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Sample records for earth iron-rich high

  1. Stability of iron-rich magnesiowüstite in Earth's lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, K.; Fujino, K.; Kuwayama, Y.; Kondo, T.; Shimizu, K.; Ohishi, Y.

    2012-12-01

    At ambient conditions, MgO periclase and FeO wüstite form a solid solution (Mg1-xFex)O, named ferropericlase (x ≤ 0.5) and magnesiowüstite (x > 0.5). (Mg1-xFex)O ferropericlase is considered to be a major component of Earth's lower mantle, and may play an important role for its structure and dynamics. Iron-rich magnesiowüstite also needs to be considered because of possible iron enrichment at the core-mantle boundary region [e.g., Nomura et al., 2011]. Recent laser-heated diamond anvil cell experiments on FeO revealed that NaCl-type (B1) structured FeO underwent an insulator-metal transition at about 70 GPa and 1800 K without any structural transformation [Fischer et al., 2011; Ohta et al., 2012]. These results imply that the metallic B1 FeO would require a two-phase field for the MgO-FeO binary system due to different chemical bonding between insulating MgO and metallic FeO. We performed simultaneous electrical conductivity and x-ray diffraction measurements on (Mg0.20Fe0.80)O and (Mg0.05Fe0.95)O magnesiowüstite up to 140 GPa and 2100 K, and then examined recovered samples by using analytical transmission electron microprobe. We obtained some evidences for the dissociation of (Mg0.05Fe0.95)O into lighter and heavier phases than starting material occurring above 70 GPa and 1900 K, which is most likely due to the metallization of FeO component. On the other hand, we did not observe such dissociation and metallization in (Mg0.20Fe0.80)O. Observed dissociation in (Mg0.05Fe0.95)O might contribute to the heterogeneity in seismic wave and electrical conductivity at the Earth's core-mantle boundary region.

  2. Phase relations in iron-rich systems and implications for the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, William W.; Svendsen, Bob; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    Recent experimental data concerning the properties of iron, iron sulfide, and iron oxide at high pressures are combined with theoretical arguments to constrain the probable behavior of the Fe-rich portions of the Fe-O and Fe-S phase diagrams. Phase diagrams are constructed for the Fe-S-O system at core pressures and temperatures. These properties are used to evaluate the current temperature distribution and composition of the core.

  3. High-temperature hematite and spinel phases in iron-rich slags produced in shales above burned coal seams

    SciT

    Modreski, P.J.; Herring, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrametamorphic effects (1300+ /sup 0/C) in shales above burned coal seams in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, include the formation of droplets and stalactites of congealed iron-rich melt (40.3 wt.% SiO/sub 2/, 35.5% Fe as Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 13.5% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 2.2% MgO, 5.0% CaO, 0.3% MnO, 1.0% K/sub 2/O, 0.5% TiO/sub 2/, 1.3% P/sub 2/O/sub 5/, <0.2% Na/sub 2/O, 0.55% LOI, total 100.2%). This melt, quartz-normative and comparable to an iron-rich basalt, formed along fractures which served as chimneys for escape of burning gases; pyrite or other iron-rich concretions in the shale may have been the source ofmore » the iron in the melts. Oxide phases, dominantly intergrown hematite+magnetite, in the droplets reflect a high-T, low-P, high-f(O/sub 2/) environment. Hematite ranges from nearly pure Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ near the droplet rims (Hm-1) to Al- and Ti-rich in the interiors (Hm-2 to -5). Magnetite contains Mg and Al (Mt-1); in the droplet interiors it is richer in Mg and Al (Mt-2 = host+lamellae) and contains lamellae of exsolved hercynite spinel (Sp-1). Near droplet rims, hematite occurs with magnesioferrite spinel (Mf-1) enriched in Mn and Zn (up to 7 wt.% ZnO), a product of reaction with gases during cooling. Averaged microprobe analyses are provided.« less

  4. Preconcentration and determination of rare-earth elements in iron-rich water samples by extraction chromatography and plasma source mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Hernández González, Carolina; Cabezas, Alberto J Quejido; Díaz, Marta Fernández

    2005-11-15

    A 100-fold preconcentration procedure based on rare-earth elements (REEs) separation from water samples with an extraction chromatographic column has been developed. The separation of REEs from matrix elements (mainly Fe, alkaline and alkaline-earth elements) in water samples was performed loading the samples, previously acidified to pH 2.0 with HNO(3), in a 2ml column preconditioned with 20ml 0.01M HNO(3). Subsequently, REEs were quantitatively eluted with 20ml 7M HNO(3). This solution was evaporated to dryness and the final residue was dissolved in 10ml 2% HNO(3) containing 1mugl(-1) of cesium used as internal standard. The solution was directly analysed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), using ultrasonic nebulization, obtaining quantification limits ranging from 0.05 to 0.10 ngl(-1). The proposed method has been applied to granitic waters running through fracture fillings coated by iron and manganese oxy-hydroxides in the area of the Ratones (Cáceres, Spain) old uranium mine.

  5. Iron-rich (Fe1-x-yNixCoy)88Zr7B4Cu1 nanocrystalline magnetic materials for high temperature applications with minimal magnetostriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martone, Anthony; Dong, Bowen; Lan, Song; Willard, Matthew A.

    2018-05-01

    As inductor technology advances, greater efficiency and smaller components demand new core materials. With recent developments of nanocrystalline magnetic materials, soft magnetic properties of these cores can be greatly improved. FeCo-based nanocrystalline magnetic alloys have resulted in good soft magnetic properties and high Curie temperatures; however, magnetoelastic anisotropies persist as a main source of losses. This investigation focuses on the design of a new Fe-based (Fe,Ni,Co)88Zr7B4Cu1 alloy with reduced magnetostriction and potential for operation at elevated temperatures. The alloys have been processed by arc melting, melt spinning, and annealing in a protective atmosphere to produce nanocrystalline ribbons. These ribbons have been analyzed for structure, hysteresis, and magnetostriction using X-Ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), and a home-built magnetostriction system, respectively. In addition, Curie temperatures of the amorphous phase were analyzed to determine the best performing, high-temperature material. Our best result was found for a Fe77Ni8.25Co2.75Zr7B4Cu1 alloy with a 12 nm average crystallite size (determined from Scherrer broadening) and a 2.873 Å lattice parameter determined from the Nelson-Riley function. This nanocrystalline alloy possesses a coercivity of 10 A/m, magnetostrictive coefficient of 4.8 ppm, and amorphous phase Curie temperature of 218°C.

  6. Advantages and disadvantages of an iron-rich diet.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, L

    2002-03-01

    A review by invitation about advantages and disadvantages of an iron-rich diet by analyzing physiological iron requirements, dietary factors influencing iron absorption and the regulatory systems available to control iron absorption according to needs. The control to prevent iron deficiency is good but not perfect, as observed in previously described studies on relationships between individual iron requirements and the probability of iron deficiency developing in relation to diet. The control to prevent iron overload seems to be perfect except in the few subjects being homozygotes for hereditary hemochromatosis. A diet rich in easily available iron is important for covering basal iron losses, menstrual iron losses and the high iron requirements for growth from infancy to adolescence and for pregnancy.

  7. Stability and anisotropy of (FexNi1-x)2O under high pressure and implications in Earth's and super-Earths' core.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shengxuan; Wu, Xiang; Qin, Shan

    2018-01-10

    Oxygen is thought to be an important light element in Earth's core but the amount of oxygen in Earth's core remains elusive. In addition, iron-rich iron oxides are of great interest and significance in the field of geoscience and condensed matter physics. Here, static calculations based on density functional theory demonstrate that I4/mmm-Fe 2 O is dynamically and mechanically stable and becomes energetically favorable with respect to the assemblage of hcp-Fe and [Formula: see text]-FeO above 270 GPa, which indicates that I4/mmm-Fe 2 O can be a strong candidate phase for stable iron-rich iron oxides at high pressure, perhaps even at high temperature. The elasticity and anisotropy of I4/mmm-(Fe x Ni 1-x ) 2 O at high pressures are also determined. Based on these results, we have derived the upper limit of oxygen to be 4.3 wt% in Earth's lower outer core. On the other hand, I4/mmm-(Fe x Ni 1-x ) 2 O with high AV S is likely to exist in a super-Earth's or an ocean planet's solid core causing the locally seismic heterogeneity. Our results not only give some clues to explore and synthesize novel iron-rich iron oxides but also shed light on the fundamental information of oxygen in the planetary core.

  8. Reflectance Spectroscopy of Palagonite and Iron-Rich Montmorillonite Clay Mixtures: Implications for the Surface Composition of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orenberg, James; Handy, Jonathan

    1992-01-01

    Mixtures of a Hawaiian palagonite and an iron-rich, montmorillonite clay (15.8 +/- 0.4 wt% Fe as Fe2O3) were evaluated as Mars surface spectral analogs from their diffuse reflectance spectra. The presence of the 2.2 microns absorption band in the reflectance spectrum of clays and its absence in the Mars spectrum have been interpreted as indicating that highly crystalline aluminous hydroxylated clays cannot be a major mineral component of the soil on Mars. The palagonite sample used in this study does not show this absorption feature in its spectrum. In mixtures of palagonite and iron-rich montmorillonite, the 2.2 microns Al-OH clay lattice band is not seen below 15 wt% montmorillonite. This suggests the possibility that iron-rich montmorillonite clay may be present in the soil of Mars at up to 15 wt% in combination with palagonite, and remain undetected in remotely sensed spectra of Mars.

  9. Origin of life and iron-rich clays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, H. H.

    1986-01-01

    The premise that life began with self-replicating iron-rich clays is explored. In association with these clays and UV light, polar organic molecules, such as oxalic acid, were synthesized. The carbonaceous chondrites have both iron-rich clays and organic molecules. It is convenient to classify meteoritic organic matter into 3 categories: insoluble polymer, hydrocarbons and polar organics (soluble in water). Recent work on the delta D, delta N-15 and delta C-13 has made it clear that these three fractions have been made by three different mechanisms. A significant fraction of the insoluble polymer has a delta-D which suggests that it was made in an interstellar medium. The hydrocarbons seem to have been made on a parent body by a Fischer-Tropsch mechanism. The polar organics were probably synthesized in a mixture of carbonate (NH4)2CO3, Fe(++) ion and liquid water by radiolysis. In a set of experiments the radiolysis of (NH4)2CO3 in the presence and absence of Fe(++) ion has been examined. The synthesis of glycine in the presence of Fe(++) ion is 3-4 times that in the absence of ferrous ion. The effects of the addition of hydrocarbons to this mixture are explored. Iron-rich clays at low temperature and pressure are synthesized. So far the results are not sufficiently crystalline to look for replication. It should be noted that organic chelating agents such as oxalic acid do increase the crystallinity of the clays but not sufficiently. The hydrothermal synthesis of iron-rich clays is being examined.

  10. Iron-rich Oxides at the Core-mantle Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicks, J. K.; Jackson, J. M.; Sturhahn, W.; Bower, D. J.; Zhuravlev, K. K.; Prakapenka, V.

    2013-12-01

    ULVZ and show that a small amount of iron-rich (Mg,Fe)O can greatly reduce the average sound velocity of an aggregate assemblage. When combined with a geodynamic model of a solid ULVZ (Bower et al., 2011), we can directly correlate inferred sound velocities to mineralogy and predicted ULVZ shapes. In this presentation, our combined geodynamic and mineral physics model of a solid ULVZ will be used to explore the relationship between the observed sound velocities and mineralogy of ULVZs with added insight into ULVZ morphology.

  11. Experimental Investigation of the Viscosity of Iron-rich Silicate Melts under Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, P. M.; Lesher, C. E.; Pommier, A.; O'Dwyer Brown, L.

    2017-12-01

    The transport properties of silicate melts govern diffusive flow of momentum, heat, and mass in the interior of terrestrial planets. In particular, constraining melt viscosity is critical for dynamic modeling of igneous processes and is thus key to our understanding of magma convection and mixing, melt migration in the mantle, and crystal-liquid fractionation. Among the different constituents of silicate melts, iron is of significant importance as it highly influences some of their properties, such as surface tension, compressibility, and density. We present an experimental study of the viscosity of natural and synthetic iron-rich silicate melts under pressure. In situ falling-sphere measurements of viscosity have been conducted on hedenbergite (CaFeSi2O6) and iron-rich peridotite melts from 1 to 7 GPa and at temperatures between 1750 and 2100 K, using the multi-anvil apparatus at the GSECARS beamline at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Lab. We used double reservoir capsules, with the bottom reservoir containing the sample, while a more refractory material is placed in the upper reservoir (e.g., diopside, enstatite, forsterite). This configuration allows the fall of two rhenium spheres across the sample at different temperatures. Melt viscosity is calculated using Stokes' law and the terminal velocity of the spheres. We observe that melt viscosity slightly decreases with increasing temperature and increasing pressure: for instance, the viscosity of the hedenbergite melt decreases from 1.26 Pa•s to 0.43 Pa•s over the 1 - 3.5 GPa pressure range and between 1820 and 1930 K. Our experimental data are used to develop a viscosity model of iron-rich silicate melts under pressure. Results will be compared with previous viscosity works on iron-free and iron-bearing silicate liquids in order to discuss the effect of iron on melt viscosity and structure at pressure and temperature conditions relevant to terrestrial mantles.

  12. The Pressure-Volume-Temperature Equation of State of Iron-Rich (Mg,Fe)O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicks, J. K.; Jackson, J. M.; Zhuravlev, K. K.; Prakapenka, V.

    2012-12-01

    Source, where high pressures and temperatures are achieved in a diamond anvil cell with in-situ laser heating. The sample was mixed with Fe metal buffer/pressure standard with a neon pressure medium, with salt plates on either side as thermal insulator. We will discuss these density measurements and their impact on sound velocities of iron-rich (Mg,Fe)O in the context of a solid ULVZ.

  13. A Mossbauer investigation of iron-rich terrestrial hydrothermal vent systems: lessons for Mars exploration.

    PubMed

    Wade, M L; Agresti, D G; Wdowiak, T J; Armendarez, L P; Farmer, J D

    1999-04-25

    Hydrothermal spring systems may well have been present on early Mars and could have served as a habitat for primitive life. The integrated instrument suite of the Athena Rover has, as a component on the robotic arm, a Mossbauer spectrometer. In the context of future Mars exploration we present results of Mossbauer analysis of a suite of samples from an iron-rich thermal spring in the Chocolate Pots area of Yellowstone National Park (YNP) and from Obsidian Pool (YNP) and Manitou Springs, Colorado. We have found that Mossbauer spectroscopy can discriminate among the iron-bearing minerals in our samples. Those near the vent and on the surface are identified as ferrihydrite, an amorphous ferric mineraloid. Subsurface samples, collected from cores, which are likely to have undergone inorganic and/or biologically mediated alteration (diagenesis), exhibit spectral signatures that include nontronite (a smectite clay), hematite (alpha-Fe2O3), small-particle/nanophase goethite (alpha-FeOOH), and siderite (FeCO3). We find for iron minerals that Mossbauer spectroscopy is at least as efficient in identification as X-ray diffraction. This observation is important from an exploration standpoint. As a planetary surface instrument, Mossbauer spectroscopy can yield high-quality spectral data without sample preparation (backscatter mode). We have also used field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), in conjunction with energy-dispersive X ray (EDX) fluorescence spectroscopy, to characterize the microbiological component of surface sinters and the relation between the microbiological and the mineralogical framework. Evidence is presented that the minerals found in these deposits can have multi-billion-year residence times and thus may have survived their possible production in a putative early Martian hot spring up to the present day. Examples include the nanophase property and the Mossbauer signature for siderite, which has been identified in a 2.09-billion-year old hematite

  14. A Mossbauer investigation of iron-rich terrestrial hydrothermal vent systems: lessons for Mars exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, M. L.; Agresti, D. G.; Wdowiak, T. J.; Armendarez, L. P.; Farmer, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrothermal spring systems may well have been present on early Mars and could have served as a habitat for primitive life. The integrated instrument suite of the Athena Rover has, as a component on the robotic arm, a Mossbauer spectrometer. In the context of future Mars exploration we present results of Mossbauer analysis of a suite of samples from an iron-rich thermal spring in the Chocolate Pots area of Yellowstone National Park (YNP) and from Obsidian Pool (YNP) and Manitou Springs, Colorado. We have found that Mossbauer spectroscopy can discriminate among the iron-bearing minerals in our samples. Those near the vent and on the surface are identified as ferrihydrite, an amorphous ferric mineraloid. Subsurface samples, collected from cores, which are likely to have undergone inorganic and/or biologically mediated alteration (diagenesis), exhibit spectral signatures that include nontronite (a smectite clay), hematite (alpha-Fe2O3), small-particle/nanophase goethite (alpha-FeOOH), and siderite (FeCO3). We find for iron minerals that Mossbauer spectroscopy is at least as efficient in identification as X-ray diffraction. This observation is important from an exploration standpoint. As a planetary surface instrument, Mossbauer spectroscopy can yield high-quality spectral data without sample preparation (backscatter mode). We have also used field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), in conjunction with energy-dispersive X ray (EDX) fluorescence spectroscopy, to characterize the microbiological component of surface sinters and the relation between the microbiological and the mineralogical framework. Evidence is presented that the minerals found in these deposits can have multi-billion-year residence times and thus may have survived their possible production in a putative early Martian hot spring up to the present day. Examples include the nanophase property and the Mossbauer signature for siderite, which has been identified in a 2.09-billion-year old hematite

  15. Laser ablation of iron-rich black films from exposed granite surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado Rodrigues, J.; Costa, D.; Mascalchi, M.; Osticioli, I.; Siano, S.

    2014-10-01

    Here, we investigated the potential of laser removal of iron-rich dark films from weathered granite substrates, which represents a very difficult conservation problem because of the polymineralic nature of the stone and of its complex deterioration mechanisms. As often occurs, biotite was the most critical component because of its high optical absorption, low melting temperature, and pronounced cleavage, which required a careful control of the photothermal and photomechanical effects to optimize the selective ablation of the mentioned unwanted dark film. Different pulse durations and wavelengths Nd:YAG lasers were tested and optimal irradiation conditions were determined through thorough analytical characterisations. Besides addressing a specific conservation problem, the present work provides information of general valence in laser uncovering of encrusted granite.

  16. Feasibility of sulfide control in sewers by reuse of iron rich drinking water treatment sludge.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Pikaar, Ilje; Sharma, Keshab Raj; Keller, Jürg; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-03-15

    Dosage of iron salt is the most commonly used method for sulfide control in sewer networks but incurs high chemical costs. In this study, we experimentally investigate the feasibility of using iron rich drinking water treatment sludge for sulfide control in sewers. A lab-scale rising main sewer biofilm reactor was used. The sulfide concentration in the effluent decreased from 15.5 to 19.8 mgS/L (without dosing) to below 0.7-2.3 mgS/L at a sludge dosing rate achieving an iron to total dissolved inorganic sulfur molar ratio (Fe:S) of 1:1, with further removal of sulfide possible by prolonging the reaction time. In fact, batch tests revealed an Fe consumption to sulfide removal ratio of 0.5 ± 0.02 (mole:mole), suggesting the possible occurrence of other reactions involving the removal of sulfide. Modelling revealed that the reaction between iron in sludge and sulfide has reaction orders of 0.65 ± 0.01 and 0.77 ± 0.02 with respect to the Fe and sulfide concentrations, respectively. The addition of sludge slightly increased the total chemical oxidation demand (tCOD) concentration (by approximately 12%) as expected, but decreased the soluble chemical oxidation demand (sCOD) concentration and methane formation by 7% and 20%, respectively. Some phosphate removal (13%) was also observed at the sludge dosing rate of 1:1 (Fe:S), which is beneficial to nutrient removal from the wastewater. Overall, this study suggests that dosing iron-rich drinking water sludge to sewers could be an effective strategy for sulfide removal in sewer systems, which would also reduce the sludge disposal costs for drinking water treatment works. However, its potential side-effects on sewer sedimentation and on the wastewater treatment plant effluent remain to be investigated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Iron rich low cost superalloys. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wayne, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    An iron-rich low-cost superalloy was developed. The alloy, when processed by conventional chill casting, has physical and mechanical properties that compare favorably with existing nickel and cobalt based superalloys while containing significantly lower amounts of strategic elements. Studies were also made on the properties of Cr(20)-Mn(10)-C(3.4)-Fe(bal.), a eutectic alloy processed by chill casting and directional solidification which produced an aligned microstructure consisting of M7C3 fibers in a gamma-Fe matrix. Thermal expansion of the M7C3 (M = Fe, Cr, Mn) carbide lattice was measured up to 800 C and found to be highly anisotropic, with the a-axis being the predominant mode of expansion. Repetitive impact sliding wear experiments performed with the Fe rich eutectic alloy showed that the directionally solidified microstructure greatly improved the alloy's wear resistance as compared to the chill cast microstructure and conventional nickel base superalloys. Studies on the molybdenum cementite phase prove that the crystal structure of the xi phase is not orthorhombic. The crystal structure of the xi phase is made up of octahedra building elements consisting of four Mo and two Fe atoms and trigonal prisms consisting of four Fe and two Mo atoms. The voids are occupied by carbon atoms. The previous chemical formula for the molybdenum cementite MoFe2C is now clearly seen to be Mo12Fe22C10.

  18. Prevalence of anemia and consumption of iron-rich food groups in Mexican children and adolescents: Ensanut MC 2016.

    PubMed

    De la Cruz-Góngora, Vanessa; Villalpando, Salvador; Shamah-Levy, Teresa

    2018-01-01

    To describe the prevalence of anemia and con-sumption of iron rich groups among Mexican children and adolescents who participated in the Halfway National Health and Nutrition Survey, 2016. Our study sample included children and adolescents who provided full capillary hemoglobin data. Anemia was defined accord-ing to WHO criteria. Logistic regression models were used to explore the association among consumption of iron-rich food groups, sociodemographic characteristics and anemia. In 2016, the prevalence of anemia was 26.9% in children aged 1 to 4 years old, 12.5% in those aged 5 to 11, and 9.6% in adolescents aged 12 to 19 years. Rates were the highest among females who lived in the southern and central parts of Mexico, belonged to an indigenous ethnic group and fell within the first tercile of the Household Wealth Index. Consumption of beef by preschoolers and viscera by ado-lescents was associated with lower risk for anemia; higher risk was associated with consumption of Liconsa milk and non-heme iron by preschoolers. Anemia is highly prevalent in Mexican children and adolescents, affect-ing mainly the poorest and youngest populations. Sources of heme iron are the principal dietary factor associated with low risk for anemia.

  19. Characterisation of iron-rich atmospheric submicrometre particles in the roadside environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderson, P.; Su, S. S.; Chang, I. T. H.; Delgado Saborit, J. M.; Kepaptsoglou, D. M.; Weber, R. J. M.; Harrison, Roy M.

    2016-09-01

    Human exposure to ambient metallic nanoparticles is an area of great interest owing to their potential health impacts. Ambient metallic nanoparticles found in the roadside environment are contributed by combustion engines and wear of brakes, tyres and road surfaces. Submicrometre atmospheric particles collected at two UK urban sites have been subject to detailed characterisation. It is found that many metallic nanoparticles collected from roadside sampling sites are rich in iron. The Fe-rich nanoparticles can be classified into (1) high Fe content (ca 90 wt%) with each alloying element less than 1 wt%; and (2) moderate Fe content (<75 wt%) with high manganese and silicon content. Both clusters contain a variable mix of minor constituents, Mn, S and Si being most important in the high-Fe group. The moderate Fe group also contains Zn, Cu, Ba, Al and Ca. The Fe-rich nanoparticles exhibit primary particle sizes ranging between 20 and 30 nm, although some much larger particles up to around 100 nm can also be observed, along with some very small particles of 10 nm or less. These tend to agglomerate forming clusters ranging from ∼200 nm to 1 μm in diameter. The iron-rich particles observed are oxides, taking the form of spheres or multifaceted regular polyhedra. Analysis by EELS shows that both high- and moderate-Fe groups include particles of FeO, Fe3O4, α-Fe2O3 and γ-Fe2O3 of which γ-Fe2O3 is the most prominent. Internal mixing of different Fe-oxides is not observed.

  20. Rapid Separation of Copper Phase and Iron-Rich Phase From Copper Slag at Low Temperature in a Super-Gravity Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Xi; Gao, Jintao; Huang, Zili; Guo, Zhancheng

    2018-03-01

    A novel approach for quickly separating a metal copper phase and iron-rich phase from copper slag at low temperature is proposed based on a super-gravity method. The morphology and mineral evolution of the copper slag with increasing temperature were studied using in situ high-temperature confocal laser scanning microscopy and ex situ scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction methods. Fe3O4 particles dispersed among the copper slag were transformed into FeO by adding an appropriate amount of carbon as a reducing agent, forming the slag melt with SiO2 at low temperature and assisting separation of the copper phase from the slag. Consequently, in a super-gravity field, the metallic copper and copper matte were concentrated as the copper phase along the super-gravity direction, whereas the iron-rich slag migrated in the opposite direction and was quickly separated from the copper phase. Increasing the gravity coefficient (G) significantly enhanced the separation efficiency. After super-gravity separation at G = 1000 and 1473 K (1200 °C) for 3 minutes, the mass fraction of Cu in the separated copper phase reached 86.11 wt pct, while that in the separated iron-rich phase was reduced to 0.105 wt pct. The recovery ratio of Cu in the copper phase was as high as up to 97.47 pct.

  1. Rapid Separation of Copper Phase and Iron-Rich Phase From Copper Slag at Low Temperature in a Super-Gravity Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Xi; Gao, Jintao; Huang, Zili; Guo, Zhancheng

    2018-06-01

    A novel approach for quickly separating a metal copper phase and iron-rich phase from copper slag at low temperature is proposed based on a super-gravity method. The morphology and mineral evolution of the copper slag with increasing temperature were studied using in situ high-temperature confocal laser scanning microscopy and ex situ scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction methods. Fe3O4 particles dispersed among the copper slag were transformed into FeO by adding an appropriate amount of carbon as a reducing agent, forming the slag melt with SiO2 at low temperature and assisting separation of the copper phase from the slag. Consequently, in a super-gravity field, the metallic copper and copper matte were concentrated as the copper phase along the super-gravity direction, whereas the iron-rich slag migrated in the opposite direction and was quickly separated from the copper phase. Increasing the gravity coefficient (G) significantly enhanced the separation efficiency. After super-gravity separation at G = 1000 and 1473 K (1200 °C) for 3 minutes, the mass fraction of Cu in the separated copper phase reached 86.11 wt pct, while that in the separated iron-rich phase was reduced to 0.105 wt pct. The recovery ratio of Cu in the copper phase was as high as up to 97.47 pct.

  2. High-Pressure Geoscience Special Feature: Dynamical stability of Fe-H in the Earth's mantle and core regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, Eyvaz I.; Skorodumova, Natalia V.; Ahuja, Rajeev; Vekilov, Yuri K.; Johansson, Börje

    2007-05-01

    The core extends from the depth of 2,900 km to the center of the Earth and is composed mainly of an iron-rich alloy with nickel, with 10% of the mass comprised of lighter elements like hydrogen, but the exact composition is uncertain. We present a quantum mechanical first-principles study of the dynamical stability of FeH phases and their phonon densities of states at high pressure. Our free-energy calculations reveal a phonon-driven stabilization of dhcp FeH at low pressures, thus resolving the present contradiction between experimental observations and theoretical predictions. Calculations reveal a complex phase diagram for FeH under pressure with a dhcp → hcp → fcc sequence of structural transitions.

  3. Iron-rich clay minerals on Mars - Potential sources or sinks for hydrogen and indicators of hydrogen loss over time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    Although direct evidence is lacking, indirect evidence suggests that iron-rich clay minerals or poorly-ordered chemical equivalents are widespread on the Martian surface. Such clays can act as sources or sinks for hydrogen ('hydrogen sponges'). Ferrous clays can lose hydrogen and ferric clays gain it by the coupled substitution Fe(3+)O(Fe(2+)OH)-1, equivalent to minus atomic H. This 'oxy-clay' substitution involves only proton and electron migration through the crystal structure, and therefore occurs nondestructively and reversibly, at relatively low temperatures. The reversible, low-temperature nature of this reaction contrasts with the irreversible nature of destructive dehydroxylation (H2O loss) suffered by clays heated to high temperatures. In theory, metastable ferric oxy-clays formed by dehydrogenation of ferrous clays over geologic time could, if exposed to water vapor, extract the hydrogen from it, releasing oxygen.

  4. The microstructure and tensile properties of extruded melt-spun ribbons of iron-rich B2 FeAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, I.; Gaydosh, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    The microstructure of extruded rods of iron-rich FeAl(B2-structure), as characterized by TEM, SEM, optical microscopy and x-ray diffractometry, consisted of elongated grains with a 111-line fibre texture containing a high dislocation density. Numerous oxide particles were found, mostly in lines which reflected the matrix flow during extrusion. In addition, some large inclusions were present. Tensile testing of annealed, relatively dislocation-free specimens as a function of increasing temperature found increasing ductility up to 900K, above which a ductility drop occurred accompanied by a change in fracture mode, from transgranular cleavage to intergranular fracture. The yield strength, which was independent of temperature up to 800K (at about 500MPa), also decreased rapidly as diffusion became more important. The predominant slip vector changed from 111-line to 100-line around 700K.

  5. Biosignatures Preservation Potential and Habitability in Phyllosilicates vs. Iron-rich Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccorsi, R.; Stoker, C. R.; McKay, C. P.; Science Team

    2008-12-01

    Phyllosilicates have been identified on the surface of Mars by the OMEGA-Mars/Express [e.g., 1], the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) instruments, i.e., HiRISE and CRISM, as well as inferred from rover observations in Gusev Crater [2]). A better understanding of the preservation potential and habitability in phyllosilicates and hematite-rich materials, achieved by studying analog sites, will therefore provide critical information in support of next decade missions landing site selection e.g., 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), the ESA Pasteur ExoMars. We present geochemical (d13C-org, d13N-tot, CN ratios) and microbiological proxies i.e., Adenosin-Triphosphate (ATP-based) and Limulus-Amebocite-Lysate (LAL-based biomass) from a suite of phyllosilicate and iron-rich environmental samples e.g., Rio Tinto (Spain), Death Valley (CA, USA), Atacama Desert (Chile), and the California coast. Phyllosilicates-rich zones (47-74wt.%) from the Rio Tinto (RT) region can preserve up to 10-time higher amount of organics (C-org = 0.23 wt.%) than the embedding hematite/goethite-rich (34-89 wt.%) rocks i.e., C-org: ~0.05 wt.% [4]. It is possible that under low pH and highly oxidizing conditions [e.g., 3] surface-derived organics are rapidly oxidized within the shallow hematite/goethite-rich materials, but preserved in phyllosilicates (smectites/illite) where conditions are more conducive [4]. ATP-based biomass was detected in some oxidized-rock samples where roots materials were present (750-1245 RLUs). Geochemical and microbiological analyses are underway to confirm the preservation/ habitability trends observed in the Rio Tinto near surface. Preliminary results suggest that oxidized, goethite-rich, sandstone (Purisima formation, CA) have higher ATP- and LAL-based (Gram negative) biomass contents i.e., 2.0 107 cell/g (35.05 EU/mL) and 3891 RLUs, than the overlying clays units i.e., 1.34 107 cell/g (22.0EU/mL) and 1143 RLUs. REFERENCES: [1] Bibring et al., 2006, Science 312

  6. Implications for Core Formation of the Earth from High Pressure-Temperature Au Partitioning Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Sharp, T. G.; Hervig, R. L.

    2005-01-01

    Siderophile elements in the Earth.s mantle are depleted relative to chondrites. This is most pronounced for the highly siderophile elements (HSEs), which are approximately 400x lower than chondrites. Also remarkable is the relative chondritic abundances of the HSEs. This signature has been interpreted as representing their sequestration into an iron-rich core during the separation of metal from silicate liquids early in the Earth's history, followed by a late addition of chondritic material. Alternative efforts to explain this trace element signature have centered on element partitioning experiments at varying pressures, temperatures, and compositions (P-T-X). However, first results from experiments conducted at 1 bar did not match the observed mantle abundances, which motivated the model described above, a "late veneer" of chondritic material deposited on the earth and mixed into the upper mantle. Alternatively, the mantle trace element signature could be the result of equilibrium partitioning between metal and silicate in the deep mantle, under P-T-X conditions which are not yet completely identified. An earlier model determined that equilibrium between metal and silicate liquids could occur at a depth of approximately 700 km, 27(plus or minus 6) GPa and approximately 2000 (plus or minus 200) C, based on an extrapolation of partitioning data for a variety of moderately siderophile elements obtained at lower pressures and temperatures. Based on Ni-Co partitioning, the magma ocean may have been as deep as 1450 km. At present, only a small range of possible P-T-X trace element partitioning conditions has been explored, necessitating large extrapolations from experimental to mantle conditions for tests of equilibrium models. Our primary objective was to reduce or remove the additional uncertainty introduced by extrapolation by testing the equilibrium core formation hypothesis at P-T-X conditions appropriate to the mantle.

  7. Crystallization characteristics of iron-rich glass ceramics prepared from nickel slag and blast furnace slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhong-Jie; Ni, Wen; Li, Ke-Qing; Huang, Xiao-Yan; Zhu, Li-Ping

    2011-08-01

    The crystallization process of iron-rich glass-ceramics prepared from the mixture of nickel slag (NS) and blast furnace slag (BFS) with a small amount of quartz sand was investigated. A modified melting method which was more energy-saving than the traditional methods was used to control the crystallization process. The results show that the iron-rich system has much lower melting temperature, glass transition temperature ( T g), and glass crystallization temperature ( T c), which can result in a further energy-saving process. The results also show that the system has a quick but controllable crystallization process with its peak crystallization temperature at 918°C. The crystallization of augite crystals begins from the edge of the sample and invades into the whole sample. The crystallization process can be completed in a few minutes. A distinct boundary between the crystallized part and the non-crystallized part exists during the process. In the non-crystallized part showing a black colour, some sphere-shaped augite crystals already exist in the glass matrix before samples are heated to T c. In the crystallized part showing a khaki colour, a compact structure is formed by augite crystals.

  8. Models of the Earth's Core.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, D J

    1981-11-06

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with the following properties. Core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and laboratory data.

  9. Models of the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with five basic properties. These are that core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and labroatory data.

  10. High contents of rare earth elements (REEs) in stream waters of a Cu-Pb-Zn mining area.

    PubMed

    Protano, G; Riccobono, F

    2002-01-01

    Stream waters draining an old mining area present very high rare earth element (REE) contents, reaching 928 microg/l as the maximum total value (sigmaREE). The middle rare earth elements (MREEs) are usually enriched with respect to both the light (LREEs) and heavy (HREEs) elements of this group, producing a characteristic "roof-shaped" pattern of the shale Post-Archean Australian Shales-normalized concentrations. At the Fenice Capanne Mine (FCM), the most important base metal mine of the study area, the REE source coincides with the mine tailings, mostly the oldest ones composed of iron-rich materials. The geochemical history of the REEs released into Noni stream from wastes in the FCM area is strictly determined by the pH, which controls the REE speciation and in-stream processes. The formation of Al-rich and mainly Fe-rich flocs effectively scavenges the REEs, which are readily and drastically removed from the solution when the pH approaches neutrality. Leaching experiments performed on flocs and waste materials demonstrate that Fe-oxides/oxyhydroxides play a key role in the release of lanthanide elements into stream waters. The origin of the "roof-shaped" REE distribution pattern as well as the peculiar geochemical behavior of some lanthanide elements in the aqueous system are discussed.

  11. Valproic acid attenuates nitric oxide and interleukin-1β production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated iron-rich microglia.

    PubMed

    Mairuae, Nootchanat; Cheepsunthorn, Poonlarp

    2018-04-01

    Iron accumulation in activated microglia has been consistently reported in neurodegenerative diseases. Previous results suggest that these cells facilitate neuroinflammation leading to neuronal cell death. Therefore, chemical compounds that alleviate the activation of iron-rich microglia may result in neuroprotection. In the present study, the effect of valproic acid (VPA) on microglial activation under iron-rich conditions was investigated. BV-2 microglial cells were exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 1 µg/ml) and iron (300 µg/ml) with or without VPA (1.6 mM). The results demonstrated that VPA attenuated the activation of iron-rich BV2 cells induced by LPS by down-regulating the mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase and interleukin 1β (IL-1β; P<0.01), to ultimately reduce the production of NO and IL-1β (P<0.01). These events were accompanied by an attenuation in the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB p65 subunit (P<0.01). These findings suggest that VPA may be therapeutically useful for attenuating the activation of iron-rich microglia.

  12. Reflectance spectroscopy of palagonite and iron-rich montmorillonite clay mixtures: Implications for the surface composition of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orenberg, J. B.; Handy, J.

    1991-01-01

    Because of the power of remote sensing reflectance spectroscopy in determining mineralogy, it was used as the major method of identifying possible mineral analogs of the Martian surface. A summary of proposed Martian surface compositions from reflectance spectroscopy before 1979 was presented. Since that time, iron-rich montmorillonite clay, nanocrystalline or nanophase hematite, and palagonite were suggested as Mars soil analog materials.

  13. Defining the Iron-Rich Fe-Ni-S Melting Curve at 20GPa: Implications for Martian Core Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfoy, F. G.; Li, J.

    2016-12-01

    In 1997, the Mars Global Surveyor detected strong remnant magnetization of 4 Ga impact basins in the planet's southern highlands (Acuna et al. 1999), but the dearth of strongly magnetized rocks younger than 4 Ga in age is interpreted as evidence cataloging the death of an early Martian dynamo (Stevenson, 2001; Fassett 2011). In order to investigate the thermal evolution of the Martian core and assess the possibility of iron "snow" core crystallization to restart the dynamo, a series of multi-anvil experiments have been conducted to define the iron-rich liquidus of the Fe-Ni-S system at 20 GPa, the estimated pressure of the Martian core-mantle boundary (CMB), across its entire temperature range. Due to the fineness of features at high temperatures and low S concentrations, area analysis techniques, in additional to traditional electron microprobe analysis, were used to determine the composition of the experimental data. When fitted using an asymmetrical regular solution model, our data yields a liquidus that is significantly depressed when compared to calculations made assuming ideal behavior. Pronounced melting point depression at S contents corresponding to the likely composition of the Martian core means that the onset of crystallization will take much longer than previously thought. By comparing a calculated areotherm to liquidii interpolated between our experimental data and that from the literature, we find that the two intersect at the high-pressure end. Thus, the Martian core solidification is expected to begin at the center of planet and iron "snow" core crystallization is unlikely to occur within Mars .

  14. Importance of extended spatial coverage for quantitative susceptibility mapping of iron-rich deep gray matter.

    PubMed

    Elkady, Ahmed M; Sun, Hongfu; Wilman, Alan H

    2016-05-01

    Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM) is an emerging area of brain research with clear application to brain iron studies in deep gray matter. However, acquisition of standard whole brain QSM can be time-consuming. One means to reduce scan time is to use a focal acquisition restricted only to the regions of interest such as deep gray matter. However, the non-local dipole field necessary for QSM reconstruction extends far beyond the structure of interest. We demonstrate the practical implications of these non-local fields on the choice of brain volume for QSM. In an illustrative numerical simulation and then in human brain experiments, we examine the effect on QSM of volume reduction in each dimension. For the globus pallidus, as an example of iron-rich deep gray matter, we demonstrate that substantial errors can arise even when the field-of-view far exceeds the physical structural boundaries. Thus, QSM reconstruction requires a non-local field-of-view prescription to ensure minimal errors. An axial QSM acquisition, centered on the globus pallidus, should encompass at least 76mm in the superior-inferior direction to conserve susceptibility values from the globus pallidus. This dimension exceeds the physical coronal extent of this structure by at least five-fold. As QSM sees wider use in the neuroscience community, its unique requirement for an extended field-of-view needs to be considered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Equation of State of Iron-Rich (Mg,Fe)O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrosavljevic, V.; Jackson, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    Recent seismic observations of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) have provided increasing evidence for the presence of a boundary layer rich in chemical diversity with lateral variations in seismic velocities and densities. Exploring causes of observed anomalies such as ultralow-velocity zones (ULVZs) in this region can lead to a deeper understanding of phenomena like hotspot volcanism and heat flow from the core. One potential explanation for the presence of these lateral heterogeneities may be iron enrichment in lower mantle minerals such as magnesiowüstite, possibly resulting from melting events or interactions with the iron-dominant outer core. Relatively little study has been directed toward iron-rich members of the (Mg,Fe)O solid solution despite the possibility for even low levels of iron enrichment to have significant impact on elastic properties. To that end, we present results from a powder x-ray diffraction study on (Mg0.06Fe0.94)O up to 90 GPa at 300 K using helium as a pressure-transmitting medium. The measurements were conducted at beamline 12.2.2 of the Advanced Light Source of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The diffraction data were used to determine the equations of state for the material's B1 cubic and rhombohedral phases and constrain the transition pressure at ambient temperature. We combine our results with pressure-temperature-volume measurements on an identical composition (Wicks et al. 2015) to produce a well-constrained thermal equation of state. Using these results, we report a thermal elasticity model for magnesiowüstite at CMB conditions for use in dynamic modeling and comparison against seismic observations.

  16. A potential new biosignature of life in iron-rich extreme environments: An iron (III) complex of scytonemin and proposal for its identification using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnali, Tereza; Edwards, Howell G. M.

    2013-07-01

    Scytonemin is a cyanobacterial sheath pigment with potent UV absorbing (UV-A, UV-B and UV-C) properties. The importance of this biomolecule is its photoprotective function which is one of the major survival strategies adopted by extremophiles to combat high energy radiation insolation in environmentally stressed conditions. Also, iron (III) oxides offering an additional UV-protecting facility to subsurface biological colonization as well as banded iron formations with zones of iron depletion in rock matrices have attracted attention with special interest in the mobilisation and transportation of iron compounds through the rock. This study represents a novel proposal that an iron-scytonemin complex could facilitate the movement of iron through the subsurface rock as part of the this extremophilic survival strategy. The predicted Raman wavenumbers for the proposed scytonemin complex of iron(III) are derived computationally using DFT calculations. Comparison of the experimentally observed Raman spectra of scytonemin with the theoretically predicted Raman spectra of the iron-scytonemin complex show that the latter may be discriminated and the expected characteristic bands are reported in relation to structural changes that are effected upon complexation. This information will inform the future search for experimental evidence for an iron-scytonemin complex, which has not been recognised hitherto and which could provide a novel biosignature for the extremophilic colonization of terrestrial iron-rich geological matrices. Such a terrestrial scenario would be potentially of significance for the remote robotic analytical exploration of the iron-rich surface and immediate subsurface of Mars.

  17. Factors influencing As(V) stabilization in the mine soils amended with iron-rich materials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mijin; Kim, Juhee; Kim, Minhee; Kim, Yong-Seong; Nam, Seung Mo; Moon, Deok Hyun; Hyun, Seunghun

    2017-09-04

    Chemical stability of As(V) in amended mine-impacted soils was assessed according to functions of incubation period (0, 1, 2, 4, and 6 months), amendment dose (2.5 and 5%), and application timing (0 and 3rd month). Six soils contaminated with 26-209 mg kg -1 of As(V) were collected from two abandoned mine sites and were treated with two alkaline iron-rich materials (mine discharge sludge (MS) and steel-making slag (SS)). Seventeen to 23% of As(V) in soils was labile. After each designated time, As(V) stability was assessed by the labile fractions determined with sequential extraction procedures (F1-F5). Over 6 months, a reduction (26.9-70.4%) of the two labile fractions (F1 and F2) and a quantitative increase (7.4-29.9%) of As(V) in F3 were observed (r 2  = 0.956). Two recalcitrant fractions (F4 and F5) remained unchanged. Temporal change of As(V) stability in a sample was well described by the two-domain model (k fast , k slow , and F fast ). The stabilization (%) correlated well with the fast-stabilizing domain (F fast ), clay content (%), and Fe oxide content (mg kg -1 ), but correlated poorly with kinetic rate constants (k fast and k slow ). Until the 3rd month, the 2.5%-MS amended sample resulted in lower As(V) stabilization (25-40%) compared to the 5% sample (50-60%). However, the second 2.5% MS addition on the 2.5% sample upon the lapse of the 3rd month led to a substantial reduction (up to 38%) of labile As(V) fraction in the following 4th and 6th months. As a result, an additional 15-25% of As(V) stability was obtained when splitting the amendment dose into 3-month intervals. In conclusion, the As(V) stabilization by Fe-rich amendment is time-dependent and its efficacy can be improved by optimizing the amendment dose and its timing.

  18. Groundwater mixing at fracture intersections triggers massive iron-rich microbial mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochet, O.; Le Borgne, T.; Bethencourt, L.; Aquilina, L.; Dufresne, A.; Pédrot, M.; Farasin, J.; Abbott, B. W.; Labasque, T.; Chatton, E.; Lavenant, N.; Petton, C.

    2017-12-01

    While most freshwater on Earth resides and flows in groundwater systems, these deep subsurface environments are often assumed to have little biogeochemical activity compared to surface environments. Here we report a massive microbial mat of iron-oxidizing bacteria, flourishing 60 meters below the surface, far below the mixing zone where most microbial activity is believed to occur. The abundance of microtubular structures in the mat hinted at the prevalence of of Leptothrix ochracea, but metagenomic analysis revealed a diverse consortium of iron-oxidizing bacteria dominated by unknown members of the Gallionellaceae family. This deep biogeochemical hot spot formed at the intersection of bedrock fractures, which maintain redox gradients by mixing water with different residence times and chemical compositions. Using measured fracture properties and hydrological conditions we developed a quantitative model to simulate the reactive zone where such deep hot spots could occur. While seasonal fluctuations are generally thought to decrease with depth, we found that meter-scale changes in water table level moved the depth of the reactive zone hundreds of meters because the microaerophilic threshold for ironoxidizers is highly sensitive to changes in mixing rates at fracture intersections. These results demonstrate that dynamic microbial communities can be sustained deep below the surface in bedrock fractures. Given the ubiquity of fractures at multiple scales in Earth's subsurface, such deep hot spots may strongly influence global biogeochemical cycles.

  19. The High Definition Earth Viewing (HDEV) Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muri, Paul; Runco, Susan; Fontanot, Carlos; Getteau, Chris

    2017-01-01

    The High Definition Earth Viewing (HDEV) payload enables long-term experimentation of four, commercial-of-the-shelf (COTS) high definition video, cameras mounted on the exterior of the International Space Station. The payload enables testing of cameras in the space environment. The HDEV cameras transmit imagery continuously to an encoder that then sends the video signal via Ethernet through the space station for downlink. The encoder, cameras, and other electronics are enclosed in a box pressurized to approximately one atmosphere, containing dry nitrogen, to provide a level of protection to the electronics from the space environment. The encoded video format supports streaming live video of Earth for viewing online. Camera sensor types include charge-coupled device and complementary metal-oxide semiconductor. Received imagery data is analyzed on the ground to evaluate camera sensor performance. Since payload deployment, minimal degradation to imagery quality has been observed. The HDEV payload continues to operate by live streaming and analyzing imagery. Results from the experiment reduce risk in the selection of cameras that could be considered for future use on the International Space Station and other spacecraft. This paper discusses the payload development, end-to- end architecture, experiment operation, resulting image analysis, and future work.

  20. A synthetic high fidelity, high cadence spectral Earth database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwieterman, Edward; Meadows, Victoria; Robinson, Tyler D.; Lustig-Yaeger, Jacob; Sparks, William B.; Cracraft, Misty

    2016-10-01

    Earth is currently our only, and will always be our best, example of a living planet. While Earth data model comparisons have been effectively used in recent years to validate spectral models, observations by interplanetary spacecraft are limited to "snapshots" in terms of viewing geometry and Earth's dynamic surface and atmosphere state. We use the well-validated Virtual Planetary Laboratory 3D spectral Earth model to generate both simulated disk-averaged spectra and high resolution, spatially resolved spectral data cubes of Earth at a viewing geometry consistent with Lunar viewing angles at wavelengths from the far UV (0.1 μm) the to the far IR (200 μm). The database includes disk-averaged spectra from dates 03/19/2008 to 04/23/2008 at one-hour cadence and fully spectral data cubes for a subset of those times. These spectral products have a wide range of applications including calibration of spacecraft instrumentation (Robinson et al. 2014), modeling the radiation environment of permanently shadowed Lunar craters due to Earthshine (Glenar et al., in prep), and testing the detectability of atmospheric and surface features of an Earth-like planet orbiting a distant star with a large space-based telescope mission concepts such as LUVOIR. These data include the phase and time-dependent changes in spectral biosignatures (O2, O3, CH4, VRE) and habitability markers (N2, H2O, CO2, ocean glint). The advantages of the VPL Earth model data products over 1D spectra traditionally used for testing instrument architectures include accurate modeling of Earth's surface inhomogeneity (continental distribution and ice caps), cloud cover and variability, pole to equator temperature gradients, obliquity, phase-dependent scattering effects, and rotation. We present a subset of this spectral data including anticipated signal-to-noise calculations of an exoEarth twin at different phases using a coronagraph instrument model (Robinson et al. 2015). We also calculate time

  1. The crystal structure of an iron-rich variety of zanazziite belonging to heteropolyhedral framework roscherite-group beryllophosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastsvetaeva, R. K.; Rozenberg, K. A.; Chukanov, N. V.; Möckel, S.

    2009-07-01

    The iron-rich variety of zanazziite Ca2[Mg0.65Fe0.35□1.0][Mg1.90Fe1.25Al0.5Mn0.35]Σ4Be4(PO4)6(OH)4(H2O,OH)2 · 4H2O, which is a heteropolyhedral framework roscherite-group beryllophos-phate from the Sapucaia pegmatite (Minas Gerais, Brazil), was studied by X-ray diffraction. The refinement was carried out in the triclinic and monoclinic systems. It was found that the cation distribution on octahedral sites in the crystal structure is in better agreement with the monoclinic symmetry ( a = 15.876 Å, b = 11.860 Å, c = 6.607 Å, β = 95.49°, sp. gr. C2/ c). In the sample under study, no ordering of Mg or Fe atoms in octahedral sites is observed in sp. gr. P bar 1 , unlike the more iron-rich member of the roscherite group (atencioite).

  2. Abundance, size distributions and trace-element binding of organic and iron-rich nanocolloids in Alaskan rivers, as revealed by field-flow fractionation and ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolpe, Björn; Guo, Laodong; Shiller, Alan M.; Aiken, George R.

    2013-03-01

    Water samples were collected from six small rivers in the Yukon River basin in central Alaska to examine the role of colloids and organic matter in the transport of trace elements in Northern high latitude watersheds influenced by permafrost. Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), selected elements (Al, Si, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, Ba, Pb, U), and UV-absorbance spectra were measured in 0.45 μm filtered samples. 'Nanocolloidal size distributions' (0.5-40 nm, hydrodynamic diameter) of humic-type and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM), Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb were determined by on-line coupling of flow field-flow fractionation (FFF) to detectors including UV-absorbance, fluorescence, and ICP-MS. Total dissolved and nanocolloidal concentrations of the elements varied considerably between the rivers and between spring flood and late summer base flow. Data on specific UV-absorbance (SUVA), spectral slopes, and the nanocolloidal fraction of the UV-absorbance indicated a decrease in aromaticity and size of CDOM from spring flood to late summer. The nanocolloidal size distributions indicated the presence of different 'components' of nanocolloids. 'Fulvic-rich nanocolloids' had a hydrodynamic diameter of 0.5-3 nm throughout the sampling season; 'organic/iron-rich nanocolloids' occurred in the <8 nm size range during the spring flood; whereas 'iron-rich nanocolloids' formed a discrete 4-40 nm components during summer base flow. Mn, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn were distributed between the nanocolloid components depending on the stability constant of the metal (+II)-organic complexes, while stronger association of Cr to the iron-rich nanocolloids was attributed to the higher oxidation states of Cr (+III or +IV). Changes in total dissolved element concentrations, size and composition of CDOM, and occurrence and size of organic/iron and iron-rich nanocolloids were related to variations in their sources from either the upper organic

  3. High Latitude Dust in the Earth System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullard, Joanna E.; Baddock, Matthew; Bradwell, Tom; Crusius, John; Darlington, Eleanor; Gaiero, Diego; Gasso, Santiago; Gisladottir, Gudrun; Hodgkins, Richard; McCulloch, Robert; hide

    2016-01-01

    Natural dust is often associated with hot, subtropical deserts, but significant dust events have been reported from cold, high latitudes. This review synthesizes current understanding of high-latitude (> or = 50degN and > or = 40degS) dust source geography and dynamics and provides a prospectus for future research on the topic. Although the fundamental processes controlling aeolian dust emissions in high latitudes are essentially the same as in temperate regions, there are additional processes specific to or enhanced in cold regions. These include low temperatures, humidity, strong winds, permafrost and niveo-aeolian processes all of which can affect the efficiency of dust emission and distribution of sediments. Dust deposition at high latitudes can provide nutrients to the marine system, specifically by contributing iron to high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll oceans; it also affects ice albedo and melt rates. There have been no attempts to quantify systematically the expanse, characteristics, or dynamics of high-latitude dust sources. To address this, we identify and compare the main sources and drivers of dust emissions in the Northern (Alaska, Canada, Greenland, and Iceland) and Southern (Antarctica, New Zealand, and Patagonia) Hemispheres. The scarcity of year-round observations and limitations of satellite remote sensing data at high latitudes are discussed. It is estimated that under contemporary conditions high-latitude sources cover >500,000 sq km and contribute at least 80-100 Tg/yr1 of dust to the Earth system (approx. 5% of the global dust budget); both are projected to increase under future climate change scenarios.

  4. Impact of biostimulated redox processes on metal dynamics in an iron-rich creek soil of a former uranium mining area.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Eva-Maria; Akob, Denise M; Bischoff, Sebastian; Sitte, Jana; Kostka, Joel E; Banerjee, Dipanjan; Scheinost, Andreas C; Küsel, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of metals and radionuclides in soil environments is necessary for evaluating risks to pristine sites. An iron-rich creek soil of a former uranium-mining district (Ronneburg, Germany) showed high porewater concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides. Thus, this study aims to (i) evaluate metal dynamics during terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPs) and (ii) characterize active microbial populations in biostimulated soil microcosms using a stable isotope probing (SIP) approach. In biostimulated soil slurries, concentrations of soluble Co, Ni, Zn, As, and unexpectedly U increased during Fe(III)-reduction. This suggests that there was a release of sorbed metals and As during reductive dissolution of Fe(III)-oxides. Subsequent sulfate-reduction was concurrent with a decrease of U, Co, Ni, and Zn concentrations. The relative contribution of U(IV) in the solid phase changed from 18.5 to 88.7% after incubation. The active Fe(III)-reducing population was dominated by delta-Proteobacteria (Geobacter) in (13)C-ethanol amended microcosms. A more diverse community was present in (13)C-lactate amended microcosms including taxa related to Acidobacteria, Firmicutes, delta-Proteobacteria, and beta-Proteobacteria. Our results suggested that biostimulated Fe(III)-reducing communities facilitated the release of metals including U to groundwater which is in contrast to other studies.

  5. The Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} ratio in natural and heat-treated iron-rich eudialytes

    SciT

    Rastsvetaeva, R. K., E-mail: rast@ns.crys.ras.ru; Aksenov, S. M.; Rozenberg, K. A.

    2011-03-15

    The structures of natural iron-rich eudialyte (specimen 3458 from the Khibiny massif, the Kola Peninsula) and two heat-treated samples of this mineral calcined at 700 and 800 Degree-Sign C were determined by X-ray diffraction. The trigonal unit-cell parameters (sp. gr. R3m) are as follows: a = 14.2645(1) Angstrom-Sign , c = 29.9635(5) Angstrom-Sign ; a = 14.1307(1) Angstrom-Sign , c = 30.1229(3) Angstrom-Sign ; a = 14.1921(2) Angstrom-Sign , c = 30.2417(5) Angstrom-Sign , respectively. It was found that Fe{sup 3+} ions in the calcined eudialytes, as well as impurities in the starting specimen, occupy the square-pyramidal Fe{sup 3+}(V) sites,more » whereas Fe{sup 2+} ions are in the planar-tetragonal Fe{sup 2+}(IV) sites.« less

  6. Mineralogy and geochemistry of a Late Permian coal in the Dafang Coalfield, Guizhou, China: Influence from siliceous and iron-rich calcic hydrothermal fluids

    Dai, S.; Chou, C.-L.; Yue, M.; Luo, K.; Ren, D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the influence of siliceous and iron-rich calcic low-temperature hydrothermal fluids (LTHF) on the mineralogy and geochemistry of the Late Permian No. 11 Coal (anthracitic, Rr =2.85%) in the Dafang Coalfield in northwestern Guizhou Province, China. The No. 11 Coal has high contents of vein ankerite (10.2 vol.%) and vein quartz (11.4 vol.%), with formation temperatures of 85 and 180 ??C, respectively, indicating that vein ankerite and vein quartz were derived from low-temperature calcic and siliceous hydrothermal fluids in two epigenetic episodes. The vein quartz appears to have formed earlier than vein ankerite did, and at least three distinct stages of ankerite formation with different Ca/Sr and Fe/Mn ratios were observed. The two types of mineral veins are sources of different suites of major and trace metals. Scanning electron microscope and sequential extraction studies show that, in addition to Fe, Mg, and Ca, vein ankerite is the dominant source of Mn, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in the coal, and the contents of these five elements are as high as 0.09% and 74.0, 33.6, 185, and 289 ??g/g, respectively. In contrast, vein quartz is the main carrier mineral for platinum-group elements (PGEs) Pd, Pt, and Ir in the coal, and the contents of Pd, Pt, and Ir are 1.57, 0.15, and 0.007 ??g/g, respectively. Sequential extraction showed a high PGE content in the silicate fraction, up to 10.4 ??g/g Pd, 1.23 ??g/g Pt, and 0.05 ??g/g Ir, respectively. It is concluded that the formation of ankerite and quartz and the anomalous enrichment of trace elements in the No. 11 Coal in the Dafang Coalfield, Guizhou, result from the influx of calcic and siliceous low-temperature hydrothermal fluids. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Connecting Earth observation to high-throughput biodiversity data.

    PubMed

    Bush, Alex; Sollmann, Rahel; Wilting, Andreas; Bohmann, Kristine; Cole, Beth; Balzter, Heiko; Martius, Christopher; Zlinszky, András; Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien; Cobbold, Christina A; Dawson, Terence P; Emerson, Brent C; Ferrier, Simon; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Herold, Martin; Jones, Laurence; Leendertz, Fabian H; Matthews, Louise; Millington, James D A; Olson, John R; Ovaskainen, Otso; Raffaelli, Dave; Reeve, Richard; Rödel, Mark-Oliver; Rodgers, Torrey W; Snape, Stewart; Visseren-Hamakers, Ingrid; Vogler, Alfried P; White, Piran C L; Wooster, Martin J; Yu, Douglas W

    2017-06-22

    Understandably, given the fast pace of biodiversity loss, there is much interest in using Earth observation technology to track biodiversity, ecosystem functions and ecosystem services. However, because most biodiversity is invisible to Earth observation, indicators based on Earth observation could be misleading and reduce the effectiveness of nature conservation and even unintentionally decrease conservation effort. We describe an approach that combines automated recording devices, high-throughput DNA sequencing and modern ecological modelling to extract much more of the information available in Earth observation data. This approach is achievable now, offering efficient and near-real-time monitoring of management impacts on biodiversity and its functions and services.

  8. Senior High School Earth Sciences and Marine Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackenberg, Mary; And Others

    This guide was developed for earth sciences and marine sciences instruction in the senior high schools of Duval County, Jacksonville, Florida. The subjects covered are: (1) Earth Science for 10th, 11th, and 12th graders; (2) Marine Biology I for 10th, 11th, and 12th graders; (3) Marine Biology II, Advanced, for 11th and 12th graders; (4) Marine…

  9. Magnetism and Hyperfine Parameters in Iron Rich Gd_2Fe_{17-x}Si_x Intermetallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, K.; Bartoli, T.; Chrobak, A.; Moscovici, J.; Bessais, L.

    2018-04-01

    Gd_2Fe_{17-x}Si_x (x = 0.25 , 0.5 and 1) samples were synthesized by arc melting and annealed at 1073 K for 1 week. X-ray diffraction analysis by the Rietveld method has shown that these materials crystallize in the rhombohedral Th_2Zn_{17} -type structure (space group R\\bar{3}m ). The Curie temperature increases with Si content x, whereas the unit-cell parameters decrease slightly. The temperature dependence of magnetization data revealed that Gd_2Fe_{17-x}Si_x exhibits a second-order ferromagnetic to paramagnetic phase transition in the vicinity of the Curie temperature. Exchange coupling parameters of R-R, M-M and R-M (R—rare earth, M—transition metal) have been determined from M(T) magnetization curves based on the mean field theory calculation. The magnetic entropy change Δ S_M and the relative cooling power were estimated from isothermal magnetization curves for all samples. In the proximity of {T}_C and in an applied field of 1.56 T, Δ S_M reached a maximum values of 1.38, 1.67 and 3.07 J/kg K for x = 0.25, 0.5 and 1, respectively. We have calculated the magnetic moment per Fe atom from magnetization measurements at 293 K up to 17 kOe, and it decreases with Si content. These results are verified by the Mössbauer spectrometry measurements obtained at the same temperature. The Mössbauer spectra analysis is based on the correlation between the Wigner-Seitz volume and the isomer-shift evolution of each specific site 6c, 9d, 18f, and 18h of the R\\bar{3} m structure. For all Si concentrations, the magnitude of the hyperfine fields are {H_HF}{6c} > {H_HF}{9d} > {H_HF}{18f} > {H_HF}{18h} . The mean hyperfine field decreases with the Si content.

  10. Magnetism and Hyperfine Parameters in Iron Rich Gd_2Fe_{17-x}Si_x Intermetallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, K.; Bartoli, T.; Chrobak, A.; Moscovici, J.; Bessais, L.

    2018-07-01

    Gd_2Fe_{17-x}Si_x (x = 0.25, 0.5 and 1) samples were synthesized by arc melting and annealed at 1073 K for 1 week. X-ray diffraction analysis by the Rietveld method has shown that these materials crystallize in the rhombohedral Th_2Zn_{17}-type structure (space group R\\bar{3}m). The Curie temperature increases with Si content x, whereas the unit-cell parameters decrease slightly. The temperature dependence of magnetization data revealed that Gd_2Fe_{17-x}Si_x exhibits a second-order ferromagnetic to paramagnetic phase transition in the vicinity of the Curie temperature. Exchange coupling parameters of R- R, M- M and R- M ( R—rare earth, M—transition metal) have been determined from M( T) magnetization curves based on the mean field theory calculation. The magnetic entropy change Δ S_M and the relative cooling power were estimated from isothermal magnetization curves for all samples. In the proximity of {T}_C and in an applied field of 1.56 T, Δ S_M reached a maximum values of 1.38, 1.67 and 3.07 J/kg K for x = 0.25, 0.5 and 1, respectively. We have calculated the magnetic moment per Fe atom from magnetization measurements at 293 K up to 17 kOe, and it decreases with Si content. These results are verified by the Mössbauer spectrometry measurements obtained at the same temperature. The Mössbauer spectra analysis is based on the correlation between the Wigner-Seitz volume and the isomer-shift evolution of each specific site 6 c, 9 d, 18 f, and 18 h of the R\\bar{3}m structure. For all Si concentrations, the magnitude of the hyperfine fields are {H_HF}{6c} > {H_HF}{9d} > {H_HF}{18f} > {H_HF}{18h}. The mean hyperfine field decreases with the Si content.

  11. Earth

    2012-01-30

    Behold one of the more detailed images of the Earth yet created. This Blue Marble Earth montage shown above -- created from photographs taken by the Visible/Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument on board the new Suomi NPP satellite -- shows many stunning details of our home planet. The Suomi NPP satellite was launched last October and renamed last week after Verner Suomi, commonly deemed the father of satellite meteorology. The composite was created from the data collected during four orbits of the robotic satellite taken earlier this month and digitally projected onto the globe. Many features of North America and the Western Hemisphere are particularly visible on a high resolution version of the image. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18033

  12. Bringing Earth Magnetism Research into the High School Physics Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. V.; Bluth, G.; Engel, E.; Kurpier, K.; Foucher, M. S.; Anderson, K. L.

    2015-12-01

    We present our work in progress from an NSF CAREER project that aims to integrate paleomagnetic research and secondary school physics education. The research project is aimed at quantifying the strength and geometry of the Precambrian geomagnetic field. Investigation of the geomagnetic field behavior is crucial for understanding the mechanisms of field generation, and the development of the Earth's atmosphere and biosphere, and can serve as a focus for connecting high-level Earth science research with a standard physics curriculum. High school science teachers have participated in each summer field and research component of the project, gaining field and laboratory research experience, sets of rock and mineral samples, and classroom-tested laboratory magnetism activities for secondary school physics and earth science courses. We report on three field seasons of teacher field experiences and two years of classroom testing of paleomagnetic research materials merged into physics instruction on magnetism. Students were surveyed before and after dedicated instruction for both perceptions and attitude towards earth science in general, then more specifically on earth history and earth magnetism. Students were also surveyed before and after instruction on major earth system and magnetic concepts and processes, particularly as they relate to paleomagnetic research. Most students surveyed had a strongly positive viewpoint towards the study of Earth history and the importance of studying Earth Sciences in general, but were significantly less drawn towards more specific topics such as mineralogy and magnetism. Students demonstrated understanding of Earth model and the basics of magnetism, as well as the general timing of life, atmospheric development, and magnetic field development. However, detailed knowledge such as the magnetic dynamo, how the magnetic field has changed over time, and connections between earth magnetism and the development of an atmosphere remained largely

  13. Hitomi Observations of the LMC SNR N132D: Fast and Asymmetric Iron-rich Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Eric D.; Hitomi Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    We present Hitomi Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) observations of N132D, a young, ~2500 year-old, X-ray bright, O-rich core-collapse supernova remnant in the LMC. Despite a very short observation of only 3.7 ksec, the SXS easily detects the line complexes of He-like S K and Fe K with 16-17 counts in each. The Fe K feature is measured for the first time at high spectral resolution, and we find that the Fe K-emitting material is highly redshifted at ~1000 km/s compared to the local LMC ISM, indicating (1) that it arises from the SN ejecta, and (2) that this ejecta is highly asymmetric, since no corresponding blue-shifted component is found. The S K-emitting material has a velocity consistent with the local LMC ISM, and is likely swept-up ISM material. These results are consistent with spatial mapping of these emission lines with XMM-Newton and Chandra, which show the Fe K concentrated in the interior of the remnant and the S K tracing the outer shell. Most importantly, they highlight the power of high-spectral-resolution imaging observations, and demonstrate the new window that has been opened with Hitomi and will be greatly widened with future missions such as the X-ray Astronomy Recovery Mission (XARM) and Athena.

  14. Reactivity of iron-rich phyllosilicates with uranium and chromium through redox transition zones

    SciT

    Burgos, William D.

    This project performed thermodynamic, kinetic, and mineral structural studies on the reactivity of phyllosilicate Fe(II/III) with metal-reducing bacteria, and with two important poly-valent DOE contaminants (chromium and uranium) that show high mobility in their oxidized state. We focused on Fe-bearing phyllosilicates because these are important components of the reactive, fines fraction of Hanford, Oak Ridge, and Idaho National Laboratory sediments. Iron-bearing phyllosilicates strongly influence the redox state and mobility of Cr and U because of their limited hydraulic conductivity, high specific surface area, and redox reactivity. This was a collaborative project between Penn State (W.D. Burgos – PI), Miami Universitymore » (H. Dong – Co-PI), and Argonne National Laboratory (K. Kemner and M. Boyanov – Co-PIs). Penn State and Miami University were funded together but separately from ANL. This report summarizes research findings and publications produced by Penn State and Miami University.« less

  15. Replacing critical rare earth materials in high energy density magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCallum, R. William

    2012-02-01

    High energy density permanent magnets are crucial to the design of internal permanent magnet motors (IPM) for hybride and electric vehicles and direct drive wind generators. Current motor designs use rare earth permanent magnets which easily meet the performance goals, however, the rising concerns over cost and foreign control of the current supply of rare earth resources has motivated a search for non-rare earth based permanent magnets alloys with performance metrics which allow the design of permanent magnet motors and generators without rare earth magnets. This talk will discuss the state of non-rare-earth permanent magnets and efforts to both improve the current materials and find new materials. These efforts combine first principles calculations and meso-scale magnetic modeling with advance characterization and synthesis techniques in order to advance the state of the art in non rare earth permanent magnets. The use of genetic algorithms in first principle structural calculations, combinatorial synthesis in the experimental search for materials, atom probe microscopy to characterize grain boundaries on the atomic level, and other state of the art techniques will be discussed. In addition the possibility of replacing critical rare earth elements with the most abundant rare earth Ce will be discussed.

