle

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to study the question of whether a phenomenological view of the Earth could be empirically endorsed. The phenomenological way of thinking considers the Earth as a material entity, but not as an object as viewed in science. In the learning science tradition, tracking the process of the conceptual change of the shape of the…

  20. Beneficial Role of Copper in the Enhancement of Durability of Ordered Intermetallic PtFeCu Catalyst for Electrocatalytic Oxygen Reduction.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Balamurugan; Tamaki, Takanori; Yamaguchi, Takeo

    2015-08-05

    Design of Pt alloy catalysts with enhanced activity and durability is a key challenge for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. In the present work, we compare the durability of the ordered intermetallic face-centered tetragonal (fct) PtFeCu catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) relative to its counterpart bimetallic catalysts, i.e., the ordered intermetallic fct-PtFe catalyst and the commercial catalyst from Tanaka Kikinzoku Kogyo, TKK-PtC. Although both fct catalysts initially exhibited an ordered structure and mass activity approximately 2.5 times higher than that of TKK-Pt/C, the presence of Cu at the ordered intermetallic fct-PtFeCu catalyst led to a significant enhancement in durability compared to that of the ordered intermetallic fct-PtFe catalyst. The ordered intermetallic fct-PtFeCu catalyst retained more than 70% of its mass activity and electrochemically active surface area (ECSA) over 10 000 durability cycles carried out at 60 °C. In contrast, the ordered intermetallic fct-PtFe catalyst maintained only about 40% of its activity. The temperature of the durability experiment is also shown to be important: the catalyst was more severely degraded at 60 °C than at room temperature. To obtain insight into the observed enhancement in durability of fct-PtFeCu catalyst, a postmortem analysis of the ordered intermetallic fct-PtFeCu catalyst was carried out using scanning transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (STEM-EDX) line scan. The STEM-EDX line scans of the ordered intermetallic fct-PtFeCu catalyst over 10 000 durability cycles showed a smaller degree of Fe and Cu dissolution from the catalyst. Conversely, large dissolution of Fe was identified in the ordered intermetallic fct-PtFe catalyst, indicating a lesser retention of Fe that causes the destruction of ordered structure and gives rise to poor durability. The enhancement in the durability of the ordered intermetallic fct-PtFeCu catalyst is ascribed to

  1. Incorporation of Interfacial Intermetallic Morphology in Fracture Mechanism Map for Sn-Ag-Cu Solder Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.; Kumar, P.; Dutta, I.; Sidhu, R.; Renavikar, M.; Mahajan, R.

    2014-01-01

    A fracture mechanism map (FMM) is a powerful tool which correlates the fracture behavior of a material to its microstructural characteristics in an explicit and convenient way. In the FMM for solder joints, an effective thickness of the interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC) layer ( t eff) and the solder yield strength ( σ ys,eff) are used as abscissa and ordinate axes, respectively, as these two predominantly affect the fracture behavior of solder joints. Earlier, a definition of t eff, based on the uniform thickness of IMC ( t u) and the average height of the IMC scallops ( t s), was proposed and shown to aptly explain the fracture behavior of solder joints on Cu. This paper presents a more general definition of t eff that is more widely applicable to a range of metallizations, including Cu and electroless nickel immersion gold (ENIG). Using this new definition of t eff, mode I FMM for SAC387/Cu joints has been updated and its validity was confirmed. A preliminary FMM for SAC387/Cu joints with ENIG metallization is also presented.

  2. Magnetic field controlled floating-zone single crystal growth of intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, R.; Gerbeth, G.; Priede, J.

    2013-03-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) floating zone single crystal growth is an important technique for the preparation of single bulk crystals. The advantage of the floating-zone method is the crucible-free growth of single crystals of reactive materials with high melting points. The strong heat diffusion on the surface, as well as the melt convection in the molten zone due to induction heating, often leads to an undesired solid-liquid interface geometry with a concave (towards the solid phase) outer rim. These concave parts aggravate the single crystal growth over the full cross-section. A two-phase stirrer was developed at IFW Dresden in order to avoid the problems connected with these concave parts. It acts as a magnetic field pump and changes the typical double vortex structure to a single roll structure, thus pushing hot melt into the regions where the concave parts may arise. The current in the secondary coil is induced by the primary coil, and the capacitor and the resistance of the secondary circuit are adjusted to get a stable 90 degree phase-shift between the coil currents. Single crystal growth of industrial relevant RuAl and TiAl intermetallic compounds was performed based on the material parameters and using the adjusted two-phase stirrer. Very recently, the magnetic system was applied to the crystal growth of biocompatible TiNb alloys and antiferromagnetic Heusler MnSi compounds.

  3. Data on a Laves phase intermetallic matrix composite in situ toughened by ductile precipitates.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Alexander J; Bhowmik, Ayan; Purkayastha, Surajit; Jones, Nicholas G; Giuliani, Finn; Clegg, William J; Dye, David; Stone, Howard J

    2017-10-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "Laves phase intermetallic matrix composite in situ toughened by ductile precipitates" (Knowles et al.) [1]. The composite comprised a Fe 2 (Mo, Ti) matrix with bcc (Mo, Ti) precipitated laths produced in situ by an aging heat treatment, which was shown to confer a toughening effect (Knowles et al.) [1]. Here, details are given on a focused ion beam (FIB) slice and view experiment performed on the composite so as to determine that the 3D morphology of the bcc (Mo, Ti) precipitates were laths rather than needles. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (S(TEM)) micrographs of the microstructure as well as energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) maps are presented that identify the elemental partitioning between the C14 Laves matrix and the bcc laths, with Mo rejected from the matrix into laths. A TEM selected area diffraction pattern (SADP) and key is provided that was used to validate the orientation relation between the matrix and laths identified in (Knowles et al.) [1] along with details of the transformation matrix determined.

  4. An intermetallic Au24Ag20 superatom nanocluster stabilized by labile ligands.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Su, Haifeng; Xu, Chaofa; Li, Gang; Gell, Lars; Lin, Shuichao; Tang, Zichao; Häkkinen, Hannu; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2015-04-08

    An intermetallic nanocluster containing 44 metal atoms, Au24Ag20(2-SPy)4(PhC≡C)20Cl2, was successfully synthesized and structurally characterized by single-crystal analysis and density funtional theory computations. The 44 metal atoms in the cluster are arranged as a concentric three-shell Au12@Ag20@Au12 Keplerate structure having a high symmetry. For the first time, the co-presence of three different types of anionic ligands (i.e., phenylalkynyl, 2-pyridylthiolate, and chloride) was revealed on the surface of metal nanoclusters. Similar to thiolates, alkynyls bind linearly to surface Au atoms using their σ-bonds, leading to the formation of two types of surface staple units (PhC≡C-Au-L, L = PhC≡C(-) or 2-pyridylthiolate) on the cluster. The co-presence of three different surface ligands allows the site-specific surface and functional modification of the cluster. The lability of PhC≡C(-) ligands on the cluster was demonstrated, making it possible to keep the metal core intact while removing partial surface capping. Moreover, it was found that ligand exchange on the cluster occurs easily to offer various derivatives with the same metal core but different surface functionality and thus different solubility.

  5. Explosive Compations of Intermetallic-Forming Powder Mixtures for Fabricating Structural Energetic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, S. W.; Aydelotte, B.; Fondse, D.; Wei, C.-T.; Jiang, F.; Herbold, E.; Vecchio, K.; Meyers, M. A.; Thadhani, N. N.

    2009-12-01

    A double-tube implosion geometry is used to explosively shock consolidate intermetallic-forming Ni-Al, Ta-Al, Nb-Al, Mo-Al and W-Al powder mixtures for fabricating bulk structural energetic materials, with mechanical strength and ability to undergo impact-initiated exothermic reactions. The compacts are characterized based on uniformity of micro structure and degree of densification. Mechanical properties of the compacts are characterized over the strain-rate range of 10-3 to 104 s-1. The impact reactivity is determined using rod-on-anvil experiments, in which disk-shaped compacts mounted on a copper projectile, are impacted against a steel anvil in using a 7.62 mm gas gun. The impact reactivity of the various explosively-consolidated reactive powder mixture compacts is correlated with overall kinetic energy and impact stress to determine their influence on threshold for reaction initiation. The characteristics of the various compacts, their mechanical properties and impact-initiated chemical reactivity will be described in this paper.

  6. First-principles screening of structural properties of intermetallic compounds on martensitic transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joohwi; Ikeda, Yuji; Tanaka, Isao

    2017-11-01

    Martensitic transformation with good structural compatibility between parent and martensitic phases are required for shape memory alloys (SMAs) in terms of functional stability. In this study, first-principles-based materials screening is systematically performed to investigate the intermetallic compounds with the martensitic phases by focusing on energetic and dynamical stabilities as well as structural compatibility with the parent phase. The B2, D03, and L21 crystal structures are considered as the parent phases, and the 2H and 6M structures are considered as the martensitic phases. In total, 3384 binary and 3243 ternary alloys with stoichiometric composition ratios are investigated. It is found that 187 alloys survive after the screening. Some of the surviving alloys are constituted by the chemical elements already widely used in SMAs, but other various metallic elements are also found in the surviving alloys. The energetic stability of the surviving alloys is further analyzed by comparison with the data in Materials Project Database (MPD) to examine the alloys whose martensitic structures may cause further phase separation or transition to the other structures.

  7. Effects of Fragmented Fe Intermetallic Compounds on Ductility in Al-Si-Mg Alloys.

    PubMed

    Kim, JaeHwang; Kim, DaeHwan

    2018-03-01

    Fe is intentionally added in order to form the Fe intermetallic compounds (Fe-IMCs) during casting. Field emission scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) was conducted to understand microstructural changes and chemical composition analyses. The needlelike Fe-IMCs based on two dimensional observation with hundreds of micro size are modified to fragmented particles with the minimum size of 300 nm through clod rolling with 80% thickness reduction. The ratio of Fe:Si on the fragmented Fe-IMCs after 80% reduction is close to 1:1, representing the β-Al5FeSi. The yield and tensile strengths are increased with increasing reduction rate. On the other hand, the elongation is decreased with the 40% reduction, but slightly increased with the 60% reduction. The elongation is dramatically increased over two times for the specimen of 80% reduction compared with that of the as-cast. Fracture behavior is strongly affected by the morphology and size of Fe-IMCs. The fracture mode is changed from brittle to ductile with the microstructure modification of Fe-IMCs.

  8. Electronic structure, elasticity, bonding features and mechanical behaviour of zinc intermetallics: A DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Fatima, Bushra, E-mail: bushrafatima25@gmail.com; Acharya, Nikita; Sanyal, Sankar P.

    2016-05-06

    The structural stability, electronic structure, elastic and mechanical properties of TiZn and ZrZn intermetallics have been studied using ab-initio full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method within generalized gradient approximation for exchange and correlation potentials. The various structural parameters, such as lattice constant (a{sub 0}), bulk modulus (B), and its pressure derivative (B’) are analysed and compared. The investigation of elastic constants affirm that both TiZn and ZrZn are elastically stable in CsCl (B{sub 2} phase) structure. The electronic structures have been analysed quantitatively from the band structure which reveals the metallic nature of these compounds. To better illustratemore » the nature of bonding and charge transfer, we have also studied the Fermi surfaces. The three well known criterion of ductility namely Pugh’s rule, Cauchy’s pressure and Frantsevich rule elucidate the ductile nature of these compounds.« less

  9. Amino Acids Aided Sintering for the Formation of Highly Porous FeAl Intermetallic Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Karczewski, Krzysztof; Stepniowski, Wojciech J.

    2017-01-01

    Fabrication of metallic foams by sintering metal powders mixed with thermally degradable compounds is of interest for numerous applications. Compounds releasing gaseous nitrogen, minimizing interactions between the formed gases and metallic foam by diluting other combustion products, were applied. Cysteine and phenylalanine, were used as gas releasing agents during the sintering of elemental Fe and Al powders in order to obtain metallic foams. Characterization was carried out by optical microscopy with image analysis, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy, and gas permeability tests. Porosity of the foams was up to 42 ± 3% and 46 ± 2% for sintering conducted with 5 wt % cysteine and phenylalanine, respectively. Chemical analyses of the formed foams revealed that the oxygen content was below 0.14 wt % and the carbon content was below 0.3 wt %. Therefore, no brittle phases could be formed that would spoil the mechanical stability of the FeAl intermetallic foams. The gas permeability tests revealed that only the foams formed in the presence of cysteine have enough interconnections between the pores, thanks to the improved air flow through the porous materials. The foams formed with cysteine can be applied as filters and industrial catalysts. PMID:28773106

  10. Applications of Ni3Al Based Intermetallic Alloys—Current Stage and Potential Perceptivities

    PubMed Central

    Jozwik, Pawel; Polkowski, Wojciech; Bojar, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of current and prospective applications of Ni3Al based intermetallic alloys—modern engineering materials with special properties that are potentially useful for both structural and functional purposes. The bulk components manufactured from these materials are intended mainly for forging dies, furnace assembly, turbocharger components, valves, and piston head of internal combustion engines. The Ni3Al based alloys produced by a directional solidification are also considered as a material for the fabrication of jet engine turbine blades. Moreover, development of composite materials with Ni3Al based alloys as a matrix hardened by, e.g., TiC, ZrO2, WC, SiC and graphene, is also reported. Due to special physical and chemical properties; it is expected that these materials in the form of thin foils and strips should make a significant contribution to the production of high tech devices, e.g., Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) or Microtechnology-based Energy and Chemical Systems (MECS); as well as heat exchangers; microreactors; micro-actuators; components of combustion chambers and gasket of rocket and jet engines as well components of high specific strength systems. Additionally, their catalytic properties may find an application in catalytic converters, air purification systems from chemical and biological toxic agents or in a hydrogen “production” by a decomposition of hydrocarbons.

  11. Launch Load Resistant Spacecraft Mechanism Bearings Made From NiTi Superelastic Intermetallic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Moore, Lewis E.

    2014-01-01

    Compared to conventional bearing materials (tool steel and ceramics), emerging Superelastic Intermetallic Materials (SIMs), such as 60NiTi, have significantly lower elastic modulus and enhanced strain capability. They are also immune to atmospheric corrosion (rusting). This offers the potential for increased resilience and superior ability to withstand static indentation load without damage. In this paper, the static load capacity of hardened 60NiTi 50mm bore ball-bearing races are measured to correlate existing flat-plate indentation load capacity data to an actual bearing geometry through the Hertz stress relations. The results confirmed the validity of using the Hertz stress relations to model 60NiTi contacts; 60NiTi exhibits a static stress capability (3.1GPa) between that of 440C (2.4GPa) and REX20 (3.8GPa) tool steel. When the reduced modulus and extended strain capability are taken into account, 60NiTi is shown to withstand higher loads than other bearing materials. To quantify this effect, a notional space mechanism, a 5kg mass reaction wheel, was modeled with respect to launch load capability when supported on 440C, 60NiTi and REX20 tool steel bearings. For this application, the use of REX20 bearings increased the static load capability of the mechanism by a factor of three while the use of 60NiTi bearings resulted in an order of magnitude improvement compared to the baseline 440C stainless steel bearings.

  12. High-Temperature Oxidation of Fe3Al Intermetallic Alloy Prepared by Additive Manufacturing LENS

    PubMed Central

    Łyszkowski, Radosław

    2015-01-01

    The isothermal oxidation of Fe-28Al-5Cr (at%) intermetallic alloy microalloyed with Zr and B (<0.08 at%) in air atmosphere, in the temperature range of 1000 to 1200 °C, was studied. The investigation was carried out on the thin-walled (<1 mm) elements prepared by Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS) from alloy powder of a given composition. Characterization of the specimens, after the oxidation, was conducted using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, with back-scatter detector (BSE) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) attachments). The investigation has shown, that the oxidized samples were covered with a thin, homogeneous α-Al2O3 oxide layers. The intensity of their growth indicates that the material lost its resistance to oxidation at 1200 °C. Structural analysis of the thin-walled components’ has not shown intensification of the oxidation process at the joints of additive layers. PMID:28788014

  13. Intermetallic Compound Growth and Stress Development in Al-Cu Diffusion Couple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishler, M.; Ouvarov-Bancalero, V.; Chae, Seung H.; Nguyen, Luu; Kim, Choong-Un

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports experimental observations evidencing that the intermetallic compound phase interfaced with Cu in the Al-Cu diffusion couple is most likely α2-Cu3Al phase, not γ-Cu9Al4 phase as previously assumed, and that its growth to a critical thickness may result in interface failure by stress-driven fracture. These conclusions are made based on an interdiffusion study of a diffusion couple made of a thick Cu plate coated with ˜ 2- μm-thick Al thin film. The interface microstructure and lattice parameter were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analysis. Specimens aged at temperature between 623 K (350°C) and 723 K (450°C) for various hours produced consistent results supporting the main conclusions. It is found that disordered α2-Cu3Al phase grows in a similar manner to solid-state epitaxy, probably owing to its structural similarity to the Cu lattice. The increase in the interface strain that accompanies the α2-Cu3Al phase growth ultimately leads to interface fracture proceeding from crack initiation and growth along the interface. This mechanism provides the most consistent explanation for interface failures observed in other studies.

  14. Characterization of ceramics and intermetallics fabricated by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurst, Janet B.

    1989-01-01

    Three efforts aimed at investigating the process of self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS) for the fabrication of structural ceramics and intermetallics are summarized. Of special interest was the influence of processing variables such as exothermic dopants, gravity, and green state morphology in materials produced by SHS. In the first effort directed toward the fabrication of SiC, exothermic dopants of yttrium and zirconium were added to SiO2 or SiO2 + NiO plus carbon powder mix and processed by SHS. This approach was unsuccessful since it did not produce the desired product of crystalline SiC. In the second effort, the influence of gravity was investigated by examining Ni-Al microstructures which were produced by SHS combustion waves traveling with and opposite the gravity direction. Although final composition and total porosities of the combusted Ni-Al compounds were found to be gravity independent, larger pores were created in those specimens which were combusted opposite to the gravity force direction. Finally, it was found that green microstructure has a significant effect on the appearance of the combusted piece. Severe pressing laminations were observed to arrest the combustion front for TiC samples.

  15. Intermetallic Nickel-Titanium Alloys for Oil-Lubricated Bearing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, C.; Pepper, S. V.; Noebe, R.; Hull, D. R.; Glennon, G.

    2009-01-01

    An intermetallic nickel-titanium alloy, NITINOL 60 (60NiTi), containing 60 wt% nickel and 40 wt% titanium, is shown to be a promising candidate material for oil-lubricated rolling and sliding contact applications such as bearings and gears. NiTi alloys are well known and normally exploited for their shape memory behavior. When properly processed, however, NITINOL 60 exhibits excellent dimensional stability and useful structural properties. Processed via high temperature, high-pressure powder metallurgy techniques or other means, NITINOL 60 offers a broad combination of physical properties that make it unique among bearing materials. NITINOL 60 is hard, electrically conductive, highly corrosion resistant, less dense than steel, readily machined prior to final heat treatment, nongalling and nonmagnetic. No other bearing alloy, metallic or ceramic encompasses all of these attributes. Further, NITINOL 60 has shown remarkable tribological performance when compared to other aerospace bearing alloys under oil-lubricated conditions. Spiral orbit tribometer (SOT) tests were conducted in vacuum using NITINOL 60 balls loaded between rotating 440C stainless steel disks, lubricated with synthetic hydrocarbon oil. Under conditions considered representative of precision bearings, the performance (life and friction) equaled or exceeded that observed with silicon nitride or titanium carbide coated 440C bearing balls. Based upon this preliminary data, it appears that NITINOL 60, despite its high titanium content, is a promising candidate alloy for advanced mechanical systems requiring superior and intrinsic corrosion resistance, electrical conductivity and nonmagnetic behavior under lubricated contacting conditions.