  16. Novel Thermotolerant Siderophilic Filamentous Cyanobacterium that Produces Intracellular Iron-Rich Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broun, Igor I.; Bryant, Donald A.; Casamatta, Dale; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Sarkisova, Svetlana A.; Shen, Gaozhang; Graham, Joel E.; Boyd, Eric S.; Peters, John W.; Garrison, Daniel H.; hide

    2010-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are the main producers of organic compounds in iron-depositing hot springs despite photosynthetically generated-oxygen and the abundance of reduced iron (Fe2+) that likely leads to enormous oxidative stress within cyanobacterial cells. Therefore, the study of cyanobacterial diversity, phylogeny, and biogeochemical activity in iron-depositing hot springs will not only provide insights into the contribution of CB to iron redox cycling in these environments, but it could also provide insights into CB evolution. This study characterizes the phylogeny, morphology, and physiology of isolate JSC-1, a novel filamentous CB isolated from an iron-depositing hot spring. While isolate JSC-1 is morphologically similar to the CB genus Leptolyngbya, 16S rDNA sequence data indicated that it shares 95 percent sequence similarity to the type strain L. boryanum. Strain JSC-1 fixes N2 and exhibited an unusually high ratio between photosystem (PS) I and PS II and was capable of complementary chromatic adaptation. Further, it synthesized only chlorophyll a and a unique set of carotenoids. Strain JSC-1 not only required high levels of Fe for growth (greater than or equal to 40 microM), but it also accumulated large amounts of extracellular ferrihydrite and generated intracellular ferric phosphates. Strain JSC-1 was found to secrete 2-oxoglutaric acid and possesses one ortholog and one paralog of bacterioferritin. Surprisingly, the latter has 70.13 % identity with a bacterioferritin in marine-proteobacterium HTCC 2080 and has joint node with bacterioferritins found in enterobacteria. Collectively, these observations provide insights into the physiological strategies that might have allowed CB to develop and proliferate in Fe-rich environments. Based on its genotypic and phenotypic characterization of strain, JSC-1 represents a new operational taxonomical unit (OTU) JSC-1.

  17. Iron-rich colloids as carriers of phosphorus in streams: A field-flow fractionation study.

    PubMed

    Baken, Stijn; Regelink, Inge C; Comans, Rob N J; Smolders, Erik; Koopmans, Gerwin F

    2016-08-01

    Colloidal phosphorus (P) may represent an important fraction of the P in natural waters, but these colloids remain poorly characterized. In this work, we demonstrate the applicability of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to high resolution ICP-MS for the characterization of low concentrations of P-bearing colloids. Colloids from five streams draining catchments with contrasting properties were characterized by AF4-ICP-MS and by membrane filtration. All streams contain free humic substances (2-3 nm) and Fe-bearing colloids (3-1200 nm). Two soft water streams contain primary Fe oxyhydroxide-humic nanoparticles (3-6 nm) and aggregates thereof (up to 150 nm). In contrast, three harder water streams contain larger aggregates (40-1200 nm) which consist of diverse associations between Fe oxyhydroxides, humic substances, clay minerals, and possibly ferric phosphate minerals. Despite the diversity of colloids encountered in these contrasting streams, P is in most of the samples predominantly associated with Fe-bearing colloids (mostly Fe oxyhydroxides) at molar P:Fe ratios between 0.02 and 1.5. The molar P:Fe ratio of the waters explains the partitioning of P between colloids and truly dissolved species. Waters with a high P:Fe ratio predominantly contain truly dissolved species because the Fe-rich colloids are saturated with P, whereas waters with a low P:Fe ratio mostly contain colloidal P species. Overall, AF4-ICP-MS is a suitable technique to characterize the diverse P-binding colloids in natural waters. Such colloids may increase the mobility or decrease the bioavailability of P, and they therefore need to be considered when addressing the transport and environmental effects of P in catchments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Stability of ferrous-iron-rich bridgmanite under reducing midmantle conditions

    SciT

    Shim, Sang-Heon; Grocholski, Brent; Ye, Yu

    2017-06-05

    Our current understanding of the electronic state of iron in lower-mantle minerals leads to a 8 considerable disagreement in bulk sound speed with seismic measurements if the lower mantle 9 has the same composition as the upper mantle (pyrolite). In the modelling studies, the content 10 and oxidation state of Fe in the minerals have been assumed to be constant throughout the lower 11 mantle. Here, we report high pressure experimental results in which Fe becomes dominantly 1 Fe2+ 12 in bridgmanite synthesized at 40–70GPa and 2,000K, while it is in mixed oxidation state (Fe3+/ P Fe = 60%) inmore » the samples synthesized below and above the pressure range. Little Fe3+ 13 14 in bridgmanite combined with the strong partitioning of Fe2+ into ferropericlase will alter the Fe 15 content for these minerals at 1,100–1,700 km depths. Our calculations show that the change in 16 iron content harmonizes the bulk sound speed of pyrolite with the seismic values in this region. 17 Our experiments support no significant changes in bulk composition for most of the mantle, 18 while possible changes in physical properties and processes (such as viscosity and mantle flow 19 patterns) in the mid mantle.« less

  19. Rock magnetic properties of iron-rich Chicxulub impact ejecta from La Sierrita, northeastern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontny, A.; Schulte, P.; Stinnesbeck, W.

    2002-12-01

    Curie or Néel temperature or reflects a grain-size effect of a ferromagnetic phase. The heating leg of the MS(T) curve generally displays constant low MS values. However, heating and cooling runs are irreversible and the cooling leg displays two Curie temperatures (TC) at 570 and 480°C, thus indicating transformation during heating of iron-bearing minerals into magnetite or magnetite-near phases. No characteristic TC related either to hematite or to goethite has been detected; this absence could be related to impurities (Si, Ni) or cation deficiency. Intensity of the natural remanent magnetization (NRM) of the ejecta deposits is very small (0.3-0.7 mA/m). In fields below 10 mT, alternating field-demagnetization of NRM shows initial rapid decrease of about 50 % of the original intensity, whereas in fields of 160 mT no further demagnetization occurs. Induced remanent magnetization (IRM) acquisition curves reveal that some studied samples are nearly saturated in fields of 1000 mT while others are not. Furthermore, the IRM data confirm the presence of a single dominant high coercive mineral such as hematite and goethite; these are the main iron-bearing magnetic phases, in addition to chlorite. The occurrence of hematite and goethite in the La Sierrita ejecta points to highly oxidizing conditions during or after ejecta formation. Such conditions may have prevented the origination of stronger (ferro-) magnetic phases (e.g. magnetite) or destroyed them.

  20. Functional Gene Analysis of Freshwater Iron-Rich Flocs at Circumneutral pH and Isolation of a Stalk-Forming Microaerophilic Iron-Oxidizing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Clara; Itoh, Takashi; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2013-01-01

    Iron-rich flocs often occur where anoxic water containing ferrous iron encounters oxygenated environments. Culture-independent molecular analyses have revealed the presence of 16S rRNA gene sequences related to diverse bacteria, including autotrophic iron oxidizers and methanotrophs in iron-rich flocs; however, the metabolic functions of the microbial communities remain poorly characterized, particularly regarding carbon cycling. In the present study, we cultivated iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) and performed clone library analyses of functional genes related to carbon fixation and methane oxidization (cbbM and pmoA, respectively), in addition to bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes, in freshwater iron-rich flocs at groundwater discharge points. The analyses of 16S rRNA, cbbM, and pmoA genes strongly suggested the coexistence of autotrophic iron oxidizers and methanotrophs in the flocs. Furthermore, a novel stalk-forming microaerophilic FeOB, strain OYT1, was isolated and characterized phylogenetically and physiologically. The 16S rRNA and cbbM gene sequences of OYT1 are related to those of other microaerophilic FeOB in the family Gallionellaceae, of the Betaproteobacteria, isolated from freshwater environments at circumneutral pH. The physiological characteristics of OYT1 will help elucidate the ecophysiology of microaerophilic FeOB. Overall, this study demonstrates functional roles of microorganisms in iron flocs, suggesting several possible linkages between Fe and C cycling. PMID:23811518

  1. Theoretical study of novel complexed structures for methoxy derivatives of scytonemin: potential biomarkers in iron-rich stressed environments.

    PubMed

    Varnali, Tereza; Edwards, Howell G M

    2013-09-01

    Scytonemin is a cyanobacterial sheath pigment with potent UV (UVA, UVB, and UVC) absorbing properties. Di- and tetramethoxy derivatives of scytonemin have also been found and described in the literature. The importance of these biomolecules is their photoprotective function, which is one of the major survival strategies adopted by extremophiles in environmentally stressed conditions. Also, iron compounds [particularly iron(III) oxides] offer an additional UV-protecting facility to subsurface endolithic biological colonization; hence, banded iron formations (accompanied by zones of depletion of iron) in rock matrices have attracted attention with special interest in the method of transportation of iron compounds through the rock. Di- and tetramethoxyscytonemin and their iron(III) complexes have been modeled and studied computationally by using density functional theory calculations at the level of B3LYP/6-31G** methodology. We propose new structures that could feature in survival strategy and facilitate the movement of iron through the rock especially for iron-rich stressed terrestrial environments exemplified by the Río Tinto system with the added potential of subsurface Mars exploration. This study represents a continuation of our previous work on scytonemin. The calculated Raman spectra of the proposed iron complexes are compared with those of their parent compounds and discussed in relation to structural changes effected in the parent ligand upon complexation. This information leads to new insights to be gained by experimental Raman spectroscopists and the characterization of spectroscopic biosignatures for the database being compiled for the remote Raman analytical interrogation of the martian surface and subsurface being proposed for the ESA ExoMars mission planned for launch in 2018.

  2. Insights into the Structure and Metabolic Function of Microbes That Shape Pelagic Iron-Rich Aggregates (“Iron Snow”)

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shipeng; Chourey, Karuna; Reiche, Marco; Nietzsche, Sandor; Shah, Manesh B.; Neu, Thomas R.; Hettich, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial ferrous iron [Fe(II)] oxidation leads to the formation of iron-rich macroscopic aggregates (“iron snow”) at the redoxcline in a stratified lignite mine lake in east-central Germany. We aimed to identify the abundant Fe-oxidizing and Fe-reducing microorganisms likely to be involved in the formation and transformation of iron snow present in the redoxcline in two basins of the lake that differ in their pH values. Nucleic acid- and lipid-stained microbial cells of various morphologies detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy were homogeneously distributed in all iron snow samples. The dominant iron mineral appeared to be schwertmannite, with shorter needles in the northern than in the central basin samples. Total bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies ranged from 5.0 × 108 copies g (dry weight)−1 in the acidic central lake basin (pH 3.3) to 4.0 × 1010 copies g (dry weight)−1 in the less acidic (pH 5.9) northern basin. Total RNA-based quantitative PCR assigned up to 61% of metabolically active microbial communities to Fe-oxidizing- and Fe-reducing-related bacteria, indicating that iron metabolism was an important metabolic strategy. Molecular identification of abundant groups suggested that iron snow surfaces were formed by chemoautotrophic iron oxidizers, such as Acidimicrobium, Ferrovum, Acidithiobacillus, Thiobacillus, and Chlorobium, in the redoxcline and were rapidly colonized by heterotrophic iron reducers, such as Acidiphilium, Albidiferax-like, and Geobacter-like groups. Metaproteomics yielded 283 different proteins from northern basin iron snow samples, and protein identification provided a glimpse into some of their in situ metabolic processes, such as primary production (CO2 fixation), respiration, motility, and survival strategies. PMID:23645202

  3. Insights into the structure and metabolic function of microbes that shape pelagic iron-rich aggregates ("iron snow").

    PubMed

    Lu, Shipeng; Chourey, Karuna; Reiche, Marco; Nietzsche, Sandor; Shah, Manesh B; Neu, Thomas R; Hettich, Robert L; Küsel, Kirsten

    2013-07-01

    Microbial ferrous iron [Fe(II)] oxidation leads to the formation of iron-rich macroscopic aggregates ("iron snow") at the redoxcline in a stratified lignite mine lake in east-central Germany. We aimed to identify the abundant Fe-oxidizing and Fe-reducing microorganisms likely to be involved in the formation and transformation of iron snow present in the redoxcline in two basins of the lake that differ in their pH values. Nucleic acid- and lipid-stained microbial cells of various morphologies detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy were homogeneously distributed in all iron snow samples. The dominant iron mineral appeared to be schwertmannite, with shorter needles in the northern than in the central basin samples. Total bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies ranged from 5.0 × 10(8) copies g (dry weight)(-1) in the acidic central lake basin (pH 3.3) to 4.0 × 10(10) copies g (dry weight)(-1) in the less acidic (pH 5.9) northern basin. Total RNA-based quantitative PCR assigned up to 61% of metabolically active microbial communities to Fe-oxidizing- and Fe-reducing-related bacteria, indicating that iron metabolism was an important metabolic strategy. Molecular identification of abundant groups suggested that iron snow surfaces were formed by chemoautotrophic iron oxidizers, such as Acidimicrobium, Ferrovum, Acidithiobacillus, Thiobacillus, and Chlorobium, in the redoxcline and were rapidly colonized by heterotrophic iron reducers, such as Acidiphilium, Albidiferax-like, and Geobacter-like groups. Metaproteomics yielded 283 different proteins from northern basin iron snow samples, and protein identification provided a glimpse into some of their in situ metabolic processes, such as primary production (CO2 fixation), respiration, motility, and survival strategies.

  4. Rare Earth Doped High Temperature Ceramic Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Pal, AnnaMarie; Patton, Martin O.; Jenkins, Phillip P.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of their electron structure, rare earth ions in crystals at high temperature emit radiation in several narrow bands rather than in a continuous blackbody manner. This study develops a spectral emittance model for films of rare earth containing materials. Although there are several possible rare earth doped high temperature materials, this study was confined to rare earth aluminum garnets. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical spectral emittances was found for erbium, thulium and erbium-holmium aluminum garnets. Spectral emittances of these films are sensitive to temperature differences across the film. Emitter efficiency is also a sensitive function of temperature. For thulium aluminum garnet the efficiency is 0.38 at 1700 K but only 0.19 at 1262 K.

  5. Magnetic transition and sound velocities of Fe 3S at high pressure: implications for Earth and planetary cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jung-Fu; Fei, Yingwei; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Zhao, Jiyong; Mao, Ho-kwang; Hemley, Russell J.

    2004-09-01

    Magnetic, elastic, thermodynamic, and vibrational properties of the most iron-rich sulfide, Fe3S, known to date have been studied with synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy (SMS) and nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (NRIXS) up to 57 GPa at room temperature. The magnetic hyperfine fields derived from the time spectra of the synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy show that the low-pressure magnetic phase displays two magnetic hyperfine field sites and that a magnetic collapse occurs at 21 GPa. The magnetic to non-magnetic transition significantly affects the elastic, thermodynamic, and vibrational properties of Fe3S. The magnetic collapse of Fe3S may also affect the phase relations in the iron-sulfur system, changing the solubility of sulfur in iron under higher pressures. Determination of the physical properties of the non-magnetic Fe3S phase is important for the interpretation of the amount and properties of sulfur present in the planetary cores. Sound velocities of Fe3S obtained from the measured partial phonon density of states (PDOS) for 57Fe incorporated in the alloy show that Fe3S has higher compressional and shear wave velocity than those of hcp-Fe and hcp-Fe0.92Ni0.08 alloy under high pressures, making sulfur a potential light element in the Earth's core based on geophysical arguments. The VP and VS of the non-magnetic Fe3S follow a Birch's law trend whereas the slopes decrease in the magnetic phase, indicating that the decrease of the magnetic moment significantly affects the sound velocities. If the Martian core is in the solid state containing 14.2 wt.% sulfur, it is likely that the non-magnetic Fe3S phase is a dominant component and that our measured sound velocities of Fe3S can be used to construct the corresponding velocity profile of the Martian core. It is also conceivable that Fe3P and Fe3C undergo similar magnetic phase transitions under high pressures.

  6. Autonomous Navigation Improvements for High-Earth Orbiters Using GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Anne; Kelbel, David; Lee, Taesul; Garrison, James; Carpenter, J. Russell; Bauer, F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center is currently developing autonomous navigation systems for satellites in high-Earth orbits where acquisition of the GPS signals is severely limited This paper discusses autonomous navigation improvements for high-Earth orbiters and assesses projected navigation performance for these satellites using Global Positioning System (GPS) Standard Positioning Service (SPS) measurements. Navigation performance is evaluated as a function of signal acquisition threshold, measurement errors, and dynamic modeling errors using realistic GPS signal strength and user antenna models. These analyses indicate that an autonomous navigation position accuracy of better than 30 meters root-mean-square (RMS) can be achieved for high-Earth orbiting satellites using a GPS receiver with a very stable oscillator. This accuracy improves to better than 15 meters RMS if the GPS receiver's signal acquisition threshold can be reduced by 5 dB-Hertz to track weaker signals.

  7. Enhancing GIS Capabilities for High Resolution Earth Science Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koziol, B. W.; Oehmke, R.; Li, P.; O'Kuinghttons, R.; Theurich, G.; DeLuca, C.

    2017-12-01

    Applications for high performance GIS will continue to increase as Earth system models pursue more realistic representations of Earth system processes. Finer spatial resolution model input and output, unstructured or irregular modeling grids, data assimilation, and regional coordinate systems present novel challenges for GIS frameworks operating in the Earth system modeling domain. This presentation provides an overview of two GIS-driven applications that combine high performance software with big geospatial datasets to produce value-added tools for the modeling and geoscientific community. First, a large-scale interpolation experiment using National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) catchments, a high resolution rectilinear CONUS grid, and the Earth System Modeling Framework's (ESMF) conservative interpolation capability will be described. ESMF is a parallel, high-performance software toolkit that provides capabilities (e.g. interpolation) for building and coupling Earth science applications. ESMF is developed primarily by the NOAA Environmental Software Infrastructure and Interoperability (NESII) group. The purpose of this experiment was to test and demonstrate the utility of high performance scientific software in traditional GIS domains. Special attention will be paid to the nuanced requirements for dealing with high resolution, unstructured grids in scientific data formats. Second, a chunked interpolation application using ESMF and OpenClimateGIS (OCGIS) will demonstrate how spatial subsetting can virtually remove computing resource ceilings for very high spatial resolution interpolation operations. OCGIS is a NESII-developed Python software package designed for the geospatial manipulation of high-dimensional scientific datasets. An overview of the data processing workflow, why a chunked approach is required, and how the application could be adapted to meet operational requirements will be discussed here. In addition, we'll provide a general overview of OCGIS

  8. Incorporating Earth Science into Other High School Science Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, C. L. B.; Holzer, M.; Colson, M.; Courtier, A. M. B.; Jacobs, B. E.

    2016-12-01

    As states begin to review their standards, some adopt or adapt the NGSS and others write their own, many basing these on the Framework for K-12 Science Education. Both the NGSS and the Frameworks have an increased emphasis on Earth Science but many high school teachers are being asked to teach these standards in traditional Biology, Chemistry and Physics courses. At the Earth Educators Rendezvous, teachers, scientists, and science education researchers worked together to find the interconnections between the sciences using the NGSS and identified ways to reference the role of Earth Sciences in the other sciences during lectures, activities and laboratory assignments. Weaving Earth and Space sciences into the other curricular areas, the teams developed relevant problems for students to solve by focusing on using current issues, media stories, and community issues. These and other lessons and units of study will be presented along with other resources used by teachers to ensure students are gaining exposure and a deeper understanding of Earth and Space Science concepts.

  9. Reflectance spectroscopy and GEX simulation of palagonite and iron-rich montmorillonite clay mixtures: Implications for the surface composition of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orenberg, J. B.; Handy, J.; Quinn, R.

    1992-01-01

    Because of the power of remote sensing reflectance spectroscopy in determining mineralogy, it has been used as the major method of identifying a possible mineral analogue of the martian surface. A summary of proposed martian surface compositions from reflectance spectroscopy before 1979 was presented by Singer et al. Since that time, iron-rich montmorillonite clay, nanocrystalline or nanophase hematite, and palagonite have been suggested as Mars soil analogue materials. Palagonite in petrological terms is best described as an amorphous, hydrated, ferric iron, silica gel. Montmorillonite is a member of the smectite clay group, and its structure is characterized by an octahedral sheet in coordination with two tetrahedral sheets in which oxygen atoms are shared. The crystal unity of montmorillonite is well defined in contrast to palagonite where it is considered amorphous or poorly crystalline at best. Because of the absence of the diagnostic strong 2.2-micron reflectance band characteristic of clays in the near-infrared (NIR) spectrum of Mars and palagonite and based upon a consideration of wide wavelength coverage (0.3-50 microns), Roush et al. concluded that palagonite is a more likely Mars surface analogue. In spite of the spectral agreement of palagonite and the Mars reflectance spectrum in the 2.2-micron region, palagonite shows poor correspondence with the results of the Viking LR experiment. In contrast, iron-rich montmorillonite clays show relatively good agreement with the results of the Viking LR experiment. This spectral study was undertaken to evaluate the spectral properties of mixtures of palagonite and Mars analogue iron-rich montmorillonite clay (16-18 wt. percent Fe as Fe2O3) as a Mars surface mineralogical model. Mixtures of minerals as Mars surface analogue materials have been studied before, but the mixtures were restricted to crystalline clays and iron oxides.

  10. Elasticity of Deep-Earth Materials at High P and T: Implication for Earths Lower Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Jay; Sinogeikin, S. V.; Mattern, Estelle; Jackson, J. M.; Matas, J.; Wang, J.; Ricard, Y.

    2005-03-01

    Brillouin spectroscopy allows measurements of sound velocities and elasticity on phases of geophysical interest at high Pressures and Temperatures. This technique was used to measure the properties of numerous important phases of Earths deep interior. Emphasis is now on measurements at elevated P-T conditions, and measurements on dense polycrystals. Measurements to 60 GPa were made using diamond anvil cells. High temperature is achieved by electrical resistance and laser heating. Excellent results are obtained for polycrystalline samples of dense oxides such as silicate spinels, and (Mg,Al)(Si,Al)O3 --perovskites. A wide range of materials can now be characterized. These and other results were used to infer Earths average lower mantle composition and thermal structure by comparing mineral properties at lower mantle P-T conditions to global Earth models. A formal inversion procedure was used. Inversions of density and bulk sound velocity do not provide robust compositional and thermal models. Including shear properties in the inversions is important to obtain unique solutions. We discuss the range of models consistent with present lab results, and data needed to further refine lower mantle models.

  11. High-Grading Lunar Samples for Return to Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton; Sellar, Glenn; Nunez, Jorge; Winterhalter, Daniel; Farmer, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Astronauts on long-duration lunar missions will need the capability to "high-grade" their samples to select the highest value samples for transport to Earth and to leave others on the Moon. We are supporting studies to defile the "necessary and sufficient" measurements and techniques for highgrading samples at a lunar outpost. A glovebox, dedicated to testing instruments and techniques for high-grading samples, is in operation at the JSC Lunar Experiment Laboratory.

  12. 3D polymer hydrogel for high-performance atomic iron-rich catalysts for oxygen reduction in acidic media

    SciT

    Qiao, Zhi; Zhang, Hanguang; Karakalos, Stavros

    Current platinum group metal (PGM)-free carbon nanocomposite catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic electrolyte often suffer from rapid degradation associated with carbon corrosion due to the use of large amount of amorphoous carbon black supports. Here, we developed a new concept of using freestanding 3D hydrogel to design support-free Fe-N-C catalysts. A 3D polyaniline (PANI)-based hydrogel was used for preparing a new type of single atomic iron site-rich catalyst, which has exhibited exceptionally enhanced activity and stability compared to conventional Fe-N-C catalysts supported on amorphous carbon blacks. The achieved performance metric on the hydrogel PANI-Fe catalysts ismore » one of the best ever reported PGM-free catalysts, reaching a half-wave potential up to 0.83 V vs. RHE and only leaving 30 mV gap with Pt/C catalysts (60 μgPt/cm2) in challenging acidic media. Remarkable ORR stability was accomplished as well on the same catalyst evidenced by using harsh potential cycling tests. The well dispersion of atomic iron into partially graphitized carbon, featured with dominance of micropores and porous network structures, is capable of accommodating increased number of active sites, strengthening local bonding among iron, nitrogen and carbon, and facilitating mass transfer. The 3D polymer hydrogel approach would be a new pathway to advance PGM-free catalysts.« less

  13. 3D polymer hydrogel for high-performance atomic iron-rich catalysts for oxygen reduction in acidic media

    DOE PAGES

    Qiao, Zhi; Zhang, Hanguang; Karakalos, Stavros; ...

    2017-08-03

    Current platinum group metal (PGM)-free carbon nanocomposite catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic electrolyte often suffer from rapid degradation associated with carbon corrosion due to the use of large amount of amorphoous carbon black supports. Here, we developed a new concept of using freestanding 3D hydrogel to design support-free Fe-N-C catalysts. A 3D polyaniline (PANI)-based hydrogel was used for preparing a new type of single atomic iron site-rich catalyst, which has exhibited exceptionally enhanced activity and stability compared to conventional Fe-N-C catalysts supported on amorphous carbon blacks. The achieved performance metric on the hydrogel PANI-Fe catalysts ismore » one of the best ever reported PGM-free catalysts, reaching a half-wave potential up to 0.83 V vs. RHE and only leaving 30 mV gap with Pt/C catalysts (60 μgPt/cm2) in challenging acidic media. Remarkable ORR stability was accomplished as well on the same catalyst evidenced by using harsh potential cycling tests. The well dispersion of atomic iron into partially graphitized carbon, featured with dominance of micropores and porous network structures, is capable of accommodating increased number of active sites, strengthening local bonding among iron, nitrogen and carbon, and facilitating mass transfer. The 3D polymer hydrogel approach would be a new pathway to advance PGM-free catalysts.« less

  14. High-Definition Television (HDTV) Images for Earth Observations and Earth Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Julie A.; Holland, S. Douglas; Runco, Susan K.; Pitts, David E.; Whitehead, Victor S.; Andrefouet, Serge M.

    2000-01-01

    As part of Detailed Test Objective 700-17A, astronauts acquired Earth observation images from orbit using a high-definition television (HDTV) camcorder, Here we provide a summary of qualitative findings following completion of tests during missions STS (Space Transport System)-93 and STS-99. We compared HDTV imagery stills to images taken using payload bay video cameras, Hasselblad film camera, and electronic still camera. We also evaluated the potential for motion video observations of changes in sunlight and the use of multi-aspect viewing to image aerosols. Spatial resolution and color quality are far superior in HDTV images compared to National Television Systems Committee (NTSC) video images. Thus, HDTV provides the first viable option for video-based remote sensing observations of Earth from orbit. Although under ideal conditions, HDTV images have less spatial resolution than medium-format film cameras, such as the Hasselblad, under some conditions on orbit, the HDTV image acquired compared favorably with the Hasselblad. Of particular note was the quality of color reproduction in the HDTV images HDTV and electronic still camera (ESC) were not compared with matched fields of view, and so spatial resolution could not be compared for the two image types. However, the color reproduction of the HDTV stills was truer than colors in the ESC images. As HDTV becomes the operational video standard for Space Shuttle and Space Station, HDTV has great potential as a source of Earth-observation data. Planning for the conversion from NTSC to HDTV video standards should include planning for Earth data archiving and distribution.

  15. Exploring Earth's Magnetism and Northern lights in High School Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, M.; Peticolas, L.

    2008-05-01

    Present studies are being conducted as a part of the outreach project entitled Geomagnetic Event Observation Network by Students (GEONS) to share excitement of the THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macro scale Interactions during Substorm) mission launched during February, 2007. The goal of this mission is to investigate the causality of events that lead to the explosive release of energy (derived from the Sun) stored in the Earth's magnetic field. The visible manifestation of the energy release is Aurora Borealis observed in the Northern hemisphere of the Earth. Inherent to understanding the root-cause of formation of spectacular aurora is the interaction between the Earth's magnetic field and the solar wind charged particles. To achieve this ambitious objective in a high school classroom, students conducted activities using the magnetic field of bar magnets, electromagnets, electromagnetic induction, and Lenz's Law. Following the fundamental understanding of these concepts, students acquired the necessary vocabulary and explored the various components of the interaction between the Earth's magnetic field and the solar wind charged particles. They were also familiarized with the general format in which THEMIS spacecraft data is displayed. In this presentation, we will address student's misconceptions, their struggle to make connections before they can appreciate "Big Idea" in terms of its components. Discussion will highlight the relationship between student understanding of new ideas and how these ideas connect with their prior knowledge.

  16. NAVIGATION PERFORMANCE IN HIGH EARTH ORBITS USING NAVIGATOR GPS RECEIVER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamford, William; Naasz, Bo; Moreau, Michael C.

    2006-01-01

    NASA GSFC has developed a GPS receiver that can acquire and track GPS signals with sensitivity significantly lower than conventional GPS receivers. This opens up the possibility of using GPS based navigation for missions in high altitude orbit, such as Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) in a geostationary orbit, and the Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) Mission, in highly eccentric orbits extending to 12 Earth radii and higher. Indeed much research has been performed to study the feasibility of using GPS navigation in high Earth orbits and the performance achievable. Recently, GSFC has conducted a series of hardware in-the-loop tests to assess the performance of this new GPS receiver in various high Earth orbits of interest. Tracking GPS signals to down to approximately 22-25 dB-Hz, including signals from the GPS transmitter side-lobes, steady-state navigation performance in a geostationary orbit is on the order of 10 meters. This paper presents the results of these tests, as well as sensitivity analysis to such factors as ionosphere masks, use of GPS side-lobe signals, and GPS receiver sensitivity.

  17. Early Earth differentiation [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Michael J.; Trønnes, Reidar G.

    2004-09-01

    The birth and infancy of Earth was a time of profound differentiation involving massive internal reorganization into core, mantle and proto-crust, all within a few hundred million years of solar system formation ( t0). Physical and isotopic evidence indicate that the formation of iron-rich cores generally occurred very early in planetesimals, the building blocks of proto-Earth, within about 3 million years of t0. The final stages of terrestrial planetary accretion involved violent and tremendously energetic giant impacts among core-segregated Mercury- to Mars-sized objects and planetary embryos. As a consequence of impact heating, the early Earth was at times partially or wholly molten, increasing the likelihood for high-pressure and high-temperature equilibration among core- and mantle-forming materials. The Earth's silicate mantle harmoniously possesses abundance levels of the siderophile elements Ni and Co that can be reconciled by equilibration between iron alloy and silicate at conditions comparable to those expected for a deep magma ocean. Solidification of a deep magma ocean possibly involved crystal-melt segregation at high pressures, but subsequent convective stirring of the mantle could have largely erased nascent layering. However, primitive upper mantle rocks apparently have some nonchondritic major and trace element refractory lithophile element ratios that can be plausibly linked to early mantle differentiation of ultra-high-pressure mantle phases. The geochemical effects of crystal fractionation in a deep magma ocean are partly constrained by high-pressure experimentation. Comparison between compositional models for the primitive convecting mantle and bulk silicate Earth generally allows, and possibly favors, 10-15% total fractionation of a deep mantle assemblage comprised predominantly of Mg-perovskite and with minor but geochemically important amounts of Ca-perovskite and ferropericlase. Long-term isolation of such a crystal pile is generally

  18. The hydro- and multi-isotope geochemistry of iron-rich ground waters emerging at the southern Baltic Sea coast line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipka, Marko; Wu, Zijun; Escher, Peter; Struck, Ulrich; Dellwig, Olaf; Schafmeister, Maria; Böttcher*, Michael E.

    2013-04-01

    Iron-rich groundwater springs emerging at the shore zone of the southern Baltic Sea (BS; Site Meschendorf) were examined on a seasonal base for a period of about two years. Besides major, minor, and trace elements, stable isotopes of water (H-2, O-18), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC; C-13), and sulfate (S-34) were analyzed. The stream bed sediment was extracted for the geochemistry of the newly formed precipitates and further characterized via SEM-EDAX. Subsequently, the hydrogeochemical results were subjected to a thermodynamic analysis via the PHREEQC speciation model. The springs emerge from small pits (about 60 cm diameter; up to 15cm depth). Surrounding sediments are sandy with gravels found at depth and corresponding high permeabilities. The positions of different springs on the shore zone were stable during the investigation period while the shape of the pits and the stream beds may vary due to wind- and wave-driven forces. Selected measurements of spring yield discharges close to 10 L/min. The H-2 and O-18 contents of the spring waters indicate the ground water to originate from relatively young mixed meteoric waters. The hydrochemistry of the springs was similar and showed some variability in between which indicates that the genetic processes for the ground water before reaching the surface may slightly differ. The springs are characterized by dissolved Ca, Mg, Na, DIC and sulfate, mainly reflecting the interaction with soils and bedrocks in the recharge area that is dominated by marly till. The oxygen-free ground water is rich in Fe, P, and DIC. Iron and dissolved sulfate originate from the oxidation of pyrite, as further confirmed by the 34-S signature of sulfate. The carbon isotope signature of DIC indicates a mixture of biogenic CO2 from the soil zone with some water-rock interaction with carbonate minerals. The streams flow towards the BS and, in contact with the atmosphere, outgas carbon dioxide and takes up oxygen. Upon CO2-degassing, C-12 is

  19. Melting behavior of Earth's lower mantle minerals at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, S.; Yang, J.; Prakapenka, V. B.; Zhang, Y.; Greenberg, E.; Lin, J. F.

    2017-12-01

    Melting behavior of the most abundant lower mantle minerals, bridgmanite and ferropericlase, at high pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions is of critical importance to understand the dynamic evolution of the early Earth and to explain the seismological and geochemical signatures in the present lowermost mantle. Theoretical calculations [1] and geodynamical models [2] suggested that partial melting of early Earth among MgO-FeO-SiO2 ternary could be located at the eutectic point where a pyrolitic composition formed for the Earth's lower mantle and the eutectic crystallization process could provide a plausible mechanism to the origin of the ultra-low velocity zones (ULVZs) near the core-mantle boundary. Here we have investigated the melting behavior of ferropericlase and Al,Fe-bearing bridgmanite in laser-heated diamond anvil cells coupled with in situ X-ray diffraction up to 120 GPa. Together with chemical and texture characterizations of the quenched samples, these results are analyzed using thermodynamic models to address the effects of iron on the liquidus and solidus temperatures as well as solid-liquid iron partitioning and the eutectic point in ferropericlase-bridgmanite existing system at lower-mantle pressure. In this presentation, we discuss the application of these results to better constrain the seismic observations of the deep lowermost mantle such as large low shear wave velocity provinces (LLSVPs) and ULVZs. We will also discuss the geochemical consequences of the ferropericlase-bridgmanite melting due to the changes in the electronic spin and valence states of iron in the system. ADDIN EN.REFLIST 1. Boukaré, C.E., Y. Ricard, and G. Fiquet, Thermodynamics of the MgO-FeO-SiO2 system up to 140 GPa: Application to the crystallization of Earth's magma ocean. Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth, 2015. 120(9): p. 6085-6101. 2. Labrosse, S., J. Hernlund, and N. Coltice, A crystallizing dense magma ocean at the base of the Earth's mantle. Nature, 2007

  20. Advantages of High vs. Low Earth Orbit for SIRTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenhardt, Peter; Werner, Michael W.

    1989-01-01

    While the subject of this workshop, which we will refer to as ET (for Enlightenment Telescope), is a dazzling successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, its location is unlikely to be the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) used by HST. Locations suggested for ET include High Earth Orbit (HEO) and the moon. The first space telescope to occupy HEO will be the liquid helium cooled Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). The selection of HEO for SIRTF was the outcome of a recent study led by the Ames Research Center which showed significant advantages for SIRTF in HEO vs. LEO. This article summarizes the main results of that study. We begin with a review of SIRTF's rationale and requirements, in part because the IR capabilities and low temperature proposed for ET make it something of a successor to SIRTF as well as to HST. We conclude with some comments about another possible location for both SIRTF and ET, the Earth-Sun L2 Lagrangian point.

  1. Researches on High Accuracy Prediction Methods of Earth Orientation Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. Q.

    2015-09-01

    The Earth rotation reflects the coupling process among the solid Earth, atmosphere, oceans, mantle, and core of the Earth on multiple spatial and temporal scales. The Earth rotation can be described by the Earth's orientation parameters, which are abbreviated as EOP (mainly including two polar motion components PM_X and PM_Y, and variation in the length of day ΔLOD). The EOP is crucial in the transformation between the terrestrial and celestial reference systems, and has important applications in many areas such as the deep space exploration, satellite precise orbit determination, and astrogeodynamics. However, the EOP products obtained by the space geodetic technologies generally delay by several days to two weeks. The growing demands for modern space navigation make high-accuracy EOP prediction be a worthy topic. This thesis is composed of the following three aspects, for the purpose of improving the EOP forecast accuracy. (1) We analyze the relation between the length of the basic data series and the EOP forecast accuracy, and compare the EOP prediction accuracy for the linear autoregressive (AR) model and the nonlinear artificial neural network (ANN) method by performing the least squares (LS) extrapolations. The results show that the high precision forecast of EOP can be realized by appropriate selection of the basic data series length according to the required time span of EOP prediction: for short-term prediction, the basic data series should be shorter, while for the long-term prediction, the series should be longer. The analysis also showed that the LS+AR model is more suitable for the short-term forecasts, while the LS+ANN model shows the advantages in the medium- and long-term forecasts. (2) We develop for the first time a new method which combines the autoregressive model and Kalman filter (AR+Kalman) in short-term EOP prediction. The equations of observation and state are established using the EOP series and the autoregressive coefficients

  2. Sound velocity and density of magnesiowüstites: Implications for ultralow-velocity zone topography: Sound velocities of Iron-rich Oxides

    SciT

    Wicks, June; Jackson, Jennifer M.; Sturhahn, Wolfgang

    We explore the effect of Mg/Fe substitution on the sound velocities of iron-rich (Mg 1 - xFe x)O, where x = 0.84, 0.94, and 1.0. Sound velocities were determined using nuclear resonance inelastic X-ray scattering as a function of pressure, approaching those of the lowermost mantle. The systematics of cation substitution in the Fe-rich limit has the potential to play an important role in the interpretation of seismic observations of the core-mantle boundary. By determining a relationship between sound velocity, density, and composition of (Mg,Fe)O, this study explores the potential constraints on ultralow-velocity zones at the core-mantle boundary.

  3. Iron and cell death in Parkinson's disease: a nuclear microscopic study into iron-rich granules in the parkinsonian substantia nigra of primate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thong, P. S. P.; Watt, F.; Ponraj, D.; Leong, S. K.; He, Y.; Lee, T. K. Y.

    1999-10-01

    Parkinson's disease is a degenerative brain disease characterised by a loss of cells in the substantia nigra (SN) region of the brain and accompanying biochemical changes such as inhibition of mitochondrial function, increased iron concentrations and decreased glutathione levels in the parkinsonian SN. Though the aetiology of the disease is still unknown, the observed biochemical changes point to the involvement of oxidative stress. In particular, iron is suspected to play a role by promoting free radical production, leading to oxidative stress and cell death. The increase in iron in the parkinsonian SN has been confirmed by several research groups, both in human post-mortem brains and in brain tissue from parkinsonian animal models. However, the question remains as to whether the observed increase in iron is a cause or a consequence of the SN cell death process. Our previous study using unilaterally 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-pyridine (MPTP)-lesioned monkeys in a time sequence experiment has shown that the increase in bulk iron concentrations follow rather than precede dopaminergic cell death. However, changes in the localised iron concentrations, which may play a more direct role in SN cell death, may not be reflected at the bulk level. Indeed, we have observed iron-rich granules in parkinsonian SNs. From this time sequence study into the iron content of iron-rich granules in the SNs of an untreated control and unilaterally MPTP-lesioned parkinsonian models, we present the following observations: (1) Iron-rich granules are found in both control and parkinsonian SNs and are variable in size and iron content in any one model. (2) These iron-rich granules may be associated with neuromelanin granules found in the SN and are known to accumulate transition metal ions such as iron. (3) The early onset of bulk SN cell loss (35%) was accompanied by a significant elevation of iron in granules found in the MPTP-injected SN compared to the contra-lateral SN. This

  4. Microbial Diversity in Surface Iron-Rich Aqueous Environments: Implications for Seeking Signs of Life on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, I. I.; Allen, C. C.; Tringe, S. G.; Klatt, C. G.; Bryant, D. A.; Sarkisova, S. A.; Garrison, D. H.; McKay, D. S.

    2010-01-01

    The success of selecting future landing sites on Mars to discover extinct and/or extant extraterrestrial life is dependent on the correct approximation of available knowledge about terrestrial paleogeochemistry and life evolution to Martian (paleo) geology and geochemistry. It is well known that both Earth and Mars are Fe rich. This widespread occurrence suggests that Fe may have played a key role in early life forms, where it probably served as a key constituent in early prosthetic moieties in many proteins of ancient microbes on Earth and likely Mars. The second critical idea is the premise that Life on Mars could most likely have developed when Mars experienced tectonic activity [1] which dramatically decreased around 1 bin years after Martian creation. After that Martian life could have gone extinct or hibernated in the deep subsurface, which would be expensive to reach in contrast to the successful work of Martian surface rovers. Here we analyze the diversity of microbes in several terrestrial Fe rich surface environments in conjunction with the phylogeny and molecular timing of emergence of those microbes on Earth. Anticipated results should help evaluate future landing sites on Mars in searches for biosignatures.

  5. Dynamical stability of Fe-H in the Earth's mantle and core regions.

    PubMed

    Isaev, Eyvaz I; Skorodumova, Natalia V; Ahuja, Rajeev; Vekilov, Yuri K; Johansson, Börje

    2007-05-29

    The core extends from the depth of 2,900 km to the center of the Earth and is composed mainly of an iron-rich alloy with nickel, with 10% of the mass comprised of lighter elements like hydrogen, but the exact composition is uncertain. We present a quantum mechanical first-principles study of the dynamical stability of FeH phases and their phonon densities of states at high pressure. Our free-energy calculations reveal a phonon-driven stabilization of dhcp FeH at low pressures, thus resolving the present contradiction between experimental observations and theoretical predictions. Calculations reveal a complex phase diagram for FeH under pressure with a dhcp --> hcp --> fcc sequence of structural transitions.

  6. Dynamical stability of Fe-H in the Earth's mantle and core regions

    PubMed Central

    Isaev, Eyvaz I.; Skorodumova, Natalia V.; Ahuja, Rajeev; Vekilov, Yuri K.; Johansson, Börje

    2007-01-01

    The core extends from the depth of 2,900 km to the center of the Earth and is composed mainly of an iron-rich alloy with nickel, with 10% of the mass comprised of lighter elements like hydrogen, but the exact composition is uncertain. We present a quantum mechanical first-principles study of the dynamical stability of FeH phases and their phonon densities of states at high pressure. Our free-energy calculations reveal a phonon-driven stabilization of dhcp FeH at low pressures, thus resolving the present contradiction between experimental observations and theoretical predictions. Calculations reveal a complex phase diagram for FeH under pressure with a dhcp → hcp → fcc sequence of structural transitions. PMID:17483486

  7. Fighting for physics and Earth science in Florida's high schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottle, Paul

    2009-11-01

    During its Spring 2009 session, the Florida Legislature considered a bill that would have suspended its comprehensive standardized test in high school science and substituted an end-of-course test in biology to satisfy the requirements of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act. By doing so, the bill would have further deemphasized high school physics and Earth science in a state where physics courses are sometimes not available in high schools (even in International Baccalaureate programs) and where the state's own statistics say that only 16% of high school graduates have taken a physics course. A group of about one hundred science faculty from thirteen colleges and universities in Florida responded with a letter to Governor Crist and visits to legislators asking that the biology-only provisions be defeated (and they were). The group has now produced a white paper on high school science requirements that has been distributed to government and business leaders and been publicized via op-ed pieces and news items in several media outlets statewide. This poster will describe the situation in Florida and the faculty group's efforts. It will also compare Florida's high school requirements in science with those in the other SESAPS states.

  8. New High Energy Electron Component of Earth Radiation Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrenko, V. V.; Galper, A. M.; Gratchev, V. M.; Kirillov-Ugryumov, V. G.; Ulin, S. E.; Voronov, S. A.

    The Earth Radiation Belt (ERB) was discovered in the course of the first flights of Russian and American satellites with conventional instruments (gas discharge and scintillation counters), which made it possible to investigate many characteristics of trapped particles and simulate adequate radiation belt models. However, the experimental and theoretical evidence accumulated over recent time, needs more elaborate measurements for its interpretation. These measurements became feasible after the development of devices based on more perfect detectors (solid and gas-filled Cherenkov detectors, magnetic spectrometer, scintillation time-of-flight systems). The evidence requiring new direct measurements in the ERB was obtained in the late 1960s in the course of balloon flights carried out by Cosmophysics Laboratory of the Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute. In these flights a correlation between the high energy electron flux in the upper atmosphere and perturbations ofthe Earth's magnetosphere was established. This phenomenon could be explained assuming there exist high energy electron fluxes in the ERB. High energy electron fluxes in the ERB were recorded for the first time in the direct experiments carried out on board orbital station 'Salyut-6' (orbit altitude - 350 km, inclination 51.6 deg). A scintillation-Cherenkov telescope 'Elena' controlled by cosmonauts was preset to different programmed positions. The measurements were made in the periphery of the ERB, namely, in the part which goes as low as several hundred km in the Brazil Anomaly Region (BRA). The flux of electrons with energies above 30 MeV was up to 104 (m2s sr)-1.

  9. High Resolution Global Electrical Conductivity Variations in the Earth's Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelbert, A.; Sun, J.; Egbert, G. D.

    2013-12-01

    Electrical conductivity of the Earth's mantle is a valuable constraint on the water content and melting processes. In Kelbert et al. (2009), we obtained the first global inverse model of electrical conductivity in the mantle capable of providing constraints on the lateral variations in mantle water content. However, in doing so we had to compromise on the problem complexity by using the historically very primitive ionospheric and magnetospheric source assumptions. In particular, possible model contamination by the auroral current systems had greatly restricted our use of available data. We have now addressed this problem by inverting for the external sources along with the electrical conductivity variations. In this study, we still focus primarily on long period data that are dominated by quasi-zonal source fields. The improved understanding of the ionospheric sources allows us to invert the magnetic fields directly, without a correction for the source and/or the use of transfer functions. It allows us to extend the period range of available data to 1.2 days - 102 days, achieving better sensitivity to the upper mantle and transition zone structures. Finally, once the source effects in the data are accounted for, a much larger subset of observatories may be used in the electrical conductivity inversion. Here, we use full magnetic fields at 207 geomagnetic observatories, which include mid-latitude, equatorial and high latitude data. Observatory hourly means from the years 1958-2010 are employed. The improved quality and spatial distribution of the data set, as well as the high resolution modeling and inversion using degree and order 40 spherical harmonics mapped to a 2x2 degree lateral grid, all contribute to the much improved resolution of our models, representing a conceptual step forward in global electromagnetic sounding. We present a fully three-dimensional, global electrical conductivity model of the Earth's mantle as inferred from ground geomagnetic

  10. Supporting Inquiry-based Earth System Science Instruction with Middle and High School Earth Science Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkel, L.; Varner, R.; Froburg, E.; Smith, M.; Graham, K.; Hale, S.; Laura, G.; Brown, D.; Bryce, J.; Darwish, A.; Furman, T.; Johnson, J.; Porter, W.; von Damm, K.

    2007-12-01

    The Transforming Earth System Science Education (TESSE) project, a partnership between faculty at the University of New Hampshire, Pennsylvania State University, Elizabeth City State University and Dillard University, is designed to enrich the professional development of in-service and pre-service Earth science teachers. One goal of this effort is to help teachers use an inquiry-based approach to teaching Earth system science in their classrooms. As a part of the TESSE project, 42 pre-service and in-service teachers participated in an intensive two-week summer institute at UNH taught by Earth scientists and science educators from TESSE partnership institutions. The institute included instruction about a range of Earth science system topics as well as an introduction to teaching Earth science using an inquiry-based approach. In addition to providing teachers with information about inquiry-based science teaching in the form of sample lesson plans and opportunities to revise traditional lessons and laboratory exercises to make them more inquiry-based, TESSE instructors modeled an inquiry- based approach in their own teaching as much as possible. By the end of the Institute participants had developed lesson plans, units, or year-long course overviews in which they were expected to explain the ways in which they would include an inquiry-based approach in their Earth science teaching over the course of the school year. As a part of the project, graduate fellows (graduate students in the earth sciences) will work with classroom teachers during the academic year to support their implementation of these plans as well as to assist them in developing a more comprehensive inquiry-based approach in the classroom.

  11. High-latitude dust in the Earth system

    Bullard, Joanna E; Baddock, Matthew; Bradwell, Tom; Crusius, John; Darlington, Eleanor; Gaiero, Diego; Gasso, Santiago; Gisladottir, Gudrun; Hodgkins, Richard; McCulloch, Robert; NcKenna Neuman, Cheryl; Mockford, Tom; Stewart, Helena; Thorsteinsson, Throstur

    2016-01-01

    Natural dust is often associated with hot, subtropical deserts, but significant dust events have been reported from cold, high latitudes. This review synthesizes current understanding of high-latitude (≥50°N and ≥40°S) dust source geography and dynamics and provides a prospectus for future research on the topic. Although the fundamental processes controlling aeolian dust emissions in high latitudes are essentially the same as in temperate regions, there are additional processes specific to or enhanced in cold regions. These include low temperatures, humidity, strong winds, permafrost and niveo-aeolian processes all of which can affect the efficiency of dust emission and distribution of sediments. Dust deposition at high latitudes can provide nutrients to the marine system, specifically by contributing iron to high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll oceans; it also affects ice albedo and melt rates. There have been no attempts to quantify systematically the expanse, characteristics, or dynamics of high-latitude dust sources. To address this, we identify and compare the main sources and drivers of dust emissions in the Northern (Alaska, Canada, Greenland, and Iceland) and Southern (Antarctica, New Zealand, and Patagonia) Hemispheres. The scarcity of year-round observations and limitations of satellite remote sensing data at high latitudes are discussed. It is estimated that under contemporary conditions high-latitude sources cover >500,000 km2 and contribute at least 80–100 Tg yr−1 of dust to the Earth system (~5% of the global dust budget); both are projected to increase under future climate change scenarios.

  12. Problem-Based Learning and Earth System Science - The ESSEA High School Earth System Science Online Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, R.; Botti, J.

    2002-12-01

    The high school Earth system science course is web based and designed to meet the professional development needs of science teachers in grades 9-12. Three themes predominate this course: Earth system science (ESS) content, collaborative investigations, and problem-based learning (PBL) methodology. PBL uses real-world contexts for in-depth investigations of a subject matter. Participants predict the potential impacts of the selected event on Earth's spheres and the subsequent feedback and potential interactions that might result. PBL activities start with an ill-structured problem that serves as a springboard to team engagement. These PBL scenarios contain real-world situations. Teams of learners conduct an Earth system science analysis of the event and make recommendations or offer solutions regarding the problem. The course design provides an electronic forum for conversations, debate, development, and application of ideas. Samples of threaded discussions built around ESS thinking in science and PBL pedagogy will be presented.

  13. Problem-Based Learning and Earth System Science - The ESSEA High School Earth System Science Online Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, R. J.; Botti, J. A.

    2001-12-01

    The high school Earth system science course is web based and designed to meet the professional development needs of science teachers in grades 9-12. Three themes predominate this course: Earth system science (ESS) content, collaborative investigations, and problem-based learning (PBL) methodology. PBL uses real-world contexts for in-depth investigations of a subject matter. Participants predict the potential impacts of the selected event on Earth's spheres and the subsequent feedback and potential interactions that might result. PBL activities start with an ill-structured problem that serves as a springboard to team engagement. These PBL scenarios contain real-world situations. Teams of learners conduct an Earth system science analysis of the event and make recommendations or offer solutions regarding the problem. The course design provides an electronic forum for conversations, debate, development, and application of ideas. Samples of threaded discussions built around ESS thinking in science and PBL pedagogy will be presented.

  14. Climatologies at high resolution for the earth's land surface areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karger, Dirk Nikolaus; Conrad, Olaf; Böhner, Jürgen; Kawohl, Tobias; Kreft, Holger; Soria-Auza, Rodrigo Wilber; Zimmermann, Niklaus E.; Linder, H. Peter; Kessler, Michael

    2017-09-01

    High-resolution information on climatic conditions is essential to many applications in environmental and ecological sciences. Here we present the CHELSA (Climatologies at high resolution for the earth's land surface areas) data of downscaled model output temperature and precipitation estimates of the ERA-Interim climatic reanalysis to a high resolution of 30 arc sec. The temperature algorithm is based on statistical downscaling of atmospheric temperatures. The precipitation algorithm incorporates orographic predictors including wind fields, valley exposition, and boundary layer height, with a subsequent bias correction. The resulting data consist of a monthly temperature and precipitation climatology for the years 1979-2013. We compare the data derived from the CHELSA algorithm with other standard gridded products and station data from the Global Historical Climate Network. We compare the performance of the new climatologies in species distribution modelling and show that we can increase the accuracy of species range predictions. We further show that CHELSA climatological data has a similar accuracy as other products for temperature, but that its predictions of precipitation patterns are better.

  15. GPS World, Innovation: Autonomous Navigation at High Earth Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamford, William; Winternitz, Luke; Hay, Curtis

    2005-01-01

    Calculating a spacecraft's precise location at high orbital altitudes-22,000 miles (35,800 km) and beyond-is an important and challenging problem. New and exciting opportunities become possible if satellites are able to autonomously determine their own orbits. First, the repetitive task of periodically collecting range measurements from terrestrial antennas to high altitude spacecraft becomes less important-this lessens competition for control facilities and saves money by reducing operational costs. Also, autonomous navigation at high orbital altitudes introduces the possibility of autonomous station keeping. For example, if a geostationary satellite begins to drift outside of its designated slot it can make orbit adjustments without requiring commands from the ground. Finally, precise onboard orbit determination opens the door to satellites flying in formation-an emerging concept for many scientific space applications. The realization of these benefits is not a trivial task. While the navigation signals broadcast by GPS satellites are well suited for orbit and attitude determination at lower altitudes, acquiring and using these signals at geostationary (GEO) and highly elliptical orbits is much more difficult. The light blue trace describes the GPS orbit at approximately 12,550 miles (20,200 km) altitude. GPS satellites were designed to provide navigation signals to terrestrial users-consequently the antenna array points directly toward the earth. GEO and HE0 orbits, however, are well above the operational GPS constellation, making signal reception at these altitudes more challenging. The nominal beamwidth of a Block II/IIA GPS satellite antenna array is approximately 42.6 degrees. At GEO and HE0 altitudes, most of these primary beam transmissions are blocked by the Earth, leaving only a narrow region of nominal signal visibility near opposing limbs of the earth. This region is highlighted in gray. If GPS receivers at GEO and HE0 orbits were designed to use these

  16. Activities for the Changing Earth System. Earth Systems Education, Middle School and High School Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Research Foundation.

    This book is intended to help teachers fulfill the need for children and future leaders to understand issues of global change and the science that lies behind them. Important changes are occurring in several of the earth's subsystems. The changes are thought to be the result from the expanding use of technology for the improvement of living…

  17. Electron paramagnetic resonance, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersion X-ray spectrometry, X-ray powder diffraction, and NMR characterization of iron-rich fired clays.

    PubMed

    Presciutti, Federica; Capitani, Donatella; Sgamellotti, Antonio; Brunetti, Brunetto Giovanni; Costantino, Ferdinando; Viel, Stéphane; Segre, Annalaura

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify the structure of an iron-rich clay and the structural changes involved in the firing process as a preliminary step to get information on ancient ceramic technology. To this purpose, illite-rich clay samples fired at different temperatures were characterized using a multitechnique approach, i.e., by electron paramagnetic resonance, scanning electron microscopy with electron dispersion X-ray spectrometry, X-ray powder diffraction, magic angle spinning and multiple quantum magic angle spinning NMR. During firing, four main reaction processes occur: dehydration, dehydroxylation, structural breakdown, and recrystallization. When the results are combined from all characterization methods, the following conclusions could be obtained. Interlayer H2O is located close to aluminum in octahedral sites and is driven off at temperatures lower than 600 degrees C. Between 600 and 700 degrees C dehydroxylation occurs whereas, between 800 and 900 degrees C, the aluminum in octahedral sites disappears, due to the breakdown of the illite structure, and all iron present is oxidized to Fe3+. In samples fired at 1000 and 1100 degrees C iron clustering was observed as well as large single crystals of iron with the occurrence of ferro- or ferrimagnetic effects. Below 900 degrees C the aluminum in octahedral sites presents a continuous distribution of chemical shift, suggesting the presence of slightly distorted sites. Finally, over the whole temperature range, the presence of at least two tetrahedral aluminum sites was revealed, characterized by different values of the quadrupolar coupling constant.

  18. Most Amazing High Definition Image of Earth - Blue Marble 2012

    2017-12-08

    January 25, 2012 *Updated February 2, 2012: According to Flickr, "The western hemisphere Blue Marble 2012 image has rocketed up to over 3.1 million views making it one of the all time most viewed images on the site after only one week." A 'Blue Marble' image of the Earth taken from the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA's most recently launched Earth-observing satellite - Suomi NPP. This composite image uses a number of swaths of the Earth's surface taken on January 4, 2012. The NPP satellite was renamed 'Suomi NPP' on January 24, 2012 to honor the late Verner E. Suomi of the University of Wisconsin. Suomi NPP is NASA's next Earth-observing research satellite. It is the first of a new generation of satellites that will observe many facets of our changing Earth. Suomi NPP is carrying five instruments on board. The biggest and most important instrument is The Visible/Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite or VIIRS. To read more about NASA's Suomi NPP go to: www.nasa.gov/npp Credit: NASA/NOAA/GSFC/Suomi NPP/VIIRS/Norman Kuring NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  19. Virginia Earth Science Collaborative: Developing Highly Qualified Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cothron, J.

    2007-12-01

    A collaborative of nine institutes of higher education and non-profits and seventy-one school divisions developed and implemented courses that will enable teachers to acquire an Add-On Earth Science endorsement and to improve their skills in teaching Earth Science. For the Earth Science Endorsement, the five courses and associated credits are Physical Geology (4), Geology of Virginia (4), Oceanography (4), Astronomy (3) and Meteorology (3). The courses include rigorous academic content, research-based instructional strategies, laboratory experiences, and intense field experiences. In addition, courses were offered on integrating new technologies into the earth sciences, developing virtual field trips, and teaching special education students. To date, 39 courses have been offered statewide, with over 560 teachers participating. Teachers showed increased conceptual understanding of earth science topics as measured by pre-post tests. Other outcomes include a project website, a collaborative of over 60 IHE and K-12 educators, pilot instruments, and a statewide committee focused on policy in the earth sciences.

  20. Tidal evolution of the Moon from a high-obliquity, high-angular-momentum Earth.

    PubMed

    Ćuk, Matija; Hamilton, Douglas P; Lock, Simon J; Stewart, Sarah T

    2016-11-17

    In the giant-impact hypothesis for lunar origin, the Moon accreted from an equatorial circum-terrestrial disk; however, the current lunar orbital inclination of five degrees requires a subsequent dynamical process that is still unclear. In addition, the giant-impact theory has been challenged by the Moon's unexpectedly Earth-like isotopic composition. Here we show that tidal dissipation due to lunar obliquity was an important effect during the Moon's tidal evolution, and the lunar inclination in the past must have been very large, defying theoretical explanations. We present a tidal evolution model starting with the Moon in an equatorial orbit around an initially fast-spinning, high-obliquity Earth, which is a probable outcome of giant impacts. Using numerical modelling, we show that the solar perturbations on the Moon's orbit naturally induce a large lunar inclination and remove angular momentum from the Earth-Moon system. Our tidal evolution model supports recent high-angular-momentum, giant-impact scenarios to explain the Moon's isotopic composition and provides a new pathway to reach Earth's climatically favourable low obliquity.

  1. Rare earth chalcogenide Ce3Te4 as high efficiency high temperature thermoelectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaochun; Yang, Ronggui; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Peihong; Xue, Yu

    2011-05-01

    The electronic band structures of Ce3Te4 have been studied using the first-principles density-functional theory calculations. It is found that the density of states of Ce3Te4 has a very high delta-shaped peak appearing 0.21 eV above the Fermi level, which mainly comes from the f orbital electrons of the rare-earth element Ce. Using the simple theory proposed by Mahan and Sofo, [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 93, 7436 (1996)], we obtain an ideal value of zT=13.5 for Ce3Te4 at T=1200 K, suggesting that the rare-earth chalcogenide Ce3Te4 could be a promising high efficiency high temperature thermoelectric material.

  2. High Frequency Variations in Earth Orientation Derived From GNSS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, R.; Englich, S.; Snajdrova, K.; Boehm, J.

    2006-12-01

    Current observations gained by the space geodetic techniques, especially VLBI, GPS and SLR, allow for the determination of Earth Orientation Parameters (EOPs - polar motion, UT1/LOD, nutation offsets) with unprecedented accuracy and temporal resolution. This presentation focuses on contributions to the EOP recovery provided by satellite navigation systems (primarily GPS). The IGS (International GNSS Service), for example, currently provides daily polar motion with an accuracy of less than 0.1mas and LOD estimates with an accuracy of a few microseconds. To study more rapid variations in polar motion and LOD we established in a first step a high resolution (hourly resolution) ERP-time series from GPS observation data of the IGS network covering the period from begin of 2005 till March 2006. The calculations were carried out by means of the Bernese GPS Software V5.0 considering observations from a subset of 79 fairly stable stations out of the IGb00 reference frame sites. From these ERP time series the amplitudes of the major diurnal and semidiurnal variations caused by ocean tides are estimated. After correcting the series for ocean tides the remaining geodetic observed excitation is compared with variations of atmospheric excitation (AAM). To study the sensitivity of the estimates with respect to the applied mapping function we applied both the widely used NMF (Niell Mapping Function) and the VMF1 (Vienna Mapping Function 1). In addition, based on computations covering two months in 2005, the potential improvement due to the use of additional GLONASS data will be discussed. Finally, satellite techniques are also able to provide nutation offset rates with respect to the most recent nutation model. Based on GPS observations from 2005 we established nutation rate time series and subsequently derived the amplitudes of several nutation waves with periods less than 30 days. The results are compared to VLBI estimates processed by means of the OCCAM 6.1 software.

  3. Minerals Masquerading As Enzymes: Abiotic Oxidation Of Soil Organic Matter In An Iron-Rich Humid Tropical Forest Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, S. J.; Silver, W. L.

    2010-12-01

    Oxidative reactions play an important role in decomposing soil organic matter fractions that resist hydrolytic degradation, and fundamentally affect the cycling of recalcitrant soil carbon across ecosystems. Microbial extracellular oxidative enzymes (e.g. lignin peroxidases and laccases) have been assumed to provide a dominant role in catalyzing soil organic matter oxidation, while other potential oxidative mechanisms remain poorly explored. Here, we show that abiotic reactions mediated by the oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) could explain high potential oxidation rates in humid tropical forest soils, which often contain high concentrations of Fe(II) and experience rapid redox fluctuations between anaerobic and aerobic conditions. These abiotic reactions could provide an additional mechanism to explain high rates of decomposition in these ecosystems, despite frequent oxygen deficits. We sampled humid tropical forest soils in Puerto Rico, USA from various topographic positions, ranging from well-drained ridges to riparian valleys that experience broad fluctuations in redox potential. We measured oxidative activity by adding the model humic compound L-DOPA to soil slurries, followed by colorimetric measurements of the supernatant solution over time. Dilute hydrogen peroxide was added to a subset of slurries to measure peroxidative activity. We found that oxidative and peroxidative activity correlated positively with soil Fe(II) concentrations, counter to prevailing theory that low redox potential should suppress oxidative enzymes. Boiling or autoclaving sub-samples of soil slurries to denature any enzymes present typically increased peroxidative activity and did not eliminate oxidative activity, further suggesting the importance of an abiotic mechanism. We found substantial differences in the oxidation products of the L-DOPA substrate generated by our soil slurries in comparison with oxidation products generated by a purified enzyme (mushroom tyrosinase

  4. Thermophilic bacterial communities inhabiting the microbial mats of "indifferent" and chalybeate (iron-rich) thermal springs: Diversity and biotechnological analysis.

    PubMed

    Selvarajan, Ramganesh; Sibanda, Timothy; Tekere, Memory

    2018-04-01

    Microbial mats are occasionally reported in thermal springs and information on such mats is very scarce. In this study, microbial mats were collected from two hot springs (Brandvlei (BV) and Calitzdorp (CA)), South Africa and subjected to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and targeted 16S rRNA gene amplicon analysis using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS). Spring water temperature was 55°C for Brandvlei and 58°C for Calitzdorp while the pH of both springs was slightly acidic, with an almost identical pH range (6.2-6.3). NGS analysis resulted in a total of 4943 reads, 517 and 736 OTUs for BV and CA at, respectively, a combined total of 14 different phyla in both samples, 88 genera in CA compared to 45 in BV and 37.64% unclassified sequences in CA compared to 27.32% recorded in BV. Dominant bacterial genera in CA microbial mat were Proteobacteria (29.19%), Bacteroidetes (9.41%), Firmicutes (9.01%), Cyanobacteria (6.89%), Actinobacteria (2.65%), Deinococcus-Thermus (2.57%), and Planctomycetes (1.94%) while the BV microbial mat was dominated by Bacteroidetes (47.3%), Deinococcus-Thermus (12.35%), Proteobacteria (7.98%), and Planctomycetes (2.97%). Scanning electron microscopy results showed the presence of microbial filaments possibly resembling cyanobacteria, coccids, rod-shaped bacteria and diatoms in both microbial mats. Dominant genera that were detected in this study have been linked to different biotechnological applications including hydrocarbon degradation, glycerol fermentation, anoxic-fermentation, dehalogenation, and biomining processes. Overall, the results of this study exhibited thermophilic bacterial community structures with high diversity in microbial mats, which have a potential for biotechnological exploitation. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Alteration of the Copper-Binding Capacity of Iron-Rich Humic Colloids during Transport from Peatland to Marine Waters.

    PubMed

    Muller, François L L; Cuscov, Marco

    2017-03-21

    Blanket bogs contain vast amounts of Sphagnum-derived organic substances which can act as powerful chelators for dissolved iron and thus enhance its export to the coastal ocean. To investigate the variations in quantity and quality of these exports, adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV) was used to characterize the metal binding properties of molecular weight-fractionated dissolved organic matter (MW-fractionated DOM) in the catchment and coastal plume of a small peat-draining river over a seasonal cycle. Within the plume, both iron- and copper-binding organic ligands showed a linear, conservative distribution with increasing salinity, illustrating the high stability of peatland-derived humic substances (HS). Within the catchment, humic colloids lost up to 50% of their copper-binding capacity, expressed as a molar ratio to organic carbon, after residing for 1 week or more in the main reservoir of the catchment. Immediately downstream of the reservoir, the molar ratio [L 2 ]/[C org ], where L 2 was the second strongest copper-binding ligand, was 0.75 × 10 -4 when the reservoir residence time was 5 h but 0.34 × 10 -4 when it was 25 days. Residence time did not affect the carbon specific iron-binding capacity of the humic substances which was [L]/[C org ] = (0.80 ± 0.20) × 10 -2 . Our results suggest that the loss of copper-binding capacity with increasing residence time is caused by intracolloidal interactions between iron and HS during transit from peat soil to river mouth.

  6. Phosphorus losses from agricultural land to natural waters are reduced by immobilization in iron-rich sediments of drainage ditches.

    PubMed

    Baken, Stijn; Verbeeck, Mieke; Verheyen, Dries; Diels, Jan; Smolders, Erik

    2015-03-15

    Redox reactions involving iron (Fe) strongly affect the mobility of phosphorus (P) and its migration from agricultural land to freshwater. We studied the transfer of P from groundwater to open drainage ditches in an area where, due to Fe(II) rich groundwater, the sediments of these ditches contain accumulated Fe oxyhydroxides. The average P concentrations in the groundwater feeding two out of three studied drainage ditches exceeded environmental limits for freshwaters by factors 11 and 16, but after passing through the Fe-rich sediments, the P concentrations in the ditch water were below these limits. In order to identify the processes which govern Fe and P mobility in these systems, we used diffusive equilibration in thin films (DET) to measure the vertical concentration profiles of P and Fe in the sediment pore water and in the ditchwater. The Fe concentrations in the sediment pore water ranged between 10 and 200 mg L(-1) and exceeded those in the inflowing groundwater by approximately one order of magnitude, due to reductive dissolution of Fe oxyhydroxides in the sediment. The dissolved P concentrations only marginally increased between groundwater and sediment pore water. In the poorly mixed ditchwater, the dissolved Fe concentrations decreased towards the water surface due to oxidative precipitation of fresh Fe oxyhydroxides, and the P concentrations decreased more sharply than those of Fe. These observations support the view that the dynamics of Fe and P are governed by reduction reactions in the sediment and by oxidation reactions in the ditchwater. In the sediment, reductive dissolution of P-containing Fe oxyhydroxides causes more efficient solubilization of Fe than of P, likely because P is buffered by adsorption on residual Fe oxyhydroxides. Conversely, in the ditchwater, oxidative precipitation causes more efficient immobilization of P than of Fe, due to ferric phosphate formation. The combination of these processes yields a natural and highly

  7. Petrology of iron-rich magmatic segregations associated with strongly peraluminous trondhjemite in the Cornucopia stock, northeastern Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K.; Barnes, C. G.; Browning, J. M.; Karlsson, H. R.