  16. Electride and superconductivity behaviors in Mn5Si3-type intermetallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaoqing; Wang, Bosen; Xiao, Zewen; Lu, Yangfan; Kamiya, Toshio; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Hosono, Hideo

    2017-08-01

    Electrides are unique in the sense that they contain localized anionic electrons in the interstitial regions. Yet they exist with a diversity of chemical compositions, especially under extreme conditions, implying generalized underlying principles for their existence. What is rarely observed is the combination of electride state and superconductivity within the same material, but such behavior would open up a new category of superconductors. Here, we report a hexagonal Nb5Ir3 phase of Mn5Si3-type structure that falls into this category and extends the electride concept into intermetallics. The confined electrons in the one-dimensional cavities are reflected by the characteristic channel bands in the electronic structure. Filling these free spaces with foreign oxygen atoms serves to engineer the band topology and increase the superconducting transition temperature to 10.5 K in Nb5Ir3O. Specific heat analysis indicates the appearance of low-lying phonons and two-gap s-wave superconductivity. Strong electron-phonon coupling is revealed to be the pairing glue with an anomalously large ratio between the superconducting gap Δ0 and Tc, 2Δ0/kBTc = 6.12. The general rule governing the formation of electrides concerns the structural stability against the cation filling/extraction in the channel site.

  17. Thermodynamic, electronic and magnetic properties of intermetallic compounds through statistical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadeville, M. C.; Pierron-Bohnes, V.; Bouzidi, L.; Sanchez, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    Local and average electronic and magnetic properties of transition metal alloys are strongly correlated to the distribution of atoms on the lattice sites. The ability of some systems to form long range ordered structures at low temperature allows to discuss their properties in term of well identified occupation operators as those related to long range order (LRO) parameters. We show that using theoretical determinations of these LRO parameters through statistical models like the cluster variation method (CVM) developed to simulate the experimental phase diagrams, we are able to reproduce a lot of physical properties. In this paper we focus on two points: (i) a comparison between CVM results and an experimental determination of the LRO parameter by NMR at 59Co in a CoPt3 compound, and (ii) the modelling of the resistivity of ferromagnetic and paramagnetic intermetallic compounds belonging to Co-Pt, Ni-Pt and Fe-Al systems. All experiments were performed on samples in identified thermodynamic states, implying that kinetic effects are thoroughly taken into account.

  18. Antiferromagnetism, structural instability and frustration in intermetallic AFe4X2 systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosner, Helge; Bergmann, Christoph; Weber, Katharina; Kraft, Inga; Mufti, N.; Klauss, Hans-Henning; Dellmann, T.; Woike, T.; Geibel, Christoph

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic systems with reduced dimensionality or frustration attract strong interest because these features lead to an increase of quantum fluctuations and often result in unusual properties. Here, we present a detailed study of the magnetic, thermodynamic, and structural properties of the intermetallic AFe4X2 compounds (A=Sc,Y,Lu,Zr; X=Si,Ge) crystallizing in the ZrFe4Si2 structure type. Our results evidence that these compounds cover the whole regime from frustrated AFM order up to an AFM quantum critical point. Susceptibility χ(T), specific heat, resistivity, and T-dependent XRD measurements were performed on polycrystalline samples. In all compounds we observed a Curie-Weiss behavior in χ(T) at high T indicating a paramagnetic moment of about 3μB/Fe. Magnetic and structural transitions as previously reported for YFe4Ge2 occur in all compounds with trivalent A. However, transition temperatures, nature of the transition as well as the relation between structural and magnetic transitions change significantly with the A element. Low TN's and large θCW /TN ratios confirm the relevance of frustration. The results are analyzed and discussed with respect to electronic, structural and magnetic instabilities applying DFT calculations. Financial support from the DFG (GRK 1621) is acknowledged

  19. Synthesis, Structure and bonding Analysis of the Polar Intermetallic Phase Ca2Pt2Cd

    SciTech Connect

    Samal, Saroj L.; Corbett, John D.

    The polar intermetallic phase Ca2Pt2Cd was discovered during explorations of the Ca-Pt-Cd system. The compound was synthesized by high temperature reactions, and its structure refined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction as orthorhombic, Immm, a = 4.4514(5), b = 5.8415(6), c = 8.5976(9) Å, Z = 2. The structure formally contains infinite, planar networks of [Pt2Cd]4– along the ab plane, which can be described as tessellation of six and four-member rings of the anions, with cations stuffed between the anion layers. The infinite condensed platinum chains show a substantial long–short distortion of 0.52 Å, an appreciable difference between Ca2Pt2Cd (26 valence electrons)more » and the isotypic but regular Ca2Cu2Ga (29 VE). The relatively large cation proportion diminishes the usual dominance of polar (Pt–Cd) and 5d–5d (Pt–Pt) contributions to the total Hamilton populations.« less

  20. On the Formation of Sludge Intermetallic Particles in Secondary Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Stefano; Bjurenstedt, Anton; Seifeddine, Salem

    2015-08-01

    The primary precipitation of Fe-rich intermetallics in AlSi9Cu3(Fe) type alloys is studied for different Fe, Mn, and Cr contents and cooling rates. Differential scanning calorimetry, thermal analysis, and interrupted solidification with a rapid quenching technique were used in combination in order to assess the nucleation temperature of sludge particles, as well as to follow their evolution. The results revealed that the sludge nucleation temperature and the release of latent heat during sludge formation are functions of Fe, Mn, and Cr levels in the molten alloy ( i.e., the sludge factor, SF) and cooling rate. Moreover, it can be concluded that sensitivity to sludge formation is not affected by cooling rate; i.e., a decrease in the SF will reduce sludge nucleation temperature to the same extent for a higher cooling rate as for a lower cooling rate. The sludge formation temperature detected will assist foundries in setting the optimal molten metal temperature for preventing sludge formation in holding furnaces and plunger systems.

  1. Control Al/Mg intermetallic compound formation during ultrasonic-assisted soldering Mg to Al.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhiwu; Li, Zhengwei; Li, Jiaqi; Ma, Zhipeng; Yan, Jiuchun

    2018-09-01

    To prevent the formation of Al/Mg intermetallic compounds (IMCs) of Al 3 Mg 2 and Al 12 Mg 17 , dissimilar Al/Mg were ultrasonic-assisted soldered using Sn-based filler metals. A new IMC of Mg 2 Sn formed in the soldered joints during this process and it was prone to crack at large thickness. The thickness of Mg 2 Sn was reduced to 22 μm at 285 °C when using Sn-3Cu as the filler metal. Cracks were still observed inside the blocky Mg 2 Sn. The thickness of Mg 2 Sn was significantly reduced when using Sn-9Zn as the filler metal. A 17 μm Mg 2 Sn layer without crack was obtained at a temperature of 200 °C, ultrasonic power of Mode I, and ultrasonic time of 2 s. The shear strengths of the joints using Sn-9Zn was much higher than those using Sn-3Cu because of the thinner Mg 2 Sn layer in the former joints. Sn whiskers were prevented by using Sn-9Zn. A cavitation model during ultrasonic assisted soldering was proposed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Growth Behavior of Intermetallic Compounds at SnAgCu/Ni and Cu Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Lihua; Huang, Jihua; Zhang, Hua; Zhao, Xingke; Wang, Haitao; Cheng, Donghai

    2010-02-01

    The growth behavior of reaction-formed intermetallic compounds (IMCs) at Sn3.5Ag0.5Cu/Ni and Cu interfaces under thermal-shear cycling conditions was investigated. The results show that the morphology of (Cu x Ni1- x )6Sn5 and Cu6Sn5 IMCs formed both at Sn3.5Ag0.5Cu/Ni and Cu interfaces gradually changed from scallop-like to chunk-like, and different IMC thicknesses developed with increasing thermal-shear cycling time. Furthermore, Cu6Sn5 IMC growth rate at the Sn3.5Ag0.5Cu/Cu interface was higher than that of (Cu x Ni1- x )6Sn5 IMC under thermal-shear cycling. Compared to isothermal aging, thermal-shear cycling led to only one Cu6Sn5 layer at the interface between SnAgCu solder and Cu substrate after 720 cycles. Moreover, Ag3Sn IMC was dispersed uniformly in the solder after reflow. The planar Ag3Sn formed near the interface changed remarkably and merged together to large platelets with increasing cycles. The mechanism of formation of Cu6Sn5, (Cu x Ni1- x )6Sn5 and Ag3Sn IMCs during thermal-shear cycling process was investigated.

  3. Mechanical Strength and Failure Characterization of Sn-Ag-Cu Intermetallic Compound Joints at the Microscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladani, Leila; Razmi, Jafar

    2012-03-01

    Continuous miniaturization of microelectronic devices has led the industry to develop interconnects on the order of a few microns for advanced superhigh-density and three-dimensional integrated circuits (3D ICs). At this scale, interconnects that conventionally consist of solder material will completely transform to intermetallic compounds (IMCs) such as Cu6Sn5. IMCs are brittle, unlike conventional solder materials that are ductile in nature; therefore, IMCs do not experience large amounts of plasticity or creep before failure. IMCs have not been fully characterized, and their mechanical and thermomechanical reliability is questioned. This study presents experimental efforts to characterize such material. Sn-based microbonds are fabricated in a controlled environment to assure complete transformation of the bonds to Cu6Sn5 IMC. Microstructural analysis including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and x-ray diffraction (XRD) is utilized to determine the IMC material composition and degree of copper diffusion into the bond area. Specimens are fabricated with different bond thicknesses and in different configurations for various tests. Normal strength of the bonds is measured utilizing double cantilever beam and peeling tests. Shear tests are conducted to quantify the shear strength of the material. Four-point bending tests are conducted to measure the fracture toughness and critical energy release rate. Bonds are fabricated in different sizes, and the size effect is investigated. The shear strength, normal strength, critical energy release rate, and effect of bond size on bond strength are reported.

  4. Earth on the Move.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides background information on the layers of the earth, the relationship between changes on the surface of the earth and its insides, and plate tectonics. Teaching activities are included, with some containing reproducible worksheets and handouts to accompany them. (TW)

  5. Earth - Pacific Ocean

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-01-29

    This color image of the Earth was obtained by NASA’s Galileo spacecraft early Dec. 12, 1990, when the spacecraft was about 1.6 million miles from the Earth. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00123

  6. The Earth & Moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-06-04

    During its flight, NASA’s Galileo spacecraft returned images of the Earth and Moon. Separate images of the Earth and Moon were combined to generate this view. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00342

  7. Oblique Shot of Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-09-05

    This highly oblique image shot over northwestern part of the African continent captures the curvature of the Earth and shows its atmosphere as seen by NASA EarthKAM. You can see clouds and even the occasional thunderhead.

  8. Exploring Spaceship Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInnis, Noel F.

    1973-01-01

    Describes various activities to understand the nature of the earth as a spaceship and its impact on human life. A figure depicting a holocoenotic environmental complex is given which can be used to illustrate various interacting forces on earth. (PS)

  9. NASA Earth Day 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-22

    Students listen intently while NASA's Director, Earth Science Division, Mike Freilich, speaks at NASA's Earth Day event. The event took place at Union Station in Washington, DC on April 22, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  10. Earth - India and Australia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-02-08

    This color image of the Earth was obtained by NASA’s Galileo spacecraft on Dec. 11, 1990, when the spacecraft was about 1.5 million miles from the Earth. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00122

  11. NASA Earth Day 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-22

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden poses for a quick selfie with students who attended the NASA sponsored Earth Day event April 22, 2014 at Union Station in Washington, DC. NASA announced the "Global Selfie" event as part of its "Earth Right Now" campaign, celebrating the launch of five Earth-observing missions in 2014. All selfies posted to social media with the hashtag "GlobalSelfie" will be included in a mosaic image of Earth. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  12. The Dynamic Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siever, Raymond

    1983-01-01

    Discusses how the earth is a dynamic system that maintains itself in a steady state. Areas considered include large/small-scale earth motions, geologic time, rock and hydrologic cycles, and other aspects dealing with the changing face of the earth. (JN)

  13. Earth Science Information Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1991-01-01

    An ESIC? An Earth Science Information Center. Don't spell it. Say it. ESIC. It rhymes with seasick. You can find information in an information center, of course, and you'll find earth science information in an ESIC. That means information about the land that is the Earth, the land that is below the Earth, and in some instances, the space surrounding the Earth. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates a network of Earth Science Information Centers that sell earth science products and data. There are more than 75 ESIC's. Some are operated by the USGS, but most are in other State or Federal agencies. Each ESIC responds to requests for information received by telephone, letter, or personal visit. Your personal visit.

  14. Formation of intermetallic phases in AlSi7Fe1 alloy processed under microgravity and forced fluid flow conditions and their influence on the permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, S.; Ratke, L.; Zimmermann, G.; Budenkova, O.

    2016-03-01

    Ternary Al-6.5wt.%Si-0.93wt.%Fe alloy samples were directionally solidified on-board of the International Space Station ISS in the ESA payload Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) equipped with Low Gradient Furnace (LGF) under both purely diffusive and stimulated convective conditions induced by a rotating magnetic field. Using different analysis techniques the shape and distribution of the intermetallic phase β-Al5SiFe in the dendritic microstructure was investigated, to study the influence of solidification velocity and fluid flow on the size and spatial arrangement of intermetallics. Deep etching as well as 3-dimensional computer tomography measurements characterized the size and the shape of β-Al5SiFe platelets: Diffusive growth results in a rather homogeneous distribution of intermetallic phases, whereas forced flow promotes an increase in the amount and the size of β-Al5SiFe platelets in the centre region of the samples. The β-Al5SiFe intermetallics can form not only simple platelets, but also be curved, branched, crossed, interacting with dendrites and porosity located. This leads to formation of large and complex groups of Fe-rich intermetallics, which reduce the melt flow between dendrites leading to lower permeability of the mushy zone and might significantly decrease feeding ability in castings.

  15. Homogeneous (Cu, Ni)6Sn5 intermetallic compound joints rapidly formed in asymmetrical Ni/Sn/Cu system using ultrasound-induced transient liquid phase soldering process.

    PubMed

    Li, Z L; Dong, H J; Song, X G; Zhao, H Y; Tian, H; Liu, J H; Feng, J C; Yan, J C

    2018-04-01

    Homogeneous (Cu, Ni) 6 Sn 5 intermetallic compound (IMC) joints were rapidly formed in asymmetrical Ni/Sn/Cu system by an ultrasound-induced transient liquid phase (TLP) soldering process. In the traditional TLP soldering process, the intermetallic joints formed in Ni/Sn/Cu system consisted of major (Cu, Ni) 6 Sn 5 and minor Cu 3 Sn IMCs, and the grain morphology of (Cu, Ni) 6 Sn 5 IMCs subsequently exhibited fine rounded, needlelike and coarse rounded shapes from the Ni side to the Cu side, which was highly in accordance with the Ni concentration gradient across the joints. However, in the ultrasound-induced TLP soldering process, the intermetallic joints formed in Ni/Sn/Cu system only consisted of the (Cu, Ni) 6 Sn 5 IMCs which exhibited an uniform grain morphology of rounded shape with a remarkably narrowed Ni concentration gradient. The ultrasound-induced homogeneous intermetallic joints exhibited higher shear strength (61.6 MPa) than the traditional heterogeneous intermetallic joints (49.8 MPa). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of Metallic Nanoparticles on Interfacial Intermetallic Compounds in Tin-Based Solders for Microelectronic Packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haseeb, A. S. M. A.; Arafat, M. M.; Tay, S. L.; Leong, Y. M.

    2017-10-01

    Tin (Sn)-based solders have established themselves as the main alternative to the traditional lead (Pb)-based solders in many applications. However, the reliability of the Sn-based solders continues to be a concern. In order to make Sn-based solders microstructurally more stable and hence more reliable, researchers are showing great interest in investigating the effects of the incorporation of different nanoparticles into them. This paper gives an overview of the influence of metallic nanoparticles on the characteristics of interfacial intermetallic compounds (IMCs) in Sn-based solder joints on copper substrates during reflow and thermal aging. Nanocomposite solders were prepared by mechanically blending nanoparticles of nickel (Ni), cobalt (Co), zinc (Zn), molybdenum (Mo), manganese (Mn) and titanium (Ti) with Sn-3.8Ag-0.7Cu and Sn-3.5Ag solder pastes. The composite solders were then reflowed and their wetting characteristics and interfacial microstructural evolution were investigated. Through the paste mixing route, Ni, Co, Zn and Mo nanoparticles alter the morphology and thickness of the IMCs in beneficial ways for the performance of solder joints. The thickness of Cu3Sn IMC is decreased with the addition of Ni, Co and Zn nanoparticles. The thickness of total IMC layer is decreased with the addition of Zn and Mo nanoparticles in the solder. The metallic nanoparticles can be divided into two groups. Ni, Co, and Zn nanoparticles undergo reactive dissolution during solder reflow, causing in situ alloying and therefore offering an alternative route of alloy additions to solders. Mo nanoparticles remain intact during reflow and impart their influence as discrete particles. Mechanisms of interactions between different types of metallic nanoparticles and solder are discussed.

  17. Intermetallic nickel silicide nanocatalyst—A non-noble metal–based general hydrogenation catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Marga-Martina; Agapova, Anastasiya

    2018-01-01

    Hydrogenation reactions are essential processes in the chemical industry, giving access to a variety of valuable compounds including fine chemicals, agrochemicals, and pharmachemicals. On an industrial scale, hydrogenations are typically performed with precious metal catalysts or with base metal catalysts, such as Raney nickel, which requires special handling due to its pyrophoric nature. We report a stable and highly active intermetallic nickel silicide catalyst that can be used for hydrogenations of a wide range of unsaturated compounds. The catalyst is prepared via a straightforward procedure using SiO2 as the silicon atom source. The process involves thermal reduction of Si–O bonds in the presence of Ni nanoparticles at temperatures below 1000°C. The presence of silicon as a secondary component in the nickel metal lattice plays the key role in its properties and is of crucial importance for improved catalytic activity. This novel catalyst allows for efficient reduction of nitroarenes, carbonyls, nitriles, N-containing heterocycles, and unsaturated carbon–carbon bonds. Moreover, the reported catalyst can be used for oxidation reactions in the presence of molecular oxygen and is capable of promoting acceptorless dehydrogenation of unsaturated N-containing heterocycles, opening avenues for H2 storage in organic compounds. The generality of the nickel silicide catalyst is demonstrated in the hydrogenation of over a hundred of structurally diverse unsaturated compounds. The wide application scope and high catalytic activity of this novel catalyst make it a nice alternative to known general hydrogenation catalysts, such as Raney nickel and noble metal–based catalysts. PMID:29888329

  18. Launch Load Resistant Spacecraft Mechanism Bearings Made From NiTi Superelastic Intermetallic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Moore, Lewis E., III

    2014-01-01

    Compared to conventional bearing materials (tool steel and ceramics), emerging Superelastic Intermetallic Materials (SIMs), such as 60NiTi, have significantly lower elastic modulus and enhanced strain capability. They are also immune to atmospheric corrosion (rusting). This offers the potential for increased resilience and superior ability to withstand static indentation load without damage. In this paper, the static load capacity of hardened 60NiTi 50-mm-bore ball bearing races are measured to correlate existing flat-plate indentation load capacity data to an actual bearing geometry through the Hertz stress relations. The results confirmed the validity of using the Hertz stress relations to model 60NiTi contacts; 60NiTi exhibits a static stress capability (approximately 3.1 GPa) between that of 440C (2.4 GPa) and REX20 (3.8 GPa) tool steel. When the reduced modulus and extended strain capability are taken into account, 60NiTi is shown to withstand higher loads than other bearing materials. To quantify this effect, a notional space mechanism, a 5-kg mass reaction wheel, was modeled with respect to launch load capability when supported on standard (catalogue geometry) design 440C; 60NiTi and REX20 tool steel bearings. For this application, the use of REX20 bearings increased the static load capability of the mechanism by a factor of three while the use of 60NiTi bearings resulted in an order of magnitude improvement compared to the baseline 440C stainless steel bearings

  19. Investigation of Y6Mn23 and YMn12 intermetallic alloys under high hydrogen pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipek, S. M.; Sato, R.; Kuriyama, N.; Tanaka, H.; Takeichi, N.