    The Middle Cretaceous Cornucopia stock in the Blue Mountains of northeastern Oregon is a small composite intrusion consisting of hornblende biotite tonalite, biotite trondhjemite, and three cordierite two mica trondhjemite units. Unusual magnetite + biotite-rich tonalitic rocks are associated with the Crater Lake cordierite trondhjemite, the youngest of the intrusions. Oxide-rich tonalites are characterized by high Fe ( 47-68 wt% total Fe as FeO), low SiO2 (<36 wt%), and enrichments in HFSE and REE (La(N)=361-903). Oxide-rich tonalites appear in a variety of forms, including composite dikes and sheets, in which they are associated with leucocratic tonalite. Leucotonalite is lower in SiO2 (60-72 wt%) than Crater Lake trondhjemite, and generally has ΣREE contents and Eu anomalies intermediate between the oxide-rich tonalite and Crater Lake compositions. Oxide-rich tonalites crosscut, and are crosscut by, shear zones in the host trondhjemite, indicating their emplacement late in the pluton's crystallization history. Granitic dikes crosscut the composite dikes in all localities. Geochemical considerations and sedimentary-like structures, such as load casts and bedding of magnetite-rich assemblages in the composite dikes and sheets, are suggestive of crystal settling from an Fe-rich parental magma. The Fe-rich liquid parental to the oxide-rich tonalite-leucotonalite pairs formed by extensive, in-situ, plagioclase + quartz-dominated crystallization of strongly peraluminous trondhjemite. Early magnetite saturation in the trondhjemite was suppressed, either because the parental trondhjemitic magma had a lower initial total Fe content or because it had a lower ferric-ferrous ratio, possibly reflecting a lower oxygen fugacity. Accumulation of magnetite from Fe-rich residual magma is a viable mechanism for the concentration of iron, and the subsequent formation of Fe-rich rocks, in calcic siliceous intrusions. Apparently, Fe-enrichment can occur locally in calcic magmas, and

  8. Petrology of iron-rich magmatic segregations associated with strongly peraluminous trondhjemite in the Cornucopia stock, northeastern Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K.; Barnes, C. G.; Browning, J. M.; Karlsson, H. R.

    2001-11-01

    The Middle Cretaceous Cornucopia stock in the Blue Mountains of northeastern Oregon is a small composite intrusion consisting of hornblende biotite tonalite, biotite trondhjemite, and three cordierite two mica trondhjemite units. Unusual magnetite + biotite-rich tonalitic rocks are associated with the Crater Lake cordierite trondhjemite, the youngest of the intrusions. Oxide-rich tonalites are characterized by high Fe ( 47-68 wt% total Fe as FeO), low SiO2 (<36 wt%), and enrichments in HFSE and REE (La(N)=361-903). Oxide-rich tonalites appear in a variety of forms, including composite dikes and sheets, in which they are associated with leucocratic tonalite. Leucotonalite is lower in SiO2 (60-72 wt%) than Crater Lake trondhjemite, and generally has ΣREE contents and Eu anomalies intermediate between the oxide-rich tonalite and Crater Lake compositions. Oxide-rich tonalites crosscut, and are crosscut by, shear zones in the host trondhjemite, indicating their emplacement late in the pluton's crystallization history. Granitic dikes crosscut the composite dikes in all localities. Geochemical considerations and sedimentary-like structures, such as load casts and bedding of magnetite-rich assemblages in the composite dikes and sheets, are suggestive of crystal settling from an Fe-rich parental magma. The Fe-rich liquid parental to the oxide-rich tonalite-leucotonalite pairs formed by extensive, in-situ, plagioclase + quartz-dominated crystallization of strongly peraluminous trondhjemite. Early magnetite saturation in the trondhjemite was suppressed, either because the parental trondhjemitic magma had a lower initial total Fe content or because it had a lower ferric-ferrous ratio, possibly reflecting a lower oxygen fugacity. Accumulation of magnetite from Fe-rich residual magma is a viable mechanism for the concentration of iron, and the subsequent formation of Fe-rich rocks, in calcic siliceous intrusions. Apparently, Fe-enrichment can occur locally in calcic magmas, and

  9. Examining the Features of Earth Science Logical Reasoning and Authentic Scientific Inquiry Demonstrated in a High School Earth Science Curriculum: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Do-Yong; Park, Mira

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the inquiry features demonstrated in the inquiry tasks of a high school Earth Science curriculum. One of the most widely used curricula, Holt Earth Science, was chosen for this case study to examine how Earth Science logical reasoning and authentic scientific inquiry were related to one another and how…

  10. Deep-Earth Equilibration between Molten Iron and Solid Silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, M.; Zurkowski, C. C.; Chidester, B.; Campbell, A.

    2017-12-01

    Elemental partitioning between iron-rich metals and silicate minerals influences the properties of Earth's deep interior, and is ultimately responsible for the nature of the core-mantle boundary. These interactions between molten iron and solid silicates were influential during planetary accretion, and persist today between the mantle and liquid outer core. Here we report the results of diamond anvil cell experiments at lower mantle conditions (40 GPa, >2500 K) aimed at examining systems containing a mixture of metals (iron or Fe-16Si alloy) and silicates (peridotite). The experiments were conducted at pressure-temperature conditions above the metallic liquidus but below the silicate solidus, and the recovered samples were analyzed by FIB/SEM with EDS to record the compositions of the coexisting phases. Each sample formed a three-phase equilibrium between bridgmanite, Fe-rich metallic melt, and an oxide. In one experiment, using pure Fe, the quenched metal contained 6 weight percent O, and the coexisting oxide was ferropericlase. The second experiment, using Fe-Si alloy, was highly reducing; its metal contained 10 wt% Si, and the coexisting mineral was stishovite. The distinct mineralogies of the two experiments derived from their different starting metals. These results imply that metallic composition is an important factor in determining the products of mixed phase iron-silicate reactions. The properties of deep-Earth interfaces such as the core-mantle boundary could be strongly affected by their metallic components.

  11. Gamma rays made on Earth have unexpectedly high energies

    SciT

    Miller, Johanna

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are the source of the highest-energy nonanthropogenic photons produced on Earth. Associated with thunder-storms - and in fact, with individual lightning discharges - they are presumed to be the bremsstrahlung produced when relativistic electrons, accelerated by the storms' strong electric fields, collide with air molecules some 10-20 km above sea level. The TGFs last up to a few milliseconds and contain photons with energies on the order of MeV.

  12. High School Symposium for Earth Systems Education (Columbus, Ohio, October 1994). Proceedings and Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortner, Rosanne W., Ed.; Mayer, Victor J., Ed.

    This volume contains the proceedings and summary for the Earth Systems Education high school symposium conducted in October, 1994. Selected participants were invited to contribute papers for inclusion in this volume so that other teachers can see how Earth Systems Education (ESE) looks in practice. The volume also contains the context for ESE in…

  13. Alkaline Earth Core Level Photoemission Spectroscopy of High-Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines photoemission measurements of the alkaline Earth core levels of high-temperature superconductors and related materials, models that seek to explain the large negative shifts observed relative to the corresponding alkaline Earth metals, and the effect of lattice site disorder on the core level spectra and the presence or absence of intrinsic surface peaks.

  14. The Treatment of Geological Time & the History of Life on Earth in High School Biology Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, Gerald; Decker, Todd; Barrow, Lloyd

    2007-01-01

    In spite of the importance of geological time in evolutionary biology, misconceptions about historical events in the history of life on Earth are common. Glenn (1990) has documented a decline from 1960 to 1989 in the amount of space devoted to the history of life in high school earth science textbooks, but we are aware of no similar study in…

  15. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-11 - HIGH APOGEE - EARTH SKY

    1966-09-14

    S66-54530 --- Libyan Desert area of Sudan, foreground, and the United Arab Republic (Egypt), at lower left, as seen from the orbiting Gemini-11 spacecraft at an altitude of 300 nautical miles during its 27th revolution of Earth. In view is the Nile River from Biba in Egypt to Khartoum in the Sudan. The Red Sea is in the background. At upper left is the Arabian Peninsula. At top right is Ethiopia. Note L-band antenna of the Agena Target Vehicle. Taken with a modified 70mm Hasselblad camera, using Eastman Kodak, Ektachrome, MS (S.O. 368) color film. Photo credit: NASA

  16. Surveillance of medium and high Earth orbits using large baseline stereovision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danescu, Radu; Ciurte, Anca; Oniga, Florin; Cristea, Octavian; Dolea, Paul; Dascal, Vlad; Turcu, Vlad; Mircea, Liviu; Moldovan, Dan

    2014-11-01

    The Earth is surrounded by a swarm of satellites and associated debris known as Resident Space Objects (RSOs). All RSOs will orbit the Earth until they reentry into Earth's atmosphere. There are three main RSO categories: Low Earth Orbit (LEO), when the satellite orbits at an altitude below 1 500 km; a Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) for Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) at an altitude of around 20 000 km, and a Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) (also sometimes called the Clarke orbit), for geostationary satellites, at an altitude of 36 000 km. The Geostationary Earth Orbits and the orbits of higher altitude are also known as High Earth Orbits (HEO). Crucial for keeping an eye on RSOs, the Surveillance of Space (SofS) comprises detection, tracking, propagation of orbital parameters, cataloguing and analysis of these objects. This paper presents a large baseline stereovision based approach for detection and ranging of RSO orbiting at medium to high altitudes. Two identical observation systems, consisting of camera, telescope, control computer and GPS receiver are located 37 km apart, and set to observe the same region of the sky. The telescopes are placed on equatorial mounts able to compensate for the Earth's rotation, so that the stars appear stationary in the acquired images, and the satellites will appear as linear streaks. The two cameras are triggered simultaneously. The satellite streaks are detected in each image of the stereo pair using its streak-like appearance against point-like stars, the motion of the streaks between successive frames, and the stereo disparity. The detected satellite pixels are then put into correspondence using the epipolar geometry, and the 3D position of the satellite in the Earth Center, Earth Fixed (ECEF) reference frame is computed using stereo triangulation. Preliminary tests have been performed, for both MEO and HEO orbits. The preliminary results indicate a very high detection rate for MEO orbits, and good detection rate for

  17. P/M Processing of Rare Earth Modified High Strength Steels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    AA094 165 TRW INC CLEVELAND OH MATERIALS TECHNOLOGY F 6 P/N PROCESSING OF RARE EARTH MODIFIED HIGH STRENGTH STEELS DEC So A A SHEXM(ER NOOŕT76-C...LEVEL’ (7 PIM PROCESSING OF RARE EARTH MODIFIED HIGH STRENGTH STEELS By A. A. SHEINKER 00 TECHNICAL REPORT Prepared for Office of Naval Research...Processing of Rare Earth Modified High 1 Technical -’ 3t eC"Strength Steels * 1dc4,093Se~ 9PEFRIGOGNZTONAEADADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK

  18. Large-Amplitude High-Frequency Waves at Earth's Magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, D. B.; Vaivads, A.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; André, M.; Le Contel, O.; Malaspina, D. M.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Wilder, F. D.; Ergun, R. E.; Gershman, D. J.; Giles, B. L.; Magnes, W.; Russell, C. T.; Burch, J. L.; Torbert, R. B.

    2018-04-01

    Large-amplitude waves near the electron plasma frequency are found by the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission near Earth's magnetopause. The waves are identified as Langmuir and upper hybrid (UH) waves, with wave vectors either close to parallel or close to perpendicular to the background magnetic field. The waves are found all along the magnetopause equatorial plane, including both flanks and close to the subsolar point. The waves reach very large amplitudes, up to 1 V m-1, and are thus among the most intense electric fields observed at Earth's magnetopause. In the magnetosphere and on the magnetospheric side of the magnetopause the waves are predominantly UH waves although Langmuir waves are also found. When the plasma is very weakly magnetized only Langmuir waves are likely to be found. Both Langmuir and UH waves are shown to have electromagnetic components, which are consistent with predictions from kinetic wave theory. These results show that the magnetopause and magnetosphere are often unstable to intense wave activity near the electron plasma frequency. These waves provide a possible source of radio emission at the magnetopause.

  19. Juno JEDI high latitude snapshot of Earth's energetic charged particle distributions during the coordinated Juno spacecraft encounter with Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranicas, C.; Mauk, B.; Haggerty, D. K.; Schlemm, C.; Jaskulek, S.; Kim, C.; Brown, L. E.; Bagenal, F.; Thorne, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    NASA's Juno spacecraft will begin its orbit of Jupiter in mid-2016. During Juno's gravity assist encounter with Earth on October 9, 2013, the Jupiter Energetic Particle Detector Instrument (JEDI) will take measurements of the energetic electron and ion distributions at relatively high latitudes. These measurements will contribute substantially to a coordinated activity to obtain a comprehensive characterization of Earth's space environment during the encounter period. Here we present and describe the JEDI measurements and discuss them in the context of measurements taken at the same time, including those obtained by the Van Allen Probes mission. JEDI comprises three nearly identical energetic charged particle sensors. Each sensor detects energetic electrons (above 25 keV up to > 1000 keV) and energetic ions (about 20 keV to > 1 MeV for protons, and 50 keV to > 10 MeV for oxygen and sulfur) with high energy, time, and angular resolution. Two of the sensors are fans viewing almost entirely in the plane perpendicular to Juno's high-gain antenna. The third fan is perpendicular to this plane, so that combined with the spacecraft spin rate of about 2 rpm, nearly the whole sky is sampled every 30 s. During the gravitational assist encounter of Earth, JEDI obtains continuous data from about 3 days prior to closest approach through at least 2 weeks after closest approach. This will include data obtained outside and through the bow shock and magnetosheath, to deep within the magnetosphere. Due to the low flyby altitude of about 560 km, JEDI will operate its high voltage (thereby obtaining ion composition information) only outside of a few RE geocentric distances. Also, by using the so-called witness detectors, on one of the three sensors, the instrument is expected to obtain an integral channel measurement inside the radiation belts.

  20. What to do when the Universities reject High School Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Norden, W.

    2011-12-01

    It is hard to imagine a state of the union more affected by Earth processes than the state of California. However, the University of California actively discourages High School students from taking Earth Science courses. For admission into the University of California students are required to take at least 2 years of courses that offer a fundamental knowledge in at least two of these three foundational subjects: biology, chemistry, and physics. Earth Science courses simply don't qualify as laboratory science courses. The UC Admissions will sometimes make an exception for an Earth Science course only if it is shown to contain a large component of biology, chemistry and physics topics. Since students don't get credit for admission for taking Earth Science, High Schools are quick to drop Earth Science courses for their college-bound students. A group of teachers and University professors have been working to reverse this policy by creating a rigorous capstone Earth Science course that clearly merits laboratory status. Getting this course accepted by the University of California is well on its way, but getting the course into the High Schools will take a lot of work and probably some extra funding.

  1. Treatment of Selected Concepts of Organic Evolution and the History of Life on Earth in Three Series of High School Earth Science Textbooks, 1960-1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, William H.

    1990-01-01

    Examined is the extent to which trends found in high school biology textbooks are also found in earth science texts. Procedures, book lists, and summaries are presented. It is recommended that more emphasis be placed on the theory of evolution in future editions of earth science textbooks. (CW)

  2. Manifestations of the rotation and gravity of the Earth in high-energy physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obukhov, Yuri N.; Silenko, Alexander J.; Teryaev, Oleg V.

    2016-08-01

    The inertial (due to rotation) and gravitational fields of the Earth affect the motion of an elementary particle and its spin dynamics. This influence is not negligible and should be taken into account in high-energy physics experiments. Earth's influence is manifest in perturbations in the particle motion, in an additional precession of the spin, and in a change of the constitutive tensor of the Maxwell electrodynamics. Bigger corrections are oscillatory, and their contributions average to zero. Other corrections due to the inhomogeneity of the inertial field are not oscillatory but they are very small and may be important only for the storage ring electric dipole moment experiments. Earth's gravity causes the Newton-like force, the reaction force provided by a focusing system, and additional torques acting on the spin. However, there are no observable indications of the electromagnetic effects due to Earth's gravity.

  3. High Pressure Earth Storable Rocket Technology Program: Basic Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chazen, M. L.; Sicher, D.; Huang, D.; Mueller, T.

    1995-01-01

    The HIPES Program was conducted for NASA-LeRC by TRW. The Basic Program consisted of system studies, design of testbed engine, fabrication and testing of engine. Studies of both pressure-fed and pump-fed systems were investigated for N2O4 and both MMH and N2H4 fuels with the result that N2H4 provides the maximum payload for all satellites over MMH. The higher pressure engine offers improved performance with smaller envelope and associated weight savings. Pump-fed systems offer maximum payload for large and medium weight satellites while pressure-fed systems offer maximum payload for small light weight satellites. The major benefits of HIPES are high performance within a confined length maximizing payload for lightsats which are length (volume) constrained. Three types of thrust chambers were evaluated -- Copper heatsink at 400, 500 and 600 psia chamber pressures for performance/thermal; water cooled to determine heat absorbed to predict rhenium engine operation; and rhenium to validate the concept. The HIPES engine demonstrated very high performance at 50 lbf thrust (epsilon = 150) and Pc = 500 psia with both fuels: Isp = 337 sec using N2O4-N2H4 and ISP = 327.5 sec using N2O4-MMH indicating combustion efficiencies greater than 98%. A powder metallurgy rhenium engine demonstrated operation with high performance at Pc = 500 psia which indicated the viability of the concept.

  4. Role of light satellites in the high-resolution Earth observation domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Moshe

    1999-12-01

    Current 'classic' applications using and exploring space based earth imagery are exclusive, narrow niche tailored, expensive and hardly accessible. On the other side new, inexpensive and widely used 'consumable' applications will be only developed concurrently to the availability of appropriate imagery allowing that process. A part of these applications can be imagined today, like WWW based 'virtual tourism' or news media, but the history of technological, cultural and entertainment evolution teaches us that most of future applications are unpredictable -- they emerge together with the platforms enabling their appearance. The only thing, which can be ultimately stated, is that the definitive condition for such applications is the availability of the proper imagery platform providing low cost, high resolution, large area, quick response, simple accessibility and quick dissemination of the raw picture. This platform is a constellation of Earth Observation satellites. Up to 1995 the Space Based High Resolution Earth Observation Domain was dominated by heavy, super-expensive and very inflexible birds. The launch of Israeli OFEQ-3 Satellite by MBT Division of Israel Aircraft Industries (IAI) marked the entrance to new era of light, smart and cheap Low Earth Orbited Imaging satellites. The Earth Resource Observation System (EROS) initiated by West Indian Space, is based on OFEQ class Satellites design and it is capable to gather visual data of Earth Surface both at high resolution and large image capacity. The main attributes, derived from its compact design, low weight and sophisticated logic and which convert the EROS Satellite to valuable and productive system, are discussed. The major advantages of Light Satellites in High Resolution Earth Observation Domain are presented and WIS guidelines featuring the next generation of LEO Imaging Systems are included.

  5. An accelerating high-latitude jet in Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, C. C.; Livermore, P. W.; Hollerbach, R.

    2016-12-01

    The structure of the core-generated magnetic field, and how it changes in time (its secular variation or SV), supplies an invaluable constraint on the dynamics of the outer core. At high latitude, previous studies have noted distinctive behaviour of secular change, in particular suggesting a polar vortex tied to the dynamics within the tangent cylinder region. Recent high-resolution observational models that include data from the Swarm satellites have refined the structure of observed SV, to a rapidly changing circular daisy-chain configuration centred on the north geographic pole, on or very close to the tangent cylinder itself. Motivated by theoretical considerations of the likely dynamical regime of the core, we demonstrate that this feature can be explained by a localised westwards cylindrical jet of 420 km width centred the tangent cylinder, whose amplitude appears to have increased in strength by a factor of three over the period 2000-2016 to about 40 km/yr. The current accelerating phase may be a short fragment of decadal fluctuations of the jet strength linked to both torsional wave activity and the rotation direction of the inner core.

  6. Hyperresolution: an hyperspectral and high resolution imager for Earth observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vidi, R.; Chiarantini, L.; Bini, A.

    2017-11-01

    Hyperspectral space imagery is an emerging technology that supports many scientific, civil, security and defence operational applications. The main advantage of this remote sensing technique is that it allows the so-called Feature Extraction: in fact the spectral signature allows the recognition of the materials composing the scene. Hyperspectral Products and their applications have been investigated in the past years by Galileo Avionica to direct the instrument characteristics design. Sample products have been identified in the civil / environment monitoring fields (such as coastal monitoring, vegetation, hot spot and urban classification) and in defense / security applications: their performances have been verified by means of airborne flight campaigns. The Hyperspectral and High Resolution Imager is a space-borne instrument that implement a pushbroom technique to get strip spectral images over the Hyperspectral VNIR and SWIR bands, with a ground sample distance at nadir of 20m in a 20 km wide ground swath, with 200 spectral channels, realizing an average spectral resolution of 10nm. The High Resolution Panchromatic Channel insists in the same swath to allow for multiresolution data fusion of hyperspectral imagery.

  7. Attainment of Selected Earth Science Concepts by Texas High School Seniors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollins, Mavis M.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Attainment of five earth science concepts by high school seniors depended on the amount of previous science coursework by the students and on the size of their school's enrollment. Seniors in Texas high schools were subjects of the study. (Author/PP)

  8. High Pressure Phase Transformations in Heavy Rare Earth Metals and Connections to Actinide Crystal Structures

    SciT

    Vohra, Yogesh K.; Sangala, Bagvanth Reddy; Stemshorn, Andrew K.

    2008-07-01

    High-pressure studies have been performed on heavy rare earth metals Terbium (Tb) to 155 GPa and Holmium (Ho) to 134 GPa in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature. The following crystal structure sequence was observed in both metals hcp {yields} Sm-type {yields} dhcp {yields} distorted fcc (hR-24) {yields} monoclinic (C2/m) with increasing pressure. The last transformation to a low symmetry monoclinic phase is accompanied by a volume collapse of 5 % for Tb at 51 GPa and a volume collapse of 3 % for Ho at 103 GPa. This volume collapse under high pressure is reminiscent of f-shell delocalizationmore » in light rare earth metal Cerium (Ce), Praseodymium (Pr), and heavy actinide metals Americium (Am) and Curium (Cm). The orthorhombic Pnma phase that has been reported in Am and Cm after f-shell delocalization is not observed in heavy rare earth metals under high pressures. (authors)« less

  9. Recent changes of the Earth's core derived from satellite observations of magnetic and gravity fields.

    PubMed

    Mandea, Mioara; Panet, Isabelle; Lesur, Vincent; de Viron, Olivier; Diament, Michel; Le Mouël, Jean-Louis

    2012-11-20

    To understand the dynamics of the Earth's fluid, iron-rich outer core, only indirect observations are available. The Earth's magnetic field, originating mainly within the core, and its temporal variations can be used to infer the fluid motion at the top of the core, on a decadal and subdecadal time-scale. Gravity variations resulting from changes in the mass distribution within the Earth may also occur on the same time-scales. Such variations include the signature of the flow inside the core, though they are largely dominated by the water cycle contributions. Our study is based on 8 y of high-resolution, high-accuracy magnetic and gravity satellite data, provided by the CHAMP and GRACE missions. From the newly derived geomagnetic models we have computed the core magnetic field, its temporal variations, and the core flow evolution. From the GRACE CNES/GRGS series of time variable geoid models, we have obtained interannual gravity models by using specifically designed postprocessing techniques. A correlation analysis between the magnetic and gravity series has demonstrated that the interannual changes in the second time derivative of the core magnetic field under a region from the Atlantic to Indian Ocean coincide in phase with changes in the gravity field. The order of magnitude of these changes and proposed correlation are plausible, compatible with a core origin; however, a complete theoretical model remains to be built. Our new results and their broad geophysical significance could be considered when planning new Earth observation space missions and devising more sophisticated Earth's interior models.

  10. HMMR (High-Resolution Multifrequency Microwave Radiometer) Earth observing system, volume 2e. Instrument panel report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Recommendations and background are provided for a passive microwave remote sensing system of the future designed to meet the observational needs of Earth scientist in the next decade. This system, called the High Resolution Multifrequency Microwave Radiometer (HMMR), is to be part of a complement of instruments in polar orbit. Working together, these instruments will form an Earth Observing System (EOS) to provide the information needed to better understand the fundamental, global scale processes which govern the Earth's environment. Measurements are identified in detail which passive observations in the microwave portion of the spectrum could contribute to an Earth Observing System in polar orbit. Requirements are established, e.g., spatial and temporal resolution, for these measurements so that, when combined with the other instruments in the Earth Observing System, they would yield a data set suitable for understanding the fundamental processes governing the Earth's environment. Existing and/or planned sensor systems are assessed in the light of these requirements, and additional sensor hardware needed to meet these observational requirements are defined.

  11. Biological effects of high ultraviolet radiation on early earth--a theoretical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cockell, C S

    1998-08-21

    The surface of early Earth was exposed to both UVC radiation (< 280 nm) and higher doses of UVB (280-315 nm) compared with the surface of present day Earth. The degree to which this radiation environment acted as a selection pressure on organisms and biological systems has rarely been theoretically examined with respect to the biologically effective irradiances that ancient organisms would receive. Here action spectra for DNA inactivation and isolated chloroplast inhibition are used to estimate biologically effective irradiances on archean Earth. Comparisons are made with present day Earth. The theoretical estimations on the UV radiation screening required to protect DNA on archean Earth compare well with field and laboratory observations on protection strategies found in present day microbial communities. They suggest that many physical and biological methods may have been effective and would have allowed for the radiation of life even under the high UV radiation regimes of archean Earth. Such strategies would also have provided effective reduction of photoinhibition by UV radiation. The data also suggest that the UV regime on the surface of Mars is not a life limiting factor per se, although other environmental factors such as desiccation and low temperatures may contribute towards the apparent lack of a surface biota.

  12. Human response to high-background radiation environments on Earth and in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, M.; Manti, L.

    The main long-term goal of the space exploration program is the colonization of the planets of the Solar System The high cosmic radiation equivalent dose rate represents a major problem for a stable and safe colonization of the planets The dose rate on Mars ranges between 60 and 150 mSv year depending on the Solar cycle and altitude and can reach values as high as 360 mSv year on the Moon The average dose rate on the Earth is about 3 mSv year reduced to about 1 mSv year excluding the internal exposure to Rn daughters However some areas of the Earth have anomalously high levels of background radiation Values 200-400 times higher than the world average are found in regions where monazite sand deposits are abundant Population in Tibet experience a high cosmic radiation background Epidemiological studies did not detect any adverse health effects in the populations living in those high-background radiation areas on Earth Chromosomal aberrations in the peripheral blood lymphocytes from the population living in the high-background radiation areas have been measured in several studies because the chromosomal damage represents an early biomarker of cancer risk Similar cytogenetic studies have been recently performed in cohort of astronauts involved in single or repeated space flights over many years A comparison of the cytogenetic findings in populations exposed at high dose rate on Earth or in space will be described

  13. High Pressure, Earth-storable Rocket Technology. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jassowski, D. M.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of elevated chamber pressure on combustion efficiency and heat transfer has been determined at the 100 lbf (445 N) thrust level for nitrogen tetroxide propellants. Measurements were made up to 500 psia (3.45 Mpa) with testbed hardware; tests at 100 psia (0.690 MPa) and 250 psia (1.72 MPa) were made with radiation-cooled rhenium chambers. The first task of the program served to determine desirable thruster applications and operating conditions: high total impulse, i.e. communication satellite or spacecraft bus axial engines, at chamber pressures up to 250 psia (1.72 MPa) pressure-fed, or up to 500 psia (3.45 MPa) pump-fed. The hardware modifications and testing required to obtain the data were determined in Task 2, which included design-support hot fire tests; supplemental hardware, including a 250 psia (1.72 MPa) Pc rhenium chamber and a 20% fuel-film cooled platelet injector was fabricated in Task 3. Testing showed that satisfactory operation of Ir-Re radiation chambers is assured at pressures up to 250 psia and may be possible up to 500. The heat transfer data obtained show good correlation with throat Reynolds number and are generally under values given by the simplified Bartz equation; chambers equilibrium temperatures match predicted values. Preliminary optimization of trip configuration and mixture ratio were made; Isp performance from thrust measurements was within 1% of predicted values. Stability, compatibility, and front-end thermal management were determined to be satisfactory.

  14. High Pressure, Earth-storable Rocket Technology. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jassowski, D. M.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of elevated chamber pressure on combustion efficiency and heat transfer has been determined at the 100 lbf (445 N) thrust level for nitrogen tetroxide propellants. Measurements were made up to 500 psia (3.45 MPa) with testbed hardware; tests at 100 psia (0.690 MPa) and 250 psia (1.72 MPa) were made with radiation-cooled rhenium chambers. The first task of the program served to determine desirable thruster applications and operating conditions: high total impulse, i.e., communication satellite or spacecraft bus axial engines, at chamber pressures up to 250 psia (1.72 MPa) pressure-fed, or up to 500 psia (3.45 MPa) pump-fed. The hardware modifications and testing required to obtain the data were determined in Task 2, which included design-support hot fire tests; supplemental hardware, including a 250 psia (1.72 MPa) Pc rhenium chamber and a 20% fuel-film cooled platelet injector was fabricated in Task 3. Testing showed that satisfactory operation of Ir-Re radiation chambers is assured at pressures up to 250 psia and may be possible up to 500. The heat transfer data obtained show good correlation with throat Reynolds number and are generally under values given by the simplified Bartz equation; chambers equilibrium temperatures match predicted values. Preliminary optimization of trip configuration and mixture ratio were made; Isp performance from thrust measurements was within 1% of predicted values. Stability, compatibility, and front-end thermal management were determined to be satisfactory.

  15. A high voltage electrical power system for low Earth orbit applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanier, J. R., Jr.; Bush, J. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The results of testing a high voltage electrical power system (EPS) breadboard using high voltage power processing equipment developed at Marshall Space Flight Center and Ni-Cd batteries are discussed. These test results are used to extrapolate to an efficient, reliable, high capacity EPS for near term low Earth orbit, high power applications. EPS efficiencies, figures of merit, and battery reliability with a battery protection and reconditioning circuit are presented.

  16. High-performance technology for indexing of high volumes of Earth remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strotov, Valery V.; Taganov, Alexander I.; Kolesenkov, Aleksandr N.; Kostrov, Boris V.

    2017-10-01

    The present paper has suggested a technology for search, indexing, cataloging and distribution of aerospace images on the basis of geo-information approach, cluster and spectral analysis. It has considered information and algorithmic support of the system. Functional circuit of the system and structure of the geographical data base have been developed on the basis of the geographical online portal technology. Taking into account heterogeneity of information obtained from various sources it is reasonable to apply a geoinformation platform that allows analyzing space location of objects and territories and executing complex processing of information. Geoinformation platform is based on cartographic fundamentals with the uniform coordinate system, the geographical data base, a set of algorithms and program modules for execution of various tasks. The technology for adding by particular users and companies of images taken by means of professional and amateur devices and also processed by various software tools to the array system has been suggested. Complex usage of visual and instrumental approaches allows significantly expanding an application area of Earth remote sensing data. Development and implementation of new algorithms based on the complex usage of new methods for processing of structured and unstructured data of high volumes will increase periodicity and rate of data updating. The paper has shown that application of original algorithms for search, indexing and cataloging of aerospace images will provide an easy access to information spread by hundreds of suppliers and allow increasing an access rate to aerospace images up to 5 times in comparison with current analogues.

  17. Highly siderophile elements in Earth's mantle as a clock for the Moon-forming impact.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Seth A; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Raymond, Sean N; O'Brien, David P; Walsh, Kevin J; Rubie, David C

    2014-04-03

    According to the generally accepted scenario, the last giant impact on Earth formed the Moon and initiated the final phase of core formation by melting Earth's mantle. A key goal of geochemistry is to date this event, but different ages have been proposed. Some argue for an early Moon-forming event, approximately 30 million years (Myr) after the condensation of the first solids in the Solar System, whereas others claim a date later than 50 Myr (and possibly as late as around 100 Myr) after condensation. Here we show that a Moon-forming event at 40 Myr after condensation, or earlier, is ruled out at a 99.9 per cent confidence level. We use a large number of N-body simulations to demonstrate a relationship between the time of the last giant impact on an Earth-like planet and the amount of mass subsequently added during the era known as Late Accretion. As the last giant impact is delayed, the late-accreted mass decreases in a predictable fashion. This relationship exists within both the classical scenario and the Grand Tack scenario of terrestrial planet formation, and holds across a wide range of disk conditions. The concentration of highly siderophile elements (HSEs) in Earth's mantle constrains the mass of chondritic material added to Earth during Late Accretion. Using HSE abundance measurements, we determine a Moon-formation age of 95 ± 32 Myr after condensation. The possibility exists that some late projectiles were differentiated and left an incomplete HSE record in Earth's mantle. Even in this case, various isotopic constraints strongly suggest that the late-accreted mass did not exceed 1 per cent of Earth's mass, and so the HSE clock still robustly limits the timing of the Moon-forming event to significantly later than 40 Myr after condensation.

  18. Evidence for a high temperature differentiation in a molten earth: A preliminary appraisal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, V. Rama

    1992-01-01

    If the earth were molten during its later stages of accretion as indicated by the present understanding of planetary accretion process, the differentiation that led to the formation of the core and mantle must have occurred at high temperatures in the range of 3000-5000 K because of the effect of pressure on the temperature of melting in the interior of the earth. This calls into question the use of low-temperature laboratory measurements of partition coefficients of trace elements to make inferences about earth accretion and differentiation. The low temperature partition coefficients cannot be directly applied to high temperature fractionations because partition coefficients refer to an equilibrium specific to a temperature for a given reaction, and must change in some proportion to exp 1/RT. There are no laboratory data on partition coefficients at the high temperatures relevant to differentiation in the interior of the earth, and an attempt to estimate high temperature distribution coefficients of siderophile elements was made by considering the chemical potential of a given element at equilibrium and how this potential changes with temperature, under some specific assumptions.

  19. Attainment of Selected Earth Science Concepts by Texas High School Seniors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollins, Mavis M.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether high school seniors (N=492) had attained each of five selected earth science concepts and if said attainment was influenced by the number of science courses completed. A 72-item, multiple-choice format test (12 items for each concept) was developed and piloted previous to this study to measure…

  20. Earth-Space Science Activity Syllabus for Elementary and Junior High School Teachers of Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Jack; And Others

    This syllabus is a collection of earth-space science laboratory activities and demonstrations intended for use at the elementary and junior high school levels. The activities are grouped into eight subject sections: Astronomy, Light, Magnetism, Electricity, Geology, Weather, Sound, and Space. Each section begins with brief background information,…

  1. Assessing Earth and Environmental Science Enrollment Trends in Texas Public High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Joan G.

    2012-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study: This study assesses the status of Earth and environmental sciences education in Texas Public High Schools by analyzing enrollment proportions of 11th and 12th grade students in 607 Independent School Districts (ISD) for the 2010-2011 academic school year using a quantitative, non-experimental alpha research design. This…

  2. Precipitation regions on the Earth of high energy electrons, injected by a point source moving along a circular Earth orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, E. K.; Klyushnikov, G. N.

    2018-05-01

    In the paper we continue the study of precipitation regions of high-energy charged particles, carried out by the authors since 2002. In contrast to previous papers, where a stationary source of electrons was considered, it is assumed that the source moves along a low circular near-earth orbit with a constant velocity. The orbit position is set by the inclination angle of the orbital plane to the equatorial plane and the longitude of the ascending node. The total number of injected electrons is determined by the source strength and the number of complete revolutions that the source makes along the circumference. Construction of precipitation regions is produced using the computational algorithm based on solving of the system of ordinary differential equations. The features of the precipitation regions structure for the dipole approximation of the geomagnetic field and the symmetrical arrangement of the orbit relative to the equator are noted. The dependencies of the precipitation regions on different orbital parametres such as the incline angle, the ascending node position and kinetic energy of injected particles have been considered.

  3. Approximate analytic method for high-apogee twelve-hour orbits of artificial Earth's satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashkovyaka, M. A.; Zaslavskii, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    We propose an approach to the study of the evolution of high-apogee twelve-hour orbits of artificial Earth's satellites. We describe parameters of the motion model used for the artificial Earth's satellite such that the principal gravitational perturbations of the Moon and Sun, nonsphericity of the Earth, and perturbations from the light pressure force are approximately taken into account. To solve the system of averaged equations describing the evolution of the orbit parameters of an artificial satellite, we use both numeric and analytic methods. To select initial parameters of the twelve-hour orbit, we assume that the path of the satellite along the surface of the Earth is stable. Results obtained by the analytic method and by the numerical integration of the evolving system are compared. For intervals of several years, we obtain estimates of oscillation periods and amplitudes for orbital elements. To verify the results and estimate the precision of the method, we use the numerical integration of rigorous (not averaged) equations of motion of the artificial satellite: they take into account forces acting on the satellite substantially more completely and precisely. The described method can be applied not only to the investigation of orbit evolutions of artificial satellites of the Earth; it can be applied to the investigation of the orbit evolution for other planets of the Solar system provided that the corresponding research problem will arise in the future and the considered special class of resonance orbits of satellites will be used for that purpose.

  4. Method for preparing high cure temperature rare earth iron compound magnetic material

    DOEpatents

    Huang, Yuhong; Wei, Qiang; Zheng, Haixing

    2002-01-01

    Insertion of light elements such as H,C, or N in the R.sub.2 Fe.sub.17 (R=rare earth metal) series has been found to modify the magnetic properties of these compounds, which thus become prospective candidates for high performance permanent magnets. The most spectacular changes are increases of the Curie temperature, T.sub.c, of the magnetization, M.sub.s, and of coercivity, H.sub.c, upon interstitial insertion. A preliminary product having a component R--Fe--C,N phase is produced by a chemical route. Rare earth metal and iron amides are synthesized followed by pyrolysis and sintering in an inert or reduced atmosphere, as a result of which, the R--Fe--C,N phases are formed. Fabrication of sintered rare earth iron nitride and carbonitride bulk magnet is impossible via conventional process due to the limitation of nitridation method.

  5. Status of High Data Rate Intersatellite Laser Communication as an Enabler for Earth and Space Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, F.; Zech, H.; Motzigemba, M.

    2017-12-01

    Space based laser communication is supporting earth observation and science missions with Gbps data download capabilities. Currently the Sentinel 1 and Sentinel 2 spacecrafts from the Copernicus earth observation program of the European Commission are using the Gbps laser communication links developed by Tesat Spacecom to download low latency data products via a commercial geostationary laser relay station- the European Data Relay Service- (EDRS) as a standard data path, in parallel to the conventional radio frequency links. The paper reports on the status of high bandwidth space laser communication as an enabler for small and large space science missions ranging from cube sat applications in low earth orbit to deep space missions. Space based laser communication has left the experimental phase and will support space science missions with unprecedented data rates.

  6. Existence of a component corotating with the earth in high-latitude disturbance magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, A.; Kim, J. S.; Sugiura, M.

    1982-01-01

    A study of the data from the high-latitude North American IMS network of magnetic stations suggests that there is a component in substorm perturbations that corotates with the earth. It is as yet not certain whether the existence of this component stems from the corotation of a part of the magnetospheric plasma involved in the substorm mechanism or if it is a 'phase change' resulting from the control of the substorm manifestations by the earth's main magnetic field which is not axially symmetric. There are other geophysical phenomena showing a persistence of longitudinal variations corotating with the earth. These phenomena are of significance for a better understanding of ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling.

  7. Visible and Ultraviolet Detectors for High Earth Orbit and Lunar Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodgate, Bruce E.

    1989-01-01

    The current status of detectors for the visible and UV for future large observatories in earth orbit and the moon is briefly reviewed. For the visible, CCDs have the highest quantum efficiency, but are subject to contamination of the data by cosmic ray hits. For the moon, the level of hits can be brought down to that at the earth's surface by shielding below about 20 meters of rock. For high earth orbits above the geomagnetic shield, CCDs might be able to be used by combining many short exposures and vetoing the cosmic ray hits, otherwise photoemissive detectors will be necessary. For the UV, photoemissive detectors will be necessary to reject the visible; to use CCDs would require the development of UV-efficient filters which reject the visible by many orders of magnitude. Development of higher count rate capability would be desirable for photoemissive detectors.

  8. EPOXI at Earth's Poles: Empirical Test for Observations of an Exoplanet at High Obliquity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livengood, Timothy A.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Deming, D.; Charbonneau, D.; Barry, R. K.; Hewagama, T.; Lisse, C. M.; McFadden, L.; Meadows, V.; Seager, S.; Wellnitz, D.; EPOXI-EPOCh Science Team

    2009-09-01

    Observations of the Earth have been obtained by the EPOXI mission to investigate empirically the visible-to-near infrared spectral distribution and lightcurve variations of the Earth as a model for terrestrial exoplanets. Exoplanetary systems may be at arbitrary inclination to the solar system, and may include planets of arbitrary obliquity. The EPOXI mission has previously observed the Earth from within the ecliptic plane and has now acquired measurements at high northern and southern sub-spacecraft latitude with nearly identical phase angle and range. On 27-28 Mar 2009 UT, the whole disc of the Earth was observed from a sub-spacecraft latitude of 62°N at 87° phase angle (53.5% illumination) and 0.114 AU range. On 27 Sep 2009, Earth will have been observed from a sub-spacecraft latitude of 74°S at 87° phase angle (52.7% illumination) and 0.115 AU range. The Earth was near the spring equinox of each pole as it was observed. The visible-light signal was sampled with 7 filters of approximately 100 nm width at 100 nm spacing over 350-950 nm central wavelength, at 15-minute intervals in 4 selected filters and 1-hour intervals in the remaining 3 filters. Near-IR spectroscopy at 1-4.8 µm was obtained at 2-hour intervals. These polar data, capturing the polar ice caps and high latitude climatic regions, will be compared to similar data previously acquired from over the equator, to investigate distinctions in the ability to discern from the global average the spectroscopic signature of vegetation and biogenic gas species. This work is supported by the NASA Discovery Program.

  9. Complex demodulation in VLBI estimation of high frequency Earth rotation components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, S.; Brzeziński, A.; Schuh, H.

    2012-12-01

    The spectrum of high frequency Earth rotation variations contains strong harmonic signal components mainly excited by ocean tides along with much weaker non-harmonic fluctuations driven by irregular processes like the diurnal thermal tides in the atmosphere and oceans. In order to properly investigate non-harmonic phenomena a representation in time domain is inevitable. We present a method, operating in time domain, which is easily applicable within Earth rotation estimation from Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). It enables the determination of diurnal and subdiurnal variations, and is still effective with merely diurnal parameter sampling. The features of complex demodulation are used in an extended parameterization of polar motion and universal time which was implemented into a dedicated version of the Vienna VLBI Software VieVS. The functionality of the approach was evaluated by comparing amplitudes and phases of harmonic variations at tidal periods (diurnal/semidiurnal), derived from demodulated Earth rotation parameters (ERP), estimated from hourly resolved VLBI ERP time series and taken from a recently published VLBI ERP model to the terms of the conventional model for ocean tidal effects in Earth rotation recommended by the International Earth Rotation and Reference System Service (IERS). The three sets of tidal terms derived from VLBI observations extensively agree among each other within the three-sigma level of the demodulation approach, which is below 6 μas for polar motion and universal time. They also coincide in terms of differences to the IERS model, where significant deviations primarily for several major tidal terms are apparent. An additional spectral analysis of the as well estimated demodulated ERP series of the ter- and quarterdiurnal frequency bands did not reveal any significant signal structure. The complex demodulation applied in VLBI parameter estimation could be demonstrated a suitable procedure for the reliable reproduction of

  10. Influence of an iron-rich amendment on chemical lability and plant (Raphanus sativus L.) availability of two metallic elements (As and Pb) on mine-impacted agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juhee; Kim, Yong-Seong; Hyun, Seunghun; Moon, Deok Hyun; Chang, Jun Young

    2016-10-01

    Variation of the chemical extractability and phytoavailability of two metallic elements (e.g., As and Pb) on amendment-treated soils was investigated. Four mine-impacted agricultural soils contaminated with both As (174-491 mg kg -1 ) and Pb (116-357 mg kg -1 ) were amended with an iron-rich sludge at the rate of 5 % (w/w). After a 4-, 8-, and 16-week incubation, the extractability of metallic elements was assessed by sequential extraction procedure (SEP; F1-F5). The control without amendment was also run. In amended soils, the labile element mass (i.e., F1 + F2) promptly decreased (15-48 % of As and 5-10 % of Pb) in 4 weeks, but the decrement was continued over 16 weeks up to 70 and 28 % for As and Pb, respectively. The labile mass decrement was quantitatively corresponded with the increment of F3 (bound to amorphous metal oxides). In plant test assessed by radish (Raphanus sativus) grown on the 16-week soils, up to 57 % of As and 28 % of Pb accumulation was suppressed and 10-43 % of growth (i.e., shoot/root elongation and fresh weight) was improved. For both the control and amended soils, element uptake by plant was well correlated with their labile soil concentrations (r 2  = 0.799 and 0.499 for As and Pb, respectively). The results confirmed that the iron-rich material can effectively suppress element uptake during R. sativus seedling growth, most likely due to the chemical stabilization of metallic elements in growth medium.

  11. Effects of rare-earth co-doping on the local structure of rare-earth phosphate glasses using high and low energy X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Alisha J; Cole, Jacqueline M; FitzGerald, Vicky; Honkimaki, Veijo; Roberts, Mark A; Brennan, Tessa; Martin, Richard A; Saunders, George A; Newport, Robert J

    2013-06-14

    Rare-earth co-doping in inorganic materials has a long-held tradition of facilitating highly desirable optoelectronic properties for their application to the laser industry. This study concentrates specifically on rare-earth phosphate glasses, (R2O3)x(R'2O3)y(P2O5)(1-(x+y)), where (R, R') denotes (Ce, Er) or (La, Nd) co-doping and the total rare-earth composition corresponds to a range between metaphosphate, RP3O9, and ultraphosphate, RP5O14. Thereupon, the effects of rare-earth co-doping on the local structure are assessed at the atomic level. Pair-distribution function analysis of high-energy X-ray diffraction data (Q(max) = 28 Å(-1)) is employed to make this assessment. Results reveal a stark structural invariance to rare-earth co-doping which bears testament to the open-framework and rigid nature of these glasses. A range of desirable attributes of these glasses unfold from this finding; in particular, a structural simplicity that will enable facile molecular engineering of rare-earth phosphate glasses with 'dial-up' lasing properties. When considered together with other factors, this finding also demonstrates additional prospects for these co-doped rare-earth phosphate glasses in nuclear waste storage applications. This study also reveals, for the first time, the ability to distinguish between P-O and P[double bond, length as m-dash]O bonding in these rare-earth phosphate glasses from X-ray diffraction data in a fully quantitative manner. Complementary analysis of high-energy X-ray diffraction data on single rare-earth phosphate glasses of similar rare-earth composition to the co-doped materials is also presented in this context. In a technical sense, all high-energy X-ray diffraction data on these glasses are compared with analogous low-energy diffraction data; their salient differences reveal distinct advantages of high-energy X-ray diffraction data for the study of amorphous materials.

  12. Atmospheric Correction Prototype Algorithm for High Spatial Resolution Multispectral Earth Observing Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the creation of a prototype algorithm for atmospheric correction using high spatial resolution earth observing imaging systems. The objective of the work was to evaluate accuracy of a prototype algorithm that uses satellite-derived atmospheric products to generate scene reflectance maps for high spatial resolution (HSR) systems. This presentation focused on preliminary results of only the satellite-based atmospheric correction algorithm.

  13. Earth's core-mantle boundary - Results of experiments at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knittle, Elise; Jeanloz, Raymond

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory experiments document that liquid iron reacts chemically with silicates at high pressures (above 2.4 x 10 to the 10th Pa) and temperatures. In particular, (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite, the most abundant mineral of earth's lower mantle, is expected to react with liquid iron to produce metallic alloys (FeO and FeSi) and nonmetallic silicates (SiO2 stishovite and MgSiO3 perovskite) at the pressures of the core-mantle boundary, 14 x 10 to the 10th Pa. The experimental observations, in conjunction with seismological data, suggest that the lowermost 200 to 300 km of earth's mantle, the D-double-prime layer, may be an extremely heterogeneous region as a result of chemical reactions between the silicate mantle and the liquid iron alloy of earth's core. The combined thermal-chemical-electrical boundary layer resulting from such reactions offers a plausible explanation for the complex behavior of seismic waves near the core-mantle boundary and could influence earth's magnetic field observed at the surface.

  14. High pressure phase transitions in the rare earth metal erbium to 151 GPa.

    PubMed

    Samudrala, Gopi K; Thomas, Sarah A; Montgomery, Jeffrey M; Vohra, Yogesh K

    2011-08-10

    High pressure x-ray diffraction studies have been performed on the heavy rare earth metal erbium (Er) in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature to a pressure of 151 GPa and Er has been compressed to 40% of its initial volume. The rare earth crystal structure sequence hcp → Sm type → dhcp → distorted fcc (hcp: hexagonal close packed; fcc: face centered cubic; dhcp: double hcp) is observed in Er below 58 GPa. We have carried out Rietveld refinement of crystal structures in the pressure range between 58 GPa and 151 GPa. We have examined various crystal structures that have been proposed for the distorted fcc (dfcc) phase and the post-dfcc phase in rare earth metals. We find that the hexagonal hR 24 structure is the best fit between 58 and 118 GPa. Above 118 GPa, a structural transformation from hR 24 phase to a monoclinic C 2/m phase is observed with a volume change of - 1.9%. We have also established a clear trend for the pressure at which a post-dfcc phase is formed in rare earth metals and show that there is a monotonic increase in this pressure with the filling of 4f shell.

  15. High pressure phase transitions in the rare earth metal erbium to 151 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Thomas, Sarah A.; Montgomery, Jeffrey M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2011-08-01

    High pressure x-ray diffraction studies have been performed on the heavy rare earth metal erbium (Er) in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature to a pressure of 151 GPa and Er has been compressed to 40% of its initial volume. The rare earth crystal structure sequence {hcp} \\to {Sm}~ {type} \\to {dhcp} \\to {distorted} fcc (hcp: hexagonal close packed; fcc: face centered cubic; dhcp: double hcp) is observed in Er below 58 GPa. We have carried out Rietveld refinement of crystal structures in the pressure range between 58 GPa and 151 GPa. We have examined various crystal structures that have been proposed for the distorted fcc (dfcc) phase and the post-dfcc phase in rare earth metals. We find that the hexagonal hR 24 structure is the best fit between 58 and 118 GPa. Above 118 GPa, a structural transformation from hR 24 phase to a monoclinic C 2/m phase is observed with a volume change of - 1.9%. We have also established a clear trend for the pressure at which a post-dfcc phase is formed in rare earth metals and show that there is a monotonic increase in this pressure with the filling of 4f shell.

  16. High-pressure phase of brucite stable at Earth's mantle transition zone and lower mantle conditions.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Andreas; Mookherjee, Mainak

    2016-12-06

    We investigate the high-pressure phase diagram of the hydrous mineral brucite, Mg(OH) 2 , using structure search algorithms and ab initio simulations. We predict a high-pressure phase stable at pressure and temperature conditions found in cold subducting slabs in Earth's mantle transition zone and lower mantle. This prediction implies that brucite can play a much more important role in water transport and storage in Earth's interior than hitherto thought. The predicted high-pressure phase, stable in calculations between 20 and 35 GPa and up to 800 K, features MgO 6 octahedral units arranged in the anatase-TiO 2 structure. Our findings suggest that brucite will transform from a layered to a compact 3D network structure before eventual decomposition into periclase and ice. We show that the high-pressure phase has unique spectroscopic fingerprints that should allow for straightforward detection in experiments. The phase also has distinct elastic properties that might make its direct detection in the deep Earth possible with geophysical methods.

  17. The Earth's core composition from high pressure density measurements of liquid iron alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morard, G.; Siebert, J.; Andrault, D.; Guignot, N.; Garbarino, G.; Guyot, F.; Antonangeli, D.

    2013-07-01

    High-pressure, high-temperature in situ X-ray diffraction has been measured in liquid iron alloys (Fe-5 wt% Ni-12 wt% S and Fe-5 wt% Ni-15 wt% Si) up to 94 GPa and 3200 K in laser-heated diamond anvil cells. From the analysis of the X-ray diffuse scattering signal of the metallic liquids, we determined density and bulk modulus of the two liquid alloys. Comparison with a reference Earth model indicates that a core composition containing 6% of sulfur and 2% of silicon by weight would best match the geophysical data. Models with 2.5% of sulfur and 4-5% of silicon are still consistent with geophysical constraints whereas silicon only compositions are not. These results suggest only moderate depletion of sulfur in the bulk Earth.

  18. High resolution earth observation satellites and services in the next decade a European perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Gunter; Dech, Stefan

    2005-07-01

    Projects to use very high resolution optical satellite sensor data started in the late 90s and are believed to be the major driver for the commercialisation of earth observation. The global political security situation and updated legislative frameworks created new opportunities for high resolution, dual use satellite systems. In addition to new optical sensors, very high resolution synthetic aperture radars will become in the next few years an important component in the imaging satellite fleet. The paper will review the development in this domain so far, and give perspectives on future emerging markets and opportunities. With dual-use satellite initiatives and new political frameworks agreed between the European Commission and the European Space Agency (ESA), the European market becomes very attractive for both service suppliers and customers. The political focus on "Global Monitoring for Environment and Security" (GMES) and the "European Defence and Security Policy" drive and amplify this demand which ranges from low resolution climate monitoring to very high resolution reconnaissance tasks. In order to create an operational and sustainable GMES in Europe by 2007, the European infrastructure need to be adapted and extended. This includes the ESA SENTINEL and OXYGEN programmes, aiming for a fleet of earth observation satellites and an open and operational earth observation ground segment. The harmonisation of national and regional geographic information is driven by the European Commission's INSPIRE programme. The necessary satellite capacity to complement existing systems in the delivery of space based data required for GMES is currently under definition. Embedded in a market with global competition and in the global political framework of a Global Earth Observation System of Systems, European companies, agencies and research institutions are now contributing to this joint undertaking. The paper addresses the chances, risks and options for the future.

  19. Spin crossover and Mott—Hubbard transition under high pressure and high temperature in the low mantle of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, S. G.; Ovchinnikova, T. M.; Plotkin, V. V.; Dyad'kov, P. G.

    2015-11-01

    Effect of high pressure induced spin crossover on the magnetic, electronic and structural properties of the minerals forming the Earth's low mantle is discussed. The low temperature P, T phase diagram of ferropericlase has the quantum phase transition point Pc = 56 GPa at T = 0 confirmed recently by the synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy. The LDA+GTB calculated phase diagram describes the experimental data. Its extension to the high temperature resulted earlier in prediction of the metallic properties of the Earth's mantle at the depth 1400 km < h < 1800 km. Estimation of the electrical conductivity based on the percolation theory is given. We discuss also the thermodynamic properties and structural anomalies resulting from the spin crossover and metal-insulator transition and compare them with the experimental seismic and geomagnetic field data.

  20. Visualization of High-Resolution LiDAR Topography in Google Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, C. J.; Nandigam, V.; Arrowsmith, R.; Blair, J. L.

    2009-12-01

    The growing availability of high-resolution LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) topographic data has proven to be revolutionary for Earth science research. These data allow scientists to study the processes acting on the Earth’s surfaces at resolutions not previously possible yet essential for their appropriate representation. In addition to their utility for research, the data have also been recognized as powerful tools for communicating earth science concepts for education and outreach purposes. Unfortunately, the massive volume of data produced by LiDAR mapping technology can be a barrier to their use. To facilitate access to these powerful data for research and educational purposes, we have been exploring the use of Keyhole Markup Language (KML) and Google Earth to deliver LiDAR-derived visualizations. The OpenTopography Portal (http://www.opentopography.org/) is a National Science Foundation-funded facility designed to provide access to Earth science-oriented LiDAR data. OpenTopography hosts a growing collection of LiDAR data for a variety of geologic domains, including many of the active faults in the western United States. We have found that the wide spectrum of LiDAR users have variable scientific applications, computing resources, and technical experience and thus require a data distribution system that provides various levels of access to the data. For users seeking a synoptic view of the data, and for education and outreach purposes, delivering full-resolution images derived from LiDAR topography into the Google Earth virtual globe is powerful. The virtual globe environment provides a freely available and easily navigated viewer and enables quick integration of the LiDAR visualizations with imagery, geographic layers, and other relevant data available in KML format. Through region-dependant network linked KML, OpenTopography currently delivers over 20 GB of LiDAR-derived imagery to users via simple, easily downloaded KMZ files hosted at the Portal

  1. Displacements Study of an Earth Fill Dam Based on High Precision Geodetic Monitoring and Numerical Modeling.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Luis Enrique; de Lacy, M Clara; Ramos, M Isabel; Cano, Juan Pedro; Herrera, Antonio Manuel; Avilés, Manuel; Gil, Antonio José

    2018-04-27

    The aim of this paper is to study the behavior of an earth fill dam, analyzing the deformations determined by high precision geodetic techniques and those obtained by the Finite Element Method (FEM). A large number of control points were established around the area of the dam, and the measurements of their displacements took place during several periods. In this study, high-precision leveling and GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) techniques were used to monitor vertical and horizontal displacements respectively. Seven surveys were carried out: February and July 2008, March and July 2013, August 2014, September 2015 and September 2016. Deformations were predicted, taking into account the general characteristics of an earth fill dam. A comparative evaluation of the results derived from predicted (FEM) and observed deformations shows the differences on average being 20 cm for vertical displacements, and 6 cm for horizontal displacements at the crest. These differences are probably due to the simplifications assumed during the FEM modeling process: critical sections are considered homogeneous along their longitude, and the properties of the materials were established according to the general characteristics of an earth fill dam. These characteristics were taken from the normative and similar studies in the country. This could also be due to the geodetic control points being anchored in the superficial layer of the slope when the construction of the dam was finished.

  2. High-Accuracy Ring Laser Gyroscopes: Earth Rotation Rate and Relativistic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beverini, N.; Di Virgilio, A.; Belfi, J.; Ortolan, A.; Schreiber, K. U.; Gebauer, A.; Klügel, T.

    2016-06-01

    The Gross Ring G is a square ring laser gyroscope, built as a monolithic Zerodur structure with 4 m length on all sides. It has demonstrated that a large ring laser provides a sensitivity high enough to measure the rotational rate of the Earth with a high precision of ΔΩE < 10-8. It is possible to show that further improvement in accuracy could allow the observation of the metric frame dragging, produced by the Earth rotating mass (Lense-Thirring effect), as predicted by General Relativity. Furthermore, it can provide a local measurement of the Earth rotational rate with a sensitivity near to that provided by the international system IERS. The GINGER project is intending to take this level of sensitivity further and to improve the accuracy and the long-term stability. A monolithic structure similar to the G ring laser is not available for GINGER. Therefore the preliminary goal is the demonstration of the feasibility of a larger gyroscope structure, where the mechanical stability is obtained through an active control of the geometry. A prototype moderate size gyroscope (GP-2) has been set up in Pisa in order to test this active control of the ring geometry, while a second structure (GINGERino) has been installed inside the Gran Sasso underground laboratory in order to investigate the properties of a deep underground laboratory in view of an installation of a future GINGER apparatus. The preliminary data on these two latter instruments are presented.

  3. High End Computing Technologies for Earth Science Applications: Trends, Challenges, and Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, John (Technical Monitor); Biswas, Rupak; Yan, Jerry C.; Brooks, Walter F.; Sterling, Thomas L.

    2003-01-01

    Earth science applications of the future will stress the capabilities of even the highest performance supercomputers in the areas of raw compute power, mass storage management, and software environments. These NASA mission critical problems demand usable multi-petaflops and exabyte-scale systems to fully realize their science goals. With an exciting vision of the technologies needed, NASA has established a comprehensive program of advanced research in computer architecture, software tools, and device technology to ensure that, in partnership with US industry, it can meet these demanding requirements with reliable, cost effective, and usable ultra-scale systems. NASA will exploit, explore, and influence emerging high end computing architectures and technologies to accelerate the next generation of engineering, operations, and discovery processes for NASA Enterprises. This article captures this vision and describes the concepts, accomplishments, and the potential payoff of the key thrusts that will help meet the computational challenges in Earth science applications.

  4. Compact High Current Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode for Hall Effect Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M. (Inventor); Watkins, Ronnie M. (Inventor); Hofer, Richard R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An apparatus and method for achieving an efficient central cathode in a Hall effect thruster is disclosed. A hollow insert disposed inside the end of a hollow conductive cathode comprises a rare-earth element and energized to emit electrons from an inner surface. The cathode employs an end opening having an area at least as large as the internal cross sectional area of the rare earth insert to enhance throughput from the cathode end. In addition, the cathode employs a high aspect ratio geometry based on the cathode length to width which mitigates heat transfer from the end. A gas flow through the cathode and insert may be impinged by the emitted electrons to yield a plasma. One or more optional auxiliary gas feeds may also be employed between the cathode and keeper wall and external to the keeper near the outlet.

  5. High Frequency Variations of Earth Rotation Parameters from GPS and GLONASS Observations

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Erhu; Jin, Shuanggen; Wan, Lihua; Liu, Wenjie; Yang, Yali; Hu, Zhenghong

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's rotation undergoes changes with the influence of geophysical factors, such as Earth's surface fluid mass redistribution of the atmosphere, ocean and hydrology. However, variations of Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP) are still not well understood, particularly the short-period variations (e.g., diurnal and semi-diurnal variations) and their causes. In this paper, the hourly time series of Earth Rotation Parameters are estimated using Global Positioning System (GPS), Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS), and combining GPS and GLONASS data collected from nearly 80 sites from 1 November 2012 to 10 April 2014. These new observations with combining different satellite systems can help to decorrelate orbit biases and ERP, which improve estimation of ERP. The high frequency variations of ERP are analyzed using a de-trending method. The maximum of total diurnal and semidiurnal variations are within one milli-arcseconds (mas) in Polar Motion (PM) and 0.5 milli-seconds (ms) in UT1-UTC. The semidiurnal and diurnal variations are mainly related to the ocean tides. Furthermore, the impacts of satellite orbit and time interval used to determinate ERP on the amplitudes of tidal terms are analyzed. We obtain some small terms that are not described in the ocean tide model of the IERS Conventions 2010, which may be caused by the strategies and models we used or the signal noises as well as artifacts. In addition, there are also small differences on the amplitudes between our results and IERS convention. This might be a result of other geophysical excitations, such as the high-frequency variations in atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) and hydrological angular momentum (HAM), which needs more detailed analysis with more geophysical data in the future. PMID:25635416

  6. The influence of high heat input and inclusions control for rare earth on welding in low alloy high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Rensheng; Mu, Shukun; Liu, Jingang; Li, Zhanjun

    2017-09-01

    In the current paper, it is analyzed for the influence of high heat input and inclusions control for rare earth on welding in low alloy high strength steel. It is observed for the structure for different heat input of the coarse-grained area. It is finest for the coarse grain with the high heat input of 200 kJ / cm and the coarse grain area with 400 kJ / cm is the largest. The performance with the heat input of 200 kJ / cm for -20 °C V-shaped notch oscillatory power is better than the heat input of 400 kJ / cm. The grain structure is the ferrite and bainite for different holding time. The grain structure for 5s holding time has a grain size of 82.9 μm with heat input of 200 kJ/cm and grain size of 97.9 μm for 10s holding time. For the inclusions for HSLA steel with adding rare earth, they are Al2O3-CaS inclusions in the Al2O3-CaS-CaO ternary phase diagram. At the same time, it can not be found for low melting calcium aluminate inclusions compared to the inclusions for the HSLA steel without rare earth. Most of the size for the inclusions is between 1 ~ 10μm. The overall grain structure is smaller and the welding performance is more excellent for adding rare earth.

  7. High-resolution sensing for precision agriculture: from Earth-observing satellites to unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, Matthew F.; Houborg, Rasmus; Lucieer, Arko

    2016-10-01

    With global population projected to approach 9 billion by 2050, it has been estimated that a 40% increase in cereal production will be required to satisfy the worlds growing nutritional demands. Any such increases in agricultural productivity are likely to occur within a system that has limited room for growth and in a world with a climate that is different from that of today. Fundamental to achieving food and water security, is the capacity to monitor the health and condition of agricultural systems. While space-agency based satellites have provided the backbone for earth observation over the last few decades, many developments in the field of high-resolution earth observation have been advanced by the commercial sector. These advances relate not just to technological developments in the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), but also the advent of nano-satellite constellations that offer a radical shift in the way earth observations are now being retrieved. Such technologies present opportunities for improving our description of the water, energy and carbon cycles. Efforts towards developing new observational techniques and interpretative frameworks are required to provide the tools and information needed to improve the management and security of agricultural and related sectors. These developments are one of the surest ways to better manage, protect and preserve national food and water resources. Here we review the capabilities of recently deployed satellite systems and UAVs and examine their potential for application in precision agriculture.

  8. Auroral x-ray imaging from high- and low-Earth orbit

    SciT

    McKenzie, D.L.; Gorney, D.J.; Imhof, W.L.

    Observations of bremsstrahlung x rays emitted by energetic electrons impacting the Earth's atmosphere can be used for remotely sensing the morphology, intensity, and energy spectra of electron precipitation from the magnetosphere. The utility of the technique is derived from the broad energy range of observable x rays (2 to > 100 KeV), the simple emission process, the large x-ray mean free path in the atmosphere, and negligible background. Two auroral x-ray imagers, developed for future spaceflights, are discussed. The Polar Ionospheric X-Ray Imaging Experiment is scheduled for launch on the NASA International Solar-Terrestrial Physics/Global Geospace Science program POLAR satellite inmore » 1994. The POLAR orbit, with an apogee and perigee of 9 and 1.8 R[sub e] (Earth radii), respectively, affords the opportunity to image the aurora from a high altitude above the north pole continuously for several hours. The Magnetospheric Atmospheric X-Ray Imaging Experiment (MAXIE) was launched aboard the NOAA-I satellite on August 8, 1993. The 800-km polar orbit passes over both the northern and southern auroral zones every 101 min. MAXIE will be capable of obtaining multiple images of the same auroral region during a single satellite orbit. The experimental approaches used to exploit these very different orbits for remote sensing of the Earth's auroral zones are emphasized.« less

  9. Comparison of high-energy trapped particle environments at the Earth and Jupiter.

    PubMed

    Jun, Insoo; Garrett, Henry B

    2005-01-01

    The 'Van Allen belts' of the trapped energetic particles in the Earth's magnetosphere were discovered by the Explorer I satellite in 1958. In addition, in 1959, it was observed that UHF radio emissions from Jupiter probably had a similar source--the Jovian radiation belts. In this paper, the global characteristics of these two planets' trapped radiation environments and respective magnetospheres are compared and state-of-the-art models used to generate estimates of the high-energy electron (> or = 100 keV) and proton (> or = 1 MeV) populations--the dominant radiation particles in these environments. The models used are the AP8/AE8 series for the Earth and the Divine-Garrett/GIRE model for Jupiter. To illustrate the relative magnitude of radiation effects at each planet, radiation transport calculations were performed to compute the total ionising dose levels at the geosynchronous orbit for the Earth and at Europa (Jupiter's 4th largest moon) for Jupiter. The results show that the dose rates are -0.1 krad(Si) d(-1) at the geosynchronous orbit and -30 krad(Si) d((-1) at Europa for a 2.5 mm spherical shell aluminium shield--a factor of -300 between the two planets.

  10. Structural Stability Assessment of the High Frequency Antenna for Use on the Buccaneer CubeSat in Low Earth Orbit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Structural Stability Assessment of the High Frequency Antenna for Use on the Buccaneer CubeSat in Low Earth...DSTO-TN-1295 ABSTRACT The Buccaneer CubeSat will be fitted with a high frequency antenna made from spring steel measuring tape. The geometry...High Frequency Antenna for Use on the Buccaneer CubeSat in Low Earth Orbit Executive Summary The Buccaneer CubeSat will be fitted with a

  11. High strength and high toughness steel

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Earl R.; Zackay, Victor F.

    1979-01-01

    A structural steel which possess both high strength and high toughness and has particular application of cryogenic uses. The steel is produced by the utilization of thermally induced phase transformation following heating in a three-phase field in iron-rich alloys of the Fe-Ni-Ti system, with a preferred composition of 12% nickel, 0.5% titanium, the remainder being iron.

  12. Human response to high-background radiation environments on Earth and in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, M.; Manti, L.

    2008-09-01

    The main long-term objective of the space exploration program is the colonization of the planets of the Solar System. The high cosmic radiation equivalent dose rate represents an inescapable problem for the safe establishment of permanent human settlements on these planets. The unshielded equivalent dose rate on Mars ranges between 100 and 200 mSv/year, depending on the Solar cycle and altitude, and can reach values as high as 360 mSv/year on the Moon. The average annual effective dose on Earth is about 3 mSv, nearly 85% of which comes from natural background radiation, reduced to less than 1 mSv if man-made sources and the internal exposure to Rn daughters are excluded. However, some areas on Earth display anomalously high levels of background radiation, as is the case with thorium-rich monazite bearing sand deposits where values 200 400 times higher than the world average can be found. About 2% of the world’s population live above 3 km and receive a disproportionate 10% of the annual effective collective dose due to cosmic radiation, with a net contribution to effective dose by the neutron component which is 3 4 fold that at sea level. Thus far, epidemiological studies have failed to show any adverse health effects in the populations living in these terrestrial high-background radiation areas (HBRA), which provide an unique opportunity to study the health implications of an environment that, as closely as possibly achievable on Earth, resembles the chronic exposure of future space colonists to higher-than-normal levels of ionizing radiation. Chromosomal aberrations in the peripheral blood lymphocytes from the HBRA residents have been measured in several studies because chromosomal damage represents an early biomarker of cancer risk. Similar cytogenetic studies have been recently performed in a cohort of astronauts involved in single or repeated space flights over many years. The cytogenetic findings in populations exposed to high dose-rate background radiation

  13. Oxygen isotopic evidence for accretion of Earth's water before a high-energy Moon-forming giant impact.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Richard C; Barrat, Jean-Alix; Miller, Martin F; Anand, Mahesh; Dauphas, Nicolas; Franchi, Ian A; Sillard, Patrick; Starkey, Natalie A

    2018-03-01

    The Earth-Moon system likely formed as a result of a collision between two large planetary objects. Debate about their relative masses, the impact energy involved, and the extent of isotopic homogenization continues. We present the results of a high-precision oxygen isotope study of an extensive suite of lunar and terrestrial samples. We demonstrate that lunar rocks and terrestrial basalts show a 3 to 4 ppm (parts per million), statistically resolvable, difference in Δ 17 O. Taking aubrite meteorites as a candidate impactor material, we show that the giant impact scenario involved nearly complete mixing between the target and impactor. Alternatively, the degree of similarity between the Δ 17 O values of the impactor and the proto-Earth must have been significantly closer than that between Earth and aubrites. If the Earth-Moon system evolved from an initially highly vaporized and isotopically homogenized state, as indicated by recent dynamical models, then the terrestrial basalt-lunar oxygen isotope difference detected by our study may be a reflection of post-giant impact additions to Earth. On the basis of this assumption, our data indicate that post-giant impact additions to Earth could have contributed between 5 and 30% of Earth's water, depending on global water estimates. Consequently, our data indicate that the bulk of Earth's water was accreted before the giant impact and not later, as often proposed.

  14. High Pressure Earth Storable Rocket Technology Program-Hipes Options 1/2 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chazen, M. L.; Sicher, D.; Calvignac, J.; Ono, D.

    1999-01-01

    Under the High Pressure Earth Storable Rocket Technology (HIPES) Program, TRW successfully completed testing of two 100 lbf thrust class rhenium chambers using N204-MMH. The first chamber was successfully fired for 4789 seconds of operating time with a maximum duration of 700 seconds. This chamber had been previously fired for 5230 seconds with N2O4-N2H4. The second chamber was successfully fired for 8085 seconds with a maximum firing duration of 1200 seconds. The Isp (specific impulse) for both chambers ranged from 323 lbf-sec/lbm to 330 lbf-sec/lbm.

  15. Use and Protection of GPS Sidelobe Signals for Enhanced Navigation Performance in High Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Joel J. K.; Valdez, Jennifer E.; Bauer, Frank H.; Moreau, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    GPS (Global Positioning System) Space Service Volume (SSV) signal environment is from 3,000-36,000 kilometers altitude. Current SSV specifications only capture performance provided by signals transmitted within 23.5(L1) or 26(L2-L5) off-nadir angle. Recent on-orbit data lessons learned show significant PNT (Positioning, Navigation and Timing) performance improvements when the full aggregate signal is used. Numerous military civil operational missions in High Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (HEOGEO) utilize the full signal to enhance vehicle PNT performance

  16. High-coercivity, thermally stable and low unblocking temperature magnetic phase: Implications for Archeomagnetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, G. A.; Gallet, Y.; Trindade, R. I.; Genevey, A.; Berquo, T. S.; Neumann, R.; Le Goff, M.

    2013-05-01

    The thermoremanent magnetization in baked clay archeological materials provide very useful information on the time evolution of the Earth's magnetic field over the past few millennia. In these materials, a thermally stable magnetic phase characterized by high coercivities (>400 mT) and low unblocking temperatures (~200 degrees Celsius) has recently been recognized in European bricks, tiles, kilns and hearth samples. Both the identification and the origin of this phase remain, however, poorly constrained. The very same high-coercivity, thermally stable, low unblocking temperature (HCSLT) magnetic phase has been identified in Brazilian bricks fragments dated of the past five centuries. We report here a large set of measurements on a selected collection of samples showing variable contributions of the HCSLT phase. These measurements include low-field magnetic susceptibility vs. temperature curves, hysteresis loops, isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) acquisition, thermal demagnetization of the three-axis IRM, first order reversal curves (FORC), low-temperature magnetization experiments (remanent magnetization curves and alternating current susceptibility), Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Results show the coexistence of low-coercivity magnetic minerals (magnetite and titanomagnetite) and high-coercivity minerals (hematite, HCSLT phase and, in some cases, goethite). We note that the HCSLT magnetic phase is always found in association with hematite. We further observe that the Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction spectra, and the FORC diagrams are also very similar to results previously obtained from annealed clays in which nontronite or iron-rich montmorillonite was transformed into Al-substituted hematite by heating. The HCSLT magnetic phase is thus confidently identified as being hematite with Al substitution. Moreover, considering the abundance of montmorillonite in clay mining settings, we suggest that the widespread occurrence of HCSLT in

  17. High-frequency variations in Earth rotation and the planetary momentum budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Richard D.

    1995-01-01

    The major focus of the subject contract was on helping to resolve one of the more notable discrepancies still existing in the axial momentum budget of the solid Earth-atmosphere system, namely the disappearance of coherence between length-of-day (l.o.d.) and atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) at periods shorter than about a fortnight. Recognizing the importance of identifying the source of the high-frequency momentum budget anomaly, the scientific community organized two special measurement campaigns (SEARCH '92 and CONT '94) to obtain the best possible determinations of l.o.d. and AAM. An additional goal was to analyze newly developed estimates of the torques that transfer momentum between the atmosphere and its underlying surface to determine whether the ocean might be a reservoir of momentum on short time scales. Discrepancies between AAM and l.o.d. at sub-fortnightly periods have been attributed to either measurement errors in these quantities or the need to incorporate oceanic angular momentum into the planetary budget. Results from the SEARCH '92 and CONT '94 campaigns suggest that when special attention is paid to the quality of the measurements, better agreement between l.o.d. and AAM at high frequencies can be obtained. The mechanism most responsible for the high-frequency changes observed in AAM during these campaigns involves a direct coupling to the solid Earth, i.e, the mountain torque, thereby obviating a significant oceanic role.

  18. Enabling Access to High-Resolution Lidar Topography for Earth Science Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, Christopher; Nandigam, Viswanath; Arrowsmith, Ramon; Baru, Chaitan

    2010-05-01

    High-resolution topography data acquired with lidar (light detection and ranging a.k.a. laser scanning) technology are revolutionizing the way we study the geomorphic processes acting along the Earth's surface. These data, acquired from either an airborne platform or from a tripod-mounted scanner, are emerging as a fundamental tool for research on a variety of topics ranging from earthquake hazards to ice sheet dynamics. Lidar topography data allow earth scientists to study the processes that contribute to landscape evolution at resolutions not previously possible yet essential for their appropriate representation. These datasets also have significant implications for earth science education and outreach because they provide an accurate digital representation of landforms and geologic hazards. However, along with the potential of lidar topography comes an increase in the volume and complexity of data that must be efficiently managed, archived, distributed, processed and integrated in order for them to be of use to the community. A single lidar data acquisition may generate terabytes of data in the form of point clouds, digital elevation models (DEMs), and derivative imagery. This massive volume of data is often difficult to manage and poses significant distribution challenges when trying to allow access to the data for a large scientific user community. Furthermore, the datasets can be technically challenging to work with and may require specific software and computing resources that are not readily available to many users. The U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded OpenTopography Facility (http://www.opentopography.org) is an online data access and processing system designed to address the challenges posed by lidar data, and to democratize access to these data for the scientific user community. OpenTopography provides free, online access to lidar data in a number of forms, including raw lidar point cloud data, standard DEMs, and easily accessible Google

  19. NCI's High Performance Computing (HPC) and High Performance Data (HPD) Computing Platform for Environmental and Earth System Data Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ben; Allen, Chris; Antony, Joseph; Bastrakova, Irina; Gohar, Kashif; Porter, David; Pugh, Tim; Santana, Fabiana; Smillie, Jon; Trenham, Claire; Wang, Jingbo; Wyborn, Lesley

    2015-04-01

    The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) has established a powerful and flexible in-situ petascale computational environment to enable both high performance computing and Data-intensive Science across a wide spectrum of national environmental and earth science data collections - in particular climate, observational data and geoscientific assets. This paper examines 1) the computational environments that supports the modelling and data processing pipelines, 2) the analysis environments and methods to support data analysis, and 3) the progress so far to harmonise the underlying data collections for future interdisciplinary research across these large volume data collections. NCI has established 10+ PBytes of major national and international data collections from both the government and research sectors based on six themes: 1) weather, climate, and earth system science model simulations, 2) marine and earth observations, 3) geosciences, 4) terrestrial ecosystems, 5) water and hydrology, and 6) astronomy, social and biosciences. Collectively they span the lithosphere, crust, biosphere, hydrosphere, troposphere, and stratosphere. The data is largely sourced from NCI's partners (which include the custodians of many of the major Australian national-scale scientific collections), leading research communities, and collaborating overseas organisations. New infrastructures created at NCI mean the data collections are now accessible within an integrated High Performance Computing and Data (HPC-HPD) environment - a 1.2 PFlop supercomputer (Raijin), a HPC class 3000 core OpenStack cloud system and several highly connected large-scale high-bandwidth Lustre filesystems. The hardware was designed at inception to ensure that it would allow the layered software environment to flexibly accommodate the advancement of future data science. New approaches to software technology and data models have also had to be developed to enable access to these large and exponentially

  20. High-latitude ocean ventilation and its role in Earth's climate transitions

    PubMed Central

    MacGilchrist, Graeme A. ; Brown, Peter J.; Evans, D. Gwyn; Meijers, Andrew J. S.; Zika, Jan D.

    2017-01-01

    The processes regulating ocean ventilation at high latitudes are re-examined based on a range of observations spanning all scales of ocean circulation, from the centimetre scales of turbulence to the basin scales of gyres. It is argued that high-latitude ocean ventilation is controlled by mechanisms that differ in fundamental ways from those that set the overturning circulation. This is contrary to the assumption of broad equivalence between the two that is commonly adopted in interpreting the role of the high-latitude oceans in Earth's climate transitions. Illustrations of how recognizing this distinction may change our view of the ocean's role in the climate system are offered. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Ocean ventilation and deoxygenation in a warming world’. PMID:28784714

  1. High-latitude ocean ventilation and its role in Earth's climate transitions.

    PubMed

    Naveira Garabato, Alberto C; MacGilchrist, Graeme A; Brown, Peter J; Evans, D Gwyn; Meijers, Andrew J S; Zika, Jan D

    2017-09-13

    The processes regulating ocean ventilation at high latitudes are re-examined based on a range of observations spanning all scales of ocean circulation, from the centimetre scales of turbulence to the basin scales of gyres. It is argued that high-latitude ocean ventilation is controlled by mechanisms that differ in fundamental ways from those that set the overturning circulation. This is contrary to the assumption of broad equivalence between the two that is commonly adopted in interpreting the role of the high-latitude oceans in Earth's climate transitions. Illustrations of how recognizing this distinction may change our view of the ocean's role in the climate system are offered.This article is part of the themed issue 'Ocean ventilation and deoxygenation in a warming world'. © 2017 The Authors.

  2. Properties of the moon, Mars, Martian satellites, and near-earth asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Jeffrey G.

    1989-01-01

    Environments and surface properties of the moon, Mars, Martian satellites, and near-earth asteroids are discussed. Topics include gravity, atmospheres, surface properties, surface compositions, seismicity, radiation environment, degradation, use of robotics, and environmental impacts. Gravity fields vary from large fractions of the earth's field such as 1/3 on Mars and 1/6 on the moon to smaller fractions of 0.0004 g on an asteroid 1 km in diameter. Spectral data and the analogy with meteor compositions suggest that near-earth asteroids may contain many resources such as water-rich carbonaceous materials and iron-rich metallic bodies. It is concluded that future mining and materials processing operations from extraterrestrial bodies require an investment now in both (1) missions to the moon, Mars, Phobos, Deimos, and near-earth asteroids and (2) earth-based laboratory research in materials and processing.

  3. Ground Radar Polarimetric Observations of High-Frequency Earth-Space Communication Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolen, Steve; Chandrasekar, V.; Benjamin, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Strategic roadmaps for NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (REDS) enterprise support near-term high-frequency communication systems that provide moderate to high data rates with dependable service. Near-earth and human planetary exploration will baseline Ka-Band, but may ultimately require the use of even higher frequencies. Increased commercial demand on low-frequency earth-space bands has also led to increased interest in the use of higher frequencies in regions like K u - and K,- band. Data is taken from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR), which operates at 13.8 GHz, and the true radar reflectivity profile is determined along the PR beam via low-frequency ground based polarimetric observations. The specific differential phase (Kdp) is measured along the beam and a theoretical model is used to determine the expected specific attenuation (k). This technique, called the k-Kdp method, uses a Fuzzy-Logic model to determine the hydrometeor type along the PR beam from which the appropriate k-Kdp relationship is used to determine k and, ultimately, the total path-integrated attenuation (PIA) on PR measurements. Measurements from PR and the NCAR S-POL radar were made during the TEFLUN-B experiment that took place near Melbourne, FL in 1998, and the TRMM-LBA campaign near Ji-Parana, Brazil in 1999.

  4. Optimal design of an earth observation optical system with dual spectral and high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Pei-pei; Jiang, Kai; Liu, Kai; Duan, Jing; Shan, Qiusha

    2017-02-01

    With the increasing demand of the high-resolution remote sensing images by military and civilians, Countries around the world are optimistic about the prospect of higher resolution remote sensing images. Moreover, design a visible/infrared integrative optic system has important value in earth observation. Because visible system can't identify camouflage and recon at night, so we should associate visible camera with infrared camera. An earth observation optical system with dual spectral and high resolution is designed. The paper mainly researches on the integrative design of visible and infrared optic system, which makes the system lighter and smaller, and achieves one satellite with two uses. The working waveband of the system covers visible, middle infrared (3-5um). Dual waveband clear imaging is achieved with dispersive RC system. The focal length of visible system is 3056mm, F/# is 10.91. And the focal length of middle infrared system is 1120mm, F/# is 4. In order to suppress the middle infrared thermal radiation and stray light, the second imaging system is achieved and the narcissus phenomenon is analyzed. The system characteristic is that the structure is simple. And the especial requirements of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), spot, energy concentration, and distortion etc. are all satisfied.

  5. Space-Confined Earth-Abundant Bifunctional Electrocatalyst for High-Efficiency Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yanqun; Fang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Xin; Fernandes, Gina; Yan, Yong; Yan, Dongpeng; Xiang, Xu; He, Jing

    2017-10-25

    Hydrogen generation from water splitting could be an alternative way to meet increasing energy demands while also balancing the impact of energy being supplied by fossil-based fuels. The efficacy of water splitting strongly depends on the performance of electrocatalysts. Herein, we report a unique space-confined earth-abundant electrocatalyst having the bifunctionality of simultaneous hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER), leading to high-efficiency water splitting. Outperforming Pt/C or RuO 2 catalysts, this mesoscopic, space-confined, bifunctional configuration is constructed from a monolithic zeolitic imidazolate framework@layered double hydroxide (ZIF@LDH) precursor on Ni foam. Such a confinement leads to a high dispersion of ultrafine Co 3 O 4 nanoparticles within the N-doped carbon matrix by temperature-dependent calcination of the ZIF@LDH. We demonstrate that the OER has an overpotential of 318 mV at a current density of 10 mA cm -2 , while that of HER is -106 mV @ -10 mA cm -2 . The voltage applied to a two-electrode cell for overall water splitting is 1.59 V to achieve a stable current density of 10 mA cm -2 while using the monolithic catalyst as both the anode and the cathode. It is anticipated that our space-confined method, which focuses on earth-abundant elements with structural integrity, may provide a novel and economically sound strategy for practical energy conversion applications.

  6. High-pressure metallization of FeO and implications for the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knittle, Elise; Jeanloz, Raymond

    1986-01-01

    The phase diagram of FeO has been experimentally determined to pressures of 155 GPa and temperatures of 4000 K using shock-wave and diamond-cell techniques. A metallic phase of FeO is observed at pressures greater than 70 GPa and temperatures exceeding 1000 K. The metallization of FeO at high pressures implies that oxygen can be present as the light alloying element of the earth's outer core, in accord with the geochemical predictions of Ringwood (1977 and 1979). The high pressures necessary for this metallization suggest that the core has acquired its composition well after the initial stages of the earth's accretion. Direct experimental observations at elevated pressures and temperatures indicate that core-forming alloy can react chemically with oxides such as those forming the mantle. The core and mantle may never have reached complete chemical equilibrium, however. If this is the case, the core-mantle boundary is likely to be a zone of active chemical reactions.

  7. High Resolution Land Use Land Cover Classification using Landsat Earth Observation Data for the Continental Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midekisa, A.; Bennet, A.; Gething, P. W.; Holl, F.; Andrade-Pacheco, R.; Savory, D. J.; Hugh, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    Spatially detailed and temporally dynamic land use land cover data is necessary to monitor the state of the land surface for various applications. Yet, such data at a continental to global scale is lacking. Here, we developed high resolution (30 meter) annual land use land cover layers for the continental Africa using Google Earth Engine. To capture ground truth training data, high resolution satellite imageries were visually inspected and used to identify 7, 212 sample Landsat pixels that were comprised entirely of one of seven land use land cover classes (water, man-made impervious surface, high biomass, low biomass, rock, sand and bare soil). For model validation purposes, 80% of points from each class were used as training data, with 20% withheld as a validation dataset. Cloud free Landsat 7 annual composites for 2000 to 2015 were generated and spectral bands from the Landsat images were then extracted for each of the training and validation sample points. In addition to the Landsat spectral bands, spectral indices such as normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and normalized difference water index (NDWI) were used as covariates in the model. Additionally, calibrated night time light imageries from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) were included as a covariate. A decision tree classification algorithm was applied to predict the 7 land cover classes for the periods 2000 to 2015 using the training dataset. Using the validation dataset, classification accuracy including omission error and commission error were computed for each land cover class. Model results showed that overall accuracy of classification was high (88%). This high resolution land cover product developed for the continental Africa will be available for public use and can potentially enhance the ability of monitoring and studying the state of the Earth's surface.

  8. Design of the high resolution optical instrument for the Pleiades HR Earth observation satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamard, Jean-Luc; Gaudin-Delrieu, Catherine; Valentini, David; Renard, Christophe; Tournier, Thierry; Laherrere, Jean-Marc

    2017-11-01

    As part of its contribution to Earth observation from space, ALCATEL SPACE designed, built and tested the High Resolution cameras for the European intelligence satellites HELIOS I and II. Through these programmes, ALCATEL SPACE enjoys an international reputation. Its capability and experience in High Resolution instrumentation is recognised by the most customers. Coming after the SPOT program, it was decided to go ahead with the PLEIADES HR program. PLEIADES HR is the optical high resolution component of a larger optical and radar multi-sensors system : ORFEO, which is developed in cooperation between France and Italy for dual Civilian and Defense use. ALCATEL SPACE has been entrusted by CNES with the development of the high resolution camera of the Earth observation satellites PLEIADES HR. The first optical satellite of the PLEIADES HR constellation will be launched in mid-2008, the second will follow in 2009. To minimize the development costs, a mini satellite approach has been selected, leading to a compact concept for the camera design. The paper describes the design and performance budgets of this novel high resolution and large field of view optical instrument with emphasis on the technological features. This new generation of camera represents a breakthrough in comparison with the previous SPOT cameras owing to a significant step in on-ground resolution, which approaches the capabilities of aerial photography. Recent advances in detector technology, optical fabrication and electronics make it possible for the PLEIADES HR camera to achieve their image quality performance goals while staying within weight and size restrictions normally considered suitable only for much lower performance systems. This camera design delivers superior performance using an innovative low power, low mass, scalable architecture, which provides a versatile approach for a variety of imaging requirements and allows for a wide number of possibilities of accommodation with a mini

  9. Origin of middle rare earth element enrichments in acid waters of a Canadian high Arctic lake.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannesson, Kevin H.; Zhou, Xiaoping

    1999-01-01

    -Middle rare earth element (MREE) enriched rock-normalized rare earth element (REE) patterns of a dilute acidic lake (Colour Lake) in the Canadian High Arctic, were investigated by quantifying whole-rock REE concentrations of rock samples collected from the catchment basin, as well as determining the acid leachable REE fraction of these rocks. An aliquot of each rock sample was leached with 1 N HNO 3 to examine the readily leachable REE fraction of each rock, and an additional aliquot was leached with a 0.04 M NH 2OH · HCl in 25% (v/v) CH 3COOH solution, designed specifically to reduce Fe-Mn oxides/oxyhydroxides. Rare earth elements associated with the leachates that reacted with clastic sedimentary rock samples containing petrographically identifiable Fe-Mn oxide/oxyhydroxide cements and/or minerals/amorphous phases, exhibited whole-rock-normalized REE patterns similar to the lake waters, whereas whole-rock-normalized leachates from mafic igneous rocks and other clastic sedimentary rocks from the catchment basin differed substantially from the lake waters. The whole-rock, leachates, and lake water REE data support acid leaching or dissolution of MREE enriched Fe-Mn oxides/oxyhydroxides contained and identified within some of the catchment basin sedimentary rocks as the likely source of the unique lake water REE patterns. Solution complexation modelling of the REEs in the inflow streams and lake waters indicate that free metal ions (e.g., Ln 3+, where Ln = any REE) and sulfate complexes (LnSO 4+) are the dominant forms of dissolved REEs. Consequently, solution complexation reactions involving the REEs during weathering, transport to the lake, or within the lake, cannot be invoked to explain the MREE enrichments observed in the lake waters.

  10. Diffusion in Zinc at High Pressure and Rheology of the Earth's Inner Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshav, S.; van Orman, J. A.

    2004-12-01

    An attempt has been made here to estimate the viscosity of the Earth's inner core, and also to identify the primary mechanism by which the inner core deforms. Estimation of the viscosity and identification of the deformation mechanism(s) of the inner core require measurements of diffusion in the hcp (hexagonal close-packed, or epsilon) phase of iron, suggested to be stable at the Earth's inner-core pressure conditions. However, owing largely to experimental and analytical challenges, actual measurements on the diffusivity in this phase are non-existent. To overcome this problem, we have focused on the divalent transition metal, zinc (Zn), which has the hcp structure over a wide range of pressures. Hcp metals are known to have similar diffusivities at the same homologous temperature. A primary goal of this work was to explore the effect of increasing pressure on diffusion in zinc. Zinc has high compressibility, allowing diffusion measurements to be made on normalized pressures (P/K, pressure/bulk modulus) approaching those of Earth's core. We focused on diffusion of gold (Au), which has been extensively studied at atmospheric pressure. We find that with increasing pressure from 10 to 25 GPa, the diffusion coefficient of Au in Zn decreases, and the data at high pressures are in good agreement with that at 1 atm. However, in a plot of log D versus homologous temperature (Tm/T, where Tm is the melting point), the slope besides being slightly shallower, the high-pressure diffusivity values retrieved are higher than predicted from extrapolation of the 1 atm data. This trend is more prominent in plot of log D versus pressure, where instead of being linear, the diffusion coefficient shows a slight parabolic dependence, indicating that the activation volume decreases with pressure. High-pressure diffusivity values are higher than predicted either from homologous temperature scaling, or those retrieved assuming constant activation volume from one atmosphere data. To a good

  11. Iron-Rich Carbonates as the Potential Source of Evolved CO2 Detected by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument in Gale Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Heil, E.; Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Archer, P. D.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H. B.; Glavin, D. P.; McAdam, A. C.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument detected at least 4 distinct CO2 release during the pyrolysis of a sample scooped from the Rocknest (RN) eolian deposit. The highest peak CO2 release temperature (478-502 C) has been attributed to either a Fe-rich carbonate or nano-phase Mg-carbonate. The objective of this experimental study was to evaluate the thermal evolved gas analysis (T/EGA) characteristics of a series of terrestrial Fe-rich carbonates under analog SAM operating conditions to compare with the RN CO2 releases. Natural Fe-rich carbonates (<53 microns) with varying Fe amounts (Fe(0.66)X(0.34)- to Fe(0.99)X(0.01)-CO3, where X refers to Mg and/or Mn) were selected for T/EGA. The carbonates were heated from 25 to 715 C (35 C/min) and evolved CO2 was measured as a function of temperature. The highest Fe containing carbonates (e.g., Fe(0.99)X(0.01)-CO3) yielded CO2 peak temperatures between 466-487 C, which is consistent with the high temperature RN CO2 release. The lower Fe-bearing carbonates (e.g., Fe(0.66)X(0.34)CO3) did not have peak CO2 release temperatures that matched the RN peak CO2 temperatures; however, their entire CO2 releases did occur within RN temperature range of the high temperature CO2 release. Results from this laboratory analog analysis demonstrate that the high temperature RN CO2 release is consistent with Fe-rich carbonate (approx.0.7 to 1 wt.% FeCO3). The similar RN geochemistry with other materials in Gale Crater and elsewhere on Mars (e.g., Gusev Crater, Meridiani) suggests that up to 1 wt. % Fe-rich carbonate may occur throughout the Gale Crater region and could be widespread on Mars. The Rocknest Fe-carbonate may have formed from the interaction of reduced Fe phases (e.g., Fe2+ bearing olivine) with atmospheric CO2 and transient water. Alternatively, the Rocknest Fe-carbonate could be derived by eolian processes that have eroded distally exposed deep crustal material that possesses Fe-carbonate that may have formed through

  12. Basic Geometric Support of Systems for Earth Observation from Geostationary and Highly Elliptical Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gektin, Yu. M.; Egoshkin, N. A.; Eremeev, V. V.; Kuznecov, A. E.; Moskatinyev, I. V.; Smelyanskiy, M. B.

    2017-12-01

    A set of standardized models and algorithms for geometric normalization and georeferencing images from geostationary and highly elliptical Earth observation systems is considered. The algorithms can process information from modern scanning multispectral sensors with two-coordinate scanning and represent normalized images in optimal projection. Problems of the high-precision ground calibration of the imaging equipment using reference objects, as well as issues of the flight calibration and refinement of geometric models using the absolute and relative reference points, are considered. Practical testing of the models, algorithms, and technologies is performed in the calibration of sensors for spacecrafts of the Electro-L series and during the simulation of the Arktika prospective system.

  13. An earth-isolated optically coupled wideband high voltage probe powered by ambient light.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xiang; Bellan, Paul M

    2012-10-01

    An earth-isolated optically-coupled wideband high voltage probe has been developed for pulsed power applications. The probe uses a capacitive voltage divider coupled to a fast light-emitting diode that converts high voltage into an amplitude-modulated optical signal, which is then conveyed to a receiver via an optical fiber. A solar cell array, powered by ambient laboratory lighting, charges a capacitor that, when triggered, acts as a short-duration power supply for an on-board amplifier in the probe. The entire system has a noise level ≤0.03 kV, a DC-5 MHz bandwidth, and a measurement range from -6 to 2 kV; this range can be conveniently adjusted.

  14. Alternative High-Performance Motors with Non-Rare Earth Materials, Final Publishable Report

    SciT

    Galioto, Steven; Johnson, Francis

    Electric drive systems, which include electric machines and power electronics, are a key enabling technology for advanced vehicle propulsion systems that reduce the petroleum dependence of the transportation sector. To have significant effect, electric drive technologies must be economical in terms of cost, weight, and size while meeting performance and reliability expectations. The goal of the project is to develop traction motors that reduce or eliminate the use of rare-earth materials and meet the DoE specifications for such a traction motor. This is accomplished by evaluating and developing multiple motor topologies in conjunction with advanced materials. Eight non-permanent magnet motormore » topologies and two reduced or non-rare earth motor topologies are analyzed and compared using a common set of requirements. Five of the motors are built and tested to validate the analysis. This paper provides a detailed quantitative comparison of the different machine topologies that reduce or eliminate rare-earth materials. Conclusions are drawn from the analysis and test data to show the tradeoffs related to selecting each of the motor topologies with the hope of providing practicing engineers and researchers in the field enough guidelines for choosing the “optimum” machine topology that suits their applications and set of performance requirements. Four materials technologies were investigated for their ability to enable a reduced rare earth electric motor. Two of the technologies were soft magnetic materials, one was a non-rare-earth containing permanent magnet technology, and the last was an insulation material. These processing and performance of these materials were first demonstrated in small coupons. The coupon tests justified proceeding to larger scale processing for two of the materials technologies: 1) a dual-phase soft magnetic material for use in rotor laminates and 2) a high temperature insulation material for use as a slot liner in the stator. The

  15. High Earth orbit design for lunar assisted small Explorer class missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, M.; Hametz, M.; Cooley, J.; Skillman, D.

    1994-01-01

    Small Expendable launch vehicles are capable of injecting modest payloads into high Earth orbits having apogee near the lunar distance. However, lunar and solar perturbations can quickly lower perigee and cause premature reentry. Costly perigee raising maneuvers by the spacecraft are required to maintain the orbit. In addition, the range of inclinations achievable is limited to those of launch sites unless costly spacecraft maneuvers are performed. This study investigates the use of a lunar swingby in a near-Hohmann transfer trajectory to raise perigee into the 8 to 25 solar radius range and reach a wide variety of inclinations without spacecraft maneuvers. It is found that extremely stable orbits can be obtained if the postencounter spacecraft orbital period is one-half of a lunar sidereal revolution and the Earth-vehicle-Moon geometry is within a specified range. Criteria for achieving stable orbits with various perigee heights and ecliptic inclinations are developed, and the sensitivity of the resulting mission orbits to transfer trajectory injection (TTI) errors is examined. It is shown that carefully designed orbits yield lifetimes of several years, with excellent ground station coverage characteristics and minimal eclipses. A phasing loop error correction strategy is considered with the spacecraft propulsion system delta V demand for TTI error correction and a postlunar encounter apogee trim maneuver typically in the 30 to 120 meters per second range.

  16. Early Earth plume-lid tectonics: A high-resolution 3D numerical modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, R.; Gerya, T.

    2016-10-01

    Geological-geochemical evidence point towards higher mantle potential temperature and a different type of tectonics (global plume-lid tectonics) in the early Earth (>3.2 Ga) compared to the present day (global plate tectonics). In order to investigate tectono-magmatic processes associated with plume-lid tectonics and crustal growth under hotter mantle temperature conditions, we conduct a series of 3D high-resolution magmatic-thermomechanical models with the finite-difference code I3ELVIS. No external plate tectonic forces are applied to isolate 3D effects of various plume-lithosphere and crust-mantle interactions. Results of the numerical experiments show two distinct phases in coupled crust-mantle evolution: (1) a longer (80-100 Myr) and relatively quiet 'growth phase' which is marked by growth of crust and lithosphere, followed by (2) a short (∼20 Myr) and catastrophic 'removal phase', where unstable parts of the crust and mantle lithosphere are removed by eclogitic dripping and later delamination. This modelling suggests that the early Earth plume-lid tectonic regime followed a pattern of episodic growth and removal also called episodic overturn with a periodicity of ∼100 Myr.

  17. Microbial processes of the carbon and sulfur cycles in an ice-covered, iron-rich meromictic lake Svetloe (Arkhangelsk region, Russia).

    PubMed

    Savvichev, Alexander S; Kokryatskaya, Natalia M; Zabelina, Svetlana A; Rusanov, Igor I; Zakharova, Elena E; Veslopolova, Elena F; Lunina, Olga N; Patutina, Ekaterina O; Bumazhkin, Boris K; Gruzdev, Denis S; Sigalevich, Pavel A; Pimenov, Nikolay V; Kuznetsov, Boris B; Gorlenko, Vladimir M

    2017-02-01

    Biogeochemical, isotope geochemical and microbiological investigation of Lake Svetloe (White Sea basin), a meromictic freshwater was carried out in April 2014, when ice thickness was ∼0.5 m, and the ice-covered water column contained oxygen to 23 m depth. Below, the anoxic water column contained ferrous iron (up to 240 μμM), manganese (60 μM), sulfide (up to 2 μM) and dissolved methane (960 μM). The highest abundance of microbial cells revealed by epifluorescence microscopy was found in the chemocline (redox zone) at 23-24.5 m. Oxygenic photosynthesis exhibited two peaks: the major one (0.43 μmol C L -1  day -1 ) below the ice and the minor one in the chemocline zone, where cyanobacteria related to Synechococcus rubescens were detected. The maximum of anoxygenic photosynthesis (0.69 μmol C L -1  day -1 ) at the oxic/anoxic interface, for which green sulfur bacteria Chlorobium phaeoclathratiforme were probably responsible, exceeded the value for oxygenic photosynthesis. Bacterial sulfate reduction peaked (1.5 μmol S L -1  day -1 ) below the chemocline zone. The rates of methane oxidation were as high as 1.8 μmol CH 4  L -1  day -1 at the oxi/anoxic interface and much lower in the oxic zone. Small phycoerythrin-containing Synechococcus-related cyanobacteria were probably involved in accumulation of metal oxides in the redox zone. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The importance of sulfur for the behavior of highly-siderophile elements during Earth's differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurenz, Vera; Rubie, David C.; Frost, Daniel J.; Vogel, Antje K.

    2016-12-01

    The highly siderophile elements (HSEs) are widely used as geochemical tracers for Earth's accretion and core formation history. It is generally considered that core formation strongly depleted the Earth's mantle in HSEs, which were subsequently replenished by a chondritic late veneer. However, open questions remain regarding the origin of suprachondritic Ru/Ir and Pd/Ir ratios that are thought to be characteristic for the primitive upper mantle. In most core-formation models that address the behavior of the HSEs, light elements such as S entering the core have not been taken into account and high P-T experimental data for S-bearing compositions are scarce. Here we present a comprehensive experimental study to investigate the effect of increasing S concentration in the metal on HSE metal-silicate partitioning at 2473 K and 11 GPa. We show that the HSEs become less siderophile with increasing S concentrations in the metal, rendering core-forming metal less efficient in removing the HSEs from the mantle if S is present. Furthermore, we investigated the FeS sulfide-silicate partitioning of the HSEs as a function of pressure (7-21 GPa) and temperature (2373-2673 K). The sulfide-silicate partition coefficient for Pt increases strongly with P, whereas those for Pd, Ru and Ir all decrease. The combined effect is such that above ∼20 GPa Ru becomes less chalcophile than Pt, which is opposite to their behavior in the metal-silicate system where Ru is always more siderophile than Pt. The newly determined experimental results are used in a simple 2-stage core formation model that takes into account the effect of S on the behavior of the HSEs during core formation. Results of this model show that segregation of a sulfide liquid to the core from a mantle with substantial HSE concentrations plays a key role in reproducing Earth's mantle HSE abundances. As Ru and Pd are less chalcophile than Pt and Ir at high P-T, some Ru and Pd remain in the mantle after sulfide segregation

  19. The high resolution optical instruments for the Pleiades HR Earth observation satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudin-Delrieu, Catherine; Lamard, Jean-Luc; Cheroutre, Philippe; Bailly, Bruno; Dhuicq, Pierre; Puig, Olivier

    2017-11-01

    Coming after the SPOT satellites series, PLEIADESHR is a CNES optical high resolution satellite dedicated to Earth observation, part of a larger optical and radar multi-sensors system, ORFEO, which is developed in cooperation between France and Italy for dual Civilian and Defense use. The development of the two PLEIADES-HR cameras was entrusted by CNES to Thales Alenia Space. This new generation of instrument represents a breakthrough in comparison with the previous SPOT instruments owing to a significant step in on-ground resolution, which approaches the capabilities of aerial photography. The PLEIADES-HR instrument program benefits from Thales Alenia Space long and successful heritage in Earth observation from space. The proposed solution benefits from an extensive use of existing products, Cannes Space Optics Centre facilities, unique in Europe, dedicated to High Resolution instruments. The optical camera provides wide field panchromatic images supplemented by 4 multispectral channels with narrow spectral bands. The optical concept is based on a four mirrors Korsch telescope. Crucial improvements in detector technology, optical fabrication and electronics make it possible for the PLEIADES-HR instrument to achieve the image quality requirements while respecting the drastic limitations of mass and volume imposed by the satellite agility needs and small launchers compatibility. The two flight telescopes were integrated, aligned and tested. After the integration phase, the alignment, mainly based on interferometric measurements in vacuum chamber, was successfully achieved within high accuracy requirements. The wave front measurements show outstanding performances, confirmed, after the integration of the PFM Detection Unit, by MTF measurements on the Proto-Flight Model Instrument. Delivery of the proto flight model occurred mi-2008. The FM2 Instrument delivery is planned Q2-2009. The first optical satellite launch of the PLEIADES-HR constellation is foreseen

  20. High-Resolution Spectroscopic Database for the NASA Earth Observing System Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Laurence S.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and enhance the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic database and associated software to support the observational programs of the Earth Observing System (EOS). In particular, the focus is on the EOS projects: the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the High-Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS), Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT), the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), and the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE III). The data requirements of these programs in terms of spectroscopy are varied, but usually call for additional spectral parameters or improvements to existing molecular bands. In addition, cross-section data for heavier molecular species must be expanded and made amenable to modeling in remote sensing. The effort in the project also includes developing software and distribution to make access, manipulation, and use of HITRAN functional to the EOS program.

  1. Preface to highly siderophile element constraints on Earth and planetary processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riches, Amy J. V.

    2017-11-01

    The geochemical properties of the highly siderophile elements (HSEs; Os, Ir, Ru, Rh, Pt, Pd, Re and Au) - being strongly iron-loving, but also chalcophile (i.e., having an affinity for sulphide), and generally occurring at ultra trace levels in silicate rocks, their weathered products, and oceanic waters - mean that this suite of elements and their isotopic compositions are useful in tracing a wide variety of processes. Thus, the HSEs are useful probes with which to tackle major research questions pertinent to past and present day change at a variety of scales and in a range of Earth and other-worldly environments by constraining reservoir compositions, chemical drivers, and the timing of key events and/or transformation rates.

  2. Challenges for Future UV Imaging of the Earth's Ionosphere and High Latitude Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James

    2006-01-01

    Large scale imaging of Geospace has played a significant role in the recent advances in the comprehension of the coupled Solar-Terrestrial System. The Earth's ionospheric far ultraviolet emissions provide a rich tapestry of observations that play a key role in sorting out the dominant mechanisms and phenomena associated with the coupling of the ionosphere and magnetosphere (MI). The MI coupling is an integral part of the Solar-Terrestrial and as such, future observations in this region should focus on understanding the coupling and the impact of solar variability. This talk will focus on the outstanding problems associated with the coupled Solar-Terrestrial system that can be best addressed using far ultraviolet imaging of the Earthls ionosphere. Challenges of global scale imaging and high-resolution imaging will be discussed and how these are driven by unresolved compelling science questions of magnetospheric configuration, and auroral dynamics.

  3. Sheath effects observed on a 10 meter high voltage panel in simulated low earth orbit plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccox, J. E.; Konradi, A.

    1979-01-01

    A large (1m x 10m) flat surface of conductive material was biased to high voltage (+ or - 3000 V) to simulate the behavior of a large solar array in low earth orbit. The model array was operated in a plasma environment of 1,000 to 1,000,000/cu cm, with sufficient free space around it for the resulting plasma sheaths to develop unimpeded for 5-10 meters into the surrounding plasma. Measurements of the resulting sheath thickness were obtained. The observed thickness varied approximately as V to the 3/4 power and N to the 1/2 power. This effect appears to limit total current leakage from the test array until sheath dimensions exceed about 1 meter. Total leakage current was also measured with the array.

  4. Geo-oculus: high resolution multi-spectral earth imaging mission from geostationary orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaillon, L.; Schull, U.; Knigge, T.; Bevillon, C.

    2017-11-01

    Geo-Oculus is a GEO-based Earth observation mission studied by Astrium for ESA in 2008-2009 to complement the Sentinel missions, the space component of the GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment & Security). Indeed Earth imaging from geostationary orbit offers new functionalities not covered by existing LEO observation missions, like real-time monitoring and fast revisit capability of any location within the huge area in visibility of the satellite. This high revisit capability is exploited by the Meteosat meteorogical satellites, but with a spatial resolution (500 m nadir for the third generation) far from most of GMES needs (10 to 100 m). To reach such ground resolution from GEO orbit with adequate image quality, large aperture instruments (> 1 m) and high pointing stability (<< 1 μrad) are required, which are the major challenges of such missions. To address the requirements from the GMES user community, the Geo-Oculus mission is a combination of routine observations (daily systematic coverage of European coastal waters) with "on-demand" observation for event monitoring (e.g. disasters, fires and oil slicks). The instrument is a large aperture imaging telescope (1.5 m diameter) offering a nadir spatial sampling of 10.5 m (21 m worst case over Europe, below 52.5°N) in a PAN visible channel used for disaster monitoring. The 22 multi-spectral channels have resolutions over Europe ranging from 40 m in UV/VNIR (0.3 to 1 μm) to 750 m in TIR (10-12 μm).

  5. High-Albedo Salt Crusts on the Tropical Ocean of Snowball Earth: Measurements and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carns, R.; Light, B.; Warren, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    During a Snowball Earth event, almost all of the ocean surface first freezes as sea ice. As in modern sea ice, trapped inclusions of liquid brine permeate the ice cover. As the ice grows and cools, salt crystals precipitate within the inclusions. At -23C, the most abundant salt in seawater, sodium chloride, begins to precipitate as the dihydrate mineral hydrohalite (NaCl·2H2O). Crystals of hydrohalite within the sea ice scatter light. Measurements of cold, natural sea ice show a broadband albedo increase of 10-20% when salt precipitates. Such snow-free natural sea ice with a surface temperature below -23C is rare on modern Earth, but would have been common in tropical regions of a Snowball Earth where evaporation exceeded precipitation. The persistent cold and lack of summer melt on the Snowball ocean surface, combined with net evaporation, is hypothesized to yield lag deposits of hydrohalite crystals on the ice surface. To investigate this process, we prepared laboratory-grown sea ice in a 1000 liter tank in a walk-in freezer laboratory. The ice was cooled below -23 C and the surface sprayed with a 23% NaCl solution to create a layer of hydrohalite-enriched ice, a proxy for lag deposits that would have formed over long periods of surface sublimation. We have developed a novel technique for measuring the spectral albedo of ice surfaces in the laboratory; this technique was used to monitor the evolution of the surface albedo of our salt crust as the ice matrix sublimated away leaving a layer of fine-grained hydrohalite crystals. Measurements of this hydrohalite surface crust show a very high albedo, comparable to fresh snow at visible wavelengths and significantly larger than fresh snow at near infrared wavelengths. Broadband albedos are 0.55 for bare artificial sea ice at -30C, 0.75 for ice containing 25% hydrohalite by volume, 0.84 after five days of desiccation and 0.93 after 47 days of desiccation. Using our laboratory measurements, along with estimates of

  6. Alkaline earth silicate wools - A new generation of high temperature insulation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert C; Harrison, Paul T C

    2012-11-01

    Intensive study of the natural asbestiform minerals that cause human diseases, and the consequent understanding of their hazardous characteristics, has enabled the development of manufactured fibres whose physical and/or chemical properties, in particular as they relate to biopersistence, have been adjusted to minimize possible harm to health. A strong driver for the developmentof new high temperature insulation materials wasthe perception of the toxicity of refractory ceramic fibres (RCF)and their classification in the EU as a category 2 carcinogen under Directive 67/548/EEC. Such classification carries with it the requirement for substitution by less hazardous materials. This paper focuses on the development of alkaline earth silicate (AES) wools as a new class of high temperature insulation with the capability of such substitution in a number of applications. These wools have only a low potential to cause harm because they do not persist in lung tissue once deposited, and have produced minimal effects in experimental test systems. AES wools are increasingly being used in a wide range of high temperature applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Design of a High Performance Earth Imagery and Raster Data Management and Processing Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Qingyun

    2016-06-01

    This paper summarizes the general requirements and specific characteristics of both geospatial raster database management system and raster data processing platform from a domain-specific perspective as well as from a computing point of view. It also discusses the need of tight integration between the database system and the processing system. These requirements resulted in Oracle Spatial GeoRaster, a global scale and high performance earth imagery and raster data management and processing platform. The rationale, design, implementation, and benefits of Oracle Spatial GeoRaster are described. Basically, as a database management system, GeoRaster defines an integrated raster data model, supports image compression, data manipulation, general and spatial indices, content and context based queries and updates, versioning, concurrency, security, replication, standby, backup and recovery, multitenancy, and ETL. It provides high scalability using computer and storage clustering. As a raster data processing platform, GeoRaster provides basic operations, image processing, raster analytics, and data distribution featuring high performance computing (HPC). Specifically, HPC features include locality computing, concurrent processing, parallel processing, and in-memory computing. In addition, the APIs and the plug-in architecture are discussed.

  8. Graduate Student and High School Teacher Partnerships Implementing Inquiry-Based Lessons in Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. A.; Preston, L.; Graham, K.

    2007-12-01

    Partnering science graduate students with high school teachers in their classroom is a mutually beneficial relationship. Graduate students who may become future university level faculty are exposed to teaching, classroom management, outreach scholarship, and managing time between teaching and research. Teachers benefit by having ready access to knowledgeable scientists, a link to university resources, and an additional adult in the classroom. Partnerships in Research Opportunities to Benefit Education (PROBE), a recent NSF funded GK-12 initiative, formed partnerships between science and math graduate students from the University of New Hampshire (UNH) and local high school science teachers. A primary goal of this program was to promote inquiry-based science lessons. The teacher-graduate student teams worked together approximately twenty hours per week on researching, preparing, and implementing new lessons and supervising student-led projects. Several new inquiry-based activities in Geology and Astronomy were developed as a result of collaboration between an Earth Science graduate student and high school teacher. For example, a "fishbowl" activity was very successful in sparking a classroom discussion about how minerals are used in industrial materials. The class then went on to research how to make their own paint using minerals. This activity provided a capstone project at the end of the unit about minerals, and made real world connections to the subject. A more involved geology lesson was developed focusing on the currently popular interest in forensics. Students were assigned with researching how geology can play an important part in solving a crime. When they understood the role of geologic concepts within the scope of the forensic world, they used techniques to solve their own "crime". Astronomy students were responsible for hosting and teaching middle school students about constellations, using a star- finder, and operating an interactive planetarium

  9. Novel Techniques for High Pressure Falling Sphere Viscosimetry under Simulated Earth's Mantle Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, H. J.; Beckmann, F.; Dobson, D. P.; Hunt, S. A.; Secco, R.; Lauterjung, J.; Lathe, C.

    2014-12-01

    Viscosity data of melts measured under in situ high pressure conditions are crucial for the understanding of Earth's lower mantle and the interior of terrestrial and extrasolar Super-Earth planets. We report recent technical advances and techniques enabling falling sphere viscosity measurements in single- and double-stage DIA-type multi-anvil apparatus. For the experiments we used presses with a maximum load of 250 tons and 1750 tons. We anticipate that our system will enable viscosity measurements up to the maximum pressure for non-diamond anvils, i.e. pressures up to some 30 GPa. For the development of the new set ups the deformation of the cell assemblies were analyzed by X-ray absorption tomography at beamline W II at DESY/HASYLAB after the high pressure runs. These analysis gave considerable insights into strategies for improving the cell assembly with the result that the optimized assemblies could be used at much higher pressures without blow-outs. We think this approach is much faster and more beneficial than the classical way of trial and error. Additionally to prevent high pressure blow outs the task was to make the whole melting chamber accessible for the high pressure X-radiography system up to the maximum pressures. This way the accuracy and reliability of the measurements can be improved. For this goal we used X-ray transparent cBN-anvils at the single-stage DIA large volume press. Because this material is recently not available for the cube size of 32 mm this aproach did not work for the double-stage DIA. As a very useful and economical alternative we used slotted carbide anvils filled with fired pyrophyllite bars. To improve the frame quality of the platinum spheres taken by the CCD-camera the energy of the monochromatic X-rays had to be increased to 100 keV. The resulting ascent of scattered radiation required a new design of the X-radiography unit. Our results are demonstrated with viscosity measurements following Stokes law by evaluation of X

  10. Silicate garnet studies at high pressures: A view into the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Pamela Gales

    Silicate garnets are an abundant component in the Earth's upper mantle and transition zone. Therefore, an understanding of garnet behavior under the pressure and temperature conditions of the mantle is critical to the development of models for mantle mineralogy and dynamics. Work from three projects is presented in this report. Each investigation explores an aspect of silicate garnet behavior under high pressures. Moreover, each investigation was made possible by state-of-the-art methods that have previously been unavailable. Brillouin scattering was used to determine the elastic constants and aggregate elastic moduli of three end-member garnets at high pressures in a diamond anvil cell. These are the first high-pressure measurements of the elastic constants of end-member silicate garnets by direct measurement of acoustic velocities. The results indicate that the pressure dependence of silicate garnet elastic constants varies with composition. Therefore, extrapolation from measurements on mixed composition garnets is not possible. A new method of laser heating minerals in a diamond anvil cell has made possible the determination of the high-pressure and high-temperature stability of almandine garnet. This garnet does not transform to a silicate perovskite phase as does pyrope garnet, but it decomposes to its constituent oxides: FeO, Alsb2Osb3, and SiOsb2. These results disprove an earlier prediction that ferrous iron may expand the stability field of garnet to the lower mantle. The present results demonstrate that this is not the case. The third topic is a presentation of the results of a new technique for studying inclusions in mantle xenoliths with synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction. The results demonstrate the importance of obtaining structural as well as chemical information on inclusions within diamonds and other high-pressure minerals. An unusual phase with garnet composition is investigated and several other phases are identified from a suite of natural

  11. Science Syllabus for Middle and Junior High Schools. Block D, The Earth's Changing Surface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of General Education Curriculum Development.

    This syllabus begins with a list of program objectives and performance criteria for the study of three general topic areas in earth science and a list of 22 science processes. Following this information is a listing of concepts and understandings for subtopics within the general topic areas: (1) the earth's surface--surface features, rock…

  12. High-grade, compact spectrometers for Earth observation from SmallSats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wal, L. F.; de Goeij, B. T. G.; Jansen, R.; Oosterling, J. A. J.; Snijders, B.

    2016-10-01

    The market for nano- and microsatellites is developing rapidly. There is a strong focus on 2D imaging of the Earth's surface, with limited possibilities to obtain spectral information. More demanding applications, such as monitoring trace gases, aerosols or water quality still require advanced imaging instruments, which are large, heavy and expensive. In recent years TNO has investigated and developed different innovative designs to realize advanced spectrometers for space applications in a more compact and cost-effective manner. This offers multiple advantages: a compact instrument can be flown on a much smaller platform (nano- or microsatellite); a low-cost instrument opens up the possibility to fly multiple instruments in a satellite constellation, improving both global coverage and temporal sampling (e.g. to study diurnal processes); a constellation of low-cost instruments may provide added value to the larger scientific and operational satellite missions (e.g. the Copernicus Sentinel missions); and a small, lightweight spectrometer can also be mounted easily on a high-altitude UAV (offering high spatial resolution). Last but not least, a low-cost instrument may allow to break through the `cost spiral': lower cost will allow to take more risk and thus progress more quickly. This may lead to a much faster development cycle than customary for current Earth Observation instruments. To explore the potential of a constellation of low-cost instruments a consortium of Dutch partners was formed, which currently consists of Airbus Defence and Space Netherlands, ISISpace, S and T and TNO. In this paper we will illustrate this new design approach by using the most advanced design of a hyperspectral imaging spectrometer (named `Spectrolite') as an example. We will discuss the different design and manufacturing techniques that were used to realize this compact and low-cost design. Laboratory tests as well as the first preliminary results of airborne measurements with the

  13. Enabling Earth-Abundant Pyrite (FeS2) Semiconductor Nanostructures for High Performance Photovoltaic Devices

    SciT

    Jin, Song

    2014-11-18

    This project seeks to develop nanostructures of iron pyrite, an earth-abundant semiconductor, to enable their applications in high-performance photovoltaic (PV) devices. Growth of high purity iron pyrite nanostructures (nanowires, nanorods, and nanoplates), as well as iron pyrite thin films and single crystals, has been developed and their structures characterized. These structures have been fundamentally investigated to understand the origin of the low solar energy conversion efficiency of iron pyrite and various passivation strategies and doping approaches have been explored in order to improve it. By taking advantage of the high surface-to-bulk ratio in nanostructures and effective electrolyte gating, we fullymore » characterized both the surface inversion and bulk electrical transport properties for the first time through electrolyte-gated Hall measurements of pyrite nanoplate devices and show that pyrite is n-type in the bulk and p-type near the surface due to strong inversion, which has important consequences to using nanocrystalline pyrite for efficient solar energy conversion. Furthermore, through a comprehensive investigation on n-type iron pyrite single crystals, we found the ionization of high-density bulk deep donor states, likely resulting from bulk sulfur vacancies, creates a non-constant charge distribution and a very narrow surface space charge region that limits the total barrier height, thus satisfactorily explains the limited photovoltage and poor photoconversion efficiency of iron pyrite single crystals. These findings suggest new ideas on how to improve single crystal pyrite and nanocrystalline or polycrystalline pyrite films to enable them for high performance solar applications.« less

  14. Use and Protection of GPS Sidelobe Signals for Enhanced Navigation Performance in High Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Joel J. K.; Valdez, Jennifer E.; Bauer, Frank H.; Moreau, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    The application of the Global Positioning System (GPS) for navigation of spacecraft in High and Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (HEO/GEO) has crossed a threshold and is now being employed in operational missions. Utilizing advanced GPS receivers optimized for these missions, space users have made extensive use of the sidelobe transmissions from the GPS satellites to realize navigation performance that far exceeds that predicted by pre-launch simulations. Unfortunately, the official specification for the GPS Space Service Volume (SSV), developed in 2006, assumes that only signals emanating from the main beam of the GPS transmit antenna are useful for navigation, which greatly under-estimates the number of signals available for navigation purposes. As a result, future high-altitude space users may be vulnerable to any GPS design changes that suppress the sidelobe transmissions, beginning with Block III space vehicles (SVs) 11-32. This paper presents proposed changes to the GPS system SSV requirements, as informed by data from recent experiments in the SSV and new mission applications that are enabled by GPS navigation in HEO/GEO regimes. The NASA/NOAA GOES-R series satellites are highlighted as an example of a mission that relies on this currently-unspecified GPS system performance to meet mission requirements.

  15. Challenges in the development of very high resolution Earth System Models for climate science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasch, Philip J.; Xie, Shaocheng; Ma, Po-Lun; Lin, Wuyin; Wan, Hui; Qian, Yun

    2017-04-01

    The authors represent the 20+ members of the ACME atmosphere development team. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has, like many other organizations around the world, identified the need for an Earth System Model capable of rapid completion of decade to century length simulations at very high (vertical and horizontal) resolution with good climate fidelity. Two years ago DOE initiated a multi-institution effort called ACME (Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy) to meet this an extraordinary challenge, targeting a model eventually capable of running at 10-25km horizontal and 20-400m vertical resolution through the troposphere on exascale computational platforms at speeds sufficient to complete 5+ simulated years per day. I will outline the challenges our team has encountered in development of the atmosphere component of this model, and the strategies we have been using for tuning and debugging a model that we can barely afford to run on today's computational platforms. These strategies include: 1) evaluation at lower resolutions; 2) ensembles of short simulations to explore parameter space, and perform rough tuning and evaluation; 3) use of regionally refined versions of the model for probing high resolution model behavior at less expense; 4) use of "auto-tuning" methodologies for model tuning; and 5) brute force long climate simulations.

  16. A new high resolution permafrost map of Iceland from Earth Observation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnie, Talfan; Conway, Susan; Balme, Matt; Graham, Alastair

    2017-04-01

    High resolution maps of permafrost are required for ongoing monitoring of environmental change and the resulting hazards to ecosystems, people and infrastructure. However, permafrost maps are difficult to construct - direct observations require maintaining networks of sensors and boreholes in harsh environments and are thus limited in extent in space and time, and indirect observations require models or assumptions relating the measurements (e.g. weather station air temperature, basal snow temperature) to ground temperature. Operationally produced Land Surface Temperature maps from Earth Observation data can be used to make spatially contiguous estimates of mean annual skin temperature, which has been used a proxy for the presence of permafrost. However these maps are subject to biases due to (i) selective sampling during the day due to limited satellite overpass times, (ii) selective sampling over the year due to seasonally varying cloud cover, (iii) selective sampling of LST only during clearsky conditions, (iv) errors in cloud masking (v) errors in temperature emissivity separation (vi) smoothing over spatial variability. In this study we attempt to compensate for some of these problems using a bayesian modelling approach and high resolution topography-based downscaling.

  17. Designing Delta-DOR acquisition strategies to determine highly elliptical earth orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frauenholz, R. B.

    1986-01-01

    Delta-DOR acquisition strategies are designed for use in determining highly elliptical earth orbits. The requirements for a possible flight demonstration are evaluated for the Charged Composition Explorer spacecraft of the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers. The best-performing strategy uses data spanning the view periods of two orthogonal baselines near the same orbit periapse. The rapidly changing viewing geometry yields both angular position and velocity information, but each observation may require a different reference quasar. The Delta-DOR data noise is highly dependent on acquisition geometry, varying several orders of magnitude across the baseline view periods. Strategies are selected to minimize the measurement noise predicted by a theoretical model. Although the CCE transponder is limited by S-band and a small bandwidth, the addition of Delta-DOR to coherent Doppler and range improves the one-sigma apogee position accuracy by more than an order of magnitude. Additional Delta-DOR accuracy improvements possible using dual-frequency (S/X) calibration, increased spanned bandwidth, and water-vapor radiometry are presented for comparison. With these benefits, the residual Delta-DOR data noise is primarily due to quasar position uncertainties.

  18. Earth Observations

    2010-06-16

    ISS024-E-006136 (16 June 2010) --- Polar mesospheric clouds, illuminated by an orbital sunrise, are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 24 crew member on the International Space Station. Polar mesospheric, or noctilucent (?night shining?), clouds are observed from both Earth?s surface and in orbit by crew members aboard the space station. They are called night-shining clouds as they are usually seen at twilight. Following the setting of the sun below the horizon and darkening of Earth?s surface, these high clouds are still briefly illuminated by sunlight. Occasionally the ISS orbital track becomes nearly parallel to Earth?s day/night terminator for a time, allowing polar mesospheric clouds to be visible to the crew at times other than the usual twilight due to the space station altitude. This unusual photograph shows polar mesospheric clouds illuminated by the rising, rather than setting, sun at center right. Low clouds on the horizon appear yellow and orange, while higher clouds and aerosols are illuminated a brilliant white. Polar mesospheric clouds appear as light blue ribbons extending across the top of the image. These clouds typically occur at high latitudes of both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, and at fairly high altitudes of 76?85 kilometers (near the boundary between the mesosphere and thermosphere atmospheric layers). The ISS was located over the Greek island of Kos in the Aegean Sea (near the southwestern coastline of Turkey) when the image was taken at approximately midnight local time. The orbital complex was tracking northeastward, nearly parallel to the terminator, making it possible to observe an apparent ?sunrise? located almost due north. A similar unusual alignment of the ISS orbit track, terminator position, and seasonal position of Earth?s orbit around the sun allowed for striking imagery of polar mesospheric clouds over the Southern Hemisphere earlier this year.

  19. An autonomous navigation algorithm for high orbit satellite using star sensor and ultraviolet earth sensor.

    PubMed

    Baohua, Li; Wenjie, Lai; Yun, Chen; Zongming, Liu

    2013-01-01

    An autonomous navigation algorithm using the sensor that integrated the star sensor (FOV1) and ultraviolet earth sensor (FOV2) is presented. The star images are sampled by FOV1, and the ultraviolet earth images are sampled by the FOV2. The star identification algorithm and star tracking algorithm are executed at FOV1. Then, the optical axis direction of FOV1 at J2000.0 coordinate system is calculated. The ultraviolet image of earth is sampled by FOV2. The center vector of earth at FOV2 coordinate system is calculated with the coordinates of ultraviolet earth. The autonomous navigation data of satellite are calculated by integrated sensor with the optical axis direction of FOV1 and the center vector of earth from FOV2. The position accuracy of the autonomous navigation for satellite is improved from 1000 meters to 300 meters. And the velocity accuracy of the autonomous navigation for satellite is improved from 100 m/s to 20 m/s. At the same time, the period sine errors of the autonomous navigation for satellite are eliminated. The autonomous navigation for satellite with a sensor that integrated ultraviolet earth sensor and star sensor is well robust.

  20. An Autonomous Navigation Algorithm for High Orbit Satellite Using Star Sensor and Ultraviolet Earth Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Baohua, Li; Wenjie, Lai; Yun, Chen; Zongming, Liu

    2013-01-01

    An autonomous navigation algorithm using the sensor that integrated the star sensor (FOV1) and ultraviolet earth sensor (FOV2) is presented. The star images are sampled by FOV1, and the ultraviolet earth images are sampled by the FOV2. The star identification algorithm and star tracking algorithm are executed at FOV1. Then, the optical axis direction of FOV1 at J2000.0 coordinate system is calculated. The ultraviolet image of earth is sampled by FOV2. The center vector of earth at FOV2 coordinate system is calculated with the coordinates of ultraviolet earth. The autonomous navigation data of satellite are calculated by integrated sensor with the optical axis direction of FOV1 and the center vector of earth from FOV2. The position accuracy of the autonomous navigation for satellite is improved from 1000 meters to 300 meters. And the velocity accuracy of the autonomous navigation for satellite is improved from 100 m/s to 20 m/s. At the same time, the period sine errors of the autonomous navigation for satellite are eliminated. The autonomous navigation for satellite with a sensor that integrated ultraviolet earth sensor and star sensor is well robust. PMID:24250261

  1. Physical modeling and high-performance GPU computing for characterization, interception, and disruption of hazardous near-Earth objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplinger, Brian Douglas

    For the past few decades, both the scientific community and the general public have been becoming more aware that the Earth lives in a shooting gallery of small objects. We classify all of these asteroids and comets, known or unknown, that cross Earth's orbit as near-Earth objects (NEOs). A look at our geologic history tells us that NEOs have collided with Earth in the past, and we expect that they will continue to do so. With thousands of known NEOs crossing the orbit of Earth, there has been significant scientific interest in developing the capability to deflect an NEO from an impacting trajectory. This thesis applies the ideas of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) theory to the NEO disruption problem. A simulation package was designed that allows efficacy simulation to be integrated into the mission planning and design process. This is done by applying ideas in high-performance computing (HPC) on the computer graphics processing unit (GPU). Rather than prove a concept through large standalone simulations on a supercomputer, a highly parallel structure allows for flexible, target dependent questions to be resolved. Built around nonclassified data and analysis, this computer package will allow academic institutions to better tackle the issue of NEO mitigation effectiveness.

  2. Orbit determination of highly elliptical Earth orbiters using improved Doppler data-processing modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estefan, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    A navigation error covariance analysis of four highly elliptical Earth orbits is described, with apogee heights ranging from 20,000 to 76,800 km and perigee heights ranging from 1,000 to 5,000 km. This analysis differs from earlier studies in that improved navigation data-processing modes were used to reduce the radio metric data. For this study, X-band (8.4-GHz) Doppler data were assumed to be acquired from two Deep Space Network radio antennas and reconstructed orbit errors propagated over a single day. Doppler measurements were formulated as total-count phase measurements and compared to the traditional formulation of differenced-count frequency measurements. In addition, an enhanced data-filtering strategy was used, which treated the principal ground system calibration errors affecting the data as filter parameters. Results suggest that a 40- to 60-percent accuracy improvement may be achievable over traditional data-processing modes in reconstructed orbit errors, with a substantial reduction in reconstructed velocity errors at perigee. Historically, this has been a regime in which stringent navigation requirements have been difficult to meet by conventional methods.

  3. High Accuracy Ground-based near-Earth-asteroid Astrometry using Synthetic Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Chengxing; Shao, Michael; Saini, Navtej; Sandhu, Jagmit; Werne, Thomas; Choi, Philip; Ely, Todd A.; Jacobs, Chirstopher S.; Lazio, Joseph; Martin-Mur, Tomas J.; Owen, William M.; Preston, Robert; Turyshev, Slava; Michell, Adam; Nazli, Kutay; Cui, Isaac; Monchama, Rachel

    2018-01-01

    Accurate astrometry is crucial for determining the orbits of near-Earth-asteroids (NEAs). Further, the future of deep space high data rate communications is likely to be optical communications, such as the Deep Space Optical Communications package that is part of the baseline payload for the planned Psyche Discovery mission to the Psyche asteroid. We have recently upgraded our instrument on the Pomona College 1 m telescope, at JPL's Table Mountain Facility, for conducting synthetic tracking by taking many short exposure images. These images can be then combined in post-processing to track both asteroid and reference stars to yield accurate astrometry. Utilizing the precision of the current and future Gaia data releases, the JPL-Pomona College effort is now demonstrating precision astrometry on NEAs, which is likely to be of considerable value for cataloging NEAs. Further, treating NEAs as proxies of future spacecraft that carry optical communication lasers, our results serve as a measure of the astrometric accuracy that could be achieved for future plane-of-sky optical navigation.

  4. Highly efficient luminescent solar concentrators based on earth-abundant indirect-bandgap silicon quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinardi, Francesco; Ehrenberg, Samantha; Dhamo, Lorena; Carulli, Francesco; Mauri, Michele; Bruni, Francesco; Simonutti, Roberto; Kortshagen, Uwe; Brovelli, Sergio

    2017-02-01

    Building-integrated photovoltaics is gaining consensus as a renewable energy technology for producing electricity at the point of use. Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) could extend architectural integration to the urban environment by realizing electrode-less photovoltaic windows. Crucial for large-area LSCs is the suppression of reabsorption losses, which requires emitters with negligible overlap between their absorption and emission spectra. Here, we demonstrate the use of indirect-bandgap semiconductor nanostructures such as highly emissive silicon quantum dots. Silicon is non-toxic, low-cost and ultra-earth-abundant, which avoids the limitations to the industrial scaling of quantum dots composed of low-abundance elements. Suppressed reabsorption and scattering losses lead to nearly ideal LSCs with an optical efficiency of η = 2.85%, matching state-of-the-art semi-transparent LSCs. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that optimized silicon quantum dot LSCs have a clear path to η > 5% for 1 m2 devices. We are finally able to realize flexible LSCs with performances comparable to those of flat concentrators, which opens the way to a new design freedom for building-integrated photovoltaics elements.

  5. Magellan radar image compared to high resolution Earth-based image of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A strip of a Magellan radar image (left) is compared to a high resolution Earth-based radar image of Venus, obtained by the U.S. National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center's Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico. The small white box in the Arecibo image corresponds to the Magellan image. This portion of the Magellan imagery shows a small region on the east flank of a major volcanic upland called Beta Regio. The image is centered at 23 degrees north latitude and 286.7 degrees east longitude. The ridge and valley network in the middle part of the image is formed by intersecting faults which have broken the Venusian crust into a complex deformed type of surface called tessera, the Latin word for tile. The parallel mountains and valleys resemble the Basin and Range Province in the western United States. The irregular dark patch near the top of the image is a smooth surface, probably formed, according to scientists, by lava flows in a region about 10 kilometers (6 miles) across. Similar dark sur

  6. High Resolution Spectroscopic Database for the NASA Earth Observing System Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Laurence

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this project has been to develop and enhance the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic database and associated software to support the observational programs of the Earth Observing System (EOS). Emphasis has been on the EOS projects: the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the High-Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS), Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT), the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), and the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE III). The HITRAN program is also involved in the Ozone Monitoring Experiment (OMI). The data requirements of these programs in terms of spectroscopy are varied with respect to constituents being observed, required remote-sensing parameters, and spectral coverage. A general requisite is for additional spectral parameters and improvements to existing molecular bands sufficient for the simulation of the observations leading to retrieval of the atmospheric state. In addition, cross-section data for heavier molecular species must be expanded and made amenable to modeling in remote sensing. The effort in the project also includes developing software and distribution to make access, manipulation, and use of HITRAN functional to the EOS program.