    2010-03-01

    Among three intermetallic compounds existing in Y-Mn system the YMn2 and Y6Mn23 can easily form interstitial hydrides while for YMn12 existence of hydride has never been reported. At moderate hydrogen pressure YMn2 and Y6Mn23 transform into YMn2H4.5 and Y6Mn23H25 respectively. At high hydrogen pressure the YMn2 (C15 or C14 parent structure) forms a unique YMn2H6 (s.g. Fm3m) complex hydride of fluorite structure in which one Mn atom Mn(1) and Y randomly occupy the 8c sites while second manganese (Mn2) in position 4a forms complex anion with 6 hydrogen atoms located in positions 24e. Formation of YMn2H6 independently of the structure of parent phase (C14 or C15) as well as occupation of the same site (8c) by Y and Mn(1) atoms suggested that also Y6Mn23 and YMn12 could transform into YMn2H6 - type hydride in which suitable number of Y atoms will be substituted by Mn(1) in the 8c positions. This assumption was confirmed by exposing R6Mn23 and RMn12 to 1 GPa of hydrogen pressure at 1000C. Formation of (RxMn2-x)MnH6 (where x = 18/29 or 3/13 for R6Mn23 and RMn12 hydrides respectively) was confirmed by XRD. Hydrogen concentration in both R6Mn23 and RMn12 based hydrides reached H/Me = 2 thus value two times higher than in R6Mn23H25.

  20. Intermetallic nickel silicide nanocatalyst-A non-noble metal-based general hydrogenation catalyst.

    PubMed

    Ryabchuk, Pavel; Agostini, Giovanni; Pohl, Marga-Martina; Lund, Henrik; Agapova, Anastasiya; Junge, Henrik; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2018-06-01

    Hydrogenation reactions are essential processes in the chemical industry, giving access to a variety of valuable compounds including fine chemicals, agrochemicals, and pharmachemicals. On an industrial scale, hydrogenations are typically performed with precious metal catalysts or with base metal catalysts, such as Raney nickel, which requires special handling due to its pyrophoric nature. We report a stable and highly active intermetallic nickel silicide catalyst that can be used for hydrogenations of a wide range of unsaturated compounds. The catalyst is prepared via a straightforward procedure using SiO 2 as the silicon atom source. The process involves thermal reduction of Si-O bonds in the presence of Ni nanoparticles at temperatures below 1000°C. The presence of silicon as a secondary component in the nickel metal lattice plays the key role in its properties and is of crucial importance for improved catalytic activity. This novel catalyst allows for efficient reduction of nitroarenes, carbonyls, nitriles, N-containing heterocycles, and unsaturated carbon-carbon bonds. Moreover, the reported catalyst can be used for oxidation reactions in the presence of molecular oxygen and is capable of promoting acceptorless dehydrogenation of unsaturated N-containing heterocycles, opening avenues for H 2 storage in organic compounds. The generality of the nickel silicide catalyst is demonstrated in the hydrogenation of over a hundred of structurally diverse unsaturated compounds. The wide application scope and high catalytic activity of this novel catalyst make it a nice alternative to known general hydrogenation catalysts, such as Raney nickel and noble metal-based catalysts.

  1. Electromigration effect on intermetallic growth and Young's modulus in SAC solder joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Luhua; Pang, John H. L.; Ren, Fei; Tu, K. N.

    2006-12-01

    Solid-state intermetallic compound (IMC) growth behavior plays and important role in solder joint reliability of electronic packaging assemblies. The directional impact of electromigration (EM) on the growth of interfacial IMCs in Ni/SAC/Ni, Cu/SAC/Ni single BGA ball solder joint, and fine pitch ball-grid-array (FPBGA) at the anode and cathode sides is reported in this study. When the solder joint was subjected to a current density of 5,000 A/cm2 at 125°C or 150°C, IMC layer growth on the anode interface was faster than that on the cathode interface, and both were faster than isothermal aging due to the Joule heating effect. The EM affects the IMC growth rate, as well as the composition and mechanical properties. The Young’s modulus and hardness were measured by the nanoindentation continuous stiffness measurement (CSM) from planar IMC surfaces after EM exposure. Different values were observed at the anode and cathode. The energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) line scan analysis was conducted at the interface from the cathode to anode to study the presence of species; Ni was found in the anode IMC at SAC/Cu in the Ni/SAC/Cu joint, but not detected when the current was reverse. Electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA) measurement on the Ni/SAC/Ni specimen also confirmed the polarized Ni and Cu distributions in cathode and anode IMCs, which were (Ni0.57Cu0.43)3Sn4 and (Cu0.73Ni0.27)6Sn5, respectively. Thus, the Young’s moduli of the IMC are 141 and 175 GPa, respectively.

  2. Hydrides of intermetallic compounds with a H/M ratio greater than unity obtained at high hydrogen pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Semenenko, K.N.; Klyamkin, S.N.

    1993-11-01

    Novel hydride phases with H/M > 1 based on Zr{sub 2}Pd, Hf{sub 2}Pd, and Hf{sub 2}Cu (structures of the MoSi{sub 2} type) have been synthesized at high H{sub 2} pressures. The X-ray diffraction investigations of the resulting hydrides have been carried out. Some factors determining the maximum hydrogen content in the hydrides of intermetallic compounds are discussed. A model structure of the hydrides obtained is proposed, which assumes the possibility of direct H-H interactions when the interatomic distances are less than 1 {angstrom}.

  3. Effects of metallic nanoparticle doped flux on the interfacial intermetallic compounds between lead-free solder ball and copper substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Sujan, G.K., E-mail: sgkumer@gmail.com; Haseeb, A.S.M.A., E-mail: haseeb@um.edu.my; Afifi, A.B.M., E-mail: amalina@um.edu.my

    2014-11-15

    Lead free solders currently in use are prone to develop thick interfacial intermetallic compound layers with rough morphology which are detrimental to the long term solder joint reliability. A novel method has been developed to control the morphology and growth of intermetallic compound layers between lead-free Sn–3.0Ag–0.5Cu solder ball and copper substrate by doping a water soluble flux with metallic nanoparticles. Four types of metallic nanoparticles (nickel, cobalt, molybdenum and titanium) were used to investigate their effects on the wetting behavior and interfacial microstructural evaluations after reflow. Nanoparticles were dispersed manually with a water soluble flux and the resulting nanoparticlemore » doped flux was placed on copper substrate. Lead-free Sn–3.0Ag–0.5Cu solder balls of diameter 0.45 mm were placed on top of the flux and were reflowed at a peak temperature of 240 °C for 45 s. Angle of contact, wetting area and interfacial microstructure were studied by optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. It was observed that the angle of contact increased and wetting area decreased with the addition of cobalt, molybdenum and titanium nanoparticles to flux. On the other hand, wettability improved with the addition of nickel nanoparticles. Cross-sectional micrographs revealed that both nickel and cobalt nanoparticle doping transformed the morphology of Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} from a typical scallop type to a planer one and reduced the intermetallic compound thickness under optimum condition. These effects were suggested to be related to in-situ interfacial alloying at the interface during reflow. The minimum amount of nanoparticles required to produce the planer morphology was found to be 0.1 wt.% for both nickel and cobalt. Molybdenum and titanium nanoparticles neither appear to undergo alloying during reflow nor have any influence at the solder/substrate interfacial reaction. Thus

  4. People and the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, John James William; Feiss, P. Geoffrey

    1998-03-01

    People and the Earth examines the numerous ways in which this planet enhances and limits our lifestyles. Written with wit and remarkable insight, and illustrated with numerous case histories, it provides a balanced view of the complex environmental issues facing our civilization. The authors look at the geologic restrictions on our ability to withdraw resources--food, water, energy, and minerals--from the earth, the effect human activity has on the earth, and the lingering damage caused by natural disasters. People and the Earth examines the basic components of our interaction with this planet, provides a lucid, scientific discussion of each issue, and speculates on what the future may hold. It provides the fundamental concepts that will enable us to make wise and conscientious choices on how to live our day-to-day lives. People and the Earth is an ideal introductory textbook and will also appeal to anyone concerned with our evolving relationship to the earth.

  5. EarthExplorer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houska, Treva

    2012-01-01

    The EarthExplorer trifold provides basic information for on-line access to remotely-sensed data from the U.S. Geological Survey Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center archive. The EarthExplorer (http://earthexplorer.usgs.gov/) client/server interface allows users to search and download aerial photography, satellite data, elevation data, land-cover products, and digitized maps. Minimum computer system requirements and customer service contact information also are included in the brochure.

  6. Mission to Planet Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Gregory S.; Huntress, Wesley T.

    1990-01-01

    The rationale behind Mission to Planet Earth is presented, and the program plan is described in detail. NASA and its interagency and international partners will place satellites carrying advanced sensors in strategic earth orbits to collect muultidisciplinary data. A sophisticated data system will process and archive an unprecedented large amount of information about the earth and how it functions as a system. Attention is given to the space observatories, the data and information systems, and the interdisciplinary research.

  7. Uderstanding Snowball Earth Deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbot, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    Earth, a normally clement planet comfortably in its star's habitable zone, suffered global or nearly global glaciation at least twice during the Neoproterozoic era (at about 635 and 710 million years ago). Viewed in the context of planetary evolution, these pan-global glaciations (Snowball Earth events) were extremely rapid, lasting only a few million years. The dramatic effect of the Snowball Earth events on the development of the planet can be seen through their link to rises in atmospheric oxygen and evolutionary innovations. These potential catastrophes on an otherwise clement planet can be used to gain insight into planetary habitability more generally. Since Earth is not currently a Snowball, a sound deglaciation mechanism is crucial for the viability of the Snowball Earth hypothesis. The traditional deglaciation mechanism is a massive build up of CO2 due to reduced weathering during Snowball Earth events until tropical surface temperatures reach the melting point. Once initiated, such a deglaciation might happen on a timescale of only dozens of thousands of years and would thrust Earth from the coldest climate in its history to the warmest. Therefore embedded in Snowball Earth events is an even more rapid and dramatic environmental change. Early global climate model simulations raised doubt about whether Snowball Earth deglaciation could be achieved at a CO2 concentration low enough to be consistent with geochemical data, which represented a potential challenge to the Snowball Earth hypothesis. Over the past few years dust and clouds have emerged as the essential missing additional processes that would allow Snowball Earth deglaciation at a low enough CO2 concentration. I will discuss the dust and cloud mechanisms and the modeling behind these ideas. This effort is critical for the broader implications of Snowball Earth events because understanding the specific deglaciation mechanism determines whether similar processes could happen on other planets.

  8. Earth on the Horizon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-03-13

    This is the first image ever taken of Earth from the surface of a planet beyond the Moon. It was taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit one hour before sunrise on the 63rd martian day, or sol, of its mission. Earth is the tiny white dot in the center. The image is a mosaic of images taken by the rover's navigation camera showing a broad view of the sky, and an image taken by the rover's panoramic camera of Earth. The contrast in the panoramic camera image was increased two times to make Earth easier to see. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA05560

  9. NASA Earth Day 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-22

    NASA Astronaut John Mace Grunsfeld takes a quick selfie with astronauts at the International Space Station at the NASA sponsored Earth Day event April 22, 2014 at Union Station in Washington, DC. NASA announced the "Global Selfie" event as part of its "Earth Right Now" campaign, celebrating the launch of five Earth-observing missions in 2014. All selfies posted to social media with the hashtag "GlobalSelfie" will be included in a mosaic image of Earth. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  10. Rare-earth-free high energy product manganese-based magnetic materials.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ketan; Zhang, Jingming; Ren, Shenqiang

    2018-06-14

    The constant drive to replace rare-earth metal magnets has initiated great interest in an alternative. Manganese (Mn) has emerged to be a potential candidate as a key element in rare-earth-free magnets. Its five unpaired valence electrons give it a large magnetocrystalline energy and the ability to form several intermetallic compounds. These factors have led Mn-based magnets to be a potential replacement for rare-earth permanent magnets for several applications, such as efficient power electronics, energy generators, magnetic recording and tunneling applications, and spintronics. For past few decades, Mn-based magnets have been explored in many different forms, such as bulk magnets, thin films, and nanoparticles. Here, we review the recent progress in the synthesis and structure-magnetic property relationships of Mn-based rare-earth-free magnets (MnBi, MnAl and MnGa). Furthermore, we discuss their potential to replace rare-earth magnetic materials through the control of their structure and composition to achieve the theoretically predicted magnetic properties.

  11. R 5T 4 compounds - unique multifunctional intermetallics for basic research and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mudryk, Yaroslav

    The unique properties of the rare-earth elements and their alloys have brought them from relative obscurity to high profile use in common high-tech applications. The broad technological impact of these remarkable materials may have never been known by the general public if not for the supply concerns that placed the rare-earth materials on the front page of newspapers and magazines. Neodymium and dysprosium, two essential components of Nd 2Fe 14B-based high-performance permanent magnets, have drawn much attention and have been deemed critical materials for many energy-related applications. Ironically, the notoriety of rare-earth elements and their alloys is the result ofmore » a global movement to reduce their use in industrial applications and, thus, ease concerns about their supply and ultimately to reduce their position in high-tech supply chains. Research into the applications of lanthanide alloys has been de-emphasized recently due to the perception that industry is moving away from the use of rare-earth elements in new products. While lanthanide supply challenges justify efforts to diversify the supply chain, a strategy to completely replace the materials overlooks the reasons rare earths became important in the first place -- their unique properties are too beneficial to ignore. Rare-earth alloys and compounds possess truly exciting potential for basic science exploration and application development such as solid-state caloric cooling. In this brief review, we touch upon several promising systems containing lanthanide elements that show important and interesting magnetism-related phenomena.« less

  12. Deformation twinning in metals and ordered intermetallics-Ti and Ti-aluminides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, M. H.; Fu, C. L.; Lee, J. K.

    1991-06-01

    The role of deformation twinning in the strength and ductility of metals and ordered intermetallic alloys is examined on the basis of crystallography, energetics and kinetics of deformation twinning. A systematic analysis is made by taking Ti, Ti3AI, TiAl, and A13Ti as four model systems. In comparison with profuse twinning in Ti, the intrinsic difficulty of twinning in Ti3A1 is rationalized in terms of the interchange shuffling mechanism. A fault (SISF) dragging mechanism based on the interaction torque explains the physical source for the low mobility of screw superdislocations in TiAl, which may lead to (111) [ 11bar{2}] twin nucleation. In TiAl and A13Ti alloys, the twin-slip (ordinary) conjugate relationship makes an important contribution to the strain compatibility for high-temperature plasticity. Potentially beneficial alloying additions to promote twinning are discussed. Les conséquences de la déformation par maclage sur la fracture et la ductilité des métaux et alliages intermétalliques ordonnés sont étudiées en fonction de la cristallographie, de l'énergie et de la cinétique des déformations par maclage. Une analyse systématique a été faite en considérant Ti, Ti3AI, TiAl et A13Ti comme quatre systèmes modèles. En comparaison avec le nombre important de maclages observés dans Ti, la difficulté intrinsèque des maclages dans Ti3AI est rationalisée en terme de mécanisme d'“interchange shuffling”. Un mécanisme de “dragging fault” basé sur l'interaction “torque” explique l'origine physique de la faible mobilité des superdislocations vissées dans TiAl qui peuvent conduire à la nucléation des macles (111) 112. Dans les alliages tels TiAl et A13Ti, la relation conjuguée entre la macle et le glissement (ordinaire) contribue de façon importante à la compatibilité des contraintes lors de la déformation plastique à haute température. Des effets bénéfiques potentiels liés à des éléments d'addition sur le processus

  13. The mystery of perpendicular fivefold axes and the fourth dimension in intermetallic structures.

    PubMed

    Berger, Robert F; Lee, Stephen; Johnson, Jeffreys; Nebgen, Ben; Sha, Fernando; Xu, Jiaqi

    2008-01-01

    The structures of eight related known intermetallic structure types are the impetus to this paper: Li21Si5, Mg44Rh7, Zn13(Fe,Ni)2, Mg6Pd, Na6Tl, Zn91Ir11, Li13Na29Ba19, and Al69Ta39. All belong to the F43m space group, have roughly 400 atoms in their cubic unit cells, are built up at least partially from the gamma-brass structure, and exhibit pseudo-tenfold symmetric diffraction patterns. These pseudo-tenfold axes lie in the {110} directions, and thus present a paradox. The {110} set is comprised of three pairs of perpendicular directions. Yet no 3D point group contains a single pair of perpendicular fivefold axes (by Friedel's Law, a fivefold axis leads to a tenfold diffraction pattern). The current work seeks to resolve this paradox. Its resolution is based on the largest of all 4D Platonic solids, the 600-cell. We first review the 600-cell, building an intuition discussing 4D polyhedroids (4D polytopes). We then show that the positions of common atoms in the F43m structures lie close to the positions of vertices in a 3D projection of the 600-cell. For this purpose, we develop a projection method that we call intermediate projection. The introduction of the 600-cell resolves the above paradox. This 4D Platonic solid contains numerous orthogonal fivefold rotations. The six fivefold directions that are best preserved after projection prove to lie along the {110} directions of the F43m structures. Finally, this paper shows that at certain ideal projected cluster sizes related to one another by the golden mean (tau=(1+ radical 5)/2), constructive interference leading to tenfold diffraction patterns is optimized. It is these optimal values that predominate in actual F43m structures. Explicit comparison of experimental cluster sizes and theoretically derived cluster sizes shows a clear correspondence, both for isolated and crystalline pairs of projected 600-cells.

  14. Longitudinal recording on FePt and FePtX (X = B, Ni) intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning

    1999-11-01

    Near field recording on high coercivity FePt intermetallic compound media using a high Bsat write element was investigated. Untextured FePt media were prepared by magnetron sputtering on ZrO2 disks at a substrate temperature of 450°C, with post annealing at 450°C for 8 hrs. Both multilayer and cosputtered precursors produced the ordered tetragonal L10 phase with high coercivity between 5kOe and 12kOe. To improve readback noise decrease magnetic domain size, FePtB media were subsequently prepared by cosputtering. Over-write, roll-off, signal to noise ratio and non-linear transition shift (NLTS) ere measured by both metal in gap (MIG) and merged MR heads. FePtB media showed similar NLTS to commercial CoCrPtTa longitudinal media, but 5dB lower signal to noise ratio. By operating recording transducers in near contact, reasonable values of (>30dB) could be obtained. VSM Rotational Transverse Magnetization has been used for measuring the anisotropy field of magnetic thin films. Magnetization reversal during rotation of a 2D isotropic an applied field is discussed. The relationship between the transverse magnetization My and the applied field H was numerically solved. An excellent approximation for the transverse magnetization is found to be: My/Ms=A(1- H/Hk) 2.5, where A = 1.1434, and Hk is the anisotropy field. For curve fitting to experimental data, both A and Hk were used as fitting parameters. Comparison between a constructed torque hysteresis method and this VSM RTM method have been made theoretically and experimentally. Both results showed that VSM RTM will give better extrapolation of the anisotropy field. The torque measurement will slightly overestimate the anisotropy field. The anisotropy fields of FePt and FePtX (X = B, Ni) films were characterized using this VSM RTM technique with comparison to a CoCrTaPt disk. Anisotropy energy was derived. Hc/Hk was used as an indicator for coherent rotation of a single domain. Interactions between magnetic domains were

  15. DOE-EPSCoR. Exchange interactions in epitaxial intermetallic layered systems

    SciTech Connect

    LeClair, Patrick R.; Gary, Mankey J.