  7. High-Resolution Spectroscopic Database for the NASA Earth Observing System Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Laurence S.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and enhance the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic database and associated - software to support the observational programs of the Earth observing System (EOS). In particular, the focus is on the EOS projects: the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the High-Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS), Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT), the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), and the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE III). The HITRAN program is also involved in the Ozone Monitoring Experiment (OMI). The data requirements of these programs in terms of spectroscopy are varied with respect to constituents being observed, required remote-sensing parameters, and spectral coverage. A general requisite is for additional spectral parameters and improvements to existing molecular bands sufficient for the simulation of the observations leading to retrieval of the atmospheric state. In addition cross-section data for heavier molecular species must be expanded and made amenable to modeling in remote sensing. The effort in the project also includes developing software and distribution to make access, manipulation, and use HITRAN functional to the EOS program.

  8. High-Resolution Spectroscopic Database for the NASA Earth Observing System Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Laurence

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and enhance the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic database and associated software to support the observational programs of the Earth Observing System (EOS). In particular, the focus is on the EOS projects: the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the High-Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS), Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT), the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), and the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE III). The HITRAN program is also involved in the Ozone Monitoring Experiment (OMI). The data requirements of these programs in terms of spectroscopy are varied with respect to constituents being observed, required remote-sensing parameters, and spectral coverage. A general requisite is for additional spectral parameters and improvements to existing molecular bands sufficient for the simulation of the observations leading to retrieval of the atmospheric state. In addition, cross-section data for heavier molecular species must be expanded and made amenable to modeling in remote sensing. The effort in the project also includes developing software and distribution to make access, manipulation, and use of HITRAN functional to the EOS program.

  9. High Accuracy Ground-based near-Earth-asteroid Astrometry using Synthetic Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, C.; Shao, M.; Saini, N. S.; Sandhu, J. S.; Werne, T. A.; Choi, P.; Ely, T. A.; Jacobs, C.; Lazio, J.; Martin-Mur, T. J.; Owen, W. K.; Preston, R. A.; Turyshev, S. G.

    2017-12-01

    Accurate astrometry is crucial for determining the orbits of near-Earth-asteroids (NEAs). Further, the future of deep space high data rate communications is likely to be optical communications, such as the Deep Space Optical Communications package to be carried on the Psyche Discovery mission to the Psyche asteroid. We have recently upgraded our instrument on the Pomona College 1 m telescope, at JPL's Table Mountain Facility, for conducting synthetic tracking by taking many short exposure images. These images can be then combined in post-processing to track both asteroid and reference stars to yield accurate astrometry. Utilizing the precision of the current and future Gaia data releases, the JPL-Pomona College effort is now demonstrating precision astrometry on NEAs, which is likely to be of considerable value for cataloging NEAs. Further, treating NEAs as proxies of future spacecraft that carry optical communication lasers, our results serve as a measure of the astrometric accuracy that could be achieved for future plane-of-sky optical navigation.

  10. High-pressure high-temperature crystal growth of equiatomic rare earth stannides RENiSn and REPdSn

    SciT

    Heymann, Gunter; Heying, Birgit; Rodewald, Ute Ch.

    2016-04-15

    The two series of equiatomic rare earth (RE) stannides RENiSn and REPdSn were systematically studied with respect to high-pressure modifications. The normal-pressure (NP) low-temperature (LT) modifications were synthesized by arc-melting and subsequently treated under high-pressure (P{sub max}=11.5 GPa) and high-temperature (T{sub max}=1570 K) conditions in a Walker-type multi-anvil press. The pressure and temperature conditions were systematically varied in order to improve the crystallization conditions. The new ZrNiAl-type high-pressure modifications HP-RENiSn (RE=Sc, Y, La, Gd–Lu) and HP-REPdSn (RE=Y, Sm–Dy) were obtained in 80 mg quantities, several of them in X-ray pure form. Some of the REPdSn stannides with the heavy raremore » earth elements show high-temperature (HT) modifications. The structures of HP-ScNiSn, HP-GdNiSn, HP-DyNiSn (both ZrNiAl-type), NP-YbNiSn, and HT-ErPdSn (both TiNiSi-type) were refined from single crystal diffractometer data, indicating full ordering of the transition metal and tin sites. TiNiSi-type NP-EuPdSn transforms to MgZn{sub 2}-type HP-EuPdSn: P6{sub 3}/mmc, a=588.5(2), c=917.0(3) pm, wR2=0.0769, 211 F{sup 2} values, 11 variables. The structure refinement indicated statistical occupancy of the palladium and tin sites on the tetrahedral network. The X-ray pure high-pressure phases were studied with respect to their magnetic properties. HP-YPdSn is a Pauli paramagnet. The susceptibility data of HP-TbNiSn, HP-DyNiSn, HP-GdPdSn, and HP-TbPdSn show experimental magnetic moments close to the free ion values of RE{sup 3+} and antiferromagnetic ordering at low temperature with the highest Néel temperature of 15.8 K for HP-TbPdSn. HP-SmPdSn shows the typical Van Vleck type behavior along with antiferromagnetic ordering at T{sub N}=5.1 K. HP-EuPdSn shows divalent europium and antiferromagnetic ordering at 8.9 K followed by a spin reorientation at 5.7 K. - Graphical abstract: Packing of the polyhedra in the high-pressure phase of

  11. High Temperature Chemistry of Rare Earth Compounds: Dramatic Examples of Periodicity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cater, E. David

    1978-01-01

    Reports that energy required to promote a 4f electron to the 5d level has a profound and predictable influence on the systematics of reactions involving conversion of rare earth atoms from combined to free states. (Author/MA)

  12. High Precision Isotope Analyses Using Multi-Collector SIMS: Applications to Earth and Planetary Science.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, N. T.; Ushikubo, T.; Valley, J. W.

    2008-05-01

    Ga) might preserve their primary oxygen isotopic records, which allows us to trace the geological processes of the early earth [1]. Lithium isotope analyses of pre- 4Ga zircon from Jack Hills show high Li abundance and low δ 7Li, indicating existence of highly weathered crustal material as early as 4.3Ga. In conclusion, these new techniques allow us to study small natural variations of stable isotopes at μm-scale that permit exciting and fundamental research where samples are small, precious, or zoned. [1] Page FZ et al. (2007) Am Min 92, 1772-1775.

  13. Super earth interiors and validity of Birch's Law for ultra-high pressure metals and ionic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Lucas Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Super Earths, recently detected by the Kepler Mission, expand the ensemble of known terrestrial planets beyond our Solar System's limited group. Birch's Law and velocity-density systematics have been crucial in constraining our knowledge of the composition of Earth's mantle and core. Recently published static diamond anvil cell experimental measurements of sound velocities in iron, a key deep element in most super Earth models, are inconsistent with each other with regard to the validity of Birch's Law. We examine the range of validity of Birch's Law for several metallic elements, including iron, and ionic solids shocked with a two-stage light gas gun into the ultra-high pressure, temperature fluid state and make comparisons to the recent static data.

  14. Electron Scattering by High-Frequency Whistler Waves at Earth's Bow Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oka, M.; Wilson, L. B., III; Phan, T. D.; Hull, A. J.; Amano, T.; Hoshino, M.; Argall, M. R.; Le Contel, O.; Agapitov, O.; Gersham, D. J.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Electrons are accelerated to non-thermal energies at shocks in space and astrophysical environments. While different mechanisms of electron acceleration have been proposed, it remains unclear how non-thermal electrons are produced out of the thermal plasma pool. Here, we report in situ evidence of pitch-angle scattering of non-thermal electrons by whistler waves at Earths bow shock. On 2015 November 4, the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission crossed the bow shock with an Alfvn Mach number is approximately 11 and a shock angle of approximately 84deg. In the ramp and overshoot regions, MMS revealed bursty enhancements of non-thermal (0.52 keV) electron flux, correlated with high-frequency (0.2 - 0.4 Omega(sub ce), where Omega(sub ce) is the cyclotron frequency) parallel-propagating whistler waves. The electron velocity distribution (measured at 30 ms cadence) showed an enhanced gradient of phase-space density at and around the region where the electron velocity component parallel to the magnetic field matched the resonant energy inferred from the wave frequency range. The flux of 0.5 keV electrons (measured at 1ms cadence) showed fluctuations with the same frequency. These features indicate that non-thermal electrons were pitch-angle scattered by cyclotron resonance with the high-frequency whistler waves. However, the precise role of the pitch-angle scattering by the higher-frequency whistler waves and possible nonlinear effects in the electron acceleration process remains unclear.

  15. High-resolution Earth-based lunar radar studies: Applications to lunar resource assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacy, N. J. S.; Campbell, D. B.

    1992-01-01

    The lunar regolith will most likely be a primary raw material for lunar base construction and resource extraction. High-resolution radar observations of the Moon provide maps of radar backscatter that have intensity variations generally controlled by the local slope, material, and structural properties of the regolith. The properties that can be measured by the radar system include the dielectric constant, density, loss tangent, and wavelength scale roughness. The radar systems currently in operation at several astronomical observatories provide the ability to image the lunar surface at spatial resolutions approaching 30 m at 3.8 cm and 12.6 cm wavelengths and approximately 500 m at 70 cm wavelength. The radar signal penetrates the lunar regolith to a depth of 10-20 wavelengths so the measured backscatter contains contributions from the vacuum-regolith interface and from wavelength-scale heterogeneities in the electrical properties of the subsurface material. The three wavelengths, which are sensitive to different scale structures and scattering volumes, provide complementary information on the regolith properties. Aims of the previous and future observations include (1) analysis of the scattering properties associated with fresh impact craters, impact crater rays, and mantled deposits; (2) analysis of high-incidence-angle observations of the lunar mare to investigate measurement of the regolith dielectric constant and hence porosity; (3) investigation of interferometric techniques using two time-delayed observations of the same site, observations that require a difference in viewing geometry less than 0.05 deg and, hence, fortuitous alignment of the Earth-Moon system when visible from Arecibo Observatory.

  16. Mineralogical modeling of the anisotropic inner core based on the phase relations and elasticity of iron and iron alloys under the Earth's core condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwayama, Y.; Tsuchiya, T.; Ohishi, Y.

    2011-12-01

    investigate the nature of the Earth's inner core, we conducted a series of high P-T experiments on various iron-rich iron-alloys using laser-heated diamond anvil cells on the basis of in-situ x-ray diffraction measurements at SPring-8, Japan, along with ab-initio density functional simulations, under the Earth's core condition. Here we will present a mineralogical model of the observed anisotropy in the inner core based on the experimental and theoretical studies on the phase relations and physical properties of iron-alloys.

  17. Structure and Stability of High-Pressure Dolomite with Implications for the Earth's Deep Carbon Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomatova, N. V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon is subducted into the mantle primarily in the form of metasomatically calcium-enriched basaltic rock, calcified serpentinites and carbonaceous ooze. The fate of these carbonates in subduction zones is not well understood. End-member CaMg(CO3)2 dolomite typically breaks down into two carbonates at 2-7 GPa, which may further decompose to oxides and CO2-bearing fluid. However, high-pressure X-ray diffraction experiments have recently shown that the presence of iron may be sufficient to stabilize dolomite I to high pressures, allowing the transformation to dolomite II at 17 GPa and subsequently to dolomite III at 35 GPa [1][2]. Such phases may be a principal host for deeply subducted carbon. The structure and equation of state of these high-pressure phases is debated and the effect of varying concentrations of iron is unknown, creating a need for theoretical calculations. Here we compare calculated dolomite structures to experimentally observed phases. Using the Vienna ab-initio simulation package (VASP) interfaced with a genetic algorithm that predicts crystal structures (USPEX), a monoclinic phase with space group 5 ("dolomite sg5") was found for pure end-member dolomite. Dolomite sg5 has a lower energy than reported dolomite structures and an equation of state that resembles that of dolomite III. It is possible that dolomite sg5 is not achieved experimentally due to a large energy barrier and a correspondingly large required volume drop, resulting in the transformation to metastable dolomite II. Due to the complex energy landscape for candidate high-pressure dolomite structures, it is likely that several competing polymorphs exist. Determining the behavior of high-pressure Ca-Mg-Fe(-Mn) dolomite phases in subduction environments is critical for our understanding of the Earth's deep carbon cycle and supercell calculations with Fe substitution are in progress. [1] Mao, Z., Armentrout, M., Rainey, E., Manning, C. E., Dera, P., Prakapenka, V. B., and Kavner, A

  18. Analysis the configuration of earthing system based on high-low and low-high soil structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramani, A. N.; Ahmad, Abdul Rahman; Sulaima, M. F.; Nasir, M. N. M.; Ahmad, Arfah

    2015-05-01

    Each TNB transmission tower requires a tower footing resistance (TFR) with a lower grounding resistance value that depends on the transmission line voltage. For 132kV and 275kV tower, the TFR must less than 10Ω and 500kV tower must less than 5Ω. The TFR is changeable with variable factors such as soil resistivity. Low TFR provides essential protection to the fault such as lightning strike that may occur at any time. The fault current flow to the lowest resistance path and easily disperses to earth. Back flashover voltage across the insulator of transmission lines may occur when the TFR is high. The TFR is influenced by soil resistivity. There are three parameters affecting the soil resistivity; moisture content, salt content and temperature of the soil. High moisture content in soil will reduce the soil resistivity and resultant low TFR. Small scale moisture control by using Micro Reservoir (MR) irrigation with semi-permeable membranes have the power to offer the stable moisture in soil. By using osmosis concept, it is the process of net movement of water molecules from high potential water to lower potential water though a semi permeable membrane. The MR can withstand for 3 to 5 days without continuous water supply. The MR installed in the centre of the tower that contains a multiple parallel of electrode rods. The concentrated of electrode rods grounding configuration with a combination of MR will improve the TFR even at multilayer soil. As a result, MR gives a little improvement to TFR. The MR in area of concentrated electrode rod configuration to ensure the soil always wet and moist at all times. The changes in soil affect the tower-footing-resistance. The tower-footing-resistance measurement at afternoon is higher than at evening because of the temperature and moisture content in soil is change due to sun radiation.

  19. Analysis the configuration of earthing system based on high-low and low-high soil structure

    SciT

    Ramani, A. N.; Ahmad, Abdul Rahman; Sulaima, M. F.

    2015-05-15

    Each TNB transmission tower requires a tower footing resistance (TFR) with a lower grounding resistance value that depends on the transmission line voltage. For 132kV and 275kV tower, the TFR must less than 10Ω and 500kV tower must less than 5Ω. The TFR is changeable with variable factors such as soil resistivity. Low TFR provides essential protection to the fault such as lightning strike that may occur at any time. The fault current flow to the lowest resistance path and easily disperses to earth. Back flashover voltage across the insulator of transmission lines may occur when the TFR is high.more » The TFR is influenced by soil resistivity. There are three parameters affecting the soil resistivity; moisture content, salt content and temperature of the soil. High moisture content in soil will reduce the soil resistivity and resultant low TFR. Small scale moisture control by using Micro Reservoir (MR) irrigation with semi-permeable membranes have the power to offer the stable moisture in soil. By using osmosis concept, it is the process of net movement of water molecules from high potential water to lower potential water though a semi permeable membrane. The MR can withstand for 3 to 5 days without continuous water supply. The MR installed in the centre of the tower that contains a multiple parallel of electrode rods. The concentrated of electrode rods grounding configuration with a combination of MR will improve the TFR even at multilayer soil. As a result, MR gives a little improvement to TFR. The MR in area of concentrated electrode rod configuration to ensure the soil always wet and moist at all times. The changes in soil affect the tower-footing-resistance. The tower-footing-resistance measurement at afternoon is higher than at evening because of the temperature and moisture content in soil is change due to sun radiation.« less

  20. Evidence for {100}<011> slip in ferropericlase in Earth's lower mantle from high-pressure/high-temperature experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immoor, J.; Marquardt, H.; Miyagi, L.; Lin, F.; Speziale, S.; Merkel, S.; Buchen, J.; Kurnosov, A.; Liermann, H.-P.

    2018-05-01

    Seismic anisotropy in Earth's lowermost mantle, resulting from Crystallographic Preferred Orientation (CPO) of elastically anisotropic minerals, is among the most promising observables to map mantle flow patterns. A quantitative interpretation, however, is hampered by the limited understanding of CPO development in lower mantle minerals at simultaneously high pressures and temperatures. Here, we experimentally determine CPO formation in ferropericlase, one of the elastically most anisotropic deep mantle phases, at pressures of the lower mantle and temperatures of up to 1400 K using a novel experimental setup. Our data reveal a significant contribution of slip on {100} to ferropericlase CPO in the deep lower mantle, contradicting previous inferences based on experimental work at lower mantle pressures but room temperature. We use our results along with a geodynamic model to show that deformed ferropericlase produces strong shear wave anisotropy in the lowermost mantle, where horizontally polarized shear waves are faster than vertically polarized shear waves, consistent with seismic observations. We find that ferropericlase alone can produce the observed seismic shear wave splitting in D″ in regions of downwelling, which may be further enhanced by post-perovskite. Our model further shows that the interplay between ferropericlase (causing VSH > VSV) and bridgmanite (causing VSV > VSH) CPO can produce a more complex anisotropy patterns as observed in regions of upwelling at the margin of the African Large Low Shear Velocity Province.

  1. The melting curve of iron to 250 gigapascals - A constraint on the temperature at earth's center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Quentin; Jeanloz, Raymond; Bass, Jay; Svendsen, Bob; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    The melting curve of iron, the primary constituent of earth's core, has been measured to pressures of 250 gigapascals with a combination of static and dynamic techniques. The melting temperature of iron at the pressure of the core-mantle boundary (136 GPa) is 4800 + or - 200 K, whereas at the inner core-outer core boundary (330 GPa), it is 7600 + or - 500 K. A melting temperature for iron-rich alloy of 6600 K at the inner core-outer core boundary and a maximum temperature of 6900 K at earth's center are inferred. This latter value is the first experimental upper bound on the temperature at earth's center, and these results imply that the temperature of the lower mantle is significantly less than that of the outer core.

  2. High-pressure elastic properties of major materials of Earth's mantle from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karki, Bijaya B.; Stixrude, Lars; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.

    2001-11-01

    The elasticity of materials is important for our understanding of processes ranging from brittle failure, to flexure, to the propagation of elastic waves. Seismologically revealed structure of the Earth's mantle, including the radial (one-dimensional) profile, lateral heterogeneity, and anisotropy are determined largely by the elasticity of the materials that make up this region. Despite its importance to geophysics, our knowledge of the elasticity of potentially relevant mineral phases at conditions typical of the Earth's mantle is still limited: Measuring the elastic constants at elevated pressure-temperature conditions in the laboratory remains a major challenge. Over the past several years, another approach has been developed based on first-principles quantum mechanical theory. First-principles calculations provide the ideal complement to the laboratory approach because they require no input from experiment; that is, there are no free parameters in the theory. Such calculations have true predictive power and can supply critical information including that which is difficult to measure experimentally. A review of high-pressure theoretical studies of major mantle phases shows a wide diversity of elastic behavior among important tetrahedrally and octahedrally coordinated Mg and Ca silicates and Mg, Ca, Al, and Si oxides. This is particularly apparent in the acoustic anisotropy, which is essential for understanding the relationship between seismically observed anisotropy and mantle flow. The acoustic anisotropy of the phases studied varies from zero to more than 50% and is found to depend on pressure strongly, and in some cases nonmonotonically. For example, the anisotropy in MgO decreases with pressure up to 15 GPa before increasing upon further compression, reaching 50% at a pressure of 130 GPa. Compression also has a strong effect on the elasticity through pressure-induced phase transitions in several systems. For example, the transition from stishovite to CaCl2

  3. Using Authentic Data in High School Earth System Science Research - Inspiring Future Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruck, L. F.

    2006-05-01

    Using authentic data in a science research class is an effective way to teach students the scientific process, problem solving, and communication skills. In Frederick County Public Schools, MD a course has been developed to hone scientific research skills, and inspire interest in careers in science and technology. The Earth System Science Research course provides eleventh and twelfth grade students an opportunity to study Earth System Science using the latest information developed through current technologies. The system approach to this course helps students understand the complexity and interrelatedness of the Earth system. Consequently students appreciate the dynamics of local and global environments as part of a complex system. This course is an elective offering designed to engage students in the study of the atmosphere, biosphere, cryosphere, geosphere, and hydrosphere. This course allows students to utilize skills and processes gained from previous science courses to study the physical, chemical, and biological aspects of the Earth system. The research component of the course makes up fifty percent of course time in which students perform independent research on the interactions within the Earth system. Students are required to produce a scientific presentation to communicate the results of their research. Posters are then presented to the scientific community. Some of these presentations have led to internships and other scientific opportunities.

  4. Rare-earth-free high energy product manganese-based magnetic materials.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ketan; Zhang, Jingming; Ren, Shenqiang

    2018-06-14

    The constant drive to replace rare-earth metal magnets has initiated great interest in an alternative. Manganese (Mn) has emerged to be a potential candidate as a key element in rare-earth-free magnets. Its five unpaired valence electrons give it a large magnetocrystalline energy and the ability to form several intermetallic compounds. These factors have led Mn-based magnets to be a potential replacement for rare-earth permanent magnets for several applications, such as efficient power electronics, energy generators, magnetic recording and tunneling applications, and spintronics. For past few decades, Mn-based magnets have been explored in many different forms, such as bulk magnets, thin films, and nanoparticles. Here, we review the recent progress in the synthesis and structure-magnetic property relationships of Mn-based rare-earth-free magnets (MnBi, MnAl and MnGa). Furthermore, we discuss their potential to replace rare-earth magnetic materials through the control of their structure and composition to achieve the theoretically predicted magnetic properties.

  5. Hardware in-the-Loop Demonstration of Real-Time Orbit Determination in High Earth Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreau, Michael; Naasz, Bo; Leitner, Jesse; Carpenter, J. Russell; Gaylor, Dave

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents results from a study conducted at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to assess the real-time orbit determination accuracy of GPS-based navigation in a number of different high Earth orbital regimes. Measurements collected from a GPS receiver (connected to a GPS radio frequency (RF) signal simulator) were processed in a navigation filter in real-time, and resulting errors in the estimated states were assessed. For the most challenging orbit simulated, a 12 hour Molniya orbit with an apogee of approximately 39,000 km, mean total position and velocity errors were approximately 7 meters and 3 mm/s respectively. The study also makes direct comparisons between the results from the above hardware in-the-loop tests and results obtained by processing GPS measurements generated from software simulations. Care was taken to use the same models and assumptions in the generation of both the real-time and software simulated measurements, in order that the real-time data could be used to help validate the assumptions and models used in the software simulations. The study makes use of the unique capabilities of the Formation Flying Test Bed at GSFC, which provides a capability to interface with different GPS receivers and to produce real-time, filtered orbit solutions even when less than four satellites are visible. The result is a powerful tool for assessing onboard navigation performance in a wide range of orbital regimes, and a test-bed for developing software and procedures for use in real spacecraft applications.

  6. Automatic Building Detection based on Supervised Classification using High Resolution Google Earth Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffarian, S.; Ghaffarian, S.

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to detect the buildings by automization of the training area collecting stage for supervised classification. The method based on the fact that a 3d building structure should cast a shadow under suitable imaging conditions. Therefore, the methodology begins with the detection and masking out the shadow areas using luminance component of the LAB color space, which indicates the lightness of the image, and a novel double thresholding technique. Further, the training areas for supervised classification are selected by automatically determining a buffer zone on each building whose shadow is detected by using the shadow shape and the sun illumination direction. Thereafter, by calculating the statistic values of each buffer zone which is collected from the building areas the Improved Parallelepiped Supervised Classification is executed to detect the buildings. Standard deviation thresholding applied to the Parallelepiped classification method to improve its accuracy. Finally, simple morphological operations conducted for releasing the noises and increasing the accuracy of the results. The experiments were performed on set of high resolution Google Earth images. The performance of the proposed approach was assessed by comparing the results of the proposed approach with the reference data by using well-known quality measurements (Precision, Recall and F1-score) to evaluate the pixel-based and object-based performances of the proposed approach. Evaluation of the results illustrates that buildings detected from dense and suburban districts with divers characteristics and color combinations using our proposed method have 88.4 % and 853 % overall pixel-based and object-based precision performances, respectively.

  7. Constraints on High Northern Photosynthesis Increase Using Earth System Models and a Set of Independent Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, A. J.; Brovkin, V.; Myneni, R.; Alexandrov, G.

    2017-12-01

    Plant growth in the northern high latitudes benefits from increasing temperature (radiative effect) and CO2 fertilization as a consequence of rising atmospheric CO2 concentration. This enhanced gross primary production (GPP) is evident in large scale increase in summer time greening over the 36-year record of satellite observations. In this time period also various global ecosystem models simulate a greening trend in terms of increasing leaf area index (LAI). We also found a persistent greening trend analyzing historical simulations of Earth system models (ESM) participating in Phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). However, these models span a large range in strength of the LAI trend, expressed as sensitivity to both key environmental factors, temperature and CO2 concentration. There is also a wide spread in magnitude of the associated increase of terrestrial GPP among the ESMs, which contributes to pronounced uncertainties in projections of future climate change. Here we demonstrate that there is a linear relationship across the CMIP5 model ensemble between projected GPP changes and historical LAI sensitivity, which allows using the observed LAI sensitivity as an "emerging constraint" on GPP estimation at future CO2 concentration. This constrained estimate of future GPP is substantially higher than the traditional multi-model mean suggesting that the majority of current ESMs may be significantly underestimating carbon fixation by vegetation in NHL. We provide three independent lines of evidence in analyzing observed and simulated CO2 amplitude as well as atmospheric CO2 inversion products to arrive at the same conclusion.

  8. High inflammogenic potential of rare earth oxide nanoparticles: the New Hazardous Entity.

    PubMed

    Han, Youngju; Lee, Dong-Keon; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Lee, Seonghan; Jeon, Soyeon; Cho, Wan-Seob

    2018-05-30

    Due to the exponential increase in the development and utilization of rare earth oxide nanoparticles (REO NPs) in various fields, the possibility of exposure in humans by inhalation has increased. However, there are little information about hazards of REO NPs and its mechanisms of toxicity. In this study, we evaluated the acute pulmonary inflammation using 10 REO NPs (Dy 2 O 3 , Er 2 O 3 , Eu 2 O 3 , Gd 2 O 3 La 2 O 3 , Nd 2 O 3 , Pr 6 O 11 , Sm 2 O 3 , Tb 4 O 7 , and Y 2 O 3 ) and four well-known toxic particles (CuO, NiO, ZnO, and DQ12). Minimum three doses per NP were instilled into the lungs of female Wistar rats at surface area dose metric and lung inflammation was evaluated at 24 h post-instillation by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) analysis and histopathological observation. All types of REO NPs showed common pathological changes including mild to moderate infiltration of neutrophils and activated macrophages in the alveoli, peribronchial, and perivascular region. The inflammogenic potential evaluated by the number of granulocytes divided by the treated surface area dose showed all types of REO NPs has much higher inflammogenic potential than DQ12, ZnO, and NiO NPs. The correlation plot between the number of granulocytes and the potential for reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation showed a good correlation with exception of Pr 6 O 11 . The higher inflammogenic potential of REO NPs than that of well-known highly toxic particles imply that REO NPs need special attention for inhalation exposure and more studies are needed. In addition, the potential of ROS generation is one of the key factors producing lung inflammation by REO NPs.

  9. Assessment of High-school Students Engaged in the EarthLabs Climate Modules using the Climate Concept Inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeal, K.; Libarkin, J. C.; Ledley, T. S.; Gold, A. U.; Lynds, S. E.; Haddad, N.; Ellins, K.; Dunlap, C.; Bardar, E. W.; Youngman, E.

    2015-12-01

    Instructors must have on hand appropriate assessments that align with their teaching and learning goals in order to provide evidence of student learning. We have worked with curriculum developers and scientists to develop the Climate Concept Inventory (CCI), which meets goals of the EarthLabs Climate on-line curriculum. The developed concept inventory includes 19 content-driven multiple choice questions, six affective-based multiple choice questions, one confidence question, three open-ended questions, and eight demographic questions. Our analysis of the instrument applies item response theory and uses item characteristic curves. We have assessed over 500 students in nearly twenty high school classrooms in Mississippi and Texas that have engaged in the implementation of the EarthLabs curriculum and completed the CCI. Results indicate that students had pre-post gains on 9 out of 10 of the content-based multiple choice questions with positive gains in answer choice selection ranging from 1.72% to 42%. Students significantly reported increased confidence with 15% more students reporting that they were either very or fairly confident with their answers. Of the six affective questions posed, 5 out of 6 showed significant shifts towards gains in knowledge, awareness, and information about Earth's climate system. The research has resulted in a robust and validated climate concept inventory for use with advanced high school students, where we have been able to apply its use within the EarthLabs project.

  10. The primary solar-type atmosphere surrounding the accreting Earth: H2O-induced high surface temperature.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, S.

    In the solar nebula, a growing planet attracts ambient gas to form a solar-type atmosphere. The structure of this H2-He atmosphere is calculated assuming the Earth was formed in the nebula. The blanketing effect of the atmosphere renders the planetary surface molten when the planetary mass exceeds 0.2 ME (ME being the present Earth's mass). Reduction of the surface melt by atmospheric H2 should add a large amount of H2O to the atmosphere: under the quartz-iron-fayalite oxygen buffer, partial pressure ratio P(H2O)/P(H2) becomes higher than 0.1. Enhancing opacity and gas mean molecular weight, the excess H2O raises the temperature and renders the atmosphere in convective equilibrium, while the dissociation of H2 suppresses the adiabatic temperature gradient. The surface temperature of the proto-Earth can be as high as 4700K when its mass is 1 ME. Such a high temperature may accelerate the evaporation of surface materials. A deep totally-molten magma ocean should exist in the accretion Earth.

  11. High Temporal and Spatial Resolution Coverage of Earth from Commercial AVSTAR Systems in Geostationary Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecompte, M. A.; Heaps, J. F.; Williams, F. H.

    Imaging the earth from Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) allows frequent updates of environmental conditions within an observable hemisphere at time and spatial scales appropriate to the most transient observable terrestrial phenomena. Coverage provided by current GEO Meteorological Satellites (METSATS) fails to fully exploit this advantage due primarily to obsolescent technology and also institutional inertia. With the full benefit of GEO based imaging unrealized, rapidly evolving phenomena, occurring at the smallest spatial and temporal scales that frequently have significant environmental impact remain unobserved. These phenomena may be precursors for the most destructive natural processes that adversely effect society. Timely distribution of information derived from "real-time" observations thus may provide opportunities to mitigate much of the damage to life and property that would otherwise occur. AstroVision International's AVStar Earth monitoring system is designed to overcome the current limitations if GEO Earth coverage and to provide real time monitoring of changes to the Earth's complete atmospheric, land and marine surface environments including fires, volcanic events, lightning and meteoritic events on a "live," true color, and multispectral basis. The understanding of severe storm dynamics and its coupling to the earth's electro-sphere will be greatly enhanced by observations at unprecedented sampling frequencies and spatial resolution. Better understanding of these natural phenomena and AVStar operational real-time coverage may also benefit society through improvements in severe weather prediction and warning. AstroVision's AVStar system, designed to provide this capability with the first of a constellation of GEO- based commercial environmental monitoring satellites to be launched in late 2003 will be discussed, including spatial and temporal resolution, spectral coverage with applications and an inventory of the potential benefits to society

  12. FeO2 and FeOOH under deep lower-mantle conditions and Earth's oxygen-hydrogen cycles.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qingyang; Kim, Duck Young; Yang, Wenge; Yang, Liuxiang; Meng, Yue; Zhang, Li; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2016-06-09

    The distribution, accumulation and circulation of oxygen and hydrogen in Earth's interior dictate the geochemical evolution of the hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere. The oxygen-rich atmosphere and iron-rich core represent two end-members of the oxygen-iron (O-Fe) system, overlapping with the entire pressure-temperature-composition range of the planet. The extreme pressure and temperature conditions of the deep interior alter the oxidation states, spin states and phase stabilities of iron oxides, creating new stoichiometries, such as Fe4O5 (ref. 5) and Fe5O6 (ref. 6). Such interactions between O and Fe dictate Earth's formation, the separation of the core and mantle, and the evolution of the atmosphere. Iron, in its multiple oxidation states, controls the oxygen fugacity and oxygen budget, with hydrogen having a key role in the reaction of Fe and O (causing iron to rust in humid air). Here we use first-principles calculations and experiments to identify a highly stable, pyrite-structured iron oxide (FeO2) at 76 gigapascals and 1,800 kelvin that holds an excessive amount of oxygen. We show that the mineral goethite, FeOOH, which exists ubiquitously as 'rust' and is concentrated in bog iron ore, decomposes under the deep lower-mantle conditions to form FeO2 and release H2. The reaction could cause accumulation of the heavy FeO2-bearing patches in the deep lower mantle, upward migration of hydrogen, and separation of the oxygen and hydrogen cycles. This process provides an alternative interpretation for the origin of seismic and geochemical anomalies in the deep lower mantle, as well as a sporadic O2 source for the Great Oxidation Event over two billion years ago that created the present oxygen-rich atmosphere.

  13. A Search for Water in a Super-Earth Atmosphere: High-resolution Optical Spectroscopy of 55Cancri e

    SciT

    Esteves, Lisa J.; De Mooij, Ernst J. W.; Watson, Chris

    We present the analysis of high-resolution optical spectra of four transits of 55Cnc e, a low-density super-Earth that orbits a nearby Sun-like star in under 18 hr. The inferred bulk density of the planet implies a substantial envelope, which, according to mass–radius relationships, could be either a low-mass extended or a high-mass compact atmosphere. Our observations investigate the latter scenario, with water as the dominant species. We take advantage of the Doppler cross-correlation technique, high-spectral resolution, and the large wavelength coverage of our observations to search for the signature of thousands of optical water absorption lines. Using our observations with HDSmore » on the Subaru telescope and ESPaDOnS on the Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope, we are able to place a 3 σ lower limit of 10 g mol{sup −1} on the mean-molecular weight of 55Cnc e’s water-rich (volume mixing ratio >10%), optically thin atmosphere, which corresponds to an atmospheric scale-height of ∼80 km. Our study marks the first high-spectral resolution search for water in a super-Earth atmosphere, and demonstrates that it is possible to recover known water-vapor absorption signals in a nearby super-Earth atmosphere, using high-resolution transit spectroscopy with current ground-based instruments.« less

  14. A Sky-High Classroom Provides a New Perspective for Earth Science Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Albert C.

    1969-01-01

    Describes an earth science program conducted from an airplane for 8th grade students of Carmel Middle School, Carmel, California. The steps involved in getting the program started, the classroom work and the preparatory field trips, as well as the airborne lesson itself, are described. (LC)

  15. Geophysics: The Earth in Space. A Guide for High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Geophysical Union, Washington, DC.

    Geophysics is the application of physics, chemistry, and mathematics to the problems and processes of the earth, from its innermost core to its outermost environs in space. Fields within geophysics include the atmospheric sciences; geodesy; geomagnetism and paleomagnetism; hydrology; oceanography; planetology; seismology; solar-planetary…

  16. Earth elevation map production and high resolution sensing camera imaging analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiubin; Jin, Guang; Jiang, Li; Dai, Lu; Xu, Kai

    2010-11-01

    The Earth's digital elevation which impacts space camera imaging has prepared and imaging has analysed. Based on matching error that TDI CCD integral series request of the speed of image motion, statistical experimental methods-Monte Carlo method is used to calculate the distribution histogram of Earth's elevation in image motion compensated model which includes satellite attitude changes, orbital angular rate changes, latitude, longitude and the orbital inclination changes. And then, elevation information of the earth's surface from SRTM is read. Earth elevation map which produced for aerospace electronic cameras is compressed and spliced. It can get elevation data from flash according to the shooting point of latitude and longitude. If elevation data between two data, the ways of searching data uses linear interpolation. Linear interpolation can better meet the rugged mountains and hills changing requests. At last, the deviant framework and camera controller are used to test the character of deviant angle errors, TDI CCD camera simulation system with the material point corresponding to imaging point model is used to analyze the imaging's MTF and mutual correlation similarity measure, simulation system use adding cumulation which TDI CCD imaging exceeded the corresponding pixel horizontal and vertical offset to simulate camera imaging when stability of satellite attitude changes. This process is practicality. It can effectively control the camera memory space, and meet a very good precision TDI CCD camera in the request matches the speed of image motion and imaging.

  17. The inclusion of Science Technology Society topics in junior high school earth science textbooks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadhli, Fathi Ali

    2000-10-01

    The Science Technology Society (STS) approach is a major science education reform through which a scientifically literate citizen could be produced. The teaching of science through STS approach is centered on science and technology related issues and problems. The purpose of this study was to analyze five earth science textbooks published in the 1990's for their inclusion of twelve sciences and technology related issues and problems and for their inclusion of activities focused on STS. The selected earth science textbooks were; Scott Foresman, Heath, Holt, Merrill and Prentice-Hall. The targeted twelve issues and problems were identified by Bybee (1987), as the most important global science and technology related issues and problems. The numbers of full text pages devoted to each topic were determined by classifying each segment to one of the targeted topics. In addition, the numbers of STS activities were also determined by using criteria developed for this study. ANOVA statistical analyses and t-tests showed that the analyzed earth science textbooks treated the studied STS issues and problems and treated the STS activities differently. It was found that six of the studied issues and problems were constantly receiving more attention in all the analyzed earth science textbooks than the rest of the topics. These topics were; Air Quality and Atmosphere, Energy Shortages, Water Resources, Land Use, Hazardous Substances, and Mineral Resources. The overall results revealed that only an average of 8.82% of the text pages in all the analyzed earth science textbooks were devoted to STS topics and 5.49% of the activities in all the analyzed earth science textbooks were focused on STS topics. However, none of the activities focused on STS topics were presented in STS approach as defined by NSTA. The percentage of STS topics inclusion and the percentage of activities focused on STS topics were considered to be very low. Accordingly, the objectives and goals of STS approach

  18. OnEarth: An Open Source Solution for Efficiently Serving High-Resolution Mapped Image Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, C. K.; Plesea, L.; Hall, J. R.; Roberts, J. T.; Cechini, M. F.; Schmaltz, J. E.; Alarcon, C.; Huang, T.; McGann, J. M.; Chang, G.; Boller, R. A.; Ilavajhala, S.; Murphy, K. J.; Bingham, A. W.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation introduces OnEarth, a server side software package originally developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), that facilitates network-based, minimum-latency geolocated image access independent of image size or spatial resolution. The key component in this package is the Meta Raster Format (MRF), a specialized raster file extension to the Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL) consisting of an internal indexed pyramid of image tiles. Imagery to be served is converted to the MRF format and made accessible online via an expandable set of server modules handling requests in several common protocols, including the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) compliant Web Map Tile Service (WMTS) as well as Tiled WMS and Keyhole Markup Language (KML). OnEarth has recently transitioned to open source status and is maintained and actively developed as part of GIBS (Global Imagery Browse Services), a collaborative project between JPL and Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The primary function of GIBS is to enhance and streamline the data discovery process and to support near real-time (NRT) applications via the expeditious ingestion and serving of full-resolution imagery representing science products from across the NASA Earth Science spectrum. Open source software solutions are leveraged where possible in order to utilize existing available technologies, reduce development time, and enlist wider community participation. We will discuss some of the factors and decision points in transitioning OnEarth to a suitable open source paradigm, including repository and licensing agreement decision points, institutional hurdles, and perceived benefits. We will also provide examples illustrating how OnEarth is integrated within GIBS and other applications.

  19. Guided-wave high-performance spectrometers for the MEOS miniature earth observation satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruzelecky, Roman V.; Wong, Brian; Zou, Jing; Jamroz, Wes; Sloan, James; Cloutis, Edward

    2017-11-01

    The MEOS Miniature Earth Observing Satellite is a low-cost mission being developed for the Canadian Space Agency with international collaborations that will innovatively combine remote correlated atmospheric/land-cover measurements with the corresponding atmospheric and ecosystem modelling in near real-time to obtain simultaneous variations in lower tropospheric GHG mixing ratios and the resulting responses of the surface ecosystems. MEOS will provide lower tropospheric CO2, CH4, CO, N2O, H2O and aerosol mixing ratios over natural sources and sinks using two kinds of synergistic observations; a forward limb measurement and a follow-on nadir measurement over the same geographical tangent point. The measurements will be accomplished using separate limb and nadir suites of innovative miniature line-imaging spectrometers and will be spatially coordinated such that the same air mass is observed in both views within a few minutes. The limb data will consist of 16-pixel vertical spectral line imaging to provide 1-km vertical resolution, while the corresponding nadir measurements will view sixteen 5 by 10 km2 ground pixels with a 160-km East-West swath width. To facilitate the mission accommodation on a low-cost microsat with a net payload mass under 22 kg, groundbreaking miniature guided-wave spectrometers with advanced optical filtering and coding technologies will be employed based on MPBC's patented IOSPEC technologies. The data synergy requirements for each view will be innovatively met using two complementary miniature line-imaging spectrometers to provide broad-band measurements from 1200 to 2450 nm at about 1.2 nm/pixel bandwidth using a multislit binary-coded MEMS-IOSPEC and simultaneous high-resolution multiple microchannels at 0.03 nm FWHM using the revolutionary FP-IOSPEC Fabry-Perot guided-wave spectrometer concept. The guided-wave spectrometer integration provides an order of magnitude reduction in the mass and volume relative to traditional bulk

  20. High charge state carbon and oxygen ions in Earth's equatorial quasi-trapping region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christon, S. P.; Hamilton, D. C.; Gloeckler, G.; Eastmann, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    Observations of energetic (1.5 - 300 keV/e) medium-to-high charge state (+3 less than or equal to Q less than or equal to +7) solar wind origin C and O ions made in the quasi-trapping region (QTR) of Earth's magnetosphere are compared to ion trajectories calculated in model equatorial magnetospheric magnetic and electric fields. These comparisons indicate that solar wind ions entering the QTR on the nightside as an energetic component of the plasma sheet exit the region on the dayside, experiencing little or no charge exchange on the way. Measurements made by the CHarge Energy Mass (CHEM) ion spectrometer on board the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorer/Charge Composition Explorer (AMPTE/CCE) spacecraft at 7 less than L less than 9 from September 1984 to January 1989 are the source of the new results contained herein: quantitative long-term determination of number densities, average energies, energy spectra, local time distributions, and their variation with geomagnetic disturbance level as indexed by Kp. Solar wind primaries (ions with charge states unchanged) and their secondaries (ions with generally lower charge states produced from primaries in the magnetosphere via charge exchange)are observed throughout the QTR and have distinctly different local time variations that persist over the entire 4-year analysis interval. During Kp larger than or equal to 3 deg intervals, primary ion (e.g., O(+6)) densities exhibit a pronounced predawn maximum with average energy minimum and a broad near-local-noon density minimum with average energy maximum. Secondary ion (e.g., O(+5)) densities do not have an identifiable predawn peak, rather they have a broad dayside maximum peaked in local morning and a nightside minimum. During Kp less than or equal to 2(-) intervals, primary ion density peaks are less intense, broader in local time extent, and centered near midnight, while secondary ion density local time variations diminish. The long-time-interval baseline helps

  1. Comparison of the Earth's high-latitude disturbances with energetic electrons measured by the ERG/Arase satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, C. Y.; Chang, T. F.; Tam, S. W. Y.; Syugu, W. J.; Kazama, Y.; Wang, B. J.; Wang, S. Y.; Kasahara, S.; Yokota, S.; Hori, T.; Yoshizumi, M.; Shinohara, I.

    2017-12-01

    The Exploration of energization and Radiation in Geospace (ERG) satellite has been successfully launched from the Uchinoura Space Center in December 2016. The main goal of the ERG project is to elucidate acceleration and loss mechanisms of relativistic electrons in the radiation belts. In addition, the apogee of the ERG satellite's orbit often exceeds the edge of outer radiation belt in radial distance. Thus the data measured from the higher-L region may be associated with the activities observed in the Earth's high-latitude region. We statistically compare the Auroral Electrojet (AE) index with the data measured by the Low-Energy Particle Experiments - Electron Analyzer (LEP-e) and Medium-Energy Particle Experiments - Electron Analyzer (MEP-e) onboard the ERG satellite in the past months. With the selected data for L > 7, we statistically investigate the contributions of the different electron energies observed in various magnetic local time (MLT) sectors to the Earth's high-latitude disturbances.

  2. A study of the motion and aerodynamic heating of ballistic missiles entering the earth's atmosphere at high supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, H Julian; Eggers, A J , Jr

    1958-01-01

    A simplified analysis of the velocity and deceleration history of ballistic missiles entering the earth's atmosphere at high supersonic speeds is presented. The results of this motion analysis are employed to indicate means available to the designer for minimizing aerodynamic heating. The heating problem considered involves not only the total heat transferred to a missile by convection, but also the maximum average and local time rates of convective heat transfer.

  3. Oblique Shot of Earth

    2008-09-05

    This highly oblique image shot over northwestern part of the African continent captures the curvature of the Earth and shows its atmosphere as seen by NASA EarthKAM. You can see clouds and even the occasional thunderhead.

  4. A method to detect ultra high energy electrons using earth's magnetic field as a radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, S. A.; Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that the detection of electrons with energies exceeding a few TeV, which lose energy rapidly through synchrotron and inverse Compton processes, would provide valuable information on the distribution of sources and on the propagation of cosmic rays in the solar neighborhood. However, it would not be possible to measure the energy spectrum beyond a few TeV with any of the existing experimental techniques. The present investigation is, therefore concerned with the possibility of detecting electrons with energies exceeding a few TeV on the basis of the photons emitted through synchrotron radiation in the earth's magnetic field. Attention is given to the synchrotron radiation of electrons in the earth's magnetic field, detector response and energy estimation, and the characteristics of an ideal detector, capable of detecting photons with energies equal to or greater than 20 keV.

  5. A Study of an Optical Lunar Surface Communications Network with High Bandwidth Direct to Earth Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, K.; Biswas, A.; Schoolcraft, J.

    2011-01-01

    Analyzed optical DTE (direct to earth) and lunar relay satellite link analyses, greater than 200 Mbps downlink to 1-m Earth receiver and greater than 1 Mbps uplink achieved with mobile 5-cm lunar transceiver, greater than 1Gbps downlink and greater than 10 Mpbs uplink achieved with 10-cm stationary lunar transceiver, MITLL (MIT Lincoln Laboratory) 2013 LLCD (Lunar Laser Communications Demonstration) plans to demonstrate 622 Mbps downlink with 20 Mbps uplink between lunar orbiter and ground station; Identified top five technology challenges to deploying lunar optical network, Performed preliminary experiments on two of challenges: (i) lunar dust removal and (ii)DTN over optical carrier, Exploring opportunities to evaluate DTN (delay-tolerant networking) over optical link in a multi-node network e.g. Desert RATS.

  6. The effects from high-altitude storm discharges in Earth atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozak, L.; Odzimek, A.; Ivchenko, V.; Kozak, P.; Gala, I.; Lapchuk, V.

    2016-06-01

    The regularities of appearance of transient luminous effects in Earth atmosphere and features of their ground-based observations are considered. Using video-observations obtained in the Institution of Geophysics of Poland Academy of Sciences the energy of atmospheric afterglow from these processes in visual wavelength range has been determined. Calibrating curve was plotted using unfocal images of Vega. The star spectrum,atmosphere absorption coefficient and characteristics of the observational camera were used.

  7. Evolution of the Oxidation State of the Earth's Mantle: Challenges of High Pressure Quenching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Righter, K.; Keller, L.; Christoffersen, R.; Rahman, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The oxidation state of the Earth's mantle during formation remains an unresolved question, whether it was constant throughout planetary accretion, transitioned from reduced to oxidized, or from oxidized to reduced. We investigate the stability of Fe3+ at depth, in order to constrain processes (water, late accretion, dissociation of FeO) which may reduce or oxidize the Earth's mantle. Experiments of more mafic compositions and at higher pressures commonly form a polyphase quench intergrowth composed primarily of pyroxenes, with interstitial glass which hosts nearly all of the more volatile minor elements. In our previous experiments on shergottite compositions, variable fO2, T, and P is less than 4 GPa, Fe3+/TotFe decreased slightly with increasing P, similar to terrestrial basalt. For oxidizing experiments less than 7GPa, Fe3+/TotFe decreased as well, but it's unclear from previous modelling whether the deeper mantle could retain significant Fe3+. Our current experiments expand our pressure range deeper into the Earth's mantle and focus on compositions and conditions relevant to the early Earth. Experiments with Knippa basalt as the starting composition were conducted at 1-8 GPa and 1800 C, using a molybdenum capsule to set the fO2 near IW, by buffering with Mo-MoO3. TEM and EELS analyses revealed the run products from 7-8 GPa quenched to polycrystalline phases, with the major phase pyroxene containing approximately equal Fe3+/2+. A number of different approaches have been employed to produce glassy samples that can be measured by EELS and XANES. A more intermediate andesite was used in one experiment, and decompression during quenching was attempted after, but both resulted in a finer grained polyphase texture. Experiments are currently underway to test different capsule materials may affect quench texture. A preliminary experiment using liquid nitrogen to greatly enhance the rate of cooling of the assembly has also been attempted and this technique will be

  8. NEO-LISP: Deflecting near-Earth objects using high average power, repetitively pulsed lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, C. R.; Michaelis, M. M.

    Several kinds of Near-Earth objects exist for which one would like to cause modest orbit perturbations, but which are inaccessible to normal means of interception because of their number, distance or the lack of early warning. For these objects, LISP (Laser Impulse Space Propulsion) is an appropriate technique for rapidly applying the required mechanical impulse from a ground-based station. In order of increasing laser energy required, examples are: (1) repositioning specially prepared geosynchronous satellites for an enhanced lifetime; (2) causing selected items of space junk to re-enter and burn up in the atmosphere on a computed trajectory; and (3) safely deflecting Earth-directed comet nuclei and earth-crossing asteroids (ECA's) a few tens of meters in size (the most hazardous size). They will discuss each of these problems in turn and show that each application is best matched by its own matrix of LISP laser pulse width, pulse repetition rate, wavelength and average power. The latter ranges from 100W to 3GW for the cases considered. They will also discuss means of achieving the active beam phase error correction during passage through the atmosphere and very large exit pupil in the optical system which are required in each of these cases.

  9. Climatic consequences of very high CO2 levels in Earth's early atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasting, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    Earth has approximately 60 bars of carbon dioxide tied up in carbonate rocks, or roughly 2/3 the amount of CO2 of Venus' atmosphere. Two different lines of evidence, one based on thermodynamics and the other on geochemical cycles, indicate that a substantial fraction of this CO2 may have resulted in the atmosphere during the first few hundred million years of the Earth's history. A natural question which arises concerning this hypothesis is whether this would have resulted in a runaway greenhouse affect. One-dimensional radiative/convective model calculations show that the surface temperature of a hypothetical primitive atmosphere containing 20 bars of CO2 would have been less than 100C and no runaway greenhouse should have occurred. The climatic stability of the early atmosphere is a consequence of three factors: (1) reduced solar luminosity at that time; (2) an increase in planetary albedo caused by Rayleigh scattering by CO2; and (3) the stabilizing effects of moist convection. The latter two factors are sufficient to prevent a CO2-induced runaway greenhouse on the present Earth and for CO2 levels up to 100 bars. It is determined whether a runaway greenhouse could have occurred during the latter stages of the accretion process and, if so, whether it would have collapsed once the influx of material slowed down.

  10. High-pressure phase transitions in rare earth metal thulium to 195 GPa.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Jeffrey M; Samudrala, Gopi K; Tsoi, Georgiy M; Vohra, Yogesh K

    2011-04-20

    We have performed image plate x-ray diffraction studies on a heavy rare earth metal, thulium (Tm), in a diamond anvil cell to a pressure of 195 GPa and volume compression V/V₀ = 0.38 at room temperature. The rare earth crystal structure sequence, hcp →Sm-type→ dhcp →fcc → distorted fcc, is observed in Tm below 70 GPa with the exception of a pure fcc phase. The focus of our study is on the ultrahigh-pressure phase transition and Rietveld refinement of crystal structures in the pressure range between 70 and 195 GPa. The hexagonal hR-24 phase is seen to describe the distorted fcc phase between 70 and 124 GPa. Above 124 ± 4 GPa, a structural transformation from hR 24 phase to a monoclinic C 2/m phase is observed with a volume change of -1.5%. The equation of state data shows rapid stiffening above the phase transition at 124 GPa and is indicative of participation of f-electrons in bonding. We compare the behavior of Tm to other heavy rare-earths and heavy actinide metals under extreme conditions of pressure.

  11. High-pressure phase transitions in rare earth metal thulium to 195 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Jeffrey M.; Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2011-04-01

    We have performed image plate x-ray diffraction studies on a heavy rare earth metal, thulium (Tm), in a diamond anvil cell to a pressure of 195 GPa and volume compression V/Vo = 0.38 at room temperature. The rare earth crystal structure sequence, {hcp}\\to {Sm {-}type} \\to {dhcp} \\to {fcc} \\to distorted fcc, is observed in Tm below 70 GPa with the exception of a pure fcc phase. The focus of our study is on the ultrahigh-pressure phase transition and Rietveld refinement of crystal structures in the pressure range between 70 and 195 GPa. The hexagonal hR- 24 phase is seen to describe the distorted fcc phase between 70 and 124 GPa. Above 124 ± 4 GPa, a structural transformation from hR 24 phase to a monoclinic C 2/m phase is observed with a volume change of - 1.5%. The equation of state data shows rapid stiffening above the phase transition at 124 GPa and is indicative of participation of f-electrons in bonding. We compare the behavior of Tm to other heavy rare-earths and heavy actinide metals under extreme conditions of pressure.

  12. Solubility of oxygen in liquid Fe at high pressure and consequences for the early differentiation of Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubie, D. C.; Gessmann, C. K.; Frost, D. J.

    2003-04-01

    Knowledge of the solubility of oxygen in liquid iron enables the partitioning of oxygen between metal and silicates and the oxidation state of residual silicates to be constrained during core formation in planetary bodies. We have determined oxygen solubility experimentally at 5--23 GPa, 2100--2700 K and oxygen fugacities 1--4 log units below the iron-wüstite buffer in samples of liquid Ni-Fe alloy contained in magnesiowüstite capsules using a multianvil apparatus. Results show that oxygen solubility increases with increasing temperature but decreases slightly with increasing pressure over the range of experimental conditions, at constant oxygen fugacity. Using an extrapolation of the results to higher pressures and temperatures, we have modeled the geochemical consequences of metal-silicate separation in magma oceans in order to explain the contrasting FeO contents of the mantles of Earth and Mars. We assume that both Earth and Mars accreted originally from material with a chondritic composition; because the initial oxidation state is uncertain, we vary this parameter by defining the initial oxygen content. Two metal-silicate fractionation models are considered: (1) Metal and silicate are allowed to equilibrate at fictive conditions that approximate the pressure and temperature at the base of a magma ocean. (2) The effect of settling Fe droplets in a magma ocean is determined using a simple polybaric metal-silicate fractionation model. We assume that the temperature at the base of a magma ocean is close to the peridotite liquidus. In the case of Earth, high temperatures in a magma ocean with a depth >1200 km would have resulted in significant quantities of oxygen dissolving in the liquid metal with the consequent extraction of FeO from the residual silicate. In contrast, on Mars, even if the magma ocean extended to the depth of the current core-mantle boundary, temperatures would not have been sufficiently high for oxygen solubility in liquid metal to be

  13. Earth Science

    1994-09-02

    This image depicts a full view of the Earth, taken by the Geostationary Operational Environment Satellite (GOES-8). The red and green charnels represent visible data, while the blue channel represents inverted 11 micron infrared data. The north and south poles were not actually observed by GOES-8. To produce this image, poles were taken from a GOES-7 image. Owned and operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES satellites provide the kind of continuous monitoring necessary for intensive data analysis. They circle the Earth in a geosynchronous orbit, which means they orbit the equatorial plane of the Earth at a speed matching the Earth's rotation. This allows them to hover continuously over one position on the surface. The geosynchronous plane is about 35,800 km (22,300 miles) above the Earth, high enough to allow the satellites a full-disc view of the Earth. Because they stay above a fixed spot on the surface, they provide a constant vigil for the atmospheric triggers for severe weather conditions such as tornadoes, flash floods, hail storms, and hurricanes. When these conditions develop, the GOES satellites are able to monitor storm development and track their movements. NASA manages the design and launch of the spacecraft. NASA launched the first GOES for NOAA in 1975 and followed it with another in 1977. Currently, the United States is operating GOES-8, positioned at 75 west longitude and the equator, and GOES-10, which is positioned at 135 west longitude and the equator. (GOES-9, which malfunctioned in 1998, is being stored in orbit as an emergency backup should either GOES-8 or GOES-10 fail. GOES-11 was launched on May 3, 2000 and GOES-12 on July 23, 2001. Both are being stored in orbit as a fully functioning replacement for GOES-8 or GOES-10 on failure.

  14. Deep Interior Mission: Imaging the Interior of Near-Earth Asteroids Using Radio Reflection Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safaeinili, A.; Asphaug, E.; Rodriquez, E.; Gurrola, E.; Belton, M.; Klaasen, K.; Ostro, S.; Plaut, J.; Yeomans, D.

    2005-01-01

    materials that we are likely to encounter, from undifferentiated to highly evolved. The 5-15 MHz radar is capable of probing more primitive bodies (e.g. comets or C-types) that may be available given other launch schedules. 5 MHz radar easily penetrates, with the required SNR , greater than 1 km of basalt (a good analog for Nyx). Basalt has a greater loss tangent than expected for most asteroids, although iron-rich M-types are probably not appropriate targets. 15 MHz radar penetrates the outer approximately 100 m of rocky 1 km asteroids and the deep interiors of comets. Laboratory studies of the most common NE0 materials expected (S-, C- and V-type meteorite analogs) will commence in 2005.

  15. Estimation of High-Frequency Earth-Space Radio Wave Signals via Ground-Based Polarimetric Radar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolen, Steve; Chandrasekar, V.

    2002-01-01

    Expanding human presence in space, and enabling the commercialization of this frontier, is part of the strategic goals for NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) enterprise. Future near-Earth and planetary missions will support the use of high-frequency Earth-space communication systems. Additionally, increased commercial demand on low-frequency Earth-space links in the S- and C-band spectra have led to increased interest in the use of higher frequencies in regions like Ku and Ka-band. Attenuation of high-frequency signals, due to a precipitating medium, can be quite severe and can cause considerable disruptions in a communications link that traverses such a medium. Previously, ground radar measurements were made along the Earth-space path and compared to satellite beacon data that was transmitted to a ground station. In this paper, quantitative estimation of the attenuation along the propagation path is made via inter-comparisons of radar data taken from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) and ground-based polarimetric radar observations. Theoretical relationships between the expected specific attenuation (k) of spaceborne measurements with ground-based measurements of reflectivity (Zh) and differential propagation phase shift (Kdp) are developed for various hydrometeors that could be present along the propagation path, which are used to estimate the two-way path-integrated attenuation (PIA) on the PR return echo. Resolution volume matching and alignment of the radar systems is performed, and a direct comparison of PR return echo with ground radar attenuation estimates is made directly on a beam-by-beam basis. The technique is validated using data collected from the TExas and Florida UNderflights (TEFLUN-B) experiment and the TRMM large Biosphere-Atmosphere experiment in Amazonia (LBA) campaign. Attenuation estimation derived from this method can be used for strategiC planning of communication systems for

  16. Highly efficient hydrophosphonylation of aldehydes and unactivated ketones catalyzed by methylene-linked pyrrolyl rare earth metal amido complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuangliu; Wu, Zhangshuan; Rong, Jiewei; Wang, Shaowu; Yang, Gaosheng; Zhu, Xiancui; Zhang, Lijun

    2012-02-27

    A series of rare earth metal amido complexes bearing methylene-linked pyrrolyl-amido ligands were prepared through silylamine elimination reactions and displayed high catalytic activities in hydrophosphonylations of aldehydes and unactivated ketones under solvent-free conditions for liquid substrates. Treatment of [(Me(3)Si)(2)N](3)Ln(μ-Cl)Li(THF)(3) with 2-(2,6-Me(2)C(6)H(3)NHCH(2))C(4)H(3)NH (1, 1 equiv) in toluene afforded the corresponding trivalent rare earth metal amides of formula {(μ-η(5):η(1)):η(1)-2-[(2,6-Me(2)C(6)H(3))NCH(2)](C(4)H(3)N)LnN(SiMe(3))(2)}(2) [Ln=Y (2), Nd (3), Sm (4), Dy (5), Yb (6)] in moderate to good yields. All compounds were fully characterized by spectroscopic methods and elemental analyses. The yttrium complex was also characterized by (1)H NMR spectroscopic analyses. The structures of complexes 2, 3, 4, and 6 were determined by single-crystal X-ray analyses. Study of the catalytic activities of the complexes showed that these rare earth metal amido complexes were excellent catalysts for hydrophosphonylations of aldehydes and unactivated ketones. The catalyzed reactions between diethyl phosphite and aldehydes in the presence of the rare earth metal amido complexes (0.1 mol%) afforded the products in high yields (up to 99%) at room temperature in short times of 5 to 10 min. Furthermore, the catalytic addition of diethyl phosphite to unactivated ketones also afforded the products in high yields of up to 99% with employment of low loadings (0.1 to 0.5 mol%) of the rare earth metal amido complexes at room temperature in short times of 20 min. The system works well for a wide range of unactivated aliphatic, aromatic or heteroaromatic ketones, especially for substituted benzophenones, giving the corresponding α-hydroxy diaryl phosphonates in moderate to high yields. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Effect of Destined High-Pressure Torsion on the Structure and Mechanical Properties of Rare Earth-Based Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W.; Cheng, H.; Jiang, X.; Wu, M. L.; Li, G.

    2018-03-01

    Changes in the atomic structure and mechanical properties of rare earth-based metallic glasses caused by destined high-pressure torsion (HPT) were studied by X-ray diffraction synchrotron radiation and nanoindentation. Results showed that destined HPT improved nanohardness and wear resistance, which indicated the significant contributions of this technique. The diffraction patterns showed that the contents of pairs between solvent and solute atoms with a large negative mixing enthalpy increased, whereas those of pairs between solvent atoms and between solute atoms decreased after destined HPT. Thus, the process was improved by increasing the proportion of high-intensity pairs between solvent and solute atoms.

  18. Utilizing rare earth elements as tracers in high TDS reservoir brines in CCS applications

    DOE PAGES

    McLing, Travis; Smith, William; Smith, Robert

    2014-12-31

    In this paper we report the result of research associated with the testing of a procedures necessary for utilizing natural occurring trace elements, specifically the Rare Earth Elements (REE) as geochemical tracers in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) applications. Trace elements, particularly REE may be well suited to serve as in situ tracers for monitoring geochemical conditions and the migration of CO₂-charged waters within CCS storage systems. We have been conducting studies to determine the efficacy of using REE as a tracer and characterization tool in the laboratory, at a CCS analogue site in Soda Springs, Idaho, and at amore » proposed CCS reservoir at the Rock Springs Uplift, Wyoming. Results from field and laboratory studies have been encouraging and show that REE may be an effective tracer in CCS systems and overlying aquifers. In recent years, a series of studies using REE as a natural groundwater tracer have been conducted successfully at various locations around the globe. Additionally, REE and other trace elements have been successfully used as in situ tracers to describe the evolution of deep sedimentary Basins. Our goal has been to establish naturally occurring REE as a useful monitoring measuring and verification (MMV) tool in CCS research because formation brine chemistry will be particularly sensitive to changes in local equilibrium caused by the addition of large volumes of CO₂. Because brine within CCS target formations will have been in chemical equilibrium with the host rocks for millions of years, the addition of large volumes of CO₂ will cause reactions in the formation that will drive changes to the brine chemistry due to the pH change caused by the formation of carbonic acid. This CO₂ driven change in formation fluid chemistry will have a major impact on water rock reaction equilibrium in the formation, which will impart a change in the REE fingerprint of the brine that can measured and be used to monitor in situ reservoir

  19. An High Resolution Near-Earth Objects Population Enabling Next-Generation Search Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tricaico, Pasquale; Beshore, E. C.; Larson, S. M.; Boattini, A.; Williams, G. V.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, the dedicated search for kilometer-size near-Earth objects (NEOs), potentially hazardous objects (PHOs), and potential Earth impactors has led to a boost in the rate of discoveries of these objects. The catalog of known NEOs is the fundamental ingredient used to develop a model for the NEOs population, either by assessing and correcting for the observational bias (Jedicke et al., 2002), or by evaluating the migration rates from the NEOs source regions (Bottke et al., 2002). The modeled NEOs population is a necessary tool used to track the progress in the search of large NEOs (Jedicke et al., 2003) and to try to predict the distribution of the ones still undiscovered, as well as to study the sky distribution of potential Earth impactors (Chesley & Spahr, 2004). We present a method to model the NEOs population in all six orbital elements, on a finely grained grid, allowing us the design and test of targeted and optimized search strategies. This method relies on the observational data routinely reported to the Minor Planet Center (MPC) by the Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) and by other active NEO surveys over the past decade, to determine on a nightly basis the efficiency in detecting moving objects as a function of observable quantities including apparent magnitude, rate of motion, airmass, and galactic latitude. The cumulative detection probability is then be computed for objects within a small range in orbital elements and absolute magnitude, and the comparison with the number of know NEOs within the same range allows us to model the population. When propagated to the present epoch and projected on the sky plane, this provides the distribution of the missing large NEOs, PHOs, and potential impactors.

  20. Anisotropy and Microstructure of High Coercivity Rare Earth Iron Permanent Magnets, List of Papers Published

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    EARTH IRON PERMANENT MAGNETS. LIST OF PAPERS PUBLISHED 1986 - 1989 Contract No.: DAJA45-86-C-0010 Report No.: R/D-5295-MS-01 NOV 0 � A = LIST OF...R.Gr~ssinger - ’-Does a Co substitution really improve the temperature dependence of Nd-Fe-B based permanent magnets" .’ Proc. of 91h Int. Workshop...in NdzFe,4-4-iZx B (Z=A1,Si,Co, Ga) compounds", J. de Physique 49 (1988) CS-599. (16) R.Gr8ssinger, R.Krewenka, H.Buchn~r, H.Harada " A new analysis of

  1. A high-fidelity satellite ephemeris program for Earth satellites in eccentric orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, David R.

    1990-01-01

    A program for mission planning called the Analytic Satellite Ephemeris Program (ASEP), produces projected data for orbits that remain fairly close to the Earth. ASEP does not take into account lunar and solar perturbations. These perturbations are accounted for in another program called GRAVE, which incorporates more flexible means of input for initial data, provides additional kinds of output information, and makes use of structural programming techniques to make the program more understandable and reliable. GRAVE was revised, and a new program called ORBIT was developed. It is divided into three major phases: initialization, integration, and output. Results of the program development are presented.

  2. The problem of iron partition between Earth and Moon during simultaneous formation as a double planet system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassidy, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    A planetary model is described which requires fractional vapor/liquid condensation, planet accumulation during condensation, a late start for accumulation of the Moon, and volatile accretion to the surfaces of each planet only near the end of the accumulation process. In the model, initial accumulation of small objects is helped if the agglomerating particles are somewhat sticky. Assuming that growth proceeds through this range, agglomeration continues. If the reservoir of vapor is being preferentially depleted in iron by fractional condensation, an iron-rich planetary core forms. As the temperature decreases, condensing material becomes progressively richer in silicates and poorer in iron, forming the silicate-rich mantle of an already differentiated Earth. A second center of agglomeration successfully forms near the growing Earth after most of the iron in the reservoir has been used up. The bulk composition of the Moon then is similar to the outer mantle of the accumulating Earth.

  3. Spaceborne Microwave Instrument for High Resolution Remote Sensing of the Earth's Surface Using a Large-Aperture Mesh Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E.; Wilson, W.; Yueh, S.; Freeland, R.; Helms, R.; Edelstein, W.; Sadowy, G.; Farra, D.; West, R.; Oxnevad, K.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes a two-year study of a large-aperture, lightweight, deployable mesh antenna system for radiometer and radar remote sensing of the Earth from space. The study focused specifically on an instrument to measure ocean salinity and Soil moisture. Measurements of ocean salinity and soil moisture are of critical . importance in improving knowledge and prediction of key ocean and land surface processes, but are not currently obtainable from space. A mission using this instrument would be the first demonstration of deployable mesh antenna technology for remote sensing and could lead to potential applications in other remote sensing disciplines that require high spatial resolution measurements. The study concept features a rotating 6-m-diameter deployable mesh antenna, with radiometer and radar sensors, to measure microwave emission and backscatter from the Earth's surface. The sensors operate at L and S bands, with multiple polarizations and a constant look angle, scanning across a wide swath. The study included detailed analyses of science requirements, reflector and feedhorn design and performance, microwave emissivity measurements of mesh samples, design and test of lightweight radar electronic., launch vehicle accommodations, rotational dynamics simulations, and an analysis of attitude control issues associated with the antenna and spacecraft, The goal of the study was to advance the technology readiness of the overall concept to a level appropriate for an Earth science emission.

  4. Absence of earthquake correlation with Earth tides: An indication of high preseismic fault stress rate

    Vidale, J.E.; Agnew, D.C.; Johnston, M.J.S.; Oppenheimer, D.H.

    1998-01-01

    Because the rate of stress change from the Earth tides exceeds that from tectonic stress accumulation, tidal triggering of earthquakes would be expected if the final hours of loading of the fault were at the tectonic rate and if rupture began soon after the achievement of a critical stress level. We analyze the tidal stresses and stress rates on the fault planes and at the times of 13,042 earthquakes which are so close to the San Andreas and Calaveras faults in California that we may take the fault plane to be known. We find that the stresses and stress rates from Earth tides at the times of earthquakes are distributed in the same way as tidal stresses and stress rates at random times. While the rate of earthquakes when the tidal stress promotes failure is 2% higher than when the stress does not, this difference in rate is not statistically significant. This lack of tidal triggering implies that preseismic stress rates in the nucleation zones of earthquakes are at least 0.15 bar/h just preceding seismic failure, much above the long-term tectonic stress rate of 10-4 bar/h.

  5. CNES developments of key detection technologies to prepare next generation focal planes for high resolution Earth observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materne, A.; Virmontois, C.; Bardoux, A.; Gimenez, T.; Biffi, J. M.; Laubier, D.; Delvit, J. M.

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the activities managed by CNES (French National Space Agency) for the development of focal planes for next generation of optical high resolution Earth observation satellites, in low sun-synchronous orbit. CNES has launched a new programme named OTOS, to increase the level of readiness (TRL) of several key technologies for high resolution Earth observation satellites. The OTOS programme includes several actions in the field of detection and focal planes: a new generation of CCD and CMOS image sensors, updated analog front-end electronics and analog-to-digital converters. The main features that must be achieved on focal planes for high resolution Earth Observation, are: readout speed, signal to noise ratio at low light level, anti-blooming efficiency, geometric stability, MTF and line of sight stability. The next steps targeted are presented in comparison to the in-flight measured performance of the PLEIADES satellites launched in 2011 and 2012. The high resolution panchromatic channel is still based upon Backside illuminated (BSI) CCDs operated in Time Delay Integration (TDI). For the multispectral channel, the main evolution consists in moving to TDI mode and the competition is open with the concurrent development of a CCD solution versus a CMOS solution. New CCDs will be based upon several process blocks under evaluation on the e2v 6 inches BSI wafer manufacturing line. The OTOS strategy for CMOS image sensors investigates on one hand custom TDI solutions within a similar approach to CCDs, and, on the other hand, investigates ways to take advantage of existing performance of off-the-shelf 2D arrays CMOS image sensors. We present the characterization results obtained from test vehicles designed for custom TDI operation on several CIS technologies and results obtained before and after radiation on snapshot 2D arrays from the CMOSIS CMV family.

  6. Nitrogen solubility in the deep mantle and the origin of Earth's primordial nitrogen budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Takahiro; Wiedenbeck, Michael; Shcheka, Svyatoslav; Keppler, Hans

    2018-04-01

    The solubility of nitrogen in the major minerals of the Earth's transition zone and lower mantle (wadsleyite, ringwoodite, bridgmanite, and Ca-silicate perovskite) coexisting with a reduced, nitrogen-rich fluid phase was measured. Experiments were carried out in multi-anvil presses at 14 to 24 GPa and 1100 to 1800 °C close to the Fe-FeO buffer. Starting materials were enriched in 15N and the nitrogen concentrations in run products were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Observed nitrogen (15N) solubilities in wadsleyite and ringwoodite typically range from 10 to 250 μg/g and strongly increase with temperature. Nitrogen solubility in bridgmanite is about 20 μg/g, while Ca-silicate perovskite incorporates about 30 μg/g under comparable conditions. Partition coefficients of nitrogen derived from coexisting phases are DNwadsleyite/olivine = 5.1 ± 2.1, DNringwoodite/wadsleyite = 0.49 ± 0.29, and DNbridgmanite/ringwoodite = 0.24 (+ 0.30 / - 0.19). Nitrogen solubility in the solid, iron-rich metal phase coexisting with the silicates was also measured and reached a maximum of nearly 1 wt.% 15N at 23 GPa and 1400 °C. These data yield a partition coefficient of nitrogen between iron metal and bridgmanite of DNmetal/bridgmanite ∼ 98, implying that in a lower mantle containing about 1% of iron metal, about half of the nitrogen still resides in the silicates. The high nitrogen solubility in wadsleyite and ringwoodite may be responsible for the low nitrogen concentrations often observed in ultradeep diamonds from the transition zone. Overall, the solubility data suggest that the transition zone and the lower mantle have the capacity to store at least 33 times the mass of nitrogen presently residing in the atmosphere. By combining the nitrogen solubility data in minerals with data on nitrogen solubility in silicate melts, mineral/melt partition coefficients of nitrogen can be estimated, from which the behavior of nitrogen during magma ocean crystallization can

  7. Microfluidic active mixers employing ultra-high aspect-ratio rare-earth magnetic nano-composite polymer artificial cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahbar, Mona; Shannon, Lesley; Gray, Bonnie L.

    2014-02-01

    We present a new micromixer based on highly magnetic, flexible, high aspect-ratio, artificial cilia that are fabricated as individual micromixer elements or in arrays for improved mixing performance. These new cilia enable high efficiency, fast mixing in a microchamber, and are controlled by small electromagnetic fields. The artificial cilia are fabricated using a new micromolding process for nano-composite polymers. Cilia fibers with aspect-ratios as high as 8:0.13 demonstrate the fabrication technique's capability in creating ultra-high aspect-ratio microstructures. Cilia, which are realized in polydimethylsiloxane doped with rare-earth magnetic powder, are magnetized to produce permanent magnetic structures with bidirectional deflection capabilities, making them highly suitable as mixers controlled by electromagnetic fields. Due to the high magnetization level of the polarized nano-composite polymer, we are able to use miniature electromagnets providing relatively small magnetic fields of 1.1 to 7 mT to actuate the cilia microstructures over a very wide motion range. Mixing performances of a single cilium, as well as different arrays of multiple cilia ranging from 2 to 8 per reaction chamber, are characterized and compared with passive diffusion mixing performance. The mixer cilia are actuated at different amplitudes and frequencies to optimize mixing performance. We demonstrate that more than 85% of the total volume of the reaction chamber is fully mixed after 3.5 min using a single cilium mixer at 7 mT compared with only 20% of the total volume mixed with passive diffusion. The time to achieve over 85% mixing is further reduced to 70 s using an array of eight cilia microstructures. The novel microfabrication technique and use of rare-earth permanently-magnetizable nano-composite polymers in mixer applications has not been reported elsewhere by other researchers. We further demonstrate improved mixing over other cilia micromixers as enabled by the high aspect

  8. High modulus rare earth and beryllium containing silicate glass compositions. [for glass reinforcing fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 16 million psi and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consisting essentially of approximately, by weight, 20 to 43% SiO2, 8 to 21% Al2O3, 4 to 10% BeO, 27 to 58% of at least one oxide selected from a first group consisting of Y2O3, La2O3, Nd2O3, Ce2O3, Ce2O3, and the mixed rare earth oxides, and 3 to 12% of at least one oxide selected from a second group consisting of MgO, ZrO2, ZnO and CaO are described. The molar ratio of BeO to the total content of the first group oxides is from 1.0 to 3.0.

  9. Backthinned TDI CCD image sensor design and performance for the Pleiades high resolution Earth observation satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materne, A.; Bardoux, A.; Geoffray, H.; Tournier, T.; Kubik, P.; Morris, D.; Wallace, I.; Renard, C.

    2017-11-01

    The PLEIADES-HR Earth observing satellites, under CNES development, combine a 0.7m resolution panchromatic channel, and a multispectral channel allowing a 2.8 m resolution, in 4 spectral bands. The 2 satellites will be placed on a sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of 695 km. The camera operates in push broom mode, providing images across a 20 km swath. This paper focuses on the specifications, design and performance of the TDI detectors developed by e2v technologies under CNES contract for the panchromatic channel. Design drivers, derived from the mission and satellite requirements, architecture of the sensor and measurement results for key performances of the first prototypes are presented.

  10. The influence of the Earth's magnetosphere on the high-energy solar protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Makhmutov, V. S.; Charakhchyan, T. N.

    1985-01-01

    In the Earth's polar regions the intensity of the solar protons with the energy above the critical energy of geomagnetic cutoff is the same as in the interplanetary space. The penumbra in the polar regions is small and the East-West effect is also small. However the geomagnetic cutoff rigidity R sub c in polar regions is difficult to calculate because it is not sufficient to include only the internal sources of the geomagnetic field. During the magneto-quiescent periods the real value of R sub c can be less by 0.1 GV than the calculated value because of the external sources. During the geomagnetic storms the real value of R sub c is still lower.

  11. Earth meandering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadiyan, H.; Zamani, A.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we try to put away current Global Tectonic Model to look the tectonic evolution of the earth from new point of view. Our new dynamic model is based on study of river meandering (RM) which infer new concept as Earth meandering(EM). In a universal gravitational field if we consider a clockwise spiral galaxy model rotate above Ninety East Ridge (geotectonic axis GA), this system with applying torsion field (likes geomagnetic field) in side direction from Rocky Mt. (west geotectonic pole WGP) to Tibetan plateau TP (east geotectonic pole EGP),it seems that pulled mass from WGP and pushed it in EGP due to it's rolling dynamics. According to this idea we see in topographic map that North America and Green land like a tongue pulled from Pacific mouth toward TP. Actually this system rolled or meander the earth over itself fractaly from small scale to big scale and what we see in the river meandering and Earth meandering are two faces of one coin. River transport water and sediments from high elevation to lower elevation and also in EM, mass transport from high altitude-Rocky Mt. to lower altitude Himalaya Mt. along 'S' shape geodetic line-optimum path which connect points from high altitude to lower altitude as kind of Euler Elastica(EE). These curves are responsible for mass spreading (source) and mass concentration (sink). In this regard, tiltness of earth spin axis plays an important role, 'S' are part of sigmoidal shape which formed due to intersection of Earth rolling with the Earth glob and actual feature of transform fault and river meandering. Longitudinal profile in mature rivers as a part of 'S' curve also is a kind of EE. 'S' which bound the whole earth is named S-1(S order 1) and cube corresponding to this which represent Earth fracturing in global scale named C-1(cube order 1 or side vergence cube SVC), C-1 is a biggest cycle of spiral polygon, so it is not completely closed and it has separation about diameter of C-7. Inside SVC we introduce cone

  12. Earth observations during Space Shuttle flight STS-27: A high latitude observations opportunity - 2-6 December 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Victor S.; Helfert, Michael R.; Lulla, Kamlesh P.; Wood, Charles A.; Amsbury, David L.; Gibson, Robert; Gardner, Guy; Mullane, Mike; Ross, Jerry; Shepherd, Bill

    1989-01-01

    The earth observations from the STS-27 mission on December 2-6, 1988 are reported. The film and generic scene characteristics chosen for the mission are given. Results are given from geological observations of the Ruwenzori Mountains between Uganda and Zaire, four rift valley systems in Africa and Asia, and several volcanoes and impact craters. Environmental observations of Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, North America and the Soviet Union, are presented. Also, meteorological and oceanographic observations are discussed. The uniqueness of the high-inclination winter launch of the STS-27 mission for obtaining observations of specific features is noted.

  13. Observation of high magnetocrystalline anisotropy on Co doping in rare earth free Fe2P magnetic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Jyoti; Singh, Om Pal; Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay; Kashyap, Manish K.

    2018-04-01

    ab-initio investigation of magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy (MAE) for Fe2P and CoFeP using density functional theory based full-potential linear augmented plane wave (FPLAPW) is reported. CoFeP alloy exhibits large magnetic moment 13.28 µB and enhanced anisotropy energy reaching as high as 1326 µeV/f.u. This energy is nearly doubled as compared to its parent Fe2P alloy, making this system a promising candidate for a rare earth free permanent magnet. Substituitng Co at Fe-3f site in Fe2P helps in stabilizing the new structure and further improves the magnetic properties.

  14. Success of the International Year of the Planet Earth through Targeted High-impact Programs at the American Geological Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, P.

    2007-12-01

    on the 2007 Earth Science Week web site, and AGI staff is participating as "first bloggers" for the IYPE Earthlearningidea online investigations. A major AGI contribution to IYPE will be an assessment of the geoscience workforce in the United States. This effort will involve analyzing supply and demand statistics for workforce and working with academia to provide material aimed at ensuring both an adequate and high-quality supply of geoscientists for the future. Such an assessment can be used in collaboratively building a global assessment of the geoscience profession.

  15. Hydrogen Clathrate Structures in Rare Earth Hydrides at High Pressures: Possible Route to Room-Temperature Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Feng; Sun, Ying; Pickard, Chris J.; Needs, Richard J.; Wu, Qiang; Ma, Yanming

    2017-09-01

    Room-temperature superconductivity has been a long-held dream and an area of intensive research. Recent experimental findings of superconductivity at 200 K in highly compressed hydrogen (H) sulfides have demonstrated the potential for achieving room-temperature superconductivity in compressed H-rich materials. We report first-principles structure searches for stable H-rich clathrate structures in rare earth hydrides at high pressures. The peculiarity of these structures lies in the emergence of unusual H cages with stoichiometries H24 , H29 , and H32 , in which H atoms are weakly covalently bonded to one another, with rare earth atoms occupying the centers of the cages. We have found that high-temperature superconductivity is closely associated with H clathrate structures, with large H-derived electronic densities of states at the Fermi level and strong electron-phonon coupling related to the stretching and rocking motions of H atoms within the cages. Strikingly, a yttrium (Y) H32 clathrate structure of stoichiometry YH10 is predicted to be a potential room-temperature superconductor with an estimated Tc of up to 303 K at 400 GPa, as derived by direct solution of the Eliashberg equation.

  16. Hydrogen Clathrate Structures in Rare Earth Hydrides at High Pressures: Possible Route to Room-Temperature Superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Peng, Feng; Sun, Ying; Pickard, Chris J; Needs, Richard J; Wu, Qiang; Ma, Yanming

    2017-09-08

    Room-temperature superconductivity has been a long-held dream and an area of intensive research. Recent experimental findings of superconductivity at 200 K in highly compressed hydrogen (H) sulfides have demonstrated the potential for achieving room-temperature superconductivity in compressed H-rich materials. We report first-principles structure searches for stable H-rich clathrate structures in rare earth hydrides at high pressures. The peculiarity of these structures lies in the emergence of unusual H cages with stoichiometries H_{24}, H_{29}, and H_{32}, in which H atoms are weakly covalently bonded to one another, with rare earth atoms occupying the centers of the cages. We have found that high-temperature superconductivity is closely associated with H clathrate structures, with large H-derived electronic densities of states at the Fermi level and strong electron-phonon coupling related to the stretching and rocking motions of H atoms within the cages. Strikingly, a yttrium (Y) H_{32} clathrate structure of stoichiometry YH_{10} is predicted to be a potential room-temperature superconductor with an estimated T_{c} of up to 303 K at 400 GPa, as derived by direct solution of the Eliashberg equation.

  17. The Deep Space Gateway Lightning Mapper (DLM) — Monitoring Global Change and Thunderstorm Processes through Observations of Earth's High-Latitude Lightning from Cis-Lunar Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, T. J.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Cecil, D. J.; Christian, H. J.; Gatlin, P. N.; Goodman, S. J.; Koshak, W. J.; Petersen, W. A.; Quick, M.; Schultz, C. J.; Tatum, P. F.

    2018-02-01

    We propose the Deep Space Gateway Lightning Mapper (DLM) instrument. The primary goal of the DLM is to optically monitor Earth's high-latitude (50° and poleward) total lightning not observed by current and planned spaceborne lightning mappers.

  18. Metal Amorphous Nanocomposite Soft Magnetic Material-Enabled High Power Density, Rare Earth Free Rotational Machines [Metal Amorphous Nanocomposite (MANC) Soft Magnetic Material (SMM) Enabled High Power Density, Rare Earth Free Rotational Machines

    SciT

    Simizu, Satoru; Ohodnicki, Paul R.; McHenry, Michael E.

    Metal amorphous nanocomposites (MANCs) are promising soft magnetic materials (SMMs) for power electronic applications offering low power loss at high frequency and maintaining a relatively high flux density. While applications in certain motor designs have been recently modeled, their widespread application awaits scaled manufacturing of MANC materials and proliferation of new higher speed motor designs. A hybrid motor design based on permanent magnets and doubly salient stator and rotor is reported here to develop a compact (a factor of 10 smaller than currently possible in Si steels), high-speed (>1 kHz, electrical), high-power (>2.5 kW) motor by incorporating low loss (<10more » W/kg at 1 kHz) MANCs such as recently reported Fe-Ni-based alloys. A feature of this motor design is flux focusing from the permanent magnet allowing use of lower energy permanent magnet chosen from among non-rare earth containing compositions and attractive due to constraints posed by rare earth criticality. A 2-D finite element analysis model reported here indicates that a 2.5 kW hybrid motor may be built with a permanent magnet with a 0.4 T remanence at a rotor speed of 6000 rpm. At a magnetic switching frequency of 1.4 kHz, the core loss may be limited to <3 W by selecting an appropriate MANC SMM. The projected efficiency exceeds 96% not including power loss in the controller. Under full load conditions, the flux density distributions for the SMM stay predominantly <1.3 T, the saturation magnetization of optimized FeNi-based MANC alloys. As a result, the maximum demagnetizing field in the permanent magnet is less than 2.2 × 10 5 A/m sustainable, for example, with a high-grade hard ferrite magnet.« less

  19. Metal Amorphous Nanocomposite Soft Magnetic Material-Enabled High Power Density, Rare Earth Free Rotational Machines [Metal Amorphous Nanocomposite (MANC) Soft Magnetic Material (SMM) Enabled High Power Density, Rare Earth Free Rotational Machines

    DOE PAGES

    Simizu, Satoru; Ohodnicki, Paul R.; McHenry, Michael E.

    2018-02-27

    Metal amorphous nanocomposites (MANCs) are promising soft magnetic materials (SMMs) for power electronic applications offering low power loss at high frequency and maintaining a relatively high flux density. While applications in certain motor designs have been recently modeled, their widespread application awaits scaled manufacturing of MANC materials and proliferation of new higher speed motor designs. A hybrid motor design based on permanent magnets and doubly salient stator and rotor is reported here to develop a compact (a factor of 10 smaller than currently possible in Si steels), high-speed (>1 kHz, electrical), high-power (>2.5 kW) motor by incorporating low loss (<10more » W/kg at 1 kHz) MANCs such as recently reported Fe-Ni-based alloys. A feature of this motor design is flux focusing from the permanent magnet allowing use of lower energy permanent magnet chosen from among non-rare earth containing compositions and attractive due to constraints posed by rare earth criticality. A 2-D finite element analysis model reported here indicates that a 2.5 kW hybrid motor may be built with a permanent magnet with a 0.4 T remanence at a rotor speed of 6000 rpm. At a magnetic switching frequency of 1.4 kHz, the core loss may be limited to <3 W by selecting an appropriate MANC SMM. The projected efficiency exceeds 96% not including power loss in the controller. Under full load conditions, the flux density distributions for the SMM stay predominantly <1.3 T, the saturation magnetization of optimized FeNi-based MANC alloys. As a result, the maximum demagnetizing field in the permanent magnet is less than 2.2 × 10 5 A/m sustainable, for example, with a high-grade hard ferrite magnet.« less

  20. Earth Observation

    2011-08-02

    ISS028-E-020276 (2 Aug. 2011) --- This photograph of polar mesospheric clouds was acquired at an altitude of just over 202 nautical miles (about 322 kilometers) in the evening hours (03:19:54 Greenwich Mean Time) on Aug. 2, 2011, as the International Space Station was passing over the English Channel. The nadir coordinates of the station were 49.1 degrees north latitude and 5.5 degrees west longitude. Polar mesospheric clouds (also known as noctilucent, or ?night-shining? clouds) are transient, upper atmospheric phenomena that are usually observed in the summer months at high latitudes (greater than 50 degrees) of both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. They appear bright and cloudlike while in deep twilight. They are illuminated by sunlight when the lower layers of the atmosphere are in the darkness of Earth?s shadow. The horizon of Earth appears at the bottom of the image, with some layers of the lower atmosphere already illuminated by the rising sun. The higher, bluish-colored clouds look much like wispy cirrus clouds, which can be found as high as 60,000 feet (18 kilometers) in the atmosphere. However noctilucent clouds, as seen here, are observed in the mesosphere at altitudes of 250,000 to 280,000 feet (about 76 to 85 kilometers). Astronaut observations of polar mesospheric clouds over northern Europe in the summer are not uncommon.

  1. Preliminary Results from NASA/GSFC Ka-Band High Rate Demonstration for Near-Earth Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Yen; Gioannini, Bryan; Bundick, Steven N.; Miller, David T.

    2004-01-01

    In early 2000, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) commenced the Ka-Band Transition Project (KaTP) as another step towards satisfying wideband communication requirements of the space research and earth exploration-satellite services. The KaTP team upgraded the ground segment portion of NASA's Space Network (SN) in order to enable high data rate space science and earth science services communications. The SN ground segment is located at the White Sands Complex (WSC) in New Mexico. NASA conducted the SN ground segment upgrades in conjunction with space segment upgrades implemented via the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS)-HIJ project. The three new geostationary data relay satellites developed under the TDRS-HIJ project support the use of the inter-satellite service (ISS) allocation in the 25.25-27.5 GHz band (the 26 GHz band) to receive high speed data from low earth-orbiting customer spacecraft. The TDRS H spacecraft (designated TDRS-8) is currently operational at a 171 degrees west longitude. TDRS I and J spacecraft on-orbit testing has been completed. These spacecraft support 650 MHz-wide Ka-band telemetry links that are referred to as return links. The 650 MHz-wide Ka-band telemetry links have the capability to support data rates up to at least 1.2 Gbps. Therefore, the TDRS-HIJ spacecraft will significantly enhance the existing data rate elements of the NASA Space Network that operate at S-band and Ku-band.

  2. Development of a High-Resolution Climate Model for Future Climate Change Projection on the Earth Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzawa, H.; Emori, S.; Nishimura, T.; Suzuki, T.; Inoue, T.; Hasumi, H.; Saito, F.; Abe-Ouchi, A.; Kimoto, M.; Sumi, A.

    2002-12-01

    The fastest supercomputer of the world, the Earth Simulator (total peak performance 40TFLOPS) has recently been available for climate researches in Yokohama, Japan. We are planning to conduct a series of future climate change projection experiments on the Earth Simulator with a high-resolution coupled ocean-atmosphere climate model. The main scientific aims for the experiments are to investigate 1) the change in global ocean circulation with an eddy-permitting ocean model, 2) the regional details of the climate change including Asian monsoon rainfall pattern, tropical cyclones and so on, and 3) the change in natural climate variability with a high-resolution model of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system. To meet these aims, an atmospheric GCM, CCSR/NIES AGCM, with T106(~1.1o) horizontal resolution and 56 vertical layers is to be coupled with an oceanic GCM, COCO, with ~ 0.28ox 0.19o horizontal resolution and 48 vertical layers. This coupled ocean-atmosphere climate model, named MIROC, also includes a land-surface model, a dynamic-thermodynamic seaice model, and a river routing model. The poles of the oceanic model grid system are rotated from the geographic poles so that they are placed in Greenland and Antarctic land masses to avoild the singularity of the grid system. Each of the atmospheric and the oceanic parts of the model is parallelized with the Message Passing Interface (MPI) technique. The coupling of the two is to be done with a Multi Program Multi Data (MPMD) fashion. A 100-model-year integration will be possible in one actual month with 720 vector processors (which is only 14% of the full resources of the Earth Simulator).

  3. A Model for Undergraduate and High School Student Research in Earth and Space Sciences: The New York City Research Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalzo, F.; Johnson, L.; Marchese, P.

    2006-05-01

    The New York City Research Initiative (NYCRI) is a research and academic program that involves high school students, undergraduate and graduate students, and high school teachers in research teams that are led by college/university principal investigators of NASA funded projects and/or NASA scientists. The principal investigators are at 12 colleges/universities within a 50-mile radius of New York City (NYC and surrounding counties, Southern Connecticut and Northern New Jersey), as well as the NASA Goddard Institute of Space Studies (GISS). This program has a summer research institute component in Earth Science and Space Science, and an academic year component that includes the formulation and implementation NASA research based learning units in existing STEM courses by high school and college faculty. NYCRI is a revision and expansion of the Institute on Climate and Planets at GISS and is funded by NASA MURED and the Goddard Space Flight Center's Education Office.

  4. Earth System Modeling 2.0: A Blueprint for Models That Learn From Observations and Targeted High-Resolution Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Tapio; Lan, Shiwei; Stuart, Andrew; Teixeira, João.

    2017-12-01

    Climate projections continue to be marred by large uncertainties, which originate in processes that need to be parameterized, such as clouds, convection, and ecosystems. But rapid progress is now within reach. New computational tools and methods from data assimilation and machine learning make it possible to integrate global observations and local high-resolution simulations in an Earth system model (ESM) that systematically learns from both and quantifies uncertainties. Here we propose a blueprint for such an ESM. We outline how parameterization schemes can learn from global observations and targeted high-resolution simulations, for example, of clouds and convection, through matching low-order statistics between ESMs, observations, and high-resolution simulations. We illustrate learning algorithms for ESMs with a simple dynamical system that shares characteristics of the climate system; and we discuss the opportunities the proposed framework presents and the challenges that remain to realize it.

  5. Displacement-based back-analysis of the model parameters of the Nuozhadu high earth-rockfill dam.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yongkang; Yuan, Huina; Zhang, Bingyin; Zhang, Zongliang; Yu, Yuzhen

    2014-01-01

    The parameters of the constitutive model, the creep model, and the wetting model of materials of the Nuozhadu high earth-rockfill dam were back-analyzed together based on field monitoring displacement data by employing an intelligent back-analysis method. In this method, an artificial neural network is used as a substitute for time-consuming finite element analysis, and an evolutionary algorithm is applied for both network training and parameter optimization. To avoid simultaneous back-analysis of many parameters, the model parameters of the three main dam materials are decoupled and back-analyzed separately in a particular order. Displacement back-analyses were performed at different stages of the construction period, with and without considering the creep and wetting deformations. Good agreement between the numerical results and the monitoring data was obtained for most observation points, which implies that the back-analysis method and decoupling method are effective for solving complex problems with multiple models and parameters. The comparison of calculation results based on different sets of back-analyzed model parameters indicates the necessity of taking the effects of creep and wetting into consideration in the numerical analyses of high earth-rockfill dams. With the resulting model parameters, the stress and deformation distributions at completion are predicted and analyzed.

  6. Rapid, High-Resolution Detection of Environmental Change over Continental Scales from Satellite Data - the Earth Observation Data Cube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Adam; Lymburner, Leo; Purss, Matthew B. J.; Brooke, Brendan; Evans, Ben; Ip, Alex; Dekker, Arnold G.; Irons, James R.; Minchin, Stuart; Mueller, Norman

    2015-01-01

    The effort and cost required to convert satellite Earth Observation (EO) data into meaningful geophysical variables has prevented the systematic analysis of all available observations. To overcome these problems, we utilise an integrated High Performance Computing and Data environment to rapidly process, restructure and analyse the Australian Landsat data archive. In this approach, the EO data are assigned to a common grid framework that spans the full geospatial and temporal extent of the observations - the EO Data Cube. This approach is pixel-based and incorporates geometric and spectral calibration and quality assurance of each Earth surface reflectance measurement. We demonstrate the utility of the approach with rapid time-series mapping of surface water across the entire Australian continent using 27 years of continuous, 25 m resolution observations. Our preliminary analysis of the Landsat archive shows how the EO Data Cube can effectively liberate high-resolution EO data from their complex sensor-specific data structures and revolutionise our ability to measure environmental change.

  7. Contributions of high-altitude winds and atmospheric moment of inertia to the atmospheric angular momentum-earth rotation relationship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, H. A., Jr.; Mayr, H. G.; Kramer, L.

    1985-01-01

    For many years it has been recognized that recurrent modulations occur in the time series of the earth's rotation rate or, alternatively, the change in the length of the day (Delta-LOD). Studies relating Delta-LOD to global patterns of zonal winds have confirmed that the variability of atmospheric angular momentum (M) is of sufficient magnitude to account for a large portion of the gross periodicities observed in the earth rotation. The present investigation is concerned with the importance of the contributions of the moment of inertia and high-altitude winds to the angular momentum budget. On the basis of an analysis of the various factors, it is found that within the available data, contributions of high-altitude winds and atmospheric moment of inertia reach levels detectable in the atmospheric angular momentum budget. Nevertheless, for the period December 1978 to December 1979 these contributions are not sufficient to resolve the apparent short-term discrepancies which are evident between Delta-LOD and M.

  8. High-temperature corrosion of metals in the salt and metallic melts containing rare earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, V. V.; Abramov, A. V.; Zhilyakov, A. Yu.; Belikov, S. V.; Volkovich, V. A.; Polovov, I. B.; Rebrin, O. I.

    2016-09-01

    A complex of independent methods was employed to study the corrosion resistance of molybdenum, zirconium, tantalum and tungsten in chloride, chloride-fluoride and fluoride-oxide melts based on LiCl, CaCl2, NaCl- KCl, LiF, and containing rare earths. Tests were conducted for 30 h at 750-1050 °C. The metals showed excellent corrosion resistance in fused chlorides (the corrosion rates were below 0.0005 g/(m2 h). Despite the presence of chemically active fluoride ions in the chloride-fluoride melts, the metals studied also showed very low corrosion rates, except molybdenum, for which the rate of corrosion was 0,8 g/(m2 h). The corrosion resistance of tantalum was considerably reduced in the fluoride-oxide melts; the corrosion rate was over 1 g/(m2 h) corresponding to the 8-th grade of stability and placing tantalum to the group of "low stability" materials.

  9. A Highly Scalable Data Service (HSDS) using Cloud-based Storage Technologies for Earth Science Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, A.; Readey, J.; Votava, P.; Henderson, J.; Willmore, F.

    2017-12-01

    Cloud based infrastructure may offer several key benefits of scalability, built in redundancy, security mechanisms and reduced total cost of ownership as compared with a traditional data center approach. However, most of the tools and legacy software systems developed for online data repositories within the federal government were not developed with a cloud based infrastructure in mind and do not fully take advantage of commonly available cloud-based technologies. Moreover, services bases on object storage are well established and provided through all the leading cloud service providers (Amazon Web Service, Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud, etc…) of which can often provide unmatched "scale-out" capabilities and data availability to a large and growing consumer base at a price point unachievable from in-house solutions. We describe a system that utilizes object storage rather than traditional file system based storage to vend earth science data. The system described is not only cost effective, but shows a performance advantage for running many different analytics tasks in the cloud. To enable compatibility with existing tools and applications, we outline client libraries that are API compatible with existing libraries for HDF5 and NetCDF4. Performance of the system is demonstrated using clouds services running on Amazon Web Services.

  10. A high-fidelity N-body ephemeris generator for satellites in Earth orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, David R.

    1991-10-01

    A program is currently used for mission planning called the Analytic Satellite Ephemeris Program (ASEP), which produces projected data for orbits that remain fairly close to Earth. Lunar and solar perturbations are taken into account in another program called GRAVE. This project is a revision of GRAVE which incorporates more flexible means of input for initial data, provides additional kinds of output information, and makes use of structured programming techniques to make the program more understandable and reliable. The computer program ORBIT was tested against tracking data for the first 313 days of operation of the CRRES satellite. A sample graph is given comparing the semi-major axis calculated by the program with the values supplied by NORAD. When calculated for points at which CRRES passes through the ascending node, the argument of perigee, the right ascension of the ascending node, and the mean anomaly all stay within about a degree of the corresponding values from NORAD; the inclination of the orbital plane is much closer. The program value of the eccentricity is in error by no more than 0.0002.

  11. Thermal Cycling and High-Temperature Corrosion Tests of Rare Earth Silicate Environmental Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darthout, Émilien; Gitzhofer, François

    2017-12-01

    Lutetium and yttrium silicates, enriched with an additional secondary zirconia phase, environmental barrier coatings were synthesized by the solution precursor plasma spraying process on silicon carbide substrates. A custom-made oven was designed for thermal cycling and water vapor corrosion testing. The oven can test four specimens simultaneously and allows to evaluate environmental barrier performances under similar corrosion kinetics compared to turbine engines. Coatings structural evolution has been observed by SEM on the polished cross sections, and phase composition has been analyzed by XRD. All coatings have been thermally cycled between 1300 °C and the ambient temperature, without spallation, due to their porosity and the presence of additional secondary phase which increases the thermal cycling resistance. During water vapor exposure at 1200 °C, rare earth disilicates showed a good stability, which is contradictory with the literature, due to impurities—such as Si- and Al-hydroxides—in the water vapor jets. The presence of vertical cracks allowed the water vapor to reach the substrate and then to corrode it. It has been observed that thin vertical cracks induced some spallation after 24 h of corrosion.

  12. Application of high-precision two-way ranging to Galileo Earth-1 encounter navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollmeier, V. M.; Thurman, S. W.

    1992-01-01

    The application of precision two-way ranging to orbit determination with relatively short data arcs is investigated for the Galileo spacecraft's approach to its first Earth encounter (December 8, 1990). Analysis of previous S-band (2.3-GHz) ranging data acquired from Galileo indicated that under good signal conditions submeter precision and 10-m ranging accuracy were achieved. It is shown that ranging data of sufficient accuracy, when acquired from multiple stations, can sense the geocentric angular position of a distant spacecraft. A range data filtering technique, in which explicit modeling of range measurement bias parameters for each station pass is utilized, is shown to largely remove the systematic ground system calibration errors and transmission media effects from the Galileo range measurements, which would otherwise corrupt the angle-finding capabilities of the data. The accuracy of the Galileo orbit solutions obtained with S-band Doppler and precision ranging were found to be consistent with simple theoretical calculations, which predicted that angular accuracies of 0.26-0.34 microrad were achievable. In addition, the navigation accuracy achieved with precision ranging was marginally better than that obtained using delta-differenced one-way range (delta DOR), the principal data type that was previously used to obtain spacecraft angular position measurements operationally.

  13. Validation of High Speed Earth Atmospheric Entry Radiative Heating from 9.5 to 15.5 km/s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandis, A. M.; Johnston, C. O.; Cruden, B. A.; Prabhu, D. K.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the analysis and measurements of equilibrium radiation obtained in the NASA Ames Research Center's Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility as a part of recent testing aimed at reaching shock velocities up to 15.5 km/s. The goal of these experiments was to measure the level of radiation encountered during high speed Earth entry conditions, such as would be relevant for an asteroid, inter-planetary or lunar return mission. These experiments provide the first spectrally and spatially resolved data for high speed Earth entry and cover conditions ranging from 9.5 to 15.5 km/s at 13.3 and 26.6 Pa (0.1 and 0.2 Torr). The present analysis endeavors to provide a validation of shock tube radiation measurements and simulations at high speed conditions. A comprehensive comparison between the spectrally resolved absolute equilibrium radiance measured in EAST and the predictive tools, NEQAIR and HARA, is presented. In order to provide a more accurate representation of the agreement between the experimental and simulation results, the integrated value of radiance has been compared across four spectral regions (VUV, UV/Vis, Vis/NIR and IR) as a function of velocity. Results have generally shown excellent agreement between the two codes and EAST data for the Vis through IR spectral regions, however, discrepancies have been identified in the VUV and parts of the UV spectral regions. As a result of the analysis presented in this paper, an updated parametric uncertainty for high speed radiation in air has been evaluated to be [9.0%, -6.3%]. Furthermore, due to the nature of the radiating environment at these high shock speeds, initial calculations aimed at modeling phenomena that become more significant with increasing shock speed have been performed. These phenomena include analyzing the radiating species emitting ahead of the shock and the increased significance of radiative cooling mechanisms.

  14. Rare earth elements in fine-grained sediments of major rivers from the high-standing island of Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan-Shun; Shi, Xue-Fa; Kao, Shuh-Ji; Liu, Yan-Guang; Lyu, Hua-Hua; Zou, Jian-Jun; Liu, Sheng-Fa; Qiao, Shu-Qing

    2013-06-01

    Thirty-eight sediment samples from 15 primary rivers on Taiwan were retrieved to characterize the rare earth element (REE) signature of fluvial fine sediment sources. Compared to the three large rivers on the Chinese mainland, distinct differences were observed in the REE contents, upper continental crust normalized patterns and fractionation factors of the sediment samples. The average REE concentrations of the Taiwanese river sediments are higher than those of the Changjiang and Huanghe, but lower than the Zhujiang. Light rare earth elements (LREEs) are enriched relative to heavy rare earth elements (HREEs) with ratios from 7.48 to 13.03. We found that the variations in (La/Lu)UCC-(Gd/Lu)UCC and (La/Yb)UCC-(Gd/Yb)UCC are good proxies for tracing the source sediments of Taiwanese and Chinese rivers due to their distinguishable values. Our analyses indicate that the REE compositions of Taiwanese river sediments were primarily determined by the properties of the bedrock, and the intensity of chemical weathering in the drainage areas. The relatively high relief and heavy rainfall also have caused the REEs in the fluvial sediments from Taiwan to be transported to the estuaries down rivers from the mountains, and in turn delivered nearly coincidently to the adjacent seas by currents and waves. Our studies suggest that the REE patterns of the river sediments from Taiwan are distinguishable from those from the other sources of sediments transported into the adjacent seas, and therefore are useful proxies for tracing the provenances and dispersal patterns of sediments, as well as paleoenvironmental changes in the marginal seas.

  15. Experimental Investigations into U/TRU Recovery using a Liquid Cadmium Cathode and Salt Containing High Rare Earth Concentrations

    SciT

    Shelly X. Li; Steven D. Herrmann; Michael F. Simpson

    2009-09-01

    Experimental Investigations into U/TRU Recovery using a Liquid Cadmium Cathode and Salt Containing High Rare Earth Concentrations Shelly X. Li, Steven D. Herrmann, and Michael F. Simpson Pyroprocessing Technology Department Idaho National Laboratory P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 USA Abstract - A series of six bench-scale liquid cadmium cathode (LCC) tests was performed to obtain basic separation data with focus on the behavior of rare earth elements. The electrolyte used for the tests was a mixed salt from the Mk-IV and Mk-V electrorefiners, in which spent metal fuels from Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) had been processed. Rare earthmore » (RE) chlorides, such as NdCl3, CeCl3, LaCl3, PrCl3, SmCl3, and YCl3, were spiked into the salt prior to the first test to create an extreme case for investigating rare earth contamination of the actinides collected by a LCC. For the first two LCC tests, an alloy with the nominal composition of 41U-30Pu-5Am-3Np-20Zr-1RE was loaded into the anode baskets as the feed material. The anode feed material for Runs 3 to 6 was spent ternary fuel (U-19Pu-10Zr). The Pu/U ratio in the salt varied from 0.6 to 1.3. Chemical and radiochemical analytical results confirmed that U and transuranics can be collected into the LCC as a group under the given run conditions. The RE contamination level in the LCC product was up to 6.7 wt% of the total metal collected. The detailed data for partitioning of actinides and REs in the salt and Cd phases are reported in the paper.« less

  16. Enrichment of rare earth metal ions by the highly selective adsorption of phytate intercalated layered double hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cheng; Liu, Huimin; Kong, Xianggui; Yan, Hong; Lei, Xiaodong

    2018-02-27

    Phytate intercalated MgAl layered double hydroxide (MgAl-LDH) was prepared by an anion exchange method with the precursor NO 3 - containing MgAl-LDH. The final as-synthesized product [Mg 0.69 Al 0.31 (OH) 2 ] (phytateNa 6 ) 0.05 (NO 3 ) 0.01 ·mH 2 O (phytate-LDH) has highly selective adsorption ability for some metal ions and can be used to enrich rare earth metal ions in mixed solution, such as Pr 3+ and Ce 3+ from a mixed solution of them with Pb 2+ and Co 2+ . At first, phytate-LDH has good adsorption performance for these ions in single metal ion solutions. At low concentration (below 10 mg L -1 ), all the capture rates of the four metal ions were more than 97%, for highly toxic Pb 2+ it was even up to nearly 100%, and a high capture rate (99.87%) was maintained for Pb 2+ at a high concentration (100 mg L -1 ). When all the four metal ions are co-existing in aqueous solution, the selectivity order is Pb 2+ ≫ Pr 3+ ≈ Ce 3+ > Co 2+ . In a solution containing mixtures of the three metal ions of Pr 3+ , Ce 3+ , and Co 2+ , the selectivity order is Pr 3+ ≈ Ce 3+ ≫ Co 2+ , and in a solution containing mixtures of Pr 3+ with Co 2+ and Ce 3+ with Co 2+ , the selectivity orders are Pr 3+ ≫ Co 2+ and Ce 3+ ≫ Co 2+ , respectively. The high selectivity and adsorption capacities for Pb 2+ , Co 2+ , Pr 3+ , and Ce 3+ result in the efficient removal of Pb 2+ and enrichment of the rare earth metal ions Pr 3+ and Ce 3+ by phytate-LDH. Based on the elemental analysis, it is found that the difference of the adsorption capacities is mainly due to the different coordination number of them with phytate-LDH. With molecular simulation, we believe that the adsorption selectivity is due to the difference of the binding energy between the metal ion and phytate-LDH. Therefore, the phytate-LDH is promising for the enrichment and/or purification of the rare earth metal ions and removal of toxic metal ions from waste water.

  17. High-frequency Earth rotation variations deduced from altimetry-based ocean tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madzak, Matthias; Schindelegger, Michael; Böhm, Johannes; Bosch, Wolfgang; Hagedoorn, Jan

    2016-11-01

    A model of diurnal and semi-diurnal variations in Earth rotation parameters (ERP) is constructed based on altimetry-measured tidal heights from a multi-mission empirical ocean tide solution. Barotropic currents contributing to relative angular momentum changes are estimated for nine major tides in a global inversion algorithm that solves the two-dimensional momentum equations on a regular 0.5° grid with a heavily weighted continuity constraint. The influence of 19 minor tides is accounted for by linear admittance interpolation of ocean tidal angular momentum, although the assumption of smooth admittance variations with frequency appears to be a doubtful concept for semi-diurnal mass terms in particular. A validation of the newly derived model based on post-fit corrections to polar motion and universal time (Δ UT1) from the analysis of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations shows a variance reduction for semi-diurnal Δ UT1 residuals that is significant at the 0.05 level with respect to the conventional ERP model. Improvements are also evident for the explicitly modeled K_1, Q_1, and K_2 tides in individual ERP components, but large residuals of more than 15 μ as remain at the principal lunar frequencies of O_1 and M_2. We attribute these shortcomings to uncertainties in the inverted relative angular momentum changes and, to a minor extent, to violation of mass conservation in the empirical ocean tide solution. Further dedicated hydrodynamic modeling efforts of these anomalous constituents are required to meet the accuracy standards of modern space geodesy.

  18. Earth-like aqueous debris-flow activity on Mars at high orbital obliquity in the last million years

    PubMed Central

    de Haas, T.; Hauber, E.; Conway, S. J.; van Steijn, H.; Johnsson, A.; Kleinhans, M. G.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid water is currently extremely rare on Mars, but was more abundant during periods of high obliquity in the last few millions of years. This is testified by the widespread occurrence of mid-latitude gullies: small catchment-fan systems. However, there are no direct estimates of the amount and frequency of liquid water generation during these periods. Here we determine debris-flow size, frequency and associated water volumes in Istok crater, and show that debris flows occurred at Earth-like frequencies during high-obliquity periods in the last million years on Mars. Results further imply that local accumulations of snow/ice within gullies were much more voluminous than currently predicted; melting must have yielded centimetres of liquid water in catchments; and recent aqueous activity in some mid-latitude craters was much more frequent than previously anticipated. PMID:26102485

  19. Design studies of large aperture, high-resolution Earth science microwave radiometers compatible with small launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Lyle C.; Bailey, M. C.; Harrington, Richard F.; Kendall, Bruce M.; Campbell, Thomas G.

    1994-01-01

    High-spatial-resolution microwave radiometer sensing from space with reasonable swath widths and revisit times favors large aperture systems. However, with traditional precision antenna design, the size and weight requirements for such systems are in conflict with the need to emphasize small launch vehicles. This paper describes tradeoffs between the science requirements, basic operational parameters, and expected sensor performance for selected satellite radiometer concepts utilizing novel lightweight compactly packaged real apertures. Antenna, feed, and radiometer subsystem design and calibration are presented. Preliminary results show that novel lightweight real aperture coupled with state-of-the-art radiometer designs are compatible with small launch systems, and hold promise for high-resolution earth science measurements of sea ice, precipitation, soil moisture, sea surface temperature, and ocean wind speeds.

  20. High-dispersion spectroscopy of extrasolar planets: from CO in hot Jupiters to O2 in exo-Earths.

    PubMed

    Snellen, Ignas

    2014-04-28

    Ground-based high-dispersion spectroscopy could reveal molecular oxygen as a biomarker gas in the atmospheres of twin-Earths transiting red dwarf stars within the next 25 years. The required contrasts are only a factor of 3 lower than that already achieved for carbon monoxide in hot Jupiter atmospheres today but will need much larger telescopes because the target stars will be orders of magnitude fainter. If extraterrestrial life is very common and can therefore be found on planets around the most nearby red dwarf stars, it may be detectable via transmission spectroscopy with the next-generation extremely large telescopes. However, it is likely that significantly more collecting area is required for this. This can be achieved through the development of low-cost flux collector technology, which combines a large collecting area with a low but sufficient image quality for high-dispersion spectroscopy of bright stars.

  1. Tropical Cyclone Activity in the High-Resolution Community Earth System Model and the Impact of Ocean Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Sriver, Ryan L.

    2018-01-01

    High-resolution Atmosphere General Circulation Models (AGCMs) are capable of directly simulating realistic tropical cyclone (TC) statistics, providing a promising approach for TC-climate studies. Active air-sea coupling in a coupled model framework is essential to capturing TC-ocean interactions, which can influence TC-climate connections on interannual to decadal time scales. Here we investigate how the choices of ocean coupling can affect the directly simulated TCs using high-resolution configurations of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). We performed a suite of high-resolution, multidecadal, global-scale CESM simulations in which the atmosphere (˜0.25° grid spacing) is configured with three different levels of ocean coupling: prescribed climatological sea surface temperature (SST) (ATM), mixed layer ocean (SLAB), and dynamic ocean (CPL). We find that different levels of ocean coupling can influence simulated TC frequency, geographical distributions, and storm intensity. ATM simulates more storms and higher overall storm intensity than the coupled simulations. It also simulates higher TC track density over the eastern Pacific and the North Atlantic, while TC tracks are relatively sparse within CPL and SLAB for these regions. Storm intensification and the maximum wind speed are sensitive to the representations of local surface flux feedbacks in different coupling configurations. Key differences in storm number and distribution can be attributed to variations in the modeled large-scale climate mean state and variability that arise from the combined effect of intrinsic model biases and air-sea interactions. Results help to improve our understanding about the representation of TCs in high-resolution coupled Earth system models, with important implications for TC-climate applications.

  2. Detection of coal mine workings using high-resolution earth resistivity techniques. Final technical report, September 1979-September 1980

    SciT

    Peters, W.R.; Campbell, T.M.; Sturdivant, V.R.

    1980-09-26

    Shallow underground voids resulting from early coal mining and other resource recovery activities over the past several decades are now being recognized as a significant cause of ground subsidence problems in developing urban areas. Uncertain knowledge of abandoned coal mines also imposes potential hazards in coal excavation operations since water inundation or the release of methane gas is a principal hazard when mine excavation operations break into an abandoned mine. US Army requirements for an effective method for detecting and mapping subversive abandoned tunnels have resulted in a surface-operated automatic earth resistivity survey system with a digital computer data processingmore » system. Field tests aimed at demonstrating the system performance resulted in successful detection of tunnels having depth-to-diameter ratios up to 15 to 1. Under the sponsorship of the Bureau of Mines, a similar system was designed and constructed for use in the detection of coal mine workings. This report discusses the hardware and software aspects of the system and the application of the high-resolution earth resistivity method to the survey and mapping of abandoned coal mine workings. In the field tests reported, the targets of interest were both air- and water-filled workings.« less

  3. Iron isotopic fractionation between silicate mantle and metallic core at high pressure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin; Dauphas, Nicolas; Roskosz, Mathieu; Hu, Michael Y.; Yang, Hong; Bi, Wenli; Zhao, Jiyong; Alp, Esen E.; Hu, Justin Y.; Lin, Jung-Fu

    2017-01-01

    The +0.1‰ elevated 56Fe/54Fe ratio of terrestrial basalts relative to chondrites was proposed to be a fingerprint of core-mantle segregation. However, the extent of iron isotopic fractionation between molten metal and silicate under high pressure–temperature conditions is poorly known. Here we show that iron forms chemical bonds of similar strengths in basaltic glasses and iron-rich alloys, even at high pressure. From the measured mean force constants of iron bonds, we calculate an equilibrium iron isotope fractionation between silicate and iron under core formation conditions in Earth of ∼0–0.02‰, which is small relative to the +0.1‰ shift of terrestrial basalts. This result is unaffected by small amounts of nickel and candidate core-forming light elements, as the isotopic shifts associated with such alloying are small. This study suggests that the variability in iron isotopic composition in planetary objects cannot be due to core formation. PMID:28216664

  4. High-Performance Data Analysis Tools for Sun-Earth Connection Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messmer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The data analysis tool of choice for many Sun-Earth Connection missions is the Interactive Data Language (IDL) by ITT VIS. The increasing amount of data produced by these missions and the increasing complexity of image processing algorithms requires access to higher computing power. Parallel computing is a cost-effective way to increase the speed of computation, but algorithms oftentimes have to be modified to take advantage of parallel systems. Enhancing IDL to work on clusters gives scientists access to increased performance in a familiar programming environment. The goal of this project was to enable IDL applications to benefit from both computing clusters as well as graphics processing units (GPUs) for accelerating data analysis tasks. The tool suite developed in this project enables scientists now to solve demanding data analysis problems in IDL that previously required specialized software, and it allows them to be solved orders of magnitude faster than on conventional PCs. The tool suite consists of three components: (1) TaskDL, a software tool that simplifies the creation and management of task farms, collections of tasks that can be processed independently and require only small amounts of data communication; (2) mpiDL, a tool that allows IDL developers to use the Message Passing Interface (MPI) inside IDL for problems that require large amounts of data to be exchanged among multiple processors; and (3) GPULib, a tool that simplifies the use of GPUs as mathematical coprocessors from within IDL. mpiDL is unique in its support for the full MPI standard and its support of a broad range of MPI implementations. GPULib is unique in enabling users to take advantage of an inexpensive piece of hardware, possibly already installed in their computer, and achieve orders of magnitude faster execution time for numerically complex algorithms. TaskDL enables the simple setup and management of task farms on compute clusters. The products developed in this project have the

  5. High-Precision Global Geodetic Systems: Revolution And Revelation In Fluid And 'Solid' Earth Tracking (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minster, J. H.; Altamimi, Z.; Blewitt, G.; Carter, W. E.; Cazenave, A. A.; Davis, J. L.; Dragert, H.; Feary, D. A.; Herring, T.; Larson, K. M.; Ries, J. C.; Sandwell, D. T.; Wahr, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    Over the past half-century, space geodetic technologies have changed profoundly the way we look at the planet, not only in the matter of details and accuracy, but also in the matter of how the entire planet changes with time, even on “human” time scales. The advent of space geodesy has provided exquisite images of the ever-changing land and ocean topography and global gravity field of the planet. We now enjoy an International Terrestrial Reference System with a time-dependent geocenter position accurate to a few millimeters. We can image small and large tectonic deformations of the surface before, during, and after earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. We measure both the past subtle changes as well as the recent dramatic changes in the ice sheets, and track global and regional sea-level change to a precision of a millimeter per year or better. The remarkable achievements of Earth observing missions over the past two decades, and the success of future international missions described in the Decadal Survey depend both implicitly and explicitly on the continued availability and enhancement of a reliable and resilient global infrastructure for precise geodesy, and on ongoing advances in geodetic science that are linked to it. This allows us to deal with global scientific, technological and social issues such as climate change and natural hazards, but the impact of the global precise geodetic infrastructure also permeates our everyday lives. Nowadays drivers, aviators, and sailors can determine their positions inexpensively to meter precision in real time, anywhere on the planet. In the foreseeable future, not only will we be able to know a vehicle’s position to centimeter accuracy in real time, but also to control that position, and thus introduce autonomous navigation systems for many tasks which are beyond the reach of “manual” navigation capabilities. This vision will only be realized with sustained international support of the precise global geodetic

  6. Earth Observation

    2013-07-31

    ISS036-E-027014 (31 July 2013) --- One of the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, as it was passing over Eastern Europe on July 31, 2013, took this night picture looking toward the Mediterranean Sea, which almost blends into the horizon. Also visible are the Aegean Sea, Adriatic Sea and Mediterranean Sea. Parts of the following countries are among those visible as well: Greece, Italy, Sicily, Bulgaria, Serbia, Croatia and Albania. The high oblique 50mm lens shot includes a number of stars in the late July sky. A solar array panel is visible in the darkness on the right side of the frame.

  7. Earth Explorer

    ,

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Earth Explorer Web site provides access to millions of land-related products, including the following: Satellite images from Landsat, advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR), and Corona data sets. Aerial photographs from the National Aerial Photography Program, NASA, and USGS data sets.  Digital cartographic data from digital elevation models, digital line graphs, digital raster graphics, and digital orthophoto quadrangles. USGS paper maps Digital, film, and paper products are available, and many products can be previewed before ordering.

  8. Earth Science Principles Pertinent to the General Education Programs in Junior High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henson, Kenneth Tyrone

    1970-01-01

    Presents the procedures, and findings of a study designed to identify principles in astronomy, geology, meterology, oceanography and physical geography pertinent to general education programs in junior high schools. (LC)

  9. Exploring high power, extreme wavelength operating potential of rare-earth-doped silica fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Pu; Li, Ruixian; Xiao, Hu; Huang, Long; Zhang, Hanwei; Leng, Jinyong; Chen, Zilun; Xu, Jiangmin; Wu, Jian; Wang, Xiong

    2017-08-01

    Ytterbium-doped fiber laser (YDFL) and Thulium doped fiber laser (TDFL) have been two kinds of the most widely studied fiber laser in recent years. Although both silica-based Ytterbium-doped fiber and Thulium doped fiber have wide emission spectrum band (more than 200 nm and 400 nm, respectively), the operation spectrum region of previously demonstrated high power YDFL and TDFL fall into 1060-1100 nm and 1900-2050nm. Power scaling of YDFL and TDFL operates at short-wavelength or long-wavelength band, especially for extreme wavelength operation, although is highly required in a large variety of application fields, is quite challenging due to small net gain and strong amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). In this paper, we will present study on extreme wavelength operation of high power YDFL and TDFL in our group. Comprehensive mathematical models are built to investigate the feasibility of high power operation and propose effective technical methods to achieve high power operation. We have achieved (1) Diodepumped 1150nm long wavelength YDFL with 120-watt level output power (2) Diode-pumped 1178nm long wavelength YDFL operates at high temperature with 30-watt level output power (3) Random laser pumped 2153nm long wavelength TDFL with 20-watt level output power (4) Diode-pumped 1018nm short wavelength YDFL with a record 2 kilowatt output power is achieved by using home-made fiber combiner.

  10. Ice911: Developing an Effective Response to Climate Change in Earth's Cryosphere using High Albedo Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, L. A.; Wadhams, P.; Root, T.; Chetty, S.; Kammen, D. M.; Venkatesh, S.; van der Heide, D.; Baum, E.

    2012-12-01

    material and deployment approach. Small deployments were once again made on a California mountain lake, using granular biodegradable food-grade materials or glass-based materials placed in large-mesh containers. The deployments successfully shielded underlying snow and ice from melting, and remained stable in the face of the strong winds in the area. It may also be possible to select materials that are readily incorporated in new ice as it forms in the winter season. Young, or thin, ice tends to have a relatively low albedo, and the higher albedo of ice so formed with these materials incorporated could be advantageous in retaining young or thin ice. We speculate that once a critical amount of ice (or snow, permafrost, etc.) is preserved, the balance may be tipped back sufficiently to slow the overall melting rate of the cryosphere, and further intervention may not be required. Localized albedo modification options such as the one being studied in this work may act to preserve ice, glaciers, permafrost and seasonal snow areas, and perhaps aid natural ice formation processes, enhance the preservation of threatened species, ensure more predictable availability of drinking water, and perhaps bring about a reduction in the Ice-Albedo Feedback Effect, thus slowing some of the effects of climate change in the earth's icy regions and beyond.

  11. Low-cost, high-resolution, single-structure array telescopes for imaging of low-earth-orbit satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massie, N. A.; Oster, Yale; Poe, Greg; Seppala, Lynn; Shao, Mike

    1992-01-01

    Telescopes that are designed for the unconventional imaging of near-earth satellites must follow unique design rules. The costs must be reduced substantially over those of the conventional telescope designs, and the design must accommodate a technique to circumvent atmospheric distortion of the image. Apertures of 12 m and more along with altitude-altitude mounts that provide high tracking rates are required. A novel design for such a telescope, optimized for speckle imaging, has been generated. Its mount closely resembles a radar mount, and it does not use the conventional dome. Costs for this design are projected to be considerably lower than those for the conventional designs. Results of a design study are presented with details of the electro-optical and optical designs.

  12. Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis and luminescent properties of ytterbium doped rare earth (Y, Sc, Lu) oxides nanopowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permin, D. A.; Novikova, A. V.; Balabanov, S. S.; Gavrishchuk, E. M.; Kurashkin, S. V.; Savikin, A. P.

    2018-04-01

    This paper describes a comparative study of structural and luminescent properties of 5%Yb-doped yttrium, scandium, and lutetium oxides (Yb:RE2O3) powders and ceramics fabricated by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis. According to X-ray diffractometry and electron microscopy the chosen method ensures preparation of low-agglomerated cubic Ctype crystal structured powders at one step. No crucial differences in luminescence spectra were found the Yb:RE2O3 powders and ceramics. It was shown that the emission lifetimes of the Yb:RE2O3 powders are lowered by crystal structure defects, while its values for ceramics samples are compared to that of monocrystals and more influenced by rare earth impurities.

  13. High-T sub c thin films on low microwave loss alkaline-rare-earth-aluminate crystals

    SciT

    Sobolewski, R.; Gierlowski, P.; Kula, W.

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on the alkaline-rare-earth aluminates (K{sub 2}NiF{sub 4}-type perovskites) which are an excellent choice as the substrate material for the growth of high-T{sub c} thin films suitable for microwave and far-infrared applications. The CaNdAlO{sub 4}, and SrLaAlO{sub 4} single crystals have been grown by Czochralski pulling and fabricated into the form of (001) oriented wafers. The Y-Ba-Cu-O and Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O films deposited on these substrates by a single-target magnetron sputtering exhibited very good superconducting and structural properties.

  14. Highly Sideophile Element Abundance Constraints on the Nature of the Late Accretionary Histories of Earth, Moon and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. J.; Puchtel, I. S.; Brandon, A. D.; Horan, M. F.; James, O. B.

    2007-01-01

    The highly siderophile elements (HSE) include Re, Os, Ir, Ru, Pt and Pd. These elements are initially nearly-quantitatively stripped from planetary silicate mantles during core segregation. They then may be re-enriched in mantles via continued accretion sans continued core segregation. This suite of elements and its included long-lived radiogenic isotopes systems (Re-187 (right arrow) Os-187; Pt-190 (right arrow) Os-186) can potentially be used to fingerprint the characteristics of late accreted materials. The fingerprints may ultimately be useful to constrain the prior nebular history of the dominant late accreted materials, and to compare the proportion and genesis of late accretionary materials added to the inner planets. The past ten years have seen considerable accumulation of isotopic and compositional data for HSE present in the Earth's mantle, lunar mantle and impact melt breccias, and Martian meteorites. Here we review some of these data and consider the broader implications of the compiled data.

  15. Elasticity of the Earth's Lower Mantle Minerals at High Pressures: Implications to Understanding Seismic Observations of the Deep Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. F.; Yang, J.; Fu, S.

    2017-12-01

    Elasticity of the candidate lower-mantle minerals at relevant P-T conditions of the region provides critical information in understanding seismic profiles, compositional and mineralogical models, and geodynamic processes of the Earth's interior. Here we will discuss recent major research advances in the investigation of the elasticity of major lower-mantle minerals in a high-pressure diamond anvil cell coupled with Brillouin Light Scattering, Impulsive Stimulated Scattering (ISS), and X-ray diffraction. These have permitted direct and reliable measurements of both Vp and Vs to derive full elastic constants of single-crystal ferropericlase and (Fe, Al)-bearing bridgmanite as well as velocity profiles of polycrystalline silicate post-perovskite at relevant lower-mantle pressures. The effects of the spin transition on the single-crystal elasticity of ferropericlase are now well understood experimentally and theoretically1,2: the spin transition causes drastic softening in elastic constants involving the compressive stress component (C11 and C12) due to the additional Gibbs free energy term arising from the mixing of the high-spin and low-spin states, while the elastic constant(s) related to the shear stress component (C44) is not affected. This leads to significant reduction in VP/VS ratio within the spin transition of ferropericlase in the mid-lower mantle. The derived single-crystal Cij of bridgmanite at lower mantle pressures display relatively small elastic Vp and Vs anisotropies as compared to the ferropericlase counterpart. Using thermoelastic modelling, we will discuss the application of the elasticity of ferropericlase, bridgmanite, and silicate post-perovskite at relevant conditions of the Earth's lower mantle to differentiate the role of the thermal vs. chemical perturbations as well as the spin transition and iron partitioning effects in the reported seismic lateral heterogeneity in lower mantle as well as the D″ zone region3,4. We will address how recent

  16. Seos - EARSEL'S Project on Science Education Through Earth Observation for High Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, R.

    2011-09-01

    SEOS is an initiative for using remote sensing in science education curricula in high schools funded under the 6th Framework Programme of the European Commission (EC). Eleven partners from several European countries, in cooperation with the European Space Agency (ESA) and teachers from European high schools, created e-learning tutorials for science students in high schools. The tutorials cover many disciplines such as physics, biology, geography, mathematics and engineering, emphasising the interdisciplinary character of remote sensing. They are the core element of the SEOS Learning Management System, allowing teachers to create their own courses, to distribute already available or new worksheets to the students for homework and to collect the results. Forums are available for teachers, students and other users to exchange information and discuss topics relevant for their study.

  17. System for beaming power from earth to a high altitude platform

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Herbert W.; Porter, Terry J.

    2002-01-01

    Power is transmitted to a high altitude platform by an array of diode pumped solid state lasers each operated at a single range of laser wavelengths outside of infrared and without using adaptive optics. Each laser produces a beam with a desired arrival spot size. An aircraft avoidance system uses a radar system for automatic control of the shutters of the lasers.

  18. The Effect of Nickel on Iron Isotope Fractionation and Implications for the Earth's Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, M. M.; Shahar, A.; Elardo, S. M.; Liu, J.; Xiao, Y.; Mao, W. L.

    2017-12-01

    The Earth's core is thought to be composed mainly of an iron-rich iron nickel (FeNi) alloy. Therefore, determining the behavior of these alloys at core conditions is crucial for interpreting and constraining geophysical and geochemical models. Understanding the effect of nickel on iron isotope fractionation can shed light on planetary core formation. We collected a series of phonon excitation spectra using nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) on 57Fe-enriched FeNi alloys with varying (Fe0.9Ni0.1, Fe0.8Ni0.2, Fe0.7Ni0.3) nickel content in a diamond anvil cell at pressures up to 50 GPa. All three alloys studied exhibited differences from pure Fe, indicating that increasing nickel content could have an effect on iron isotope fractionation which would have implications for planetary core formation and provide constraints the bulk composition for terrestrial planets.

  19. Leveraging High Resolution Topography for Education and Outreach: Updates to OpenTopography to make EarthScope and Other Lidar Datasets more Prominent in Geoscience Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleber, E.; Crosby, C. J.; Arrowsmith, R.; Robinson, S.; Haddad, D. E.

    2013-12-01

    The use of Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) derived topography has become an indispensable tool in Earth science research. The collection of high-resolution lidar topography from an airborne or terrestrial platform allows landscapes and landforms to be represented at sub-meter resolution and in three dimensions. In addition to its high value for scientific research, lidar derived topography has tremendous potential as a tool for Earth science education. Recent science education initiatives and a community call for access to research-level data make the time ripe to expose lidar data and derived data products as a teaching tool. High resolution topographic data fosters several Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCIs) of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGS, 2013), presents respective Big Ideas of the new community-driven Earth Science Literacy Initiative (ESLI, 2009), teaches to a number National Science Education Standards (NSES, 1996), and Benchmarks for Science Literacy (AAAS, 1993) for science education for undergraduate physical and environmental earth science classes. The spatial context of lidar data complements concepts like visualization, place-based learning, inquiry based teaching and active learning essential to teaching in the geosciences. As official host to EarthScope lidar datasets for tectonically active areas in the western United States, the NSF-funded OpenTopography facility provides user-friendly access to a wealth of data that is easily incorporated into Earth science educational materials. OpenTopography (www.opentopography.org), in collaboration with EarthScope, has developed education and outreach activities to foster teacher, student and researcher utilization of lidar data. These educational resources use lidar data coupled with free tools such as Google Earth to provide a means for students and the interested public to visualize and explore Earth's surface in an interactive manner not possible with most other remotely sensed imagery. The

  20. The Deep Space Gateway Lightning Mapper (DLM) - Monitoring Global Change and Thunderstorm Processes Through Observations of Earth's High-Latitude Lightning from Cis-Lunar Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Timothy; Blakeslee, R. J.; Cecil, D. J.; Christian, H. J.; Gatlin, P. N.; Goodman, S. J.; Koshak, W. J.; Petersen, W. A.; Quick, M.; Schultz, C. J.; hide

    2018-01-01

    Function: Monitor global change and thunderstorm processes through observations of Earth's high-latitude lightning. This instrument will combine long-lived sampling of individual thunderstorms with long-term observations of lightning at high latitudes: How is global change affecting thunderstorm patterns; How do high-latitude thunderstorms differ from low-latitude? Why is the Gateway the optimal facility for this instrument / research: Expected DSG (Deep Space Gateway) orbits will provide nearly continuous viewing of the Earth's high latitudes (50 degrees latitude and poleward); These regions are not well covered by existing lightning mappers (e.g., Lightning Imaging Sensor / LIS, or Geostationary Lightning Mapper / GLM); Polar, Molniya, Tundra, etc. Earth orbits have significant drawbacks related to continuous coverage and/or stable FOVs (Fields of View).

  1. Formation of the high-energy ion population in the earth's magnetotail: spacecraft observations and theoretical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Vasko, I. Y.; Lutsenko, V. N.; Petrukovich, A. A.

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the formation of the high-energy (E ∈ [20,600] keV) ion population in the earth's magnetotail. We collect statistics of 4 years of Interball / Tail observations (1995-1998) in the vicinity of the neutral plane in the magnetotail region (X <-17 RE, |Y| ≤ 20 RE in geocentric solar magnetospheric (GSM) system). We study the dependence of high-energy ion spectra on the thermal-plasma parameters (the temperature Ti and the amplitude of bulk velocity vi) and on the magnetic-field component Bz. The ion population in the energy range E ∈ [20,600] keV can be separated in the thermal core and the power-law tail with the slope (index) ~ -4.5. Fluxes of the high-energy ion population increase with the growth of Bz, vi and especially Ti, but spectrum index seems to be independent on these parameters. We have suggested that the high-energy ion population is generated by small scale transient processes, rather than by the global reconfiguration of the magnetotail. We have proposed the relatively simple and general model of ion acceleration by transient bursts of the electric field. This model describes the power-law energy spectra and predicts typical energies of accelerated ions.

  2. High time resolution characteristics of intermediate ion distributions upstream of the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    High time resolution particle data upstream of the bow shock during time intervals that have been identified as having intermediate ion distributions often show high amplitude oscillations in the ion fluxes of energy 2 and 6 keV. These ion oscillations, observed with the particle instruments of the University of California, Berkeley, on the ISEE 1 and 2 spacecraft, are at the same frequency (about 0.04 Hz) as the magnetic field oscillations. Typically, the 6-keV ion flux increases then the 2-keV flux increases followed by a decrease in the 2-keV flux and then the 6-keV flux decreases. This process repeats many times. Although there is no entirely satisfactory explanation, the presence of these ion flux oscillations suggests that distributions often are misidentified as intermediate ion distributions.