    2015-05-25

    The goal of this research is to develop a fundamental understanding of the exchange interactions in epitaxial intermetallic alloy thin films and multilayers, including films and multilayers of Fe-Pt, Co-Pt and Fe-P-Rh alloys deposited on MgO and Al2O3 substrates. Our prior results have revealed that these materials have a rich variety of ferromagnetic, paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases which are sensitive functions of composition, substrate symmetry and layer thickness. Epitaxial antiferromagnetic films of FePt alloys exhibit a different phase diagram than bulk alloys. The antiferromagnetism of these materials has both spin ordering transitions and spin orienting transitions. The objectives include themore » study of exchange-inversion materials and the interface of these materials with ferromagnets. Our aim is to formulate a complete understanding of the magnetic ordering in these materials, as well as developing an understanding of how the spin structure is modified through contact with a ferromagnetic material at the interface. The ultimate goal is to develop the ability to tune the phase diagram of the materials to produce layered structures with tunable magnetic properties. The alloy systems that we will study have a degree of complexity and richness of magnetic phases that requires the use of the advanced tools offered by the DOE-operated national laboratory facilities, such as neutron and x-ray scattering to measure spin ordering, spin orientations, and element-specific magnetic moments. We plan to contribute to DOE’s mission of producing “Materials by Design” with properties determined by alloy composition and crystal structure. We have developed the methods for fabricating and have performed neutron diffraction experiments on some of the most interesting phases, and our work will serve to answer questions raised about the element-specific magnetizations using the magnetic x-ray dichroism techniques and interface magnetism in layered

  16. Microstructural and Material Quality Effects on Rolling Contact Fatigue of Highly Elastic Intermetallic NiTi Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Howard, S. Adam; Thomas, Fransua; Stanford, Malcolm K.

    2017-01-01

    Rolling element bearings made from highly-elastic intermetallic materials (HIM)s, such as 60NiTi, are under development for applications that require superior corrosion and shock resistance. Compared to steel, intermetallics have been shown to have much lower rolling contact fatigue (RCF) stress capability in simplified 3-ball on rod (ASTM STP 771) fatigue tests. In the 3-ball tests, poor material quality and microstructural flaws negatively affect fatigue life but such relationships have not been established for full-scale 60NiTi bearings. In this paper, 3-ball-on-rod fatigue behavior of two quality grades of 60NiTi are compared to the fatigue life of full-scale 50mm bore ball bearings made from the same materials. 60NiTi RCF rods with material or microstructural flaws suffered from infant mortality failures at all tested stress levels while high quality 60NiTi rods exhibited no failures at lower stress levels. Similarly, tests of full-scale bearings made from flawed materials exhibited early surface fatigue and through crack type failures while bearings made from high quality material did not fail even in long-term tests. Though the full-scale bearing test data is yet preliminary, the results suggest that the simplified RCF test is a good qualitative predictor of bearing performance. These results provide guidance for materials development and to establish minimum quality levels required for successful bearing operation and life.

  17. Advancement of Compositional and Microstructural Design of Intermetallic γ-TiAl Based Alloys Determined by Atom Probe Tomography.

    PubMed

    Klein, Thomas; Clemens, Helmut; Mayer, Svea

    2016-09-06

    Advanced intermetallic alloys based on the γ-TiAl phase have become widely regarded as most promising candidates to replace heavier Ni-base superalloys as materials for high-temperature structural components, due to their facilitating properties of high creep and oxidation resistance in combination with a low density. Particularly, recently developed alloying concepts based on a β-solidification pathway, such as the so-called TNM alloy, which are already incorporated in aircraft engines, have emerged offering the advantage of being processible using near-conventional methods and the option to attain balanced mechanical properties via subsequent heat-treatment. Development trends for the improvement of alloying concepts, especially dealing with issues regarding alloying element distribution, nano-scale phase characterization, phase stability, and phase formation mechanisms demand the utilization of high-resolution techniques, mainly due to the multi-phase nature of advanced TiAl alloys. Atom probe tomography (APT) offers unique possibilities of characterizing chemical compositions with a high spatial resolution and has, therefore, been widely used in recent years with the aim of understanding the materials constitution and appearing basic phenomena on the atomic scale and applying these findings to alloy development. This review, thus, aims at summarizing scientific works regarding the application of atom probe tomography towards the understanding and further development of intermetallic TiAl alloys.

  18. Enthalpies of formation of Cd–Pr intermetallic compounds and thermodynamic assessment of the Cd–Pr system

    PubMed Central

    Reichmann, Thomas L.; Richter, Klaus W.; Delsante, Simona; Borzone, Gabriella; Ipser, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    In the present study standard enthalpies of formation were measured by reaction and solution calorimetry at stoichiometric compositions of Cd2Pr, Cd3Pr, Cd58Pr13 and Cd6Pr. The corresponding values were determined to be −46.0, −38.8, −35.2 and −24.7 kJ/mol(at), respectively. These data together with thermodynamic data and phase diagram information from literature served as input data for a CALPHAD-type optimization of the Cd–Pr phase diagram. The complete composition range could be described precisely with the present models, both with respect to phase equilibria as well as to thermodynamic input data. The thermodynamic parameters of all intermetallic compounds were modelled following Neumann–Kopp rule. Temperature dependent contributions to the individual Gibbs energies were used for all compounds. Extended solid solubilities are well described for the low- and high-temperature modifications of Pr and also for the intermetallic compound CdPr. A quite good agreement with all viable data available from literature was found and is presented. PMID:25540475

  19. Surface improvement and biocompatibility of TiAl 24Nb 10 intermetallic alloy using rf plasma nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Rahman, A. M.; Maitz, M. F.; Kassem, M. A.; El-Hossary, F. M.; Prokert, F.; Reuther, H.; Pham, M. T.; Richter, E.

    2007-09-01

    The present work describes the surface improvement and biocompatibility of TiAl 24Nb 10 intermetallic alloy using rf plasma nitriding. The nitriding process was carried out at different plasma power from 400 W to 650 W where the other plasma conditions were fixed. Grazing incidence X-ray diffractometry (GIXRD), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), tribometer and a nanohardness tester were employed to characterize the nitrided layer. Further potentiodynamic polarization method was used to describe the corrosion behavior of the un-nitrided and nitrided alloy. It has been found that the Vickers hardness (HV) and corrosion resistance values of the nitrided layers increase with increasing plasma power while the wear rates of the nitrided layers reduce by two orders of magnitude as compared to those of the un-nitrided layer. This improvement in surface properties of the intermetallic alloy is due to formation of a thin modified layer which is composed of titanium nitride in the alloy surface. Moreover, all modified layers were tested for their sustainability as a biocompatible material. Concerning the application area of biocompatibility, the present treated alloy show good surface properties especially for the nitrided alloy at low plasma power of 400 W.

  20. Advancement of Compositional and Microstructural Design of Intermetallic γ-TiAl Based Alloys Determined by Atom Probe Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Thomas; Clemens, Helmut; Mayer, Svea

    2016-01-01

    Advanced intermetallic alloys based on the γ-TiAl phase have become widely regarded as most promising candidates to replace heavier Ni-base superalloys as materials for high-temperature structural components, due to their facilitating properties of high creep and oxidation resistance in combination with a low density. Particularly, recently developed alloying concepts based on a β-solidification pathway, such as the so-called TNM alloy, which are already incorporated in aircraft engines, have emerged offering the advantage of being processible using near-conventional methods and the option to attain balanced mechanical properties via subsequent heat-treatment. Development trends for the improvement of alloying concepts, especially dealing with issues regarding alloying element distribution, nano-scale phase characterization, phase stability, and phase formation mechanisms demand the utilization of high-resolution techniques, mainly due to the multi-phase nature of advanced TiAl alloys. Atom probe tomography (APT) offers unique possibilities of characterizing chemical compositions with a high spatial resolution and has, therefore, been widely used in recent years with the aim of understanding the materials constitution and appearing basic phenomena on the atomic scale and applying these findings to alloy development. This review, thus, aims at summarizing scientific works regarding the application of atom probe tomography towards the understanding and further development of intermetallic TiAl alloys. PMID:28773880

  1. The Influence of Ultrasonic Cavitation on the Formation of Fe-Rich Intermetallics in A383 Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Yang; Liu, Tao; Nastac, Laurentiu; Brewer, Luke; Levin, Ilya; Arvikar, Vish

    2018-06-01

    The effect of ultrasonic treatment (UST) on the formation of Fe-rich intermetallics (including sludge) in the A383 alloy is investigated for different processing temperatures in the present study. Differential scanning calorimetry is used to analyze the precipitation temperature of the sludge phase. The results revealed that the sludge will precipitate at a temperature above that of the Al matrix and the precipitation temperature decreases with an increasing cooling rate. UST cavitation applied at different temperatures (600 °C to 750 °C) during the solidification process breaks the sludge into small island-like pieces. However, the aggregation trend of the sludge is not changed. Sludge with small size and uniform distribution is obtained when UST is applied at 600 °C, which is lower than the precipitation temperature of the sludge. At the highest temperature (850 °C), the application of UST has no effect on the formation of either sludge or α-Fe intermetallics. At 750 °C, UST promotes the formation of the sludge when applied at 750 °C.

  2. Estimation of the composition of intermetallic compounds in LiCl-KCl molten salt by cyclic voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya L; Liu, Kui; Yuan, Li Y; Chai, Zhi F; Shi, Wei Q

    2016-08-15

    In this work, the compositions of Ce-Al, Er-Al and La-Bi intermetallic compounds were estimated by the cyclic voltammetry (CV) technique. At first, CV measurements were carried out at different reverse potentials to study the co-reduction processes of Ce-Al, Er-Al and La-Bi systems. The CV curves obtained were then re-plotted with the current as a function of time, and the coulomb number of each peak was calculated. By comparing the coulomb number of the related peaks, the compositions of the Ce-Al, Er-Al and La-Bi intermetallic compounds formed in the co-reduction process could be estimated. The results showed that Al11Ce3, Al3Ce, Al2Ce and AlCe could be formed by the co-reduction of Ce(iii) and Al(iii). For the co-reduction of Er(iii) and Al(iii), Al3Er2, Al2Er and AlEr were formed. In a La(iii) and Bi(iii) co-existing system in LiCl-KCl melts, LaBi2, LaBi and Li3Bi were the major products as a result of co-reduction.

  3. Earth System Science Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford, Sandra; Coffman, Margaret

    2004-01-01

    For several decades, science teachers have used bottles for classroom projects designed to teach students about biology. Bottle projects do not have to just focus on biology, however. These projects can also be used to engage students in Earth science topics. This article describes the Earth System Science Project, which was adapted and developed…

  4. Crescent Earth and Moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-08-29

    This picture of a crescent-shaped Earth and Moon, the first of its kind ever taken by a spacecraft, was recorded Sept. 18, 1977, by NASA Voyager 1 when it was 7.25 million miles 11.66 million kilometers from Earth. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00013

  5. Introducing Earth's Orbital Eccentricity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Most students know that planetary orbits, including Earth's, are elliptical; that is Kepler's first law, and it is found in many science textbooks. But quite a few are mistaken about the details, thinking that the orbit is very eccentric, or that this effect is somehow responsible for the seasons. In fact, the Earth's orbital eccentricity is…

  6. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-17

    During the annual Earth Day celebration at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, Shari Blissett-Clark of the Florida Bat Conservancy displays one of the mammals. The event took place during the annual Earth Day celebration at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, guests have an opportunity to learn more about energy awareness, the environment and sustainability.

  7. Spaceship Earth Curriculum Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInnis, Noel; And Others

    Three separate papers from the Project are included in this document. One of these, by the Center staff, is entitled "Potentials of the Spaceship Earth Metaphor". It discusses static, dynamic, and analogic representations of spaceship earth and their educational value. A second paper, "Some Resources for Introducing Environmental…

  8. The Earth's Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeanloz, Raymond

    1983-01-01

    The nature of the earth's core is described. Indirect evidence (such as that determined from seismological data) indicates that it is an iron alloy, solid toward its center but otherwise liquid. Evidence also suggests that it is the turbulent flow of the liquid that generates the earth's magnetic field. (JN)

  9. NASA Earth Day 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-22

    An attendee of NASA's Earth Day event observes the glow from a bracelet that is part of an exhibit at the event. The Earth Day event took place at Union Station in Washington, DC on April 22, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  10. Cool Earth Solar

    ScienceCinema

    Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan,

    2018-05-30

    In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

  11. Hands On Earth Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisgarber, Sherry L.; Van Doren, Lisa; Hackathorn, Merrianne; Hannibal, Joseph T.; Hansgen, Richard

    This publication is a collection of 13 hands-on activities that focus on earth science-related activities and involve students in learning about growing crystals, tectonics, fossils, rock and minerals, modeling Ohio geology, geologic time, determining true north, and constructing scale-models of the Earth-moon system. Each activity contains…

  12. The Earth Charter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Education for Sustainable Development, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Humanity is part of a vast evolving universe. Earth is alive with a unique community of life. The forces of nature make existence a demanding and uncertain adventure, but Earth has provided the conditions essential to life's evolution. The resilience of the community of life and the well-being of humanity depend upon preserving a healthy biosphere…

  13. Skylab Explores the Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This book describes the Skylab 4 Earth Explorations Project. Photographs of the earth taken by the Skylab astronauts are reproduced here and accompanied by an analytical and explanatory text. Some of the geological and geographical topics covered are: (1) global tectonics - some geological analyses of observations and photographs from Skylab; (2)…

  14. Earth and ocean modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knezovich, F. M.

    1976-01-01

    A modular structured system of computer programs is presented utilizing earth and ocean dynamical data keyed to finitely defined parameters. The model is an assemblage of mathematical algorithms with an inherent capability of maturation with progressive improvements in observational data frequencies, accuracies and scopes. The Eom in its present state is a first-order approach to a geophysical model of the earth's dynamics.

  15. The Earth Needs You!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Celebrated annually on April 22, schools and communities organize numerous activities during Earth Day to promote awareness. To help teachers plan their own initiatives and to learn more about what is happening around the world, they can join the Earth Day Network at: http://network.earthday.net/. Once they have joined, they can create a webpage…

  16. Earth Science Informatics - Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 10-15 years, significant advances have been made in information management, there are an increasing number of individuals entering the field of information management as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing data, and the field of informatics has come to its own. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of science data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also includes the use of computers and computational methods to support decision making and applications. Earth Science Informatics (ESI, a.k.a. geoinformatics) is the application of informatics in the Earth science domain. ESI is a rapidly developing discipline integrating computer science, information science, and Earth science. Major national and international research and infrastructure projects in ESI have been carried out or are on-going. Notable among these are: the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), the European Commissions INSPIRE, the U.S. NSDI and Geospatial One-Stop, the NASA EOSDIS, and the NSF DataONE, EarthCube and Cyberinfrastructure for Geoinformatics. More than 18 departments and agencies in the U.S. federal government have been active in Earth science informatics. All major space agencies in the world, have been involved in ESI research and application activities. In the United States, the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP), whose membership includes nearly 150 organizations (government, academic and commercial) dedicated to managing, delivering and applying Earth science data, has been working on many ESI topics since 1998. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)s Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) has been actively coordinating the ESI activities among the space agencies. Remote Sensing; Earth Science Informatics, Data Systems; Data Services; Metadata

  17. Earth as art three

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2010-01-01

    For most of us, deserts, mountains, river valleys, coastlines even dry lakebeds are relatively familiar features of the Earth's terrestrial environment. For earth scientists, they are the focus of considerable scientific research. Viewed from a unique and unconventional perspective, Earth's geographic attributes can also be a surprising source of awe-inspiring art. That unique perspective is space. The artists for the Earth as Art Three exhibit are the Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 satellites, which orbit approximately 705 kilometers (438 miles) above the Earth's surface. While studying the images these satellites beam down daily, researchers are often struck by the sheer beauty of the scenes. Such images inspire the imagination and go beyond scientific value to remind us how stunning, intricate, and simply amazing our planet's features can be. Instead of paint, the medium for these works of art is light. But Landsat satellite sensors don't see light as human eyes do; instead, they see radiant energy reflected from Earth's surface in certain wavelengths, or bands, of red, green, blue, and infrared light. When these different bands are combined into a single image, remarkable patterns, colors, and shapes emerge. The Earth as Art Three exhibit provides fresh and inspiring glimpses of different parts of our planet's complex surface. The images in this collection were chosen solely based on their aesthetic appeal. Many of the images have been manipulated to enhance color variations or details. They are not intended for scientific interpretation only for your viewing pleasure. Enjoy!

  18. Early Earth slab stagnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrusta, R.; Van Hunen, J.

    2016-12-01

    At present day, the Earth's mantle exhibits a combination of stagnant and penetrating slabs within the transition zone, indicating a intermittent convection mode between layered and whole-mantle convection. Isoviscous thermal convection calculations show that in a hotter Earth, the natural mode of convection was dominated by double-layered convection, which may imply that slabs were more prone to stagnate in the transition zone. Today, slab penetration is to a large extent controlled by trench mobility for a plausible range of lower mantle viscosity and Clapeyron slope of the mantle phase transitions. Trench mobility is, in turn, governed by slab strength and density and upper plate forcing. In this study, we systematically investigate the slab-transition zone internation in the Early Earth, using 2D self-consistent numerical subduction models. Early Earth's higher mantle temperature facilitates decoupling between the plates and the underlying asthenosphere, and may result in slab sinking almost without trench retreat. Such behaviour together with a low resistance of a weak lower mantle may allow slabs to penetrate. The ability of slab to sink into the lower mantle throughout Earth's history may have important implications for Earth's evolution: it would provide efficient mass and heat flux through the transition zone therefore provide an efficient way to cool and mix the Earth's mantle.

  19. Accretion of the Earth.

    PubMed

    Canup, Robin M

    2008-11-28

    The origin of the Earth and its Moon has been the focus of an enormous body of research. In this paper I review some of the current models of terrestrial planet accretion, and discuss assumptions common to most works that may require re-examination. Density-wave interactions between growing planets and the gas nebula may help to explain the current near-circular orbits of the Earth and Venus, and may result in large-scale radial migration of proto-planetary embryos. Migration would weaken the link between the present locations of the planets and the original provenance of the material that formed them. Fragmentation can potentially lead to faster accretion and could also damp final planet orbital eccentricities. The Moon-forming impact is believed to be the final major event in the Earth's accretion. Successful simulations of lunar-forming impacts involve a differentiated impactor containing between 0.1 and 0.2 Earth masses, an impact angle near 45 degrees and an impact speed within 10 per cent of the Earth's escape velocity. All successful impacts-with or without pre-impact rotation-imply that the Moon formed primarily from material originating from the impactor rather than from the proto-Earth. This must ultimately be reconciled with compositional similarities between the Earth and the Moon.

  20. Influence of Filler Alloy Composition and Process Parameters on the Intermetallic Layer Thickness in Single-Sided Cold Metal Transfer Welding of Aluminum-Steel Blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvayeh, Zahra; Vallant, Rudolf; Sommitsch, Christof; Götzinger, Bruno; Karner, Werner; Hartmann, Matthias

    2017-11-01

    Hybrid components made of aluminum alloys and high-strength steels are typically used in automotive lightweight applications. Dissimilar joining of these materials is quite challenging; however, it is mandatory in order to produce multimaterial car body structures. Since especially welding of tailored blanks is of utmost interest, single-sided Cold Metal Transfer butt welding of thin sheets of aluminum alloy EN AW 6014 T4 and galvanized dual-phase steel HCT 450 X + ZE 75/75 was experimentally investigated in this study. The influence of different filler alloy compositions and welding process parameters on the thickness of the intermetallic layer, which forms between the weld seam and the steel sheet, was studied. The microstructures of the weld seam and of the intermetallic layer were characterized using conventional optical light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results reveal that increasing the heat input and decreasing the cooling intensity tend to increase the layer thickness. The silicon content of the filler alloy has the strongest influence on the thickness of the intermetallic layer, whereas the magnesium and scandium contents of the filler alloy influence the cracking tendency. The layer thickness is not uniform and shows spatial variations along the bonding interface. The thinnest intermetallic layer (mean thickness < 4 µm) is obtained using the silicon-rich filler Al-3Si-1Mn, but the layer is more than twice as thick when different low-silicon fillers are used.

  1. Intermetallic Al-, Fe-, Co- and Ni-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings Prepared by Cold Spray for Applications on Low Heat Rejection Diesel Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leshchinsky, E.; Sobiesiak, A.; Maev, R.