  3. Navigating highly elliptical earth orbiters with simultaneous VLBI from orthogonal baseline pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frauenholz, Raymond B.

    1986-01-01

    Navigation strategies for determining highly elliptical orbits with VLBI are described. The predicted performance of wideband VLBI and Delta VLBI measurements obtained by orthogonal baseline pairs are compared for a 16-hr equatorial orbit. It is observed that the one-sigma apogee position accuracy improves two orders of magnitude to the meter level when Delta VLBI measurements are added to coherent Doppler and range, and the simpler VLBI strategy provides nearly the same orbit accuracy. The effects of differential measurement noise and acquisition geometry on orbit accuracy are investigated. The data reveal that quasar position uncertainty limits the accuracy of wideband Delta VLBI measurements, and that polar motion and baseline uncertainties and offsets between station clocks affect the wideband VLBI data. It is noted that differential one-way range (DOR) has performance nearly equal to that of the more complex Delta DOR and is recommended for use on spacecraft in high elliptical orbits.

  4. Rare earth element patterns in Archean high-grade metasediments and their tectonic significance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Stuart Ross; Rudnick, Roberta L.; Mclennan, Scott M.; Eriksson, Kenneth A.

    1986-01-01

    REE data on metasedimentary rocks from two different types of high-grade Archean terrains are presented and analyzed. The value of REEs as indicators of crustal evolution is explained; the three geologic settings (in North America, Southern Africa, and Australia) from which the samples were obtained are described; and the data are presented in extensive tables and graphs and discussed in terms of metamorphic effects, the role of accessory phases, provenance, and tectonic implications (recycling, the previous extent of high-grade terrains, and a model of Archean crustal growth). The diversity of REE patterns in shallow-shelf metasediments is attributed to local provenance, while the Eu-depleted post-Archean patterns are associated with K-rich plutons from small, stable early Archean terrains.

  5. Synthesis of illite-smectite from smectite at earth surface temperatures and high pH

    Eberl, D.D.; Velde, Bruce; McCormick, T.C.

    1993-01-01

    It is well known that illite-smectite can form from smectite at elevated temperatures in natural and experimental systems. However, the conversion of smectite to illite-smectite is also found in some natural systems that have never been heated. The present experiments show that illite layers can form from smectite by chemical reaction at 35° and 60°C at high solution pH. The rate of this reaction is accelerated by wetting and drying.

  6. High energy density rechargeable magnesium battery using earth-abundant and non-toxic elements

    PubMed Central

    Orikasa, Yuki; Masese, Titus; Koyama, Yukinori; Mori, Takuya; Hattori, Masashi; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Okado, Tetsuya; Huang, Zhen-Dong; Minato, Taketoshi; Tassel, Cédric; Kim, Jungeun; Kobayashi, Yoji; Abe, Takeshi; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu

    2014-01-01

    Rechargeable magnesium batteries are poised to be viable candidates for large-scale energy storage devices in smart grid communities and electric vehicles. However, the energy density of previously proposed rechargeable magnesium batteries is low, limited mainly by the cathode materials. Here, we present new design approaches for the cathode in order to realize a high-energy-density rechargeable magnesium battery system. Ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 demonstrates a high reversible capacity exceeding 300 mAh·g−1 at a voltage of approximately 2.4 V vs. Mg. Further, the electronic and crystal structure of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 changes during the charging and discharging processes, which demonstrates the (de)insertion of magnesium in the host structure. The combination of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 with a magnesium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide–triglyme electrolyte system proposed in this work provides a low-cost and practical rechargeable magnesium battery with high energy density, free from corrosion and safety problems. PMID:25011939

  7. Dielectric and electromechanical properties of rare earth calcium oxyborate piezoelectric crystals at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fapeng; Zhang, Shujun; Zhao, Xian; Yuan, Duorong; Qin, Lifeng; Wang, Qing-Ming; Shrout, Thomas R

    2011-04-01

    The electrical resistivity, dielectric, and electromechanical properties of ReCa(4)O(BO(3))(3) (ReCOB; Re = Er, Y, Gd, Sm, Nd, Pr, and La) piezoelectric crystals were investigated as a function of temperature up to 1000 °C. Of the studied crystals, ErCOB and YCOB were found to possess extremely high resistivity (p): p > 3 × 10(7) ω.cm at 1000 °C. The property variation in ReCOB crystals is discussed with respect to their disordered structure. The highest electromechanical coupling factor κ(26) and piezoelectric coefficient d(26) at 1000°C, were achieved in PrCOB crystals, with values being on the order of 24.7% and 13.1 pC/N, respectively. The high thermal stability of the electromechanical properties, with variation less than 25%, together with the low dielectric loss (<46%) and high mechanical quality factor (>1500) at elevated temperatures of 1000 °C, make ErCOB, YCOB, and GdCOB crystals promising for ultrahigh temperature electromechanical applications. © 2011 IEEE

  8. High energy density rechargeable magnesium battery using earth-abundant and non-toxic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orikasa, Yuki; Masese, Titus; Koyama, Yukinori; Mori, Takuya; Hattori, Masashi; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Okado, Tetsuya; Huang, Zhen-Dong; Minato, Taketoshi; Tassel, Cédric; Kim, Jungeun; Kobayashi, Yoji; Abe, Takeshi; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu

    2014-07-01

    Rechargeable magnesium batteries are poised to be viable candidates for large-scale energy storage devices in smart grid communities and electric vehicles. However, the energy density of previously proposed rechargeable magnesium batteries is low, limited mainly by the cathode materials. Here, we present new design approaches for the cathode in order to realize a high-energy-density rechargeable magnesium battery system. Ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 demonstrates a high reversible capacity exceeding 300 mAh.g-1 at a voltage of approximately 2.4 V vs. Mg. Further, the electronic and crystal structure of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 changes during the charging and discharging processes, which demonstrates the (de)insertion of magnesium in the host structure. The combination of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 with a magnesium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide-triglyme electrolyte system proposed in this work provides a low-cost and practical rechargeable magnesium battery with high energy density, free from corrosion and safety problems.

  9. Origin of Volatiles in Earth: Indigenous Versus Exogenous Sources Based on Highly Siderophile, Volatile Siderophile, and Light Volatile Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Danielson, L.; Pando, K. M.; Marin, N.; Nickodem, K.

    2015-01-01

    Origin of Earth's volatiles has traditionally been ascribed to late accretion of material after major differentiation events - chondrites, comets, ice or other exogenous sources. A competing theory is that the Earth accreted its volatiles as it was built, thus water and other building blocks were present early and during differentiation and core formation (indigenous). Here we discuss geochemical evidence from three groups of elements that suggests Earth's volatiles were acquired during accretion and did not require additional sources after differentiation.

  10. Classroom management at the university level: lessons from a former high school earth science teacher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, C.

    2009-12-01

    Just a few days before my career as a fledgling science teacher began in a large public high school in New York City, a mentor suggested I might get some ideas about how to run a classroom from a book called The First Days Of School by Harry Wong. Although the book seemed to concentrate more on elementary students, I found that many of the principles in the book worked well for high school students. Even as I have begun to teach at the university level, many of Wong’s themes have persisted in my teaching style. Wong’s central thesis is that for learning to occur, a teacher must create the proper environment. In education jargon, a good climate for learning is generated via classroom management, an array of methods used by elementary and secondary school teachers to provide structure and routine to a class period via a seamless flow of complementary activities. Many college professors would likely consider classroom management to be chiefly a set of rules to maintain discipline and order among an otherwise unruly herd of schoolchildren, and therefore not a useful concept for mature university students. However, classroom management is much deeper than mere rules for behavior; it is an approach to instructional design that considers the classroom experience holistically. A typical professorial management style is to lecture for an hour or so and ask students to demonstrate learning via examinations several times in a semester. In contrast, a good high school teacher will manage a class from bell-to-bell to create a natural order and flow to a given lesson. In this presentation, I will argue for an approach to college lesson design similar to the classroom management style commonly employed by high school and elementary school teachers. I will suggest some simple, practical techniques learned during my high school experience that work just as well in college: warm-up and practice problems, time management, group activities, bulletin boards, learning environment

  11. Earth Observation

    2014-06-01

    ISS040-E-006327 (1 June 2014) --- A portion of International Space Station solar array panels and Earth?s horizon are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the space station.

  12. Melting Experiments in the Fe-FeSi System at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, H.; Hirose, K.

    2013-12-01

    The principal light element in the Earth's core must reproduce the density jump at the inner core boundary (ICB). Silicon is thought to be a plausible light element in the core, and the melting phase relations in Fe-FeSi binary system at the ICB pressure are of great importance. Theoretical calculations on the Fe-FeSi binary system suggested that the difference in Si content between the outer core and the inner core would be too small to satisfy the observed density jump at the ICB [Alfè et al., 2002 EPSL], which requires other light elements in addition to silicon. Here we experimentally examined partitioning of silicon between liquid and solid iron up to 97 GPa. High pressure and temperature conditions were generated in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. Chemical compositions of co-existing quenched liquid and solid Fe-Si alloys were determined with a field-emission-type electron probe micro-analyzer. We used Fe-Si alloy containing 9 wt% Si as a starting material. Chemical analyses on the recovered samples from 39 and 49 GPa demonstrated the coexistence of quenched Si-depleted liquid and Si-enriched solid. In contrast, silicon partitions preferentially into liquid metal at 97 GPa, suggesting the starting composition (Fe-9wt% Si) lies on the iron-rich part of the eutectic. These results indicate the eutectic composition shifts toward FeSi between 49 and 97 GPa.

  13. Quest for highly connected metal-organic framework platforms: rare-earth polynuclear clusters versatility meets net topology needs.

    PubMed

    Alezi, Dalal; Peedikakkal, Abdul Malik P; Weseliński, Łukasz J; Guillerm, Vincent; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Cairns, Amy J; Chen, Zhijie; Wojtas, Łukasz; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2015-04-29

    Gaining control over the assembly of highly porous rare-earth (RE) based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) remains challenging. Here we report the latest discoveries on our continuous quest for highly connected nets. The topological exploration based on the noncompatibility of a 12-connected RE polynuclear carboxylate-based cluster, points of extension matching the 12 vertices of the cuboctahedron (cuo), with 3-connected organic ligands led to the discovery of two fascinating and highly connected minimal edge-transitive nets, pek and aea. The reduced symmetry of the employed triangular tricarboxylate ligand, as compared to the prototype highly symmetrical 1,3,5-benzene(tris)benzoic acid guided the concurrent occurrence of nonanuclear [RE9(μ3-OH)12(μ3-O)2(O2C-)12] and hexanuclear [RE6(OH)8(O2C-)8] carboxylate-based clusters as 12-connected and 8-connected molecular building blocks in the structure of a 3-periodic pek-MOF based on a novel (3,8,12)-c trinodal net. The use of a tricarboxylate ligand with modified angles between carboxylate moieties led to the formation of a second MOF containing solely nonanuclear clusters and exhibiting once more a novel and a highly connected (3,12,12)-c trinodal net with aea topology. Notably, it is the first time that RE-MOFs with double six-membered ring (d6R) secondary building units are isolated, representing therefore a critical step forward toward the design of novel and highly coordinated materials using the supermolecular building layer approach while considering the d6Rs as building pillars. Lastly, the potential of these new MOFs for gas separation/storage was investigated by performing gas adsorption studies of various probe gas molecules over a wide range of pressures. Noticeably, pek-MOF-1 showed excellent volumetric CO2 and CH4 uptakes at high pressures.

  14. High-temperature earth-storable propellant acoustic cavity technology. [for combustion stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberg, C. L.; Hines, W. S.; Falk, A. Y.

    1974-01-01

    Design criteria, methods and data, were developed to permit effective design of acoustic cavities for use in regeneratively cooled OME-type engines. This information was developed experimentally from two series of motor firings with high-temperature fuel during which the engine stability was evaluated under various conditions and with various cavity configurations. Supplementary analyses and acoustic model testing were used to aid cavity design and interpretation of results. Results from this program clearly indicate that dynamic stability in regeneratively cooled OME-type engines can be ensured through the use of acoustic cavities. Moreover, multiple modes of instability were successfully suppressed with the cavity.

  15. Anisotropy and Microstructure of High-Coercivity Rare Earth Iron Permanent Magnets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    still necessary in order to achieve a high quality permanent magnet with an opera - ting temperature up to 150C. Acces1O, FO" NTIS CRA&i DTIC TAB... China , Crucible Materials and Unocal, USA) under different processing and post-sintering heat treatment conditions. Doped, "two-phase" Nd:0FebaiBe...mation for the nucleation field Ho (8,10). -15- 4.5 Al-substituted magnets These sintered magnets were produced by the Institute of Physics in Bejing

  16. Earth Experiments in a Virtual World: Introducing Climate & Coding to High School Girls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, H. A.; Twedt, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    In our increasingly technologically-driven and information-saturated world, literacy in STEM fields can be crucial for career advancement. Nevertheless, both systemic and interpersonal barriers can prevent individuals, particularly members of under-represented groups, from engaging in these fields. Here, we present a high school-level workshop developed to foster basic understanding of climate science while exposing students to the Python programming language. For the past four years, the workshop has been a part of the annual Expanding Your Horizons conference for high school girls, whose mission is to spark interest in STEM fields. Moving through current events in the realm of global climate policy, the fundamentals of climate, and the mathematical representation of planetary energy balance, the workshop culminates in an under-the-hood exploration of a basic climate model coded in the Python programming language. Students interact directly with the underlying code to run `virtual world' experiments that explore the impact of solar insolation, planetary albedo, the greenhouse effect, and meridional energy transport on global temperatures. Engagement with Python is through the Jupyter Notebook interface, which permits direct interaction with the code but is more user-friendly for beginners than a command-line approach. We conclude with further ideas for providing online access to workshop materials for educators, and additional venues for presenting such workshops to under-represented groups in STEM.

  17. Relationship between high- and low-grade Archean terranes: Implications for early Earth paleogeography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriksson, K. A.

    1986-01-01

    The Western Gneiss Terrain (WGT) of the Yilgarn Block, Western Australia was studied. The WGT forms an arcuate belt of Archean gneisses that flank the western margin of the Yilgarn Block. In general the WGT is composed of high-grade orthogneisses and paragneisses which contain supracrustal belts composed largely of siliciclastic metasediments and subordinate iron formation. The platformal nature of the metasedimentary belts and lack of obvious metavolcanic lithologies contrasts with the composition of typical Yilgarn greenstones to the east. Radiometric data from WGT rocks indicates that these rocks are significantly older than Yilgarn rocks to the east (less than 3.3 Ga) and this has led to the suggestion that the WGT represents sialic basement to Yilgarn granite-greenstone belts. The Mount Narryer region exposes the northernmost occurrence of high-grade metasediments within the WGT and consists of quartz-rich clastic metasediments at upper amphibolite to granulite grade. Most occurrences of supracrustal rocks in this region comprise isolated lenses within the gneissic basement. However, at Mount Narryer a unique sequence of metaclastics with preserved bedding provide an unusual window into the parentage of similar supracrustal bodies in this region.

  18. Ice Shelf Microbial Ecosystems in the High Arctic and Implications for Life on Snowball Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, W. F.; Gibson, J. A. E.; Pienitz, R.; Villeneuve, V.; Broady, P. A.; Hamilton, P. B.; Howard-Williams, C.

    The Ward Hunt Ice Shelf (83°N, 74°W) is the largest remaining section of thick (>10m) landfast sea ice along the northern coastline of Ellesmere Island, Canada. Extensive meltwater lakes and streams occur on the surface of the ice and are colonized by photosynthetic microbial mat communities. This High Arctic cryo-ecosystem is similar in several of its physical, biological and geochemical features to the McMurdo Ice Shelf in Antarctica. The ice-mats in both polar regions are dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria but also contain diatoms, chlorophytes, flagellates, ciliates, nematodes, tardigrades and rotifers. The luxuriant Ward Hunt consortia also contain high concentrations (107-108cm-2) of viruses and heterotrophic bacteria. During periods of extensive ice cover, such as glaciations during the Proterozoic, cryotolerant mats of the type now found in these polar ice shelf ecosystems would have provided refugia for the survival, growth and evolution of a variety of organisms, including multicellular eukaryotes.

  19. High Performance Real-Time Visualization of Voluminous Scientific Data Through the NOAA Earth Information System (NEIS).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, J.; Hackathorn, E. J.; Joyce, J.; Smith, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Within our community data volume is rapidly expanding. These data have limited value if one cannot interact or visualize the data in a timely manner. The scientific community needs the ability to dynamically visualize, analyze, and interact with these data along with other environmental data in real-time regardless of the physical location or data format. Within the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's), the Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) is actively developing the NOAA Earth Information System (NEIS). Previously, the NEIS team investigated methods of data discovery and interoperability. The recent focus shifted to high performance real-time visualization allowing NEIS to bring massive amounts of 4-D data, including output from weather forecast models as well as data from different observations (surface obs, upper air, etc...) in one place. Our server side architecture provides a real-time stream processing system which utilizes server based NVIDIA Graphical Processing Units (GPU's) for data processing, wavelet based compression, and other preparation techniques for visualization, allows NEIS to minimize the bandwidth and latency for data delivery to end-users. Client side, users interact with NEIS services through the visualization application developed at ESRL called TerraViz. Terraviz is developed using the Unity game engine and takes advantage of the GPU's allowing a user to interact with large data sets in real time that might not have been possible before. Through these technologies, the NEIS team has improved accessibility to 'Big Data' along with providing tools allowing novel visualization and seamless integration of data across time and space regardless of data size, physical location, or data format. These capabilities provide the ability to see the global interactions and their importance for weather prediction. Additionally, they allow greater access than currently exists helping to foster scientific collaboration and new

  20. High-resolution simulations of the final assembly of Earth-like planets. 2. Water delivery and planetary habitability.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Sean N; Quinn, Thomas; Lunine, Jonathan I

    2007-02-01

    The water content and habitability of terrestrial planets are determined during their final assembly, from perhaps 100 1,000-km "planetary embryos " and a swarm of billions of 1-10-km "planetesimals. " During this process, we assume that water-rich material is accreted by terrestrial planets via impacts of water-rich bodies that originate in the outer asteroid region. We present analysis of water delivery and planetary habitability in five high-resolution simulations containing about 10 times more particles than in previous simulations. These simulations formed 15 terrestrial planets from 0.4 to 2.6 Earth masses, including five planets in the habitable zone. Every planet from each simulation accreted at least the Earth's current water budget; most accreted several times that amount (assuming no impact depletion). Each planet accreted at least five water-rich embryos and planetesimals from the past 2.5 astronomical units; most accreted 10-20 water-rich bodies. We present a new model for water delivery to terrestrial planets in dynamically calm systems, with low-eccentricity or low-mass giant planets-such systems may be very common in the Galaxy. We suggest that water is accreted in comparable amounts from a few planetary embryos in a " hit or miss " way and from millions of planetesimals in a statistically robust process. Variations in water content are likely to be caused by fluctuations in the number of water-rich embryos accreted, as well as from systematic effects, such as planetary mass and location, and giant planet properties.

  1. Instrument technology for magnetosphere plasma imaging from high Earth orbit. Design of a radio plasma sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, D. Mark; Reinisch, Bodo W.

    1995-01-01

    The use of radio sounding techniques for the study of the ionospheric plasma dates back to G. Briet and M. A. Tuve in 1926. Ground based swept frequency sounders can monitor the electron number density (N(sub e)) as a function of height (the N(sub e) profile). These early instruments evolved into a global network that produced high-resolution displays of echo time delay vs frequency on 35-mm film. These instruments provided the foundation for the success of the International Geophysical Year (1958). The Alouette and International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) programs pioneered the used of spaceborne, swept frequency sounders to obtain N(sub e) profiles of the topside of the ionosphere, from a position above the electron density maximum. Repeated measurements during the orbit produced an orbital plane contour which routinely provided density measurements to within 10%. The Alouette/ISIS experience also showed that even with a high powered transmitter (compared to the low power sounder possible today) a radio sounder can be compatible with other imaging instruments on the same satellite. Digital technology was used on later spacecraft developed by the Japanese (the EXOS C and D) and the Soviets (Intercosmos 19 and Cosmos 1809). However, a full coherent pulse compression and spectral integrating capability, such as exist today for ground-based sounders (Reinisch et al., 1992), has never been put into space. NASA's 1990 Space Physics Strategy Implementation Study "The NASA Space Physics Program from 1995 to 2010" suggested using radio sounders to study the plasmasphere and the magnetopause and its boundary layers (Green and Fung, 1993). Both the magnetopause and plasmasphere, as well as the cusp and boundary layers, can be observed by a radio sounder in a high-inclination polar orbit with an apogee greater than 6 R(sub e) (Reiff et al., 1994; Calvert et al., 1995). Magnetospheric radio sounding from space will provide remote density measurements of

  2. High Efficiency, 100 mJ per pulse, Nd:YAG Oscillator Optimized for Space-Based Earth and Planetary Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, D. Barry; Stysley, Paul R.; Poulios, Demetrios; Fredrickson, Robert M.; Kay, Richard B.; Cory, Kenneth C.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a newly solid state laser transmitter, designed and packaged for Earth and planetary space-based remote sensing applications for high efficiency, low part count, high pulse energy scalability/stability, and long life. Finally, we have completed a long term operational test which surpassed 2 Billion pulses with no measured decay in pulse energy.

  3. Sister Earth, Our Common Home: Toward a Sustainable, Planet Friendly Approach to Dialysis, a Paradigm of High Technology Medicine.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Giorgina Barbara; Mery, David

    2017-11-01

    In our high-technology, highly polluted world, medicine plays an important role balancing saving lives with the expenses of growing amounts of waste products, not only biologically dangerous (the potentially "contaminated" or "hazardous" waste) but also potentially harmful for the planet (nonrecyclable, plastic waste). Dialysis, the prototype of high-technology medicine, is central to these problems, as the present treatment of about 2 million patients produces an enormous quantity of waste (considering hazardous waste only about 2 kg per session, with 160 sessions per year, that is 320 kg per patient, or about 640,000 tons of hazardous waste per year for 2 million patients, roughly corresponding to 6 nuclear aircraft carriers). Furthermore, obsolete dialysis machines, and water treatments are discharged, adding to the "technological waste." Water produced by the reverse osmosis is also discharged; this is the only nonhazardous, nonpolluting waste, but in particular in dry areas, wasting water is a great ecologic concern. The present review is aimed at discussing strategies already in place and to be further implemented for reducing this particular "uremic toxin" for the earth: dialysis waste, including dialysis disposables, water, and dialysis machines. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Professionality of Junior High School (SMP) Science Teacher in Preparing Instructional Design of Earth and Space Sciences (IPBA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlina, L.; Liliasari; Tjasyono, B.; Hendayana, S.

    2017-02-01

    The teacher is one important factor in the provision of education in schools. Therefore, improving the quality of education means we need to enhance the quality and the professionalism of teachers. We offer a solution through education and training of junior high school science teachers in developing the instructional design of Earth and Space Sciences (IPBA). IPBA is part of the science subjects which is given to students from elementary school to college. This research is a preliminary study of junior high school science teacher professionalism in creating instructional design IPBA. Mixed method design is used to design the research. Preliminary studies conducted on junior high school science teacher in one MGMPs in South Sumatera, and the respondent are 18 teachers from 13 schools. The educational background of science teachers who teach IPBA not only from physical education but also biology and agriculture. The result of preliminary study showed that the ratio of teachers who teach IPBA are 56% from physic education, 39% from biology, and 5% from agriculture. The subjects of IPBA that considered difficult by teachers are the distribution of sun, moon, and satellite motion; specific processes in lithosphere and atmosphere; and the correlation between lithosphere and atmosphere with the environment. The teachers also face difficulty in preparing media, choosing the right methods in teaching IPBA.

  5. Recovery considerations for possible high inclination long duration earth orbital missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obriant, T. E.; Ferguson, J. E.

    1969-01-01

    Problem areas are discussed and various solutions proposed. One of the major recovery problems encountered with missions having higher orbital inclinations than previous missions is the greater likelihood of severe weather conditions in the landing zones, especially if landing zones are optimized for orbital coverage considerations. Restricting the reentry window and increasing in-orbit wait times can partially eliminate the weather problem, but the possibility of emergency landings at higher latitudes still exists. It can be expected that the increased confidence level in spacecraft reliability that will exist by the time the high-inclination missions are flown will reduce the probabilities of an emergency landing in an unfavorable recovery location to a very low level.

  6. Non-numeric computation for high eccentricity orbits. [Earth satellite orbit perturbation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, R.; Renard, M. L.

    1975-01-01

    Geocentric orbits of large eccentricity (e = 0.9 to 0.95) are significantly perturbed in cislunar space by the sun and moon. The time-history of the height of perigee, subsequent to launch, is particularly critical. The determination of 'launch windows' is mostly concerned with preventing the height of perigee from falling below its low initial value before the mission lifetime has elapsed. Between the extremes of high accuracy digital integration of the equations of motion and of using an approximate, but very fast, stability criteria method, this paper is concerned with the developement of a method of intermediate complexity using non-numeric computation. The computer is used as the theory generator to generalize Lidov's theory using six osculating elements. Symbolic integration is completely automatized and the output is a set of condensed formulae well suited for repeated applications in launch window analysis. Examples of applications are given.

  7. High-resolution lidar topography of the Puget Lowland, Washington - A bonanza for earth science

    Haugerud, R.A.; Harding, D.J.; Johnson, S.Y.; Harless, J.L.; Weaver, C.S.; Sherrod, B.L.

    2003-01-01

    More than 10,000 km2 of high-resolution, public-domain topography acquired by the Puget Sound Lidar Consortium is revolutionizing investigations of active faulting, continental glaciation, landslides, and surficial processes in the seismically active Puget Lowland. The Lowland-the population and economic center of the Pacific Northwest-presents special problems for hazards investigations, with its young glacial topography, dense forest cover, and urbanization. Lidar mapping during leaf-off conditions has led to a detailed digital model of the landscape beneath the forest canopy. The surface thus revealed contains a rich and diverse record of previously unknown surface-rupturing faults, deep-seated landslides, uplifted Holocene and Pleistocene beaches, and subglacial and periglacial features. More than half a dozen suspected postglacial fault scarps have been identified to date. Five scarps that have been trenched show evidence of large, Holocene, surface-rupturing earthquakes.

  8. A Study of an Optical Lunar Surface Communications Network with High Bandwidth Direct to Earth Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, K.; Biswas, A.; Schoolcraft, J.

    2011-01-01

    A lunar surface systems study explores the application of optical communications to support a high bandwidth data link from a lunar relay satellite and from fixed lunar assets. The results show that existing 1-m ground stations could provide more than 99% coverage of the lunar terminal at 100Mb/s data rates from a lunar relay satellite and in excess of 200Mb/s from a fixed terminal on the lunar surface. We have looked at the effects of the lunar regolith and its removal on optical samples. Our results indicate that under repeated dust removal episodes sapphire rather than fused silica would be a more durable material for optical surfaces. Disruption tolerant network protocols can minimize the data loss due to link dropouts. We report on the preliminary results of the DTN protocol implemented over the optical carrier.

  9. Sound velocities of olivine at high pressures and temperatures and the composition of Earth's upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin S.; Bass, Jay D.

    2016-09-01

    We present the elastic properties of San Carlos olivine up to P = 12.8(8) GPa and T = 1300(200) K using Brillouin spectroscopy with CO2 laser heating. A comparison of our results with the global seismic model AK135 yields average olivine content near 410 km depth of about 37% and 43% in a dry and wet (1.9 wt % H2O) upper mantle, respectively. These olivine contents are far less than in the pyrolite model. However, comparisons of our results with regional seismic models lead to very different conclusions. High olivine contents of up to 87% are implied by seismic models of the western U.S. and eastern Pacific regions. In contrast, we infer less than 35% olivine under the central Pacific. Strong variations of olivine content and upper mantle lithologies near the 410 km discontinuity are suggested by regional seismic models.

  10. High energy proton induced radiation damage of rare earth permanent magnet quadrupoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanz, M.; Endres, M.; Löwe, K.; Lienig, T.; Deppert, O.; Lang, P. M.; Varentsov, D.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Gutfleisch, O.

    2017-12-01

    Permanent magnet quadrupoles (PMQs) are an alternative to common electromagnetic quadrupoles especially for fixed rigidity beam transport scenarios at particle accelerators. Using those magnets for experimental setups can result in certain scenarios, in which a PMQ itself may be exposed to a large amount of primary and secondary particles with a broad energy spectrum, interacting with the magnetic material and affecting its magnetic properties. One specific scenario is proton microscopy, where a proton beam traverses an object and a collimator in which a part of the beam is scattered and deflected into PMQs used as part of a diagnostic system. During the commissioning of the PRIOR (Proton Microscope for Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) high energy proton microscope facility prototype at Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung in 2014, a significant reduction of the image quality was observed which was partially attributed to the demagnetization of the used PMQ lenses and the corresponding decrease of the field quality. In order to study this phenomenon, Monte Carlo simulations were carried out and spare units manufactured from the same magnetic material—single wedges and a fully assembled PMQ module—were deliberately irradiated by a 3.6 GeV intense proton beam. The performed investigations have shown that in proton radiography applications the above described scattering may result in a high irradiation dose in the PMQ magnets. This did not only decrease the overall magnetic strength of the PMQs but also caused a significant degradation of the field quality of an assembled PMQ module by increasing the parasitic multipole field harmonics which effectively makes PMQs impractical for proton radiography applications or similar scenarios.

  11. High energy proton induced radiation damage of rare earth permanent magnet quadrupoles.

    PubMed

    Schanz, M; Endres, M; Löwe, K; Lienig, T; Deppert, O; Lang, P M; Varentsov, D; Hoffmann, D H H; Gutfleisch, O

    2017-12-01

    Permanent magnet quadrupoles (PMQs) are an alternative to common electromagnetic quadrupoles especially for fixed rigidity beam transport scenarios at particle accelerators. Using those magnets for experimental setups can result in certain scenarios, in which a PMQ itself may be exposed to a large amount of primary and secondary particles with a broad energy spectrum, interacting with the magnetic material and affecting its magnetic properties. One specific scenario is proton microscopy, where a proton beam traverses an object and a collimator in which a part of the beam is scattered and deflected into PMQs used as part of a diagnostic system. During the commissioning of the PRIOR (Proton Microscope for Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) high energy proton microscope facility prototype at Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung in 2014, a significant reduction of the image quality was observed which was partially attributed to the demagnetization of the used PMQ lenses and the corresponding decrease of the field quality. In order to study this phenomenon, Monte Carlo simulations were carried out and spare units manufactured from the same magnetic material-single wedges and a fully assembled PMQ module-were deliberately irradiated by a 3.6 GeV intense proton beam. The performed investigations have shown that in proton radiography applications the above described scattering may result in a high irradiation dose in the PMQ magnets. This did not only decrease the overall magnetic strength of the PMQs but also caused a significant degradation of the field quality of an assembled PMQ module by increasing the parasitic multipole field harmonics which effectively makes PMQs impractical for proton radiography applications or similar scenarios.

  12. Toward biotechnology in space: High-throughput instruments for in situ biological research beyond Earth.

    PubMed

    Karouia, Fathi; Peyvan, Kianoosh; Pohorille, Andrew

    2017-11-15

    Space biotechnology is a nascent field aimed at applying tools of modern biology to advance our goals in space exploration. These advances rely on our ability to exploit in situ high throughput techniques for amplification and sequencing DNA, and measuring levels of RNA transcripts, proteins and metabolites in a cell. These techniques, collectively known as "omics" techniques have already revolutionized terrestrial biology. A number of on-going efforts are aimed at developing instruments to carry out "omics" research in space, in particular on board the International Space Station and small satellites. For space applications these instruments require substantial and creative reengineering that includes automation, miniaturization and ensuring that the device is resistant to conditions in space and works independently of the direction of the gravity vector. Different paths taken to meet these requirements for different "omics" instruments are the subjects of this review. The advantages and disadvantages of these instruments and technological solutions and their level of readiness for deployment in space are discussed. Considering that effects of space environments on terrestrial organisms appear to be global, it is argued that high throughput instruments are essential to advance (1) biomedical and physiological studies to control and reduce space-related stressors on living systems, (2) application of biology to life support and in situ resource utilization, (3) planetary protection, and (4) basic research about the limits on life in space. It is also argued that carrying out measurements in situ provides considerable advantages over the traditional space biology paradigm that relies on post-flight data analysis. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Approaches for Improving Earth System Science Education in Middle Schools and High Schools in the United States (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, P. E.

    2009-12-01

    Earth system science is an often neglected subject in the US science curriculum. The state of Kansas State Department of Education, for example, has provided teachers with a curriculum guide for incorporating earth system science as an ancillary topic within the subjects of physics, chemistry, and the biological sciences. While this does provide a means to have earth system science within the curriculum, it relegates earth system science topics to a secondary status. In practice, earth system science topics are considered optional or only taught if there is time within an already an overly crowded curriculum. Given the importance of developing an educated citizenry that is capable of understanding, coping, and deciding how to live in a world where climate change is a reality requires a deeper understanding of earth system science. The de-emphasis of earth system science in favor of other science disciplines makes it imperative to seek opportunities to provide teachers, whose primary subject is not earth system science, with professional development opportunities to develop content knowledge understanding of earth system science, and pedagogical content knowledge (i.e. effective strategies for teaching earth system science). This is a noble goal, but there is no single method. At Fort Hays State University we have developed multiple strategies from face-to-face workshops, on-line coursework, and academic year virtual and face-to-face consultations with in-service and pre-service teachers. A review of the techniques and measures of effectiveness (based on teacher and student performance), and strengths and limitations of each method will be presented as an aid to other institutions and programs seeking to improve the teaching and learning of earth system science in their region.

  14. The DoD's High Performance Computing Modernization Program - Ensuing the National Earth Systems Prediction Capability Becomes Operational

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, W.

    2016-12-01

    The Department of Defense's (DoD) High Performance Computing Modernization Program (HPCMP) provides high performance computing to address the most significant challenges in computational resources, software application support and nationwide research and engineering networks. Today, the HPCMP has a critical role in ensuring the National Earth System Prediction Capability (N-ESPC) achieves initial operational status in 2019. A 2015 study commissioned by the HPCMP found that N-ESPC computational requirements will exceed interconnect bandwidth capacity due to the additional load from data assimilation and passing connecting data between ensemble codes. Memory bandwidth and I/O bandwidth will continue to be significant bottlenecks for the Navy's Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) scalability - by far the major driver of computing resource requirements in the N-ESPC. The study also found that few of the N-ESPC model developers have detailed plans to ensure their respective codes scale through 2024. Three HPCMP initiatives are designed to directly address and support these issues: Productivity Enhancement, Technology, Transfer and Training (PETTT), the HPCMP Applications Software Initiative (HASI), and Frontier Projects. PETTT supports code conversion by providing assistance, expertise and training in scalable and high-end computing architectures. HASI addresses the continuing need for modern application software that executes effectively and efficiently on next-generation high-performance computers. Frontier Projects enable research and development that could not be achieved using typical HPCMP resources by providing multi-disciplinary teams access to exceptional amounts of high performance computing resources. Finally, the Navy's DoD Supercomputing Resource Center (DSRC) currently operates a 6 Petabyte system, of which Naval Oceanography receives 15% of operational computational system use, or approximately 1 Petabyte of the processing capability. The DSRC will

  15. High-latitude spacecraft charging in low-Earth polar orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frooninckx, Thomas B.

    Spacecraft charging within the upper ionosphere is commonly thought to be insignificant and thus has received little attention. Recent experimental evidence has shown that electric potential differences as severe as 680 volts can develop between Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) polar-orbiting (840 kilometers) spacecraft and their high-latitude environment. To explore space vehicle charging in this region more fully, an analysis was performed using DMSP F6, F7, F8, and F9 satellite precipitating particle and ambient plasma measurements taken during the winters of 1986-87 (solar minimum) and 1989-90 (solar maximum). An extreme solar cycle dependence was discovered as charging occurred more frequently and with greater severity during the period of solar minimum. One hundred seventy charging events ranging from -46 to 1,430 volts were identified, and satellite measurements and Time Dependent Ionospheric Model (TDIM) output were used to characterize the environments which generated and inhibited these potentials. All current sources were considered to determine the cause of the solar cycle dependence.

  16. Students Across Borders: A Summer Earth Science Workshop for Hispanic High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, R. F.; Kresan, P.; Baez, A.; Sheppard, P.; Forger, G.; Rendon-Coke, G.; Gray, F.

    2003-12-01

    Southern Arizona has a high school (HS) population that is 28% Hispanic. However this fast-growing minority group represents only 14% of undergraduate students at the University of Arizona and 11% of science and engineering majors. The Students Across Borders Program was designed to assist Hispanic HS students across borders that often separate them from higher education and careers in science. In June 2003, five person student-teacher teams from Tucson, Yuma, and northern Sonora, Mexico lived in dormitories and participated in a weeklong program based on the University of Arizona campus. Activities included: field trips featuring inquiry-based investigations of geology, water quality, and tree rings; tours of engineering and science laboratories; introduction to student support organizations such as the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers; and counseling by Career Services and Admissions personnel. Technology training included instruction in web design, digital imaging and online communication tools. Web sites developed by the student teams were presented to participants and families at the conclusion of the on-campus program. Web site development is continuing during the academic year to foster continuing communication between the student teams and presentation of results of follow-on projects assisted by graduate and undergraduate CATTS fellows and university faculty.

  17. Chemical Interaction between High-Tc Superconducting Oxides and Alkaline Earth Fluorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Takuya; Asakawa, Toshiaki; Shiraishi, Tadashi; Yoshida, Tsutomu; Yoshimoto, Mamoru; Koinuma, Hideomi

    1989-07-01

    Reactions of high-Tc superconductors and MF2 (M: Ca, Sr, Ba) were investigated by means of ac susceptibility, X-ray diffraction, and TG-DTA measurements. The superconducting transition temperature (Tconset) of Ba2YCu3O7-δ powder mixed with MF2 powder decreased as a result of heat treatment at 600°C in air, whereas it did not decrease by the heat treatment under carefully dried conditions. In contrast, neither of the heat-treatment conditions decreased the Tconset of Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox mixed with MF2 powder. Heating with MF2 at temperatures higher than 700°C reduced volume fractions of these superconductors even in dry atmosphere and the reactivity increased in the order of BaF2

  18. Herbal Earth

    2017-12-08

    Subtle vegetation changes are visible in this year-long visualization. Large-scale patterns vary with seasons, but the local variations in green are also sensitive precipitation, drought and fire. High values of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, or NDVI, represent dense green functioning vegetation and low NDVI values represent sparse green vegetation or vegetation under stress from limiting conditions, such as drought. The visualization was created from a year’s worth of data from April 2012 to April 2013. The information was sent back to Earth from the Visible-Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership or Suomi NPP satellite, a partnership between NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA. Credit: NASA/NOAA To read more go to: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/NPP/news/vegetation.html NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  19. High Pressure, Earth-Storable Rocket Technology. Volume 3; Appendices C and D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jassowski, D. M.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of elevated chamber pressure on combustion efficiency and heat transfer has been determined at the 100 lbf (445 N) thrust level for nitrogen tetroxide propellants. Measurements were made up to 500 psia (3.45 MPa) with testbed hardware; tests at 100 psia (0.690 MPa) and 250 psia (1.72 MPa) were made with radiation-cooled rhenium chambers. The first task of the program served to determine desirable thruster applications and operating conditions: high total impulse, i.e. communication satellite or spacecraft bus axial engines, at chamber pressures up to 250 psia (1.72 MPa) pressure-fed, or up to 500 psia (3.45 MPa) pump-fed. The hardware modifications and testing required to obtain the data were determined in Task 2, which included design-support hot fire tests; supplemental hardware, including a 250 psia (1.72 MPa) Pc rhenium chamber and a 20% fuel-film cooled platelet injector was fabricated in Task 3. Testing showed that satisfactory operation of Ir-Re radiation chambers is assured at pressures up to 250 psia and may be possible up to 500. The heat transfer data obtained show good correlation with throat Reynolds number and are generally under values given by the simplified Bartz equation; chambers equilibrium temperatures match predicted values. Preliminary optimization of trip configuration and mixture ratio were made; Isp performance from thrust measurements was within 1% of predicted values. Stability, compatibility, and front-end thermal management were determined to be satisfactory.

  20. Alloying effects of Ni, Si, and S on the phase diagram and sound velocities of Fe under high pressures and high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Fei, Y.; Sturhahn, W.; Zhao, J.; Mao, H.; Hemley, R.

    2004-05-01

    Iron-nickel is the most abundant constituent of the Earth's core. The amount of Ni in the core is about 5.5 wt%. Geophysical and cosmochemical studies suggest that the Earth's outer core also contains approximately 10% of light element(s) and a certain amount of light element(s) may be present in the inner core. Si and S are believed to be alloying light elements in the iron-rich planetary cores such as the Earth and Mars. Therefore, understanding the alloying effects of Ni, Si, and S on the phase diagram and physical properties of Fe under core conditions is crucial for geophysical and geochemical models of planetary interiors. The addition of Ni and Si does not appreciably change the compressibility of hcp-Fe under high pressures. Studies of the phase relations of Fe and Fe-Ni alloys indicate that Fe with up to 10 wt% Ni is likely to be in the hcp structure under inner core conditions. On the other hand, adding Si into Fe strongly stabilizes the bcc structure to much higher pressures and temperatures (Lin et al., 2002). We have also studied the sound velocities and magnetic properties of Fe0.92Ni0.08, Fe0.85Si0.15, and Fe3S alloys with nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and nuclear forward scattering up to 106 GPa, 70 GPa, and 57 GPa, respectively. The sound velocities of the alloys are obtained from the measured partial phonon density of states for 57Fe incorporated in the alloys. Addition of Ni slightly decreases the VP and VS of Fe under high pressures (Lin et al., 2003). Si or S alloyed with Fe increases the VP and VS under high pressures, which provides a better match to seismological data of the Earth's core. We note that the increase in the VP and VS of Fe0.85Si0.15 and Fe3S is mainly contributed from the density decrease of adding Si and S in iron. Time spectra of the nuclear forward scattering reveal that the most iron rich sulfide, Fe3S, undergoes a magnetic to non-magnetic transition at approximately 18 GPa from a low-pressure magnetically

  1. High performance of treated and washed MSWI bottom ash granulates as natural aggregate replacement within earth-moist concrete.

    PubMed

    Keulen, A; van Zomeren, A; Harpe, P; Aarnink, W; Simons, H A E; Brouwers, H J H

    2016-03-01

    Municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash was treated with specially designed dry and wet treatment processes, obtaining high quality bottom ash granulate fractions (BGF) suitable for up to 100% replacement of natural gravel in concrete. The wet treatment (using only water for separating and washing) significantly lowers the leaching of e.g. chloride and sulfate, heavy metals (antimony, molybdenum and copper) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Two potential bottom ash granulate fractions, both in compliance with the standard EN 12620 (aggregates for concrete), were added into earth-moist concrete mixtures. The fresh and hardened concrete physical performances (e.g. workability, strength and freeze-thaw) of high strength concrete mixtures were maintained or improved compared with the reference mixtures, even after replacing up to 100% of the initial natural gravel. Final element leaching of monolithic and crushed granular state BGF containing concretes, showed no differences with the gravel references. Leaching of all mixtures did not exceed the limit values set by the Dutch Soil Quality Degree. In addition, multiple-life-phase emission (pH static test) for the critical elements of input bottom ash, bottom ash granulate (BGF) and crushed BGF containing concrete were assessed. Simulation pH lowering or potential carbonation processes indicated that metal (antimony, barium, chrome and copper) and sulfate element leaching behavior are mainly pH dominated and controlled, although differ in mechanism and related mineral abundance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Improving the critical thinking skills of junior high school students on Earth and Space Science (ESS) materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlina, L.; Liliasari; Tjasyono, B.; Hendayana, S.

    2018-05-01

    Critical thinking skills need to be developed in students. With critical thinking skills, students will be able to understand the concept with more depth easily, be sensitive with problems that occur, understand and solve problems that occur in their surroundings, and apply the concepts in different situations. Earth and Space Science (ESS) material is part of the science subjects given from elementary school to college. This research is a test of research program with quantitative method. This study aims to investigate the improvement of critical thinking skills of students through training of science teachers in junior high school in designing learning media for teaching ESS. With samples of 24 science teachers and 32 students of grade 7th in junior high school which are chosen by purposive sampling in a school in Ogan Ilir District, South Sumatra, obtained average pre-test and post-test scores of students’ critical thinking skills are 52.26 and 67.06 with an average N-gain of 0.31. A survey and critical thinking skills based-test were conducted to get the data. The results show positive impact and an increase in students’ critical thinking skills on the ESS material.

  3. Chemically Inhomogeneous RE-Fe-B Permanent Magnets with High Figure of Merit: Solution to Global Rare Earth Criticality

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jiaying; Ma, Tianyu; Zhang, Yujing; Bai, Guohua; Yan, Mi

    2016-01-01

    The global rare earth (RE) criticality, especially for those closely-relied Nd/Pr/Dy/Tb in the 2:14:1-typed permanent magnets (PMs), has triggered tremendous attempts to develop new alternatives. Prospective candidates La/Ce with high abundance, however, cannot provide an equivalent performance due to inferior magnetic properties of (La/Ce)2Fe14B to Nd2Fe14B. Here we report high figure-of-merit La/Ce-rich RE-Fe-B PMs, where La/Ce are inhomogeneously distributed among the 2:14:1 phase. The resultant exchange coupling within an individual grain and magnetostatic interactions across grains ensure much superior performance to the La/Ce homogeneously distributed magnet. Maximum energy product (BH)max of 42.2 MGOe is achieved even with 36 wt. % La-Ce incorporation. The cost performance, (BH)max/cost, has been raised by 27.1% compared to a 48.9 MGOe La/Ce-free commercial magnet. The construction of chemical heterogeneity offers recipes to develop commercial-grade PMs using the less risky La/Ce, and also provides a promising solution to the REs availability constraints. PMID:27553789

  4. A highly reliable, high performance open avionics architecture for real time Nap-of-the-Earth operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Richard E.; Elks, Carl

    1995-01-01

    An Army Fault Tolerant Architecture (AFTA) has been developed to meet real-time fault tolerant processing requirements of future Army applications. AFTA is the enabling technology that will allow the Army to configure existing processors and other hardware to provide high throughput and ultrahigh reliability necessary for TF/TA/NOE flight control and other advanced Army applications. A comprehensive conceptual study of AFTA has been completed that addresses a wide range of issues including requirements, architecture, hardware, software, testability, producibility, analytical models, validation and verification, common mode faults, VHDL, and a fault tolerant data bus. A Brassboard AFTA for demonstration and validation has been fabricated, and two operating systems and a flight-critical Army application have been ported to it. Detailed performance measurements have been made of fault tolerance and operating system overheads while AFTA was executing the flight application in the presence of faults.

  5. High-Efficiency K-Band Space Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier for Near-Earth High Data Rate Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Force, Dale A.; Spitsen, Paul C.; Menninger, William L.; Robbins, Neal R.; Dibb, Daniel R.; Todd, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    The RF performance of a new K-Band helix conduction cooled traveling-wave tube amplifier (TWTA) is presented in this paper. A total of three such units were manufactured, tested and delivered. The first unit is currently flying onboard NASA s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft and has flawlessly completed over 2000 orbits around the Moon. The second unit is a proto-flight model. The third unit will fly onboard NASA s International Space Station (ISS) as a very compact and lightweight transmitter package for the Communications, Navigation and Networking Reconfigurable Testbed (CoNNeCT), which is scheduled for launch in 2011. These TWTAs were characterized over the frequencies 25.5 to 25.8 GHz. The saturated RF output power is >40 W and the saturated RF gain is >46 dB. The saturated AM-to- PM conversion is 3.5 /dB and the small signal gain ripple is 0.46 dB peak-to-peak. The overall efficiency of the TWTA, including that of the electronic power conditioner (EPC) is as high as 45 percent.

  6. High-Efficiency K-Band Space Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier for Near-Earth High Data Rate Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Force, Dale A.; Spitsen, Paul C.; Menninger, William L.; Robbins, Neal R.; Dibb, Daniel R.; Todd, Phillip C.

    2010-01-01

    The RF performance of a new K-Band helix conduction cooled traveling-wave tube amplifier (TWTA), is presented in this paper. A total of three such units were manufactured, tested and delivered. The first unit is currently flying onboard NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft and has flawlessly completed over 2000 orbits around the Moon. The second unit is a proto-flight model. The third unit will fly onboard NASA's International Space Station (ISS) as a very compact and lightweight transmitter package for the Communications, Navigation and Networking Reconfigurable Testbed (CoNNeCT), which is scheduled for launch in 2011. These TWTAs were characterized over the frequencies 25.5 to 25.8 GHz. The saturated RF output power is greater than 40 W and the saturated RF gain is greater than 46 dB. The saturated AM-to-PM conversion is 3.5 /dB and the small signal gain ripple is 0.46 dB peak-to-peak. The overall efficiency of the TWTA, including that of the electronic power conditioner (EPC) is as high as 45%.

  7. Earth Observation

    2013-07-29

    ISS036-E-025908 (29 July 2013) --- One of the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, as it was passing over Africa, took this night picture of Sicily (center frame) and much of Italy (frame left to frame center) on July 29, 2013. The Stretto de Messina, which separates Sicily from Italy, is near frame center. The high oblique 50mm lens shot includes a scenic horizon with a number of stars in the late July sky. Barely visible in the darkness, part of the long arm of the Space Station Remote Manipulator System or Canadarm2 runs diagonally through the right one-third of the image.

  8. Sulfur Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, B. H.

    2007-12-01

    Variations in surface tension affect the buoyancy of objects floating in a liquid. Thus an object floating in water will sink deeper in the presence of dishwater fluid. This is a very minor but measurable effect. It causes for instance ducks to drown in aqueous solutions with added surfactant. The surface tension of liquid iron is very strongly affected by the presence of sulfur which acts as a surfactant in this system varying between 1.9 and 0.4 N/m at 10 mass percent Sulfur (Lee & Morita (2002), This last value is inferred to be the maximum value for Sulfur inferred to be present in the liquid outer core. Venting of Sulfur from the liquid core manifests itself on the Earth surface by the 105 to 106 ton of sulfur vented into the atmosphere annually (Wedepohl, 1984). Inspection of surface Sulfur emission indicates that venting is non-homogeneously distributed over the Earth's surface. The implication of such large variation in surface tension in the liquid outer core are that at locally low Sulfur concentration, the liquid outer core does not wet the predominantly MgSiO3 matrix with which it is in contact. However at a local high in Sulfur, the liquid outer core wets this matrix which in the fluid state has a surface tension of 0.4 N/m (Bansal & Doremus, 1986), couples with it, and causes it to sink. This differential and diapiric movement is transmitted through the essentially brittle mantle (1024 Pa.s, Lambeck & Johnson, 1998; the maximum value for ice being about 1030 Pa.s at 0 K, in all likely hood representing an upper bound of viscosity for all materials) and manifests itself on the surface by the roughly 20 km differentiation, about 0.1 % of the total mantle thickness, between topographical heights and lows with concomitant lateral movement in the crust and upper mantle resulting in thin skin tectonics. The brittle nature of the medium though which this movement is transmitted suggests that the extremes in topography of the D" layer are similar in range to

  9. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Colleen

    1998-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-sponsored project for teachers of grades 5-12, designed to: (1) enhance understanding of the Earth as an integrated system; (2) enhance the interdisciplinary approach to science instruction; and (3) provide classroom materials that focus on those goals. Discover Earth is conducted by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies in collaboration with Dr. Eric Barron, Director, Earth System Science Center, The Pennsylvania State University; and Dr. Robert Hudson, Chair, the Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland at College Park. The enclosed materials: (1) represent only part of the Discover Earth materials; (2) were developed by classroom teachers who are participating in the Discover Earth project; (3) utilize an investigative approach and on-line data; and (4) can be effectively adjusted to classrooms with greater/without technology access. The Discover Earth classroom materials focus on the Earth system and key issues of global climate change including topics such as the greenhouse effect, clouds and Earth's radiation balance, surface hydrology and land cover, and volcanoes and climate change. All the materials developed to date are available on line at (http://www.strategies.org) You are encouraged to submit comments and recommendations about these materials to the Discover Earth project manager, contact information is listed below. You are welcome to duplicate all these materials.

  10. A Solid Earth educational module, co-operatively developed by scientists and high school teachers through the Scripps Classroom Connection GK12 Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, L. B.; van Dusen, D.; Benedict, R.; Chojnacki, P. R.; Peach, C. L.; Staudigel, H.; Constable, C.; Laske, G.

    2010-12-01

    The Scripps Classroom Connection, funded through the NSF GK-12 program, pairs local high school teachers with Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) graduate students in the earth and ocean sciences for their mutual professional development. An integral goal of the program is the collaborative production of quality earth science educational modules that are tested in the classroom and subsequently made freely available online for use by other educators. We present a brief overview of the program structure in place to support this goal and illustrate a module that we have developed on the Solid Earth & Plate Tectonics for a 9th grade Earth Science classroom. The unit includes 1) an exercise in constructing a geomagnetic polarity timescale which exposes students to authentic scientific data; 2) activities, labs, lectures and worksheets that support the scientific content; and 3) use of online resources such as Google Earth and interactive animations that help students better understand the concepts. The educational unit is being implemented in two separate local area high schools for Fall 2010 and we will report on our experiences. The co-operative efforts of teachers and scientists lead to educational materials which expose students to the scientific process and current science research, while teaching basic concepts using an engaging inquiry-based approach. In turn, graduate students involved gain experience communicating their science to non-science audiences.

  11. Electrical and thermal conductivity of Fe-C alloy at high pressure: implications for effects of carbon on the geodynamo of the Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Lin, J. F.; Liu, Y.; Feng, S.; Jin, C.; Yoshino, T.

    2017-12-01

    Thermal conductivity of iron alloy in the Earth's core plays a crucial role in constraining the energetics of the geodynamo and the thermal evolution of the planet. Studies on the thermal conductivity of iron reveal the importance of the effects of light elements and high temperature. Carbon has been proposed to be a candidate light element in Earth's core for its meteoritic abundance and high-pressure velocity-density profiles of iron carbides (e.g., Fe7C3). In this study, we employed four-probe van der Pauw method in a diamond anvil cell to measure the electrical resistivity of pure iron, iron carbon alloy, and iron carbides at high pressures. These studies were complimented with synchrotron X-ray diffraction and focused ion beam (FIB) analyses. Our results show significant changes in the electrical conductivity of these iron-carbon alloys that are consistent previous reports with structural and electronic transitions at high pressures, indicating that these transitions should be taken into account in evaluating the electrical and thermal conductivity at high pressure. To apply our results to understand the thermal conduction in the Earth's core, we have compared our results with literature values for the electrical and thermal conductivity of iron alloyed with light elements (C, Si) at high pressures. These comparisons permit the validity of the Wiedemann-Franz law and Matthiessen's rule for the effects of light elements on the thermal conductivity of the Earth's core. We found that an addition of a light element such as carbon has an strong effect on the reducing the thermal conductivity of Earth's core, but the magnitude of the alloying effect strongly depends on the identity of the light element and the crystal and electronic structures. Based on our results and literature values, we have modelled the electrical and thermal conductivity of iron-carbon alloy at Earth's core pressure-temperature conditions to the effects on the heat flux in the Earth's core. In

  12. On-the-fly machine-learning for high-throughput experiments: search for rare-earth-free permanent magnets

    PubMed Central

    Kusne, Aaron Gilad; Gao, Tieren; Mehta, Apurva; Ke, Liqin; Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Ho, Kai-Ming; Antropov, Vladimir; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Kramer, Matthew J.; Long, Christian; Takeuchi, Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Advanced materials characterization techniques with ever-growing data acquisition speed and storage capabilities represent a challenge in modern materials science, and new procedures to quickly assess and analyze the data are needed. Machine learning approaches are effective in reducing the complexity of data and rapidly homing in on the underlying trend in multi-dimensional data. Here, we show that by employing an algorithm called the mean shift theory to a large amount of diffraction data in high-throughput experimentation, one can streamline the process of delineating the structural evolution across compositional variations mapped on combinatorial libraries with minimal computational cost. Data collected at a synchrotron beamline are analyzed on the fly, and by integrating experimental data with the inorganic crystal structure database (ICSD), we can substantially enhance the accuracy in classifying the structural phases across ternary phase spaces. We have used this approach to identify a novel magnetic phase with enhanced magnetic anisotropy which is a candidate for rare-earth free permanent magnet. PMID:25220062

  13. NAOMI instrument: a product line of compact and versatile cameras designed for high resolution missions in Earth observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luquet, Ph.; Chikouche, A.; Benbouzid, A. B.; Arnoux, J. J.; Chinal, E.; Massol, C.; Rouchit, P.; De Zotti, S.

    2017-11-01

    EADS Astrium is currently developing a new product line of compact and versatile instruments for high resolution missions in Earth Observation. First version has been developed in the frame of the ALSAT-2 contract awarded by the Algerian Space Agency (ASAL) to EADS Astrium. The Silicon Carbide Korsch-type telescope coupled with a multilines detector array offers a 2.5 m GSD in PAN band at Nadir @ 680 km altitude (10 m GSD in the four multispectral bands) with a 17.5 km swath width. This compact camera - 340 (W) x 460 (L) x 510 (H) mm3, 13 kg - is embarked on a Myriade-type small platform. The electronics unit accommodates video, housekeeping, and thermal control functions and also a 64 Gbit mass memory. Two satellites are developed; the first one is planned to be launched on mid 2009. Several other versions of the instrument have already been defined with enhanced resolution or/and larger field of view.

  14. Synthesis and magnetic properties of rare-earth free MnBi alloy: A high-energy hard magnetic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar; Prakash, H. R.; Ram, S.; Pradhan, D.

    2018-04-01

    MnBi is a rare-earth free high-energy magnetic material useful for the permanent magnet based devices. In a simple method, a MnBi alloy was prepared by arc melting method using Mn and Bi metals in 60:40 atomic ratio. In terms of the X-ray diffraction, a crystalline MnBi phase is formed with Bi as impurity phase of the as-prepared alloy. FESEM image of chemically etched sample shows small grains throughout the alloy. SEAD pattern and lattice image were studied to understand the internal microstructure of the alloy. The thermomagnetic curves measured in ZFC-FC cycles over 5-380 K temperatures at 500 Oe field, shows the induced magnetization of 5-25 % in the sample. The coercivity values, 7.455 kOe (13.07 emu/g magnetization) at 380 K, and 5.185k Oe (14.75 emu/g magnetization) at 300 K, are observed in the M-H hysteresis loops. A decreased value 0.181kOe (18.05 emu/g magnetization) appears at 100 K due to the change in the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The results are useful to fabricate small MnBi magnets for different permanent magnets based devices.

  15. Automatic building detection based on Purposive FastICA (PFICA) algorithm using monocular high resolution Google Earth images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffarian, Saman; Ghaffarian, Salar

    2014-11-01

    This paper proposes an improved FastICA model named as Purposive FastICA (PFICA) with initializing by a simple color space transformation and a novel masking approach to automatically detect buildings from high resolution Google Earth imagery. ICA and FastICA algorithms are defined as Blind Source Separation (BSS) techniques for unmixing source signals using the reference data sets. In order to overcome the limitations of the ICA and FastICA algorithms and make them purposeful, we developed a novel method involving three main steps: 1-Improving the FastICA algorithm using Moore-Penrose pseudo inverse matrix model, 2-Automated seeding of the PFICA algorithm based on LUV color space and proposed simple rules to split image into three regions; shadow + vegetation, baresoil + roads and buildings, respectively, 3-Masking out the final building detection results from PFICA outputs utilizing the K-means clustering algorithm with two number of clusters and conducting simple morphological operations to remove noises. Evaluation of the results illustrates that buildings detected from dense and suburban districts with divers characteristics and color combinations using our proposed method have 88.6% and 85.5% overall pixel-based and object-based precision performances, respectively.

  16. Application of high precision two-way S-band ranging to the navigation of the Galileo Earth encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollmeier, Vincent M.; Kallemeyn, Pieter H.; Thurman, Sam W.

    1993-01-01

    The application of high-accuracy S/S-band (2.1 GHz uplink/2.3 GHz downlink) ranging to orbit determination with relatively short data arcs is investigated for the approach phase of each of the Galileo spacecraft's two Earth encounters (8 December 1990 and 8 December 1992). Analysis of S-band ranging data from Galileo indicated that under favorable signal levels, meter-level precision was attainable. It is shown that ranginging data of sufficient accuracy, when acquired from multiple stations, can sense the geocentric angular position of a distant spacecraft. Explicit modeling of ranging bias parameters for each station pass is used to largely remove systematic ground system calibration errors and transmission media effects from the Galileo range measurements, which would otherwise corrupt the angle finding capabilities of the data. The accuracy achieved using the precision range filtering strategy proved markedly better when compared to post-flyby reconstructions than did solutions utilizing a traditional Doppler/range filter strategy. In addition, the navigation accuracy achieved with precision ranging was comparable to that obtained using delta-Differenced One-Way Range, an interferometric measurement of spacecraft angular position relative to a natural radio source, which was also used operationally.

  17. Bell Test over Extremely High-Loss Channels: Towards Distributing Entangled Photon Pairs between Earth and the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yuan; Li, Yu-Huai; Zou, Wen-Jie; Li, Zheng-Ping; Shen, Qi; Liao, Sheng-Kai; Ren, Ji-Gang; Yin, Juan; Chen, Yu-Ao; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2018-04-01

    Quantum entanglement was termed "spooky action at a distance" in the well-known paper by Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen. Entanglement is expected to be distributed over longer and longer distances in both practical applications and fundamental research into the principles of nature. Here, we present a proposal for distributing entangled photon pairs between Earth and the Moon using a Lagrangian point at a distance of 1.28 light seconds. One of the most fascinating features in this long-distance distribution of entanglement is as follows. One can perform the Bell test with human supplying the random measurement settings and recording the results while still maintaining spacelike intervals. To realize a proof-of-principle experiment, we develop an entangled photon source with 1 GHz generation rate, about 2 orders of magnitude higher than previous results. Violation of Bell's inequality was observed under a total simulated loss of 103 dB with measurement settings chosen by two experimenters. This demonstrates the feasibility of such long-distance Bell test over extremely high-loss channels, paving the way for one of the ultimate tests of the foundations of quantum mechanics.

  18. Toward server-side, high performance climate change data analytics in the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) eco-system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiore, Sandro; Williams, Dean; Aloisio, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    In many scientific domains such as climate, data is often n-dimensional and requires tools that support specialized data types and primitives to be properly stored, accessed, analysed and visualized. Moreover, new challenges arise in large-scale scenarios and eco-systems where petabytes (PB) of data can be available and data can be distributed and/or replicated (e.g., the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) serving the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, Phase 5 (CMIP5) experiment, providing access to 2.5PB of data for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). Most of the tools currently available for scientific data analysis in the climate domain fail at large scale since they: (1) are desktop based and need the data locally; (2) are sequential, so do not benefit from available multicore/parallel machines; (3) do not provide declarative languages to express scientific data analysis tasks; (4) are domain-specific, which ties their adoption to a specific domain; and (5) do not provide a workflow support, to enable the definition of complex "experiments". The Ophidia project aims at facing most of the challenges highlighted above by providing a big data analytics framework for eScience. Ophidia provides declarative, server-side, and parallel data analysis, jointly with an internal storage model able to efficiently deal with multidimensional data and a hierarchical data organization to manage large data volumes ("datacubes"). The project relies on a strong background of high performance database management and OLAP systems to manage large scientific data sets. It also provides a native workflow management support, to define processing chains and workflows with tens to hundreds of data analytics operators to build real scientific use cases. With regard to interoperability aspects, the talk will present the contribution provided both to the RDA Working Group on Array Databases, and the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF

  19. Grid Technology as a Cyberinfrastructure for Delivering High-End Services to the Earth and Space Science Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinke, Thomas H.

    2004-01-01

    Grid technology consists of middleware that permits distributed computations, data and sensors to be seamlessly integrated into a secure, single-sign-on processing environment. In &is environment, a user has to identify and authenticate himself once to the grid middleware, and then can utilize any of the distributed resources to which he has been,panted access. Grid technology allows resources that exist in enterprises that are under different administrative control to be securely integrated into a single processing environment The grid community has adopted commercial web services technology as a means for implementing persistent, re-usable grid services that sit on top of the basic distributed processing environment that grids provide. These grid services can then form building blocks for even more complex grid services. Each grid service is characterized using the Web Service Description Language, which provides a description of the interface and how other applications can access it. The emerging Semantic grid work seeks to associates sufficient semantic information with each grid service such that applications wii1 he able to automatically select, compose and if necessary substitute available equivalent services in order to assemble collections of services that are most appropriate for a particular application. Grid technology has been used to provide limited support to various Earth and space science applications. Looking to the future, this emerging grid service technology can provide a cyberinfrastructures for both the Earth and space science communities. Groups within these communities could transform those applications that have community-wide applicability into persistent grid services that are made widely available to their respective communities. In concert with grid-enabled data archives, users could easily create complex workflows that extract desired data from one or more archives and process it though an appropriate set of widely distributed grid

  20. Detection of actinides and rare earths in natural matrices with the AGLAE new, high sensitivity detection set-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucchiatti, Alessandro; Alonso, Ursula; Lemasson, Quentin; Missana, Tiziana; Moignard, Brice; Pacheco, Claire; Pichon, Laurent; Camarena de la Mora, Sandra

    2014-08-01

    tolerated.This kind of set-up should be advantageous for the detection of elements that are present in a geological, archaeological or artistic samples to the level of a few tens ppm. This is true in particular for the rare earths which are relevant to the provenance attribution of various classes of cultural heritage objects (clays, glasses, …) and the actinides which are relevant in very specific and highly impacting dating problems and, more generally, critical environmental elements with special reference to the radionuclide mobility in deep geological formations hosting radioactive waste [2]. Geological materials are highly heterogeneous and consequently their retention of contaminants is heterogeneous as well. In this frame, the capabilities of the AGLAE set-up would allow an improved characterization of natural heterogeneous rock, detecting the presence of the elements of interest (actinides and rare earth) at concentration levels of tens of ppm. This provides a better definition of the initial system, avoiding biased interpretation of the retention properties of the material for the analysis of possible contamination. Additionally, if lower detection limits were achieved, new perspectives to evaluate retention of low solubility contaminants in a wider range of geochemical conditions would be opened.A glass standard and a series of reference granite samples (Grimsel and Äspö), either enriched by sorption with natU and La or kept natural, have been scanned by PIXE at the New-AGLAE detection system, to test measurement protocols and assess the MDL's allowed by the five detectors system.

  1. The Effects of Earth Science Textbook Contents on High School Students' Knowledge of, Attitude toward, and Behavior of Energy Saving and Carbon Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Yu-Long; Chou, Ying-Chyi; Yen, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Shr-Jya

    2017-01-01

    As science textbooks are considered as one of the major source of climate change information of students, this study aims to examine the differences in energy saving and carbon reduction knowledge, attitude, and behavior between two groups of Taiwan's high school students using earth science textbooks of two different publishers. Some items of…

  2. A Case of Fragmented High School Earth and Space Science Education in the Great Plains: Tracing Teacher Certification Policy to Students' Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Elizabeth; Lu, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Although U.S. high school students' access to Earth and space science (ESS) varies widely from state to state, nationally, ESS content is the most neglected area of science education and scientific literacy. States have been considering whether they will formally adopt, or less formally adapt, the new national science education standards, the Next…

  3. Elasticity of ferropericlase and seismic heterogeneity in the Earth's lower mantle: Ferropericlase High Pressure-Temperature Elasticity

    SciT

    Yang, Jing; Lin, Jung-Fu; Jacobsen, Steven D.

    2016-12-16

    Deciphering the origin of seismic heterogeneity has been one of the major challenges in understanding the geochemistry and geodynamics of the deep mantle. Fully anisotropic elastic properties of constituent minerals at relevant pressure-temperature conditions of the lower mantle can be used to calculate seismic heterogeneity parameters in order to better understand chemically and thermally induced seismic heterogeneities. In this study, the single-crystal elastic properties of ferropericlase (Mg0.94Fe0.06)O were measured using Brillouin spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction at conditions up to 50 GPa and 900 K. The velocity-density results were modeled using third-order finite-strain theory and thermoelastic equations along a representative geothermmore » to investigate high pressure-temperature and compositional effects on the seismic heterogeneity parameters. Our results demonstrate that from 660 to 2000 km, compressional wave anisotropy of ferropericlase increased from 4% to 9.7%, while shear wave anisotropy increased from 9% to as high as 22.5%. The thermally induced lateral heterogeneity ratio (RS/P = ∂lnVS/∂lnVP) of ferropericlase was calculated to be 1.48 at ambient pressure but decreased to 1.43 at 40 GPa along a representative geotherm. The RS/P of a simplified pyrolite model consisting of 80% bridgmanite and 20% ferropericlase was approximately 1.5, consistent with seismic models at depths from 670 to 1500 km, but showed an increased mismatch at lower mantle depths below ~1500 km. This discrepancy below mid-lower mantle could be due to either a contribution from chemically induced heterogeneity or the effects of the Fe spin transition in the deeper parts of the Earth's lower mantle.« less

  4. Very high resolution Earth Observation features for testing the direct and indirect effects of landscape structure on local habitat quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mairota, Paola; Cafarelli, Barbara; Labadessa, Rocco; Lovergine, Francesco P.; Tarantino, Cristina; Nagendra, Harini; Didham, Raphael K.