    2018-02-01

    Conventional thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems consist of a duplex structure with a metallic bond coat and a ceramic heat insulating topcoat. They possess the desired low thermal conductivity, but at the same time they are very brittle and sensitive to thermal shock and thermal cycling due to the inherently low coefficient of thermal expansion. Recent research activities are focused on the developing of multilayer TBC structures obtained using cold spraying and following annealing. Aluminum intermetallics have demonstrated thermal and mechanical properties that allow them to be used as the alternative TBC materials, while the intermetallic layers can be additionally optimized to achieve superior thermal physical properties. One example is the six layer TBC structure in which cold sprayed Al-based intermetallics are synthesized by annealing in nitrogen atmosphere. These multilayer coating systems demonstrated an improved thermal fatigue capability as compared to conventional ceramic TBC. The microstructures and properties of the coatings were characterized by SEM, EDS and mechanical tests to define the TBC material properties and intermetallic formation mechanisms.

  2. Earth Science Informatics - Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 10-15 years, significant advances have been made in information management, there are an increasing number of individuals entering the field of information management as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing data, and the field of informatics has come to its own. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of science data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also includes the use of computers and computational methods to support decision making and applications. Earth Science Informatics (ESI, a.k.a. geoinformatics) is the application of informatics in the Earth science domain. ESI is a rapidly developing discipline integrating computer science, information science, and Earth science. Major national and international research and infrastructure projects in ESI have been carried out or are on-going. Notable among these are: the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), the European Commissions INSPIRE, the U.S. NSDI and Geospatial One-Stop, the NASA EOSDIS, and the NSF DataONE, EarthCube and Cyberinfrastructure for Geoinformatics. More than 18 departments and agencies in the U.S. federal government have been active in Earth science informatics. All major space agencies in the world, have been involved in ESI research and application activities. In the United States, the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP), whose membership includes over 180 organizations (government, academic and commercial) dedicated to managing, delivering and applying Earth science data, has been working on many ESI topics since 1998. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)s Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) has been actively coordinating the ESI activities among the space agencies.

  3. Earth Science Informatics - Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 10-15 years, significant advances have been made in information management, there are an increasing number of individuals entering the field of information management as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing data, and the field of informatics has come to its own. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of science data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also includes the use of computers and computational methods to support decision making and applications. Earth Science Informatics (ESI, a.k.a. geoinformatics) is the application of informatics in the Earth science domain. ESI is a rapidly developing discipline integrating computer science, information science, and Earth science. Major national and international research and infrastructure projects in ESI have been carried out or are on-going. Notable among these are: the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), the European Commissions INSPIRE, the U.S. NSDI and Geospatial One-Stop, the NASA EOSDIS, and the NSF DataONE, EarthCube and Cyberinfrastructure for Geoinformatics. More than 18 departments and agencies in the U.S. federal government have been active in Earth science informatics. All major space agencies in the world, have been involved in ESI research and application activities. In the United States, the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP), whose membership includes over 180 organizations (government, academic and commercial) dedicated to managing, delivering and applying Earth science data, has been working on many ESI topics since 1998. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)s Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) has been actively coordinating the ESI activities among the space agencies.The talk will present an overview of current efforts in ESI, the role members of IEEE GRSS play, and discuss

  4. Rare earth gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, W.F.

    1975-10-31

    A high energy gas laser with light output in the infrared or visible region of the spectrum is described. Laser action is obtained by generating vapors of rare earth halides, particularly neodymium iodide or, to a lesser extent, neodymium bromide, and disposing the rare earth vapor medium in a resonant cavity at elevated temperatures; e.g., approximately 1200/sup 0/ to 1400/sup 0/K. A particularly preferred gaseous medium is one involving a complex of aluminum chloride and neodymium chloride, which exhibits tremendously enhanced vapor pressure compared to the rare earth halides per se, and provides comparable increases in stored energy densities.

  5. Earth before life.

    PubMed

    Marzban, Caren; Viswanathan, Raju; Yurtsever, Ulvi

    2014-01-09

    A recent study argued, based on data on functional genome size of major phyla, that there is evidence life may have originated significantly prior to the formation of the Earth. Here a more refined regression analysis is performed in which 1) measurement error is systematically taken into account, and 2) interval estimates (e.g., confidence or prediction intervals) are produced. It is shown that such models for which the interval estimate for the time origin of the genome includes the age of the Earth are consistent with observed data. The appearance of life after the formation of the Earth is consistent with the data set under examination.

  6. Earth Science Applications Showcase

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-05

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden speaks with young professionals about their project during the annual DEVELOP Earth Science Application Showcase at NASA headquarters Tuesday, August 5, 2014. The Earth Science Applications Showcase highlights the work of over 150 participants in the 10-week DEVELOP program that started in June. The DEVELOP Program bridges the gap between NASA Earth science and society, building capacity in both its participants and partner organizations, to better prepare them to handle the challenges that face our society and future generations. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  7. Earth Science Applications Showcase

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-05

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden poses for a selfie after a quick rap performance by some young professionals during the annual DEVELOP Earth Science Application Showcase at NASA headquarters Tuesday, August 5, 2014. The Earth Science Applications Showcase highlights the work of over 150 participants in the 10-week DEVELOP program that started in June. The DEVELOP Program bridges the gap between NASA Earth science and society, building capacity in both its participants and partner organizations, to better prepare them to handle the challenges that face our society and future generations. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  8. Earth Science Applications Showcase

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-05

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden speaks with young professionals about their project on New England water resources during the annual DEVELOP Earth Science Application Showcase at NASA headquarters Tuesday, August 5, 2014. The Earth Science Applications Showcase highlights the work of over 150 participants in the 10-week DEVELOP program that started in June. The DEVELOP Program bridges the gap between NASA Earth science and society, building capacity in both its participants and partner organizations, to better prepare them to handle the challenges that face our society and future generations. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  9. Earth Science Applications Showcase

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-05

    Lisa Waldron and Justin Roberts-Pierel present their project on Texas health and air quality during the annual DEVELOP Earth Science Application Showcase at NASA headquarters Tuesday, August 5, 2014. The Earth Science Applications Showcase highlights the work of over 150 participants in the 10-week DEVELOP program that started in June. The DEVELOP Program bridges the gap between NASA Earth science and society, building capacity in both its participants and partner organizations, to better prepare them to handle the challenges that face our society and future generations. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  10. Earth Science Applications Showcase

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-05

    Michael Gao presents his project on Southeast Asian disasters during the annual DEVELOP Earth Science Application Showcase at NASA headquarters Tuesday, August 5, 2014. The Earth Science Applications Showcase highlights the work of over 150 participants in the 10-week DEVELOP program that started in June. The DEVELOP Program bridges the gap between NASA Earth science and society, building capacity in both its participants and partner organizations, to better prepare them to handle the challenges that face our society and future generations. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  11. Earth Science Applications Showcase

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-05

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden asks young professionals about their projects after posing for a group photo during the annual DEVELOP Earth Science Application Showcase at NASA headquarters Tuesday, August 5, 2014. The Earth Science Applications Showcase highlights the work of over 150 participants in the 10-week DEVELOP program that started in June. The DEVELOP Program bridges the gap between NASA Earth science and society, building capacity in both its participants and partner organizations, to better prepare them to handle the challenges that face our society and future generations. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  12. Earth Day 2017

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Happy Earth Day! Explore the diverse colors, unique shapes and striking patterns of our very favorite planet, Earth - as only NASA can see it. Credit: NASA/Goddard #nasagoddard NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  13. Earth Eclipses the Sun

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-21

    Several times a day for a few days the Earth completely blocked the Sun for about an hour due to NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory's orbital path (Feb. 15, 2017). The edge of the Earth is not crisp, but kind of fuzzy due to Earth's atmosphere. This frame from a video shows the ending of one such eclipse over -- just seven minutes. The sun is shown in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. These eclipses re-occur about every six months. The Moon blocks SDO's view of the sun on occasion as well. Movies are available at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21461

  14. Exploring phase stability, electronic and mechanical properties of Ce–Pb intermetallic compounds using first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Xiaoma; Computational Alloy Design Group, IMDEA Materials Institute, Getafe, Madrid 28906; Wang, Ziru

    2016-05-15

    The phase stability, electronic and mechanical properties of Ce–Pb intermetallics have been investigated by using first-principles calculations. Five stable and four metastable phases of Ce–Pb intermetallics were verified. Among them, CePb{sub 2} has been confirmed as HfGa{sub 2}-type structure. For Ce{sub 5}Pb{sub 3}, the high pressure phase transformation from D8{sub m} to D8{sub 8} with trivalent Ce has been predicted to occur at P=1.2 GPa and a high temperature phase transformation has been predicted from D8{sub m} to D8{sub 8} with tetravalent Ce at 531.5 K. The calculated lattice constants of the five stable phases are in good agreement withmore » experimental values. The electronic density of states, charge density and electron localization function of Ce{sub 3}Pb have been calculated, which indicated that the Ce and Pb show ionic behavior. The polycrystalline bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, and Poisson's ratio are also estimated from the calculated single crystalline elastic constants. All of the calculated elastic constants satisfy mechanical stability criteria. The microhardness and mechanical anisotropy are predicted. The anisotropic nature of the Ce–Pb intermetallic compounds are demonstrated by the three-dimensional orientation dependent surfaces of Young's moduli and linear compressibility are also demonstrated. The longitudinal, transverse and average sound velocities and the Debye temperatures are also obtained in this work. The Ce{sub 3}Pb has the largest Debye temperature of 192.6 K, which means the Ce{sub 3}Pb has a highest melting point and high thermal conductivity than other compounds. - Graphical abstract: The convex hull plots of the enthalpies of formation for Ce–Pb binary systems calculated at 0 K. - Highlights: • The five stable and four metastable phases in the Ce–Pb binary system were predicted. • The crystal structure of CePb{sub 2} has been confirmed as HfGa{sub 2}-type.« less

  15. Crystal-field splittings in rare-earth-based hard magnets: An ab initio approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delange, Pascal; Biermann, Silke; Miyake, Takashi; Pourovskii, Leonid

    2017-10-01

    We apply the first-principles density functional theory + dynamical mean-field theory framework to evaluate the crystal-field splitting on rare-earth sites in hard magnetic intermetallics. An atomic (Hubbard-I) approximation is employed for local correlations on the rare-earth 4 f shell and self-consistency in the charge density is implemented. We reduce the density functional theory self-interaction contribution to the crystal-field splitting by properly averaging the 4 f charge density before recalculating the one-electron Kohn-Sham potential. Our approach is shown to reproduce the experimental crystal-field splitting in the prototypical rare-earth hard magnet SmCo5. Applying it to R Fe12 and R Fe12X hard magnets (R =Nd , Sm and X =N , Li), we obtain in particular a large positive value of the crystal-field parameter A20〈r2〉 in NdFe12N resulting in a strong out-of-plane anisotropy observed experimentally. The sign of A20〈r2〉 is predicted to be reversed by substituting N with Li, leading to a strong out-of-plane anisotropy in SmFe12Li . We discuss the origin of this strong impact of N and Li interstitials on the crystal-field splitting on rare-earth sites.

  16. Down to earth relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, I. I.

    1978-01-01

    The basic concepts of the special and general theories of relativity are described. Simple examples are given to illustrate the effect of relativity on measurements of time and frequency in the near-earth environment.

  17. The Earth Tides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Judah

    1982-01-01

    In addition to oceans, the earth is subjected to tidal stresses and undergoes tidal deformations. Discusses origin of tides, tidal stresses, and methods of determining tidal deformations (including gravity, tilt, and strain meters). (JN)

  18. Earth study from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidorenko, A. V.

    1981-01-01

    The significance that space studies are making to all Earth sciences in the areas of geography, geodesy, cartography, geology, meteorology, oceanology, agronomy, and ecology is discussed. It is predicted that cosmonautics will result in a revolution in science and technology.

  19. NASA Earth Day 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-22

    NASA's Administrator, Charles Bolden, conducts an experiment using circuits at NASA's Earth Day event. The event took place at Union Station in Washington, DC on April 22, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  20. NASA Earth Day 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-22

    NASA's Administrator, Charles Bolden watches as some students conduct an experiment with a balloon at NASA's Earth Day event. The event took place at Union Station in Washington, DC on April 22, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  1. NASA Earth Day 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-22

    Students listen intently while an exhibitor conducts an experiment at NASA's Earth Day event. The event took place at Union Station in Washington, DC on April 22, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  2. NASA Earth Day 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-22

    Students listen intently while Astronaut John Mace Grunsfeld speaks at NASA's Earth Day event. The event took place at Union Station in Washington, DC on April 22, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  3. LANL Studies Earth's Magnetosphere

    ScienceCinema

    Daughton, Bill

    2018-02-13

    A new 3-D supercomputer model presents a new theory of how magnetic reconnection works in high-temperature plasmas. This Los Alamos National Laboratory research supports an upcoming NASA mission to study Earth's magnetosphere in greater detail than ever.

  4. Earth Radiation Measurement Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. Louis

    2000-01-01

    This document is the final report for NASA Grant NAG1-1959, 'Earth Radiation Measurement Science'. The purpose of this grant was to perform research in this area for the needs of the Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System (CERES) project and for the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), which are bing conducted by the Radiation and Aerosols Branch of the Atmospheric Sciences Division of Langley Research Center. Earth Radiation Measurement Science investigates the processes by which measurements are converted into data products. Under this grant, research was to be conducted for five tasks: (1) Point Response Function Measurements; (2) Temporal Sampling of Outgoing Longwave Radiation; (3) Spatial Averaging of Radiation Budget Data; (4) CERES Data Validation and Applications; and (5) ScaRaB Data Validation and Application.

  5. Observing earth from Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Skylab technology and observations of earth resources are discussed. Special attention was given to application of Skylab data to mapmaking, geology/geodesy, water resources, oceanography, meteorology, and geography/ecology.

  6. Olivine on Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-30

    The semi-precious gem peridot is a variety of olivine. NASA Curiosity rover shows the diffraction signature, or fingerprint, of the mineral olivine, shown here on Earth in the form of tumbled crystals.

  7. Earth science: Extraordinary world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, James M. D.

    2016-09-01

    The isotopic compositions of objects that formed early in the evolution of the Solar System have been found to be similar to Earth's composition -- overturning notions of our planet's chemical distinctiveness. See Letters p.394 & p.399

  8. Earth retaining structures manual

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-10-29

    The objectives of this policy are to obtain statewide uniformity, establish standard : procedures and delineate responsibility for the preparation and review of plans, : design and construction control of earth retaining structures. In addition, it i...

  9. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-18

    Students from Rockledge High School in Rockledge, Fla., make “plarn” – plastic yarn -- out of used plastic bags during Kennedy Space Center’s annual Earth Day celebration. The plarn was donated to be woven into mats for homeless veterans. The two-day Earth Day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  10. Earth and Space Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeson, Blanche W.

    1999-01-01

    Workshop for middle and high school teachers to enhance their knowledge of the Earth as a system. NASA data and materials developed by teachers (all available via the Internet) will be used to engage participants in hands-on, investigative approaches to the Earth system. All materials are ready to be applied in pre-college classrooms. Remotely-sensed data will be used in combination with familiar resources, such as maps, to examine global climate change.

  11. Fuller's earth (montmorillonite) pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, A R; Pooley, F D

    1994-01-01

    A fuller's earth worker developed signs of pneumoconiosis. Pathological examination of the lung tissues showed interstitial collections of dust laden macrophages associated with mild fibrosis. Mineralogical analysis showed a high content of montmorillonite. This study shows that a pneumoconiosis can result from prolonged heavy exposure to calcium montmorillonite (fuller's earth) in the absence of quartz. The disease is relatively mild and associated with little clinical disability. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7951799

  12. Skylab explores the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Data from visual observations are integrated with results of analyses of approxmately 600 of the nearly 2000 photographs taken of Earth during the 84-day Skylab 4 mission to provide additional information on (1) Earth features and processes; (2) operational procedures and constraints in observing and photographing the planet; and (3) the use of man in real-time analysis of oceanic and atmospheric phenomena.

  13. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-18

    Organizers and volunteers for Kennedy Space Center’s Earth Day celebration gather for a photo at the NASA Exchange raffle booth. From left to right are Jeanne Ryba, Environmental Sustainability program specialist; Robert Smith, Earth Day volunteer; and Natasha Darre, Cultural Resources Specialist. The two-day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  14. Biosignatures of early earths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilcher, Carl B.

    2003-01-01

    A major goal of NASA's Origins Program is to find habitable planets around other stars and determine which might harbor life. Determining whether or not an extrasolar planet harbors life requires an understanding of what spectral features (i.e., biosignatures) might result from life's presence. Consideration of potential biosignatures has tended to focus on spectral features of gases in Earth's modern atmosphere, particularly ozone, the photolytic product of biogenically produced molecular oxygen. But life existed on Earth for about 1(1/2) billion years before the buildup of atmospheric oxygen. Inferred characteristics of Earth's earliest biosphere and studies of modern microbial ecosystems that share some of those characteristics suggest that organosulfur compounds, particularly methanethiol (CH(3)SH, the sulfur analog of methanol), may have been biogenic products on early Earth. Similar production could take place on extrasolar Earth-like planets whose biota share functional chemical characteristics with Earth life. Since methanethiol and related organosulfur compounds (as well as carbon dioxide) absorb at wavelengths near or overlapping the 9.6-microm band of ozone, there is potential ambiguity in interpreting a feature around this wavelength in an extrasolar planet spectrum.

  15. Guided earth boring tool

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Donald, W.J.; Pittard, G.T.; Maurer, W.C.

    A controllable tool for drilling holes in the earth is described comprising a hollow elongated rigid supporting drill pipe having a forward end for entering the earth, means supporting the drill pipe for earth boring or piercing movement, including means for moving the drill pipe longitudinally for penetrating the earth, the drill pipe moving means being constructed to permit addition and removal of supporting drill pipe during earth penetrating operation, a boring mole supported on the forward end of the hollow low drill pipe comprising a cylindrical housing supported on and open to the forward end of the drill pipe,more » a first means on the front end for applying a boring force to the soil comprising an anvil having a striking surface inside the housing and a boring surface outside the housing, a second means comprising a reciprocally movable hammer positioned in the housing to apply a percussive force to the anvil striking surface for transmitting a percussive force to the boring force applying means, and means permitting introduction of air pressure supplied through the hollow pipe into the housing for operating the hammer and for discharging spent air from the housing to the hole being bored, and the tool being operable to penetrate the earth upon longitudinal movement of the drill rod by the longitudinal rod moving means and operation of the mole by reciprocal movement of the hammer.« less

  16. Biosignatures of early earths.

    PubMed

    Pilcher, Carl B

    2003-01-01

    A major goal of NASA's Origins Program is to find habitable planets around other stars and determine which might harbor life. Determining whether or not an extrasolar planet harbors life requires an understanding of what spectral features (i.e., biosignatures) might result from life's presence. Consideration of potential biosignatures has tended to focus on spectral features of gases in Earth's modern atmosphere, particularly ozone, the photolytic product of biogenically produced molecular oxygen. But life existed on Earth for about 1(1/2) billion years before the buildup of atmospheric oxygen. Inferred characteristics of Earth's earliest biosphere and studies of modern microbial ecosystems that share some of those characteristics suggest that organosulfur compounds, particularly methanethiol (CH(3)SH, the sulfur analog of methanol), may have been biogenic products on early Earth. Similar production could take place on extrasolar Earth-like planets whose biota share functional chemical characteristics with Earth life. Since methanethiol and related organosulfur compounds (as well as carbon dioxide) absorb at wavelengths near or overlapping the 9.6-microm band of ozone, there is potential ambiguity in interpreting a feature around this wavelength in an extrasolar planet spectrum.

  17. Influence of Al grain boundaries segregations and La-doping on embrittlement of intermetallic NiAl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Anatoly I.; Wainstein, Dmitry L.; Rashkovskiy, Alexander Yu.