    2015-02-01

    Modelling the empirical relationships between habitat quality and species distribution patterns is the first step to understanding human impacts on biodiversity. It is important to build on this understanding to develop a broader conceptual appreciation of the influence of surrounding landscape structure on local habitat quality, across multiple spatial scales. Traditional models which report that 'habitat amount' in the landscape is sufficient to explain patterns of biodiversity, irrespective of habitat configuration or spatial variation in habitat quality at edges, implicitly treat each unit of habitat as interchangeable and ignore the high degree of interdependence between spatial components of land-use change. Here, we test the contrasting hypothesis, that local habitat units are not interchangeable in their habitat attributes, but are instead dependent on variation in surrounding habitat structure at both patch- and landscape levels. As the statistical approaches needed to implement such hierarchical causal models are observation-intensive, we utilise very high resolution (VHR) Earth Observation (EO) images to rapidly generate fine-grained measures of habitat patch internal heterogeneities over large spatial extents. We use linear mixed-effects models to test whether these remotely-sensed proxies for habitat quality were influenced by surrounding patch or landscape structure. The results demonstrate the significant influence of surrounding patch and landscape context on local habitat quality. They further indicate that such an influence can be direct, when a landscape variable alone influences the habitat structure variable, and/or indirect when the landscape and patch attributes have a conjoined effect on the response variable. We conclude that a substantial degree of interaction among spatial configuration effects is likely to be the norm in determining the ecological consequences of habitat fragmentation, thus corroborating the notion of the spatial context

  5. High coercivity, anisotropic, heavy rare earth-free Nd-Fe-B by Flash Spark Plasma Sintering.

    PubMed

    Castle, Elinor; Sheridan, Richard; Zhou, Wei; Grasso, Salvatore; Walton, Allan; Reece, Michael J

    2017-09-11

    In the drive to reduce the critical Heavy Rare Earth (HRE) content of magnets for green technologies, HRE-free Nd-Fe-B has become an attractive option. HRE is added to Nd-Fe-B to enhance the high temperature performance of the magnets. To produce similar high temperature properties without HRE, a crystallographically textured nanoscale grain structure is ideal; and this conventionally requires expensive "die upset" processing routes. Here, a Flash Spark Plasma Sintering (FSPS) process has been applied to a Dy-free Nd 30.0 Fe 61.8 Co 5.8 Ga 0.6 Al 0.1 B 0.9 melt spun powder (MQU-F, neo Magnequench). Rapid sinter-forging of a green compact to near theoretical density was achieved during the 10 s process, and therefore represents a quick and efficient means of producing die-upset Nd-Fe-B material. The microstructure of the FSPS samples was investigated by SEM and TEM imaging, and the observations were used to guide the optimisation of the process. The most optimal sample is compared directly to commercially die-upset forged (MQIII-F) material made from the same MQU-F powder. It is shown that the grain size of the FSPS material is halved in comparison to the MQIII-F material, leading to a 14% increase in coercivity (1438 kA m -1 ) and matched remanence (1.16 T) giving a BH max of 230 kJ m -3 .

  6. Very high resolution Earth observation features for monitoring plant and animal community structure across multiple spatial scales in protected areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mairota, Paola; Cafarelli, Barbara; Labadessa, Rocco; Lovergine, Francesco; Tarantino, Cristina; Lucas, Richard M.; Nagendra, Harini; Didham, Raphael K.

    2015-05-01

    Monitoring the status and future trends in biodiversity can be prohibitively expensive using ground-based surveys. Consequently, significant effort is being invested in the use of satellite remote sensing to represent aspects of the proximate mechanisms (e.g., resource availability) that can be related to biodiversity surrogates (BS) such as species community descriptors. We explored the potential of very high resolution (VHR) satellite Earth observation (EO) features as proxies for habitat structural attributes that influence spatial variation in habitat quality and biodiversity change. In a semi-natural grassland mosaic of conservation concern in southern Italy, we employed a hierarchical nested sampling strategy to collect field and VHR-EO data across three spatial extent levels (landscape, patch and plot). Species incidence and abundance data were collected at the plot level for plant, insect and bird functional groups. Spectral and textural VHR-EO image features were derived from a Worldview-2 image. Three window sizes (grains) were tested for analysis and computation of textural features, guided by the perception limits of different organisms. The modelled relationships between VHR-EO features and BS responses differed across scales, suggesting that landscape, patch and plot levels are respectively most appropriate when dealing with birds, plants and insects. This research demonstrates the potential of VHR-EO for biodiversity mapping and habitat modelling, and highlights the importance of identifying the appropriate scale of analysis for specific taxonomic groups of interest. Further, textural features are important in the modelling of functional group-specific indices which represent BS in high conservation value habitat types, and provide a more direct link to species interaction networks and ecosystem functioning, than provided by traditional taxonomic diversity indices.

  7. Preliminary Results of the GPS Flight Experiment on the High Earth Orbit AMSAT-OSCAR 40 Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreau, Michael C.; Bauer, Frank H.; Carpenter, J. Russell; Davis, Edward P.; Davis, George W.; Jackson, Larry A.

    2002-01-01

    The GPS flight experiment on the High Earth Orbit (HEO) AMSAT-OSCAR 40 (AO-40) spacecraft was activated for a period of approximately six weeks between 25 September and 2 November, 2001, and the initial results have exciting implications for using GPS as a low-cost orbit determination sensor for future HEO missions. AO-40, an amateur radio satellite launched November 16, 2000, is currently in a low inclination, 1000 by 58,800 km altitude orbit. Although the GPS receiver was not initialized in any way, it regularly returned GPS observations from points all around the orbit. Raw signal to noise levels as high as 9 AMUs (Trimble Amplitude Measurement Units) or approximately 48 dB-Hz have been recorded at apogee, when the spacecraft was close to 60,000 km in altitude. On several occasions when the receiver was below the GPS constellation (below 20,000 krn altitude), observations were reported for GPS satellites tracked through side lobe transmissions. Although the receiver has not returned any point solutions, there has been at least one occasion when four satellites were tracked simultaneously, and this short arc of data was used to compute point solutions after the fact. These results are encouraging, especially considering the spacecraft is currently in a spin-stabilized attitude mode that narrows the effective field of view of the receiving antennas and adversely affects GPS tracking. Already AO-40 has demonstrated the feasibility of recording GPS observations in HEO using an unaided receiver. Furthermore, it is providing important information about the characteristics of GPS signals received by a spacecraft in a HEO, which has long been of interest to many in the GPS community. Based on the data returned so far, the tracking performance is expected to improve when the spacecraft is transitioned to a three axis stabilized, nadir pointing attitude in Summer, 2002.

  8. Polymerization of amino acids under high-pressure conditions: Implication to chemical evolution on the early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakegawa, T.; Ohara, S.; Ishiguro, T.; Abiko, H.; Nakazawa, H.

    2008-12-01

    Prebiotic polymerization of amino acids is the most fundamental reaction to promote the chemical evolution for origin of life. Polymerization of amino acids is the dehydration reaction. This questions as to if submarine hydrothermal conditions, thus hydrated enironments, were appropreate for peptide formations. Our previous experiments implied that non-aqueous and high-pressure environments (more than 20 MPa) would be suitable for polymerization of amino acids (Ohara et al., 2006). This leads to the hypothesis that the first peptides may have formed in the Hadean oceanic crustal environments, where dehydration proceeded with availability of appropriate temperatures and pressures. In the present study, experiments simulating the crustal conditions were performed with various pressures (1-175 MPa) and temperatures (100- 200 C degree) using autoclaves. Purified powders (100 mg) of alanine, glycine, valine and aspartic acid were used in the experiments without mixing water in order to examine the solid-solid reactions. The products were analyzed using HPLC and LC-MS. Results indicate that: (1) longer time is required to form peptide compared to those of previous aqueous experiments; (2) pressure has a role to limit the production of melanoidine and cyclic amino acids, which are inhibitors for elongation of peptides; (3) glycine was polymerized up to 11-mer, which was not formed in any previous experiments without catalyses; (4) valine was polymerized up to 3-mer; and (5) aspartic acid was polymerized to 4-mer, accompanied with production of other amino acids. It is noteworthy that high-pressure environments favor all examined polymerization reactions. Such situations would have happened inside of deep oceanic crusts of the early Earth.

  9. Siderophilic Cyanobacteria: Implications for Early Earth.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, I. I.; Mummey, D.; Sarkisova, S.; Shen, G.; Bryant, D. A.; Lindsay, J.; Garrison, D.; McKay, D. S.

    2006-01-01

    Of all extant environs, iron-depositing hot springs (IDHS) may exhibit the greatest similarity to late Precambrian shallow warm oceans in regards to temperature, O2 gradients and dissolved iron and H2S concentrations. Despite the insights into the ecology, evolutionary biology, paleogeobiochemistry, and astrobiology examination of IDHS could potentially provide, very few studies dedicated to the physiology and diversity of cyanobacteria (CB) inhabiting IDHS have been conducted. Results. Here we describe the phylogeny, physiology, ultrastructure and biogeochemical activity of several recent CB isolates from two different greater Yellowstone area IDHS, LaDuke and Chocolate Pots. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes indicated that 6 of 12 new isolates examined couldn't be placed within established CB genera. Some of the isolates exhibited pronounced requirements for elevated iron concentrations, with maximum growth rates observed when 0.4-1 mM Fe(3+) was present in the media. In light of "typical" CB iron requirements, our results indicate that elevated iron likely represents a salient factor selecting for "siderophilicM CB species in IDHS. A universal feature of our new isolates is their ability to produce thick EPS layers in which iron accumulates resulting in the generation of well preserved signatures. In parallel, siderophilic CB show enhanced ability to etch the analogs of iron-rich lunar regolith minerals and impact glasses. Despite that iron deposition by CB is not well understood mechanistically, we recently obtained evidence that the PS I:PS II ratio is higher in one of our isolates than for other CB. Although still preliminary, this finding is in direct support of the Y. Cohen hypothesis that PSI can directly oxidize Fe(2+). Conclusion. Our results may have implications for factors driving CB evolutionary relationships and biogeochemical processes on early Earth and probably Mars.

  10. Building Nationally-Focussed, Globally Federated, High Performance Earth Science Platforms to Solve Next Generation Social and Economic Issues.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyborn, Lesley; Evans, Ben; Foster, Clinton; Pugh, Timothy; Uhlherr, Alfred

    2015-04-01

    Digital geoscience data and information are integral to informing decisions on the social, economic and environmental management of natural resources. Traditionally, such decisions were focused on regional or national viewpoints only, but it is increasingly being recognised that global perspectives are required to meet new challenges such as predicting impacts of climate change; sustainably exploiting scarce water, mineral and energy resources; and protecting our communities through better prediction of the behaviour of natural hazards. In recent years, technical advances in scientific instruments have resulted in a surge in data volumes, with data now being collected at unprecedented rates and at ever increasing resolutions. The size of many earth science data sets now exceed the computational capacity of many government and academic organisations to locally store and dynamically access the data sets; to internally process and analyse them to high resolutions; and then to deliver them online to clients, partners and stakeholders. Fortunately, at the same time, computational capacities have commensurately increased (both cloud and HPC): these can now provide the capability to effectively access the ever-growing data assets within realistic time frames. However, to achieve this, data and computing need to be co-located: bandwidth limits the capacity to move the large data sets; the data transfers are too slow; and latencies to access them are too high. These scenarios are driving the move towards more centralised High Performance (HP) Infrastructures. The rapidly increasing scale of data, the growing complexity of software and hardware environments, combined with the energy costs of running such infrastructures is creating a compelling economic argument for just having one or two major national (or continental) HP facilities that can be federated internationally to enable earth and environmental issues to be tackled at global scales. But at the same time, if

  11. Probing the Hydrogen Sublattice of FeHx with High-Pressure Neutron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, C. A.; Guthrie, M.; Boehler, R.; Somayazulu, M.; Fei, Y.; Molaison, J.; dos Santos, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    The combination of seismic, cosmochemical, and mineral physics observations have revealed that Earth's iron-rich core must contain some light elements, such as hydrogen, carbon, oxygen, silicon, and/or sulfur. Therefore, understanding the influence of these light elements on the structural, thermoelastic, and electronic properties of iron is important for constraining the composition of this remote layer of the Earth and, in turn, providing constraints on planetary differentiation and core formation models. The high-pressure structural and magnetic properties of iron hydride (FeHx) have previously been studied using synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Such experiments revealed that the double hexagonal close-packed (dhcp) structure of FeHx is stable above a pressure of ~5 GPa and up to at least 80 GPa at 300 K [1]. In addition, dhcp-FeHx is ferromagnetic at low-pressures, but undergoes a magnetic collapse around 22 GPa [2]. X-ray experiments provide valuable insight into the properties of FeHx, but such techniques are largely sensitive to the iron component because it is difficult to detect the hydrogen sublattice with x-rays. Therefore, neutron diffraction has been used to investigate metastable FeHx, which is formed by quenching the high-pressure phase to liquid nitrogen temperatures and probing the sample at ambient pressure [3]. However, such neutron experiments have been limited to formation pressures below 10 GPa, and cannot be performed at ambient temperature. Here we present the first in-situ investigation of FeHx at 300 K using high-pressure neutron diffraction experiments performed at the Spallation Neutrons and Pressure Diffractometer (SNAP) instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In order to achieve pressures of ~50 GPa, we loaded iron samples with a hydrogen gas pressure medium into newly designed large-volume panoramic diamond-anvil cells (DACs) for neutron diffraction experiments [4; 5]. We

  12. Earth Wisdom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Matre, Steve

    1985-01-01

    In our human-centered ignorance and arrogance we are rapidly destroying the earth. We must start helping people understand the big picture of ecological concepts. What these concepts mean for our own lives and how we must begin to change our lifestyles in order to live more harmoniously with the earth. (JHZ)

  13. Earth Science

    1976-01-01

    The LAGEOS I (Laser Geodynamics Satellite) was developed and launched by the Marshall Space Flight Center on May 4, 1976 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California . The two-foot diameter satellite orbited the Earth from pole to pole and measured the movements of the Earth's surface.

  14. LANL Studies Earth's Magnetosphere

    Daughton, Bill

    2018-02-13

    A new 3-D supercomputer model presents a new theory of how magnetic reconnection works in high-temperature plasmas. This Los Alamos National Laboratory research supports an upcoming NASA mission to study Earth's magnetosphere in greater detail than ever.

  15. HIRIS (High-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer: Science opportunities for the 1990s. Earth observing system. Volume 2C: Instrument panel report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The high-resolution imaging spectrometer (HIRIS) is an Earth Observing System (EOS) sensor developed for high spatial and spectral resolution. It can acquire more information in the 0.4 to 2.5 micrometer spectral region than any other sensor yet envisioned. Its capability for critical sampling at high spatial resolution makes it an ideal complement to the MODIS (moderate-resolution imaging spectrometer) and HMMR (high-resolution multifrequency microwave radiometer), lower resolution sensors designed for repetitive coverage. With HIRIS it is possible to observe transient processes in a multistage remote sensing strategy for Earth observations on a global scale. The objectives, science requirements, and current sensor design of the HIRIS are discussed along with the synergism of the sensor with other EOS instruments and data handling and processing requirements.

  16. X-ray Raman scattering study of MgSiO3 glass at high pressure: Implication for triclustered MgSiO3 melt in Earth's mantle

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Keun; Lin, Jung-Fu; Cai, Yong Q.; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Eng, Peter J.; Okuchi, Takuo; Mao, Ho-kwang; Meng, Yue; Hu, Michael Y.; Chow, Paul; Shu, Jinfu; Li, Baosheng; Fukui, Hiroshi; Lee, Bum Han; Kim, Hyun Na; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2008-01-01

    Silicate melts at the top of the transition zone and the core-mantle boundary have significant influences on the dynamics and properties of Earth's interior. MgSiO3-rich silicate melts were among the primary components of the magma ocean and thus played essential roles in the chemical differentiation of the early Earth. Diverse macroscopic properties of silicate melts in Earth's interior, such as density, viscosity, and crystal-melt partitioning, depend on their electronic and short-range local structures at high pressures and temperatures. Despite essential roles of silicate melts in many geophysical and geodynamic problems, little is known about their nature under the conditions of Earth's interior, including the densification mechanisms and the atomistic origins of the macroscopic properties at high pressures. Here, we have probed local electronic structures of MgSiO3 glass (as a precursor to Mg-silicate melts), using high-pressure x-ray Raman spectroscopy up to 39 GPa, in which high-pressure oxygen K-edge features suggest the formation of tricluster oxygens (oxygen coordinated with three Si frameworks; [3]O) between 12 and 20 GPa. Our results indicate that the densification in MgSiO3 melt is thus likely to be accompanied with the formation of triculster, in addition to a reduction in nonbridging oxygens. The pressure-induced increase in the fraction of oxygen triclusters >20 GPa would result in enhanced density, viscosity, and crystal-melt partitioning, and reduced element diffusivity in the MgSiO3 melt toward deeper part of the Earth's lower mantle. PMID:18535140

  17. Earth Observation

    2014-08-05

    ISS040-E-088891 (5 Aug. 2014) --- Thunderheads near Borneo, Indonesia are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the International Space Station. Late afternoon sun casts long shadows from high thunderhead anvils over southern Borneo. Crews aboard the space station have recently concentrated on panoramic views of clouds?taken with lenses similar to the focal length of the human eye. These images reveal the kinds of views crews see -- huge areas of the planet, with a strong three-dimensional sense of what it is like to fly 350 kilometers above Earth. Winds usually blow in different directions at different altitudes. High-altitude winds are clearly sweeping the tops off the many tallest thunderclouds, generating long anvils of diffuse cirrus plumes that trail south. At low levels, ?streets? of white dots -- fair-weather cumulus clouds -- are aligned with west-moving winds (lower left). Small smoke plumes from forest fires onshore are also aligned west. Storm formation near the horizon -- more than 1,000 kilometers away (center) -- is assisted by air currents rising over the central mountains of Borneo.

  18. Soft x-ray emission of galliumlike rare-earth atoms produced by high-temperature low-density tokamak and high-density laser plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, K. B.; Goldstein, W. H.; Osterheld, A.; Finkenthal, M.; Lippmann, S.; Huang, L. K.; Moos, H. W.; Spector, N.

    1994-09-01

    Spectra of rare-earth atoms praseodymium, Z=59, to ytterbium, Z=70, emitted from the high-temperature (1 keV) low-density (1013 cm-3) TEXT tokamak (at the Fusion Research Center, University of Texas, Austin) and high-density (1020 cm-3) laser plasmas have been recorded in the soft-x-ray range of 50-200 Å with an image intensifier detector and on photographic plates. The brightest n=4 to n=4 transitions of galliumlike ions have been identified and their emission patterns have been studied by comparison with ab initio atomic structure calculations and collisional radiative models under the respective plasma conditions. We have investigated the use of the ratios of the intensities of 4-4 transitions as indicators of plasma densities. This is possible owing to the doublet structure of the galliumlike ground state, which leads to a strong density dependence for ratios of transitions between low-lying levels. We have also used semiempirical ionization balance calculations to characterize the charge state distribution of the tokamak plasmas, in preparation for an investigation of the use of ratios of galliumlike to zinclike and copperlike emission features as indicators of whether the impurities are in coronal equilibrium or undergoing ionization.

  19. Design, fabrication and characterization of an arrayable all-polymer microfluidic valve employing highly magnetic rare-earth composite polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahbar, Mona; Shannon, Lesley; Gray, Bonnie L.

    2016-05-01

    We present a new magnetically actuated microfluidic valve that employs a highly magnetic composite polymer (M-CP) containing rare-earth hard-magnetic powder for its actuating element and for its valve seat. The M-CP offers much higher magnetization compared to the soft-magnetic, ferrite-based composite polymers typically used in microfluidic applications. Each valve consists of a permanently magnetized M-CP flap and valve seat mounted on a microfluidic channel system fabricated in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). Each valve is actuated under a relatively small external magnetic field of 80 mT provided by a small permanent magnet mounted on a miniature linear actuator. The performance of the valve with different flap thicknesses is characterized. In addition, the effect of the magnetic valve seat on the valve’s performance is also characterized. It is experimentally shown that a valve with a 2.3 mm flap thickness, actuated under an 80 mT magnetic field, is capable of completely blocking liquid flow at a flow rate of 1 ml min-1 for pressures up to 9.65 kPa in microfluidic channels 200 μm wide and 200 μm deep. The valve can also be fabricated into an array for flow switching between multiple microfluidic channels under continuous flow conditions. The performance of arrays of valves for flow routing is demonstrated for flow rates up to 5 ml min-1 with larger microfluidic channels of up to 1 mm wide and 500 μm deep. The design of the valves is compatible with other commonly used polymeric microfluidic components, as well as other components that use the same novel permanently magnetic composite polymer, such as our previously reported cilia-based mixing devices.

  20. Sources, behaviour, and environmental and human health risks of high-technology rare earth elements as emerging contaminants.

    PubMed

    Gwenzi, Willis; Mangori, Lynda; Danha, Concilia; Chaukura, Nhamo; Dunjana, Nothando; Sanganyado, Edmond

    2018-04-26

    Recent studies show that high-technology rare earth elements (REEs) of anthropogenic origin occur in the environment including in aquatic systems, suggesting REEs are contaminants of emerging concern. However, compared to organic contaminants, there is a lack of comprehensive reviews on the anthropogenic sources, environmental behaviour, and public and ecological health risks of REEs. The current review aims to: (1) identify anthropogenic sources, transfer mechanisms, and environmental behaviour of REEs; (2) highlight the human and ecological health risks of REEs and propose mitigation measures; and (3) identify knowledge gaps and future research directions. Out of the 17 REEs, La, Gd, Ce and Eu are the most studied. The main sources of anthropogenic REE include; medical facilities, petroleum refining, mining and technology industries, fertilizers, livestock feeds, and electronic wastes and recycling plants. REEs are mobilized and transported in the environment by hydrological and wind-driven processes. Ecotoxicological effects include reduced plant growth, function and nutritional quality, genotoxicity and neurotoxicity in animals, trophic bioaccumulation, chronic and acute toxicities in soil organisms. Human exposure to REEs occurs via ingestion of contaminated water and food, inhalation, and direct intake during medical administration. REEs have been detected in human hair, nails, and biofluids. In humans, REEs cause nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and severe damage to nephrological systems associated with Gd-based contrast agents, dysfunctional neurological disorder, fibrotic tissue injury, oxidative stress, pneumoconiosis, cytotoxicity, anti-testicular effects, and male sterility. Barring REEs in medical devices, epidemiological evidence directly linking REEs in the environment to human health conditions remains weak. To minimize health risks, a conceptual framework and possible mitigation measures are highlighted. Future research is needed to better understand

  1. Low-latency high-rate GPS data streams from the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, G.; Borsa, A.; Jackson, M.; Stark, K.

    2008-05-01

    Real-time processing of high rate GPS data can give precise (e.g., 5-10 mm for data recorded once per second) recordings of rapid volcanic and seismic deformation. These time series now provide an emerging tool for seismic, volcanic, and tsunami geodesy and early warning applications. UNAVCO, as part of the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory project, has developed the UStream system to provide streaming GPS data from some PBO and other UNAVCO-operated GPS stations. UStream is based on the Ntrip standard, a widely used protocol for streaming GNSS data over the Internet. Remote GPS stations provide a stream of BINEX data at 1 sample/sec to an Ntrip server at UNAVCO's Boulder offices, while simultaneously recording data locally in the event of communications failure. Once in Boulder, the data fork into three output streams: BINEX files stored at UNAVCO and streams of data in BINEX and RTCM 2.3 format. These streams flow to an Ntrip broadcaster that distributes data to Ntrip clients, which can be anything from low-latency processing systems to external data archiving systems. Current development efforts are geared toward providing data in RTCM 3.x format. This system is now operating in a public beta test mode, with data available from over 55 PBO and Nucleus GPS stations across the western United States. Data latencies from stations operating on mobile telephone communications are under 1.1 seconds at 95% confidence, and data completeness is typically more than 95% barring transient communications disruptions. Data from the system are available under the terms of the draft UNAVCO streaming data usage policy. For further information, please visit http://rtgps.unavco.org or send e-mail to rtgps@unavco.org.

  2. Methodology Measuring Rare Earth Elements in High TDS Reservoir Brines Application as Natural Tracers in CCUS Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W.; Mcling, T. L.; Smith, R. W.; Neupane, H.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years rare earth elements (REE) have been demonstrated to be useful natural tracers for geochemical processes in aqueous environments. The application of REE's to carbon dioxide utilization and storage (CCUS) could provide researchers with a sensitive, inexpensive tool for tracking the movement of CO2 and displaced formation brines. By definition, geologic reservoirs that have been deemed suitable for carbon capture and storage contain formation brine with total dissolved solids (TDS) greater than 10,000 ppm and often these formation brines exceed 75,000 ppm TDS. This high TDS water makes it very difficult to measure REE, which typically occur at part per trillion concentrations. Critical to the use of REE for CCUS studies is the development of a procedure, which allows for the pre-concentration of REE's across a wide range of water quality. Additionally, due to the large number of samples that will need analysis, any developed procedure must be inexpensive, reproducible, and quick to implement. As part of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Project the INL's Center for Advance Energy Studies is developing REE pre-concentration procedures based on methods reported in the literature. While there are many REE pre-concentration procedures in the literature, our tests have shown these methods have difficulty at TDS greater than seawater (roughly 35,000 ppm TDS). Therefore, the ability to quantitatively measure REE's in formation brines with very high TDS has required the modification of an already developed procedure. After careful consideration and testing we selected methods modified after those described by Kingston et al., 1978 and Strachan et al., 1989 utilizing chelating media for very high TDS waters and ion-exchange media as detailed by Crock et al., 1984; Robinson et al., 1985; and Stetzenbach et al., 1994 for low TDS (<10,000 ppm TDS) waters. These modified procedures have been successfully tested in our laboratory and have proven effective in greatly

  3. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    2014-08-20

    Panelists pose for a group photo at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and highlighted how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  4. The "Life at the Poles" Study Unit: Developing Junior High School Students' Ability to Recognize the Relations between Earth Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Assaraf, Orit Ben-Zvi; Orpaz, Idit

    2010-01-01

    Understanding of Earth's systems, including the crucial role of human beings within them, is an important part of citizens' ability to think intelligently and critically about the environment, pollution, sustainability and other socio-economic and scientific issues central to life in the modern world. Part of this understanding involves seeing the…

  5. Comprehensive approach to tau-lepton production by high-energy tau neutrinos propagating through the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Muñiz, Jaime; Carvalho, Washington R.; Payet, Kévin; Romero-Wolf, Andrés; Schoorlemmer, Harm; Zas, Enrique

    2018-01-01

    There has been a recent surge in interest in the detection of τ -lepton-induced air showers from detectors at altitude. When a τ neutrino (ντ) enters the Earth, it produces τ leptons as a result of nuclear charged-current interactions. In some cases, this process results in a τ lepton exiting the surface of the Earth, which can subsequently decay in the atmosphere and produce an extensive air shower. These upward-going air showers can be detected via fluorescence, optical Cherenkov, or geomagnetic radio emission. Several experiments have been proposed to detect these signals. We present a comprehensive simulation of the production of τ leptons by ντ's propagating through Earth to aid the design of future experiments. These simulations for ντ's and leptons in the energy range from 1 015 eV to 1 021 eV treat the full range of incidence angles from Earth-skimming to diametrically traversing. Propagation of ντ's and leptons includes the effects of rock and an ocean or ice layer of various thicknesses. The interaction models include ντ regeneration and account for uncertainties in the Standard Model neutrino cross section and in the photonuclear contribution to the τ energy-loss rate.

  6. In Junior High You Take Earth Science: Including a Student with Severe Disabilities into an Academic Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel-Causey, Ellin; McMorris, Carol; McGowen, Susan; Sands-Buss, Sue

    1998-01-01

    This case study of a 14-year-old boy with severe disabilities describes the collaboration of a team of educators who sought to include him in eighth-grade general-education classes. His inclusion plan included four steps: planning, selecting classes, accommodating, and collaborating. The accomplishments of the student's inclusion in earth science…

  7. Earth Observation

    2013-08-20

    Earth observation taken during day pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message: Looking southwest over northern Africa. Libya, Algeria, Niger.

  8. Earth Observation

    2014-09-01

    Earth Observation taken during a night pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: New Zealand Aurora night pass. On crewmember's Flickr page - Look straight down into an aurora.

  9. Earth Observation

    2014-06-07

    ISS040-E-008174 (7 June 2014) --- Layers of Earth's atmosphere, brightly colored as the sun rises, are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the International Space Station.

  10. Earth Observation

    2014-06-02

    ISS040-E-006817 (2 June 2014) --- Intersecting the thin line of Earth's atmosphere, International Space Station solar array wings are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member on the International Space Station.

  11. Earth Science

    1992-07-18

    Workers at Launch Complex 17 Pad A, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) encapsulate the Geomagnetic Tail (GEOTAIL) spacecraft (upper) and attached payload Assist Module-D upper stage (lower) in the protective payload fairing. GEOTAIL project was designed to study the effects of Earth's magnetic field. The solar wind draws the Earth's magnetic field into a long tail on the night side of the Earth and stores energy in the stretched field lines of the magnetotail. During active periods, the tail couples with the near-Earth magnetosphere, sometimes releasing energy stored in the tail and activating auroras in the polar ionosphere. GEOTAIL measures the flow of energy and its transformation in the magnetotail and will help clarify the mechanisms that control the imput, transport, storage, release, and conversion of mass, momentum, and energy in the magnetotail.

  12. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-funded project for teachers of grades 5-12 who want to expand their knowledge of the Earth system, and prepare to become master teachers who promote Earth system science in their own schools, counties, and throughout their state. Participants from the following states are invited to apply: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington, DC. Teachers selected for the project participate in a two-week summer workshop conducted at the University of Maryland, College Park; develop classroom-ready materials during the workshop for broad dissemination; conduct a minimum of two peer training activities during the coming school year; and participate in other enrichment/education opportunities as available and desired. Discover Earth is a team effort that utilizes expertise from a range of contributors, and balances science content with hands-on classroom applications.

  13. Earth Observation

    2014-05-31

    Earth Observation taken during a day pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: CEO - Arena de Sao Paolo. View used for Twitter message: Cloudy skies over São Paulo Brazil

  14. Earth Observation

    2013-07-26

    Earth observation taken during day pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message: Never tire of finding shapes in the clouds! These look very botanical to me. Simply perfect.

  15. Earth Observation

    2014-06-12

    Earth Observation taken during a day pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: Moon, Japan, Kamchatka with a wild cloud. Part of a solar array is also visible.

  16. Earth Science

    1990-10-24

    Solar Vector Magnetograph is used to predict solar flares, and other activities associated with sun spots. This research provides new understanding about weather on the Earth, and solar-related conditions in orbit.

  17. Earth Observation

    2013-08-03

    Earth observation taken during day pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message: Perhaps a dandelion losing its seeds in the wind? Love clouds!

  18. Earth Observation

    2014-06-27

    Earth Observation taken during a day pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Part of Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) is visible. Folder lists this as: the Middle East, Israel.

  19. Rare earth gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, W.F.

    1975-10-31

    A high energy gas laser with light output in the infrared or visible region of the spectrum is described. Laser action is obtained by generating vapors of rare earth halides, particularly neodymium iodide or, to a lesser extent, neodymium bromide, and disposing the rare earth vapor medium in a resonant cavity at elevated temperatures; e.g., approximately 1200/sup 0/ to 1400/sup 0/K. A particularly preferred gaseous medium is one involving a complex of aluminum chloride and neodymium chloride, which exhibits tremendously enhanced vapor pressure compared to the rare earth halides per se, and provides comparable increases in stored energy densities.

  20. Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  1. Computer modeling of high-voltage solar array experiment using the NASCAP/LEO (NASA Charging Analyzer Program/Low Earth Orbit) computer code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichl, Karl O., Jr.

    1987-06-01

    The relationship between the Interactions Measurement Payload for Shuttle (IMPS) flight experiment and the low Earth orbit plasma environment is discussed. Two interactions (parasitic current loss and electrostatic discharge on the array) may be detrimental to mission effectiveness. They result from the spacecraft's electrical potentials floating relative to plasma ground to achieve a charge flow equilibrium into the spacecraft. The floating potentials were driven by external biases applied to a solar array module of the Photovoltaic Array Space Power (PASP) experiment aboard the IMPS test pallet. The modeling was performed using the NASA Charging Analyzer Program/Low Earth Orbit (NASCAP/LEO) computer code which calculates the potentials and current collection of high-voltage objects in low Earth orbit. Models are developed by specifying the spacecraft, environment, and orbital parameters. Eight IMPS models were developed by varying the array's bias voltage and altering its orientation relative to its motion. The code modeled a typical low Earth equatorial orbit. NASCAP/LEO calculated a wide variety of possible floating potential and current collection scenarios. These varied directly with both the array bias voltage and with the vehicle's orbital orientation.

  2. Education and Outreach Programs Offered by the Center for High Pressure Research and the Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, G. A.

    2003-12-01

    Major research facilities and organizations provide an effective venue for developing partnerships with educational organizations in order to offer a wide variety of educational programs, because they constitute a base where the culture of scientific investigation can flourish. The Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences (COMPRES) conducts education and outreach programs through the Earth Science Educational Resource Center (ESERC), in partnership with other groups that offer research and education programs. ESERC initiated its development of education programs in 1994 under the administration of the Center for High Pressure Research (CHiPR), which was funded as a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center from 1991 to 2002. Programs developed during ESERC's association with CHiPR and COMPRES have targeted a wide range of audiences, including pre-K, K-12 students and teachers, undergraduates, and graduate students. Since 1995, ESERC has offered inquiry-based programs to Project WISE (Women in Science and Engineering) students at a high school and undergraduate level. Activities have included projects that investigated earthquakes, high pressure mineral physics, and local geology. Through a practicum known as Project Java, undergraduate computer science students have developed interactive instructional tools for several of these activities. For K-12 teachers, a course on Long Island geology is offered each fall, which includes an examination of the role that processes in the Earth's interior have played in the geologic history of the region. ESERC has worked with Stony Brook's Department of Geosciences faculty to offer courses on natural hazards, computer modeling, and field geology to undergraduate students, and on computer programming for graduate students. Each summer, a four-week residential college-level environmental geology course is offered to rising tenth graders from the Brentwood, New York schools in partnership with

  3. Rapid and highly reproducible analysis of rare earth elements by multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Joel; Waight, Tod; Ulfbeck, David

    2002-10-01

    A method has been developed for the rapid chemical separation and highly reproducible analysis of the rare earth elements (REE) by isotope dilution analysis by means of a multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS). This technique is superior in terms of the analytical reproducibility or rapidity of analysis compared with quadrupole ICP-MS or with thermal ionization mass spectrometric isotope dilution techniques. Samples are digested by standard hydrofluoric-nitric acid-based techniques and spiked with two mixed spikes. The bulk REE are separated from the sample on a cation exchange column, collecting the middle-heavy and light REE as two groups, which provides a middle-heavy REE cut with sufficient separation of the light from the heavier REE to render oxide interferences trivial, and a Ba-free light REE cut. The heavy (Er-Lu), middle (Eu-Gd), and light REE (La-Eu) concentrations are determined by three short (1 to 2 min) analyses with a CETAC Aridus desolvating nebulizer introduction system. Replicate digestions of international rock standards demonstrate that concentrations can be reproduced to <1%, which reflects weighing errors during digestion and aliquotting as inter-REE ratios reproduce to ≤0.2% (2 SD). Eu and Ce anomalies reproduce to <0.15%. In addition to determining the concentrations of polyisotopic REE by isotope dilution analysis, the concentration of monoisotopic Pr can be measured during the light REE isotope dilution run, by reference to Pr/Ce and Pr/Nd ratios measured in a REE standard solution. Pr concentrations determined in this way reproduce to <1%, and Pr/REE ratios reproduce to <0.4%. Ce anomalies calculated with La and Pr also reproduce to <0.15% (2 SD). The precise Ce (and Eu) anomaly measurements should allow greater use of these features in studying the recycling of materials with these anomalies into the mantle, or redox-induced effects on the REE during recycling and dehydration of oceanic lithosphere

  4. Carbon stocks and fluxes in the high latitudes: using site-level data to evaluate Earth system models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadburn, Sarah E.; Krinner, Gerhard; Porada, Philipp; Bartsch, Annett; Beer, Christian; Belelli Marchesini, Luca; Boike, Julia; Ekici, Altug; Elberling, Bo; Friborg, Thomas; Hugelius, Gustaf; Johansson, Margareta; Kuhry, Peter; Kutzbach, Lars; Langer, Moritz; Lund, Magnus; Parmentier, Frans-Jan W.; Peng, Shushi; Van Huissteden, Ko; Wang, Tao; Westermann, Sebastian; Zhu, Dan; Burke, Eleanor J.

    2017-11-01

    It is important that climate models can accurately simulate the terrestrial carbon cycle in the Arctic due to the large and potentially labile carbon stocks found in permafrost-affected environments, which can lead to a positive climate feedback, along with the possibility of future carbon sinks from northward expansion of vegetation under climate warming. Here we evaluate the simulation of tundra carbon stocks and fluxes in three land surface schemes that each form part of major Earth system models (JSBACH, Germany; JULES, UK; ORCHIDEE, France). We use a site-level approach in which comprehensive, high-frequency datasets allow us to disentangle the importance of different processes. The models have improved physical permafrost processes and there is a reasonable correspondence between the simulated and measured physical variables, including soil temperature, soil moisture and snow. We show that if the models simulate the correct leaf area index (LAI), the standard C3 photosynthesis schemes produce the correct order of magnitude of carbon fluxes. Therefore, simulating the correct LAI is one of the first priorities. LAI depends quite strongly on climatic variables alone, as we see by the fact that the dynamic vegetation model can simulate most of the differences in LAI between sites, based almost entirely on climate inputs. However, we also identify an influence from nutrient limitation as the LAI becomes too large at some of the more nutrient-limited sites. We conclude that including moss as well as vascular plants is of primary importance to the carbon budget, as moss contributes a large fraction to the seasonal CO2 flux in nutrient-limited conditions. Moss photosynthetic activity can be strongly influenced by the moisture content of moss, and the carbon uptake can be significantly different from vascular plants with a similar LAI. The soil carbon stocks depend strongly on the rate of input of carbon from the vegetation to the soil, and our analysis suggests that

  5. Earth Day 2018 Activities

    2018-04-18

    Students from Rockledge High School in Rockledge, Fla., make “plarn” – plastic yarn -- out of used plastic bags during Kennedy Space Center’s annual Earth Day celebration. The plarn was donated to be woven into mats for homeless veterans. The two-day Earth Day event featured approximately 50 exhibitors offering information on a variety of topics, including electric vehicles, sustainable lighting, renewable energy, Florida-friendly landscaping tips, Florida’s biking trails and more.

  6. Earth and Space Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeson, Blanche W.

    1999-01-01

    Workshop for middle and high school teachers to enhance their knowledge of the Earth as a system. NASA data and materials developed by teachers (all available via the Internet) will be used to engage participants in hands-on, investigative approaches to the Earth system. All materials are ready to be applied in pre-college classrooms. Remotely-sensed data will be used in combination with familiar resources, such as maps, to examine global climate change.

  7. Fuller's earth (montmorillonite) pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, A R; Pooley, F D

    1994-01-01

    A fuller's earth worker developed signs of pneumoconiosis. Pathological examination of the lung tissues showed interstitial collections of dust laden macrophages associated with mild fibrosis. Mineralogical analysis showed a high content of montmorillonite. This study shows that a pneumoconiosis can result from prolonged heavy exposure to calcium montmorillonite (fuller's earth) in the absence of quartz. The disease is relatively mild and associated with little clinical disability. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7951799

  8. Earth Versus Neutrinos: Measuring the Total Muon-Neutrino-to-Nucleon Cross Section at Ultra-High Energies through Differential Earth Absorption of Muon Neutrinos from Cosmic Rays Using the IceCube Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miarecki, Sandra Christine

    The IceCube Neutrino Detector at the South Pole was constructed to measure the flux of high-energy neutrinos and to try to identify their cosmic sources. In addition to these astrophysical neutrinos, IceCube also detects the neutrinos that result from cosmic ray interactions with the atmosphere. These atmospheric neutrinos can be used to measure the total muon neutrino-to-nucleon cross section by measuring neutrino absorption in the Earth. The measurement involves isolating a sample of 10,784 Earth-transiting muons detected by IceCube in its 79-string configuration. The cross-section is determined using a two-dimensional fit in measured muon energy and zenith angle and is presented as a multiple of the Standard Model expectation as calculated by Cooper-Sarkar, Mertsch, and Sarkar in 2011. A multiple of 1.0 would indicate agreement with the Standard Model. The results of this analysis find the multiple to be 1.30 (+0.21 -0.19 statistical) (+0.40 -0.44 systematic) for the neutrino energy range of 6.3 to 980 TeV, which is in agreement with the Standard Model expectation.

  9. Development of low-cost technology for the next generation of high efficiency solar cells composed of earth abundant elements

    SciT

    Agrawal, Rakesh

    2014-09-28

    The development of renewable, affordable, and environmentally conscious means of generating energy on a global scale represents a grand challenge of our time. Due to the “permanence” of radiation from the sun, solar energy promises to remain a viable and sustainable power source far into the future. Established single-junction photovoltaic technologies achieve high power conversion efficiencies (pce) near 20% but require complicated manufacturing processes that prohibit the marriage of large-scale throughput (e.g. on the GW scale), profitability, and quality control. Our approach to this problem begins with the synthesis of nanocrystals of semiconductor materials comprising earth abundant elements and characterizedmore » by material and optoelectronic properties ideal for photovoltaic applications, namely Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe). Once synthesized, such nanocrystals are formulated into an ink, coated onto substrates, and processed into completed solar cells in such a way that enables scale-up to high throughput, roll-to-roll manufacturing processes. This project aimed to address the major limitation to CZTSSe solar cell pce’s – the low open-circuit voltage (Voc) reported throughout literature for devices comprised of this material. Throughout the project significant advancements have been made in fundamental understanding of the CZTSSe material and device limitations associated with this material system. Additionally, notable improvements have been made to our nanocrystal based processing technique to alleviate performance limitations due to the identified device limitations. Notably, (1) significant improvements have been made in reducing intra- and inter-nanoparticle heterogeneity, (2) improvements in device performance have been realized with novel cation substitution in Ge-alloyed CZTGeSSe absorbers, (3) systematic analysis of absorber sintering has been conducted to optimize the selenization process for large grain CZTSSe absorbers, (4) novel

  10. Earth: Earth Science and Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2001-01-01

    A major new NASA initiative on environmental change and health has been established to promote the application of Earth science remote sensing data, information, observations, and technologies to issues of human health. NASA's Earth Sciences suite of Earth observing instruments are now providing improved observations science, data, and advanced technologies about the Earth's land, atmosphere, and oceans. These new space-based resources are being combined with other agency and university resources, data integration and fusion technologies, geographic information systems (GIS), and the spectrum of tools available from the public health community, making it possible to better understand how the environment and climate are linked to specific diseases, to improve outbreak prediction, and to minimize disease risk. This presentation is an overview of NASA's tools, capabilities, and research advances in this initiative.

  11. Development and Evaluation of the Interferometric Monitor for Greenhouse Gases: a High-throughput Fourier-transform Infrared Radiometer for Nadir Earth Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Shimota, Akiro; Kondo, Kayoko; Okumura, Eisuke; Kameda, Yoshihiko; Shimoda, Haruhisa; Ogawa, Toshihiro

    1999-11-01

    The interferometric monitor for greenhouse gases (IMG) was the precursor of the high-resolution Fourier-transform infrared radiometer (FTIR) onboard a satellite for observation of the Earth. The IMG endured the stress of a rocket launch, demonstrating that the high-resolution, high-throughput spectrometer is indeed feasible for use onboard a satellite. The IMG adopted a newly developed lubricant-free magnetic suspension mechanism and a dynamic alignment system for the moving mirror with a maximum traveling distance of 10 cm. We present the instrumentation of the IMG, characteristics of the movable mirror drive system, and the evaluation results of sensor specifications during space operation.

  12. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    2014-08-20

    Panelists discuss how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  13. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    2014-08-20

    Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist, Planetary Science Institute, moderates a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and highlighted how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  14. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    2014-08-20

    An audience member asks the panelists a question at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  15. A Mercury-like component of early Earth yields uranium in the core and high mantle 142Nd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlers, Anke; Wood, Bernard J.

    2015-04-01

    Recent 142Nd isotope data indicate that the silicate Earth (its crust plus the mantle) has a samarium to neodymium elemental ratio (Sm/Nd) that is greater than that of the supposed chondritic building blocks of the planet. This elevated Sm/Nd has been ascribed either to a `hidden' reservoir in the Earth or to loss of an early-formed terrestrial crust by impact ablation. Since removal of crust by ablation would also remove the heat-producing elements--potassium, uranium and thorium--such removal would make it extremely difficult to balance terrestrial heat production with the observed heat flow. In the `hidden' reservoir alternative, a complementary low-Sm/Nd layer is usually considered to reside unobserved in the silicate lower mantle. We have previously shown, however, that the core is a likely reservoir for some lithophile elements such as niobium. We therefore address the question of whether core formation could have fractionated Nd from Sm and also acted as a sink for heat-producing elements. We show here that addition of a reduced Mercury-like body (or, alternatively, an enstatite-chondrite-like body) rich in sulfur to the early Earth would generate a superchondritic Sm/Nd in the mantle and an 142Nd/144Nd anomaly of approximately +14 parts per million relative to chondrite. In addition, the sulfur-rich core would partition uranium strongly and thorium slightly, supplying a substantial part of the `missing' heat source for the geodynamo.

  16. A Mercury-like component of early Earth yields uranium in the core and high mantle (142)Nd.

    PubMed

    Wohlers, Anke; Wood, Bernard J

    2015-04-16

    Recent (142)Nd isotope data indicate that the silicate Earth (its crust plus the mantle) has a samarium to neodymium elemental ratio (Sm/Nd) that is greater than that of the supposed chondritic building blocks of the planet. This elevated Sm/Nd has been ascribed either to a 'hidden' reservoir in the Earth or to loss of an early-formed terrestrial crust by impact ablation. Since removal of crust by ablation would also remove the heat-producing elements--potassium, uranium and thorium--such removal would make it extremely difficult to balance terrestrial heat production with the observed heat flow. In the 'hidden' reservoir alternative, a complementary low-Sm/Nd layer is usually considered to reside unobserved in the silicate lower mantle. We have previously shown, however, that the core is a likely reservoir for some lithophile elements such as niobium. We therefore address the question of whether core formation could have fractionated Nd from Sm and also acted as a sink for heat-producing elements. We show here that addition of a reduced Mercury-like body (or, alternatively, an enstatite-chondrite-like body) rich in sulfur to the early Earth would generate a superchondritic Sm/Nd in the mantle and an (142)Nd/(144)Nd anomaly of approximately +14 parts per million relative to chondrite. In addition, the sulfur-rich core would partition uranium strongly and thorium slightly, supplying a substantial part of the 'missing' heat source for the geodynamo.

  17. The American Indian Summer Institute in Earth System Science (AISESS) at UC Irvine: A Two-Week Residential Summer Program for High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. R.; Polequaptewa, N.; Leon, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Native Americans remain severely underrepresented in the geosciences, despite a clear need for qualified geoscience professionals within Tribal communities to address critical issues such as natural resource and land management, water and air pollution, and climate change. In addition to the need for geoscience professionals within Tribal communities, increased participation of Native Americans in the geosciences would enhance the overall diversity of perspectives represented within the Earth science community and lead to improved Earth science literacy within Native communities. To address this need, the Department of Earth System Science and the American Indian Resource Program at the University California have organized a two-week residential American Indian Summer Institute in Earth System Science (AISESS) for high-school students (grades 9-12) from throughout the nation. The format of the AISESS program is based on the highly-successful framework of a previous NSF Funded American Indian Summer Institute in Computer Science (AISICS) at UC Irvine and involves key senior personnel from the AISICS program. The AISESS program, however, incorporates a week of camping on the La Jolla Band of Luiseño Indians reservation in Northern San Diego County, California. Following the week of camping and field projects, the students spend a week on the campus of UC Irvine participating in Earth System Science lectures, laboratory activities, and tours. The science curriculum is closely woven together with cultural activities, native studies, and communication skills programs The program culminates with a closing ceremony during which students present poster projects on environmental issues relevant to their tribal communities. The inaugural AISESS program took place from July 15th-28th, 2012. We received over 100 applications from Native American high school students from across the nation. We accepted 40 students for the first year, of which 34 attended the program. The

  18. Stability and melting of Fe3C at high pressure and temperature: Implication for the carbon in the Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, S.; Ohtani, E.; Sakai, T.; Hirao, N.; Ohishi, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The Earth's core is regarded as an Fe-Ni alloy but its density is lower than that of pure Fe at the core conditions. Therefore, the Earth's core is supposed to contain light elements and carbon is one of the candidates of the light elements to explain the density deficit of the Earth's core. Nakajima et al. (2009) reported the melting temperature of Fe3C up to around 30 GPa based on textual observations, the chemical analysis of the quenched run products and in situ X-ray diffraction experiments using a Kawai-type multi anvil apparatus. Lord et al. (2009) reported melting temperatures of Fe3C up to 70 GPa, which was determined by the temperature plateau during increasing laser power using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. They also suggested Fe+Fe7C3 is a stable subsolidus phase. There are obvious discrepancies between the melting curve and the stable subsolidus phase reported by Nakajima et al. (2009) and those reported by Lord et al. (2009). In this study, the melting temperatures of Fe3C and a subsolidus phase relation were determined based on in situ X-ray diffraction experiments. This study aims to reveal the stability field of Fe3C and the melting temperature of Fe3C and to discuss the behaviors of carbon in the Earth's core. We have performed experiments using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell combined with in situ X-ray diffraction experiment at BL10XU beamline, SPring-8 synchrotron facility. An NaCl powder and a rhenium or tungsten foil were used for the insulator and gasket, respectively. Melting of the sample was determined by disappearance of the X-ray diffraction peaks. We determined the melting relation of Fe3C up to 145 GPa by in situ X-ray diffraction experiments. Present results are close to Nakajima et al. (2009) up to 30 GPa but become close to that reported by Lord et al. (2009) at higher pressure conditions. The solidus temperature extrapolated to the ICB pressure, 330 GPa, is 5400 K. We also confirmed that Fe3C is stable as a subsolidus phase

  19. Earth Science

    1994-03-08

    Workers at the Astrotech processing facility in Titusville prepared for a news media showing of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-1 (GOES-1). GOES-1 was the first in a new generation of weather satellites deployed above Earth. It was the first 3-axis, body-stabilized meteorological satellite to be used by the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NASA. These features allowed GOES-1 to continuously monitor the Earth, rather than viewing it just five percent of the time as was the case with spin-stabilized meteorological satellites. GOES-1 also has independent imaging and sounding instruments which can operate simultaneously yet independently. As a result, observations provided by each instrument will not be interrupted. The imager produces visual and infrared images of the Earth's surface, oceans, cloud cover and severe storm development, while the prime sounding products include vertical temperature and moisture profiles, and layer mean moisture.

  20. Advancements in medium and high resolution Earth observation for land-surface imaging: Evolutions, future trends and contributions to sustainable development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouma, Yashon O.

    2016-01-01

    Technologies for imaging the surface of the Earth, through satellite based Earth observations (EO) have enormously evolved over the past 50 years. The trends are likely to evolve further as the user community increases and their awareness and demands for EO data also increases. In this review paper, a development trend on EO imaging systems is presented with the objective of deriving the evolving patterns for the EO user community. From the review and analysis of medium-to-high resolution EO-based land-surface sensor missions, it is observed that there is a predictive pattern in the EO evolution trends such that every 10-15 years, more sophisticated EO imaging systems with application specific capabilities are seen to emerge. Such new systems, as determined in this review, are likely to comprise of agile and small payload-mass EO land surface imaging satellites with the ability for high velocity data transmission and huge volumes of spatial, spectral, temporal and radiometric resolution data. This availability of data will magnify the phenomenon of ;Big Data; in Earth observation. Because of the ;Big Data; issue, new computing and processing platforms such as telegeoprocessing and grid-computing are expected to be incorporated in EO data processing and distribution networks. In general, it is observed that the demand for EO is growing exponentially as the application and cost-benefits are being recognized in support of resource management.

  1. Earth Observation

    2010-08-23

    ISS024-E-016042 (23 Aug. 2010) --- This night time view captured by one of the Expedition 24 crew members aboard the International Space Station some 220 miles above Earth is looking southward from central Romania over the Aegean Sea toward Greece and it includes Thessaloniki (near center), the larger bright mass of Athens (left center), and the Macedonian capital of Skopje (lower right). Center point coordinates of the area pictured are 46.4 degrees north latitude and 25.5 degrees east longitude. The picture was taken in August and was physically brought back to Earth on a disk with the return of the Expedition 25 crew in November 2010.

  2. Earth Observation

    2014-07-19

    ISS040-E-070412 (19 July 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station recorded this July 19 panorama featuring wildfires which are plaguing the Northwest and causing widespread destruction. (Note: south is at the top of the frame). The orbital outpost was flying 223 nautical miles above Earth at the time of the photo. Parts of Oregon and Washington are included in the scene. Mt. Jefferson, Three Sisters and Mt. St. Helens are all snow-capped and visible in the photo, and the Columbia River can also be delineated.

  3. Earth Observation

    2014-07-19

    ISS040-E-070424 (19 July 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station recorded this July 19 image of wildfires which are plaguing the Northwest and causing widespread destruction. The orbital outpost was flying 223 nautical miles above Earth at the time of the photo. Lightning has been given as the cause of the Ochoco Complex fires in the Ochoco National Forest in central Oregon. The complex has gotten larger since this photo was taken.

  4. Earth observation

    2014-09-04

    ISS040-E-129950 (4 Sept. 2014) --- In this photograph. taken by one of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, the orange spot located in the very center is the sun, which appears to be sitting on Earth's limb. At far right, a small bright spot is believed to be a reflection from somewhere in the camera system or something on the orbital outpost. When the photographed was exposed, the orbital outpost was flying at an altutude of 226 nautical miles above a point near French Polynesia in the Pacific Ocean.

  5. Earth Science

    2004-08-13

    This panoramic view of Hurricane Charley was photographed by the Expedition 9 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS) on August 13, 2004, at a vantage point just north of Tampa, Florida. The small eye was not visible in this view, but the raised cloud tops near the center coincide roughly with the time that the storm began to rapidly strengthen. The category 2 hurricane was moving north-northwest at 18 mph packing winds of 105 mph. Crew Earth Observations record Earth surface changes over time, as well as more fleeting events such as storms, floods, fires, and volcanic eruptions.

  6. Earth Science

    2004-09-11

    This image hosts a look at the eye of Hurricane Ivan, one of the strongest hurricanes on record, as the storm topped the western Caribbean Sea on Saturday, September 11, 2004. The hurricane was photographed by astronaut Edward M. (Mike) Fincke from aboard the International Space Station (ISS) at an altitude of approximately 230 miles. At the time, the category 5 storm sustained winds in the eye of the wall that were reported at about 160 mph. Crew Earth Observations record Earth surface changes over time, as well as more fleeting events such as storms, floods, fires, and volcanic eruptions.

  7. Earth Science

    2004-09-15

    Except for a small portion of the International Space Station (ISS) in the foreground, Hurricane Ivan, one of the strongest hurricanes on record, fills this image over the northern Gulf of Mexico. As the downgraded category 4 storm approached landfall on the Alabama coast Wednesday afternoon on September 15, 2004, sustained winds in the eye of the wall were reported at about 135 mph. The hurricane was photographed by astronaut Edward M. (Mike) Fincke from aboard the ISS at an altitude of approximately 230 miles. Crew Earth Observations record Earth surface changes over time, as well as more fleeting events such as storms, floods, fires, and volcanic eruptions.

  8. Earth Science

    2004-09-15

    This image hosts a look into the eye of Hurricane Ivan, one of the strongest hurricanes on record, as the storm approached landfall on the central Gulf coast Wednesday afternoon on September 15, 2004. The hurricane was photographed by astronaut Edward M. (Mike) Fincke from aboard the International Space Station (ISS) at an altitude of approximately 230 miles. At the time, sustained winds in the eye of the wall were reported at about 135 mph as the downgraded category 4 storm approached the Alabama coast. Crew Earth Observations record Earth surface changes over time, as well as more fleeting events such as storms, floods, fires, and volcanic eruptions.

  9. Digital Earth - A sustainable Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahavir

    2014-02-01

    All life, particularly human, cannot be sustainable, unless complimented with shelter, poverty reduction, provision of basic infrastructure and services, equal opportunities and social justice. Yet, in the context of cities, it is believed that they can accommodate more and more people, endlessly, regardless to their carrying capacity and increasing ecological footprint. The 'inclusion', for bringing more and more people in the purview of development is often limited to social and economic inclusion rather than spatial and ecological inclusion. Economic investment decisions are also not always supported with spatial planning decisions. Most planning for a sustainable Earth, be at a level of rural settlement, city, region, national or Global, fail on the capacity and capability fronts. In India, for example, out of some 8,000 towns and cities, Master Plans exist for only about 1,800. A chapter on sustainability or environment is neither statutorily compulsory nor a norm for these Master Plans. Geospatial technologies including Remote Sensing, GIS, Indian National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI), Indian National Urban Information Systems (NUIS), Indian Environmental Information System (ENVIS), and Indian National GIS (NGIS), etc. have potential to map, analyse, visualize and take sustainable developmental decisions based on participatory social, economic and social inclusion. Sustainable Earth, at all scales, is a logical and natural outcome of a digitally mapped, conceived and planned Earth. Digital Earth, in fact, itself offers a platform to dovetail the ecological, social and economic considerations in transforming it into a sustainable Earth.

  10. Combined computational-experimental design of high temperature, high-intensity permanent magnetic alloys with minimal addition of rare-earth elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Rajesh

    AlNiCo magnets are known for high-temperature stability and superior corrosion resistance and have been widely used for various applications. Reported magnetic energy density ((BH) max) for these magnets is around 10 MGOe. Theoretical calculations show that ((BH) max) of 20 MGOe is achievable which will be helpful in covering the gap between AlNiCo and Rare-Earth Elements (REE) based magnets. An extended family of AlNiCo alloys was studied in this dissertation that consists of eight elements, and hence it is important to determine composition-property relationship between each of the alloying elements and their influence on the bulk properties. In the present research, we proposed a novel approach to efficiently use a set of computational tools based on several concepts of artificial intelligence to address a complex problem of design and optimization of high temperature REE-free magnetic alloys. A multi-dimensional random number generation algorithm was used to generate the initial set of chemical concentrations. These alloys were then examined for phase equilibria and associated magnetic properties as a screening tool to form the initial set of alloy. These alloys were manufactured and tested for desired properties. These properties were fitted with a set of multi-dimensional response surfaces and the most accurate meta-models were chosen for prediction. These properties were simultaneously extremized by utilizing a set of multi-objective optimization algorithm. This provided a set of concentrations of each of the alloying elements for optimized properties. A few of the best predicted Pareto-optimal alloy compositions were then manufactured and tested to evaluate the predicted properties. These alloys were then added to the existing data set and used to improve the accuracy of meta-models. The multi-objective optimizer then used the new meta-models to find a new set of improved Pareto-optimized chemical concentrations. This design cycle was repeated twelve times

  11. Strategy for earth explorers in global earth sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the current NASA Earth System Science initiative is to obtain a comprehensive scientific understanding of the Earth as an integrated, dynamic system. The centerpiece of the Earth System Science initiative will be a set of instruments carried on polar orbiting platforms under the Earth Observing System program. An Earth Explorer program can open new vistas in the earth sciences, encourage innovation, and solve critical scientific problems. Specific missions must be rigorously shaped by the demands and opportunities of high quality science and must complement the Earth Observing System and the Mission to Planet Earth. The committee believes that the proposed Earth Explorer program provides a substantial opportunity for progress in the earth sciences, both through independent missions and through missions designed to complement the large scale platforms and international research programs that represent important national commitments. The strategy presented is intended to help ensure the success of the Earth Explorer program as a vital stimulant to the study of the planet.

  12. Earth Observation

    2014-08-10

    ISS040-E-091158 (10 Aug. 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members 225 nautical miles above Earth onboard the International Space Station used a 200mm lens to record this image of Hawke's Bay, New Zealand on Aug. 10, 2014. Napier and the bay area's most populous area are at bottom center of the frame.

  13. Earth Observation

    2013-06-13

    ISS036-E-007619 (13 June 2013) --- To a crew member aboard the International Space Station, the home planet is seen from many different angles and perspectives, as evdenced by this Expedition 36 image of Earth's atmophere partially obscured by one of the orbital outpost's solar panels.

  14. Think Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niedermeyer, Fred; Ice, Kay

    1992-01-01

    Describes a series of environmental education instructional units for grades K-6 developed by the Think Earth Consortium that cover topics such as conservation, pollution control, and waste reduction. Provides testimony from one sixth-grade teacher that field tested the second-grade unit. (MDH)

  15. Earth Observation

    2014-09-01

    Earth Observation taken during a night pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: New Zealand Aurora night pass. Docked Soyuz and Progress spacecraft are visible. On crewmember's Flickr page - The Moon, about to dive into a glowing ocean of green᥿9.

  16. Earth Observation

    2013-07-21

    Earth observation taken during night pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message this is labeled as : Tehran, Iran. Lights along the coast of the Caspian Sea visible through clouds. July 21.

  17. Earth Observation

    2013-05-19

    ISS036-E-002224 (21 May 2013) --- The sun is captured in a "starburst" mode over Earth's horizon by one of the Expedition 36 crew members as the orbital outpost was above a point in southwestern Minnesota on May 21, 2013.

  18. Earth Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaufele, Christopher; Zumoff, Nancy

    Earth Algebra is an entry level college algebra course that incorporates the spirit of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Curriculum and Evaluation Standards for School Mathematics at the college level. The context of the course places mathematics at the center of one of the major current concerns of the world. Through…

  19. Earth Science

    1993-03-29

    Small Expendable Deployer System (SEDS) is a tethered date collecting satellite and is intended to demonstrate a versatile and economical way of delivering smaller payloads to higher orbits or downward toward Earth's atmosphere. 19th Navstar Global Positioning System Satellite mission joined with previously launched satellites used for navigational purposes and geodite studies. These satellites are used commercially as well as by the military.

  20. Earth Observation

    2014-06-14

    ISS040-E-011868 (14 June 2014) --- The dark waters of the Salton Sea stand out against neighboring cultivation and desert sands in the middle of the Southern California desert, as photographed by one of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station on June 14, 2014.

  1. Earth Observation

    2013-08-03

    Earth observation taken during day pass by an Expedition 36 crew member on board the International Space Station (ISS). Per Twitter message: From southernmost point of orbit over the South Pacific- all clouds seemed to be leading to the South Pole.

  2. Earth Sky

    1965-12-16

    S65-63282 (16 Dec. 1965) --- Area of Indian Ocean, just east of the island of Madagascar, as seen from the Gemini-6 spacecraft during its 15th revolution of Earth. Land mass at top of picture is the Malagasy Republic (Madagascar). Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  3. Rare earths

    Gambogi, J.

    2013-01-01

    Global mine production of rare earths was estimated to have declined slightly in 2012 relative to 2011 (Fig. 1). Production in China was estimated to have decreased to 95 from 105 kt (104,700 from 115,700 st) in 2011, while new mine production in the United States and Australia increased.

  4. Earth Observation

    2013-07-04

    ISS036-E-015354 (4 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires near the Manicouagan Reservoir (seen at lower left) were recorded as part of a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station.

  5. Earth Observation

    2013-07-04

    ISS036-E-015355 (4 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires near the Manicouagan Reservoir (seen at bottom center) were recorded in a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station.

  6. Earth Observation

    2013-07-03

    ISS036-E-015292 (3 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires southeast of James Bay were recorded as part of a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 3-4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station. This image was recorded on July 3.

  7. Earth Observation

    2013-07-04

    ISS036-E-015342 (4 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires southeast of James Bay were recorded as part of a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station.

  8. Earth Observation

    2013-07-04

    ISS036-E-015335 (4 July 2013) --- A number of Quebec, Canada wildfires southeast of James Bay were recorded as part of a series of photographs taken and downlinked to Earth on July 4 by the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the International Space Station.

  9. Earth Observation

    2014-06-12

    Earth Observation taken during a day pass by the Expedition 40 crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Folder lists this as: Moon, Japan, Kamchatka with a wild cloud. Part of the U.S. Lab and PMM are also visible.

  10. Earth Observation

    2013-08-29

    ISS036-E-038117 (29 Aug. 2013) --- One of the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station photographed massive smoke plumes from the California wildfires. When this image was exposed on Aug. 29, the orbital outpost was approximately 220 miles above a point located at 38.6 degrees north latitude and 123.2 degrees west longitude.

  11. Earth Observation

    2013-08-29

    ISS036-E-038114 (29 Aug. 2013) --- One of the Expedition 36 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station photographed massive smoke plumes from the California wildfires. When this image was exposed on Aug. 29, the orbital outpost was approximately 220 miles above a point located at 38.6 degrees north latitude and 123.3 degrees west longitude.

  12. Earth Observations

    2014-11-18

    ISS042E006751 (11/08/2014) --- Earth observation taken from the International Space Station of the coastline of the United Arab Emirates. The large wheel along the coast center left is "Jumeirah" Palm Island, with a conference center, hotels, recreation areas and a large marine zoo.

  13. Earth Moon

    1998-06-08

    NASA Galileo spacecraft took this image of Earth moon on December 7, 1992 on its way to explore the Jupiter system in 1995-97. The distinct bright ray crater at the bottom of the image is the Tycho impact basin. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00405

  14. Earth's horizon

    2005-07-30

    S114-E-6076 (30 July 2005) --- The blackness of space and Earth’s horizon form the backdrop for this view of the extended Space Shuttle Discovery’s remote manipulator system (RMS) robotic arm while docked to the International Space Station during the STS-114 mission.

  15. Earth Observations

    2010-09-09

    ISS024-E-014071 (9 Sept. 2010) --- This striking panoramic view of the southwestern USA and Pacific Ocean is an oblique image photographed by an Expedition 24 crew member looking outwards at an angle from the International Space Station (ISS). While most unmanned orbital satellites view Earth from a nadir perspective?in other words, collecting data with a ?straight down? viewing geometry?crew members onboard the space station can acquire imagery at a wide range of viewing angles using handheld digital cameras. The ISS nadir point (the point on Earth?s surface directly below the spacecraft) was located in northwestern Arizona, approximately 260 kilometers to the east-southeast, when this image was taken. The image includes parts of the States of Arizona, Nevada, Utah, and California together with a small segment of the Baja California, Mexico coastline at center left. Several landmarks and physiographic features are readily visible. The Las Vegas, NV metropolitan area appears as a gray region adjacent to the Spring Mountains and Sheep Range (both covered by white clouds). The Grand Canyon, located on the Colorado Plateau in Arizona, is visible (lower left) to the east of Las Vegas with the blue waters of Lake Mead in between. The image also includes the Mojave Desert, stretching north from the Salton Sea (left) to the Sierra Nevada mountain range. The Sierra Nevada range is roughly 640 kilometers long (north-south) and forms the boundary between the Central Valley of California and the adjacent Basin and Range. The Basin and Range is so called due to the pattern of long linear valleys separated by parallel linear mountain ranges ? this landscape, formed by extension and thinning of Earth?s crust, is particularly visible at right.

  16. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    2014-08-20

    Dr. Shawn Domagal-Goldman, Research Space Scientist, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, speaks on a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  17. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    2014-08-20

    Dr. Phoebe Cohen, Professor of Geosciences, Williams College, speaks on a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  18. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    2014-08-20

    Dr. Christopher House, Professor of Geosciences, Pennsylvania State University, speaks on a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  19. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    2014-08-20

    Dr. Dawn Sumner, Professor of Geology, UC Davis, speaks on a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  20. Ancient Earth, Alien Earths Event

    2014-08-20

    Dr. Timothy Lyons, Professor of Biogeochemistry, UC Riverside, speaks on a panel at the “Ancient Earth, Alien Earths” Event at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC Wednesday, August 20, 2014. The event was sponsored by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Smithsonian Institution and was moderated by Dr. David H. Grinspoon, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute. Six scientists discussed how research on early Earth could help guide our search for habitable planets orbiting other stars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)