    2015-11-01

    The microscopic nature of intergranular fracture of NiAl was experimentally investigated by the set of electron spectroscopy techniques. The paper demonstrates that embrittlement of NiAl intermetallic compound is caused by ordering of atomic structure that leads to formation of structural aluminum segregations at grain boundaries (GB). Such segregations contain high number of brittle covalent interatomic bonds. The alloying by La increases the ductility of material avoiding Al GB enrichment and disordering GB atomic structure. The influence of La alloying on NiAl mechanical properties was investigated. GB chemical composition, atomic and electronic structure transformations after La doping were investigated by AES, XPS and EELFS techniques. To qualify the interatomic bonds metallicity the Fermi level (EF) position and electrons density (neff) in conduction band were determined in both undoped and doped NiAl. Basing on experimental results the physical model of GB brittleness formation was proposed.

  18. Formation of Multi-Layer Structures in Bi3Pb7 Intermetallic Compounds under an Ultra-High Gravitational Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashimo, T.; Iguchi, Y.; Bagum, R.; Sano, T.; Sakata, O.; Ono, M.; Okayasu, S.

    2008-02-01

    Ultra-high gravitational field (Mega-gravity field) can promote sedimentation of atoms (diffusion) even in solids, and is expected to form a compositionally-graded structure and/or nonequilibrium phase in multi-component condensed matter. We had achieved sedimentation of substitutional solute atoms in miscible systems (Bi-Sb, In-Pb, etc.). In this study, a mega-gravity experiment at high temperature was performed on a thin-plate sample (0.7 mm in thickness) of the intermetallic compound Bi3Pb7. A visible four-layer structure was produced, which exhibited different microscopic structures. In the lowest-gravity region layer, Bi phase appeared. In the mid layers, a compositionally-graded structure was formed, with differences observed in the powder X-ray diffraction patterns. Such a multi-layer structure is expected to exhibit unique physical properties such as superconductivity.

  19. Complex magnetism of lanthanide intermetallics and the role of their valence electrons: Ab Initio theory and experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Petit, L.; Paudyal, D.; Mudryk, Y.; ...

    2015-11-09

    We explain a profound complexity of magnetic interactions of some technologically relevant gadolinium intermetallics using an ab initio electronic structure theory which includes disordered local moments and strong f-electron correlations. The theory correctly finds GdZn and GdCd to be simple ferromagnets and predicts a remarkably large increase of Curie temperature with a pressure of +1.5 K kbar –1 for GdCd confirmed by our experimental measurements of +1.6 K kbar –1. Moreover, we find the origin of a ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic competition in GdMg manifested by noncollinear, canted magnetic order at low temperatures. As a result, replacing 35% of the Mg atoms withmore » Zn removes this transition, in excellent agreement with long-standing experimental data.« less

  20. Fracture Behaviors of Sn-Cu Intermetallic Compound Layer in Ball Grid Array Induced by Thermal Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jun; Zhai, Dajun; Cao, Zhongming; Zhao, Mali; Pu, Yayun

    2014-02-01

    In this work, thermal shock reliability testing and finite-element analysis (FEA) of solder joints between ball grid array components and printed circuit boards with Cu pads were used to investigate the failure mechanism of solder interconnections. The morphologies, composition, and thickness of Sn-Cu intermetallic compounds (IMC) at the interface of Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu lead-free solder alloy and Cu substrates were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Based on the experimental observations and FEA results, it can be recognized that the origin and propagation of cracks are caused primarily by the difference between the coefficient of thermal expansion of different parts of the packaged products, the growth behaviors and roughness of the IMC layer, and the grain size of the solder balls.

  1. Theoretical investigation of thermoelectric and elastic properties of intermetallic compounds ScTM (TM = Cu, Ag, Au and Pd)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, R.; Bilal, M.; Jalali-Asadabadi, S.; Rahnamaye Aliabad, H. A.; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the structural, electronic, thermoelectric and elastic properties of intermetallic compounds ScTM (TM = Cu, Ag, Au and Pd) using density functional theory. The produced results show high values of Seebeck coefficients and electrical conductivity for these materials. High power factor for these materials at room-temperature shows that these materials may be beneficial for low-temperature thermoelectric devices and alternative energy sources. Furthermore, elastic properties of these compounds are also calculated, which are used to evaluate their mechanical properties. The Cauchy’s pressure and B/G ratio figure out that these compounds are ductile in nature. The calculated results also predict that these compounds are stable against deforming force.

  2. Quantum many-body intermetallics: Phase stability of Fe3Al and small-gap formation in Fe2VAl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristanovski, Oleg; Richter, Raphael; Krivenko, Igor; Lichtenstein, Alexander I.; Lechermann, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Various intermetallic compounds harbor subtle electronic correlation effects. To elucidate this fact for the Fe-Al system, we perform a realistic many-body investigation based on a combination of density functional theory with dynamical mean-field theory in a charge self-consistent manner. A better characterization and understanding of the phase stability of bcc-based D 03-Fe3Al through an improved description of the correlated charge density and the magnetic energy is achieved. Upon replacement of one Fe sublattice with V, the Heusler compound Fe2VAl is realized, known to display bad-metal behavior and increased specific heat. Here we document a charge-gap opening at low temperatures in line with previous experimental work. The gap structure does not match conventional band theory and is reminiscent of (pseudo)gap characteristics in correlated oxides.

  3. Multiplet Splitting Effects on Core-Level Photoemission and Inverse-Photoemission Spectra of Uranium Intermetallic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Kozo

    1999-03-01

    The present paper discusses the role of U 5f-5f exchange interaction (J) in the inverse photoemission spectrum (IPES) and the U 4f x-ray photoemission spectrum (XPS) of uranium intermetallic compounds. The origin of the broad main peak in the IPES of UPd3 and UPd2Al3, for instance, is ascribed to the exchange coupling effects of 5f electrons. In other words, whether the ground state is of high-spin or of low-spin is directly reflected in the width of the IPES. On the other hand, the interpretation for the U 4f photoemission spectrum is not so greatly influenced by J. The full-multiplet calculations are also performed for an U4+ ion for comparison.

  4. FP-LAPW study of structural, electronic, elastic, mechanical and thermal properties of AlFe intermetallic

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Ekta, E-mail: jainekta05@gmail.com; Pagare, Gitanjali, E-mail: gita-pagare@yahoo.co.in; Sanyal, S. P., E-mail: sps.physicsbu@gmail.com

    2016-05-06

    The structural, electronic, elastic, mechanical and thermal properties of AlFe intermetallic compound in B{sub 2}-type (CsCl) structure have been investigated using first-principles calculations. The exchange-correlation term was treated within generalized gradient approximation. Ground state properties i.e. lattice constants (a{sub 0}), bulk modulus (B) and first-order pressure derivative of bulk modulus (B’) are presented. The density of states are derived which show the metallic character of present compound. Our results for C{sub 11}, C{sub 12} and C{sub 44} agree well with previous theoretical data. Using Pugh’s criteria (B/G{sub H} < 1.75), brittle character of AlFe is satisfied. In addition shear modulusmore » (G{sub H}), Young’s modulus (E), sound wave velocities and Debye temperature (θ{sub D}) have also been estimated.« less

  5. Electronic and optical properties of RESn{sub 3} (RE=Pr & Nd) intermetallics: A first principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Pagare, G., E-mail: gita-pagare@yahoo.co.in; Abraham, Jisha A.; Department of Physics, National Defence Academy, Pune-411023

    2015-06-24

    A theoretical study of structural, electronic and optical properties of RESn{sub 3} (RE = Pr & Nd) intermetallics have been investigated systematically using first principles density functional theory. The calculations are carried out within the PBE-GGA and LSDA for the exchange correlation potential. The ground state properties such as lattice parameter (a{sub 0}), bulk modulus (B) and its pressure derivative (B′) are calculated and the calculated lattice parameters show well agreement with the experimental results. We first time predict elastic constants for these compounds. From energy dispersion curves, it is found that these compounds are metallic in nature. The linearmore » optical response of these compounds are also studied and the higher value of static dielectric constant shows the possibility to use them as good dielectric materials.« less

  6. Laser Cladding of TiAl Intermetallic Alloy on Ti6Al4V -Process Optimization and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cárcel, B.; Serrano, A.; Zambrano, J.; Amigó, V.; Cárcel, A. C.

    In order to improve Ti6Al4V high-temperature resistance and its tribological properties, the deposition of TiAl intermetallic (Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb) coating on a Ti6Al4V substrate by coaxial laser cladding has been investigated. Laser cladding by powder injection is an emerging laser material processing technique that allows the deposition of thick protective coatings on substrates,using a high power laser beam as heat source. Laser cladding is a multiple-parameter-dependent process. The main process parameters involved (laser power, powder feeding rate, scanning speed and preheating temperature) has been optimized. The microstructure and geometrical quantities (clad area and dilution) of the coating was characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In addition the cooling rate of the clad during the process was measured by a dual-color pyrometer. This result has been related to defectology and mechanical coating properties.

  7. From Structural Complexity to Structure-Property Relationships in Intermetallics: Development of Density Functional Theory-Chemical Pressure Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelkemier, Joshua

    The unparalleled structural diversity of intermetallic compounds provides nearly unlimited potential for the discovery and optimization of materials with useful properties, such as thermoelectricity, superconductivity, magnetism, hydrogen storage, superelasticity, and catalysis. This same diversity, however, creates challenges for understanding and controlling the unpredictable structure of intermetallic phases. Moreover, the fundamental design principles that have proven so powerful in molecular chemistry do not have simple analogues for metallic, solid state materials. One of these basic principles is the concept of atomic size effects. Especially in densely packed crystal structures where the need to fill space is in competition with the atoms' preferences for ideal interatomic distances, substitution of one element in a compound for another with similar chemical properties yet different atomic size can have dramatic effects on the ordering of the atoms (which in turn affects the electronic structure, vibrational properties, and materials properties). But because the forces that hold metallic phases together are less easily understood from a local perspective than covalent or ionic interactions in other kinds of materials, it is usually unclear whether the atoms are organized to optimize stabilizing, bonding interactions or rather forced to be close together despite repulsive, steric interactions. This dissertation details the development of a theoretical method, called Density Functional Theory-Chemical Pressure (DFT-CP) analysis, to address this issue. It works by converting the distribution of total energy density from a DFT calculation into a map of chemical pressure through a numerical approximation of the first derivative of energy with respect to voxel volume. The CP distribution is then carefully divided into contact volumes between neighboring atoms, from which it is possible to determine whether atoms are too close together (positive CP) or too far

  8. The characteristics of hot swaged NiAl intermetallic compounds with ternary additions consolidated by HIP techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiyama, S.; Eto, M.; Mishima, Y.

    Stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric NiAl intermetallics with ternary additives, such as Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo or Mo/e, W, Mn, Fe, Cu and B, fabricated with the combination of Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) and hot swaging techniques have been investigated. The mechanical properties of hot swaged NiAl with various ternary additives, consolidated by ion beam casting or HIP techniques, have been tested at temperatures ranging from R.T. to 1,000 C. It is found that significant tensile elongation at room temperature can be achieved by hot swaged as-HIP`ed NiAl compounds with Mo or Mo/Re additives, whereas cast and hotmore » swaged compounds with Mo addition resulted in some elongation above 400 C.« less

  9. Ab-initio thermodynamic and elastic properties of AlNi and AlNi3 intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalameha, Shahram; Vaez, Aminollah

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, thermodynamic and elastic properties of the AlNi and AlNi3 were investigated using density functional theory (DFT). The full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (APW) in the framework of the generalized gradient approximation as used as implemented in the Wien2k package. The temperature dependence of thermal expansion coefficient, bulk modulus and heat capacity in a wide range of temperature (0-1600 K) were investigated. The calculated elastic properties of the compounds show that both intermetallic compounds of AlNi and AlNi3 have surprisingly negative Poisson’s ratio (NPR). The results were compared with other experimental and computational data.

  10. Investigation of electronic structure and chemical bonding of intermetallic Pd2HfIn: An ab-initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bano, Amreen; Gaur, N. K.

    2018-05-01

    Ab-initio calculations are carried out to study the electronic and chemical bonding properties of Intermetallic full Heusler compound Pd2HfIn which crystallizes in F-43m structure. All calculations are performed by using density functional theory (DFT) based code Quantum Espresso. Generalized gradient approximations (GGA) of Perdew- Burke- Ernzerhof (PBE) have been adopted for exchange-correlation potential. Calculated electronic band structure reveals the metallic character of the compound. From partial density of states (PDoS), we found the presence of relatively high intensity electronic states of 4d-Pd atom at Fermi level. We have found a pseudo-gap just abouve the Fermi level and N(E) at Fermi level is observed to be 0.8 states/eV, these finding indicates the existence of superconducting character in Pd2HfIn.

  11. Development of B2 Shape Memory Intermetallics Beyond NiAl, CoNiAl and CoNiGa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstein, G.; Firstov, G. S.; Kosorukova, T. A.; Koval, Yu. N.; Maier, H. J.

    2018-06-01

    The present study describes the development of shape memory alloys based on NiAl. Initially, this system was considered a promising but unsuccessful neighbour of NiTi. Later, however, shape memory alloys like CoNiAl or CoNiGa were developed that can be considered as NiAl derivatives and already demonstrated good mechanical properties. Yet, these alloys were still inferior to NiTi in most respects. Lately, using a multi-component approach, a CoNiCuAlGaIn high entropy intermetallic compound was developed from the NiAl prototype. This new alloy featured a B2 phase and a martensitic transformation along with a remarkable strength in the as-cast state. In the long-term, this new approach might led to a breakthrough for shape memory alloys in general.

  12. Effect of Mg2Sn Intermetallic on the Grain Refinement in As-cast AM Series Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, J.; Pan, F. S.; Hu, H. H.; Tang, A. T.; Yu, Z. W.; Song, K.

    2015-08-01

    In the present work, in order to investigate the grain refinement mechanism of AM containing Sn alloys, the as-cast AM60, AM90 alloys, and the alloys with addition of 1 wt.% Sn were fabricated by traditional casting, respectively. During the solidification of AM + Sn alloys, the morphology of divorced eutectic Mg17Al12 was refined by Mg2Sn intermetallic that served as the heterogeneous nucleation cores. The modified Mg17Al12 effectively restricted the grain growth and resulted in a grain refinement. As a result, the yield strength of as-cast AM alloys was significantly enhanced by addition of Sn, while the ductility also improved. Moreover, the edge-to-edge model was employed to predict the orientation relationship between Mg17Al12 and Mg2Sn.

  13. Influence of severe plastic deformation on intermetallic particles in Mg-12 wt.%Zn alloy investigated using transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Němec, M., E-mail: nemecm@fzu.cz

    The in-depth microstructural characterization of intermetallic particles in an Mg-12 wt.%Zn binary alloy subjected to a severe plastic deformation is presented. The alloy was processed by four passes via equal channel angular pressing with an applied back pressure at a gradually decreasing temperature and analyzed using transmission electron microscopy techniques to observe the influence of processing on intermetallic particles. The results are compared with the initial state of the material prior to severe plastic deformation. The microstructural evolution of the α-Mg matrix and the Mg{sub 21}Zn{sub 25}, Mg{sub 51}Zn{sub 20} and MgZn{sub 2} was analyzed using bright field imaging, selectedmore » area electron diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and high-angle annular dark field imaging in scanning mode. The plastic deformation process influenced the α-Mg matrix and each type of intermetallic particle. The α-Mg matrix consisted of two types of areas. The first type of area had a highly deformed structure, and the second type of area had a partially recrystallized structure with an average grain size of approximately 250 nm. The Mg{sub 21}Zn{sub 25} microparticles exhibited distinct forms in the α-Mg matrix that were characterized as a single-crystalline form, a nano-crystalline form and a broken up form. No evidence of Mg{sub 51}Zn{sub 20} nanoparticles within the α-Mg matrix was found in the microstructure, which indicates their dissolution or phase transformation during the deformation process. MgZn{sub 2} nanoparticles exhibited different behavior in both types of α-Mg matrix. Two orientation relationships toward the highly deformed α-Mg matrix were observed; however, there was no relationship toward the partially recrystallized α-Mg matrix. Additionally, the growth of the MgZn{sub 2} nanoparticles was different in the two types of α-Mg matrix. The Mg{sub 51}Zn{sub 20} nanoparticles inside Mg{sub 21}Zn{sub 25} microparticles

  14. The Influence of Grain Structure on Intermetallic Compound Layer Growth Rates in Fe-Al Dissimilar Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lei; Robson, Joseph D.; Wang, Li; Prangnell, Philip B.

    2018-02-01

    The thickness of the intermetallic compound (IMC) layer that forms when aluminum is welded to steel is critical in determining the properties of the dissimilar joints. The IMC reaction layer typically consists of two phases ( η and θ) and many attempts have been made to determine the apparent activation energy for its growth, an essential parameter in developing any predictive model for layer thickness. However, even with alloys of similar composition, there is no agreement of the correct value of this activation energy. In the present work, the IMC layer growth has been characterized in detail for AA6111 aluminum to DC04 steel couples under isothermal annealing conditions. The samples were initially lightly ultrasonically welded to produce a metallic bond, and the structure and thickness of the layer were then characterized in detail, including tracking the evolution of composition and grain size in the IMC phases. A model developed previously for Al-Mg dissimilar welds was adapted to predict the coupled growth of the two phases in the layer, whilst accounting explicitly for grain boundary and lattice diffusion, and considering the influence of grain growth. It has been shown that the intermetallic layer has a submicron grain size, and grain boundary diffusion as well as grain growth plays a critical role in determining the thickening rate for both phases. The model was used to demonstrate how this explains the wide scatter in the apparent activation energies previously reported. From this, process maps were developed that show the relative importance of each diffusion path to layer growth as a function of temperature and time.

  15. Sub-4 nm PtZn Intermetallic Nanoparticles for Enhanced Mass and Specific Activities in Catalytic Electrooxidation Reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Qi, Zhiyuan; Xiao, Chaoxian; Liu, Cong; ...

    2017-03-08

    Atomically ordered intermetallic nanoparticles (iNPs) have sparked considerable interest in fuel cell applications by virtue of their exceptional electronic and structural properties. However, the synthesis of small iNPs in a controllable manner remains a formidable challenge because of the high temperature generally required in the formation of intermetallic phases. Here in this paper we report a general method for the synthesis of PtZn iNPs (3.2 ± 0.4 nm) on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) via a facile and capping agent free strategy using a sacrificial mesoporous silica (mSiO 2) shell. The as-prepared PtZn iNPs exhibited ca. 10 times higher mass activitymore » in both acidic and basic solution toward the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) compared to larger PtZn iNPs synthesized on MWNT without the mSiO 2 shell. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations predict that PtZn systems go through a “non-CO” pathway for MOR because of the stabilization of the OH* intermediate by Zn atoms, while a pure Pt system forms highly stable COH* and CO* intermediates, leading to catalyst deactivation. Experimental studies on the origin of the backward oxidation peak of MOR coincide well with DFT predictions. Moreover, the calculations demonstrate that MOR on smaller PtZn iNPs is energetically more favorable than larger iNPs, due to their high density of corner sites and lower-lying energetic pathway. Therefore, smaller PtZn iNPs not only increase the number but also enhance the activity of the active sites in MOR compared with larger ones. This work opens a new avenue for the synthesis of small iNPs with more undercoordinated and enhanced active sites for fuel cell applications.« less

  16. Sub-4 nm PtZn Intermetallic Nanoparticles for Enhanced Mass and Specific Activities in Catalytic Electrooxidation Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Zhiyuan; Xiao, Chaoxian; Liu, Cong

    2017-03-22

    Atomically ordered intermetallic nanoparticles (iNPs) have sparked considerable interest in fuel cell applications by virtue of their exceptional electronic and structural properties. However, the synthesis of small iNPs in a controllable manner remains a formidable challenge because of the high temperature generally required in the formation of intermetallic phases. Here we report a general method for the synthesis of PtZn. iNPs (3.2 +/- 0.4 nm) on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) via a facile and capping agent free strategy using a sacrificial mesoporous silica (mSiO(2)) shell. The as-prepared PtZn iNPs exhibited ca. 10 times higher mass activity in both acidic andmore » basic solution toward the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) compared to larger PtZn iNPs synthesized on MWNT without the mSiO2 shell. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations predict that PtZn systems go through a "non-CO" pathway for MOR because of the stabilization of the OH* intermediate by Zn atoms, while a pure Pt system forms highly stable COH* and CO* intermediates, leading to catalyst deactivation. Experimental studies on the origin of the backward oxidation peak of MOR coincide well with DFT predictions. Moreover, the calculations demonstrate that MOR on smaller PtZn iNPs is energetically more favorable than larger iNPs, due to their high density of corner sites and lower-lying energetic pathway. Therefore, smaller PtZn iNPs not only increase the number but also enhance the activity of the active sites in MOR compared with larger ones. This work opens a new avenue for the synthesis of small iNPs with more undercoordinated and enhanced active sites for fuel cell applications.« less

  17. The evolution of γ-Mg17Al12 intermetallic compound during accumulative back extrusion and subsequent ageing treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghsoudi, M. H.; Zarei-Hanzaki, A.; Abedi, H. R.; Shamsolhodaei, A.

    2015-11-01

    Accumulative back extrusion (ABE) processing, as a novel severe plastic deformation (SPD) method, has been recently justified to be capable of modifying the microstructural characteristics of alloys. In line to its ongoing researches, the present work has been planned to study the evolution of γ-Mg17Al12 intermetallic phase during ABE and subsequent ageing treatment in a high Al-bearing Mg-Al-Zn alloy. The behaviour of γ intermetallic has been systematically examined as following points of view: (i) strain-temperature-dependent morphology changes, (ii) strain-induced dissolution, and (iii) re-ageing behaviour as a function of time and temperature. Aiming to analyse the morphology of eutectic γ compound with respect to the strain and temperature, 2D projections of effective diameter, shape factor and globularity have been made in strain/temperature graphs. The processing conditions (strain and temperature) corresponding to the desired and undesired morphologies are introduced and microstructurally explained through underlying plasticity mechanisms, i.e., 'necking-thinning-particle separation' and 'brittle fragmentation.' The former mechanism is suggested to be in relation with partial strain-induced dissolution of eutectic γ phase, leading to generation of a supersaturated solid solution. This has resulted to the observation of 'off-stoichiometry' phenomena in Mg17Al12 phase and has been justified through dislocation-assisted deformation mechanism at elevated temperature. Surprisingly, a unique re-ageing behaviour has been found for the obtained solid solutions, where a modified kinetics and morphology of γ phase precipitation were characterized. The altered precipitation behaviour is attributed to the specific defect structure achieved by SPD acting as fast diffusion channel for Al solutes.

  18. Section 2: Phase transformation studies in mechanically alloyed Fe-Nz and Fe-Zn-Si intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, A.; Uwakweh, O.N.C.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1997-04-01

    The initial stage of this study, which was completed in FY 1995, entailed an extensive analysis characterizing the structural evolution of the Fe-Zn intermetallic system. The primary interest in these Fe-Zn phases stems from the fact that they form an excellent coating for the corrosion protection of steel (i.e., automobile body panels). The Fe-Zn coating generally forms up to four intermetallic phases depending on the particular industrial application used, (i.e., galvanization, galvannealing, etc.). Since the different coating applications are non-equilibrium in nature, it becomes necessary to employ a non-equilibrium method for producing homogeneous alloys in the solid-state to reflect themore » structural changes occurring in a true coating. This was accomplished through the use of a high energy/non-equilibrium technique known as ball-milling which allowed the authors to monitor the evolution process of the alloys as they transformed from a metastable to stable equilibrium state. In FY 1996, this study was expanded to evaluate the presence of Si in the Fe-Zn system and its influence in the overall coating. The addition of silicon in steel gives rise to an increased coating. However, the mechanisms leading to the coating anomaly are still not fully understood. For this reason, mechanical alloying through ball-milling of pure elemental powders was used to study the structural changes occurring in the sandelin region (i.e., 0.12 wt % Si). Through the identification of invariant reactions (i.e., eutectic, etc.) the authors were able to explore the sandelin phenomenon and also determine the various fields or boundaries associated with the Fe-Zn-Si ternary system.« less

  19. Large magnetocaloric effect and near-zero thermal hysteresis in the rare earth intermetallic Tb1-x Dy x Co2 compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yuyang; Tian, Fanghua; Chang, Tieyan; Chen, Kaiyun; Yang, Sen; Cao, Kaiyan; Zhou, Chao; Song, Xiaoping

    2017-02-01

    We report the magnetocaloric effect in a Tb1-x Dy x Co2 compound which exhibits a wide working temperature window around the Curie temperature (T C) and delivers a large refrigerant capacity (RC) with near-zero thermal hysteresis. Specifically, the wide full width at half maxima ({δ\\text{WFHM}} ) can reach up to 62 K and the RC value changes from 216.5 to 274.3 J Kg-1 when the external magnetic field increases to 5 T. Such magnetocaloric effects are attributed to a magnetic and structural transition from a paramagnetic and cubic phase to a ferromagnetic (M S along [1 1 1] direction) and rhombohedral phase or ferromagnetic (M S along [0 0 1] direction) and tetragonal phase.

  20. Earth's earliest atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Zahnle, Kevin; Schaefer, Laura; Fegley, Bruce

    2010-10-01

    Earth is the one known example of an inhabited planet and to current knowledge the likeliest site of the one known origin of life. Here we discuss the origin of Earth's atmosphere and ocean and some of the environmental conditions of the early Earth as they may relate to the origin of life. A key punctuating event in the narrative is the Moon-forming impact, partly because it made Earth for a short time absolutely uninhabitable, and partly because it sets the boundary conditions for Earth's subsequent evolution. If life began on Earth, as opposed to having migrated here, it would have done so after the Moon-forming impact. What took place before the Moon formed determined the bulk properties of the Earth and probably determined the overall compositions and sizes of its atmospheres and oceans. What took place afterward animated these materials. One interesting consequence of the Moon-forming impact is that the mantle is devolatized, so that the volatiles subsequently fell out in a kind of condensation sequence. This ensures that the volatiles were concentrated toward the surface so that, for example, the oceans were likely salty from the start. We also point out that an atmosphere generated by impact degassing would tend to have a composition reflective of the impacting bodies (rather than the mantle), and these are almost without exception strongly reducing and volatile-rich. A consequence is that, although CO- or methane-rich atmospheres are not necessarily stable as steady states, they are quite likely to have existed as long-lived transients, many times. With CO comes abundant chemical energy in a metastable package, and with methane comes hydrogen cyanide and ammonia as important albeit less abundant gases.

  1. Texture evolution during thermomechanical processing in rare earth free magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Victoria Mayne

    The use of wrought magnesium alloys is highly desirable for a wide range of applications where low component weight is desirable due to the high specific strength and stiffness the alloys can achieve. However, the implementation of wrought magnesium has been hindered by the limited room temperature formability which typically results from deformation processing. This work identifies opportunities for texture modification during thermomechanical processing of conventional (rare earth free) magnesium alloys via a combination of experimental investigation and polycrystal plasticity simulations. During deformation, it is observed that a homogeneous distribution of coarse intermetallic particles efficiently weakens deformation texture at all strain levels, while a highly inhomogeneous particle distribution is only effective at high strains. The particle deformation effects are complemented by the addition of alkaline earth solute, which modifies the relative deformation mode activity. During recrystallization, grains with basal orientations recrystallize more readily than off-basal grains, despite similar levels of internal misorientation. Dislocation substructure investigations revealed that this is a result of enhanced nucleation in the basal grains due to the dominance of prismatic slip. This dissertation identifies avenues to enhance the potential formability of magnesium alloys during thermomechanical processing by minimizing the evolved texture strength. The following are the identified key aspects of microstructural control: -Maintaining a fine grain size, likely via Zener pinning, to favorably modify deformation mode activity and homogenize deformation. -Developing a coarse, homogeneously distributed population of coarse intermetallic particles to promote a diffuse deformation texture. -Minimizing the activity of prismatic slip to retard the recrystallization of grains with basal orientations, allowing the development of a more diffuse recrystallization texture.

  2. Electronic and Spectral Properties of RRhSn (R = Gd, Tb) Intermetallic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyazev, Yu. V.; Lukoyanov, A. V.; Kuz'min, Yu. I.; Gupta, S.; Suresh, K. G.

    2018-02-01

    The investigations of electronic structure and optical properties of GdRhSn and TbRhSn were carried out. The calculations of band spectrum, taking into account the spin polarization, were performed in a local electron density approximation with a correction for strong correlation effects in 4f shell of rare earth metal (LSDA + U method). The optical studies were done by ellipsometry in a wide range of wavelengths, and the set of spectral and electronic characteristics was determined. It was shown that optical absorption in a region of interband transitions has a satisfactory explanation within a scope of calculations of density of electronic states carried out.

  3. Earth views and an illuminated earth limb

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-11-20

    STS047-54-016 (12 - 20 Sept 1992) --- The colors in this photograph provide insight into the relative density of the atmosphere. The crew members had many opportunities to witness sunrises and sunsets, considering they orbit the Earth every 90 minutes, but few, they said, compared to this scene. It captures the silhouette of several mature thunderstorms with their cirrus anvil tops spreading out against the tropopause (the top of the lowest layer of Earth's atmosphere) at sunset. The lowest layer (troposphere) is the densest and refracts light at the red end of the visible spectrum (7,400 Angstroms), while the blues (4,000 Angstroms) are separated in the least dense portion of the atmosphere (middle and upper atmosphere, or stratosphere and mesosphere). Several layers of blue can be seen. NASA scientists studying the photos believe this stratification to be caused by the scattering of light by particulate trapped in the stratosphere and mesosphere particulate that generally originate from volcanic eruptions, such as those of Mt. Pinatubo in the Philippines and, most recently, Mt. Spurr in Alaska.

  4. Venus, Earth, Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahnle, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    Xenon has been regarded as an important goal of many proposed missions to Venus. This talk is intended to explain why. Despite its being the heaviest gas found in natural planetary atmospheres, there is more evidence that Xe escaped from Earth than for any element apart from helium: (i) Atmospheric Xe is very strongly mass fractionated (at about 4% per amu) from any known solar system source. This suggests fractionating escape that preferentially left the heavy Xe isotopes behind. (ii) Xe is underabundant compared to Kr, a lighter noble gas that is not strongly mass fractionated in air. (iii) Radiogenic Xe is strongly depleted by factors of several to ~100 compared to the quantities expected from radioactive decay of primordial solar system materials. In these respects Xe on Mars is similar to Xe on Earth, but with one key difference: Xe on Mars is readily explained by a simple process like hydrodynamic escape that acts on an initially solar or meteoritic Xe. This is not so for Earth. Earth's Xe cannot be derived by an uncontrived mass fractionating process acting on any known type of Solar System Xe. Earth is a stranger, made from different stuff than any known meteorite or Mars or even the Sun. Who else is in Earth's family? Comets? We know nothing. Father Zeus? Data from Jupiter are good enough to show that jovian Xe is not strongly mass-fractionated but not good enough to determine whether Jupiter resembles the Earth or the Sun. Sister Venus? Noble gas data from Venus are incomplete, with Kr uncertain and Xe unmeasured. Krypton was measured by several instruments on several spacecraft. The reported Kr abundances are discrepant and were once highly controversial. These discrepancies appear to have been not so much resolved as forgotten. Xenon was not detected on Venus. Upper limits were reported for the two most abundant xenon isotopes 129Xe and 132Xe. From the limited data it is not possible to tell whether Venus's affinities lie with the solar wind, or with

  5. Earth Orientation - Naval Oceanography Portal

    Science.gov Websites

    section Advanced Search... Sections Home Time Earth Orientation Astronomy Meteorology Oceanography Ice You are here: Home › USNO › Earth Orientation USNO Logo USNO Navigation Earth Orientation Products GPS -based Products VLBI-based Products EO Information Center Publications about Products Software Info Earth

  6. The Earth System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark; Rood, Richard B.; Hildebrand, Peter; Raymond, Carol

    2003-01-01

    The Earth System Model is the natural evolution of current climate models and will be the ultimate embodiment of our geophysical understanding of the planet. These models are constructed from components - atmosphere, ocean, ice, land, chemistry, solid earth, etc. models and merged together through a coupling program which is responsible for the exchange of data from the components. Climate models and future earth system models will have standardized modules, and these standards are now being developed by the ESMF project funded by NASA. The Earth System Model will have a variety of uses beyond climate prediction. The model can be used to build climate data records making it the core of an assimilation system, and it can be used in OSSE experiments to evaluate. The computing and storage requirements for the ESM appear to be daunting. However, the Japanese ES theoretical computing capability is already within 20% of the minimum requirements needed for some 2010 climate model applications. Thus it seems very possible that a focused effort to build an Earth System Model will achieve succcss.

  7. Earth - Moon Conjunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    On December 16, 1992, 8 days after its encounter with Earth, the Galileo spacecraft looked back from a distance of about 6.2 million kilometers (3.9 million miles) to capture this remarkable view of the Moon in orbit about Earth. The composite photograph was constructed from images taken through visible (violet, red) and near-infrared (1.0-micron) filters. The Moon is in the foreground; its orbital path is from left to right. Brightly colored Earth contrasts strongly with the Moon, which reacts only about one-third as much sunlight as our world. To improve the visibility of both bodies, contrast and color have been computer enhanced. At the bottom of Earth's disk, Antarctica is visible through clouds. The Moon's far side can also be seen. The shadowy indentation in the Moon's dawn terminator--the boundary between its dark and lit sides--is the South Pole-Aitken Basin, one of the largest and oldest lunar impact features. This feature was studied extensively by Galileo during the first Earth flyby in December 1990.

  8. Crescent Earth and Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    This picture of a crescent-shaped Earth and Moon -- the first of its kind ever taken by a spacecraft -- was recorded Sept. 18, 1977, by NASA's Voyager 1 when it was 7.25 million miles (11.66 million kilometers) from Earth. The Moon is at the top of the picture and beyond the Earth as viewed by Voyager. In the picture are eastern Asia, the western Pacific Ocean and part of the Arctic. Voyager 1 was directly above Mt. Everest (on the night side of the planet at 25 degrees north latitude) when the picture was taken. The photo was made from three images taken through color filters, then processed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Image Processing Lab. Because the Earth is many times brighter than the Moon, the Moon was artificially brightened by a factor of three relative to the Earth by computer enhancement so that both bodies would show clearly in the print. Voyager 2 was launched Aug. 20, 1977, followed by Voyager 1 on Sept. 5, 1977, en route to encounters at Jupiter in 1979 and Saturn in 1980 and 1981. JPL manages the Voyager mission for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  9. The Sun and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

    2012-01-01

    Thus the Sun forms the basis for life on Earth via the black body radiation it emits. The Sun also emits mass in the form of the solar wind and the coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Mass emission also occurs in the form of solar energetic particles (SEPs), which happens during CMEs and solar flares. Both the mass and electromagnetic energy output of the Sun vary over a wide range of time scales, thus introducing disturbances on the space environment that extends from the Sun through the entire heliosphere including the magnetospheres and ionospheres of planets and moons of the solar system. Although our habitat is located in the neutral atmosphere of Earth, we are intimately connected to the non-neutral space environment starting from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere and to the vast interplanetary space. The variability of the solar mass emissions results in the interaction between the solar wind plasma and the magnetospheric plasma leading to huge disturbances in the geospace. The Sun ionizes our atmosphere and creates the ionosphere. The ionosphere can be severely disturbed by the transient energy input from solar flares and the solar wind during geomagnetic storms. The complex interplay between Earth's magnetic field and the solar magnetic field carried by the solar wind presents varying conditions that are both beneficial and hazardous to life on earth. This seminar presents some of the key aspects of this Sun-Earth connection that we have learned since the birth of space science as a scientific discipline some half a century ago.

  10. NASA Sun Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    CME blast and subsequent impact at Earth -- This illustration shows a CME blasting off the Sun’s surface in the direction of Ea CME blast and subsequent impact at Earth -- This illustration shows a CME blasting off the Sun’s surface in the direction of Earth. This left portion is composed of an EIT 304 image superimposed on a LASCO C2 coronagraph. Two to four days later, the CME cloud is shown striking and beginning to be mostly deflected around the Earth’s magnetosphere. The blue paths emanating from the Earth’s poles represent some of its magnetic field lines. The magnetic cloud of plasma can extend to 30 million miles wide by the time it reaches earth. These storms, which occur frequently, can disrupt communications and navigational equipment, damage satellites, and even cause blackouts. (Objects in the illustration are not drawn to scale.) Credit: NASA/GSFC/SOHO/ESA To learn more go to the SOHO website: sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/home.html To learn more about NASA's Sun Earth Day go here: sunearthday.nasa.gov/2010/index.php

  11. Better Than Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, René

    2015-01-01

    Do we inhabit the best of all possible worlds? German mathematician Gottfried Leibniz thought so, writing in 1710 that our planet, warts and all, must be the most optimal one imaginable. Leibniz's idea was roundly scorned as unscientific wishful thinking, most notably by French author Voltaire in his magnum opus, Candide. Yet Leibniz might find sympathy from at least one group of scientists - the astronomers who have for decades treated Earth as a golden standard as they search for worlds beyond our own solar system. Because earthlings still know of just one living world - our own - it makes some sense to use Earth as a template in the search for life elsewhere, such as in the most Earth-like regions of Mars or Jupiter's watery moon Europa. Now, however, discoveries of potentially habitable planets orbiting stars other than our sun - exoplanets, that is - are challenging that geocentric approach.

  12. Google Earth Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelick, Noel

    2013-04-01

    The Google Earth Engine platform is a system designed to enable petabyte-scale, scientific analysis and visualization of geospatial datasets. Earth Engine provides a consolidated environment including a massive data catalog co-located with thousands of computers for analysis. The user-friendly front-end provides a workbench environment to allow interactive data and algorithm development and exploration and provides a convenient mechanism for scientists to share data, visualizations and analytic algorithms via URLs. The Earth Engine data catalog contains a wide variety of popular, curated datasets, including the world's largest online collection of Landsat scenes (> 2.0M), numerous MODIS collections, and many vector-based data sets. The platform provides a uniform access mechanism to a variety of data types, independent of their bands, projection, bit-depth, resolution, etc..., facilitating easy multi-sensor analysis. Additionally, a user is able to add and curate their own data and collections. Using a just-in-time, distributed computation model, Earth Engine can rapidly process enormous quantities of geo-spatial data. All computation is performed lazily; nothing is computed until it's required either for output or as input to another step. This model allows real-time feedback and preview during algorithm development, supporting a rapid algorithm development, test, and improvement cycle that scales seamlessly to large-scale production data processing. Through integration with a variety of other services, Earth Engine is able to bring to bear considerable analytic and technical firepower in a transparent fashion, including: AI-based classification via integration with Google's machine learning infrastructure, publishing and distribution at Google scale through integration with the Google Maps API, Maps Engine and Google Earth, and support for in-the-field activities such as validation, ground-truthing, crowd-sourcing and citizen science though the Android Open Data

  13. Google Earth Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelick, N.

    2012-12-01

    The Google Earth Engine platform is a system designed to enable petabyte-scale, scientific analysis and visualization of geospatial datasets. Earth Engine provides a consolidated environment including a massive data catalog co-located with thousands of computers for analysis. The user-friendly front-end provides a workbench environment to allow interactive data and algorithm development and exploration and provides a convenient mechanism for scientists to share data, visualizations and analytic algorithms via URLs. The Earth Engine data catalog contains a wide variety of popular, curated datasets, including the world's largest online collection of Landsat scenes (> 2.0M), numerous MODIS collections, and many vector-based data sets. The platform provides a uniform access mechanism to a variety of data types, independent of their bands, projection, bit-depth, resolution, etc..., facilitating easy multi-sensor analysis. Additionally, a user is able to add and curate their own data and collections. Using a just-in-time, distributed computation model, Earth Engine can rapidly process enormous quantities of geo-spatial data. All computation is performed lazily; nothing is computed until it's required either for output or as input to another step. This model allows real-time feedback and preview during algorithm development, supporting a rapid algorithm development, test, and improvement cycle that scales seamlessly to large-scale production data processing. Through integration with a variety of other services, Earth Engine is able to bring to bear considerable analytic and technical firepower in a transparent fashion, including: AI-based classification via integration with Google's machine learning infrastructure, publishing and distribution at Google scale through integration with the Google Maps API, Maps Engine and Google Earth, and support for in-the-field activities such as validation, ground-truthing, crowd-sourcing and citizen science though the Android Open Data

  14. How Big is Earth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Bonnie B.

    2015-08-01

    How Big is Earth celebrates the Year of Light. Using only the sunlight striking the Earth and a wooden dowel, students meet each other and then measure the circumference of the earth. Eratosthenes did it over 2,000 years ago. In Cosmos, Carl Sagan shared the process by which Eratosthenes measured the angle of the shadow cast at local noon when sunlight strikes a stick positioned perpendicular to the ground. By comparing his measurement to another made a distance away, Eratosthenes was able to calculate the circumference of the earth. How Big is Earth provides an online learning environment where students do science the same way Eratosthenes did. A notable project in which this was done was The Eratosthenes Project, conducted in 2005 as part of the World Year of Physics; in fact, we will be drawing on the teacher's guide developed by that project.How Big Is Earth? expands on the Eratosthenes project by providing an online learning environment provided by the iCollaboratory, www.icollaboratory.org, where teachers and students from Sweden, China, Nepal, Russia, Morocco, and the United States collaborate, share data, and reflect on their learning of science and astronomy. They are sharing their information and discussing their ideas/brainstorming the solutions in a discussion forum. There is an ongoing database of student measurements and another database to collect data on both teacher and student learning from surveys, discussions, and self-reflection done online.We will share our research about the kinds of learning that takes place only in global collaborations.The entrance address for the iCollaboratory is http://www.icollaboratory.org.

  15. Our Impact on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, A.

    This paper discusses the problem of understanding the causes of changes in the Earth's environments. It reviews very briefly the role of the atmosphere, because it is an important element of the total picture. It discusses even more briefly the oceans, and then the land, moving from the wetter parts to the drier ones, these last being the writer's speciality as a desert geomorphologist. No apology is made for concentrating on the terrestrial deserts, for Mars is more like our deserts than any other part of Earth.

  16. STS-34 earth observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1989-10-20

    STS034-44-023 (20 Oct. 1989) --- The Southern Lights or Aurora Australis were photographed by the STS-34 crewmembers aboard the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Atlantis. From the Shuttle astronauts can photograph expanses of auroras, an advantage over scientists on Earth who can only get small sections at a time in a frame of photography. The space position allows for large-scale changes. This scene was one of 26 shown to the press by the five STS-34 crewmembers at their post-flight press conference.

  17. Coronal Hole Facing Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-05-08

    An extensive equatorial coronal hole has rotated so that it is now facing Earth (May 2-4, 2018). The dark coronal hole extends about halfway across the solar disk. It was observed in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. This magnetically open area is streaming solar wind (i.e., a stream of charged particles released from the sun) into space. When Earth enters a solar wind stream and the stream interacts with our magnetosphere, we often experience nice displays of aurora. Videos are available at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00624

  18. Coronal Hole Facing Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-05-15

    An extensive equatorial coronal hole has rotated so that it is now facing Earth (May 2-4, 2018). The dark coronal hole extends about halfway across the solar disk. It was observed in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. This magnetically open area is streaming solar wind (i.e., a stream of charged particles released from the sun) into space. When Earth enters a solar wind stream and the stream interacts with our magnetosphere, we often experience nice displays of aurora. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00577

  19. Teaching earth science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alpha, Tau Rho; Diggles, Michael F.

    1998-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains 17 teaching tools: 16 interactive HyperCard 'stacks' and a printable model. They are separated into the following categories: Geologic Processes, Earthquakes and Faulting, and Map Projections and Globes. A 'navigation' stack, Earth Science, is provided as a 'launching' place from which to access all of the other stacks. You can also open the HyperCard Stacks folder and launch any of the 16 stacks yourself. In addition, a 17th tool, Earth and Tectonic Globes, is provided as a printable document. Each of the tools can be copied onto a 1.4-MB floppy disk and distributed freely.

  20. Nimbus earth resources observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabatini, R. R.; Rabchevsky, G. A.; Sissala, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    The potential for utilizing data gathered by Nimbus satellites to study the earth surface and its physical properties is illustrated. The Nimbus data applicable to investigations of the earth and its resources, and to the problems of resolution and cloud cover are described. Geological, hydrological, and oceanographic applications are discussed. Applications of the data to other fields, such as cartography, agriculture, forestry, and urban analysis are presented. Relevant information is also given on the Nimbus orbit and experiments; surface and atmospheric effects on HRIR and THIR radiation measurements; and noise problems in the AVCS, IDCS, HRIR, and THIR data.

  1. The Earth's Plasmasphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's plasmasphere is an inner part of the magneteosphere. It is located just outside the upper ionosphere located in Earth's atmosphere. It is a region of dense, cold plasma that surrounds the Earth. Although plasma is found throughout the magnetosphere, the plasmasphere usually contains the coldest plasma. Here's how it works: The upper reaches of our planet's atmosphere are exposed to ultraviolet light from the Sun, and they are ionized with electrons that are freed from neutral atmospheric particles. The results are electrically charged negative and positive particles. The negative particles are electrons, and the positive particles are now called ions (formerly atoms and molecules). If the density of these particles is low enough, this electrically charged gas behaves differently than it would if it were neutral. Now this gas is called plasma. The atmospheric gas density becomes low enough to support the conditions for a plasma around earth at about 90 kilometers above Earth's surface. The electrons in plasma gain more energy, and they are very low in mass. They move along Earth's magnetic field lines and their increased energy is enough to escape Earth's gravity. Because electrons are very light, they don't have to gain too much kinetic energy from the Sun's ultraviolet light before gravity loses its grip on them. Gravity is not all that holds them back, however. As more and more electrons begin to escape outward, they leave behind a growing net positive electric charge in the ionosphere and create a growing net negative electric charge above the ionosphere; an electric field begins to develop (the Pannekoek-Rosseland E-field). Thus, these different interacting charges result in a positively charged ionosphere and negatively charged region of space above it. Very quickly this resulting electric field opposed upward movement of the electrons out of the ionosphere. The electrons still have this increased energy, however, so the electric field doesn't just

  2. Exploring the Earth's Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindaman, Arnold D.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    Describes three approaches to a study of the earth's past: (1) development of a time line of the ages; (2) a study of rocks and how each was formed; and (3) a study of fossils as found in certain kinds of stone. (Editor)

  3. Bones of the Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correa, Jose Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The film "Bones of the Earth" (Riglin, Cunninham & Correa, 2014) is an experience in collective inquiry and visual creation based on arts-based research. Starting from the meeting of different subjectivities and through dialogue, planning, shooting and editing, an audiovisual text that reconstructs a reflexive process of collective…

  4. The Island Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mead, Margaret

    1970-01-01

    Dr. Mead, the world-renowned anthropologist and expert behavioral scientist, is associated with the American Museum of Natural History, which acts as her headquarters as she documents her observations on Man, society and technology. She discusses the need to develop specialists with concern for saving the endangered planet earth. (Editor/GR)

  5. Earth Sciences Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-06-01

    This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrogeology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. Much of the Division's research deals with the physical and chemical properties and processes in the earth's crust, from the partially saturated, low-temperature near-surface environment to the high-temperature environments characteristic of regions where magmatic-hydrothermal processes are active. Strengths in laboratory and field instrumentation, numerical modeling, and in situ measurement allow study of the transport of mass and heat through geologic media -- studies that now include the appropriate chemical reactions and the hydraulic-mechanical complexities of fractured rock systems. Of particular note are three major Division efforts addressing problems in the discovery and recovery of petroleum, the application of isotope geochemistry to the study of geodynamic processes and earth history, and the development of borehole methods for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface using seismic and electromagnetic waves. In 1989, a major DOE-wide effort was launched in the areas of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. Many of the methods previously developed for and applied to deeper regions of the earth will, in the coming years, be turned toward process definition and characterization of the very shallow subsurface, where man-induced contaminants now intrude and where remedial action is required.

  6. The Earth's Mantle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    The nature and dynamics of the earth's mantle is discussed. Research indicates that the silicate mantle is heated by the decay of radioactive isotopes and that the heat energizes massive convention currents in the upper 700 kilometers of the ductile rock. These currents and their consequences are considered. (JN)

  7. Google Earth Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, William H.; Padgett, Clifford W.; Secrest, Jeffery A.

    2015-01-01

    Google Earth has made a wealth of aerial imagery available online at no cost to users. We examine some of the potential uses of that data in illustrating basic physics and astronomy, such as finding the local magnetic declination, using landmarks such as the Washington Monument and Luxor Obelisk as gnomons, and showing how airport runways get…

  8. Understanding Earth's Albedo Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidler, Chuck

    2012-01-01

    Earth and space science in the middle school classroom are composed of intricately intertwined sets of conceptual systems (AAAS 1993; NRC 1996). Some systems of study, such as the water and rock cycles, are quite explicit and often found as stand-alone middle school science units. Other phenomena are not so apparent, yet they play an extremely…

  9. How life shaped Earth.

    PubMed

    Gross, Michael

    2015-10-05

    Earth is much more complex than all the other solar system objects that we know. Thanks to its rich and diverse geology, our planet can offer habitats to a wide range of living species. Emerging insights suggest that this is not just a happy coincidence, but that life itself has in many ways helped to shape the planet.

  10. Earth - Antarctica Mosaic

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-02-01

    This color picture of the limb of the Earth, looking north past Antarctica, is a mosaic of 11 images taken during a ten-minute period near 5:45 p.m. PST Dec. 8, 1990, by NASA’s Galileo imaging system. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00116

  11. "Galileo Calling Earth..."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This guide presents an activity for helping students understand how data from the Galileo spacecraft is sent to scientists on earth. Students are asked to learn about the concepts of bit-rate and resolution and apply them to the interpretation of images from the Galileo Orbiter. (WRM)

  12. Earth Science Misconceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philips, William C.

    1991-01-01

    Presented is a list of over 50 commonly held misconceptions based on a literature review found in students and adults. The list covers earth science topics such as space, the lithosphere, the biosphere, the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, and the cryosphere. (KR)

  13. Beyond Earth's Boundaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Kennedy Space Center, FL. John F. Kennedy Space Center.

    This resource for teachers of elementary age students provides a foundation for building a life-long interest in the U.S. space program. It begins with a basic understanding of man's attempt to conquer the air, then moves on to how we expanded into near-Earth space for our benefit. Students learn, through hands-on experiences, from projects…

  14. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-18

    Employees stop by the University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences booth at Kennedy Space Center’s annual Earth Day celebration. The two-day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  15. Earth's Reflection: Albedo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillette, Brandon; Hamilton, Cheri

    2011-01-01

    When viewing objects of different colors, you might notice that some appear brighter than others. This is because light is reflected differently from various surfaces, depending on their physical properties. The word "albedo" is used to describe how reflective a surface is. The Earth-atmosphere has a combined albedo of about 30%, a number that is…

  16. Earth as art 4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2016-03-29

    Landsat 8 is the latest addition to the long-running series of Earth-observing satellites in the Landsat program that began in 1972. The images featured in this fourth installment of the Earth As Art collection were all acquired by Landsat 8. They show our planet’s diverse landscapes with remarkable clarity.Landsat satellites see the Earth as no human can. Not only do they acquire images from the vantage point of space, but their sensors record infrared as well as visible wavelengths of light. The resulting images often reveal “hidden” details of the Earth’s land surface, making them invaluable for scientific research.As with previous Earth As Art exhibits, these Landsat images were selected solely for their aesthetic appeal. Many of the images have been manipulated to enhance color variations or details. They are not intended for scientific interpretation—only for your viewing pleasure. What do you see in these unique glimpses of the Earth’s continents, islands, and coastlines?

  17. 51F earth observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-06-25

    51F-37-014 (29 July-6 Aug 1985) --- This Earth view shows Oregon and Washington including metropolitan Portland at the center. The Columbia River can be seen from Goble (upper left) upstream to Bonneville (upper right). The Willamette River is at the lower photo and seen upstream to east of McMinnville.

  18. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-18

    Employees discuss one of the electric vehicles on display during Kennedy Space Center’s annual Earth Day celebration. The two-day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  19. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-17

    During the annual Earth Day celebration at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, guests have an opportunity to learn more about energy awareness, the environment and sustainability. The two-day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  20. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-18

    An array of electric vehicles are on display for Kennedy Space Center employees during the center’s annual Earth Day celebration. The two-day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  1. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-18

    Employees had the opportunity to take a look under the hood of an electric vehicle on display during Kennedy Space Center’s annual Earth Day celebration. The two-day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  2. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-17

    During the annual Earth Day celebration at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, guests have an opportunity to get an up-close look at experimental electric vehicles. The two-day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  3. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-18

    An employee learns about indoor air quality at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Environmental and Medical Contract (KEMCON) booth at the center’s annual Earth Day celebration. The two-day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  4. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-17

    During the annual Earth Day celebration at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, guests have an opportunity to learn about the environment. The two-day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  5. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-17

    During the annual Earth Day celebration at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, guests have an opportunity to learn about the environment and meet Butterfly Dan” Dunwoody. The two-day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  6. Spaceship Earth Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pultorak, Robert W.

    1981-01-01

    Describes a self-paced undergraduate environmental science course focusing on a theme that earth is similar to a spaceship inasmuch as: (1) both possess finite room and resources, and (2) living things are dependent upon life-support systems for continued survival. Includes a list of laboratory and learning activities. (DS)

  7. integrated Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Andew; Di Vittorio, Alan; Collins, William

    The integrated Earth system model (iESM) has been developed as a new tool for projecting the joint human/climate system. The iESM is based upon coupling an integrated assessment model (IAM) and an Earth system model (ESM) into a common modeling infrastructure. IAMs are the primary tool for describing the human-Earth system, including the sources of global greenhouse gases (GHGs) and short-lived species (SLS), land use and land cover change (LULCC), and other resource-related drivers of anthropogenic climate change. ESMs are the primary scientific tools for examining the physical, chemical, and biogeochemical impacts of human-induced changes to the climate system. Themore » iESM project integrates the economic and human-dimension modeling of an IAM and a fully coupled ESM within a single simulation system while maintaining the separability of each model if needed. Both IAM and ESM codes are developed and used by large communities and have been extensively applied in recent national and international climate assessments. By introducing heretofore-omitted feedbacks between natural and societal drivers, we can improve scientific understanding of the human-Earth system dynamics. Potential applications include studies of the interactions and feedbacks leading to the timing, scale, and geographic distribution of emissions trajectories and other human influences, corresponding climate effects, and the subsequent impacts of a changing climate on human and natural systems.« less

  8. Modeling Earth's Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pallant, Amy; Lee, Hee-Sun; Pryputniewicz, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Systems thinking suggests that one can best understand a complex system by studying the interrelationships of its component parts rather than looking at the individual parts in isolation. With ongoing concern about the effects of climate change, using innovative materials to help students understand how Earth's systems connect with each other is…

  9. Sun-Earth Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Michael Sandras, a member of the Pontchartrain Astronomical Society, explains his solar telescope to students of Second Street in Bay St. Louis, Hancock County and Nicholson elementary schools in StenniSphere's Millennium Hall on April 10. The students participated in several hands-on activities at Stennis Space Center's Sun-Earth Day celebration.

  10. 2012 Earth Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-24

    Bonnie Humphrey of NASA (l to r), Van Ward of NASA, Kim Maddox of the Naval Oceanographic Office, and Al Bryden of the NASA Shared Services Center learn about the Crosby Arboretum in Picayune, Miss., during the Earth Day celebration at Stennis Space Center on April 24, 2012.

  11. 2011 Earth Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-21

    Pat Drackett of the Crosby Arboretum in Picayune (l) speaks with Helen Robinson and Arlene Brown, both employees of the Naval Oceanographic Office at Stennis Space Center, during Earth Day 2011 activities April 21. During the day, Stennis employees were able to visit various exhibits featuring environmentally friendly and energy-conscious items and information. The activities were coordinated by the Stennis Environmental Office.

  12. An Earth Day Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, Don, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presents what the author believes to be some of the most important environmental books published since Earth Day 1970. Discusses each selection and how it provides the historical background, basic information, and appreciation necessary to understand the character of our environmental dilemma and our need to address it. (MCO)

  13. Venus - Lessons for earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunten, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    The old idea that Venus might possess surface conditions to those of an overcast earth has been thoroughly refuted by space-age measurements. Instead, the two planets may have started out similar, but diverged because of the greater solar flux at Venus. This cannot be proved, but is consistent with everything known. A runaway greenhouse effect could have evaporated an 'ocean'. The hydrogen would escape, and most of the oxygen would be incorporated into the crust. Without liquid water, CO2 would remain in the atmosphere. Chlorine atoms would catalyze the recombination of any free oxygen back to CO2. The same theories apply to the future of the earth, and to the explanation of the polar ozone holes; the analogies are striking. There is no likelihood that the earth will actually come to resemble Venus, but Venus serves both as a warning that major environmental effects can flow from seemingly small causes, and as a testbed for the predictive models of the earth.

  14. Rates of Earth degassing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onions, R. K.

    1994-01-01

    The degassing of the Earth during accretion is constrained by Pu-U-I-Xe systematics. Degassing was much more efficient during the first 100-200 Ma than subsequently, and it was more complete for Xe than for the lighter gases. More than 90 percent of the degassed Xe escaped from the atmosphere during this period. The combination of fractional degassing of melts and rare gas escape from the atmosphere is able to explain the deficit of terrestrial Xe as a simple consequence of this early degassing history. By the time Xe was quantitatively retained in the atmosphere, the abundances of Kr and the lighter gases in the Earth's interior were similar to or higher than the present-day atmospheric abundances. Subsequent transfer of these lighter rare gases into the atmosphere requires a high rate of post-accretion degassing and melt production. Considerations of Pu-U-Xe systematics suggest that relatively rapid post-accretion degassing was continued to ca. 4.1-4.2 Ga. The present-day degassing history of the Earth is investigated through consideration of rare gas isotope abundances. Although the Earth is a highly degassed body, depleted in rare gases by many orders of magnitude relative to their solar abundances, it is at the present-day losing primordial rare gases which were trapped at the time of accretion.

  15. Earth Sky- GT-7

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-12

    S65-63766 (12 Dec. 1965) --- Ras Azir on the coast of the Republic of Somali, looking east, as seen from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Gemini-7 spacecraft during its 117th revolution of Earth. Taken with a modified 70mm Hasselblad camera, using Eastman Kodak, Ektachrome MS (S.O. 217) color film. Photo credit: NASA

  16. Geology: The Active Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Geology: The Active Earth." Contents are organized into the…

  17. Earth Science in 1970

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geotimes, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Reviews advancements in earth science during 1970 in each of these areas: economic geology (fuels), economic geology (metals), economic geology (nonmetals), environmental geology, geochemistry, manpower, hydrology, mapping, marine geology, mineralogy, paleontology, plate tectonics, politics and geology, remote sensing, and seismology. (PR)

  18. Mission: New Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, David

    1997-01-01

    Describes an interdisciplinary unit on the environment and space travel in which students plan a fictional departure from Earth which is on the brink of destruction from environmental waste and neglect. Students travel through concepts in environmental education, math, art, English, and astronomy before reaching their destination with a clearer…

  19. Sun-Earth Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-04-11

    Michael Sandras, a member of the Pontchartrain Astronomical Society, explains his solar telescope to students of Second Street in Bay St. Louis, Hancock County and Nicholson elementary schools in StenniSphere's Millennium Hall on April 10. The students participated in several hands-on activities at Stennis Space Center's Sun-Earth Day celebration.

  20. Trees for Mother Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Sandy

    1993-01-01

    Describes Trees for Mother Earth, a program in which secondary students raise funds to buy fruit trees to plant during visits to the Navajo Reservation. Benefits include developing feelings of self-worth among participants, promoting cultural exchange and understanding, and encouraging self-sufficiency among the Navajo. (LP)